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Sample records for oral tongue cancer

  1. Living in limbo: Being diagnosed with oral tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Philiponis, Genevieve; Malloy, Kelly M.; Kagan, Sarah H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Oral tongue cancer presents clinical challenges to effective diagnosis that affect patient experience. Patient experience of the diagnostic process is poorly described, making opportunities for nursing intervention unclear. Methods: We qualitatively describe, using constant comparative analysis, oral tongue cancer diagnosis using data from a larger grounded theory study of oral tongue cancer survivorship. Using constant comparative analysis — in keeping with the methodology of the main study — we analyzed 16 survivor interviews for themes explaining the patient experience of oral tongue cancer diagnosis. Results: We termed the broader diagnostic process “living in limbo.” This process includes the themes describing the peri-diagnostic process itself — “self-detected lesion,” “lack of concern,” “seeking help,” “not a straightforward diagnosis,” and “hearing the diagnosis.” Entry into treatment concludes “Living in Limbo” and is described by the theme “worry and trust.” Conclusions: Our findings are limited by retrospective interviews and participant homogeneity among other features. Future research with prospective designs and diverse groups of people at risk for and diagnosed with oral tongue cancer, as well as targeting those who have had negative biopsies with no eventual diagnosis of oral tongue cancer, will build on our findings. Further, study of patient experience in other sociocultural context and healthcare systems is needed to inform nursing science and practice. Finally, “living in limbo” suggests that clinician and public education about oral tongue cancer diagnosis is needed. PMID:27981120

  2. New Management Strategies of Oral Tongue Cancer in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Jachmen; Bashar, Abul; Molla, Motiur Rahman

    2014-12-01

    Malignancies of the tongue represent one of the greatest management challenges for the maxillofacial surgeons as well as oncologists, because of the adverse effects of treatment on oral and pharyngeal function, the eventual quality of life, and the poor prognosis of advanced disease. Therefore, it is important to use judgment and experience in determining the best method of treatment. We reviewed forty cases of oral tongue cancer patients admitted in the Dental and Facio-Maxillary Surgical Oncology department in National Institute of Cancer Research and Hospital, and department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dhaka Dental College and Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh, during the past four years and followed till the lesion healed or recurred and followed later on upto two years. All cases were thoroughly examined, investigated with routine blood examinations and radiography of the involved region. Preoperative biopsy of the lesion and staging was done in each and every case. Postoperative biopsy was taken where there was a doubt about the possibility of recurrence. Squamous cell carcinoma (well differentiated) is by far the most common malignancy of the oral tongue. Generally a correlation is recognized between tumor size, nodal presence, metastasis, and eventual prognosis. When surgeons detect oral tongue cancer at an early stage, they can often treat it with surgery or can, often treat it with surgery or radiation. In later stages the cancer may require a combination of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Standard and uniform protocol has not been explored till now for the practice in our country. So current management strategies of oral tongue cancer cannot be underestimated.

  3. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral Cancer Basic description Cancer can affect any part of the oral cavity, including the lips, tongue, mouth, and throat. There are 2 kinds of oral cancer: oral cavity cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. The most ...

  4. Speaking legibly: Qualitative perceptions of altered voice among oral tongue cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Philiponis, Genevieve; Kagan, Sarah H

    2015-01-01

    Treatment for oral tongue cancer poses unique challenges to restoring and maintaining personally acceptable, intelligible speech. We report how oral tongue cancer survivors describe their speech after treatment in a qualitative descriptive approach using constant comparative technique to complete a focal analysis of interview data from a larger grounded theory study of oral tongue cancer survivorship. Interviews were completed with 16 tongue cancer survivors 3 months to 12 years postdiagnosis with stage I-IV disease and treated with surgery alone, surgery and radiotherapy, or chemo-radiation. All interview data from the main study were analyzed for themes describing perceptions of speech as oral tongue cancer survivors. Actual speech impairments varied among survivors. None experienced severe impairments that inhibited their daily lives. However, all expressed some level of concern about speech. Concerns about altered speech began when survivors heard their treatment plans and continued through to survivorship without being fully resolved. The overarching theme, maintaining a pattern and character of speech acceptable to the survivor, was termed "speaking legibly" using one survivor's vivid in vivo statement. Speaking legibly integrate the sub-themes of "fears of sounding unusual", "learning to talk again", "problems and adjustments", and "social impact". Clinical and scientific efforts to further understand and address concerns about speech, personal presentation, and identity among those diagnosed with oral tongue are important to improving care processes and patient-centered experience.

  5. Speaking legibly: Qualitative perceptions of altered voice among oral tongue cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Philiponis, Genevieve; Kagan, Sarah H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treatment for oral tongue cancer poses unique challenges to restoring and maintaining personally acceptable, intelligible speech. Methods: We report how oral tongue cancer survivors describe their speech after treatment in a qualitative descriptive approach using constant comparative technique to complete a focal analysis of interview data from a larger grounded theory study of oral tongue cancer survivorship. Interviews were completed with 16 tongue cancer survivors 3 months to 12 years postdiagnosis with stage I-IV disease and treated with surgery alone, surgery and radiotherapy, or chemo-radiation. All interview data from the main study were analyzed for themes describing perceptions of speech as oral tongue cancer survivors. Results: Actual speech impairments varied among survivors. None experienced severe impairments that inhibited their daily lives. However, all expressed some level of concern about speech. Concerns about altered speech began when survivors heard their treatment plans and continued through to survivorship without being fully resolved. The overarching theme, maintaining a pattern and character of speech acceptable to the survivor, was termed “speaking legibly” using one survivor's vivid in vivo statement. Speaking legibly integrate the sub-themes of “fears of sounding unusual”, “learning to talk again”, “problems and adjustments”, and “social impact”. Conclusions: Clinical and scientific efforts to further understand and address concerns about speech, personal presentation, and identity among those diagnosed with oral tongue are important to improving care processes and patient-centered experience. PMID:27981121

  6. Oral tongue cancer in public hospitals in Madrid, Spain (1990-2008)

    PubMed Central

    Herrero-Sánchez, Alicia; Esparza-Gómez, Germán

    2016-01-01

    Background The cancer which appears in the mobile portion of the tongue is the most common neoplasm of the oral cavity. The objective of this study was to analyse oral tongue cancer epidemiology in a population of 610 patients diagnosed between 1990 and 2008 and detailed in the Tumour Registry of the Madrid region. Material and Methods A retrospective analysis based on the following variables provided in the Tumour Registry was achieved: age, gender, histology, stage, location, treatment. Descriptive and analytic statistics with these variables, using Pearson’s Chi-square test to study the relationship between the qualitative variables. Results Patients’ mean age was 61.53±13.95 years, with a gender ratio of 2.09:1 (413 males vs 197 females). The lesion was mainly localized in the lateral border of tongue, with other sites (dorsal face, ventral face, lingual tonsil, contiguous sites, tongue NOS) represented at lower rates. Squamous cell carcinomas (94.9%) far outweighted other histologies (salivary gland tumours, soft tissue tumours, haematolymphoid tumours). 59% of the cases appeared in localized stages, versus 35.2% in regional and 4.8% in distant stages. Surgery was the most frequently used treatment, followed by surgery in combination with radiotherapy. Conclusions Oral tongue cancer is a disease of the elderly, with a male predominance. It mainly appears in its lateral border, localized squamous cell carcinomas representing the great majority of lingual neoplasms. Key words:Oral tongue cancer, squamous cell carcinoma, epidemiology, treatment. PMID:27694779

  7. Risk stratification of early stage oral tongue cancers based on HPV status and p16 immunoexpression.

    PubMed

    Ramshankar, Vijayalakshmi; Soundara, Viveka T; Shyamsundar, Vidyarani; Ramani, Prathiba; Krishnamurthy, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Recent epidemiological data have implicated human papilloma virus (HPV) infection in the pathogenesis of head and neck cancers, especially oropharyngeal cancers. Although, HPV has been detected in varied amounts in persons with oral dysplasia, leukoplakias and malignancies, its involvement in oral tongue carcinogenesis remains ambiguous. HPV DNA prevalence was assessed by PCR with formalin fixed paraffin embedded sections (n=167) of oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma patients and the physical status of the HPV16 DNA was assessed by qPCR. Immunohistochemistry was conducted for p16 evaluation. We found the HPV prevalence in tongue cancers to be 51.2%, HPV 16 being present in 85.2% of the positive cases. A notable finding was a very poor concordance between HPV 16 DNA and p16 IHC findings (kappa<0.2). Further molecular classification of patients based on HPV16 DNA prevalence and p16 overexpression showed that patients with tumours showing p16 overexpression had increased hazard of death (HR=2.395; p=0.005) and disease recurrence (HR=2.581; p=0.002) irrespective of their HPV 16 DNA status. Our study has brought out several key facets which can potentially redefine our understanding of tongue cancer tumorigenesis. It has emphatically shown p16 overexpression to be a single important prognostic variable in defining a high risk group and depicting a poorer prognosis, thus highlighting the need for its routine assessment in tongue cancers. Another significant finding was a very poor concordance between p16 expression and HPV infection suggesting that p16 expression should possibly not be used as a surrogate marker for HPV infection in tongue cancers. Interestingly, the prognostic significance of p16 overexpression is different from that reported in oropharyngeal cancers. The mechanism of HPV independent p16 over expression in oral tongue cancers is possibly a distinct entity and needs to be further studied.

  8. Association of marijuana smoking with oropharyngeal and oral tongue cancers: pooled analysis from the INHANCE consortium.

    PubMed

    Marks, Morgan A; Chaturvedi, Anil K; Kelsey, Karl; Straif, Kurt; Berthiller, Julien; Schwartz, Stephen M; Smith, Elaine; Wyss, Annah; Brennan, Paul; Olshan, Andrew F; Wei, Qingyi; Sturgis, Erich M; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Morgenstern, Hal; Muscat, Joshua; Lazarus, Philip; McClean, Michael; Chen, Chu; Vaughan, Thomas L; Wunsch-Filho, Victor; Curado, Maria Paula; Koifman, Sergio; Matos, Elena; Menezes, Ana; Daudt, Alexander W; Fernandez, Leticia; Posner, Marshall; Boffetta, Paolo; Lee, Yuan-Chin Amy; Hashibe, Mia; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal and oral tongue cancers has increased over the last 20 years which parallels increased use of marijuana among individuals born after 1950. A pooled analysis was conducted comprising individual-level data from nine case-control studies from the United States and Latin America in the INHANCE consortium. Self-reported information on marijuana smoking, demographic, and behavioral factors was obtained from 1,921 oropharyngeal cases, 356 oral tongue cases, and 7,639 controls. Compared with never marijuana smokers, ever marijuana smokers had an elevated risk of oropharyngeal [adjusted OR (aOR), 1.24; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-1.47] and a reduced risk of oral tongue cancer (aOR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.29, 0.75). The risk of oropharyngeal cancer remained elevated among never tobacco and alcohol users. The risk of oral tongue cancer was reduced among never users of tobacco and alcohol. Sensitivity analysis adjusting for potential confounding by HPV exposure attenuated the association of marijuana use with oropharyngeal cancer (aOR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.71-1.25), but had no effect on the oral tongue cancer association. These results suggest that the association of marijuana use with head and neck carcinoma may differ by tumor site. The associations of marijuana use with oropharyngeal and oral tongue cancer are consistent with both possible pro- and anticarcinogenic effects of cannabinoids. Additional work is needed to rule out various sources of bias, including residual confounding by HPV infection and misclassification of marijuana exposure.

  9. The prognostic importance of midline involvement in oral tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Shane; Yu, James B; Wilson, Lynn D; Judson, Benjamin L; Decker, Roy H

    2012-10-01

    To examine the importance of midline involvement and other clinicopathologic factors in predicting the rate of contralateral lymph node metastasis and survival in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma. We used Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data to identify a cohort of 5430 patients with laterally rising tumors. Clinicopathologic factors examined as potentially predictive of contralateral lymph node metastasis included extension to midline, T classification, anatomic site, grade, histologic subtype, race, age, and sex. Survival analysis included the above factors plus lymph node status. T1 tumors and lateral T2 and T3 tumors had rates of contralateral lymph node metastasis ranging from 0.7% to 0.9% on presentation. T4 lesions and midline crossing T2 and T3 lesions had corresponding rates of 8.3% to 13.0%. Primary extension across the midline was associated with a mean survival about half that of strictly lateral tumors and its significance was maintained in multivariate analysis. Patients with T1 disease or T2-3 disease that does not cross midline are in a different prognostic class from patients with T2-3 disease that crosses midline or T4 tumors. These results give the strongest evidence to date that involvement of the midline is a powerful predictor for decreased survival in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

  10. Oral tongue cancer in public hospitals in Madrid, Spain (1990-2008).

    PubMed

    García-Kass, A-I; Herrero-Sánchez, A; Esparza-Gómez, G

    2016-11-01

    The cancer which appears in the mobile portion of the tongue is the most common neoplasm of the oral cavity. The objective of this study was to analyse oral tongue cancer epidemiology in a population of 610 patients diagnosed between 1990 and 2008 and detailed in the Tumour Registry of the Madrid region. A retrospective analysis based on the following variables provided in the Tumour Registry was achieved: age, gender, histology, stage, location, treatment. Descriptive and analytic statistics with these variables, using Pearson's Chi-square test to study the relationship between the qualitative variables. Patients' mean age was 61.53±13.95 years, with a gender ratio of 2.09:1 (413 males vs 197 females). The lesion was mainly localized in the lateral border of tongue, with other sites (dorsal face, ventral face, lingual tonsil, contiguous sites, tongue NOS) represented at lower rates. Squamous cell carcinomas (94.9%) far outweighted other histologies (salivary gland tumours, soft tissue tumours, haematolymphoid tumours). 59% of the cases appeared in localized stages, versus 35.2% in regional and 4.8% in distant stages. Surgery was the most frequently used treatment, followed by surgery in combination with radiotherapy. Oral tongue cancer is a disease of the elderly, with a male predominance. It mainly appears in its lateral border, localized squamous cell carcinomas representing the great majority of lingual neoplasms.

  11. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  12. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral cancer can form in any part of the mouth. Most oral cancers begin in the flat cells that cover the ... your mouth, tongue, and lips. Anyone can get oral cancer, but the risk is higher if you are ...

  13. Suspension of the tongue to the digastric tendon following resection of the anterior mandibular arch for oral cancer prevents postoperative tongue fall and avoids the need for tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Pandey, D

    2012-01-01

    Resection of the anterior arch of the mandible leads to tongue fall and postoperative stridor because of the detachment of tongue musculature from the mandible. In this article, a simple method of tongue suspension is described which would prevent such complications and the need for tracheostomy. This study was carried out on patients with oral cancer requiring resection of the anterior arch of the mandible as a part of the surgical resection at a tertiary centre. This study was performed on 32 patients with oral cancer requiring resection of the anterior arch of the mandible as a part of the surgical resection. Following an appropriate resection of the oral cancer (including the anterior mandibular arch) and neck dissection, a silk suture is used to loop the tongue musculature on either side to the intermediate tendon of the digastric muscle. This technique of tongue suspension was used in 32 patients who required resection of the anterior mandibular arch for oral cancer. Prophylactic tracheostomy was not performed. One patient developed stridor at extubation and required temporary tracheostomy. All other patients could be successfully extubated within 12 h of surgery and none experienced postoperative stridor or sleep apnea. One other patient required temporary tracheostomy for pulmonary toilet as he developed aspiration pneumonitis related to nasogastric feed. This simple method of tongue suspension to the digastric tendon prevents postoperative tongue fall and obviates the need for tracheostomy in most instances.

  14. Surgery in early cancer of the oral tongue (Tl-2). Wide excision versus hemiglossectomy.

    PubMed

    Parikh, H K; Rao, R S; Sukhthankar, P; Deshmane, V H; Parikh, D M

    1998-10-01

    Cancer of the oral tongue is a common disease. Thirty five (35%) percent of patients seen at our hospital are in Stages I&II. The choice of surgical treatment is a wide excision of the lesion (WE) or a hemiglossectomy (HG). This study was carried out to compare the local recu-rrences and survival in patients undergoing either a WE or HG for early cancer of the tongue. One hundred and twenty six (126) patients were evaluated, 40 underwent a WE and 86 HG. The local recurrence was higher in the WE group, 25% compared with 9% in the HG group; which is statistically significant (p=0.02). This was also seen in the Tl subgroup (p=0.003). Survival were better in the HG group (p=0.005), which was also seen for the Tl subgroup (p=0.004). Our study demonstrates that there is a lower incidence of local recurrences following a hemiglossectomy for Tl-2 tumours of the oral tongue with improved survivals. Our recommendation is that hemi-glossectomy should be the optimal surgery performed for early cancer of the oral tongue.

  15. Tumour thickness predicts cervical nodal metastases and survival in early oral tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    O-charoenrat, P; Pillai, G; Patel, S; Fisher, C; Archer, D; Eccles, S; Rhys-Evans, P

    2003-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral tongue is characterized by a high propensity for cervical nodal metastasis, which affects the probability of regional control and survival. Until now, elective treatment of the clinically negative neck in early lesions (T(1-2)) of the oral tongue cancer remains controversial. This study attempted to identify predictive factor(s) for cervical nodal metastasis and treatment outcomes in patients with early stage SCC of the oral tongue treated primarily by surgery. Fifty patients with previously untreated Stage I/II primary tongue carcinomas with available archival specimens treated at the Royal Marsden Hospital between 1981 and 1998 were reviewed. Clinico-pathological features including age, gender, alcohol and tobacco consumption, tumour location, histological grade, tumour-stromal border, growth pattern, tumour thickness, and clinical stage were evaluated and the correlations with cervical metastases and outcome analysis were determined. The overall occult nodal metastatic rate was 40% (20/50). Tumour thickness exceeding 5 mm was statistically significantly correlated with cervical metastases (P = 0.003; relative risk = 2.429). No statistical correlation was observed between other clinico-pathological parameters and nodal metastasis. With a median follow-up of 98 months, 5-year actuarial overall, disease-specific (DSS), and relapse-free survival were 65.71, 67.77, and 68.18%, respectively. Univariate analysis for DSS showed poorer outcomes for patients with age > 60 years (P = 0.0423) and tumour thickness > 5 mm (P = 0.0067). The effect of tumour thickness was maintained (P = 0.005) on multivariate analysis. The present study indicates that the thickness of primary tumour has a strong predictive value for occult cervical metastasis and poor outcomes in patients with Stage I/II oral tongue SCC. Thus, elective neck treatment (surgery or irradiation) is indicated for tumours exceeding 5 mm thickness. Copyright 2003 Elsevier

  16. A longitudinal study of functional outcomes after surgical resection and microvascular reconstruction for oral cancer: tongue mobility and swallowing function.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lindsay; Rieger, Jana M; Harris, Jeffrey; Seikaly, Hadi

    2010-11-01

    Controversy exists regarding physiologic outcomes related to the tongue after radial forearm free flap (RFFF) reconstruction of hemiglossectomy defects. The purpose of this study is to report swallowing and tongue mobility outcomes for patients with RFFF reconstruction of the anterior two thirds of the tongue. Swallowing and tongue mobility were assessed at 4 different time points over the course of 1 year of treatment for 15 patients who underwent RFFF reconstruction of the anterior two thirds of the tongue. Preoperative swallowing function in the treatment group was compared with a patient group that had no involvement of the tongue. A comparison group of 14 patients with nasopharyngeal cancer was used to compare preintervention function in patients with and without lesions of the tongue. No differences existed between the experimental and comparison groups before intervention. Two significant differences were found for swallowing ability and tongue mobility in the experimental group. Some of the measures at 1 month postoperatively were significantly different from some of the preoperative measures for liquid swallows and posterior-tongue mobility. All measures returned to baseline by the study's end. Although some minor deficits exist in swallowing and tongue mobility after RFFF reconstruction, it appears that these problems are no longer evident 12 months postoperatively. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Tumour thickness as a predictor of nodal metastases in oral cancer: comparison between tongue and floor of mouth subsites.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Ebrahimi, Ardalan; Gupta, Ruta; Gao, Kan; Elliott, Michael; Palme, Carsten E; Clark, Jonathan R

    2014-12-01

    To identify whether tumour thickness as a predictor of nodal metastases in oral squamous cell carcinoma differs between tongue and floor of mouth (FOM) subsites. Retrospective review of 343 patients treated between 1987 and 2012. The neck was considered positive in the presence of pathologically proven nodal metastases on neck dissection or during follow-up. There were 222 oral tongue and 121 FOM tumours. In patients with FOM tumours 2.1-4mm thick, the rate of nodal metastases was 41.7%. In contrast, for tongue cancers of a similar thickness the rate was only 11.2%. This increased to 38.5% in patients with tongue cancers that were 4.1-6mm thick. Comparing these two subsites, FOM cancers cross the critical 20% threshold of probability for nodal metastases between 1 and 2mm whereas tongue cancers cross the 20% threshold just under 4mm thickness. On logistic regression adjusting for relevant covariates, there was a significant difference in the propensity for nodal metastases based on tumour thickness according to subsite (p=0.028). Thin FOM tumours (2.1-4mm) have a high rate of nodal metastases. Elective neck dissection is appropriate in FOM tumours ⩾2mm thick and in tongue tumours ⩾4mm thick. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Elective neck irradiation in the treatment of cancer of the oral tongue

    SciTech Connect

    Leborgne, F.; Leborgne, J.H.; Barlocci, L.A.; Ortega, B.

    1987-08-01

    A total of 69 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue Stages T1-2-3 N0 were treated between 1952 and 1982 at one cancer center in Montevideo, Uruguay. Of 52 patients with the primary disease controlled, 2 had elective cervical lymph node dissection, and were therefore excluded from the study, 25 were treated with elective neck irradiation, and 25 were followed without irradiation to the neck. In the untreated group, 40% developed neck node metastases, while this was observed only in 20% of the group receiving elective neck irradiation, but only 4% recurred in the elective irradiated areas of the neck (p: 0.0028). The survival was the same for each group (5-year absolute survival with NED 67% for the neck irradiation group and 64% for the unirradiated group). From this retrospective study, we conclude that elective neck irradiation in carcinoma of the oral tongue decreases the incidence of neck metastases but an improvement in survival of these patients was not demonstrated.

  19. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound mapping of sentinel lymph nodes in oral tongue cancer-a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gvetadze, Shalva R; Xiong, Ping; Lv, Mingming; Li, Jun; Hu, Jingzhou; Ilkaev, Konstantin D; Yang, Xin; Sun, Jian

    2017-03-01

    To assess the usefulness of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) with peritumoral injection of microbubble contrast agent for detecting the sentinel lymph nodes for oral tongue carcinoma. The study was carried out on 12 patients with T1-2cN0 oral tongue cancer. A radical resection of the primary disease was planned; a modified radical supraomohyoid neck dissection was reserved for patients with larger lesions (T2, n = 8). The treatment plan and execution were not influenced by sentinel node mapping outcome. The Sonovue(™) contrast agent (Bracco Imaging, Milan, Italy) was utilized. After detection, the position and radiologic features of the sentinel nodes were recorded. The identification rate of the sentinel nodes was 91.7%; one patient failed to demonstrate any enhanced areas. A total of 15 sentinel nodes were found in the rest of the 11 cases, with a mean of 1.4 nodes for each patient. The sentinel nodes were localized in: Level IA-1 (6.7%) node; Level IB-11 (73.3%) nodes; Level IIA-3 (20.0%) nodes. No contrast-related adverse effects were observed. For oral tongue tumours, CEUS is a feasible and potentially widely available approach of sentinel node mapping. Further clinical research is required to establish the position of CEUS detection of the sentinel nodes in oral cavity cancers.

  20. A New Accurate 3D Measurement Tool to Assess the Range of Motion of the Tongue in Oral Cancer Patients: A Standardized Model.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Simone; van Alphen, Maarten J A; Jacobi, Irene; Smeele, Ludwig E; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Balm, Alfons J M

    2016-02-01

    In oral cancer treatment, function loss such as speech and swallowing deterioration can be severe, mostly due to reduced lingual mobility. Until now, there is no standardized measurement tool for tongue mobility and pre-operative prediction of function loss is based on expert opinion instead of evidence based insight. The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of a triple-camera setup for the measurement of tongue range of motion (ROM) in healthy adults and its feasibility in patients with partial glossectomy. A triple-camera setup was used, and 3D coordinates of the tongue in five standardized tongue positions were achieved in 15 healthy volunteers. Maximum distances between the tip of the tongue and the maxillary midline were calculated. Each participant was recorded twice, and each movie was analysed three times by two separate raters. Intrarater, interrater and test-retest reliability were the main outcome measures. Secondly, feasibility of the method was tested in ten patients treated for oral tongue carcinoma. Intrarater, interrater and test-retest reliability all showed high correlation coefficients of >0.9 in both study groups. All healthy subjects showed perfect symmetrical tongue ROM. In patients, significant differences in lateral tongue movements were found, due to restricted tongue mobility after surgery. This triple-camera setup is a reliable measurement tool to assess three-dimensional information of tongue ROM. It constitutes an accurate tool for objective grading of reduced tongue mobility after partial glossectomy.

  1. Effects of exercise on swallowing and tongue strength in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer treated with primary radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, C L; Husaini, H; Falciglia, D; DeLacure, M; Branski, R C; Kraus, D; Lee, N; Ho, M; Ganz, C; Smith, B; Sanfilippo, N

    2014-05-01

    Tongue strength is reduced in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for oral/oropharyngeal cancer. Tongue strengthening protocols have resulted in improved lingual strength and swallowing in healthy individuals, as well as in patients following a neurological event. However, no studies have examined the efficacy of tongue strengthening exercises on tongue strength, swallowing, and quality of life (QOL; Head and Neck Cancer Inventory) in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. A randomized clinical trial examined the effects of a tongue strengthening programme paired with traditional exercises vs. traditional exercises alone. Dependent variables included tongue strength, swallowing, and QOL in a group of patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer treated with primary radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Differences with regard to tongue strength and oropharyngeal swallow efficiency (OPSE) were not observed within or between groups. QOL in the eating and speech domains improved following treatment in both groups. However, the experimental group demonstrated greater impairment in QOL in the social disruption domain following treatment, whereas the control group demonstrated a slight improvement in functioning. Tongue strengthening did not yield a statistically significant improvement in either tongue strength or swallowing measures in this patient cohort. Patient compliance and treatment timing may be factors underlying these outcomes.

  2. Is it time to incorporate 'depth of infiltration' in the T staging of oral tongue and floor of mouth cancer?

    PubMed

    Piazza, Cesare; Montalto, Nausica; Paderno, Alberto; Taglietti, Valentina; Nicolai, Piero

    2014-04-01

    To summarize recent acquisitions in three-dimensional tongue and floor of mouth anatomy that can help in better evaluation of the pathways of cancer progression within these oral subsites, thus giving some hints for refining of the current TNM staging system. The Visual Human Project is an initiative aimed at establishing a three-dimensional dataset of anatomy of two cadavers made available free to the scientific community. Visual human data have been analyzed by specific software thus improving our three-dimensional understanding of the tongue myostructure. It is already known that there is limited prognostic utility in using the two-dimensional surface diameter alone as criterion for T1-T3 definition. Recently, also the T4a categorization for the infiltration of 'deep' or extrinsic tongue muscles has been criticized. This is largely because the descriptor 'deep' does not take into account the fact that considerable portions of these muscles lie in a very superficial plane. Different prognosticators have been proposed for inclusion into the TNM staging system of oral cancer but 'depth of tumor infiltration' seems to be the most robust, universally recognized, and reproducible in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative settings. Oral tongue and floor of mouth cancer needs to be classified according to a revised TNM staging system in which 'depth of infiltration' should be taken into account. An 'ideal cut off' for distinguishing 'low' (T1-T2) from 'high-risk' (T3-T4) categories has been proposed based on the literature review, but needs retrospective as well as large prospective trials before its validation.

  3. Disruptive TP53 Mutation is Associated with Aggressive Disease Characteristics in an Orthotopic Murine Model of Oral Tongue Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Daisuke; Xie, Tong-Xin; Ow, Thomas J.; Zhao, Mei; Pickering, Curtis R.; Zhou, Ge; Sandulache, Vlad C.; Wheeler, David A.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Caulin, Carlos; Myers, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To characterize tumor growth and metastatic potential in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines in an orthotopic murine model of oral tongue cancer, and to correlate TP53 mutation status with these findings. Experimental Design Cells from each of 48 HNSCC cell lines were orthotopically injected into the oral tongues of nude mice. Tumor volume, cervical lymph node metastasis, and mouse survival were recorded. Direct sequencing of the TP53 gene and western blot analysis for the p53 protein after induction with 5-fluorouracil was performed. Cell lines were categorized as either mutant TP53 or wild-type TP53, and lines with TP53 mutation were further categorized on the basis of type of mutation (disruptive or non-disruptive), and level of p53 protein expression. The behavior of tumors in these different groups was compared. Results The 48 HNSCC cell lines showed a wide range of behavior from highly aggressive and metastatic to no tumor formation. Mice injected with cells harboring disruptive TP53 mutations had faster tumor growth, greater incidence of cervical lymph node metastasis, and shorter survival than mice injected with cells lacking these mutations. Conclusions HNSCC cell lines display a wide spectrum of behavior in an orthotopic model of oral cancer. Cell lines with disruptive TP53 mutations are more aggressive in this system, corroborating clinical reports that have linked these mutations to poor patient outcome. PMID:21903770

  4. Disruptive TP53 mutation is associated with aggressive disease characteristics in an orthotopic murine model of oral tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Sano, Daisuke; Xie, Tong-Xin; Ow, Thomas J; Zhao, Mei; Pickering, Curtis R; Zhou, Ge; Sandulache, Vlad C; Wheeler, David A; Gibbs, Richard A; Caulin, Carlos; Myers, Jeffrey N

    2011-11-01

    To characterize tumor growth and metastatic potential in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines in an orthotopic murine model of oral tongue cancer and to correlate TP53 mutation status with these findings. Cells from each of 48 HNSCC cell lines were orthotopically injected into the oral tongues of nude mice. Tumor volume, cervical lymph node metastasis, and mouse survival were recorded. Direct sequencing of the TP53 gene and Western blot analysis for the p53 protein after induction with 5-fluorouracil was conducted. Cell lines were categorized as either mutant TP53 or wild-type TP53, and lines with TP53 mutation were further categorized on the basis of type of mutation (disruptive or nondisruptive) and level of p53 protein expression. The behavior of tumors in these different groups was compared. These 48 HNSCC cell lines showed a wide range of behavior from highly aggressive and metastatic to no tumor formation. Mice injected with cells harboring disruptive TP53 mutations had faster tumor growth, greater incidence of cervical lymph node metastasis, and shorter survival than mice injected with cells lacking these mutations. HNSCC cell lines display a wide spectrum of behavior in an orthotopic model of oral cancer. Cell lines with disruptive TP53 mutations are more aggressive in this system, corroborating clinical reports that have linked these mutations to poor patient outcome. ©2011 AACR

  5. Invasion characteristics of oral tongue cancer: frequency of reporting and effect on survival in a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Michael; Liu, Lihua; Ward, Kevin; Zhang, Juanjuan; Almon, Lyn; Su, Gan; Berglund, Lenard; Chen, Amy; Sinha, Uttam K; Young, John L

    2009-09-01

    The 2000 College of American Pathologists (CAP) guidelines recommend that a characterization of carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract, including tongue cancer, should include depth of invasion (DI) and the presence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) or perineural invasion (PNI). This study included patients who were diagnosed with cancer of the oral tongue, who underwent tumor resection, and who were reported to either the Metropolitan Atlanta and Rural Georgia Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry or the Los Angeles SEER registry. The authors assessed the completeness of pathology reporting with respect to the documentation of PNI or LVI and DI. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine factors that influenced reporting while taking into consideration clustering of observations within the hospitals. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses were conducted to examine the impact of tumor invasion characteristics on mortality while controlling for other prognostic factors. DI reporting increased from 13% between 1997 and 1999 to 23% between 2000 and 2004 after the CAP issued its recommendations; whereas mode of invasion (the presence of LVI and/or PNI) reporting for the same period increased from 13% to 38%. The observed increase in reporting was most pronounced in the first 2 years (2000 and 2001) and appeared to decline again afterward. Tumor invasion >3 mm in depth and the presence of PNI were among the strongest predictors of survival in multivariate analyses. The current results indicated the importance of reporting tumor invasion characteristics for patients diagnosed with cancer of the oral tongue. The findings also underscore the need for continuous monitoring of adherence to the CAP protocol.

  6. Histamine H4 receptor signalling in tongue cancer and its potential role in oral carcinogenesis - a short report.

    PubMed

    Salem, Abdelhakim; Almahmoudi, Rabeia; Listyarifah, Dyah; Siponen, Maria; Maaninka, Katariina; Al-Samadi, Ahmed; Salo, Tuula; Eklund, Kari K

    2017-06-26

    Recent reports indicate that histamine and its novel, high-affinity histamine H4 receptor (H4R) play a role in carcinogenesis, and thus H4R signalling has become a focus of increasing interest in the pathogenesis of many cancers. The roles of H4R in oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) and oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) are unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess H4R expression in OTSCC patients and in OTSCC-derived cell lines. Biopsies taken from OED, OTSCC and healthy oral mucosa were studied by immunostaining. Primary human oral keratinocytes (HOKs) and two OTSCC-derived cell lines (HSC-3 and SCC-25) were used for the in vitro studies. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure oncogene expression in the stimulated HOKs. We found that H4R-immunoreactivity was significantly reduced in the OED and OTSCC samples, especially in the samples with higher histopathological grades and noticeably increased mast cell counts. The presence of H4R in HSC-3 cells had clearly waned, in contrast to the HOKs. Gene expression data indicated that histamine-relevant inflammatory and environmental elements may participate in the regulation of oncogenes. Our results suggest an association between H4R and oral carcinogenesis. Furthermore, our findings raise a potential implication of histamine-mediated factors in the regulation of oncogenes, possibly via mast cells, as crucial components of the tumor microenvironment. The identification of new elements that govern oral cancer development is highly relevant for the development of novel therapeutic approaches in OTSCC.

  7. Evaluation of the budding and depth of invasion (BD) model in oral tongue cancer biopsies.

    PubMed

    Almangush, Alhadi; Leivo, Ilmo; Siponen, Maria; Sundquist, Elias; Mroueh, Rayan; Mäkitie, Antti A; Soini, Ylermi; Haglund, Caj; Nieminen, Pentti; Salo, Tuula

    2017-08-02

    It is of great clinical importance to identify simple prognostic markers from preoperative biopsies that could guide treatment planning. Here, we compared tumor budding (B), depth of invasion (D), and the combined scores (i.e., budding and depth of invasion (BD) histopathologic model) in preoperative biopsies and the corresponding postoperative specimens of oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC). Tumor budding and depth of invasion were evaluated in the pre- and postoperative samples from 100 patients treated for OTSCC. Sensitivity and specificity statistics were used. Our results showed statistically significant (P < 0.001) relationship between pre- and postoperative BD scores. There was an agreement between the pre- and postoperative BD model scores in 83 cases (83%) with 57.1% sensitivity (95% CI 39.4 to 73.7%) and 96.9% specificity (95% CI 89.3 to 99.6%). Our findings suggest that the BD model, analyzed from representative biopsies, could be used for the treatment planning of OTSCC.

  8. Tongue biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Results Mean Abnormal results may mean: Amyloidosis Tongue (oral) cancer Viral ulcer Benign tumors Risks Risks for this ... D.A.M. Editorial team. Biopsy Read more Oral Cancer Read more Tongue Disorders Read more A.D. ...

  9. miR-15b inhibits cancer-initiating cell phenotypes and chemoresistance of cisplatin by targeting TRIM14 in oral tongue squamous cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xijun; Guo, Hongmei; Yao, Banjamin; Helms, Julia

    2017-03-27

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) is one of the most lethal cancers within the oral cavity and its prognosis remains dismal due to the paucity of effective therapeutic targets. The formation of cancer-initiating cells (CICs) and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are pivotal events involved in the dismal prognosis. They have been shown to be related to the resistance to cisplatin treatment. In the present study, we showed that TRIM14 induced formation of cancer-initiating cells and EMT in TSCC SCC25 cells. Its overexpression promoted cisplatin resistance in the SCC25 cells. We found that overexpression of miR-15b suppressed TRIM14 and inhibited CIC phenotypes in the SCC25 cells. Moreover, overexpression of miR-15b promoted mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) in the SCC25 cells and sensitized cisplatin-resistant SCC25 (SCC25-res) cells to cisplatin. Thus, we conclude that miR-15b inhibited cancer stem cell phenotypes and its restoration reversed the chemoresistance of cisplatin by targeting TRIM14 in TSCC. Elucidating the molecular mechanism of EMT and cancer stem cells in TSCC may further aid in the understanding of the pathogenesis and progression of the disease, and offer novel targets for the discovery of new drugs.

  10. Evaluation of Microscopic Disease in Oral Tongue Cancer Using Whole-Mount Histopathologic Techniques: Implications for the Management of Head-and-Neck Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Sorcha; Poon, Ian; Markel, Dan; Vena, Dan; Higgins, Kevin; Enepekides, Dan; Rapheal, Simon; Wong, John; Allo, Ghassan; Morgen, Eric; Khaoum, Nader; Smith, Ben; Balogh, Judith; MacKenzie, Robert; Davidson, Jean; Wang, Dan; Yaffe, Martin

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To map the distribution of microscopic disease (MD) in head-and-neck cancer by analyzing digital images of whole-mounted serial sections of tongue cancer specimens. Methods and Materials: Ten T1-3 oral tongue cancer specimens were evaluated. The specimens were sliced into 3-mm blocks from which one or more 4-{mu}m slides were taken and digitized to create whole-mounted serial sections. Gross tumor and microscopic disease were digitally contoured on each slide. Lines perpendicular to the gross tumor volume (GTV) edge were created at 0.05-mm intervals and the distance between GTV and MD measured. Results: Of 88 slides assessed, 44 (50%) had evidence of MD. Of the 63,809 perpendicular lines drawn along the GTV edges, 2320 (3.6%) encountered microscopic disease along their path. The majority of MD abutted the GTV, and only 26.7% was noncontiguous with the GTV edge. The maximum distance from the border was 7.8 mm. Ninety-nine percent of all MD was within 4.75 mm and 95% was within 3.95 mm of the GTV. Conclusion: In this study we were able to assess the distribution of MD more accurately than has been possible with routine pathologic techniques. The results indicate that when the GTV is correctly identified, there is very little MD to be found outside this volume. This has implications for the volume of tissue resected at surgery and the volume included in the clinical target volume in conformal radiotherapy planning.

  11. Ablation of advanced tongue or base of tongue cancer and reconstruction with free flap: functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chien, C Y; Su, C Y; Hwang, C F; Chuang, H C; Jeng, S F; Chen, Y C

    2006-04-01

    To evaluate the functional outcomes of patients who underwent total or nearly total glossectomy for advanced tongue or base of tongue cancer. We used the radial forearm free flap (RFFF), anterior lateral thigh flap (ALTF) or fibular osteocutaneous flap (FOCF) to reconstruct the oral defect after radical resection in 39 patients undergoing total or nearly total glossectomy with laryngeal preservation. Good functional outcomes, measured by independent feeding, speech and swallowing were achieved in 35, 36 and 35 patients, respectively. The cumulative 4-year survival rates were 63.8% for tongue cancer and 42.9% for base of tongue cancer. Reconstruction with free flaps is a feasible method to restore the functional outcomes in speech and deglutition among patients who undergo total or nearly total glossectomy with laryngeal preservation.

  12. Accuracy of MRI in Prediction of Tumour Thickness and Nodal Stage in Oral Tongue and Gingivobuccal Cancer With Clinical Correlation and Staging

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Pratap Singh; Parihar, Akhilesh; Goel, Ashok Kumar; Waghwani, Kapil; Gupta, Richa; Bhutekar, Umesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Squamous cell carcinoma of lower gingivo-buccal complex and tongue are the most common cancer in the Indian sub-continent. The value of imaging in the staging of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is in judging operability, assessment of the prognostic characteristics and dimensions of the primary tumour, depth of tumour invasion, the presence of cervical metastasis and detection of bone infiltration. Aim This study evaluated squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity (tongue and gingivo-buccal complex) on the basis of their appearance, soft tissue extent, depth of tumour invasion and staging. Further, this study assessed the accuracy of MRI in the detection of cervical lymph nodal metastasis on the basis of ADC values on diffusion weighted MR sequence. Materials and Methods T1- and T2-weighted MR, diffusion-weighted sequences and post contrast T1W sequences were performed in various planes on biopsy proven squamous cell carcinomas (61 cases) involving tongue and/or gingivo-buccal region. Depth of tumour invasion was calculated on axial images of post contrast T1W images. The Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) was measured by using two b factors (500 and 1000 s/mm2). MRI findings were compared clinically and histopathologically. Results Average depth of invasion calculated on MRI was 8.47mm and by histopathology was 6.85mm. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was 0.988. Shrinkage factor was 0.8. A 71% of patients with depth of invasion greater than 9mm showed evidence of cervical lymph nodal metastasis at one or another levels. Cut-off value to discriminate between malignant and benign lymph nodes was 1.038 x10-3 mm2/s in the present study. Conclusion Depth of tumour invasion in oral malignancies can be measured reliably on MRI which helps in predicting cervical lymph node metastasis. Benign or malignant cervical lymph nodes can be differentiated on diffusion-weighted imaging of MRI on the basis of their ADC values. PMID:27504375

  13. Investigation of the presence of HPV related oropharyngeal and oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Jeffrey; Monjane, Leonel; Prasad, Manju; Carrilho, Carla; Judson, Benjamin L

    2015-12-01

    Cervical cancer caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) is endemic in East Africa. Recent, dramatic, increases in the incidence of oropharyngeal cancer in the United States and Europe are linked to the same high risk HPV genotypes responsible for cervical cancer. Currently, there is extremely limited data regarding the role of HPV in head and neck cancers in Africa. Evidence of HPV as an etiologic agent in head and neck cancers in Africa would have important prevention and treatment implications. A retrospective single institution review of oral tongue and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas diagnosed between 2005 and 2013 was performed. Individual case data for 51 patients with biopsy proven squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) from the oropharynx (n=22) and oral tongue (n=29) were identified. Formalin fixed, paraffin embedded biopsy samples were obtained and evaluated for p16 by immunohistochemistry and HPV genotype 16 specific oncogenes, E6 and E7, by PCR. All of the positive controls, but none of the oropharyngeal samples stained positively for p16. Two of the oral tongue samples stained positive for p16. None of the oropharyngeal or oral tongue cases demonstrated PCR products for HPV-16 E6 or E7. Though Mozambique has extremely high levels of HPV positive cervical cancer this study demonstrates an absence of HPV positive oropharyngeal or oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma within biopsy samples from a single referral hospital in Maputo, the capital of Mozambique. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Tongue-out versus tongue-in position during intensity-modulated radiotherapy for base of tongue cancer: Clinical implications for minimizing post-radiotherapy swallowing dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kil, Whoon Jong; Kulasekere, Christina; Hatch, Craig; Bugno, Jacob; Derrwaldt, Ronald

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether different tongue positions change the radiation doses to swallowing organs at risks: the pharyngeal constrictor, oral cavity, and larynx during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for base of tongue (BOT) cancer. IMRT plans with Tongue-out (IMRT-TO) and tongue-in position (IMRT-TI) was compared in 3 cases. Distance from BOT to pharyngeal constrictor was increased to 1.8 ± 0.8 cm with IMRT-TO from 0.9 ± 0.6 cm with IMRT-TI (P < .01). Compared to IMRT-TI, IMRT-TO significantly decreased the radiation dose to the anterior oral cavity, oral tongue, superior pharyngeal constrictor, middle pharyngeal constrictor, and supraglottic larynx (all P ≤ .04). IMRT-TO also had a smaller volume irradiated than IMRT-TI to the anterior oral cavity and the oral tongue receiving ≥30 Gy (V30) and V35, and superior pharyngeal constrictor and middle pharyngeal constrictor for V55 and V65 (all P ≤ .04). Dosimetric advantage with IMRT-TO over IMRT-TI may potentially reduce post-IMRT swallowing dysfunction in selected patients with BOT cancer. 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. [The delay of pharyngeal phase initiation vs the course of the deglutition act in patients after partial or total tongue excision due to oral cancer].

    PubMed

    Halczy-Kowalik, Ludmiła; Wysocki, Rościsław; Posio, Violetta

    2006-01-01

    The coordination of the respiratory and alimentary function is indispensable to transport the food from the oral cavity to the stomach without aspiration risk. Disturbances during pharyngeal phase of swallowing, registered after oral tumour excision, are caused by diminishing of the tongue shape, decreasing of gustatory sensitivity and oral stereognosis. The aim of the work is to estimate the influence the oral tissue excision to the pharyngeal phase of deglution. videoradiological examination of deglutition by W.J. Dodds - for 95 patients after oral tumour excision, with swallowing disturbances. Duration of oral and pharyngeal activities, degree of realization these activities and aspiration risk were valued. Abnormal mobility of tongue, lack of palato-pharyngeal and glosso-pharyngeal closure, abnormal formation of bolus accompanied to delayed initiation of pharyngeal phase. The delay of pharyngeal phase initiation was the most important for beginning and ending of the larynx closure, oesophagus opening, pharynx emptying. This delay wasn't statistically significant for duration these activities. The retention in oral cavity and in lower throat, additional deglutitions, inter-deglutition and postdeglutition leakage correlated with delay of the pharyngeal phase initiation. 1. The delay of pharyngeal phase initation after oral tumour excision is caused by oral swallowing disturbances. 2. The delay of pharyngeal phase initiation after oral tumor excision is dependent on the range of surgery and reconstruction. 3. The delay of pharyngeal phase initiation after oral tumour excision is important for beginning and ending of the pharyngeal phase activities, it isn't important for their duration. 4. The deficit of oral sensory stimuli causes desynchronization of the pharyngeal phase activities and diminishes the swallowing efficiency. 5. Improvement of the swallowing efficiency after partial or total tongue excision is possible by oral phase elongation, by monitoring of the

  16. Potential screening and early diagnosis method for cancer: Tongue diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Shuwen; Yang, Xi; Qi, Quan; Pan, Yuefen; Chen, Yongchao; Shen, Junjun; Liao, Haihong; Ji, Zhaoning

    2016-06-01

    Tongue diagnosis, as a unique method of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), was used to discriminate physiological functions and pathological conditions by observing the changes of the tongue and tongue coating. The aims of the present study were to explore a potential screening and early diagnosis method of cancer through evaluating the differences of the images of tongue and tongue coating and the microbiome on the tongue coating. The DS01-B tongue diagnostic information acquisition system was used to photograph and analyze the tongue and tongue coating. The next-generation sequencing technology was used to determine the V2-V4 hypervariable regions of 16S rDNA to investigate the microbiome on the tongue coating. Bioinformatics and statistical methods were used to analyze the microbial community structure and diversity. Comparing with the healthy people, the number of mirror-like tongue, thick tongue coating and the moisture of tongue were increased in cancers. The dominant color of the tongue in the healthy people was reddish while it was purple in the cancers. The relative abundance of Neisseria, Haemophilus, Fusobacterium and Porphyromonas in the healthy people were higher than that in the cancers. We also found 6 kinds of special microorganisms at species level in cancers. The study suggested that tongue diagnosis may provide potential screening and early diagnosis method for cancer.

  17. Potential screening and early diagnosis method for cancer: Tongue diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    HAN, SHUWEN; YANG, XI; QI, QUAN; PAN, YUEFEN; CHEN, YONGCHAO; SHEN, JUNJUN; LIAO, HAIHONG; JI, ZHAONING

    2016-01-01

    Tongue diagnosis, as a unique method of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), was used to discriminate physiological functions and pathological conditions by observing the changes of the tongue and tongue coating. The aims of the present study were to explore a potential screening and early diagnosis method of cancer through evaluating the differences of the images of tongue and tongue coating and the microbiome on the tongue coating. The DS01-B tongue diagnostic information acquisition system was used to photograph and analyze the tongue and tongue coating. The next-generation sequencing technology was used to determine the V2-V4 hypervariable regions of 16S rDNA to investigate the microbiome on the tongue coating. Bioinformatics and statistical methods were used to analyze the microbial community structure and diversity. Comparing with the healthy people, the number of mirror-like tongue, thick tongue coating and the moisture of tongue were increased in cancers. The dominant color of the tongue in the healthy people was reddish while it was purple in the cancers. The relative abundance of Neisseria, Haemophilus, Fusobacterium and Porphyromonas in the healthy people were higher than that in the cancers. We also found 6 kinds of special microorganisms at species level in cancers. The study suggested that tongue diagnosis may provide potential screening and early diagnosis method for cancer. PMID:27035407

  18. Quality of life outcome measures using UW-QOL questionnaire v4 in early oral cancer/squamous cell cancer resections of the tongue and floor of mouth with reconstruction solely using local methods.

    PubMed

    Boyapati, Raghuram P; Shah, Ketan C; Flood, Valerie; Stassen, Leo F A

    2013-09-01

    Cancer treatment either by surgery alone or in a combination of surgery, radiotherapy±chemotherapy has significant consequences on the physical, mental, emotional and psychosocial wellbeing of the patient. Measurement of quality of life (QOL) is necessary to understand the patient's perception of their own treatment, as clinicians' views can be biased. Reconstruction of a cancerous defect with a free vascular flap is ideal in large, often composite defects, provided it is appropriate to the advanced stage and prognosis of the disease, medical condition of the patient, availability of surgical and financial resources and allows the prosthetic rehabilitation of the anatomic area. Using University of Washington Quality of life 4 questionnaire (UW-QOL4), we assessed the QOL of 38 patients, who underwent local surgical reconstructions after resection of T1/T2 tongue/floor of mouth squamous cell carcinoma defects. Objective assessment of speech and swallow function was also carried out using therapy outcome measure (TOM) scores by the speech and language therapy team (SALT) aiming to see the differences in the scores obtained in patients who underwent post-operative radiotherapy. Our study, conducted 6months after completion of all oncologic treatment for the primary disease, showed satisfactory levels of quality of life parameters with good function showing that local reconstructive methods are successful and may have benefits in the management of early oral cancers involving the tongue and floor of mouth. They are beneficial by providing a good quality in terms of function, by reducing the operating time, the surgical morbidity, simplifying post-operative care and thereby becoming an efficient, effective and a cost effective method. Copyright © 2012 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Is an Elective Neck Dissection Necessary for All Cases of N0 Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma? -Elective Neck Dissection may be Performed for Tongue Cancer with Tumor Thickness More than 4 mm.

    PubMed

    Otsuru, Mitsunobu; Aoki, Takayuki; Ota, Yoshihide; Denda, Yuya; Akiba, Takeshi; Sekine, Riyo; Yoshida, Yoshifumi; Osaka, Ryuta

    2016-09-20

    We investigated whether neck dissection should be performed to prevent T1-2N0M0 tongue cancer by using the Weiss and colleague's decision tree method. The results showed that preventive neck dissection should not be recommended for T1-2N0M0 tongue cancer. However, preventive neck dissection is a suitable approach when treating tongue cancer tumors with a thickness of ≥ 4 mm.

  20. Sensory outcomes of the anterior tongue after lingual nerve repair in oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Elfring, T T; Boliek, C A; Seikaly, H; Harris, J; Rieger, J M

    2012-03-01

    Primary treatment of oropharyngeal cancer often involves surgical resection and reconstruction of the affected area. However, during base of tongue reconstruction the lingual nerve is often severed on one or both sides, affecting sensation in the preserved tissue of the anterior tongue. The loss of specific tongue sensations could negatively affect a person's oral function and quality of life. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of different types of lingual nerve intervention on sensory function for patients with base of tongue cancer as compared to healthy, age-matched adults. Subjects included 30 patients who had undergone primary oropharyngeal reconstruction with a radial forearm free-flap and 30 matched controls. Sensations tested were temperature, two-point discrimination, light touch, taste, oral stereognosis and texture on the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. Results indicated that type of surgical nerve repair may not have a significant impact on overall sensory outcomes, providing mixed results for either nerve repair technique. Sensations for the nonoperated tongue side and operated side with lingual nerve intact were comparable to matched controls, with mixed outcomes for nerve repair. The poorest sensory outcomes were observed in patients with the lingual nerve severed, while all patients with lingual nerve intervention exhibited deteriorated taste sensation on the affected tongue side. Overall, patients in this study who had undergone oropharyngeal reconstruction with lingual nerve intervention exhibited decreased levels of sensation on the operated tongue side, with minimal differences between types of lingual nerve repair. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Institute, components of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. For more copies contact: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Oral Health Information Clearinghouse 1 NOHIC Way Bethesda, MD 20892-3500 1–866–232–4528 www. nidcr. ...

  2. Size of cervical lymph node and metastasis in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue and floor of mouth.

    PubMed

    Jarungroongruangchai, Weerawut; Charoenpitakchai, Mongkol; Silpeeyodom, Tawatchai; Pruksapong, Chatchai; Burusapat, Chairat

    2014-02-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral tongue and floor of mouth are the most common head and neck cancers. Regional metastasis of SCC is most likely found at the cervical lymph node. Size and characteristics of pathologically suspicious lymph nodes are related to the aggressiveness of the primary tumor: The objective of this study is to analyze the conrrelation between sizes of cervical node and metastasis in SCC of oral tongue and floor of mouth. Retrospective review was conducted firom the patient's charts between January 2008 and December 2012. Clinical, histopathology and surgical records were reviewed. Cervical lymph nodes ofSCC of oral tongue and floor of mouth were reviewed and divided into four groups depending on their size (1-5 mm, 6-9 mm, 10-30 mm and more than 30 am,). A p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. 196 patients with SCC of the oral cavity were recorded. Sixteen patients ofSCC of the oral tongue and 15patients of SCC of the floor of mouth underwent neck dissection (641 cervical nodes). Most ofthe patients were diagnosed with stage 3 (41.94%). Extracapsular extension was found in 72.15% of SCC of oral tongue and 73.33 % of SCC ofthe floor of mouth. Size of cervical lymph nodes less than 10 mm was found to be metastasis at 9.27% and 10.82% of SCC of oral tongue and floor of mouth, respectively. Cervical node metastasis can be found in SCC of the oral tongue and floor ofmouth with clinlically negative node andsize of cervical node less than 10 mm. Here in, size of cervical node less than 10 mm was still important due to the chance for metastasis especially high grade tumors, advanced stage cancer and lymphovascular invasion.

  3. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Tongue in the Pediatric Age Group

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Luc G. T.; Patel, Snehal G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Ganly, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare outcomes of a pediatric cohort of patients compared with a matched cohort of adult patients, all diagnosed as having squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral tongue. Outcomes of oral cancer in pediatric patients have not been studied, to our knowledge. Design Retrospective matched-pair cohort study. Setting Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. Patients A total of 10 pediatric and 40 adult patients diagnosed as having SCC of the oral tongue. Main Outcome Measures Overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results The 5-year OS was equivalent in the 2 groups: 70% in the pediatric group and 64% in the adult group (P=.97). The 5-year DSS was also equivalent: 80% in the pediatric group and 76% in the adult group (P=.90). The 5-year RFS was 70% in the pediatric group and 78% in the adult group (P=.54). Conclusions When pediatric and adult patients were matched for sex, tobacco use history, TNM status, surgical procedure, and adjuvant radiotherapy, outcomes for OS, DSS, and RFS were equivalent. Pediatric patients with SCC of the oral tongue should be treated similarly to adult patients. PMID:20644066

  4. Tumor satellite in predicting occult nodal metastasis of tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tsung-Lin; Lou, Pei-Jen; Chang, Yih-Leong; Wu, Chen-Tu; Wang, Cheng-Ping; Ko, Jenq-Yuh

    2011-10-01

    Tongue cancer is well known to have a high potential for locoregional metastasis. However, controversy about electively treating the neck in early-stage tongue cancer remains. Although many risk factors related to cervical occult nodal metastasis (ONM) have been investigated, the ability of the tumor to spread, a phenomenon that results from the intrinsic property of the tumor and its interaction with the surrounding environment, has seldom been addressed. Retrospective case series with chart review. Tertiary referral hospital of university. Patients with early-stage squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue. In 71 eligible enrolled patients, ONM was detected in 19 (27%) patients, while the results were negative (ONM(-)) in 52 (73%) patients. The average tumor satellite distance (TSD) in the ONM(+) group was 4.1 ± 4.3 mm, in contrast to that in the ONM(-) group (1.0 ± 1.5 mm; P < .001). When stratified by increased TSD values, the significance of the difference between the 2 groups increased. For clinical applications, the optimal TSD threshold for determining the ONM probability was 3.5 mm. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that TSD was an independent prognosticator. The results indicate that TSD is a feasible pathological parameter that is useful for determining the status of cervical nodal metastasis. It can be used as an indicator of potential cervical subclinical disease and as a guideline for deciding the necessity and modality of neck treatment.

  5. Tongue twisters: feeding enrichment to reduce oral stereotypy in giraffe.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Loraine Tarou; Bashaw, Meredith J; Sartor, Richard L; Bouwens, Nichole R; Maki, Todd S

    2008-05-01

    Stereotypic behavior has been well-studied and documented in a variety of animals including primates, carnivores, and domesticated ungulates. However, very little information is known about stereotypic behavior of captive exotic ungulates. Giraffe have been found to perform a wide range of stereotypic behaviors. According to a survey of zoological institutions, oral stereotypies, specifically the licking of nonfood objects are the most prevalent stereotypic behaviors observed in giraffe. Their performance appears to be related to feeding and rumination and may be a result of the inability of a highly motivated feeding behavior pattern, tongue manipulation, to be successfully completed. To test this hypothesis, the indoor and outdoor feeders for three giraffe housed at Zoo Atlanta were modified to require the giraffe to perform more naturalistic and complex foraging behaviors. Data were collected using instantaneous scan sampling in both exhibit and holding areas. Our results showed that, for the giraffe that engaged in the highest rates of oral stereotypic behavior in the baseline, more complex feeders that required tongue use to access grain or alfalfa had the greatest effect on behavior. For the giraffe that performed low baseline rates of oral stereotypic behavior, adding slatted tops to the alfalfa feeders indoors virtually eliminated the behavior. Although some changes in ruminating and feeding behavior were observed, the decreases in stereotypic behavior were not associated with the changes in ruminating or feeding behavior. These results provide evidence for the hypothesis that oral stereotypy in herbivores can be reduced by encouraging giraffe to engage in more naturalistic foraging behavior.

  6. TCM tongue diagnosis index of early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lo, Lun-Chien; Cheng, Tsung-Lin; Chen, Yi-Jing; Natsagdorj, Sainbuyan; Chiang, John Y

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates discriminating tongue features to distinguish between early stage breast cancer (BC) patients and non-breast cancer individuals through non-invasive traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) tongue diagnosis. The tongue features for 67 patients with 0 and 1 stages of BC, and 70 non-breast cancer individuals are extracted by the automatic tongue diagnosis system (ATDS). A total of nine tongue features, namely, tongue color, tongue quality, tongue fissure, tongue fur, red dot, ecchymosis, tooth mark, saliva, and tongue shape are identified for each tongue. Features extracted are further sub-divided according to the areas located, i.e., spleen-stomach, liver-gall-left, liver-gall-right, kidney, and heart-lung areas. This study focuses on deriving significant tongue features (p<0.05) to discriminate early-stage BC patients from non-breast cancer individuals. The Mann-Whitney test shows that the amount of tongue fur (p=0.024), maximum covering area of tongue fur (p=0.009), thin tongue fur (p=0.009), the average area of red dot (p=0.049), the maximum area of red dot (p=0.009), red dot in the spleen-stomach area (p=0.000), and red dot in the heart-lung area (p=0.000) demonstrate significant differences. The data collected are further classified into two groups. The training group consists of 57 early-stage BC patients and 60 non-breast cancer individuals, while the testing group is composed of 10 early-stage BC patients and 10 non-breast cancer individuals. The logistic regression by utilizing these 7 tongue features with significant differences in Mann-Whitney test as factors is performed. In order to reduce the number of tongue features employed in prediction, tongue features with the least amount of significant difference, namely, maximum area of red dot and average area of red dot, are removed progressively. The tongue features of the testing group are employed in the aforementioned three models to test the power of significant tongue features

  7. [Oral cavity cancer: epidemiology and early diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Ghantous, Y; Yaffi, V; Abu-Elnaaj, I

    2015-07-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity (Oral cancer) is the 11th most common malignancy in the world, despite the general global trend of a slight decrease in the incidence of oral cancer, tongue cancer incidence is increasing. About 90% of tumors are subtyped to oral Squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The incidence and mortality of this tumor shows variability according to the geographic location in which it is diagnosed, however in the last decade an increase was seen in the percentage of young patients, especially patients with tongue cancer. The overall prognosis of this cancer is roughly 55-65%, this is probably due to late diagnosis. Early diagnosis of oral cancer is the most important factor affecting the overall survival and prognosis, thus several diagnosis methods have been developed in the past few years. Still, the prognosis did not improve as expected. Oral cancer biomarkers in saliva is as easy body fluid, for noninvasive detection. Several researches identified several possible biomarkers, but none was specific. In our review, the incidence and mortality of oral tumors pose a main health problem in many aspects all around the world, as well as differences in behavior of these tumors. We witnessed more cases of anterior tongue cancers affecting mainly the young age patient group, a two decades younger than the normal risk group of oral cancer. Several countries in Europe showed a significant increase of oral cancer prevalence, such as Germany, especially in men. Similar behavior was also reported in the United States, which showed a change in the risk groups. Studies have reported an alarming lack of awareness about oral cancer, its symptoms and early diagnosis. These gaps in knowledge need to be addressed by further public education, possibly targeted at high-risk groups. With the knowledge of possible, specific, early biomarkers, primary detection could improve the prognosis tremendously. Research on the salivary biomarkers of the disease would help to develop

  8. Tongue Pressure Modulation for Initial Gel Consistency in a Different Oral Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Sumiko; Hori, Kazuhiro; Tamine, Ken-ichi; Fujiwara, Shigehiro; Inoue, Makoto; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Funami, Takahiro; Ishihara, Sayaka; Ono, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Background In the recent hyper-aged societies of developed countries, the market for soft diets for patients with dysphagia has been growing and numerous jelly-type foods have become available. However, interrelationships between the biomechanics of oral strategies and jelly texture remain unclear. The present study investigated the influence of the initial consistency of jelly on tongue motor kinetics in different oral strategies by measuring tongue pressure against the hard palate. Methods Jellies created as a mixture of deacylated gellan gum and psyllium seed gum with different initial consistencies (hard, medium or soft) were prepared as test foods. Tongue pressure production while ingesting 5 ml of jelly using different oral strategies (Squeezing or Mastication) was recorded in eight healthy volunteers using an ultra-thin sensor sheet system. Maximal magnitude, duration and total integrated values (tongue work) of tongue pressure for size reduction and swallowing in each strategy were compared among initial consistencies of jelly, and between Squeezing and Mastication. Results In Squeezing, the tongue performed more work for size reduction with increasing initial consistency of jelly by modulating both the magnitude and duration of tongue pressure over a wide area of hard palate, but tongue work for swallowing increased at the posterior-median and circumferential parts by modulating only the magnitude of tongue pressure. Conversely, in Mastication, the tongue performed more work for size reduction with increasing initial consistency of jelly by modulating both magnitude and duration of tongue pressure mainly at the posterior part of the hard palate, but tongue work as well as other tongue pressure parameters for swallowing showed no differences by type of jelly. Conclusions These results reveal fine modulations in tongue-palate contact according to the initial consistency of jelly and oral strategies. PMID:24643054

  9. Comparison of quality-of-life in tongue cancer patients undergoing tongue reconstruction with lateral upper arm free flap and radial forearm free flap.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yujie; Cui, Yaqi; Liao, Guiqing

    2015-01-01

    Surgery entails radical resection, neck dissection and tongue reconstruction has been commonly used in treatment of T2 and T3 tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Although lateral upper arm free flap (LUFF) and radial forearm free flap (RFFF) are similar in texture and thickness, significant differences can be noticed in the donor-site function and surgical demands. In the treatment of T2 and T3 tongue cancer, the choice of either LUFF or RFFF is still not defined.We aim to investigatethe long-term QOL of patients with moderate tongue defect and reconstruction with LUFF or RFFF, based on which to provide clinical suggestion for tongue reconstructions.Sixty-five patients (T2 or T3 stage, 42 underwent tongue reconstruction with RFFF and 23 with LUFF) treated at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-Sen University from January 2005 to June 2009 were included. The QOL of each patient was determined using the questionnaire designed based on the University of Washington Quality-of-Life (UW-QOL, version 4). The questionnaire was accomplished by a qualified medical staff blinded to the study after telephone communication with each patient. Statistical analysis showed that no significant difference was noticed in the long-term QOL of patients with tongue cancer after tongue reconstruction using LUFF or RFFF, respectively, indicating that similar QOLs were obtained in the long-term follow-up of patients with tongue cancer (T2 or T3 stages) using LUFF and RFFF for reconstruction.

  10. Comparison of quality-of-life in tongue cancer patients undergoing tongue reconstruction with lateral upper arm free flap and radial forearm free flap

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yujie; Cui, Yaqi; Liao, Guiqing

    2015-01-01

    Surgery entails radical resection, neck dissection and tongue reconstruction has been commonly used in treatment of T2 and T3 tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Although lateral upper arm free flap (LUFF) and radial forearm free flap (RFFF) are similar in texture and thickness, significant differences can be noticed in the donor-site function and surgical demands. In the treatment of T2 and T3 tongue cancer, the choice of either LUFF or RFFF is still not defined.We aim to investigatethe long-term QOL of patients with moderate tongue defect and reconstruction with LUFF or RFFF, based on which to provide clinical suggestion for tongue reconstructions.Sixty-five patients (T2 or T3 stage, 42 underwent tongue reconstruction with RFFF and 23 with LUFF) treated at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-Sen University from January 2005 to June 2009 were included. The QOL of each patient was determined using the questionnaire designed based on the University of Washington Quality-of-Life (UW-QOL, version 4). The questionnaire was accomplished by a qualified medical staff blinded to the study after telephone communication with each patient. Statistical analysis showed that no significant difference was noticed in the long-term QOL of patients with tongue cancer after tongue reconstruction using LUFF or RFFF, respectively, indicating that similar QOLs were obtained in the long-term follow-up of patients with tongue cancer (T2 or T3 stages) using LUFF and RFFF for reconstruction. PMID:26064380

  11. Clinical efficacy of a new tooth and tongue gel applied with a tongue cleaner in reducing oral halitosis.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Dorothea; Himmelmann, Agnes; Axmann, Eva-Maria; Wilhelm, Klaus-Peter

    2012-09-01

    The short-term and overnight effect of three treatment regimens on oral halitosis were investigated: toothbrushing with a reference toothpaste, toothbrushing with reference toothpaste and tongue cleaning, and toothbrushing and tongue cleaning with a tooth-and-tongue gel. Fifty-four subjects meeting the inclusion criteria for bad breath were enrolled in the study. All subjects received each of the three treatment regimens in a balanced design. Efficacy was assessed by organoleptic ratings and volatile sulfur compound (VSC) measurements 5 and 60 minutes after first application and overnight after 7 days of repeated use. The combination of toothbrushing and tongue cleaning with tooth-and-tongue gel provided the best results in terms of organoleptic ratings and VSC measurements at all time points compared to the other treatment regimens. The use of tooth and tongue gel for both toothbrushing and tongue cleaning showed a positive short-term and overnight effects after 7 days of use. This treatment regimen is a promising approach to control halitosis.

  12. Mouse papillomavirus MmuPV1 infects oral mucosa and preferentially targets the base of the tongue

    PubMed Central

    Cladel, Nancy M.; Budgeon, Lynn R; Balogh, Karla K.; Cooper, Timothy K.; Hu, Jiafen; Christensen, Neil D.

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, a new mouse papillomavirus, MmuPV1, was discovered in a colony of NMRI- Foxn1nu /Foxn1nu athymic mice in India. This finding was significant because it was the first papillomavirus to be found in a laboratory mouse. In this paper we report successful infections of both dorsal and ventral surfaces of the rostral tongues of outbred athymic nude mice. We also report the observation that the base of the tongue, the area of the tongue often targeted by cancer-associated high-risk papillomavirus infections in humans, is especially susceptible to infection. A suitable animal model for the study of oral papillomavirus infections, co-infections, and cancers has long been sought. The work presented here suggests that such a model is now at hand. PMID:26609937

  13. Quantitative Diagnosis of Tongue Cancer from Histological Images in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guolan; Qin, Xulei; Wang, Dongsheng; Muller, Susan; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Amy; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2016-01-01

    We developed a chemically-induced oral cancer animal model and a computer aided method for tongue cancer diagnosis. The animal model allows us to monitor the progress of the lesions over time. Tongue tissue dissected from mice was sent for histological processing. Representative areas of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue from tongue sections were captured for classifying tumor and non-tumor tissue. The image set used in this paper consisted of 214 color images (114 tumor and 100 normal tissue samples). A total of 738 color, texture, morphometry and topology features were extracted from the histological images. The combination of image features from epithelium tissue and its constituent nuclei and cytoplasm has been demonstrated to improve the classification results. With ten iteration nested cross validation, the method achieved an average sensitivity of 96.5% and a specificity of 99% for tongue cancer detection. The next step of this research is to apply this approach to human tissue for computer aided diagnosis of tongue cancer. PMID:27656036

  14. Quantitative diagnosis of tongue cancer from histological images in an animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guolan; Qin, Xulei; Wang, Dongsheng; Muller, Susan; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Amy; Chen, Zhuo G.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-03-01

    We developed a chemically-induced oral cancer animal model and a computer aided method for tongue cancer diagnosis. The animal model allows us to monitor the progress of the lesions over time. Tongue tissue dissected from mice was sent for histological processing. Representative areas of hematoxylin and eosin stained tissue from tongue sections were captured for classifying tumor and non-tumor tissue. The image set used in this paper consisted of 214 color images (114 tumor and 100 normal tissue samples). A total of 738 color, texture, morphometry and topology features were extracted from the histological images. The combination of image features from epithelium tissue and its constituent nuclei and cytoplasm has been demonstrated to improve the classification results. With ten iteration nested cross validation, the method achieved an average sensitivity of 96.5% and a specificity of 99% for tongue cancer detection. The next step of this research is to apply this approach to human tissue for computer aided diagnosis of tongue cancer.

  15. Changes in Abundance of Oral Microbiota Associated with Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Brian L.; Kuczynski, Justin; Bhattacharya, Aditi; Huey, Bing; Corby, Patricia M.; Queiroz, Erica L. S.; Nightingale, Kira; Kerr, A. Ross; DeLacure, Mark D.; Veeramachaneni, Ratna; Olshen, Adam B.; Albertson, Donna G.

    2014-01-01

    Individual bacteria and shifts in the composition of the microbiome have been associated with human diseases including cancer. To investigate changes in the microbiome associated with oral cancers, we profiled cancers and anatomically matched contralateral normal tissue from the same patient by sequencing 16S rDNA hypervariable region amplicons. In cancer samples from both a discovery and a subsequent confirmation cohort, abundance of Firmicutes (especially Streptococcus) and Actinobacteria (especially Rothia) was significantly decreased relative to contralateral normal samples from the same patient. Significant decreases in abundance of these phyla were observed for pre-cancers, but not when comparing samples from contralateral sites (tongue and floor of mouth) from healthy individuals. Weighted UniFrac principal coordinates analysis based on 12 taxa separated most cancers from other samples with greatest separation of node positive cases. These studies begin to develop a framework for exploiting the oral microbiome for monitoring oral cancer development, progression and recurrence. PMID:24887397

  16. The Relationship Between Tongue Pressure and Oral Dysphagia in Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Ha; Kim, Hee-Sang; Yun, Dong Hwan; Chon, Jinmann; Han, Yoo Jin; Yoo, Seung Don; Kim, Dong Hwan; Lee, Seung Ah; Joo, Hye In; Park, Ji-Su; Kim, Jin Chul; Soh, Yunsoo

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the relationships between tongue pressure and different aspects of the oral-phase swallowing function. We included 96 stroke patients with dysphagia, ranging in age from 40 to 88 years (mean, 63.7 years). Measurements of tongue pressure were obtained with the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument, a device with established normative data. Three trials of maximum performance were performed for lip closure pressure (LP), anterior hard palate-to-tongue pressure (AP), and posterior hard palate-to-tongue pressure (PP); buccal-to-tongue pressures on both sides were also recorded (buccal-to-tongue pressure, on the weak side [BW]; buccal-to-tongue pressure, on the healthy side [BH]). The average pressure in each result was compared between the groups. Clinical evaluation of the swallowing function was performed with a videofluoroscopic swallowing study. The average maximum AP and PP values in the intact LC group were significantly higher than those in the inadequate lip closure group (AP, p=0.003; PP, p<0.001). AP and PP showed significant relationships with bolus formation (BF), mastication, premature bolus loss (PBL), tongue to palate contact (TP), and oral transit time (OTT). Furthermore, LP, BW, and BH values were significantly higher in the groups with intact mastication, without PBL and intact TP. These findings indicate that the tongue pressure appears to be closely related to the oral-phase swallowing function in post-stroke patients, especially BF, mastication, PBL, TP and OTT.

  17. Distant metastasis from oral cancer: A review and molecular biologic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Soussan

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has been estimated to be the sixth most common cancer worldwide. The distant metastasis plays a critical role in the management and prognosis in oral cancer patients. Regarding the distant metastasis from the oral cancer, the hypopharynx is the most common primary site, followed by the base of tongue and anterior tongue. The present review article analyzes the characteristics of the distant metastases from the oral cavity from 1937 to 2015. PMID:27583211

  18. Speech and swallowing following tongue cancer surgery and free flap reconstruction--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lam, Lisetta; Samman, Nabil

    2013-06-01

    This was a systematic review of the current research on speech and swallowing outcomes and the factors affecting these outcomes after primary resection of tongue cancer and free flap reconstruction. A structured search in various electronic databases and relevant journals was performed. Retrieved articles were critically appraised in three rounds according to the level of evidence, the methodological quality, and the specific domain of speech and swallowing. A total of 21 articles were in the final review and the findings were categorized according to the area of tongue resection. For patients with resection and free flap reconstruction limited to either the oral tongue or the base of tongue (BOT), significant decline in speech and swallowing function was evident in the early postoperative phase, but the majority recovered close to preoperative level after 1 year. Poorer speech and swallowing outcomes were found following resections involving both oral and base of tongue (OBOT) regardless of the type of free flap reconstruction. Results overall were influenced by multiple factors including tumor size, area of resection, method of reconstruction and the use of adjuvant therapy. The use of free flaps in the immediate reconstruction of the tongue after tumor resection should aim at the maintenance of the mobility of the residual tongue and restoration of tongue bulk in order to optimize the recovery of speech and swallowing function. Future research in this field should employ standardized and reliable evaluation of speech and swallowing outcomes using multiple modalities in well-designed cohort studies with longer follow-up. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Altered oral sensory perception in tongue thrusters with an anterior open bite.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Sridhar; Avathvadi Venkatesan, Srinivasan; Rangachari, Sivaram

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate oral sensory perception in patients with an anterior open bite (AOB) and associated tongue thrusting activity. This study was performed in the Department of Orthodontics, Government Dental Hospital, Chennai, on 30 subjects (16 females and 14 males) aged from 12 to 17 years with an AOB associated with a tongue thrust and in a control group of 100 subjects (53 females and 47 males aged from 12 to 17 years) with a normal occlusion and no oral habits. Stereognosis and two-point discrimination (2PD) were employed for evaluation of oral sensory perception. Statistical comparison was undertaken using a Student's t-test. Stereognostic ability was altered in children with an AOB associated with a tongue thrust (t = 15.2, probability of occurrence P < 0.01). The mean oral stereognostic score in the control group was 31.8 and in tongue thrusters 25.3. The AOB group also showed a diminished 2PD threshold at the tip of the tongue [control group 1.08 mm, tongue thrusters with an AOB 1.64 mm (t = 7.3, P < 0.01)]. This finding highlights the fact that the tongue plays a vital role in oral sensory perception. Oral stereognostic tests and 2PD as diagnostic tools are valuable in the evaluation of oral sensory perception.

  20. Evaluation of neuropathic pain occurring after high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy of oral tongue

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Kapoor, Rakesh; Ahuja, Chirag K.; Oinam, Arun S.; Ghoshal, Sushmita

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To recognize neuropathic pain as a complication of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy of oral tongue and to evaluate the possible causes of neuropathy. Material and methods Twenty one patients who underwent interstitial brachytherapy for early cancer of oral tongue were evaluated. The patients either underwent primary brachytherapy (42-48 Gy at 3-4 Gy/fraction) or a boost (18-24 Gy at 3 Gy/fraction) after external radiation to 40 Gy. Lingual nerve was the nerve concerned and the sublingual space (SLS) was contoured as its surrogate. Dosimetric parameters were correlated with onset of pain. Results Ten patients out of 21 (47.61%) developed painful neuropathy. Five patients of six (5/6) who underwent primary brachytherapy developed neuropathy. Five out of 15 (5/15) patients who underwent brachytherapy as a boost developed neuropathy. The patients who underwent primary brachytherapy were ten times more likely to develop neuropathy. Among the patients receiving boost treatment, the equivalent dose at 2 Gy/fraction (EQD2) to 2 cc of SLS was higher (39.25 Gy) in the patients who developed pain compared to those without pain (10.29 Gy). Conclusions This is the first report to recognize neuropathic pain as a complication of HDR brachytherapy of oral tongue. Patients undergoing primary brachytherapy were more likely to develop pain. Among other factors like dose to SLS, number of catheters, size of the primary tumor, and the dose rate, only dose to 2 cc of the SLS correlated with onset of pain. The SLS (containing the lingual nerve) may be considered an organ at risk to prevent the occurrence of this complication. PMID:26034495

  1. Collagenase-2 (matrix metalloproteinase-8) plays a protective role in tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Korpi, J T; Kervinen, V; Mäklin, H; Väänänen, A; Lahtinen, M; Läärä, E; Ristimäki, A; Thomas, G; Ylipalosaari, M; Åström, P; Lopez-Otin, C; Sorsa, T; Kantola, S; Pirilä, E; Salo, T

    2008-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue is the most common cancer in the oral cavity and has a high mortality rate. A total of 90 mobile tongue SCC samples were analysed for Bryne's malignancy scores, microvascular density, and thickness of the SCC sections. In addition, the staining pattern of cyclooxygenase-2, αvβ6 integrin, the laminin-5 γ2-chain, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2, -7, -8, -9, -20, and -28 were analysed. The expression of MMP-8 (collagenase-2) was positively associated with improved survival of the patients and the tendency was particularly prominent in females. No sufficient evidence for a correlation with the clinical outcome was found for any other immunohistological marker. To test the protective role of MMP-8 in tongue carcinogenesis, MMP-8 knockout mice were used. MMP-8 deficient female mice developed tongue SCCs at a significantly higher incidence than wild-type mice exposed to carcinogen 4-Nitroquinoline-N-oxide. Consistently, oestrogen-induced MMP-8 expression in cultured HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells, and MMP-8 cleaved oestrogen receptor (ER) α and β. According to these data, we propose that, contrary to the role of most proteases produced by human carcinomas, MMP-8 has a protective, probably oestrogen-related role in the growth of mobile tongue SCCs. PMID:18253113

  2. Salivary mineral composition in patients with oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Dziewulska, Anna; Janiszewska-Olszowska, Joanna; Bachanek, Teresa; Grocholewicz, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    To analyse the mineral content of saliva in patients with oral cancer in order to identify possible markers that might aid the diagnosis of oral cancer. The study group consisted of 34 patients, aged 35-72 years with a diagnosis of oral cancer, including seven women and 27 men, before the start of treatment. Samples of unstimulated saliva were collected in plastic containers. The concentrations of sodium and potassium were assessed using ion selective electrodes, and the concentrations of calcium, magnesium, iron and phosphorus were assessed using colorimetric methods. Statistically significant differences between the study and control groups were found only for the concentration of sodium--higher concentrations were found in the study group. When comparing different cancer localisations, the highest levels of salivary sodium were found in cases of cancer of the floor of the oral cavity, and the lowest levels in tongue or parotid gland cancer. The highest calcium levels were found in cancer of the floor of the oral cavity, and the lowest levels in tongue cancer. The highest levels of magnesium were found in cancer of the floor of the oral cavity, and the lowest in tongue cancer. As regards the different histological types, higher sodium and calcium levels were found in squamous cell carcinomas than in other types. Salivary mineral content in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma is indicative of oral dehydration; however, we found no evidence of any salivary mineral markers that would be useful for the diagnosis of oral cancer.

  3. Oral stereognostic ability among tongue thrusters with interdental lisp, tongue thrusters without interdental lisp and normal children.

    PubMed

    Colletti, E A; Geffner, D; Schlanger, P

    1976-02-01

    30 children, i.e., 10 children per group, 8 yr. of age, were given an oral stereognostic test. This test of 10 geometric forms varying in shape were developed by NIDR. 47 stimuli pairs were used and 10 pairs were repeated to measure test reliability. Subjects were blindfolded and asked to respond whether Items 1 and 2, presented consecutively, were the same or different. Results indicated that both groups of tongue thrusters with and without interdental lisp scored significantly more poorly than did normal children (t = 4.68, P less than .001; t = 5.00, P less than .001), respectively. There were no significant differences, however, between tongue thrusters with and without interdental lisp (t = .33, P greater than .05). Observations indicated that normal children used the tongue tip more frequently and accurately when discriminating the geometric forms than did the other groups.

  4. Metastasis of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue.

    PubMed

    Sano, Daisuke; Myers, Jeffrey N

    2007-12-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue (SCCOT) is one of the most prevalent tumors of the head and neck region. Despite advances in treatment, the survival of patients with SCCOT has not significantly improved over the past several decades. Most frequently, treatment failure takes the form of local and regional recurrences, but as disease control in these areas improves, SCCOT treatment failures are occurring more often as distant metastasis. The presence of cervical lymph node metastasis is the most reliable adverse prognostic factor in patients with SCCOT, and extracapsular spread (ECS) of cervical lymph nodes metastasis is a particularly reliable predictor of regional and distant recurrence and death from disease. Decisions regarding the elective and therapeutic management of cervical lymph node metastases are made mainly on clinical grounds as we cannot always predict cervical lymph node metastasis from the size and extent of invasion of the primary tumors. Therefore, the treatment of these metastases in the management of SCCOT remains controversial. The promise of basing treatment decisions on biomarkers has yet to be fully realized because of our poor understanding of the mechanisms of regional and distant metastases of SCCOT. Here we summarize the current status of investigations of SCCOT metastases and the potential of these studies to have a positive impact on the clinical management of SCCOT in the future.

  5. Clinical, Genomic and Metagenomic Characterization of Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Patients Who Do Not Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ryan; Faden, Daniel L.; Fakhry, Carole; Langelier, Chaz; Jiao, Yuchen; Wang, Yuxuan; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Old, Matthew; Lang, James; Loyo, Myriam; Ahn, Sun Mi; Tan, Marietta; Gooi, Zhen; Chan, Jason; Richmon, Jeremy; Wood, Laura D.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Bishop, Justin; Westra, William H.; Chung, Christine H.; Califano, Joseph; Gourin, Christine G.; Bettegowda, Chetan; Meyerson, Matthew; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests the incidence of oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma is increasing in young patients, many who have no history of tobacco use. Methods We clinically reviewed 89 oral tongue cancer patients. Exomic sequencing of tumor DNA from 6 non-smokers was performed and compared to previously sequenced cases. RNA from 20 tumors was evaluated by massively parallel sequencing to search for potentially oncogenic viruses. Results Non-smokers (53 of 89) were younger than smokers (36 of 89) mean 50.4 vs. 61.9 years, P<0.001), and appeared more likely to be female, (58.5% vs. 38.9%, P=0.069). Non-smokers had fewer TP53 mutations (P=0.02) than smokers. No tumor-associated viruses were detected. Conclusions The young age of non-smoker oral tongue cancer patients, and fewer TP53 mutations suggest a viral role in this disease. Our efforts to identify such a virus were unsuccessful. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the drivers of carcinogenesis in these patients. PMID:24954188

  6. Essentials of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators. PMID:26617944

  7. Essentials of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators.

  8. Extra-tongue oral granular cell tumor: Histological and immunohistochemical aspect

    PubMed Central

    Pigatti, Fernanda-Mombrini; Martins-Mussi, Maria-Carolina; Sedassari, Bruno-Tavares; Orsini-Machado de Sousa, Suzana-Cantanhede

    2017-01-01

    Background Granular cell tumor (GCT) is an uncommon benign tumor founded in any part of the body but mainly in the tongue. Extra-tongue oral granular cell tumor (ETOGCT) is rare with few cases reported. Here we describe seven cases of oral GCT located in sites other then the tongue and discuss histopathological and immunohistochemical differences between differential diagnoses. Material and Methods We retrieved all cases diagnosed with oral granular cell tumor, from the Oral Pathology Service at the School of Dentistry/ University of São Paulo, and excluded the ones sited in the tongue. Immunohistochemical staining anti-S100 was also performed. Results The presented cases of Extra-tongue Oral Granular Cell Tumor (ETOGT) are composed by granular cells with intimately association with the adjacent tissue. Atypia and mitoses were not seen, and in most cases, the typical pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia was not observed. Conclusions The importance of an adequate attention is to avoid misdiagnoses, since ETOGT is rare and the tricking histopathological findings could induce to it. All the cases can be differentiated from the tumors that has a granular cell proliferation through a morphological analysis and when needed, immunohistochemistry stain. Key words:Abrikossoff`s tumor, granular cell tumor, oral cavity. PMID:27918739

  9. Successful treatment of self-inflicted tongue trauma patient using a special oral appliance.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ik Jae; Kim, Soung Min; Park, Hee Kyung; Myoung, Hoon; Lee, Jong Ho; Lee, Suk Keun

    2015-11-01

    A 7-year-old male presented with a painful ulcerative lesion on the right lateral tongue and left lower buccal mucosa due to self-inflicted trauma. Antibiotic medication and use of a mouthwash agent were not effective. We made a special oral appliance to cover the maxillary arch and teeth to protect the tongue. The patient showed immediate improvement and did not suffer from any complications. Invasive procedures such as biopsy were not needed. We believe that accurate clinical diagnosis is important and treatment with an oral appliance is effective in self-inflicted oral trauma in children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Does an oral appliance reduce palatal flutter and tongue base snoring?

    PubMed

    Stouder, Stephanie; Jones, Loren; Brietzke, Scott; Mair, Eric A

    2007-05-01

    Oral appliances are designed to treat snoring and sleep apnea by advancing the mandible and tongue. We test the hypothesis that an oral appliance affects palatal snoring as well as tongue base obstruction. Prospective observational cohort study. Sixty patients with a chief complaint of snoring with or without apnea were enrolled. Each patient underwent a home sleep test followed by 3 weeks sleeping with an oral appliance. Each patient then underwent a repeat home sleep test while using the device. There was a statistically significant improvement in the snores per hour (P = 0.0005), the maximum snoring loudness (P = 0.0001), average snoring loudness (P = 0.00001), and the percentage of palatal snoring (P = 0.0007). There was also a significant decrease in oxygen desaturation events (P = 0.003). This study suggests oral appliances may be effective treatment for both palatal and tongue base snoring.

  11. Oral symptoms and functional outcome related to oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamstra, Jolanda I; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Huisman, Paulien M; van Oort, Rob P; van der Laan, Bernard F A M; Roodenburg, Jan L N

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to assess: (1) oral symptoms of patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer; (2) how patients rank the burden of oral symptoms; (3) the impact of the tumor, the treatment, and oral symptoms on functional outcome. Eighty-nine patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer were asked about their oral symptoms related to mouth opening, dental status, oral sensory function, tongue mobility, salivary function, and pain. They were asked to rank these oral symptoms according to the degree of burden experienced. The Mandibular Function Impairment Questionnaire (MFIQ) was used to assess functional outcome. In a multivariate linear regression analyses, variables related to MFIQ scores (p≤0.10) were entered as predictors with MFIQ score as the outcome. Lack of saliva (52%), restricted mouth opening (48%), and restricted tongue mobility (46%) were the most frequently reported oral symptoms. Lack of saliva was most frequently (32%) ranked as the most burdensome oral symptom. For radiated patients, an inability to wear a dental prosthesis, a T3 or T4 stage, and a higher age were predictive of MFIQ scores. For non-radiated patients, a restricted mouth opening, an inability to wear a dental prosthesis, restricted tongue mobility, and surgery of the mandible were predictive of MFIQ scores. Lack of saliva was not only the most frequently reported oral symptom after treatment for oral or oropharyngeal cancer, but also the most burdensome. Functional outcome is strongly influenced by an inability to wear a dental prosthesis in both radiated and non-radiated patients.

  12. HIV infection induces morphometrical changes on the oral (buccal mucosa and tongue) epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pompermayer, Adriane Bastos; Gil, Francisca Berenice Dias; França, Beatriz Helena Sottile; Machado, Maria Ângela Naval; Trevilatto, Paula Cristina; Fernandes, Angela; de Lima, Antônio Adilson Soares

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess morphological and morphometrical alterations of oral squamous epithelial cells in type 1 HIV infected individuals. Oral smears were collected from tongue and buccal mucosa of 30 HIV infected (experimental) and 30 non-infected (control) individuals by liquid-based exfoliative cytology. The cells were morphologically analyzed and the nuclear area (NA), the cytoplasmic area (CA) and the nucleus-to-cytoplasm area ratio (NA/CA) were calculated. No morphological differences were found between the groups. The mean values of CA were decreased in tongue (P=.00006) and buccal mucosa (P=.00242) in HIV infected individual, while mean values of NA were increased (P=.00308 and .00095, respectively) in the same group. NA/CA ratio for experimental group was increased in both collected places, with P=.00001 (tongue) and P=.00000 (buccal mucosa). This study revealed that HIV infection was able to induce morphometrical changes on the oral epithelial cells.

  13. Combined-modality treatment for advanced oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, K.-H.; Lin, C.-Y. |; Kang, C.-J.; Huang, S.-F.; Chen, I.-H.; Liao, C.-T. |; Wang, H.-M. |; Cheng, A.-J. |; Chang, J.T.-C. ||. E-mail: jtchang@adm.cgmh.org.tw

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate prognostic factors in advanced-stage oral tongue cancer treated with postoperative adjuvant therapy and to identify indications for adjuvant concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 201 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue managed between January 1995 and November 2002. All had undergone wide excision and neck dissection plus adjuvant radiotherapy or CCRT. Based on postoperative staging, 123 (61.2%) patients had Stage IV and 78 (38.8%) had Stage III disease. All patients were followed for at least 18 months after completion of radiotherapy or until death. The median follow-up was 40.4 months for surviving patients. The median dose of radiotherapy was 64.8 Gy (range, 58.8-72.8 Gy). Cisplatin-based regimens were used for chemotherapy. Results: The 3-year overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates were 48% and 50.8%, respectively. Stage, multiple nodal metastases, differentiation, and extracapsular spread (ECS) significantly affected disease-specific survival on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, multiple nodal metastases, differentiation, ECS, and CCRT were independent prognostic factors. If ECS was present, only CCRT significantly improved survival (3-year RFS with ECS and with CCRT = 48.2% vs. without CCRT = 15%, p = 0.038). In the presence of other poor prognostic factors, results of the two treatment strategies did not significantly differ. Conclusions: Based on this study, ECS appears to be an absolute indication for adjuvant CCRT. CCRT can not be shown to be statistically better than radiotherapy alone in this retrospective series when ECS is not present.

  14. Oral environment and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yasusei; Tada, Hidesuke; Fujiwara, Natsumi; Tada, Yoshiko; Tsunematsu, Takaaki; Miyake, Yoichiro; Ishimaru, Naozumi

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is now the leading cause of death in Japan. A rapid increase in cancer mortality is expected as Japan is facing a super-aged society. Many causes of cancer are known to be closely linked to life style factors, such as smoking, drinking, and diet. The oral environment is known to be involved in the pathogenesis and development of various diseases such as bronchitis, pneumonia, diabetes, heart disease, and dementia. Because the oral cavity acts as the bodily entrance for air and food, it is constantly exposed to foreign substances, including bacteria and viruses. A large number of bacteria are endemic to the oral cavity, and indigenous oral flora act to prevent the settlement of foreign bacteria. The oral environment is influenced by local factors, including dental plaque, tartar, teeth alignment, occlusion, an incompatible prosthesis, and bad lifestyle habits, and systemic factors, including smoking, consumption of alcohol, irregular lifestyle and eating habits, obesity, stress, hormones, and heredity. It has recently been revealed that the oral environment is associated with cancer. In particular, commensal bacteria in the oral cavity are involved in the development of cancer. Moreover, Candida, human papilloma virus and Epstein-Barr virus as well as commensal bacteria have been reported to be associated with the pathogenesis of cancer. In this review, we introduce recent findings of the correlation between the oral environment and cancer.

  15. Vowel category dependence of the relationship between palate height, tongue height, and oral area.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark; Pizza, Shamala; Alwan, Abeer; Cha, Jul Setsu; Haker, Katherine

    2003-06-01

    This article evaluates intertalker variance of oral area, logarithm of the oral area, tongue height, and formant frequencies as a function of vowel category. The data consist of coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences and acoustic recordings of 5 talkers, each producing 11 different vowels. Tongue height (left, right, and midsagittal), palate height, and oral area were measured in 3 coronal sections anterior to the oropharyngeal bend and were subjected to multivariate analysis of variance, variance ratio analysis, and regression analysis. The primary finding of this article is that oral area (between palate and tongue) showed less intertalker variance during production of vowels with an oral place of articulation (palatal and velar vowels) than during production of vowels with a uvular or pharyngeal place of articulation. Although oral area variance is place dependent, percentage variance (log area variance) is not place dependent. Midsagittal tongue height in the molar region was positively correlated with palate height during production of palatal vowels, but not during production of nonpalatal vowels. Taken together, these results suggest that small oral areas are characterized by relatively talker-independent vowel targets and that meeting these talker-independent targets is important enough that each talker adjusts his or her own tongue height to compensate for talker-dependent differences in constriction anatomy. Computer simulation results are presented to demonstrate that these results may be explained by an acoustic control strategy: When talkers with very different anatomical characteristics try to match talker-independent formant targets, the resulting area variances are minimized near the primary vocal tract constriction.

  16. Correlation between clinical and MRI assessment of depth of invasion in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Alsaffar, H A; Goldstein, D P; King, E V; de Almeida, J R; Brown, D H; Gilbert, R W; Gullane, P J; Espin-Garcia, O; Xu, W; Irish, J C

    2016-11-22

    Neck metastasis is the most important prognostic factor in oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). Apart from the T- stage, depth of invasion has been used as a highly predictable factor for microscopic neck metastasis, despite the controversy on the exact depth cut off point. Depth of invasion can be determined clinically and radio logically. However, there is no standard tool to determine depth of invasion preoperatively. Although MRI is used widely to stage the head and neck disease, its utility in depth evaluation has not formally been assessed. To compare preoperative clinical and radiological depth evaluation in oral tongue SCC using the standard pathological depth. To compare clinical and radiological accuracy between superficial (<5 mm) vs. deep invaded tumor (≥5 mm) METHODS: This prospective study used consecutive biopsy-proven oral tongue invasive SCC that presented to the University health network (UHN), Toronto. Clinical examination, radiological scan and appropriate staging were determined preoperatively. Standard pathology reports postoperatively were reviewed to determine the depth of invasion from the tumor specimen. 72 tumour samples were available for analysis and 53 patients were included. For all tumors, both clinical depth (r = 0.779; p < 0.001) and radiographic depth (r =0.907; p <0.001) correlated well with pathological depth, with radiographic depth correlating slightly better. Clinical depth also correlated well with radiographic depth (r = 0.731; p < 0.001). By contrast, for superficial tumors (less than 5 mm on pathological measurement) neither clinical (r = 0.333, p = 0.34) nor radiographic examination (r = - 0.211; p = 0.56) correlated with pathological depth of invasion. This is the first study evaluating the clinical assessment of tumor thickness in comparison to radiographic interpretation in oral cavity cancer. There are strong correlations between pathological, radiological, and clinical

  17. Oral microbiota and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meurman, Jukka H.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation caused by infections may be the most important preventable cause of cancer in general. However, in the oral cavity the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the complex metabolic pathways and may thus be involved in carcinogenesis. Poor oral health associates statistically with prevalence of many types of cancer, such as pancreatic and gastrointestinal cancer. Furthermore, several oral micro-organisms are capable of converting alcohol to carcinogenic acetaldehyde which also may partly explain the known association between heavy drinking, smoking, poor oral health and the prevalence of oral and upper gastrointestinal cancer. A different problem is the cancer treatment-caused alterations in oral microbiota which may lead to the emergence of potential pathogens and subsequent other systemic health problems to the patients. Hence clinical guidelines and recommendations have been presented to control oral microbiota in patients with malignant disease, but also in this area the scientific evidence is weak. More controlled studies are needed for further conclusion. PMID:21523227

  18. Oncologic and functional results after transhyoid surgical approach for cancer of the base of tongue.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Juan P; Díaz-Molina, Juan Pablo; Moreno, Carla; Suárez, Carlos

    2011-08-01

    The optimal treatment for base of tongue cancer remains unclear, especially in advanced stages. We retrospectively review 84 previously untreated patients that underwent a transhyoid resection of a base of tongue carcinoma. Sixty-four patients (76%) underwent postoperative radiotherapy. Five patients had stage II disease, 6 had stage III, 58 had stage IVA, and 15 had stage IVB. The overall recurrence rate was 68%. Five-year disease-specific survival rates by stage were 100%, 67%, 27%, and 8% for stage II to IVB, respectively (p = .0007). Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of lymph node metastases was an independent predictor of reduced disease-specific survival rates (p = .02). All patients maintained an intelligible voice, and oral alimentation was successfully recovered in 97.5% of them. The transhyoid approach allowed adequate resection of base of tongue cancers with low morbidity and acceptable functional results, but the oncologic outcomes in advanced stages are poor. Head Neck, 2011. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Radial free forearm flap versus pectoralis major pedicled flap for reconstruction in patients with tongue cancer: Assessment of quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peipei; Li, Rui; Liu, Yiming; Kan, Quancheng

    2016-01-01

    Background This study investigated the quality of life of Chinese patients with tongue cancer who had undergone immediate flap reconstruction surgery. In addition, we compared 2 groups of patients: those who had received radial forearm free flap (RFFF) surgery and others who had received pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) surgery. Material and Methods Patients who received RFFF or PMMF reconstruction after primary tongue cancer treated with total and subtotal tongue resection were eligible for the current study. The patients’ demographic data, medical history, and quality of life scores (14-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) and the University of Washington Quality of Life (UW-QOL) questionnaires) were collected. Results A total of 41 of 63 questionnaires were returned (65.08%). There were significant differences between the 2 groups in the gender (p< .05). Patients reconstructed with RFFF performed better in the shoulder domains, in addition to worse appearance domains. Conclusions Using either RFFF or PMMF for reconstruction of defects after tongue cancer resection significantly influences a patient’s quality of life. Data from this study provide useful information for physicians and patients during their discussion of reconstruction modalities for tongue cancers. Key words:Quality of life, radial forearm free flaps, pectoralis major myocutaneous flap, tongue cancer, oral function. PMID:27694786

  20. Occupational Risk for Oral Cancer in Nordic Countries.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, Laura; Suojanen, Juho; Kyyronen, Pentti; Lindqvist, Christian; Martinsen, Jan Ivar; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Lynge, Elsebeth; Sparen, Par; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Pukkala, Eero

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate occupational risk for cancer of the tongue, oral cavity or pharynx after adjustment for alcohol and tobacco use. The data covered 14.9 million people and 28,623 cases of cancer of the tongue, oral cavity and pharynx in the Nordic countries 1961-2005. Alcohol consumption by occupation was estimated based on mortality from liver cirrhosis and incidence of liver cancer. Smoking by occupation was estimated based on the incidence of lung cancer. Only few occupations had relative risks of over 1.5 for cancer of the tongue, oral cavity and pharynx. These occupations included dentists, artistic workers, hairdressers, journalists, cooks and stewards, seamen and waiters. Several occupational categories, including dentists, had an increased relative risk of tongue cancer. This new finding remains to be explained but could be related to occupational chemical exposures, increased consumption of alcohol and tobacco products, or infection with human papilloma virus. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  1. Role of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) in pT1-T2 N0 deep tongue cancers.

    PubMed

    Gokavarapu, Sandhya; Parvataneni, Nagendra; Rao S, L M Chandrasekhara; Reddy, Rammohan; Raju, K V V N; Chander, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    Carcinoma of tongue is associated with a high risk of occult metastasis and mortality despite early-stage detection and therapy; the critical tumor thickness at which this risk increases has been demonstrated as 4 mm or greater. There are no sufficient data in the published literature to evaluate the role of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) in the treatment of pT1-T2 N0 oral tongue cancers with depth of invasion 4 mm or greater. Historical cohorts of patients with primary pT1-T2 N0 oral tongue cancer of depth of invasion 4 mm or greater treated surgically from January 2010 to December 2012 were included in the study, and negative margins on initial resection were filtered. Locoregional recurrence and death were analyzed among the patients who received PORT and those who did not. A total of 103 patients fulfilled the above-mentioned criteria, with 62 patients receiving PORT and 41 patients not receiving PORT; median period of follow-up was 41.3 months. Logistic and Cox regression models showed no significant difference in locoregional recurrences (P = .078) and survival (P = .339) between patients who received PORT and those who did not receive PORT. PORT did not influence survival of patients with stage I and stage II deep tongue cancers, with 4 mm or greater tumor invasion depth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Treatment and prognosis of oral cancer].

    PubMed

    de Visscher, J G A M

    2008-04-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common variety of malignant oral tumour. Most commonly oral carcinomas occur at the lateral tongue surfaces and at the anterior part of the floor of the mouth. If oral cancer is suspected, a dentist will refer the patient to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon who will perform a biopsy. When the diagnosis squamous cell carcinoma is established, the patient will be referred to a multidisciplinary head and neck oncological centre for additional diagnostics and treatment. Depending upon size, location and extent of the tumour and the presence or absence of regional metastases, the management may include surgical excision, radiotherapy or a combination of surgery and radiotherapy. The prognosis is mainly determined by the size of the tumour and regional lymph node involvement. Therefore, early detection is of utmost importance.

  3. Daily reduction of oral malodor with the use of a sonic tongue brush combined with an antibacterial tongue spray in a randomized cross-over clinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Saad, S; Gomez-Pereira, P; Hewett, K; Horstman, P; Patel, J; Greenman, J

    2016-02-12

    The objective of this clinical investigation was to test the effectiveness on breath odor of a newly designed sonic tongue brush (TongueCare+, TC). It consists of a soft silicone brush optimally designed based on the tongue's anatomy to remove bacterial biofilm from the tongue's complex surface, and it is coupled with a sonic power toothbrush handle. TC was used in combination with an antibacterial tongue spray (BreathRx, BRx) containing 0.09% cetylpyridinium chloride and 0.7% zinc gluconate. A total of 21 participants with oral malodor exceeding the threshold for recognition took part in this cross-over clinical investigation, which consisted of a single use of four treatment arms with one week washout period in between. The treatments consisted of: (1) TC  +  BRx, (2) TC  +  water, (3) BRx and (4) water. Malodor levels and bacterial density were monitored up to 6 h by organoleptic scoring and selective plating, respectively. The organoleptic score and bacterial density were significantly lower after using TC  +  BRx compared to all alternative treatments at all time points. A significant decrease in both parameters was detected after a single use of TC  +  BRx, from levels characteristic of high oral malodor, to barely noticeable levels after treatment and this was maintained up to 6 h. Moreover, we identified a significant positive correlation between bacterial density and organoleptic score, confirming that bacterial tongue biofilm is the root cause of oral malodor in these subjects. The results of this clinical investigation demonstrated that the combined treatment of a sonic tongue brush with the antibacterial tongue spray is able to deliver more than 6 h of fresh breath following a single use. The clinical investigation was registered at the ISRCTN registry under study identification number ISRCTN38199132.

  4. The Consequences of Tongue Piercing on Oral and Periodontal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sakellari, Dimitra

    2014-01-01

    This paper is discussing the potential consequences that may arise by the implementation of piercing in the oral cavity and is also categorizing the consequences according to their extent and severity. Furthermore, this paper is reviewing some possible oral hygiene methods that can prove to be auxiliary in decreasing the potential complications arising from oral piercing. This literature review is based on articles published from 1985 to 2012. PMID:24616814

  5. Radiation dose to the tongue and velopharynx predicts acoustic-articulatory changes after chemo-IMRT treatment for advanced head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Irene; Navran, Arash; van der Molen, Lisette; Heemsbergen, Wilma D; Hilgers, Frans J M; van den Brekel, Michiel W M

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent changes in speech after C-IMRT treatment are related to mean doses to the tongue and velopharynx (VP). In 34 patients with advanced hypopharyngeal, nasopharyngeal, or oropharyngeal cancer, changes in speech from pretreatment to 10 weeks and 1 year posttreatment were correlated with mean doses to the base of tongue (BOT), oral cavity (OC) and tonsillar fossa/soft palate (VP). Differences in anteroposterior tongue position, dorsoventral degree of tongue to palate or pharynx constriction, grooving, strength, nasality, and laryngeal rise, were assessed by acoustic changes in three speech sounds that depend on a (post-) alveolar closure or narrowing (/t/, /s/, /z/), three with a tongue to palate/pharyngeal narrowing (/l/, /r/, /u/), and in vowel /a/ at comfortable and highest pitch. Acoustically assessed changes in tongue positioning, shape, velopharyngeal constriction, and laryngeal elevation were significantly related to mean doses to the tongue and velopharynx. The mean dose to BOT predicted changes in anteroposterior tongue positioning from pre- to 10-weeks posttreatment. From pretreatment to 1-year, mean doses to BOT, OC, and VP were related to changes in grooving, strength, laryngeal height, nasality, palatalization, and degree of pharyngeal constriction. Changes in speech are related to mean doses to the base of tongue and velopharynx. The outcome indicates that strength, motility, and the balance between agonist and antagonist muscle forces change significantly after radiotherapy.

  6. [Oral precancer and cancer].

    PubMed

    López-López, José; Omaña-Cepeda, Carlos; Jané-Salas, Enric

    2015-11-06

    We reviewed the concept of oral precancerous lesions, oral cancer, and the possibility of early diagnosis. With the keywords: premalignant oral lesions prevention, a search was performed over the past 10 years. Also clinical trials are searched from January 2011 until today with the keywords: oral cancer prevention AND dentistry. It is emphasized that there can be no significant changes related to the concept of precancerous lesions and cancer, and those relating to the early diagnosis. Despite the numerous described methods of screening, biopsy remains the most useful test, and therefore it is essential, mainly if we consider the new possibilities of molecular studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Oral Cancer Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the rates of oral cancers, pancreatic cancer, periodontal disease, and the chronic infections that it produces may ... patients who have confirmed distant metastasis of the disease, it is a powerful ... from periodontal problems, caries, etc. may be extracted. This avoidance ...

  8. Photodynamic Therapy Using Temoporfin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Oral Cavity or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  9. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma at Invasion Front

    PubMed Central

    Shimazu, Yoshihito; Yagishita, Hisao; Soeno, Yuuichi; Sato, Kaori; Taya, Yuji; Aoba, Takaaki

    2013-01-01

    We conducted three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) using serial histological sections to visualize the architecture of invasive tumors. Fourteen OTSCC cases were collected from archival paraffin-embedded specimens. Based on a pathodiagnostic survey of whole cancer lesions, a core tissue specimen (3 mm in diameter) was dissected out from the deep invasion front using a paraffin tissue microarray. Serial sections (4 μm thick) were double immunostained with pan-cytokeratin and Ki67 antibodies and digitized images were acquired using virtual microscopy. For 3D reconstruction, image registration and RGB color segmentation were automated using ImageJ software to avoid operator-dependent subjective errors. Based on the 3D tumor architecture, we classified the mode of invasion into four types: pushing and bulky architecture; trabecular architecture; diffuse spreading; and special forms. Direct visualization and quantitative assessment of the parenchymal-stromal border provide a new dimension in our understanding of OTSCC architecture. These 3D morphometric analyses also ascertained that cell invasion (individually and collectively) occurs at the deep invasive front of the OTSCC. These results demonstrate the advantages of histology-based 3D reconstruction for evaluating tumor architecture and its potential for a wide range of applications. PMID:24228031

  10. Effects of sensory feedback in intra-oral target selection tasks with the tongue.

    PubMed

    Caltenco, Hector A; Lontis, Eugen R; Bentsen, Bo; Andreasen Struijk, Lotte N S

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the effects of visual and tactile intra-oral sensor-position feedback for target selection tasks with the tip of the tongue. Target selection tasks were performed using an inductive tongue-computer interface (ITCI). Visual feedback was established by highlighting the area on a visual display corresponding to the activated intra-oral target. Tactile feedback was established using a sensor-border matrix over the sensor plates of the ITCI, which provided sensor-position tactile queues via the user's tongue. Target selection tasks using an on-screen keyboard by controlling the mouse pointer with the ITCI's was also evaluated. Mean target selection rates of 23, 5 and 15 activations per minute were obtained using visual, tactile and "none" feedback techniques in the 3rd training session. On-screen keyboard target selection tasks averaged 10 activations per minute in the 3rd training session. Involuntary activations while speaking or drinking were significantly reduced either through a sensor-matrix or dwell time for sensor activation. These results provide key design considerations to further increase the typing efficiency of tongue-computer interfaces for individuals with upper-limb mobility impairments.

  11. In vitro antimicrobial effects of two antihalitosis mouth rinses on oral pathogens and human tongue microbiota.

    PubMed

    Raangs, G C; Winkel, E G; van Winkelhoff, A J

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the antimicrobial activity of a mouth rinse containing chlorhexidine and cetylpyridinium chloride (MR1) with a stannous fluoride-based mouth rinse (MR2) in vitro. Samples of the tongues from 10 subjects with and 10 subjects without halitosis were inoculated on blood agar plates. The agar was perforated, and the cylindrical holes were filled either with mouth rinse MR1 or with mouth rinse MR2. After incubation, inhibition zones of the whole tongue microbiota and Fusobacterium nucleatum were measured. In addition, MR1 and MR2 were applied in a short interval killing test (SIKT) on four oral pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, F. nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Total viable cell counts were made after two minutes of incubation with increasing concentrations of MR1 and MR2. MR1 showed a significantly higher in vitro antimicrobial activity against the whole tongue microbiota and F. nucleatum than MR2 in both groups of subjects. In the SIK test, MR1 showed a significantly greater killing capacity than MR2. The results show that a mouth rinse with low concentrations of chlorhexidine and 0.05% cetylpyridinium chloride appears to be more effective in inhibiting growth of the human tongue microbiota in vitro than a fluoride/stannous fluoride-containing mouth rinse. This in vitro observation supports the use of chlorhexidine and cetylpyridinium chloride in the treatment of oral halitosis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Change in tongue pressure in patients with head and neck cancer after surgical resection.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yoko; Sugahara, Kazuma; Fukuoka, Tatsuyuki; Saito, Shota; Sakuramoto, Ayumi; Horii, Nobuhide; Sano, Saori; Hasegawa, Kana; Nakao, Yuta; Nanto, Tomoki; Kadoi, Kanenori; Moridera, Kuniyasu; Noguchi, Kazuma; Domen, Kazuhisa; Kishimoto, Hiromitsu

    2017-02-14

    Tongue pressure is reportedly associated with dysphagia. This study investigated relationships among characteristics of head and neck cancer, tongue pressure and dysphagia screening tests performed in patients with head and neck cancer during the acute phase after surgical resection. Fifty-seven patients (36 men, 21 women; age range 26-95 years) underwent surgical resection and dysphagia screening tests (Repetitive Saliva Swallowing Test, Water Swallowing Test, Modified Water Swallowing Test and Food Test) and pre- and postoperative measurement of tongue pressure at 5 time points (preoperatively, and 1-2 weeks and 1, 2, and 3 months postoperatively). Progression of cancer (stage), tracheotomy, surgical reconstruction, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and neck dissection were factors associated with postoperative tongue pressure. Data were analyzed by linear mixed-effect model, Spearman correlation coefficient and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Tongue pressure was significantly reduced 1-2 weeks after surgery, and recovered over time. Changes in tongue pressure were significantly associated with stage, radiotherapy and reconstruction. All screening tests showed a significant relationship with tongue pressure. Analysis of ROC and area under the effect curve suggested that a tongue pressure of 15 kPa can be used as a cut-off value to detect dysphagia after surgery for head and neck cancer. Our results suggest that tongue pressure evaluation might offer a safe, useful and objective tool to assess dysphagia immediately postoperatively in patients with head and neck cancer.

  13. Changes in the Oral Moisture and the Amount of Microorganisms in Saliva and Tongue Coating after Oral Ingestion Resumption: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Natsuki; Stegaroiu, Roxana; Shibata, Satoko; Ito, Kayoko; Inoue, Makoto; Ohuchi, Akitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Tube feeding has been significantly associated with a higher rate of aspiration pneumonia that is mainly related to oral microorganisms and a reduced salivary flow. Thus, the difference in the mode of nutritional intake is expected to affect the oral environment, but this has not yet been fully clarified. The purpose of this study was to investigate, in tube-fed patients, changes in the oral moisture and the counts of microorganisms in saliva and tongue coating, which occur after oral ingestion resumption. Study participants were 7 tube-fed inpatients of the Niigata University Medical and Dental Hospital (72.7±8.5 years old) who received dysphagia rehabilitation at the Unit of Dysphagia Rehabilitation until oral ingestion resumption. Their oral health, swallowing, and nutrition status, oral mucosal moisture, amount of unstimulated saliva and the counts of microorganisms (total microorganisms, streptococci, Candida) in saliva and tongue coating were investigated and compared before and after the recommencement of oral intake. Tongue coating, choking, oral mucosal moisture and amount of unstimulated saliva were improved significantly after resumption of oral ingestion. The other investigated parameters did not significantly change, except for the streptococci in tongue coating, which significantly increased 1 week after oral ingestion recommencement, but decreased thereafter. After oral intake resumption, oral mucosal moisture and amount of unstimulated saliva were improved. However, because of a transitory increase in the counts of streptococci with oral ingestion recommencement, it is important to appropriately manage oral hygiene in these patients, according to the changes in their intraoral microbiota.

  14. Oral foregut cyst in the ventral tongue: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Eun-Jung; Jung, Young-Soo; Park, Hyung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    An oral foregut cyst is a rare congenital choristoma lined by the respiratory and/or gastrointestinal epithelium. The exact etiology has not been fully identified, but it is thought to arise from misplaced primitive foregut. This lesion develops asymptomatically but sometimes causes difficulty in swallowing and pronunciation depending on its size. Thus, the first choice of treatment is surgical excision. Surgeons associated with head and neck pathology should include the oral foregut cyst in the differential diagnosis for ranula, dermoid cyst, thyroglossal duct cyst and lymphangioma in cases of pediatric head and neck lesions. PMID:25551098

  15. [The application of free tissue flap in simultaneous reconstruction of defects after tongue cancer].

    PubMed

    Shi, Ye; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Yong-Ning; Zhao, Ji-Zhi; Yu, Li-Jiang; Shi, Tian-Yin; Ma, Chao

    2013-09-01

    To discuss the feasibility of using free tissue flap for simultaneous tongue reconstruction after tongue cancer resection. Radial forearm flaps and anterolateral thigh flaps were used for simultaneous reconstruction of different defects after tongue cancer resection in 47 cases. The functional evaluation was assessed during the follow-up period of 3 months to 9 years. Only one flap failed,giving a success rate of 97.7%. The 36 patient available for postoperative follow-up were all able to communicate in basic languages and eat normally. Among them, normal speech was found in 34, while slurred speech was found in two. 31 patients could eat normal diet ,while eight could eat soft diet and two could eat liquid diet. Simultaneous tongue reconstruction with free tissue flap is a reliable method with high successful rate. Flaps selection based on different tongue defects is the key point to achieve good functional and cosmetic results for the reconstruction tongue.

  16. Effect of the tongue rotation exercise training on the oral functions in normal adults - Part 1 investigation of tongue pressure and labial closure strength.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, I; Koide, K; Takahashi, M; Mizuhashi, F

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the tongue rotation exercise training on the oral functions using the measurement of maximum tongue pressure (MTP) and labial closure strength (LCS) in normal adults. In experiment 1, the differences in MTP and LCS at the measurement point for both groups with and without tongue rotation exercise training were examined. We instructed subjects to perform the tongue rotation exercise for 2 months. We measured MTP and LCS at the point before training and at the points of 1 and 2 months after the beginning of training. In experiment 2, the changes of MTP and LCS based on the sex differences and the measurement points in training were examined. We instructed subjects to perform the tongue rotation exercise for 3 months, and measured MTP and LCS at the point before training and at the points of 2 weeks and 1, 2 and 3 months after the beginning of training. The results of experiment 1 showed MTP and LCS increased with the progress of continuous training. The results of experiment 2 showed MTP and LCS were always higher in men than in women and increased significantly at 2 weeks of training in both sexes (P < 0.01). These results might be suggested that the tongue rotation exercise training was effective for the recovery of the activity of the stomatognathic system.

  17. Assessing oral cancer knowledge in Romanian undergraduate dental students.

    PubMed

    Dumitrescu, A L; Ibric, S; Ibric-Cioranu, V

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the level of Romanian dental students' knowledge regarding the oral cancer risk and non-risk factors as well as oral cancer signs, symptoms, and diagnostic signs. A total of 192 first- to sixth-year undergraduate dental students (mean age 22.20 ± 2.94 years) who consented to participate in the study filled in a questionnaire enquiring about their knowledge of oral cancer. A score of the oral cancer knowledge was calculated for each participant based on their correct answers. Regarding the knowledge of oral cancer risk factors, the vast majority of the students correctly recognized tobacco (96.8 %), having a prior oral cancer lesion (85.1 %), the consumption of alcohol (77.7 %), and older age (64.2 %). Respectively, 87.7 and 54.3 % knew the tongue and the floor of mouth to be the most common oral cancer sites. Of the students, 71.3 % agreed that oral cancer examinations for those 20 years of age and older should be provided during regular periodic health examinations, 92.9 % considered that patients with suspicious oral lesions should be referred to specialists, and 84.6 % agreed that oral cancer examinations should be a routine part of a comprehensive oral examination. A significant association was found between the year of study in the dental school, age, and knowledge of the oral cancer knowledge scores. Although students' knowledge increased with academic year, there is a clear need to enhance the dental curricula in oral cancer clinical training in oral cancer prevention and examination for dental students.

  18. Feasibility of tongue strength measurements during (chemo)radiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Van den Steen, Leen; Vanderveken, Olivier; Vanderwegen, Jan; Van Gestel, Dirk; Daisne, Jean-François; Allouche, Johan; Delacroix, Laurence; Van Rompaey, Diane; Beauvois, Sylvie; Cvilic, Sophie; Mariën, Steven; Desuter, Gauthier; Vermorken, Jan Baptist; Van den Weyngaert, Danielle; Specenier, Pol; Van Laer, Carl; Peeters, Marc; Van de Heyning, Paul; Chantrain, Gilbert; Lawson, Georges; Lazarus, Cathy; De Bodt, Marc; Van Nuffelen, Gwen

    2017-06-02

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of tongue strength measures (TSMs) and the influence of bulb location, sex, and self-perceived pain and mucositis in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients during chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Twenty-six newly diagnosed HNC patients treated with CRT performed anterior and posterior maximal isometric tongue pressures by means of the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument (IOPI). The Oral Mucositis Weekly Questionnaire (OMWQ) and a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain during swallowing were completed weekly from baseline to 1 week post CRT. Feasibility of TSMs during CRT declines significantly from 96 to 100% at baseline to 46% after 6 weeks of CRT. But post-hoc analyses reveal only significant differences in feasibility between baseline and measurements after 4 weeks of treatment. No effect of gender or bulb location was established, but feasibility is influenced by pain and mucositis. Feasibility of TSMs declines during CRT and is influenced by mucositis and pain. For the majority of subjects, TSMs were feasible within the first 4 weeks, which provides a window of scientific and clinical opportunities in this patient population.

  19. Tongue pressure and oral conditions affect volatile release from liquid systems in a model mouth.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, O; Silcock, P; Beauchamp, J; Buettner, A; Everett, D W

    2012-10-03

    The release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the mouth cavity is an integral part of the way flavor is perceived. An in vitro model mouth with an artificial tongue was developed to measure the dynamic release of VOCs from liquid model systems [e.g., aqueous solution, oil, and oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions] under oral conditions. The release of seven selected VOCs was affected by the different polarity and vapor pressure of the compounds and their affinity to the liquid system media. Different tongue pressure patterns were applied to the liquid systems, and the release of VOCs was monitored in real time using proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry. The release was significantly more intense for longer tongue pressure duration and was influenced by the tongue altering the sample surface area and the distribution of the VOCs. The role of saliva (artificial versus human) and the sample temperature had a significant effect on VOC release. Saliva containing mucin and a higher sample temperature enhanced the release.

  20. Intra-oral administration of rebamipide liquid prevents tongue injuries induced by X-ray irradiation in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Takako; Uematsu, Naoya; Sakurai, Kazushi

    2017-07-01

    Oral mucositis is a common and serious side effect in patients who undergo cytotoxic cancer therapies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of rebamipide on radiation-induced glossitis model in rats. Glossitis was induced by a single dose of 15 Gy of X-rays to the snouts of rats (day 0). A novel form of rebamipide liquid comprising its submicronized crystals was administered intra-orally. The preventive effect of rebamipide on tongue injuries was macroscopically evaluated on day 7 following irradiation. The pretreatment period, dosing frequency, and dose dependency of rebamipide were examined. Two percent rebamipide liquid, administered six times a day for 14 days from day -7 to day 6, significantly decreased the ulcer-like area. However, no significant effect was observed when rebamipide was given either from day -4 or from day -1. Four or six times daily, 2% rebamipide liquid significantly inhibited the ulcer-like injury area ratio, but not when given twice daily. Rebamipide liquid, 1, 2, and 4% six times daily significantly reduced the area ratios of total injury and ulcer-like injury in a dose-dependent manner. Gene expression and protein levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were dramatically elevated in the irradiated tongues of control rats on day 7 without rebamipide liquid treatment. They were dose-dependently and significantly suppressed in rebamipide-treated groups. Intra-oral administration of rebamipide liquid prevented oral mucositis dose-dependently accompanied by the suppression of inflammatory expression in the radiation-induced rats' glossitis model.

  1. Changes in the distributions of fluorine-18-labelled fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose accumulation into tongue-related muscles after dissection in patients with tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Kito, Shinji; Koga, Hirofumi; Oda, Masafumi; Tanaka, Tatsurou; Miyamoto, Ikuya; Kodama, Masaaki; Habu, Manabu; Kokuryo, Shinya; Osawa, Kenji; Yamamoto, Noriaki; Matsumoto-Takeda, Shinobu; Wakasugi-Sato, Nao; Kawanabe, Noriaki; Yoshiga, Daigo; Nishimura, Shun; Joujima, Takaaki; Kito-Shingaki, Ayae; Uehara, Masataka; Sasaguri, Masaaki; Morimoto, Yasuhiro

    2017-08-01

    To elucidate the changes in the distributions of fluorine-18-labelled fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ((18)F-FDG) accumulation in the tongue muscles of patients following four kinds of surgical operations for tongue cancers. The changes in the distributions of (18)F-FDG accumulations in the tongue muscles on positron emission tomography (PET)-CT, in association with imaging findings on CT and MRI, were retrospectively analyzed before and after four kinds of surgical operations for 50 patients with tongue cancers. (18)F-FDG-PET-positive areas appeared at the back of the intrinsic muscles of the tongue after invasive surgery for tongue cancers despite the absence of abnormal findings on CT and MRI. A correlation between the standardized uptake value maximum of (18)F-FDG in the intrinsic muscles and the degree of invasiveness of the surgical procedures for tongue cancers (r = 0.539, p < 0.01) was found. It is important to pay attention to the changes in (18)F-FDG distributions in the intrinsic muscles of the tongue before and after invasive surgery despite the absence of abnormal findings on CT and MRI when evaluating the tongue on (18)F-FDG-PET.

  2. Dental implications in oral cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Escoda-Francolí, Jaume; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Araceli; Pérez-García, Silvia; Gargallo-Albiol, Jordi; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2011-07-01

    A study is made of the dental implications of oral cancer, with a view to avoiding the complications that appear once oncological treatment is started. The study comprised a total of 22 patients diagnosed with oral cancer according to clinical and histological criteria in the Service of Maxillofacial Surgery (Dental Clinic of the University of Barcelona, Spain) during the period 1996-2005, and posteriorly treated in different hospital centers in Barcelona. Of the 22 patients diagnosed with oral cancer in our Service, the present study finally analyzed the 12 subjects who reported for the dental controls. As regards the remaining 10 patients, 5 had died and 5 could not be located; these subjects were thus excluded from the analysis. All of the smokers had abandoned the habit. The most common tumor location was the lateral margin of the tongue. None of the patients visited the dentist regularly before the diagnosis of oral cancer. T1N0M0 was the most common tumor stage. Surgery was carried out in 50% of the cases, while 8.4% of the patients received radiotherapy and 41.6% underwent surgery with postoperative radiotherapy. In turn, 66.6% of the patients reported treatment sequelae such as dysgeusia, xerostomia or speech difficulties, and one patient suffered osteoradionecrosis. Forty-one percent of the patients did not undergo regular dental controls after cancer treatment. As regards oral and dental health, 16.6% presented caries, and 50% had active periodontal disease. Protocols are available for preventing the complications of oral cancer treatment, and thus for improving patient quality of life. However, important shortcomings in the application of such protocols on the part of the public health authorities make it difficult to reach these objectives.

  3. Incidence of oral cancer occult metastasis and survival of T1-T2N0 oral cancer patients.

    PubMed

    El-Naaj, Imad Abu; Leiser, Yoav; Shveis, Myrela; Sabo, Edmond; Peled, Micha

    2011-10-01

    In head and neck cancer, the most important prognostic factor is the presence or absence of neck metastasis. Although still debated in the published data regarding the "wait and see" policy for Stage T1-T2 oral cancer, a large number of clinicians support the necessity of neck dissection, especially in cases of oral tongue carcinoma, because of the poor prognosis and high risk of recurrence. The aim of the present study was to summarize and quantify the incidence of occult metastasis in oral cancer treatment at the oral and maxillofacial surgery department, Rambam Medical Center, in the past 10 years. A total of 142 neck dissections performed at our department in the past 10 years (1998 to 2009) and a series of 68 patients (44 men and 22 women) treated for Stage T1N0 or T2N0 oral cancer were included in the present retrospective study. All patients underwent surgical resection of the oral cancer and selective neck dissection of the ipsilateral side. Occult lymph node metastases were detected in 11 patients (16% overall, 9 in the tongue, 1 in the buccal mucosa, and 1 in the gingiva of the mandible). The frequency of occult metastasis from tongue carcinoma was 34% (9 of 26 cases). The 5-year survival rate in the present study was 78.9%. In patients who underwent chemotherapy, radiotherapy, brachytherapy, or a combination of the 3 after surgical management, the overall survival rate decreased significantly to 22.5% (P = .006, log-rank test). The incidence of occult metastasis in patients with oral cancer in the present study was 16% overall. In those with tongue carcinoma, a much greater incidence (34%) of occult metastasis was detected. Furthermore, the need for chemoradiotherapy after initial surgical management, mainly because of occult metastasis, was a significant negative predictor of patient outcome. The results of the present study emphasize the need for prophylactic neck dissection in patients with oral cancer diagnosed with Stage T1N0 or T2N0 disease

  4. Oral cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Dios, Pedro Diz; Lestón, Juan Seoane

    2010-06-01

    Pain may be the initial symptom in oral cancer, and is a common complaint both in patients awaiting treatment and in those already in treatment. However, little has been published in the literature on the management of oral cancer pain. Effective pain control requires a multimodal approach in which pharmacological management based on the World Health Organization (WHO) analgesic ladder continues to play an essential role. Although different routes are available for the administration of analgesics, oral delivery continues to be the principal route for pain control in the first instance. Interventional approaches include blockade of a peripheral nerve or of the relevant ganglion, and the use of central neuraxial blockade. The intraventricular or intrathecal administration of opioids, with or without local anaesthetics, has been indicated for severe intractable pain. The development of new treatment modalities provides additional options, though further clinical research is required. There is no evidence of the efficacy of non-pharmacological methods such as acupuncture or transcutaneous nerve stimulation in the management of oral cancer pain. Surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have also been suggested, but their results have not been quantified. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Genomic instability in non-neoplastic oral mucosa cells can predict risk during 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide-induced rat tongue carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Fávero Salvadori, Daisy Maria; da Silva, Renata Nunes; Ribeiro Darros, Bruno; Alencar Marques, Mariangela Esther

    2004-10-01

    4-Nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO)-induced rat tongue carcinogenesis is a useful model for studying oral squamous cell carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the level of DNA damage induced by 4NQO in oral mucosa cells by the single cell gel (comet) assay. Male Wistar rats were distributed into three groups of 10 animals each and treated with 50 ppm 4NQO solution by drinking water for 4, 12 or 20 weeks. Ten animals were used as negative control. Statistically significant increase of DNA damage was observed in non-neoplastic oral cells at four weeks of 4NQO administration when compared with control (P < 0.05). The level of DNA damage was directly associated with the severity of histological changes. The results suggest that histologically normal tissue is able to harbor genetically unstable cells contributing to the initiation of oral carcinogenesis. Genomic instability appears to be associated with the risk and progression of oral cancer.

  6. Oral and neck examination for early detection of oral cancer--a practical guide.

    PubMed

    MacCarthy, Denise; Flint, Stephen R; Healy, Claire; Stassen, Leo F A

    2011-01-01

    Cancer of the head and neck region presents a challenge since, unlike other areas of the body, the boundaries are not always easy to delineate. The functional morbidity associated with head and neck cancer and its treatment are considerable. Head and neck cancer is described as cancer of the lip, mouth, tongue, tonsil, pharynx (unspecified), salivary gland, hypopharynx, larynx and other. Oral cancer refers to cancers of the lip, tongue, gingivae, floor of the mouth, palate (hard and soft), maxilla, vestibule and retromolar area up to the anterior pillar of the fauces (tonsil). When patients present with oral cancer, over 60% of them have regional (lymph node) and sometimes distant (metastatic) spread. The overall five-year survival rates for oral cancer average at between 50 and 80%, depending on the stage of the disease, varying from 86% for stage I to 12-16% for stage IV. The incidence of 'field cancerisation'/unstable oral epithelium is high (17%), and even after successful treatment our patients need to be monitored for dental care and further disease. Unlike other areas in the body, the oral epithelium is readily accessible for examination and even self-examination. Dentists and dental hygienists are effective clinicians in the examination of the oral cavity for mouth cancer. An oral and neck examination must be part of every dental examination. An examination protocol is suggested here, which is similar to, but more detailed than, the standardised oral examination method recommended by the World Health Organisation, and consistent with those protocols followed by the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.

  7. Black, Hairy Tongue

    MedlinePlus

    ... content of the mouth following antibiotic use Poor oral hygiene Dry mouth (xerostomia) Medications containing bismuth, such as ... as: Normal variations in tongue color (pigment) Poor oral hygiene Foods or medications that have stained the tongue ...

  8. Small interfering RNA targeting ILK inhibits metastasis in human tongue cancer cells through repression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Yu; Qi, Jin; Deng, Shixiong; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Luyu; Chen, Junxia

    2013-08-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a multifunctional serine/threonine kinase. Accumulating evidences suggest that ILK are involved in cell–matrix interactions, cell proliferation, invasion, migration, angiogenesis and Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. EMT has been postulated as a prerequisite for metastasis. The reports have demonstrated that EMT was implicated in metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinomas. Therefore, here we further postulate that ILK might participate in EMT of tongue cancer. We showed that ILK siRNA inhibited EMT with low N-cadherin, Vimentin, Snail, Slug and Twist as well as high E-cadherin expression in vivo and in vitro. We found that knockdown of ILK inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion as well as changed cell morphology. We also demonstrated that ILK siRNA inhibited phosphorylation of downstream signaling targets Akt and GSK3β as well as reduced expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Furthermore, we found that the tongue tumor with high metastasis capability showed higher ILK, Vimentin, Snail, Slug and Twist as well as lower E-cadherin expression in clinical specimens. Finally, ILK siRNA led to the suppression for tumorigenesis and metastasis in vivo. Our findings suggest that ILK could be a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for tongue cancer. Highlights: • ILK siRNA influences cell morphology, cell cycle, migration and invasion. • ILK siRNA affects the expression of proteins associated with EMT. • ILK expression is related to EMT in clinical human tongue tumors. • ILK siRNA inhibits metastasis of the tongue cancer cells through suppressing EMT.

  9. Decreased expression of Beclin-1 is significantly associated with a poor prognosis in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zedong; Zhong, Zhaoming; Huang, Shaohui; Wen, Haojie; Chen, Xue; Chu, Hongying; Li, Qiuli; Sun, Chuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    The autophagy-related gene Beclin-1 is critical in the regulation of tumourigenesis and progression, but its role in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) has not yet been reported. This study aimed to investigate Beclin-1 expression and its significance in OTSCC. Beclin-1 expression was assessed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction or western blot analysis in 14 OTSCC tissues and matched adjacent noncancerous tissues as well as in 5 OTSCC cell lines and a normal tongue epithelial cell line. Beclin-1 protein expression was examined by immunohistochemistry in 133 OTSCC specimens, and the correlation between Beclin-1 expression and clinicopathological features was investigated. Furthermore, MTT and colony formation assays were performed to investigate the effect of Beclin-1 on the proliferation and clonogenicity of OTSCC cells. It was demonstrated that Beclin-1 expression was significantly decreased in the majority of the 14 OTSCC tissues and the 5 OTSCC cell lines relative to the matched non-cancerous tissues and the normal tongue epithelial cell line, respectively. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that decreased Beclin-1 expression was significantly correlated with poor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, advanced clinical tumour-node-metastasis stage, and a poor prognosis in patients with OTSCC. The in vitro assays indicated that the overexpression of Beclin-1 significantly inhibits the proliferation and clonogenicity of OTSCC cells. These results demonstrate that Beclin-1 acts as a tumour suppressor in the development or progression of OTSCC and that Beclin-1 may represent a novel prognostic marker for patients with OTSCC. PMID:27356955

  10. Oral cancer in the UAE: a multicenter, retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Anis, Raeefa; Gaballah, Kamis

    2013-01-01

    Aim To determine the prevalence of various malignant oral lesions in the UAE and correlate cases of squamous cell carcinomas with age, gender, site, grade, clinical presentations at the time of diagnosis, and the prevalence of neck metastasis. Materials and methods A multicenter, retrospective study was conducted at four major hospitals in the UAE. The study was based on histopathology reports of biopsies of oral tissues. Results Of the 992 oral biopsy reports retrieved, 147 cases of malignant tumors were found which accounted for 14.9% of the total biopsies. Fifteen different types of malignant lesions were diagnosed, of which oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) was the most prevalent and made up 11.4% of the overall oral biopsies retrieved. The commonest presentation of cancer was ulceration (31.17%), followed by lumps and white lesions. The most common site where the lesions were diagnosed was the tongue (51.9%), followed by the cheeks and lips. OSCC accounted for 77% of all malignancies reported. Neck dissections were conducted in only 20.8% of all OSCC cases diagnosed at Mafraq and Tawam hospitals, of which 43.75% showed evidence of neck metastasis. Conclusion Oral cancer is not an uncommon disease in the UAE. This may mandate more awareness campaigning, including screening procedures for early detection of cancerous lesions and other potentially malignant oral diseases. Elective neck dissections to detect lymph node metastasis should be more routinely performed, in particular for tongue carcinomas because of the early neck involvement potential.

  11. Oral cancer in the UAE: a multicenter, retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Anis, Raeefa; Gaballah, Kamis

    2013-08-27

    To determine the prevalence of various malignant oral lesions in the UAE and correlate cases of squamous cell carcinomas with age, gender, site, grade, clinical presentations at the time of diagnosis, and the prevalence of neck metastasis. A multicenter, retrospective study was conducted at four major hospitals in the UAE. The study was based on histopathology reports of biopsies of oral tissues. Of the 992 oral biopsy reports retrieved, 147 cases of malignant tumors were found which accounted for 14.9% of the total biopsies. Fifteen different types of malignant lesions were diagnosed, of which oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) was the most prevalent and made up 11.4% of the overall oral biopsies retrieved. The commonest presentation of cancer was ulceration (31.17%), followed by lumps and white lesions. The most common site where the lesions were diagnosed was the tongue (51.9%), followed by the cheeks and lips. OSCC accounted for 77% of all malignancies reported. Neck dissections were conducted in only 20.8% of all OSCC cases diagnosed at Mafraq and Tawam hospitals, of which 43.75% showed evidence of neck metastasis. Oral cancer is not an uncommon disease in the UAE. This may mandate more awareness campaigning, including screening procedures for early detection of cancerous lesions and other potentially malignant oral diseases. Elective neck dissections to detect lymph node metastasis should be more routinely performed, in particular for tongue carcinomas because of the early neck involvement potential.

  12. Oral cancer in the UAE: a multicenter, retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Anis, Raeefa; Gaballah, Kamis

    2013-01-01

    Aim To determine the prevalence of various malignant oral lesions in the UAE and correlate cases of squamous cell carcinomas with age, gender, site, grade, clinical presentations at the time of diagnosis, and the prevalence of neck metastasis. Materials and methods A multicenter, retrospective study was conducted at four major hospitals in the UAE. The study was based on histopathology reports of biopsies of oral tissues. Results Of the 992 oral biopsy reports retrieved, 147 cases of malignant tumors were found which accounted for 14.9% of the total biopsies. Fifteen different types of malignant lesions were diagnosed, of which oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) was the most prevalent and made up 11.4% of the overall oral biopsies retrieved. The commonest presentation of cancer was ulceration (31.17%), followed by lumps and white lesions. The most common site where the lesions were diagnosed was the tongue (51.9%), followed by the cheeks and lips. OSCC accounted for 77% of all malignancies reported. Neck dissections were conducted in only 20.8% of all OSCC cases diagnosed at Mafraq and Tawam hospitals, of which 43.75% showed evidence of neck metastasis. Conclusion Oral cancer is not an uncommon disease in the UAE. This may mandate more awareness campaigning, including screening procedures for early detection of cancerous lesions and other potentially malignant oral diseases. Elective neck dissections to detect lymph node metastasis should be more routinely performed, in particular for tongue carcinomas because of the early neck involvement potential. PMID:23985381

  13. Early Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma Sampling of Margins From Tumor Bed and Worse Local Control

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Jessica H.; Thompson, Lester D. R.; Brandwein-Gensler, Margaret S.; Weiss, Bernhard G.; Canis, Martin; Purgina, Bibianna; Prabhu, Arpan V.; Lai, Chi; Shuai, Yongli; Carroll, William R.; Morlandt, Anthony; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Kim, Seungwon; Johnson, Jonas T.; Ferris, Robert L.; Seethala, Raja; Chiosea, Simion I.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Positive margins are associated with poor prognosis among patients with oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). However, wide variation exists in the margin sampling technique. OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of the margin sampling technique on local recurrence (LR) in patients with stage I or II oral tongue SCC. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A retrospective study was conducted from January 1, 1986, to December 31, 2012, in 5 tertiary care centers following tumor resection and elective neck dissection in 280 patients with pathologic (p)T1-2 pN0 oral tongue SCC. Analysis was conducted from June 1, 2013, to January 20, 2015. INTERVENTIONS In group 1 (n = 119), tumor bed margins were not sampled. In group 2 (n = 61), margins were examined from the glossectomy specimen, found to be positive or suboptimal, and revised with additional tumor bed margins. In group 3 (n = 100), margins were primarily sampled from the tumor bed without preceding examination of the glossectomy specimen. The margin status (both as a binary [positive vs negative] and continuous [distance to the margin in millimeters] variable) and other clinicopathologic parameters were compared across the 3 groups and correlated with LR. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Local recurrence. RESULTS Age, sex, pT stage, lymphovascular or perineural invasion, and adjuvant radiation treatment were similar across the 3 groups. The probability of LR-free survival at 3 years was 0.9 and 0.8 in groups 1 and 3, respectively (P = .03). The frequency of positive glossectomy margins was lowest in group 1 (9 of 117 [7.7%]) compared with groups 2 and 3 (28 of 61 [45.9%] and 23 of 95 [24.2%], respectively) (P < .001). Even after excluding cases with positive margins, the median distance to the closest margin was significantly narrower in group 3 (2 mm) compared with group 1 (3 mm) (P = .008). The status (positive vs negative) of margins obtained from the glossectomy specimen correlated with LR (P = .007), while

  14. Geographic Tongue

    MedlinePlus

    ... cases, most often related to eating hot, spicy, salty or acidic foods Many people with geographic tongue ... sensitive oral tissues, including: Hot, spicy, acidic or salty foods Tobacco products Toothpaste that contains tartar-control ...

  15. Radial free forearm flap versus pectoralis major pedicled flap for reconstruction in patients with tongue cancer: Assessment of quality of life.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Zhang, P; Li, R; Liu, Y; Kan, Q

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the quality of life of Chinese patients with tongue cancer who had undergone immediate flap reconstruction surgery. In addition, we compared 2 groups of patients: those who had received radial forearm free flap (RFFF) surgery and others who had received pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF) surgery. Patients who received RFFF or PMMF reconstruction after primary tongue cancer treated with total and subtotal tongue resection were eligible for the current study. The patients' demographic data, medical history, and quality of life scores (14-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) and the University of Washington Quality of Life (UW-QOL) questionnaires) were collected. A total of 41 of 63 questionnaires were returned (65.08%). There were significant differences between the 2 groups in the gender (p< .05). Patients reconstructed with RFFF performed better in the shoulder domains, in addition to worse appearance domains. Using either RFFF or PMMF for reconstruction of defects after tongue cancer resection significantly influences a patient's quality of life. Data from this study provide useful information for physicians and patients during their discussion of reconstruction modalities for tongue cancers.

  16. Molecular Portrait of Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma Shown by Integrative Meta-Analysis of Expression Profiles with Validations

    PubMed Central

    Thangaraj, Soundara Viveka; Shyamsundar, Vidyarani; Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Ramani, Pratibha; Ganesan, Kumaresan; Muthuswami, Muthulakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Oral Tongue Squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC), the most frequently affected oral cancer sub-site, is associated with a poor therapeutic outcome and survival despite aggressive multi- modality management. Till date, there are no established biomarkers to indicate prognosis and outcome in patients presenting with tongue cancer. There is an urgent need for reliable molecular prognostic factors to enable identification of patients with high risk of recurrence and treatment failure in OTSCC management. In the current study, we present the meta-analysis of OTSCC microarray based gene expression profiles, deriving a comprehensive molecular portrait of tongue cancer biology, showing the relevant genes and pathways which can be pursued further to derive novel, tailored therapeutics as well as for prognostication. We have studied 5 gene expression profiling data sets available on exclusively oral tongue subsite comprising of sample size; n = 190, consisting of 111 tumors and 79 normals. The meta- analysis results showed 2405 genes differentially regulated comparing OTSCC tumor and normal. The top up regulated genes were found to be involved in Extracellular matrix degradation (ECM) and Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathways. The top down regulated genes were found to be involved in detoxication pathways. We validated the results in clinical samples (n = 206), comprising of histologically normals (n = 10), prospective (n = 29) and retrospective (n = 167) OTSCC by evaluating MMP9 and E-cadherin gene expression by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Consistent with meta-analysis results, MMP9 mRNA expression was significantly up regulated in OTSCC primary tumors compared to normals. MMP9 protein over expression was found to be a significant predictor of poor prognosis, disease recurrence and poor Disease Free Survival (DFS) in OTSCC patients. Analysis by univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard model showed patients with loss of E-cadherin expression in OTSCC

  17. Molecular Portrait of Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma Shown by Integrative Meta-Analysis of Expression Profiles with Validations.

    PubMed

    Thangaraj, Soundara Viveka; Shyamsundar, Vidyarani; Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Ramani, Pratibha; Ganesan, Kumaresan; Muthuswami, Muthulakshmi; Ramshankar, Vijayalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Oral Tongue Squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC), the most frequently affected oral cancer sub-site, is associated with a poor therapeutic outcome and survival despite aggressive multi- modality management. Till date, there are no established biomarkers to indicate prognosis and outcome in patients presenting with tongue cancer. There is an urgent need for reliable molecular prognostic factors to enable identification of patients with high risk of recurrence and treatment failure in OTSCC management. In the current study, we present the meta-analysis of OTSCC microarray based gene expression profiles, deriving a comprehensive molecular portrait of tongue cancer biology, showing the relevant genes and pathways which can be pursued further to derive novel, tailored therapeutics as well as for prognostication. We have studied 5 gene expression profiling data sets available on exclusively oral tongue subsite comprising of sample size; n = 190, consisting of 111 tumors and 79 normals. The meta- analysis results showed 2405 genes differentially regulated comparing OTSCC tumor and normal. The top up regulated genes were found to be involved in Extracellular matrix degradation (ECM) and Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathways. The top down regulated genes were found to be involved in detoxication pathways. We validated the results in clinical samples (n = 206), comprising of histologically normals (n = 10), prospective (n = 29) and retrospective (n = 167) OTSCC by evaluating MMP9 and E-cadherin gene expression by qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Consistent with meta-analysis results, MMP9 mRNA expression was significantly up regulated in OTSCC primary tumors compared to normals. MMP9 protein over expression was found to be a significant predictor of poor prognosis, disease recurrence and poor Disease Free Survival (DFS) in OTSCC patients. Analysis by univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard model showed patients with loss of E-cadherin expression in OTSCC

  18. Changes in the Oral Moisture and the Amount of Microorganisms in Saliva and Tongue Coating after Oral Ingestion Resumption: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, Natsuki; Stegaroiu, Roxana; Shibata, Satoko; Ito, Kayoko; Inoue, Makoto; Ohuchi, Akitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Tube feeding has been significantly associated with a higher rate of aspiration pneumonia that is mainly related to oral microorganisms and a reduced salivary flow. Thus, the difference in the mode of nutritional intake is expected to affect the oral environment, but this has not yet been fully clarified. The purpose of this study was to investigate, in tube-fed patients, changes in the oral moisture and the counts of microorganisms in saliva and tongue coating, which occur after oral ingestion resumption. Methods: Study participants were 7 tube-fed inpatients of the Niigata University Medical and Dental Hospital (72.7±8.5 years old) who received dysphagia rehabilitation at the Unit of Dysphagia Rehabilitation until oral ingestion resumption. Their oral health, swallowing, and nutrition status, oral mucosal moisture, amount of unstimulated saliva and the counts of microorganisms (total microorganisms, streptococci, Candida) in saliva and tongue coating were investigated and compared before and after the recommencement of oral intake. Results: Tongue coating, choking, oral mucosal moisture and amount of unstimulated saliva were improved significantly after resumption of oral ingestion. The other investigated parameters did not significantly change, except for the streptococci in tongue coating, which significantly increased 1 week after oral ingestion recommencement, but decreased thereafter. Conclusion: After oral intake resumption, oral mucosal moisture and amount of unstimulated saliva were improved. However, because of a transitory increase in the counts of streptococci with oral ingestion recommencement, it is important to appropriately manage oral hygiene in these patients, according to the changes in their intraoral microbiota. PMID:27099636

  19. Impact of obesity on the survival of patients with early-stage squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, Neil M; Kochhar, Amit; Morris, Patrick G; Morris, Luc G; Zhou, Xi K; Ghossein, Ronald A; Pino, Alejandro; Fury, Matthew G; Pfister, David G; Patel, Snehal G; Boyle, Jay O; Hudis, Clifford A; Dannenberg, Andrew J

    2014-04-01

    Although obesity increases risk and negatively affects survival for many malignancies, the prognostic implications in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral tongue, a disease often associated with prediagnosis weight loss, are unknown. Patients with T1-T2 oral tongue SCC underwent curative-intent resection in this single-institution study. All patients underwent nutritional assessment prior to surgery. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated from measured height and weight and categorized as obese (≥ 30 kg/m(2) ), overweight (25-29.9 kg/m(2) ), or normal (18.5-24.9 kg/m(2) ). Clinical outcomes, including disease-specific survival, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival, were compared by BMI group using Cox regression. From 2000 to 2009, 155 patients (90 men, 65 women) of median age 57 years (range, 18-86 years) were included. Baseline characteristics were similar by BMI group. Obesity was significantly associated with adverse disease-specific survival compared with normal weight in univariable (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.07-6.59; P = .04) and multivariable analyses (HR = 5.01; 95% CI = 1.69-14.81; P = .004). A consistent association was seen between obesity and worse recurrence-free survival (HR = 1.87; 95% CI = 0.90-3.88) and between obesity and worse overall survival (HR = 2.03; 95% CI = 0.88-4.65) though without reaching statistical significance (P = .09 and P = .10, respectively) in multivariable analyses. In this retrospective study, obesity was an adverse independent prognostic variable. This association may not have been previously appreciated due to confounding by multiple factors including prediagnosis weight loss. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  20. Assessing oral cancer knowledge among dental students in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Cannick, Gabrielle F; Horowitz, Alice M; Drury, Thomas F; Reed, Susan G; Day, Terry A

    2005-03-01

    Because South Carolina has the fourth highest mortality rate for oral cancer among the 50 states, dental students in the state must be knowledgeable about prevention and early detection of the disease. In 2002, the authors surveyed 163 students using a written questionnaire (response rate, 79.1 percent). The questionnaire included questions about oral cancer risk and nonrisk factors as well as oral cancer diagnostic signs, symptoms and examination procedures. The authors performed univariate and bivariate analyses (alpha < or = .025). At least 93 percent of the students replied that tobacco, alcohol and previous oral cancer lesions were risk factors. One hundred six students (65 percent) knew that the most likely site for oral cancer is the ventrolateral border of the tongue. Students differed in their overall knowledge of risk factors (P = .002), nonrisk factors (P < .001) and diagnostic procedures (P < .001). Although students' level of knowledge increased with academic year, educators and policy-makers need to place greater emphasis on oral cancer education and training in dental schools. Morbidity and mortality are likely to be reduced if dentists know how to prevent and detect oral cancer.

  1. Prevalence of oral squamous cell carcinoma of tongue in and around Davangere, Karnataka, India: A retrospective study over 13 years

    PubMed Central

    Selvamani, M.; Yamunadevi, Andamuthu; Basandi, Praveen S.; Madhushankari, G. S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to determine the frequency and distribution of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) involving tongue among patients by studying biopsy specimens obtained from the archives of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, College of Dental Sciences, Davangere, Karnataka, India, during the past 13 years. Methodology: Data for the study were retrieved from the case records of patients. Analyzed clinical variables included age, sex, anatomical site, and histological diagnosis. Results: Of the 369 squamous cell carcinoma involving head and neck region, we found 52 biopsies reported exclusively involving tongue. Lateral border of the tongue was most commonly involved (43 cases, 82.7%), followed by base of tongue and posterior part of tongue. The patient were affected over a wide range of 27–80 years with mean age of 55.75 years and peak incidence was seen in the fourth and fifth decades of life, with the male: female ratio of 1.7:1. Conclusion: The prevalence rate of OSCC involving tongue showed a definite geographic variation when compared with a study done in other parts of the world. PMID:26538904

  2. Oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Nguyen, Ly M.; Thomas, Sroka; Hong-Ly, Bevan; Chi, Alexander; Vos, Paul; Karlsson, Ulf; Vinh-Hung, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: We aimed to study the prevalence of oral sex and its possible association with human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 infection in the development of oropharyngeal cancer in the US population for possible prevention. Methods: We conduct a systemic review on the prevalence of oral sex among Americans among different age groups, the prevalence of HPV 16 infection reported in oropharyngeal cancer, and correlation between oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer. Results: Oral sex is prevalent among adolescents and sexually active adults. Sixty percent of oropharyngeal cancer reported in the United States is associated with HPV 16 infections. Individuals who practiced oral sex with multiple partners are at risk for developing oropharyngeal cancer and need to be informed about practicing safe sex or getting vaccination. Conclusion: Family physicians will play a key role in prevention and educating the public about the risk of oral sex. PMID:27428229

  3. Oral contraceptives and cancer.

    PubMed

    Edgren, R A

    1991-01-01

    Concerns over the safety of oral contraceptives (OCs) have led to numerous empirical studies of the relationship of OC use to normal pregnancy outcomes, pituitary effects, cardiovascular accidents, and cancer. The article reviews some of the results of studies on the effects of OC use on ovarian, uterine, cervical, and breast cancer and on hepatic cancer and melanomas. Reference is made to direct study results rather than to reviews of studies, although it is noted that the critical reviews of Goldzieher and Realini reflect appropriate critiques of the validity of the methods employed in the analysis of cancers as well as cardiovascular risks. Concern is raised for meta-analysis of pooled data. In spite of the 30 years of research on OCs there is no definitive answer to the question of cause and effect. The epidemiological articles reviewed do not meet the standards of critical editorial review boards of experimental journals; confirmation of findings is also lacking. Studies suggesting increased risks as well as those showing positive benefits are questionable. The conclusion reached is that OCs protect against ovarian and uterine cancers and do not cause mammary, cervical, or liver cancer or melanoma. This conclusion is based on inconclusive data. The conclusion on hepatic cancer is that the 3 retrospective case control studies and anecdotal reports are flawed in design, and little confidence can be placed on such a limited number of cases. Malignant melanoma conclusions are that the data are inconsistent and hover around a risk of one for long-term OC-users. There is no increased risk related to OC-use. Ovarian cancer risk seems to be decreased in about 40% of OC-users. Endometrial cancer risk seems to be decreased, except for the sequential contraceptive Oracon which is associated with increased risk. Decreased risk is related to length of usage and continues after stoppage. Cervical carcinoma results appear to confirm the finding that prolonged OC use slightly

  4. Small interfering RNA targeting ILK inhibits metastasis in human tongue cancer cells through repression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yu; Qi, Jin; Deng, Shixiong; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Luyu; Chen, Junxia

    2013-08-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a multifunctional serine/threonine kinase. Accumulating evidences suggest that ILK are involved in cell-matrix interactions, cell proliferation, invasion, migration, angiogenesis and Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. EMT has been postulated as a prerequisite for metastasis. The reports have demonstrated that EMT was implicated in metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinomas. Therefore, here we further postulate that ILK might participate in EMT of tongue cancer. We showed that ILK siRNA inhibited EMT with low N-cadherin, Vimentin, Snail, Slug and Twist as well as high E-cadherin expression in vivo and in vitro. We found that knockdown of ILK inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion as well as changed cell morphology. We also demonstrated that ILK siRNA inhibited phosphorylation of downstream signaling targets Akt and GSK3β as well as reduced expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Furthermore, we found that the tongue tumor with high metastasis capability showed higher ILK, Vimentin, Snail, Slug and Twist as well as lower E-cadherin expression in clinical specimens. Finally, ILK siRNA led to the suppression for tumorigenesis and metastasis in vivo. Our findings suggest that ILK could be a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for tongue cancer.

  5. Oral cancer: just the facts.

    PubMed

    Laronde, Denise M; Hislop, T Greg; Elwood, J Mark; Rosin, Miriam P

    2008-04-01

    Oral cancer screening should be an integral part of a clinician's routine. This article reviews facts about oral cancer that are relevant to screening. The relevance of some issues in a particular dental practice will vary with the patient composition of the practice.

  6. Effects of Change in Tongue Pressure and Salivary Flow Rate on Swallow Efficiency Following Chemoradiation Treatment for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rogus-Pulia, Nicole M.; Larson, Charles; Mittal, Bharat B; Pierce, Marge; Zecker, Steven; Kennelty, Korey; Kind, Amy; Connor, Nadine P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients treated with chemoradiation for head and neck cancer frequently develop dysphagia. Tissue damage to the oral tongue causing weakness and decreases in saliva production may contribute to dysphagia. Yet, effects of these variables on swallowing-related measures are unclear. The purpose of this study was (1) to determine effects of chemoradiation on tongue pressures, as a surrogate for strength, and salivary flow rates and (2) to elucidate relationships among tongue pressures, saliva production, and swallowing efficiency by bolus type. Methods and Materials 21 patients with head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiation were assessed before and after treatment and matched with 21 healthy control participants who did not receive chemoradiation. Each participant was given a questionnaire to rate dysphagia symptoms. Videofluoroscopic evaluation of swallowing was used to determine swallowing efficiency; the Saxon test measured salivary flow rate; and the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument (IOPI) was used for oral tongue maximum and endurance measures. Results Results revealed significantly lower tongue endurance measures for patients post-treatment as compared to controls (p=.012). Salivary flow rates also were lower compared to pre-treatment (p=.000) and controls (p=.000). Simple linear regression analyses showed that change in salivary flow rate was predictive of change in swallow efficiency measures from pre- to post-treatment for 1mL thin liquid (p=.017), 3mL nectar-thick liquid (p=.026), and 3mL standard barium pudding (p=.011) boluses. Conclusions Based on these findings, it appears that chemoradiation treatment affects tongue endurance and salivary flow rate and these changes may impact swallow efficiency. These factors should be considered when planning treatment for dysphagia. PMID:27492408

  7. Increasing incidence of oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma in young white women, age 18 to 44 years.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sagar C; Carpenter, William R; Tyree, Seth; Couch, Marion Everett; Weissler, Mark; Hackman, Trevor; Hayes, D Neil; Shores, Carol; Chera, Bhishamjit S

    2011-04-10

    To evaluate the incidence of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC) and oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) in young white women, age 18 to 44 years. We analyzed incidence and survival data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute from 1975 to 2007 for OCSCC and OTSCC. Three cohorts were examined: all ages, age 18 to 44 years (ie, "young"), and age > 44 years. Individuals were stratified by sex and/or race. Percentage change (PC) and annual percentage change (APC) were calculated. Joinpoint regression analyses were performed to examine trend differences. Overall, incidence of OCSCC was decreasing for all ages. However, incidence was increasing for young white women (PC, 34.8; APC, 2.2; P < .05). Incidence of OTSCC was decreasing for all ages except in the age 18 to 44 years group (PC, 28.8; APC, 1.8; P < .05). Young white individuals had increasing incidence trends of OTSCC (white women: PC, 111.3; APC, 4; P < .05; young white men: PC, 43.7; APC, 1.6; P < .05). The APC of OTSCC was significantly greater in young white women compared with that in young white men (P = .007). Furthermore, incidence of SCC in all other subsites of the oral cavity was decreasing. Nonwhites had a decreasing incidence of OCSCC and OTSCC. Cause-specific survival was similar among whites age 18 to 44 and individuals older than age 44 years. OTSCC is increasing among young white individuals age 18 to 44 years, particularly among white women. Young white women may be a new, emerging head and neck cancer patient population.

  8. On the tip of the tongue: learning typing and pointing with an intra-oral computer interface.

    PubMed

    Caltenco, Héctor A; Breidegard, Björn; Struijk, Lotte N S Andreasen

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate typing and pointing performance and improvement over time of four able-bodied participants using an intra-oral tongue-computer interface for computer control. A physically disabled individual may lack the ability to efficiently control standard computer input devices. There have been several efforts to produce and evaluate interfaces that provide individuals with physical disabilities the possibility to control personal computers. Training with the intra-oral tongue-computer interface was performed by playing games over 18 sessions. Skill improvement was measured through typing and pointing exercises at the end of each training session. Typing throughput improved from averages of 2.36 to 5.43 correct words per minute. Pointing throughput improved from averages of 0.47 to 0.85 bits/s. Target tracking performance, measured as relative time on target, improved from averages of 36% to 47%. Path following throughput improved from averages of 0.31 to 0.83 bits/s and decreased to 0.53 bits/s with more difficult tasks. Learning curves support the notion that the tongue can rapidly learn novel motor tasks. Typing and pointing performance of the tongue-computer interface is comparable to performances of other proficient assistive devices, which makes the tongue a feasible input organ for computer control. Intra-oral computer interfaces could provide individuals with severe upper-limb mobility impairments the opportunity to control computers and automatic equipment. Typing and pointing performance of the tongue-computer interface is comparable to performances of other proficient assistive devices, but does not cause fatigue easily and might be invisible to other people, which is highly prioritized by assistive device users. Combination of visual and auditory feedback is vital for a good performance of an intra-oral computer interface and helps to reduce involuntary or erroneous activations.

  9. Oral cancer in Myanmar: a preliminary survey based on hospital-based cancer registries.

    PubMed

    Oo, Htun Naing; Myint, Yi Yi; Maung, Chan Nyein; Oo, Phyu Sin; Cheng, Jun; Maruyama, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Manabu; Yagi, Minoru; Sawair, Faleh A; Saku, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of oral cancer is not clearly known in Myanmar, where betel quid chewing habits are widely spread. Since betel quid chewing has been considered to be one of the important causative factors for oral cancer, the circumstantial situation for oral cancer should be investigated in this country. We surveyed oral cancer cases as well as whole body cancers from two cancer registries from Yangon and Mandalay cities, both of which have representative referral hospitals in Myanmar, and we showed that oral cancer stood at the 6th position in males and 10th in females, contributing to 3.5% of whole body cancers. There was a male predominance with a ratio of 2.1:1. Their most frequent site was the tongue, followed by the palate, which was different from that in other countries with betel quid chewing habits. About 90% of male and 44% of female patients had habitual backgrounds of chewing and smoking for more than 15 years. The results revealed for the first time reliable oral cancer frequencies in Myanmar, suggesting that longstanding chewing and smoking habits are etiological backgrounds for oral cancer patients.

  10. Bmi1-positive cells in the lingual epithelium could serve as cancer stem cells in tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Atsumi, Naho; Nakamura, Naohiro; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Komai, Yoshihiro; Omachi, Taichi; Tanaka, Kiyomichi; Ishigaki, Kazuhiko; Saiga, Kazuho; Ohsugi, Haruyuki; Tokuyama, Yoko; Imahashi, Yuki; Hisha, Hiroko; Yoshida, Naoko; Kumano, Keiki; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Ueno, Hiroo

    2016-12-22

    We recently reported that the polycomb complex protein Bmi1 is a marker for lingual epithelial stem cells (LESCs), which are involved in the long-term maintenance of lingual epithelial tissue in the physiological state. However, the precise role of LESCs in generating tongue tumors and Bmi1-positive cell lineage dynamics in tongue cancers are unclear. Here, using a mouse model of chemically (4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide: 4-NQO) induced tongue cancer and the multicolor lineage tracing method, we found that each unit of the tumor was generated by a single cell and that the assembly of such cells formed a polyclonal tumor. Although many Bmi1-positive cells within the tongue cancer specimens failed to proliferate, some proliferated continuously and supplied tumor cells to the surrounding area. This process eventually led to the formation of areas derived from single cells after 1-3 months, as determined using the multicolor lineage tracing method, indicating that such cells could serve as cancer stem cells. These results indicate that LESCs could serve as the origin for tongue cancer and that cancer stem cells are present in tongue tumors.

  11. Bmi1-positive cells in the lingual epithelium could serve as cancer stem cells in tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Atsumi, Naho; Nakamura, Naohiro; Yanai, Hirotsugu; Komai, Yoshihiro; Omachi, Taichi; Tanaka, Kiyomichi; Ishigaki, Kazuhiko; Saiga, Kazuho; Ohsugi, Haruyuki; Tokuyama, Yoko; Imahashi, Yuki; Hisha, Hiroko; Yoshida, Naoko; Kumano, Keiki; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Ueno, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that the polycomb complex protein Bmi1 is a marker for lingual epithelial stem cells (LESCs), which are involved in the long-term maintenance of lingual epithelial tissue in the physiological state. However, the precise role of LESCs in generating tongue tumors and Bmi1-positive cell lineage dynamics in tongue cancers are unclear. Here, using a mouse model of chemically (4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide: 4-NQO) induced tongue cancer and the multicolor lineage tracing method, we found that each unit of the tumor was generated by a single cell and that the assembly of such cells formed a polyclonal tumor. Although many Bmi1-positive cells within the tongue cancer specimens failed to proliferate, some proliferated continuously and supplied tumor cells to the surrounding area. This process eventually led to the formation of areas derived from single cells after 1–3 months, as determined using the multicolor lineage tracing method, indicating that such cells could serve as cancer stem cells. These results indicate that LESCs could serve as the origin for tongue cancer and that cancer stem cells are present in tongue tumors. PMID:28004815

  12. A comparative study of candidal invasion in rabbit tongue mucosal explants and reconstituted human oral epithelium.

    PubMed

    Jayatilake, J A M S; Samaranayake, Y H; Samaranayake, L P

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the light and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) features of tissue invasion by three Candida species (C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. dubliniensis) in two different tissue culture models: rabbit tongue mucosal explants (RTME) and reconstituted human oral epithelium (RHOE). Tongue mucosal biopsies of healthy New Zealand rabbits were maintained in explant culture using a transwell system. RHOE was obtained from Skinethic Laboratory (Nice, France). RTME and RHOE were inoculated with C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. dubliniensis separately and incubated at 37 degrees C, 5% CO(2), and 100% humidity up to 48 h. Light microscopic and SEM examinations of uninfected (controls) and infected tissues were performed at 24 and 48 h. C. albicans produced characteristic hallmarks of pathological tissue invasion in both tissue models over a period of 48 h. Hyphae penetrated through epithelial cells and intercellular gaps latter resembling thigmotropism. SEM showed cavitations on the epithelial cell surfaces particularly pronounced at sites of hyphal invasion. Some hyphae on RTME showed several clusters of blastospores attached in regular arrangements resembling "appareil sporifere". C. tropicalis and C. dubliniensis produced few hyphae mainly on RTME but they did not penetrate either model. Our findings indicate that multiple host-fungal interactions such as cavitations, thigmotropism, and morphogenesis take place during candidal tissue invasion. RTME described here appears to be useful in investigations of such pathogenic processes of Candida active at the epithelial front.

  13. [A Case of Advanced Esophageal Cancer and Tongue Cancer Treated with Induction DCF Chemotherapy Followed by Radical Surgery].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Motomu; Koyanagi, Kazuo; Sugiura, Hitoshi; Kakefuda, Toshihiro

    2015-11-01

    A man in his 60s was admitted for the treatment of advanced cervical esophageal cancer with metastasis to the lymph nodes and advanced tongue cancer with metastasis to the lymph nodes. Esophageal cancer was suspected to have invaded the trachea. The tongue cancer was located on the left side and had invaded beyond the median line of the tongue. Both cancers were pathologically diagnosed as squamous cell carcinomas. Therefore, it was determined that pharyngo-laryngo- esophagectomy and total glossectomy were required prior to the treatment. However, after 2 courses of docetaxel/cisplatin/ 5-FU combined induction chemotherapy, both cancers remarkably decreased; consequently, an esophagectomy to preserve laryngeal function and partial glossectomy could be performed simultaneously. The patient is well without recurrence 1 year post-surgery.

  14. Role of MRI in Evaluation of Malignant Lesions of Tongue and Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amandeep; Thukral, Chuni Lal; Gupta, Kamlesh; Sood, Arvinder Singh; Singla, Hanish; Singh, Kunwarpal

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of MRI in staging of malignant lesions of the oral cavity and to correlate MRI findings with clinical/surgical and anatomical-pathological findings, wherever possible. Material/Methods The study included 50 patients who presented with malignant lesions of the oral cavity and were referred to radiology departments for MRI. All patients included were subjected to a detailed physical examination following which MRI was carried out on Philips Gyroscan Achieva 1.5 Tesla unit. Results In the study, the highest number of patients were found to have tongue malignancy (82%) followed by buccal mucosa and gingivobuccal sulcus malignancy (18%). The highest number of patients was in the age group of 51–60 years (32%). The incidence was higher in males (96%). There was moderate agreement (k=0.537) for T stage between the clinical and MRI staging assessments. The agreement for N stage between clinical and MRI staging assessments was fair (k=0.328). The final diagnosis was made by histopathology in 22 patients. The agreement for T stage was good/substantial (k=0.790) and for N stage was moderate (k=0.458) between MRI and histopathology staging assessments. Conclusions MRI provides satisfactory accuracy for preoperative estimation of tumor thickness and predicting occult cervical nodal metastasis. MRI is the preferred modality in evaluation and staging of oral cavity malignancy which helps a clinician for planning of treatment. PMID:28289481

  15. [Morbidity and mortality for oral and pharyngeal cancer in Chile].

    PubMed

    Riera, Paula; Martínez, Benjamín

    2005-05-01

    Most oral cancers are squamous cell carcinomas (90%) which are two to four times more common in men than in women. The reasons for these differences are associated with exposure to factors such as tobacco and alcohol. Age is also considered as a risk factor (about 90% of the cases are diagnosed after 45 years of age). To analyze the frequency of oral cavity cancer during the last years in Chile. Mortality rates were obtained from death records of the "Instituto Nacional de Estadísticas" and publications of the World Health Organization, from 1955 to 2002. Morbidity from 1969 to 2002 was obtained from hospital discharge records of the Chilean Ministry of Health. Oral cancer corresponded to 1.6% of total cancer cases in Chile, with a male:female ratio of 2.3 to 1. Deaths due to oral cancer was 1% of all cancer deaths, with a male:female ratio of 2.8 to 1. The morbidity rate for both genders increased while the mortality rate was relatively constant. However, we observed an increase in the mortality rate among women from 1980 to 2002, associated with more than 100% increase in the frequency of smoking, between 1970 and 1998. The most common anatomical location was the tongue. The incidences of oral cancer is increasing in Chilean women, but men are more commonly affected.

  16. Survival of Patients with Oral Cavity Cancer in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Listl, Stefan; Jansen, Lina; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Freier, Kolja; Emrich, Katharina; Holleczek, Bernd; Katalinic, Alexander; Gondos, Adam; Brenner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to describe the survival of patients diagnosed with oral cavity cancer in Germany. The analyses relied on data from eleven population-based cancer registries in Germany covering a population of 33 million inhabitants. Patients with a diagnosis of oral cavity cancer (ICD-10: C00-06) between 1997 and 2006 are included. Period analysis for 2002–2006 was applied to estimate five-year age-standardized relative survival, taking into account patients' sex as well as grade and tumor stage. Overall five-year relative survival for oral cavity cancer patients was 54.6%. According to tumor localization, five-year survival was 86.5% for lip cancer, 48.1% for tongue cancer and 51.7% for other regions of the oral cavity. Differences in survival were identified with respect to age, sex, tumor grade and stage. The present study is the first to provide a comprehensive overview on survival of oral cavity cancer patients in Germany. PMID:23349710

  17. Survival of patients with oral cavity cancer in Germany.

    PubMed

    Listl, Stefan; Jansen, Lina; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Freier, Kolja; Emrich, Katharina; Holleczek, Bernd; Katalinic, Alexander; Gondos, Adam; Brenner, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to describe the survival of patients diagnosed with oral cavity cancer in Germany. The analyses relied on data from eleven population-based cancer registries in Germany covering a population of 33 million inhabitants. Patients with a diagnosis of oral cavity cancer (ICD-10: C00-06) between 1997 and 2006 are included. Period analysis for 2002-2006 was applied to estimate five-year age-standardized relative survival, taking into account patients' sex as well as grade and tumor stage. Overall five-year relative survival for oral cavity cancer patients was 54.6%. According to tumor localization, five-year survival was 86.5% for lip cancer, 48.1% for tongue cancer and 51.7% for other regions of the oral cavity. Differences in survival were identified with respect to age, sex, tumor grade and stage. The present study is the first to provide a comprehensive overview on survival of oral cavity cancer patients in Germany.

  18. BDNF signaling contributes to oral cancer pain in a preclinical orthotopic rodent model

    PubMed Central

    Chodroff, Leah; Bendele, Michelle; Valenzuela, Vanessa; Henry, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The majority of patients with oral cancer report intense pain that is only partially managed by current analgesics. Thus, there is a strong need to study mechanisms as well as develop novel analgesics for oral cancer pain. Current study employed an orthotopic tongue cancer model with molecular and non-reflexive behavioral assays to determine possible mechanisms of oral cancer pain. Human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells line, HSC2, was injected into the tongue of male athymic mice and tumor growth was observed by day 6. Immunohistological analyses revealed a well-differentiated tumor with a localized immune response and pronounced sensory and sympathetic innervation and vascularization. The tumor expressed TMPRSS2, a protein previously reported with oral squamous cell carcinoma. ATF3 expression in trigeminal ganglia was not altered by tumor growth. Molecular characterization of the model demonstrated altered expression of several pain-related genes, out of which up-regulation of BDNF was most striking. Moreover, BDNF protein expression in trigeminal ganglia neurons was increased and inhibition of BDNF signaling with a tyrosine kinase B antagonist, ANA-12, reversed pain-like behaviors induced by the oral tumor. Oral squamous cell carcinoma tumor growth was also associated with a reduction in feeding, mechanical hypersensitivity in the face, as well as spontaneous pain behaviors as measured by the conditioned place preference test, all of which were reversed by analgesics. Interestingly, injection of HSC2 into the hindpaw did not reproduce this spectrum of pain behaviors; nor did injection of a colonic cancer cell line into the tongue. Taken together, this orthotopic oral cancer pain model reproduces the spectrum of pain reported by oral cancer patients, including higher order cognitive changes, and demonstrates that BDNF signaling constitutes a novel mechanism by which oral squamous cell carcinoma induces pain. Identification of the key role of tyrosine kinase B

  19. Spectrum analysis of Chinese vowels formant in patients with tongue carcinoma underwent hemiglossectomy

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yujie; Numan, Fahmi Ahmed; Li, Kan; Liao, Guiqing

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Tongue is the most important phonatory organ in stomatognathic system. Radical resection of tongue squamous cell carcinoma can cause tongue defect and result in serious oral dysfunction, especially in phonetic function. This study aims to reveal the influence of tongue cancer, tongue defect and tongue reconstructions to phonetic function of tongue cancer patients. Study design: Formant spectrum analysis of Chinese vowels was performed by linear predictive coding (LPC) in tongue squamous cell carcinoma patients (before surgery and 3 months, 9 months and 2 years after surgery) and normal people. Patients with tongue squamous cell carcinoma were divided into reconstruction group and non-reconstruction group. In reconstruction group, patients underwent tongue reconstruction with radial forearm free flap (RFFF) and lateral arm free flap (LAFF), respectively. Results: 45 patients and 40 normal people were included. Differences were statistically significant between patients and normal persons, between patients before surgery and after surgery, between non-reconstruction group and construction group 2 years after operation. No statistical significance was found between patients underwent tongue reconstruction with RFFF or LAFF 2 years after operation. Conclusions: This study showed that tongue cancer and tongue defect after radical resections affected phonetic function of patients. Tongue reconstruction with free flaps could restore phonetic function to some extent. The efficiency of tongue reconstruction with RFFF and LAFF respectively were similar. PMID:25932247

  20. Spectrum analysis of Chinese vowels formant in patients with tongue carcinoma underwent hemiglossectomy.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yujie; Numan, Fahmi Ahmed; Li, Kan; Liao, Guiqing

    2015-01-01

    Tongue is the most important phonatory organ in stomatognathic system. Radical resection of tongue squamous cell carcinoma can cause tongue defect and result in serious oral dysfunction, especially in phonetic function. This study aims to reveal the influence of tongue cancer, tongue defect and tongue reconstructions to phonetic function of tongue cancer patients. Formant spectrum analysis of Chinese vowels was performed by linear predictive coding (LPC) in tongue squamous cell carcinoma patients (before surgery and 3 months, 9 months and 2 years after surgery) and normal people. Patients with tongue squamous cell carcinoma were divided into reconstruction group and non-reconstruction group. In reconstruction group, patients underwent tongue reconstruction with radial forearm free flap (RFFF) and lateral arm free flap (LAFF), respectively. 45 patients and 40 normal people were included. Differences were statistically significant between patients and normal persons, between patients before surgery and after surgery, between non-reconstruction group and construction group 2 years after operation. No statistical significance was found between patients underwent tongue reconstruction with RFFF or LAFF 2 years after operation. This study showed that tongue cancer and tongue defect after radical resections affected phonetic function of patients. Tongue reconstruction with free flaps could restore phonetic function to some extent. The efficiency of tongue reconstruction with RFFF and LAFF respectively were similar.

  1. Oral and gastrointestinal symptomatic metastases as initial presentation of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Jeba, Jenifer; Backianathan, Selvamani; Ishitha, Gunadala; Singh, Ashish

    2016-11-18

    Metastasis to the tongue, duodenum or pancreas from primary lung cancer is uncommon. Primary lung cancer presenting with symptoms related to metastases at these sites, at initial presentation is extremely rare. We report a 45-year-old man with disseminated lung malignancy who presented with dyspepsia, melena, symptoms due to anaemia and swelling in the tongue. Oral examination revealed a hard submucosal anterior tongue lesion. Biopsies from the tongue lesion and the duodenal ulcer seen on upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were suggestive of metastasis from lung primary. CT revealed lung primary with disseminated metastasis to lung, liver, adrenals, kidneys, head and body of pancreas, duodenum and intra-abdominal lymph nodes. The patient was treated with palliative chemotherapy. The unusual presentation and diagnostic details are discussed.

  2. [Radiotherapy for oral cavity cancers].

    PubMed

    Lapeyre, M; Biau, J; Racadot, S; Moreira, J F; Berger, L; Peiffert, D

    2016-09-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy are standard techniques for the irradiation of oral cavity cancers. These techniques are detailed in terms of indication, preparation, delineation and selection of the volumes, dosimetry and patient positioning control.

  3. Oral complications in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  4. Interaction between Chronic Inflammation and Oral HPV Infection in the Etiology of Head and Neck Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Tezal, Mine

    2012-01-01

    Incidences of oral tongue, base of the tongue, and tonsil cancers have been increasing steadily in many parts of the world in spite of declining rates of tobacco use over the last four decades. A better understanding of the etiology, interactions between risk factors, and new approaches to prevention and treatment are necessary to change this course. This paper will present evidence supporting a potential role of chronic inflammation in the etiologies of oral human papillomavirus infection and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and it will discuss the implications for prevention and treatment. PMID:22518158

  5. CD147 and Ki-67 overexpression confers poor prognosis in squamous cell carcinoma of oral tongue: A tissue microarray study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yau-Hua; Morales, Jose; Feng, Lei; Lee, J. Jack; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue (SCCOT) exhibits high risk for recurrence and regional metastasis even after surgical resection. We assessed the clinicopathologic and prognostic significance of a group of functionally related biomarkers. We used a tissue microarray consisting SCCOT from 32 patients for this study. These patients were treated at the UT- M.D. Anderson Cancer Center from 1995 to 2008. Biomarker expression levels were examined by immunohistochemistry and graded semiquantitatively to determine their prognostic significance. CD147 and Tp63 expressions were significantly associated with a higher T-stage and Ki-67 labelling index as well as shorter overall survival (OS). Expression of Tp63 associated positively with poorly-differentiated histology. There was significant association of Tp63 with the expression levels of CD147 and Glut-1. Glut-1 overexpression was marginally associated with a higher T-stage. There was no prognostic significance of CD44v6 expression in SCCOT. SCCOT with CD147 overexpression in combination with high Ki-67 labelling index had poor OS. CD147 and Ki-67 overexpression is associated with aggressive disease with poor prognosis in SCCOT. PMID:25747176

  6. A new, simple method of making a spacer in interstitial brachytherapy for mobile tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, K; Kawazu, T; Morita, M; Uehara, S; Kunitake, N; Kanda, S

    2000-04-01

    This article demonstrates a new method of making a spacer that increases the distance between the mandible and implanted radioactive sources in interstitial brachytherapy for patients with mobile tongue cancer. Fifty-three patients with mobile tongue cancer underwent interstitial brachytherapy with spacers made by this new technique. Our spacer is not difficult to create or to use. The spacer was made from a plastic splint by using thermoforming techniques and quick self-curing resin, which did not need waxing, wiring, or casting. The surface of the spacer, which comes in contact with the tongue, is smooth because it is covered with tissue-conditioning material. There were no complaints of pain from the patients. Osteoradionecrosis of the mandible developed in only 1 (1.9%) of these patients. This spacer is simple to make and prevented osteoradionecrosis.

  7. Perforation of the small bowel due to metastasis from tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Yoshiko; Matsuda, Keiji; Shimada, Ryu; Horiuchi, Atsushi; Shibuya, Hajime; Nakamura, Keisuke; Iinuma, Hisae; Hayama, Tamuro; Yamada, Hideki; Nozawa, Keijiro; Ishihara, Soichiro; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Distant small bowel metastases from head and neck squamous cell carcinomas are extremely rare, and tongue cancer metastasizing to the small bowel has not been previously reported. We describe a 40-year-old male patient who underwent subtotal gross laryngectomy for squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue in February 2007 and then presented in November 2008 with severe abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) and X-rays revealed free air, suggesting intestinal perforation. Emergency surgery revealed a 10-mm perforation at the ileum and a palpable hard tumor at the perforation site. The ileum was resected, and pathologic findings showed squamous cell carcinoma at the perforation site, which was consistent with metastasis from tongue cancer.

  8. Objective evaluation of tongue base snoring after the use of an oral appliance: a prospective case series.

    PubMed

    Abo-Khatwa, M M; Osman, E Z; Hill, P D; Lee, B W V; Osborne, J E

    2008-12-01

    Oral appliances have become increasingly popular for treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea especially for patients who are not able to tolerate continuous positive airway pressure devices. For simple snoring, oral appliances have become one of the treatments of choice despite a relative lack of scientific evidence of their efficiency. This study was designed to objectively evaluate the clinical effectiveness of oral appliance in the treatment of simple snoring. Prospective case series. Fifteen patients with confirmed simple tongue base snoring had pre- and post-oral appliance objective assessment of their snoring loudness and duration at home. The Snore Index was calculated as the number of snores per hour slept. Patients bed partners were asked to rate the snoring severity on a Spouse Dissatisfaction Scale. Overall there was no significant difference in the Snore Index in the pre- and post-oral appliance recordings. Subjectively, there was a statistically significant decrease in the Spouse Dissatisfaction Scale following the use of oral appliance. Tongue base snorers had no significant reduction in their snoring with the oral appliances. There is a subjective benefit which may be due to the placebo effect.

  9. Integrating oral health throughout cancer care.

    PubMed

    Hartnett, Erin

    2015-10-01

    Oral health is often not a priority during cancer treatment; however, patients with cancer are at increased risk for oral complications during and after treatment. This article focuses on the importance of oral health care before, during, and after cancer treatment using the head, eyes, ears, nose, oral cavity, and throat, or HEENOT, approach. AT A GLANCE: Oral health is linked to overall health, and healthcare providers must be cognizant of the oral-systemic connection with patients undergoing cancer treatment, which may cause acute and chronic oral health problems. 
Oral assessment, prevention, early recognition, and treatment of oral problems must be incorporated into cancer care, particularly with the aid of an interprofessional team to meet patients' oral care needs. 
The head, eyes, ears, nose, oral cavity, and throat, or HEENOT, approach integrates oral care into patients' history taking, physical examination, and plan of cancer care.
.

  10. Postoperative Conversion Disorder in Elderly Oral Cancer Patient.

    PubMed

    Yakushiji, Takashi; Hayashi, Kamichika; Morikawa, Takamichi; Migita, Masashi; Ogane, Satoru; Muramatsu, Kyotaro; Kamio, Takashi; Shibahara, Takahiko; Takano, Nobuo

    2016-01-01

    Conversion disorder is a condition in which psychological stress in response to difficult situations manifests as physical symptoms. Here, we report a case of postoperative coma due to conversion disorder in an elderly oral cancer patient. An 82-year-old woman was referred to Tokyo Dental College Chiba Hospital with a mass lesion on the tongue. A biopsy revealed a well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Surgical treatment was performed for the tongue carcinoma and tracheotomy for management of the airway. On postoperative day 5, the patient exhibited loss of consciousness (Glasgow Coma Scale: E1, VT, M1; Japan Coma Scale: III-300). The patient's vital signs were all normal, as were the results of a full blood count, brain-CT, MRI, and MRA. Only the arm dropping test was positive. Therefore, the cause of the coma was diagnosed as conversion disorder. Seven hours later, the patient showed a complete recovery.

  11. Classification of oral cancers using Raman spectroscopy of serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Aditi; Talathi, Sneha; Sawant, Sharada; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Oral cancers are the sixth most common malignancy worldwide, with low 5-year disease free survival rates, attributable to late detection due to lack of reliable screening modalities. Our in vivo Raman spectroscopy studies have demonstrated classification of normal and tumor as well as cancer field effects (CFE), the earliest events in oral cancers. In view of limitations such as requirement of on-site instrumentation and stringent experimental conditions of this approach, feasibility of classification of normal and cancer using serum was explored using 532 nm excitation. In this study, strong resonance features of β-carotenes, present differentially in normal and pathological conditions, were observed. In the present study, Raman spectra of sera of 36 buccal mucosa, 33 tongue cancers and 17 healthy subjects were recorded using Raman microprobe coupled with 40X objective using 785 nm excitation, a known source of excitation for biomedical applications. To eliminate heterogeneity, average of 3 spectra recorded from each sample was subjected to PC-LDA followed by leave-one-out-cross-validation. Findings indicate average classification efficiency of ~70% for normal and cancer. Buccal mucosa and tongue cancer serum could also be classified with an efficiency of ~68%. Of the two cancers, buccal mucosa cancer and normal could be classified with a higher efficiency. Findings of the study are quite comparable to that of our earlier study, which suggest that there exist significant differences, other than β- carotenes, between normal and cancerous samples which can be exploited for the classification. Prospectively, extensive validation studies will be undertaken to confirm the findings.

  12. Oral microbiome and oral and gastrointestinal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Chen, Calvin Y; Hayes, Richard B

    2012-03-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates human oral bacteria in the etiology of oral and gastrointestinal cancers. Epidemiological studies consistently report increased risks of these cancers in men and women with periodontal disease or tooth loss, conditions caused by oral bacteria. More than 700 bacterial species inhabit the oral cavity, including at least 11 bacterial phyla and 70 genera. Oral bacteria may activate alcohol and smoking-related carcinogens locally or act systemically, through chronic inflammation. High-throughput genetic-based assays now make it possible to comprehensively survey the human oral microbiome, the totality of bacteria in the oral cavity. Establishing the association of the oral microbiome with cancer risk may lead to significant advances in understanding of cancer etiology, potentially opening a new research paradigm for cancer prevention.

  13. Oral Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the disease drawn from literally hundreds of sources. Current Stories OCF Support Group A FREE and anonymous patient / survivor discussion forum is open to the public, where those currently fighting oral ...

  14. Long non-coding RNA MALAT1 interacts with miR-124 and modulates tongue cancer growth by targeting JAG1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong-Han; Liang, Li-Zhong; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Wu, Ji-Nan; Su, Kui; Chen, Jue-Yao; Zheng, Qiao-Yi; Huang, Hong-Zhang; Liao, Gui-Qing

    2017-04-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1), a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), was the earliest discovered to be correlated with cancer and contributes to the initiation and development of several types of tumors. Dysregulation of MALAT1 expression is frequently observed in many types of cancer such as gastric cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and glioma. To date, the role of MALAT1 and the underlying mechanisms in tongue cancer development remain unclear. In the present study, we studied the influence of MALAT1 on tongue cancer cell lines and clinical tongue cancer samples so as to detect its function and the underlying mechanism. In the present study, lncRNA-MALAT1 was specifically upregulated in tongue cancer cell lines and overexpression promoted tongue cancer cell growth by targeting miR-124. Knockdown of MALAT1 suppressed the growth and invasion of human tongue cancer cells and inhibited metastasis in vitro and in vivo. In addition, miR-124-dependent jagged1 (JAG1) regulation was required for MALAT1-induced tongue cancer cell growth. Our data revealed that MALAT1 inhibited tongue cancer cell growth and metastasis through miR-124-dependent JAG1 regulation. In conclusion, we revealed that MALAT1 may play an oncogenic role by increasing proliferation and metastasis of tongue cancer and is a potential therapeutic target in human tongue cancer.

  15. Cancer of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Montero, Pablo H; Patel, Snehal G

    2015-07-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. Although early diagnosis is relatively easy, presentation with advanced disease is not uncommon. The standard of care is primary surgical resection with or without postoperative adjuvant therapy. Improvements in surgical techniques combined with the routine use of postoperative radiation or chemoradiation therapy have resulted in improved survival. Successful treatment is predicated on multidisciplinary treatment strategies to maximize oncologic control and minimize impact of therapy on form and function. Prevention of oral cancer requires better education about lifestyle-related risk factors, and improved awareness and tools for early diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasound Imaging for Analyzing Lateral Tongue Movements during Mastication in Adults with Cerebral Palsy Compared with Adults without Oral Motor Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Remijn, Lianne; Weijers, Gert; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Groen, Brenda E; de Korte, Chris L

    2015-06-01

    Described here is an ultrasound technique used to study tongue movements, particularly lateral tongue movements, during mastication. A method to analyze spatial and temporal tongue movements was developed, and the feasibility of using this method was evaluated. Biplane ultrasound images of tongue movements of four adults without oral motor disability and two adults with oral motor disability as a result of cerebral palsy, were acquired. Tongue movements were analyzed in the coronal and sagittal planes using B-mode and M-mode ultrasonography. Inter-rater and intra-rater agreement for manual tracing of tongue contours was good (ICC = 0.81 and 0.84, respectively). There were significant differences between the two adult groups in movement frequency in the horizontal direction in both coronal and sagittal planes. In the coronal plane, differences in movement frequency and range of vertical movement were detected. Data obtained from sagittal images, with the exception of vertical frequency, indicated no differences between the groups. The protocol developed in this study (using B-mode and M-mode) proved to be valid and reliable. By using this protocol with individuals with and without oral motor disability, we were able to illustrate the clinical application of our protocol to evaluation of differences in tongue movements during mastication.

  17. Oral Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer.gov on the Managing Cancer Care page. Contact Us More information about contacting us or receiving ... Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Google+ LinkedIn GovDelivery RSS CONTACT INFORMATION Contact Us LiveHelp Online Chat MORE INFORMATION ...

  18. Ki-67 and p53 correlation prognostic value in squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity and tongue.

    PubMed

    Motta, Rafael Da Ros; Zettler, Claudio Galeano; Cambruzzi, Eduardo; Jotz, Geraldo Pereira; Berni, Renata Brutti

    2009-01-01

    Epidermoid carcinomas represent from 90% to 95% of oral cavity malignant neoplasias, making up 13,470 cases/year. To correlate p53 and Ki-67 expressions in mouth and tongue carcinomas with lymph node status, gender, histological grade, tumor volume and pathological stage. We carried out a retrospective study of 28 cases of mouth and tongue epidermoid carcinomas. They were submitted to immunohistochemical study in order to check the expression of p53 and Ki-67 antibodies and statistically compare them in terms of lymph node status, gender, histological grade, tumor volume and pathological staging. The individually analyzed p53 proved to have statistical significance (p<0.05) when compared to tumor volume (p=0.029). Despite a strong tendency, the p53/tumor volume relation was not significant. When p53 + Ki67 were analyzed, tumor volume had p < 0.05 (p = 0.029). Literature shows that the expression of p53 and Ki-67 is related to the presence of metastasis to lymph nodes and a worse prognosis. In oral cavity and tongue epidermoid carcinomas, p53 and Ki-67 are related to larger tumors, metastasis to lymph nodes and very likely to a worse prognosis.

  19. Oral contraceptives and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K H; Millard, P S

    1996-10-01

    The Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer conducted a meta-analysis of data from 10 cohort and 44 case-control studies of the association between combined oral contraceptive (OC) use and breast cancer. 53,297 women with breast cancer and 100,239 women with no breast cancer from 25 countries worldwide were studied. Current OC users faced a 24% increased risk of developing breast cancer (confidence interval = 1.15-1.33). This risk fell steadily after cessation and reached 0 at 10 years and thereafter. Use of OCs with higher doses were associated with a greater risk of breast cancer than medium or low-dose OCs. The number of excess cancers in women while using OCs and up to 10 years after OC cessation stood at 0.5/10,000 women 16-19 years old, 1.5/10,000 women 20-24 years old, and 4.7/10,000 women 25-29 years old. The elevated risk of developing breast cancer did not differ by country of origin, ethnic background, reproductive history, or family history of breast cancer. OC users had less clinically advanced breast cancer than never-users who had breast cancer. This finding plus the moderate reduced risk of breast cancer more than 10 years after OC cessation suggest that OCs may effect earlier diagnosis of existing breast cancer instead of causing new breast cancers. The findings of this meta-analysis along with a plausible biologic mechanism (estrogen stimulates breast cancer cells) suggest a causal relationship between OC use and breast cancer. They also indicate that the risk is small, decreases with time, and is lower among low-dose OC users. It is reassuring that the breast cancers found among OC users is less clinically advanced than those found in never-users.

  20. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Washio, Jumpei; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-06-02

    Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the 'Warburg effect'. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases.

  1. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Washio, Jumpei; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the ‘Warburg effect’. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases. PMID:27271597

  2. Oral hygiene, dentition, sexual habits and risk of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Talamini, R; Vaccarella, S; Barbone, F; Tavani, A; Vecchia, C La; Herrero, R; Muñoz, N; Franceschi, S

    2000-01-01

    In an Italian case-control study of oral cancer, number of missing teeth and other aspects of dental care were similar, but the general condition of the mouth, as indicated by gum bleeding, tartar deposits and mucosal irritation, was worse among oral cancer cases than controls. No differences were detected in sexual practices (including oral sex) and (previous) sexually transmitted infections. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11027440

  3. Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial: tongue strengthening exercises in head and neck cancer patients, does exercise load matter?

    PubMed

    Van Nuffelen, Gwen; Van den Steen, Leen; Vanderveken, Olivier; Specenier, Pol; Van Laer, Carl; Van Rompaey, Diane; Guns, Cindy; Mariën, Steven; Peeters, Marc; Van de Heyning, Paul; Vanderwegen, Jan; De Bodt, Marc

    2015-09-04

    Reduced tongue strength is an important factor contributing to early and late dysphagia in head and neck cancer patients previously treated with chemoradiotherapy. The evidence is growing that tongue strengthening exercises can improve tongue strength and swallowing function in both healthy and dysphagic subjects. However, little is known about the impact of specific features of an exercise protocol for tongue strength on the actual outcome (strength or swallowing function). Previous research originating in the fields of sports medicine and physical rehabilitation shows that the degree of exercise load is an influential factor for increasing muscle strength in the limb skeletal muscles. Since the tongue is considered a muscular hydrostat, it remains to be proven whether the same concepts will apply. This ongoing randomized controlled trial in chemoradiotherapy-treated patients with head and neck cancer investigates the effect of three tongue strengthening exercise protocols, with different degrees of exercise load, on tongue strength and swallowing. At enrollment, 51 patients whose dysphagia is primarily related to reduced tongue strength are randomly assigned to a training schedule of 60, 80, or 100% of their maximal tongue strength. Patients are treated three times a week for 8 weeks, executing 120 repetitions of the assigned exercise once per training day. Exercise load is progressively adjusted every 2 weeks. Patients are evaluated before, during and after treatment by means of tongue strength measurements, fiber-optic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing and quality-of-life questionnaires. This randomized controlled trial is the first to systematically investigate the effect of different exercise loads in tongue strengthening exercise protocols. The results will allow the development of more efficacious protocols. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN14447678.

  4. Oral Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview History of NCI Contributing to Cancer Research Senior Leadership Director Previous Directors NCI Organization Divisions, Offices & Centers Advisory Boards & Groups Budget & Appropriations Current Year Budget Annual Plan & Budget ...

  5. Anatomical coverage in elective irradiation of the neck for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue

    SciTech Connect

    Meoz, R.T.; Fletcher, G.H.; Lindberg, R.D.

    1982-11-01

    From January 1954 through December 1978, 146 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue and clinically negative neck had their primary lesion conrolled with irradiation. Metastases to the neck developed later in: 27 of 76 patients (36%) treated by interstitial implantation; nine of 27 patients (33%) who received 2,000 rad in five fractions to the upper neck prior to the implant; eight of 19 (42%) patients who received 5,000 rad through an upper ipsilateral neck field prior to the implant; four of 24 patients (16.6%) who received 5,000 rad through bilateral portals to the upper neck with or without irradiation of the lower neck. In the 43 ipsilateral neck failures, 23 were in the upper jugular chain, (posterior subdigastric nodes), 12 in the mid-jugular, three in the lower jugular, and four in the more anterior part of the subdigastric area. There was one failure in the posterior cervical chain, and five contralateral neck failures. A review of the treatment charts showed that the patients who had an ipsilateral upper neck field only, had smaller portals because the irradiation was tailored to produce shrinkage of the primary tumor prior to needling. To include adequate coverage of the posterior subdigastric nodes (upper jugular), the bodies of the vertebrae must be seen on the simulator films. Also the junction of the subdigastric and the mid-jugular lymphatics must be covered. Although there were only three failures in the lower jugular nodes, it is technically easier to treat the upper mid-jugular nodes through an anterior appositional portal to the lower neck. A dose of 5,000 rad must be given since 2,000 rad, even if delivered in five fractions, gives a failure rate as if there had been no irradiation to the neck.

  6. Anatomical coverage in elective irradiation of the neck for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue

    SciTech Connect

    Meoz, R.T.; Fletcher, G.H.; Lindberg, R.D.

    1982-11-01

    From January 1954 through December 1978, 146 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue and clinically negative neck had their primary lesion controlled with irradiation. Metastases to the neck developed later in: 27 of 76 patients (36%) treated by interstitial implantation: nine of 27 patients (33%) who received 2,000 rad in five fractions to the upper neck prior to the implant; eight of 19 (42%) patients who received 5,000 rad through an upper ipsilateral neck field prior to the implant; four of 24 patients (16.6%) who received 5,000 rad through bilateral portals to the upper neck with or without irradiation of the lower neck. In the 43 ipsilateral neck failures, 23 were in the upper jugular chain, (posterior subdigastric nodes), 12 in the mid-jugular, three in the lower jugular, and four in the more anterior part of the subdigastric area. There was one failure in the posterior cervical chain, and five contralateral neck failures. A review of the treatment charts showed that the patients who had ipsilateral upper neck field only, had smaller portals because the irradiation was tailored to produce shrinkage of the primary tumor prior to needling. To include adequate coverage of the posterior subdigastric nodes (upper jugular), the bodies of the vertebrae must be seen on the simulator films. Also the junction of the subdigastric and the mid-jugular lymphatics must be covered. Although there were only three failures in the lower jugular nodes, it is technically easier to treat the upper mid-jugular nodes through an anterior appositional portal to the lower neck. A dose of 5,000 rad must be given since 2,000 rad, even if delivered in five fractions, gives a failure rate as if there had been no irradition to the neck.

  7. A longitudinal acoustic study of the effects of the radial forearm free flap reconstruction on sibilants produced by tongue cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Laaksonen, Juha-Pertti; Rieger, Jana; Harris, Jeffrey; Seikaly, Hadi

    2011-04-01

    Acoustic properties of 980 tokens of sibilants /s, z, ƒ/ produced by 17 Canadian English-speaking female and male tongue cancer patients were studied. The patients had undergone tongue resection and tongue reconstruction with a radial forearm free flap (RFFF). The spectral moments (mean, skewness) and frication duration were analysed in connected speech samples produced before the tongue resection, and 1, 6 and 12 months after the surgery. The effects of radiation therapy (RT) and inclusion of the floor of the mouth (FOM) were also studied. Acoustic changes were observed only on alveolar sibilants /s, z/ such that speech was found to improve towards normal over the 1-year period. The reduction of acoustic distinction between /s, z/ and /ƒ/ was short term. A history of RT and involvement of the FOM had no differing effects on outcomes compared with non-RT or non-FOM. Variability between individuals was found, accentuating the speaker-specific abilities for adaptation, compensation and relearning after oral reconstruction.

  8. Divergent routes to oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Keith D; Thurlow, Johanna K; Fleming, Janis; Drake, Paul J H; Vass, J Keith; Kalna, Gabriela; Higham, Des J; Herzyk, Pawel; Macdonald, D Gordon; Parkinson, E Ken; Harrison, Paul R

    2006-08-01

    Most head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients present with late-stage cancers, which are difficult to treat. Therefore, early diagnosis of high-risk premalignant lesions and incipient cancers is important. HNSCC is currently perceived as a single progression mechanism, resulting in immortal invasive cancers. However, we have found that approximately 40% of primary oral SCCs are mortal in culture, and these have a better prognosis. About 60% of oral premalignancies (dysplasias) are also mortal. The mortal and immortal tumors are generated in vivo as judged by p53 mutations and loss of p16(INK4A) expression being found only in the original tumors from which the immortal cultures were derived. To investigate the relationships of dysplasias to SCCs, we did microarray analysis of primary cultures of 4 normal oral mucosa biopsies, 19 dysplasias, and 16 SCCs. Spectral clustering using the singular value decomposition and other bioinformatic techniques showed that development of mortal and immortal SCCs involves distinct transcriptional changes. Both SCC classes share most of the transcriptional changes found in their respective dysplasias but have additional changes. Moreover, high-risk dysplasias that subsequently progress to SCCs more closely resemble SCCs than nonprogressing dysplasias. This indicates for the first time that there are divergent mortal and immortal pathways for oral SCC development via intermediate dysplasias. We believe that this new information may lead to new ways of classifying HNSCC in relation to prognosis.

  9. A Longitudinal Acoustic Study of the Effects of the Radial Forearm Free Flap Reconstruction on Sibilants Produced by Tongue Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laaksonen, Juha-Pertti; Rieger, Jana; Harris, Jeffrey; Seikaly, Hadi

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic properties of 980 tokens of sibilants /s, z, [approximately]/ produced by 17 Canadian English-speaking female and male tongue cancer patients were studied. The patients had undergone tongue resection and tongue reconstruction with a radial forearm free flap (RFFF). The spectral moments (mean, skewness) and frication duration were analysed…

  10. A Longitudinal Acoustic Study of the Effects of the Radial Forearm Free Flap Reconstruction on Sibilants Produced by Tongue Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laaksonen, Juha-Pertti; Rieger, Jana; Harris, Jeffrey; Seikaly, Hadi

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic properties of 980 tokens of sibilants /s, z, [approximately]/ produced by 17 Canadian English-speaking female and male tongue cancer patients were studied. The patients had undergone tongue resection and tongue reconstruction with a radial forearm free flap (RFFF). The spectral moments (mean, skewness) and frication duration were analysed…

  11. Expression of semaphorin 3A and neuropilin 1 with clinicopathological features and survival in human tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Hong; Fu, Zhen; Ye, Jin; Liu, Lai; Song, Xiao; Wu, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between semaphorin 3A (SEMA 3A) and its receptor neuropilin 1 (NRP1) and the clinicopathologic characteristics of patients with tongue cancer. Study Design: Forty-three tongue squamous cell carcinoma specimens were included. Immunohistochemical staining of SEMA3A and NRP1 was performed on 15 normal tongue epithelium specimens and the 43 tumour specimens. Immunoreactivity was evaluated based on the staining intensity and distribution score. Statistical analyses were performed using Chi-squared and Spearman tests and Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: SEMA3A was significantly down-regulated in tongue cancer compared with normal tongue (P=0.025), while NRP1 was over-expressed in tumours (P<0.001). SEMA3A expression inversely correlated with nodal metastasis (P=0.017). NRP1 expression did not correlate with any clinicopathological characteristics. Higher SEMA3A expression strongly predicted longer survival (P=0.005). Scores for the NRP1/SEMA3A ratio of ≥1 predicted shorter survival (P=0.045). Conclusions: Aberrant expression of SEMA3A and its receptor NRP1 might be involved in the development of tongue cancer and might be useful prognostic markers in this tumour type. Key words:Semaphorin 3A, neuropilin 1, tongue, squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:22926477

  12. [Identification of cervical lymph node micrometastasis of tongue cancer by color Doppler and MRI].

    PubMed

    Fan, Sufeng; Zhang, Quan; Li, Qiuli; Wang, Lina; Zheng, Lie; Liu, Longzhong

    2014-01-01

    To assess the values of color Doppler and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the identification of cervical lymph node micrometastasis of tongue cancer. Totally 96 cases of tongue cancer with impalpable neck lymph node was examined with color Doppler and MRI within one week before surgery. Chi-square test was used to assess if the presence of regional lymph node micrometastasis, histopathological analysis as a golden standard lymph node micrometastasis. For the diagnosis of cervical lymph node micrometastasis, color Doppler was significantly better than MRI in sensitivity (72.5% vs 50.0%, P = 0.039) and the accuracy (78.1% vs 64.6%, P = 0.038), but no significant difference in the specificity (82.1% vs 75.0%, P = 0.357), the positive predictive value (74.4% vs 58.8%, P = 0.159) and the negative predictive value (80.7% vs 67.7%, P = 0.108). Color Doppler is better than MRI in the sensitivity and accuracy for the diagnosis of cervical lymph node micrometastasis of tongue cancer.

  13. Malignant Tumors of Tongue in Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Mohammad Esmaeil; Atarbashi Moghadam, Saede; Atarbashi Moghadam, Fazele; Bastani, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of oral cancers varies from one country to another, which can be clarified by the difference in the distribution of the risk factors and the possible etiologies. Tongue is a main segment of oral cavity and malignant lesions of this region accounts for nearly 30% of all oral cancers. Objectives In the present study, we evaluated the pattern of tongue cancer in Iranian population and compared these findings with those previously reported in the other countries. Methods In this multicenter, retrospective cross-sectional study recorded cases of the malignant tongue tumors in the cancer research center (CRC) of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences were extracted. The patient records and their microscopic reports were retrieved from the archives and age, sex and microscopic types were evaluated. It is to be noted that the CRC has been serving as a cancer registry center for major hospitals all over the country since the year of 2003. Thus, the obtained statistics are highly reliable. Results During the years 2003 to 2008, a total number of 952 new cases of the tongue cancer were recorded in the CRC. Most cases are diagnosed in the sixth and seventh decades of life. 450 cases (47.2%) occurred in men and 489 cases (51.36%) in women. Four different types of malignant lesions (epithelial, salivary gland, hematopoietic and mesenchymal) were diagnosed. Epithelial tumors were the most prevalent malignancies (93%) of which squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) made up 87.39% of all lesions. Salivary gland tumors had the second place with 3.15% of the total lesions. Conclusions In Iranian population, squamous cell carcinoma is the most prevalent malignancy of tongue and it is notable that the ratio of female to male population was equal. These lesions were prevalent in the sixth and seventh decades of life. Thus screening examination of tongue by dentist especially in elderly patients is necessary for early detection of cancerous lesions. PMID:27761209

  14. Clinical recommendations for oral cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Richards, Derek

    2010-01-01

    To address the benefits and limitations of oral cancer screening and the use of adjunctive screening aids to visualise and detect potentially malignant and malignant oral lesions. Squamous cell carcinomas of the lips and cancers of the oropharynx (including the posterior one-third of the base of the tongue and the tonsils were excluded. A specially convened expert panel evaluated the available evidence which was derived from a systematic search of Medline and the Cochrane Library. Further details about the search are available in a supplement to the published article available on the Journal of the America Dental Association's website (http://jada.ada.org/cgi/content/full/141/5/509). Qualitative synthesis of the data was performed by the panel. Where consensus could not be reached majority voting was employed. Recommendations were reviewed by internal and external scientific experts and organisations. After review recommendations were revised where appropriate and the ADA Council on Scientific Affairs approved the final clinical recommendations. No information provided in article. The key recommendations were all classified as level D being based on grade IV evidence or extrapolated from grade I, II or III evidence using a system based on Shekelle et al.(1) The main recommendations can be summarised as:1) Clinicians should remain alert for signs of potentially malignant lesions or early-stage cancers in all patients while performing routine visual and tactile examinations, particularly for patients who use tobacco or who are heavy consumers of alcohol. 2) For seemingly innocuous lesions, clinicians should follow up in seven to 14 days to confirm persistence after removing any possible cause to reduce the potential for false-positive screening results. 3) For lesions that raise suspicion of cancer or for lesions that persist after removal of a possible cause, clinicians should communicate the potential benefits and risks of early diagnosis. Considerations include

  15. Susceptibility to oral cancers with CD95 and CD95L promoter SNPs may vary with the site and gender.

    PubMed

    Daripally, Sarika; Nallapalle, Sateesh Reddy; Katta, Saritha; Prasad, Vidudala V T S

    2015-09-01

    We investigated risk association of oral cancers (tongue and buccal mucosa cancers) with FAS (-1377G > A and FAS -670 A > G) and FASL (-844 T > C) SNPs, in males and females. A case-control study of 535 oral cancer and 525 control subjects was performed. SNPs were detected in the genomic DNA isolated from peripheral blood using PCR-RFLP. We report FASL -844 T > C SNPs increased risk for buccal mucosa cancer in females but not in males. On the other hand, FAS genotypes did not alter the risk of the cancers in both females and males. However, co-occurrence of FAS -1377 GA and -670 GG, FAS -1377 AA and -670 GG genotypes, and combined genotypes of FAS and FASL (FAS -1377 AA + FAS -670 GG + FASL -844 CC) alter male susceptibility towards tongue cancer. In females, combined genotypes of FAS (-1377GA and -670 AA) were found to be a risk factor of buccal mucosa cancer (OR = 3.27, CI = 1.28-8.36; P ≤ 0.01). FASL variants (GA and AA) increased tongue cancer risk in females who were tobacco users compared to non-tobacco users. In conclusion, SNPs of the FAS and FASL might alter risk of tongue and buccal mucosa cancers differentially, in a gender-dependent manner.

  16. Stages of Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  17. TP53 gene expression in HPV-positive oral tongue SCC and its correlation with nodal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Seraj, Jalal Mehdizadeh; Yazdani, Nasrin; Ashtiani, Zahra Ousati; Seraj, Siamak Mehdizadeh; Hasheminasab, Sayed-Mohammad; Memar, Bahram; Mirashrafi, Fatemeh; Borghei, Hasti; Yazdani, Javad; Mostaan, Leila Vazifeh

    2011-12-15

    In this study, we investigated the prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and TP53 expression in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue and, subsequently, its significance in cervical lymph node metastases and tumor differentiation. Sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks from 94 histologically confirmed tongue SCC cases were investigated in this study. Immunohistochemistry was used to study TP53 expression, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed for the detection of high risk HPV types (16 and 18). The frequency of HPV-16 and HPV-18 infection was 10.6% and 16%, respectively. Overexpression of TP53 was observed in 70.2% of patients. Young patients (aged below 45 years) comprised 20% of all patients. There was no significant association between TP53, HPV-16, or HPV 18 presence and higher stages of the tumor, tumor differentiation, or presence of nodal metastasis. Although an association between head and neck SCC and HPV infection is being recognized and reported, our data implicate that HPV infection or TP53 expression does not play a significant role in oral tongue SCC pathogenesis, differentiation, or metastasis, as seen in our patients.

  18. Error-Free Text Typing Performance of an Inductive Intra-Oral Tongue Computer Interface for Severely Disabled Individuals.

    PubMed

    Andreasen Struijk, Lotte; Bentsen, Bo; Gaihede, Michael; Lontis, Eugen

    2017-05-19

    For severely paralyzed individuals, alternative computer interfaces are becoming increasingly essential for everyday life as social and vocational activities are facilitated by information technology and as the environment becomes more automatic and remotely controllable. Tongue computer interfaces have proven to be desirable by the users partly due to their high degree of aesthetic acceptability, but so far the mature systems have shown a relatively low error-free text typing efficiency. This study evaluated the intra-oral inductive tongue computer interface (ITCI) in its intended use: Error-free text typing in a generally available text editing system, Word©. Individuals with tetraplegia and able bodied individuals used the ITCI for typing using a Matlab© interface and for Word© typing for 4-5 experimental days, and the results showed an average error-free text typing rate in Word© of 11.6 correct characters/min across all participants and of 15.5 correct characters/min for participants familiar with tongue piercings. Improvements in typing rates between the sessions suggest that typing rates can be improved further through long-term use of the ITCI.

  19. Exfoliative cytology for diagnosing oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sayánsm, M; Somoza-Martín, J M; Barros-Angueira, F; Reboiras-López, M D; Gándara-Vila, P; Gándara Rey, J M; García-García, A

    2010-04-28

    Exfoliative cytology is a minimally invasive technique for obtaining oral cell specimens from patients for diagnostic purposes. Classical applications of oral cytology studies, such as oral candidiasis, have been extended to include oral precancerous and cancerous lesions. A number of analytical methods are available for studying cytology specimens. The development of molecular analysis techniques, the oral cancer etiopathogenic process, and improvements in liquid-based exfoliative cytology are leading to renewed interest in exfoliative cytology. Results sometimes are disputed, so the aim of our review was to clarify the applicability of exfoliative cytology to the diagnosis of oral precancerous and cancerous lesions.

  20. Oral targeted therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carrington, Christine

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Oral targeted therapies are increasingly being used to treat cancer. They work by interfering with specific molecules or pathways involved in tumour growth. It is essential that health professionals managing patients taking these drugs have appropriate training and skills. They should be aware of potential adverse effects and drug interactions, and be able to manage toxicities when they occur. Despite the selectivity of these targeted therapies, they still have serious adverse effects including skin reactions, diarrhoea and altered organ function. PMID:26648656

  1. Oral health considerations in cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Mawardi, Hani H; Al-Mohaya, Maha A; Treister, Nathaniel S

    2013-05-01

    Over the past decade, advances in cancer treatment have helped in prolonging the survival rate for cancer patients. However, the patients who undergo treatment for cancer are potentially at high-risk for developing a number of oral complications, including oral mucositis, infections, hyposalivation, dental caries, and jaw osteonecrosis. Cancer survivors may remain at life-long risk of developing oral complications, and therefore require long-term dental follow-up, well after completion of cancer therapy. Patients should typically undergo thorough oral examination prior to initiation of therapy, during and after therapy to identify any active infection. In addition, and in order to maintain adequate oral health throughout treatment, patients should continue normal oral hygiene with tooth brushing and interproximal cleaning. The aim of this review is to discuss potential oral complications as a result of cancer therapy, and the certain precautions we should be aware of these patients.

  2. Innate tissue fluorescence of the oral mucosa of controls and head-and-neck cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Howard E.; Kolli, Venkateswara; Ansley, John; Chandawarkar, Rajiv Y.; Alfano, Robert R.; Schantz, Stimson P.

    1995-04-01

    Base line spectral excitation and emission scans were defined for the oral mucosa in a population of 61 controls, 16 oral tongue cancer patients and 2 patients with tongue leukoplakia. A xenon-based fluorescence spectrophotometer (Mediscience Corp.) with a fiberoptic probe (Mediscience Corp.) was used to collect excitation and emission spectra. Two excitation scans ((lambda) Ex 200-360 nm, (lambda) Em 380 nm; (lambda) Ex 240-430 nm, (lambda) Em 450 nm) and two emission scans ((lambda) Ex 300 nm, (lambda) Em 320-580 nm; (lambda) Ex 340 nm, (lambda) Em 360-660 nm) were used to analyze the buccal mucosa (BM), hard palate (HP), floor of mouth (FOM) and dorsal tongue (DT) of 61 control individuals. In 41 controls the lateral tongue site (LT) was added. The same set of scans was performed on tumor lesions and contralateral normal tissues of 16 patients with lateral tongue tumors and on two individuals with leukoplakia of the tongue. Ratios of points on the individual scans were used to quantitate data. The excitation scan ((lambda) Ex 200-360 nm, (lambda) Em 380 nm) and the emission scan ((lambda) Ex 300 nm, (lambda) Em 320-580 nm) were able to statistically discriminate the HP and DT from the BM and FOM. The ratios of intensities of neoplastic mucosa and contralateral sites were significantly different with the excitation scans ((lambda) Ex 200-360 nm, (lambda) Em 380 nm, p < 0.001) and ((lambda) Ex 240-430 nm, (lambda) Em 450 nm, p < 0.01) and with the emission scan ((lambda) Ex 300 nm, (lambda) Em 320-580 nm, p < 0.001). Discrimination was significant with the emission scan ((lambda) Ex 340 nm, (lambda) Em 360- 660 nm, p < 0.07). Innate tissue fluorescence has potential as a monitor of cancer patients and populations at risk for head and neck cancer.

  3. Decreased radiation doses to tongue with “stick-out” tongue position over neutral tongue position in head and neck cancer patients who refused or could not tolerate an intraoral device (bite-block, tongue blade, or mouthpiece) due to trismus, gag reflex, or discomfort during intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kil, Whoon Jong; Kulasekere, Christina; Derrwaldt, Ronald; Bugno, Jacob; Hatch, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess changes in oral cavity (OC) shapes and radiation doses to tongue with different tongue positions during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) but who refused or did not tolerate an intraoral device (IOD), such as bite block, tongue blade, or mouthpiece. Results Tongue volume outside of OC was 7.1 ± 3.8 cm3 (5.4 ± 2.6% of entire OC and 7.8 ± 3.1% of oral tongue) in IMRT-S. Dmean of OC was 34.9 ± 8.0 Gy and 31.4 ± 8.7 Gy with IMRT-N and IMRT-S, respectively (p < 0.001). OC volume receiving ≥ 36 Gy (V36) was 40.6 ± 16.9% with IMRT-N and 33.0 ± 17.0% with IMRT-S (p < 0.001). Dmean of tongue was 38.1 ± 7.9 Gy and 32.8 ± 8.8 Gy in IMRT-N and IMRT-S, respectively (p < 0.001). V15, V30, and V45 of tongue were significantly lower in IMRT-S (85.3 ± 15.0%, 50.6 ± 16.2%, 24.3 ± 16.0%, respectively) than IMRT-N (94.4 ± 10.6%, 64.7 ± 16.2%, 34.0 ± 18.6%, respectively) (all p < 0.001). Positional offsets of tongue during the course of IMRT-S was –0.1 ± 0.2 cm, 0.01 ± 0.1 cm, and –0.1 ± 0.2 cm (vertical, longitudinal, and lateral, respectively). Materials and Methods 13 patients with HNSCC underwent CT-simulations both with a neutral tongue position and a stick-out tongue for IMRT planning (IMRT-N and IMRT-S, respectively). Planning objectives were to deliver 70 Gy, 63 Gy, and 56 Gy in 35 fractions to 95% of PTVs. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) recommended dose constraints were applied. Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation and compared using the student t-test. Conclusions IMRT-S for patients with HNSCC who refused or could not tolerate an IOD has significant decreased radiation dose to the tongue than IMRT-N, which may potentially reduce RT related toxicity in tongue in selected patients. PMID:27447973

  4. Decreased radiation doses to tongue with "stick-out" tongue position over neutral tongue position in head and neck cancer patients who refused or could not tolerate an intraoral device (bite-block, tongue blade, or mouthpiece) due to trismus, gag reflex, or discomfort during intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kil, Whoon Jong; Kulasekere, Christina; Derrwaldt, Ronald; Bugno, Jacob; Hatch, Craig

    2016-08-16

    To assess changes in oral cavity (OC) shapes and radiation doses to tongue with different tongue positions during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) but who refused or did not tolerate an intraoral device (IOD), such as bite block, tongue blade, or mouthpiece. Tongue volume outside of OC was 7.1 ± 3.8 cm3 (5.4 ± 2.6% of entire OC and 7.8 ± 3.1% of oral tongue) in IMRT-S. Dmean of OC was 34.9 ± 8.0 Gy and 31.4 ± 8.7 Gy with IMRT-N and IMRT-S, respectively (p < 0.001). OC volume receiving ≥ 36 Gy (V36) was 40.6 ± 16.9% with IMRT-N and 33.0 ± 17.0% with IMRT-S (p < 0.001). Dmean of tongue was 38.1 ± 7.9 Gy and 32.8 ± 8.8 Gy in IMRT-N and IMRT-S, respectively (p < 0.001). V15, V30, and V45 of tongue were significantly lower in IMRT-S (85.3 ± 15.0%, 50.6 ± 16.2%, 24.3 ± 16.0%, respectively) than IMRT-N (94.4 ± 10.6%, 64.7 ± 16.2%, 34.0 ± 18.6%, respectively) (all p < 0.001). Positional offsets of tongue during the course of IMRT-S was -0.1 ± 0.2 cm, 0.01 ± 0.1 cm, and -0.1 ± 0.2 cm (vertical, longitudinal, and lateral, respectively). 13 patients with HNSCC underwent CT-simulations both with a neutral tongue position and a stick-out tongue for IMRT planning (IMRT-N and IMRT-S, respectively). Planning objectives were to deliver 70 Gy, 63 Gy, and 56 Gy in 35 fractions to 95% of PTVs. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) recommended dose constraints were applied. Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation and compared using the student t-test. IMRT-S for patients with HNSCC who refused or could not tolerate an IOD has significant decreased radiation dose to the tongue than IMRT-N, which may potentially reduce RT related toxicity in tongue in selected patients.

  5. Oral contraceptives and liver cancer.

    PubMed

    1997-11-01

    To date, nine case-control studies conducted in developed countries have identified an association between oral contraceptives (OCs) and liver cancer. The most recent population-based data from both developed and developing countries failed to confirm such an association, however. A study conducted by the World Health Organization in eight developing countries (Chile, China, Colombia, Israel, Kenya, Nigeria, Philippines, and Thailand), in which 122 women with liver cancer were matched with 802 controls, found no elevated risk for OC users compared with never-users (relative risk, 0.7; 95% confidence interval, 0.4-1.2). This study is particularly significant since it was conducted in countries where hepatitis B virus infection, an important risk factor for primary liver cancer, is widespread. In addition, population mortality data from the US, UK, Japan, and Sweden have failed to document increases in liver cancer cases coincident with increases in OC use. Given that population statistics can detect changes on the magnitude of a 40-50% decrease in the risk of ovarian and endometrial cancer related to OC use, they should be able to detect increases of two to 20 times the risk of liver cancer. The increased risk of liver cancer found in the case-control studies may reflect bias resulting from the small size of these studies.

  6. Co-occurrence of Dystonic and Dyskinetic Tongue Movements with Oral Apraxia in Post-regression Dysphagia in Classical Rett Syndrome Years of Life 1 Through 5.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Suzanne S; Taragin, Ben; Djukic, Alesandra

    2015-04-01

    We do not know the natural history of dysphagia in classical Rett syndrome (RTT) by stage or age. This study investigated swallowing physiology in 23 females ages 1:7 to 5:8 (years, months) with classical Rett syndrome to determine common and distinguishing features of dysphagia in post-regression early Pseudostationary Stage III. In-depth analysis of videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS) found dysmotility of oral stage events across subjects implicating oral apraxia. Impaired motility was further compromised by recurrent dystonic and dyskinetic movements that co-occurred with oral apraxia during oral ingestion in 78 % (n = 18) of the subjects with RTT. Of this group, 44 % displayed rocking and/or rolling lingual pattern, 56 % had recurrent oral tongue retroflexions, and/or elevated posturing of the tongue tip, and, 72 % displayed multi-wave oropharyngeal transfer pattern. The proportion of subjects whose swallowing motility was disrupted by aberrant involuntary tongue movements did not differ significantly between bolus types (liquid, puree, and solid) trialed. Liquid ingestion was significantly more efficient in subjects using bottles with nipples than their counterparts who used spouted or straw cups. Dystonic and dyskinetic tongue movements disrupted liquid ingestion in subjects using cups with spouts or straws significantly more than those using bottles. Analysis of food ingestion revealed that significantly more subjects were able to orally form, transport, and transfer a puree bolus into the pharynx than they were a solid bolus. A significantly larger number of subjects aspirated and penetrated liquid than they did puree or solid. No significant relationship was found between subjects with airway contamination and those with dystonic and dyskinetic tongue movements. Subjects' rocking and rolling lingual patterns were consistent with those evidenced in adults with Parkinson's disease. Subjects' tongue retroflexions were classified as provisionally

  7. Efficacy of topical antibiotic administration on the inhibition of perioperative oral bacterial growth in oral cancer patients: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Funahara, M; Hayashida, S; Sakamoto, Y; Yanamoto, S; Kosai, K; Yanagihara, K; Umeda, M

    2015-10-01

    Parenteral antibiotic prophylaxis is the current standard of therapy in clean-contaminated oral cancer surgery. Nevertheless, the incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) in oral oncological surgery is relatively high, especially in major surgery with reconstruction and tracheotomy. The aims of this study were to investigate the perioperative condition related to microorganisms in the oral cavity and to examine the efficacy of the topical administration of tetracycline in reducing the number of bacteria in the oropharyngeal fluid during intubation. The number of oral bacteria was measured during intubation in patients undergoing major oral cancer surgery. The efficacy of the topical administration of tetracycline or povidone iodine gel in reducing the bacteria was then investigated. Bacteria in the oropharyngeal fluid grew from 10(6)CFU/ml to 10(8)CFU/ml during the 3h after intubation (CFU, colony-forming units). When tetracycline was applied to the dorsum of the tongue, oral bacteria decreased immediately to 10(5)CFU/ml, and the number of bacteria in the oropharyngeal fluid was maintained below 10(7)CFU/ml for 7h. The concentration of tetracycline in the oropharyngeal fluid was extremely high for several hours after topical administration. The topical administration of tetracycline could reduce oral bacteria in patients undergoing clean-contaminated oral cancer surgery. This method is expected to be effective in the prevention of SSI.

  8. One patient - three head and neck primaries: nasopharyngeal, tongue and thyroid cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We report a rare case of three head and neck malignancies in one patient. Squamous cell carcinoma of tongue and papillary thyroid carcinoma occurred as metachronous cancers in a patient with primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma. These three pathologically distinct malignancies of head and neck region in one patient is a rare phenomenon and is not reported so far. Case presentation A 60 year old Saudi female patient presented in March 2011 with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma. After completion of concurrent chemoradiation in June 2011, she developed two new primaries i-e thyroid cancer and tongue cancer in May 2012 along with recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma. We discuss histopathologic features, diagnostic tools and treatment modalities for this rarely existing case. Conclusion High index of suspicion and thorough work up is essential in follow up of patients with head and neck primary cancers. The effect of field cancerization and environmental factors need to be explored in greater depths in such selected cases. However, which patients are at increased risk of triplet primaries, is still unknown. PMID:24164964

  9. Fenofibrate Suppresses Oral Tumorigenesis via Reprogramming Metabolic Processes: Potential Drug Repurposing for Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Chia-Ing; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Huang, Yi-Ping; Liu, Chia Jen; Chang, Nai Wen

    2016-01-01

    One anticancer strategy suggests targeting mitochondrial metabolism to trigger cell death through slowing down energy production from the Warburg effect. Fenofibrate is a clinical lipid-lowering agent and an effective anticancer drug. In the present study, we demonstrate that fenofibrate provided novel mechanisms for delaying oral tumor development via the reprogramming of metabolic processes. Fenofibrate induced cytotoxicity by decreasing oxygen consumption rate (OCR) that was accompanied with increasing extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) and reducing ATP content. Moreover, fenofibrate caused changes in the protein expressions of hexokinase II (HK II), pyruvate kinase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), which are associated with the Warburg effect. In addition, fenofibrate reprogrammed the metabolic pathway by interrupting the binding of HK II to VDAC. In an oral cancer mouse model, fenofibrate exhibited both preventive and therapeutic efficacy on oral tumorigenesis. Fenofibrate administration suppressed the incidence rate of tongue lesions, reduced the tumor sizes, decreased the tumor multiplicity, and decreased the immunoreactivities of VDAC and mTOR. The molecular mechanisms involved in fenofibrate's ability to delay tumor development included the down-regulation of mTOR activity via TSC1/2-dependent signaling through activation of AMPK and inactivation of Akt, or via a TSC1/2-independent pathway through direct suppression of raptor. Our findings provide a molecular rationale whereby fenofibrate exerts anticancer and additional beneficial effects for the treatment of oral cancer patients. PMID:27313493

  10. Recent trends in prevention of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Mangalath, Ummar; Aslam, Sachin Aslam; Abdul Khadar, Abdul Hafiz Kooliyat; Francis, Pulikkan George; Mikacha, Muhamed Shaloob Karimbil; Kalathingal, Jubin Hassan

    2014-12-01

    Oral cancers often occurs out of long standing potentially malignant lesions and conditions so called premalignant lesions and conditions. Oral precancer is a intermediate state with increased cancer rate which can be recognized and treated obviously with much better prognosis than a full blown malignancy. Oral cancer risk can be lowered or even prevented by simply understanding basic oral hygiene, different bacteria found in the mouth, and how diet influences oral cancers. Currently, research is being done on the relationship between diet and oral cancer. Oral cancer is a very serious disease that can be prevented. Practicing good oral hygiene is key to help keep the oral cavity clean. Limiting the use of tobacco and alcohol products is also important because these are the causes of most oral cancers. Lastly, eating a well balanced diet that has protective affects can reduce the risk of oral cancer. This includes a diet high in fruits, vegetables, and fish and low in high fat and cholesterol meats, rice, and refined grains.

  11. [Oral cancer--not only a disease of elder patients with risk factors].

    PubMed

    Mogilner, R; Elishoov, H

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is currently the 7th most common malignancy worldwide with more than 600,000 new cases diagnosed each year; oral cancer alone comprises about half of these cases. Tobacco and alcohol are the main etiologic factors for oral cancer. The mean age of patients is 60 years. However, in the recent years, an alarming increase in the incidence of oral cancer among patients younger than 60 years of age with seemingly no relation to the classical etiologic factors, has been reported from several regions, mainly from Western countries. In line with this, we report the case of a non-smoker, non-alcohol user, 26-year old patient who was diagnosed with cancer of the tongue (anterior two-thirds). The tumor mimicked a traumatic ulcer, however immediate biopsy procedure enabled an accurate diagnosis and referral of the patient to treatment without delay.

  12. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in epithelial cells in vivo: rare detection of EBV replication in tongue mucosa but not in salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Frangou, Phroso; Buettner, Maike; Niedobitek, Gerald

    2005-01-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is transmitted through saliva, but the cellular source is controversial. Putative reservoirs include oral epithelium and salivary glands. Tongue mucosal samples, salivary glands, and tongue carcinomas were studied, by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, for evidence of EBV infection. EBV replication was seen in 1.3% of tongue mucosal samples. No latent infection was found at this site. EBV infection was detected neither in normal salivary glands nor in tongue carcinomas. Thus, EBV replication occurs infrequently in tongue epithelial cells, and salivary glands are unlikely to harbor EBV. EBV is unlikely to be involved in the pathogenesis of tongue cancer.

  13. Role of oral microbiome on oral cancers, a review.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, Pourya; Eslami, Hosein; Yousefi, Mehdi; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Kafil, Hossein Samadi

    2016-12-01

    The oral cavity is inhibited by many of the bacterial species. Some of them have a key role in the development of oral disease. Interrelationships between oral microbiome and systemic conditions such as head-and-neck cancer have become increasingly appreciated in recent years. Emerging evidence also suggests a link between periodontal disease and oral cancer, and the explanation being that chronic inflammation could be a major factor in both diseases. Squamous cell carcinoma is that the most frequently occurring malignancy of the oral cavity and adjacent sites, representing over 90% of all cancers. The incidence of oral cancer is increasing, significantly among young people and women. Worldwide there are 350,000-400,000 new cases diagnosed every year. Bacteria, viruses, and fungi are strongly implicated as etiological factors in certain cancers. In this review we will discuss the association between the development of oral cancer in potentially malignant oral lesions with chronic periodontitis, chronic Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, candida, other microbes and described mechanisms which may be involved in these carcinoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Expression of semaphorin 3A and neuropilin 1 with clinicopathological features and survival in human tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Hong; Fu, Zhen; Ye, Jin; Liu, Lai; Song, Xiao; Wu, Yu

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the association between semaphorin 3A (SEMA 3A) and its receptor neuropilin 1 (NRP1) and the clinicopathologic characteristics of patients with tongue cancer. Forty-three tongue squamous cell carcinoma specimens were included. Immunohistochemical staining of SEMA3A and NRP1 was performed on 15 normal tongue epithelium specimens and the 43 tumour specimens. Immunoreactivity was evaluated based on the staining intensity and distribution score. Statistical analyses were performed using Chi-squared and Spearman tests and Kaplan-Meier analysis. SEMA3A was significantly down-regulated in tongue cancer compared with normal tongue (P=0.025), while NRP1 was over-expressed in tumours (P<0.001). SEMA3A expression inversely correlated with nodal metastasis (P=0.017). NRP1 expression did not correlate with any clinicopathological characteristics. Higher SEMA3A expression strongly predicted longer survival (P=0.005). Scores for the NRP1/SEMA3A ratio of ≥1 predicted shorter survival (P=0.045). Aberrant expression of SEMA3A and its receptor NRP1 might be involved in the development of tongue cancer and might be useful prognostic markers in this tumour type.

  15. Predictability of oral and laryngopharyngeal function for aspiration and limitation of oral intake in patients after surgery for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Hey, Christiane; Lange, Benjamin P; Aere, Christina; Eberle, Silvia; Zaretsky, Yevgen; Sader, Robert; Stöver, Timo; Wagenblast, Jens

    2013-08-01

    Swallowing disorders are common in patients after surgery for head and neck cancer. The clinical assessment of oral and laryngopharyngeal abilities is widely used as a dysphagia assessment tool in this patient group, despite a lack of research. The goal of this study was to assess the predictability of clinical parameters for aspiration and limitation of oral intake. A swallowing disorder with the need for further intervention was identified by fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) in 65%, with aspiration in 49%, silently in 21%, and limited oral intake with tube dependency in 56% of studied patients. Four clinical parameters (dysglossia, wet voice, tongue motility, and tongue strength) correlated significantly with aspiration and limitation of oral intake. However, none of these clinical parameters was able to predict one of our two reference criteria, due to low positive likelihood ratios, mostly less than two. Clinical assessment is therefore inappropriate for early detection of swallowing disorders in such patients.

  16. How will I be after my operation for oral cancer?

    PubMed

    Kanatas, A; Singh, P; Lowe, D; Rogers, S N

    2015-07-01

    Validated health-related quality of life measures for patients with oral cancer have been available for over a decade. We used the Liverpool head and neck cancer database to identify 1060 patients who had curative operations for primary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck at the regional maxillofacial unit between 1995 and 2010. We then produced one-page summary tables for subsites of oral cancer by stage and common treatments based on patient-reported outcomes from the University of Washington quality of life (UWQoL) head and neck cancer questionnaire. Data had been collected in a series of annual surveys. Sites included were buccal and retromolar (n=189), oral tongue (n=358), floor of the mouth (n=321), and other oral sites (n=192). A total of 633 patients completed at least one questionnaire (total 1931) between 9 and 60 months after treatment (71% of those alive at 9 months). Only questionnaires completed around 2 years from diagnosis or operation were analysed. Data include crude survival at 1, 2, and 5 years, the 12 UWQoL domains, which comprise the number of patients who chose the best 2 responses for each, overall health-related QoL, and the number who chose the worst responses (based on an algorithm). The data are sufficiently detailed to be used in discussions with patients about likely outcomes. They can help patients to make decisions about the type of treatment, provide a reference for realistic expectations, and enable them to be better informed when they give their consent. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Recovery surgery in cancer of the tongue. Apropos of 101 cases].

    PubMed

    Gehanno, P; Kebaili, C; Guedon, C; Moisy, N; Vericel, R; de Larrard, J; Cohen, B

    1987-01-01

    Results of 101 salvage glossectomies, after unsuccessful treatment of cancer of tongue by radiotherapy, showed a 3-year survival of 39% and a 5-year of 31%. Carcinologic failures represented 81% of causes of death: 17% due to distant metastases, 6% to a second focus and principally 32% to local recurrence. Local recurrence varied as a function of tumor size but also of site and type of surgical treatment. Tumors of the mobile tongue have a relatively good prognosis, even when the total organ is involved, with attachment to floor of mouth if an anterior transverse glossectomy is performed. Inversely, lateralized tumors spreading to base and to the mobile tongue treated by partial longitudinal glossectomy tend to have a high frequency of failure of local therapy, probably partly avoidable by wider excision. These same local failures of treatment are the cause of the worsening prognosis after total glossectomy in patients who had been poorly selected perhaps and presented extralingual spread not controlled by surgery. Finally, the authors emphasize the need for a collaboration of the patient in the choice of therapy, which involves surgery with functional sequelae that risk to be extremely heavy.

  18. Metastasis from oral cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    Noguti, Juliana; De Moura, Carolina Foot Gomes; De Jesus, Gustavo Protasio Pacheco; Da Silva, Victor Hugo Pereira; Hossaka, Thais Ayako; Oshima, Celina Tijuko Fujiyama; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2012-01-01

    Oral cancer is a common neoplasm worldwide. Its incidence and mortality have also increased over the past decades. It is characterized by poor prognosis and a low survival rate despite sophisticated surgical and radiotherapeutic modalities. Metastasis of oral cancer is a complex process involving detachment of cells from tumor tissue, regulation of cell motility and invasion, proliferation and evasion through the lymphatic system or blood vessels. In this review, we will focus on the current knowledge in metastasis from oral cancer regarding facts, such as incidence; stage, histopathology and grade of primary tumor; clinical manifestations; diagnosis; and treatment. Certainly, such information will contribute to the understanding of oral cancer pathogenesis.

  19. Freeze-Dried Black Raspberries in Preventing Oral Cancer Recurrence in High-Risk Appalachian Patients Previously Treated With Surgery For Oral Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-20

    Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  20. Trends in oral cancer rates in Isfahan, Iran during 1991-2010

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Sayed Mohammad; Siadat, Sara; Rahbar, Pegah; Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen; Shirani, Amir Mansour

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is a variation in trends of oral cancers all over the world. Many investigations have reported evidence of an increasing incidence in oral cancers during recent years. The purpose of this study was to investigate time trend and changes in demographic distribution of oral cancers incidence in Isfahan during 1991-2010. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective analytic study archive of Oral Pathology Department of School of Dentistry, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences from 1991 to 2010 were reviewed. A total of 231 Pathology reports were analyzed. Age, sex, primary site, histologic type of cancer, and the referral year were recorded. Data were analyzed by using Jointpoint Regression Program 3 and SPSS 18. P value less than 0.05 consider as significant level. Results: Out of all malignancies, 55% were male and 45% were female. The most frequent cancer was squamous cell carcinoma. Comparing the two time intervals (1991-2000) and (2001-2010) showed that the ratio of carcinomas and salivary gland tumors had decreased while there was an increase in incidence of sarcomas and lymphomas. Among young persons, the occurrence of oral carcinomas (mostly SCC) is rare but sarcomas were more common in younger patients. Gingiva was the most frequently involved in oral cancers with (46%), followed by tongue with (18%). Conclusion : According to this study it revealed that some changes in trends of oral cancer have happened in Isfahan that calls for more study and evaluation of etiologies of these changes. PMID:23814568

  1. Feeding Arteries of Primary Tongue Cancers on Intra-arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kamitani, Takeshi; Kawanami, Satoshi; Asayama, Yoshiki Matsuo, Yoshio Yonezawa, Masato Yamasaki, Yuzo; Nagao, Michinobu; Yamanouchi, Torahiko; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Nakashima, Torahiko; Honda, Hiroshi

    2016-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the frequency and the predictive factor of each feeding artery on intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (IAIC) in primary tongue cancer.Materials and MethodsWe retrospectively evaluated 20 patients who received IAIC for primary tongue cancer. The main and accompanying feeding arteries were identified on super-selective angiography of the branches of the external carotid artery. Tumor diameter, and extension to the contralateral side, tongue extrinsic muscles (TEMs), and lateral mesopharyngeal wall were determined based on magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography findings.ResultsThe main feeding artery was the ipsilateral lingual artery (LA) in 15 of the 20 examined tumors and the contralateral LA in the other 5. Ten cancers had only one feeding artery, and multiple feeding arteries were detected in the remaining 10. Tumors >4 cm (n = 9), those with extension to the contralateral side (n = 13), and those with extension to TEMs (n = 15) were supplied by significantly larger numbers of feeding arteries compared to tumors without these features (P = 0.01, 0.049, and 0.02, respectively). The frequency of feeding from the contralateral LA was 64 % (9/14) and 17 % (1/6) in tumors with and without extension to the contralateral side, respectively. Feeding from a facial artery (FA) was not detected in tumors ≤4 cm, while 5 of the 9 (56 %) tumors >4 cm were supplied by a FA (P = 0.01).ConclusionA careful search for feeding arteries is required, especially in large tumors with extension to the contralateral side or to TEMs.

  2. Feeding Arteries of Primary Tongue Cancers on Intra-arterial Infusion Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kamitani, Takeshi; Kawanami, Satoshi; Asayama, Yoshiki; Matsuo, Yoshio; Yonezawa, Masato; Yamasaki, Yuzo; Nagao, Michinobu; Yamanouchi, Torahiko; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Nakashima, Torahiko; Honda, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the frequency and the predictive factor of each feeding artery on intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (IAIC) in primary tongue cancer. We retrospectively evaluated 20 patients who received IAIC for primary tongue cancer. The main and accompanying feeding arteries were identified on super-selective angiography of the branches of the external carotid artery. Tumor diameter, and extension to the contralateral side, tongue extrinsic muscles (TEMs), and lateral mesopharyngeal wall were determined based on magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography findings. The main feeding artery was the ipsilateral lingual artery (LA) in 15 of the 20 examined tumors and the contralateral LA in the other 5. Ten cancers had only one feeding artery, and multiple feeding arteries were detected in the remaining 10. Tumors >4 cm (n = 9), those with extension to the contralateral side (n = 13), and those with extension to TEMs (n = 15) were supplied by significantly larger numbers of feeding arteries compared to tumors without these features (P = 0.01, 0.049, and 0.02, respectively). The frequency of feeding from the contralateral LA was 64 % (9/14) and 17 % (1/6) in tumors with and without extension to the contralateral side, respectively. Feeding from a facial artery (FA) was not detected in tumors ≤4 cm, while 5 of the 9 (56 %) tumors >4 cm were supplied by a FA (P = 0.01). A careful search for feeding arteries is required, especially in large tumors with extension to the contralateral side or to TEMs.

  3. Molecular basis of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Saiz-Rodriguez, A

    2001-01-01

    In this article we try to analyze the current knowledge on the molecular basis of the carcinogenesis and their application in the oral cancer. Molecular Biology, has contributed in a great manner, with the etiology of cancer, because it has allowed to explain the genetic mechanisms by which a cell becomes and acquires a malignant phenotype. In the chromosome of a cell exist genes (protooncogenes), that promote phenomes of growth, maturation and normal cellular proliferation. Sometimes, these protooncogenes can suffer mutations that cause an alteration in their normal function. These genes are called oncogenes. We described the most important protein products of oncogenes, as well as, the tumor-suppressor genes, with special attention in the p53 gene.

  4. Oral bisphosphonates and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vogtmann, Emily; Corley, Douglas A; Almers, Lucy M; Cardwell, Chris R; Murray, Liam J; Abnet, Christian C

    2017-03-10

    Use of oral bisphosphonates has been associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the association may be related to residual confounding by healthy lifestyle or body mass index (BMI). Therefore, we conducted a prospective nested case-control study within the Kaiser Permanente, Northern California health system cohort. In total, 12,505 CRC cases were individually matched to 599,534 controls. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using conditional logistic regression models with adjustment for important covariates extracted from the database. Participants who had ever used oral bisphosphonates were less likely than non-users to be diagnosed with CRC (OR 0.82; 95% CI: 0.74, 0.89). Colon and rectum site-specific associations were similar to the overall association. A stronger inverse association for ever use of bisphosphonates was observed for men (OR 0.63; 95% CI: 0.47, 0.85), however when stratified by previous lower endoscopy, the association was only observed in the participants who did not have a previous lower endoscopy (OR 0.73 (0.64, 0.83)). In conclusion, we found that oral bisphosphonate use was associated with a decreased odds of CRC, however this association may be due to residual confounding by BMI or another confounder.

  5. Oral bisphosphonates and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vogtmann, Emily; Corley, Douglas A.; Almers, Lucy M.; Cardwell, Chris R.; Murray, Liam J.; Abnet, Christian C.

    2017-01-01

    Use of oral bisphosphonates has been associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the association may be related to residual confounding by healthy lifestyle or body mass index (BMI). Therefore, we conducted a prospective nested case-control study within the Kaiser Permanente, Northern California health system cohort. In total, 12,505 CRC cases were individually matched to 599,534 controls. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using conditional logistic regression models with adjustment for important covariates extracted from the database. Participants who had ever used oral bisphosphonates were less likely than non-users to be diagnosed with CRC (OR 0.82; 95% CI: 0.74, 0.89). Colon and rectum site-specific associations were similar to the overall association. A stronger inverse association for ever use of bisphosphonates was observed for men (OR 0.63; 95% CI: 0.47, 0.85), however when stratified by previous lower endoscopy, the association was only observed in the participants who did not have a previous lower endoscopy (OR 0.73 (0.64, 0.83)). In conclusion, we found that oral bisphosphonate use was associated with a decreased odds of CRC, however this association may be due to residual confounding by BMI or another confounder. PMID:28281559

  6. Cancer of the oral cavity - trends in Karachi South (1995-2002).

    PubMed

    Bhurgri, Yasmin

    2005-01-01

    The objective was to study the time trends in site-specific oral cancer incidence and to determine the age-and socio-economic profile over time in Karachi South. Oral cancer ranks second in this population, in both genders. The incidence is the highest reported worldwide. Incident oral cancer cases received at the Karachi Cancer Registry during 1(st) January 1995 to 30(th) June 2004 were reviewed. To ensure maximally complete data, cases registered between 1(st) January 1995 and 31(st) December 2002 were considered for the present study. Cases of lymphoma, leukemia and melanoma were not included. Trends were studied by grouping cases into two periods, 1995-1997 and 1998-2002. A total of 2253 cases of oral cancer were registered in Karachi South for the 8 year study period accounting for 8.8% of all cancer cases. Overall, the most common site was the mucosa cheek (55.9%), followed by the tongue (28.4%), palate (6.8%), gum (4.4%), lip (3.1%) and floor of the mouth (1.4%). About 30% of cases occurred in patients 40 years and younger and 23% occurred in patients 65 years and older. Sub-categories of oral cancer showed variation in trends, but an earlier onset of disease in period two was evident for all categories. The incidence of lip cancer in men decreased, the rates remained level in females. An increased incidence was observed for tongue, but a more dramatic increase in the cheek was evident in both sexes, despite no improvement during the past decade in detection of early, localized lesions. A strong socio-economic factor with a poorer, low literacy profile of oral cancer was apparent in the entire study period. The evidence that the largest increase in incidence has occurred in this population may unfavorably affect the mortality rates. Oral cancer trends are an interplay of prevalent risk factors, the level of prevalence, preventive education and intervention. Cost effective and efficient cancer control focused around the target populations would be beneficial

  7. Reassessment of risk factors for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Gangane, Nitin; Chawla, Shweta; Anshu; Subodh, Anshu; Gupta, Subodh Sharan; Sharma, Satish M

    2007-01-01

    A total of 140 cases of histologically confirmed oral cancer were evaluated for their demographic details, dietary habits and addiction to tobacco and alcohol using a pre-designed structured questionnaire at the Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sevagram in Central India. These cases were matched with three sets of age and sex matched controls. Oral cancer was predominant in the age group of 50-59 years. Individuals on a non-vegetarian diet appeared to be at greater risk of developing oral cancer. Cases were habituated to consuming hot beverages more frequently and milk less frequently than controls. Consumption of ghutka, a granular form of chewable tobacco and areca nut, was significantly associated with oral cancer cases. Cases had been using oral tobacco for longer duration than controls, and were habituated to sleeping with tobacco quid in their mouth. Most cases were also addicted to smoking tobacco and alcohol consumption. Bidi (a crude cigarette) smoking was most commonly associated with oral cancer. On stratified analysis, a combination of regular smoking and oral tobacco use, as well as a combination of regular alcohol intake and oral tobacco use were significantly associated with oral cancer cases. Synergistic effects of all three or even two of the risk factors - oral tobacco use, smoking and alcohol consumption- was more commonly seen in cases when compared to controls.

  8. Predictive Significance of Tumor Depth and Budding for Late Lymph Node Metastases in Patients with Clinical N0 Early Oral Tongue Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hori, Yukiko; Kubota, Akira; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Furukawa, Madoka; Matsushita, Takeshi; Takita, Morihito; Mitsunaga, Sachiyo; Mizoguchi, Nobutaka; Nonaka, Tetsuo; Nakayama, Yuko; Oridate, Nobuhiko

    2017-04-03

    In clinical N0 early oral tongue carcinoma, treatment of occult lymph node metastasis is controversial. The purpose of this study was to assess the histopathological risk factors for predicting late lymph node metastasis in early oral tongue carcinoma. We retrospectively reviewed 48 patients with early oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Associations between the histopathological factors (depth of tumor, differentiation, blood vessel invasion, lymphatic invasion, and tumor budding) and late lymph metastasis were analyzed. Although the univariate analysis identified blood vessel invasion, lymphatic invasion, and high-grade tumor budding as predictive factors for neck recurrence (p < 0.001), the Cox proportional hazards model identified high-grade tumor budding as an independent predictive factor (p < 0.01). The combination of a tumor depth ≥ 3 mm and high-grade tumor budding yielded high diagnostic accuracy. Tumor depth and budding grade were identified as histopathological risk factors for late neck recurrence in clinical N0 early oral tongue carcinoma.

  9. [Hospital discharges for oral cancer in the Mexican Institute of Social Security, 1991-2000].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-García, Sergio; Juárez-Cedillo, Teresa; Espinel-Bermúdez, María Claudia; Mould-Quevedo, Joaquín; Gómez-Dantés, Héctor; de la Fuente-Hernández, Javier; Leyva-Huerta, Elba Rosa; García-Peña, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    A descriptive study based on the secondary analysis of the Unique System of Information database, Subsystem 13 of Hospital discharges to oral cancer of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) during the decade from 1991 to 2000, it was considered all the registrations for oral cancer according to the International Classification of Diseases ICD-9. During that time, 8,800 hospital discharges were registered for oral cancer, out of which 64.6% (n = 5682) were men. The men: women ratio showed 1.8 men per admitted woman for oral cancer. The mortality gross rate for oral cancer was of 50.4 for each 100,000 hospital discharges with a significantly descendent trend. Hospital discharges rate by age group was specifically concentrated in population to 35 years-old or more, registering themselves the greater rates as of the 55 years-old. The hospital average stay was of 5.1 days. According to the topography of the oral cavity, we found that the tongue (25.1%), principal salivary glands (24.0%) and tonsil-oropharynx (14.2%) were the main places where this pathology presented. During the above decade, the oral cancer hospital discharges registered in the IMSS didn't show an increasing pattern.

  10. Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Young Women: A Matched Comparison—Do Outcomes Justify Treatment Intensity?

    PubMed Central

    Goepfert, Ryan P.; Kezirian, Eric J.; Wang, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The incidence of oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) in young women is increasing with uncertain outcomes compared to traditional patients. Published outcomes data are at odds in this cohort of young women. Methods. Retrospective analysis comparing demographic, clinicopathologic, and outcomes data of women OTSCC patients younger than 45 years old matched 1 : 2 by stage with men both younger and older than 45 and women older than 45. Results. No disease-free or overall survival differences were found between cohorts. Young women were significantly more likely to receive radiation therapy, particularly in stage I disease, even when controlling for common pathologic indications. Conclusions. OTSCC in young women was not associated with worse outcomes compared to a matched cohort of other patients. Increased frequency of radiation treatment for this cohort may not be justified. PMID:24734200

  11. The vallecular line: an objective measure in evaluating the base of the tongue and vallecular cancers for transoral robotic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hai, Nabila; Taheri, M Reza; Sadeghi, Nader

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesized that the degree of the exophytic nature of the base of the tongue and vallecular cancers (BOTs) impacts the feasibility of transoral resection. The growth pattern of these cancers can be measured by the vallecular line (VL), which is the distance between the hyoid bone and the vallecular tip. The normal VL was measured by 3 radiologists on 50 magnetic resonance imaging scans. The VL was then measured on magnetic resonance imaging scans of patients with BOT cancers. The mean VL was 8.2 mm (6.4-10 mm) in the healthy patients. The mean VL of the patients with predominantly exophytic BOT cancer was 22.7 mm (20.6-24.8 mm). Postoperative images of these patients demonstrate minimal loss of the native tongue after transoral resection. The VL is a valuable objective measurement of the exophytic nature of BOT cancers. Predominantly exophytic BOT cancers are deemed more amenable for successful and functional transoral surgical resection.

  12. Human papillomavirus and p16 protein expression as prognostic biomarkers in mobile tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Minami, Kazuhiko; Kogashiwa, Yasunao; Ebihara, Yasuhiro; Nakahira, Mitsuhiko; Sugasawa, Masashi; Fujino, Takashi; Yasuda, Masanori

    2017-10-01

    The objectives were to determine the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in mobile tongue cancer (MTC) and evaluate associations and survival. Patients who underwent surgical resection as primary treatment for MTC (n = 127) were retrospectively evaluated. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens were assessed for p16 and p53 by immunohistochemistry; for HPV DNA by nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using two pairs of consensus primers (MY09-MY11 and GP5+-GP6+); and for E6 and E7 oncogenes from 13 high-risk HPV types (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66, and 68) by real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). There were 18 (14.2%) p16-positive, 45 (35.4%) p53-positive, 9 (7.1%) HPV DNA-positive, and 7 (5.5%) E6 and/or E7 mRNA-positive tumors, but the correlation of all pairs was poor. There was no demographic or histopathologic association with HPV status. Cause-specific survival was significantly better with p16-positive than with p16-negative tumors (p = .037). The prevalence of HPV and p16 positivity was relatively low and p16 status was a poor surrogate marker for HPV status. The results showed the importance of p16 expression in prognosticating mobile tongue cancer.

  13. Impact of Obesity on the Survival of Patients with Early Stage Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Tongue

    PubMed Central

    Iyengar, Neil M.; Kochhar, Amit; Morris, Patrick G.; Morris, Luc G.; Zhou, Xi K.; Ghossein, Ronald A.; Pino, Alejandro; Fury, Matthew G.; Pfister, David G.; Patel, Snehal G.; Boyle, Jay O.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Dannenberg, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Background While obesity increases risk and negatively impacts survival for many malignancies, the prognostic implications in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral tongue, a disease often associated with pre-diagnosis weight loss, are unknown. Methods Patients with T1–T2 oral tongue SCC underwent curative-intent resection in this single-institution study. All patients underwent nutritional assessment prior to surgery. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated from measured height and weight and categorized as obese (≥30 kg/m2), overweight (25 to 29.9 kg/m2), or normal (18.5 to 24.9 kg/m2). Clinical outcomes including disease specific survival (DSS), recurrence free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS), were compared by BMI group using Cox regression. Results From 2000–2009, 155 patients (90 men, 65 women) of median age 57 (range 18 to 86) were included. Baseline characteristics were similar by BMI group. Obesity was significantly associated with adverse DSS compared with normal weight in univariable (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.65, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07 to 6.59; P = .04) and multivariable analyses (HR = 5.01; 95% CI, 1.69 to 14.81; P = .004). A consistent association was seen between obesity and worse RFS (HR =1.87; 95% CI, .90 to 3.88) and between obesity and worse OS (HR=2.03; 95% CI, .88 to 4.65) though without reaching statistical significance (P = .09 and P = .10 respectively) in multivariable analyses. Conclusions In this retrospective study, obesity was an adverse independent prognostic variable. This association may not have been previously appreciated due to confounding by multiple factors including pre-diagnosis weight loss. PMID:24449483

  14. Tongue function in patients treated for malignancies in tongue and/or floor of mouth; a one year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Speksnijder, C M; van der Bilt, A; van der Glas, H W; Koole, R; Merkx, M A W

    2011-12-01

    Progress in (reconstructive) surgery and radiotherapy tends to improve survival and reduce oral functional deficits. Despite the growing sophistication of cancer treatment, patients still report deterioration in tongue function. Sensory function, mobility, and force of the tongue were determined in 45 patients with a carcinoma of tongue and/or floor of mouth. Measurements were performed before surgery, shortly after surgery, shortly after radiotherapy, 6, and 12 months after surgery. Surgery had a negative impact on tongue sensory function and mobility. Post-surgery radiotherapy did not further deteriorate sensory function, mobility, or force of the tongue. Patients in the surgery-radiotherapy group (SRG) had significantly worse tongue sensory function and mobility than patients in the surgery group (SG), probably caused by more advanced tumour stage and more extensive reconstructions and related scar tissue. The tongue force in patients in both groups significantly increased in the first 6 months after surgery, but this increase disappeared in the next 6 months. The authors conclude that surgery had a significant negative influence on tongue function, especially in the group of patients treated with radiotherapy. No further deterioration of tongue function was observed after post-surgical radiotherapy within the first year after surgery. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Primary oral leishmaniasis mimicking oral cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Celentano, A; Ruoppo, E; Mansueto, G; Mignogna, M D

    2015-04-01

    Primary mucosal leishmaniasis is a rare infectious disease, particularly in immunocompetent patients. We present a 50-year-old patient with a 6-week history of a painful lesion of the left buccal mucosa that mimicked cancer. The exophytic lesion looked invasive, and we took an incisional biopsy specimen to exclude cancer. The diagnosis of leishmaniasis was unexpected, and the patient was successfully treated with amphotericin B for five weeks. After five months the patient had a visceral recurrence. Chronic exophytic and ulcerated mucosal lesions that do not heal within 3-4 weeks should be regarded as the first signs of oral cancer, but primary oral leishmaniasis can easily mimic it.

  16. Expression of ER stress markers (GRP78/BiP and PERK) in patients with tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaira, K; Toyoda, M; Shimizu, A; Mori, K; Shino, M; Sakakura, K; Takayasu, Y; Takahashi, K; Oyama, T; Asao, T; Chikamatsu, K

    2016-01-01

    The glucose-regulated protein (GRP78/BiP) and PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) plays a crucial role in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. GRP78/BiP is highly elevated in various human cancers. Our study is to examine the clinicopathological significance of GRP78/BiP and PERK expression in patients with tongue cancer. A total of 85 tongue cancer patients were analyzed, and tumor specimens were stained by immunohistochemistry for GRP78/BiP, PERK, GLUT1, Ki-67 and microvessel density (MVD) determined by CD34.GRP78/BiP and PERK were highly expressed in 47% and 35% of all patients, respectively. GRP78/BiP disclosed a significant relationship with PERK expression, lymphatic permeation, vascular invasion, glucose metabolism and cell proliferation. The expression of GRP78/BiP was significantly higher in metastatic sites than in primary sites (79% vs. 47%, p=0.003). We found that the high expression of GRP78/BiP was proven to be an independent prognostic factor for predicting poor outcome in patients with tongue cancer. In the analysis of PFS, PERK was identified as an independent predictor. The increased GRP78/BiP expression was clarified as an independent prognostic marker for predicting worse outcome. Our study suggests that the expression of GRP78/BiP as ER stress marker is important in the pathogenesis and development of tongue cancer.

  17. Mapping the tip of the tongue--deprivation, sensory sensitisation, and oral haptics.

    PubMed

    Topolinski, Sascha; Türk Pereira, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the impact of food deprivation on oral and manual haptic size perception of food and non-food objects. From relevant theories (need-proportional perception, motivated perception, frustrative nonreward, perceptual defence, and sensory sensitisation) at least four completely different competing predictions can be derived. Testing these predictions, we found across four experiments that participants estimated the length of both non-food and food objects to be larger when hungry than when satiated, which was true only for oral haptic perception, while manual haptic perception was not influenced by hunger state. Subjectively reported hunger correlated positively with estimated object size in oral, but not in manual, haptic perception. The impact of food deprivation on oral perception vanished after oral stimulations even for hungry individuals. These results favour a sensory sensitisation account maintaining that hunger itself does not alter oral perception but the accompanying lack of sensory stimulation of the oral mucosa. Both oral and manual haptic perception tended to underestimate actual object size. Finally, an enhancing effect of domain-target matching was found, ie food objects were perceived larger by oral than by manual haptics, while non-food objects were perceived larger by manual than by oral haptics.

  18. Rational development of taste masked oral liquids guided by an electronic tongue.

    PubMed

    Woertz, Katharina; Tissen, Corinna; Kleinebudde, Peter; Breitkreutz, Jörg

    2010-11-15

    Human taste testing is often associated with ethical concerns, organizational and validation issues. Electrochemical sensor array systems, so called electronic tongues, offer an alternative to assess the taste of multi-component liquid formulations. Therefore, it should be investigated how an electronic tongue can be implemented in the rational development of taste masked formulations. Taste masking of bitter tasting quinine hydrochloride (QH) in a liquid formulation was carried out by screening sweetening agents (sucrose, glucose, fructose, mannitol, sucralose, sodium saccharin, acesulfame potassium, and monoammonium glycyrrhizinate), strong and weak cation ion exchange (IE) resins (Amberlite™ IRP69, Amberlite™ IRP88, and Indion 234), and soluble complexing agents (α-, β-, hydroxypropyl-β-, sulfobutyl ether-β- and γ-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin). Amberlite™ IRP88 showed the best binding capacity for quinine (1.9 g quinine/1 g IE). The addition of sulfobutyl ether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD) could significantly reduce the bitter taste of QH (79% reduction of free QH). The SBE-β-CD formulation was further improved by adding sodium saccharin as secondary taste masking agent. It could also be shown that presence of strawberry flavor and the preservative domiphen bromide does not affect evaluation of taste masking efficiency. The introduced stepwise approach was shown to be applicable to rationally develop novel taste masked formulations.

  19. Genetic Abnormalities in Oral Leukoplakia and Oral Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Kil, Tae Jun; Kim, Hyun Sil; Kim, Hyung Jun; Nam, Woong; Cha, In-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The cancer progression of oral leukoplakia is an important watchpoint in the follow-up observation of the patients. However, potential malignancies of oral leukoplakia cannot be estimated by histopathologic assessment alone. We evaluated genetic abnormalities at the level of copy number variation (CNV) to investigate the risk for developing cancer in oral leukoplakias. The current study used 27 oral leukoplakias with histological evidence of dysplasia. The first group (progressing dysplasia) consisted of 7 oral lesions from patients with later progression to cancer at the same site. The other group (non- progressing dysplasia) consisted of 20 lesions from patients with no occurrence of oral cancer and longitudinal follow up (>7 years). We extracted DNA from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) samples and examined chromosomal loci and frequencies of CNVs using Taqman copy number assays. CNV frequently occurred at 3p, 9p, and 13q loci in progressing dysplasia. Our results also indicate that CNV at multiple loci-in contrast to single locus occurrences-is characteristic of progressing dysplasia. This study suggests that genetic abnormalities of the true precancer demonstrate the progression risk which cannot be delineated by current histopathologic diagnosis.

  20. Tongue Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your tongue helps you taste, swallow, and chew. You also use it to speak. Your tongue is made up of many muscles. The upper surface contains your taste buds. Problems with the tongue include Pain Swelling ...

  1. Tongue problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... SIZE OF THE TONGUE Tongue swelling occurs with: Acromegaly Amyloidosis Down syndrome Myxedema Rhabdomyoma Prader Willi Syndrome ... Vinson syndrome Sprue Possible causes of tongue swelling: Acromegaly Allergic reaction to food or medicine Amyloidosis Angioedema ...

  2. Molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and tumor microenvironment components suggests potential targets for new therapeutic approaches in mobile tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Dan; Salo, Tuula; Salo, Sirpa; Nyberg, Pia; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Costea, Daniela Elena; Vered, Marilena

    2012-01-01

    We characterized tumor microenvironment (TME) components of mobile tongue (MT) cancer patients in terms of overall inflammatory infiltrate, focusing on the protumorigenic/anti-inflammatory phenotypes and on cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in order to determine their interrelations and associations with clinical outcomes. In addition, by culturing tongue carcinoma cells (HSC-3) on a three-dimensional myoma organotypic model that mimics TME, we attempted to investigate the possible existence of a molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and TME components. Analysis of 64 cases of MT cancer patients revealed that the overall density of the inflammatory infiltrate was inversely correlated to the density of CAFs (P = 0.01), but that the cumulative density of the protumorigenic/anti-inflammatory phenotypes, including regulatory T cells (Tregs, Foxp3+), tumor-associated macrophages (TAM2, CD163+), and potentially Tregs-inducing immune cells (CD80+), was directly correlated with the density of CAFs (P = 0.01). The hazard ratio (HR) for recurrence in a TME rich in CD163+ Foxp3+ CD80+ was 2.9 (95% CI 1.03–8.6, P = 0.043 compared with low in CD163+ Foxp3+ CD80+). The HR for recurrence in a TME rich in CAFs was 4.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3–12.8, P = 0.012 compared with low in CAFs). In vitro studies showed cancer-derived exosomes, epithelial–mesenchymal transition process, fibroblast-to-CAF-like cell transdifferentiation, and reciprocal interrelations between different cytokines suggesting the presence of molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and TME components. Collectively, these results highlighted the emerging need of new therapies targeting this crosstalk between the cancer cells and TME components in MT cancer. PMID:23342263

  3. Estimation of premature mortality from oral cancer in Japan, 1995 and 2005.

    PubMed

    Ibayashi, Haruhisa; Pham, Truong-Minh; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Ozasa, Kotaro; Matsuda, Shinya; Yoshimura, Takesumi

    2011-08-01

    To better understand the picture of premature death from oral cancer, we estimated years of life lost (YLL) and average years of life lost (AYLL) of this cancer for the years 1995 and 2005 in Japan. We obtained the mortality data for 5-year age groups from the Vital Statistics of Japan for the years 1995 and 2005, an interval of 10 years. Age-standardized rates (ASRs) per 100,000 persons were calculated for each subset of oral cancer. We estimated YLL and AYLL according to life tables in Japan to reflect premature mortality. For both men and women combined, 4099 and 5679 deaths due to oral cancer were recorded for the years 1995 and 2005. In men, cancer of tongue, oropharynx, and hypopharynx were the most frequently observed anatomic sites. We observed a total of 51,339.1 years of life lost in 1995 and 68,630.4 years in 2005, corresponding to an overall AYLL for all oral cancer deaths combined of 17.2 and 16.5 years earlier than life expectancy, respectively. The greatest AYLL was seen for deaths from nasopharyngeal cancer, with AYLL of 21.1 years in 1995 and 20.3 years in 2005. In women, cancer of the tongue and gum were the most affected anatomic sites. Total numbers of YLL were 18,884.8 years in 1995 and 24,765.7 in 2005, corresponding to an overall AYLL of 16.9 and 16.2 years earlier than life expectancy. The greatest AYLL was seen for deaths from nasopharyngeal cancer, with AYLL of 22.4 years and 20.4 years in 1995 and 2005, respectively. The present study shows that cancer of pharynx, tongue, and gum were the most frequent oral cancers in both sexes in both 1995 and 2005, and responsible for a remarkable number of years of life expectancy lost. Deaths due to those cancer sites occurred about 16-21 years earlier than expected in men, and 14-22 years in women. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Selective participation of c-Jun with Fra-2/c-Fos promotes aggressive tumor phenotypes and poor prognosis in tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shilpi; Kumar, Prabhat; Kaur, Harsimrut; Sharma, Nishi; Saluja, Daman; Bharti, Alok C.; Das, Bhudev C.

    2015-01-01

    Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) is most aggressive head and neck cancer often associated with HR-HPV infection. The role of AP-1 which is an essential regulator of HPV oncogene expression and tumorigenesis is not reported in tongue cancer. One hundred tongue tissue biopsies comprising precancer, cancer and adjacent controls including two tongue cancer cell lines were employed to study the role of HPV infection and AP-1 family proteins. An exclusive prevalence (28%) of HR-HPV type 16 was observed mainly in well differentiated tongue carcinomas (78.5%). A higher expression and DNA binding activity of AP-1 was observed in tongue tumors and cancer cell lines with c-Fos and Fra-2 as the major binding partners forming the functional AP-1 complex but c-Jun participated only in HPV negative and poorly differentiated carcinoma. Knocking down of Fra-2 responsible for aggressive tongue tumorigenesis led to significant reduction in c-Fos, c-Jun, MMP-9 and HPVE6/E7 expression but Fra-1 and p53 were upregulated. The binding and expression of c-Fos/Fra-2 increased as a function of severity of tongue lesions, yet selective participation of c-Jun appears to promote poor differentiation and aggressive tumorigenesis only in HPV negative cases while HPV infection leads to well differentiation and better prognosis preferably in nonsmokers. PMID:26581505

  5. The Role of Chronic Mucosal Trauma in Oral Cancer: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Singhvi, Hitesh Rajendra; Malik, Akshat; Chaturvedi, Pankaj

    2017-01-01

    Chronic mucosal trauma resulting from sharp teeth, dentures, faulty restoration, or implants has frequently been associated with the development of oral cancer. The definitive evidence for the same is lacking. We undertook a search using the terms – dental trauma, mucosal trauma, oral cancer, squamous cell carcinoma, risk factor, potentially malignant lesion, dental factor, mechanical irritation, dental irritation, and cancer in the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, PubMed, ScienceDirect, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Wiley InterScience. The search yielded 788 articles. Of these articles, only 22 articles described chronic mucosal trauma as risk factors for oral cancers and were considered in this review. The review shows that chronic mucosal irritation resulting from ill-fitting dentures may be considered a risk factor for the development of oral cancer, such cancers occur commonly over the lateral border of the tongue. However, no association has been proven between the duration of denture use and cancer formation. In patients without any addiction, such cancers occur more frequently in females. These cancers may present with an early nodal disease but their prognosis and outcomes have not been studied separately till now. PMID:28469336

  6. Edema worsens target coverage in high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy of mobile tongue cancer: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Akiyama, Hironori; Takenaka, Tadashi; Masui, Koji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Uesugi, Yasuo; Shimbo, Taiju; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiko; Yoshioka, Hiroto; Arika, Takumi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Narumi, Yoshifumi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We report our study on two patients to highlight the risk of underdosage of the clinical target volume (CTV) due to edema during high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) of mobile tongue cancer. Material and methods To treat the lateral side of the CTV, flexible applicator tubes were implanted on the mouth floor. Two-dimensional planning was performed using X-ray images for Case 1, and three-dimensional (3D) planning was performed using computed tomography (CT) for Case 2. Prescribed doses for both cases were 54 Gy in nine fractions. Case reports Case 1 was treated for cancer of the right lateral border of the tongue in 2005. Tongue edema occurred after implantation, and part of the lateral border of the tongue protruded between the applicator tubes. Acute mucosal reaction abated in the protruded area earlier than in the other parts of the CTV. In this case, the tumor recurred in this area 5 months after the treatment. Case 2 was treated for cancer of the left lateral border of the tongue. Because tongue edema occurred in this case also, plastic splints were inserted between the applicator tubes to push the edematous region into the irradiated area. The mucosal surface of the CTV was covered by the 70% isodose, and 100% isodose line for before and after splint insertion. Local control of the tumor was achieved 4 years after treatment. Discussion and conclusions To ensure sufficient target coverage, 3D image-based planning using CT should be performed, followed by re-planning using repeated CT as needed. Also, the development of devices to prevent protrusion of the edematous tissue outside the target area will help to ensure the full dosing of CTV. PMID:28344606

  7. Dissortativity and duplications in oral cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Pramod; Yadav, Alok; Rai, Aparna; Jalan, Sarika

    2015-08-01

    More than 300 000 new cases worldwide are being diagnosed with oral cancer annually. Complexity of oral cancer renders designing drug targets very difficult. We analyse protein-protein interaction network for the normal and oral cancer tissue and detect crucial changes in the structural properties of the networks in terms of the interactions of the hub proteins and the degree-degree correlations. Further analysis of the spectra of both the networks, while exhibiting universal statistical behaviour, manifest distinction in terms of the zero degeneracy, providing insight to the complexity of the underlying system.

  8. Notch pathway activation is essential for maintenance of stem-like cells in early tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Ekjot; Aich, Jyotirmoi; Dani, Prachi; Sethunath, Vidyalakshmi; Gardi, Nilesh; Chandrani, Pratik; Godbole, Mukul; Sonawane, Kavita; Prasad, Ratnam; Kannan, Sadhana; Agarwal, Beamon; Kane, Shubhada; Gupta, Sudeep; Dutt, Shilpee; Dutt, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Background Notch pathway plays a complex role depending on cellular contexts: promotes stem cell maintenance or induces terminal differentiation in potential cancer-initiating cells; acts as an oncogene in lymphocytes and mammary tissue or plays a growth-suppressive role in leukemia, liver, skin, and head and neck cancer. Here, we present a novel clinical and functional significance of NOTCH1 alterations in early stage tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC). Patients and Methods We analyzed the Notch signaling pathway in 68 early stage TSCC primary tumor samples by whole exome and transcriptome sequencing, real-time PCR based copy number, expression, immuno-histochemical, followed by cell based biochemical and functional assays. Results We show, unlike TCGA HNSCC data set, NOTCH1 harbors significantly lower frequency of inactivating mutations (4%); is somatically amplified; and, overexpressed in 31% and 37% of early stage TSCC patients, respectively. HNSCC cell lines over expressing NOTCH1, when plated in the absence of attachment, are enriched in stem cell markers and form spheroids. Furthermore, we show that inhibition of NOTCH activation by gamma secretase inhibitor or shRNA mediated knockdown of NOTCH1 inhibits spheroid forming capacity, transformation, survival and migration of the HNSCC cells suggesting an oncogenic role of NOTCH1 in TSCC. Clinically, Notch pathway activation is higher in tumors of non-smokers compared to smokers (50% Vs 18%, respectively, P=0.026) and is also associated with greater nodal positivity compared to its non-activation (93% Vs 64%, respectively, P=0.029). Conclusion We anticipate that these results could form the basis for therapeutic targeting of NOTCH1 in tongue cancer. PMID:27391340

  9. Oral Cancer in African Americans: Addressing Health Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Virginia J.; Watson, Jennifer M.; Choi, Youjin; Tomar, Scott L.; Logan, Henrietta L.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To explore factors underlying African Americans' perceptions of oral cancer and the oral cancer exam. Study findings were used to guide development of oral cancer messages designed to increase oral cancer exams among African Americans. Methods: Focus groups were conducted to understand African Americans' attitudes and expectations…

  10. Oral Cancer in African Americans: Addressing Health Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Virginia J.; Watson, Jennifer M.; Choi, Youjin; Tomar, Scott L.; Logan, Henrietta L.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To explore factors underlying African Americans' perceptions of oral cancer and the oral cancer exam. Study findings were used to guide development of oral cancer messages designed to increase oral cancer exams among African Americans. Methods: Focus groups were conducted to understand African Americans' attitudes and expectations…

  11. Interstitial HDR brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in early stage mobile tongue cancers in young patients – Gliwice experience

    PubMed Central

    Białas, Brygida; Fijałkowski, Marek; Składowski, Krzysztof; Szlag, Marta; Cholewka, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In early stage mobile tongue cancer radical radiotherapy offers good local control and organ preservation, which is especially important in the group of young patients. In our department, for many years HDR-BT has been performed in mobile tongue cancers as a sole treatment or as a “boost” with EBRT. The aim of the study was to show our experience with HDR-BT in early stage mobile tongue cancers among young patients. Material and methods From 2001 to 2006 in Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, five patients under 45 years with mobile tongue cancer were treated with HDR brachytherapy (T1N0M0 – 3/5 and T2N0M0 – 2/5); 4 with HDR brachytherapy “boost” and 1 as a sole treatment. One woman was previously treated with tumour resection, but because of positive surgical margins was referred for radiotherapy. All patients had clinically negative lymph nodes, without dissection. They were treated with interstitial HDR-BT (3-8 catheters). In 4 patients treated with HDR-BT as a “boost”, total doses ranged from 18 to 21 Gy given in 6-7 fractions (twice a day, 3 Gy per fraction). Total doses in EBRT (to local lymph nodes and tumour bed) ranged from 50 to 60 Gy (1.8-2 Gy per fraction 5 days/week). One patient, treated with radical HDR brachytherapy, received 45 Gy in 10 fractions and 50 Gy in EBRT to regional lymph nodes. Results We did not notice local recurrences or distant metastases in our group of patients. Median follow-up was 67 months (range 47-79 months). All patients preserved normal tongue function. A severe late complication occurred in 1 patient – fracture of the mandible. Conclusions In the analysed group of young patients with mobile tongue cancer interstitial HDR brachytherapy in combination with EBRT was an effective and well tolerated treatment modality which allowed preservation of the tongue and its function. PMID:27829846

  12. Interstitial HDR brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in early stage mobile tongue cancers in young patients - Gliwice experience.

    PubMed

    Kellas-Ślęczka, Sylwia; Białas, Brygida; Fijałkowski, Marek; Składowski, Krzysztof; Szlag, Marta; Cholewka, Agnieszka

    2010-06-01

    In early stage mobile tongue cancer radical radiotherapy offers good local control and organ preservation, which is especially important in the group of young patients. In our department, for many years HDR-BT has been performed in mobile tongue cancers as a sole treatment or as a "boost" with EBRT. The aim of the study was to show our experience with HDR-BT in early stage mobile tongue cancers among young patients. From 2001 to 2006 in Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, five patients under 45 years with mobile tongue cancer were treated with HDR brachytherapy (T1N0M0 - 3/5 and T2N0M0 - 2/5); 4 with HDR brachytherapy "boost" and 1 as a sole treatment. One woman was previously treated with tumour resection, but because of positive surgical margins was referred for radiotherapy. All patients had clinically negative lymph nodes, without dissection. They were treated with interstitial HDR-BT (3-8 catheters). In 4 patients treated with HDR-BT as a "boost", total doses ranged from 18 to 21 Gy given in 6-7 fractions (twice a day, 3 Gy per fraction). Total doses in EBRT (to local lymph nodes and tumour bed) ranged from 50 to 60 Gy (1.8-2 Gy per fraction 5 days/week). One patient, treated with radical HDR brachytherapy, received 45 Gy in 10 fractions and 50 Gy in EBRT to regional lymph nodes. We did not notice local recurrences or distant metastases in our group of patients. Median follow-up was 67 months (range 47-79 months). All patients preserved normal tongue function. A severe late complication occurred in 1 patient - fracture of the mandible. In the analysed group of young patients with mobile tongue cancer interstitial HDR brachytherapy in combination with EBRT was an effective and well tolerated treatment modality which allowed preservation of the tongue and its function.

  13. Relationship between chronic trauma of the oral mucosa, oral potentially malignant disorders and oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Piemonte, Eduardo David; Lazos, Jerónimo Pablo; Brunotto, Mabel

    2010-08-01

    Oral cancer represents 2%-5% of all cancers, being one of the 10 most frequent ones. Apart from oral cancer risk factors already described in literature, such as tobacco and alcohol consumption, others emerging risk factors have been proposed, such as chronic irritation from dental factors. The aim of this work was to assess the influence of chronic trauma of the oral mucosa (CTOM) in patients with oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) and cancer. A retrospective study of 406 patients (both sexes; aged between 18 and 80 years; with OPMD and cancer) who attended the Department of Clinical Stomatology A of the National University of Cordoba was performed by non-probabilistic sampling. The association of variables and outcome variable diagnosis, with levels control, OPMD, oral cancer, was evaluated by multinomial regression model. Population under study was represented by 72% of control patients, 16% patients with OPMD and 11% of patients with oral cancer. It was observed a significant association between diagnosis and CTOM (P = 0.000), after adjustment of confounding factors (smoking and drinking habits, sex, cancer inheritance and denture use). Our results suggest that CTOM is, together with other factors, an important risk factor in patients with oral cancer diagnosis, but not for patients with OPMD.

  14. PS2-37: Oral Cancer Information on the Web: Assessing the Quality and Content of English and Spanish Oral Cancer Websites

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Jeannie Y; Thyvalikakath, Thankam; Schleyer, Titus; Wali, Teena; Kerr, Ross

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims: In the United States, about 8,000 people a year die from oral cancer and more than 30,000 new cases are diagnosed annually. A recent study showed that 80% of American adult Internet users have searched the Web for health information and 15% of those specifically searched for dental health information. Having high quality oral cancer information available via the Web is important given the significance of this health problem. The goal of this study was to evaluate the quality and content of multiple English and Spanish oral cancer websites. Methods: We developed a search strategy using the keywords: oral cancer, mouth cancer, and tongue cancer to find oral cancer sites via Medline Plus, Google, and Yahoo. We then used the translations cancer oral, cancer de la boca, and cancer de la lengua to search Medline Plus en Español, Google Español, and Yahoo Telemundo. We added sites to the datasets based on inclusion/exclusion criteria. Two native speaking raters evaluated each site within their set for quality using the modified Information Quality Tool (IQT). We then developed a survey tool to asses the content of the sites. Two native speaking oral cancer experts evaluated each site within their set using this new tool. Results: Our search strategy produced 24 English language sites and 24 Spanish language sites for evaluation. English language websites had an average IQT score of 74.7 (out of 100) and average content score of 51.5 (out of 100). Spanish-language sites had an average IQT score of 48.8 and an average content score of 25.9. Conclusions: Despite higher scores for the English language websites, our analysis showed that there was a great variation in overall quality and content with room for improvement for both language types. English sites could make the biggest improvements by providing more information about their sponsors and who controls site content as well as updated and fixing links and author credentials. The Spanish sites should

  15. Can Superselective Intra-Arterial Chemoradiotherapy Replace Surgery Followed by Radiation for Advanced Cancer of the Tongue and Floor of the Mouth?

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Wataru; Kukobota, Kosei; Ito, Ryohei; Sakaki, Hirotaka; Nakagawa, Hirosi; Teh, Beng Gwan

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare quality of life (QoL) and the survival rate after surgery with and without radiotherapy versus superselective intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy (SSIACRT) for advanced cancer of the tongue and floor of the mouth. Patients with stage III and IV squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and floor of the mouth treated between 2000 and 2013 were included in this study. The predictor variables were surgery without radiotherapy, surgery followed by radiotherapy, and SSIACRT. The outcome variables were QoL and the survival rate. The University of Washington QoL questionnaire (UW-QOL) was used for evaluation of QoL. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the overall survival rate. The UW-QOL was analyzed by analysis of covariance, and the survival rate was analyzed statistically by the log-rank test. Sixty-two patients were eligible for this study. Of these, 13 were treated by surgery without radiotherapy, 29 were treated by surgery plus radiotherapy, and 20 were treated by SSIACRT. The SSIACRT group had the best UW-QOL scores among the 3 groups. The 5-year Kaplan-Meier disease-specific survival rates for these groups were 92.9%, 62.9%, and 83.2%, respectively, with no significant difference (P = .20) shown. The QoL scores of the SSIACRT group were the best among the 3 groups in most domains. The superiority of QoL and the survival rate in the SSIACRT group showed that SSIACRT should be preferred in managing advanced cancer of the tongue and floor of the mouth. Copyright © 2016 The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical outcome of surgical treatment of T1-2 N0 squamous cell carcinoma of oral tongue with observation for the neck: Analysis of 176 cases

    PubMed Central

    Hakeem, Arsheed Hussain; Pradhan, Sultan Ahmed; Kannan, Rajan; Tubachi, Jagadish

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze various demographic, clinical, and histopathologic factors in T1-2 N0 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral tongue to define a high-risk group for regional recurrence that will benefit from elective neck dissection. Materials and Methods: Retrospective outcome analysis of a patient cohort without palpable or ultrasound (USG) detectable nodal metastases undergoing per oral wide glossectomy for T1-2 N0 SCC of oral tongue. Patients were followed up using palpation and serial USG neck and fine-needle aspiration cytology. Results: Of the 176 patients, 69 (39%) showed recurrence during follow-up. Fifty-eight cases developed regional neck node metastases, i.e., overall regional node recurrence rate of 33%. Fifty-three (91%) with regional neck node metastases were salvaged successfully with further treatment. In 110 cases with tumor thickness more than 5 mm, 39% cases developed regional neck node metastases. This association was significant with P = 0.0402. Among 44 cases with perineural invasion, 54% developed regional neck node metastases. Similarly in 39 cases with lymphovascular invasion, 61% developed regional neck node metastases. Association of both of these parameters with the development of regional neck node metastases was significant. Conclusion: We recommend prophylactic selective neck dissection in early stage SCC of oral tongue, especially with depth of invasion more than 5 mm, perineural and lymphovascular invasion. PMID:28299264

  17. Post-resection mucosal margin shrinkage in oral cancer: quantification and significance.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Rajesh C; Qureshi, Sajid S; Kumaran, C

    2005-08-01

    The importance of tumor free margins in outcome of cancer surgery is well known. Often the pathological margins are reported to be significantly smaller than the in situ margins. This discrepancy is due to margin shrinkage the quantum of which has not been studied in patients with oral cancers. To quantify the shrinkage of mucosal margin following excision for carcinoma of the oral tongue and buccal mucosa. Mucosal margins were measured prior to resection and half an hour after excision in 27 patients with carcinoma of the tongue and buccal mucosa. The mean margin shrinkage was assessed and the variables affecting the quantum of shrinkage analyzed. The mean shrinkage from the in situ to the post resection margin status was 22.7% (P < 0.0001). The mean shrinkage of the tongue margins was 23.5%, compared to 21.2% for buccal mucosa margins. The mean shrinkage in T1/T2 tumors (25.6%) was significantly more than in T3/T4 (9.2%, P < 0.011). There is significant shrinkage of mucosal margins after surgery. Hence this should be considered and appropriate margins should be taken at initial resection to prevent the agony of post-operative positive surgical margins. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Applications of nanomedicine in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Virupakshappa, Banu

    2012-06-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the sixth most common cancer for both sexes worldwide. The high mortality rate in cancer such as oral squamous cell carcinoma is commonly attributed to the difficulties in detecting the disease at an early and treatable stage. New methods of nanoengineered materials that are being developed might be effective in detecting the disease at an early treatable stage and treating illnesses and diseases such as cancer. "Nanotechnology" refers to the handling and/or engineering of nano-objects on the scale of molecules. This review deals with some recent developments concerning cancer detection and treatment enabled by nanotechnologies.

  19. Human papilloma virus in oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most prevalent cancer among women, and it arises from cells that originate in the cervix uteri. Among several causes of cervical malignancies, infection with some types of human papilloma virus (HPV) is well known to be the greatest cervical cancer risk factor. Over 150 subtypes of HPV have been identified; more than 40 types of HPVs are typically transmitted through sexual contact and infect the anogenital region and oral cavity. The recently introduced vaccine for HPV infection is effective against certain subtypes of HPV that are associated with cervical cancer, genital warts, and some less common cancers, including oropharyngeal cancer. Two HPV vaccines, quadrivalent and bivalent types that use virus-like particles (VLPs), are currently used in the medical commercial market. While the value of HPV vaccination for oral cancer prevention is still controversial, some evidence supports the possibility that HPV vaccination may be effective in reducing the incidence of oral cancer. This paper reviews HPV-related pathogenesis in cancer, covering HPV structure and classification, trends in worldwide applications of HPV vaccines, effectiveness and complications of HPV vaccination, and the relationship of HPV with oral cancer prevalence. PMID:28053902

  20. Human papilloma virus in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soung Min

    2016-12-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most prevalent cancer among women, and it arises from cells that originate in the cervix uteri. Among several causes of cervical malignancies, infection with some types of human papilloma virus (HPV) is well known to be the greatest cervical cancer risk factor. Over 150 subtypes of HPV have been identified; more than 40 types of HPVs are typically transmitted through sexual contact and infect the anogenital region and oral cavity. The recently introduced vaccine for HPV infection is effective against certain subtypes of HPV that are associated with cervical cancer, genital warts, and some less common cancers, including oropharyngeal cancer. Two HPV vaccines, quadrivalent and bivalent types that use virus-like particles (VLPs), are currently used in the medical commercial market. While the value of HPV vaccination for oral cancer prevention is still controversial, some evidence supports the possibility that HPV vaccination may be effective in reducing the incidence of oral cancer. This paper reviews HPV-related pathogenesis in cancer, covering HPV structure and classification, trends in worldwide applications of HPV vaccines, effectiveness and complications of HPV vaccination, and the relationship of HPV with oral cancer prevalence.

  1. Oral cancer screening: serum Raman spectroscopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Aditi K.; Dhoot, Suyash; Singh, Amandeep; Sawant, Sharada S.; Nandakumar, Nikhila; Talathi-Desai, Sneha; Garud, Mandavi; Pagare, Sandeep; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Nair, Sudhir; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Murali Krishna, C.

    2015-11-01

    Serum Raman spectroscopy (RS) has previously shown potential in oral cancer diagnosis and recurrence prediction. To evaluate the potential of serum RS in oral cancer screening, premalignant and cancer-specific detection was explored in the present study using 328 subjects belonging to healthy controls, premalignant, disease controls, and oral cancer groups. Spectra were acquired using a Raman microprobe. Spectral findings suggest changes in amino acids, lipids, protein, DNA, and β-carotene across the groups. A patient-wise approach was employed for data analysis using principal component linear discriminant analysis. In the first step, the classification among premalignant, disease control (nonoral cancer), oral cancer, and normal samples was evaluated in binary classification models. Thereafter, two screening-friendly classification approaches were explored to further evaluate the clinical utility of serum RS: a single four-group model and normal versus abnormal followed by determining the type of abnormality model. Results demonstrate the feasibility of premalignant and specific cancer detection. The normal versus abnormal model yields better sensitivity and specificity rates of 64 and 80% these rates are comparable to standard screening approaches. Prospectively, as the current screening procedure of visual inspection is useful mainly for high-risk populations, serum RS may serve as a useful adjunct for early and specific detection of oral precancers and cancer.

  2. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... What We Do Administration of Anesthesia Administration of Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ... Teeth Management Procedures Administration of Anesthesia Administration of Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ...

  3. Effects of different general anaesthetic techniques on immune responses in patients undergoing surgery for tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T; Fan, Y; Liu, K; Wang, Y

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different general anaesthesia techniques on immune responses in patients undergoing surgery for tongue cancer. Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1 or 2 patients undergoing elective reconstructive surgery for tongue cancer were randomised to three groups. Group 1 received propofol induction and maintenance (TIVA), group 2 received propofol induction and sevoflurane maintenance (MIXED) and group 3 received sevoflurane induction and maintenance (SEVO). All patients received an infusion of remifentanil. Blood samples were obtained at eight time-points: 30 minutes before induction (T0); one hour (T1), three hours (T2) and five hours (T3) after induction; at the end of the operation (T4); and 24 hours (T5), 48 hours (T6) and 72 hours (T7) after operation. The T lymphocyte subsets (including CD3(+) cells, CD3(+)CD4(+) cells and CD3(+)CD8(+)cells) and CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio, natural killer cells and B lymphocytes were analysed by flow cytometry. All immunological indicators except CD3(+)CD8(+) cells were significantly decreased in all groups at T1~T5 compared to T0 (P <0.05). The percentages of CD3(+) cells, CD3(+)CD4(+) cells and natural killer cells, and the CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratios were significantly lower in the MIXED groups and SEVO groups but not the TIVA group at T6 as compared with T0 (P <0.05). There were minor but statistically significant differences in the percentages of CD3(+) cells, CD3(+)CD4(+) cells and natural killer cells, and the CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratios between the SEVO group and the TIVA group at T2approxT6 (P <0.05). These findings suggest that propofol has slightly less effect on cellular immune responses than sevoflurane.

  4. Previous tonsillectomy modifies odds of tonsil and base of tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zevallos, Jose P; Mazul, Angela L; Rodriguez, Nidia; Weissler, Mark C; Brennan, Paul; Anantharaman, Devasena; Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush; Neil Hayes, D; Olshan, Andrew F

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tonsillectomy is a commonly performed surgical procedure that involves removal of the palatine tonsils. The purpose of this study is to examine the association between previous tonsillectomy and odds of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) in a large population-based case–control study. We hypothesise that previous tonsillectomy is associated with a decreased odds of tonsil cancer with no impact on the odds of developing base of tongue (BOT) cancer. Methods: This was a population-based, frequency-matched case–control study with multinomial logistic regression, including 1378 controls, 108 BOT cancer cases, and 198 tonsil cancer cases. Demographic and risk factor data were collected using a structured questionnaire during an in-home visit conducted by trained nurse-interviewers. The human papillomavirus (HPV) tumour status was determined through Luminex-based multiplex PCR and p16 status by immunohistochemistry. Results: Previous tonsillectomy was associated with a nearly two-fold increased odds of BOT cancer (OR=1.95, 95% CI 1.25–3.06, P=0.003) and a large decrease in the odds of tonsil cancer (OR=0.22, 95% CI 0.13–0.36, P<0.001). When HPV status was considered, tonsillectomy was associated with a decreased odds of HPV-positive tonsil cancer (OR=0.17, 95% CI 0.08–0.34, P<0.001) and an increased risk of HPV-positive BOT cancer (OR=2.46, 95% CI 1.22–4.95, P=0.012). When p16 status was considered, tonsillectomy was associated with an increased odds of p16-positive BOT cancer (OR=2.24, 95% CI 1.16–4.35, P=0.017) and a decreased odds of p16-positive tonsil cancer (OR=0.14, 95% CI 0.07–0.31, P<0.001). Conclusions: Previous tonsillectomy modifies the odds of both tonsil and BOT cancer, with decreased odds of tonsil cancer and increased odds of BOT cancer. A history of previous tonsillectomy may play a role in OPSCC risk stratification when considered along with other covariates such as sexual history, smoking status, and age. PMID

  5. Previous tonsillectomy modifies odds of tonsil and base of tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Zevallos, Jose P; Mazul, Angela L; Rodriguez, Nidia; Weissler, Mark C; Brennan, Paul; Anantharaman, Devasena; Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush; Neil Hayes, D; Olshan, Andrew F

    2016-03-29

    Tonsillectomy is a commonly performed surgical procedure that involves removal of the palatine tonsils. The purpose of this study is to examine the association between previous tonsillectomy and odds of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) in a large population-based case-control study. We hypothesise that previous tonsillectomy is associated with a decreased odds of tonsil cancer with no impact on the odds of developing base of tongue (BOT) cancer. This was a population-based, frequency-matched case-control study with multinomial logistic regression, including 1378 controls, 108 BOT cancer cases, and 198 tonsil cancer cases. Demographic and risk factor data were collected using a structured questionnaire during an in-home visit conducted by trained nurse-interviewers. The human papillomavirus (HPV) tumour status was determined through Luminex-based multiplex PCR and p16 status by immunohistochemistry. Previous tonsillectomy was associated with a nearly two-fold increased odds of BOT cancer (OR=1.95, 95% CI 1.25-3.06, P=0.003) and a large decrease in the odds of tonsil cancer (OR=0.22, 95% CI 0.13-0.36, P<0.001). When HPV status was considered, tonsillectomy was associated with a decreased odds of HPV-positive tonsil cancer (OR=0.17, 95% CI 0.08-0.34, P<0.001) and an increased risk of HPV-positive BOT cancer (OR=2.46, 95% CI 1.22-4.95, P=0.012). When p16 status was considered, tonsillectomy was associated with an increased odds of p16-positive BOT cancer (OR=2.24, 95% CI 1.16-4.35, P=0.017) and a decreased odds of p16-positive tonsil cancer (OR=0.14, 95% CI 0.07-0.31, P<0.001). Previous tonsillectomy modifies the odds of both tonsil and BOT cancer, with decreased odds of tonsil cancer and increased odds of BOT cancer. A history of previous tonsillectomy may play a role in OPSCC risk stratification when considered along with other covariates such as sexual history, smoking status, and age.

  6. Oral cancer: Etiology and risk factors: A review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Malay; Nanavati, Ronak; Modi, Tapan G; Dobariya, Chintan

    2016-01-01

    Oral cancer is the sixth most common malignancy in the world. Oral cancer is of major concern in Southeast Asia primarily because of the prevalent oral habits of betel quid chewing, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Despite recent advances in cancer diagnoses and therapies, the 5.year survival rate of oral cancer patients has remained at a dismal 50% in the last few decades. This paper is an overview of the various etiological agents and risk factors implicated in the development of oral cancer.

  7. Aetiology of Oral Cancer in the Sudan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To review the studied risk factors that linked to aetiology of oral cancer in the Sudan. There have been numerous reports in the increase in the incidence of oral cancer from various parts of the world. A recent trend for a rising incidence of oral cancer, with the absence of the well established risk factors, has raised concern. Although, there are inconsistent data on incidence and demographical factors, studies suggest that the physiologic response to risk factors by men and women vary in different populations. Material and Methods This review principally examines 33 publications devoted to aetiology of oral cancer in the Sudan, in addition to some risk factors that are commonly practiced in the Sudan. Results Several studies examining risk factors for oral cancer include tobacco use (Smoked and Smokeless), alcohol consumption, occupational risk, familial risk, immune deficits, virus infection and genetic factors. Conclusions Toombak use and infection with high risk Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) were extensively investigated and linked to the aetiology of oral cancer in Sudan. PMID:24422031

  8. Risk Stratification System for Oral Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Lutécia H Mateus; Reis, Isildinha M; Reategui, Erika P; Gordon, Claudia; Saint-Victor, Sandra; Duncan, Robert; Gomez, Carmen; Bayers, Stephanie; Fisher, Penelope; Perez, Aymee; Goodwin, W Jarrard; Hu, Jennifer J; Franzmann, Elizabeth J

    2016-06-01

    Oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancer (oral cancer) is a deadly disease that is increasing in incidence. Worldwide 5-year survival is only 50% due to delayed intervention with more than half of the diagnoses at stage III and IV, whereas earlier detection (stage I and II) yields survival rates up to 80% to 90%. Salivary soluble CD44 (CD44), a tumor-initiating marker, and total protein levels may facilitate oral cancer risk assessment and early intervention. This study used a hospital-based design with 150 cases and 150 frequency-matched controls to determine whether CD44 and total protein levels in oral rinses were associated with oral cancer independent of age, gender, race, ethnicity, tobacco and alcohol use, and socioeconomic status (SES). High-risk subjects receiving oral cancer prevention interventions as part of a community-based program (n = 150) were followed over 1 year to determine marker specificity and variation. CD44 ≥5.33 ng/mL was highly associated with case status [adjusted OR 14.489; 95% confidence interval (CI), 5.973-35.145; P < .0001, vs. reference group CD44 <2.22 ng/mL and protein <1.23 mg/mL]. Total protein aided prediction above CD44 alone. Sensitivity and specificity in the frequency-matched study was 80% and 48.7%, respectively. However, controls were not representative of the target screening population due, in part, to a high rate of prior cancer. In contrast, specificity in the high-risk community was 74% and reached 95% after annual retesting. Simple and inexpensive salivary CD44 and total protein measurements may help identify individuals at heightened risk for oral cancer from the millions who partake in risky behaviors. Cancer Prev Res; 9(6); 445-55. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. In Vitro Adherence of Oral Bacteria to Different Types of Tongue Piercings

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Julia Medeiros; Alves, Caroline Vieira

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to verify in vitro adherence of E. corrodens and S. oralis to the surface of tongue piercings made of surgical steel, titanium, Bioplast, and Teflon. For this, 160 piercings were used for the count of Colony Forming Units (CFU) and 32 piercings for analysis under scanning electron microscopy. Of these, 96 (24 of each type) were individually incubated in 5 mL of BHI broth and 50 μL of inoculum at 37°C/24 h. The other 96 piercings formed the control group and were individually incubated in 5 mL of BHI broth at 37°C/24 h. Plates were incubated at 37°C/48 h for counting of CFU/mL and data were submitted to statistical analysis (p value <0.05). For E. corrodens, difference among types of material was observed (p < 0.001) and titanium and surgical steel showed lower bacterial adherence. The adherence of S. oralis differed among piercings, showing lower colonization (p < 0.007) in titanium and surgical steel piercings. The four types of piercings were susceptible to colonization by E. corrodens and S. oralis, and bacterial adhesion was more significant in those made of Bioplast and Teflon. The piercings presented bacterial colonies on their surface, being higher in plastic piercings probably due to their uneven and rough surface. PMID:27725949

  10. Protection of Dietary Polyphenols against Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yijian; Yao, Hua; Yao, Yanan; Yenwong Fai, Leonard; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    Oral cancer represents a health burden worldwide with approximate 275,000 new cases diagnosed annually. Its poor prognosis is due to local tumor invasion and frequent lymph node metastasis. Better understanding and development of novel treatments and chemo-preventive approaches for the preventive and therapeutic intervention of this type of cancer are necessary. Recent development of dietary polyphenols as cancer preventives and therapeutic agents is of great interest due to their antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic activities. Polyphenols may inhibit carcinogenesis in the stage of initiation, promotion, or progression. In particular, dietary polyphenols decrease incidence of carcinomas and exert protection against oral cancer by induction of cell death and inhibition of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. In this review, we discuss current progress of dietary polyphenols against oral cancers in vitro, in vivo, and at population levels. PMID:23771133

  11. Prevention of Carcinogen-Induced Oral Cancer by Sulforaphane.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Julie E; Zang, Yan; Sen, Malabika; Li, Changyou; Wang, Lin; Egner, Patricia A; Fahey, Jed W; Normolle, Daniel P; Grandis, Jennifer R; Kensler, Thomas W; Johnson, Daniel E

    2016-07-01

    Chronic exposure to carcinogens represents the major risk factor for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Beverages derived from broccoli sprout extracts (BSE) that are rich in glucoraphanin and its bioactive metabolite sulforaphane promote detoxication of airborne pollutants in humans. Herein, we investigated the potential chemopreventive activity of sulforaphane using in vitro models of normal and malignant mucosal epithelial cells and an in vivo model of murine oral cancer resulting from the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO). Sulforaphane treatment of Het-1A, a normal mucosal epithelial cell line, and 4 HNSCC cell lines led to dose- and time-dependent induction of NRF2 and the NRF2 target genes NQO1 and GCLC, known mediators of carcinogen detoxication. Sulforaphane also promoted NRF2-independent dephosphorylation/inactivation of pSTAT3, a key oncogenic factor in HNSCC. Compared with vehicle, sulforaphane significantly reduced the incidence and size of 4NQO-induced tongue tumors in mice. A pilot clinical trial in 10 healthy volunteers evaluated the bioavailability and pharmacodynamic activity of three different BSE regimens, based upon urinary sulforaphane metabolites and NQO1 transcripts in buccal scrapings, respectively. Ingestion of sulforaphane-rich BSE demonstrated the greatest, most consistent bioavailability. Mucosal bioactivity, defined as 2-fold or greater upregulation of NQO1 mRNA, was observed in 6 of 9 evaluable participants ingesting glucoraphanin-rich BSE; 3 of 6 ingesting sulforaphane-rich BSE; and 3 of 9 after topical-only exposure to sulforaphane-rich BSE. Together, our findings demonstrate preclinical chemopreventive activity of sulforaphane against carcinogen-induced oral cancer, and support further mechanistic and clinical investigation of sulforaphane as a chemopreventive agent against tobacco-related HNSCC. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 547-57. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Tongue-Palate Contact Pressure, Oral Air Pressure, and Acoustics of Clear Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searl, Jeff; Evitts, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors compared articulatory contact pressure (ACP), oral air pressure (Po), and speech acoustics for conversational versus clear speech. They also assessed the relationship of these measures to listener perception. Method: Twelve adults with normal speech produced monosyllables in a phrase using conversational and clear speech.…

  13. Tongue-Palate Contact Pressure, Oral Air Pressure, and Acoustics of Clear Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searl, Jeff; Evitts, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors compared articulatory contact pressure (ACP), oral air pressure (Po), and speech acoustics for conversational versus clear speech. They also assessed the relationship of these measures to listener perception. Method: Twelve adults with normal speech produced monosyllables in a phrase using conversational and clear speech.…

  14. Improving Oral Cancer Survival: The Role of Dental Providers

    PubMed Central

    MESSADI, DIANA V.; WILDER-SMITH, PETRA; WOLINSKY, LAWRENCE

    2010-01-01

    Oral cancer accounts for 2 percent to 4 percent of all cancers diagnosed each year in the United States. In contrast to other cancers, the overall U.S. survival rate from oral cancer has not improved during the past 50 years, mostly due to late-stage diagnosis. Several noninvasive oral cancer detection techniques that emerged in the past decade will be discussed, with a brief overview of most common oral cancer chemopreventive agents. PMID:19998655

  15. Oral cancer: current and future diagnostic techniques.

    PubMed

    Scully, Crispian; Bagan, José V; Hopper, Colin; Epstein, Joel B

    2008-08-01

    Oral cancer is among the 10 most common cancers worldwide, and is especially seen in disadvantaged elderly males. Early detection and prompt treatment offer the best chance for cure. As patient awareness regarding the danger of oral cancer increases, the demand for "screening" is expected to increase. The signs and symptoms of oral cancer often resemble less serious conditions more commonly found and similarly usually presenting as a lump, red or white patch or ulcer. If any such lesion does not heal within 3 weeks, a malignancy or some other serious disorder must be excluded and a biopsy may be indicated. Dental health care workers have a duty to detect benign and potentially malignant oral lesions such as oral cancer and are generally the best trained health care professionals in this field. Prompt referral to an appropriate specialist allows for the best management but, if this is not feasible, the dental practitioner should take the biopsy which should be sent to an oral/head and neck pathologist for histological evaluation.

  16. Cancer therapy-related oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Redding, Spencer W

    2005-08-01

    Oral mucositis is a common side effect of cancer therapies, particularly radiation therapy for head and neck cancer and various forms of chemotherapy. It commonly results in severe oral pain that can compromise the duration and success of cancer management. Hospitalizations are common because patients lose the ability to take anything by mouth due to severe pain and must have alimentation supported during this period. Pain management usually requires potent narcotic analgesia. Cancer therapy-related oral mucositis is commonly described as the most significant and debilitating acute complication associated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Until recently, cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis was thought to be a process involving the epithelium only. Evidence is building that the process of oral mucositis involves far more than just the epithelium, but includes multiple cellular processes of the submucosa as well. Many strategies have been evaluated to prevent oral mucositis, but the data is confusing since it is often conflicting. Therapy with the growth factor, KGF1, appears promising, as it is the only medication currently approved by the FDA. A multifaceted approach that targets the entire mucositis process will probably be needed to optimize overall prevention.

  17. Oral and oropharyngeal cancer in a Venezuelan population.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Helen; Nikitakis, Nikolaos G; Correnti, María; Maissi, Sara; Ponce, José G

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze diagnosed cases of Oral Cancer (OC) and Oropharyngeal Cancer (OPC) in a Venezuelan population. We clinically evaluated 130 patients with OC and OPC and a histopathologic diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma. The patients were analyzed according to gender age, and use of alcohol and tobacco and the tumors were classIfied based on anatomic location, staging parameters, and degree of difFerentiation. Ninety one patients (70%) were male and 39 (30%) were female. Patients' age ranged from 26 to 86 years old. Use of smoking tobacco, alcohol or both was reported by 84.3%, 49.1% and 45.4% of patients, respectively, and was more frequent in males. The most common oropharyngeal anatomic location was the base of the tongue (22.3%), followed by the tonsils (13.9%), while the most frequently affected oral location was the oral tongue (19.2%) followed by the gingiva and alveolar mucosa (10.8%), and the floor of mouth (7.7%). The majority of tumors (77.7%) were diagnosed at an advanced stage (Stage III or IV); metastasis to the regional lymph nodes occurred in 53.1% of cases. According to degree of diferentiation, well, moderately and poorly difFerentiated tumors accounted for 45.4%, 46.1% and 8.5% of cases, respectively. Well differentiated tumors accounted for 56.7% of OC cases, while the majority of OPC cases were classified as moderately or poorly differentiated (72.3%) (p < or = 0.002). Also, non-metastatic cases (NO) showed a predominance of well-diferentiated tumors (61.2%), while metastatic tumors (N+) were classified as moderately or poorly differentiated in 89.8% of cases (p < or = 0.0001). Our study population was characterized by a predominance of smokers and/or drinkers and a predilection for male patients. Most tumors were diagnosed at an advanced stage with a high incidence of metastatic spread to the regional lymph nodes, indicating possible delays in diagnosis. Less differentiated tumors were more frequently encountered among

  18. Indian Council of Medical Research consensus document for the management of tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    D’Cruz, Anil K.; Sharma, Shilpi; Agarwal, Jaiprakash P.; Thakar, Alok; Teli, Ashraf; Arya, Supreeta; Desai, Chirag; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Sebastian, Paul; Verghese, Bipin T.; Kane, Shubhada; Sucharita, V; Kaur, Tanvir; Shukla, D. K.; Rath, Goura Kishor

    2015-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The document is based on consensus among the experts and best available evidence pertaining to Indian population and is meant for practice in India.Early diagnosis is imperative in improving outcomes and preserving quality of life. High index of suspicion is to be maintained for leukoplakia (high risk site).Evaluation of a patient with newly diagnosed tongue cancer should include essential tests: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is investigative modality of choice when indicated. Computed tomography (CT) scan is an option when MRI is unavailable. In early lesions when imaging is not warranted ultrasound may help guide management of the neck.Early stage cancers (stage I & II) require single modality treatment – either surgery or radiotherapy. Surgery is preferred. Adjuvant radiotherapy is indicated for T3/T4 cancers, presence of high risk features [lymphovascular emboli (LVE), perineural invasion (PNI), poorly differentiated, node +, close margins). Adjuvant chemoradiation (CTRT) is indicated for positive margins and extranodal disease.Locally advanced operable cancers (stage III & IVA) require combined multimodality treatment - surgery + adjuvant treatment. Adjuvant treatment is indicated in all and in the presence of high risk features as described above.Locally advanced inoperable cancers (stage IVB) are treated with palliative chemo-radiotherapy, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or symptomatic treatment depending upon the performance status. Select cases may be considered for neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical salvage.Metastatic disease (stage IVC) should be treated with a goal for palliation. Chemotherapy may be offered to patients with good performance status. Local treatment in the form of radiotherapy may be added for palliation of symptoms.Intense follow-up every 3 months is required for initial 2 years as most recurrences occur in the first 24 months. After 2nd year follow up is done at 4-6 months interval. At each follow up

  19. Capsaicin induces apoptosis in SCC-4 human tongue cancer cells through mitochondria-dependent and -independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Ip, Siu-Wan; Lan, Sheng-Hui; Huang, An-Cheng; Yang, Jai-Sing; Chen, Ya-Yin; Huang, Hui-Ying; Lin, Zen-Pin; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Yang, Mei-Due; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-05-01

    Although there have been advances in the fields of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy of tongue cancer, the cure rates are still not substantially satisfactory. Capsaicin (trans-8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is the major pungent ingredient of hot chili pepper and has been reported to have an antitumor effect on many human cancer cell types. The molecular mechanisms of the antitumor effect of capsaicin are not yet completely understood. Herein, we investigated whether capsaicin induces apoptosis in human tongue cancer cells. Capsaicin decreased the percentage of viable cells in a dose-dependent manner in human tongue cancer SCC-4 cells. In addition, capsaicin produced DNA fragmentation, decreased the DNA contents (sub-G1 phase), and induced G0/G1 phase arrest in SCC-4 cells. We demonstrated that capsaicin-induced apoptosis is associated with an increase in reactive oxygen species and Ca²⁺ generations and a disruption of the mitochondrial transmenbrane potential (ΔΨ(m)). Treatment with capsaicin induced a dramatic increase in caspase-3 and -9 activities, as assessed by flow cytometric methods. A possible mechanism of capsaicin-induced apoptosis is involved in the activation of caspase-3 (one of the apoptosis-executing enzyme). Confocal laser microscope examination also showed that capsaicin induced the releases of AIF, ATF-4, and GADD153 from mitochondria of SCC-4 cells. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A histological and clinical study on oral cancer: descriptive analyses of 365 cases.

    PubMed

    Dias, Gonçalo Seguro; Almeida, Arlindo Pereira de

    2007-11-01

    Cancer is the second cause of death in Portugal right after cardio vascular diseases. In Portugal the incidence of oral and pharynx cancer (OPC) is higher than uterus and larynx cancers, and in US its frequency is higher than melanoma or uterus cancer, diseases that concern more population than oral cancer. The aim of this paper is to identify preferable anatomic location for oral cancer, mean age of patients, the use of tobacco and alcohol, histological characteristics, staging, type of therapeutics, presence of metastases and 1 and 5 year follow up. Data was collected from clinical charts of 365 cases from the Centro de Lisboa do Instituto Portugues de Oncologia with histological confirmation of malign tumor of the mouth. These cases are the total of oral malign tumors in the years of 1997, 1998 and 1999 in that institution. We observe that despite modern diagnostic and treatment techniques 37,9% of all patients died after first year with evidence of tumor. From all patients just 23,7% were free of disease after 5 years of treatment. Tongue was the principal region affected and the average age was 62, 25 years. It was concluded that 57, 8% of patient were smokers and 43,8% were alcohol drinkers. A high number of patients were submitted to radiotherapy either alone or with other treatment options.

  1. Effect of oral cleaning using mouthwash and a mouth moisturizing gel on bacterial number and moisture level of the tongue surface of older adults requiring nursing care.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kenichiro; Ryu, Masahiro; Izumi, Sachi; Ueda, Takayuki; Sakurai, Kaoru

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of oral cleaning using a mouthwash and a mouth moisturizing gel on the number of bacteria and moisture level of the tongue surface of older adults requiring nursing care. The 60 participants were randomly divided into groups according to their use of oral cleaning procedures as follows: group 1, mouthwash and a moisturizing gel (M + m); group 2, mouthwash (M); group 3, water and a moisturizing gel (W + m); and group 4, water (W). The number of anaerobic bacteria, tongue coating index and moisture level of the tongue surface were measured at baseline, and after 1 and 2 weeks after cleaning commenced to compare the effectiveness of oral cleaning among the groups. There was no significant difference in baseline measurements among the groups. The numbers of anaerobic bacteria decreased for all groups, and there were significant differences in the rates of decrease after 2 weeks between the M + m and W + m groups, M + m and W groups, and M and W groups. The tongue coating index decreased for all groups. There was no significant difference in the rate of decrease among the groups after 1 week, and there was a significant difference after 2 weeks between the M + m and W groups. The moisture levels of all groups increased, and there were significant differences after 2 weeks between the M + m and M groups, the M + m and W groups, and the W + m and W groups. The most effective cleaning technique was the combination of a mouthwash and a moisturizing gel. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 116-121. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  2. Molecular concept in human oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Akhilesh; Singh, Shraddha; Kumar, Vijay; Pal, U. S.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of oral cancer remains high in both Asian and Western countries. Several risk factors associated with development of oral cancer are now well-known, including tobacco chewing, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Cancerous risk factors may cause many genetic events through chromosomal alteration or mutations in genetic material and lead to progression and development of oral cancer through histological progress, carcinogenesis. Oral squamous carcinogenesis is a multistep process in which multiple genetic events occur that alter the normal functions of proto-oncogenes/oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Furthermore, these gene alterations can deregulate the normal activity such as increase in the production of growth factors (transforming growth factor-α [TGF-α], TGF-β, platelet-derived growth factor, etc.) or numbers of cell surface receptors (epidermal growth factor receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor, etc.), enhanced intracellular messenger signaling and mutated production of transcription factors (ras gene family, c-myc gene) which results disturb to tightly regulated signaling pathways of normal cell. Several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes have been implicated in oral cancer especially cyclin family, ras, PRAD-1, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p53 and RB1. Viral infections, particularly with oncogenic human papilloma virus subtype (16 and 18) and Epstein-Barr virus have tumorigenic effect on oral epithelia. Worldwide, this is an urgent need to initiate oral cancer research programs at molecular and genetic level which investigates the causes of genetic and molecular defect, responsible for malignancy. This approach may lead to development of target dependent tumor-specific drugs and appropriate gene therapy. PMID:26668446

  3. Human papillomavirus infection and oral cancer: a case-control study in Montreal, Canada.

    PubMed

    Pintos, Javier; Black, Martin J; Sadeghi, Nader; Ghadirian, Parviz; Zeitouni, Anthony G; Viscidi, Raphael P; Herrero, Rolando; Coutlée, François; Franco, Eduardo L

    2008-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and risk of developing oral cancer. The investigation followed a hospital-based case-control design. Cases consisted of newly diagnosed patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx. Controls were frequency matched to cases on gender, age, and hospital. Subjects were interviewed to elicit information on putative risk factors. Oral exfoliated cells were tested for detection of HPV DNA by the PGMY09/11 polymerase chain reaction protocol. Serum antibodies against HPV 16, 18, and 31 viral capsids were detected using an immunoassay technique. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of oral cancer according to HPV exposure variables. HPV DNA was detected in 19% of cases (14 out of 72), and 5% of controls (six out of 129). Among tonsil-related cancers (palatine tonsil and base of tongue) viral DNA was detected in 43% of cases (nine out of 21). The OR for tonsil-related cancers for high-risk HPV types was 19.32 (95%CI: 2.3-159.5), after adjustment for socio-demographic characteristics, tobacco, and alcohol consumption. The equivalent OR for HPV 16 seropositivity was 31.51 (95%CI: 4.5-219.7). The ORs of non-tonsillar oral cancers for high risk HPV DNA in oral cells and for seropositivity were 2.14 (95%CI: 0.4-13.0) and 3.16 (95%CI: 0.8-13.0), respectively. These results provide evidence supporting a strong causal association between HPV infection and tonsil-related cancers. The evidence for an etiologic link is less clear for non-tonsillar oral cancers.

  4. Compensatory Mechanisms in Patients After a Partial or Total Glossectomy due to Oral Cancer.

    PubMed

    Halczy-Kowalik, Ludmiła; Wiktor, Andrzej; Rzewuska, Anna; Kowalczyk, Robert; Wysocki, Rościsław; Posio, Violetta

    2015-12-01

    Excision of a part or the whole of tongue due to oral cancer disturbs swallowing and speech. Lower airways aspiration of the swallowed bolus in patients after such oral structures excision is a symptom of major swallowing disorder and may be the cause of aspiration pneumonia. Restoration of oral nutrition is possible after exclusion or reduction of aspiration threat in the patients. Video fluoroscopic evaluation of the swallowing performed at the beginning of the swallowing rehabilitation in 95 patients after a total or partial glossectomy due to oral cancer, who assessed their saliva swallowing as efficient on the day of examination, showed disturbances of all of the swallowing stages. The most common disturbances involved the oral stage: limited mobility of the oral tongue, impaired glossopalatal seal, and weak glossopharyngeal seal. The most serious among them involved pharyngeal stage of swallowing, as leakage into the larynx and aspiration. The patients used their own methods during barium suspension swallowing to facilitate the swallowing act. They used such methods as: changing the position of the head to the body, additional swallows, engaging the adjacent structures into sealing the oral fissure. We assumed that the compensatory mechanisms (CM) worked out by the patients before the swallowing examination will enable them efficient barium suspension swallowing. The CM were applied by 71 of 95 patients; 51 of the patients used more than one compensatory mechanism. Swallowing in 61 of the compensating patients was at least functional; swallowing in 10 of the compensating patients was non-efficient and caused recurrent aspiration. The results of our research negate the validity of multiple swallows (more than three) without apnea elongation because it may lead to aspiration. Aspiration was also recorded in patients with weak airways closure and immovable epiglottis, who complemented the impaired oral transport with gravitational oral transport by moving chin

  5. Clinical features and evolution of oral cancer: A study of 274 cases in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Brandizzi, Daniel; Gandolfo, Mariana; Velazco, María Lucia; Cabrini, Rómulo Luis; Lanfranchi, Hector Eduardo

    2008-09-01

    Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma has a low survival rate, 34 to 66% five-year survival after initial diagnosis, due to late diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to examine the clinical features and evolution of oral cancer in the University of Buenos Aires. 274 patients with primary oral carcinoma, over the 1992-2000 period were included in the study. The survival rate of this population was 80% at 12 months, 60% at 24 months, 46% at 36 months, 40% at 48 months, and 39% at 60 months (5 years). The tumor localizations with worse prognosis were floor of mouth and tongue, with survival rates of 19% and 27% respectively. Sixty-five percent of the oral carcinomas evaluated were diagnosed at advanced stages (III and IV). The patients under study exhibited the lowest survival rate described for oral cancer (34% five-year survival after initial diagnosis). The population included in this study can be considered representative of the Argentine population. This bad prognosis would be mainly due to the large number of oral cancer cases that were diagnosed at advanced stages.

  6. Oral cancer in Libya and development of regional oral cancer registries: A review

    PubMed Central

    BenNasir, E.; El Mistiri, M.; McGowan, R.; Katz, R.V.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this paper are three-fold: (1) to summarize the current epidemiological data on oral cancer in Libya as reported in the published literature and as compared to other national oral cancer rates in the region; (2) to present both the history of the early development, and future goals, of population-based oral cancer tumor registries in Libya as they partner with the more established regional and international population-based cancer tumor registries; and, (3) to offer recommendations that will likely be required in the near future if these nascent, population-based Libyan oral cancer registries are to establish themselves as on-going registries for describing the oral cancer disease patterns and risk factors in Libya as well as for prevention and treatment. This comprehensive literature review revealed that the current baseline incidence of oral cancer in Libya is similar to those of other North Africa countries and China, but is relatively low compared to the United Kingdom, the United States, and India. The recently established Libyan National Cancer Registry Program, initiated in 2007, while envisioning five cooperating regional cancer registries, continues to operate at a relatively suboptimal level. Lack of adequate levels of national funding continue to plague its development…and the accompanying quality of service that could be provided to the Libyan people. PMID:26644751

  7. Candida spp. in oral cancer and oral precancerous lesions.

    PubMed

    Gall, Francesca; Colella, Giuseppe; Di Onofrio, Valeria; Rossiello, Raffaele; Angelillo, Italo Francesco; Liguori, Giorgio

    2013-07-01

    To assess the presence of Candida spp. in lesions of the oral cavity in a sample of patients with precancer or cancer of the mouth and evaluate the limitations and advantages of microbiological and histological methods, 103 subjects with precancerous or cancerous lesions and not treated were observed between 2007 and 2009. The presence of Candida in the lesions was analyzed by microbiological and histological methods. Cohen's k statistic was used to assess the agreement between culture method and staining techniques. Forty-eight (47%) patients had cancer and 55 (53%) patients had precancerous lesions. Candida spp. were isolated from 31 (30%) patients with cancerous lesions and 33 (32%) with precancerous lesions. C. albicans was the most frequent species isolated in the lesions. The k value showed a fair overall agreement for comparisons between culture method and PAS (0.2825) or GMS (0.3112). This study supports the frequent presence of Candida spp. in cancer and precancerous lesions of the oral cavity. Both microbiological investigations and histological techniques were reliable for detection of Candida spp. It would be desirable for the two techniques to be considered complementary in the detection of yeast infections in these types of lesions.

  8. Brachytherapy as part of the definitive management of squamous cancer of the base of tongue

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, L.B.; Sessions, R.B.; Strong, E.W.; Fass, D.E.; Nori, D.; Fuks, Z. )

    1989-12-01

    Between 1981 and 1986, 17 patients were treated at the Department of Radiation Oncology at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center with squamous cancer of the base of the tongue whose definitive treatment included brachytherapy. There were four patients with T1 lesions, six with T2, six with T3, and one with T4. In general, treatment consisted of 5000-5400 cGy with external beam radiation and 2000-3000 cGy boost to the base of tongue via an Ir-192 implant using afterloading catheters. Necks were managed with elective radiation alone in the N0 group (n = 5) or with radiation plus neck dissection in the N+ group (n = 12). Five patients who would have required laryngectomy had they undergone primary surgery received neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by external beam and implant as part of a larynx preservation study that was being done at our institution (4-T3, 1-T2). The range of follow-up is 8 to 59 months, with median follow-up of 24 months. No patients have been lost to follow-up. Crude local control by T-Stage are as follows: T1-4/4, T2-5/6, T3-5/6, T4-1/1. Actuarial local control at 24 months is 87%. There have been no neck failures. There have been five patients who had soft tissue ulceration (STU) and one patient who had osteoradionecrosis (ORN). All soft tissue ulceration patients have been successfully managed conservatively. The patient with osteoradionecrosis is currently being managed. In 4 of these 6 cases, the implant was the initial therapeutic intervention and the entire tumor bed was implanted. On the other hand, when external beam was the initial treatment, the boost was administered to the smaller volume of residual disease. Overall, 4 of 7 patients who had implant first developed either soft tissue ulceration or osteoradionecrosis, as opposed to 2 of 10 patients who had implant after external beam and/or chemotherapy.

  9. A prospective cohort study on poor oral hygiene and pancreatic cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiaqi; Roosaar, Ann; Axéll, Tony; Ye, Weimin

    2016-01-15

    Poor oral hygiene has been proposed to increase the risk for pancreatic cancer. We aim to assess this hypothesis, using number of teeth, dental plaque and oral mucosal lesions examined at baseline as a proxy for oral hygiene. During 1973-74 a population-based prevalence study of oral mucosal lesions was carried out in Uppsala County in central Sweden. We followed the study population through linkages with the Swedish Cancer and Total Population registers. A total of 19,924 participants were included, and 126 pancreatic cancer cases were identified during an average of 28.7 years of follow-up. Hazard ratios (HRs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for pancreatic cancer were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Overall, subjects with fewer teeth at baseline tended to have an increased risk for pancreatic cancer, although the estimates were not statistically significant. Among subjects with more than 10 teeth, those with unacceptable dental plaque had an HR of 2.1 (95% CI: 1.0, 4.7), compared with those without dental plaque after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Individuals with Candida-related or denture-related oral mucosal lesions, or tongue lesions, compared with those without any of the three studied lesions, had a 70, 30 and 80% excess risk of developing pancreatic cancer, respectively. Presence of more than one type of studied lesions further increased the risk for pancreatic cancer. In conclusion, our findings provide evidence to support the hypothesis that poor oral hygiene plays an important role in the development of pancreatic cancer.

  10. Oral and head and neck cancer. Special listing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-03

    The Special Listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a publication of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute. Each Listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The research areas include: Diagnostic and prognostic studies of oral and head and neck cancers; Treatment of oral and head and neck cancers; Rehabilitation and other support following treatment of oral and head and neck cancers; Etiology, epidemiology, and follow-up studies of patients with oral and head and neck cancers; Training programs for dental professions; Broad clinical programs for treatment of head and neck cancers; Salivary gland pathology.

  11. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Followed by Surgery in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  12. [Pull-through resection and peroral resection in early-stage (T1 and T2) tongue and floor of the mouth cancers: a comparison of two techniques].

    PubMed

    Başerer, Nermin; Damar, Murat

    2011-01-01

    To compare oncological, functional, clinical and cosmetic results of peroral resection and pull-through resection in early stage (T1, T2) tongue and floor of the mouth cancers. Forty-nine patients (23 females, 26 males; mean age 54.4 years; range 21 to 87 years) with stage T1 and T2 oral tongue and floor of the mouth cancers primarily treated with peroral resection or pull-through resection techniques between 1998 and 2008 were included in this study. The data obtained during the study (clinical follow-up, tumor stage, type of surgery) were retrospectively evaluated, and the data obtained from patient follow-up (relapse, speaking, eating and drinking function, cosmetic appearance, patient satisfaction) were evaluated prospectively. Twenty-two patients were staged T1 and 27 patients were staged T2. Ten patients with stage T1 underwent pull-through resection, 12 patients with stage T1 underwent peroral resection. Sixteen patients with stage T2 underwent pull-through resection, 11 patients with stage T2 underwent peroral resection. Independent Samples T-test, One Way ANOVA test and Chi-Square test were used to compare these two resection techniques. Cervical lymph node metastases were detected in 13 patients (27%) of 49 patients with early stage T1-T2 during postoperative histopathological evaluation. The difference was statistically significant in terms of recurrence in T2 tumors (p<0.05). The recurrence rate was 26% in patients who underwent peroral resection and 3.8% in patients who underwent pull-through resection with stage T1 and T2. Although there was no significant difference when comparing patient satisfaction, cosmetic appearance and postoperative complications, a significant difference was found for nasogastric tube and prophylactic tracheotomy applications in patients who underwent pull-through resection (p<0.05). Pull-through resection is oncologically safer than peroral resection at the early stage (T1, T2) of floor of the mouth and oral tongue

  13. Tongue (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The tongue is mainly composed of muscles. It is covered with a mucous membrane. Small nodules of tissue (papillae) cover the upper surface of the tongue. Between the papillae are the taste buds, which ...

  14. Inhibition of mTOR/eIF4E by anti-viral drug ribavirin effectively enhances the effects of paclitaxel in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dai, Dehua; Chen, Hujie; Tang, Jing; Tang, Yi

    2017-01-22

    Upregulation of eIF4E is associated with poor clinical outcome in many human cancers and represents a potential therapeutic target. However, the function of eIF4E remains unknown in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC). In this work, we show that ribavirin, an anti-viral drug, effectively augments sensitivity of OTSCC cells to paclitaxel via inhibiting mTOR/eIF4E signaling pathway. Ribavirin dose-dependently inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in SCC-9 and CAL27 cells. Combination of ribavirin and paclitaxel are more effective in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis in OTSCC cells. Importantly, the in vivo efficacy of ribavirin and its synergism with paclitaxel is confirmed by two independent OTSCC xenograft mouse models. Mechanistically, ribavirin significantly decreases mTOR/eIF4E signaling pathway in OTSCC cells via suppressing phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR, 4EBP1 and eIF4E. Overexpression of the phosphor-mimetic form of eIF4E (eIF4E S209D) but not the nonphosphorylatable form (eIF4E S209A) reverses the effects of ribavirin, confirming that eIF4E inhibition is the mechanism of action of ribavirin in OTSCC cells. In addition, eIF4E depletion significantly enhances the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of paclitaxel, demonstrating the critical role of eIF4E in OTSCC cell response to paclitaxel. Our work is the first to demonstrate the efficacy of ribavirin as a single agent and synergism as combination with paclitaxel in OTSCC in vitro and in vivo. Our findings also demonstrate the therapeutic value of inhibiting eIF4E in OTSCC treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Risk for oral cancer from smokeless tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Janbaz, Khalid Hussain; Basser, Hibba Tul; Bokhari, Tanveer Hussain; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco products which are used in a way other than smoking are known as smokeless tobacco. The most common smokeless tobaccos are chewing tobacco, naswar, snuff, snus, gutka, and topical tobacco paste. Any product which contains tobacco is not safe for human health. There are more than twenty-five compounds in smokeless tobacco which have cancer causing activity. Use of smokeless tobacco has been linked with risk of oral cancer. Smokeless tobacco contains tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs), polonium, formaldehyde, cadmium, lead, and benzo[a]pyrene, which are carcinogenic agents. Although there is presence of some compounds, carotenoids and phenolic compounds, that have cancer inhibiting properties, they are in low concentrations. Dry snuff use is linked with higher relative risks, while the use of other smokeless tobacco is of intermediate risk. Moist snuff and chewing tobacco have a very low risk for oral cancer. Therefore, from this review article, it was concluded that smokeless tobacco has risk for oral cancer – either low, medium or high depending on the balance between cancer causing agents and cancer inhibiting agents. PMID:25520574

  16. Risk for oral cancer from smokeless tobacco.

    PubMed

    Janbaz, Khalid Hussain; Qadir, M Imran; Basser, Hibba Tul; Bokhari, Tanveer Hussain; Ahmad, Bashir

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco products which are used in a way other than smoking are known as smokeless tobacco. The most common smokeless tobaccos are chewing tobacco, naswar, snuff, snus, gutka, and topical tobacco paste. Any product which contains tobacco is not safe for human health. There are more than twenty-five compounds in smokeless tobacco which have cancer causing activity. Use of smokeless tobacco has been linked with risk of oral cancer. Smokeless tobacco contains tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs), polonium, formaldehyde, cadmium, lead, and benzo[a]pyrene, which are carcinogenic agents. Although there is presence of some compounds, carotenoids and phenolic compounds, that have cancer inhibiting properties, they are in low concentrations. Dry snuff use is linked with higher relative risks, while the use of other smokeless tobacco is of intermediate risk. Moist snuff and chewing tobacco have a very low risk for oral cancer. Therefore, from this review article, it was concluded that smokeless tobacco has risk for oral cancer - either low, medium or high depending on the balance between cancer causing agents and cancer inhibiting agents.

  17. Yellow Tongue

    MedlinePlus

    ... related to another medical condition. Medical treatment for yellow tongue usually isn't necessary. If tongue discoloration bothers you, try gently brushing your tongue with a solution that is 1 part hydrogen peroxide and 5 parts water once a day. Rinse your mouth ...

  18. Differential mechanisms of CDKN2A (p16) alteration in oral tongue squamous cell carcinomas and correlation with patient outcome.

    PubMed

    Lim, Annette M; Do, Hongdo; Young, Richard J; Wong, Stephen Q; Angel, Christopher; Collins, Marnie; Takano, Elena A; Corry, June; Wiesenfeld, David; Kleid, Stephen; Sigston, Elizabeth; Lyons, Bernard; Fox, Stephen B; Rischin, Danny; Dobrovic, Alexander; Solomon, Benjamin

    2014-08-15

    CDKN2A (p16) disruption is reported as a frequent event in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas that confers poor prognosis. We investigated the frequency of different potential mechanisms of CDKN2A inactivation in oral tongue squamous cell carcinomas (OTSCC) and their impact on patient outcome. From a cohort of 153 OTSCC patients, 131 formalin fixed paraffin embedded blocks of pre-treatment primary tumours were suitable for further molecular analysis. We assessed CDKN2A (p16) levels by immunohistochemistry (IHC), promoter methylation status by methylation-sensitive high resolution melting, mutation status by Sanger sequencing, gene copy number variation by fluorescence in situ hybridisation, and correlated these with patient outcome. We found that the majority of OTSCC did not overexpress p16 (110/116, 95%), assessed by IHC. The frequency of CDKN2A mutations was 20% (21/103), homozygous loss was 7% (7/97), hemizygous loss 31% (30/97), and promoter methylation was 18% (20/113). We found no evidence of these mechanisms in 24/106 (23%) p16 IHC negative tumours. No significant correlation was identified between any potential mechanism of CDKN2A inactivation and clinical features, including smoking status and age. There was a non-significant trend for worse overall survival for p16 IHC negative patients versus positive patients (HR = 1.81, 95% CI = 0.44-7.47, p = 0.40). No relationship was found between mechanisms of CDKN2A disruption and patient outcome. In conclusion, we demonstrate that CDKN2A alteration is a frequent event in OTSCC tumourigenesis. However, no correlation was identified between different potential mechanisms of CDKN2A disruption and clinical characteristics or patient outcome. © 2014 UICC.

  19. Galectin-3 accelerates the progression of oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma via a Wnt/β-catenin-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ping; Chen, Shu-Wei; Zhuang, Shi-Min; Li, Huan; Song, Ming

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the clinicopathological significance and mechanism of action of galectin-3 in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC). Here, the expression of galectin-3 was quantified in OTSCC (n = 68) and paired OTSCC and normal surrounding tissues (n = 10) using immunohistochemical staining. Tca8113 OTSCC cells were transfected with a plasmid expressing galectin-3 cDNA or siRNA against galectin-3. Cell proliferation, migration and invasion were measured using the MTT assay, Matrigel-coated Transwell migration assay and wound healing assay. The effect of galectin-3 on the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) were investigated using a plasmid expressing the Wnt antagonist dickkopf 1 (DKK1) and Western blotting. Galectin-3 was expressed at significantly higher levels in OTSCC than the normal adjacent tissues; galectin-3 expression correlated strongly with pathological stage, pathological grade and lymph node invasion in OTSCC. Overexpression of galectin-3 promoted Tca8113 cell proliferation, migration and invasion, upregulated Wnt protein expression, activated β-catenin and induced the EMT; knockdown of galectin-3 had the opposite effects. Co-transfection of Tca8113 cells overexpressing galectin-3 with the Wnt antagonist DKK1 reduced the ability of galectin-3 to increase cell proliferation, migration and invasion, reduced upregulation of Wnt, inhibited β-catenin activation and abrogated the EMT, demonstrating that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway mediated the effects of galectin-3. Galectin-3 plays an important role in the progression of OTSCC via activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  20. Chemoprevention of oral cancer by lyophilized strawberries.

    PubMed

    Casto, Bruce C; Knobloch, Thomas J; Galioto, Rebecca L; Yu, Zhangsheng; Accurso, Brent T; Warner, Blake M

    2013-11-01

    Oral cancer represents approximately 2.5% of all cancers in the United States, with five- and 10-year survival rates of 62% and 51%. In the present study, lyophilized strawberries (LS) were evaluated for their potential to inhibit tumorigenesis in the hamster cheek pouch (HCP) model of oral cancer and for their ability to modify expression of several genes relevant to oral cancer development. HCPs were painted three times a week for six weeks with 0.2% 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA). Hamsters were given 5% or 10% LS in their diet prior to, during, and after, or only after carcinogen treatment. Animals were sacrificed 12 weeks from the beginning of DMBA treatment and the number of total lesions and tumors was determined. A significant difference (p<0.01-0.04) in the number of tumors was found between the LS-treated groups and the carcinogen controls. Histological examination of HCPs revealed a significant reduction in mild and severe dysplasia following 12 weeks of treatment with LS. Molecular analysis revealed that genes related to tumor development were modulated by LS. These experiments support previous studies in HCP that demonstrated a chemopreventive activity by black raspberries and show, to our knowledge for the first time, that strawberries can inhibit tumor formation in an animal model of oral cancer.

  1. Chemoprevention of Oral Cancer by Lyophilized Strawberries

    PubMed Central

    Casto, Bruce C.; Knobloch, Thomas J.; Galioto, Rebecca L.; Yu, Zhangsheng; Accurso, Brent T.; Warner, Blake M.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim Oral cancer represents approximately 2.5% of all cancer in the United States, with five- and 10-year survival rates of 62% and 51%. In the present study, lyophilized strawberries (LS) were evaluated for their potential to inhibit tumorigenesis in the hamster cheek pouch (HCP) model of oral cancer and for their ability to modify expression of several genes relevant to oral cancer development. Materials and Methods HCPs were painted three times a week for six weeks with 0.2% 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA). Hamsters were given 5% LS or 10% LS in their diet prior to, during, and after, or only after carcinogen treatment. Animals were sacrificed 12 weeks from the beginning of DMBA treatment and the number of total lesions and tumors determined. Results A significant difference (p-value <0.01–0.04) in the number of tumors was found between the LS-treated groups and the carcinogen controls. Histological examination of HCPs revealed a significant reduction in mild and severe dysplasia following 12 weeks of treatment with LS. Molecular analysis revealed that genes related to tumor development were modulated by LS. Conclusions These experiments support previous studies in HCPs that demonstrated a chemopreventive activity by black raspberries and show, to our knowledge for the first time, that strawberries can inhibit tumor formation in an animal model of oral cancer. PMID:24222110

  2. Ketorolac salt is a newly discovered DDX3 inhibitor to treat oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Sabindra K.; Routray, Samapika; Veeramachaneni, Ganesh Kumar; Dash, Rupesh; Botlagunta, Mahendran

    2015-01-01

    DDX3 belongs to DEAD box RNA helicase family and is involved in the progression of several types of cancer. In this work, we employed a High Throughput Virtual screening approach to identify bioactive compounds against DDX3 from ZINC natural database. Ketorolac salt was selected based on its binding free energy less than or equals to −5 Kcal/mol with reference to existing synthetic DDX3 inhibitors and strong hydrogen bond interactions as similar to crystallized DDX3 protein (2I4I). The anti-cancer activity of Ketorolac salt against DDX3 was tested using oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines. This compound significantly down regulated the expression of DDX3 in human OSCC line (H357) and the half maximal growth inhibitory concentration (IC50) of Ketorolac salt in H357 cell line is 2.6 µM. Ketorolac salt also inhibited the ATP hydrolysis by directly interacting with DDX3. More importantly, we observed decreased number of neoplastic tongue lesions and reduced lesion severity in Ketorolac salt treated groups in a carcinogen induced tongue tumor mouse model. Taken together, our result demonstrates that Ketorolac salt is a newly discovered bioactive compound against DDX3 and this compound can be used as an ideal drug candidate to treat DDX3 associated oral cancer. PMID:25918862

  3. Ketorolac salt is a newly discovered DDX3 inhibitor to treat oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sabindra K; Routray, Samapika; Veeramachaneni, Ganesh Kumar; Dash, Rupesh; Botlagunta, Mahendran

    2015-04-28

    DDX3 belongs to DEAD box RNA helicase family and is involved in the progression of several types of cancer. In this work, we employed a High Throughput Virtual screening approach to identify bioactive compounds against DDX3 from ZINC natural database. Ketorolac salt was selected based on its binding free energy less than or equals to -5 Kcal/mol with reference to existing synthetic DDX3 inhibitors and strong hydrogen bond interactions as similar to crystallized DDX3 protein (2I4I). The anti-cancer activity of Ketorolac salt against DDX3 was tested using oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines. This compound significantly down regulated the expression of DDX3 in human OSCC line (H357) and the half maximal growth inhibitory concentration (IC50) of Ketorolac salt in H357 cell line is 2.6 µM. Ketorolac salt also inhibited the ATP hydrolysis by directly interacting with DDX3. More importantly, we observed decreased number of neoplastic tongue lesions and reduced lesion severity in Ketorolac salt treated groups in a carcinogen induced tongue tumor mouse model. Taken together, our result demonstrates that Ketorolac salt is a newly discovered bioactive compound against DDX3 and this compound can be used as an ideal drug candidate to treat DDX3 associated oral cancer.

  4. Identification of genes associated with tongue cancer in patients with a history of tobacco and/or alcohol use

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yin; Fu, Dongna; Xu, Chengbi; Yang, Jingpu; Wang, Zonggui

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify genes associated with tongue cancer in patients with a history of tobacco and/or alcohol use. Microarray dataset GSE42023, including 10 tissue samples of tongue cancer from patients with a history of tobacco and/or alcohol use (habit group) and 11 tissue samples of non-habit-associated tongue cancer (non-habit group), were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) between the habit and non-habit groups were identified using the Linear Models for Microarray Data software package. The enrichment functions and pathways of these genes were subsequently predicted using Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis. Transcription factors (TFs) and tumor-associated genes (TAGs) were selected from the DEGs using the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements database and the TAG database, respectively. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks for DEGs were constructed using Cytoscape. In addition, functional module analysis was performed using BioNet. This analysis identified 642 DEGs between the habit and non-habit groups, including 200 upregulated and 442 downregulated genes. The majority of upregulated DEGs were functionally enriched in the regulation of apoptosis and the calcium signaling pathway. The majority of downregulated DEGs were functionally enriched in fat cell differentiation and the adipocytokine signaling pathway. In addition, 31 TFs and 42 TAGs were identified from the DEGs. Furthermore, this analysis demonstrated that certain DEGs, including AKT serine/threonine kinase 1 (AKT1), E1A binding protein p300 (EP300), erb-b2 receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (ERBB2) and epiregulin (EREG), had high connectivity degrees in the PPI networks and/or functional modules. Overall, DEGs in a functional module, such as AKT1, EP300, ERBB2 and EREG, may serve important roles in the development of tongue cancer in patients with a history of tobacco and/or alcohol use. These DEGs are

  5. [A study on human tongue cancer cells' proliferation affected by Lactobacillus acidophilus].

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoyan; Chen, Jun; Che, Tuanjie; Bai, Decheng; He, Xiangyi

    2012-02-01

    To study the effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acidophilus) on the proliferation and cell cycle distribution of human tongue cancer cells (Tca8113 cells). In vitro cultivated human Tca8113 cells were treated by L. acidophilus supernatant, inactivated bacilli, cell free extracts and normal culture medium respectively, which were 1, 4, 16-fold(s) dilutelly, to investigate the proliferous effects of Tca8113 cells using of inverted microscope, cell counting, sulforhodamine B (SRB) and flow cytometry. The free radicals and Ca2+ in Tca8113 cells were also studied by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). At the 48th hour after adding different L. acidophilus components, the Tca8113 cells changed in shape from the diamond-like, polygonal and slabs into the elongated form. In the condition of different times and different culture concentrations, the proliferation of Tca8113 cells was significantly inhibited by L. acidophilus components, which enhanced as the time prolonged and the concentrations of each L. acidophilus components increased according to the cell counting and the SRB experimental analysis. The cell proliferation index (CPI) was significantly reduced (P<0.01). The free radicals and Ca2+ in Tca8113 cells under the effect of each L. acidophilus components for 48 h indicated an obviously rising (P<0.01). L. acidophilus restrains the proliferation of Tca8113 cells, which might be due to the increase in quantity of free radicals and Ca2+ in Tca8113 cells, and might be resulted from the release of metabolic products of L. acidophilus.

  6. Oral cryotherapy reduced oral mucositis in patients having cancer treatments.

    PubMed

    Spivakovsky, Sylvia

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, CANCERLIT, CINAHL, the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of oral cryotherapy in patients with cancer receiving treatment compared to usual care, no treatment or other interventions to prevent mucositis. The primary outcome was incidence of mucositis and its severity.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers carried out study assessment and data extraction independently. Treatment effect for continuous data was calculated using mean values and standard deviations and expressed as mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval. Risk ratio (RR) was calculated for dichotomous data. Meta-analysis was performed.ResultsFourteen studies with 1280 participants were included. Subgroup analysis was undertaken according to the main cancer treatment type. Cryotherapy reduced the risk of developing mucositis by 39% (RR = 0.61; 95%CI, 0.52 to 0.72) on patients treated with fluorouracil (5FU). For melphalan-based treatment the risk of developing mucositis was reduced by 41% (RR =0.59; 95%CI, 0.35 to 1.01). Oral cryotherapy was shown to be safe, with very low rates of minor adverse effects, such as headaches, chills, numbness/taste disturbance and tooth pain. This appears to contribute to the high rates of compliance seen in the included studies.ConclusionsThere is confidence that oral cryotherapy leads to a large reduction in oral mucositis in adults treated with 5FU. Although there is less certainty on the size of the reduction on patients treated with melphalan, it is certain there is reduction of severe mucositis.

  7. Bionutrition and oral cancer in humans.

    PubMed

    Enwonwu, C O; Meeks, V I

    1995-01-01

    Tobacco (smoking and smokeless) use and excessive consumption of alcohol are considered the main risk factors for oral cancer (ICD9 140-149). Conspicuous national and international variations in oral cancer incidence and mortality rates, as well as observations in migrant populations, raise the possibility that diet and nutritional status could be an important etiologic factor in oral carcinogenesis. As shown in this report, abuse of alcohol and tobacco has serious nutritional implications for the host, and generates increased production of reactive free radicals as well as eliciting immunosuppression. Maintenance of optimal competence of the immune system is critical for cancer surveillance. Active oxygen species and other reactive free radicals mediate phenotypic and genotypic alterations that lead from mutation to neoplasia. Consequently, the most widely used chemopreventive agents against oral cancer (e.g., vitamins A, E, C, and beta-carotene) are anti-oxidants/free radical scavengers. These anti-oxidants, both natural and synthetic, neutralize metabolic products (including reactive oxygen species), interfere with activation of procarcinogens, prevent binding of carcinogens to DNA, inhibit chromosome aberrations, restrain replication of the transformed cell, suppress actions of cancer promoters, and may even induce regression of precancerous oral lesions such as leukoplakia and erythroplakia. Malnutrition is characterized by marked tissue depletion of anti-oxidant nutrients, including GSH (gamma-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine), a key cellular anti-oxidant as well as a modulator of T-cell activation. GSH or its precursor cysteine inhibits activation of the nuclear transcription factor kB(NFkB), and has been shown to be protective against chemically induced oral cancer and leukoplakia. Alcohol-, tobacco-, and/or malnutrition-induced immunosuppression promotes impaired salivary gland function and oral mucosal immunity, a prominent reduction in the number of helper CD4

  8. Oral cancer: Current role of radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shao-Hui; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2013-03-01

    The term oral cavity cancer (OSCC) constitutes cancers of the mucosal surfaces of the lips, floor of mouth, oral tongue, buccal mucosa, lower and upper gingiva, hard palate and retromolar trigone. Treatment approaches for OSCC include single management with surgery, radiotherapy [external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or brachytherapy], as well as adjuvant systemic therapy (chemotherapy and/or target agents); various combinations of these modalities may also be used depending on the disease presentation and pathological findings. The selection of sole or combined modality is based on various considerations that include disease control probability, the anticipated functional and cosmetic outcomes, tumor resectability, patient general condition, and availability of resources and expertise. For resectable OSCC, the mainstay of treatment is surgery, though same practitioners may advocate for the use of radiotherapy alone in selected "early" disease presentations or combined with chemotherapy in more locally advanced stage disease. In general, the latter is more commonly reserved for cases where surgery may be problematic. Thus, primary radiotherapy ± chemotherapy is usually reserved for patients unable to tolerate or who are otherwise unsuited for surgery. On the other hand, brachytherapy may be considered as a sole modality for early small primary tumor. It also has a role as an adjuvant to surgery in the setting of inadequate pathologically assessed resection margins, as does postoperative external beam radiotherapy ± chemotherapy, which is usually reserved for those with unfavorable pathological features. Brachytherapy can also be especially useful in the re-irradiation setting for persistent or recurrent disease or for a second primary arising within a previous radiation field. Biological agents targeting the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) have emerged as a potential modality in combination with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy and are currently under

  9. Cryotherapy for oral precancers and cancers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuan-Hang; Lin, Hung-Pin; Cheng, Shih-Jung; Sun, Andy; Chen, Hsin-Ming

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies have used cryotherapy for the treatment of oral precancers including oral leukoplakia (OL) and oral verrucous hyperplasia (OVH) as well as oral cancers including oral verrucous carcinoma (OVC) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Cryotherapy is a method that locally destroys lesional tissues by freezing in situ. It can be carried out by either an "open" or a "closed" system. Lesional tissues are destroyed mainly through disruption of cell membrane, cellular dehydration, enzyme and protein damage, cell swelling and rupture, thermal shock injury to cells, damage to vasculature, and immune-mediated cytotoxicity. Cryotherapy is used frequently for the treatment of OL lesions with promising results. It can also be used to treat OVH and OVC lesions. Because OVH and OVC lesions are usually fungating and bulky, a combination therapy of shave excision and cryotherapy is needed to achieve a complete regression of the lesion. OSCCs have also been treated by cryotherapy. However, cryotherapy is not the main-stream treatment modality for OSCCs. Cryotherapy seems suitable for treatment of thin or relatively thick plaque-typed lesions such as OL lesions. By careful selection of patients, cryotherapy is a simple, safe, easy, conservative, and acceptable treatment modality for certain benign oral lesions and oral precancers.

  10. Phase 1b Food Based Modulation of Biomarkers in Human Tissues at High-Risk for Oral Cancer.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-04

    Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  11. Mortality in tongue cancer patients treated by curative surgery: a retrospective cohort study from CGRD

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Shao; Lai, Chia-Hsuan; Lee, Chuan-Pin; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Chen, Pau-Chung; Kang, Chung-Jan; Chang, Geng-He; Tsai, Yao-Te; Lu, Chang-Hsien; Chien, Chih-Yen; Young, Chi-Kuang; Fang, Ku-Hao; Liu, Chin-Jui; Yeh, Re-Ming A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Our study aimed to compare the outcomes of surgical treatment of tongue cancer patients in three different age groups. Methods From 2004 to 2013, we retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 1,712 patients who were treated in the four institutions constituting the Chang Gung Memorial Hospitals (CGMH). We divided and studied the patients in three age groups: Group 1, younger (<65 years); Group 2, young old (65 to <75); and Group 3, older old patients (≥75 years). Results Multivariate analyses determined the unfavorable, independent prognostic factors of overall survival to be male sex, older age, advanced stage, advanced T, N classifications, and surgery plus chemotherapy. No significant differences were found in adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of death in early-stage disease (stage I–II) among Group 1 (HR 1.0), Group 2 (HR 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) [0.87–2.34], p = 0.158), and Group 3 (HR 1.22, 95% CI [0.49–3.03], p = 0.664) patients. However, amongst advanced-stage patients (stage (III–IV)), Group 3 (HR 2.53, 95% CI [1.46–4.38], p  = 0.001) showed significantly worse survival than the other two groups after other variables were adjusted for. Fourteen out of 21 older old, advanced-staged patients finally died, and most of the mortalities were non-cancerogenic (9/14, 64.3%), and mostly occurred within one year (12/14, 85%) after cancer diagnosis. These non-cancer cause of death included underlying diseases in combination with infection, pneumonia, poor nutrition status, and trauma. Conclusions Our study showed that advanced T classification (T3–4), positive nodal metastasis (N1–3) and poorly differentiated tumor predicted poor survival for all patients. Outcome of early-stage patients (stage I–II) among three age groups were not significantly different. However, for advanced-stage patients (stage III–IV), the older old patients (≥75) had significantly worse survival than the other two patient groups. Therefore, for early

  12. A dynamic oral cancer field: unraveling the underlying biology and its clinical implication.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Ivy F L; Garnis, Cathie; Poh, Catherine F

    2009-11-01

    Oral cancer is a complex disease that is characterized by histologic and genetic heterogeneity. The evolution and progression of this disease is thought to result from the accumulation of alterations in molecular pathways. Although the oral cavity is accessible for routine screening of suspicious lesions, gene alterations are known to accrue in histologically normal tissues. Therefore, some cancer forerunners may remain undetected clinically or histologically. Recently emerging optical and molecular technologies have provided a powerful means for redefining the extent of the field of alteration. Often this means expanding upon regions detectable with standard white light approaches. In this report, we used a newly developed optical technique, direct fluorescence visualization, to define a contiguous field that extended beyond the margins of a clinically visible oral squamous cell carcinoma. Multiple biopsies were taken within this contiguous optically altered field. Genome alterations detected for each specimen were compared to define whether each lesion arose independently or as a consequence of a shared progenitor cell. Our results indicate that the field effect of oral cancer is extremely dynamic, with different genetic alterations present in different biopsies within a field. This case study also demonstrated that 2 genetically unrelated squamous cell carcinoma could be developed within 10 mm at the right lateral tongue of this patient. These findings provide evidence for the importance to implement optical technologies in defining surgical margins and support the use of whole genome technologies in the diagnosis of clonal versus independent lesions of the oral cavity, which may have implications on treatment strategies.

  13. Simulation for training in oral cancer biopsy: A surgical model and feedback from GDPs

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Juan; Varela-Centelles, Pablo; Cerero-Lapiedra, Rocío; Seoane-Romero, Juan M.; Diz, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To describe a new bench model for oral precancer/cancer biopsy training and to assess its effectiveness in terms of trainees’ perception. Study design: Cross-sectional, descriptive, performed on 424 general dental practitioners (GDP) who undertook biopsies on a pig tongue. The participants were assessed by direct observation for 2.5 hours using specific check-lists and by means of a self-applied questionnaire. Results: The workshop was perceived as “very interesting” even by those with previous surgical experience (Xi - Xj = 0.07; 95%CI= -0.20-0.09). Most GDPs considered themselves able to undertake oral biopsies on real patients after the workshop. Those who had previously received theoretical continuous education courses on oral biopsy scored higher values within the group (Xi - Xj = 0.20; 95%CI= 0.04-0.37). Conclusions: There is a need for including clinical abilities workshops when instructing on oral biopsy techniques. More studies are needed to validate the procedure and to address cognitive and communication skills. Key words:Models, animal, education, dental, continuing, biopsy, oral cancer, oral surgical procedures. PMID:23385492

  14. Granular cell tumor of the oral cavity; a case series including a case of metachronous occurrence in the tongue and the lung.

    PubMed

    van de Loo, Sander; Thunnissen, Erik; Postmus, Pieter; van der Waal, Isaäc

    2015-01-01

    The granular cell tumor (GCT) is a rare, benign tumor that most commonly occurs in the oral cavity, particularly in the anterior part of the tongue. In this study the experience with 16 patients with a GCT observed in a single Institution will be discussed. Although no radicality has been obtained in most cases, recurrences are rare. In one patient, a recurrence was noted four years after excision of the primary. In the same patient a pulmonary lesion occurred five years after excision of the recurrence in the oral cavity, most likely representing an example of metachronous occurrence and not a distant metastasis. Since recurrences and metachronous lesions are rare, as are distant metastases, routine follow-up does not seem warranted in patients treated for a granular cell tumor of the oral cavity.

  15. Oral cancer risk factors in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Yakin, Muhammed; Gavidi, Ratu Osea; Cox, Brian; Rich, Alison

    2017-03-03

    Oral cancer constitutes the majority of head and neck cancers, which are the fifth most common malignancy worldwide, accounting for an estimated 984,430 cases in 2012. Between 2000 and 2010, there were 1,916 cases of OSCC in New Zealand with a male to female ratio of 1.85:1, and an age-standardised incidence rate of 42 persons per 1,000,000 population. This article presents an overview of the main risk factors for oral and oropharyngeal cancers and their prevalence in New Zealand. Alcohol consumption is the most prevalent risk factor in New Zealand, followed by tobacco. Given the high prevalence of these two risk factors and their synergistic effect, it is important for doctors and dentists to encourage smoking cessation in smokers and to recommend judicious alcohol intake. Research is needed to determine the prevalence of use of oral preparations of tobacco and water-pipe smoking in New Zealand, especially due to changing demography and increases in migrant populations. UV radiation is also an important risk factor. Further investigations are also needed to determine the prevalence of oral and oropharyngeal cancers attributable to oncogenic HPV infection.

  16. Oral Cancer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Русский) Oral Cancer English Рак полости рта - Русский (Russian) ... not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  17. Propolis in Dentistry and Oral Cancer Management

    PubMed Central

    S., Vagish Kumar L.

    2014-01-01

    Propolis, known as bee glue, is a wax-cum-resin substance, which is created out of a mix of buds from some trees with the substance secreted from the bee's glands. Its diverse chemical content is responsible for many valuable properties. Multiple applications of propolis have been studied and described in detail for centuries. However, currently available information on propolis is scarce. A literature search in the PubMed database was performed for English language articles, using the search terms propolis, oral health, dentistry, and oral cancer; no restrictions were used for publication dates. The aim of the article was to review propolis and its applications in dentistry including oral cancer. PMID:25006559

  18. Oral cancer presentation among Malay patients in hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan.

    PubMed

    Razak, Asmani Abdul; Saddki, Norkhafizah; Naing, Nyi Nyi; Abdullah, Nizam

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the characteristics of oral cancer among Malay patients in Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM), Kelantan. A retrospective record review was conducted from August to December 2006 in HUSM. Of 133 patients with oral cancer diagnosed from 1986 to 2005, 118 were Malay. Data on socio-demographic background, high-risk habits practiced, clinical and histological characteristics, and treatment profile of the patients were obtained. Malay patients with oral cancer were predominantly elderly, aged 60 years old and above (51.7%) at the time of diagnosis, with a mean age of 58.1 years (SD 16.81). Most patients were males (64.4%) and the majority of them were married (83.9%). More than half (58.5%) had been smokers, and of those who smoked, 89.9% were males. Some had a betel quid chewing habit (22.9%) but none ever consumed alcohol. The majority of the patients (77.1%) were diagnosed at stage IV. The tongue was the most usual site involved (37.3%) and squamous cell carcinoma was the most common histological type seen (75.4%). The prevalence of oral cancer among Malay patients in HUSM is high (88.7%). It is predominantly found in elderly males and the majority of cases present at advanced stage.

  19. Oral Contraceptives and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ... PubMed Abstract] Farges O, Ferreira N, Dokmak S. Changing trends in malignant transformation of hepatocellular adenoma. Gut 2011; ...

  20. Trends in oral cavity cancer incidence, mortality, survival and treatment in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Boukje A C; Brands, Marieke T; Geurts, Sandra M E; Merkx, Matthias A W; Roodenburg, Jan L N

    2016-08-01

    Information on epidemiology is essential to evaluate care for the growing group of oral cancer patients. We investigated trends in incidence, mortality and relative survival rates for oral cavity cancer (OCC) and its subsites in the Netherlands from 1991 to 2010, and relate these to changes in stage and treatment. Patient (age, sex), tumour (subsite, stage) and treatment characteristics of patients diagnosed with OCC (ICD-O-3: C02-C06) in 1991-2010 were extracted from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Incidence, mortality and 5-year relative survival rates over time are presented, as well as trends in type of treatment. The incidence of OCC increased with +1.2% (95%CI: +0.9%;+1.6%) per year: more strongly in women, stage I and IV disease, and in cancers of the tongue and gum. The mortality rate slightly rose (+0.8%, 95%CI: +0.3%;+1.3% per year), but differed by subsite. The 5-year relative survival improved from 57% in 1991-1995 to 62% in 2006-2010. The 5-year relative survival was better for women compared with men (64% and 55%, respectively), decreased with increasing stage, was the best for tongue cancer (63%) and the worst for cancer of the gum (56%) and floor of mouth cancer (55%). The relative excess risk of dying was higher for non-surgery-based treatments. Surgery was the main treatment option and the proportion of "surgery only" rose in stage I and III disease. The incidence and, to a lesser extent, mortality of OCC are increasing and therefore, even with slightly improving survival rates, OCC is an increasingly important health problem. © 2016 UICC.

  1. Oral cancer incidence and survival rates in the Republic of Ireland, 1994-2009.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hala; Sinnott, Sarah-Jo; Corcoran, Paul; Deady, Sandra; Sharp, Linda; Kabir, Zubair

    2016-12-20

    Oral cancer is a significant public health problem world-wide and exerts high economic, social, psychological, and physical burdens on patients, their families, and on their primary care providers. We set out to describe the changing trends in incidence and survival rates of oral cancer in Ireland between 1994 and 2009. National data on incident oral cancers [ICD 10 codes C01-C06] were obtained from the National Cancer Registry Ireland from 1994 to 2009. We estimated annual percentage change (APC) in oral cancer incidence during 1994-2009 using joinpoint regression software (version 4.2.0.2). The lifetime risk of oral cancer to age 79 was estimated using Irish incidence and population data from 2007 to 2009. Survival rates were also examined using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazard models to explore the influence of several demographic/lifestyle covariates with follow-up to end 2012. Data were obtained on 2,147 oral cancer incident cases. Men accounted for two-thirds of oral cancer cases (n = 1,430). Annual rates in men decreased significantly during 1994-2001 (APC = -4.8 %, 95 % CI: -8.7 to -0.7) and then increased moderately (APC = 2.3 %, 95 % CI: -0.9 to 5.6). In contrast, annual incidence increased significantly in women throughout the study period (APC = 3.2 %, 95 % CI: 1.9 to 4.6). There was an elevated risk of death among oral cancer patients who were: older than 60 years of age; smokers; unemployed or retired; those living in the most deprived areas; and those whose tumour was sited in the base of the tongue. Being married and diagnosed in more recent years were associated with reduced risk of death. Oral cancer increased significantly in both sexes between 1999 and 2009 in Ireland. Our analyses demonstrate the influence of measured factors such as smoking, time of diagnosis and age on observed trends. Unmeasured factors such as alcohol use, HPV and dietary factors may also be contributing to increased trends. Several of

  2. It's not just an "oral cancer" exam.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michaell A; Sankar, Vidya

    2013-05-01

    The early identification and treatment of cancer of the head and neck, including oropharyngeal cancer (OPC), is associated with an improved survival rate. Specific efforts to promote screening to improve the early detection of OPC have come under scrutiny, largely due to the low prevalence of the disease. However, screening the patient for OPC does not occur as an isolated event in contemporary practice, but as an integral component of the hard and soft tissue examination to determine the totality of the patient's oral health. Three patient vignettes are presented to demonstrate that, regardless the outcome of the debate over OPC screening, the oral health care professional who performs a thorough examination of the head and neck is often in the best position to discover early cancer affecting the head and neck.

  3. Erlotinib and the Risk of Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    William, William N.; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki; Lee, J. Jack; Mao, Li; Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Lin, Heather Y.; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Martin, Jack W.; Lingen, Mark W.; Boyle, Jay O.; Shin, Dong M.; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Shinn, Nancy; Heymach, John V.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Tang, Ximing; Kim, Edward S.; Saintigny, Pierre; Blair, Elizabeth A.; Meiller, Timothy; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Myers, Jeffrey; El-Naggar, Adel; Lippman, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Standard molecularly based strategies to predict and/or prevent oral cancer development in patients with oral premalignant lesions (OPLs) are lacking. OBJECTIVE To test if the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib would reduce oral cancer development in patients with high-risk OPLs defined by specific loss of heterozygosity (LOH) profiles. Secondary objectives included prospective determination of LOH as a prognostic marker in OPLs. DESIGN The Erlotinib Prevention of Oral Cancer (EPOC) study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-bind trial. Accrual occurred from November 2006 through July 2012, with a median follow-up time of 35 months in an ambulatory care setting in 5 US academic referral institutions. Patients with OPLs were enrolled in the protocol, and each underwent LOH profiling (N = 379); they were classified as high-risk (LOH-positive) or low-risk (LOH-negative) patients based on their LOH profiles and oral cancer history. The randomized sample consisted of 150 LOH-positive patients. INTERVENTIONS Oral erlotinib treatment (150mg/d) or placebo for 12 months. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Oral cancer–free survival (CFS). RESULTS A total of 395 participants were classified with LOH profiles, and 254 were classified LOH positive. Of these, 150 (59%) were randomized, 75 each to the placebo and erlotinib groups. The 3-year CFS rates in placebo- and erlotinib-treated patients were 74%and 70%, respectively (hazard ratio [HR], 1.27; 95%CI, 0.68–2.38; P = .45). The 3-year CFS was significantly lower for LOH-positive compared with LOH-negative groups (74%vs 87%, HR, 2.19; 95%CI, 1.25–3.83; P = .01). Increased EGFR gene copy number correlated with LOH-positive status (P < .001) and lower CFS (P = .01). The EGFR gene copy number was not predictive of erlotinib efficacy. Erlotinib-induced skin rash was associated with improved CFS (P = .01). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE In this trial, LOH was validated as a marker of oral cancer risk and

  4. Age Effects and Temporal Trends in HPV-Related and HPV-Unrelated Oral Cancer in the United States: A Multistage Carcinogenesis Modeling Analysis.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Andrew F; Eisenberg, Marisa C; Meza, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Differences in prognosis in HPV-positive and HPV-negative oral (oropharyngeal and oral cavity) squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) and increasing incidence of HPV-related cancers have spurred interest in demographic and temporal trends in OSCC incidence. We leverage multistage clonal expansion (MSCE) models coupled with age-period-cohort (APC) epidemiological models to analyze OSCC data in the SEER cancer registry (1973-2012). MSCE models are based on the initiation-promotion-malignant conversion paradigm in carcinogenesis and allow for interpretation of trends in terms of biological mechanisms. APC models seek to differentiate between the temporal effects of age, period, and birth cohort on cancer risk. Previous studies have looked at the effect of period and cohort on tumor initiation, and we extend this to compare model fits of period and cohort effects on each of tumor initiation, promotion, and malignant conversion rates. HPV-related, HPV-unrelated except oral tongue, and HPV-unrelated oral tongue sites are best described by placing period and cohort effects on the initiation rate. HPV-related and non-oral-tongue HPV-unrelated cancers have similar promotion rates, suggesting similar tumorigenesis dynamics once initiated. Estimates of promotion rates at oral tongue sites are lower, corresponding to a longer sojourn time; this finding is consistent with the hypothesis of an etiology distinct from HPV or alcohol and tobacco use. Finally, for the three subsite groups, men have higher initiation rates than women of the same race, and black people have higher promotion than white people of the same sex. These differences explain part of the racial and sex differences in OSCC incidence.

  5. Oral contraceptives, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    La Vecchia, Carlo; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-03-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus is the key determinant of cervical cancer, but other risk factors interact with it to define individual risk. Among these, there is oral contraceptive (OC) use. A quantitative review of the link between OCs and cervical cancer was performed. Long-term (>5 year) current or recent OC use has been related to an about two-fold excess risk of cervical cancer. Such an excess risk, however, levels off after stopping use, and approaches unity 10 or more years after stopping. The public health implications of OC use for cervical cancer are limited. In any case, such implications are greater in middle-income and low-income countries, as well as in central and eastern Europe and Latin America, where cervical cancer screening and control remain inadequate.

  6. Knowledge and attitudes of Saudi dental undergraduates on oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Kujan, Omar; Alzoghaibi, Ibrahim; Azzeghaiby, Saleh; Altamimi, Mohammed Alsakran; Tarakji, Bassel; Hanouneh, Salah; Idress, Majdy; Alenzi, Faris Q; Iqbal, Mazhar; Taifour, Shahama

    2014-12-01

    Oral cancer awareness among future dental practitioners may have an impact on the early detection and prevention of oral cancer. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken to assess the current knowledge of future Saudi dentists on oral cancer and their opinions on oral cancer prevention. A pretested questionnaire was sent to 550 undergraduate dental students in the fourth, fifth, and sixth year of the Al-Farabi College for Dentistry and Nursing, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Questions relating to knowledge of oral cancer, risk factors, and opinions on oral cancer prevention and practices were posed. Four hundred seventy-nine students returned the questionnaire (87.1 %). Eighty-one percent of respondents correctly answered questions relating to oral cancer awareness. Eighty-seven percent of respondents felt confident in performing a systematic oral examination to detect changes consistent with oral malignancy. Interestingly, 57 % of respondents had seen the use of oral cancer diagnostics aids. Thirty-seven percent of respondents felt inadequately trained to provide tobacco and alcohol cessation advice. There is a need to reinforce the undergraduate dental curriculum with regards to oral cancer education; particularly in its prevention and early detection. Incorporating the use of oral cancer diagnostic aids should be made mandatory.

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  8. Treatment Options for Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  9. General Information about Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  10. Treatment Options by Stage (Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... team of doctors who are expert in treating head and neck cancer. Treatment will be overseen by a medical ... Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Oral Complications of Chemotherapy and Head/Neck Radiation Head and Neck Cancers Tobacco (includes help ...

  11. Mutagenesis and carcinogenesis induced by dibenzo[a,l]pyrene in the mouse oral cavity: a potential new model for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Joseph B.; Kosinska, Wieslawa; Zhao, Zhong-Lin; Chen, Kun-Ming; Aliaga, Cesar; DelTondo, Joseph; Cooper, Timothy; Sun, Yuan-Wan; Zhang, Shang-Min; Jiang, Kun; Bruggeman, Richard; Sharma, Arun K.; Amin, Shantu; Ahn, Kwangmi; El-Bayoumy, Karam

    2013-01-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity is a serious disease, affecting about 30,000 individuals in US annually. There are several animal models of oral cancer, but each has certain disadvantages. As a new model, we investigated whether topical application of the tobacco smoke carcinogen, dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P) is mutagenic and carcinogenic in the oral cavity of the B6C3F1 lacI and B6C3F1 mouse, respectively. B6C3F1 lacI mice received DB[a,l]P (0, 3, 6, 12 nmol) 3× per week. B6C3F1 mice received the same doses and also 24 nmol. At 38 weeks mutagenesis was measured in oral tissues in lacI mice. For the high dose group, the mutant fraction (MF) in upper mucosa and tongue increased about twofold relative to that in vehicle-alone. The increases were statistically significant. The mutational profile in the DB[a,l]P-induced mutants was compared with that induced by benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in oral tissue. BaP is mutagenic in many tissues when administered by gavage. The mutational profile for DB[a,l]P was more similar to that reported for p53 mutations in head and neck cancers than was that of BaP. At 47 weeks, oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) were found in 31% of the high-dose B6C3F1 group. Elevations of p53 and COX-2 protein were observed in tumor and dysplastic tissue. As DB[a,l]P induces mutations and tumors in the oral cavity, and has a mutational profile in oral tissue similar to that found in p53 in human OSCC, the treatment protocol described here may represent a new and relevant model for cancer of the oral cavity. PMID:21815141

  12. Mutagenesis and carcinogenesis induced by dibenzo[a,l]pyrene in the mouse oral cavity: a potential new model for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Guttenplan, Joseph B; Kosinska, Wieslawa; Zhao, Zhong-Lin; Chen, Kun-Ming; Aliaga, Cesar; DelTondo, Joseph; Cooper, Timothy; Sun, Yuan-Wan; Zhang, Shang-Min; Jiang, Kun; Bruggeman, Richard; Sharma, Arun K; Amin, Shantu; Ahn, Kwangmi; El-Bayoumy, Karam

    2012-06-15

    Cancer of the oral cavity is a serious disease, affecting about 30,000 individuals in US annually. There are several animal models of oral cancer, but each has certain disadvantages. As a new model, we investigated whether topical application of the tobacco smoke carcinogen, dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P) is mutagenic and carcinogenic in the oral cavity of the B6C3F1 lacI and B6C3F1 mouse, respectively. B6C3F1 lacI mice received DB[a,l]P (0, 3, 6, 12 nmol) 3× per week. B6C3F1 mice received the same doses and also 24 nmol. At 38 weeks mutagenesis was measured in oral tissues in lacI mice. For the high dose group, the mutant fraction (MF) in upper mucosa and tongue increased about twofold relative to that in vehicle-alone. The increases were statistically significant. The mutational profile in the DB[a,l]P-induced mutants was compared with that induced by benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in oral tissue. BaP is mutagenic in many tissues when administered by gavage. The mutational profile for DB[a,l]P was more similar to that reported for p53 mutations in head and neck cancers than was that of BaP. At 47 weeks, oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) were found in 31% of the high-dose B6C3F1 group. Elevations of p53 and COX-2 protein were observed in tumor and dysplastic tissue. As DB[a,l]P induces mutations and tumors in the oral cavity, and has a mutational profile in oral tissue similar to that found in p53 in human OSCC, the treatment protocol described here may represent a new and relevant model for cancer of the oral cavity. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  13. Epidemiology of oral cancer in Asia in the past decade--an update (2000-2012).

    PubMed

    Krishna Rao, Sree Vidya; Mejia, Gloria; Roberts-Thomson, Kaye; Logan, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of oral cancers (OC) is high in Asian countries, especially in South and Southeast Asia. Asian distinct cultural practices such as betel-quid chewing, and varying patterns of tobacco and alcohol use are important risk factors that predispose to cancer of the oral cavity. The aim of this review is to provide an update on epidemiology of OC between 2000 and 2012. A literature search for this review was conducted on Medline for articles on OC from Asian countries. Some of the articles were also hand searched using Google. High incidence rates were reported from developing nations like India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Taiwan and Sri Lanka. While an increasing trend has been observed in Pakistan, Taiwan and Thailand, a decreasing trend is seen in Philippines and Sri Lanka. The mean age of occurrence of cancer in different parts of oral cavity is usually between 51-55 years in most countries. The tongue is the leading site among oral cancers in India. The next most common sites in Asian countries include the buccal mucosa and gingiva. The 5 year survival rate has been low for OC, despite improvements in diagnosis and treatment. Tobacco chewing, smoking and alcohol are the main reasons for the increasing incidence rates. Low socioeconomic status and diet low in nutritional value lacking vegetables and fruits contribute towards the risk. In addition, viral infections, such as HPV and poor oral hygiene, are other important risk factors. Hence, it is important to control OC by screening for early diagnosis and controlling tobacco and alcohol use. It is also necessary to have cancer surveillance at the national-level to collect and utilise data for cancer prevention and control programs.

  14. Speech Outcome in Oral Cancer Patients – Pre- and Post-operative Evaluation: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Saravanan, Gomathi; Ranganathan, Venkatesan; Gandhi, Anitha; Jaya, V

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The tongue plays a major role in articulation. Speech outcome depends on the site of lesion, extent of resection, and flexibility of the remaining structures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the speech outcome measures such as sounds that are misarticulated and speech intelligibility and its connection to tumor site before and after surgery. Methodology: Totally, 24 (12 pre- and 12 post-operative patients) patients who had buccal and tongue cancer underwent speech intelligibility rating and articulation screening. Result: The results show that the speech outcome is worse in postoperative patients when compared to preoperative patients. The articulation errors produced by tongue cancer patients were more than the errors produced in buccal cancer patients. The type of reconstruction also affects the speech outcome. Conclusion: The perceptual analysis of oral cancer patients showed specific articulation issues and reduced intelligibility of speech in regards to site of lesion and type of reconstruction surgery. To reduce the speech errors, effective rehabilitation is recommended. A comprehensive speech evaluation and analysis of error patterns would help us in planning the rehabilitative measures of speech which is the most important factor in re-establishing interpersonal communication and well-being of the individual. PMID:27803574

  15. Evaluation of the Correlation between CD44, Tumor Prognosis and the 5-Year Survival Rate in Patients with Oral Tongue SCC

    PubMed Central

    Kaboodkhani, Reza; Karimi, Ebrahim; Khorsandi Ashtiani, Mohammad Taghi; Kowkabi, Safoura; Firouzifar, Mohammad Reza; Yazdani, Farzad; Yazdani, Nasrin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: 90% of the tumors in the head and neck are squamous-cell carcinomas (HNSCC), which have overall 5- year survival rate between 50% -60%. CD44 has been shown to be associated with the prognosis. Materials and Methods: Biopsy specimens of 51 patients with oral tongue SCC were evaluated by Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for the CD44 antibody. Results: There was no significant correlation between CD44 and survival (P=0.77), age (P=0.4), CD44 and lymph node metastasis (P=0.87), sex (P=0.947), smoking (P=0.287) and tumor size (P=0.813). However, there was significant correlation between smoking and survival. Conclusion: There are widespread discrepancies among the findings in the literature regarding the prognosis of CD44 expression in OCSCC. Our study shows that the expression of CD44 is not a marker of aggressive behavior in oral tongue SCC. Consequently, CD44 cannot be considered as handy tool to establish the tumor behavior, prognosis and 5- year survival rate of these tumors. PMID:28008391

  16. Trismus release in oral cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yao-Chou; Wong, Tung-Yiu; Shieh, Shyh-Jou; Lee, Jing-Wei

    2012-12-01

    Trismus is a common problem among oral cancer patients. This report aimed to study the inciting factors of trismus and to find out the rationale of trismus release. Between 1996 and 2008, 61 oral cancer patients with retrievable records of interincisor distance (IID) were analyzed by retrospective chart review. The IID decreased from 31.4 (12.4) to 24.9 (12.0) mm in 36 patients undergoing cancer ablation only (P = 0.001). Other variables prompting trismus include buccal cancer (P = 0.017), radiotherapy (P = 0.008), and recurrence (P = 0.001). In contrast, the IID improved from 11.7 (7.1) to 22.7 (11.9) mm in 25 patients receiving cancer ablative and trismus releasing surgeries (P = 0.000). The improvement fared better in individuals with IID less than 15 mm than the others (P = 0.037). In conclusion, involvement of buccal region, ablative surgery, radiotherapy, and recurrence are provocative factors of trismus. Patients with IID less than 15 mm will benefit from releasing surgery significantly. Others may better be handled with conservative managements firstly, and enrolled as candidates of surgical release only until the patients entertained a 28-month period of disease-free interval, by which time the risk of recurrence would be markedly reduced.

  17. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    YamazakI, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Furukawa, Souhei; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. PMID:23179377

  18. Contemporary management of cancer of the oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Genden, Eric M.; Silver, Carl E.; Takes, Robert P.; Suárez, Carlos; Owen, Randall P.; Haigentz, Missak; Stoeckli, Sandro J.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Rapidis, Alexander D.; Rodrigo, Juan Pablo; Rinaldo, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Oral cancer represents a common entity comprising a third of all head and neck malignant tumors. The options for curative treatment of oral cavity cancer have not changed significantly in the last three decades; however, the work up, the approach to surveillance, and the options for reconstruction have evolved significantly. Because of the profound functional and cosmetic importance of the oral cavity, management of oral cavity cancers requires a thorough understanding of disease progression, approaches to management and options for reconstruction. The purpose of this review is to discuss the most current management options for oral cavity cancers. PMID:20155361

  19. Oral Complications and Management Strategies for Patients Undergoing Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With cancer survival rate climbing up over the past three decades, quality of life for cancer patients has become an issue of major concern. Oral health plays an important part in one's overall quality of life. However, oral health status can be severely hampered by side effects of cancer therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, prevention and treatment of these complications are often overlooked in clinical practice. The present paper aims at drawing health care professionals' attention to oral complications associated with cancer therapy by giving a comprehensive review. Brief comments on contemporary cancer therapies will be given first, followed by detailed description of oral complications associated with cancer therapy. Finally, a summary of preventive strategies and treatment options for common oral complications including oral mucositis, oral infections, xerostomia, and dysgeusia will be given. PMID:24511293

  20. Oral sex, cancer and death: sexually transmitted cancers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We briefly highlight the growing body of recent evidence linking unprotected oral sex with the development of some types of head and neck cancer in younger patients. These tumours appear to be increasing in incidence although the development of more sensitive methods of HPV detection may be a confounding factor. PMID:22673108

  1. Exploring the mechanisms of alcohol-related damage in oral mucosa - is oxidative stress associated with the increase in cell proliferation in rat tongue epithelium?

    PubMed

    Carrard, Vinicius C; Pires, Aline S; Mendez, Marina; Pasquali, Matheus A B; Badauy, Cristiano M; Lauxen, Isabel S; Moreira, José Cláudio F; Sant'ana Filho, Manoel

    2013-02-01

    Alcohol consumption has been related to a cell proliferation increase in oral epithelium but its mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether oxidative stress parameters are implicated in the induction of cell proliferation in rat tongue epithelium after different times of chronic alcohol consumption. Cell proliferation was assessed in tongue epithelium using AgNOR (argyrophilic proteins related to active nucleolar organizer regions) quantification. Oxidative stress parameters [lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyls, superoxide dismutase activity and catalase (CAT) activity and immunocontent] and Nrf2 immunocontent were quantified in tongue homogenates. Mean AgNOR numbers (mAgNOR) per nucleus was 2.22 ± 0.30 in ventral tongue epithelium after 120 days of alcohol consumption (vs. 1.87 ± 0.18 for control animals and 1.91 ± 0.23 for animals treated with alcohol for 60 days) indicating cell proliferation increase (p < 0.05, ANOVA followed by Tukey post hoc). Interestingly, 60 days of alcohol consumption induced changes in oxidative stress parameters, but no alteration in cell proliferation. Vitamin E co-treatment was conduced in order to evaluate its possible protective effects. The 120 day Tween + vitamin E + alcohol treatment induced an increase in mAgNORs when compared to the Tween + vitamin E treated group (respectively 2.10 ± 0.30 vs. 1.77 ± 0.11, p < 0.05, ANOVA followed by Tukey post hoc), showing that vitamin E co-treatment had no protective effects. In addition, an inverse association was observed between CAT activity and AgNORs quantity (R = -0.32; p < 0.05, Person's correlation) as well as the possible involvement of Nrf2 in alcohol-related damage. Our findings suggest that the increase in cell proliferation associated with alcohol-related damage has no direct relation with an imbalance in oxidative parameters. In contrast, our results indicate that hydrogen peroxide may be implicated in cellular signaling during

  2. Successful tongue cancer surgery under general anesthesia in a 99-year-old patient in Okinawa, Japan: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Tessho; Nakasone, Toshiyuki; Matayoshi, Akira; Arasaki, Akira

    2016-09-01

    As advances in the medical field have resulted in increased life expectancy, performing surgery under general anesthesia in elderly patients has become an important issue. A 99-year-old Okinawan female was admitted to the hospital presenting with pain in the tongue. Following physical examination, a clinical diagnosis of early stage tongue cancer (T2N0Mx) was confirmed. Early stage tongue cancer is particularly easy to access for surgical resection. By contrast, later stages of tongue cancer are associated with pain, dysphagia and throat obstruction. The patient and their family agreed to surgery due to the worsening pain associated with the tumor and gave informed consent for surgery. Following consultation with a cardiologist and an anesthesiologist, the tongue tumor was surgically resected under general anesthesia. Subsequent to surgery, the patient experienced pain relief and was discharged from the hospital on day 14 post-surgery. The patient was able to maintain the same quality of life, and lived for 5 years and 2 months longer without evidence of disease, surviving to the age of 104 years old. The present case demonstrates that surgery under general anesthesia may be appropriate in patients of an advanced age, with a treatment plan that should ideally be based on careful assessment of the wishes of the patient and their family, medical risks, and benefits and economic costs of alternative treatments, in addition to consideration of the patient's culture.

  3. Successful tongue cancer surgery under general anesthesia in a 99-year-old patient in Okinawa, Japan: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Tessho; Nakasone, Toshiyuki; Matayoshi, Akira; Arasaki, Akira

    2016-01-01

    As advances in the medical field have resulted in increased life expectancy, performing surgery under general anesthesia in elderly patients has become an important issue. A 99-year-old Okinawan female was admitted to the hospital presenting with pain in the tongue. Following physical examination, a clinical diagnosis of early stage tongue cancer (T2N0Mx) was confirmed. Early stage tongue cancer is particularly easy to access for surgical resection. By contrast, later stages of tongue cancer are associated with pain, dysphagia and throat obstruction. The patient and their family agreed to surgery due to the worsening pain associated with the tumor and gave informed consent for surgery. Following consultation with a cardiologist and an anesthesiologist, the tongue tumor was surgically resected under general anesthesia. Subsequent to surgery, the patient experienced pain relief and was discharged from the hospital on day 14 post-surgery. The patient was able to maintain the same quality of life, and lived for 5 years and 2 months longer without evidence of disease, surviving to the age of 104 years old. The present case demonstrates that surgery under general anesthesia may be appropriate in patients of an advanced age, with a treatment plan that should ideally be based on careful assessment of the wishes of the patient and their family, medical risks, and benefits and economic costs of alternative treatments, in addition to consideration of the patient's culture. PMID:27588116

  4. Therapeutic strategies with oral fluoropyrimidine anticancer agent, S-1 against oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Harada, Koji; Ferdous, Tarannum; Ueyama, Yoshiya

    2017-08-01

    Oral cancer has been recognized as a tumor with low sensitivity to anticancer agents. However, introduction of S-1, an oral cancer agent is improving treatment outcome for patients with oral cancer. In addition, S-1, as a main drug for oral cancer treatment in Japan can be easily available for outpatients. In fact, S-1 exerts high therapeutic effects with acceptable side effects. Moreover, combined chemotherapy with S-1 shows higher efficacy than S-1 alone, and combined chemo-radiotherapy with S-1 exerts remarkable therapeutic effects. Furthermore, we should consider the combined therapy of S-1 and molecular targeting agents right now as these combinations were reportedly useful for oral cancer treatment. Here, we describe our findings related to S-1 that were obtained experimentally and clinically, and favorable therapeutic strategies with S-1 against oral cancer with bibliographic considerations.

  5. Role of Dental Profession in Oral Cancer Prevention and Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Q A; Awan, K H

    2016-12-01

    The incidence of oral cancer is increasing worldwide. Malignant neoplasms of the mouth and pharynx have been rated as the 10th most common cancer in men and 7th in women, though geographical variations exist.(1)Generally, in a society, oral cancer is not properly understood. The sign and symptoms are frequently overlooked in the initial stages when it is responsive to treat.

  6. Arterial Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Tongue Cancer: Analysis of Retrospective Study of Therapeutic Results in 88 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Fuwa, Nobukazu Kodaira, Takesi; Furutani, Kazuhisa; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Nakahara, Rie; Tomoda, Takuya; Inokuti, Haruo; Daimon, Takashi

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively investigate the therapeutic results of arterial injection therapy by way of the superficial temporal artery for 88 cases of Stage III and IV (M0) tongue cancer and to clarify the factors that affected the therapeutic results. Methods and Materials: We administered intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy by continuous infusion of carboplatin in 39 patients between January 1993 and July 2002. Systemic concurrent chemotherapy was given to 19 of these patients. We administered intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin with sodium thiosulfate to 49 patients between October 2002 and December 2006. Concurrent systemic chemotherapy was given to 38 of these patients. Results: The 3-year local control rate was 72% (T2-T3, 80%; and T4, 48%), and the 3-year survival rate was 57% (Stage III, 67%; Stage IV, 43%). On univariate analysis, age, T stage, N stage, overall stage, systemic chemotherapy, difference in intra-arterial chemotherapy, and performance status had a significant effect on survival. On multivariate analysis, N stage, systemic chemotherapy, difference in intra-arterial chemotherapy, and artery selected had a significant effect on survival. Conclusions: The therapeutic results of intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy using the superficial temporal artery were not inferior to the results of surgery. In particular, the results of arterial injection therapy using cisplatin with sodium thiosulfate were excellent, and we believe it will be a new therapy for advanced tongue cancer.

  7. Common tongue conditions in primary care.

    PubMed

    Reamy, Brian V; Derby, Richard; Bunt, Christopher W

    2010-03-01

    Although easily examined, abnormalities of the tongue can present a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma for physicians. Recognition and diagnosis require a thorough history, including onset and duration, antecedent symptoms, and tobacco and alcohol use. Examination of tongue morphology and a careful assessment for lymphadenopathy are also important. Geographic tongue, fissured tongue, and hairy tongue are the most common tongue problems and do not require treatment. Median rhomboid glossitis is usually associated with a candidal infection and responds to topical antifungals. Atrophic glossitis is often linked to an underlying nutritional deficiency of iron, folic acid, vitamin B12, riboflavin, or niacin and resolves with correction of the underlying condition. Oral hairy leukoplakia, which can be a marker for underlying immunodeficiency, is caused by the Epstein-Barr virus and is treated with oral antivirals. Tongue growths usually require biopsy to differentiate benign lesions (e.g., granular cell tumors, fibromas, lymphoepithelial cysts) from premalignant leukoplakia or squamous cell carcinoma. Burning mouth syndrome often involves the tongue and has responded to treatment with alpha-lipoic acid, clonazepam, and cognitive behavior therapy in controlled trials. Several trials have also confirmed the effectiveness of surgical division of tongue-tie (ankyloglossia), in the context of optimizing the success of breastfeeding compared with education alone. Tongue lesions of unclear etiology may require biopsy or referral to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, head and neck surgeon, or a dentist experienced in oral pathology.

  8. MFAP5 and TNNC1: Potential markers for predicting occult cervical lymphatic metastasis and prognosis in early stage tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Wu, Kailiu; Li, Siyi; Hu, Longwei; Han, Jing; Zhu, Dongwang; Tian, Xuerui; Liu, Wei; Tian, Zhen; Zhong, Laiping; Yan, Ming; Zhang, Chenping; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2017-01-10

    The purpose of this study is to identify candidate genes that could predict prognosis of early-stage tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) and its occult cervical lymphatic metastasis by large-scale gene expression profiling. Tumor tissue and matched normal mucosa samples were collected from patients with TSCC and analyzed with Affymetrix HTA2.0 high-density oligonucleotide array. Differentially expressed genes in TSCC with cervical lymph node metastasis (CLNM) were further analyzed with Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes for their functions and related pathways. A total of 107 differentially expressed genes (p < 0.05) were identified by microarray in TSCC samples with CLNM (n = 6) compared to those without CLNM (n = 6). Genes involved in the cell-matrix adherens junction and migration function including MFAP5, TNNC1, MGP, FBFBP1 and FBXO32 were selected and validated by RT-PCR in TSCC samples (n = 32). Of the five genes, MFAP5 and TNCC1 expressions were further validated by immohistochemistry (n = 61). The significant positive correlation between MFAP5 and TNNC1 expression (p<0.001) was observed. Notably, over-expression of MFAP5 and TNNC1 were correlated with CLNM, metastasis relapse-free survival and overall survival. Our findings indicated that MFAP5 and TNNC1 may be potential markers for predicting occult cervical lymphatic metastasis and prognosis of oral tongue carcinoma.

  9. Relationship between squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and the position of dental prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ki-Yong; Kim, Soung-Min; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue has a relatively high incidence of all oral cancers. Some studies have reported a relationship between intraoral dental prosthesis and SCC of the tongue; however, this relationship remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between SCC of the tongue and the positional aspects of dental prosthesis using a retrospective analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 439 patients with SCC of the tongue were diagnosed and treated in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Seoul National University Dental Hospital. Patients were treated over a 12.5-year period ranging from January 1, 2001 to June 30, 2013. Statistical analysis was performed to examine potential differences between the groups. RESULTS The number of patients with a crown and/or a bridge (134, 63.5%) was significantly different than the number of patients without a prosthesis (77, 36.5%). Even after accounting for different types of prostheses such as crowns, bridges, and dentures, no significant differences were observed between the position of the prosthesis and the location of the SCC of the tongue, with significance defined as a P-value less than .05 by the Pearson-Chi square test. CONCLUSION Patients with crowns and/or bridges exhibited more frequent SCC of the tongue compared with patients without these prosthesis. These data support the hypothesis that mechanical trauma and galvanic phenomena play a role in the etiology of SCC of the tongue. PMID:25932311

  10. Relationship between squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and the position of dental prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Huan; Yoon, Ki-Yong; Kim, Soung-Min; Myoung, Hoon; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Myung-Jin

    2015-04-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue has a relatively high incidence of all oral cancers. Some studies have reported a relationship between intraoral dental prosthesis and SCC of the tongue; however, this relationship remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between SCC of the tongue and the positional aspects of dental prosthesis using a retrospective analysis. A total of 439 patients with SCC of the tongue were diagnosed and treated in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Seoul National University Dental Hospital. Patients were treated over a 12.5-year period ranging from January 1, 2001 to June 30, 2013. Statistical analysis was performed to examine potential differences between the groups. The number of patients with a crown and/or a bridge (134, 63.5%) was significantly different than the number of patients without a prosthesis (77, 36.5%). Even after accounting for different types of prostheses such as crowns, bridges, and dentures, no significant differences were observed between the position of the prosthesis and the location of the SCC of the tongue, with significance defined as a P-value less than .05 by the Pearson-Chi square test. Patients with crowns and/or bridges exhibited more frequent SCC of the tongue compared with patients without these prosthesis. These data support the hypothesis that mechanical trauma and galvanic phenomena play a role in the etiology of SCC of the tongue.

  11. Update from the 4th Edition of the World Health Organization of Head and Neck Tumours: Tumours of the Oral Cavity and Mobile Tongue.

    PubMed

    Müller, Susan

    2017-03-01

    There have been several additions and deletions in Chapter 4 on Tumours of the oral cavity and mobile tongue in the 2017 fourth edition of the World Health Organization Classification of Tumours of the Head and Neck. This chapter excludes the oropharynx, which now is a stand-alone chapter acknowledging the uniqueness of the oropharynx from the oral cavity. New entries in Chapter 4 include rhabdomyoma, haemangioma, schwannoma, neurofibroma and myofibroblastic sarcoma in the section titled Soft tissue and neural tumours. Discussion of salivary gland entities have been reduced and includes mucoepidermoid carcinoma and pleomorphic adenoma as the other salivary gland types are discussed elsewhere. In the Haematolymphoid tumours section, like the salivary gland section, only tumors that commonly present in the oral cavity are discussed in Chapter 4. Excluded entities in the updated classification include papillary hyperplasia, median rhomboid glossitis, keratoacanthoma, focal oral mucinosis, and secondary tumors. This article will summarize the changes in the new classification since the 2005 edition focusing on selected entities that have had significant changes along with new entries.

  12. Ten-year analysis of oral cancer focusing on young people in northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Komolmalai, Nicha; Chuachamsai, Sompol; Tantiwipawin, Salee; Dejsuvan, Sarita; Buhngamongkol, Patcharaluk; Wongvised, Chanika; Chitapanarux, Imjai; Iamaroon, Anak

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the current situation of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in northern Thailand, with an emphasis on patients <40 years of age. Medical records of patients histologically diagnosed with OSCC were collected from the Cancer Registry of Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital, Thailand between 2001 and 2010. The clinico-demographic data of patients aged <40 years (young group) and those aged ≥40 years (old group) were compared. A total of 874 patients were included in this study, of which 4.1% were <40 years of age. The tongue was the most common cancer site in both age groups. Most patients in both age groups were diagnosed with oral cancer at stage IV. Tobacco smoking (62.3%) and alcohol consumption (52.3%) were the most common risk factors in both age groups. However, the rates of betel quid chewing (17.5%) had decreased from those found in our study in the previous decade (50.2%); these rates were not found in the young group. The 5-year survival rate was 27.4% for the old group and 56.2% for the young group. OSCC remains a serious oral health problem in northern Thailand, and it has not been resolved among young adults.

  13. Detection of survivin mRNA in healthy oral mucosa, oral leucoplakia and oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Lodi, G; Franchini, R; Bez, C; Sardella, A; Moneghini, L; Pellegrini, C; Bosari, S; Manfredi, M; Vescovi, P; Carrassi, A

    2010-01-01

    Survivin is involved in modulation of cell death and cell division processes. Survivin expression in normal adult tissues has not been fully understood, although it is markedly lower than in cancer, where it is over-expressed. To investigate survivin expression in normal, potentially malignant and cancerous oral mucosa. We measured survivin mRNA levels by real-time RT-PCR in specimens of oral mucosa (15 from normal mucosa, 17 from potentially malignant lesions, 17 from neoplasms). Scores were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test and post hoc according to Conover. Chi-squared test was used for dichotomous data. The median relative levels of survivin mRNA resulted six for normal mucosa, eight for potentially malignant lesions, 13 for cancers: differences among these three groups were statistically significant, as between cancer and potentially malignant lesions. Expression in normal mucosa and potentially lesions group showed no significant difference. Low, but not marginal expression of survivin in normal mucosa is a new finding, and it could be explained with the higher sensibility of our methods. Survivin expression in oral potentially malignant lesions might indicate a progressive deregulation of expression paralleling oncogenesis, particularly during the first stages of process, suggesting a putative predictive role for survivin.

  14. Apc-Mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) Rats Are Susceptible to 4-NQO-Induced Tongue Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Shimizu, Masahito; Kochi, Takahiro; Shirakami, Yohei; Mori, Takayuki; Watanabe, Naoki; Naiki, Takafumi; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Yoshimi, Kazuto; Serikawa, Tadao; Kuramoto, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Despite widening interest in the possible association between infection/inflammation and cancer development, knowledge of this issue in relation to oral cancer remains inadequate. This study aimed to determine the susceptibility of Apc-mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) rats, which are vulnerable to developing inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis, to 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO)-induced tongue carcinogenesis in order to clarify the role of inflammation in oral cancer. KAD (20 males and 22 females) and F344/NS1c (22 males and 23 females) rats received drinking water with or without 4-NQO (20 ppm) for eight weeks. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses of the tongue were performed at week 20. Additionally, the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue mucosa was determined at week 8. Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) developed in the KAD and F344/NS1c rats that received 4-NQO. Regardless of gender, the incidence and multiplicity of tongue SCC were greater in the KAD rats than in the F344/NS1c rats. In addition, the multiplicity of tongue SCC in the female KAD rats was significantly greater than that observed in the male KAD (p < 0.01) and female F344/NS1c rats (p < 0.05). The levels of inflammation and the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue in the 4-NQO-treated female KAD rats were the highest among the rats given 4-NQO. These results show that KAD rats, particularly females, are susceptible to 4-NQO-induced tongue carcinogenesis, suggesting the utility of models employing KAD rats for investigating the pathobiology of oral (tongue) carcinogenesis associated with inflammation. PMID:25050571

  15. Oral complications of cancer and cancer therapy: from cancer treatment to survivorship.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Joel B; Thariat, Juliette; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean; Barasch, Andrei; Murphy, Barbara A; Kolnick, Leanne; Popplewell, Leslie; Maghami, Ellie

    2012-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Oral complications resulting from cancer and cancer therapies cause acute and late toxicities that may be underreported, underrecognized, and undertreated. Recent advances in cancer treatment have led to changes in the incidence, nature, and severity of oral complications. As the number of survivors increases, it is becoming increasingly recognized that the aggressive management of oral toxicities is needed to ensure optimal long-term oral health and general well-being. Advances in care have had an impact on previously recognized oral complications and are leading to newly recognized adverse effects. Here, the authors briefly review advances in cancer therapy, including recent advances in surgery, oral care, radiation therapy, hematopoietic cell transplantation, and medical oncology; describe how these advances affect oral health; and discuss the frequent and/or severe oral health complications associated with cancer and cancer treatment and their effect upon long-term health. Although some of the acute oral toxicities of cancer therapies may be reduced, they remain essentially unavoidable. The significant impact of long-term complications requires increased awareness and recognition to promote prevention and appropriate intervention. It is therefore important for the primary oncologist to be aware of these complications so that appropriate measures can be implemented in a timely manner. Prevention and management is best provided via multidisciplinary health care teams, which must be integrated and communicate effectively in order to provide the best patient care in a coordinated manner at the appropriate time.

  16. Ethanol Promotes Chemically Induced Oral Cancer in Mice through Activation of the 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway of Arachidonic Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yizhu; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Xinyan; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol drinking is a known risk factor for oral cancer in humans. However, previous animal studies on the promoting effect of ethanol on oral carcinogenesis were inconclusive. It is necessary to develop an animal model with which the molecular mechanism of ethanol-related oral carcinogenesis may be elucidated in order to develop effective prevention strategies. In this study, mice were first treated with 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO, 100μg/ml in drinking water) for 8 weeks, and then given water or ethanol (8%) as the sole drink for another 16 weeks. During the experiment, 8% ethanol was well tolerated by mice. The incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) increased from 20% (8/41) to 43% (17/40; p<0.05). Expression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-Lox) and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) was increased in dysplasia and SCC of 4NQO-treated tongues, and further enhanced by ethanol. Using this mouse model, we further demonstrated that fewer cancers were induced in Alox5−/− mice, as were cell proliferation, inflammation, and angiogenesis in the tongue, as compared with Alox5+/+ mice. Interestingly, Cox-2 expression was induced by ethanol in knockout mice, while 5-Lox and leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) expression and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) biosynthesis were dramatically reduced. Moreover, ethanol enhanced expression and nuclear localization of 5-Lox and stimulated LTB4 biosynthesis in human tongue SCC cells (SCC-15 and SCC-4) in vitro. In conclusion, this study clearly demonstrated that ethanol promoted 4NQO-induced oral carcinogenesis, at least in part, through further activation of the 5-Lox pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism. PMID:21881027

  17. Evaluation of swallowing by Sydney Swallow Questionnaire (SSQ) in oral and oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with primary surgery.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Raghav C; St Rose, Suzanne; Chisholm, Edward J; Georgalas, Christos; Bisase, Brian; Amen, Furrat; Kerawala, Cyrus J; Clarke, Peter M; Nutting, Christopher M; Rhys-Evans, Peter H; Harrington, Kevin J; Kazi, Rehan

    2012-12-01

    This work aimed at evaluating patients' swallowing functions by a newly validated swallow-specific questionnaire, the Sydney Swallow Questionnaire (SSQ), in a cohort of oral and oropharyngeal cancer patients. Mean/median SSQ scores were calculated and compared with study variables using the Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis test. The mean composite SSQ scores (SD) for the base of tongue, oral tongue, and tonsillar cancer patients were 663.8 (382.8), 456.2 (407.6), and 283.0 (243.1), respectively (p = 0.005); for advanced vs. early T stage disease they were 918.1 (319.5) vs. 344.8 (292.1) (p ≤ 0.001); for patients <60 years vs. ≥60 years they were 549.3 (415.1) vs. 314.0 (247.3) (p = 0.02); and for patients with reconstruction vs. without reconstruction they were 676.5 (410.5) vs. 331.9 (286.5) (p = 0.002). SSQ is a useful tool for evaluation of swallowing in head and neck cancer patients. Site of cancer, T stage, patient's age, and reconstruction directly affect post-treatment swallow outcome.

  18. Combination of Telmisartan with Cisplatin Controls Oral Cancer Cachexia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Bhoomika M.; Damle, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to study the effect of combination of telmisartan with cisplatin in oral cancer cachexia induced by applying 0.5% 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO) in propylene glycol to tongue, thrice a week for 8 weeks. From 8th to 22nd week, cisplatin (0.23 mg/kg, i.v.) was administered once in three weeks and telmisartan (5 mg/kg/day, p.o.) was administered daily. 4-NQO produced significant decrease in food intake, body weight, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and bradycardia, worsened hemodyanamics, increased cachexia markers like insulin, C-reactive protein, and interleukin-6, and increased tumor markers like lactate dehydrogenase and γ-glutamyl transferase.Treatment with combination of telmisartan with cisplatin produced significant increase in food intake and body weight and controlled hyperglycaemia and dyslipidemia, preserved hemodynamic function, and decreased the cachexia markers while cisplatin alone did not produce any increase in food intake and body weight. Further, the combination of telmisartan with cisplatin significantly reduced tumor marker levels. Combination of telmisartan with cisplatin prevented 4-NQO induced oxidative stress, hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis, premalignant dysplasia, and invasive squamous cell carcinoma in the tongue. Our data suggests that combination of telmisartan with cisplatin treatment is beneficial in controlling cancer cachexia. Telmisartan can be used as an add-on therapy with cisplatin or other traditional chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:24381940

  19. Oral Cancer Malnutrition Impacts Weight and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Gellrich, Nils-Claudius; Handschel, Jörg; Holtmann, Henrik; Krüskemper, Gertrud

    2015-01-01

    Diet is important for both quality of life (QoL) and survival of patients with oral cancer. Their intake of food is impeded by functional restrictions in chewing and swallowing. In the DÖSAK REHAB STUDY 1652 patients from 38 hospitals within the German-language area of Germany; Austria and Switzerland were examined with regard to functional and psychological variables having an impact on diet. Chewing and swallowing are correlated with mobility of the tongue and the mandible as well as opening of the mouth. Thirty five percent of the patients lost weight; 41% maintained their weight and 24% gained weight. The QoL of patients who were able to maintain their weight and of those who gained weight was significantly better than that of patients who lost weight. A normal diet was important for maintaining weight. Mashed food; liquid food and loss of appetite were closely associated with loss of weight; although it was possible for nutritional counseling and dietary support to be implemented particularly favorably in this respect. Due to problems with eating patients’ strength deteriorated; thus restricting activity. Radiotherapy had a negative impact on diet and weight. It influenced sense of taste; dryness of the mouth; swelling and discomfort when ingesting food. Pain and scars in the region of the operation also cause patients to dislike hard; spicy and sour food. Support from a nutritional counselor in implementing a calorie-rich diet remedied this and such support needs to be integrated into patient management. The fact that a poor nutritional status is of such great importance is well-known; but what is often lacking is the systematic implementation of continued professional nutritional counseling over a long period of time; weight control and psycho-social support of the operated patients; particularly those who also have had radiotherapy. PMID:25825828

  20. Infectious and dietary risk factors of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Meurman, Jukka H

    2010-06-01

    In addition to the classic risk factors of oral cancer, namely alcohol and tobacco, other factors both infectious and environmental are thought to be associated with the development of oral malignancy. Infections in the oral cavity may be an important preventable cause of cancer. Poor oral hygiene, periodontal disease, chronic candidiasis, human papilloma virus (HPV) and herpesvirus infections link statistically with cancer but the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. Infections may trigger cell proliferation, inhibit apoptosis, interfere with cellular signaling mechanisms and up-regulate tumor promoters. In addition, several oral micro-organisms metabolize alcohol to carcinogenic acetaldehyde thus explaining the association between poor oral hygiene, alcohol consumption and carcinogenesis. With regards to dietary factors the Mediterranean-type fruit and vegetable rich diet has been shown to reduce the risk of oral cancer but the evidence is weak, the effect of individual food components and trace elements on carcinogenesis remains unclear at present.

  1. Oral cancer risk and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Chimenos-Küstner, Eduardo; Font-Costa, Imma; López-López, José

    2004-01-01

    The clinical appearance and, especially, the degree of dysplasia that may be shown by pre-cancerous lesions in the oral cavity suggest a potential for malignisation. An increasing number of studies are seeking new, more specific markers that would help to determine the degree of cell alteration and enable a better understanding of the degree of malignant degeneration of these cells. The present review considers the most recent findings for these markers, grouping them into families: tumour growth markers; markers of tumour suppression and anti-tumour response; angiogenesis markers; markers of tumour invasion and metastatic potential; cell surface markers; intracellular markers; markers derived from arachidonic acid; and enzymatic markers.

  2. Lifestyle risk factors for oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Petti, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    The "style of life is the unique way in which individuals try to realize their fictional final goal and meet or avoid the three main tasks of life: work, community, love" (Alfred Adler, founder of the Individual Psychology). Lifestyle refers to the way individuals live their lives and how they handle problems and interpersonal relations. The lifestyle behaviours associated to oral cancer with convincing evidence are tobacco use, betel quid chewing, alcohol drinking, low fruit and vegetable consumption (the detrimental lifestyle is high fat and/or sugar intake, resulting in low fruit and/or vegetable intake). Worldwide, 25% of oral cancers are attributable to tobacco usage (smoking and/or chewing), 7-19% to alcohol drinking, 10-15% to micronutrient deficiency, more than 50% to betel quid chewing in areas of high chewing prevalence. Carcinogenicity is dose-dependent and magnified by multiple exposures. Conversely, low and single exposures do not significantly increase oral cancer risk. These behaviours have common characteristics: (i) they are widespread: one billion men, 250 million women smoke cigarettes, 600-1200 million people chew betel quid, two billion consume alcohol, unbalanced diet is common amongst developed and developing countries; (ii) they were already used by animals and human forerunners millions of years ago because they were essential to overcome conditions such as cold, hunger, famine; their use was seasonal and limited by low availability, in contrast with the pattern of consumption of the modern era, characterized by routine, heavy usage, for recreational activities and with multiple exposures; (iii) their consumption in small doses is not recognized as detrimental by the human body and activates the dopaminergic reward system of the brain, thus giving instant pleasure, "liking" (overconsumption) and "wanting" (craving). For these reasons, effective Public Health measures aimed at preventing oral cancer and other lifestyle-related conditions

  3. Tongue tie

    MedlinePlus

    ... this band is overly short and thick. The exact cause of tongue tie is not known. Your ... must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  4. Your Tongue

    MedlinePlus

    ... taste buds , so you can taste everything from apples to zucchini! People are born with about 10, ... onion slice under your nose while eating an apple. What do you taste? Your tongue also gets ...

  5. Geographic tongue

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a long time. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if the symptoms last longer than 10 days. Seek immediate medical help if: You have breathing problems. Your tongue ...

  6. Oral Candida colonization in oral cancer patients and its relationship with traditional risk factors of oral cancer: a matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Alnuaimi, Ali D; Wiesenfeld, David; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Reynolds, Eric C; McCullough, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Candida, an opportunistic fungal pathogen, has been implicated in oral and oesophageal cancers. This study aimed to examine oral Candida carriage in 52 oral cancer patients and 104 age-, gender- and denture status-matched oral cancer-free subjects. We assessed general health, smoking and alcohol drinking habits, use of alcohol-containing mouthwash and periodontal status (community periodontal index of treatment needs). Yeasts were isolated using oral rinse technique and genetically identified via Real-Time PCR-High resolution melting curve analysis of conserved ribosomal DNA. Conditional and binary logistic regressions were used to identify explanatory variables that are risk factors for oral cancer. The frequencies of oral yeasts' presence and high oral colonization were significantly higher in oral cancer than non-oral cancer patients (p=001; p=0.033, respectively). No significant difference in the isolation profile of Candida species was found between the two groups, except C. parapsilosis was more frequent in non-oral cancer group. Differences were noticed in the incidence of C. albicans strains where significantly more C. albicans genotype-A was isolated from cancer patients and significantly more C. albicans genotype-B isolated from non-cancer patients. Multiple regression analyses showed significant association with cancer observed for alcohol drinking (OR=4.253; 95% CI=1.351, 13.386), Candida presence (OR=3.242; 95% CI=1.505, 6.984) and high oral colonization (OR=3.587; 95% CI=1.153, 11.162). These results indicate that there is a significant association between oral cancer occurrence and Candida oral colonization and that the observed genotypic diversity of C. albicans strains may play a role in oral carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of Tongue Strength Training and Detraining on Tongue Pressures in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jong-Chi

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the effect of tongue strengthening training and long-term detraining on tongue tip pressure, tongue base pressure, and tongue pressure during effortful swallowing. Ten young healthy volunteers (21-35 years) were participated in this study. Participants received 8-week tongue strengthening exercise 3 days a week with each session lasting 30 min. Measurement of tongue pressure and tongue strengthening exercise were administrated using Iowa Oral Performance Instrument (IOPI). Training intensity was applied at 60 and 80% of maximal tongue pressure for the first week and the remainder, respectively. Following completion of 8-week training, 28 weeks of detraining period was continued. Training increased tongue tip pressure, tongue base pressure, and tongue pressure during effortful swallowing above pre-training values (p < 0.05). After 28-week detraining, all tongue variables were significantly lower than after 8-week training (p < 0.05) but remained significantly higher than pre-training levels (p < 0.05). These findings demonstrate that high-intensity tongue strengthening exercise can improve tongue pressures. However, training effects were diminished gradually during detraining period. Thus, maintenance programs after strengthening exercise would be required for prolonging training effects.

  8. Smoking and smokeless tobacco-associated human buccal cell mutations and their association with oral cancer--a review.

    PubMed

    Proia, Nicole K; Paszkiewicz, Geraldine M; Nasca, Maureen A Sullivan; Franke, Gail E; Pauly, John L

    2006-06-01

    Reported herein are the results of a structured literature review that was undertaken to (a) determine if human buccal (mouth) cell changes are associated with smoking and smokeless ("chewing") tobacco, (b) tabulate different buccal cell alterations that have been reported, (c) delineate buccal cell assays that have been used successfully, (d) determine whether buccal cell changes correlate with oral cancer as defined in clinicopathologic investigations, and (e) assess the feasibility of developing a high-throughput buccal cell assay for screening smokers for the early detection of oral cancer. The results of the studies reported herein have established that diverse buccal cell changes are associated with smoking and smokeless tobacco. This review documents also that buccal cells have been collected in a noninvasive manner, and repetitively for serial studies, from different sites of the mouth (e.g., cheek, gum, and tongue) and from normal tissue, preneoplastic lesions (leukoplakia), and malignant tumors. Tobacco-associated genetic mutations and nongenetic changes have been reported; a partial listing includes (a) micronuclei, (b) bacterial adherence, (c) genetic mutations, (d) DNA polymorphisms, (d) carcinogen-DNA adducts, and (e) chromosomal abnormalities. Clinical studies have correlated buccal cell changes with malignant tumors, and some oral oncologists have reported that the buccal cell changes are practical biomarkers. Summarily, the literature has established that buccal cells are useful not only for characterizing the molecular mechanisms underlying tobacco-associated oral cancers but also as exfoliative cells that express diverse changes that offer promise as candidate biomarkers for the early detection of oral cancer.

  9. Prognostic significance of the number of lymph nodes in elective neck dissection for tongue and mouth floor cancers.

    PubMed

    Amar, Ali; Chedid, Helma Maria; Rapoport, Abrão; Cernea, Claudio Roberto; Dedivitis, Rogério Aparecido; Curioni, Otávio Alberto; Brandão, Lenine Garcia

    2012-04-01

    The presence of metastatic lymph nodes is a relevant aspect in the treatment of head and neck cancer, bringing about a 50% reduction in survival. To assess the number of lymph nodes removed in the neck dissection and their relationship with the prognosis. A retrospective study involving 143 patients with tongue and mouth floor epidermoid carcinoma, which histological exam showed no lymph node metastases. Among those, 119 were males and 24 females, with mean age of 54 years. As to the primary tumor site, 65 were in the tongue and 78 in the mouth floor. T stage distribution was of four T1, 84 T2, 36 T3 and 19 T4. We carried out 176 neck dissections, unilateral in 110 cases and bilateral in 33. Of these, 78 were radical and 98 selective. The patients were broken down into three groups, according to the 33 and 66 percentiles of the number of lymph nodes resected. The mean number of resected lymph nodes was 27; 24 in selective dissections and 31 in the complete ones. We did not have statistically significant differences when associated to the T and N stages. The larger number of lymph nodes dissected in the neck dissection identifies the group of better prognoses among pN0 cases.

  10. Oral versus intravenous fluoropyrimidines for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chionh, Fiona; Lau, David; Yeung, Yvonne; Price, Timothy; Tebbutt, Niall

    2017-07-28

    Patients prefer oral to intravenous (IV) palliative chemotherapy, provided that oral therapy is not less effective. We compared the efficacy and safety of oral and IV fluoropyrimidines for treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC). To compare the effects of oral and IV fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy in patients treated with curative or palliative intent for CRC. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 5), along with OVID MEDLINE, OVID Embase, and Web of Science databases, in June 2016. We also searched five clinical trials registers, several conference proceedings, and reference lists from study reports and systematic reviews. We contacted pharmaceutical companies to identify additional studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing oral and IV fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy in patients treated with curative or palliative intent for CRC. Three review authors extracted data and assessed risk of bias independently. We assessed the seven domains in the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool and three additional domains: schedules of outcome assessment and/or follow-up; use of intention-to-treat analysis; and baseline comparability of treatment arms. We included nine RCTs (total of 10,918 participants) that examined treatment with curative intent for CRC with neoadjuvant and/or adjuvant chemotherapy. We included 35 RCTs (total of 12,592 participants) that examined treatment with palliative intent for inoperable advanced or metastatic CRC with chemotherapy (31 first-line studies, two second-line studies, and two studies of first- or second-line chemotherapy). All studies included male and female participants, and no studies included participants younger than 18 years of age. Patients treated with curative intent for CRC with neoadjuvant and/or adjuvant chemotherapy • Disease-free survival (DFS): DFS did not differ between participants treated with oral versus IV fluoropyrimidines (hazard ratio (HR) 0.93, 95% confidence

  11. Integrated analysis of oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma identifies key variants and pathways linked to risk habits, HPV, clinical parameters and tumor recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Neeraja; Gupta, Saurabh; Palve, Vinayak; Varghese, Linu; Pattnaik, Swetansu; Jain, Prach; Khyriem, Costerwell; Hariharan, Arun; Dhas, Kunal; Nair, Jayalakshmi; Pareek, Manisha; Prasad, Venkatesh; Siddappa, Gangotri; Suresh, Amritha; Kekatpure, Vikram; Kuriakose, Moni; Panda, Binay

    2015-01-01

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinomas (OTSCC) are a homogeneous group of tumors characterized by aggressive behavior, early spread to lymph nodes and a higher rate of regional failure. Additionally, the incidence of OTSCC among younger population (<50yrs) is on the rise; many of whom lack the typical associated risk factors of alcohol and/or tobacco exposure. We present data on single nucleotide variations (SNVs), indels, regions with loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and copy number variations (CNVs) from fifty-paired oral tongue primary tumors and link the significant somatic variants with clinical parameters, epidemiological factors including human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and tumor recurrence. Apart from the frequent somatic variants harbored in TP53, CASP8, RASA1, NOTCH and CDKN2A genes, significant amplifications and/or deletions were detected in chromosomes 6-9, and 11 in the tumors. Variants in CASP8 and CDKN2A were mutually exclusive. CDKN2A, PIK3CA, RASA1 and DMD variants were exclusively linked to smoking, chewing, HPV infection and tumor stage. We also performed a whole-genome gene expression study that identified matrix metalloproteases to be highly expressed in tumors and linked pathways involving arachidonic acid and NF-k-B to habits and distant metastasis, respectively. Functional knockdown studies in cell lines demonstrated the role of CASP8 in a HPV-negative OTSCC cell line. Finally, we identified a 38-gene minimal signature that predicts tumor recurrence using an ensemble machine-learning method. Taken together, this study links molecular signatures to various clinical and epidemiological factors in a homogeneous tumor population with a relatively high HPV prevalence. PMID:26834999

  12. Changing Trends in oral cancer - a global scenario

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Neha; Acharya, Arun Kumar; Patthi, Basavaraj; Goud, Venkatesh; Reddy, Somanath; Garg, Anshul; Singla, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the highly prevalent cancers worldwide and a leading cause of mortality in certain regions like South-Central Asia. It is a major public health problem. Late diagnosis, high mortality rates and morbidity are characteristics of the disease worldwide. For control of oral cancer an idea of the coverage of the same in the various regions is necessary. The estimated incidence, mortality and 5-year survival due to lip, oral cavity cancer in world is 3, 00, 373(2.1%), 1, 45, 328(1.8%) and 7, 02, 149(2.2%) respectively according to data of GLOBOCAN 2012. A changing trend in incidence and prevalence of oral cancer has been observed with more women and youngsters being affected by oral cancer. PMID:28804673

  13. Oral Cancer and Oral Precancerous Lesions in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Katsanos, Konstantinos H; Roda, Giulia; Brygo, Alexandre; Delaporte, Emmanuel; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    Oral cancer is historically linked to well-known behavioural risk factors such as tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption. Other risk factors include age over 40, male sex, several dietary factors, nutritional deficiencies, viruses, sexually transmitted infections, human papillomavirus, chronic irritation, and possibly genetic predisposition. Precancerous lesions in the oral cavity include leukoplakia, erythroplakia, and lichen planus. Histology of oral cancer varies widely but the great majority are squamous cell carcinomas.Epidemiological studies and cancer registries have shown a consistently increased risk of oral malignancies in kidney, bone marrow, heart, or liver transplantation, in graft vs host disease, and in patients with HIV infection. Because of the increasing use of immunosuppressive drugs in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, it is useful to more accurately delineate the consequences of chronic immunosuppression to the oral cavity. Oral cancer and precancerous oral lesions in patients with inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] have been scarcely reported and reviews on the topic are lacking.We conducted a literature search using the terms and variants of all cancerous and precancerous oral manifestations of inflammatory bowel diseases. By retrieving the existing literature, it is evident that patients with IBD belong to the high-risk group of developing these lesions, a phenomenon amplified by the increasing HPV prevalence. Education on modifiable risk behaviours in patients with oral cancer is the cornerstone of prevention.Oral screening should be performed for all IBD patients, especially those who are about to start an immunosuppressant or biological drug.

  14. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Oral complications in the pediatric population

    SciTech Connect

    Leggott, P.J. )

    1990-01-01

    A number of acute oral complications may be associated with cancer therapy in children, but the extent and duration of these complications, and the most effective management techniques. have not been well described. The few studies differ in design, making comparisons difficult. Well-controlled, prospective clinical studies are needed to define the most effective strategies for the management of acute oral complications in children. However, it is clear that dental intervention prior to cancer therapy is an important factor in the optimal preparation of the patient. During cancer therapy, intensive supervised oral preventive protocols appear to be of benefit to the child's oral health, overall comfort, and well-being. Furthermore, the prevention of oral infection may significantly reduce the morbidity associated with cancer therapy. Long-term preventive oral care may help prevent dental disease and infection in medically compromised children and contribute to improving the quality of life. 41 references.

  15. Heterotrimeric G-protein alpha-12 (Gα12) subunit promotes oral cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Gan, Chai Phei; Patel, Vyomesh; Mikelis, Constantinos M; Zain, Rosnah Binti; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Abraham, Mannil Thomas; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Abdul Rahman, Zainal Ariff; Gutkind, J Silvio; Cheong, Sok Ching

    2014-10-30

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has a propensity to spread to the cervical lymph nodes (LN). The presence of cervical LN metastases severely impacts patient survival, whereby the two-year survival for oral cancer patients with involved LN is ~30% compared to over 80% in patients with non-involved LN. Elucidation of key molecular mechanisms underlying OSCC metastasis may afford an opportunity to target specific genes, to prevent the spread of OSCC and to improve patient survival. In this study, we demonstrated that expression of the heterotrimeric G-protein alpha-12 (Gα12) is highly up-regulated in primary tumors and LN of OSCC patients, as assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). We also found that exogenous expression of the constitutively activated-form of Gα12 promoted cell migration and invasion in OSCC cell lines. Correspondingly, inhibition of Gα12 expression by shRNA consistently inhibited OSCC cell migration and invasion in vitro. Further, the inhibition of G12 signaling by regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) inhibited Gα12-mediated RhoA activation, which in turn resulted in reduced LN metastases in a tongue-orthotopic xenograft mouse model of oral cancer. This study provides a rationale for future development and evaluation of drug candidates targeting Gα12-related pathways for metastasis prevention.

  16. Oral histoplasmosis masquerading as oral cancer in HIV-infected patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Shafiulla; Sinha, Mahua; Chavan, Purushottam; Premalata, CS; Shivaprakash, MR; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Jayshree, Rudrapatna S

    2012-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is an endemic mycoses caused by Histoplasma capsulatum with endemicity around midwestern United States and central America. The endemicity of histoplasmosis in India is not clearly known. Histoplasmosis, especially oral histoplasmosis, is now increasingly being reported from India. We report here a culture-confirmed and sequence confirmed, oral histoplasmosis in a HIV seropositive individual who was referred to our regional cancer centre with a suspicion of oral cancer. PMID:24371747

  17. Black hairy tongue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gurvits, Grigoriy E; Tan, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Black hairy tongue (BHT) is a benign medical condition characterized by elongated filiform lingual papillae with typical carpet-like appearance of the dorsum of the tongue. Its prevalence varies geographically, typically ranging from 0.6% to 11.3%. Known predisposing factors include smoking, excessive coffee/black tea consumption, poor oral hygiene, trigeminal neuralgia, general debilitation, xerostomia, and medication use. Clinical presentation varies but is typically asymptomatic, although aesthetic concerns are common. Differential diagnosis includes pseudo-BHT, acanthosis nigricans, oral hairy leukoplakia, pigmented fungiform papillae of the tongue, and congenital melanocytic/melanotic nevi/macules. Clinical diagnosis relies on visual observation, detailed history taking, and occasionally microscopic evaluation. Treatment involves identification and discontinuation of the offending agent, modifications of chronic predisposing factors, patient’s re-assurance to the benign nature of the condition, and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene with gentle debridement to promote desquamation. Complications of BHT (burning mouth syndrome, halitosis, nausea, gagging, dysgeusia) typically respond to therapy. Prognosis is excellent with treatment of underlying medical conditions. BHT remains an important medical condition which may result in additional burden on the patient and health care system and requires appropriate prevention, recognition and treatment. PMID:25152586

  18. Assessing oral cancer knowledge among Saudi medical undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Kujan, Omar; Abuderman, Abdulwahab; Azzegahiby, Saleh; Alenzi, Faris Q; Idrees, Majdy

    2013-12-01

    Oral cancer is the sixth most common malignancy worldwide with more than 263,000 patients diagnosed in 2008. Nonspecialists' negative attitudes and poor working knowledge of oral cancer significantly contribute to suboptimal detection of early-stage disease which leads to delays in diagnosis. We aimed to assess the working knowledge and views associated with oral cancer prevention among medical students in Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey of 4th, 5th, and 6th year undergraduate medical students was undertaken. Questions included knowledge of oral cancer, risk factors, and opinions on oral cancer prevention. The overall response rate was 82 % (137/167). Mean score of cancer knowledge was 57.8 % which was below the expected standard of 70 %. Only 53 % correctly answered all questions related to oral cancer. This result had no association with either the academic year (p = 0.23) or gender (p = 0.37). Interestingly, 72 % of the respondents did not feel confident in performing an oral examination. Sixty-three percent of the medical students believed it to be beyond their role to aid patients in smoking cessation measures or to take part in other disease preventative strategies. This study demonstrates a dearth of knowledge relating to the diagnosis and management of oral cancer among clinical students within an established Saudi medical school. An immediate refinement of current medical curricula to address these deficiencies is warranted.

  19. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Postoperative Treatment of Oral Cavity Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Daniel R. Zhung, Joanne E.; Gomez, Jennifer; Chan, Kelvin; Wu, Abraham J.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Pfister, David G.; Shaha, Ashok; Shah, Jatin P.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Wong, Richard J.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To present our single-institution experience of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oral cavity cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and December 2006, 35 patients with histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity underwent surgery followed by postoperative IMRT. The sites included were buccal mucosa in 8, oral tongue in 11, floor of the mouth in 9, gingiva in 4, hard palate in 2, and retromolar trigone in 1. Most patients had Stage III-IV disease (80%). Ten patients (29%) also received concurrent postoperative chemotherapy with IMRT. The median prescribed radiation dose was 60 Gy. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 28.1 months (range, 11.9-85.1). Treatment failure occurred in 11 cases as follows: local in 4, regional in 2, and distant metastases in 5. Of the 5 patients with distant metastases, 2 presented with dermal metastases. The 2- and 3-year estimates of locoregional progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 84% and 77%, 85% and 85%, 70% and 64%, and 74% and 74%, respectively. Acute Grade 2 or greater dermatitis, mucositis, and esophageal reactions were experienced by 54%, 66%, and 40% of the patients, respectively. Documented late complications included trismus (17%) and osteoradionecrosis (5%). Conclusion: IMRT as an adjuvant treatment after surgical resection for oral cavity tumors is feasible and effective, with promising results and acceptable toxicity.

  20. Simulation for training in oral cancer biopsy: a surgical model and feedback from GDPs.

    PubMed

    Seoane, Juan; Varela-Centelles, Pablo; Esparza-Gómez, Germán; Cerero-Lapiedra, Rocío; Seoane-Romero, Juan M; Diz, Pedro

    2013-03-01

    To describe a new bench model for oral precancer/cancer biopsy training and to assess its effectiveness in terms of trainees' perception. Cross-sectional, descriptive, performed on 424 general dental practitioners (GDP) who undertook biopsies on a pig tongue. The participants were assessed by direct observation for 2.5 hours using specific check-lists and by means of a self-applied questionnaire. The workshop was perceived as "very interesting" even by those with previous surgical experience (Xi - Xj = 0.07; 95%CI= -0.20-0.09). Most GDPs considered themselves able to undertake oral biopsies on real patients after the workshop. Those who had previously received theoretical continuous education courses on oral biopsy scored higher values within the group (Xi - Xj = 0.20; 95%CI= 0.04-0.37). There is a need for including clinical abilities workshops when instructing on oral biopsy techniques. More studies are needed to validate the procedure and to address cognitive and communication skills.

  1. Is oral cancer incidence among patients with oral lichen planus/oral lichenoid lesions underestimated?

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Moles, M A; Gil-Montoya, J A; Ruiz-Avila, I; Bravo, M

    2017-02-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) and oral lichenoid lesions (OLL) are considered potentially malignant disorders with a cancer incidence of around 1% of cases, although this estimation is controversial. The aim of this study was to analyze the cancer incidence in a case series of patients with OLP and OLL and to explore clinicopathological aspects that may cause underestimation of the cancer incidence in these diseases. A retrospective study was conducted of 102 patients diagnosed with OLP (n = 21, 20.58%) or OLL (n = 81) between January 2006 and January 2016. Patients were informed of the risk of malignization and followed up annually. The number of sessions programmed for each patient was compared with the number actually attended. Follow-up was classified as complete (100% attendance), good (75-99%), moderate (25-74%), or poor (<25% attendance) compliance. Cancer was developed by four patients (3.9%), three males and one male. One of these developed three carcinomas, which were diagnosed at the follow-up visit (two in lower gingiva, one in floor of mouth); one had OLL and the other three had OLP. The carcinoma developed in mucosal areas with no OLP or OLL involvement in three of these patients, while OLP and cancer were diagnosed simultaneously in the fourth. Of the six carcinomas diagnosed, five (83.3%) were T1 and one (16.7%) T2. None were N+, and all patients remain alive and disease-free. The cancer incidence in OLP and OLL appears to be underestimated due to the strict exclusion criteria usually imposed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. [Research progress on the risk factors of geographic tongue].

    PubMed

    Huamei, Yang; Yu, Zhou; Xin, Zeng; Ga, Liao; Qianming, Chen

    2015-02-01

    Geographic tongue, also called benign migratory glossitis, is a common and superficial benign inflammatory disorder that affects the tongue epithelium. The majority of geographic tongue lesions typically manifest as irregular central erythematous patches. These lesions, which are caused by the loss of filiform papillae, are defined by an elevated whitish band-like border that can change location, size, and pattern over a period of time. Histological observations of the oral mucosa affected by geographic tongue revealed nonspecific inflammation. Some reports described cases of migratory stomatitis, wherein lesions simultaneously manifested on the extra lingual oral mucosa. This condition is also called ectopic geographic tongue, which is clinically and histologically similar to the type normally confined to the tongue. In most cases, patients are asymptomatic and do not require treatment. The condition may spontaneously exhibit periods of remission and exacerbation with good prognosis. The specific etiology of geographic tongue remains unknown. Geographic tongue is age-related and is prevalent among young individuals. Various etiological factors that have been suggested in literature include immunological factors, genetic factors, atopic or allergic tendency, emotional stress, tobacco consumption, hormonal disturbances, and zinc deficiency. Geographic tongue may coexist with other disorders, such as fissured tongue, psoriasis, diabetes mellitus, gastroin- testinal diseases, burning mouth syndrome, and Down syndrome. Experts currently disagree on whether geographic tongue is an oral manifestation of psoriasis. Moreover, some scholars suggest that geographic tongue is a prestage of fissured tongue. The objective of this review is to summarize current research on risk factors of geographic tongue.

  3. Enhancement of active MMP release and invasive activity of lymph node metastatic tongue cancer cells by elevated signaling via the TNF-α-TNFR1-NF-κB pathway and a possible involvement of angiopoietin-like 4 in lung metastasis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takuya; Imamura, Takahisa; Yoneda, Masakazu; Irie, Atsushi; Ogi, Hidenao; Nagata, Masashi; Yoshida, Ryoji; Fukuma, Daiki; Kawahara, Kenta; Shinohara, Masanori; Nakayama, Hideki

    2016-10-01

    To study the role of TNF-α in tongue cancer metastasis, we made highly metastatic cells from a human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line (SAS) by repeating the passage in which the cells were injected into a nude mouse tongue and harvested from metastasized cervical lymph nodes. Cancer cells after 5 passages (GSAS/N5) increased invasive activity 7-fold in a TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1)-dependent manner and enhanced mRNA expression of TNF-α and TNFR1. In the highly metastatic cells, NF-κB activation was upregulated via elevated phosphorylation of Akt and Ikkα/β in the signaling pathway and secretion of TNF-α, active MMP-2 and MMP-9 increased. Suppression of increase of TNF-α mRNA expression and MMP secretion by NF-κB inhibitor NBD peptide suggested a positive feedback loop in GSAS/N5 cells; TNF-α activates NF-κB and activated NF-κB induces further TNF-α secretion, leading to increase of active MMP release and promotion of invasion and metastasis of the cells. GSAS/N5 cells that had been injected into the nude mouse tongue and harvested from metastasized lungs multiplied angiopoietin-like 4 (angptl4) expression with enhanced migration activity, which indicated a possible involvement of angptl4 in lung metastasis of the cells. These results suggest that TNF-α and angptl4 promote metastasis of the oral cancer cells, thus, these molecules may be therapeutic targets for patients with tongue cancer.

  4. Atrophic tongue associated with Candida.

    PubMed

    Terai, Haruhiko; Shimahara, Masashi

    2005-08-01

    Traditionally, total atrophic tongue has been due to nutritional deficiencies, such as vitamin B12, folic acid, or iron deficiencies, and partial atrophic tongue has been well known as median rhomboid glossitis or geographic tongue. The other cause of atrophic tongue is oral candidiasis. Forty patients with atrophic change of the tongue were examined on a relation to candidiasis. All of them complained of tongue pain on spicy or hot diet. Laboratory examinations included blood examination for diabetes and anemia, culture test and direct cytologic examination. The intensity of tongue pain was evaluated pre- and post-treatment using visual analogue scale (VAS). Twenty-four of 40 (60%) had pre-disposing factors of candidiasis including diabetes mellitus, malignancy, systemic steroid therapy, long-term antibiotic therapy and others in their medical history. Blood examinations revealed mild anemia and/or Fe deficiency in 5 (12.5%), mild diabetes in 4 (10.0%), both in two, while residual 29 patients (72.5%) were within reference levels. In the culture examination, candidal species were isolated in 72.5%, and almost all of them were candida albicans. The direct cytologic examination performed in 17 of 40 patients, witch revealed pseudohyphae of fungi in 14 patients (82.4%). After the antifungal treatment, the tongue pain disappeared or improved markedly in 80%. Simultaneously, the regenerative tendency of filifolm papilla of the tongue dorsum was observed in these patients. Atrophic tongue associated with pain at eating, even though it is mild atrophic change, has a high probability of being a candida-induced lesion. Long disease duration and no benefit by topical steroids are suggestive and diagnostic factors of this disease.

  5. Characteristics of Oral Problems and Effects of Oral Care in Terminally Ill Patients With Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Nobuhisa

    2017-06-01

    Various distresses appear in the terminal stage of cancer. Oral problems including dry mouth, stomatitis and candidiasis are one of the important problems which should be resolved. The purpose of this study was to investigate oral problems in this stage and improvement of dry mouth by oral care. The study subjects were consecutive terminally ill cancer patients admitted over the past 2 years. Patients were divided based on the status of oral food intake into good oral food intake group (≥30%) and poor oral food intake group. The following 3 items were retrospectively investigated: 1) The incidences of these oral problems, 2) Severity of dry mouth and complication with other oral problems, 3) Improvement of dry mouth using standard oral care by nursing staff and specialist oral care including dentists as needed. There were 115 and 158 patients in good and poor oral intake groups, respectively. 1) The incidences of dry mouth, stomatitis, and candidiasis were significantly higher in poor oral intake group ( p < 0.001). 2) Severe cases of dry mouth (Grade-2&3) were noted in 20.0% and 64.8% in good and poor oral intake groups, respectively ( p < 0.0001). Candidiasis complication rate was significantly higher in poor oral intake group ( p = 0.0002). 3) The rate of dry mouth improvement by oral care was 100% in Grade-1, 86% in Grade-2 and 81% in Grade-3. Oral problems occur in many of terminally ill cancer patients. Accurate diagnosis of oral problems and corresponding appropriate interventions are important for improving quality of end-of-life care.

  6. Profiling cancer risk in oral potentially malignant disorders-A patient cohort study.

    PubMed

    Thomson, P J; Goodson, M L; Smith, D R

    2017-08-20

    Oral potentially malignant disorders harbour variable and unpredictable risk for squamous carcinoma development. Whilst current management strategies utilise histopathological diagnoses, dysplasia grading and targeted intervention for "high-risk" lesions, clinicians are unable to predict malignant potential. Detailed, retrospective clinico-pathological analysis of potentially malignant lesions undergoing malignant transformation, from a 590 patient cohort treated by interventional laser surgery and followed for a mean of 7.3 years, was undertaken. Clinical outcome was documented at study census date (31 December 2014). A total of 99 patients (16.8%) developed cancer: 71 (12%) seen "unexpectedly" upon excision and 28 (4.8%) progressing to malignancy at a median of 87.3 months post-surgery. Thirty "unexpected" excisions were micro-invasive (42.3%) arising primarily in severely dysplastic precursors (75%) at ventro-lateral tongue and floor of mouth sites (54.5%); 1 patient (1.4%) had a cancer-related death, whilst 58 (81.7%) were disease free. A total of 19 of 28 "progressive" cancers (67.9%) arose at new sites, with erythroleukoplakia a significant predictor of malignancy (P = .0019). Nine (32.1%) developed at the same precursor site, with 6 (77.7%) on the ventro-lateral tongue and floor of mouth. Three (10.7%) were micro-invasive, 9 patients (32.1%) died from metastatic disease and 12 (42.9%) were disease free (P < .001). Squamous carcinoma may arise at the site of a precursor lesion as transformation or new-site development via field cancerisation. Whilst interventional surgery facilitates early diagnosis and treatment of occult disease, thus reducing risk from same-site transformation, new-site cancer is a significant long-term risk for patients with potentially malignant disorder. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Differential susceptibility to hydrogen sulfide-induced apoptosis between PHLDA1-overexpressing oral cancer cell lines and oral keratinocytes: role of PHLDA1 as an apoptosis suppressor.

    PubMed

    Murata, Takatoshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Kamoda, Takeshi; Moriyama, Hiromitsu; Kumazawa, Yasuo; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a novel gasotransmitter that plays multiple biological roles in various body systems. In addition to its endogenous production, H2S is produced by bacteria colonizing digestive organs, including the oral cavity. H2S was previously shown to enhance pro-apoptotic effects in cancer cell lines, although the mechanisms involved remain unclear. To properly assess the anti-cancer effects of H2S, however, investigations of apoptotic effects in normal cells are also necessary. The aims of this study were (1) to compare the susceptibility to H2S-induced apoptosis between the oral cancer cell line Ca9-22 and oral keratinocytes that were derived from healthy gingiva, and (2) to identify candidate genes involved in the induction of apoptosis by H2S. The susceptibility to H2S-induced apoptosis in Ca9-22 cells was significantly higher than that in keratinocytes. H2S exposure in Ca9-22 cells, but not keratinocytes, enhanced the expression of pleckstrin homology-like domain, family A, member 1 (PHLDA1), which was identified through a differential display method. In addition, PHLDA1 expression increased during actinomycin D-induced apoptosis in Ca9-22 cells. Knockdown of PHLDA1 expression by small interfering RNA in Ca9-22 cells led to expression of active caspase 3, thus indicating apoptosis induction. The tongue cancer cell line SCC-25, which expresses PHLDA1 at a high level, showed similar effects. Our data indicate that H2S is an anti-cancer compound that may contribute to the low incidence of oral cancer. Furthermore, we demonstrated the role of PHLDA1 as an apoptosis suppressor. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tyrrhena Tongue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    23 March 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a tongue of debris at the base of the wall of a large crater in Terra Tyrrhena. The tongue is the combined product of landsliding and emplacement of crater ejecta-a 3 km (1.9 mi) wide impact crater formed on the rim of the larger crater and, when it did, it caused the movement which created the tongue. About one third of the crater that caused this can be seen near the southwest (lower left) corner of the image.

    Location near: 21.1oS, 270.0oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  9. Soft tissue management and prosthetic rehabilitation in a tongue cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Umberto; Lollobrigida, Marco; Palaia, Gaspare; Laurito, Domenica; Cugnetto, Riccardo; De Biase, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    One major challenge in treating head and neck oncologic patients is to achieve an acceptable recovery of physiologic functions compatible with the complete tumor excision. However, after tumor resection, some patients present a surgically altered anatomy incompatible with prosthetic rehabilitation, unless some soft tissue correction is carried out. The aim of the present study is to describe the overall mandibular prosthetic rehabilitation of a postoncologic patient focusing on the possibility of soft tissue correction as a part of the treatment. A 72-year-old woman, who undergone a hemiglossectomy for squamous cell carcinoma several years before, was referred to our department needing a new prosthesis. The patient presented partial mandibular edentulism, defects in tongue mobility, and a bridge of scar tissue connecting one side of the tongue to the alveolar ridge. A diode laser (980 nm) was used to remove the fibrous scar tissue. After reestablishing a proper vestibular depth and soft tissue morphology, two implants were placed in the interforaminal region of the mandible to support an overdenture.

  10. Oral paracetamol (acetaminophen) for cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Wiffen, Philip J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; McNicol, Ewan D; Bell, Rae F; Carr, Daniel B; McIntyre, Mairead; Wee, Bee

    2017-07-12

    Pain is a common symptom with cancer, and 30% to 50% of all people with cancer will experience moderate to severe pain that can have a major negative impact on their quality of life. Non-opioid drugs are commonly used to treat mild to moderate cancer pain, and are recommended for this purpose in the WHO cancer pain treatment ladder, either alone or in combination with opioids.A previous Cochrane review that examined the evidence for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or paracetamol, alone or combined with opioids, for cancer pain was withdrawn in 2015 because it was out of date; the date of the last search was 2005. This review, and another on NSAIDs, updates the evidence. To assess the efficacy of oral paracetamol (acetaminophen) for cancer pain in adults and children, and the adverse events reported during its use in clinical trials. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, and Embase from inception to March 2017, together with reference lists of retrieved papers and reviews, and two online study registries. We included randomised, double-blind, studies of five days' duration or longer, comparing paracetamol alone with placebo, or paracetamol in combination with an opioid compared with the same dose of the opioid alone, for cancer pain of any intensity. Single-blind and open studies were also eligible for inclusion. The minimum study size was 25 participants per treatment arm at the initial randomisation. Two review authors independently searched for studies, extracted efficacy and adverse event data, and examined issues of study quality and potential bias. We did not carry out any pooled analyses. We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE and created a 'Summary of findings' table. Three studies in adults satisfied the inclusion criteria, lasting up to one week; 122 participants were randomised initially, and 95 completed treatment. We found no studies in children. One study was parallel-group, and

  11. Does elective neck dissection in T1/T2 carcinoma of the oral tongue and floor of the mouth influence recurrence and survival rates?

    PubMed

    Kelner, Natalie; Vartanian, José Guilherme; Pinto, Clóvis Antônio Lopes; Coutinho-Camillo, Cláudia Malheiros; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of elective neck dissection compared with observation (control group) in selected cases of early carcinoma of the oral tongue and floor of the mouth. It was a retrospective analysis of 222 patients who had the tumour resected (161 also had elective neck dissection). Occult lymph node metastases were detected in 33/161 (21%), and neck recurrences were diagnosed in 10 of the 61 patients in the control group (16%). Occult lymph node metastases reduced the 5-year disease-specific survival from 90% to 65% (p=0.001) and it was 96% among the controls. The 5-year disease-specific survival was 85% in the group treated by neck dissection and 96% in the observation group (p=0.09). Rigorous follow-up of selected low risk patients is associated with high rates of salvage, and overall survival was similar to the observed survival in patients treated by elective neck dissection. Observation is a reasonable option in the treatment of selected patients. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential spheroid formation by oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Carlin; Lee, Casey; Atakilit, Amha; Siu, Amanda; Ramos, Daniel M

    2014-12-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) make up 96% of all oral cancers. Most laboratory SCC studies grow cells as a monolayer, which does not accurately represent the disease in vivo. We used a more relevant multicellular spheroid (MCS) model to study this disease. The SCC9β6KDFyn cell line, which expresses full-length β6 and a kinase dead Fyn formed the largest MCS. Cell adhesive properties are dynamic and N-cadherin was increased in the largest MCS. c-Raf mediates the survival of tumor cells and was consistently expressed both in monolayers and in the MCS by SCC9β6D1 cells which lack the β6 cytoplasmic tail and, do not activate Fyn. SCC9β6KDFyn cells also express high levels of c-Raf when grown as spheroids in which Fyn suppression stimulates MCS formation. Tumor microenvironment and growth patterns modulate cell behavior and suppression of Fyn kinase may promote MCS growth.

  13. Vascularity as assessed by Doppler intraoral ultrasound around the invasion front of tongue cancer is a predictor of pathological grade of malignancy and cervical lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Chika; Yuasa, Kenji; Okamura, Kazuhiko; Shiraishi, Tomoko; Miwa, Kunihiro

    2016-01-01

    To quantitatively evaluate the relationship of vascularity of tongue cancer as demonstrated on intraoral ultrasonography images and tumour thickness with pathological grade of malignancy and the presence of cervical lymph node metastases. 18 patients with tongue cancer were enrolled in this retrospective study. Using Doppler ultrasonography images of the invasion front of the cancers along the length of their tumour boundaries, three vascular indexes were analysed quantitatively, namely ratio of blood flow signal area within the cancer to whole tumour area (BAR), blood flow signal number ratio (BNR) and blood flow signal width ratio (BWR). The associations between these three indexes and occurrence of cervical lymph node metastasis and pathological grade of malignancy [Yamamoto-Kohama (YK) classification] were assessed. Furthermore, the relationship between tumour thickness and occurrence of cervical lymph node metastasis was evaluated on B-mode intraoral ultrasonography images. There was no significant association between BAR and tumour thickness or occurrence of cervical lymph node metastasis. The BNRs and BWRs of patients with cervical lymph node metastasis were significantly higher than those of patients without nodal involvement. The BWRs of patients with high-grade malignancy (YK-4C) were significantly higher than those of patients with low-grade malignancy (YK-2 or 3). BNR and BWR on the invasion front of the tongue cancer are predictors of pathological grade of malignancy and cervical lymph node metastasis.

  14. New method for evaluation of tongue-coating status.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, T; Ueda, T; Sakurai, K

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the viability of Tongue Coating Index, which is a new method for evaluating tongue-coating status. To determine the reliability and reproducibility of our new evaluation criteria (Score 0: Tongue coating not visible; Score 1: Tongue coating thin, papillae of tongue visible; Score 2: Tongue coating very thick, papillae of tongue not visible), 10 observers evaluated 20 photographs of tongues. Each tongue surface was divided into nine sections. Observers evaluated each section according to our new criteria and each score for tongue-coating status was recorded in the pertinent section of the Tongue Coating Record form. They repeated the same evaluation 2 weeks after the first evaluation. The relationship between the scores obtained and number of oral microorganisms was investigated in 50 edentulous patients. Tongue coating was collected from the tongue surface after evaluation of tongue-coating status. The total number of anaerobic bacteria and the number of Candida species were counted from the specimens collected. Interobserver agreement and intraobserver agreement were 0.66 and 0.80 by Cohen's kappa, respectively. No significant difference was observed in the number of Candida species among the three scores. The number of total anaerobic bacteria, however, was significantly different among the scores (P < 0.05). Therefore, we conclude that our method for evaluating tongue-coating status offers new criteria that are superior in reliability and reproducibility, and that also reflect the total number of anaerobic bacteria present on the dorsum of the tongue.

  15. Emodin, aloe-emodin and rhein inhibit migration and invasion in human tongue cancer SCC-4 cells through the inhibition of gene expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Yin; Chiang, Su-Yin; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Ma, Yi-Shih; Liao, Ching-Lung; Weng, Shu-Wen; Lai, Tung-Yuan; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2010-05-01

    Emodin, aloe-emodin and rhein are major compounds in rhubarb (Rheum palmatum L.), used in Chinese herbal medicine, and found to have antitumor properties including cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in many human cancer cells. Our previous studies also showed that emodin, aloe-emodin and rhein induced apoptosis in human tongue cancer SCC-4 cells. However, the detail regarding emodin, aloe-emodin and rhein affecting migration and invasion in SCC-4 cells are not clear. In the present study, we investigated whether or not emodin, aloe-emodin and rhein inhibited migration and invasion of SCC-4 cells. Herein, we demonstrate that emodin, aloe-emodin and rhein inhibit the protein levels and activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) but did not affect gene expression of MMP-2, however, they inhibited the gene expression of MMP-9 and all also inhibited the migration and invasion of human tongue cancer SCC-4 cells. MMP-9 (gelatinase-B) plays an important role and is the most associated with tumor migration, invasion and metastasis in various human cancers. Results from zymography and Western blotting showed that emodin, aloe-emodin and rhein treatment decrease the levels of MMP-2, urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA) in a concentration-dependent manner. The order of inhibition of associated protein levels and gene expression of migration and invasion in SCC-4 cells are emodin >aloe-emodin >rhein. Our results provide new insight into the mechanisms by which emodin, aloe-emodin and rhein inhibit tongue cancers. In conclusion, these findings suggest that molecular targeting of MMP-9 mRNA expression by emodin, aloe-emodin and rhein might be a useful strategy for chemo-prevention and/or chemo-therapeutics of tongue cancers.

  16. Development of a mobile application for oral cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Mayra Sousa; Bonan, Paulo Rogério Ferreti; Ferreira, Vitor Yuri Nicolau; de Lucena Pereira, Laudenice; Correia, Ricardo João Cruz; da Silva Teixeira, Hélder Bruno; Pereira, Daniel Cláudio; Bonan, Paulo

    2017-01-01

    To develop a mobile application (app) for oral cancer screening. The app was developed using Android system version 4.4.2, with JAVA language. Information concerning sociodemographic data and risk factors for oral cancer development, e.g., tobacco and alcohol use, sun exposure and other contributing factors, such as unprotected oral sex, oral pain and denture use, were included. We surveyed a population at high risk for oral cancer development and then evaluated the sensitivity/specificity/accuracy and predictive values of clinical oral diagnosis between two blinded trained examiners, who used movies and data from the app, and in loco oral examination as gold-standard. A total of 55 individuals at high risk for oral cancer development were surveyed. Of these, 31% presented homogeneous/heterogeneous white lesions with potential of malignancy. The clinical diagnoses performed by the two examiners using videos were found to have sensitivity of 82%-100% (average 91%), specificity of 81%-100% (average 90.5%), and accuracy of 87.27%-95.54% (average 90.90%), as compared with the gold-standard. The Kappa agreement value between the gold-standard and the examiner with the best agreement was 0.597. Mobile apps including videos and data collection interfaces could be an interesting alternative in oral cancer research development.

  17. [Metastatic renal tumor from oral floor cancer: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yusuke; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Okamoto, Teppei; Suzuki, Yuichiro; Kudo, Shigemasa; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Koie, Takuya; Kamimura, Noritaka; Sakaki, Hirotaka; Kobayashi, Wataru; Kimura, Hiroto; Ohyama, Chikara

    2012-11-01

    A 61-year-old man with oral floor cancer (adenoid cystic carcinoma, T2N0M1) was treated with systemicc hemotherapy and radiation therapy at the department of dentistry and oral surgery in our hospital. He had three lung metastases and renal tumors detected by screening computed tomography. The oral floor cancer responded to the treatment to achieve partial response. However, lung and renal metastases did not respond to chemotherapy. Then, the patient was referred to our clinic to rule out the possibility of lung metastasis from renal cell carcinoma. Laparoscopic left nephrectomy was performed and pathological examination on the renal lesions revealed adenoid cystic carcinoma, which had identical histopathological features to the oral floor cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first report of metastatic renal tumor from oral floor cancer (adenoid cystic carcinoma).

  18. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Description and incidence of oral complications

    SciTech Connect

    Dreizen, S. )

    1990-01-01

    No part of the body reflects the complications of cancer chemotherapy as visibly and as vividly as the mouth. The infectious, hemorrhagic, cytotoxic, nutritional, and neurologic signs of drug toxicity are reflected in the mouth by changes in the color, character, comfort, and continuity of the mucosa. The stomatologic complications of radiotherapy for oral cancer are physical and physiological in nature, transient or lasting in duration, and reversible or irreversible in type. Some linger as permanent mementos long after the cancer has been destroyed. They stem from radiation injury to the salivary glands, oral mucosa, oral musculature, alveolar bone, and developing teeth. They are expressed clinically by xerostomia, trismus, radiation dermatitis, nutritional stomatitis, and dentofacial malformation. In both cancer chemotherapy and cancer radiotherapy, the oral complications vary in pattern, duration, intensity, and number, with not every patient developing every complication. 21 references.

  19. Bacterial infections complicating tongue piercing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Catherine Hy; Minnema, Brian J; Gold, Wayne L

    2010-01-01

    Tongue piercing has become an increasingly popular form of body art. However, this procedure can occasionally be complicated by serious bacterial infections. The present article reports a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by a Gemella species in a patient with a pierced tongue, and reviews 18 additional cases of local and systemic bacterial infections associated with tongue piercing. Infections localized to the oral cavity and head and neck region included molar abscess, glossal abscess, glossitis, submandibular lymphadenitis, submandibular sialadenitis, Ludwig's angina and cephalic tetanus. Infections distal to the piercing site included eight cases of infective endocarditis, one case of chorioamnionitis and one case of cerebellar abscess. Oropharyngeal flora were isolated from all cases. While bacterial infections following tongue piercing are rare, there are reports of potentially life-threatening infections associated with the procedure. Both piercers and their clients should be aware of these potential complications, and standardized infection prevention and control practices should be adopted by piercers to reduce the risk.

  20. Predicting Scheduling and Attending for an Oral Cancer Examination

    PubMed Central

    Shepperd, James A.; Emanuel, Amber S.; Howell, Jennifer L.; Logan, Henrietta L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral and pharyngeal cancer is highly treatable if diagnosed early, yet late diagnosis is commonplace apparently because of delays in undergoing an oral cancer examination. Purpose We explored predictors of scheduling and attending an oral cancer examination among a sample of Black and White men who were at high risk for oral cancer because they smoked. Methods During an in-person interview, participants (N = 315) from rural Florida learned about oral and pharyngeal cancer, completed survey measures, and were offered a free examination in the next week. Later, participants received a follow-up phone call to explore why they did or did not attend their examination. Results Consistent with the notion that scheduling and attending an oral cancer exam represent distinct decisions, we found that the two outcomes had different predictors. Defensive avoidance and exam efficacy predicted scheduling an examination; exam efficacy and having coping resources, time, and transportation predicted attending the examination. Open-ended responses revealed that the dominant reasons participants offered for missing a scheduled examination was conflicting obligations, forgetting, and confusion or misunderstanding about the examination. Conclusions The results suggest interventions to increase scheduling and attending an oral cancer examination. PMID:26152644

  1. Early diagnosis in primary oral cancer: is it possible?

    PubMed

    van der Waal, Isaäc; de Bree, Remco; Brakenhoff, Ruud; Coebergh, Jan-Willem

    2011-05-01

    In this treatise oral carcinogenesis is briefly discussed, particularly with regard to the number of cell divisions that is required before cancer reaches a measurable size. At that stage, metastatic spread may have already taken place. Therefore, the term "early diagnosis" is somewhat misleading. The delay in diagnosis of oral cancer is caused both by patients' delay and doctors' delay. The total delay, including scheduling delay, work-up delay and treatment planning delay, varies in different studies, but averages some six months. The total delay is more or less evenly distributed between patients' and doctors' delay and is partly due to the unawareness of oral cancer among the public and professionals, and partly to barriers in the health care system that may prevent patients from seeking dental and medical care. Due to the relatively low incidence of oral cancer it will be difficult to increase the awareness of this cancer type among the public, thereby reducing patients' delay. However, it should be possible to considerably reduce doctors' delay by increasing the awareness of oral cancer among professionals and by improving their diagnostic ability. Population-based annual or semi-annual screening for oral cancer is not cost-effective, high-risk groups such as heavy smokers and drinkers perhaps excluded. Dentists and physicians, and also oral hygienists and nurse practitioners, may play a valuable role in such screening programs.

  2. Significance of DNMT3b in oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Miao-Fen; Lin, Paul-Yang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore specific molecular markers that could lead to new insights into the identification of innovative treatments. The role of DNMT3b and its predictive power in the prognosis of oral cancer were identified. Human oral cancer cell lines including SCC4 and SCC25 were selected for cellular experiments. Changes in tumor growth, aggressiveness and the responsible signaling pathway were investigated in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, 125 oral cancer tissue specimens were analyzed using immunohistochemical staining on tissue microarray slides, and correlations calculated between the level of DNMT3b and the clinical outcome of patients. Our data revealed that inhibition of DNMT3b resulted in slower tumor growth, attenuated tumor invasion ability and epithelial mesenchymal transition, as determined by in vitro and in vivo experiments. Activated IL-6 signaling might be responsible to the induction of DNMT3b overexpression on oral cancer. Regarding clinical data, the incidence of DNMT3b immunoreactivity in oral cancer specimens was significantly higher than in non-malignant epithelium, and positively linked to expression of IL-6. Furthermore, expression of DNMT3b was significantly linked with the risk of lymph node involvement, disease recurrence and shorter survival in patients with pathological stage III-IV oral cancer. In conclusion, IL-6 -DNMT3b axis could be used to predict the prognosis of oral cancer in clinics, and targeting DNMT3b could represent a promising treatment strategy.

  3. Oral cancer: knowledge, practices and opinions of dentists in yemen.

    PubMed

    Alaizari, Nader Ahmed; Al-Maweri, Sadeq Ali

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer presents with high mortality rates, and the likelihood of survival is remarkably superior when detected early. Dental professionals have an important role and responsibility in prevention and early detection of oral cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge, practices and opinions regarding oral cancer among dentists in Yemen. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire involving private and public dental practitioners, working in different governorates in Yemen. Of the 800 dentists surveyed, a total of 221 questionnaires were completed and returned (response rate 27.6%). A vast majority of dentists (96.38%) identified tobacco as the major risk factor for oral cancer, and 82.8% knew that squamous cell carcinoma is the most common form. While 47.1% of the dentists agreed that they were adequately trained in oral cancer screening, the majority (86%) believed that they need further training in oral cancer screening. These results suggest that additional training and continuing educational programs on prevention and early detection of oral cancer for dentists are to be highly recommended.

  4. Functional comparison after reconstruction with a radial forearm free flap or a pectoralis major flap for cancer of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Su, Wan-Fu; Hsia, Yi-Jan; Chang, Yen-Chine; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Sheng, Hwa

    2003-03-01

    Numerous patients in Taiwan with tongue carcinoma require tongue reconstruction. We compared the abilities of 2 methods of tongue reconstruction to reserve tongue function. Sixty patients underwent resection of the tumors and reconstruction with a pectoralis major flap or a radial forearm flap. The Chinese articulation test was used to evaluate the place and manner of error production, and a questionnaire on dietary habits was used to evaluate deglutition 6 months to 10 years after reconstruction. Patients with the free flap had more intelligible speech. The questionnaire study showed no significant difference between the 2 groups in swallowing rating. Motility caused by flap pliability increased speech intelligibility more than it did on swallowing function. Our experience in a few selected patients shows that the functional outcome of tongue surgery is related to the reconstruction methods used (for speech) and to the extent of tongue resection (for swallowing).

  5. Optical screening of oral cancer: technology for emerging markets.

    PubMed

    Naik, Sarif Kumar; Gupta, Lalit; Mittal, Chetan; Balakrishnan, Srinivasan; Rath, Satish Prasad; Santhosh, C; Pai, Keerthilatha M

    2007-01-01

    Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer in the world. It is one of the most prevalent cancers in the developing countries of South Asia accounting for one third of the world burden. Sixty percent of the cancers are advanced by the time they are detected. Two methods of optical spectroscopy for detection of oral cancer have been discussed here. These methods are simple, easy to handle and non-invasive. The evaluation of the data is done automatically using pattern recognition techniques, making the screening subjective.

  6. [Evaluation of a combination chemotherapy with nedaplatin and 5-FU for oral cancers].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, G; Shimada, T; Nishida, T; Ishida, Y; Iba, T; Nakata, T; Ohtsuki, T; Takigami, K; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoshitake, K; Tanaka, A; Tsuda, Y

    2001-08-01

    Nedaplatin (cis-diammine-glycolato platinum: CDGP) is a platinum compound with a molecular weight of 303.18 that was recently developed in Japan. There have been reports of the antineoplastic effects of Nedaplatin on cancers in the cranio-cervical region, lung, esophagus, urinary bladder, testis, ovary, and uterus. In this study, we performed combined therapy of CDGP and fluorouracil (5-FU) for 8 patients with oral cancers, and evaluated the results to elucidate the clinical effect and adverse side effects. The subjects were 8 patients with squamous cell carcinoma (5 males and 3 females aged 33-65 years). The primary carcinoma regions were the tongue in 5 patients, oral floor in 2 patients, and mandibular gingiva in 1 patient. The T-classification was T2 in 6 patients and T4 in 2 patients, and the clinical staging was Stage II in 5 patients, Stage III in 1 patient and Stage IV in 2 patients. We first administered 700 mg/m2 5-FU per day from day 1 to day 5 (total dose 3,500 mg/m2), then 90 mg/m2 CDGP on day 5. The clinical effect was evaluated as a partial response in all cases, showing a 100% success rate. The histopathological findings of resected tumors were evaluated by Ohboshi and Shimozato's classification. One patient was Grade IIA, 5 patients Grade IIB, and 2 patients Grade III. The adverse side effects were slight myelotoxicity, gagging, nausea, alopecia, and stomatitis less than Grade II. Although the oral cancers in this study were extroverted superficial ulcerative cancers, and the number of patients was low at 8, this combined therapy is considered useful and worth evaluating in further accumulated cases.

  7. [Application of exfoliated cells in early diagnosis of oral cancer].

    PubMed

    Liu, T; Zhang, X Y; Sun, Z

    2017-03-09

    Exfoliative cytology is a simple and non-invasive examination method that is easily accepted by the patient. A number of new techniques are used to further increase the accuracy of sample collecting. It is widely used in the detection of cervical, oral cavity and various coelom exfoliated cells. This article reviews the development of exfoliative cytology in oral cancer diagnosis. It is realized that the qualitative and quantitative analysis of cancer and precancerous lesions, through DNA quantitative analysis to calculate DNA index (DI value), multiple parameter analysis and statistical modeling calculation to evaluate oral cancer risk index (OCRI) of the patient has great significance in cancer screening, early diagnosis and prognosis review, especially in the field of oral cancer.

  8. Oral cancer: the association between nation-based alcohol-drinking profiles and oral cancer mortality.

    PubMed

    Petti, Stefano; Scully, Crispian

    2005-09-01

    The unclear association between different nation-based alcohol-drinking profiles and oral cancer mortality was investigated using, as observational units, 20 countries from Europe, Northern America, Far Eastern Asia, with cross-nationally comparable data. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were run with male age-standardised, mortality rate (ASMR) as explanatory variable and annual adult alcohol consumption, adult smoking prevalence, life expectancy, as explanatory. Large between-country differences in ASMR (range, 0.88-6.87 per 100,000) were found, but the mean value was similar to the global estimate (3.31 vs. 3.09 per 100,000). Differences in alcohol consumption (2.06-21.03 annual litres per capita) and in distribution between beverages were reported. Wine was the most prevalent alcoholic beverage in 45% of cases. Significant increases in ASMR for every litre of pure ethanol (0.15 per 100,000; 95 CI, 0.01-0.29) and spirits (0.26 per 100,000; 95 CI, 0.03-0.49), non-significant effects for beer and wine were estimated. The impact of alcohol on oral cancer deaths would be higher than expected and the drinking profile could affect cancer mortality, probably because of the different drinking pattern of spirit drinkers, usually consuming huge alcohol quantities on single occasions, and the different concentrations of ethanol and cancer-preventing compounds such as polyphenols, in the various beverages.

  9. Ankyloglossia (tongue-tie): a diagnostic and treatment quandary.

    PubMed

    Kotlow, L A

    1999-04-01

    The tongue is an important oral structure that affects speech, the position of teeth, periodontal tissue, nutrition, swallowing, nursing, and certain social activities. Ankyloglossia (tongue-tie) limits the range of motion of the tongue, impairing its ability to fulfill its functions. In this article, diagnostic criteria needed to evaluate and treat ankyloglossia are suggested, and a method for classifying ankyloglossia is proposed.

  10. Factors associated with lip and oral cavity cancer.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Isabella Lima Arrais; de Medeiros, Júlia Julliêta; Rodrigues, Larycia Vicente; Valença, Ana Maria Gondim; Lima Neto, Eufrásio de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify factors associated with the occurrence of primary cancer of the lip and oral cavity regions compared to other types of head and neck cancers according to demographic, socioeconomic data and lifestyle, in Brazil, from 2000 to 2011. A study was conducted using Hospital Cancer Records (Instituto Nacional do Câncer), from 2000 to 2011, totaling 23,153 cases. Data were analyzed by binary logistic regression (response category: primary cancers located in the lip and oral cavity; comparison category; other types of primary cancer in the head and neck, which does not affect the lip and oral cavity) at a significance level α = 5%. The study showed factors associated with higher incidence of cancer in the lip and oral cavity: being of advanced age (OR = 1.16), not having a family history of cancer (OR = 2.38), alcohol consumption (OR = 1.17); former tobacco use (OR = 1.51) or current tobacco use (OR = 1.65); having a previous diagnosis of cancer without treatment (OR =1.66). Being female (OR = 0.92), having completed basic (OR = 0.71) and higher (OR = 0.46) education and having previous diagnosis of cancer with treatment (OR = 0.74) constituted factors associated with lower prevalence of cancer of the lip and oral cavity. Age, absence of family history of cancer, smoking habits and alcohol consumption, and previous diagnosis of cancer without treatment were associated with a higher incidence of cancer of the lip and oral cavity.

  11. Preoperative oral health care reduces postoperative inflammation and complications in oral cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Shigeishi, Hideo; Ohta, Kouji; Fujimoto, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Mizuta, Kuniko; Ono, Shigehiro; Shimasue, Hiroshi; Ninomiya, Yoshiaki; Higashikawa, Koichiro; Tada, Misato; Ishida, Fumi; Okui, Gaku; Okumura, Toshiya; Fukui, Akiko; Kubozono, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Ishida, Yoko; Seino, Sayaka; Hashikata, Miho; Sasaki, Kazuki; Naruse, Takako; Rahman, Mohammad Zeshaan; Uetsuki, Ryo; Nimiya, Akiko; Takamoto, Megumi; Dainobu, Kana; Tokikazu, Tomoko; Nishi, Hiromi; Sugiyama, Masaru; Takechi, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    The records of 70 patients with oral cancer who were treated at a single institution between 2008 and 2014 were reviewed. The body temperature, white blood cell count, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were compared between those who had received preoperative oral care (oral care group) and those who had not received any (non-oral care group). When the patients were divided into those who underwent minimally invasive surgery and those who underwent severely invasive surgery, the mean CRP level in the early postoperative period was lower in the oral care group as compared with the non-oral care group in those who underwent minimally invasive surgery as well as those who underwent severely invasive surgery. However, the mean CRP level was most evidently reduced in the severely invasive group on days 1 and 3–5. However, no significant differences were observed with regard to the percentage of postoperative infectious complications (for example, surgical site infection, anastomotic leak and pneumonia) between the oral care (13.6%) and non-oral care (20.8%) groups, though a reduced prevalence of postoperative complications following preoperative oral care was noted. The results of the present study suggest that preoperative oral care can decrease inflammation during the early postoperative stage in patients with oral cancer who undergo severely invasive surgery. PMID:27588111

  12. [Superselective intra-arterial infusion therapy with docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil for head and neck cancer--for tongue cancer patients in comparison patients with other therapies].

    PubMed

    Furusaka, Tohru

    2006-09-01

    In order to cure head and neck cancer without resection, chemotherapy (superselective intra-arterial infusion therapy with DCF) was conducted by anterograde, superselective intra-arterial infusion of 50-60 mg/m(2) of DOC and 50-60 mg/m(2) of CDDP via the femoral artery on day 1 followed by continuous intravenous instillation of 600-750 mg/m(2)/day of 5-FU for 5 days from day 2. A total of 70 patients with advanced and recurrent cancer of the head and neck have been treated since April 2000. With the median follow-up duration of 1,017 days, the survival rate was 92.7% and the organ preservation rate was 90.1%. Almost no complications associated with this therapy were observed. Due to space limitations, here we report only cases of tongue cancer. Histological CR was obtained from all 19 patients with squamous cell cancer of the tongue. With the median follow-up duration of 1,371 days (45.7 months: 471-2, 133 days), the survival rate was 94.74% and the organ preservation rate was 88.42% by the Kaplan-Meier method. For both the survival rate and organ preservation rate, extremely good results were obtained by the superselective intra-arterial infusion therapy with DCF compared to the intravenous infusion therapy using a combination of CDDP and 5-FU (five-year survival rate: 20%) as well as the superselective intra-arterial infusion of CDDP alone followed by continuous intravenous infusion of 5-FU (five year survival rate: 28.5%) that had been conducted before. Major adverse effects observed were leukopenia and alopecia. Although patients who underwent concurrent radiation therapy developed mucositis and dermatitis, both were reversible changes.

  13. Speech after Radial Forearm Free Flap Reconstruction of the Tongue: A Longitudinal Acoustic Study of Vowel and Diphthong Sounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laaksonen, Juha-Pertti; Rieger, Jana; Happonen, Risto-Pekka; Harris, Jeffrey; Seikaly, Hadi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use acoustic analyses to describe speech outcomes over the course of 1 year after radial forearm free flap (RFFF) reconstruction of the tongue. Eighteen Canadian English-speaking females and males with reconstruction for oral cancer had speech samples recorded (pre-operative, and 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year…

  14. Speech after Radial Forearm Free Flap Reconstruction of the Tongue: A Longitudinal Acoustic Study of Vowel and Diphthong Sounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laaksonen, Juha-Pertti; Rieger, Jana; Happonen, Risto-Pekka; Harris, Jeffrey; Seikaly, Hadi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use acoustic analyses to describe speech outcomes over the course of 1 year after radial forearm free flap (RFFF) reconstruction of the tongue. Eighteen Canadian English-speaking females and males with reconstruction for oral cancer had speech samples recorded (pre-operative, and 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year…

  15. Preventing Complications from High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy when Treating Mobile Tongue Cancer via the Application of a Modular Lead-Lined Spacer

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Shumei; Verdonschot, Rinus G.; Kakimoto, Naoya; Sumida, Iori; Fujiwara, Masateru; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Furukawa, Souhei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To point out the advantages and drawbacks of high-dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of mobile tongue cancer and indicate the clinical importance of modular lead-lined spacers when applying this technique to patients. Methods First, all basic steps to construct the modular spacer are shown. Second, we simulate and evaluate the dose rate reduction for a wide range of spacer configurations. Results With increasing distance to the source absorbed doses dropped considerably. Significantly more shielding was obtained when lead was added to the spacer and this effect was most pronounced on shorter (i.e. more clinically relevant) distances to the source. Conclusions The modular spacer represents an important addition to the planning and treatment stages of mobile tongue cancer using HDR-ISBT. PMID:27128434

  16. Preventing Complications from High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy when Treating Mobile Tongue Cancer via the Application of a Modular Lead-Lined Spacer.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shumei; Verdonschot, Rinus G; Kakimoto, Naoya; Sumida, Iori; Fujiwara, Masateru; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Furukawa, Souhei

    2016-01-01

    To point out the advantages and drawbacks of high-dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of mobile tongue cancer and indicate the clinical importance of modular lead-lined spacers when applying this technique to patients. First, all basic steps to construct the modular spacer are shown. Second, we simulate and evaluate the dose rate reduction for a wide range of spacer configurations. With increasing distance to the source absorbed doses dropped considerably. Significantly more shielding was obtained when lead was added to the spacer and this effect was most pronounced on shorter (i.e. more clinically relevant) distances to the source. The modular spacer represents an important addition to the planning and treatment stages of mobile tongue cancer using HDR-ISBT.

  17. Roles of Human Papillomaviruses and p16 in Oral Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sritippho, Thanun; Chotjumlong, Pareena; Iamaroon, Anak

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancer, including oral cancer, is the sixth most common cancer in humans worldwide. More than 90% of oral cancers are of squamous cell carcinoma type. Recent studies have shown a strong relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and head and neck cancer, especially oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Moreover, the incidence of HPV-related OSCC appears to be on the rise while HPV-unrelated OSCC tends to have stabilized in the past decades. p16, a tumor suppressor gene, normally functions as a regulator of the cell cycle. Upon infection with high-risk types of HPV (HR-HPV), particularly types 16, 18, 31, 33, 34, 35, 39, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66, 68, and 70, the expression of p16 is aberrantly overexpressed. Therefore, the expression of p16 is widely used as a surrogate marker for HPV infection in head and neck cancer.

  18. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity in Nonsmoking Women: A New and Unusual Complication of Chemotherapy for Recurrent Ovarian Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Dominic W.; Hirsch, David; Delacure, Mark; Downey, Andrea; Kerr, Alexander R.; Bannan, Michael; Andreopoulou, Eleni; Safra, Tamar; Muggia, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To describe occurrences of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in patients who had received long-term pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) for ovarian cancer. Patients and Methods. In our cohort of patients on maintenance PLD for ovarian and related mullerian epithelial malignancies, we encountered two patients with invasive SCC of the oral cavity (one of them multifocal) and one with high-grade squamous dysplasia. Review of patients at our institution receiving PLD for recurrent ovarian cancer identified three additional patients. The duration of treatment, cumulative PLD dose, human papillomavirus (HPV) positivity, BRCA status, stage at diagnosis, outcome, and other characteristics are reviewed. Results. All five cases were nonsmokers with no known risk factors for HPV and four were negative for p16 expression. Four of the patients had known BRCA mutations whereas one tested negative. Cumulative doses of PLD were >1,600 mg/m2 given over 30–132 months. Three had SCCs staged as T1N0 oral tongue, alveolar ridge (gingival), and multifocal oral mucosa; one had a T2N0 oral tongue; and one had dysplasia. After excision, two were given radiation but recurred shortly thereafter; the others remain well and have had no further exposure to cytotoxic drugs, including PLD. Conclusion. Awareness of this possible long-term complication during PLD treatment should enhance the likelihood of early detection of oral lesions in these patients. Decisions to continue maintenance PLD after complete response of the original cancer should perhaps consider the benefits of delaying ovarian cancer recurrence versus the possible risk for a secondary cancer. PMID:22622148

  19. Liaison between micro-organisms and oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Srinivasprasad, Vijayan; Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Sathiyajeeva, J; Karthikeyan, M; Sunitha, J; Ragunathan, Ramachandran

    2015-08-01

    Oral cancer which is a subtype of head and neck, cancer is any neoplastic tissue growth in the oral cavity. It comprises an abnormal mass of cells that foists genetic mutation and impedes the normal cell cycle, resulting in its unrestrained growth. Various studies on the plausible link between oral microbial flora and cancer notwithstanding, our understanding of their link remains obscure and inadequate. The multitude of mechanisms by which the microflora initiate or spur Carcinogenesis are still under study and scrutiny. As is widely known, the oral cavity is an abode to a wide assortment of microbes, each present in contrasting amounts. It is observed that increased growth of the microflora is concomitant with known clinical risk factors for oral cancer. Manifold bacterial species have been found to interfere directly with eukaryotic cellular signaling, adopting a style typical of tumor promoters. Bacteria are also known to impede apoptosis thereby potentially promoting carcinogenesis. The viral role in carcinogenesis (by annulling of p53 tumor suppressor gene and other cellular proteins with subsequent alteration in host genome function) is well documented. Furthermore, the changes occurring in the commensal microflora in accompaniment with cancer development could possibly be used as a diagnostic indicator for early cancer detection. The intention of this review is to obtain a better understanding of the "role" that micro-organisms play in oral cancer etiology.

  20. Liaison between micro-organisms and oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasprasad, Vijayan; Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Sathiyajeeva, J.; Karthikeyan, M.; Sunitha, J.; Ragunathan, Ramachandran

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer which is a subtype of head and neck, cancer is any neoplastic tissue growth in the oral cavity. It comprises an abnormal mass of cells that foists genetic mutation and impedes the normal cell cycle, resulting in its unrestrained growth. Various studies on the plausible link between oral microbial flora and cancer notwithstanding, our understanding of their link remains obscure and inadequate. The multitude of mechanisms by which the microflora initiate or spur Carcinogenesis are still under study and scrutiny. As is widely known, the oral cavity is an abode to a wide assortment of microbes, each present in contrasting amounts. It is observed that increased growth of the microflora is concomitant with known clinical risk factors for oral cancer. Manifold bacterial species have been found to interfere directly with eukaryotic cellular signaling, adopting a style typical of tumor promoters. Bacteria are also known to impede apoptosis thereby potentially promoting carcinogenesis. The viral role in carcinogenesis (by annulling of p53 tumor suppressor gene and other cellular proteins with subsequent alteration in host genome function) is well documented. Furthermore, the changes occurring in the commensal microflora in accompaniment with cancer development could possibly be used as a diagnostic indicator for early cancer detection. The intention of this review is to obtain a better understanding of the “role” that micro-organisms play in oral cancer etiology. PMID:26538877

  1. Oral cavity infection: an adverse effect after the treatment of oral cancer in aged individuals.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Zhao, Jun; Jiang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The immune compromised patients after treatment of oral cancer may have a chance of infection by drug-resistant opportunistic microbes. We investigated the occurrence of opportunistic microorganisms in aged individuals receiving follow-up examinations after treatment of oral cancer in China. These patients were used as test group and the respective age grouped healthy individuals as control group. In this study, the oral cavity microorganisms such as bacteria and yeast were taken for the analysis. After the screening of representative microorganisms, their aptitude of pervasiveness against drugs was studied. Here, we used antimicrobial agents which are common in clinical practice. We also performed studies to investigate the presence of toxin genes in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The results indicate that the prevalence of drug-resistant microbes was more pronounced in oral cancer patients after initial treatment above 70 years old. The oxacillin resistance of S. aureus isolate confirms that the prevalence of MRSA is increasing in accordance to age-factor and immune compromise in elderly patients. This study reveals the occurrence of drug-resistant opportunistic microorganisms in oral cavity after treatment for oral cancer in aged individuals. Special attention should be directed to MRSA during the treatment of oral cancer, and to realize the fact of immune compromise in elderly patients.

  2. [Study on the oral hygiene of patients with oral cavity cancer].

    PubMed

    Bratoĭcheva, M St; Kondeva, V K

    2008-01-01

    Many authors consider oral hygiene an important factor in the etiology and pathogenesis of oral cavity cancer. The aim of the present study was to establish the role of poor oral hygiene in the development of malignant lesions in the oral cavity. One hundred and three patients were interviewed. Questions, regarding oral hygiene were included in the interview. Results showed that 53,80% of urban residents brush their teeth twice daily whereas 65,52% of rural residents brush their teeth irregularly - p<0,001 (chi(2)=23,67). 46,88% of women clean their teeth twice daily. 46,94% of men do not maintain adequate oral hygiene - p<0,05 (chi(2)= 9,21). Regarding the brush, it was found out that 56,00% of females use a hard bristle toothbrush, the same refers to 28,04% of men - p<0,05 (chi(2)= 4,15). Hard bristle toothbrush was used by 48,88% of urban residents and 9,09% of rural residents - p<0,05 (chi(2)= 5,78). People up to 30 years of age use hard bristle toothbrush most often -39,13% - p<0,01 (chi(2)=12,26). The accumulated evidence provides further explanation why oral cavity cancer is more frequent in men, rural residents and in the elderly. Oral hygiene is a factor in the development of oral cavity cancer.

  3. Oral Candidiasis in children and adolescents with cancer. Identification of Candida spp.

    PubMed

    González Gravina, Haylen; González de Morán, Evelyn; Zambrano, Olga; Lozano Chourio, María; Rodríguez de Valero, Sofía; Robertis, Sandra; Mesa, Luz

    2007-10-01

    Oral candidiasis represents a serious problem for children with cancer. The mortality rate of this infection has increased due to fungal septicemia, associated with a primary buccal infection. Identify the Candida spp. in buccal lesions of patients with cancer, establish the predominant species and correlate them to age and sex of the patient, clinical presentation, type of neoplasic disease and cytostatic therapy received. 62 patients, between 0-16 years, were investigated in a cross sectional study. SAMPLE INCLUSION CRITERIA: Patients with malignant neoplasic disease that were receiving cytostatic treatment and had suspicious lesions of oral candidiasis. Patients with antifungal therapy, active caries, calculus or intraoral appliances were excluded. A clinical evaluation was carried out. The lesion sample was taken and studied by direct exam and culture in CHROMagar-Candida and Sabouraud-Dextrose Agar with chloramphenicol. The identification of the isolated yeast was done by the filamentation test, carbohydrate fermentation and assimilation. Most of the cases (69.35%) were positive to oral candidiasis, C. albicans was the most frequent species found, followed by C. parapsilosis (14.89%), C. tropicalis (12.77%), C. krusei (4.26%), C. glabrata (2.13%) and C. lusitaniae (2.13%). In some cases more than one specie were isolated (9.30%). The most frequent location of the lesion was in the tongue (72.70%). The pseudomembranous candidiasis was the most frequent clinical presentation found (78.71%). There were not significant statistically differences with regard to sex and age of the patient, type of neoplasic disease and cytostatic agent received. The results suggest that oral candidiasis is a frequent complication in the pediatric oncological population, being C. albicans the main etiological agent, however, there is an important participation of other Candida species.

  4. Opium usage as an etiologic factor of oral cavity cancer.

    PubMed

    Razmpa, Ebrahim; Saedi, Babak; Motiee-langroudi, Maziar; Garajei, Ata; Hoseinpor, Sareh; Motamedi, Mohammad Hosein Kalantar

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of opium in causing oral cancer. Eighty patients and 80 selected matched controls who were referred to the ear-nose-throat department of an academic hospital were included in this study between October 2008 and September 2010. In addition to demographic data, information regarding alcohol, tobacco, and opium use was documented in the subjects. Finally, the effect of each risk factor was assessed. There was no significant difference in patient demographics between the 2 groups. Smoking (P = 0.042) and poor oral hygiene (P = 0.016) significantly correlated with cancer. Finally, opium addiction showed a significant relationship with oral cavity cancer with an odds ratio of 4 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-13.6). Opium use is among the possible risk factors for oral cancer.

  5. Oral cancer, HPV infection and evidence of sexual transmission

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Hernández, Juan G.; Cano, Jorge; Campo, Julián; del Romero, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal cancer and oral cancer is growing worldwide, both in young non-smokers and in young non-drinkers (smoking and drinking are considered the main risk factors). Epidemiologic studies suggest a strong association between the infection by human papillomavirus (HPV), especially types 16 and 18 (high oncological risk) which have already demonstrated their etiological role in anal tumours as well as in cervix cancer. There is clear epidemiologic evidence that both types of tumours relate to changes in sexual behaviour and that both are linked to sexual transmission of HPV. The number of oral and oropharyngeal cancer cases is rising nowadays, especially among young individuals with no typical toxic habits, such as tobacco and/or alcohol. In this review we set out to update the aspects related to the onset of oral cancer, its relationship with HPV infection and whether this association may be due to the sexual transmission of the virus. Key words:Human papillomavirus, oral sex, head and neck cancer, oral cancer, squamous cell carcinoma, oropharyngeal cancer. PMID:23524417

  6. What Are Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat. The oral cavity (mouth) and oropharynx (throat) The oral cavity includes the lips, the inside ... oropharynx. The oropharynx is the part of the throat just behind the mouth. It begins where the ...

  7. Results of brachytherapy for cancer of the tongue with special emphasis on local prognosis

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, J.; Okuyama, T.; Shibuya, H.; Takeda, M.

    1982-05-01

    One hundred and sixty-six patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue were treated with radiation. Treatment modalities were mainly interstitial implant with or without external beam irradiation, except for early lesions, which were treated with intraoral electron beam therapy. Analysis was made on the local prognosis of the lesion to clarify the indications for interstitial therapy, especially the combined program with external beam therapy, and the time-dose relationship of the brachytherapy. Local recurrence-free rates (two years) were 94% in T1, 77% in T2 and 32% in T3 lesions, respectively. For T1 and surperficial or exophytic T2 lesions, the local recurrence-free rate was excellent with the interstitial therapy alone using either permanent implants of gold grain or radium implants. Therefore, prior external beam therapy seemed to be unnecessary for these lesions. When the treated area was less than 10 cm/sup 2/, subsequent complications were not likely even if the TDF (time-dose factor) value was high. Most of the patients who received combined external beam and interstitial therapy showed infiltrative T2 and a majority of the T3 lesions. In these patients, it was apparent that most of the total dose should be given from the interstitial implant after a small prior dose with external irradiation, because these lesions could not be cured even if the external dose was increased.

  8. Effect of G-CSF on oral mucositis and traumatic ulcers produced in the tongue of rats undergoing radiotherapy: clinical and histologic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Juliana; Roithmann, Sérgio; Camilotti, Renata Stifelman; Salum, Fernanda Gonçalves; Cherubini, Karen; Zancanaro de Figueiredo, Maria Antonia

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on oral mucositis (OM) and on the healing of traumatic ulcers produced in the tongue of rats undergoing radiotherapy (RT). Twenty-seven Wistar rats were assigned to four groups: (1) RT + traumatic ulcer + filgrastim (G-CSF analog; n = 7); (2) RT + traumatic ulcer + saline (n = 7); (3) no RT + traumatic ulcer + filgrastim (n = 7); and (4) no RT + traumatic ulcer (n = 6). The radiation dose was 30 Gy, and medication was filgrastim (10 μg/kg) for 7 days. Clinically, groups differed in the presence (Fisher's exact test: P = .008) and size of traumatic ulcers after irradiation (Kruskal-Wallis test: P = .032) and in the severity of OM (Fisher's exact test: P = .005 between the irradiated groups). Histologically, there was an increased inflammatory response in the nonirradiated groups (Fisher's exact test: P = .001). Filgrastim reduced manifestations and the severity of trauma-induced ulcers and radiation-induced OM. Significant differences were not observed histologically between the study drug and respective control groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Stable gene-silence of Kif2a synergistic with 5-fluorouracil suppresses oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Qin; Li, Yu-Jun; Wei, Zhi-Min; Zhu, Chang-Jun; Qu, Xun; Wei, Feng-Cai; Xing, Xiao-Ming; Yu, Wen-Juan

    2013-07-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue (SCCOT) is one of the most common malignant carcinomas in the head and neck. Recurrence and/or metastasis often results in failure of treatment and decreases the survival of the patients. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of gene-silence of Kif2a on SCCOT in viro and in vivo. Plasmid-mediated expression of Kif2a-siRNA (pGPU6/GFP/Kif2a) was employed to silence the expression of Kif2a in Tca8113 cells at both mRNA and protein levels. Tca8113 cell proliferation was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and growth of Tca8113 tumors was determined by intra-tumor injection of pGPU6/GFP/Kif2a in nude mice. Gene-silence of Kif2a suppressed Tca8113 cell proliferation. pGPU6/GFP/Kif2a synergized the tumor suppression effect of 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu) on Tca8113 cells. Our data support that Kif2a is a potential molecular target for the therapeutics of recurrent and metastatic SCCOT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of salivary metabolomic biomarkers for oral cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Shigeo; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Kitabatake, Kenichiro; Sugano, Ayako; Nakamura, Marina; Kaneko, Miku; Ota, Sana; Hiwatari, Kana; Enomoto, Ayame; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Iino, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore salivary metabolite biomarkers by profiling both saliva and tumor tissue samples for oral cancer screening. Paired tumor and control tissues were obtained from oral cancer patients and whole unstimulated saliva samples were collected from patients and healthy controls. The comprehensive metabolomic analysis for profiling hydrophilic metabolites was conducted using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In total, 85 and 45 metabolites showed significant differences between tumor and matched control samples, and between salivary samples from oral cancer and controls, respectively (P < 0.05 correlated by false discovery rate); 17 metabolites showed consistent differences in both saliva and tissue-based comparisons. Of these, a combination of only two biomarkers yielded a high area under receiver operating characteristic curves (0.827; 95% confidence interval, 0.726–0.928, P < 0.0001) for discriminating oral cancers from controls. Various validation tests confirmed its high generalization ability. The demonstrated approach, integrating both saliva and tumor tissue metabolomics, helps eliminate pseudo-molecules that are coincidentally different between oral cancers and controls. These combined salivary metabolites could be the basis of a clinically feasible method of non-invasive oral cancer screening. PMID:27539254

  11. Public awareness and knowledge of oral cancer in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Al-Maweri, Sadeq Ali; Addas, Abdallah; Tarakji, Bassel; Abbas, Alkasem; Al-Shamiri, Hashem M; Alaizari, Nader Ahmed; Shugaa-Addin, Bassam

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer is in increasing in incidence in Yemen and indeed worldwide. Knowledge regarding risk factors and early signs in the general population can help in prevention and early detection of the disease. The aim of this study was to assess the level of awareness and knowledge of oral cancer in the general population in Yemen. A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire was conducted on Yemeni adults aged ≥15 years old. A total of 543 persons participated, the collected data being analyzed using SPSS software. The significance level was set at p<0.05. Two thirds (71.5%) of the participants had heard about oral cancer. Smoking and smokeless tobacco usage were identified as the major risk factors by 71.5% and 73.7% of the participants, respectively. Only 24.1% and 21.4%, respectively, were able to correctly identify red and white lesions as early signs of oral cancer. Knowledge of oral cancer was significantly associated with age (p<0.01), gender (p<0.05) and education level (p<0.001). The findings suggest that the knowledge regarding oral cancer in this population is low. Therefore, educational programs are highly needed to improve such knowledge.

  12. Oral cavity cancer risk in relation to tobacco chewing and bidi smoking among men in Karunagappally, Kerala, India: Karunagappally cohort study.

    PubMed

    Jayalekshmi, Padmavaty Amma; Gangadharan, Paleth; Akiba, Suminori; Koriyama, Chihaya; Nair, Raghu Ram K

    2011-02-01

    The Karunagapally cohort in Kerala, India was established in the 1990s. The present study examined oral cancer risk among 66,277 men aged 30-84 years in the cohort, using Poisson regression analysis of grouped data, stratified on attained age, calendar time, education, and family income. By the end of 2005, 160 oral cancer cases were identified by the Karunagapally Cancer Registry. Tobacco chewing increased oral cancer risk (P < 0.001). Particularly increased was the risk of cancers of the gum and mouth (relative risk [RR] = 4.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.8-7.9), which increased with higher daily frequencies (P < 0.001) and longer duration (P < 0.001) of tobacco chewing. Alcohol drinking was not significantly related to oral cancer risk regardless of tobacco chewing. Bidi smoking significantly increased oral cancer risk (RR = 2.6; 95%CI = 1.4-4.9) only among men without tobacco chewing habits. The risk increased with higher daily consumption (P < 0.001), longer duration (P = 0.001), and younger age at start of bidi smoking (P = 0.007). In location-specific analysis, bidi smoking was significantly associated with cancer of the gum and mouth (RR = 3.6; 95%CI = 1.1-12.1), and its risk significantly increased with larger daily consumption of bidis (P = 0.013) and younger age at the start of smoking (P = 0.044). Tongue cancer risk was significantly increased among men who smoked bidis for 30 years or longer, and men started bidi smoking at 18 years old or younger. The present study is the first cohort study showing that tobacco chewing increases cancers of the gum and mouth among men keeping chewing tobacco in the cheek, and that bidi smoking strongly increased oral cancer risk among men without a tobacco chewing habit.

  13. Applications of the oral scraped (exfoliative) cytology in oral cancer and precancer.

    PubMed

    Acha, Amelia; Ruesga, María T; Rodríguez, María J; Martínez de Pancorbo, María A; Aguirre, José M

    2005-01-01

    Scraped (exfoliative) cytology is a simple and harmless procedure, which has been a controversial technique according to its real validity in oral pathology. Lately it has re-emerged due to its application in oral precancer and cancer as a diagnostic and predictive method as well as for monitoring patients. New diagnostic techniques have been developed, such as "brush biopsy" and multiple molecular studies using the cells collected. In this review we are going to analyse the more novel aspects related with the applications of the scraped or exfoliative cytology in oral precancerous and cancerous pathology, specially focusing on molecular studies and their diagnostic and prognostic implications.

  14. Oral cancer, HPV infection and evidence of sexual transmission.

    PubMed

    Martín-Hernán, Fátima; Sánchez-Hernández, Juan-Gabriel; Cano, Jorge; Campo, Julián; del Romero, Jorge

    2013-05-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal cancer and oral cancer is growing worldwide, both in young non-smokers and in young non-drinkers (smoking and drinking are considered the main risk factors). Epidemiologic studies suggest a strong association between the infection by human papillomavirus (HPV), especially types 16 and 18 (high oncological risk) which have already demonstrated their etiological role in anal tumours as well as in cervix cancer. There is clear epidemiologic evidence that both types of tumours relate to changes in sexual behaviour and that both are linked to sexual transmission of HPV. The number of oral and oropharyngeal cancer cases is rising nowadays, especially among young individuals with no typical toxic habits, such as tobacco and/or alcohol. In this review we set out to update the aspects related to the onset of oral cancer, its relationship with HPV infection and whether this association may be due to the sexual transmission of the virus.

  15. [BIPADDLED SPLIT PECTORALIS MAJOR MYOCUTANEOUS FLAPS FOR IMMEDIATE RECONSTRUCTION OF ORAL MUCOSAL DEFECTS AND NECK DEFECTS AFTER RESECTION OF RECURRENT ORAL CANCER].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Jiang, Canhua; Li, Ning; Gao, Zhengyang; Chen, Lichun; Wu, Xiaoshan; Chen, Xinqun; Jian, Xinchun

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility of the bipaddled split pectoralis major myocutaneous flap for immediate reconstruction of oral mucosal defects and neck defects after resection of recurrent oral cancer. Six patients with oral mucosal defects combined with neck defects after recurrent oral cancer resection were treated with bipaddled split pectoralis major myocutaneous flap between September 2013 and September 2014. There were 5 males and 1 female with an average age of 54.7 years (range, 45-62 years), including 4 cases of recurrent tongue cancer, 1 case of recurrent mandibular gingival cancer, and 1 case of mouth floor carcinoma. All patients underwent local recurrence at 8 to 14 months after first operation, with no distant metastasis. The defects of the intraoral mucosa was 4.0 cm x 2.5 cm to 6.5 cm x 3.5 cm and the defect of the neck skin was 5.5 cm x 3.5 cm to 7.5 cm x 5.0 cm. The pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps (14.0 cm x 3.5 cm to 17.0 cm x 5.5 cm) were incised at the level of the 3rd to the 4th rib, and then split down along the muscle fiber till about 2 cm away from the thoracoacromial vessels, forming 2 independent skin paddles with 1-2 branch vessels to the pedicles of the distal ones. The distal skin paddles were used for oral reconstruction while the proximal paddles for repair of neck defects. The chest donor sites were sutured directly. Cervical haematoma and infection happened in 1 patient respectively after operation, and were cured after symptomatic treatment. All 6 split pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps with 12 skin paddles completely survived. All patients were followed up 6 to 18 months (mean, 11 months). One patient died of pulmonary metastasis at 8 months after operation and the other 5 survived without relapse or metastasis during follow-up. The intraoral paddles showed good shape with satisfactory speech function and swallowing recovery. The paddles also healed perfectly on the neck with flat outlooks, and all patients obtained full

  16. Effects of tongue cleaning on bacterial flora in tongue coating and dental plaque: a crossover study.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Miki; Chosa, Naoyuki; Shimoyama, Yu; Minami, Kentaro; Kimura, Shigenobu; Kishi, Mitsuo

    2014-01-14

    The effects of tongue cleaning on reconstruction of bacterial flora in dental plaque and tongue coating itself are obscure. We assessed changes in the amounts of total bacteria as well as Fusobacterium nucleatum in tongue coating and dental plaque specimens obtained with and without tongue cleaning. We conducted a randomized examiner-blind crossover study using 30 volunteers (average 23.7 ± 3.2 years old) without periodontitis. After dividing randomly into 2 groups, 1 group was instructed to clean the tongue, while the other did not. On days 1 (baseline), 3, and 10, tongue coating and dental plaque samples were collected after recording tongue coating score (Winkel tongue coating index: WTCI). After a washout period of 3 weeks, the same examinations were performed with the subjects allocated to the alternate group. Genomic DNA was purified from the samples and applied to SYBR® Green-based real-time PCR to quantify the amounts of total bacteria and F. nucleatum. After 3 days, the WTCI score recovered to baseline, though the amount of total bacteria in tongue coating was significantly lower as compared to the baseline. In plaque samples, the bacterial amounts on day 3 and 10 were significantly lower than the baseline with and without tongue cleaning. Principal component analysis showed that variations of bacterial amounts in the tongue coating and dental plaque samples were independent from each other. Furthermore, we found a strong association between amounts of total bacteria and F. nucleatum in specimens both. Tongue cleaning reduced the amount of bacteria in tongue coating. However, the cleaning had no obvious contribution to inhibit dental plaque formation. Furthermore, recovery of the total bacterial amount induced an increase in F. nucleatum in both tongue coating and dental plaque. Thus, it is recommended that tongue cleaning and tooth brushing should both be performed for promoting oral health.

  17. Effects of tongue cleaning on bacterial flora in tongue coating and dental plaque: a crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The effects of tongue cleaning on reconstruction of bacterial flora in dental plaque and tongue coating itself are obscure. We assessed changes in the amounts of total bacteria as well as Fusobacterium nucleatum in tongue coating and dental plaque specimens obtained with and without tongue cleaning. Methods We conducted a randomized examiner-blind crossover study using 30 volunteers (average 23.7 ± 3.2 years old) without periodontitis. After dividing randomly into 2 groups, 1 group was instructed to clean the tongue, while the other did not. On days 1 (baseline), 3, and 10, tongue coating and dental plaque samples were collected after recording tongue coating score (Winkel tongue coating index: WTCI). After a washout period of 3 weeks, the same examinations were performed with the subjects allocated to the alternate group. Genomic DNA was purified from the samples and applied to SYBR® Green-based real-time PCR to quantify the amounts of total bacteria and F. nucleatum. Results After 3 days, the WTCI score recovered to baseline, though the amount of total bacteria in tongue coating was significantly lower as compared to the baseline. In plaque samples, the bacterial amounts on day 3 and 10 were significantly lower than the baseline with and without tongue cleaning. Principal component analysis showed that variations of bacterial amounts in the tongue coating and dental plaque samples were independent from each other. Furthermore, we found a strong association between amounts of total bacteria and F. nucleatum in specimens both. Conclusions Tongue cleaning reduced the amount of bacteria in tongue coating. However, the cleaning had no obvious contribution to inhibit dental plaque formation. Furthermore, recovery of the total bacterial amount induced an increase in F. nucleatum in both tongue coating and dental plaque. Thus, it is recommended that tongue cleaning and tooth brushing should both be performed for promoting oral health. PMID:24423407

  18. Participation of Canadian Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons in Oral, Lip, and Oropharyngeal Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, Karl K; Mascarenhas, Wendall; Cobb, Graham

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the participation of Canadian oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMSs) in the various phases of oral, lip, and oropharyngeal cancer care. A survey was conducted to quantify participation in oral, lip, and oropharyngeal cancer care and assess participation ranging from screening for malignancy to active treatment and rehabilitation of those with late-stage disease. Three hundred ninety-one surgeons were contacted and 206 (52.7%) responded to the online survey. The survey showed 98.1% of respondents were involved with cancer screening and 97.1% were involved in prevention and early intervention (monitoring and treatment) of premalignant lesions. In addition, 95.1% of respondents participated in diagnosis and staging of tumors. Early-stage cancer was managed surgically by 49.5% of respondents, whereas 11.2% of respondents managed late-stage disease. Management of oral rehabilitation was performed by 79.0% of respondents. OMSs are an integral part of all phases of oral and oropharyngeal cancer care, including primary surgical oncology, in Canada. Although OMSs in Canada participate widely in integral prevention and survivor rehabilitation programs, few members participate in late-stage disease management and regional multidisciplinary care teams. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Oral cancer incidence and mortality in China, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shao-Kai; Zheng, Rongshou; Chen, Qiong; Zhang, Siwei

    2015-01-01

    Objective To descript the incidence and mortality rates of oral cancer among Chinese population in 2011, and provide valuable data for oral cancer prevention and research. Methods Data from 177 population-based cancer registries distributed in 28 provinces were accepted for this study after evaluation based on quality control criteria, covering a total of 175,310,169 populations and accounting for 13.01% of the overall national population in 2011. Incidence and mortality rates were calculated by area, gender and age groups. The numbers of new cases and deaths were estimated using the 5-year age-specific cancer incidence/mortality rates and the corresponding populations. The Chinese population in 2000 and World Segi’s population were used for age-standardized rates. Results The estimate of new cases diagnosed with oral cancer was 39,450 including 26,160 males and 13,290 females. The overall crude incidence rate for oral cancer was 2.93/100,000. The age-standardized rates by China (ASRCN) population and by World population (ASRwld) were 2.22/100,000 and 2.17/100,000, respectively. Among subjects aged 0-74 years, the cumulative incidence rate was 0.25%. The estimated number of oral cancer deaths of China in 2011 was 16,933, including 11,794 males and 5,139 females. The overall crude mortality rate was 1.26/100,000, accounting for 0.80% of all cancer deaths. The ASRCN and ASRwld for mortality were 0.90/100,000 and 0.89/100,000, respectively. Among subjects aged 0-74 years, the cumulative mortality rate was 0.10%. The incidence and mortality rates of oral cancer were much higher in males and urban areas than in females and rural areas. In addition, the incidence and mortality rates were increased by the raising of ages. Conclusions Results in the study may have important roles for oral cancer prevention and research. Although oral cancer burden of China is not high, we must pay attention to this malignancy as well. In addition, further researches need to be done for

  20. Risk for oral cancer associated to smoking, smokeless and oral dip products.

    PubMed

    Madani, Abdoul Hossain; Dikshit, Madhurima; Bhaduri, Debanshu

    2012-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the most common life threatening diseases in India. Tobacco and alcohol are considered to be the most risk factors for oral cancer. This study was conducted to investigate the association of tobacco and poly-ingredient oral dip products with oral cancer. A case-control study of 350 cases and 350 controls, over a period of 19 months, between February 2005 and September 2006 was carried out in Pune, India. The self-reported information about the consumption of tobacco, poly-ingredient oral dip products, alcohol, dietary habits and demographic status were collected by a researcher made questionnaire. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to identify the risk of substances abuse. The frequency of smoking, smokeless and oral dip products in cases were significantly higher than controls (P < 0.0001). Among smoking types, bidi (P < 0.0001, OR = 4.1 95% CI = 2.4 - 6.9), of smokeless types, chewing tobacco (P < 0.0001, OR = 8.3, 95% CI = 5.4 - 13.0) and mishiri (P < 0.0001, OR = 3.3, 95% CI =2.1 - 5.4), and of oral dip products, consumption of gutkha (P < 0.0001, OR = 12.8, 95% CI =7.0 - 23.7) and supari (P < 0.0001, OR = 6.6, 95% CI =3.0 - 14.8) indicated strong association with oral cancer upon adjustment. This study provides strong evidence that gutkha, supari -areca nut- chewing tobacco (tobacco flakes), bidi smoking and mishiri (tobacco powder, which applied as a tooth and gum cleaner) are independent risk for oral cancer.

  1. [Oral cancer surgery and oral cutaneous fistulas: risk factors].

    PubMed

    Ramos, Gyl Henrique A; Crivelaro, André Luiz Soares; de Oliveira, Benedito Valdecir; Pedruzzi, Paola Andrea G; de Freitas, Rosyane Rena

    2010-04-01

    To quantify the oral cutaneous fistulae after surgery and to identify possible risk factors. A retrospective study, interesting patients that were submitted to surgery, with a two years minimum post-operative follow up. The considered variables were: sex, concomitant diseases, tabacco and alcohol use, the anesthesic and pulmonary risks, clinical stage, cervical linphadenectomy, pre or postoperative radiotherapy, accidents during the surgery, wound infection and or hematoma, pulmonary infection, surgery and reconstruction extension. In 159 patients, oral cutaneous fistulae occurred in 48 patients (30,3%): Patients stage T1 in 26,6 %,T2 in 1,8 %,T3 in 16%, and T4 in 40,3% (p=0,0138). The cases N+ developed fistulae in 22.9%, (N2c with 42,8%, (p=0,0136), those with preoperative radiotherapy in 63,6% (p=0,0346) Those with wound infection in 47,3% (p=0,0146), and those with wound deiscense in 53,7 % (p=0,0030). The fistulae rate was of 60% in the regional mucocutaneous flaps reconstruction cases, 39,2% in the myocutaneous ones and 12,5% of microsurgery ones (p=0,0286). The general rate of oral cutaneous fistulae was 30,3%. The significant factors were: T stage, cervical linphadenectomy, pre or postoperative radiotherapy, wound infection and deiscense, and the use of flaps.

  2. Diagnostic aids in the screening of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Fedele, Stefano

    2009-01-30

    The World Health Organization has clearly identified prevention and early detection as major objectives in the control of the oral cancer burden worldwide. At the present time, screening of oral cancer and its pre-invasive intra-epithelial stages, as well as its early detection, is still largely based on visual examination of the mouth. There is strong available evidence to suggest that visual inspection of the oral mucosa is effective in reducing mortality from oral cancer in individuals exposed to risk factors. Simple visual examination, however, is well known to be limited by subjective interpretation and by the potential, albeit rare, occurrence of dysplasia and early OSCC within areas of normal-looking oral mucosa. As a consequence, adjunctive techniques have been suggested to increase our ability to differentiate between benign abnormalities and dysplastic/malignant changes as well as to identify areas of dysplasia/early OSCC that are not visible to naked eye. These include the use of toluidine blue, brush biopsy, chemiluminescence and tissue autofluorescence. The present paper reviews the evidence supporting the efficacy of the aforementioned techniques in improving the identification of dysplastic/malignant changes of the oral mucosa. We conclude that available studies have shown promising results, but strong evidence to support the use of oral cancer diagnostic aids is still lacking. Further research with clear objectives, well-defined population cohorts, and sound methodology is strongly required.

  3. Interventions for preventing oral mucositis in patients with cancer receiving treatment: oral cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Riley, Philip; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Worthington, Helen V; Littlewood, Anne; Clarkson, Jan E; McCabe, Martin G

    2015-12-23

    Oral mucositis is a side effect of chemotherapy, head and neck radiotherapy, and targeted therapy, affecting over 75% of high risk patients. Ulceration can lead to severe pain and difficulty eating and drinking, which may necessitate opioid analgesics, hospitalisation and nasogastric or intravenous nutrition. These complications may lead to interruptions or alterations to cancer therapy, which may reduce survival. There is also a risk of death from sepsis if pathogens enter the ulcers of immunocompromised patients. Ulcerative oral mucositis can be costly to healthcare systems, yet there are few preventive interventions proven to be beneficial. Oral cryotherapy is a low-cost, simple intervention which is unlikely to cause side-effects. It has shown promise in clinical trials and warrants an up-to-date Cochrane review to assess and summarise the international evidence. To assess the effects of oral cryotherapy for preventing oral mucositis in patients with cancer who are receiving treatment. We searched the following databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 17 June 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 5), MEDLINE via Ovid (1946 to 17 June 2015), EMBASE via Ovid (1980 to 17 June 2015), CANCERLIT via PubMed (1950 to 17 June 2015) and CINAHL via EBSCO (1937 to 17 June 2015). We searched the US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry, and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching databases. We included parallel-design randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of oral cryotherapy in patients with cancer receiving treatment. We used outcomes from a published core outcome set registered on the COMET website. Two review authors independently screened the results of electronic searches, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We contacted study authors for information

  4. Upper gastrointestinal tract cancers as double-cancers in elderly patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ikawa, Hiroaki; Tonogi, Morio; Yamane, Gen-Yuki; Yamauchi, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Yoichi; Sato, Michio; Matsui, Junichi; Ando, Nobutoshi; Katakura, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Against a background of a rapidly aging society, the number of patients with oral cancers in Japan is increasing yearly. The number of double-cancers with oral cancer as the first malignancy is also reportedly on the rise. Esophageal and gastric cancers are the most common second malignancies. At our institution, our policy is to proactively perform upper gastrointestinal (GI) fiberscopy (GIF) in patients with oral cancer. In anticipation of a probable further increase in the number of patients with double-cancers consisting of oral and GI tract malignancies, we retrospectively analyzed the occurrence of upper GI tract cancers in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The cohort consisted of 171 patients in whom OSCC had been diagnosed and who had undergone upper GIF between March 1996 and August 2008. Multivariate analysis was performed. Upper GIF identified 8 patients (7 men, 1 woman, totaling 4.7% of 171 patients) with double-cancer in the upper GI tract. One patient had a triple malignancy consisting of oral, esophageal and gastric cancers. Seven patients had esophageal cancer, while two had gastric cancer. An age of over 65 years was significantly higher in patients with double-cancers including esophageal cancer than in patients without esophageal cancer (OR=10.454, 95% CI=1.143-95.621). None of the other analyzed patient factors (sex, smoking habit, drinking habit, site of OSCC, TNM classification, staging results) showed a significant difference. These results indicate that, when treating elderly patients with oral cancers, physicians need to devise suitable treatment plans which take into account the possibility of upper GI tract cancer, particularly esophageal cancer, as a double-cancer.

  5. Sites of origin of oral cavity cancer in nonsmokers vs smokers: possible evidence of dental trauma carcinogenesis and its importance compared with human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Perry, Brendan J; Zammit, Andrew P; Lewandowski, Andrew W; Bashford, Julia J; Dragovic, Adrian S; Perry, Emily J; Hayatbakhsh, Reza; Perry, Christopher F L

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high and possibly rising incidence of mouth squamous cell carcinoma in nonsmokers, especially women, without obvious cause has been noted by previous authors. Is chronic dental trauma and irritation a carcinogen, and what is its importance compared with human papillomavirus (HPV) oropharyngeal cancer in nonsmokers? To determine whether oral cavity cancers occurred more commonly at sites of dental trauma and how the position of these cancers varied between nonsmokers lacking major identified carcinogens and smokers. If these cancers occurred more frequently at sites of chronic trauma, especially in nonsmokers, it would suggest chronic dental trauma as a possible carcinogen. A retrospective analysis of 881 patients with oral cavity or oropharyngeal cancers seen through a tertiary referral hospital between 2001 and 2011 was performed. Patient medical records were analyzed to determine the location of the tumor within the oral cavity and oropharynx and how it relates to patient demographics, smoking and alcohol histories, and comorbidities. Dental histories were also sought, including use of dentures. Nonsmokers comprised 87 of 390 patients with mouth cancer (22%) and 48 of 334 patients with oropharyngeal cancer (14%). Female nonsmoking patients included 53 with oral cancer (61%) but only 12 with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (25%). Oral cancers occurred on the lateral tongue, a potential site of chronic dental trauma, in 57 nonsmokers (66%) compared with 107 smokers/ex-smokers (33%) (P < .001). Gingival and floor of mouth lesions occurred in older patients, possibly from chronic denture rubbing. Twenty-six patients had dental abnormalities recorded in close proximity to where their tumor developed. Oral cavity cancers occur predominantly at sites of potential dental and denture trauma, especially in nonsmokers without other risk factors. Recognizing teeth irritation as a potential carcinogen would have an impact on prevention and treatment

  6. MYCN-mediated miR-21 overexpression enhances chemo-resistance via targeting CADM1 in tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guopei; Li, Nan; Jia, Xiaoting; Peng, Cong; Luo, Liyun; Deng, Yingen; Yin, Jiang; Song, Ying; Liu, Hao; Lu, Minying; Zhang, Zhijie; Gu, Yixue; He, Zhimin

    2016-10-01

    Chemo-resistance is still a major obstacle in successful cancer treatment. Previously, we found that miR-21 (miR-21-5p) was upregulated in drug-resistant tongue cancer (TC) cell line Tca8113/PYM. However, the mechanisms for miR-21 upregulation and its role in chemo-resistance in TC remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that functional inhibition of miR-21 sensitized TC cells to chemotherapy. In agreement, overexpressed miR-21 enhanced chemo-resistance in TC cells. We found that miR-21 directly targeted CADM1 expression, which was downregulated in drug-resistant TC cells. Restored CADM1 expression sensitized TC cells to chemotherapy, but CADM1 knockdown induced chemo-resistance. Mechanically, CADM1 interacted with BMI1 to inhibit its nuclear translocation. Moreover, MYCN which was overexpressed in drug-resistant TC cells directly bound to the miR-21 promoter to upregulated miR-21 expression in TC cells. Importantly, the expression levels of miR-21 and CADM1 negatively correlated, but MYCN and miR-21 positively correlated in TC tissues. High levels of miR-21 and MYCN and low level of CADM1 were associated with poor prognosis in TC patients. In conclusion, our study suggests an important role of the MYCN/miR-21/CADM1 axis in chemo-resistance in TC patients and may lead to promising prognostic biomarkers and novel treatment strategies to improve the chemotherapeutic efficacy for TC patients.

  7. Mastication in patients treated for malignancies in tongue and/or floor of mouth: A 1-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Speksnijder, Caroline M; van der Bilt, Andries; Abbink, Jan H; Merkx, Matthias A W; Koole, Ron

    2011-07-01

    People confronted with oral cancer run a high risk of deteriorated masticatory performance. Reduced masticatory function may affect quality of life and food choice. An altered food choice may result in lower intakes for key nutrients and weight loss. Dental state, bite force, and masticatory performance were determined in a group of 45 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and/or floor of mouth. Measurements were performed before surgery and at various moments after surgery and/or radiotherapy. Surgical intervention had a large negative impact on oral function. Radiotherapy further worsened oral function. Also, the recovery of oral function 1 year after surgery was less prominent for the surgery-radiotherapy group than for the surgery group. Objective determination of oral function 1 year after surgery showed that patients treated for malignancies in the tongue and/or floor of mouth had significantly deteriorated masticatory performance, bite force, and dental state. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Detection and delineation of oral cancer with a PARP1 targeted optical imaging agent

    PubMed Central

    Kossatz, Susanne; Brand, Christian; Gutiontov, Stanley; Liu, Jonathan T. C.; Lee, Nancy Y.; Gönen, Mithat; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Reiner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Earlier and more accurate detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is essential to improve the prognosis of patients and to reduce the morbidity of surgical therapy. Here, we demonstrate that the nuclear enzyme Poly(ADP-ribose)Polymerase 1 (PARP1) is a promising target for optical imaging of OSCC with the fluorescent dye PARPi-FL. In patient-derived OSCC specimens, PARP1 expression was increased 7.8 ± 2.6-fold when compared to normal tissue. Intravenous injection of PARPi-FL allowed for high contrast in vivo imaging of human OSCC models in mice with a surgical fluorescence stereoscope and high-resolution imaging systems. The emitted signal was specific for PARP1 expression and, most importantly, PARPi-FL can be used as a topical imaging agent, spatially resolving the orthotopic tongue tumors in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that PARP1 imaging with PARPi-FL can enhance the detection of oral cancer, serve as a screening tool and help to guide surgical resections. PMID:26900125

  9. A genetic programming approach to oral cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Mei Sze; Tan, Jing Wei; Yap, Hwa Jen; Abdul Kareem, Sameem; Zain, Rosnah Binti

    2016-01-01

    Background The potential of genetic programming (GP) on various fields has been attained in recent years. In bio-medical field, many researches in GP are focused on the recognition of cancerous cells and also on gene expression profiling data. In this research, the aim is to study the performance of GP on the survival prediction of a small sample size of oral cancer prognosis dataset, which is the first study in the field of oral cancer prognosis. Method GP is applied on an oral cancer dataset that contains 31 cases collected from the Malaysia Oral Cancer Database and Tissue Bank System (MOCDTBS). The feature subsets that is automatically selected through GP were noted and the influences of this subset on the results of GP were recorded. In addition, a comparison between the GP performance and that of the Support Vector Machine (SVM) and logistic regression (LR) are also done in order to verify the predictive capabilities of the GP. Result The result shows that GP performed the best (average accuracy of 83.87% and average AUROC of 0.8341) when the features selected are smoking, drinking, chewing, histological differentiation of SCC, and oncogene p63. In addition, based on the comparison results, we found that the GP outperformed the SVM and LR in oral cancer prognosis. Discussion Some of the features in the dataset are found to be statistically co-related. This is because the accuracy of the GP prediction drops when one of the feature in the best feature subset is excluded. Thus, GP provides an automatic feature selection function, which chooses features that are highly correlated to the prognosis of oral cancer. This makes GP an ideal prediction model for cancer clinical and genomic data that can be used to aid physicians in their decision making stage of diagnosis or prognosis. PMID:27688975

  10. Designing and Dosimetry of a Shield for Photon Fields of Radiation Therapy in Oral Cavity Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Senobari, Somayeh; Roayaei, Mahnaz; Rostampour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    The cancer of oral cavity is related to lesions of mucous membrane of tongue and gum that can be treated with radiation therapy. A lateral photon field can be used to treat this kind of tumor, which has a side-effect on normal tissue in the opposite side of the oral cavity. In this study the dosimetric effect of the various shields in oral cavity is evaluated. In this study, a special phantom similar to the structure of oral cavity with capability of film dosimetry was designed and constructed. The various shield slabs were made of five materials: Lead, Plexiglas, Acrylic resin, Silicon and Plaster. For irradiation, Cobalt 60 (60Co) and 6 MV photon beams were used. The film dosimetry before and after the shield was performed using GAFCHROMIC EBT2 films. The film before the shield measures the magnitude of backscattering radiation from the shield. The prescribed dose was 150 cGy. Results showed that 3 cm of the lead in both energies had the maximum absorption of radiation. The absorbed dose to opposite side of shield for 6 MV photon beams and 60Co were 21 and 32 cGy, respectively. The minimum attenuation on radiation was observed in silicon shield for which the dose of opposite side were 116 and 147 cGy for 6 MV and 60Co respectively. The maximum backscattered dose was measured 177 cGy and 219 cGy using 3 cm thickness of lead, which was quite considerable. The minimum backscattering where for acrylic resin 101 and 118 cGy for 6 MV and cobalt. In this study, it was concluded that the amount of backscattering for 3 cm Lead shield is quite considerable and increases the dose significantly. A composite layer of shield with 1–2 cm lead and 1 cm acrylic resin can have the protective effect and low backscattering radiation at the same time. PMID:26120570

  11. Designing and Dosimetry of a Shield for Photon Fields of Radiation Therapy in Oral Cavity Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Keyvan; Senobari, Somayeh; Roayaei, Mahnaz; Rostampour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    The cancer of oral cavity is related to lesions of mucous membrane of tongue and gum that can be treated with radiation therapy. A lateral photon field can be used to treat this kind of tumor, which has a side-effect on normal tissue in the opposite side of the oral cavity. In this study the dosimetric effect of the various shields in oral cavity is evaluated. In this study, a special phantom similar to the structure of oral cavity with capability of film dosimetry was designed and constructed. The various shield slabs were made of five materials: Lead, Plexiglas, Acrylic resin, Silicon and Plaster. For irradiation, Cobalt 60 (60Co) and 6 MV photon beams were used. The film dosimetry before and after the shield was performed using GAFCHROMIC EBT2 films. The film before the shield measures the magnitude of backscattering radiation from the shield. The prescribed dose was 150 cGy. Results showed that 3 cm of the lead in both energies had the maximum absorption of radiation. The absorbed dose to opposite side of shield for 6 MV photon beams and 60Co were 21 and 32 cGy, respectively. The minimum attenuation on radiation was observed in silicon shield for which the dose of opposite side were 116 and 147 cGy for 6 MV and 60Co respectively. The maximum backscattered dose was measured 177 cGy and 219 cGy using 3 cm thickness of lead, which was quite considerable. The minimum backscattering where for acrylic resin 101 and 118 cGy for 6 MV and cobalt. In this study, it was concluded that the amount of backscattering for 3 cm Lead shield is quite considerable and increases the dose significantly. A composite layer of shield with 1-2 cm lead and 1 cm acrylic resin can have the protective effect and low backscattering radiation at the same time.

  12. A new surgical strategy for treatment of tongue squamous cell carcinoma based on anatomic study with preliminary clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhen-Hu; Wu, Han-Jiang; Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Kai; Gong, Zhao-Jian; He, Zhi-Jing; Peng, Jie

    2015-10-01

    This study characterized the infiltration of primary tumors along the intrinsic and extrinsic muscles of the tongue in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC), to create a new surgical strategy that is suitable for most stages. A preliminary evaluation of this novel surgical approach was also conducted. An anatomic study of macroscopic specimens from 10 human cadavers and 100 OTSCC patients was conducted. The anatomic characteristics of the primary tumors and the origin and distribution of fibers of the intrinsic and extrinsic tongue muscles were observed and measured. After initial treatment with curative intent, the 100 patients were regularly followed-up with clinical examination and imaging. Based on the anatomic characteristics of the primary tumors and tongue muscles, a new surgical approach was developed, and was described as muscle anatomy tongue surgery (MATS). MATS proved suitable for almost all stages of OTSCC. According to the morphology of the invasive tumor front, the 100 cases were divided into four types. The rate of 2-year local disease control was 98%, locoregional control 86%, disease-free survival 85%, and overall survival 89%. Tongue functions were perfectly recovered in more than 60% of the patients. Application of the principles of MATS to the treatment of OTSCC proved suitable for almost all stages of the disease. MATS is a novel surgical technique that may improve outcomes in tongue cancer surgery. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cortico-muscular synchronization by proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles during isometric tongue protrusion.

    PubMed

    Maezawa, Hitoshi; Mima, Tatsuya; Yazawa, Shogo; Matsuhashi, Masao; Shiraishi, Hideaki; Funahashi, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    Tongue movements contribute to oral functions including swallowing, vocalizing, and breathing. Fine tongue movements are regulated through efferent and afferent connections between the cortex and tongue. It has been demonstrated that cortico-muscular coherence (CMC) is reflected at two frequency bands during isometric tongue protrusions: the beta (β) band at 15-35Hz and the low-frequency band at 2-10Hz. The CMC at the β band (β-CMC) reflects motor commands from the primary motor cortex (M1) to the tongue muscles through hypoglossal motoneuron pools. However, the generator mechanism of the CMC at the low-frequency band (low-CMC) remains unknown. Here, we evaluated the mechanism of low-CMC during isometric tongue protrusion using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Somatosensory evoked fields (SEFs) were also recorded following electrical tongue stimulation. Significant low-CMC and β-CMC were observed over both hemispheres for each side of the tongue. Time-domain analysis showed that the MEG signal followed the electromyography signal for low-CMC, which was contrary to the finding that the MEG signal preceded the electromyography signal for β-CMC. The mean conduction time from the tongue to the cortex was not significantly different between the low-CMC (mean, 80.9ms) and SEFs (mean, 71.1ms). The cortical sources of low-CMC were located significantly posterior (mean, 10.1mm) to the sources of β-CMC in M1, but were in the same area as tongue SEFs in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1). These results reveal that the low-CMC may be driven by proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles to S1, and that the oscillatory interaction was derived from each side of the tongue to both hemispheres. Oscillatory proprioceptive feedback from the tongue muscles may aid in the coordination of sophisticated tongue movements in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Tongue Measures in Individuals with Normal and Impaired Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stierwalt, Julie A. G.; Youmans, Scott R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This investigation sought to add to the extant literature on measures of normal tongue function, to provide information on measures of tongue function in a group of individuals with oral phase dysphagia, and to provide a comparison of these 2 groups matched for age and gender. Method: The Iowa Oral Performance Instrument was utilized to…

  15. Tongue Measures in Individuals with Normal and Impaired Swallowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stierwalt, Julie A. G.; Youmans, Scott R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This investigation sought to add to the extant literature on measures of normal tongue function, to provide information on measures of tongue function in a group of individuals with oral phase dysphagia, and to provide a comparison of these 2 groups matched for age and gender. Method: The Iowa Oral Performance Instrument was utilized to…

  16. Prevalence of tongue lesions in the Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Kaswan, Sumita; Rahman, Farzan; Doni, Bharati

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Tongue lesions are a health concern for the dental practitioners and the patients as they constitute a significant proportion of oral mucosal lesions. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of various tongue lesions in the Indian population. Material and methods: 4926 patients attending the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology were examined for the presence of various tongue lesions during the period from October, 2010 to September, 2012. The age of the patients ranged from 12-80 years with a mean age of 36.51 years. Results: The prevalence of tongue lesions was 12.07%. The most common lesion diagnosed was coated tongue affecting 28.0% of the subjects, followed by geographic tongue (16.4%), fissured tongue (14.9%) and depapillated tongue (11.5%). Males were more frequently affected than females. The most common systemic condition observed in the patients with tongue lesions was anaemia (189), followed by hypertension (47) and diabetes mellitus (38). Conclusion: The high prevalence necessitates adequate awareness of the various tongue lesions in the general population. The dental clinicians should also be knowledgeable about the etiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of these lesions. Key words:Tongue lesions, prevalence, Indian population, coated tongue. PMID:24455067

  17. Selective activator protein-1 inhibitor T-5224 prevents lymph node metastasis in an oral cancer model.

    PubMed

    Kamide, Daisuke; Yamashita, Taku; Araki, Koji; Tomifuji, Masayuki; Tanaka, Yuya; Tanaka, Shingo; Shiozawa, Shunichi; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2016-05-01

    Activator protein-1 (AP-1) is a transcriptional factor that regulates the expression of various genes associated with tumor invasion and migration. The purpose of our study was to assess the therapeutic effects of a novel selective AP-1 inhibitor, T-5224, in preventing lymph node metastasis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in an orthotopic mouse model. We assessed the effect of T-5224 on HNSCC cell invasion, migration, proliferation, and MMP activity by carrying out an in vitro study using an invasion assay, scratch assay, WST-8 assay, and gelatin zymography. We also observed morphological changes in HNSCC cells by time-lapse microscopy. Furthermore, cervical lymph node metastasis was assessed using an orthotopic tumor model of human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells (HSC-3-M3) injected in the tongue of a BALB/c nude mouse. T-5224 (150 mg/kg) or vehicle was given orally every day for 4 weeks. Animals were killed and assessed for lymph node metastasis by H&E staining of resected lymph nodes. T-5224 significantly inhibited the invasion, migration, and MMP activity of HNSCC cells in a dose-dependent manner; there was no significant influence on cell proliferation. The antimetastatic effect of T-5224 was also confirmed in our animal study. The rate of cervical lymph node metastasis in the model was 40.0% in the T-5224-treated group (n = 30) versus 74.1% in the vehicle-treated group (n = 27; P < 0.05). In conclusion, T-5224 inhibited the invasion and migration of HNSCC cells in vitro, and prevented lymph node metastasis in head and neck cancer in an animal model. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  18. An oral cancer awareness intervention in community pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Rogers, S N; Lowe, D; Catleugh, M; Edwards, D

    2010-10-01

    We investigated the impact on 95 community pharmacies of an educational package on awareness of oral cancer, which consisted of a training evening, pharmacy protocol, and information for patients. Results of a questionnaire and the experience of a mystery shopper before the intervention and 6 months later were used to evaluate its effectiveness. Before the intervention 29% of pharmacies advised "my 60-year-old friend who has had an ulcer in his mouth for 4 weeks" to see a doctor or a dentist. Afterwards this rose to 45% with advice being confined to seeing a doctor. There was also a substantial reduction in advice being given to buy a product. The questionnaire showed that although responses between the baseline and follow up were similar regarding health behaviours and signs and symptoms in relation to oral cancer, more (74-89%) thought that drinking alcohol, and less (46-36%) thought that passive smoking increased the risk of oral cancer. There was also an increase in the number who thought that burning sensations (42-57%), white patches (52-76%), red patches (57-76%), speckled patches (46-68%), and a persistent ulcer (82-91%) might be signs or symptoms of oral cancer. The intervention was well received, and changes in knowledge and practice were evident, but the study showed that there is potential for much greater awareness of oral cancer amongst pharmacists and their staff.

  19. Quality of life following surgical treatment of oral cancers

    PubMed Central

    Efunkoya, Akinwale Adeyemi; Adebola, Raphael Adetokunbo; Amole, Ibiyinka Olushola; Akhiwu, Benjamin Idemudia; Osunde, Daniel Otasowie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Quality of life (QoL) studies provide information about the impact of disease, the treatment of symptoms, and outcomes following treatment. The present study aims to evaluate the postoperative QoL of patients treated for oral cancer in a Nigerian government tertiary hospital. Materials and Methods A prospective study on consenting patients with oral cancer was undertaken at Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria. The subjects completed the University of Washington QoL (UW-QoL) questionnaire one day prior to surgery and postoperatively after 7 days, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months. Results Sixty-eight patients with oral cancer were recruited. Of these, 38 were males, and 30 were females (male : female, 1.3 : 1). Twenty-four patients (12 males and 12 females) underwent surgery and completed postoperative QoL assessment using the UW-QoL questionnaire. Preoperative QoL mean score was 2.21, while postoperative mean scores after 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months were 3.67, 3.46, 2.82, and 2.61, respectively. Conclusion An improvement in QoL following surgical treatment for patients with oral cancer was observed. 'Appearance,' 'recreation,' and 'chewing' were identified as the most important determinants of postoperative QoL in patients with oral cancer in our study. PMID:25741464

  20. Quality of life following surgical treatment of oral cancers.

    PubMed

    Efunkoya, Akinwale Adeyemi; Adebola, Raphael Adetokunbo; Omeje, Kelvin Uchenna; Amole, Ibiyinka Olushola; Akhiwu, Benjamin Idemudia; Osunde, Daniel Otasowie

    2015-02-01

    Quality of life (QoL) studies provide information about the impact of disease, the treatment of symptoms, and outcomes following treatment. The present study aims to evaluate the postoperative QoL of patients treated for oral cancer in a Nigerian government tertiary hospital. A prospective study on consenting patients with oral cancer was undertaken at Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria. The subjects completed the University of Washington QoL (UW-QoL) questionnaire one day prior to surgery and postoperatively after 7 days, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months. Sixty-eight patients with oral cancer were recruited. Of these, 38 were males, and 30 were females (male : female, 1.3 : 1). Twenty-four patients (12 males and 12 females) underwent surgery and completed postoperative QoL assessment using the UW-QoL questionnaire. Preoperative QoL mean score was 2.21, while postoperative mean scores after 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months were 3.67, 3.46, 2.82, and 2.61, respectively. An improvement in QoL following surgical treatment for patients with oral cancer was observed. 'Appearance,' 'recreation,' and 'chewing' were identified as the most important determinants of postoperative QoL in patients with oral cancer in our study.

  1. Risk factors for oral cancer in northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Loyha, Kulchaya; Vatanasapt, Patravoot; Promthet, Supannee; Parkin, Donald Maxwell

    2012-01-01

    Oral cancer is a common site of head and neck cancer, and is relatively frequent in Northeast Thailand. The objective of this hospital-based, case-control study was to determine associations with risk factors. A total of 104 oral cancer cases diagnosed between July 2010 and April 2011 in 3 hospitals were matched with control subjects by age, sex and hospital. Data were collected by personal interview. There were significant associations between oral cancer and tobacco smoking (OR=4.47; 95%CI=2.00 to 9.99), alcohol use among women (OR=4.16; 95%CI=1.70 to 10.69), and betel chewing (OR=9.01; 95%CI=3.83 to 21.22), and all three showed dose-response effects. Smoking is rare among Thai women (none of the control women were smokers), but betel chewing, especially among older women, is relatively common. We did not find any association between practicing oral sex and oral cancer.

  2. Factors affecting the association of oral contraceptives and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Cramer, D W; Hutchison, G B; Welch, W R; Scully, R E; Knapp, R C

    1982-10-21

    We investigated the relation between epithelial ovarian cancer and the use of oral contraceptives in a case-control study of 144 white women under the age of 60 who had ovarian cancer and 139 white women under 60 who were selected from the general population. We observed a decreased risk for ovarian cancer associated with the use of oral contraceptives in subjects 40 through 59 years of age at the time of the study. The relative risk, adjusted for parity, was 0.11, with 95 per cent confidence limits of 0.04 to 0.33. In contrast to the findings in older women, a decreased risk for ovarian cancer associated with oral-contraceptive use was not found in women under 40. In this group, the adjusted relative risk associated with any use of oral contraceptives was 1.98, with 95 per cent confidence limits of 0.74 to 5.27. The lowest risk for ovarian cancer associated with the use of oral contraceptives was observed in older parous subjects and in women who had discontinued use more than 10 years previously.

  3. Café discussions on oral sex, oral cancer, and HPV infection: summative report.

    PubMed

    Brondani, Mario Augusto

    2010-12-01

    Recent emphasis has been placed on the potential links between oral sex, HPV infection, and oral cancer development. Such links were addressed by researchers, clinicians, and the community during two Café Scientifique discussions in October and November 2008, in Vancouver, Canada. The Cafes gathered panels of experts on oral pathology, dentistry, oncology, social work, and community-based research who interacted with an audience of policy makers, health care administrators, sociologists, sexologists, pharmacists, clinical and social researchers, social workers, technicians, and graduate, undergraduate, and high school students. This commentary summarizes the main points discussed during these two events to encourage a worldwide open dialogue about potential risks for oral cancer beyond tobacco smoking and excessive alcohol consumption as such malignancies have high mortality and morbidity, but are yet preventable diseases.

  4. Oral micro-organisms in the etiology of cancer.

    PubMed

    Meurman, Jukka H; Uittamo, Johanna

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel concept on carcinogenesis mediated by oral microbiota. Oral micro-organisms are capable of metabolizing alcohol to acetaldehyde. This finding casts light on the observed association between poor oral hygiene and oral cancer. Ethanol, as such, is not carcinogenic, but its first metabolite acetaldehyde is indisputably carcinogenic. Several gastro-intestinal microbial species possess the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), which is also the enzyme responsible for alcohol metabolism in the liver. In oral microbiota, we observed that species such as the ubiquitous viridans streptococci and Candida also possess ADH. Ethanol can be detected in the mouth hours after the consumption of alcoholic beverages. Patients with poor oral health status have shown higher salivary acetaldehyde concentrations than those w