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Sample records for oral trichlorfon solution

  1. 21 CFR 520.2520 - Trichlorfon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trichlorfon oral dosage forms. 520.2520 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520 Trichlorfon oral dosage forms....

  2. 21 CFR 520.1326 - Mebendazole and trichlorfon oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mebendazole and trichlorfon oral dosage forms. 520... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1326 Mebendazole and trichlorfon oral dosage forms....

  3. 21 CFR 520.2520f - Trichlorfon granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Trichlorfon granules. 520.2520f Section 520.2520f Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520f Trichlorfon granules...

  4. 21 CFR 520.2520f - Trichlorfon granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Trichlorfon granules. 520.2520f Section 520.2520f Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520f Trichlorfon granules...

  5. 21 CFR 520.2520f - Trichlorfon granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Trichlorfon granules. 520.2520f Section 520.2520f Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520f Trichlorfon granules...

  6. 21 CFR 520.2520f - Trichlorfon granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trichlorfon granules. 520.2520f Section 520.2520f Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520f Trichlorfon granules...

  7. 21 CFR 520.2520f - Trichlorfon granules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Trichlorfon granules. 520.2520f Section 520.2520f Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520f Trichlorfon granules...

  8. 21 CFR 520.2520e - Trichlorfon boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520e Trichlorfon boluses. (a... not use this product on animals simultaneously with, or within 2 weeks, before or after treatment with...

  9. 21 CFR 520.2520e - Trichlorfon boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520e Trichlorfon boluses. (a... not use this product on animals simultaneously with, or within 2 weeks, before or after treatment with...

  10. 21 CFR 520.2520e - Trichlorfon boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520e Trichlorfon boluses. (a... not use this product on animals simultaneously with, or within 2 weeks, before or after treatment with...

  11. 21 CFR 520.2520e - Trichlorfon boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520e Trichlorfon boluses. (a... not use this product on animals simultaneously with, or within 2 weeks, before or after treatment with...

  12. 21 CFR 520.2520e - Trichlorfon boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2520e Trichlorfon boluses. (a... not use this product on animals simultaneously with, or within 2 weeks, before or after treatment with...

  13. Electrolytes: Oral Electrolyte Solutions.

    PubMed

    Harris, Lisa

    2017-08-01

    Oral electrolyte solutions are used widely for rehydration in diarrheal illness and to maintain hydration during vigorous exercise. In diarrheal illness, an oral rehydration solution (ORS) typically is preferred over intravenous fluids except for patients with severe dehydration. The preferred ORS is one similar to the glucose-containing reduced osmolarity World Health Organization ORS. There also are polymer-based solutions that use rice or wheat as the source of carbohydrates but these are not widely recommended. Use of other liquids, such as sport drinks, juice, soft drinks, and chicken broth is not recommended, though these can be considered for patients with no or mild dehydration. For maintaining hydration during exercise, particularly vigorous high-intensity exercise, recommendations are to consume fluids (ie, 5 to 7 mL/kg) and a sodium-containing snack at least 4 hours before. During exercise, individuals require 200 to 800 mL/hour of liquid that should contain 20 to 30 mEq/L of sodium. Carbohydrate intake is recommended during high-intensity exercise. Intake of excessive sodium-free fluids should be avoided to prevent exercise-induced hyponatremia. Additional fluids (ie, 1.5 L/kg of weight lost) can be consumed after exercise to restore hydration. Vitamin and mineral supplements are not recommended routinely for athletes unless known deficiencies exist. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  14. Cereal based oral rehydration solutions.

    PubMed

    Kenya, P R; Odongo, H W; Oundo, G; Waswa, K; Muttunga, J; Molla, A M; Nath, S K; Molla, A; Greenough, W B; Juma, R

    1989-07-01

    A total of 257 boys (age range 4-55 months), who had acute diarrhoea with moderate to severe dehydration, were randomly assigned to treatment with either the World Health Organisation/United Nations Childrens Fund (WHO/Unicef) recommended oral rehydration solution or cereal based oral rehydration solution made either of maize, millet, sorghum, or rice. After the initial rehydration was achieved patients were offered traditional weaning foods. Treatment with oral rehydration solution continued until diarrhoea stopped. Accurate intake and output was maintained throughout the study period. Efficacy of the treatment was compared between the different treatment groups in terms of intake of the solution, stool output, duration of diarrhoea after admission, and weight gain after 24, 48, and 72 hours, and after resolution of diarrhoea. Results suggest that all the cereal based solutions were as effective as glucose based standard oral rehydration solution in the treatment of diarrhoea.

  15. Neuropsychic Disorders in Trichlorfon Poisoning,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-21

    timidity and obsessive fears. Attention was drawn to the persistence of autonomic disorders in these patients. Complaints of impotence were not...I ADAO~g939 OREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIV WRIGHT-PATTERSDN AFS 0DH F/G 6/20 E NUR OPSY(CHIC DISORDERS IN TRICHL ORFON POISONING,(U) IAUG 7 9 V I BAR A 3AS...SHEET DTIC OCT79 70A oc’r 7, ’K FTD-ID (RS)T-1179-79 FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION NEUROPSYCHIC DISORDERS IN TRICHLORFON POISONING by 7,- I. Barabash

  16. Determination of trace trichlorfon by high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection based on its catalytic effect on sodium perborate oxidizing benzidine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hai-Zhen; Cui, Yan-Mei; Zheng, Xiu-Wen; Han, Hang-Ru; Yang, Ming-Min

    2007-02-12

    Trichlorfon has the capacity to catalyze the oxidation of benzidine (4,4'-diamino-biphenyl) to 4-amino-4'-nitro biphenyl in the presence of sodium perborate. The product of the catalyzed reaction was validated by LC-MS method. Reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography with 365 nm UV detection was used for separation and quantification of 4-amino-4'-nitro biphenyl. It can be proven there is a linear relationship between the peak areas of 4-amino-4'-nitro biphenyl and trichlorfon in the concentration range of 0.02-0.5 mg L(-1) (r=0.9988). Limit of detection was 2.0 microg L(-1). A method for the indirect determination of trichlorfon using HPLC was developed based on catalytic effect of trichlorfon. Method validation was performed on samples spiked at three levels (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 mg kg(-1)), the recoveries ranged from 67.5 to 82.1%, with relative standard deviations between 4.5 and 7.3%. 0.01 mol L(-1) sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) solution was used to extract trichlorfon from samples and solid-phase extraction was used to isolate and concentrate trichlorfon in SDS solution. The recoveries of trichlorfon obtained with percolating the extraction through a SPE system were essentially in agreement with those obtained by liquid-liquid extraction. This new isolation technique decreases the use of toxic solvents and satisfies the requirements of Green Analytical Chemistry.

  17. 21 CFR 520.2520b - Trichlorfon and atropine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Trichlorfon and atropine. 520.2520b Section 520... atropine. (a) Chemical name. (1) For trichlorfon: O,O-Dimethyl 2,2,2-trichloro-1-hydroxyethyl phosphonate. (2) For atropine: Atropine N.F. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000856 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter....

  18. 21 CFR 520.2520b - Trichlorfon and atropine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trichlorfon and atropine. 520.2520b Section 520... atropine. (a) Chemical name. (1) For trichlorfon: O,O-Dimethyl 2,2,2-trichloro-1-hydroxyethyl phosphonate. (2) For atropine: Atropine N.F. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000856 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter....

  19. Beneficial effect of pine honey on trichlorfon induced some biochemical alterations in mice.

    PubMed

    Eraslan, Gökhan; Kanbur, Murat; Silici, Sibel; Karabacak, Mürsel

    2010-07-01

    Forty-eight male BALB/c mice, weighing 30-35 g, were used in the study, and were divided into groups of 12 each. The four groups established in the study included one control group and three experimental groups. The first group served as the control group, while Groups 2, 3 and 4 were administered 1g/kg bw/day pine honey, 180 mg/kg bw/day trichlorfon ( approximately 1/5LD(50)) and 1g/kg bw/day pine honey plus 180 mg/kg bw/day trichlorfon, respectively, by the oral route using a catheter for 21 days. At the end of 21 days post-administration, blood and tissue (liver, kidney, brain and heart) samples were collected. Serum levels/activities of total protein, albumin, glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, BUN, creatine, uric acid, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, total bilirubin, GGT, LDH, AST, ALT and ALP were determined. Furthermore, tissue MDA levels and CAT, SOD and GSH-Px activities were analyzed. According to the data obtained, when administered at the indicated dose and for the indicated time period, trichlorfon was determined to lead to negative alterations in most of the biochemical parameters investigated. The administration of pine honey was determined to alleviate this effect.

  20. Effect of Trichlorfon on Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in Crucian Carp Carassius auratus gibelio

    PubMed Central

    Xu, WeiNa; Liu, WenBin; Shao, XianPing; Jiang, GuangZhen; Li, XianngFei

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the toxic effects of the organophosphate pesticide trichlorfon on hepatic lipid accumulation in crucian carp Carassius auratus gibelio. Seventy-five fish were divided into five groups (each group in triplicate), and then exposed to 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 mg/L of trichlorfon and fed with commercial feed for 30 d. At the end of the experiment, plasma and hepatic lipid metabolic biochemical status were analyzed. Triglyceride contents were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in liver but decreased in plasma after 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 mg/L trichlorfon treatments. Plasma insulin contents were markedly (P < 0.05) increased when trichlorfon concentrations were 0.5, 1.0, and 4.0 mg/L. There were no significant differences in hepatic hormone-sensitive lipase contents between the trichlorfon-treated fish and the controls. Hepatic cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate, very-low-density lipoprotein, and apolipoprotein B100 contents were decreased in the fish when trichlorfon concentration was 2.0 mg/L. Furthermore, electron microscope observations showed rough endoplasmic reticulum dilatation and mitochondrial vacuolization in hepatocytes with trichlorfon exposure. On the basis of morphological and physiological evidence, trichlorfon influenced crucian carp hepatic pathways of lipid metabolism and hepatocellular ultrastructure, which resulted in lipid accumulation in the liver. PMID:22897202

  1. The effect of trichlorfon on acetylcholinesterase activity and histopathology of cultivated fish Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, A T B; Silva de Assis, H C; Boeger, W

    2007-09-01

    Among the most extensively used compounds in aquaculture for the treatment of parasitic organisms are the organophosphates (e.g., trichlorfon). The influence of trichlorfon, applied to the treatment dose, on the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and gill histopathology of the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.) was evaluated. Cultivated fish were exposed to a single application of 0.25 ppm of trichlorfon. The results indicated a significant decrease in the muscular AChE activity in the treated individuals. After 4, 8, and 24h of exposure to trichlorfon, several histopathological alterations on gill of O. niloticus were observed but only edema and blood congestion were presented up to 72 h. No inflammatory processes were observed after 96 h of exposure. The treatment dose of trichlorfon causes biochemical effects to the fish. An indiscriminated use of this pesticide will probably decrease the production parameters of a cultivated fish such as in growth rates and final weight.

  2. Stability of dilute oral morphine solution for neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sauberan, Jason; Rossi, Steven; Kim, Jae H

    2013-01-01

    Oral morphine is a recommended option for the treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Commercially available oral morphine solution products in the United States are not formulated in concentrations appropriate for use in neonates. To test the stability of a diluted oral morphine solution for treatment of NAS. Ethanol-free morphine 2 mg/mL oral solution was diluted to 0.4 mg/mL with sterile water and stored in a light protected container at room temperature (20°C-25°C). The change in morphine concentration over time was measured by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry with simultaneous ultraviolet diode array detection. : The test morphine solution retained 107% of its original concentration after 60 days. Extemporaneously prepared 0.4 mg/mL oral morphine solution is suitable for use in the treatment of NAS as a potentially safer alternative to opium-containing agents.

  3. 21 CFR 520.2520g - Trichlorfon, phenothiazine, and piperazine dihydrochloride powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... chemicals. (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. 18.2 milligrams of trichlorfon, 12.5 milligrams of.... Administer by stomach tube. Do not fast horses before or after treatment. Treatment of mares in...

  4. 21 CFR 520.2520g - Trichlorfon, phenothiazine, and piperazine dihydrochloride powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... chemicals. (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. 18.2 milligrams of trichlorfon, 12.5 milligrams of.... Administer by stomach tube. Do not fast horses before or after treatment. Treatment of mares in...

  5. 21 CFR 520.2520g - Trichlorfon, phenothiazine, and piperazine dihydrochloride powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... chemicals. (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. 18.2 milligrams of trichlorfon, 12.5 milligrams of.... Administer by stomach tube. Do not fast horses before or after treatment. Treatment of mares in...

  6. 21 CFR 520.2520g - Trichlorfon, phenothiazine, and piperazine dihydrochloride powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... chemicals. (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. 18.2 milligrams of trichlorfon, 12.5 milligrams of.... Administer by stomach tube. Do not fast horses before or after treatment. Treatment of mares in...

  7. Dissipation kinetics, safety evaluation, and preharvest interval assessment of trichlorfon application on rice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Jun; Ren, Ya-jun; Meng, Zhi-yuan; Lu, Chun-liang; Gu, Hao-tian; Zhuang, Yi-qing

    2016-05-01

    Nowadays, there is an urgent need for the investigation of the field dissipation and assessment of the preharvest interval for trichlorfon residues on rice. To protect consumers from potential health risks, this study can provide references for the safe application of trichlorfon in the rice fields. Results of the field dissipation study showed that the dissipation dynamic equations of trichlorfon were based on the first-order reaction dynamic equations and that the dissipation rates vary among rice plant, brown rice, rice bran, soil, and water. The 2-year field trials conducted in Yangzhou and Xiaogan suggested the interval of each application for trichlorfon on rice to be at least 7 days when 80 % trichlorfon SP was sprayed with a dose ranges between 80 and 160 a.i g/667 m(2). Additionally, the preharvest interval of the last application should be at least 15 days to ensure the amounts of residues below the maximum residue limits of trichlorfon on brown rice (0.1 mg/kg).

  8. Oral bioavailability: issues and solutions via nanoformulations.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Kamla; Raghuvanshi, Smita

    2015-04-01

    The delivery of drugs through the oral route is regarded as most optimal to achieve desired therapeutic effects and patient compliance. However, poor pharmacokinetic profiles of oral drug candidates remains an area of concern, and approaches to enhance their bioavailability are widely cited in the literature. Traditionally, the approaches have been confined to molecular optimization of the drug molecule, which has gradually evolved into development of microsized and nanosized formulations. Nanoformulations, by virtue of their nanosize, are widely acclaimed for circumventing the obstacles of poor pharmacokinetics. In this review, an attempt has been made to discuss existing challenges of bioavailability and approaches to overcome the same, with in-depth compilation of the literature on nanoformulations. The nanoformulations reviewed include nanocrystals, nanoemulsions, polymeric nanoparticles, self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, polymeric micelles and lipid nanocarriers. This review confirms the potential of nanomedicines to improve the pharmacokinetics of drugs via nanoformulations. Chemotherapeutic applications and patent reports are also compiled in the review. Despite the promising benefits, nanomedicines are associated with hazards to human health. Hence, the review also deals with toxicological consequences of nanomedicines, and with in vitro/in vivo screening methods to assess bioavailability as per regulatory considerations. Nanotechnology has been shown to facilitate the clinical translation of drug candidates that were deemed to be bioavailability failures. Conclusively, nanotechnological approaches to particle design and formulation are beginning to expand the market for many drugs with improved bioavailability and therapeutics. However, dedicated efforts are needed to develop advanced nanomedicines with minimal or no adverse effects.

  9. Gastric emptying of oral rehydration solutions in acute cholera.

    PubMed

    Collins, B J; Van Loon, F P; Molla, A; Molla, A M; Alam, N H

    1989-08-01

    Gastric emptying of rice powder electrolyte solution and of glucose electrolyte solution was measured by a marker dilution double sampling technique in 14 and in 16 adult patients respectively after intravenous rehydration during an attack of acute cholera. Six patients who received rice powder electrolyte solution and seven who received glucose electrolyte solution re-attended for a repeat study with the same test meal 16 days later, when fully recovered from cholera. No differences in gastric emptying patterns of the two electrolyte solutions were observed, either in the acute or in the recovered patients. Similarly, gastric emptying of both solutions was rapid during acute cholera and comparable to that observed in recovered patients. This study indicates that gastric emptying is not impaired in acute cholera and that the rate of emptying of oral rehydration solutions is adequate to account for their observed clinical efficacy in fast purging patients with acute cholera.

  10. In vitro study of the neuropathic potential of the organophosphorus compounds trichlorfon and acephate.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Laís S; Emerick, Guilherme L; dos Santos, Neife Aparecida G; de Paula, Eloísa Silva; Barbosa, Fernando; dos Santos, Antonio Cardozo

    2015-04-01

    Organophosphorus-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) is a central and peripheral distal axonopathy characterized by ataxia and paralysis. Trichlorfon and acephate are two organophosphorus compounds (OPs) used worldwide as insecticide and which cause serious effects to non-target species. Despite that, the neuropathic potential of these OPs remains unclear. The present study addressed the neurotoxic effects and the neuropathic potential of trichlorfon and acephate in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, by evaluating inhibition and aging of neuropathy target esterase (NTE), inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), neurite outgrowth, cytotoxicity and intracellular calcium. Additionally, the effects observed were compared to those of two well-studied OPs: mipafox (known as neuropathic) and paraoxon (known as non-neuropathic). Trichlorfon and mipafox presented the lowest percentage of reactivation of inhibited NTE and the lowest ratio IC50 NTE/IC50 AChE. Moreover, they caused inhibition and aging of at least 70% of the activity of NTE at sub-lethal concentrations. All these effects have been associated with induction of OPIDN. When assayed at these concentrations, trichlorfon and mipafox reduced neurite outgrowth and increased intracellular calcium, events implicated in the development of OPIDN. Acephate caused effects similar to those caused by paraoxon (non-neuropathic OP) and was only able to inhibit 70% of NTE activity at lethal concentrations. These findings suggest that trichlorfon is potentially neuropathic, whereas acephate is not.

  11. Trichlorfon-induced haematological and biochemical changes in Cyprinus carpio: ameliorative effect of propolis.

    PubMed

    Yonar, M Enis; Yonar, Serpil Mişe; Pala, Ayşegül; Silici, Sibel; Sağlam, Naim

    2015-06-03

    Trichlorfon is among the most commonly used products to treat fish parasites in aquaculture. We investigated the effectiveness of propolis in alleviating the toxicity of trichlorfon on haematological and oxidant/antioxidant parameters in carp Cyprinus carpio. Fish were exposed to sublethal concentrations (11 and 22 mg l-1) of trichlorfon, and propolis (10 mg kg-1 of fish weight) was simultaneously administered. At the end of 14 d administration, blood and tissue (liver, kidney, gill) samples were collected. Haematological changes (red and white blood cell count, haemoglobin concentration, haematocrit level and erythrocyte indices: mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration) were determined in the blood samples, while antioxidant parameters (malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione levels and superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities) were evaluated in the liver, kidney and gill samples. Trichlorfon led to negative alterations in the haematological and antioxidant parameters investigated. The administration of propolis alleviated this effect and suggests that fish treated with trichlorfon improve their physiological status when fed a propolis-supplemented diet.

  12. Administration diluents differentiate Neoral from a generic cyclosporine oral solution.

    PubMed

    Kovarik, John M; Barilla, Denise; McMahon, Louis; Wang, Yibin; Kisicki, James; Schmouder, Robert

    2002-08-01

    A non-microemulsion cyclosporine oral solution was recently recalled from the market because of the lack of bioequivalence when administered with apple juice compared with water as the diluent. This open-label, randomized, two-period, crossover study assessed the effect of apple juice on Neoral, a microemulsion cyclosporine oral solution. The study enrolled 34 subjects who received 180 mg Neoral oral solution diluted in 200 mL tap water or apple juice. Cyclosporine was measured in whole blood by a liquid chromatography method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were compared by standard bioequivalence tests. With water vs. apple juice, cyclosporine Cmax was 1263 +/- 203 vs. 1191 +/- 225 ng/mL and AUC was 4714 +/- 1117 vs. 4788 +/- 1320 ng h/mL, respectively. Bioequivalence was demonstrated for both parameters. These data were comparable with those from a previous study in which subjects received 180 mg Neoral oral solution with orange juice. Cyclosporine bioavailability is unaltered when Neoral is administered diluted in apple juice or orange juice compared with tap water which conforms to the cyclosporine product label.

  13. 21 CFR 520.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. 520....1044b Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of pig pump oral.... (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Administer 1.15 milliliters of pig pump oral solution (5...

  14. 21 CFR 520.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. 520....1044b Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of pig pump oral.... (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Administer 1.15 milliliters of pig pump oral solution (5...

  15. 21 CFR 520.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. 520....1044b Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of pig pump oral.... (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Administer 1.15 milliliters of pig pump oral solution (5...

  16. 21 CFR 520.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. 520....1044b Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of pig pump oral.... (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Administer 1.15 milliliters of pig pump oral solution (5...

  17. 21 CFR 520.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. 520....1044b Gentamicin sulfate pig pump oral solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of pig pump oral.... (d) Conditions of use—(1) Amount. Administer 1.15 milliliters of pig pump oral solution (5...

  18. 76 FR 9789 - Determination That Theophylline Oral Solution, 80 Milligrams/15 Milliliters, Was Not Withdrawn...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination That Theophylline Oral Solution, 80 Milligrams... determined that theophylline oral solution, 80 milligrams (mg)/15 milliliters (mL), was not withdrawn from... new drug applications (ANDAs) for theophylline oral solution, 80 mg/15 mL, if all other legal and...

  19. Metabolic effects of trichlorfon (Masoten®) on the neotropical freshwater fish pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus).

    PubMed

    Venturini, Francine P; Moraes, Fernanda D; Cortella, Lucas R X; Rossi, Priscila A; Cruz, Claudinei; Moraes, Gilberto

    2015-02-01

    Fish parasites are among the crucial limiting factors in aquaculture. The organophosphorous pesticide trichlorfon is widely used as an insecticide and against fish parasites worldwide. In this study, the effects of environmental trichlorfon on biochemical and physiological parameters were investigated in Piaractus mesopotamicus (pacu), a widely farmed fish in South America, through sublethal exposure (8 µg L(-1), 10 % of the LC50; 96 h) and recovery. The activity of brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was reduced after exposure (15.5 %) and remained decreased during the recovery (21.5 %). In white muscle, AChE activity decreased 31 % only after recovery. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and acid phosphatase (ACP) activities of the liver, muscle and plasma were steady during exposure. However, after the recovery period, ALP activity was increased in the liver and muscle and decreased in plasma, while ACP was increased in the liver and decreased in muscle. Intermediary metabolism was also affected by trichlorfon, depicting increase of energetic demand (hypoglycemia, neoglucogenesis and lipid catabolism), which remained even after recovery. These results indicate that P. mesopotamicus is adversely affected by sublethal concentrations of trichlorfon and are useful for assessing the impact as well as the pros and cons of its use in controlling fish parasites in aquaculture.

  20. The effect of trichlorfon and methylazoxymethanol on the development of guinea pig cerebellum

    SciTech Connect

    Mehl, Anna; Schanke, Tore M.; Torvik, Ansgar; Fonnum, Frode . E-mail: frode.fonnum@bio.uio.no

    2007-03-15

    The pesticide trichlorfon (125 mg/kg on days 42-44 in gestation) gives hypoplasia of Brain of the offspring without any significant reduction in their body weights. The hypoplasia may be caused by trichlorfon itself or by its metabolite dichlorvos. This period of development coincides with the growth spurt period of guinea pig brain. The largest changes occurred in the cerebellum. Electron microscopic examination of the cerebellar cortex showed increased apoptotic death of cells in the granule cell layer after trichlorfon treatment. A reduction in thickness of the external germinal layer of the cerebellar cortex and an elevated amount of pyknotic and karyorrhexic cells in the granule cell layer was found. There was a significant reduction in choline esterase, choline acetyltransferase and glutamate decarboxylase activities in the cerebellum. Methylazoxymethanol (15 mg/kg body weight, day 43) was examined for comparison and caused similar hypoplasia of the guinea pig cerebellum, but did also induce a reduction in body weight. Trichloroethanol, the main metabolite of trichlorfon, did not give brain hypoplasia.

  1. Preparation of patients submitted to thyroidectomy with oral glucose solutions.

    PubMed

    Libiszewski, Michał; Drozda, Rafał; Smigielski, Janusz; Kuzdak, Krzysztof; Kołomecki, Krzysztof

    2012-05-01

    The AIM OF THE STUDY was to determine postoperative insulin-resistance in patients subject to total thyroidectomy, the prevalence of subjective feelings of hunger immediately before surgery, and the incidence of nausea/vomiting after surgery in patients prepared for elective operations by means of oral glucose solutions. The study group comprised 115 patients, including 71 patients prepared for surgery by means of oral glucose solutions (12.5% glucose) administered 12 and 3 hours before the procedure, at a dose of 800 and 400 ml. The control group comprised 44 patients prepared for surgery by means of the traditional manner- the last meal was served before 2pm the day before the surgical procedure, while fluids before 10pm. Considering both groups, we evaluated glucose and insulin levels three times, as well as determined the insulin-resistance ratio (HOMA-IR) 24 before, and 12 hours and 7 days after surgery. The incidence of nausea and vomiting after surgery, and the subjective feeling of hunger before surgery were also evaluated. Statistically significant differences considering insulin level and HOMA-IR values were observed during the II and III measurements. The glucose and insulin values, and the HOMA-IR insulin-resistance ratio, showed no statistically significant differences during measurement I. No statistically significant glucose level differences were observed during measurements II and III. A significantly greater subjective feeling of hunger before surgery and nausea/vomiting afterwards were observed in the control group. The preparation of patients with oral glucose solutions decreases the incidence of postoperative (thyroidectomy) insulin-resistance, and occurrence of nausea/vomiting during the postoperative period.

  2. Main features of nucleation in model solutions of oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Chikanova, E. S.; Punin, Yu. O.

    2015-05-01

    The regularities of nucleation in model solutions of oral cavity have been investigated, and the induction order and constants have been determined for two systems: saliva and dental plaque fluid (DPF). It is shown that an increase in the initial supersaturation leads to a transition from the heterogeneous nucleation of crystallites to a homogeneous one. Some additives are found to enhance nucleation: HCO{3/-} > C6H12O6 > F-, while others hinder this process: protein (casein) > Mg2+. It is established that crystallization in DPF occurs more rapidly and the DPF composition is favorable for the growth of small (52.6-26.1 μm) crystallites. On the contrary, the conditions implemented in the model saliva solution facilitate the formation of larger (198.4-41.8 μm) crystals.

  3. Drug interaction between oral solution itraconazole and calcineurin inhibitors in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients: an association with bioavailability of oral solution itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takehiko; Aisa, Yoshinobu; Kato, Jun; Nakamura, Yukinori; Ikeda, Yasuo; Okamoto, Shinichiro

    2009-07-01

    To assess the drug interaction between oral solution itraconazole and calcineurin inhibitors, 10 recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), in whom oral solution itraconazole was started when they had been on a steady dose of calcineurin inhibitors (cyclosporine A or tacrolimus), were retrospectively evaluated. The concentration/dose [C/D; (ng/mL)/(mg/kg)] ratio of calcineurin inhibitors significantly increased after initiating oral solution itraconazole, and the increase at 7-10 days after initiating itraconazole was 93.7%, ranging from 37.3 to 328.2%. The plasma level of itraconazole/hydroxyitraconazole was significantly correlated with the increase in the C/D ratio of calcineurin inhibitors (correlation coefficient, 0.65; P < 0.05). These results suggest that oral solution itraconazole significantly interacts with calcineurin inhibitors with a wide interindividual variability in allogeneic HSCT recipients, which could partly be explained by the variable bioavailability of oral solution itraconazole.

  4. Oral bioavailability of pantoprazole suspended in sodium bicarbonate solution.

    PubMed

    Ferron, Geraldine M; Ku, Sherry; Abell, Madelyn; Unruh, Mary; Getsy, John; Mayer, Philip R; Paul, Jeffrey

    2003-07-01

    The bioavailability of pantoprazole when administered as a suspension in sodium bicarbonate solution and as the oral tablet was studied. In an open-label, randomized, two-period crossover study, healthy fasting subjects received either one enteric-coated 40-mg pantoprazole tablet by mouth with 240 mL of water or 20 mL of a suspension prepared from one crushed pantoprazole tablet and 840 mg of sodium bicarbonate solution and administered via a nasogastric tube. Treatments were separated by a 48-hour washout period. Blood samples were collected at intervals up to 24 hours after drug administration for measurement of pantoprazole concentration by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and estimation of pharmacokinetic values. A separate study was conducted to determine pantoprazole's stability in the suspension for up to three months at 25, 5, and -20 degrees C; concentrations were measured by HPLC. Twelve subjects completed the study. The suspension yielded pantoprazole Cmax values similar to those of the tablet formulation, but the drug was 25% less bioavailable. There was no lag time for the suspension. The suspension was stable for up to two weeks at 5 degrees C and up to three months at -20 degrees C. A suspension of pantoprazole in sodium bicarbonate solution yielded a Cmax similar to that of the tablet formulation, and the drug was quickly absorbed. However, bio-availability was slightly lower with the suspension than with the tablet.

  5. Physical chemistry of supersaturated solutions and implications for oral absorption.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Lynne S; Zhang, Geoff G Z

    2016-06-01

    Amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) formulations are widely used for delivery of poorly soluble drugs for dissolution enhancement and bioavailability improvement. When administered, ASDs often exhibit fast dissolution to yield supersaturated solutions. The physical chemistry of these supersaturated solutions is not well understood. This review will discuss the concepts of solubility, supersaturation, and the connection to membrane transport rate. Liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS), which occurs when the amorphous solubility is exceeded, leading to solutions with interesting properties is extensively discussed as a phenomenon that is relevant to all enabling formulations. The multiple physical processes occurring during dissolution of the ASD and during oral absorption are analyzed. The beneficial reservoir effect of a system that has undergone LLPS is demonstrated, both experimentally and conceptually. It is believed that formulations that rapidly supersaturate and subsequently undergo LLPS, with maintenance of the supersaturation at this maximum value throughout the absorption process, i.e. those that exhibit "spring and plateau" behavior, will give superior performance in terms of absorption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 76 FR 32366 - Determination That ORLAAM (Levomethadyl Acetate Hydrochloride) Oral Solution, 10 Milligrams...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ... determined that ORLAAM (levomethadyl acetate hydrochloride (HCl)) oral solution, 10 milligrams (mg... solution, 10 mg/mL, if all other legal and regulatory requirements are met. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... HCl) oral solution, 10 mg/mL, is the subject of NDA 20-315, held by Roxane Laboratories, Inc....

  7. Oral rehydration solutions in non-cholera diarrhea: a review.

    PubMed

    Atia, Antwan N; Buchman, Alan L

    2009-10-01

    The use of oral rehydration solution (ORS) has revolutionized the management of acute diarrhea. The implementation of the standard World Health Organization ORS (WHO-ORS) has resulted in decreased mortality associated with acute diarrheal illnesses in children, although in general stool volume and diarrhea durations are not reduced. Decreased morbidity and mortality have occurred because of improved hydration status. Decreased morbidity has also been described in adults who used this therapy. Various modifications to the standard ORS have been derived. These modifications have included hypo-osmolar or hyperosmolar solutions, use of rice-based ORS, zinc supplementation, and the use of amino acids, including glycine, alanine, and glutamine. Some of these variations have been successful, some have not, and others are still under investigation. ORS has been used for travelers' diarrhea and to decrease intravenous (IV) fluid requirements in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) who require parenteral nutrition (PN). This paper reviews the standard WHO-ORS and its mechanism of action, followed by more contemporary reduced osmolarity ORS and rice-based ORS in non-cholera diarrhea. Various modifications to improve ORS are also discussed.

  8. Oral therapy in children with cholera: a comparison of sucrose and glucose electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Sack, D A; Islam, S; Brown, K H; Islam, A; Kabir, A K; Chowdhury, A M; Ali, M A

    1980-01-01

    We performed a double-blind trial comparing sucrose electrolyte oral solution with glucose electrolyte oral solution in children less than 5 years of age with severe cholera-like diarrhea. Of 111 patients studied (102 with bacteriologically confirmed cholera), 55 received sucrose solution and 56 received glucose solution. The success rates, as defined by the absence of the need to give unscheduled intravenous therapy, were similar in the two groups (73% and 77% in the sucrose and glucose groups, respectively). There was no difference in purging rates between the two groups. The primary determinant of success for oral fluid regardless of the sugar was the purging rate. Sucrose malabsorption was responsible for oral therapy failure in one child. This study demonstrates that sucrose is an effective alternative to glucose in the oral therapy solution, but either must be used in conjunction with intravenous solution when treating severe dehydrating diarrhea.

  9. Reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution for treating cholera.

    PubMed

    Murphy, C; Hahn, S; Volmink, J

    2004-10-18

    Oral rehydration solution (ORS) is used to treat dehydration caused by diarrheal diseases including cholera. Reduced osmolarity formulations are safe and more effective than standard ORS for treating non-cholera diarrhea. As cholera causes rapid electrolyte loss, it is important to know if these benefits are similar for people with cholera. To compare the safety and efficacy of reduced osmolarity oral rehydration solution (ORS) with standard ORS for treating diarrhea due to cholera. We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register (January 2004), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2004), MEDLINE (1966 to January 2004), EMBASE (1974 to January 2004), and LILACS (1982 to January 2004). We also contacted organizations and searched reference lists. Randomized controlled trials comparing reduced osmolarity ORS with standard ORS for treating adults and children with acute diarrhea due to cholera. Two reviewers independently applied eligibility criteria, assessed trial quality, and extracted data. We pooled binary data using relative risks (RR), continuous data using weighted mean difference (WMD) or the standardized mean difference (SMD), and presented the results with 95% confidence intervals (CI). For glucose-based reduced osmolarity ORS, seven trials (718 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Biochemical hyponatremia (serum sodium < 130 mmol/L) was more common with reduced osmolarity ORS (RR 1.67, CI 1.09 to 2.57; 465 participants, 4 trials); for severe biochemical hyponatremia (serum sodium < 125 mmol/L) this was not significant (RR 1.58, CI 0.62 to 4.04; 465 participants, 4 trials). No trials reported symptomatic hyponatremia or death. We found no statistically significant difference in the need for unscheduled intravenous infusion. Analyses separating children and adults showed no obvious trends. Two trials also examined rice-based ORS. In the reduced osmolarity group, duration of diarrhea was shorter (WMD -16.85 hours, CI -21.22 to

  10. Effect of food on the pharmacokinetics of dronabinol oral solution versus dronabinol capsules in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Oh, D Alexander; Parikh, Neha; Khurana, Varun; Cognata Smith, Christina; Vetticaden, Santosh

    2017-01-01

    Dronabinol is a pharmaceutical tetrahydrocannabinol originally developed as an oral capsule. A dronabinol oral solution was recently approved, and the effects of food on absorption and bioavailability of the oral solution versus capsules were compared in an open-label, single-dose, 3-period crossover study. Healthy volunteers were randomized to either dronabinol oral solution 4.25 mg (fed) or dronabinol capsule 5 mg (fed or fasted). Dosing was separated by a 7-day washout period. Plasma pharmacokinetics were evaluated for dronabinol and its major metabolite, 11-hydroxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-Δ9-THC). Pharmacokinetic data were available for analysis in 54 volunteers. In the fed state, initial dronabinol absorption was faster with oral solution versus capsule (mean time to the first measurable concentration, 0.15 vs 2.02 hours, respectively), with 100% and 15% of volunteers, respectively, having detectable plasma dronabinol levels 30 minutes postdose. There was less interindividual variability in plasma dronabinol concentration during early absorption with oral solution versus capsule. Compared with the fasted state, mean area under the plasma concentration–time curve from time zero to the last measurable concentration (AUC0−t) increased by 2.1- and 2.4-fold for dronabinol oral solution and capsule, respectively, when taken with food. Mean time to maximum plasma concentration was similarly delayed for dronabinol oral solution with food (7.7 hours) and capsule with food (5.6 hours) versus capsule with fasting (1.7 hours). Under fed conditions, AUC0−t and area under the plasma concentration–time curve from time zero to infinity were similar for the oral solution versus capsule based on 11-OH-Δ9-THC levels. An appreciable food effect was observed for dronabinol oral solution and capsules. Dronabinol oral solution may offer therapeutic benefit to patients, given its rapid and lower interindividual absorption variability versus dronabinol capsule

  11. Effect of food on the pharmacokinetics of dronabinol oral solution versus dronabinol capsules in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Oh, D Alexander; Parikh, Neha; Khurana, Varun; Cognata Smith, Christina; Vetticaden, Santosh

    2017-01-01

    Dronabinol is a pharmaceutical tetrahydrocannabinol originally developed as an oral capsule. A dronabinol oral solution was recently approved, and the effects of food on absorption and bioavailability of the oral solution versus capsules were compared in an open-label, single-dose, 3-period crossover study. Healthy volunteers were randomized to either dronabinol oral solution 4.25 mg (fed) or dronabinol capsule 5 mg (fed or fasted). Dosing was separated by a 7-day washout period. Plasma pharmacokinetics were evaluated for dronabinol and its major metabolite, 11-hydroxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-Δ9-THC). Pharmacokinetic data were available for analysis in 54 volunteers. In the fed state, initial dronabinol absorption was faster with oral solution versus capsule (mean time to the first measurable concentration, 0.15 vs 2.02 hours, respectively), with 100% and 15% of volunteers, respectively, having detectable plasma dronabinol levels 30 minutes postdose. There was less interindividual variability in plasma dronabinol concentration during early absorption with oral solution versus capsule. Compared with the fasted state, mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to the last measurable concentration (AUC0-t ) increased by 2.1- and 2.4-fold for dronabinol oral solution and capsule, respectively, when taken with food. Mean time to maximum plasma concentration was similarly delayed for dronabinol oral solution with food (7.7 hours) and capsule with food (5.6 hours) versus capsule with fasting (1.7 hours). Under fed conditions, AUC0-t and area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity were similar for the oral solution versus capsule based on 11-OH-Δ9-THC levels. An appreciable food effect was observed for dronabinol oral solution and capsules. Dronabinol oral solution may offer therapeutic benefit to patients, given its rapid and lower interindividual absorption variability versus dronabinol capsule.

  12. 21 CFR 520.1696c - Penicillin V potassium for oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penicillin V potassium for oral solution. 520....1696c Penicillin V potassium for oral solution. (a) Specifications. When reconstituted, each milliliter... infections and septicemia caused by pathogens susceptible to penicillin V potassium. (3) Limitations...

  13. 21 CFR 520.1696c - Penicillin V potassium for oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penicillin V potassium for oral solution. 520....1696c Penicillin V potassium for oral solution. (a) Specifications. When reconstituted, each milliliter... infections and septicemia caused by pathogens susceptible to penicillin V potassium. (3) Limitations...

  14. 21 CFR 520.1696c - Penicillin V potassium for oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penicillin V potassium for oral solution. 520....1696c Penicillin V potassium for oral solution. (a) Specifications. When reconstituted, each milliliter... infections and septicemia caused by pathogens susceptible to penicillin V potassium. (3) Limitations...

  15. 21 CFR 520.1326a - Mebendazole and trichlorfon powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (c) Conditions of use. Horses—(1) Amount. 8.8 milligrams of mebendazole and 40 milligrams of...) Limitations. Administer orally as an individual dose by stomach tube or throughly mixed in the ground...

  16. 21 CFR 520.1326a - Mebendazole and trichlorfon powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (c) Conditions of use. Horses—(1) Amount. 8.8 milligrams of mebendazole and 40 milligrams of...) Limitations. Administer orally as an individual dose by stomach tube or throughly mixed in the ground...

  17. 21 CFR 520.1326a - Mebendazole and trichlorfon powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (c) Conditions of use. Horses—(1) Amount. 8.8 milligrams of mebendazole and 40 milligrams of...) Limitations. Administer orally as an individual dose by stomach tube or throughly mixed in the ground...

  18. 21 CFR 520.1326a - Mebendazole and trichlorfon powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (c) Conditions of use. Horses—(1) Amount. 8.8 milligrams of mebendazole and 40 milligrams of...) Limitations. Administer orally as an individual dose by stomach tube or throughly mixed in the ground...

  19. Lactulose oral solution for the treatment of postpartum constipation.

    PubMed

    Huang, P; Gou, W L; Wang, X T; Ding, Y L; He, J; Wang, C H

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the effectiveness and safety of lactulose oral solution in treating puerperal constipation. The lactulose group was given lactulose, 15 ml once a day, and then given a maintenance dose of 5 ~ 15 ml/time according to defecation condition of patients. Maintenance treatment lasted for one week if the symptoms were relieved; but once symptoms recurred, the medication was restored. Patients in the control group were blank controls. The treatment lasted for six weeks. The conditions of patients, adverse events and combined medication were recorded every day. Patients were evaluated with SF-36 scale before and after treatment. Two hundred and eleven patients with postpartum constipation were selected from five research institutes and they were divided into lactulose group (n=106) and control group (n=105). The curative effect and the improvement of symptoms of the lactulose group were much better than those of the control group (p less than 0.01). Constipation in the lactulose group relieved faster compared to the control group (p less than 0.05). Number of days without constipation in the lactulose group was much more than that of the control group (p less than 0.05). Defecation time in the lactulose group was shorter than that of the control group (p less than 0.05). Dose of lactulose in the lactulose group reduced week by week. Differences of general physical conditions in SF-36 scale between two groups were statistically significant (p less than 0.05). Various vital signs of the two groups had no significant changes after treatment. It can be concluded that, lactulose is an effective and safe drug for treating postpartum constipation.

  20. Efficacy of oral rehydration solutions in a rat model of secretory diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Rolston, D D; Borodo, M M; Kelly, M J; Dawson, A M; Farthing, M J

    1987-01-01

    Controversy continues regarding the ideal composition of glucose/electrolyte solutions used for oral rehydration of infants and children with acute diarrhea. We have used cholera toxin-treated rat small intestine as a model of secretory diarrhea to assess the efficacy of oral rehydration solutions by intestinal perfusion. All solutions tested reversed net water secretion but a hypotonic bicarbonate-free solution was more effective than other solutions, including the World Health Organization oral rehydration solution (p less than 0.003). Net sodium secretion persisted with all solutions tested but there was a significant linear relationship between sodium concentration of the solution perfused and net sodium transport (r = 0.75, p less than 0.05). Cholera toxin treatment alone and in combination with perfusion of oral rehydration solutions significantly reduced plasma sodium concentration and osmolality (p less than 0.05), the effects being most marked with low sodium solutions. Although direct parallelism between observations in this animal model of secretory diarrhea and human diarrheal disease has not been established as yet, the model may be useful in assessing clinical efficacy of new oral rehydration solutions and in systematic analysis of the relative benefits of their individual components.

  1. A study on biomimetic immunoassay-capillary electrophoresis method based on molecularly imprinted polymer for determination of trace trichlorfon residue in vegetables.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Lu, Juxiu; Qiao, Xuguang; Xu, Zhixiang

    2017-04-15

    Pesticide residue in vegetables is a serious problem that has adverse effects on human health. In our study, we designed and synthesized a molecularly imprinted polymer that can selectively recognize trichlorfon. Using the polymer material as biomimetic antibody, we developed a biomimetic immunoassay-capillary electrophoresis method with improved sensitivity for the detection of trichlorfon. We evaluated the competitive reactions between HRP labeled trichlorfon hapten and free trichlorfon with the biomimetic antibody. Factors that affected the sensitivity of our method were tested in detail. Under optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD, IC15) and the sensitivity (IC50) of this method were 0.16mgL(-1) and 0.13μgL(-1) for trichlorfon. We used this method to determine the trichlorfon spiked in the kidney bean and cucumber samples with recoveries ranging from 78.8% to 103%. We also detected residual trichlorfons in the leek samples, and these results were verified by gas chromatography method.

  2. 21 CFR 520.1326a - Mebendazole and trichlorfon powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1326a... infections of bots (Gastrophilus intestinalis and G. nasalis), large roundworms (Parascaris equorum), large... more than once every 30 days. Do not treat sick or debilitated animals, foals under 4 months of age, or...

  3. 21 CFR 520.1326b - Mebendazole and trichlorfon paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1326b... (Gastrophilus intestinalis and G. nasalis), large roundworms (Parascaris equorum), large strongyles (Strongylus... administer more than once every 30 days. Do not treat sick or debilitated animals, foals under 4 months of...

  4. 21 CFR 520.1631 - Oxfendazole and trichlorfon paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1631... intestinalis, 2nd and 3rd instars; G. nasalis, 3rd instar) and the following gastrointestinal worms: Large roundworms (Parascaris equorum), pinworms (Oxyuris equi), adult and 4th stage larvae; large strongyles...

  5. 21 CFR 520.563 - Diatrizoate meglumine and diatrizoate sodium oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diatrizoate meglumine and diatrizoate sodium oral solution. 520.563 Section 520.563 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL...

  6. Effect of a treatment with eprinomectin or trichlorfon on the yield and quality of milk produced by multiparous dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Reist, M; Medjitna, T D E; Braun, U; Pfister, K

    2002-09-28

    The effects of a strategic antiparasitic treatment against Hypoderma species and other parasites on the milk yield, composition, and somatic cell counts of 742 multiparous dairy cattle were investigated on 79 farms in a Hypoderma species-endemic area in western Switzerland; 357 of the cows were treated with eprinomectin, 252 with trichlorfon, and 133 were left untreated. The treatments were given between October and early December 1998, on average 53 days before calving. Milk yield, fat, protein and somatic cell counts were measured once a month until the end of lactation. Eprinomectin and trichlorfon significantly increased milk yield during the first month after treatment compared with the control cows by 2.14 (P < 0.001) and 2.50 kg per day (P < 0.001), respectively. Initially, the difference between the eprinomectin- and trichlorfon-treated animals was not significant, but the effect of eprinomectin on milk yield was persistent, whereas the effect of trichlorfon decreased significantly by 0.12 kg per day per month (P < 0.05). The somatic cell counts increased significantly slower in the treated cows than in the control cows (P < 0.05). Milk composition was not affected by the treatments.

  7. Electrolyte vs. glucose-electrolyte isotonic solutions for oral rehydration therapy in horses.

    PubMed

    Monreal, L; Garzón, N; Espada, Y; Ruíz-Gopegui, R; Homedes, J

    1999-07-01

    An isotonic electrolyte solution with a composition similar to equine sweat was compared to an isotonic glucose-glycine-electrolyte solution for oral rehydration therapy in exercising horses. Ten horses were dehydrated by using frusemide and allocated randomly to receive 4 different oral solutions: isotonic sweat-like electrolyte solution, half-strength hypotonic electrolyte solution, isotonic glucose-glycine-electrolyte solution, and plain water. Solutions were given by nasogastric tube using the same volume as the bodyweight lost by each horse. Blood samples were collected before and throughout 6 h of the rehydration period. Results showed that all solutions recovered pre-frusemide values of packed cell volume (PCV) and total plasma protein (TP) in a similar fashion. No changes for Na+ values were observed during the rehydration period when the isotonic sweat-like solution was used. However, a significant hyponatraemia was induced throughout rehydration when the other 3 solutions were given, especially when hypotonic solution and water were used. Osmolality values did not change when both isotonic solutions were administered; but a significant hypotonicity was observed when hypotonic solution and water were given. When the isotonic sweat-like solution was used, plasma Cl-, K+ and creatinine values recovered to premedication values significantly faster than the other 3 solutions. In conclusion, the isotonic sweat-like electrolyte was the best solution because it restored rapidly the fluid and plasma electrolyte imbalances. In contrast, the isotonic glucose-glycine-electrolyte solution impaired the plasma electrolyte imbalances.

  8. Bioavailability study of dronabinol oral solution versus dronabinol capsules in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Neha; Kramer, William G; Khurana, Varun; Cognata Smith, Christina; Vetticaden, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Background Dronabinol, a pharmaceutical Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was originally developed as an oral capsule. This study evaluated the bioavailability of a new formulation, dronabinol oral solution, versus a dronabinol capsule formulation. Methods In an open-label, four-period, single-dose, crossover study, healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to one of two treatment sequences (T-R-T-R and R-T-R-T; T = dronabinol 4.25 mg oral solution and R = dronabinol 5 mg capsule) under fasted conditions, with a minimum 7-day washout period between doses. Analyses were performed on venous blood samples drawn 15 minutes to 48 hours postdose, and dronabinol concentrations were assayed by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Results Fifty-one of 52 individuals had pharmacokinetic data for analysis. The 90% confidence interval of the geometric mean ratio (oral solution/capsule) for dronabinol was within the 80%–125% bioequivalence range for area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC) from time zero to last measurable concentration (AUC0–t) and AUC from time zero to infinity (AUC0–∞). Maximum plasma concentration was also bioequivalent for the two dronabinol formulations. Intraindividual variability in AUC0–∞ was >60% lower for dronabinol oral solution 4.25 mg versus dronabinol capsule 5 mg. Plasma dronabinol concentrations were detected within 15 minutes postdose in 100% of patients when receiving oral solution and in <25% of patients when receiving capsules. Conclusion Single-dose dronabinol oral solution 4.25 mg was bioequivalent to dronabinol capsule 5 mg under fasted conditions. Dronabinol oral solution formulation may provide an easy-to-swallow administration option with lower intraindividual variability as well as more rapid absorption versus dronabinol capsules. PMID:27785111

  9. [Effects of special mouth care with an aroma solution on oral status and oral cavity microorganism growth in elderly stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Hye; Park, Hyojung

    2015-02-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effect of oral care with an aroma solution on oral status and oral cavity microorganism growth in elderly patients with stroke. A non-equivalent control group, with a pretest-posttest design was used in this study. The participants were assigned to the experimental group (n=30) that received oral care with an aroma solution or the control group (n=31) that received 0.9% saline solution. To identify the effect of the experimental treatments, objective/subjective assessments of oral status and oral cavity microorganism growth were performed using the oral assessment guide, oral perception guide, and oral swab culture. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and t-test with the SPSS version 21.0 program. The objective oral status was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (t= -3.64, p<.001). There was no significant difference between the subjective oral status of the experimental group and control groups (t= -1.24, p=.109). Oral microorganism growth was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (t= -7.39, p<.001). These findings indicate that special mouth care using an aroma solution could be an effective oral health nursing intervention for elderly patients with stroke.

  10. Apple Tree Dental: An Innovative Oral Health Solution.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Deborah; Helgeson, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    The Surgeon General's Report on Oral Health called attention to the "silent epidemic" of dental disease. Older adults and other vulnerable people continue to suffer disproportionately from dental disease and inadequate access to care. As a society and as dental professionals, we face multiple challenges to care for our aging patients, parents and grandparents. Apple Tree Dental's community collaborative practice model illustrates a sustainable, patient-centered approach to overcoming barriers to care across the lifespan.

  11. Treatment of acute diarrhea with oral rehydration solutions containing glutamine.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro Júnior, H; Ribeiro, T; Mattos, A; Palmeira, C; Fernandez, D; Sant'Ana, I; Rodrigues, I; Bendicho, M T; Fontaine, O

    1994-06-01

    In a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial we compared the efficacy of adding 90 mmol/L L-glutamine to the standard World Health Organization oral rehydration salts (WHO-ORS). One hundred twenty male infants, > 1 month and < 1 year of age, with acute non-cholera diarrhea and dehydration were randomly assigned to one of the two treatment groups. Patients were kept in a metabolic unit where body weight, ORS, water and food intake, as well as stool, urine and vomitus output were recorded at 6-hour intervals. Laboratory evaluation, including blood gases and electrolytes, were monitored during hospitalization. Diarrheal stool output, duration of diarrhea and volume of ORS required to achieve and maintain hydration was not significantly different between the treatment groups. This study demonstrated that a glutamine-based ORS did not provide any additional therapeutic advantage over the standard WHO-ORS during treatment of dehydration in infants with acute non-cholera diarrhea.

  12. Oral literacy demand of health care communication: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Roter, Debra L

    2011-01-01

    Literacy deficits are widespread; one-quarter of the U.S. population has below basic literacy skills and the health consequences of literacy deficits are well-known and significant. While the need to simplify written health education print material is widely recognized, there has been little attempt to describe or reduce the literacy demand of health care dialogue. Patients with limited literacy complain they are not given information about their problems in ways they can understand, leaving them uninformed, frustrated, and distrustful. The purpose of this article is to review a conceptual approach to describing oral literacy demand in health care dialogue, to review several key studies that support the predictive validity of the conceptual framework in regard to patient satisfaction and recall of information, and to propose several practical ways to diminish literacy demand and facilitate more effective health care exchanges with patients.

  13. Sleep apnea and occupational accidents: Are oral appliances the solution?

    PubMed Central

    Rabelo Guimarães, Maria De Lourdes; Hermont, Ana Paula

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental practitioners have a key role in the quality of life and prevention of occupational accidents of workers with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS). Aim: The aim of this study was to review the impact of OSAS, the Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) therapy, and the evidence regarding the use of oral appliances (OA) on the health and safety of workers. Materials and Methods: Searches were conducted in MEDLINE (PubMed), Lilacs and Sci ELO. Articles published from January 1980 to June 2014 were included. Results: The research retrieved 2188 articles and 99 met the inclusion criteria. An increase in occupational accidents due to reduced vigilance and attention in snorers and patients with OSAS was observed. Such involvements were related to excessive daytime sleepiness and neurocognitive function impairments. The use of OA are less effective when compared with CPAP, but the results related to excessive sleepiness and cognitive performance showed improvements similar to CPAP. Treatments with OA showed greater patient compliance than the CPAP therapy. Conclusion: OSAS is a prevalent disorder among workers, leads to increased risk of occupational accidents, and has a significant impact on the economy. The CPAP therapy reduces the risk of occupational accidents. The OA can improve the work performance; but there is no scientific evidence associating its use with occupational accidents reduction. Future research should focus on determining the cost-effectiveness of OA as well as its influence and efficacy in preventing occupational accidents. PMID:25568596

  14. Multicentre evaluation of reduced-osmolarity oral rehydration salts solution. International Study Group on Reduced-osmolarity ORS solutions.

    PubMed

    1995-02-04

    In developed countries, use of oral rehydration salts (ORS) solution with osmolarity lower than that of plasma has been recommended because of the risk of hypernatraemia. We compared the clinical efficacy of reduced-osmolarity ORS and standard ORS solutions in children with acute diarrhoea in four developing countries. 447 boys aged 1-24 months, admitted to hospitals in four countries with acute diarrhoea and signs of dehydration, were randomly assigned either standard ORS (311 mmol/L) or reduced-osmolarity ORS (224 mmol/L) solution. Total stool output was 39% greater (95% CI 11-75), total ORS intake 18% greater (3-33), and duration of diarrhoea 22% longer (2-45) in the standard ORS group than in the reduced-osmolarity ORS group. The risk of requiring intravenous infusion after completion of the initial oral rehydration was greater in children given standard ORS solution than in those given reduced-osmolarity ORS solution in three of the four countries (all-country relative risk 1.4 [0.9-2.4]). This relative risk was significantly increased only in non-breastfed children (2.0 [1.0-3.8], p < 0.05). In breastfed children, the relative risk of requiring intravenous infusion was not affected by the ORS solution (0.9 [0.4-2.0]). The mean sodium concentration 24 h after admission was significantly lower in the reduced-osmolarity ORS group than in the standard ORS group (135 [134-136] vs 138 [136-139] mmol/L, p < 0.01). Reduced-osmolarity ORS solution has beneficial effects on the clinical course of acute diarrhoea. Our findings support the use of reduced-osmolarity ORS solution in children with acute non-cholera diarrhoea in developing countries. Further studies are needed to find the best formulation and whether such a solution would be satisfactory for the treatment of cholera.

  15. Response of breeding birds to aerial sprays of trichlorfon (Dylox) and carbaryl (Sevin-4-Oil) in Montana forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWeese, L.R.; Henny, C.J.; Floyd, R.L.; Bobal, K.A.; Schultz, A.W.

    1979-01-01

    Breeding density, food, nesting success, and mortality of 20 bird species were monitored at Beaverhead National Forest, Montana, in 1975 in conjunction with experimental applications of trichlorfon (Dylox) and carbaryl (Sevin-4-oil) to western budworms (Choristoneura occidentalis). Bird species on nine 350- to 550-ha forested plots (three controls and three treated with each pesticide) were studied before and for 14 days after the spraying of trichlorfon at 1.1 kg in?9.4 L of Panasol AN3 per ha (1 pound active ingredient in 1.0 gallon/acre) and of carbaryl at 1.1 kg in 4.7 L of diesel oil per ha (l pound active ingredient in 0.5 gallon/acre). No significant decrease in bird numbers was detected from breeding-pair estimates or live bird counts after the spraying. Of the breeding pairs present before spraying, 92% remained on control plots, 89% on trichlorfon plots, and 92% on carbaryl plots. Counts of live birds made before and after spraying in three types of habitat supported the. results of the breeding-pair estimates. Nests with eggs or with young at the time of spraying were 74 and 97% successful, respectively, in control plots, 83 and 100% in plots sprayed with trichlorfon, and 86 and 100% in plots sprayed with carbaryl. No sick or dead birds were found after the spraying, although budworms were found in bird stomachs, and tracer-dye from the pesticide occurred on the feathers or feet of 74% of the 202 birds collected. Species dwelling in the tree canopy encountered the dye (and thus the pesticide) at a slightly higher rate (80%) than did species below the treetops (71 %) or near the ground and in open areas (70%).

  16. Enteral resuscitation of burn shock using World Health Organization oral rehydration solution: a potential solution for mass casualty care.

    PubMed

    Michell, Michael W; Oliveira, Hermes M; Kinsky, Michael P; Vaid, Sumreen U; Herndon, David N; Kramer, George C

    2006-01-01

    Enteral resuscitation could provide a means to resuscitate burn shock when intravenous (IV) therapy is unavailable, such as in mass disasters. We evaluated the extent of intestinal absorption and resuscitative effects of World Health Organization Oral Rehydration Solution after a 40% TBSA burn in anesthetized swine compared with the IV infusion of lactated Ringer's infused by Parkland formula. Plasma volume (PV) was measured using indocyanine green dye dilution. Intestinal absorption was assessed using phenol red as a nonabsorbable marker. Changes in hematocrit, hemodynamics, and measured PV showed equivalent resuscitative effects of enteral and IV resuscitation. The duodenal fluid absorption rate started at 77 +/- 32 ml/hr per meter of intestine during the first hour and increased to 296 +/- 40 ml/hr during the fourth hour of resuscitation, with a total of 93 +/- 2% of World Health Organization Oral Rehydration Solution infused into the intestine being absorbed. Intestinal absorption rates after burn injury are sufficient to resuscitate a 40% TBSA burn.

  17. [Basic Studies on the Stability of Flavored Oral Solutions of Rebamipide].

    PubMed

    Yajima, Ryo; Imaoka, Futa; Wako, Tetsuya; Kuroda, Yuko; Matsumoto, Kazuaki; Kizu, Junko; Katayama, Shiro

    2015-01-01

    Stomatitis frequently occurs during chemotherapy and radiotherapy for cancer. Because of its pharmacological properties including anti-inflammatory activity and stimulatory effects on endogenous prostaglandin synthesis, rebamipide has been suggested as a potentially effective treatment against stomatitis. In the present study we tested the stability of oral rebamipide solutions prepared in our hospital pharmacy using sodium alginate as a thickener to increase retention of this agent in the oral cavity, and the addition of different flavoring mixtures intended for use in enteral diets to reduce the bitterness of rebamipide and sodium alginate. Samples of oral rebamipide solution prepared with 13 kinds of flavoring and sodium alginate were evaluated in terms of their appearance, redispersibility, pH, viscosity, and rebamipide content immediately after preparation and 1, 3, 7, and 10 days after storage at room temperature under ambient light or in a cool, dark place. After 10 days of storage, favorable stability was observed in four sample solutions supplemented with green apple, pineapple, yogurt, and tomato flavoring mixtures intended for use in Elental(®) diets. These oral solutions may have potential clinical application.

  18. Multiple subcutaneous mycetomas caused by Pseudallescheria boydii: response to therapy with oral potassium iodide solution.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fida A; Hashmi, Shahrukh; Sarwari, Arif R

    2010-02-01

    We describe the case of a sixteen-year-old male who presented with multiple subcutaneous mycetomas proven on culture to be secondary to Pseudallescheria boydi., The lesions responded completely to oral potassium iodide solution. To our knowledge this has never been reported in humans.

  19. Randomized trial of itraconazole oral solution for oropharyngeal candidiasis in HIV/AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Graybill, J R; Vazquez, J; Darouiche, R O; Morhart, R; Greenspan, D; Tuazon, C; Wheat, L J; Carey, J; Leviton, I; Hewitt, R G; MacGregor, R R; Valenti, W; Restrepo, M; Moskovitz, B L

    1998-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidasis (thrush) is the most common opportunistic infection in individuals who are positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and those who have progressed to AIDS. Itraconazole has a broad in vitro spectrum of activity, including a wide variety of Candida species. Our study determined the relative efficacy of a new oral solution formulation of itraconazole and fluconazole tablets in the treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis. This was a prospective randomized, third-party-blind, multicenter trial conducted at 12 centers in the United States. One hundred seventy-nine HIV-positive patients with mycologically documented oropharyngeal candidiasis were treated with itraconazole oral solution 200 mg/ day for 7 or 14 days, or fluconazole tablets 100 mg/day for 14 days. Severity of disease was scored clinically before treatment and at clinical evaluations on days 3, 7, 14, 21, 35, and 42. Semi-quantitative cultures of mouth washings were also obtained on these days. Both 14-day and 7-day regimens of itraconazole oral solution were equivalent to fluconazole for most efficacy parameters. The clinical response rate was 97% after 14 days of itraconazole and 87% after 14 days of fluconazole. Itraconazole oral solution given for 7 days was also equivalent to fluconazole treatment for 14 days. Approximately one half of patients in all three groups relapsed by 1 month after completion of treatment. There were few adverse reactions to either drug. Itraconazole oral solution is well tolerated and offers an alternative at least as effective as fluconazole in the treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis.

  20. Chelation Therapy with Oral Solution of Deferiprone in Transfusional Iron-Overloaded Children with Hemoglobinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Makis, Alexandros; Chaliasos, Nikolaos; Alfantaki, Sapfo; Karagouni, Paraskevi; Siamopoulou, Antigone

    2013-01-01

    Iron overload in hemoglobinopathies is secondary to blood transfusions, chronic hemolysis, and increased iron absorption and leads to tissue injury requiring the early use of chelating agents. The available agents are parenteral deferoxamine and oral deferiprone and deferasirox. There are limited data on the safety and efficacy of deferiprone at a very young age. The aim of our study was the presentation of data regarding the use of oral solution of deferiprone in 9 children (mean age 6.5, range 2–10) with transfusion dependent hemoglobinopathies (6 beta thalassemia major, 1 thalassemia intermedia, and 2 sickle cell beta thalassemia). The mean duration of treatment was 21.5 months (range 15–31). All children received the oral solution without any problems of compliance. Adverse reactions were temporary abdominal discomfort and diarrhea (1 child), mild neutropenia (1 child) that resolved with no need of discontinuation of treatment, and transient arthralgia (1 child) that resolved spontaneously. The mean ferritin levels were significantly reduced at the end of 12 months (initial 2440 versus final 1420 μg/L, P < 0.001). This small study shows that oral solution of deferiprone was well tolerated by young children and its use was not associated with major safety concerns. Furthermore, it was effective in decreasing serum ferritin. PMID:24294523

  1. Oral treatment with etoposide in small cell lung cancer – dilemmas and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Rezonja, Renata; Knez, Lea; Cufer, Tanja; Mrhar, Ales

    2013-01-01

    Background Etoposide is a chemotherapeutic agent, widely used for the treatment of various malignancies, including small cell lung cancer (SCLC), an aggressive disease with poor prognosis. Oral etoposide administration exhibits advantages for the quality of life of the patient as well as economic benefits. However, widespread use of oral etoposide is limited by incomplete and variable bioavailability. Variability in bioavailability was observed both within and between patients. This suggests that some patients may experience suboptimal tumor cytotoxicity, whereas other patients may be at risk for excess toxicity. Conclusions The article highlights dilemmas as well as solutions regarding oral treatment with etoposide by presenting and analyzing relevant literature data. Numerous studies have shown that bioavailability of etoposide is influenced by genetic, physiological and environmental factors. Several strategies were explored to improve bioavailability and to reduce pharmacokinetic variability of oral etoposide, including desired and undesired drug interactions (e.g. with ketoconazole), development of suitable drug delivery systems, use of more water-soluble prodrug of etoposide, and influence on gastric emptying. In addition to genotype-based dose administration, etoposide is suitable for pharmacokinetically guided dosing, which enables dose adjustments in individual patient. Further, it is established that oral and intravenous schedules of etoposide in SCLC patients do not result in significant differences in treatment outcome, while results of toxicity are inconclusive. To conclude, the main message of the article is that better prediction of the pharmacokinetics of oral etoposide may encourage its wider use in routine clinical practice. PMID:23450046

  2. Expression characteristics of potential biomarker genes in Tra catfish, Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, exposed to trichlorfon.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Amit Kumar; Vanparys, Caroline; De Boeck, Gudrun; Kestemont, Patrick; Wang, Neil; Nguyen, Phuong Thanh; Scippo, Marie-Louise; De Coen, Wim; Robbens, Johan

    2010-09-01

    Trichlorfon (TRC) is the most common organophosphorous insecticide used in aquaculture practices in Southeast Asian countries. Indiscriminate use of TRC can either damage or alter the enzymatic and hormonal activities in the living organisms. In this present study, therefore, toxicogenomic analyses using real time PCR was used to characterize expression levels of various genes in Pangasianodon hypophthalmus after exposure to three concentrations, the 96 h 1/100LC(50) (0.01 mg/L), the 96 h 110LC(50) (0.1 mg/L) and the 96 h 12LC(50) (0.5 mg/L) of TRC for 6 h, 24 h, 96 h, 7 days, 14 days, 28 days and 56 days respectively. The expression kinetics of stress and other cellular toxicity representative genes such as heat shock protein70 (HSP70), growth hormone, acetylcholinesterase (AChE), trypsinogen, cytochrome P4501B (CYP1B) and cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) were investigated in liver and gills. TRC at a level of 0.1 mg/L and 0.5 mg/L induced a time and dose-dependent increase in the expression of the HSP70, COI and CYPIB while the transcript level of AChE, growth hormone and trypsinogen were significantly down-regulated. These results could permit to develop a "molecular biomarker system" which can be applied as a first-tier method of identifying contaminant exposure before effects at population level occur.

  3. Development of a novel physico-chemically and microbiologically stable oral solution of flecainide for pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Santoveña, Ana; Charola, Irma; Suárez-González, Javier; Teigell-Pérez, Nuria; García-van Nood, Susana; Soriano, Mabel; Fariña, José B

    2016-09-23

    There is as yet no commercialized preparation for oral administration of flecainide acetate (FA) to children. In such cases, manipulation of commercial tablets is the usual practice in pharmacy services of hospitals and compounding pharmacies, to provide a suitable dosage form for this vulnerable pediatric population group. In this study we have formulated FA as an oral solution, as an alternative to the suspension elaborated from commercial tablets. Due to this sensitivity of young patients, we have used the pure active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and the lowest permitted levels of pediatric excipients. Despite being a highly soluble API, only one of the formulations appears as a transparent solution due to complete FA solubilization. The proposed formulation is physico-chemically and microbiologically stable and the mass and dose uniformity is appropriate for 30 days' storage at 25°C.

  4. Tolerability of Oral Xylitol Solution in Young Children: Implications for Otitis Media Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Vernacchio, Louis; Vezina, Richard M.; Mitchell, Allen A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Xylitol, given as two grams orally five times-a-day, significantly reduces the incidence of acute otitis media (AOM) in children. A less frequent dosing schedule, if tolerable and efficacious, would promote the more widespread use of this treatment. We sought to determine the tolerability and acceptability in young children of oral xylitol solution at doses of 5 grams three times-a-day (TID) and 7.5 grams once daily (QD). Methods. The study was a three-month randomized placebo-controlled trial of the tolerability and acceptability of oral xylitol solution in 120 children 6-36 months of age performed in the SCOR Network. Results. Study withdrawals and unscheduled medical visits for gastrointestinal complaints did not differ significantly among the study groups. The proportions of subjects in the xylitol TID group who experienced excessive gas or diarrhea at months one, two, and three were 22.7%, 10.0%, and 14.3%, respectively, and in the xylitol QD group were 27.3%, 17.4%, and 14.3%, respectively, and these did not differ from the placebo groups. The proportions who accepted the study solution easily or with only minor difficulty at one, two, and three months in the xylitol TID group were 77.3%, 90.0%, and 90.5% and in the xylitol QD group, 77.3%, 82.6%, and 90.5%, respectively. Conclusions. Oral xylitol solution at dosages of 5 grams TID and 7.5 grams QD is well-tolerated by young children. Given the potential for xylitol as a safe, inexpensive option for AOM prophylaxis, clinical trials using these dosages of xylitol can be conducted. PMID:17097152

  5. [Sodium concentrations in solutions for oral rehydration in children with diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Mota-Hernández, F; Morales-Barradas, J A

    1990-04-01

    Using the appropriate treatment for dehydration due to diarrhea, over a million deaths a year in children under five are being prevented. After analyzing the information related to the concentration of sodium in solutions used for oral rehydration, the following conclusions can be made: 1. Solutions with high glucose content, as well as hyperosmolar foods, favor the development of hypernatremia. Not so, sodium concentrations of up to 90 mmol/L, with glucose under 2.5%. 2. There are other factors which correlate with the presence of hypernatremia: abundant watery diarrhea, a good state of nutrition, under six months of age and the administration of solute loads, orally (boiled milk) as well as intravenously. 3. The WHO oral rehydration solution which contains, in mmol/L: sodium 90, glucose 111 (2%), chloride 80, potassium 20 and citrate 10, with a total osmolarity of 311 or 331 mOsm/L, is the one which more closely resembles the ideal concentration and has shown to be effective, not only in the treatment of dehydration due to diarrhea, but has also been to be useful in the prevention and maintenance of rehydration, independently from the etiology, the patient's age or the state of nutrition. 4. The use of oral serum with a sodium concentration of 90 mmol/L, reduces the natremia more slowly, therefore protecting the patient with hypernatremic dehydration from developing convulsions during treatment. This sodium concentration is also the best for cases of hyponatremic dehydration. 5. Using the recommended norms in cases of children with diarrhea, including continuing regular feeding habits and the adding of complementary liquids, no cases of hypernatremia have been recorded.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Breastfeeding or oral sucrose solution in term neonates receiving heel lance: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Codipietro, Luigi; Ceccarelli, Manuela; Ponzone, Alberto

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the efficacy of breastfeeding versus orally administered sucrose solution in reducing pain response during blood sampling through heel lance. METHODS; We conducted an open-label, randomized, controlled trial at a neonatal unit of a public hospital in northern Italy on 101 term neonates undergoing heel lance with an automated piercing device for routine neonatal screening for congenital disorders. Newborn infants were randomly assigned to breastfeeding during blood sampling or to the oral administration of 1 mL of 25% sucrose solution. We validated the multidimensional acute pain rating scale of the Premature Infant Pain Profile, heart rate increase, oxygen saturation decrease, crying behavior (duration of first cry, cry percentage in 2 minutes, and during blood sampling), duration of sampling, and the number of performed heel lances. Median Premature Infant Pain Profile scores were lower in the breastfeeding group (3.0) than in the sucrose-solution group (8.5), and the median group difference was -5.0. The median heart rate increase, oxygen saturation decrease, and duration of first cry for the breastfeeding group were, respectively, 13.0, -1, and 3 and for sucrose group were 22, -3, and 21. Medians were significantly different between the groups. There were no significant differences in the sampling duration and numbers of heel lances. This study suggests that breastfeeding provides superior analgesia for heel lance compared with oral sucrose in term neonates.

  7. Stability study of a clonidine oral solution in a novel vehicle designed for pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Potier, Arnaud; Voyat, Julien; Nicolas, Alain

    2017-10-09

    Clonidine hydrochloride is administered to opioid-addicted mothers' neonates to reduce neonatal abstinence syndrome. It is prescribed off-label to neonates at 0.5-1 µg/kg/6 hours, alone or in combination. The commercially injectable form of clonidine - Catapressan® 0.15 mg/mL - is being orally given after an appropriate dilution in water. However, this practice is not suitable for a perfectly safe and accurate administration. The objectives were to design a 10 µg/mL oral solution of clonidine hydrochloride in Inorpha® and to study the stability of this solution by a validated stability indicating liquid chromatography (LC) method. The chemical, physicochemical and microbiological stability of the compounded formulation stored at 5°C ± 3°C and 25°C ± 2°C was tested over 60 days. The LC method used is specific, linear, accurate and precise. Upon storage between 2°C and 8°C according to classical and 'in use' schedules, the concentrations of clonidine and potassium sorbate (preservative) were found to be between 90.0% and 110.0% of the initial concentration, the pH between 4.4 and 4.7 and no microbial growth was noted. The stability of clonidine hydrochloride oral solution in Inorpha® sets the basis for individualised, easy and safe administration of clonidine in pediatric populations.

  8. Factors associated with the use of oral rehydration solution among mothers in west Lombok, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Widarsa, K T; Muninjaya, A A

    1994-12-01

    To determine factors associated with the use of oral rehydration solution (ORS) in West Lombok, Indonesia, interviews were conducted among 293 mothers in six villages with a total population of 54,324. This study included mothers of children aged less than 2 years. The children had episode of diarrhoea in the past week during the 3-month survey period of June-August 1991. Questions asked included when ORS was used, how often it was used, how to make ORS, and the availability and accessibility of ORS in the community. Mothers were observed when preparing ORS. More than 66% of the mothers questioned had used oral rehydration therapy for home management of diarrhoea, either as packaged oral rehydration solution (ORS) or as salt-sugar solution (SSS). Fifty-six percent of mothers reported giving ORS and 10% reported giving SSS. Only 37% of mothers, however, were able to prepare ORS properly, and only 9% were able to prepare SSS properly. The following factors significantly increased the likelihood that a mother would use ORS: watching a demonstration of how to prepare ORS (odds ratio 6.34), availability of ORS (odds ratio 2.37), and accessibility of ORS (3.50). However, the ability to prepare ORS properly did not significantly increase the likelihood of feeding ORS. These results indicate that demonstrations of preparation of ORS and availability of ORS are necessary to increase the use of ORS for management of acute diarrhoea in West Lombok.

  9. Comparison of intramuscular olanzapine, orally disintegrating olanzapine tablets, oral risperidone solution, and intramuscular haloperidol in the management of acute agitation in an acute care psychiatric ward in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wen-Yu; Huang, Si-Sheng; Lee, Bo-Shyan; Chiu, Nan-Ying

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare efficacy and safety among intramuscular olanzapine, intramuscular haloperidol, orally disintegrating olanzapine tablets, and oral risperidone solution for agitated patients with psychosis during the first 24 hours of treatment in an acute care psychiatric ward. Forty-two inpatients from an acute care psychiatric ward of a medical center in central Taiwan were enrolled. They were randomly assigned to 1 of the 4 treatment groups (10-mg intramuscular olanzapine, 10-mg olanzapine oral disintegrating tablet, 3-mg oral risperidone solution, or 7.5-mg intramuscular haloperidol). Agitation was measured by using the excited component of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS-EC), the Agitation-Calmness Evaluation Scale, and the Clinical Global Impression--Severity Scale during the first 24 hours. There were significant differences in the PANSS-EC total scores for the 4 intervention groups at 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 minutes after the initiation of treatment. More significant differences were found early in the treatment. In the post hoc analysis, the patients who received intramuscular olanzapine or orally disintegrating olanzapine tablets showed significantly greater improvement in PANSS-EC scores than did patients who received intramuscular haloperidol at points 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 minutes after injection. These findings suggest that intramuscular olanzapine, orally disintegrating olanzapine tablets, and oral risperidone solution are as effective treatments as intramuscular haloperidol for patients with acute agitation. Intramuscular olanzapine and disintegrating olanzapine tablets are more effective than intramuscular haloperidol in the early phase of the intervention. There is no significant difference in effectiveness among intramuscular olanzapine, orally disintegrating olanzapine tablets, and oral risperidone solution.

  10. Antibiotic intravenous-to-oral switch guidelines: barriers to adherence and possible solutions.

    PubMed

    Warburton, John; Hodson, Karen; James, Delyth

    2014-10-01

    To identify reasons for poor adherence to antibiotic intravenous-to-oral switch guidelines and to explore the possible solutions. To rate the importance of the barriers and solutions identified, as perceived by a multidisciplinary expert panel. Three-round Delphi study in an expert panel comprising doctors, nurses and pharmacists, with concurrent semi-structured interviews. The three rounds of the Delphi were completed by 13 out of the 30 healthcare professionals invited to participate. No nurses were included in the final round. Consensus was achieved for 28 out of 35 statements, with the most important barrier being that of inappropriate antibiotic review at the weekend, and the most important solution being to raise guideline awareness. The findings from the seven interviews (three doctors, two pharmacists and two nurses) complemented those from the Delphi study, although they provided more specific suggestions on how to improve the adherence to guidelines. This study, using a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods, has identified several barriers to explore further and offered many practical solutions to improve practice. The importance of a multidisciplinary approach to address guideline non-adherence was emphasised. Clinical guidelines must be well publicised and well written to prevent a feeling of guideline saturation in the healthcare populous. Novel approaches may have to be investigated in order to further encourage adherence with antibiotic intravenous-to-oral switch guidelines. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  11. Physical and chemical stability of proflavine contrast agent solutions for early detection of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawedia, Jitesh D; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Myers, Alan L; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R; Kramer, Mark A; Gillenwater, Ann M; Culotta, Kirk S

    2016-02-01

    Proflavine hemisulfate solution is a fluorescence contrast agent to visualize cell nuclei using high-resolution optical imaging devices such as the high-resolution microendoscope. These devices provide real-time imaging to distinguish between normal versus neoplastic tissue. These images could be helpful for early screening of oral cancer and its precursors and to determine accurate margins of malignant tissue for ablative surgery. Extemporaneous preparation of proflavine solution for these diagnostic procedures requires preparation in batches and long-term storage to improve compounding efficiency in the pharmacy. However, there is a paucity of long-term stability data for proflavine contrast solutions. The physical and chemical stability of 0.01% (10 mg/100 ml) proflavine hemisulfate solutions prepared in sterile water was determined following storage at refrigeration (4-8℃) and room temperature (23℃). Concentrations of proflavine were measured at predetermined time points up to 12 months using a validated stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography method. Proflavine solutions stored under refrigeration were physically and chemically stable for at least 12 months with concentrations ranging from 95% to 105% compared to initial concentration. However, in solutions stored at room temperature increased turbidity and particulates were observed in some of the tested vials at 9 months and 12 months with peak particle count reaching 17-fold increase compared to baseline. Solutions stored at room temperature were chemically stable up to six months (94-105%). Proflavine solutions at concentration of 0.01% were chemically and physically stable for at least 12 months under refrigeration. The solution was chemically stable for six months when stored at room temperature. We recommend long-term storage of proflavine solutions under refrigeration prior to diagnostic procedure. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Pediatric oral solutions with propranolol hydrochloride for extemporaneous compounding: the formulation and stability study.

    PubMed

    Klovrzová, Sylva; Zahálka, Lukáš; Matysová, Ludmila; Horák, Petr; Sklubalová, Zdenka

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study is to formulate an extemporaneous pediatric oral solution of propranolol hydrochloride (PRO) 2 mg/ml for the therapy of infantile haemangioma or hypertension in a target age group of 1 month to school children and to evaluate its stability. A citric acid solution and/or a citrate-phosphate buffer solution, respectively, were used as the vehicles to achieve pH value of about 3, optimal for the stability of PRO. In order to mask the bitter taste of PRO, simple syrup was used as the sweetener. All solutions were stored in tightly closed brown glass bottles at 5 ± 3 °C and/or 25 ± 3 °C, respectively. The validated HPLC method was used to evaluate the concentration of PRO and a preservative, sodium benzoate, at time intervals of 0-180 days. All preparations were stable at both storage temperatures with pH values in the range of 2.8-3.2. According to pharmacopoeial requirements, the efficacy of sodium benzoate 0.05 % w/v was proved (Ph.Eur., 5.1.3). The preparation formulated with the citrate-phosphate buffer, in our experience, had better palatability than that formulated with the citric acid solution. propranolol hydrochloride pediatric preparation extemporaneous preparation solution stability testing HPLC.

  13. American Indian and Alaska Native Access to Oral Health Care: A Potential Solution.

    PubMed

    Batliner, Terrence S

    2016-02-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) experience significant health disparities relative to the general U.S. In particular, oral diseases affect the majority of the AI/AN population and their prevalence is significantly greater than observed in other demographic sectors of the U.S. The reasons for these disparities are multiple but lack of access to dental care is clearly a contributing factor. The dentist-to-population ratio in many AI/AN communities is less than half the U.S. average. A solution has been developed in Alaska by AI/AN leaders: dental therapists, i.e., local people trained for two years to provide basic dental services. This solution is being fought by organized dentistry that sees the approach as an economic threat, but AI/AN organizations are committed to implementing this Native solution to their access problem. The Alaska experience indicates that access to oral health services can be improved through the addition of dental therapists to the dental team.

  14. Improved water and sodium absorption from oral rehydration solutions based on rice syrup in a rat model of osmotic diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Wapnir, R A; Litov, R E; Zdanowicz, M M; Lifshitz, F

    1991-04-01

    Rice syrup solids, rice protein, and casein hydrolysate were added to experimental oral rehydration solutions in various combinations and tested in a rat intestinal perfusion system. Chronic osmotic diarrhea was induced in juvenile rats by supplying the cathartic agents, magnesium citrate and phenolphthalein, in their drinking water for 1 week. The experimental oral rehydration solutions were compared with standard oral rehydration solutions containing 20 gm/L or 30 gm/L of glucose and with each other to determine if there were significant differences in net water, sodium, or potassium absorption. An oral rehydration solution containing 30 gm/L of rice syrup solids had a net water absorption rate significantly higher than that of the standard 20 gm/L glucose-based oral rehydration solution (2.1 +/- 0.62 versus 1.5 +/- 0.48 microliters/[min x cm], p less than 0.05). Casein hydrolysate did not significantly affect net water absorption. However, combinations of 30 gm/L rice syrup solids and 5 gm/L casein hydrolysate significantly increased (p less than 0.05) net sodium and potassium absorption compared with the 20 gm/L glucose-based oral rehydration solution but not versus rice syrup solids alone. Oral rehydration solutions containing 30 gm/L rice syrup solids plus 5 gm/L rice protein, and 30 gm/L rice syrup solids plus 5 gm/L casein hydrolysate, had net water absorption rates significantly higher than the rate of a 30 gm/L glucose-based oral rehydration solution (2.5 +/- 0.36 and 2.4 +/- 0.38, respectively, versus 0.87 +/- 0.40 microliters/[min x cm], p less than 0.05). Rice protein and casein hydrolysate, however, did not significantly affect net water, sodium, or potassium absorption when added to rice protein glucose-based oral rehydration solutions. An inverse correlation between osmolality and net water absorption was observed (r = -0.653, p less than 0.02). The data suggest that substitution of rice syrup solids for glucose in oral rehydration solutions will

  15. Kinetic characteristics of crystallization from model solutions of the oral cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovanova, O. A.; Chikanova, E. S.

    2015-11-01

    The kinetic regularities of crystallization from model solutions of the oral cavity are investigated and the growth order and constants are determined for two systems: saliva and dental plaque fluid (DPF). It is found that the stage in which the number of particles increases occurs in the range of mixed kinetics and their growth occurs in the diffusion range. The enhancing effect of additives HCO- 3 > C6H12O6 > F- and the retarding effect of Mg2+ are demonstrated. The HCO- 3 and Mg2+ additives, taken in high concentrations, affect the corresponding rate constants. It is revealed the crystallization in DPF is favorable for the growth of small crystallites, while the model solution of saliva is, vice versa, favorable for the growth of larger crystals.

  16. [Preparation and immunological evaluation of oral solution of egg yolk-derived hepatitis B virus-specific transfer factor].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanping; Zhang, Qing; Zhan, Xuejun; Xie, Daze; Dai, Ge; Yang, Hui

    2013-12-01

    To prepare the oral solution of egg yolk hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific transfer factor (EYHBV-TF) and evaluate its immunological activity as an immune regulator against hepatitis B. From hens immunized with the Hepatitis B vaccine the egg yolk was isolated to extract the specific transfer factor EYHBV-TF, and its physicochemical properties were examined. Leukocyte adhesion inhibition test (LAI) was performed to detect the immunogenic activity of EYHBV-TF. The solution of EYHBV-TF was then administered orally in normal mice, and the specific cellular immune activity induced was assayed with delayed type skin hypersensitivity test (DTH), with the non-specific immune activity assessed with immune organ index. The immune responses induced by oral EYHBV-STF solution were compared with those by EYHBV-STF injection and by different dosages (injection and oral) of porcine spleen HBV-specific transfer factor (PSHBV-STF), porcine spleen nonspecific transfer factor, and egg yolk extracts from non-immunized hens. The prepared EYHBV-STF oral solution, which met the standards for biological products, could inhibit leukocyte adhesion in vitro and significantly enhance mouse foot pad swelling, demonstrating its capability of transferring antigen-specific delayed type hypersensitivity reactions to naive recipient. EYHBV-STF oral solution also significantly improved the immune organ index in mice (P<0 01) with similar effects to those caused by EYHBV-STF injections and by PSHBV-STF injection and oral solution. Orally administered EYHBV-STF and EYHBV-STF injection both possess hepatitis B antigen-specific cellular immune activity and can significantly enhance specific cellular immune responses.

  17. Detection of stain formation on teeth by oral antiseptic solution using fiber optic displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, H. A.; Rahim, H. R. A.; Harun, S. W.; Yasin, M.; Apsari, R.; Ahmad, H.; Wan Abas, W. A. B.

    2013-02-01

    The application of a simple intensity modulated fiber optic displacement sensor for the detection of stain formation on human teeth is demonstrated. The proposed sensor uses a concentric type bundled plastic optical fiber (POF) as a probe in conjunction with the surfaces of five human teeth as the reflecting targets. Prior to the experiment, the stains were produced extrinsically by soaking the teeth in different concentrations of oral antiseptic solution containing hexetidine. The concentration of the oral antiseptic solution is measured in volume%. For a concentration change from 0% to 80%, the peak voltage decreases exponentially from 1.15 mV to 0.41 mV with a measured resolution of 0.48% and 1.75% for concentration ranges of 0-40% and 40-80%, respectively. The correlation between the detector output and variation in the color of human tooth surface has successfully been examined. Simple in design and low in cost, this sensor can detect color changes due to hexetidine-induced stain on a tooth surface in a fast and convenient way. Thus, this sensor will be very promising in esthetic dentistry, dental color matching techniques, chemical and biomedical applications.

  18. The use of oral replacement solutions in the treatment of choleraand other severe diarrhoeal disorders.

    PubMed

    Sack, R B; Cassells, J; Mitra, R; Merritt, C; Butler, T; Thomas, J; Jacobs, B; Chaudhuri, A; Mondal, A

    1970-01-01

    Despite the progress that has been made in the treatment of cholera, mortality rates from this disease remain high in rural areas where intravenous fluids are not readily available. The authors have therefore conducted controlled studies into the efficacy of a simpler form of maintenance therapy-the administration of glucose-containing electrolyte solutions by mouth. The results obtained from the study of 51 adult patients (36 with cholera and 15 with severe non-cholera diarrhoea) indicate that oral fluids are adequate for maintenance therapy in cholera and severe diarrhoeal disease, and that there is no significant increase in the duration of diarrhoea or in the stool volume in patients receiving such therapy.The addition of a non-specific adsorbent, charcoal, to the fluid led to a significant increase in the volume of diarrhoeal stools and to prolongation of vibrio excretion; its use is therefore not recommended. The use of oral replacement solutions should result in improvement of cholera treatment of adults in rural areas and in a reduction in the cost of treatment.

  19. The use of oral replacement solutions in the treatment of cholera and other severe diarrhoeal disorders*

    PubMed Central

    Sack, R. B.; Cassells, J.; Mitra, R.; Merritt, C.; Butler, T.; Thomas, J.; Jacobs, B.; Chaudhuri, A.; Mondal, A.

    1970-01-01

    Despite the progress that has been made in the treatment of cholera, mortality rates from this disease remain high in rural areas where intravenous fluids are not readily available. The authors have therefore conducted controlled studies into the efficacy of a simpler form of maintenance therapy—the administration of glucose-containing electrolyte solutions by mouth. The results obtained from the study of 51 adult patients (36 with cholera and 15 with severe non-cholera diarrhoea) indicate that oral fluids are adequate for maintenance therapy in cholera and severe diarrhoeal disease, and that there is no significant increase in the duration of diarrhoea or in the stool volume in patients receiving such therapy. The addition of a non-specific adsorbent, charcoal, to the fluid led to a significant increase in the volume of diarrhoeal stools and to prolongation of vibrio excretion; its use is therefore not recommended. The use of oral replacement solutions should result in improvement of cholera treatment of adults in rural areas and in a reduction in the cost of treatment. PMID:5312988

  20. Oral Mucosal Injection of a Local Anesthetic Solution Containing Epinephrine Enhances Muscle Relaxant Effects of Rocuronium

    PubMed Central

    Ninomiya, Asako; Terakawa, Yui; Matsuura, Nobuyuki; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Kaneko, Yuzuru

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how submucosal injection of a clinically relevant dose of a lidocaine hydrochloride solution containing epinephrine affects the muscle relaxant effects of rocuronium bromide. Sixteen patients scheduled for orthognathic surgery participated in this study. All patients were induced with fentanyl citrate, a target-controlled infusion of propofol and rocuronium bromide. Anesthesia was maintained by total intravenous anesthesia. After nasotracheal intubation, an infusion of rocuronium bromide was started at 7 µg/kg/min, and the infusion rate was then adjusted to maintain a train of four (TOF) ratio at 10 to 15%. The TOF ratio just prior to oral mucosal injection of a 1% lidocaine hydrochloride solution containing 10 µg/mL epinephrine (LE) was taken as the baseline. TOF ratio was observed for 20 minutes, with 1-minute intervals following the start of injection. Mean epinephrine dose was 85.6 ± 18.6 µg and mean infusion rate of rocuronium bromide was 6.3 ± 1.6 µg/kg/min. TOF ratio began to decrease 2 minutes after the injection of LE, reached the minimum value at 3.1 ± 3.6% 12 minutes after the injection, and then began to recover. We conclude that oral mucosal injection of LE enhances the muscle relaxant effects of rocuronium bromide. PMID:22428970

  1. Oral mucosal injection of a local anesthetic solution containing epinephrine enhances muscle relaxant effects of rocuronium.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Asako; Terakawa, Yui; Matsuura, Nobuyuki; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Kaneko, Yuzuru

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how submucosal injection of a clinically relevant dose of a lidocaine hydrochloride solution containing epinephrine affects the muscle relaxant effects of rocuronium bromide. Sixteen patients scheduled for orthognathic surgery participated in this study. All patients were induced with fentanyl citrate, a target-controlled infusion of propofol and rocuronium bromide. Anesthesia was maintained by total intravenous anesthesia. After nasotracheal intubation, an infusion of rocuronium bromide was started at 7 µg/kg/min, and the infusion rate was then adjusted to maintain a train of four (TOF) ratio at 10 to 15%. The TOF ratio just prior to oral mucosal injection of a 1% lidocaine hydrochloride solution containing 10 µg/mL epinephrine (LE) was taken as the baseline. TOF ratio was observed for 20 minutes, with 1-minute intervals following the start of injection. Mean epinephrine dose was 85.6 ± 18.6 µg and mean infusion rate of rocuronium bromide was 6.3 ± 1.6 µg/kg/min. TOF ratio began to decrease 2 minutes after the injection of LE, reached the minimum value at 3.1 ± 3.6% 12 minutes after the injection, and then began to recover. We conclude that oral mucosal injection of LE enhances the muscle relaxant effects of rocuronium bromide.

  2. Diclofenac topical solution compared with oral diclofenac: a pooled safety analysis

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Sanford H; Fuller, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Background Topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) formulations, which produce less systemic exposure compared with oral formulations, are an option for the management of osteoarthritis (OA). However, the overall safety and efficacy of these agents compared with oral or systemic therapy remains controversial. Methods Two 12-week, double-blind, double-dummy, randomized, controlled, multicenter studies compared the safety and efficacy profiles of diclofenac topical solution (TDiclo) with oral diclofenac (ODiclo). Each study independently showed that TDiclo had similar efficacy to ODiclo. To compare the safety profiles of TDiclo and ODiclo, a pooled safety analysis was performed for 927 total patients who had radiologically confirmed symptomatic OA of the knee. This pooled analysis included patients treated with TDiclo, containing 45.5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and those treated with ODiclo. Safety assessments included monitoring of adverse events (AEs), recording of vital signs, dermatologic evaluation of the study knee, and clinical laboratory evaluation. Results AEs occurred in 312 (67.1%) patients using TDiclo versus 298 (64.5%) of those taking ODiclo. The most common AE with TDiclo was dry skin at the application site (24.1% vs 1.9% with ODiclo; P < 0.0001). Fewer gastrointestinal (25.4% vs 39.0%; P < 0.0001) and cardiovascular (1.5% vs 3.5%; P = 0.055) AEs occurred with TDiclo compared with ODiclo. ODiclo was associated with significantly greater increases in liver enzymes and creatinine, and greater decreases in creatinine clearance and hemoglobin (P < 0.001 for all). Conclusions These findings suggest that TDiclo represents a useful alternative to oral NSAID therapy in the management of OA, with a more favorable safety profile. PMID:21811391

  3. Comparative study of titrated oral misoprostol solution and vaginal dinoprostone for labor induction at term pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu; Yang, Aijun; Ma, Qingyong; Li, Xuelan; Qin, Li; He, Tongqiang

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate effectiveness and safety of titrated oral misoprostol solution (OMS) in comparison with vaginal dinoprostone for cervix ripening and labor induction in term pregnant women. A multicenter randomized controlled trial of women with term singleton pregnancy with indications for labor induction; 481 participants were allocated to receive titrated OMS with different doses by hourly administration according to the procedure or insert vaginal dinoprostone for cervix ripening and labor induction to compare maternal outcomes including indication of labor induction, mode of outcome of delivery, maternal morbidity, and neonatal outcomes between two groups for evaluating the efficacy and safety of titrated oral misoprostol induction. Proportion of delivery within 12 h of titrated oral misoprostol is significantly less than vaginal dinoprostone (p = 0.03), but no difference of total vaginal delivery rate (p = 0.93); the mean time of first treatment to vaginal delivery was longer in OMS group (21.3 ± 14.5 h) compared with the vaginal dinoprostone group (15.7 ± 9.6 h). Although the proportion of cesarean section between the two groups showed no statistically significant difference, OMS group showed significantly lower frequency of uterine hyperstimulation, hypertonus, partus precipitatus and non-reassuring fetal heart rate than dinoprostone group. Neonatal outcomes were similar evaluating from Apgar score and NICU admission. Our study also showed that labor induction of women with cervix Bishop score ≤3 needed increased dosage of misoprostol solution. Titrated OMS is as effective as vaginal dinoprostone in labor induction for term pregnant women, with safer effect for its lower rate of adverse effect for women.

  4. The presence of bicarbonate in oral rehydration solution does not influence fluid absorption in cholera.

    PubMed

    Sarker, S A; Mahalanabis, D

    1995-03-01

    On the basis of human perfusion studies it has been speculated that bicarbonate ions in oral rehydration salt solutions (ORS) to treat diarrhoea are more efficiently absorbed from the small bowel. We evaluated the role of bicarbonate in ORS by using a reduced purging rate in cholera as a proxy indicator for absorption efficiency in cholera-like severe diarrhoea. In a double-blind randomized trial 60 patients received standard ORS containing bicarbonate or an identical solution except that sodium bicarbonate was replaced by an equimolar amount of sodium chloride (sodium, 90 mmol/l; potassium, 20 mmol/l; chloride, 80 mmol/l; bicarbonate, 30 mmol/l; glucose, 111 mmol/l; and osmolality, 331 mmol/l) after initial intravenous rehydration to correct initial dehydration and shock and until diarrhoea ceased. Five patients receiving standard ORS and eight receiving bicarbonate-free ORS required unscheduled intravenous therapy for recurrence of severe dehydration in spite of receiving ORS solution. ORS intake and purging rate, in ml/kg body weight/day, both including and excluding stool output during unscheduled intravenous therapy are closely similar in the two treatment groups. The results indicate that bicarbonate-containing ORS solution does not have any clinically significant effect on the absorption efficiency of ORS, either beneficial or adverse, and its use is relevant only for correction of metabolic acidosis of diarrhoeal dehydration.

  5. Evaluation of computed tomographic enterography with an orally administered lactulose solution in clinically normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Keh, Seoyeon; Sohn, Jungmin; Choi, Mihyun; Lee, Namsoon; Jang, Jaeyoung; Kim, Hyunwook; Chang, Dongwoo; Choi, Mincheol; Yoon, Junghee

    2016-04-01

    To determine optimal techniques for CT enterography in clinically normal dogs and to evaluate luminal distention after oral administration of lactulose solution as a contrast agent. 15 healthy dogs. CT was performed in a control group (2 dogs that underwent CT to evaluate metastasis and 5 other dogs). In a bolus administration group (5 dogs from the control group), lactulose solution (1.34 g/mL) was administered (60 mL/kg) rapidly via gastric tube to anesthetized dogs, and CT was performed every 10 minutes for 1 hour. In a continuous administration group of 8 other dogs, lactulose solution (60 mL/kg) was administered slowly via nasoesophageal tube over a period of 45 minutes. Then, 15 minutes after anesthetic induction, CT was performed every 10 minutes for 1 hour. Luminal distention of the small intestines was evaluated qualitatively by use of a 3-point scale. All small intestinal segments had poor luminal distention in the control group. The terminal ileum had poor luminal distention for the bolus administration group. Nearly all segments had good luminal distention for the continuous administration group with mild adverse effects. Luminal distention scores from 0 to 20 minutes after lactulose administration were significantly higher than scores from 30 to 60 minutes. Interobserver reproducibility was high for all intestinal segments. CT performed between 0 and 20 minutes after continuous administration of lactulose solution (60 mL/kg) may reveal adequate luminal distention for examination of small intestinal segments in dogs.

  6. Formulation and stability of an extemporaneously compounded oral solution of chlorpromazine HCl.

    PubMed

    Prohotsky, Daniel L; Juba, Katherine M; Zhao, Fang

    2014-12-01

    Chlorpromazine is a phenothiazine antipsychotic which is often used in hospice and palliative care to treat hiccups, delirium, and nausea. With the discontinuation of the commercial oral solution concentrate, there is a need to prepare this product by extemporaneous compounding. This study was initiated to identify an easy-to-prepare formulation for the compounding pharmacist. A stability study was also conducted to select the proper storage conditions and establish the beyond-use date. Chlorpromazine HCl powder and the Ora-Sweet® syrup vehicle were used to prepare the 100 mg/mL solution. Once the feasibility was established, a batch of the solution was prepared and packaged in amber plastic prescription bottles for a stability study. These samples were stored at refrigeration (2-8°C) or room temperature (20-25°C) for up to 3 months. At each monthly time point, the samples were evaluated by visual inspection, pH measurement, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A separate forced stability study was conducted to confirm that the HPLC method was stability indicating. A clear and colorless solution of 100 mg/mL chlorpromazine HCl was obtained by dissolving the drug powder in Ora-Sweet® with moderate agitation. The stability study results indicated that this solution product remained unchanged in visual appearance or pH at both refrigeration and room temperature for up to 3 months. The HPLC results also confirmed that all stability samples retained 93.6-101.4% of initial drug concentration. Chlorpromazine HCl solution 100 mg/mL can be compounded extemporaneously by dissolving chlorpromazine HCl drug powder in Ora-Sweet®. The resulting product is stable for at least three months in amber plastic prescription bottles stored at either refrigeration or room temperature.

  7. [Oral hydratation with a low osmolality solution in dehydrated children with diarrheic diseases: controlled clinical trial].

    PubMed

    Bernal, Carlos; Velásquez, Claudia; García, Guillermo; Uribe, Gustavo; Palacio, Carlos Mauricio

    2003-03-01

    A clinical trial was conducted to compare the efficacy of a low-osmolarity solution (245 mOsm/L), and a standard oral rehydration solution (ORS) recommended by WHO for children dehydrated by diarrhea. Group 1 (69 children) received WHO/ORS (311 mOsml/L) and group 2 (71 children) received a low-osmolarity solution (245 mOsm/L). Rehydration was successful in 88.4% in group 1 and 92.9% in group 2 (p = 0.35). Rehydration was completed in 5.2 h (SD +/- 1.8) in group 1 and 5.5 (SD +/- 1.7) in group 2 (p = 0.31). Stool output was 6.3 g/kg/h (SD +/- 5.0) in group 1 and 5.6 g/kg/h (SD +/- 5.1) in group 2 (p = 0.94). Sodium at rehydration-completion was 139.3 mEq/L (SD +/- 7.1) in group 1 and 136.7 mEq/L (SD +/- 4.3) in group 2 (p = 0.014). Group 1 was under observation for 21 hours (SD +/- 5.7) and group 2, for 22 hours (SD +/- 5.6). Stool output in group 1 was 5.2 g/kg/h (SD 4.1) and 4.2 gr./kg/h (SD +/- 4.1) in group 2 (p = 0.16). In group 1, 23.1% required intravenous solutions and 9.8% in group 2 (p = 0.03). In treating dehydrated children, the low-osmolarity solution diminished the need for intravenous solutions, corrected most plasmatic sodium disorders, and produced no-risk of developing hyponatremia.

  8. Modulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission induced by sublethal doses of the organophosphate trichlorfon in cockroaches.

    PubMed

    Stürmer, Graziele Daiane; de Freitas, Thiago Carrazoni; Heberle, Marines de Avila; de Assis, Dênis Reis; Vinadé, Lúcia; Pereira, Antônio Batista; Franco, Jeferson Luis; Dal Belo, Cháriston André

    2014-11-01

    Organophosphate (OP) insecticides have been used indiscriminately, based on their high dissipation rates and low residual levels in the environment. Despite the toxicity of OPs to beneficial insects is principally devoted to the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, the physiological mechanisms underlying this activity remain poorly understood. Here we showed the pharmacological pathways that might be involved in severe alterations in the insect locomotion and grooming behaviors following sublethal administration of the OP Trichlorfon (Tn) (0.25, 0.5 and 1 µM) in Phoetalia pallida. Tn inhibited the acetylcholinesterase activity (46±6, 38±3 and 24±6 nmol NADPH/min/mg protein, n=3, p<0.05), respectively. Tn (1 µM) also increased the walking maintenance of animals (46±5 s; n=27; p<0.05). Tn caused a high increase in the time spent for this behavior (344±18 s/30 min, 388±18 s/30 min and 228±12 s/30 min, n=29-30, p<0.05, respectively). The previous treatment of the animals with different cholinergic modulators showed that pirenzepine>atropine>oxotremorine>d-tubocurarine>tropicamide>methoctramine induced a decrease on Tn (0.5 µM)-induced grooming increase, respectively in order of potency. Metoclopramide (0.4 µM), a DA-D2 selective inhibitor decreased the Tn-induced grooming activity (158±12 s/30 min; n=29; p<0.05). Nevertheless, the effect of the selective DA-D1 receptor blocker SCH 23390 (1.85 µM) on the Tn (0.5 µM)-induced grooming increase was significative and more intense than that of metoclopramide (54±6 s/30 min; n=30; p<0.05). Taken together the results suggest that a cross-talking between cholinergic M1/M3 and dopaminergic D1 receptors at the insect nervous system may play a role in the OP-mediated behavioral alterations.

  9. Preparation of ibuprofen-loaded chitosan films for oral mucosal drug delivery using supercritical solution impregnation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chuan; Guan, Yi-Xin; Yao, Shan-Jing; Zhu, Zi-Qiang

    2014-10-01

    Drug-loaded chitosan films suitable for oral mucosal drug delivery were prepared using supercritical solution impregnation (SSI) technology. Firstly, chitosan films were obtained via casting method, and the film properties including water-uptake, erosion and mucoadhesive were characterized. SSI process was then employed to load the drug of ibuprofen onto the prepared chitosan films, and the effects of impregnation pressure and temperature on morphologies of the ibuprofen-loaded chitosan films and drug loading capacity (DLC) were studied. The SEM and X-ray diffraction patterns suggested that distinct ibuprofen shapes such as microparticles, flake, rod-like and needle-like occurred after impregnation at different pressures, and DLC varied from 7.9% to 130.4% during the SSI process. The ex vivo release profiles showed that ibuprofen-loaded chitosan films could deliver the drug across the rabbit buccal mucosa, and up to 70% of the ibuprofen was released from the matrix in 460 min. SSI process is a promising method to prepare drug-loaded film formulations for oral mucosal drug delivery, which provides the advantages of low solvent residual and sustained- and controlled- release behavior.

  10. Effectiveness of oral rehydration salt solution (ORS) in reduction of death during cholera epidemic.

    PubMed

    Sircar, B K; Saha, M R; Deb, B C; Singh, P K; Pal, S C

    1990-01-01

    An extensive outbreak of acute gastroenteritis involving all age group of patients occurred during July-September, 1978 in the Central district of Manipur state. A total of 4469 cases occurred during the period. 45.7% of diarrhoea cases sampled and 47.6% of water samples collected from rivers were found to be positive for V.cholerae biotype EITor. Case fatality rate in this epidemic was exceptionally low (0.8%) which was attributed to the early domiciliary use of oral rehydration salt solution (ORS) in the affected villages. Utility of ORS in drastic reduction of case fatality rate during any epidemic situation was first of its kind in the Indian scene.

  11. [A prospective multicenter randomized controlled clinical study on the efficacy and safety of Guaifenesin compound pseudoephedrine hydrochloride oral solution].

    PubMed

    Lu, Quan

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate efficacy and safety of Guaifenesin compound pseudoephedrine hydrochloride oral solution for the treatment of cough, expectoration, nasal congestion and runny nose in children. This was a prospective multicenter randomized single-blind, parallel-controlled clinical study. A total of 10 centers participated in this study, the actual number of cases in line with the program was 412, of whom 205 cases in trial group were treated with Guaifenesin compound pseudoephedrine hydrochloride oral solution, and 207 cases in control group with ambroxol hydrochloride oral solution, treatment of both groups persisted for 7 days. The improvement rate of each single symptom and the combined symptoms and the overall effective rate were compared between the two groups. The adverse drug reactions and compliance were assessed as well. The treatment of both groups showed efficacy. Except sputum stickiness, the improvement of all symptoms in trial group was superior to that in the control group on the 3rd day after treatment (P < 0.05) and except nasal congestion, the efficacy in all the other symptoms of trial group was better than that in the control group as well on the 7th day (P < 0.01). The improvement rate for combined symptoms of Guaifenesin compound pseudoephedrine hydrochloride oral solution was 82.9% and the overall efficacy rate was 89.3%. Guaifenesin compound Pseudoephedrine hydrochloride oral solution had higher compliance and its adverse event rate was merely 0.92%. Guaifenesin compound pseudoephedrine hydrochloride oral solution showed significant efficacy and safety in children for treatment of cough, expectoration, nasal congestion and runny nose caused by common cold or acute tracheobronchitis.

  12. Oral hypertonic electrolyte-glucose/mosapride complex solution for resuscitation of burn shock in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hu, Quan; Chai, Jiake; Hu, Sen; Zhou, Guoyong; Sheng, Zhiyong

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of oral feeding of an electrolyte glucose mosapride solution for resuscitation in dogs with shock after a 35% TBSA full-thickness burn and the effect of mosapride on gastric emptying time. Eighteen male Beagle dogs were randomly divided into intravenous isotonic solution group, intragastric hypertonic solution group, and mosapride group after they were subjected to a 35% TBSA full-thickness flame injury. In intravenous isotonic solution group (I group), isotonic electrolyte glucose solution was given through vein with adoption of the Parkland formula. The resuscitation fluid in intragastric hypertonic solution group (H group) and mosapride group (M group) consisted of 1.8% NaCl and 5% glucose, the total fluid volume was one half of that for I group, and it was given in divided amount every 2 hours. Mosapride was added to the resuscitation fluid in mosapride group. Fluid replacement was begun 30 minutes after the injury in all the groups. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output index (CI), intrathoracic blood volume index (ITBI), blood volume (BV), serum sodium concentration, intestinal mucosal blood flow (IMBF), gastric emptying, and serum motilin levels were determined at different time points. The urinary output of all animals was measured immediately after burn upto 360 minutes postburn. CI, ITBI, BV, and IMBF were all decreased obviously after burn. In I group and M group, CI, ITBI, BV, and IMBF were increased gradually after resuscitation, and they were significantly higher than that of H group (P < .05). MAP in all three groups was lowered significantly and then gradually recovered, showing no significant difference among groups. The urinary output in M group was similar to that in I group (P > .05), and it was higher than that in H group (P < .05). Serum sodium level in H group and M group increased in varying degrees and were markedly higher compared with the I group (P < .05). Postburn gastric

  13. Randomized clinical trial between hourly titrated and 2 hourly static oral misoprostol solution for induction of labor.

    PubMed

    Rouzi, Abdulrahim A; Alsahly, Nora; Alamoudi, Rana; Almansouri, Nisma; Alsinani, Nawal; Alkafy, Souzan; Rozzah, Rayyan; Abduljabbar, Hassan

    2017-04-01

    Misoprostol is an effective agent for the induction of labor. Existing guidelines recommend oral misoprostol solution 25 μg every 2 hours. However, more research is required to optimize the use of oral misoprostol solution for the induction of labor. The purpose of this study was to compare efficacy and safety of hourly titrated-dose oral misoprostol solution with static-dose oral misoprostol solution every 2 hours for labor induction. In this randomized controlled study, oral misoprostol solution was administered as (1) 20 μg hourly (≤4 doses) that was increased in the absence of regular uterine contractions to 40 μg hourly (≤4 doses) and then to 60 μg hourly (≤16 doses) or (2) 25 μg every 2 hours until active labor began (≤12 doses). A sample size of 146 women was planned with the use of a projected 95% rate for the primary endpoint (vaginal delivery within 24 hours) for hourly titrated-dose misoprostol and 80% rate for static-dose misoprostol every 2 hours. Safety outcomes included maternal morbidity and adverse neonatal outcomes. From December 2013 to July 2015, 146 women were assigned randomly to treatment. Demographic and clinical factors were similar between groups, except for age. Vaginal delivery was achieved within 24 hours in 47 women (64.4%) who received hourly titrated-doses of misoprostol solution and 48 women (65.8%) who received 2-hourly static-dose misoprostol solution (P=1.00). Rates of vaginal delivery within 24 hours did not differ significantly between treatment groups for women who were nulliparous (P=1.00) or who had postterm pregnancies (P=.66), a Bishop score of ≤3 (P=.84), or oxytocin augmentation (P=.83). Cesarean deliveries were performed within 24 hours in 9 women who received hourly titrated-dose misoprostol solution and 2 women who received 2-hourly static-dose misoprostol solution (P=.056). Pyrexia and meconium-stained liquor occurred more frequently with the hourly titrated-dose regimen. The static-dose oral

  14. Acute toxicity of 4-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, terbufos and trichlorfon to grass shrimp (Palaemonetes spp.) and sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) as affected by salinity and temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brecken-Folse, J. A.; Mayer, F.L.; Pedigo, L.E.; Marking, L.L.

    1994-01-01

    The toxicities of two industrial chemicals (4-nitrophenol and 2,4-dinitrophenol) and two organophosphate insecticides (terbufos and trichlorfon) to juvenile grass shrimp (Palaemonetes spp.) and sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon vanegatus) were determined by static, 96-h toxicity tests in a factorial design with 12 combinations of salinity and temperature (15, 20, 25, 30ppt x 17, 22, 27°C). Concentrations of the toxicants, including bioconcentradon, were determined as appropriate by gas or liquid chromatography and the use of 14C-labeled compounds. The 96-h LC50s for 4-nitrophenol ranged from 12 to 31 mg/L and for 2,4-dinitrophenol from 13 to 50 mg/L. Toxicity decreased as salinity increased for 4-nitrophenol and both test organisms. Toxicity decreased as salinity increased for 2,4-dinitrophenol and sheepshead minnows, but toxicity to grass shrimp increased as salinity increased. Toxicity decreased with increased temperature for grass shrimp exposed to 2,4-dinitrophenol and sheepshead minnows exposed to 4-nitrophenol, increased with temperature for sheepshead minnows exposed to 2,4-dinitrophenol, and no change was observed for grass shrimp exposed to 4-nitrophenol. Bioconcentration of phenols in both test organisms increased as concentration increased. The 96-h LC50s for terbufos ranged from 3.4 to 6.6 μg/L and for trichlorfon from 6.3 to 19,300 μg/L. Terbufos and trichlorfon toxicity to grass shrimp and sheepshead minnows increased with increased temperature. BCFs for terbufos were greater in sheepshead minnows than grass shrimp, but were reversed for trichlorfon.

  15. Acute toxicity of 4-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, terbufos and trichlorfon to grass shrimp (Palaemonetes spp. ) and sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) as affected by salinity and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Brecken-Folse, J.A. . Environmental Protection Agency) Mayer, F.L. . Environmental Protection Agency); Pedigo, L.E. ); Marking, L.L. . National Fisheries Research Center)

    1994-01-01

    The toxicities of two industrial chemicals (4-nitrophenol and 2,4-dinitrophenol) and two organophosphate insecticides (terbufos and trichlorfon) to juvenile grass shrimp (Palaemonetes spp.) and sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus) were determined by static, 96-h toxicity tests in a factorial design with 12 combinations of salinity and temperature (15, 20, 25, 30 ppt [times] 17, 22, 27 C). Concentrations of the toxicants, including bioconcentration, were determined as appropriate by gas or liquid chromatography and the use of [sup 14]C-labeled compounds. The 96-h LC50s for 4-nitrophenol ranged from 12 to 31 mg/L and for 2,4-dinitrophenol from 13 to 50 mg/L. Toxicity decreased as salinity increased for 4-nitrophenol and both test organisms. Toxicity decreased as salinity increased for 2,4-dinitrophenol and sheepshead minnows, but toxicity to grass shrimp increased as salinity increased. Toxicity decreased with increased temperature for grass shrimp exposed to 2,4-dinitrophenol and sheepshead minnows exposed to 4-nitrophenol, increased with temperature for sheepshead minnows exposed to 2,4-dinitrophenol, and no change was observed for grass shrimp exposed to 4-nitrophenol. Bioconcentration of phenols in both test organisms increased as concentration increased. The 96-h LC50s for terbufos ranged from 3.4 to 6.6 [mu]g/L and for trichlorfon from 6.3 to 19,300 [mu]g/L. Terbufos and trichlorfon toxicity to grass shrimp and sheepshead minnows increased with increased temperature. BCFs for terbufos were greater in sheepshead minnows than grass shrimp, but were reversed for trichlorfon.

  16. The Influence of Oral Carbohydrate Solution Intake on Stress Response before Total Hip Replacement Surgery during Epidural and General Anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Çeliksular, M Cem; Saraçoğlu, Ayten; Yentür, Ercüment

    2016-06-01

    The effects of oral carbohydrate solutions, ingested 2 h prior to operation, on stress response were studied in patients undergoing general or epidural anaesthesia. The study was performed on 80 ASA I-II adult patients undergoing elective total hip replacement, which were randomized to four groups (n=20). Group G patients undergoing general anaesthesia fasted for 8 h preoperatively; Group GN patients undergoing general anaesthesia drank oral carbohydrate solutions preoperatively; Group E patients undergoing epidural anaesthesia fasted for 8 h and Group EN patients undergoing epidural anaesthesia drank oral carbohydrate solutions preoperatively. Groups GN and EN drank 800 mL of 12.5% oral carbohydrate solution at 24:00 preoperatively and 400 mL 2 h before the operation. Blood samples were taken for measurements of glucose, insulin, cortisol and IL-6 levels. The effect of preoperative oral carbohydrate ingestion on blood glucose levels was not significant. Insulin levels 24 h prior to surgery were similar; however, insulin levels measured just before surgery were 2-3 times higher in groups GN and EN than in groups G and E. Insulin levels at the 24(th) postoperative hour in epidural groups were increased compared to those at basal levels, although general anaesthesia groups showed a decrease. From these measurements, only the change in Group EN was statistically significant (p<0.05). Plasma cortisol levels at the 2(nd) peroperative hour were higher in epidural groups than in general anaesthesia groups. Both anaesthesia techniques did not have an effect on IL-6 levels. We concluded that epidural anaesthesia suppressed stress response, although preoperative oral carbohydrate nutrition did not reveal a significant effect on surgical stress response.

  17. Rice-based oral rehydration solution decreases the stool volume in acute diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Molla, A M; Ahmed, S M; Greenough, W B

    1985-01-01

    A ramdomized trial using oral rehydration solutions (ORS) with rice or glucose was carried out in 342 patients with acute watery diarrhea in the outpatient ward of the International Centre for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh, during an epidemic of cholera between December 1982-March 1983. On admission, 75% of these patients had severe dehydration and 70% were positive for Vibrio cholerae. There were 185 children aged under 10 years and 157 adults; 169 patients were treated with rice-ORS and 173 with glucose-ORS. Patients in both groups were comparable in age and body weight as well as the duration and severity of illness. Patients with severe dehydration were first rehydrated intravenously, and then treated with ORS. Those with moderate dehydration received ORS from the start. The mean stool output in the first 24 hours in children treated with rice-ORS was less than that in those treated with glucose-ORS (155 vs 204 ml/kg 24h; P0.01). The same was the case for the adult patients, the corresponding values for stool output being 115 versus 159 ml/kg24h (P0.05); the corresponding intakes in adult patients were, respectively, 180.5 and 247 ml/kg24 hours. A gain of about 10% of the body weight on admission was observed in all the groups. 6 cases (4 children and 2 adults) who failed to respond to oral rehydration after intravenous therapy all belonged to the glucose-ORS group. The study shows that, even under epidemic conditions of severe cholera or in cholera-like diarrhea, the glucose or sucrose solutions can be replaced by rice powder with improved results. Glucose and sucrose are manufactured products which are expensive and not always available in countries where diarrheal diseases are a problem. Rice, a staple food in many of these countries, reduces the fluid requirements when used in ORS and also provides increased nutrition even in the acute stage of illness.

  18. Polymer-based oral rehydration solution for treating acute watery diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Gregorio, Germana V; Gonzales, Maria Liza M; Dans, Leonila F; Martinez, Elizabeth G

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute diarrhoea is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality among children in low-income countries. Glucose-based oral rehydration solution (ORS) helps replace fluid and prevent further dehydration from acute diarrhoea. Since 2004, the World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended the osmolarity of less than 270 mOsm/L (ORS ≤ 270) versus greater than 310 mOsm/L formulation (ORS ≥ 310). Polymer-based ORS (for example, prepared using rice or wheat) slowly releases glucose and may be superior to glucose-based ORS. Objectives To compare polymer-based oral rehydration solution (polymer-based ORS) with glucose-based oral rehydration solution (glucose-based ORS) for treating acute watery diarrhoea. Search methods We searched the following sources up to 5 September 2016: the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group (CIDG) Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 9), MEDLINE (1966 to 5 September 2016), EMBASE (1974 to 5 September 2016), LILACS (1982 to 5 September 2016), and mRCT (2007 to 5 September 2016). We also contacted researchers, organizations, and pharmaceutical companies, and searched reference lists. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of people with acute watery diarrhoea (cholera and non-cholera associated) that compared polymer-based and glucose-based ORS (with identical electrolyte contents). Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed the search results and risk of bias, and extracted data. In multiple-treatment arms with two or more treatment groups, we combined outcomes as appropriate and compared collectively with the control group. Main results Thirty-five trials that included 4284 participants met the inclusion criteria: 28 trials exclusively included children, five included adults, and two included both adults and children. Polymer-based ORS versus glucose-based ORS (osmolarity ≤ 270) Eight trials

  19. Bioequivalence of diclofenac sodium 2% and 1.5% topical solutions relative to oral diclofenac sodium in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Holt, Robert J; Taiwo, Tolu; Kent, Jeffrey D

    2015-08-01

    Topical formulations of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are generally considered to be safer alternatives to oral NSAIDs due to lower systemic absorption. We conducted randomized, crossover studies that compared the pharmacokinetics (PK), bioequivalence and safety of topical diclofenac sodium 2% twice daily (BID), diclofenac sodium 1.5% four times daily (QID) and oral diclofenac sodium in healthy subjects. The results of three bioequivalence studies are reviewed. Healthy adult subjects (n = 76) applied topical diclofenac sodium 2% solution (40.4 mg/2 mL) BID; or 1.5% solution (19.3 mg/40 drops) QID to each knee for 7.5 consecutive days separated by a washout period. Subjects (n = 22) in one study also received oral diclofenac sodium 75 mg BID for 7.5 days. Plasma diclofenac concentrations were determined from serial blood samples collected on Days 1 and 8 (steady state), and diclofenac PK parameters were estimated by noncompartmental methods. The studies demonstrated comparable bioequivalence between the 2% and 1.5% topical solutions as well as lower systemic exposure compared to oral dosing (approximately 93% less). Daily systemic exposure was comparable between the two formulations with only a 12% difference in the AUCss(0-24) (p = 0.140). Furthermore, both topical solutions demonstrated delayed elimination with a t(1/2) of 4- to 6-fold longer, as compared to oral diclofenac. The 2% solution provided more consistent dosing relative to the 1.5% solution when comparing AUCss(0-24) and Cmaxss across studies. Mild application site reactions were the most common treatment-emergent adverse event reported with topical diclofenac. The steady-state PK profile of topical diclofenac 2% solution administered BID is similar to that of the 1.5% solution administered QID. Systemic exposure to diclofenac is substantially lower after topical application as compared to oral administration. (Study 2 was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov; NCT01202799; https

  20. A field trial of wheat-based oral rehydration solution among Afghan refugee children.

    PubMed

    Murphy, H H; Bari, A; Molla, A M; Zaidi, A; Hirschhorn, N

    1996-02-01

    A total of 326 Afghan children aged between 6 months and 5 years with uncomplicated nondysenteric diarrhea for the previous 24 h to 5 days were treated at home by their mothers with either wheat-salt solution (WSS) or World Health Organization recommended glucose-oral rehydration salts (G-ORS). For 7 consecutive days the children were examined in the household and the mothers interviewed to assess the progress, feeding practices, and perception of treatment efficacy. Children treated with WSS recovered significantly earlier; the mean duration on treatment was 4.0 days (SD 1.7 days) on WSS compared to 6.4 days (SD 1.7 days) on G-ORS. By the second day of treatment, significantly more mothers using WSS (56%) reported that their children had formed stools versus 11% of their G-ORS counterparts; the mean stool frequency after 2 days was also significantly reduced; 3 stools day-1 (SD 2.1) on WSS versus 5 (SD 2.9) on G-ORS. The cereal-based solution was not confused with normal food and led to better feeding patterns. By day 2, 74% of the mothers using WSS had resumed their normal feeding frequencies as opposed to 33% of G-ORS mothers. On recovery the WSS group had gained significantly more weight; the WSS group gained 169 g (SD 142 g) while the G-ORS group lost 150 g (SD 174g). This study suggests by subjective and objective measures that WSS could be considered as an effective home fluid for the first-line treatment of diarrhea.

  1. A new reconstitutable oral paediatric hydrocortisone solution containing hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Orlu-Gul, Mine; Fisco, Giacomo; Parmar, Dipesh; Gill, Hardyal; Tuleu, Catherine

    2013-07-01

    Hydrocortisone (HC) despite a low aqueous solubility and a very poor palatability is frequently used unlicensed in paediatric practice. Hence a reconstitutable taste masked hydrocortisone solution with the potential to be easily produced extemporaneously was developed. Excipients for the reconstitutable dry powder mix were selected based on their aqueous solubility, compatibility, safety profile in children and stability at the optimum pH for HC. Formulations were visually inspected and pH was checked. The chemical and microbiological stability was assessed by a validated HPLC method and the European Pharmacopeia tests. A taste assessment study was performed on 20 young healthy adults to determine the optimum sweetener. HC was flavored (orange tangerine), preserved (methyl paraben sodium salt/potassium sorbate), adjusted to pH 4.2 (citric acid buffer) and included in a 1:6 hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CyD) complex which allowed complete solubilization of the drug following reconstitution within 1 min of handshake. Neotame 0.075% was found to be the sweetener of choice to mask the unpalatable taste and aftertaste of HC. All formulations tested at different storage conditions were found to be chemically stable after reconstitution with a HC recovery of >95% for 1 month. Microbiological assessment showed that the selected preservative combination was efficient and the presence of preservative ensured the recommended acceptance criteria for microbiological quality after reconstitution with repetitive sampling. The successfully developed 5 mg/mL reconstituted oral palatable paediatric HC solution was stable for 1 month after reconstitution and has the potential to facilitate dosing, acceptability, availability and affordability.

  2. Intermittent oral administration of potassium iodide solution for the correction of iodine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Todd, C H; Dunn, J T

    1998-06-01

    Iodized salt and iodized oil are the main methods used to prevent iodine deficiency, but sometimes alternative approaches are needed. We tested the efficacy of various regimens for the intermittent administration of potassium iodide in Hwedza, Zimbabwe, an area of known severe iodine deficiency. We divided 304 schoolchildren aged 7-13 y into five equal groups that received iodine as a 10% solution of potassium iodide as follows: 8.7 mg every 2 wk (group A), 29.7 mg every month (group B), 148.2 mg every 3 mo (group C), 382 mg every 6 mo (group D), or 993 mg once (group E). The follow-up period was 13 mo. No adverse effects were encountered with any of these doses. After 6 mo, the median blood spot thyroglobulin concentration had decreased in all groups and had normalized in groups A and B to values found in iodine-sufficient populations. The number of children with elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations decreased in groups A-C, but the changes were not significant. Urine iodine concentration generally remained low in all groups but increased in group A. After 13 mo, mean thyroid volume measured by ultrasound had decreased in groups A and B to values comparable with those in iodine-sufficient areas, and was unchanged in the other groups. We conclude that oral potassium iodide is effective for the prophylaxis of iodine deficiency if given as a dose of 30 mg I monthly or 8 mg biweekly.

  3. Negative findings for use of coconut water as an oral rehydration solution in childhood diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Fagundes Neto, U; Franco, L; Tabacow, K; Machado, N L

    1993-04-01

    This study reports the chemical composition of coconut water during its maturation. Composition was measured at 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 months maturation. Concentrations of sodium and glucose, and the osmolality values showed great variation throughout maturation. The concentration of sodium remained constant between the 5th and 7th months (mean 2.9 mEq/l), but increased after the 8th month (mean 12.5 mEq/l). The concentration of glucose remained constant between the 5th and 8th months (mean 3392.4 mg%), but abruptly decreased after the 9th month (mean 820 mg%). Osmolality followed the variation of the glucose concentration averaging 377.3 mOsm/l up to the 8th month, then decreasing to 310.3 mOsm/l after the 9th month. This study showed great variability in coconut water composition during maturation of the fruit. In no instance did the coconut water contain sodium and glucose concentrations of potential value as an oral rehydration solution.

  4. Carob bean juice: a powerful adjunct to oral rehydration solution treatment in diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Akşit, S; Cağlayan, S; Cukan, R; Yaprak, I

    1998-04-01

    In children, the treatment of acute diarrhoea with the World Health Organization (WHO) standard oral rehydration solution (ORS) provides effective rehydration but does not reduce the severity of diarrhoea. In community practice, carob bean has been used to treat diarrhoeal diseases in Anatolia since ancient times. In order to test clinical antidiarrhoeal effects of carob bean juice (CBJ), 80 children, aged 4-48 months, who were admitted to SSK Tepecik Teaching Hospital with acute diarrhoea and mild or moderate dehydration, were randomly assigned to receive treatment with either standard WHO ORS alone or a combination of standard WHO ORS and CBJ. Three patients were excluded from the study because of excessive vomiting. In the children receiving ORS + CBJ the duration of diarrhoea was shortened by 45%, stool output was reduced by 44% and ORS requirement was decreased by 38% compared with children receiving ORS alone. Weight gain was similar in the two groups at 24 h after the initiation of the study. Hypernatraemia was detected in three patients in the ORS group but in none of those in the ORS + CBJ group. The use of CBJ in combination with ORS did not lead to any clinical metabolic problem. We therefore conclude that CBJ may have a role in the treatment of children's diarrhoea after it has been technologically processed, and that further studies would be justified.

  5. First do no harm: making oral rehydration solution safer in a cholera epidemic.

    PubMed

    Daniels, N A; Simons, S L; Rodrigues, A; Gunnlaugsson, G; Forster, T S; Wells, J G; Hutwagner, L; Tauxe, R V; Mintz, E D

    1999-06-01

    Oral rehydration solution (ORS) is lifesaving therapy for cholera and pediatric diarrhea. During a cholera epidemic in Guinea-Bissau, we evaluated the microbiologic quality of ORS prepared at a hospital and tested a simple intervention using special vessels for disinfecting tap water with bleach and for preparing, storing, and dispensing ORS. Few coliform bacteria and Escherichia coli were recovered from tap water; however, pre-intervention ORS contained numerous bacteria including E. coli and toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1. In contrast, ORS samples from intervention vessels had few or no coliform bacteria, no E. coli, and no V. cholerae. Mean pre-intervention counts of coliform bacteria (3.4 x 10(7) colony-forming units [cfu]/100 ml) and E. coli (6.2 x 10(3) cfu) decreased significantly during the intervention period to 3.6 x 10(2) cfu and 0 cfu, respectively (P < 0.001). This simple system using bleach disinfectant and special storage vessels prevents bacterial contamination of ORS and reduces the risk of nosocomial transmission of cholera and other enteric pathogens.

  6. The effect of oral rehydration solution and recommended home fluids on diarrhoea mortality

    PubMed Central

    Munos, Melinda K.; Walker, Christa L Fischer; Black, Robert E

    2010-01-01

    Background Most diarrhoeal deaths can be prevented through the prevention and treatment of dehydration. Oral rehydration solution (ORS) and recommended home fluids (RHFs) have been recommended since 1970s and 1980s to prevent and treat diarrhoeal dehydration. We sought to estimate the effects of these interventions on diarrhoea mortality in children aged <5 years. Methods We conducted a systematic review to identify studies evaluating the efficacy and effectiveness of ORS and RHFs and abstracted study characteristics and outcome measures into standardized tables. We categorized the evidence by intervention and outcome, conducted meta-analyses for all outcomes with two or more data points and graded the quality of the evidence supporting each outcome. The CHERG Rules for Evidence Review were used to estimate the effectiveness of ORS and RHFs against diarrhoea mortality. Results We identified 205 papers for abstraction, of which 157 were included in the meta-analyses of ORS outcomes and 12 were included in the meta-analyses of RHF outcomes. We estimated that ORS may prevent 93% of diarrhoea deaths. Conclusions ORS is effective against diarrhoea mortality in home, community and facility settings; however, there is insufficient evidence to estimate the effectiveness of RHFs against diarrhoea mortality. PMID:20348131

  7. Lead, cadmium and aluminum in Canadian infant formulae, oral electrolytes and glucose solutions

    PubMed Central

    Dabeka, Robert; Fouquet, Andre; Belisle, Stephane; Turcotte, Stephane

    2011-01-01

    Lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and aluminum (Al) were determined in 437 individual samples of infant formulae, oral electrolytes and 5% glucose solutions available in Canada. In the electrolytes, Cd and Pb concentrations were all below 0.01 and 0.041 ng g−1, respectively. In the 5% glucose solutions, Pb and Cd levels averaged 0.01 and 0.09 ng g−1, respectively. Reported on an as-consumed basis, Pb levels in milk- and soya-based formulae averaged 0.90 and 1.45 ng g−1, respectively, while Cd levels averaged 0.23 and 1.18 ng g−1, respectively Average Al levels on an as-consumed basis were 440 ng g−1 (range 10–3400 ng g−1) in milk-based formulae and 730 ng g−1 (range 230–1100 ng g−1) in soy-based formulae. Al concentrations increased in the following order: plain formula < low-iron formula < iron-supplemented formula < casein hydrolysate formula ≈ premature formula ≤ soy formula. For example, in the powdered formulae, average Al concentrations were 18 ng g−1 for plain milk-based, 37 ng g−1 for low-iron, 128 ng g−1 for iron supplemented, 462 ng g−1 for lactose-free, 518 ng g−1 for hypoallergenic and 619 ng g−1 for soy-based formula. Al concentrations, as-consumed, increased with decreasing levels of concentration: powder < concentrated liquid < ready-to-use. Formulae stored in glass bottles contained between 100 and 300 ng g−1 more Al than the same formulae stored in cans. The source of the increased Al did not appear to be the glass itself, because most electrolytes and glucose solutions, also stored in glass, contained less than 8 ng g−1 Al. Corresponding differences in Pb and Cd levels were not observed. Al concentrations varied substantially among manufacturers; however, all manufacturers were able to produce plain milk-based formulae containing less than 50 ng g−1 Al, i.e. within the range of Al concentrations found in human milk. Next to soya-based and hypoallergenic formulae, premature formulae contained among the highest

  8. Lead, cadmium and aluminum in Canadian infant formulae, oral electrolytes and glucose solutions.

    PubMed

    Dabeka, Robert; Fouquet, Andre; Belisle, Stephane; Turcotte, Stephane

    2011-06-01

    Lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and aluminum (Al) were determined in 437 individual samples of infant formulae, oral electrolytes and 5% glucose solutions available in Canada. In the electrolytes, Cd and Pb concentrations were all below 0.01 and 0.041 ng g(-1), respectively. In the 5% glucose solutions, Pb and Cd levels averaged 0.01 and 0.09 ng g(-1), respectively. Reported on an as-consumed basis, Pb levels in milk- and soya-based formulae averaged 0.90 and 1.45 ng g(-1), respectively, while Cd levels averaged 0.23 and 1.18 ng g(-1), respectively Average Al levels on an as-consumed basis were 440 ng g(-1) (range 10-3400 ng g(-1)) in milk-based formulae and 730 ng g(-1) (range 230-1100 ng g(-1)) in soy-based formulae. Al concentrations increased in the following order: plain formula < low-iron formula < iron-supplemented formula < casein hydrolysate formula ≈ premature formula ≤ soy formula. For example, in the powdered formulae, average Al concentrations were 18 ng g(-1) for plain milk-based, 37 ng g(-1) for low-iron, 128 ng g(-1) for iron supplemented, 462 ng g(-1) for lactose-free, 518 ng g(-1) for hypoallergenic and 619 ng g(-1) for soy-based formula. Al concentrations, as-consumed, increased with decreasing levels of concentration: powder < concentrated liquid < ready-to-use. Formulae stored in glass bottles contained between 100 and 300 ng g(-1) more Al than the same formulae stored in cans. The source of the increased Al did not appear to be the glass itself, because most electrolytes and glucose solutions, also stored in glass, contained less than 8 ng g(-1) Al. Corresponding differences in Pb and Cd levels were not observed. Al concentrations varied substantially among manufacturers; however, all manufacturers were able to produce plain milk-based formulae containing less than 50 ng g(-1) Al, i.e. within the range of Al concentrations found in human milk. Next to soya-based and hypoallergenic formulae, premature formulae contained among the highest

  9. Oral rehydration salt solution for treating cholera: ≤ 270 mOsm/L solutions vs ≥ 310 mOsm/L solutions.

    PubMed

    Musekiwa, Alfred; Volmink, Jimmy

    2011-12-07

    Oral rehydration solution (ORS) is used to treat the dehydration caused by diarrhoeal diseases, including cholera. ORS formulations with an osmolarity (a measure of solute concentration) of ≤ 270 mOsm/L (ORS ≤ 270) are safe and more effective than ORS formulations with an osmolarity of ≥ 310 mOsm/L (ORS ≥ 310) for treating non-cholera diarrhoea. As cholera causes rapid electrolyte loss, it is important to know if these benefits are similar for people suffering from cholera. To compare the safety and efficacy of ORS ≤270 with ORS ≥ 310 for treating dehydration due to cholera. We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register (April 2011), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2011), MEDLINE (1966 to April 2011), EMBASE (1974 to April 2011), and LILACS (1982 to April 2011). We also contacted organizations and searched reference lists. Randomized controlled trials comparing ORS ≤ 270 with ORS ≥ 310 for treating adults and children with acute diarrhoea due to cholera. Two reviewers independently applied eligibility criteria, assessed trial quality, and extracted data. We pooled dichotomous data using risk ratio (RR), pooled continuous data using mean difference (MD) or the standardized mean difference (SMD), and presented the results with 95% confidence intervals (CI). For glucose-based ORS, seven trials (718 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Biochemical hyponatraemia (blood sodium levels < 130 mmol/L) was more common with ORS ≤ 270 (RR 1.67, CI 1.09 to 2.57; 465 participants, four trials), while a higher level of severe biochemical hyponatraemia (blood sodium levels < 125 mmol/L) in the same group was not significant (RR 1.58, CI 0.62 to 4.04; 465 participants, four trials). No instances of symptomatic hyponatraemia or death were noted in the trials that intended to record them. We found no statistically significant difference in the need for unscheduled intravenous infusion. Analyses separating children and adults

  10. Long-term Stability of Vancomycin Hydrochloride in Oral Solution: The Brand Name Versus a Generic Product.

    PubMed

    Huvelle, Sophie; Godet, Marie; Hecq, Jean-Daniel; Gillet, Patricia; Jamart, Jacques; Galanti, Laurence M

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin hydrochloride is often used for antibiotherapy in oral solution for hospitalized patients. Preparation of this solution in advance could improve time management or cost savings of drug delivery. Brand and generic products of vancomycin hydrochloride are now commercially available. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term stability of the vancomycin hydrochloride brand name Vancocin versus the generic Vancomycine at 5°C ± 3°C. Five vials of each oral solution of 1.25 g/100 mL Vancocin and Vancomycine were stored up to 57 days at 5°C ± 3°C. Concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection. Visual inspection by microscopy and spectrophotometry, as well as pH measurement, were performed periodically during the storage period. No color change or precipitation in the solution was observed throughout the study period. The lower confidence limit of the concentration for these solutions remained superior to 90% of the initial concentration as recommended by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration up to a 57-day storage period for Vancocin (106.47%) and vancomycin (102.73%). The solutions prepared either from brand or generic vancomycin hydrochloride were chemically stable for more than one month and could be prepared in advance. Copyright© by International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding, Inc.

  11. Food-based solutions are a viable alternative to glucose-electrolyte solutions for oral hydration in acute diarrhoea--studies in a rat model of secretory diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Rolston, D D; Mathew, P; Mathan, V I

    1990-01-01

    A survey of acute diarrhoea and its treatment, in 3 groups of villages in south India, revealed that use of the World Health Organization oral rehydration solution (WHO-ORS) was poor or virtually non-existent and that several liquid foods were given to children during acute diarrhoea. The effects of the most commonly used, boiled and cooled supernatants of these liquid foods [rice (Oryza sativa)-water, ragi (Eleusine coracana)-water, arrowroot (Maranta arundinacea)-water], and tender coconut-water, and of the bicarbonate- and citrate-WHO-ORS on intestinal water transport were evaluated using a rat model of secretory diarrhoea. All solutions either decreased cholera toxin-induced net water secretion (arrowroot-water) or reversed it to net absorption. Ragi-water produced maximum net water absorption, significantly greater than the WHO oral rehydration solutions. WHO-ORS utilization is poor in some developing countries, and locally used food-based solutions could be used for maintaining hydration or correcting the dehydration due to acute diarrhoea once their effectiveness has been proved by clinical trials.

  12. Determination of acesulfame and sucralose in oral electrolyte maintenance solution by liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Johns, Paul; Dowlati, Lobat

    2003-01-01

    A method was developed for the direct, simultaneous determination of acesulfame and sucralose in oral electrolyte maintenance solution (OEMS). Analyte separation and quantitation were achieved by gradient reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC) and UV absorbance at 192 nm, respectively. Detection at a second wavelength, 214 nm, was used to check sucralose peak purity; 20 microL OEMS was injected without preparation or dilution. System linearity was demonstrated as 192 nm peak area versus analyte concentration at 80-120% OEMS sweetener fortification (r > 0.999, and all residuals < 0.5%, for both acesulfame and sucralose). Spike recoveries for OEMS samples prepared at 3 spiking levels (80, 100, and 120% sweetener fortification) ranged from 100.3 to 102.0% for acesulfame, and from 97.9 to 102.3% for sucralose. In a second assessment of method accuracy, the same spiked OEMS samples were tested by 2 alternative methods: acesulfame (LC/UV at 230 nm) and sucralose (anion exchange-pulsed amperometric detection). Results for the alternative acesulfame method were within 1.2%, and for the alternative sucralose method within 6.0%, of the corresponding results obtained by the 192 nm method. Repeatability and intermediate precision RSD values were < 1 % for acesulfame and < 3% for sucralose. The limits of quantitation were 1.6 and 32 mg/L for acesulfame potassium and sucralose, respectively. Despite the weak UV absorptivity of sucralose and the consequent small size of its LC peak, no evidence was found for sucralose interference in any of the commercial OEMS flavors.

  13. Tracking Cholera through Surveillance of Oral Rehydration Solution Sales at Pharmacies: Insights from Urban Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Azman, Andrew S.; Lessler, Justin; Satter, Syed Moinuddin; Mckay, Michael V.; Khan, Azharul; Ahmed, Dilruba; Gurley, Emily S.

    2015-01-01

    Background In Bangladesh, pharmacy-purchased oral rehydration solution (ORS) is often used to treat diarrhea, including cholera. Over-the-counter sales have been used for epidemiologic surveillance in the past, but rarely, if ever, in low-income countries. With few early indicators for cholera outbreaks in endemic areas, diarrhea-related product sales may serve as a useful surveillance tool. Methodology/Principal Findings We tracked daily ORS sales at 50 pharmacies and drug-sellers in an urban Bangladesh community of 129,000 for 6-months while simultaneously conducting surveillance for diarrhea hospitalizations among residents. We developed a mobile phone based system to track the sales of ORS and deployed it in parallel with a paper-based system. Our objectives were to determine if the mobile phone system was practical and acceptable to pharmacists and drug sellers, whether data were reported accurately compared to a paper-based system, and whether ORS sales were associated with future incidence of cholera hospitalizations within the community. We recorded 47,215 customers purchasing ORS, and 315 hospitalized diarrhea cases, 22% of which had culture-confirmed cholera. ORS sales and diarrhea incidence were independently associated with the mean daily temperature; therefore both unadjusted and adjusted models were explored. Through unadjusted cross-correlation statistics and generalized linear models, we found increases in ORS sales were significantly associated with increases in hospitalized diarrhea cases up to 9-days later and hospitalized cholera cases up to one day later. After adjusting for mean daily temperature, ORS was significantly associated with hospitalized diarrhea two days later and hospitalized cholera one day later. Conclusions/Significance Pharmacy sales data may serve as a feasible and useful surveillance tool. Given the relatively short lagged correlation between ORS sales and diarrhea, rapid and accurate sales data are key. More work is needed

  14. Comparative pharmacokinetic studies of fast dissolving film and oral solution of ondansetron in rats.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Dhagla R; Patel, Vishnu A; Chhalotiya, Usmangani K; Patel, Harsha V; Kundawala, Aliasgar J

    2013-12-01

    Ondansetron, selective serotonin (5-HT3) receptor blocker, is used in treating chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting in cancer patients. Mouth dissolving films containing ondansetron were developed to have better onset and patient compliances. The drug content of prepared films was within 85%-115%. The films were found to be stable for 4 months when stored at 40 %°C and 75% RH. In-vitro dissolution studies suggested a rapid disintegration, in which most of ondansetron was released (91.5±3.4%) within 90 sec. Subsequently, Sprague-Dawley rats were used to compare pharmacokinetic parameters of the formulated films with oral administration of pure drug solution. Pharmacokinetic parameters were similar between the two groups in which AUC0-t (ng h/ml), AUC0-∞ (ng h/ml), Cmax (ng/ml), Tmax (min), Kel (h(-1)) and t1/2 (h) of reference was 109.091±15.73, 130.32±18.56, 28.5±4.053, 60, 0.1860±0.0226, and 3.771±0.498 respectively; and for formulated film 113.663±16.64, 151.79±16.54, 30±3.51, 60, 0.1521±0.0310 and 4.755±0.653 respectively. These results suggest that the fast dissolving film containing ondansetron is likely to become one of the choices to treat chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting.

  15. Tracking Cholera through Surveillance of Oral Rehydration Solution Sales at Pharmacies: Insights from Urban Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Azman, Andrew S; Lessler, Justin; Satter, Syed Moinuddin; Mckay, Michael V; Khan, Azharul; Ahmed, Dilruba; Gurley, Emily S

    2015-12-01

    In Bangladesh, pharmacy-purchased oral rehydration solution (ORS) is often used to treat diarrhea, including cholera. Over-the-counter sales have been used for epidemiologic surveillance in the past, but rarely, if ever, in low-income countries. With few early indicators for cholera outbreaks in endemic areas, diarrhea-related product sales may serve as a useful surveillance tool. We tracked daily ORS sales at 50 pharmacies and drug-sellers in an urban Bangladesh community of 129,000 for 6-months while simultaneously conducting surveillance for diarrhea hospitalizations among residents. We developed a mobile phone based system to track the sales of ORS and deployed it in parallel with a paper-based system. Our objectives were to determine if the mobile phone system was practical and acceptable to pharmacists and drug sellers, whether data were reported accurately compared to a paper-based system, and whether ORS sales were associated with future incidence of cholera hospitalizations within the community. We recorded 47,215 customers purchasing ORS, and 315 hospitalized diarrhea cases, 22% of which had culture-confirmed cholera. ORS sales and diarrhea incidence were independently associated with the mean daily temperature; therefore both unadjusted and adjusted models were explored. Through unadjusted cross-correlation statistics and generalized linear models, we found increases in ORS sales were significantly associated with increases in hospitalized diarrhea cases up to 9-days later and hospitalized cholera cases up to one day later. After adjusting for mean daily temperature, ORS was significantly associated with hospitalized diarrhea two days later and hospitalized cholera one day later. Pharmacy sales data may serve as a feasible and useful surveillance tool. Given the relatively short lagged correlation between ORS sales and diarrhea, rapid and accurate sales data are key. More work is needed in creating actionable algorithms that make use of this data and in

  16. Polymer-based oral rehydration solution for treating acute watery diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Gregorio, Germana V; Gonzales, Maria Liza M; Dans, Leonila F; Martinez, Elizabeth G

    2016-12-13

    Acute diarrhoea is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality among children in low-income countries. Glucose-based oral rehydration solution (ORS) helps replace fluid and prevent further dehydration from acute diarrhoea. Since 2004, the World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended the osmolarity of less than 270 mOsm/L (ORS ≤ 270) versus greater than 310 mOsm/L formulation (ORS ≥ 310). Polymer-based ORS (for example, prepared using rice or wheat) slowly releases glucose and may be superior to glucose-based ORS. To compare polymer-based oral rehydration solution (polymer-based ORS) with glucose-based oral rehydration solution (glucose-based ORS) for treating acute watery diarrhoea. We searched the following sources up to 5 September 2016: the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group (CIDG) Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 9), MEDLINE (1966 to 5 September 2016), EMBASE (1974 to 5 September 2016), LILACS (1982 to 5 September 2016), and mRCT (2007 to 5 September 2016). We also contacted researchers, organizations, and pharmaceutical companies, and searched reference lists. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of people with acute watery diarrhoea (cholera and non-cholera associated) that compared polymer-based and glucose-based ORS (with identical electrolyte contents). Two review authors independently assessed the search results and risk of bias, and extracted data. In multiple-treatment arms with two or more treatment groups, we combined outcomes as appropriate and compared collectively with the control group. Thirty-five trials that included 4284 participants met the inclusion criteria: 28 trials exclusively included children, five included adults, and two included both adults and children. Polymer-based ORS versus glucose-based ORS (osmolarity ≤ 270) Eight trials (752 participants) evaluated this comparison, and seven trials used rice as a polymer source

  17. Performance of trichlorfon degradation by a novel Bacillus tequilensis strain PA F-3 and its proposed biodegradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jiang; Yu, Chenlei; Xue, Yingwen; Zhao, Ruixue; Wang, Jing; Chen, Lanzhou

    2016-11-01

    The novel trichlorfon (TCF)-degrading bacterium PA F-3, identified as Bacillus tequilensis, was isolated from pesticide-polluted soils by using an effective screening and domesticating procedure. The TCF biodegradation pathways of PA F-3 were also systematically elucidated. As revealed by high-performance liquid chromatography, the TCF residues in the mineral salt medium demonstrated that PA F-3 can utilize TCF as its sole carbon source and reach the highest degradation of 71.1 % at an initial TCF concentration of 200 mg/L within 5 days. The TCF degradation conditions were optimized using response surface methodology as follows: temperature, 28 °C; inoculum amount, 4 %; and initial TCF concentration, 125 mg/L. Biodegradation treatments supplemented with exogenous carbon sources and yeast extract markedly increased the microbial dry weights and TCF-degrading performance of PA F-3, respectively. Meanwhile, five metabolic products of TCF were identified through gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and a biodegradation pathway was proposed. Results indicated that deoxidation and dehydration (including the cleavage of the P-C phosphonate bond and the C-O bond) were the preferred metabolic reactions of TCF in this TCF-degrading bacterium.

  18. Acute Diarrhoea in Children: Determination of Duration Using a Combined Bismuth Hydroxide Gel and Oral Rehydration Solution Therapy vs. Oral Rehydration Solution

    PubMed Central

    Oviedo, Adriana; Díaz, Mirna; Valenzuela, María Laura; Vidal, Victoria; Racca, Liliana; Bottai, Hebe; Priore, Graciela; Peluffo, Graciela; Di Bartolomeo, Susana; Cabral, Graciela; Toca, María del Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Oral rehydration salt (ORS) treatment in young children with acute diarrhoea (AD) has contributed to decrease mortality associated with dehydration although effective strategies to reduce morbidity associated with this disease are required. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diarrhoea duration when using combined colloidal bismuth hydroxide gel (CBHG) and oral rehydration salt treatment compared with ORS therapy in children with AD. We designed a double-blind, randomised prospective study with treatment and control groups. Patients aged one to 12 years, with no prior pathology and with AD of less than 48 h were included. The Chi-squared and Mann-Whitney tests were used, as well as the Cox proportional hazards model and the Kaplan-Meier estimator. Patients were randomised into an ORS and CBHG treatment group and a control group for ORS plus placebo. (Average age: 3.2 years). The result of the post-treatment evaluation with respect to the average duration of AD was 25.5 h for the treated group vs. 41.5 h for the control group (p = 0.015). The average number of stools was 4.8 in the treated group and 8.2 in the control group (p = 0.032). We conclude that the use of CBHG plus ORS significantly reduced the duration of AD, the number of stools and the percentage of children with persistent AD after 24 h of treatment compared to the control group. AD remitted almost twice as fast in patients treated with CBHG and ORS compared to those who received ORS plus placebo. PMID:28009823

  19. Acute Diarrhoea in Children: Determination of Duration Using a Combined Bismuth Hydroxide Gel and Oral Rehydration Solution Therapy vs. Oral Rehydration Solution.

    PubMed

    Oviedo, Adriana; Díaz, Mirna; Valenzuela, María Laura; Vidal, Victoria; Racca, Liliana; Bottai, Hebe; Priore, Graciela; Peluffo, Graciela; Di Bartolomeo, Susana; Cabral, Graciela; Toca, María Del Carmen

    2016-12-21

    Oral rehydration salt (ORS) treatment in young children with acute diarrhoea (AD) has contributed to decrease mortality associated with dehydration although effective strategies to reduce morbidity associated with this disease are required. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diarrhoea duration when using combined colloidal bismuth hydroxide gel (CBHG) and oral rehydration salt treatment compared with ORS therapy in children with AD. We designed a double-blind, randomised prospective study with treatment and control groups. Patients aged one to 12 years, with no prior pathology and with AD of less than 48 h were included. The Chi-squared and Mann-Whitney tests were used, as well as the Cox proportional hazards model and the Kaplan-Meier estimator. Patients were randomised into an ORS and CBHG treatment group and a control group for ORS plus placebo. (Average age: 3.2 years). The result of the post-treatment evaluation with respect to the average duration of AD was 25.5 h for the treated group vs. 41.5 h for the control group (p = 0.015). The average number of stools was 4.8 in the treated group and 8.2 in the control group (p = 0.032). We conclude that the use of CBHG plus ORS significantly reduced the duration of AD, the number of stools and the percentage of children with persistent AD after 24 h of treatment compared to the control group. AD remitted almost twice as fast in patients treated with CBHG and ORS compared to those who received ORS plus placebo.

  20. The Effect of Bamboo Leaf Extract Solution and Sodium Copper Chlorophyllin Solution on Growth and Volatile Sulfur Compounds Production of Oral Malodor Associated Some Anaerobic Periodontal Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Majbauddin, Abir; Kodani, Isamu; Ryoke, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Background Bamboo leaf extract solution (BLES) and sodium copper chlorophyllin solution (SCCS) are known for their anti-oxidant activities. Oral malodor is often related with periodontal pathogens. The present study was undertaken to investigate the anti-bacterial effect of both BLES and SCCS on anaerobic periodontal bacteria producing oral malodorous volatile sulfur compounds (VSC). Methods Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 (PG), Prevotella intermidai TDC19B (PI), Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC25586 (FN) and Prevotella nigrescence ATCC33563 (PN) were investigated as oral isolated bacteria. VSC production ability of the oral strains was investigated by gas chromatography. With serial dilution of BLES or SCCS, the strains PG, PI, FN or PN were cultured anaerobically with AnaeroPack at 37 ℃ for 3 days. For the determination of anti-bacterial action of BLES or SCCS, the inoculum was cultured with original concentrations of BLES 0.16% (w/v) or SCCS 0.25% (w/v). Results Gas chromatography exhibited that all strains, PG, PI, FN and PN were responsible for producing a high range of H2S and a moderate range of CH3SH. Anti-bacterial effect of BLES or SCCS on the strains was observed. Inhibition of BLES or SCCS on the strains was revealed as concentration dependent. BLES or SCCS inhibited bacterial proliferation at higher concentrations (PG; 0.04% BLES or 0.03% SCCS, PI; 0.002% BLES or 0.03% SCCS, FN; 0.005% BLES or 0.01% SCCS, PN; 0.01% BLES or 0.015% SCCS). No viable bacterial colony observed at original concentration of BLES 0.16% or SCCS 0.25%. Strain growth was eliminated from inhibition at lower concentrations (PG; 0.02% BLES or 0.015% SCCS, PI; 0.001% BLES or 0.015% SCCS, FN; 0.002% BLES or 0.007% SCCS, PN; 0.005% BLES or 0.007% SCCS). Conclusion High concentrations of both BLES (0.16%) and SCCS (0.25%) show superior inhibiting capability on all four oral malodor associated periodontal anaerobes during testing, suggesting that these compounds might have a beneficial effect

  1. Influence of preparation method on itraconazole oral solutions using cyclodextrins as complexing agents.

    PubMed

    Holvoet, C; Vander Heyden, Y; Plaizier-Vercammen, J

    2007-07-01

    In the literature, solubility values of itraconazole complexed with 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CD) were found which were still much too low to obtain the target concentration of 1 g itraconazole/100 ml, the concentration of the marketed itraconazole formulation Sporanox (Janssen Pharmaceutica). Therefore, we compared two preparation methods: the classical and the dissolving method to investigate if the method of preparation can have an influence on the solubility of itraconazole complexed with cyclodextrin (CD). With the classical method, the active compound and the CDs are jointly dissolved with a co-solvent, propylene glycol, in water. With the dissolving method, the active compound is first dissolved separately in a solvent in which it dissolves well, while the CDs are dissolved in water, before mixing. Three different CDs were used and compared for their complexing capacity with itraconazole. The complex formation of itraconazole with HP-beta-CD, sulfobutylether-7-beta-cyclodextrin (SBE-7-beta-CD) and maltosyl-beta-cyclodextrin (malt-beta-CD) was investigated at pH 2, in the presence of 10% propylene glycol for an oral solution. These three CDs were chosen as they can also serve in formulations for parenteral use. The method of preparation had an important influence on the complex formation. With the dissolving method, a much higher solubility of itraconazole was obtained using the same CD concentration than with the classical method. Inclusion capacity obtained with the dissolving method was comparable for HP-beta-CD and SBE-7-beta-CD: 1 g itraconazole/100 ml of 25% HP-beta-CD or of 30% SBE-7-beta-CD. In 100 ml of 40% malt-beta-CD only about 500 mg of itraconazole could be dissolved. With the classical method only around 160 mg itraconazole could be dissolved with 100 ml 40 % HP-beta-CD or SBE-7-beta-CD. Due to the fast preparation, once the CD amount is known by pretests, the dissolving method shows also an advantage for industrial production.

  2. In vitro susceptibility of oral Candida albicans strains to different pH levels and calcium hydroxide saturated aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Weckwerth, Paulo Henrique; Carnietto, Cristiane; Weckwerth, Ana Carolina Villas Boas; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Vivan, Rodrigo Ricci

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans is present in the oral cavity and in the whole digestive tract of humans and other animals, being frequently related to endodontic treatment failure. The present study determined the incidence of C. albicans in the oral cavity and the susceptibility of isolates to different pH values and saturated calcium hydroxide aqueous solution at pH 12.5. Sixty-five patients attending the Endodontic Clinic at the Sagrado Coração University participated in the study. The collected samples were cultivated in selective media for C. albicans and the isolates were tested in terms of resistance to both alkaline pH and saturated aqueous solution of calcium hydroxide. In relation to time variables, yeast viability was assessed by the Sabouraud's agar culture and fluorescein diacetate and ethidium bromide fluorescent staining method. Results from the different pHs and experimental times, including those from different techniques measuring fungal viability, were compared using the chi-square and Fisher's exact tests (α=0.05). The yeasts became completely inviable after 48 h of contact with the calcium hydroxide solution. On the other hand, when exposed to the alkaline culture broth, the yeasts were found to be viable at pHs 9.5 and 10.5 for up to 7 days. In conclusion, C. albicans can only be completely inhibited by direct contact with saturated calcium hydroxide aqueous solution after 48 h of exposure.

  3. Effectiveness of vital staining with iodine solution in reducing local recurrence after resection of dysplastic or malignant oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Hiroshi; Kamata, Takahiro; Li, Xiangjun; Nakanishi, Yoshitaka; Shimane, Tetsu; Koike, Takeshi

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess the effect of vital staining with iodine solution in reducing local recurrence after resection of dysplastic or malignant oral mucosa. The historical control group had dysplastic or malignant mucosal lesions resected solely on the evidence of direct inspection and palpation. In the vital staining group tissue was resected only after vital staining with iodine solution. Seven of 25 patients in the conventional group developed recurrent dysplastic or cancerous oral mucosa around the primary site, while no patient among 23 reported recurrence in the vital staining group (p<0.01). Kaplan-Meier assessment showed that the 5-year primary control rate was 100% in the vital staining group and 75% in the conventional group. Although this retrospective study has some limitations, the results suggest that vital staining with iodine may be useful in reducing the incidence of recurrence of dysplastic or cancerous epithelium at a primary site. Further well-controlled study is essential. Copyright © 2011 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of the effects of varying solute content on the efficacy of oral rehydration solutions in a rat model of secretory diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Pillai, G V; Brueton, M J; Burston, D; Sandhu, B K

    1994-05-01

    A series of in vivo steady-state perfusion studies in cholera toxin-induced secreting rat intestine were carried out to investigate net water, sodium, and potassium absorption and water influx and efflux from a range of oral rehydration solutions (ORSs) in which the glucose content had been partially replaced by amino acids or food supplements and the sodium content had been reduced to 60 mM. The reference solution used was the World Health Organization formula. There was a significant correlation between the osmolality of the ORS and the net water absorption (r = -0.911; p < 0.02). The greatest net water absorption occurred using comminuted chicken- and tapioca-supplemented ORS.

  5. Zinc supplementation in oral rehydration solutions: experimental assessment and mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Altaf, Waseem; Perveen, Shahana; Rehman, Khalil U; Teichberg, Saul; Vancurova, Ivana; Harper, Rita G; Wapnir, Raul A

    2002-02-01

    Zinc deficiency is associated with chronic diarrhea. This condition is generally linked to an overproduction of nitric oxide (NO), which induces secretion and cellular damage as a free radical. Use of oral rehydration solutions (ORS) is an important part of diarrhea treatment, especially early in infancy and for patients with cholera. The presence of zinc in an ORS could be a positive factor in recovery from diarrheal disease. This study was undertaken to determine whether zinc added to an ORS could regulate the synthesis of NO metabolites in the lumen of zinc deficient rat intestine, acting as a gastrointestinal protector and thus accelerating normalization of intestinal function and zinc status. The effects of zinc on NO metabolism were studied in young male rats fed a zinc deficient diet for three weeks to mimic the condition of patients with recurrent diarrheal episodes. During the fourth week of the zinc deficient feedings, experimental diarrhea was induced using cathartics (magnesium citrate plus phenolphthalein) that exacerbate NO production. A standard ORS with or without 1 mM zinc was given to the rats for the last two days. A control group received a zinc sufficient diet. Rats were killed at each stage. Intestinal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was assayed, cecal fluid contents were analyzed for nitrates and nitrites, intestinal histology was examined, and activation of nuclear factor NF-kappaB DNA binding activity was determined. Rats fed the zinc-deficient diet for three weeks gained less weight than rats fed a normal zinc content diet and had a lower plasma zinc than controls (51.6 +/- 5.4 [n = 101 vs. 143.6 +/- 7.2 microg/dL [n = 11], p < 0.05). Recovery with ORS+Zn resulted in a higher plasma zinc than with the ORS-Zn (ORS+Zn: 186.5 +/- 12.2; ORS-Zn: 57.5 +/- 6.6 microg/dL, p < 0.05). The zinc-deficient diet did not alter mucosal NOS, as compared to the values of rats fed a normal diet. However, those animals which received five days of cathartic fluids

  6. Chronic invasive sinus and intracerebral aspergillosis controlled by combination therapy with micafungin and a daily dose of 400 mg itraconazole oral solution.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Taku; Matsumoto, Kana; Tsujimoto, Kazunori; Hishiya, Naokuni; Yamada, Yutaka; Uno, Kenji; Kasahara, Kei; Maeda, Koichi; Nario, Kazuhiko; Mikasa, Keiichi; Morita, Kunihiko

    2015-02-01

    Chronic invasive aspergillosis of the sinus is frequently fatal in the absence of early surgical and chemotherapeutic intervention because of its invasion of vascular tissue. We attempted to control a case of inoperable invasive aspergillosis of the sinus with micafungin and itraconazole oral solution. We prescribed a daily oral dose of 400 mg of itraconazole, which is twice the usual dose, and monitored the serum concentration of the drug. Finally, we were able to control the spread of the lesion. This case indicates that combination therapy with micafungin and a daily dose of 400 mg itraconazole oral solution is an alternative treatment strategy for inoperable invasive aspergillosis of the sinus.

  7. Titrated oral misoprostol solution compared with intravenous oxytocin for labor augmentation: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming; Cheng, Shi-Yann; Li, Tsai-Chung

    2010-09-01

    To compare titrated oral misoprostol to intravenous oxytocin for labor augmentation among women at 36 to 42 weeks of gestation with spontaneous onset of active labor. Women meeting the general selection criteria with regular contractions and an effaced cervix dilated between 3 and 9 cm, and who had inadequate uterine contractions (two or fewer contractions every 10 minutes) during the first stage of labor, were randomly assigned to titrated oral misoprostol or intravenous oxytocin. Augmentation-to-vaginal delivery interval and vaginal delivery within 12 or 24 hours were the primary outcomes. The data were analyzed by intention to treat. Of the 231 women, 118 (51.1%) were randomized to titrated oral misoprostol and 113 (48.9%) to titrated intravenous oxytocin. The median interval from the start of augmentation to vaginal delivery was 5.22 hours (3.77-8.58 hours, 25th-75th percentile) in the misoprostol group, and 5.20 hours (3.23-6.50 hours, 25th-75th percentile) in the intravenous oxytocin group (P=.019). Complete vaginal delivery occurred within 12 hours for 92 women (78.0%) in the misoprostol group and for 97 women (85.8%) in the oxytocin group (P=.121; relative risk 0.91, 95% confidence interval 0.80-1.03). There were no significant differences between the two groups who delivered vaginally within 24 hours. Side effects and neonatal outcomes also did not differ between the two groups. Labor augmentation with titrated oral misoprostol or intravenous oxytocin resulted in similar rates of vaginal delivery within 12 and 24 hours. ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00695331. I.

  8. Oral Health Disparities and Unmet Dental Needs among Preschool Children in Chelsea, MA: Exploring Mechanisms, Defining Solutions.

    PubMed

    Isong, Inyang; Dantas, Laila; Gerard, Macda; Kuhlthau, Karen

    Significant disparities exist in children's receipt of preventive dental care (PDC) in the United States. Many of the children at greatest risk of dental disease do not receive timely PDC; when they do receive dental care, it is often more for relief of dental pain. Chelsea is a low-income, diverse Massachusetts community with high rates of untreated childhood caries. There are various dental resources available in Chelsea, yet many children do not access dental care at levels equivalent to their needs. Using Chelsea as a case-study, to explore factors contributing to forgone PDC (including the age 1 dental visit) in an in-depth way. We used a qualitative study design that included semi-structured interviews with parents of preschool children residing in Chelsea, and Chelsea-based providers including pediatricians, dentists, a dental hygienist and early childhood care providers. We examined: a) parents' dental attitudes and oral health cultural beliefs; b) parents' and providers' perspectives on facilitators and barriers to PDC, reasons for unmet needs, and proposed solutions to address the problem. We recorded, transcribed and independently coded all interviews. Using rigorous, iterative qualitative data analyses procedures, we identified emergent themes. Factors perceived to facilitate receipt of PDC included Head-Start oral health policies, strong pediatric primary care/dental linkages, community outreach and advertising, and parents' own oral health experiences. Most parents and providers perceived there to be an adequate number of accessible dental services and resources in Chelsea, including for Medicaid enrollees. However, several barriers impeded children from receiving timely PDC, the most frequently cited being insurance related problems for children and adults. Other barriers included limited dental services for children <2 years, perceived poor quality of some dental practices, lack of emphasis on prevention-based dental care, poor care

  9. Oral Health Disparities and Unmet Dental Needs among Preschool Children in Chelsea, MA: Exploring Mechanisms, Defining Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Isong, Inyang; Dantas, Laila; Gerard, Macda; Kuhlthau, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Background Significant disparities exist in children’s receipt of preventive dental care (PDC) in the United States. Many of the children at greatest risk of dental disease do not receive timely PDC; when they do receive dental care, it is often more for relief of dental pain. Chelsea is a low-income, diverse Massachusetts community with high rates of untreated childhood caries. There are various dental resources available in Chelsea, yet many children do not access dental care at levels equivalent to their needs. Objective Using Chelsea as a case-study, to explore factors contributing to forgone PDC (including the age 1 dental visit) in an in-depth way. Methods We used a qualitative study design that included semi-structured interviews with parents of preschool children residing in Chelsea, and Chelsea-based providers including pediatricians, dentists, a dental hygienist and early childhood care providers. We examined: a) parents’ dental attitudes and oral health cultural beliefs; b) parents’ and providers’ perspectives on facilitators and barriers to PDC, reasons for unmet needs, and proposed solutions to address the problem. We recorded, transcribed and independently coded all interviews. Using rigorous, iterative qualitative data analyses procedures, we identified emergent themes. Results Factors perceived to facilitate receipt of PDC included Head-Start oral health policies, strong pediatric primary care/dental linkages, community outreach and advertising, and parents’ own oral health experiences. Most parents and providers perceived there to be an adequate number of accessible dental services and resources in Chelsea, including for Medicaid enrollees. However, several barriers impeded children from receiving timely PDC, the most frequently cited being insurance related problems for children and adults. Other barriers included limited dental services for children <2 years, perceived poor quality of some dental practices, lack of emphasis on

  10. Automated volumetric analysis for comparison of oral sulfate solution (SUPREP) with established cathartic agents at CT colonography

    PubMed Central

    Bannas, Peter; Bakke, Joshua; Patrick, James L.; Pickhardt, Perry J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To objectively compare residual colonic fluid volume and attenuation of oral sulfate solution (OSS) with four different established cathartic regimens using an automated volumetric software tool at CT colonography (CTC). Methods This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval. Volumetric analysis of residual contrast-tagged colonic fluid was performed on CTC studies in 263 adults (mean age, 60.1 years; 137M/126F) using an automated volumetric software tool. 23 patients receiving 177 ml OSS (SUPREP; single-bottle purgation) were compared with 60 patients each receiving 45 ml sodium phosphate (NaP), 90 ml NaP (2xNaP), 592 ml (two bottles) magnesium citrate (MgC), and 4000 ml polyethylene glycol (PEG). All patients received oral contrast cleansing after catharsis. Data were analyzed with unpaired t test with Welch correction and F test. Results The mean volume of residual colonic fluid was less with OSS (125±60 ml) than for established cathartic agents: 2xNaP (206±125 ml, (p<0.0001), MgC (184±125 ml, p<0.01), PEG (166±114 ml, p<0.05) and NaP (165±135 ml, p=0.067). Variance of volumes was also significantly lower for OSS (range, 28 – 251 ml) than for established agents (range, 4 – 853 ml) (all p<0.01). Mean fluid attenuation was higher with OSS (956±168 HU) than for established agents (all p<0.05): 2xNaP (455±191 HU), MgC (691±154 HU), NaP (779±127 HU), and PEG (843±193 HU). Conclusions Automated volumetry allows rapid objective assessment of bowel preparation quality at CTC. Purgation with the novel oral sulfate solution (SUPREP) consistently resulted in less residual colonic fluid and higher fluid attenuation compared with established cathartic regimens. PMID:24965898

  11. Comparison of caffeine disposition following administration by oral solution (energy drink) and inspired powder (AeroShot) in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Laizure, S Casey; Meibohm, Bernd; Nelson, Kembral; Chen, Feng; Hu, Zhe-Yi; Parker, Robert B

    2017-07-31

    To determine the disposition and effects of caffeine after administration using a new dosage form (AeroShot) that delivers caffeine by inspiration of a fine powder into the oral cavity and compare it to an equivalent dose of an oral solution (energy drink) as the reference standard. Healthy human subjects (n = 17) inspired a 100 mg caffeine dose using the AeroShot device or consumed an energy drink on separate study days. Heart rate, blood pressure and subject assessments of effects were measured over an 8-h period. Plasma concentrations of caffeine and its major metabolites were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic, cardiovascular and perceived stimulant effects were compared between AeroShot and energy drink phases using a paired t test and standard bioequivalency analysis. Caffeine disposition was similar after caffeine administration by the AeroShot device and energy drink: peak plasma concentration 1790 and 1939 ng ml(-1) , and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) 15 579 and 17 569 ng ml(-1) × h, respectively, but they were not bioequivalent: AeroShot AUC of 80.3% (confidence interval 71.2-104.7%) and peak plasma concentration of 86.3% (confidence interval 62.8-102.8%) compared to the energy drink. Female subjects did have a significantly larger AUC compared to males after consumption of the energy drink. The heart rate and blood pressure were not significantly affected by the 100 mg caffeine dose, and there were no consistently perceived stimulant effects by the subjects using visual analogue scales. Inspiration of caffeine as a fine powder using the AeroShot device produces a similar caffeine profile and effects compared to administration of an oral solution (energy drink). © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. Oral Reading and Handwriting Miscues Which Appear in the Literacy Period and Solution Offers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basar, Murat

    2013-01-01

    In this research, literacy miscues and the solution offers are taken stock by teachers and parents. 50 first grade teachers and 50 parents form the study group of this qualitative action research. The teachers are the ones who claim that one or more of their students have literacy miscues and the parents are the students' parents. Students'…

  13. [Effect of a new amino acid solution in the oral hydration of nursing infants with acute diarrhea. A prospective study].

    PubMed

    Velásquez-Jones, L; Mota-Hernández, F

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-two one- to 12-month-old male infants with diarrheal dehydration treated with either the oral rehydration solution recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO), or the same solution modified by the addition of glycerine (60 mmol/L) and glycil-glycine (30 mmol/L), with a total osmolality of 379 mOsm/kg. The patients belonging to the latter group exhibited greater stool losses (10.3 +/- 8.3 vs 8.0 +/- 6.4 mL/kg/hour) and a greater urine volume (10.4 +/- 14.2 vs 4.6 +/- 4.0 mL/kg/6 hours), during the first four to six hours of the rehydration period. The results of this study show, that in contrast with those of other series, the addition of glycine and glycil-glycine to the WHO solution, at the concentrations used in the study, produces greater fecal water losses in children with dehydration due to acute diarrhea.

  14. Comparative bacterial study of oral rehydration solution (ORS) prepared in plain unboiled and boiled drinking water of Kathmandu valley.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, R K; Rai, S K; Pokhrel, B M; Khadka, J B

    1989-01-01

    Result of bacterial study on Oral Rehydration Solution (ORS) prepared in plain unboiled and boiled drinking water of Kathmandu valley is reported. Of the total 100 water samples collected from different sources and area all the samples, as a base line study, were subjected for the examination of bacterial presence. Eighty eight percent of the water samples studied were found to be unsatisfactory for drinking. Thirty five percent of the ORS prepared in unboiled water and kept for 24 hours at room temperature showed increased bacterial count whereas none of the ORS prepared in 5 minute boiled water and kept for 24 hour at room temperature showed any bacterial growth. Decreased bacterial count was not found in any of the ORS prepared in unboiled water. Typical coliform bacilli were found grown in 57.0% of the ORS prepared in unboiled water samples.

  15. Modifying a displacement pump for oral gavage dosing of solution and suspension preparations to adult and neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Sherry M; Lee, Fei W; Ali, A Afshan; Allaben, William T; Weis, Constance C; Leakey, Julian E A

    2010-05-01

    To assess a drug's toxic or carcinogenic effects on neonatal and adult mice and rats, researchers often carry out oral gavage studies. Whether dosed singly or in various combinations, provided as soluble solutions or as colloidal suspensions, the drug must be delivered in accurate and precise doses. For studies that require newborn mice to receive multiple daily doses, delicately handling neonates to increase their chances of surviving is just as critical as the ability to accurately dose small volumes. To help ensure accurate and precise delivery of drug doses ranging from 5 microl for neonatal mice to 400 microl for adults, the authors adapted an automated pipetting system. By slightly modifying standard gavage needles, the authors delivered, on average, 98-99% of targeted dose volumes to neonatal mice.

  16. Cholinesterase activity in the tissues of bivalves Noah's ark shell (Arca noae) and warty venus (Venus verrucosa): characterisation and in vitro sensitivity to organophosphorous pesticide trichlorfon.

    PubMed

    Perić, Lorena; Ribarić, Luka; Nerlović, Vedrana

    2013-08-01

    Cholinesterase (ChE, EC 3.1.1.7) activity was investigated in gills and adductor muscle of two bivalve species: Arca noae and Venus verrucosa. The properties of ChEs were investigated using acetylcholine iodide (ASCh), butyrylcholine iodide (BSCh) and propionylcholine iodide (PrSCh) as substrates and eserine, BW254c51 and iso-OMPA as specific inhibitors. The highest level of ChE activity in crude tissue extracts was detected with PrSCh followed by ASCh, while values obtained with BSCh were apparently low, except in A. noae adductor muscle. The enzyme activity in A. noae gills and V. verrucosa gills and adductor muscle was significantly inhibited by BW254c51, but not with iso-OMPA. ChE activity in adductor muscle of A. noae was significantly reduced by both diagnostic inhibitors. The effect of organophosphorous pesticide trichlorfon on ChE activity was investigated in vitro in both species as well as in the gills of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis. The highest sensitivity of ChE to trichlorfon was observed in A. noae gills and adductor muscle (IC50 1.6×10(-7)M and 1.1×10(-7)M, respectively), followed by M. galloprovincialis gills (IC50 1.0×10(-6)M) and V. verrucosa gills and adductor muscle (IC50 1.7×10(-5)M and 0.9×10(-5)M, respectively). The results of this study suggest the potential of ChE activity measurement in the tissues of A. noae as effective biomarker of OP exposure in marine environment.

  17. Automated volumetric analysis for comparison of oral sulfate solution (SUPREP) with established cathartic agents at CT colonography.

    PubMed

    Bannas, Peter; Bakke, Joshua; Patrick, James L; Pickhardt, Perry J

    2015-01-01

    To objectively compare residual colonic fluid volume and attenuation of oral sulfate solution (OSS) with four different established cathartic regimens using an automated volumetric software tool at CT colonography (CTC). This HIPAA-compliant study had institutional review board approval. Volumetric analysis of residual contrast-tagged colonic fluid was performed on CTC studies in 263 adults (mean age 60.1 years; 137M/126F) using an automated volumetric software tool. Twenty-three patients receiving 177 mL OSS (SUPREP; single-bottle purgation) were compared with 60 patients each receiving 45 mL sodium phosphate (NaP), 90 mL NaP (2× NaP), 592 mL (two bottles) magnesium citrate (MgC), and 4,000 mL polyethylene glycol (PEG). All patients received oral contrast cleansing after catharsis. Data were analyzed with unpaired t test with Welch correction and F test. The mean volume of residual colonic fluid was less with OSS (125 ± 60 mL) than for established cathartic agents: 2× NaP (206 ± 125 mL, P < 0.0001), MgC (184 ± 125 mL, P < 0.01), PEG (166 ± 114 mL, P < 0.05), and NaP (165 ± 135 mL, P = 0.067). Variance of volumes was also significantly lower for OSS (range 28-251 mL) than for established agents (range 4-853 mL) (all P < 0.01). Mean fluid attenuation was higher with OSS (956 ± 168 HU) than for established agents (all P < 0.05): 2× NaP (455 ± 191 HU), MgC (691 ± 154 HU), NaP (779 ± 127 HU), and PEG (843 ± 193 HU). Automated volumetry allows rapid objective assessment of bowel preparation quality at CTC. Purgation with the novel oral sulfate solution (SUPREP) consistently resulted in less residual colonic fluid and higher fluid attenuation compared with established cathartic regimens.

  18. Safety of fluralaner oral solution, a novel systemic antiparasitic treatment for chickens, in laying hens after oral administration via drinking water.

    PubMed

    Prohaczik, Angella; Menge, Monika; Huyghe, Bruno; Flochlay-Sigognault, Annie; Traon, Gaëlle Le

    2017-08-08

    Poultry mites are the most significant pest affecting production systems in the egg-laying industry. Fluralaner is a novel systemic insecticide and acaricide that is effective against poultry mites (Dermanyssus gallinae, Ornithonyssus sylviarum) in chickens after oral administration. This study investigated the safety of oral administration of a 1% solution of fluralaner in drinking water to laying hens at the recommended treatment dose and at multiples of this dose. One hundred-twenty healthy 28-week-old laying hens, weighing 1.4-2.1 kg at first administration, were included in the study, and allocated to 4 treatment groups of 30 hens each receiving daily doses of 0, 0.5, 1.5 and 2.5 mg fluralaner/kg body weight, equivalent to 0, 1, 3, and 5 times the recommended dose of fluralaner. The product was administered via drinking water on a total of six occasions, as 3-day treatment periods twice with an interval of 4 days with no treatment (treatment on days 1, 2, 3 and 8, 9, 10), representing 3 times the recommended number of administrations. Hens supplied with non-medicated drinking water served as controls. During the study, all hens were clinically observed, and their health was carefully monitored including body weight, food and water consumption, hematology, clinical chemistry, and withdrawal reflex test. Eggs laid over the study were evaluated for main characteristics (e.g. weight, shape, strength, shell thickness and soundness, albumen height, yolk color, Haugh unit and presence of blood and/or meat spots). Following euthanasia of the hens at the end of the second treatment period (day 11) or 18 days later (day 29), complete gross post-mortem examination, including organ weight determination, and histopathological examination of multiple tissues were conducted. There were no clinical findings related to fluralaner treatment. Statistically significant differences between the treated groups and the control group were observed for some clinical pathology

  19. Emergency Coagulation Assessment During Treatment With Direct Oral Anticoagulants: Limitations and Solutions.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Matthias; Birschmann, Ingvild; Peter, Andreas; Härtig, Florian; Spencer, Charlotte; Kuhn, Joachim; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Zuern, Christine S; Ziemann, Ulf; Poli, Sven

    2017-09-01

    In patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), emergency treatment like thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke is complicated by insufficient availability of DOAC-specific coagulation tests. Conflicting recommendations have been published concerning the use of global coagulation assays for ruling out relevant DOAC-induced anticoagulation. Four hundred eighty-one samples from 96 DOAC-treated patients were tested using prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and thrombin time (TT), DOAC-specific assays (anti-Xa activity, diluted TT), and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Sensitivity and specificity of test results to identify DOAC concentrations <30 ng/mL were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were used to define reagent-specific cutoff values. Normal PT and aPTT provide insufficient specificity to safely identify DOAC concentrations <30 ng/mL (rivaroxaban/PT: specificity, 77%/sensitivity, 94%; apixaban/PT: specificity, 13%/sensitivity, 94%, dabigatran/aPTT: specificity, 49%/sensitivity, 91%). Normal TT was 100% specific for dabigatran, but sensitivity was 26%. In contrast, reagent-specific PT and aPTT cutoffs provided >95% specificity and a specific TT cutoff enhanced sensitivity for dabigatran to 84%. For apixaban, no cutoffs could be established. Even if highly DOAC-reactive reagents are used, normal results of global coagulation tests are not suited to guide emergency treatment: whereas normal PT and aPTT lack specificity to rule out DOAC-induced anticoagulation, the low sensitivity of normal TT excludes the majority of eligible patients from treatment. However, reagent-specific cutoffs for global coagulation tests ensure high specificity and optimize sensitivity for safe emergency decision making in rivaroxaban- and dabigatran-treated patients. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT02371044 and NCT02371070. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Study of the acceptability of antibiotic syrups, suspensions, and oral solutions prescribed to pediatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Robert; de La Rocque, France; Lécuyer, Aurélie; Wollner, Claudie; Bodin, Marie Josée; Wollner, Alain

    2009-07-01

    This observational study was designed to evaluate the acceptability of oral antibiotics (including generics) commonly prescribed to children by community practitioners in France. Between February and July 2006, the parents of 953 children enrolled by 46 pediatricians completed a questionnaire, including a taste assessment based on representations of five facial expressions. The proportions of "satisfactory" taste judgments showed a significant difference between amoxicillin-clavulanate reference product and its generics (77.9% vs. 65%, p = 0.01). The amoxicillin-clavulanate generics were more likely than the reference product to be spat out at least once (28.7% vs. 19%, p = 0.05). The full treatment course was taken by 91.7% and 82.3% of children prescribed the amoxicillin-clavulanate reference product and its generics, respectively (p = 0.02). The proportions of "satisfactory" taste judgments showed no significant difference between amoxicillin reference product and generics (64.3% vs. 72.5%, p = 0.3). The amoxicillin generics were not different from the reference product to be spat out at least once (8.6% vs. 14.3%, p = 0.2). The full treatment course was taken by 90.7% and 94.6% of children prescribed the amoxicillin reference product and its generics, respectively (p = 0.3). This study suggests the role of the active substance in the taste, and calls for the evaluation of palatability of future drugs (generics and references) before granting of the marketing authorization, particularly for active substances of poor taste; this palatability plays a significant role in the compliance of the treatment, notably in children. Poor compliance increases the risk of therapeutic failures and the emergence of resistance.

  1. Efficacy of a packaged rice oral rehydration solution among children with cholera and cholera-like illness.

    PubMed

    Zaman, K; Yunus, M; Rahman, A; Chowdhury, H R; Sack, D A

    2001-05-01

    In past studies, patients with cholera and cholera-like diarrhoea treated with rice oral rehydration solution (ORS) had lower purging rates and a shorter illness duration. We evaluated a new packet form of rice ORS (CeraLyte-90) in 167 boys aged 5 to 15 y, with acute, dehydrating cholera and cholera-like diarrhoea in Bangladesh. The patients were randomized to receive either CeraLyte-90 (n = 85) or glucose ORS (n = 82) and were given early feeding and early antibiotics. The efficacy of the two solutions was compared for stool output during the first 8 h, the first 24 h, and total output, duration of diarrhoea, hematocrit, serum electrolytes and requirement for unscheduled intravenous fluids. The clinical and laboratory characteristics of the two groups were comparable on admission, and most of the patients had cholera (88% and 84% in the CeraLyte and glucose groups, respectively). The mean (+/- SE) stool output was 20% less in the rice ORS group during the first 8 h of treatment (86.2+/-6.6 ml/Kg vs 108.8+/-7.9 ml/Kg, p < 0.05), but the outputs during the other time periods were similar in the two groups, although children in the rice ORS group had slightly more vomiting on day one (p < 0.05). The mean serum electrolyte concentrations in both groups of children remained within normal range. The study documents the safety and efficacy of the new, packaged rice ORS.

  2. Evaluation of an oral electrolyte solution for treatment of mild to moderate dehydration in dogs with hemorrhagic diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Reineke, Erica L; Walton, Karie; Otto, Cynthia M

    2013-09-15

    To determine the safety and efficacy of an electrolyte solution for oral administration (OES) for the correction of mild to moderate dehydration associated with hemorrhagic diarrhea in dogs. Nonrandomized, noncontrolled clinical trial. 20 dogs that had hemorrhagic diarrhea with < 3 episodes of vomiting. All dogs underwent testing for parvovirus infection, were given maropitant citrate to control emesis, and were offered an OES. Intravenous crystalloid fluid administration was performed when dogs refused the OES or had vomiting, a 5% increase in PCV, 5% decrease in body weight, serum creatinine or BUN concentration higher than at admission, or clinically important alterations in blood electrolyte or serum glucose concentrations. 13 (65%) dogs voluntarily consumed the OES; 7 (35%) dogs refused the OES and received a balanced electrolyte solution IV instead. All 13 dogs in the OES group consumed the solution ≤ 5 hours after hospital admission. Eight and 16 hours after admission, PCV and serum total protein and BUN concentrations were significantly lower than at hospital admission in the OES group, whereas no significant changes were identified in venous blood pH, base excess, and concentrations of sodium, potassium, chloride, ionized calcium, ionized magnesium, and lactate. The cost of treatment was significantly less for the OES group than for the IV treated group. Rehydration therapy with an OES was effective and safe in dogs with mild to moderate dehydration associated with hemorrhagic diarrhea. Potential benefits of this treatment approach for gastroenteritis in dogs, compared with traditional IV fluid administration, include lower owner-related veterinary costs and decreased staff time associated with treatment.

  3. An alkalinizing oral rehydration solution containing lecithin-coated citrus fiber is superior to a nonalkalinizing solution in treating 360 calves with naturally acquired diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Goodell, G M; Campbell, J; Hoejvang-Nielsen, L; Stansen, W; Constable, P D

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this field study was to compare the efficacy and cost of 2 commercially available oral rehydration therapy (ORT) solutions in treating dairy calves with naturally acquired diarrhea. A total of 1,349 newborn Holstein-Friesian calves were prospectively enrolled in the study. Calves were housed in individual hutches and fed a mixture of pasteurized hospital milk and an all-milk protein milk replacer twice per day. Calves were monitored twice each day from d 2 of life until 30 d of age for the presence or absence of diarrhea, and were assigned a fecal score and a hydration score at each examination. Calves that developed mild to severe diarrhea that did not need intravenous fluids and did not have clinical evidence of concurrent disease (n = 360) were assigned randomly to receive 1 of 2 commercial ORT solutions: a hypertonic alkalinizing ORT containing lecithin-coated citrus fibers (Diaque, group D, n = 180; Boehringer Ingelheim, Ingelheim, Germany), and an isotonic nonalkalinizing ORT (RE-SORB, group R, n = 180; Pfizer Animal Health, New York, NY) for 2 to 8d; the duration of treatment depended on whether diarrhea was still present. No significant differences were observed in mortality rates or treatment failure rates between the 2 treatment groups. Fecal consistency returned to normal more quickly in group D calves than in group R calves; consequently, group D calves were treated for 1d less than were group R calves. The increase in body weight after 4d of treatment was larger in group D than in group R. The average daily gain from birth to weaning in calves that did not develop concurrent disease (such as pneumonia) during the study period tended to be higher in group D calves (0.53±0.11 kg/d) than in group R calves (0.51±0.09 kg/d). The smaller number of treatments at a lower cost per treatment produced a cost advantage of $4.82 per treated calf in group D calves compared with group R calves. Our findings support the concept that milk should continue

  4. Dosimetric consideration for patients with dental filling materials undergoing irradiation of oral cavity using RapidArc: challenges and solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mail, Noor; Albarakati, Y.; Khan, M. Ahmad; Saeedi, F.; Safadi, N.; Al-Ghamdi, S.; Saoudi, A.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of dental filling materials (DFM) on RapidArcTM treatment plans and delivery in a patient undergoing radiotherapy treatment. The presence of DFM creates uncertainties in CT number and causes long streaking artifacts in the reconstructed images which greatly affect the dose distribution inside the oral cavity. The influence of extensive dental filling artifacts on dose distribution was performed using a geometrically well defined head and neck IMRT verification phantom (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) together with inserts from DFM (Amalgam, 11.3 g/cm3). The phantom was scanned using Siemens SOMATOM Sensation CT simulator (Siemens AG, Germany) under standard head and neck imaging protocol (120 kV, 120 mAs, voxel size 1×1×2 mm3). Three RapidArcTM plans were created in the Varian Eclipse treatment planning System (TPS) to treat oral cavity using the same CT dataset including; 1) raw CT image, 2) streaking artifacts replaced with a mask of 10 HU and 3) 2 cm thick 6000 HU virtual filter (a volume around the teeth in TPS to mimic extra attenuation). The virtual filter thickness optimization was purely based on measured PDD data acquired with DFM and the calculation in Eclipse Planning System using direct beam. The dose delivery and distribution for the three plans was verified using Gafchromic EBT2 (International Specialty Product, Wayne, NJ, USA) film measurements. The artifact mask and virtual filter around the teeth in the planning was found very useful to reduce the discrepancies between the dose plan and delivery. From clinical point of view, these results can be helpful to understand the increase of mucositis in patient having DFM, and further investigation is underway for clinical solution.

  5. The effects of tonicity, glucose concentration and temperature of an oral rehydration solution on its absorption and elimination.

    PubMed

    Sosa León, L A; Davie, A J; Hodgson, D R; Rose, R J

    1995-11-01

    Effects of different tonicities, glucose concentrations and temperatures of an oral rehydration solution (ORS) on its uptake and elimination in resting horses were studied. Fluid and electrolyte deficits similar to those occurring during prolonged exercise were induced by the administration of 1 mg/kg bwt of frusemide i.m., 3 h prior to the ORS. Fluid was administered via nasogastric tube at a volume equivalent to 4% bodyweight, which approximated diuretic induced losses. The uptake of fluid was evaluated by changes in haematocrit (PCV) and plasma total protein concentration (TP). Changes in electrolyte balance were studied by measurements of plasma and urinary electrolyte concentrations while changes in bodyweight, urine volume and faecal water content were used to estimate retention of the administered fluids. Changes in acid base status were assessed from venous blood bicarbonate values. Fluid tonicity had a major effect on the uptake and elimination of the ORS. The hypertonic fluid (628 mOsm/kg bwt) was less rapidly absorbed and resulted in more rapid fluid and electrolyte excretion than the isotonic (314 mOsm/kg bwt) and hypotonic (water) fluids. The inclusion of glucose did not enhance the absorption of the ORS, although fluids containing higher concentrations of electrolytes resulted in more rapid elimination of fluid in urine. There was a direct relationship between higher concentrations of sodium in the ORS, plasma sodium values and osmolality. Fluid temperature (5, 21 and 37 degrees C) had no demonstrable effect on absorption of the ORS and elimination of fluids post administration. We concluded that while glucose concentration and fluid temperature have minimal effects on fluid absorption and elimination, fluid tonicity was a key element in the uptake and elimination of orally administered fluid. These findings are likely to be of relevance when administering ORS in association with exercise.

  6. Cost-analysis model of colonoscopy preparation using split-dose reduced-volume oral sulfate solution (OSS) and polyethylene glycol with electrolytes solution (PEG-ELS).

    PubMed

    Huynh, Lynn; Yermakov, Sander; Davis, Matthew; Campbell, Romaine; Cleveland, Mark; Farraye, Francis A; Yenikomshian, Mihran

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to (1) develop a cost model for colonoscopy preparation among patients referred for colonoscopy using split-dose reduced-volume oral sulfate solution (OSS) and generic polyethylene glycol with electrolytes solution (PEG-ELS), (2) examine cost savings associated with OSS vs PEG-ELS, and (3) assess the robustness of the cost model. Efficacy of each agent was based on the results of a 541-patient clinical trial comparing OSS to PEG-ELS. Cleansing agent and colonoscopy procedure costs were calculated from OptumHealth Reporting & Insights claims data for 2010-Q12013. In the model, patients' colonoscopies were tracked over a 25 or 35 year time period until the patients reached age 75. The difference per patient per year (PPPY) in total cleansing agent and colonoscopy procedure costs over the time horizon between the OSS and PEG-ELS cohort was calculated. One-way sensitivity analyses were conducted to test the robustness of the cost model. The model showed lower cost for OSS patients over the time horizon. Total PPPY costs were $280.34 for the OSS cohort and $296.36 for the PEG-ELS cohort, resulting in a cost saving of $16.01 PPPY for the OSS cohort. This was due primarily to OSS patients having fewer colonoscopies (OSS: 0.158 vs PEG-ELS: 0.170 PPPY). Over the time horizon, cost savings of $4 763 335 were observed among 10, 000 OSS patients. Cost savings switched from OSS to PEG-ELS cohort in four cases: (1) base-case cost of a completed colonoscopy decreased by 75%, (2) base-case cost of OSS increased to over $143 per usage, (3) all non-completers were lost to follow-up, and (4) OSS bowel preparation quality dropped below PEG-ELS to 70%. From a payer's perspective, the model showed that the use of OSS as the cleansing agent resulted in potential cost savings compared with PEG-ELS. Cost savings under OSS remained under various sensitivity analyses.

  7. Randomized trial comparing oral sulfate solution with 4-L polyethylene glycol administered in a split dose as preparation for colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyo-Joon; Park, Soo-Kyung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Im, Jong Pil; Yeom, Dong Han; Seo, Geom Seog; Park, Dong Il

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the non-inferiority of low-volume oral sulfate solution (OSS) to 4-L polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions administered in a split-dose regimen as bowel preparation for colonoscopy. The safety and tolerability were also compared between the two regimens. In this prospective, randomized, single-blind, active-control, parallel group, and non-inferiority trial, consecutive outpatients and health checkup recipients aged 19-65 years undergoing elective colonoscopy were enrolled to receive OSS or 4-L PEG in a split-dose regimen. The quality of bowel preparation was evaluated using the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale. The occurrence of any adverse events, acceptance, compliance, and satisfaction during bowel preparation were evaluated by participant interviews. Overall, 210 participants were randomized, and 199 were administered by the study agents. Adequate bowel preparation was achieved in 98.0% (97/99) of the OSS group, which was non-inferior to the PEG group (96%; 96/100) with a difference of +2.8% (95% confidence interval; -2.8, +6.8). There were no differences in the incidence of adverse events except for abdominal pain, which was more frequent in the OSS (7.1%, 7/99) than in the PEG (1.0%, 1/100; P = 0.035) group. Acceptance, compliance, and satisfaction were significantly higher in the OSS than in the PEG group (all P < 0.05). Split-dose OSS was non-inferior to split-dose 4-L PEG with regard to bowel preparation efficacy before colonoscopy in adult outpatients or screening colonoscopy recipients aged ≤65 years with acceptable safety and superior tolerability. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. A heuristic model to quantify the impact of excess cyclodextrin on oral drug absorption from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Niels Erik; Westh, Peter; Holm, René

    2016-05-01

    The intestinal drug solubilising capacity (Dtot(SC)) of a drug formulated as an aqueous cyclodextrin solution is a recently proposed quantity to predict the cyclodextrin concentration needed to fully solubilise the drug in the intestinal lumen. According to this concept, the cyclodextrin concentration in the drug product must be higher than the amount needed to solubilise the compound, due to the displacement of the drug from the cyclodextrin cavity by bile salts in the intestinal lumen. On the other hand, dosing cyclodextrin at >Dtot(SC) is expected to result in decreased free intestinal drug concentrations and thus potentially a lower fraction absorbed. In this study, data from three previous in vivo studies in rats with fixed concentrations of three compounds (danazol, cinnarizine and benzo[A]pyrene) and various cyclodextrin concentrations >Dtot(SC) were analysed. The model was developed for danazol and applied to the two other compounds. Absorption, as quantified from the area under the plasma concentration-time profile, was predicted by the model to decrease at elevated concentrations of co-administered cyclodextrin in accordance with the in vivo data. In addition, at high cyclodextrin concentrations a delay in Tmax and a decrease in Cmax were predicted, again in accordance with the experimental observations. These observations were rationalised in terms of the free intestinal drug concentration by a chemical equilibrium model for Dtot(SC). This model depends on the quantity termed the dimensionless dose concentration, Dtot(∗)=Do/Pn, given as the fraction of the permeation number (Pn) and dose number (Do). The model provides the formulation scientist with a critical quality attribute for assessing the implication of having excess cyclodextrin in an oral solution.

  9. Determination of cetirizine dihydrochloride, related impurities and preservatives in oral solution and tablet dosage forms using HPLC.

    PubMed

    Jaber, A M Y; Al Sherife, H A; Al Omari, M M; Badwan, A A

    2004-10-29

    An HPLC method was developed and validated for the determination of cetirizine dihydrochloride (CZ) as well as its related impurities in commercial oral solution and tablet formulations. Furthermore, two preservatives associated with the drug formulations, namely, propyl (PP) and butylparabens (BP) were successfully determined by this method. The chromatographic system used was equipped with a Hypersil BDS C18, 5 microm column (4.6 x 250 mm) and a detector set at 230 nm in conjunction with a mobile phase of 0.05 M dihydrogen phosphate:acetonitrile:methanol:tetrahydrofuran (12:5:2:1, v/v/v/v) at a pH of 5.5 and a flow rate of 1 ml min(-1). The calibration curves were linear within the target concentration ranges studied, namely, 2 x 10(2) - 8 x 10(2) microg ml(-1) and 1-4 microg ml(-1) for CZ, 20-100 microg ml(-1) for preservatives and 1-4 microg ml(-1) for CZ related impurities. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) for CZ were, respectively, 0.10 and 0.34 microg ml(-1) and for CZ related impurities were in the ranges of 0.08-0.26 microg ml(-1) and 0.28-0.86 microg ml(-1), respectively. The method proved to be specific, stability indicating, accurate, precise, robust and could be used as an alternative to the European pharmacopoeial method set for CZ and its related impurities.

  10. A comparison of oral sulfate solution with sodium picosulfate: magnesium citrate in split doses as bowel preparation for colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Rex, Douglas K; DiPalma, Jack A; McGowan, John; Cleveland, Mark vB

    2014-12-01

    There are few data comparing U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved low-volume bowel preparations for colonoscopy. To compare oral sulfate solution (OSS) with sodium picosulfate plus magnesium citrate (SP+MC) for bowel cleansing efficacy. Single-blind, randomized, controlled trial. Ten U.S. centers. Outpatients undergoing colonoscopy for routine indications. Patients were randomized to undergo bowel preparation with OSS or SP+MC. Both preparations were given in split doses. Cleansing efficacy on a 4-point scale from excellent (4) to poor (1). Among 338 randomized patients who took preparation, OSS resulted in a higher rate of successful (excellent or good) preparation (94.7% vs 85.7%; P = .006) and more excellent preparations (54% vs 26%; P < .001) compared with SP+MC. There was no difference between OSS and SP+MC in treatment-emergent adverse events. SP+MC had better scores for nausea, but the differences were small. The preparation grading scale has been used in previous studies and has regulatory acceptance but has not been formally validated. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved split-dose regimen of OSS provides superior bowel cleansing compared with the approved split-dose regimen of SP+MC. ( NCT01786629.). Copyright © 2014 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Comparison of Chlorhexidine Solution and Swab With Toothbrush and Toothpaste Effect on Preventing Oral Lesions in Hospitalized Patients in Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Estaji, Zahra; Alinejad, Mohammad; Rakhshani, Mohammad Hassan; Rad, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Maintaining of oral hygiene has been known as one of the basic tasks of nurses working at intensive care unit. This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of chlorhexidine solution with toothbrush in prevention of oral lesions or ulcers in the different parts of the mouth. Methods: In this clinical trial study, research Society included patients hospitalized with endotracheal tube since the arrival time in intensive care unit. In this study, 30 patients were selected with target-based approach and equally divided into two groups through the permutation blocking method for oral care toothbrush and toothpaste and using chlorhexidine and swab. The modified form of Beck Oral Assessment Scale (BOAS) and MPS were used to obtain needed information. Data were analyzed by means of R software (version 3.0.2) and also multiple logistic regressions in the confidence level of 95%. Results: This study indicated an association between using toothbrush and the oral health level (OR: 1.52). In different parts of the mouth, there was no difference between two groups in prevention of lesions in gums, lips and tongue while, this was significant in relation to plaque, mucus and teeth with an odd ratio of 3.94 for teeth and 2.75 for mucus. In comparison, there was an association between implying chlorhexidine and saliva health level. (OR: 2.046). Conclusion: This survey showed that using toothbrush has a noticeable impact on declining oral lesions in varied parts of the mouth. PMID:26652098

  12. Comparative pharmacokinetics of prim-O-glucosylcimifugin and cimifugin by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry after oral administration of Radix Saposhnikoviae extract, cimifugin monomer solution and prim-O-glucosylcimifugin monomer solution to rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueyue; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Hai; Jia, Jing; Lv, Lei; Zhou, Guichen; Chai, Yifeng; Zhang, Guoqing

    2012-10-01

    A sensitive and reliable liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method has been developed and validated for simultaneous determination of cimifugin and prim-O-glucosylcimifugin in rat plasma after oral administration of Radix Saposhnikoviae (RS) extract, prim-O-glucosylcimifugin monomer solution and cimifugin monomer solution. Plasma samples were pretreated by protein precipitation with acetonitrile containing the internal standards puerarin and daidzein. LC separation was achieved on a Zorbax SB-C(18) column (150 × 4.6 mm i.d., 5 µm) with 0.1% formic acid in water and methanol by isocratic elution. The detection was carried out in select-ion-monitoring mode with a positive electrospray ionization interface. The fully validated method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of the analytes in rats. A bimodal phenomenon appeared in the concentration-time curve of prim-O-glucosylcimifugin and cimifugin after oral administration of RS extract. Prim-O-glucosylcimifugin mainly transformed to cimifugin when it was absorbed into blood. Both absorption and elimination of cimifugin after oral administration of RS were longer than after administration of single cimifugin. The pharmacokinetic parameters (AUC(0-t) , AUC(0-∞) and t(1/2) ) of prim-O-glucosylcimifugin and cimifugin by giving cimifugin monomer solution, prim-O-glucosylcimifugin monomer solution and RS extract had significant differences (P < 0.05).

  13. Caregiver perceptions and utilization of oral rehydration solution and other treatments for diarrhea among young children in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Digre, Peder; Simpson, Evan; Cali, Shannon; Lartey, Belinda; Moodley, Melissa; Diop, Ndack

    2016-01-01

    Background More than 500 000 young children die from dehydration caused by severe diarrhea each year, globally. Although routine use of oral rehydration solution (ORS) could prevent almost all of these deaths, ORS utilization remains low in many low–income countries. Previous research has suggested that misperceptions among caregivers may be an obstacle to wider use of ORS. Methods To better understand the extent of ORS utilization and the reasons for use or non–use in low–resource settings, the project team conducted a semi–structured, quantitative survey of 400 caregivers in Burkina Faso in 2014. All caregivers had a child below the age of five who had diarrhea lasting 2 days or more in the previous 2 months. Results Although more than 80% of caregivers were aware of ORS, less than half reported using it to treat their child’s diarrhea. Replacing fluids lost due to diarrhea was considered a low priority by most caregivers, and many said they considered antibiotics more effective for treating diarrhea. Users and non–users of ORS held substantially different perceptions of the product, though all caregivers tended to follow recommendations of health care workers. A significant proportion of users reported difficulty in getting a child to drink ORS. Costs and access to ORS were not found to be significant barriers to use. Conclusions Misperceptions among caregivers and health workers contribute to low utilization of ORS. Better caregiver understanding of diarrheal disease and the importance of rehydration, as well as increased recommendation by health workers, will help to increase ORS utilization. Improving product presentation and taste will also help to increase use. PMID:27699000

  14. Scaling up access to oral rehydration solution for diarrhea: Learning from historical experience in low– and high–performing countries

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Shelby E.; Morris, Saul S.; Gilbert, Sarah Skye; Mosites, Emily; Hackleman, Rob; Weum, Kristoffer L.M.; Pintye, Jillian; Manhart, Lisa E.; Hawes, Stephen E.

    2013-01-01

    Aim This paper aims to identify factors that systematically predict why some countries that have tried to scale up oral rehydration solution (ORS) have succeeded, and others have not. Methods We examined ORS coverage over time, across countries, and through case studies. We conducted expert interviews and literature and data searches to better understand the history of ORS scale–up efforts and why they failed or succeeded in nine countries. We used qualitative, pairwise (or three–country) comparisons of geographically or otherwise similar countries that had different outcomes in terms of ORS scale–up. An algorithm was developed which scored country performance across key supply, demand and financing activities to quantitatively assess the scale–up efforts in each country. Results The vast majority of countries have neither particularly low nor encouragingly high ORS use rates. We observed three clearly identifiable contrasts between countries that achieved and sustained high ORS coverage and those that did not. Key partners across sectors have critical roles to play to effectively address supply– and demand–side barriers. Efforts must synchronize demand generation, private provider outreach and public sector work. Many donor funds are either suspended or redirected in the event of political instability, exacerbating the health challenges faced by countries in these contexts. We found little information on the cost of scale–up efforts. Conclusions We identified a number of characteristics of successful ORS scale–up programs, including involvement of a broad range of key players, addressing supply and demand generation together, and working with both public and private sectors. Dedicated efforts are needed to launch and sustain success, including monitoring and evaluation plans to track program costs and impacts. These case studies were designed to inform programmatic decision–making; thus, rigorous academic methods to qualitatively and

  15. An amino acid-based oral rehydration solution (AA-ORS) enhanced intestinal epithelial proliferation in mice exposed to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Liangjie; Gupta, Reshu; Vaught, Lauren; Grosche, Astrid; Okunieff, Paul; Vidyasagar, Sadasivan

    2016-01-01

    Destruction of clonogenic cells in the crypt following irradiation are thought to cause altered gastrointestinal function. Previously, we found that an amino acid-based oral rehydration solution (AA-ORS) improved gastrointestinal function in irradiated mice. However, the exact mechanisms were unknown. Electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, qPCR, and Western blot analysis were used to determine that AA-ORS increased proliferation, maturation, and differentiation and improved electrolyte and nutrient absorption in irradiated mice. A single-hit, multi-target crypt survival curve showed a significant increase in crypt progenitors in irradiated mice treated with AA-ORS for six days (8.8 ± 0.4) compared to the saline-treated group (6.1 ± 0.3; P < 0.001) without a change in D0 (4.8 ± 0.1 Gy). The Dq values increased from 8.8 ± 0.4 Gy to 10.5 ± 0.5 Gy with AA-ORS treatment (P < 0.01), indicating an increased radiation tolerance of 1.7 Gy. We also found that AA-ORS treatment (1) increased Lgr5+, without altering Bmi1 positive cells; (2) increased levels of proliferation markers (Ki-67, p-Erk, p-Akt and PCNA); (3) decreased apoptosis markers, such as cleaved caspase-3 and Bcl-2; and (4) increased expression and protein levels of NHE3 and SGLT1 in the brush border membrane. This study shows that AA-ORS increased villus height and improved electrolyte and nutrient absorption. PMID:27876791

  16. L-isoleucine-supplemented oral rehydration solution in the treatment of acute diarrhoea in children: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Alam, N H; Raqib, R; Ashraf, H; Qadri, F; Ahmed, S; Zasloff, M; Agerberth, B; Salam, M A; Gyr, N; Meier, R

    2011-06-01

    Antimicrobial peptides represent an important component of the innate immune defenses of living organisms, including humans. They are broad-spectrum surface-acting agents secreted by the epithelial cells of the body in response to infection. Recently, L-isoleucine and its analogues have been found to induce antimicrobial peptides. The objectives of the study were to examine if addition of L-isoleucine to oral rehydration salts (ORS) solution would reduce stool output and/or duration of acute diarrhoea in children and induce antimicrobial peptides in intestine. This double-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted at the Dhaka Hospital of ICDDR,B. Fifty male children, aged 6-36 months, with acute diarrhoea and some dehydration, attending the hospital, were included in the study. Twenty-five children received L-isoleucine (2 g/L)-added ORS (study), and 25 received ORS without L-isoleucine (control). Stool weight, ORS intake, and duration of diarrhoea were the primary outcomes. There was a trend in reduction in mean +/- standard deviation (SD) daily stool output (g) of children in the L-isoleucine group from day 2 but it was significant on day 3 (388 +/- 261 vs. 653 +/- 446; the difference between mean [95% confidence interval (CI) (-)265 (-509, -20); p = 0.035]. Although the cumulative stool output from day 1 to day 3 reduced by 26% in the isoleucine group, it was not significant. Also, there was a trend in reduction in the mean +/- SD intake of ORS solution (mL) in the L-isoleucine group but it was significant only on day 1 (410 +/- 169 vs. 564 +/- 301), the difference between mean (95% CI) (-)154 (-288, -18); p = 0.04. The duration (hours) of diarrhoea was similar in both the groups. A gradual increase in stool concentrations of beta-defensin 2 and 3 was noted but they were not significantly different between the groups. L-isoleucine-supplemented ORS might be beneficial in reducing stool output and ORS intake in children with acute watery diarrhoea. A further

  17. Efficacy of standard glucose-based and reduced-osmolarity maltodextrin-based oral rehydration solutions: effect of sugar malabsorption.

    PubMed

    el-Mougi, M; Hendawi, A; Koura, H; Hegazi, E; Fontaine, O; Pierce, N F

    1996-01-01

    Previously we reported that standard oral rehydration salts (ORS) solution is not as effective as a reduced-osmolarity glucose-based ORS for the treatment of children with acute noncholera diarrhoea: with standard ORS the diarrhoea lasts longer, stool output is greater, serum sodium is higher, and there is more need for supplemental intravenous infusion. We studied a reduced-osmolarity maltodextrin (MD)-based ORS to determine whether it had similar benefits, and also the effect of sugar malabsorption on the efficacy of standard and MD-based ORS. A total of 90 boys aged 3-24 months with acute noncholera diarrhoea and moderate dehydration were randomly assigned to either standard ORS (glucose 20 g/l, osmolarity 311 mmol/l) or MD-ORS (MD 50 g/l, osmolarity 227 mmol/l). There were no differences in treatment results. Some 46% of subjects had a high total stool output (> 300 g/kg), which was unrelated to the type of ORS given. High stool output was significantly associated with a longer duration of diarrhoea (33 vs. 15 hours; P < 0.001), a persistently elevated serum sodium (149 vs. 144 mmol/l at 24 h; P < 0.02), the need for intravenous infusion (11/41 vs. 0/48; P < 0.002), and an increase in faecal reducing substances (10.8 vs. 3.4 g/l at 24 h; P < 0.001). We conclude that some children given standard ORS develop osmotic diarrhoea owing to the combined effect of transient sugar malabsorption and slight hypertonicity of the ORS. Earlier studies show that this adverse outcome can largely be avoided when extra water is given in reduced-osmolarity glucose-based ORS. Reduced osmolarity has no benefit, however, when glucose is replaced by maltodextrin, probably because the sugars released by hydrolysis of MD, when malabsorbed, raise the intraluminal osmolarity to equal or exceed that of standard ORS. Thus, reduced-osmolarity glucose-based ORS is superior to both standard ORS and reduced-osmolarity solutions based on maltodextrin and probably other complex carbohydrates

  18. Efficacy of standard glucose-based and reduced-osmolarity maltodextrin-based oral rehydration solutions: effect of sugar malabsorption.

    PubMed Central

    el-Mougi, M.; Hendawi, A.; Koura, H.; Hegazi, E.; Fontaine, O.; Pierce, N. F.

    1996-01-01

    Previously we reported that standard oral rehydration salts (ORS) solution is not as effective as a reduced-osmolarity glucose-based ORS for the treatment of children with acute noncholera diarrhoea: with standard ORS the diarrhoea lasts longer, stool output is greater, serum sodium is higher, and there is more need for supplemental intravenous infusion. We studied a reduced-osmolarity maltodextrin (MD)-based ORS to determine whether it had similar benefits, and also the effect of sugar malabsorption on the efficacy of standard and MD-based ORS. A total of 90 boys aged 3-24 months with acute noncholera diarrhoea and moderate dehydration were randomly assigned to either standard ORS (glucose 20 g/l, osmolarity 311 mmol/l) or MD-ORS (MD 50 g/l, osmolarity 227 mmol/l). There were no differences in treatment results. Some 46% of subjects had a high total stool output (> 300 g/kg), which was unrelated to the type of ORS given. High stool output was significantly associated with a longer duration of diarrhoea (33 vs. 15 hours; P < 0.001), a persistently elevated serum sodium (149 vs. 144 mmol/l at 24 h; P < 0.02), the need for intravenous infusion (11/41 vs. 0/48; P < 0.002), and an increase in faecal reducing substances (10.8 vs. 3.4 g/l at 24 h; P < 0.001). We conclude that some children given standard ORS develop osmotic diarrhoea owing to the combined effect of transient sugar malabsorption and slight hypertonicity of the ORS. Earlier studies show that this adverse outcome can largely be avoided when extra water is given in reduced-osmolarity glucose-based ORS. Reduced osmolarity has no benefit, however, when glucose is replaced by maltodextrin, probably because the sugars released by hydrolysis of MD, when malabsorbed, raise the intraluminal osmolarity to equal or exceed that of standard ORS. Thus, reduced-osmolarity glucose-based ORS is superior to both standard ORS and reduced-osmolarity solutions based on maltodextrin and probably other complex carbohydrates

  19. Efficacy of oral rehydration therapy solutions containing sodium bicarbonate or sodium acetate for treatment of calves with naturally acquired diarrhea, moderate dehydration, and strong ion acidosis.

    PubMed

    Sen, Ismail; Altunok, Vahdettin; Ok, Mahmut; Coskun, Alparslan; Constable, Peter D

    2009-04-01

    To determine and compare the effects of 4 oral replacement therapy (ORT) solutions on acid-base balance, abomasal emptying rate, and plasma volume expansion in calves with naturally acquired diarrhea and moderate dehydration. Prospective study. 20 calves. 20 calves up to 45 days of age were randomly allocated (n = 5/group) to receive 2 L of 1 of 4 treatments via oroesophageal intubation: sodium bicarbonate (150 mmol/L or 300 mmol/L) or sodium acetate (150 mmol/L or 300 mmol/L). The 4 test solutions contained acetaminophen (50 mg/kg [22.7 mg/lb]) and 50 g of glucose monohydrate. Jugular venous blood samples were obtained periodically before and after administration of the ORT solution. Abomasal emptying rate was determined by use of the time to maximal plasma acetaminophen concentration. Plasma bicarbonate concentration increased more rapidly in calves administered bicarbonate-containing ORT solutions, whereas the rate of systemic alkalinization, as assessed via blood pH, did not differ consistently among treatments. The 300 mmol/L ORT solutions were emptied at a significantly slower rate from the abomasum than 150 mmol/L ORT solutions, with no difference in emptying rate between acetate and bicarbonate-containing ORT solutions of similar molality. The 300 mmol/L sodium acetate ORT solution significantly increased plasma volume. Clinically important differences in the resuscitative response to 300 mmol/L or 150 mmol/L ORT solutions of sodium acetate or sodium bicarbonate were not identified.

  20. Differential pharmacokinetics of diclofenac potassium for oral solution vs immediate-release tablets from a randomized trial: effect of fed and fasting conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cuiping; Bujanover, Shay; Kareht, Stephanie; Rapoport, Alan M

    2015-02-01

    To compare the pharmacokinetics of, and food effect on, diclofenac potassium delivered as an oral solution vs an immediate-release tablet. Diclofenac potassium for oral solution is the only nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug approved as monotherapy for the acute treatment of migraine attacks with or without aura in adults 18 years of age or older. It is formulated with potassium bicarbonate as a buffering agent to raise the pH and consequently increase the aqueous solubility of diclofenac in the acidic environment of the stomach following oral administration. The dosage is 50 mg of powdered diclofenac potassium dissolved in 1 to 2 ounces (30 to 60 mL) of water prior to administration, with dosing time in relation to food intake not specified - this was the case for the pivotal efficacy and safety trials in subjects with acute migraine attacks in which the primary endpoints were achieved. For acute treatment of migraine attacks, rapid onset of pain relief is desirable and is likely related to a rapid appearance of an effective concentration of the drug in the systemic circulation. The rate at which an orally administered drug reaches the blood is affected by both its formulation and the presence of food in the stomach. The present study was designed to investigate the pharmacokinetics of 2 formulations of diclofenac potassium, an immediate-release tablet and an oral solution, and to ascertain the effect of food. This was an open-label, randomized, single-center, crossover trial in healthy volunteers. Subjects were randomized using computer-generated list to 1:1:1:1 ratio. They received a single 50-mg dose of diclofenac potassium in 4 sequences (ABCD, BADC, CDBA, and DCAB) during each of the 4 treatment periods. The 4 treatments were: A, oral solution fasting; B, tablet fasting; C, oral solution fed; and D, tablet fed. There was a ≥7-day washout period between dosing. Blood samples for pharmacokinetic analysis were taken for up to 12 hours post-dose and

  1. Comparison of the inhibitory effect against copper ion-induced oxidation in rat plasma after oral administration of salvianolic acid B and its decocted solutions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoung Jae; Cho, Jeong-Yong; Moon, Jae-Hak

    2013-03-01

    The effects of salvianolic acid B (Sal B) decoction on antioxidative activities were evaluated. The 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity, Fe(2+)-chelating activity, reducing power, and total phenolic content of the Sal B-decocted solutions did not change significantly after decoction in an aqueous solution. However, the formation of cholesteryl ester hydroperoxide (CE-OOH) in rat blood plasma containing the Sal B-decocted solutions was more effectively inhibited than that of plasma containing the Sal B solution, regardless of the decoction time. In addition, the accumulation of CE-OOH in rat plasma after oral administration of the Sal B-decocted solutions was more effectively suppressed than when the Sal B solution was administered, considering the lag time. It is likely that the decoction was partly responsible for the increased antioxidant activity in blood plasma. Therefore, the Sal B-decocted solution may contribute more to antioxidant defense in blood than a Sal B solution that is not decocted.

  2. Safety and efficacy of glycopyrrolate oral solution for management of pathologic drooling in pediatric patients with cerebral palsy and other neurologic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Robert S; Davidson, Jennifer; Lee, Hak-Myung; Cavanaugh, Paul F

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of oral glycopyrrolate solution 1 mg/5 mL for 24 weeks in pediatric patients with chronic moderate-to- severe drooling associated with cerebral palsy and other neurologic conditions. Methods In this multicenter, open-label, 24-week study, males and females aged 3–18 years weighing at least 27 lb received oral glycopyrrolate solution, starting at 0.02 mg/kg three times daily and titrated in increments of 0.02 mg/kg every 5–7 days for 4 weeks to an optimal maintenance dose or a maximum dose of 0.1 mg/kg, but not exceeding 3 mg three times daily. Safety was assessed by description and tabulation of all adverse events. The primary efficacy endpoint was response, defined as at least a three-point change from baseline to week 24 on the modified Teacher’s Drooling Scale. Results Of 137 intent-to-treat participants, 10 (7.3%) received the maximum dose of 0.1 mg/kg three times daily; 122 (89%) had at least one treatment-emergent adverse event, 47% related to oral glycopyrrolate solution, with most being mild-to-moderate in intensity. The most commonly reported treatment-emergent adverse events were constipation (20.4%), vomiting (17.5%), diarrhea (17.5%), pyrexia (14.6%), dry mouth (10.9%), flushing (10.9%), and nasal congestion (10.9%). Nineteen patients (13.9%) discontinued treatment due to an adverse event, but no adverse event was specifically associated with discontinuation. Two patients had clinically significant toxicity grade shifts, one each in platelet count and calcium concentration. No deaths occurred on treatment; deaths of three patients (multisystem organ failure, anoxic encephalopathy, and aspiration pneumonia) within 30 days of their last dose were not considered to be treatment-related. At 24 weeks, 52.3% (95% confidence interval 43.7–60.9) of patients were responders, with at least a three-point decrease in modified Teacher’s Drooling Scale from baseline, with 83.5% of

  3. Effects of water temperature and pH on toxicity of terbufos, trichlorfon, 4-nitrophenol and 2,4- dinitrophenol to the amphipod Gammarus pseudolimnaeus and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howe, G.E.; Marking, L.L.; Bills, T.D.; Rach, J.J.; Mayer, F.L.

    1994-01-01

    Acute toxicity tests were conducted to determine (a) the individual and interactive effects of water temperature (7, 12, 17 degree C), pH (6.5, 7.5, 8.5, 9.5), and time on the toxicity of terbufos, trichlorfon, 4- nitrophenol, and 2,4-dinitrophenol to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and the amphipod Gammarus pseudolimnaeus, and (b) the individual and interactive effects of water temperature and pH on chemical bioconcentration during acute tests with rainbow trout and Gammarus exposed to terbufos, 4-nitrophenol, and 2,4-dinitrophenol. The toxicity of all four chemicals was significantly affected by pH in all tests, except for Gammarus exposed to terbufos. The toxicity of terbufos to rainbow trout and Gammarus was less at pH 7.5 than at higher or lower pH. The toxicity of both nitrophenols decreased as pH increased, whereas the toxicity of trichlorfon increased with pH. The effect of pH on trichlorfon toxicity decreased with temperature. Temperature significantly affected the toxicity of all four chemicals to both species. Toxicity increased with temperature in all tests, except for rainbow trout exposed to nitrophenols; toxicity decreased as temperature increased for rainbow trout. Chemical bioconcentration was also significantly affected by temperature and pH and was directly related to toxicity in most tests. Significant interactive effects between toxicity-modifying factors were also frequently observed. Temperature and pH effects on chemical toxicity need to be considered in chemical hazard assessment to ensure adequate protection of aquatic organisms.

  4. Effects of water temperature and pH on toxicity of terbufos, trichlorfon, 4-nitrophenol and 2,4-dinitrophenol to the amphipod Gammarus pseudolimnaeus and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, G.E.; Marking, L.L.; Bills, T.D.; Rach, J.J. . National Fisheries Research Center); Mayer, F.L. Jr. . Environmental Research Lab.)

    1994-01-01

    Acute toxicity tests were conducted to determine (a) the individual and interactive effects of water temperature (7, 12, 17 C), pH (6.5, 7.5, 8.5, 9.5), and time on the toxicity of terbufos, trichlorfon, 4-nitrophenol, and 2,4-dinitrophenol to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and the amphipod Gammarus pseudolimnaeus, and (b) the individual and interactive effects of water temperature and pH on chemical bioconcentration during acute tests with rainbow trout and Gammarus exposed to terbufos, 4-nitrophenol, and 2,4-dinitrophenol. The toxicity of all four chemicals was significantly affected by pH in all tests, except for Gammarus exposed to terbufos. The toxicity of terbufos to rainbow trout and Gammarus was less at pH 7.5 than at higher or lower pH. The toxicity of both nitrophenols decreased as pH increased, whereas the toxicity of trichlorfon increased with pH. The effect of pH on trichlorfon toxicity decreased with temperature. Temperature significantly affected the toxicity of all four chemicals to both species. Toxicity increased with temperature in all tests, except for rainbow trout exposed to nitrophenols; toxicity decreased as temperature increased for rainbow trout. Chemical bioconcentration was also significantly affected by temperature and pH and was directly related to toxicity in most tests. Significant interactive effects between toxicity-modifying factors were also frequently observed. Temperature and pH effects on chemical toxicity need to be considered in chemical hazard assessment to ensure adequate protection of aquatic organisms.

  5. [Effects of oral fluid resuscitation with pyruvate-oral rehydration solution on the hemodynamic parameters and organ functions during shock stage in dogs with a 50% total body surface area full thickness burn].

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangxi; Li, Juan; Bai, Xiaodong; Hu, Sen; Zhou, Fangqiang

    2014-06-01

    To study the effect of oral fluid resuscitation with pyruvate sodium-glucose-electrolyte solution (PGES) on hemodynamics, organ functions and mortalities during shock stage in dogs with burn. In comparison of oral pyruvate sodium-glucose-electrolyte solution (PGES) with NaHCO₃-glucose-electrolyte solution (HGES), beagle dogs with intubation of the carotid artery, jugular vein and jejunum for 24 hours were subjected to a 50% total body surface area (TBSA) burn, and were divided into three groups: pure burn without fluid resuscitation (NR, n = 8), and two oral fluid resuscitation (each n = 10), in which dogs were given with Pry-GES (OP) or NaHCO₃-GES (OH) according to Parkland formula. The hemodynamic and organ functions were measured serially before burn and 2, 6, 8, 12 and 24 hours after burn at no anaesthesia state A. Twenty-four hours mortality rate following burn was also recorded. Two hours after burn, the mean arterial pressure of NR, OH and OP group was (45 ± 8), (57 ± 8) and (80 ± 9) mmHg (1 mmHg = 0.133 kPa) respectively, which were significantly reduced (t = 16.967, 14.595 and 10.100, all P < 0.05) compared with those before injury ((42 ± 6), (144 ± 6) and (142 ± 6) mmHg respectively), the change of cardiac output, dp/dtmax of left ventricular contractility and intestinal mucosal blood flow had the same trend as the mean arterial pressure. The systemic vascular resistance and organ parameters (Cr, CK-MB, ALT and DAO) in all groups increased obviously (t = -46.894--2.465, all P < 0.05). All measurements of NR group kept worsening, and all died within 24 hours after burn; while those of two oral resuscitation groups had improved gradually (F = 0.001-1.600, all P < 0.05), OP group was significantly superior to OH group (F = 0.013-0.466, P < 0.05). At 24 hours after burn, 6 (6/10) survived in OP group, 4 (4/10) in OH group and 0 (0/8) in NR group. The Pyr-GES may be superior to the standard NaHCO₃-GES in the improvement of hemodynamics and organ

  6. Evaluation and comparison of efficacy of three different storage media, coconut water, propolis, and oral rehydration solution, in maintaining the viability of periodontal ligament cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanghavi, Tulsi; Shah, Nimisha; Parekh, Vaishali; Singbal, Kiran

    2013-01-01

    Background: Two of the most critical factors affecting the prognosis of an avulsed tooth after replantation are extra oral dry time and the storage medium in which the tooth is placed before treatment is rendered. However, the ability of a storage/transport medium to support cell viability can be more important than the extra oral time to prevent ankylosis and replacement resorption. Aim: Purpose of this study was evaluation and comparison of efficacy of a new storage medium, oral rehydration solution (ORS) with coconut water, and propolis in maintaining the viability of periodontal ligament (PDL) cells by using a collagenase-dispase assay. Materials and Methods: 40 teeth were selected with intact crown which were advised for Orthodontic extraction having healthy PDL. Teeth were then randomly divided into three experimental storage solution groups. Other 10 were divided into positive and negative control groups (5 each). Statistical Analysis and Result: The results were statistically analyzed with analysis of variance and multiple range by using post hoc tests. The results of the prevailing study indicated that coconut water group demonstrated a significantly higher number of viable PDL cells than propolis 50%, and ORS. There was no significant difference between coconut water and propolis 50% groups. PMID:23349581

  7. Effects of basswood honey, honey-comparable glucose-fructose solution, and oral glucose tolerance test solution on serum insulin, glucose, and C-peptide concentrations in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Münstedt, Karsten; Sheybani, Babak; Hauenschild, Annette; Brüggmann, Dörthe; Bretzel, Reinhard G; Winter, Daniel

    2008-09-01

    Studies suggest that honey has less influence on serum glucose concentrations than monosaccharides and disaccharides. This study aimed to confirm these findings conclusively by comparing directly the effects of honey, an identical sugar solution, and oral glucose tolerance (OGT) test solution on serum glucose, insulin, and C-peptide values in healthy subjects. Twelve healthy men with a mean age of 27.7 years, a mean body mass index of 23.2 kg/m(2), and no history of metabolic disorders participated in the study. Subjects underwent OGT testing to establish values and exclude preclinical diabetes. One week later they were randomly assigned to basswood honey or a glucose-fructose solution (honey-comparable glucose-fructose solution). The following week subjects were given the other solution. All solutions contained 75 g of glucose. Serum glucose was measured before drinking test solutions and every 10 minutes for 120 minutes afterwards. C-peptide and insulin were measured at 60 and 120 minutes. Serum insulin and C-peptide values at 60 minutes were significantly lower for honey. The mean serum glucose concentration was also lower for honey, but direct comparisons at the various times showed no statistically significant differences between solutions. However, the area under the concentration-time profile for glucose response was lower for the honey than the honey-comparable glucose-fructose solution. Honey had less effect on serum glucose, C-peptide, and insulin values than the honey-comparable glucose-fructose solution. Further study to elucidate underlying mechanisms may be worthwhile, as may investigation of the implications of these findings for diabetic patients.

  8. Antimicrobial effect of Australian antibacterial essential oils as alternative to common antiseptic solutions against clinically relevant oral pathogens.

    PubMed

    Karbach, J; Ebenezer, S; Warnke, P H; Behrens, E; Al-Nawas, B

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the in vitro antibacterial activity of different oils in comparison to antiseptics against oral microorganisms. The antimicrobial effect of tea tree oil (TTO), eucalyptus oil (EO), lemon grass oil (LGO), and a eucalyptus-based oil mixture (MXT) were tested in comparison to chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), povidone-iodine (BTA), and octenidine dihydrochloride (OCT). Oral bacterial strains and candida species using the agar diffusion test were used for the antimicrobial study. All tested oils showed antimicrobial potency against the tested biological indicators. In comparison of all tested substances the largest effective zones were measured for LGO, followed from MXT and CHX. TTO and EO were less effective against the tested microorganisms followed from BTA. The results of this study show that some essential oils have better antimicrobial properties than standard oral antiseptics. In a follow-up step, the ideal concentrations, the composition of essential oils, and the mode of application will be evaluated. The antibacterial efficacy of essential oils might be promising for use in clinical and oral hygiene applications. The cost reduction and availability particularly in rural areas with easy access to the originating plants might be advantageous factors to be considered.

  9. Polyethylene glycol plus an oral sulfate solution as a bowel cleansing regimen for colon capsule endoscopy: a prospective, single-arm study in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Ravit

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: As with colonoscopy, adequate bowel cleansing is essential prior to colon capsule endoscopy (CCE). Because CCE requires that the capsule traverse the entire gastrointestinal tract during the examination, laxative ‘boosters’ are used. The objective of this prospective, single-center, single-arm study was to evaluate the safety of a bowel preparation consisting of polyethylene glycol (PEG) plus an oral sulfate solution. Methods: Subjects were healthy volunteers aged 50–75 years old with normal baseline serum chemistry. The bowel preparation consisted of 4 Senna tablets, 4 liters of PEG (split dose), 10 mg metoclopramide, 2 oral sulfate solution boosters (6 oz. and 3 oz.), and 10 mg bisacodyl. Serum chemistry was performed at baseline, following PEG intake, 24 hours after bisacodyl administration, and at 7 days post procedure (in subjects with abnormal 24 hour results). The primary endpoints were the percentage of subjects with a clinically significant change in serum chemistry at the last test and the adverse event (AE) rate. Results: A total of 25 subjects were enrolled. The serum chemistry was normal in all subjects at the final evaluation. One subject showed a slight elevation in creatinine (1.08 mg/dl 7 days post procedure from 0.84 mg/dl at baseline), deemed not clinically significant. Another subject had a transient elevation in serum creatinine (from 1.01 mg/dl at baseline to 1.45 mg/dl at 24 hours after the bowel preparation); values returned to near baseline at 7 days post procedure (1.06 mg/dl). There were no serious AEs, three moderate AEs related to the bowel preparation (nausea, headache, elevated creatinine) and two mild unrelated AEs (chills, abdominal cramping). Conclusions: A bowel cleansing regimen of PEG plus an oral sulfate solution can be used in healthy volunteers. These data provide support for the continued study of this regimen in future CCE clinical trials and in medical practice. PMID:26327914

  10. Switching levothyroxine from the tablet to the oral solution formulation corrects the impaired absorption of levothyroxine induced by proton-pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vita, Roberto; Saraceno, Giovanna; Trimarchi, Francesco; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2014-12-01

    Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) impair tablet levothyroxine (LT4) intestinal absorption by increasing the gastric pH and decreasing LT4 dissolution in the stomach. The purpose of this study was to verify whether a liquid formulation of LT4 would correct LT4 malabsorption induced by PPIs. This was a prospective observational cohort study. The study was conducted from 2012 to 2013, and the mean duration of the follow-up was 23.7 ± 11.9 weeks. The study was conducted in a tertiary university hospital outpatients clinic. Upon informed consent, we recruited 24 consecutive adult patients (18 women and 6 men), who took LT4 for replacement (n = 14) or suppressive purposes (n = 10) and who had absorption of tablet LT4 impaired by PPIs. The 24 patients were switched from the tablet to the oral solution LT4 at the same daily dose. Significantly lower mean TSH levels were seen with the oral solution than with the tablet as were significantly greater rates of serum TSH less than or equal to the specified cutoff values (replacement [REP] group) or ≤ 0.10 mU/L (suppressive [SUP] group) with the oral solution than with the tablet. Serum TSH was lower with the oral solution than with the tablet formulation (REP group, 1.7 ± 1.0 mU/L vs 5.4 ± 4.3, P < .0001; SUP group, 0.1 ± 0.3 mU/L vs 2.1 ± 2.7, P < .0001). In the REP group, the rate of TSH values of ≤ 4.12 or ≤ 2.5 mU/L was 29 of 30 (96.7%) or 24 of 30 (80.0%) postswitch but only 17 of 36 (47.2%) or 9 of 36 (25.0%) preswitch (P < .0001). In the SUP group, the rate of serum TSH values of ≤ 0.10 mU/L was 26 of 35 (74.3%) postswitch but 0 of 22 (0%) preswitch (P < .0001). These data demonstrate the continued absorption of liquid LT4 despite the increased gastric pH due to PPI therapy.

  11. Oral passive IgY-based immunotherapeutics: a novel solution for prevention and treatment of alimentary tract diseases.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Shofiqur; Van Nguyen, Sa; Icatlo, Faustino C; Umeda, Kouji; Kodama, Yoshikatsu

    2013-05-01

    This commentary summarizes the laboratory investigations and clinical trials published recently involving per-oral application of IgY supplemented food for specific orogastrointestinal disease prevention and control purposes. The prolonged use and misuse of conventional antibacterial drugs has spawned antibiotic resistant microbes prompting scientists to search for other germ-killing options. In particular, the use of IgY as a novel mode of immunotherapy using oral chicken immunoglobulin (IgY) to confer passive immunity has gained much interest as an inexpensive non-antibiotic alternative for the prophylaxis and treatment of a wide variety of infectious diseases. The stability of IgY in the orogastrointestinal tract and its safety profile has been well-documented. IgY has been used in the treatment or prevention of dental caries, periodontitis and gingivitis, gastritis and gastric ulcer, oral thrush and infant rotavirus diarrhea. The recent clinical trials on IgY with encouraging results has catapulted into the market novel nutraceutical or health supplements for therapeutic or prophylactic intervention based on the consumption of mono-specific or mixed IgY formulations. With recent trends in consumer preference for natural materials to alleviate health concerns, the increasing healthcare costs and the recent advances in drug delivery systems, IgY is likely to shift from its mainly functional food status toward pharmaceuticalization in the foreseeable future.

  12. Efficacy of Hydrochlorothiazide and low renal solute feed in Neonatal Central Diabetes Insipidus with transition to Oral Desmopressin in early infancy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The treatment of central diabetes insipidus (DI) with desmopressin in the neonatal period is challenging because of the significant risk of hyponatremia with this agent. The fixed anti-diuresis action of desmopressin and the obligate high fluid intake with milk feeds lead to considerable risk of water intoxication and hyponatremia. To reduce this risk, thiazide diuretics, part of the treatment of nephrogenic DI, were used in conjunction with low renal solute feed and were effective in a single case series of neonatal central DI. Aim We evaluated the efficacy of early treatment of neonatal central DI with hydrochlorothiazide with low solute feed and investigated the clinical indicators for transition to desmopressin during infancy. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted at Princess Margaret Hospital, Perth of neonates diagnosed with central DI and treated with hydrochlorothiazide, between 2007 and 2013. Four newborns were identified. Mean sNa and mean change in sNa with desmopressin and hydrochlorothiazide treatment were recorded along with episodes of hyponatremia and hypernatremia. Length and weight trajectories during the first 12 months were assessed. Results The mean change in sNa per day with hydrochlorothiazide and low renal solute feed was 2.5 - 3 mmol/L; on desmopressin treatment, the mean change in sNa was 6.8-7.9 mmol/L. There was one episode of symptomatic hyponatremia with intranasal desmopressin with no episodes of hyponatremia or hypernatremia during treatment with hydrochlorothiazide or following transition to oral desmopressin. Transition to oral desmopressin between 3 to 12 months of age was associated with good control of DI. Following introduction of solids, sNa remained stable but weight gain was slow. This improved following transition to desmopressin in one infant. Conclusions Hydrochlorothiazide with low renal solute feed is a safe and effective treatment option in neonatal central DI. However, transition to

  13. Capromorelin oral solution (ENTYCE®) increases food consumption and body weight when administered for 4 consecutive days to healthy adult Beagle dogs in a randomized, masked, placebo controlled study.

    PubMed

    Zollers, Bill; Rhodes, Linda; Heinen, Ernst

    2017-01-05

    Dogs can suffer from inappetence caused by a variety of medical conditions. This may present as anorexia (complete loss of appetite), hyporexia (decreased appetite) or dysrexia (change in food preferences). A drug with a new mechanism of action, capromorelin, has potential to stimulate appetite in dogs. Capromorelin is a ghrelin receptor agonist, which mimics the action of endogenous ghrelin. It is a member of the growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) class of drugs. Capromorelin oral solution (ENTYCE®) was tested in healthy adult male and female Beagle dogs (n = 6 males and 6 females per group) for its effect on food consumption and body weight. A randomized, masked, placebo controlled study was conducted to measure the effects of a daily 3 mg/kg oral dose given over 4 days. Dogs were observed for clinical signs, physical examinations were completed prior to and at the end of treatment, and blood was drawn before and after treatment for evaluation of serum chemistry and hematology parameters. Capromorelin was well-tolerated, with no abnormalities seen on physical examination or clinical pathology. Some dogs showed increased salivation. Capromorelin treated dogs had increased mean (±SD) food consumption compared to placebo treated dogs (60.55 ± 39.87% versus -11.15 ± 14.23% respectively, P < 0.001). Treated dogs also had increased mean body weights compared to placebo treated dogs (5.96 ± 1.76% versus 0.053 ± 1.14% respectively, P < 0.001). This study supports the effectiveness of capromorelin oral solution as an appetite stimulant in dogs. Treatment with the oral solution resulted in dramatic increases in appetite, as measured by food consumption, of over 60% compared to placebo. The drug was well tolerated. Capromorelin is the first ghrelin receptor agonist developed for appetite stimulation in any species, and represents a novel mechanism of action for this clinical use.

  14. Core-shell silver nanoparticles in endodontic disinfection solutions enable long-term antimicrobial effect on oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Ertem Bekdemir, Elif; Gutt, Beatrice; Zuber, Flavia; Allegri, Sergio; Le Ouay, Benjamin; Mefti, Selma; Formentin, Kitty; Stellacci, Francesco; Ren, Qun

    2017-09-18

    To achieve effective long-term disinfection of the root canals, we synthesized core-shell silver nanoparticles (AgNPs@SiO2) and used them to develop two irrigation solutions containing sodium phytate (SP) and ethylene glycol-bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), respectively. Ex vivo studies with instrumented root canals revealed that the developed irrigation solutions can effectively remove the smear layer from the dentinal surfaces. Further in vitro experiments with single and multi-species biofilms demonstrated for the first time that AgNPs@SiO2 based irrigation solutions possess excellent antimicrobial activities for at least 7 days, whereas the bare AgNPs lose the activity almost immediately and do not show any antibacterial activity after 2 days. The long term antimicrobial activity exhibited by AgNPs@SiO2 solutions can be attributed to the sustainable availability of soluble silver, even after 7 days. Both solutions showed lower cytotoxicity towards human gingival fibroblasts compared to the conventionally used solution (3% NaOCl and 17% EDTA). Irrigation solutions containing AgNP@SiO2 may therefore be highly promising for applications needed long-term antimicrobial effect.

  15. Optimising concentrations of antimicrobial agents in pharmaceutical preparations: Case of an oral solution of glycerol and an ophthalmic solution containing cysteamine.

    PubMed

    Chan Hew Wai, A; Becasse, P; Tworski, S; Pradeau, D; Planas, V

    2014-11-01

    In the context of current distrust of antimicrobial preservatives, the quantities of these substances in two pharmaceutical formulas were studied: an ophthalmic solution of cysteamine preserved benzalkonium chloride at 1mg/5mL and Glycerotone(®) preserved with sorbic acid at 0.1g/100g. The purpose of this work was to verify that a reduction of the quantities of preservative continues to fulfil the requirements for antimicrobial preservation. The Test of efficacy of antimicrobial preservation, section 5.1.3 of the 8th edition of the European Pharmacopoeia, was carried out on each formulation prepared with decreasing quantities of preservative. The results show that formulations whose preservative concentration was reduced by a factor of four remained compliant with standards. It is to be noted that in formulas without preservative, fungal growth was observed in both the solution of Glycerotone(®) and the ophthalmic solution containing cysteamine. Although there is no question that an antimicrobial preservative is necessary, the quantity of preservative can be reduced without deteriorating the quality of the pharmaceutical product but the minimal effective concentration remains to be determined. The formulations of many pharmaceutical products should therefore be examined in order to limit the quantities of preservative while continuing to guarantee patient's safety. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Intraosseous anesthesia with solution injection controlled by a computerized system versus conventional oral anesthesia: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Beneito-Brotons, Rut; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Ata-Ali, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare a computerized intraosseous anesthesia system with the conventional oral anesthesia techniques, and analyze the latency and duration of the anesthetic effect and patient preference. Design: A simple-blind prospective study was made between March 2007 and May 2008. Each patient was subjected to two anesthetic techniques: conventional and intraosseous using the Quicksleeper® system (DHT, Cholet, France). A split-mouth design was adopted in which each patient underwent treatment of a tooth with one of the techniques, and treatment of the homologous contralateral tooth with the other technique. The treatments consisted of restorations, endodontic procedures and simple extractions. Results: The study series comprised 12 females and 18 males with a mean age of 36.8 years. The 30 subjects underwent a total of 60 anesthetic procedures. Intraosseous and conventional oral anesthesia caused discomfort during administration in 46.3% and 32.1% of the patients, respectively. The latency was 7.1±2.23 minutes for the conventional technique and 0.48±0.32 for intraosseous anesthesia – the difference being statistically significant. The depth of the anesthetic effect was sufficient to allow the patients to tolerate the dental treatments. The duration of the anesthetic effect in soft tissues was 199.3 minutes with the conventional technique versus only 1.6 minutes with intraosseous anesthesia – the difference between the two techniques being statistically significant. Most of the patients (69.7%) preferred intraosseous anesthesia. Conclusions: The described intraosseous anesthetic system is effective, with a much shorter latency than the conventional technique, sufficient duration of anesthesia to perform the required dental treatments, and with a much lesser soft tissue anesthetic effect. Most of the patients preferred intraosseous anesthesia. Key words:Anesthesia, intraosseous, oral anesthesia, infiltrating, mandibular block, Quicksleeper®. PMID

  17. Safety of rapid intravenous rehydration and comparative efficacy of 3 oral rehydration solutions in the treatment of severely malnourished children with dehydrating cholera.

    PubMed

    Alam, Nur H; Islam, Sufia; Sattar, Samima; Monira, Shirajum; Desjeux, Jehan-François

    2009-03-01

    Assess the safety of rapid intravenous rehydration of severely malnourished children and compare the efficacy of 3 formulations of oral rehydration salts solutions. A group of 175 severely malnourished children of either sex (weight/length <70% of National Center for Health Statistics median), ages 6 to 36 months with cholera, were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 3 oral rehydration solutions (ORSs): glucose-ORS (n=58), glucose-ORS plus 50 g/L of amylase-resistant starch (n=59), or rice-ORS (n=58). Severely dehydrated children at enrollment were administered 100 mL/kg of an intravenous solution for 4 to 6 hours before randomisation, and those with some dehydration were randomised on enrollment. The electrolytes of the 3 ORSs were identical. In acute and convalescence phases, treatment was similar other than the nature of the ORSs. Intravenous fluid (mean) administered to 149 study children was 103 mL/kg (95% confidence interval [CI] 96-109), and all were rehydrated within 6 hours. None of them developed overhydration or heart failure. During the first 24 hours, stool output (31%; 95% CI 14%-42%; P=0.004) and the ORS intake (26%; 95% CI 12%-37%; P=0.002) of children receiving rice-ORS were significantly less compared with children receiving glucose-ORS. The mean duration of diarrhoea in all children (66 hours; 95% CI 62-71), and time to attain 80% of median weight/length (7.15+/-2.81 days) were not different. Dehydration in severely malnourished children can safely be corrected within 6 hours. All study ORSs were equally efficient in correcting dehydration. Rice-ORS significantly reduced the stool output and ORS intake, confirming previous reports.

  18. Stability and compatibility of granisetron hydrochloride in i.v. solutions and oral liquids and during simulated Y-site injection with selected drugs.

    PubMed

    Mayron, D; Gennaro, A R

    1996-02-01

    The stability and compatibility of granisetron hydrochloride in common i.v. fluids and oral liquids and during simulated Y-site injection with selected drugs were studied. One milliliter of solution containing granisetron 1 mg (as the hydrochloride salt) was added to 50 mL of 5% dextrose injection, 5% dextrose and 0.9% sodium chloride injection, 5% dextrose and 0.45% sodium chloride injection, or 0.9% sodium chloride injection in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bags and to 5 mL of 5% dextrose injection, 0.9% sodium chloride injection, or bacteriostatic water for injection in polypropylene syringes and stored at room temperature (20 degrees C) for 24 hours. One milliliter of the granisetron hydrochloride injection was added to 50 mL of apple juice, orange juice, cola, or an electrolyte replacement solution and stored for 60 minutes at room temperature. Twenty-nine drugs were mixed with the granisetron hydrochloride injection in 0.9% sodium chloride injection in volumes simulating Y-site injection and stored at room temperature. Finally, dexamethasone sodium phosphate injection 0.5 mL and 1 mL of the granisetron hydrochloride injection were added to 50 mL of 0.9% sodium chloride injection in a PVC bag and stored for 60 minutes. Drug concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, and color, clarity, and pH were evaluated. Granisetron hydrochloride was stable in and compatible with all the i.v. solutions and oral liquids. Neither granisetron nor any of the drugs it was tested with during simulated Y-site injection showed any physical changes except for a slight Tyndall effect in the granisetron hydrochloride-doxorubicin hydrochloride combination; all the drugs retained at least 96% of initial concentrations. Granisetron and dexamethasone sodium phosphate were stable and compatible in the admixture. Granisetron 1 mg (as the hydrochloride salt) was stable for 24 hours in four i.v. infusion fluids in PVC bags and in 5% dextrose injection, 0.9% sodium

  19. Structural variations of different oral basement membranes revealed by cationic dyes and detergent added to aldehyde fixative solution.

    PubMed

    Chardin, H; Gokani, J P; Septier, D; Ruch, J V; Goldberg, M

    1992-06-01

    The ultrastructural appearance of different types of basement membrane was studied using histochemical methods for visualizing glycosaminoglycans. Samples of rat gingiva and mouse molar germ tissue were fixed either with glutaraldehyde, glutaraldehyde-ruthenium hexammine trichloride (RHT), glutaraldehyde-Cuprolinic Blue (CB) or cetylpyridinium chloride-glutaraldehyde (CPC). Ultrathin sections were stained with uranyl acetate and lead citrate. The results showed that the conventional trilaminar structure of the basement membrane was observed after glutaraldehyde and CB fixation. In contrast, after CPC or RHT fixation, the appearance of the basement membrane was homogeneous without any evidence of a lamina lucida. Furthermore, after single fixation with CPC, the ultrastructure of different basement membranes from oral tissues showed some differences in appearance which were related to their localizations, functions, or both.

  20. Intraosseous anesthesia with solution injection controlled by a computerized system versus conventional oral anesthesia: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Beneito-Brotons, Rut; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Ata-Ali, Javier; Peñarrocha, María

    2012-05-01

    To compare a computerized intraosseous anesthesia system with the conventional oral anesthesia techniques, and analyze the latency and duration of the anesthetic effect and patient preference. A simple-blind prospective study was made between March 2007 and May 2008. Each patient was subjected to two anesthetic techniques: conventional and intraosseous using the Quicksleeper® system (DHT, Cholet, France). A split-mouth design was adopted in which each patient underwent treatment of a tooth with one of the techniques, and treatment of the homologous contralateral tooth with the other technique. The treatments consisted of restorations, endodontic procedures and simple extractions. The study series comprised 12 females and 18 males with a mean age of 36.8 years. The 30 subjects underwent a total of 60 anesthetic procedures. Intraosseous and conventional oral anesthesia caused discomfort during administration in 46.3% and 32.1% of the patients, respectively. The latency was 7.1±2.23 minutes for the conventional technique and 0.48±0.32 for intraosseous anesthesia--the difference being statistically significant. The depth of the anesthetic effect was sufficient to allow the patients to tolerate the dental treatments. The duration of the anesthetic effect in soft tissues was 199.3 minutes with the conventional technique versus only 1.6 minutes with intraosseous anesthesia--the difference between the two techniques being statistically significant. Most of the patients (69.7%) preferred intraosseous anesthesia. The described intraosseous anesthetic system is effective, with a much shorter latency than the conventional technique, sufficient duration of anesthesia to perform the required dental treatments, and with a much lesser soft tissue anesthetic effect. Most of the patients preferred intraosseous anesthesia.

  1. Preoperative oral rehydration solution intake volume does not affect relative change of mean arterial blood pressure and crystalloid redistribution during general anesthesia in low-risk patients: an observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Iwayama, Sachiko; Tatara, Tsuneo; Osugi, Toshihiro; Hirose, Munetaka

    2014-02-01

    Despite the implementation of liberal preoperative fasting routines, it is unclear whether preoperative oral rehydration solution intake volume affects blood pressure during general anesthesia. We enrolled 60 patients (American Society of Anesthesiologists status I/II) undergoing tympanoplasty. Patients drank 200-1,000 ml oral rehydration solution until 2-3 h before anesthesia induction. Anesthesia was induced by propofol and maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil. Coinciding with anesthesia induction, 15 ml/kg Ringer's acetate solution was administered intravenously over 60 min followed by 1 ml/kg Ringer's acetate solution over the next 30 min. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and whole-body bioelectrical resistance for extracellular fluid (R e) during anesthesia were compared between retrospectively classified intake groups of oral rehydration solution. There were no differences in mean MAP during the 30-90 min period relative to baseline [0.67 (0.60-0.74), 0.65 (0.61-0.76), 0.64 (0.60-0.70), P = 0.96] and relative R e at 90 min [0.945 (0.018), 0.944 (0.021), 0.943 (0.021), P = 0.95] between the small (n = 14), intermediate (n = 29), and large (n = 17) intake groups. The intake volume of preoperative oral rehydration solution does not affect the magnitude of hypotension during general anesthesia in low-risk patients undergoing minor surgery.

  2. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Placement of FDA-Approved Products of Oral Solutions Containing Dronabinol [(-)-delta-9-transtetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC)] in Schedule II. Interim final rule, with request for comments.

    PubMed

    2017-03-23

    On July 1, 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new drug application for Syndros, a drug product consisting of dronabinol [(-)-delta-9-trans-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC)] oral solution. Thereafter, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) provided the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) with a scheduling recommendation that would result in Syndros (and other oral solutions containing dronabinol) being placed in schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). In accordance with the CSA, as revised by the Improving Regulatory Transparency for New Medical Therapies Act, DEA is hereby issuing an interim final rule placing FDA-approved products of oral solutions containing dronabinol in schedule II of the CSA.

  3. Cytogenetic analysis of oral mucosa cells, induced by chlorhexidine, essential oils in ethanolic solution and triclosan mouthwashes

    SciTech Connect

    Ros-Llor, Irene; Lopez-Jornet, Pia

    2014-07-15

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate DNA damage and cytokinetic defects, proliferative potential and cell death caused by the frequent use of mouthrinses containing chlorhexidine, triclosan and essential oils in ethanolic solution, compared to a placebo mouthwash. Study design: This double-blind, prospective, randomized clinical trial included 80 Caucasian patients. Subjects were divided into four groups: Group I used a mouthrinse, Triclosan; Group II used physiological saline; Group III used chlorhexidine; Group IV a mouthrinse with essential oils in ethanolic solution. All subjects used the mouthrinses for two weeks (15 ml, twice a day, rinsing for 30 s). Two cell samples per subject were collected, before and after mouthrinse use (on day 0 and day 15). Samples were processed as follows: cell collection from cheeks with a cytobrush; cell centrifuge; slide preparation, fixation and staining; and fluorescent microscope analysis. 2000 exfoliated cells were screened for nuclear abnormalities, particularly the presence of micronuclei by means of cytome assay. Results: No significant differences between study times (before and after use of mouthwash) were identified for any of the variables studied (p>0.05). Differences between mouthrinse groups were also compared but no significant differences were found (p>0.05). Conclusions: This study did not observe any genotoxic effect resulting from mouthrinse use. - Highlights: • Mouthrinses are used widely, mainly for their capacity to control dental plaque. • No genotoxic effects from the mouthrinses triclosan, chlorhexidine essential oils solution. • The buccal cytome assay is a sensitive, non-invasive, and low cost technique.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of an oral solution of the microemulsion formulation of cyclosporine in maintenance pediatric liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Dunn, S; Cooney, G; Sommerauer, J; Lindsay, C; McDiarmid, S; Wong, R L; Chang, C T; Smith, H T; Choc, M G

    1997-06-27

    A comparison of the oral bioavailability of cyclosporine from the original formulation (CsA) and from the new formulation, cyclosporine for microemulsion (CsA-ME), was made in pediatric maintenance liver transplant patients within two age groups (group 1, ages 1-5 years; group 2, ages 6-17 years) in an open-label, multicenter, randomized crossover trial. All patients were at least 6 months past transplantation and were receiving CsA maintenance therapy. In study period 1 (days 1 through 14), patients were administered either CsA or CsA-ME at the same b.i.d. dosage as their maintenance therapy. Upon entry into period 2 (days 15 through 28), patients were converted to the alternate formulation at a 1:1 mg dose ratio. On day 29, all patients returned to the CsA treatment administered at study entry, with follow-up on day 35. Dosage adjustments were not allowed with either CsA or CsA-ME. Twelve-hour pharmacokinetic profiling was performed at the end of periods 1 and 2. Both the mean area under the concentration-versus-time curve and the mean maximum blood concentration of cyclosporine-both normalized for dose-were significantly increased: by 66% and 109%, respectively, in patients receiving CsA-ME compared with those receiving CsA in group 1 and by 39% and 75%, respectively, in group 2. During this study, liver function remained stable, and serum creatinine and blood pressure did not differ significantly between treatment groups. This study shows increased bioavailability in all patients converted to CsA-ME, with the greatest increase seen in patients with the lowest initial cyclosporine bioavailability. The tolerability was similar between the two formulations during this study.

  5. [Post-marketing surveillance of acetylcysteine oral solution 17.6% "SENJU" for the antidote to acetaminophen overdose--use--results surveillance].

    PubMed

    Suenobu, Toshihide; Yoshioka, Toshiharu; Maruta, Shinichi; Shimoji, Hidemi

    2006-10-01

    Use-result surveillance was conducted to investigate the safety and efficacy of Acetylcysteine Oral Solution 17.6 % "SENJU" having the indication for the antidote to acetaminophen (Paracetamol) overdose. Ninety six cases (patients) were collected for the safety evaluation, and 13 cases (incidence was 13.5 %) showed 29 adverse drug reactions as follows: 4 cases of nausea; 3 cases of vomiting; 2 cases each of liver dysfunction, headache, abdominal pain, diarrhea, blood bilirubin increased; and one case each of CK increased, anaemia, prothrombin time prolonged, gamma-glutamyltransferase increased, LDH increased, body temperature increased, proteinuria, blood potassium decreased, thrombocytopenia, platelet count increased, white blood cell decreased, and blood amylase increased. One case of severe liver dysfunction which was ameliorated later was found. Neither case showing transitional chronic liver dysfunction, nor case of death was observed. Patient background analysis showed that 79.2% of the total patients was female, and that 28.1% was patients with mental disease. Gastrolavage, active charcoal administration, and extracorporeal removal of toxins were performed in cases of 71.9%, 50.0% and 7.3%, respectively. Those concomitant treatments, however, showed no influence for the incidence of adverse drug reaction or the drug effectiveness. Blood acetaminophen assay was performed in only 43.8% of the total cases. This rate indicates that the medical treatment procedure needs more consideration on the clinical standard for the antidote to acetaminophen overdose and on its practical application.

  6. Gastric pre-processing is an important determinant of the ability of medium-chain lipid solution formulations to enhance oral bioavailability in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kathy Wai Yu; Porter, Christopher J H; Boyd, Ben J

    2013-11-01

    The contribution of dispersion and digestion in the stomach to the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs administered in lipid-based formulations was assessed by comparison of intraduodenal (ID) and peroral (p.o.) administration using cinnarizine (CZ) as a model drug. Differences in the dispersion and digestion in the gastric and intestinal compartments for medium-chain triacylglycerides (MCT) and long-chain triacylglycerides (LCT) were observed, leading to differences in the oral bioavailability of CZ. Bypassing gastric processing using ID administration of lipid solution formulations decreased drug bioavailability regardless of lipid type. Overall, bioavailability from LCT formulations was higher than MCT regardless of route of administration, consistent with past data after p.o. administration and previously reported descriptions of increases in drug precipitation after administration of medium-chain lipid formulations. The larger differences between bioavailability after both p.o. and ID administration for MCT compared with LCT formulations suggest that passage through the stomach is more critical for MCT formulations, and that gastric digestion may be more critical for MCT than LCT formulations. For MCT-based formulations, efficient dispersion and partial digestion in the stomach may be required to allow rapid transfer to intestinal-mixed micelles and absorption in the upper small intestine prior to drug precipitation.

  7. A Pilot Study Comparing 2 Oral Rehydration Solutions in Patients With Short Bowel Syndrome Receiving Home Parenteral Nutrition: A Prospective Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Ryan T; Vallumsetla, Nishanth; Edakkanambeth Varayil, Jithinraj; Bonnes, Sara L; Nanda, Sanjeev; Nadeau, Joseph; Mundi, Manpreet S

    2017-06-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a common indication for home parenteral nutrition (HPN). Oral rehydration solutions (ORSs) have the ability to supplement or reduce HPN dependence. However, ORSs have suffered from poor taste profiles, making long-term consumption and compliance unlikely. The goal of the current study was to assess the taste and compliance of 2 ORSs among patients with SBS requiring HPN. All participants with SBS receiving HPN with anticipated duration >3 months were offered enrollment: 31 participants met inclusion criteria; 3 declined enrollment; and 28 were randomized to receive a modified World Health Organization ORS (group A) or a commercially available ORS (DripDrop; group B). Six participants dropped out shortly after randomization (3 in each group) due to poor taste or intolerance. An additional 3 (1 in group A and 2 in group B) discontinued the ORS before the end of the study at 6 months. At the end of the study, 19 remained. The mean taste rating given by the participants was, on a scale of 1-10, 7.3 ± 1.9 for group A and 7.6 ± 1.6 for group B ( P = .61). The mean number of days that ORSs were consumed each week was 6.0 ± 1.3 for group A and 6.6 ± 1 days for group B ( P = .06). Taste rating was not different for both ORSs; however, a significant number of participants did not complete the study.

  8. On-line monitoring the extract process of Fu-fang Shuanghua oral solution using near infrared spectroscopy and different PLS algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Qian; Ru, Qingguo; Liu, Yan; Xu, Lingyan; Liu, Jia; Wang, Yifei; Zhang, Yewen; Li, Hui; Zhang, Qing; Wu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    An on-line near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy monitoring method with an appropriate multivariate calibration method was developed for the extraction process of Fu-fang Shuanghua oral solution (FSOS). On-line NIR spectra were collected through two fiber optic probes, which were designed to transmit NIR radiation by a 2 mm flange. Partial least squares (PLS), interval PLS (iPLS) and synergy interval PLS (siPLS) algorithms were used comparatively for building the calibration regression models. During the extraction process, the feasibility of NIR spectroscopy was employed to determine the concentrations of chlorogenic acid (CA) content, total phenolic acids contents (TPC), total flavonoids contents (TFC) and soluble solid contents (SSC). High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), ultraviolet spectrophotometric method (UV) and loss on drying methods were employed as reference methods. Experiment results showed that the performance of siPLS model is the best compared with PLS and iPLS. The calibration models for AC, TPC, TFC and SSC had high values of determination coefficients of (R2) (0.9948, 0.9992, 0.9950 and 0.9832) and low root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) (0.0113, 0.0341, 0.1787 and 1.2158), which indicate a good correlation between reference values and NIR predicted values. The overall results show that the on line detection method could be feasible in real application and would be of great value for monitoring the mixed decoction process of FSOS and other Chinese patent medicines.

  9. Does oral experience terminate ingestion?

    PubMed

    Swithers, S E; Hall, W G

    1994-10-01

    Using data from studies of ingestive behavior in developing rat pups we demonstrate how oral experience can contribute to the termination of ingestion. In rat pups, repeated oral stimulation with sweet solutions causes a decline in oral responsiveness. The diminished responsiveness is specific to the flavor of the stimulus experienced orally and can persist for several hours. We suggest that this experience-based decrement in responsiveness is best considered "oral habituation" and that oral habituation largely accounts for the onset of satiety. Post-ingestive feedback signals may have their influence through the oral habituation process or act in the context of oral habituation. Oral habituation is also shown to depend on the pattern of stimulus presentation, a phenomenon that adds considerable complexity to assessing the contributions of oral experience to satiety. The concept of oral habituation may be useful in understanding the immediate control of ingestion and the moment-to-moment expression of ingestive behavior in adult animals.

  10. A randomized controlled trial of glucose versus amylase resistant starch hypo-osmolar oral rehydration solution for adult acute dehydrating diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan S; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Mohan, Vivek; Sebastian, Bendon K; Young, Graeme P; Farthing, Michael J; Binder, Henry J

    2008-02-13

    Reduction of gross diarrhea rate in excess of that seen over time with intravenous therapy and appropriate antibiotics is not usually achieved by oral glucose-electrolyte rehydration therapy for cholera and cholera-like diarrheas. This prospective randomized clinical trial at a tertiary referral hospital in southern India was undertaken to determine whether amylase resistant starch, substituting for glucose in hypo-osmolar oral rehydration solution, would reduce diarrhea duration and weight in adults with acute severe dehydrating diarrhea. 50 adult males with severe watery diarrhea of less than three days' duration and moderate to severe dehydration were randomized to receive hypo-osmolar ORS (HO-ORS) or HO-ORS in which amylase resistant high amylose maize starch 50g/L substituted for glucose (HAMS-ORS). All remaining therapy followed standard protocol. Duration of diarrhea (ORS commencement to first formed stool) in hours was significantly shorter with HAMS-ORS (median 19, IQR 10-28) compared to HO-ORS (median 42, IQR 24-50) (Bonferroni adjusted P, P(adj)<0.001). Survival analysis (Kaplan-Meier) showed faster recovery from diarrhea in the HAMS-ORS group (P<0.001, log rank test). Total diarrhea fecal weight in grams (median, IQR) was not significantly lower in the HAMS-ORS group (2190, 1160-5635) compared to HO-ORS (5210, 2095-12190) (P(adj) = 0.08). However, stool weight at 13-24 hours (280, 0-965 vs. 1360, 405-2985) and 25-48 hours (0, 0-360 vs. 1080, 55-3485) were significantly lower in HAMS-ORS compared to HO-ORS group (P(adj) = 0.048 and P = 0.012, respectively). ORS intake after first 24 hours was lower in the HAMS-ORS group. Subgroup analysis of patients with culture isolates of Vibrio cholerae indicated similar significant differences between the treatment groups. Compared to HO-ORS, HAMS-ORS reduced diarrhea duration by 55% and significantly reduced fecal weight after the first 12 hours of ORS therapy in adults with cholera-like diarrhea. Current

  11. Oral surgery. Basic techniques.

    PubMed

    Ross, D L; Goldstein, G S

    1986-09-01

    Some of the clinical problems most frequently seen in veterinary dentistry and their surgical solutions are discussed. Extraction of teeth, surgical repositioning of teeth, tooth transplant, oral abscesses of tooth origin, impaction of teeth, repair of maxillary canine oronasal fistula, and simple techniques for oral wiring are among the issues considered.

  12. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral Cancer Basic description Cancer can affect any part of the oral cavity, including the lips, tongue, mouth, and throat. There are 2 kinds of oral cancer: oral cavity cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. The most ...

  13. An observational study using blood gas analysis to assess neonatal calf diarrhea and subsequent recovery with a European Commission-compliant oral electrolyte solution.

    PubMed

    Sayers, Ríona G; Kennedy, Aideen; Krump, Lea; Sayers, Gearóid P; Kennedy, Emer

    2016-06-01

    An observational study was conducted on dairy calves (51 healthy, 31 with neonatal diarrhea) during outbreaks of diarrhea on 4 dairy farms. Clinical assessment scores (CAS) were assigned to each healthy and diarrheic calf [from 0 (healthy) to 4 (marked illness)]. Blood gas analysis [pH, base excess (BE), Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Cl(-), glucose, total hemoglobin, standard HCO3(-), strong ion difference (SID), and anion gap (AG)] was completed for each calf. Repeated measurements were taken in healthy animals, and pre- and postintervention measurements were taken for diarrheic calves. The mean CAS of diarrheic calves was 1.7, with 51, 30, 17, and 2% of calves scoring 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The mean value for blood pH, BE, AG, and SID was 7.26, -4.93mM, 16.3mM, and 38.59mM, respectively. Calves were administered an oral rehydration and buffering solution (ORBS; Vitalife for Calves, Epsilion Ltd., Cork, Ireland) and reassessed. The mean CAS decreased to 0.38 (65% of calves scored 0 and 35% scored 1) at 6 to 18h posttreatment and to 0.03 (98% of calves scored 0 and 2% scored 1) within 24 to 48h. Significant increases in mean value for pH, BE, HCO3(-), Na(+), and SID, and significant decreases in AG, K(+), Ca(2+), and total hemoglobin were recorded posttreatment. The correlation estimates indicated that pH, HCO3(-), and BE were strongly correlated with CAS, with values exceeding 0.60 in all cases. Administration of an ORBS with a high SID and bicarbonate buffer demonstrated rapid recovery from a diarrheic episode in dairy calves. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ocoxin® oral solution slows down tumor growth in an experimental model of colorectal cancer metastasis to the liver in Balb/c mice

    PubMed Central

    MÁRQUEZ, JOANA; MENA, JORGE; HERNANDEZ-UNZUETA, IERA; BENEDICTO, AITOR; SANZ, EDUARDO; ARTETA, BEATRIZ; OLASO, ELVIRA

    2016-01-01

    Liver metastatic disease is the main cause of death in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. During metastatic spread of the disease an imbalance in the oxidative stress and inflammation plays a crucial role in tumor progression. In order to improve the efficacy of current therapies, new complementary therapeutic approaches are being analyzed including biologically active compounds with low side effects. The anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of Ocoxin® oral solution (OOS) prompt us to analyze its effect on the metastatic development of CRC to the liver. First, in vitro effect of OOS in tumor cell viability and migration was analyzed. Second, in vivo effect of different dosage patterns and concentrations in the development of hepatic metastasis was analyzed by intrasplenic inoculation of C26 colon carcinoma cells in Balb/c mice. Third, the expression of alpha smooth muscle actin, caspase-3 and Ki-67 expression was quantified by immunohistochemistry, then gene expression levels of inflammatory factors were measured by quantitative RT-PCR. According to our results, OOS reduced tumor cell viability and migration in vitro. Moreover, in vivo daily administration of OOS from the 7th day after tumor cell inoculation decreased the total area and size of metastatic foci in the liver. Furthermore, cell proliferation and fibroblast recruitment was decreased in tumor foci while a higher number of apoptotic cells were observed. Finally, RNA levels for the inflammatory mediators COX-2, IFNγ, IL1β, IL6 and TNFα were reduced in total liver. In conclusion, OOS reduced the metastatic development of colorectal cancer to the liver by increasing apoptosis, and decreasing tumor cell proliferation and fibroblast recruitment in the tumor foci, as well as the expression of inflammatory mediators in total liver. These results point out OOS as a potential supplement to be applied as complementary therapy for the treatment of liver metastasis from colorectal cancer. PMID:26676882

  15. Evaluation of who oral rehydration solution (ORS) and salt tablets in resuscitating adult patients with burns covering more than 15% of total body surface area (TBSA)

    PubMed Central

    Moghazy, A.M.; Adly, O.A.; Elbadawy, M.A.; Hashem, R.E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Intra-venous (IV) burn resuscitation is effective; nevertheless it has its disadvantages. WHO Oral Rehydration Solution (ORS) has shown high effectiveness in treating dehydration. WHO-ORS, with salt supplement, seems to be suitable for burn resuscitation, where IV resuscitation is not available, feasible or possible. The objective of the study was to evaluate acute phase efficacy and safety, as well as limitations and complications of burn resuscitation using WHO-ORS and salt tablets. This randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in the Burn Unit, Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt. The study group was given WHO-ORS (15% of body weight/day) with one salt tablet (5gm) per liter according to Sørensen’s formula. The control group was given IV fluids according to the Parkland formula. Patients’ vital signs and urine output were monitored for 72 hours after starting resuscitation. Both groups were comparable regarding age, sex, and percentage, etiology and degree of burns. For all assessed parameters, there were no major significant differences between the study group (10 cases) and control group (20 cases). Even where there was a significant difference, apart from blood pressure in the first hour of the first day, the study group never crossed safe limits for pulse, systolic blood pressure, urine output, respiratory rate and conscious level. WHO-ORS with 5gm salt tablets, given according to Sørenson’s formula, is a safe and efficient alternative for IV resuscitation. It could even be a substitute, particularly in low resource settings and fire disasters. PMID:27857652

  16. Safety and efficacy of aspartame-based liquid versus sucrose-based liquids used for dilution in oral sodium phosphate solutions for colonoscopy preparations.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Sherman M; Balart, J Carter; Sideridis, Kostas; Salek, Jefrey; Sridhar, Subbaramiah; Thompson, William O

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether an oral sodium phosphate solution (OSPS) mixed with aspartame-based clear liquids as the diluent would yield improved colon cleansing results compared to an OSPS mixed with sucrose-based liquids as the diluent. Fifty-one patients undergoing colonoscopy were prospectively randomized into two groups to receive different OSPS colonoscopy preparations, with sucrose-based or aspartame-based liquids used as diluents. The primary end point was the quality of the colonoscopy preparation and secondary end points were serum electrolytes before and after preparations. No significant difference in colonoscopy preparation quality was seen between the two OSPS diluent groups (Mantel-Haenzel chi (2) = 0.795, P = 0.484). There were no significant differences in mean electrolyte shifts of sodium, potassium, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), or BUN/Cr ratios between the two groups. There was a statistically significant increase in serum phosphorous in the aspartame-based group compared to the sucrose-based diluent group (P = 0.021). In conclusion, there was no clinically detectable difference in colonoscopy preparation quality between the two OSPS diluent groups. This study suggests that passive fluid transport by aquaporins may well be the major mediator of fluid shifts in the study subjects. This result suggests the potential importance of aquaporins and minimizes the importance of sodium glucose cotransporter SGLT1 in fluid and electrolyte transport in the human gastrointestinal tract. Aspartame or its constituent amino acids may enhance phosphate absorption across the human small intestine.

  17. Ocoxin® oral solution slows down tumor growth in an experimental model of colorectal cancer metastasis to the liver in Balb/c mice.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Joana; Mena, Jorge; Hernandez-Unzueta, Iera; Benedicto, Aitor; Sanz, Eduardo; Arteta, Beatriz; Olaso, Elvira

    2016-03-01

    Liver metastatic disease is the main cause of death in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. During metastatic spread of the disease an imbalance in the oxidative stress and inflammation plays a crucial role in tumor progression. In order to improve the efficacy of current therapies, new complementary therapeutic approaches are being analyzed including biologically active compounds with low side effects. The anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of Ocoxin® oral solution (OOS) prompt us to analyze its effect on the metastatic development of CRC to the liver. First, in vitro effect of OOS in tumor cell viability and migration was analyzed. Second, in vivo effect of different dosage patterns and concentrations in the development of hepatic metastasis was analyzed by intra-splenic inoculation of C26 colon carcinoma cells in Balb/c mice. Third, the expression of alpha smooth muscle actin, caspase-3 and Ki-67 expression was quantified by immunohistochemistry, then gene expression levels of inflammatory factors were measured by quantitative RT-PCR. According to our results, OOS reduced tumor cell viability and migration in vitro. Moreover, in vivo daily administration of OOS from the 7th day after tumor cell inoculation decreased the total area and size of metastatic foci in the liver. Furthermore, cell proliferation and fibroblast recruitment was decreased in tumor foci while a higher number of apoptotic cells were observed. Finally, RNA levels for the inflammatory mediators COX-2, IFNγ, IL1β, IL6 and TNFα were reduced in total liver. In conclusion, OOS reduced the metastatic development of colorectal cancer to the liver by increasing apoptosis, and decreasing tumor cell proliferation and fibroblast recruitment in the tumor foci, as well as the expression of inflammatory mediators in total liver. These results point out OOS as a potential supplement to be applied as complementary therapy for the treatment of liver metastasis from colorectal cancer.

  18. Evaluation of who oral rehydration solution (ORS) and salt tablets in resuscitating adult patients with burns covering more than 15% of total body surface area (TBSA).

    PubMed

    Moghazy, A M; Adly, O A; Elbadawy, M A; Hashem, R E

    2016-03-31

    Intra-venous (IV) burn resuscitation is effective; nevertheless it has its disadvantages. WHO Oral Rehydration Solution (ORS) has shown high effectiveness in treating dehydration. WHO-ORS, with salt supplement, seems to be suitable for burn resuscitation, where IV resuscitation is not available, feasible or possible. The objective of the study was to evaluate acute phase efficacy and safety, as well as limitations and complications of burn resuscitation using WHO-ORS and salt tablets. This randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in the Burn Unit, Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt. The study group was given WHO-ORS (15% of body weight/day) with one salt tablet (5gm) per liter according to Sørensen's formula. The control group was given IV fluids according to the Parkland formula. Patients' vital signs and urine output were monitored for 72 hours after starting resuscitation. Both groups were comparable regarding age, sex, and percentage, etiology and degree of burns. For all assessed parameters, there were no major significant differences between the study group (10 cases) and control group (20 cases). Even where there was a significant difference, apart from blood pressure in the first hour of the first day, the study group never crossed safe limits for pulse, systolic blood pressure, urine output, respiratory rate and conscious level. WHO-ORS with 5gm salt tablets, given according to Sørenson's formula, is a safe and efficient alternative for IV resuscitation. It could even be a substitute, particularly in low resource settings and fire disasters.

  19. Taste-masked and affordable donepezil hydrochloride orally disintegrating tablet as promising solution for non-compliance in Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Liew, Kai Bin; Tan, Yvonne Tze Fung; Peh, Kok Khiang

    2015-04-01

    Manufacturing process and superdisintegrants used in orally disintegrating tablet (ODT) formulation are often time discussed. However, the effect of suitable filler for ODT formulation is not explored thoroughly. The aim of this study was to develop a novel taste masked and affordable donepezil hydrochloride ODT with fast disintegration time and stable to improve medication compliance of Alzheimer's disease patient. The ODT was manufactured using simple wet-granulation method. Crospovidone XL-10 was used as superdisintegrant and optimization was done by comparing the effect of three grades of lactose monohydrate compound as filler: Starlac®, Flowlac® and Tablettose®. Formulations containing higher amount of colloidal silicon dioxide showed increase in hardness, weight, disintegration time and wetting time after stability study. Formulation E which containing 50% of Starlac® was found with shortest in vitro disintegration time (21.7 ± 1.67 s), in vivo disintegration time (24.0 ± 1.05 s) and in vitro disintegration time in artificial salvia (22.5 ± 1.67 s). Physical stability studies at 40 °C/75% RH for 6 months, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis and X-ray diffraction results showed that the formulation was stable. The drug-released profile showed that 80% of donepezil hydrochloride was released within 1 min. A single-dose, fasting, four-period, seven-treatment, double-blinded study involving 16 healthy human volunteers was performed to evaluate the palatability of ODT. Formulation VII containing 10 mg of ammonium glycyrrhizinate was able to mask the bitter taste of the drug. The product has the potential to be commercialized and it might serve as solution for non-compliance among the Alzheimer's disease patients.

  20. Efficacy and safety of oral rehydration solution with reduced osmolarity in adults with cholera: a randomised double-blind clinical trial. CHOICE study group.

    PubMed

    Alam, N H; Majumder, R N; Fuchs, G J

    1999-07-24

    The effects of oral rehydration solution (ORS) with reduced osmolarity on children with acute watery diarrhoea are known, but little is known about the effects of such ORS on adults with cholera. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of an ORS with reduced osmolarity with that of standard WHO ORS in adults with cholera. We undertook a double-blind, controlled clinical trial in adults with severe cholera at the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh. Our primary outcomes were mean stool output in the 24 h after randomisation, proportion of patients who needed unscheduled intravenous therapy, and proportion of patients with biochemical hyponatraemia 24 h after randomisation. 147 patients received ORS with reduced osmolarity and 153 received standard WHO ORS. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of main outcome variables: mean initial 24 h and total stool output (reduced osmolarity vs standard WHO ORS 212 [SE 8] vs 207 [8] and 284 [13] vs 273 [13] g/kg respectively), duration of diarrhoea (46 [1.5] vs 43 [1.5]). The proportion of patients vomiting during the first 24 h and the proportion who received unscheduled intravenous infusion during the first 24 h was similar between groups. More patients on reduced osmolarity ORS than on standard WHO ORS developed hyponatraemia during the first 24 h, defined as serum sodium concentration below 130 mmol/L (29 of 142 vs 16 of 150; odds ratio 2.1 [95% CI 1.1-4.1]). However, all hyponatraemic patients in both groups were symptom-free and the proportion of patients with serum sodium concentration below 125 mmol/L was similar between groups. There was no difference in clinical outcome between cholera patients treated with reduced osmolarity ORS solution and those treated with standard WHO ORS. The risk of increased incidence of symptom-free hyponatraemia in patients with cholera treated with an ORS with reduced osmolarity should be further assessed by meta-analysis. The

  1. Effects of an alanyl-glutamine-based oral rehydration and nutrition therapy solution on electrolyte and water absorption in a rat model of secretory diarrhea induced by cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Lima, Aldo A M; Carvalho, Graça H P; Figueiredo, Aline A; Gifoni, Angela R; Soares, Alberto M; Silva, Eduardo A T; Guerrant, Richard L

    2002-06-01

    Recurring diarrhea and persistent diarrhea are commonly associated with malnutrition and long-term functional deficits. A beneficial approach would be to develop an alanyl-glutamine (AlaGln)-based oral rehydration and nutrition therapy (ORNT). We investigated the effect of an AlaGln-ORNT solution on electrolyte and water absorption in a rat model of secretory diarrhea induced by cholera toxin. Phenolsulfonphthalein (50 microg/mL) was used as a non-absorbable marker for calculation of net water and electrolyte transport. Solutions tested were Ringer's solution, a glutamine-based ORNT (Gln-ORNT) solution, and an AlaGln-ORNT solution. Cholera toxin (1 microg/mL) was injected into lumen of rat small intestinal segments and incubated for 18 h before the initiation of the perfusion. Cholera toxin induced significant secretion of electrolyte and water in the control Ringer's solution. AlaGln-ORNT and Gln-ORNT solutions reduced the sodium secretory effect of cholera toxin by 128% and 36%, respectively. The net water secretion also was reduced by 95% and 60%, respectively, with the AlaGln-ORNT and Gln-ORTN solutions. These results showed that AlaGln-ORNT solution can enhance water and electrolyte intestinal absorption even better than glutamine or glucose and thus provide a potential novel approach for ORNT to break the vicious cycle of diarrhea and malnutrition. Clinical trials are now needed in children and adults with diarrhea and malnutrition.

  2. Treatment of diarrhea in young children: results from surveys on the perception and use of oral rehydration solutions, antibiotics, and other therapies in India and Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Zwisler, Greg; Simpson, Evan; Moodley, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Background Diarrheal disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among children under five. Although oral rehydration solution (ORS) has tremendous therapeutic benefits, coverage of and demand for this product have remained low in many developing countries. This study surveyed caregivers and health care providers in India and Kenya to gather information about perceptions and use of various diarrhea treatments, assess reasons for low ORS use, and identify opportunities for expanding ORS use. Methods The project team conducted two rounds of semi–structured, quantitative surveys with more than 2000 caregivers in India and Kenya in 2012. A complementary survey covered more than 500 pharmacy staff and health care workers in both countries. In Kenya, the team also surveyed rural pharmacies to gather pricing and sales data. Results Although caregivers generally had very positive perceptions of ORS, they typically ranked antibiotics ahead of ORS as the strongest medicine for diarrhea (in India 62% ranked antibiotics first and 23% ranked ORS first, n = 404; in Kenya results were 55% and 29%, n = 401). Many caregivers had misconceptions about the purpose and effectiveness of various treatments. For example, most caregivers who gave ORS at last episode expected it to stop their child’s diarrhea (65% in India, n = 190; 73% in Kenya, n = 154). There were noteworthy differences between India and Kenya in the selection and sourcing of treatments. Much of the money spent by families during the last episode of diarrhea was for inappropriate treatments. This was especially true in India, where rural households typically spent US$ 2.29 (median for the 79% of rural households that paid for health care services or treatments, n = 199) with most of this going to pay fees of private health workers and/or for antibiotics. Conclusions Caregivers’ primary treatment goal is to stop diarrhea, and many believe that antibiotics or ORS will accomplish this

  3. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Oral cancer can form in any part of the mouth. Most oral cancers begin in the flat cells that cover the ... your mouth, tongue, and lips. Anyone can get oral cancer, but the risk is higher if you are ...

  4. Oral myiasis.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Thalaimalai; Mohan, Mathan A; Thinakaran, Meera; Ahammed, Saneem

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy.

  5. Oral Myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Saravanan, Thalaimalai; Mohan, Mathan A; Thinakaran, Meera; Ahammed, Saneem

    2015-01-01

    Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy. PMID:25709196

  6. Vitamin D3 supplementation in healthy adults: a comparison between capsule and oral spray solution as a method of delivery in a wintertime, randomised, open-label, cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Todd, Joshua J; McSorley, Emeir M; Pourshahidi, L Kirsty; Madigan, Sharon M; Laird, Eamon; Healy, Martin; Magee, Pamela J

    2016-10-01

    Vitamin D is typically supplied in capsule form, both in trials and in clinical practice. However, little is known regarding the efficacy of vitamin D administered via oral sprays - a method that primarily bypasses the gastrointestinal absorption route. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of vitamin D3 liquid capsules and oral spray solution in increasing wintertime total 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations. In this randomised, open-label, cross-over trial, healthy adults (n 22) received 3000 IU (75 µg) vitamin D3 daily for 4 weeks in either capsule or oral spray form. Following a 10-week washout phase, participants received the opposite treatment for a final 4 weeks. Anthropometrics and fasted blood samples were obtained before and after supplementation, with samples analysed for total 25(OH)D, creatinine, intact parathyroid hormone and adjusted Ca concentrations. At baseline, vitamin D sufficiency (total 25(OH)D>50 nmol/l), insufficiency (31-49 nmol/l) and clinical deficiency (<30 nmol/l) were evident in 59, 23 and 18 % of the participants, respectively. Overall, baseline total mean 25(OH)D concentration averaged 59·76 (sd 29·88) nmol/l, representing clinical sufficiency. ANCOVA revealed no significant difference in the mean and standard deviation change from baseline in total 25(OH)D concentrations between oral spray and capsule supplementation methods (26·15 (sd 17·85) v. 30·38 (sd 17·91) nmol/l, respectively; F=1·044, adjusted r 2 0·493, P=0·313). Oral spray vitamin D3 is an equally effective alternative to capsule supplementation in healthy adults.

  7. A Phase 1, Open-Label, Randomized, Crossover Study Evaluating the Bioavailability of TAS-102 (Trifluridine/Tipiracil) Tablets Relative to an Oral Solution Containing Equivalent Amounts of Trifluridine and Tipiracil.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Carlos R; Yoshida, Kenichiro; Mizuguchi, Hirokazu; Patel, Manish; Von Hoff, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    TAS-102 (trifluridine/tipiracil) is composed of an antineoplastic thymidine-based nucleoside analogue trifluridine (FTD), and a thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor, tipiracil (TPI), at a molar ratio of 1:0.5 (weight ratio, 1:0.471). A phase 1 study evaluated relative bioavailability of TAS-102 tablets compared with an oral solution containing equivalent amounts of FTD and TPI. In an open-label, 2-sequence, 3-period, crossover bioavailability study (part 1), patients 18 years or older with advanced solid tumors were randomized to receive TAS-102 tablets (60 mg; 3 × 20-mg tablets) on day 1 and TAS-102 oral solution (60 mg) on days 8 and 15, or the opposite sequence. In an extension (part 2), all patients received TAS-102 tablets. Of the 46 patients treated in the crossover study, 38 were evaluable in the crossover bioavailability pharmacokinetic population. For area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)0-∞ and AUC0-last for FTD and TPI, and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax ) for TPI, the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) of the geometric mean ratios were within the 0.80 to 1.25 boundary for demonstration of bioequivalence; for FTD Cmax , the lower limit of the 90%CI was 0.786. The most frequently reported treatment-related grade 3 or 4 adverse events were neutropenia (7 patients) and decreased neutrophil count (3 patients). Although the lower limit of the 90%CI for the geometric mean ratio of FTD Cmax was slightly lower than 0.80, the bioavailability of the TAS-102 tablet is considered clinically similar to that of a TAS-102 oral solution. TAS-102 was well tolerated in this population of patients with advanced solid tumors. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  8. Study of modified electroconvulsive therapy combined with risperidone oral solution in the treatment of agitation in the acute stage of epilepsy and expression level changes of insulin-like growth factor-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiansheng; Li, Chengyan

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to explore the efficacy of modified electroconvulsive therapy (MECT) combined with risperidone oral solution in the treatment of agitation in the acute stage of epilepsy, and the effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 mRNA and protein expression. Forty-six cases with seizures and agitation in the acute stage were included from February 2012 to February 2014. This study was approved by the ethics committee in our hospital. Patients were divided randomly into the experimental (23 cases) and control (23 cases) groups. The patients in the experimental group were treated with MECT combined with risperidone oral solution. The patients in the control group were treated with risperidone oral solution. The Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS) score and Treatment-Emergent Symptom Scale (TESS) score were compared before and after treatment. The insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) protein and mRNA expression level were detected with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and qRT-PCR, respectively. There were no significant differences on positive and negative symptom scores or total score in the two groups before treatment (P>0.05). After treatment, the positive symptom score, negative symptom score, and total score all decreased in both groups, and the decrease was more obvious in the experimental group (P<0.05). After treatment, TESS scores of the experimental group were significantly lower than those of the control group (P<0.05). In the experimental group, the total efficiency was significantly higher than that in the control group (P<0.05). Before treatment, there were no significant differences in the expression levels of IGF-1 protein or mRNA in the two groups (P>0.05), while after treatment the expression levels of IGF-1 protein and mRNA decreased in both groups. However, the decrease was more obvious in the experimental group. The differences were all significant for scores (P<0.05). The combined application of MECT and

  9. Oral rehydration solution containing a mixture of non-digestible carbohydrates in the treatment of acute diarrhea: a multicenter randomized placebo controlled study on behalf of the ESPGHAN working group on intestinal infections.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, J H; Szajewska, H; Zikri, M Abu; Micetic-Turk, D; Weizman, Z; Papadopoulou, A; Guarino, A; Dias, J A; Oostvogels, B

    2004-09-01

    A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter study to evaluate efficacy and safety of a mixture of non-digestible carbohydrates (NDC) as an adjunct to oral rehydration therapy in treatment of acute infectious diarrhea in children with mild to moderate dehydration. 144 boys aged 1 to 36 months with diarrhea defined as three or more watery stools per day for >1 day but <5 days with mild or moderate dehydration (World Health Organization criteria) were randomly assigned to receive hypotonic oral rehydration solution (ORS) (Na 60 mmol/L, glucose 111 mmol/L) with or without a mixture of NDC (soy polysaccharide 25%, alpha-cellulose 9%, gum arabic 19%, fructooligosaccharides 18.5%, inulin 21.5%, resistant starch 7%). Intention-to-treat analysis did not show significant differences in mean 48 hour stool volume (ESPGHAN-ORS with NDC versus ESPGHAN-ORS, 140 +/- 124 g/kg versus 143 +/- 114 g/kg; P = 0.41). Duration of diarrhea after randomization was similar in both groups (82 +/- 39 hours versus 97 +/- 76 hours, P = 0.24). There were no significant differences in the duration of hospital stay (111 +/- 44 hours versus 126 +/- 78 hours; P = 0.3). Unscheduled intravenous rehydration was similar in both groups (21.4% versus 16.2%, P = 0.42). In boys with acute non-cholera diarrhea with mild to moderate dehydration a mixture of non-digestible carbohydrates was ineffective as an adjunct to oral rehydration therapy.

  10. [Oral ulcers].

    PubMed

    Bascones-Martínez, Antonio; Figuero-Ruiz, Elena; Esparza-Gómez, Germán Carlos

    2005-10-29

    Ulcers commonly occur in the oral cavity, their main symptom being pain. There are different ways to classify oral ulcers. The most widely accepted form divides them into acute ulcers--sudden onset and short lasting--and chronic ulcers--insidious onset and long lasting. Commonest acute oral ulcers include traumatic ulcer, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, viral and bacterial infections and necrotizing sialometaplasia. On the other hand, oral lichen planus, oral cancer, benign mucous membrane pemphigoid, pemphigus and drug-induced ulcers belong to the group of chronic oral ulcers. It is very important to make a proper differential diagnosis in order to establish the appropriate treatment for each pathology.

  11. Herpes - oral

    MedlinePlus

    Cold sore; Fever blister; Oral herpes simplex; Herpes labialis; Herpes simplex ... Oral herpes is a common infection of the mouth area. It is caused by ... genital herpes . However, sometimes HSV-2 is spread to the ...

  12. Oral candidosis.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, G T

    2001-04-01

    Oral candidoses are frequently encountered in the practice of dentistry. Although most oral candidoses are symptomless, the can indicate the presence of an underlying systemic disease, and the persistence of oral candidosis following appropriate conventional management may be one of the first signs of undiagnosed immunosuppression. The opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans is the most commonly isolated species from oral candidal lesions; however, the non-albicans Candida spp. are also implicated in the aetiology of oral candidoses. The effective management of oral candidosis is dependent on an accurate diagnosis, identification and elimination of any predisposing factors (where possible), and the prescription of either topical or systemic antifungal agents. Oral candidosis may have significant implications for the general health of immunosuppressed patients, particularly when caused by the non-albicans spp. and, in cases of severe immunosuppression, systemic candidosis can be life-threatening. This article outlines the clinical presentation and appropriate management for the commonly presenting oral candidal conditions.

  13. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  14. A win-win solution in oral delivery of lipophilic drugs: supersaturation via amorphous solid dispersions increases apparent solubility without sacrifice of intestinal membrane permeability.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jonathan M; Beig, Avital; Carr, Robert A; Spence, Julie K; Dahan, Arik

    2012-07-02

    Recently, we have revealed a trade-off between solubility increase and permeability decrease when solubility-enabling oral formulations are employed. We have shown this trade-off phenomenon to be ubiquitous, and to exist whenever the aqueous solubility is increased via solubilizing excipients, regardless if the mechanism involves decreased free fraction (cyclodextrins complexation, surfactant micellization) or simple cosolvent solubilization. Discovering a way to increase drug solubility without concomitant decreased permeability represents a major advancement in oral delivery of lipophilic drugs and is the goal of this work. For this purpose, we sought to elucidate the solubility-permeability interplay when increased apparent solubility is obtained via supersaturation from an amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) formulation. A spray-dried ASD of the lipophilic drug progesterone was prepared in the hydrophilic polymer hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMC-AS), which enabled supersaturation up to 4× the crystalline drug's aqueous solubility (8 μg/mL). The apparent permeability of progesterone from the ASD in HPMC-AS was then measured as a function of increasing apparent solubility (supersaturation) in the PAMPA and rat intestinal perfusion models. In contrast to previous cases in which apparent solubility increases via cyclodextrins, surfactants, and cosolvents resulted in decreased apparent permeability, supersaturation via ASD resulted in no decrease in apparent permeability with increasing apparent solubility. As a result, overall flux increased markedly with increasing apparent solubility via ASD as compared to the other formulation approaches. This work demonstrates that supersaturation via ASDs has a subtle yet powerful advantage over other solubility-enabling formulation approaches. That is, increased apparent solubility may be achieved without the expense of apparent intestinal membrane permeability. Thus, supersaturation via ASDs presents a

  15. EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY OF 2-HOURLY 20 MCG ORAL MISOPROSTOL SOLUTION COMPARED TO STANDARD INTRAVENOUS OXYTOCIN IN LABOUR INDUCTION DUE TO PRE-LABOUR RUPTURE OF MEMBRANES AT TERM: A RANDOMISED CLINICAL TRIAL AT KENYATTA NATIONAL HOSPITAL.

    PubMed

    Mbaluka, C M; Kamau, K; Karanja, J G; Mugo, N

    2014-09-01

    Pre-labour rupture of membranes (PROM) at term is a common event whose management varies from centre to centre. The practice at the Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) for patients with PROM at term is to initiate delivery of the patient soon on admission with intravenous oxytocin, if there are no contraindications to vaginal delivery. However, in PROM at term, if the cervix is not ripe, vaginal administration of prostaglandin pessaries for cervical ripening is not possible when there is active draining of liquor, thus use of intravenous oxytocin may take a very long time or fail all together. Oral misoprostol at low doses has been found to be a safe and effective agent for labour induction in numerous studies carried out in the developed world, where there are better resources for monitoring of labour. None of the studies has been carried out in Kenya, a limited resource country. Therefore, there is a need to determine the effectiveness and safety of oral misoprostol solution at the KNH, a limited resource set up. To determine the effectiveness and safety of 2-hourly 20 mcg oral misoprostol solution compared to the standard intravenous oxytocin in labour induction in mothers with pre-labour rupture of membranes at term at the Kenyatta National Hospital. An unblinded randomised clinical trial. Kenyatta National Hospital Labour Ward Unit. Eighty three pregnant women with pre-labour rupture of membranes at term without an indication for Caeserian section were consented and randomised for labour induction with either oral misoprostol at a dose of 20mcg 2-hourly up to a maximum of 4-doses, or with intravenous oxytocin according to the WHO protocol. Induction to delivery interval; maternal complications and early neonatal outcomes. The overall induction success rates in the misoprostol arm was 81% versus 83% in the oxytocin arm (P = 0.447). The mean induction to vaginal delivery interval in the misoprostol arm was 8.4 hours as compared to 9.45 hours in the oxytocin arm (P

  16. Use of Only Oral Rehydration Salt Solution for Successful Management of a Young Infant with Serum Sodium of 201 mmol/L in an Urban Diarrhoeal Diseases Hospital, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Pietroni, Mark A.C.; Alom, Mohammad Samsul; Smith, Jonathan Harvey

    2012-01-01

    A boy aged 4 months 7 days was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the Dhaka Hospital of icddr,b, Dhaka, Bangladesh, with the problems of acute watery diarrhoea with some dehydration, pneumonia, lethargy, and hypernatraemia (serum sodium of 201 mmol/L). Correction for hypernatraemia was tried by using only oral rehydration salt (ORS) solution. Seizures occurred during correction of the hypernatraemia. These were difficult to control and required three doses of injection lorazepam, a loading dose of injection phenobarbitone, followed by injection phenytoin and finally two doses of injection mannitol (even though there was no clinical or imaging evidence by ultrasonography or computed tomography of cerebral oedema). The correction was continued with ORS, and all the anticonvulsants were successfully weaned without any further seizures, and the patient recovered without any overt neurological sequelae. We present a case report of extreme hypernatraemia, which was successfully managed using only ORS. PMID:23082639

  17. Thermal inkjet application in the preparation of oral dosage forms: dispensing of prednisolone solutions and polymorphic characterization by solid-state spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Meléndez, Peter A; Kane, Kevin M; Ashvar, Claudine S; Albrecht, Mary; Smith, Pamela A

    2008-07-01

    The utility of thermal inkjet (TIJ) technology for preparing solid dosage forms of drugs was examined. Solutions of prednisolone in a solvent mixture of ethanol, water, and glycerol (80/17/3 by volume) were dispensed onto poly(tetrafluoroethylene)-coated fiberglass films using TIJ cartridges and a personal printer and using a micropipette for comparison. The post-dried, TIJ-dispensed samples were shown to contain a mixture of prednisolone Forms I and III based on PXRD analyses that were confirmed by Raman analyses. The starting commercial material was determined to be Form I. Samples prepared by dispensing the solution from a micropipette initially showed only Form I; subsequent Raman mapping of these samples revealed the presence of two polymorphs. Raman mapping of the TIJ-dispensed samples also showed both polymorphs. The results indicate that the solvent mixture used in the dispensing solution combined with the thermal treatment of the samples after dispensing were likely the primary reason for the generation of the two polymorphs. The advantages of using a multidisciplinary approach to characterize drug delivery systems are demonstrated using solid state mapping techniques. Both PXRD and Raman spectroscopy were needed to fully characterize the samples. Finally, this report clarifies prednisolone's polymorphic nomenclature existent in the scientific literature.

  18. Use of rice-based oral rehydration solution in a large diarrhoea treatment centre in Bangladesh: in-house production, use and relative cost.

    PubMed

    Islam, M A; Mahalanabis, D; Majid, N

    1994-12-01

    Glucose-based oral rehydration salt (ORS) is an appropriate and cost-effective tool to treat diarrhoeal dehydration. In patients with a high purging rate, particularly due to cholera, rice-based ORS has been shown to substantially reduce stool output compared to glucose ORS. However, it is not used in the hospitals or diarrhoea treatment centres largely because of the non-availability of a ready-to-use inexpensive packaged product and because of the problem of cooking. In a large diarrhoea treatment centre in Bangladesh (with an annual ORS consumption of approximately 140,000 litres), we have maintained in-house production of rice ORS and used it routinely for more than 600,000 patients over the last nine years. Semi-literate health workers cook rice ORS and supervise mothers in its use. Rice ORS is less costly (US $0.15 per patient treated compared with US $0.37 for glucose ORS) and is well accepted. It is an attractive alternative to glucose ORS in many fixed facility treatment centres in countries where rice is a staple and cholera is endemic. The process of its in-house preparation and use is described in this report which may assist hospitals wishing to use rice ORS in treating diarrhoea patients. Availability of a low cost ready-to-use rice ORS packet (which needs no cooking) with adequate shelf-life will increase its use at fixed facilities.

  19. Oral Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Charruf, Laurie Frey

    1984-01-01

    Oral tests for speaking skills evaluate two major skills: linguistic competence, including accuracy of pronunciation, vocabulary, and structure, and communication ease. Four factors affect students' oral performance: verbal intelligence, short-term auditory and visual memory, sound-symbol association skill, and grammatical analysis. Personality…

  20. Oral cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Chunduri, Nagendra S; Goteki, Venkateswarulu; Gelli, Vamsi; Madasu, Krishnaveni

    2013-03-01

    Cysticercosis is a common disease in developing countries, but oral lesions caused by this parasitic infestation are rare. We report here a rare case of oral cysticercosis in a 17 year old male who sought treatment for an asymptomatic nodule of the lower lip that had previously been diagnosed as a mucocele.

  1. Oral Thrush

    MedlinePlus

    ... more susceptible to oral thrush infection: HIV/AIDS. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) — the virus that causes AIDS — damages or destroys cells of your immune system, making you more susceptible to opportunistic infections that your body would normally resist. Repeated bouts of oral thrush, ...

  2. pH-Responsive poly(itaconic acid-co-N-vinylpyrrolidone) hydrogels with reduced ionic strength loading solutions offer improved oral delivery potential for high isoelectric point-exhibiting therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koetting, Michael C.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    pH-Responsive hydrogels comprised of itaconic acid copolymerized with N-vinylpyrrolidone (P(IA-co-NVP)) were synthesized and tested as carriers for the oral delivery of high isoelectric point (pI) exhibiting therapeutic proteins. Swelling studies show that P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogels exhibit significantly greater and faster pH-responsive swelling than previously studied methacrylic acid-based hydrogels, achieving up to 68% greater equilibrium swelling and 10.4 times greater swelling in time-limited experiments. Using salmon calcitonin as a model high pI protein therapeutic, we show that P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogels exhibit significantly greater delivery potential than methacrylic acid-based hydrogels. Additionally, we show that utilizing a lower ionic strength solution during drug loading significantly improves drug delivery potential for high pI therapeutics. By using a 1.5 mM PBS buffer rather than the standard 150 mM PBS buffer during loading, up to 83 times as much calcitonin can be delivered in neutral conditions, with up to a 9.6 fold improvement in percent release. Using P(IA-co-NVP) hydrogel microparticles and a low ionic strength loading solution, up to 48 μg calcitonin/mg hydrogel can be delivered in small intestinal conditions. Based on expected absorption in the small intestine, this is sufficient delivery potential for achieving therapeutic dosage via a single, regularly-sized pill taken daily. PMID:24853463

  3. Does an L-glutamine-containing, Glucose-free, Oral Rehydration Solution Reduce Stool Output and Time to Rehydrate in Children with Acute Diarrhoea? A Double-blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Claudia; Villa, Sofía; Mota, Felipe R.; Calva, Juan J.

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed whether an oral rehydration solution (ORS) in which glucose is replaced by L-glutamine (L-glutamine ORS) is more effective than the standard glucose-based rehydration solution recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO-ORS) in reducing the stool volume and time to rehydrate in acute diarrhoea. In a double-blind, randomized controlled trial in a Mexican hospital, 147 dehydrated children, aged 1–60 month(s), were assigned either to the WHO-ORS (74 children), or to the L-glutamine ORS (73 children) and followed until successful rehydration. There were no significant differences between the groups in stool output during the first four hours, time to successful rehydration, volume of ORS required for rehydration, urinary output, and vomiting. This was independent of rotavirus-associated infection. An L-glutamine-containing glucose-free ORS seems not to offer greater clinical benefit than the standard WHO-ORS in mildly-to-moderately-dehydrated children with acute non-cholera diarrhoea. PMID:18330060

  4. Does an L-glutamine-containing, glucose-free, oral rehydration solution reduce stool output and time to rehydrate in children with acute diarrhoea? A double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Claudia; Villa, Sofía; Mota, Felipe R; Calva, Juan J

    2007-09-01

    This study assessed whether an oral rehydration solution (ORS) in which glucose is replaced by L-glutamine (L-glutamine ORS) is more effective than the standard glucose-based rehydration solution recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO-ORS) in reducing the stool volume and time to rehydrate in acute diarrhoea. In a double-blind, randomized controlled trial in a Mexican hospital, 147 dehydrated children, aged 1-60 month(s), were assigned either to the WHO-ORS (74 children), or to the L-glutamine ORS (73 children) and followed until successful rehydration. There were no significant differences between the groups in stool output during the first four hours, time to successful rehydration, volume of ORS required for rehydration, urinary output, and vomiting. This was independent of rotavirus-associated infection. An L-glutamine-containing glucose-free ORS seems not to offer greater clinical benefit than the standard WHO-ORS in mildly-to-moderately-dehydrated children with acute non-cholera diarrhoea.

  5. Stability of refrigerated miglustat after preparation in InOrpha(®) flavored suspending excipient for compounding of oral solutions and suspensions.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Sofyen; Ambühl, Michael; Stichler, Jürgen; Bandilla, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Miglustat (Zavesca(®)) is an oral treatment for type 1 Gaucher disease and Niemann-Pick disease type C. Patients with Niemann-Pick disease type C often have difficulties swallowing, and miglustat has an unpleasant taste. The stability of miglustat at 2°C-8°C prepared in InOrpha(®) suspending vehicle, a liquid taste-masking agent, was assessed. The contents of Zavesca(®) 100 mg capsules (a powder blend comprising miglustat and several excipients) were transferred into InOrpha(®). Although miglustat was soluble in InOrpha(®) at all concentrations tested, some of the excipients were not. An InOrpha(®) suspension containing 20 mg/mL miglustat was investigated initially. Subsequently, a pH-adjusted suspension of 20 mg/mL, and non-adjusted 10 and 5 mg/mL suspensions were evaluated. All suspensions were stored under refrigerated conditions. Physicochemical and microbiological challenge testing was performed at 0 hours and after 14 and 28 days. Degradation was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography, appearance was assessed visually, and pH was recorded. Suspensions were inoculated with seven species of bacteria, yeast, and mold, and growth evaluated using membrane filtration. Miglustat 20 mg/mL suspension changed from yellow (0 hours) to brown (days 14 and 28); pH remained stable at 7.4-7.6. Pure InOrpha(®) (pH 4.6) remained yellow throughout the study. Pure InOrpha(®) adjusted to pH 7.5 displayed a brownish discoloration after 9 days. Miglustat 5 and 20 mg/mL suspensions, adjusted to pH 6.5 and 4.4, respectively, remained yellow at days 14 and 28. Miglustat 10 mg/mL suspension (pH 7.3) changed from yellow to brown on day 9. No degradates were detected for any of the concentrations tested. There was no proliferation of microorganisms over the study period; in all cases the level of contamination was clearly reduced. InOrpha(®) suspensions containing miglustat 5 mg/mL (without pH adjustment) and 20 mg/mL (with pH adjusted to 4.4) display stable

  6. Oral Histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Folk, Gillian A; Nelson, Brenda L

    2017-02-20

    A 44-year-old female presented to her general dentist with the chief complaint of a painful mouth sore of 2 weeks duration. Clinical examination revealed an irregularly shaped ulcer of the buccal and lingual attached gingiva of the anterior mandible. A biopsy was performed and microscopic evaluation revealed histoplasmosis. Histoplasmosis, caused by Histoplasma capsulate, is the most common fungal infection in the United States. Oral lesions of histoplasmosis are generally associated with the disseminated form of histoplasmosis and may present as a fungating or ulcerative lesion of the oral mucosa. The histologic findings and differential diagnosis for oral histoplasmosis are discussed.

  7. There are considerable drawbacks to oral anticoagulant for monitoring patients at home which should lead family physicians to discuss alternative or enhanced solutions: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background INR (International Normalized Ratio) is the biological reference test for the monitoring of vitamin K antagonist (VKA) therapy. Overdosage of VKAs causes about 17,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths each year in France. To avoid these complications, monitoring and blood sampling conditions must be rigorous. In France, more than half of INRs are carried out at home. The aim was to determine blood-sampling conditions at home, transit time and the quality of the laboratory reagents used. Method Questionnaire-based, descriptive epidemiological cross-sectional prevalence study involving home care nurses, family physicians (FPs) and clinical laboratories. Setting: Brittany, France, 2008. Study of the pre-analytical phase of INRs sampled at home and its influence on INR results. Results The study included 291 FPs, 249 home care nurses, and 49 laboratories. 32.5% of reported INRs were outside the therapeutic range. Samples were drawn into unsuitable tubes in 5.5% of cases and delivered in a chilled condition in 9% of cases. In urban areas 50% of the tubes took more than 2 hours to reach the laboratory compared with 71% from rural areas. The average International Sensitivity Index (ISI) of the thromboplastin was 1.62. The INRs provided by the laboratories were not analyzable in 64.7% of cases where blood samples had been taken at home. Conclusion Blood sample quality, transit time and the reagents used are currently inadequate. The majority of INRs taken at home are not reliable. FPs should consider these drawbacks in comparison with alternative solutions to increase patient safety. PMID:24024556

  8. Prophylactic Effects of Garlic Oil and Onion Oil Fractions as Compared to Vitamin E on Rats Orally Fed with Lead Acetate Solution.

    PubMed

    Sajitha, G R; Augusti, K T; Jose, Regi

    2016-07-01

    Heavy metal pollution is a global public health challenge due to its stable and persistent environmental contamination. Of these lead is considered to be one of the most common ubiquitous and industrial pollutants and at low concentration it exerts extensive damages to the tissues. Daily feeding of lead acetate solution (Dose: 10 mg/kg/day) to normal rats for a month adversely altered the parameters of blood, serum and tissues, viz; RBC, WBC, Hb, ɗ- ALAD (Delta amino levulinic acid dehydratase), Pb content, lipids, oxidized lipids (TBARS), vitamins C and E and GSH levels and activities of AST, ALT and antioxidant enzymes viz; catalase, GR, Gpx and SOD. In order to study whether antioxidants have any effect to counteract the toxicity of lead we have selected comparatively better active allium fractions for the study viz: polar fraction of garlic (PFG) and polar fraction of onion (PFO). On feeding of these active fractions of garlic and onion oils i.e. their polar fractions and vitamin E (Dose 100 mg/kg/day) separately for a month along with or without lead acetate to rats each nutraceutical and vitamin E counteracted the adverse effects of Pb significantly (p ≤ 0.05). Their effects are in the order of PFG > PFO > Vitamin E. All these results point out that garlic and onion oils contain natural disulfoxide compounds which act as antioxidant and anti toxic to lead compounds. Their comparative differences in action may be due to the presence and position of double bonds and disulfide oxide bonds in their molecules. i.e., in PFG the allyl disulfide oxide group is present and in PFO saturated methyl and propyl groups and unsaturated propenyl group are present in place of allyl groups. The former group confers a better antioxidant activity on PFG, while the latter groups confer a lesser activity on PFO.

  9. Oral mucositis

    MedlinePlus

    ... help keep your mouth moist. Stop wearing your dentures if they cause you to get sores on ... 2016. www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/side-effects/mouth-throat/oral-complications-hp-pdq . Accessed March ...

  10. Oral pathology.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2008-05-01

    Oral disease is exceedingly common in small animal patients. In addition, there is a very wide variety of pathologies that are encountered within the oral cavity. These conditions often cause significant pain and/or localized and systemic infection; however, the majority of these conditions have little to no obvious clinical signs. Therefore, diagnosis is not typically made until late in the disease course. Knowledge of these diseases will better equip the practitioner to effectively treat them. This article covers the more common forms of oral pathology in the dog and cat, excluding periodontal disease, which is covered in its own chapter. The various pathologies are presented in graphic form, and the etiology, clinical signs, recommended diagnostic tests, and treatment options are discussed. Pathologies that are covered include: persistent deciduous teeth, fractured teeth, intrinsically stained teeth, feline tooth resorption, caries, oral neoplasia, eosinophilic granuloma complex, lymphoplasmacytic gingivostomatitis, enamel hypoplasia, and "missing" teeth.

  11. Relative bioavailability of a newly developed 5-mg levomethadone hydrochloride IR tablet (L-Polamidon® 5 mg tablets) in comparison with the 5-mg levomethadone hydrochloride oral solution (L-Polamidon® solution for substitution) as reference product.

    PubMed

    Blume, Henning H; Wedemeyer, Ralf-Steven; Donath, Frank; Roscher, Katrin; Elvert, Gerd; Wagner, Daniel; Bley, Oliver; Vuia, Alexander; Todorova-Sanjari, Marina; Villalobos, Ramon; Schug, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    To establish the relative bioavailability (rBA) between two p.o. 5-mg levomethadone hydrochloride formulations, i.e., L-Polamidon® 5 mg tablets (test) vs. L-Polamidon® solution for substitution (reference). To assess the safety and tolerability of both formulations. A total of 33 healthy male subjects, aged 29 ± 6 years (BMI: 23.9 ± 2.5 kg/m2) completed this single center, open-label, randomized, 2-period cross-over study with single dose administrations under fasting conditions and coadministration with naltrexone for safety reasons. Administrations of both investigational products were separated by a washout period of at least 2 weeks, i.e., 13 treatmentfree days. The total dose for each subject was 2 x 5 mg resulting in 10 mg levomethadone hydrochloride. For pharmacokinetic evaluation, blood samples were withdrawn until 72 hours postdose. A validated non-stereoselective liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy method (LC-MS/MS) was applied for the determination of levomethadone in plasma. The lower limit of quantitation was 0.100 ng/mL. Adverse events were descriptively analyzed in the study population. The geometric means of the parameters related with the extent of total exposure of levomethadone, i.e., AUC(0-tlast) and AUC(0-∞), were 244.422 ng x h/mL and 332.999 ng x h/mL for test and 246.837 ng x h/mL and 329.467 ng×h/mL for reference, respectively. The geometric means of the peak exposure for levomethadone, i.e., Cmax, were 8.923 ng/mL for test and 8.635 ng/mL for reference. The point estimates (PEs) of the Test/Reference (T/R) adjusted geometric mean ratios of AUC(0-last), AUC(0-∞), and C(max) were 99.20%, 101.42%, and 104.11%, respectively, and all of them showed 90%-confidence intervals (CIs) within the range of 80.00 - 125.00% as suggested by regulatory requirements for bioequivalence assessment In total, 21 subjects experienced 55 AEs during the study, the most frequently reported AE, i.e., headache, accounted for 13 out of the total

  12. Oral biopsy: oral pathologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Kumaraswamy, K L; Vidhya, M; Rao, Prasanna Kumar; Mukunda, Archana

    2012-01-01

    Many oral lesions may need to be diagnosed by removing a sample of tissue from the oral cavity. Biopsy is widely used in the medical field, but the practice is not quite widespread in dental practice. As oral pathologists, we have found many artifacts in the tissue specimen because of poor biopsy technique or handling, which has led to diagnostic pitfalls and misery to both the patient and the clinician. This article aims at alerting the clinicians about the clinical faults arising preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively while dealing with oral biopsy that may affect the histological assessment of the tissue and, therefore, the diagnosis. It also reviews the different techniques, precautions and special considerations necessary for specific lesions.

  13. The relationship between the success rate of empirical antifungal therapy with intravenous itraconazole and clinical parameters, including plasma levels of itraconazole, in immunocompromised patients receiving itraconazole oral solution as prophylaxis: a multicenter, prospective, open-label, observational study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Seok; Cheong, June-Won; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Park, Jinny; Mun, Yeung-Chul; Kang, Hye Jin; Yi, Hyeon Gyu; Lee, Je-Hwan; Kim, Yang Soo; Ryoo, Hun-Mo; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Ho Young; Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Dong-Gun; Kim, Hoon-Gu; Kim, Hawk; Joo, Young-Don; Min, Yoo Hong

    2014-01-01

    To identify the role of therapeutic drug monitoring of itraconazole (ITZ) in the setting of empirical antifungal therapy with intravenous (IV) ITZ, we performed a multicenter, prospective study in patients with hematological malignancies who had received antifungal prophylaxis with ITZ oral solution (OS). We evaluated the plasma levels of ITZ and hydroxy (OH) ITZ both before initiation of IV ITZ and on days 5-7 of IV ITZ. A total of 181 patients showed an overall success rate of 68.0 %. Prolonged baseline neutropenia and accompanying cardiovascular comorbidity were significantly associated with poor outcomes of the empirical antifungal therapy (P = 0.005 and P = 0.001, respectively). A significantly higher trough plasma level of OH ITZ per body weight was found in the patients who achieved success with empirical antifungal therapy (P = 0.036). There were no significant correlations between plasma concentrations of ITZ/OH ITZ (baseline or trough levels) and toxicities. Seven patients had a discontinuation of ITZ therapy due to toxicity. This study demonstrated that IV ITZ as empirical antifungal therapy was effective and therapeutic drug monitoring was helpful to estimate the outcome of empirical antifungal therapy in patients receiving antifungal prophylaxis with ITZ OS. To predict the outcome of empirical antifungal therapy with IV ITZ, we should evaluate baseline clinical characteristics and also perform the therapeutic drug monitoring of both ITZ and OH ITZ.

  14. Tolerability of up to 200 days of prophylaxis with valganciclovir oral solution and/or film-coated tablets in pediatric kidney transplant recipients at risk of cytomegalovirus disease.

    PubMed

    Varela-Fascinetto, G; Benchimol, C; Reyes-Acevedo, R; Genevray, M; Bradley, D; Ives, J; Silva, H T

    2017-02-01

    This multicenter, open-label study evaluated the tolerability of extended prophylaxis with valganciclovir in pediatric kidney transplant recipients at risk of CMV disease. Fifty-six patients aged 4 months to 16 years received once-daily valganciclovir oral solution and/or tablets, dosed by BSA and renal function, for up to 200 days. The most common AEs on treatment were upper respiratory tract infection (33.9%), urinary tract infection (33.9%), diarrhea (32.1%), leukopenia (25.0%), neutropenia (23.2%), and headache (21.4%). There were fewer AEs during days 101-228 vs days 1-100. Twenty-seven patients (48.2%) had treatment-related AEs during valganciclovir treatment, most commonly leukopenia (21.4%), neutropenia (19.6%), anemia (7.1%), and tremor (5.4%). Treatment-related serious AEs were reported for nine patients (16.1%) and six withdrew due to AEs. Viremia was centrally confirmed in 10 patients; there was no confirmed CMV disease. One patient tested positive for a resistance mutation (UL97 L595F). Biopsy-proven acute rejection occurred in six patients (10.7%), but no graft loss or deaths occurred. In conclusion, up to 200 days of valganciclovir prophylaxis in pediatric kidney allograft recipients showed a safety profile consistent with that established in adult transplant patients.

  15. Normal Oral Flora and the Oral Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Samaranayake, Lakshman; Matsubara, Victor H

    2017-04-01

    The oral ecosystem comprises the oral flora, so-called oral microbiome, the different anatomic microniches of the oral cavity, and its bathing fluid, saliva. The oral microbiome comprises a group of organisms and includes bacteria, archaea, fungi, protozoa, and viruses. The oral microbiome exists suspended in saliva as planktonic phase organisms or attached to oral surfaces as a plaque biofilm. Homeostasis of the plaque biofilm and its symbiotic relationship with the host is critical for oral health. Disequilibrium or dysbiosis within the plaque biofilms is the initiating event that leads to major oral diseases, such as caries and periodontal disease.

  16. Oral myiasis.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Treville; Tamgadge, Avinash P; Chande, Mayura S; Bhalerao, Sudhir; Tamgadge, Sandhya

    2010-10-01

    Myiasis is a relatively rare condition arising from the invasion of body tissues or cavities of living animals or humans by maggots or larvae of certain species of flies. It is an uncommon clinical condition, being more frequent in underdeveloped countries and hot climate regions, and is associated with poor hygiene, suppurative oral lesions; alcoholism and senility. Its diagnosis is made basically by the presence of larvae. The present article reports a case of oral myiasis involving 20 larvae in a patient with neurological deficiency.

  17. Oral myiasis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Treville; Tamgadge, Avinash P.; Chande, Mayura S.; Bhalerao, Sudhir; Tamgadge, Sandhya

    2010-01-01

    Myiasis is a relatively rare condition arising from the invasion of body tissues or cavities of living animals or humans by maggots or larvae of certain species of flies. It is an uncommon clinical condition, being more frequent in underdeveloped countries and hot climate regions, and is associated with poor hygiene, suppurative oral lesions; alcoholism and senility. Its diagnosis is made basically by the presence of larvae. The present article reports a case of oral myiasis involving 20 larvae in a patient with neurological deficiency. PMID:22114438

  18. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Institute, components of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. For more copies contact: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Oral Health Information Clearinghouse 1 NOHIC Way Bethesda, MD 20892-3500 1–866–232–4528 www. nidcr. ...

  19. Oral Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Lecavalier, D.R.; Main, J.H.P.

    1988-01-01

    The authors of this article review briefly the anatomy of the oral soft tissues and describe the more common benign and malignant tumours of the mouth, giving emphasis to their clinical features. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:21253197

  20. Oral medications.

    PubMed

    Albretsen, Jay C

    2002-03-01

    Many medications are available today by prescription or in over-the-counter preparations. This article reviews the pharmacokinetics, mechanism of action, toxicity, clinical signs, and management procedures necessary for some oral medications. The medications reviewed include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, benzodiazepines, amphetamines or amphetamine like drugs, carprofen, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, pseudoephedrine, calcium channel blockers, and baclofen.

  1. Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection in Children.

    PubMed

    Ilea, Aranka; Boşca, Bianca; Miclăuş, Viorel; Rus, Vasile; Băbţan, Anida Maria; Mesaros, Anca; Crişan, Bogdan; Câmpian, Radu Septimiu

    2016-02-01

    Oral human papillomavirus infection is rare in children, but the presence of a villous lesion with slow but continuous growth concerns parents, who need information and therapeutic solutions from the physician. All these aspects are discussed based on a case report of a 9-year-old child with an oral human papillomavirus infection.

  2. Oral candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Akpan, A; Morgan, R

    2002-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is a common opportunistic infection of the oral cavity caused by an overgrowth of Candida species, the commonest being Candida albicans. The incidence varies depending on age and certain predisposing factors. There are three broad groupings consisting of acute candidiasis, chronic candidiasis, and angular cheilitis. Risk factors include impaired salivary gland function, drugs, dentures, high carbohydrate diet, and extremes of life, smoking, diabetes mellitus, Cushing's syndrome, malignancies, and immunosuppressive conditions. Management involves taking a history, an examination, and appropriate antifungal treatment with a few requiring samples to be taken for laboratory analysis. In certain high risk groups antifungal prophylaxis reduces the incidence and severity of infections. The prognosis is good in the great majority of cases. PMID:12185216

  3. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Oesterheld, Jessica R; Cozza, Kelly; Sandson, Neil B

    2008-01-01

    Nearly 50 years ago, the introduction of Enovid (norethynodrel 10 microg and mestranol 150 microg), which provided convenient and reliable contraception, revolutionized birth control. Reports of interactions between oral contraceptives (OCs) and other drugs began to trickle into the literature. At first, these drug interactions appeared to be random and unrelated. Increased understanding of P450 enzymes and phase II reactions of sulfation and glucuronidation has permitted preliminary categorization and assessment of the clinical relevance of these drug interactions.

  4. Disinfectants to Fight Oral Candida Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M Elisa; Henriques, Mariana; Silva, Sónia

    Oral biofilms, especially those caused by oral mycobiota, which include Candida species, are very difficult to eradicate, due to their complex structure and recalcitrance. Moreover, the mouth is prone to be colonized since it presents different types of surfaces, especially biomaterials and dental implants, often associated with a high rate of infections. Therefore, although disinfection of the oral cavity is of major importance, the number of commercially available disinfectants is not high. However, new solutions, as silver nanoparticles are being developed to help oral biofilms' eradication.

  5. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Maclennan, A H

    1987-12-01

    Over 60 million women use highly efficient and safe modern combined oral contraceptives (OCs) every day. A women who takes the oral contraceptive for 5 years before the age of 30 will actually live 12 days longer, although a woman taking the pill for the 1st time for 5 years after the age of 30 will have her life span reduced on the average by 80 days. OC related morbidity and mortality mostly occur in women over 35 who smoke. Combined low dose OCs are safe for women who do not smoke, at least to 45 years of age and probably to the menopause. The prescription of OCs is also safe to the young adolescent. The pill does not interfere with maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary ovarian axis and does not increase the incidence of amenorrhoea, oligomenorrhoea or infertility in later life. Patients with contraindications to estrogen therapy are excluded from OC use (history of thromboembolism, major heart disease, liver disease, breast cancer). Low-dose (30-35 mcg estrogen-containing monophasic or triphasic) pills are recommended. Combined oral contraceptives contain either ethinyl estradiol (1.7 to 2 times more potent) or mestranol. After absorption the progestagens, norethisterone acetate, ethynodiol diacetate and lynoestrenol are all metabolized to norethisterone. The progestagen-only pill has about a 2% failure rate and poorer cycle control than the combined pill, but it lacks estrogenic, progestagenic and androgenic side effects. This pill is suitable for the lactating mother, for smokers over 35, for hypertensive patients, and for those with a history of thrombosis. The efficacy of the progestagen-only pill is restored in 3 days of pill taking. Postcoital contraception is an alternative: treatment can be given for at least 72 hours after intercourse. The Yuzpe method calls for the patient to take 2 combined oral contraceptive tablets containing levonorgestrel and ethinyl estradiol (Eugynon or Ovral) followed by a further 2 tablets 12 hours later. This regimen

  6. Oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, A J; Leversee, J H

    1990-09-01

    Management of oral contraception requires an understanding of the relationships between the method's effectiveness, noncontraceptive benefits, and hormonal adverse effects. The new multiphasic combinations or OCs containing 35 micrograms of ethinyl estradiol and 0.5-1.0 mg of norethindrone or equivalent result in a maximum combination of efficacy and safety for the patient with minimal annoying problems for the patient and the prescriber. Patient education regarding early warning symptoms of adverse effects, breakthrough bleeding, and lack of withdrawal bleeding adds an additional margin of safety and reduces patient questions and uncertainties.

  7. Vitamin D3 supplementation using an oral spray solution resolves deficiency but has no effect on VO2 max in Gaelic footballers: results from a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Todd, Joshua J; McSorley, Emeir M; Pourshahidi, L Kirsty; Madigan, Sharon M; Laird, Eamon; Healy, Martin; Magee, Pamela J

    2017-06-01

    Vitamin D inadequacy is a global health concern in athletes as well as the general population. Whilst the role of vitamin D in skeletal health is well defined, there remains uncertainty over whether vitamin D supplementation has an added benefit beyond bone health. This randomised placebo-controlled trial in healthy male and female Gaelic footballers (n = 42) investigated the effect of vitamin D3 supplementation [3000 IU (75 µg) daily for 12 weeks, via an oral spray solution] on VO2 max which was the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcomes included skeletal muscle and lung function. Supplementation significantly increased total 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations compared to the placebo group (mean ± SD change from baseline, 36.31 ± 32.34 vs. 6.11 ± 23.93 nmol/L, respectively; P = 0.006). At baseline, 50 and 22 % of footballers presented with vitamin D insufficiency (31-49 nmol/L) and deficiency (<30 nmol/L), respectively. Total 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration did not significantly correlate with any measure of physical performance. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) models demonstrated that vitamin D supplementation over 12 weeks had no significant effect on VO2 max (P = 0.375), vertical jump height (P = 0.797), left and right handgrip strength (P = 0.146 and P = 0.266, respectively), forced vital capacity (P = 0.573) or forced expiratory volume at 1 s (P = 0.665), after adjusting for confounders. The high prevalence of vitamin D inadequacy observed in this cohort of collegiate Gaelic footballers supports the need for vitamin D supplementation during wintertime to avoid being at risk of poor bone health. Twelve-week daily supplementation with 3000 IU (75 µg) vitamin D3 successfully resolved deficiency but did not have any significant effect on VO2 max, skeletal muscle or lung function.

  8. Diffusion of Macromolecules in Model Oral Biofilms▿

    PubMed Central

    Takenaka, Shoji; Pitts, Betsey; Trivedi, Harsh M.; Stewart, Philip S.

    2009-01-01

    The diffusive penetration of fluorescently tagged macromolecular solutes into model oral biofilms was visualized by time-lapse microscopy. All of the solutes tested, including dextrans, proteases, green fluorescent protein, and immunoglobulin G, accessed the interior of cell clusters 100 to 200 μm in diameter within 3 min or less. PMID:19168660

  9. Oral Lichen Planus

    MedlinePlus

    Oral lichen planus Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Oral lichen planus (LIE-kun PLAY-nus) is an ongoing (chronic) ... that affects mucous membranes inside your mouth. Oral lichen planus may appear as white, lacy patches; red, ...

  10. A comparison of Listerine® and sodium bicarbonate oral cleansing solutions on dental plaque colonisation and incidence of ventilator associated pneumonia in mechanically ventilated patients: a randomised control trial.

    PubMed

    Berry, A M

    2013-10-01

    Effective oral hygiene has been proposed as a key factor in the reduction of dental plaque colonisation and subsequent development of ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP). Listerine(®) oral rinse, while used extensively in dental practice has rarely been tested in mechanically ventilated patients. Sodium bicarbonate as an oral rinse has been more commonly utilised in oral hygiene regimens in intensive care patients. To test the efficacies of the essential oil mouth rinse, Listerine(®) (Pfizer) and sodium bicarbonate in the reduction of dental plaque colonisation with respiratory pathogens and the subsequent development of VAP. The study design was a prospective, single blind randomised comparative study of adult patients mechanically ventilated for at least 4 days. Patients were randomised to Listerine(®) (Pfizer) oral rinse twice daily, sodium bicarbonate oral rinse 2/24 or sterile water 2/24 (control group). All groups received tooth brushing 3 times a day. Dental plaque colonisation (primary outcome) and incidence of ventilator associated pneumonia (secondary outcome) were studied. Three hundred and ninety-eight patients were randomised to either the Listerine group (127), sodium bicarbonate group (133) or the control group (138). Baseline characteristics were similar for all groups. There were no significant differences between the control and study groups in colonisation of dental plaque at Day 4 (p=0.243). Ventilator associated pneumonia was diagnosed in 18 patients. The incidence was, Listerine(®) group 4.7%, sodium bicarbonate group 4.5% and control 4.3% [OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.31 to 3.16; p=0.92]. Compared to the control group, Listerine(®) or sodium bicarbonate oral rinses were not more effective in the reduction of colonisation of dental plaque or the incidence of VAP. Given the low incidence of VAP, the common factor of a small, soft toothbrush as part of an oral hygiene regimen suggests possible benefit in mechanically ventilated patients. Crown

  11. 21 CFR 520.1454 - Moxidectin solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Moxidectin solution. 520.1454 Section 520.1454... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1454 Moxidectin solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter (mL) of solution contains 1 milligram (mg) moxidectin. (b) Sponsor. See...

  12. 21 CFR 520.1454 - Moxidectin solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Moxidectin solution. 520.1454 Section 520.1454... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1454 Moxidectin solution. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter (mL) of solution contains 1 milligram (mg) moxidectin. (b) Sponsor. See...

  13. [Prevention of oral diseases].

    PubMed

    Vodanović, Marin

    2013-06-01

    Oral health is essential to general health and quality of life. Ever more people are affected with oral diseases. Dental caries, gingivitis and periodontitis are the most common oral diseases and they can be prevented. Oral health promotion and oral disease prevention programs should be incorporated in national health strategies. Inability to understand health information can be a profound disadvantage to patients when asked to take responsibility for their health. Increasing the level of oral health literacy and improvement of communication between patients and dentists by avoiding the usage of professional dental terminology should be included in each oral prevention program.

  14. Clinical application of povidone-iodine oral antiseptic 1% (Betadine mouthwash) and povidone-iodine skin antiseptic 10% (Betadine solution) for the management of odontogenic and deep fascial space infection.

    PubMed

    Valderrama, Lucia Sarmiento

    2006-01-01

    Treatment of infections largely encompasses the field of dental medicine. Prevention and management of infection in the oral and maxillofacial region involve every facet of dental care that may be necessary due to caries, periodontal disease, pulpal pathology, trauma, reconstructive and surgical implants. One of the first surgical procedures in the treatment of localized infection commenced with the opening of bulbous abscesses with sharp stones and pointed sticks. The principles for the management of infection basically remain the same although the surgical technique has remarkably improved. It takes a qualitative and quantitative amount of bacterial insult to produce a certain degree of infection that may eventually lead to facial swelling, asymmetry, discomfort and loss of function. In the oral cavity and its surrounding structures, the predominant organisms such as the staphylococci and streptococci release enzymes responsible for the breakdown of fibrin (connective tissue ground substances) and lyse cellular debris, which facilitates a rapid spread of infection. At the University of the Philippines, Philippine General Hospital Medical Center, where I have served for 18 years, 90% of dental consultations from the outpatient department and emergency room complex concern infection, and 85% of facial swelling is dental in origin. A typical odontogenic infection is a dentoalveolar abscess that spreads deeply into the soft tissue rather than exiting superficially through the oral and cutaneous route, consequently involving the fascial spaces. Following the path of least resistance through connective tissue and along fascial planes, infection may diffuse quite distantly from its dental source, causing damage to the surrounding structures. Appreciation not only of the anatomy of the face and neck is necessary to predict sufficiently the pathway of spread of these infections, but also knowledge of how to drain these spaces adequately.

  15. Oral rehydration therapy.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, H P

    1996-08-01

    Oral rehydration solution (ORS), the best treatment of dehydration due to acute diarrhea, is the most important medical advance of this century since it is key to reducing infant and child morbidity and mortality. Pathogens responsible for acute diarrhea include those which produce enterotoxin at the intestinal mucosal surface, inducing secretion but are not invasive (e.g., Vibrio cholerae); those which invade and disrupt the mucosal lining (e.g., shigella species); and rotavirus. The World Health Organization (WHO)/UNICEF ORS is considered a universal ORS. Much research has been done on the ideal composition of an ORS. An ORS must have sufficient sodium to replace losses on a volume to volume basis, a glucose concentration that matches that of sodium to ensure its delivery to the ileum, sufficient amounts of potassium and base (e.g., sodium bicarbonate or trisodium citrate dihydrate) to correct acidosis and to enhance sodium absorption, and sufficient amounts of liquid. The risk of hypernatremia with use of the WHO/UNICEF ORS is a concern since infants and young children have an immature renal concentrating capacity, increased insensible water losses, and an impaired natriuretic response. Neonates and young infants may be prone to relatively slow correction of acidosis. It appears that the potassium content (20 mmol/l) of WHO-ORS should be higher to promote a net positive potassium retention. Too much glucose in the ORS will induce reverse osmosis of water into the gut, effectively making the ORS a dehydrating solution rather than a hydrating solution. Some carbohydrates other than glucose have proven effective glucose substitutes (e.g., sucrose, rice starch and powder, other cereals). Cereals have higher acceptability levels in developing countries. Research is investigating the nutritional benefits of supplementing ORS with micronutrients (e.g., vitamin A, folic acid, and zinc). ORS use with early refeeding has a beneficial effect on nutritional status after an

  16. Uremic toxins and oral adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shunsuke; Yoshiya, Kunihiko; Kita, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Hideki; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2011-04-01

    Uremic toxins are associated with various disorders in patients with end-stage renal disease and it is difficult to remove some of these toxins by dialysis. Since some uremic toxins are generated by bacterial metabolites in the colon, oral adsorbents that interfere with the absorption of uremic toxins or their precursors are believed to prevent their accumulation in the body. AST-120 adsorbs various uremic retention solutes in the gastrointestinal system and has potential for providing clinical benefit. Sevelamer hydrochloride binds some harmful compounds in addition to phosphate and seems to have pleiotropic effects that include lowering serum LDL cholesterol levels and reduction of inflammation. The effect of sevelamer hydrochloride on indoxyl sulfate and p-cresol has been shown in an in vitro study; however, in vivo studies in mice or humans did not demonstrate this effect on protein-binding uremic toxins. Oral adsorbents are thus one of the important modalities in the treatment of uremic syndrome.

  17. Disparities in Oral Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips Disparities in Oral Health Oral Health Conditions Periodontal Disease Community Water Fluoridation Water Fluoridation Basics Over 70 ... 2% of U.S. adults have some form of periodontal disease. In adults aged 65 and older, 70.1% ...

  18. Nicotine Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Nicotine oral inhalation is used to help people stop smoking. Nicotine oral inhalation should be used together with a ... support groups, counseling, or specific behavioral change techniques. Nicotine inhalation is in a class of medications called ...

  19. Peptides in oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Alberta; Guida, Agostino; Petruzzi, Massimo; Capone, Giovanni; Laino, Luigi; Serpico, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The oral cavity is home to numerous viruses and micro-organisms recognized as having a role in various oral diseases as well as in infections in other parts of the body. Indeed, in general a microbial infection underlies or is believed to underlie the ample spectrum of oral diseases, from tooth enamel decay to periodontal lesions, from candidiasis to virus-induced oral squamous cell carcinomas, and bullous autoimmune oral disorders. This clinico-pathological context stresses the need of targeted therapies to specifically kill infectious agents in a complex environment such as the oral cavity, and explains the current interest in exploring peptide-based therapeutic approaches in oral and dental research. Here, we review the therapeutic potential of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, beta defensins, adrenomedullin, histatins, and of various peptides modulating gene expression and immuno-biological interaction(s) in oral diseases.

  20. Albuterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... and airways). Albuterol inhalation aerosol and powder for oral inhalation is also used to prevent breathing difficulties ... years of age and older. Albuterol powder for oral inhalation (Proair Respiclick) is used in children 12 ...

  1. HAD Oral History Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, Jarita

    2014-01-01

    The Historical Astronomy Division is the recipient of an American Institute of Physics Neils Bohr Library Grant for Oral History. HAD has assembled a team of volunteers to conduct oral history interviews since May 2013. Each oral history interview varies in length between two and six hours. This presentation is an introduction to the HAD Oral History Project and the activities of the team during the first six months of the grant.

  2. Oral Steroids for Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrew D; Clarke, Jesse; Williams, Timothy K

    2015-01-01

    Contact/allergic dermatitis is frequently treated inappropriately with lower-than-recommended doses or inadequate duration of treatment with oral and intramuscular glucocorticoids. This article highlights a case of dermatitis in a Ranger Assessment and Selection Program student who was improperly treated over 2 weeks with oral steroids after being bit by Cimex lectularius, commonly known as bed bugs. The article also highlights the pitfalls of improper oral steroid dosing and provides reasoning for longer-duration oral steroid treatment.

  3. Understanding Oral Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, W. Jay

    2012-01-01

    A five-year research project of seminary students from various cultural backgrounds revealed that the slight majority of contemporary seminary students studied are oral learners. Oral learners learn best and have their lives most transformed when professors utilize oral teaching and assessment methods. After explaining several preferences of oral…

  4. Understanding Oral Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, W. Jay

    2012-01-01

    A five-year research project of seminary students from various cultural backgrounds revealed that the slight majority of contemporary seminary students studied are oral learners. Oral learners learn best and have their lives most transformed when professors utilize oral teaching and assessment methods. After explaining several preferences of oral…

  5. Oral Communication K-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottrell, June, Ed.

    This speech communication curriculum guide is designed to provide a comprehensive oral language curriculum, to suggest ways for integrating oral activities into other curriculum areas, and to stimulate ideas for using oral language in a holistic rather than a fragmentary learning environment. Following an introductory chapter on "creating the…

  6. Skin beautification with oral non-hydrolized versions of carnosine and carcinine: Effective therapeutic management and cosmetic skincare solutions against oxidative glycation and free-radical production as a causal mechanism of diabetic complications and skin aging.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Deyev, Anatoliy I; Savel'yeva, Ekaterina L; Lankin, Vadim Z; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2012-10-01

    Advanced glycation Maillard reaction end products (AGEs) are causing the complications of diabetes and skin aging, primarily via adventitious and cross-linking of proteins. Long-lived proteins such as structural collagen are particularly implicated as pathogenic targets of AGE processes. The formation of α-dicarbonyl compounds represents an important step for cross-linking proteins in the glycation or Maillard reaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of glycation coupled to the glycation free-radical oxidation reactions as markers of protein damage in the aging of skin tissue proteins and diabetes. To elucidate the mechanism for the cross-linking reaction, we studied the reaction between a three-carbon α-dicarbonyl compound, methylglyoxal, and amino acids using EPR spectroscopy, a spectrophotometric kinetic assay of superoxide anion production at the site of glycation and a chemiluminescence technique. The transglycating activity, inhibition of transition metal ions peroxidative catalysts, resistance to hydrolysis of carnosine mimetic peptide-based compounds with carnosinase and the protective effects of carnosine, carcinine and related compounds against the oxidative damage of proteins and lipid membranes were assessed in a number of biochemical and model systems. A 4-month randomized, double-blind, controlled study was undertaken including 42 subjects where the oral supplement of non-hydrolized carnosine (Can-C Plus® formulation) was tested against placebo for 3 months followed by a 1-month supplement-free period for both groups to assess lasting effects. Assessment of the age-related skin parameters and oral treatment efficacy measurements included objective skin surface evaluation with Visioscan® VC 98 and visual assessment of skin appearance parameters. The results together confirm that a direct one-electron transfer between a Schiff base methylglyoxal dialkylimine (or its protonated form) and methylglyoxal is responsible for

  7. Pilot double-blinded study to assess efficacy and tolerability of morphine sulphate oral solution (Oramorph®) given preoperatively as add-on therapy within a multimodal postoperative pain approach in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, A; Ghisi, D; Pergolotti, B; Martinotti, M; Fanelli, G; Danelli, G

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at investigating the effect of a single pre-operative oral administration of morphine sulphate (Oramorph®) on pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). Forty-one ASA I-III patients, aged 18-65 years, undergoing LC were randomly, double-blindly allocated to treatment (N.=20, 30mg Oramorph®, group M) or placebo (N.=21, group P). General anesthesia was maintained with propofol and remifentanil. All patients received ketamine 0.2 mg/kg iv at induction, intraoperative ketorolac 30mg iv and tramadol postoperatively (iv PCA: bolus 50 mg, lock-out 30 min, max 100 mg/4 hours). Numerical rating scale for pain (NRS), White's fast track and PADSS scores, tramadol consumption and adverse events were recorded for the first 24h. All patients underwent State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Anthropometric characteristics, MMSE, STAI, ASA status, NRS rest, White's and PADDS scores, PONV incidence were similar. Group M showed significantly lower NRS on movement during the first 3 hours after awakening. Cumulative tramadol consumption was lower in group M than in group P (185±142 mg versus 263±199 mg, P=0.199). Within a multimodal approach, a single preoperative oral administration of 30 mg of morphine sulphate in patients undergoing LC did not improve pain at rest, but improved NRS on movement during the first 3 hours after awakening. Group P required a higher mean dose of tramadol compared to Group M, although not significantly. The safety profile of Oramorph® allowed fast extubation and awakening times as well as prompt home discharge within 6 hours from surgery.

  8. Essentials of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators. PMID:26617944

  9. Oral steroid contraception.

    PubMed

    Sech, Laura A; Mishell, Daniel R

    2015-11-01

    Oral steroid contraception is a popular method of family planning worldwide. Over the past several decades, this method of contraception has changed significantly by decreasing the estrogen dose, changing the progestin component, and reducing the hormone free interval. Despite the popularity of oral steroid contraception, there has been much criticism regarding the associated risks of venous thromboembolism and stroke. Despite these established, yet uncommon risks, oral steroid contraception has many important health benefits. This review highlights the available formulations of oral contraceptives along with their evidence-based associated risks and benefits. Highlights regarding future directions for development of novel oral contraceptives are also addressed.

  10. Essentials of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Rivera, César

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the 10 most common cancers in the world, with a delayed clinical detection, poor prognosis, without specific biomarkers for the disease and expensive therapeutic alternatives. This review aims to present the fundamental aspects of this cancer, focused on squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (OSCC), moving from its definition and epidemiological aspects, addressing the oral carcinogenesis, oral potentially malignant disorders, epithelial precursor lesions and experimental methods for its study, therapies and future challenges. Oral cancer is a preventable disease, risk factors and natural history is already being known, where biomedical sciences and dentistry in particular are likely to improve their poor clinical indicators.

  11. 78 FR 57057 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Amprolium; Meloxicam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 520 Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Amprolium....100 Yes....... CE \\1\\. Health Corp., (amprolium) 9.6% as a generic GlenPointe Oral Solution. copy of........... Ceva Sante MELOXIDYL Original approval 520.1350 Yes....... CE \\1\\. Animale, 10 (meloxicam) Oral as a...

  12. Pediatric drugs--a review of commercially available oral formulations.

    PubMed

    Strickley, Robert G; Iwata, Quynh; Wu, Sylvia; Dahl, Terrence C

    2008-05-01

    Pediatric oral formulations can be quite scientifically challenging to develop and the prerequisites for both a measurable dosage form to administer based upon bodyweight, and also taste-masking are two of the challenges unique for pediatric oral formulations. The physicochemical and organoleptic properties of the active drug substance such as solubility, chemical stability, and taste along with the intended dose can determine which formulations are feasible to develop. Oral pediatric formulations are available in 17 different varieties and can be either a ready-to-use formulation such as a solution, syrup, suspension, tablet, scored tablet, chewable tablet, orally disintegrating tablet, or thin strip, or can also be a formulation that requires manipulation such as a powder for constitution to a suspension, tablet for constitution to a suspension, powder for constitution to a solution, drops for reconstitution to a suspension, concentrated solution for dilution, effervescent tablet, bulk oral granules, bulk oral powder, or solid in a capsule to mix with food or drink. Recently there has been an increase in pediatric formulation development inspired by increased regulatory incentives. The intent of this review is to educate the reader on the various types of formulations administered orally to pediatrics, the rationale in deciding which type of formulation to develop, the excipients used, development challenges, the in-use handling of oral pediatric formulations, and the regulatory incentives.

  13. Radiation Induced Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    PS, Satheesh Kumar; Balan, Anita; Sankar, Arun; Bose, Tinky

    2009-01-01

    Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i) With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii) who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii) who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv) who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene PMID:20668585

  14. Pharmacokinetics of three oral formulations of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R L; Koup, J R; Williams-Warren, J; Weber, A; Smith, A L

    1985-01-01

    We compared the absorption of three formulations of ciprofloxacin after oral administration in 18 normal adult male volunteers. Each subject received 500 mg of ciprofloxacin as two 250-mg tablets, one 500-mg tablet, or a solution in a randomized crossover sequence. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by model independent methods. Because a solution is considered to be the ideal oral dosage form, the results determined for the tablets were compared to those for the solution. Mean values for the maximum concentration of drug in serum, the time to maximum concentration of drug in serum, and the elimination half-life were 3.23 micrograms/ml, 1.00 h, and 5.04 h, respectively, for the solution. The mean renal clearance of ciprofloxacin was 372 ml/min and accounted for at least 50% of the total clearance. We recovered 44.4, 48.6, and 55.8% of the administered ciprofloxacin from the urine as unchanged drug within 24 h after dosing with the 250-mg tablets, 500-mg tablets, or solution, respectively. The 500-mg tablets were found to be bioequivalent to the solution with regard to all pharmacokinetic parameters. The 250-mg tablet was not bioequivalent to either of the other formulations; the relative bioavailability values were 78.7 and 74.1%, respectively, for the 500-mg tablet and the solution. The clinical significance of this difference in bioavailability is yet to be determined. PMID:2931047

  15. Towards understanding oral health.

    PubMed

    Zaura, Egija; ten Cate, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term 'oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain microbial community stability in health. However, the oral ecosystem itself is not stable: throughout life an individual undergoes multiple physiological changes while progressing through infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. Recent discussions on the definition of general health have led to the proposal that health is the ability of the individual to adapt to physiological changes, a condition known as allostasis. In this paper the allostasis principle is applied to the oral ecosystem. The multidimensionality of the host factors contributing to allostasis in the oral cavity is illustrated with an example on changes occurring in puberty. The complex phenomenon of oral health and the processes that prevent the ecosystem from collapsing during allostatic changes in the entire body are far from being understood. As yet individual components (e.g. hard tissues, microbiome, saliva, host response) have been investigated, while only by consolidating these and assessing their multidimensional interactions should we be able to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the ecosystem, which in turn could serve to develop rational schemes to maintain health. Adapting such a 'system approach' comes with major practical challenges for the entire research field and will require vast resources and large-scale multidisciplinary collaborations.

  16. Oral microbiota and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meurman, Jukka H.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation caused by infections may be the most important preventable cause of cancer in general. However, in the oral cavity the role of microbiota in carcinogenesis is not known. Microbial populations on mouth mucosa differ between healthy and malignant sites and certain oral bacterial species have been linked with malignancies but the evidence is still weak in this respect. Nevertheless, oral microorganisms inevitably up-regulate cytokines and other inflammatory mediators that affect the complex metabolic pathways and may thus be involved in carcinogenesis. Poor oral health associates statistically with prevalence of many types of cancer, such as pancreatic and gastrointestinal cancer. Furthermore, several oral micro-organisms are capable of converting alcohol to carcinogenic acetaldehyde which also may partly explain the known association between heavy drinking, smoking, poor oral health and the prevalence of oral and upper gastrointestinal cancer. A different problem is the cancer treatment-caused alterations in oral microbiota which may lead to the emergence of potential pathogens and subsequent other systemic health problems to the patients. Hence clinical guidelines and recommendations have been presented to control oral microbiota in patients with malignant disease, but also in this area the scientific evidence is weak. More controlled studies are needed for further conclusion. PMID:21523227

  17. Bimaxillary Oral Focal Mucinosis.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sunil; Malik, Sunita; Mittal, Hitesh Chander; Singh, Gurdarshan; Kamra, Hemlata

    2016-10-01

    Oral focal mucinosis is considered as oral counterpart of cutaneous focal mucinosis. The preoperative diagnosis of mucinosis is almost impossible because of its rarity and clinical similarity to other lesions of various etiologies. The histological diagnosis of oral mucinosis is important to better understand the etiopathogenesis, treatment modalities, and any recurrence of the lesion besides differentiating from the other soft tissue lesions.The purpose of this paper is to report the first case of bimaxillary involvement with dome-shaped elevated, rounded, asymptomatic, normally colored swelling in left posterior palatal mucosa and left mandibular posterior region in a 25-year old woman who was diagnosed as oral focal mucinosis histopathologically.

  18. Electromarking solution

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, Jonathan S.; Harper, William L.; Peck, Charles G.

    1976-06-22

    This invention is directed to an aqueous halogen-free electromarking solution which possesses the capacity for marking a broad spectrum of metals and alloys selected from different classes. The aqueous solution comprises basically the nitrate salt of an amphoteric metal, a chelating agent, and a corrosion-inhibiting agent.

  19. Solution preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    Reviewed in this statement are methods of preparing solutions to be used in laboratory experiments to examine technical issues related to the safe disposal of nuclear waste from power generation. Each approach currently used to prepare solutions has advantages and any one approach may be preferred over the others in particular situations, depending upon the goals of the experimental program. These advantages are highlighted herein for three approaches to solution preparation that are currently used most in studies of nuclear waste disposal. Discussion of the disadvantages of each approach is presented to help a user select a preparation method for his particular studies. Also presented in this statement are general observations regarding solution preparation. These observations are used as examples of the types of concerns that need to be addressed regarding solution preparation. As shown by these examples, prior to experimentation or chemical analyses, laboratory techniques based on scientific knowledge of solutions can be applied to solutions, often resulting in great improvement in the usefulness of results.

  20. Epilepsy and oral care.

    PubMed

    Fiske, Janice; Boyle, Carole

    2002-05-01

    Epilepsy is a common symptom of an underlying neurological disorder. The seizures can take a variety of forms. Both the condition and its medical management can affect oral health. Prevention of oral disease and carefully planned dental treatment are essential to the well-being of people with epilepsy.

  1. Migraine and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Mousa, G Y

    1982-10-01

    Migraine is a common complaint in optometric practice. Three cases of migrainous patients taking oral contraceptives are presented in this report. The role of oral contraceptives in triggering a migraine attack and possibly elevating the risk of a stroke in a patient with migraine is discussed. The counseling an optometrist can provide in such cases in discussed.

  2. Oral environment and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yasusei; Tada, Hidesuke; Fujiwara, Natsumi; Tada, Yoshiko; Tsunematsu, Takaaki; Miyake, Yoichiro; Ishimaru, Naozumi

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is now the leading cause of death in Japan. A rapid increase in cancer mortality is expected as Japan is facing a super-aged society. Many causes of cancer are known to be closely linked to life style factors, such as smoking, drinking, and diet. The oral environment is known to be involved in the pathogenesis and development of various diseases such as bronchitis, pneumonia, diabetes, heart disease, and dementia. Because the oral cavity acts as the bodily entrance for air and food, it is constantly exposed to foreign substances, including bacteria and viruses. A large number of bacteria are endemic to the oral cavity, and indigenous oral flora act to prevent the settlement of foreign bacteria. The oral environment is influenced by local factors, including dental plaque, tartar, teeth alignment, occlusion, an incompatible prosthesis, and bad lifestyle habits, and systemic factors, including smoking, consumption of alcohol, irregular lifestyle and eating habits, obesity, stress, hormones, and heredity. It has recently been revealed that the oral environment is associated with cancer. In particular, commensal bacteria in the oral cavity are involved in the development of cancer. Moreover, Candida, human papilloma virus and Epstein-Barr virus as well as commensal bacteria have been reported to be associated with the pathogenesis of cancer. In this review, we introduce recent findings of the correlation between the oral environment and cancer.

  3. Oral contraceptives in migraine.

    PubMed

    Allais, Gianni; Gabellari, Ilaria Castagnoli; De Lorenzo, Cristina; Mana, Ornella; Benedetto, Chiara

    2009-03-01

    Combined oral contraceptives are a safe and highly effective method of birth control, but they can also raise problems of clinical tolerability and/or safety in migraine patients. It is now commonly accepted that, in migraine with aura, the use of combined oral contraceptives is always contraindicated, and that their intake must also be suspended by patients suffering from migraine without aura if aura symptoms appear. The newest combined oral contraceptive formulations are generally well tolerated in migraine without aura, and the majority of migraine without aura sufferers do not show any problems with their use; nevertheless, the last International Classification of Headache Disorders identifies at least two entities evidently related to the use of combined oral contraceptives: exogenous hormone-induced headache and estrogen-withdrawal headache. As regards the safety, even if both migraine and combined oral contraceptive intake are associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke, migraine without aura per se is not a contraindication for combined oral contraceptive use. Other risk factors (tobacco use, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity and diabetes) must be carefully considered when prescribing combined oral contraceptives in migraine without aura patients, in particular in women aged over 35 years. Furthermore, the exclusion of a hereditary thrombophilia and of alterations of coagulative parameters should precede any decision of combined oral contraceptive prescription in migraine patients.

  4. Oral Transliterating. PEPNet Tipsheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troiano, Claire A.

    2010-01-01

    An oral transliterator provides communication access to a person who is deaf or hard of hearing and who uses speechreading and speaking as a means of communicating. The oral transliterator, positioned in front of the speechreader, inaudibly repeats the spoken message, making it as speechreadable as possible. This is called Expressive Oral…

  5. ORAL AMELANOTIC MELANOMA

    PubMed Central

    Adisa, A.O.; Olawole, W.O.; Sigbeku, O.F.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant melanomas of the mucosal regions of the head and neck are extremely rare neoplasms accounting for less than 1% of all melanomas. Approximately half of all head and neck melanomas occur in the oral cavity. Less than 2% of all melanomas lack pigmentation, in the oral mucosa however, up to 75% of cases are amelanotic. No etiologic factors or risk factors have been recognized for oral melanomas. Some authors have suggested that oral habits and selfmedication may be of etiological significance. Oral melanoma is rare but it is relatively frequent in countries like Japan, Uganda, and India. It is rarely identified under the age of 20 years. In Australia where cutaneous melanomas are relatively common primary melanoma of the oral mucosa is rare. The surface architecture of oral melanomas ranges from macular to ulcerated and nodular. The lesion is said to be asymptomatic in the early stages but may become ulcerated and painful in advanced lesions. The diagnosis of amelanotic melanoma is more difficult than that of pigmented lesions. The neoplasm consists of spindle-shaped cells with many mitotic figures and no cytoplasmic melanin pigmentation. Immunohistochemistry using S-100, HMB-45, Melan-A and MART-1 will help in establishing the correct diagnosis. Radical surgery with ample margins and adjuvant chemotherapy are appropriate management protocol for malignant melanoma. Oral melanoma is associated with poor prognosis but its amelanotic variant has even worse prognosis because it exhibits a more aggressive biology and because of difficulty in diagnosis which leads to delayed treatment. PMID:25161399

  6. Genomics of oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Margaret J

    2003-01-01

    Advances in bacterial genetics came with the discovery of the genetic code, followed by the development of recombinant DNA technologies. Now the field is undergoing a new revolution because of investigators' ability to sequence and assemble complete bacterial genomes. Over 200 genome projects have been completed or are in progress, and the oral microbiology research community has benefited through projects for oral bacteria and their non-oral-pathogen relatives. This review describes features of several oral bacterial genomes, and emphasizes the themes of species relationships, comparative genomics, and lateral gene transfer. Genomics is having a broad impact on basic research in microbial pathogenesis, and will lead to new approaches in clinical research and therapeutics. The oral microbiota is a unique community especially suited for new challenges to sequence the metagenomes of microbial consortia, and the genomes of uncultivable bacteria.

  7. Oral contraceptives: current status.

    PubMed

    Burkman, R T

    2001-03-01

    During the past four decades, oral contraceptives have remained a safe and effective method of birth control. Reductions in the estrogen and progestin dosages have significantly decreased the incidence of cardiovascular complications. The association between oral contraceptives and breast cancer appears to be primarily because of detection bias or possibly a promotional effect. Despite the changes in formulation, the problems related to side effects have not been totally solved. Because compliance and successful use is strongly affected by side effects, improvement in this area is probably the biggest challenge faced by developers of oral contraceptives. It is also clear that there are a growing number of significant noncontraceptive benefits that accrue in oral contraceptive users. Unfortunately, many women do not know about these benefits. Thus, one of the issues that providers need to continue to address is how to provide better information about oral contraceptives and contraception in general to patients.

  8. [Oral fluid bacteriocidal activity in complex diagnostics of oral disbiosis].

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, O F; Abramova, E S

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of examination of oral fluid bacteriocidal activity in complex diagnostics of oral mucosa disbiosis was evaluated. Thirty-seven patients were included in complex clinical and laboratory studies. The patients were divided in two groups: main group (30 patients exhibiting various grades of oral mucosa disbiosis) and control group (7 patients with no signs of oral disbiosis). The oral fluid bacteriocidal activity was examined by means of laser flow cytometry. Study results proved oral fluid bacteriocidal activity increase to correlate with the grade of oral mucosa disbiosis thus confirming the usefulness of the method in complex diagnostics of oral disbiosis.

  9. [Oral rehydration at a third-level service].

    PubMed

    Mota-Hernández, F

    1990-02-01

    Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) has been shown to be useful in decreasing mortality, reducing treatment costs and diminishing the frequency of complications in children under the age of five with acute diarrhea. The current concept of ORT includes not only the increase in the intake of fluids and the administering of oral solution in order to prevent or treat dehydration, but also the continuance of everyday feeding, the teaching of the child's mother to detect signs of dehydration and other alarming changes, as well as the non-administering of medication, especially those considered as anti-diarrheal or anti-vomiting, and limiting the use of antimicrobials, only to be used in special cases. The theoretical know-how of these concepts has been seen to be insufficient in order to increase the use of community-wide Oral Rehydration Therapy, being this the main purpose for the establishment of the Oral Rehydration Ward in teaching hospitals of second and third level, where the majority of its' personnel must come into contact with and share the responsibility of treating children with diarrhea. Within these wards students obtain information, ability and assurance in the effective actual management of children with diarrhea, including the correction of the state of dehydration through the administering of oral solutions. Another complementary benefit from the coming about of this ward is the decrease in the need to hospitalize the majority of the patient with diarrhea therefore reducing costs and any related complications. Oral rehydration therapy; diarrhea; dehydration; oral solutions.

  10. Postirradiation flap infection about the oral cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Cabbabe, E.B.; Herbold, D.R.; Sunwoo, Y.C.; Baroudi, I.F.

    1983-06-01

    Postirradiation alteration of oral flora is well documented in the literature. Infection as a complication leading to partial or complete loss of a flap used to reconstruct a defect in the oral cavity is a worrisome outcome. We describe how a flap that was judged clinically to be viable became overwhelmingly infected with the Klebsiella oxytoca, an oral cavity pathogen encountered in this patient following irradiation. Local and systemic changes led to detachment of the flap. This complication may be explained, in view of the absence of venous congestion or arterial ischemia both clinically and pathologically, by the proven contamination of the flap by the Klebsiella pathogen. Local factors resulted in lower resistance and subsequent overwhelming infection. Discussion of the case, review of pertinent literature, and proposed solutions are presented.

  11. Oral Contraceptive Pill and PCOS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health PCOS: The Oral Contraceptive Pill Posted under Health Guides . ... of oral contraceptive pills for young women with PCOS? Regular and Lighter Periods: Oral contraceptive pills can ...

  12. Literatura Oral Hispanica (Hispanic Oral Literature).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlpine, Dave

    As part of a class in Hispanic Oral Literature, students collected pieces of folklore from various Hispanic residents in the region known as "Siouxland" in Iowa. Consisting of some of the folklore recorded from the residents, this paper includes 18 "cuentos y leyendas" (tales and legends), 48 "refranes" (proverbs), 17…

  13. The effect of chlorhexidine in reducing oral colonisation in geriatric patients: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sharif-Abdullah, Sharifah Shafinaz Binti; Chong, Mei Chan; Surindar-Kaur, Surat Singh; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul Bahyah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Inadequate oral care has been implicated in the development of aspiration pneumonia in frail geriatric patients and is a major cause of mortality, due to the colonisation of microbes in vulnerable patients. This type of pneumonia has been associated with an increase in respiratory pathogens in the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chlorhexidine compared to routine oral care in edentulous geriatric inpatients. METHODS A double-blind, parallel-group randomised controlled trial was carried out. The intervention group received oral care with chlorhexidine 0.2%, while the control group received routine oral care with thymol. Nurses provided oral care with assigned solutions of 20 mL once daily over seven days. Oral cavity assessment using the Brief Oral Health Status Examination form was performed before each oral care procedure. Data on medication received and the subsequent development of aspiration pneumonia was recorded. An oral swab was performed on Day 7 to obtain specimens to test for colonisation. RESULTS The final sample consisted of 35 (control) and 43 (intervention) patients. Chlorhexidine was effective in reducing oral colonisation compared to routine oral care with thymol (p < 0.001). The risk of oral bacterial colonisation was nearly three times higher in the thymol group compared to the chlorhexidine group. CONCLUSION The use of chlorhexidine 0.2% significantly reduced oral colonisation and is recommended as an easier and more cost-effective alternative for oral hygiene. PMID:27211885

  14. The effect of chlorhexidine in reducing oral colonisation in geriatric patients: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sharif-Abdullah, Sharifah Shafinaz Binti; Chong, Mei Chan; Surindar-Kaur, Surat Singh; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul Bahyah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2016-05-01

    Inadequate oral care has been implicated in the development of aspiration pneumonia in frail geriatric patients and is a major cause of mortality, due to the colonisation of microbes in vulnerable patients. This type of pneumonia has been associated with an increase in respiratory pathogens in the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chlorhexidine compared to routine oral care in edentulous geriatric inpatients. A double-blind, parallel-group randomised controlled trial was carried out. The intervention group received oral care with chlorhexidine 0.2%, while the control group received routine oral care with thymol. Nurses provided oral care with assigned solutions of 20 mL once daily over seven days. Oral cavity assessment using the Brief Oral Health Status Examination form was performed before each oral care procedure. Data on medication received and the subsequent development of aspiration pneumonia was recorded. An oral swab was performed on Day 7 to obtain specimens to test for colonisation. The final sample consisted of 35 (control) and 43 (intervention) patients. Chlorhexidine was effective in reducing oral colonisation compared to routine oral care with thymol (p < 0.001). The risk of oral bacterial colonisation was nearly three times higher in the thymol group compared to the chlorhexidine group. The use of chlorhexidine 0.2% significantly reduced oral colonisation and is recommended as an easier and more cost-effective alternative for oral hygiene. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  15. 21 CFR 310.534 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as oral...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as oral wound healing agents. 310.534 Section 310.534 Food... active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as oral wound healing agents. (a... aqueous solution have been present in oral mucosal injury drug products for use as oral wound...

  16. 21 CFR 310.534 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as oral...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as oral wound healing agents. 310.534 Section 310.534 Food... active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as oral wound healing agents. (a... aqueous solution have been present in oral mucosal injury drug products for use as oral wound...

  17. 21 CFR 310.534 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as oral...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as oral wound healing agents. 310.534 Section 310.534 Food... active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as oral wound healing agents. (a... aqueous solution have been present in oral mucosal injury drug products for use as oral wound...

  18. 21 CFR 310.534 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as oral...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as oral wound healing agents. 310.534 Section 310.534 Food... active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as oral wound healing agents. (a... aqueous solution have been present in oral mucosal injury drug products for use as oral wound healing...

  19. 21 CFR 310.534 - Drug products containing active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as oral...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as oral wound healing agents. 310.534 Section 310.534 Food... active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for human use as oral wound healing agents. (a... aqueous solution have been present in oral mucosal injury drug products for use as oral wound healing...

  20. Oral misoprostol for induction of labour.

    PubMed

    Alfirevic, Zarko; Aflaifel, Nasreen; Weeks, Andrew

    2014-06-13

    achieved in 24 hours, uterine hyperstimulation with fetal heart rate (FHR) changes, and caesarean section were highly heterogenous - for uterine hyperstimulation with FHR changes this was related to dosage with lower rates in those with lower doses of oral misoprostol. However, there were fewer babies born with a low Apgar score in the oral group (RR 0.60, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.82; 19 trials; 4009 babies) and a decrease in postpartum haemorrhage (RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.95; 10 trials; 1478 women). However, the oral misoprostol group had an increase in meconium-stained liquor (RR 1.22, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.44; 24 trials; 3634 women). Oral misoprostol as an induction agent is effective at achieving vaginal birth. It is more effective than placebo, as effective as vaginal misoprostol and results in fewer caesarean sections than vaginal dinoprostone or oxytocin.Where misoprostol remains unlicensed for the induction of labour, many practitioners will prefer to use a licensed product like dinoprostone. If using oral misoprostol, the evidence suggests that the dose should be 20 to 25 mcg in solution. Given that safety is the primary concern, the evidence supports the use of oral regimens over vaginal regimens. This is especially important in situations where the risk of ascending infection is high and the lack of staff means that women cannot be intensely monitored.

  1. Examining the association between oral health and oral HPV infection.

    PubMed

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M; Ross, Michael Wallis; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2013-09-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of 40% to 80% of oropharyngeal cancers; yet, no published study has examined the role of oral health in oral HPV infection, either independently or in conjunction with other risk factors. This study examined the relation between oral health and oral HPV infection and the interactive effects of oral health, smoking, and oral sex on oral HPV infection. Our analyses comprised 3,439 participants ages 30 to 69 years for whom data on oral HPV and oral health were available from the nationally representative 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results showed that higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with four measures of oral health, including self-rated oral health as poor-to-fair [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-1.95], indicated the possibility of gum disease (PR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13-2.01), reported use of mouthwash to treat dental problems in the past week (PR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.52), and higher number of teeth lost (Ptrend = 0.035). In multivariable logistic regression models, oral HPV infection had a statistically significant association with self-rated overall oral health (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15-2.09), independent of smoking and oral sex. In conclusion, poor oral health was an independent risk factor of oral HPV infection, irrespective of smoking and oral sex practices. Public health interventions may aim to promote oral hygiene and oral health as an additional measure to prevent HPV-related oral cancers.

  2. Oral availability of bilastine.

    PubMed

    Sádaba, B; Gómez-Guiu, A; Azanza, J R; Ortega, I; Valiente, R

    2013-05-01

    Bilastine (Bilaxten™) is a novel non-sedating H1 receptor antagonist (antihistamine) developed in the dosage form of oral tablets and indicated for the treatment of allergic rhinitis (seasonal and perennial) and urticaria. Several clinical trials have been performed in order to determine the efficacy and safety of bilastine. The aim of this trial was to study the absolute oral bioavailability of bilastine in humans. Twelve male and female adults were recruited into a single centre for a randomized, single-dose, open-label, controlled two-arm crossover study with a minimum 14-day washout period between the two single doses. Two single doses of bilastine were administered: a 20-mg oral tablet and a 10-mg intravenous formulation. Blood and urine samples were collected between 0 and 72 h post each administration. The clinical trial was carried out under quality assurance and quality control systems with standard operating procedures to ensure that the study was conducted and data generated in compliance with the protocol, Good Clinical Practice standards, International Conference on Harmonisation and other applicable regulations. Oral bioavailability of bilastine was 60.67 % with a 90 % parametric confidence interval of 53.79-67.56. The maximum bilastine concentration was measured 1.31 h after oral administration. Pharmacokinetic parameters were similar to those observed in previous studies. Tolerance to treatment was good, with no adverse events related to study medication. The absorption of bilastine after oral administration to healthy subjects was rapid. The absolute oral bioavailability was moderate.

  3. Personality and oral health.

    PubMed

    Thomson, W Murray; Caspi, Avshalom; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E; Broadbent, Jonathan M

    2011-10-01

    We investigated age-26 personality characteristics and age-32 oral health in a prospective study of a complete birth cohort born in Dunedin, New Zealand. Personality was measured using the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ). Oral health was measured using the short-form Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14), a global measure, and dental examinations. Personality profiles were constructed for 916 individuals (50.8% men) using standardized MPQ scores, and multivariate analyses examined their association with oral health. Those reporting 1+ OHIP-14 impacts had higher Negative Emotionality scores (and lower Constraint and Positive Emotionality MPQ superfactor scores) than those who did not. After controlling for gender, clinical status, and the other two MPQ superfactors, those scoring higher on Negative Emotionality had a greater risk of reporting 1+ OHIP-14 impacts, as well as 3+ OHIP-14 impacts and worse-than-average oral health. They also had a greater risk of having lost at least one tooth from caries and of having 3+ decayed surfaces. Personality characteristics appear to shape self-reports of oral health. Personality is also a risk factor for clinical disease status, at least with respect to dental caries and its sequelae. Because the attitudes and values tapped into by personality tests can be altered by brief cognitive interventions, those might be useful in preventive dentistry. © 2011 Eur J Oral Sci.

  4. Oral health: locus of control, health behavior, self-rated oral health and socio-demographic factors in Istanbul adults.

    PubMed

    Peker, Kadriye; Bermek, Gulcin

    2011-01-01

    To determine oral health control beliefs of Istanbul adults using the Multidimensional Oral Health Locus of Control Scale (MOHLCS) after confirming its factorial validity and to examine the relationships between these beliefs, self-rated oral health, oral health behaviors and socio-demographic factors. The MOHLCS was administered to a sample of 1200 subjects aged ≥18 years in Istanbul chosen using a quota-sampling method (response 88%). The relationship between the MOHLCS and oral health behaviors, self-rated oral health and socio-demographic factors was assessed after confirming the factorial validity of the MOHLCS. The MOHLCS demonstrated satisfactory internal reliability. Factor analysis results showed a new four-factor solution, namely Internal, Dentist, Chance, and Socialization agents. Multivariate analysis showed that female gender, younger age, higher socioeconomic status, more frequent daily toothbrushing, and regular dental check-ups were associated with higher Internal beliefs, while older age, lower educational level, lower socioeconomic status, low toothbrushing frequency, and symptom-orientated dental attendance were associated with higher Chance beliefs. Being unmarried and low toothbrushing frequency were associated with lower Dentist beliefs. Males and older subjects had lower Socialization agents beliefs. Internal, Dentist and Chance beliefs were significantly associated with self-rated oral health. Compared with the original factor structure, the new factor structure had better goodness of fit for this sample. Self-rated oral health, socio-demographic factors, and oral health behaviors were significantly associated with oral health control beliefs. These beliefs may be useful for planning oral health promotion programs and for formulating advice given by oral health professionals about their patients' oral health behaviors.

  5. Oral health and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Pla, G W

    1994-03-01

    The relationships between oral health conditions, dietary practices and nutritional status, and general health status in the older American are complex, with many interrelating factors. Just as inadequate nutrition can affect oral health, poor oral health status affects food choices and, thus, nutritional status. It is clearly essential that the primary care practitioner and/or screening health professionals always include an evaluation of oral status in assessment of an elderly person. Effective care for the elderly dental patient requires knowledge about the disease of aging and the impact of those diseases on oral health and nutrition, pharmacology and drug interactions and their impact on oral health status, the biology of aging including sensory changes, the relationship of general medicine and systemic diseases, and psychology and sociology. The attitudes of empathy and understanding, caring and compassion, respect and a positive attitude toward the older patient, and flexibility in treatment planning are also critical elements. The interdisciplinary team of physicians, nurses, nutrition professionals, dentists, and social service professionals must all work together to ensure that good oral health status and adequate nutrition are maintained in older Americans. Recognizing and treating oral health and nutrition problems are important in improving the health and quality of life for the elderly population. Research that can provide more answers to health care problems in this growing group; educating professionals with respect to the relationships between oral health and nutrition; and public policy changes with regard to provision and funding of nutrition services, especially when provided by registered and/or licensed nutrition professionals, contribute to improving the health and quality of life for elders.

  6. Solid Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Go-Eun; Kim, Il-Ho; Lim, Young Soo; Seo, Won-Seon; Choi, Byeong-Jun; Hwang, Chang-Won

    2014-06-01

    Since Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 have the same crystal structure, they form a homogeneous solid solution. Therefore, the thermal conductivity of the solid solution can be reduced by phonon scattering. The thermoelectric figure of merit can be improved by controlling the carrier concentration through doping. In this study, Bi2Te2.85Se0.15:D m (D: dopants such as I, Cu, Ag, Ni, Zn) solid solutions were prepared by encapsulated melting and hot pressing. All specimens exhibited n-type conduction in the measured temperature range (323 K to 523 K), and their electrical conductivities decreased slightly with increasing temperature. The undoped solid solution showed a carrier concentration of 7.37 × 1019 cm-3, power factor of 2.1 mW m-1 K-1, and figure of merit of 0.56 at 323 K. The figure of merit ( ZT) was improved due to the increased power factor by I, Cu, and Ag dopings, and maximum ZT values were obtained as 0.76 at 323 K for Bi2Te2.85Se0.15:Cu0.01 and 0.90 at 423 K for Bi2Te2.85Se0.15:I0.005. However, the thermoelectric properties of Ni- and Zn-doped solid solutions were not enhanced.

  7. Oral, post-oral and genetic interactions in sweet appetite.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Anthony

    2006-11-30

    Inbred mouse strains differ in their preferences for sweeteners, due in part to variations in their T1R3 sweet taste receptor. Recent studies of sweet sensitive C57BL/6J (B6) and subsensitive 129P3/J (129) mice indicate that experiential and post-oral effects of sugar substantially modify sweetener preference. In fact, the strain difference in sucrose preference disappeared after the mice were given 23 h/day tests with sucrose at ascending concentrations (0.5-32%). Intragastric infusions of sucrose (16%) also conditioned increased preference for and absolute intake of flavored sweet solutions in B6 and 129 mice. An operant analysis of sweetener appetite revealed, unexpectedly, that sugar-experienced 129 mice respond more vigorously than B6 mice for 16% sucrose rewards. These findings indicate that experiential and nutritional factors can, to some degree, override genetic differences in peripheral taste sensitivity in determining food appetite.

  8. Oral, Post-Oral and Genetic Interactions in Sweet Appetite

    PubMed Central

    Sclafani, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Inbred mouse strains differ in their preferences for sweeteners, due in part to variations in their T1R3 sweet taste receptor. Recent studies of sweet sensitive C57BL/6J (B6) and subsensitive 129P3/J (129) mice indicate that experiential and post-oral effects of sugar substantially modify sweetener preference. In fact, the strain difference in sucrose preference disappeared after the mice were given 23 h/day tests with sucrose at ascending concentrations (0.5 - 32%). Intragastric infusions of sucrose (16%) also conditioned increased preference for and absolute intake of flavored sweet solutions in B6 and 129 mice. An operant analysis of sweetener appetite revealed, unexpectedly, that sugar-experienced 129 mice respond more vigorously than B6 mice for 16% sucrose rewards. These findings indicate that experiential and nutritional factors can, to some degree, override genetic differences in peripheral taste sensitivity in determining food appetite. PMID:16647093

  9. [Oral formulation of choice for children].

    PubMed

    Lajoinie, A; Henin, E; Kassai, B

    2015-08-01

    Selecting the most appropriate oral formulation is very challenging when developing medicines for children and in routine practice. Research in pediatric pharmacology has focused on oral drug formulation, determining whether the active pharmaceutical ingredient can be successfully delivered to children. Pediatric expert committees (EMA, EuFPI) recommend that children's medicines be safe, well tolerated, easy to use (palatable and requiring minimal handling), transportable, easily produced, cost effective, commercially viable, with a minimal impact on children's life-style. Oral liquid drug formulations (OLFs: solutions, syrups, suspensions) are historically considered as the most appropriate oral formulation for children, since they are easy to swallow for younger infants and palatable for children. However, OLFs present numerous disadvantages, such as low stability, potentially toxic excipients for children, and low transportability. In the long-term, dose volume and frequency of administration might lead to non-compliance. Multiple preparation steps and volume calculations are also among risk factors for medicine errors in children. An alternative to OLFs is the conventional solid oral dosage form (OSF), such as tablets and capsules. These offer the advantages of greater stability, easy dose selection, improved transportability, and ease of storage. They also allow the modification of drug pharmacokinetic parameters, minimizing administration frequency. Finally, OSFs are less costly than OLFs, since they are easier to develop, manufacture, transport, store, and deliver. Controlled study results suggest that the use of OSFs in children would be associated with greater acceptability by children, greater preference on the part of caregivers, and higher drug compliance than OLFs. Recent controlled studies, confirming that OSFs with an acceptable size for children (mini-tablets), should shift the current paradigm of OLFs as the reference for children's oral medicine

  10. Malabsorption due to selected oral antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Mero, K N; Rollin, R E; Phillips, R W

    1985-11-01

    This article represents an overview of recent research conducted on antibiotic-induced malabsorption in calves. The authors feel strongly that this work identifies a serious and ill-defined problem in the management of neonatal calves. Too often the solution utilized by veterinarian and stockmen for controlling neonatal diarrhea has been to administer oral antibiotics. In many cases, this has been done on the basis of antibiotic sensitivity testing, an approach that seems appropriate. Unfortunately, little consideration has been given to the relative sensitivity of the neonatal intestinal mucosa, with its very rapid turnover, to the potentially detrimental effects of oral antimicrobial therapy. The data that we have collected over the past 3 years conclusively demonstrate that high levels of four commonly used oral antibiotics, especially neomycin and chloramphenicol but also tetracycline and ampicillin, can cause a malabsorption diarrhea in normal calves. This action is not due to viral agents or overgrowth of resistant microbes but is the result of direct modification of the intestinal mucosa. Extrapolation of these data to different dose levels may not be accurate. Oral antibiotics may be of value in treating neonatal enteritis. Conversely, there can be too much of a good thing, and many cases of chronic diarrhea following use of oral antibiotics may be the result of an overenthusiastic and prolonged dosage regimen. Be cautious!

  11. [Schizophrenia and oral health].

    PubMed

    Moullan, M; Denis, F

    2017-04-01

    Mental health is an essential component of general health. Schizophrenia is a severe and chronic mental illness that affects higher brain functions. It is characterized by the presence of a mental dissociation, dampened or inappropriate affects, hallucinations and delirium. Schizophrenia has also a negative impact on oral health. As schizophrenia affects 1% of the population, every practitioner concerned with oral sphere will be confronted one day or another with a patient suffering from this disease. It is therefore important to acquire essential notions. The aim of our work was to make an update about factors that may affect oral health in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Oral Lesions in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali; Jafer, Mohammed; Maralingannavar, Mahesh; Sukumaran, Anil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral lesions in neonates represent a wide range of diseases often creating apprehension and anxiety among parents. Early examination and prompt diagnosis can aid in prudent management and serve as baseline against the future course of the disease. The present review aims to enlist and describe the diagnostic features of commonly encountered oral lesions in neonates. How to cite this article: Patil S, Rao RS, Majumdar B, Jafer M, Maralingannavar M, Sukumaran A. Oral Lesions in Neonates. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):131-138. PMID:27365934

  13. Etiology of oral habits.

    PubMed

    Bayardo, R E; Mejia, J J; Orozco, S; Montoya, K

    1996-01-01

    The pedodontic admission histories of 1600 Mexican children were analyzed, to determine general epidemiologic factors or oral habits, as well as their relationship with identifiable biopsychosociologic factors. Fifty-six percent of the children gave evidence of an oral habit, with significant predisposition among female patients, single children, subjects in poor physical health (particularly from allergies), as well as children with histories of chronic health problems. Oral habits should be considered a major health hazard because of their high incidence. Successful treatment requires a multidisciplinary approach to the basic cause of the problem.

  14. Probiotics and Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Haukioja, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The number of products containing probiotics, viable bacteria with proven health benefits, entering the market is increasing. Traditionally, probiotics have been associated with gut health, and most clinical interest has been focused on their use for prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal infections and diseases; however, during the last decade several investigators have also suggested the use of probiotics for oral health purposes. The aim of this review is to examine potential mechanisms of probiotic bacteria in the oral cavity and summarize observed effects of probiotics with respect to oral health. The review focuses on probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, genera that are most used in various probiotic products. PMID:20613927

  15. Polyelectrolyte Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colby, Ralph H.

    2008-03-01

    Pierre-Gilles de Gennes once described polyelectrolytes as the ``least understood form of condensed matter''. In this talk, I will describe the state of the polyelectrolyte field before and after de Gennes' seminal contributions published 1976-1980. De Gennes clearly explained why electrostatic interactions only stretch the polyelectrolyte chains on intermediate scales in semidilute solution (between the electrostatic blob size and the correlation length) and why the scattering function has a peak corresponding to the correlation length (the distance to the next chain). Despite many other ideas being suggested since then, the simple de Gennes scaling picture of polyelectrolyte conformation in solution has stood the test of time. How that model is used today, including consequences for dynamics in polyelectrolyte solutions, and what questions remain, will clarify the importance of de Gennes' ideas.

  16. [Optimizing biopsies of the oral mucosa].

    PubMed

    Raybaud, H; Voha, C; Cardot-Leccia, N; Monteil, R A

    2012-11-01

    We had for aim to describe and illustrate the artefacts observed in biopsies of the oral mucosa, as well as the impact of sending non-representative histological material to a laboratory. This article was based on an international literature review, as well as on our experience. We analysed the problems raised, for the pathologists and the histology lab-technicians, by these artefacts as well as their impact on the pathology report patient management. We suggest simple solutions.

  17. Oral Hypersensitivity Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... of substances. The most common causes are food, food additives, drugs, oral hygiene products, and dental materials. Q: Are there any specific foods that are more commonly implicated in intraoral hypersensitivity ...

  18. Oral compound nevus.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Lyzete Berriel; Consalaro, Alberto; da Silva Santos, Paulo Sérgio; da Silva Sampieri, Marcelo Bonifácio; Tinoco-Araújo, José Endrigo

    2014-02-18

    The melanocytic nevus is a benign and focal proliferation of nevus cells that can be congenital or acquired. Intraoral lesions are uncommon, and the etiology and pathogenesis are poorly understood. The occurrence rate of oral compound nevus is about 5.9% to 16.5% of all oral melanocytic nevi. A 22-year-old male patient presented with a dark brown macule on the buccal mucosa of the maxilla in the region of tooth 26. The lesion was elliptical, 0.7 x 0.5 cm, well circumscribed, asymptomatic, and the evolution time was unknown. An excisional biopsy was performed and microscopic analysis revealed nests of nevus cells in the epithelium and underlying connective tissue that were compatible with melanocytic compound nevus. Owing to the clinical similarity between oral melanocytic nevus and oral melanoma, a histopathological analysis is mandatory for definitive diagnosis.

  19. Massive Oral Decoding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janicke, Eugene M.

    1981-01-01

    An intensive reading clinic used the Massive Oral Decoding (MOD) technique to help 10 reading disabled students (grades 7 and 8) increase independent reading skills. MOD stresses large amounts of reading practice at the student's independent level. (CL)

  20. Oral manifestations of menopause.

    PubMed

    Zachariasen, R D

    1993-12-01

    Menopause is a normal developmental stage in a woman's life, marking the permanent cessation of menstruation. It is the result of irreversible changes in the hormonal and reproductive functions of the ovaries. Menopause is accompanied by a number of characteristic physical changes; some of which occur in the oral cavity. The two most common oral manifestations of menopause are: oral discomfort, including pain, a burning sensation, dryness, and altered taste perception; and alveolar bone loss as a result of osteoporosis. Although menopause has been recognized for centuries, it has only been recently that the study of menopause has gained much attention. The purpose of this article is to review the basic physiology of menopause, and to present the etiology of the oral manifestations associated with menopause.

  1. Oral contraceptives and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Friedman, G D

    1977-01-01

    A variety of studies have noted that the use of oral contraceptives generally leads to mild increases in blood pressure which are usually reversible when the medication is discontinued. Representative data from the Walnut Creek Contraceptive Drug Study and the Royal College of General Practitioners Study concerning the magnitude of excess risk and relation to duration of use and pull content are shown. Preliminary data from women, aged 25-34 years, taking multiphasic health checkups in Oakland and San Francisco, suggest that black as well as white women are susceptible to this side effect of oral contraceptives. A method is given for estimating the proportion of hypertensives among a population of young women that is attributable to oral contraceptive use. Although the risk of pull-induced hypertension is small for the average user, oral contraceptives appear to be an important identifiable cause of hypertension in samples of women studied.

  2. Budesonide Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Budesonide is used to prevent difficulty breathing, chest tightness, wheezing, and coughing caused by asthma. Budesonide powder for oral inhalation (Pulmicort Flexhaler) is used in adults and children 6 ...

  3. [Oral precancer and cancer].

    PubMed

    López-López, José; Omaña-Cepeda, Carlos; Jané-Salas, Enric

    2015-11-06

    We reviewed the concept of oral precancerous lesions, oral cancer, and the possibility of early diagnosis. With the keywords: premalignant oral lesions prevention, a search was performed over the past 10 years. Also clinical trials are searched from January 2011 until today with the keywords: oral cancer prevention AND dentistry. It is emphasized that there can be no significant changes related to the concept of precancerous lesions and cancer, and those relating to the early diagnosis. Despite the numerous described methods of screening, biopsy remains the most useful test, and therefore it is essential, mainly if we consider the new possibilities of molecular studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Oral Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the disease drawn from literally hundreds of sources. Current Stories OCF Support Group A FREE and anonymous patient / survivor discussion forum is open to the public, where those currently fighting oral ...

  5. Mometasone Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... other medical conditions, such as asthma, arthritis, or eczema (a skin disease), they may worsen when your oral steroid dose is decreased. Tell your doctor if this happens or if you experience any ...

  6. Oral contraception and sexuality.

    PubMed

    Dennerstein, L; Burrows, G

    1976-05-22

    A search of the literature has been carried out to determined how oral contraceptives affect sexuality in women. Some studies featured a high incidence of loss of libido. This could perhaps be attributed to preparations containing progestational compounds. However, no adequate double-blind trial has confirmed this observation. Some psychological and pharmacological aspects of contraceptions are discussed. More research is needed to ascertain why women often lose their sexual interest when taking oral contraceptives.

  7. Maintaining women's oral health.

    PubMed

    McCann, A L; Bonci, L

    2001-07-01

    Women must adopt health-promoting strategies for both general health and the oral cavity, because the health of a woman's body and oral cavity are bidirectional. For general health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should actively advise women to minimize alcohol use, abstain from or cease smoking, stay physically active, and choose the right foods to nourish both the body and mind. For oral health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should advise women on how to prevent or control oral infections, particularly dental caries and periodontal diseases. Specifically, women need to know how to remove plaque from the teeth mechanically, use appropriate chemotherapeutic agents and dentifrices, use oral irrigation, and control halitosis. Dental practitioners also need to stress the importance of regular maintenance visits for disease prevention. Adolescent women are more prone to gingivitis and aphthous ulcers when they begin their menstrual cycles and need advice about cessation of tobacco use, mouth protection during athletic activities, cleaning orthodontic appliances, developing good dietary habits, and avoiding eating disorders. Women in early to middle adulthood may be pregnant or using oral contraceptives with concomitant changes in oral tissues. Dental practitioners need to advise them how to take care of the oral cavity during these changes and how to promote the health of their infants, including good nutrition. Older women experience the onset of menopause and increased vulnerability to osteoporosis. They may also experience xerostomia and burning mouth syndrome. Dental practitioners need to help women alleviate these symptoms and encourage them to continue good infection control and diet practices.

  8. Oral and esophageal disorders.

    PubMed

    Noyer, C M; Simon, D

    1997-06-01

    This article focused on the approach to oral and esophageal disorders in patients with AIDS. Most of these disorders respond to various therapeutic regimens. Some of the oral complications can be prevented with dental prophylaxis, whereas recurrent esophageal disease in some patients may require long-term suppressive therapy. As patients with AIDS live longer with lower CD4 counts, gastroenterologists need to become familiar with the approach to and management of the more common lesions of the mouth and esophagus.

  9. Oral pigmentation: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sreeja, C.; Ramakrishnan, K.; Vijayalakshmi, D.; Devi, M.; Aesha, I.; Vijayabanu, B.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations. PMID:26538887

  10. Oral pigmentation: A review.

    PubMed

    Sreeja, C; Ramakrishnan, K; Vijayalakshmi, D; Devi, M; Aesha, I; Vijayabanu, B

    2015-08-01

    Pigmentations are commonly found in the mouth. They represent in various clinical patterns that can range from just physiologic changes to oral manifestations of systemic diseases and malignancies. Color changes in the oral mucosa can be attributed to the deposition of either endogenous or exogenous pigments as a result of various mucosal diseases. The various pigmentations can be in the form of blue/purple vascular lesions, brown melanotic lesions, brown heme-associated lesions, gray/black pigmentations.

  11. Oral vs. salivary diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Joana; Corby, Patricia M.; Barber, Cheryl A.; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The field of "salivary diagnostics" includes studies utilizing samples obtained from a variety of sources within the oral cavity. These samples include; whole unstimulated saliva, stimulated whole saliva, duct saliva collected directly from the parotid, submandibular/sublingual glands or minor salivary glands, swabs of the buccal mucosa, tongue or tonsils, and gingival crevicular fluid. Many publications state "we collected saliva from subjects" without fully describing the process or source of the oral fluid. Factors that need to be documented in any study include the time of day of the collection, the method used to stimulate and collect the fluid, and how much fluid is being collected and for how long. The handling of the oral fluid during and post-collection is also critical and may include addition of protease or nuclease inhibitors, centrifugation, and cold or frozen storage prior to assay. In an effort to create a standard protocol for determining a biomarker's origin we carried out a pilot study collecting oral fluid from 5 different sites in the mouth and monitoring the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines detected using MesoScaleDiscovery (MSD) electrochemiluminesence assays. Our data suggested that 3 of the cytokines are primarily derived from the submandibular gland, while 7 of the cytokines come from a source other than the major salivary glands such as the minor salivary glands or cells in the oral mucosae. Here we review the literature on monitoring biomarkers in oral samples and stress the need for determining the blood/saliva ratio when a quantitative determination is needed and suggest that the term oral diagnostic be used if the source of an analyte in the oral cavity is unknown.

  12. Polymer solutions

    DOEpatents

    Krawczyk, Gerhard Erich; Miller, Kevin Michael

    2011-07-26

    There is provided a method of making a polymer solution comprising polymerizing one or more monomer in a solvent, wherein said monomer comprises one or more ethylenically unsaturated monomer that is a multi-functional Michael donor, and wherein said solvent comprises 40% or more by weight, based on the weight of said solvent, one or more multi-functional Michael donor.

  13. -Saturated Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliyan, Faysal Fayez; Alfantazi, Akram

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents an electrochemical study on the corrosion behavior of API-X100 steel, heat-treated to have microstructures similar to those of the heat-affected zones (HAZs) of pipeline welding, in bicarbonate-CO2 saturated solutions. The corrosion reactions, onto the surface and through the passive films, are simulated by cyclic voltammetry. The interrelation between bicarbonate concentration and CO2 hydration is analyzed during the filming process at the open-circuit potentials. In dilute bicarbonate solutions, H2CO3 drives more dominantly the cathodic reduction and the passive films form slowly. In the concentrated solutions, bicarbonate catalyzes both the anodic and cathodic reactions, only initially, after which it drives a fast-forming thick passivation that inhibits the underlying dissolution and impedes the cathodic reduction. The significance of the substrate is as critical as that of passivation in controlling the course of the corrosion reactions in the dilute solutions. For fast-cooled (heat treatment) HAZs, its metallurgical significance becomes more comparable to that of slower-cooled HAZs as the bicarbonate concentration is higher.

  14. Sound Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2007-01-01

    Poor classroom acoustics are impairing students' hearing and their ability to learn. However, technology has come up with a solution: tools that focus voices in a way that minimizes intrusive ambient noise and gets to the intended receiver--not merely amplifying the sound, but also clarifying and directing it. One provider of classroom audio…

  15. Sound Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2007-01-01

    Poor classroom acoustics are impairing students' hearing and their ability to learn. However, technology has come up with a solution: tools that focus voices in a way that minimizes intrusive ambient noise and gets to the intended receiver--not merely amplifying the sound, but also clarifying and directing it. One provider of classroom audio…

  16. Susceptibility of Oral Bacteria to an Antimicrobial Decapeptide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    kai.leung@amedd.army.mil Received 14 April 2003 Accepted 24 August 2003 Susceptibility of oral bacteria to an antimicrobial decapeptide S. P. Concannon,1† T...resident saliva bacteria collected from human subjects. Cytotoxic activity of KSL against mammalian cells and the structural features of this...decapeptide were also investigated, the latter by using two-dimensional NMR in aqueous and DMSO solutions. MICs of KSL for the majority of oral bacteria

  17. Oral and systemic photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Andrew C; Damian, Diona L; Halliday, Gary M

    2014-01-01

    Photoprotection can be provided not only by ultraviolet (UV) blockers but also by oral substances. Epidemiologically identified associations between foods and skin cancer and interventional experiments have discovered mechanisms of UV skin damage. These approaches have identified oral substances that are photoprotective in humans. UV inhibits adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production causing an energy crisis, which prevents optimal skin immunity and DNA repair. Enhancing ATP production with oral nicotinamide protects from UV immunosuppression, enhances DNA repair and reduces skin cancer in humans. Reactive oxygen species also contribute to photodamage. Nontoxic substances consumed in the diet, or available as oral supplements, can protect the skin by multiple potential mechanisms. These substances include polyphenols in fruit, vegetables, wine, tea and caffeine-containing foods. UV-induced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) contributes to photodamage. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and food substances reduce production of this lipid mediator. Fish oils are photoprotective, at least partially by reducing PGE2 . Orally consumed substances, either in the diet or as supplements, can influence cutaneous responses to UV. A current research goal is to develop an oral supplement that could be used in conjunction with other sun protective strategies in order to provide improved protection from sunlight.

  18. Oral application of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Georgiades, J A; Fleischmann, W R

    1996-01-01

    A number of different laboratories reported on studies with orally administered interferons and cytokines. Their observations extend previous observations which showed that orally administered interferons and cytokines can exert both local and systemic effects. As difficult as it may be to understand how orally administered interferons and cytokines may exert both effects, the increasing number of laboratories that demonstrate biological effects with orally administered cytokines suggests that serious consideration be given to the possibility that orally administered interferons and cytokines can indeed exert effects. They also raise the possibility that these effects may have biological relevance for the treatment of human disease. Moreover, they may indicate that the nasal/oral region is a window on the environment. It is most important, however, to assure that these experiments are performed with special care to avoid presenting preliminary data that is not properly controlled. It is essential to carry out these studies with sufficient animals or patients to ascertain their significance; and to plan the studies as double-blind evaluations to avoid misinterpretations when subjective tests are used. Nevertheless, the overall data presented give one the impression of an area that should be pursued.

  19. Oral somatosensory awareness.

    PubMed

    Haggard, Patrick; de Boer, Lieke

    2014-11-01

    Oral somatosensory awareness refers to the somatic sensations arising within the mouth, and to the information these sensations provide about the state and structure of the mouth itself, and objects in the mouth. Because the oral tissues have a strong somatosensory innervation, they are the locus of some of our most intense and vivid bodily experiences. The salient pain of toothache, or the habit of running one's tongue over one's teeth when someone mentions "dentist", provide two very different indications of the power of oral somatosensory awareness in human experience and behaviour. This paper aims to review the origins and structure of oral somatosensory awareness, focussing on quantitative, mechanistic studies in humans. We first extend a model of levels of bodily awareness to the specific case of the mouth. We then briefly summarise the sensory innervation of oral tissues, and their projections in the brain. We next describe how these peripheral inputs give rise to perceptions of objects in the mouth, such as foods, liquids and oral devices, and also of the mouth tissues themselves. Finally, we consider the concept of a conscious mouth image, and the somatosensory basis of "mouth feel". The theoretical framework outlined in this paper is intended to facilitate scientific studies of this important site of human experience. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers. PMID:22792106

  1. 40 CFR 180.198 - Trichlorfon; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances... following food commodities: Commodity Parts per million Cattle, fat 1 0.5 Cattle, meat 1 0.2 Cattle, meat...

  2. 40 CFR 180.198 - Trichlorfon; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances... following food commodities: Commodity Parts per million Cattle, fat 1 0.5 Cattle, meat 1 0.2 Cattle, meat...

  3. 40 CFR 180.198 - Trichlorfon; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances... following food commodities: Commodity Parts per million Cattle, fat 1 0.5 Cattle, meat 1 0.2 Cattle, meat...

  4. 40 CFR 180.198 - Trichlorfon; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances... following food commodities: Commodity Parts per million Cattle, fat 1 0.5 Cattle, meat 1 0.2 Cattle, meat...

  5. 40 CFR 180.198 - Trichlorfon; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances... following food commodities: Commodity Parts per million Cattle, fat 1 0.5 Cattle, meat 1 0.2 Cattle, meat...

  6. 21 CFR 520.1631 - Oxfendazole and trichlorfon paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... intestinalis, 2nd and 3rd instars; G. nasalis, 3rd instar) and the following gastrointestinal worms: Large... few days before or after treatment with or exposure to, cholinesterase-inhibiting drugs,...

  7. 21 CFR 520.1631 - Oxfendazole and trichlorfon paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... intestinalis, 2nd and 3rd instars; G. nasalis, 3rd instar) and the following gastrointestinal worms: Large... few days before or after treatment with or exposure to, cholinesterase-inhibiting drugs,...

  8. 21 CFR 520.1631 - Oxfendazole and trichlorfon paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... intestinalis, 2nd and 3rd instars; G. nasalis, 3rd instar) and the following gastrointestinal worms: Large... few days before or after treatment with or exposure to, cholinesterase-inhibiting drugs,...

  9. 21 CFR 520.1631 - Oxfendazole and trichlorfon paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... intestinalis, 2nd and 3rd instars; G. nasalis, 3rd instar) and the following gastrointestinal worms: Large... few days before or after treatment with or exposure to, cholinesterase-inhibiting drugs,...

  10. 21 CFR 520.2380e - Thiabendazole with trichlorfon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... mixed in 5 to 10 fluid ounces of water and administered by stomach tube or drench. (3) Do not re-treat... stomach tube or drench it shall also bear the statement: Caution; Federal law restricts this drug to use...

  11. 21 CFR 520.2380e - Thiabendazole with trichlorfon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... mixed in 5 to 10 fluid ounces of water and administered by stomach tube or drench. (3) Do not re-treat... stomach tube or drench it shall also bear the statement: Caution; Federal law restricts this drug to use...

  12. 21 CFR 520.2380e - Thiabendazole with trichlorfon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... mixed in 5 to 10 fluid ounces of water and administered by stomach tube or drench. (3) Do not re-treat... stomach tube or drench it shall also bear the statement: Caution; Federal law restricts this drug to use...

  13. 21 CFR 520.2380e - Thiabendazole with trichlorfon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... mixed in 5 to 10 fluid ounces of water and administered by stomach tube or drench. (3) Do not re-treat... stomach tube or drench it shall also bear the statement: Caution; Federal law restricts this drug to use...

  14. 21 CFR 520.2380e - Thiabendazole with trichlorfon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... mixed in 5 to 10 fluid ounces of water and administered by stomach tube or drench. (3) Do not re-treat... stomach tube or drench it shall also bear the statement: Caution; Federal law restricts this drug to use...

  15. HPV-associated oral warts.

    PubMed

    Feller, L; Khammissa, R A G; Wood, N H; Marnewick, J C; Meyerov, R; Lemmer, J

    2011-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is strictly epitheliotropic, infecting stratified squamous cutaneous and mucosal epithelial cells. Oral HPV infection may be subclinical or putatively associated with benign or malignant oral neoplasms. The benign HPV-associated oral lesions, focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck disease), oral squamous cell papilloma, oral verruca vulgaris (common wart) and oral condyloma acuminatum, are collectively referred to as oral warts. Oral warts are usually asymptomatic, may be persistent or uncommonly, may regress spontaneously. HPV-associated oral warts have a prevalence of 0.5% in the general population, occur in up to 5% of HIV-seropositive subjects, and in up to 23% of HIV-seropositive subjects on highly active antiretroviral therapy. This paper is a clinico-pathological review of HPV-associated oral warts.

  16. Enhancing oral moisture using an extract of Capparis masaikai Levl.

    PubMed

    Kitada, K; Ishikawa, M; Shibuya, K; Nakasugi, T; Oho, T

    2008-01-04

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a Capparis masaikai Levl. extract on enhancing oral moisture. Solutions of Capparis masaikai extract, citric acid, sodium chloride, and sucrose were dropped on the tongue dorsum of 20 healthy subjects aged 23-34 years. After swallowing each solution, the oral moisture was measured for 60 min using a saliva wetness tester and a moisture checker. The subjects recorded the degree of taste using a visual analog scale to examine the stimulating effect of each solution on salivation. The Capparis masaikai extract had a long-lasting moistening effect on both the tongue dorsum and buccal mucosa for up to 60 min. The weakly bittersweet taste of the extract was perceived stronger than the other taste elements. The results suggest that the Capparis masaikai extract is useful for enhancing oral moisture.

  17. The Canine Oral Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Klein, Erin A.; Thompson, Emily C.; Blanton, Jessica M.; Chen, Tsute; Milella, Lisa; Buckley, Catherine M. F.; Davis, Ian J.; Bennett, Marie-Lousie; Marshall-Jones, Zoe V.

    2012-01-01

    Determining the bacterial composition of the canine oral microbiome is of interest for two primary reasons. First, while the human oral microbiome has been well studied using molecular techniques, the oral microbiomes of other mammals have not been studied in equal depth using culture independent methods. This study allows a comparison of the number of bacterial taxa, based on 16S rRNA-gene sequence comparison, shared between humans and dogs, two divergent mammalian species. Second, canine oral bacteria are of interest to veterinary and human medical communities for understanding their roles in health and infectious diseases. The bacteria involved are mostly unnamed and not linked by 16S rRNA-gene sequence identity to a taxonomic scheme. This manuscript describes the analysis of 5,958 16S rRNA-gene sequences from 65 clone libraries. Full length 16S rRNA reference sequences have been obtained for 353 canine bacterial taxa, which were placed in 14 bacterial phyla, 23 classes, 37 orders, 66 families, and 148 genera. Eighty percent of the taxa are currently unnamed. The bacterial taxa identified in dogs are markedly different from those of humans with only 16.4% of oral taxa are shared between dogs and humans based on a 98.5% 16S rRNA sequence similarity cutoff. This indicates that there is a large divergence in the bacteria comprising the oral microbiomes of divergent mammalian species. The historic practice of identifying animal associated bacteria based on phenotypic similarities to human bacteria is generally invalid. This report describes the diversity of the canine oral microbiome and provides a provisional 16S rRNA based taxonomic scheme for naming and identifying unnamed canine bacterial taxa. PMID:22558330

  18. Oral Insulin Reloaded

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Plum-Mörschel, Leona

    2014-01-01

    Optimal coverage of insulin needs is the paramount aim of insulin replacement therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus. To apply insulin without breaking the skin barrier by a needle and/or to allow a more physiological provision of insulin are the main reasons triggering the continuous search for alternative routes of insulin administration. Despite numerous attempts over the past 9 decades to develop an insulin pill, no insulin for oral dosing is commercially available. By way of a structured approach, we aim to provide a systematic update on the most recent developments toward an orally available insulin formulation with a clear focus on data from clinical-experimental and clinical studies. Thirteen companies that claim to be working on oral insulin formulations were identified. However, only 6 of these companies published new clinical trial results within the past 5 years. Interestingly, these clinical data reports make up a mere 4% of the considerably high total number of publications on the development of oral insulin formulations within this time period. While this picture clearly reflects the rising research interest in orally bioavailable insulin formulations, it also highlights the fact that the lion’s share of research efforts is still allocated to the preclinical stages. PMID:24876606

  19. The Oral Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Arweiler, Nicole B; Netuschil, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    The oral microbiota represents an important part of the human microbiota, and includes several hundred to several thousand diverse species. It is a normal part of the oral cavity and has an important function to protect against colonization of extrinsic bacteria which could affect systemic health. On the other hand, the most common oral diseases caries, gingivitis and periodontitis are based on microorganisms. While (medical) research focused on the planktonic phase of bacteria over the last 100 years, it is nowadays generally known, that oral microorganisms are organised as biofilms. On any non-shedding surfaces of the oral cavity dental plaque starts to form, which meets all criteria for a microbial biofilm and is subject to the so-called succession. When the sensitive ecosystem turns out of balance - either by overload or weak immune system - it becomes a challenge for local or systemic health. Therefore, the most common strategy and the golden standard for the prevention of caries, gingivitis and periodontitis is the mechanical removal of this biofilms from teeth, restorations or dental prosthesis by regular toothbrushing.

  20. Enhancement of the oral absorption of cyclosporin in man.

    PubMed Central

    Drewe, J; Meier, R; Vonderscher, J; Kiss, D; Posanski, U; Kissel, T; Gyr, K

    1992-01-01

    1. The oral absorption of cyclosporin from three new semi-solid oral formulations was compared with the standard soft gelatine preparation in twelve healthy male volunteers. One formulation was based on a solid micellar solution, while the other two, with different in vitro release properties, were based on a microemulsion principle. 2. The results showed that the solid micellar solution and the faster releasing microemulsion formulation increased the extent of absorption on average by 45.2 and 49.0%, respectively, compared with the reference soft gelatine capsule. PMID:1633069

  1. 21 CFR 520.1044a - Gentamicin sulfate oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....5 milligram/pound/day; swine dysentery: 1 milliliter per 1 gallon of drinking water for 3... control and treatment of swine dysentery associated with Treponema hyodysenteriae. (3) Limitations. For... dysentery recurs. Do not slaughter treated swine for food for at least 3 days following treatment....

  2. Oral zinc sulfate solutions inhibit sweet taste perception.

    PubMed

    Keast, Russell S J; Canty, Thomas M; Breslin, Paul A S

    2004-07-01

    We investigated the ability of zinc sulfate (5, 25, 50 mM) to inhibit the sweetness of 12 chemically diverse sweeteners, which were all intensity matched to 300 mM sucrose [800 mM glucose, 475 mM fructose, 3.25 mM aspartame, 3.5 mM saccharin, 12 mM sodium cyclamate, 14 mM acesulfame-K, 1.04 M sorbitol, 0.629 mM sucralose, 0.375 mM neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC), 1.5 mM stevioside and 0.0163 mM thaumatin]. Zinc sulfate inhibited the sweetness of most compounds in a concentration dependent manner, peaking with 80% inhibition by 50 mM. Curiously, zinc sulfate never inhibited the sweetness of Na-cyclamate. This suggests that Na-cyclamate may access a sweet taste mechanism that is different from the other sweeteners, which were inhibited uniformly (except thaumatin) at every concentration of zinc sulfate. We hypothesize that this set of compounds either accesses a single receptor or multiple receptors that are inhibited equally by zinc sulfate at each concentration.

  3. 21 CFR 520.1044a - Gentamicin sulfate oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....5 milligram/pound/day; swine dysentery: 1 milliliter per 1 gallon of drinking water for 3... control and treatment of swine dysentery associated with Treponema hyodysenteriae. (3) Limitations. For... dysentery recurs. Do not slaughter treated swine for food for at least 3 days following treatment. ...

  4. 21 CFR 520.1044a - Gentamicin sulfate oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....5 milligram/pound/day; swine dysentery: 1 milliliter per 1 gallon of drinking water for 3... control and treatment of swine dysentery associated with Treponema hyodysenteriae. (3) Limitations. For... dysentery recurs. Do not slaughter treated swine for food for at least 3 days following treatment. ...

  5. 21 CFR 520.1044a - Gentamicin sulfate oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....5 milligram/pound/day; swine dysentery: 1 milliliter per 1 gallon of drinking water for 3... control and treatment of swine dysentery associated with Treponema hyodysenteriae. (3) Limitations. For... dysentery recurs. Do not slaughter treated swine for food for at least 3 days following treatment. ...

  6. 21 CFR 520.1044a - Gentamicin sulfate oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....5 milligram/pound/day; swine dysentery: 1 milliliter per 1 gallon of drinking water for 3... control and treatment of swine dysentery associated with Treponema hyodysenteriae. (3) Limitations. For... dysentery recurs. Do not slaughter treated swine for food for at least 3 days following treatment. ...

  7. 21 CFR 520.2158a - Streptomycin sulfate oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... sole source of streptomycin. Warning: Certain strains of bacteria may develop a tolerance for...: Certain strains of bacteria may develop a tolerance for streptomycin. Consult a veterinarian or animal...

  8. 21 CFR 520.2158a - Streptomycin sulfate oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... sole source of streptomycin. Warning: Certain strains of bacteria may develop a tolerance for...: Certain strains of bacteria may develop a tolerance for streptomycin. Consult a veterinarian or animal...

  9. 21 CFR 520.2158a - Streptomycin sulfate oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... sole source of streptomycin. Warning: Certain strains of bacteria may develop a tolerance for...: Certain strains of bacteria may develop a tolerance for streptomycin. Consult a veterinarian or animal...

  10. 21 CFR 520.2158a - Streptomycin sulfate oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... sole source of streptomycin. Warning: Certain strains of bacteria may develop a tolerance for...: Certain strains of bacteria may develop a tolerance for streptomycin. Consult a veterinarian or animal...

  11. 21 CFR 520.2158a - Streptomycin sulfate oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... sole source of streptomycin. Warning: Certain strains of bacteria may develop a tolerance for...: Certain strains of bacteria may develop a tolerance for streptomycin. Consult a veterinarian or animal...

  12. Oral varix: a review.

    PubMed

    Lazos, Jerónimo P; Piemonte, Eduardo D; Panico, René L

    2015-06-01

    Ageing produces several changes on the oral cavity, and oral varix (OV) is among the most common, and they are related with some medical diseases; however, this association is not clear. The aim of this article is to offer a review of OV, regarding aetiology, clinical and histological features, associated factors, treatment and its clinical significance. Except for a higher incidence of OV in elder individuals, there is limited evidence that supports its relationship with medical conditions such us cardiovascular diseases or portal hypertension. Also, there is no consensus regarding its pathogenesis, but the hemodynamic theory embodies the most comprehensive approach. The high prevalence in elderly people stresses the need for regular oral examination, but more detailed studies regarding OV in relation to systemic diseases are needed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [MICROFLORA AND ORAL DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Khavkin, A I; Ippolitov, Y A; Aleshina, E O; Komarova O N

    2015-01-01

    Acid-producing microorganisms are base etiological agents of lesions of tooth enamel and destruction of dentin. The process start by specific microflora of tooth deposit--Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacteria and Actinomycetis viscosus which ferment food carbogydrate to form acids. High titre of them in oral cavity may be considered like a marker of carbohydrate food. But the pathogenic bacteria don't have aggression to host organism until they will have virulent factors which help to get over protection of host organism. At the same time, microflora of oral cavity is involved to form pellicula. Pellicula is a biofilm which to protect tooth enamel and dentin. Understanding relationships between safety factors of host and pathogenic microflora of oral cavity will give to create effective methods of prevention and treatment.

  14. Topical Antimycotics for Oral Candidiasis in Warfarin Users.

    PubMed

    Hellfritzsch, Maja; Pottegård, Anton; Pedersen, Andreas James Thestrup; Burghle, Alaa; Mouaanaki, Fatima; Hallas, Jesper; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Damkier, Per

    2017-04-01

    Treatment for oral candidiasis in warfarin users may be complicated by drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between warfarin and topically applied antimycotics. However, current knowledge of these putative DDIs is merely based on case series. We therefore performed a cohort cross-over study with the objective to evaluate the potential DDIs between warfarin and miconazole oral gel or nystatin oral solution. The cohort consisted of individuals using warfarin in the period of 1998-2012 (n ≈ 7400). We collected data on cohort members' measurements of the international normalized ratio (INR) from a clinical database, and obtained information on their use of topically applied miconazole and nystatin from a regional prescription register. Potential DDIs were assessed by comparing INR values before and after initiation of an antimycotic drug. Among 17 warfarin users exposed to miconazole oral gel, the mean INR increased from 2.5 (95% CI: 2.1-2.8) to 3.8 (95% CI: 2.8-4.8) after exposure, corresponding to a mean INR increase of 1.4 (95% CI: 0.3-2.4). Among 30 warfarin users exposed to nystatin oral solution, the mean INR was 2.7 (95% CI: 2.3-3.1) before and 2.5 (95% CI: 2.2-2.9) after exposure. In conclusion, we found evidence supporting a clinically relevant drug-drug interaction between warfarin and miconazole oral gel. In contrast, we did not find any indication of an interaction between warfarin and nystatin oral solution. Nystatin rather than miconazole should be preferred when treating warfarin users for oral candidiasis.

  15. Oral contraceptives: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Derman, R

    1989-09-01

    Cardiovascular risks attributable to oral contraceptive use may now be subdivided into those that appear to be secondary to the estrogen component, i.e., venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and those linked to the progestin component, i.e., small vessel disease including myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident. It appears that venous risk is attributable to subtle changes in clotting factors, while arterial risk may be secondary to changes in glucose and lipid metabolism. In order to determine which women are at greatest risk from oral contraceptive use, Spellacy et al. has developed a risk scoring form that aids in the screening process. After excluding women with an absolute contraindication to pill use, women at greatest risk for cardiovascular disease related to oral contraceptive use are those with a family history of hyperlipidemia, gestational or overt diabetics, hypertensives, and smokers over the age of 35. The gradual reduction by manufacturers of the steroid content of oral contraceptives appears to have lessened the incidence of adverse effects. Our current knowledge of risk factors permits the clinician to reduce exposure to oral contraceptive-related mortality by as much as 86 per cent. As we continue to search for ways to reduce risk among oral contraceptive users, it is important to note that more than 25 per cent of women are still taking formulations containing 50 micrograms of estrogen. It becomes the responsibility of the practicing physician to "step-down" these patients to lower-dose preparations such as the multiphasics. Such preparations also represent optimal therapy for first-time pill users.

  16. Oral and perioral candidosis.

    PubMed

    Fotos, P G; Ray, T L

    1994-06-01

    The following article has been assembled from the current literature and our clinical experience to provide a comprehensive review of oral and perioral candidal infections. A brief review of the epidemiology and pathogenesis is followed by a description of the various clinical signs and symptoms associated with oral candidosis. Methods useful in arriving at a diagnosis of candidal infection as well as a number of effective therapeutic modalities are discussed. In addition, special considerations relating to the treatment of patients with other concurrent mucosal diseases and long-term antifungal maintenance regimes are addressed.

  17. Oral Myiasis : Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ramli, Roszalina; Abd Rahman, Roslan

    2002-01-01

    Myiasis occurs when living tissues of mammals are invaded by eggs or larvae of flies, mainly from the order of Diptera. Most of the previousty reported cases are in the tropics and they were usually associated with inadequate personal hygiene, sometimes with poor manual dexterity. This report describes two cases of oral myiasis in cerebral palsy patients in Seremban General Hospital, Malaysia. This article also discusses the therapeutic property of maggots and highlights the importance of oral health care in the special needs patients. PMID:22844224

  18. Per-oral cholangioscopy

    PubMed Central

    Monga, Amitabh; Ramchandani, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    Direct endoscopic views of bile duct have been described in literature since the 1970s. Since then rapid strides have been made with the advent of technologically advanced systems with better image quality and maneuverability. The single operator semi-disposable per-oral cholangioscope and other novel methods such as the cholangioscopy access balloon are likely to revolutionize this field. Even though cholangioscopy is currently used primarily for characterization of indeterminate strictures and management of large bile duct stones, the diagnostic and therapeutic indications are likely to expand in future. The following is an overview of the currently available per-oral cholangioscopy equipments, indications for use and future directions. PMID:21776429

  19. Oral myiasis in children.

    PubMed

    Reddy, M H Raghunath; Das, Nagarajappa; Vivekananda, M R

    2012-04-01

    Oral myiasis is a rare condition in humans and is associated with poor oral hygiene, severe halitosis, mouth breathing during sleep, mental handicap, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, anterior open bite, incompetent lips, and other conditions. In this report, a 14 year-old boy who had an orofacial trauma in the maxillary dentoalveolar region,which was neglected, has been described. There was a deep lacerated wound on the upper vestibule which was infected and maggots were found on the same wound. The clinical features, management, treatment are discussed and relevant literature is reviewed.

  20. [Oral hygiene (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Gülzow, H J

    1978-12-08

    Appropriate oral hygiene is an essential and effective prophylactic measure against caries and periodontal disease. The most important aids for this purpose are suitable multi-tufted short-headed tooth brushes with suitable plastic bristles and suitable tooth-pastes. By means of a rational technique, as for instance the rotation method, teeth and gum margin should be systematically cleaned for at least three minutes if at all possible after every meal. A certain massage effect is exerted on the gingivae at the same time. All other aids to oral hygiene such as toothpicks, dental floss, interdental stimulators, mouthwashes etc. are only additional aids which certainly have their special indications.

  1. Oral myiasis in children

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, M. H. Raghunath; Das, Nagarajappa; Vivekananda, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    Oral myiasis is a rare condition in humans and is associated with poor oral hygiene, severe halitosis, mouth breathing during sleep, mental handicap, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, anterior open bite, incompetent lips, and other conditions. In this report, a 14 year-old boy who had an orofacial trauma in the maxillary dentoalveolar region,which was neglected, has been described. There was a deep lacerated wound on the upper vestibule which was infected and maggots were found on the same wound. The clinical features, management, treatment are discussed and relevant literature is reviewed. PMID:22629058

  2. [Oral contraceptives (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kopera, H

    1976-11-26

    A short review of the endocrinological basis of reproduction in the female is followed by a critical survey of the oral contraceptive methods in current use. The composition of the preparations, their use, their biological and use-effectiveness and mode of action are discussed.The importance is emphasized of complying with the basic principles of drug testing in the evaluation of effects of oral contraceptiveson health. Other effects than merely the contraceptive actions of these preparations are described in detail, including not only the undesirable, frequently neglected, yet very important beneficial effects on the drug-users, their children and families.

  3. Maintaining oral health after stroke.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Hazel

    Oral care is essential to maintain oral health and prevent complications such as tooth loss, gingivitis and periodontitis. Poor oral hygiene in dependent, hospitalised patients could lead to serious complications such as chest infection, pneumonia, poor nutritional intake and increased length of hospital stay. Patients who have had a stroke may have physical and cognitive problems that make them dependent on others for their personal care, including oral care. It is essential that nurses and carers understand why maintaining oral hygiene is important following stroke and the consequences of poor oral care.

  4. Oral inflammation in small animals.

    PubMed

    Lommer, Milinda J

    2013-05-01

    The oral cavity can be affected by a wide variety of disorders characterized by inflammation of the gingiva and/or oral mucosa. In dogs and cats, differential diagnoses for generalized oral inflammatory disorders include plaque-reactive mucositis, chronic gingivostomatitis, eosinophilic granuloma complex, pemphigus and pemphigoid disorders, erythema multiforme, and systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition, endodontic or periodontal abscesses, infectious conditions, reactive lesions, and neoplastic conditions may initially present with localized or generalized inflammation of the oral mucosa. Determination of the underlying cause of an oral inflammatory condition relies on a thorough history, complete physical and oral examination, and incisional biopsy and histopathologic examination of lesions.

  5. Oral microbiome and oral and gastrointestinal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Chen, Calvin Y; Hayes, Richard B

    2012-03-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates human oral bacteria in the etiology of oral and gastrointestinal cancers. Epidemiological studies consistently report increased risks of these cancers in men and women with periodontal disease or tooth loss, conditions caused by oral bacteria. More than 700 bacterial species inhabit the oral cavity, including at least 11 bacterial phyla and 70 genera. Oral bacteria may activate alcohol and smoking-related carcinogens locally or act systemically, through chronic inflammation. High-throughput genetic-based assays now make it possible to comprehensively survey the human oral microbiome, the totality of bacteria in the oral cavity. Establishing the association of the oral microbiome with cancer risk may lead to significant advances in understanding of cancer etiology, potentially opening a new research paradigm for cancer prevention.

  6. Oral and written instruction of oral hygiene: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Harnacke, Daniela; Beldoch, Magdalena; Bohn, Gertrude-Heidi; Seghaoui, Ouarda; Hegel, Nicole; Deinzer, Renate

    2012-10-01

    This randomized, evaluator-masked, controlled study evaluates the effectiveness of oral in contrast to written instruction of oral hygiene. Eighty-three students without clinical signs of periodontitis were randomly assigned to either a control group or one of three experimental conditions: 1) written instruction, 2) standardized oral instruction, or 3) individualized oral instruction. Plaque and bleeding indices were assessed to analyze intervention effects on oral health and oral hygiene skills. Measurements took place at baseline and 4 weeks after intervention. Groups differed significantly with respect to gingival bleeding and were tentatively significant with respect to oral hygiene skills. Participants who had received oral individualized instructions showed the best results. A gradient of effectiveness of the instruction methods was observed with most favorable results for the individualized instruction.

  7. Oral therapy of infant diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Ransome-Kuti, O; Bamisaiye, A

    1978-08-26

    Immediate oral therapy at home by the mother using a sugar-salt solution offers a real prospect of reducing mortality from gastroenteritis among preschool children in the developing world. The sugar-salt solution enables the mother to take action against a disease which is the most frequent cause of death among young children. In Lagos, Nigeria, knowledge of the treatment has diffused rapidly in a low-income community served by a clinic run by the Institute of Child Health. In a recent study, women expecting their 1st child and others who had never used the service were able to describe the sugar-salt solution treatment taught to all who attend the clinic. However, of the 217 women who described the method, less than 1/2 (34%) could give the correct proportions of sugar and salt to be used (4 teaspoons and 1/4 teaspoon respectively in a standard local beer bottle filled with water). Most errors involved the use of too much salt. In nearly 1/2 these cases, 4 times too much salt was described, and in 3 cases, 16 times too much salt. Under these circumstances, we can expect a possible increase in children admitted with hypernatremia, a situation which would bring the method into disrepute. Any attempt to transfer health skills to mothers in developing countries must recognize, as in this example, the problems posed by lack of education and unfamiliarity with measurement terms such as "1/4" or even "a teaspoon." What is required is a simple measuring spoon giving the actual quantity to be used. Manufactured on a large scale in plastic, this would be inexpensive. Ideally, every mother of a preschool child should have 1, but where this is not possible, all health workers should have such spoons so that they can measure into a mother's hand the correct amounts. In this way the mother can make correct use of a treatment which has such potential for saving lives.

  8. Curriculum Guidelines for Predoctoral Oral Diagnosis/Oral Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Oral diagnosis is the area of dental practice that deals with gathering, recording, and evaluating information contributing to the identification of abnormalities of the head and neck region. A statement of general curricular goals in oral diagnosis/oral medicine is presented. (MLW)

  9. Curriculum Guidelines for Predoctoral Oral Diagnosis/Oral Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Oral diagnosis is the area of dental practice that deals with gathering, recording, and evaluating information contributing to the identification of abnormalities of the head and neck region. A statement of general curricular goals in oral diagnosis/oral medicine is presented. (MLW)

  10. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Washio, Jumpei; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-06-02

    Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the 'Warburg effect'. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases.

  11. The New Orality: Oral Characteristics of Computer-Mediated Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Sharmila Pixy; Montgomery, Maureen

    1996-01-01

    Considers the characteristics of orality and literacy developed in the work of scholars such as Walter Ong to consider computer-mediated communication (CMC) as the potential site of a "new orality" which is neither purely oral or literate. Notes that the medium of CMC is writing, which has traditionally represented the…

  12. Metabolomic Studies of Oral Biofilm, Oral Cancer, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Washio, Jumpei; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Oral diseases are known to be closely associated with oral biofilm metabolism, while cancer tissue is reported to possess specific metabolism such as the ‘Warburg effect’. Metabolomics might be a useful method for clarifying the whole metabolic systems that operate in oral biofilm and oral cancer, however, technical limitations have hampered such research. Fortunately, metabolomics techniques have developed rapidly in the past decade, which has helped to solve these difficulties. In vivo metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm have produced various findings. Some of these findings agreed with the in vitro results obtained in conventional metabolic studies using representative oral bacteria, while others differed markedly from them. Metabolomic analyses of oral cancer tissue not only revealed differences between metabolomic profiles of cancer and normal tissue, but have also suggested a specific metabolic system operates in oral cancer tissue. Saliva contains a variety of metabolites, some of which might be associated with oral or systemic disease; therefore, metabolomics analysis of saliva could be useful for identifying disease-specific biomarkers. Metabolomic analyses of the oral biofilm, oral cancer, and saliva could contribute to the development of accurate diagnostic, techniques, safe and effective treatments, and preventive strategies for oral and systemic diseases. PMID:27271597

  13. The novel oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Hernandez, Cristhiam M; Garcia, David A

    2013-03-01

    After the introduction of warfarin, long-term oral anticoagulation treatment remained unchanged for more than 50 years. Most recently, with the development and approval of new oral anticoagulants, the treatment of medical conditions that require thrombosis prophylaxis and long-term anticoagulation has become more complex. In the case of venous thromboembolism (VTE) prevention after orthopedic surgery, the new oral agents will be less costly than the parenteral alternative. In other settings (such as atrial fibrillation or treatment of acute VTE), the new agents will offer additional convenience at higher cost, but the degree to which they will reduce clinically important events such as thrombosis or bleeding will be limited, especially for patients on optimally controlled warfarin. As the use of the new oral anticoagulants becomes more widespread, it will be important for all clinicians to have a basic understanding of their pharmacology, advantages, and limitations. Although the need to measure or reverse the effect of these drugs will arise infrequently, clinicians--especially hematologists--will desire evidence-based recommendations about how to manage such scenarios, which will require research studies.

  14. AAS Oral History Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Holbrook, Jarita; AAS Oral History Team

    2016-06-01

    Now in its fourth year, the AAS Oral History Project has interviewed over 80 astronomers from all over the world. Led by the AAS Historical Astronomy Division (HAD) and partially funded by the American Institute of Physics Niels Bohr Library and ongoing support from the AAS, volunteers have collected oral histories from astronomers at professional meetings starting in 2015, including AAS, DPS, and the IAU general assembly. Each interview lasts one and a half to two hours and focuses on interviewees’ personal and professional lives. Questions include those about one’s family, childhood, strong influences on one’s scientific career, career path, successes and challenges, perspectives on how astronomy is changing as a field, and advice to the next generation. Each interview is audio recorded and transcribed, the content of which is checked with each interviewee. Once complete, interview transcripts are posted online as part of a larger oral history library at https://www.aip.org/history-programs/niels-bohr-library/oral-histories. Future analysis will reveal a rich story of astronomers and will help the community address issues of diversity, controversies, and the changing landscape of science. We are still recruiting individuals to be interviewed from all stages of career from undergraduate students to retired and emeritus astronomers. Contact Jarita Holbrook to schedule an interview or to find out more information about the project (astroholbrook@gmail.com). Also, contact Jarita Holbrook if you would like to become an interviewer for the project.

  15. Oral Cancer Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the rates of oral cancers, pancreatic cancer, periodontal disease, and the chronic infections that it produces may ... patients who have confirmed distant metastasis of the disease, it is a powerful ... from periodontal problems, caries, etc. may be extracted. This avoidance ...

  16. Oral Language Continuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fresno County Dept. of Education, Fresno, CA.

    An oral language continuum designed to help elementary students develop techniques for a variety of speech situations, learn to listen, and learn to be aware of the responsibility of the speaker is presented. The continuum is divided into four sections. Student needs, implications for teaching, and suggested activities are arranged sequentially.…

  17. History of oral contraception.

    PubMed

    Dhont, Marc

    2010-12-01

    On the 50th birthday of the pill, it is appropriate to recall the milestones which have led to its development and evolution during the last five decades. The main contraceptive effect of the pill being inhibition of ovulation, it may be called a small miracle that this drug was developed long before the complex regulation of ovulation and the menstrual cycle was elucidated. Another stumbling block on its way was the hostile climate with regard to contraception that prevailed at the time. Animal experiments on the effect of sex steroids on ovulation, and the synthesis of sex steroids and orally active analogues were the necessary preliminaries. We owe the development of oral contraceptives to a handful of persons: two determined feminists, Margaret Sanger and Katherine McCormick; a biologist, Gregory Pincus; and a gynaecologist, John Rock. Soon after the introduction of the first pills, some nasty and life-threatening side effects emerged, which were due to the high doses of sex steroids. This led to the development of new preparations with reduced oestrogen content, progestins with more specific action, and alternative administration routes. Almost every decade we have witnessed a breakthrough in oral contraception. Social and moral objections to birth control have gradually disappeared and, notwithstanding some pill scares, oral contraceptives are now one of the most used methods of contraception. Finally, all's well that ends well: recent reports have substantiated the multiple noncontraceptive health benefits paving the way for a bright future for this 50-year-old product.

  18. Research in Oral Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, Walter T., Ed.

    This collection of six articles on oral language is a product of the cooperative efforts of the National Conference on Research in English, the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, the International Reading Association, the Association for Childhood Education International, and the National Council of Teachers of English. It is…

  19. Oral Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gallus, Alexander S.; Wittkowsky, Ann; Crowther, Mark; Hylek, Elaine M.; Palareti, Gualtiero

    2012-01-01

    Background: The objective of this article is to summarize the published literature concerning the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral anticoagulant drugs that are currently available for clinical use and other aspects related to their management. Methods: We carried out a standard review of published articles focusing on the laboratory and clinical characteristics of the vitamin K antagonists; the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran etexilate; and the direct factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban Results: The antithrombotic effect of each oral anticoagulant drug, the interactions, and the monitoring of anticoagulation intensity are described in detail and discussed without providing specific recommendations. Moreover, we describe and discuss the clinical applications and optimal dosages of oral anticoagulant therapies, practical issues related to their initiation and monitoring, adverse events such as bleeding and other potential side effects, and available strategies for reversal. Conclusions: There is a large amount of evidence on laboratory and clinical characteristics of vitamin K antagonists. A growing body of evidence is becoming available on the first new oral anticoagulant drugs available for clinical use, dabigatran and rivaroxaban. PMID:22315269

  20. Oral cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Dios, Pedro Diz; Lestón, Juan Seoane

    2010-06-01

    Pain may be the initial symptom in oral cancer, and is a common complaint both in patients awaiting treatment and in those already in treatment. However, little has been published in the literature on the management of oral cancer pain. Effective pain control requires a multimodal approach in which pharmacological management based on the World Health Organization (WHO) analgesic ladder continues to play an essential role. Although different routes are available for the administration of analgesics, oral delivery continues to be the principal route for pain control in the first instance. Interventional approaches include blockade of a peripheral nerve or of the relevant ganglion, and the use of central neuraxial blockade. The intraventricular or intrathecal administration of opioids, with or without local anaesthetics, has been indicated for severe intractable pain. The development of new treatment modalities provides additional options, though further clinical research is required. There is no evidence of the efficacy of non-pharmacological methods such as acupuncture or transcutaneous nerve stimulation in the management of oral cancer pain. Surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have also been suggested, but their results have not been quantified. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. WRITING ORAL DRILLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NEY, JAMES W.

    ALL ORAL LANGUAGE DRILLS MAY BE SEPARATED INTO TWO TYPES--(1) MIM-MEM OR MIMICRY MEMORIZATION DRILLS OR (2) PATTERN PRACTICE DRILLS. THESE TWO LARGER CATEGORIES CAN BE SUB-DIVIDED INTO A NUMBER OF OTHER TYPES, SUCH AS TRANSFORMATION AND SUBSTITUTION DRILLS. THE USE OF ANY PARTICULAR TYPE DEPENDS ON THE PURPOSE TO WHICH THE DRILL IS PUT. IN ANY…

  2. Oral Communication in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    Noting that oral communication skills need continuous refinement, this document outlines various methods of practicing these skills, such as literature circles in reading; a reader's theater; presentations of book reports; story telling; a poetry reading club; and choral reading. The document describes literature circles as small groups of readers…

  3. Oral Language Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwestern Cooperative Educational Lab., Albuquerque, NM.

    The Southwestern Cooperative Educational Laboratory is currently field testing a set of instructional materials for teaching English language speaking and listening skills in preschool and first grade classes. The Oral Language Program (OLP) is directed at providing non-English speaking youngsters with a fluent, independent speaking ability in…

  4. Oral focal epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bassioukas, K; Danielides, V; Georgiou, I; Photos, E; Zagorianakou, P; Skevas, A

    2000-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) or Heck disease, is a rare viral infection of the oral mucosa caused by HPV 13 or HPV 32. In Caucasians there have been only a few cases reported. We present the first case in Greece in a young Caucasian girl in which HPV 13 was detected with PCR analysis. The patient was successfully treated with CO2 laser.

  5. Lakota Oral Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    One Feather, Vivian

    Course objectives for the three credit hour Lakota Oral Literature (college level English) course presented in this publication are to: perceive through the reading and hearing of Lakota legends a better understanding of the known world of the Lakota people which existed prior to white contact; understand the origin of the laws which the Lakota…

  6. Antibiotics and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    DeRossi, Scott S; Hersh, Elliot V

    2002-10-01

    With the exception of rifampin-like drugs, there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting the ability of commonly prescribed antibiotics, including all those routinely employed in outpatient dentistry, to either reduce blood levels and/or the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. To date, all clinical trials studying the effects of concomitant antibiotic therapy (with the exception of rifampin and rifabutin) have failed to demonstrate an interaction. Like all drugs, oral contraceptives are not 100% effective with the failure rate in the typical United States population reported to be as high as 3%. It is thus possible that the case reports of unintended pregnancies during antibiotic therapy may simply represent the normal failure rate of these drugs. Considering that both drug classes are prescribed frequently to women of childbearing potential, one would expect a much higher rate of oral contraceptive failure in this group of patients if a true drug:drug interaction existed. On the other hand, if the interaction does exist but is a relatively rare event, occurring in, say, 1 in 5000 women, clinical studies such as those described in this article would not detect the interaction. The pharmacokinetic studies of simultaneous antibiotic and oral contraceptive ingestion, and the retrospective studies of pregnancy rates among oral contraceptive users exposed to antibiotics, all suffer from one potential common weakness, i.e., their relatively small sample size. Sample sizes in the pharmacokinetic trials ranged from 7 to 24 participants, whereas the largest retrospective study of pregnancy rates still evaluated less than 800 total contraceptive users. Still, the incidence of such a rare interaction would not differ from the accepted normal failure rate of oral contraceptive therapy. The medico-legal ramifications of what looks like at best a rare interaction remains somewhat "murky." On one hand, we have medico-legal experts advising the profession to exercise caution

  7. Oral potassium supplementation in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Hainsworth, Alison J; Gatenby, Piers A

    2008-08-01

    Hospital inpatients are frequently hypokalaemic. Low plasma potassium levels may cause life threatening complications, such as cardiac arrhythmias. Potassium supplementation may be administered parenterally or enterally. Oral potassium supplements have been associated with oesophageal ulceration, strictures and gastritis. An alternative to potassium salt tablets or solution is dietary modification with potassium rich food stuffs, which has been proven to be a safe and effective method for potassium supplementation. The potassium content of one medium banana is equivalent to a 12 mmol potassium salt tablet. Potassium supplementation by dietary modification has been shown to be equally efficacious to oral potassium salt supplementation and is preferred by the majority of patients. Subsequently, it is our practice to replace potassium using dietary modification, particularly in surgical patients having undergone oesophagogastrectomy or in those with peptic ulcer disease.

  8. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... What We Do Administration of Anesthesia Administration of Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ... Teeth Management Procedures Administration of Anesthesia Administration of Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to ...

  9. Hemophilia and oral health.

    PubMed

    Zaliuniene, Ruta; Peciuliene, Vytaute; Brukiene, Vilma; Aleksejuniene, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to overview the oral health aspects in hemophilia patients. An electronic search of Medline (Pub Med), Cochrane, SSCI (Social Citation Index), SCI (Science Citation Index) databases from 1982 to the present, using the following search words: hemophilia, oral health, dental caries, dental caries prevalence, gingivitis, periodontitis, primary dentition, permanent dentition, dental treatment and review, was performed. The search yielded 196 titles and abstracts on chosen words. All articles were full-text reviewed and 40 of publications were included. Nowadays coagulation factor abnormalities are the most common of inherited bleeding disorders, but occur much less frequently approximating 10000-50000 male births than acquired coagulation defects. Von Willebrand disease, Hemophilia A and Hemophilia B account for 95-97% of all coagulation deficiencies. Hemophilias A and B are subdivided according to the factor's activity levels in the blood: mild, moderate or severe. The two main oral diseases affecting patients with hemophilia are the same as for the rest of population, i.e. dental caries and gingivitis/periodontitis. Only a few studies concerning oral health aspects in hemophilia patients were carried out. Some controversy exists concerning caries prevalence in both primary and permanent dentitions in children with hemophilia. People with congenital hemorrhagic diatheses constitute a very small proportion of the total population. Due to that fact treatment of such patients becomes a challenge to the most of dentists due to the fact that most of them have no experience in dealing with dental problems in such patients. There is a lack of epidemiological studies in oral health status of hemophilia patient.

  10. Oral Manifestations of Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Anitha; Masthan, Mahaboob Kader; Sankar, Leena Sankari; Narayanasamy, Aravindha Babu; Elumalai, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vitiligo is one of the disorder that has social impact. Both skin and mucous membrane show depigmentation in vitiligo. Depigmentation in oral cavity can be more easily observed and the patient can be given awareness regarding the condition if they are unaware of vitiligo elsewhere in their body and can be guided for treatment. Aim and objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of occurrence of oral mucosal vitiligo in vitiligo patients and to determine the most commonly involved oral mucosal site. Materials and methods: The study sample included 100 vitiligo patients. The patients of all age groups and both genders were included. Vitiligo patients associated with systemic conditions such as thyroid disorders, juvenile diabetes mellitus, pernicious anemia, Addison's disease were excluded in this study. Results: Out of 100 vitiligo patients 44 % male and 56% were female. The oral presentation of vitiligo in this study showed depigmentation of buccal mucosa in 5% of patients, labial mucosa in 5% of patients, palate in 8% of patients, gingiva in 2% of patients and alveolar mucosa 1%. Depigmentation of lip was seen in 42% of patients. Lip involvement refers to depigmentation of both the lips or either lip. Also vermilion border involvement was noted in majority of cases. In some cases, the depigmentation of lip extended to the facial skin also. Conclusion: In this study 55 patients out of 100 patients showed depigmentation in the oral cavity. Lip involvement was most common in this study showing about 42% of patients. Intraoral mucosal involvement was found in 21% of patients. Among intraoral mucosal site palate was common followed by buccal and labial mucosa, gingiva. Two patients had lip pigmentation as the only manifestation without any depigmentation in the skin. PMID:25657420

  11. Pharmaceutical nanotechnology for oral delivery of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Mei, Lin; Zhang, Zhiping; Zhao, Lingyun; Huang, Laiqiang; Yang, Xiang-Liang; Tang, Jintian; Feng, Si-Shen

    2013-06-15

    Oral chemotherapy is an important topic in the 21st century medicine, which may radically change the current regimen of chemotherapy and greatly improve the quality of life of the patients. Unfortunately, most anticancer drugs, especially those of high therapeutic efficacy such as paclitaxel and docetaxel, are not orally bioavailable due to the gastrointestinal (GI) drug barrier. The molecular basis of the GI barrier has been found mainly due to the multidrug efflux proteins, i.e. P-type glycoproteins (P-gp), which are rich in the epithelial cell membranes in the GI tract. Medical solution for oral chemotherapy is to apply P-gp inhibitors such as cyclosporine A, which, however, suppress the body's immune system either, thus causing medical complication. Pharmaceutical nanotechnology, which is to apply and further develop nanotechnology to solve the problems in drug delivery, may provide a better solution and thus change the way we make drug and the way we take drug. This review is focused on the problems encountered in oral chemotherapy and the pharmaceutical nanotechnology solutions such as prodrugs, nanoemulsions, dendrimers, micelles, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles and nanoparticles of biodegradable polymers. Proof-of-concept in vitro and in vivo results for oral delivery of anticancer drugs by the various nanocarriers, which can be found so far from the literature, are provided.

  12. The microbiome of the oral mucosa in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fourie, Nicolaas H.; Wang, Dan; Abey, Sarah K.; Sherwin, LeeAnne B.; Joseph, Paule V.; Rahim-Williams, Bridgett; Ferguson, Eric G.; Henderson, Wendy A.

    2016-01-01

    abstract Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood disorder characterized by persistent symptoms, including visceral pain. Studies have demonstrated oral microbiome differences in inflammatory bowel diseases suggesting the potential of the oral microbiome in the study of non-oral conditions. In this exploratory study we examine whether differences exist in the oral microbiome of IBS participants and healthy controls, and whether the oral microbiome relates to symptom severity. The oral buccal mucosal microbiome of 38 participants was characterized using PhyloChip microarrays. The severity of visceral pain was assessed by orally administering a gastrointestinal test solution. Participants self-reported their induced visceral pain. Pain severity was highest in IBS participants (P = 0.0002), particularly IBS-overweight participants (P = 0.02), and was robustly correlated to the abundance of 60 OTUs, 4 genera, 5 families and 4 orders of bacteria (r2 > 0.4, P < 0.001). IBS-overweight participants showed decreased richness in the phylum Bacteroidetes (P = 0.007) and the genus Bacillus (P = 0.008). Analysis of β-diversity found significant separation of the IBS-overweight group (P < 0.05). Our oral microbial results are concordant with described fecal and colonic microbiome-IBS and -weight associations. Having IBS and being overweight, rather than IBS-subtypes, was the most important factor in describing the severity of visceral pain and variation in the microbiome. Pain severity was strongly correlated to the abundance of many taxa, suggesting the potential of the oral microbiome in diagnosis and patient phenotyping. The oral microbiome has potential as a source of microbial information in IBS. PMID:26963804

  13. The microbiome of the oral mucosa in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fourie, Nicolaas H; Wang, Dan; Abey, Sarah K; Sherwin, LeeAnne B; Joseph, Paule V; Rahim-Williams, Bridgett; Ferguson, Eric G; Henderson, Wendy A

    2016-07-03

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood disorder characterized by persistent symptoms, including visceral pain. Studies have demonstrated oral microbiome differences in inflammatory bowel diseases suggesting the potential of the oral microbiome in the study of non-oral conditions. In this exploratory study we examine whether differences exist in the oral microbiome of IBS participants and healthy controls, and whether the oral microbiome relates to symptom severity. The oral buccal mucosal microbiome of 38 participants was characterized using PhyloChip microarrays. The severity of visceral pain was assessed by orally administering a gastrointestinal test solution. Participants self-reported their induced visceral pain. Pain severity was highest in IBS participants (P = 0.0002), particularly IBS-overweight participants (P = 0.02), and was robustly correlated to the abundance of 60 OTUs, 4 genera, 5 families and 4 orders of bacteria (r(2) > 0.4, P < 0.001). IBS-overweight participants showed decreased richness in the phylum Bacteroidetes (P = 0.007) and the genus Bacillus (P = 0.008). Analysis of β-diversity found significant separation of the IBS-overweight group (P < 0.05). Our oral microbial results are concordant with described fecal and colonic microbiome-IBS and -weight associations. Having IBS and being overweight, rather than IBS-subtypes, was the most important factor in describing the severity of visceral pain and variation in the microbiome. Pain severity was strongly correlated to the abundance of many taxa, suggesting the potential of the oral microbiome in diagnosis and patient phenotyping. The oral microbiome has potential as a source of microbial information in IBS.

  14. [Oral manifestations in systemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge; Jensen, Siri Beier

    2010-11-01

    Systemic diseases may affect the oral tissues, i.e. oral mucosa, salivary glands, teeth or bone, and oral manifestations will frequently present early, i.e. in association with (non-fulminant) systemic disease. Thus, recognition and proper diagnosis is essential to initiate appropriate treatment schedules. Key examples of systemic disease groups with oral manifestations include dermatological, inflammatory connective tissue diseases, haematological and inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases, as well as neurological and endocrine diseases.

  15. Oral Manifestations and Molecular Basis of Oral Genodermatoses: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shilpasree, A.S.; Chaudhary, Meenakshi

    2016-01-01

    Genodermatoses refers to group of inherited monogenic disorders with skin manifestations. Many of these disorders are rare and also have oral manifestations, called oral genodermatoses. This article provides a focused review of molecular basis of important genodermatoses that affects the oral cavity and also have prominent associated dermatologic features. In several conditions discussed here, the oral findings are distinct and may provide the first clue of an underlying genetic diagnosis. The article also emphasises on the prenatal diagnosis, genetic counselling and the treatment oral genodermatoses. PMID:27437377

  16. Prevention of oral diseases and oral health promotion.

    PubMed

    Gift, H C

    1991-06-01

    Research and activities, as promoted in 1989 and 1990, in oral disease prevention and health promotion are summarized. Significant syntheses of research findings have occurred, as a result of planning and workship activities, which will direct oral health promotion in the 1990s. Original research on established and new preventive therapies for dental caries, periodontal diseases, oral mucosal alterations, soft-tissue lesions, precancers and cancers, and trauma are reported, opportunities to prevent oral diseases or maintain oral health through changes in individual behaviors, professional orientation, and social and environmental changes are addressed.

  17. Oral and Perioral Piercing Complications

    PubMed Central

    Escudero-Castaño, N; Perea-García, M.A; Campo-Trapero, J; Cano-Sánchez; Bascones-Martínez, A

    2008-01-01

    Background. The oral an perioral piercing has a long history as part of religious, tribal,cultural or sexual symbolism and nowdays there is a high incidence of oral and perioral piercing in the adolescent population. This practice has a long history as part of religious, tribal, cultural or sexual symbolism. This article reviews current knowledge on injuries or diseases that might be produced by piercing in the oral cavity. We propose a classification to diagnosed the pathologies related to oral an perioral piercing Methods. A search was conducted of articles in PubMed, Scielo published between 1997 and 2007, using the key words ``oral and perioral, piercing ´´, ``oral, piercing and disease”, ``recessions and oral piercing´´. It has reviewed about twentythree articles 17 were narrative reviews and 6 case series Results. A review was carried out on the origins of oral and perioral body piercing and its local implications, classifying the different alterations like recessions, systemic implications that it can produce in the oral and perioral cavity. Conclusion. Patients with oral and perioral piercing should be regularly followed up because of the possible development of different types of adverse effects. Clinical implications. Adverse effects of oral and perioral piercing can be systemic, with transmission of infectious diseases such as hepatitis B or C, or can be local, with alteration of oral mucosae or even of dental structures. PMID:19444317

  18. CREATIVE EXPERIENCES IN ORAL LANGUAGE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HENRY, MABEL WRIGHT, ED.

    IDEAS FOR THE CREATIVE USE OF ORAL LANGUAGE IN THE ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM ARE PRESENTED IN THIS SYMPOSIUM. PART 1, "THE NEED FOR CREATIVE EXPERIENCES IN ORAL LANGUAGE" BY M.W. HENRY, IS CONCERNED WITH THE INTERRELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CREATIVE ORAL LANGUAGE ACTIVITIES AND THE ACQUISITION OF READING AND WRITING SKILLS. PART 2, "CHORIC INTERPRETATION" BY…

  19. Oral History: A Selective Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusnerz, Peggy Ann

    1979-01-01

    This selected bibliography lists 188 items pertaining to oral history, including manuals and handbooks, collection guides and directories, methods, interviewing techniques, theories, teaching devices, oral history in libraries and archives, international perspectives, oral history in research, the profession, and periodicals. (CHC)

  20. A History of Oral Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahn, Eugene; Bahn, Margaret L.

    This historical account of the oral interpretation of literature establishes a chain of events comprehending 25 centuries of verbal tradition from the Homeric Age through 20th Century America. It deals in each era with the viewpoints and contributions of major historical figures to oral interpretation, as well as with oral interpretation's…

  1. Oral and perioral piercing complications.

    PubMed

    Escudero-Castaño, N; Perea-García, M A; Campo-Trapero, J; Cano-Sánchez; Bascones-Martínez, A

    2008-12-04

    BACKGROUND.: The oral an perioral piercing has a long history as part of religious, tribal,cultural or sexual symbolism and nowdays there is a high incidence of oral and perioral piercing in the adolescent population. This practice has a long history as part of religious, tribal, cultural or sexual symbolism. This article reviews current knowledge on injuries or diseases that might be produced by piercing in the oral cavity. We propose a classification to diagnosed the pathologies related to oral an perioral piercing METHODS.: A search was conducted of articles in PubMed, Scielo published between 1997 and 2007, using the key words ;;oral and perioral, piercing , ;;oral, piercing and disease", ;;recessions and oral piercing . It has reviewed about twentythree articles 17 were narrative reviews and 6 case series RESULTS.: A review was carried out on the origins of oral and perioral body piercing and its local implications, classifying the different alterations like recessions, systemic implications that it can produce in the oral and perioral cavity. CONCLUSION.: Patients with oral and perioral piercing should be regularly followed up because of the possible development of different types of adverse effects. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS.: Adverse effects of oral and perioral piercing can be systemic, with transmission of infectious diseases such as hepatitis B or C, or can be local, with alteration of oral mucosae or even of dental structures.

  2. A History of Oral Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahn, Eugene; Bahn, Margaret L.

    This historical account of the oral interpretation of literature establishes a chain of events comprehending 25 centuries of verbal tradition from the Homeric Age through 20th Century America. It deals in each era with the viewpoints and contributions of major historical figures to oral interpretation, as well as with oral interpretation's…

  3. [Ectodermal Capdepont syndrome and oral prosthetic rehabilitation. About a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Kumpanya, P; Matshumba, M; Sekele, I B; Mayunga, M; Lutula, P S; Ntumba, M K

    2015-03-01

    The authors describe the ectodermal Capdepont syndrome as an anomaly characterized by anhidrosis, hypotrichosis and anodontia diagnosed in a 22 year-old adult. In front of this anodontia, oral prosthetic rehabilitation remains the only solution.

  4. Oral Appliances Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sleep Solutions Nierman Practice Management ProSomnus Sleep Technologies Space Maintainers Laboratory ... © American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine, All Rights Reserved. American Academy of Dental Sleep ...

  5. 47 CFR 1.297 - Oral argument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oral argument. 1.297 Section 1.297... Actions in Hearing Proceedings § 1.297 Oral argument. Oral argument with respect to any contested... oral argument. ...

  6. Preventive Effects of Houttuynia cordata Extract for Oral Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sekita, Yasuko; Murakami, Keiji; Yumoto, Hiromichi; Amoh, Takashi; Fujiwara, Natsumi; Ogata, Shohei; Matsuo, Takashi; Miyake, Yoichiro; Kashiwada, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Houttuynia cordata (HC) (Saururaceae) has been used internally and externally as a traditional medicine and as an herbal tea for healthcare in Japan. Our recent survey showed that HC poultice (HCP) prepared from smothering fresh leaves of HC had been frequently used for the treatment of purulent skin diseases with high effectiveness. Our experimental study also demonstrated that ethanol extract of HCP (eHCP) has antibacterial, antibiofilm, and anti-inflammatory effects against S. aureus which caused purulent skin diseases. In this study, we focused on novel effects of HCP against oral infectious diseases, such as periodontal disease and dental caries. We determined the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects of water solution of HCP ethanol extract (wHCP) against important oral pathogens and investigated its cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory effects on human oral epithelial cells. wHCP had moderate antimicrobial effects against some oral microorganisms and profound antibiofilm effects against Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus mutans, and Candida albicans. In addition, wHCP had no cytotoxic effects and could inhibit interleukin-8 and CCL20 productions by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human oral keratinocytes. Our findings suggested that wHCP may be clinically useful for preventing oral infectious diseases as a mouthwash for oral care.

  7. Preventive Effects of Houttuynia cordata Extract for Oral Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sekita, Yasuko; Murakami, Keiji; Amoh, Takashi; Ogata, Shohei; Matsuo, Takashi; Miyake, Yoichiro; Kashiwada, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Houttuynia cordata (HC) (Saururaceae) has been used internally and externally as a traditional medicine and as an herbal tea for healthcare in Japan. Our recent survey showed that HC poultice (HCP) prepared from smothering fresh leaves of HC had been frequently used for the treatment of purulent skin diseases with high effectiveness. Our experimental study also demonstrated that ethanol extract of HCP (eHCP) has antibacterial, antibiofilm, and anti-inflammatory effects against S. aureus which caused purulent skin diseases. In this study, we focused on novel effects of HCP against oral infectious diseases, such as periodontal disease and dental caries. We determined the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects of water solution of HCP ethanol extract (wHCP) against important oral pathogens and investigated its cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory effects on human oral epithelial cells. wHCP had moderate antimicrobial effects against some oral microorganisms and profound antibiofilm effects against Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus mutans, and Candida albicans. In addition, wHCP had no cytotoxic effects and could inhibit interleukin-8 and CCL20 productions by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human oral keratinocytes. Our findings suggested that wHCP may be clinically useful for preventing oral infectious diseases as a mouthwash for oral care. PMID:27413739

  8. [Oral mucosa analog allografts in non-consanguineous rats].

    PubMed

    González, Luis; Padrón, Karla; Salmen, Siham; Jerez, Elsy; Dávila, Lorena; Solórzano, Eduvigis

    2017-01-24

    Although there are therapeutic options for the treatment of oral mucosa defects, the need for functional, anatomical and aesthetically similar substitutes persists, as well as for solutions to reduce autologous grafts morbidity. To determine clinical and histological compatibility of equivalent oral mucosa allografts generated through tissue engineering in non-consanguineous rats. We used a sample of oral mucosa from Sprague Dawley rats to obtain a fibroblast culture and a keratinocytes and fibroblasts co-culture. In both cases, we used a commercial collagen membrane as "scaffold". After ten weeks of culture, we grafted the resulting membranes into four Wistar rats. The first phase of the study was the development of the oral mucosa equivalents generated by tissue engineering. Then, we implanted them in immunocompetent Wistar rats, and finallywe evaluated the clinical and histological features of the allografts. In vivo evaluation of mucosal substitutes showed a correct integration of artificial oral mucosa in immunocompetent hosts, with an increase in periodontal biotype and the creation of a zone with increased keratinization. Histologically, the tissue was similar to the control oral mucosa sample with no inflammatory reaction nor clinical or histological rejection signs. The equivalent oral mucosa allografts generated by tissue engineering showed clinical and histological compatibility.

  9. [Tranexamic acid gel in patients treated with oral anticoagulants].

    PubMed

    Ripollés-de Ramón, Jorge; Muñoz-Corcuera, Marta; Bravo-Llatas, Carmen; Bascones-Martínez, Antonio

    2014-12-09

    Patients treated with oral anticoagulants have increased susceptibility to bleeding, and therefore any surgical medical procedure and especially oral surgery requires a therapeutic approach that minimizes bleeding effects in these patients. The working hypothesis was based on studies of local application of tranexamic acid after maxillofacial interventions as effective therapeutic alternative for the prevention and control of bleeding. The aim was to assess the effectiveness of the application of a gel solution tranexamic acid after tooth extraction in anticoagulated patients in terms of healing time and degree of healing. The results indicate that application of tranexamic acid gel is very effective for consistency and maintenance in the place of action and shows its efficacy as a procoagulant material. The application of a gel solution of tranexamic acid in oral anticoagulants patients ameliorates healing time and the bleeding time within the first 48-72 h. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Alloy solution hardening with solute pairs

    DOEpatents

    Mitchell, John W.

    1976-08-24

    Solution hardened alloys are formed by using at least two solutes which form associated solute pairs in the solvent metal lattice. Copper containing equal atomic percentages of aluminum and palladium is an example.

  11. Life's Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Simon Conway

    2004-11-01

    Life's Solution builds a persuasive case for the predictability of evolutionary outcomes. The case rests on a remarkable compilation of examples of convergent evolution, in which two or more lineages have independently evolved similar structures and functions. The examples range from the aerodynamics of hovering moths and hummingbirds to the use of silk by spiders and some insects to capture prey. Going against the grain of Darwinian orthodoxy, this book is a must read for anyone grappling with the meaning of evolution and our place in the Universe. Simon Conway Morris is the Ad Hominen Professor in the Earth Science Department at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St. John's College and the Royal Society. His research focuses on the study of constraints on evolution, and the historical processes that lead to the emergence of complexity, especially with respect to the construction of the major animal body parts in the Cambrian explosion. Previous books include The Crucible of Creation (Getty Center for Education in the Arts, 1999) and co-author of Solnhofen (Cambridge, 1990). Hb ISBN (2003) 0-521-82704-3

  12. Life's Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Simon Conway

    2003-09-01

    Life's Solution builds a persuasive case for the predictability of evolutionary outcomes. The case rests on a remarkable compilation of examples of convergent evolution, in which two or more lineages have independently evolved similar structures and functions. The examples range from the aerodynamics of hovering moths and hummingbirds to the use of silk by spiders and some insects to capture prey. Going against the grain of Darwinian orthodoxy, this book is a must read for anyone grappling with the meaning of evolution and our place in the Universe. Simon Conway Morris is the Ad Hominen Professor in the Earth Science Department at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St. John's College and the Royal Society. His research focuses on the study of constraints on evolution, and the historical processes that lead to the emergence of complexity, especially with respect to the construction of the major animal body parts in the Cambrian explosion. Previous books include The Crucible of Creation (Getty Center for Education in the Arts, 1999) and co-author of Solnhofen (Cambridge, 1990). Hb ISBN (2003) 0-521-82704-3

  13. 75 FR 54492 - Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Tiamulin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 520 Oral Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Tiamulin AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration... increased strength of tiamulin concentrate solution in the drinking water of swine for the treatment of...

  14. Proinflammatory cytokine levels in oral lichen planus, oral leukoplakia, and oral submucous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jasdeep; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to identify salivary and serum concentrations of interleukin (IL)-8, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in patients with oral lichen planus, oral leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, and healthy controls. Patients selected included 54 oral lichen planus (41 to 65 years), 50 oral leukoplakia (42 to 65 years), 51 oral submucous fibrosis (41 to 65 years), and 50 healthy controls (42 to 65 years). Oral lichen planus, oral leukoplakia, and oral submucous fibrosis cases were diagnosed using histopathological analysis. Salivary and serum cytokine concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunoassay kits in all subjects. The levels of serum and salivary TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 were statistically significantly increased in oral leukoplakia, submucous fibrosis, and lichen planus in contrast to normal healthy subjects (P<0.05). Serum and salivary correlation analysis revealed strong and highly significant correlations for TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 in all groups (r=0.72-0.82, P<0.05). Salivary and serum cytokines were also elevated when analyzed in oral precancerous lesions. Thus, salivary and serum IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α levels might act as diagnostic markers for detection of oral precancer.

  15. Oral chemotherapy in tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Kay, N J

    1981-05-01

    A double-blind triple cross-over trial was designed for 21 patients suffering from tinnitus; mexiletine, diazapam, betahistine and placebo were taken each for a month sequentially during which time the patients recorded their tinnitus loudness subjectively on a visual analogue scale. The results showed that these medications did not influence the tinnitus loudness. Since mexiletine is an oral analogue of lignocaine and a cardiovascular drug, any untoward cardiovascular history and clinical finding disqualified such patients from the trial. Twenty-one such patients were rejected from an original group of 42 patients. In a volunteer trial mexiletine unrelated to this, it was reported that a vasovagal attack was suffered by someone who had just consumed 400 mg mexiletine orally. After ethical considerations the tinnitus trial was stopped. Eleven patients completed the cycle of medications, 10 did not. The dangers of using a cardiovascular drug for a non-cardiovascular condition is thus exposed.

  16. Immunologically mediated oral diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jimson, Sudha; Balachader, N.; Anita, N.; Babu, R.

    2015-01-01

    Immune mediated diseases of oral cavity are uncommon. The lesions may be self-limiting and undergo remission spontaneously. Among the immune mediated oral lesions the most important are lichen planus, pemphigus, erythema multiformi, epidermolysis bullosa, systemic lupus erythematosis. Cellular and humoral mediated immunity play a major role directed against epithelial and connective tissue in chronic and recurrent patterns. Confirmatory diagnosis can be made by biopsy, direct and indirect immunoflouresence, immune precipitation and immunoblotting. Therapeutic agents should be selected after thorough evaluation of immune status through a variety of tests and after determining any aggravating or provoking factors. Early and appropriate diagnosis is important for proper treatment planning contributing to better prognosis and better quality of life of patient. PMID:26015713

  17. Infant Oral Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, Michael J.; Levine, Norman

    1988-01-01

    The family physician/pediatrician who sees a child from birth as part of the well-baby visit program is in the best position to identify early dental problems and to educate the family about early oral preventive health care. Since children under three years of age are not seen routinely by dentists, they are at risk of developing dental disease. This paper briefly covers the areas of infant oral pathology, early preventive care, teething, suckling habits, and dental trauma in the toddler. The physician will then be in a better position to recommend to parents when they should seek dental advice and treatment for their young children. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:21253204

  18. Herbs in Oral Mucositis

    PubMed Central

    Baharvand, Maryam; Jafari, Soudeh

    2017-01-01

    Oral mucositis is an inflammatory mucosal destruction as a result of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, which in severe cases can impair patients’ quality of life. Moreover, mucosal infection and/or systemic involvement due to compromised immunity leads to delay or discontinuation of the treatment. Many strategies and agents have been suggested for the management of this condition. Because of their lower side effects compared to chemical drugs, general interest in evaluating therapeutic effects of herbs has been increased intensively. Herbal plants apply their effect through different mechanisms of action: antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antiseptic, and anticarcinogenic activity. Recently, various natural agents in plants have been noticed in mucositis, which may improve the symptoms through different interventions. The purpose of this review is to focus on the preventive or therapeutic use of herbal medicine to alleviate oral mucositis. PMID:28511530

  19. Damaging Oral Habits

    PubMed Central

    Kamdar, Rajesh J; Al-Shahrani, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Oral habits, if persist beyond certain developmental age, can pose great harm to the developing teeth, occlusion, and surrounding oral tissues. In the formative years, almost all children engage in some non-nutritive sucking habits. Clinicians, by proper differential diagnosis and thorough understanding of natural growth and developmental processes, should take a decision for intervening. This article describes case series reports of thumb sucking, finger sucking, and tongue thrusting habits, which have been successfully treated by both removable and fixed orthodontic appliances. The cases shown are ranging from the age group of 9-19 years presenting combination of both mixed and permanent dentition development. All cases show satisfactory correction of habits and stable results. PMID:25954079

  20. Oral manifestations of hyperoxaluria.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Eliete Neves da Silva; Vianna, Leonora; Sobreira, Maria Nazareth; de Araújo, Flavio Nader Gross; de Melo, Nilce Santos

    2011-11-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria is a rare, inherited autosomal recessive disease caused by defects in the metabolism of glyoxylate. Oral manifestations of hyperoxaluria are rare. However, bone and tooth resorption may be the result of chronic inflammation and the presence of osteoclastic cells surrounding the oxalate crystal deposit. A deposit of calcium oxalate in the periodontium was identified in a patient with end-stage renal disease. Dental radiographs indicated bone loss and external tooth resorption. Radiolucent image in the inferior incisor region was observed and removed. The tissue showed granulomatous inflammation with foreign body reaction and associated crystalline deposits. When viewed in polarized light, these deposits are green and presented a birefringent aspect, which were interpreted as calcium oxalate crystals compatible with oxaluria. Oral manifestations of hyperoxaluria are of particular interest because of the unusual location of the oxalate crystal deposition, resulting in aggressive tooth resorption and alveolar bone loss, which may be misdiagnosed.

  1. Oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Olson, Meredith A; Rogers, Roy S; Bruce, Alison J

    2016-01-01

    Lichen planus is an inflammatory mucocutaneous disease that can affect the skin, hair, nails, and mucosal surfaces. Mucosal sites of involvement include oral, genital, ocular, otic, esophageal, and, less commonly, bladder, nasal, laryngeal, and anal surfaces. Oral lichen planus is a mucosal variant of lichen planus, which tends to affect women more often than men, with a typically more chronic course and potential for significant morbidity. Treatment can be challenging, and there is potentially a low risk of malignant transformation; however, therapeutic benefits can be obtained with various topical and systemic medications. Clinical monitoring is recommended to ensure symptomatic control. Increasing awareness and recognition of this entity have continued to fuel advances in therapy and in our understanding of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute oral ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Julia S; Rogers, Roy S

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of acute oral ulcers can be challenging. Important historic details include the pattern of recurrence, anatomic areas of involvement within the mouth and elsewhere on the mucocutaneous surface, associated medical symptoms or comorbidities, and symptomology. Careful mucocutaneous examination is essential. When necessary, biopsy at an active site without ulceration is generally optimal. Depending on the clinical scenario, supplemental studies that may be useful include cultures; perilesional biopsy for direct immunofluorescence testing; and evaluation for infectious diseases, gluten sensitivity, inflammatory bowel disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, connective tissue diseases, or hematinic deficiencies. Clinicians should maintain a broad differential diagnosis when evaluating patients with acute oral ulcers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lasers in oral surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Ulrich; Hibst, Raimund

    1994-12-01

    The indications of lasers in oral surgery are defined by the laser-tissue interaction types. These are mainly thermal effects depending especially on the absorption of laser light in varying biological tissues. In histological sections different laser effects are demonstrated on oral mucosa, bone and cartilage, which have a great influence on wound healing and subsequently on clinical indications of the different wavelengths. On the one hand the good coagulation effect of the Nd:YAG laser is wanted for hemostasis in soft tissue surgery. On the other hand, for the treatment of precancerous dysplasias or neoplasias an effective cutting with a coagulation effect like using the CO2 laser is necessary. However, the excision of benign mucosal lesions as well as performing osteotomies or shaping of cartilage should be undertaken with the Er:YAG laser without greater coagulation and consequently without any delay of wound healing.

  4. Skylab oral health studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. R.; Frome, W. J.; Handler, S.; Wheatcroft, M. G.; Rider, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Evaluation of Skylab crewmembers for mission related effects on oral health in relation to possible dental injuries provided the following distinctive changes: (1) increased counts of specific anaerobic and streptococcal components; (2) elevations in levels of secretory IgA concurrent with diminutions of salivary lysozyme; and (3) increases in dental calculus and gingival inflammations. The clinical changes are considered to be more influenced by the preexisting state of dental health than by any mission related effects.

  5. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    PubMed

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  6. Skylab oral health studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. R.; Frome, W. J.; Handler, S.; Wheatcroft, M. G.; Rider, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Evaluation of Skylab crewmembers for mission related effects on oral health in relation to possible dental injuries provided the following distinctive changes: (1) increased counts of specific anaerobic and streptococcal components; (2) elevations in levels of secretory IgA concurrent with diminutions of salivary lysozyme; and (3) increases in dental calculus and gingival inflammations. The clinical changes are considered to be more influenced by the preexisting state of dental health than by any mission related effects.

  7. [Reiter's syndrome oral manifestations].

    PubMed

    Fotiou, G; Laskaris, G

    1988-01-01

    Reiter's syndrome is characterized by arthritis, non-gonococcal urethritis, conjunctivitis and mucocutaneous lesions. Oral lesions occur in 20-40% of the cases. They appear as papules and ulcerations on the buccal mucosa, gingiva and lips. Lesions on the tongue resemple "geographic tongue". One case of Reiter's syndrome is described. The significance of the clinical lesions, their microscopic appearance and the differential diagnosis are discussed.

  8. Oral health & HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, Susan; Naidoo, Sudeshi; Berthold, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Oral lesions are common in women and children with HIV/AIDS and may decrease the overall quality of life in these patients because of pain, dry mouth, and difficulty in eating. An oral cavity screening is an easy, noninvasive, quick, and inexpensive procedure that provides nurses with invaluable information about the need for referral, treatment, and health education. Nurses can use the information obtained from a careful oral screening to decrease the symptoms experienced with oral lesions and optimize a patient's ability to chew and enjoy food. Common oral manifestations of HIV infection include fungal, viral, and bacterial infections, although neoplasms, periodontal disease, salivary gland disease, and lesions of uncertain origin are also seen. Oral lesions such as candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, herpetic ulcers, and Kaposi's sarcoma are often among the first symptoms of HIV infection.

  9. Good Oral Health and Diet

    PubMed Central

    Scardina, G. A.; Messina, P.

    2012-01-01

    An unhealthy diet has been implicated as risk factors for several chronic diseases that are known to be associated with oral diseases. Studies investigating the relationship between oral diseases and diet are limited. Therefore, this study was conducted to describe the relationship between healthy eating habits and oral health status. The dentistry has an important role in the diagnosis of oral diseases correlated with diet. Consistent nutrition guidelines are essential to improve health. A poor diet was significantly associated with increased odds of oral disease. Dietary advice for the prevention of oral diseases has to be a part of routine patient education practices. Inconsistencies in dietary advice may be linked to inadequate training of professionals. Literature suggests that the nutrition training of dentists and oral health training of dietitians and nutritionists is limited. PMID:22363174

  10. Relative oral bioavailability of morphine and naltrexone derived from crushed morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride extended-release capsules versus intact product and versus naltrexone solution: a single-dose, randomized-sequence, open-label, three-way crossover trial in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Franklin K; Stark, Jeffrey G; Bieberdorf, Frederick A; Stauffer, Joe

    2010-06-01

    Morphine sulfate/sequestered naltrexone hydrochloride (HCl) (MS-sNT) extended-release fixed-dose combination capsules, approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in August 2009 for chronic moderate to severe pain, contain extended-release morphine pellets with a sequestered core of the opioid antagonist naltrexone. MS-sNT was designed so that if the product is tampered with by crushing, the naltrexone becomes bioavailable to mitigate morphine-induced subjective effects, rendering the product less attractive for tampering. The primary aim of this study was to compare the oral bioavailability of naltrexone and its metabolite 6-beta-naltrexol, derived from crushed pellets from MS-sNT capsules, to naltrexone solution. This study also assessed the relative bioavailability of morphine from crushed pellets from MS-sNT capsules and that from the whole, intact product. This single-dose, randomized-sequence, open-label, 3-period, 3-treatment crossover trial was conducted in healthy volunteers. Adults admitted to the study center underwent a 10-hour overnight fast before study drug administration. Each subject received all 3 of the following treatments, 1 per session, separated by a 14-day washout: tampered pellets (crushed for >or=2 minutes with a mortar and pestle) from a 60-mg MS-sNT capsule (60 mg morphine/2.4 mg naltrexone); 60-mg whole, intact MS-sNT capsule; and oral naltrexone HCl (2.4 mg) solution. Plasma concentrations of naltrexone and 6-beta-naltrexol were measured 0 to 168 hours after administration. Morphine pharmaco-kinetics of crushed and whole pellets were determined 0 to 72 hours after administration. The analysis of relative bioavailability was based on conventional FDA criteria for assuming bioequivalence; that is, 90% CIs for ratios of geometric means (natural logarithm [In]-transformed C(max) and AUC) fell within the range of 80% to 125%. Subjects underwent physical examinations, clinical laboratory tests, and ECG at screening and study

  11. Milk and oral health.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ingegerd; Lif Holgerson, Pernilla

    2011-01-01

    Oral health includes freedom from disease in the gums, the mucosa and the teeth. There has been a striking reduction in dental caries and periodontitis in industrialized countries, although the proportion with severe disease has remained at 10-15%, and the prevalence increases in less developed countries. If left untreated, these diseases may lead to pain, and impaired quality of life and nutritional status. Prevention and treatment need, besides traditional implementation of proper oral hygiene, sugar restriction and use of fluoride, newer cost-effective strategies. Non-sweetened dairy products, which are proven non-cariogenic, or specific bioactive components from alike sources might prove to be part of such strategies. Thus, milk proteins, such as bovine and human caseins and lactoferrin, inhibit initial attachment of cariogenic mutans streptococci to hydroxyapatite coated with saliva or purified saliva host ligands. In contrast, both bovine and human milk coated on hydroxyapatite promotes attachment of commensal Actinomyces naeslundii and other streptococci in vitro, and phosphorylated milk-derived peptides promote maintenance of tooth minerals, as shown for the β-casein-derived caseino-phosphate peptide. Observational studies are promising, but randomized clinical trials are needed to reveal if dairy products could be a complementary treatment for oral health.

  12. Global Oral Health Inequalities

    PubMed Central

    Pitts, N.; Amaechi, B.; Niederman, R.; Acevedo, A.-M.; Vianna, R.; Ganss, C.; Ismail, A.; Honkala, E.

    2011-01-01

    The IADR Global Oral Health Inequalities Task Group on Dental Caries has synthesized current evidence and opinion to identify a five-year implementation and research agenda which should lead to improvements in global oral health, with particular reference to the implementation of current best evidence as well as integrated action to reduce caries and health inequalities between and within countries. The Group determined that research should: integrate health and oral health wherever possible, using common risk factors; be able to respond to and influence international developments in health, healthcare, and health payment systems as well as dental prevention and materials; and exploit the potential for novel funding partnerships with industry and foundations. More effective communication between and among the basic science, clinical science, and health promotion/public health research communities is needed. Translation of research into policy and practice should be a priority for all. Both community and individual interventions need tailoring to achieve a more equal and person-centered preventive focus and reduce any social gradient in health. Recommendations are made for both clinical and public health implementation of existing research and for caries-related research agendas in clinical science, health promotion/public health, and basic science. PMID:21490233

  13. Oral contraceptive compliance during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Serfaty, D

    1997-06-17

    A review of the available literature suggests that adolescent lack of compliance with oral contraceptives (OCs) is a multifactorial problem that requires a multifactorial solution. Because of their lack of experience with contraception, higher frequency of intercourse, higher intrinsic fertility, and pattern of frequent stopping or switching of methods, adolescents experience higher OC failure rates than do adult women. Adolescents also are more likely to forget to take the pill or to discontinue due to side effects, without consulting their physician. A survey of European young women identified contraceptive protection without weight gain as the most necessary change in OCs. Adolescents must be counseled not to miss a single pill, observe the pill-free interval, take phasic formulations in the right order, and use a back-up method in case of diarrhea and vomiting or when certain medications (e.g., antibiotics and anti-epileptics) are used concurrently, and be informed of steps to take in the event of side effects and unprotected intercourse. The quality of the counseling appears to be more important to compliance than the quantity of information provided. Pharmacists should complete the counseling initiated by the physician and explain prescription use. The most significant predictor of consistent OC use is the adolescent's motivation.

  14. Relative Bioavailability of Apixaban Solution or Crushed Tablet Formulations Administered by Mouth or Nasogastric Tube in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan; Wang, Xiaoli; Perlstein, Itay; Wang, Jessie; Badawy, Sherif; Frost, Charles; LaCreta, Frank

    2015-08-01

    Crushed tablet and solution formulations of apixaban administered orally or via a nasogastric tube (NGT) may be useful in patients unable to swallow solid dose formulations. It is important to understand whether new formulations and/or methods of administration impact apixaban bioavailability and pharmacokinetic properties. These studies evaluated the relative bioavailability (Frel) of apixaban solution administered orally; oral solution administered via NGT flushed with either 5% dextrose in water (D5W) or with infant formula; oral solution via NGT with a nutritional supplement; and crushed tablet suspended in D5W and administered via NGT. Three open-label, randomized, crossover studies were conducted in healthy adults (study 1: apixaban 10-mg tablet [reference] versus oral solution, both administered PO; study 2: apixaban 5-mg oral solution PO [reference] versus oral solution via NGT flushed with either D5W or infant formula; study 3: apixaban 5-mg oral solution PO [reference] versus apixaban 5-mg oral solution via NGT with a nutritional supplement and versus crushed tablet suspended in D5W and administered via NGT). Point estimates and 90% CIs of the geometric mean ratios (GMRs; test/reference) were generated for Cmax and AUC. Adverse events were recorded throughout each study. Frel of the oral solution was 105% versus tablet, and Frel for oral solution via NGT with D5W flush, infant formula flush, nutritional supplement, and crushed tablet via NGT versus oral solution administration were 96.7%, 92.2%, 81.3%, and 95.1%, respectively. The 90% CIs of the GMRs of all AUCs met the bioequivalence criterion except that of the nutritional supplement (0.766-0.863). The corresponding GMRs for Cmax were 0.977, 0.953, 0.805, 0.682, and 0.884. For the solution via NGT flushed with D5W and for the crushed tablet, the 90% CIs of the Cmax GMRs met the bioequivalence criterion. Apixaban was well tolerated in all 3 studies; most adverse events were mild. Comparable Frel was

  15. Betel nut chewing, oral premalignant lesions, and the oral microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Zhu, Xuemei; Goodman, Marc T.; Gatewood, Robert; Mendiola, Paul; Quinata, Katrina; Paulino, Yvette C.

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancers are attributed to a number of causal agents including tobacco, alcohol, human papillomavirus (HPV), and areca (betel) nut. Although betel nut chewing has been established as an independent cause of oral cancer, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are poorly understood. An investigation was undertaken to evaluate the influence of betel nut chewing on the oral microbiome and oral premalignant lesions. Study participants were recruited from a dental clinic in Guam. Structured interviews and oral examinations were performed. Oral swabbing and saliva samples were evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3- V5 region of the 16S rRNA bacterial gene and genotyped for HPV. One hundred twenty-two adults were enrolled including 64 current betel nut chewers, 37 former chewers, and 21 with no history of betel nut use. Oral premalignant lesions, including leukoplakia and submucous fibrosis, were observed in 10 chewers. Within-sample bacterial diversity was significantly lower in long-term (≥10 years) chewers vs. never chewers and in current chewers with oral lesions vs. individuals without lesions. Between-sample bacterial diversity based on Unifrac distances significantly differed by chewing status and oral lesion status. Current chewers had significantly elevated levels of Streptococcus infantis and higher and lower levels of distinct taxa of the Actinomyces and Streptococcus genera. Long-term chewers had reduced levels of Parascardovia and Streptococcus. Chewers with oral lesions had significantly elevated levels of Oribacterium, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus, including Streptococcus anginosus. In multivariate analyses, controlling for smoking, oral HPV, S.anginosus, and S. infantis levels, current betel nut chewing remained the only predictor of oral premalignant lesions. Our study provides evidence that betel nut chewing alters the oral bacterial microbiome including that of chewers who develop oral premalignant lesions. Nonetheless, whether microbial changes

  16. Betel nut chewing, oral premalignant lesions, and the oral microbiome.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Brenda Y; Zhu, Xuemei; Goodman, Marc T; Gatewood, Robert; Mendiola, Paul; Quinata, Katrina; Paulino, Yvette C

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancers are attributed to a number of causal agents including tobacco, alcohol, human papillomavirus (HPV), and areca (betel) nut. Although betel nut chewing has been established as an independent cause of oral cancer, the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are poorly understood. An investigation was undertaken to evaluate the influence of betel nut chewing on the oral microbiome and oral premalignant lesions. Study participants were recruited from a dental clinic in Guam. Structured interviews and oral examinations were performed. Oral swabbing and saliva samples were evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing of the V3- V5 region of the 16S rRNA bacterial gene and genotyped for HPV. One hundred twenty-two adults were enrolled including 64 current betel nut chewers, 37 former chewers, and 21 with no history of betel nut use. Oral premalignant lesions, including leukoplakia and submucous fibrosis, were observed in 10 chewers. Within-sample bacterial diversity was significantly lower in long-term (≥10 years) chewers vs. never chewers and in current chewers with oral lesions vs. individuals without lesions. Between-sample bacterial diversity based on Unifrac distances significantly differed by chewing status and oral lesion status. Current chewers had significantly elevated levels of Streptococcus infantis and higher and lower levels of distinct taxa of the Actinomyces and Streptococcus genera. Long-term chewers had reduced levels of Parascardovia and Streptococcus. Chewers with oral lesions had significantly elevated levels of Oribacterium, Actinomyces, and Streptococcus, including Streptococcus anginosus. In multivariate analyses, controlling for smoking, oral HPV, S.anginosus, and S. infantis levels, current betel nut chewing remained the only predictor of oral premalignant lesions. Our study provides evidence that betel nut chewing alters the oral bacterial microbiome including that of chewers who develop oral premalignant lesions. Nonetheless, whether microbial changes

  17. Expanding oral health preventative services for young children: a successful interprofessional model.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Evelyn; Marino, Deborah; Thacker, Sherrey; DiMarco, Marguerite; Huff, Marlene; Biordi, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Progressive solutions are needed to solve the oral health chronic disease problem in the U.S. The importance of oral health coupled with urgent community oral health needs, shortage of primary providers, and emphasis on interprofessional collaboration make the timing ripe for allied health training and practice in oral health preventative services. A successful model is described that addressed the unmet oral health care needs of low-income and at-risk children. The model is a guide for integrating an oral health screen, fluoride varnish, anticipatory guidance, and dental referrals into allied health practice. An alternative oral health provider approach was used to address the low rate of early caries detection, preventative oral care, and access for underserved children. A comprehensive system for the administrative and clinical components of the project, including implementation plan, clinical protocols, prescriptive authority, a dental home referral system, clinical training and competency testing, was developed. The interprofessional project increased oral health services capacity and practice acceptance of oral health screening and fluoride varnishing among dietitians. Oral health care services provide allied health practitioners with unique opportunities to impact the poor access and unmet needs of at risk children and adults and to improve overall health.

  18. Oral health problems and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Ki; Baker, Lindsey A.; Davarian, Shieva; Crimmins, Eileen

    2013-01-01

    Background/purpose Previous studies have shown the relationship between individual oral health conditions and mortality; however, the relationship between mortality and multiple oral health conditions has not been examined. This study investigates the link between individual oral health problems and oral comorbidity and mortality risk. Materials and methods Data are derived from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2004, which is linked to the National Death Index for mortality follow-up through 2006. We estimated the risk of mortality among people with three individual oral health conditions—tooth loss, root caries, and periodontitis as well as with oral comorbidity—or having all three conditions. Results Significant tooth loss, root caries, and periodontal disease were associated with increased odds of dying. The relationship between oral health conditions and mortality disappeared when controlling for sociodemographic, health, and/or health behavioral indicators. Having multiple oral health problems was associated with an even higher rate of mortality. Conclusion Individual oral health conditions—tooth loss, root caries, and periodontal disease—were not related to mortality when sociodemographic, health, and/or health behavioral factors were considered, and there was no differential pattern between the three conditions. Multiple oral health problems were associated with a higher risk of dying. PMID:24416472

  19. Oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Rio, Rute; Simões-Silva, Liliana; Garro, Sofia; Silva, Mário-Jorge; Azevedo, Álvaro

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that placenta may harbour a unique microbiome that may have origin in maternal oral microbiome. Although the major physiological and hormonal adjustments observed in pregnant women lead to biochemical and microbiological modifications of the oral environment, very few studies evaluated the changes suffered by the oral microbiota throughout pregnancy. So, the aim of our study was to evaluate oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy and to compare it with non-pregnant women. Material and Methods The oral yeast colonization was assessed in saliva of 30 pregnant and non-pregnant women longitudinally over a 6-months period. Demographic information was collected, a non-invasive intra-oral examination was performed and saliva flow and pH were determined. Results Pregnant and non-pregnant groups were similar regarding age and level of education. Saliva flow rate did not differ, but saliva pH was lower in pregnant than in non-pregnant women. Oral yeast prevalence was higher in pregnant than in non-pregnant women, either in the first or in the third trimester, but did not attain statistical significance. In individuals colonized with yeast, the total yeast quantification (Log10CFU/mL) increase from the 1st to the 3rd trimester in pregnant women, but not in non-pregnant women. Conclusions Pregnancy may favour oral yeast growth that may be associated with an acidic oral environment. Key words:Oral yeast, fungi, pregnancy, saliva pH. PMID:28160578

  20. Clinical trial registration in oral health journals.

    PubMed

    Smaïl-Faugeron, V; Fron-Chabouis, H; Durieux, P

    2015-03-01

    Prospective registration of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) represents the best solution to reporting bias. The extent to which oral health journals have endorsed and complied with RCT registration is unknown. We identified journals publishing RCTs in dentistry, oral surgery, and medicine in the Journal Citation Reports. We classified journals into 3 groups: journals requiring or recommending trial registration, journals referring indirectly to registration, and journals providing no reference to registration. For the 5 journals with the highest 2012 impact factors in each group, we assessed whether RCTs with results published in 2013 had been registered. Of 78 journals examined, 32 (41%) required or recommended trial registration, 19 (24%) referred indirectly to registration, and 27 (35%) provided no reference to registration. We identified 317 RCTs with results published in the 15 selected journals in 2013. Overall, 73 (23%) were registered in a trial registry. Among those, 91% were registered retrospectively and 32% did not report trial registration in the published article. The proportion of trials registered was not significantly associated with editorial policies: 29% with results in journals that required or recommended registration, 15% in those that referred indirectly to registration, and 21% in those providing no reference to registration (P = 0.05). Less than one-quarter of RCTs with results published in a sample of oral health journals were registered with a public registry. Improvements are needed with respect to how journals inform and require their authors to register their trials. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  1. Issues related to diagnosing oral lichen planus among oral pathologists in South India: A pilot survey.

    PubMed

    Sanketh, D Sharathkumar; Srinivasan, Samuel Raj; Patil, Shankargouda; Ranganathan, Kannan

    2016-10-26

    In the present study, we simulated clinical scenarios by explicitly describing the history and clinical and histological features of hypothetical patients presenting with oral lichen planus (OLP), oral lichenoid lesion, and epithelial dysplasia in a self-designed questionnaire. By doing so, we aimed to elicit a diagnosis from oral pathologists and trainees, analyze their responses, appraise issues, and propose solutions regarding the diagnosis of OLP. The questionnaire was distributed to 100 oral pathologists and trainees in South India. Six questions were designed to assess awareness of the diagnostic aspects of OLP. Ten questions were hypothetical clinical scenarios (HCS) devised to evaluate respondents' knowledge of diagnostic guidelines and the criteria used by the respondents to render a diagnosis. There were 60 of 100 responses to the questionnaire. More than half the respondents were aware of the World Health Organization and modified guidelines of OLP. We observed considerable variations in diagnoses for the HCS. Our study illustrates the ambiguity in rendering an accurate diagnosis, despite adequate guidelines. Based on the responses for the HCS, we hypothesized that changes in the distribution (unilateral or bilateral) and clinical characteristic of OLP, and habits of patients, have a significant bearing on the clinical and final diagnoses of the lesion. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Oral hygiene, dentition, sexual habits and risk of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Talamini, R; Vaccarella, S; Barbone, F; Tavani, A; Vecchia, C La; Herrero, R; Muñoz, N; Franceschi, S

    2000-01-01

    In an Italian case-control study of oral cancer, number of missing teeth and other aspects of dental care were similar, but the general condition of the mouth, as indicated by gum bleeding, tartar deposits and mucosal irritation, was worse among oral cancer cases than controls. No differences were detected in sexual practices (including oral sex) and (previous) sexually transmitted infections. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11027440

  3. Oral Thrush (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development ( ... baby is being treated with the antifungal solution. Changing diapers often also prevents fungal diaper rashes . Treatment ...

  4. Oral verruciform xanthoma

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Lydia; Staines, Konrad; Pring, Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Verruciform xanthoma (VX) of the oral cavity is a benign mucosal growth that often presents as a pink, yellow or grey raised plaque or papule with granular, papillary or verrucous surface morphology. Intraorally this often presents on the masticatory mucosa and extraorally often involves the skin and anogenital mucosa. There are several proposed aetiological factors and the clinical features of VX can be misleading; clinically it can resemble malignancy. Histopathological diagnosis is a key for the correct management of this lesion. Excision of this lesion is curative. PMID:25819830

  5. Oral epithelioid hemangioendothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Preeti Tomar; Guledgud, Mahima V.; Patil, Karthikeya

    2015-01-01

    Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HE) is an intermediate malignant potential vascular neoplasm with uncertain clinical behavior, wide variations in microscopic findings, and prognosis. According to the World Health Organization (2002) classification, epithelioid HE has been considered under malignant tumors which rarely metastasize. The epithelioid variant, the most aggressive one, has similar gender predilection and sporadic occurrence in children. The patients usually present with an asymptomatic oral mass whereas few cases may report with the painful bleeding lesion. We attempt to present a case in an adolescent male with previously never described biological behavior, diverse histopathological features, and immunohistochemistry findings. PMID:26681871

  6. Oral manifestations in transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Nappalli, Deepika; Lingappa, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplantation is a widely undertaken procedure and has become an important alternative for the treatment of different end-stage organ diseases that previously had a poor prognosis. The field of organ transplant and hematopoietic stem cell transplant is developing rapidly. The increase in the number of transplant recipients also has an impact on oral and dental services. Most of the oral problems develop as a direct consequence of drug-induced immunosuppression or the procedure itself. These patients may present with oral complaints due to infections or mucosal lesions. Such lesions should be identified, diagnosed, and treated. New treatment strategies permit continuous adaptation of oral care regimens to the changing scope of oral complications. The aim of this review is to analyze those oral manifestations and to discuss the related literature. PMID:26005458

  7. Oral Lesions and Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Castellarin, P.; Pozzato, G.; Tirelli, G.; Di Lenarda, R.; Biasotto, M.

    2010-01-01

    Lymphoproliferative disorders are heterogeneous malignancy characterized by the expansion of a lymphoid clone more or less differentiated. At the level of the oral cavity, the lymphoproliferative disorder can occur in various ways, most commonly as lymphoid lesions with extranodal externalization, but sometimes, oral lesions may represent a localization of a disease spread. With regard to the primary localizations of lymphoproliferative disorders, a careful examination of the head and neck, oral, and oropharyngeal area is necessary in order to identify suspicious lesions, and their early detection results in a better prognosis for the patient. Numerous complications have been described and frequently found at oral level, due to pathology or different therapeutic strategies. These complications require precise diagnosis and measures to oral health care. In all this, oral pathologists, as well as dental practitioners, have a central role in the treatment and long-term monitoring of these patients. PMID:20871659

  8. Oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Nguyen, Ly M.; Thomas, Sroka; Hong-Ly, Bevan; Chi, Alexander; Vos, Paul; Karlsson, Ulf; Vinh-Hung, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: We aimed to study the prevalence of oral sex and its possible association with human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 infection in the development of oropharyngeal cancer in the US population for possible prevention. Methods: We conduct a systemic review on the prevalence of oral sex among Americans among different age groups, the prevalence of HPV 16 infection reported in oropharyngeal cancer, and correlation between oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer. Results: Oral sex is prevalent among adolescents and sexually active adults. Sixty percent of oropharyngeal cancer reported in the United States is associated with HPV 16 infections. Individuals who practiced oral sex with multiple partners are at risk for developing oropharyngeal cancer and need to be informed about practicing safe sex or getting vaccination. Conclusion: Family physicians will play a key role in prevention and educating the public about the risk of oral sex. PMID:27428229

  9. Genital occurrence of oral microbiota.

    PubMed

    Forsum, U; Hjelm, E; Holmberg, K; Nord, C E; Wallin, J

    1978-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that tonsillar gonococcal infection or colonization is fairly common. Carriage rates of about 8% have been found. These studies also indicate that oro-genital contacts are common. Since very little is known about the amount of oral microbiota transmitted to the genitals, we have studied the occurrence of oral streptococci and Neisseria species in urethra and cervix. Among 128 patients attending an STD-clinic we found 10 carriers of oral streptococci, one Streptococcus mitior, four Streptococcus sanguis, one Streptococcus mutans and four Streptococcus salivarius and case of urethritis due to Neisseria menigitidis. Seventy-three of the patients had recently had their genitals exposed to the oral flora of their partners. Despite the heavy contamination with oral microbiota that can be assumed to occur in these cases, there seems to be no colonization of the genitals with oral microbiota.

  10. Oral tuberculosis: unusual radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Sansare, K; Gupta, A; Khanna, V; Karjodkar, F

    2011-05-01

    Oral tuberculosis and its radiographic findings are not commonly encountered in an oral and maxillofacial radiology practice. Literature has occasional mention of the radiographic findings of oral tuberculosis, which are still ambiguous. When affected, it is manifested majorly in the oral mucosa and rarely in the jaw bones. Here, we report certain unusual radiographic findings of oral tuberculosis which have been rarely mentioned in the literature. Four illustrative cases describe bony resorption, condylar resorption, resorption of the inferior border of the mandible and rarefaction of the alveolar bone as radiographic findings of oral tuberculosis. Follow up of the first case demonstrated regeneration of the condylar head after anti-Kochs therapy was completed, a hitherto unreported phenomenon. The importance of including tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis of some of the unusual radiographic manifestations is emphasized.

  11. Absorption kinetics of orally administered leucovorin calcium.

    PubMed

    McGuire, B W; Sia, L L; Haynes, J D; Kisicki, J C; Gutierrez, M L; Stokstad, E L

    1987-01-01

    Oral dose proportionality and pharmacokinetics of leucovorin [(d,l)-5-formyltetrahydrofolate (5-formyl-THF)] were studied in 30 healthy male subjects. In a randomized cross-over design, 24 fasted subjects were given 4 of a series of 5 single test doses between 20 and 100 mg, at 1-week intervals, of 5-formyl-THF as an oral solution of leucovorin calcium. Six separate subjects received 200 mg iv and po in a 2-way crossover. Blood and urine samples were collected over 24 hours for differential microbiological folate assays using Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus faecalis. Using L casei activity to measure total serum folates, the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to infinite time (AUC[0-infinity]) was calculated. Relative bioavailabilities were 78%, 62%, 49%, and 42% for the 40-, 60-, 80-, and 100-mg doses, respectively. Both the AUC and peak concentration (CPEAK) of total folates (consisting predominantly of the major metabolite, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-methyl-THF], displayed significant deviation from linearity consistent with a saturation of folate absorption. Absolute bioavailability of the 200-mg oral dose of leucovorin based on AUC was 31% compared with that of the iv dose (6,848 vs. 22,298 ng.hr/ml, respectively). Total clearance, terminal half-life, and apparent volume of distribution of total folate at the 200-mg dose were not significantly different between the two routes of administration. Eighty-three percent of the biologically active iv dose was recovered in the urine within 24 hours, 31% as 5-methyl-THF. Twenty percent of the same oral dose was excreted in 24 hours, 16% as 5-methyl-THF. In contrast to the nondose-proportionality observed in total serum folates, AUC of the small component of S faecalis activity, which appeared earlier than 5-methyl-THF, displayed linear kinetics, suggestive of a distinct mechanism of uptake. As dose increased, S faecalis activity increased in relative proportion to L casei, indicating that saturation

  12. A comparative analysis of policies addressing rural oral health in eight English-speaking OECD countries.

    PubMed

    Crocombe, Leonard A; Goldberg, Lynette R; Bell, Erica; Seidel, Bastian

    2017-01-01

    Oral health is fundamental to overall health. Poor oral health is largely preventable but unacceptable inequalities exist, particularly for people in rural areas. The issues are complex. Rural populations are characterised by lower rates of health insurance, higher rates of poverty, less water fluoridation, fewer dentists and oral health specialists, and greater distances to access care. These factors inter-relate with educational, attitudinal, and system-level issues. An important area of enquiry is whether and how national oral health policies address causes and solutions for poor rural oral health. The purpose of this study was to examine a series of government policies on oral health to (i) determine the extent to which such policies addressed rural oral health issues, and (ii) identify enabling assumptions in policy language about problems and solutions regarding rural communities. Eight current oral health policies were identified from Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the USA, England, Scotland, Northern Ireland, and Wales. Validated content and critical discourse analyses were used to document and explore the concepts in these policy documents, with a particular focus on the frequency with which rural oral health was mentioned, and the enabling assumptions in policy language about rural communities. Seventy-three concepts relating to oral health were identified from the textual analysis of the eight policy documents. The rural concept addressing oral health issues occurred in only 2% of all policies and was notably absent from the oral health policies of countries with substantial rural populations. It occurred most frequently in the policy documents from Australia and Scotland, less so in the policy documents from Canada, Wales, and New Zealand, and not at all in the oral health policies from the US, England, and Northern Ireland. Thus, the oral health needs of rural communities were generally not the focus of, nor included in, the oral health policy

  13. Oral mucosal immunization using glucomannosylated bilosomes.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sanyog; Indulkar, Anura; Harde, Harshad; Agrawal, Ashish K

    2014-06-01

    The present study embarks on the feasibility of GM-bilosomes as a rationally designed vehicle for oral mucosal immunization. Bilosomes containing BSA as a model antigen were found to have vesicle size of 157 +/- 3 nm, PDI of 0.287 +/- 0.045, zeta potential of -21.8 +/- 2.01 mV and entrapment efficiency of 71.3 +/- 4.3%. Bilosomal formulations were freeze dried and entrapped BSA in freeze dried formulations was found to retain its structural and conformational stability as evident by SDS-PAGE and CD analysis. The GM-bilosomes were also found stable in different simulated biological fluids and bile salt solutions of different concentrations. In-vitro drug release revealed that GM-bilosomes were able to sustain drug release up to 24 h. In-vitro cell uptake in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells demonstrated significantly higher uptake of GM-bilosomes in comparison with bilosomes and free antigen. Intestinal uptake studies on excised rat intestinal sections further demonstrated higher uptake of vesicular systems throughout the intestinal region in comparison with free antigen. Significantly higher (p < 0.05) systemic immune response (serum IgG level) was observed in case of GM-bilosomes in comparison with bilosomes and alum adsorbed BSA (BSA-AL) following oral administration. The immune response observed in case of GM-bilosomes was comparable to BSA-AL administered through im route without any significant difference (p > 0.05). More importantly, GM-bilosomes were found capable of inducing mucosal immune response as well as cell mediated immune response which was not induced by im BSA-AL. In conclusion, GM-bilosomes could be considered as promising carrier and adjuvant system for oral mucosal immunization and productively exploited for oral delivery of other candidate antigens.

  14. Oral complications in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  15. Editorial: Oral glucose/electrolyte therapy for acute diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    1975-01-11

    Much clinical experience has been gained in the use of the glucose/electrolyte oral solutions in the treatment of acute diarrhea. Those patients who are in shock or too weak to drink need intravenous fluids to correct their total deficit. With isotonic polyelectrolyte fluids rehydration may be achieved in 2-4 hours. Subsequently, most of these patients can be given oral fluids to replace continuing stool loss. Patients who are not in shock and who are sufficiently strong to drink at the outset nearly always can be rehydrated with oral fluids alone. Vomiting is most likely caused by acidosis and volume depletion, and these can be corrected in severely dehydrated patients by intravenous therapy and by oral therapy in those not in shock and able to drink by oral therapy. Proponents of oral glucose/electrolyte therapy for diarrhea, like other proponents of new treatments, have great visions of its benefits to the world, yet these visions require validation. The biggest problem will be getting glucose and electrolytes to where they are most needed -- at the level of home and village.

  16. Complications of equine oral surgery.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Padraic M; Hawkes, Claire; Townsend, Neil

    2008-12-01

    The vast majority of equine oral procedures are dental-related and, unless great care is taken, almost all such procedures have the potential to cause marked short- or long-term damage to other oral structures. This review of the more common complications of oral surgery begins at the rostral oral cavity with procedures of the incisors, and then moves caudally to deal with complications related to procedures of wolf teeth and cheek teeth, including salivary duct disruption and dental sinusitis. Finally, complications associated with maxillary and mandibular fractures are discussed.

  17. Improving oral hygiene for patients.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Debbie; Hampson, Victoria; Queen, Kerry; Kirk, Donna; Clarkson, Jan; Young, Linda

    2015-01-13

    Systematic reviews and patient safety initiatives recommend that oral hygiene should be part of routine patient care. However, evidence suggests it is often neglected in hospitals and care homes. Research recommends encouraging beliefs that support oral hygiene, and teaching nurses appropriate skills, as necessary prerequisites to implementing best practice in hospital wards. This article describes a pilot study of an educational workshop on oral hygiene. Results from the pilot study suggest that this workshop is a feasible intervention for a service-wide trial. The literature suggests that other interventions are required to complement this approach if nurses are to make oral hygiene a priority in daily patient care.

  18. [Oral transmission of Chagas' disease].

    PubMed

    Toso M, Alberto; Vial U, Felipe; Galanti, Norbel

    2011-02-01

    The traditional transmission pathways of Chagas' disease are vectorial, transfusional, transplacental and organ transplantation. However, oral transmission is gaining importance. The first evidence of oral transmission was reported in Brazil in 1965. Nowadays the oral route is the transmission mode in 50% of cases in the Amazon river zone. Oral infection is produced by the ingestion of infected triatomine bugs or their feces, undercooked meat from infested host animals and food contaminated with urine or anal secretion of infected marsupials. Therefore travelers to those zones should be advised about care to be taken with ingested food. In Chile, this new mode of transmission should be considered in public health policies.

  19. Oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rio, R; Simões-Silva, L; Garro, S; Silva, M-J; Azevedo, Á; Sampaio-Maia, B

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that placenta may harbour a unique microbiome that may have origin in maternal oral microbiome. Although the major physiological and hormonal adjustments observed in pregnant women lead to biochemical and microbiological modifications of the oral environment, very few studies evaluated the changes suffered by the oral microbiota throughout pregnancy. So, the aim of our study was to evaluate oral yeast colonization throughout pregnancy and to compare it with non-pregnant women. The oral yeast colonization was assessed in saliva of 30 pregnant and non-pregnant women longitudinally over a 6-months period. Demographic information was collected, a non-invasive intra-oral examination was performed and saliva flow and pH were determined. Pregnant and non-pregnant groups were similar regarding age and level of education. Saliva flow rate did not differ, but saliva pH was lower in pregnant than in non-pregnant women. Oral yeast prevalence was higher in pregnant than in non-pregnant women, either in the first or in the third trimester, but did not attain statistical significance. In individuals colonized with yeast, the total yeast quantification (Log10CFU/mL) increase from the 1st to the 3rd trimester in pregnant women, but not in non-pregnant women. Pregnancy may favour oral yeast growth that may be associated with an acidic oral environment.

  20. Gingival involvement in oral paracoccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Cléverson O; Almeida, Aroldo Dos Santos; Pereira, Alessandro Antônio Costa; Sallum, Antônio Wilson; Hanemann, João Adolfo Costa; Tatakis, Dimitris N

    2007-07-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis, a deep mycosis endemic in parts of Latin America, often presents with oral lesions involving the gingiva. Nevertheless, the periodontal literature is devoid of references to oral paracoccidioidomycosis. The purpose of this study was to characterize the gingival involvement in oral paracoccidioidomycosis and to contrast clinical and histopathologic diagnosis of the disease. Differential diagnosis and management of oral paracoccidioidomycosis were reviewed. From January 1995 to October 2006, the files of the Oral Pathology Laboratory, School of Dentistry, Alfenas Federal University, were reviewed to identify cases referred because of a clinical diagnosis of oral paracoccidioidomycosis. Data collected included patient demographics (age, gender, race, and occupation), clinical information (oral lesion location), and histopathologic diagnosis. Forty-six cases were identified, and 34 were histopathologically confirmed as paracoccidioidomycosis. Of the remaining 12 cases, one-half were diagnosed as either carcinoma or dysplastic leukoplakia. Of the 34 confirmed paracoccidioidomycosis cases, 45% presented with multiple site involvement, whereas the gingiva/alveolar process was the most prevalent site overall (52%). The gingiva/alveolar process was the most prevalent site in both multiple and single site cases. The majority of patients were men (88%), white (75%), and in their fourth decade of life (47%). Statistical analysis revealed that patients with gingival/alveolar process involvement were demographically indistinguishable from those without. Oral paracoccidioidomycosis has a strong predilection for the gingiva, whereas patients with gingival lesions do not differ from patients lacking such involvement. Early diagnosis of gingival/oral lesions may prevent life-threatening complications of this mycosis.