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Sample records for oral mycophenolate mofetil

  1. Safety of oral and intravenous mycophenolate mofetil in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Slovak, Jennifer E; Villarino, Nicolas F

    2017-02-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and clinical effects of intravenous (IV) and oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in healthy cats. Methods A total of 24 healthy adult cats weighing >3.5 kg were either administered IV MMF (over a 2 h infusion) or oral MMF. The dosages used were as follows: 5 mg/kg IV once (n = 2), 10 mg/kg q12h IV for 1 day (n = 1), 20 mg/kg q12h IV for 1 day (n = 6) and 10 mg/kg q12h IV for 3 days (n = 5). Blood was collected from each cat at intervals of up to 12 h from the last dose for analysis purposes. Oral MMF was given at 10 mg/kg q12h for 7 days (n = 3), 15 mg/kg q12h for 7 days (n = 3) and 15 mg/kg q8h for 7 days (n = 4). Results Side effects to MMF were minimal. There was no anorexia or vomiting noted in any of the cats during or after IV medication administration. Only 4/14 cats had diarrhea from 12-48 h after IV administration. There was hyporexia in 1/10 cats given oral MMF and no vomiting noted. In 5/10 cats given oral MMF, there was diarrhea between days 2 and 7 of the study. Conclusions and relevance Cats tolerate MMF at an IV dose of 10 mg/kg q12h for 3 days and an oral dose ⩽15 mg/kg q12h for up to 7 days. There seems to be a dose-dependent incidence of gastrointestinal side effects. MMF may be a useful alternative immunosuppressant to be considered for use in some cats.

  2. Population pharmacokinetics and dose optimization of mycophenolic acid in HCT recipients receiving oral mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Mager, D E; Sandmaier, B M; Maloney, D G; Bemer, M J; McCune, J S

    2013-04-01

    We sought to create a population pharmacokinetic model for total mycophenolic acid (MPA), to study the effects of different covariates on MPA pharmacokinetics, to create a limited sampling schedule (LSS) to characterize MPA exposure (i.e., area under the curve or AUC) with maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimation, and to simulate an optimized dosing scheme for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients. Four thousand four hundred ninety-six MPA concentration-time points from 408 HCT recipients were analyzed retrospectively using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling approach. MPA pharmacokinetics was characterized with a two-compartment model with first-order elimination and a time-lagged first-order absorption process. Concomitant cyclosporine and serum albumin were significant covariates. The median MPA clearance (CL) and volume of the central compartment were 24.2 L/hour and 36.4 L, respectively, for a 70 kg patient receiving tacrolimus with a serum albumin of 3.4 g/dL. Dosing simulations indicated that higher oral MMF doses are needed with concomitant cyclosporine, which increases MPA CL by 33.8%. The optimal LSS was immediately before and at 0.25 hours, 1.25 hours, 2 hours, and 4 hours after oral mycophenolate mofetil administration. MPA AUC in an individual HCT recipient can be accurately estimated using a five-sample LSS and maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimation.

  3. Mizoribine and mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, H

    1999-07-01

    Both mizoribine (MZR) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) are immunosuppressive agents that inhibit the proliferation of lymphocytes selectively, via inhibition of IMPDH. MZR is a nucleoside of the imidazole class, isolated from the culture medium of the mold Eupenicillium brefeldianum M-2166. Although this compound has been found to have weak antimicrobial activity against Candida albicans, it has proved ineffective against experimental candidiasis. Unlike azathioprine, this compound is not taken up by nucleic acids in the cell. Instead, after phosphorylation MZR-5 -monophosphate inhibits GMP synthesis by the antagonistic blocking of IMPDH (Ki = 10(-8)M) and GMP- synthetase (Ki =10(-5) M). The drug has been found to inhibit both humoral and cellular immunity, and on this basis it was developed in Japan as an immunosuppressant. MZR has been shown in animal experiments to lack oncogenicity, and has been shown clinically to be associated with a low incidence of severe adverse reactions. MZR has been registered in Japan for the prevention of rejection in renal transplantation, and for the treatment of lupus nephritis, rheumatoid arthritis and the nephrotic syndrome. MMF is the morpholinoethyl ester prodrug of mycophenolic acid (MPA), which was first isolated in 1896 from the culture media of several Penicillium species. MPA has been evaluated for its unique properties as an anticancer, antiviral, antifungal and antibacterial agent, as well as for its therapeutic use in psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis. MMF was designed to enhance the oral bioavailability of the parent compound. After beneficial effects were observed in animals, the clinical efficacy of MMF as an immunosuppressant in renal transplantation was studied in the United States. In 1995 the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of MMF for the prevention of rejection in renal transplantation, the drug also available on a number of European markets.

  4. Oral ulcers produced by mycophenolate mofetil in two liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, J; Poniachik, J; Cisco, D; Contreras, J; Oksenberg, D; Valera, J M; Díaz, J C; Rojas, J; Cardemil, G; Mena, S; Castillo, J; Rencoret, G; Godoy, J; Escobar, J; Rodríguez, J; Leyton, P; Fica, A; Toledo, C

    2007-04-01

    Oral ulcers are a frequent problem in transplant medicine. It is important to consider infectious etiologies, exacerbated by the immunosuppressive treatment, but other etiologies are also possible, like adverse drug reactions. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is an immunosuppressive medication that has been used in combination with calcineurin inhibitors and steroids. Reports of renal transplant patients with oral ulcers related to MMF have appeared lately and herein we have described 2 cases in liver transplant patients. Their oral ulcers resolved quickly after suspension of the medication. Our 2 cases in liver transplant patients represented a unique setting for this type of complication.

  5. [Relative bioavailability study of two oral formulations of mycophenolate mofetil in healthy volunteers].

    PubMed

    Saavedra S, Iván; Sasso A, Jaime; Quiñones S, Luis; Saavedra B, Mónica; Gaete G, Leonardo; Boza T, Ignacio; Carvajal H, Cristóbal; Soto L, Jorge

    2011-07-01

    The bioequivalence of different formulations of a same pharmaceutical product must be tested empirically. To evaluate the relative bioavailability for an oralformulation of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) (Linfonex™) compared to the reference formulation (Cellcept™) to determine the bioequivalence between both formulations. A randomized, crossover, double-blind trial in 22 healthy male volunteers, who received a single oral dose of 1000 mg of Linfonex and Cellcept with a washout period of 10 days. Plasma levels of the drug were determined by high performance liquid chr ornatography. Plasma concentrations were plotted and maximum concentration, area under the plasma concentration versus time between 0 and 12 hours after administration and área under plasma concentration curve versus time after administration between 0 and infinity, were calculated for both products. The active compound, mycophenolic acid, was similarly absorbed in both formulations. No statistically significant differences were found in calculated pharmacokinetic parameters between both formulations. Linfonex™ 500 mg is bioequivalent to Cellcept™ 500 mg.

  6. Population Pharmacokinetics and Dose Optimization of Mycophenolic Acid in HCT Recipients Receiving Oral Mycophenolate Mofetil

    PubMed Central

    Li, H; Mager, D E; Sandmaier, B M; Maloney, D G; Bemer, M J; McCune, J S

    2012-01-01

    We sought to create a population pharmacokinetic model for total mycophenolic acid (MPA), to study the effects of different covariates on MPA pharmacokinetics, to create a limited sampling schedule (LSS) to characterize MPA exposure (i.e., area under the curve or AUC) with maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimation, and to simulate an optimized dosing scheme for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients. 4,496 MPA concentration-time points from 408 HCT recipients were analyzed retrospectively using a nonlinear mixed effects modeling approach. MPA pharmacokinetics was characterized with a two-compartment model with first-order elimination and a time-lagged first-order absorption process. Concomitant cyclosporine and serum albumin were significant covariates. The median MPA clearance and volume of the central compartment were 24.2 L/hr and 36.4 L, respectively, for a 70 kg patient receiving tacrolimus with a serum albumin of 3.4 g/dL. Dosing simulations indicated that higher oral MMF doses are needed with concomitant cyclosporine, which increases MPA clearance by 33.8%. The optimal LSS was immediately before and at 0.25, 1.25, 2, and 4hr after oral MMF administration. MPA AUC in an individual HCT recipient can be accurately estimated using a five-sample LSS and maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimation. PMID:23382105

  7. Oral mycophenolate mofetil prevents in-stent intimal hyperplasia without edge effect.

    PubMed

    Ilkay, Erdogan; Tirikli, Latif; Ozercan, Ibrahim; Yavuzkir, Mustafa; Karaca, Ilgin; Rahman, Ali; Arslan, Nadi

    2006-01-01

    Neointimal hyperplasia is in the forefront in in-stent restenosis. Prevention of in-stent restenosis is possible by reducing and inhibiting the hyperplasia of smooth muscle cells. The authors planned this study to test the hypothesis that when administered orally, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) could inhibit in-stent neointimal hyperplasia. The study included 14 New Zealand rabbits. The rabbits were allocated to 2 different groups: Group 1 included 7 rabbits that were given MMF, 40 mg/kg/day by oral route. Group 2 included 7 rabbits that were not given MMF after the stenting. Sampling materials were taken before and after stenting by incising the artery so as to cover a 5-mm area. The samples taken from the edge of the stent in Group 1 showed focal neointimal cell proliferation, but it was less than that from the control group. Neointimal thickness was 0.048 +/-0.009 mm and neointimal area was 0.0925 +/-0.019 mm(2). Apparent neointimal cell proliferation and thickening of the intimal layer were observed in Group 2. Neointimal thickness at the stent edge was 0.147 +/-0.051 mm and the neointimal area was 0.154 +/-0.023 mm(2). The differences between groups in terms of neointimal thickness and neointimal area were statistically significant (p=0.001 for thickness and p=0.001 for area). In-stent artery samples of Group 1 showed that some subjects had no neointimal cell proliferation, while others had very limited focal intimal thickening. Neointimal thickening was 0.071 +/-0.003 mm and neointimal area was 0.073 +/-0.003 mm(2). In Group 2 apparent, and mostly focal, neointimal cell proliferation and formation of intimal layer were observed in the stent. Neointimal thickening was 0.154 +/-0.069 mm and neointimal area was 0.279 +/-0.059 mm(2). The comparison between groups showed significant differences (p=0.011 for thickness and p=0.001 for area). It was established in the third month that endothelialization was completed in both groups. Oral MMF decreased in-stent intimal

  8. Mycophenolate mofetil versus oral cyclophosphamide in scleroderma-related interstitial lung disease (SLS II): a randomised controlled, double-blind, parallel group trial.

    PubMed

    Tashkin, Donald P; Roth, Michael D; Clements, Philip J; Furst, Daniel E; Khanna, Dinesh; Kleerup, Eric C; Goldin, Jonathan; Arriola, Edgar; Volkmann, Elizabeth R; Kafaja, Suzanne; Silver, Richard; Steen, Virginia; Strange, Charlie; Wise, Robert; Wigley, Fredrick; Mayes, Maureen; Riley, David J; Hussain, Sabiha; Assassi, Shervin; Hsu, Vivien M; Patel, Bela; Phillips, Kristine; Martinez, Fernando; Golden, Jeffrey; Connolly, M Kari; Varga, John; Dematte, Jane; Hinchcliff, Monique E; Fischer, Aryeh; Swigris, Jeffrey; Meehan, Richard; Theodore, Arthur; Simms, Robert; Volkov, Suncica; Schraufnagel, Dean E; Scholand, Mary Beth; Frech, Tracy; Molitor, Jerry A; Highland, Kristin; Read, Charles A; Fritzler, Marvin J; Kim, Grace Hyun J; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Elashoff, Robert M

    2016-09-01

    12 months of oral cyclophosphamide has been shown to alter the progression of scleroderma-related interstitial lung disease when compared with placebo. However, toxicity was a concern and without continued treatment the efficacy disappeared by 24 months. We hypothesised that a 2 year course of mycophenolate mofetil would be safer, better tolerated, and produce longer lasting improvements than cyclophosphamide. This randomised, double-blind, parallel group trial enrolled patients from 14 US medical centres with scleroderma-related interstitial lung disease meeting defined dyspnoea, pulmonary function, and high-resolution CT (HRCT) criteria. The data coordinating centre at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA, CA, USA), randomly assigned patients using a double-blind, double-dummy, centre-blocked design to receive either mycophenolate mofetil (target dose 1500 mg twice daily) for 24 months or oral cyclophosphamide (target dose 2·0 mg/kg per day) for 12 months followed by placebo for 12 months. Drugs were given in matching 250 mg gel capsules. The primary endpoint, change in forced vital capacity as a percentage of the predicted normal value (FVC %) over the course of 24 months, was assessed in a modified intention-to-treat analysis using an inferential joint model combining a mixed-effects model for longitudinal outcomes and a survival model to handle non-ignorable missing data. The study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00883129. Between Sept 28, 2009, and Jan 14, 2013, 142 patients were randomly assigned to either mycophenolate mofetil (n=69) or cyclophosphamide (n=73). 126 patients (mycophenolate mofetil [n=63] and cyclophosphamide [n=63]) with acceptable baseline HRCT studies and at least one outcome measure were included in the primary analysis. The adjusted % predicted FVC improved from baseline to 24 months by 2·19 in the mycophenolate mofetil group (95% CI 0·53-3·84) and 2·88 in the cyclophosphamide group (1·19-4·58). The

  9. Mycophenolate mofetil for ocular myasthenia.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jane W

    2008-04-01

    To study the safety and tolerability of mycophenolate mofetil (MM), since this steroid-sparing immunomodulatory agent with less side effects, compared to corticosteroids, may be considered for long-term management of ocular myasthenia (OMG). Consecutive patients with OMG started on MM between December 2000 and December 2002 were followed up to December 2006. All of the 31 patients with OMG were treated with prednisone at 40-60 mg/d while MM was increased up to the target of 1.0 g/d. After symptoms completely resolved, all patients were then tapered off prednisone over a period of 4 weeks. Eighty-seven percent (27/31) of patients continued on MM during the study. Mycophenolate mofetil discontinuation occurred in 4/31 (13%) of patients within the first four months of starting the drug. Of the patients who continued on MM, 93% (25/27) remained at stage I of the disease. The 7% (2/27) of patients on MM who generalized in our study did so by 2 years and were treated with additional prednisone. MM-related adverse events included nausea in 9 of 31 patients, diarrhea in 5 of 31 patients, and vomiting in 1/31 patients. No cases of infections, cytopenias, or malignancies were observed. Eighty-seven percent of OMG patients on corticosteroids who were switched to MM remained at Stage I of the disease over a mean period of 4.2 years. MM at 1.0 g/d was safe and tolerable as a long-term immunosuppressant for OMG.

  10. Mycophenolate mofetil in liver transplantation: a review.

    PubMed

    Kaltenborn, Alexander; Schrem, Harald

    2013-12-18

    Liver transplantation is the only live-saving, curative treatment for various end-stage liver diseases, and it has excellent survival rates. Mycophenolate mofetil is widely used as co-medication for immunosuppression after liver transplantation, especially to allow a sparing effect on calcineurin-inhibitors, thus reducing their numerous adverse effects. It improves both graft and patient survival. The properties of its active metabolite, mycophenolic acid, are diverse: inhibition of de novo purine synthesis and selective lymphocyte inhibition, anti-tumoral, antiviral, anti-angioneoplastic, and vasculoprotective mechanisms are described and summarized in this review. The most common adverse effects of mycophenolate mofetil are gastrointestinal complaints such as diarrhea, which often lead to dose-reduction or withdrawal of mycophenolate mofetil. A newer, enteric-coated formulation is available, which is meant to reduce the gastrointestinal adverse effects. Mycophenolate mofetil does not relevantly interact with other common drugs. The question of whether therapeutic drug monitoring allows optimized dosing strategies cannot be satisfyingly answered yet. The optimal partner-immunosuppressant seems to be tacrolimus, especially in low doses. This tutorial review provides an overview of recent studies exploring the role of mycophenolate mofetil in liver transplantation with regards to its development, mechanism of action, and actual controversies such as therapeutic drug monitoring or de novo malignancy after transplantation.

  11. Mycophenolate mofetil inducing remission of lupus enteritis.

    PubMed

    Al Balushi, F; Humby, F; Mahto, A; Kelly, C; Jawad, A

    2012-04-01

    We report the case of a young woman with a background history of discoid lupus who presented with abdominal pain, vomiting and intermittent diarrhoea. Physical examination revealed tenderness in the right upper quadrant with a palpable right inguinal lymph node without any other clinical signs of active lupus. Laboratory investigations showed normal inflammatory markers, positive ANA and Anti-Ro antibodies, persistent hypocomplementemia and lymphopenia, CT showed marked bowel oedema involving the small and large bowel (halo sign) with massive ascites and moderate right-sided pleural effusion. Mantoux test, AFB and TB cultures were negative. A diagnosis of lupus enteritis was made and treatment with high-dose steroids was commenced with little improvement. Treatment with cyclophosphamide was discussed but declined by the patient. Mycophenolate mofetil was commenced and resulted in significant clinical and radiological resolution. To the best of the authors' knowledge this is the first report of the successful use of mycophenolate mofetil in inducing and maintaining remission in lupus enteritis.

  12. Impairment of mycophenolate mofetil absorption by calcium polycarbophil.

    PubMed

    Kato, Ryuji; Ooi, Kazuya; Ikura-Mori, Megumi; Tsuchishita, Yoshimasa; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Hironori; Uenishi, Kohji; Kawai, Masayuki; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Ueno, Kazuyuki

    2002-11-01

    The effect of calcium polycarbophil on the absorption of mycophenolate mofetil, an immunosuppressive agent, was evaluated in healthy subjects. In vitro studies were performed to further evaluate the mechanism of the potential interaction. In the in vitro study, the release of mycophenolate mofetil from a cellulose membrane in the presence or absence of metal cations was measured using the dissolution test procedure. In the in vivo study, a randomized crossover design with two phases was used. In one phase, 6 male healthy volunteers received 1000 mg of mycophenolate mofetil alone (treatment 1); in the other phase, they received 1000 mg of mycophenolate mofetil and 2400 mg of calcium polycarbophil fine granules concomitantly (treatment 2). They received 30 mg of lansoprazole for 5 days and, on the 6th day, received mycophenolate mofetil and 2400 mg of calcium polycarbophil fine granules concomitantly (treatment 3). The serum concentration of mycophenolic acid was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. In the in vitro study, the release from a cellulose membrane in the presence of calcium or iron ions was slower than that in the absence of these metal ions. In the in vivo study, the AUC0-12 and C(max) in treatment 2 were less than those in treatment 1. About 50% and 25% decreases in AUC0-12 in treatment 2 and treatment 3 were observed compared with those in treatment 1, respectively. These findings suggest that when mycophenolate mofetil and calcium polycarbophil were coadministered concomitantly, a decrease in mycophenolate mofetil absorption was observed. Therefore, it appears clear that the concomitant administration of mycophenolate mofetil and calcium polycarbophil should be avoided.

  13. Mycophenolate mofetil therapy for severe immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alice; Neave, Lucy; Solanki, Shalini; Westwood, John Paul; Terrinonive, Ilaria; McGuckin, Siobhan; Kothari, Jaimal; Cooper, Nichola; Stasi, Roberto; Scully, Marie

    2015-11-01

    Severe immune thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP) presents a clinical challenge. Second-line treatment options are variable without a precise protocol. We present 46 severe ITP patients treated with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), retrospectively identified from three London teaching hospitals. Data was collected on patient demographics, co-morbidities and previous treatment strategies. Our key interest was whether there was a sustained response in platelet count to MMF. Patients included 27 males and 19 females whose ages ranged from 19 to 93 years old (median 52·5 years). Twenty-nine had primary ITP and 17 had secondary ITP, a third of whom had viral-associated disease. The standard dose of MMF was 1 g/day. Twenty-four patients (52%) responded with 15 (33%) achieving a complete response. No active viral-associated ITP patients demonstrated a response to MMF, although numbers were small (n = 4). We were not able to demonstrate a difference between responders and non-responders based on gender, age, previous therapies or time since diagnosis of ITP. Three of four previously splenectomized patients responded, two achieving complete response. We conclude that MMF is a useful steroid-sparing immunosuppressant to be considered in the second-line or later treatment of ITP.

  14. Successful treatment of severe refractory lupus hepatitis with mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Y; Saito, T; Takada, K; Kawahata, K; Kohsaka, H

    2016-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus-related hepatitis, known as lupus hepatitis, is a rare manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus, and is usually subclinical with mild abnormalities of serum liver enzymes. While cases with clinically significant and refractory lupus hepatitis are uncommon, treatment options for lupus hepatitis are to be established. Here, we report the case of a 45-year-old man with progressive lupus hepatitis accompanied by autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. Lupus hepatitis of this patient was refractory to tacrolimus, azathioprine and cyclophosphamide, but was successfully treated by mycophenolate mofetil. Mycophenolate mofetil might be an effective therapeutic option for refractory lupus hepatitis.

  15. Effectiveness of mycophenolate mofetil in C3 glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Rabasco, Cristina; Cavero, Teresa; Román, Elena; Rojas-Rivera, Jorge; Olea, Teresa; Espinosa, Mario; Cabello, Virginia; Fernández-Juarez, Gema; González, Fayna; Ávila, Ana; Baltar, José María; Díaz, Montserrat; Alegre, Raquel; Elías, Sandra; Antón, Monserrat; Frutos, Miguel Angel; Pobes, Alfonso; Blasco, Miguel; Martín, Francisco; Bernis, Carmen; Macías, Manuel; Barroso, Sergio; de Lorenzo, Alberto; Ariceta, Gema; López-Mendoza, Manuel; Rivas, Begoña; López-Revuelta, Katia; Campistol, José María; Mendizábal, Santiago; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez; Praga, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    C3 glomerulonephritis is a clinicopathologic entity defined by the presence of isolated or dominant deposits of C3 on immunofluorescence. To explore the effect of immunosuppression on C3 glomerulonephritis, we studied a series of 60 patients in whom a complete registry of treatments was available over a median follow-up of 47 months. Twenty patients had not received immunosuppressive treatments. In the remaining 40 patients, 22 had been treated with corticosteroids plus mycophenolate mofetil while 18 were treated with other immunosuppressive regimens (corticosteroids alone or corticosteroids plus cyclophosphamide). The number of patients developing end-stage renal disease was significantly lower among treated compared with untreated patients (3 vs. 7 patients, respectively). No patient in the corticosteroids plus mycophenolate mofetil group doubled serum creatinine nor developed end-stage renal disease, as compared with 7 (significant) and 3 (not significant), respectively, in patients treated with other immunosuppressive regimens. Renal survival (100, 80, and 72% at 5 years) and the number of patients achieving clinical remission (86, 50, and 25%) were significantly higher in patients treated with corticosteroids plus mycophenolate mofetil as compared with patients treated with other immunosuppressive regimens and untreated patients, respectively. Thus, immunosuppressive treatments, particularly corticosteroids plus mycophenolate mofetil, can be beneficial in C3 glomerulonephritis.

  16. Ulcerative cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa treated with mycophenolate mofetil and pentoxifylline.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Nicolas; Guillot, Bernard; Bessis, Didier

    2011-06-01

    Cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa (CPAN) is a self-limited cutaneous vasculitis characterized by painful nodules, affecting mostly the lower limbs, and livedo reticularis. Despite its benign course, CPAN may display a chronic relapsing evolution with repeated exacerbations. Ulcerative CPAN has a more prolonged evolution and is associated with peripheral neuropathy. We report on a patient with a 20-year history of ulcerative and painful CPAN, refractory to multiple immunosuppressive treatments, treated successfully by mycophenolate mofetil and pentoxifylline.

  17. Mycophenolate mofetil attenuates pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Chihiro; Takahashi, Masafumi . E-mail: masafumi@sch.md.shinshu-u.ac.jp; Morimoto, Hajime; Izawa, Atsushi; Ise, Hirohiko; Hongo, Minoru; Hoshikawa, Yasushi; Ito, Takayuki; Miyashita, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Ikeda, Uichi

    2006-10-20

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by abnormal proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs), leading to occlusion of pulmonary arterioles, right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy, and death. We investigated whether mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), a potent immunosuppresssant, prevents the development of monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH in rats. MMF effectively decreased RV systolic pressure and RV hypertrophy, and reduced the medial thickness of pulmonary arteries. MMF significantly inhibited the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells, infiltration of macrophages, and expression of P-selectin and interleukin-6 on the endothelium of pulmonary arteries. The infiltration of T cells and mast cells was not affected by MMF. In vitro experiments revealed that mycophenolic acid (MPA), an active metabolite of MMF, dose-dependently inhibited proliferation of human pulmonary arterial SMCs. MMF attenuated the development of PAH through its anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties. These findings provide new insight into the potential role of immunosuppressants in the treatment of PAH.

  18. Update on the Teratogenicity of Maternal Mycophenolate Mofetil

    PubMed Central

    Coscia, Lisa A.; Armenti, Dawn P.; King, Ryan W.; Sifontis, Nicole M.; Constantinescu, Serban; Moritz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) products, namely mycophenolate mofetil and mycophenolate sodium, are immunosuppressive medications used to prevent rejection in solid organ transplant recipients and to treat various autoimmune disorders. Mycophenolate therapy is considered to be teratogenic based on observational studies of pregnancies exposed to MPA, which demonstrated an increased incidence of miscarriages in pregnancies exposed to MPA during their first trimester and a pattern of birth defects in the offspring of some pregnancies exposed to MPA. Herein, we have detailed case and series reports in a comprehensive literature review summarizing what is known to date regarding fetal exposure to MPA. Based on evidence from the literature, results of postmarketing surveillance, and information from registries such as the National Transplantation Pregnancy Registry in the United States, it is advised that pregnancy be avoided by women taking MPA. Preconception planning offers the opportunity to explore the alternatives to protect the mother, her transplanted organ, and minimize fetal risk. How to proceed in cases of unplanned pregnancies exposed to MPA in transplant recipients is a complex issue. Research involving large epidemiological studies is expected to be sparse as women heed the warnings about becoming pregnant on MPA. Published recommendations for managing MPA in women of childbearing potential include discontinuing the medication prior to conception, switching the MPA to another medication, or discontinuing the MPA when the pregnancy is discovered. PMID:27617117

  19. Mycophenolate Mofetil versus Oral Cyclophosphamide in Scleroderma-related Interstitial Lung Disease: Scleroderma Lung Study II (SLS-II), a double-blind, parallel group, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tashkin, Donald P; Roth, Michael D; Clements, Philip J; Furst, Daniel E; Khanna, Dinesh; Kleerup, Eric C; Goldin, Jonathan; Arriola, Edgar; Volkmann, Elizabeth R; Kafaja, Suzanne; Silver, Richard; Steen, Virginia; Strange, Charlie; Wise, Robert; Wigley, Fredrick; Mayes, Maureen; Riley, David J; Hussain, Sabiha; Assassi, Shervin; Hsu, Vivien M; Patel, Bela; Phillips, Kristine; Martinez, Fernando; Golden, Jeffrey; Connolly, M Kari; Varga, John; Dematte, Jane; Hinchcliff, Monique; Fischer, Aryeh; Swigris, Jeffrey; Meehan, Richard; Theodore, Arthur; Simms, Robert; Volkov, Suncica; Schraufnagel, Dean E; Scholand, Mary Beth; Frech, Tracy; Molitor, Jerry A; Highland, Kristin; Read, Charles A; Fritzler, Marvin J; Kim, Grace Hyun J; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Elashoff, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Summary BACKGROUND Twelve months of oral cyclophosphamide (CYC) has been shown to alter the progression of scleroderma-related interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD) when compared to placebo. However, toxicity was a concern and without continued treatment the efficacy disappeared by 24 months. We hypothesized that a two-year course of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) would be safer, better tolerated and produce longer lasting improvements than CYC. METHODS Patients with SSc-ILD meeting defined dyspnea, pulmonary function and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) criteria were randomized in a double-blind, two-arm trial at 14 medical centers. MMF (target dose 1500 mg twice daily) was administered for 24 months in one arm and oral CYC (target dose 2·0 mg/kg/day) administered for 12 months followed by placebo for 12 months in the other arm. The primary endpoint, change in forced vital capacity as a percent of the predicted normal value (FVC %) over the course of 24 months, was assessed in a modified intention-to-treat analysis using an inferential joint model combining a mixed effects model for longitudinal outcomes and a survival model to handle non-ignorable missing data. The study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00883129, and is closed. RESULTS Between November, 2009, and January, 2013, 142 patients were randomized. 126 patients (63 MMF; 63 CYC) with acceptable baseline HRCT studies and at least one outcome measure were included in the analysis. The adjusted FVC % (primary endpoint) improved from baseline to 24 months by 2.17 in the MMF arm (95% CI, 0.53–3.84) and 2·86 in the CYC arm (95% confidence interval 1·19–4·58) with no significant between-treatment difference (p=0·24), indicating that the trial was negative for the primary endpoint. However, in a post-hoc analysis of the primary endpoint, within-treatment improvements from baseline to 24 months were noted in both the CYC and MMF arms. A greater number of patients on CYC than on MMF

  20. Bioavailability of a generic of the immunosuppressive agent mycophenolate mofetil in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    González-Ramírez, Rodrigo; González-Bañuelos, Jessica; Villa, María de la Salud; Jiménez, Braulio; García-Roca, Pilar; Cruz-Antonio, Leticia; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Medeiros, Mara

    2014-09-01

    The use of generic immunosuppressive agents is controversial, especially for the treatment of pediatric patients, as information on the bioavailability of generic immunosuppressants in children is particularly scarce. The aim of the study was to compare the bioavailabilities of two products containing mycophenolate mofetil, the innovator and a generic, in children. Pediatric patients with end-stage renal disease on the waiting list for renal transplantation received a single oral dose of mycophenolate mofetil as either the innovator product (CellCept(®) , Roche) or the generic (Tevacept(®) , Teva Pharmaceuticals). A nine point pharmacokinetic profile was obtained. Mycophenolic acid concentration was quantitated in plasma by HPLC, plasma concentration-against-time curves were constructed, and bioavailability parameters were determined. Pharmaceutical quality analysis of both formulations, including drug content and dissolution profile, was also performed. There were no statistically significant differences between formulations in bioavailability parameters. Interindividual variability was very important, but individual values of AUC, an indicator of the extent of drug absorption, were within the same range for both formulations. The two formulations exhibited similar drug content and dissolution profiles, as well as comparable mycophenolic acid plasma levels in an end-stage renal failure population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Mycophenolate mofetil versus azathioprine for maintenance treatment of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Kaballo, Babikir G; Ahmed, Ahmed Elias; Nur, Musa Mohammed; Khalid, Ismail Osman; Abu-Aisha, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) with that of azathioprine (AZA) drugs in the maintenance therapy of lupus nephritis (LN) patients, we studied 81 Sudanese patients with LN (32 in Class III, 34 in Class IV, and 15 in combined Class V + IV of the ISN/RPS 2003 Classification). All patients received induction therapy consisting of monthly intravenous pulse doses of cyclophosphamide (CYC) (500 mg/m 2 of body-surface area) for six months, plus three consecutive pulses of intravenous methylprednisolone 15 mg/kg/day of body weight (maximum 500 mg). Subsequently, 41 (50.6%) patients were randomized into a group that received oral MMF (22 mg/kg/day), and 40 (49.4%) patients randomized to a group that received oral AZA (2 mg/kg/day). All patients initially received oral prednisone (1 mg/kg of body weight daily) for four weeks. The baseline characteristics of the two groups were similar. Total remission rate was 75.3% (80.5% in MMF and 70% in AZA), complete remission rate of 54.3% (56.1% with MMF and 52.5% with AZA), and a partial remission rate of 21% (24.4% with MMF and 17.5% with AZA) over 29 months. During maintenance therapy, six patients died (four in the AZA group and two in the MMF group), and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) developed in five patients (three in the AZA group and two in the MMF group). During the 36-months of the study, both groups had comparable event-free survival rate for the composite end point of death or ESRD and rate of relapse-free survival. Furthermore, both groups had no significant differences in terms of frequency of hospitalization, amenorrhea, infection, nausea, and vomiting. We conclude that our study showed that short-term therapy with intravenous CYC followed by maintenance therapy with oral MMF or AZA had similar efficacy and safety for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe LN.

  2. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for the quantitation of mycophenolate mofetil in human plasma: Application to a bioequivalence study and metabolite identification.

    PubMed

    Partani, Pankaj; Verma, Saurabh Manaswita; Monif, Tausif

    2015-10-01

    We established a sensitive, selective, and rapid analytical method for the quantitation and pharmacokinetic investigation of mycophenolate mofetil in human plasma. To our knowledge, this is the first method that characterizes presence of mycophenolate mofetil glucuronide in clinical samples through tandem mass spectrometry detection and resolves mycophenolate mofetil from its glucuronide metabolite. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry detection in positive ion mode was selected to provide optimal selectivity and sensitivity. Due to the ionizable characteristics of the mycophenolate mofetil, a mixed-mode cation-exchange disposable extraction cartridge was prudently chosen. The chromatographic separation was achieved on Luna(®) C18(2) (100×4.60 mm) column using mobile phase consisting of a mixture of 1±0.05 mM ammonium formate in water, titrated to pH 3.1±0.1 with formic acid, and methanol (20:80, v/v), at a flow rate of 0.7 mL/min. The detection was led at m/z ratios of 434.4→ 114.2 and 438.4→ 118.3, for mycophenolate mofetil and mycophenolate mofetil-D4, respectively. The developed method was linear between 40.2-4986.0 pg/mL. All validation parameters were within the defined limits. The validated method was then successfully applied for the evaluation of bioequivalence parameters of mycophenolate mofetil after an oral administration of 500 mg mycophenolate mofetil tablet to healthy male Indian volunteers.

  3. [Duodenal villous atrophy associated with Mycophenolate mofetil: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Tapia, Oscar; Villaseca, Miguel; Sierralta, Armando; Roa, Juan Carlos

    2010-05-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is an immunosupressor agent frequently used in patients after bone marrow or solid organ transplants. The most common adverse reactions of the drug are gastrointestinal, specially diarrhea and vomiting. We report a 53-year-old male, that received a heart transplant receiving immunosuppression with cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisone. Six months after the transplant, the patient started with diarrhea, anorexia and weight loss. A duodenal biopsy showed villous atrophy. Celiac disease and the presence of parasites were discarded. Mycophenolate mofetil was discontinued and one week later, diarrhea subsided. Two months later the patient was asymptomatic and recovered weight. A new duodenal biopsy showed absence of villous atrophy.

  4. Toxoplasmic encephalitis during mycophenolate mofetil immunotherapy of neuromuscular disease

    PubMed Central

    Chahin, Nizar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To show that immunotherapy with medications such mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) can cause serious complications in patients with neuromuscular disorders. Methods: Two patients with neuromuscular disorders on immunotherapy with long-term MMF who developed toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE) were included in this case series. Results: One patient with myasthenia gravis and one patient with inflammatory myopathy on immunotherapy with long-term MMF developed severe TE. Diagnosis was based on clinical presentation, MRI brain imaging characteristics, and CSF PCR positivity for Toxoplasma gondii. Both patients were treated with pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine, and leucovorin for 2 months without clinical improvement, and both died. Conclusions: Immunotherapy with medications such as MMF can cause devastating TE in non-HIV patients with neuromuscular disorders. Early consideration and recognition of this complication is important to possibly prevent unfavorable outcomes. The utility of screening and prophylaxis against toxoplasmosis in individuals with neuroimmunologic disorders and other autoimmune disorders who receive immunosuppressive therapy requires future study. PMID:25635260

  5. Treatment of presumptive primary immune-mediated thrombocytopenia with mycophenolate mofetil versus cyclosporine in dogs.

    PubMed

    Cummings, F O; Rizzo, S A

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare hospitalisation duration, survival times, adverse events and cost of therapy in dogs with presumptive primary immune-mediated thrombocytopenia undergoing therapy with mycophenolate mofetil and corticosteroids versus cyclosporine and corticosteroids. A retrospective study of medical case records of dogs with presumed primary immune-mediated thrombocytopenia was conducted. Data collected included signalment, presenting complaints, haematologic and biochemical profiles, vector-borne disease testing, thoracic and abdominal radiographs, abdominal ultrasound, medications administered, duration of hospitalisation, 30- and 60-day survival, adverse events and cost of therapy. Variables were compared between dogs treated solely with mycophenolate mofetil and corticosteroids or cyclosporine and corticosteroids. A total of 55 dogs with primary immune-mediated thrombocytopenia were identified. Eighteen were excluded because multiple immunosuppressive medications were used during treatment. Hospitalisation times, 30-day survival and 60-day survival times were similar between both groups. Dogs in the mycophenolate mofetil/corticosteroid group experienced fewer adverse events than the cyclosporine/corticosteroid group. Therapy with mycophenolate mofetil was less expensive than that with cyclosporine. These results suggest that using the combination of mycophenolate mofetil and corticosteroids appears to be as effective as cyclosporine and corticosteroids in the treatment of presumed primary immune-mediated thrombocytopenia in dogs. Adverse events were less common and cost of therapy was lower in the mycophenolate mofetil group. Additional larger prospective, controlled, double-masked, outcome-based, multi-institutional studies are required to substantiate these preliminary findings. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  6. Mycophenolate Mofetil (MMF) Efficacy in Glomerulonephritis (GN), a Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huraib, Sameer O; Qureshi, Junaid I; Quadri, Khaja Hm; Al Flaiw, Ahmed; Al Ghamdi, Ghormullah; Jumani, Abdulqadir; Al Hejaili, Fayez; Raza, Hammad; Al Johani, Abdulaziz; Al-Katheri, Abdulmalik; Al-Khader, Abdullah A

    2005-01-01

    Mycophenolate Mofetil MMF has been widely used in post-transplant immunosuppression. Its role is emerging in GN. MMF demonstrated promising results compared with cyclosphosphamide in stage IV lupus nephritis, in a recently published trial. It has been found to have a wide safety profile, with mostly gastroinetestinal side effects, which can be avoided through titration. Its action is through inhibition of the enzyme IMDPH (ionosine monophosphate dehydrogenase), leading to purine antagonism and inhibition of lymphocytes. We were aiming to demonstrate the efficacy of MMF in our GN population. In this study, we reviewed 17 patients who received MMF (dose - 1 gm po bid) for the past year. They were only included if it was given for the management of resistant primary glomerulonephritis. Complete remission has been defined as proteinuria of less than 0.5 g/day and partial remission as a reduction of proteinuria 50% of starting MMF therapy; all 17 MMF therapy patients uniformly achieved good BP ((29%) achieved complete remission and this group consisted of 1 membranous GN, 2 lupus GN (type IV and membranous), one FSGS and one with MPGN. Four of 17 (23%) were non-responders to therapy. This group articles.aspx? id=41 to side effects. We conclude that the MMF appears to be an effective alternate treatment modality in resistant membranous GN, lupus nephritis (type IV and V) and possibly MPGN, and to a lesser extent in resistant FSGS. Further prospective data may demonstrate the efficacy of MMF in GN.

  7. Mycophenolate mofetil embryopathy: A newly recognized teratogenic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Perez-Aytes, Antonio; Marin-Reina, Purificacion; Boso, Virginia; Ledo, Ana; Carey, John C; Vento, Maximo

    2017-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is probably the most common employed immunosuppressant drug in recipients of solid organ transplant and in many autoimmune diseases. In vitro studies, a significant number of single clinical observations and a recent study from a group of different European teratogen information services, have provided very consistent data supporting the existence of a specific MMF embryopathy. The typical malformative pattern of MMF embryopathy includes external ear anomalies ranging from hypoplastic pinna (microtia) to complete absence of pinna (anotia); cleft lip, with or without cleft palate, and ocular anomalies as iris or chorioretinal coloboma and anophthalmia/microphthalmia. Other less frequent features are congenital heart defects, distal limbs anomalies, esophageal atresia, vertebral malformations, diaphragmatic hernia, and kidney and central nervous system anomalies. Neurodevelopmental outcome seems favorable in the small number of patients where information about this issue is available, but neurological deficits have been documented. Physicians in charge of women under MMF therapy should be aware of the potential risk of this drug to cause a specific embryopathy and the need of interrupting the treatment at least six weeks before becoming pregnant.

  8. Mycophenolate mofetil in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ali

    2009-12-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is an immunosuppressive agent that has been shown to be effective in transplant patients. It is also efficacious in the management of lupus nephritis and useful in the treatment of autoimmune conditions because its mechanisms of action target T- and B- lymphocytes, leading to suppression of the cell-mediated immune response and antibody formation. MMF has been used successfully to treat immune-mediated conditions like myasthenia gravis, autoimmune hepatitis and immune cytopenias. However, the conditions for its optimal use for non-renal manifestations (e.g., hematological, neuropsychiatric, myocardial, pulmonary or cutaneous symptoms) in lupus patients are unclear. There have yet to be any randomized, controlled trials to guide the optimal dose and duration of MMF treatment in such situations. MMF is well tolerated and safe to use, although there are reports of serious adverse effects including urticaria, myopathy, Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoma, cytomegalovirus infection and disseminated varicella zoster infection. Immunosuppressive treatment with MMF and supportive care over the past few decades have led to improved clinical outcomes in patients with severe lupus nephritis. A favorable long-term prognosis can be ensured provided that effective treatment is instituted early, before irreversible renal parenchymal damage occurs. Another area of concern for patients is the increased cost of long-term MMF use.

  9. [Mycophenolate mofetil in lupus nephritis refractory to intravenous cyclophosphamide].

    PubMed

    Daza, Leonel; Pérez, Salvador; Velasco, Ulises; Hernández, Martha

    2006-09-01

    To evaluate the use of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in lupus nephritis (LN) patients with prior failure to intravenous cyclophosphamide over a 12-month follow-up. Eleven patients with LN were included. MMF doses ranged from 1.5-2 grams per day. In all patients, 24-h urinary protein excretion, creatinine clearance, and serum creatinine were evaluated. Treatment-related adverse effects were recorded over the 12-month follow-up. Basal proteinuria decreased from 1.63 g/L (95% CI: 0.78-2.5) to 0.93 (95% CI: 0.1-1.62) g/L at the end of the follow-up period (p = 0.04). Creatinine clearance showed a tendency to improve but no statistically significant differences were found, 69.2 (95% CI 51.4- 87.4) vs. 79.29 (IC 95% 49.2-109.3) ml/min, respectively; p = 0.90). No significant differences were found in the remaining variables. Patients without response to MMF had a higher chronicity index than those with good or average response. MMF doses of 1.5-2 grams per day are a good alternative in LN patients without response to intravenous cyclophosphamide and a low chronicity index. No severe adverse effects were found. Copyright © 2006 Elsevier España S.L. Barcelona. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Insights on chronic-relapsing opsoclonus-myoclonus from a pilot study of mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Pranzatelli, Michael R; Tate, Elizabeth D; Travelstead, Anna L; Baumgardner, Christine A; Gowda, Narayana V; Halthore, Sri N; Kerstan, Peter; Kossak, Brian D; Mitchell, Wendy G; Taub, Jeffrey W

    2009-03-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome is characterized by abnormal lymphocyte trafficking into brain. The authors hypothesized that mycophenolate mofetil, a lymphocyte proliferation inhibitor, might be therapeutic. The cerebrospinal fluid and blood immunophenotypes of 15 children with predominantly chronic-relapsing opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome were compared before and after treatment by flow cytometry. Mycophenolate mofetil reduced the cerebrospinal fluid expansion of HLA-DR+ activated T cells (-40%); the frequency of other T-cell or natural killer cell subsets remained unchanged, but cerebrospinal fluid B cells increased significantly. Adrenocorticotropic hormone dose was lowered by 64% over an average of 1.5 years, yet 73% eventually relapsed despite therapeutic drug levels. Prior treatment with rituximab prevented relapse-associated increase in cerebrospinal fluid B cells, without hindering mycophenolate mofetil-induced reduction in T-cell activation. These data demonstrate resistant immunologic problems in chronic-relapsing opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome. Mycophenolate mofetil did not prevent relapse. The novel effect of mycophenolate mofetil on chronically activated T cells may contribute to its efficacy in T-cell mediated neurological disorders.

  11. Determination of mycophenolic acid and mycophenolate mofetil by high-performance liquid chromatography using postcolumn derivatization.

    PubMed

    Renner, U D; Thiede, C; Bornhäuser, M; Ehninger, G; Thiede, H M

    2001-01-01

    An efficient method to lower the optical detection limit is described using the displacement of an absorption and emission band of an analyte after a polarity change in different solvents. This solvatochromic effect was used in a RP-HPLC assay for the fluorescence detection of mycophenolic acid (6-(4-hydroxy-6-methoxy-7-methyl-3-oxo-5-phthalanyl)-4-methyl-4-hexenoic acid, MPA) and the prodrug mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), the N-(2-hydroxyethyl)morpholino ester of MPA. The rational to use fluorescence detection is based on the behavior of MMF and MPA, which fluoresce in a basic medium (pH >9.5). Following a simple protein precipitation, the analytes were separated in an isocratic RP-HPLC system. The postcolumn generation of the phenolate anions of MPA and MMF was achieved by addition of an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution regulated by a newly developed continuous-flow liquid control system. MPAG, not directly accessible for fluorescence detection, was analyzed after enzymatic deglucuronidation to MPA. Compared to published quantification limits for MPA and MMF by UV detection, this method is more than 100-fold more sensitive, with a lower limit of quantification of 45 fmol for both MPA and MMF.

  12. Treatment of canine idiopathic immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia with mycophenolate mofetil and glucocorticoids: 30 cases (2007 to 2011).

    PubMed

    Wang, A; Smith, J R; Creevy, K E

    2013-08-01

    To compare short-term outcome and frequency of adverse events for dogs with idiopathic immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia treated with glucocorticoids and mycophenolate mofetil vs alternate immunosuppressive protocols. A retrospective study of medical case records of dogs with immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia was conducted. Data collected included signalment, clinicopathological data, medications administered, duration of hospitalization, short-term survival and adverse events. Variables were compared between dogs treated with glucocorticoids and mycophenolate mofetil (mycophenolate mofetil group) vs dogs treated with other two-drug immunosuppressive protocols (combined group). Sixty-four cases of idiopathic immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia were identified. Two dogs were euthanased without treatment, three received glucocorticoids alone, and seven received two additional drugs. Fifty-two dogs received glucocorticoids and additional immunosuppressive medications: 30 mycophenolate mofetil, 15 cyclosporine, 6 azathioprine and 1 human immunoglobulin. There was no significant difference between the discharge rate, 30-day or 60-day survival rates between the mycophenolate mofetil and the combined groups (Fisher's exact; P=0·272, 0·518, 1·000, respectively). The sole adverse event observed in the mycophenolate mofetil group was diarrhoea (n=5). Administration of mycophenolate mofetil appears safe in dogs with idiopathic immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia. The combination of glucocorticoids and mycophenolate mofetil has similar efficacy to alternate immunosuppressive protocols used to treat this disease. © 2013 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  13. Mycophenolate Mofetil versus Cyclophosphamide for Induction Treatment of Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Gerald B.; Contreras, Gabriel; Dooley, Mary Anne; Ginzler, Ellen M.; Isenberg, David; Jayne, David; Li, Lei-Shi; Mysler, Eduardo; Sánchez-Guerrero, Jorge; Solomons, Neil; Wofsy, David

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) may offer advantages over intravenous cyclophosphamide (IVC) for the treatment of lupus nephritis, but these therapies have not been compared in an international randomized, controlled trial. Here, we report the comparison of MMF and IVC as induction treatment for active lupus nephritis in a multinational, two-phase (induction and maintenance) study. We randomly assigned 370 patients with classes III through V lupus nephritis to open-label MMF (target dosage 3 g/d) or IVC (0.5 to 1.0 g/m2 in monthly pulses) in a 24-wk induction study. Both groups received prednisone, tapered from a maximum starting dosage of 60 mg/d. The primary end point was a prespecified decrease in urine protein/creatinine ratio and stabilization or improvement in serum creatinine. Secondary end points included complete renal remission, systemic disease activity and damage, and safety. Overall, we did not detect a significantly different response rate between the two groups: 104 (56.2%) of 185 patients responded to MMF compared with 98 (53.0%) of 185 to IVC. Secondary end points were also similar between treatment groups. There were nine deaths in the MMF group and five in the IVC group. We did not detect significant differences between the MMF and IVC groups with regard to rates of adverse events, serious adverse events, or infections. Although most patients in both treatment groups experienced clinical improvement, the study did not meet its primary objective of showing that MMF was superior to IVC as induction treatment for lupus nephritis. PMID:19369404

  14. Linear IgA/IgG bullous dermatosis: successful treatment with dapsone and mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Passos, Leny; Rabelo, Renata Fernandes; Matsuo, Christiane; Santos, Mônica; Talhari, Sinesio; Talhari, Carolina

    2011-01-01

    A 21-year-old female presenting linear IgA and IgG disease initially responded well to dapsone therapy. However, the treatment with dapsone was withdrawn due to severe anemia induced by malaria, which led to worsening of the clinical picture. Although prednisone and methylprednisolone were tried, the patient responded only to the association of dapsone and mycophenolate mofetil.

  15. Mycophenolate mofetil alters the antioxidant status in duodenum of rats: Implication for silymarin usage in mycophenolate mofetil-induced gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Sheikhzadeh, Sanaz; Malekinejad, Hassan; Hobbenaghi, Rahim

    2013-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as an immunosuppressive agent is used to prevent graft rejection. One of the adverse effects of long time administration of MMF is the gastrointestinal disorder. This study aimed to investigate the gastroprotective effect of silymarin (SMN) on MMF-induced gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Twenty-four adult female Wistar rats were assigned into three groups including the control and test groups. The control animals received saline (5 mL kg(-1)) and the test animals were treated with MMF (40 mg kg(-1), orally) and saline, MMF and silymarin (SMN, 50 mg kg(-1), orally) for 14 consecutive days, respectively. To evaluate the GI disorders due to the MMF-induced oxidative stress and subsequently the protective effect of SMN, malondialdehyde (MDA), total thiol molecules (TTM) levels and total anti-oxidant capacity (TAC) were determined. Additionally, histopathological examinations in the duodenal region of small intestine were performed. The MMF-increased level of MDA was reduced by SMN administration, while the MMF-reduced level of TTM increased significantly (p < 0.05) by SMN administration. Histopathological examinations showed the goblet cell reduction and congestion in the MMF-received animals; while SMN was able to improve the MMF-induced goblet cell reduction and congestion. Our data suggest that the MMF-induced GI disorders are characterized by changes in antioxidant status, which presented by the elevation of MDA level and reduction of TTM concentration. Moreover, the improved biochemical alterations and histopathologic damages by SMN indicating its gastroprotective and antioxidant effects.

  16. Beneficial effects of mycophenolate mofetil on cardiotoxicity induced by tacrolimus in wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferjani, Hanen; Timoumi, Rim; Amara, Ines; Abid, Salwa; Achour, Abedellatif; Boussema-Ayed, Imen

    2016-01-01

    The immunosuppressive drug tacrolimus (TAC) is used clinically to reduce the rejection rate in transplant patients. TAC has contributed to an increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease in patients receiving solid organ transplantation. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), a potent inhibitor of de novo purine synthesis, is known to prevent ongoing rejection in combination with TAC. In the present study, we investigated the antioxidant and antigenotoxic effect of MMF on TAC-induced cardiotoxicity in rats. Oral administration of TAC at 2.4, 24, and 60 mg/kg b.w. corresponding, respectively, to 1, 10, and 25% of LD50 for 24 h caused cardiac toxicity in a dose-dependant manner. TAC increased significantly DNA damage level in hearts of treated rats. Furthermore, it increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyl (PC) levels and decreased catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. The oral administration of MMF at 50 mg/kg b.w. simultaneously with TAC at 60 mg/kg b.w. proved a significant cardiac protection by decreasing DNA damage, MDA, and PC levels, and by increasing the antioxidant activities of CAT and SOD. Thus, our study showed, for the first time, the protective effect of MMF against cardiac toxicity induced by TAC. This protective effect was mediated via an antioxidant process. PMID:26582055

  17. Involvement of carboxylesterase 1 and 2 in the hydrolysis of mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Fujiyama, Nobuhiro; Miura, Masatomo; Kato, Shoutaro; Sone, Tomomichi; Isobe, Masakazu; Satoh, Shigeru

    2010-12-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is the ester prodrug of the immunosuppressant agent mycophenolic acid (MPA) and is rapidly activated by esterases after oral administration. However, the role of isoenzymes in MMF hydrolysis remains unclear. Although human plasma, erythrocytes, and whole blood contain MMF hydrolytic activities, the mean half-lives of MMF in vitro were 15.1, 1.58, and 3.20 h, respectively. Thus, blood esterases seemed to contribute little to the rapid MMF disappearance in vivo. In vitro analyses showed that human intestinal microsomes exposed to 5 and 10 μM MMF exhibited hydrolytic activities of 2.38 and 4.62 nmol/(min · mg protein), respectively. Human liver microsomes exhibited hydrolytic activities of 14.0 and 26.1 nmol/(min · mg protein), respectively, approximately 6-fold higher than those observed for intestinal microsomes. MMF hydrolytic activities in human liver cytosols were 1.40 and 3.04 nmol/(min · mg protein), respectively. Because hepatic cytosols generally contain 5-fold more protein than microsomes, MMF hydrolysis in human liver cytosols corresponded to approximately 50% of that observed in microsomes. Fractions obtained by 9000g centrifugation of supernatants from COS-1 cells expressing human carboxylesterase (CES) 1 or 2 exhibited MMF hydrolytic activity, with CES1-containing fractions showing higher catalytic efficiency than CES2-containing fractions. The CES inhibitor bis-p-nitrophenylphosphate inhibited MMF hydrolysis in human liver microsomes and cytosols with IC(50) values of 0.51 and 0.36 μM, respectively. In conclusion, both intestinal and hepatic CESs and in particular CES1 may be involved in MMF hydrolysis and play important roles in MMF bioactivation. Hepatic CES1 activity levels may help explain the between-subject variability observed for MMF usage.

  18. Autoimmune myelofibrosis with pancytopenia as a presenting manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus responsive to mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Ungprasert, P; Chowdhary, V R; Davis, M D; Makol, A

    2016-04-01

    Hematological abnormalities, such as anemia, leucopenia, and thrombocytopenia, secondary to peripheral destruction, are common in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, cytopenias from autoimmune myelofibrosis (AIMF) are extremely uncommon in SLE, with less than 40 reported cases in the literature. We report the case of a 33-year-old female who presented with bullous skin lesions and pancytopenia as the presenting manifestation of what was ultimately diagnosed as SLE with AIMF. She responded well to glucocorticoids and mycophenolate mofetil.

  19. Pediatric pemphigus vulgaris: durable treatment responses achieved with prednisone and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF).

    PubMed

    Baratta, Andrea; Camarillo, Diana; Papa, Christine; Treat, James R; Payne, Aimee S; Rozenber, Suzanne S; Yan, Albert C

    2013-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a chronic autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes. Most cases occur in adults; cases in children are rare. This report describes the clinical presentations and treatment responses of three children with PV, as confirmed according to histology and indirect immunofluorescence studies. In all three cases, oral prednisone used in conjunction with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) resulted in complete clinical remission, during which all pharmacotherapy was successfully discontinued. Resolution of the skin and mucosal blistering tended to occur quickly with prednisone, and after initiation of treatment with MMF, discontinuation of all pharmacotherapy was achieved within a range of 10 to 30 months in the three patients. One patient experienced a recurrence of genital lesions 19 months after discontinuation of therapy, but the condition remitted within 2 weeks with topical corticosteroid therapy. At the time of this report, the duration of complete remission ranged from 6 to 19 months. In summary, combination therapy with prednisone and MMF for pediatric PV appears to be a safe and effective approach that is associated with durable remission.

  20. Pediatric Pemphigus Vulgaris: Durable Treatment Responses Achieved with Prednisone and Mycophenolate Mofetil (MMF)

    PubMed Central

    Baratta, Andrea; Camarillo, Diana; Papa, Christine; Treat, James R.; Payne, Aimee S.; Rozenber, Suzanne S.; Yan, Albert C.

    2013-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a chronic autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes. Most cases occur in adults; cases in children are rare. This report describes the clinical presentations and treatment responses of three children with PV, as confirmed according to histology and indirect immunofluorescence studies. In all three cases, oral prednisone used in conjunction with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) resulted in complete clinical remission, during which all pharmacotherapy was successfully discontinued. Resolution of the skin and mucosal blistering tended to occur quickly with prednisone, and after initiation of treatment with MMF, discontinuation of all pharmacotherapy was achieved within a range of 10 to 30 months in the three patients. One patient experienced a recurrence of genital lesions 19 months after discontinuation of therapy, but the condition remitted within 2 weeks with topical corticosteroid therapy. At the time of this report, the duration of complete remission ranged from 6 to 19 months. In summary, combination therapy with prednisone and MMF for pediatric PV appears to be a safe and effective approach that is associated with durable remission. PMID:22747679

  1. Self-resolution of Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoma in a patient with dermatomyositis following withdrawal of mycophenolate mofetil and methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Mark A; Callen, Jeffrey P

    2004-08-01

    Self-resolving Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphomas have become more common with the use of immunosuppressive agents in both transplant patients and patients with connective tissue disorders. Immunosuppressive agents are often used for control of dermatomyositis, but their use has not been linked to subsequent malignancy. We present a 46-year-old woman with dermatomyositis, who developed an EBV-associated B-cell lymphoma of the brain while on oral methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil and low-dose prednisone. The patient's lymphoma gradually resolved "spontaneously" upon discontinuation of the methotrexate and mycophenolate mofetil. The potential for EBV-associated B-cell lymphoma to self-resolve should be recognized by the clinician in order to prevent unnecessary and potentially toxic treatments including radiation therapy or multi-drug chemotherapy.

  2. Development of primary central nervous system lymphoma in a systemic lupus erythematosus patient after treatment with mycophenolate mofetil and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Balci, M A; Pamuk, G E; Unlu, E; Usta, U; Pamuk, O N

    2017-01-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare form of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma and four cases of PCNSL have previously been described in association with mycophenolate mofetil. We report the fifth case of PCNSL in a patient with lupus nephropathy while on mycophenolate mofetil treatment.

  3. Long-term experience of mycophenolate mofetil for treatment of diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Le, Elizabeth N; Wigley, Fredrick M; Shah, Ami A; Boin, Francesco; Hummers, Laura K

    2013-01-01

    Background Immunosuppressive therapy may potentially alter the natural disease course of scleroderma. There have been reports of using mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) for the treatment of scleroderma skin disease. Objective To analyse the experience of using MMF for the treatment of active diffuse cutaneous scleroderma. Methods The authors compared the change in mean modified Rodnan skin scores (mRSS) in an MMF cohort at baseline with scores at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months and with those of historical controls from a pooled analysis of three multicentre randomised clinical trials of recombinant human relaxin, d-penicillamine and oral bovine type I collagen. Results Improvement in mRSS after treatment with MMF compared with baseline was seen as early as 3 months and continued through the 12-month follow-up. The mRSS of the MMF cohort was not different from that of the historical controls at 6 months (MMF −3.05±7.4 vs relaxin −4.83±6.99, p=0.059), but was significantly lower at 12 months (MMF −7.59±10.1 vs d-penicillamine −2.47±8.6, p<0.001; collagen −3.4±7.12, p=0.002). General and muscle severity scores and quality of life measures also improved compared with baseline. Pulmonary function remained stable. Conclusions MMF may benefit skin disease in patients with diffuse scleroderma, but prospective studies are required to determine its role. PMID:21378404

  4. Use of Mycophenolate Mofetil or Azathioprine for the Management of Chronic Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Morisset, Julie; Johannson, Kerri A; Vittinghoff, Eric; Aravena, Carlos; Elicker, Brett M; Jones, Kirk D; Fell, Charlene D; Manganas, Helene; Dubé, Bruno-Pierre; Wolters, Paul J; Collard, Harold R; Ryerson, Christopher J; Ley, Brett

    2017-03-01

    The treatment of chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis (cHP) often includes systemic oral corticosteroids, but the optimal pharmacologic management remains unclear. The morbidity associated with prednisone has motivated the search for alternative therapies. We aimed to determine the effect of treatment with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) or azathioprine (AZA) on lung function in patients with cHP. Patients with cHP treated with either MMF or AZA were retrospectively identified from four interstitial lung disease centers. Change in lung function before and after treatment initiation was analyzed using linear mixed-effects modeling (LMM), adjusting for age, sex, smoking history, and prednisone use. Seventy patients were included: 51 were treated with MMF and 19 with AZA. Median follow-up after treatment initiation was 11 months. Prior to treatment initiation, FVC and diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (Dlco) % predicted were declining at a mean rate of 0.12% (P < .001) and 0.10% (P < .001) per month, respectively. Treatment with either MMF or AZA was not associated with improved FVC (0.5% at 1 year; P = .46) but was associated with a statistically significant improvement in Dlco of 4.2% (P < .001) after 1 year of treatment. Results were similar in the subgroup of patients treated with MMF for 1 year; the FVC increased nonsignificantly by 1.3% (P = .103) and Dlco increased by 3.9% (P < .001). Treatment with MMF or AZA is associated with improvements in Dlco in patients with cHP. Prospective randomized trials are needed to validate their effectiveness for cHP. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mycophenolic acid exposure after administration of mycophenolate mofetil in the presence and absence of cyclosporin in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, Dirk R; Ekberg, Henrik; Grinyó, Josep; Nashan, Björn; Vincenti, Flavio; Snell, Paul; Mamelok, Richard D; Bouw, Rene M

    2009-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of mycophenolic acid (MPA) are complex, with large interindividual variability over time. There are also well documented interactions with cyclosporin, and assessment of MPA exposure is therefore necessary when reducing or stopping cyclosporin therapy. Here we report on the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic behaviour of MPA in renal transplant patients on standard dose, reduced dose and no cyclosporin. The CAESAR study, a prospective 12-month study in primary renal allograft recipients, was designed to determine whether mycophenolate mofetil-based regimens containing either low-dose cyclosporin or low-dose cyclosporin withdrawn by 6 months could minimize nephrotoxicity and improve renal function without an increase in acute rejection compared with a mycophenolate mofetil-based regimen containing standard-dose cyclosporin. A subset of patients from the CAESAR study contributed to this pharmacokinetic analysis of MPA exposure. Blood samples were taken over one dosing interval on day 7 and at months 3, 7 and 12 post-transplantation. The sampling time points were predose, 20, 40 and 75 minutes and 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 12 hours after mycophenolate mofetil dosing. Assessments included plasma concentrations of MPA and mycophenolic acid glucuronide (MPAG) and cyclosporin trough concentrations. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from 0 to 12 hours (AUC(12)) for MPA was the primary pharmacokinetic parameter, and the AUC(12) for MPAG was the secondary parameter. In total, 536 de novo renal allograft recipients were randomized in the CAESAR study. Of these, 114 patients were entered into the pharmacokinetic substudy and 110 patients contributed to the pharmacokinetic analysis. There was a rapid rise in MPA concentrations (median time to peak concentration 0.72-1.25 hours). At day 7 and month 3, the MPA AUC(12) values were similar in the cyclosporin withdrawal and low-dose cyclosporin groups (patients with the same cyclosporin target

  6. Refractory optic perineuritis due to granulomatosis with polyangiitis successfully treated with methotrexate and mycophenolate mofetil combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yoshitaka; Asako, Kurumi; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Kono, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    Optic perineuritis is an uncommon inflammatory disorder of the optic sheath that causes visual loss or eye pain. There are few case reports of optic perineuritis associated with granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Herein we report the case of a 37-year-old male with granulomatosis with polyangiitis and who presented with headache, blurred vision in the right eye, diplopia, and numbness in the right forehead. Brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) findings revealed hypertrophic pachymeningitis and refractory optic perineuritis. These were manageable only by means of weekly methotrexate and mycophenolate mofetil combination therapy but not with methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil, intravenous cyclophosphamide, rituximab, azathioprine, or cyclosporine individually. PMID:28293459

  7. Pharmacokinetics of mycophenolic acid in kidney transplant recipients treated with a low dose (1 gram/day) of mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Julasareekul, Wichian; Eiam-Ong, Somchai; Bejraputra, Ornanong; Seublinvong, Tada

    2003-08-01

    Pharmacokinetic studies of mycophenolic acid (MPA) were performed in 16 stable Thai kidney transplant recipients treated with 1 g/d of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). The complete area under the blood concentration-time curve (AUC) of MPA was determined using the linear trapezoidal rule from 8 concentrations at, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 12 h after MMF administration. The mean values of AUC(0-12) were 37.54 + 0.80 microg x h/ml. MPA concentrations at 8 h after dosing, not the trough or maximum levels, showed the best correlation with AUC(0-12) (r2 = 0.72). The equation model of abbreviated AUC of MPA, derived by multiple linear regression analysis, that had the highest correlation (r2) and lowest absolute prediction error (APE) was: AUC = 0.6 C1 + 1.9 C3 + 8.68 C8 + 4.65 (r2 = 0.92, APE = 2.05 +/- 0.32%). The best abbreviated AUC equations obtained by linear trapezoidal rule were: AUC = 4.5 C0 + C1 + 1.5 C2 + 5 C4 (r2 = 0.78, APE = 5.78 +/- 1.14%) and AUC = 5 C0 + C1 + C2 + 5 C3 (r2 = 0.76, APE = 6.21 +/- 1.46%).

  8. Steroid withdrawal and reduction of cyclosporine A under mycophenolate mofetil after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Faulhaber, Marion; Mäding, Ilona; Malehsa, Doris; Raggi, Matthias C; Haverich, Axel; Bara, Christoph L

    2013-04-01

    Survival and quality of life after heart transplantation are limited by a significant incidence of cardiovascular complications. Side effects of immunosuppressives contribute unfavorably. Aim of this study was to determine (1) whether withdrawal of corticosteroids and dose reduction of cyclosporine A can be performed safely under immunosuppressive therapy with mycophenolate mofetil and (2) if this is beneficial for renal function and cardiovascular risk reduction. Long term heart transplant recipients on steroids and cyclosporine A were examined in a monocentric, prospective, single-arm cohort study. Steroids were withdrawn, mycophenolate mofetil introduced and cyclosporine A dose reduced (target level 50-90 ng/ml). Follow up was 24 months. 23 patients were analyzed: Renal parameters (creatinine, urea, uric acid) improved significantly (p<0.01), as did cardiovascular parameters (heart rate [p<0.05], systolic and diastolic blood pressure [p<0.01]), HbA1c (p<0.05) and triglycerides (p<0.05). In contrast, the self-percepted state of health (SF36™) decreased. Drop outs occurred mostly due to steroid withdrawal syndrome [n=7]. The incidence of adverse events reflected the usual course after heart transplantation. We conclude that CS free immunosuppression comprising reduced cyclosporine levels and addition of MMF in long term heart transplant recipients is safe and improves the cardiovascular risk profile, carbohydrate metabolism and renal function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients treated with mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storer, Barry E; Boeckh, Michael J; Bemer, Meagan J; Phillips, Brian R; Risler, Linda J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-08-01

    A novel approach to personalizing postgrafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients is evaluating inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity as a drug-specific biomarker of mycophenolic acid (MPA)-induced immunosuppression. This prospective study evaluated total MPA, unbound MPA, and total MPA glucuronide plasma concentrations and IMPDH activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) at 5 time points after the morning dose of oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on day +21 in 56 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Substantial interpatient variability in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics was observed and accurately characterized by the population pharmacokinetic-dynamic model. IMPDH activity decreased with increasing MPA plasma concentration, with maximum inhibition coinciding with maximum MPA concentration in most patients. The overall relationship between MPA concentration and IMPDH activity was described by a direct inhibitory maximum effect model with an IC50 of 3.23 mg/L total MPA and 57.3 ng/mL unbound MPA. The day +21 IMPDH area under the effect curve (AUEC) was associated with cytomegalovirus reactivation, nonrelapse mortality, and overall mortality. In conclusion, a pharmacokinetic-dynamic model was developed that relates plasma MPA concentrations with PMNC IMPDH activity after an MMF dose in HCT recipients. Future studies should validate this model and confirm that day +21 IMPDH AUEC is a predictive biomarker.

  10. Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling Study on the Interaction Between Mycophenolate Mofetil and Pepsin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoli; Guo, Liuqi; Wang, Qing; He, Jiawei; Li, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is an immunosuppressant used in clinical practice to limit the rejection of transplanted organs. MMF is absorbed and metabolized by the gastrointestinal tract and converted to mycophenolic acid by esterases in the plasma, liver, and kidney. Mycophenolic acid is the resulting active metabolite. The interaction of MMF with pepsin may affect the transfer and distribution of MMF. Given this effect, the present study investigated the interaction behavior between pepsin with MMF using docking simulation and spectroscopy method at different temperatures. The results of spectroscopy revealed that MMF has strong ability to quench the fluorescence of pepsin. The results also show that the acting force for binding was composed of hydrophobic forces. The three-dimensional fluorescence spectra and synchronous spectroscopy employed to determine the conformation showed that the binding of MMF with pepsin could induce MMF conformation and microenvironment changes. Furthermore, the molecular interaction distance and energy-transfer efficiency between pepsin and MMF were determined based on the Förster non-radiative energy-transfer mechanism. Docking simulation showed that MMF entered the hydrophobic cavity of pepsin, and a hydrogen bond was formed between the oxygen atoms of the carbanyl group of MMF and hydrogen atoms of tyrosine 189 of pepsin.

  11. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF): firing at the atherosclerotic plaque from different angles?

    PubMed

    van Leuven, Sander I; Kastelein, John J P; Allison, Anthony C; Hayden, Michael R; Stroes, Erik S G

    2006-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by a persistent, low-grade inflammatory state in which immune cell activation is inseparably linked to plaque formation and destabilization. The T-lymphocyte in particular has emerged as a pivotal player throughout the course of atherogenesis. As a consequence, the concept that immune modulation is a suitable target for cardiovascular prevention is currently an important focus of research. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has emerged as a non-competitive inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) that exerts cytostatic effects, particularly on proliferating T-lymphocytes. In addition, MMF has other immune-modulating effects, such as downregulation of the expression of adhesion molecules and attenuation of monocyte and macrophage responses. Given the added benefit that MMF is well tolerated, this immunosuppressive agent constitutes an attractive candidate for the modulation of inflammatory activation in atherogenesis. The present review provides an overview of the potential anti-atherogenic properties of MMF.

  12. Mycophenolate mofetil toxicity mimicking acute cellular rejection in a small intestinal transplant

    PubMed Central

    Apostolov, Ross; Asadi, Khashayar; Lokan, Julie; Kam, Ning; Testro, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is an important medication used for maintenance immunosuppression in solid organ transplants. A common gastrointestinal (GI) side effect of MMF is enterocolitis, which has been associated with multiple histological features. There is little data in the literature describing the histological effects of MMF in small intestinal transplant (SIT) recipients. We present a case of MMF toxicity in a SIT recipient, with histological changes in the donor ileum mimicking persistent acute cellular rejection (ACR). Concurrent biopsies of the patient’s native colon showed similar changes to those from the donor small bowel, suggesting a non-graft specific process, raising suspicion for MMF toxicity. The MMF was discontinued and complete resolution of these changes occurred over three weeks. MMF toxicity should therefore be considered as a differential diagnosis for ACR and graft-versus-host disease in SITs. PMID:28280702

  13. Adult onset Still's disease and collapsing glomerulopathy: successful treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins and mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Bennett, A N; Peterson, P; Sangle, S; Hangartner, R; Abbs, I C; Hughes, G R V; D'Cruz, D P

    2004-06-01

    In this Grand Round we present a 32-yr-old African man who became severely ill after a 5-month history of weight loss, pyrexia, arthralgia, sweats and rash. He went on to develop pericarditis, pericardial effusion with tamponade, hepatomegaly with abnormal liver function tests, lymphadenopathy, massive proteinuria and required ventilatory, circulatory and renal support. The differential diagnosis was adult onset Still's disease, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), infection and lymphoma. Primary infection and lymphoma were excluded and he was treated, with dramatic success, with intravenous immunoglobulins (i.v.IG). Subsequent renal biopsy excluded SLE but confirmed collapsing glomerulopathy. The proteinuria improved dramatically following treatment with mycophenolate mofetil. We discuss some of the difficult diagnostic and management issues raised by this patient and the different uses and mechanisms of action of i.v.IG.

  14. Enhancement of Mycophenolate Mofetil Permeation for Topical Use by Eucalyptol and N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone

    PubMed Central

    Songkram, Chalermkiat

    2016-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is a prodrug of mycophenolic acid (MPA) which can be metabolized by esterase. MMF has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) for treatment of psoriasis patient with skin symptoms. However, it remains unclear whether MMF is efficiently effective to treat skin symptoms developed from psoriasis. The insufficient amount of MMF penetrating through the skin results in the treatment failure due to the difficulty in MMF penetration through the stratum corneum. Skin permeation enhancers such as eucalyptol (EUL) and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) potentially aid in increasing skin penetration. This study aimed to investigate the effects of a concentration ratio (% w/v) between two enhancers (EUL and NMP). The results showed that EUL enhanced MMF permeation with an enhancement ratio (ER) of 3.44 while NMP was not able to promote the penetration of MMF. Interestingly, the synergistic effect of the two enhancers was observed with a suitable ratio given that the ER was 8.21. EUL and NMP are promising enhancers for the development of MMF based skin product. PMID:27069715

  15. The use of mycophenolate mofetil suspension in pediatric renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Bunchman, T; Navarro, M; Broyer, M; Sherbotie, J; Chavers, B; Tönshoff, B; Birk, P; Lerner, G; Lirenman, D; Greenbaum, L; Walker, R; Zimmerhackl, L B; Blowey, D; Clark, G; Ettenger, R; Arterburn, S; Klamerus, K; Fong, A; Tang, H; Thomas, S; Ramos, E

    2001-12-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is widely used to prevent acute rejection in adults after renal, cardiac, and liver transplantation. This study investigated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of MMF suspension in pediatric renal allograft recipients. One hundred renal allograft recipients were enrolled into three age groups (33 patients, 3 months to <6 years; 34 patients, 6 to <12 years; 33 patients, 12 to 18 years). Patients received MMF 600 mg/m2 b.i.d. concomitantly with cyclosporine and corticosteroids with or without antilymphocyte antibody induction. One year after transplantation, patient and graft survival (including death) were 98% and 93%, respectively. Twenty-five patients (25%) experienced a biopsy-proven (Banff grade borderline or higher) or presumptive acute rejection within the first 6 months post-transplantation. Analysis of pharmacokinetic parameters for mycophenolic acid (MPA) and mycophenolic acid glucuronide showed no clinically significant differences among the age groups. The dosing regimen of MMF 600 mg/m2 b.i.d. achieved the targeted early post-transplantation MPA 12-h area under concentration-time curve (AUC0-12) of 27.2 microg h per ml. Adverse events had similar frequencies among the age groups (with the exception of diarrhea, leukopenia, sepsis, and anemia, which were more frequent in the <6 years age group) and led to withdrawal of MMF in about 10% of patients. Administration of MMF 600 mg/m2 b.i.d. is effective in prevention of acute rejection, provides predictable pharmacokinetics, and is associated with an acceptable safety profile in pediatric renal transplant recipients.

  16. A Prospective Randomized, Comparative Trial of High-Dose Mizoribine Versus Mycophenolate Mofetil in Combination With Tacrolimus and Basiliximab for Living Donor Renal Transplant: A Multicenter Trial.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hideki; Takahara, Shiro; Amada, Noritoshi; Tomikawa, Shinji; Chikaraishi, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Kota; Uchida, Kazuhiro; Akiyama, Takahiro; Tanabe, Kazunari; Toma, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    Our objectives were to compare the clinical outcomes of mizoribine (12 mg/kg/d) and mycophenolate mofetil (2000 mg/d) in combination with tacrolimus, basiliximab, and corticosteroids. We enrolled 83 recipients of living-donor renal transplant (performed between 2008 and 2013) in this study. This prospective multi-institutional randomized comparative study compared mizoribine (n = 41) and mycophenolate mofetil (n = 42) in combination with tacrolimus, basiliximab, and corticosteroids for living-donor renal transplant recipients. We compared the acute rejection and graft survival rates and adverse event rates within 1 year of renal transplant between the 2 groups using intention-to-treat analyses. During the 1-year observation period, patient and graft survival rates were 100%. The acute rejection rate was 17.1% in the mizoribine group and 19% in the mycophenolate mofetil group. The incidence rate of cytomegalovirus infection seropositivity (recipient and donor with positive cytomegalovirus antibody status) was higher in the mycophenolate mofetil group than in the mizoribine group, although the difference in these rates was not statistically significant. The incidence of leukopenia was higher in the mizoribine group than in the mycophenolate mofetil group. High-dose mizoribine at 12 mg/kg/day was a safe and efficacious immunosuppressive alternative to mycophenolate mofetil in living-donor renal transplant recipients. Leukopenia should be closely monitored in the initial period of insufficient kidney function after renal transplant.

  17. A Prospective Randomized, Comparative Trial of High-Dose Mizoribine Versus Mycophenolate Mofetil in Combination With Tacrolimus and Basiliximab for Living Donor Renal Transplant: A Multicenter Trial.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hideki; Takahara, Shiro; Amada, Noritoshi; Tomikawa, Shinji; Chikaraishi, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Kota; Uchida, Kazuhiro; Akiyama, Takahiro; Tanabe, Kazunari; Toma, Hiroshi

    2016-05-17

    Our objectives were to compare the clinical outcomes of mizoribine (12 mg/kg/d) and mycophenolate mofetil (2000 mg/d) in combination with tacrolimus, basiliximab, and corticosteroids. We enrolled 83 recipients of living-donor renal transplant (performed between 2008 and 2013) in this study. This prospective multi-institutional randomized comparative study compared mizoribine (n = 41) and mycophenolate mofetil (n = 42) in combination with tacrolimus, basiliximab, and corticosteroids for living-donor renal transplant recipients. We compared the acute rejection and graft survival rates and adverse event rates within 1 year of renal transplant between the 2 groups using intention-to-treat analyses. During the 1-year observation period, patient and graft survival rates were 100%. The acute rejection rate was 17.1% in the mizoribine group and 19% in the mycophenolate mofetil group. The incidence rate of cytomegalovirus infection seropositivity (recipient and donor with positive cytomegalovirus antibody status) was higher in the mycophenolate mofetil group than in the mizoribine group, although the difference in these rates was not statistically significant. The incidence of leukopenia was higher in the mizoribine group than in the mycophenolate mofetil group. High-dose mizoribine at 12 mg/kg/day was a safe and efficacious immunosuppressive alternative to mycophenolate mofetil in living-donor renal transplant recipients. Leukopenia should be closely monitored in the initial period of insufficient kidney function after renal transplant.

  18. Evaluation of limited sampling strategies for mycophenolic acid after mycophenolate mofetil intake in adult kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Barraclough, Katherine A; Isbel, Nicole M; Franklin, Michael E; Lee, Katie J; Taylor, Paul J; Campbell, Scott B; Petchey, William G; Staatz, Christine E

    2010-12-01

    Multiple limited sampling strategies (LSSs) have been proposed for estimation of mycophenolic acid (MPA) area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 12 hours postdose (AUC 0-12) after mycophenolate mofetil intake. The aim of this study was to provide summary information on all published LSSs for MPA and to evaluate their predictive performance in an independent population of kidney transplant recipients. Seventy-eight LSSs for MPA were identified. Sixty-nine full AUC profiles were collected from 45 subjects (25 cotreated with cyclosporine and 20 with tacrolimus). Predicted MPA AUC 0-12, calculated by applying the relevant concentration measurements within the LSS equations, was compared with full AUC calculated by using all concentration measurements in the linear trapezoidal rule. Four error indices (median prediction error, median percentage prediction error [MPPE], root median squared prediction error, and median absolute percentage prediction error [MAPE]) were used to evaluate bias and imprecision. Twelve of the 25 LSSs for cyclosporine-cotreated recipients and one of the 53 LSSs for tacrolimus-cotreated recipients displayed acceptable (less than 15%) bias and imprecision. In the cyclosporine group, two equations demonstrated the highest predictive power, one that used four time points in the first 6 hours postdose (r2 = 0.84, MPPE 1.6%, MAPE 7.8%) and one that used four time points in the first 4 hours postdose (r2 = 0.76, MPPE -0.8%, MAPE 10.2%). In the tacrolimus group, an equation that used two time points in the first 4 hours postdose was superior (r2 = 0.80, MPPE -3.0%, MAPE 13.6%). Application of the LSSs most appropriate for cyclosporine-cotreated patients to the tacrolimus-cotreated group resulted in clinically unacceptable bias and imprecision and vice versa. High variability in performance of LSSs highlights the importance of validating any LSS before applying it to an alternative population. Attention to comedication use is of particular

  19. Development and validation of HPTLC method for the determination of mycophenolate mofetil in bulk and pharmaceutical formulation

    PubMed Central

    Kathirvel, S.; Prasad, K. Rajendra; Babu, K. Madhu

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Described in this manuscript is the first ever reported, new, simple, high-performance thin-layer chromatographic method for the determination of mycophenolate mofetil in bulk and tablet dosage form. Materials and Methods: The drug was separated on aluminum plates precoated with silica gel 60 F254 with toluene, acetone, and methanol in the ratio of 6:2:2 (v/v/v) as the mobile phase. Quantitative analysis was performed by densitometric scanning at 254 nm. Results: The method was validated for linearity, accuracy, precision, and robustness. The calibration plot was linear in the range of 100–500 ng band-1 for mycophenolate mofetil. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of the drug in a pharmaceutical dosage form. PMID:23781485

  20. A randomized phase II trial of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and sirolimus after non-myeloablative unrelated donor transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kornblit, Brian; Maloney, David G; Storer, Barry E; Maris, Michael B; Vindeløv, Lars; Hari, Parameswaran; Langston, Amelia A; Pulsipher, Michael A; Bethge, Wolfgang A; Chauncey, Thomas R; Lange, Thoralf; Petersen, Finn B; Hübel, Kai; Woolfrey, Ann E; Flowers, Mary E D; Storb, Rainer; Sandmaier, Brenda M

    2014-10-01

    The study is a randomized phase II trial investigating graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis after non-myeloablative (90 mg/m(2) fludarabine and 2 Gy total body irradiation) human leukocyte antigen matched unrelated donor transplantation. Patients were randomized as follows: arm 1 - tacrolimus 180 days and mycophenolate mofetil 95 days (n=69); arm 2 - tacrolimus 150 days and mycophenolate mofetil 180 days (n=71); arm 3 - tacrolimus 150 days, mycophenolate mofetil 180 days and sirolimus 80 days (n=68). All patients had sustained engraftment. Grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease rates in the 3 arms were 64%, 48% and 47% at Day 150, respectively (arm 3 vs. arm 1 (hazard ratio 0.62; P=0.04). Owing to the decreased incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease, systemic steroid use was lower at Day 150 in arm 3 (32% vs. 55% in arm 1 and 49% in arm 2; overall P=0.009 by hazard ratio analysis). The Day 150 incidence of cytomegalovirus reactivation was lower in arm 3 (arm 1, 54%; arm 2, 47%; arm 3, 22%; overall P=0.002 by hazard ratio analysis). Non-relapse mortality was comparable in the three arms at two years (arm 1, 26%; arm 2, 23%; arm 3, 18%). Toxicity rates and other outcome measures were similar between the three arms. The addition of sirolimus to tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil is safe and associated with lower incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease and cytomegalovirus reactivation. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 00105001). Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  1. A preclinical and clinical study of mycophenolate mofetil in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pascual, J; Sha, P; García-García, E; Rajeshkumar, N V; De Vicente, E; Quijano, Y; Cubillo, A; Angulo, B; Hernando, O; Hidalgo, M

    2013-02-01

    A high throughput screening for anticancer activity of FDA approved drugs identified mycophenolic acid (MPA), an inhibitor of inositol monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) as an active agent with an antiangiogenesis mode of action. Exposure of pancreatic cancer cell lines to MPA resulted in growth inhibition and reduced the expression of VEGF that was reversed by supplementing the media with guanosine supporting and IMPDH-dependant mechanism. In preclinical in vivo study, MPA showed a moderate inhibition of tumor growth in a panel of 6 human derived pancreatic cancer xenografts but reduced the expression of VEGF. To investigate the effects of MPA in human pancreatic cancer, a total of 12 patients with resectable pancreatic cancer (PDA) received increasing doses of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in cohorts of 6 patients each from 5-15 days prior to surgical resection. Treatment was well tolerated with one episode of grade 1 muscle pain, one episode of grade 2 lymphopenia (2 gr/day dose) and one episode of grade 2 elevantion in LFT (all in the 2 gr./day dose). Patients recovered from surgery uneventfully with no increased post-operative complications. Assessment of CD31, VEGF, and TUNEL in resected specimens compared to a non treated control of 6 patients showed no significant variations in any of the study endpoints. In conclusion, this study shows the feasibility of translating a preclinical observation to the clinical setting and to explore a drug mechanism of action in patients. MPA, however, did not show any hints of antiangiogenesis of anticancer clinical activity questioning if this agent should be further developed in PDA.

  2. Associations of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases polymorphisms with mycophenolate mofetil pharmacokinetics in Chinese renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-chun; Li, Jun; Wang, Hong-yang; Li, Hong-liang; Liu, Jing; Fu, Qian; Huang, Jia-wen; Zhu, Chen; Zhong, Guo-ping; Wang, Xue-ding; Sun, Ping-ping; Huang, Min; Wang, Chang-xi; Li, Jia-li

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) polymorphisms on the pharmacokinetics of the immunosuppressant mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in Chinese renal transplant recipients. A total of 127 renal transplant patients receiving MMF were genotyped for polymorphisms in UGT1A9 -1818T>C, I399C>T, -118T9/10, -440C>T, -331T>C, UGT2B7 IVS1+985A>G, 211G>T, -900A>G, UGT1A8 518C>G and UGT1A7 622T>C. The plasma concentrations of the MMF active moiety mycophenolic acid (MPA) and main metabolite 7-O-MPA-glucuronide (MPAG) were analyzed using HPLC. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the effects of UGT-related gene polymorphisms on MPA pharmacokinetics. The dose-adjusted MPA AUC0-12 h of the patients with the UGT2B7 IVS1+985AG genotype was 48% higher than that of the patients with the IVS1+985AA genotype, which could explain 11.2% of the inter-individual variation in MPA pharmacokinetics. The dose-adjusted MPAG AUC0-12 h of the patients with the UGT1A7 622CC and UGT1A9 -440CT/-331TC genotypes, respectively, was significantly higher than that of the patients with 622T homozygotes and -440C/-331T homozygotes. Furthermore, the genotypes UGT1A9 -1818T>C and UGT1A8 518C>G were associated with a low dose-adjusted MPAG AUC0-12 h. The UGT2B7 11+985A>G genotype is associated with the pharmacokinetics of MPA in Chinese renal transplant patients, which demonstrates the usefulness of this SNP for individualizing MMF dosing.

  3. Mycophenolate mofetil versus methotrexate for prevention of graft-versus-host disease in people receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed; Mhaskar, Rahul; Reljic, Tea; Pidala, Joseph; Perkins, Janelle B; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Kumar, Ambuj

    2014-07-25

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) is associated with improved outcomes for people with various hematologic diseases; however, the morbidity and mortality resulting from acute and subsequently chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) pose a serious challenge to wider applicability of allo-HCT. Intravenous methotrexate in combination with a calcineurin inhibitor, cyclosporine or tacrolimus, is a widely used regimen for the prophylaxis of acute GVHD, but the administration of methotrexate is associated with a number of adverse events. Mycophenolate mofetil, in combination with a calcineurin inhibitor, has been used extensively in people undergoing allo-HCT. Conflicting results regarding various clinical outcomes following allo-HCT have been observed when comparing mycophenolate mofetil-based regimens against methotrexate-based regimens for acute GVHD prophylaxis. to assess the effect of mycophenolate mofetil versus methotrexate for prevention of acute GVHD in people undergoing allo-HCT. to evaluate the effect of mycophenolate mofetil versus methotrexate for overall survival, prevention of chronic GVHD, incidence of relapse, treatment-related harms, nonrelapse mortality, and quality of life. We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and MEDLINE from inception to March 2014. We handsearched conference abstracts from the last two meetings (2011 and 2012) of relevant societies in the field. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov, Novartis clinical trials database (www.novctrd.com), Roche clinical trial protocol registry (www.roche-trials.com), Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR), and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials for ongoing trials. Two review authors independently reviewed all titles/abstracts and selected full-text articles for inclusion. We included all references that reported results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of mycophenolate mofetil versus methotrexate for the prophylaxis of

  4. Physical and Chemical Stability of Mycophenolate Mofetil (MMF) Suspension Prepared at the Hospital.

    PubMed

    Fahimi, Fanak; Baniasadi, Shadi; Mortazavi, Seyed Alireza; Dehghan, Hanie; Zarghi, Afshin

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the physical and chemical stability of a suspension of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) prepared in the hospital from commercially available MMF capsules and tablets. Extemporaneous pharmacy was used as a feasible method in this experimental study to prepare suspension form of MMF. Suspension formulations were prepared from both tablets and capsules forms of MMF. Thereafter the stability parameters such as pH, microbial control, thermal and physical stability and particle sizes were evaluated. The amount of MMF, in the suspension was measured at various time points by HPLC. The HPLC method showed that concentration of suspensions prepared from tablets and capsules were 49 mg/mL and 50 mg/mL at time 0, respectively. The effective amount of suspensions prepared from capsules was 101% at time 0, 100% after 7 days, 98% after 14 days, and less than 70% after 28 days. According to the obtained results in this study, capsule-based suspension was stable for as long as 14 days at 5°C. This formulation appears to be clinically acceptable and provides a convenient dosage form for pediatric patients and for adults during the early postoperative period.

  5. Mycophenolate mofetil as a steroid-sparing agent in sarcoid-associated renal disease.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Anita A; DeVita, Maria V; Michelis, Michael F; Rosenstock, Jordan L

    2015-01-01

    Steroids are the mainstay of treatment for renal sarcoidosis. Many patients with sarcoidosis are chronically dependent on steroids and there is limited data on the use of steroid-sparing agents. This is a case of a patient that has remained in remission using mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as a steroid-sparing agent. The patient is a 56-year-old female with a history of sarcoidosis diagnosed by lymph node biopsy who developed 3 episodes of acute kidney injury (AKI) in the setting of exacerbations of her sarcoidosis, each responding to prednisone treatment. Due to possible lifelong need for prednisone, MMF was started as a steroid-sparing treatment. She tolerated the MMF well and has now been steroidfree for 22 months. There have been only a few case reports about the use of MMF as a steroid-sparing agent in sarcoid-associated renal disease, in which patients could be successfully weaned off steroids. This is the longest reported follow-up of a patient being off steroids while on MMF. It is also notable for the patient having a relapse on the MMF which responded to an increased dose. MMF should be studied further as a potential steroid-sparing agent in the treatment of sarcoid associated renal disease.

  6. Pilot study of anti-thymocyte globulin plus mycophenolate mofetil in recent-onset diffuse scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Stratton, R J; Wilson, H; Black, C M

    2001-01-01

    To assess the safety and efficacy of anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) followed by mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in the treatment of diffuse scleroderma. A pilot study of 13 patients with recent-onset diffuse scleroderma was carried out. Patients received ATG for 5 days, followed by MMF for 12 months. We recorded adverse events, scleroderma skin score, hand contractures, EuroQol score, scleroderma functional assessment, pulmonary function studies, echocardiogram and plasma creatinine concentration. Mean skin score decreased during the study from 28 at baseline to 17 after 12 months of MMF (P<0.01). Hand contractures worsened during the study. Mean measurements of systemic disease remained stable. One patient died after a scleroderma renal crisis. Five patients developed serum sickness after ATG treatment, but this was controlled by corticosteroid therapy. MMF therapy was well tolerated. ATG and MMF appear safe in scleroderma. The improvement in skin score and the apparent stability of systemic disease during the study period suggest that controlled studies of these agents are justified.

  7. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) treatment efficacy in children with primary and secondary glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Ostalska-Nowicka, Danuta; Malinska, Agnieszka; Silska, Magdalena; Perek, Bartlomiej; Zachwieja, Jacek

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The aim of our study was to analyse the efficacy and safety of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as part of the complex immunosuppressive therapy in children with different types of primary and secondary glomerulonephritis, who were not eligible for the standard treatment routine suggested by evidence-based guidelines. Material and methods The study group comprised 85 children with proteinuric glomerulopathies hospitalized between 2007 and 2010, who were non-responders to immunosuppressive therapy. The dose of MMF was established as 1 g/m2/24 h. Remission was defined as negative proteinuria in three consecutive urinalyses. Results The patients were divided into 4 groups: idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (n = 35), primary glomerulonephritis (n = 15), auto-antibody associated glomerulonephritis (n = 20) and lupus nephropathy (LN, n = 15). Ten patients from the first group (29%) and 5 patients each from the second and third group (34% and 25% respectively) did not respond to MMF therapy. On the other hand, all the children diagnosed with LN have reached clinical and biochemical remission. Conclusions Alternative rescue MMF therapy should always be taken into consideration in proteinuric patients who are non-responders to steroids, cyclosporine A and cyclophosphamide in whom the initial glomerular filtration rate is higher than 60 ml/min/1.73m2. It is recommended that MMF be administered as part of the standard treatment regimen in patients diagnosed with lupus nephropathy. In these groups of patients, the potent benefits of this therapy are higher than expected side-effects. PMID:22328889

  8. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) treatment efficacy in children with primary and secondary glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Ostalska-Nowicka, Danuta; Malinska, Agnieszka; Silska, Magdalena; Perek, Bartlomiej; Zachwieja, Jacek; Nowicki, Michal

    2011-12-31

    The aim of our study was to analyse the efficacy and safety of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as part of the complex immunosuppressive therapy in children with different types of primary and secondary glomerulonephritis, who were not eligible for the standard treatment routine suggested by evidence-based guidelines. The study group comprised 85 children with proteinuric glomerulopathies hospitalized between 2007 and 2010, who were non-responders to immunosuppressive therapy. The dose of MMF was established as 1 g/m(2)/24 h. Remission was defined as negative proteinuria in three consecutive urinalyses. The patients were divided into 4 groups: idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (n = 35), primary glomerulonephritis (n = 15), auto-antibody associated glomerulonephritis (n = 20) and lupus nephropathy (LN, n = 15). Ten patients from the first group (29%) and 5 patients each from the second and third group (34% and 25% respectively) did not respond to MMF therapy. On the other hand, all the children diagnosed with LN have reached clinical and biochemical remission. Alternative rescue MMF therapy should always be taken into consideration in proteinuric patients who are non-responders to steroids, cyclosporine A and cyclophosphamide in whom the initial glomerular filtration rate is higher than 60 ml/min/1.73m(2). It is recommended that MMF be administered as part of the standard treatment regimen in patients diagnosed with lupus nephropathy. In these groups of patients, the potent benefits of this therapy are higher than expected side-effects.

  9. Evaluation of mycophenolate mofetil for initial treatment of chronic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Storer, Barry E.; Rowley, Scott D.; Flowers, Mary E. D.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Carpenter, Paul A.; Wingard, John R.; Shaughnessy, Paul J.; DeVetten, Marcel P.; Jagasia, Madan; Fay, Joseph W.; van Besien, Koen; Gupta, Vikas; Kitko, Carrie; Johnston, Laura J.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Arora, Mukta; Jacobson, Pamala A.; Weisdorf, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a double-blind, randomized multicenter trial to determine whether the addition of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) improves the efficacy of initial systemic treatment of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The primary endpoint was resolution of chronic GVHD and withdrawal of all systemic treatment within 2 years, without secondary treatment. Enrollment of 230 patients was planned, providing 90% power to observe a 20% difference in success rates between the 2 arms. The study was closed after 4 years because the interim estimated cumulative incidence of success for the primary endpoint was 23% among 74 patients in the MMF arm and 18% among 77 patients in the control arm, indicating a low probability of positive results for the primary endpoint after completing the study as originally planned. Analysis of secondary endpoints showed no evidence of benefit from adding MMF to the systemic regimen first used for treatment of chronic GVHD. The estimated hazard ratio of death was 1.99 (95% confidence interval, 0.9-4.3) among patients in the MMF arm compared with the control arm. MMF should not be added to the initial systemic treatment regimen for chronic GVHD. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00089141 on August 4, 2004. PMID:19270260

  10. Villous atrophy induced by mycophenolate mofetil in renal-transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Kamar, Nassim; Faure, Patrick; Dupuis, Emmanuel; Cointault, Olivier; Joseph-Hein, Karine; Durand, Dominique; Moreau, Jacques; Rostaing, Lionel

    2004-09-01

    Leucopenia and diarrhoea are the main side effects observed after the use of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in renal-transplant patients. The mechanism of diarrhoea remains unknown. We report on four cases presenting with severe diarrhoea, which appeared, respectively, at 4, 10, 24, and 66 months after MMF therapy had been started. All patients presented with weight loss and biological signs of malabsorption syndrome. Oesophago-gastroduodenoscopy revealed duodenal villous atrophy, which was confirmed by pathology examination. Anti-endomysium antibodies were negative. In all patients, diarrhoea disappeared within 1 month of MMF withdrawal without a gluten-free diet. A control oesophago-gastroduodenoscopy was performed in one patient 6 months later and was considered normal. None of the patients showed evidence of cytomegalovirus in enterocytes or cytomegalovirus-positive viraemia. In conclusion, villous atrophy induced by MMF might be one of the mechanisms of diarrhoea. It is mandatory to differentiate coeliac disease from MMF-induced villous atrophy because, in the latter case, a gluten-free diet is not required.

  11. Infundibuloneurohypophysitis Associated With Sjögren Syndrome Successfully Treated With Mycophenolate Mofetil

    PubMed Central

    Louvet, Camille; Maqdasy, Salwan; Tekath, Marielle; Grobost, Vincent; Rieu, Virginie; Ruivard, Marc; Le Guenno, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypophysitis is an inflammatory disorder of the pituitary gland and corticosteroids are usually recommended as the first-line treatment. Hypophysitis related to primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS) is uncommon. We describe the unusual case of a patient with infundibuloneurohypophysitis associated with pSS successfully treated with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). We describe a case of a 60-year-old man with a medical history of pSS presented with central diabetes insipidus and panhypopituitarism. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a thickening of the pituitary stalk and intense enhancement of the posterior pituitary, pituitary stalk, and hypothalamus. We diagnosed infundibuloneurohypophysitis associated with pSS. Hormonal replacement was started immediately and MMF was introduced without corticosteroids. After 9 months of treatment, MRI of the pituitary revealed a complete regression of the nodular thickening of the pituitary stalk, with normal enhancement and appearance of the pituitary. The pituitary axes had completely recovered, whereas the diabetes insipidus was partially restored. Our findings suggest that MMF is an effective alternative to corticosteroids for the treatment of lymphocytic hypophysitis associated with an autoimmune disease. Furthermore, this report could contribute to extend the spectrum of the neurological and endocrinological manifestations of pSS. PMID:27043673

  12. Spectrophotometric Determination of Mycophenolate Mofetil as Its Charge-Transfer Complexes with Two π-Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Vinay, K. B.; Revanasiddappa, H. D.; Raghu, M. S.; Abdulrahman, Sameer. A. M.; Rajendraprasad, N.

    2012-01-01

    Two simple, selective, and rapid spectrophotometric methods are described for the determination of mycophenolate mofetil (MPM) in pure form and in tablets. Both methods are based on charge-transfer complexation reaction of MPM with p-chloranilic acid (p-CA) or 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) in dioxane-acetonitrile medium resulting in coloured product measurable at 520 nm (p-CA) or 580 nm (DDQ). Beer's law is obeyed over the concentration ranges of 40–400 and 12–120 μg mL−1 MPM for p-CA and DDQ, respectively, with correlation coefficients (r) of 0.9995 and 0.9947. The apparent molar absorptivity values are calculated to be 1.06 × 103 and 3.87 × 103 L mol−1 cm−1, respectively, and the corresponding Sandell's sensitivities are 0.4106 and 0.1119 μg cm−1. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) are also reported for both methods. The described methods were successfully applied to the determination of MPM in tablets. Statistical comparison of the results with those of the reference method showed excellent agreement. No interference was observed from the common excipients present in tablets. Both methods were validated statistically for accuracy and precision. The accuracy and reliability of the methods were further ascertained by recovery studies via standard addition procedure. PMID:22567572

  13. Successful treatment of severe or methotrexate-resistant juvenile localized scleroderma with mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Martini, Giorgia; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Falcini, Fernanda; Girschick, Hermann; Goldsmith, Donald P; Zulian, Francesco

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in the treatment of severe refractory juvenile localized scleroderma (JLS). A retrospective chart review was performed in patients with JLS who had been treated with MMF after the failure of a combination of MTX and corticosteroids for at least 4 months, or whose JLS had concomitant severe extracutaneous manifestations. Outcome was assessed through clinical examination and thermography. Adverse events were recorded. Ten patients (six females and four males) were enrolled in the study. JLS clinical subtypes were deep morphoea (two patients with disabling pansclerotic morphoea), generalized morphoea (three patients), linear scleroderma (five patients) affecting the limbs in two and face in three patients (en coup de sabre). The age at onset of disease was 8 (range 2-16) years, and the disease duration at the time of treatment with MMF was 18 (range 8-62) months. All MMF-treated patients experienced clinical improvement that allowed withdrawal or reduction of doses of corticosteroids and MTX. Over a follow-up of 27 (range 6-36) months, mild abdominal discomfort was reported in only one patient. MMF appears to be effective in arresting disease progression in severe or MTX-refractory JLS and is generally well tolerated. Further controlled studies are needed to confirm these data.

  14.  Conversion to mycophenolate mofetil monotherapy in liver recipients: Calcineurin inhibitor levels are key.

    PubMed

    Norero, Blanca; Serrano, Carolina A; Sanchez-Fueyo, Alberto; Duarte, Ignacio; Torres, Javiera; Ocquetau, Mauricio; Barrera, Francisco; Arrese, Marco; Soza, Alejandro; Benítez, Carlos

     The use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) after liver transplantation is associated with post-transplant nephrotoxicity. Conversion to mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) monotherapy improves renal function, but is related to graft rejection in some recipients. Our aim was to identify variables associated with rejection after conversion to MMF monotherapy. Conversion was attempted in 40 liver transplant recipients. Clinical variables were determined and peripheral mononuclear blood cells were immunophenotyped during a 12-month follow-up. Conversion was classified as successful (SC) if rejection did not occur during the follow-up. MMF conversion was successful with 28 patients (70%) and was associated with higher glomerular filtration rates at the end of study. It also correlated with increased time elapsed since transplantation, low baseline CNI levels (Tacrolimus ≤ 6.5 ng/mL or Cyclosporine ≤ 635 ng/mL) and lower frequency of tacrolimus use. The only clinical variable independently related to SC in multivariate analysis was low baseline CNI levels (p = 0.02, OR: 6.93, 95%, CI: 1.3-29.7). Mean baseline fluorescent intensity of FOXP3+ T cells was significantly higher among recipients with SC. In conclusion, this study suggests that baseline CNI levels can be used to identify recipients with higher probability of SC to MMF monotherapy. Clinicaltrials.gov identification: NCT01321112.

  15. Associations of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases polymorphisms with mycophenolate mofetil pharmacokinetics in Chinese renal transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiao-chun; Li, Jun; Wang, Hong-yang; Li, Hong-liang; Liu, Jing; Fu, Qian; Huang, Jia-wen; Zhu, Chen; Zhong, Guo-ping; Wang, Xue-ding; Sun, Ping-ping; Huang, Min; Wang, Chang-xi; Li, Jia-li

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effects of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) polymorphisms on the pharmacokinetics of the immunosuppressant mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in Chinese renal transplant recipients. Methods: A total of 127 renal transplant patients receiving MMF were genotyped for polymorphisms in UGT1A9 −1818T>C, I399C>T, −118T9/10, −440C>T, −331T>C, UGT2B7 IVS1+985A>G, 211G>T, −900A>G, UGT1A8 518C>G and UGT1A7 622T>C. The plasma concentrations of the MMF active moiety mycophenolic acid (MPA) and main metabolite 7-O-MPA-glucuronide (MPAG) were analyzed using HPLC. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the effects of UGT-related gene polymorphisms on MPA pharmacokinetics. Results: The dose-adjusted MPA AUC0–12 h of the patients with the UGT2B7 IVS1+985AG genotype was 48% higher than that of the patients with the IVS1+985AA genotype, which could explain 11.2% of the inter-individual variation in MPA pharmacokinetics. The dose-adjusted MPAG AUC0–12 h of the patients with the UGT1A7 622CC and UGT1A9 −440CT/−331TC genotypes, respectively, was significantly higher than that of the patients with 622T homozygotes and −440C/−331T homozygotes. Furthermore, the genotypes UGT1A9 −1818T>C and UGT1A8 518C>G were associated with a low dose-adjusted MPAG AUC0–12 h. Conclusion: The UGT2B7 11+985A>G genotype is associated with the pharmacokinetics of MPA in Chinese renal transplant patients, which demonstrates the usefulness of this SNP for individualizing MMF dosing. PMID:25864649

  16. The efficacy of Mycophenolate mofetil for the treatment of Chinese Takayasu’s arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Yang, Yunjiao; Zhao, Jiuliang; Li, Mengtao; Tian, Xinping; Zeng, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effect of mycophenolate mofetil(MMF) on Chinese Takayasu’s arteritis(TAK) patients. Thirty consecutive TAK outpatients were prospectively enrolled during 2013 to 2015. MMF combined with glucocorticoid was the primary treatment regimen. If clinical stable disease could not be reached, another traditional immunosuppressive agent could be added. All patients were evaluated and followed up every 3 months and vascular image studies by Doppler ultrasonography were repeated every 6 months. The effectiveness of MMF was defined as:(1) ESR < 20 mm/hr;(2) CRP < 10 mg/L or hs-CRP<3 mg/L;(3) stable or improved in vascular image studies;(4) clinical assessment is stable, improved or in remission;(5) the dosage of glucocorticoid could be tapered to less than 15 mg/day. ESR < 40 mm/hr, CRP < 20 mg/L or hs-CRP < 6 mg/L, but meet the other three criteria is defined as partial effectiveness. MMF alone combined with corticosteroid was effective in 12(40.0%) patients. When MMF combined with methotrexate less than 15 mg/week, the effective rate was 30.0%(9/30), including partial effective in 3 patients. When MMF combined with azathioprine 100–150 mg/day, the effective rate was 10.0%(3/30), including partial effective in 1 patient. Four patients withdrew due to side effects. Two patients failed to show response. The overall effective rate of therapy including MMF in treating TAK is 80%. PMID:27924855

  17. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) for the treatment of steroid-resistant idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ming; Peng, Jun; Shi, Yan; Zhang, Chunqing; Qin, Ping; Zhao, Chuanli; Ji, Xuebin; Wang, Xueyong; Zhang, Maohong

    2003-06-01

    The treatment of chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is difficult in those unresponsive to corticosteroids and/or splenectomy. We attempted to induce durable response in 21 patients with refractory ITP by applying mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) (1.5-2.0 g/d), a novel immunosuppressive agent. Overall response rate was 62% (13 of 21), including 24% (five of 21) in complete response (CR), 29% (six of 21) in partial response (PR), and 10% (two of 21) in minor response (MR). The response rates for non-splenectomized and splenectomized ITP patients were 64% (nine of 14) and 57% (four of seven), respectively (P > 0.05). 39% (five of 13) responders relapsed as a result of dose reduction or withdraw of MMF, and 61% (eight of 13) responders maintained their effectiveness for a median of 24 wk. Sustained response was observed in three patients in whom MMF was withdrawn. MMF was well tolerated with only slight nausea and diarrhea recorded in 3 of 21 cases. No premature withdrawal was found in this study. CD3+ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and CD19+ PBMC were significantly reduced 12 wk after MMF administration in the responders. Platelet-associated antibodies against glycoproteins GPIIb/IIIa were detected in 13 of 21 (62%) patients before MMF treatment, and antibody levels were significantly decreased in responders 12 wk after MMF administration. This suggested that MMF might correct the immunologic abnormalities underlying the destruction of circulating platelets in ITP. We conclude that MMF could be used as a second-line agent for the treatment of steroid-resistant ITP before or after splenectomy and thereby is worth of further evaluation in randomized studies.

  18. Mycophenolate mofetil as first-line treatment improves clinically evident early scleroderma lung disease.

    PubMed

    Liossis, S N C; Bounas, A; Andonopoulos, A P

    2006-08-01

    To find an effective, safe immunosuppressive regimen as an alternative to cyclophosphamide (Cy) for the treatment of clinically evident diffuse scleroderma (dSSc)-associated alveolitis of recent onset. Five consecutive patients with dSSc and recent-onset alveolitis were enrolled and treated with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and small (< or =10 mg/day) doses of predinisolone in this open-label trial. One patient with long-standing fibrosing alveolitis was later added to our cohort. Pulmonary function tests [carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO) and forced vital capacity (FVC)], pulmonary high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans and clinical assessment were performed before and at specified time-points after enrolment. Cases of significant infections, leucopenia and abdominal pain were recorded. After 4-6 months of MMF therapy, DLCO improved significantly compared with pre-treatment (mean DLCO 75.4% vs 64.2% of predicted value, respectively, P = 0.033). Values of FVC also improved, with the difference almost reaching levels of statistical significance (mean FVC 76.2% vs 65.6% of predicted value, P = 0.057). Ground glass opacities cleared in three of four patients with recent-onset alveolitis and were reduced in one patient after 6-8 months of treatment. Breathlessness and cough improved by 3 months. A possible treatment failure was seen in one patient. However, in five patients functional and clinical improvement was sustained during the study period. No adverse events were recorded in this ongoing clinical trial. Our preliminary data suggest that in patients with dSSc and recent, clinically apparent alveolitis, early treatment with MMF and small doses of corticosteroids (CS) may represent an effective, well-tolerated and safe alternative therapy.

  19. Mycophenolate Mofetil Improves Lung Function in Connective Tissue Disease-associated Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Aryeh; Brown, Kevin K.; Du Bois, Roland M.; Frankel, Stephen K.; Cosgrove, Gregory P.; Fernandez-Perez, Evans R.; Huie, Tristan J.; Krishnamoorthy, Mahalakshmi; Meehan, Richard T.; Olson, Amy L.; Solomon, Joshua J.; Swigris, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Small series suggest mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is well tolerated and may be an effective therapy for connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease (CTD-ILD). We examined the tolerability and longitudinal changes in pulmonary physiology in a large and diverse cohort of patients with CTD-ILD treated with MMF. Methods We identified consecutive patients evaluated at our center between January 2008 and January 2011 and prescribed MMF for CTD-ILD. We assessed safety and tolerability of MMF and used longitudinal data analyses to examine changes in pulmonary physiology over time, before and after initiation of MMF. Results We identified 125 subjects treated with MMF for a median 897 days. MMF was discontinued in 13 subjects. MMF was associated with significant improvements in estimated percentage of predicted forced vital capacity (FVC%) from MMF initiation to 52, 104, and 156 weeks (4.9% ± 1.9%, p = 0.01; 6.1% ± 1.8%, p = 0.0008; and 7.3% ± 2.6%, p = 0.004, respectively); and in estimated percentage predicted diffusing capacity (DLCO%) from MMF initiation to 52 and 104 weeks (6.3% ± 2.8%, p = 0.02; 7.1% ± 2.8%, p = 0.01). In the subgroup without usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP)-pattern injury, MMF significantly improved FVC% and DLCO%, and in the subgroup with UIP-pattern injury, MMF was associated with stability in FVC% and DLCO%. Conclusion In a large diverse cohort of CTD-ILD, MMF was well tolerated and had a low rate of discontinuation. Treatment with MMF was associated with either stable or improved pulmonary physiology over a median 2.5 years of followup. MMF appears to be a promising therapy for the spectrum of CTD-ILD. PMID:23457378

  20. Circadian variation of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by an immunosuppressive agent "Mycophenolate Mofetil" in rats.

    PubMed

    Dridi, Ichrak; Grissa, Intissar; Ezzi, Lobna; Chakroun, Sana; Ben-Cherif, Wafa; Haouas, Zohra; Aouam, Karim; Ben-Attia, Mossadok; Reinberg, Alain; Boughattas, Naceur A

    2016-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs such as Mycophenolate Mofetil (MMF) are used to suppress the immune system activity in transplant patients and reduce the risk of organ rejection. The present study investigates whether the potential cytotoxicity and genotoxicity varied according to MMF dosing-time in Wistar Rat. A potentially toxic MMF dose (300 mg/kg) was acutely administered by the i.p. route in rats at four different circadian stages (1, 7, 13 and 19 hours after light onset, HALO). Rats were sacrificed 3 days following injection, blood and bone marrow were removed for determination of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity analysis. The genotoxic effect of this pro-drug was investigated using the comet assay and the micronucleus test. Hematological changes were also evaluated according to circadian dosing time. MMF treatment induced a significant decrease at 7 HALO in red blood cells, in the hemoglobin rate and in white blood cells. These parameters followed a circadian rhythm in controls or in treated rats with an acrophase located at the end of the light-rest phase. A significant, thrombocytopenia was observed according to MMF circadian dosing time. Furthermore, abnormally shaped red cells, sometimes containing micronuclei, poikilocytotic in red cells and hypersegmented neutrophil nuclei were observed with MMF treatment. The micronucleus test revealed damage to chromosomes in rat bone marrow; the comet assay showed significant DNA damage. This damage varied according to circadian MMF dosing time. The injection of MMF in the middle of the dark-activity phase produced a very mild hematological toxicity and low genotoxicity. Conversely, it induced maximum hematological toxicity and genotoxicity when the administration occurred in the middle of the light-rest phase, which is physiologically analogous to the end of the activity of the diurnal phase in human patients.

  1. Fructooligosaccharide raftilose reduces the mycophenolate mofetil-induced complications: Hematological and biochemical alterations.

    PubMed

    Cheraghi, Hadi; Khaki, Zohreh; Malekinejad, Hassan; Sasani, Farhang

    2015-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is a selective inhibitor of Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase. Gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances in immature ones are reported for MMF-induced compilations, which in the case of occurrence dose reduction is required. Thus, in the present study, the fructooligosaccharide raftilose(®) (RFT) was co-administrated with MMF to estimate the protective effect of RFT against MMF-induced GI complications. Thirty six immature male Wistar rats were divided into six groups including: Control (normal saline), RFT-treated (100 mg kg(-1)), MMF-treated (20 mg kg(-1)), MMF + LRFT (50 mg kg(-1)), MMF + MRFT (100 mg kg(-1)) and MMF + HRFT (200 mg kg(-1)) groups. The hematocrit (Hct), lymphocyte/total WBC, feces water content and pH were analyzed. Moreover, the hepatic functional tests, kidney-related biomarkers, lipid and protein profiles, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) contents were assessed. Co-administration of RFT stabilized the MMF-reduced body weight. The MMF significantly diminished Hct and lymph/total WBC (p < 0.05). Only MRFT enhanced the lymphocyte/total WBC. Increased water content, no changes in feces pH, increased serum ALT and AST, no alteration in urea and mild enhancement in creatinine were demonstrated in MMF-received animals. However, RFT at low dose ameliorated the feces parameters and reduced ALT. No significant changes were demonstrated for serum lipid and protein profiles in MMF- and RFT + MMF-treated groups. The RFT enhanced the serum TAC, reduced MDA and NO contents. In conclusion, our data suggested that RFT could be considered as an effective agent to subsidize the MMF-induced clinical, hematological and biochemical disorders.

  2. Fructooligosaccharide raftilose reduces the mycophenolate mofetil-induced complications: Hematological and biochemical alterations

    PubMed Central

    Cheraghi, Hadi; Khaki, Zohreh; Malekinejad, Hassan; Sasani, Farhang

    2015-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is a selective inhibitor of Inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase. Gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances in immature ones are reported for MMF-induced compilations, which in the case of occurrence dose reduction is required. Thus, in the present study, the fructooligosaccharide raftilose® (RFT) was co-administrated with MMF to estimate the protective effect of RFT against MMF-induced GI complications. Thirty six immature male Wistar rats were divided into six groups including: Control (normal saline), RFT-treated (100 mg kg-1), MMF-treated (20 mg kg-1), MMF + LRFT (50 mg kg-1), MMF + MRFT (100 mg kg-1) and MMF + HRFT (200 mg kg-1) groups. The hematocrit (Hct), lymphocyte/total WBC, feces water content and pH were analyzed. Moreover, the hepatic functional tests, kidney-related biomarkers, lipid and protein profiles, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) contents were assessed. Co-administration of RFT stabilized the MMF-reduced body weight. The MMF significantly diminished Hct and lymph/total WBC (p < 0.05). Only MRFT enhanced the lymphocyte/total WBC. Increased water content, no changes in feces pH, increased serum ALT and AST, no alteration in urea and mild enhancement in creatinine were demonstrated in MMF-received animals. However, RFT at low dose ameliorated the feces parameters and reduced ALT. No significant changes were demonstrated for serum lipid and protein profiles in MMF- and RFT + MMF-treated groups. The RFT enhanced the serum TAC, reduced MDA and NO contents. In conclusion, our data suggested that RFT could be considered as an effective agent to subsidize the MMF-induced clinical, hematological and biochemical disorders. PMID:26973768

  3. Mycophenolate mofetil for scleroderma-related interstitial lung disease: A real world experience.

    PubMed

    Baqir, Misbah; Makol, Ashima; Osborn, Thomas G; Bartholmai, Brian J; Ryu, Jay H

    2017-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) remains the number one cause of mortality in scleroderma (SSc). Our goal was to determine the effectiveness of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in treating SSc-ILD in a retrospective study. A retrospective, computer-assisted search was performed to identify patients with SSc-ILD treated with MMF from 1997 through 2014. We used a novel software tool, Computer-Aided Lung Informatics for Pathology Evaluation and Rating (CALIPER), to quantify parenchymal lung abnormalities on high-resolution computed tomography. Lung function was evaluated at baseline, 6, 12, and 24 months of MMF therapy. We identified 46 patients (28 females) with SSc-ILD (mean age at diagnosis 55 y) treated with MMF for at least 1 year (majority on 2 gm/day). Twenty-one patients (45.7%) stopped using MMF during the follow up period after the first 12 months, and they took MMF for a median of 2.12 years (range, 0.91-8.93 years). Only 4 discontinued MMF because of disease progression. Compared to baseline, the mean percentage change in forced vital capacity (95% CI) at 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively, was 1.01% (-2.38%-4.39%) (n = 26), 2.06% (-1.09%-5.22%) (n = 31), and -0.07% (-3.31%-3.17%) (n = 30), and the mean percentage change in ILD as measured by CALIPER (95% CI) was -5.40% (-18.62%-7.83%) (n = 18), -1.51% (-14.69%-11.68%) (n = 17), and -8.35% (-20.71%-4.02%) (n = 22).The mean right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) remained stable over the study period. MMF is well tolerated and slows the rate of decline in lung function in SSc-ILD patients, even at doses lower at 3 g/day.

  4. Mycophenolate mofetil suspension in pediatric renal transplantation: three-year data from the tricontinental trial.

    PubMed

    Höcker, Britta; Weber, Lutz T; Bunchman, Timothy; Rashford, Michelle; Tönshoff, Burkhard

    2005-08-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is widely used to prevent acute rejection in adult solid organ transplant recipients, but data in children and adolescents are scarce. This prospective, multicenter, open-labeled, single-arm study investigated the efficacy and safety of an MMF-based immunosuppressive regimen in 100 pediatric renal transplant recipients over a 3-yr period of time. Three age groups were formed (<6 yr, n = 33; 6 to <12 yr, n = 34; 12-18 yr, n = 33). Basic immunosuppression consisted of MMF (600 mg/m(2) b.i.d), cyclosporin A microemulsion and corticosteroids. Seventy-three percent of patients were given anti-lymphocyte antibody induction therapy, of whom 74% received anti-thymocyte globulin. Patient and graft survival 3 yr after transplantation amounted to 98 and 95%, respectively. Twenty-five percent of all patients suffered a biopsy-proven acute rejection episode in the first 6 month post-transplant. Children undergoing induction therapy exhibited a numerically lower rejection rate (21 vs. 37%, p = 0.11). Three years after transplantation, the acute rejection rate added up to 30% (26% with induction therapy vs. 41% without induction therapy, p = 0.21). The number of patients with acute rejection was lowest in the youngest age group (18%), in comparison with 39% in the 6 to <12 yr and 33% in the 12-18 yr age group, respectively. For the entire patient population, the rate of patients who withdrew prematurely because of adverse events was low (12%). The present study shows that MMF therapy in pediatric renal transplant recipients leads to an excellent patient and graft survival 3 yr post-transplant with an acceptable safety profile.

  5. Mycophenolate mofetil prevents cerebrovascular injury in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Dhande, Isha S; Zhu, Yaming; Braun, Michael C; Hicks, M John; Wenderfer, Scott E; Doris, Peter A

    2017-03-01

    Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-A3) develop strokes and progressive kidney disease as a result of naturally occurring genetic variations. We recently identified genetic variants in immune signaling pathways that contribute to end-organ injury. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that a dysregulated immune response promotes stroke susceptibility. We salt-loaded 20 wk old male SHR-A3 rats and treated them with the immunosuppressant mycophenolate mofetil (MMF, 25 mg/kg/day po) (n = 8) or vehicle (saline) (n = 9) for 8 wk. Blood pressure (BP) was measured weekly by telemetry. Compared with vehicle-treated controls, MMF-treated SHR-A3 rats had improved survival and lower neurological deficit scores (1.44 vs. 0.125; P < 0.02). Gross morphology of the brain revealed cerebral edema in 8 of 9, and microbleeds and hemorrhages in 5 of 9 vehicle-treated rats. These lesions were absent in MMF-treated rats. Brain CD68 expression, indicating macrophage/microglial activation, was upregulated in vehicle-treated rats with microbleeds and hemorrhages but was undetectable in the brains of MMF-treated rats. MMF also prevented renal injury in SHR-A3 rats, evidenced by reduced proteinuria (albumin:creatinine) from 7.52 to 1.05 mg/mg (P < 0.03) and lower tubulointerstitial injury scores (2.46 vs. 1.43; P < 0.01). Salt loading resulted in a progressive increase in BP, which was blunted in rats receiving MMF. Our findings provide evidence that abnormal immune activation predisposes to cerebrovascular and renal injury in stroke-prone SHR-A3 rats.

  6. Down-regulation of multiple low dose streptozotocin-induced diabetes by mycophenolate mofetil

    PubMed Central

    MAKSIMOVIC-IVANIC, D; TRAJKOVIC, V; MILJKOVIC, DJ; STOJKOVIC, M MOSTARICA; STOSIC-GRUJICIC, S

    2002-01-01

    The new immunosuppressive agent mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has been shown recently to exert a protective effects in certain animal models of autoimmunity, including diabetes in diabetes-prone bio-breeding (BB) rats. In the present study, the immunomodulatory potential of MMF was investigated in autoimmune diabetes induced by multiple low doses of streptozotocin (MLD-STZ) in genetically susceptible DA rats 20 mg STZ/kg body weight (b.w.) for 5 days] and CBA/H mice (40 mg STZ/kg b.w. for 5 days). In both species, short time treatment of animals with MMF (25 mg/kg) during the early development of the disease, as well as continuous MMF treatment, prevented the appearance of hyperglycaemia and inflammatory infiltrates in the pancreatic tissue. Moreover, clinical manifestations of diabetes were suppressed by application of the drug after the onset of clinical symptoms. Treatment with guanosine (1 mg/kg) in parallel with MMF completely reversed MMF activity in vivo, indicating that inhibition of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) was responsible for the observed suppressive effects. MMF-mediated protection from diabetes correlated with reduced ex vivo spontaneous spleen mononuclear cell (MNC) proliferation and defective adhesive cell interactions. MMF-treated animals also had lower local production of IFN-γ, as well as IL-12 and nitric oxide (NO) production by peripheral tissues (spleen and peritoneal cells), compared to that in control diabetic groups, while IL-10 level was elevated. Together, these data demonstrate that MMF interferes with autoimmune process in streptozotocin-induced diabetes at multiple levels, including lymphocyte proliferation and adhesion, as well as pro/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance. PMID:12165076

  7. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: response to mycophenolate mofetil and pyrimethamine/sulfadoxine in a 5-year-old child.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sunaina; Singh, Neeraj; Chaudhary, Gurmeet Kaur; John, M Joseph

    2011-06-01

    Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) is a rare inherited disorder of disrupted lymphocyte homeostasis characterized by chronic splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy of early onset, hypergammaglobulinemia (Ig G and Ig A), autoimmune phenomena, and expanded populations of TCR-α/β+, CD3+, CD4-, CD8-T cells (Fisher et al. Cell 81:935-946; 1995), called double negative T-cells [(DN) T cells]. We discuss a case of ALPS which showed good response to immunosuppressant drug Mycophenolate-Mofetil in combination with Pyrimethamine/Sulfadoxine.

  8. Azathioprine versus mycophenolate mofetil for long-term immunosuppression in lupus nephritis: results from the MAINTAIN Nephritis Trial

    PubMed Central

    Houssiau, Frédéric A; D'Cruz, David; Sangle, Shirish; Remy, Philippe; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Petrovic, Radmila; Fiehn, Christoph; de Ramon Garrido, Enrique; Gilboe, Inge-Magrethe; Tektonidou, Maria; Blockmans, Daniel; Ravelingien, Isabelle; le Guern, Véronique; Depresseux, Geneviève; Guillevin, Loïc; Cervera, Ricard

    2010-01-01

    Background Long-term immunosuppressive treatment does not efficiently prevent relapses of lupus nephritis (LN). This investigator-initiated randomised trial tested whether mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) was superior to azathioprine (AZA) as maintenance treatment. Methods A total of 105 patients with lupus with proliferative LN were included. All received three daily intravenous pulses of 750 mg methylprednisolone, followed by oral glucocorticoids and six fortnightly cyclophosphamide intravenous pulses of 500 mg. Based on randomisation performed at baseline, AZA (target dose: 2 mg/kg/day) or MMF (target dose: 2 g/day) was given at week 12. Analyses were by intent to treat. Time to renal flare was the primary end point. Mean (SD) follow-up of the intent-to-treat population was 48 (14) months. Results The baseline clinical, biological and pathological characteristics of patients allocated to AZA or MMF did not differ. Renal flares were observed in 13 (25%) AZA-treated and 10 (19%) MMF-treated patients. Time to renal flare, to severe systemic flare, to benign flare and to renal remission did not statistically differ. Over a 3-year period, 24 h proteinuria, serum creatinine, serum albumin, serum C3, haemoglobin and global disease activity scores improved similarly in both groups. Doubling of serum creatinine occurred in four AZA-treated and three MMF-treated patients. Adverse events did not differ between the groups except for haematological cytopenias, which were statistically more frequent in the AZA group (p=0.03) but led only one patient to drop out. Conclusions Fewer renal flares were observed in patients receiving MMF but the difference did not reach statistical significance. PMID:20833738

  9. Impact of dose reductions on efficacy outcome in heart transplant patients receiving enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium or mycophenolate mofetil at 12 months post-transplantation.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Javier; Gerosa, Gino; Almenar, Luis; Livi, Ugolino; Viganò, Mario; Arizón, Jose Maria; Yonan, Nizar; Di Salvo, Thomas G; Renlund, Dale G; Kobashigawa, Jon A

    2008-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) dose reduction is associated with increased risk of rejection and graft loss in renal transplantation. This analysis investigated the impact of MPA dose changes with enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) or mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in de novo heart transplant recipients. In a 12-month, single-blind trial, 154 patients (EC-MPS, 78; MMF, 76) were randomized to either EC-MPS (1080 mg bid) or MMF (1500 mg bid) in combination with cyclosporine and steroids. The primary efficacy variable was the incidence of treatment failure, comprising a composite of biopsy-proven (BPAR) and treated acute rejection, graft loss or death. Significantly fewer patients receiving EC-MPS required > or =2 dose reductions than patients on MMF (26.9% vs. 42.1% of patients, p = 0.048). Accordingly, the average daily dose of EC-MPS as a percentage of the recommended dose was significantly higher than for MMF (88.4% vs. 79.0%, p = 0.016). Among patients requiring > or =1 dose reduction, the incidence of treated BPAR grade > or =3A was significantly lower with EC-MPS compared with MMF (23.4% vs. 44.0%, p = 0.032). These data suggest that EC-MPS-treated heart transplant patients are less likely to require multiple dose reductions than those on MMF which may be associated with a significantly lower risk of treated BPAR > or =3A.

  10. Randomized controlled trial of pulse intravenous cyclophosphamide versus mycophenolate mofetil in the induction therapy of proliferative lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Ong, Loke Meng; Hooi, Lai Seong; Lim, Teck Onn; Goh, Bak Leong; Ahmad, Ghazali; Ghazalli, Rozina; Teo, Sue Mei; Wong, Hin Seng; Tan, Si Yen; Shaariah, Wan; Tan, Chwee Choon; Morad, Zaki

    2005-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of mycophenolate mofetil in the induction therapy of proliferative lupus nephritis. Forty-four patients from eight centres with newly diagnosed lupus nephritis World Health Organization class III or IV were randomly assigned to either mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) 2 g/day for 6 months or intravenous cyclophosphamide (IVC) 0.75-1 g/m(2) monthly for 6 months in addition to corticosteroids. Remission occurred in 13 out of 25 patients (52%) in the IVC group and 11 out of 19 patients (58%) in the MMF group (P = 0.70). There were 12% in the IVC group and 26% in the MMF group that achieved complete remission (P = 0.22). Improvements in haemoglobin, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, serum albumin, serum complement, proteinuria, urinary activity, renal function and the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index score were similar in both groups. Twenty-four follow-up renal biopsies at the end of therapy showed a significant reduction in the activity score in both groups. The chronicity index increased in both groups but was only significant in the IVC group. Adverse events were similar. Major infections occurred in three patients in each group. There was no difference in gastrointestinal side-effects. MMF in combination with corticosteroids is an effective induction therapy for moderately severe proliferative lupus nephritis.

  11. Mycophenolate Mofetil and Rapamycin Induce Apoptosis in the Human Monocytic U937 Cell Line Through Two Different Pathways.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Maxime; Tardivel, Sylviane; Nguyen-Khoa, Thao; Abreu, Sonia; Allaoui, Fatima; Fournier, Natalie; Chaminade, Pierre; Paul, Jean-Louis; Lacour, Bernard

    2017-10-01

    Transplant vasculopathy may be considered as an accelerated form of atherosclerosis resulting in chronic rejection of vascularized allografts. After organ transplantation, a diffuse intimal thickening is observed, leading to the development of an atherosclerosis plaque due to a significant monocyte infiltration. This results from a chronic inflammatory process induced by the immune response. In this study, we investigated the impact of two immunosuppressive drugs used in therapy initiated after organ transplantation, mycophenolate mofetil, and rapamycin, on the apoptotic response of monocytes induced or not by oxidized LDL. Here we show the pro-apoptotic effect of these two drugs through two distinct signaling pathways and we highlight a synergistic effect of rapamycin on apoptosis induced by oxidized LDL. In conclusion, since immunosuppressive therapy using mycophenolate mofetil or rapamycin can increase the cell death in a monocyte cell line, this treatment could exert similar effects on human monocytes in transplant patients, and thus, prevent transplant vasculopathy, atherosclerosis development, and chronic allograft rejection. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 3480-3487, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Complete Reversion of Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Phenotype Associated with Tacrolimus and Mycophenolate Mofetil Treatment Following Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pinsk, Vered; Pinsk, Ilia; Ling, Galina; Yerushalmi, Baruch; Osyntsov, Lidia; Ling, Eduard

    2017-06-01

    Numerous germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor-suppressor gene are responsible for development of multiple adenomatous colorectal polyps with their inevitable progression to cancer. Multiple attempts at dietary and pharmacological prevention of colorectal carcinoma development in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) have provided conflicting results. Immunosuppressive treatment with tacrolimus is known to be associated with an increased risk of malignancy and should be avoided in patients with high propensity for development of neoplasia. We observed a complete reversion of FAP phenotype in a male teenager carrying a germline mutation in APC gene who underwent a kidney transplant due to end-stage kidney disease secondary to congenital dysplastic kidneys. The patient was treated with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil after transplantation. The possible chemopreventative role of these agents should be evaluated and confirmed in a larger cohort. The elucidation of molecular mechanisms underpinning the observed chemopreventative effect of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil might lead to the development of a novel colorectal cancer therapy. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of cyclosporine and everolimus on the main mycophenolate mofetil pharmacokinetic parameters: Cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Noreikaitė, Aurelija; Saint-Marcoux, Franck; Marquet, Pierre; Kaduševičius, Edmundas; Stankevičius, Edgaras

    2017-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of cyclosporine (CsA) on the pharmacokinetic parameters of mycophenolic acid (MPA), an active mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) metabolite, and to compare with the effect of everolimus (EVR).Anonymized medical records of 404 kidney recipients were reviewed. The main MPA pharmacokinetic parameters (AUC(0-12) and Cmax) were evaluated.The patients treated with a higher mean dose of CsA displayed higher MPA AUC(0-12) exposure in the low-dose MMF group (1000 mg/day) (40.50 ± 10.97 vs 28.08 ± 11.03 h mg/L; rs = 0.497, P < 0.05), medium-dose MMF group (2000 mg/day) (43.00 ± 6.27 vs 28.85 ± 11.08 h mg/L; rs = 0.437, P < 0.01), and high-dose MMF group (3000 mg/day) (56.75 ± 16.78 vs 36.20 ± 3.70 h mg/L; rs = 0.608, P < 0.05).A positive correlation was also observed between the mean CsA dose and the MPA Cmax in the low-dose MMF group (Cmax 22.83 ± 10.82 vs 12.08 ± 5.59 mg/L; rs = 0.507, P < 0.05) and in the medium-dose MMF group (22.77 ± 8.86 vs 13.00 ± 6.82 mg/L; rs = 0.414, P < 0.01).The comparative analysis between 2 treatment arms (MMF + CsA and MMF + EVR) showed that MPA AUC(0-12) exposure was by 43% higher in the patients treated with a medium dose of MMF and EVR than in the patients treated with a medium dose of MMF and CsA.The data of the present study suggest a possible CsA versus EVR influence on MMF pharmacokinetics. Study results show that CsA has an impact on the main MPA pharmacokinetic parameters (AUC(0-12) and Cmax) in a CsA dose-related manner, while EVR mildly influence or does not affect MPA pharmacokinetic parameters. Low-dose CsA (lower than 180 mg/day) reduces MPA AUC(0-12) exposure under the therapeutic window and may lead to ineffective therapy, while a high-dose CsA (>240 mg/day) is related to greater than 10 mg/L MPA Cmax and increases the likelihood of adverse events.

  14. Influence of cyclosporine and everolimus on the main mycophenolate mofetil pharmacokinetic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Noreikaitė, Aurelija; Saint-Marcoux, Franck; Marquet, Pierre; Kaduševičius, Edmundas; Stankevičius, Edgaras

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of cyclosporine (CsA) on the pharmacokinetic parameters of mycophenolic acid (MPA), an active mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) metabolite, and to compare with the effect of everolimus (EVR). Anonymized medical records of 404 kidney recipients were reviewed. The main MPA pharmacokinetic parameters (AUC(0–12) and Cmax) were evaluated. The patients treated with a higher mean dose of CsA displayed higher MPA AUC(0–12) exposure in the low-dose MMF group (1000 mg/day) (40.50 ± 10.97 vs 28.08 ± 11.03 h mg/L; rs = 0.497, P < 0.05), medium-dose MMF group (2000 mg/day) (43.00 ± 6.27 vs 28.85 ± 11.08 h mg/L; rs = 0.437, P < 0.01), and high-dose MMF group (3000 mg/day) (56.75 ± 16.78 vs 36.20 ± 3.70 h mg/L; rs = 0.608, P < 0.05). A positive correlation was also observed between the mean CsA dose and the MPA Cmax in the low-dose MMF group (Cmax 22.83 ± 10.82 vs 12.08 ± 5.59 mg/L; rs = 0.507, P < 0.05) and in the medium-dose MMF group (22.77 ± 8.86 vs 13.00 ± 6.82 mg/L; rs = 0.414, P < 0.01). The comparative analysis between 2 treatment arms (MMF + CsA and MMF + EVR) showed that MPA AUC(0–12) exposure was by 43% higher in the patients treated with a medium dose of MMF and EVR than in the patients treated with a medium dose of MMF and CsA. The data of the present study suggest a possible CsA versus EVR influence on MMF pharmacokinetics. Study results show that CsA has an impact on the main MPA pharmacokinetic parameters (AUC(0–12) and Cmax) in a CsA dose-related manner, while EVR mildly influence or does not affect MPA pharmacokinetic parameters. Low-dose CsA (lower than 180 mg/day) reduces MPA AUC(0–12) exposure under the therapeutic window and may lead to ineffective therapy, while a high-dose CsA (>240 mg/day) is related to greater than 10 mg/L MPA Cmax and increases the

  15. [Effects of mycophenolate mofetil in ischemic acute renal failure in rats].

    PubMed

    Chávez-Velásquez, M; Pons, H; Medina, M; Quiroz, Y; Parra, G; Herrera, J

    2007-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is a purine synthesis inhibitor commonly used as immunosupresive agent in transplantation. Kidney grafts undergo more or less prolonged cold ischemia after harvesting which results in variable degrees of ischemia reperfusion injury. To determine whether the inhibition of early events of cellular infiltration may influence the severity of damage induced by ischemic acute renal failure, 45 Sprague Dawley rats were given MMF at a dose of 20mg/kg/day (MMF-rats) by gavage 2 days before (pre-MMF group, n=15) or after (post-MMF group, n=15) clamping the left renal artery for 40 minutes followed by rigt-sided nephrectomy. (control group, n=15) received vehicle. Serum Creatinine (Screat) was measured daily in all groups. On the 2nd post-ischemic day Screat was significantly lower (p=0.001) in pre-MMF group compared with post-MMF group and control group (4 +/- 2mg/dl post-MMF group vs 1.7 +/- 1.2 mg/dl pre-MMF group, control group 5+/-2, p< 0.05). Kidney biopsies shown that the histologic damage was 54 +/- 28% in post-MMF group vs 34+/- 22% in pre-MMF group and 61 +/- 25% in control group (pre-MMF vs post-MMF, p NS). On the 5th day post-ischemic, MMF-rats showed more severe tubulointerstitial necrosis (pre-MMF group: 17 +/- 20 %, post-MMF group: 33 +/- 27%) than controls (4 +/- 5%). The severity of ATN was significantly higher in post-MMF group compared with controls (p=0.01). Tubulointersticial T-lymphocyte (T CD 5) and monocyte (ED 1) infiltration evaluated on the 2nd post-ischemic day was less intense in group I (T CD5: 3 +/- 3, ED 1: 10 +/- 9, cel/mm2) compared to post-MMF group (T CD 5: 10 +/- 4, ED 1: 55 +/- 40) and to control group (T CD 5: 10+/- 4, ED 1: 64 +/- 46). However, on the 5th post-ischemia day, ED 1 infiltration was significantly higher in post-MMF group (24 +/- 18%) compared to pre-MMF group (5 +/- 5, p NS) and also in pre-MMF group vs control group (31 +/- 33, p< 0.05). Our results suggest that MMF given before a renal ischemic

  16. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) does not slow the progression of subclinical atherosclerosis in SLE over 2 years.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Adnan N; Magder, Laurence S; Petri, Michelle

    2012-09-01

    Accelerated atherosclerosis is a major cause of mortality in SLE. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has been shown to suppress growth factor-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells in animal models. We hypothesized that MMF might modify the inflammatory component of atherosclerosis in SLE. We examined the effect of MMF on atherosclerosis as measured by changes in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) or coronary artery calcium (CAC) over 2 years. CAC and carotid IMT were measured at baseline and 2 years later in a cohort of 187 patients with SLE. The cohort was 91% women, 59% Caucasian, and 35% African-American, with a mean age of 45 ± 11 years. Of these, 12.5% (n = 25) received MMF during follow-up. The daily dose ranged from 500 to 3,000 mg/day, and duration ranged from 84 days to the entire 2 years. We divided MMF users into three groups: low exposure (<1,500 mg average daily dose), high exposure (≥1,500 average daily dose), and any exposure of MMF (<1,500 or ≥1,500 average daily dose) for 2 years. The mean CAC increased in all four groups: no MMF: 1.17-1.28, low MMF: 1.02-1.13, high MMF: 1.44-1.61, and any MMF: 1.21-1.34 log-Agatston units. Compared to no MMF, there was no statistically different change between the three groups (p = 0.99, 0.87, and 0.91). Similarly, mean carotid IMT increased in all four groups: no MMF: 0.58-0.66, low MMF: 0.55-0.60, high MMF: 0.56-0.71, and any MMF: 0.56-0.66. We then adjusted for statin use, lupus nephritis, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, cholesterol, and age during the 2-year follow-up. The association between MMF exposure and change in CAC or carotid IMT was not statistically significant (p = 0.63 for CAC, and p = 0.085 for carotid IMT). There was no evidence that MMF slowed or decreased the progression of atherosclerosis as measured by carotid IMT or CAC. Because the number of patients taking MMF was only twenty-five, larger studies for longer time periods are needed to explore any

  17. Long-term efficacy and tolerability of mycophenolate mofetil therapy in diffuse scleroderma skin disease.

    PubMed

    Boulos, Daniel; Ngian, Gene-Siew; Rajadurai, Anton; Elford, Kathleen; Stevens, Wendy; Proudman, Susanna; Owen, Claire; Roddy, Janet; Nikpour, Mandana; Youssef, Peter; Hill, Catherine; Sahhar, Joanne

    2017-04-01

    To assess the long-term efficacy and tolerability of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in patients with diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc). Patients enrolled in the Australian Scleroderma Cohort study with dcSSc and baseline modified Rodnan skin score (mRSS) ≥ 12 who were treated for a minimum of 12 months with MMF for the primary indication of skin disease were included and their prospectively collected data retrieved. Change in mRSS, the proportion with a clinically significant improvement (reduction in mRSS ≥ 5 from baseline) and adverse effects due to therapy were determined. Seventy-four participants treated with MMF were identified and of these, 42 met inclusion criteria. The mean age was 53 ± 12 years, with mean disease duration at MMF commencement of 4.8 ± 4.3 years. Twenty-one participants (50%) commenced MMF within 2 years of disease onset and the mean duration of therapy was 2.7 ± 1.7 years. The mean mRSS at baseline was 25.9 ± 9.2 with a reduction of 3.7 ± 7.1 (P = 0.07) after 1 year of therapy, 7.6 ± 8.3 after 2 years (P = 0.01) and 10.5 ± 10.3 after 5 years (P < 0.01). Response to treatment was not affected by disease duration at MMF commencement or baseline skin score. Eighteen participants (43%) demonstrated clinically significant improvement after 1 year, increasing to 92% after 4 years. Two participants (5%) ceased MMF due to adverse effects. MMF was associated with a modest improvement in mRSS and was well tolerated in the treatment of dcSSc. Given the natural history of dcSSc where skin involvement can spontaneously improve, randomized, placebo-controlled studies are required to confirm whether improvement can be attributed to MMF therapy. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Bioavailability of a new generic formulation of mycophenolate mofetil MMF 500 versus CellCept in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Masri, M A; Rizk, S; Attia, M L E; Barbouch, H; Rost, M

    2007-05-01

    Several studies have revealed a decreased incidence of early graft rejection with the use of mycophenate mofetil (MMF). The cost of the drug is, however, prohibitive especially in developing countries with limited resources. We compared the pharmacokinetic profile of a new MMF generic formulation (MMF 500 batch number: 06T3001; Medis Tunis) with those of Cellcept, (batch number: M1427; Hoffmann La Roche, Switzerland) in healthy volunteers. The study was double-blinded to investigator and volunteers. It had a balanced randomized, two-treatment, two-period, two-sequence, single-dose, crossover, comparative oral bioavailability design in adult healthy human volunteers. The study was designed, performed, and monitored by CRO Transmedical s.a.l International (Beirut, Lebanon) in accordance with the Basic Principals defined in the US 21 CFR Part 312.20, and the principals enunciated in the World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki. We included nonsmoking healthy volunteers between the ages of 22 and 45 years. The subjects were admitted to the hospital one night prior to blood sampling. After volunteers received the same dinner, they were fasted overnight and for 2 hours postdosing. At 8 am each person received a single oral dose of 500 mg of either formulation. Blood samples were collected to construct the pharmacokinetic profiles as follows: 0, 0.15, 0.30, 0.45 minutes and 1, 1.15, 1.30, 2, 4, 6, 10, 12, and 24 hours. Water and food intake were the same for all volunteers during the whole study period. Following an 8-day washout period, the subjects were crossed over. Plasma mycophenolic acid concentrations were determined using a high-performance liquid chromatography validated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based method (TransMedical, Beirut Lebanon). Physical examinations, hematology, urinanalysis, serum chemistry tests, and liver enzymes were performed at screening and at the end of each period. Subjects were monitored for safety and adverse events

  19. Improved gastrointestinal symptoms and quality of life after conversion from mycophenolate mofetil to enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium in renal transplant patients receiving tacrolimus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyeon Seok; Hyoung, Bok Jin; Kim, Sol; Oh, Ha Young; Kim, Yon Su; Kim, Jung Kyung; Kim, Yeong Hoon; Kim, Yong Lim; Kim, Chan Duck; Shin, Gyu Tae; Yang, Chul Woo

    2010-12-01

    It is reported that a conversion from mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) to enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) relieves gastrointestinal (GI) symptom burden and improves health-related quality of life (HRQoL). However, it is unclear whether renal transplant recipients using tacrolimus receive the same benefit from the conversion. In this prospective, multi-center, open-label trial, patients were categorized into two groups by their GI symptom screening. Equimolar EC-MPS (n=175) was prescribed for patients with GI burdens; those with no complaints remained on MMF (n=83). Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) and Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (GIQLI) were evaluated at baseline and after one month. Patients and physicians completed Overall Treatment Effect (OTE) at one month. EC-MPS-converted patients had worse GSRS and GIQLI scores at baseline than MMF-continued patients (all P<0.001). Significant improvements in GSRS and GIQLI scores were observed for EC-MPS-converted patients at one month, but MMF-continued patients showed worsened GSRS scores (all P<0.05). OTE scale indicated that EC-MPS patients improved in overall GI symptoms and HRQoL more than MMF patients did (P<0.001). In tacrolimus-treated renal transplant recipients with GI burdens, a conversion from MMF to EC-MPS improves GI-related symptoms and HRQoL.

  20. Converting everolimus to mycophenolate mofetil ameliorated prolonged respiratory syncytial virus infection in a child after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Suginobe, Hidehiro; Nawa, Nobutoshi; Ishida, Hidekazu; Kogaki, Shigetoyo

    2017-08-03

    In immunocompromised patients, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections are known to be severe and prolonged, and have significant mortality and morbidity. However, little is known about the clinical courses and treatment strategy of RSV infection in heart transplant recipients. Here, we report a 6-year-old female with heart transplantation who had exhibited prolonged respiratory symptoms and shedding of RSV. She had received everolimus as an immunosuppressant. As immunosuppressants could have been responsible for the prolonged activation of RSV, we converted everolimus to mycophenolate mofetil. After the conversion, RSV promptly disappeared, and her symptoms improved. We speculate that converting the immunosuppressant may be effective for prolonged RSV infection due to the different immunosuppressive mechanisms. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Pharmacokinetics-based optimal dose prediction of donor source-dependent response to mycophenolate mofetil in unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wakahashi, Kanako; Yamamori, Motohiro; Minagawa, Kentaro; Ishii, Shinichi; Nishikawa, Shinichirou; Shimoyama, Manabu; Kawano, Hiroki; Kawano, Yuko; Kawamori, Yuriko; Sada, Akiko; Matsui, Toshimitsu; Katayama, Yoshio

    2011-08-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has been widely used for prophylaxis against graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). However, no clear advantage over methotrexate has been reported, other than reduced incidence of mucositis. We speculated that the wide inter-individual variation of plasma mycophenolic acid (MPA) levels veiled the benefits of MMF. Data from 36 unrelated allogeneic bone marrow (allo-BMT) and cord blood transplantation (CBT) were analyzed retrospectively based on MPA area under the curve (AUC(0-24h)). In allo-BMT, high AUC(0-24h) (>30 μg h/ml) resulted in no incidence of grade II-IV acute/extensive chronic GVHD and tended to show higher overall and disease-free survival, lower relapse rates, and non-relapse mortality. In CBT, AUC(0-24h) less than 30 μg h/ml was sufficient for low incidence of acute/chronic GVHD and high survival. Strong correlation between AUC(0-24h) and C(2h), plasma MPA concentration at 2 h after administration was observed. Single point assessment of C(2h) was shown to provide a useful surrogate of AUC(0-24h) to predict GVHD incidence. The results of this study suggest that individualized MMF dosing in a donor source-dependent fashion may be important for maximizing the benefit of MMF in allo-SCT.

  2. Do Asian renal transplant patients need another mycophenolate mofetil dose compared with Caucasian or African American patients?

    PubMed

    Li, Pengmei; Shuker, Nauras; Hesselink, Dennis A; van Schaik, Ron H N; Zhang, Xianglin; van Gelder, Teun

    2014-10-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is used to prevent acute rejection following solid organ transplantation in transplant centers all over the world. Patients from different ethnic backgrounds are treated with this drug, for which therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) has not become the standard of practice in most centers. Whether or not some ethnic groups require a different MMF dose has been a topic of debate in recent years. In this review, it is shown that Asian patients, compared with Caucasian patients, with a comparable MMF dose reach higher mycophenolic acid (MPA) exposure. Also clinical experience points toward more adverse events in case of treatment with 1 g MMF bid in Asian patients, and therefore, for this ethnic group, a lower maintenance dose seems justified. In contrast, African American patients reach similar drug concentrations as Caucasians patients receiving the same MMF dose, but due to immunological reasons, they require a higher MMF dose to reach comparable acute rejection incidences. When TDM is performed, clinicians can correct the dose and compensate for interethnic differences in drug exposure. Otherwise, it is important to choose the right dose. This optimal dose is 20-46% lower in Asian transplant recipients than in Caucasian or African American patients. © 2014 Steunstichting ESOT.

  3. Simultaneous determination of mycophenolate mofetil and its active metabolite, mycophenolic acid, by differential pulse voltammetry using multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Soleimani, Mohammad; Afkhami, Abbas

    2014-09-01

    A highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for the simultaneous determination of mycophenolate mofetil (MPM) and mycophenolic acid (MPA) was fabricated by multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode (MWCNTs/GCE). The electrochemical behavior of these two drugs was studied at the modified electrode using cyclic voltammetry and adsorptive differential pulse voltammetry. MPM and MPA were oxidized at the GCE during an irreversible process. DPV analysis showed two oxidation peaks at 0.87V and 1.1V vs. Ag/AgCl for MPM and an oxidation peak at 0.87V vs. Ag/AgCl for MPA in phosphate buffer solution of pH5.0. The MWCNTs/GCE displayed excellent electrochemical activities toward oxidation of MPM and MPA relative to the bare GCE. The experimental design algorithm was used for optimization of DPV parameters. The electrode represents linear responses in the range 5.0×10(-6) to 1.6×10(-4)molL(-1) and 2.5×10(-6)molL(-1) to 6.0×10(-5)molL(-1) for MPM and MPA, respectively. The detection limit was found to be 9.0×10(-7)molL(-1) and 4.0×10(-7)molL(-1) for MPM and MPA, respectively. The modified electrode showed a good sensitivity and stability. It was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of MPM and MPA in plasma and urine samples.

  4. Thymoglobulin induction in liver transplant recipients with a tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroid immunosuppressive regimen: a five-year randomized prospective study.

    PubMed

    Boillot, Olivier; Seket, Belhassen; Dumortier, Jérôme; Pittau, Gabriella; Boucaud, Catherine; Bouffard, Yves; Scoazec, Jean-Yves

    2009-11-01

    This randomized, comparative study assessed the long-term efficacy and tolerability of thymoglobulin (TMG) induction in 93 liver transplant patients with an initial regimen of tacrolimus (Tac), mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and steroids. Forty-four patients were randomly allocated to the TMG+ group, and 49 patients were randomly allocated to the TMG- group. In both groups, Tac was given orally at the initial daily dose of 0.075 mg/kg twice daily, and MMF was given at the initial daily dose of 2 g/day. Steroid withdrawal was planned at 3 months after liver transplantation. The results were evaluated with respect to acute rejection incidence, patient and graft survival, graft function, and medical complications until 5 years or death for all patients. No significant differences were found between groups for the incidence of acute rejection at 5 years (11.4% versus 14.3%), 5-year patient survival (77.3% versus 87.8%), graft function, or postoperative renal function. One patient in the TMG- group underwent retransplantation. There was no difference between groups with respect to the incidence of medical complications, excepted for a higher rate of leukopenia in the TMG+ group, during the 5-year follow-up. In conclusion, the results of this prospective randomized study suggest that the addition of TMG to a triple immunosuppressive regimen (Tac, MMF, and steroids) did not modify the incidence of acute rejection episodes or long-term survival and was responsible for increased leukopenia rates.

  5. Beneficial effect of the inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitor mycophenolate mofetil on survival and severity of glomerulonephritis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-prone MRLlpr/lpr mice

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, C A; Svensson, L; Carlsten, H

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on the course of disease in SLE-prone MRLlpr/lpr mice. Three-months-old mice displaying clinical symptoms of glomerulonephritis were given MMF (100 mg/kg per day) orally via the drinking water. Control mice received i.p. injections of cyclophosphamide (CYC) (1.8 mg/mouse per week) or saline. Survival, albuminuria and haematuria, immunoglobulin levels and anti-dsDNA antibodies in serum, frequencies of immunoglobulin-producing B lymphocytes and glomerular deposits of immunoglobulin and C3 were analysed. The results showed that MMF treatment significantly prolonged survival and reduced the occurrence of albuminuria and haematuria in MRLlpr/lpr mice. In addition, the number of immunoglobulin-producing B cells and serum levels of IgG and IgG anti-dsDNA antibodies were reduced after MMF and CYC treatment. MMF treatment significantly reduced the extent of deposition of C3 in glomeruli. We conclude that the reduced severity of glomerulonephritis following treatment of lupus-prone mice with MMF was as efficacious as that of CYC. These results warrant clinical trials of MMF in SLE patients with glomerulonephritis. PMID:10361247

  6. Monitoring of mycophenolate mofetil metabolites in children with nephrotic syndrome and the proposed novel target values of pharmacokinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Sobiak, Joanna; Resztak, Matylda; Ostalska-Nowicka, Danuta; Zachwieja, Jacek; Gąsiorowska, Karolina; Piechanowska, Wiktoria; Chrzanowska, Maria

    2015-09-18

    The aim of the study was to estimate target values of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) pharmacokinetic parameters in children with proteinuric glomerulopathies by calculating the pharmacokinetic parameters of MMF metabolites (mycophenolic acid [MPA], free MPA [fMPA] and MPA glucuronide [MPAG]) and assessing their relation to proteinuria recurrence. One hundred and sixty-eight blood samples were collected from children, aged 3-18 years, diagnosed with nephrotic syndrome or lupus nephritis. MMF metabolites concentrations were examined before drug administration (Ctrough) and up to 12h afterward employing high-performance liquid chromatography. Dose-normalized MPA Ctrough and area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 12h (AUC12) were within 0.29-6.47 μg/mL/600 mg/m(2) and 9.97-105.52 μg h/mL/600 mg/m(2), respectively. MPA Ctrough was twofold lower (p=0.024) in children with proteinuria recurrence. MPA, fMPA and MPAG concentrations correlated positively to respective AUC12. It may be suggested MMF metabolites monitoring in children with proteinuric glomerulopathies is justified by MPA Ctrough<2 μg/mL in patients at risk of the proteinuria recurrence. Such a recurrence is most probably caused by not sufficient MPA concentration during proteinuric glomerulopathies treatment. MPA Ctrough>3 μg/mL may be considered as an efficient one to avoid proteinuria recurrence. Finally, MPA target AUC12 should exceed 60 μg h/mL to ensure the safe and effective treatment in children with nephrotic syndrome, however, the upper limit is still to be established. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Development and validation of limited sampling strategy equation for mycophenolate mofetil in children with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Prabha, R.; Mathew, B. S.; Jeyaseelan, V.; Kumar, T. S.; Agarwal, I.; Fleming, D. H.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a limited sample strategy (LSS) to predict the mycophenolic acid (MPA) area under the curve (AUC)(0-12) in children with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Three months after initiation of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) 26 children with SLE presented for therapeutic drug monitoring of MPA. On the day of the test, 10 specimens were collected, analyzed, and MPA AUC(0-12) was calculated. Using step-wise regression analysis, LSS equations were developed. Using bootstrap validation, the predictive performance was calculated. The measured mean (standard deviation) for the trough concentration and AUC(0-12) were 2.55 (1.57) μg/ml and 62.6 (21.67) mg.h/L, respectively. The range of trough concentrations and AUC(0-12) were 0.7–5.54 μg/ml and 22.1–104.8 mg.h/L, respectively. The interindividual variability (%CV) for dose normalized AUC(0-12) and dose normalized Ctrough was 46.5% and 61.1%, respectively. The correlation between the concentrations at the different time points and MPA AUC(0-12) ranged from 0.05 (1.5 h) to 0.56 (4 h). Two LSS equations that included 4 or 5 time points up to 3 h were developed and validated. The 4 point LSS had a correlation (R2) of 0.88 and the 5 point LSS an R2 of 0.87. With respect to the 4 point and 5 point MPA LSS AUC(0-12), the bias was 1.92% and 1.96%, respectively, and the imprecision was 11.24% and 11.28%, respectively. A 4 point LSS which concludes within 3 h after the administration of the MMF dose was developed and validated, to determine the MPA AUC(0-12) in children with SLE. PMID:27942171

  8. A prospective analysis of the effects of enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium and mycophenolate mofetil co-medicated with a proton pump inhibitor in kidney transplant recipients at a single institute in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Cai, M; Shi, B-Y; Li, Z-L; Li, X; Jin, H-L

    2014-06-01

    Enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), two prodrugs of mycophenolic acid (MPA), have been used in immunosuppressive regimens. After being taken orally, both of them transform to MPA to achieve immune suppression effects; however, the main site of absorption and metabolism of EC-MPS is different from that of MMF in vivo. Therefore, combined application with related drugs may result in different MPA levels and have different clinical effects in kidney transplant recipients. To evaluate the efficacy of EC-MPS compared with MMF in Chinese renal transplant patients comedicated with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Our subjects were 88 patients who received renal transplants at the 309th Hospital of the Chinese PLA from May 2010 to April 2013. These were made up of two groups including 27 patients with EC-MPS and 61 with MMF. The immunosuppression regimen was EC-MPS/MMF + cyclosporine/tacrolimus + steroid hormone, comedicated with a PPI (omeprazole). The patients' levels of exposure of MPA within 1 week after operation were monitored. Clinical indicators such as incidence of delayed graft function and acute rejection, the rate of change of serum creatinine hemoglobin, leucocytes, and neutrophils, as well as clinical adverse drug reactions and drug conversion were analyzed retrospectively. The kidney function of patients recovered to normal in both the EC-MPS and MMF groups. The mean concentration to peak (Cmax), the mean half-life (t1/2), and the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-12) of MPA in the EC-MPS group were higher than those in the MMF group (P < .05). This indicated that the pharmacokinetic parameters for MPA when EC-MPS is co-administered with a PPI in kidney transplant patients in China is better than for comedication with MMF and a PPI. The MMF group had a higher incidence of drug withdrawal because of higher infection rates, leucocyte decrease, and more gastrointestinal side effects than the EC-MPS group (P

  9. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in mycophenolate mofetil-treated patients with connective tissue disease: analysis of 17 cases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Zheng, Yi

    2014-12-01

    The association of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP) with connective tissue disease (CTD) and mycophenolate mofetil's (MMF) potent activity against PJP have been separately reported. Until now, there have been no papers describing the occurrence of PJP following MMF treatment in CTD patients. The objective of this study was to describe the clinical features, risk factors, outcomes of PJP in patients with CTD and investigates the effects of MMF on the occurrence of PJP in China. In this retrospective cohort study, we performed a chart review, analyzing clinical features, treatment, and outcomes of PJP in patients with CTD in a single hospital. A total of 17 cases met the inclusion criteria of having PJP and a CTD diagnosis: systemic lupus erythematosus; polymyositis; dermatomyositis; rheumatoid arthritis; Wegener's granulomatosis; and microscopic polyangiitis. Sixteen patients were treated with glucocorticoids (GCs) plus immunosuppressive drugs. Only one patient had GCs without immunosuppressive drugs. Ten subjects (62.5 %) received MMF (1-1.5 g/day), and all ten had lymphopenia. The mortality rates of MMF and non-MMF patients were 50 and 14 %, respectively. This study is the first report of PJP following MMF plus GC treatment in patients with CTD. CTD itself may be a risk factor for PJP. When CTD patients receiving MMF therapy have low lymphocyte counts and/or CD4 lymphocyte counts <250/µL, we should be care of occurrence of PJP.

  10. Mycophenolate mofetil in low-risk renal transplantation in patients receiving no cyclosporine: a single-centre experience.

    PubMed

    Raheem, Omer A; Daly, Padraig J; O'Kelly, Patrick; Shields, William P; Zimmerman, Antonio J; Mohan, Ponnusamy; Power, Richard; Little, Dilly M; Conlon, Peter J; Hickey, David P

    2012-02-01

    We assess our long-term experience with regards the safety and efficacy of Mycophenolate Mofetil (MMF) in our low risk renal transplant population and compared it retrospectively to Azathioprine (AZA) immunosuppressive regimen. Patients and methods. Between January 1999 and December 2005, 240 renal transplants received MMF as part of their immunosuppressive protocol (MMF group). AZA group of 135 renal transplants was included for comparative analysis (AZA group). Patients received Cyclosporine was excluded from this study. The incidence of biopsy proven 3-month acute rejections was 30 (12.5%) in MMF group and 22 (16%) in AZA group respectively (P = 0.307). Patient survival rates at 1 and 5 years for the MMF group were 97 and 94%, respectively, compared to 100% and 91% at 1 and 5 years respectively for the AZA group (P = 0.61). Graft survival rates at 1 and 5 years for the MMF group were 95 and 83%, respectively, compared to 97 and 84% at 1 and 5 years, respectively for the AZA group (P = 0.62). There was no difference in acute rejection episodes between MMF and AZA based immunotherapy. Additionally, we observed no significant difference concerning graft survival in the MMF group when compared to AZA group.

  11. Mycophenolate mofetil and cyclosporine for graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis following reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mohty, M; de Lavallade, H; Faucher, C; Bilger, K; Vey, N; Stoppa, A-M; Gravis, G; Coso, D; Viens, P; Gastaut, J-A; Blaise, D

    2004-09-01

    The use of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) can result in a significant decrease in early procedure-related toxicity in patients not eligible for standard myeloablative regimens. However, acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) remains a matter of concern after RIC allo-SCT, and its incidence might be expected to be higher in elderly and high-risk patients. This report investigated mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and cyclosporin A (CsA) combination (n=14) in comparison to CsA alone (n=20) for GVHD prophylaxis in cancer patients aged over 50 years (27 haematological malignancies and seven solid tumours) receiving an HLA-identical sibling antithymocyte-globulin (ATG)-based RIC allo-SCT. Baseline demographic characteristics and risk factors for aGVHD were comparable between both groups. Although MMF administration was not associated with any significant toxicity, the cumulative incidence of any form of GVHD was comparable between both groups (cumulative incidence of grade II-IV aGVHD, 50% (95% CI, 28-72%) for CsA alone, as compared to 64% (95% CI, 39-89%) to CsA and MMF, P=NS), suggesting that adjunction of MMF to CsA is feasible, but does not translate towards a significant reduction of aGVHD, at least in the context ATG-based RIC allo-SCT.

  12. Mycophenolate Mofetil for Induction and Maintenance of Remission in Microscopic Polyangiitis with Mild to Moderate Renal Involvement—A Prospective, Open-Label Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Francisco; Specks, Ulrich; Kalra, Sanjay; Hogan, Marie C.; Leung, Nelson; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) is a systemic small-vessel vasculitis associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), often targeting myeloperoxidase (MPO). Cyclophosphamide (CYC) plus corticosteroids (CS) is considered standard therapy for patients with renal involvement, but treatment response is not satisfactory in all patients and CYC has well recognized toxicity. This prospective pilot trial explored whether mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) represents an effective alternative to CYC for induction and maintenance of remission in MPA with mild to moderate renal involvement. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Seventeen P-ANCA/MPO-ANCA-positive patients with MPA with mild to moderate renal involvement received MMF (1000 mg orally, twice daily) and CS (intravenous methylprednisolone, 1 to 3 g, followed by oral prednisone at 1 mg/kg per day). Oral CS were discontinued by month 6; MMF was continued through month 18. The primary outcome measure was remission by month 6 and stable renal function. Secondary endpoints included major relapses necessitating a switch to CYC plus CS, minor relapses requiring an increase in CS dosage, and adverse events. Results: Thirteen of 17 patients enrolled achieved the primary outcome, and 4 failed because of insufficient response, relapse, or MMF intolerance. Twelve patients remained in remission through month 18, renal function remained stable, and proteinuria improved. Side effects of MMF were mild, transient, and responsive to dose adjustments in all patients except one. Conclusions: MMF represents an alternative to CYC for induction and maintenance of remission in patients with MPO-ANCA-associated MPA with mild to moderate renal disease. PMID:20093349

  13. A Pilot Study of Continuous Infusion of Mycophenolate Mofetil for Prophylaxis of Graft-versus-Host-Disease in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Windreich, Randy M; Goyal, Rakesh K; Joshi, Rujuta; Kenkre, Tanya S; Howrie, Denise; Venkataramanan, Raman

    2016-04-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), an ester prodrug of mycophenolic acid (MPA), is used increasingly for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. Empiric fixed-dose-escalation strategies in pediatric hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients have failed to achieve target MPA exposure. We evaluated the safety and feasibility of a pharmacokinetics-based dosing approach using a novel continuous infusion (CI) method of administration of MMF in pediatric HCT recipients. All patients received a myeloablative conditioning with cyclosporine A and MMF for GVHD prophylaxis. MMF was initiated on day 0 at a dose of 15 mg/kg every 8 hours. Based on steady-state pharmacokinetics, MMF was converted to CI to target a total MPA AUC(0-24) of 40 to 80 μg·hour/mL. The MMF dose was adjusted to maintain a total MPA steady-state concentration (Css) of 1.7 to 3.3 μg/mL. During the CI schedule, MPA AUC(0-24) was maintained at a mean of 40.1 μg·hour/mL (range, 20.6 to 63.8), and 17 of 19 patients (89%) achieved MPA Css within target of 1.7 to 3.3 μg/mL. Eighteen of 19 patients (95%) achieved neutrophil engraftment at a median of 13 days (range, 8 to 41) post-transplant and platelet engraftment at 39 days (range, 17 to 298) days post-transplant. Six of 18 assessable patients (33%) developed stages II to IV acute GVHD and 2 of 15 (13%) developed chronic GVHD. The MMF dose was reduced in 9 patients due to gastrointestinal symptoms (n = 6), low blood counts (n = 4), and viral infection (n = 3). Five patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia relapsed, of whom 4 have died. Fifteen of 19 patients are alive with a median follow-up of 2.4 years (range, .4 to 4.9), with 3-year event-free and overall survival rates of 68% and 79%, respectively. In this pilot study of pharmacokinetically directed MMF dosing, we observed no toxic deaths, excellent engraftment, and low rates of grades III to IV acute and chronic GVHD. We found significantly lower half-life and higher drug clearance in

  14. Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality after liver transplantation: The protective role of Mycophenolate Mofetil.

    PubMed

    D'Avola, D; Cuervas-Mons, V; Martí, J; Ortiz de Urbina, J; Lladó, L; Jimenez, C; Otero, E; Suarez, F; Rodrigo, J M; Gómez, M A; Fraga, E; Lopez, P; Serrano, T; Rios, A; Fábrega, E; Herrero, J I

    2017-02-03

    Cardiovascular (CV) diseases are recognized long-term causes of death after liver transplantation (LT). The objective of this multicenter study was to analyse the prevalence and the evolution of CV risk factors and CV morbidity and mortality in 1819 liver transplant recipients along 5 years after LT. The influence of baseline variables on survival, morbidity and mortality was studied. There was a continuous and significant increase of the prevalence of all the CV risk factors (except smoking) after LT. CV diseases were the fourth cause of mortality in the 5 years after LT, causing 12% of deaths during the follow-up. Most CV events (39%) occurred in the first year after LT. Pre-existing CV risk factors such as age, pre-LT CV events, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and hyperuricemia, and mycophenolate-free immunosuppressive therapy, increased post-LT CV morbidity and mortality. The development of new onset CV risk factors after LT, such as dyslipidemia and obesity, independently affected late CV morbidity and mortality. Tacrolimus and steroids increased the risk of post-transplant diabetes, while cyclosporine increased the risk of arterial hypertension dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome.

  15. Tacrolimus with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) or sirolimus vs. cyclosporine with MMF in cardiac transplant patients: 1-year report.

    PubMed

    Kobashigawa, J A; Miller, L W; Russell, S D; Ewald, G A; Zucker, M J; Goldberg, L R; Eisen, H J; Salm, K; Tolzman, D; Gao, J; Fitzsimmons, W; First, R

    2006-06-01

    The most advantageous combination of immunosuppressive agents for cardiac transplant recipients has not yet been established. Between November 2001 and June 2003, 343 de novo cardiac transplant recipients were randomized to receive steroids and either tacrolimus (TAC) + sirolimus (SRL), TAC + mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) or cyclosporine (CYA) + MMF. Antilymphocyte induction therapy was allowed for up to 5 days. The primary endpoint of >/=3A rejection or hemodynamic compromise rejection requiring treatment showed no significant difference at 6 months (TAC/MMF 22.4%, TAC/SRL 24.3%, CYA/MMF 31.6%, p = 0.271) and 1 year (p = 0.056), but it was significantly lower in the TAC/MMF group when compared only to the CYA/MMF group at 1 year (23.4% vs. 36.8%; p = 0.029). Differences in the incidence of any treated rejection were significant (TAC/SRL = 35%, TAC/MMF = 42%, CYA/MMF = 59%; p < 0.001), as were median levels of serum creatinine (TAC/SRL = 1.5 mg/dL, TAC/MMF = 1.3 mg/dL, CYA/MMF = 1.5 mg/dL; p = 0.032) and triglycerides (TAC/SRL = 162 mg/dL, TAC/MMF = 126 mg/dL, CYA/MMF = 154 mg/dL; p = 0.028). The TAC/SRL group encountered fewer viral infections but more fungal infections and impaired wound healing. These secondary endpoints suggest that the TAC/MMF combination appears to offer more advantages than TAC/SRL or CYA/MMF in cardiac transplant patients, including fewer >/=3A rejections or hemodynamic compromise rejections and an improved side-effect profile.

  16. EARLY TERMINATION OF A TRIAL OF MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL FOR TREATMENT OF INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS/PAINFUL BLADDER SYNDROME: LESSONS LEARNED

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Claire C.; Burks, David A.; Propert, Kathleen J.; Mayer, Robert D.; Peters, Kenneth M.; Nickel, J. Curtis; Payne, Christopher K.; FitzGerald, Mary P.; Hanno, Philip M.; Chai, Toby C.; Kreder, Karl J.; Lukacz, Emily S.; Foster, Harris E.; Cen, Liyi; Landis, J. Richard; Kusek, John W.; Nyberg, Leroy M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in patients with treatment refractory interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS). Materials and Methods Two hundred and ten patients with IC/PBS were to be randomized into a multicenter, placebo-controlled trial using a 2:1 randomization. Participants who had failed at least three IC/PBS-specific treatments and had at least moderately severe symptoms were enrolled in a 12-week treatment study. The primary study endpoint was the Global Response Assessment (GRA). Secondary endpoints included general and disease-specific symptom questionnaires and voiding diaries. Results Only 58 subjects were randomized before a black box warning regarding MMF safety was issued by the manufacturer in October 2007. The trial was halted, and an interim analysis was performed and presented to an independent Data and Safety Monitoring Board. Of the subjects randomized at the time of study cessation, 6/39 (15%) were considered responders for MMF, compared to 3/19 (16%) of controls (p=0.67). Secondary outcome measures reflected more improvement among controls. Conclusion In a randomized placebo-controlled trial that was prematurely halted, MMF demonstrated efficacy similar to placebo in treating symptoms of refractory IC/PBS. The results of this limited study cannot be used to confirm or refute the hypothesis that immunosuppressive therapy may be beneficial to at least a subgroup of IC\\PBS patients. Despite study termination, there are lessons that can be gleaned to inform future investigations. PMID:21238993

  17. Differential effects of cyclophosphamide and mycophenolate mofetil on cellular and serological parameters in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Fassbinder, Till; Saunders, Ute; Mickholz, Eva; Jung, Elisabeth; Becker, Heidemarie; Schlüter, Bernhard; Jacobi, Annett Marita

    2015-04-03

    Disease activity and therapy show an impact on cellular and serological parameters in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study was performed to compare the influence of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and cyclophosphamide (CYC) therapy on these parameters in patients with flaring, organ-threatening disease. SLE patients currently receiving CYC (n = 20), MMF (n = 25) or no immunosuppressive drugs (n = 22) were compared using a cross-sectional design. Median disease activity and daily corticosteroid dose were similar in these treatment groups. Concurrent medication, organ manifestations, and disease activity were recorded, and cellular and serological parameters were determined by routine diagnostic tests or flow cytometric analysis. In addition follow-up data were obtained from different sets of patients (CYC n = 24; MMF n = 23). Although both drugs showed a significant effect on disease activity and circulating B cell subsets, only MMF reduced circulating plasmablasts and plasma cells as well as circulating free light chains within three months of induction therapy. Neither MMF nor CYC were able to reduce circulating memory B cells. MMF lowered IgA levels more markedly than CYC. We did not observe a significant difference in the reduction of IgG levels or anti-dsDNA antibodies comparing patients receiving MMF or CYC. In contrast to MMF, induction therapy with CYC was associated with a significant increase of circulating CD8+ effector T cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs) after three months. The results indicate differences between MMF and CYC with regard to the mechanism of action. MMF, but not CYC, treatment leads to a fast and enduring reduction of surrogate markers of B cell activation, such as circulating plasmablasts, plasma cells and free light chains but a comparable rate of hypogammaglobulinemia.

  18. Long-term outcome of mycophenolate mofetil treatment for patients with microscopic polyangiitis: an observational study in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinghua; Gao, Erzhi; Yang, Liu; Liu, Xia; Li, Kang; Liu, Zhengzhao; Zeng, Caihong; Zhang, Haitao; Liu, Zhihong; Hu, Weixin

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to retrospectively analyze the long-term outcome of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) therapy for microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) with mild to moderate renal involvement in Chinese patients. Thirty-four MPA patients (24 females, 10 males, aged 44.7 ± 17 years, BVAS score 13.8 ± 3.2, SCr 2.2 ± 1.1 mg/dl) with SCr < 5 mg/dl and who received glucocorticoids plus MMF therapy for inducing and maintaining remission were included in this study. The remission and relapse rates, patient and renal survival rates and adverse events were retrospectively analyzed. We found that 31 (91.2 %) of 34 patients achieved remission and were continuously treated with glucocorticoids plus MMF for maintaining remission. The median duration of MMF treatment was 24 months (IQR 15-53 months) and follow-up time was 86 months (IQR 29-124 months). During the follow-up, 7 (22.6 %) patients relapsed, one patient died, and one patient progressed into end-stage renal disease. The 5-year patient and renal survival rates were 92.8 and 95.2 %, respectively. 11 (32.4 %) patients suffered 16 adverse events, 13 of which were pulmonary infection. In conclusion, glucocorticoids plus MMF regimen as induction and maintenance therapy could achieve high remission rate and good long-term renal survival in MPA patients with mild to moderate renal involvement. Prospective controlled trials with a large sample size are needed to confirm the efficacy of MMF in this population.

  19. B-cell dysfunction and depletion using mycophenolate mofetil in a pediatric combined liver and kidney graft recipient.

    PubMed

    Ganschow, R; Lyons, M; Kemper, M J; Burdelski, M

    2001-02-01

    The use of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in combination with cyclosporin A (CsA) and steroids is well established after kidney transplantation (Tx) in children. A 9-yr-old girl with primary hyperoxaluria type 1 and systemic oxalosis underwent a combined kidney and liver Tx at our institution. The post-operative immunosuppression consisted of CsA, prednisolone, and MMF. Four weeks post-transplant the girl suffered from a severe urinary tract infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, when the serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentration was found to be critically low (<1.53 g/L). Additionally, there was an isolated B-cell depletion (240/microL) at that time. In the following course, the B-cell count was significantly diminished until the MMF was stopped 13 weeks post-transplant. As a result of the very low serum IgG concentration, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) substitution was necessary. There was no significant loss of immunoglobulins in the ascites and urine and no other medication with possible side-effects on B cells was given. We suggest that MMF can lead to suppressed IgG production by B cells and can cause a defective differentiation into mature B cells. In vitro studies demonstrated these effects of MMF on B cells, but no in vivo cases of this phenomenon have been reported. B-cell counts and serum IgG concentrations returned to normal values after discontinuing the MMF. As we can assume that the observed B-cell dysfunction and depletion were MMF related, we suggest that serum IgG concentrations should be monitored when MMF is used after solid-organ Tx.

  20. Effects of mycophenolate mofetil introduction in liver transplant patients: results from an observational, non-interventional, multicenter study (LOBSTER).

    PubMed

    Schlitt, Hans J; Jonas, Sven; Ganten, Tom M; Grannas, Gerrit; Moench, Christian; Rauchfuss, Falk; Obed, Aiman; Tisone, Giuseppe; Pinna, Antonio D; Gerunda, Giorgio E; Beckebaum, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The benefits of calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-sparing regimens on renal function following liver transplantation (LT) have been demonstrated in clinical studies. This observational study assessed the real-life effects of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) introduction in LT patients. Four hundred and ninety-seven patients in whom MMF was introduced according to local standards or clinical considerations were entered. Patients were grouped by time between transplantation and start of MMF (start of study): Group A (n = 263): ≤6 d; Group B (n = 64): >6 d to ≤1 month; Group C (n = 74): >1 month to ≤1 yr; and Group D (n = 96): >1 yr. CNI sparing occurred in all groups, particularly in Groups C and D. Mean MMF doses at 12 months were 1202.7, 1363.5, 1504.7, and 1578.1 mg/d, respectively, in Groups A-D. At introduction of MMF, median glomerular filtration rate was 73.3, 81.7, 62.7, and 53.7 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in Groups A-D. At 12 months, this decreased to 66 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in Groups A and B, remained stable in Group C, and increased in Group D (64.8 mL/min/1.73 m(2) ). Serious adverse drug reactions were lowest in Group D. In conclusion, MMF with a subsequent decrease in CNI was well tolerated and improved renal function even years after transplantation. A more forceful MMF dosing strategy with greater CNI sparing may further improve renal function.

  1. Pharmacokinetic modelling and development of Bayesian estimators for therapeutic drug monitoring of mycophenolate mofetil in reduced-intensity haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Marcoux, Franck; Royer, Bernard; Debord, Jean; Larosa, Fabrice; Legrand, Faezeh; Deconinck, Eric; Kantelip, Jean-Pierre; Marquet, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Background Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), a prodrug of mycophenolic acid (MPA), is used during nonmyeloablative and reduced-intensity conditioning haematopoetic cell transplantation (HCT) to improve engraftment and reduce graft versus host disease (GVHD). However, information about MPA pharmacokinetics is sparse in this context and its use is still empirical. Objectives To perform a pilot pharmacokinetic study and to develop maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimators (MAP-BEs) for the estimation of MPA exposure in HCT. Patients and methods Fourteen patients given orally MMF 15 mg/kg 3 times daily were included. Two consecutive 8-hour PK profiles were performed the same day respectively three days before and 4 days after the HCT. One 8-hour PK profile was performed on day 27 after transplantation. For these 8-hours pharmacokinetic profiles, blood samples were collected pre-dose and 20, 40, 60, 90 min, 2, 4, 6 and 8 h post-dose after administration of the drug. Using the iterative two-stage method (ITS), two different one-compartment open PK models with first-order elimination were developed to describe the data: one with two gamma laws and one with three gamma laws to describe the absorption phase. For each PK profile, the Akaike criterion was calculated to evaluate model fitting. On the basis of the population PK parameters, MAP-BEs were developed for the estimation of MPA pharmacokinetics and area under the concentration-time curves (AUC0-8h) at the different studied periods using a limited sampling strategy (LSS). These MAP-BEs were then validated using a data-splitting method. Results The ITS approach allowed the development of MAP-BEs based either on “double-gamma” or “triple-gamma” models, the combination of which allowed correct estimation of MPA pharmacokinetics and AUC on the basis of a C20min-C90min-C240min sampling schedule. The mean bias of the Bayesian versus reference (trapezoidal) AUCs was <5% with less than 16% of the patients with absolute bias

  2. A case of non-regenerative immune-mediated anemia treated by combination therapy of human immune globulin and mycophenolate mofetil in a dog.

    PubMed

    Yuki, M

    2011-01-01

    A 12-year-old female Shih Tzu dog was referred with diarrhea. Hematological examination indicated severe non-regenerative anemia. Bone marrow aspiration smears and core biopsy specimens revealed normal bone marrow. Based on those results, non-regenerative immune-mediated anemia was diagnosed. The dog was initially treated using prednisolone and cyclosporine. However, this treatment regimen did not prove effective. Nevertheless, the patient achieved a good hematological response after the administration of a combination therapy of human immune globulin and mycophenolate mofetil. Such a combination therapy may prove effective against non-regenerative immune-mediated anemia.

  3. Comparison of sequential protocol using basiliximab versus antithymocyte globulin with high-dose mycophenolate mofetil in recipients of a kidney graft from an expanded-criteria donor.

    PubMed

    Pallet, Nicolas; Anglicheau, Dany; Martinez, Frank; Mamzer, Marie-France; Legendre, Christophe; Thervet, Eric

    2006-03-27

    This retrospective pilot study investigated use of high-dose mycophenolate mofetil with biological induction and sequential introduction of low-dose cyclosporine in recipients of expanded criteria donor (ECD) kidneys. Fifty-four patients received mycophenolate mofetil 3 g/day for 45 days, cyclosporine 4 mg/kg/day, prednisolone, and rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG, n=14) or basiliximab (n=40). Acute rejection incidence was 11.3% (7.1% with rATG, 12.6% with basiliximab). Delayed graft function was observed in 31 patients (54%). At one year, measured glomerular filtration rate was 54+/-4 ml/min, with no significant differences between induction therapies. Thirty patients (55%) required > or =1 MMF dose reduction within month 1 due to adverse events (gastrointestinal symptoms, 67%; leucopenia 33%). Leucopenia was more frequent with rATG, while gastrointestinal symptoms were more frequent with basiliximab. Cytomegalovirus replication occurred in three patients (23%) with rATG and 3 (8%) with basiliximab. In conclusion, high-dose MMF, corticosteroids, delayed low-dose cyclosporine and induction therapy offers an excellent risk-to-benefit ratio in patients receiving an ECD allograft.

  4. Efficacy and safety of a conversion from the original tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil to the generics Tacpan® and Mowel® after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vollmar, Johanna; Bellmann, Maren Christina; Darstein, Felix; Hoppe-Lotichius, Maria; Mittler, Jens; Heise, Michael; Rüttger, Bernd; Weyer, Veronika; Zimmermann, Anca; Lang, Hauke; Galle, Peter R; Zimmermann, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Background Expensive pharmaceuticals are a major reason for cost intensive health care systems. Long-term immunosuppressive therapy plays a relevant role after organ transplantation. Patents of original drugs have expired and cheaper products are available. Little data are available regarding efficacy and safety of generic immunosuppressive agents. Methods In this prospective study, 25 patients, who were clinically stable for a minimum of 2 years after liver transplantation, were converted from the original formulations of tacrolimus (TAC) and mycophenolate mofetil to the generics Tacpan® (TAP) and Mowel® (MOW). Patients were followed-up for 6 months. Results were compared retrospectively to 25 age- and sex-matched controls treated with the original brands. Results In the matched-pair analysis of TAC trough level/dose ratio, no significant difference was found between TAP/MOW and TAC/mycophenolate mofetil groups. No acute rejection occurred in either group. In total, 17 patients reported mild side effects in the TAP/MOW group. The most common side effects were gastrointestinal symptoms. Intra-individual analysis of costs revealed a considerable cost reduction in the TAP/MOW group (in median 25.03%; P<0.001). Conclusion In summary, the use of the generics TAP/MOW is effective and seems to be safe and cost-efficient in stable liver-transplantation patients. PMID:26604701

  5. Impact of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)-related gastrointestinal complications and MMF dose alterations on transplant outcomes and healthcare costs in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Tierce, J C; Porterfield-Baxa, J; Petrilla, A A; Kilburg, A; Ferguson, R M

    2005-12-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), a mycophenolic acid prodrug, is a highly effective adjunct immunosuppressive agent in transplant therapy. Although MMF is generally well tolerated, optimal therapy may be limited by adverse effects, in particular gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity, which has been reported to occur in up to 45% of MMF-treated patients. MMF dose changes resulting from these adverse events may lead to sub-therapeutic dosing and impaired clinical outcomes. This retrospective study analyzed clinical records from 772 renal transplant patients from 10 US transplant centers who were initiated on MMF. The analysis revealed that 49.7% (n = 382) of patients experienced at least one GI complication within the first 6 months post-transplant, with 66.8% (n = 255) of these having multiple GI complications. Of the patients with GI complications, 39.0% experienced MMF dose adjustments or discontinuation of MMF therapy. Patients with GI complications who experienced MMF dose adjustments/discontinuation had a significantly increased incidence of acute rejections compared with patients without GI complications (30.2% vs. 19.4%; p = 0.005). Mean treatment costs were higher in patients with GI complications than in those with no GI complications, particularly in those who experienced MMF dose adjustments/discontinuation (p = 0.0001). The mean incremental cost for patients experiencing GI complications was US$3700 per patient during the 6 months post-transplant (p < 0.001), which was mainly attributable to hospitalization costs. In summary, GI complications and MMF dose adjustments/discontinuations are associated with a significant negative impact on transplant outcomes and markedly increase short-term treatment costs.

  6. The Novel Immunosuppressive Agent Mycophenolate Mofetil Markedly Potentiates the Antiherpesvirus Activities of Acyclovir, Ganciclovir, and Penciclovir In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Neyts, Johan; Andrei, Graciela; De Clercq, Erik

    1998-01-01

    The immunosuppressive agent mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has been approved for use in kidney transplant recipients and may thus be used concomitantly for the treatment of intercurrent herpesvirus infections with drugs such as acyclovir (ACV), ganciclovir (GCV), and penciclovir (PCV). We found that MMF and its parent compound mycophenolic acid (at concentrations that are attainable in plasma) strongly potentiate the antiherpesvirus (herpes simplex virus [HSV] type 1 [HSV-1], HSV-2, thymidine kinase-deficient [TK−] HSV-1, both wild-type and TK− varicella-zoster virus, and human cytomegalovirus) activities of ACV, PCV, and GCV (up to 350-fold increases in their activities). The mechanism of potentiation was found to reside in the depletion of endogenous dGTP pools, which favored the inhibitory effect of the triphosphate of ACV, GCV, or PCV on the viral DNA polymerase. The combination of topically applied 5% MMF with 0.1% ACV strongly protected against HSV-1-induced cutaneous lesions in hairless mice, whereas therapy with either compound used singly had no protective effect. Interestingly, the combination of topically applied 5% MMF with 5% ACV was also highly effective in protecting against TK− HSV-2-induced cutaneous lesions (that were refractory to ACV treatment) in athymic nude mice. Topical therapy with MMF was very well tolerated, and no signs of irritation were observed. When given perorally at 200 mg/kg of body weight/day, MMF potentiated to some extent the growth retardation induced by GCV in young NMRI mice. These observations may have clinical implications (i) for those transplant recipients who receive both MMF and either ACV, GCV, or PCV and (ii) for the treatment of ACV-resistant mucocutaneous HSV infections. PMID:9527762

  7. Mycophenolate Mofetil Modulates Differentiation of Th1/Th2 and the Secretion of Cytokines in an Active Crohn’s Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Qing-Kang; Liu, Ju-Xiong; Li, Su-Nan; Gao, Ying-Jie; Lv, Yan; Xu, Zi-Peng; Huang, Bing-Xu; Xu, Shi-Yao; Yang, Dong-Xue; Zeng, Ya-Long; Liu, Dian-Feng; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is an alternative immunosuppressive agent that has been reported to be effective and well tolerated for the treatment of refractory inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of MMF on intestinal injury and tissue inflammation, which were caused by Crohn’s disease (CD). Here, trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-relapsing (TNBS) colitis was induced in mice; then, we measured the differentiation of Th1/Th2 cells in mouse splenocytes by flow cytometry and the secretion of cytokines in mice with TNBS-induced colitis by real-time polymerase chain reaction and/or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (RT-PCR/ELISA). The results show that MMF significantly inhibited mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12, IL-6, and IL-1β in mice with TNBS-induced colitis; however, MMF did not inhibit the expression of IL-10 mRNA. Additionally, ELISA showed that the serum levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12, IL-6, and IL-1β were down-regulated in a TNBS model of colitis. Flow cytometric analysis showed MMF markedly reduced the percentages of Th1 and Th2 splenocytes in the CD mouse model. Mycophenolic acid (MPA) also significantly decreased the percentages of splenic Th1 and Th2 cells in vitro. Furthermore, MMF treatment not only significantly ameliorated diarrhea, and loss of body weight but also abrogated the histopathologic severity and inflammatory response of inflammatory colitis, and increased the survival rate of TNBS-induced colitic mice. These results suggest that treatment with MMF may improve experimental colitis and induce inflammatory response remission of CD by down-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines via modulation of the differentiation of Th1/Th2 cells. PMID:26561804

  8. The effect of mycophenolate mofetil on disease development in the gld.apoE (-/-) mouse model of accelerated atherosclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Richez, Christophe; Richards, Rocco J; Duffau, Pierre; Weitzner, Zachary; Andry, Christopher D; Rifkin, Ian R; Aprahamian, Tamar

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease that is characterized by autoantibody production and inflammatory disease involving multiple organs. Premature atherosclerosis is a common complication of SLE and results in substantial morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD). The reasons for the premature atherosclerosis in SLE are incompletely understood, although chronic inflammation is thought to play an important role. There is currently no known preventative treatment of premature atherosclerosis in SLE. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is an immunosuppressive agent that is commonly used for treatment of patients with SLE. In order to study the impact of this drug on murine lupus disease including premature atherosclerosis development, we treated gld.apoE(-/-) mice, a model of SLE and accelerated atherosclerosis, with MMF. We maintained seven-week old gld.apoE(-/-) mice on a high cholesterol Western diet with or without MMF. After 12 weeks on diet, mice receiving MMF showed decreased atherosclerotic lesion area compared to the control group. MMF treatment also improved the lupus phenotype, indicated by a significant decrease circulating autoantibody levels and ameliorating lupus nephritis associated with this model. This data suggests that the effects of MMF on the immune system may not only be beneficial for lupus, but also for inflammation driving lupus-associated atherosclerosis.

  9. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia and microtia in a newborn with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) exposure: phenocopy for Fryns syndrome or broad spectrum of teratogenic effects?

    PubMed

    Parisi, Melissa A; Zayed, Hatem; Slavotinek, Anne M; Rutledge, Joe C

    2009-06-01

    A newborn female infant born to a woman on immunosuppressive medications including mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) for a renal graft secondary to lupus nephritis presented with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and additional findings of microtia, esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula, cleft palate, congenital heart defect, digital anomalies, and dysmorphic facial features. Pulmonary hypoplasia resulted in death at day 2 of life. She was presumed to have Fryns syndrome based on diagnostic criteria established for this recessive disorder with prominent features including CDH, facial anomalies, and nail hypoplasia. In retrospect, this infant's findings are more likely the result of teratogenic exposure to MMF, as more recent data have emerged linking aural atresia, digital anomalies, and dysmorphic features to this drug. To date, this is the only human report of CDH in an infant with prenatal exposure to MMF, although the manufacturer's package insert alludes to animal studies with a broad spectrum of malformations, including CDH. Thus, a teratogenic exposure can mimic a known Mendelian genetic syndrome, and caution is urged in presuming a genetic etiology for infants with potential teratogenic exposure to relatively new drugs with limited published animal data.

  10. A critical analysis of racial difference with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) dosing, clinical outcomes and adverse effects in pediatric kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Jensen, C J; Shrivastava, S; Taber, D J; Weimert, N A; Shatat, I F; Orak, J; Chavin, K D; Baliga, P K

    2011-01-01

    There is paucity in the data examining the differences in mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) dosing and outcomes among pediatric kidney transplant recipients (PKTX) between races. The aims of this study were as follows (i) to assess whether higher doses of MMF are being utilized in African American (AA) PKTX (ii) to determine whether there is a correlation between MMF dose and outcomes between races, and (iii) to assess the adverse effects of MMF between races. This study analyzed 109 PKTX who received MMF between 7/99 and 5/08. Demographics were similar between groups. Fewer AAs received kidneys from living donors (18% vs. 44%), spent more time on dialysis (1.0 vs. 0.5 yr), and had more human leukocyte antigen mismatches (4 vs. 3). MMF doses among AA patients were higher throughout the study, with statistical differences at week 4, month 3, and month 18. AA patients had significantly higher acute rejection rates and trended toward poorer graft survival; infections, adverse events from MMF and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease tended to be lower in the AA patients. AA PKTX received higher MMF doses within the first three yr post-transplant compared to their non-AA counterparts, yet demonstrate significantly more acute rejection episodes. Importantly, MMF caused fewer adverse events in AA patients, despite these patients receiving higher doses.

  11. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia and Microtia in a Newborn with Mycophenolate Mofetil (MMF) Exposure: Phenocopy for Fryns Syndrome or Broad Spectrum of Teratogenic Effects?

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Melissa A.; Zayed, Hatem; Slavotinek, Anne M.; Rutledge, Joe C.

    2009-01-01

    A newborn female infant born to a woman on immunosuppressive medications including mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) for a renal graft secondary to lupus nephritis presented with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and additional findings of microtia, esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula, cleft palate, congenital heart defect, digital anomalies, and dysmorphic facial features. Pulmonary hypoplasia resulted in death at day two of life. She was presumed to have Fryns syndrome based on diagnostic criteria established for this recessive disorder with prominent features including CDH, facial anomalies, and nail hypoplasia. In retrospect, this infant's findings are more likely the result of teratogenic exposure to MMF, as more recent data have emerged linking aural atresia, digital anomalies, and dysmorphic features to this drug. To date, this is the only human report of CDH in an infant with prenatal exposure to MMF, although the manufacturer's package insert alludes to animal studies with a broad spectrum of malformations, including CDH. Thus, a teratogenic exposure can mimic a known Mendelian genetic syndrome, and caution is urged in presuming a genetic etiology for infants with potential teratogenic exposure to relatively new drugs with limited published animal data. PMID:19449404

  12. Advantage of Rapamycin Over Mycophenolate Mofetil When Used With Tacrolimus for Simultaneous Pancreas Kidney Transplants: Randomized, Single-Center Trial at 10 Years

    PubMed Central

    Ciancio, G.; Sageshima, J.; Chen, L.; Gaynor, J. J.; Hanson, L.; Tueros, L.; Montenora-Velarde, E.; Gomez, C.; Kupin, W.; Guerra, G.; Mattiazzi, A.; Fornoni, A.; Pugliese, A.; Roth, D.; Wolf, M.; Burke, G. W.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous pancreas kidney transplantation (SPKT) is the treatment of choice for patients with type 1 diabetes and end-stage renal disease. Rapamycin and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) have been used for maintenance immunosuppression with tacrolimus in SPKT; however, long-term outcomes are lacking. From September 2000 through December 2009, 170 SPKT recipients were enrolled in a randomized, prospective trial receiving Rapamycin (n = 84) or MMF (n = 86). All patients received dual induction therapy with thymoglobulin and daclizumab, and low-dose maintenance tacrolimus and corticosteroids. Compared to MMF, rates of freedom from first biopsy-proven acute kidney or pancreas rejection were superior for Rapamycin at year 1 (kidney: 100% vs. 88%; P = 0.001; pancreas: 99% vs. 92%; P = 0.04) and at year 10 (kidney: 88% vs. 71%, P = 0.01; pancreas: 99% vs. 89%, P = 0.01). The higher rates of rejection were associated with withholding MMF (vs. Rapamycin, p = 0.009), generally for gastrointestinal or bone marrow toxicity. There was no significant difference in creatinine, proteinuria, c-peptide, viral infections, lymphoproliferative disorders or posttransplant diabetes. HbA1C and lipid levels were normal in both groups, although higher in the Rapamycin arm. There were no significant differences in patient or allograft survival. In this 10-year SPKT study, Rapamycin in combination with tacrolimus was better tolerated and more effective than MMF. Overall, the patient and allograft survival were equivalent. PMID:22946986

  13. Expression of NO Synthase Under Medication with Cyclosporine A, Mycophenolate Mofetil, and Tacrolimus during Development of Transplant Vasculopathy on Rat Cardiac Allograft.

    PubMed

    Bogossian, Harilaos; Frommeyer, Gerrit; Ninios, Ilias; Bandorski, Dirk; Seyfarth, Melchior; Matzaroglou, Charalampos; Lemke, Bernd; Eckardt, Lars; Zarse, Markus; Kafchitsas, Konstantinos

    2016-08-01

    The transplant vasculopathy as a sign of chronic graft rejection affects both the epicardial and the intramyocardial arteries of the graft. This is at least partially mediated by NO synthases. The aim of this study was to assess possible protective effects of cyclosporine A (CsA), tacrolimus (FK506), and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on the expression of NO synthases in an experimental transplant rat model. Heart transplantation was performed in 322 rats. These were randomly assigned to four equal groups (control, CsA, FK506, MMF). Recipients were monitored up to 60 days after transplantation, while transplanted hearts were recovered at certain time points for analysis. Expression and staining intensity for endothelial nitric oxide synthases (e-nos) and inducible nitric oxide synthases (i-nos) were analyzed in epicardial and intramyocardial vessels in each group. All employed drugs led to a significant reduction of expression or staining intensity of i-nos and e-nos. MMF was most effective in reduction in expression of both NO synthases. These results imply that all described drugs prevent endothelial impairment induced by toxicity of NO and thereby prevent transplant vasculopathy. MMF seems to be the most effective drug. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Comparison of cyclosporine and tacrolimus combined with mycophenolate mofetil in prophylaxis for graft-versus-host disease after reduced-intensity umbilical cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Takashima, Shuichiro; Kato, Koji; Takase, Ken; Yoshimoto, Goichi; Yoshida, Shuro; Henzan, Hideho; Osaki, Koichi; Kamimura, Tomohiko; Iwasaki, Hiromi; Eto, Tetsuya; Teshima, Takanori; Nagafuji, Koji; Akashi, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood transplantation with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen (RIC-UCBT) is used increasingly in patients who have comorbid organ functions and lack human leukocyte antigen-identical donors. We compared the outcomes in 35 patients who received mycophenolate mofetil plus cyclosporine (MMF/CSP, n = 17) or MMF plus tacrolimus (MMF/TAC, n = 18) for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis after RIC-UCBT. Cumulative incidence of neutrophil engraftment was 94 and 89 % in MMF/CSP and MMF/TAC groups, respectively (p = 0.34). The incidence of pre-engraftment immune reaction did not differ between the MMF/CSP (41 %) and MMF/TAC (39 %, p = 1.00) groups; however, patients in the MMF/TAC group tended to have a lower incidence of grade II-IV acute GVHD than those in MMF/CSP group (28 vs 53 %, p = 0.11). Overall survival (OS) at 1 year was 43 and 60 % in MMF/CSP and MMF/TAC groups, respectively (p = 0.39). Progression-free survival, non-relapse mortality, and relapse rate were comparable between the two groups (p = 0.76, 0.59, and 0.88, respectively). In multivariate analyses, MMF/TAC GVHD prophylaxis was closely associated with improved OS, but not with incidence of engraftment and acute GVHD. These results suggest that more intensive GVHD prophylaxis with MMF/TAC decreased acute GVHD without affecting other clinical outcomes, resulting in improved OS after RIC-UCBT.

  15. Long-term follow-up of the MAINTAIN Nephritis Trial, comparing azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil as maintenance therapy of lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Tamirou, Farah; D'Cruz, David; Sangle, Shirish; Remy, Philippe; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Fiehn, Christoph; Ayala Guttierez, Maria del Mar; Gilboe, Inge-Magrethe; Tektonidou, Maria; Blockmans, Daniel; Ravelingien, Isabelle; le Guern, Véronique; Depresseux, Geneviève; Guillevin, Loïc; Cervera, Ricard; Houssiau, Frédéric A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To report the 10-year follow-up of the MAINTAIN Nephritis Trial comparing azathioprine (AZA) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as maintenance therapy of proliferative lupus nephritis, and to test different definitions of early response as predictors of long-term renal outcome. Methods In 2014, data on survival, kidney function, 24 h proteinuria, renal flares and other outcomes were collected for the 105 patients randomised between 2002 and 2006, except in 13 lost to follow-up. Results Death (2 and 3 in the AZA and MMF groups, respectively) and end-stage renal disease (1 and 3, respectively) were rare events. Time to renal flare (22 and 19 flares in AZA and MMF groups, respectively) did not differ between AZA and MMF patients. Patients with good long-term renal outcome had a much more stringent early decrease of 24 h proteinuria compared with patients with poor outcome. The positive predictive value of a 24 h proteinuria <0.5 g/day at 3 months, 6 months and 12 months for a good long-term renal outcome was excellent (between 89% and 92%). Inclusion of renal function and urinalysis in the early response criteria did not impact the value of early proteinuria decrease as long-term prognostic marker. Conclusions The long-term follow-up data of the MAINTAIN Nephritis Trial do not indicate that MMF is superior to AZA as maintenance therapy in a Caucasian population suffering from proliferative lupus nephritis. Moreover, we confirm the excellent positive predictive value of an early proteinuria decrease for long-term renal outcome. Trial registration number NCT00204022. PMID:25757867

  16. Long-term follow-up of the MAINTAIN Nephritis Trial, comparing azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil as maintenance therapy of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Tamirou, Farah; D'Cruz, David; Sangle, Shirish; Remy, Philippe; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Fiehn, Christoph; Ayala Guttierez, Maria del Mar; Gilboe, Inge-Magrethe; Tektonidou, Maria; Blockmans, Daniel; Ravelingien, Isabelle; le Guern, Véronique; Depresseux, Geneviève; Guillevin, Loïc; Cervera, Ricard; Houssiau, Frédéric A

    2016-03-01

    To report the 10-year follow-up of the MAINTAIN Nephritis Trial comparing azathioprine (AZA) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as maintenance therapy of proliferative lupus nephritis, and to test different definitions of early response as predictors of long-term renal outcome. In 2014, data on survival, kidney function, 24 h proteinuria, renal flares and other outcomes were collected for the 105 patients randomised between 2002 and 2006, except in 13 lost to follow-up. Death (2 and 3 in the AZA and MMF groups, respectively) and end-stage renal disease (1 and 3, respectively) were rare events. Time to renal flare (22 and 19 flares in AZA and MMF groups, respectively) did not differ between AZA and MMF patients. Patients with good long-term renal outcome had a much more stringent early decrease of 24 h proteinuria compared with patients with poor outcome. The positive predictive value of a 24 h proteinuria <0.5 g/day at 3 months, 6 months and 12 months for a good long-term renal outcome was excellent (between 89% and 92%). Inclusion of renal function and urinalysis in the early response criteria did not impact the value of early proteinuria decrease as long-term prognostic marker. The long-term follow-up data of the MAINTAIN Nephritis Trial do not indicate that MMF is superior to AZA as maintenance therapy in a Caucasian population suffering from proliferative lupus nephritis. Moreover, we confirm the excellent positive predictive value of an early proteinuria decrease for long-term renal outcome. NCT00204022. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Three-year results of a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial of mycophenolate mofetil versus azathioprine in cardiac transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Howard J; Kobashigawa, Jon; Keogh, Anne; Bourge, Robert; Renlund, Dale; Mentzer, Robert; Alderman, Edwin; Valantine, Hannah; Dureau, Georges; Mancini, Donna; Mamelok, Richard; Gordon, Robert; Wang, Whedy; Mehra, Mandeep; Constanzo, Maria Rosa; Hummel, Manfred; Johnson, Jay

    2005-05-01

    This study reports the 36-month results of a randomized, double-blind, active-controlled trial of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) vs azathioprine (AZA) in heart transplant patients. Patients were randomized at the time of transplant to receive MMF (1,500 mg twice a day, N = 327) or AZA (1.5 to 3 mg/kg in 4 daily doses, N = 323) in addition to cyclosporine and corticosteroids; 289 patients in each group received study drug. Data were analyzed in all randomized patients (enrolled) and in patients who received study medications (treated). Clinical and graft assessments continued for 36 months. For the co-primary end-point, 53 of 289 (18.3%) AZA-treated patients either died or received another transplant compared with 34 of 289 (11.8%) MMF-treated patients (p < 0.01). Time to re-transplantation or patient death was significantly shorter for AZA- than MMF-treated patients (p = 0.029). In patients undergoing intravascular ultrasound, the change in mean maximal intimal thickness was less for the MMF group than for the AZA group (0.06 +/- 0.03 mm vs 0.13 +/- 0.03 mm, respectively; p = 0.056). No significant differences between treatments were observed in quantitative coronary angiographic measurements of transplant coronary vasculopathy. Congestive heart failure, atrial arrhythmia and leukopenia were more common in the AZA group, whereas diarrhea, esophagitis, Herpes simplex, Herpes zoster and cytomegalovirus (CMV) tissue invasion were more common in MMF-treated patients. MMF reduces mortality and graft loss up to 36 months after transplantation.

  18. Mycophenolate mofetil for the treatment of children with immune thrombocytopenia and Evans syndrome. A retrospective data review from the Italian association of paediatric haematology/oncology.

    PubMed

    Miano, Maurizio; Ramenghi, Ugo; Russo, Giovanna; Rubert, Laura; Barone, Angelica; Tucci, Fabio; Farruggia, Piero; Petrone, Angelamaria; Mondino, Anna; Lo Valvo, Laura; Crescenzio, Nicoletta; Bellia, Francesco; Olivieri, Irene; Palmisani, Elena; Caviglia, Ilaria; Dufour, Carlo; Fioredda, Francesca

    2016-11-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has been shown to be effective in children with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) and Evans syndrome (ES), but data from larger series and details on the timing of the response are lacking. We evaluated 56 children treated with MMF for ITP (n = 40) or ES (n = 16), which was primary or secondary to autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome -related syndrome (ARS). Thirty-five of the 54 evaluable patients (65%) achieved a partial (18%) or complete (46%) response after a median (range) of 20 (7-137) and 37 (7-192) d, respectively. ITP and ES patients responded in 58% and 81% of cases (P = not significant, ns), with complete response in 32% and 81% (P = 0·01), respectively. 60% and 73% of children with primary disease and ARS responded (P = ns) with complete response in 34% and 68% of cases (P = 0·01), respectively. Six of 35 (17%) children relapsed after a median of 283 d (range 189-1036). Limited toxicity was observed in four patients. The median durations of treatment and follow-up were seven and 12·7 months, respectively. This is the largest reported cohort of patients treated with MMF for ITP/ES. The results show that MMF is effective and safe and provides a relatively quick response, suggesting that it has a potential role as an alternative to more aggressive and expensive second/further-line treatments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide and Tacrolimus-Mycophenolate Mofetil Combination Prevents Graft-versus-Host Disease in Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation from HLA-Matched Donors.

    PubMed

    Carnevale-Schianca, Fabrizio; Caravelli, Daniela; Gallo, Susanna; Coha, Valentina; D'Ambrosio, Lorenzo; Vassallo, Elena; Fizzotti, Marco; Nesi, Francesca; Gioeni, Luisa; Berger, Massimo; Polo, Alessandra; Gammaitoni, Loretta; Becco, Paolo; Giraudo, Lidia; Mangioni, Monica; Sangiolo, Dario; Grignani, Giovanni; Rota-Scalabrini, Delia; Sottile, Antonino; Fagioli, Franca; Aglietta, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) remains the only curative therapy for many hematologic malignancies but it is limited by high nonrelapse mortality (NRM), primarily from unpredictable control of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Recently, post-transplant cyclophosphamide demonstrated improved GVHD control in allogeneic bone marrow HCT. Here we explore cyclophosphamide in allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (alloPBSCT). Patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies received alloPBSCT from HLA-matched unrelated/related donors. GVHD prophylaxis included combination post-HCT cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg (days +3 and +4) and tacrolimus/mofetil mycophenolate (T/MMF) (day +5 forward). The primary objective was the cumulative incidence of acute and chronic GVHD. Between March 2011 and May 2015, 35 consecutive patients received the proposed regimen. MMF was stopped in all patients at day +28; the median discontinuation of tacrolimus was day +113. Acute and chronic GVHD cumulative incidences were 17% and 7%, respectively, with no grade IV GVHD events, only 2 patients requiring chronic GVHD immunosuppression control, and no deaths from GVHD. Two-year NRM, overall survival, event-free survival, and chronic GVHD event-free survival rates were 3%, 77%, 54%, and 49%, respectively. The graft-versus-tumor effect was maintained as 5 of 15 patients (33%) who received HCT with evidence of disease experienced further disease response. A post-transplant cyclophosphamide + T/MMF combination strategy effectively prevented acute and chronic GVHD after alloPBSCT from HLA-matched donors and achieved an unprecedented low NRM without losing efficacy in disease control or impaired development of the graft-versus-tumor effect. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02300571.

  20. Cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil 48 hours before renal transplantation enables the use of low cyclosporine doses and achieves better graft function.

    PubMed

    Maamoun, H; Soliman, A; Zayed, B

    2010-12-01

    Reducing calcineurin-inhibitor induced nephrotoxicity and simultaneously avoiding long-term side effects are desirable goals in renal transplantation. We examined the hypothesis that administration of cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) 48 hours before renal transplantation allows reduction in the target cyclosporine C2 concentration, thus decreasing toxicity and improving graft function. We enrolled 80 kidney recipients in a single-center study comparing 2 cyclosporine-based protocols. Group I patients (n = 40) received a standard dose of cyclosporine (blood cyclosporine C2, 800-1500 ng/mL) with MMF and standard doses of corticosteroids. Group II patients (n = 40) were treated with a low dose of cyclosporine (blood cyclosporine C2, 450-800 ng/mL) and MMF plus low doses of corticosteroids after induction 48 hours before surgery with cyclosporine and MMF. Patient (97.5% vs 100%) and graft survivals (92.5% vs 95%) at 1 year were not different between the groups, although patients in group II experienced significantly fewer acute rejection episodes (10% vs 30%; P < .01). Delayed graft function occurred less often among group I than group II (17.5 vs 20%), but the difference was not significant. Graft function at 1 year was significantly better among group II (serum creatinine 1.31 vs 1.64 mg/dL and creatinine clearance 63 mL/min versus 47 mL/min; P < .05). We concluded that administration of cyclosporine and MMF 48 hours before renal transplantation allowed the safe effective use of low target C2 cyclosporine concentrations, enabling an early decrease in cyclosporine dose. These preliminary results indicated better 1-year graft function compared with the normal cyclosporine dose regimen. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Rejection is a strong graft survival predictor in live donor pediatric renal transplantation using cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroids: 5-year outcomes in a single Mexican center.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Mier, G; Enriquez-De Los Santos, H; Méndez-López, M T; Avila-Pardo, S F; Budar-Fernandez, L F; Gonzalez-Velazquez, F

    2013-05-01

    Long-term graft function and survival are of particular importance in children assuming that they have a longer transplantation life span than most adults. Because acute rejection episodes (ARE) continue to have a serious impact on graft loss, we analyzed the effects of ARE on 5-year survival and function in our population. Fifty-seven living donor kidney transplant recipients (34 males) younger than 18 years of age (13.5 ± 2.6 years; range, 5-17) were follow up for at feast 12 months using cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroid therapy with or without induction treatment between February 2003 and December 2010. ARE incidence during the first 12 months following transplantation was 14%. One-, 3- and 5-year serum creatinine values were 1.24 ± 0.39, 2.16 ± 2.39, and 1.76 ± 0.9 mg/dL, respectively. Mean calculated creatinine clearances (Schwartz) at 1, 3, and 5 years were 82.5 ± 24.8, 64.7 ± 24.1, and 67 ± 27.5 mL/min*1.73 m(2), respectively. Patient/graft survival rates were 96/85%, 90/72%, and 88/65% at 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively. Patients who experienced an ARE within 12 months following transplantation displayed a reduced 5-year graft survival rate (37.5%) versus those who did not (78%; P = .005). Patients who did not have an ARE during 60 months had a higher graft survival rate (76%) than those who had ARE (33%; P = .001). Patient without basiliximab induction showed a lower 5-year graft survival rate (61% vs 100%; P = not significant [NS]). ARE is an important risk factor for graft loss in the pediatric kidney transplant population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A randomized trial with steroids and antithymocyte globulins comparing cyclosporine/azathioprine versus tacrolimus/mycophenolate mofetil (CATM2) in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vacher-Coponat, Henri; Moal, Valerie; Indreies, Monica; Purgus, Raj; Loundou, Anderson; Burtey, Stephane; Brunet, Philippe; Moussi-Frances, Julie; Daniel, Laurent; Dussol, Bertrand; Berland, Yvon

    2012-02-27

    The best immunosuppressive regimen in benefit-risk ratio in renal transplantation is debated. Nowadays, tacrolimus (Tac) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) are considered more efficient than cyclosporine A (CsA) and MMF, but recent studies have challenged this assumption. We conducted a monocentric, prospective, open-labeled, randomized, and controlled trial comparing CsA/azathioprine (Aza) versus Tac/MMF in 289 kidney transplant recipients treated with antithymocyte globulins and prednisone. Primary outcome was the number of patients with clinically suspected acute rejection at 1 year. Secondary outcomes were the number of patients with biopsy-proven acute rejection (BPAR), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), patient and graft survivals, and adverse events at 1 and 3 years. During the first year, 21 patients had clinically suspected acute rejection with CsA/Aza (14.4%) vs. 11 (7.7%) with Tac/MMF (P=0.07). BPAR, including borderline, was more frequent in the CsA/Aza group (14.4%) than in the Tac/MMF group (5.6%; P=0.013). At 1 year, patient and graft survivals were not different, and eGFR was 48±1 in the CsA/Aza group and 53±1 mL/min/1.73 m in the Tac/MMF group (P=0.007). There was no significant difference in diabetes after transplantation (16.8% and 18.8%, respectively). With antithymocyte globulins and steroids, clinically suspected acute rejections did not differ between CsA/Aza and Tac/MMF arms. Analysis of secondary endpoints showed a lower rate of BPAR, including border line, and a higher eGFR in the Tac/MMF group. CsA/Aza allowed a low acute rejection rate, but Tac/MMF seemed as a better regimen regarding severe secondary outcomes.

  3. 5-year follow-up of a randomized clinical study comparing everolimus plus reduced-dose cyclosporine with mycophenolate mofetil plus standard-dose cyclosporine in de novo kidney transplantation: Retrospective single center assessment.

    PubMed

    Hiramitsu, Takahisa; Okada, Manabu; Futamura, Kenta; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Tsujita, Makoto; Goto, Norihiko; Narumi, Shunji; Watarai, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Asami; Iwasaki, Kenta; Uchida, Kazuharu; Kobayashi, Takaaki

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of everolimus plus reduced-dose cyclosporine compared with mycophenolate mofetil plus standard-dose cyclosporine 5years after living donor kidney transplantation. Between March 2008 and August 2009, 24 living donor kidney transplantations were enrolled in a 2-year, multicenter, randomized phase 3 study (RAD001A1202 study). 24 recipients were randomly classified into two groups and closely observed for 5years. 13 recipients were administered steroid, reduced-dose cyclosporine, everolimus and basiliximab (EVR group). 11 recipients were administered steroid, standard-dose cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil and basiliximab (STD group). Two groups were compared not only in graft function including estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and proteinuria, but also in adverse events such as de novo donor-specific antibody (DSA) production, rejection, new-onset diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. No graft loss was identified in 5years. The incidences of acute T cell rejection, de novo DSA production, hyperlipidemia, and new-onset diabetes were similar. eGFR levels throughout the observation periods were similar. Three cases of proteinuria were identified in STD group. One case of proteinuria observed in EVR group was well controlled with angiotensin receptor blocker. Incidence of CMV infection in CMV antibody-positive recipients was significantly lower in EVR group. The safety and efficacy of reduced-dose cyclosporine and everolimus protocol were similar to those of standard-dose cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil other than for superior prevention of CMV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF TACROLIMUS AND PREDNISONE VERSUS TACROLIMUS, PREDNISONE AND MYCOPHENOLATE MOFETIL IN PRIMARY ADULT LIVER TRANSPLANTATION: A SINGLE CENTER REPORT1

    PubMed Central

    Jain, A.; Kashyap, R.; Dodson, F.; Kramer, D.; Hamad, I.; Khan, A.; Eghestad, B.; Starzl, T.E.; Fung, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Tacrolimus (TAC) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) are currently approved immunosuppressants for prevention of rejection in liver transplantation (LTx). They have different modes of action and toxicity profiles, but the efficacy and safety of MMF in primary liver transplantation with TAC has not been determined. Methods An Institutional Review Board-approved, open-label, single-center, prospective randomized trial was initiated to study the efficacy and toxicity of TAC and steroids (double-drug therapy (D)) versus TAC, steroids, and MMF (triple-drug therapy (T)) in primary adult LTx recipients. Both groups of patients were started on the same doses of TAC and steroids. Patients randomized to T also received 1 gm MMF twice a day. Results Between August 1995 and May 1998, 350 patients were enrolled at a single center-175 in the D and 175 in the T groups. All patients were followed until May 1998, with a mean follow-up of 33.8±9.1 months. Using an intention-to-treat analysis, the 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-year patient survival was 85.1%, 81.6%, 78.6%, and 75.8%, respectively, for D and 87.4%, 85.4%, 81.3%, and 79.9%, respectively, for T. The 4-year graft survival was 70% for D and 72.1% for T. Although the rate of acute rejection in the first 3 months was significantly lower for T than for D (28% for triple vs. 38.9% for double, P=0.03), the overall rate of rejection for T at the end of 1 year was not significantly lower than for the D (38.9% triple vs. 45.2% double). The median time to the first episode of rejection was 14 days for D versus 24 days for T (P=0.008). During the study period, 38 of 175 patients in D received MMF to control ongoing acute rejection, nephrotoxicity, and/or neurotoxicity. On the other hand, 103 patients in the T discontinued MMF for infection, myelosuppression, and/or gastrointestinal disturbances. The need for corticosteroids was less after 6 months for T and the perioperative need for dialysis was lower with use of MMF. Conclusion This

  5. Ten-year results of a randomized trial comparing tacrolimus versus cyclosporine a in combination with mycophenolate mofetil after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Guethoff, Sonja; Meiser, Bruno M; Groetzner, Jan; Eifert, Sandra; Grinninger, Carola; Ueberfuhr, Peter; Reichart, Bruno; Hagl, Christian; Kaczmarek, Ingo

    2013-02-27

    Long-term results of prospective randomized trials comparing triple immunosuppressive strategies combining tacrolimus (TAC) or cyclosporine A (CsA) with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and steroids after heart transplantation (HTX) are rarely published. Therefore, we collected long-term follow-up data of an intervention cohort 10 years after randomization. Ten-year follow-up data of 60 patients included in a prospective, randomized trial between 1998 and 2000 were analyzed as intention-to-treat (TAC-MMF n=30; CsA-MMF n=30). Baseline characteristics were well balanced. Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) was graduated in accordance with the new ISHLT classification. Survival at 1, 5, and 10 years was 96.7%, 80.0%, and 66.7% for TAC-MMF and 90.0%, 83.3%, and 80.0% for CsA-MMF (P=ns). Freedom from acute rejection (AR) was significantly higher in TAC-MMF versus CsA-MMF (65.5% vs. 21.7%, log-rank 8.3, P=0.004). Freedom from ISHLT≥CAV1 after 5 and 10 years was in TAC-MMF 64.0% and 45.8%, and in CsA-MMF 36.0% (log-rank 3.0, P=0.085) and 8.0% (log-rank 9.0, P=0.003). No difference in long-term results for freedom from coronary angioplasty or stenting, renal dysfunction, diabetes mellitus, CMV infection, or malignancy was detected. Cross-over effects because of treatment switch may result in impairment of significance between the groups. The long-term analysis resulted in a significant difference in manifestation of CAV between the groups after 10 years. Less rejection in the TAC-group might have contributed to the lower incidence of CAV. Superior freedom from AR and CAV in the TAC-MMF group did not result in better long-term survival.

  6. [Daclizumab in combination with mycophenolate mofetil and a late introduction of Tacrolimus at low doses, as a therapeutic approach in the elderly renal transplant donor-recipients pairs in kidney transplant].

    PubMed

    Gentil, M A; Osuna, A; Capdevilla, L; Cantarell, C; Pereira, P; Mazuecos, A; González Molina, M

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays, it is more frequent the use of kidneys from older donors in the renal transplantation. Moreover, it is also increasing the age of the recipients due to the ageing of the population treated with hemodialysis. This makes that recipients become older more commonly. This situation raises specific problems in the renal graft and in the recipient as well. In this manuscript we present the results of a multicenter study that analyzed an immunosuppressive strategy specifically designed to elderly renal transplant donor-recipients. Patients > or =50 years were transplanted from donors > or =55 years. Immunosuppressive strategy consisted of daclizumab (2 doses of 1mg/Kg) in combination with steroids, mycophenolate mofetil (2g/daily during the first 45 days and then adjusted according to local practice) and Tacrolimus. Tacrolimus was introduced between 5 and 7 day post-transplantation, adjusting the predose levels between 4-8 ng/mL. Mean follow-up was 12 months. A total of 133 patients were included in the study. Mean age of recipients and donors was 61.3+/-6.2 years and 64.4+/-5.3, respectively. 42.9% of patients needed dialysis during the first week (median 4 days). Between first month and first year, serum creatinine improved from 2.0+/-1.0 mg/dl to 1.5+/-0.4 mg/dl. Similar improvements were observed when creatinine clearance (Cockroft-Gault) was calculated. The survival of patient and renal graft at 12 months was 97.7% and 96.1%, respectively. The acute rejection rate was 13.5%. Security profile was good, as expected. The Daclizumab and mycophenolate mofetil regimen with a late introduction of Tacrolimus at low doses is a good alternative in the elderly renal transplant recipients with a low immunologic risk.

  7. Exploratory research for optimal GvHD prophylaxis after single unit CBT in adults: short-term methotrexate reduced the incidence of severe GvHD more than mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Terakura, S; Wake, A; Inamoto, Y; Murata, M; Sakai, R; Yamaguchi, T; Takahashi, S; Uchida, N; Onishi, Y; Ohashi, K; Ozawa, Y; Kanamori, H; Yamaguchi, H; Fukuda, T; Ichinohe, T; Takanashi, M; Atsuta, Y; Teshima, T

    2017-03-01

    In order to examine GvHD prophylaxis in umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) in more detail, we compared transplant outcomes after UCBT for acute leukemia among GvHD prophylaxes using registry data. We selected patients transplanted with a calcineurin inhibitor and methotrexate (MTX)/mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) combination. A total of 1516 first myeloablative UCBT between 2000 and 2012 (Cyclosporine A (CyA) plus MTX, 824, Tacrolimus (Tac) plus MTX, 554, Tac plus MMF, 138) were included. With adjusted analyses, Tac plus MMF showed a significantly higher risk for grade II-IV and III-IV acute GvHD than CyA or Tac plus MTX. Although NRM was similar, Tac plus MMF showed a significantly lower risk of relapse than CyA or Tac plus MTX. A significant difference was observed in the risk of overall mortality (OM) between the MTX-containing group and MMF-containing group. In patients with standard-risk disease, there was no significant difference in the risk of OM in any GvHD prophylaxis. However, in patients with advanced-risk disease, Tac plus MMF showed a significantly lower risk of OM. Therefore, MTX-containing prophylaxis is preferred in UCBT for standard-risk disease, whereas MMF-containing prophylaxis is preferred for advanced-risk disease. A prospective study to identify optimal GvHD prophylaxis for UCBT is warranted.

  8. Minimization of maintenance immunosuppressive therapy after renal transplantation comparing cyclosporine A/azathioprine or cyclosporine A/mycophenolate mofetil bitherapy to cyclosporine A monotherapy: a 10-year postrandomization follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Thierry, Antoine; Le Meur, Yannick; Ecotière, Laure; Abou-Ayache, Ramzi; Etienne, Isabelle; Laurent, Charlotte; Vuiblet, Vincent; Colosio, Charlotte; Bouvier, Nicolas; Aldigier, Jean-Claude; Rerolle, Jean-Philippe; Javaugue, Vincent; Gand, Elise; Bridoux, Frank; Essig, Marie; Hurault de Ligny, Bruno; Touchard, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Long-term outcomes in renal transplant recipients withdrawn from steroid and submitted to further minimization of immunosuppressive regimen after 1 year are lacking. In this multicenter study, 204 low immunological risk kidney transplant recipients were randomized 14.2 ± 3.7 months post-transplantation to receive either cyclosporine A (CsA) + azathioprine (AZA; n = 53), CsA + mycophenolate mofetil (MMF; n = 53), or CsA monotherapy (n = 98). At 3 years postrandomization, the occurrence of biopsy for graft dysfunction was similar in bitherapy and monotherapy groups (21/106 vs. 26/98; P = 0.25). At 10 years postrandomization, patients' survival was 100%, 94.2%, and 95.8% (P = 0.25), and death-censored graft survival was 94.9%, 94.7%, and 95.2% (P = 0.34) in AZA, MMF, and CsA groups, respectively. Mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was 70.4 ± 31.1, 60.1 ± 22.2, and 60.1 ± 19.0 ml/min/1.73 m(2), respectively (P = 0.16). The incidence of biopsy-proven acute rejection was 1.4%/year in the whole cohort. None of the patients developed polyomavirus-associated nephropathy. The main cause of graft loss (n = 12) was chronic antibody-mediated rejection (n = 6). De novo donor-specific antibodies were detected in 13% of AZA-, 21% of MMF-, and 14% of CsA-treated patients (P = 0.29). CsA monotherapy after 1 year is safe and associated with prolonged graft survival in well-selected renal transplant recipient (ClinicalTrials.gov number: 980654). © 2015 Steunstichting ESOT.

  9. Pharmacokinetic Assessment of Drug‐Drug Interactions of Isavuconazole With the Immunosuppressants Cyclosporine, Mycophenolic Acid, Prednisolone, Sirolimus, and Tacrolimus in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Groll, Andreas H.; Desai, Amit; Han, David; Howieson, Corrie; Kato, Kota; Akhtar, Shahzad; Kowalski, Donna; Lademacher, Christopher; Lewis, William; Pearlman, Helene; Mandarino, Debra; Yamazaki, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This report summarizes phase 1 studies that evaluated pharmacokinetic interactions between the novel triazole antifungal agent isavuconazole and the immunosuppressants cyclosporine, mycophenolic acid, prednisolone, sirolimus, and tacrolimus in healthy adults. Healthy subjects received single oral doses of cyclosporine (300 mg; n = 24), mycophenolate mofetil (1000 mg; n = 24), prednisone (20 mg; n = 21), sirolimus (2 mg; n = 22), and tacrolimus (5 mg; n = 24) in the presence and absence of clinical doses of oral isavuconazole (200 mg 3 times daily for 2 days; 200 mg once daily thereafter). Coadministration with isavuconazole increased the area under the concentration‐time curves (AUC0–∞) of tacrolimus, sirolimus, and cyclosporine by 125%, 84%, and 29%, respectively, and the AUCs of mycophenolic acid and prednisolone by 35% and 8%, respectively. Maximum concentrations (Cmax) of tacrolimus, sirolimus, and cyclosporine were 42%, 65%, and 6% higher, respectively; Cmax of mycophenolic acid and prednisolone were 11% and 4% lower, respectively. Isavuconazole pharmacokinetics were mostly unaffected by the immunosuppressants. Two subjects experienced elevated creatinine levels in the cyclosporine study; most adverse events were not considered to be of clinical concern. These results indicate that isavuconazole is an inhibitor of cyclosporine, mycophenolic acid, sirolimus, and tacrolimus metabolism. PMID:27273343

  10. Clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of mycophenolate in patients with autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Abd Rahman, Azrin N; Tett, Susan E; Staatz, Christine E

    2013-05-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA), the active drug moiety of mycophenolate, is a potent immunosuppressant agent, which is increasingly being used in the treatment of patients with various autoimmune diseases. An understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of mycophenolate in this population should assist the clinician with rational dosage decisions. This review aims to provide an overview of the published literature on the clinical pharmacokinetics of mycophenolate in autoimmune disease and a briefer summary of current pharmacodynamic knowledge, and to identify areas of potential future research in this field. A literature search was conducted using PubMed and EMBASE databases as well as bibliographies of relevant articles and 'on-line early' pages of key journals. Twenty-six pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies of mycophenolate in people with autoimmune disease were identified and appraised. Twenty-two of these studies used non-compartmental analysis techniques and four used population modelling methods to estimate mycophenolate pharmacokinetic parameters. Seven studies linked mycophenolate exposure to treatment outcomes. Only four studies measured free (unbound) as well as total mycophenolate exposure and only two studies characterised MPA disposition following enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) administration. Across all studies MPA displayed erratic and complex pharmacokinetics with substantial between-subject variability. Based on total drug measurement, the dose-normalised MPA area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from 0 to 12 h post-dose (AUC12) varied at least five- to ten-fold between subjects. Typical values for apparent oral clearance (CL/F) of MPA during nonlinear mixed-effects modelling ranged from 8.3 to 25.3 L/h. Patient renal function, serum albumin levels, sex, ethnicity, food intake, concurrent administration of interacting drugs such as antacids, metal-containing medications and proton pump inhibitors and

  11. Nonrelapse mortality and mycophenolic acid exposure in nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Cara L; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storer, Barry; Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E; Boeckh, Michael J; Bemer, Meagan J; Knutson, Jennifer; McCune, Jeannine S

    2013-08-01

    We evaluated the pharmacodynamic relationships between mycophenolic acid (MPA), the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and outcomes in 308 patients after nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation. Patients were conditioned with total body irradiation ± fludarabine, received grafts from HLA-matched related (n = 132) or unrelated (n = 176) donors, and received postgrafting immunosuppression with MMF and a calcineurin inhibitor. Total and unbound MPA pharmacokinetics were determined to day 25; maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimators were used to estimate total MPA concentration at steady state (Css). Rejection occurred in 9 patients, 8 of whom had a total MPA Css less than 3 μg/mL. In patients receiving a related donor graft, MPA Css was not associated with clinical outcomes. In patients receiving an unrelated donor graft, low total MPA Css was associated with increased grades III to IV acute graft-versus-host disease and increased nonrelapse mortality but not with day 28 T cell chimerism, disease relapse, cytomegalovirus reactivation, or overall survival. We conclude that higher initial oral MMF doses and subsequent targeting of total MPA Css to greater than 2.96 μg/mL could lower grades III to IV acute graft-versus-host disease and nonrelapse mortality in patients receiving an unrelated donor graft.

  12. Non-relapse mortality and mycophenolic acid exposure in nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Cara L.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Storer, Barry; Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E.; Boeckh, Michael J.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Knutson, Jennifer; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the pharmacodynamic relationships between mycophenolic acid (MPA), the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and outcomes in 308 patients after nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplant. Patients were conditioned with total body irradiation ± fludarabine, received grafts from HLA-matched related (N=132) or unrelated (N=176) donors, and received post-grafting immunosuppression with MMF and a calcineurin inhibitor. Total and unbound MPA pharmacokinetics were determined to day 25; maximum a posteriori Bayesian estimators were used to estimate total MPA concentration at steady state (Css). Rejection occurred in nine patients, eight of whom had a total MPA Css less than 3 μg/mL. In patients receiving a related donor graft, MPA Css was not associated with clinical outcomes. In patients receiving an unrelated donor graft, low total MPA Css was associated with increased grades 3–4 acute graft versus host disease (aGVHD) and increased non-relapse mortality, but not with day 28 T-cell chimerism, disease relapse, cytomegalovirus reactivation, or overall survival. We conclude that higher initial oral MMF doses and subsequent targeting of total MPA Css to greater than 2.96 μg/mL could lower grades 3–4 aGVHD and non-relapse mortality in patients receiving an unrelated donor graft. PMID:23660171

  13. Enteric coating of mycophenolate reduces dosage adjustments.

    PubMed

    Brister, K; Yau, C L; Slakey, D

    2009-06-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) are bioequivalent. However, the effectiveness of MMF may be limited by gastrointestinal (GI) side effects. This study assessed the relationship between the number of medication dosage adjustments and posttransplantation side effects. In a review of 109 kidney transplant patients, 65 initially received MMF and 44 initially received EC-MPS. The incidences of patient-reported GI complications were significantly different: MMF 45.5% vs EC-MPS 35.3% (P = .0194). The proportions of patients requiring dosage adjustment due to GI complications were MMF 5.9% and EC-MPS 2.3% (P < .0001). Patients receiving MMF were more likely to experience GI complications resulting in dosage adjustment (odds ratio = 9.9; P = .0306). The incidences of acute rejection, cytomegalovirus (CMV), and leukopenia resulting in dosage adjustment were not significantly different. Patients receiving MMF required more immunosuppressive medication adjustments, which may complicate care and decrease overall compliance.

  14. Myasthenia gravis exacerbation after discontinuing mycophenolate

    PubMed Central

    Rocke, David M.; Dengel, Karsten; Richman, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether discontinuation or marked reduction of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) causes MG exacerbations. Methods: We identified 88 patients with MG who took MMF during the 5-year period 2007–2011 at our MG clinic. We then performed detailed chart reviews and recorded all MG exacerbations and their relationship to MMF and other treatment changes. We also recorded demographic data and disease characteristics (including antibody status and Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America status). Results: There were 14 patients who had an MG exacerbation during the study period. Of these, 13 had discontinued MMF therapy, with a median time until exacerbation of 16 weeks after discontinuation (9 patients) or marked dose reduction (4 patients) of MMF therapy (exacerbation in the absence of change in any other component of the immunosuppressive regimen). Using the cluster option in a Cox regression analysis, the MMF coefficient was −5.32, with a standard error of 1.05 and a p value of 0.0002, corresponding to an estimated hazard ratio of 204. Conclusions: This retrospective cohort study suggests that discontinuation/marked reduction of MMF therapy may increase the risk of MG exacerbation many fold, supporting the hypothesis that MMF plays a role in the maintenance of MG remission/minimal manifestation status. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that in patients with MG taking MMF, discontinuation or marked reduction of MMF causes MG exacerbation. PMID:26850977

  15. Simultaneous determination of mycophenolic acid and its glucuronides in human plasma using isocratic ion pair high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mino, Yasuaki; Naito, Takafumi; Matsushita, Tomomi; Kagawa, Yoshiyuki; Kawakami, Junichi

    2008-02-13

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of mycophenolic acid (MPA) following administration of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) or the enteric-coated sodium salt of MPA formulations, seems beneficial because of the large intra- and inter-individual variability in MPA pharmacokinetics. MPA is an active component from these oral formulations and are further metabolised to inactive phenolic glucuronide (MPAG) and active acyl glucuronide (AcMPAG). This study aims to determine simultaneously these three metabolites of MMF using isocratic ion pair HPLC and to evaluate the short-term stability of AcMPAG in human plasma. Samples were prepared using solid phase extraction. Chromatographic separation was achieved over an RP column (TSKgel ODS-80Ts, 150 mm x 4.6 mm i.d., 5 microm particle size) with acetonitrile and 30 mM tetra-n-butylammonium bromide containing 5 mM ammonium acetate at pH 9.0 (33/67, v/v) as the mobile phase. The flow rate of the mobile phase was 1ml/min, and the wavelength of determination by UV detection was 250 nm (run time, 16 min). Calibration curves for MPA, MPAG and AcMPAG in human plasma were linear over a concentration range of 0.05-50, 0.1-400 and 0.08-8 microg/ml, respectively. Intra- and inter-assay R.S.D. were<6.5%. Extraction efficiencies were more than 85% for all analytes. Since AcMPAG was unstable in human plasma, plasma acidification was needed for the quantification of AcMPAG. Large interindividual variability was observed in the AcMPAG pharmacokinetics in the early period after renal transplantation. In conclusion, a simple, accurate and reproducible HPLC method to measure simultaneously these three MMF metabolites has been established. The method will be helpful in evaluating pharmacokinetics of MPA and its glucuronides.

  16. Enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium experience in liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, G P C; Zanotelli, M L; Gleisner, A L M; de Mello Brandão, A; Marroni, C A

    2006-04-01

    Mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) has been shown to be as effective and as safe as mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in renal transplant patients. Nevertheless, compared to MMF its use in liver transplant patients has been limited. The purpose of this study was to analyze the efficacy of EC-MPS as a primary immunosuppressant or as a replacement for MMF in liver transplant patients. Ninety among 470 liver transplant recipients were receiving or had added an antimetabolite to their immunosuppressant therapy. The most common reason for this change was renal dysfunction (47.8%) or diabetes (32.2%). EC-MPS was started at a median of 30 months after liver transplantation. The mean administered daily dose was 720 mg/d. At least one gastrointestinal symptom was reported by 25 patients. Abdominal pain (16.6%) and diarrhea (14.5%) were the most frequent. EC-MPS had to be discontinued in two patients, while six others required dose reduction to resolve the symptoms. Hematological adverse events were infrequent: three patients had leukopenia and one, anemia, all of which responded to dosage reduction. There was a creatinine reduction within 6 months of drug commencement and maintenance of the lower creatinine levels at 1 year among patients who began EC-MPS for renal dysfunction. Serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly lower among patients on EC-MPS than on MMF. In conclusion, EC-MPS appears to have a similar efficacy and safety profile as MMF in liver transplant patients. Hematological and gastrointestinal adverse events were infrequent; seldom had the drug to be discontinued.

  17. Refractory linear IgA bullous dermatosis successfully treated with mycophenolate sodium.

    PubMed

    Marzano, Angelo V; Ramoni, Stefano; Spinelli, Diana; Alessi, Elvio; Berti, Emilio

    2008-01-01

    Linear IgA bullous dermatosis (LABD) is a rare, blistering autoimmune disease characterized by linear deposits of IgA at the basement membrane zone (BMZ), with the possible presence of circulating IgA anti-BMZ antibodies. LABD of childhood is usually self-healing, while in adults it follows a more prolonged course and refractory cases may rarely occur. The first-line treatment for LABD is dapsone in monotherapy or in combination with systemic corticosteroids, but various therapeutic approaches have been used in non-responder patients. We report two adult patients with refractory LABD successfully treated with enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS), a recently introduced formulation of mycophenolic acid (MPA). MPA is an immunosuppressive agent that acts by inhibiting monophosphate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme in the novo synthesis of purines. Based on the present cases, we indicate EC-MPS as being a safe and effective adjuvant therapy in the treatment of LABD when dapsone or the other steroid-sparing drugs fail. It seems to offer an improved gastric side effect profile in comparison with the classic formulation of MPA, namely its ester mycophenolate mofetil (MMF).

  18. A case of acute humoral rejection in liver transplantation: successful treatment with plasmapheresis and mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Rostron, Anthony; Carter, Vaughan; Mutunga, Mbithe; Cavanagh, Gary; O'Suilleabhain, Criostoir; Burt, Alistair; Jaques, Bryon; Talbot, David; Manas, Derek

    2005-11-01

    We present a case of a 23-year-old female who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation (OLTx) for biliary atresia, 22 years after a failed Kasai operation. Unusually, her postoperative course was complicated by severe acute humoral rejection. In this case report, we discuss her management as well as the role of plasmapheresis in treating allograft dysfunction secondary to acute humoral rejection in liver transplant patients.

  19. A randomized controlled trial of mycophenolate mofetil in patients with IgA nephropathy [ISRCTN62574616

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, Ronald J; Wyatt, Robert J

    2004-01-01

    Background IgAN is the most common type of glomerulonephritis in the world. Between 15 and 40 percent of adults and children diagnosed with IgAN eventually progress to ESRD. Despite the need for effective treatment strategies, very few RCTs for IgAN have been performed. The most effective therapies for IgAN appear to be corticosteroids, ACEi, and FOS that contain a high concentration of omega 3 fatty acids. While ACEi and FOS are generally well tolerated with minimal side effects, the use of high dose steroids over a long course of therapy is often associated with significant morbidity. Objective of the study The objective of the study is to test the hypothesis that treatment with the immunosuppressive agent, MMF, will lead to significant and sustained improvement in urinary protein excretion in patients with IgAN who have been pre-treated (and continue to be treated) with ACEi and FOS compared to a placebo control group of patients receiving comparable doses of ACEi and FOS without MMF. Design After a three month treatment period with the ACEi, lisinopril and the FOS, Omacor®, 100 (2 × 50) patients with IgAN and a urinary P/C ratio ≥ 0.6 (males) and ≥ 0.8 (females) and an estGFR ≥ 40 ml/min/1.73 m2 will be randomized to treatment with either MMF or placebo for one year. All patients will be followed off study drug for a second year, but will continue treatment with lisinopril and Omacor® for the two year duration of the study. The primary outcome measure of change in urine P/C ratio will be assessed at the end of years one and two. PMID:15043759

  20. Long-term mycophenolate monotherapy in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical living-donor kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Methods We analyzed all PRA-negative patients who received a first kidney transplant from an HLA-identical living donor. The patients received no antibody induction. An intraoperative bolus of 500 mg of methylprednisolone was administered. Then, steroid therapy was withdrawn within one week. Tacrolimus and mycophenolate treatment were started 3 days before transplantation with tacrolimus target levels of 4 to 8 ng/mL. In the absence of rejection, tacrolimus was withdrawn between 3 and 12 months post-transplant to reach mycophenolate mofetil monotherapy of 2 g/day or equivalent. Results Six patients were treated with the above protocol. At last follow-up, graft and patient survival were 100%. MDRD glomerular filtration rates were 54, 60, and 62 mL/min at 3 months, 12 months and last follow-up, respectively. None of the patients developed PRA post-transplant. One episode of acute rejection Banff IA occurred 9 years after transplantation due to non-adherence with good outcome after treatment. The mean number of concomitant drugs given with mycophenolate was 2.6. Four patients needed antihypertensive drugs. Conclusion Steroid-free de novo treatment and calcineurin-inhibitor weaning with mycophenolate monotherapy is feasible in first HLA-identical kidney transplantation from a living sibling. Although recipients of a first HLA-identical living-donor kidney transplant seem to need less immunosuppression, there are no guideline recommendations for these patients, and few prospective trials are available. PMID:24491040

  1. Primary CNS lymphoproliferative disease, mycophenolate and calcineurin inhibitor usage

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Genevieve M.; Powell, Helen; Kostadinov, Rumen; Rocafort, Patrick Tim; Rifkin, Dena E.; Burger, Peter C.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Swinnen, Lode J.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Duffield, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppression for solid organ transplantation increases lymphoproliferative disease risk. While central nervous system (CNS) involvement is more rare, we noticed an increase in primary CNS (PCNS) disease. To investigate a potential association with the immunosuppressive regimen we identified all post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) cases diagnosed over a 28-year period at our institution (174 total, 29 PCNS) and all similar cases recorded in a United Network for Organ Sharing-Organ Procurement and Transplant Network (UNOS-OPTN) data file. While no PCNS cases were diagnosed at our institution between 1986 and 1997, they comprised 37% of PTLD cases diagnosed from 2011–2014. PCNS disease was more often associated with renal vs. other organ transplant, Epstein-Barr virus, large B-cell morphology and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as compared to PTLD that did not involve the CNS. Calcineurin inhibitors were protective against PCNS disease when given alone or in combination with MMF. A multivariate analysis of a larger UNOS-OPTN dataset confirmed these findings, where both MMF and lack of calcineurin inhibitor usage were independently associated with risk for development of PCNS PTLD. These findings have significant implications for the transplant community, particularly given the introduction of new regimens lacking calcineurin inhibitors. Further investigation into these associations is warranted. PMID:26460822

  2. Mycophenolate

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack of the transplanted organ by the immune system of the person receiving the organ) in people ... agents. It works by weakening the body's immune system so it will not attack and reject the ...

  3. Influence of carboxylesterase 2 genetic polymorphisms on mycophenolic acid pharmacokinetics in Japanese renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Fujiyama, N; Miura, M; Satoh, S; Inoue, K; Kagaya, H; Saito, M; Habuchi, T; Suzuki, T

    2009-05-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA), converted from the prodrug mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), is generated by intestinal and hepatic esterases. The role of carboxylesterase (CES) in MMF hydrolysis was examined in vitro using human liver microsomes. V(max) and K(m) values of MMF hydrolysis in pooled human liver microsomes were 1368 +/- 44 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein and 1030 +/- 65 microM, respectively. Hydrolytic activity was inhibited by the CES inhibitors phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride, bis-p-nitorophenylphosphate and diisopropylfluorophosphate, with IC(50) values of 77.1, 3.59 and 0.0312 microM, respectively. Eighty Japanese renal transplant recipients that received repeated-doses of MMF, tacrolimus and prednisolone,were evaluated for MPA pharmacokinetics 28 days after transplantation to investigate the relationship between MPA pharmacokinetics and CES2 genetic polymorphisms. No significant differences in MPA pharmacokinetics were observed between CES2 A4595G, C8721T orA-1548G genotype groups. CES2 allelic variants also did not appear to affect plasma MPA concentrations between individuals. In conclusion, the study demonstrated that while CES1 and/or CES2 are involved in the hydrolysis of MMF to MPA, CES2 allelic variants appeared to make only a minor contribution to inter-personal differences in MPA pharmacokinetics.

  4. Mycophenolic Acid Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Gastric Cancer Cells via Multiple Molecular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Dun, Boying; Sharma, Ashok; Teng, Yong; Liu, Haitao; Purohit, Sharad; Xu, Heng; Zeng, Lingwen; She, Jin-Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is the metabolized product and active element of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) that has been widely used for the prevention of acute graft rejection. MPA potently inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) that is up-regulated in many tumors and MPA is known to inhibit cancer cell proliferation as well as fibroblast and endothelial cell migration. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time MPA’s antimigratory and anti-invasion abilities of MPA-sensitive AGS (gastric cancer) cells. Genome-wide expression analyses using Illumina whole genome microarrays identified 50 genes with ≥2 fold changes and 15 genes with > 4 fold alterations and multiple molecular pathways implicated in cell migration. Real-time RT-PCR analyses of selected genes also confirmed the expression differences. Furthermore, targeted proteomic analyses identified several proteins altered by MPA treatment. Our results indicate that MPA modulates gastric cancer cell migration through down-regulation of a large number of genes (PRKCA, DOCK1, INF2, HSPA5, LRP8 and PDGFRA) and proteins (PRKCA, AKT, SRC, CD147 and MMP1) with promigratory functions as well as up-regulation of a number of genes with antimigratory functions (ATF3, SMAD3, CITED2 and CEAMCAM1). However, a few genes that may promote migration (CYR61 and NOS3) were up-regulated. Therefore, MPA’s overall antimigratory role on cancer cells reflects a balance between promigratory and antimigratory signals influenced by MPA treatment. PMID:24260584

  5. Risk evaluation and mitigation strategies: a focus on the mycophenolic acid preparations.

    PubMed

    Rostas, Sara; Kim, Miae; Gabardi, Steven

    2014-03-01

    To review risks associated with mycophenolic acid (MPA) preparations and evaluate their required risk evaluation and mitigation strategies (REMS) elements. Articles were identified through a non-date-limited MEDLINE and EMBASE search using the terms fetal toxicity, teratogenicity, risk evaluation and mitigation strategies, REMS, MPA, mycophenolate mofetil, entericcoated MPA, and organ transplant. Information from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the manufacturers of the MPA preparations was also evaluated. The MPA preparations are associated with several potential risks, including gastrointestinal disturbances and myelosuppression; however, their impact on the fetus in pregnant patients taking 1 of these agents poses the greatest risk. The FDA approved REMS programs for all MPA products, both innovator and generic preparations, in September 2012. With evidence of increased risk of miscarriage and birth defects associated with MPA use, the FDA instituted a REMS program that contains both a medication guide and elements to assure safe use (ETASU). The medication guides for the MPA products, which were previously FDA approved, should continue to be distributed to patients who get either an initial prescription filled or a refill. The ETASU requires prescribers to complete training and obtain patient signatures on the Patient-Prescriber Acknowledgment Form. A single, national, voluntary pregnancy registry specific to this medication has been established, and pregnant patients should be encouraged to participate. Although the impact of the MPA REMS on clinical practice is not clear, it is a step toward increasing the understanding of fetal risks with MPA.

  6. Intra-individual variability of mycophenolic acid concentration according to renal function in liver transplant recipients receiving mycophenolate monotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Park, Gil-Chun; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Ha, Tae-Yong; Kim, Ki-Hun; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2017-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has wide inter- and intra-individual variability of mycophenolic acid (MPA) after liver transplantation (LT). On this study, we aimed to analyse the intra-individual variability of MPA concentration in stable adult LT recipients receiving MMF monotherapy and develop a method to determine the target level in the situation of wide intra-individual variability. Methods This retrospective cross-sectional study included 30 LT recipients. All patients received MMF monotherapy at a dose of 500 mg twice daily for ≥2 years and were divided into two groups based on renal function. MPA concentration-associated values were presented as mean with standard deviation and coefficient of variation (CV). Results The normal renal function group (n=15) showed a mean 12-hour MPA concentration of 2.5±0.5 µg/ml (range, 1.8±0.5 to 3.6±0.7 µg/ml) and a mean CV of 20.4±7.7% (range, 8.7% to 39.4%). In the renal dysfunction group (n=15), the 12-hour MPA concentration fluctuated more widely with a mean value of 3.7±0.9 µg/ml (range, 2.8±0.8 to 5.1±1.2 µg/ml) and a mean CV of 24.5±4.9% (range, 17.1% to 37.5%). The 12-hour MPA concentration was significantly higher in the renal dysfunction group, as compared to the normal renal function group (p=0.001); whereas, the CV was not significantly different between the two groups (p=0.093). Conclusions We determined the inter- and intra-individual variability of 12-hour MPA concentration after LT. The results suggested that therapeutic drug monitoring of MPA is necessary due to the inter-individual and intra-individual variability of MMF pharmacokinetics, especially in LT recipients with renal dysfunction. PMID:28317040

  7. Frailty, Mycophenolate Reduction, and Graft Loss in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    McAdams-DeMarco, Mara A.; Law, Andrew; Tan, Jingwen; Delp, Cassandra; King, Elizabeth A.; Orandi, Babak; Salter, Megan; Alachkar, Nada; Desai, Niraj; Grams, Morgan; Walston, Jeremy; Segev, Dorry L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) side effects often prompt dose reduction or discontinuation, and this MMF dose reduction (MDR) can lead to rejection and possibly graft loss. Unfortunately, little is known about what factors might cause or contribute to MDR. Frailty, a measure of physiologic reserve, is emerging as an important, novel domain of risk in kidney transplantation (KT) recipients. We hypothesized that frailty, an inflammatory phenotype, might be associated with MDR. Methods: We measured frailty (shrinking, weakness, exhaustion, low activity, and slowed walking speed), other patient and donor characteristics, longitudinal MMF doses, and graft loss in 525 KT recipients. Time-to-MDR was quantified using an adjusted Cox proportional hazards model. Results: By 2 years post-transplant, 54% of frail recipients and 45% of non-frail recipients experienced MDR; by 4 years, incidence was 67% and 51%. Frail recipients were 1.29-times (95%CI:1.01-1.66; P=0.04) more likely to experience MDR, as were deceased donor recipients (aHR=1.92, 95%CI:1.44-2.54, P<0.001) and older adults (age≥65 vs. <65; aHR=1.47, 95%CI:1.10-1.96, P=0.01). MDR was independently associated with a substantially increased risk of death-censored graft loss (aHR=5.24, 95%CI:1.97-13.98, P=0.001). Conclusion: A better understanding of risk factors for MMF intolerance might help in planning alternate strategies to maintain adequate immunosuppression and prolong allograft survival. PMID:25393156

  8. Oral candidiasis in patients with renal transplants

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Gonzalo; de Arriba, Lorenzo; de Andrés, Amado

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Oral candidiasis (OC) is a frequent oral lesion in renal transplant patients (RTPs). Despite the increased prevalence of OC in RTPs, no study has examined related risk factors. The aims of this study were to analyze the prevalence of and risk factors for OC in RTPs compared with age- and gender-matched healthy control group (HC) as well as determine the incidence of OC after transplantation. Study Design: We analyzed the prevalence and risk factors of OC in a group of 500 RTPs (307 men, 193 women, mean age 53.63 years) and 501 HC subjects (314 men, 187 women, mean age 52.25 years). Demographic and pharmacological data were recorded for all subjects. Incident cases of OC were ascertained retrospectively from outpatient clinical records only in the RTP group. Results: The prevalence of OC was 7.4% in RTPs compared with 4.19% in HC (P<0.03). The most frequent type of OC in the two groups was denture stomatitis. Statistical association was found between OC and age, mycophenolate mofetil dose and blood levels, dentures and tobacco. The multiple logistic regression model only chose for denture variable. According to the outpatient clinical records, 24 RTPs suffered OC during the first moth post-transplant. Severe lesions affecting the oral cavity and pharynx appeared in 79% of the OC cases. Conclusions: This study shows a lower prevalence of OC in RTPs than previous reports. Denture stomatitis was the most frequent OC prevalence form described in RTPs. Severe candidiasis is more frequent in the immediate posttransplant period. The presence of denture is an important risk factor of OC. These results emphasise the importance of adequate pre- and post-transplant oral health and denture cleaning and adjustment is recommended for these subjects to prevent this infection. Key words:Oral candidiasis, immunosuppressive therapy, renal transplantation. PMID:23385511

  9. Conversion from tacrolimus/mycophenolic acid to tacrolimus/leflunomide to treat cutaneous warts in a series of four pediatric renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Lieuko; McClellan, Robert B; Chaudhuri, Abanti; Alexander, Steven R; Chen, Sharon F; Concepcion, Waldo; Grimm, Paul

    2012-09-15

    The challenge of immunosuppression in pediatric renal transplantation is to balance preventing rejection while avoiding infectious complications. A dermatological complication of immunosuppression is viral warts, which cause significant disfigurement and increase the risk of skin malignancy. We present three pediatric and adolescent renal allograft recipients with multiple, recalcitrant verrucae vulgares lesions and one patient with molluscum contagiosum who were switched from mycophenolate mofetil to leflunomide. Teriflunomide metabolite levels were carefully maintained between 50,000 and 100,000 ng/mL to balance its immunosuppressive and antiviral properties. No adverse events requiring discontinuation of leflunomide were encountered. Switching from mycophenolate mofetil to leflunomide successfully cleared verrucae vulgares and molluscum lesions in all four renal transplant patients. The ability to minimize and even resolve warts can improve quality of life by reducing risk of skin malignancies and emotional distress in solid organ transplant patients. Leflunomide is a potential therapeutic option for posttransplantation patients with skin warts because it serves both as an adjunct to the immunosuppressive regimen and an antiviral agent.

  10. Associations between polymorphisms in target, metabolism, or transport proteins of mycophenolate sodium and therapeutic or adverse effects in kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Woillard, Jean-Baptiste; Picard, Nicolas; Thierry, Antoine; Touchard, Guy; Marquet, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    Different associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in cellular target, metabolism enzymes or transport proteins, and biopsy-proven acute rejection (BPAR) or adverse events have been reported in transplant patients receiving mycophenolate mofetil. This work aimed to study these in patients on enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS). The study included 189 renal transplant patients from the DOMINOS trial. Fifteen SNPs in IMPDH2, IMPDH1, ABCC2, SLCO1B3, UGT1A8, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, CYP2C8, HUS1, and IL12A were genotyped in all patients. Associations between SNPs and the first event of BPAR or diarrhea were investigated using multivariate logistic regressions. Associations between SNPs and leukopenia or anemia at nine different visits between days 0 and 190 after transplantation were studied using time-dependent Cox proportional hazards regression models. Multivariate analyses showed that the CYP2C8 rs11572076 wild-type genotype was associated significantly with a lower risk of leukopenia [GG vs. GA: hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) 0.14 (0.03, 0.59), P=0.00783]. Higher EC-MPS doses and the UGT2B7 c.-840 G>A variant allele were associated with an increased risk of anemia [EC-MPS per unit dose increase: 1.004 (1.003, 1.005), P<0.0001; UGT2B7 GA vs. AA: 1.65 (1.12, 2.43), P=0.01043; GG vs. AA: 1.88 (1.23, 2.88), P=0.00343]. However, no significant association was found between any of the SNPs studied and diarrhea or BPAR. Two pharmacogenetic associations reported previously with mycophenolate mofetil were found in a population of 189 renal transplant patients treated with EC-MPS.

  11. Pharmacokinetic modeling of enterohepatic circulation of mycophenolic acid in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Colom, Helena; Lloberas, Núria; Andreu, Franc; Caldés, Ana; Torras, Joan; Oppenheimer, Federico; Sanchez-Plumed, Jaime; Gentil, Miguel A; Kuypers, Dirk R; Brunet, Mercè; Ekberg, Henrik; Grinyó, Josep M

    2014-06-01

    Several factors contribute to mycophenolic acid (MPA) between-patient variability. Here we characterize the metabolic pathways of MPA and quantify the effect of combining genetic polymorphism of multidrug-resistant-associated protein-2, demographics, biochemical covariates, co-medication (cyclosporine (CsA) vs. macrolides), and renal function on MPA, 7-O-MPA-glucuronide (MPAG), and acyl-glucuronide (AcMPAG) disposition, in renal transplant recipients, after mycophenolate mofetil. Complete pharmacokinetic profiles from 56 patients (five occasions) were analyzed. Enterohepatic circulation was modeled by transport of MPAG to the absorption site. This transport significantly decreased with increasing CsA trough concentrations (CtroughCsA). MPAG and AcMPAG plasma clearances significantly decreased with renal function. No significant influence of multidrug-resistant-associated protein-2 C24T single-nucleotide polymorphism was found. The model adequately predicted the increase in MPAG/AcMPAG exposures in CsA and macrolide patients with decreased renal function. This resulted in higher MPA exposures in macrolide patients versus CsA patients, and increased MPA exposures with renal function from 25 to 10 ml/min, in macrolide patients, owing to enhanced MPAG enterohepatic circulation. Lower-percentage enterohepatic circulation occurred with higher CtroughCsA and renal function values. The lack of MPA protein-binding modeling did not permit evaluation of the impact of renal function and CtroughCsA on MPA exposures in CsA patients. Thus, dose tailoring of covariates is recommended for target MPA exposure.

  12. In Vitro Influence of Mycophenolic Acid on Selected Parameters of Stimulated Peripheral Canine Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Guzera, Maciej; Szulc-Dąbrowska, Lidia; Cywińska, Anna; Archer, Joy; Winnicka, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is an active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil, a new immunosuppressive drug effective in the treatment of canine autoimmune diseases. The impact of MPA on immunity is ambiguous and its influence on the canine immune system is unknown. The aim of the study was to determine markers of changes in stimulated peripheral canine lymphocytes after treatment with MPA in vitro. Twenty nine healthy dogs were studied. Phenotypic and functional analysis of lymphocytes was performed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultured with mitogens and different MPA concentrations– 1 μM (10−3 mol/m3), 10 μM or 100 μM. Apoptotic cells were detected by Annexin V and 7-aminoactinomycin D (7-AAD). The expression of antigens (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD21, CD25, forkhead box P3 [FoxP3] and proliferating cell nuclear antigen [PCNA]) was assessed with monoclonal antibodies. The proliferation indices were analyzed in carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE)-labeled cells. All analyses were performed using flow cytometry. The influence of MPA on apoptosis was dependent on the mechanism of cell activation and MPA concentration. MPA caused a decrease in the expression of lymphocyte surface antigens, CD3, CD8 and CD25. Its impact on the expression of CD4 and CD21 was negligible. Its negative influence on the expression of FoxP3 was dependent on cell stimulation. MPA inhibited lymphocyte proliferation. In conclusion, MPA inhibited the activity of stimulated canine lymphocytes by blocking lymphocyte activation and proliferation. The influence of MPA on the development of immune tolerance–expansion of Treg cells and lymphocyte apoptosis–was ambiguous and was dependent on the mechanism of cellular activation. The concentration that MPA reaches in the blood may lead to inhibition of the functions of the canine immune system. The applied panel of markers can be used for evaluation of the effects of immunosuppressive compounds in the dog. PMID:27138877

  13. Mycophenolic acid counteracts B cell proliferation and plasmablast formation in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Eickenberg, Sebastian; Mickholz, Eva; Jung, Elisabeth; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch; Pavenstadt, Hermann J; Jacobi, Annett M

    2012-01-01

    Clinical trials revealed a high efficacy of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)in inducing and maintaining remission in patients with class III-V-lupus nephritis. Also extrarenal manifestations respond to MMF treatment. However, few attempts have been undertaken to delineate its mechanism of action in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) a disease characterized by enhanced B cell activation. Clinical and paraclinical parameters of 107 patients with SLE were recorded consecutively and analyzed retrospectively. Patients were divided into treatment groups (MMF: n=39, azathioprine (AZA) n=30 and controls without immunosuppressive therapy n=38). To further delineate the effect of mycophenolic acid (MPA) on naive and memory B cells in vitro assays were performed. Although patients taking AZA flared more frequently than patients on MMF or controls, the analysis of clinical parameters did not reveal significant differences.However, profound differences in paraclinical parameters were found. B cell frequencies and numbers were significantly higher in patients taking MMF compared to those on AZA but lower numbers and frequencies of plasmablasts were detected compared to AZA-treated patients or controls. Notably, MMF treatment was associated with a significantly higher frequency and number of transitional B cells as well as naive B cells compared to AZA treatment. Differences in T cell subsets were not significant. MPA abrogated in vitro proliferation of purified B cells completely but had only moderate impact on B cell survival. The thorough inhibition of B cell activation and plasma cell formation by MMF might explain the favorable outcomes of previous clinical trials in patients with SLE, since enhanced B cell proliferation is a hallmark of this disease.

  14. Cyclosporine Sparing Effect of Enteric-Coated Mycophenolate Sodium in De Novo Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su Hyung; Oh, Chang-Kwon; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Sung Joo; Ha, Jongwon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The increased tolerability of enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS), compared to mycophenolate mofetil, among kidney transplant recipients has the potential to facilitate cyclosporine (CsA) minimization. Therefore, a prospective trial to determine the optimum EC-MPS dose in CsA-based immunosuppression regimens is necessary. Materials and Methods A comparative, parallel, randomized, open-label study was performed for 140 patients from four centers to compare the efficacy and tolerability of low dose CsA with standard dose EC-MPS (the investigational group) versus standard dose CsA with low dose EC-MPS (the control group) for six months in de novo kidney transplant recipients. Graft function, the incidence of efficacy failure [biopsy-confirmed acute rejection (BCAR), death, graft loss, loss to follow-up], and adverse events were compared. Results The mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of the investigational group at six months post-transplantation was non-inferior to that of the control group (confidence interval between 57.3 mL/min/1.73m2 and 67.4 mL/min/1.73 m2, p<0.001). One graft loss was reported in the control group, and no patient deaths were reported in either group. The incidence of BCAR of the investigational group was 8.7%, compared to 18.8% in the control group (p=0.137), during the study period. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) in the incidence of discontinuations and serious adverse events (SAE) between the groups. Conclusion CsA minimization using a standard dose of EC-MPS kept the incidence of acute rejection and additional risks as low as conventional immunosuppression and provided therapeutic equivalence in terms of renal graft function and safety issues. PMID:27873516

  15. Cyclosporine Sparing Effect of Enteric-Coated Mycophenolate Sodium in De Novo Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Hyung; Park, Jae Berm; Oh, Chang Kwon; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Sung Joo; Ha, Jongwon

    2017-01-01

    The increased tolerability of enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS), compared to mycophenolate mofetil, among kidney transplant recipients has the potential to facilitate cyclosporine (CsA) minimization. Therefore, a prospective trial to determine the optimum EC-MPS dose in CsA-based immunosuppression regimens is necessary. A comparative, parallel, randomized, open-label study was performed for 140 patients from four centers to compare the efficacy and tolerability of low dose CsA with standard dose EC-MPS (the investigational group) versus standard dose CsA with low dose EC-MPS (the control group) for six months in de novo kidney transplant recipients. Graft function, the incidence of efficacy failure [biopsy-confirmed acute rejection (BCAR), death, graft loss, loss to follow-up], and adverse events were compared. The mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of the investigational group at six months post-transplantation was non-inferior to that of the control group (confidence interval between 57.3 mL/min/1.73m² and 67.4 mL/min/1.73 m², p<0.001). One graft loss was reported in the control group, and no patient deaths were reported in either group. The incidence of BCAR of the investigational group was 8.7%, compared to 18.8% in the control group (p=0.137), during the study period. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) in the incidence of discontinuations and serious adverse events (SAE) between the groups. CsA minimization using a standard dose of EC-MPS kept the incidence of acute rejection and additional risks as low as conventional immunosuppression and provided therapeutic equivalence in terms of renal graft function and safety issues.

  16. A Limited Sampling Schedule to Estimate Mycophenolic Acid Area Under the Concentration-Time Curve in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Salinger, David H.; Vicini, Paolo; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Nash, Richard; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2011-01-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is a key component of post-grafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. The plasma area under the curve (AUC) of its active metabolite, mycophenolic acid (MPA), is associated with MMF efficacy and toxicity. This study developed a population pharmacokinetic model of MPA in HCT recipients and created limited sampling schedules (LSS) to enable individualized pharmacotherapy. A retrospective evaluation of MPA concentration-time data following a 2 hr MMF intravenous (IV) infusion was conducted in 77 HCT recipients. The final model consisted of one and two compartments for MMF and MPA pharmacokinetics, respectively. The mean estimated values (coefficient of variation, %) for total systemic clearance, distributional clearance, and central and peripheral compartment volumes of MPA were 36.9 L/h (34.5%), 15.3 L/h (80.4%), 11.9 L (71.7%), and 182 L (127%), respectively. No covariates significantly explained variability among individuals. Optimal LSS were derived using a simulation approach based on the scaled mean squared error. A five-sample schedule of 2, 2.5, 3, 5, and 6 hr from the start of the infusion precisely estimated MPA AUC0–12 hr for Q12 hr IV MMF. A comparable schedule (2, 2.5, 3, 4 and 6 hr) similarly estimated MPA AUC0–8hr for Q8 hr dosing. PMID:22174435

  17. A limited sampling schedule to estimate mycophenolic Acid area under the concentration-time curve in hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E; Bemer, Meagan J; Salinger, David H; Vicini, Paolo; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Nash, Richard; McCune, Jeannine S

    2012-11-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is a key component of postgrafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. The plasma area under the curve (AUC) of its active metabolite, mycophenolic acid (MPA), is associated with MMF efficacy and toxicity. This study developed a population pharmacokinetic model of MPA in HCT recipients and created limited sampling schedules (LSSs) to enable individualized pharmacotherapy. A retrospective evaluation of MPA concentration-time data following a 2-hour MMF intravenous (IV) infusion was conducted in 77 HCT recipients. The final model consisted of 1 and 2 compartments for MMF and MPA pharmacokinetics, respectively. The mean estimated values (coefficient of variation, %) for total systemic clearance, distributional clearance, and central and peripheral compartment volumes of MPA were 36.9 L/h (34.5%), 15.3 L/h (80.4%), 11.9 L (71.7%), and 182 L (127%), respectively. No covariates significantly explained variability among individuals. Optimal LSSs were derived using a simulation approach based on the scaled mean squared error. A 5-sample schedule of 2, 2.5, 3, 5, and 6 hours from the start of the infusion precisely estimated MPA AUC(0-12 h) for Q12-hour IV MMF. A comparable schedule (2, 2.5, 3, 4, and 6 hours) similarly estimated MPA AUC(0-8) (h) for Q8-hour dosing.

  18. A Protocol for the Pharmacokinetics of Enteric Coated Mycophenolate Sodium in Lupus Nephritis (POEMSLUN): an open-label, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Dwarakanathan; John, George T; Healy, Helen; Roberts, Matthew J; Fassett, Robert G; Lipman, Jeffrey; Kubler, Paul; Ungerer, Jacobus; McWhinney, Brett C; Lim, Aaron; Purvey, Megan; Reyaldeen, Reza; Roberts, Jason A

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mycophenolate sodium, an enteric-coated tablet (EC-MPS), is as effective and safe as mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in preventing transplant rejection. EC-MPS and MMF improve the outcome of severe lupus nephritis (LN) and have fewer side effects than pulsed intravenous cyclophosphamide. Blood concentrations of mycophenolic acid (MPA), the active metabolite of EC-MPS, vary between participants despite fixed dosing. Interpatient variability has been studied in transplantation, but not well documented in LN. The relationship between MPA concentration and its clinical effect on LN has not been described. Methods and analysis This is a prospective, open-label, randomised controlled trial. –32 participants with LN who meet the inclusion and exclusion criteria will be randomised into two groups: one receiving a fixed dose of EC-MPS and the second, a dosing regimen that is titrated with therapeutic drug monitoring. Included participants will have blood sampled over a period of 8–12 h on three different occasions. Pharmacokinetic parameters will be calculated using non-compartmental methods. Ethics and dissemination The Human Research and Ethics Committee of the Royal Brisbane Women's Hospital have approved this study. The study is registered with Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry—ACTRN12611000798965 We planned to present the de-identified information at conferences and publish the results in medical journals. Trial Registration ACTRN12611000798965 PMID:23929919

  19. Mycophenolic Acid Production by Penicillium brevicompactum on Solid Media

    PubMed Central

    Bartman, C. D.; Doerfler, D. L.; Bird, B. A.; Remaley, A. T.; Peace, J. N.; Campbell, I. M.

    1981-01-01

    When grown on Czapek-Dox agar, Penicillium brevicompactum produced mycophenolic acid after a vegetative mycelium had been formed and as aerial hyphae were developing. Nutrients were still plenteous in the agar when the synthesis began. If aerial hyphal development was prevented by placing a dialysis membrane over the growing fungus, no mycophenolic acid was produced. When the dialysis membrane was peeled back and, as a consequence, production of aerial hyphae began, mycophenolic acid biosynthesis was observed. We concluded that mycophenolic acid was produced only by P. brevicompactum colonies that possessed an aerial mycelium. PMID:16345733

  20. Use of mycophenolate sodium in stable renal transplant recipients in Spain: preliminary results of the MIDATA study.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fructuoso, A; Ruiz, J C; Rengel, M; Andrés, A; Morales, J M; Beneyto, I; Guirado, L I; Cantarell, C

    2009-01-01

    The use of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is limited by gastrointestinal adverse events (GI-AEs). Enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) was developed to avoid these effects. This multicenter prospective study sought to analyze the clinical benefit of EC-MPS among 726 stable renal transplant recipients in Spain. The data collection included: doses and trough levels of mycophenolic acid (MPA) and calcineurin inhibitors (CNI), renal function, routine biochemical parameters (3-6 months preconversion, baseline, and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months of EC-MPS initiation), as well as graft and patient survivals and adverse events. The main indication for EC-MPS introduction was GI-AEs associated with MMF (44.1%). Preliminary data showed that before introduction of EC-MPs there was a progressive deterioration of renal function, as demonstrated by a negative slope of the creatinine clearance (P < .005). However, after EC-MPS conversion, the slope became positive (P < .05), suggesting an improvement in renal function. Only in 4.8%, EC-MPS was stopped due to GI-AEs. There was an increase in MPA serum levels (P < .01) and a reduction in CNI doses. Interestingly, 80% of 85 patients without MMF treatment because of severe GI-AEs tolerated EC-MPS, including 43% who could be treated with adequate doses of EC-MPS (>or=720 mg/d). There was a significant improvement in GI-AEs after conversion from MMF to EC-MPS. The use of lower doses of CNI and the better tolerability of EC-MPS could be the underlying causes of improvement in renal function.

  1. Production of mycophenolic acid by Penicillium roqueforti strains.

    PubMed Central

    Lafont, P; Debeaupuis, J P; Gaillardin, M; Payen, J

    1979-01-01

    Sixteen strains of Penicillium roqueforti Thom, isolated from blue-molded cheeses, were studied. In vitro, all of these strains produced mycophenolic acid, some on the order of 0.8 to 4 mg/g od dry culture. The greatest yields were obtained after 10 days of incubation of cultures at 15 degrees C. However, under some experimental conditions, mycophenolic acid was not alone responsible for the toxicity of culture extracts to chicken embryos. PMID:453818

  2. Influence of lansoprazole and rabeprazole on mycophenolic acid pharmacokinetics one year after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Miura, Masatomo; Satoh, Shigeru; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Kagaya, Hideaki; Saito, Mitsuru; Suzuki, Toshio; Habuchi, Tomonori

    2008-02-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a common complication after organ transplantation, and long-term administration of antiulcer agents is needed in many renal transplant recipients. Although several drug interactions with mycophenolic acid (MPA), the active metabolite of the prodrug mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), have been reported, little is known about the interaction between MPA and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The present study investigated the drug interaction between MMF and lansoprazole or rabeprazole and the impact of cytochrome (CYP) 2C19, and multidrug resistance (MDR)1 C3435T polymorphisms on these drug interactions at 1 year after renal transplantation. Retrospectively, 61 recipients were divided into 3 groups: MMF and tacrolimus as combination immunosuppressive therapy, together with either 30 mg lansoprazole (n = 22) or 10 mg rabeprazole (n = 17), or without PPI (n = 22). One year after transplantation, plasma concentrations of MPA were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The mean dose-unadjusted and -adjusted Cmax of MPA with 30 mg lansoprazole were significantly lower than those without PPI (11.8 vs. 17.8 microg/mL, P = 0.0197, and 22.6 vs. 33.1 ng/mL/mg MMF, P = 0.0222, respectively). In recipients having the CYP2C19 *1/*2+*1/*3 or MDR1 C3435T CC genotype, the mean dose-adjusted AUC0-12 of MPA with 30 mg lansoprazole was significantly smaller than that with 10 mg rabeprazole or without PPI. The plasma concentration of MPA was influenced by 30 mg lansoprazole but not 10 mg rabeprazole. Because of the greater gastric acid secretion-inhibitory effect of 30 mg lansoprazole in recipients having the CYP2C19 *1/*2+*1/*3 (intermediate metabolizer) or MDR1 C3435T CC genotype, the elution and hydrolysis of MMF might be decreased. Although the clinical relevance might be minor, the fact that administration of 30 mg lansoprazole in patients having the CYP2C19 *2 or *3 allele or the MDR1 C3435T CC genotype diminishes the absorption of MPA in the

  3. Renal graft function and low-dose cyclosporine affect mycophenolic acid pharmacokinetics in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cortinovis, Monica; Gotti, Eliana; Pradini, Silvia; Gaspari, Flavio; Perico, Norberto

    2011-09-15

    In kidney transplantation, the pharmacokinetics of mycophenolic acid (MPA), the active compound of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), is influenced by concomitant immunosuppressive therapy, including cyclosporine (CsA). However, whether in the setting of immunosuppressive therapy minimization CsA still affects MPA pharmacokinetics, particularly in relation to varying degree of renal graft function deterioration, remains ill defined. One hundred thirty-five complete MPA profiles were sequentially collected from 56 kidney transplant recipients given MMF and low-dose CsA as part of their immunosuppressive therapy. MPA pharmacokinetic parameters were correlated with blood CsA area under the curve (AUC0-12) and graft function as measured glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The relative contribution of CsA exposure and GFR to MPA kinetics in relation to other clinical parameters was determined by multivariate analysis. Dose-adjusted MPA AUC0-12 negatively correlated with CsA AUC0-12. MPA exposure significantly increased when CsA AUC0-12 was below 2000 ng hr/mL. Stratification of MPA profiles according to stages of renal dysfunction showed that dose-adjusted MPA AUC0-12 was higher (P<0.001) in patients with severe (stage 4: 70.37±27.93 μg hr/mL/g MMF) than in those with mild (stage 2: 47.46±11.66 μg hr/mL/g MMF) or moderate (stage 3; 47.48±15.22 μg hr/mL/g MMF) renal insufficiency. At multivariate analysis GFR, serum albumin and hemoglobin levels, use of gastroprotective medications, and time posttransplant were identified as independent determinants of MPA AUC0-12. In stable renal transplant recipients given MMF, tapering CsA dose and deterioration of renal graft function contribute to increased MPA exposure. Thus, monitoring plasma MPA pharmacokinetics should be advised, especially in patients on minimized CsA therapy with severe renal insufficiency.

  4. Stable renal transplant recipients can be safely converted from MMF to enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium tablets: Interim results of a multicenter Latin American study.

    PubMed

    Abbud-Filho, M; Girón, F; Hernández, E; Juarez, F; Liendo, C; Novoa, P; Toledo, M

    2004-01-01

    Enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) is designed to reduce mycophenolate acid (MPA)-related upper gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events (AEs). A multicenter, open-label, Latin American study in stable renal transplant patients is ongoing to assess the safety of the conversion from mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) to EC-MPS. An interim analysis was performed when 93 patients had completed 3 months. Prior to conversion, they had received MMF at a dose of 2 g/d, with the exception of eight adult patients who were receiving an average daily dose of 1.25 g. All adult patients were converted to EC-MPS (1.44 g/d; 0.450 g/m(2) bid for children). After conversion, the reported total incidence of AEs was 40.9%, including 28% infections, 1.1% hematologic, 19.4% GI, including 10.8% upper-GI AE (all mild) and 5.4% diarrhea. No patient discontinued the study medication due to adverse events. Only six patients (6%) required a dose adjustment. There were no episodes of acute rejection, death, or graft loss. During the period of analysis, the conversion from MMF to EC-MPS was safe, the enteric-coated tablet formulation prevented release of MPA in the upper GI tract, and only one patient had to reduce the dose due to an upper GI AE, concomitant with diarrhea. EC-MPS offers transplant physicians and their patients an alternative MPA therapy that is as effective and safe as MMF, but in a formulation that may provide GI tolerability benefits.

  5. No relevant pharmacokinetic interaction between pantoprazole and mycophenolate in renal transplant patients: a randomized crossover study

    PubMed Central

    Rissling, Olesja; Glander, Petra; Hambach, Pia; Mai, Marco; Brakemeier, Susanne; Klonower, Daniela; Halleck, Fabian; Singer, Eugenia; Schrezenmeier, Eva-Vanessa; Dürr, Michael; Neumayer, Hans-Hellmut; Budde, Klemens

    2015-01-01

    Aims Mycophenolic acid (MPA) suppresses lymphocyte proliferation through inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) inhibition. Two formulations have been approved: mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS). Pantoprazole (PAN) inhibits gastric acid secretion, which may alter MPA exposure. Data from healthy volunteers suggest a significant drug–drug interaction (DDA) between pantoprazole and MPA. In transplant patients, a decreased MPA area under the concentration–time curve (AUC) may lead to higher IMPDH activity, which may lead to higher acute rejection risk. Therefore this DDA was evaluated in renal transplant patients under maintenance immunosuppressive therapy. Methods In this single-centre, open, randomized, four-sequence, four-treatment crossover study, the influence of PAN 40 mg on MPA pharmacokinetics such as (dose-adjusted) AUC0–12 h (dAUC) was analysed in 20 renal transplant patients (>6 months post-transplantation) receiving MMF (1–2 g day–1) and EC-MPS in combination with ciclosporin. The major metabolite MPA glucuronide (MPAG) and the IMPDH activity were also examined. Results MMF + PAN intake led to a lowest mean dAUC for MPA of 41.46 ng h ml–1 mg–1 [95% confidence interval (CI) 32.38, 50.54], while MPA exposure was highest for EC-MPS + PAN [dAUC: 46.30 ng h ml–1 mg–1 (95% CI 37.11, 55.49)]. Differences in dAUC and dose-adjusted maximum concentration (dCmax) were not significant. Only for MMF [dAUC: 41.46 ng h ml–1 mg–1 (95% CI 32.38, 50.54)] and EC-MPS [dAUC: 43.39 ng h ml–1 mg–1 (95% CI 33.44, 53.34)] bioequivalence was established for dAUC [geometric mean ratio: 101.25% (90% CI 84.60, 121.17)]. Simultaneous EC-MPS + PAN intake led to an earlier time to Cmax (tmax) [median: 2.0 h (min–max: 0.5–10.0)] than EC-MPS intake alone [3 h (1.5–12.0); P = 0.037]. Tmax was not affected for MMF [1.0 h (0.5–5.0)] ± pantoprazole [1.0 h (0.5–6.0), P = 0

  6. Mycophenolic acid production by Penicillium brevicompactum in two media.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, D L; Bartman, C D; Campbell, I M

    1979-08-01

    Penicillium brevicompactum produces mycophenolic acid as it grows vegetatively, not only on a simple medium where growth is slow but also on a richer medium where growth is less restricted. The implications of this finding on the association of fungal secondary metabolism with the idiophase in liquid and solid culture are discussed.

  7. Determination of Mycophenolic Acid in Plasma Samples Using the Terbium-Sensitized Luminescence Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayanfar, A.; Ghavimi, H.; Zolali, E.; Jouyban, A.

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this work were to provide an analytical method, for the quantitative determination of the mycophenolic acid (MFA) in plasma samples and its application to quantification of the MFA in rat plasma after oral administration. In order to remove the fluorescence interferences of the plasma, the samples were precipitated by acetonitrile in 1:8 ratio and then a few parameters were optimized and the fluorescence intensity measured at 545 nm using an excitation wavelength of 347 nm. Under the optimized concentration, the method provided a linear range between 1.0 and 10.0 mg/l with a correlation coefficient of 0.998. MFA was detected and the validation was performed according to the FDA guidelines. Linearity, accuracy, precision, and selectivity of the developed method were suitable for th determination of the MFA in plasma samples. The proposed analytical approach was applied to determine the MFA concentration in a rat plasma-time profile study.

  8. Validation of limited sampling strategy for the estimation of mycophenolic acid exposure in Chinese adult liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Hao, Chen; Erzheng, Chen; Anwei, Mao; Zhicheng, Yu; Baiyong, Shen; Xiaxing, Deng; Weixia, Zhang; Chenghong, Peng; Hongwei, Li

    2007-12-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is indicated as immunosuppressive therapy in liver transplantation. The abbreviated models for the estimation of mycophenolic acid (MPA) area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) have been established by limited sampling strategies (LSSs) in adult liver transplant recipients. In the current study, the performance of the abbreviated models to predict MPA exposure was validated in an independent group of patients. A total of 30 MPA pharmacokinetic profiles from 30 liver transplant recipients receiving MMF in combination with tacrolimus were used to compare 8 models' performance with a full 10 time-point MPA-AUC. Linear regression analysis and Bland-Altman analysis were used to compare the estimated MPA-AUC0-12h from each model against the measured MPA-AUC0-12h. A wide range of agreement was shown when estimated MPA-AUC0-12h was compared with measured MPA-AUC0-12h, and the range of coefficient of determination (r2) was from 0.479 to 0.936. The model based on MPA pharmacokinetic parameters C1h, C2h, C6h, and C8h had the best ability to predict measured MPA-AUC0-12h, with the best coefficient of determination (r2=0.936), the excellent prediction bias (2.18%), the best prediction precision (5.11%), and the best prediction variation (2SD=+/-7.88 mg.h/L). However, the model based on MPA pharmacokinetic sampling time points C1h, C2h, and C4h was more suitable when concerned with clinical convenience, which had shorter sampling interval, an excellent coefficient of determination (r2=0.795), an excellent prediction bias (3.48%), an acceptable prediction precision (14.37%), and a good prediction variation (2SD=+/-13.23 mg.h/L). Measured MPA-AUC0-12h could be best predicted by using MPA pharmacokinetic parameters C1h, C2h, C6h, and C8h. The model based on MPA pharmacokinetic parameters C1h, C2h, and C4h was more feasible in clinical application.

  9. The evaluation of enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium in cardiac deceased donor liver transplant patients in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuoyi; He, J J; Liu, X Y; Lin, Bingyi; Zhang, Lin; Geng, Lei; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    The management of liver receivers requires intense immunosuppression to prevent graft rejection. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is a common immunosuppressant but frequently suffer dose reduction for gastrointestinal adverse reactions (GI). Hence, the enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) is introduced as a substitute for MMF to reduce GI. The study was designed to investigate the efficacy, safety and exposure equation of EC-MPS in liver transplant patients in China. Ninety-two liver receivers who administered EC-MPS or MMF as a primary immunosuppressant were enrolled in this single-center study and divided into MMF group and EC-MPC group, respectively. Efficacy and safety of EC-MPS were compared with MMF. The MPA exposure was measured at time 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12 h after mean 4.5 days of EC-MPS treatment. An equation of limited time points for estimating serum MPA exposure of EC-MPS was established using multiple stepwise regression model. Data show an interpatient variation in MPA AUC, Cmax and Tmax. After a first dose of EC-MPS, the mean value of serum AUC0-12 h was 20.68 mg/L (SD 8.94, range 8.1-46.3). Cmax was 9.7 mg/L (SD 6.48, range 2.7-16.3); Tmax was 1.90 h (SD 0.97, range 0.5-4). The best equation for estimating the AUC was 6.0 1 4 + 0.946C2 + 0.606C3 + 1.154C4 + 2.479C6 + 5.07C12. Comparing with MMF, EC-MPS not only effectively maintained immunosuppression, but also had similar incidences of infection, renal dysfunction and hematological disorders. However, EC-MPS markedly improved GI, the incidence of GI was half of the MMF group. This analysis presented that EC-MPS is an effective and safe immunosuppressant as similar as MMF. The conversion of MMF to EC-MPS could be administered.

  10. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may reduce enterohepatic recirculation of mycophenolic acid in patients with childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Tsuyoshi; Brunner, Hermine I; Sagcal-Gironella, Anna Carmela P; Vinks, Alexander A

    2011-10-01

    The large interindividual differences observed in mycophenolic acid (MPA) pharmacokinetics (MPA-PK) are in part attributed to the large variability in enterohepatic recirculation (EHC) of the drug. The main metabolite of MPA, MPA glucuronide is actively secreted into the bile via the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) transporter. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown to inhibit the MRP2 transporter, which can alter EHC and drug exposure. Here, we evaluated the effects of this potential drug-transporter interaction on MPA-PK in a cohort of patients with childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus on mycophenolate mofetil therapy. Full MPA concentration-time profiles and demographics including comedications were available for 19 patients with childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus. Concentrations at predose (C(trough)), 9 hour (C₉), and nadir (C(nadir); defined as the lowest concentration between C(max) and C₉), and area under the curve (AUC₀₋₁₂ and AUC₆₋₁₂) were assessed using standard methods (WinNonlin5.1). AUC6-12/AUC₀₋₁₂ and C₉/C(nadir) ratios were used to evaluate the effects of NSAID treatment on MPA-PK. Eleven out of 19 patients were on NSAID treatment and did not show visual evidence of EHC in their PK profile. In contrast, patients not on NSAID therapy showed evidence of EHC-related MPA concentration increase in the later part of their PK profiles, typically after 6 hours. This phenomenon could be well characterized by the C₉/C(nadir) ratio, which was significantly lower in the NSAID-treated cohort (P < 0.01). These preliminary data suggest that the concomitant intake of NSAIDs may lower EHC of MPA possibly through the inhibition of MRP2 transport of MPA-G. Further mechanism-based studies are needed to further elucidate this potential transporter interaction.

  11. Therapeutic drug monitoring of enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium by limited sampling strategies is associated with a high rate of failure

    PubMed Central

    Hougardy, Jean-Michel; Maufort, Laurette; Cotton, Frédéric; Coussement, Julien; Mikhalski, Dimitri; Wissing, Karl M.; Le Moine, Alain; Broeders, Nilufer; Abramowicz, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background Therapeutic drug monitoring of mycophenolic acid (MPA) is usually performed with a limited sampling strategy (LSS), which relies on a limited number of blood samples and subsequent extrapolation of the global exposure to MPA. LSS is usually performed successfully with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), but data on enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) are scarce. Here, we evaluated the feasibility of 6-h LSS therapeutic drug monitoring with EC-MPS compared with MMF monitoring among kidney transplant recipients. Methods Sixty-two patients who received EC-MPS during the first 6 months of transplantation were compared with a matched group of 64 MMF-treated kidney transplant recipients. The area under the curve (AUC) was computed by LSS using multiple concentration time points (0, 1, 2, 3 and 6 h post-dose) and a trapezoidal rule. Patients had MPA therapeutic drug monitoring performed on two occasions, one within 2 weeks and the second after 3–4 months of transplantation. Results EC-MPS monitoring and MMF therapeutic drug monitoring were not interpretable in 34.5% (n = 40/116) and 1.8% (n = 2/112) of patients, respectively {relative risk [RR] 19.3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 4.8–78.0]; P < 0.0001}. The main cause of abnormal EC-MPS therapeutic drug monitoring was delayed absorption of both the previous evening and the morning dose, resulting in MPA plasma levels before the next morning dose being higher than MPA plasma levels measured at 1, 2 and 3 h after taking EC-MPS. Cyclosporin in association with MMF significantly increased the risk of low AUC values (<30 mg h/L) in comparison with tacrolimus [55% (n = 11/20) and 10% (n = 9/88), respectively; RR 5.4 (95% CI 2.6–11.2); P < 0.0001]. Conclusions The risk of therapeutic drug monitoring failure with EC-MPS is >30% during the first 6 months of renal transplantation. Delayed pharmacokinetics was the main reason. In contrast, the risk of therapeutic drug monitoring failure was substantially lower with

  12. Influence of Proton Pump Inhibitors on Mycophenolic Acid Pharmacokinetics in Patients With Renal Transplantation and the Relationship With Cytochrome 2C19 Gene Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Ciftci, H S; Karadeniz, M S; Tefik, T; Caliskan, Y; Yazıcı, H; Demir, E; Turkmen, A; Nane, I; Oguz, F S; Aydin, F

    2017-04-01

    Most patients have serious digestive complications after renal transplantation. Therefore, it is important to protect gastrointestinal function to improve the survival rate of transplant patients. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) such as lansoprazole and rabeprazole are widely administered to renal transplant patients with mycophenolic acid (MPA) in the perioperative period. PPIs are metabolized by cytochrome (CYP) 2C19 enzymes. Mycophenolate sodium (MYF) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) have been used in immunosuppression. Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions have been described between immunosuppressive drugs. In the present study, we investigated the drug interaction between MPA and lansoparazole or rabeprazole and the impact of CYP2C19 polymorphisms on these drug interactions after renal transplantation. A total of 125 renal transplant patients taking MPA derivatives between 2012 and 2016 were included in this study. The 125 patients were divided into 6 groups: MMF/tacrolimus/steroid together with lansoprazole or rabeprazole; MYF/tacrolimus/steroid together with lansoprazole or rabeprazole and without PPI. The single nucleotide polymorphisms of CYP2C19 were determined by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Plasma concentrations of MPA were measured by cloned enzyme donor immunoassay. Clinical parameters such as incidence of delayed graft function and acute rejection, the rate of change of serum creatinine, toxicity, and gastrointestinal adverse effects were analyzed retrospectively. The mean concentrations of MPA in the MYF group were higher than those in the MMF group. The mean dose-adjusted blood concentration of MPA coadministered with lansoprazole was lower than that of MPA with rabeprazole or without PPI in MMF and MYF groups (P < .05). In patients with the CYP2C19*2/*2 genotype, the mean concentrations of MMF with lansoprazole were significantly lower than those with rabeprazole with MMF or without PPI (P < .05

  13. Sirolimus, Cyclosporine, and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing Graft-versus-Host Disease in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-03

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large B -Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Plasma Cell Myeloma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  14. Fludarabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating HIV-Positive Patients With or Without Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-17

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Aggressive NK-cell Leukemia; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV Infection; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Polycythemia Vera; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Primary Myelofibrosis; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Multiple Myeloma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  15. Fludarabine Phosphate, Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclosporine, Mycophenolate Mofetil, Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Hematopoietic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-01

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. Alemtuzumab, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-13

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  17. Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Tacrolimus, Mycophenolate Mofetil, Total-Body Irradiation, and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  18. High Dose Cyclophosphamide, Tacrolimus, and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients With Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Myeloablative or Reduced Intensity Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-14

    Acute Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma; Graft Versus Host Disease; Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Recurrent Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  19. Tacrolimus and Mycophenolate Mofetil With or Without Sirolimus in Preventing Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-23

    Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Stage II Contiguous Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Contiguous Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Non-Contiguous Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  20. Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients With Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Undergoing Donor Bone Marrow Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-12

    Adenosine Deaminase Deficiency; Autosomal Recessive Disorder; Immune System Disorder; Purine-Nucleoside Phosphorylase Deficiency; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency With Absence of T and B Cells; X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

  1. Mycophenolate Mofetil and Cyclosporine in Reducing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies or Metastatic Kidney Cancer Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Renal Cell Carcinoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Type 1 Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Type 2 Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  2. Is mycophenolate more than just an immunosuppressant?--An overview.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Abishek; Brown, Lindsay

    2009-02-01

    The development of immunosuppressant compounds, such as cyclosporine and tacrolimus was crucial to the success of transplant surgery and for treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, immunosuppressant therapy may increase the concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS), inducing oxidative damage such as an increased vascular damage. The major source of ROS in the vascular endothelial cells is NADPH oxidase. The subunit structure and function of this enzyme complex in vascular cells differs from that in phagocytic leucocytes. The enzyme subunits Nox1, Nox2 and Nox4 are only found in vascular cells. The GTP-dependent protein subunit Rac 1 needs to be activated for this enzyme to function. Inhibiting this protein subunit should reduce NADPH oxidase-induced oxidative stress. In the cardiovascular system, oxidative stress is observed as hypertension, hypertrophy, fibrosis, conduction abnormalities and endothelial dysfunction, as well as cardiac allograft vasculopathy in transplant patients. In contrast to cyclosporine and tacrolimus, the immunosuppressant mycophenolate inhibits the Rac 1 subunit thus inhibiting NADPH oxidase in the vasculature. This may reduce oxidative stress, prevent the development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy, decrease the deterioration of vascular function and improve cardiovascular function chronically in transplant patients. This overview discusses whether this antioxidant immunosuppressive property could translate into a more general protective role for mycophenolate in the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  3. Mycophenolic Acid-Induced Developmental Defects in Zebrafish Embryos.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ling-Ling; Liu, Mei-Hui; Li, Jian-Ying; He, Zhi-Heng; Li, Huan; Shen, Ning; Wei, Ping; He, Ming-Fang

    2016-11-01

    With the increasing use of mycophenolic acid (MPA) in solid organ transplantation, some clinical studies indicate that it is also a human teratogen. However, it is unknown by which mechanism MPA acts as a teratogen. Mycophenolic acid was a selective blocker of de novo purine synthesis, and its immunosuppressive effect is mediated by the inhibition of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase, which could be a target for MPA-induced toxicity as well. The aim of our study was to examine the direct influence of MPA exposure on zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. Morphological defects including tail curvature and severe pericardial edema in zebrafish embryos caused by MPA (3.7-11.1 µmol/L) were found in a dose-dependent manner. The teratogenic index (25% lethal concentration value (LC25)/no observed adverse effect level ratio) was 16, which indicated MPA as a teratogen. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that the expression level of impdh1b and impdh2 was significantly reduced by MPA treatment at 8 µmol/L (equals to LC25 level). All the toxic effects could be partially reversed by the addition of 33.3 µmol/L guanosine. Our results indicated that MPA impairs the development of zebrafish embryos via inhibition of impdh activity, which subsequently caused a guanosine nucleotide depletion in vivo.

  4. Kinetically controlled drug resistance: how Penicillium brevicompactum survives mycophenolic acid.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin E; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2011-11-25

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium brevicompactum produces the immunosuppressive drug mycophenolic acid (MPA), which is a potent inhibitor of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases (IMPDHs). IMPDH catalyzes the conversion of IMP to XMP via a covalent enzyme intermediate, E-XMP*; MPA inhibits by trapping E-XMP*. P. brevicompactum (Pb) contains two MPA-resistant IMPDHs, PbIMPDH-A and PbIMPDH-B, which are 17- and 10(3)-fold more resistant to MPA than typically observed. Surprisingly, the active sites of these resistant enzymes are essentially identical to those of MPA-sensitive enzymes, so the mechanistic basis of resistance is not apparent. Here, we show that, unlike MPA-sensitive IMPDHs, formation of E-XMP* is rate-limiting for both PbIMPDH-A and PbIMPDH-B. Therefore, MPA resistance derives from the failure to accumulate the drug-sensitive intermediate.

  5. UGT1A9, UGT2B7, and MRP2 genotypes can predict mycophenolic acid pharmacokinetic variability in pediatric kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Tsuyoshi; Goebel, Jens; Cox, Shareen; Maseck, Denise; Zhang, Kejian; Sherbotie, Joseph R; Ellis, Eileen N; James, Laura P; Ward, Robert M; Vinks, Alexander A

    2012-12-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) exposure in pediatric patients with kidney transplant receiving body surface area (BSA)-based dosing exhibits large variability. Several genetic variants in glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) and of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) have independently been suggested to predict MPA exposure in adult patients with varying results. Here, the combined contribution of these genetic variants to MPA pharmacokinetic variability was investigated in pediatric renal transplant recipients who were on mycophenolic mofetil maintenance therapy. MPA and MPA-glucuronide concentrations from 32 patients were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. MPA exposure (AUC) was estimated using a 4-point abbreviated sampling strategy (predose/trough and 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 3 hours after dose) using a validated pediatric Bayesian estimator. Genotyping was performed for all of the following single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): UGT1A8 830G>A(*3), UGT1A9 98T>C(*3), UGT1A9-440C>T, UGT1A9-2152C>T, UGT1A9-275T>A, UGT2B7-900A>G, and MRP2-24T>C. Recipients heterozygous for MRP2-24T>C who also had UGT1A9-440C>T or UGT2B7-900A>G (n = 4), and MRP2-24T>C-negative recipients having both UGT1A9-440C>T and UGT2B7-900A>G (n = 5) showed a 2.2 and 1.7 times higher dose-dependent and BSA-normalized MPA-AUC compared with carriers of no or only 1 UGT-SNP (P < 0.001 and P = 0.01, respectively) (n = 7). Dose-dependent and BSA-normalized predose MPA concentrations were 3.0 and 2.4 times higher, respectively (P < 0.001). Interindividual variability in peak concentrations could be explained by the presence of the UGT1A9-440C>T genotype (P < 0.05). Our preliminary study demonstrates that combined UGT1A9-440C>T, UGT2B7-900A>G, and MRP2-24T>C polymorphisms can be important predictors of interindividual variability in MPA exposure in the pediatric population.

  6. UGT1A9, UGT2B7 and MRP2 genotypes can predict mycophenolic acid pharmacokinetic variability in pediatric kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Tsuyoshi; Goebel, Jens; Cox, Shareen; Maseck, Denise; Zhang, Kejian; Sherbotie, Joseph R.; Ellis, Eileen N.; James, Laura P.; Ward, Robert M.; Vinks, Alexander A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Mycophenolic acid (MPA) exposure in pediatric kidney transplant patients receiving body surface area (BSA)-based dosing exhibits large variability. Several genetic variants in glucuronosyl transferases (UGTs) and of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) have independently been suggested to predict MPA exposure in adult patients with varying results. Here, the combined contribution of these genetic variants to MPA pharmacokinetic variability was investigated in pediatric renal transplant recipients who were on mycophenolic mofetil maintenance therapy. Methods MPA and MPA-Glucuronide (MPAG) concentrations from 32 patients were quantified by HPLC. MPA exposure (AUC) was estimated using a 4-point abbreviated sampling strategy (pre-dose/trough and 20min, 1h and 3h post-dose) using a validated pediatric Bayesian estimator. Genotyping was performed for all of the following single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): UGT1A8 830G>A(*3), UGT1A9 98T>C(*3), UGT1A9-440C>T, UGT1A9-2152C>T, UGT1A9-275T>A, UGT2B7-900A>G and MRP2 -24T>C. Results Recipients heterozygous for MRP2-24T>C who also had UGT1A9-440C>T and/or UGT2B7-900A>G (n=4), and MRP2-24T>C-negative recipients having both UGT1A9-440C>T and UGT2B7-900A>G (n=5) showed a 2.2 and 1.7-times higher dose- and BSA-normalized MPA-AUC compared to carriers of no or only one UGT-SNP (P < 0.001 and P=0.01, respectively) (n=7). Dose- and BSA-normalized pre-dose MPA concentrations were 3.0- and 2.4-times higher, respectively (P < 0.001). Inter-individual variability in peak concentrations could be explained by the presence of the UGT1A9-440C>T genotype (P<0.05). Conclusion Our preliminary study demonstrates that combined UGT1A9-440C>T, UGT2B7-900A>G and MRP2-24T>C polymorphisms can be important predictors of interindividual variability in MPA exposure in the pediatric population. PMID:23131697

  7. Molecular basis for mycophenolic acid biosynthesis in Penicillium brevicompactum.

    PubMed

    Regueira, Torsten Bak; Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Mortensen, Uffe H; Hertweck, Christian; Nielsen, Jens

    2011-05-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is the active ingredient in the increasingly important immunosuppressive pharmaceuticals CellCept (Roche) and Myfortic (Novartis). Despite the long history of MPA, the molecular basis for its biosynthesis has remained enigmatic. Here we report the discovery of a polyketide synthase (PKS), MpaC, which we successfully characterized and identified as responsible for MPA production in Penicillium brevicompactum. mpaC resides in what most likely is a 25-kb gene cluster in the genome of Penicillium brevicompactum. The gene cluster was successfully localized by targeting putative resistance genes, in this case an additional copy of the gene encoding IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH). We report the cloning, sequencing, and the functional characterization of the MPA biosynthesis gene cluster by deletion of the polyketide synthase gene mpaC of P. brevicompactum and bioinformatic analyses. As expected, the gene deletion completely abolished MPA production as well as production of several other metabolites derived from the MPA biosynthesis pathway of P. brevicompactum. Our work sets the stage for engineering the production of MPA and analogues through metabolic engineering.

  8. Applications of ultrasound to enhance mycophenolic acid production.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yupeng; Ang, Woon T; Xing, James; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Jie

    2012-09-01

    Reducing production costs for fermentation-based drugs (e.g., antibiotics) is crucial for the long-term sustainability of healthcare. In this study, we propose a novel low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation scheme using a nominal frequency of 1.5 MHz with a 20% duty cycle (200 μs ultrasound on and 800 μs ultrasound off) to increase production of fermentation-based drugs. We chose Penicillium brevicompactum as a model system to demonstrate the performance of our LIPUS system. Penicillium brevicompactum can produce mycophenolic acid (MPA), an immunosuppressive agent commonly used to prevent rejection after organ transplantation. We have stimulated Penicillium brevicompactum in 50 mL shake flasks using LIPUS during its fermentation. After a series of screening experiments to optimize ultrasound parameters (e.g., ultrasound intensities, treatment duration and treatment frequency per day), it was concluded that ultrasound stimulation can increase MPA production by as much as 60% when treated eight times a day for 10-min durations at an intensity (spatial peak temporal average) of 200 mW/cm(2). These findings elucidate a new approach to reduce the cost of producing fermentation-based drugs. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of mycophenolic acid, penicillic acid, patulin, sterigmatocystin, and aflatoxins in cheese.

    PubMed

    Siriwardana, M G; Lafont, P

    1979-07-01

    A method has been developed for detection of aflatoxins, mycophenolic acid, patulin, penicillic acid, and sterigmatocystin in cheese. It is based on selective extraction with a mixture of equal volumes of 5% sodium chloride, methanol, and aceton, precipitation of caseins at -25 C, defatting with hexane, and removal of extraneous matter by transfer of mycotoxins to chloroform and ethyl acetate. The extract is purified further by column chromatography. Mycotoxins are quantitated on thin layer chromatograms by fluorescence comparisons. Mycophenolic acid, patulin, and penicillic acid are visualized with diethylamine. The limits of detection in cheese are about 20 micrograms/kg for mycophenolic acid, patulin, and sterigmatocystin, 30 microgram/kg for pencillic acid, and 1 microgram/kg for aflatoxins B1 and M1.

  10. Mycophenolic acid mediated disruption of the intestinal epithelial tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Muhammad; Rahman, Hazir; Ahmed, Raees; Oellerich, Michael; Asif, Abdul R

    2014-04-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicity is a common adverse effect of mycophenolic acid (MPA) treatment in organ transplant patients, through poorly understood mechanisms. Phosphorylation of myosin light chain 2 (MLC2) is associated with epithelial tight junction (TJ) modulation which leads to defective epithelial barrier function, and has been implicated in GI diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether MPA could induce epithelial barrier permeability via MLC2 regulation. Caco-2 monolayers were exposed to therapeutic concentrations of MPA, and MLC2 and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) expression were analyzed using PCR and immunoblotting. Epithelial cell permeability was assessed by measuring transepithelial resistance (TER) and the flux of paracellular permeability marker FITC-dextran across the epithelial monolayers. MPA increased the expression of MLC2 and MLCK at both the transcriptional and translational levels. In addition, the amount of phosphorylated MLC2 was increased after MPA treatment. Confocal immunofluorescence analysis showed redistribution of TJ proteins (ZO-1 and occludin) after MPA treatment. This MPA mediated TJ disruption was not due to apoptosis or cell death. Additionally ML-7, a specific inhibitor of MLCK was able to reverse both the MPA mediated decrease in TER and the increase in FITC-dextran influx, suggesting a modulating role of MPA on epithelial barrier permeability via MLCK activity. These results suggest that MPA induced alterations in MLC2 phosphorylation and may have a role in the patho-physiology of intestinal epithelial barrier disruption and may be responsible for the adverse effects (GI toxicity) of MPA on the intestine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Disposition of Mycophenolic Acid, Brevianamide A, Asperphenamate, and Ergosterol in Solid Cultures of Penicillium brevicompactum

    PubMed Central

    Bird, B. A.; Campbell, I. M.

    1982-01-01

    When Penicillium brevicompactum was grown between layers of dialysis membrane on Czapek-Dox agar for 3 days, no synthesis of mycophenolic acid, brevianamide A, asperphenamate, or ergosterol occurred. After removal of the uppermost membrane layer, aerial mycelium developed and all four metabolites were formed. The bulk of the mycophenolic acid that was formed was excreted into the medium, the bulk of the brevianamide A and asperphenamate was found in the aerial hyphae, and ergosterol was found in both vegetative and aerial mycelia. PMID:16345939

  12. Production of Mycophenolic Acid by Penicillium brevicompactum Using Solid State Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Gopal; Patil, Mahesh D; Soni, Surbhi; Chisti, Yusuf; Banerjee, Uttam Chand

    2017-05-01

    Solid-state fermentation using the microfungus Penicillium brevicompactum for the production of mycophenolic acid is reported in this paper. Of the initial substrates tested (whole wheat, cracked wheat, long grain Basmati rice, and short grain Parmal rice), Parmal rice proved to be the best. Under initial conditions, using steamed Parmal rice with 80% (w/w) initial moisture content, a maximum mycophenolic acid concentration of 3.4 g/kg substrate was achieved in 12 days of fermentation at 25 °C. The above substrate was supplemented with the following additional nutrients (g/L packed substrate): glucose 40.0, peptone 54.0, KH2PO4 8.0, MgSO4⋅7H2O 2.0, glycine 7.0, and methionine 1.65 (initial pH 5.0). A small amount of a specified trace element solution was also added. The final mycophenolic acid concentration was increased to nearly 4 g/kg substrate by replacing glucose with molasses. Replacing Parmal rice with rice bran as substrate further improved the mycophenolic acid production to nearly 4.5 g/kg substrate.

  13. Open label randomized controlled trial assessing the efficacy of mycophenolate sodium against other conventional immunosuppressive agents in active systemic lupus erythematosus patients without renal involvement.

    PubMed

    Yahya, Fariz; Jasmin, Raja; Ng, Chin Teck; Cheah, Tien Eang; Sockalingam, Sargunan

    2013-12-01

    Mycophenolate is an immunosuppressive agent which has been used in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients who have failed conventional therapy. However, the use of mycophenolate sodium in extra-renal SLE involvement has yet to be established. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of mycophenolate sodium in extra-renal SLE. A total of 14 SLE patients without renal involvement were randomized either to receive mycophenolate sodium or other immunosuppressive agents. Patients were assessed monthly from baseline until week 16. Assessment parameters included SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score, other organ-specific parameters and immunological parameters, including anti-double stranded DNA and C3. Steroid-sparing effect of mycophenolate sodium was also evaluated. Mycophenolate sodium produced a significant reduction in SLEDAI scores (P < 0.05) after 16 weeks of treatment. Mixed responses were detected in terms of organ-specific clinical changes. A positive trend was observed in improvement of immunological parameters and steroid dose reduction. No major adverse events were reported in this study. Mycophenolate sodium is a safe alternative therapy in SLE patients with extra-renal involvement. The reduction in SLEDAI scores and the observation of no major safety concerns suggest that a larger prospective study of mycophenolate sodium in non-renal SLE is warranted. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation, and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant Followed by Donor Natural Killer Cell Therapy, Mycophenolate Mofetil, and Tacrolimus in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-06

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Recurrent Indolent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  15. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-13

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  16. Tacrolimus and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Who Have Undergone Total-Body Irradiation With or Without Fludarabine Phosphate Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-25

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Polycythemia Vera; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Multiple Myeloma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Testicular Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  17. [Establishment of a genetic transformation system for Penicillium brevicompactum to produce mycophenolic acid].

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhihong; Su, Caiyun; Yan, Jing; Dai, Meng; Zhao, Ying; Wang, Hongyi; Dai, Mingwei; Zhang, Jia

    2013-11-04

    We established a genetic transformation system for Penicillium brevicompactum to produce mycophenolic acid. We developed protoplast transformation methods mediated by Polyethylene glycol, using phleomycin resistance gene (Sh ble) as a dominant selection marker. The frequency of transformation was up to 2 - 3 transformants per microg DNA; analysis of the transformants by PCR showed that the foreign DNA had been integrated into the host genome. The transformants retained stable after generation. The establishment of the genetic transformation system of Penicillium brevicompactum could serve as the basis for the research of molecular biology and the breeding of gene engineering of the fungus.

  18. Successful Treatment of Fibrosing Organising Pneumonia Causing Respiratory Failure with Mycophenolic Acid.

    PubMed

    Paul, Christina; Lin-Shaw, Ammy; Joseph, Mariamma; Kwan, Keith; Sergiacomi, Gianluigi; Mura, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Organising pneumonia (OP) is usually promptly responsive to corticosteroid treatment. We describe a series of 3 cases of severe, progressive, biopsy-proven fibrosing OP causing respiratory failure. All cases presented with peribronchial and subpleural consolidations, had a fibro-inflammatory infiltrative component in the alveolar septa, and only had a partial and unsatisfactory response to corticosteroids. However, they responded to mycophenolic acid (MPA) treatment with resolution of respiratory failure as well as clinical and functional improvement. MPA as an additional treatment option for aggressive forms of fibrosing OP and interstitial lung disease needs to be further explored. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. The Anti-Fibrotic Effect of Mycophenolic Acid–Induced Neutral Endopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Oglio, Maria Pia; Rossini, Michele; Divella, Chiara; Pontrelli, Paola; Verrienti, Raffaella; Rutigliano, Monica; Ditonno, Pasquale; Stifanelli, Patrizia; Ancona, Nicola; Schena, Francesco Paolo; Grandaliano, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) appears to have anti-fibrotic effects, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this are unknown. We prospectively studied 35 stable kidney transplant recipients maintained on cyclosporine and azathioprine. We converted 20 patients from azathioprine to enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) and continued the remaining 15 patients on azathioprine. Exploratory mRNA expression profiling, performed on five randomly selected EC-MPS patients, revealed significant upregulation of neutral endopeptidase (NEP), which is an enzyme that degrades angiotensin II. We confirmed these microarray data by measuring levels of NEP expression in all subjects; in addition, we found that NEP gene expression correlated inversely with proteinuria. In an additional 33 patients, glomerular and tubular NEP protein levels from renal graft biopsies were significantly higher among the 13 patients receiving cyclosporine + EC-MPS than among the 12 patients receiving cyclosporine + azathioprine or 8 patients receiving cyclosporine alone. Glomerular NEP expression inversely correlated with glomerulosclerosis and proteinuria, and tubular NEP expression inversely correlated with interstitial fibrosis. Incubation of human proximal tubular cells with MPA increased NEP gene expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, MPA reduced angiotensin II–induced expression of the profibrotic factor plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and a specific NEP inhibitor completely reversed this effect. Taken together, our data suggest that MPA directly induces expression of neutral endopeptidase, which may reduce proteinuria and slow the progression of renal damage in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:20864690

  20. Do cytostatic drugs reach drinking water? The case of mycophenolic acid.

    PubMed

    Franquet-Griell, Helena; Ventura, Francesc; Boleda, M Rosa; Lacorte, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) has been identified as a new river contaminant according to its wide use and high predicted concentration. The aim of this study was to monitor the impact of MPA in a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) that collects water downstream Llobregat River (NE Spain) in a highly densified urban area. During a one week survey MPA was recurrently detected in the DWTP intake (17-56.2 ng L(-1)). The presence of this compound in river water was associated to its widespread consumption (>2 tons in 2012 in Catalonia), high excretion rates and low degradability. The fate of MPA in waters at each treatment step of the DWTP was analyzed and complete removal was observed after pretreatment with chlorine dioxide. So far, MPA has not been described as water contaminant and its presence associated with its consumption in anticancer treatments is of relevance to highlight the importance of monitoring this compound. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Structure and mechanism of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase in complex with the immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid.

    PubMed

    Sintchak, M D; Fleming, M A; Futer, O; Raybuck, S A; Chambers, S P; Caron, P R; Murcko, M A; Wilson, K P

    1996-06-14

    The structure of inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) in complex with IMP and mycophenolic acid (MPA) has been determined by X-ray diffraction. IMPDH plays a central role in B and T lymphocyte replication. MPA is a potent IMPDH inhibitor and the active metabolite of an immunosuppressive drug recently approved for the treatment of allograft rejection. IMPDH comprises two domains: a core domain, which is an alpha/beta barrel and contains the active site, and a flanking domain. The complex, in combination with mutagenesis and kinetic data, provides a structural basis for understanding the mechanism of IMPDH activity and indicates that MPA inhibits IMPDH by acting as a replacement for the nicotinamide portion of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide cofactor and a catalytic water molecule.

  2. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identification of Penicillium brevicompactum, a grape contaminant and mycophenolic acid producer.

    PubMed

    Patiño, B; Medina, A; Doménech, M; González-Jaén, M T; Jiménez, M; Vázquez, C

    2007-02-01

    Penicillium brevicompactum is a ubiquitous fungal species that contaminates diverse substrates and commodities and produces an array of metabolites toxic to human and animals. The present work has obtained evidence, by liquid chromatography (LC)-ion-trap mass spectrometry, of the ability of P. brevicompactum strains isolated from grapes to produce mycophenolic acid, a potent immunosuppressor. In order to facilitate early diagnosis of this species on commodities for human and animal consumption, a rapid, sensitive and specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for P. brevicompactum was developed. The specific primers were designed based on the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2ITS (Internal Transcribed Spacers of rRNA genes) multicopy region. This method provides a useful aid to detect the presence of this fungal species in grapes and other commodities in order to prevent the toxins produced entering the food chain.

  3. [Production of mycophenolic acid by fungi of the genus Penicillium link].

    PubMed

    Vinokurova, N G; Ivanushkina, N E; Kochkina, G A; Arinbasarov, M U; Ozerskaia, S M

    2005-01-01

    Out of 36 strains of fungi of the genus Penicillium, some of which were isolated from ancient permafrost soils, 14 strains synthesized mycophenolic acid (MPA). Maximal (over 500 mg/l) accumulation of MPA in culture liquid was observed in P. brevicompactum strains (VKM F-457, VKM F-477, and VKM F-1150). This was the first study to detect MPA in representatives of the species P. rugulosum; in three strains of this species (VKM FW-665, VKM FW-717, and VKM FW-733), the level of MPA accumulation exceeded 300 mg/l. The time course of the synthesis of MPA by the P. rugulosum strain VKM FW-733 was studied. It was shown that the synthesis of this metabolite was dramatically intensified at the stationary growth phase (ten days).

  4. Estimation of Mycophenolic Acid Area Under the Curve With Limited-Sampling Strategy in Chinese Renal Transplant Recipients Receiving Enteric-Coated Mycophenolate Sodium

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yichen; Peng, Bo; Li, Long; Wang, Jina; Wang, Xuanchuan; Qi, Guisheng; Rong, Ruiming; Wang, Liming; Qiu, Jianxin; Xu, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Background: The enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS), whose active constituent is mycophenolic acid (MPA), has been widely clinically used for organ transplant recipients. However, its absorption is delayed due to its special designed dosage form, which results in difficulty to monitor the exposure of the MPA in patients receiving the EC-MPS. This study was aimed at developing a relatively practical and precise model with limited sampling strategy to estimate the 12-hour area under the concentration–time curve (AUC0–12 h) of MPA for Chinese renal transplant recipients receiving EC-MPS. Methods: A total of 36 Chinese renal transplant recipients receiving the EC-MPS and tacrolimus were recruited in this study. The time point was 2 weeks after the transplantation for all the patients. The MPA concentrations were measured with enzyme-multiplied immunoassay technique for 11 blood specimens collected predose and at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 12 hours after the morning dose of EC-MPS. The measured AUC was calculated with these 11 points of MPA concentrations with the linear trapezoidal rule. Limited sampling strategy was used to develop models for estimated AUC in the model group (n = 18). The bias and precision of different models were evaluated in the validation group (n = 18). Results: C4 showed the strongest correlation with the measured AUC. The best 3 time point equation was 6.629 + 8.029 × C0 + 0.592 × C3 + 1.786 × C4 (R2 = 0.910; P < 0.001), whereas the best 4 time point equation was 3.132 + 5.337 × C0 + 0.735 × C3 + 1.783 × C4 + 3.065 × C8 (R2 = 0.959; P < 0.001). When evaluated in the validation group, the 4 time point model had a much better performance than the 3 time point model: for the 4 time point model: R2 = 0.873, bias = 0.505 [95% confidence interval (CI), −10.159 to 11.170], precision = 13.370 (95% CI, 5.186–21.555), and 77.8% of estimated AUCs was within 85%–115% of the measured AUCs; for the 3 time point model: R2

  5. Simultaneous determination of mycophenolic acid and its glucuronide and glycoside derivatives in canine and feline plasma by UHPLC-UV.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Sol Maiam; Hwang, Julianne K; Slovak, Jeniffer E; Court, Michael H; Villarino, Nicolas F

    2017-02-01

    Cats and dogs can suffer from multiple autoimmune diseases. Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is a potentially useful immunosuppressant drug in cats and dogs, because of its well-documented efficacy in controlling autoimmune disease in humans. However, the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in these species remain to be determined. We have developed and validated a sensitive, precise, accurate and reproducible method that provides consistent quantification of MPA and its major derivatives, MPA phenol glucoside and MPA phenol glucuronide, in canine and feline plasma using ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled to an ultraviolet detector. The main advantages of this novel method include a small sample volume, easy sample preparation, a short chromatographic analysis time and the option to select either phenolphthalein β-d-glucuronide or mycophenolic acid carboxybutoxy ether as internal standard. Results of validation indicate that this analytical method is suitable to study the plasma disposition of MPA and its derivatives in dogs and cats.

  6. Complete remission of nephrotic syndrome and acute kidney injury in crescentic IgA nephropathy: Role of mycophenolate sodium

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, D.; Jhaveri, K. D.; Shah, H. H.

    2016-01-01

    Optimal therapy and prognosis of crescentic-IgA nephropathy (C-IgAN) are not known. Reported treatment options for C-IgAN include combination of corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide for 6 months. The role of mycophenolate sodium in C-IgAN is unknown. We report a case of C-IgAN that was successfully treated with combination immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:27795634

  7. Lupus nephritis: induction therapy in severe lupus nephritis--should MMF be considered the drug of choice?

    PubMed

    Rovin, Brad H; Parikh, Samir V; Hebert, Lee A; Chan, Tak Mao; Mok, Chi Chiu; Ginzler, Ellen M; Hooi, Lai Seong; Brunetta, Paul; Maciuca, Romeo; Solomons, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Severe lupus nephritis is an aggressive disease that requires an aggressive approach to treatment. Recent randomized clinical trials showed that mycophenolate mofetil compared favorably with cyclophosphamide (traditional approach) for remission induction. Consequently, mycophenolate mofetil is now commonly recommended as first-line therapy. Nevertheless, the role of mycophenolate mofetil in treating severe lupus nephritis is unclear, because such patients were excluded from these trials. With this limitation as background, this work addresses the question of mycophenolate mofetil for induction therapy for severe lupus nephritis. We performed a systematic review of the outcomes of treating severe lupus nephritis with mycophenolate mofetil or cyclophosphamide. Because no studies directly addressed this question, these data were extracted from the published literature or obtained by personal communications from investigators. There is no universally accepted definition, and therefore, severe lupus nephritis was arbitrarily defined by renal histology, resistance to therapy, or level of kidney function at presentation. For each trial analyzed, we determined the partial and complete remission rates. Long-term outcomes were compared when available. The pooled results suggest that mycophenolate mofetil and cyclophosphamide are equally effective in inducing remission of severe lupus nephritis. However, relapse rates and risk of developing ESRD were higher for mycophenolate mofetil compared with cyclophosphamide. In conclusion, in the short term, mycophenolate mofetil and cyclophosphamide are about equal in inducing remission. However, long-term outcomes suggest better preservation of kidney function and fewer relapses with cyclophosphamide therapy. Therefore, mycophenolate mofetil should not yet be considered the induction drug of choice for severe lupus nephritis.

  8. RECENT CLINICAL TRIALS IN LUPUS NEPHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Recent clinical trials have provided evidence for the efficacy of low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide and mycophenolate mofetil as induction treatment for patients with proliferative lupus nephritis in comparative trials with standard-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide. Trials of maintenance treatments have had more variable results, but suggest that mycophenolate mofetil may be similar to quarterly standard-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide and somewhat more efficacious than azathioprine. Differential responses to mycophenolate mofetil based on ethnicity suggest that it may be more effective in black and Hispanic patients. Rituximab was not efficacious as an adjunct to induction treatment with mycophenolate mofetil. PMID:25034160

  9. Mycophenolate versus cyclophosphamide for progressive interstitial lung disease associated with systemic sclerosis: a 2-year case control study.

    PubMed

    Panopoulos, Stylianos T; Bournia, Vassiliki-Kalliopi; Trakada, Georgia; Giavri, Irene; Kostopoulos, Charalambos; Sfikakis, Petros P

    2013-10-01

    Cyclophosphamide is considered the treatment of choice for interstitial lung disease (ILD) secondary to systemic sclerosis (SSc), albeit having a minimal effect. Although controlled evidence does not exist, mycophenolate is used increasingly in clinical practice as an alternative. We aimed to compare the long-term efficacy of these drugs. Patients from our SSc cohort who received mycophenolate for over 1 year for progressive ILD were 1:1 matched for age, gender, and baseline forced vital capacity (FVC ±3 %) with cyclophosphamide-treated patients. Changes in FVC, total lung capacity (TLC), diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO), and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans were compared between groups. Changes in pulmonary function tests (PFTs) over at least 1 year in six unmatched control patients, who had denied mycophenolate or cyclophosphamide, also were examined. FVC, TLC, and DLCO did not change significantly in either mycophenolate (from 79.0 ± 12.5 to 80.2 ± 8.1 to 81.2 ± 11.4, from 71.5 ± 16.1 to 74.3 ± 10.8 to 71.8 ± 13.0, from 56.8 ± 12.0 to 55.2 ± 9.9 to 50.6 ± 8.5, respectively) or cyclophosphamide group (from 77.3 ± 12.5 to 79.7 ± 10.3 to 82.5 ± 12.9, from 64.7 ± 14.9 to 68.6 ± 16.0 to 66.1 ± 15.5, from 53.1 ± 14.3 to 56.4 ± 13.5 to 56.3 ± 6.7, respectively), after 1 or 2 years of treatment. PFTs also remained stable in the control group. In either the mycophenolate or cyclophosphamide groups, six patients remained stable, three improved, and one deteriorated according to the definitions of the American Thoracic Society. However, and despite the fact that patients in the cyclophosphamide group had more extended ILD at baseline, a deterioration of lung HRCT findings at 2 years was noticed after mycophenolate (from 10.0 ± 8.9 to 12.7 ± 8.2, p = 0.039) but not after cyclophosphamide. Although these results derive from patients selected for receiving at least 1 year of

  10. A comprehensive characterization of the impact of mycophenolic acid on the metabolism of Jurkat T cells.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ramos, Ana A; Marchetti-Laurent, Catherine; Poindessous, Virginie; Antonio, Samantha; Petitgas, Céline; Ceballos-Picot, Irène; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Bortoli, Sylvie; Loriot, Marie-Anne; Pallet, Nicolas

    2017-09-05

    Metabolic reprogramming is critical for T cell fate and polarization and is regulated by metabolic checkpoints, including Myc, HIF-1α, AMPK and mTORC1. Our objective was to determine the impact of mycophenolic acid (MPA) in comparison with rapamycin (Rapa), an inhibitor of mTORC1, on the metabolism of Jurkat T cells. We identified a drug-specific transcriptome signature consisting of the key enzymes and transporters involved in glycolysis, glutaminolysis or nucleotide synthesis. MPA produced an early and transient drop in the intracellular ATP content related to the inhibition of de novo synthesis of purines, leading to the activation of the energy sensor AMPK. MPA decreases glycolytic flux, consistent with a reduction in glucose uptake, but also in the oxidation of glutamine. Additionally, both drugs reduce aerobic glycolysis. The expression of HIF-1α and Myc, promoting the activation of glycolysis and glutaminolysis, was inhibited by MPA and Rapa. In conclusion, we report that MPA profoundly impacts the cellular metabolism of Jurkat T cells by generating an energetic distress, decreasing the glycolytic and glutaminolytic fluxes and by targeting HIF-1α and Myc. These findings open interesting perspectives for novel combinatorial therapeutic strategies targeting metabolic checkpoints to block the proliferation of T cells.

  11. Cytoskeletal reorganization by mycophenolic acid alters mesangial cell migration and contractility.

    PubMed

    Dubus, Isabelle; L'Azou, Beatrice; Gordien, Myriam; Delmas, Yahsou; Labouyrie, Jean-Pierre; Bonnet, Jacques; Combe, Christian

    2003-11-01

    Cytoskeleton alterations are a hallmark of mesangial cell activation during glomerulosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether mycophenolic acid (MPA) affects cytoskeletal organization and motility of human mesangial cells. Using the IP15 cell line, we found that treatment with 1 micromol/L MPA inhibited both receptor-dependent (angiotensin II) and receptor-independent (KCl) contractile responses, as well as serum-induced migration activity, suggesting alterations in the intracellular mechanisms that control mesangial cell motility. Immunofluorescence studies of MPA-treated cells provided evidence for decreased membrane disassembly/reassembly of alpha-smooth muscle actin and F-actin fibers, which was correlated with sustained quantitative and qualitative modifications of actin-associated proteins: calponin was overexpressed and became associated with actin fibers, whereas phosphorylation levels of cofilin and myosin light chain increased, suggesting both an activation of the mechanisms responsible for actin polymerization and an inhibition of actin-depolymerizing processes. These observations support a stabilizing effect of MPA on the mesangial actin cytoskeleton, which constitutes an additive action by which MPA, beyond its anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative and antifibrotic properties, might protect against excessive mesangial activation in the context of various glomerulopathies and kidney transplantation.

  12. Suppression of autophagy by mycophenolic acid contributes to inhibition of HCV replication in human hepatoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Shoucai; Su, Jinming; Liang, Bingyu; Li, Xu; Li, Yu; Jiang, Junjun; Huang, Jiegang; Zhou, Bo; Ning, Chuanyi; Li, Jieliang; Ho, Wenzhe; Li, Yiping; Chen, Hui; Liang, Hao; Ye, Li

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that mycophenolic acid (MPA) has an anti-HCV activity. However, the mechanism of MPA-mediated inhibition of HCV replication remains to be determined. This study investigated whether MPA has an effect on autophagy, a cellular machinery required for HCV replication, thereby, inhibits HCV replication in Huh7 cells. MPA treatment of Huh7 cells could suppress autophagy, evidenced by decreased LC3B-II level and conversion of LC3B-I to LC3B-II, decreased autophagosome formation, and increased p62 level compared to MPA-untreated cells. Tunicamycin treatment or HCV infection could induce cellular autophagy, however, MPA also exhibited its inhibitory effect on tunicamycin- or HCV infection-induced autophagy. The expression of three autophagy-related genes, Atg3, Atg5, and Atg7 were identified to be inhibited by MPA treatment. Over-expression of these genes could partly recover HCV replication inhibited by MPA; however, silencing their expression by siRNAs could enhance the inhibitory effect of MPA on HCV. Collectively, these results reveal that suppression of autophagy by MPA plays a role in its anti-HCV activity. Down-regulating the expression of three autophagy-related genes by MPA involves in its antiviral mechanism. PMID:28276509

  13. Investigations on the immunosuppressive activity of derivatives of mycophenolic acid in immature dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Iwaszkiewicz-Grzes, Dorota; Cholewinski, Grzegorz; Kot-Wasik, Agata; Trzonkowski, Piotr; Dzierzbicka, Krystyna

    2017-03-01

    The main activity of mycophenolic acid 1 (MPA) and its analogs is the inhibition of proliferation of T cells. Here, we hypothesized that MPA and its conjugates inhibits also the activity of antigen-presenting cells (APC) including dendritic cells (DCs). We tested the effect of novel amino acid derivatives of MPA and conjugates of MPA with acridines/acridones on DCs by flow cytometry, ELISA and MLR assay. Both acridines/acridone derivatives could inhibit the maturation of DC, as shown by the decreased expression of B7 family receptors. It was confirmed in the mixed leucocyte reaction (MLR), in which T cells challenged with DCs pretreated with the analogs showed decreased proliferation and reduced cytokine secretion. The most interesting activity in this series of studies, that is, the suppression of CD86 receptor expression, decreased cytokine production and suppressed mixed leucocyte reaction, exhibited (mycophenoyl-N-3-propyl)-9-acridone-4-carboxamide ester 5a and (mycophenoyl-N-5-pentyl)-9-acridone-4-carboxamide ester 5b. These compounds reduced also the secretion of IL-2 and IL-15. In addition, they increased secretion of suppressive IL-10. Equally promising results were obtained for the N-mycophenoyl-D-glutamic acid 4b, which previously gave the highest value of selectivity. Acridone derivatives of MPA are therefore good immunosuppressive drug candidates for further testing.

  14. Molecular Basis for Mycophenolic Acid Biosynthesis in Penicillium brevicompactum▿†

    PubMed Central

    Regueira, Torsten Bak; Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Mortensen, Uffe H.; Hertweck, Christian; Nielsen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is the active ingredient in the increasingly important immunosuppressive pharmaceuticals CellCept (Roche) and Myfortic (Novartis). Despite the long history of MPA, the molecular basis for its biosynthesis has remained enigmatic. Here we report the discovery of a polyketide synthase (PKS), MpaC, which we successfully characterized and identified as responsible for MPA production in Penicillium brevicompactum. mpaC resides in what most likely is a 25-kb gene cluster in the genome of Penicillium brevicompactum. The gene cluster was successfully localized by targeting putative resistance genes, in this case an additional copy of the gene encoding IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH). We report the cloning, sequencing, and the functional characterization of the MPA biosynthesis gene cluster by deletion of the polyketide synthase gene mpaC of P. brevicompactum and bioinformatic analyses. As expected, the gene deletion completely abolished MPA production as well as production of several other metabolites derived from the MPA biosynthesis pathway of P. brevicompactum. Our work sets the stage for engineering the production of MPA and analogues through metabolic engineering. PMID:21398490

  15. Production of mycophenolic acid by Penicillium brevicompactum-A comparison of two methods of optimization.

    PubMed

    Patel, Gopal; Patil, Mahesh D; Soni, Surbhi; Khobragade, Taresh P; Chisti, Yusuf; Banerjee, Uttam Chand

    2016-09-01

    Production of mycophenolic acid (MPA) by submerged fermentation using the microfungus Penicillium brevicompactum MTCC 8010 is reported here. Screening experiments were used to identify: the suitable media composition; the optimal initial pH; and the optimal incubation temperature to maximize the production of MPA in batch cultures. The initial concentrations of the selected sources of carbon (glucose), nitrogen (peptone) and the precursors (methionine, glycine) were then optimized by: (1) one-at-a-time variation of factors; and (2) a central composite design (CCD) of experiments, in a 12-day batch culture at an initial pH of 5.0, an incubation temperature of 25 °C, and an agitation speed of 200 rpm. The medium optimized using the one-at-a-time variation yielded a peak MPA titer of 1232 ± 90 mg/L. The medium optimized by the CCD method yielded a 40% higher MPA titer of 1737 ± 55 mg/L. The latter value was nearly 9-fold greater than the titer achieved prior to optimization.

  16. Identification and Functional Analysis of the Mycophenolic Acid Gene Cluster of Penicillium roqueforti.

    PubMed

    Del-Cid, Abdiel; Gil-Durán, Carlos; Vaca, Inmaculada; Rojas-Aedo, Juan F; García-Rico, Ramón O; Levicán, Gloria; Chávez, Renato

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium roqueforti is widely known as the ripening agent of blue-veined cheeses. Additionally, this fungus is able to produce several secondary metabolites, including the meroterpenoid compound mycophenolic acid (MPA). Cheeses ripened with P. roqueforti are usually contaminated with MPA. On the other hand, MPA is a commercially valuable immunosuppressant. However, to date the molecular basis of the production of MPA by P. roqueforti is still unknown. Using a bioinformatic approach, we have identified a genomic region of approximately 24.4 kbp containing a seven-gene cluster that may be involved in the MPA biosynthesis in P. roqueforti. Gene silencing of each of these seven genes (named mpaA, mpaB, mpaC, mpaDE, mpaF, mpaG and mpaH) resulted in dramatic reductions in MPA production, confirming that all of these genes are involved in the biosynthesis of the compound. Interestingly, the mpaF gene, originally described in P. brevicompactum as a MPA self-resistance gene, also exerts the same function in P. roqueforti, suggesting that this gene has a dual function in MPA metabolism. The knowledge of the biosynthetic pathway of MPA in P. roqueforti will be important for the future control of MPA contamination in cheeses and the improvement of MPA production for commercial purposes.

  17. Virtual High-Throughput Screening Identifies Mycophenolic Acid as a Novel RNA Capping Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay-Létourneau, Maude; Despins, Simon; Bougie, Isabelle; Bisaillon, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The RNA guanylyltransferase (GTase) is involved in the synthesis of the m7Gppp-RNA cap structure found at the 5′ end of eukaryotic mRNAs. GTases are members of the covalent nucleotidyl transferase superfamily, which also includes DNA and RNA ligases. GTases catalyze a two-step reaction in which they initially utilize GTP as a substrate to form a covalent enzyme-GMP intermediate. The GMP moiety is then transferred to the diphosphate end of the RNA transcript in the second step of the reaction to form the Gppp-RNA structure. In the current study, we used a combination of virtual database screening, homology modeling, and biochemical assays to search for novel GTase inhibitors. Using this approach, we demonstrate that mycophenolic acid (MPA) can inhibit the GTase reaction by preventing the catalytic transfer of the GMP moiety onto an acceptor RNA. As such, MPA represents a novel type of inhibitor against RNA guanylyltransferases that inhibits the second step of the catalytic reaction. Moreover, we show that the addition of MPA to S. cerevisiae cells leads to a reduction of capped mRNAs. Finally, biochemical assays also demonstrate that MPA can inhibit DNA ligases through inhibition of the second step of the reaction. The biological implications of these findings for the MPA-mediated inhibition of members of the covalent nucleotidyl superfamily are discussed. PMID:21935470

  18. Clinicopathologic features and outcome of mycophenolate-induced colitis in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Luis Gustavo M; Rodrigues, Maria Aparecida M; Romeiro, Fernando G; Garcia, Paula D; Contti, Mariana M; de Carvalho, Maria Fernanda C

    2014-11-01

    Reports on the clinical course of mycophenolic acid (MPA)-related colitis in kidney transplant recipients are scarce. This study aimed at assessing MPA-related colitis incidence, risk factors, and progression after kidney transplantation. All kidney transplant patients taking MPA who had colonic biopsies for persistent chronic diarrhea, between 2000 and 2012, at the Kidney Transplantation Unit of Botucatu Medical School Hospital, Brazil, were included. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunohistochemistry was performed in all biopsy specimens. Data on presenting symptoms, medications, immunosuppressive drugs, colonoscopic findings, and follow-up were obtained. Of 580 kidney transplant patients on MPA, 34 underwent colonoscopy. Colonoscopic findings were associated with MPA usage in 16 patients. The most frequent histologic patterns were non-specific colitis (31.3%), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-like colitis (25%), normal/near normal (18.8%), graft-versus-host disease-like (18.8%), and ischemia-like colitis (12.5%). All patients had persistent acute diarrhea and weight loss. Six of the 16 MPA-related diarrhea patients (37.5%) showed acute dehydration requiring hospitalization. Diarrhea resolved when MPA was switched to sirolimus (50%), discontinued (18.75%), switched to azathioprine (12.5%), or reduced by 50% (18.75%). No graft loss occurred. Four patients died during the study period. Late-onset MPA was more frequent, and no correlation with MPA dose or formulation was found.

  19. In vitro study of antiviral activity of mycophenolic acid on Brazilian orthobunyaviruses.

    PubMed

    Livonesi, Márcia Cristina; Moro de Sousa, Ricardo Luiz; Moraes Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu

    2007-01-01

    Oropouche, Caraparu, Guama, Guaroa and Tacaiuma are ssRNA viruses that belong to the genus Orthobunyavirus and have been associated with human febrile illnesses and/or encephalitis. In this study, we evaluated the antiviral action of mycophenolic acid (MPA) on theseorthobunyaviruses to achieve a therapeutic agent to treat the diseases caused by these viruses. The in vitro antiviral evaluation to MPA was done by using plaque assay at different periods of treatment. Results showed that MPA at a concentration of 10 microg/ml has significant antiviral activity on Tacaiuma virus when treatment was initiated either 24 h before or 2 h after viral infection. Moreover, MPA has an inhibitory effect on Guama virus replication, but only when treatment was initiated before cell infection. Addition of guanosine in the culture reverted the inhibitory effect of MPA on Tacaiuma and Guama viruses, suggesting that the antiviral activity of this substance was via depletion of the intracellular guanosine pool. Our results suggest that MPA would not be a good therapeutic agent to treat the diseases caused by Oropouche, Caraparu, Guama, Guaroa, and Tacaiuma viruses. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Strain-Specific Synthesis of Mycophenolic Acid by Penicillium roqueforti in Blue-Veined Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Günter; von Milczewski, Karl Ernst; Prokopek, Dieter; Teuber, Michael

    1982-01-01

    Twenty of 80 strains of Penicillium roqueforti were able to produce up to 600 mg of mycophenolic acid (MPA) liter−1 in 2% yeast extract-5% sucrose broth. Sixty-two of these strains had been isolated from the main blue-veined cheese varieties of western Europe or from starter cultures. Of these 62 dairy strains, only 7 had MPA-producing potential in vitro. These seven strains had all been isolated during the period 1975 to 1981 from the blue cheese of one individual factory. In cheese from the market, MPA (up to 5 mg kg−1) was only found in samples of this same factory. With MPA-producing and -nonproducing strains for the experimental manufacture of blue cheese, MPA synthesis in cheese was only detected with strains which form MPA in yeast extract-sucrose broth. The maximum MPA level at 4 mg kg−1 was similar to that in commercial cheese. Toxicity of MPA was tested with two established human cell lines (Detroit 98 and Girardi Heart) and one established pig kidney cell line (AmII). PMID:16346004

  1. An additional Meyerozyma guilliermondii IMH3 gene confers mycophenolic acid resistance in fungal CTG clade species.

    PubMed

    Defosse, Tatiana A; Mélin, Céline; Clastre, Marc; Besseau, Sébastien; Lanoue, Arnaud; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Oudin, Audrey; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Vandeputte, Patrick; Linder, Tomas; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Courdavault, Vincent; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Papon, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    The fungal CTG clade comprises a number of well-known yeasts that impact human health or with high biotechnological potential. To further extend the set of molecular tools dedicated to these microorganisms, the initial focus of this study was to develop a mycophenolic acid (MPA) resistance cassette. Surprisingly, while we were carrying out preliminary susceptibility testing experiments in a set of yeast species, Meyerozyma guilliermondii, although not being a MPA producer, was found to be primarily resistant toward this drug, whereas a series of nine related species were susceptible to MPA. Using comparative and functional genomic approaches, we demonstrated that all MPA-susceptible CTG clade species display a single gene, referred to as IMH3.1, encoding the MPA target inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and that MPA resistance relies on the presence in the M. guilliermondii genome of an additional IMPDH-encoding gene (IMH3.2). The M. guilliermondii IMH3.2 gene displays marked differences compared to IMH3.1 including the lack of intron, a roughly 160-fold higher transcription level and a serine residue at position 251. Placed under the control of the M. guilliermondii actin 1 gene promoter, IMH3.2 was successfully used to transform Lodderomyces elongisporus, Clavispora lusitaniae, Scheffersomyces stipitis and Candida parapsilosis.

  2. Pharmacokinetics and target attainment of mycophenolate in pediatric renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Martial, Lisa C; Jacobs, Bart A W; Cornelissen, Elisabeth A M; de Haan, Anton F J; Koch, Birgit C P; Burger, David M; Aarnoutse, Rob E; Schreuder, Michiel F; Brüggemann, Roger J M

    2016-06-01

    MPA is an immunosuppressive agent used to prevent graft rejection after renal transplantation. MPA shows considerable inter- and intraindividual variability in exposure in children and has a defined therapeutic window, and TDM is applied to individualize therapy. We aimed to study the exposure to MPA measured as the AUC in pediatric renal transplant patients, to identify factors influencing exposure and to assess target attainment. Children transplanted between 1998 and 2014 in a single center were included. Two groups were identified: Group 1 (AUC <3 wk post-transplantation) and Group 2 (AUC >18 months post-transplantation). Therapeutic targets were set at: AUC0-12h of 30-60 mg h/L. A total of 39 children were included in Group 1 (median age 13.3 yr) vs. 14 in Group 2 (median age 13.4 yr). AUC0-12h was 29.7 mg h/L in Group 1 and 56.6 mg h/L in Group 2, despite a lower dosage in Group 2 (584 and 426 mg/m(2) , respectively). About 46% of patients reached the target AUC0-12h in Group 1. Time since transplantation and serum creatinine were significantly associated with MPA exposure (p < 0.001), explaining 36% of the variability. Individualization of the mycophenolate dose by more intense and more early TDM could improve target attainment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Identification and Functional Analysis of the Mycophenolic Acid Gene Cluster of Penicillium roqueforti

    PubMed Central

    Del-Cid, Abdiel; Gil-Durán, Carlos; Vaca, Inmaculada; Rojas-Aedo, Juan F.; García-Rico, Ramón O.; Levicán, Gloria; Chávez, Renato

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium roqueforti is widely known as the ripening agent of blue-veined cheeses. Additionally, this fungus is able to produce several secondary metabolites, including the meroterpenoid compound mycophenolic acid (MPA). Cheeses ripened with P. roqueforti are usually contaminated with MPA. On the other hand, MPA is a commercially valuable immunosuppressant. However, to date the molecular basis of the production of MPA by P. roqueforti is still unknown. Using a bioinformatic approach, we have identified a genomic region of approximately 24.4 kbp containing a seven-gene cluster that may be involved in the MPA biosynthesis in P. roqueforti. Gene silencing of each of these seven genes (named mpaA, mpaB, mpaC, mpaDE, mpaF, mpaG and mpaH) resulted in dramatic reductions in MPA production, confirming that all of these genes are involved in the biosynthesis of the compound. Interestingly, the mpaF gene, originally described in P. brevicompactum as a MPA self-resistance gene, also exerts the same function in P. roqueforti, suggesting that this gene has a dual function in MPA metabolism. The knowledge of the biosynthetic pathway of MPA in P. roqueforti will be important for the future control of MPA contamination in cheeses and the improvement of MPA production for commercial purposes. PMID:26751579

  4. The Immunosuppressant Mycophenolic Acid Alters Nucleotide and Lipid Metabolism in an Intestinal Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Heischmann, Svenja; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hansen, Kirk; Leibfritz, Dieter; Christians, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    The study objective was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the negative effects of mycophenolic acid (MPA) on human intestinal cells. Effects of MPA exposure and guanosine supplementation on nucleotide concentrations in LS180 cells were assessed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Proteomics analysis was carried out using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture combined with gel-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and lipidome analysis using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Despite supplementation, depletion of guanosine nucleotides (p < 0.001 at 24 and 72 h; 5, 100, and 250 μM MPA) and upregulation of uridine and cytidine nucleotides (p < 0.001 at 24 h; 5 μM MPA) occurred after exposure to MPA. MPA significantly altered 35 proteins mainly related to nucleotide-dependent processes and lipid metabolism. Cross-reference with previous studies of MPA-associated protein changes widely corroborated these results, but showed differences that may be model- and/or method-dependent. MPA exposure increased intracellular concentrations of fatty acids, cholesterol, and phosphatidylcholine (p < 0.01 at 72 h; 100 μM MPA) which corresponded to the changes in lipid-metabolizing proteins. MPA affected intracellular nucleotide levels, nucleotide-dependent processes, expression of structural proteins, fatty acid and lipid metabolism in LS180 cells. These changes may compromise intestinal membrane integrity and contribute to gastrointestinal toxicity. PMID:28327659

  5. Pharmacokinetics, Electrophysiological, and Morphological Effects of the Intravitreal Injection of Mycophenolic Acid in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Gasparin, Fabio; Aguiar, Renata Genaro; Ioshimoto, Gabriela Lourençon; Silva-Cunha, Armando; Fialho, Silvia Ligório; Liber, André Mauricio; Nagy, Balázs Vince; Oiwa, Nestor Norio; Costa, Marcelo Fernandes; Joselevitch, Christina; Ventura, Dora Fix

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To determine the half-life of mycophenolic acid (MPA) in the vitreous of New Zealand albino rabbits after intravitreal injection and the retinal toxicity of different doses of MPA. Methods: Ten micrograms of MPA (Roche Bioscience, Palo Alto, CA) was injected in the vitreous of 16 rabbits, animals were sacrificed at different time-points, and vitreous samples underwent high-performance liquid chromatography. For functional and morphological studies, 5 doses of MPA (0.05, 0.5, 2, 10, and 100 μg) were injected in the vitreous of 20 rabbits. As control, contralateral eyes were injected with aqueous vehicle. Electroretinograms (ERGs) were recorded before injection and at days 7, 15, and 30. Animals were sacrificed on day 30 and retinas were analyzed under light microscopy. Results: MPA half-life in the vitreous was 5.0±0.3 days. ERG revealed photoreceptor functional impairment in eyes injected with 0.5 μg and higher on day 30, while eyes injected with 100 μg presented the same changes already from day 15. No morphological change was found. Conclusions: MPA vitreous half-life is 5.0 days. Intravitreal injection of 0.5 μg MPA and higher causes dose- and time-related photoreceptor sensitivity decrease in rabbits. The MPA dose of 0.05 μg may be safe for intravitreal use in rabbits. PMID:24828287

  6. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral Cancer Basic description Cancer can affect any part of the oral cavity, including the lips, tongue, mouth, and throat. There are 2 kinds of oral cancer: oral cavity cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. The most ...

  7. Inhibitory effect of ciprofloxacin on β-glucuronidase-mediated deconjugation of mycophenolic acid glucuronide.

    PubMed

    Kodawara, Takaaki; Masuda, Satohiro; Yano, Yoshitaka; Matsubara, Kazuo; Nakamura, Toshiaki; Masada, Mikio

    2014-07-01

    The interaction between mycophenolate (MPA) and quinolone antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin is considered to reduce the enterohepatic recycling of MPA, which is biotransformed in the intestine from MPA glucuronide (MPAG) conjugate excreted via the biliary system; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this biotransformation of MPA is still unclear. In this study, an in vitro system was established to evaluate β-glucuronidase-mediated deconjugation and to examine the influence of ciprofloxacin on the enzymatic deconjugation of MPAG and MPA resynthesis. Resynthesis of MPA via deconjugation of MPAG increased in a time-dependent manner from 5 to 60 min in the presence of β-glucuronidase. Ciprofloxacin and phenolphthalein-β-d-glucuronide (PhePG), a typical β-glucuronidase substrate, significantly decreased the production of MPA from MPAG in the β-glucuronidase-mediated deconjugation system. In addition, enoxacin significantly inhibited the production of MPA from MPAG, while levofloxacin and ofloxacin had no inhibitory effect on MPA synthesis. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that ciprofloxacin showed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on MPA production from MPAG via β-glucuronidase with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) value of 30.4 µm. While PhePG inhibited the β-glucuronidase-mediated production of MPA from MPAG in a competitive manner, ciprofloxacin inhibited MPA synthesis via noncompetitive inhibition. These findings suggest that the reduction in the serum MPA concentration during the co-administration of ciprofloxacin is at least in part due to the decreased enterohepatic circulation of MPA because of noncompetitive inhibition of deconjugation of MPAG by intestinal β-glucuronidase. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Genetic basis for mycophenolic acid production and strain-dependent production variability in Penicillium roqueforti.

    PubMed

    Gillot, Guillaume; Jany, Jean-Luc; Dominguez-Santos, Rebeca; Poirier, Elisabeth; Debaets, Stella; Hidalgo, Pedro I; Ullán, Ricardo V; Coton, Emmanuel; Coton, Monika

    2017-04-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is a secondary metabolite produced by various Penicillium species including Penicillium roqueforti. The MPA biosynthetic pathway was recently described in Penicillium brevicompactum. In this study, an in silico analysis of the P. roqueforti FM164 genome sequence localized a 23.5-kb putative MPA gene cluster. The cluster contains seven genes putatively coding seven proteins (MpaA, MpaB, MpaC, MpaDE, MpaF, MpaG, MpaH) and is highly similar (i.e. gene synteny, sequence homology) to the P. brevicompactum cluster. To confirm the involvement of this gene cluster in MPA biosynthesis, gene silencing using RNA interference targeting mpaC, encoding a putative polyketide synthase, was performed in a high MPA-producing P. roqueforti strain (F43-1). In the obtained transformants, decreased MPA production (measured by LC-Q-TOF/MS) was correlated to reduced mpaC gene expression by Q-RT-PCR. In parallel, mycotoxin quantification on multiple P. roqueforti strains suggested strain-dependent MPA-production. Thus, the entire MPA cluster was sequenced for P. roqueforti strains with contrasted MPA production and a 174bp deletion in mpaC was observed in low MPA-producers. PCRs directed towards the deleted region among 55 strains showed an excellent correlation with MPA quantification. Our results indicated the clear involvement of mpaC gene as well as surrounding cluster in P. roqueforti MPA biosynthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Effect of Tacrolimus and Mycophenolic Acid on CD14+ Monocyte Activation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kannegieter, Nynke M.; Hesselink, Dennis A.; Dieterich, Marjolein; Kraaijeveld, Rens; Rowshani, Ajda T.; Leenen, Pieter J. M.; Baan, Carla C.

    2017-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages play key roles in many disease states, including cellular and humoral rejection after solid organ transplantation (SOT). To suppress alloimmunity after SOT, immunosuppressive drug therapy is necessary. However, little is known about the effects of the immunosuppressive drugs tacrolimus and mycophenolic acid (MPA) on monocyte activation and function. Here, the effect of these immunosuppressants on monocytes was investigated by measuring phosphorylation of three intracellular signaling proteins which all have a major role in monocyte function: p38MAPK, ERK and Akt. In addition, biological functions downstream of these signaling pathways were studied, including cytokine production, phagocytosis and differentiation into macrophages. To this end, blood samples from healthy volunteers were spiked with diverse concentrations of tacrolimus and MPA. Tacrolimus (200 ng/ml) inhibited phosphorylation of p38MAPK by 30% (mean) in CD14+ monocytes which was significantly less than in activated CD3+ T cells (max 60%; p < 0.05). This immunosuppressive agent also partly inhibited p-AKT (14%). MPA, at a therapeutic concentration showed the strongest effect on p-AKT (27% inhibition). p-ERK was inhibited with a maximum of 15% after spiking with either tacrolimus or MPA. The production of IL-1β and phagocytosis by monocytes were not affected by tacrolimus concentrations, whereas MPA did inhibit IL-1β production by 50%. Monocyte/macrophage polarization was shifted to an M2-like phenotype in the presence of tacrolimus, while MPA increased the expression of M2 surface markers, including CD163 and CD200R, on M1 macrophages. These results show that tacrolimus and MPA do not strongly affect monocyte function, apart from a change in macrophage polarization, to a clinically relevant degree. PMID:28122021

  10. Enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium in de novo and maintenance kidney-pancreas transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Ricart, María J; Oppenheimer, Frederic; Andrés, Amado; Morales, José M; Álonso, Angel; Fernández, Constantino

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to describe efficacy and safety of enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) in de novo and maintenance recipients of kidney-pancreas transplant in the clinical practice. Observational, multicentre, prospective, 12-month study. We included 24 de novo and 24 maintenance patients. EC-MPS mean (± SD) doses at initiation in de novo patients were 1440 ± 0 vs. 1268 ± 263 mg/d at month 12 (M12). Patient and renal graft survival at one yr were 100%, and pancreatic graft survival was 83.3% (two losses owing to technical failure and two owing to rejection). In the maintenance cohort, EC-MPS was introduced at a median (P25-P75) of 30 (6-71) months after transplant. Baseline doses were 585 ± 310 vs. 704 ± 243 mg/d at M12. In this group, a significant increase in creatinine clearance was observed (65 ± 22 at baseline vs. 74 ± 20 mL/min at M12, p = 0.011). Patient, renal, and pancreatic graft survival were 100%, 95.8%, and 100%, respectively (one kidney graft loss owing to rejection). During follow-up, one patient from each group discontinued EC-MPS. The efficacy of EC-MPS in the clinical practice of kidney-pancreas transplantation is good, with high patient and grafts survival at 12 months, and good safety profile. The maintenance group displayed an improvement in renal function. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Dried Blood Spot Sampling for Tacrolimus and Mycophenolic Acid in Children: Analytical and Clinical Validation.

    PubMed

    Martial, Lisa C; Hoogtanders, Karin E J; Schreuder, Michiel F; Cornelissen, Elisabeth A; van der Heijden, Jac; Joore, Manuela A; Van Maarseveen, Erik M; Burger, David M; Croes, Sander; Brüggemann, Roger J M; Aarnoutse, Rob E

    2017-08-01

    Tacrolimus and mycophenolic acid (MPA) are the backbone of immunosuppressive therapy after pediatric kidney transplantation. Dosing of these drugs is individualized by therapeutic drug monitoring. Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling may prove beneficial over conventional venous sampling. We aimed to develop and clinically validate a DBS method for tacrolimus and MPA in children. A joint DBS liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry assay for tacrolimus and MPA was developed. DBS-specific items included the hematocrit effect and influence of spot volume. Subsequently, a clinical validation study among children aged 2-18 years was performed to assess the agreement between observed and DBS-predicted venous concentrations. Agreement of the methods was assessed with Passing-Bablok regression, Bland-Altman plots, and quantification of the DBS predictive performance in terms of bias (median percentage prediction error) and precision (median absolute percentage prediction error), both should be <15%. A total of 40 tacrolimus and 32 MPA samples were available from 28 children. Conversion factors were used to predict venous concentrations from DBS. For tacrolimus, 95% of the individual ratios of predicted and observed concentrations were within a range of 0.74-1.28, with 85% of these ratios between 0.80 and 1.20 (Bland-Altman plots). For MPA, the 95% limits of agreement represented a broader range of 0.49-1.49%, and 72% of individual ratios were between the 0.80 and 1.20 limits. Median percentage prediction error and median absolute percentage prediction error were less than 15% for both drugs. A DBS assay was developed for tacrolimus and MPA. Tacrolimus venous concentrations could be adequately predicted from DBS. DBS analysis of MPA seemed to be a semiquantitative measurement at the most when compared with conventional plasma analysis, considering the high variability between observed and predicted concentrations. Next, home-based DBS sampling of tacrolimus for the purpose of

  12. Functional characterization of MpaG', the O-methyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of mycophenolic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Cao, Shaona; Qiu, Li; Qi, Fengxia; Li, Zhong; Yang, Ying; Huang, Shaohua; Bai, Fali; Liu, Changning; Wan, Xiaobo; Li, Shengying

    2015-03-02

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA, 1) is a clinically important immunosuppressant. In this report, a gene cluster mpa' responsible for the biosynthesis of 1 was identified from Penicillium brevicompactum NRRL 864. The S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent (SAM-dependent) O-methyltransferase encoded by the mpaG' gene was functionally and kinetically characterized in vitro. MpaG' catalyzes the methylation of demethylmycophenolic acid (DMMPA, 6) to form 1. It also showed significant substrate flexibility by methylating two structural derivatives of 6 prepared by organic synthesis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Synthesis and biological activity of ester derivatives of mycophenolic acid and acridines/acridones as potential immunosuppressive agents.

    PubMed

    Cholewinski, Grzegorz; Iwaszkiewicz-Grzes, Dorota; Trzonkowski, Piotr; Dzierzbicka, Krystyna

    2016-12-01

    Improved derivatives of mycophenolic acid (MPA) are necessary to reduce the frequency of adverse effects, this drug exerts in treated patients. In this study, MPA was coupled with N-(ω-hydroxyalkyl)-9-acridone-4-carboxamides or N-(ω-hydroxyalkyl)acridine-4-carboxamides to give respective ester conjugates upon Yamaguchi protocol. This esterification required protection of phenol group in MPA. Designed conjugates revealed higher potency in vitro than parent MPA. Acridine derivatives were more active than acridone analogs and length of the alkyl linker between MPA and heterocyclic units influenced the observed cytotoxicity. Derivatives 2b, 2d, 3a, 3b displayed the most promising immunosuppressive activity.

  14. [Studies on the breeding by ion implantation and cultivation of mycophenolic acid producing strain].

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Zhang, Peng; Cui, Xiao-Lan; Ren, Xiao; Zhang, Hua

    2006-10-01

    Mycophenolic acid is produced by aerobic fermentation of several Penicillium species. It has a broad spectrum of activity like antitumor activity, antiviral, anti-psoriatic, immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory activity. It also exhibits antibacterial and antifungal activities. The immunosuppressive effect of MPA has been important in treatment of organ rejection after organ transplant surgery. There is a continuous need to find improved process for efficiently obtaining superior MPA producing mutants. In recent years, the ion implantation technique has been widely applied in many fields and has been drawn morn concern. However there is no report in the field of mutational breeding of MPA producing strain. Penicillium brevicompactum M-51 was derived from MPA producing strain F-663 by varied mutational methods including U.V. and microwave irradiation. In the process of increasing the production of MPA from P. brevicompactum M-51, a mutant strain M-163 was obtained by means of N+ ion implantation. An decline-increase-decline tendency of strain survival rates was observed when the strain was implanted by N+ ion with dose from 20 2.6 x 10(13) ions/cm2 to 180 x 2.6 x 10(13) ions/cm2 under implantation energy 15 keV. It apparently appeared "saddle shape". And under the implantation dose of 140 x 2.6 x 10(13) ions/cm2, the variation rate and the positive variation rate of the strain had reached the highest values 88.9% and 63.4%, respectively. The HPLC results showed that MPA yield of P. brevicompactum M-163 was improved by 30.1%, and its productivity was rather stable through successive transfer of cultures. The effect of seed growth time on yield of MPA was studied, and the best seed age was 24h after incubation. In the mean time, the fermentative condition of M-163 was studied through orthogonal design. The major ingredients being investigated included carbon and nitrogen sources. Finally the optimized fermentation medium was obtained. The yield of MPA reached 2819g

  15. Differential proteome analysis of human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK-293) following mycophenolic acid treatment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is widely used as a post transplantation medicine to prevent acute organ rejection. In the present study we used proteomics approach to identify proteome alterations in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK-293) after treatment with therapeutic dose of MPA. Following 72 hours MPA treatment, total protein lysates were prepared, resolved by two dimensional gel electrophoresis and differentially expressed proteins were identified by QTOF-MS/MS analysis. Expressional regulations of selected proteins were further validated by real time PCR and Western blotting. Results The proliferation assay demonstrated that therapeutic MPA concentration causes a dose dependent inhibition of HEK-293 cell proliferation. A significant apoptosis was observed after MPA treatment, as revealed by caspase 3 activity. Proteome analysis showed a total of 12 protein spots exhibiting differential expression after incubation with MPA, of which 7 proteins (complement component 1 Q subcomponent-binding protein, electron transfer flavoprotein subunit beta, cytochrome b-c1 complex subunit, peroxiredoxin 1, thioredoxin domain-containing protein 12, myosin regulatory light chain 2, and profilin 1) showed significant increase in their expression. The expression of 5 proteins (protein SET, stathmin, 40S ribosomal protein S12, histone H2B type 1 A, and histone H2B type 1-C/E/F/G/I) were down-regulated. MPA mainly altered the proteins associated with the cytoskeleton (26%), chromatin structure/dynamics (17%) and energy production/conversion (17%). Both real time PCR and Western blotting confirmed the regulation of myosin regulatory light chain 2 and peroxiredoxin 1 by MPA treatment. Furthermore, HT-29 cells treated with MPA and total kidney cell lysate from MMF treated rats showed similar increased expression of myosin regulatory light chain 2. Conclusion The emerging use of MPA in diverse pathophysiological conditions demands in-depth studies to understand molecular basis of

  16. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral cancer can form in any part of the mouth. Most oral cancers begin in the flat cells that cover the ... your mouth, tongue, and lips. Anyone can get oral cancer, but the risk is higher if you are ...

  17. Labelled acetone and levulinic acid are formed when [14C]acetate is being converted to mycophenolic acid in Penicillium brevicompactum.

    PubMed

    Nulton, C P; Campbell, I M

    1978-02-01

    Evidence is presented that is compatible with the hypothesis that the farnesyl unit involved in the biosynthesis of mycophenolic acid in Penicillium brevicompactum is degraded by two successive oxidative cleavages at the double bonds distal from the phthalide nucleus. Acetone and levulinic acid are two non-aromatic degradation products.

  18. Oral myiasis.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Thalaimalai; Mohan, Mathan A; Thinakaran, Meera; Ahammed, Saneem

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy.

  19. Oral Myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Saravanan, Thalaimalai; Mohan, Mathan A; Thinakaran, Meera; Ahammed, Saneem

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy. PMID:25709196

  20. Acute cutaneous graft-versus-host disease resembling type II (atypical adult) pityriasis rubra pilaris.

    PubMed

    Surjana, Devita; Robertson, Ivan; Kennedy, Glen; James, Daniel; Weedon, David

    2015-02-01

    We present a case of cutaneous acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) with confluent erythematous perifollicular hyperkeratosis and ichthyosiform scale in the clinical pattern of type II (atypical adult) pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP), which developed 26 days after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplant. Skin histology confirmed features of both aGVHD and PRP. The skin lesions were refractory to oral prednisolone and cyclosporine and only partially responsive to a combination of i.v. methylprednisolone, oral tacrolimus, oral mycophenolate mofetil, and infusions of anti-thymocyte globulin and the tumour necrosis factor-α inhibitor, etanercept. © 2013 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  1. Effects of Phenylglyoxal and N-ethylmaleimide Concentration on Mycophenolic Acid Production by Penicillium brevi-compactum ATCC16024

    PubMed Central

    Ardestani, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid is a secondary extracellular metabolite of Penicillium strains with numerous pharmaceutical properties such as antibiotic and immunosuppressive uses. The aim of this work is the survey of the effect of phenylglyoxal and n-ethylmaleimide concentration in culture medium on mycophenolic acid production by Penicillium brevi-compactum ATCC16024 was investigated. Batch submerged fermentation was performed in 250 mL shake flasks at 24 °C and 200 rpm in a rotary shaker for 300 h using a basic culture medium containing different concentrations of phenylglyoxal and n-ethylmaleimide ranged from 0 to 20 mg. L-1. For the basic medium without any amounts of phenylglyoxal and n-ethylmaleimide (control), maximum MPA production, product yield and productivity of process was in order, 1.5042 g. L-1, 20.3 mg. g-1 consumed glucose and 5.37 mg. L-1h-1. Maximum produced MPA of 2.9032 g. L-1, MPA yield of 39.23 mg. g-1 of consumed glucose, productivity of 10.37 mg. L-1 h-1 and total enhancement of 93.11% was obtained when the culture medium was contained 18 mg. L-1 of phenylglyoxal, represented more than 93% raising in compare to control. Maximum MPA concentration, yield and productivity in order was obtained 3.1123 g. L-1, 42.06 mg. g-1 of consumed glucose and 11.11 mg. L-1 h-1, with using 6 mg. L-1 of n-ethylmaleimide. N-ethylmaleimide was caused to 2.138 folds (106.89%) increase in MPA production by P. brevi-compactum ATCC16024. PMID:28243291

  2. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology.

  3. Herpes - oral

    MedlinePlus

    Cold sore; Fever blister; Oral herpes simplex; Herpes labialis; Herpes simplex ... Oral herpes is a common infection of the mouth area. It is caused by ... genital herpes . However, sometimes HSV-2 is spread to the ...

  4. Oral candidosis.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, G T

    2001-04-01

    Oral candidoses are frequently encountered in the practice of dentistry. Although most oral candidoses are symptomless, the can indicate the presence of an underlying systemic disease, and the persistence of oral candidosis following appropriate conventional management may be one of the first signs of undiagnosed immunosuppression. The opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans is the most commonly isolated species from oral candidal lesions; however, the non-albicans Candida spp. are also implicated in the aetiology of oral candidoses. The effective management of oral candidosis is dependent on an accurate diagnosis, identification and elimination of any predisposing factors (where possible), and the prescription of either topical or systemic antifungal agents. Oral candidosis may have significant implications for the general health of immunosuppressed patients, particularly when caused by the non-albicans spp. and, in cases of severe immunosuppression, systemic candidosis can be life-threatening. This article outlines the clinical presentation and appropriate management for the commonly presenting oral candidal conditions.

  5. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  6. Mycophenolate sodium dosing in combination with tacrolimus: pharmacokinetic evaluation of a novel regimen in de novo tacrolimus-treated kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Pons, Bertrand; Delavenne, Xavier; Mehdi, Manolie; Maillard, Nicolas; Sauron, Catherine; Berthoux, François; Alamartine, Eric; Basset, Thierry; Mariat, Christophe

    2012-06-01

    There are no clear guidelines concerning the appropriate dose of mycophenolate acid (MPA) to be used in association with tacrolimus. When MPA is given at an approved fixed dose in cyclosporine-treated patients, initial systemic under exposure is frequent and associated with the occurrence of acute rejection. We pharmacologically evaluated in tacrolimus-treated recipients a novel dosing regimen of MPA with an initial high dose followed by a gradual decrease over time. 15 de novo tacrolimus-treated kidney transplant patients were administered mycophenolate sodium at the dose of 720 mg b.i.d. for the first week post-transplant, 540 mg b.i.d. until Day 30, and then 360 mg b.i.d. until Day 90. MPA exposure was evaluated by the 12 h area under MPA concentration versus time curve (AUC) determined at Days 2, 7, 15, 30 and 90 post-transplant. Median MPA AUC was constantly within the therapeutic window of 30 - 60 mg/l × h throughout the three months of evaluation. More than 75% of patients had a MPA AUC above 30 mg/l × h at Day 2 and Day 7 post-transplant. This exploratory study suggests that such a dosing regimen of mycophenolate sodium might quickly offer and sustain an optimal exposure to MPA in tacrolimus-treated kidney transplant patients.

  7. The Effects of Unbound Mycophenolic Acid (MPA) on Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase (IMPDH) Inhibition in Pediatric Kidney Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Thomas A.; Cox, Shareen; Fukuda, Tsuyoshi; Sherbotie, Joseph; Ward, Robert; Goebel, Jens; Vinks, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is a key immunosuppressive drug that acts through inhibition of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). MPA is commonly measured as part of therapeutic drug monitoring as the total concentration in plasma. However, it has been postulated that the free (unbound) fraction of MPA (fMPA) is responsible for the immunosuppressive effects. In this study, a sensitive low volume high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay was developed to measure fMPA concentrations in order to explore the relationship between fMPA and IMPDH activity. Methods To obtain fMPA concentrations, plasma samples were filtrated using Centrifree® Ultrafiltration Devices. The ultrafiltrate was analyzed by HPLC using a Kinetex® C18 column (2.6 μm, 3.0 × 75 mm). fMPA concentrations were compared to total MPA concentrations available in 28 pediatric kidney transplant patients at 3 consecutive occasions post-transplantation. The relationship between fMPA and IMPDH activity was analyzed using an Emax-model. Results The HPLC-assay using 25μL of the ultrafiltrates was validated over a range from 2.5 to 1000 μg/L with good accuracy, precision and reproducibility. Total and free MPA concentrations were well correlated (R2 = 0.85, P < 0.0001) although large intra-and inter-individual variability in the bound MPA fractions was observed. The overall relationship between fMPA concentrations and IMPDH inhibition using the Emax-model was comparable to that of total MPA as previously reported. The model estimated EC50 (164.5 μg/L) is in good agreement with reported in vitro EC50 values. Conclusions This study provides a simple HPLC method for the measurement of fMPA and a pharmacologically reasonable EC50-estimate. The good correlation between total and free MPA concentrations suggests that routine measurement of fMPA to characterize mycophenolate PK/PD does not seem warranted although the large variability in the bound fractions of MPA warrants further study

  8. Effects of light intensity and light wavelength on the production of mycophenolic acid by Penicillium brevicompactum in batch cultures.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chin-Hang; Peng, Jeng-Chin; Tsai, Chieh-Chung

    2010-05-05

    The influence of different light sources and light intensity on mycophenolic acid (MPA) by Penicillium brevicompactum in batch culture was significant and demonstrated in this study. MPA batch cultures under various light sources including fluorescent light, red LED light (630nm) and blue LED light (470nm), were investigated in a light controlled photo-bioreactor. Results of cultures under fluorescent light indicated that optimal maximum cell density and maximum MPA concentration (Pmax) achieved at 1400lux were 9.40 and 0.48gL(-1), respectively. Results of culture under LED lights indicated that the optimal culture condition for cell growth was red LED light at 600lux with cell yield, 0.88gg(-1), while that for MPA formation was blue LED light at 600lux with specific product yield, 0.056gg(-1). Red LED light stimulated both cell growth and MPA formation; however, blue LED light inhibited cell growth but stimulated MPA formation. A novel two-stage LED light process has been successfully demonstrated to optimize MPA fermentation of P. brevicompactum, and the highest Pmax of 0.56gL(-1) was achieved with 87% improvement as compared with that of the batch in the dark. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Change in pharmacokinetics of mycophenolic acid as a function of age in rats and effect of coadministered amoxicillin/clavulanate.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, Junko; Tsuda, Tomoko; Suga, Yukio; Ito, Satsuki; Arai, Kunizo; Sai, Yoshimichi; Miyamoto, Ken-Ichi

    2012-01-01

    Changes of mycophenolic acid (MPA) pharmacokinetics with aging were investigated in rats. We also compared the effect of concomitant amoxicillin/clavulanate combination (CVA/AMPC) on the pharmacokinetics of MPA in 4-week-old and 12-week-old rats (the package insert of CVA/AMPC warns of possible interaction with MPA). Four-week-old rats showed a 1.4-fold higher total body clearance of MPA and a lower volume of distribution of MPA (65%), compared to the values in 12-week-old rats. However, the difference in MPA pharmacokinetics disappeared when enterohepatic circulation was eliminated by bile duct cannulation (BDC). Concomitant CVA/AMPC significantly reduced plasma MPA concentration in intact rats of both age groups, and the age-dependent difference of MPA pharmacokinetics was no longer apparent. The effect of CVA/AMPC was not seen in rats that had undergone BDC, suggesting that the drug-drug interaction can be attributed to inhibition of enterohepatic circulation by CVA/AMPC. These results indicate that the aging-related alteration of MPA pharmacokinetics is a consequence of immature enterohepatic circulation in 4-week-old rats. Higher doses of MPA may be necessary in juveniles.

  10. Comparative metabolism of mycophenolic acid by glucuronic acid and glucose conjugation in human, dog, and cat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Slovak, J E; Mealey, K; Court, M H

    2017-04-01

    Use of the immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid (MPA) in cats is limited because MPA elimination depends on glucuronidation, which is deficient in cats. We evaluated formation of major (phenol glucuronide) and minor (acyl glucuronide, phenol glucoside, and acyl glucoside) MPA metabolites using liver microsomes from 16 cats, 26 dogs, and 48 humans. All MPA metabolites were formed by human liver microsomes, while dog and cat liver microsomes formed both MPA glucuronides, but only one MPA glucoside (phenol glucoside). Intrinsic clearance (CLint) of MPA for phenol glucuronidation by cat liver microsomes was only 15-17% that of dog and human liver microsomes. However, CLint for acyl glucuronide and phenol glucoside formation in cat liver microsomes was similar to or greater than that for dog and human liver microsomes. While total MPA conjugation CLint was generally similar for cat liver microsomes compared with dog and human liver microsomes, relative contributions of each pathway varied between species with phenol glucuronidation predominating in dog and human liver microsomes and phenol glucosidation predominating in cat liver microsomes. MPA conjugation variation between cat liver microsomes was threefold for total conjugation and for phenol glucosidation, sixfold for phenol glucuronidation, and 11-fold for acyl glucuronidation. Our results indicate that total MPA conjugation is quantitatively similar between liver microsomes from cats, dogs, and humans despite large differences in the conjugation pathways that are utilized by these species.

  11. Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase (IMPDH) Activity as a Pharmacodynamic Biomarker of Mycophenolic Acid Effects in Pediatric Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Tsuyoshi; Goebel, Jens; Thøgersen, Håvard; Maseck, Denise; Cox, Shareen; Logan, Barbara; Sherbotie, Joseph; Seikaly, Mouin; Vinks, Alexander A.

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity as a biomarker of mycophenolic acid (MPA)–induced immunosuppression may serve as a novel approach in pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD)–guided therapy. The authors prospectively studied MPA pharmacokinetics and IMPDH inhibition in 28 pediatric de novo kidney transplant recipients. Pretransplant IMPDH activity and full PK/PD profiles were obtained at 3 different occasions: 1 to 3 days, 4 to 9 days, and approximately 6 months after transplant. Large intra- and interpatient variability was noted in MPA pharmacokinetics and exposure and IMPDH inhibition. MPA exposure (AUC0-12 h) was low early posttransplant and increased over time and stabilized at months 3 to 6. Mean pretransplant IMPDH activity (6.4 ± 4.6 nmol/h/mg protein) was lower than previously reported in adults. In most of the patients, IMPDH enzyme activity decreased with increasing MPA plasma concentration, with maximum inhibition coinciding with maximum MPA concentration. The overall relationship between MPA concentration and IMPDH activity was described by a direct inhibitory Emax model (EC50 = 0.97 mg/L). This study suggests the importance of early PK/PD monitoring to improve drug exposure. Because IMPDH inhibition is well correlated to MPA concentration, pre-transplant IMPDH activity may serve as an early marker to guide the initial level of MPA exposure required in a pediatric population. PMID:20418509

  12. Impact of longitudinal exposure to mycophenolic acid on acute rejection in renal-transplant recipients using a joint modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Daher Abdi, Z; Essig, M; Rizopoulos, D; Le Meur, Y; Prémaud, A; Woillard, J B; Rérolle, J P; Marquet, P; Rousseau, A

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association between longitudinal exposure to mycophenolic acid (MPA) and acute rejection (AR) risk in the first year after renal transplantation, and to propose MPA exposure targets conditionally to this association. A joint model, adjusted for monitoring strategy (fixed-dose versus concentration-controlled) and recipient age, was developed; it combined a mixed-effects model to describe the whole pattern of MPA exposure (i.e. area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)) and a survival model. MPA AUC thresholds were determined using time-dependent receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curves. Data from 490 adult renal-transplant recipients, representative of the general population of adult renal-transplant patients (i.e. including patients considered at low immunological risk-enrolled in the OPERA trial as well as second renal transplant and patients co-treated by either cyclosporine or tacrolimus), were analyzed. A significant association was found between the longitudinal exposure to MPA (MPA AUCs=f(t)) and AR (p=0.0081), and validated by bootstrapping. A significant positive correlation was observed between time post-transplantation and ROC thresholds which increased in average from 35 mg h/L in the first days to 41 mg h/L beyond six months post-transplantation (p<0.001). Using a new modeling approach which recognizes the repeated measures in a same patient, this study supports the association between MPA exposure and AR.

  13. Identifying the differences in mechanisms of mycophenolic acid controlling fucose content of glycoproteins expressed in different CHO cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, An; Tsang, Valerie Liu; Markely, Lam R; Kurt, Lutfiye; Huang, Yao-Ming; Prajapati, Shashi; Kshirsagar, Rashmi

    2016-11-01

    In the biopharmaceutical industry, glycosylation is a critical quality attribute that can modulate the efficacy of a therapeutic glycoprotein. Obtaining a consistent glycoform profile is desired because molecular function can be defined by its carbohydrate structures. Specifically, the fucose content of oligosaccharides in glycoproteins is one of the most important attributes that can significantly affect antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. It is therefore important to understand the fucosylation pathway and be able to control fucosylation at the desired level to match predecessor materials in late stage and biosimilar programs. Several strategies were explored in this study and mycophenolic acid (MPA) was able to finely modulate the fucose content with the least undesired side effects. However, the response was significantly different between CHO cell lines of different lineages. Further experiments were then performed for a deeper understanding of the mechanism of fucosylation in different CHO cell lines. Results indicated that changes in the intracellular nucleotide involved in fucosylation pathway after MPA treatment are the main cause of the differences in fucosylation level response in different CHO cell lines. Differences in MPA metabolism in the various CHO cell lines directly resulted in different levels of afucosylation measured in antibodies produced by the CHO cell lines. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2367-2376. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Oral Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Charruf, Laurie Frey

    1984-01-01

    Oral tests for speaking skills evaluate two major skills: linguistic competence, including accuracy of pronunciation, vocabulary, and structure, and communication ease. Four factors affect students' oral performance: verbal intelligence, short-term auditory and visual memory, sound-symbol association skill, and grammatical analysis. Personality…

  15. Oral cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Chunduri, Nagendra S; Goteki, Venkateswarulu; Gelli, Vamsi; Madasu, Krishnaveni

    2013-03-01

    Cysticercosis is a common disease in developing countries, but oral lesions caused by this parasitic infestation are rare. We report here a rare case of oral cysticercosis in a 17 year old male who sought treatment for an asymptomatic nodule of the lower lip that had previously been diagnosed as a mucocele.

  16. Oral Thrush

    MedlinePlus

    ... more susceptible to oral thrush infection: HIV/AIDS. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) — the virus that causes AIDS — damages or destroys cells of your immune system, making you more susceptible to opportunistic infections that your body would normally resist. Repeated bouts of oral thrush, ...

  17. A new class of IMP dehydrogenase with a role in self-resistance of mycophenolic acid producing fungi

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many secondary metabolites produced by filamentous fungi have potent biological activities, to which the producer organism must be resistant. An example of pharmaceutical interest is mycophenolic acid (MPA), an immunosuppressant molecule produced by several Penicillium species. The target of MPA is inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), which catalyses the rate limiting step in the synthesis of guanine nucleotides. The recent discovery of the MPA biosynthetic gene cluster from Penicillium brevicompactum revealed an extra copy of the IMPDH-encoding gene (mpaF) embedded within the cluster. This finding suggests that the key component of MPA self resistance is likely based on the IMPDH encoded by mpaF. Results In accordance with our hypothesis, heterologous expression of mpaF dramatically increased MPA resistance in a model fungus, Aspergillus nidulans, which does not produce MPA. The growth of an A. nidulans strain expressing mpaF was only marginally affected by MPA at concentrations as high as 200 μg/ml. To further substantiate the role of mpaF in MPA resistance, we searched for mpaF orthologs in six MPA producer/non-producer strains from Penicillium subgenus Penicillium. All six strains were found to hold two copies of IMPDH. A cladistic analysis based on the corresponding cDNA sequences revealed a novel group constituting mpaF homologs. Interestingly, a conserved tyrosine residue in the original class of IMPDHs is replaced by a phenylalanine residue in the new IMPDH class. Conclusions We identified a novel variant of the IMPDH-encoding gene in six different strains from Penicillium subgenus Penicillium. The novel IMPDH variant from MPA producer P. brevicompactum was shown to confer a high degree of MPA resistance when expressed in a non-producer fungus. Our study provides a basis for understanding the molecular mechanism of MPA resistance and has relevance for biotechnological and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:21923907

  18. A new class of IMP dehydrogenase with a role in self-resistance of mycophenolic acid producing fungi.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Bjarne G; Genee, Hans J; Kaas, Christian S; Nielsen, Jakob B; Regueira, Torsten B; Mortensen, Uffe H; Frisvad, Jens C; Patil, Kiran R

    2011-09-16

    Many secondary metabolites produced by filamentous fungi have potent biological activities, to which the producer organism must be resistant. An example of pharmaceutical interest is mycophenolic acid (MPA), an immunosuppressant molecule produced by several Penicillium species. The target of MPA is inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), which catalyses the rate limiting step in the synthesis of guanine nucleotides. The recent discovery of the MPA biosynthetic gene cluster from Penicillium brevicompactum revealed an extra copy of the IMPDH-encoding gene (mpaF) embedded within the cluster. This finding suggests that the key component of MPA self resistance is likely based on the IMPDH encoded by mpaF. In accordance with our hypothesis, heterologous expression of mpaF dramatically increased MPA resistance in a model fungus, Aspergillus nidulans, which does not produce MPA. The growth of an A. nidulans strain expressing mpaF was only marginally affected by MPA at concentrations as high as 200 μg/ml. To further substantiate the role of mpaF in MPA resistance, we searched for mpaF orthologs in six MPA producer/non-producer strains from Penicillium subgenus Penicillium. All six strains were found to hold two copies of IMPDH. A cladistic analysis based on the corresponding cDNA sequences revealed a novel group constituting mpaF homologs. Interestingly, a conserved tyrosine residue in the original class of IMPDHs is replaced by a phenylalanine residue in the new IMPDH class. We identified a novel variant of the IMPDH-encoding gene in six different strains from Penicillium subgenus Penicillium. The novel IMPDH variant from MPA producer P. brevicompactum was shown to confer a high degree of MPA resistance when expressed in a non-producer fungus. Our study provides a basis for understanding the molecular mechanism of MPA resistance and has relevance for biotechnological and pharmaceutical applications.

  19. Involvement of a Natural Fusion of a Cytochrome P450 and a Hydrolase in Mycophenolic Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Mnich, Ewelina; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Nielsen, Jakob Blæsbjerg; Nielsen, Morten Thrane; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2012-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is a fungal secondary metabolite and the active component in several immunosuppressive pharmaceuticals. The gene cluster coding for the MPA biosynthetic pathway has recently been discovered in Penicillium brevicompactum, demonstrating that the first step is catalyzed by MpaC, a polyketide synthase producing 5-methylorsellinic acid (5-MOA). However, the biochemical role of the enzymes encoded by the remaining genes in the MPA gene cluster is still unknown. Based on bioinformatic analysis of the MPA gene cluster, we hypothesized that the step following 5-MOA production in the pathway is carried out by a natural fusion enzyme MpaDE, consisting of a cytochrome P450 (MpaD) in the N-terminal region and a hydrolase (MpaE) in the C-terminal region. We verified that the fusion gene is indeed expressed in P. brevicompactum by obtaining full-length sequence of the mpaDE cDNA prepared from the extracted RNA. Heterologous coexpression of mpaC and the fusion gene mpaDE in the MPA-nonproducer Aspergillus nidulans resulted in the production of 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylphthalide (DHMP), the second intermediate in MPA biosynthesis. Analysis of the strain coexpressing mpaC and the mpaD part of mpaDE shows that the P450 catalyzes hydroxylation of 5-MOA to 4,6-dihydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-3-methylbenzoic acid (DHMB). DHMB is then converted to DHMP, and our results suggest that the hydrolase domain aids this second step by acting as a lactone synthase that catalyzes the ring closure. Overall, the chimeric enzyme MpaDE provides insight into the genetic organization of the MPA biosynthesis pathway. PMID:22544261

  20. Involvement of a natural fusion of a cytochrome P450 and a hydrolase in mycophenolic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Mnich, Ewelina; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Nielsen, Jakob Blæsbjerg; Nielsen, Morten Thrane; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb

    2012-07-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is a fungal secondary metabolite and the active component in several immunosuppressive pharmaceuticals. The gene cluster coding for the MPA biosynthetic pathway has recently been discovered in Penicillium brevicompactum, demonstrating that the first step is catalyzed by MpaC, a polyketide synthase producing 5-methylorsellinic acid (5-MOA). However, the biochemical role of the enzymes encoded by the remaining genes in the MPA gene cluster is still unknown. Based on bioinformatic analysis of the MPA gene cluster, we hypothesized that the step following 5-MOA production in the pathway is carried out by a natural fusion enzyme MpaDE, consisting of a cytochrome P450 (MpaD) in the N-terminal region and a hydrolase (MpaE) in the C-terminal region. We verified that the fusion gene is indeed expressed in P. brevicompactum by obtaining full-length sequence of the mpaDE cDNA prepared from the extracted RNA. Heterologous coexpression of mpaC and the fusion gene mpaDE in the MPA-nonproducer Aspergillus nidulans resulted in the production of 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylphthalide (DHMP), the second intermediate in MPA biosynthesis. Analysis of the strain coexpressing mpaC and the mpaD part of mpaDE shows that the P450 catalyzes hydroxylation of 5-MOA to 4,6-dihydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-3-methylbenzoic acid (DHMB). DHMB is then converted to DHMP, and our results suggest that the hydrolase domain aids this second step by acting as a lactone synthase that catalyzes the ring closure. Overall, the chimeric enzyme MpaDE provides insight into the genetic organization of the MPA biosynthesis pathway.

  1. Outcomes in ethnic minority renal transplant recipients receiving everolimus versus mycophenolate: comparative risk assessment results from a pooled analysis.

    PubMed

    Melancon, Keith; Mulgaonkar, Shamkant P; Delcoro, Carlos; Wiland, Anne; McCague, Kevin; Shihab, Fuad S

    2013-12-27

    Everolimus (EVR) has demonstrated good efficacy after renal transplantation. Racial disparities in clinical outcomes after de novo renal transplantation are well documented; whether the efficacy of EVR varies based on recipient ethnicity is unknown. We conducted a comparative risk assessment of EVR by ethnicity. Data on 2004 renal transplant recipients from three EVR studies were pooled to identify the impact of ethnicity on efficacy outcomes across EVR dosing groups and control groups. Ethnic groups compared were African Americans, non-U.S. blacks, Asians, Hispanics, and Caucasians. EVR groups received either 1.5 or 3 mg per day, with either standard-dose cyclosporine or reduced-dose cyclosporine. Control groups received mycophenolic acid (MPA) with standard-dose cyclosporine. Composite efficacy failure endpoint was graft loss, death, biopsy-proven acute rejection, or lost to follow-up. Adjusted odds ratios were calculated using a logistic regression model. The proportion of renal transplant recipients who met the composite endpoint was African Americans (46%), non-U.S. black (35%), Caucasian (31%), Hispanic (28%), and Asian (25%). The odds of meeting the composite endpoint were significantly (P=0.0001) greater for African Americans versus Caucasians but did not differ among the other ethnic groups (ethnic groups were only compared with Caucasians). EVR and MPA were associated with similar efficacy among each of the ethnic groups. In this pooled data analysis in more than 2000 renal transplant recipients, EVR versus MPA resulted in similar composite endpoint incidence events across ethnicities. Consistent with previously published data, African Americans had poorer clinical outcomes. EVR is efficacious regardless of ethnicity.

  2. Efficacy and Safety of Elective Conversion From Sotrastaurin (STN) to Tacrolimus (TAC) or Mycophenolate (MPS) in Stable Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Hannun, Pedro; Felipe, Claudia; Ferreira, Alexandra; Sandes-Freitas, Tainá; Cristelli, Marina; Aguiar, Wilson; Franco, Marcello; Campos, Erika; Gerbase de Lima, Maria; Tedesco-Silva, Hélio; Medina-Pestana, José

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety outcomes of conversion strategies in stable kidney transplant recipients after premature termination of the sotrastaurin (STN) development program. This is an exploratory and prospective study, including 38 stable renal transplant recipients. Tacrolimus (TAC) group [STN → mycophenolate sodium (MPS)] consisted of 9 patients receiving TAC, STN, and prednisone that were converted from STN to MPS. Everolimus (EVR) group (STN → TAC) consisted of 29 patients receiving EVR, STN, and prednisone that were converted from STN to TAC. In TAC (STN → MPS) group, dose-adjusted TAC concentrations decreased from baseline to first week (2.3 ± 1.1 versus 1.5 ± 1.0 ng·mL·mg, P < 0.05). Two patients experienced a first acute rejection episode. Conversion to MPS was associated with a higher incidence of adverse events. In EVR (STN → TAC) group, dose-adjusted EVR concentrations decreased from baseline to first week (3.6 ± 2.3 ng·mL·mg versus 1.9 ± 0.8 ng·mL·mg, P < 0.01). The proportion of patients with donor-specific antibodies was lower in TAC (STN → MPS) (11%) compared to EVR (STN → TAC) (31%) before conversion. Conversion from STN to TAC was associated with a reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate (69.6 ± 16.9 versus 61.0 ± 18.8 mL·min·1.73 m, P < 0.01) and a decreased proportion of patients with donor-specific antibodies (31% versus 14%) at 12 months. Conversion from TAC/STN to TAC/MPS or from EVR/STN to TAC/EVR was associated with significant pharmacokinetic changes in both TAC and EVR whole-blood trough concentrations due to known drug-to-drug interaction, which were associated with changes in efficacy and safety.

  3. High prevalence of potential drug interactions affecting mycophenolic acid pharmacokinetics in nonmyeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Jaklič, Alenka; Collins, Carol J.; Mrhar, Aleš; Sorror, Mohamed L.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Locatelli, Igor; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Mycophenolic acid (MPA) exposure is associated with clinical outcomes in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. Various drug interaction studies, predominantly in healthy volunteers or solid organ transplant recipients, have identified medications which impact MPA pharmacokinetics. Recipients of nonmyeloablative HCT, however, have an increased burden of comorbidities, potentially increasing the number of concomitant medications and potential drug interactions (PDI) affecting MPA exposure. Thus, we sought to be the first to characterize these PDI in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Materials and methods: We compiled PDI affecting MPA pharmacokinetics and characterized the prevalence of PDI in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. A comprehensive literature evaluation of four databases and PubMed was conducted to identify medications with PDI affecting MPA pharmacokinetics. Subsequently, a retrospective medication review was conducted to characterize the cumulative PDI burden, defined as the number of PDI for an individual patient over the first 21 days after allogeneic graft infusion, in 84 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Results: Of the 187 concomitant medications, 11 (5.9%) had a PDI affecting MPA pharmacokinetics. 87% of 84 patients had one PDI, with a median cumulative PDI burden of 2 (range 0 – 4). The most common PDI, in descending order, were cyclosporine, omeprazole and pantoprazole. Conclusion: Only a minority of medications (5.9%) have a PDI affecting MPA pharmacokinetics. However, the majority of nonmyeloablative HCT recipients had a PDI, with cyclosporine and the proton pump inhibitors being the most common. A better understanding of PDI and their management should lead to safer medication regimens for nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:23782584

  4. Validation of an LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of mycophenolic acid in human kidney transplant biopsies.

    PubMed

    Md Dom, Zaipul I; Noll, Benjamin D; Coller, Janet K; Somogyi, Andrew A; Russ, Graeme R; Hesselink, Dennis A; van Gelder, Teun; Sallustio, Benedetta C

    2014-01-15

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) has a low therapeutic index and large inter-individual pharmacokinetic variability necessitating therapeutic drug monitoring to individualise dosing after transplantation. There is an ongoing discrepancy as to whether plasma MPA concentrations sufficiently predict kidney rejection or toxicity and whether immunosuppressant concentrations within the graft tissue may better predict transplant outcomes. The aim of the study was to develop an LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of MPA concentrations in human kidney biopsies taken as part of routine clinical procedures. A total of 4 surplus human kidney biopsies obtained from 4 different kidney transplant recipients were available to use for this study. MPA was also quantified in 2 kidney samples from rats administered MPA to assess tissue extraction reproducibility. Human kidney biopsies and rat kidneys were homogenised mechanically and underwent liquid-liquid extraction before analysis by LC-MS/MS. MPA-free human kidney tissue was used in calibrators and quality control samples. Analyte detection was achieved from multiple reaction monitoring of the ammonium adducts of both MPA (m/z 321.1→207.3) and N-phthaloyl-l-phenylalanine (PPA, internal standard, m/z 296.2→250.2) using positive electrospray ionisation. The method was linear (calibration curves R(2)>0.99, n=10), precise, and accurate with coefficients of variation and bias less than 15%. Extraction efficiencies for MPA and PPA were approximately 97% and 86%, respectively, and matrix effects were minimal. In 4 kidney transplant recipients, tissue MPA concentrations ranged from 1.3 to 7.7ng/mg of tissue, however, the correlation between blood (C0) and tissue MPA concentrations could not be established. The method was successfully applied to the quantification of MPA in human kidney biopsies without the need to alter current clinical protocols.

  5. Outcomes in Ethnic Minority Renal Transplant Recipients Receiving Everolimus versus Mycophenolate: Comparative Risk Assessment Results From a Pooled Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Melancon, Keith; Mulgaonkar, Shamkant P.; Delcoro, Carlos; Wiland, Anne; McCague, Kevin; Shihab, Fuad S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Everolimus (EVR) has demonstrated good efficacy after renal transplantation. Racial disparities in clinical outcomes after de novo renal transplantation are well documented; whether the efficacy of EVR varies based on recipient ethnicity is unknown. We conducted a comparative risk assessment of EVR by ethnicity. Methods Data on 2004 renal transplant recipients from three EVR studies were pooled to identify the impact of ethnicity on efficacy outcomes across EVR dosing groups and control groups. Ethnic groups compared were African Americans, non-U.S. blacks, Asians, Hispanics, and Caucasians. EVR groups received either 1.5 or 3 mg per day, with either standard-dose cyclosporine or reduced-dose cyclosporine. Control groups received mycophenolic acid (MPA) with standard-dose cyclosporine. Composite efficacy failure endpoint was graft loss, death, biopsy-proven acute rejection, or lost to follow-up. Adjusted odds ratios were calculated using a logistic regression model. Results The proportion of renal transplant recipients who met the composite endpoint was African Americans (46%), non-U.S. black (35%), Caucasian (31%), Hispanic (28%), and Asian (25%). The odds of meeting the composite endpoint were significantly (P=0.0001) greater for African Americans versus Caucasians but did not differ among the other ethnic groups (ethnic groups were only compared with Caucasians). EVR and MPA were associated with similar efficacy among each of the ethnic groups. Conclusion In this pooled data analysis in more than 2000 renal transplant recipients, EVR versus MPA resulted in similar composite endpoint incidence events across ethnicities. Consistent with previously published data, African Americans had poorer clinical outcomes. EVR is efficacious regardless of ethnicity. PMID:24345868

  6. Oral Histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Folk, Gillian A; Nelson, Brenda L

    2017-02-20

    A 44-year-old female presented to her general dentist with the chief complaint of a painful mouth sore of 2 weeks duration. Clinical examination revealed an irregularly shaped ulcer of the buccal and lingual attached gingiva of the anterior mandible. A biopsy was performed and microscopic evaluation revealed histoplasmosis. Histoplasmosis, caused by Histoplasma capsulate, is the most common fungal infection in the United States. Oral lesions of histoplasmosis are generally associated with the disseminated form of histoplasmosis and may present as a fungating or ulcerative lesion of the oral mucosa. The histologic findings and differential diagnosis for oral histoplasmosis are discussed.

  7. [Interstitial lung disease (ILD) in systemic sclerosis (SSc)].

    PubMed

    Novak, Srdan

    2010-01-01

    Intersitial lung disease is a frequent complication of systemic sclerosis that often has a poor pognosis and together with pulmonary arterial hypertension are the most common cause of death in scleroderma patients. For detection and evaluation of interstitial lung disease, high-resolution CT and pulmorary functional tests are pivotal. The decision about whether to start treatment is often the most difficult challenge. Patients with short duration of systemic disease with recent deterioration in DCO are the candidates for immunosupressive therapy. Best current initial treatment is intravenous monthly cyclophosphamide together with low-dose oral glucocorticoids although azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil are also widely used.

  8. Neuromyelitis optica in patients with coexisting human immunodeficiency virus infections.

    PubMed

    Feyissa, Anteneh M; Singh, Parbhdeep; Smith, Robert G

    2013-09-01

    Two patients with known human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections and receiving antiretroviral treatment developed neuromyelitis optica (Devic's disease). One patient tested positive for serum aquaporin-4 immunoglobulin G antibodies. Both patients were treated with high dose pulsed intravenous methylprednisolone followed by standard sessions of plasma exchange both at the onset attack and during disease relapses. For maintenance therapy, one patient received rituximab infusions and the second patient received mycophenolate mofetil orally. Despite treatment, both patients are currently wheelchair-bound due to severe paraparesis. Neuromyelitis optica can occur in the course of HIV infection and poses an ongoing therapeutic challenge.

  9. Atopic dermatitis: Kids are not just little people.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Smita; Rothe, Marti Jill; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-01-01

    The approach to children and adults with atopic dermatitis is similar. In both age groups, failure to respond to conventional therapy should prompt evaluation for complicating factors such as secondary infection and secondary ACD. Immunologic, metabolic, genetic, and nutritional disorders should be considered in the differential diagnosis of refractory pediatric atopic dermatitis. Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL), cutaneous drug reactions, other spongiotic dermatoses, psoriasis, dermatomycosis, and infestations should be considered in the differential of refractory atopic dermatitis in adults. Systemic therapies prescribed to both children and adults with severe atopic dermatitis include oral corticosteroids, cyclosporine, methotrexate, azathioprine, and mycophenolate mofetil.

  10. Oral mucositis

    MedlinePlus

    ... help keep your mouth moist. Stop wearing your dentures if they cause you to get sores on ... 2016. www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/side-effects/mouth-throat/oral-complications-hp-pdq . Accessed March ...

  11. Oral pathology.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2008-05-01

    Oral disease is exceedingly common in small animal patients. In addition, there is a very wide variety of pathologies that are encountered within the oral cavity. These conditions often cause significant pain and/or localized and systemic infection; however, the majority of these conditions have little to no obvious clinical signs. Therefore, diagnosis is not typically made until late in the disease course. Knowledge of these diseases will better equip the practitioner to effectively treat them. This article covers the more common forms of oral pathology in the dog and cat, excluding periodontal disease, which is covered in its own chapter. The various pathologies are presented in graphic form, and the etiology, clinical signs, recommended diagnostic tests, and treatment options are discussed. Pathologies that are covered include: persistent deciduous teeth, fractured teeth, intrinsically stained teeth, feline tooth resorption, caries, oral neoplasia, eosinophilic granuloma complex, lymphoplasmacytic gingivostomatitis, enamel hypoplasia, and "missing" teeth.

  12. Oral biopsy: oral pathologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Kumaraswamy, K L; Vidhya, M; Rao, Prasanna Kumar; Mukunda, Archana

    2012-01-01

    Many oral lesions may need to be diagnosed by removing a sample of tissue from the oral cavity. Biopsy is widely used in the medical field, but the practice is not quite widespread in dental practice. As oral pathologists, we have found many artifacts in the tissue specimen because of poor biopsy technique or handling, which has led to diagnostic pitfalls and misery to both the patient and the clinician. This article aims at alerting the clinicians about the clinical faults arising preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively while dealing with oral biopsy that may affect the histological assessment of the tissue and, therefore, the diagnosis. It also reviews the different techniques, precautions and special considerations necessary for specific lesions.

  13. A limited sampling strategy for the simultaneous estimation of tacrolimus, mycophenolic acid and unbound prednisolone exposure in adult kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Barraclough, Katherine A; Isbel, Nicole M; Johnson, David W; Hawley, Carmel M; Lee, Katie J; McWhinney, Brett C; Ungerer, Jacobus P; Campbell, Scott B; Leary, Diana R; Staatz, Christine E

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a limited sampling strategy (LSS) for the simultaneous estimation of exposure to tacrolimus, mycophenolic acid and unbound prednisolone in adult kidney transplant recipients. Tacrolimus, mycophenolic acid and unbound prednisolone area under the concentration-time curve profiles from 0 to 12 h post dose (AUC(0-12)) were collected from 20 subjects. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to develop a LSS enabling the simultaneous estimation of exposure to all three drugs. Median percentage prediction error and median absolute percentage prediction error were calculated via jackknife analysis to evaluate bias and imprecision. LSS showed superior ability to predict exposure compared with single concentration-time points. A LSS incorporating concentration measurements at 0.5 h (C(0.5)), 2 h (C(2)) and 4 h (C(4)) post dose displayed acceptable predictive ability for all three drugs. This LSS may serve as a useful research tool for further investigation of the utility of concentration monitoring of these medications. © 2011 The Authors. Nephrology © 2011 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  14. Effect of mycophenolic acid on TNFα-induced expression of cell adhesion molecules in human venous endothelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Ingeborg A; Johnson, David R; Thévenod, Frank; Goppelt-Strübe, Margarete

    1997-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is an inhibitor of inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase and therefore interferes with cellular GTP biosynthesis. Recently, MPA has been used as an antiproliferative and immunosuppressive agent. In the present study, the effect of MPA on the expression of the endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), intercellular (I) CAM-1, vascular (V) CAM-1 and endothelial (E)-selectin, was investigated in tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα)-activated cultured human venous endothelial cells (EC).Surface expression of CAMs was measured by flow cytometry and mRNA expression by Northern blot analysis. Transcriptional activation of CAMs by the nuclear factor NF-κB was determined by an electromobility shift assay. The function of CAMs was studied by a static adhesion assay with human monocyte-like undifferentiated U937 cells.Pretreatment of TNFα- (5  ng ml−1, 12 h) activated EC with MPA (10 μM, 24 h) increased the binding of U937 cells, which had not been treated with MPA, by ≈amp;2 fold. MPA-pretreatment of EC did not affect TNFα-induced surface expression of ICAM-1. However, VCAM-1 and E-selectin were increased 2–3 fold and remained elevated up to 24 h, by which time TNFα-activated control EC had returned to baseline levels of expression. The effect of MPA on the surface expression of CAMs was half-maximal at ≈amp;1 μM and required ⩾12 h of pretreatment. Guanosine (0.3 mM), a precursor of GTP, did not prevent the effect of MPA on the expression of CAMs in TNFα-activated EC.Kinetics of mRNA expression of CAMs mirrored protein expression: mRNA for ICAM-1 was unaffected, whereas TNFα-induced mRNA expression for E-selectin and VCAM-1 was prolonged and increased by MPA. This effect was not due to increased transcription mediated by the nuclear transcription factor NF-κB. However, half-life for E-selectin mRNA was increased 10 fold by MPA, whereas ICAM-1 mRNA half-life was unchanged.The data demonstrate that apart from its

  15. Statistical tools for dose individualization of mycophenolic acid and tacrolimus co-administered during the first month after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Musuamba, Flora T; Mourad, Michel; Haufroid, Vincent; De Meyer, Martine; Capron, Arnaud; Delattre, Isabelle K; Verbeeck, Roger K; Wallemacq, Pierre

    2013-05-01

    To predict simultaneously the area under the concentration-time curve during one dosing interval [AUC(0,12 h)] for mycophenolic acid (MPA) and tacrolimus (TAC), when concomitantly used during the first month after transplantation, based on common blood samples. Data were from two different sources, real patient pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles from 65 renal transplant recipients and 9000 PK profiles simulated from previously published models on MPA or TAC in the first month after transplantation. Multiple linear regression (MLR) and Bayesian estimation using optimal samples were performed to predict MPA and TAC AUC(0,12 h) based on two concentrations. The following models were retained: AUC(0,12 h) = 16.5 + 4.9 × C1.5 + 6.7 × C3.5 (r(2) = 0.82, rRMSE = 9%, with simulations and r(2) = 0.66, rRMSE = 24%, with observed data) and AUC(0,12 h) = 24.3 + 5.9 × C1.5 + 12.2 × C3.5 (r(2) = 0.94, rRMSE = 12.3%, with simulations r(2) = 0.74, rRMSE = 15%, with observed data) for MPA and TAC, respectively. In addition, bayesian estimators were developed including parameter values from final models and values of concentrations at 1.5 and 3.5 h after dose. Good agreement was found between predicted and reference AUC(0,12 h) values: r(2) = 0.90, rRMSE = 13% and r(2) = 0.97, rRMSE = 5% with simulations for MPA and TAC, respectively and r(2) = 0.75, rRMSE = 11% and r(2) = 0.83, rRMSE = 7% with observed data for MPA and TAC, respectively. Statistical tools were developed for simultaneous MPA and TAC therapeutic drug monitoring. They can be incorporated in computer programs for patient dose individualization. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Normal Oral Flora and the Oral Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, Lakshman; Matsubara, Victor H

    2017-04-01

    The oral ecosystem comprises the oral flora, so-called oral microbiome, the different anatomic microniches of the oral cavity, and its bathing fluid, saliva. The oral microbiome comprises a group of organisms and includes bacteria, archaea, fungi, protozoa, and viruses. The oral microbiome exists suspended in saliva as planktonic phase organisms or attached to oral surfaces as a plaque biofilm. Homeostasis of the plaque biofilm and its symbiotic relationship with the host is critical for oral health. Disequilibrium or dysbiosis within the plaque biofilms is the initiating event that leads to major oral diseases, such as caries and periodontal disease.

  17. Oral myiasis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Treville; Tamgadge, Avinash P; Chande, Mayura S; Bhalerao, Sudhir; Tamgadge, Sandhya

    2010-10-01

    Myiasis is a relatively rare condition arising from the invasion of body tissues or cavities of living animals or humans by maggots or larvae of certain species of flies. It is an uncommon clinical condition, being more frequent in underdeveloped countries and hot climate regions, and is associated with poor hygiene, suppurative oral lesions; alcoholism and senility. Its diagnosis is made basically by the presence of larvae. The present article reports a case of oral myiasis involving 20 larvae in a patient with neurological deficiency.

  18. Oral myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Treville; Tamgadge, Avinash P.; Chande, Mayura S.; Bhalerao, Sudhir; Tamgadge, Sandhya

    2010-01-01

    Myiasis is a relatively rare condition arising from the invasion of body tissues or cavities of living animals or humans by maggots or larvae of certain species of flies. It is an uncommon clinical condition, being more frequent in underdeveloped countries and hot climate regions, and is associated with poor hygiene, suppurative oral lesions; alcoholism and senility. Its diagnosis is made basically by the presence of larvae. The present article reports a case of oral myiasis involving 20 larvae in a patient with neurological deficiency. PMID:22114438

  19. Treatment of pure red-cell aplasia with cyclosporine in a renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Rahsan; Bilen, Yusuf; Keles, Mustafa; Uyanik, Abdullah; Gokbulut, Puren; Aydinli, Bulent

    2013-02-01

    Acquired pure red-cell aplasia is a rare disorder that can be either idiopathic or associated with certain autoimmune diseases, pregnancy, lymphoproliferative disorders, nutritional deficiencies, or medicines. We present a deceased-donor renal transplant patient who developed pure red-cell aplasia associated with mycophenolate mofetil or tacrolimus and was treated with cyclosporine. A 20-year-old woman was transplanted from a deceased donor 1 month earlier and presented to us with symptoms of fatigue, prostration, and palpitation. The results of a laboratory examination revealed anemia. A diagnostic work-up resulted in a diagnosis of pure red-cell aplasia. Mycophenolate mofetil was discontinued. Tacrolimus also was replaced with cyclosporine 2 months after mycophenolate mofetil was halted because of a lack of improvement in anemia. Three months later, her anemia improved with cyclosporine. Starting cyclosporine instead of tacrolimus or mycophenolate mofetil showed good improvement in our patient within 6 months of therapy.

  20. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Institute, components of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. For more copies contact: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Oral Health Information Clearinghouse 1 NOHIC Way Bethesda, MD 20892-3500 1–866–232–4528 www. nidcr. ...

  1. Oral Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Lecavalier, D.R.; Main, J.H.P.

    1988-01-01

    The authors of this article review briefly the anatomy of the oral soft tissues and describe the more common benign and malignant tumours of the mouth, giving emphasis to their clinical features. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:21253197

  2. Oral medications.

    PubMed

    Albretsen, Jay C

    2002-03-01

    Many medications are available today by prescription or in over-the-counter preparations. This article reviews the pharmacokinetics, mechanism of action, toxicity, clinical signs, and management procedures necessary for some oral medications. The medications reviewed include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, benzodiazepines, amphetamines or amphetamine like drugs, carprofen, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, pseudoephedrine, calcium channel blockers, and baclofen.

  3. Adoptive Immunotherapy Combined with Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation as a Therapeutic Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    irradiation (TBI) followed by postgrafting immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil ( MMF ) and cyclosporin A (CSP) for 28 and 35 days respectively...immunosuppression of MMF and CSP (11). We now believe this problem was due to our replacing an aged 4 meV linear accelerator (Linac) with a newer 6 meV...lymphocyte reaction MMF mycophenolate mofetil PBL peripheral blood lymphocytes PBMC peripheral blood mononuclear cells PBS phosphate buffered

  4. Oral candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Akpan, A; Morgan, R

    2002-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is a common opportunistic infection of the oral cavity caused by an overgrowth of Candida species, the commonest being Candida albicans. The incidence varies depending on age and certain predisposing factors. There are three broad groupings consisting of acute candidiasis, chronic candidiasis, and angular cheilitis. Risk factors include impaired salivary gland function, drugs, dentures, high carbohydrate diet, and extremes of life, smoking, diabetes mellitus, Cushing's syndrome, malignancies, and immunosuppressive conditions. Management involves taking a history, an examination, and appropriate antifungal treatment with a few requiring samples to be taken for laboratory analysis. In certain high risk groups antifungal prophylaxis reduces the incidence and severity of infections. The prognosis is good in the great majority of cases. PMID:12185216

  5. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Oesterheld, Jessica R; Cozza, Kelly; Sandson, Neil B

    2008-01-01

    Nearly 50 years ago, the introduction of Enovid (norethynodrel 10 microg and mestranol 150 microg), which provided convenient and reliable contraception, revolutionized birth control. Reports of interactions between oral contraceptives (OCs) and other drugs began to trickle into the literature. At first, these drug interactions appeared to be random and unrelated. Increased understanding of P450 enzymes and phase II reactions of sulfation and glucuronidation has permitted preliminary categorization and assessment of the clinical relevance of these drug interactions.

  6. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Maclennan, A H

    1987-12-01

    Over 60 million women use highly efficient and safe modern combined oral contraceptives (OCs) every day. A women who takes the oral contraceptive for 5 years before the age of 30 will actually live 12 days longer, although a woman taking the pill for the 1st time for 5 years after the age of 30 will have her life span reduced on the average by 80 days. OC related morbidity and mortality mostly occur in women over 35 who smoke. Combined low dose OCs are safe for women who do not smoke, at least to 45 years of age and probably to the menopause. The prescription of OCs is also safe to the young adolescent. The pill does not interfere with maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary ovarian axis and does not increase the incidence of amenorrhoea, oligomenorrhoea or infertility in later life. Patients with contraindications to estrogen therapy are excluded from OC use (history of thromboembolism, major heart disease, liver disease, breast cancer). Low-dose (30-35 mcg estrogen-containing monophasic or triphasic) pills are recommended. Combined oral contraceptives contain either ethinyl estradiol (1.7 to 2 times more potent) or mestranol. After absorption the progestagens, norethisterone acetate, ethynodiol diacetate and lynoestrenol are all metabolized to norethisterone. The progestagen-only pill has about a 2% failure rate and poorer cycle control than the combined pill, but it lacks estrogenic, progestagenic and androgenic side effects. This pill is suitable for the lactating mother, for smokers over 35, for hypertensive patients, and for those with a history of thrombosis. The efficacy of the progestagen-only pill is restored in 3 days of pill taking. Postcoital contraception is an alternative: treatment can be given for at least 72 hours after intercourse. The Yuzpe method calls for the patient to take 2 combined oral contraceptive tablets containing levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol (Eugynon or Ovral) followed by a further 2 tablets 12 hours later. This regimen

  7. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, A J; Leversee, J H

    1990-09-01

    Management of oral contraception requires an understanding of the relationships between the method's effectiveness, noncontraceptive benefits, and hormonal adverse effects. The new multiphasic combinations or OCs containing 35 micrograms of ethinyl estradiol and 0.5-1.0 mg of norethindrone or equivalent result in a maximum combination of efficacy and safety for the patient with minimal annoying problems for the patient and the prescriber. Patient education regarding early warning symptoms of adverse effects, breakthrough bleeding, and lack of withdrawal bleeding adds an additional margin of safety and reduces patient questions and uncertainties.

  8. Oral Lichen Planus

    MedlinePlus

    Oral lichen planus Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Oral lichen planus (LIE-kun PLAY-nus) is an ongoing (chronic) ... that affects mucous membranes inside your mouth. Oral lichen planus may appear as white, lacy patches; red, ...

  9. Which is more suitable for kidney transplantation at the early post-transplantation phase in China - low dosing or standard dosing of enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium?

    PubMed

    Ding, C; Xue, W; Tian, P; Ding, X; Pan, X; Xiang, H; Tian, X; Li, Y; Zheng, J

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the pharmacokinetics of enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) and the clinical outcome in kidney transplant recipients in the early post-transplantation phase. Then explain which regimen is more suitable for Chinese renal transplant recipients. In total, 60 de novo kidney transplant recipients treated with tacrolimus and steroids were randomised to receive EC-MPS at standard dose (SD; 1440 mg/day; n = 28) or low dose (LD; 1080 mg/day; n = 32). Efficacy parameters, safety and tolerability were assessed over a 6-month study period. Full mycophenolic acid (MPA) areas under the curve (AUCs) were completed on days 3 and 5, whereas a three-point limited sampling strategy (LSS) was utilised for MPA AUC assessments at 2 weeks and months 1, 3 and 6 (the LSS for three-time-point MPA AUC 0-12 h (mg h/l) = 15.99 + 0.87C1 h  + 0.68C2 h  + 7.85C4 h ; r(2)  = 0.8670. The mean AUC levels at day 3 and day 5 in the SD group were significantly higher than in the LD group (57.4 mg·h/l vs. 38.2 mg·h/l and 59.3 mg·h/l vs. 44.8 mg·h/l, respectively, p < 0.01). There was a trend for fewer clinically diagnosed acute rejections in the SD group vs. the LD group at 6 months (7.1% vs. 12.5%). This trend was also present when acute rejection was analysed as biopsy-proven cases. There were significantly more acute rejections (all definitions) in patients with MPA AUC levels < 30 mg·h/l compared with those with MPA AUC levels ≥ 30 mg·h/l within 6 months (p < 0.05). Renal function, incidence of infection and haematological disorders were not significantly different in either study group. Early adequate MPA exposure in renal transplant recipients can be achieved with a higher starting dose. In addition, a SD regimen was as well-tolerated as a LD regimen. Furthermore, early adequate MPA exposure significantly lowered the rate of acute rejection without compromising safety and tolerability. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Evaluation of the area under the curve of enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium using a limited sampling strategy in Chinese kidney transplant recipients
.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongfeng; Yao, Xi; Wu, Jianyong; Peng, Wenhan; Chen, Jianghua

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the area under the curve (AUC) of mycophenolic acid (MPA) in adult Chinese renal allograft recipients receiving concomitant enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) and cyclosporine (CsA) during the early post-transplant phase and to develop optimal model equations for estimation of the MPA area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to 12 hours (AUC0-12h) using a limited-sampling strategy (LSS). The present study enrolled 24 Chinese renal recipients treated with EC-MPS, CsA, and corticosteroid, from whom 24 serial blood samples were collected over 12 hours. MPA concentration was evaluated with enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique (EMIT). LSS was developed by multiple stepwise regression analysis using a two-group method (test group, n = 12; and validation group, n = 12). The MPA predose concentration had a poor correlation with MPA AUC0-12h, and the best equations obtained from the test group were the following: 25.73 + 0.59 × C1.5 + 0.79 × C2 + 2.03 × C4 (for three time points, r2 = 0.761) and 22.13 + 1.7 × C0.5 + 0.61 × C1.5 + 0.78 × C2 + 1.83 × C4 (for four time points, r2 = 0.853). When these equations were tested in the validation group, there were no significant differences in prediction errors. An LSS using time points at 1.5, 2, and 4 hours or 0.5, 1.5, 2, and 4 hours provides the most accurate and reliable estimation of the MPA AUC0-12h in Chinese adult renal recipients treated concomitantly with EC-MPS and CsA during the early post-transplant phase.
.

  11. Pilot conversion trial from mycophenolic acid to everolimus in ABO-incompatible kidney-transplant recipients with BK viruria and/or viremia.

    PubMed

    Belliere, Julie; Kamar, Nassim; Mengelle, Catherine; Allal, Asma; Sallusto, Federico; Doumerc, Nicolas; Game, Xavier; Congy-Jolivet, Nicolas; Esposito, Laure; Debiol, Benedicte; Rostaing, Lionel

    2016-03-01

    Immunosuppression using everolimus (EVR) plus low-dose tacrolimus (Tac) is commonly used in organ transplantation. EVR has potential antiviral effects. Herein, the long-term outcomes and impacts of Tac-EVR on the BK virus are reported in ABO-incompatible kidney-transplant recipients. The initial immunosuppressive regimen combined steroids, Tac, and mycophenolic acid (MPA). At a median of 141 (34-529) days post-transplantation, seven stable ABO-incompatible kidney-transplant recipients were converted from MPA to EVR because of active BK replication, and compared with a reference group of fourteen ABO-incompatible patients receiving classical Tac plus MPA. At 1 month before conversion, at 1, 3 months after, and at last follow-up, clinical and biological parameters were monitored. The median time from conversion to the last follow-up was 784 (398-866) days. Conversion to EVR caused no change to rejection episodes or immunological status (isoagglutinin titers, anti-HLA antibodies). At last follow-up, median eGFR was similar in the Tac-MPA versus Tac-EVR group (40 [range: 14-56] vs. 54.5 ml/min/1.73 m(2) [range: 0-128], P = 0.07). The major adverse event was dyslipidemia. Interestingly, conversion from MPA to EVR decreased BK viral load in five patients. ABO-incompatible kidney-transplant recipients with an active BK virus infection may benefit from conversion to EVR.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of mycophenolic acid in Nagase analbuminemic rats: Evaluation of protein binding effects using the modeling and simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Kazuaki; Yano, Ikuko; Kawanishi, Misaki; Nakagawa, Shunsaku; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to examine the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of mycophenolic acid (MPA) in Nagase analbuminemic rats (NARs) to evaluate the effect of protein binding on the associated inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. Free fractions of MPA in the control rats and NARs were 2.09 and 24.8%, respectively. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters simultaneously obtained by the nonlinear mixed effects modeling program NONMEM explained reasonably well the concentrations of MPA and MPA glucuronide as well as IMPDH activity in both rats. NARs showed a higher clearance and a smaller volume of distribution based on the free MPA concentration than the controls did, besides the increase in free fraction. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration based on free MPA was estimated as 163 ng/mL for both rats. Simulations based on the obtained pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters showed that the area under the IMPDH activity-time curve decreased non-linearly according to the increase in free fraction of MPA. In conclusion, the experimental data obtained from NARs followed by the modeling and simulation approach quantitatively clarified that the free MPA concentration was suitable for the biomarker of immunosuppressive effect of MPA. Dose adjustments based on the total MPA may cause unnecessary overexposure to MPA in patients with hypoalbuminemia.

  13. A novel freeze-dried storage and preparation method for the determination of mycophenolic acid in plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Qiang, Wei; Li, Ying; Cheng, Zeneng; Xie, Mengmeng

    2017-02-15

    Plasma samples were conventionally stored at freezing conditions until the time of detection. Such a technique, when carried out over an extended period, is energy consuming; in addition, preparation and transportation of stored samples is inconvenient. In this study, a freeze-dried storage and preparation method was proposed to determine the presence of mycophenolic acid (MPA) in plasma. Fresh plasma samples were freeze-dried using a device, and then stored at ambient temperature. After the stored samples were soaked with methanol spiked with the internal standard, high-performance liquid chromatography was conducted to detect MPA. The proposed method was demonstrated to be precise and accurate over the linear range of 0.5-50 μg mL(-1) , with both intra- and inter-day precision being <7% and biases <10%. The freeze-dried samples were stable at ambient temperature for at least 40 days. This method was also successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of MPA in healthy volunteers. Pharmacokinetic parameters, such as maximum plasma concentration, time point of maximum plasma concentration and elimination half-life, among others, were consistent with the results in the published study. This proposed technique was proved to be simple, reproducible and energy saving. This approach could also simplify the storage and analysis of samples in clinical and scientific drug research.

  14. 5 year comparison of very low-dose cyclosporine and high-dose everolimus vs standard cyclosporine and enteric-coated mycophenolate in renal transplantation patients.

    PubMed

    Carta, P; Zanazzi, M; Di Maria, L; Larti, A; Caroti, L; Antognoli, G; Buti, E; Moscarelli, L; Minetti, E E

    2014-09-01

    In this retrospective study, we compared the outcome of renal transplanted patients who received everolimus (EVR) (C0: 8-12 ng/mL)+cyclosporine (CsA) (C2: 150-300 ng/mL)+steroids, vs those who received enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) (1,440 mg/d)+CsA (C2: 500-700 ng/mL)+steroids. Efficacy was evaluated at 5 years. We found a nonsignificant trend toward a better 5-year graft survival (81.2% vs 68.6%) and better graft function (estimated glomerular filtration rate 71.8±35.7 vs 60.0±26.2 mL/min, P=.114) in favor of the EVR group. In our experience, EVR with a very low dose of CsA was associated with a nonstatistical trend toward better renal function and graft survival compared to a standard regimen of CsA and EC-MPS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The influence of intrauterine exposure to immunosuppressive treatment on changes in the immune system in juvenile Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Kabat-Koperska, Joanna; Kolasa-Wołosiuk, Agnieszka; Wojciuk, Bartosz; Wojciechowska-Koszko, Iwona; Roszkowska, Paulina; Krasnodębska-Szponder, Barbara; Paczkowska, Edyta; Safranow, Krzysztof; Gołembiewska, Edyta; Machaliński, Bogusław; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    In our study, we assessed the impact of immunosuppressive drug combinations on changes in the immune system of juvenile Wistar rats exposed to these drugs during pregnancy. We primarily concentrated on changes in two organs of the immune system - the thymus and the spleen. The study was conducted on 40 (32+8) female Wistar rats administered full and half dose of drugs, respectively, subjected to regimens commonly used in therapy of human kidney transplant recipients ([1] cyclosporine A, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone; [2] tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone; [3] cyclosporine A, everolimus, and prednisone). The animals received drugs by oral gavage 2 weeks before pregnancy and during 3 weeks of pregnancy. There were no statistically significant differences in the weight of the thymus and spleen, but changes were found in the results of blood hematology, cytometry from the spleen, and a histologic examination of the examined immune organs of juvenile Wistar rats. In the cytokine assay, changes in the level of interleukine 17 (IL-17) after increasing amounts of concanavaline A were dose-dependent; the increase of IL-17 was blocked after administration of higher doses of immunosuppressive drugs. However, after a reduction of doses, its increase resumed. Qualitative, quantitative, and morphological changes in the immune system of infant rats born to pharmacologically immunosuppressed females were observed. Thymus structure, spleen composition, and splenocyte IL-17 production were mostly affected in a drug regimen-dependent manner.

  16. The influence of intrauterine exposure to immunosuppressive treatment on changes in the immune system in juvenile Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Kabat-Koperska, Joanna; Kolasa-Wołosiuk, Agnieszka; Wojciuk, Bartosz; Wojciechowska-Koszko, Iwona; Roszkowska, Paulina; Krasnodębska-Szponder, Barbara; Paczkowska, Edyta; Safranow, Krzysztof; Gołembiewska, Edyta; Machaliński, Bogusław; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    Background In our study, we assessed the impact of immunosuppressive drug combinations on changes in the immune system of juvenile Wistar rats exposed to these drugs during pregnancy. We primarily concentrated on changes in two organs of the immune system – the thymus and the spleen. Methods The study was conducted on 40 (32+8) female Wistar rats administered full and half dose of drugs, respectively, subjected to regimens commonly used in therapy of human kidney transplant recipients ([1] cyclosporine A, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone; [2] tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone; [3] cyclosporine A, everolimus, and prednisone). The animals received drugs by oral gavage 2 weeks before pregnancy and during 3 weeks of pregnancy. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the weight of the thymus and spleen, but changes were found in the results of blood hematology, cytometry from the spleen, and a histologic examination of the examined immune organs of juvenile Wistar rats. In the cytokine assay, changes in the level of interleukine 17 (IL-17) after increasing amounts of concanavaline A were dose-dependent; the increase of IL-17 was blocked after administration of higher doses of immunosuppressive drugs. However, after a reduction of doses, its increase resumed. Conclusion Qualitative, quantitative, and morphological changes in the immune system of infant rats born to pharmacologically immunosuppressed females were observed. Thymus structure, spleen composition, and splenocyte IL-17 production were mostly affected in a drug regimen–dependent manner. PMID:27471376

  17. [Prevention of oral diseases].

    PubMed

    Vodanović, Marin

    2013-06-01

    Oral health is essential to general health and quality of life. Ever more people are affected with oral diseases. Dental caries, gingivitis and periodontitis are the most common oral diseases and they can be prevented. Oral health promotion and oral disease prevention programs should be incorporated in national health strategies. Inability to understand health information can be a profound disadvantage to patients when asked to take responsibility for their health. Increasing the level of oral health literacy and improvement of communication between patients and dentists by avoiding the usage of professional dental terminology should be included in each oral prevention program.

  18. Pharmacokinetic drug interaction profile of omeprazole with adverse consequences and clinical risk management

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Zeng, Su; Yu, Lu-Shan; Zhou, Quan

    2013-01-01

    Background Omeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), is widely used for the treatment of dyspepsia, peptic ulcer, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and functional dyspepsia. Polypharmacy is common in patients receiving omeprazole. Drug toxicity and treatment failure resulting from inappropriate combination therapy with omeprazole have been reported sporadically. Systematic review has not been available to address the pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction (DDI) profile of omeprazole with adverse consequences, the factors determining the degree of DDI between omeprazole and comedication, and the corresponding clinical risk management. Methods Literature was identified by performing a PubMed search covering the period from January 1988 to March 2013. The full text of each article was critically reviewed, and data interpretation was performed. Results Omeprazole has actual adverse influences on the pharmacokinetics of medications such as diazepam, carbamazepine, clozapine, indinavir, nelfinavir, atazanavir, rilpivirine, methotrexate, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, clopidogrel, digoxin, itraconazole, posaconazole, and oral iron supplementation. Meanwhile, low efficacy of omeprazole treatment would be anticipated, as omeprazole elimination could be significantly induced by comedicated efavirenz and herb medicines such as St John’s wort, Ginkgo biloba, and yin zhi huang. The mechanism for DDI involves induction or inhibition of cytochrome P450, inhibition of P-glycoprotein or breast cancer resistance protein-mediated drug transport, and inhibition of oral absorption by gastric acid suppression. Sometimes, DDIs of omeprazole do not exhibit a PPI class effect. Other suitable PPIs or histamine 2 antagonists may be therapeutic alternatives that can be used to avoid adverse consequences. The degree of DDIs associated with omeprazole and clinical outcomes depend on factors such as genotype status of CYP2C19 and CYP1A2, ethnicity, dose and treatment course of precipitant

  19. Mycophenolate-based graft versus host disease prophylaxis is not inferior to methotrexate in myeloablative-related donor stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Nada; Shanavas, Mohamed; Michelis, Fotios V; Uhm, Jieun; Gupta, Vikas; Seftel, Matthew; Kuruvilla, John; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Messner, Hans A; Kim, Dennis Dong Hwan

    2015-05-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 242 patients who received related donor myeloablative peripheral blood hematopoietic cell transplantation. We compared patients who received mycophenolate (MMF)/cyclosporine (CSA) (n = 71), to historical controls who received methotrexate (MTX)/CSA (n = 172). There were no differences in overall survival, nonrelapse mortality, and relapse. The MMF/CSA group had significantly faster neutrophil and platelet engraftment: medians of 13 versus 18 days and 10 versus 14 days, respectively (P = 0.001). The cumulative incidence of acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) (Grades, 2-4) was significantly lower in the MMF/CSA group (45.1 vs. 74.4%, P < 0.001). The MMF/CSA group showed a lower incidence of skin (51.5 vs. 72.1%, P < 0.001) and liver acute GVHD (11.3 vs. 54.2%, P < 0.001) and a higher incidence of lung (42.2 vs. 19.0%, P = 0.045), eye (59.7 vs. 30.1%, P < 0.001), and mouth (72.8 vs. 56.4%, P = 0.001) chronic GVHD but only eye chronic GVHD was confirmed in propensity score matching (PSM) analysis. The incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) viremia was higher in the MMF/CSA group (55.8 vs. 39.6%, P < 0.001) but this was not confirmed in PSM analysis. MMF/CSA was identified as an independent favorable factor for acute GVHD (P < 0.001, hazard ratio, 0.41) but as a possible adverse risk factor for CMV viremia as this was not found to be statistically significant in PSM analysis. MMF/CSA in myeloablative matched related donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant is not inferior as GVHD prophylaxis in comparison with MTX/CSA and is associated with faster engraftment but a potentially higher risk of CMV viremia.

  20. Versatile Enzyme Expression and Characterization System for Aspergillus nidulans, with the Penicillium brevicompactum Polyketide Synthase Gene from the Mycophenolic Acid Gene Cluster as a Test Case▿†

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Bjarne G.; Salomonsen, Bo; Nielsen, Morten T.; Nielsen, Jakob B.; Hansen, Niels B.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Regueira, Torsten B.; Nielsen, Jens; Patil, Kiran R.; Mortensen, Uffe H.

    2011-01-01

    Assigning functions to newly discovered genes constitutes one of the major challenges en route to fully exploiting the data becoming available from the genome sequencing initiatives. Heterologous expression in an appropriate host is central in functional genomics studies. In this context, filamentous fungi offer many advantages over bacterial and yeast systems. To facilitate the use of filamentous fungi in functional genomics, we present a versatile cloning system that allows a gene of interest to be expressed from a defined genomic location of Aspergillus nidulans. By a single USER cloning step, genes are easily inserted into a combined targeting-expression cassette ready for rapid integration and analysis. The system comprises a vector set that allows genes to be expressed either from the constitutive PgpdA promoter or from the inducible PalcA promoter. Moreover, by using the vector set, protein variants can easily be made and expressed from the same locus, which is mandatory for proper comparative analyses. Lastly, all individual elements of the vectors can easily be substituted for other similar elements, ensuring the flexibility of the system. We have demonstrated the potential of the system by transferring the 7,745-bp large mpaC gene from Penicillium brevicompactum to A. nidulans. In parallel, we produced defined mutant derivatives of mpaC, and the combined analysis of A. nidulans strains expressing mpaC or mutated mpaC genes unequivocally demonstrated that mpaC indeed encodes a polyketide synthase that produces the first intermediate in the production of the medically important immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid. PMID:21398493

  1. Versatile enzyme expression and characterization system for Aspergillus nidulans, with the Penicillium brevicompactum polyketide synthase gene from the mycophenolic acid gene cluster as a test case.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Bjarne G; Salomonsen, Bo; Nielsen, Morten T; Nielsen, Jakob B; Hansen, Niels B; Nielsen, Kristian F; Regueira, Torsten B; Nielsen, Jens; Patil, Kiran R; Mortensen, Uffe H

    2011-05-01

    Assigning functions to newly discovered genes constitutes one of the major challenges en route to fully exploiting the data becoming available from the genome sequencing initiatives. Heterologous expression in an appropriate host is central in functional genomics studies. In this context, filamentous fungi offer many advantages over bacterial and yeast systems. To facilitate the use of filamentous fungi in functional genomics, we present a versatile cloning system that allows a gene of interest to be expressed from a defined genomic location of Aspergillus nidulans. By a single USER cloning step, genes are easily inserted into a combined targeting-expression cassette ready for rapid integration and analysis. The system comprises a vector set that allows genes to be expressed either from the constitutive PgpdA promoter or from the inducible PalcA promoter. Moreover, by using the vector set, protein variants can easily be made and expressed from the same locus, which is mandatory for proper comparative analyses. Lastly, all individual elements of the vectors can easily be substituted for other similar elements, ensuring the flexibility of the system. We have demonstrated the potential of the system by transferring the 7,745-bp large mpaC gene from Penicillium brevicompactum to A. nidulans. In parallel, we produced defined mutant derivatives of mpaC, and the combined analysis of A. nidulans strains expressing mpaC or mutated mpaC genes unequivocally demonstrated that mpaC indeed encodes a polyketide synthase that produces the first intermediate in the production of the medically important immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid.

  2. Diabetes Mellitus Reduces Activity of Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 in Liver and Kidney Leading to Decreased Formation of Mycophenolic Acid Acyl-Glucuronide Metabolite

    PubMed Central

    Dostalek, Miroslav; Court, Michael H.; Hazarika, Suwagmani

    2011-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is an immunosuppressive agent commonly used after organ transplantation. Altered concentrations of MPA metabolites have been reported in diabetic kidney transplant recipients, although the reason for this difference is unknown. We aimed to compare MPA biotransformation and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) expression and activity between liver (n = 16) and kidney (n = 8) from diabetic and nondiabetic donors. Glucuronidation of MPA, as well as the expression and probe substrate activity of UGTs primarily responsible for MPA phenol glucuronide (MPAG) formation (UGT1A1 and UGT1A9), and MPA acyl glucuronide (AcMPAG) formation (UGT2B7), was characterized. We have found that both diabetic and nondiabetic human liver microsomes and kidney microsomes formed MPAG with similar efficiency; however, AcMPAG formation was significantly lower in diabetic samples. This finding is supported by markedly lower glucuronidation of the UGT2B7 probe zidovudine, UGT2B7 protein, and UGT2B7 mRNA in diabetic tissues. UGT genetic polymorphism did not explain this difference because UGT2B7*2 or *1c genotype were not associated with altered microsomal UGT2B7 protein levels or AcMPAG formation. Furthermore, mRNA expression and probe activities for UGT1A1 or UGT1A9, both forming MPAG but not AcMPAG, were comparable between diabetic and nondiabetic tissues, suggesting the effect may be specific to UGT2B7-mediated AcMPAG formation. These findings suggest that diabetes mellitus is associated with significantly reduced UGT2B7 mRNA expression, protein level, and enzymatic activity of human liver and kidney, explaining in part the relatively low circulating concentrations of AcMPAG in diabetic patients. PMID:21123165

  3. Simple and Sensitive High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) Method with UV Detection for Mycophenolic Acid Assay in Human Plasma. Application to a Bioequivalence Study

    PubMed Central

    Danafar, Hossein; Hamidi, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A simple and available reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with UV detection has been developed and validated for mycophenolic acid (MPA) assay in human plasma. Methods: MPA was extracted from plasma with protein precipitation method by acetonitrile: percholeric acid: methanol (75:5:20 v/v/v). The drug separation was achieved using a C8 analytical column and a mobile phase of 0.1M triethylammonium phosphate (pH=5.4)-acetonitril (65:35, v/v), with a flow rate of 1.5 ml/min. The detection wavelength was 304 nm. Limit of detection (LOD) of the method was determined as the lowest MPA concentration producing a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of about 3. Limit of quantitation (LOQ) was determined as the lowest MPA concentration capable of being quantitated with enough accuracy and precision. Results: The method showed significant linear response-concentration relationship throughout the MPA concentration range of 0.2-10 µg/ml. A typical linear regression equation of the method was: y = 8.5523 x + 0.094, with x and y representing MPA concentration (in µg/ml) and peak height respectively, and the regression coefficient (r) of 0.9816. The average within-run and between-run variations of 7.81 and 4.78 percent. The average drug recovery from plasma was 95.24 percent throughout the linear concentration range. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) of the method were 0.05 and 0.2 µg/ml, respectively. The practical applicability of the method was proven throughout a bioequivalence study. Conclusion: The results showed the acceptable degree of linearity, sensitivity, precision, accuracy and recovery for the method. The method was used successfully for quantitation of MPA in plasma samples of healthy volunteers throughout a bioequivalence study. PMID:26819930

  4. Optimization of submerged fermentation conditions for immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid production by Penicillium roqueforti isolated from blue-molded cheeses: enhanced production by ultraviolet and gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ismaiel, Ahmed A; Ahmed, Ashraf S; El-Sayed, El-Sayed R

    2014-10-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is a promising drug owing to its immunosuppressive and biological activities. In this study, two strains of Penicillium roqueforti designated as AG101 and LG109 were selected among several strains isolated from Roquefort cheese samples on the basis of their activity for MPA-producing ability. The appropriate fermentation conditions necessary for MPA biosynthesis by the two respective fungal strains were investigated. These conditions included selection of the cultivation medium, agitation rate, incubation temperature, fermentation time, pH value, inoculum size, and fermentation medium volume. Maximum MPA productivities were maintained when the fermentation process was carried out using a medium composed of (g l(-1)): Sucrose, 30; peptone, 5.0; KH2PO4, 1.0; MgSO4·7H2O, 0.5 and KCl, 0.5; pH 6.0, inoculated with an inoculum size of 6.0 % (v/v), and incubated at 25 °C for 10 days at 120 rpm. The potentiality of both P. roqueforti strains for further improvement of MPA production was applied by mutagenesis through exposure to irradiation by ultraviolet rays (UV, 254 nm) for different periods of time and gamma rays at various doses (KGy). The dry cell weight of both irradiated fungal strains showed a greater reduction when irradiated either with UV or gamma rays. However, the MPA yield of both strains was increased by 1.27-1.39 fold when irradiated with UV rays and by 2.11-2.33 fold when irradiated with gamma rays, as compared with the respective controls (non-irradiated cultures). These findings indicate the future possibility to reduce the cost of producing fermentation-based drugs.

  5. Everolimus-treated renal transplant recipients have a more robust CMV-specific CD8+ T-cell response compared with cyclosporine- or mycophenolate-treated patients.

    PubMed

    Havenith, Simone H C; Yong, Si La; van Donselaar-van der Pant, Karlijn A M I; van Lier, René A W; ten Berge, Ineke J M; Bemelman, Fréderike J

    2013-01-15

    In renal transplant recipients, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors have been reported to protect against cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease. Here, we questioned whether mTOR inhibitors specifically influence human CMV-induced T-cell responses. We studied renal transplant recipients treated with prednisolone, cyclosporine A (CsA), and mycophenolate sodium (MPS) for the first 6 months after transplantation followed by double therapy consisting of prednisolone/everolimus, which is an mTOR inhibitor (P/EVL; n=10), prednisolone/CsA (P/CsA; n=7), or prednisolone/MPS (P/MPS; n=9). All patients were CMV-IgG positive before transplantation. CMV reactivation was detectable in the first 6 months after transplantation and not thereafter. None of the patients included in this study suffered from CMV disease. Both CD27CD8 and CD27CD28CD4 effector-type T-cell counts, known to be associated with CMV infection, were measured before transplantation and at 6 and 24 months after transplantation. Additionally, we determined both number and function of CMV-specific CD8 T cells at these time points. The number of total CD8 T cells, CD27CD8 T cells, and CD28CD4 T cells increased significantly after switch to therapy with P/EVL but not after switch to P/CsA or P/MPS. Specifically, CMV-specific CD8 T-cell counts significantly increased after switch to therapy with P/EVL. Furthermore, the mTOR inhibitor sirolimus strongly inhibited alloresponses in vitro, whereas it did not affect CMV-specific responses. We observed a significant increase in (CMV-specific) effector-type CD8 and CD4 T-cell counts in everolimus-treated patients. These findings may at least in part explain the reported low incidence of CMV-related pathology in everolimus-treated patients.

  6. Disparities in Oral Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips Disparities in Oral Health Oral Health Conditions Periodontal Disease Community Water Fluoridation Water Fluoridation Basics Over 70 ... 2% of U.S. adults have some form of periodontal disease. In adults aged 65 and older, 70.1% ...

  7. Nicotine Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Nicotine oral inhalation is used to help people stop smoking. Nicotine oral inhalation should be used together with a ... support groups, counseling, or specific behavioral change techniques. Nicotine inhalation is in a class of medications called ...

  8. Peptides in oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Alberta; Guida, Agostino; Petruzzi, Massimo; Capone, Giovanni; Laino, Luigi; Serpico, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The oral cavity is home to numerous viruses and micro-organisms recognized as having a role in various oral diseases as well as in infections in other parts of the body. Indeed, in general a microbial infection underlies or is believed to underlie the ample spectrum of oral diseases, from tooth enamel decay to periodontal lesions, from candidiasis to virus-induced oral squamous cell carcinomas, and bullous autoimmune oral disorders. This clinico-pathological context stresses the need of targeted therapies to specifically kill infectious agents in a complex environment such as the oral cavity, and explains the current interest in exploring peptide-based therapeutic approaches in oral and dental research. Here, we review the therapeutic potential of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, beta defensins, adrenomedullin, histatins, and of various peptides modulating gene expression and immuno-biological interaction(s) in oral diseases.

  9. Albuterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... and airways). Albuterol inhalation aerosol and powder for oral inhalation is also used to prevent breathing difficulties ... years of age and older. Albuterol powder for oral inhalation (Proair Respiclick) is used in children 12 ...

  10. HAD Oral History Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, Jarita

    2014-01-01

    The Historical Astronomy Division is the recipient of an American Institute of Physics Neils Bohr Library Grant for Oral History. HAD has assembled a team of volunteers to conduct oral history interviews since May 2013. Each oral history interview varies in length between two and six hours. This presentation is an introduction to the HAD Oral History Project and the activities of the team during the first six months of the grant.

  11. Oral Steroids for Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrew D; Clarke, Jesse; Williams, Timothy K

    2015-01-01

    Contact/allergic dermatitis is frequently treated inappropriately with lower-than-recommended doses or inadequate duration of treatment with oral and intramuscular glucocorticoids. This article highlights a case of dermatitis in a Ranger Assessment and Selection Program student who was improperly treated over 2 weeks with oral steroids after being bit by Cimex lectularius, commonly known as bed bugs. The article also highlights the pitfalls of improper oral steroid dosing and provides reasoning for longer-duration oral steroid treatment.

  12. Understanding Oral Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, W. Jay

    2012-01-01

    A five-year research project of seminary students from various cultural backgrounds revealed that the slight majority of contemporary seminary students studied are oral learners. Oral learners learn best and have their lives most transformed when professors utilize oral teaching and assessment methods. After explaining several preferences of oral…

  13. Understanding Oral Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, W. Jay

    2012-01-01

    A five-year research project of seminary students from various cultural backgrounds revealed that the slight majority of contemporary seminary students studied are oral learners. Oral learners learn best and have their lives most transformed when professors utilize oral teaching and assessment methods. After explaining several preferences of oral…

  14. Oral Communication K-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottrell, June, Ed.

    This speech communication curriculum guide is designed to provide a comprehensive oral language curriculum, to suggest ways for integrating oral activities into other curriculum areas, and to stimulate ideas for using oral language in a holistic rather than a fragmentary learning environment. Following an introductory chapter on "creating the…

  15. Essentials of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators. PMID:26617944

  16. Oral steroid contraception.

    PubMed

    Sech, Laura A; Mishell, Daniel R

    2015-11-01

    Oral steroid contraception is a popular method of family planning worldwide. Over the past several decades, this method of contraception has changed significantly by decreasing the estrogen dose, changing the progestin component, and reducing the hormone free interval. Despite the popularity of oral steroid contraception, there has been much criticism regarding the associated risks of venous thromboembolism and stroke. Despite these established, yet uncommon risks, oral steroid contraception has many important health benefits. This review highlights the available formulations of oral contraceptives along with their evidence-based associated risks and benefits. Highlights regarding future directions for development of novel oral contraceptives are also addressed.

  17. Essentials of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators.

  18. Effects of topically applied rapamycin and mycophenolic acid on TNCB-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung Eun; Lee, Ye Jin; Ryu, Yun Hee; Kim, Jung Eun; Kim, Hei Sung; Kim, Beom Joon; Kang, Hoon; Park, Young Min

    2015-06-01

    Rapamycin (RPM) and mycophenolic acid (MPA) are immunosuppressive drugs approved for use in preventing transplant rejection. These drugs have also been used in the field of dermatology as glucocorticoid sparing agents for autoimmune and inflammatory disorders such as atopic dermatitis (AD). The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of topically applied RPM and/or MPA on AD-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice. RPM (0.04% - 4%), MPA (0.2% - 5%), and formulations of both agents at various ratios were administrated topically to NC/Nga mice with 2-chloro-1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNCB)-induced AD-like skin lesions. The therapeutic effects of topical RPM, MPA, and the mixed formulations in TNCB-treated NC/Nga mice were assessed by measuring skin severity scores, ear thickness, and histological changes in the lesioned skin including mast cell count and total serum IgE levels. Expression of interleukin (IL)-4, and interferon (IFN)-γ was also assessed. Topical 4% RPM and/or 1% MPA treatment significantly improved clinical signs of AD such as erythema, edema, excoriation, and dryness on day 29 (P<0.05). In addition, 4% RPM, 1% MPA, and the mixed formulations significantly decreased epidermal thickening, dermal edema, and cellular infiltration into the dermis compared with the vehicle. RPM (4%) and/or MPA (1%) significantly reduced the expression of IL-4 and IFN-γ mRNA and protein levels compared with the vehicle (P<0.05). No significant change in the levels of total serum IgE was induced by topical 4% RPM and/or 1% MPA. The present results demonstrated that topical 4% RPM and/or 1% MPA improved TNCB-induced AD-like lesions of NC/Nga mice by suppressing expression of Th2-related cytokines (IL-4) and Th1-related cytokines (IFN-γ). These findings suggest that RPM and/or MPA may be promising topical therapeutic candidates for the treatment of AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A Comparison of the Immunochemical Methods, PETINIA and EMIT, With That of HPLC-UV for the Routine Monitoring of Mycophenolic Acid in Heart Transplant Patients.

    PubMed

    Kunicki, Paweł K; Pawiński, Tomasz; Boczek, Aleksandra; Waś, Joanna; Bodnar-Broniarczyk, Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate particle enhanced turbidimetric inhibition immunoassay (PETINIA) recently developed for mycophenolic acid (MPA) determination in plasma and to compare it with a reference high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method, using samples from heart transplant recipients. The results are presented in the context of PETINIA being compared with enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique (EMIT). PETINIA evaluation was performed using 194 routine trough plasma samples at steady state. EMIT was evaluated using 677 samples from 61 steady-state 12-hour profiles obtained from 35 heart transplant patients. Evaluation was undertaken on a Dimension EXL 200 analyzer (PETINIA) and on a Viva-E analyzer (EMIT). The mean MPA concentration measured by PETINIA was significantly higher than that measured by high-performance liquid chromatography combined with UV detector (2.36 ± 1.30 mcg/mL versus 1.82 ± 1.23 mcg/mL, respectively, P < 0.0001). Bland-Altman analysis revealed a mean bias of 0.54 mcg/mL [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.49-0.59] comprising 33.48% (95% CI, 30.34-36.61). Passing-Bablok regression was: y = 1.100x + 0.38 (95% CI for slope: 1.044-1.154 and for intercept: 0.30-0.47). Regardless of a significant observed correlation (r = 0.9230, P < 0.0001), the statistical analyses showed a significant difference between PETINIA and the reference chromatographic method. The mean MPA concentration measured by EMIT was significantly higher than that measured by HPLC (7.48 ± 8.34 mcg/mL versus 5.57 ± 6.61 mcg/mL, respectively, P < 0.0001) with a mean bias of 1.91 mcg/mL (95% CI, 1.75-2.07) comprising 35.91% (95% CI, 34.37-37.45). The significant difference between EMIT and HPLC was confirmed by Passing-Bablok regression: y = 1.300x + 0.24 (95% CI for slope: 1.279-1.324 and for intercept: 0.18-0.29). The analysis of the determinations, grouped by sampling time, revealed positive bias between EMIT and HPLC ranging from 24.54% to 42.77% and

  20. Mycophenolic acid induces ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) expression through the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yanni; Lai, Fangfang; Xu, Yang; Wu, Yexiang; Liu, Qi; Li, Ni; Wei, Yuzhen; Feng, Tingting; Zheng, Zhihui; Jiang, Wei; Yu, Liyan; Hong, Bin; Si, Shuyi

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using an ABCA1p-LUC HepG2 cell line, we found that MPA upregulated ABCA1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MPA induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 markedly inhibited MPA-induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of MPA upregulating ABCA1 was due mainly to activation of the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 pathway. -- Abstract: ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) promotes cholesterol and phospholipid efflux from cells to lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I and plays an important role in atherosclerosis. In a previous study, we developed a high-throughput screening method using an ABCA1p-LUC HepG2 cell line to find upregulators of ABCA1. Using this method in the present study, we found that mycophenolic acid (MPA) upregulated ABCA1 expression (EC50 = 0.09 {mu}M). MPA upregulation of ABCA1 expression was confirmed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis in HepG2 cells. Previous work has indicated that MPA is a potent agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}; EC50 = 5.2-9.3 {mu}M). Liver X receptor {alpha} (LXR{alpha}) is a target gene of PPAR{gamma} and may directly regulate ABCA1 expression. Western blot analysis showed that MPA induced LXR{alpha} protein expression in HepG2 cells. Addition of PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 markedly inhibited MPA-induced ABCA1 and LXR{alpha} protein expression. These data suggest that MPA increased ABCA1 expression mainly through activation of PPAR{gamma}. Thus, the effects of MPA on upregulation of ABCA1 expression were due mainly to activation of the PPAR{gamma}-LXR{alpha}-ABCA1 signaling pathway. This is the first report that the antiatherosclerosis activity of MPA is due to this mechanism.

  1. Influence of uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferases and ABCC2 genetic polymorphisms on the pharmacokinetics of mycophenolic acid and its metabolites in Chinese renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W-X; Chen, B; Jin, Z; Yu, Z; Wang, X; Chen, H; Mao, A; Cai, W

    2008-11-01

    The aim was to investigate the effect of UGT1A9, UGT1A8, UGT2B7 and ABCC2 polymorphism on the pharmacokinetics of mycophenolic acid (MPA) and its metabolites phenolic glucuronide (MPAG) and acyl glucuronide (AcMPAG) in Chinese renal transplant recipients. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in UGT1A9-118(dT)(9)/(10), UGT1A9 T-440C/C-331T, UGT1A8*3, UGT2B7 G211T, UGT2B7 C802T, ABCC2 C-24T, and ABCC2 G1249A were detected. A total of 46 recipients were enrolled in the pharmacokinetics study at day 30 after kidney transplantation. Differences in the MPA pharmacokinetic profiles confirmed large inter-patient variation of MPA exposure. A statistical significant increase in the dose-adjusted AUC(6-12) level of MPA was found in patients bearing the -118(dT)(10) allele of the UGT1A9 gene (T(9) = 7.34 +/- 4.11 mg h ml(-1) g(-1); T(9)/T(10) = 11.54 +/- 7.62 mg h ml(-1) g(-1); and T(10) = 11.89 +/-8.76 mg h ml(-1) g(-1), p = 0.041). A similar trend was also observed for the dose-adjusted AUC(0-12) and AUC(6-12) of MPAG. Patients carrying the heterozygous mutant alleles of ABCC2 G1249A exhibited higher AUC(6-12)/D of AcMPAG than those with wild-type genotype (p = 0.016). The other SNPs that were genotyped did not cause any significant variation in MPA and MPAG pharmacokinetic parameters. In conclusion, the enterohepatic recirculation of MPA in the patients seems to be more extensive in UGT1A9-118(dT)(10) allele carriers, and the exposure of AcMPAG is higher in patients carrying ABCC2 G1249A genotype than those with wild-type genotype.

  2. Radiation Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    PS, Satheesh Kumar; Balan, Anita; Sankar, Arun; Bose, Tinky

    2009-01-01

    Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene PMID:20668585

  3. Towards understanding oral health.

    PubMed

    Zaura, Egija; ten Cate, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term 'oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain microbial community stability in health. However, the oral ecosystem itself is not stable: throughout life an individual undergoes multiple physiological changes while progressing through infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. Recent discussions on the definition of general health have led to the proposal that health is the ability of the individual to adapt to physiological changes, a condition known as allostasis. In this paper the allostasis principle is applied to the oral ecosystem. The multidimensionality of the host factors contributing to allostasis in the oral cavity is illustrated with an example on changes occurring in puberty. The complex phenomenon of oral health and the processes that prevent the ecosystem from collapsing during allostatic changes in the entire body are far from being understood. As yet individual components (e.g. hard tissues, microbiome, saliva, host response) have been investigated, while only by consolidating these and assessing their multidimensional interactions should we be able to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the ecosystem, which in turn could serve to develop rational schemes to maintain health. Adapting such a 'system approach' comes with major practical challenges for the entire research field and will require vast resources and large-scale multidisciplinary collaborations.

  4. Oral microbiota and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meurman, Jukka H.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation caused by infections may be the most important preventable cause of cancer in general. However, in the oral cavity the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the complex metabolic pathways and may thus be involved in carcinogenesis. Poor oral health associates statistically with prevalence of many types of cancer, such as pancreatic and gastrointestinal cancer. Furthermore, several oral micro-organisms are capable of converting alcohol to carcinogenic acetaldehyde which also may partly explain the known association between heavy drinking, smoking, poor oral health and the prevalence of oral and upper gastrointestinal cancer. A different problem is the cancer treatment-caused alterations in oral microbiota which may lead to the emergence of potential pathogens and subsequent other systemic health problems to the patients. Hence clinical guidelines and recommendations have been presented to control oral microbiota in patients with malignant disease, but also in this area the scientific evidence is weak. More controlled studies are needed for further conclusion. PMID:21523227

  5. Bimaxillary Oral Focal Mucinosis.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sunil; Malik, Sunita; Mittal, Hitesh Chander; Singh, Gurdarshan; Kamra, Hemlata

    2016-10-01

    Oral focal mucinosis is considered as oral counterpart of cutaneous focal mucinosis. The preoperative diagnosis of mucinosis is almost impossible because of its rarity and clinical similarity to other lesions of various etiologies. The histological diagnosis of oral mucinosis is important to better understand the etiopathogenesis, treatment modalities, and any recurrence of the lesion besides differentiating from the other soft tissue lesions.The purpose of this paper is to report the first case of bimaxillary involvement with dome-shaped elevated, rounded, asymptomatic, normally colored swelling in left posterior palatal mucosa and left mandibular posterior region in a 25-year old woman who was diagnosed as oral focal mucinosis histopathologically.

  6. Epilepsy and oral care.

    PubMed

    Fiske, Janice; Boyle, Carole

    2002-05-01

    Epilepsy is a common symptom of an underlying neurological disorder. The seizures can take a variety of forms. Both the condition and its medical management can affect oral health. Prevention of oral disease and carefully planned dental treatment are essential to the well-being of people with epilepsy.

  7. Migraine and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Mousa, G Y

    1982-10-01

    Migraine is a common complaint in optometric practice. Three cases of migrainous patients taking oral contraceptives are presented in this report. The role of oral contraceptives in triggering a migraine attack and possibly elevating the risk of a stroke in a patient with migraine is discussed. The counseling an optometrist can provide in such cases in discussed.

  8. Oral environment and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yasusei; Tada, Hidesuke; Fujiwara, Natsumi; Tada, Yoshiko; Tsunematsu, Takaaki; Miyake, Yoichiro; Ishimaru, Naozumi

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is now the leading cause of death in Japan. A rapid increase in cancer mortality is expected as Japan is facing a super-aged society. Many causes of cancer are known to be closely linked to life style factors, such as smoking, drinking, and diet. The oral environment is known to be involved in the pathogenesis and development of various diseases such as bronchitis, pneumonia, diabetes, heart disease, and dementia. Because the oral cavity acts as the bodily entrance for air and food, it is constantly exposed to foreign substances, including bacteria and viruses. A large number of bacteria are endemic to the oral cavity, and indigenous oral flora act to prevent the settlement of foreign bacteria. The oral environment is influenced by local factors, including dental plaque, tartar, teeth alignment, occlusion, an incompatible prosthesis, and bad lifestyle habits, and systemic factors, including smoking, consumption of alcohol, irregular lifestyle and eating habits, obesity, stress, hormones, and heredity. It has recently been revealed that the oral environment is associated with cancer. In particular, commensal bacteria in the oral cavity are involved in the development of cancer. Moreover, Candida, human papilloma virus and Epstein-Barr virus as well as commensal bacteria have been reported to be associated with the pathogenesis of cancer. In this review, we introduce recent findings of the correlation between the oral environment and cancer.

  9. Oral contraceptives in migraine.

    PubMed

    Allais, Gianni; Gabellari, Ilaria Castagnoli; De Lorenzo, Cristina; Mana, Ornella; Benedetto, Chiara

    2009-03-01

    Combined oral contraceptives are a safe and highly effective method of birth control, but they can also raise problems of clinical tolerability and/or safety in migraine patients. It is now commonly accepted that, in migraine with aura, the use of combined oral contraceptives is always contraindicated, and that their intake must also be suspended by patients suffering from migraine without aura if aura symptoms appear. The newest combined oral contraceptive formulations are generally well tolerated in migraine without aura, and the majority of migraine without aura sufferers do not show any problems with their use; nevertheless, the last International Classification of Headache Disorders identifies at least two entities evidently related to the use of combined oral contraceptives: exogenous hormone-induced headache and estrogen-withdrawal headache. As regards the safety, even if both migraine and combined oral contraceptive intake are associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke, migraine without aura per se is not a contraindication for combined oral contraceptive use. Other risk factors (tobacco use, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity and diabetes) must be carefully considered when prescribing combined oral contraceptives in migraine without aura patients, in particular in women aged over 35 years. Furthermore, the exclusion of a hereditary thrombophilia and of alterations of coagulative parameters should precede any decision of combined oral contraceptive prescription in migraine patients.

  10. Oral Transliterating. PEPNet Tipsheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troiano, Claire A.

    2010-01-01

    An oral transliterator provides communication access to a person who is deaf or hard of hearing and who uses speechreading and speaking as a means of communicating. The oral transliterator, positioned in front of the speechreader, inaudibly repeats the spoken message, making it as speechreadable as possible. This is called Expressive Oral…

  11. ORAL AMELANOTIC MELANOMA

    PubMed Central

    Adisa, A.O.; Olawole, W.O.; Sigbeku, O.F.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant melanomas of the mucosal regions of the head and neck are extremely rare neoplasms accounting for less than 1% of all melanomas. Approximately half of all head and neck melanomas occur in the oral cavity. Less than 2% of all melanomas lack pigmentation, in the oral mucosa however, up to 75% of cases are amelanotic. No etiologic factors or risk factors have been recognized for oral melanomas. Some authors have suggested that oral habits and selfmedication may be of etiological significance. Oral melanoma is rare but it is relatively frequent in countries like Japan, Uganda, and India. It is rarely identified under the age of 20 years. In Australia where cutaneous melanomas are relatively common primary melanoma of the oral mucosa is rare. The surface architecture of oral melanomas ranges from macular to ulcerated and nodular. The lesion is said to be asymptomatic in the early stages but may become ulcerated and painful in advanced lesions. The diagnosis of amelanotic melanoma is more difficult than that of pigmented lesions. The neoplasm consists of spindle-shaped cells with many mitotic figures and no cytoplasmic melanin pigmentation. Immunohistochemistry using S-100, HMB-45, Melan-A and MART-1 will help in establishing the correct diagnosis. Radical surgery with ample margins and adjuvant chemotherapy are appropriate management protocol for malignant melanoma. Oral melanoma is associated with poor prognosis but its amelanotic variant has even worse prognosis because it exhibits a more aggressive biology and because of difficulty in diagnosis which leads to delayed treatment. PMID:25161399

  12. Oral surgery. Basic techniques.

    PubMed

    Ross, D L; Goldstein, G S

    1986-09-01

    Some of the clinical problems most frequently seen in veterinary dentistry and their surgical solutions are discussed. Extraction of teeth, surgical repositioning of teeth, tooth transplant, oral abscesses of tooth origin, impaction of teeth, repair of maxillary canine oronasal fistula, and simple techniques for oral wiring are among the issues considered.

  13. Genomics of oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Margaret J

    2003-01-01

    Advances in bacterial genetics came with the discovery of the genetic code, followed by the development of recombinant DNA technologies. Now the field is undergoing a new revolution because of investigators' ability to sequence and assemble complete bacterial genomes. Over 200 genome projects have been completed or are in progress, and the oral microbiology research community has benefited through projects for oral bacteria and their non-oral-pathogen relatives. This review describes features of several oral bacterial genomes, and emphasizes the themes of species relationships, comparative genomics, and lateral gene transfer. Genomics is having a broad impact on basic research in microbial pathogenesis, and will lead to new approaches in clinical research and therapeutics. The oral microbiota is a unique community especially suited for new challenges to sequence the metagenomes of microbial consortia, and the genomes of uncultivable bacteria.

  14. Oral contraceptives: current status.

    PubMed

    Burkman, R T

    2001-03-01

    During the past four decades, oral contraceptives have remained a safe and effective method of birth control. Reductions in the estrogen and progestin dosages have significantly decreased the incidence of cardiovascular complications. The association between oral contraceptives and breast cancer appears to be primarily because of detection bias or possibly a promotional effect. Despite the changes in formulation, the problems related to side effects have not been totally solved. Because compliance and successful use is strongly affected by side effects, improvement in this area is probably the biggest challenge faced by developers of oral contraceptives. It is also clear that there are a growing number of significant noncontraceptive benefits that accrue in oral contraceptive users. Unfortunately, many women do not know about these benefits. Thus, one of the issues that providers need to continue to address is how to provide better information about oral contraceptives and contraception in general to patients.

  15. [Oral fluid bacteriocidal activity in complex diagnostics of oral disbiosis].

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, O F; Abramova, E S

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of examination of oral fluid bacteriocidal activity in complex diagnostics of oral mucosa disbiosis was evaluated. Thirty-seven patients were included in complex clinical and laboratory studies. The patients were divided in two groups: main group (30 patients exhibiting various grades of oral mucosa disbiosis) and control group (7 patients with no signs of oral disbiosis). The oral fluid bacteriocidal activity was examined by means of laser flow cytometry. Study results proved oral fluid bacteriocidal activity increase to correlate with the grade of oral mucosa disbiosis thus confirming the usefulness of the method in complex diagnostics of oral disbiosis.

  16. Oral Contraceptive Pill and PCOS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health PCOS: The Oral Contraceptive Pill Posted under Health Guides . ... of oral contraceptive pills for young women with PCOS? Regular and Lighter Periods: Oral contraceptive pills can ...

  17. Literatura Oral Hispanica (Hispanic Oral Literature).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlpine, Dave

    As part of a class in Hispanic Oral Literature, students collected pieces of folklore from various Hispanic residents in the region known as "Siouxland" in Iowa. Consisting of some of the folklore recorded from the residents, this paper includes 18 "cuentos y leyendas" (tales and legends), 48 "refranes" (proverbs), 17…

  18. Examining the association between oral health and oral HPV infection.

    PubMed

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M; Ross, Michael Wallis; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2013-09-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of 40% to 80% of oropharyngeal cancers; yet, no published study has examined the role of oral health in oral HPV infection, either independently or in conjunction with other risk factors. This study examined the relation between oral health and oral HPV infection and the interactive effects of oral health, smoking, and oral sex on oral HPV infection. Our analyses comprised 3,439 participants ages 30 to 69 years for whom data on oral HPV and oral health were available from the nationally representative 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results showed that higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with four measures of oral health, including self-rated oral health as poor-to-fair [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-1.95], indicated the possibility of gum disease (PR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13-2.01), reported use of mouthwash to treat dental problems in the past week (PR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.52), and higher number of teeth lost (Ptrend = 0.035). In multivariable logistic regression models, oral HPV infection had a statistically significant association with self-rated overall oral health (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15-2.09), independent of smoking and oral sex. In conclusion, poor oral health was an independent risk factor of oral HPV infection, irrespective of smoking and oral sex practices. Public health interventions may aim to promote oral hygiene and oral health as an additional measure to prevent HPV-related oral cancers.

  19. Oral availability of bilastine.

    PubMed

    Sádaba, B; Gómez-Guiu, A; Azanza, J R; Ortega, I; Valiente, R

    2013-05-01

    Bilastine (Bilaxten™) is a novel non-sedating H1 receptor antagonist (antihistamine) developed in the dosage form of oral tablets and indicated for the treatment of allergic rhinitis (seasonal and perennial) and urticaria. Several clinical trials have been performed in order to determine the efficacy and safety of bilastine. The aim of this trial was to study the absolute oral bioavailability of bilastine in humans. Twelve male and female adults were recruited into a single centre for a randomized, single-dose, open-label, controlled two-arm crossover study with a minimum 14-day washout period between the two single doses. Two single doses of bilastine were administered: a 20-mg oral tablet and a 10-mg intravenous formulation. Blood and urine samples were collected between 0 and 72 h post each administration. The clinical trial was carried out under quality assurance and quality control systems with standard operating procedures to ensure that the study was conducted and data generated in compliance with the protocol, Good Clinical Practice standards, International Conference on Harmonisation and other applicable regulations. Oral bioavailability of bilastine was 60.67 % with a 90 % parametric confidence interval of 53.79-67.56. The maximum bilastine concentration was measured 1.31 h after oral administration. Pharmacokinetic parameters were similar to those observed in previous studies. Tolerance to treatment was good, with no adverse events related to study medication. The absorption of bilastine after oral administration to healthy subjects was rapid. The absolute oral bioavailability was moderate.

  20. Personality and oral health.

    PubMed

    Thomson, W Murray; Caspi, Avshalom; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E; Broadbent, Jonathan M

    2011-10-01

    We investigated age-26 personality characteristics and age-32 oral health in a prospective study of a complete birth cohort born in Dunedin, New Zealand. Personality was measured using the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ). Oral health was measured using the short-form Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14), a global measure, and dental examinations. Personality profiles were constructed for 916 individuals (50.8% men) using standardized MPQ scores, and multivariate analyses examined their association with oral health. Those reporting 1+ OHIP-14 impacts had higher Negative Emotionality scores (and lower Constraint and Positive Emotionality MPQ superfactor scores) than those who did not. After controlling for gender, clinical status, and the other two MPQ superfactors, those scoring higher on Negative Emotionality had a greater risk of reporting 1+ OHIP-14 impacts, as well as 3+ OHIP-14 impacts and worse-than-average oral health. They also had a greater risk of having lost at least one tooth from caries and of having 3+ decayed surfaces. Personality characteristics appear to shape self-reports of oral health. Personality is also a risk factor for clinical disease status, at least with respect to dental caries and its sequelae. Because the attitudes and values tapped into by personality tests can be altered by brief cognitive interventions, those might be useful in preventive dentistry. © 2011 Eur J Oral Sci.

  1. Oral health and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Pla, G W

    1994-03-01

    The relationships between oral health conditions, dietary practices and nutritional status, and general health status in the older American are complex, with many interrelating factors. Just as inadequate nutrition can affect oral health, poor oral health status affects food choices and, thus, nutritional status. It is clearly essential that the primary care practitioner and/or screening health professionals always include an evaluation of oral status in assessment of an elderly person. Effective care for the elderly dental patient requires knowledge about the disease of aging and the impact of those diseases on oral health and nutrition, pharmacology and drug interactions and their impact on oral health status, the biology of aging including sensory changes, the relationship of general medicine and systemic diseases, and psychology and sociology. The attitudes of empathy and understanding, caring and compassion, respect and a positive attitude toward the older patient, and flexibility in treatment planning are also critical elements. The interdisciplinary team of physicians, nurses, nutrition professionals, dentists, and social service professionals must all work together to ensure that good oral health status and adequate nutrition are maintained in older Americans. Recognizing and treating oral health and nutrition problems are important in improving the health and quality of life for the elderly population. Research that can provide more answers to health care problems in this growing group; educating professionals with respect to the relationships between oral health and nutrition; and public policy changes with regard to provision and funding of nutrition services, especially when provided by registered and/or licensed nutrition professionals, contribute to improving the health and quality of life for elders.

  2. Hyperkalemic distal renal tubular acidosis caused by immunosuppressant treatment with tacrolimus in a liver transplant patient: case report.

    PubMed

    Riveiro-Barciela, M; Campos-Varela, I; Tovar, J L; Vargas, V; Simón-Talero, M; Ventura-Cots, M; Crespo, M; Bilbao, I; Castells, L

    2011-12-01

    Nephrotoxicity is one of the most common side effects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy with calcineurin inhibitors. We describe a case of distal renal tubular acidosis secondary to tacrolimus administration. A 43-year-old man with end-stage liver disease due to hepatitis C and B virus infections and alcoholic cirrhosis received a liver transplantation under immunosuppressive treatment with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. In the postoperative period, the patient developed hyperkalemic hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis, with a normal serum anion gap and a positive urinary anion gap, suggesting distal renal tubular acidosis. We excluded other causes of hyperkalemia. Administration of intravenous bicarbonate, loop diuretics, and oral resin exchanger corrected the acidosis and potassium levels. Distal renal tubular acidosis is one of several types of nephrotoxicity induced by tacrolimus treatment, resulting from inhibition of potassium secretion in the collecting duct. Treatment to correct the acidosis and hyperkalemia should be promptly initiated, and the tacrolimus dose adjusted when possible.

  3. Behçet's syndrome in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Martineau, Marcus; Haskard, Dorian O; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Behçet's syndrome (BS), a systemic inflammatory disease characterized by oral and genital ulceration, eye inflammation and arthritis, usually presents in the third and fourth decades of life, but is rare in pregnancy. BS is not usually associated with a detrimental effect on pregnancy outcome. In most women BS is reported to improve in pregnancy, although it may not always follow a similar course in successive pregnancies and it is not possible to predict the course of BS in a particular pregnancy. Many of the drug therapies used to treat BS are safe to use in pregnancy and in the breastfeeding mother. These include corticosteroids, azathioprine, calcineurin inhibitors and probably colchicine. Experience with use of biologics in pregnancy is increasing. Drugs used in the management of BS that should be avoided in women planning a pregnancy include methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil, thalidomide, cyclophosphamide and chlorambucil. PMID:27582833

  4. [Schizophrenia and oral health].

    PubMed

    Moullan, M; Denis, F

    2017-04-01

    Mental health is an essential component of general health. Schizophrenia is a severe and chronic mental illness that affects higher brain functions. It is characterized by the presence of a mental dissociation, dampened or inappropriate affects, hallucinations and delirium. Schizophrenia has also a negative impact on oral health. As schizophrenia affects 1% of the population, every practitioner concerned with oral sphere will be confronted one day or another with a patient suffering from this disease. It is therefore important to acquire essential notions. The aim of our work was to make an update about factors that may affect oral health in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  6. Etiology of oral habits.

    PubMed

    Bayardo, R E; Mejia, J J; Orozco, S; Montoya, K

    1996-01-01

    The pedodontic admission histories of 1600 Mexican children were analyzed, to determine general epidemiologic factors or oral habits, as well as their relationship with identifiable biopsychosociologic factors. Fifty-six percent of the children gave evidence of an oral habit, with significant predisposition among female patients, single children, subjects in poor physical health (particularly from allergies), as well as children with histories of chronic health problems. Oral habits should be considered a major health hazard because of their high incidence. Successful treatment requires a multidisciplinary approach to the basic cause of the problem.

  7. Probiotics and Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Haukioja, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The number of products containing probiotics, viable bacteria with proven health benefits, entering the market is increasing. Traditionally, probiotics have been associated with gut health, and most clinical interest has been focused on their use for prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal infections and diseases; however, during the last decade several investigators have also suggested the use of probiotics for oral health purposes. The aim of this review is to examine potential mechanisms of probiotic bacteria in the oral cavity and summarize observed effects of probiotics with respect to oral health. The review focuses on probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, genera that are most used in various probiotic products. PMID:20613927

  8. Does oral experience terminate ingestion?

    PubMed

    Swithers, S E; Hall, W G

    1994-10-01

    Using data from studies of ingestive behavior in developing rat pups we demonstrate how oral experience can contribute to the termination of ingestion. In rat pups, repeated oral stimulation with sweet solutions causes a decline in oral responsiveness. The diminished responsiveness is specific to the flavor of the stimulus experienced orally and can persist for several hours. We suggest that this experience-based decrement in responsiveness is best considered "oral habituation" and that oral habituation largely accounts for the onset of satiety. Post-ingestive feedback signals may have their influence through the oral habituation process or act in the context of oral habituation. Oral habituation is also shown to depend on the pattern of stimulus presentation, a phenomenon that adds considerable complexity to assessing the contributions of oral experience to satiety. The concept of oral habituation may be useful in understanding the immediate control of ingestion and the moment-to-moment expression of ingestive behavior in adult animals.

  9. Oral Hypersensitivity Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... of substances. The most common causes are food, food additives, drugs, oral hygiene products, and dental materials. Q: Are there any specific foods that are more commonly implicated in intraoral hypersensitivity ...

  10. Oral compound nevus.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Lyzete Berriel; Consalaro, Alberto; da Silva Santos, Paulo Sérgio; da Silva Sampieri, Marcelo Bonifácio; Tinoco-Araújo, José Endrigo

    2014-02-18

    The melanocytic nevus is a benign and focal proliferation of nevus cells that can be congenital or acquired. Intraoral lesions are uncommon, and the etiology and pathogenesis are poorly understood. The occurrence rate of oral compound nevus is about 5.9% to 16.5% of all oral melanocytic nevi. A 22-year-old male patient presented with a dark brown macule on the buccal mucosa of the maxilla in the region of tooth 26. The lesion was elliptical, 0.7 x 0.5 cm, well circumscribed, asymptomatic, and the evolution time was unknown. An excisional biopsy was performed and microscopic analysis revealed nests of nevus cells in the epithelium and underlying connective tissue that were compatible with melanocytic compound nevus. Owing to the clinical similarity between oral melanocytic nevus and oral melanoma, a histopathological analysis is mandatory for definitive diagnosis.

  11. Massive Oral Decoding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janicke, Eugene M.

    1981-01-01

    An intensive reading clinic used the Massive Oral Decoding (MOD) technique to help 10 reading disabled students (grades 7 and 8) increase independent reading skills. MOD stresses large amounts of reading practice at the student's independent level. (CL)

  12. Oral manifestations of menopause.

    PubMed

    Zachariasen, R D

    1993-12-01

    Menopause is a normal developmental stage in a woman's life, marking the permanent cessation of menstruation. It is the result of irreversible changes in the hormonal and reproductive functions of the ovaries. Menopause is accompanied by a number of characteristic physical changes; some of which occur in the oral cavity. The two most common oral manifestations of menopause are: oral discomfort, including pain, a burning sensation, dryness, and altered taste perception; and alveolar bone loss as a result of osteoporosis. Although menopause has been recognized for centuries, it has only been recently that the study of menopause has gained much attention. The purpose of this article is to review the basic physiology of menopause, and to present the etiology of the oral manifestations associated with menopause.

  13. Oral contraceptives and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Friedman, G D

    1977-01-01

    A variety of studies have noted that the use of oral contraceptives generally leads to mild increases in blood pressure which are usually reversible when the medication is discontinued. Representative data from the Walnut Creek Contraceptive Drug Study and the Royal College of General Practitioners Study concerning the magnitude of excess risk and relation to duration of use and pull content are shown. Preliminary data from women, aged 25-34 years, taking multiphasic health checkups in Oakland and San Francisco, suggest that black as well as white women are susceptible to this side effect of oral contraceptives. A method is given for estimating the proportion of hypertensives among a population of young women that is attributable to oral contraceptive use. Although the risk of pull-induced hypertension is small for the average user, oral contraceptives appear to be an important identifiable cause of hypertension in samples of women studied.

  14. Budesonide Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Budesonide is used to prevent difficulty breathing, chest tightness, wheezing, and coughing caused by asthma. Budesonide powder for oral inhalation (Pulmicort Flexhaler) is used in adults and children 6 ...

  15. [Oral precancer and cancer].

    PubMed

    López-López, José; Omaña-Cepeda, Carlos; Jané-Salas, Enric

    2015-11-06

    We reviewed the concept of oral precancerous lesions, oral cancer, and the possibility of early diagnosis. With the keywords: premalignant oral lesions prevention, a search was performed over the past 10 years. Also clinical trials are searched from January 2011 until today with the keywords: oral cancer prevention AND dentistry. It is emphasized that there can be no significant changes related to the concept of precancerous lesions and cancer, and those relating to the early diagnosis. Despite the numerous described methods of screening, biopsy remains the most useful test, and therefore it is essential, mainly if we consider the new possibilities of molecular studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Oral Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the disease drawn from literally hundreds of sources. Current Stories OCF Support Group A FREE and anonymous patient / survivor discussion forum is open to the public, where those currently fighting oral ...

  17. Mometasone Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... other medical conditions, such as asthma, arthritis, or eczema (a skin disease), they may worsen when your oral steroid dose is decreased. Tell your doctor if this happens or if you experience any ...

  18. Successful treatment of severe myasthenia gravis developed after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with plasma exchange and rituximab.

    PubMed

    Unal, Sule; Sag, Erdal; Kuskonmaz, Baris; Kesici, Selman; Bayrakci, Benan; Ayvaz, Deniz C; Tezcan, Ilhan; Yalnızoglu, Dilek; Uckan, Duygu

    2014-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis is among the rare complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and is usually associated with chronic GVHD. Herein, we report a 2-year and 10 months of age female with Griscelli syndrome, who developed severe myasthenia gravis at post-transplant +22nd month and required respiratory support with mechanical ventilation. She was unresponsive to cyclosporine A, methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin, and mycophenolate mofetil and the symptoms could only be controlled after plasma exchange and subsequent use of rituximab, in addition to cyclosporine A and mycophenolate mofetil maintenance. She is currently asymptomatic on the 6th month of follow-up.

  19. Oral contraception and sexuality.

    PubMed

    Dennerstein, L; Burrows, G

    1976-05-22

    A search of the literature has been carried out to determined how oral contraceptives affect sexuality in women. Some studies featured a high incidence of loss of libido. This could perhaps be attributed to preparations containing progestational compounds. However, no adequate double-blind trial has confirmed this observation. Some psychological and pharmacological aspects of contraceptions are discussed. More research is needed to ascertain why women often lose their sexual interest when taking oral contraceptives.

  20. Maintaining women's oral health.

    PubMed

    McCann, A L; Bonci, L

    2001-07-01

    Women must adopt health-promoting strategies for both general health and the oral cavity, because the health of a woman's body and oral cavity are bidirectional. For general health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should actively advise women to minimize alcohol use, abstain from or cease smoking, stay physically active, and choose the right foods to nourish both the body and mind. For oral health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should advise women on how to prevent or control oral infections, particularly dental caries and periodontal diseases. Specifically, women need to know how to remove plaque from the teeth mechanically, use appropriate chemotherapeutic agents and dentifrices, use oral irrigation, and control halitosis. Dental practitioners also need to stress the importance of regular maintenance visits for disease prevention. Adolescent women are more prone to gingivitis and aphthous ulcers when they begin their menstrual cycles and need advice about cessation of tobacco use, mouth protection during athletic activities, cleaning orthodontic appliances, developing good dietary habits, and avoiding eating disorders. Women in early to middle adulthood may be pregnant or using oral contraceptives with concomitant changes in oral tissues. Dental practitioners need to advise them how to take care of the oral cavity during these changes and how to promote the health of their infants, including good nutrition. Older women experience the onset of menopause and increased vulnerability to osteoporosis. They may also experience xerostomia and burning mouth syndrome. Dental practitioners need to help women alleviate these symptoms and encourage them to continue good infection control and diet practices.

  1. Oral and esophageal disorders.

    PubMed

    Noyer, C M; Simon, D

    1997-06-01

    This article focused on the approach to oral and esophageal disorders in patients with AIDS. Most of these disorders respond to various therapeutic regimens. Some of the oral complications can be prevented with dental prophylaxis, whereas recurrent esophageal disease in some patients may require long-term suppressive therapy. As patients with AIDS live longer with lower CD4 counts, gastroenterologists need to become familiar with the approach to and management of the more common lesions of the mouth and esophagus.

  2. Oral pigmentation: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sreeja, C.; Ramakrishnan, K.; Vijayalakshmi, D.; Devi, M.; Aesha, I.; Vijayabanu, B.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations. PMID:26538887

  3. Oral pigmentation: A review.

    PubMed

    Sreeja, C; Ramakrishnan, K; Vijayalakshmi, D; Devi, M; Aesha, I; Vijayabanu, B

    2015-08-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations.

  4. Oral vs. salivary diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Joana; Corby, Patricia M.; Barber, Cheryl A.; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The field of "salivary diagnostics" includes studies utilizing samples obtained from a variety of sources within the oral cavity. These samples include; whole unstimulated saliva, stimulated whole saliva, duct saliva collected directly from the parotid, submandibular/sublingual glands or minor salivary glands, swabs of the buccal mucosa, tongue or tonsils, and gingival crevicular fluid. Many publications state "we collected saliva from subjects" without fully describing the process or source of the oral fluid. Factors that need to be documented in any study include the time of day of the collection, the method used to stimulate and collect the fluid, and how much fluid is being collected and for how long. The handling of the oral fluid during and post-collection is also critical and may include addition of protease or nuclease inhibitors, centrifugation, and cold or frozen storage prior to assay. In an effort to create a standard protocol for determining a biomarker's origin we carried out a pilot study collecting oral fluid from 5 different sites in the mouth and monitoring the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines detected using MesoScaleDiscovery (MSD) electrochemiluminesence assays. Our data suggested that 3 of the cytokines are primarily derived from the submandibular gland, while 7 of the cytokines come from a source other than the major salivary glands such as the minor salivary glands or cells in the oral mucosae. Here we review the literature on monitoring biomarkers in oral samples and stress the need for determining the blood/saliva ratio when a quantitative determination is needed and suggest that the term oral diagnostic be used if the source of an analyte in the oral cavity is unknown.

  5. Oral and systemic photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Andrew C; Damian, Diona L; Halliday, Gary M

    2014-01-01

    Photoprotection can be provided not only by ultraviolet (UV) blockers but also by oral substances. Epidemiologically identified associations between foods and skin cancer and interventional experiments have discovered mechanisms of UV skin damage. These approaches have identified oral substances that are photoprotective in humans. UV inhibits adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production causing an energy crisis, which prevents optimal skin immunity and DNA repair. Enhancing ATP production with oral nicotinamide protects from UV immunosuppression, enhances DNA repair and reduces skin cancer in humans. Reactive oxygen species also contribute to photodamage. Nontoxic substances consumed in the diet, or available as oral supplements, can protect the skin by multiple potential mechanisms. These substances include polyphenols in fruit, vegetables, wine, tea and caffeine-containing foods. UV-induced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) contributes to photodamage. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and food substances reduce production of this lipid mediator. Fish oils are photoprotective, at least partially by reducing PGE2 . Orally consumed substances, either in the diet or as supplements, can influence cutaneous responses to UV. A current research goal is to develop an oral supplement that could be used in conjunction with other sun protective strategies in order to provide improved protection from sunlight.

  6. Oral application of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Georgiades, J A; Fleischmann, W R

    1996-01-01

    A number of different laboratories reported on studies with orally administered interferons and cytokines. Their observations extend previous observations which showed that orally administered interferons and cytokines can exert both local and systemic effects. As difficult as it may be to understand how orally administered interferons and cytokines may exert both effects, the increasing number of laboratories that demonstrate biological effects with orally administered cytokines suggests that serious consideration be given to the possibility that orally administered interferons and cytokines can indeed exert effects. They also raise the possibility that these effects may have biological relevance for the treatment of human disease. Moreover, they may indicate that the nasal/oral region is a window on the environment. It is most important, however, to assure that these experiments are performed with special care to avoid presenting preliminary data that is not properly controlled. It is essential to carry out these studies with sufficient animals or patients to ascertain their significance; and to plan the studies as double-blind evaluations to avoid misinterpretations when subjective tests are used. Nevertheless, the overall data presented give one the impression of an area that should be pursued.

  7. Oral somatosensory awareness.

    PubMed

    Haggard, Patrick; de Boer, Lieke

    2014-11-01

    Oral somatosensory awareness refers to the somatic sensations arising within the mouth, and to the information these sensations provide about the state and structure of the mouth itself, and objects in the mouth. Because the oral tissues have a strong somatosensory innervation, they are the locus of some of our most intense and vivid bodily experiences. The salient pain of toothache, or the habit of running one's tongue over one's teeth when someone mentions "dentist", provide two very different indications of the power of oral somatosensory awareness in human experience and behaviour. This paper aims to review the origins and structure of oral somatosensory awareness, focussing on quantitative, mechanistic studies in humans. We first extend a model of levels of bodily awareness to the specific case of the mouth. We then briefly summarise the sensory innervation of oral tissues, and their projections in the brain. We next describe how these peripheral inputs give rise to perceptions of objects in the mouth, such as foods, liquids and oral devices, and also of the mouth tissues themselves. Finally, we consider the concept of a conscious mouth image, and the somatosensory basis of "mouth feel". The theoretical framework outlined in this paper is intended to facilitate scientific studies of this important site of human experience. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers. PMID:22792106

  9. [Treatment of lupus nephritis].

    PubMed

    Novak, Srdan

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 50% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus will develop lupus nephritis. Signs of renal involvement such as proteinuria > or = 0.5 g/24 h especially with glomerular hematuria and/or cellular casts should be an indication for biopsy. Goals of immunosuppressive treatment in lupus nephritis is remission with avoidance of treatment-re- lated harms. Initial treatment for patients with class III (+/- V) and class IV (+/- V) LN are intravenous cyclophosphamide (total dose 3 g over 3 months) or mycophenolate mofetil (or mycophenolic acid) in target dose of 3 g/day for 6 months, always in combination with glucocorticoids, wihile in class V, mycophenolate mofetil in combination with glucocorticoids is recommended. In patients improving after initial treatment, mycophenolate mofetil at lower doses (2 g/day) or azatioprine (2 mg/kg/day), both in combination with low dose prednisone for at least 3 years are recommended. In resistant and relapse cases switch from cyclophosphamide to mycophenolate mofetil, or vice versa, or rituximab is recommended.

  10. HPV-associated oral warts.

    PubMed

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Wood, N H; Marnewick, J C; Meyerov, R; Lemmer, J

    2011-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is strictly epitheliotropic, infecting stratified squamous cutaneous and mucosal epithelial cells. Oral HPV infection may be subclinical or putatively associated with benign or malignant oral neoplasms. The benign HPV-associated oral lesions, focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck disease), oral squamous cell papilloma, oral verruca vulgaris (common wart) and oral condyloma acuminatum, are collectively referred to as oral warts. Oral warts are usually asymptomatic, may be persistent or uncommonly, may regress spontaneously. HPV-associated oral warts have a prevalence of 0.5% in the general population, occur in up to 5% of HIV-seropositive subjects, and in up to 23% of HIV-seropositive subjects on highly active antiretroviral therapy. This paper is a clinico-pathological review of HPV-associated oral warts.

  11. The Canine Oral Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Klein, Erin A.; Thompson, Emily C.; Blanton, Jessica M.; Chen, Tsute; Milella, Lisa; Buckley, Catherine M. F.; Davis, Ian J.; Bennett, Marie-Lousie; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the bacterial composition of the canine oral microbiome is of interest for two primary reasons. First, while the human oral microbiome has been well studied using molecular techniques, the oral microbiomes of other mammals have not been studied in equal depth using culture independent methods. This study allows a comparison of the number of bacterial taxa, based on 16S rRNA-gene sequence comparison, shared between humans and dogs, two divergent mammalian species. Second, canine oral bacteria are of interest to veterinary and human medical communities for understanding their roles in health and infectious diseases. The bacteria involved are mostly unnamed and not linked by 16S rRNA-gene sequence identity to a taxonomic scheme. This manuscript describes the analysis of 5,958 16S rRNA-gene sequences from 65 clone libraries. Full length 16S rRNA reference sequences have been obtained for 353 canine bacterial taxa, which were placed in 14 bacterial phyla, 23 classes, 37 orders, 66 families, and 148 genera. Eighty percent of the taxa are currently unnamed. The bacterial taxa identified in dogs are markedly different from those of humans with only 16.4% of oral taxa are shared between dogs and humans based on a 98.5% 16S rRNA sequence similarity cutoff. This indicates that there is a large divergence in the bacteria comprising the oral microbiomes of divergent mammalian species. The historic practice of identifying animal associated bacteria based on phenotypic similarities to human bacteria is generally invalid. This report describes the diversity of the canine oral microbiome and provides a provisional 16S rRNA based taxonomic scheme for naming and identifying unnamed canine bacterial taxa. PMID:22558330

  12. Oral Insulin Reloaded

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Plum-Mörschel, Leona

    2014-01-01

    Optimal coverage of insulin needs is the paramount aim of insulin replacement therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. To apply insulin without breaking the skin barrier by a needle and/or to allow a more physiological provision of insulin are the main reasons triggering the continuous search for alternative routes of insulin administration. Despite numerous attempts over the past 9 decades to develop an insulin pill, no insulin for oral dosing is commercially available. By way of a structured approach, we aim to provide a systematic update on the most recent developments toward an orally available insulin formulation with a clear focus on data from clinical-experimental and clinical studies. Thirteen companies that claim to be working on oral insulin formulations were identified. However, only 6 of these companies published new clinical trial results within the past 5 years. Interestingly, these clinical data reports make up a mere 4% of the considerably high total number of publications on the development of oral insulin formulations within this time period. While this picture clearly reflects the rising research interest in orally bioavailable insulin formulations, it also highlights the fact that the lion’s share of research efforts is still allocated to the preclinical stages. PMID:24876606

  13. The Oral Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Arweiler, Nicole B; Netuschil, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    The oral microbiota represents an important part of the human microbiota, and includes several hundred to several thousand diverse species. It is a normal part of the oral cavity and has an important function to protect against colonization of extrinsic bacteria which could affect systemic health. On the other hand, the most common oral diseases caries, gingivitis and periodontitis are based on microorganisms. While (medical) research focused on the planktonic phase of bacteria over the last 100 years, it is nowadays generally known, that oral microorganisms are organised as biofilms. On any non-shedding surfaces of the oral cavity dental plaque starts to form, which meets all criteria for a microbial biofilm and is subject to the so-called succession. When the sensitive ecosystem turns out of balance - either by overload or weak immune system - it becomes a challenge for local or systemic health. Therefore, the most common strategy and the golden standard for the prevention of caries, gingivitis and periodontitis is the mechanical removal of this biofilms from teeth, restorations or dental prosthesis by regular toothbrushing.

  14. Oral varix: a review.

    PubMed

    Lazos, Jerónimo P; Piemonte, Eduardo D; Panico, René L

    2015-06-01

    Ageing produces several changes on the oral cavity, and oral varix (OV) is among the most common, and they are related with some medical diseases; however, this association is not clear. The aim of this article is to offer a review of OV, regarding aetiology, clinical and histological features, associated factors, treatment and its clinical significance. Except for a higher incidence of OV in elder individuals, there is limited evidence that supports its relationship with medical conditions such us cardiovascular diseases or portal hypertension. Also, there is no consensus regarding its pathogenesis, but the hemodynamic theory embodies the most comprehensive approach. The high prevalence in elderly people stresses the need for regular oral examination, but more detailed studies regarding OV in relation to systemic diseases are needed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. [MICROFLORA AND ORAL DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Khavkin, A I; Ippolitov, Y A; Aleshina, E O; Komarova O N

    2015-01-01

    Acid-producing microorganisms are base etiological agents of lesions of tooth enamel and destruction of dentin. The process start by specific microflora of tooth deposit--Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacteria and Actinomycetis viscosus which ferment food carbogydrate to form acids. High titre of them in oral cavity may be considered like a marker of carbohydrate food. But the pathogenic bacteria don't have aggression to host organism until they will have virulent factors which help to get over protection of host organism. At the same time, microflora of oral cavity is involved to form pellicula. Pellicula is a biofilm which to protect tooth enamel and dentin. Understanding relationships between safety factors of host and pathogenic microflora of oral cavity will give to create effective methods of prevention and treatment.

  16. Oral contraceptives: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Derman, R

    1989-09-01

    Cardiovascular risks attributable to oral contraceptive use may now be subdivided into those that appear to be secondary to the estrogen component, i.e., venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and those linked to the progestin component, i.e., small vessel disease including myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident. It appears that venous risk is attributable to subtle changes in clotting factors, while arterial risk may be secondary to changes in glucose and lipid metabolism. In order to determine which women are at greatest risk from oral contraceptive use, Spellacy et al. has developed a risk scoring form that aids in the screening process. After excluding women with an absolute contraindication to pill use, women at greatest risk for cardiovascular disease related to oral contraceptive use are those with a family history of hyperlipidemia, gestational or overt diabetics, hypertensives, and smokers over the age of 35. The gradual reduction by manufacturers of the steroid content of oral contraceptives appears to have lessened the incidence of adverse effects. Our current knowledge of risk factors permits the clinician to reduce exposure to oral contraceptive-related mortality by as much as 86 per cent. As we continue to search for ways to reduce risk among oral contraceptive users, it is important to note that more than 25 per cent of women are still taking formulations containing 50 micrograms of estrogen. It becomes the responsibility of the practicing physician to "step-down" these patients to lower-dose preparations such as the multiphasics. Such preparations also represent optimal therapy for first-time pill users.

  17. Oral and perioral candidosis.

    PubMed

    Fotos, P G; Ray, T L

    1994-06-01

    The following article has been assembled from the current literature and our clinical experience to provide a comprehensive review of oral and perioral candidal infections. A brief review of the epidemiology and pathogenesis is followed by a description of the various clinical signs and symptoms associated with oral candidosis. Methods useful in arriving at a diagnosis of candidal infection as well as a number of effective therapeutic modalities are discussed. In addition, special considerations relating to the treatment of patients with other concurrent mucosal diseases and long-term antifungal maintenance regimes are addressed.

  18. Oral Myiasis : Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ramli, Roszalina; Abd Rahman, Roslan

    2002-01-01

    Myiasis occurs when living tissues of mammals are invaded by eggs or larvae of flies, mainly from the order of Diptera. Most of the previousty reported cases are in the tropics and they were usually associated with inadequate personal hygiene, sometimes with poor manual dexterity. This report describes two cases of oral myiasis in cerebral palsy patients in Seremban General Hospital, Malaysia. This article also discusses the therapeutic property of maggots and highlights the importance of oral health care in the special needs patients. PMID:22844224

  19. Per-oral cholangioscopy

    PubMed Central

    Monga, Amitabh; Ramchandani, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    Direct endoscopic views of bile duct have been described in literature since the 1970s. Since then rapid strides have been made with the advent of technologically advanced systems with better image quality and maneuverability. The single operator semi-disposable per-oral cholangioscope and other novel methods such as the cholangioscopy access balloon are likely to revolutionize this field. Even though cholangioscopy is currently used primarily for characterization of indeterminate strictures and management of large bile duct stones, the diagnostic and therapeutic indications are likely to expand in future. The following is an overview of the currently available per-oral cholangioscopy equipments, indications for use and future directions. PMID:21776429

  20. Oral myiasis in children.

    PubMed

    Reddy, M H Raghunath; Das, Nagarajappa; Vivekananda, M R

    2012-04-01

    Oral myiasis is a rare condition in humans and is associated with poor oral hygiene, severe halitosis, mouth breathing during sleep, mental handicap, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, anterior open bite, incompetent lips, and other conditions. In this report, a 14 year-old boy who had an orofacial trauma in the maxillary dentoalveolar region,which was neglected, has been described. There was a deep lacerated wound on the upper vestibule which was infected and maggots were found on the same wound. The clinical features, management, treatment are discussed and relevant literature is reviewed.

  1. [Oral hygiene (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Gülzow, H J

    1978-12-08

    Appropriate oral hygiene is an essential and effective prophylactic measure against caries and periodontal disease. The most important aids for this purpose are suitable multi-tufted short-headed tooth brushes with suitable plastic bristles and suitable tooth-pastes. By means of a rational technique, as for instance the rotation method, teeth and gum margin should be systematically cleaned for at least three minutes if at all possible after every meal. A certain massage effect is exerted on the gingivae at the same time. All other aids to oral hygiene such as toothpicks, dental floss, interdental stimulators, mouthwashes etc. are only additional aids which certainly have their special indications.

  2. Oral myiasis in children

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, M. H. Raghunath; Das, Nagarajappa; Vivekananda, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    Oral myiasis is a rare condition in humans and is associated with poor oral hygiene, severe halitosis, mouth breathing during sleep, mental handicap, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, anterior open bite, incompetent lips, and other conditions. In this report, a 14 year-old boy who had an orofacial trauma in the maxillary dentoalveolar region,which was neglected, has been described. There was a deep lacerated wound on the upper vestibule which was infected and maggots were found on the same wound. The clinical features, management, treatment are discussed and relevant literature is reviewed. PMID:22629058

  3. [Oral contraceptives (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kopera, H

    1976-11-26

    A short review of the endocrinological basis of reproduction in the female is followed by a critical survey of the oral contraceptive methods in current use. The composition of the preparations, their use, their biological and use-effectiveness and mode of action are discussed.The importance is emphasized of complying with the basic principles of drug testing in the evaluation of effects of oral contraceptiveson health. Other effects than merely the contraceptive actions of these preparations are described in detail, including not only the undesirable, frequently neglected, yet very important beneficial effects on the drug-users, their children and families.

  4. Maintaining oral health after stroke.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Hazel

    Oral care is essential to maintain oral health and prevent complications such as tooth loss, gingivitis and periodontitis. Poor oral hygiene in dependent, hospitalised patients could lead to serious complications such as chest infection, pneumonia, poor nutritional intake and increased length of hospital stay. Patients who have had a stroke may have physical and cognitive problems that make them dependent on others for their personal care, including oral care. It is essential that nurses and carers understand why maintaining oral hygiene is important following stroke and the consequences of poor oral care.

  5. Oral inflammation in small animals.

    PubMed

    Lommer, Milinda J

    2013-05-01

    The oral cavity can be affected by a wide variety of disorders characterized by inflammation of the gingiva and/or oral mucosa. In dogs and cats, differential diagnoses for generalized oral inflammatory disorders include plaque-reactive mucositis, chronic gingivostomatitis, eosinophilic granuloma complex, pemphigus and pemphigoid disorders, erythema multiforme, and systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition, endodontic or periodontal abscesses, infectious conditions, reactive lesions, and neoplastic conditions may initially present with localized or generalized inflammation of the oral mucosa. Determination of the underlying cause of an oral inflammatory condition relies on a thorough history, complete physical and oral examination, and incisional biopsy and histopathologic examination of lesions.

  6. Oral microbiome and oral and gastrointestinal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Chen, Calvin Y; Hayes, Richard B

    2012-03-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates human oral bacteria in the etiology of oral and gastrointestinal cancers. Epidemiological studies consistently report increased risks of these cancers in men and women with periodontal disease or tooth loss, conditions caused by oral bacteria. More than 700 bacterial species inhabit the oral cavity, including at least 11 bacterial phyla and 70 genera. Oral bacteria may activate alcohol and smoking-related carcinogens locally or act systemically, through chronic inflammation. High-throughput genetic-based assays now make it possible to comprehensively survey the human oral microbiome, the totality of bacteria in the oral cavity. Establishing the association of the oral microbiome with cancer risk may lead to significant advances in understanding of cancer etiology, potentially opening a new research paradigm for cancer prevention.

  7. Oral and written instruction of oral hygiene: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Harnacke, Daniela; Beldoch, Magdalena; Bohn, Gertrude-Heidi; Seghaoui, Ouarda; Hegel, Nicole; Deinzer, Renate

    2012-10-01

    This randomized, evaluator-masked, controlled study evaluates the effectiveness of oral in contrast to written instruction of oral hygiene. Eighty-three students without clinical signs of periodontitis were randomly assigned to either a control group or one of three experimental conditions: 1) written instruction, 2) standardized oral instruction, or 3) individualized oral instruction. Plaque and bleeding indices were assessed to analyze intervention effects on oral health and oral hygiene skills. Measurements took place at baseline and 4 weeks after intervention. Groups differed significantly with respect to gingival bleeding and were tentatively significant with respect to oral hygiene skills. Participants who had received oral individualized instructions showed the best results. A gradient of effectiveness of the instruction methods was observed with most favorable results for the individualized instruction.

  8. Curriculum Guidelines for Predoctoral Oral Diagnosis/Oral Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Oral diagnosis is the area of dental practice that deals with gathering, recording, and evaluating information contributing to the identification of abnormalities of the head and neck region. A statement of general curricular goals in oral diagnosis/oral medicine is presented. (MLW)

  9. Curriculum Guidelines for Predoctoral Oral Diagnosis/Oral Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Oral diagnosis is the area of dental practice that deals with gathering, recording, and evaluating information contributing to the identification of abnormalities of the head and neck region. A statement of general curricular goals in oral diagnosis/oral medicine is presented. (MLW)

  10. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Washio, Jumpei; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-06-02

    Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the 'Warburg effect'. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases.

  11. The New Orality: Oral Characteristics of Computer-Mediated Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Sharmila Pixy; Montgomery, Maureen

    1996-01-01

    Considers the characteristics of orality and literacy developed in the work of scholars such as Walter Ong to consider computer-mediated communication (CMC) as the potential site of a "new orality" which is neither purely oral or literate. Notes that the medium of CMC is writing, which has traditionally represented the…

  12. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Washio, Jumpei; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the ‘Warburg effect’. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases. PMID:27271597

  13. The novel oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Hernandez, Cristhiam M; Garcia, David A

    2013-03-01

    After the introduction of warfarin, long-term oral anticoagulation treatment remained unchanged for more than 50 years. Most recently, with the development and approval of new oral anticoagulants, the treatment of medical conditions that require thrombosis prophylaxis and long-term anticoagulation has become more complex. In the case of venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention after orthopedic surgery, the new oral agents will be less costly than the parenteral alternative. In other settings (such as atrial fibrillation or treatment of acute VTE), the new agents will offer additional convenience at higher cost, but the degree to which they will reduce clinically important events such as thrombosis or bleeding will be limited, especially for patients on optimally controlled warfarin. As the use of the new oral anticoagulants becomes more widespread, it will be important for all clinicians to have a basic understanding of their pharmacology, advantages, and limitations. Although the need to measure or reverse the effect of these drugs will arise infrequently, clinicians--especially hematologists--will desire evidence-based recommendations about how to manage such scenarios, which will require research studies.

  14. AAS Oral History Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Holbrook, Jarita; AAS Oral History Team

    2016-06-01

    Now in its fourth year, the AAS Oral History Project has interviewed over 80 astronomers from all over the world. Led by the AAS Historical Astronomy Division (HAD) and partially funded by the American Institute of Physics Niels Bohr Library and ongoing support from the AAS, volunteers have collected oral histories from astronomers at professional meetings starting in 2015, including AAS, DPS, and the IAU general assembly. Each interview lasts one and a half to two hours and focuses on interviewees’ personal and professional lives. Questions include those about one’s family, childhood, strong influences on one’s scientific career, career path, successes and challenges, perspectives on how astronomy is changing as a field, and advice to the next generation. Each interview is audio recorded and transcribed, the content of which is checked with each interviewee. Once complete, interview transcripts are posted online as part of a larger oral history library at https://www.aip.org/history-programs/niels-bohr-library/oral-histories. Future analysis will reveal a rich story of astronomers and will help the community address issues of diversity, controversies, and the changing landscape of science. We are still recruiting individuals to be interviewed from all stages of career from undergraduate students to retired and emeritus astronomers. Contact Jarita Holbrook to schedule an interview or to find out more information about the project (astroholbrook@gmail.com). Also, contact Jarita Holbrook if you would like to become an interviewer for the project.

  15. Oral Cancer Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the rates of oral cancers, pancreatic cancer, periodontal disease, and the chronic infections that it produces may ... patients who have confirmed distant metastasis of the disease, it is a powerful ... from periodontal problems, caries, etc. may be extracted. This avoidance ...

  16. Oral Language Continuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fresno County Dept. of Education, Fresno, CA.

    An oral language continuum designed to help elementary students develop techniques for a variety of speech situations, learn to listen, and learn to be aware of the responsibility of the speaker is presented. The continuum is divided into four sections. Student needs, implications for teaching, and suggested activities are arranged sequentially.…

  17. History of oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Dhont, Marc

    2010-12-01

    On the 50th birthday of the pill, it is appropriate to recall the milestones which have led to its development and evolution during the last five decades. The main contraceptive effect of the pill being inhibition of ovulation, it may be called a small miracle that this drug was developed long before the complex regulation of ovulation and the menstrual cycle was elucidated. Another stumbling block on its way was the hostile climate with regard to contraception that prevailed at the time. Animal experiments on the effect of sex steroids on ovulation, and the synthesis of sex steroids and orally active analogues were the necessary preliminaries. We owe the development of oral contraceptives to a handful of persons: two determined feminists, Margaret Sanger and Katherine McCormick; a biologist, Gregory Pincus; and a gynaecologist, John Rock. Soon after the introduction of the first pills, some nasty and life-threatening side effects emerged, which were due to the high doses of sex steroids. This led to the development of new preparations with reduced oestrogen content, progestins with more specific action, and alternative administration routes. Almost every decade we have witnessed a breakthrough in oral contraception. Social and moral objections to birth control have gradually disappeared and, notwithstanding some pill scares, oral contraceptives are now one of the most used methods of contraception. Finally, all's well that ends well: recent reports have substantiated the multiple noncontraceptive health benefits paving the way for a bright future for this 50-year-old product.

  18. Research in Oral Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, Walter T., Ed.

    This collection of six articles on oral language is a product of the cooperative efforts of the National Conference on Research in English, the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, the International Reading Association, the Association for Childhood Education International, and the National Council of Teachers of English. It is…

  19. Oral Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gallus, Alexander S.; Wittkowsky, Ann; Crowther, Mark; Hylek, Elaine M.; Palareti, Gualtiero

    2012-01-01

    Background: The objective of this article is to summarize the published literature concerning the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral anticoagulant drugs that are currently available for clinical use and other aspects related to their management. Methods: We carried out a standard review of published articles focusing on the laboratory and clinical characteristics of the vitamin K antagonists; the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate; and the direct factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban Results: The antithrombotic effect of each oral anticoagulant drug, the interactions, and the monitoring of anticoagulation intensity are described in detail and discussed without providing specific recommendations. Moreover, we describe and discuss the clinical applications and optimal dosages of oral anticoagulant therapies, practical issues related to their initiation and monitoring, adverse events such as bleeding and other potential side effects, and available strategies for reversal. Conclusions: There is a large amount of evidence on laboratory and clinical characteristics of vitamin K antagonists. A growing body of evidence is becoming available on the first new oral anticoagulant drugs available for clinical use, dabigatran and rivaroxaban. PMID:22315269

  20. Oral cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Dios, Pedro Diz; Lestón, Juan Seoane

    2010-06-01

    Pain may be the initial symptom in oral cancer, and is a common complaint both in patients awaiting treatment and in those already in treatment. However, little has been published in the literature on the management of oral cancer pain. Effective pain control requires a multimodal approach in which pharmacological management based on the World Health Organization (WHO) analgesic ladder continues to play an essential role. Although different routes are available for the administration of analgesics, oral delivery continues to be the principal route for pain control in the first instance. Interventional approaches include blockade of a peripheral nerve or of the relevant ganglion, and the use of central neuraxial blockade. The intraventricular or intrathecal administration of opioids, with or without local anaesthetics, has been indicated for severe intractable pain. The development of new treatment modalities provides additional options, though further clinical research is required. There is no evidence of the efficacy of non-pharmacological methods such as acupuncture or transcutaneous nerve stimulation in the management of oral cancer pain. Surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have also been suggested, but their results have not been quantified. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. WRITING ORAL DRILLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NEY, JAMES W.

    ALL ORAL LANGUAGE DRILLS MAY BE SEPARATED INTO TWO TYPES--(1) MIM-MEM OR MIMICRY MEMORIZATION DRILLS OR (2) PATTERN PRACTICE DRILLS. THESE TWO LARGER CATEGORIES CAN BE SUB-DIVIDED INTO A NUMBER OF OTHER TYPES, SUCH AS TRANSFORMATION AND SUBSTITUTION DRILLS. THE USE OF ANY PARTICULAR TYPE DEPENDS ON THE PURPOSE TO WHICH THE DRILL IS PUT. IN ANY…

  2. Oral Communication in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Noting that oral communication skills need continuous refinement, this document outlines various methods of practicing these skills, such as literature circles in reading; a reader's theater; presentations of book reports; story telling; a poetry reading club; and choral reading. The document describes literature circles as small groups of readers…

  3. Oral Language Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwestern Cooperative Educational Lab., Albuquerque, NM.

    The Southwestern Cooperative Educational Laboratory is currently field testing a set of instructional materials for teaching English language speaking and listening skills in preschool and first grade classes. The Oral Language Program (OLP) is directed at providing non-English speaking youngsters with a fluent, independent speaking ability in…

  4. Oral focal epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bassioukas, K; Danielides, V; Georgiou, I; Photos, E; Zagorianakou, P; Skevas, A

    2000-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) or Heck disease, is a rare viral infection of the oral mucosa caused by HPV 13 or HPV 32. In Caucasians there have been only a few cases reported. We present the first case in Greece in a young Caucasian girl in which HPV 13 was detected with PCR analysis. The patient was successfully treated with CO2 laser.

  5. Lakota Oral Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    One Feather, Vivian

    Course objectives for the three credit hour Lakota Oral Literature (college level English) course presented in this publication are to: perceive through the reading and hearing of Lakota legends a better understanding of the known world of the Lakota people which existed prior to white contact; understand the origin of the laws which the Lakota…

  6. Antibiotics and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    DeRossi, Scott S; Hersh, Elliot V

    2002-10-01

    With the exception of rifampin-like drugs, there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting the ability of commonly prescribed antibiotics, including all those routinely employed in outpatient dentistry, to either reduce blood levels and/or the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. To date, all clinical trials studying the effects of concomitant antibiotic therapy (with the exception of rifampin and rifabutin) have failed to demonstrate an interaction. Like all drugs, oral contraceptives are not 100% effective with the failure rate in the typical United States population reported to be as high as 3%. It is thus possible that the case reports of unintended pregnancies during antibiotic therapy may simply represent the normal failure rate of these drugs. Considering that both drug classes are prescribed frequently to women of childbearing potential, one would expect a much higher rate of oral contraceptive failure in this group of patients if a true drug:drug interaction existed. On the other hand, if the interaction does exist but is a relatively rare event, occurring in, say, 1 in 5000 women, clinical studies such as those described in this article would not detect the interaction. The pharmacokinetic studies of simultaneous antibiotic and oral contraceptive ingestion, and the retrospective studies of pregnancy rates among oral contraceptive users exposed to antibiotics, all suffer from one potential common weakness, i.e., their relatively small sample size. Sample sizes in the pharmacokinetic trials ranged from 7 to 24 participants, whereas the largest retrospective study of pregnancy rates still evaluated less than 800 total contraceptive users. Still, the incidence of such a rare interaction would not differ from the accepted normal failure rate of oral contraceptive therapy. The medico-legal ramifications of what looks like at best a rare interaction remains somewhat "murky." On one hand, we have medico-legal experts advising the profession to exercise caution

  7. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... What We Do Administration of Anesthesia Administration of Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ... Teeth Management Procedures Administration of Anesthesia Administration of Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ...

  8. Hemophilia and oral health.

    PubMed

    Zaliuniene, Ruta; Peciuliene, Vytaute; Brukiene, Vilma; Aleksejuniene, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to overview the oral health aspects in hemophilia patients. An electronic search of Medline (Pub Med), Cochrane, SSCI (Social Citation Index), SCI (Science Citation Index) databases from 1982 to the present, using the following search words: hemophilia, oral health, dental caries, dental caries prevalence, gingivitis, periodontitis, primary dentition, permanent dentition, dental treatment and review, was performed. The search yielded 196 titles and abstracts on chosen words. All articles were full-text reviewed and 40 of publications were included. Nowadays coagulation factor abnormalities are the most common of inherited bleeding disorders, but occur much less frequently approximating 10000-50000 male births than acquired coagulation defects. Von Willebrand disease, Hemophilia A and Hemophilia B account for 95-97% of all coagulation deficiencies. Hemophilias A and B are subdivided according to the factor's activity levels in the blood: mild, moderate or severe. The two main oral diseases affecting patients with hemophilia are the same as for the rest of population, i.e. dental caries and gingivitis/periodontitis. Only a few studies concerning oral health aspects in hemophilia patients were carried out. Some controversy exists concerning caries prevalence in both primary and permanent dentitions in children with hemophilia. People with congenital hemorrhagic diatheses constitute a very small proportion of the total population. Due to that fact treatment of such patients becomes a challenge to the most of dentists due to the fact that most of them have no experience in dealing with dental problems in such patients. There is a lack of epidemiological studies in oral health status of hemophilia patient.

  9. Oral Manifestations of Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Anitha; Masthan, Mahaboob Kader; Sankar, Leena Sankari; Narayanasamy, Aravindha Babu; Elumalai, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vitiligo is one of the disorder that has social impact. Both skin and mucous membrane show depigmentation in vitiligo. Depigmentation in oral cavity can be more easily observed and the patient can be given awareness regarding the condition if they are unaware of vitiligo elsewhere in their body and can be guided for treatment. Aim and objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of occurrence of oral mucosal vitiligo in vitiligo patients and to determine the most commonly involved oral mucosal site. Materials and methods: The study sample included 100 vitiligo patients. The patients of all age groups and both genders were included. Vitiligo patients associated with systemic conditions such as thyroid disorders, juvenile diabetes mellitus, pernicious anemia, Addison's disease were excluded in this study. Results: Out of 100 vitiligo patients 44 % male and 56% were female. The oral presentation of vitiligo in this study showed depigmentation of buccal mucosa in 5% of patients, labial mucosa in 5% of patients, palate in 8% of patients, gingiva in 2% of patients and alveolar mucosa 1%. Depigmentation of lip was seen in 42% of patients. Lip involvement refers to depigmentation of both the lips or either lip. Also vermilion border involvement was noted in majority of cases. In some cases, the depigmentation of lip extended to the facial skin also. Conclusion: In this study 55 patients out of 100 patients showed depigmentation in the oral cavity. Lip involvement was most common in this study showing about 42% of patients. Intraoral mucosal involvement was found in 21% of patients. Among intraoral mucosal site palate was common followed by buccal and labial mucosa, gingiva. Two patients had lip pigmentation as the only manifestation without any depigmentation in the skin. PMID:25657420

  10. [Oral manifestations in systemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge; Jensen, Siri Beier

    2010-11-01

    Systemic diseases may affect the oral tissues, i.e. oral mucosa, salivary glands, teeth or bone, and oral manifestations will frequently present early, i.e. in association with (non-fulminant) systemic disease. Thus, recognition and proper diagnosis is essential to initiate appropriate treatment schedules. Key examples of systemic disease groups with oral manifestations include dermatological, inflammatory connective tissue diseases, haematological and inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases, as well as neurological and endocrine diseases.

  11. Steroid-resistant kidney transplant rejection: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bock, H A

    2001-02-01

    Decreases in transplant function may be attributable to a variety of conditions, including prerenal and postrenal failure, cyclosporin A (CsA) toxicity, polyoma nephritis, recurrent glomerulonephritis, and rejection. The diagnosis of rejection should therefore be made on the basis of a transplant biopsy of adequate size, before the initiation of any therapy. Pulse steroid treatment (three to five 0.25- to 1.0-g pulses of methylprednisolone, administered intravenously) is the usual first-line therapy and has a 60 to 70% success rate, although orally administered prednisone (0.25 g) may be just as efficacious. Even if reverted, any rejection should trigger an at least temporary increase in basal immunosuppression, consisting of an increase in CsA or tacrolimus target levels, the addition of steroids or an increase in their dosage, the addition of mycophenolate mofetil, or a switch from CsA to tacrolimus. The addition of rapamycin or its RAD derivative may fulfill the same purpose. Steroid resistance should not be assumed before the fifth day of pulse steroid treatment, although histologic features of vascular rejection may indicate the need for more aggressive treatment earlier. Steroid-resistant rejection is traditionally treated with poly- or monoclonal antilymphocytic antibodies, with success rates of 60 to 70%. Their potential benefit must be carefully balanced against the risks of infection and lymphoma. More recently, mycophenolate mofetil has been successfully used to treat steroid-resistant rejection, but only of the interstitial (cellular) type. Switching from CsA to tacrolimus for treating recurrent or antibody-resistant rejection is successful in approximately 60% of cases. Plasmapheresis and intravenously administered Ig have been used in some desperate cases, with surprising success. Because none of the available drugs has a significantly better profile of therapeutic versus adverse effects, the possible benefits of continued rejection therapy must be

  12. Borderline tuberculoid leprosy in childhood onset systemic lupus erythematosus patient.

    PubMed

    Lopes, V A P; Lourenço, D M R; Guariento, A; Trindade, M A; Avancini, J; Silva, C A

    2015-11-01

    Leprosy is a contagious and chronic systemic granulomatous disease caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium leprae. To our knowledge, no case of leprosy in a childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (c-SLE) patient has been reported. For a period of 31 years, 312 c-SLE patients were followed at the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit of our University Hospital. One of them (0.3%) had tuberculoid leprosy skin lesions during the disease course and is here reported. A 10-year-old boy from Northwest of Brazil was diagnosed with c-SLE based on malar rash, photosensitivity, oral ulcers, lymphopenia, proteinuria, positive antinuclear antibodies, anti-double-stranded DNA, anti-Sm and anti-Ro/SSA autoantibodies. He was treated with prednisone, hydroxychloroquine and intravenous cyclophosphamide, followed by mycophenolate mofetil. At 12-years-old, he presented asymmetric skin lesions characterized by erythematous plaques with elevated external borders and hypochromic center with sensory loss. Peripheral nerve involvement was not evidenced. No history of familial cases of leprosy was reported, although the region where the patient resides is considered to be endemic for leprosy. Skin biopsy revealed a well-defined tuberculoid form. A marked thickening of nerves was observed, often destroyed by granulomas, without evidence of Mycobacterium leprae bacilli. At that time, the SLEDAI-2K score was 4 and he had been receiving prednisone 15 mg/day, hydroxychloroquine 200 mg/day and mycophenolate mofetil 3 g/day. Paucibacillary treatment for leprosy with dapsone and rifampicine was also introduced. In conclusion, we have reported a rare case of leprosy in the course of c-SLE. Leprosy should always be considered in children and adolescents with lupus who present skin abnormalities, particularly with hypoesthesic or anesthesic cutaneous lesions.

  13. Oral Manifestations and Molecular Basis of Oral Genodermatoses: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shilpasree, A.S.; Chaudhary, Meenakshi

    2016-01-01

    Genodermatoses refers to group of inherited monogenic disorders with skin manifestations. Many of these disorders are rare and also have oral manifestations, called oral genodermatoses. This article provides a focused review of molecular basis of important genodermatoses that affects the oral cavity and also have prominent associated dermatologic features. In several conditions discussed here, the oral findings are distinct and may provide the first clue of an underlying genetic diagnosis. The article also emphasises on the prenatal diagnosis, genetic counselling and the treatment oral genodermatoses. PMID:27437377

  14. Prevention of oral diseases and oral health promotion.

    PubMed

    Gift, H C

    1991-06-01

    Research and activities, as promoted in 1989 and 1990, in oral disease prevention and health promotion are summarized. Significant syntheses of research findings have occurred, as a result of planning and workship activities, which will direct oral health promotion in the 1990s. Original research on established and new preventive therapies for dental caries, periodontal diseases, oral mucosal alterations, soft-tissue lesions, precancers and cancers, and trauma are reported, opportunities to prevent oral diseases or maintain oral health through changes in individual behaviors, professional orientation, and social and environmental changes are addressed.

  15. Oral and Perioral Piercing Complications

    PubMed Central

    Escudero-Castaño, N; Perea-García, M.A; Campo-Trapero, J; Cano-Sánchez; Bascones-Martínez, A

    2008-01-01

    Background. The oral an perioral piercing has a long history as part of religious, tribal,cultural or sexual symbolism and nowdays there is a high incidence of oral and perioral piercing in the adolescent population. This practice has a long history as part of religious, tribal, cultural or sexual symbolism. This article reviews current knowledge on injuries or diseases that might be produced by piercing in the oral cavity. We propose a classification to diagnosed the pathologies related to oral an perioral piercing Methods. A search was conducted of articles in PubMed, Scielo published between 1997 and 2007, using the key words ``oral and perioral, piercing ´´, ``oral, piercing and disease”, ``recessions and oral piercing´´. It has reviewed about twentythree articles 17 were narrative reviews and 6 case series Results. A review was carried out on the origins of oral and perioral body piercing and its local implications, classifying the different alterations like recessions, systemic implications that it can produce in the oral and perioral cavity. Conclusion. Patients with oral and perioral piercing should be regularly followed up because of the possible development of different types of adverse effects. Clinical implications. Adverse effects of oral and perioral piercing can be systemic, with transmission of infectious diseases such as hepatitis B or C, or can be local, with alteration of oral mucosae or even of dental structures. PMID:19444317

  16. CREATIVE EXPERIENCES IN ORAL LANGUAGE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HENRY, MABEL WRIGHT, ED.

    IDEAS FOR THE CREATIVE USE OF ORAL LANGUAGE IN THE ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM ARE PRESENTED IN THIS SYMPOSIUM. PART 1, "THE NEED FOR CREATIVE EXPERIENCES IN ORAL LANGUAGE" BY M.W. HENRY, IS CONCERNED WITH THE INTERRELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CREATIVE ORAL LANGUAGE ACTIVITIES AND THE ACQUISITION OF READING AND WRITING SKILLS. PART 2, "CHORIC INTERPRETATION" BY…

  17. Oral History: A Selective Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusnerz, Peggy Ann

    1979-01-01

    This selected bibliography lists 188 items pertaining to oral history, including manuals and handbooks, collection guides and directories, methods, interviewing techniques, theories, teaching devices, oral history in libraries and archives, international perspectives, oral history in research, the profession, and periodicals. (CHC)

  18. A History of Oral Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahn, Eugene; Bahn, Margaret L.

    This historical account of the oral interpretation of literature establishes a chain of events comprehending 25 centuries of verbal tradition from the Homeric Age through 20th Century America. It deals in each era with the viewpoints and contributions of major historical figures to oral interpretation, as well as with oral interpretation's…

  19. Oral and perioral piercing complications.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Castaño, N; Perea-García, M A; Campo-Trapero, J; Cano-Sánchez; Bascones-Martínez, A

    2008-12-04

    BACKGROUND.: The oral an perioral piercing has a long history as part of religious, tribal,cultural or sexual symbolism and nowdays there is a high incidence of oral and perioral piercing in the adolescent population. This practice has a long history as part of religious, tribal, cultural or sexual symbolism. This article reviews current knowledge on injuries or diseases that might be produced by piercing in the oral cavity. We propose a classification to diagnosed the pathologies related to oral an perioral piercing METHODS.: A search was conducted of articles in PubMed, Scielo published between 1997 and 2007, using the key words ;;oral and perioral, piercing , ;;oral, piercing and disease", ;;recessions and oral piercing . It has reviewed about twentythree articles 17 were narrative reviews and 6 case series RESULTS.: A review was carried out on the origins of oral and perioral body piercing and its local implications, classifying the different alterations like recessions, systemic implications that it can produce in the oral and perioral cavity. CONCLUSION.: Patients with oral and perioral piercing should be regularly followed up because of the possible development of different types of adverse effects. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS.: Adverse effects of oral and perioral piercing can be systemic, with transmission of infectious diseases such as hepatitis B or C, or can be local, with alteration of oral mucosae or even of dental structures.

  20. A History of Oral Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahn, Eugene; Bahn, Margaret L.

    This historical account of the oral interpretation of literature establishes a chain of events comprehending 25 centuries of verbal tradition from the Homeric Age through 20th Century America. It deals in each era with the viewpoints and contributions of major historical figures to oral interpretation, as well as with oral interpretation's…

  1. 47 CFR 1.297 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oral argument. 1.297 Section 1.297... Actions in Hearing Proceedings § 1.297 Oral argument. Oral argument with respect to any contested... oral argument. ...

  2. Proinflammatory cytokine levels in oral lichen planus, oral leukoplakia, and oral submucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jasdeep; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to identify salivary and serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in patients with oral lichen planus, oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, and healthy controls. Patients selected included 54 oral lichen planus (41 to 65 years), 50 oral leukoplakia (42 to 65 years), 51 oral submucous fibrosis (41 to 65 years), and 50 healthy controls (42 to 65 years). Oral lichen planus, oral leukoplakia, and oral submucous fibrosis cases were diagnosed using histopathological analysis. Salivary and serum cytokine concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunoassay kits in all subjects. The levels of serum and salivary TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 were statistically significantly increased in oral leukoplakia, submucous fibrosis, and lichen planus in contrast to normal healthy subjects (P<0.05). Serum and salivary correlation analysis revealed strong and highly significant correlations for TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 in all groups (r=0.72-0.82, P<0.05). Salivary and serum cytokines were also elevated when analyzed in oral precancerous lesions. Thus, salivary and serum IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α levels might act as diagnostic markers for detection of oral precancer.

  3. Oral chemotherapy in tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Kay, N J

    1981-05-01

    A double-blind triple cross-over trial was designed for 21 patients suffering from tinnitus; mexiletine, diazapam, betahistine and placebo were taken each for a month sequentially during which time the patients recorded their tinnitus loudness subjectively on a visual analogue scale. The results showed that these medications did not influence the tinnitus loudness. Since mexiletine is an oral analogue of lignocaine and a cardiovascular drug, any untoward cardiovascular history and clinical finding disqualified such patients from the trial. Twenty-one such patients were rejected from an original group of 42 patients. In a volunteer trial mexiletine unrelated to this, it was reported that a vasovagal attack was suffered by someone who had just consumed 400 mg mexiletine orally. After ethical considerations the tinnitus trial was stopped. Eleven patients completed the cycle of medications, 10 did not. The dangers of using a cardiovascular drug for a non-cardiovascular condition is thus exposed.

  4. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N.; Anita, N.; Babu, R.

    2015-01-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient. PMID:26015713

  5. Infant Oral Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, Michael J.; Levine, Norman

    1988-01-01

    The family physician/pediatrician who sees a child from birth as part of the well-baby visit program is in the best position to identify early dental problems and to educate the family about early oral preventive health care. Since children under three years of age are not seen routinely by dentists, they are at risk of developing dental disease. This paper briefly covers the areas of infant oral pathology, early preventive care, teething, suckling habits, and dental trauma in the toddler. The physician will then be in a better position to recommend to parents when they should seek dental advice and treatment for their young children. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:21253204

  6. Herbs in Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Baharvand, Maryam; Jafari, Soudeh

    2017-01-01

    Oral mucositis is an inflammatory mucosal destruction as a result of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, which in severe cases can impair patients’ quality of life. Moreover, mucosal infection and/or systemic involvement due to compromised immunity leads to delay or discontinuation of the treatment. Many strategies and agents have been suggested for the management of this condition. Because of their lower side effects compared to chemical drugs, general interest in evaluating therapeutic effects of herbs has been increased intensively. Herbal plants apply their effect through different mechanisms of action: antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antiseptic, and anticarcinogenic activity. Recently, various natural agents in plants have been noticed in mucositis, which may improve the symptoms through different interventions. The purpose of this review is to focus on the preventive or therapeutic use of herbal medicine to alleviate oral mucositis. PMID:28511530

  7. Damaging Oral Habits

    PubMed Central

    Kamdar, Rajesh J; Al-Shahrani, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Oral habits, if persist beyond certain developmental age, can pose great harm to the developing teeth, occlusion, and surrounding oral tissues. In the formative years, almost all children engage in some non-nutritive sucking habits. Clinicians, by proper differential diagnosis and thorough understanding of natural growth and developmental processes, should take a decision for intervening. This article describes case series reports of thumb sucking, finger sucking, and tongue thrusting habits, which have been successfully treated by both removable and fixed orthodontic appliances. The cases shown are ranging from the age group of 9-19 years presenting combination of both mixed and permanent dentition development. All cases show satisfactory correction of habits and stable results. PMID:25954079

  8. Oral manifestations of hyperoxaluria.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Eliete Neves da Silva; Vianna, Leonora; Sobreira, Maria Nazareth; de Araújo, Flavio Nader Gross; de Melo, Nilce Santos

    2011-11-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria is a rare, inherited autosomal recessive disease caused by defects in the metabolism of glyoxylate. Oral manifestations of hyperoxaluria are rare. However, bone and tooth resorption may be the result of chronic inflammation and the presence of osteoclastic cells surrounding the oxalate crystal deposit. A deposit of calcium oxalate in the periodontium was identified in a patient with end-stage renal disease. Dental radiographs indicated bone loss and external tooth resorption. Radiolucent image in the inferior incisor region was observed and removed. The tissue showed granulomatous inflammation with foreign body reaction and associated crystalline deposits. When viewed in polarized light, these deposits are green and presented a birefringent aspect, which were interpreted as calcium oxalate crystals compatible with oxaluria. Oral manifestations of hyperoxaluria are of particular interest because of the unusual location of the oxalate crystal deposition, resulting in aggressive tooth resorption and alveolar bone loss, which may be misdiagnosed.

  9. Oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Olson, Meredith A; Rogers, Roy S; Bruce, Alison J

    2016-01-01

    Lichen planus is an inflammatory mucocutaneous disease that can affect the skin, hair, nails, and mucosal surfaces. Mucosal sites of involvement include oral, genital, ocular, otic, esophageal, and, less commonly, bladder, nasal, laryngeal, and anal surfaces. Oral lichen planus is a mucosal variant of lichen planus, which tends to affect women more often than men, with a typically more chronic course and potential for significant morbidity. Treatment can be challenging, and there is potentially a low risk of malignant transformation; however, therapeutic benefits can be obtained with various topical and systemic medications. Clinical monitoring is recommended to ensure symptomatic control. Increasing awareness and recognition of this entity have continued to fuel advances in therapy and in our understanding of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute oral ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Julia S; Rogers, Roy S

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of acute oral ulcers can be challenging. Important historic details include the pattern of recurrence, anatomic areas of involvement within the mouth and elsewhere on the mucocutaneous surface, associated medical symptoms or comorbidities, and symptomology. Careful mucocutaneous examination is essential. When necessary, biopsy at an active site without ulceration is generally optimal. Depending on the clinical scenario, supplemental studies that may be useful include cultures; perilesional biopsy for direct immunofluorescence testing; and evaluation for infectious diseases, gluten sensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, connective tissue diseases, or hematinic deficiencies. Clinicians should maintain a broad differential diagnosis when evaluating patients with acute oral ulcers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Lasers in oral surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Ulrich; Hibst, Raimund

    1994-12-01

    The indications of lasers in oral surgery are defined by the laser-tissue interaction types. These are mainly thermal effects depending especially on the absorption of laser light in varying biological tissues. In histological sections different laser effects are demonstrated on oral mucosa, bone and cartilage, which have a great influence on wound healing and subsequently on clinical indications of the different wavelengths. On the one hand the good coagulation effect of the Nd:YAG laser is wanted for hemostasis in soft tissue surgery. On the other hand, for the treatment of precancerous dysplasias or neoplasias an effective cutting with a coagulation effect like using the CO2 laser is necessary. However, the excision of benign mucosal lesions as well as performing osteotomies or shaping of cartilage should be undertaken with the Er:YAG laser without greater coagulation and consequently without any delay of wound healing.

  12. Skylab oral health studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. R.; Frome, W. J.; Handler, S.; Wheatcroft, M. G.; Rider, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Evaluation of Skylab crewmembers for mission related effects on oral health in relation to possible dental injuries provided the following distinctive changes: (1) increased counts of specific anaerobic and streptococcal components; (2) elevations in levels of secretory IgA concurrent with diminutions of salivary lysozyme; and (3) increases in dental calculus and gingival inflammations. The clinical changes are considered to be more influenced by the preexisting state of dental health than by any mission related effects.

  13. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    PubMed

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  14. Skylab oral health studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. R.; Frome, W. J.; Handler, S.; Wheatcroft, M. G.; Rider, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Evaluation of Skylab crewmembers for mission related effects on oral health in relation to possible dental injuries provided the following distinctive changes: (1) increased counts of specific anaerobic and streptococcal components; (2) elevations in levels of secretory IgA concurrent with diminutions of salivary lysozyme; and (3) increases in dental calculus and gingival inflammations. The clinical changes are considered to be more influenced by the preexisting state of dental health than by any mission related effects.

  15. [Reiter's syndrome oral manifestations].

    PubMed

    Fotiou, G; Laskaris, G

    1988-01-01

    Reiter's syndrome is characterized by arthritis, non-gonococcal urethritis, conjunctivitis and mucocutaneous lesions. Oral lesions occur in 20-40% of the cases. They appear as papules and ulcerations on the buccal mucosa, gingiva and lips. Lesions on the tongue resemple "geographic tongue". One case of Reiter's syndrome is described. The significance of the clinical lesions, their microscopic appearance and the differential diagnosis are discussed.

  16. Oral health & HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, Susan; Naidoo, Sudeshi; Berthold, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Oral lesions are common in women and children with HIV/AIDS and may decrease the overall quality of life in these patients because of pain, dry mouth, and difficulty in eating. An oral cavity screening is an easy, noninvasive, quick, and inexpensive procedure that provides nurses with invaluable information about the need for referral, treatment, and health education. Nurses can use the information obtained from a careful oral screening to decrease the symptoms experienced with oral lesions and optimize a patient's ability to chew and enjoy food. Common oral manifestations of HIV infection include fungal, viral, and bacterial infections, although neoplasms, periodontal disease, salivary gland disease, and lesions of uncertain origin are also seen. Oral lesions such as candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, herpetic ulcers, and Kaposi's sarcoma are often among the first symptoms of HIV infection.

  17. Good Oral Health and Diet

    PubMed Central

    Scardina, G. A.; Messina, P.

    2012-01-01

    An unhealthy diet has been implicated as risk factors for several chronic diseases that are known to be associated with oral diseases. Studies investigating the relationship between oral diseases and diet are limited. Therefore, this study was conducted to describe the relationship between healthy eating habits and oral health status. The dentistry has an important role in the diagnosis of oral diseases correlated with diet. Consistent nutrition guidelines are essential to improve health. A poor diet was significantly associated with increased odds of oral disease. Dietary advice for the prevention of oral diseases has to be a part of routine patient education practices. Inconsistencies in dietary advice may be linked to inadequate training of professionals. Literature suggests that the nutrition training of dentists and oral health training of dietitians and nutritionists is limited. PMID:22363174

  18. Milk and oral health.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ingegerd; Lif Holgerson, Pernilla

    2011-01-01

    Oral health includes freedom from disease in the gums, the mucosa and the teeth. There has been a striking reduction in dental caries and periodontitis in industrialized countries, although the proportion with severe disease has remained at 10-15%, and the prevalence increases in less developed countries. If left untreated, these diseases may lead to pain, and impaired quality of life and nutritional status. Prevention and treatment need, besides traditional implementation of proper oral hygiene, sugar restriction and use of fluoride, newer cost-effective strategies. Non-sweetened dairy products, which are proven non-cariogenic, or specific bioactive components from alike sources might prove to be part of such strategies. Thus, milk proteins, such as bovine and human caseins and lactoferrin, inhibit initial attachment of cariogenic mutans streptococci to hydroxyapatite coated with saliva or purified saliva host ligands. In contrast, both bovine and human milk coated on hydroxyapatite promotes attachment of commensal Actinomyces naeslundii and other streptococci in vitro, and phosphorylated milk-derived peptides promote maintenance of tooth minerals, as shown for the β-casein-derived caseino-phosphate peptide. Observational studies are promising, but randomized clinical trials are needed to reveal if dairy products could be a complementary treatment for oral health.

  19. Global Oral Health Inequalities

    PubMed Central

    Pitts, N.; Amaechi, B.; Niederman, R.; Acevedo, A.-M.; Vianna, R.; Ganss, C.; Ismail, A.; Honkala, E.

    2011-01-01

    The IADR Global Oral Health Inequalities Task Group on Dental Caries has synthesized current evidence and opinion to identify a five-year implementation and research agenda which should lead to improvements in global oral health, with particular reference to the implementation of current best evidence as well as integrated action to reduce caries and health inequalities between and within countries. The Group determined that research should: integrate health and oral health wherever possible, using common risk factors; be able to respond to and influence international developments in health, healthcare, and health payment systems as well as dental prevention and materials; and exploit the potential for novel funding partnerships with industry and foundations. More effective communication between and among the basic science, clinical science, and health promotion/public health research communities is needed. Translation of research into policy and practice should be a priority for all. Both community and individual interventions need tailoring to achieve a more equal and person-centered preventive focus and reduce any social gradient in health. Recommendations are made for both clinical and public health implementation of existing research and for caries-related research agendas in clinical science, health promotion/public health, and basic science. PMID:21490233

  20. PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE (IMPDH) ACTIVITY IN MMF-TREATED HCT RECIPIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Storer, Barry E.; Boeckh, Michael J.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Risler, Linda J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach to personalizing postgrafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients is evaluating inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity as a drug-specific biomarker of mycophenolic acid (MPA)-induced immunosuppression. This prospective study evaluated total MPA, unbound MPA, and total MPA glucuronide plasma concentrations and IMPDH activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) at five time points after the morning dose of oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on day +21 in 56 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Substantial interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics was observed and accurately characterized by the population pharmacokinetic/dynamic model. IMPDH activity decreased with increasing MPA plasma concentration, with maximum inhibition coinciding with maximum MPA concentration in most patients. The overall relationship between MPA concentration and IMPDH activity was described by a direct inhibitory Emax model with an IC50 = 3.23 mg/L total MPA and 57.3 ng/mL unbound MPA. The day +21 IMPDH area under the effect curve (AUEC) was associated with cytomegalovirus reactivation, non-relapse mortality, and overall mortality. In conclusion, a pharmacokinetic/dynamic model was developed that relates plasma MPA concentrations with PMNC IMPDH activity after an MMF dose in HCT recipients. Future studies should validate this model and confirm that day +21 IMPDH AUEC is a predictive biomarker. PMID:24727337

  1. Betel nut chewing, oral premalignant lesions, and the oral microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Zhu, Xuemei; Goodman, Marc T.; Gatewood, Robert; Mendiola, Paul; Quinata, Katrina; Paulino, Yvette C.

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancers are attributed to a number of causal agents including tobacco, alcohol, human papillomavirus (HPV), and areca (betel) nut. Although betel nut chewing has been established as an independent cause of oral cancer, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are poorly understood. An investigation was undertaken to evaluate the influence of betel nut chewing on the oral microbiome and oral premalignant lesions. Study participants were recruited from a dental clinic in Guam. Structured interviews and oral examinations were performed. Oral swabbing and saliva samples were evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3- V5 region of the 16S rRNA bacterial gene and genotyped for HPV. One hundred twenty-two adults were enrolled including 64 current betel nut chewers, 37 former chewers, and 21 with no history of betel nut use. Oral premalignant lesions, including leukoplakia and submucous fibrosis, were observed in 10 chewers. Within-sample bacterial diversity was significantly lower in long-term (≥10 years) chewers vs. never chewers and in current chewers with oral lesions vs. individuals without lesions. Between-sample bacterial diversity based on Unifrac distances significantly differed by chewing status and oral lesion status. Current chewers had significantly elevated levels of Streptococcus infantis and higher and lower levels of distinct taxa of the Actinomyces and Streptococcus genera. Long-term chewers had reduced levels of Parascardovia and Streptococcus. Chewers with oral lesions had significantly elevated levels of Oribacterium, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus, including Streptococcus anginosus. In multivariate analyses, controlling for smoking, oral HPV, S.anginosus, and S. infantis levels, current betel nut chewing remained the only predictor of oral premalignant lesions. Our study provides evidence that betel nut chewing alters the oral bacterial microbiome including that of chewers who develop oral premalignant lesions. Nonetheless, whether microbial changes

  2. Betel nut chewing, oral premalignant lesions, and the oral microbiome.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Brenda Y; Zhu, Xuemei; Goodman, Marc T; Gatewood, Robert; Mendiola, Paul; Quinata, Katrina; Paulino, Yvette C

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancers are attributed to a number of causal agents including tobacco, alcohol, human papillomavirus (HPV), and areca (betel) nut. Although betel nut chewing has been established as an independent cause of oral cancer, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are poorly understood. An investigation was undertaken to evaluate the influence of betel nut chewing on the oral microbiome and oral premalignant lesions. Study participants were recruited from a dental clinic in Guam. Structured interviews and oral examinations were performed. Oral swabbing and saliva samples were evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3- V5 region of the 16S rRNA bacterial gene and genotyped for HPV. One hundred twenty-two adults were enrolled including 64 current betel nut chewers, 37 former chewers, and 21 with no history of betel nut use. Oral premalignant lesions, including leukoplakia and submucous fibrosis, were observed in 10 chewers. Within-sample bacterial diversity was significantly lower in long-term (≥10 years) chewers vs. never chewers and in current chewers with oral lesions vs. individuals without lesions. Between-sample bacterial diversity based on Unifrac distances significantly differed by chewing status and oral lesion status. Current chewers had significantly elevated levels of Streptococcus infantis and higher and lower levels of distinct taxa of the Actinomyces and Streptococcus genera. Long-term chewers had reduced levels of Parascardovia and Streptococcus. Chewers with oral lesions had significantly elevated levels of Oribacterium, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus, including Streptococcus anginosus. In multivariate analyses, controlling for smoking, oral HPV, S.anginosus, and S. infantis levels, current betel nut chewing remained the only predictor of oral premalignant lesions. Our study provides evidence that betel nut chewing alters the oral bacterial microbiome including that of chewers who develop oral premalignant lesions. Nonetheless, whether microbial changes

  3. [Non necrotizing bacterial cellulitis and bacteriemia due to Shewanella putrefaciens].

    PubMed

    Aubert, T; Rovery, C; Bourhaba, K; Singeorzan, S; Heim, M; Crétel, E

    2009-09-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens is a Gram negative opportunistic pathogen which causes skin and soft tissue infections and bacteriemia in immunocompromized patients. We report a 86-year-old man, who presented with an infectious cellulitis of the leg associated with Shewanella putrefaciens bacteriemia. This patient was treated by mycophenolate mofetil for a bullous pemphigoid resistant to corticotherapy.

  4. Oral health problems and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Ki; Baker, Lindsey A.; Davarian, Shieva; Crimmins, Eileen

    2013-01-01

    Background/purpose Previous studies have shown the relationship between individual oral health conditions and mortality; however, the relationship between mortality and multiple oral health conditions has not been examined. This study investigates the link between individual oral health problems and oral comorbidity and mortality risk. Materials and methods Data are derived from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2004, which is linked to the National Death Index for mortality follow-up through 2006. We estimated the risk of mortality among people with three individual oral health conditions—tooth loss, root caries, and periodontitis as well as with oral comorbidity—or having all three conditions. Results Significant tooth loss, root caries, and periodontal disease were associated with increased odds of dying. The relationship between oral health conditions and mortality disappeared when controlling for sociodemographic, health, and/or health behavioral indicators. Having multiple oral health problems was associated with an even higher rate of mortality. Conclusion Individual oral health conditions—tooth loss, root caries, and periodontal disease—were not related to mortality when sociodemographic, health, and/or health behavioral factors were considered, and there was no differential pattern between the three conditions. Multiple oral health problems were associated with a higher risk of dying. PMID:24416472

  5. Oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Rio, Rute; Simões-Silva, Liliana; Garro, Sofia; Silva, Mário-Jorge; Azevedo, Álvaro

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that placenta may harbour a unique microbiome that may have origin in maternal oral microbiome. Although the major physiological and hormonal adjustments observed in pregnant women lead to biochemical and microbiological modifications of the oral environment, very few studies evaluated the changes suffered by the oral microbiota throughout pregnancy. So, the aim of our study was to evaluate oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy and to compare it with non-pregnant women. Material and Methods The oral yeast colonization was assessed in saliva of 30 pregnant and non-pregnant women longitudinally over a 6-months period. Demographic information was collected, a non-invasive intra-oral examination was performed and saliva flow and pH were determined. Results Pregnant and non-pregnant groups were similar regarding age and level of education. Saliva flow rate did not differ, but saliva pH was lower in pregnant than in non-pregnant women. Oral yeast prevalence was higher in pregnant than in non-pregnant women, either in the first or in the third trimester, but did not attain statistical significance. In individuals colonized with yeast, the total yeast quantification (Log10CFU/mL) increase from the 1st to the 3rd trimester in pregnant women, but not in non-pregnant women. Conclusions Pregnancy may favour oral yeast growth that may be associated with an acidic oral environment. Key words:Oral yeast, fungi, pregnancy, saliva pH. PMID:28160578

  6. Oral hygiene, dentition, sexual habits and risk of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Talamini, R; Vaccarella, S; Barbone, F; Tavani, A; Vecchia, C La; Herrero, R; Muñoz, N; Franceschi, S

    2000-01-01

    In an Italian case-control study of oral cancer, number of missing teeth and other aspects of dental care were similar, but the general condition of the mouth, as indicated by gum bleeding, tartar deposits and mucosal irritation, was worse among oral cancer cases than controls. No differences were detected in sexual practices (including oral sex) and (previous) sexually transmitted infections. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11027440

  7. Oral verruciform xanthoma

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Lydia; Staines, Konrad; Pring, Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Verruciform xanthoma (VX) of the oral cavity is a benign mucosal growth that often presents as a pink, yellow or grey raised plaque or papule with granular, papillary or verrucous surface morphology. Intraorally this often presents on the masticatory mucosa and extraorally often involves the skin and anogenital mucosa. There are several proposed aetiological factors and the clinical features of VX can be misleading; clinically it can resemble malignancy. Histopathological diagnosis is a key for the correct management of this lesion. Excision of this lesion is curative. PMID:25819830

  8. Oral epithelioid hemangioendothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Preeti Tomar; Guledgud, Mahima V.; Patil, Karthikeya

    2015-01-01

    Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HE) is an intermediate malignant potential vascular neoplasm with uncertain clinical behavior, wide variations in microscopic findings, and prognosis. According to the World Health Organization (2002) classification, epithelioid HE has been considered under malignant tumors which rarely metastasize. The epithelioid variant, the most aggressive one, has similar gender predilection and sporadic occurrence in children. The patients usually present with an asymptomatic oral mass whereas few cases may report with the painful bleeding lesion. We attempt to present a case in an adolescent male with previously never described biological behavior, diverse histopathological features, and immunohistochemistry findings. PMID:26681871

  9. Oral manifestations in transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Nappalli, Deepika; Lingappa, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplantation is a widely undertaken procedure and has become an important alternative for the treatment of different end-stage organ diseases that previously had a poor prognosis. The field of organ transplant and hematopoietic stem cell transplant is developing rapidly. The increase in the number of transplant recipients also has an impact on oral and dental services. Most of the oral problems develop as a direct consequence of drug-induced immunosuppression or the procedure itself. These patients may present with oral complaints due to infections or mucosal lesions. Such lesions should be identified, diagnosed, and treated. New treatment strategies permit continuous adaptation of oral care regimens to the changing scope of oral complications. The aim of this review is to analyze those oral manifestations and to discuss the related literature. PMID:26005458

  10. Oral Lesions and Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Castellarin, P.; Pozzato, G.; Tirelli, G.; Di Lenarda, R.; Biasotto, M.

    2010-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disorders are heterogeneous malignancy characterized by the expansion of a lymphoid clone more or less differentiated. At the level of the oral cavity, the lymphoproliferative disorder can occur in various ways, most commonly as lymphoid lesions with extranodal externalization, but sometimes, oral lesions may represent a localization of a disease spread. With regard to the primary localizations of lymphoproliferative disorders, a careful examination of the head and neck, oral, and oropharyngeal area is necessary in order to identify suspicious lesions, and their early detection results in a better prognosis for the patient. Numerous complications have been described and frequently found at oral level, due to pathology or different therapeutic strategies. These complications require precise diagnosis and measures to oral health care. In all this, oral pathologists, as well as dental practitioners, have a central role in the treatment and long-term monitoring of these patients. PMID:20871659

  11. Oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Nguyen, Ly M.; Thomas, Sroka; Hong-Ly, Bevan; Chi, Alexander; Vos, Paul; Karlsson, Ulf; Vinh-Hung, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: We aimed to study the prevalence of oral sex and its possible association with human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 infection in the development of oropharyngeal cancer in the US population for possible prevention. Methods: We conduct a systemic review on the prevalence of oral sex among Americans among different age groups, the prevalence of HPV 16 infection reported in oropharyngeal cancer, and correlation between oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer. Results: Oral sex is prevalent among adolescents and sexually active adults. Sixty percent of oropharyngeal cancer reported in the United States is associated with HPV 16 infections. Individuals who practiced oral sex with multiple partners are at risk for developing oropharyngeal cancer and need to be informed about practicing safe sex or getting vaccination. Conclusion: Family physicians will play a key role in prevention and educating the public about the risk of oral sex. PMID:27428229

  12. Genital occurrence of oral microbiota.

    PubMed

    Forsum, U; Hjelm, E; Holmberg, K; Nord, C E; Wallin, J

    1978-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that tonsillar gonococcal infection or colonization is fairly common. Carriage rates of about 8% have been found. These studies also indicate that oro-genital contacts are common. Since very little is known about the amount of oral microbiota transmitted to the genitals, we have studied the occurrence of oral streptococci and Neisseria species in urethra and cervix. Among 128 patients attending an STD-clinic we found 10 carriers of oral streptococci, one Streptococcus mitior, four Streptococcus sanguis, one Streptococcus mutans and four Streptococcus salivarius and case of urethritis due to Neisseria menigitidis. Seventy-three of the patients had recently had their genitals exposed to the oral flora of their partners. Despite the heavy contamination with oral microbiota that can be assumed to occur in these cases, there seems to be no colonization of the genitals with oral microbiota.

  13. Oral tuberculosis: unusual radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Sansare, K; Gupta, A; Khanna, V; Karjodkar, F

    2011-05-01

    Oral tuberculosis and its radiographic findings are not commonly encountered in an oral and maxillofacial radiology practice. Literature has occasional mention of the radiographic findings of oral tuberculosis, which are still ambiguous. When affected, it is manifested majorly in the oral mucosa and rarely in the jaw bones. Here, we report certain unusual radiographic findings of oral tuberculosis which have been rarely mentioned in the literature. Four illustrative cases describe bony resorption, condylar resorption, resorption of the inferior border of the mandible and rarefaction of the alveolar bone as radiographic findings of oral tuberculosis. Follow up of the first case demonstrated regeneration of the condylar head after anti-Kochs therapy was completed, a hitherto unreported phenomenon. The importance of including tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis of some of the unusual radiographic manifestations is emphasized.

  14. Oral complications in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  15. Pemphigus vulgaris with nail involvement presenting with vegetating and verrucous lesions.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, R; Fernandes, B; Reis, J P; Tellechea, O; Figueiredo, A

    2003-12-01

    We report the case of a 68-year-old female with longstanding insulin-treated diabetes mellitus, observed for the first time in our department in August 1999 with multiple painful erosive lesions of the oral cavity and many bullous or erosive lesions on the abdominal wall, back, and thigh. She also had vegetating and verrucous lesions, similar to common warts, involving the hands and feet, mainly on the palms, palmar surface of the fingers, and nail folds. Her lesions were present for 1 year. Skin and mucous biopsies showed the characteristic histopathologic findings of pemphigus vulgaris, with an epidermal intercellular IgG deposition on direct immunofluorescence. Histology of a warty lesion of the finger also showed suprabasal acantholysis. After partial improvement with low doses of oral steroids and azathioprine, her disease progressed to involve the oral cavity, trunk, hands, feet, and scalp. Control of her disease required successive treatments of mycophenolate mofetil and cyclophosphamide, as well as corticosteroids. A partial response was obtained with all these treatments. After being controlled by cyclophosphamide that was slowly tapered, she is now well controlled with azathioprine and oral steroids, showing only discrete lesions of the oral mucosa after 1 year of followup. We report this case of pemphigus vulgaris with unusual clinical aspects, namely vegetating and verrucous lesions as well as nail involvement, rarely described in this disease.

  16. Complications of equine oral surgery.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Padraic M; Hawkes, Claire; Townsend, Neil

    2008-12-01

    The vast majority of equine oral procedures are dental-related and, unless great care is taken, almost all such procedures have the potential to cause marked short- or long-term damage to other oral structures. This review of the more common complications of oral surgery begins at the rostral oral cavity with procedures of the incisors, and then moves caudally to deal with complications related to procedures of wolf teeth and cheek teeth, including salivary duct disruption and dental sinusitis. Finally, complications associated with maxillary and mandibular fractures are discussed.

  17. Improving oral hygiene for patients.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Debbie; Hampson, Victoria; Queen, Kerry; Kirk, Donna; Clarkson, Jan; Young, Linda

    2015-01-13

    Systematic reviews and patient safety initiatives recommend that oral hygiene should be part of routine patient care. However, evidence suggests it is often neglected in hospitals and care homes. Research recommends encouraging beliefs that support oral hygiene, and teaching nurses appropriate skills, as necessary prerequisites to implementing best practice in hospital wards. This article describes a pilot study of an educational workshop on oral hygiene. Results from the pilot study suggest that this workshop is a feasible intervention for a service-wide trial. The literature suggests that other interventions are required to complement this approach if nurses are to make oral hygiene a priority in daily patient care.

  18. [Oral transmission of Chagas' disease].

    PubMed

    Toso M, Alberto; Vial U, Felipe; Galanti, Norbel

    2011-02-01

    The traditional transmission pathways of Chagas' disease are vectorial, transfusional, transplacental and organ transplantation. However, oral transmission is gaining importance. The first evidence of oral transmission was reported in Brazil in 1965. Nowadays the oral route is the transmission mode in 50% of cases in the Amazon river zone. Oral infection is produced by the ingestion of infected triatomine bugs or their feces, undercooked meat from infested host animals and food contaminated with urine or anal secretion of infected marsupials. Therefore travelers to those zones should be advised about care to be taken with ingested food. In Chile, this new mode of transmission should be considered in public health policies.

  19. Oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rio, R; Simões-Silva, L; Garro, S; Silva, M-J; Azevedo, Á; Sampaio-Maia, B

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that placenta may harbour a unique microbiome that may have origin in maternal oral microbiome. Although the major physiological and hormonal adjustments observed in pregnant women lead to biochemical and microbiological modifications of the oral environment, very few studies evaluated the changes suffered by the oral microbiota throughout pregnancy. So, the aim of our study was to evaluate oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy and to compare it with non-pregnant women. The oral yeast colonization was assessed in saliva of 30 pregnant and non-pregnant women longitudinally over a 6-months period. Demographic information was collected, a non-invasive intra-oral examination was performed and saliva flow and pH were determined. Pregnant and non-pregnant groups were similar regarding age and level of education. Saliva flow rate did not differ, but saliva pH was lower in pregnant than in non-pregnant women. Oral yeast prevalence was higher in pregnant than in non-pregnant women, either in the first or in the third trimester, but did not attain statistical significance. In individuals colonized with yeast, the total yeast quantification (Log10CFU/mL) increase from the 1st to the 3rd trimester in pregnant women, but not in non-pregnant women. Pregnancy may favour oral yeast growth that may be associated with an acidic oral environment.

  20. Gingival involvement in oral paracoccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Cléverson O; Almeida, Aroldo Dos Santos; Pereira, Alessandro Antônio Costa; Sallum, Antônio Wilson; Hanemann, João Adolfo Costa; Tatakis, Dimitris N

    2007-07-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis, a deep mycosis endemic in parts of Latin America, often presents with oral lesions involving the gingiva. Nevertheless, the periodontal literature is devoid of references to oral paracoccidioidomycosis. The purpose of this study was to characterize the gingival involvement in oral paracoccidioidomycosis and to contrast clinical and histopathologic diagnosis of the disease. Differential diagnosis and management of oral paracoccidioidomycosis were reviewed. From January 1995 to October 2006, the files of the Oral Pathology Laboratory, School of Dentistry, Alfenas Federal University, were reviewed to identify cases referred because of a clinical diagnosis of oral paracoccidioidomycosis. Data collected included patient demographics (age, gender, race, and occupation), clinical information (oral lesion location), and histopathologic diagnosis. Forty-six cases were identified, and 34 were histopathologically confirmed as paracoccidioidomycosis. Of the remaining 12 cases, one-half were diagnosed as either carcinoma or dysplastic leukoplakia. Of the 34 confirmed paracoccidioidomycosis cases, 45% presented with multiple site involvement, whereas the gingiva/alveolar process was the most prevalent site overall (52%). The gingiva/alveolar process was the most prevalent site in both multiple and single site cases. The majority of patients were men (88%), white (75%), and in their fourth decade of life (47%). Statistical analysis revealed that patients with gingival/alveolar process involvement were demographically indistinguishable from those without. Oral paracoccidioidomycosis has a strong predilection for the gingiva, whereas patients with gingival lesions do not differ from patients lacking such involvement. Early diagnosis of gingival/oral lesions may prevent life-threatening complications of this mycosis.

  1. Electrolytes: Oral Electrolyte Solutions.

    PubMed

    Harris, Lisa

    2017-08-01

    Oral electrolyte solutions are used widely for rehydration in diarrheal illness and to maintain hydration during vigorous exercise. In diarrheal illness, an oral rehydration solution (ORS) typically is preferred over intravenous fluids except for patients with severe dehydration. The preferred ORS is one similar to the glucose-containing reduced osmolarity World Health Organization ORS. There also are polymer-based solutions that use rice or wheat as the source of carbohydrates but these are not widely recommended. Use of other liquids, such as sport drinks, juice, soft drinks, and chicken broth is not recommended, though these can be considered for patients with no or mild dehydration. For maintaining hydration during exercise, particularly vigorous high-intensity exercise, recommendations are to consume fluids (ie, 5 to 7 mL/kg) and a sodium-containing snack at least 4 hours before. During exercise, individuals require 200 to 800 mL/hour of liquid that should contain 20 to 30 mEq/L of sodium. Carbohydrate intake is recommended during high-intensity exercise. Intake of excessive sodium-free fluids should be avoided to prevent exercise-induced hyponatremia. Additional fluids (ie, 1.5 L/kg of weight lost) can be consumed after exercise to restore hydration. Vitamin and mineral supplements are not recommended routinely for athletes unless known deficiencies exist. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  2. Apixaban and oral implications

    PubMed Central

    Bagán, Jose V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Thrombotic disorders remain a leading cause of death in the Western world, and in this regard a number of anticoagulation treatment have been used, including heparins, fondaparinux, vitamin K antagonists (warfarin, acenocoumarol), and new oral anticoagulants such as apixaban. For years there has been great controversy regarding the use of anticoagulants in planning dental treatments that imply bleeding. The main concerns about using new oral anticoagulants in invasive dental procedures are bleeding due to the lack of an antidote, and the thrombotic risk of the disease for which anticoagulation was indicated in the first place. Material and Methods A literature search was conducted through May 2014 using the keyword “apixaban” for publications in the ISI Web of Knowledge. The search was extended to other databases (PubMed, Scopus and the Cochrane Library). Results Based on the results of the different studies, apixaban seems to be a good alternative to conventional anticoagulation and a reasonable treatment option, though its main and most common adverse effect is bleeding. Dose adjustment is needed in some patients, though regular laboratory monitoring is not required. The use of the drug in different patient populations will define its final indications and doses. Conclusions Regarding the use of apixaban in the dental setting, there is a compelling need for further clinical studies in order to establish more evidence-based guidelines for patients requiring antithrombotic treatment. Key words:Apixaban, dental treatment, dental implications. PMID:26535102

  3. Le Discours Oral (Oral Discourse). Melanges Pedagogiques, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulanger, C.; And Others

    The contrast between written language and oral language did not really begin to attract attention until second language teaching defined as its goal the acquisition of a communicative tool rather than a literary tool. This focus on communication made necessary the distinction between language used for oral communication and language used for…

  4. Role of oral microbiome on oral cancers, a review.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, Pourya; Eslami, Hosein; Yousefi, Mehdi; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Kafil, Hossein Samadi

    2016-12-01

    The oral cavity is inhibited by many of the bacterial species. Some of them have a key role in the development of oral disease. Interrelationships between oral microbiome and systemic conditions such as head-and-neck cancer have become increasingly appreciated in recent years. Emerging evidence also suggests a link between periodontal disease and oral cancer, and the explanation being that chronic inflammation could be a major factor in both diseases. Squamous cell carcinoma is that the most frequently occurring malignancy of the oral cavity and adjacent sites, representing over 90% of all cancers. The incidence of oral cancer is increasing, significantly among young people and women. Worldwide there are 350,000-400,000 new cases diagnosed every year. Bacteria, viruses, and fungi are strongly implicated as etiological factors in certain cancers. In this review we will discuss the association between the development of oral cancer in potentially malignant oral lesions with chronic periodontitis, chronic Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, candida, other microbes and described mechanisms which may be involved in these carcinoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. [Intra-oral and peri-oral piercing].

    PubMed

    Zad