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Sample records for orally administered arachidonic

  1. Orally Administered Bioadherent Sustained Release Microencapsulated Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    Bioadherent Sustained Release Microencapsulated Vaccines PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. G. Duncan Hitchens, Anthony Giletto, Allison Rice-Ficht, Sunitha...Aug 96) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Orally Administered Bioadherent Sustained Release Microencapsulated Vaccines DAMD17-95-C-5099 6... microencapsulated vaccine against staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA). The research is centered around using a known bioadhesive, vitelline protein B (vpB), to

  2. Regression of oral hairy leukoplakia after orally administered acyclovir therapy.

    PubMed

    Resnick, L; Herbst, J S; Ablashi, D V; Atherton, S; Frank, B; Rosen, L; Horwitz, S N

    1988-01-15

    To define the role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the pathogenesis of oral hairy leukoplakia, 13 human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive men with clinical and histologic evidence of oral hairy leukoplakia were enrolled in an open-label trial of orally administered acyclovir therapy (3.2 g/d for 20 days). Of six patients who received therapy, five exhibited clinical regression. Once therapy was discontinued, recurrences occurred in all responders. Among seven patients who refused therapy, no spontaneous remissions occurred. Before therapy, EBV replication within the leukoplakia was demonstrated by immunofluorescence tissue staining or electron microscopy in five patients who were studied. Human papillomavirus was not detected by immunocytochemistry or electron microscopy from tissue specimens of six patients. After therapy, biopsy specimens from two patients with complete responses revealed a normalization of histologic abnormalities and an inability to detect EBV in previously involved mucosa by immunofluorescence or in situ DNA hybridization assays. It was concluded that EBV replication within the epithelial cells of the tongue is necessary for the development of oral hairy leukoplakia.

  3. Absorption kinetics of orally administered leucovorin calcium.

    PubMed

    McGuire, B W; Sia, L L; Haynes, J D; Kisicki, J C; Gutierrez, M L; Stokstad, E L

    1987-01-01

    Oral dose proportionality and pharmacokinetics of leucovorin [(d,l)-5-formyltetrahydrofolate (5-formyl-THF)] were studied in 30 healthy male subjects. In a randomized cross-over design, 24 fasted subjects were given 4 of a series of 5 single test doses between 20 and 100 mg, at 1-week intervals, of 5-formyl-THF as an oral solution of leucovorin calcium. Six separate subjects received 200 mg iv and po in a 2-way crossover. Blood and urine samples were collected over 24 hours for differential microbiological folate assays using Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus faecalis. Using L casei activity to measure total serum folates, the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to infinite time (AUC[0-infinity]) was calculated. Relative bioavailabilities were 78%, 62%, 49%, and 42% for the 40-, 60-, 80-, and 100-mg doses, respectively. Both the AUC and peak concentration (CPEAK) of total folates (consisting predominantly of the major metabolite, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-methyl-THF], displayed significant deviation from linearity consistent with a saturation of folate absorption. Absolute bioavailability of the 200-mg oral dose of leucovorin based on AUC was 31% compared with that of the iv dose (6,848 vs. 22,298 ng.hr/ml, respectively). Total clearance, terminal half-life, and apparent volume of distribution of total folate at the 200-mg dose were not significantly different between the two routes of administration. Eighty-three percent of the biologically active iv dose was recovered in the urine within 24 hours, 31% as 5-methyl-THF. Twenty percent of the same oral dose was excreted in 24 hours, 16% as 5-methyl-THF. In contrast to the nondose-proportionality observed in total serum folates, AUC of the small component of S faecalis activity, which appeared earlier than 5-methyl-THF, displayed linear kinetics, suggestive of a distinct mechanism of uptake. As dose increased, S faecalis activity increased in relative proportion to L casei, indicating that saturation

  4. Antinociceptive and gastroprotective effects of inhaled and orally administered Lavandula hybrida Reverchon "Grosso" essential oil.

    PubMed

    Barocelli, E; Calcina, F; Chiavarini, M; Impicciatore, M; Bruni, R; Bianchi, A; Ballabeni, V

    2004-11-26

    In this study the antinociceptive and the gastroprotective effects of orally administered or inhaled Lavandula hybrida Reverchon "Grosso" essential oil, and its principal constituents linalool and linalyl acetate were evaluated in rodents. Either when orally administered (100 mg/kg) or inhaled for 60 min lavender essential oil significantly reduced the acetic acid-writhing response in a naloxone-sensitive manner. In the hot plate test, analgesic activity observed after oil inhalation was inhibited by naloxone, atropine, mecamylamine pretreatment suggesting the involvement of opioidergic as well as cholinergic pathways. Regardless of the administration route and the experimental model used both linalool and linalyl acetate did not produce significant analgesic response. Oral or inhalatory treatment with analgesic doses of essential oil did not affect mice spontaneous locomotor activity. Concerning the gastric effects, lavender oil, linalool and linalyl acetate oral administration protected against acute ethanol-induced gastric ulcers but did not prevent indomethacin-induced lesions indicating no interference with arachidonic acid metabolic cascade. In conclusion, besides this gastroprotection, lavender oil reveals an interesting analgesic activity mainly relevant after inhalation, at doses devoid of sedative side effect, suggesting the interest for potential application of this oil in aromatherapy.

  5. Oral gold compound auranofin triggers arachidonate release and cyclooxygenase metabolism in the alveolar macrophage

    SciTech Connect

    Peters-Golden, M.; Shelly, C.

    1988-12-01

    We examined the effect of in vitro incubation with the oral gold compound auranofin (AF) on arachidonic acid (AA) release and metabolism by rat alveolar macrophages (AMs). AF stimulated dose- and time-dependent release of /sup 14/C-AA from prelabeled AMs, which reached 4.7 +/- 0.3% (mean +/- SEM) of incorporated radioactivity at 10 micrograms/ml for 90 min, as compared to 0.5 +/- 0.1% release following control incubation for 90 min (p less than 0.001). Similar dose- and time-dependent synthesis of thromboxane (Tx) A2 (measured as TxB2) and prostaglandin (PG) E2 was demonstrated by radioimmunoassay of medium from unlabeled cultures, reaching 18-fold and 9-fold, respectively, of the control values at 10 micrograms/ml AF for 90 min (p less than 0.001 for both). AF-induced TxB2 and PGE2 synthesis was inhibited by indomethacin as well as by pretreatment with methylprednisolone. No increase in the synthesis of immunoreactive leukotrienes (LT) B4 or C4 was noted at any dose or time of AF. High performance liquid chromatographic separation of /sup 14/C-eicosanoids synthesized by prelabeled AMs confirmed that AF induced the release of free AA and its metabolism to cyclooxygenase, but not 5-lipoxygenase, metabolites. The ability of AF to trigger macrophage AA metabolism may be relevant to the exacerbation of certain inflammatory processes which sometimes accompany gold therapy.

  6. Absorption sites of orally administered drugs in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Teruo

    2017-09-17

    In pharmacotherapy, drugs are mostly taken orally to be absorbed systemically from the small intestine, and some drugs are known to have preferential absorption sites in the small intestine. It would therefore be valuable to know the absorption sites of orally administered drugs and the influencing factors. Areas covered:In this review, the author summarizes the reported absorption sites of orally administered drugs, as well as, influencing factors and experimental techniques. Information on the main absorption sites and influencing factors can help to develop ideal drug delivery systems and more effective pharmacotherapies. Expert opinion: Various factors including: the solubility, lipophilicity, luminal concentration, pKa value, transporter substrate specificity, transporter expression, luminal fluid pH, gastrointestinal transit time, and intestinal metabolism determine the site-dependent intestinal absorption. However, most of the dissolved fraction of orally administered drugs including substrates for ABC and SLC transporters, except for some weakly basic drugs with higher pKa values, are considered to be absorbed sequentially from the proximal small intestine. Securing the solubility and stability of drugs prior to reaching to the main absorption sites and appropriate delivery rates of drugs at absorption sites are important goals for achieving effective pharmacotherapy.

  7. Effect of Calcium Carbonate on Bioavailability of Orally Administered Gemifloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Pletz, M. W.; Petzold, P.; Allen, A.; Burkhardt, O.; Lode, H.

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the effect of calcium carbonate on the oral bioavailability of gemifloxacin. Gemifloxacin was administered alone, 2 h before, simultaneously, or 2 h after calcium carbonate in 16 volunteers. Data for 320 mg of gemifloxacin alone were as follows: maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax),13 μg/ml; half-life, 7.33 h; and area under the concentration-time curve from 0 h to infinity (AUC∞), 6.79 μg · h/ml. Only simultaneous coadministration of calcium carbonate reduced Cmax (−17%) and AUC∞ (−21%) significantly. PMID:12821462

  8. Urinary metabolites of daidzin orally administered in rats.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, T; Ohsawa, K

    1998-09-01

    In a study on the metabolism of flavonoids, the isoflavone glycoside daidzin was orally administered to rats. Urine samples were collected and treated with beta-glucuronidase and arylsulfatase. Aglycone daidzein (M3) and other three metabolites, 3',4',7-trihydroxyisoflavone (M1), 4',7-dihydroxyisoflavanone (M2) and 4',7-dihydroxyisoflavan (M4) were isolated from the urine following treatment with enzymes. The structures of M1, M2 and M4 were determined on the basis of chemical and spectral data.

  9. Human metabolism of orally administered radioactive cobalt chloride.

    PubMed

    Holstein, H; Ranebo, Y; Rääf, C L

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the human gastrointestinal uptake (f1) and subsequent whole-body retention of orally administered inorganic radioactive cobalt. Of eight adult volunteers aged between 24 and 68 years, seven were given solutions of (57)Co (T1/2 = 272 d) containing a stable cobalt carrier, and six were given carrier-free (58)Co (T1/2 = 71 d). The administered activities ranged between 25 and 103 kBq. The observed mean f1, based on 6 days accumulated urinary excretion sampling and whole-body counting, was 0.028 ± 0.0048 for carrier-free (58)Co, and 0.016 ± 0.0021 for carrier-associated (57)Co. These values were in reasonable agreement with values reported from previous studies involving a single intake of inorganic cobalt. The time pattern of the total retention (including residual cobalt in the GI tract) included a short-term component with a biological half-time of 0.71 ± 0.03 d (average ± 1 standard error of the mean for the two nuclides), an intermediate component with a mean half-time of 32 ± 8.5 d, and a long-term component (observed in two volunteers) with half-times ranging from 80 to 720 d for the two isotopes. From the present data we conclude that for the short-lived (57)Co and (58)Co, more than 95% of the internal absorbed dose was delivered within 7 days following oral intake, with a high individual variation influenced by the transit time of the unabsorbed cobalt through the gastro-intestinal tract.

  10. Toxicity and biodistribution of orally administered casein nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gil, Ana Gloria; Irache, Juan Manuel; Peñuelas, Iván; González Navarro, Carlos Javier; López de Cerain, Adela

    2017-08-01

    In the last years, casein nanoparticles have been proposed as carriers for the oral delivery of biologically active compounds. However, till now, no information about their possible specific hazards in vivo was available. The aim of this work was to assess the safety of casein nanoparticles when administered orally to animals through a 90 days dose-repeated toxicity study (OECD guideline 408), that was performed in Wistar rats under GLP conditions. After 90 days, no evidences of significant alterations in animals treated daily with 50, 150 or 500 mg/kg bw of nanoparticles were found. This safety agrees well with the fact that nanoparticles were not absorbed and remained within the gut as observed by radiolabelling in the biodistribution study. After 28 days, there was a generalized hyperchloremia in males and females treated with the highest dose of 500 mg/kg bw, that was coupled with hypernatremia in the females. These effects were related to the presence of mannitol which was used as excipient in the formulation of casein nanoparticles. According to these results, the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) could be established in 150 mg/kg bw/day and the Lowest Observed Effect Level (LOEL) could be established in 500 mg/kg bw/day. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Evaluation of a Self-Administered Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

    PubMed Central

    Bethel, M. Angelyn; Price, Hermione C.; Sourij, Harald; White, Sarah; Coleman, Ruth L.; Ring, Arne; Kennedy, Irene E.C.; Tucker, Lynne; Holman, Rury R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the feasibility of using a disposable, self-administered, capillary blood sampling oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) device in a community setting. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Eighteen healthy and 12 type 2 diabetic volunteers underwent six 75-g OGTTs using a prototype device in the following three settings: unaided at home (twice); unaided but observed in clinic (twice); and performed by a nurse with simultaneous laboratory glucose assays of 0- and 120-min venous plasma samples (twice). The device displayed no results. A detachable data recorder returned to the clinic provided plasma-equivalent 0- and 120-min glucose values and key parameters, including test date, start and end times, and time taken to consume the glucose drink. RESULTS The device was universally popular with participants and was perceived as easy to use, and the ability to test at home was well liked. Device failures meant that 0- and 120-min glucose values were obtained for only 141 (78%) of the 180 OGTTs performed, independent of setting. Device glucose measurements showed a mean bias compared with laboratory-measured values of +0.9 at 5.0 mmol/L increasing to +4.4 at 15.0 mmol/L. Paired device glucose values were equally reproducible across settings, with repeat testing showing no training effect regardless of setting order. CONCLUSIONS Self-administered OGTTs can be performed successfully by untrained individuals in a community setting. With improved device reliability and appropriate calibration, this novel technology could be used in routine practice to screen people who might need a formal OGTT to confirm the presence of impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes. PMID:23321216

  12. Evaluation of a self-administered oral glucose tolerance test.

    PubMed

    Bethel, M Angelyn; Price, Hermione C; Sourij, Harald; White, Sarah; Coleman, Ruth L; Ring, Arne; Kennedy, Irene E C; Tucker, Lynne; Holman, Rury R

    2013-06-01

    To assess the feasibility of using a disposable, self-administered, capillary blood sampling oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) device in a community setting. Eighteen healthy and 12 type 2 diabetic volunteers underwent six 75-g OGTTs using a prototype device in the following three settings: unaided at home (twice); unaided but observed in clinic (twice); and performed by a nurse with simultaneous laboratory glucose assays of 0- and 120-min venous plasma samples (twice). The device displayed no results. A detachable data recorder returned to the clinic provided plasma-equivalent 0- and 120-min glucose values and key parameters, including test date, start and end times, and time taken to consume the glucose drink. The device was universally popular with participants and was perceived as easy to use, and the ability to test at home was well liked. Device failures meant that 0- and 120-min glucose values were obtained for only 141 (78%) of the 180 OGTTs performed, independent of setting. Device glucose measurements showed a mean bias compared with laboratory-measured values of +0.9 at 5.0 mmol/L increasing to +4.4 at 15.0 mmol/L. Paired device glucose values were equally reproducible across settings, with repeat testing showing no training effect regardless of setting order. Self-administered OGTTs can be performed successfully by untrained individuals in a community setting. With improved device reliability and appropriate calibration, this novel technology could be used in routine practice to screen people who might need a formal OGTT to confirm the presence of impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes.

  13. Aqueous penetration of orally and topically administered moxifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Trisha; Kamath, M Manjunath; Kamath, M Gurudutt; Nayak, Rajesh R; Bairy, K L; Musmade, Prashant B

    2015-09-01

    To assess the intraocular penetration of 0.5% moxifloxacin hydrochloride into aqueous humour after oral and topical administration. A prospective, interventional study of 42 patients scheduled to undergo cataract surgery was carried out. Out of the 42 subjects, 21 were randomly categorised into Group I and received one drop of 0.5% topical moxifloxacin four times, at 15 min intervals starting 75 min before the surgery. Another 21 subjects were categorised into Group II and all subjects in this group were administered a single tablet of 400 mg of moxifloxacin, 12 h before the surgery. Estimation of moxifloxacin in aqueous samples was carried out using high-performance liquid chromatography. Results were analysed using Student unpaired 't' test and analysis of variance. The value of p<0.05 was considered to be significant. Mean aqueous concentration of moxifloxacin attained in the oral group (n=21) was 0.504±0.30 μg/mL while that in the topical group (n=21) was 2.04±0.72 μg/mL, and this difference in levels was statistically significant (p<0.005). The levels attained by both the groups well exceeded the MIC90 (minimum inhibitory concentration of antibiotic required to inhibit growth of 90% of bacteria strains) levels for most of the organisms causing endophthalmitis. Penetration of moxifloxacin in aqueous in both the groups was not affected by gender, intraocular pressure or comorbidities significantly. However, aqueous levels were found to be higher among the younger subjects within the topical group. Moxifloxacin has an impressive spectrum of coverage and this pharmacokinetic study reinforces its potential as a prophylactic drug against intraocular infections, given the high aqueous levels post topical administration. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Antinociceptive profiles and mechanisms of orally administered coumarin in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Hyun; Sim, Yun-Beom; Kang, Yu-Jung; Kim, Sung-Su; Kim, Chea-Ha; Kim, Su-Jin; Lim, Su-Min; Suh, Hong-Won

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the antinociceptive profiles of coumarin were examined in ICR mice. Coumarin administered orally (from 1 to 10 mg/kg) showed an antinociceptive effect in a dose-dependent manner as measured in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Duration of antinociceptive action of coumarin maintained at least for 60 min. But, the cumulative response time of nociceptive behaviors induced by a subcutaneous (s.c.) formalin injection, intrathecal (i.t.) substance P (0.7 µg) or glutamate (20 µg) injection was not affected by coumarin. In addition, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) or intrathecal (i.t.) administration with coumarin (10-40 µg) attenuated acetic acid-induced writhing response in a dose dependent manner. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) pretreatment with naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist) attenuated antinociceptive effect induced by coumarin in the writhing test. Furthermore, i.c.v. or i.t. pretreatment with naloxone (5 µg) reversed the decreased acetic acid-induced writhing response. However, methysergide (a 5-HT serotonergic receptor antagonist) or yohimbine (an α2-adrenergic receptor antagonist) did not affect antinociception induced by coumarin in the writhing test. Our results suggest that coumarin exerts a selective antinociceptive property in the acetic acid-induced visceral-derived pain model. Furthermore, the antinociceptive effect of coumarin may be mediated by activation of central opioid receptors, but not serotonergic and adrenergic receptors.

  15. Ethanol Promotes Chemically Induced Oral Cancer in Mice through Activation of the 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway of Arachidonic Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yizhu; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Xinyan; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol drinking is a known risk factor for oral cancer in humans. However, previous animal studies on the promoting effect of ethanol on oral carcinogenesis were inconclusive. It is necessary to develop an animal model with which the molecular mechanism of ethanol-related oral carcinogenesis may be elucidated in order to develop effective prevention strategies. In this study, mice were first treated with 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO, 100μg/ml in drinking water) for 8 weeks, and then given water or ethanol (8%) as the sole drink for another 16 weeks. During the experiment, 8% ethanol was well tolerated by mice. The incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) increased from 20% (8/41) to 43% (17/40; p<0.05). Expression of 5-lipoxygenase (5-Lox) and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2) was increased in dysplasia and SCC of 4NQO-treated tongues, and further enhanced by ethanol. Using this mouse model, we further demonstrated that fewer cancers were induced in Alox5−/− mice, as were cell proliferation, inflammation, and angiogenesis in the tongue, as compared with Alox5+/+ mice. Interestingly, Cox-2 expression was induced by ethanol in knockout mice, while 5-Lox and leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) expression and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) biosynthesis were dramatically reduced. Moreover, ethanol enhanced expression and nuclear localization of 5-Lox and stimulated LTB4 biosynthesis in human tongue SCC cells (SCC-15 and SCC-4) in vitro. In conclusion, this study clearly demonstrated that ethanol promoted 4NQO-induced oral carcinogenesis, at least in part, through further activation of the 5-Lox pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism. PMID:21881027

  16. Bioequivalence in dogs of a meloxicam formulation administered as a transmucosal oral mist with an orally administered pioneer suspension product.

    PubMed

    Lees, P; Cheng, Z; Keefe, T J; Weich, E; Bryd, J; Cedergren, R; Cozzi, E

    2013-02-01

    A mucosal mist formulation of meloxicam, administered as a spray into the mouth (test article), was compared for bioequivalence to a pioneer meloxicam suspension for oral administration (reference article). Pharmacokinetic profiles and average bioequivalence were investigated in 20 dogs. The study design comprised a two-period, two-sequence, two-treatment cross-over design, with maximum concentration (C(max)) and area under plasma concentration-time curve to last sampling time (AUC(last)) used as pivotal bioequivalence variables. Bioequivalence of the products was confirmed, based on relative ratios of geometric mean concentrations (and 90% confidence intervals within the range 0.80-1.25) for C(max) of 101.9 (97.99-106.0) and for AUC(last) of 97.24 (94.44-100.1). The initial absorption of meloxicam was more rapid for the test article, despite virtually identical C(max) values for the two products. Mean elimination half-lives were 29.6 h (test article) and 30.0 h (reference article). The meloxicam plasma concentration-time profiles were considered in relation to published data on the inhibition of the cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and COX-2 isoenzymes by meloxicam.

  17. Absorption and metabolism of orally fed arachidonic and linoleic acid in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, A.; Melin, T. )

    1988-11-01

    ({sup 3}H)arachidonic (({sup 3}H)20:4) and ({sup 14}C)linoleic acid ({sup 14}C)18:2 were fed to rats in Intralipid or cream. Later (30-240 min) the stomach, small intestine, plasma, and liver were analyzed for radioactivity in different lipid classes. ({sup 3}H)20:4 and ({sup 14}C)18:2 were emptied from the stomach and absorbed by the intestine at similar rates. The ({sup 3}H)20:4:({sup 14}C)18:2 ratio of the lipids in the small intestinal wall increased, however, with time. This was due to a higher retention of ({sup 3}H)20:4 than ({sup 14}C)18:2 in intestinal phospholipids. In contrast, more of the ({sup 14}C)18:2 was in triacylglycerol of the small intestine and plasma. The highest {sup 3}H:{sup 14}C ratios were found in phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol. The {sup 3}H:{sup 14}C ratio of intestinal phosphatidylcholine varied with the type of fat vehicle used, being highest in the Intralipid experiments. After feeding Intralipid (30-60 min), significantly more of the plasma ({sup 3}H)20:4 than plasma ({sup 14}C)18:2 was in diacylglycerol, the {sup 3}H:{sup 14}C ratio of which was much higher than that of plasma free fatty acids. ({sup 3}H)20:4 and ({sup 14}C)18:2 of chyle triacylglycerol are thus metabolized differently.

  18. Orally administered epigallocatechin gallate attenuates light-induced photoreceptor damage.

    PubMed

    Costa, Belmira Lara da Silveira Andrade da; Fawcett, Rebecca; Li, Guang-Yu; Safa, Rukhsana; Osborne, Neville N

    2008-07-01

    EGCG, a major component of green tea, has a number of properties which includes it being a powerful antioxidant. The purpose of this investigation was to deduce whether inclusion of EGCG in the drinking water of albino rats attenuates the effect of a light insult (2200lx, for 24h) to the retina. TUNEL-positive cells were detected in the outer nuclear layer of the retina, indicating the efficacy of the light insult in inducing photoreceptor degeneration. Moreover, Ret-P1 and the mRNA for rhodopsin located at photoreceptors were also significantly reduced as well as the amplitude of both the a- and b-waves of the electroretinogram was also reduced showing that photoreceptors in particular are affected by light. An increase in protein/mRNA of GFAP located primarily to Müller cells caused by light shows that other retinal components are also influenced by the light insult. However, antigens associated with bipolar (alpha-PKC), ganglion (Thy-1) and amacrine (GABA) cells, in contrast, appeared unaffected. The light insult also caused a change in the content of various proteins (caspase-3, caspase-8, PARP, Bad, and Bcl-2) involved in apoptosis. A number of the changes to the retina caused by a light insult were significantly attenuated when EGCG was in the drinking water. The reduction of the a- and b-waves and photoreceptor specific mRNAs/protein caused by light were significantly less. In addition, EGCG attenuated the changes caused by light to certain apoptotic proteins (especially at after 2 days) but did not appear to significantly influence the light-induced up-regulation of GFAP protein/mRNA. It is concluded that orally administered EGCG blunts the detrimental effect of light to the retina of albino rats where the photoreceptors are primarily affected.

  19. Evaluation of single cell sources of docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid: a 4-week oral safety study in rats.

    PubMed

    Wibert, G J; Burns, R A; Diersen-Schade, D A; Kelly, C M

    1997-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) are secreted in human milk and consumed by the nursing neonate but are not present in infant formulas currently available in the US. Supplementation of formulas with DHA and ARA may be particularly important for premature infants, who have less accretion of these fatty acids in utero than term infants. Some experts suggest that DHA and ARA should be added to infant formulas. Common sources of these fatty acids (e.g. fish oils, egg yolk lipids) are not optimal for infants in that they contain disproportionate amounts of other fatty acids. This 4-wk study examined the safety of a high-DHA algal oil and a high-ARA fungal oil, blended so that the DHA:ARA ratio approximates that in human milk. Rats were fed the blend at levels representing three, 11 and 22 times the anticipated infant exposure. Control animals were fed either a high-fat diet (13.1%, w/w; equivalent to the fat content of the treated groups) or a low-fat diet (5%, w/w). There were no treatment-related differences in body weight, food intake, organ weights, haematology or clinical chemistry. Thus, this study indicates that a blend of algal and fungal oils is a safe source of DHA and ARA as it produced no adverse effects in rats when administered for 4 wk at levels up to 22 times the expected infant exposure.

  20. Somatic mutations in arachidonic acid metabolism pathway genes enhance oral cancer post-treatment disease-free survival.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Nidhan K; Das, Subrata; Maitra, Arindam; Sarin, Rajiv; Majumder, Partha P

    2014-12-17

    The arachidonic acid metabolism (AAM) pathway promotes tumour progression. Chemical inhibitors of AAM pathway prolong post-treatment survival of cancer patients. Here we test whether non-synonymous somatic mutations in genes of this pathway, acting as natural inhibitors, increase post-treatment survival. We identify loss-of-function somatic mutations in 15 (18%) of 84 treatment-naïve oral cancer patients by whole-exome sequencing, which we map to genes of AAM pathway. Patients (n = 53) who survived ≥ 12 months after surgery without recurrence have significantly (P = 0.007) higher proportion (26% versus 3%) of mutations than those who did not (n = 31). Patients with mutations have a significantly (P = 0.003) longer median disease-free survival (24 months) than those without (13 months). Compared with the presence of a mutation, absence of any mutation increases the hazard ratio for death (11.3) significantly (P = 0.018). The inferences are strengthened when we pool our data with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data. In patients with AAM pathway mutations, some downstream pathways, such as the PI3K-Akt pathway, are downregulated.

  1. Data on the effect of oral feeding of Arachidonic acid or Docosahexanoic acid on haematopoiesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Limbkar, Kedar; Dhenge, Ankita; Jadhav, Dipesh D; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V; Kale, Vaijayanti; Limaye, Lalita

    2017-10-01

    Stem cells have peculiar property to self-renew and differentiate. It is important to control their fate in safe and effective ways for their therapeutic use. The mediators of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) namely Arachidonic acid (AA) and Docosahexanoic acid (DHA) are known to play a role in haematopoiesis via various metabolic pathways [1]. However the direct effect of purified AA or DHA on haematopoiesis has not been well investigated yet. We have reported that oral administration of PUFAs enhanced haematopoiesis in mice [2]. Signaling Leukocyte Antigen Molecule (SLAM) (CD48(-)CD150(+)) phenotype consists of pure population of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Herein we observed higher percentage of SLAM (CD48(-)CD150(+)) phenotype in the bone marrow (BM) cells of mice fed with AA or DHA compared to PBS fed control mice. Data from engraftment study depicts that BM from AA/DHA-fed mice showed higher absolute number of donor cells in recipient mice compared to control. The enhanced hematopoiesis observed in AA/DHA-fed mice was returned to normal when the mice were kept on normal diet for six weeks (after ten days of oral feeding). We confirmed GCMS (Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy) retention times of AA and DHA by co-injecting fatty acid extract from AA or DHA fed mice with purified AA or DHA standards respectively. Representative flow cytometry profile of Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-kit(+)(LSK) cells showed higher expression of CXCR4 protein and ligands of Wnt, Notch1 signaling in BM of AA/DHA-fed mice.

  2. [Detection of cystoid macular edema with orally administered fluorescein].

    PubMed

    Hütz, W; Hessemer, V; Jacobi, K W

    1989-10-01

    To detect cystoid macular edema after extracapsular cataract extraction, the authors used indirect ophthalmoscopy after oral application of fluorescein, rather than intravenous fluorescein angiography. The patients drank 10-20 ml 10% fluorescein sodium in 250 ml orange juice. Ophthalmoscopy was performed 30-45 minutes later using an exciter filter. Twenty-five patients with a tentative clinical diagnosis of cystoid macular edema were examined in this way. In six of them a manifest edema was detected. The results were confirmed by intravenous fluorescein angiography.

  3. Transfer of orally administered terpenes in goat milk and cheese.

    PubMed

    Poulopoulou, I; Zoidis, E; Massouras, T; Hadjigeorgiou, I

    2012-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationships between terpenes' intake and their presence in animal tissues (blood and milk) as well as in the final product (cheese). Eight dairy goats were divided in two balanced groups, representing control (C) and treatment (T) group. In T group oral administration of a mixture of terpenes (α-pinene, limonene and β-caryophyllene) was applied over a period of 18 d. Cheese was produced, from C and T groups separately, on three time points, twice during the period of terpenes' oral administration and once after the end of experiment. Terpenes were identified in blood by extraction using petroleum ether and in milk and cheese by the use of solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) method, followed by GC-MS analysis. Chemical properties of the milk and the produced cheeses were analyzed and found not differing between the two groups. Limonene and α-pinene were found in all blood and milk samples of the T group after a lag-phase of 3 d, while β-caryophyllene was determined only in few milk samples. Moreover, none of the terpenes were traced in blood and milk of C animals. In cheese, terpenes' concentrations presented a more complicated pattern implying that terpenes may not be reliable feed tracers. We concluded that monoterpenes can be regarded as potential feed tracers for authentification of goat milk, but further research is required on factors affecting their transfer.

  4. Transfer of Orally Administered Terpenes in Goat Milk and Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Poulopoulou, I.; Zoidis, E.; Massouras, T.; Hadjigeorgiou, I.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationships between terpenes’ intake and their presence in animal tissues (blood and milk) as well as in the final product (cheese). Eight dairy goats were divided in two balanced groups, representing control (C) and treatment (T) group. In T group oral administration of a mixture of terpenes (α-pinene, limonene and β-caryophyllene) was applied over a period of 18 d. Cheese was produced, from C and T groups separately, on three time points, twice during the period of terpenes’ oral administration and once after the end of experiment. Terpenes were identified in blood by extraction using petroleum ether and in milk and cheese by the use of solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) method, followed by GC-MS analysis. Chemical properties of the milk and the produced cheeses were analyzed and found not differing between the two groups. Limonene and α-pinene were found in all blood and milk samples of the T group after a lag-phase of 3 d, while β-caryophyllene was determined only in few milk samples. Moreover, none of the terpenes were traced in blood and milk of C animals. In cheese, terpenes’ concentrations presented a more complicated pattern implying that terpenes may not be reliable feed tracers. We concluded that monoterpenes can be regarded as potential feed tracers for authentification of goat milk, but further research is required on factors affecting their transfer. PMID:25049497

  5. An update on new orally administered contraceptives for women.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Anita L

    2015-01-01

    The focus in contraception is shifting from oral contraceptives to more effective methods, such as implants and intrauterine devices. Generics are favored by third-party payors. As a result, potentially exciting developments in branded pills to increase safety or to reduce side effects may have gone unnoticed. This article reviews the features of each of the four new oral contraceptives that have been introduced in the United States and/or Europe in the last few years. The motivation for the development of each product is outlined as is its efficacy, safety, tolerability and the noncontraceptive applications that have been explored are described. The hypothesis that using estradiol in place of ethinyl estradiol would reduce the risk of venous thromboembolism is still to be proven. However, the stronger progestogens used in these formulations may offer other tangible benefits for selected women. The new products for extended cycle pill use may have less impact. The flexible regimen can be adopted using any pill, but the approved product does provide convenience to patients. Cost will continue to be the determining factor in the acceptance of these new products, unless substantial health benefits can be conclusively proven.

  6. Metabolism and excretion of orally administered arsenobetaine in the hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, H.; Kaise, T.; Yamamura, Y.

    1986-03-01

    Arsenobetaine, one of the trimethylarsenic compounds (TMA), occurs abundantly in seafoods. The urinary excretion pattern of arsenic in man following oral ingestion of TMA contained in fishes once only indicates that the most portion of the TMA is excreted in urine. These experiments in humans have used fish arsenic but no authentic arsenobetaine. From previous experiments in mice, rats and rabbits using/sup 73/As-labeled arsenobetaine, it was reported that arsenobetaine is not converted in vivo into any other chemical species of arsenic. The metabolic and excretory patterns of arsenic compounds in the hamster seem to be similar to those in humans. In the present study, the authors examined arsenobetaine-treated hamsters for what chemical species of arsenic this arsenic compound (arsenobetaine) would be metabolized into in vivo and also for its excretory patterns in urine and feces with time.

  7. Ultimate biodegradability and ecotoxicity of orally administered antidiabetic drugs.

    PubMed

    Markiewicz, Marta; Jungnickel, Christian; Stolte, Stefan; Białk-Bielińska, Anna; Kumirska, Jolanta; Mrozik, Wojciech

    2017-03-16

    Hypoglycaemic pharmaceuticals are recently more and more frequently detected in the environment. In our previous study, we have shown that even though many of them undergo significant primary degradation some are transformed to stable products or undergo such transformation that a large part of the structure is still preserved. One of the main routes of elimination from wastewaters or surface waters is biodegradation and a lack thereof leads to accumulation in the environment. Within this work we tested the ultimate biodegradability of six oral antidiabetics: metformin and its main metabolite guanylurea, acarbose, glibenclamide, gliclazide, glimepiride and repaglinide. We also compared the experimental results obtained in this and accompanying work with models designed to predict biodegradability and showed that these models are only moderately successful. Additionally, we examined these compounds in acute Daphnia magna test to check if they might pose an ecotoxicological threat. Combining the results of biodegradability and toxicity tests allows a preliminary assessment of their potential environmental impact.

  8. Oral absorption of ofloxacin administered together with aluminum.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez Navarro, A; Martínez Cabarga, M; Dominguez-Gil Hurlé, A

    1994-01-01

    A clinical study was carried out to establish the influence of aluminum on the oral absorption of ofloxacin. Ten healthy volunteers were included in a crossover study based on a Latin square design. The treatments that all volunteers received were A, consisting of 400 mg of ofloxacin, and B, consisting of 400 mg of ofloxacin plus 11 g of colloidal aluminum phosphate. The absorption constant and other ofloxacin parameters were calculated from data on levels in plasma by using model-independent calculation methods. There were no statistically significant differences between the mean values of the areas under the curve corresponding to the administration of ofloxacin alone and those of ofloxacin with aluminum. Regarding the other pharmacokinetic parameters, a significant difference between the absorption constants was found. The presence of aluminum reduces the absorption rate of this quinolone but does not modify the percentage of the absorbed dose. PMID:7840600

  9. Disposition of flunixin meglumine injectable preparation administered orally to healthy horses.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini-Masini, A; Poppenga, R H; Sweeney, R W

    2004-06-01

    An injectable preparation of flunixin meglumine was administered orally and intravenously at a dose of 1.1 mg/kg to six healthy adult horses in a cross-over design. Flunixin meglumine was detected in plasma within 15 min of administration and peak plasma concentrations were observed 45-60 min after oral administration. Mean bioavailability of the oral drug was 71.9 +/- 26.0%, with an absorption half-life of 0.76 h. The apparent elimination half-life after oral administration was 2.4 h. The injectable preparation of flunixin meglumine is suitable for oral administration to horses.

  10. Effect of orally administered Lactobacillus brevis HY7401 in a food allergy mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeongmin; Bang, Jieun; Woo, Hee-Jong

    2013-11-28

    We had found that orally administered Lactobacillus species were effective immune modulators in ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized mice. To validate these findings, we investigated the effects of orally administered Lactobacillus brevis HY7401 in OVA-T cell receptor transgenic mice. This strain showed a tendency to induce Th1 cytokines and inhibit Th2 cytokines. All assayed isotypes of OVA-specific antibody were effectively reduced. Systemic anaphylaxis was also relatively reduced with the probiotic administration. These results reveal that L. brevis HY7401 might be useful to promote anti-allergic processes through oral administration.

  11. Stability of orally administered immunoglobulin in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeongmin; Kang, Hae-Eun; Woo, Hee-Jong

    2012-10-31

    Oral administration of immunoglobulin in the colostrum or egg yolk has been considered an effective tool for preventing enterobacterial infection via passive immunization. During this process, the transmission and residence of the active immunoglobulin are the most important conditions for successful protection. We investigated the stability of encapsulated colostrum and egg yolk immunoglobulin for the effective transmission of immunoglobulin in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. First, we measured GI transit time. Contrast media passed through and reached the stomach within 10 min, the small intestine within 3.5 h, and the cecum within 5 h. Both the encapsulated colostrum containing anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) antibody (IgG) and egg yolk with anti-rotavirus antibody (IgY) showed lower antibody activity than the non-encapsulated colostrum did in the stomach after administration; however, significantly higher antibody activities were observed in the encapsulated groups than in the non-encapsulated groups in the small intestine 3.5 h after the administration. In the large intestine, the antibody activities of the encapsulated groups were maintained or slightly increased in a time-dependent manner; however, the titers of each non-capsulated control were as low as the negative controls. Therefore, this encapsulation is considered a useful tool for the delivery of active antibody through the GI tract.

  12. The fate of dienochlor administered orally and dermally to rats.

    PubMed

    Quistad, G B; Mulholland, K M; Skinner, W S

    1986-09-15

    Within four days of receiving a single oral dose (1 mg/kg) of [U-ring-14C]dienochlor [bis(pentachloro-2,4-cyclopentadien-1-yl)] female rats excreted 2 and 88% of the applied 14C in urine and feces, respectively. Metabolites could not be identified and the preponderance of the fecal radioactivity consisted of unextractable 14C-labeled residues. Within 1 day virtually all of the dienochlor had been degraded by rats, with only traces of parent dienochlor in excreta and tissues. After four days only 2% of the applied dose remained in tissues (mainly kidney, liver, and gastrointestinal tract). Pharmacokinetic studies with blood plasma and bile showed dienochlor (and/or its metabolites) to be poorly absorbed. Rats were exposed dermally for 24 hr to [14C]dienochlor formulated as Pentac WP miticide both as an aqueous suspension and as an undiluted wettable powder. Half of the dose adhered to the skin and the other half was found in gauze patches used to protect the treated skin. After a 24-hr exposure over 60% of the radiolabel that adhered to skin was removed by washing with an aqueous soap solution and 86% of this rinsing solution was unmetabolized dienochlor. The dienochlor and its metabolites were transported inefficiently from the application site; only 1% of the applied dose was detected in urine plus feces and less than or equal to 0.2% in tissues. With application rates that simulate field exposure by humans, the actual residue of dienochlor and metabolites in skin (i.e., not removable by washing) is about thirteen times higher following exposure to dienochlor as undiluted wettable powder than as an aqueous suspension.

  13. Penetration of orally administered prulifloxacin into human prostate tissue.

    PubMed

    Giberti, Claudio; Gallo, Fabrizio; Rosignoli, Maria T; Ruggieri, Alessandro; Barattè, Simona; Picollo, Rossella; Dionisio, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Prulifloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent, may be a useful addition to the antimicrobial armamentarium against prostatitis once the ability of its active metabolite, ulifloxacin, to penetrate prostatic tissue has been determined. This study set out to evaluate ulifloxacin penetration into the prostate following administration of the oral fluoroquinolone prodrug prulifloxacin in patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). This was a phase I, randomized, open-label, single-centre study involving 20 male Caucasian patients (mean age 63.1 years) requiring TURP for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Sixteen patients were randomized to receive prulifloxacin; the other four patients were not treated (controls) in order to validate the bioanalytical method. Patients in the active treatment groups were randomized to receive one or three once-daily doses of prulifloxacin 600 mg, with the last administration 3 hours prior to surgery. Central/transitional and peripheral zone prostatic tissue samples were obtained from the 6 o'clock and 9 o'clock positions in the prostate, and blood samples were collected concurrently. Ulifloxacin concentrations were determined in the tissue samples and plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Safety was also assessed. Prostatic tissue concentrations of ulifloxacin always exceeded those in plasma. Mean ulifloxacin concentrations measured in samples collected from the 6 o'clock central/transitional zone of the prostate were higher in patients who received prulifloxacin for 3 days than in those who received a single dose. Mean prostatic tissue/plasma ulifloxacin concentration ratios after single and repeated prulifloxacin administration ranged from 3.8 to 7.1 and from 3.9 to 9.5, respectively. The highest mean ratio was found in the 6 o'clock central/transitional zone after repeated dosing. Prostatic levels of ulifloxacin were above the minimum inhibitory concentrations for the most

  14. Biodegradable Bioadherent Microcapsules for Orally Administered Sustained Release Vaccines. Phase 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-10-23

    composites produced by the helminth Fasciola hepatica for biological microencapsulation . The natural microcapsule can withstand treatment with strong...can take advantage of large batch fermentation technology. 3. Methods for Microencapsulation Numerous methods exist for the production of microcapsules ...Biodegradable Bioadherent Microcapsules for Orally Administered Sustained Release Vaccines PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Cynthia L. Sheffield, Ph.D

  15. Multidose pharmacokineetecs of orally administered florfenicol in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plasma disposition of florfenicol in channel catfish was investigated after an oral dose (10mg/kg for 10 days) administered in freshwater at water temperatures ranging from 24.7 to 25.9°C. Florfenicol concentrations in plasma were analyzed by means of liquid chromatography with MS/MS detection. Af...

  16. 30 CFR 250.1508 - What must I do when MMS administers written or oral tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I do when MMS administers written or oral tests? 250.1508 Section 250.1508 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Well Control...

  17. 30 CFR 250.1508 - What must I do when MMS administers written or oral tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What must I do when MMS administers written or oral tests? 250.1508 Section 250.1508 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION... CONTINENTAL SHELF Well Control and Production Safety Training § 250.1508 What must I do when MMS...

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Posaconazole Administered Orally or by Nasogastric Tube in Healthy Volunteers▿

    PubMed Central

    Dodds Ashley, Elizabeth S.; Varkey, Jay B.; Krishna, Gopal; Vickery, Donna; Ma, Lei; Yu, Xin; Malavade, Darshana; Goodwin, Megan; Perfect, John R.; Power, Eddie

    2009-01-01

    The use of a nasogastric tube is one means of administering antifungal therapy to critically ill patients unable to receive medication via the oral route. This was a phase 1, open-label, single-center, randomized, crossover study of posaconazole administered via nasogastric tube in healthy volunteers. Each subject received two 400-mg single doses of posaconazole, one administered orally and one administered by nasogastric tube, with a 7-day washout period between each dose. Posaconazole was administered 5 to 10 min after subjects received a nutritional supplement. Blood samples for pharmacokinetic analysis were obtained up to 120 h postdose. The analysis of variance estimate of the study population suggests that the posaconazole nasogastric tube administration least-square mean values of observed maximum concentration (Cmax), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) to the last measurable concentration, and AUC to time infinity were 81%, 76%, and 77%, respectively, of the corresponding oral administration values. The reason for lower Cmax and AUC values when posaconazole is administered via the nasogastric tube route is not known. Oral and nasogastric tube administration of a single 400-mg dose of posaconazole suspension was safe and well tolerated in healthy adult subjects. The incidence and nature of treatment-emergent adverse events were similar with both administration routes, and no serious adverse events or clinically significant laboratory test or vital sign abnormalities were reported. Obtaining plasma posaconazole concentrations may be warranted when posaconazole is given to patients via a nasogastric tube to ensure adequate posaconazole exposure. Strategies that have been shown to enhance posaconazole exposure (such as splitting the dose and minimizing the use of proton pump inhibitors) may also be used. PMID:19433558

  19. Orally administered DTPA penta-ethyl ester for the decorporation of inhaled (241)Am.

    PubMed

    Sueda, Katsuhiko; Sadgrove, Matthew P; Huckle, James E; Leed, Marina G D; Weber, Waylon M; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Guilmette, Raymond A; Jay, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is an effective decorporation agent to facilitate the elimination of radionuclides from the body, but its permeability-limited oral bioavailability limits its utility in mass-casualty emergencies. To overcome this limitation, a prodrug strategy using the penta-ethyl ester form of DTPA is under investigation. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies were conducted in rats by orally administering [(14) C]DTPA penta-ethyl ester, and this prodrug and its hydrolysis products were analyzed as a single entity. Compared with a previous reporting of intravenously administered DTPA, the oral administration of this prodrug resulted in a sustained plasma concentration profile with higher plasma exposure and lower clearance. An assessment of the urine composition revealed that the bioactivation was extensive but incomplete, with no detectable levels of the penta- or tetra-ester forms. Tissue distribution at 12 h was limited, with approximately 73% of the administered dose being associated with the gastrointestinal tract. In the efficacy study, rats were exposed to aerosols of (241) Am nitrate before receiving a single oral treatment of the prodrug. The urinary excretion of (241) Am was found to be 19% higher than with the control. Consistent with prior reports of DTPA, the prodrug was most effective when the treatment delays were minimized. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  20. Orally administered DTPA penta-ethyl ester for the decorporation of inhaled 241Am

    PubMed Central

    Sueda, Katsuhiko; Sadgrove, Matthew P.; Huckle, James E.; Leed, Marina G. D.; Weber, Waylon M.; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Jay, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is an effective decorporation agent to facilitate the elimination of radionuclides from the body, but its permeability-limited oral bioavailability limits its utility in mass-casualty emergencies. To overcome this limitation, a prodrug strategy using the penta-ethyl ester form of DTPA is under investigation. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies were conducted in rats by orally administering [14C]DTPA penta-ethyl ester, and this prodrug and its hydrolysis products were analyzed as a single entity. Compared to a previous reporting of intravenously administered DTPA, the oral administration of this prodrug resulted in a sustained plasma concentration profile with higher plasma exposure and lower clearance. An assessment of the urine composition revealed that the bioactivation was extensive but incomplete, with no detectable levels of the penta- or tetra-ester forms. Tissue distribution at 12 h was limited, with approximately 73% of the administered dose being associated with the gastrointestinal tract. In the efficacy study, rats were exposed to aerosols of 241Am nitrate before receiving a single oral treatment of the prodrug. The urinary excretion of 241Am was found to be 19% higher than with the control. Consistent with prior reports of DTPA, the prodrug was most effective when the treatment delays were minimized. PMID:24619514

  1. Antithrombotic activity of oral administered low molecular weight fucoidan from Laminaria Japonica.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue; Guo, Fengjun; Hu, Jing; Zhang, Lijuan; Xue, Changhu; Zhang, Zhaohui; Li, Bafang

    2016-08-01

    Fucoidans extracted from brown algae have been documented to have excellent antithrombotic activity when administered by either intravenous or subcutaneous route in animal models. However, it is unknown if the fucoidans also have antithrombotic activity when administered orally, a highly desirable feature of oral antithrombotic agents. In the present study, we compared the oral absorption, bioavailability and antithrombotic activity of two fucoidan fractions from Laminaria japonica with different molecular weight by oral administration in an electricity induced arterial thrombosis model and the underlying molecular mechanisms. After a single dose of oral administration, the fucoidan content in plasma and urine in rats was assessed using the reverse-phased HPLC analysis of 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP)-labeled fucose. The fucose content in the low molecular weight (LMW) fucoidan-treated rats increased up to 2-fold and peaked at 15h, indicating that the LMW fucoidan had much better absorption and bioavailability than the MMW fucoidan in vivo. Oral administration of the LMW fucoidan at 400 and 800mg/kg for 30days inhibited the arterial thrombosis formation effectively induced by electrical shock in rats, accompanied by moderate anticoagulation activity, regulation on TXB2 and 6-keto-PGF1α, significant antiplatelet activity and effective fibrinolysis. The LMW fucoidan showed better oral absorption and antithrombotic activity in addition to different antithrombotic mechanisms compared to those of the medium molecular weight (MMW) fucoidan. Thus, the LMW fucoidan has a potential to become an oral antithrombotic agent. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. The co-solvent Cremophor EL limits absorption of orally administered paclitaxel in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Malingré, M M; Schellens, J H; Van Tellingen, O; Ouwehand, M; Bardelmeijer, H A; Rosing, H; Koopman, F J; Schot, M E; Ten Bokkel Huinink, W W; Beijnen, J H

    2001-11-16

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the co-solvents Cremophor EL and polysorbate 80 on the absorption of orally administered paclitaxel. 6 patients received in a randomized setting, one week apart oral paclitaxel 60 mg m(-2) dissolved in polysorbate 80 or Cremophor EL. For 3 patients the amount of Cremophor EL was 5 ml m(-2), for the other three 15 ml m(-2). Prior to paclitaxel administration patients received 15 mg kg(-1) oral cyclosporin A to enhance the oral absorption of the drug. Paclitaxel formulated in polysorbate 80 resulted in a significant increase in the maximal concentration (C(max)) and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of paclitaxel in comparison with the Cremophor EL formulations (P = 0.046 for both parameters). When formulated in Cremophor EL 15 ml m(-2), paclitaxel C(max) and AUC values were 0.10 +/- 0.06 microM and 1.29 +/- 0.99 microM h(-1), respectively, whereas these values were 0.31 +/- 0.06 microM and 2.61 +/- 1.54 microM h(-1), respectively, when formulated in polysorbate 80. Faecal data revealed a decrease in excretion of unchanged paclitaxel for the polysorbate 80 formulation compared to the Cremophor EL formulations. The amount of paclitaxel excreted in faeces was significantly correlated with the amount of Cremophor EL excreted in faeces (P = 0.019). When formulated in Cremophor EL 15 ml m(-2), paclitaxel excretion in faeces was 38.8 +/- 13.0% of the administered dose, whereas this value was 18.3 +/-15.5% for the polysorbate 80 formulation. The results show that the co-solvent Cremophor EL is an important factor limiting the absorption of orally administered paclitaxel from the intestinal lumen. They highlight the need for designing a better drug formulation in order to increase the usefulness of the oral route of paclitaxel

  3. Orally administered misoprostol for induction of labor with prelabor rupture of membranes at term.

    PubMed

    Radoff, Kari A

    2014-01-01

    Prelabor rupture of membranes (PROM) occurs in approximately 8% to 10% of women with term pregnancies. The management of PROM continues to be controversial. Approaches include expectant management and immediate induction of labor. The use of orally administered misoprostol for the management of women with PROM may provide significant advantages when they choose immediate induction of labor. This literature review presents current evidence that supports the use of oral misoprostol for women with PROM, including the benefits of a decreased interval time from PROM to vaginal birth, good safety profile, and reductions in the use of oxytocin augmentation and epidural anesthesia. In addition to clinically proven benefits to women of oral misoprostol for PROM, it also has the potential to reduce chorioamnionitis by reducing the number of sterile vaginal examinations performed thereby reducing the risk of ascending bacteria. Women have also reported acceptability and satisfaction when using oral misoprostol for immediate induction of labor. This review of literature discusses what is known about the use of orally administered misoprostol for the management of term PROM and makes recommendations for clinical use.

  4. Occurrence of orally administered curcuminoid as glucuronide and glucuronide/sulfate conjugates in rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Asai, A; Miyazawa, T

    2000-10-27

    Curcuminoids, curcumin and its structurally related compounds, constitute the phenolic yellowish pigment of turmeric. We investigated the absorption and metabolism of orally administered curcuminoids (curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin) in rats. HPLC and LC-MS analyses after enzymatic hydrolyses showed that the predominant metabolites in plasma following administration were glucuronides and glucuronide/sulfates (conjugates with both glucuronide and sulfate) of curcuminoids. The plasma concentrations of conjugated curcuminoids reached a maximum one hour after administration. The conjugative enzyme activities for glucuronidation and sulfation of curcumin were found in liver, kidney and intestinal mucosa. These results indicate that orally administered curcuminoids are absorbed from the alimentary tract and present in the general blood circulation after largely being metabolized to the form of glucuronide and glucuronide/sulfate conjugates.

  5. Orally administered glucagon-like peptide-1 affects glucose homeostasis following an oral glucose tolerance test in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Steinert, R E; Poller, B; Castelli, M C; Friedman, K; Huber, A R; Drewe, J; Beglinger, C

    2009-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) exerts several effects on glucose homeostasis and reduces food intake. After its release from intestinal L cells, GLP-1 is subject to (i) rapid breakdown by dipeptidyl peptidase IV and (ii) high liver extraction. The highest concentrations of GLP-1 are found in the splanchnic blood rather than in the systemic circulation. An oral delivery system would mimic endogenous secretion. Here we investigated the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) effects of a single dose (2 mg) of oral GLP-1 administered prior to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 16 healthy males. GLP-1 was rapidly absorbed from the gut, leading to tenfold higher plasma concentrations compared with controls. The PD profile was consistent with reported pharmacology; GLP-1 significantly stimulated basal insulin release (P < 0.027), with marked effects on glucose levels. The postprandial glucose peak was delayed with GLP-1, suggesting an effect on gastric emptying.

  6. PHARMACOKINETICS OF SINGLE-DOSE ORALLY ADMINISTERED CIPROFLOXACIN IN CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Lorraine; Johnson, Shawn P; Papich, Mark G; Gulland, Frances

    2015-06-01

    Ciprofloxacin is commonly selected for clinical use due to its broad-spectrum efficacy and is a frequently administered antibiotic at The Marine Mammal Center, a marine mammal rehabilitation facility. Ciprofloxacin is used for treatment of California sea lions ( Zalophus californianus ) suffering from a variety of bacterial infections at doses extrapolated from other mammalian species. However, as oral absorption is variable both within and across species, a more accurate determination of appropriate dosage is needed to ensure effective treatment and avoid emergence of drug-resistant bacterial strains. A pharmacokinetic study was performed to assess plasma concentrations of ciprofloxacin in California sea lions after a single oral dose. Twenty healthy California sea lions received a single 10-mg/kg oral dose of ciprofloxacin administered in a herring fish. Blood was then collected at two of the following times from each individual: 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 4, 8, 10, 12, 18, and 24 hr postingestion. Plasma ciprofloxacin concentration was assessed via high-performance liquid chromatography. A population pharmacokinetics model demonstrated that an oral ciprofloxacin dose of 10 mg/kg achieved an area under the concentration vs. time curve of 6.01 μg hr/ml. Absorption was rapid, with ciprofloxacin detectable in plasma 0.54 hr after drug administration; absorption half-life was 0.09 hr. A maximum plasma concentration of 1.21 μg/ml was observed at 1.01 hr, with an elimination half-life of 3.09 hr. Ciprofloxacin administered orally at 10 mg/kg produced therapeutic antibacterial exposure for only some of the most susceptible bacterial organisms commonly isolated from California sea lions.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of desmopressin administered as tablet and oral lyophilisate formulation in children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis.

    PubMed

    De Bruyne, Pauline; De Guchtenaere, Ann; Van Herzeele, Charlotte; Raes, Ann; Dehoorne, Jo; Hoebeke, Piet; Van Laecke, Erik; Vande Walle, Johan

    2014-02-01

    Desmopressin 120 μg oral lyophilisate and 200 μg tablet are considered bioequivalent, based on extrapolation of studies in a limited number of adults and on one dose-finding study of desmopressin oral lyophilisate in children. However, no comparative pharmacokinetic study in children was executed confirming this statement. No data are available on the influence of food intake on the bioavailability of desmopressin tablet in a pediatric setting, although studies in adults have documented that food intake results in a significantly lower desmopressin plasma concentration. In this study, we analyzed plasma concentrations of desmopressin oral lyophilisate and tablet with concomitant food intake. Twenty-three children with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (mean age, 12.7 years) were recruited. Two tests were performed on two separate days in identical conditions with a standardized food and fluid intake. Desmopressin was administered as desmopressin tablet or desmopressin oral lyophilisate immediately after a meal. Desmopressin plasma concentration was measured at 1 h, 2 h, and 6 h postdosing. No significant difference in plasma concentration of 120 μg desmopressin oral lyophilisate and 200 μg tablet was demonstrated, even with concomitant food intake. A significant difference in variability was found, identifying a smaller variance for desmopressin oral lyophilisate plasma concentrations at all time points. This study demonstrates comparable plasma levels for desmopressin oral lyophilisate, despite the lower dose. The dosage for desmopressin oral lyophilisate is more predictable due to the significantly smaller variance. Therefore, desmopressin oral lyophilisate seems more suitable, especially in the younger age group for which time interval between dinner and drug administration is limited.

  8. Biorelevant in vitro performance testing of orally administered dosage forms-workshop report.

    PubMed

    Reppas, Christos; Friedel, Horst-Dieter; Barker, Amy R; Buhse, Lucinda F; Cecil, Todd L; Keitel, Susanne; Kraemer, Johannes; Morris, J Michael; Shah, Vinod P; Stickelmeyer, Mary P; Yomota, Chikako; Brown, Cynthia K

    2014-07-01

    Biorelevant in vitro performance testing of orally administered dosage forms has become an important tool for the assessment of drug product in vivo behavior. An in vitro performance test which mimics the intraluminal performance of an oral dosage form is termed biorelevant. Biorelevant tests have been utilized to decrease the number of in vivo studies required during the drug development process and to mitigate the risk related to in vivo bioequivalence studies. This report reviews the ability of current in vitro performance tests to predict in vivo performance and generate successful in vitro and in vivo correlations for oral dosage forms. It also summarizes efforts to improve the predictability of biorelevant tests. The report is based on the presentations at the 2013 workshop, Biorelevant In Vitro Performance Testing of Orally Administered Dosage Forms, in Washington, DC, sponsored by the FIP Dissolution/Drug Release Focus Group in partnership with the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) and a symposium at the AAPS 2012 Annual meeting on the same topic.

  9. Efficacy and Safety of Orally Administered Intravenous Midazolam Versus a Commercially Prepared Syrup

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Katayoun; Khoshrang, Hossein; Kousha, Maryam; Hoseini, Mahboobeh; Ranjbar, Marzieh; Baniasadi, Shadi; Salamzadeh, Jamshid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Among different categories of sedative agents, benzodiazepines have been prescribed for more than three decades to patients of all ages. The effective and predictable sedative and amnestic effects of benzodiazepines support their use in pediatric patients. Midazolam is one of the most extensively used benzodiazepines in this age group. Oral form of drug is the best accepted route of administration in children. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of a commercially midazolam syrup versus orally administered IV midazolam in uncooperative dental patients. Second objective was to determine whether differences concerning sedation success can be explained by child‘s behavioral problems and dental fear. Patients and Methods: Eighty eight uncooperative dental patients (Frankl Scales 1,2) aged 3 to 6 years, and ASA I participated in this double blind, parallel randomized, controlled clinical trial. Midazolam was administered in a dose of 0.5 mg/kg for children under the age 5 and 0.2 mg/kg in patients over 5 years of age. Physiologic parameters including heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation and blood pressure were recorded. Behavior assessment was conducted throughout the course of treatment using Houpt Sedation Rating Scale and at critical moments of treatment (injection and cavity preparation) by North Carolina Scale. Dental fear and behavioral problems were evaluated using Child Fear Schedule Survey-Dental Subscale (CFSS-DS), and Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Independent t-test, Chi-Square, and Pearson correlation were used for statistical analysis. Results: Acceptable overall sedation ratings were observed in 90% and 86% of syrup and IV/Oral group respectively; Chi-Square P = 0.5. Other domains of Houpt Scale including: sleep, crying and movement were also not significantly different between groups. Physiological parameters remained in normal limits during study without significant

  10. Orally administered ethanol: transepidermal pathways and effects on the human skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Ute; Bartoll, Jens; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    Ethanol intake is associated with a variety of skin diseases. The aim of the present study was (1) to identify the pathways of release of orally administered ethanol through the skin, and (2) to investigate the effects of a single oral dose of ethanol on the penetration of topically applied substances into the skin. Ethanol evaporation via the skin was measured using the new technique of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin surface temperature were simultaneously measured before and after ethanol consumption. Measurements were performed on skin sites with different stratum corneum (SC) thickness, and density of follicles and sweat glands. These appendages were selectively sealed to investigate their participation in ethanol evaporation. The penetration of a topically applied UV filter substance was studied before and after ethanol consumption after removing the SC with adhesive tape. Ethanol evaporation was measured within 5 min of consumption, while the skin surface temperature remained nearly constant. The sealing of the appendages did not have a significant effect on ethanol evaporation. On the forehead, a higher TEWL value was measured than on the forearm. On both skin sites, an increase in TEWL was observed after ethanol ingestion. No influence of orally administered ethanol on the penetration of the topically applied UV filter substance was observed. The results indicate that ethanol evaporation occurs via the lipid layers without a significant effect on the penetration of the topically applied substance.

  11. Review of the spectrum and potency of orally administered cephalosporins and amoxicillin/clavulanate.

    PubMed

    Sader, Helio S; Jacobs, Michael R; Fritsche, Thomas R

    2007-03-01

    The antimicrobial spectrum and in vitro potency of the most frequently prescribed orally administered cephalosporins (cefaclor, cefdinir, cefpodoxime, cefprozil, cefuroxime axetil, cephalexin) and amoxicillin/clavulanate are reviewed. These beta-lactam agents have been widely used in the outpatient arena for the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract and other mild-to-moderate infections. The data presented here were obtained from critical review articles on each of these compounds. Cephalexin and cefaclor were among the least potent and had the narrowest antimicrobial spectrums against the pathogens evaluated. In contrast, cefdinir, cefpodoxime, cefprozil, and cefuroxime were highly active against penicillin-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae and retained some activity against penicillin-intermediate strains, whereas amoxicillin/clavulanate was the most active against S. pneumoniae, including most penicillin nonsusceptible strains. Amoxicillin/clavulanate and cefdinir were the most potent compounds against methicillin (oxacillin)-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, whereas cefpodoxime was the most potent compound against Haemophilus influenzae. Amoxicillin/clavulanate, cefdinir, and cefpodoxime were also active against Moraxella catarrhalis, including beta-lactamase-producing strains. In summary, orally administered "3rd-generation" or extended spectrum cephalosporins exhibited more balanced spectrums of activity against the principal bacterial pathogens responsible for outpatient respiratory tract and other infections when compared with other widely used oral cephalosporins of earlier generations or amoxicillin alone.

  12. The co-solvent Cremophor EL limits absorption of orally administered paclitaxel in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Malingré, M M; Schellens, J H M; Tellingen, O Van; Ouwehand, M; Bardelmeijer, H A; Rosing, H; Koopman, F J; Schot, M E; Huinink, W W Ten Bokkel; Beijnen, J H

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the co-solvents Cremophor EL and polysorbate 80 on the absorption of orally administered paclitaxel. 6 patients received in a randomized setting, one week apart oral paclitaxel 60 mg m−2 dissolved in polysorbate 80 or Cremophor EL. For 3 patients the amount of Cremophor EL was 5 ml m−2, for the other three 15 ml m−2. Prior to paclitaxel administration patients received 15 mg kg−1 oral cyclosporin A to enhance the oral absorption of the drug. Paclitaxel formulated in polysorbate 80 resulted in a significant increase in the maximal concentration (C max) and area under the concentration–time curve (AUC) of paclitaxel in comparison with the Cremophor EL formulations (P = 0.046 for both parameters). When formulated in Cremophor EL 15 ml m−2, paclitaxel C max and AUC values were 0.10 ± 0.06 μM and 1.29 ± 0.99 μM h−1, respectively, whereas these values were 0.31 ± 0.06 μM and 2.61 ± 1.54 μM h−1, respectively, when formulated in polysorbate 80. Faecal data revealed a decrease in excretion of unchanged paclitaxel for the polysorbate 80 formulation compared to the Cremophor EL formulations. The amount of paclitaxel excreted in faeces was significantly correlated with the amount of Cremophor EL excreted in faeces (P = 0.019). When formulated in Cremophor EL 15 ml m−2, paclitaxel excretion in faeces was 38.8 ± 13.0% of the administered dose, whereas this value was 18.3 ±15.5% for the polysorbate 80 formulation. The results show that the co-solvent Cremophor EL is an important factor limiting the absorption of orally administered paclitaxel from the intestinal lumen. They highlight the need for designing a better drug formulation in order to increase the usefulness of the oral route of paclitaxel © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign   http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11720431

  13. In vivo evidence of the immunomodulatory activity of orally administered Aloe vera gel.

    PubMed

    Im, Sun-A; Lee, Young-Ran; Lee, Young-Hee; Lee, Myung-Koo; Park, Young In; Lee, Sungwon; Kim, Kyungjae; Lee, Chong-Kil

    2010-03-01

    The gels of Aloe species contain immunomodulatory components such as aloctin A and acemannan. Most studies on these gels were performed in in vitro cell culture systems. Although several studies examined their immunomodulatory activity in vivo, the route of administration was intraperitoneal or intramuscular. Here, we evaluated the in vivo immunomodulatory activity of processed Aloe vera gel (PAG) in mice. Oral administration of PAG significantly reduced the growth of C. albicans in the spleen and kidney following intravenous injection of C. albicans in normal mice. PAG administration also reduced the growth of C. albicans in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. PAG administration did not increase ovalbumin (OVA)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) generation in normal mice, but did increase it in high-fat-diet induced diabetic mice. These findings provide the first clear evidence for the immunomodulatory activity of orally administered Aloe vera gel.

  14. In vivo uptake and acute immune response to orally administered chitosan and PEG coated PLGA nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Semete, B.; Booysen, L.I.J.; Kalombo, L.; Venter, J.D.; Katata, L.; Ramalapa, B.; Verschoor, J.A.; Swai, H.

    2010-12-01

    Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems offer great promise in addressing challenges of drug toxicity, poor bioavailability and non-specificity for a number of drugs. Much progress has been reported for nano drug delivery systems for intravenous administration, however very little is known about the effects of orally administered nanoparticles. Furthermore, the development of nanoparticulate systems necessitates a thorough understanding of the biological response post exposure. This study aimed to elucidate the in vivo uptake of chitosan and polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated Poly, DL, lactic-co-glycolic Acid (PLGA) nanoparticles and the immunological response within 24 h of oral and peritoneal administration. These PLGA nanoparticles were administered orally and peritoneally to female Balb/C mice, they were taken up by macrophages of the peritoneum. When these particles were fluorescently labelled, intracellular localisation was observed. The expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, IL-6, IL-12p70 and TNF-{alpha} in plasma and peritoneal lavage was found to remain at low concentration in PLGA nanoparticles treated mice as well as ZnO nanoparticles during the 24 hour period. However, these were significantly increased in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treated mice. Of these pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and IL-12p70 were produced at the highest concentration in the positive control group. The anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and chemokines INF-{gamma}, IL-4, IL-5 remained at normal levels in PLGA treated mice. IL-10 and INF-{gamma} were significantly increased in LPS treated mice. MCP-1 was found to be significantly produced in all groups in the first hours, except the saline treated mice. These results provide the first report to detail the induction of cytokine production by PLGA nanoparticles engineered for oral applications.

  15. Sedation with orally administered midazolam in elderly dental patients with major neurocognitive disorder.

    PubMed

    Rignell, Lena; Mikati, Mona; Wertsén, Madeleine; Hägglin, Catharina

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate acceptance of treatment after oral sedation with midazolam in dental patients with major neurocognitive disorder. Midazolam is commonly used as premedication in paediatric dentistry, oral surgery and people suffering from dental fear. Little is known about its use in other patient groups. Dental and sedation records of 61 patients (64% women) sedated with midazolam were examined retrospectively. All records came from patients with major neurocognitive disorder who had been referred to a special dental care unit in Sweden due to uncooperative behaviour and sedated with orally administered midazolam between 2006 and 2011. Data concerning dose, degree of acceptance of dental treatment (four-point scale) and number of possible interacting drugs were collected from dental records. On average, the participants were 80 years old (range: 62-93) and used 3.4 possible interacting drugs. The average midazolam dose was 0.11 mg/kg body weight, which is in line with the regional medical guidelines for sedation. Twenty-seven participants (44%) had no cooperation problems when sedated, twenty-six (43%) were treated with minor adaptations, five had poor cooperation, and three were not possible to treat. No statistically significant differences were found for degree of acceptance of treatment and dose or number of possible interacting drugs. Antiepileptics were used by 13% (n=7) with good or quite good acceptance compared to 37% (n=3) among those with poor or no acceptance. Unfavourable side effects were rare; one participant became hyperactive and one drowsier than expected. Sedation with orally administered midazolam seems to be effective and safe in dental treatment of uncooperative persons with major neurocognitive disorder. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Effectiveness of fecal-derived microbiota transfer using orally administered capsules for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Bruce E; Saraiya, Nimit; Poeth, Kaitlin; Schwartz, Rebecca M; Epstein, Marcia E; Honig, Gerard

    2015-04-17

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), a complication of antibiotic-induced injury to the gut microbiome, is a prevalent and dangerous cause of infectious diarrhea. Antimicrobial therapy for CDI is typically effective for acute symptoms, but up to one third of patients later experience recurrent CDI. Fecal-derived microbiota transplantation (FMT) can ameliorate the underlying dysbiosis and is highly effective for recurrent CDI. Traditional methods of FMT are limited by patient discomfort, risk and inefficient procedures. Many individuals with recurrent CDI have extensive comorbidities and advanced age. Widespread use of FMT requires strategies that are non-invasive, scalable and applicable across healthcare settings. A method to facilitate microbiota transfer was developed. Fecal samples were collected and screened for potential pathogens. Bacteria were purified, concentrated, cryopreserved and formulated into multi-layered capsules. Capsules were administered to patients with recurrent CDI, who were then monitored for 90 days. Thirteen women and six men with recurrent CDI were provided with microbiota transfer with orally administered capsules. The procedure was well tolerated. Thirteen individuals responded to a single course. Four patients were cured after a second course. There were 2 failures. The cumulative clinical cure rate of 89% is similar to the rates achieved with reported fecal-derived transplantation procedures. Recurrent CDI represents a profound dysbiosis and a debilitating chronic disease. Stable cure can be achieved by restoring the gut microbiome with an effective, well-tolerated oral capsule treatment. This strategy of microbiota transfer can be widely applied and is particularly appropriate for frail patients.

  17. Alteration of Intestinal Microbiota in Mice Orally Administered with Salmon Cartilage Proteoglycan, a Prophylactic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Krisana; Yoshimura, Sayuri; Nakane, Akio

    2013-01-01

    Proteoglycan (PG) extracted from salmon nasal cartilage has potential to be a prophylactic agent. Daily oral administration of the PG attenuates systemic inflammatory response in the experimental mouse models. In this study, we applied the culture-independent approach to investigate an alteration of intestinal microbiota composition in PG-administered mice. The results indicated that the population level of bacilli increased in the small and large intestine upon PG administration. On the other hand, the population level of clostridia decreased in the large intestine. The proportion of bacteria that are able to ferment saccharides and produce short-chain fatty acids increased in the small intestine and decreased in the large intestine. Importantly, population level of probiotic lactobacilli and bacteria exhibiting the immunomodulatory effect increased in the PG-administered mice. In addition, several disease-associated bacteria decreased upon PG administration. These results provided an understanding of the specific role of PG involved in host immune modulation and supported our hypothesis that daily oral administration of PG improves the overall balance in composition of the intestinal microbial community. PMID:24040376

  18. Solubility, retention, and metabolism of intratracheally and orally administered inorganic arsenic compounds in the hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Marafante, E.; Vahter, M.

    1987-02-01

    The absorption, biotransformation, and tissue retention of arsenic following intratracheal and oral administration of /sup 74/As-labeled sodium arsenite, sodium arsenate, arsenic trisulfide (suspension), and lead arsenate (suspension) have been studied in hamsters, and correlated to the in vitro and in vivo solubility of the compounds. After intratracheal instillation, the clearance of /sup 74/As from the lungs was positively correlated to the in vivo solubility. Less than 0.1% of the sodium arsenite and sodium arsenate was retained in the lungs after 3 days, compared to 1.3% of the arsenic trisulfide particles and 45% of the lead arsenate particles. The latter showed a very low solubility both in vivo and in vitro. In general, orally administered arsenic had a shorter biological half-life than intratracheally administered, especially when given in the form of arsenic trisulfide or lead arsenate particles, which seemed to be absorbed to only 20-30% in the gastrointestinal tract. Reduction, oxidation, and methylation of arsenic varied to a great extent with the arsenic compound and the route of exposure. Trivalent arsenic was methylated to a greater extent than pentavalent and less soluble compounds (suspended particles) more than dissolved compounds. The trivalent arsenic compounds caused higher concentrations than the pentavalent in the upper gastrointestinal tract but not in other tissues.

  19. Effect of dietary purines on the pharmacokinetics of orally administered ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Li, Linghui; Koo, Seok Hwee; Limenta, Lie Michael George; Han, Li; Hashim, Khadijah Binte; Quek, Hung Hiang; Lee, Edmund Jon Deoon

    2009-06-01

    Ribavirin is found to be absorbed in the intestine through the human concentrative nucleoside transporter 2 (hCNT2). Cellular uptake of ribavirin was strongly inhibited by purine nucleoside in an in vitro study. This study aims to examine the effects of dietary purine on the pharmacokinetics of orally administered ribavirin in vivo. Twenty healthy participants were enrolled in a randomized, 2-period crossover study. Participants were administered a single 600-mg oral dose of ribavirin after either a high-purine meal or a low-purine meal. Serial blood samples were collected predose and over 144 hours after dosing. Ribavirin concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. In comparison with corresponding plasma values of ribavirin following a high-purine meal, C(max), AUC(0-144) and AUC(0-infinity) of ribavirin following a low-purine meal were 136% (90% confidence internal [CI]: 120%-155%), 134% (90% CI: 118%-153%), and 139% (90% CI: 120%-159%), respectively. This study indicates that dietary purines have an effect on ribavirin absorption. Dosage regimens of ribavirin might need to be adjusted according to the purine content of the meal.

  20. Application of the yeast-surface-display system for orally administered salmon calcitonin and safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping-Nan; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Chen, Yun-Song; Zang, Xiao-Nan

    2010-01-01

    High manufacturing costs and oral delivery are the constraints in clinical application of calcitonin. We selected surface-displayed Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a low-cost and safe carrier for oral delivery of salmon calcitonin (sCT). The sCT DNA fragment, optimized according to the codon preference of S. cerevisiae, was synthesized and cloned into the plasmid M-pYD1 to yield recombinant yAGA2-sCT, which was induced to express sCT by galactose for 0, 12, and 24 h. sCT expression was detected on the cell surface by indirect immunofluorescence and peaked at 12 h. About 65% recombinants expressed sCT on flow cytometry. The in vivo and in vitro activity of recombinant sCT was determined by detecting bioactivity of antiosteoclastic absorption on bone wafers and orally administering yAGA2-sCT to Wistar rats, respectively. For safety assessment of yAGA2-sCT, we observed abnormalities, morbidity, and mortality and determined body weight, serum chemistry parameters, hematological parameters, and organ weight. In vitro bioactivity of the recombinant sCT was similar to that of commercial sCT, Miacalcic; oral administration of 5 g/kg yAGA2-sCT induced a long-term hypocalcemic effect in Wistar rats and no adverse effects. This study demonstrates that yAGA2-sCT anchoring sCT protein on a S. cerevisiae surface has potential for low-cost and safe oral delivery of sCT.

  1. Effects of orally self-administered bath salt constituent 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) in mice.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Brenda M; Russell, Lauren N; Modi, Meet S; Rice, Kenner C; Fantegrossi, William E

    2017-10-01

    Synthetic cathinones in bath salts products are psychostimulant drugs of abuse, and 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) is a common constituent of these products. Oral MDPV has been show to stimulate locomotor activity but reinforcing, locomotor and appetitive stimulus effects of oral MDPV are unknown. Choice procedures evaluated preference for 0.03, 0.10, 0.30, and 1.00mg/mL MDPV solutions versus 0.10mg/mL quinine solution or water. To verify that oral MDPV produced pharmacological effects, locomotor activity was monitored during and after consumption of water, quinine, or MDPV solutions. Conditioned place preference (CPP) tested the apparent appetitive effects of a preferred concentration of oral MDPV with locomotor stimulant effects (0.30mg/mL), using water as a control, and compared with results from intraperitoneally-administered MDPV. Consumption of MDPV solutions (0.03-1.00mg/mL) was low when the alternative fluid was water, but a history of MDPV consumption increased MDPV choice. When paired with a quinine control solution, MDPV solutions (0.03-0.30mg/mL) were almost exclusively preferred, and treatment with the catecholamine synthesis inhibitor αMPT decreased MDPV choice. Consumption of MDPV concentrations (0.1-1.0mg/mL) stimulated locomotor activity. Chronic (10day) access to 0.30mg/mL MDPV resulted in escalated consumption, but locomotor effects did not systematically change across the access period. Finally, consumption of 0.30mg/mL MDPV elicited CPP with a magnitude similar to the preference observed following intraperitoneal administration of MDPV. Consistent with human abuse patterns, oral MDPV has reinforcing effects in the mouse which are most likely related to its psychostimulant-like pharmacological profile. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Safety evaluation of orally administered afoxolaner and milbemycin oxime in eight-week-old dogs.

    PubMed

    Drag, M; Saik, J; Harriman, J; Letendre, L; Yoon, S; Larsen, D

    2017-10-01

    The safety profile of afoxolaner (an isoxazoline molecule) when combined with milbemycin oxime (a macrocyclic lactone) was evaluated according to the regulatory requirements when administered six times orally in a soft chewable formulation at a dose of at least 1×, 3×, or 5× the maximum exposure dose in 8-week-old Beagle dogs. Thirty-two healthy puppies (16 males and 16 females) were enrolled and allocated randomly to one of four treatment groups. Three doses were administered at 28-day intervals (Days 0, 28, and 56), followed by three additional doses administered with 14-day intervals (Days 84, 98, and 112). The study ended on Day 126. Treatment groups were as follows: Group 1: untreated, sham-dosed control; Group 2: afoxolaner/milbemycin oxime chews administered at a dose of at least 5 and 1 mg/kg, respectively (1×); Group 3: afoxolaner/milbemycin oxime chews administered at a dose of at least 15 and 3 mg/kg, respectively (3); and Group 4: afoxolaner/milbemycin oxime chews administered at a dose of at least 25 and 5 mg/kg, respectively (5×). All dogs were examined for general health twice a day beginning on Day -14. Physical examinations, and blood collections for clinical pathology analysis and afoxolaner and milbemycin oxime plasma concentrations, were performed throughout the study. No afoxolaner/milbemycin oxime treatment-related changes were observed in growth, physical variables, clinical pathology variables, or tissues examined histologically. No clinically relevant or statistically significant health abnormalities related to the administration of afoxolaner/milbemycin oxime were observed. No signs of macrocyclic lactone sensitivity were observed at any time during the study. Vomiting and diarrhea were observed sporadically across all groups including the controls. Based upon the results of this study, afoxolaner/milbemycin oxime soft chewables were shown to be safe when administered repeatedly at up to 5× the maximum exposure dose in dogs as

  3. Orally administered phosphatidic acids and lysophosphatidic acids ameliorate aspirin-induced stomach mucosal injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tamotsu; Morito, Katsuya; Kinoshita, Masafumi; Ohmoto, Mayumi; Urikura, Mai; Satouchi, Kiyoshi; Tokumura, Akira

    2013-04-01

    Recent investigations revealed that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a phospholipid with a growth factor-like activity, plays an important role in the integrity of the gastrointestinal tract epithelium. This paper attempts to clarify the effect of orally administered phosphatidic acid (PA) and LPA on aspirin-induced gastric lesions in mice. Phospholipids, a free fatty acid, a diacylglycerol and a triglyceride at 1 mM (5.7 μmol/kg body weight) or 0.1 mM were orally administered to mice 0.5 h before oral administration of aspirin (1.7 mmol/kg). The total length of lesions formed on the stomach wall was measured as a lesion index. Formation of LPA from PA in the mouse stomach was examined by in vitro (in stomach lavage fluid), ex vivo (in an isolated stomach) and in vivo (in the stomach of a living mouse) examinations of phospholipase activity. Palmitic acid, dioleoyl-glycerol, olive oil and lysophosphatidylcholine did not affect the aspirin-induced lesions. In contrast, phosphatidylcholine (1 mM), LPA (1 mM) and PA (0.1, 1 mM) significantly reduced the lesion index. Evidence for formation of LPA from PA in the stomach by gastric phospholipase A2 was obtained by in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo experiments. An LPA-specific receptor, LPA2, was found to be localized on the gastric surface-lining cells of mice. Pretreatment with PA-rich diets may prevent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced stomach ulcers.

  4. Effects of orally administered undenatured type II collagen against arthritic inflammatory diseases: a mechanistic exploration.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, D; Misner, B; Bagchi, M; Kothari, S C; Downs, B W; Fafard, R D; Preuss, H G

    2002-01-01

    Arthritis afflicts approximately 43 million Americans or approximately 16.6% of the US population. The two most common and best known types of arthritis are osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A significant amount of scientific research has been done in attempts to explain what initiates forms of arthritis, how it is promoted and perpetuated and how to effectively intervene in the disease process and promote cartilage remodeling. Current pharmacological strategies mainly address immune suppression and antiinflammatory mechanisms and have had limited success. Recent research provides evidence that alterations in the three-dimensional configuration of glycoproteins are responsible for the recognition/response signaling that catalyzes T-cell attack. Oral administration of autoantigens has been shown to suppress a variety of experimentally induced autoimmune pathologies, including antigen-induced RA. The interaction between gut-associated lymphoid tissue in the duodenum and epitopes of orally administered undenatured type II collagen facilitates oral tolerance to the antigen and stems systemic T-cell attack on joint cartilage. Previous studies have shown that small doses of orally administered undenatured type II chicken collagen effectively deactivate killer T-cell attack. A novel glycosylated undenatured type II collagen material (UC-II) was developed to preserve biological activity. The presence of active epitopes in the UC-II collagen is confirmed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test and distinguishes this form from hydrolyzed or denatured collagen. Oral intake of small amounts of glycosylated UC-II presents active epitopes, with the correct three-dimensional structures, to Peyer's patches, which influences the signaling required for the development of immune tolerance. UC-II has demonstrated the ability to induce tolerance, effectively reducing joint pain and swelling in RA subjects. A pilot study was conducted for 42 days to evaluate the

  5. Postoperative analgesic effects of intravenous, intramuscular, subcutaneous or oral transmucosal buprenorphine administered to cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Tatiana; Steagall, Paulo V M; Ferreira, Tatiana H; Minto, Bruno W; de Sá Lorena, Sílvia Elaine Rodolfo; Brondani, Juliana; Luna, Stelio P L

    2010-07-01

    To compare the postoperative analgesic effects of intravenous (IV), intramuscular (IM), subcutaneous (SC) or oral transmucosal (OTM) buprenorphine administered to cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Randomized, prospective and blinded clinical trial. 100 female cats. Cats were assigned to receive 0.01 mg kg(-1) of buprenorphine administered by the IV, IM, SC or OTM route (n = 25/group). Buprenorphine was made up to 0.3 mL with 0.9% saline. DIVAS (0-100 mm) and simple descriptive scale (SDS) (from 0 to 4) pain and sedation scores were assigned to each cat before and 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 24 hours after ovariohysterectomy. Buprenorphine and carprofen were administered for rescue analgesia. Data were analyzed using anova and Fisher's exact test (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between groups for breed, body weight, anesthetic time or surgery time (p > 0.05). There were no significant differences between groups for sedation scores at any time. SDS pain scores did not detect any differences between groups (p > 0.05). DIVAS pain scores after OTM administration were significantly higher than IV and IM administration at 1 hour and at 3, 4, 6, 8 and 12 hours, respectively (p < 0.05). DIVAS pain scores after SC administration were significantly higher than IV and IM administration at 2 hours and at 2, 3, 4, 8, 12 and 24 hours (p < 0.05), respectively. Six, four, 13 and 17 cats that received IV, IM, SC and OTM buprenorphine required rescue analgesia, respectively. There was a significantly higher incidence of treatment failure in cats that received SC and OTM buprenorphine compared with cats that received IV and IM buprenorphine (p < 0.05). IV and IM administration of buprenorphine provided better postoperative analgesia than SC or OTM administration of the drug and these routes of administration should be preferred when buprenorphine is administered to cats.

  6. Evaluation of single-cell sources of docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid: 3-month rat oral safety study with an in utero phase.

    PubMed

    Burns, R A; Wibert, G J; Diersen-Schade, D A; Kelly, C M

    1999-01-01

    Owing to the presence of the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) in human milk and their important biological function, several authorities recommend that they be added to infant formulas. This study assessed the safety of an algal oil rich in DHA and a fungal oil rich in ARA, blended to provide a DHA to ARA ratio similar to human milk. The oil blend was incorporated into diets and fed to rats such that they received 3, 11 and 22 times the anticipated infant exposure to DHA and ARA. Low-fat and high-fat control groups received canola oil. Rats received experimental diets over a premating interval and throughout mating, gestation and lactation. Pups born during this period (F1) consumed treatment diets from weaning for 3 months. Physical observations, ophthalmoscopic examinations, body weight, food intake, clinical chemistry, neurobehavioural evaluations and postmortem histopathology of selected tissues were performed. No statistically significant, dose-dependent adverse effects were seen in reproductive performance or fertility, nor in the neonates from birth to weaning. Mid- and high-dose treated F1 animals exhibited increased white cell count, neutrophil count and blood urea nitrogen; increased liver and spleen weights (absolute and relative to body weight) also were observed. There were no corresponding microscopic findings. The clinical pathology and organ weight differences at these treatment levels represent physiological or metabolic responses to the test substance rather than adverse responses. These single-cell oils produced no adverse effects in rats when administered in utero and for 90 days at dietary levels resulting in exposures up to 22 or 66 times higher than those expected in infant formulas when extrapolated on the basis of diet composition (g/100 Cal) or intake (g/kg body weight), respectively.

  7. Metabolism and excretion of orally and intraperitoneally administered methylarsonic acid in the hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, H.; Yamato, N.; Yamamura, Y.

    1988-02-01

    A number of investigators have demonstrated that when inorganic arsenic is administered to humans and experimental animals, methylarsonic acid (MAA) is formed in vivo. Low concentrations of MAA have been detected in human organs and urine. Few studies of the metabolism and elimination of MAA have been published. Following administration of a single oral dose of MAA to human subject, it was reported that MAA was rapidly metabolized to dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA) in vivo and excreted in urine. While the elimination of MAA has been investigated experimentally in animals, nothing is known of MAA metabolism and distribution in vivo. In the present study, the metabolism of MAA was investigated following its administration to hamsters. Arsenic species deposited in selected organs and blood, and the amounts and chemical species of arsenic excreted in urine and feces were determined.

  8. Whole-body retention and distribution of orally administered radiolabelled zerovalent iron nanoparticles in mice.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michael F; Long, Thomas C; Boyes, William K; Ramabhadran, Ram

    2013-09-01

    Zerovalent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) are used for in situ remediation of contaminated ground water, raising the possibility that nZVI particles or their altered residues could contaminate the ground water. Therefore, it is important to study their effects on humans and other organisms in vivo. The objective of this study was to assess the whole-body retention and terminal disposition of neutron-activated radioactive nZVI administered by oral gavage in mice. Radioactivity was primarily eliminated in the faeces within 1 day of administration. However, a small amount of iron-derived radioactivity appeared in the liver after three repeated daily doses. This prototypic study further suggests that neutron activation applied judiciously may be broadly applicable to studies of nanoparticles derived from other biologically abundant metals.

  9. Effect of trikatu pretreatment on the pharmacokinetics of pefloxacin administered orally in mountain Gaddi goats.

    PubMed

    Dama, Madhukar S; Varshneya, C; Dardi, M S; Katoch, V C

    2008-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics of orally administered pefloxacin were studied to evaluate the bio-enhancing effect of the herbal bio-enhancer, trikatu, in mountain Gaddi goats (n = 6). The findings of the study revealed a decreased plasma concentration (p > 0.05) of pefloxacin following trikatu administration during the absorption phase (10, 15, 20 min post pefloxacin administration). In contrast, the plasma concentrations of pefloxacin were significantly higher at 4, 6, 8 and 12 h (during the elimination phase) of the pefloxacin administration. The findings of the investigation revealed higher values for the area under the curve, the area under the first moment of the plasma drug concentration time curve, the mean residential time, the total duration of pharmacological action and bioavailability. Trikatu treatment, however, significantly reduced the elimination half life (t 1/2 beta) and zero time intercept of the elimination phase. The apparent volume of distribution based on the total area under the plasma drug concentration curve [(Vd(area)] and the apparent volume of distribution based on the zero time plasma concentration intercept of the elimination phase [Vd(B)] were significantly higher in trikatu treated animals indicating a better penetration of the drug. Based on the MIC of 0.8 microg/ml of pefloxacin, a priming dose of 6.0 mg/kg and a maintenance dose of 2.21 mg/kg is required to be administered at 8 h intervals. For practical purposes in goats this would mean a priming dose of 6 mg/kg and a maintenance dose of 2 mg/kg given by the oral route, to be repeated at 8 h intervals.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of oral gabapentin alone or co-administered with meloxicam in ruminant beef calves.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Johann F; Mosher, Ruby A; Kohake, Laura E; Cull, Charley A; Kelly, Lindsey L; Mueting, Stacy L; KuKanich, Butch

    2011-10-01

    Gabapentin is a γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogue indicated for treatment of neuropathic pain. This study determined the pharmacokinetics of oral (PO) gabapentin alone or in combination with meloxicam in ruminant calves. Gabapentin capsules at 10mg/kg or gabapentin powder (from capsules at 15mg/kg) and meloxicam tablets (0.5mg/kg) were administered PO to six beef calves. Plasma drug concentrations were determined over 48h post-administration by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry followed by non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis. The mean (± standard deviation, SD) C(max), T(max) and elimination half-life (t(½)λz) for gabapentin (10mg/kg) alone was 2.97 ± 0.40μg/mL, 9.33 ± 2.73h and 11.02 ± 3.68h, respectively. The mean (± SD) C(max), T(max) and t(½)λz for gabapentin (15mg/kg) co-administered with meloxicam was 3.57±1.04μg/mL, 7.33 ± 1.63h and 8.12±2.11h, respectively. The mean (±SD) C(max), T(max) and t(½)λz for meloxicam was 2.11± 0.19μg/mL, 11.67 ± 3.44h and 20.47 ± 9.22h, respectively. Plasma gabapentin concentrations >2μg/mL were maintained for up to 15h and meloxicam concentrations >0.2μg/mL for up to 48h. The pharmacokinetic profile of oral gabapentin and meloxicam supported clinical evaluation of these compounds for management of neuropathic pain in cattle.

  11. Immobilization of black bears (Ursus americanus) with orally administered carfentanil citrate.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, E C; Sleeman, J M; Clyde, V L

    1995-07-01

    Ten black bears (Ursus americanus) were immobilized with orally administered carfentanil citrate. The total carfentanil dose was mixed with 5 to 20 ml honey and given incrementally to captive bears. The bears ranged in weight from 80 (estimated) to 233 kg. Total carfentanil doses ranged from 0.7 to 3.0 mg, resulting in dosages of 6.8 to 18.8 micrograms carfentanil/kg. Mean (+/- SD) times from estimated 80% mixture consumption to sternal recumbency, and first safe human contact were 7.7 +/- 2.3 min and 19.7 +/- 5.6 min, respectively. Undesired side effects of immobilization were muscle rigidity, bradypnea, and oxygen desaturation. All bears received diazepam to alleviate muscle rigidity and were insufflated with oxygen during immobilization. Nine immobilizations were considered satisfactory or good. The bear receiving 6.8 micrograms carfentanil/kg, the lowest dosage used, was very excited during induction and required intravenous (IV) ketamine to permit safe examination. Immobilization was reversed with 100 mg naltrexone/mg carfentanil administered (75% subcutaneous, 25% IV). Bears recovered to full mobility in 6.3 +/- 1.9 min. Five bears vomited post-recovery but no episodes of renarcotization were observed.

  12. Effects of Cremophor EL on the absorption of orally administered saquinavir and fexofenadine in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Tomaru, Atsuko; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko; Maeda, Kazuya; Banba, Hirokazu; Takayama, Kozo; Kumagai, Yuji; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2015-06-01

    Modulation of CYP3A and/or P-gp function by several excipients has been reported. However, relatively few studies have investigated their effects in humans. Therefore, the aim of this clinical study was to clarify the effects of Cremophor EL on the inhibition of CYP3A and P-gp in the human small intestine. Eight healthy Japanese subjects received an oral dose of saquinavir (2 mg, substrate of P-gp/CYP3A) or fexofenadine (50 μg, substrate of P-gp) without or with Cremophor EL (720 mg and 1440 mg). Significant increases in Cmax (1.3-fold) and AUC0-24 (1.6-fold) were observed for fexofenadine when administered with 1440 mg of Cremophor EL. In contrast, a significant decrease was observed for saquinavir when administered with 720 mg of Cremophor EL. The equilibrium dialysis experiment was performed to investigate the micellar interaction between Cremophor EL and drugs. The equilibrium dialysis study showed that saquinavir was far extensively entrapped into the micelles. The reduced concentration of free saquinavir by entrapping in micelles was considered to cause the reduction of systemic exposure for saquinavir. In conclusion, this clinical study suggests that Cremophor EL at least inhibits P-gp in the human small intestine.

  13. Evaluation of computed tomographic enterography with an orally administered lactulose solution in clinically normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Keh, Seoyeon; Sohn, Jungmin; Choi, Mihyun; Lee, Namsoon; Jang, Jaeyoung; Kim, Hyunwook; Chang, Dongwoo; Choi, Mincheol; Yoon, Junghee

    2016-04-01

    To determine optimal techniques for CT enterography in clinically normal dogs and to evaluate luminal distention after oral administration of lactulose solution as a contrast agent. 15 healthy dogs. CT was performed in a control group (2 dogs that underwent CT to evaluate metastasis and 5 other dogs). In a bolus administration group (5 dogs from the control group), lactulose solution (1.34 g/mL) was administered (60 mL/kg) rapidly via gastric tube to anesthetized dogs, and CT was performed every 10 minutes for 1 hour. In a continuous administration group of 8 other dogs, lactulose solution (60 mL/kg) was administered slowly via nasoesophageal tube over a period of 45 minutes. Then, 15 minutes after anesthetic induction, CT was performed every 10 minutes for 1 hour. Luminal distention of the small intestines was evaluated qualitatively by use of a 3-point scale. All small intestinal segments had poor luminal distention in the control group. The terminal ileum had poor luminal distention for the bolus administration group. Nearly all segments had good luminal distention for the continuous administration group with mild adverse effects. Luminal distention scores from 0 to 20 minutes after lactulose administration were significantly higher than scores from 30 to 60 minutes. Interobserver reproducibility was high for all intestinal segments. CT performed between 0 and 20 minutes after continuous administration of lactulose solution (60 mL/kg) may reveal adequate luminal distention for examination of small intestinal segments in dogs.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of sulphamethoxazole and trimethoprim administered intravenously and orally to Japanese quails.

    PubMed

    Lashev, L D; Mihailov, R

    1994-10-01

    The pharmacokinetic behaviour of sulphamethoxazole and trimethoprim was studied after combined intravenous (i.v.) administration at doses of 20 mg/kg and 4 mg/kg, respectively, and after oral administration at doses of 50 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg. The serum concentration versus time data after i.v. administration were best described by the biexponential equations C = 34.77.e-2.655.t + 39.03.e-0.241.t for sulphamethoxazole and C = 3.29.e-3.878.t + 0.83.e-0.306.t for trimethoprim. Mean biological half-lives of the drugs were 2.89 +/- 0.11 and 2.38 +/- 0.33 h, respectively. The distribution volumes (V area) were 0.475 +/- 0.026 l/kg (sulphamethoxazole) and 3.89 +/- 0.61 l/kg (trimethoprim). Orally administered sulphamethoxazole and trimethoprim were rapidly absorbed. The maximum serum concentrations were reached 0.5-1 h after administration. The bioavailability was 81% for sulphamethoxazole and 41% for trimethoprim.

  15. Immunopotentiative effect of polysaccharide from kefir grain, KGF-C, administered orally in mice.

    PubMed

    Murofushi, M; Mizuguchi, J; Aibara, K; Matuhasi, T

    1986-08-01

    Since a water-soluble polysaccharide (KGF-C) from the kefir grains was shown to have the property of retarding tumor growth in vivo when administered orally, the effect of KGF-C was examined on antibody responses to thymus-dependent antigen, sheep red blood cells (SRBC), and thymus-independent antigen, dinitrophenyl-Ficoll and trinitrophenyl-lipopolysaccharide. Antibody response in mice intubated with KGF-C was enhanced to low doses of SRBC, but not to optimal or high doses. The optimal dose of KGF-C required for the enhancement was 100 mg/kg body weight. The time-course studies on KGF-C administration implied that KGF-C exerted its effect on the early events of anti-SRBC response. The enhancement was not due to the alteration of kinetics of anti-SRBC responses. Furthermore, the enhancing effect on antibody responses to thymus-independent antigens, such as dinitrophenyl-Ficoll and trinitrophenyl-lipopolysaccharide, was observed neither in nu/nu nor in nu/+ mice, and the effect on delayed-type hypersensitivity response to a low dose of SRBC in normal mice was also found. These findings suggest that the oral immune enhancement by KGF-C is elucidated probably through T-cell but not through B-cell participation.

  16. Orally administered conjugated linoleic acid ameliorates allergic dermatitis induced by repeated applications of oxazolone in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Tomonori; Tokunaga, Yuzo; Yamasaki, Masao; Erickson, Laurie; Kawahara, Satoshi

    2016-12-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is one of the constituents of animal products with possible health benefits such as anti-carcinogenic and anti-obesity effects. In this study, we investigated the immunomodulatory effects of CLA using a mouse model of allergic dermatitis. Mice were orally administered either a CLA mixture containing equal amounts of 9c, 11 t-CLA and 10 t, 12c-CLA, or high linoleic acid safflower oil, and allergic dermatitis was induced on the ear by repeated topical applications of oxazolone. Oral administration of the CLA mixture but not the high linoleic safflower oil attenuated the symptoms of allergic dermatitis in both ear weights and clinical scores. This effect was associated with decreased levels of ear interleukin-4 (IL-4) and plasma immunoglobulin E. The immunomodulatory effects of the CLA isomers were compared by an in vitro cytokine production assay. The results showed that 9c, 11 t-CLA, the most predominant isomer in animal products, significantly inhibited IL-4 and interferon-γ production from mouse splenocytes with similar potency to 10 t, 12c-CLA. These findings suggest that CLA, a constituent of animal products, has a potentially beneficial effect for amelioration of allergic dermatitis. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  17. Urinary excretion of orally administered oxalic acid in saccharin and o-phenylphenol-fed NMRI mice.

    PubMed

    Salminen, E; Salminen, S

    1986-01-01

    Both saccharin and o-phenylphenol have been suggested to be carcinogenic to the urinary bladder in experimental animals, but the mechanism has remained unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary saccharin and o-phenylphenol on the urinary excretion of dietary oxalic acid. Male NMRI mice were gradually adapted to either 3% o-phenylphenol or 5% saccharin in their diet. Having being adapted to these diets for 1 week or after consuming them for 3 months, the animals were fasted for 6 h and given a 2.5-microCi oral dose of U-14C-oxalic acid. Dosed animals were kept in metabolism cages for 48 h to monitor urinary and fecal excretion of the label. Adaptation to dietary o-phenylphenol appeared to increase the urinary excretion of orally administered U-14C-oxalic acid when food and water were available during urinary and fecal collections. Adaptation to dietary saccharin had little effect on urinary oxalate levels when compared to control animals. These results indicate that changes in urinary oxalate levels should be more carefully studied in connection with potential urinary bladder carcinogens to avoid the possibility of bladder irritation by increased urinary oxalate excretion.

  18. Effects of orally administered yeast-derived beta-glucans: a review.

    PubMed

    Samuelsen, Anne Berit C; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Knutsen, Svein H

    2014-01-01

    Yeast-derived beta-glucans (Y-BG) are considered immunomodulatory compounds suggested to enhance the defense against infections and exert anticarcinogenic effects. Specific preparations have received Generally Recognized as Safe status and acceptance as novel food ingredients by European Food Safety Authority. In human trials, orally administered Y-BG significantly reduced the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections in individuals susceptible to upper respiratory tract infections, whereas significant differences were not seen in healthy individuals. Increased salivary IgA in healthy individuals, increased IL-10 levels in obese subjects, beneficial changes in immunological parameters in allergic patients, and activated monocytes in cancer patients have been reported following Y-BG intake. The studies were conducted with different doses (7.5-1500 mg/day), using different preparations that vary in their primary structure, molecular weight, and solubility. In animal models, oral Y-BG have reduced the incidence of bacterial infections and levels of stress-induced cytokines and enhanced antineoplastic effects of cytotoxic agents. Protective effects toward drug intoxication and ischemia/reperfusion injury have also been reported. In conclusion, additional studies following good clinical practice principles are needed in which well-defined Y-BG preparations are used and immune markers and disease endpoints are assessed. Since optimal dosing may depend on preparation characteristics, dose-response curves might be assessed to find the optimal dose for a specific preparation. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Subchronic (13-week) oral toxicity study, preceded by an in utero exposure phase, with arachidonate-enriched triglyceride oil (SUNTGA40S) in rats.

    PubMed

    Lina, B A R; Wolterbeek, A P M; Suwa, Y; Fujikawa, S; Ishikura, Y; Tsuda, S; Dohnalek, M

    2006-03-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as arachidonic acid (ARA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are natural constituents found in human milk, fish oil or egg yolk. Until recently, infant formulas, though providing the essential fatty acid precursors for these PUFAs, did not contain preformed ARA or DHA. In this study the safety of SUNTGA40S as source of ARA, not only for use in infant formulas but also for nutritional products or food supplements, was evaluated in a subchronic study in Wistar rats, preceded by a 4-week pretreatment period of parental (F(0)) rats and exposure of the F(0) dams throughout mating, gestation and lactation. SUNTGA40S was administered at dietary levels of 0.5%, 1.5% and 5% (wt/wt) adjusted with corn oil to 5.76% added fat. An additional group received 3.65% (wt/wt) SUNTGA40S in conjunction with 2.11% (wt/wt) high DHA Tuna oil, providing an ARA:DHA ratio of 2.7:1. High-fat and low-fat controls received basal diet with or without 5.76% corn-oil supplement. The content, stability and homogeneous distribution of the test substances in the diet were confirmed under study conditions. The administration of SUNTGA40S, with or without DHA oil, did not affect health, growth, fertility or reproductive performance of the parental rats, nor pup characteristics (condition, weight gain, viability, number per litter or sex ratio). In the subchronic study with the offspring (F(1)) rats, no significant differences were found in condition, neurobehavioural observations, ophthalmoscopy, growth, urinalysis or macroscopic and microscopic findings between the test groups and the low-fat or the high-fat controls. In males of the 5% SUNTGA40S and the SUNTGA40S/DHA group, red blood cell counts, haemoglobin concentration and packed cell volume were lower and reticulocytes were slightly higher than in the high-fat and low-fat control groups. Cholesterol, triglycerides and phospholipids in plasma were lower than in the high-fat controls in both sexes in the 5

  20. The pharmacokinetics of orally administered S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine in the dog, calf and sheep.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Panayotis; Forbes, Ben; Mitchell, Stephen C; Steventon, Glyn B

    2010-02-19

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of employing S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine as a treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in dogs. To this end the pharmacokinetic parameters of orally administered S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine were determined in the dog, cow and sheep. Six healthy beagle dogs, six endogenous Greek sheep and four Holstein Fresian calves were orally dosed with 10 mg/kg body weight of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine. No significant differences in T(max) and T(1/2) were reported between the species. However, significantly higher AUC((0-last)), 21.56+/-6.67 microg h ml(-1) and AUC((0-infinity)), 21.63+/-6.68 microg h ml(-1) were seen in the dogs compared to the sheep and calves. The calculated V(D) was significantly higher in the sheep (10.4+/-2.7 L kg(-1)) and the calves (3.8+/-0.7 L kg(-1)) compared to the dogs (1.0+/-0.6 L kg(-1)). The rank order of increasing C(L) was sheep (3.4+/-2.7 L h(-1)kg(-1))>calves (2.7+/-0.4 L h(-1) kg(-1))>dogs (0.5+/-0.2 L h(-1)kg(-1)). The result for the dogs was significantly lower that the calculated C(L) for the sheep and calves. All these results indicate that the oral administration of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine may be useful during the therapeutic management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in dogs.

  1. Human pharmacokinetics and toxicity of high-dose metronidazole administered orally and intravenously

    SciTech Connect

    Urtasun, R.C.; Rabin, H.R.; Partington, J.

    1983-01-01

    This study is part of a clinical program to assess the use of nitroimidazoles as radiosensitizers of hypoxic tumor cells. A total of 37 patients with malignant tumors have been entered into the study to receive oral high-dose metronidazole in conjunction with radiation. Twenty-eight patients with malignant brain tumors received 6 gm/m2 three times a week for 3 weeks (a mean total dose of 5.3 gm/m2). Maximum mean plasma drug concentration of 1 mM was obtained at 4 hours after drug ingestion with a mean half-life of 13 hours. Tissue and cerebrospinal fluid levels of 80% to 90% of the plasma levels were obtained at 4 to 6 hours. A linear relationship between increased drug dose and increased plasma concentration was observed at doses of 2.5 gm/m2 up to 6 gm/m2. Acute gastrointestinal and central nervous system toxicity was the dose-limiting factor (50% and 25%, respectively, at total doses of 5.3 gm/m2). Pharmacokinetic studies of intravenous metronidazole were performed in eight consenting patients. Single doses of 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 gm were administered intravenously by zero-order infusion pump. Seven of the eight patients received a second identical dose orally 1 week later and the results were compared. Open two-compartment kinetic characteristics of metronidazole were computed from simultaneous plasma infusion and urine excretion rate equations, by use of a nonlinear least-squares regression analysis program (NONLIN). The mean (+/- SD) for alpha half-life was 1.2 +/- 1.3 hours, and that for the beta half-life was 9.8 +/- 5.9 hours. The absolute oral bioavailability was estimated to approximate 100%.

  2. Development of Orally Administered γ-Tocotrienol (GT3) Nanoemulsion for Radioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Ledet, Grace A.; Biswas, Shukla; Kumar, Vidya P.; Graves, Richard A.; Mitchner, Demaurian M.; Parker, Taylor M.; Bostanian, Levon A.; Ghosh, Sanchita P.; Mandal, Tarun K.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to formulate γ-tocotrienol (GT3) in a nanoemulsion formulation as a prophylactic orally administered radioprotective agent; and (2) to optimize the storage conditions to preserve the structural integrity of both the formulation and the compound. γ-tocotrienol was incorporated into a nanoemulsion and lyophilized with lactose. Ultra performance liquid chromatography–mass spectroscopy (UPLC–MS) was used to monitor the chemical stability of GT3 over time, the particle size and ζ potential, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to study the physical stability of the nanoemulsion. Radioprotective and toxicity studies were performed in mice. The liquid formulation exhibited GT3 degradation at all storage temperatures. Lyophilization, in the presence of lactose, significantly reduced GT3 degradation. Both the liquid and lyophilized nanoemulsions had stable particle size and ζ potential when stored at 4 °C. Toxicity studies of the nanoemulsion resulted in no observable toxicity in mice at an oral dose of 600 mg/kg GT3. The nano-formulated GT3 (300 mg/kg) demonstrated enhanced survival efficacy compared to GT3 alone (200 and 400 mg/kg) in CD2F1 mice exposed to total body gamma radiation. The optimal long-term storage of formulated GT3 is as a powder at −20 °C to preserve drug and formulation integrity. Formulation of GT3 as a nanoemulsion for oral delivery as a prophylactic radioprotectant shows promise and warrants further investigation. PMID:28029115

  3. Development of Orally Administered γ-Tocotrienol (GT3) Nanoemulsion for Radioprotection.

    PubMed

    Ledet, Grace A; Biswas, Shukla; Kumar, Vidya P; Graves, Richard A; Mitchner, Demaurian M; Parker, Taylor M; Bostanian, Levon A; Ghosh, Sanchita P; Mandal, Tarun K

    2016-12-24

    The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to formulate γ-tocotrienol (GT3) in a nanoemulsion formulation as a prophylactic orally administered radioprotective agent; and (2) to optimize the storage conditions to preserve the structural integrity of both the formulation and the compound. γ-tocotrienol was incorporated into a nanoemulsion and lyophilized with lactose. Ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (UPLC-MS) was used to monitor the chemical stability of GT3 over time, the particle size and ζ potential, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to study the physical stability of the nanoemulsion. Radioprotective and toxicity studies were performed in mice. The liquid formulation exhibited GT3 degradation at all storage temperatures. Lyophilization, in the presence of lactose, significantly reduced GT3 degradation. Both the liquid and lyophilized nanoemulsions had stable particle size and ζ potential when stored at 4 °C. Toxicity studies of the nanoemulsion resulted in no observable toxicity in mice at an oral dose of 600 mg/kg GT3. The nano-formulated GT3 (300 mg/kg) demonstrated enhanced survival efficacy compared to GT3 alone (200 and 400 mg/kg) in CD2F1 mice exposed to total body gamma radiation. The optimal long-term storage of formulated GT3 is as a powder at -20 °C to preserve drug and formulation integrity. Formulation of GT3 as a nanoemulsion for oral delivery as a prophylactic radioprotectant shows promise and warrants further investigation.

  4. Intestinal absorption and biological effects of orally administered amorphous silica particles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although amorphous silica nanoparticles are widely used in the production of food products (e.g., as anticaking agents), there is little information available about their absorption and biological effects after oral exposure. Here, we examined the in vitro intestinal absorption and in vivo biological effects in mice of orally administered amorphous silica particles with diameters of 70, 300, and 1,000 nm (nSP70, mSP300, and mSP1000, respectively) and of nSP70 that had been surface-modified with carboxyl or amine groups (nSP70-C and nSP70-N, respectively). Analysis of intestinal absorption by means of the everted gut sac method combined with an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer showed that the intestinal absorption of nSP70-C was significantly greater than that of nSP70. The absorption of nSP70-N tended to be greater than that of nSP70; however, the results were not statistically significant. Our results indicate that silica nanoparticles can be absorbed through the intestine and that particle diameter and surface properties are major determinants of the degree of absorption. We also examined the biological effects of the silica particles after 28-day oral exposure in mice. Hematological, histopathological, and biochemical analyses showed no significant differences between control mice and mice treated with the silica particles, suggesting that the silica nanoparticles evaluated in this study are safe for use in food production. PMID:25288919

  5. The effects of the oral administration of fish oil concentrate on the release and the metabolism of (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid and (/sup 14/C)eicosapentaenoic acid by human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, A.; Terano, T.; Hamazaki, T.; Sajiki, J.; Kondo, S.; Ozawa, A.; Fujita, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Tamura, Y.; Kumagai, A.

    1982-11-01

    It has been suggested by several investigators that eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5 omega 3, EPA) might have anti-thrombotic effects. In this experiment, the effect of the oral administration of EPA rich fish oil concentrate on platelet aggregation and the release and the metabolism of (/sup 1 -14/C)arachidonic acid and ((U)-/sup 14/C)eicosapentaenoic acid by human platelets was studied. Eight healthy male subjects ingested 18 capsules of fish oil concentrate (EPA 1.4 g) per day for 4 weeks. Plasma and platelet concentrations of EPA markedly increased, while those of arachidonic acid (C20:4 omega 6, AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6 omega 3, DHA) did not change. Platelet aggregation induced by collagen and ADP was reduced. Collagen induced (/sup 14/C)thromboxane B2 (TXB2) formation from (/sup 14/C)AA prelabeled platelets decreased. There was no detectable formation of (/sup 14/C)TXB3 from (/sup 14/C)EPA prelabeled platelets, and the conversion of exogenous (/sup 14/C)EPA to (/sup 14/C)TXB3 was lower than that of (/sup 14/C)AA to (/sup 14/C)TXB2. The release of (/sup 14/C)AA from (/sup 14/C)AA prelabeled platelets by collagen was significantly decreased. These observations raise the possibility that the release of arachidonic acid from platelet lipids might be affected by the alteration of EPA content in platelets.

  6. Differential effects of orally versus parenterally administered qinghaosu derivative artemether in dogs.

    PubMed

    Classen, W; Altmann, B; Gretener, P; Souppart, C; Skelton-Stroud, P; Krinke, G

    1999-11-01

    Artemether (AM) is an antimalarial drug derived from artemisinin (Qinghaosu), an extract of the herb Artemisia annua L., sweet wormwood. Its antiparasitic effect is that of a schizontocide and is explained by rapid uptake by parasitized erythrocytes and interaction with a component of hemoglobin degradation resulting in formation of free radicals. It has been shown to exhibit a high clinical cure rate. Previous animal safety studies with Qinghaosu derivatives revealed dose-dependent neurotoxicity with movement disturbances and neuropathic changes in the hindbrain of intramuscularly treated dogs, rats and monkeys. Such effects have not been seen in man. The objective of our present studies was to compare the effects of high levels of AM administered to dogs p.o. versus i.m. In a pilot study 20 mg/kg/day of AM was given i.m. to groups of 3 male Beagle dogs for 5 and 30 days, respectively. Clinical signs of neurotoxicity were noted in some individual dogs from test day 23 on. One dog had to be sacrificed pre-term. Hematologic findings indicated a hypochromic, microcytic anemia. Microscopic examination demonstrated neuropathic changes only at 30 days, but not at 5 days. The animals had neuronal and secondary axonal damage, most prominent in the cerebellar roof, pontine and vestibular nuclei, and in the raphe/paralemniscal region. The affected neurons showed loss of Nissl substance, cytoplasmic eosinophilia, shrinkage of the nucleus and in advanced stages scavenging by microglia. In a subsequent experiment, AM was administered to groups of 4 male and 4 female dogs, respectively, at 8 daily doses of 0, 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg i.m., or 0, 50, 150 and 600 mg/kg p.o. Neurologic signs were seen at high i.m. doses only. In most animals they were inconspicuous and consisted of reduced activity with convulsions seen in single dogs shortly before death. Neuronal damage occurred in all animals at 40 and 80 mg/kg following i.m. treatment. At 20 mg/kg minimal effects occurred in 5

  7. Barriers to administering non-oral formulations in a paediatric population: A semi-structured interview study.

    PubMed

    Venables, Rebecca; Batchelor, Hannah; Stirling, Heather; Marriott, John

    2016-01-30

    There is a paucity of research exploring barriers to non-oral medicines administration in paediatric patients; however, these undoubtedly influence medicines adherence. Studies conducted with healthcare professionals have identified various issues with the administration and acceptance of non-oral medicines and devices (Venables et al., 2012; Walsh et al., 2015). EMA (2014) guidelines specify that formulation teams should demonstrate 'acceptability' of paediatric formulations when developing pharmaceutical formulations. Semi-structured interviews exploring barriers to administering non-oral medicines were conducted with young persons and the parents/legal guardians of children (0-17 years) with chronic conditions at the University Hospital of Coventry and Warwickshire, UK. 90 children prescribed a total of 148 non-oral medicines were recruited to the study; 88 barriers to administering non-oral medicines were reported. The most commonly reported barriers were: poor acceptance of face mask/difficulties with spacer for inhaled formulations (38% of reports); disliking parenteral/preferring alternative formulations (38% of reports); greasy texture of topical preparations; difficulty with administering an ocular ointment and the large dose volume of a nasal preparation. Formulation teams should consider the use of child-friendly, age-appropriate designs to improve usability and acceptance, thus medicines adherence. These findings should be used to inform future development of non-oral formulations and devices, suitable in terms of safety, efficacy and acceptability to paediatric patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Orally Administered Mucolytic Drug l-Carbocisteine Inhibits Angiogenesis and Tumor Growth in Mice.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Tomohiro; Yokota, Tsubasa; Nakayama, Shiori; Oki, Sayuri; Mutoh, Junpei; Takahashi, Satoru; Sato, Keizo

    2015-09-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels, is essential for the growth and metastasis of tumors. In this study, we found that l-carbocisteine, a widely used expectorant, potently inhibits angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. An in vivo Matrigel plug assay revealed that l-carbocisteine (2.5 mg/kg i.p. twice daily) significantly inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis. l-Carbocisteine also suppressed VEGF-stimulated proliferation, migration, and formation of capillary-like structures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We examined the signaling pathways affected in VEGF-stimulated HUVECs, and found that l-carbocisteine significantly inhibited VEGF-induced phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC) γ, protein kinase C (PKC) μ, and extracellular signal-related kinases (ERK) 1/2, which have been shown to be essential for angiogenesis. However, these inhibitory effects of l-carbocisteine were not observed in the HeLa human cervical cancer cell line. An in vivo study of Colon-26 tumor-bearing mice found that tumor volumes were significantly smaller in mice treated with l-carbocisteine (150 mg/kg administered orally twice daily) in comparison with vehicle-treated mice. However, l-carbocisteine had no direct effect on Colon-26 cell proliferation or ERK activation. Collectively, our results suggest that l-carbocisteine inhibits tumor angiogenesis by suppressing PLCγ/PKC/ERK signaling.

  9. Orally Administered Bifidobacteria as Vehicles for Delivery of Agents to Systemic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Michelle; Morrissey, David; Rajendran, Simon; El Mashad, Shereen M; van Sinderen, Douwe; O'Sullivan, Gerald C; Tangney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Certain bacteria have emerged as biological gene vectors with natural tumor specificity, capable of specifically delivering genes or gene products to the tumor environment when intravenously (i.v.) administered to rodent models. We show for the first time that oral administration of bacteria to mice resulted in their translocation from the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) with subsequent homing to and replication specifically in tumors. The commensal, nonpathogenic Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 harboring a plasmid expressing lux fed to mice bearing subcutaneous (s.c.) tumors were readily detected specifically in tumors, by live whole-body imaging, at levels similar to i.v. administration. Reporter gene expression was visible for >2 weeks in tumors. Mice remained healthy throughout experiments. Cytokine analyses indicated a significant upregulation of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in the GIT of bifidobacteria-fed mice, which is associated with increases in epithelial permeability. However, B. breve feeding did not increase systemic levels of other commensal bacteria. The presence of tumor was not necessary for translocation to systemic organs to occur. These findings indicate potential for safe and efficient gene-based treatment and/or detection of tumors via ingestion of nonpathogenic bacteria expressing therapeutic or reporter genes. PMID:20389288

  10. Pharmacokinetics of a single, orally administered dose of digoxin in horses.

    PubMed

    Pedersoli, W M; Ravis, W R; Belmonte, A A; McCullers, R M

    1981-08-01

    Digoxin (elixir, 0.022 mg/kg) was administered via stomach tube to healthy horses of mixed breeding and sexes. Serum digoxin concentrations reached a peak (2.21 +/- 0.6 ng/ml) at approximately 1 hour after dosing and had a half-life of 28.8 +/- 10.7 hours. Digoxin kinetics followed a triexponential curve, indicating that at least a 2 compartmental model is required to characterize the serum concentration-time curve after this route of administration. It was calculated that to achieve average serum concentrations of 1.1 ng/ml, an oral dose of 17.4 microgram of digoxin elixir/kg/day and an IV dose of 6.1 microgram of parenteral preparation/kg/day would be required. There was no significant (P greater than 0.05) alteration in base-line serum calcium, potassium, and sodium concentrations and heart rate, P-R interval, and mean arterial blood pressure.

  11. Interpretive accuracy of the disk diffusion method for testing newer orally administered cephalosporins against Morganella morganii.

    PubMed Central

    Biedenbach, D J; Jones, R N; Erwin, M E

    1993-01-01

    Eight newer orally administered cephems (cefdinir, cefetamet, cefixime, cefpodoxime, cefprozil, ceftibuten, cefuroxime, and loracarbef) were tested against 100 clinical strains of Morganella morganii to determine the extent of serious interpretive very major (false-susceptible) errors when current criteria for the disk diffusion test are applied. Agar dilution MICs and disk diffusion tests were performed as recommended by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (Villanova, Pa.) (NCCLS), and the methods were compared by regression analysis using the method of least squares and by error rate bounding. The following results are listed in the order of increasing error rates: cefdinir, loracarbef, and cefprozil, < or = 1% very major error; ceftibuten, 8% minor errors; cefuroxime, 21% minor errors; cefixime, cefpodoxime, and cefetamet, very major errors of 15, 24, and 36%, respectively. M. morganii produces unacceptable rates of test error with cefuroxime, cefixime, cefpodoxime, and cefetamet. The latter two cephalosporins currently have NCCLS table footnote warnings covering the problem observed with this organism. The inclusion of cefuroxime and cefixime in the NCCLS table footnote is strongly recommended. PMID:8253998

  12. Orally administered lactoferrin increases hepatic protein synthesis in formula-fed newborn pigs.

    PubMed

    Burrin, D G; Wang, H; Heath, J; Dudley, M A

    1996-07-01

    Lactoferrin is a polypeptide which is abundant in colostrum; however, its biologic effect in the neonate is unknown. The objective was to determine the potentially anabolic effect of orally administered lactoferrin on visceral organ growth and protein synthesis in newborn pigs. We studied a total of 18 unsuckled newborn pigs from six litters. Three pigs from each litter were randomly assigned to one of three dietary treatment groups (n = 6) and bottle-fed (10 mL/h) formula, formula containing physiologic levels (1 mg/mL) of added bovine lactoferrin (bLF), or colostrum. After 24 h of feeding, we measured visceral organ protein synthesis in vivo using a flooding dose of [3H]phenylalanine. We also measured visceral organ protein and DNA mass, as well as intestinal hydrolase activities and villus morphology. Hepatic protein synthesis in pigs fed either formula containing bLF or colostrum was similar and in both groups was significantly higher than in pigs fed formula. Splenic protein synthesis was not significantly different in pigs fed either formula or formula containing bLF, but was significantly higher in colostrum-fed animals. There were no significant differences in small intestinal growth, protein synthesis, or hydrolase activities between newborn pigs fed formula, formula containing bLF, or colostrum. Our results demonstrate that feeding formula containing physiologic concentrations of added bLF increased hepatic protein synthesis in newborn pigs, suggesting that colostrumborne lactoferrin serves an anabolic function in neonates.

  13. Pharmacokinetic study of orally administered zinc in humans: evidence for an enteral recirculation.

    PubMed

    Nève, J; Hanocq, M; Peretz, A; Abi Khalil, F; Pelen, F; Famaey, J P; Fontaine, J

    1991-01-01

    Starting from the experimental design of the established 'Zinc Tolerance Tests', the absorption and distribution of the essential trace element zinc in humans was investigated in 10 subjects by performing a pharmacokinetic study of the serum zinc profile after oral administration of a pharmacological dose of the metal, i.e. 0.69 mmol (45 mg) zinc as ZnSO4.7 H2O. The adopted experimental conditions include frequent measurements of serum concentrations, a total investigation time of 8 h after ingestion, and a correction of basal zinc levels taking into account the circadian variation. Rebound effects were evidenced in the time versus concentration curves showing a regular recycling of the element in the digestive tract. Estimation of the parameters by an original method allowed us to calculate the characteristics of the cycles. The first one occurred after 1.4 h, before the time needed for appearance of the maximum concentration which was around 2.3 h, and exhibited mean reabsorption of 70% of administered dose. The subsequent ones, maximum 5 during the investigation period, appeared at regular intervals of approximately 1.2 h, with a decrease in the quantity reabsorbed. These observations are consistent with the previously reported endogenous secretion of zinc, a physiological mechanism contributing to zinc homeostasis.

  14. Circadian time-effect of orally administered loratadine on plasma pharmacokinetics in mice.

    PubMed

    Dridi, Dorra; Ben-Attia, Mossadok; Sani, Mamane; Djebli, Nassim; Sauvage, Francois Ludovic; Boughattas, Naceur A

    2008-07-01

    Little is known about the chronopharmacokinetics of loratadine, a long-acting tricyclic antihistamine H(1) widely used in the treatment of allergic diseases. Hence, the pharmacokinetics of loratadine and its major metabolite, desloratadine, were investigated after a 20 mg/kg dose of loratadine had been orally administered to comparable groups of mice (n=33), synchronized for three weeks to 12 h light (rest span)/12 h dark (activity span). The drug was administered at three different circadian times (1, 9, and 17 h after light onset [HALO]). Multiple blood samples were collected over 48 h, and plasma concentrations of loratadine and desloratadine were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. There were no significant differences in T(max) of loratadine and desloratadine between treatment-time different groups. However, the elimination half-life (t1/2) of the parent compound and its metabolite was significantly longer (p<0.01) following administration at 9 HALO (t1/2 loratadine and desloratadine 5.62 and 4.08 h at 9 HALO vs. 4.29 and 2.6 h at 17 HALO vs. 3.26 and 3.27 at 1 HALO). There were relevant (p<0.05) differences in C(max) between the three treated groups for loratadine and desloratadine; 133.05+/-3.55 and 258.07+/-14.45 ng/mL at 9 HALO vs. 104.5+/-2.61 and 188.62+/-7.20 ng/mL at 1 HALO vs. 94.33+/-20 and 187.75+/-10.79 ng/mL at 17 HALO. Drug dosing at 17 HALO resulted in highest loratadine and desloratadine total apparent clearance values: 61.46 and 15.97 L/h/kg, respectively, whereas loratadine and desloratadine clearances (CL) were significantly slower (p<0.05) at the other administration times (loratadine and desloratadine CL was 57.3 and 14.22 L/h/kg at 1 HALO vs. 43.79 and 12.89 L/h/kg at 9 HALO, respectively). The area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of loratadine and desloratadine was significantly (p<0.05) greater following drug administration at 9 HALO (456.75 and 1550.57 (ng/mL) . h, respectively); it was lowest following

  15. Pharmacokinetics of AT-2266 Administered Orally to Mice, Rats, Dogs, and Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shinichi; Kurobe, Nobuyuki; Kashimoto, Shigeki; Ohue, Tomio; Takase, Yoshiyuki; Shimizu, Masanao

    1983-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of AT-2266 (1-ethyl-6-fluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxo-7-(1-piperazinyl)-1,8-naphthyridine- 3-carboxylic acid) were studied in various experimental animals and compared in a number of aspects with those of norfloxacin. Both agents were administered orally. The mean peak plasma levels of AT-2266 in mice, rats, and dogs (given a single dose of 50 mg/kg for mice and rats and 25 mg/kg for dogs) were 2.39, 1.63, and 5.00 μg/ml, respectively, with elimination half-lives of 2.24, 2.81, and 5.76 h. The respective mean plasma levels of norfloxacin at similar dosages were 0.510, 0.410, and 0.700 μg/ml; elimination half-lives were 1.40, 2.35, and 6.06 h. In dogs repeatedly dosed with 25 mg of AT-2266 per kg every 12 h, the mean peak plasma levels after the third and fifth doses were about 1.4 times those after the first dose. The binding rates of AT-2266 and norfloxacin to plasma of mice, rats, and dogs and to human serum ranged from 27.6 to 40.2% and 39.8 to 44.2%, respectively. In rats receiving a single dose of 50 mg/kg, the respective mean peak levels of AT-2266 in plasma, lung, muscle, and kidney were 2.47, 4.60, 5.35, and 33.9 μg/ml or g, whereas those of norfloxacin were 0.234, 0.390, 0.272, and 2.05 μg/ml or g. AT-2266 was widely distributed in tissues of dogs and monkeys after repeated dosage. The respective 24-h recoveries of AT-2266 from urine of mice, rats, and dogs after single doses of 50, 50, and 25 mg/kg were 56.6, 40.5, and 64.1%, and recoveries of norfloxacin at these doses were 4.40, 2.91, and 5.34%. The respective 24-h recoveries of AT-2266 from bile and feces of rats given a single dose of 50 mg/kg were 2.47 and 52.7%. Bioautography of plasma and urine indicated that AT-2266 was metabolized to but a slight degree. The results indicate that AT-2266 is better than norfloxacin in oral absorption and similar to the latter in stability to metabolic inactivation. Images PMID:6226241

  16. Orally administered extract from Prunella vulgaris attenuates spontaneous colitis in mdr1a-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Haarberg, Kelley MK; Wymore Brand, Meghan J; Overstreet, Anne-Marie C; Hauck, Catherine C; Murphy, Patricia A; Hostetter, Jesse M; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E; Wannemuehler, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of a Prunella vulgaris (P. vulgaris) ethanolic extract to attenuate spontaneous typhlocolitis in mdr1a-/- mice. METHODS: Vehicle (5% ethanol) or P. vulgaris ethanolic extract (2.4 mg/d) were administered daily by oral gavage to mdr1a-/- or wild type FVBWT mice from 6 wk of age up to 20 wk of age. Clinical signs of disease were noted by monitoring weight loss. Mice experiencing weight loss in excess of 15% were removed from the study. At the time mice were removed from the study, blood and colon tissue were collected for analyses that included histological evaluation of lesions, inflammatory cytokine levels, and myeloperoxidase activity. RESULTS: Administration of P. vulgaris extracts to mdr1a-/- mice delayed onset of colitis and reduced severity of mucosal inflammation when compared to vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice. Oral administration of the P. vulgaris extract resulted in reduced (P < 0.05) serum levels of IL-10 (4.6 ± 2 vs 19.4 ± 4), CXCL9 (1319.0 ± 277 vs 3901.0 ± 858), and TNFα (9.9 ± 3 vs 14.8 ± 1) as well as reduced gene expression by more than two-fold for Ccl2, Ccl20, Cxcl1, Cxcl9, IL-1α, Mmp10, VCAM-1, ICAM, IL-2, and TNFα in the colonic mucosa of mdr1a-/- mice compared to vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice. Histologically, several microscopic parameters were reduced (P < 0.05) in P. vulgaris-treated mdr1a-/- mice, as was myeloperoxidase activity in the colon (2.49 ± 0.16 vs 3.36 ± 0.06, P < 0.05). The numbers of CD4+ T cells (2031.9 ± 412.1 vs 5054.5 ± 809.5) and germinal center B cells (2749.6 ± 473.7 vs 4934.0 ± 645.9) observed in the cecal tonsils of P. vulgaris-treated mdr1a-/- were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) from vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice. Vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice were found to produce serum antibodies to antigens derived from members of the intestinal microbiota, indicative of severe colitis and a loss of adaptive tolerance to the members of the microbiota. These serum antibodies were greatly

  17. The antihypertensive effect of orally administered nifedipine-loaded nanoparticles in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Il Kim, Young; Fluckiger, Laurence; Hoffman, Maurice; Lartaud-Idjouadiene, Isabelle; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Maincent, Philippe

    1997-01-01

    The therapeutic use of nifedipine is limited by the rapidity of the onset of its action and its short biological half-life. In order to produce a form devoid of these disadvantages we made nanoparticles of nifedipine from three different polymers, poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL), polylactic and glycolic acid (1 : 1) copolymers (PLAGA), and Eudragit RL/RS (Eudragit). Nifedipine in polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG) solution was used as a control.The average diameters of the nanoparticles ranged from 0.12 to 0.21 μm; the encapsulation ratio was 82% to 88%.In spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), the initial rapid fall in systolic arterial blood pressure following oral administration of nifedipine in PEG solution (from 193±3 to 102±2 mmHg) was not seen following administration of the same dose in Eudragit nanoparticles (from 189±2 to 156±2 mmHg); with PCL and PLAGA nanoparticles the initial fall in blood pressure was significantly reduced (nadirs PCL 124±2 and PLAGA 113±2 mmHg). Ten hours following administration, blood pressure in rats administered the nifedipine/PEG preparation had returned to normal (183±3 mmHg) whereas that of animals given nifedipine in nanoparticles (PCL 170±3, PLAGA 168±2, Eudragit 160±3 mmHg) was still significantly reduced.All of the nanoparticle dosage forms decreased Cmax and increased Tmax and the mean residence time (MRT) values. Relative bioavailability was significantly increased with Eudragit nanoparticles compared to the nifedipine/PEG solution.There was an inverse linear correlation between the fall in blood pressure and plasma nifedipine concentration with all preparations.The nanoparticle nifedipine preparations represent sustained release forms with increased bioavailability, a less pronounced initial antihypertensive effect and a long-lasting action. PMID:9031742

  18. Prevention of gastrointestinal iron absorption by chelation from an orally administered premixed deferoxamine/charcoal slurry.

    PubMed

    Gomez, H F; McClafferty, H H; Flory, D; Brent, J; Dart, R C

    1997-11-01

    To investigate the effect of an orally administered premixed slurry of deferoxamine mesylate (DFO) and activated charcoal (AC) on the gastrointestinal (GI) absorption of ferrous sulfate under physiologic conditions. This was a prospective, crossover, controlled human volunteer study. Participants were healthy adult subjects aged 25 to 38 years. Volunteers ingested either 5 mg/kg ferrous sulfate alone, 5 mg/kg ferrous sulfate added to 25 g of 20% (weight/ volume) AC, or 5 mg/kg ferrous sulfate added to a premixed slurry consisting of 8 g of DFO and 25 g of 20% (weight/volume) AC. The same group of volunteers was used in each limb of the study. Serum iron concentrations were measured at baseline and at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, and 24 hours after ingestion for all subjects. Urinary iron was determined over the first 12 hours after ingestion for each limb. The maximum iron concentration (Cmax), the time to maximum iron concentration (Tmax), and the area under the curve (AUC) were compared for all three limbs. The AUC (P = .042) and Cmax (P = .017) were significantly lower in all subjects in the DFO/AC limb compared with the two control limbs. There was no significant difference in the Tmax iron concentration (P = .77). In the ferrous sulfate control limb, female volunteers had a significantly higher mean Cmax (P = .008) and AUC (P = .014) than males. Iron was undetectable in all baseline and 12-hour urine collections. In this model, a premixed 1:3 (weight/weight) DFO/ AC slurry reduced the GI absorption of ferrous sulfate in adult volunteers under physiologic conditions.

  19. Relationship between orally administered dose, surface emission rate for gamma radiation, and urine radioactivity in radioiodine-treated hyperthyroid cats.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Daniel A; Jessen, Carl R; Weichselbaum, Ralph C; Cronk, Daniel E; Anderson, Kari L

    2003-10-01

    To determine the relationship between surface emission rate of gamma radiation and urine concentration of I131 (urine radioactivity) during the period 7 to 21 days after oral or SC administration of I131 to hyperthyroid cats. 47 hyperthyroid cats administered I131 PO and 24 hyperthyroid cats administered I131 SC. A dose of I131 (1.78 to 2.04 X 10(2) MBq [4.8 to 5.5 mCi]) was administered orally. Surface emission at the skin adjacent to the thyroid gland on days 7, 10, 14, 18, and 21 and number of counts/30 s in a urine sample (1 mL, obtained via cystocentesis) on days 7, 14, and 21 after oral administration were measured. Effective half-life (T1/2E) was derived for each point. Surface emission thresholds for maximum urine radioactivity values were established. A dose of I131 (1.48 X 10(2) MBq [4.0 mCi]) was administered SC. Urine radioactivity and surface emission rates for SC administration were compared with values for oral administration. The T1/2E for surface emissions and urine radioactivity progressively increased toward values for physical T1/2 over time. The T1/2E for surface emissions was 2.19 to 4.70 days, and T1/2E for urine radioactivity was 2.16 to 3.67 days. Surface emission rates had a clinically useful threshold relationship to maximum urine concentrations of I131. Surface emission rates for cats administered I131 appeared useful in determining upper limits (threshold) of urine radioactivity and are a valid method to assess the time at which cats can be discharged after I131 administration.

  20. Dietary fats and pharmaceutical lipid excipients increase systemic exposure to orally administered cannabis and cannabis-based medicines

    PubMed Central

    Zgair, Atheer; Wong, Jonathan CM; Lee, Jong Bong; Mistry, Jatin; Sivak, Olena; Wasan, Kishor M; Hennig, Ivo M; Barrett, David A; Constantinescu, Cris S; Fischer, Peter M; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    There has been an escalating interest in the medicinal use of Cannabis sativa in recent years. Cannabis is often administered orally with fat-containing foods, or in lipid-based pharmaceutical preparations. However, the impact of lipids on the exposure of patients to cannabis components has not been explored. Therefore, the aim of this study is to elucidate the effect of oral co-administration of lipids on the exposure to two main active cannabinoids, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). In this study, oral co-administration of lipids enhanced the systemic exposure of rats to THC and CBD by 2.5-fold and 3-fold, respectively, compared to lipid-free formulations. In vitro lipolysis was conducted to explore the effect of lipids on the intestinal solubilisation of cannabinoids. More than 30% of THC and CBD were distributed into micellar fraction following lipolysis, suggesting that at least one-third of the administered dose will be available for absorption following co-administration with lipids. Both cannabinoids showed very high affinity for artificial CM-like particles, as well as for rat and human CM, suggesting high potential for intestinal lymphatic transport. Moreover, comparable affinity of cannabinoids for rat and human CM suggests that similar increased exposure effects may be expected in humans. In conclusion, co-administration of dietary lipids or pharmaceutical lipid excipients has the potential to substantially increase the exposure to orally administered cannabis and cannabis-based medicines. The increase in patient exposure to cannabinoids is of high clinical importance as it could affect the therapeutic effect, but also toxicity, of orally administered cannabis or cannabis-based medicines. PMID:27648135

  1. Dietary fats and pharmaceutical lipid excipients increase systemic exposure to orally administered cannabis and cannabis-based medicines.

    PubMed

    Zgair, Atheer; Wong, Jonathan Cm; Lee, Jong Bong; Mistry, Jatin; Sivak, Olena; Wasan, Kishor M; Hennig, Ivo M; Barrett, David A; Constantinescu, Cris S; Fischer, Peter M; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    There has been an escalating interest in the medicinal use of Cannabis sativa in recent years. Cannabis is often administered orally with fat-containing foods, or in lipid-based pharmaceutical preparations. However, the impact of lipids on the exposure of patients to cannabis components has not been explored. Therefore, the aim of this study is to elucidate the effect of oral co-administration of lipids on the exposure to two main active cannabinoids, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). In this study, oral co-administration of lipids enhanced the systemic exposure of rats to THC and CBD by 2.5-fold and 3-fold, respectively, compared to lipid-free formulations. In vitro lipolysis was conducted to explore the effect of lipids on the intestinal solubilisation of cannabinoids. More than 30% of THC and CBD were distributed into micellar fraction following lipolysis, suggesting that at least one-third of the administered dose will be available for absorption following co-administration with lipids. Both cannabinoids showed very high affinity for artificial CM-like particles, as well as for rat and human CM, suggesting high potential for intestinal lymphatic transport. Moreover, comparable affinity of cannabinoids for rat and human CM suggests that similar increased exposure effects may be expected in humans. In conclusion, co-administration of dietary lipids or pharmaceutical lipid excipients has the potential to substantially increase the exposure to orally administered cannabis and cannabis-based medicines. The increase in patient exposure to cannabinoids is of high clinical importance as it could affect the therapeutic effect, but also toxicity, of orally administered cannabis or cannabis-based medicines.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of orally administered terbinafine in African penguins (Spheniscus demersus) for potential treatment of aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Bechert, Ursula; Christensen, J Mark; Poppenga, Robert; Le, Hang; Wyatt, Jeff; Schmitt, Todd

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of orally administered terbinafine hydrochloride based on 3, 7, and 15 mg/kg single- as well as multiple-dosage trials in order to calculate dosing requirements for potential treatment of aspergillosis in African penguins (Spheniscus demersus). Ten adult African penguins were used in each of these trials, with a 2-wk washout period between trials. Mean plasma concentrations of terbinafine peaked in approximately 4 hrs at 0.11 +/- 0.017 microg/ml (mean +/- SD) following administration of 3 mg/kg terbinafine, while 7 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg dosages resulted in peak plasma concentrations of 0.37 +/- 0.105 and 0.33 +/- 0.054 microg/ml, respectively. The volume of distribution increased with increasing dosages, being 37 +/- 28.5, 40 +/- 28.1, and 52 +/- 18.6 mg/L for 3, 7, and 15 mg/kg doses, respectively. The mean half-life was biphasic with initial terminal half-life (t(1/2)) values of 9.9 +/- 4.5, 17.2 +/- 4.9 and 16.9 +/- 5.4 hrs, for 3, 7, and 15 mg/kg doses, respectively. A rapid first elimination phase was followed by a slower second phase, and final elimination was estimated to be 136 +/- 9.7 and 131 +/- 9.9 hrs, for 7 and 15 mg/kg doses, respectively. Linearity was demonstrated for area under the curve but not for peak plasma concentrations for the three dosages used. Calculations based on pharmacokinetic parameter values indicate that a 15 mg/kg terbinafine q24h dosage regimen would result in steady-state trough plasma concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentration (0.8-1.6 microg/ ml), and this dosage is recommended as a potential treatment option for aspergillosis in penguins. However, additional research is required to determine both treatment efficacy and safety.

  3. Multiple-Dose Pharmacokinetics and Tolerability of Gemifloxacin Administered Orally to Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Ann; Bygate, Elizabeth; Vousden, Marika; Oliver, Stuart; Johnson, Martin; Ward, Christopher; Cheon, Ae-Jin; Choo, Youn Sung; Kim, In-Chull

    2001-01-01

    Gemifloxacin mesylate (SB-265805-S, LB-20304a) is a potent, novel fluoroquinolone agent with a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. The pharmacokinetics and tolerability of oral gemifloxacin were characterized in two parallel group studies in healthy male volunteers after doses of 160, 320, 480, and 640 mg once daily for 7 days. Multiple serum or plasma and urine samples were collected on days 1 and 7 and were analyzed for gemifloxacin by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)–fluorescence (study 1) or HPLC-mass spectrometry (study 2). Safety assessments included vital signs, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) readings, hematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, and adverse experience monitoring. Gemifloxacin was rapidly absorbed, with a time to maximum concentration of approximately 1 h after dosing followed by a biexponential decline in concentration. Generally, maximum concentration and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) increased linearly with dose after either single or repeat doses. Mean ± standard deviation values of AUC0–τ on day 7 were 4.92 ± 1.08, 9.06 ± 2.20, 12.2 ± 3.69, and 20.1 ± 3.67 μg·h/ml following 160-, 320-, 480-, and 640-mg doses, respectively. The terminal-phase half-life was approximately 7 to 8 h, independent of dose, and was similar following single and repeated administrations. There was minimal accumulation of gemifloxacin after multiple dosing. Approximately 20 to 30% of the administered dose was excreted unchanged in the urine. The renal clearance was 160 ml/min on average after single and multiple doses, which was slightly greater than the accepted glomerular filtration rate (approximately 120 ml/min). These data show that the pharmacokinetics of gemifloxacin are linear and independent of dose. Gemifloxacin was generally well tolerated, although one subject was withdrawn from the study after 6 days at 640 mg for mild, transient elevations of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase not

  4. Treatment of human contamination with plutonium and americium: would orally administered Ca- or Zn-DTPA be effective?

    PubMed

    Taylor, David M; Hodgson, Susan A; Stradling, Neil

    2007-01-01

    Accidental or deliberate dispersion of plutonium (Pu) and americium (Am) into the public environment could contaminate large numbers of people by inhalation. If measures to reduce the internal dose are considered appropriate, oral administration of either calcium (Ca) or zinc (Zn) diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) would be the simplest treatment. Published experimental data from rats on the effects of oral DTPA on the retention of inhaled Pu and Am show that: (1) orally administered Zn-DTPA is as effective as repeated intravenous injection for the decorporation of Pu and Am inhaled as nitrates, although higher dosages are required; (2) oral Zn-DTPA appears to be an effective treatment for Am dioxide but not Pu dioxide; (3) maximum decorporation of Pu, by oral or intravenous administration, requires a large molar excess of Zn-DTPA over Pu (>1 x 10(6)); (4) neither oral nor injected Zn-DTPA are likely to be effective for Pu oxides, nor when Pu and Am nitrates are mixed with other dusts. It is concluded that oral administration of a simple aqueous solution of Zn-DTPA could be an important treatment in accident or emergency scenarios after intake of pure chemical forms of Pu and Am, which are highly or moderately soluble in biological fluids. However, more research is needed on the efficacy of treatment when these forms are mixed with other materials. Importantly, studies designed to increase the efficiency of uptake of DTPA from the gastrointestinal tract could appreciably reduce the dosage.

  5. Penetration of topical, oral, and combined administered ofloxacin into the subretinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Cekic, O.; Batman, C.; Yasar, U.; Totan, Y.; Basci, N.; Bozkurt, A.; Zilelioglu, O.; Kayaalp, S

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—To assess the subretinal fluid (SRF) levels of ofloxacin following topical, oral or combined administration.
METHODS—31 patients undergoing conventional retinal reattachment surgery were randomly assigned to three groups. Nine patients received topical ofloxacin, 11 patients received oral ofloxacin, and the other 11 patients received combined administration. Collected SRF samples were analysed for drug level by using high performance liquid chromatography.
RESULTS—SRF drug levels after oral and combined administration were significantly higher than that after topical administration (p=0.0002 and p=0.0002, respectively) while there was no significant difference between oral and combined administration (p=0.0844).
CONCLUSIONS—Ocular bioavailability of ofloxacin in SRF after oral and combined administration is equivalent. The addition of oral ofloxacin to topical therapy increased drug SRF penetration sixfold.

 PMID:10502583

  6. Different cardiovascular protective effects of quercetin administered orally or intraperitoneally in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Galindo, P; González-Manzano, S; Zarzuelo, M J; Gómez-Guzmán, M; Quintela, A M; González-Paramás, A; Santos-Buelga, C; Pérez-Vizcaíno, F; Duarte, J; Jiménez, R

    2012-06-01

    We tested whether the administration procedure of quercetin affects its metabolite profile and antihypertensive activity. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were randomly assigned to four experimental treatments: (1) 1 mL of 1% methylcellulose by oral gavage and 2% DMSO i.p. (control group); (2) 10 mg kg⁻¹ quercetin by oral gavage once daily and 2% DMSO i.p.; (3) 10 mg kg⁻¹ quercetin by oral gavage divided in two daily doses (5 + 5 at 12 h intervals) and 2% DMSO i.p.; (4) 1 mL of 1% methylcellulose by oral gavage and 10 mg kg⁻¹ quercetin i.p. injection. Rats were treated daily for 5 weeks. Single dose and two daily doses, in a long-term oral treatment were equally efficient, both restoring the impaired aortic endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and reducing mesenteric contractile response to phenylephrine, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and heart and kidney hypertrophy. Attenuation of vascular NADPH oxidase-driven O₂⁻ production was also found in orally treated rats. Intraperitoneal administration reduced, to lesser extent than oral administration, the increased systolic blood pressure, being without effect to the endothelial dysfunction and vascular oxidative stress. In contrast, greater levels of metabolites were quantified following intraperitoneal compared to oral administration at any time point, except for higher plasma methylated quercetin aglycone in oral as compared to intraperitoneal administration at 2 but not at 8 h. In conclusion, oral quercetin was superior to intraperitoneal administration for the protection from cardiovascular complications in SHR. No differences were found between the oral administration as a single daily dose or divided into two daily doses.

  7. Orally administered oleoylethanolamide protects mice from focal cerebral ischemic injury by activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Yang, Lichao; Ma, Ang; Zhang, Xuemei; Li, Weijie; Yang, Wushuang; Chen, Caixia; Jin, Xin

    2012-08-01

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is a high-affinity agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) which may act as an endogenous neuroprotective factor. However, it is not clear whether orally administered OEA is effective against ischemic brain injury. In our study, transient focal cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion for 90 min followed by reperfusion. To evaluate its preventive effects, OEA (10, 20 or 40 mg/kg, ig) was administered for 3 days before ischemia. To evaluate its therapeutic effects, OEA (40 mg/kg, ig) was administered at 0.5 or 1h before reperfusion or at 0 or 1h after reperfusion. In some experiments, the PPARα antagonist MK886 (10mg/kg, ig) was administered 0.5h before OEA. Neurological deficit score, infarct volume and brain edema degree were determined at 24h after reperfusion. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption was evaluated by Evans blue (EB) leakage at 6h after reperfusion. Real-time RT-PCR and western blot were performed to detect PPARα mRNA and protein expression. Oral OEA pretreatment improved neurological dysfunction reduced infarct volume and alleviated brain edema in a dose-dependent manner; the most effective dose was 40 mg/kg. The therapeutic time is within 1h after reperfusion. OEA also increased PPARα mRNA and protein expression in the ischemic brain. The PPARα antagonist MK886 abolished the protective effects of OEA. In conclusion, our results indicate that orally administered OEA protects against acute cerebral ischemic injury in mice, at least in part by activating PPARα. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Subretinal fluid levels of topical, oral, and combined administered ciprofloxacin in humans

    PubMed Central

    Cekic, O.; Batman, C.; Yasar, U.; Basci, N.; Zilelioglu, O.; Bozkurt, A.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To investigate the subretinal fluid (SRF) penetration of ciprofloxacin following topical, oral, and combined administration.
METHODS—34 patients undergoing conventional retinal reattachment surgery were randomly assigned to three groups. Twelve patients received topical ciprofloxacin, 11 patients received oral ciprofloxacin, and the other 11 patients received combined drug administration. SRF drug level was measured by using high performance liquid chromatography method.
RESULTS—The highest drug concentrations of all tested modes were attained following combined administration and lowest following topical administration (p <0.001). The SRF drug concentration following oral administration was also significantly higher than that of topical administration (p <0.001). Concentrations after oral and combined administration did not differ significantly (p = 0.217).
CONCLUSIONS—Topical ciprofloxacin can penetrate SRF. Ocular bioavailability of ciprofloxacin in SRF after oral and combined administration is equivalent.

 PMID:10966968

  9. Antitumor activity of orally administered maitake α-glucan by stimulating antitumor immune response in murine tumor

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Yuki; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Akihiro; Naito, Kenta; Konishi, Morichika

    2017-01-01

    Maitake α-glucan, YM-2A, isolated from Grifola frondosa, has been characterized as a highly α-1,6-branched α-1,4 glucan. YM-2A has been shown to possess an anti-virus effect in mice; however, it does not directly inhibit growth of the virus in vitro, indicating that the anti-virus effect of YM-2A might be associated with modulation of the host immune system. In this study, we found that oral administration of YM-2A could inhibit tumor growth and improve survival rate in two distinct mouse models of colon-26 carcinoma and B16 melanoma. Orally administered YM-2A enhanced antitumor immune response by increasing INF-γ-expressing CD4+ and CD8+ cells in the spleen and INF-γ-expressing CD8+ cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes. In vitro study showed that YM-2A directly activated splenic CD11b+ myeloid cells, peritoneal macrophages and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, but did not affect splenic CD11b- lymphocytes or colon-26 tumor cells. YM-2A is more slowly digested by pancreatic α-amylase than are amylopectin and rabbit liver glycogen, and orally administered YM-2A enhanced the expression of MHC class II and CD86 on dendritic cells and the expression of MHC class II on macrophages in Peyer’s patches. Furthermore, in vitro stimulation of YM-2A increased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in Peyer’s patch CD11c+ cells. These results suggest that orally administered YM-2A can activate dendritic cells and macrophages in Peyer’s patches, inducing systemic antitumor T-cell response. Thus, YM-2A might be a candidate for an oral therapeutic agent in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:28278221

  10. Recent advances in orally administered cell-specific nanotherapeutics for inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Si, Xiao-Ying; Merlin, Didier; Xiao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic relapsing disease in gastrointestinal tract. Conventional medications lack the efficacy to offer complete remission in IBD therapy, and usually associate with serious side effects. Recent studies indicated that nanoparticle-based nanotherapeutics may offer precise and safe alternative to conventional medications via enhanced targeting, sustained drug release, and decreased adverse effects. Here, we reviewed orally cell-specific nanotherapeutics developed in recent years. In addition, the various obstacles for oral drug delivery are also reviewed in this manuscript. Orally administrated cell-specific nanotherapeutics is expected to become a novel therapeutic approach for IBD treatment. PMID:27678353

  11. High-dose intravenously administered iron versus orally administered iron in blood donors with iron deficiency: study protocol for a randomised, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Macher, Susanne; Drexler, Camilla; Lindenau, Ines; Sareban, Nazanin; Schlenke, Peter; Amrein, Karin

    2016-10-28

    About 2-3 % of the population participates in blood donation programmes. Each whole blood donation or ten apheresis donations cause a loss of 200-250 mg of iron. As a result, one of the most common risks of regular blood donors is iron deficiency. Although this has been known for decades, in most countries, iron status is currently not assessed or treated in this population. Premenopausal women are particularly affected, as they have lower iron reserves and higher daily requirements. Besides anaemia, iron deficiency may lead to fatigue and impaired cognitive and physical performance. Current iron preparations for intravenous administration are well tolerated and allow for application of large doses up to 1 g in one visit. Our hypothesis is that in blood donors with iron deficiency, intravenously administered iron is more efficient and as safe as oral iron supplementation. Since anaemia is one of the most frequent reasons for permanent or intermittent donor deferral, maintaining an iron-replete donor pool may help to prevent shortages in blood supply and to avoid iron deficiency-related comorbidities. In this randomised clinical trial we include male and female blood donors aged ≥18 and ≤65 years with a ferritin value of ≤30 ng/ml. Stratified by gender, participants are randomized with a web-based randomisation tool in a 1:1 ratio to either 1 g of intravenously administered ferric carboxymaltose or 10 g of iron fumarate supplements at one to two daily doses of 100 mg each. Eight to 12 weeks after the first visit, iron status, blood count and symptoms are assessed in both groups. The primary endpoint is the difference in transferrin saturation (%) following the intervention between both groups. Secondary endpoints include other parameters of iron metabolism and red blood cell count, the number of patients with drug-related adverse events, and subjective symptoms including those of the restless legs syndrome, quality of life, and fatigue. Iron

  12. Effectiveness and safety of orally administered immunotherapy for food allergies: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Devereux, Graham; Worth, Allison; Healy, Laura; Sheikh, Aziz

    2014-01-14

    The aim of using oral and sublingual immunotherapy with food allergies is to enable the safe consumption of foods containing these allergens in patients with food allergies. In the present study, a systematic review of intervention studies was undertaken; this involved the searching of eleven international databases for controlled clinical trials. We identified 1152 potentially relevant papers, from which we selected twenty-two reports of twenty-one eligible trials (i.e. eighteen randomised controlled trials and three controlled clinical trials). The meta-analysis revealed a substantially lower risk of reactions to the relevant food allergen in those receiving orally administered immunotherapy (risk ratios (RR) 0·21, 95 % CI 0·12, 0·38). The meta-analysis of immunological data demonstrated that skin prick test responses to the relevant food allergen significantly decreased with immunotherapy (mean difference - 2·96 mm, 95 % CI - 4·48, - 1·45), while allergen-specific IgG4 levels increased by an average of 19·9 (95 % CI 17·1, 22·6) μg/ml. Sensitivity analyses excluding studies at the highest risk of bias and subgroup analyses in relation to specific food allergens and treatment approaches generated comparable summary estimates of effectiveness and immunological changes. Pooling of the safety data revealed an increased risk of local (i.e. minor oropharyngeal/gastrointestinal) adverse reactions with immunotherapy (RR 1·47, 95 % CI 1·11, 1·95); there was a non-significant increased average risk of systemic adverse reactions with immunotherapy (RR 1·08, 95 % CI 0·97, 1·19). There is strong evidence that orally administered immunotherapy can induce immunomodulatory changes and thereby promote desensitisation to a range of foods. However, given the paucity of evidence on longer-term safety, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, orally administered immunotherapy should not be used outside experimental conditions presently.

  13. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the injectable formulation of methadone hydrochloride and methadone in lipid nanocarriers administered orally to horses.

    PubMed

    Crosignani, N; Luna, S P; Dalla Costa, T; Pimenta, E L; Detoni, C B; Guterres, S S; Puoli Filho, J N; Pantoja, J C; Pigatto, M C

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the thermal, electrical and mechanical antinociceptive and physiological effects (heart rate, respiratory rate, arterial blood pressure, head height and abdominal auscultation score), and pharmacokinetics, of 0.5 mg/kg of the injectable formulation (ORAL) or nanoparticulated methadone (NANO) given orally, in six adult mares, using a crossover, blind and prospective design. Repeated-measure models were used to compare parametric data between and within treatments, followed by Tukey's test. Nonparametric data were analysed with Wilcoxon signed-rank, adjusted by Bonferroni tests. Blood samples were also collected up to 6 h after dosing for plasma drug quantification by LC-MS/MS. Methadone pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by noncompartmental and compartmental approaches. There were no differences in pharmacodynamic parameters. No statistical differences were observed in the pharmacokinetic parameters from noncompartmental analysis for both groups, except a significant decrease in peak plasma concentration, increase in apparent volume of distribution per fraction absorbed (Vdss /F) and increased mean residence time (MRT) for NANO. One-compartment open model with first order elimination best described the pharmacokinetic profiles for both groups. Neither ORAL nor NANO administered orally to horses produced antinociception. The nanoencapsulated formulation of methadone given orally to horses did not improve methadone pharmacokinetic parameters or increased systemic body exposure to methadone. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Esomeprazole administered through a nasogastric tube provides bioavailability similar to oral dosing.

    PubMed

    Sostek, M B; Chen, Y; Skammer, W; Winter, H; Zhao, J; Andersson, T

    2003-09-15

    To determine if nasogastric tube administration of the enteric-coated pellets from an opened esomeprazole capsule provides bioavailability similar to oral dosing with the intact capsule. A randomized, single-centre, open-label, two-period crossover pharmacokinetic study consisting of two 5-day dosing periods separated by a 7- to 14-day washout period was conducted. Healthy subjects between the ages of 18 and 50 years received esomeprazole 40 mg once daily either orally as an intact capsule, or as a suspension of the enteric-coated pellets from an opened capsule in water through a nasogastric tube. In 47 evaluable subjects, the 90% confidence intervals were 0.87-1.08 and 0.93-1.25 for the geometric mean of the ratio of nasogastric tube administration relative to administration of the intact capsule for the area under the plasma concentration-time curve and for maximum plasma concentration, respectively, on day 1, demonstrating bioequivalence. Oral and nasogastric administration also demonstrated similar bioavailabilities on day 5. Esomeprazole was well tolerated regardless of the mode of administration. Nasogastric tube administration of the enteric-coated pellets from an opened esomeprazole 40 mg capsule provides bioavailability similar to oral dosing. Administration of the contents of an opened esomeprazole 40 mg capsule in water through a nasogastric tube is a practical alternative for patients with feeding tubes who require effective gastric acid suppression, but cannot swallow an oral preparation.

  15. Orally Administered Enoxaparin Ameliorates Acute Colitis by Reducing Macrophage-Associated Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lean, Qi Ying; Eri, Rajaraman D.; Randall-Demllo, Sarron; Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh; Stewart, Niall; Peterson, Gregory M.; Gueven, Nuri; Patel, Rahul P.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases, such as ulcerative colitis, cause significant morbidity and decreased quality of life. The currently available treatments are not effective in all patients, can be expensive and have potential to cause severe side effects. This prompts the need for new treatment modalities. Enoxaparin, a widely used antithrombotic agent, is reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties and therefore we evaluated its therapeutic potential in a mouse model of colitis. Acute colitis was induced in male C57BL/6 mice by administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Mice were treated once daily with enoxaparin via oral or intraperitoneal administration and monitored for colitis activities. On termination (day 8), colons were collected for macroscopic evaluation and cytokine measurement, and processed for histology and immunohistochemistry. Oral but not intraperitoneal administration of enoxaparin significantly ameliorated DSS-induced colitis. Oral enoxaparin-treated mice retained their body weight and displayed less diarrhea and fecal blood loss compared to the untreated colitis group. Colon weight in enoxaparin-treated mice was significantly lower, indicating reduced inflammation and edema. Histological examination of untreated colitis mice showed a massive loss of crypt architecture and goblet cells, infiltration of immune cells and the presence of edema, while all aspects of this pathology were alleviated by oral enoxaparin. Reduced number of macrophages in the colon of oral enoxaparin-treated mice was accompanied by decreased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Oral enoxaparin significantly reduces the inflammatory pathology associated with DSS-induced colitis in mice and could therefore represent a novel therapeutic option for the management of ulcerative colitis. PMID:26218284

  16. Improved anticoagulant effect of fucosylated chondroitin sulfate orally administered as gastro-resistant tablets.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Roberto J C; Sucupira, Isabela D; Oliveira, Stephan Nicollas M C G; Santos, Gustavo R C; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2017-04-03

    Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FucCS) is a potent anticoagulant polysaccharide extracted from sea cucumber. Its anticoagulant activity is attributed to the presence of unique branches of sulfated fucose. Although this glycosaminoglycan exerts an antithrombotic effect following oral administration, high doses are necessary to achieve the maximum effect. The diminished activity of FucCS following oral administration is likely due to its degradation in the gastrointestinal tract and its limited ability to cross the intestinal cell membranes. The latter aspect is particularly difficult to overcome. However, gastro-resistant tablet formulation may help limit the degradation of FucCS in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present work, we found that the oral administration of FucCS as gastro-resistant tablets produces a more potent and prolonged anticoagulant effect compared with its administration as an aqueous solution, with no significant changes in the bleeding tendency or arterial blood pressure. Experiments using animal models of arterial thrombosis initiated by endothelial injury demonstrated that FucCS delivered as gastro-protective tablets produced a potent antithrombotic effect, whereas its aqueous solution was ineffective. However, there was no significant difference between the effects of FucCS delivered as gastro-resistant tablets or as aqueous solution in a venous thrombosis model, likely due to the high dose of thromboplastin used. New oral anticoagulants tested in these experimental models for comparison showed significantly increased bleeding tendencies. Our study provides a framework for developing effective oral anticoagulants based on sulfated polysaccharides from marine organisms. The present results suggest that FucCS is a promising oral anticoagulant.

  17. Severe anaphylaxis caused by orally administered vancomycin to a patient with Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Bossé, D; Lemire, C; Ruel, J; Cantin, A M; Ménard, F; Valiquette, L

    2013-04-01

    We report the first case of anaphylaxis to oral vancomycin in a cystic fibrosis patient with severe and relapsing Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) refractory to metronidazole. The patient's colitis has been successfully treated with a combination of intravenous metronidazole and tigecycline.

  18. Bactericidal and sterilizing activities of several orally administered combined regimens against Mycobacterium ulcerans in mice.

    PubMed

    Ji, Baohong; Chauffour, Aurélie; Robert, Jérome; Jarlier, Vincent

    2008-06-01

    Treatment with rifampin-clarithromycin or moxifloxacin-clarithromycin for 8 weeks displayed promising bactericidal activity against Mycobacterium ulcerans in mice; none of the mice treated with rifampin-clarithromycin relapsed, whereas 59% of those treated with moxifloxacin-clarithromycin relapsed after treatment was stopped. The bactericidal and sterilizing activities of the five-times-weekly (5/7) administration of 5 mg of rifapentine/kg of body weight, either alone or in combination, were virtually identical to those of the corresponding regimens with 10 mg of rifampin/kg of body weight; however, because of the long half-life of rifapentine, accumulation of the drug after 5/7 administration is a concern. The bactericidal activity of 20 mg/kg rifapentine in monotherapy or 20 mg/kg rifapentine in combination with 150 mg/kg streptomycin or 200 mg/kg moxifloxacin administered twice weekly was as effective as the corresponding regimens containing 10 mg/kg rifampin administered 5/7, suggesting that Buruli ulcer might be treated with intermittently administered rifapentine-containing combinations.

  19. Digestion, absorption and tissue distribution of ovalbumin and palmitoyl-ovalbumin: impact on immune responses triggered by orally administered antigens.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, F M; Dos Santos, E M; Alves, A C; Campana-Pereira, M A; Ramaldes, G A; Cardoso, V N; Ruiz-de-Souza, V; Gontijo, C M

    2007-02-01

    Previous work in this laboratory has demonstrated that ovalbumin coupled to palmitoyl residues (palmitoyl-Ova) does not induce oral tolerance. The present study sought to determine whether this coupling affects digestion, absorption and transfer of antigen. Ova and palmitoyl-Ova were shown to be digested differently in vitro by proteolytic enzymes and presented different tissue distribution kinetics after being labelled with (99m)technetium and orally administered to animals. Palmitoyl-Ova remained longer in the stomach, while native Ova was quickly transferred to the gut and other organs. After 3 h, higher levels of palmitoyl-Ova were found in the blood, Peyer's patches, mesenteric lymph nodes, liver and, especially, the spleen, which appears to be essential for immunization with palmitoyl-Ova. In fact, splenectomized mice treated orally with palmitoyl-Ova became tolerant, while tolerance to Ova was not affected. Thus, palmitoyl coupling was demonstrated to affect antigen digestion, absorption and transport. This is the first time that the spleen has been shown to be required for oral immunization with palmitoyl-Ova.

  20. Evaluation of toxicity and adjuvant effects of peptidoglycan microspheres orally administered to mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qingshen; Fan, Jiahui; Han, Dequan; Zhang, Jialing; Jiang, Baojiang; Li, Xueru; Li, Xueyang; Song, Yong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, peptidoglycan microspheres were evaluated for their toxicity and adjuvant effects after oral administration to mice. The liver and spleen indexes, CD cell content in peripheral blood and spleen, and immunoglobulin content in peripheral blood were measured by flow cytometry and indirect ELISA, respectively. Peptidoglycan microspheres with a loading capacity of 46.41 ± 0.83 g/100 g were prepared. In vivo tests showed that peptidoglycan microspheres revealed an immuno-enhancing profile as indicated by the slow increase of IgG content in peripheral blood compared with that of the untreated peptidoglycan group. In conclusion, peptidoglycan microspheres may be used as a new oral adjuvant in the host.

  1. Modulation of human humoral immune response through orally administered bovine colostrum.

    PubMed

    He, F; Tuomola, E; Arvilommi, H; Salminen, S

    2001-08-01

    Eighteen healthy volunteers were randomized into two treatment groups and consumed liquid prepackaged bovine colostrum whey and placebo for 7 days. On days 1, 3 and 5, an attenuated Salmonella typhi Ty21a oral vaccine was given to all subjects to mimic an enteropathogenic infection. The circulating antibody secreting cells and the expression of phagocytosis receptors of the subjects before and after oral immunization were measured with the ELISPOT assay and flow cytometry. All subjects responded well to the vaccine. No significant differences were observed in ELISPOT values for IgA, IgG, IgM, Fcgamma and CR receptor expression on neutrophils and monocytes between the two groups. There was a trend towards greater increase in specific IgA among the subjects receiving their vaccine with bovine colostrum. These results suggest that bovine colostrum may possess some potential to enhance human special immune responses.

  2. Hollow quaternized chitosan microspheres increase the therapeutic effect of orally administered insulin.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Ma, Guang-Hui; Wang, Lian-Yan; Wu, Jie; Su, Zhi-Guo

    2010-01-01

    The delivery of insulin by non-parenteral routes has gained significant attention over the last two decades. In the present study, we prepared hollow quaternized chitosan microspheres by the SPG membrane emulsification technique and glutaraldehyde cross-linking method. The structural properties, as well as the uniform size and autofluorescence, enabled us to develop oral delivery of insulin which conserved the bioactivity of the encapsulated insulin, achieving bioadhesion of microspheres, increasing the loading ability and optimizing the release profile. In vivo evaluation also saw an optimal reduction in blood glucose level and powerful therapeutic effects after treatment with the designed microspheres, which further confirmed the feasibility of using hollow quaternized chitosan microspheres as insulin carriers for oral administration.

  3. Efficacy of orally administered salbutamol and theophylline in pre-schoolchildren with asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Groggins, R C; Lenney, W; Milner, A D; Stokes, G M

    1980-01-01

    Oral administration of salbutamol and theophylline has been shown to be effective in relieving bronchoconstriction in asthmatic children aged between 3 and 5 years. Changes in respiratory function were monitored using a Wright's low range peak flow meter and a modification of the forced oscillation technique. A combination of both drugs in half doses was as effective as either alone. Nebulised salbutamol produced considerable further improvement in lung function. PMID:6992715

  4. The Subchronic Toxicity of Diethylene Glycol Monobutyl Ether Administered Orally to Rats.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    Forming Foam (AFFF), a liquid concentrate used in U.S. Navy shipboard fire protection proportioning systems. DGBE also has been used in some household...secondary to passive pulmonary congestion. A final microscopic observation which deserves comment was the presence of increased numbers of "laminated...weights may have been increased due to passive congestion associated with pulmonary lesions. It is concluded that an oral dose of 0.07 g/kg/day (1% of the

  5. Pharmacokinetics of an orally administered methylcellulose formulation of gallium maltolate in neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Chaffin, M K; Fajt, V; Martens, R J; Arnold, C E; Cohen, N D; O'Conor, M; Taylor, R J; Bernstein, L R

    2010-08-01

    Gallium is a trivalent semi-metal with anti-microbial effects because of its incorporation into crucial iron-dependent reproductive enzyme systems. Gallium maltolate (GaM) provides significant gallium bioavailability to people and mice following oral administration and to neonatal foals following intragastric administration. To study the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of GaM against Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in foals, we developed a methylcellulose formulation of GaM (GaM-MCF) for oral administration to neonatal foals. Normal neonatal foals were studied. Six foals received 20 mg/kg and another six foals received 40 mg/kg of GaM-MCF orally. Serial serum samples were collected and serum gallium concentrations were determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Gallium was rapidly absorbed (T(max) of 4 h), and a mean C(max) of 0.90 or 1.8 microg/mL was achieved in foals receiving 20 or 40 mg/kg respectively. Marked variability existed in C(max) among foals: only half of the foals receiving 20 mg/kg attained serum concentrations of >0.7 microg/mL, a level suggested to be therapeutic against R. equi by previous studies. Mean elimination half-life was 32.8 or 32.4 h for foals receiving 20 or 40 mg/kg respectively. The results of this study suggest that at least 30 mg/kg orally every 24 h should be considered in future pharmacodynamic and efficacy studies.

  6. ORAL AND INTRAVENOUSLY ADMINISTERED AMINO ACIDS PRODUCE SIMILAR EFFECTS ON MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS IN THE ELDERLY

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, B.B.; Wolfe, R.R.; Volpi, E.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Muscle protein synthesis is stimulated in the elderly when amino acid availability is increased. OBJECTIVE To determine which mode of delivery of amino acids (intravenous vs. oral ingestion) is more effective in stimulating the rate of muscle protein synthesis in elderly subjects. DESIGN Fourteen elderly subjects were assigned to one of two groups. Following insertion of femoral arterial and venous catheters, subjects were infused with a primed, continuous infusion of L-[ring-2H5] phenylalanine. Blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained to measure muscle protein fractional synthesis rate (FSR) with the precursor-product model, phenylalanine kinetics across the leg with the three-pool model, and whole body phenylalanine kinetics. Protein metabolism parameters were measured in the basal period, and during the administration of oral amino acids (n=8) or a similar amount of intravenous amino acids (n=6). RESULTS Enteral and parenteral amino acid administration increased amino acid arterial concentrations and delivery to the leg to a similar extent in both groups. Muscle protein synthesis as measured by both FSR, and the three-pool model, increased during amino acid administration (P < 0.05 vs. basal) in both groups with no differences between groups. Whole body proteolysis did not change with the oral amino acids whereas it increased slightly during parenteral amino acid administration. CONCLUSIONS Increased amino acid availability stimulates the rate of muscle protein synthesis independent of the route of administration (enteral vs. parenteral). PMID:12459885

  7. Cellular distribution of orally and intramuscularly administered iron dextran in newborn piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Thorén-Tolling, K; Jönsson, L

    1977-01-01

    Histochemical studies were performed on tissues from piglets of different ages treated orally with iron dextran soon after birth. The mucosal cells in the distal region of the small intestine were heavily laden with stainable iron granules during the first three days after the iron administration. The absorptive epithelial cells are desquamated within seven to ten days after birth. Consequently, the number of iron granules gradually diminishes during the first seven days after treatment and no iron granules are demonstrated 12 days after the administration of iron. The iron dextran complex is pinocytosed in newborn piglets and then transported via the lymphatic system. Thus the sinusoidal lining cells of the body and mesenteric lymph nodes are already heavily laden with iron granules 24 hours after oral treatment. This iron store is released only slowing during the first weeks of life. Great amounts of iron granules are demonstrated in the liver and spleen macrophages during the first week after the administration of iron. Due to the rapid utilization of iron in growing piglets these iron stores diminish sharply during the weeks following birth. The distribution of stainable iron in the lymph nodes, liver and spleen seven days after intramuscular injection of iron dextran in newborn piglets was comparable to that for oral administration at that stage of the experiment. Images Fig. 1a-e. Fig. 2a-e. Fig. 3a-d. Fig. 4a-d. Fig. 5a-d. PMID:907907

  8. A rare case of lumbosacral meningioma: nondural attachment and possible enlargement by orally administered sex steroid.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Jun; Fukuoka, Muneyoshi; Tsubouchi, Shunji; Otsuka, Takanobu; Tono, Yuji; Shimizu, Shigeki; Matsui, Nobuo

    2002-08-15

    A case report is presented. To present a very rare case of orally ingested sex hormone pills inducing nondurally attached meningioma in the lumbosacral region. Meningiomas are known to enlarge in response to female sex hormones. At this writing, few cases of nondurally based intradural meningioma have been reported. Moreover, meningiomas in the lumbosacral region are very rare. Spinal meningiomas predominantly arise in the fourth to sixth decades of life and are more common in women. The patient was a 20-year-old woman. She had undergone oral sex steroid therapy for long-term oligomenorrhea. The patient complained of intolerable lumbago and numbness in her buttocks. Nonopioid analgesics did not relieve her pain, and she was unable to walk without the aid of a walker. Radiography disclosed a lumbosacral intradural tumor. Complete removal of the tumor was performed. The tumor was not adherent to the dura, and its appearance was that of a typical neurilemmoma. However, the pathologic diagnosis was meningioma. The tumor in the reported case may have enlarged in response to orally ingested sex steroid pills. Nondural attachment intradural meningiomas are quite uncommon. The gross appearance of the tumor during surgery was typical of neurilemmoma. All the cases reported so far, including the current case, have involved tumor located in the lumbosacral region. Care must be taken in the management of lumbosacral intradural tumors because tumors resembling neurilemmoma may in fact represent meningioma, some subtypes of which possess a high rate of recurrence.

  9. Murine bone marrow IgA responses to orally administered sheep erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Alley, C D; Kiyono, H; McGhee, J R

    1986-06-15

    Specific immunization protocols have been established for the induction of murine bone marrow IgA responses to the T cell-dependent (TD) antigen sheep red blood cells (SRBC). Systemic immunization, either i.p. or i.v., followed by a second injection, induced splenic IgM and IgG responses and a bone marrow IgM response. No significant IgA responses were observed in either lymphoid tissue compartment. Oral immunization with SRBC by gastric intubation for 2 days, followed 1 wk later by an i.p. injection of SRBC resulted in a splenic IgA plaque-forming cell (PFC) response, but did not elicit a bone marrow IgA response. Repeated daily gastric intubation of SRBC to C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mice led to the previously reported pattern of systemic unresponsiveness in C3H/HeN mice and good anamnestic type IgM, IgG, and IgA splenic anti-SRBC PFC responses in the C3H/HeJ strain upon parenteral challenge. Oral administration of SRBC for 14 days to C3H/HeN mice, followed by systemic SRBC challenge, resulted in diminished splenic PFC responses of all isotypes, whereas gastric intubation of SRBC for 28 days led to complete systemic unresponsiveness to antigen in C3H/HeN mice. Interestingly, the repeated oral administration of SRBC resulted in significant bone marrow IgA PFC responses upon i.p. challenge in both C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mouse strains. The bone marrow IgA responses were clearly dependent upon chronic oral exposure to SRBC, because gastric intubation with SRBC for 2 consecutive days/wk for 10 wk also induced bone marrow and splenic IgA anti-SRBC PFC responses in C3H/HeN mice. These results suggest that memory B cells reside in the bone marrow of orally immunized mice and can yield anamnestic-type responses to challenge with the inducing antigen. The memory cells may arise in the Peyer's patches of the gut and migrate to the bone marrow. The possibility that the bone marrow is a component of the common mucosal immune system in mammals is suggested by this study.

  10. Distribution of orally administered trimethoprim and sulfadiazine into noninfected subcutaneous tissue chambers in adult ponies.

    PubMed

    van Duijkeren, E; Ensink, J M; Meijer, L A

    2002-08-01

    The distribution of trimethoprim (TMP) and sulfadiazine (SDZ) into subcutaneously implanted noninfected tissue chambers was studied in healthy adult ponies. Six ponies were given an oral TMP/SDZ paste formulation at a dose of 5 mg/kg TMP and 25 mg/kg SDZ at 12 h intervals for 2 days in order to reach steady-state concentrations. Plasma concentrations and tissue chamber fluid (TCF) concentrations of both drugs were measured at regular intervals during a period commencing 24 h after the last oral administration. The peak concentration of TMP (mean +/- SD) was 2.92 +/- 0.86 microg/mL for plasma and 1.09 +/- 0.25 microg/mL for TCF. For SDZ, the mean peak concentration was 40.20 +/- 14.74 microg/mL for plasma and 23.48 +/- 5.84 microg/mL for TCF. TMP peak concentrations in plasma were reached at 3.17 +/- 03.48 h and those in TCF at 7.33 +/- 03.72 h. SDZ peak concentrations in plasma were reached at 1.83 +/- 02.04 h and those in TCF at 8.00 +/- 03.10 h. Concentrations of TMP and SDZ in TCF remained above the generally accepted breakpoint for susceptibility (0.5/9.5 for the TMP/SDZ combination) for 12 h. Therefore, in ponies oral administration of TMP/SDZ at a dose rate of 30 mg/kg given twice daily in the form of a paste should be appropriate for effective treatment of infections caused by susceptible bacteria.

  11. Viper and cobra venom neutralization by alginate coated multicomponent polyvalent antivenom administered by the oral route.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Sourav; Chakraborty, Mousumi; Mukhopadhyay, Piyasi; Kundu, P P; Mishra, Roshnara

    2014-08-01

    Snake bite causes greater mortality than most of the other neglected tropical diseases. Snake antivenom, although effective in minimizing mortality in developed countries, is not equally so in developing countries due to its poor availability in remote snake infested areas as, and when, required. An alternative approach in this direction could be taken by making orally deliverable polyvalent antivenom formulation, preferably under a globally integrated strategy, for using it as a first aid during transit time from remote trauma sites to hospitals. To address this problem, multiple components of polyvalent antivenom were entrapped in alginate. Structural analysis, scanning electron microscopy, entrapment efficiency, loading capacity, swelling study, in vitro pH sensitive release, acid digestion, mucoadhesive property and venom neutralization were studied in in vitro and in vivo models. Results showed that alginate retained its mucoadhesive, acid protective and pH sensitive swelling property after entrapping antivenom. After pH dependent release from alginate beads, antivenom (ASVS) significantly neutralized phospholipaseA2 activity, hemolysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity and lethality of venom. In ex vivo mice intestinal preparation, ASVS was absorbed significantly through the intestine and it inhibited venom lethality which indicated that all the components of antivenom required for neutralization of venom lethality were retained despite absorption across the intestinal layer. Results from in vivo studies indicated that orally delivered ASVS can significantly neutralize venom effects, depicted by protection against lethality, decreased hemotoxicity and renal toxicity caused by russell viper venom. Alginate was effective in entrapping all the structural components of ASVS, which on release and intestinal absorption effectively reconstituted the function of antivenom in neutralizing viper and cobra venom. Further research in this direction can strategize to

  12. Neurobehavioral and Cardiovascular Effects of Potassium Cyanide Administered Orally to Mice.

    PubMed

    Hawk, Michael A; Ritchie, Glenn D; Henderson, Kim A; Knostman, Katherine A B; Roche, Brian M; Ma, Zhenxu J; Matthews, Claire M; Sabourin, Carol L; Wakayama, Edward J; Sabourin, Patrick J

    2016-09-01

    The Food and Drug Administration Animal Rule requires evaluation of cardiovascular and central nervous system (CNS) effects of new therapeutics. To characterize an adult and juvenile mouse model, neurobehavioral and cardiovascular effects and pathology of a single sublethal but toxic, 8 mg/kg, oral dose of potassium cyanide (KCN) for up to 41 days postdosing were investigated. This study describes the short- and long-term sensory, motor, cognitive, and behavioral changes associated with oral dosing of a sublethal but toxic dose of KCN utilizing functional observation battery and Tier II CNS testing in adult and juvenile mice of both sexes. Selected tissues (histopathology) were evaluated for changes associated with KCN exposure with special attention to brain regions. Telemetry (adult mice only) was used to evaluate cardiovascular and temperature changes. Neurobehavioral capacity, sensorimotor responsivity or spontaneous locomotor activity, and rectal temperature were significantly reduced in adult and juvenile mice at 30 minutes post-8 mg/kg KCN dose. Immediate effects of cyanide included bradycardia, adverse electrocardiogram arrhythmic events, hypotension, and hypothermia with recovery by approximately 1 hour for blood pressure and heart rate effects and by 2 hours for body temperature. Lesions consistent with hypoxia, such as mild acute tubular necrosis in the kidneys corticomedullary junction, were the only histopathological findings and occurred at a very low incidence. The mouse KCN intoxication model indicates rapid and completely reversible effects in adult and juvenile mice following a single oral 8 mg/kg dose. Neurobehavioral and cardiovascular measurements can be used in this animal model as a trigger for treatment.

  13. Viper and Cobra Venom Neutralization by Alginate Coated Multicomponent Polyvalent Antivenom Administered by the Oral Route

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sourav; Chakraborty, Mousumi; Mukhopadhyay, Piyasi; Kundu, P. P.; Mishra, Roshnara

    2014-01-01

    Background Snake bite causes greater mortality than most of the other neglected tropical diseases. Snake antivenom, although effective in minimizing mortality in developed countries, is not equally so in developing countries due to its poor availability in remote snake infested areas as, and when, required. An alternative approach in this direction could be taken by making orally deliverable polyvalent antivenom formulation, preferably under a globally integrated strategy, for using it as a first aid during transit time from remote trauma sites to hospitals. Methodology/Principal Findings To address this problem, multiple components of polyvalent antivenom were entrapped in alginate. Structural analysis, scanning electron microscopy, entrapment efficiency, loading capacity, swelling study, in vitro pH sensitive release, acid digestion, mucoadhesive property and venom neutralization were studied in in vitro and in vivo models. Results showed that alginate retained its mucoadhesive, acid protective and pH sensitive swelling property after entrapping antivenom. After pH dependent release from alginate beads, antivenom (ASVS) significantly neutralized phospholipaseA2 activity, hemolysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity and lethality of venom. In ex vivo mice intestinal preparation, ASVS was absorbed significantly through the intestine and it inhibited venom lethality which indicated that all the components of antivenom required for neutralization of venom lethality were retained despite absorption across the intestinal layer. Results from in vivo studies indicated that orally delivered ASVS can significantly neutralize venom effects, depicted by protection against lethality, decreased hemotoxicity and renal toxicity caused by russell viper venom. Conclusions/Significance Alginate was effective in entrapping all the structural components of ASVS, which on release and intestinal absorption effectively reconstituted the function of antivenom in neutralizing viper and cobra

  14. PHARMACOKINETICS OF ORALLY ADMINISTERED VORICONAZOLE IN AFRICAN PENGUINS (SPHENISCUS DEMERSUS) AFTER SINGLE AND MULTIPLE DOSES.

    PubMed

    Hyatt, Michael W; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Hope, William W; Stott, Katharine E

    2017-06-01

    Aspergillosis is a common respiratory fungal disease in African penguins ( Spheniscus demersus ) under managed care, and treatment failures with itraconazole due to drug resistance are increasingly common, leading to recent use of voriconazole. Empirical dosing with voriconazole based on other avian studies has resulted in adverse clinical drug effects in penguins. The objective of this study was to determine oral voriconazole pharmacokinetics (PK) in African penguins (n = 18). Single and once daily multiple oral doses of 5 mg/kg voriconazole were evaluated with a 4-mo washout period between trials. Plasma voriconazole concentrations were determined via high-performance liquid chromatography. Data was modeled using 3-compartamental population methodologies that supported first-order elimination. Observed mean peak concentration (1.89 μg/ml) after single dosing PK analysis was determined within the first hour following voriconazole administration. In the multiple-dose trial average plasma voriconazole concentrations were significantly higher on days 4 and 7 as compared with day 2. The mean estimates for volume of distribution (V/F) and clearance (Cl/F) for the multiple-dose study were 3.34 L and 0.18 L/hr, respectively. Monte Carlo simulations determined the median area under the curve (AUC0-24) at 84 hr was 37.7 μg·h/ml. As this assessment was comparable with the average AUC in humans receiving the recommended human oral dosage 200 mg b.i.d., it suggests that 5 mg/kg p.o. s.i.d. could be a safe and effective regimen in African penguins for treatment of aspergillosis. However, due to potential drug accumulation and subsequent toxicity, therapeutic drug monitoring with dosage adjustments is recommended to individualize dosing.

  15. Antitumor activity in mice of orally administered polysaccharide from Kefir grain.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, M; Sasaki, K; Murofushi, M; Aibara, K

    1982-04-01

    The antitumor activity of a water-soluble polysaccharide (KGF-C), isolated from the Kefir grain, was studied in the mice subcutaneously inoculated with Ehrlich carcinoma (EC) or Sarcoma 180 (S-180). The growth of EC and S-180 solid tumor was inhibited by 40-59% and 21-81%, respectively, by oral administration of KGF-C as compared with the unadministered mice. The tumor growth was similarly inhibited by intraperitoneal administration. The mechanism of the antitumor activity of KGF-C was considered to be host-mediated because of the lack of direct in vitro effect on tumor cells.

  16. Fate of orally administered 15N-labeled polyamines in rats bearing solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Xu, Yong Ji; Samejima, Keijiro; Goda, Hitomi; Niitsu, Masaru; Takahashi, Masakazu; Hashimoto, Yoshiyuki

    2003-03-01

    We studied absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) in the gastrointestinal tract using (15)N-labeled polyamines as tracers and ionspray ionization mass spectrometry (IS-MS). The relatively simple protocol using rats bearing solid tumors provided useful information. Three (15)N-labeled polyamines that were simultaneously administered were absorbed equally from gastrointestinal tract, and distributed within tissues at various concentrations. The uptake of (15)N-spermidine seemed preferential to that of (15)N-spermine since the concentrations of (15)N-spermidine in the liver and tumors were higher, whereas those of (15)N-spermine were higher in the kidney, probably due to the excretion of excess extracellular spermine. Most of the absorbed (15)N-putrescine seemed to be lost, suggesting blood and tissue diamine oxidase degradation. Concentrations of (15)N-spermidine and (15)N-spermine in the tumor were low. We also describe the findings from two rats that were administered with (15)N-spermine. The tissue concentrations of (15)N-spermine were unusually high, and significant levels of (15)N-spermidine were derived from (15)N-spermine in these animals.

  17. Distribution Analysis via Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Ephedrine in the Lungs of Rats Orally Administered the Japanese Kampo Medicine Maoto.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takashi; Kushida, Hirotaka; Matsushita, Shoko; Oyama, Yoshiyuki; Suda, Takafumi; Watanabe, Junko; Kase, Yoshio; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2017-03-08

    Maoto, a traditional Japanese Kampo medicine, has been used to treat various respiratory diseases, including respiratory infections and influenza. Ephedrine (EPD), the main ingredient in maoto, is also clinically used to treat respiratory diseases. However, the pharmacokinetics and distribution of EPD in the lungs after the administration of maoto have not been demonstrated. This study aimed to determine the concentrations, distribution, and pharmacokinetics of EPD and its precursor methylephedrine (MEPD) in the lungs of rats orally administered maoto (1 and 4 g/kg). We used liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry to measure the ingredient concentrations. Both ingredients were detected in maoto-treated lung homogenates. Next, we examined the distribution of both ingredients in lung sections by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging, a powerful tool for the visualization of the distribution of biological molecules. The mass spectrometry imaging analysis detected only EPD and provided the first visual demonstration that EPD is distributed in the alveoli, bronchi, and bronchioles in the lungs of rats orally administered maoto (4 g/kg, three times at 2-h intervals). These results suggest that the pharmacological efficacy of maoto for the amelioration of respiratory symptoms is related to the distribution of EPD in the lung.

  18. Distribution Analysis via Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Ephedrine in the Lungs of Rats Orally Administered the Japanese Kampo Medicine Maoto

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takashi; Kushida, Hirotaka; Matsushita, Shoko; Oyama, Yoshiyuki; Suda, Takafumi; Watanabe, Junko; Kase, Yoshio; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Maoto, a traditional Japanese Kampo medicine, has been used to treat various respiratory diseases, including respiratory infections and influenza. Ephedrine (EPD), the main ingredient in maoto, is also clinically used to treat respiratory diseases. However, the pharmacokinetics and distribution of EPD in the lungs after the administration of maoto have not been demonstrated. This study aimed to determine the concentrations, distribution, and pharmacokinetics of EPD and its precursor methylephedrine (MEPD) in the lungs of rats orally administered maoto (1 and 4 g/kg). We used liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry to measure the ingredient concentrations. Both ingredients were detected in maoto-treated lung homogenates. Next, we examined the distribution of both ingredients in lung sections by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging, a powerful tool for the visualization of the distribution of biological molecules. The mass spectrometry imaging analysis detected only EPD and provided the first visual demonstration that EPD is distributed in the alveoli, bronchi, and bronchioles in the lungs of rats orally administered maoto (4 g/kg, three times at 2-h intervals). These results suggest that the pharmacological efficacy of maoto for the amelioration of respiratory symptoms is related to the distribution of EPD in the lung. PMID:28272490

  19. Pharmacokinetics of intravenously and orally administered sotalol hydrochloride in horses and effects on surface electrocardiogram and left ventricular systolic function.

    PubMed

    Broux, B; De Clercq, D; Decloedt, A; De Baere, S; Devreese, M; Van Der Vekens, N; Ven, S; Croubels, S; van Loon, G

    2016-02-01

    Arrhythmias are common in horses. Some, such as frequent atrial or ventricular premature beats, may require long-term anti-arrhythmic therapy. In humans and small animals, sotalol hydrochloride (STL) is often used for chronic oral anti-arrhythmic therapy. STL prolongs repolarization and the effective refractory period in all cardiac tissues. No information on STL pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics in horses is available and the aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of intravenously (IV) and orally (PO) administered STL and the effects on surface electrocardiogram and left ventricular systolic function. Six healthy horses were given 1 mg STL/kg bodyweight either IV or PO. Blood samples to determine plasma STL concentrations were taken before and at several time points after STL administration. Electrocardiography and echocardiography were performed at different time points before and after IV STL administration. Mean peak plasma concentrations after IV and PO administration of STL were 1624 ng/mL and 317 ng/mL, respectively. The oral bioavailability was intermediate (48%) with maximal absorption after 0.94 h, a moderate distribution and a mean elimination half-life of 15.24 h. After IV administration, there was a significant increase in QT interval, but no significant changes in other electrocardiographic and echocardiographic parameters. Transient transpiration was observed after IV administration, but no adverse effects were noted after a single oral dose of 1 mg/kg STL in any of the horses. It was concluded that STL has an intermediate oral bioavailability in the horse and might be useful in the treatment of equine arrhythmias.

  20. Oxytetracycline pharmacokinetics in rainbow trout during and after an orally administered medicated feed regimen.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ron A; Pelsor, Francis R; Kane, Andrew S; Reimschuessel, Renate

    2012-06-01

    The pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic predictor of antimicrobial activity for tetracyclines is reported to be the area under the concentration-time curve at steady state (AUC(ss)) divided by the minimal inhibitory concentration of the targeted pathogen. Here, we estimate AUC(ss) values for oxytetracycline (OTC) in serum of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss by using a destructive sampling study design. Seventy-two rainbow trout were fed OTC-medicated feed at 74.7 +/- 1.5 mg/kg (mean +/- SD) body weight (BW) by oral gavage for 10 consecutive days. Serum was collected from nine fish at 1, 3, 6, 8, 10, 12, 15, and 22 d after dosing began. Serum OTC concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with a 0.01-microg/mL limit of detection. The average OTC AUC(ss) was 29.2 microg x h/mL and was estimated using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling and bootstrap resampling techniques. The elimination half-life was estimated as 85.0 h, and the fraction of steady state achieved was estimated as 0.85. The calculated AUC(ss) (24.8 microg x h/mL) following 10 d of oral dosing with 75 mg OTC/kg BW was less than the estimated AUC(ss). Results suggest that the pharmacokinetics of OTC exposure, including the AUC(ss), is better evaluated by using multiday dosimetry than by using a standard single-dose protocol.

  1. Intratumoral Concentrations and Effects of Orally Administered Micellar Curcuminoids in Glioblastoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Dützmann, Stephan; Schiborr, Christina; Kocher, Alexa; Pilatus, Ulrich; Hattingen, Elke; Weissenberger, Jakob; Geßler, Florian; Quick-Weller, Johanna; Franz, Kea; Seifert, Volker; Frank, Jan; Senft, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The oral bioavailability of curcuminoids is low, but can be enhanced by incorporation into micelles. The major curcuminoid curcumin has antitumor effects on glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. We therefore aimed to determine intratumoral concentrations and the clinical tolerance of highly bioavailable micellar curcuminoids in glioblastoma patients. Thirteen glioblastoma patients ingested 70 mg micellar curcuminoids [57.4 mg curcumin, 11.2 mg demethoxycurcumin (DMC), and 1.4 mg bis-demethoxycurcumin (BDMC)] three times per day for 4 days (total amount of 689 mg curcumin, 134 mg DMC, and 17 mg BDMC) prior to planned resection of their respective brain tumors. Tumor and blood samples were taken during the surgery and analyzed for total curcuminoid concentrations. (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging was performed before and after curcuminoid consumption. Ten patients completed the study. The mean intratumoral concentration of curcumin was 56 pg/mg of tissue (range 9-151), and the mean serum concentration was 253 ng/ml (range 129-364). Inorganic phosphate was significantly increased within the tumor (P = 0.034). The mean ratio of phosphocreatine to inorganic phosphate decreased, and the mean intratumoral pH increased (P = 0.08) after curcuminoid intervention. Oral treatment with micellar curcuminoids led to quantifiable concentrations of total curcuminoids in glioblastomas and may alter intratumoral energy metabolism.

  2. Enhanced Mucosal Antibody Production and Protection against Respiratory Infections Following an Orally Administered Bacterial Extract

    PubMed Central

    Pasquali, Christian; Salami, Olawale; Taneja, Manisha; Gollwitzer, Eva S.; Trompette, Aurelien; Pattaroni, Céline; Yadava, Koshika; Bauer, Jacques; Marsland, Benjamin J.

    2014-01-01

    Secondary bacterial infections following influenza infection are a pressing problem facing respiratory medicine. Although antibiotic treatment has been highly successful over recent decades, fatalities due to secondary bacterial infections remain one of the leading causes of death associated with influenza. We have assessed whether administration of a bacterial extract alone is sufficient to potentiate immune responses and protect against primary infection with influenza, and secondary infections with either Streptococcus pneumoniae or Klebsiella pneumoniae in mice. We show that oral administration with the bacterial extract, OM-85, leads to a maturation of dendritic cells and B-cells characterized by increases in MHC II, CD86, and CD40, and a reduction in ICOSL. Improved immune responsiveness against influenza virus reduced the threshold of susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections, and thus protected the mice. The protection was associated with enhanced polyclonal B-cell activation and release of antibodies that were effective at neutralizing the virus. Taken together, these data show that oral administration of bacterial extracts provides sufficient mucosal immune stimulation to protect mice against a respiratory tract viral infection and associated sequelae. PMID:25593914

  3. Improving the prediction of the brain disposition for orally administered drugs using BDDCS

    PubMed Central

    Broccatelli, Fabio; Larregieu, Caroline A.; Cruciani, Gabriele; Oprea, Tudor I.; Benet, Leslie Z.

    2012-01-01

    In modeling blood–brain barrier (BBB) passage, in silico models have yielded ~80% prediction accuracy, and are currently used in early drug discovery. Being derived from molecular structural information only, these models do not take into account the biological factors responsible for the in vivo outcome. Passive permeability and P-glycoprotein (Pgp, ABCB1) efflux have been successfully recognized to impact xenobiotic extrusion from the brain, as Pgp is known to play a role in limiting the BBB penetration of oral drugs in humans. However, these two properties alone fail to explain the BBB penetration for a significant number of marketed central nervous system (CNS) agents. The Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System (BDDCS) has proved useful in predicting drug disposition in the human body, particularly in the liver and intestine. Here we discuss the value of using BDDCS to improve BBB predictions of oral drugs. BDDCS class membership was integrated with in vitro Pgp efflux and in silico permeability data to create a simple 3-step classification tree that accurately predicted CNS disposition for more than 90% of 153 drugs in our data set. About 98% of BDDCS class 1 drugs were found to markedly distribute throughout the brain; this includes a number of BDDCS class 1 drugs shown to be Pgp substrates. This new perspective provides a further interpretation of how Pgp influences the sedative effects of H1-histamine receptor antagonists. PMID:22261306

  4. Methods to assess reproductive effects of environmental chemicals: studies of cadmium and boron administered orally.

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, R L; Lee, I P; Sherins, R J

    1976-01-01

    Results of a U.S.S.R.--U.S. cooperative laboratory effort to improve and validate experimental techniques used to assess subtle reproductive effects in male laboratory animals are reported. The present studies attempted to evaluate the reproductive toxicity of cadmium as cadmium chloride and boron as borax (Na2B4O7) and to investigate the mechanism of toxicity in the rat following acute and subchronic oral exposure. In vitro cell separation techniques, in vivo serial mating tests, and plasma assays for hormones were utilized. Effects on the seminal vesicle and prostate were evaluated with chemical and enzyme assays. Clinical chemistry was monitored routinely. Acute oral doses, expressed as boron were 45, 150, and 450 mg/kg while doses for cadmium equivalent were 6.25, 12.5, and 25 mg/kg. Rats were also allowed free access to drinking water containing either boron (0.3, 1.0, and 6.0 mg/l.) or cadmium (0.001, and 0.l mg/l.) for 90 days. Randomly selected animals were studied following 30, 60, and 90 days of treatment. These initial studies, utilizing a variety of methods to assess the reproductive toxicity of environmental substances in male animals, suggest that cadmium and boron at the concentrations and dose regimens tested are without significant reproductive toxicity. PMID:1269508

  5. Pre-systemic metabolism of orally administered drugs and strategies to overcome it.

    PubMed

    Pereira de Sousa, Irene; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2014-10-28

    The oral bioavailability of numerous drugs is not only limited by poor solubility and/or poor membrane permeability as addressed by the biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS) but also by a pre-systemic metabolism taking place to a high extent in the intestine. Enzymes responsible for metabolic reactions in the intestine include cytochromes P450 (CYP450), transferases, peptidases and proteases. Furthermore, in the gut nucleases, lipases as well as glycosidases influence the metabolic pathway of drugs and nutrients. A crucial role is also played by the intestinal microflora able to metabolize a wide broad of pharmaceutical compounds. Strategies to provide a protective effect towards an intestinal pre-systemic metabolism are based on the co-administration of enzyme inhibitor being optimally immobilized on unabsorbable and undegradable polymeric excipients in order to keep them concentrated there where an inhibitory effect is needed. Furthermore, certain polymeric excipients such as polyacrylates exhibit per se enzyme inhibitory properties. In addition, by incorporating drugs in cyclodextrines, in self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS) or liposomes a protective effect towards an intestinal enzymatic attack can be achieved. Being aware of the important role of this pre-systemic metabolism by integrating it in the BCS as third dimension and keeping strategies to overcome this enzymatic barrier in mind, the therapeutic efficacy of many orally given drugs can certainly be substantially improved.

  6. Susceptibility of Respiratory Tract Anaerobes to Orally Administered Penicillins and Cephalosporins

    PubMed Central

    Busch, David F.; Kureshi, Lubna Afzal; Sutter, Vera L.; Finegold, Sydney M.

    1976-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria recovered from airway-related infections were tested by agar dilution against selected penicillins and cephalosporins available for oral administration. Against 136 isolates, penicillins G and V showed comparable activity, particularly when pharmacological differences were considered. Although many isolates were exquisitely susceptible to the penicillins, only 55% of the Bacteroides species and 72% of all isolates were inhibited at 0.5 μg of penicillin G per ml. Results for penicillin V at 1 μg/ml were similar (59 and 73%). The two cephalosporins were more active at achievable levels, inhibiting 94 to 95% of Bacteroides and 95 to 96% of all isolates at 8 μg/ml. These levels represent approximately 50% of the reported peak serum levels after oral administration of 625 mg of the penicillins and 500 mg of the cephalosporins. Dicloxacillin and nafcillin were tested against 50 isolates. The two were comparably active on a weight basis; dicloxacillin was more active when pharmacological differences were considered, but did not match the other penicillins or the cephalosporins. PMID:984805

  7. Retention, organ distribution, and excretory pattern of cadmium orally administered in a single dose to two monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, S.; Taguchi, T.

    1980-07-01

    Retention, excretion, and organ distribution of radioactive Cd were observed after a single oral dose of two monkeys. The retention rate of Cd 19 d after the administration of radiocadmium (/sup 109/CdCl/sub 2/, carrier-free) to one monkey was 5.2% of the administered dose; 73.4% of the dose was excreted in the feces and 0.7% in the urine. The largest fractions of the administered dose were found in the small intestine, liver, and kidney. The absorption rate of Cd 25 d after the administration of radiocadmium with 1.0 mg cold Cd as CdCl/sub 2/ solution to the other monkey was 6.3% of the administered dose; 75.5% of the dose was excreted in the feces and 0.9% in the urine. Setting the whole body retention equal to 100% on d 19 or 25, the largest fractions were found in the small intestines (51.5 and 36.3%), livers (21.8 and 29.6%), and kidneys (13.4 and 21.0%) of the respective monkeys). The effect of carrier Cd on absorption, excretion, and organ distribution was not pronounced. The highest concentration and greatest retention of Cd was observed in the upper small intestinal wall and the content of the small intestine, indicating the importance of enteroenteric circulation of the element; this finding was different from the results for Cd metabolism in rodents.

  8. Evaluation of clinical safety and anthelmintic efficacy of aurixazole administed orally at 24 mg/kg in cattle.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Claudio Alessandro M; Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; Buzzulini, Carolina; Cruz, Breno Cayeiro; Felippelli, Gustavo; Teixeira, Weslen F; Silva, Helenara Machado; Santana, Luis Fernando; Soares, Vando Edésio; Henrique, Carlos Henrique; de Oliveira, Gilson Pereira; da Costa, Alvimar José

    2014-06-01

    The current study evaluated, in vivo, the clinical safety and the anthelmintic efficacy of 24% aurixazole (24 mg/kg), administered orally, in bovines. Two experiments were conducted: the first one evaluating the clinical safety of 24% aurixazole (24 mg/kg) in cattle, and a second one evaluating the anthelmintic efficacy of aurixazole (24 mg/kg) against gastrointestinal nematodes on naturally infected cattle. Based on the results of clinical safety, no alterations on clinical and haematological signs and on the biochemical values obtained in animals treated orally with aurixazole 24 mg/kg were observed. Regarding the results of reduction or efficacy, obtained by eggs per gram of faeces (EPG) counts, the formulation of aurixazole reached values superior to 99% (arithmetic means) in all post-treatment dates. In two occasions, this formulation reached maximum efficacy (100%). Comparing these results with the reduction percentages obtained by EPG counts, it is possible to verify that the values obtained by all three formulations were compatible with the efficacy results. Aurixazole reached maximum efficacy (100%) against Haemonchus placei, Cooperia spatulata and Oesophagostomum radiatum. Against Cooperia punctata, this formulation reached an efficacy index of 99.99%. Regarding aurixazole, no specific trials were conducted on the field in order to evaluate the behaviour of this molecule against helminths that are resistant to other molecules, specially isolated levamisole and disophenolat. Due to this fact, future studies will be necessary to assess the effectiveness of aurixazole against strains of nematodes that are resistant to levamisole and disophenolat, but the results of clinical safety and efficacy described in this study allow us to conclude that the aurixazole molecule, concomitantly with other measures and orally administered formulations, can be another important tool in the control of nematodes parasitizing bovines.

  9. Safety and pharmacokinetics of oral cannabidiol when administered concomitantly with intravenous fentanyl in humans

    PubMed Central

    Manini, Alex F.; Yiannoulos, Georgia; Bergamaschi, Mateus M.; Hernandez, Stephanie; Olmedo, Ruben; Barnes, Allan J.; Winkel, Gary; Sinha, Rajita; Jutras-Aswad, Didier; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Hurd, Yasmin L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cannabidiol (CBD) is hypothesized as a potential treatment for opioid addiction, with safety studies an important first step for medication development. We determined CBD safety and pharmacokinetics when administered concomitantly with a high-potency opioid in healthy subjects. Methods This double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study of CBD co-administered with intravenous fentanyl, was conducted at the Clinical Research Center in Mount Sinai Hospital, a tertiary care medical center in New York City. Participants were healthy volunteers aged 21–65 years with prior opioid exposure, regardless of route. Blood samples were obtained before and after 400 or 800 mg CBD pretreatment, followed by a single 0.5 (Session 1) or 1.0mcg/Kg (Session 2) intravenous fentanyl dose. The primary outcome was the Systematic Assessment for Treatment Emergent Events (SAFTEE) to assess safety and adverse effects. CBD peak plasma concentrations, time to reach peak plasma concentrations (tmax), and area under the curve (AUC) were measured. Results SAFTEE data were similar between groups without respiratory depression or cardiovascular complications during any test session. Following low dose CBD, tmax occurred at 3 and 1.5h (Sessions 1 and 2, respectively). Following high dose CBD, tmax occurred at 3 and 4h in Sessions 1 and 2, respectively. There were no significant differences in plasma CBD or cortisol (AUC p=NS) between sessions. Conclusions CBD does not exacerbate adverse effects associated with intravenous fentanyl administration. Co-administration of CBD and opioids was safe and well tolerated. These data provide the foundation for future studies examining CBD as a potential treatment for opioid abuse. PMID:25748562

  10. Amelioration of Chemotherapy-Induced Intestinal Mucositis by Orally Administered Probiotics in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chun-Bin; Cheng, Mei-Lien; Liu, Chia-Yuan; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chiang Chiau, Jen-Shiu; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Intestinal mucositis is a frequently encountered side effect in oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. No well-established or up to date therapeutic strategies are available. To study a novel way to alleviate mucositis, we investigate the effects and safety of probiotic supplementation in ameliorating 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. Methods Seventy-two mice were injected saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) intraperitoneally daily. Mice were either orally administrated daily saline, probiotic suspension of Lactobacillus casei variety rhamnosus (Lcr35) or Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum (LaBi). Diarrhea score, pro-inflammatory cytokines serum levels, intestinal villus height and crypt depth and total RNA from tissue were assessed. Samples of blood, liver and spleen tissues were assessed for translocation. Results Marked diarrhea developed in the 5-FU groups but was attenuated after oral Lcr35 and LaBi administrations. Diarrhea scores decreased significantly from 2.64 to 1.45 and 0.80, respectively (P<0.001). Those mice in 5-FU groups had significantly higher proinflammatory cytokine levels (TNF-α: 234.80 vs. 29.10, P<0.001, IL-6: 25.13 vs. 7.43, P<0.001, IFN-γ: 22.07 vs. 17.06, P = 0.137). A repairing of damage in jejunal villi was observed following probiotics administration. We also found TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA expressions were up-regulated in intestinal mucositis tissues following 5-FU treatment (TNF-α: 4.35 vs. 1.18, IL-1β: 2.29 vs. 1.07, IL-6: 1.49 vs. 1.02) and that probiotics treatment suppressed this up-regulation (P<0.05). No bacterial translocation was found in this study. Conclusions In conclusion, our results show that oral administration of probiotics Lcr35 and LaBi can ameliorate chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. This suggests probiotics may serve as an alternative therapeutic strategy for the prevention or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in

  11. Amelioration of Chemotherapy-Induced Intestinal Mucositis by Orally Administered Probiotics in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Chun-Yan; Chan, Wai-Tao; Jiang, Chun-Bin; Cheng, Mei-Lien; Liu, Chia-Yuan; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chiang Chiau, Jen-Shiu; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal mucositis is a frequently encountered side effect in oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. No well-established or up to date therapeutic strategies are available. To study a novel way to alleviate mucositis, we investigate the effects and safety of probiotic supplementation in ameliorating 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. Seventy-two mice were injected saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) intraperitoneally daily. Mice were either orally administrated daily saline, probiotic suspension of Lactobacillus casei variety rhamnosus (Lcr35) or Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum (LaBi). Diarrhea score, pro-inflammatory cytokines serum levels, intestinal villus height and crypt depth and total RNA from tissue were assessed. Samples of blood, liver and spleen tissues were assessed for translocation. Marked diarrhea developed in the 5-FU groups but was attenuated after oral Lcr35 and LaBi administrations. Diarrhea scores decreased significantly from 2.64 to 1.45 and 0.80, respectively (P<0.001). Those mice in 5-FU groups had significantly higher proinflammatory cytokine levels (TNF-α: 234.80 vs. 29.10, P<0.001, IL-6: 25.13 vs. 7.43, P<0.001, IFN-γ: 22.07 vs. 17.06, P = 0.137). A repairing of damage in jejunal villi was observed following probiotics administration. We also found TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA expressions were up-regulated in intestinal mucositis tissues following 5-FU treatment (TNF-α: 4.35 vs. 1.18, IL-1β: 2.29 vs. 1.07, IL-6: 1.49 vs. 1.02) and that probiotics treatment suppressed this up-regulation (P<0.05). No bacterial translocation was found in this study. In conclusion, our results show that oral administration of probiotics Lcr35 and LaBi can ameliorate chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis in a mouse model. This suggests probiotics may serve as an alternative therapeutic strategy for the prevention or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in the future.

  12. Discovery of sarolaner: A novel, orally administered, broad-spectrum, isoxazoline ectoparasiticide for dogs.

    PubMed

    McTier, Tom L; Chubb, Nathan; Curtis, Michael P; Hedges, Laura; Inskeep, Gregory A; Knauer, Christopher S; Menon, Sanjay; Mills, Brian; Pullins, Aleah; Zinser, Erich; Woods, Debra J; Meeus, Patrick

    2016-05-30

    The novel isoxazoline ectoparasiticide, sarolaner, was identified during a lead optimization program for an orally-active compound with efficacy against fleas and ticks on dogs. The aim of the discovery program was to identify a novel isoxazoline specifically for use in companion animals, beginning with de novo synthesis in the Zoetis research laboratories. The sarolaner molecule has unique structural features important for its potency and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties, including spiroazetidine and sulfone moieties. The flea and tick activity resides in the chirally pure S-enantiomer, which was purified to alleviate potential off-target effects from the inactive enantiomer. The mechanism of action was established in electrophysiology assays using CHO-K1 cell lines stably expressing cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis) RDL (resistance-to-dieldrin) genes for assessment of GABA-gated chloride channel (GABACls) pharmacology. As expected, sarolaner inhibited GABA-elicited currents at both susceptible (CfRDL-A285) and resistant (CfRDL-S285) flea GABACls with similar potency. Initial whole organism screening was conducted in vitro using a blood feeding assay against C. felis. Compounds which demonstrated robust activity in the flea feed assay were subsequently tested in an in vitro ingestion assay against the soft tick, Ornithodoros turicata. Efficacious compounds which were confirmed safe in rodents at doses up to 30mg/kg were progressed to safety, PK and efficacy studies in dogs. In vitro sarolaner demonstrated an LC80 of 0.3μg/mL against C. felis and an LC100 of 0.003μg/mL against O. turicata. In a head-to-head comparative in vitro assay with both afoxolaner and fluralaner, sarolaner demonstrated superior flea and tick potency. In exploratory safety studies in dogs, sarolaner demonstrated safety in dogs≥8 weeks of age upon repeated monthly dosing at up to 20mg/kg. Sarolaner was rapidly and well absorbed following oral dosing. Time to maximum plasma concentration

  13. Absorption of orally administered /sup 65/Zn by normal human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Aamodt, R.L.; Rumble, W.F.; Johnston, G.S.; Markley, E.J.; Henkin, R.I.

    1981-12-01

    Despite studies by several investigators of human gastrointestinal 65Zn absorption, implications of these data for evaluation of functional zinc status are unclear because limited numbers of normal subjects have been studied. To evaluated zinc absorption in normal humans, 75 subjects (31 women, 44 men, ages 18 to 84 yr) were given 10 micro Ci carrier-free 65Zn orally after an overnight fast. Absorption calculated from total body retention measured 7, 14, and 21 days after administration of tracer was 65 +/- 11% (mean +/- 1 SD), range from 40 to 86%. Comparison of these results with those for patients with a variety of diseases indicate that patients exhibit a wider range of absorption and, in four of six studies patients exhibit decreased mean zinc absorption. These results of gastrointestinal zinc absorption in a large number of normal humans offer a basis for a clearer comparison with data from patients who exhibit abnormalities of zinc absorption.

  14. Use of orally administered carfentanil prior to isoflurane-induced anesthesia in a Kodiak brown bear.

    PubMed

    Mama, K R; Steffey, E P; Withrow, S J

    2000-08-15

    A captive 590-kg (1,298-lb) 22-year-old castrated male Kodiak brown bear was evaluated because of a soft tissue mass in the right carpal and antebrachial regions. General anesthesia was deemed necessary on 3 occasions for various procedures including radiographic evaluation and biopsy, excision, and radiation treatment. The bear was given carfentanil orally to induce sedation, followed by i.m. administration of tiletamine-zolazepam (on 1 occasion) and atropine. Anesthesia was maintained by administration of isoflurane in oxygen. After each procedure, effects of carfentanil were reversed by administration of naltrexone. Although there was some variability, blood pressure, nasal temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, PO2, and PCO2 remained within a clinically acceptable ranges.

  15. Protective efficacy of orally administered, heat-killed Lactobacillus pentosus b240 against influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Kiso, Maki; Takano, Ryo; Sakabe, Saori; Katsura, Hiroaki; Shinya, Kyoko; Uraki, Ryuta; Watanabe, Shinji; Saito, Hiroshi; Toba, Masamichi; Kohda, Noriyuki; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A(H1N1)pdm virus caused the first human pandemic of the 21st century. Although various probiotic Lactobacillus species have been shown to have anti-microbial effects against pneumonia-inducing pathogens, the prophylactic efficacy and mechanisms behind their protection remain largely unknown. Here, we evaluated the prophylactic efficacy of heat-killed Lactobacillus pentosus b240 against lethal influenza A(H1N1)pdm virus infection in a mouse model. To further define the protective responses induced by b240, we performed virologic, histopathologic, and transcriptomic analyses on the mouse lungs. Although we did not observe an appreciable effect of b240 on virus growth, cytokine production, or histopathology, gene expressional analysis revealed that oral administration of b240 differentially regulates antiviral gene expression in mouse lungs. Our results unveil the possible mechanisms behind the protection mediated by b240 against influenza virus infection and provide new insights into probiotic therapy. PMID:23535544

  16. Protective efficacy of orally administered, heat-killed Lactobacillus pentosus b240 against influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Kiso, Maki; Takano, Ryo; Sakabe, Saori; Katsura, Hiroaki; Shinya, Kyoko; Uraki, Ryuta; Watanabe, Shinji; Saito, Hiroshi; Toba, Masamichi; Kohda, Noriyuki; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A(H1N1)pdm virus caused the first human pandemic of the 21st century. Although various probiotic Lactobacillus species have been shown to have anti-microbial effects against pneumonia-inducing pathogens, the prophylactic efficacy and mechanisms behind their protection remain largely unknown. Here, we evaluated the prophylactic efficacy of heat-killed Lactobacillus pentosus b240 against lethal influenza A(H1N1)pdm virus infection in a mouse model. To further define the protective responses induced by b240, we performed virologic, histopathologic, and transcriptomic analyses on the mouse lungs. Although we did not observe an appreciable effect of b240 on virus growth, cytokine production, or histopathology, gene expressional analysis revealed that oral administration of b240 differentially regulates antiviral gene expression in mouse lungs. Our results unveil the possible mechanisms behind the protection mediated by b240 against influenza virus infection and provide new insights into probiotic therapy.

  17. Survival and digestibility of orally-administered immunoglobulin preparations containing IgG through the gastrointestinal tract in humans.

    PubMed

    Jasion, Victoria S; Burnett, Bruce P

    2015-03-07

    Oral immunoglobulin (Ig) preparations are prime examples of medicinal nutrition from natural sources. Plasma products containing Ig have been used for decades in animal feed for intestinal disorders to mitigate the damaging effects of early weaning. These preparations reduce overall mortality and increase feed utilization in various animal species leading to improved growth. Oral administration of Ig preparations from human serum as well as bovine colostrum and serum have been tested and proven to be safe as well as effective in human clinical trials for a variety of enteric microbial infections and other conditions which cause diarrhea. In infants, children, and adults, the amount of intact IgG recovered in stool ranges from trace amounts up to 25% of the original amount ingested. It is generally understood that IgG can only bind to antigens within the GI tract if the Fab structure is intact and has not been completely denatured through acidic pH or digestive proteolytic enzymes. This is a comprehensive review of human studies regarding the survivability of orally-administered Ig preparations, with a focus on IgG. This review also highlights various biochemical studies on IgG which potentially explain which structural elements are responsible for increased stability against digestion.

  18. Plasma concentrations and effects of salbutamol administered orally to patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Demnati, R; Michoud, M C; Jeanneret-Grosjean, A; Ong, H; Du Souich, P

    1995-01-01

    1. To test whether cystic fibrosis (CF) altered the kinetics and dynamics of oral salbutamol, 11 patients with CF (19-33 years old; five females; FEV1: 37 +/- 12% of predicted value) and 10 healthy volunteers (20-41 years old; five females; FEV1: 99 +/- 14% of predicted value) received orally 4 mg salbutamol. 2. The estimated pharmacokinetic parameters of salbutamol in patients with CF were identical to those in healthy subjects. For instance, peak plasma concentrations of salbutamol were 10.5 +/- 2.6 (mean +/- s.d.) and 10.2 +/- 2.9 ng ml-1 (NS), and the area under salbutamol plasma concentrations as a function of time (AUC (0, 7 h)) was 43.0 +/- 9.3 ng ml-1 h and 43.3 +/- 12.7 ng ml-1 h (NS) in CF patients and in healthy subjects, respectively. Since on a mg kg-1 dose basis, CF patients received a dose 28% greater than healthy subjects, this lack of differences implies a decrease in the amount of salbutamol absorbed, or alternatively, an increase in both clearance and volume of distribution of salbutamol. 3. Salbutamol did not elicit bronchodilation in CF patients, but increased heart rate from 77 +/- 2 to 103 +/- 3 beats min-1 (P < 0.05). 4. Salbutamol decreased plasma potassium concentrations from 4.5 +/- 0.1 to 3.8 +/- 0.1 mmol l-1 in the CF group (P < 0.05) and from 4.1 +/- 0.2 to 3.4 +/- 0.1 mmol l-1 in the controls (P < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8554933

  19. The effects of rifampicin on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of orally administered nilvadipine to healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Saima, S; Furuie, K; Yoshimoto, H; Fukuda, J; Hayashi, T; Echizen, H

    2002-01-01

    Aims To study the effects of rifampicin on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of nilvadipine. Methods Five healthy adult volunteers received nilvadipine (4 mg) orally before and after a 6 day treatment with rifampicin. Blood and urine were collected and assayed for plasma nilvadipine and urinary 6β-hydroxycortisol and cortisol. Results The treatment with rifampicin reduced the mean (± s.d.) AUC of nilvadipine from 17.4 ± 8.4 to 0.6 ± 0.4 µg l−1 h (mean difference −16.8 µg l−1 h, 95% CI −9.4, 24.2 µg l−1 h). While the administration of nilvadipine alone elicited a significant (P < 0.05) hypotensive (mean difference for diastolic blood pressure –8 mmHg, 95% CI −4, −12 mmHg) and reflex tachycardia (mean difference 5 beats min−1, 95% CI 1, 9 beats min−1), the treatment with rifampicin abolished these responses. The urinary 6β-hydroxycortisol/cortisol ratio showed a significant (P < 0.05) increase from 10.3 ± 4.0 to 50.3 ± 24.6 by rifampicin: mean difference 40.1, 95% CI 20.4, 59.8. Conclusions Because rifampicin may greatly decrease the oral bioavailability of nilvadipine, caution is needed when these two drugs are to be coadministered. PMID:11851646

  20. Decorporation of systemically distributed americium by a novel orally administered diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) formulation in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Wilson, James P; Cobb, Ronald R; Dungan, Nathanael W; Matthews, Laura L; Eppler, Bärbel; Aiello, Kenneth V; Curtis, Shiro; Boger, Teannetta; Guilmette, Raymond A; Weber, Waylon; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Talton, James D

    2015-03-01

    Novel decorporation agents are being developed to protect against radiological accidents and terrorists attacks. Radioactive americium is a significant component of nuclear fallout. Removal of large radioactive materials, such as 241Am, from exposed persons is a subject of significant interest due to the hazards they pose. The objective of this study was to evaluate the dose-related efficacy of daily doses of NanoDTPA™ Capsules for decorporating Am administered intravenously as a soluble citrate complex to male and female beagle dogs. In addition, the efficacy of the NanoDTPA™ Capsules for decorporating 241Am was directly compared to intravenously administered saline and DTPA. Animals received a single IV administration of 241Am(III)-citrate on Day 0. One day after radionuclide administration, one of four different doses of NanoDTPA™ Capsules [1, 2, or 6 capsules d(-1) (30 mg, 60 mg, or 180 mg DTPA) or 2 capsules BID], IV Zn-DTPA (5 mg kg(-1) pentetate zinc trisodium) as a positive control, or IV saline as a placebo were administered. NanoDTPA™ Capsules, IV Zn-DTPA, or IV saline was administered on study days 1-14. Animals were euthanized on day 21. A full necropsy was conducted, and liver, spleen, kidneys, lungs and trachea, tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN), muscle samples (right and left quadriceps), gastrointestinal (GI) tract (stomach plus esophagus, upper and lower intestine), gonads, two femurs, lumbar vertebrae (L1-L4), and all other soft tissue remains were collected. Urinary and fecal excretion profiles were increased approximately 10-fold compared to those for untreated animals. Tissue contents were decreased compared to untreated controls. In particular, liver content was decreased by approximately eightfold compared to untreated animals. The results from this study further demonstrate that oral NanoDTPA™ Capsules are equally efficient compared to IV Zn-DTPA in decorporation of actinides.

  1. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and hydrolysis of oral pyrroloquinazolinediamines administered in single and multiple doses in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Qigui; Kozar, Michael P; Shearer, Todd W; Xie, Lisa H; Lin, Ai J; Smith, Kirsten S; Si, Yuanzheng; Anova, Lalaine; Zhang, Jing; Milhous, Wilbur K; Skillman, Donald R

    2007-08-01

    Pyrroloquinazolinediamine (PQD) derivatives such as tetra-acetamide PQD (PQD-A4) and bis-ethylcarbamyl PQD (PQD-BE) were much safer (with therapeutic indices of 80 and 32, respectively) than their parent compound, PQD (therapeutic index, 10). Further evaluation of PQD-A4 and PQD-BE in single and multiple pharmacokinetic (PK) studies as well as corresponding toxicity studies was conducted with rats. PQD-A4 could be converted to two intermediate metabolites (monoacetamide PQD and bisacetamide PQD) first and then to the final metabolite, PQD, while PQD-BE was directly hydrolyzed to PQD without precursor and intermediate metabolites. Maximum tolerant doses showed that PQD-A4 and PQD-BE have only 1/12 and 1/6, respectively, of the toxicity of PQD after a single oral dose. Compared to the area under the concentration-time curve for PQD alone (2,965 ng.h/ml), values measured in animals treated with PQD-A4 and PQD-BE were one-third (1,047 ng.h/ml) and one-half (1,381 ng.h/ml) as high, respectively, after an equimolar dosage, suggesting that PQD was the only agent to induce the toxicity. Similar results were also shown in multiple treatments; PQD-A4 and PQD-BE generated two-fifths and three-fifths, respectively, of PQD concentrations, with 8.8-fold and 3.8-fold safety margins, respectively, over the parent drug. PK data indicated that the bioavailability of oral PQD-A4 was greatly limited at high dose levels, that PQD-A4 was slowly converted to PQD via a sequential three-step process of conversion, and that PQD-A4 was significantly less toxic than the one-step hydrolysis drug, PQD-BE. It was concluded that the slow and smaller release of PQD was the main reason for the reduction in toxicity and that the active intermediate metabolites can still maintain antimalarial potency. Therefore, the candidate with multiple-step hydrolysis of PQD could be developed as a safer potential agent for malaria treatment.

  2. Assessment of the effects of orally administered ferrous sulfate on Oncopeltus fasciatus (Heteroptera: Lygaeidae).

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Amparo; Torreblanca, Amparo; Garcerá, María Dolores

    2017-03-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient needed for multiple biological processes, but it is also an effective pro-oxidant in its reduced form. Environmental sources of iron toxic species include reduced soils from rice plantations, polluted natural areas from metal industry waste, or iron oxides used in soil bioremediation. Few studies have been conducted to assess the toxicity of iron species in insects. The present work aims to assess the oxidative stress effects of ferrous sulfate administered in drinking water after acute exposure (96 h) to adults of the insect model Oncopeltus fasciatus (Dallas). Mortality was higher in exposed groups and significantly associated with iron treatment (OR [95% CI]; 11.8 [6.1-22.7]). Higher levels of body iron content were found in insects exposed to ferrous sulfate, with an increase of 5-6 times with respect to controls. Catalase activity and lipid peroxidation (TBARS content), but not glutathione S-transferase activity, were significantly higher in exposed insects and significantly correlated with body iron content (Pearson coefficient of 0.68 and 0.74, respectively) and between them (0.78). The present work demonstrates that, despite the disruption in water and food intake caused by iron administration, this metal is accumulated by insect causing lipid peroxidation and eliciting an antioxidant response mediated by catalase.

  3. The Influence of Intestinal Tract and Probiotics on the Fate of Orally Administered Drugs.

    PubMed

    Stojančević, Maja; Bojić, Gordana; Salami, Hani Al; Mikov, Momir

    2014-01-01

    Although the liver has long been considered as a main organ responsible for drug metabolism, the role of the gut metabolizing enzymes and the gut microflora is becoming more profoundly evident in drug metabolism, absorption and overall efficacy. This review will explore various mechanisms by which the gut-microflora influences drug pharmacokinetics including biotransformation, bioactivation, and biodegradation as well as up- or down-regulation of the epithelial transporters. The gut-luminal fluids, intestinal mucosa and gut microflora contain high concentrations of various enzymes which are responsible for the oxidation, hydrolysis and conjugation of drugs. Such metabolic reactions may lead to either drug over- or under-dosing, which impacts the drugs efficacy and safety. The processes, by which the intestinal enzymes and gut-protein transporters influence drug pharmacokinetic parameters, will be detailed. Since the intestinal microflora plays an important role in physiological, nutritional, metabolic, and immunological processes in human body, there is currently some interest in the manipulation of its composition and activity by administering probiotics. This review will also examine the capacity of probiotics to interact with resident microbial community, affecting the respective enzymes or by providing their own specific enzymatic activities that may consequently change the bioavailability and pharmacological activity of concomitantly taken drugs.

  4. The fate of calcium carbonate nanoparticles administered by oral route: absorption and their interaction with biological matrices

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-A; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Kim, Hyoung-Mi; Lee, Jong Kwon; Jeong, Jayoung; Kim, Young-Rok; Oh, Jae-Min; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background Orally administered particles rapidly interact with biological fluids containing proteins, enzymes, electrolytes, and other biomolecules to eventually form particles covered by a corona, and this corona potentially affects particle uptake, fate, absorption, distribution, and elimination in vivo. This study explored relationships between the biological interactions of calcium carbonate particles and their biokinetics. Methods We examined the effects of food grade calcium carbonates of different particle size (nano [N-Cal] and bulk [B-Cal]: specific surface areas of 15.8 and 0.83 m2/g, respectively) on biological interactions in in vitro simulated physiological fluids, ex vivo biofluids, and in vivo in gastrointestinal fluid. Moreover, absorption and tissue distribution of calcium carbonates were evaluated following a single dose oral administration to rats. Results N-Cal interacted more with biomatrices than bulk materials in vitro and ex vivo, as evidenced by high fluorescence quenching ratios, but it did not interact more actively with biomatrices in vivo. Analysis of coronas revealed that immunoglobulin, apolipoprotein, thrombin, and fibrinogen, were the major corona proteins, regardless of particle size. A biokinetic study revealed that orally delivered N-Cal was more rapidly absorbed into the blood stream than B-Cal, but no significant differences were observed between the two in terms of absorption efficiencies or tissue distributions. Both calcium carbonates were primarily present as particulate forms in gastrointestinal fluids but enter the circulatory system in dissolved Ca2+, although both types showed partial phase transformation to dicalcium phosphate dihydrate. Relatively low dissolution (about 4%), no remarkable protein–particle interaction, and the major particulate fate of calcium carbonate in vivo gastrointestinal fluids can explain its low oral absorption (about 4%) regardless of particle size. Conclusion We conclude that calcium

  5. The fate of calcium carbonate nanoparticles administered by oral route: absorption and their interaction with biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-A; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Kim, Hyoung-Mi; Lee, Jong Kwon; Jeong, Jayoung; Kim, Young-Rok; Oh, Jae-Min; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Orally administered particles rapidly interact with biological fluids containing proteins, enzymes, electrolytes, and other biomolecules to eventually form particles covered by a corona, and this corona potentially affects particle uptake, fate, absorption, distribution, and elimination in vivo. This study explored relationships between the biological interactions of calcium carbonate particles and their biokinetics. We examined the effects of food grade calcium carbonates of different particle size (nano [N-Cal] and bulk [B-Cal]: specific surface areas of 15.8 and 0.83 m(2)/g, respectively) on biological interactions in in vitro simulated physiological fluids, ex vivo biofluids, and in vivo in gastrointestinal fluid. Moreover, absorption and tissue distribution of calcium carbonates were evaluated following a single dose oral administration to rats. N-Cal interacted more with biomatrices than bulk materials in vitro and ex vivo, as evidenced by high fluorescence quenching ratios, but it did not interact more actively with biomatrices in vivo. Analysis of coronas revealed that immunoglobulin, apolipoprotein, thrombin, and fibrinogen, were the major corona proteins, regardless of particle size. A biokinetic study revealed that orally delivered N-Cal was more rapidly absorbed into the blood stream than B-Cal, but no significant differences were observed between the two in terms of absorption efficiencies or tissue distributions. Both calcium carbonates were primarily present as particulate forms in gastrointestinal fluids but enter the circulatory system in dissolved Ca(2+), although both types showed partial phase transformation to dicalcium phosphate dihydrate. Relatively low dissolution (about 4%), no remarkable protein-particle interaction, and the major particulate fate of calcium carbonate in vivo gastrointestinal fluids can explain its low oral absorption (about 4%) regardless of particle size. We conclude that calcium carbonate nanoparticles can act more

  6. Effectiveness of orally administered cupric oxide needles in alleviating hypocupraemia in sheep and cattle.

    PubMed

    Suttle, N F

    1981-05-09

    The oral administration of a small dose of cupric oxide "needles" (CuOn), providing 0.5 g copper, to hypocupraemic ewes maintained on a copper-deficient diet alleviated hypocupraemia for 111 days when the diet was supplemented with molybdenum and sulphate and for 301 days when the diet was not supplemented. The same amount of copper given as cupric sulphate was approximately half as effective. The administration of a large dose of CuOn, providing 40 g copper, to hypocupraemic steers and heifers alleviated hypocupraemia for not less than 41 days, at which time a substantial reserve of copper (428 mg) remained in the liver. The absorbability of copper in CuOn was estimated to be 8.3 per cent and 3.8 per cent (depending on diet) for sheep. It was calculated that enough absorbable copper could be provided in a single dose to meet the net copper requirements of ewes for several years. This new form of copper therapy demands a totally different approach from that associated with parenteral copper usage.

  7. Gastrointestinal behavior of orally administered radiolabeled erythromycin pellets in man as determined by gamma scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Digenis, G.A.; Sandefer, E.P.; Parr, A.F.; Beihn, R.; McClain, C.; Scheinthal, B.M.; Ghebre-Sellassie, I.; Iyer, U.; Nesbitt, R.U.; Randinitis, E. )

    1990-07-01

    The behavior of single 250-mg doses of a multiparticulate form of erythromycin base (ERYC(R)), each including five pellets radiolabeled with neutron-activated samarium-153, was observed by gamma scintigraphy in seven male subjects under fasting and nonfasting conditions. The residence time and locus of radiolabeled pellets within regions of the gastrointestinal tract were determined and were correlated with plasma concentrations of erythromycin at coincident time points. Administration of food 30 minutes postdosing reduced fasting plasma erythromycin Cmax and area under the plasma erythromycin versus time curve (AUC) values by 43% and 54%, respectively. Mean peak plasma concentration of erythromycin (Cmax) in the fasting state was 1.64 micrograms/mL versus 0.94 micrograms/mL in the nonfasting state. Total oral bioavailability, as determined by mean AUC (0-infinity) of the plasma erythromycin concentration versus time curve, was 7.6 hr/micrograms/mL in the fasted state, versus 3.5 hr/micrograms/mL in the nonfasting state. Mean time to peak plasma erythromycin concentration (tmax) in the fasting state was 3.3 hours, versus 2.3 hours in the nonfasting state. Plasma concentrations of erythromycin in both fasting and nonfasting states were within acceptable therapeutic ranges.

  8. Estimation of parameters for the elimination of an orally administered test substance with unknown absorption.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Josef A; Denzer, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Assessment of the elimination of an oral test dose based on plasma concentration values requires correction for the effect of gastric release and absorption. Irregular uptake processes should be described 'model independently', which requires estimation of a large number of absorption parameters. To limit the associated computational effort a new approach is developed with a reduced number of unknown parameters. A marginalized and regularized absorption approach (MRA) is defined, which uses for the uptake just one parameter to control rigidity of the uptake curve. For validation, elimination and absorption were reproduced using published IVIVC data and a synthetic data set for comparison with approaches using a 'model-free'--staircase function or mechanistic models to describe absorption. MRA performed almost as accurate as well specified mechanistic models, which gave the best reproduction. MRA demonstrated a 50fold increase in computational efficiency compared to other approaches. The absorption estimated for the IVIVC study demonstrated an in vivo-in vitro correlation comparable to published values. The newly developed MRA approach can be used to efficiently and accurately estimate elimination and absorption with a restricted number of adaptive parameters and with automatic adjustment of the complexity of the uptake.

  9. Combination therapy of orally administered glycyrrhizin and UVB improved active-stage generalized vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Mou, K.H.; Han, D.; Liu, W.L.; Li, P.

    2016-01-01

    Glycyrrhizin has been used clinically for several years due to its beneficial effect on immunoglobulin E (IgE)-induced allergic diseases, alopecia areata and psoriasis. In this study, glycyrrhizin, ultraviolet B light (UVB) or a combination of both were used to treat active-stage generalized vitiligo. One hundred and forty-four patients between the ages of 3 and 48 years were divided into three groups: group A received oral compound glycyrrhizin (OCG); group B received UVB applications twice weekly, and group C received OCG+UVB. Follow-ups were performed at 2, 4, and 6 months after the treatment was initiated. The Vitiligo Area Scoring Index (VASI) and the Vitiligo Disease Activity (VIDA) instrument were used to assess the affected body surface, at each follow-up. Results showed that 77.1, 75.0 and 87.5% in groups A, B and C, respectively, presented repigmentation of lesions. Responsiveness to therapy seemed to be associated with lesion location and patient compliance. Adverse events were limited and transient. This study showed that, although the three treatment protocols had positive results, OCG and UVB combination therapy was the most effective and led to improvement in disease stage from active to stable. PMID:27464024

  10. Corn oil and milk enhance the absorption of orally administered allyl isothiocyanate in rats.

    PubMed

    Ippoushi, Katsunari; Ueda, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Atsuko

    2013-11-15

    Allyl isothiocyanate, a chief component of mustard oil, exhibits anticancer effects in both cultured cancer cells and animal models. The accumulation of the N-acetylcysteine conjugate of allyl isothiocyanate, the final metabolite of allyl isothiocyanate, in urine was evaluated in rats that were orally coadministered allyl isothiocyanate with fluids (e.g., water, green tea, milk, and 10% ethanol) or corn oil. The N-acetylcysteine conjugate of allyl isothiocyanate content in urine when allyl isothiocyanate (2 or 4μmol) was coadministered with corn oil or milk showed a greater increase (1.4±0.22 or 2.7±0.34μmol or 1.2±0.32 or 2.5±0.36μmol, 1.6- to 1.8-fold or 1.5-fold, respectively) than when allyl isothiocyanate (2 or 4μmol) was coadministered with water (0.78±0.10 or 1.7±0.17μmol). This result demonstrates that corn oil and milk enhance the absorption of allyl isothiocyanate in rats.

  11. Schistosoma mansoni: Antiparasitic effects of orally administered Nigella sativa oil and/or Chroococcus turgidus extract.

    PubMed

    Ali, Medhat; Eldahab, Marwa Abou; Mansour, Hoda Anwer; Nigm, Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is one of the parasites causing schistosomiasis, a disease which threatens millions of people all over the world. Traditional chemical drugs are not fully effective against schistosomaisis due to the evolving drug resistant worm strains, so exploring new remedies derived from natural products is a good way to fight schistosomiasis. In the present investigation two natural products, Nigella sativa oil and Chroococcus turgidus extract were used separately or in a combination to explore their effect on S. mansoni. The infected mice treated with Chroococcus turgidus extract or/and sativa seed oil showed a significant decrease in the total worm burden. The total number of deposited eggs by females of S. mansoni was significantly decreased in the liver of mice treated with Chroococcus turgidus extract or/and sativa seed oil. However, in the intestine, the number of eggs was significantly reduced in mice treated with algal extract and those treated with both algal extract and oil. Fecundity of female S. mansoni showed a significant decrease from mice treated with algal extract or/and sativa seed oil. According to SEM investigations the tegmental surface, oral and ventral suckers of worms also showed considerable changes; as the tubercles lost their spines, some are swollen and torn out. The suckers become edematous and enlarged while the tegmental surface is damaged due to the treatment with Chroococcus turgidus extract or/and sativa seed oil. In conclusion, the Nigella sativa oil and Chroococcus turgidus extract are promising natural compounds that can be used in fighting schistosomiasis.

  12. Orally administered whole egg demonstrates antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test on rats.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Mao; Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Ogino, Yumi; Yoshida, Junki; Tomonaga, Shozo; Yasuo, Shinobu; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2014-08-01

    Several studies have reported that vegetarian diets are associated with a higher prevalence of major depression. Therefore, we hypothesised that the consumption of animal products, especially eggs, may have positive effects on mental health, especially on major depression, because a previous study reported that egg consumption produces numerous beneficial effects in humans. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of chronic whole-egg treatment on depression-like behaviours in Wistar rats, a control strain, and Wistar Kyoto rats, an animal model of depression. In both the rats, either whole-egg solution (5 ml/kg) or distilled water (5 ml/kg) was orally administrated for 35 days. During these periods, the open-field test (OFT) was conducted on the 21st day, and a forced swimming test (FST) was enforced on the 27th and 28th days. On the 36th day, the plasma and brain were collected. Chronic whole-egg treatment did not affect line crossing in the OFT, whereas it reduced the total duration of immobility in the FST on both strains. Furthermore, interestingly, the results indicated the possibility that whole-egg treatment elevated the incorporation of tryptophan into the brain, and the tryptophan concentration in the prefrontal cortex was actually increased by the treatment. This study demonstrated that whole-egg treatment exerts an antidepressant-like effect in the FST. It is suggested that whole egg may be an excellent food for preventing and alleviating the conditions of major depression.

  13. Fate of orally administered radioactive fatty acids in the late-pregnant rat.

    PubMed

    López-Luna, Pilar; Ortega-Senovilla, Henar; López-Soldado, Iliana; Herrera, Emilio

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the biodisponibility of placental transfer of fatty acids, rats pregnant for 20 days were given tracer amounts of [(14)C]palmitic (PA), oleic (OA), linoleic (LA), α-linolenic (LNA), or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) orally and euthanized at 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, or 8.0 h thereafter. Maternal plasma radioactivity in lipids initially increased only to decline at later times. Most of the label appeared first as triacylglycerols (TAG); later, the proportion in phospholipids (PhL) increased. The percentage of label in placental lipids was also always highest shortly after administration and declined later; again, PhL increased with time. Fetal plasma radioactivity increased with time, with its highest value at 8.0 h after DHA or LNA administration. DHA initially appeared primarily in the nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and PA, OA, LA, and LNA as TAG followed by NEFA; in all cases, there was an increase in PhL at later times. Measurement of fatty acid concentrations allowed calculation of specific (radio)activities, and the ratio (fetal/maternal) of these in the plasmas gave an index of placental transfer activity, which was LNA > LA > DHA = OA > PA. It is proposed that a considerable proportion of most fatty acids transferred through the placenta are released into the fetal circulation in the form of TAG.

  14. Antiosteoporotic effect of orally administered yolk-derived peptides on bone mass in women.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Adham M; Watabe, Kazuya; Yamane, Tetsuro; Isono, Tadayuki; Okamura, Yoshitaka; Kawahito, Seiji; Takeshima, Kazuhito; Masuda, Kazuyuki; Kim, Mujo

    2014-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to verify the effect of oral intake of a yolk-derived peptide preparation (HYP) obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of yolk water-soluble protein on bone markers and bone density in 65 perimenopausal women with an average age of 47.6 ± 5.2 years. Subjects were divided into three groups, and then enrolled in a 6-month, randomized, double-blind clinical trial. Bone formation and resorption markers were measured at 0, 3, and 6 months, while bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spines was measured at 0 and 6 months. Although the bone formation marker levels showed the similarity changes among the groups, bone resorption markers in the test HYP group were significantly decreased after 3 and 6 months in comparison to other groups (P < 0.05). After 6 months, BMD in the test HYP group maintained at healthy numerical values whereas BMD values were decreased in other groups. Hence HYP would be an antiosteoporotic agent originated from natural food to maintain bone health, especially for women.

  15. Biorelevant in-vitro performance testing of orally administered dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Reppas, Christos; Vertzoni, Maria

    2012-07-01

    This review focuses on the evolution and current status of biorelevant media and hydrodynamics, and discusses the usefulness of biorelevant performance testing in the evaluation of specific dosage form related lumenal processes. During the last 15 years our knowledge of the gastrointestinal environment (including the lower gut) has improved dramatically and biorelevant media composition and, to a lesser extent, biorelevant hydrodynamics, have been refined. Biorelevant dissolution/release testing is useful for the evaluation of formulation and food effects on plasma levels after administration of immediate release dosage forms containing low solubility compounds and after administration of extended release products. Lumenal disintegration times of immediate release dosage forms and the bile acid sequestering activity of resins in the lumen can also be successfully forecasted with biorelevant in vitro testing. Biorelevant in-vitro performance testing is an important tool for evaluating intralumenal dosage form performance. Since the formulation of new active pharmaceutical ingredients for oral delivery is more challenging than ever before, efforts to improve the predictability of biorelevant tests are expected to continue. © 2012 The Authors. JPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  16. Toxicity of colloidal silica nanoparticles administered orally for 90 days in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Ri; Lee, Seung-Young; Lee, Eun Jeong; Park, Sung Ha; Seong, Nak-won; Seo, Heung-Sik; Shin, Sung-Sup; Kim, Seon-Ju; Meang, Eun-Ho; Park, Myeong-Kyu; Kim, Min-Seok; Kim, Cheol-Su; Kim, Soo-Ki; Son, Sang Wook; Seo, Young Rok; Kang, Boo Hyon; Han, Beom Seok; An, Seong Soo A; Lee, Beom-Jun; Kim, Meyoung-Kon

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the potential toxicity and establish the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) and target organ(s) of negatively charged colloidal silica particles of different sizes, ie, SiO2 (EN20(-)) (20 nm) or SiO2 (EN100(-)) 2(100 nm), administered by gavage in Sprague-Dawley rats. After verification of the physicochemical properties of the SiO2 particles to be tested, a preliminary dose range-finding study and 90-day repeated dose study were conducted according to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development test guideline. Based on the results of the 14-day dose range-finding study, a high dose was determined to be 2,000 mg/kg, and middle and low doses were set at 1,000 and 500 mg/kg, respectively. In the 90-day toxicity study, there were no animal deaths in relation to administration of SiO2 particles of either size. In addition, no treatment-related clinical changes or histopathological findings were observed in any of the experimental groups. Moreover, no difference in toxic effects from chronic exposure to SiO2 (EN20(-))(20 nm) or SiO2 (EN100(-)) (100 nm) was observed. The results of this study indicate that the NOAEL for SiO2 (EN20(-)) and SiO2 (EN100(-)) would most likely be 2,000 mg/kg, and no target organ was identified in rats of either sex.

  17. Orally administered novel cyclic pentapeptide P-317 alleviates symptoms of diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Marta; Chen, Chunqiu; Mokrowiecka, Anna; Cygankiewicz, Adam I; Zakrzewski, Piotr K; Sałaga, Maciej; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Wlaź, Piotr; Krajewska, Wanda M; Fichna, Jakub

    2015-02-01

    The aim of our study was to characterize the effect of P-317, a novel cyclic derivative of morphiceptin, on gastrointestinal (GI) motility and abdominal pain in mouse models mimicking symptoms of diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D). The effect of P-317 on mouse intestinal motility was characterized in vitro and in vivo in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The antinociceptive action of P-317 was characterized in the mustard oil-induced abdominal pain model and the writhing test. Locomotor activity and grip-strength tests were used to evaluate the effect of P-317 in the central nervous system (CNS). To translate our study to clinical conditions, the semi-quantitative expression of μ-opioid receptors (MOP) and κ-opioid receptors (KOP) messenger RNA (mRNA) in human colonic samples from IBS-D patients was quantified. In vitro, P-317 (10(-10) -10(-6) M) inhibited colonic and ileal smooth muscle contractions in a concentration-dependent, β-funaltrexamine and nor-binaltorphimine-reversible manner. In vivo, P-317 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p. and 1 mg/kg, p.o.) inhibited GI transit, displayed a potent antinociceptive action in abdominal pain tests and did not influence the CNS. P-317 produced a potent analgesic and antidiarrhoeal action in the mouse GI tract after oral administration. Given lower expression of MOP and KOP mRNA in IBS-D patients, P-317 is a promising peptide-based drug candidate for IBS-D therapy. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  18. Assessment of vitamin B(12) absorption based on the accumulation of orally administered cyanocobalamin on transcobalamin.

    PubMed

    Hardlei, Tore Forsingdal; Mørkbak, Anne Louise; Bor, Mustafa Vakur; Bailey, Lynn B; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Nexo, Ebba

    2010-03-01

    Vitamin B(12), or cobalamin (Cbl), is absorbed in the intestine and transported to the cells bound to transcobalamin (TC). We hypothesize that cyanocobalamin (CNCbl) is absorbed unchanged, thereby allowing measurement of the complex of CNCbl bound to TC (TC-CNCbl) to be used for studying the absorption of the vitamin. TC was immunoprecipitated from serum samples obtained from healthy donors at baseline and at 24 h after oral administration of three 9-microg CNCbl doses over 1 day. Cbl was released by treatment with subtilisin Carlsberg. The different forms of Cbl were isolated by HPLC and subsequently quantified with an ELISA-based Cbl assay. At baseline, the median TC-CNCbl concentration was 1 pmol/L (range, 0-10 pmol/L); the intraindividual variation (SD) was 1.6 pmol/L (n = 31). After CNCbl administration, the TC-CNCbl concentration increased significantly (P = 0.0003, paired t-test), whereas no major changes were observed in any of the other Cbl forms bound to TC (n = 10). Only a moderate additional increase in TC-CNCbl was observed with prolonged (5 days) CNCbl administration (n = 10). We designed an absorption test based on measuring TC-CNCbl at baseline and 24 h after CNCbl intake and established a reference interval for the increase in TC-CNCbl (n = 78). The median absolute increase was 23 pmol/L (range, 6-64 pmol/L), and the relative increase was >3-fold. Our data demonstrate that CNCbl is absorbed unchanged and accumulates on circulating TC. We suggest that measuring TC-CNCbl will improve the assessment of vitamin B(12) absorption.

  19. Plasma Drug Concentrations of Orally Administered Rosuvastatin in Hispaniolan Amazon Parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    PubMed

    Beaufrère, Hugues; Papich, Mark G; Brandão, João; Nevarez, Javier; Tully, Thomas N

    2015-03-01

    Atherosclerotic diseases are common in pet psittacine birds, in particular Amazon parrots. While hypercholesterolemia and dyslipidemia have not definitely been associated with increased susceptibility to atherosclerosis in parrots, these are important and well-known risk factors in humans. Therefore statin drugs such as rosuvastatin constitute the mainstay of human treatment of dyslipidemia and the prevention of atherosclerosis. No pharmacologic studies have been performed in psittacine birds despite the high prevalence of atherosclerosis in captivity. Thirteen Hispaniolan Amazon parrots were used to test a single oral dose of 10 mg/kg of rosuvastatin with blood sampling performed according to a balanced incomplete block design over 36 hours. Because low plasma concentrations were produced in the first study, a subsequent pilot study using a dose of 25 mg/kg in 2 Amazon parrots was performed. Most plasma samples for the 10 mg/kg dose and all samples for the 25 mg/kg dose had rosuvastatin concentration below the limits of quantitation. For the 10 mg/kg study, the median peak plasma concentration and time to peak plasma concentration were 0.032 μg/mL and 2 hours, respectively. Our results indicate that rosuvastatin does not appear suitable in Amazon parrots as compounded and used at the dose in this study. Pharmacodynamic studies investigating lipid-lowering effects of statins rather than pharmacokinetic studies may be more practical and cost effective in future studies to screen for a statin with more ideal properties for potential use in psittacine dyslipidemia and atherosclerotic diseases.

  20. DNA damage induced by red food dyes orally administered to pregnant and male mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, S; Murakami, M; Matsusaka, N; Kano, K; Taniguchi, K; Sasaki, Y F

    2001-05-01

    We determined the genotoxicity of synthetic red tar dyes currently used as food color additives in many countries, including JAPAN: For the preliminary assessment, we treated groups of 4 pregnant mice (gestational day 11) once orally at the limit dose (2000 mg/kg) of amaranth (food red No. 2), allura red (food red No. 40), or acid red (food red No. 106), and we sampled brain, lung, liver, kidney, glandular stomach, colon, urinary bladder, and embryo 3, 6, and 24 h after treatment. We used the comet (alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis) assay to measure DNA damage. The assay was positive in the colon 3 h after the administration of amaranth and allura red and weakly positive in the lung 6 h after the administration of amaranth. Acid red did not induce DNA damage in any sample at any sampling time. None of the dyes damaged DNA in other organs or the embryo. We then tested male mice with amaranth, allura red, and a related color additive, new coccine (food red No. 18). The 3 dyes induced DNA damage in the colon starting at 10 mg/kg. Twenty ml/kg of soaking liquid from commercial red ginger pickles, which contained 6.5 mg/10 ml of new coccine, induced DNA damage in colon, glandular stomach, and bladder. The potencies were compared to those of other rodent carcinogens. The rodent hepatocarcinogen p-dimethylaminoazobenzene induced colon DNA damage at 1 mg/kg, whereas it damaged liver DNA only at 500 mg/kg. Although 1 mg/kg of N-nitrosodimethylamine induced DNA damage in liver and bladder, it did not induce colon DNA damage. N-nitrosodiethylamine at 14 mg/kg did not induce DNA damage in any organs examined. Because the 3 azo additives we examined induced colon DNA damage at a very low dose, more extensive assessment of azo additives is warranted.

  1. Immobilization of domestic goats (Capra hircus) using orally administered carfentanil citrate and detomidine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Sleeman, J M; Carter, W; Tobin, T; Ramsay, E C

    1997-06-01

    Eight domestic goats (Capra hircus) were anesthetized with a combination of carfentanil citrate and detomidine HCl each at a dosage of 60 micrograms/kg, mixed with an equal volume of 0.5% saponin, an absorption enhancer. The drug combination was delivered by hand directly into the buccal cavity. Physiologic parameters were measured prior to drug administration and at 5-min intervals after the goats reached sternal recumbency. Depth of anesthesia was assessed at the same time intervals following drug administration. Blood was drawn prior to drug administration, at initial contact following sustained sternal recumbency, and at 15-min intervals thereafter. Serum carfentanil and detomidine levels were measured using slightly modified commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits and techniques. Mean (+/-SD) induction time (time from drug administration to sternal recumbency) was 22 +/- 4.3 min (n = 8), and inductions were characterized by long excitement phases (9.3 +/- 5.8 min). There was considerable variation in the depth of anesthesia. Three goats appeared to be lightly anesthetized, two goats showed moderate levels of anesthesia, and three goats attained levels of anesthesia adequate for the performance of minor veterinary procedures. Physiologic changes caused by the drug combination were minor and were consistent with changes seen with parenteral administration of these drugs. Serum carfentanil levels were greatest at the time of initial contact for three goats and greatest 15 min later for two other goats. Levels then decreased slightly during the procedures, suggesting carfentanil absorption in these animals was across the oral mucosa. Serum detomidine levels rose gradually throughout anesthesia. Reversals with naltrexone and yohimbine or atipamezole were rapid and smooth.

  2. Bone Regeneration Is Promoted by Orally Administered Bovine Lactoferrin in a Rabbit Tibial Distraction Osteogenesis Model.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyang; Zhu, Songsong; Hu, Jing

    2015-07-01

    bovine lactoferrin treatment significantly increased serum levels of bone alkaline phosphatase and decreased serum levels of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase 5b. In addition, RT-PCR and immunohistochemical analyses suggested that bovine lactoferrin treatment induced a lower receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (RANK) ligand/osteoprotegerin (RANKL/OPG) ratio in the distracted callus. The results of our study suggest that bovine lactoferrin treatment could promote bone regeneration during distraction osteogenesis in the rabbit. The results indicate that the OPG/RANKL/RANK system might be a major mechanism for increased bone formation and decreased bone resorption in distraction osteogenesis with bovine lactoferrin treatment. Oral administration of bovine lactoferrin may provide a feasible approach for promoting osteogenesis during distraction osteogenesis.

  3. Amelioration of Radiation Esophagitis by Orally Administered p53/Mdm2/Mdm4 Inhibitor (BEB55) or GS-Nitroxide

    PubMed Central

    KIM, HYUN; BERNARD, MARK E.; EPPERLY, MICHAEL W.; SHEN, HONGMEI; AMOSCATO, ANDREW; DIXON, TRACY M.; DOEMLING, ALEXANDER S.; LI, SONG; GAO, XIANG; WIPF, PETER; WANG, HONG; ZHANG, XICHEN; KAGAN, VALERIAN E.; GREENBERGER, JOEL S.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim Esophagitis is a significant toxicity of radiation therapy for lung cancer. In this study, reduction of irradiation esophagitis in mice, by orally administered p53/Mdm2/Mdm4 inhibitor, BEB55, or the GS-nitroxide, JP4-039, was evaluated. Materials and Methods BEB55 or JP4-039 in F15 (liposomal) formulation was administered intraesophageally to C57BL/6 mice prior to thoracic irradiation of 29 Gy × 1 or 11.5 Gy × 4 thoracic irradiation. Progenitor cells were sorted from excised esophagus, and nitroxide was quantified, by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Mice with Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) orthotopic lung tumors were treated with BEB55 or JP4-039 prior to 20 Gy to determine if the drugs would protect the tumor cells from radiation. Results Intraesophageal BEB55 and JP4-039 compared to formulation alone increased survival after single fraction (p=0.0209 and 0.0384, respectively) and four fraction thoracic irradiation (p=0.0241 and 0.0388, respectively). JP4-039 was detected in esophagus, liver, bone marrow, and orthotopic Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) tumor. There was no significant radiation protection of lung tumors by BEB55 or JP4-039 compared to formulation only as assessed by survival (p=0.3021 and 0.3693, respectively). Thus, BEB55 and JP4-039 safely ameliorate radiation esophagitis in mice. PMID:22021675

  4. Attenuation of obesity-induced inflammation in mice orally administered with salmon cartilage proteoglycan, a prophylactic agent.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Shouhei; Asano, Krisana; Nakane, Akio

    2017-03-11

    Obesity is associated with chronic inflammation of adipose tissue and causes development of type 2 diabetes. M1 macrophage population was increased in adipose tissue of obese mouse. M1 macrophages induce insulin resistance through the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Our previous studies demonstrated that salmon cartilage proteoglycan (PG) suppresses excess inflammation in various mouse inflammatory diseases. In this study, we examined the effect of PG on type 2 diabetes using high-fat-diet (HFD) induced obese mouse model. Oral PG administration enhanced the population of small adipocytes (area less than 1000 μm(2)) without body and tissue weight gain. In addition, PG administration suppressed mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-6 and CXCL2 in adipose tissue. The proportion of M1 macrophages was decreased by PG administration. In addition, PG administration suppressed hyperglycemia after intraperitoneal glucose injection. Fasted serum insulin level was decreased in PG-administered mice. Moreover, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt was enhanced in the liver and gastrocnemius skeletal muscle of PG-administered mice. These data suggested that PG administration improves hyperglycemia and insulin sensitivity in obese mice by modulation of M1 macrophages which secrete proinflammatory cytokines in adipose tissue and activation of Akt in liver and skeletal muscle.

  5. The short- and long-term effects of orally administered high-dose reduced graphene oxide nanosheets on mouse behaviors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ding; Zhang, Zheyu; Liu, Yayun; Chu, Maoquan; Yang, Chengyu; Li, Wenhao; Shao, Yuxiang; Yue, Yan; Xu, Rujiao

    2015-11-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO), a carbon-based nanomaterial, has enormous potential in biomedical research, including in vivo cancer therapeutics. Concerns over the toxicity remain outstanding and must be investigated before clinical application. The effect of rGO exposure on animal behaviors, such as learning and memory abilities, has not been clarified. Herein, we explored the short- and long-term effects of orally administered rGO on mouse behaviors, including general locomotor activity level, balance and neuromuscular coordination, exploratory and anxiety behaviors, and learning and memory abilities using open-field, rotarod, and Morris water maze tests. Compared with mice administered buffer-dispersed mouse chow or buffer alone, mice receiving a high dose of small or large rGO nanosheets showed little change in exploratory, anxiety-like, or learning and memory behaviors, although general locomotor activity, balance, and neuromuscular coordination were initially affected, which the mechanisms (e.g. the influence of rGO exposure on the activity of superoxide dismutase in mouse serum) were discussed. The results presented in this work look to provide a deep understanding of the in vivo toxicity of rGO to animals, especially its effect on learning and memory and other behaviors.

  6. Orally administered Chrysin improves post-thawed sperm quality and fertility of rooster.

    PubMed

    Zhandi, M; Ansari, M; Roknabadi, P; Zare Shahneh, A; Sharafi, M

    2017-07-10

    Chrysin is a bioflavonoid compound found in passion flower, chamomile, propolis and honey at high levels. Post-thawed sperm quality and fertility of Chrysin-fed roosters were assessed in this study. Twenty 40-week-old male broiler breeders were randomly divided into four groups and fed basal diet supplemented with different levels of Chrysin including 0 (Ch-0), 25 (Ch-25), 50 (Ch-50) or 75 (Ch-75) mg/day for 12 consecutive weeks. Semen samples were weekly collected from 6th to 9th week of experiment to evaluate some sperm quality parameters including total and progressive motility, plasma membrane integrity and functionality (in fresh and post-thawed samples) and mitochondrial activity (only in post-thawed samples). Also, collected semen samples from 10th, 11th and 12th week of experiment were frozen and then artificially inseminated to test fertility rate. According to the results, an improvement in both fresh and post-thawed sperm quality including total [fresh: 88.00 ± 0.58 and 87.25 ± 0.67 (p < .01); post-thawed: 51.07 ± 2.05 and 52.72 ± 1.96 (p < .01)] and progressive motility [fresh: 76.00 ± 0.58 and 78.25 ± 0.65 (p < .01); post-thawed: 40.61 ± 2.01 and 39.88 ± 2.01 (p < .01)], plasma membrane integrity [fresh: 91.60 ± 0.58 and 89.85 ± 0.59 (p < .01); post-thawed: 56.99 ± 1.86 and 54.39 ± 1.86 (p < .01)] and functionality [fresh: 75.40 ± 0.42 and 77.90 ± 0.96 (p < .01); post-thawed: 45.69 ± 1.71 and 46.35 ± 1.71 (p < .01)] was noted for both Ch-50 and Ch-75, respectively, groups compared to control group. Despite no significant change in mitochondrial activity, fertility rate of post-thawed spermatozoa was significantly improved in all Chrysin-fed groups compared to Ch-0 group. In conclusion, oral Chrysin administration to roosters could ameliorate cryopreservation-induced impairment of sperm quality and fertility rate. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. The effects of food on the bioavailability of fenofibrate administered orally in healthy volunteers via sustained-release capsule.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hwi-Yeol; Joo Lee, Eun; Youn Chung, Soo; Choi, Sun-Ok; Kee Kim, Hyung; Kwon, Jun-Tack; Kang, Wonku; Kwon, Kwang-Il

    2006-01-01

    To examine the effects of food on plasma concentration and bioavailability of fenofibrate administered as a sustained-release capsule. Twenty-four healthy Korean volunteers were enrolled in a randomised, open-label, balanced, three-treatment, three-period, three-sequence, single oral dose, crossover pharmacokinetic study. A single dose of fenofibrate (250 mg sustained-release capsule) was administered on three occasions -- after overnight fasting, after consumption of a standard breakfast and after a high-fat breakfast. Serial blood samples were collected for the next 72 hours. Plasma fenofibric acid concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. The pharmacokinetic parameters were significantly affected by food intake. The high-fat breakfast affected the rate of absorption of fenofibrate more than the standard breakfast and fasted conditions. Specifically, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC(infinity)) and peak plasma concentration (C(max)) increased 2.45-fold and 2.89-fold, respectively, between the fasted and standard-fed conditions (p < 0.01). In addition, the high-fat meal caused 3.34-fold and 3.82-fold increases compared with the fasted condition in AUC(infinity) and C(max), respectively. A one-compartment open model with lag time successfully described the plasma concentrations of fenofibric acid. In healthy volunteers, AUC(infinity) and C(max) of fenofibrate, when administered via sustained-release capsules immediately after the consumption of food, was increased significantly from the fasting conditions (p < 0.01). The greatest AUC(infinity) and C(max) occurred when the capsules were taken after a high-fat breakfast.

  8. Impact of nutritional status on the oral bioavailability of leucine administered to rats as part of a standard enteral diet.

    PubMed

    Miralles-Arnau, Silvia; Nácher, Amparo; Jiménez, Africa; Jiménez-Torres, N Víctor; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde

    2011-08-01

    To investigate the absorption and relative bioavailability of leucine administered orally as part of an enteral diet in well and malnourished animals. Two groups - RN (regular nutrition) and PCR (protein-calorie restricted) - were fed with different diets for 23-25 days. Rats from each group were assigned randomly to one of three treatments (water, T-Diet Plus Standard(®) (problem) or Isosource ST(®) (reference)) administered in single (N = 76) or multiple (N = 39) doses. Blood samples were assayed for leucine content. Area under the curve (AUC) was calculated by non-compartmental analysis. Log-transformed AUC(s) were statistically compared by analysis of variance, and 90% confidence intervals (CI 90%) of the ratio of the log-transformed AUC(s) between problem and reference diets, and between enteral diet and water were determined. The AUC (last) between the problem and reference diets was not statistically different. 90% CIs for single and multiple doses were 58.4-137.5% and 78-134.6% for RN and 76.7-172.2% and 72-167.2% for PCR, respectively. Leucine absorption was 12% higher among malnourished animals when multiple doses were administered, but the differences detected were not statistically different. In spite of the different composition of proteins in the enteral diets tested, the absorption of leucine, even though slightly higher in the malnourished state, is similar in both of them. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  9. An orally administered bacterial immunomodulator primes rabbit neutrophils for increased oxidative burst in response to opsonized zymosan.

    PubMed Central

    Helmberg, A; Böck, G; Wolf, H; Wick, G

    1989-01-01

    To assess the potential effect of an orally administered immunomodulator, consisting of a lysate of seven different bacteria, on polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) function, rabbits were fed this preparation for five consecutive days via a gastric tube. On day 6, PMN were separated from peripheral blood and oxidative burst was triggered by opsonized zymosan or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate and quantitated on a single-cell basis. This study presents the extension of an existing flow cytometric method, leading to the possibility of quantitating single-cell oxidative burst triggered by particulate (instead of only soluble) stimuli. By this means, treated animals showed statistically significant increased oxidative burst reactions compared with the control group. The data provide evidence that oral application of a bacterial immunomodulator leads to a primed state in PMN for increased oxidative activity in response to a particulate stimulus. This offers the possibility that the beneficial effect of similar treatment in humans may in part be due to comparable mechanisms. PMID:2807539

  10. Effect of acid secretion blockade by omeprazole on the relative bioavailability of orally administered furazolidone in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Calafatti, Silvana A; Ortiz, Rodrigo A M; Deguer, Maristela; Martinez, Márcio; Pedrazzoli, José

    2001-01-01

    Aims The administration of omeprazole may interfere with the absorption of orally administered drugs by reducing gastric pH and hence tablet dissolution. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a 5 day administration of omeprazole on the pharmacokinetics of furazolidone. Methods Eighteen healthy (nine male and nine female) volunteers were selected. The study had an open randomized two-period crossover design with a 21 day washout period between the phases. Serum concentrations of furazolidone were measured by reversed-phase h.p.l.c. with ultraviolet detection. Results Administration of omeprazole caused a significant reduction of Cmax [0.34 µg ml−1 (range 0.25–0.43) vs 0.24 µg ml−1 (range 0.15–0.34)] with no significant delay in absorption tmax [2.5 h (range 1.85–3.0) vs 2.4 h (range 2.06–2.71)]. Conclusions Furazolidone was rapidly absorbed after oral administration. Short-term treatment with omeprazole did alter the relative bioavailability of this drug, probably through an effect on absorption kinetics or first-pass metabolism. PMID:11488780

  11. Treatment adherence of cancer patients to orally administered chemotherapy: insights from a Greek study using a self-reported questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Saratsiotou, Ioanna; Kordoni, Maria; Bakogiannis, Charalampos; Livadarou, Eleftheria; Skarlos, Dimosthenis; Kosmidis, Paris A; Razis, Evangelia

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this prospective observational study was to investigate the patterns of treatment adherence to orally administered chemotherapy of patients being treated for cancer. Patients were asked to participate in the survey during their visits to the study centers' pharmacists or doctors to obtain their oral medication from April 2008 until May 2009. The data were collected using a self-reported anonymous 7-page long questionnaire, which contained questions about their demographic profile, disease and treatment characteristics, and side-effects and adherence information, both intentional and nonintentional. 99 Patients completed the questionnaire. Missing values ranged from 1% to 8%. Unintended nonadherence to therapy was reported by 19 patients. The most important factor correlating with unintended nonadherence was the patient's belief regarding treatment effectiveness since only 16.7% of the patients believing that their treatment is effective reported nonadherence as opposed to 62.5% for those that did not believe that treatment is effective (p=0.03). Intentional nonadherence was reported by 14 patients The most important factor correlating to intentional nonadherence was time since disease diagnosis, as nonadherence was reported by 33.3% of the patients having the disease less than 6 months, compared to 16.7% for those between 6 and 24 months and 8.3% for those between 2 and 5 years (p=0.01). Greek patients seem to have similar nonadherence pattern as in other countries. Confidence in treatment efficacy appeared as a significant adherence determinant.

  12. Orally Administered P22 Phage Tailspike Protein Reduces Salmonella Colonization in Chickens: Prospects of a Novel Therapy against Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Waseh, Shakeeba; Hanifi-Moghaddam, Pejman; Coleman, Russell; Masotti, Michael; Ryan, Shannon; Foss, Mary; MacKenzie, Roger; Henry, Matthew; Szymanski, Christine M.; Tanha, Jamshid

    2010-01-01

    One of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in man and economically important animals is bacterial infections of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The emergence of difficult-to-treat infections, primarily caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria, demands for alternatives to antibiotic therapy. Currently, one of the emerging therapeutic alternatives is the use of lytic bacteriophages. In an effort to exploit the target specificity and therapeutic potential of bacteriophages, we examined the utility of bacteriophage tailspike proteins (Tsps). Among the best-characterized Tsps is that from the Podoviridae P22 bacteriophage, which recognizes the lipopolysaccharides of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In this study, we utilized a truncated, functionally equivalent version of the P22 tailspike protein, P22sTsp, as a prototype to demonstrate the therapeutic potential of Tsps in the GI tract of chickens. Bacterial agglutination assays showed that P22sTsp was capable of agglutinating S. Typhimurium at levels similar to antibodies and incubating the Tsp with chicken GI fluids showed no proteolytic activity against the Tsp. Testing P22sTsp against the three major GI proteases showed that P22sTsp was resistant to trypsin and partially to chymotrypsin, but sensitive to pepsin. However, in formulated form for oral administration, P22sTsp was resistant to all three proteases. When administered orally to chickens, P22sTsp significantly reduced Salmonella colonization in the gut and its further penetration into internal organs. In in vitro assays, P22sTsp effectively retarded Salmonella motility, a factor implicated in bacterial colonization and invasion, suggesting that the in vivo decolonization ability of P22sTsp may, at least in part, be due to its ability to interfere with motility… Our findings show promise in terms of opening novel Tsp-based oral therapeutic approaches against bacterial infections in production animals and potentially in humans. PMID:21124920

  13. Intraperitoneal Injection of Ethanol Results in Drastic Changes in Bone Metabolism Not Observed When Ethanol is Administered by Oral Gavage

    PubMed Central

    Iwaniec, Urszula T.; Turner, Russell T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic alcohol abuse is associated with increased risk for osteoporosis while light to moderate alcohol intake correlates with reduced osteoporosis risk. Addition of alcohol to a liquid diet is often used to model chronic alcohol abuse. Methods to model intermittent drinking (including bindge drinking and light to moderate consumption) include 1) intragastric administration of alcohol by oral gavage or 2) intraperitoneal (ip) administration of alcohol by injection. However, it is unclear whether the latter two methods produce comparable results. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the skeletal response to alcohol delivered daily by oral gavage or ip injection. Materials and Methods Ethanol or vehicle was administered to 4-month-old female Sprague Dawley rats once daily at 1.2 g/kg body weight for 7 days. Following necropsy, bone formation and bone architecture were evaluated in tibial diaphysis (cortical bone) and proximal tibial metaphysis (cancellous bone) by histomorphometry. mRNA was measured for bone matrix proteins in distal femur metaphysis. Results Administration of alcohol by gavage had no significant effect on body weight gain or bone measurements. In contrast, administration of the same dose of alcohol by ip injection resulted in reduced body weight, total suppression of periosteal bone formation in tibial diaphysis, decreased cancellous bone formation in proximal tibial metaphysis, and decreased mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins in distal femur. Conclusions Our findings raise concerns regarding the use of ip injection of ethanol in rodents as a method for modeling the skeletal effects of intermittent exposure to alcohol in humans. This concern is based on a failure of the ip route to replicate the oral route of alcohol administration. PMID:23550821

  14. Effects of orally administered enalapril on blood pressure and hemodynamic response to vasopressors during isoflurane anesthesia in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Amanda E; Shepard, Molly K; Schmiedt, Chad W; Hofmeister, Erik H; Brown, Scott A

    2016-09-01

    To examine whether preanesthetic administration of enalapril, compared with placebo, results in a greater decline in blood pressure (BP) or decreased responsiveness of BP to isotonic fluids or vasopressors in healthy dogs during isoflurane anesthesia. Randomized, experimental, placebo-controlled, blinded, crossover study. Twelve healthy, female, purpose-bred beagles. Dogs underwent the following week-long treatment protocols, each preceded by a 1 week washout period: oral placebo twice daily (PLA); oral enalapril, 0.5 mg kg(-1) twice daily, with the 15th dose withheld on the day of anesthesia (ENA-W), and oral enalapril, 0.5 mg kg(-1) twice daily, with the 15th dose administered 90 minutes prior to anesthetic induction (ENA). On day 8 of each treatment period, dogs were anesthetized in random order utilizing a standard protocol. Following stabilization at an end-tidal isoflurane concentration (Fe'Iso) of 1.3%, invasively measured systolic (SAP), diastolic (DAP) and mean (MAP) arterial blood pressure were continuously recorded via telemetry. Hypotension (SAP < 85 mmHg) was treated with the following sequential interventions: lactated Ringer's solution (LRS) bolus (10 mL kg(-1) ); repeated LRS bolus; dopamine (7 μg kg(-1)  min(-1) ); and dopamine (10 μg kg(-1)  min(-1) ) first without and then with vasopressin (1 mU kg(-1)  hour(-1) ). Compared with the PLA but not the ENA-W group, the ENA group had significantly lower average SAP, DAP and MAP at an Fe'Iso of 1.3%, spent more minutes in hypotension, and required a greater number of interventions to correct moderate-to-severe mean arterial hypotension. In healthy dogs, enalapril administered 90 minutes prior to isoflurane anesthesia increases the degree of intra-anesthetic hypotension and the number of interventions required to correct moderate-to-severe hypotension. Dogs receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on the day of anesthesia may exhibit clinically significant intra

  15. Oral drug dosage forms administered to hospitalized children: Analysis of 117,665 oral administrations in a French paediatric hospital over a 1-year period.

    PubMed

    Lajoinie, A; Henin, E; Nguyen, K A; Malik, S; Mimouni, Y; Sapori, J M; Bréant, V; Cochat, P; Kassai, B

    2016-03-16

    Selecting the most appropriate dosage form, that ensures safe administration and adherence of medications, is a major issue for children. Marketed drugs, however, have rarely been tested for their use in children. There is a need for more data on drug formulations administered to children to identify unmet needs, and drive future paediatric research. We observed, over a 12-month follow-up, 117,665 oral drug administrations to 1998 hospitalized children. Nine-tenths belonged to five Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classes: Alimentary tract & metabolism, Nervous system, Cardiovascular system, Anti-infectives for systemic use and Blood & blood forming organs, one third of drug doses administered to school-age children and adolescents were liquids, and extemporaneous capsules were commonly used in younger children. Our study shows that despite the advantages of solid dosage forms and recent evidence from randomized controlled trials showing their acceptability in infants, they are seldom used in paediatric practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of gemifloxacin administered as an intravenous 200 mg formulation or an oral 320 mg tablet.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jo; Lim, Hyeong-Seok; Cho, Sang-Heon; Bae, Kyun-Seop

    2014-03-01

    , AUC∞ and maximum plasma concentration (C max) values were 9.12 (4.03) μg·h/mL, 9.26 (4.07) μg·h/mL and 2.90 (1.65) μg/mL, respectively, while these values for the oral formulation were 9.44 (3.34) μg·h/mL, 9.60 (3.49) μg·h/mL and 2.03 (0.95) μg/mL, respectively. For the intravenous and oral formulations, the median (range) time to reach C max (t max) values were 0.9 (0.7-1.0) and 1.0 (0.5-2.0) h, respectively. The mean relative bioavailability was 68.99 %. The 90 % CI of the ratios of the log-transformed values of AUClast and AUC∞ was 0.82-1.07. There were no serious adverse events. The intravenous and oral formulations were associated with treatment-emergent adverse event incidences of 63 % (10/16) and 13 % (2/15), respectively. After the intravenous formulation was administered, application site pain and paraesthesia were the most frequently reported adverse events (31 and 25 %, respectively). All adverse events resolved spontaneously without treatment. Intravenous 200 mg and oral 320 mg formulations of gemifloxacin are equivalent in terms of AUC following a single dose in healthy male subjects.

  17. Randomized trial comparing oral sulfate solution with 4-L polyethylene glycol administered in a split dose as preparation for colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyo-Joon; Park, Soo-Kyung; Kim, Jee Hyun; Im, Jong Pil; Yeom, Dong Han; Seo, Geom Seog; Park, Dong Il

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the non-inferiority of low-volume oral sulfate solution (OSS) to 4-L polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions administered in a split-dose regimen as bowel preparation for colonoscopy. The safety and tolerability were also compared between the two regimens. In this prospective, randomized, single-blind, active-control, parallel group, and non-inferiority trial, consecutive outpatients and health checkup recipients aged 19-65 years undergoing elective colonoscopy were enrolled to receive OSS or 4-L PEG in a split-dose regimen. The quality of bowel preparation was evaluated using the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale. The occurrence of any adverse events, acceptance, compliance, and satisfaction during bowel preparation were evaluated by participant interviews. Overall, 210 participants were randomized, and 199 were administered by the study agents. Adequate bowel preparation was achieved in 98.0% (97/99) of the OSS group, which was non-inferior to the PEG group (96%; 96/100) with a difference of +2.8% (95% confidence interval; -2.8, +6.8). There were no differences in the incidence of adverse events except for abdominal pain, which was more frequent in the OSS (7.1%, 7/99) than in the PEG (1.0%, 1/100; P = 0.035) group. Acceptance, compliance, and satisfaction were significantly higher in the OSS than in the PEG group (all P < 0.05). Split-dose OSS was non-inferior to split-dose 4-L PEG with regard to bowel preparation efficacy before colonoscopy in adult outpatients or screening colonoscopy recipients aged ≤65 years with acceptable safety and superior tolerability. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Strain dependent protection conferred by Lactobacillus spp. administered orally with a Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine in a murine challenge model.

    PubMed

    Esvaran, M; Conway, P L

    2012-03-30

    Consumption of Lactobacillus spp. has been shown to enhance immune responses in mice. This study examined the immuno-adjuvant capacity of two strains: Lactobacillus acidophilus L10 and Lactobacillus fermentum PC2, in the induction of protective humoral immunity in a Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine challenge model. Briefly, BALB/c mice were divided into four groups. Three groups of mice received S. Typhimurium vaccine (10(8) colony forming units (CFU) per dose) on days 0 and 14. In addition to the vaccine, five doses (10(8) CFU per dose) of either L. acidophilus L10 or L. fermentum PC2 were also administered to a group. All mice were challenged with viable S. Typhimurium on day 28. On day 10 post challenge, the study was terminated and microbial and immunological parameters were assessed. Mice dosed with L. fermentum PC2 in addition to the vaccine had a significantly enhanced S. Typhimurium humoral response. The mice in this group had high levels of lactobacilli in the feces and in association with the Peyer's patches, no detectable levels of either lactobacilli or S. Typhimurium in the spleen, and no detectable weight loss. Mice given L. acidophilus L10 with the vaccine were unable to exhibit elevated S. Typhimurium specific humoral responses. However, there was no detectable S. Typhimurium in the spleens of this group. Interestingly, translocation of lactobacilli into the spleen was observed as well as a slight weight loss was noted in mice that received the L. acidophilus L10 with the vaccine. This study shows that, the L. fermentum PC2 had a greater capacity than the L. acidophilus L10 to act as an oral adjuvant in a S. Typhimurium oral vaccine program and afforded greater protection against a live S. Typhimurium challenge. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of Orally Administered Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus on the Well-Being and Salmonella Colonization of Young Chicks ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Atterbury, Robert J.; Hobley, Laura; Till, Robert; Lambert, Carey; Capeness, Michael J.; Lerner, Thomas R.; Fenton, Andrew K.; Barrow, Paul; Sockett, R. Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a bacterium which preys upon and kills Gram-negative bacteria, including the zoonotic pathogens Escherichia coli and Salmonella. Bdellovibrio has potential as a biocontrol agent, but no reports of it being tested in living animals have been published, and no data on whether Bdellovibrio might spread between animals are available. In this study, we tried to fill this knowledge gap, using B. bacteriovorus HD100 doses in poultry with a normal gut microbiota or predosed with a colonizing Salmonella strain. In both cases, Bdellovibrio was dosed orally along with antacids. After dosing non-Salmonella-infected birds with Bdellovibrio, we measured the health and well-being of the birds and any changes in their gut pathology and culturable microbiota, finding that although a Bdellovibrio dose at 2 days of age altered the overall diversity of the natural gut microbiota in 28-day-old birds, there were no adverse effects on their growth and well-being. Drinking water and fecal matter from the pens in which the birds were housed as groups showed no contamination by Bdellovibrio after dosing. Predatory Bdellovibrio orally administered to birds that had been predosed with a gut-colonizing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 4 strain (an important zoonotic pathogen) significantly reduced Salmonella numbers in bird gut cecal contents and reduced abnormal cecal morphology, indicating reduced cecal inflammation, compared to the ceca of the untreated controls or a nonpredatory ΔpilA strain, suggesting that these effects were due to predatory action. This work is a first step to applying Bdellovibrio therapeutically for other animal, and possibly human, infections. PMID:21705523

  20. Effects of orally administered Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus on the well-being and Salmonella colonization of young chicks.

    PubMed

    Atterbury, Robert J; Hobley, Laura; Till, Robert; Lambert, Carey; Capeness, Michael J; Lerner, Thomas R; Fenton, Andrew K; Barrow, Paul; Sockett, R Elizabeth

    2011-08-15

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a bacterium which preys upon and kills Gram-negative bacteria, including the zoonotic pathogens Escherichia coli and Salmonella. Bdellovibrio has potential as a biocontrol agent, but no reports of it being tested in living animals have been published, and no data on whether Bdellovibrio might spread between animals are available. In this study, we tried to fill this knowledge gap, using B. bacteriovorus HD100 doses in poultry with a normal gut microbiota or predosed with a colonizing Salmonella strain. In both cases, Bdellovibrio was dosed orally along with antacids. After dosing non-Salmonella-infected birds with Bdellovibrio, we measured the health and well-being of the birds and any changes in their gut pathology and culturable microbiota, finding that although a Bdellovibrio dose at 2 days of age altered the overall diversity of the natural gut microbiota in 28-day-old birds, there were no adverse effects on their growth and well-being. Drinking water and fecal matter from the pens in which the birds were housed as groups showed no contamination by Bdellovibrio after dosing. Predatory Bdellovibrio orally administered to birds that had been predosed with a gut-colonizing Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis phage type 4 strain (an important zoonotic pathogen) significantly reduced Salmonella numbers in bird gut cecal contents and reduced abnormal cecal morphology, indicating reduced cecal inflammation, compared to the ceca of the untreated controls or a nonpredatory ΔpilA strain, suggesting that these effects were due to predatory action. This work is a first step to applying Bdellovibrio therapeutically for other animal, and possibly human, infections.

  1. Comparable lumefantrine oral bioavailability when co-administered with oil-fortified maize porridge or milk in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Mwebaza, Norah; Jerling, Markus; Gustafsson, Lars L; Obua, Celestino; Waako, Paul; Mahindi, Margarita; Ntale, Muhammad; Beck, Olof; Hellgren, Urban

    2013-07-01

    Co-administration of artemether-lumefantrine with milk is recommended to improve lumefantrine (L) absorption but milk may not be available in resource-limited settings. This study explored the effects of cheap local food in Uganda on oral bioavailability of lumefantrine relative to milk. In an open-label, four-period crossover study, 13 healthy adult volunteers were randomized to receive a single oral dose of artemether-lumefantrine (80 mg artemether/480 mg lumefantrine) with water, milk, maize porridge or maize porridge with oil on separate occasions. Plasma lumefantrine was assayed using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Pharmacokinetic exposure parameters were determined by non-compartmental methods using WinNonlin. Peak concentrations (Cmax ) and area under concentration-time curve restricted to 48 hr after single dosing (AUC(0-48) ) were selected for relative bioavailability evaluations using confidence interval approach for average bioequivalence. Lumefantrine exposure was comparable in milk and maize porridge plus oil study groups. When artemether-lumefantrine was administered with maize porridge plus oil, average bioequivalence ranges (means ratios 90% CI, 0.84-1.88 and 0.85-1.69 for Cmax and AUC(0-48) , respectively) were within and exceeded acceptance ranges relative to milk (90% CI, 0.80-1.25). Both fasted and maize porridge groups demonstrated similarly much lower ranges of lumefantrine exposures (bioinequivalence) relative to milk. If milk is not available, it is thus possible to recommend fortification of carbohydrate-rich food with little fat (maize porridge plus vegetable oil) to achieve similarly optimal absorption of lumefantrine after artemether-lumefantrine administration.

  2. An orally administered butyrate-releasing derivative reduces neutrophil recruitment and inflammation in dextran sulphate sodium-induced murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Simeoli, Raffaele; Mattace Raso, Giuseppina; Pirozzi, Claudio; Lama, Adriano; Santoro, Anna; Russo, Roberto; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Berni Canani, Roberto; Calignano, Antonio; Perretti, Mauro; Meli, Rosaria

    2017-06-01

    Butyrate has shown benefits in inflammatory bowel diseases. However, it is not often administered orally because of its rancid smell and unpleasant taste. The efficacy of a more palatable butyrate-releasing derivative, N-(1-carbamoyl-2-phenylethyl) butyramide (FBA), was evaluated in a mouse model of colitis induced by dextran sodium sulphate (DSS). Male 10 week-old BALB/c mice received DSS (2.5%) in drinking water (for 5 days) followed by DSS-free water for 7 days (DSS group). Oral FBA administration (42.5 mg·kg(-1) ) was started 7 days before DSS as preventive (P-FBA), or 2 days after DSS as therapeutic (T-FBA); both treatments lasted 19 days. One DSS-untreated group received only tap water (CON). FBA treatments reduced colitis symptoms and colon damage. P-FBA and T-FBA significantly decreased polymorphonuclear cell infiltration score compared with the DSS group. FBA reversed the imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (reducing inducible NOS protein expression, CCL2 and IL-6 transcripts in colon and increasing TGFβ and IL-10). Morever, P-FBA and T-FBA limited neutrophil recruitment (by expression and localization of the neutrophil granule protease Ly-6G), restored deficiency of the butyrate transporter and improved intestinal epithelial integrity, preventing tight-junction impairment (zonulin-1 and occludin). FBA, similar to its parental compound sodium butyrate, inhibited histone deacetylase-9 and restored H3 histone acetylation, exerting an anti-inflammatory effect through NF-κB inhibition and the up-regulation of PPARγ. FBA reduces inflammatory intestinal damage in mice indicating its potential as a postbiotic derivative without the problems associated with the oral administration of sodium butyrate. This article is part of a themed section on Principles of Pharmacological Research of Nutraceuticals. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v174.11/issuetoc. © 2016 The British

  3. Alcohol-induced Hyperlipidemia Is Ameliorated by Orally Administered DWP208, a Sodium Succinate Form of ZYM201

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jae Youl; Choi, Jongwon; Park, Jae Gwang; Yi, Young-Su; Hossen, Muhammad Jahangir; Kim, Hyeongmin; Ro, Jieun; Cha, Bae Cheon; Yoo, Eun Sook

    2014-01-01

    DWP208 is a sodium succinate form of ZYM-201 which is a triterpenoid glycoside isolated from Sanguisorba officinalis, a medicinal plant prescribed for various diseases, such as duodenal ulcers and bleeding in East Asian counties. We demonstrated that this compound is able to normalize the altered lipid metabolism induced by hyperglycemia and a high fat diet. In this study, we determined whether hyperlipidemic conditions induced with chronically treated alcohol can also be restored by DWP208. Similar to our previous results, orally administered DWP208 (1 to 10 mg/kg) also ameliorated the hyperlipidemia that was induced by alcohol. This compound reversed the alcohol-induced hyperlipidemia including (i) up-regulated hyperlipidemic parameters such as low-density lipoprotein (LDL), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), atherosclerotic index (AI), triglyceride, and total cholesterol, and (ii) down-regulated hyperlipidemic parameters such as absolute body weight, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in serum and liver. According to our data, the ameliorative activity of DWP208 is due to its indirect anti-oxidative activity as a result of which lipid peroxide and hydroxyl radical levels were reduced and the activity of SOD was enhanced. Therefore, our data strongly suggest that DWP208 can be used as a remedy against alcohol-induced hyperlipidemia. PMID:25598660

  4. Orally administered nanocurcumin to attenuate morphine tolerance: comparison between negatively charged PLGA and partially and fully PEGylated nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hao; Hu, Xiaoyu; Szymusiak, Magdalena; Wang, Zaijie Jim; Liu, Ying

    2013-12-02

    We have formulated hydrophobic curcurmin [1,7-bis-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione] into stable nanoparticle suspensions (nanocurcumin) to overcome its relatively low bioavailability, high rate of metabolism, and rapid elimination and clearance from the body. Employing the curcumin nanoformulations as the platform, we discovered that curcumin has the potential to alleviate morphine tolerance. The two types of stable polymeric nanoparticles, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic acid) (PEG-b-PLA), and the hybrid of the two were generated using flash nanoprecipitation integrated with spray drying. The optimized formulations have high drug loading (>45%), small particles size with narrow distribution, and controlled surface properties. Mice behavioral studies (tail-flick and hot-plate tests) were conducted to verify the effects of nanocurcumin on attenuating morphine tolerance. Significant analgesia was observed in mice during both tail-flick and hot-plate tests using orally administered nanocurcumin following subcutaneous injections of morphine. However, unformulated curcumin at the same dose showed no effect. Compared with PEGylated nanocurcumin, negatively charged PLGA nanoparticles showed better functionality.

  5. Exploratory Pharmacokinetics of Geniposide in Rat Model of Cerebral Ischemia Orally Administered with or without Baicalin and/or Berberine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenzhe; Shi, Feiyan; Zhou, Jing; Zhang, Meng; Zhu, Huaxu; Zeng, Mingfei

    2013-01-01

    Huang-Lian-Jie-Du-Tang (HLJDT), a classical Chinese prescription, has been clinically employed to treat cerebral ischemia for thousands of years. Geniposide is the major active ingredient in HLJDT. The aim is to investigate the comparative evaluations on pharmacokinetics of geniposide in MCAO rats in pure geniposide, geniposide : berberine, and geniposide : berberine : baicalin. Obviously, the proportions of geniposide : berberine, geniposide : baicalin, and geniposide : berberine : baicalin were determined according to HLJDT. In our study, the cerebral ischemia model was reproduced by suture method in rats. The MCAO rats were randomly assigned to four therapy groups and orally administered with different prescription proportions of pure geniposide, geniposide : berberine, geniposide : baicalin, and geniposide : berberine : baicalin, respectively. The concentrations of geniposide in rat serum were determined using HPLC, and main pharmacokinetic parameters were investigated. The results indicated that the pharmacokinetics of geniposide in rat serum was nonlinear and there were significant differences between different groups. Berberine might hardly affect the absorption of geniposide, and baicalin could increase the absorption ability of geniposide. Meanwhile, berberine could decrease the absorption increase of baicalin on geniposide. PMID:24367386

  6. Orally administered ovine serum immunoglobulins modulate the intestinal levels of Lactobacillus and enterobacteria in the growing rat.

    PubMed

    Balan, P; Han, K-S; Lawley, B; Moughan, P J

    2013-08-01

    The aim was to determine whether orally administered ovine serum immunoglobulins modulate the gut microbiota in the growing rat. Thirty Sprague-Dawley male rats were used in a 21-d study and fed either a basal control diet (control; no immunoglobulin) or a similar diet containing freeze-dried ovine immunoglobulin (ovine Ig) with 15 individually fed rats per diet. Bacterial DNA isolated from ileal and colonic digesta were subjected to PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). In the ileum, the DGGE band number and diversity index were greater (P < 0.05) for rats fed the ovine Ig than those fed the control diet. The DNA sequencing of a selected DGGE band in the ovine Ig-fed rats revealed 99% similarity to the Lactobacillus strains. The quantitative PCR data revealed that supplementation of the diet with the ovine Ig fraction supported the growth of Lactobacillus and conversely decreased the number of enterobacteria in ileal and colonic digesta. Inclusion of the ovine Ig fraction led to a greater (P < 0.05) ratio for total Lactobacillus to total bacteria and total Lactobacillus to enterobacteria. The results from the present study show that dietary supplementation with ovine Ig may alter the intestinal environment by a specific enrichment of Lactobacillus strains and depletion of enterobacteria.

  7. Naloxegol: the first orally administered, peripherally acting, mu opioid receptor antagonist, approved for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, M; Tack, J

    2015-08-01

    Treatment of opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is becoming a relevant clinical challenge as most of the treatments demonstrated to be more effective than placebo in treating OIC have safety issues limiting a broad clinical application. Naloxegol is the first orally administered, peripherally acting, µ opioid receptor antagonist approved by the FDA and EMA specifically for the treatment of noncancer patients with OIC. This review summarizes the results of the studies regarding the effects of naloxegol in OIC. Pharmacodynamic studies have demonstrated that naloxegol was able to inhibit gastrointestinal opioid effects while preserving central analgesic actions. Phase II and phase III studies in patients with noncancer OIC have confirmed the efficacy of naloxegol to inhibit OIC, and the most consistent efficacy was seen with the 25-mg dose once daily. Side effects were mainly gastrointestinal in origin (and usually transient and mild) and there were no signs of opioid withdrawal in the studies. Safety and tolerability were shown in a long-term safety study. Considering its efficacy, safety, route of administration and the limitations of most of the other available treatments, naloxegol has the potential to become the first-line treatment for noncancer patients with OIC.

  8. Efficacy of orally administered amphipathic polyaminocarboxylic acid chelators for the removal of plutonium and americium: comparison with injected Zn-DTPA in the rat.

    PubMed

    Miller, Scott C; Liu, Gang; Bruenger, Fred W; Lloyd, Ray D

    2006-01-01

    Chelators are used to promote excretion of actinides and some other metals, but few are orally effective. The relative efficacies of orally administered triethylenetetraminepentaacetic acids (TT) with varying lipophilic properties on the removal of 241Am and 239Pu and comparison with parenteral Zn-DTPA was determined. The actinides were administered to adult rats 2 weeks prior to initiation of 30 d of chelation treatment. The TT compounds were given orally while Zn-DTPA was given twice weekly by injection. Total body content of 241Am was measured before and during the treatment period and organ contents of 241Am and 239Pu were measured at the end of the study. Significant reductions in 241Am occurred within the first week, with Zn-DTPA being the most effective. By 3 weeks, the most lipophilic chelator, C22TT was as effective as Zn-DTPA. After 30 d, reductions in organ content of 239Pu and 241Am directly correlated with increasing lipophilicity of the TT chelators. Oral C22TT was as effective as injected Zn-DTPA in liver and bone, the major organs of actinide deposition. The removal of 239Pu from the liver and reduction of redeposition of 239Pu in newly formed bone by C22TT was confirmed by neutron-induced autoradiographs. The amphipathic TT chelators may be useful as orally administered alternatives to current parenteral DTPA for the removal of actinide elements from the body, particularly for longer-term therapeutic applications.

  9. Preliminary efficacy investigations of oral fipronil against Anopheles arabiensis when administered to Zebu cattle (Bos indicus) under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Poché, Richard M; Githaka, Naftaly; van Gool, Frans; Kading, Rebekah C; Hartman, Daniel; Polyakova, Larisa; Abworo, Edward Okoth; Nene, Vishvanath; Lozano-Fuentes, Saul

    2017-12-01

    Globally, malaria remains one of the most important vector-borne diseases despite the extensive use of vector control, including indoor residual spraying (IRS) and insecticide-treated nets (ITNs). These control methods target endophagic vectors, whereas some malaria vectors, such as Anopheles arabiensis, preferentially feed outdoors on cattle, making it a complicated vector to control using conventional strategies. Our study evaluated whether treating cattle with a capsule containing the active ingredient (AI) fipronil could reduce vector density and sporozoite rates, and alter blood feeding behavior, when applied in a small-scale field study. A pilot field study was carried out in the Samia District, Western Kenya, from May to July 2015. Four plots, each comprised of 50 huts used for sleeping, were randomly designated to serve as control or treatment. A week before cattle treatment, baseline mosquito collections were performed inside the houses using mechanical aspirators. Animals in the treatment (and buffer) were administered a single oral application of fipronil at ∼0.5mg/kg of body weight. Indoor mosquito collections were performed once a week for four weeks following treatment. Female mosquitoes were first identified morphologically to species complex, followed by PCR-based methods to obtain species identity, sporozoite presence, and the host source of the blood meal. All three species of anophelines found in the study area (An. gambiae s.s., An. arabiensis, An. funestus s.s.) were actively transmitting Plasmodium falciparum during the study period. The indoor resting density of An. arabiensis was significantly reduced in treatment plot one at three weeks post-treatment (T1) (efficacy=89%; T1 density=0.08, 95% credibility intervals [0.05, 0.10]; control plot density=0.78 [0.22, 0.29]) and at four weeks post-treatment (efficacy=64%; T1 density=0.16 [0.08, 0.14]; control plot density=0.48 [0.17, 0.22]). The reduction of An. arabiensis mosquitoes captured in

  10. A phase I and pharmacokinetic study of oral lapatinib administered once or twice daily in patients with solid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Burris, Howard A; Taylor, Charles W; Jones, Suzanne F; Koch, Kevin M; Versola, Melissa J; Arya, Niki; Fleming, Ronald A; Smith, Deborah A; Pandite, Lini; Spector, Neil; Wilding, George

    2009-11-01

    This study determined the range of tolerable doses, clinical safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary evidence of clinical activity following once or twice daily administration of lapatinib in patients with solid malignancies. Cancer patients (n = 81) received oral doses of lapatinib ranging from 175 to 1,800 mg once daily or 500 to 900 mg twice daily. Clinical assessments of safety and antitumor activity were recorded and blood was sampled for pharmacokinetic assessments. The effect of a low-fat meal on lapatinib pharmacokinetics was assessed in a subset of patients. Lapatinib was well tolerated, such that dose escalation was limited at 1,800 mg once daily only by pill burden. Twice-daily dosing was implemented to further explore tolerability, and was limited by diarrhea to 500 mg twice daily. The most commonly reported adverse events with once-daily dosing were diarrhea (48%), nausea (40%), rash (40%), and fatigue (38%) and with twice-daily dosing were diarrhea (85%), rash (54%), and nausea (34%). Lapatinib serum concentrations accumulated upon repeated dosing, increasing nearly in proportion with dose, and were significantly increased when dosed with food or administered twice daily. One patient with head and neck cancer achieved a confirmed complete response and 22 patients had stable disease of >or=8 weeks including three patients with stable disease of >10 months (renal, lung, and salivary gland cancers). Lapatinib was well tolerated following once and twice daily administration. Systemic exposure to lapatinib was dependent on the dose, duration and frequency of dosing, and prandial state. Clinical activity was observed.

  11. Efficacy and Safety of an Orally Administered Selective Prostacyclin Receptor Agonist, Selexipag, in Japanese Patients With Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Nobuhiro; Ikeda, Satoshi; Tahara, Nobuhiro; Fukuda, Keiichi; Hatano, Masaru; Ito, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Tomotaka; Anzai, Toshihisa; Hashimoto, Akiyoshi; Inoue, Teruo; Kajinami, Kouji; Kihara, Yasuki; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Murohara, Toyoaki; Okazaki, Osamu; Sakai, Satoshi; Satoh, Toru; Takeda, Yutaka; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Taniguchi, Mitsugu; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Yamauchi-Takihara, Keiko; Yoshioka, Koichiro; Sasayama, Shigetake

    2017-08-25

    Selexipag is an orally available prostacyclin receptor (IP receptor) agonist with a non-prostanoid structure. In this open-label Phase II trial, the efficacy and safety of selexipag in Japanese patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is examined.Methods and Results:Selexipag was administered at 200 μg twice daily and titrated up to 1,600 μg by increments of 200 μg in 37 subjects to reach the individual maximum tolerated dose. At 16 weeks, in 33 patients comprising the per-protocol set, the pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR; primary endpoint) decreased from 683.2±237.3 to 560.3±238.7 dyn·s/cm(5)(P<0.0001). For the secondary endpoint, the 6-min walk distance (6MWD) increased from 445.0±102.2 to 459.1±112.8 m (P=0.0324); World Health Organization functional class improved in 4 patients (12.1%), and was maintained in 29 patients (87.9%). A decrease in PVR was also shown in patients treated with selexipag, on top of a phosphodiesterase inhibitor and endothelin receptor antagonist. Most of the commonly reported adverse events were consistent with those reported for other PGI2formulations. Thirty-four patients attained the individual maximum tolerated dose (maintenance dose). The efficacy and tolerability of selexipag in Japanese PAH patients was confirmed by improvement in pulmonary hemodynamics, exercise capacity, symptoms. Selexipag is an efficacious treatment option for Japanese PAH patients. (Trial registration: JAPIC Clinical Trials Information [JapicCTI-111532].).

  12. Comparative bioavailability of two oral formulations of clozapine in steady state administered in schizophrenic volunteers under individualized dose regime.

    PubMed

    do Carmo Borges, Ney C; Astigarraga, Rafael B; Sverdloff, Carlos E; Galvinas, Paulo R; Borges, Bruno C; Moreno, Ronilson A

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, a novel, fast, sensitive and robust method to quantify clozapine in human plasma using quetiapine as the internal standard (IS) is described. The analyte and the IS were extracted from plasma using a single protein precipitation extraction technique with methanol and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to the electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). The method was linear over the range 20 to 1500 ng.mL-1. The intra-assay precisions ranged from 3.8 to 5.9%, while inter-assay precisions ranged from 4.2 to 6.0%. The intra-assay accuracies ranged from 99.3 to 107.5%, while the inter-assay accuracies ranged from 98.9 to 101.7%. This method agrees with the requirements proposed by the US Food and Drug Administration of high sensitivity, specificity and high sample throughput and was used to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profiles and bioequivalence of the two clozapine formulations in twenty six schizophrenic patients affected by refractory schizophrenia under steady-state conditions. During the hospitalization period the patients received the 100 mg clozapine formulation tablets corresponding to the same dose they were using 14 days before hospitalization. The clozapine pharmacokinetic did not differ significantly after administration of both test and the reference formulations. The Tmax and T1/2 for the test formulation were 2.26 and 10.92 h, respectively. In addition, the Tmax and T1/2 for the reference formulation were 2.44 and 11.08 h, respectively. The 90% confidence interval of the mean ratio of lnAUC0-t was within 0.80-1.25 range which indicates that the test formulation was bioequivalent to the reference formulation when orally administered to schizophrenic patients regarding both the rate and extent of absorption.

  13. Development of the susceptibility to oral tolerance induction in infant mice administered a herbal drug, Hochu-ekki-to (Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang).

    PubMed

    Kaneko, M; Kawakita, T; Yamaoka, Y; Nomoto, K

    2001-02-01

    The susceptibility to oral tolerance in post-neonatal infant mice and the effect of a herbal drug, Hochu-ekki-to (HOT), on the susceptibility were investigated. To induce oral tolerance induction, infant and adult mice at 4 and 8 weeks of age, respectively, were orally administered a single high dose of OVA before an intraperitoneal immunization with OVA adsorbed on aluminum hydroxide. HOT (1000 mg/kg) was administered orally for 7 days before the induction. HOT significantly decreased the serum levels of OVA-specific IgE and IgG1 and the antigen-specific proliferation of spleen cells in infant mice, both of which were greatly enhanced compared to in adult mice. HOT increased the number of both CD4+ T cells and antigen-presenting cells expressing MHC class II as well as costimulatory molecules (CD40, CD80 and/or CD86) in the Peyer's patch (PP) of infant mice, which had fewer cells than adult mice. In the PP, moreover, HOT augmented the IL-12p40 mRNA expression and spontaneous or CD40-stimulated IL-12 production, and increased the number of CD4+ cells expressing CD40 ligand, which is up regulated by IL-12. These results suggest that HOT increases the number and improves the function of PP cells that are fully susceptible to the induction of oral tolerance.

  14. The pharmacokinetics of a single oral or rectal dose of concurrently administered isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    P Brock, A; Isaza, R; Egelund, E F; Hunter, R P; Peloquin, C A

    2014-10-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a disease of concern in captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Treatment for tuberculosis in elephants utilizes multidrug protocols combining isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and/or ethambutol. In this study, a single, coformulated dose of isoniazid 5 mg/kg, rifampin 10 mg/kg, pyrazinamide 30 mg/kg, and ethambutol 30 mg/kg was administered orally to six Asian elephants, and rectally to five elephants using a cross-over design. Blood samples were collected serially over 24 h. Pyrazinamide and ethambutol concentrations were determined using validated gas chromatography assays. Isoniazid and rifampin concentrations were determined using validated high-performance liquid chromatography assays. Rectal isoniazid produced an earlier Tmax compared with oral administration. Oral isoniazid resulted in a comparatively lower Cmax , but higher AUC values compared with rectal isoniazid. Oral rifampin and oral ethambutol were well absorbed while rectal rifampin was not. Oral pyrazinamide produced comparatively higher Cmax and AUC values compared with rectal pyrazinamide. Results of this study indicate that currently recommended therapeutic monitoring sample collection times for rectal isoniazid and oral rifampin do not provide an accurate assessment of exposure for these drugs. This study demonstrates notable individual variability, indicating that dosing of these medications requires individual monitoring and provides additional information to guide the clinician when treating elephants. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of orally administered glucosamine oligomer in an experimental model of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kazuo; Osaki, Tomohiro; Kurozumi, Seiji; Kiyose, Masatoshi; Tsuka, Takeshi; Murahata, Yusuke; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Itoh, Norihiko; Minami, Saburo; Sato, Kimihiko; Okamoto, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-22

    Anti-inflammatory effects of oral administration of the glucosamine oligomers (chito-oligosaccharides: COS) were evaluated in an experimental model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Oral administration of COS improved shortening of colon length and tissue injury (as assessed by histology) in mice. Oral administration of COS inhibited inflammation in the colonic mucosa by suppression of myeloperoxidase activation in inflammatory cells, as well as activation of nuclear factor-kappa B, cyclooxygenase-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Oral administration of COS also reduced serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6). Moreover, it prolonged survival time in mice. These data suggest that COS have anti-inflammatory effects in an experimental model of IBD, and could be new functional foods for IBD patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Osteonecrosis of the jaw induced by orally administered bisphosphonates: incidence, clinical features, predisposing factors and treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Yarom, N; Yahalom, R; Shoshani, Y; Hamed, W; Regev, E; Elad, S

    2007-10-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is a well-known devastating side effect of bisphosphonate therapy for cancer. Several ONJ cases of patients using oral bisphosphonates have been reported in the literature. The present study analyzed the clinical features, predisposing factors, and treatment outcome of 11 patients with oral bisphosphonates-related ONJ. Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is a well-known side effect of parenteral bisphosphonates therapy. Although ONJ has been reported in patients using oral bisphosphonates, documentation of this entity is sparse. It was hypothesized that the clinical features, predisposing factors, and treatment outcome of this population are different from those of oncologic patients. This retrospective bi-central study involved 98 ONJ patients, 13 of whom were treated with oral bisphosphonates. Two patients were excluded because of previous use of intravenous bisphosphonates. The profiles of 11 patients were analyzed. The mean duration of alendronate use before developing ONJ was 4.1 years. ONJ was triggered by dental surgery in 9 patients and by ill-fitted dentures in 2. Heavy smokers were the most recalcitrant subjects. Among the nine patients with at least 6 months of follow-up, ONJ healed completely in three, partially in four, and not at all in two. ONJ is a rare devastating side effect of oral bisphosphonates associated with patient morbidity and high financial burden. Clinicians must be aware of this entity and inform patients of the risks of dental surgery. The synergistic effect of smoking in the pathogenesis of ONJ should be further investigated.

  17. Orally administered live attenuated Salmonella Typhimurium protects mice against lethal infection with H1N1 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Nitin Machindra; Hajam, Irshad Ahmed; Lee, John Hwa

    2017-03-01

    Pre-stimulation of toll-like receptors (TLRs) by agonists has been shown to increase protection against influenza virus infection. In this study, we evaluated the protective response generated against influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8; H1N1) virus by oral and nasal administration of live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, JOL911 strain, in mice. Oral and nasal inoculation of JOL911 significantly increased the mRNA copy number of TLR-2, TLR4 and TLR5, and downstream type I interferon (IFN) molecules, IFN-α and IFN-β, both in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and in lung tissue. Similarly, the mRNA copy number of interferon-inducible genes (ISGs), Mx and ISG15, were significantly increased in both the orally and the nasally inoculated mice. Post PR8 virus lethal challenge, the nasal JOL911 and the PBS control group mice showed significant loss of body weight with 70% and 100% mortality, respectively, compared to only 30% mortality in the oral JOL911 group mice. Post sub-lethal challenge, the significant reduction in PR8 virus copy number in lung tissue was observed in oral [on day 4 and 6 post-challenge (dpc)] and nasal (on 4dpc) than the PBS control group mice. The lethal and sub-lethal challenge showed that the generated stimulated innate resistance (StIR) in JOL911 inoculated mice conferred resistance to acute and initial influenza infection but might not be sufficient to prevent the PR8 virus invasion and replication in the lung. Overall, the present study indicates that oral administration of attenuated S. Typhimurium can pre-stimulate multiple TLR pathways in mice to provide immediate early StIR against a lethal H1N1 virus challenge.

  18. Reducing blood glucose levels in TIDM mice with an orally administered extract of sericin from hIGF-I-transgenic silkworm cocoons.

    PubMed

    Song, Zuowei; Zhang, Mengyao; Xue, Renyu; Cao, Guangli; Gong, Chengliang

    2014-05-01

    In previous studies, we reported that the blood glucose levels of mice with type I diabetes mellitus (TIDM) was reduced with orally administered silk gland powder from silkworms transgenic for human insulin-like growth factor-I (hIGF-I). However, potential safety hazards could not be eliminated because the transgenic silk gland powder contained heterologous DNA, including the green fluorescent protein (gfp) and neomycin resistance (neo) genes. These shortcomings might be overcome if the recombinant hIGF-I were secreted into the sericin layer of the cocoon. In this study, silkworm eggs were transfected with a novel piggyBac transposon vector, pigA3GFP-serHS-hIGF-I-neo, containing the neo, gfp, and hIGF-I genes controlled by the sericin-1 (ser-1) promoter with the signal peptide DNA sequence of the fibrin heavy chain (Fib-H) and a helper plasmid containing the piggyBac transposase sequence under the control of the Bombyx mori actin 3 (A3) promoter, using sperm-mediated gene transfer to generate the transformed silkworms. The hIGF-I content estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was approximately 162.7 ng/g. To estimate the biological activity of the expressed hIGF-I, streptozotocin-induced TIDM mice were orally administered sericin from the transgenic silkworm. The blood glucose levels of the mice were significantly reduced, suggesting that the extract from the transgenic hIGF-I silkworm cocoons can be used as an orally administered drug.

  19. High-resolution manometric evaluation of the effects of cisapride and metoclopramide hydrochloride administered orally on lower esophageal sphincter pressure in awake dogs.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Jennifer; Lewis, Fraser; Reusch, Claudia E; Kook, Peter H

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of cisapride and metoclopramide hydrochloride administered orally on the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) resting pressure in awake healthy dogs. 6 adult Beagles. Each dog was evaluated after administration of a single dose of cisapride (0.5 mg/kg), metoclopramide (0.5 mg/kg), or placebo (empty gelatin-free capsule) in 3 experiments performed at 3-week intervals. To measure LES pressure, a high-resolution manometry catheter equipped with 40 pressure sensors spaced 10 mm apart was used. For each experiment, LES pressure was recorded during a 20-minute period with a virtual electronic sleeve emulation before treatment (baseline) and at 1, 4, and 7 hours after drug or placebo administration. A linear mixed-effects model was used to test whether the 3 treatments affected LES pressure differently. In the cisapride, metoclopramide, and placebo experiments, median baseline LES pressures were 29.1, 30.5, and 29.0 mm Hg, respectively. For the cisapride, metoclopramide, and placebo treatments, median LES pressures at 1 hour after administration were 44.4, 37.8, and 36.6 mm Hg, respectively; median LES pressures at 4 hours after administration were 50.7, 30.6, and 31.1 mm Hg, respectively; and median LES pressures at 7 hours after administration were 44.3, 28.5, and 33.3 mm Hg, respectively. The LES pressures differed significantly only between the placebo and cisapride treatments. Results suggested that orally administered cisapride may be of benefit in canine patients for which an increase in LES pressure is desirable, whereas orally administered metoclopramide did not affect LES resting pressures in dogs.

  20. Quantitative elemental analysis on aluminum accumulation by HVTEM-EDX in liver tissues of mice orally administered with aluminum chloride.

    PubMed

    Kametani, Kiyokazu; Nagata, Tetsuji

    2006-06-01

    Quantitative elemental analysis on Al was carried out by high-accelerating voltage transmission electron microscopy (HVTEM) equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) using an accelerating voltage at 300 kV with high permeability in 1-mum-thick samples obtained from mice administered with aluminum chloride solution for 3, 9, and 17 weeks. By light microscopic observation, no morphological changes were observed in the hepatocytes and macrophages in the liver tissues of mice that were administered with excess Al as compared with the normal control mice. In contrast, by electron microscopic observation, ultrastructural changes were observed in the lysosomes in the hepatocytes as well as the pinocytotic vesicles in the macrophages in the experimental animals. Therefore, the concentrations of Al detected in lysosomes in hepatocytes and pinocytotic vesicles in macrophages of livers of mice administered with Al were measured in relationship to those administration periods. Moreover, transitional changes of hepatocyte lysosome ratios by image analysis and the macrophage counts in the unit area increased in liver tissues of mice administered with Al as compared with normal control mice. From the results, it was demonstrated that hepatocyte lysosome ratio and macrophage count increased in liver tissues of treated mice during those short-term excessive Al administration periods. It was also clarified that the concentrations of Al in both hepatocytes and macrophages increased as observed by HVTEM-EDX. In conclusion, Al accumulated in hepatocytes and macrophages at 3 and 9 weeks administration, while the ultrastructural changes remained in the hepatocytes and macrophages. In contrast, Al concentration did not increase in the liver at 17 weeks administration.

  1. Efficacy of orally administered T-705 on lethal avian influenza A (H5N1) virus infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Sidwell, Robert W; Barnard, Dale L; Day, Craig W; Smee, Donald F; Bailey, Kevin W; Wong, Min-Hui; Morrey, John D; Furuta, Yousuke

    2007-03-01

    T-705 (6-fluoro-3-hydroxy-2-pyrazinecarboxamide) was inhibitory to four strains of avian H5N1 influenza virus in MDCK cells, with the 90% effective concentrations ranging from 1.3 to 7.7 microM, as determined by a virus yield reduction assay. The efficacy was less than that exerted by oseltamivir carboxylate or zanamivir but was greater than that exerted by ribavirin. Experiments with mice lethally infected with influenza A/Duck/MN/1525/81 (H5N1) virus showed that T-705 administered per os once, twice, or four times daily for 5 days beginning 1 h after virus exposure was highly inhibitory to the infection. Dosages from 30 to 300 mg/kg of body weight/day were well tolerated; each prevented death, lessened the decline of arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)), and inhibited lung consolidation and lung virus titers. Dosages from 30 to 300 mg/kg/day administered once or twice daily also significantly prevented the death of the mice. Oseltamivir (20 mg/kg/day), administered per os twice daily for 5 days, was tested in parallel in two experiments; it was only weakly effective against the infection. The four-times-daily T-705 treatments at 300 mg/kg/day could be delayed until 96 h after virus exposure and still significantly inhibit the infection. Single T-705 treatments administered up to 60 h after virus exposure also prevented death and the decline of SaO(2). Characterization of the pathogenesis of the duck influenza H5N1 virus used in these studies was undertaken; although the virus was highly pathogenic to mice, it was less neurotropic than has been described for clinical isolates of the H5N1 virus. These data indicate that T-705 may be useful for the treatment of avian influenza virus infections.

  2. Orally Administered Targeted Recombinant Beta-Lactamase Prevents Ampicillin-Induced Selective Pressure on the Gut Microbiota: a Novel Approach to Reducing Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Harmoinen, Jaana; Mentula, Silja; Heikkilä, Matti; van der Rest, Michel; Rajala-Schultz, Päivi J.; Donskey, Curtis J.; Frias, Rafael; Koski, Pertti; Wickstrand, Nina; Jousimies-Somer, Hannele; Westermarck, Elias; Lindevall, Kai

    2004-01-01

    Antibiotics that are excreted into the intestinal tract promote antibiotic resistance by exerting selective pressure on the gut microbiota. Using a beagle dog model, we show that an orally administered targeted recombinant β-lactamase enzyme eliminates the portion of parenteral ampicillin that is excreted into the small intestine, preventing ampicillin-induced changes to the fecal microbiota without affecting ampicillin levels in serum. In dogs receiving ampicillin, significant disruption of the fecal microbiota and the emergence of ampicillin-resistant Escherichia coli and TEM genes were observed, whereas in dogs treated with ampicillin in combination with an oral β-lactamase, these did not occur. These results suggest a new strategy for reducing antimicrobial resistance in humans. PMID:14693521

  3. Orally administered DTPA di-ethyl ester for decorporation of (241)Am in dogs: Assessment of safety and efficacy in an inhalation-contamination model.

    PubMed

    Huckle, James E; Sadgrove, Matthew P; Pacyniak, Erik; Leed, Marina G D; Weber, Waylon M; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Guilmette, Raymond A; Agha, Bushra J; Susick, Robert L; Mumper, Russell J; Jay, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Currently two injectable products of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) are U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for decorporation of (241)Am; however, an oral product is considered more amenable in a mass casualty situation. The di-ethyl ester of DTPA, named C2E2, is being developed as an oral drug for treatment of internal radionuclide contamination. Single-dose decorporation efficacy of C2E2 administered 24-h post contamination was determined in beagle dogs using a (241)Am nitrate inhalation contamination model. Single and multiple dose toxicity studies in beagle dogs were performed as part of an initial safety assessment program. In addition, the genotoxic potential of C2E2 was evaluated by the in vitro bacterial reverse mutation Ames test, mammalian cell chromosome aberration cytogenetic assay and an in vivo micronucleus test. Oral administration of C2E2 significantly increased (241)Am elimination over untreated controls and significantly reduced the retention of (241)Am in tissues, especially liver, kidney, lung and bone. Daily dosing of 200 mg/kg/day for 10 days was well tolerated in dogs. C2E2 was found to be neither mutagenic or clastogenic. The di-ethyl ester of DTPA (C2E2) was shown to effectively enhance the elimination of (241)Am after oral administration in a dog inhalation-contamination model and was well tolerated in toxicity studies.

  4. Orally Administered DTPA Di-ethyl Ester for Decorporation of 241Am in dogs: Assessment of Safety and Efficacy in an Inhalation-Contamination Model

    PubMed Central

    Huckle, James E.; Sadgrove, Matthew P.; Pacyniak, Erik; Leed, Marina G. D.; Weber, Waylon M.; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Agha, Bushra J.; Susick, Robert L.; Mumper, Russell J.; Jay, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Currently two injectable products of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) are U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for decorporation of 241Am, however, an oral product is considered more amenable in a mass casualty situation. The diethyl ester of DTPA, named C2E2, is being developed as an oral drug for treatment of internal radionuclide contamination. Materials and methods Single dose decorporation efficacy of C2E2 administered 24-hours post contamination was determined in beagle dogs using a 241Am nitrate inhalation contamination model. Single and multiple dose toxicity studies in beagle dogs were performed as part of an initial safety assessment program. In addition, the genotoxic potential of C2E2 was evaluated by the in vitro bacterial reverse mutation Ames test, mammalian cell chromosome aberration cytogenetic assay and an in vivo micronucleus test. Results Oral administration of C2E2 significantly increased 241Am elimination over untreated controls and significantly reduced the retention of 241Am in tissues, especially liver, kidney, lung and bone. Daily dosing of 200 mg/kg/day for 10 days was well tolerated in dogs. C2E2 was found to be neither mutagenic or clastogenic. Conclusions The di-ethyl ester of DTPA (C2E2) was shown to effectively enhance the elimination of 241Am after oral administration in a dog inhalation-contamination model and was well tolerated in toxicity studies. PMID:25912343

  5. Biodistribution and molecular studies on orally administered nanoparticle-AON complexes encapsulated with alginate aiming at inducing dystrophin rescue in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Passarelli, Chiara; Bassi, Elena; Fabris, Marina; Perrone, Daniela; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Maraldi, Nadir M; Donà, Silvia; Selvatici, Rita; Bonaldo, Paolo; Sparnacci, Katia; Laus, Michele; Braghetta, Paola; Rimessi, Paola; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that intraperitoneal injections of 2'-O-methyl-phosphorothioate (2'OMePS) antisense oligoribonucleotides adsorbed onto a cationic core-shell nanoparticles (NPs), termed ZM2, provoke dystrophin restoration in the muscles of mdx mice. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the oral route as an alternative way of administration for ZM2-antisense oligoribonucleotides complexes. The biodistribution and elimination of nanoparticles were evaluated after single and multiple oral doses of IR-dye conjugated nanoparticles. Labeled nanoparticles were tracked in vivo as well as in tissue cryosections, urines and feces by Odyssey infrared imaging system, and revealed a permanence in the intestine and abdominal lymph nodes for 72 hours to 7 days before being eliminated. We subsequently tested alginate-free and alginate-encapsulated ZM2-antisense oligoribonucleotides (AON) complexes orally administered 2 and 3 times per week, respectively, in mdx mice for a total of 12 weeks. Treatment with alginate ZM2-AON induced a slight dystrophin rescue in diaphragm and intestine smooth muscles, while no dystrophin was detected in alginate-free ZM2-AON treated mice. These data encourage further experiments on oral administration testing of NP and AON complexes, possibly translatable in oligoribonucleotides-mediated molecular therapies.

  6. Phase I study to determine the maximal tolerated dose and dose-limiting toxicities of orally administered idarubicin in dogs with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Vail, D M; Husbands, B D; Kamerling, S G; Simpson, H; Kurzman, I D; McDonnell, A

    2012-01-01

    Idarubicin, a PO bioavailable anthracycline antibiotic-class chemotherapeutic, could have substantial convenience advantages over currently available similar class agents in use that require IV delivery. The primary objective of this study was to determine the maximally tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), and basic pharmacokinetic parameters of oral idarubicin exposure in dogs with lymphoma after a single oral dose. A secondary objective was to document preliminary antitumor efficacy in an expanded treatment cohort using the established MTD. Client-owned dogs with measurable lymphoma. Dogs (n = 31) were enrolled in a prospective open label phase I study of oral idarubicin. By means of a 3 + 3 cohort design, dose escalations were made with 3 dogs per dose level, and the MTD was established based on the number of patients experiencing a DLT. Plasma concentrations of idarubicin and idarubicinol were determined by postdose sampling. Assessment of antitumor efficacy focused on evaluation of accessible, measurable lymph nodes and skin lesions by modified RECIST guidelines. The MTD in dogs > 15 kg body weight was 22 mg/m(2) . Adverse hematologic events (neutropenia and thrombocytopenia) were the predominant DLT and generally correlated with higher plasma concentrations of idarubicin and idarubicinol. PO administered idarubicin was generally well-tolerated and had preliminary antitumor activity in dogs with lymphoma. Furthermore, the potential clinical advantage of a safe and efficacious oral anthracycline alternative supports further investigations of this agent in repeated-dose, randomized clinical trials. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  7. Anthelmintic efficacy of ivermectin and abamectin, administered orally for seven consecutive days (100 µg/kg/day), against nematodes in naturally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; Teixeira, Weslen Fabricio Pires; Felippelli, Gustavo; Cruz, Breno Cayeiro; Buzulini, Carolina; Maciel, Willian Giquelin; Fávero, Flávia Carolina; Gomes, Lucas Vinicius Costa; Prando, Luciana; Bichuette, Murilo A; Dos Santos, Thais Rabelo; da Costa, Alvimar José

    2014-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate ivermectin and abamectin, both administered orally in naturally infected domestic swine, as well as analysing if the EPG (eggs per gram of faeces) values were equivalent with the ivermectin and abamectin efficacy obtained by parasitological necropsies. The animals were randomly selected based on the average of three consecutive EPG counts of Strongylida, Ascaris suum and Trichuris for experiment I, and of Strongylida and Trichuris for experiment II. After the random draw, eight animals were treated, orally, during seven consecutive days with 100 µg/kg/day ivermectin (Ivermectina® premix, Ouro Fino Agronegócios), eight other animals were treated, orally, during seven consecutive days with 100 µg/kg/day abamectin (Virbamax® premix - Virbac do Brasil Indústria e Comércio Ltda.), and eight pigs were kept as controls. EPG counts were performed for each individual animal at 14th day post-treatment (DPT). All animals (control and treatment) were necropsied at the 14th DPT. The results from both experiments demonstrate that both ivermectin and abamectin, administered orally for a continuous period of seven days, at a daily dosage of 100 µg/kg, were highly effective (>95%) against Hyostrongylus rubidus, Strongyloides ransomi, Ascaris suum and Metastrongylus salmi. Against Oesophagostomum dentatum, abamectin presented over 95% efficacy against both evaluated strains, while ivermectin reached other strain as resistant. Regarding T. suis, both ivermectin and abamectin were effective (efficacies >90%) against one of the tested strains, while the other one was classified as resistant. Furthermore, the EPG values were equivalent with the ivermectin and abamectin efficacy obtained by parasitological necropsies.

  8. Orally Administered Particular β-Glucan Modulates Tumor-capturing Dendritic Cells and Improves Anti-tumor T Cell Responses in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Cai, Yihua; Qi, Chunjian; Hansen, Richard; Ding, Chuanlin; Mitchell, Thomas C.; Yan, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The beneficial properties of β-glucans have been recognized for centuries. Their proposed mechanisms of action in cancer therapy occur via stimulation of macrophages and priming of innate neutrophil complement receptor 3 (CR3) for eliciting CR3-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of iC3b-opsonized tumor cells. The current study is to investigate whether β-glucan therapy has any impact on anti-tumor adaptive T cell responses. Experimental Design We first examined the trafficking of orally administered particulate yeast-derived β-glucan and its interaction with dendritic cells (DCs) that captured tumor materials. Antigen-specific T cells were adoptively transferred into recipient mice to determine whether oral β-glucan therapy induces augmented T cell responses. Lewis lung carcinoma and RAM-S lymphoma models were used to test oral β-glucan therapeutic effect. Further mechanistic studies including tumor-infiltrating T cells and cytokine profiles within the tumor milieu were determined. Results Orally administered particulate β-glucan trafficked into spleen and lymph nodes and activated DCs that captured dying tumor cells in vivo, leading to the expansion and activation of antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. In addition, IFN-γ production of tumor-infiltrating T cells and CTL responses were significantly enhanced upon β-glucan treatment, which ultimately resulted in significantly reduced tumor burden. Moreover, β-glucan-treated tumors had significantly more DC infiltration with the activated phenotype and significant levels of Th1-biased cytokines within the tumor microenvironment. Conclusions These data highlight the ability of yeast-derived β-glucan to bridge innate and adaptive anti-tumor immunity and suggest that it can be used as an adjuvant for tumor immunotherapy. PMID:20855461

  9. Particulate adducts based on sodium risedronate and titanium dioxide for the bioavailability enhancement of oral administered bisphosphonates.

    PubMed

    Dissette, Valeria; Bozzi, Pietro; Bignozzi, Carlo Alberto; Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Ferraro, Luca; Beggiato, Sarah; Leo, Eliana; Vighi, Eleonora; Pasti, Luisa

    2010-10-09

    Adducts based on a bisphosphonate drug (sodium risedronate) and titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) particles have been developed and characterized in order to improve the bioavailability of orally administrated bisphosphonates. Nanocrystalline and colloidal TiO(2), both characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, were used to obtain the adducts 1 and 2, respectively. Adducts 1 and 2 appeared constituted by nanoparticles of about 50nm and 90nm grouped in clusters of about 0.2microm and 2.5microm, respectively. Higher amounts of drugs were adsorbed on adduct 2 (7.2+/-0.3%) with respect to adduct 1 (4.0+/-0.3%). In vitro studies demonstrate that the adducts were able to release the drug in the pH range of 6-9, whereas they remained essentially stable in the pH range of 0-5. In vivo studies indicate that after oral administration to male Wistar rats, the microparticles of adduct 2 were able to prolong the presence of risedronate in the bloodstream during an 8h period, resulting in a relative bioavailability almost doubled with respect to the free drug. This behaviour allows envisioning an improvement of the risedronate therapeutic effects and/or a reduction of its frequency of administration with consequent reduction of gastro-oesophageal injuries typically induced by oral administration of bisphosphonates.

  10. Efficacy of systemic adjuvant therapies administered to dogs after excision of oral malignant melanomas: 151 cases (2001-2012).

    PubMed

    Boston, Sarah E; Lu, Xiaomin; Culp, William T N; Montinaro, Vincenzo; Romanelli, Giorgio; Dudley, Robert M; Liptak, Julius M; Mestrinho, Lisa A; Buracco, Paolo

    2014-08-15

    To determine prognostic factors for and compare outcome among dogs with oral malignant melanoma following excision with or without various systemic adjuvant therapies. Retrospective case series. 151 dogs with naturally occurring oral malignant melanomas treated by excision with or without adjuvant therapies from 2001 to 2012. Case accrual was solicited from Veterinary Society of Surgical Oncology members via an email list service. Information collected from case records included signalment, tumor staging, tumor characteristics, type of surgical excision, histologic diagnosis, adjuvant therapy, and survival time. The overall median survival time was 346 days. Results of multivariate analysis indicated that tumor size, patient age, and intralesional excision (vs marginal, wide, or radical excision) were considered poor prognostic indicators. All other demographic and clinical variables were not significantly associated with survival time after adjusting for the aforementioned 3 variables. A clear survival benefit was not evident with any systemic adjuvant therapy, including vaccination against melanoma or chemotherapy; however, the number of dogs in each treatment group was small. Ninety-eight dogs received no postoperative adjuvant therapy, and there was no difference in survival time between dogs that did (335 days) and did not (352 days) receive systemic adjuvant therapy. For dogs with oral malignant melanoma, increasing tumor size and age were negative prognostic factors. Complete excision of all macroscopic tumor burden improved survival time. Long-term survival was possible following surgery alone. Although systemic adjuvant therapy was not found to improve survival time, this could have been due to type II error.

  11. Enhanced oral bioavailability of morin administered in mixed micelle formulation with PluronicF127 and Tween80 in rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeon Ah; Yoon, You Hyun; Choi, Kwangik; Kwon, Mihwa; Goo, Soo Hyeon; Cha, Jin-Sun; Choi, Min-Koo; Lee, Hye Suk; Song, Im-Sook

    2015-01-01

    To overcome the low oral bioavailability of morin, a mixed micelle formulation with pharmaceutical excipients that facilitate solubilization and modulate P-glycoprotein (P-gp) was developed and evaluated in vitro and in vivo rats. Morin-loaded mixed micelle formulation with a morin-PluronicF127-Tween80 ratio of 1 : 10 : 0.02 (w/w/w) was prepared by a thin-film hydration method. The solubility, size distribution, drug encapsulation efficiency, and percent drug loading of the formulation were characterized. Subsequently, in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters of morin loaded in a PluronicF127 and Tween80 mixed-micelle formulation were investigated in rats. Absolute bioavailability of morin was dramatically increased by the oral administration of morin-loaded PluronicF127 and Tween80 mixed micelle from 0.4% to 11.2% without changing the systemic clearance and half-life. In Caco-2 cells, absorption permeability of morin from the novel formulation was increased 3.6-fold compared with that of morin alone. P-gp inhibition by cyclosporine A (CsA) increased absorptive permeability of morin 2.4-fold but decreased the efflux of morin by 52%, which was consistent with increased plasma concentration of morin in the pretreatment of CsA in rats. The morin formulation inhibited P-gp transport activity by 83.1% at 100 µM as morin concentration. Moreover, morin formulation increased paracellular permeability of Lucifer yellow by 1.6-1.8 fold. In conclusion, enhanced oral bioavailability of morin from morin-loaded PluronicF127 and Tween80 mixed micelle formulation can be attributed to increased intestinal permeation of morin, which was mediated at least by P-gp inhibition and enhanced paracellular route.

  12. Effect of orally administered polysaccharide from kefir grain on delayed-type hypersensitivity and tumor growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Murofushi, M; Shiomi, M; Aibara, K

    1983-02-01

    The effect of oral administration of a polysaccharide (KGF-C), isolated from the kefir grain, on delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) induced by picryl chloride and on the growth of solid tumor was examined in mice. KGF-C caused an increase in DTH response in intact mice and also tumor-bearing mice. The growth of tumor inoculated after the DTH test was markedly inhibited in the groups with high DTH response. A significant correlation between the DTH response and the antitumor activity was observed in intact mice.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of an oral drug (acetaminophen) administered at various times relative to subcutaneous injection of pramlintide in subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kellmeyer, Terrie A; Kesty, Nicole C; Wang, Yan; Frias, Juan P; Fineman, Mark S

    2007-07-01

    Pramlintide, an adjunct treatment to mealtime insulin for patients with type 2 and type 1 diabetes, aids glycemic control by suppressing postprandial glucagon secretion, slowing gastric emptying, and enhancing satiety. Because gastric emptying affects oral medication absorption, this placebo-controlled, single-blind, crossover study examined the absorption of 1000 mg of acetaminophen elixir administered -2, -1, 0, +1, and +2 hours relative to pramlintide (120 microg) or 0 hours relative to placebo in 24 patients with type 2 diabetes. When acetaminophen administration occurred 0, +1, or +2 hours relative to pramlintide, the maximum observed plasma concentration of acetaminophen decreased 14% to 29%, and time to maximum observed plasma concentration increased by 0.8 to 1.2 hours compared with administration 0 hours relative to placebo. Pramlintide treatment slowed but did not alter the extent of acetaminophen absorption (area under the concentration-time curve). No serious adverse events or withdrawals were reported. Oral agents should be administered at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after pramlintide injection if rapid onset of action is required for efficacy.

  14. Fecal Excretion of Orally Administered Collagen-Like Peptides in Rats: Contribution of the Triple-Helical Conformation to Their Stability.

    PubMed

    Koide, Takaki; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Taira, Kazuma B; Yasui, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Orally ingested peptides are generally digested in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and absorbed in the form of oligopeptides. We previously reported that intravenously administered collagen-like triple-helical peptides circulated in the bloodstream and were excreted in their intact forms in urine nearly quantitatively. In the present study, we investigated the fates of orally administered collagen-like peptides in rats. (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10 (Hyp: 4-hydroxyproline), which formed a stable triple-helical structure, was stable in the GI tract, and 72.3±13.0% of the peptide was excreted in the feces. Its recovery ratio was similar to that of all-D-(Pro-Pro-Gly)10 (75.1±15.7%), the indigestible control. In contrast, (Pro-Hyp-Gly)5 and (Pro-Pro-Gly)10, the random coil conformations of which were dominant at body temperature, were not detected in fecal samples, indicating that they were digested by proteases. The high stability of the triple-helical conformation in mammalian bodies suggests the potential use of collagen-like peptides as novel scaffolds of peptide drugs.

  15. Efficacy of bath and orally administered praziquantel and fenbendazole against Lepidotrema bidyana Murray, a monogenean parasite of silver perch, Bidyanus bidyanus (Mitchell).

    PubMed

    Forwood, J M; Harris, J O; Deveney, M R

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the efficacy of praziquantel (PZQ) and fenbendazole (FBZ), each administered by bath and orally, against the monogenean Lepidotrema bidyana Murray, a gill parasite of the freshwater fish silver perch, Bidyanus bidyanus (Mitchell). PZQ and FBZ were each administered by bath at 10 mg L⁻¹ for 48 h and on surface-coated feed pellets at 75 mg kg⁻¹ per body weight (BW) per day for 6 days. Bath treatments of PZQ and FBZ had an efficacy of 99% and 91%, respectively, against adult L. bidyana. Oral treatments of PZQ and FBZ had an efficacy of 79% and 95%, respectively, against adult L. bidyana. Fish rejected feed pellets surface-coated with PZQ, suggesting that palatability of surface-coated PZQ-medicated feed is poor, which undermined efficacy. In all trials, some juvenile parasites were present on fish after treatment during efficacy assessment, indicating that efficacy may be lower against juvenile parasites or that recruitment occurred post-treatment, demonstrating that repeat treatments are necessary to effectively control L. bidyana in aquaculture.

  16. Orally administered thermostable N-acyl homoserine lactonase from Bacillus sp. strain AI96 attenuates Aeromonas hydrophila infection in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanan; He, Suxu; Zhou, Zhigang; Zhang, Meichao; Mao, Wei; Zhang, Huitu; Yao, Bin

    2012-03-01

    N-Acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) lactonases are capable of degrading signal molecules involved in bacterial quorum sensing and therefore represent a new approach to control bacterial infection. Here a gene responsible for the AHL lactonase activity of Bacillus sp. strain AI96, 753 bp in length, was cloned and then expressed in Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequence of Bacillus sp. AI96 AiiA (AiiA(AI96)) is most similar to those of other Bacillus sp. AHL lactonases (~80% sequence identity) and was consequently categorized as a member of the metallo-β-lactamase superfamily. AiiA(AI96) maintains ~100% of its activity at 10°C to 40°C at pH 8.0, and it is very stable at 70°C at pH 8.0 for at least 1 h; no other Bacillus AHL lactonase has been found to be stable under these conditions. AiiA(AI96) resists digestion by proteases and carp intestinal juice, and it has broad-spectrum substrate specificity. The supplementation of AiiA(AI96) into fish feed by oral administration significantly attenuated Aeromonas hydrophila infection in zebrafish. This is the first report of the oral administration of an AHL lactonase for the efficient control of A. hydrophila.

  17. Milrinone efficiently potentiates insulin secretion induced by orally but not intravenously administered glucose in C57BL6J mice.

    PubMed

    Degerman, Eva; Manganiello, Vincent; Holst, Jens J; Ahrén, Bo

    2004-09-13

    To study the effect of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 inhibition on plasma insulin and glucose levels, the selective PDE 3 inhibitor milrinone (0.25, 1.0, and 2.5 mg/kg) was given orally to anesthetized CL57Bl/6J mice 10 min before a gastric glucose gavage (150 mg/mouse). It was found that milrinone augmented the glucose-mediated increase in plasma insulin at 1.0 and 2.5 mg/kg without, however, any improvement in glucose elimination. In contrast, when given 10 min before intravenous glucose (1 g/kg), milrinone (1 mg/kg) did not affect the insulin response to glucose. The increase in glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels after gastric glucose was not altered by milrinone. However, the PDE3 inhibitor augmented the insulin response to intravenous GLP-1 (2.8 nmol/kg). We therefore conclude that PDE3 inhibition by milrinone augments insulin secretion in vivo in mice after oral but not after intravenous glucose, which may be explained by enhanced response to the cAMP-dependent insulinotropic action of endogenously released GLP-1.

  18. Choice in HIV testing: the acceptability and anticipated use of a self-administered at-home oral HIV test among South Africans.

    PubMed

    Kelvin, Elizabeth A; Cheruvillil, Sonia; Christian, Stephanie; Mantell, Joanne E; Milford, Cecilia; Rambally-Greener, Letitia; Mosery, Nzwakie; Greener, Ross; Smit, Jennifer A

    2016-07-01

    Combination HIV prevention is being widely promoted by funders. This strategy aims to offer HIV prevention choices that can be selected and combined to decrease HIV risk in ways that fit with each individual's situation. Treatment as prevention and pre-exposure prophylaxis are two new evidence-based strategies to decrease HIV incidence, both of which require high HIV testing rates to be effective, and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) has set a goal of 90% of HIV-positive individuals knowing their status by 2030. However, HIV testing rates in many countries remain suboptimal. Just as no single HIV prevention method is ideal for all people in all situations, no single HIV testing modality is likely to be acceptable to everyone. By offering HIV testing choices, we may be able to increase testing rates. However, many low-resourced countries have been slow to take up new HIV testing options such as the self-administered at-home oral HIV test that is currently available in the United States. In this paper, we present findings from 20 in-depth interviews, conducted in 2010, documenting opinions about self-administered at-home oral HIV testing, a testing modality still largely unavailable in Africa. Participants were clients of three primary healthcare clinics in South Africa. Self-testing was seen as enabling confidentiality/privacy, saving time, and facilitating testing together with partners. However, concerns were raised about psychological distress when testing at home without a counsellor. Some suggested this concern could be minimised by having experienced clinic-based HIV testing and counselling before getting self-testing kits for home use. Thus, self-administered HIV testing could be an option added to the current testing modalities to address some important barriers to testing.

  19. Disposition of intravenously or orally administered silver nanoparticles in pregnant rats and the effect on the biochemical profile in urine.

    PubMed

    Fennell, Timothy R; Mortensen, Ninell P; Black, Sherry R; Snyder, Rodney W; Levine, Keith E; Poitras, Eric; Harrington, James M; Wingard, Christopher J; Holland, Nathan A; Pathmasiri, Wimal; Sumner, Susan C J

    2017-05-01

    Few investigations have been conducted on the disposition and fate of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) in pregnancy. The distribution of a single dose of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-stabilized AgNP was investigated in pregnant rats. Two sizes of AgNP, 20 and 110 nm, and silver acetate (AgAc) were used to investigate the role of AgNP diameter and particle dissolution in tissue distribution, internal dose and persistence. Dams were administered AgNP or AgAc intravenously (i.v.) (1 mg kg(-1) ) or by gavage (p.o.) (10 mg kg(-1) ), or vehicle alone, on gestation day 18 and euthanized at 24 or 48 h post-exposure. The silver concentration in tissues was measured using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The distribution of silver in dams was influenced by route of administration and AgNP size. The highest concentration of silver (μg Ag g(-1) tissue) at 48 h was found in the spleen for i.v. administered AgNP, and in the lungs for AgAc. At 48 h after p.o. administration of AgNP, the highest concentration was measured in the cecum and large intestine, and for AgAc in the placenta. Silver was detected in placenta and fetuses for all groups. Markers of cardiovascular injury, oxidative stress marker, cytokines and chemokines were not significantly elevated in exposed dams compared to vehicle-dosed control. NMR metabolomics analysis of urine indicated that AgNP and AgAc exposure impact the carbohydrate, and amino acid metabolism. This study demonstrates that silver crosses the placenta and is transferred to the fetus regardless of the form of silver. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of a single dose of voriconazole administered orally with and without food to red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensus).

    PubMed

    Parsley, Ruth A; Tell, Lisa A; Gehring, Ronette

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics of voriconazole administered PO with or without food to red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensus) and whether any observed variability could be explained by measured covariates to inform dose adjustments. ANIMALS 7 adult red-tailed hawks. PROCEDURES In a crossover study design, hawks were randomly assigned to first receive voriconazole (15 mg/kg, PO) injected into a dead mouse (n = 3; fed birds) or without food (4; unfed birds). Sixteen days later, treatments were reversed. Blood samples were collected at various points to measure plasma voriconazole concentrations by ultraperformance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic data were analyzed by noncompartmental methods and fit to a compartmental model through nonlinear mixed-effects regression, with feeding status and body weight investigated as covariates. RESULTS Voriconazole was well absorbed, with quantifiable plasma concentrations up to 24 hours after administration. Mean plasma half-life was approximately 2 hours in fed and unfed birds. Administration of the voriconazole in food delayed absorption, resulting in a significant delay in time to maximum plasma concentration. The final compartmental model included a categorical covariate to account for this lag in absorption as well as body weight as a covariate of total body clearance (relative to unknown bioavailability). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE A single dose of voriconazole (15 mg/kg) administered PO to red-tailed hawks resulted in mean plasma voriconazole concentrations greater than the targeted value (1 μg/mL). Additional studies with larger sample sizes and multidose regimens are required before the model developed here can be applied in clinical settings.

  1. Ability of Saudi mothers to appropriately and accurately use dosing devices to administer oral liquid medications to their children.

    PubMed

    Almazrou, Saja; Alsahly, Hind; Alwattar, Huda; Alturki, Lamya; Alamri, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Most liquid medications are packaged with administration devices, which may be used inappropriately or inaccurately, and sometimes are not used at all. Because of the importance of their proper use for children's health, this study was designed to assess Saudi mothers' experiences with measuring cups, syringes, and droppers for oral liquid medications; to compare accuracy of dosing across these devices; and to determine the effects of mothers' education statuses and pharmacist counseling on dosing accuracy. This was a cross-sectional study in which mothers were observed as they used a set of commonly available dosing devices which are a dosing cup, syringe, and dropper. Interviews were conducted in the outpatient pharmacy waiting area in several tertiary hospitals and primary clinics in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between March and April 2013. Saudi women who were mothers of children aged 12 years old or younger and who gave their consent were eligible. Caregivers other than mothers and subjects with vision problems or cognitive/physical disabilities were excluded. We gathered demographic information such as age, number of children, and education status. Subjects were asked if they had had counseling on how to use measuring devices and which device they preferred. Then, the mothers were required to demonstrate how to measure 5 mL of paracetamol (acetaminophen) syrup using a cup and a syringe and 1 mL of paracetamol syrup using a dropper. Dosing errors were evaluated visually as overdosing, underdosing, or no error (if the dose was accurate). The data were entered into Microsoft Excel and evaluated using Stata 11.1. Logistic regression was employed to determine relationships. The results revealed that 58% of participants measured an accurate dose of paracetamol using the oral dosing syringe versus 50% of participants using the dropper and 51% using the dosing cup. In general, participants measured more than the intended dose with the dosing cup and less than the intended

  2. Pharmacokinetics of orally administered single- and multiple-dose olopatadine in healthy Chinese subjects: an open-label study.

    PubMed

    Chu, Nan-Nan; Chen, Wei-Li; Xu, Hong-Rong; Li, Xue-Ning

    2009-01-01

    Olopatadine is a new selective histamine H(1) receptor antagonist with anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic effects. Its pharmacokinetics and safety have not previously been evaluated in Chinese subjects. The aims of this study were to assess the pharmacokinetics and safety of olopatadine after single- and multiple-dose oral administration in healthy Chinese subjects and to identify any differences in pharmacokinetics between males and females. The pharmacokinetic parameters for olopatadine in 12 healthy Chinese subjects (six males and six females) were assessed by determining olopatadine concentrations with a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Safety and tolerability were evaluated by monitoring adverse events, laboratory assay results, vital signs, physical examination findings and 12-lead ECG results. The pharmacokinetic parameters (mean +/- SD) for olopatadine following a single dose were: maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) 69.98 +/-20.87 ng/mL, time to reach C(max) (t(max)) 1.02 +/- 0.34 h, elimination half-life (t1/2) 5.87 +/- 4.24 h, area under the plasma-concentration curve (AUC) from time zero to the time of last quantifiable concentration (AUC(last)) 266.00 +/- 143.95 ng.h/mL, AUC from time zero extrapolated to infinity (AUC(infinity)) 283.46 +/- 152.96 ng.h/mL, apparent oral clearance (CL/F) 23.45 +/- 12.59 L/h and apparent volume of distribution after oral administration (V(d)/F) 133.83 +/- 43.07 L. The pharmacokinetic parameters of olopatadine after multiple doses were similar to those after a single dose. In both studies, significantly higher AUC(last), AUC(infinity) and C(max), longer t1/2 (single-dose only) and lower CL/F were observed in female subjects compared with male subjects after both single and multiple dosing. No serious adverse events occurred. Olopatadine was shown to be safe and well tolerated in healthy Chinese subjects. There were no changes in absorption and elimination of olopatadine following

  3. The effects of orally administered Beta-glucan on innate immune responses in humans, a randomized open-label intervention pilot-study.

    PubMed

    Leentjens, Jenneke; Quintin, Jessica; Gerretsen, Jelle; Kox, Matthijs; Pickkers, Peter; Netea, Mihai G

    2014-01-01

    To prevent or combat infection, increasing the effectiveness of the immune response is highly desirable, especially in case of compromised immune system function. However, immunostimulatory therapies are scarce, expensive, and often have unwanted side-effects. β-glucans have been shown to exert immunostimulatory effects in vitro and in vivo in experimental animal models. Oral β-glucan is inexpensive and well-tolerated, and therefore may represent a promising immunostimulatory compound for human use. We performed a randomized open-label intervention pilot-study in 15 healthy male volunteers. Subjects were randomized to either the β -glucan (n = 10) or the control group (n = 5). Subjects in the β-glucan group ingested β-glucan 1000 mg once daily for 7 days. Blood was sampled at various time-points to determine β-glucan serum levels, perform ex vivo stimulation of leukocytes, and analyze microbicidal activity. β-glucan was barely detectable in serum of volunteers at all time-points. Furthermore, neither cytokine production nor microbicidal activity of leukocytes were affected by orally administered β-glucan. The present study does not support the use of oral β-glucan to enhance innate immune responses in humans. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01727895.

  4. The Effects of Orally Administered Beta-Glucan on Innate Immune Responses in Humans, a Randomized Open-Label Intervention Pilot-Study

    PubMed Central

    Leentjens, Jenneke; Quintin, Jessica; Gerretsen, Jelle; Kox, Matthijs; Pickkers, Peter; Netea, Mihai G.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale To prevent or combat infection, increasing the effectiveness of the immune response is highly desirable, especially in case of compromised immune system function. However, immunostimulatory therapies are scarce, expensive, and often have unwanted side-effects. β-glucans have been shown to exert immunostimulatory effects in vitro and in vivo in experimental animal models. Oral β-glucan is inexpensive and well-tolerated, and therefore may represent a promising immunostimulatory compound for human use. Methods We performed a randomized open-label intervention pilot-study in 15 healthy male volunteers. Subjects were randomized to either the β -glucan (n = 10) or the control group (n = 5). Subjects in the β-glucan group ingested β-glucan 1000 mg once daily for 7 days. Blood was sampled at various time-points to determine β-glucan serum levels, perform ex vivo stimulation of leukocytes, and analyze microbicidal activity. Results β-glucan was barely detectable in serum of volunteers at all time-points. Furthermore, neither cytokine production nor microbicidal activity of leukocytes were affected by orally administered β-glucan. Conclusion The present study does not support the use of oral β-glucan to enhance innate immune responses in humans. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01727895 PMID:25268806

  5. Lipoprotein lipase expression, serum lipid and tissue lipid deposition in orally-administered glycyrrhizic acid-treated rats

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Wai Yen Alfred; Chia, Yoke Yin; Liong, Shih Yeen; Ton, So Ha; Kadir, Khalid Abdul; Syed Husain, Sharifah Noor Akmal

    2009-01-01

    Background The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of metabolic abnormalities comprising visceral obesity, dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance (IR). With the onset of IR, the expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), a key regulator of lipoprotein metabolism, is reduced. Increased activation of glucocorticoid receptors results in MetS symptoms and is thus speculated to have a role in the pathophysiology of the MetS. Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), the bioactive constituent of licorice roots (Glycyrrhiza glabra) inhibits 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 that catalyzes the activation of glucocorticoids. Thus, oral administration of GA is postulated to ameliorate the MetS. Results In this study, daily oral administration of 50 mg/kg of GA for one week led to significant increase in LPL expression in the quadriceps femoris (p < 0.05) but non-significant increase in the abdominal muscle, kidney, liver, heart and the subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues (p > 0.05) of the GA-treated rats compared to the control. Decrease in adipocyte size (p > 0.05) in both the visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue depots accompanies such selective induction of LPL expression. Consistent improvement in serum lipid parameters was also observed, with decrease in serum free fatty acid, triacylglycerol, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol but elevated HDL-cholesterol (p > 0.05). Histological analysis using tissue lipid staining with Oil Red O showed significant decrease in lipid deposition in the abdominal muscle and quadriceps femoris (p < 0.05) but non-significant decrease in the heart, kidney and liver (p > 0.05). Conclusion Results from this study may imply that GA could counteract the development of visceral obesity and improve dyslipidaemia via selective induction of tissue LPL expression and a positive shift in serum lipid parameters respectively, and retard the development of IR associated with tissue steatosis. PMID:19638239

  6. A pilot study comparing the effect of orally administered esomeprazole and omeprazole on gastric fluid pH in horses.

    PubMed

    Huxford, K E; Dart, A J; Perkins, N R; Bell, R; Jeffcott, L B

    2017-08-07

    AIMS To compare the efficacy of an enteric coated esomeprazole paste with an enteric coated omeprazole paste to increase gastric pH after oral administration in horses. METHODS Nine adult Standardbred horses were randomly assigned to three groups, each containing three horses, for a study comprising three phases of 10 days, with an 18-day washout period between each phase. In each phase, three horses received either 0.5 mg/kg esomeprazole, 1 mg/kg omeprazole or a placebo, as an oral paste, once daily for 10 days (Days 0-9). Over the course of study all horses received all three treatments. Gastric fluid samples were collected using a gastroscope on Days 1, 3, 5, 8 and 10, with food and water withheld for 16 hours prior to collection of samples. The pH of all samples was measured immediately after collection. RESULTS Mean pH (3.38; SD 1.75) of the gastric fluid samples in the horses that received the placebo was lower than in the horses that received esomeprazole (6.28; SD 1.75) or omeprazole (6.13; SD 1.75) (p<0.001). There was no difference in the mean pH between horses receiving esomeprazole and those receiving omeprazole (p=0.56). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Under these study conditions, esomeprazole paste was equally as effective as omeprazole paste in increasing gastric pH in horses. Enteric coated esomeprazole, may be a therapeutic alternative to omeprazole for the prevention of gastric ulcers in horses.

  7. Is the brain arachidonic acid cascade a common target of drugs used to manage bipolar disorder?

    PubMed

    Bazinet, Richard P

    2009-10-01

    Although lithium has been used therapeutically to treat patients with bipolar disorder for over 50 years, its mechanism of action, as well as that of other drugs used to treat bipolar disorder, is not agreed upon. In the present paper, I review studies in unanaesthetized rats using a neuropharmacological approach, combined with kinetic, biochemical and molecular biology techniques, demonstrating that chronic administration of three commonly used mood stabilizers (lithium, valproic acid and carbamazepine), at therapeutically relevant doses, selectively target the brain arachidonic acid cascade. Upon chronic administration, lithium and carbamazepine decrease the binding activity of activator protein-2 and, in turn, the transcription, translation and activity of its arachidonic acid-selective calcium-dependent phospholipase A(2) gene product, whereas chronic valproic acid non-competitively inhibits long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase. The net overlapping effects of the three mood stabilizers are decreased turnover of arachidonic acid, but not of docosahexaenoic acid, in rat brain phospholipids, as well as decreased brain cyclo-oxygenase-2 and prostaglandin E(2). As an extension of this theory, drugs that are thought to induce switching to mania, especially when administered during bipolar depression (fluoxetine and imipramine), up-regulate enzymes of the arachidonic acid cascade and turnover of arachidonic acid in rat brain phospholipids. Future basic and clinical studies on the arachidonic acid hypothesis of bipolar disorder are warranted.

  8. Age-Related P-Glycoprotein Expression in the Intestine and Affecting the Pharmacokinetics of Orally Administered Enrofloxacin in Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yong; Zhang, Yu; Dong, Lingling; Dai, Xiaohua; Wang, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Bioavailability is the most important factor for the efficacy of any drug and it is determined by P- glycoprotein (P-gp) expression. Confirmation of P-gp expression during ontogeny is needed for understanding the differences in therapeutic efficacy of any drug in juvenile and adult animals. In this study, Abcb1 mRNA levels in the liver and intestine of broilers during ontogeny were analysed by RT qPCR. Cellular distribution of P-gp was detected by immunohistochemstry. Age-related differences of enrofloxacin pharmacokinetics were also studied. It was found that broilers aged 4 week-old expressed significantly (P<0.01) higher levels of P-gp mRNA in the liver, jejunum and ileum, than at other ages. However, there was no significant (P>0.05) age-related difference in the duodenum. Furthermore, the highest and lowest levels of Abcb1 mRNA expression were observed in the jejunum, and duodenum, respectively. P-gp immunoreactivity was detected on the apical surface of the enterocytes and in the bile canalicular membranes of the hepatocytes. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that the 8 week-old broilers, when orally administrated enrofloxacin, exhibited significantly higher Cmax (1.97 vs. 0.98 μg•ml-1, P=0.009), AUC(14.54 vs. 9.35 μg•ml-1•h, P=0.005) and Ka (1.38 vs. 0.43 h-1, P=0.032), as well as lower Tpeak (1.78 vs. 3.28 h, P=0.048) and T1/2ka (0.6 vs. 1.64 h, P=0.012) than the 4 week-old broilers. The bioavailability of enrofloxacin in 8 week-old broilers was increased by 15.9%, compared with that in 4 week-old birds. Interestingly, combining verapamil, a P-gp modulator, significantly improved pharmacokinetic behaviour of enrofloxacin in all birds. The results indicate juvenile broilers had a higher expression of P-gp in the intestine, affecting the pharmacokinetics and reducing the bioavailability of oral enrofloxacin in broilers. On the basis of our results, it is recommended that alternative dose regimes are necessary for different ages of broilers for

  9. Treatment of Dry Eye Syndrome with Orally Administered CF101: Data from a Phase 2 Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Avni, Isaac; Garzozi, Hanna J.; Barequet, Irina S.; Segev, Fanni; Varssano, David; Sartani, Gil; Chetrit, Noa; Bakshi, Erez; Zadok, David; Tomkins, Oren; Litvin, Gilad; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Fishman, Sari; Harpaz, Zivit; Farbstein, Motti; Bar Yehuda, Sara; Silverman, Michael H.; Kerns, William D.; Bristol, David R.; Cohn, Ilan; Fishman, Pnina

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the safety and efficacy of CF101, an A3 adenosine receptor agonist, in patients with moderate-to-severe dry eye syndrome Design Phase 2, multicenter, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study. Participants 68 patients completed the study, 35 patients in the placebo group and 33 patients in the CF101 group. Intervention Patients were orally treated with either 1 mg CF101 pills or matching vehicle-filled placebo pills, given twice daily for 12 weeks, followed by a 2-week post-treatment observation. Main Outcome Measures Efficacy an improvement of >25% over baseline at week 12 in one of the following parameters: (a) tear break-up time (BUT); (b) superficial punctate keratitis assessed by fluorescein staining (FS); (c) Schirmer tear test 1 (ST1). Safety clinical laboratory safety tests, ophthalmic examinations, intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements, electrocardiographic evaluations, vital sign measurements and monitoring of adverse events. Results A statistically significant increase in the proportion of patients who achieved more than 25% improvement in the corneal staining and in the clearance of corneal staining was noted between the CF101-treated group and the placebo group. Treatment with CF101 resulted in a statistically significant improvement in the mean change from baseline at week 12 of the corneal staining, BUT, and tear meniscus (TM) height in the CF101-treated group CF101 was well tolerated and exhibited an excellent safety profile with no serious adverse events. A statistically significant decrease from baseline was observed in the IOP of the CF101-treated group in comparison with the placebo group. Conclusions CF101, given orally, induced a statistically significant improvement in the corneal staining and an improvement in the BUT and TM in patients with moderate-to-severe dry eye syndrome. The drug was very well tolerated. These data and the anti-inflammatory characteristic of CF101 support further study

  10. Age-related P-glycoprotein expression in the intestine and affecting the pharmacokinetics of orally administered enrofloxacin in broilers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mengjie; Bughio, Shamsuddin; Sun, Yong; Zhang, Yu; Dong, Lingling; Dai, Xiaohua; Wang, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Bioavailability is the most important factor for the efficacy of any drug and it is determined by P- glycoprotein (P-gp) expression. Confirmation of P-gp expression during ontogeny is needed for understanding the differences in therapeutic efficacy of any drug in juvenile and adult animals. In this study, Abcb1 mRNA levels in the liver and intestine of broilers during ontogeny were analysed by RT qPCR. Cellular distribution of P-gp was detected by immunohistochemstry. Age-related differences of enrofloxacin pharmacokinetics were also studied. It was found that broilers aged 4 week-old expressed significantly (P<0.01) higher levels of P-gp mRNA in the liver, jejunum and ileum, than at other ages. However, there was no significant (P>0.05) age-related difference in the duodenum. Furthermore, the highest and lowest levels of Abcb1 mRNA expression were observed in the jejunum, and duodenum, respectively. P-gp immunoreactivity was detected on the apical surface of the enterocytes and in the bile canalicular membranes of the hepatocytes. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that the 8 week-old broilers, when orally administrated enrofloxacin, exhibited significantly higher Cmax (1.97 vs. 0.98 μg • ml(-1), P=0.009), AUC(14.54 vs. 9.35 μg • ml(-1) • h, P=0.005) and Ka (1.38 vs. 0.43 h(-1), P=0.032), as well as lower Tpeak (1.78 vs. 3.28 h, P=0.048) and T1/2 ka (0.6 vs. 1.64 h, P=0.012) than the 4 week-old broilers. The bioavailability of enrofloxacin in 8 week-old broilers was increased by 15.9%, compared with that in 4 week-old birds. Interestingly, combining verapamil, a P-gp modulator, significantly improved pharmacokinetic behaviour of enrofloxacin in all birds. The results indicate juvenile broilers had a higher expression of P-gp in the intestine, affecting the pharmacokinetics and reducing the bioavailability of oral enrofloxacin in broilers. On the basis of our results, it is recommended that alternative dose regimes are necessary for different ages of

  11. Oral administered particulate yeast-derived glucan promotes hepatitis B virus clearance in a hydrodynamic injection mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Dandan; Shi, Bisheng; Ren, Guangxu; Peng, Xiuhua; Fang, Zhong; Kozlowski, Maya; Zhou, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xiaonan; Wu, Min; Wang, Cong; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) persistent infection is associated with ineffective immune response for the clearance of virus. Immunomodulators represent an important class of therapeutics, which potentially could be beneficial for the treatment of HBV infection. The particulate yeast-derived glucan (PYDG) has been shown to enhance the innate and adaptive immune responses. We therefore, assessed the efficacy of PYDG in enhancing HBV specific immune responses by employing the hydrodynamic injection-based (HDI) HBV transfection mouse model. Mice were intragatric administered PYDG daily for 9 weeks post pAAV/HBV1.2 hydrodynamic injection. PYDG treatment significantly promoted HBV DNA clearance and production of HBsAb compared to control mice. PYDG treatment resulted in recruitment of macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs) and effector T cells to the liver microenvironment, accompanied by a significantly augmented DCs maturation and HBV-specific IFN-γ and TNF-α production by T cell. In addition, enhanced production of Th1 cytokines in liver tissue interstitial fluid (TIF) was associated with PYDG administration. Live imaging showed the accumulation of PYDG in the mouse liver. Our results demonstrate that PYDG treatment significantly enhances HBV-specific Th1 immune responses, accompanied by clearance of HBV DNA, and therefore holds promise for further development of therapeutics against chronic hepatitis B.

  12. Rapid and complete urinary elimination of (/sup 14/C)-5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde administered orally or intravenously to rats

    SciTech Connect

    Germond, J.E.; Philippossian, G.; Richli, U.; Bracco, I.; Arnaud, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    5-Hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (HMF), is a major product of sugar degradation found in food and solutions used in parenteral nutrition. Labeled (/sup 14/C)HMF was synthesized by dehydration of (/sup 14/C)fructose on ion-exchange resin and administered per os (po) and intravenously (iv) to rats. Metabolic balance of radioactivity demonstrated that HMF or its metabolites are rapidly eliminated in the urine with a recovery of 95-100% after 24 h. Literature reported, in some cases, 50% retention in the body. HMF was completely converted to two metabolites, which have been identified by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectroscopy (MS) as 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furoic acid and N-(5-hydroxymethyl-2-furoyl)glycine. Administration of high doses of HMF showed a similar rapid elimination, but a proportional reduction of the amount of the glycine conjugate produced. Whole-animal-body autoradiography confirm that shortly after administration radioactive material was present in the liver but was mostly in the kidney and the bladder. The only significant difference between po and iv administration was the presence of a higher level of radioactive material in the brain of iv-treated rats.

  13. Effect of orally administered L. fermentum NCIMB 5221 on markers of metabolic syndrome: an in vivo analysis using ZDF rats.

    PubMed

    Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Saha, Shyamali; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Jones, Mitchell L; Labbé, Alain; Rodes, Laetitia; Kahouli, Imen; Prakash, Satya

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome, encompassing type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, is a growing health concern of industrialized countries. Ferulic acid (FA) is a phenolic acid found in foods normally consumed by humans that has demonstrated antioxidant activity, cholesterol-lowering capabilities, and anti-tumorigenic properties. Select probiotic bacteria, including Lactobacillus fermentum NCIMB 5221, produce FA due to intrinsic ferulic acid esterase activity. The aim of the present research was to investigate a FA-producing probiotic, L. fermentum NCIMB 5221, as a biotherapeutic for metabolic syndrome. The probiotic formulation was administered daily for 8 weeks to Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats, a model of hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia. Results show that the probiotic formulation reduced fasting insulin levels and insulin resistance, significantly reduced serum triglycerides (p = 0.016), lowered serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (p = 0.008), and significantly reduced the atherogenic (p = 0.016) and atherosclerosis (p = 0.012) index as compared to the control animals. In addition, the probiotic formulation significantly increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (p = 0.041) as compared to the control animals. This research indicates that administration of the FA-producing L. fermentum NCIMB 5221 has the potential to reduce insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, hypercholesterolemia, and other markers involved in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. Further studies are required to investigate the human clinical potential of the probiotic formulation in affecting the markers and pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome.

  14. Selective Enhancement of Systemic Th1 Immunity in Immunologically Immature Rats with an Orally Administered Bacterial Extract

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, L. M.; Holt, P. G.

    2001-01-01

    Infant rats primed during the first week of life with soluble antigen displayed adult-equivalent levels of T-helper 2 (Th2)-dependent immunological memory development as revealed by production of secondary immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) antibody responses to subsequent challenge, but in contrast to adults failed to prime for Th1-dependent IgG2b responses. We demonstrate that this Th2 bias in immune function can be redressed by oral administration to neonates of a bacterial extract (Broncho-Vaxom OM-85) comprising lyophilized fractions of several common respiratory tract bacterial pathogens. Animals given OM-85 displayed a selective upregulation in primary and secondary IgG2b responses, accompanied by increased gamma interferon and decreased interleukin-4 production (both antigen specific and polyclonal), and increased capacity for development of Th1-dependent delayed hypersensitivity to the challenge antigen. We hypothesize that the bacterial extract functions via enhancement of the process of postnatal maturation of Th1 function, which is normally driven by stimuli from the gastrointestinal commensal microflora. PMID:11349036

  15. Effect of orally administered soy milk fermented with Lactobacillus plantarum LAB12 and physical exercise on murine immune responses.

    PubMed

    Appukutty, M; Ramasamy, K; Rajan, S; Vellasamy, S; Ramasamy, R; Radhakrishnan, A K

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that confer health benefits through the gastrointestinal microbiota. This nutritional supplement may benefit athletes who undergo rigorous training by maintaining their gastrointestinal functions and overall health. In this study the influence of moderate physical exercise using a graded treadmill exercise, alone or in combination with the consumption of a soy product fermented with Lactobacillus plantarum LAB12 (LAB12), on tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) responses was investigated in a murine model. Male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups of six mice each (control, exercise alone, LAB12 and LAB12 + exercise). Mice treated with the potential probiotic LAB12 were orally gavaged for 42 days. At autopsy, blood and spleen from the animals were collected. The splenocytes were cultured in the presence of a mitogen, concanavalin A (Con A). The amount of TNF-α produced by the Con A-stimulated splenocytes was quantified using ELISA, while their proliferation was determined using the [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation method. This study shows that LAB12-supplemented and exercise-induced mice showed marked increase (P<0.05) in cell proliferation compared to the control animals. TNF-α production was suppressed (P<0.05) in the LAB12 group compared to the untreated mice. These results demonstrate that supplementation with LAB12 has immunomodulatory effects, under conditions of moderate physical exercise, which may have implications for human athletes. Further investigation in human trials is warranted to confirm and extrapolate these findings.

  16. Orally Administered Nano-curcumin to Attenuate Morphine Tolerance: Comparison between Negatively Charged PLGA and Partially and Fully PEGylated Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hao; Hu, Xiaoyu; Szymusiak, Magdalena; Wang, Zaijie Jim; Liu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    We have formulated hydrophobic curcurmin [1,7-bis-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione] into stable nanoparticle suspensions (nano-curcumin) to overcome its relatively low bioavailability, high rate of metabolism and rapid elimination and clearance from the body. Employing the curcumin nanoformulations as the platform, we discovered that curcumin has the potential to alleviate morphine tolerance. The two types of stable polymeric nanoparticles - poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic acid) (PEG-b-PLA) - and the hybrid of the two were generated using flash nanoprecipitation integrated with spray drying. The optimized formulations have high drug loading (>45%), small particles size with narrow distribution, and controlled surface properties. Mice behavioral studies (tail-flick and hot-plate tests) were conducted to verify the effects of nano-curcumin on attenuating morphine tolerance. Significant analgesia was observed in mice during both tail-flick and hot-plate tests using orally administrated nano-curcumin following subcutaneous injections of morphine. However, unformulated curcumin at the same dose showed no effect. Compared with PEGylated nano-curcumin, negatively charged PLGA nanoparticles showed better functionality. PMID:24195658

  17. Orally administered betaine reduces photodamage caused by UVB irradiation through the regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Im, A-Rang; Lee, Hee Jeong; Youn, Ui Joung; Hyun, Jin Won; Chae, Sungwook

    2016-01-01

    Betaine is widely distributed in plants, microorganisms, in several types of food and in medical herbs, including Lycium chinense. The administration of 100 mg betaine/kg body weight/day is an effective strategy for preventing ultraviolet irradiation‑induced skin damage. The present study aimed to determine the preventive effects of betaine on ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation‑induced skin damage in hairless mice. The mice were divided into three groups: Control (n=5), UVB‑treated vehicle (n=5) and UVB‑treated betaine (n=5) groups. The level of irradiation was progressively increased between 60 mJ/cm2 per exposure at week 1 (one minimal erythematous dose = 60 mJ/cm2) and 90 mJ/cm2 per exposure at week 7. The formation of wrinkles significantly increased following UVB exposure in the UVB‑treated vehicle group. However, treatment with betaine suppressed UVB‑induced wrinkle formation, as determined by the mean length, mean depth, number, epidermal thickness and collagen damage. Furthermore, oral administration of betaine also inhibited the UVB‑induced expression of mitogen‑activated protein kinase kinase (MEK), extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK), and matrix metalloproteinase‑9 (MMP‑9). These findings suggested that betaine inhibits UVB‑induced skin damage by suppressing increased expression of MMP‑9 through the inhibition of MEK and ERK.

  18. International guidelines for bioequivalence of systemically available orally administered generic drug products: a survey of similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Davit, Barbara; Braddy, April C; Conner, Dale P; Yu, Lawrence X

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this article is to discuss the similarities and differences among bioequivalence approaches used by international regulatory authorities when reviewing applications for marketing new generic drug products which are systemically active and intended for oral administration. We focused on the 13 jurisdictions and organizations participating in the International Generic Drug Regulators Pilot. These are Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Chinese Taipei, the European Medicines Association, Japan, Mexico, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, the USA, and the World Health Organization. We began with a comparison of how the various jurisdictions and organizations define a generic product and its corresponding reference product. We then compared the following bioequivalence approaches: recommended bioequivalence study designs, method of pharmacokinetic calculations and bioequivalence acceptance limits, recommendations for modifying bioequivalence study designs and limits for highly variable drugs and narrow therapeutic index drugs, provisions for waiving bioequivalence study requirements (granting biowaivers), and implementation of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System. We observed that, overall, there are more similarities than differences in bioequivalence approaches among the regulatory authorities surveyed.

  19. A dose-response study of orally administered clonidine as premedication in the elderly: evaluating hemodynamic safety.

    PubMed

    Filos, K S; Patroni, O; Goudas, L C; Bosas, O; Kassaras, A; Gartaganis, S

    1993-12-01

    Clonidine premedication in a dose of 5 micrograms/kg may be particularly well suited for elderly patients. To pursue this approach, sedation, intraocular pressure (IOP), and the hemodynamic profile of two doses of oral clonidine premedication were compared in 60 elderly patients, aged 65-82 yr, who underwent elective ophthalmic surgery under local anesthesia. Group 1 (n = 20) received placebo, Group 2 (n = 20) 150 micrograms of clonidine (2-2.5 micrograms/kg), and Group 3 (n = 20) 300 micrograms of clonidine (4-4.5 micrograms/kg) in a randomized, double-blind fashion. Decreases in mean arterial blood pressure were more pronounced and occurred earlier after 300 micrograms of clonidine (31.4 +/- 12.1%, P < 0.001) as compared to 150 micrograms of clonidine (18.1 +/- 10.9%, P < 0.001). Throughout the study, six patients (30%) in Group 3 (300 micrograms clonidine-treated group), but no patient in Groups 1 or 2, were treated at least once for hypotension (P < 0.05). Heart rate decreased significantly 18.5 +/- 8.1% (P < 0.001) only after 300 micrograms of clonidine. Clonidine 150 micrograms and 300 micrograms decreased IOP 32.1 +/- 14.3% (P < 0.001) and 47.8 +/- 17.2% (P < 0.001), respectively. After 150 micrograms of clonidine patients were significantly more sedated as compared to those given placebo (P < 0.01) but significantly less sedated than after 300 micrograms of clonidine (P < 0.01), where sedation persisted more than 6 h postoperatively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. [Development of a pharmacological curriculum for general practice: Identifying and prescribing orally administered pharmacological substances with relevance for general practice].

    PubMed

    Straßner, Cornelia; Kaufmann-Kolle, Petra; Flum, Elisabeth; Schwill, Simon; Brandt, Bettina; Steinhäuser, Jost

    2017-05-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are among the specialists who prescribe the highest number of medication. Therefore the improvement of pharmacological competencies is an important part of the GP specialist training. The self-concept of general practice stating that GPs are the first contact persons for all health problems makes it challenging to define and acquire competencies for specialist training. While the "Competence-based Curriculum" developed by the German College of General Practitioners and Family Physicians defines diagnoses, reasons for counselling and competencies which are essential for general practice, a similar orientation guide is lacking for the pharmacological field. The aim of this study is to define and characterize pharmacological substances which every GP should know so well that he or she is able to conduct counselling and monitoring. We analysed private and public health insurance prescriptions of all general practices participating in the CONTENT project in the period from 2009 to 2014. The analysis was limited to substances with oral application which were prescribed at least once by at least 25 % (n = 11) of the practices. While the 100 most frequent prescriptions were included due to their frequency, less frequently prescribed substances were assessed concerning their relevance for general practice in a rating procedure. The substances included were classified by diagnoses and reasons for counselling. We analysed 1,912,896 prescriptions from 44 practices and 112,535 patients on the basis of the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system. After applying the inclusion criteria, 453 substances were left, 302 of which were considered relevant for general practice and could be assigned to 45 diagnoses / reasons for counselling. The result of this study could be considered a working draft for a pharmacological curriculum for general practice, which may complement the "Competence-based Curriculum" in the medium term. Copyright

  1. Genistein administered as a once-daily oral supplement had no beneficial effect on the tibia in rat models for postmenopausal bone loss.

    PubMed

    Turner, Russell T; Iwaniec, Urszula T; Andrade, Juan E; Branscum, Adam J; Neese, Steven L; Olson, Dawn A; Wagner, Lindsay; Wang, Victor C; Schantz, Susan L; Helferich, William G

    2013-06-01

    Estrogen deficiency after menopause results in rapid bone loss, predisposing women to osteoporotic fractures. Genistein, a phytoestrogen present in high concentrations in soy, is an ingredient in dietary supplements aggressively marketed for bone health. However, in a recent long-duration clinical trial in postmenopausal women, the efficacy of soy extracts in reducing bone loss was disappointing. To better understand the failure of soy extracts to consistently induce a robust skeletal response in women, we investigated the long-term (5 mo) efficacy of genistein, administered as a daily oral supplement, (1) in preventing cancellous bone loss in skeletally mature virgin Long-Evans rats ovariectomized at 7 months of age and (2) in improving cancellous bone mass and architecture in aged retired-breeder rats ovariectomized at 16 or 22 months of age. Rats within each age group were randomly assigned into one of three treatment groups (n = 7-12 rats/group): (1) vehicle control, (2) genistein 485 μg/day, or (3) genistein 970 μg/day, resulting in mean (SE) serum genistein levels of 0.18 (0.10), 0.76 (0.15), and 1.48 (0.31) μM, respectively. Total tibia bone mass and density were evaluated using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, whereas cancellous bone mass and architecture in the tibial metaphysis, as well as cortical bone mass and architecture in the tibial diaphysis, were evaluated by micro-CT. Oral genistein administered as a dietary supplement did not influence the cumulative effects of ovariectomy, aging, and/or reproductive history on cancellous and cortical bone mass and architecture. Serum levels of genistein similar to those in women consuming a high-soy diet are ineffective in preventing or treating bone loss in rat models for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  2. The effects of orally administered Bacillus coagulans and inulin on prevention and progression of rheumatoid arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Abhari, Khadijeh; Shekarforoush, Seyed Shahram; Hosseinzadeh, Saeid; Nazifi, Saeid; Sajedianfard, Javad; Eskandari, Mohammad Hadi

    2016-01-01

    < 0.001), which was similar to the anti-inflammatory effect of indomethacin. Furthermore, no significant anti-inflammatory effects were observed following different treatments using α1AGp as an RA indicator. Pretreatment with all supplied diets significantly inhibited the development of paw swelling induced by CFA (P < 0.001). Conclusion The results of this study indicate that the oral intake of probiotic B. coagulans and prebiotic inulin can improve the biochemical and clinical parameters of induced RA in rat. PMID:27427194

  3. Impact of orally administered lozenges with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 on the number of salivary mutans streptococci, amount of plaque, gingival inflammation and the oral microbiome in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Toiviainen, Aino; Jalasvuori, Heli; Lahti, Emilia; Gursoy, Ulvi; Salminen, Seppo; Fontana, Margherita; Flannagan, Susan; Eckert, George; Kokaras, Alexis; Paster, Bruce; Söderling, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effects of orally administered Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 (BB-12) on the number of salivary mutans streptococci (MS), amount of plaque, gingival inflammation and the oral microbiota in healthy young adults. The study was a randomised, controlled, double-blind trial. Healthy volunteers used lozenges containing a combination of LGG and BB-12 (test group, n = 29) or lozenges without added probiotics (control group, n = 31) for 4 weeks. At baseline and at the end of the test period, the plaque index (PI) and gingival index (GI) were determined, and stimulated saliva was collected. The microbial composition of saliva was assessed using human oral microbe identification microarray (n = 30). MS and lactobacilli (LB) were plate cultured. The probiotic lozenge decreased both PI and GI (p < 0.05) while no changes were observed in the control group. However, no probiotic-induced changes were found in the microbial compositions of saliva in either group. The probiotic lozenge improved the periodontal status without affecting the oral microbiota. Short-term consumption of LGG and BB-12 decreased the amount of plaque which was associated with a clinical impact: a decrease in gingival inflammation.

  4. Target animal safety study of meloxicam administered via transmucosal oral spray (Promist(®) technology) for 6 months in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hare, J E; Niemuller, C A; Petrick, D M

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated the safety of meloxicam administered via transmucosal oral spray (TMOS) at 1, 2, 3 and 5 times the maximum proposed dose for 6 months in dogs. After baseline assessments, 40 Beagles (20 M, 20 F) were randomized to gender-balanced groups administered either water or meloxicam TMOS at 1, 2, 3 and 5 times the maximum proposed dose once daily for 26 weeks. Dogs were subjected to daily food consumption measurements and clinical and dose site observations. Periodic evaluations were made of body weight, physical examination, clinical pathology, urinalysis, buccal mucosal bleeding time (BMBT) and gastroduodenal endoscopy. At study completion, all dogs were subjected to gross necropsy. Histopathology was performed on tissues from dogs in groups 0X and 5X and from selected tissues in other dose groups. Clinical signs of previously reported NSAID-associated gastrointestinal upset were noted with higher frequency in meloxicam-dosed animals than in controls. Despite the presence of statistically significant effects on some clinicopathological variables, no toxicologically relevant dose-associated effects were determined on these or on food consumption, dose site observations, body weight, physical examination, urinalysis, BMBT, endoscopic examination or gross and histopathological examination of necropsy tissues.

  5. Imaging copper metabolism imbalance in Atp7b (-/-) knockout mouse model of Wilson's disease with PET-CT and orally administered 64CuCl2.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fangyu; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Sun, Xiankai; Muzik, Otto

    2012-10-01

    This study aims to determine the feasibility and utility of functional imaging of copper metabolism imbalance in Atp7b (-/-) knockout mouse model of Wilson's disease (WD) with positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) using orally administered copper-64 chloride ((64)CuCl(2)) as a tracer. Atp7b (-/-) KO mice (N = 5) were subjected to PET scanning using a hybrid PET-CT scanner, after oral administration of (64)CuCl(2) as a tracer. Time-dependent PET quantitative analysis was performed to assess gastrointestinal absorption and biodistribution of (64)Cu radioactivity in the Atp7b (-/-) KO mice, using C57BL wild-type (WT) mice (N = 5) as a normal control. Estimates of human radiation dosimetry were calculated based on biodistribution of (64)Cu radioactivity in live animals. PET-CT analysis demonstrated higher (64)Cu radioactivity in the liver of Atp7b (-/-) knockout mice compared with that in the control C57BL WT mice (p < 0.001), following oral administration of (64)CuCl(2) as a tracer. In addition, (64)Cu radioactivity in the lungs of the Atp7b (-/-) knockout mice was slightly higher than those in the control C57BL WT mice (p = 0.01). Despite initially higher renal clearance of (64)Cu, there was no significant difference of (64)Cu radioactivity in the kidneys of the Atp7b (-/-) KO mice and the control C57BL WT mice at 24 h post-oral administration of (64)CuCl(2) (p = 0.16). There was no significant difference in low (64)Cu radioactivity in the blood, brain, heart, and muscles between the Atp7b (-/-) knockout mice and control C57BL WT mice (p > 0.05). Based on the biodistribution of (64)Cu radioactivity in C57BL WT mice, radiation dosimetry estimates of (64)Cu in normal human subjects were obtained. An effective dose (ED) of 42.4 μSv/MBq (weighted dose over 22 organs) was calculated and the lower large intestines were identified as the critical organ for radiation exposure (120 μGy/MBq for males and 135 μGy/MBq for

  6. Sex specific impact of perinatal bisphenol A (BPA) exposure over a range of orally administered doses on rat hypothalamic sexual differentiation.

    PubMed

    McCaffrey, Katherine A; Jones, Brian; Mabrey, Natalie; Weiss, Bernard; Swan, Shanna H; Patisaul, Heather B

    2013-05-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high volume production chemical used in polycarbonate plastics, epoxy resins, thermal paper receipts, and other household products. The neural effects of early life BPA exposure, particularly to low doses administered orally, remain unclear. Thus, to better characterize the dose range over which BPA alters sex specific neuroanatomy, we examined the impact of perinatal BPA exposure on two sexually dimorphic regions in the anterior hypothalamus, the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) and the anterioventral periventricular (AVPV) nucleus. Both are sexually differentiated by estradiol and play a role in sex specific reproductive physiology and behavior. Long Evans rats were prenatally exposed to 10, 100, 1000, 10,000μg/kg bw/day BPA through daily, non-invasive oral administration of dosed-cookies to the dams. Offspring were reared to adulthood. Their brains were collected and immunolabeled for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the AVPV and calbindin (CALB) in the SDN-POA. We observed decreased TH-ir cell numbers in the female AVPV across all exposure groups, an effect indicative of masculinization. In males, AVPV TH-ir cell numbers were significantly reduced in only the BPA 10 and BPA 10,000 groups. SDN-POA endpoints were unaltered in females but in males SDN-POA volume was significantly lower in all BPA exposure groups. CALB-ir was significantly lower in all but the BPA 1000 group. These effects are consistent with demasculinization. Collectively these data demonstrate that early life oral exposure to BPA at levels well below the current No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) of 50mg/kg/day can alter sex specific hypothalamic morphology in the rat.

  7. Sex specific impact of perinatal bisphenol A (BPA) exposure over a range of orally administered doses on rat hypothalamic sexual differentiation

    PubMed Central

    McCaffrey, Katherine A.; Jones, Brian; Mabrey, Natalie; Weiss, Bernard; Swan, Shanna H.; Patisaul, Heather B.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high volume production chemical used in polycarbonate plastics, epoxy resins, thermal paper receipts, and other household products. The neural effects of early life BPA exposure, particularly to low doses administered orally, remain unclear. Thus, to better characterize the dose range over which BPA alters sex specific neuroanatomy, we examined the impact of perinatal BPA exposure on two sexually dimorphic regions in the anterior hypothalamus, the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) and the anterioventral periventricular (AVPV) nucleus. Both are sexually differentiated by estradiol and play a role in sex specific reproductive physiology and behavior. Long Evans rats were prenatally exposed to 10, 100, 1000, 10,000 mg/kg bw/day BPA through daily, noninvasive oral administration of dosed-cookies to the dams. Offspring were reared to adulthood. Their brains were collected and immunolabeled for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the AVPV and calbindin (CALB) in the SDN-POA. We observed decreased TH-ir cell numbers in the female AVPV across all exposure groups, an effect indicative of masculinization. In males, AVPV TH-ir cell numbers were significantly reduced in only the BPA 10 and BPA 10,000 groups. SDN-POA endpoints were unaltered in females but in males SDN-POA volume was significantly lower in all BPA exposure groups. CALB-ir was significantly lower in all but the BPA 1000 group. These effects are consistent with demasculinization. Collectively these data demonstrate that early life oral exposure to BPA at levels well below the current No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) of 50 mg/kg/day can alter sex specific hypothalamic morphology in the rat. PMID:23500335

  8. Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity of Orally Administered Botanical Composition, UP446-Part III: Effects on Fertility and Early Embryonic Development to Implantation in Sprague Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young-Chul; Hyun, Eu-Jin; Jia, Qi

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, high prevalence of adverse effects associated to the use of traditional medicines during pregnancy is becoming alarming due to the self-medication of oral supplements by expecting mothers without supervision. Many expectant mothers use alternative and complementary medicines as a supplement to conventional pregnancy management with an inherent belief of considering herbal remedies as harmless. To the contrary, herbal remedies could incur a potential teratogenic risk both to the child bearing mother and the developing fetuses when consumed before or at the time of gestation. Here, we describe the potential adverse effects of orally administered UP446, a standardized bioflavonoid composition from the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis and the heartwoods of Acacia catechu, on fertility and early embryonic development to implantation in Sprague Dawley rats at doses of 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg. Besides body weight and food consumption, reproductive functions, sperm motility and morphology, estrus cycle, and fertility rate were monitored. There were no statistically significant differences in reproductive function in all UP446 treated groups in both genders. Test substance impacts on reproductive parameters were very minimal. Neither sperm motility nor morphology was affected as a result of oral UP446 administrations in males. There were no treatment-related effects on estrus cycle stages in females. No significant changes in necropsy or histopathology were observed for all the groups. Therefore, the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of UP446 was considered to be 1000 mg/kg, the highest dose tested, in both genders. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Effects of the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen administered orally on normal food intake and intraperitoneally on fat intake in non-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Bains, Rasneer S; Ebenezer, Ivor S

    2013-01-05

    It has been previously reported that the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen decreases food intake after oral administration and fat intake after intraperitoneal administration. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of baclofen (1-4 mg/ kg) administered orally (Experiment 1) on food intake in non-deprived rats (n=6) and intraperitoneally (Experiment 2) on fat intake in non-deprived rats (n=8) that were naïve to baclofen (1st set of trials) and in the same group of rats after they were sub-chronically exposed to baclofen (2nd set of trials). The results from Experiment 1 show that baclofen had no effects on food intake during the 1st set of trials, but the 2 and 4 mg/kg doses significantly increased food consumption during the 2nd set of trials. Baclofen produced sedation during the 1st set of trials, but tolerance occurred to this effect and was not apparent during the 2nd set of trials. These observations suggest that the motor effects may have competed with the hyperphagic effects of baclofen during the 1st set of trials. The data from Experiment 2 show that baclofen had no effects on fat intake during either the 1st or 2nd set of trials. The results of the study thus indicate that orally administrated baclofen increases food intake and intraperitoneal administration has no effect on fat intake in non-deprived rats under the conditions used in this study. These findings may have important implications for research on the use of baclofen in studies concerned with ingestive behaviours.

  10. Lipid emulsion administered intravenously or orally attenuates triglyceride accumulation and expression of inflammatory markers in the liver of nonobese mice fed parenteral nutrition formula.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kyoko; Hao, Lei; Wray, Amanda E; Ross, A Catharine

    2013-03-01

    The accumulation of hepatic TG and development of hepatic steatosis (HS) is a serious complication of the use of parenteral nutrition (PN) formulas containing a high percentage of dextrose. But whether fat emulsions or other nutrients can ameliorate the induction of HS by high-carbohydrate diets is still uncertain. We hypothesized that administration of a lipid emulsion (LE; Intralipid) and/or the vitamin A metabolite retinal (RAL) will reduce hepatic TG accumulation and attenuate indicators of inflammation. C57BL/6 male mice were fed PN formula as their only source of hydration and nutrition for 4-5 wk. In Expt. 1, mice were fed PN only or PN plus treatment with RAL (1 μg/g orally), LE (200 μL i.v.), or both LE and RAL. In Expt. 2, LE was orally administered at 4 and 13.5% of energy to PN-fed mice. All PN mice developed HS compared with mice fed normal chow (NC) and HS was reduced by LE. The liver TG mass was lower in the PN+LE and PN+RAL+LE groups compared with the PN and PN+RAL groups (P < 0.01) and in the 4% and 13.5% PN+LE groups compared with PN alone. Hepatic total retinol was higher in the RAL-fed mice (P < 0.0001), but RAL did not alter TG mass. mRNA transcripts for fatty acid synthase (Fasn) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (Srebpf1) were higher in the PN compared with the NC mice, but FAS protein and Srebpf1 mRNA were lower in the PN+LE groups compared with PN alone. The inflammation marker serum amyloid P component was also reduced. In summary, LE given either i.v. or orally may be sufficient to reduce the steatotic potential of orally fed high-dextrose formulas and may suppress the early development of HS during PN therapy.

  11. Behavioral toxicity and physiological changes from repeated exposure to fluorene administered orally or intraperitoneally to adult male Wistar rats: A dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, Julie; Grova, Nathalie; Hidalgo, Sophie; Salquèbre, Guillaume; Rychen, Guido; Bisson, Jean-François; Appenzeller, Brice M R; Schroeder, Henri

    2016-03-01

    Fluorene is one of the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment by reason of its high volatility. Demonstrated to be a neurotoxicant through inhalation, it was also identified as a contributive PAH to food contamination. Since no data are available on its oral neurotoxicity, the purpose of the present study was to assess the behavioral and physiological toxicity of repeated oral administration of fluorene to adult Wistar male rats. Animals were daily treated with fluorene at 1, 10 or 100mg/kg/day for 28 consecutive days. Administration was intraperitoneal (i.p.) or oral (p.o.) to evaluate the influence of the route of exposure on fluorene toxicity. Following this period of treatment, animals in both groups were subjected to similar cognitive evaluations, namely anxiety (elevated-plus maze), locomotor activity (open-field) and learning and memory abilities (eight-arm maze and avoidance test of an aversive light stimulus), as well as physiological measurements. The behavioral testing occurred from the 28th to the 60th day of the experiment during which fluorene treatment continued uninterrupted. At the end of this period, the concentration levels of fluorene and of three of its monohydroxylated metabolites in blood and brain were determined using a GC-MS/MS method. The results demonstrated a reduction in rat anxiety level at the lowest doses administered (1 and 10mg/kg/day) regardless of the treatment route, whereas locomotor activity and learning abilities remained unchanged. Moreover, a less significant weight gain was noticed in animals i.p.- and p.o.-treated with 100mg/kg/day during the 28-day period of treatment, which, upon comparison with the three other groups, induced a body weight gap that was maintained throughout the experiment. Significant increases in relative liver weight were also observed in a dose-dependent manner in orally treated rats and only in animal treated i.p. with 100mg/kg/day. According to the dose, higher

  12. Pharmacokinetics of a low dose and FDA-labeled dose of diclazuril administered orally as a pelleted topdressing in adult horses.

    PubMed

    Hunyadi, L; Papich, M G; Pusterla, N

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of the FDA-approved labeled dose of diclazuril and compare it to a low dose in plasma and CSF in adult horses. During each research period, six healthy adult horses received 0.5 mg/kg of 1.56% diclazuril pellets (Protazil(TM) , Merck Animal Health) compared to the approved labeled dose of 1 mg/kg orally once in two separate phases. A dose of 0.5 mg/kg was calculated to each horse's weight. Blood was then collected immediately before diclazuril administration and then at regular intervals up to a 168 h. After the last blood collection following the single dose at hour 168, a once daily oral dose was administered for the next 10 days to ensure the drug's concentration reached steady-state. To determine the CSF concentration at steady-state, CSF samples were collected after the 9th oral dose. Blood was then collected after the 10th dose and then at regular intervals up to 168 h. A washout period of 4 weeks was allowed before repeating this protocol for the FDA-labeled dose at 1 mg/kg. Plasma and CSF samples were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography. A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order oral absorption was fitted to the single administration data. Steady-state pharmacokinetics was performed using noncompartmental analysis for steady-state analysis. The mean (standard deviation) concentration of diclazuril in CSF following the low dose was 26 ng/mL (5 ng/mL), while CSF in the FDA-labeled dose was 25 ng/mL (4 ng/mL), P = 0.3750. Substantial accumulation in plasma occurred at steady-state after the 10th dose for both doses. The results of this study show that diclazuril pellets given at the approved label dose and a lower dose both produce similar plasma drug concentrations at steady-state and attain plasma and CSF concentrations known to inhibit Sarcocystis neurona in cell culture. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Orally Administered Salacia reticulata Extract Reduces H1N1 Influenza Clinical Symptoms in Murine Lung Tissues Putatively Due to Enhanced Natural Killer Cell Activity.

    PubMed

    Romero-Pérez, Gustavo A; Egashira, Masayo; Harada, Yuri; Tsuruta, Takeshi; Oda, Yuriko; Ueda, Fumitaka; Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Tsukamoto, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of respiratory tract infection. Although most cases do not require further hospitalization, influenza periodically causes epidemics in humans that can potentially infect and kill millions of people. To countermeasure this threat, new vaccines need to be developed annually to match emerging influenza viral strains with increased resistance to existing vaccines. Thus, there is a need for finding and developing new anti-influenza viral agents as alternatives to current treatments. Here, we tested the antiviral effects of an extract from the stems and roots of Salacia reticulata (SSRE), a plant rich in phytochemicals, such as salacinol, kotalanol, and catechins, on H1N1 influenza virus-infected mice. Following oral administration of 0.6 mg/day of SSRE, the incidence of coughing decreased in 80% of mice, and only one case of severe pulmonary inflammation was detected. Moreover, when compared with mice given Lactobacillus casei JCM1134, a strain previously shown to help increase in vitro natural killer (NK) cell activity, SSRE-administered mice showed greater and equal NK cell activity in splenocytes and pulmonary cells, respectively, at high effector cell:target cell ratios. Next, to test whether or not SSRE would exert protective effects against influenza in the absence of gut microbiota, mice were given antibiotics before being inoculated influenza virus and subsequently administered SSRE. SSRE administration induced an increase in NK cell activity in splenocytes and pulmonary cells at levels similar to those detected in mice not treated with antibiotics. Based on our results, it can be concluded that phytochemicals in the SSRE exerted protective effects against influenza infection putatively via modulation of the immune response, including enhancement of NK cell activity, although some protective effects were not necessarily through modulation of gut microbiota. Further investigation is necessary to elucidate the molecular mechanisms

  14. PHARMACOKINETICS OF TRAMADOL HYDROCHLORIDE AND ITS METABOLITE O-DESMETHYLTRAMADOL FOLLOWING A SINGLE, ORALLY ADMINISTERED DOSE IN CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Jennifer L; Barbosa, Lorraine; Van Bonn, William G; Johnson, Shawn P; Gulland, Frances M D; Cox, Sherry K; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas

    2015-09-01

    Tramadol is a synthetic, centrally acting, opiate-like analgesic that is structurally related to codeine and morphine. The objective of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of tramadol hydrochloride and its major active metabolite O-desmethyltramadol (M1) in the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus). A single dose of tramadol was administered orally in fish at 2 mg/kg to a total of 15 wild California sea lions admitted for rehabilitation. Twenty-four total blood samples were collected post drug administration at 10, 20, 30, and 45 min and at 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 12, and 24 hr. Blood plasma was separated and stored at -80°C until analysis with high-performance liquid chromatography was performed to determine levels of tramadol and M1, the major active metabolite. The results indicate that the plasma levels of parent tramadol are low or negligible during the first 30-45 min and then reach the predicted mean maximum plasma concentration of 358 ng/ml at 1.52 hr. The M1 metabolite was not detectable in 21 of 24 plasma samples, below the level of quantification of 5 ng/ml in one sample, and detectable at 11 and 17 ng/ml in two of the samples. This study suggests that a 2 mg/kg dose would need to be administered every 6-8 hr to maintain concentrations of tramadol above the minimum human analgesic level for mild to moderate pain. Based on dosing simulations, a dose of 4 mg/kg q8 hr or q12 hr, on average, may represent an adequate compromise, but further studies are needed using a larger sample size. Pharmacodynamic studies are warranted to determine if tramadol provides analgesic effects in this species. The potential for tramadol toxicosis at any dose also has not been determined in this species.

  15. Orally Administered Salacia reticulata Extract Reduces H1N1 Influenza Clinical Symptoms in Murine Lung Tissues Putatively Due to Enhanced Natural Killer Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Pérez, Gustavo A.; Egashira, Masayo; Harada, Yuri; Tsuruta, Takeshi; Oda, Yuriko; Ueda, Fumitaka; Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Tsukamoto, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of respiratory tract infection. Although most cases do not require further hospitalization, influenza periodically causes epidemics in humans that can potentially infect and kill millions of people. To countermeasure this threat, new vaccines need to be developed annually to match emerging influenza viral strains with increased resistance to existing vaccines. Thus, there is a need for finding and developing new anti-influenza viral agents as alternatives to current treatments. Here, we tested the antiviral effects of an extract from the stems and roots of Salacia reticulata (SSRE), a plant rich in phytochemicals, such as salacinol, kotalanol, and catechins, on H1N1 influenza virus-infected mice. Following oral administration of 0.6 mg/day of SSRE, the incidence of coughing decreased in 80% of mice, and only one case of severe pulmonary inflammation was detected. Moreover, when compared with mice given Lactobacillus casei JCM1134, a strain previously shown to help increase in vitro natural killer (NK) cell activity, SSRE-administered mice showed greater and equal NK cell activity in splenocytes and pulmonary cells, respectively, at high effector cell:target cell ratios. Next, to test whether or not SSRE would exert protective effects against influenza in the absence of gut microbiota, mice were given antibiotics before being inoculated influenza virus and subsequently administered SSRE. SSRE administration induced an increase in NK cell activity in splenocytes and pulmonary cells at levels similar to those detected in mice not treated with antibiotics. Based on our results, it can be concluded that phytochemicals in the SSRE exerted protective effects against influenza infection putatively via modulation of the immune response, including enhancement of NK cell activity, although some protective effects were not necessarily through modulation of gut microbiota. Further investigation is necessary to elucidate the molecular mechanisms

  16. Efficacy of an orally administered combination of hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, curcumin and quercetin for the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Torella, M; Del Deo, F; Grimaldi, A; Iervolino, S A; Pezzella, M; Tammaro, C; Gallo, P; Rappa, C; De Franciscis, P; Colacurci, N

    2016-12-01

    To assess whether the orally administered combination of hyaluronic acid (HA), chondroitin sulfate (CS), curcumin and quercetin could be effective in preventing recurrent cystitis in postmenopausal women and whether its efficacy was conditioned by the concurrent use of local estrogen therapy. This was a prospective evaluation of 145 postmenopausal women consecutively recruited from the database of three different investigators. All women should have mild-to-moderate urogenital atrophy and a history of recurrent urinary tract infections (≥2 episodes within 6 months or ≥3 episodes within 12 months documented by positive urine cultures) during the last year. Patients were assigned to three different therapeutic regimens: the first group was treated only with vaginal estrogens, the second group only with HA, CS, curcumin and quercetin per os, and the third group was treated with HA, CS, curcumin and quercetin associated with local estrogens. We evaluated the number of patients with <2 infective episodes in the 6-month follow-up and <3 episodes in the 12-month follow-up (main aim definition) and the reduction of related symptoms through a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the Pelvic Pain and Urgency/Frequency (PUF) patient symptom scale. Student's t-test and chi-squared test were used for data analysis as appropriate. At 6-month follow up, the main aim rate was 8%, 11.1% and 25% in the three groups, respectively (p<0.05 compared to baseline only in group 3). Although the reduction in the number of recurrent episodes became significant in all groups at 1 year follow-up, the main aim rate was almost double in women receiving both local estrogens and oral therapy (group 3) compared to those receiving single treatments. The improvement of related symptoms was significant in all groups at 12-month follow-up. In postmenopausal women, the combination of HA, CS, curcumin and quercetin per os was effective in preventing recurrent urinary tract infections, especially if

  17. Pharmacokinetics and effects of demographic factors on blood 25(OH)D3 levels after a single orally administered high dose of vitamin D3

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-zhan; Li, Mian; Duan, Xiao-hua; Jia, Jing-ying; Li, Jing-quan; Chu, Rui-ai; Yu, Chen; Han, Jun-hua; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To examine the biological consequences and demographic factors that might affect the pharmacokinetics of vitamin D3 after a single high dose intervention in a young Chinese population with vitamin D insufficiency status. Methods: A total of 28 young subjects (25 to 35 years old) with vitamin D insufficiency status [serum 25(OH)D <30 ng/mL] was recruited in Shanghai, China. The subjects were orally administered a single high dose of vitamin D3 (300 000 IU). Baseline characteristics and blood samples were collected at d 0, 1, 2, 3, 7, 28, 56, 84 and 112 after the intervention. The blood biomarker levels were determined with standardized methods. Results: The intervention markedly increased the blood 25(OH)D3 levels within the first five days (mean Tmax=5.1±2.1 d) and sustained an optimal circulating level of 25(OH)D3 (≥30 ng/mL) for 56 d. After the intervention, body weight and baseline 25(OH)D3 levels were significantly correlated with circulating 25(OH)D3 levels. No adverse events and no consistently significant changes in serum calcium, creatinine, glucose, parathyroid hormone, vitamin D binding protein, or the urinary calcium/reatinine ratio were observed. However, there was a significant increase in phosphorus after the vitamin D3 intervention. Total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were decreased at the end of the trial. Conclusion: The pharmacokinetics of vitamin D after intervention were influenced by baseline 25(OH)D3 levels and the body weight of the subjects. The results suggest that a single high oral vitamin D3 intervention is safe and efficient for improving the vitamin D status of young Chinese people with vitamin D insufficiency. PMID:27569392

  18. Total coenzyme Q10 concentrations in Asian men following multiple oral 50-mg doses administered as coenzyme Q10 sustained release tablets or regular tablets.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wan-Liang; Zhang, Qiang; Lee, How-Sung; Zhou, Tian-Yan; Sun, Hua-Dong; Zhang, Da-Wei; Zheng, Li; Lee, Michael; Wong, Sai-Ming

    2003-01-01

    Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)), a highly lipophilic compound present in the inner mitochondrial membrane, is essential for production of cellular energy in the form of ATP. CoQ(10) is used as a dietary supplement and for treatment of various cardiovascular disorders. Our goal was to compare the CoQ(10) levels in Asians following multiple oral doses administered as sustained release or regular tablets. Twenty healthy male volunteers (19-23 years old) were divided into two equal groups. Each subject in Group I received 50 mg oral doses of coenzyme Q(10) as sustained release tablets once a day for fifteen days, while subject in Group II received 50 mg doses of coenzyme Q(10) regular tablets. The CoQ(10) levels were measured by HPLC-UV (reverse phase ODS column, 10 microm, 250 x 4.6 mm; oven temperature 30 degrees C). Mobile phase was constituted by methanol-ethanol 9 : 1 v/v. Flow rate was 1.5 ml/min and UV detection was carried out at 275 nm. Coenzyme Q(9) was used as an internal standard. CoQ(10) baseline in the morning was 0.88+/-0.48 mg/l. Following 1 week 50 mg/d dosing of CoQ(10), plasma CoQ(10) concentrations increased to 1.85+/-1.03 mg/l for sustained release tablets and up to 1.37+/-0.74mg/l for regular tablets. The net increment proportion in AUC for sustained release and regular tablets were 148.26+/-176.56%, 102.57+/-130.00%, respectively. Both preparations significantly increased the systemic exposure when compared to endogenous baseline.

  19. Silexan, an orally administered Lavandula oil preparation, is effective in the treatment of 'subsyndromal' anxiety disorder: a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Siegfried; Gastpar, Markus; Müller, Walter E; Volz, Hans-Peter; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Dienel, Angelika; Schläfke, Sandra

    2010-09-01

    This study was performed to investigate the anxiolytic efficacy of silexan, a new oral lavender oil capsule preparation, in comparison to placebo in primary care. In 27 general and psychiatric practices 221 adults suffering from anxiety disorder not otherwise specified (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental disorders-IV 300.00 or International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth revision F41.9) were randomized to 80 mg/day of a defined, orally administered preparation from Lavandula species or placebo for 10 weeks with visits every 2 weeks. A Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) total score >or=18 and a total score >5 for the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) were required. The primary outcome measures were HAMA and PSQI total score decrease between baseline and week 10. Secondary efficacy measures included the Clinical Global Impressions scale, the Zung Self-rating Anxiety Scale, and the SF-36 Health Survey Questionnaire. Patients treated with silexan showed a total score decrease by 16.0+/-8.3 points (mean+/-SD, 59.3%) for the HAMA and by 5.5+/-4.4 points (44.7%) for the PSQI compared to 9.5+/-9.1 (35.4%) and 3.8+/-4.1 points (30.9%) in the placebo group (P<0.01 one-sided, intention to treat). Silexan was superior to placebo regarding the percentage of responders (76.9 vs. 49.1%, P<0.001) and remitters (60.6 vs. 42.6%, P=0.009). Lavandula oil preparation had a significant beneficial influence on quality and duration of sleep and improved general mental and physical health without causing any unwanted sedative or other drug specific effects. Lavandula oil preparation silexan is both efficacious and safe for the relief of anxiety disorder not otherwise specified. It has a clinically meaningful anxiolytic effect and alleviates anxiety related disturbed sleep.

  20. Pharmacokinetics and effects of demographic factors on blood 25(OH)D3 levels after a single orally administered high dose of vitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Zhan; Li, Mian; Duan, Xiao-Hua; Jia, Jing-Ying; Li, Jing-Quan; Chu, Rui-Ai; Yu, Chen; Han, Jun-Hua; Wang, Hui

    2016-11-01

    To examine the biological consequences and demographic factors that might affect the pharmacokinetics of vitamin D3 after a single high dose intervention in a young Chinese population with vitamin D insufficiency status. A total of 28 young subjects (25 to 35 years old) with vitamin D insufficiency status [serum 25(OH)D <30 ng/mL] was recruited in Shanghai, China. The subjects were orally administered a single high dose of vitamin D3 (300 000 IU). Baseline characteristics and blood samples were collected at d 0, 1, 2, 3, 7, 28, 56, 84 and 112 after the intervention. The blood biomarker levels were determined with standardized methods. The intervention markedly increased the blood 25(OH)D3 levels within the first five days (mean Tmax=5.1±2.1 d) and sustained an optimal circulating level of 25(OH)D3 (≥30 ng/mL) for 56 d. After the intervention, body weight and baseline 25(OH)D3 levels were significantly correlated with circulating 25(OH)D3 levels. No adverse events and no consistently significant changes in serum calcium, creatinine, glucose, parathyroid hormone, vitamin D binding protein, or the urinary calcium/reatinine ratio were observed. However, there was a significant increase in phosphorus after the vitamin D3 intervention. Total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were decreased at the end of the trial. The pharmacokinetics of vitamin D after intervention were influenced by baseline 25(OH)D3 levels and the body weight of the subjects. The results suggest that a single high oral vitamin D3 intervention is safe and efficient for improving the vitamin D status of young Chinese people with vitamin D insufficiency.

  1. Effects of SiC nanoparticles orally administered in a rat model: Biodistribution, toxicity and elemental composition changes in feces and organs

    SciTech Connect

    Lozano, Omar; Laloy, Julie; Alpan, Lütfiye; Mejia, Jorge; Rolin, Stéphanie; Toussaint, Olivier; Dogné, Jean-Michel; and others

    2012-10-15

    Background: Silicon carbide (SiC) presents noteworthy properties as a material such as high hardness, thermal stability, and photoluminescent properties as a nanocrystal. However, there are very few studies in regard to the toxicological potential of SiC NPs. Objectives: To study the toxicity and biodistribution of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles in an in vivo rat model after acute (24 h) and subacute (28 days) oral administrations. The acute doses were 0.5, 5, 50, 300 and 600 mg·kg{sup −1}, while the subacute doses were 0.5 and 50 mg·kg{sup −1}. Results: SiC biodistribution and elemental composition of feces and organs (liver, kidneys, and spleen) have been studied by Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). SiC and other elements in feces excretion increased by the end of the subacute assessment. SiC did not accumulate in organs but some elemental composition modifications were observed after the acute assessment. Histopathological sections from organs (stomach, intestines, liver, and kidneys) indicate the absence of damage at all applied doses, in both assessments. A decrease in the concentration of urea in blood was found in the 50 mg·kg{sup −1} group from the subacute assessment. No alterations in the urine parameters (sodium, potassium, osmolarity) were found. Conclusion: This is the first study that assesses the toxicity, biodistribution, and composition changes in feces and organs of SiC nanoparticles in an in vivo rat model. SiC was excreted mostly in feces and low traces were retrieved in urine, indicating that SiC can cross the intestinal barrier. No sign of toxicity was however found after oral administration. -- Highlights: ► SiC nanoparticles were orally administered to rats in acute and subacute doses. ► SiC was found in low traces in urine. It is mostly excreted in feces within 5 days. ► SiC excretion rate, feces and organ elemental composition change with time. ► No morphological alteration were found on GI tract, liver, kidneys

  2. Arachidonic acid metabolism in cultured mouse keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kondoh, H.; Sato, Y.; Kanoh, H.

    1985-07-01

    The authors attempted to characterize the general features of arachidonate metabolism in cultured mouse keratinocytes. The cells labeled with (/sup 3/H)arachidonate were stimulated by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), ionophore A23187, and fetal bovine serum (FBS). Common to the three substances, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylcholine almost equally served as sources of arachidonate liberated by the action of phospholipase A2. The stimulation of phospholipase A2 action was observed in the order of A23187 greater than FBS greater than TPA. When stimulated by TPA or A23187, the radioactivity released into the extracellular medium was mostly found in prostaglandin (PG) E2. Formation of other PGs and hydroxyeicosatetraenoate (HETE) was extremely limited. In the case of stimulation by FBS, however, the released radioactivity was mainly associated with non-converted arachidonate. FBS also inhibited the TPA- and A23187-induced conversion of arachidonate to PGE2. Phospholipid degradation induced by the three stimulators was similarly dependent on extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. The stimulation by FBS and A23187 was suppressed by calmodulin antagonists, though the effect of A23187 was much more sensitive to the antagonists when compared to that of FBS. The authors observed more than additive effects of the three stimulators when tested together.

  3. Orally administered glycidol and its fatty acid esters as well as 3-MCPD fatty acid esters are metabolized to 3-MCPD in the F344 rat.

    PubMed

    Onami, Saeko; Cho, Young-Man; Toyoda, Takeshi; Akagi, Jun-ichi; Fujiwara, Satoshi; Ochiai, Ryosuke; Tsujino, Kazushige; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Ogawa, Kumiko

    2015-12-01

    IARC has classified glycidol and 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) as group 2A and 2B, respectively. Their esters are generated in foodstuffs during processing and there are concerns that they may be hydrolyzed to the carcinogenic forms in vivo. Thus, we conducted two studies. In the first, we administered glycidol and 3-MCPD and associated esters (glycidol oleate: GO, glycidol linoleate: GL, 3-MCPD dipalmitate: CDP, 3-MCPD monopalmitate: CMP, 3-MCPD dioleate: CDO) to male F344 rats by single oral gavage. After 30 min, 3-MCPD was detected in serum from all groups. Glycidol was detected in serum from the rats given glycidol or GL and CDP and CDO in serum from rats given these compounds. In the second, we examined if metabolism occurs on simple reaction with rat intestinal contents (gastric, duodenal and cecal contents) from male F344 gpt delta rats. Newly produced 3-MCPD was detected in all gut contents incubated with the three 3-MCPD fatty acid esters and in gastric and duodenal contents incubated with glycidol and in duodenal and cecal contents incubated with GO. Although our observation was performed at 1 time point, the results showed that not only 3-MCPD esters but also glycidol and glycidol esters are metabolized into 3-MCPD in the rat. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The acute effects of single-dose orally administered doramectin, eprinomectin and selamectin on natural infections of Syphacia muris in rats.

    PubMed

    Sevimli, Feride Kircali; Kozan, Esma; Sevimli, Alper; Doğan, Nurhan; Bülbül, Aziz

    2009-07-01

    This study was designed to determine the acute effects of a single-dose of orally administered doramectin, eprinomectin and selamectin on Syphacia muris infection in rats. Rats, naturally infected with S. muris, were divided into four groups: three different treatment groups (n=7) and one positive control (n=7). Cellophane tape preparations were obtained from the treated rats on day 0 pre-treatment and on days 2, 4 and 6 post-treatment. Syphacia sp. eggs were counted. Eprinomectin was found to be 100% effective in eliminating eggs on two post-treatment. However when egg counts on day 6 post-treatment were compared with pre-treatment egg counts, doramectin and selamectin were found to be 99.32 and 98.77% effective in eliminating eggs, respectively. On day 7 post-treatment, blood samples were obtained from all groups, and then the rats were necropsied. Doramectin, eprinomectin and selamectin were found to be 100% effective in eliminating adult S. muris, when compared with the positive control group.

  5. Arachidonate metabolism in bovine gallbladder muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, M.; Hidaka, T.; Ueta, T.; Ogura, R.

    1983-04-01

    Incubation of (1-/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid (AA) with homogenates of bovine gallbladder muscle generated a large amount of radioactive material having the chromatographic mobility of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (stable product of PGI2) and smaller amounts of products that comigrated with PGF2 alpha PGE2. Formation of these products was inhibited by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. The major radioactive product identified by thin-layer chromatographic mobility and by gas chromatography - mass spectrometric analysis was found to be 6-keto-PGF1 alpha. The quantitative metabolic pattern of (1-/sup 14/C)PGH2 was virtually identical to that of (1-/sup 14/C)AA. Incubation of arachidonic acid with slices of bovine gallbladder muscle released labile anti-aggregatory material in the medium, which was inhibited by aspirin or 15-hydroperoxy-AA. These results indicate that bovine gallbladder muscle has a considerable enzymatic capacity to produce PGI2 from arachidonic acid.

  6. Immunogenicity and reactogenicity of the human rotavirus vaccine, RIX4414 oral suspension, when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rong-cheng; Huang, Teng; Li, Yanping; Wang, Lao-Hong; Tao, Junhui; Fu, Botao; Si, Guoai; Nong, Yi; Mo, Zhaojun; Liao, XueYan; Luan, Ivy; Tang, Haiwen; Rathi, Niraj; Karkada, Naveen; Han, Htay Htay

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the immunogenicity of the human rotavirus (RV) vaccine (RIX4414) when co-administered with routine childhood vaccines in Chinese infants (NCT01171963). Healthy infants aged 6–16 weeks received 2 doses of either RIX4414 or placebo according to a 0, 1-month schedule. Infants received routine diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTPa) and oral poliovirus (OPV) vaccines either separately from or concomitantly with RIX4414/placebo (separate and co-administration cohorts, respectively). Anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates (one month post-dose-2) and seropositivity rates (at one year of age) were measured using ELISA. Immune responses against the DTPa and OPV antigens were measured one month post-DTPa dose-3 in the co-administration cohort. Solicited local and general symptoms were recorded for 8-days post-vaccination (total cohort). The according-to-protocol immunogenicity population included 511 infants in the separate cohort and 275 in the co-administration cohort. One month post-RIX4414 dose-2, anti-RV IgA seroconversion rates were 74.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 68.9–79.9) and 64.2% (95% CI: 55.4–72.3) in the separate and co-administration cohorts; seropositivity rates at one year of age were 71.5% (95% CI: 65.5–77.1) and 50.0% (95% CI: 40.9–59.1), respectively. One month post-DTPa dose-3, all infants in the co-administration cohort were seroprotected against diphtheria and tetanus, and seropositive for pertussis toxoid, pertactin and filamentous haemaglutinin. Two months post-OPV dose-3, seroprotection rates against anti-poliovirus types 1, 2 and 3 were >99% in the co-administration cohort. Reactogenicity profiles were similar in both cohorts. RIX4414 was immunogenic and well-tolerated in Chinese infants and did not appear to interfere with the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of co-administered routine childhood vaccines. PMID:27149266

  7. An exploratory study of the combined effects of orally administered methylphenidate and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on cardiovascular function, subjective effects, and performance in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Kollins, Scott H; Schoenfelder, Erin N; English, Joseph S; Holdaway, Alex; Van Voorhees, Elizabeth; O'Brien, Benjamin R; Dew, Rachel; Chrisman, Allan K

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is commonly prescribed for the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and is often used illicitly by young adults. Illicit users often coadminister MPH with marijuana. Little is known about physiologic and subjective effects of these substances used in combination. In this double-blind, cross-over experiment, sixteen healthy adult subjects free from psychiatric illness (including ADHD) and reporting modest levels of marijuana use participated in 6 experimental sessions wherein all combinations of placebo or 10mg oral doses of delta-9-tetrahydocannibinol (THC); and 0mg, 10mg and 40 mg of MPH were administered. Sessions were separated by at least 48 hours. Vital signs, subjective effects, and performance measure were collected. THC and MPH showed additive effects on heart rate and rate pressure product (e.g., peak heart rate for 10mg THC+0mg, 10mg, and 40 mg MPH=89.1, 95.9, 102.0 beats/min, respectively). Main effects of THC and MPH were also observed on a range of subjective measures of drug effects, and significant THC dose × MPH dose interactions were found on measures of "Feel Drug," "Good Effects," and "Take Drug Again." THC increased commission errors on a continuous performance test (CPT) and MPH reduced reaction time variability on this measure. Effects of THC, MPH, and their combination were variable on a measure of working memory (n-back task), though in general, MPH decreased reaction times and THC mitigated these effects. These results suggest that the combination of low to moderate doses of MPH and THC produces unique effects on cardiovascular function, subjective effects and performance measures.

  8. Naïve averaged, naïve pooled, and population pharmacokinetics of orally administered marbofloxacin in juvenile harbor seals.

    PubMed

    KuKanich, Butch; Huff, David; Riviere, Jim E; Papich, Mark G

    2007-02-01

    To determine the pharmacokinetics of marbofloxacin after oral administration in juvenile harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) at a dose of 5 mg/kg (2.3 mg/lb) and to compare pharmacokinetic variables after pharmacokinetic analysis by naïve averaged, naïve pooled, and nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. Original study. Animals-33 male and 22 female juvenile seals being treated for various conditions. Blood collection was limited to < or = 3 samples/seal. Plasma marbofloxacin concentrations were measured via high-pressure liquid chromatography with UV detection. Mean +/- SE dose of marbofloxacin administered was 5.3 +/- 0.1 mg/kg (2.4 +/- 0.05 mg/lb). The terminal half-life, volume of distribution (per bioavailability), and clearance (per bioavailability) were approximately 5 hours, approximately 1.4 L/kg, and approximately 3 mL/min/kg, respectively (values varied slightly with the method of calculation). Maximum plasma concentration and area under the plasma-time concentration curve were approximately 3 microg/mL and 30 h x microg/mL, respectively. Naïve averaged and naïve pooled analysis appeared to yield a better fit to the population, but nonlinear mixed-effects modeling yielded a better fit for individual seals. Values of pharmacokinetic variables were similar regardless of the analytic method used. Pharmacokinetic variability can be assessed with nonlinear mixed-effects modeling, but not with naïve averaged or naïve pooled analysis. Visual observation by experienced trainers revealed no adverse effects in treated seals. Plasma concentrations attained with a dosage of 5 mg/kg every 24 hours would be expected to be efficacious for treatment of infections caused by susceptible bacteria (excluding Pseudomonas aeruginosa).

  9. Bioavailability, safety, and pharmacodynamics of delayed-release dexlansoprazole administered as two 30 mg orally disintegrating tablets or one 60 mg capsule.

    PubMed

    Kukulka, Michael; Nudurupati, Sai; Perez, Maria Claudia

    2016-11-01

    Dual delayed-release dexlansoprazole is approved for use in adults as a 30 mg orally disintegrating tablet (ODT) or as 30 mg and 60 mg capsules. The pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety profile of two dexlansoprazole 30 mg ODTs were compared with one dexlansoprazole 60 mg capsule in this randomized, phase I, open-label, single-center, multiple-dose, two-period crossover study. Participants were randomized in one of two treatment sequences, each comprised two 5-day treatment periods during which two dexlansoprazole 30 mg ODTs or one 60 mg capsule was administered once daily. Pharmacokinetic parameters and the mean intragastric pH profile for the 24-hour period after dosing on days 1 and 5 were described. Adverse events were monitored during study duration and followed up with a phone call 5-10 days after the last dose of study drug. On day 1, peak observed plasma concentration (Cmax) values were similar between two 30 mg ODTs (1047 ng/ml) and one 60 mg capsule (1164 ng/ml). Systemic exposure, measured by the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), was approximately 25% lower after ODT administration. On day 5, mean pH after daily doses of two 30 mg ODT or one 60 mg capsule was 4.33 and 4.36, respectively; both regimens maintained intragastric pH above 4.0 for 60% of the 24-hour period. Headache was the most commonly reported adverse event (observed in 19.2% of participants); no adverse events leading to study withdrawal occurred. While systemic exposure (AUC) was 25% lower with ODT, peak concentrations (Cmax) after administration of two dexlansoprazole 30 mg ODTs and one 60 mg capsule were similar. The 24-hour intragastric pH control after administration of two dexlansoprazole 30 mg ODTs was equivalent to one dexlansoprazole 60 mg capsule. Both ODT and capsule were well tolerated.

  10. Bioavailability, safety, and pharmacodynamics of delayed-release dexlansoprazole administered as two 30 mg orally disintegrating tablets or one 60 mg capsule

    PubMed Central

    Kukulka, Michael; Nudurupati, Sai; Perez, Maria Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dual delayed-release dexlansoprazole is approved for use in adults as a 30 mg orally disintegrating tablet (ODT) or as 30 mg and 60 mg capsules. The pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety profile of two dexlansoprazole 30 mg ODTs were compared with one dexlansoprazole 60 mg capsule in this randomized, phase I, open-label, single-center, multiple-dose, two-period crossover study. Methods: Participants were randomized in one of two treatment sequences, each comprised two 5-day treatment periods during which two dexlansoprazole 30 mg ODTs or one 60 mg capsule was administered once daily. Pharmacokinetic parameters and the mean intragastric pH profile for the 24-hour period after dosing on days 1 and 5 were described. Adverse events were monitored during study duration and followed up with a phone call 5–10 days after the last dose of study drug. Results: On day 1, peak observed plasma concentration (Cmax) values were similar between two 30 mg ODTs (1047 ng/ml) and one 60 mg capsule (1164 ng/ml). Systemic exposure, measured by the area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC), was approximately 25% lower after ODT administration. On day 5, mean pH after daily doses of two 30 mg ODT or one 60 mg capsule was 4.33 and 4.36, respectively; both regimens maintained intragastric pH above 4.0 for 60% of the 24-hour period. Headache was the most commonly reported adverse event (observed in 19.2% of participants); no adverse events leading to study withdrawal occurred. Conclusions: While systemic exposure (AUC) was 25% lower with ODT, peak concentrations (Cmax) after administration of two dexlansoprazole 30 mg ODTs and one 60 mg capsule were similar. The 24-hour intragastric pH control after administration of two dexlansoprazole 30 mg ODTs was equivalent to one dexlansoprazole 60 mg capsule. Both ODT and capsule were well tolerated. PMID:27803732

  11. A Phase 1 Study of AMG 900, an Orally Administered Pan-Aurora Kinase Inhibitor, in Adult Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kantarjian, Hagop M; Schuster, Michael W; Jain, Nitin; Advani, Anjali; Jabbour, Elias; Gamelin, Erick; Rasmussen, Erik; Juan, Gloria; Anderson, Abraham; Chow, Vincent F; Friberg, Greg; Vogl, Florian D; Sekeres, Mikkael A

    2017-03-28

    Aurora kinases are involved in the pathophysiology of several cancers including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this phase 1 study, we investigated the safety and efficacy of AMG 900, an orally administered, highly potent, selective, small-molecule inhibitor of both Aurora kinase A and B, in patients with AML. Patients with pathologically documented AML who either declined standard treatments or had relapsed from or were refractory to previous therapies were enrolled. Two every-2-week dose-escalation schedules using a modified 3 + 3+3 design were used: AMG 900 given daily for 4 days with 10 days off (4/10 schedule), and AMG 900 given daily for 7 days with 7 days off (7/7 schedule). Thirty-five patients were enrolled at 9 different dose levels: 22 patients on the 4/10 schedule (doses from 15 to 100 mg daily), and 13 patients on the 7/7 schedule (doses from 30 to 50 mg daily). Both schedules were tolerated; nausea (31%), diarrhea (29%), febrile neutropenia (29%), and fatigue (23%) were the most common treatment-related adverse events. Three patients (9%) achieved complete response with incomplete count recovery. Patients with higher baseline expression of a set of specific pathway-related genes (BIRC5, AURKA, TTK, CDC2, and CCNB1) were more likely to respond in an exploratory biomarker analysis. AMG 900 was tolerated in a general AML population, and pathway-specific biomarkers identified a potential target population. Future research efforts will be directed toward further exploration of biomarkers of response and combination of AMG 900 with other anticancer agents. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Orally administered fructose increases the numbers of peripheral lymphocytes reduced by exposure of mice to gamma or SPE-like proton radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Weaver, A. L.; Ni, J.; Lin, L.; Kennedy, A. R.

    2014-07-01

    Exposure of the whole body or a major portion of the body to ionizing radiation can result in Acute Radiation Sickness (ARS), which can cause symptoms that range from mild to severe, and include death. One of the syndromes that can occur during ARS is the hematopoietic syndrome, which is characterized by a reduction in bone marrow cells as well as the number of circulating blood cells. Doses capable of causing this syndrome can result from conventional radiation therapy and accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. It is of concern that this syndrome could also occur during space exploration class missions in which astronauts could be exposed to significant doses of solar particle event (SPE) radiation. Of particular concern is the reduction of lymphocytes and granulocytes, which are major components of the immune system. A significant reduction in their numbers can compromise the immune system, causing a higher risk for the development of infections which could jeopardize the success of the mission. Although there are no specific countermeasures utilized for the ARS resulting from exposure to space radiation(s), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been proposed as a countermeasure for the low number of neutrophils caused by SPE radiation, but so far no countermeasure exists for a reduced number of circulating lymphocytes. The present study demonstrates that orally administered fructose significantly increases the number of peripheral lymphocytes reduced by exposure of mice to 2 Gy of gamma- or SPE-like proton radiation, making it a potential countermeasure for this biological end-point.

  13. Orally Administered Fructose Increases the Numbers of Peripheral Lymphocytes Reduced by Exposure of Mice to Gamma or SPE-like Proton Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Weaver, A.L.; Ni, J.; Lin, L.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the whole body or a major portion of the body to ionizing radiation can result in Acute Radiation Sickness (ARS), which can cause symptoms that range from mild to severe, and include death. One of the syndromes that can occur during ARS is the hematopoietic syndrome, which is characterized by a reduction in bone marrow cells as well as the number of circulating blood cells. Doses capable of causing this syndrome can result from conventional radiation therapy and accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. It is of concern that this syndrome could also occur during space exploration class missions in which astronauts could be exposed to significant doses of solar particle event (SPE) radiation. Of particular concern is the reduction of lymphocytes and granulocytes, which are major components of the immune system. A significant reduction in their numbers can compromise the immune system, causing a higher risk for the development of infections which could jeopardize the success of the mission. Although there are no specific countermeasures utilized for the ARS resulting from exposure to space radiation(s), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been proposed as a countermeasure for the low number of neutrophils caused by SPE radiation, but so far no countermeasure exists for a reduced number of circulating lymphocytes. The present study demonstrates that orally administered fructose significantly increases the number of peripheral lymphocytes reduced by exposure of mice to 2 Gy of gamma- or SPE-like proton radiation, making it a potential countermeasure for this biological end-point. PMID:25360417

  14. Oral Migalastat HCl Leads to Greater Systemic Exposure and Tissue Levels of Active α-Galactosidase A in Fabry Patients when Co-Administered with Infused Agalsidase

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, David G.; Bichet, Daniel G.; Holida, Myrl; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem; Nicholls, Kathy; Thomas, Mark; Eyskens, Francois; Shankar, Suma; Adera, Mathews; Sitaraman, Sheela; Khanna, Richie; Flanagan, John J.; Wustman, Brandon A.; Barth, Jay; Barlow, Carrolee; Valenzano, Kenneth J.; Lockhart, David J.; Boudes, Pol; Johnson, Franklin K.

    2015-01-01

    Migalastat HCl (AT1001, 1-Deoxygalactonojirimycin) is an investigational pharmacological chaperone for the treatment of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A) deficiency, which leads to Fabry disease, an X-linked, lysosomal storage disorder. The currently approved, biologics-based therapy for Fabry disease is enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with either agalsidase alfa (Replagal) or agalsidase beta (Fabrazyme). Based on preclinical data, migalastat HCl in combination with agalsidase is expected to result in the pharmacokinetic (PK) enhancement of agalsidase in plasma by increasing the systemic exposure of active agalsidase, thereby leading to increased cellular levels in disease-relevant tissues. This Phase 2a study design consisted of an open-label, fixed-treatment sequence that evaluated the effects of single oral doses of 150 mg or 450 mg migalastat HCl on the PK and tissue levels of intravenously infused agalsidase (0.2, 0.5, or 1.0 mg/kg) in male Fabry patients. As expected, intravenous administration of agalsidase alone resulted in increased α-Gal A activity in plasma, skin, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) compared to baseline. Following co-administration of migalastat HCl and agalsidase, α-Gal A activity in plasma was further significantly increased 1.2- to 5.1-fold compared to agalsidase administration alone, in 22 of 23 patients (95.6%). Importantly, similar increases in skin and PBMC α-Gal A activity were seen following co-administration of migalastat HCl and agalsidase. The effects were not related to the administered migalastat HCl dose, as the 150 mg dose of migalastat HCl increased α-Gal A activity to the same extent as the 450 mg dose. Conversely, agalsidase had no effect on the plasma PK of migalastat. No migalastat HCl-related adverse events or drug-related tolerability issues were identified. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01196871 PMID:26252393

  15. An exploratory study of the combined effects of orally administered methylphenidate and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on cardiovascular function, subjective effects, and performance in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Kollins, Scott H.; Schoenfelder, Erin N.; English, Joseph S.; Holdaway, Alex; Van Voorhees, Elizabeth; O’Brien, Benjamin R.; Dew, Rachel; Chrisman, Allan K.

    2014-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is commonly prescribed for the treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and is often used illicitly by young adults. Illicit users often coadminister MPH with marijuana. Little is known about physiologic and subjective effects of these substances used in combination. In this double-blind, cross-over experiment, sixteen healthy adult subjects free from psychiatric illness (including ADHD) and reporting modest levels of marijuana use participated in 6 experimental sessions wherein all combinations of placebo or 10 mg oral doses of delta-9-tetrahydocannibinol (THC); and 0 mg, 10 mg and 40 mg of MPH were administered. Sessions were separated by at least 48 hours. Vital signs, subjective effects, and performance measure were collected. THC and MPH showed additive effects on heart rate and rate pressure product (e.g., peak heart rate for 10 mg THC + 0 mg, 10 mg, and 40 mg MPH = 89.1, 95.9, 102.0 beats/min, respectively). Main effects of THC and MPH were also observed on a range of subjective measures of drug effects, and significant THC dose × MPH dose interactions were found on measures of “Feel Drug,” “Good Effects,” and “Take Drug Again.” THC increased commission errors on a continuous performance test (CPT) and MPH reduced reaction time variability on this measure. Effects of THC, MPH, and their combination were variable on a measure of working memory (n-back task), though in general, MPH decreased reaction times and THC mitigated these effects. These results suggest that the combination of low to moderate doses of MPH and THC produces unique effects on cardiovascular function, subjective effects and performance measures. PMID:25175495

  16. Effects of arachidonic acid intake on inflammatory reactions in dextran sodium sulphate-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yukiko; Ji, Xu; Tachibana, Shigehiro; Aoki, Satoko; Furuya, Mami; Tazura, Yoshiyuki; Miyazawa, Daisuke; Harauma, Akiko; Moriguchi, Toru; Nagata, Tomoko; Iwai, Naoharu; Ohara, Naoki

    2015-09-14

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the administration of oral arachidonic acid (AA) in rats with or without dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced inflammatory bowel disease. Male Wistar rats were administered AA at 0, 5, 35 or 240 mg/kg daily by gavage for 8 weeks. Inflammatory bowel disease was induced by replacing drinking water with 3 % DSS solution during the last 7 d of the AA dosing period. These animals passed loose stools, diarrhoea and red-stained faeces. Cyclo-oxygenase-2 concentration and myeloperoxidase activity in the colonic tissue were significantly increased in the animals given AA at 240 mg/kg compared with the animals given AA at 0 mg/kg. Thromboxane B2 concentration in the medium of cultured colonic mucosae isolated from these groups was found to be dose-dependently increased by AA, and the increase was significant at 35 and 240 mg/kg. Leukotriene B4 concentration was also significantly increased and saturated at 5 mg/kg. In addition, AA at 240 mg/kg promoted DSS-induced colonic mucosal oedema with macrophage infiltration. In contrast, administration of AA for 8 weeks, even at 240 mg/kg, showed no effects on the normal rats. These results suggest that in rats with bowel disease AA metabolism is affected by oral AA, even at 5 mg/kg per d, and that excessive AA may aggravate inflammation, whereas AA shows no effects in rats without inflammatory bowel disease.

  17. Effect of mefloquine administered orally at single, multiple, or combined with artemether, artesunate, or praziquantel in treatment of mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shu-hua; Mei, Jing-yan; Jiao, Pei-ying

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to explore the efficacy of mefloquine administered orally at single, multiple doses, or in combination with artesuante, artemether, or praziquantel in mouse--Schistosoma japonicum model. A total of 205 mice were divided into 4 batches and each batch of mice was infected percutaneously with 40 S. japonicum cercariae for 35 days. The infected mice were treated orally with mefloquine at single doses, multiple daily doses, or combined with artesunate, artemether, or praziquantel, while infected but untreated mice served as control. All treated animals were killed 4 weeks post-treatment for assessment of effect. When infected mice were treated orally with mefloquine at single or multiple daily doses under the same total dose levels, the tendency to decrease the efficacy was seen. Particularly, when a lower single dose of 100 mg/kg was divided equally into five daily doses of 20 mg/kg, the efficacy decreased statistically significant (P<0.05), i.e., the total worm and female worm reductions of 67.9% and 73.4% decreased to 31.3% and 30.3%, respectively. In infected mice treated with mefloquine or artesuante at a single dose of 100 mg/kg, a moderate effect against schistosomes was observed. No further significant reduction of total and female worm burdens was seen, when the two drugs combined together at the same dose level. On the other hand, administration of mefloquine combined with artesunate at single dose of 50 mg/kg, which exhibited no effect against schistosomes, resulted in significant reduction of total and female worm burdens in comparison with the groups treated with mefloquine and artesunate alone at the same dose level. Similar results were observed in treatment of infected mice with mefloquine in combination with artemether at the smaller dose of 50 mg/kg. The total worm burden was significantly lower than that of control and the female worm burden was also significant lower than that of groups treated with mefloquine and

  18. Contraceptive Efficacy of Oral and Transdermal Hormones When Co-Administered With Protease Inhibitors in HIV-1–Infected Women: Pharmacokinetic Results of ACTG Trial A5188

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Mary A.; Patterson, Kristine; Kamemoto, Lori; Park, Jeong-Gun; Watts, Heather; Aweeka, Francesca; Klingman, Karin L.; Cohn, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions between lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) and transdermally delivered ethinyl estradiol (EE) and norelgestromin (NGMN) are unknown. Methods Using a standard noncompartmental PK analysis, we compared EE area under the time–concentration curve (AUC) and NGMN AUC during transdermal contraceptive patch administration in HIV-1–infected women on stable LPV/r to a control group of women not on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). In addition, EE AUC after a single dose of a combination oral contraceptive pill including EE and norethindrone was measured before patch placement and was compared with patch EE AUC in both groups. Contraceptive effects on LPV/r PKs were estimated by measuring LPV/r AUC at baseline and during week 3 of patch administration. Results Eight women on LPV/r, and 24 women in the control group were enrolled. Patch EE median AUC0–168 h was 45% lower at 6010.36 pg·h·mL−1 in those on LPV/r versus 10911.42 pg·h·mL−1 in those on no HAART (P = 0.064). Pill EE median AUC0–48 hours was similarly 55% lower at 344.67 pg·h·mL−1 in those on LPV/r versus 765.38 pg·h·mL−1 in those on no HAART (P = 0.003). Patch NGMN AUC0–168 h however, was 138.39 ng·h·mL−1, 83% higher in the LPV/r group compared with the control AUC of 75.63 ng·h·mL−1 (P = 0.036). After 3 weeks on the patch, LPVAUC0–8 h decreased by 19%, (P = 0.156). Conclusions Although PKs of contraceptive EE and NGMN are significantly altered with LPV/r, the contraceptive efficacy of the patch is likely to be maintained. Larger studies are indicated to fully assess contraceptive efficacy versus risks of the transdermal contraceptive patch when co-administered with protease inhibitors. PMID:20842042

  19. Specific and cross-reactive immune response to oral Salmonella Typhi Ty21a and parenteral Vi capsular polysaccharide typhoid vaccines administered concomitantly.

    PubMed

    Pakkanen, Sari H; Kantele, Jussi M; Savolainen, Laura E; Rombo, Lars; Kantele, Anu

    2015-01-09

    Since protective efficacy of the current typhoid vaccines-oral whole-cell Salmonella Typhi Ty21a and parenteral Vi-capsular polysaccharide preparation-is not optimal, and no vaccines are available against paratyphoid or non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serotypes, new approaches deserve to be explored. The immunological mechanisms elicited by the two typhoid vaccines are mainly targeted against different structures. We studied whether these vaccines would enhance S. Typhi-specific immune response and cross-reactivity against other Salmonellae, if administered concomitantly. Volunteers were immunized simultaneously with Ty21a and Vi vaccines (Ty21a+Vi group) or with either of the two singly (Ty21a and Vi groups). All volunteers were investigated for circulating specific and cross-reactive plasmablasts, identified by ELISPOT as IgA, IgG or IgM antibody-secreting cells (ASC) reactive with S. Typhi, S. Paratyphi A/B/C, or selected NTS serotypes (S. Enteritidis, S. Typhimurium). In the Ty21a+Vi group, no specific or cross-reactive plasmablasts were detected before vaccination. After vaccination, the number of S. Typhi-specific plasmablasts (878 ASC/10(6) PBMC, 95%CI 554-1201) proved higher than in the Ty21a (339 ASC/10(6) PBMC; p<0.001) and Vi (149 ASC/10(6) PBMC; p<0.001) groups. Likewise, cross-reactive responses in the Ty21a+Vi group were higher than in the Ty21a and Vi groups (Ty21a+Vi vs Ty21a: ASC against S. Paratyphi A/B, S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium p<0.05, against S. Paratyphi C p<0.01; Ty21a+Vi vs Vi: against S. Paratyphi C not significant, others p<0.0001). A gut-directed homing profile was seen among O antigen-specific and a systemic one among Vi antigen-specific plasmablasts. Concomitant administration of Ty21a and Vi vaccines is well tolerated and induces an additive immune response to the two vaccines. Thus it enhances the magnitude of both typhoid-specific plasmablast responses and those cross-reacting with paratyphoid and most important NTS serotypes

  20. Orally administered fatty acids enhance anorectic potential but do not activate central fatty acid sensing in Senegalese sole post-larvae.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Cristina; Bonacic, Kruno; Soengas, José L; Morais, Sofia

    2017-02-15

    Studies in fish have reported the presence and function of fatty acid (FA)-sensing systems comparable in many aspects to those known in mammals. Such studies were carried out in juvenile and adult fish, but the presence of FA-sensing systems and control of food intake have never been evaluated in early life stages, despite the importance of establishing when appetite regulation becomes functional in larval fish. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the possible effects of different specific FAs on neural FA-sensing systems and neuropeptides involved in the control of food intake in Senegalese sole post-larvae. To achieve this, we orally administered post-larvae with different solutions containing pure FA - oleate (OA), linoleate (LA), α-linolenate (ALA) or eicosapentaenoate (EPA) - and evaluated changes in mRNA abundance of neuropeptides involved in the control of food intake and of transcripts related to putative FA-sensing systems, 3 and 6 h post-administration. The changes in neuropeptide gene expression were relatively consistent with the activation of anorectic pathways (enhanced cart4 and pomcb) and a decrease in orexigenic factors (npy) following intake of FA. Even though there were a few differences depending on the nature of the FA, the observed changes appear to suggest the existence of a putative anorectic response in post-larvae fish to the ingestion of all four tested FAs. However, changes in neuropeptides cannot be explained by the integration of metabolic information regarding FAs in circulation through FA-sensing mechanisms in the brain. Only the reduction in mRNA levels of the FA metabolism gene acc in OA-treated (6 h), ALA-treated (3 h) and EPA-treated (3 and 6 h) post-larvae could be indicative of the presence of a FA-sensing system, but most genes either were not significantly regulated (fat/cd36-lmp2, acly, kir6.x, srebp1c) or were affected in a way that was inconsistent with FA-sensing mechanisms (fat/cd36-pg4l, fas, cpt1.1, cpt1

  1. Comparative effects of a Mg-enriched diet and different orally administered magnesium oxide preparations on ionized Mg, Mg metabolism and electrolytes in serum of human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Altura, B T; Wilimzig, C; Trnovec, T; Nyulassy, S; Altura, B M

    1994-10-01

    To determine whether: 1) short-term dietary elevation in magnesium (Mg) intake could alter serum ionized Mg (IMg2+), total Mg (TMg); % ionized Mg (% IMg2+) and other cations; and 2) different formulated preparations of Mg oxide (MgO) in the presence and absence of phosphate could alter serum IMg2+, TMg, % IMg2+ and other cations in Mg-loaded subjects. A randomized, triple cross-over study was performed on a rigorously defined group of normal male volunteers. Eighteen males were administered diets containing four to five times the United States recommended daily allowance (USRDA) of Mg followed by a randomization of three different MgO preparations, in the presence or absence of phosphate, containing equimolar amounts (12.34 mmol) of elemental Mg. Forty age-matched volunteers served as reference range controls. Specific ion selective electrodes were utilized to measure IMg2+, ionized calcium (ICa2+), sodium (Na+) potassium (K+) and hydrogen ion concentration (H+). Measurement of urinary excretion of Mg as well as TMg were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Diets enriched with different oral formulations of Mg given for 6 days result in significant elevations in serum IMg2+ and % IMg2+ but not TMg, ICa2+, K+ or H+ in normal subjects. Although such Mg-loaded subjects demonstrate significant elevation in urinary excretion of Mg, no further changes in IMg2+, TMg or any of the serum cations were produced by ingestion of either of the three MgO preparations. Subjects showing normally low basal levels of serum IMg2+, (< or = 0.54 mM/L), could easily have their serum IMg2+ level manipulated by diets enriched with Mg, whereas subjects having average normal or high normal IMg2+ levels did not have their IMg2+ elevated significantly with either diets enriched with Mg or with exogenous MgO. These results indicate that since serum IMg2+ and % IMg2+, but not TMg, can be altered by dietary intake, previous or future findings which may indicate no change in TMg by diet

  2. [Studies on arachidonic acid production by Mortierella].

    PubMed

    Bao, S; Zhu, F; Lin, W; Yao, R

    1997-10-01

    The effects of the incubation temperature, initial pH of the medium, carbon source and nitrogen source on the production of arachidonic acid by Mortierella sp. M10 were studied. Thought orthogonal experiments, the optimum culture medium was obtained (g/L): glucose, 100; yeast extract, 10; KNO3, 4.0; KH2PO4, 2.0; CaCl2.2H2O, 0.1; MgSO4.7H2O, 0.5; FeCl3.6H2O, 0.015; ZnSO4.7H2O, 0.0075; CuSO4.5H2O, 0.0005. Under the optimum culture conditions, the dry cell weight and arachidonic acid was 33.51 g/L and 0.827 g/L, respectively. The flask culture process was analysed.

  3. Relative bioavailability of single doses of prolonged-release tacrolimus administered as a suspension, orally or via a nasogastric tube, compared with intact capsules: a phase 1 study in healthy participants.

    PubMed

    Undre, Nasrullah; Dickinson, James

    2017-04-04

    Tacrolimus, an immunosuppressant widely used in solid organ transplantation, is available as a prolonged-release capsule for once-daily oral administration. In the immediate postsurgical period, if patients cannot take intact capsules orally, tacrolimus therapy is often initiated as a suspension of the capsule contents, delivered orally or via a nasogastric tube. This study evaluated the relative bioavailability of prolonged-release tacrolimus suspension versus intact capsules in healthy participants. A phase 1, open-label, single-dose, cross-over study. A single clinical research unit. In total, 20 male participants, 18-55 years old, entered and completed the study. All participants received nasogastric administration of tacrolimus 10 mg suspension in treatment period 1, with randomisation to oral administration of suspension or intact capsules in periods 2 and 3. Blood concentration-time profile over 144 hours was used to estimate pharmacokinetic parameters. Primary end point: relative bioavailability of prolonged-release intact capsule versus oral or nasogastric administration of prolonged-release tacrolimus suspension (area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) from time 0 to infinity post-tacrolimus dose (AUC0-∞); AUC measured until the last quantifiable concentration (AUC0-tz); maximum observed concentration (Cmax); time to Cmax (Tmax)). Tolerability was assessed throughout the study. Relative bioavailability of prolonged-release tacrolimus suspension administered orally was similar to intact capsules, with a ratio of least-square means for AUC0-tz and AUC0-∞ of 1.05 (90% CI 0.96 to 1.14). Bioavailability was lower with suspension administered via a nasogastric tube versus intact capsules (17%; ratio 0.83; CI 0.76 to 0.92). Cmax was higher for oral and nasogastric suspension (30% and 28%, respectively), and median Tmax was shorter (difference 1.0 and 1.5 hours postdose, respectively) versus intact capsules (2.0 hours). Single 10 mg doses of

  4. Relative bioavailability of single doses of prolonged-release tacrolimus administered as a suspension, orally or via a nasogastric tube, compared with intact capsules: a phase 1 study in healthy participants

    PubMed Central

    Undre, Nasrullah; Dickinson, James

    2017-01-01

    Objective Tacrolimus, an immunosuppressant widely used in solid organ transplantation, is available as a prolonged-release capsule for once-daily oral administration. In the immediate postsurgical period, if patients cannot take intact capsules orally, tacrolimus therapy is often initiated as a suspension of the capsule contents, delivered orally or via a nasogastric tube. This study evaluated the relative bioavailability of prolonged-release tacrolimus suspension versus intact capsules in healthy participants. Design A phase 1, open-label, single-dose, cross-over study. Setting A single clinical research unit. Participants In total, 20 male participants, 18–55 years old, entered and completed the study. Interventions All participants received nasogastric administration of tacrolimus 10 mg suspension in treatment period 1, with randomisation to oral administration of suspension or intact capsules in periods 2 and 3. Blood concentration–time profile over 144 hours was used to estimate pharmacokinetic parameters. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary end point: relative bioavailability of prolonged-release intact capsule versus oral or nasogastric administration of prolonged-release tacrolimus suspension (area under the concentration–time curve (AUC) from time 0 to infinity post-tacrolimus dose (AUC0–∞); AUC measured until the last quantifiable concentration (AUC0–tz); maximum observed concentration (Cmax); time to Cmax (Tmax)). Tolerability was assessed throughout the study. Results Relative bioavailability of prolonged-release tacrolimus suspension administered orally was similar to intact capsules, with a ratio of least-square means for AUC0–tz and AUC0–∞ of 1.05 (90% CI 0.96 to 1.14). Bioavailability was lower with suspension administered via a nasogastric tube versus intact capsules (17%; ratio 0.83; CI 0.76 to 0.92). Cmax was higher for oral and nasogastric suspension (30% and 28%, respectively), and median Tmax was shorter

  5. Uterotrophic assay of two concentrations of migrates from each of 23 polystyrenes administered orally (by gavage) to immature female Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, S; Hellwig, J; Jäckh, R; Christian, M S

    1998-01-01

    The Styrene Steering Committee (SSC) of the European Chemical Industry Council (CEFIC) sponsored this work to address any concern that styrene dimers and trimers that might migrate from polystyrene containers into food could possess some estrogenic activity and thus possibly affect human health. All phases of the study were conducted in conformance with GLP regulations and without knowledge of the oligomer migrates tested. All activities were managed and audited under a third-party contract between the SSC and Argus International. Low and high doses of the styrene oligomer migrates of 23 polystyrene samples [i.e. 9 general purpose polystyrenes (GPPS), 8 high impact polystyrenes (HIPS) and 6 expandable polystyrenes (EPS)] were tested for estrogenicity in an in vivo uterotrophic assay (immature female rat model). This model is considered to be the "gold standard" for use in screening for estrogenic effects because it evaluates both direct and indirect potential effects. The two concentrations of migrates of each of the 23 polystyrenes tested were selected to simulate daily human consumption of a low and high amount of food. Representative dimer and trimer concentrations were obtained in conformance with EEC Council Directives and calculated to be at levels simulating human consumption of 0.5 or 5 kg of food for the GPPS and the HIPS samples and of 0.5 or 3.15 kg of food for the EPS samples, respectively. The study was conducted in a series of three blocks. Each block included concurrent untreated control (negative control), vehicle control (25% ethanol, 20 ml/kg/day) and positive control (diethylstilbestrol-dipropionate, DES-DP, 5 micrograms/kg/day) groups, and low and high doses of each of 7 (1 block) or 8 (2 blocks) polystyrene oligomer migrates. Each group in each block consisted of 10 immature Wistar (Chbb: THOM-SPF) female rats. Beginning when the rats were 22 +/- 1 days of age, each rat was appropriately handled (untreated control group) or administered twice

  6. Control of arachidonic acid release in chick muscle cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templeton, G. H.; Padalino, M.; Wright, W.

    1985-01-01

    Cultures from thigh muscles of 12 day old embryonic chicks are utilized to examine arachidonic release, prostaglandin (PG) biosynthesis, and protein synthesis. The preparation of the cultures is described. It is observed that exogenous arachidonic acid is formed into photsphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine, is released by a calcium ionosphere or phospholiphase simulator, and is the substrate for the biosynthesis of PG; the epidermal growth factor and PGF do not stimulate protein synthesis over the basal levels. The relationship between arachidonate release and melittin is studied. The data reveal that a change in intracellular calcium stimulates phospholiphase activity, arachidonate release, and PG synthesis in chick muscle culture.

  7. [Clinical trial of pregnancy terminations in 353 patients where amenorrhea was present for less than 49 days by 600 mg of RU 486 (administered orally) and 500 mg of sulprostone (Nalador) administered intramuscularly].

    PubMed

    Aubeny, E; Bureau, A; Gabeaud, P; Heard, I; Eucher, M; Husson, T; Meng, L; Riotte, S

    1989-04-01

    354 women seeking abortions were treated at a hospital in Paris between February-September 1988 with 600 mg of RU 486 taken orally in 1 dose and an injection of 500 mg sulprostone 48 hours later. The women all had amenorrhea of less than 49 days. 1/3 were 18-25 years old, 1/2 were 25-35, and 16% were over 35. 206 were nulliparas. 110 were married and the rest were separated, widowed, divorced, or single. Sulprostone was injected early in the morning in the hospital and the women were discharged after expulsion of the products of conception, which occurred usually 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 hours later. If expulsion did not occur, the woman returned in 3 days for a sonogram to confirm uterine vacuity. 13 of the 354 women had RU 486 only. 2 refused the sulprostone and underwent aspiration and 11 experienced spontaneous expulsions in the 48 hours following RU 486 administration. 338 of the women had spontaneous expulsions. 2 pregnancies were terminated but not expelled and aspiration was required. 285 of the women expelled in the hospital within 4 hours of sulprostone administration and the other 55 did so at home 6 or more hours later. RU 486 was very well tolerated. Secondary effects were more common with sulprostone but generally subsided within 3 hours. 70 patients required treatment for uterine pain after sulprostone administration. 150 complained of nausea but only 6 required treatment. 5 women required aspiration of curettage for hemorrhage but none required transfusion. In 3 cases the hemorrhages were due to histologically proven retention. 1 patient developed endometritis 3 days after expulsion and another, who had a history of extrauterine pregnancy, developed salpingitis 15 days after expulsion. Both patients were treated with antibiotics. The method appears to be safe and effective. Its major disadvantages are that it prolongs the amount of time required for abortion and it frequently causes pelvic pain. The responsibility of the patient is also increased.

  8. Arachidonic acid metabolites in pathogenic yeasts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Although most of what is known about the biology and function of arachidonic acid metabolites comes from the study of mammalian biology, these compounds can also be produced by lower eukaryotes, including yeasts and other fungi. It is also in this group of organisms that the least is known about the metabolic pathways leading to the production of these compounds as well as the functions of these compounds in the biology of fungi and yeasts. This review will deal with the discovery of oxylipins from polyunsaturated fatty acids, and more specifically the arachidonic acid derived eicosanoids, such as 3-hydroxy eicosatetraenoic acid, prostaglandin F2α and prostaglandin E2, in yeasts starting in the early 1990s. This review will also focus on what is known about the metabolic pathways and/or proteins involved in the production of these compounds in pathogenic yeasts. The possible roles of these compounds in the biology, including the pathology, of these organisms will be discussed. PMID:22873782

  9. Arachidonic acid metabolism in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    YANG, PEIYING; CARTWRIGHT, CARRIE A.; LI, JIN; WEN, SIJIN; PROKHOROVA, INA N.; SHUREIQI, IMAD; TRONCOSO, PATRICIA; NAVONE, NORA M.; NEWMAN, ROBERT A.; KIM, JERI

    2012-01-01

    The arachidonic acid pathway is important in the development and progression of numerous malignant diseases, including prostate cancer. To more fully evaluate the role of individual cyclooxygenases (COXs), lipoxygenases (LOXs) and their metabolites in prostate cancer, we measured mRNA and protein levels of COXs and LOXs and their arachidonate metabolites in androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (PC-3 and DU145) prostate cancer cell lines, bone metastasis-derived MDA PCa 2a and MDA PCa 2b cell lines and their corresponding xenograft models, as well as core biopsy specimens of primary prostate cancer and nonneoplastic prostate tissue taken ex vivo after prostatectomy. Relatively high levels of COX-2 mRNA and its product PGE2 were observed only in PC-3 cells and their xenografts. By contrast, levels of the exogenous 12-LOX product 12-HETE were consistently higher in MDA PCa 2b and PC-3 cells and their corresponding xenograft tissues than were those in LNCaP cells. More strikingly, the mean endogenous level of 12-HETE was significantly higher in the primary prostate cancers than in the nonneoplastic prostate tissue (0.094 vs. 0.010 ng/mg protein, respectively; p=0.019). Our results suggest that LOX metabolites such as 12-HETE are critical in prostate cancer progression and that the LOX pathway may be a target for treating and preventing prostate cancer. PMID:22895552

  10. Influence of nutritional state on the disposal of orally and intramuscularly administered iodized oil to iodine repleted older children and adult women.

    PubMed

    Fierro-Benitez, R; Sandoval-Valencia, H; Sevilla-Munoz, B; Rodriguez, E; Gualotuna, E; Fierro-Carrion, G; Pacheco-Bastides, V; Andrade, J; Wang, P H; Stanbury, J B

    1989-06-01

    Iodinated oil (Ethiodol, 1 or 2 ml) was administered po or by im administration to adult women and older children in rural highland Ecuador who were either well nourished or malnourished to determine the effect of nutritional status on the disposal rate of iodine. These subjects resides in a region previously severely deficient in iodine, but this had been corrected in these subjects by prior administration of iodinated oil or by use of iodized salt or both. Malnutrition as determined by the conventional standards of height for age was associated with a significantly shortened retention time of the administered iodine, whether given po or im. The half life of retention was approximately half in the malourished of that in the well nourished. If these findings can be extrapolated to chronically iodine deficient subjects, then malnourished populations in need of iodine supplementation should either receive higher dosages than those conventionally employed or more frequent dosage.

  11. Cardiovascular effects of orally administered HNS-32, an originally synthesized azulene-1-carboxamidine derivative, assessed in the in vivo rat model.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Masaki; Sugiyama, Atsushi; Nakazawa, Tomoo; Hashimoto, Keitaro

    2002-07-01

    HNS-32, an azulene-1-carboxamidine derivative, is an originally synthesized antiarrhythmic compound. Its cardiovascular effects after oral administration (1-10 mg/kg) were assessed using the pentobarbital-anesthetized in vivo rat model in comparison with those of verapamil (3 mg/kg, p.o.). Verapamil decreased the heart rate and mean blood pressure and prolonged the PR interval without changing the QRS width (n = 6). Similar results were observed for HNS-32 except that the QRS width was prolonged by the highest dose and the effects occurred slowly and lasted longer. These results suggest that HNS-32 is an orally active slowly-acting calcium plus sodium channel blocker.

  12. Effect of orally administered cadmium of in situ pH, PCO{sub 2}, and bicarbonate concentration in rat testis and epididymis

    SciTech Connect

    Caflisch, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    Acute injections of high doses of cadmium (Cd) induce marked testicular necrosis. However, the effects of low-dose oral Cd exposure, on a chronic basis, are not well documented. The present investigation was designed to examine the effects of such exposure on in situ pH, PCO{sub 2}, and bicarbonate concentration ([HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}]) in the rat testis and epididymis, plasma testosterone levels, and testis and epididymis weights. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 50 or 100 ppm Cd for 40 d. Oral administration of 50 or 100 ppm Cd was associated with significant alkalinization of luminal fluid in seminiferous tubules (ST) but did not alter in situ pH values in proximal caput (PCP), middle caput (MCP), or proximal cauda epididymidis (PCD). The in situ PCO{sub 2} values in ST, PCP, MCP, and PCD of control animals were indistinguishable from each other and from values after Cd exposure, and all values were significantly higher than system arterial blood (SAB) PCO{sub 2}. Oral Cd exposure at 50 or 100 ppm did not change the values for bicarbonate in SAB, PCP, or MCP but increased markedly the value in ST. Plasma testosterone levels and testis and epididymis weights were not altered after oral cadmium administration. These findings suggest that, at the doses employed in this study, Cd exposure may result in subtle alterations in the blood-testis barrier and subsequent impairment of acid-base pathways. Furthermore, the traditional view of Cd-related testicular insult based on acute injection protocols needs to be reevaluated in terms of environmental relevance. 25 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. Biological control of Haemonchus contortus infective larvae in ovine faeces by administering an oral suspension of Duddingtonia flagrans chlamydospores to sheep.

    PubMed

    Mendoza de Gives, P; Flores Crespo, J; Herrera Rodriguez, D; Vazquez Prats, V; Liebano Hernandez, E; Ontiveros Fernandez, G E

    1998-12-01

    A single oral dose of an aqueous suspension containing 11,350,000 chlamydospores of a Mexican isolate of Duddingtonia flagrans (FTHO-8) given to sheep, resulted in a maximum reduction of 88% (range 86.7-90.4%) of the population of Haemonchus contortus infective larvae in the faeces. The effect of this treatment continued for 4-5 days after administration of the suspension. The possible use of this treatment as a method of control of ovine haemonchosis is discussed.

  14. New uses of bioglycerin: production of arachidonic acid

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Filamentous fungi of the genus Mortierella are known to produce arachidonic acid from glucose and M. alpina is currently used in industrial scale production of arachidonic acid in Japan. In anticipation of a large excess of co-product bioglycerin from the national biodiesel program, we would like ...

  15. Effect of orally administered Hochu-ekki-to, a Japanese herbal medicine, on contact hypersensitivity caused by repeated application of antigen.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Kenji; Matsumoto, Tsukasa; Santa, Kazuki; Triizuka, Kazuo; Hanawa, Toshihiko

    2002-06-01

    The effects of oral administration of Hochu-ekki-to (HET; bu-zhong-yi-qi-tang in Chinese), a traditional Japanese and Chinese herbal medicine, on chronic contact hypersensitivity were investigated. HET suppressed ear swelling due to chronic contact hypersensitivity caused by repeated application of 2,4,6-trinitro-1-chlorobenzene (TNCB). HET significantly suppressed not only increases in hapten-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) and IgG1 titer due to repeated application of TNCB, but also total IgE and IgG1 concentration in the serum. Interleukin 4 (IL-4) level in inflamed ear tissue was significantly increased by repeated application of TNCB, and this increase in IL-4 level in the ear was significantly suppressed by oral administration of HET. Interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), IL-2, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-12 levels are not changed as much as IL4 by TNCB and HET did not alter these cytokines as much as IL-4. These results suggest that oral administration of HET suppresses chronic contact hypersensitivity, and it can be assumed that the suppression of serum Ig E and Ig G1 and IL-4 in inflamed ear.

  16. A pilot double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled study of orally administered IFN-alpha-n1 (Ins) in pediatric patients with measles.

    PubMed

    Lecciones, J A; Abejar, N H; Dimaano, E E; Bartolome, R; Cinco, S; Mariano, N; Yerro, M E; Cobar, S; Fuggan, B

    1998-09-01

    To determine the safety and effectiveness of low-dose oral interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) against measles, 30 confined pediatric patients were prospectively and randomly assigned to either a placebo or an oral IFN-alpha group and observed daily for 14 days in a double-blind manner. The IFN patients received a daily sublingual dose of 200 IU of human lymphoblastoid IFN-alpha. The IFN-treated group showed shorter average duration of malaise (3.2 vs. 10.7 days, p < 0.0001), anorexia (3.1 vs. 6.7 days, p < 0.0001), and irritability (1.1 vs. 2.2 days, p < 0.01) and shorter duration of macular/maculopapular/papular lesions (4.3 vs. 8.2 days,p < 0.0001) and branny desquamation (4.6 vs. 5.8 days, p > 0.05) and shorter time for rash to become generalized (5.5 vs. 10.3 days, p < 0.0001). No hematologic, renal, or liver toxicities were noted. It, therefore, appears that low-dose oral human lymphoblastoid IFN-alpha used in this pilot study is both safe and effective in children with measles infection.

  17. Synaptic plasticity preserved with arachidonic acid diet in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Susumu; Nakazawa, Hiroe; Tokimasa, Takayuki; Akimoto, Kengo; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Toyoda-Ono, Yoshiko; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Okaichi, Hiroshige; Sakakibara, Manabu

    2003-08-01

    We examined whether synaptic plasticity was preserved in aged rats administered an arachidonic acid (AA) containing diet. Young male Fischer-344 rats (2 mo of age), and two groups of aged rats of the same strain (2 y of age) who consumed either a control diet or an AA ethyl ester-containing diet for at least 3 mo were used. In the Morris water maze task, aged rats on the AA diet had tendency to show better performance than aged rats on the control diet. Long-term potentiation induced by tetanic stimulation was recorded from a 300 microm thick hippocampal slice with a 36 multi-electrode-array positioned at the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons. The degree of potentiation after 1 h in aged rats on the AA diet was comparable as that of young controls. Phospholipid analysis revealed that AA and docosahexaenoic acid were the major fatty acids in the hippocampus in aged rats. There was a correlation between the behavioral measure and the changes in excitatory postsynaptic potential slope and between the physiologic measure and the total amount of AA in hippocampus.

  18. Capromorelin oral solution (ENTYCE®) increases food consumption and body weight when administered for 4 consecutive days to healthy adult Beagle dogs in a randomized, masked, placebo controlled study.

    PubMed

    Zollers, Bill; Rhodes, Linda; Heinen, Ernst

    2017-01-05

    Dogs can suffer from inappetence caused by a variety of medical conditions. This may present as anorexia (complete loss of appetite), hyporexia (decreased appetite) or dysrexia (change in food preferences). A drug with a new mechanism of action, capromorelin, has potential to stimulate appetite in dogs. Capromorelin is a ghrelin receptor agonist, which mimics the action of endogenous ghrelin. It is a member of the growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) class of drugs. Capromorelin oral solution (ENTYCE®) was tested in healthy adult male and female Beagle dogs (n = 6 males and 6 females per group) for its effect on food consumption and body weight. A randomized, masked, placebo controlled study was conducted to measure the effects of a daily 3 mg/kg oral dose given over 4 days. Dogs were observed for clinical signs, physical examinations were completed prior to and at the end of treatment, and blood was drawn before and after treatment for evaluation of serum chemistry and hematology parameters. Capromorelin was well-tolerated, with no abnormalities seen on physical examination or clinical pathology. Some dogs showed increased salivation. Capromorelin treated dogs had increased mean (±SD) food consumption compared to placebo treated dogs (60.55 ± 39.87% versus -11.15 ± 14.23% respectively, P < 0.001). Treated dogs also had increased mean body weights compared to placebo treated dogs (5.96 ± 1.76% versus 0.053 ± 1.14% respectively, P < 0.001). This study supports the effectiveness of capromorelin oral solution as an appetite stimulant in dogs. Treatment with the oral solution resulted in dramatic increases in appetite, as measured by food consumption, of over 60% compared to placebo. The drug was well tolerated. Capromorelin is the first ghrelin receptor agonist developed for appetite stimulation in any species, and represents a novel mechanism of action for this clinical use.

  19. Arachidonic acid and ion channels: an update

    PubMed Central

    Meves, H

    2008-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid with four double bonds, has multiple actions on living cells. Many of these effects are mediated by an action of AA or its metabolites on ion channels. During the last 10 years, new types of ion channels, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) channels and non-SOCE channels have been studied. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the effects of AA on TRP and non-SOCE channels as well as classical ion channels. It aims to distinguish between effects of AA itself and effects of AA metabolites. Lipid mediators are of clinical interest because some of them (for example, leukotrienes) play a role in various diseases, others (such as prostaglandins) are targets for pharmacological therapeutic intervention. PMID:18552881

  20. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of orally administered acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone), a highly potent Nrf2 activator with a reversible covalent mode of action

    SciTech Connect

    Kostov, Rumen V.; Knatko, Elena V.; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Henderson, Colin J.; Zheng, Suqing; Huang, Jeffrey T.-J.; Honda, Tadashi; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.

    2015-09-25

    The acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone) TBE-31 is a highly potent cysteine targeting compound with a reversible covalent mode of action; its best-characterized target being Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1), the cellular sensor for oxidants and electrophiles. TBE-31 reacts with cysteines of Keap1, impairing its ability to target nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) for degradation. Consequently, Nrf2 accumulates and orchestrates cytoprotective gene expression. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of TBE-31 in C57BL/6 mice. After a single oral dose of 10 μmol/kg (∼200 nmol/animal), the concentration of TBE-31 in blood exhibited two peaks, at 22.3 nM and at 15.5 nM, 40 min and 4 h after dosing, respectively, as determined by a quantitative stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method. The AUC{sub 0–24h} was 195.5 h/nmol/l, the terminal elimination half-life was 10.2 h, and the k{sub el} was 0.068 h{sup −1}. To assess the pharmacodynamics of Nrf2 activation by TBE-31, we determined the enzyme activity of its prototypic target, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and found it elevated by 2.4- and 1.5-fold in liver and heart, respectively. Continuous feeding for 18 days with diet delivering the same daily doses of TBE-31 under conditions of concurrent treatment with the immunosuppressive agent azathioprine had a similar effect on Nrf2 activation without any indications of toxicity. Together with previous reports showing the cytoprotective effects of TBE-31 in animal models of carcinogenesis, our results demonstrate the high potency, efficacy and suitability for chronic administration of cysteine targeting reversible covalent drugs. - Highlights: • TBE-31 is a cysteine targeting compound with a reversible covalent mode of action. • After a single oral dose, the blood concentration of TBE-31 exhibits two peaks. • Oral TBE-31 is a potent activator of Nrf2-dependent enzymes in

  1. The effect of orally administered probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri-containing tablets in peri-implant mucositis: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Flichy-Fernández, A J; Ata-Ali, J; Alegre-Domingo, T; Candel-Martí, E; Ata-Ali, F; Palacio, J R; Peñarrocha-Diago, M

    2015-12-01

    Probiotics create a biofilm and protect the oral tissues against the action of periodontal pathogenic bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the oral probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri Prodentis upon the peri-implant health of edentulous patients with dental implants and peri-implant mucositis, establishing comparisons vs implants without peri-implant disease. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, prospective cross-over study was made. The patients were all edentulous and were divided into two groups, (A) no peri-implant disease, and (B) peri-implant mucositis affecting one or more implants. Patients with peri-implantitis were excluded. The dosage was one tablet every 24 h over 30 d. All patients in both groups initially received the oral probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri Prodentis, followed by placebo. Patients started with probiotic treatment during 30 d, followed by a 6 mo washout period and the administration of placebo for the same period. The following parameters were studied: crevicular fluid volume, modified plaque index, probing depth, modified gingival index, and concentrations of interleukin 1β, interleukin 6 and interleukin 8. A total of 77 implants were evaluated in 34 patients. Group A involved 22 patients with 54 implants without peri-implant alterations, and group B, 12 patients with mucositis affecting one or more implants (23 implants). After treatment with the probiotic, both the patients with mucositis and the patients without peri-implant disease showed improvements in the clinical parameters, with reductions in cytokine levels. In contrast, no such changes were observed with placebo. After treatment with the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri in patients with implants presenting mucositis, the clinical parameters improved, and the cytokine levels decreased - in contraposition to the observations in the placebo group. Probiotic administration may be regarded as a good alternative for both the treatment of peri-implant mucositis

  2. Efficacy of orally administered prednisolone versus partial endodontic treatment on pain reduction in emergency care of acute irreversible pulpitis of mandibular molars: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kérourédan, Olivia; Jallon, Léonard; Perez, Paul; Germain, Christine; Péli, Jean-François; Oriez, Dominique; Fricain, Jean-Christophe; Arrivé, Elise; Devillard, Raphaël

    2017-03-28

    Irreversible pulpitis is a highly painful inflammatory condition of the dental pulp which represents a common dental emergency. Recommended care is partial endodontic treatment. The dental literature reports major difficulties in achieving adequate analgesia to perform this emergency treatment, especially in the case of mandibular molars. In current practice, short-course, orally administered corticotherapy is used for the management of oral pain of inflammatory origin. The efficacy of intraosseous local steroid injections for irreversible pulpitis in mandibular molars has already been demonstrated but resulted in local comorbidities. Oral administration of short-course prednisolone is simple and safe but its efficacy to manage pain caused by irreversible pulpitis has not yet been demonstrated. This trial aims to evaluate the noninferiority of short-course, orally administered corticotherapy versus partial endodontic treatment for the emergency care of irreversible pulpitis in mandibular molars. This study is a noninferiority, open-label, randomized controlled clinical trial conducted at the Bordeaux University Hospital. One hundred and twenty subjects will be randomized in two 1:1 parallel arms: the intervention arm will receive one oral dose of prednisolone (1 mg/kg) during the emergency visit, followed by one morning dose each day for 3 days and the reference arm will receive partial endodontic treatment. Both groups will receive planned complete endodontic treatment 72 h after enrollment. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients with pain intensity below 5 on a Numeric Scale 24 h after the emergency visit. Secondary outcomes include comfort during care, the number of injected anesthetic cartridges when performing complete endodontic treatment, the number of antalgic drugs and the number of patients coming back for consultation after 72 h. This randomized trial will assess the ability of short-term corticotherapy to reduce pain in irreversible

  3. Disposition of orally administered 2,2-Bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)propane (Bisphenol A) in pregnant rats and the placental transfer to fetuses.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, O; Oishi, S

    2000-01-01

    We studied the disposition of bisphenol A (BPA) in pregnant female F344/DuCrj(Fischer) rats and its placental transfer to fetuses after a single oral administration of 1 g/kg BPA dissolved in propylene glycol. BPA in maternal blood, liver, and kidney reached maximal concentrations (14.7, 171, and 36 microg/g) 20 min after the administration and gradually decreased. The levels were 2-5% of the maximum 6 hr after the administration. The maximal concentration of BPA in fetuses (9 microg/g) was also attained 20 min after the administration. BPA levels then gradually reduced in a similar manner to maternal blood. These results suggest that the absorption and distribution of BPA in maternal organs and fetuses are extremely rapid and that the placenta does not act as a barrier to BPA. PMID:11049811

  4. Dose-Response Relationship Between Orally Administered Ammonium Perchlorate and Urine Perchlorate Concentrations in Rats: Possible Biomarker to Quantify Environmental Ammonium Perchlorate Exposure on Thyroid Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong Xia; Ding, Miao Hong; Li, Yong Gan; Liu, Qin; Peng, Kai Liang

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of urine perchlorate as a biomarker of ammonium perchlorate (AP) exposure and to explore the correlation between the thyroid function indicators and the perchlorate concentrations, a sensitive and selective ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS) method was developed to detect perchlorate in urine samples. Rats were orally administrated with different doses of perchlorate. Serum free thyroxine (FT4), free triiodothyronine (FT3), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) were determined by radioimmunoassays. The results showed that a dose of AP up to 520 mg kg(-1) body weight induced a significant increase of TSH, with a decrease of FT4. Particularly, the levels of urine perchlorate increased dose-dependently on AP exposure from drinking water. The findings highlighted that urine perchlorate may be a useful biomarker for AP environmental exposure.

  5. Immunogenicity in Swine of Orally Administered Recombinant Lactobacillus plantarum Expressing Classical Swine Fever Virus E2 Protein in Conjunction with Thymosin α-1 as an Adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi-Gang; Guan, Xue-Ting; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Tian, Chang-Yong; Cui, Li-Chun

    2015-06-01

    Classical swine fever, caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV), is a highly contagious disease that results in enormous economic losses in pig industries. The E2 protein is one of the main structural proteins of CSFV and is capable of inducing CSFV-neutralizing antibodies and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activities in vivo. Thymosin α-1 (Tα1), an immune-modifier peptide, plays a very important role in the cellular immune response. In this study, genetically engineered Lactobacillus plantarum bacteria expressing CSFV E2 protein alone (L. plantarum/pYG-E2) and in combination with Tα1 (L. plantarum/pYG-E2-Tα1) were developed, and the immunogenicity of each as an oral vaccine to induce protective immunity against CSFV in pigs was evaluated. The results showed that recombinant L. plantarum/pYG-E2 and L. plantarum/pYG-E2-Tα1 were both able to effectively induce protective immune responses in pigs against CSFV infection by eliciting immunoglobulin A (IgA)-based mucosal, immunoglobulin G (IgG)-based humoral, and CTL-based cellular immune responses via oral vaccination. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in the levels of immune responses were observed between L. plantarum/pYG-E2-Tα1 and L. plantarum/pYG-E2, suggesting a better immunogenicity of L. plantarum/pYG-E2-Tα1 as a result of the Tα1 molecular adjuvant that can enhance immune responsiveness and augment specific lymphocyte functions. Our data suggest that the recombinant Lactobacillus microecological agent expressing CSFV E2 protein combined with Tα1 as an adjuvant provides a promising strategy for vaccine development against CSFV.

  6. Impaired B cell responses to orally administered antigens in lamina propria but not Peyer's patches of Gαi2-deficient mice prior to colitis

    PubMed Central

    Öhman, Lena; Åström, Rolf-Göran; Hörnquist, Elisabeth Hultgren

    2005-01-01

    Despite numerous studies on the intestinal immune system in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and animal models of IBD, very little is known about the immune reactivity of mucosal lymphocytes following oral immunizations under these circumstances. The reactivity of Peyer's patch (PP) and lamina propria (LP) T and B lymphocytes in inhibitory G-protein α2 subunit-deficient (Gαi2–/–) mice developing an IBD resembling ulcerative colitis was investigated following repeated oral immunizations with keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH), together with the adjuvant cholera toxin, prior to colitis. The antigen-specific B-cell response in the LP of both the small and the large intestines was significantly reduced in Gαi2–/– as compared to wild-type mice. In contrast, the frequency of KLH-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)-producing cells in the PP did not differ between Gαi2–/– and wild-type mice, whereas the total frequency of Ig-producing cells as well as the frequency of enteric flora-specific Ig-producing cells in the PP was significantly increased in Gαi2–/– as compared to wild-type mice. Analysis of T cell responses following restimulation ex vivo with KLH revealed a dramatic increase in the production of interferon-γ in mesenteric lymph node, PP and LP lymphocytes from Gαi2-deficient as compared to wild-type mice, together with decreased production of interleukin-10 in all locations except the PP. PMID:15885134

  7. Orally administered lycopene attenuates diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in rats by modulating Nrf-2/HO-1 and Akt/mTOR pathways.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Kazim; Orhan, Cemal; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Nurhan; Ali, Shakir; Bahcecioglu, Ibrahim H; Guler, Osman; Ozercan, Ibrahim; Ilhan, Necip; Kucuk, Omer

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocarcinogenesis is one of the most prevalent and lethal cancers. We studied the mechanisms underlying the inhibition of diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced hepatocarcinogenesis by lycopene in rats. Hepatocarcinogenesis was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of DEN followed by promotion with phenobarbital for 24 successive wk. The rats were given lycopene (20 mg/kg body weight) 3 times a week orally for 4 wk prior to initiation, and the treatment was continued for 24 consecutive wk. Lycopene reduced incidence, number, size, and volume of hepatic nodules. Serum alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin, and malondialdehyde (MDA) considerably increased and hepatic antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase) and glutathione decreased in DEN-treated rats when compared with the control group. Lycopene significantly reversed these biochemical changes and increased the expression of NF-E-2-related factor-2)/heme oxygenase-1, and it decreased NF-κB/cyclooxygenase-2, inhibiting the inflammatory cascade and activating antioxidant signaling (P < 0.05). Lycopene also decreased DEN-induced increases in phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin (p-mTOR), phosphorylated p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1, phosphorylated 4E-binding protein 1, and protein kinase B (P < 0.05). Lycopene is an active chemopreventive agent that offers protection against DEN-induced hepatocarcinogenesis by inhibiting NF-κB and mTOR pathways.

  8. Orally administered H-Dmt-Tic-Lys-NH-CH2-Ph (MZ-2), a potent mu/delta-opioid receptor antagonist, regulates obese-related factors in mice.

    PubMed

    Marczak, Ewa D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Myers, Page H; Blankenship, Terry; Wilson, Ralph; Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2009-08-15

    Orally active dual mu-/delta-opioid receptor antagonist, H-Dmt-Tic-Lys-NH-CH(2)-Ph (MZ-2) was applied to study body weight gain, fat content, bone mineral density, serum insulin, cholesterol and glucose levels in female ob/ob (B6.V-Lep/J homozygous) and lean wild mice with or without voluntary exercise on wheels for three weeks, and during a two week post-treatment period under the same conditions. MZ-2 (10mg/kg/day, p.o.) exhibited the following actions: (1) reduced body weight gain in sedentary obese mice that persisted beyond the treatment period without effect on lean mice; (2) stimulated voluntary running on exercise wheels of both groups of mice; (3) decreased fat content, enhanced bone mineral density (BMD), and decreased serum insulin and glucose levels in obese mice; and (4) MZ-2 (30 microM) increased BMD in human osteoblast cells (MG-63) comparable to naltrexone, while morphine inhibited mineral nodule formation. Thus, MZ-2 has potential application in the clinical management of obesity, insulin and glucose levels, and the amelioration of osteoporosis.

  9. Orally administered H-Dmt-Tic-Lys-NH-CH2-Ph (MZ-2), a potent μ-/δ-opioid receptor antagonist, regulates obese-related factors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Marczak, Ewa D.; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Myers, Page H.; Blankenship, Terry; Wilson, Ralph; Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Lazarus, Lawrence H.

    2009-01-01

    Orally active dual μ-/δ-opioid receptor antagonist, H-Dmt-Tic-Lys-NH-CH2-Ph (MZ-2) was applied to study body weight gain, fat content, bone mineral density, serum insulin, cholesterol and glucose levels in female ob/ob (B6.V-Lep/J homozygous) and lean wild mice with or without voluntary exercise on wheels for three weeks, and during a two week post-treatment period under the same conditions. MZ-2 (10 mg/kg/day, p.o.) exhibited the following actions: (1) reduced body weight gain in sedentary obese mice that persisted beyond the treatment period without effect on lean mice; (2) stimulated voluntary running on exercise wheels of both groups of mice; (3) decreased fat content, enhanced bone mineral density (BMD), and decreased serum insulin and glucose levels in obese mice; and (4) MZ-2 (30 μM) increased BMD in human osteoblast cells (MG-63) comparable to naltrexone, while morphine inhibited mineral nodule formation. Thus, MZ-2 has potential application in the clinical management of obesity, insulin and glucose levels, and the amelioration of osteoporosis. PMID:19576206

  10. Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity of Orally Administered Botanical Composition, UP446-Part I: Effects on Embryo-Fetal Development in New Zealand White Rabbits and Sprague Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young-Chul; Hyun, Eu-Jin; Jia, Qi

    2015-08-01

    The pharmacotoxicology impacts of dietary supplements taken at the time of pregnancy have remained alarming since women are the frequent herbal medicine users in many countries as a complement to the conventional pregnancy management. The use of herbal medicines and diet supplements in expectant mothers linked closely to the health of the childbearing mothers and the fetuses where the lack of developmental safety data imposes a challenge to make the right choices. Here, we describe the potential adverse effects of UP446, a standardized bioflavonoid composition from the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis and the heartwoods of Acacia catechu, on embryo-fetal development following maternal exposure during the critical period of major organogenesis in rabbits and rats. Pregnant dams were treated orally with UP446 at doses of 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg/day during gestation. The number of resorptions, implantations, litter size, body weights, and skeletal development was evaluated. Maternal food intake and body, tissue, and placenta weight were also assessed. There were no statistically significant differences in implantation, congenital malformation, embryo-fetal mortalities, and fetuses sex ratios in all dosing groups of both species. Therefore, the no observed adverse effect level of UP446 was considered to be greater than 1000 mg/kg in both the maternal and fetus in both species. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Protective effects of green tea polyphenols administered by oral intubation against chemical carcinogen-induced forestomach and pulmonary neoplasia in A/J mice.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, S K; Agarwal, R; Mukhtar, H

    1993-09-30

    Our studies and others have shown the cancer chemopreventive effects of chronic administration of green tea in several animal tumor models. In this study, the administration of a polyphenolic fraction isolated from green tea (GTP) by oral intubation at a dose of 5 mg in 0.2 ml water 30 min prior to challenge with carcinogen, afforded significant protection against both diethylnitrosamine (DEN)- and benzo(a)pyrene (BP)-induced forestomach and lung tumorigenesis in A/J mice. The protective effects were evident by a decrease in numbers of tumors/mouse in GTP-fed groups compared to non GTP-fed controls. In the forestomach tumorigenesis protocol, GTP afforded 71 and 66% protection against, respectively DEN- and BP-induced tumor multiplicity. In the case of lung tumorigenesis protocol, however, the protective effects of GTP were 41 and 39%, respectively. Histological examination of forestomach tumors showed significantly lesser number of squamous cell carcinoma formation in GTP-fed groups of mice compared to carcinogen alone-treated controls. When pulmonary tumors were examined histologically, no adenocarcinomas were observed in GTP-fed groups compared to 15% mice with adenocarcinomas in DEN and BP alone-treated controls. The results of this study suggest that limited doses of GTP administration by gavage 30 min prior to carcinogen challenge may afford protection against carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis in internal body organs.

  12. Factors that Influence the Immunological Adjuvant Effect of Lactobacillus fermentum PC1 on Specific Immune Responses in Mice to Orally Administered Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Esvaran, Meera; Conway, Patricia L.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the influences of the dosage of the adjuvant, the nature of the antigen and the host genetics on the capacity of L. fermentum PC1 (PC1) to function as an oral adjuvant. BALB/c and DBA/1 mice were vaccinated with either ovalbumin (OVA) or Salmonella Typhimurium on days 0 and 14, Mice were also dosed with the PC1 (108 CFU or 1011 CFU per dose per mouse) with the antigens (days 0 and 14) and alone (days −1 and 13). The higher PC1 dose elicited a greater specific serum IgG2a response than IgG1 for both antigens and mice strains, indicating a Th1-biased humoral immune response. The Th1 bias was also observed at the cellular level with greater specific IFN-γ levels than IL-4 and IL-10 with both antigen types and mouse strains. With the particulate antigen, the lower dose of PC1 elicited a Th1 bias at the cellular level, but a balanced Th1/Th2 response at the systemic humoral level. With the soluble antigen, a strong Th1-biased response occurred at the cellular level while the systemic humoral response was Th2-biased. In conclusion, PC1 at the higher dose was an excellent Th1 adjuvant, which was unaffected by the nature of the antigen or the host’s genetic background. PMID:27447674

  13. Therapeutic potency of bee pollen against biochemical autistic features induced through acute and sub-acute neurotoxicity of orally administered propionic acid.

    PubMed

    Al-Salem, Huda S; Bhat, Ramesa Shafi; Al-Ayadhi, Laila; El-Ansary, Afaf

    2016-04-23

    It is now well documented that postnatal exposure to certain chemicals has been reported to increase the risk of autism spectrum disorder. Propionic acid (PA), as a metabolic product of gut microbiotaandas a commonly used food additive, has been reported to mediate the effects of autism. Results from animal studies may help to identify environmental neurotoxic agents and drugs that can ameliorate neurotoxicity and may thereby aid in the treatment of autism. The present study investigated the ameliorative effects of natural bee pollen against acute and sub-acute brain intoxication induced by (PA) in rats. Twenty-four young male Western Albino ratswere enrolled in the present study. They were classified into four equal groups, eachwith6 rats. The control group received only phosphate buffered saline; the oral buffered PA-treated groups (II and III) received a neurotoxic dose of 750 mg/kg body weight divided in 3 dose of 250 mg/kg body weight/day serving asthe acute group and 750 mg/kg body weight divided in 10 equal dose of 75 mg/kg body weight/day as the sub-acute group. The fourth group received 50 mg bee pollen for 30 days after PA-acute intoxication. The obtained data showed that the PA-treated groups demonstrated multiple signs of brain toxicity, as indicated by a depletion of serotonin (5HT), dopamine and nor-adrenaline, together withan increase in IFN-γ and caspase 3. Bee pollen was effective in ameliorating the neurotoxic effect of PA. All measured parameters demonstrated minimal alteration in comparison with thecontrol animal than did those of acute and sub-acute PA-treated animals. In conclusion, bee pollen demonstrates anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects while ameliorating the impaired neurochemistry of PA-intoxicated rats.

  14. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of orally administered acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone), a highly potent Nrf2 activator with a reversible covalent mode of action

    PubMed Central

    Kostov, Rumen V.; Knatko, Elena V.; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Henderson, Colin J.; Zheng, Suqing; Huang, Jeffrey T.-J.; Honda, Tadashi; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.

    2015-01-01

    The acetylenic tricyclic bis(cyanoenone) TBE-31 is a highly potent cysteine targeting compound with a reversible covalent mode of action; its best-characterized target being Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1), the cellular sensor for oxidants and electrophiles. TBE-31 reacts with cysteines of Keap1, impairing its ability to target nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) for degradation. Consequently, Nrf2 accumulates and orchestrates cytoprotective gene expression. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of TBE-31 in C57BL/6 mice. After a single oral dose of 10 μmol/kg (∼200 nmol/animal), the concentration of TBE-31 in blood exhibited two peaks, at 22.3 nM and at 15.5 nM, 40 min and 4 h after dosing, respectively, as determined by a quantitative stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method. The AUC0–24h was 195.5 h/nmol/l, the terminal elimination half-life was 10.2 h, and the kel was 0.068 h−1. To assess the pharmacodynamics of Nrf2 activation by TBE-31, we determined the enzyme activity of its prototypic target, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and found it elevated by 2.4- and 1.5-fold in liver and heart, respectively. Continuous feeding for 18 days with diet delivering the same daily doses of TBE-31 under conditions of concurrent treatment with the immunosuppressive agent azathioprine had a similar effect on Nrf2 activation without any indications of toxicity. Together with previous reports showing the cytoprotective effects of TBE-31 in animal models of carcinogenesis, our results demonstrate the high potency, efficacy and suitability for chronic administration of cysteine targeting reversible covalent drugs. PMID:26265043

  15. A phase I trial of the selective oral cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor seliciclib (CYC202; R-Roscovitine), administered twice daily for 7 days every 21 days

    PubMed Central

    Benson, C; White, J; Bono, J De; O'Donnell, A; Raynaud, F; Cruickshank, C; McGrath, H; Walton, M; Workman, P; Kaye, S; Cassidy, J; Gianella-Borradori, A; Judson, I; Twelves, C

    2006-01-01

    Seliciclib (CYC202; R-roscovitine) is the first selective, orally bioavailable inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases 1, 2, 7 and 9 to enter clinical trial. Preclinical studies showed antitumour activity in a broad range of human tumour xenografts. A phase I trial was performed with a 7-day b.i.d. p.o. schedule. Twenty-one patients (median age 62 years, range: 39–73 years) were treated with doses of 100, 200 and 800 b.i.d. Dose-limiting toxicities were seen at 800 mg b.i.d.; grade 3 fatigue, grade 3 skin rash, grade 3 hyponatraemia and grade 4 hypokalaemia. Other toxicities included reversible raised creatinine (grade 2), reversible grade 3 abnormal liver function and grade 2 emesis. An 800 mg portion was investigated further in 12 patients, three of whom had MAG3 renograms. One patient with a rapid increase in creatinine on day 3 had a reversible fall in renal perfusion, with full recovery by day 14, and no changes suggestive of renal tubular damage. Further dose escalation was precluded by hypokalaemia. Seliciclib reached peak plasma concentrations between 1 and 4 h and elimination half-life was 2–5 h. Inhibition of retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation was not demonstrated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. No objective tumour responses were noted, but disease stabilisation was recorded in eight patients; this lasted for a total of six courses (18 weeks) in a patient with ovarian cancer. PMID:17179992

  16. Arachidonic acid inhibits glycine transport in cultured glial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zafra, F; Alcantara, R; Gomeza, J; Aragon, C; Gimenez, C

    1990-01-01

    The effects of arachidonic acid on glycine uptake, exchange and efflux in C6 glioma cells were investigated. Arachidonic acid produced a dose-dependent inhibition of high-affinity glycine uptake. This effect was not due to a simple detergent-like action on membranes, as the inhibition of glycine transport was most pronounced with cis-unsaturated long-chain fatty acids, whereas saturated and trans-unsaturated fatty acids had relatively little or no effect. Endogenous unsaturated non-esterified fatty acids may exert a similar inhibitory effect on the transport of glycine. The mechanism for this inhibitory effect has been examined in a plasma membrane vesicle preparation derived from C6 cells, which avoids metabolic or compartmentation interferences. The results suggest that part of the selective inhibition of glycine transport by arachidonic acid could be due to the effects of the arachidonic acid on the lipid domain surrounding the carrier. PMID:2121132

  17. Urinary recovery of orally administered chromium 51-labeled EDTA, lactulose, rhamnose, d-xylose, 3-O-methyl-d-glucose, and sucrose in healthy adult male Beagles.

    PubMed

    Frias, Rafael; Steiner, Jörg M; Williams, David A; Sankari, Satu; Westermarck, Elias

    2012-05-01

    Objective-To provide values for gastrointestinal permeability and absorptive function tests (GIPFTs) with chromium 51 ((51)Cr)-labeled EDTA, lactulose, rhamnose, d-xylose, 3-O-methyl-d-glucose, and sucrose in Beagles and to evaluate potential correlations between markers. Animals-19 healthy adult male Beagles. Procedures-A test solution containing 3.7 MBq of (51)Cr-labeled EDTA, 2 g of lactulose, 2 g of rhamnose, 2 g of d-xylose, 1 g of 3-O-methyl-d-glucose, and 8 g of sucrose was administered intragastrically to each dog. Urinary recovery of each probe was determined 6 hours after administration. Results-Mean ± SD (range) percentage urinary recovery was 6.3 ± 1.6% (4.3% to 9.7%) for (51)Cr-labeled EDTA, 3.3 ± 1.1% (1.7% to 5.3%) for lactulose, 25.5 ± 5.0% (16.7% to 36.9%) for rhamnose, and 58.8% ± 11.0% (40.1% to 87.8%) for 3-O-methyl-d-glucose. Mean (range) recovery ratio was 0.25 ± 0.06 (0.17 to 0.37) for (51)Cr-labeled EDTA to rhamnose, 0.13 ± 0.04 (0.08 to 0.23) for lactulose to rhamnose, and 0.73 ± 0.09 (0.60 to 0.90) for d-xylose to 3-O-methyl-d-glucose. Median (range) percentage urinary recovery was 40.3% (31.6% to 62.7%) for d-xylose and 0% (0% to 0.8%) for sucrose. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Reference values in healthy adult male Beagles for 6 of the most commonly used GIPFT markers were determined. The correlation between results for (51)Cr-labeled EDTA and lactulose was not as prominent as that reported for humans and cats; thus, investigators should be cautious in the use and interpretation of GIPFTs performed with sugar probes in dogs with suspected intestinal dysbiosis.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of a New Orally Disintegrating Tablet Formulation of Aripiprazole 15 mg Administered Without Water in Healthy Middle-aged Korean Subjects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yunjeong; Jeon, Ji-Young; Chung, Young-Chul; Kim, Min-Gul

    2015-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetic properties and relative bioavailability of two 15-mg aripiprazole formulations (an orally disintegrating tablet [ODT] as the test drug and a conventional tablet as the reference drug) in healthy middle-aged Korean subjects. This study was conducted in a population of healthy middle-aged Korean subjects as a randomized, open-label, single-dose, 2-sequence, 2-period crossover trial. After administration of a single dose of a 15-mg aripiprazole standard tablet with 240 mL water or an aripiprazole 15-mg ODT without water, blood samples were collected at specific time intervals from 0 to 240 hours. Concentrations of aripiprazole in plasma were analyzed by using a LC-MS/MS method of detection. Data on the pharmacokinetic parameters were recorded, and the 90% CIs of the ratios of the geometric means of the parameters were determined from the logarithmically transformed data by using an ANOVA model. Thirty-nine healthy middle-aged Korean subjects were enrolled (mean age, 52.7 years; mean height, 167 cm; mean weight, 67.6 kg); 33 participants completed the study (29 male subjects and 4 female subjects). The 90% CIs of the geometric means ratio (test drug/reference drug) of Cmax, AUC0-last, and AUC0-∞ values were 0.95 to 1.14, 0.98 to 1.09, and 0.97 to 1.08, respectively. All of the subjects who experienced adverse events recovered without sequelae, and no serious adverse events were observed. The aripiprazole pharmacokinetics was similar for the ODT and standard tablet of 15-mg aripiprazole in these healthy middle-aged Korean subjects. The aripiprazole ODT formulation is therefore expected to offer a convenient alternative for patients who have difficulty swallowing tablets without water. The study was registered at http://cris.nih.go.kr (registration number: KCT0001677). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Immuno-Regulatory Impact of Orally-Administered Hypericum perforatum Extract on Balb/C Mice Inoculated with H1n1 Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Nan; Singh, Navrozedeep; Yoon, Kyoungjin; Loiacono, Christina M.; Kohut, Marian L.; Birt, Diane F.

    2013-01-01

    Hypericumperforatum (H. perforatum) ethanol extract has been found to inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced production of inflammatory mediators and cytokines in cultured macrophages. Therefore, it may be able to protect the host from excessive inflammation during viral infection. In the current study, the immune-regulatory effect of H. perforatum extract was evaluated in A549 lung epithelial cells and BALB/c mice exposed to Influenza A/PR/8/34 H1N1 virus. In A549 cells, the extract (30 µg/mL) significantly inhibited influenza virus induced monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and interferon-γ induced protein 10 kD (IP-10), but dramatically increased interleukin-6 (IL-6). In mice inoculated intranasally with 107.9 EID50 of Influenza A/PR/8/34 H1N1 (high dose), daily oral treatment of H. perforatum extract at a rate of 110 mg/kg of body weight increased lung viral titer, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels, and the infiltration of pro-inflammatory cells in the lung 5 days post-inoculation, as compared to ethanol vehicle treated mice. Transcription of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) was increased by H. perforatum extract both in A549 cells and BALB/c mice, which could have interrupted anti-viral immune response and thus led to the inefficient viral clearance and increased lung inflammation. H. perforatum treatment resulted in minor reduction in viral titer without affecting body weight when mice were inoculated with a lower dose (~105.0 EID50) and H. perforatum was applied in the later phase of infection. Mice challenged intranasally with high dose of influenza virus (107.9 EID50) suffered from a higher mortality rate when dosed with H. perforatum extract. In conclusion, the current study showed that SOCS3 elevation by H. perforatum may cause impaired immune defense against influenza virus infection and lead to higher mortality. PMID:24098792

  20. The immuno-regulatory impact of orally-administered Hypericum perforatum extract on Balb/C mice inoculated with H1n1 influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Nan; Singh, Navrozedeep; Yoon, Kyoungjin; Loiacono, Christina M; Kohut, Marian L; Birt, Diane F

    2013-01-01

    Hypericumperforatum (H. perforatum) ethanol extract has been found to inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced production of inflammatory mediators and cytokines in cultured macrophages. Therefore, it may be able to protect the host from excessive inflammation during viral infection. In the current study, the immune-regulatory effect of H. perforatum extract was evaluated in A549 lung epithelial cells and BALB/c mice exposed to Influenza A/PR/8/34 H1N1 virus. In A549 cells, the extract (30 µg/mL) significantly inhibited influenza virus induced monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and interferon-γ induced protein 10 kD (IP-10), but dramatically increased interleukin-6 (IL-6). In mice inoculated intranasally with 10(7.9) EID50 of Influenza A/PR/8/34 H1N1 (high dose), daily oral treatment of H. perforatum extract at a rate of 110 mg/kg of body weight increased lung viral titer, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels, and the infiltration of pro-inflammatory cells in the lung 5 days post-inoculation, as compared to ethanol vehicle treated mice. Transcription of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) was increased by H. perforatum extract both in A549 cells and BALB/c mice, which could have interrupted anti-viral immune response and thus led to the inefficient viral clearance and increased lung inflammation. H. perforatum treatment resulted in minor reduction in viral titer without affecting body weight when mice were inoculated with a lower dose (~10(5.0) EID50) and H. perforatum was applied in the later phase of infection. Mice challenged intranasally with high dose of influenza virus (10(7.9) EID50) suffered from a higher mortality rate when dosed with H. perforatum extract. In conclusion, the current study showed that SOCS3 elevation by H. perforatum may cause impaired immune defense against influenza virus infection and lead to higher mortality.

  1. Efficacy of dietary arachidonic acid provided as triglyceride or phospholipid as substrates for brain arachidonic acid accretion in baboon neonates.

    PubMed

    Wijendran, Vasuki; Huang, Meng-Chuan; Diau, Guan-Yeu; Boehm, Günther; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Brenna, J Thomas

    2002-03-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is a long-chain polyunsaturate (LCP) present in human breast milk as both triglyceride (TG) and as phospholipid (PL). There has been little attention to the metabolic consequences of lipid form of AA in infant formulas. Our objective was to investigate the efficacy of dietary TG and PL as carriers of AA for accretion in the brain and associated organs of term baboon neonates consuming a formula with LCP composition typical of human milk. TG and phosphatidylcholine (PC) with [U-(13)C]-AA in the sn-2 position and with unlabeled 16:0 in the remaining positions (TG-AA* or PL-AA*, respectively) were used as tracers to study the tissue AA* incorporation. Baboon neonates received a single oral dose of either TG-AA* (n = 3) or PL-AA* (n = 4) at 18-19 d of life. Tissues were obtained 10 d later (28-29 d of life) and isotopic enrichment was measured. In the brain, 4.5% of the PL-AA* dose and 2.1% of the TG-AA* dose were recovered as brain AA*, respectively, indicating that PL was about 2.1-fold more effective than TG as a substrate for brain AA accretion. Preferential incorporation of PL-derived AA* over TG source of AA* was also observed in the liver, lung, plasma, and erythrocytes. Because of the quantitative predominance of TG-AA in formula, total brain AA accretion, expressed as absolute weight, was 5.0-fold greater from TG-AA than from PL-AA. We estimate that about half of postnatal brain AA accretion is derived from dietary preformed AA in term baboon neonates consuming a formula with lipid composition similar to that of human milk.

  2. Orally administered proteases in aesthetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Dusková, M; Wald, M

    1999-01-01

    Increasing demand for shortening the sequel period after aesthetic surgery has led to comparative testing of optional approaches. Systemic enzyme therapy with its pharmacological effects represents a preventive and curative option for inflammatory process including healing. Excellent results were presented, namely, in the treatment of secondary lymphoedema. The incidence of hematoma, edema, and pain was followed, and the results were compared in a randomized group of 20 patients with upper eyelid blepharoplasty treated with proteases (Wobenzym drg) and in a similar group treated with systemic antiedema and hemostyptic therapy (Dicynone drg and Reparil drg). No undesirable side effects were observed. In addition, proteases apparently have no limitation for patients with the risk of concurrent cardiovascular, hepatic, or renal diseases.

  3. Inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase decreases arachidonic acid mediated inflammation in liver ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Mutay; Özcan, Filiz; Tuzcu, Hazal; Kıraç, Ebru; Elpek, Gulsum O

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the role of selective neutral sphingomyelinase (N-SMase) inhibition on arachidonic acid (AA) mediated inflammation following liver ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Selective N-SMase inhibitor was administered via intraperitoneal injections. Liver IR injury was created by clamping blood vessels supplying the median and left lateral hepatic lobes for 60 min, followed by 60 min reperfusion. Levels of AA in liver tissue were determined by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) using ultra fast-liquid chromatography (UFLC) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenase (COX) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were measured in liver tissue. Arachidonic acid levels, activity of PLA2, COX and PGE2 levels were significantly increased in postischemic liver tissue compared to nonischemic controls. N-SMase inhibition significantly decreased COX activity and PGE2 levels in postischemic liver. Future studies evaluating agents blocking N-SMase activity can facilitate the development of treatment strategies to alleviate inflammation in liver I/R injury. PMID:25550821

  4. Decreased plasma arachidonic acid binding capacity in neonates.

    PubMed

    Sadowitz, P D; Walenga, R W; Clark, D; Stuart, M J

    1987-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites have been implicated in neonatal pathologic states such as respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Since free (nonprotein bound) AA is the substrate for synthesis of these compounds, a decreased capacity to bind AA in neonatal plasma could contribute to these disorders. AA binding was assayed by equilibrium dialysis in plasma samples from healthy adults and various infant groups. Plasma from these infant groups bound significantly less AA than adult plasma. Premature infants with RDS and premature infants receiving intralipid had the lowest capacity to bind AA. The increased availability of free AA may be important in neonatal pathophysiologic states involving arachidonate metabolites.

  5. Explication of Definitional Description and Empirical Use of Fraction of Orally Administered Drugs Absorbed From the Intestine (Fa) and Intestinal Availability (Fg): Effect of P-glycoprotein and CYP3A on Fa and Fg.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuta; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Maeda, Kazuya; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    Conventionally, it is believed that the fraction of orally administered drugs absorbed from the intestine (Fa) and intestinal availability (Fg) are independently determined by the apical membrane permeation and intestinal metabolism, respectively. However, the validity of this belief has not been well discussed, and Fa and Fg are often used without careful definition. In this review, Fa and Fg are mathematically described based on their definitions under the linear kinetics of metabolism and transport. Even considering with different models, intestinal metabolic enzymes such as cytochrome P450 3A affected both Fa and Fg, whereas apical efflux transporters including P-glycoprotein had no influence on Fg at least under the linear condition. To determine whether Fa and Fg calculated using different clinical methods are identical, empirical Fa and Fg were mathematically described based on "feces method" and "grapefruit juice method" and compared with their definitions. Fa and Fg obtained by the feces method corresponded with their definitions whereas the grapefruit juice method provided smaller Fa and larger Fg particularly for dual substrates of P-glycoprotein and cytochrome P450 3A with low membrane permeability. Our analyses suggest that the definitions and calculation methods of Fa and Fg should be considered when we intend to separately determine these values.

  6. Immunogenicity, reactogenicity and safety of the human rotavirus vaccine RIX4414 (Rotarix™) oral suspension (liquid formulation) when co-administered with expanded program on immunization (EPI) vaccines in Vietnam and the Philippines in 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Anh, D D; Carlos, C C; Thiem, D V; Hutagalung, Y; Gatchalian, S; Bock, H L; Smolenov, I; Suryakiran, P V; Han, H H

    2011-03-03

    Evaluation of immunogenicity and safety of a 2-dose liquid formulation of human rotavirus vaccine, RIX4414 following WHO's Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) schedule (0, 1, and 2 months; Month 0 indicates day of enrollment) in Vietnam and the Philippines. Infants aged 6-10 (mean=8.7 ± 1.07 weeks Vietnam) and 5-10 weeks (mean=6.6 ± 1.03 weeks Philippines) received two doses of RIX4414 vaccine (V) and one dose of placebo (PL) or three placebo doses concomitantly with commercially available diphtheria-tetanus-whole-cell pertussis, hepatitis B and oral poliovirus vaccines. The vaccination schedules were: V-V-PL, V-PL-V and PL-PL-PL (Vietnam); PL-V-V, V-PL-V and PL-PL-PL (Philippines). Anti-rotavirus seroconversion rate was assessed pre-vaccination and post-vaccination (ELISA cut-off=20 U/ml). 375 infants were enrolled in each country. Seroconversion rates at one month post-Dose 2 of RIX4414 were Vietnam 63.3% (95% CI: 54.3-71.6) in V-V-PL group and 81.5% (95% CI: 73.4-88) in V-PL-V group; Philippines 70% (95% CI: 61-78) in PL-V-V group and 59.2% (95% CI: 49.8-68) in V-PL-V group. Frequencies of solicited (8-day post-each dose) and unsolicited symptoms (31-day post-each dose) were similar. Two-doses of rotavirus vaccine administered within the WHO EPI offer flexibility in existing schedule, though both schedules provides good immune responses.

  7. Administering Eye Medications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Sara; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on administering eye medications is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. A brief discussion follows of…

  8. Administering Eye Medications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Sara; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on administering eye medications is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. A brief discussion follows of…

  9. Antimitogenic effect of Larrea divaricata Cav.: participation in arachidonate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Anesini, C; Genaro, A; Cremaschi, G; Sterin Borda, L; Borda, E

    1999-02-01

    Aqueous extracts of the leaves of Larrea divaricata Cav. exert antimitogenic effects on tumor cells (BW 5147 murine immature T-lymphoma) and normal, stimulated lymphocytes. The effective concentration was four times smaller in the case of tumor cells than in the case of normal, stimulated lymphocytes. Inhibitor studies of arachidonate pathway suggest that the proliferative effect of the extract is due to the activation of lipoxygenase metabolism, while the inhibitory action could be a direct effect.

  10. Arachidonic acid assimilation by thrombocytes from white carneau pigeons

    SciTech Connect

    Saxon, D.J.; Blankenship, T.

    1986-03-01

    The metabolism of arachidonic acid was investigated using thrombocyte-enriched-plasma from RBWC and WC-II white carneau pigeons, which differ genetically in their susceptibility to atherosclerosis. Thrombocytes were incubated at 42 C with (/sup 14/C) arachidonate in Puck's solution. After a 1 hour labeling period the WC-II cells had taken up 69% and RBWC 77% of the (/sup 14/C)arachidonate from the medium. When 8,11,14-eicosatrienoic acid or 5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid were added to incubation media the (/sup 14/C) uptake was reduced in each type cell, with WC-II exhibiting the greatest effect. Release of (/sup 14/C)molecules from cells labeled with (/sup 14/)Carachidonate was studied using calcium ionophore and indomethacin. Indomethacin inhibited (/sup 14/C) molecule release similarly in both RBWC and WC-II cells. Calcium ionophore was twice as effective in stimulating (/sup 14/C)molecule release from WC-II than RBWC cells. Therefore, the WE-II cells (from pigeons greater in susceptibility to atherosclerosis) are more sensitive to calcium ionophore than the REWC cells.

  11. Speed of kill efficacy and efficacy of flavored spinosad tablets administered orally to cats in a simulated home environment for the treatment and prevention of cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis) infestations.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Daniel E; Meyer, Katherine A; Wiseman, Scott; Trout, Candace M; Young, David R

    2013-09-23

    point post-treatment. No adverse events that were attributable to the treatments were observed in either study. These studies demonstrated that spinosad administered orally to cats is safe and effective, providing >90% efficacy from 2h post-dosing and 100% knockdown at 24h, and preventing infestations over a 95 day study period from a flea-contaminated simulated home environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Significant utilization of dietary arachidonic acid is for brain adrenic acid in baboon neonates.

    PubMed

    Wijendran, Vasuki; Lawrence, Peter; Diau, Guan-Yeu; Boehm, G; Nathanielsz, P W; Brenna, J T

    2002-05-01

    Dietary arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) utilization in-vivo for carbon recycling into de-novo lipogenesis and conversion to n-6 long chain polyunsaturates was investigated in baboon neonates using [U-(13)C]20:4n-6. Neonates consuming a formula typical of human milk received a single oral dose of [(13)C]arachidonic acid in sn-2 position of either triglyceride or phosphatidylcholine at 18-19 days of postnatal life. Neonate brain, retina, liver, and plasma were obtained 10 days later (28-29 days of life). Low isotopic enrichment (0.27-1.0%Total label) was detected in dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (20:3n-6) in all tissues, but label incorporation into saturates or monounsaturates was not detected. In neonate brain and retina, 16% and 11% of total label was recovered in 22:4n-6, respectively. The relative contribution of dietary fatty acids to postnatal brain 22:4n-6 accretion can be estimated for dietary 20:4n-6 and preformed 22:4n-6 as 17% and 8%, respectively, corresponding to efficiencies of 0.48% and 0.54% of dietary levels, respectively. These results demonstrate in term baboon neonates that in vivo 1) 20:4n-6 was retroconverted to 20:3n-6, 2) 20:4n-6 did not contribute significantly to de novo lipogenesis of saturates and monounsaturates, and 3) the preformed 20:4n-6 contribution to brain 22:4n-6 accumulation was quantitatively a significant metabolic fate for dietary 20:4n-6.

  13. The effect of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNB) on colonocyte arachidonic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Stratton, M D; Sexe, R; Peterson, B; Kaminski, D L; Li, A P; Longo, W E

    1996-02-01

    In previous studies we found that luminal perfusion of the isolated left colon of the rabbit with the hapten, trinitrobenzene, resulted in the production of an acute inflammatory process associated with alterations in eicosanoid metabolism. As the colitis was attenuated by cyclooxygenase inhibitors it is possible that the inflammation was mediated by arachidonic acid metabolites. In the present study it was intended to evaluate the effect of trinitrobenzene on eicosanoid metabolism in transformed human colonic cells by exposing Caco-2++ cells to various doses of trinitrobenzene. Cell injury was evaluated by measuring lactate dehydrogenase levels and cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase activity was evaluated by measuring prostanoid and leukotriene production. In separate experiments resting and trinitrobenzene stimulated cells were treated with indomethacin and dexamethasone. Trinitrobenzene produced increased prostaglandin E2 and 6-keto prostaglandin F1alpha++ and increased lactate dehydrogenase levels. Leukotriene B4 was significantly increased compared to control values at the highest TNB concentration administered. Indomethacin inhibited the lactate dehydrogenase and prostanoid changes, suggesting that the inflammatory changes produced were mediated by the prostanoids. Dexamethasone administered for 1 hr prior to trinitrobenzene decreased the 6-keto prostaglandin F1alpha but did not alter trinitrobenzene produced changes in lactate dehydrogenase concentrations. Exposure of Caco-2 cells to dexamethasone for 24 hr decreased the trinitrobenzene produced lactate dehydrogenase and eicosanoid changes. The results suggest that trinitrobenzene produces an acute injury to Caco-2 cells that may be mediated by the cyclooxygenase enzymes.

  14. Modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism by Rous sarcoma virus

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, K.; Aderem, A.; Hanafusa, H. )

    1989-07-01

    Arachidonic acid (C{sub 20:4}) metabolites were released constitutively from wild-type Rous sarcoma virus-transformed chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF). {sup 3}H-labeled C{sub 20:4} and its metabolites were released from unstimulated and uninfected CEF only in response to stimuli such as serum, phorbol ester, or the calcium ionophore A23187. High-pressure liquid chromatography analysis showed that the radioactivity released from ({sup 3}H)arachidonate-labeled transformed cells was contained in free arachidonate and in the cyclooxygenase products prostaglandin E{sub 2} and prostaglandin F{sub 2} alpha; no lipoxygenase products were identified. The release of C{sub 20:4} and its metabolites from CEF infected with pp60{sup src} deletion mutants was correlated with serum-independent DNA synthesis and with the expression of the mRNA for 9E3, a gene expressed in Rous sarcoma virus-transformed cells which has homology with several mitogenic and inflammatory peptides. {sup 3}H-labeled C{sub 20:4} release was not correlated with p36 phosphorylation, which argues against a role for this protein as a phospholipase A{sub 2} inhibitor. CEF infected with other oncogenic viruses encoding a tyrosine kinase also released C{sub 20:4}, as did CEF infected with viruses that contained mos and ras; however, infection with a crk-containing virus did not result in stimulation of {sup 3}H-labeled C{sub 20:4} release, suggesting that utilization of this signaling pathway is specific for particular transformation stimuli.

  15. Arachidonic acid enhances reproduction in Daphnia magna and mitigates changes in sex ratios induced by pyriproxyfen.

    PubMed

    Ginjupalli, Gautam K; Gerard, Patrick D; Baldwin, William S

    2015-03-01

    Arachidonic acid is 1 of only 2 unsaturated fatty acids retained in the ovaries of crustaceans and an inhibitor of HR97g, a nuclear receptor expressed in adult ovaries. The authors hypothesized that, as a key fatty acid, arachidonic acid may be associated with reproduction and potentially environmental sex determination in Daphnia. Reproduction assays with arachidonic acid indicate that it alters female:male sex ratios by increasing female production. This reproductive effect only occurred during a restricted Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata diet. Next, the authors tested whether enriching a poorer algal diet (Chlorella vulgaris) with arachidonic acid enhances overall reproduction and sex ratios. Arachidonic acid enrichment of a C. vulgaris diet also enhances fecundity at 1.0 µM and 4.0 µM by 30% to 40% in the presence and absence of pyriproxyfen. This indicates that arachidonic acid is crucial in reproduction regardless of environmental sex determination. Furthermore, the data indicate that P. subcapitata may provide a threshold concentration of arachidonic acid needed for reproduction. Diet-switch experiments from P. subcapitata to C. vulgaris mitigate some, but not all, of arachidonic acid's effects when compared with a C. vulgaris-only diet, suggesting that some arachidonic acid provided by P. subcapitata is retained. In summary, arachidonic acid supplementation increases reproduction and represses pyriproxyfen-induced environmental sex determination in D. magna in restricted diets. A diet rich in arachidonic acid may provide protection from some reproductive toxicants such as the juvenile hormone agonist pyriproxyfen. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:527-535. © 2014 SETAC.

  16. Altered arachidonic acid metabolism and platelet size in atopic subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Audera, C.; Rocklin, R.; Vaillancourt, R.; Jakubowski, J.A.; Deykin, D.

    1988-03-01

    The release and metabolism of endogenous arachidonic acid (AA) in physiologically activated platelets obtained from 11 atopic patients with allergic rhinitis and/or asthma was compared to that of sex- and age-matched nonatopic controls. Prelabeled (/sup 3/H)AA platelets were stimulated with thrombin or collagen and the amount of free (/sup 3/H)AA and radiolabeled metabolites released were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The results obtained indicate that although the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)AA into platelet phospholipids and total release of /sup 3/H-radioactivity upon stimulation were comparable in the two groups, the percentage of /sup 3/H-radioactivity released from platelets as free AA was significantly lower (P less than 0.01) in the atopic group. The reduction in free (/sup 3/H)AA was accompanied by an increase (P less than 0.01) in the percentage of /sup 3/H-radioactivity released as cyclooxygenase products in atopic platelets (compared to nonatopic cells) after stimulation with 10 and 25 micrograms/ml collagen. The amount of platelet lipoxygenase product released was comparable between the two groups. Although the blood platelet counts were similar, the mean platelet volume was statistically higher (P less than 0.01) in the atopic group. These results indicate that arachidonic acid metabolism in atopic platelets is altered, the pathophysiological significance of which remains to be clarified.

  17. Modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism by bovine alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study were to identify the arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites produced by cultured bovine alveolar macrophages (AM), to investigate the effects of various stimuli on the production of those metabolites, and to study the effect of interferons and lipopolysaccharide on AA metabolism by AM. Initial studies were conducted to ascertain which AA metabolites are produced by bovine alveolar macrophages. Cultured macrophages were labeled with tritiated arachidonic acid and stimulated with calcium ionophore A23187. The radiolabeled AA metabolites released were identified using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The production of LTB{sub 4}, TXB{sub 2}, and PGF{sub 2{alpha}} by AM stimulated with A23187 or opsonized zymosan (OPZ) was measured using radioimmunoassay. Finally, the effects of recombinant bovine interferon alpha{sub 1}-1 (IFN-{alpha}{sub 1}-1), recombinant bovine interferon gamma (IFN-{gamma}), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from Escherichia coli 0111:B4 on the AA metabolism of bovine AM were investigated. These studies indicate that appropriately stimulated bovine AM are the source of a number of AA metabolites. Furthermore, the production of these metabolites may be dramatically altered by exposure of the AM to IFNs or LPS. Such exposure could occur in vivo during gram negative bacterial pneumonias following viral infections. Because AA metabolites are intimately involved in the inflammatory process, it is possible that AM may contribute to the development of pulmonary inflammation in certain situations.

  18. Cannabinoids influence lipid-arachidonic acid pathways in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Smesny, Stefan; Rosburg, Timm; Baur, Kati; Rudolph, Nicole; Sauer, Heinrich

    2007-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests modulating effects of cannabinoids on time of onset, severity, and outcome of schizophrenia. Efforts to discover the underlying pathomechanism have led to the assumption of gene x environment interactions, including premorbid genetical vulnerability and worsening effects of continuing cannabis use. The objective of this cross-sectional study is to investigate the relationship between delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol intake and niacin sensitivity in schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. Intensity of niacin skin flushing, indicating disturbed prostaglandin-mediated processes, was used as peripheral marker of lipid-arachidonic acid pathways and investigated in cannabis-consuming and nonconsuming schizophrenia patients and in healthy controls. Methylnicotinate was applied in three concentrations onto the forearm skin. Flush response was assessed in 3-min intervals over 15 min using optical reflection spectroscopy. In controls, skin flushing was significantly decreased in cannabis-consuming as compared to nonconsuming individuals. When comparing the nonconsuming subgroups, patients showed significantly decreased flush response. The populations as a whole (patients and controls) showed an inverse association between skin flushing and sum scores of Symptom Check List 90-R. Results demonstrate an impact of long-term cannabis use on lipid-arachidonic acid pathways. Considering pre-existing vulnerability of lipid metabolism in schizophrenia, observed effects of cannabis use support the notion of a gene x environment interaction.

  19. Efficacy and safety of oral palonosetron compared with IV palonosetron administered with dexamethasone for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in patients with solid tumors receiving cisplatin-based highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC).

    PubMed

    Karthaus, Meinolf; Tibor, Csőszi; Lorusso, Vito; Singh-Arora, Rajender; Filippov, Alexander; Rizzi, Giada; Borroni, Maria Elisa; Rossi, Giorgia; Grunberg, Steven M

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to compare the efficacy and safety of oral palonosetron with intravenous (IV) palonosetron for the prevention of cisplatin-related chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). A multinational, randomized, double-blind study enrolling adult chemotherapy-naive patients with malignant solid tumors scheduled to receive cisplatin-based highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC). Patients received oral palonosetron (0.50 mg) or IV palonosetron (0.25 mg), each with oral dexamethasone. The primary objective was to demonstrate non-inferiority in terms of patients with a complete response (CR, no emesis/no rescue medication) within the acute phase (0-24 h after chemotherapy administration). Of the 743 patients randomized, 739 received study medications and 738 were included in the full analysis set. The CR rate in the acute phase was high for both groups (oral 89.4 %; IV 86.2 %). As this difference in proportions (stratum-adjusted Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel method) was 3.21 % (99 % confidence interval (CI) -2.74 to 9.17 %), non-inferiority was demonstrated (since the lower limit of the 99 % CI was closer to zero than the predefined margin of 15 %). Treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) related to the study drug were rare (oral 3.2 %; IV 6.5 %). No TEAEs related to study drug leading to discontinuation were reported. Non-inferiority of oral versus IV palonosetron was demonstrated. The CR rate in the acute phase was >86 % in both patient groups. The safety profiles were comparable.

  20. Arachidonic Acid Enhances Turnover of the Dermal Skeleton: Studies on Zebrafish Scales

    PubMed Central

    de Vrieze, Erik; Moren, Mari; Metz, Juriaan R.; Flik, Gert; Lie, Kai Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    In fish nutrition, the ratio between omega-3 and omega-6 poly-unsaturated fatty acids influences skeletal development. Supplementation of fish oils with vegetable oils increases the content of omega-6 fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid in the diet. Arachidonic acid is metabolized by cyclooxygenases to prostaglandin E2, an eicosanoid with effects on bone formation and remodeling. To elucidate effects of poly-unsaturated fatty acids on developing and existing skeletal tissues, zebrafish (Danio rerio) were fed (micro-) diets low and high in arachidonic acid content. Elasmoid scales, dermal skeletal plates, are ideal to study skeletal metabolism in zebrafish and were exploited in the present study. The fatty acid profile resulting from a high arachidonic acid diet induced mild but significant increase in matrix resorption in ontogenetic scales of adult zebrafish. Arachidonic acid affected scale regeneration (following removal of ontogenetic scales): mineral deposition was altered and both gene expression and enzymatic matrix metalloproteinase activity changed towards enhanced osteoclastic activity. Arachidonic acid also clearly stimulates matrix metalloproteinase activity in vitro, which implies that resorptive effects of arachidonic acid are mediated by matrix metalloproteinases. The gene expression profile further suggests that arachidonic acid increases maturation rate of the regenerating scale; in other words, enhances turnover. The zebrafish scale is an excellent model to study how and which fatty acids affect skeletal formation. PMID:24586706

  1. Arachidonic acid enhances turnover of the dermal skeleton: studies on zebrafish scales.

    PubMed

    de Vrieze, Erik; Moren, Mari; Metz, Juriaan R; Flik, Gert; Lie, Kai Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    In fish nutrition, the ratio between omega-3 and omega-6 poly-unsaturated fatty acids influences skeletal development. Supplementation of fish oils with vegetable oils increases the content of omega-6 fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid in the diet. Arachidonic acid is metabolized by cyclooxygenases to prostaglandin E2, an eicosanoid with effects on bone formation and remodeling. To elucidate effects of poly-unsaturated fatty acids on developing and existing skeletal tissues, zebrafish (Danio rerio) were fed (micro-) diets low and high in arachidonic acid content. Elasmoid scales, dermal skeletal plates, are ideal to study skeletal metabolism in zebrafish and were exploited in the present study. The fatty acid profile resulting from a high arachidonic acid diet induced mild but significant increase in matrix resorption in ontogenetic scales of adult zebrafish. Arachidonic acid affected scale regeneration (following removal of ontogenetic scales): mineral deposition was altered and both gene expression and enzymatic matrix metalloproteinase activity changed towards enhanced osteoclastic activity. Arachidonic acid also clearly stimulates matrix metalloproteinase activity in vitro, which implies that resorptive effects of arachidonic acid are mediated by matrix metalloproteinases. The gene expression profile further suggests that arachidonic acid increases maturation rate of the regenerating scale; in other words, enhances turnover. The zebrafish scale is an excellent model to study how and which fatty acids affect skeletal formation.

  2. Source of the arachidonic acid released on stimulation of rat basophilic leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Gil, M.; Siraganian, R.P.

    1986-05-15

    Triggering of rat basophilic leukemia cells for histamine secretion is accompanied by arachidonic acid release. The source of this arachidonic acid released after IgE or calcium ionophore A23187 stimulation was studied. The 48-hr culture of the cells with (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid resulted in labeling of the phospholipids to constant specific activity. After IgE stimulation, 8.8% of the cellular (/sup 14/C)arachidonate was released; this was predominantly from phosphatidylinositol (PI)/phosphatidylserine (PS) (66.3%), less from phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) (25.9%), and minimally from phosphatidylcholine (PC). In contrast, after ionophore stimulation the cells released 16.4% of cellular (/sup 14/C)arachidonate, most of this was from PE (55.4%) followed by about equal amounts from PS/PI and PC (24% and 20%, respectively). Therefore, the source of the released arachidonic acid depends on the stimulus. In contrast, the results are different when the cells are cultured for only 2 hr with (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid. The label in phospholipids was in PC (44%), PE (38%), and PI/PS (20%); the stimulation of the cells with IgE or ionophore resulted in the release of the (/sup 14/C)arachidonate from PC (81% and 96%, respectively). This suggests the presence of several pools of phospholipids that are labeled at different rates and have variable proximity and/or accessibility to the phospholipase(s) enzyme(s) activated during cell secretion.

  3. Assessment of skin absorption and irritation potential of arachidonic acid and glyceryl arachidonate using in vitro diffusion cell techniques.

    PubMed

    Eppler, A R; Kraeling, M E K; Wickett, R R; Bronaugh, R L

    2007-11-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA), a precursor of pro-inflammatory mediators, and its glycerin ester, glyceryl arachidonate (GA), are reportedly used in cosmetic products. In vitro skin penetration of AA and GA and GA's ester hydrolysis was determined in flow-through diffusion cells. AA penetration with human and rat skin was 19.5% and 52.3% of the applied dose respectively, a substantial amount of which remained in the skin at 24h. Similar penetration results were obtained with GA in human skin. However, GA penetration through cultured skin (EpiDerm) was 51% of the applied dose, almost all of which appeared in the receptor fluid. At least 27.8% of GA penetrating skin was hydrolyzed to AA. In vitro methods were used to assess skin irritation in diffusion cells. Skin irritation of AA, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), and Tween 80 was determined by changes in transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin viability (3-(4,5-dimethylthiaxol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, MTT, formation), and cytokine release (IL-1alpha). SLS irritation was much less pronounced in an emulsion versus an aqueous vehicle. No significant irritation was observed in vitro from AA in an emulsion. This work predicts that AA would penetrate human skin in vivo and that it could be formed in skin from topically applied GA.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of guaifenesin, pseudoephedrine and hydrocodone in a combination oral liquid formulation, administered as single and multiple doses in healthy Chinese volunteers, and comparison with data for individual compounds formulated as Antuss®.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shuhua; Huang, Wencan; Ni, Xiaojia; Zhang, Ming; Lu, Haoyang; Wang, Zhanzhang; Hu, Jinqing; Zhu, Xiuqing; Qiu, Chang; Shang, Dewei; Zhang, Yuefeng; Xiong, Linghui; Wen, Yuguan

    2017-10-01

    1. A new oral liquid formulation combining guaifenesin, pseudoephedrine and hydrocodone is effective in improving the symptoms of common cold. The pharmacokinetic properties of the individual components were evaluated in a randomized, open-label, four-period study in 12 healthy Chinese volunteers following single and multiple doses. The data were compared with data for the individual ingredients in Antuss®. 2. In the single-dose period, exposure levels (AUC and Cmax) for guaifenesin, pseudoephedrine and hydrocodone increased directly as the dose of the oral liquid formulation increased from 5 to 15 mL. Only minor amounts of guaifenesin and hydrocodone were excreted in urine (∼0.10% and 4.66%, respectively). Pseudoephedrine was mainly excreted unchanged, with 44.95% of the dose excreted in urine within 24 h. After multiple dosing, there was no obvious accumulation of any drug, as assessed by AUC. When considering Cmax, there was a trend toward accumulation of hydrocodone and pseudoephedrine. The pharmacokinetic profiles of guaifenesin and pseudoephedrine in the oral liquid formulation were similar to those in the branded preparation, Antuss®. 3. The newly developed oral liquid formulation combining guaifenesin, pseudoephedrine and hydrocodone was safe and well tolerated and might provide a reliable alternative to the branded formulation for patients with common colds.

  5. Further evidence for a role of arachidonic acid in glucocorticoid teratogenic action in the palate.

    PubMed

    Piddington, R; Herold, R; Goldman, A S

    1983-12-01

    Arachidonic acid produces a significant reversal of the production of cleft palate by cortisone in the offspring of sensitive strains of mice in vivo. Arachidonic acid in nanogram per milliliter concentrations also produces a significant reversal of the cortisol inhibition of the programmed cell death of the medial edge epithelium of palatal shelves in vitro. This corrective action of arachidonic acid in vitro is significantly blocked by indomethacin at a nanogram per milliliter concentration which selectively inhibits the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins and/or thromboxanes at the level of cyclooxygenase. These results support the hypothesis that the inhibition of arachidonic acid release and subsequent prostaglandin and/or thromboxane production by glucocorticoids is involved in the teratogenic action of glucocorticoids and demonstrate that one site of this action is the inhibition of epithelial loss.

  6. Unraveling the Genetic Basis of Aspirin Hypersensitivity in Asthma Beyond Arachidonate Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se-Min; Park, Jong Sook; Park, Hae-Sim

    2013-01-01

    Although aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) has attracted a great deal of attention because of its association with severe asthma, it remains widely under-diagnosed in the asthmatic population. Oral aspirin challenge is the best method of diagnosing AERD, but this is a time-consuming procedure with serious complications in some cases. Thus, development of non-invasive methods for easy diagnosis is necessary to prevent unexpected complications of aspirin use in susceptible patients. For the past decade, many studies have attempted to elucidate the genetic variants responsible for risk of AERD. Several approaches have been applied in these genetic studies. To date, a limited number of biologically plausible candidate genes in the arachidonate and immune and inflammatory pathways have been studied. Recently, a genome-wide association study was performed. In this review, the results of these studies are summarized, and their limitations discussed. In addition to the genetic variants, changes in methylation patterns on CpG sites have recently been identified in a target tissue of aspirin hypersensitivity. Finally, perspectives on application of new genomic technologies are introduced; these will aid our understanding of the genetic pathogenesis of aspirin hypersensitivity in asthma. PMID:24003382

  7. Safety evaluation of arachidonic acid rich Mortierella alpina biomass in albino rats--a subchronic study.

    PubMed

    Nisha, A; Muthukumar, S P; Venkateswaran, G

    2009-04-01

    Safety evaluation of arachidonic acid rich Mortierella alpina biomass was carried out in Wistar rats by acute and subchronic oral toxicity studies. A preliminary acute toxicity study revealed that the biomass was safe at acute doses and that the LD50 exceeded 5000mg/kg BW, the highest dose used in the study. In subchronic study, rats were fed diet containing 0, 2500, 5000, 10,000, 20,000 and 30,000mg/kg, M. alpina biomass for a period of 13 weeks. Results indicated that biomass fortification had a positive influence on growth with no overt toxic effects on the survival, food consumption and body weight gain throughout the treatment interlude. The statistically significant changes in relative organ weights, serum biochemical and hematological indices in M. alpina fed groups' viz., higher relative weights of spleen, liver, brain and ovary in females, reduced hemoglobin concentration in males, elevated WBC counts at highest dose, reduction in serum triglycerides and increased alkaline phosphatase activity were not concomitant with pertinent histopathological changes and hence toxicologically inconsequential. No microscopic or macroscopic lesions attributable to the treatment were manifested in the experimental groups. The results of the present study strongly advocate the safety of M. alpina biomass in rats at levels used in the study.

  8. Human monocyte differentiation stage affects response to arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Alvarez, Elizabeth; Pelaez, Carlos A; García, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    AA-induced cell death mechanisms acting on human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), U937 promonocytes and PMA-differentiated U937 cells were studied. Arachidonic acid induced apoptosis and necrosis in monocytes and U937 cells but only apoptosis in MDM and U937D cells. AA increased both types of death in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cells and increased the percentage of TNFalpha+ cells and reduced IL-10+ cells. Experiments blocking these cytokines indicated that AA-mediated death was TNFalpha- and IL-10-independent. The differences in AA-mediated cell death could be explained by high ROS, calpain and sPLA-2 production and activity in monocytes. Blocking sPLA-2 in monocytes and treatment with antioxidants favored M. tuberculosis control whereas AA enhanced M. tuberculosis growth in MDM. Such evidence suggested that AA-modulated effector mechanisms depend on mononuclear phagocytes' differentiation stage.

  9. DNA damage and mutations induced by arachidonic acid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Punnajit; Sadre-Bazzaz, Kianoush; Shurter, Jesse; Sarasin, Alain; Termini, John

    2003-12-30

    Endogenous cellular oxidation of omega6-polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) has long been recognized as a contributing factor in the development of various cancers. The accrual of DNA damage as a result of reaction with free radical and electrophilic aldehyde products of lipid peroxidation is believed to be involved; however, the genotoxic and mutation-inducing potential of specific membrane PUFAs remains poorly defined. In the present study we have examined the ability of peroxidizing arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4omega6) to induce DNA strand breaks, base modifications, and mutations. The time-dependent induction of single-strand breaks and oxidative base modifications by AA in genomic DNA was quantified using denaturing glyoxal gel electrophoresis. Mutation spectra were determined in XP-G fibroblasts and a repair-proficient line corrected for this defect by c-DNA complementation (XP-G(+)). Mutation frequencies were elevated from approximately 5- to 30-fold over the background following reaction of DNA with AA for various times. The XPG gene product was found to be involved in the suppression of mutations after extended reaction of DNA with AA. Arachidonic acid-induced base substitutions were consistent with the presence of both oxidized and aldehyde base adducts in DNA. The frequency of multiple-base substitutions induced by AA was significantly reduced upon correction for the XPG defect (14% vs 2%, P = 0.0015). Evidence is also presented which suggests that the induced frequency of multiple mutations is lesion dependent. These results are compared to published data for mutations stimulated by alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes identified as products of lipid peroxidation.

  10. Determination of the Pharmacokinetics and Oral Bioavailability of Salicylamine, a Potent γ-Ketoaldehyde Scavenger, by LC/MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Zagol-Ikapitte, Irene; Matafonova, Elena; Amarnath, Venkataraman; Bodine, Christopher L.; Boutaud, Olivier; Tirona, Rommel G.; Oates, John A.; Roberts, L. Jackson; Davies, Sean S.

    2010-01-01

    Levels of reactive γ-ketoaldehydes derived from arachidonate increase in diseases associated with inflammation and oxidative injury. To assess the biological importance of these γ-ketoaldehydes, we previously identified salicylamine as an effective γ-ketoaldehyde scavenger in vitro and in cells. To determine if salicylamine could be administered in vivo, we developed an LC/MS/MS assay to measure salicylamine in plasma and tissues. In mice, half-life (t1/2) was 62 minutes. Drinking water supplementation (1-10 g/L) generated tissue concentrations (10-500 μM) within the range previously shown to inhibit γ-ketoaldehydes in cells. Therefore, oral administration of salicylamine can be used to assess the contribution of γ-ketoaldehydes in animal models of disease. PMID:21822464

  11. Arachidonic acid release from PC12 pheochromocytoma cells is regulated by I1-imidazoline receptors.

    PubMed

    Ernsberger, P

    1998-10-15

    Rat PC 12 pheochromocytoma cells lack alpha2-adrenergic receptors but express plasma membrane I1-imidazoline receptors. In response to the I1-agonist moxonidine, diglycerides are generated via phosphatidylcholine-selective phospholipase C, and prostaglandin E2 is released. This report characterizes I-receptor-mediated release of arachidonic acid, the precursor to the prostaglandins. PC12 cells were incubated with [3H]arachidonic acid for 24 h and superfused with 0.01% bovine serum albumin in Krebs' physiological buffer at 1 ml/min. Calcium ionophore increased arachidonic acid release only marginally, implying that in PC12 cells arachidonic acid release is not driven by calcium. The I1-agonist moxonidine at concentrations between 10 nM and 1.0 microM rapidly elicited up to two-fold increases in [3H]arachidonic acid release. Guanabenz, a potent alpha2-agonist and I2-ligand, had no effect. The selective I1-antagonist efaroxan blocked the action of moxonidine. The phospholipase A2 inhibitor aristolochic acid had no effect, suggesting that arachidonic acid release may be through an indirect pathway, possibly involving diglycerides. Thus, I1-imidazoline receptors in PC12 cells are coupled to arachidonic acid release through an as yet unknown pathway.

  12. The influence of mono- and divalent cations on the cardiac metabolism of arachidonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Weis, M.T.; Malik, K.U. )

    1989-06-01

    Our previous study indicated that, in the isolated rabbit heart, perfusion with Ca2+ free Krebs Henseleit buffer (KHB) results in increased conversion of exogenous arachidonic acid to PGE2 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, probably as the result of increased availability of substrate to cyclooxygenase. Since perfusion with Ca2+ free buffer is known to cause alterations in the cardiac content of various mono- and divalent cations, the present study was performed to determine: (a) The relationship between the conversion of exogenous arachidonic acid to prostaglandins and cardiac content of Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+; and (b) Whether enhanced arachidonic acid conversion to prostaglandins during Ca2+ free perfusion is due to reduced incorporation of this fatty acid into tissue lipids. Perfusion of the rabbit heart with Ca2+ free buffer produced a significant reduction in the tissue content of Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+. However, the production of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha from exogenous arachidonic acid was linearly correlated with tissue Mg2+. These observations, together with our finding that perfusion with Ca2+ free KHB reduced the incorporation of (3H) arachidonic acid into tissue lipids, suggests that Ca2+ free perfusion may, by reducing the activity of arachidonyl CoA synthetase (a Mg2+ dependent enzyme), decrease the acylation of arachidonic acid into lipids, thus increasing the availability of arachidonic acid to cyclooxygenase.

  13. [Elicitor activity of chitosan and arachidonic acid: their similarity and distinction].

    PubMed

    Vasiukova, N I; Gerasimova, N G; Chalenko, G I; Ozeretskovskaia, O L

    2012-01-01

    Two elicitors-chitosan and arachidonic acid-induced the same defense responses in potatoes, stimulating the processes of wound reparation and inducing the formation of phytoalexins, inhibitors of proteinase, and active forms of oxygen. However, chitosan induced the defense potential of plant tissues at concentrations higher than those of arachidonic acid. The protective action of chitosan was defined by two parameters, i.e., the ability to induce the immune responses in plant tissues and to exhibit a toxic effect on the pathogen development, causing late blight and seedling blight, whereas the elicitor effect of arachidonic acid depended on its ability to induce the defense potential of plant tissues only.

  14. Influences of intraperitoneally and dietary administered vitamin E and selenium on the lipid composition in reproductive organs of male animals.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, O; Celik, S; Dilsiz, N

    1997-05-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the protective effect of intraperitoneally and dietary administered vitamin E and selenium (Se) on the total lipid, cholesterol, and fatty acid composition in rat and lamb testes. The level of total lipid in rat testes was significantly decreased (p < 0.001) in the combination group as compared to the control group but slightly decreased in lamb testes (p < 0.05). In addition, the level of total lipid in lamb testes was significantly decreased (p < 0.001) by the Se alone. The content of total cholesterol in rats was higher in the Se group and its level in lamb testes was higher in the vitamin E groups than in the control group (p < 0.001). In rats testes, the amounts of palmitic, oleic, arachidonic acids, the total fatty acid, total unsaturated and total omega 6 acids were higher (p < 0.001) in the Se group. The proportions of palmitic and arachidonic acids were reduced in the vitamin E group and linoleic acid, total unsaturated, and total omega 6 fatty acids were high (p < 0.05) in the vitamin E and combination groups. In lamb testis tissues, the amounts of palmitic, arachidonic, total unsaturated and total omega 6 fatty acids were decreased in the vitamin E group in comparison to the control (p < 0.05). However, the amounts of arachidonic and total omega 6 fatty acids increased (p < 0.05) in the Se group. The proportions of arachidonic acid, total unsaturated fatty acid and total omega 6 fatty acids were high (p < 0.05) in the Se and combination groups. We concluded that the level of total lipid in testis tissues was reduced by dietary and intraperitoneally administered vitamin E and Se together. In contrast, it seems that the proportions of unsaturated and essential fatty acids in examined tissues are increased by vitamin E and Se.

  15. A comparative evaluation of the effect of diclofenac sodium with and without per-orally administered methylprednisolone on the sequelae of impacted mandibular third molar removal: A cohort randomized double-blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Prashar, Deepti V.; Pahwa, Deepti; Kalia, Vimal; Jindal, Govind; Kaur, Rupinder

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Objectives: This study evaluated the efficacy of oral methylprednisolone and diclofenac sodium on post-operative sequelae after third molar surgery. Settings and Design: A randomized double-blind clinical trial was conducted (with institutional and university approval for dissertation) to evaluate the effect of methylprednisolone with diclofenac sodium (group A) as compared with diclofenac sodium and placebo (group B) on three variables: Pain, swelling and trismus, after third molar surgery. Materials and Methods: Thirty consecutive consenting patients for surgical removal of mandibular impacted third molar were randomly placed into two groups of 15 each (groups A and B). Pain, swelling and trismus were observed by visual analog scale, facial measurements and inter-incisal opening. Scores were recorded after 24 and 72 h and on the seventh post-operative day. Results were subjected to the Chi-square test and independent sample t-test (P = 0.05). Results: Mean difference in pain experienced between the two groups was statistically significant at 24 h (P = 0.015) and 72 h (P = 0.001) and on the seventh day (P = 0.005). Difference in inter-incisal distance was insignificant (P = 0.239) pre-operatively, but significant after 24 h (P = 0.014) and 72 h (P = 0.001) and on the seventh post-operative day (P = 0.001). Mean difference in swelling was highly significant after 24 h (P = 0.001) and 72 h (P = 0.0001) and on the seventh post-operative day (P = 0.047). Conclusions: The combination of oral dose of methylprednisolone (a corticosteroid) diclofenac sodium (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) was found to be more effective than diclofenac sodium alone on the sequelae of surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar. PMID:27134449

  16. The Essentiality of Arachidonic Acid in Infant Development

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, Kevin B.; Ryan, Alan S.; Forsyth, Stewart; Gautier, Sheila; Salem, Norman

    2016-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (ARA, 20:4n-6) is an n-6 polyunsaturated 20-carbon fatty acid formed by the biosynthesis from linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6). This review considers the essential role that ARA plays in infant development. ARA is always present in human milk at a relatively fixed level and is accumulated in tissues throughout the body where it serves several important functions. Without the provision of preformed ARA in human milk or infant formula the growing infant cannot maintain ARA levels from synthetic pathways alone that are sufficient to meet metabolic demand. During late infancy and early childhood the amount of dietary ARA provided by solid foods is low. ARA serves as a precursor to leukotrienes, prostaglandins, and thromboxanes, collectively known as eicosanoids which are important for immunity and immune response. There is strong evidence based on animal and human studies that ARA is critical for infant growth, brain development, and health. These studies also demonstrate the importance of balancing the amounts of ARA and DHA as too much DHA may suppress the benefits provided by ARA. Both ARA and DHA have been added to infant formulas and follow-on formulas for more than two decades. The amounts and ratios of ARA and DHA needed in infant formula are discussed based on an in depth review of the available scientific evidence. PMID:27077882

  17. Mood-Stabilizers Target the Brain Arachidonic Acid Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Jagadeesh S.; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2009-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe psychiatric illness characterized by recurrent manic and depressive episodes, without a characteristic neuropathology or clear etiology. Drugs effective in BD target many key signaling pathways in animal and cell studies. However, their mode of action in the BD brain remains elusive. In the rat brain, some of the mood stabilizers effective in treating mania (lithium, carbamazepine, valproate) or depression (lamotrigine) in BD are reported to decrease transcription of cytosolic phospholipase A2 and cyclooxygenase-2 and to reduce levels of AP-2 and NF-κB, transcription factors of the two enzymes. The anti-manic drugs also decrease arachidonic acid (AA) turnover in brain phospholipids when given chronically to rats. Thus, drugs effective in BD commonly target AA cascade kinetics as well as AA cascade enzymes and their transcription factors in the rat brain. These studies suggest that BD is associated with increased AA signaling in the brain. Developing therapeutic agents that suppress brain AA signaling could lead to additional treatments for BD. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of action of mood stabilizers and the effects of docosahexaenoic acid on AA cascade enzymes in relation to BD. PMID:20021459

  18. Cytochrome P450 arachidonic acid metabolism in bovine corneal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Masferrer, J.; Schwartzman, M.L.; Abraham, N.G.; Dunn, M.W.; McGiff, J.C.

    1986-03-01

    The presence of the cytochrom P450 system and its involvement in the metabolism of AA was studied in the corneal epithelium. This tissue contains cytochrome P450 as assessed directly by measurement of the carbon monoxide reduced spectrum (specific activity of 161 pmol/10 mg protein) and indirectly by measuring the activity of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) - a cytochrome P450-dependent enzyme (11-39 pmol 3-OH benzopyrene/mg protein/10 min). When corneal epithelial microsomes were incubated with /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid, 30-50% of the total radioactivity was converted to two peaks, I and II. Further separation using high performance liquid chromatography has shown that each peak contains two metabolites, A,B and C,D. Metabolite formation was dependent on the addition of NADPH (1 mM) and inhibited by carbon monoxide and SKF-525A (100 ..mu..M) suggesting a cytochrome P450-dependent mechanism. Compound C (5-10 ..mu..M) inhibited the activity of corneal epithelial Na-K-ATPase by 30-60%, being 100-fold more potent than ouabain. Compound D (10-100 ng) induced a dose dependent relaxation of the rat caudal artery. Compound D also inhibited corneal Na-K-ATPase activity but less potently than compound C. These compounds may be important to transport processes of ocular epithelia and participate in the control of the ocular circulation and aqueous humor dynamics.

  19. Arachidonic acid metabolism in glutathione-deficient macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Rouzer, C A; Scott, W A; Griffith, O W; Hamill, A L; Cohn, Z A

    1982-01-01

    Mouse resident peritoneal macrophages were treated with the glutathione (GSH) synthesis inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine to deplete intracellular GSH. The arachidonic acid metabolites released by the GSH-depleted macrophages in response to a zymosan challenge were analyzed by HPLC. Buthionine sulfoximine treatment resulted in inhibition of both prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene C synthesis that was directly related to the degree of GSH depletion. Macrophages in which GSH levels were reduced to 3% of normal exhibited reductions to 4% and 1%, respectively, in PGE2 and LTC formation. The total quantity of cyclooxygenase metabolites secreted by GSH-deficient macrophages was identical to that of control cells as a result of increased synthesis of prostacyclin and, to a lesser extent, 12-L-hydroxy-5,8,10-heptadecatrienoic acid. Total lipoxygenase products were decreased, however; increased formation of hydroxyicosatetraenoic acids only partially compensated for the deficit in leukotriene C production. These findings extent our earlier observations on the inhibition of leukotriene C synthesis in GSH-depleted macrophages and confirm with intact cells the previously suggested role of GSH in prostaglandin E2 formation. PMID:6803245

  20. Ancestral genetic complexity of arachidonic acid metabolism in Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongjuan; Zou, Qiuqiong; Yu, Ting; Song, Cuikai; Huang, Shengfeng; Chen, Shangwu; Ren, Zhenghua; Xu, Anlong

    2014-09-01

    Eicosanoids play an important role in inducing complex and crucial physiological processes in animals. Eicosanoid biosynthesis in animals is widely reported; however, eicosanoid production in invertebrate tissue is remarkably different to vertebrates and in certain respects remains elusive. We, for the first time, compared the orthologs involved in arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism in 14 species of invertebrates and 3 species of vertebrates. Based on parsimony, a complex AA-metabolic system may have existed in the common ancestor of the Metazoa, and then expanded and diversified through invertebrate lineages. A primary vertebrate-like AA-metabolic system via cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), and cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathways was further identified in the basal chordate, amphioxus. The expression profiling of AA-metabolic enzymes and lipidomic analysis of eicosanoid production in the tissues of amphioxus supported our supposition. Thus, we proposed that the ancestral complexity of AA-metabolic network diversified with the different lineages of invertebrates, adapting with the diversity of body plans and ecological opportunity, and arriving at the vertebrate-like pattern in the basal chordate, amphioxus.

  1. Dietary arachidonic acid in perinatal nutrition: a commentary.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Lotte; Fewtrell, Mary; Agostoni, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is supplied together with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in infant formulas, but we have limited knowledge about the effects of supplementation with either of these long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) on growth and developmental outcomes. AA is present in similar levels in breast milk throughout the world, whereas the level of DHA is highly diet dependent. Autopsy studies show similar diet-dependent variation in brain DHA, whereas AA is little affected by intake. Early intake of DHA has been shown to affect visual development, but the effect of LCPUFA on neurodevelopment remains to be established. Few studies have found any functional difference between infants supplemented with DHA alone compared to DHA+AA, but some studies show neurodevelopmental advantages in breast-fed infants of mothers supplemented with n-3 LCPUFA alone. It also remains to be established whether the AA/DHA balance could affect allergic and inflammatory outcomes later in life. Disentangling effects of genetic variability and dietary intake on AA and DHA-status and on functional outcomes may be an important step in the process of determining whether AA-intake is of any physiological or clinical importance. However, based on the current evidence we hypothesize that dietary AA plays a minor role on growth and development relative to the impact of dietary DHA.

  2. Arachidonic acid stimulates glucose uptake in cerebral cortical astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, N; Martin, J L; Stella, N; Magistretti, P J

    1993-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) has recently been shown to influence various cellular functions in the central nervous system. Here we report that AA increases, in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, 2-deoxy-D-[1-3H]glucose ([3H]2DG) uptake in primary cultures of astrocytes prepared from the cerebral cortex of neonatal mice. This effect is mimicked by an unsaturated fatty acid such as linolenic acid, while palmitic and arachidic acids, two saturated fatty acids, are inactive. Pharmacological agents that increase the endogenous levels of AA by stimulating AA release (melittin) or by inhibiting its reacylation (thimerosal) also promote [3H]2DG uptake by astrocytes. We also report that norepinephrine (NE) stimulates the release of [3H]AA from membrane phospholipids, with an EC50 of 3 microM; this effect is accompanied, with a temporal delay of approximately 4 min, by the stimulation of [3H]2DG uptake, for which the EC50 of NE is 1 microM. Since the cerebral cortex, the brain region from which astrocytes used in this study were prepared, receives a massive noradrenergic innervation, originating from the locus coeruleus, the effects of NE reported here further stress the notion that certain neurotransmitters may play a role in the regulation of energy metabolism in the cerebral cortex and point at astrocytes as the likely targets of such metabolic effects. PMID:8483920

  3. The Essentiality of Arachidonic Acid in Infant Development.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Kevin B; Ryan, Alan S; Forsyth, Stewart; Gautier, Sheila; Salem, Norman

    2016-04-12

    Arachidonic acid (ARA, 20:4n-6) is an n-6 polyunsaturated 20-carbon fatty acid formed by the biosynthesis from linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6). This review considers the essential role that ARA plays in infant development. ARA is always present in human milk at a relatively fixed level and is accumulated in tissues throughout the body where it serves several important functions. Without the provision of preformed ARA in human milk or infant formula the growing infant cannot maintain ARA levels from synthetic pathways alone that are sufficient to meet metabolic demand. During late infancy and early childhood the amount of dietary ARA provided by solid foods is low. ARA serves as a precursor to leukotrienes, prostaglandins, and thromboxanes, collectively known as eicosanoids which are important for immunity and immune response. There is strong evidence based on animal and human studies that ARA is critical for infant growth, brain development, and health. These studies also demonstrate the importance of balancing the amounts of ARA and DHA as too much DHA may suppress the benefits provided by ARA. Both ARA and DHA have been added to infant formulas and follow-on formulas for more than two decades. The amounts and ratios of ARA and DHA needed in infant formula are discussed based on an in depth review of the available scientific evidence.

  4. Arachidonate 12-lipoxygenases with reference to their selective inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Shozo . E-mail: yamamosh@kyoto-wu.ac.jp; Katsukawa, Michiko; Nakano, Ayumi; Hiraki, Emi; Nishimura, Kohji; Jisaka, Mitsuo; Yokota, Kazushige; Ueda, Natsuo

    2005-12-09

    Lipoxygenase is a dioxygenase recognizing a 1-cis,4-cis-pentadiene of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The enzyme oxygenates various carbon atoms of arachidonic acid as a substrate and produces 5-, 8-, 12- or 15-hydroperoxy eicosatetraenoic acid with a conjugated diene chromophore. The enzyme is referred to as 5-, 8-, 12- or 15-lipoxygenase, respectively. Earlier we found two isoforms of 12-lipoxygenase, leukocyte- and platelet-type enzymes, which were distinguished by substrate specificity, catalytic activity, primary structure, gene intron size, and antigenicity. Recently, the epidermis-type enzyme was found as the third isoform. Attempts have been made to find isozyme-specific inhibitors of 12-lipoxygenase, and earlier we found hinokitol, a tropolone, as a potent inhibitor selective for the platelet-type 12-lipoxygenase. More recently, we tested various catechins of tea leaves and found that (-)-geotechnical gallate was a potent and selective inhibitor of human platelet 12-lipoxygenase with an IC{sub 5} of 0.14 {mu}M. The compound was much less active with 12-lipoxygenase of leukocyte-type, 15-, 8-, and 5-lipoxygenases, and cyclo oxygenases-1 and -2.

  5. Actions of arachidonic acid on erythrocyte membrane Rb permeability.

    PubMed

    Dwight, J F; Hendry, B M

    1995-07-14

    The effects of non-esterified arachidonic acid (AA) on erythrocyte membrane ion permeability have been studied using 86Rb flux measurements. [14C]AA was used to quantify membrane incorporation of AA and to show AA removal by albumin washing. The actions of vitamin E and other antioxidants on the effects of AA were examined. Reversible membrane incorporation of 700-2000 nmol AA per ml cells was achieved without significant haemolysis or morphological change. AA incorporation caused a reversible mean increase in bumetanide-sensitive Rb influx of 34% (S.E.M. 4.5, n = 23). This action could be partially prevented by co-incubation with vitamin E, but not by Trolox or dithioerythritol. AA incorporation caused an irreversible mean increase in residual Rb permeability (bumetanide and ouabain insensitive) of 130% (S.E.M. 22, n = 20), associated with a rise in intracellular Na and a fall in intracellular K concentrations. This action was also partially prevented by co-incubation with vitamin E. The effects of AA incorporation on Na,K-ATPase function were difficult to quantify because of the concomitant rises in intracellular Na but the data are consistent with approximately 20% inhibition of activity. Modulation of membrane ion permeability by AA appears to be partially mediated by lipid peroxidation and may have pathophysiological significance.

  6. Brain histamine H1 receptor occupancy of orally administered antihistamines measured by positron emission tomography with 11C-doxepin in a placebo-controlled crossover study design in healthy subjects: a comparison of olopatadine and ketotifen

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Manabu; Mochizuki, Hideki; Sakurada, Yumiko; Ishii, Kenji; Oda, Keiichi; Kimura, Yuichi; Sasaki, Toru; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2006-01-01

    Aims The strength of sedation due to antihistamines can be evaluated by using positron emission tomography (PET). The purpose of the present study is to measure histamine H1 receptor (H1R) occupancy due to olopatadine, a new second-generation antihistamine and to compare it with that of ketotifen. Methods Eight healthy males (mean age 23.5 years-old) were studied following single oral administration of olopatadine 5 mg or ketotifen 1 mg using PET with 11C-doxepin in a placebo-controlled crossover study design. Binding potential ratio and H1R occupancy were calculated and were compared between olopatadine and ketotifen in the medial prefrontal (MPFC), dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPFC), anterior cingulate (ACC), insular (IC), temporal (TC), parietal (PC), occipital cortices (OC). Plasma drug concentration was measured, and correlation of AUC to H1R occupancy was examined. Results H1R occupancy after olopatadine treatment was significantly lower than that after ketotifen treatment in the all cortical regions (P < 0.001). Mean H1R occupancies for olopatadine and ketotifen were, respectively: MPFC, 16.7 vs. 77.7; DLPFC, 14.1 vs. 85.9; ACC, 14.7 vs. 76.1; IC, 12.8 vs. 69.7; TC, 12.5 vs. 66.5; PC, 13.9 vs. 65.8; and OC, 19.5 vs. 60.6. Overall cortical mean H1R occupancy of olopatadine and ketotifen were 15% and 72%, respectively. H1R occupancy of both drugs correlated well with their respective drug plasma concentrations (P < 0.001). Conclusion It is suggested that 5 mg oral olopatadine, with its low H1R occupancy and thus minimal sedation, could safely be used an antiallergic treatment for various allergic disorders. Abbreviations histamine H1 receptor (H1R), histamine H1 receptor occupancy (H1RO), dopamine D2 receptor (D2R), positron emission tomography (PET), blood–brain barrier (BBB), binding potential ratio (BPR), distribution volume (DV) PMID:16390347

  7. Activation and regulation of arachidonic acid release in rabbit peritoneal neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, W.

    1988-01-01

    Arachidonic acid release in rabbit neutrophils can be enhanced by the addition of chemotactic fMet-Leu-Phe, platelet-activating factor, PAF, or the calcium ionophore A23187. Over 80% of the release ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid comes from phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol. The release is dose-dependent and increases with increasing concentration of the stimulus. The A23187-induced release increases with increasing time of the stimulation. ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid release, but not the rise in the concentration of intracellular calcium, is inhibited in pertussis toxin-treated neutrophils stimulated with PAF. The ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid released by A23187 is potentiated while that release by fMET-Leu-Phe or PAF is inhibited in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, PMA, treated rabbit neutrophils. The protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine, H-7, has no effect on the potentiation by PMA of the A23187-induced release, it prevents the inhibition by PMA of the release produced by PAF or fMet-Leu-Phe. In addition, PMA increases arachidonic acid release in H-7-treated cells stimulated with fMet-Leu-Phe. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59022 increases the level of diacylglycerol in neutrophils stimulated with fMet-Leu-Phe. Furthermore, R59022 potentiates ({sup 3}H) arachidonic acid release produced by fMet-Leu-Phe. This potentiation is not inhibited by H-7, in fact, it is increased in H-7-treated neutrophils.

  8. The rabbit pulmonary cytochrome P450 arachidonic acid metabolic pathway: characterization and significance.

    PubMed Central

    Zeldin, D C; Plitman, J D; Kobayashi, J; Miller, R F; Snapper, J R; Falck, J R; Szarek, J L; Philpot, R M; Capdevila, J H

    1995-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 metabolizes arachidonic acid to several unique and biologically active compounds in rabbit liver and kidney. Microsomal fractions prepared from rabbit lung homogenates metabolized arachidonic acid through cytochrome P450 pathways, yielding cis-epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and their hydration products, vic-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids, mid-chain cis-trans conjugated dienols, and 19- and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids. Inhibition studies using polyclonal antibodies prepared against purified CYP2B4 demonstrated 100% inhibition of arachidonic acid epoxide formation. Purified CYP2B4, reconstituted in the presence of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and cytochrome b5, metabolized arachidonic acid, producing primarily EETs. EETs were detected in lung homogenate using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy, providing evidence for the in vivo pulmonary cytochrome P450 epoxidation of arachidonic acid. Chiral analysis of these lung EETs demonstrated a preference for the 14(R),15(S)-, 11(S),12(R)-, and 8(S),9(R)-EET enantiomers. Both EETs and vic-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids were detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. At micromolar concentrations, methylated 5,6-EET and 8,9-EET significantly relaxed histamine-contracted guinea pig hilar bronchi in vitro. In contrast, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid caused contraction to near maximal tension. We conclude that CYP2B4, an abundant rabbit lung cytochrome P450 enzyme, is the primary constitutive pulmonary arachidonic acid epoxygenase and that these locally produced, biologically active eicosanoids may be involved in maintaining homeostasis within the lung. Images PMID:7738183

  9. Arachidonate is a potent modulator of human heat shock gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Jurivich, D A; Sistonen, L; Sarge, K D; Morimoto, R I

    1994-01-01

    Cell and tissue injury activate the inflammatory response through the action(s) of arachidonic acid and its metabolites, leading to the expression of acute-phase proteins and inflammatory cytokines. At the molecular level, little is known how arachidonic acid regulates the inflammatory response. As inflammation is also associated with local increase in tissue temperatures, we examined whether arachidonic acid was directly involved in the heat shock response. Extracellular exposure to arachidonic acid induced heat shock gene transcription in a dose-dependent manner via acquisition of DNA-binding activity and phosphorylation of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). In addition, exposure of cells to low concentrations of arachidonic acid, which by themselves did not induce HSF1 DNA-binding activity, reduced the temperature threshold for HSF1 activation from elevated temperatures which are not physiologically relevant (> 42 degrees C) to temperatures which can be attained during the febrile response (39-40 degrees C). These results indicate that elevated heat shock gene expression is a direct consequence of an arachidonic acid-mediated cellular response. Images PMID:8134388

  10. In vitro release of arachidonic acid and in vivo responses to respirable fractions of cotton dust

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, T.A.; Edwards, J.H.; Al-Zubaidy, T.S.; Brown, R.C.; Poole, A.; Nicholls, P.J.

    1986-04-01

    It was considered that the fall in lung function seen after exposure to cotton dust may be attributable in part to the activity of arachidonic acid metabolites, such as leucotrienes as well as to the more established release of histamine by cotton dust. However, we found that cotton and barley dusts elicited poor release of arachidonic acid from an established macrophage like cell line compared with that observed with other organic dusts. In the experimental animal, pulmonary cellular responses to both cotton and barley dust were similar to those evoked by moldy hay and pigeon dropping dusts, although after multiple doses a more severe response was seen to cotton and barley. Since both moldy hay and pigeon droppings elicit a greater arachidonic acid release than cotton or barley, a role for arachidonic acid in inducing the cellular response is less likely than other factors. There are limitations to our conclusions using this system, i.e., the arachidonic acid may be released in a nonmetabolized form, although it is noted that the two dusts with the greatest arachidonic acid release produce their clinical responses in humans largely by hypersensitivity mechanisms.

  11. Dietary arachidonic acid as a risk factor for age-associated neurodegenerative diseases: Potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mélanie H; Pelleieux, Sandra; Vitale, Nicolas; Olivier, Jean Luc

    2016-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease and associated diseases constitute a major public health concern worldwide. Nutrition-based, preventive strategies could possibly be effective in delaying the occurrence of these diseases and lower their prevalence. Arachidonic acid is the second major polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and several studies support its involvement in Alzheimer's disease. The objective of this review is to examine how dietary arachidonic acid contributes to Alzheimer's disease mechanisms and therefore to its prevention. First, we explore the sources of neuronal arachidonic acid that could potentially originate from either the conversion of linoleic acid, or from dietary sources and transfer across the blood-brain-barrier. In a second part, a brief overview of the role of the two main agents of Alzheimer's disease, tau protein and Aβ peptide is given, followed by the examination of the relationship between arachidonic acid and the disease. Third, the putative mechanisms by which arachidonic acid could influence Alzheimer's disease occurrence and evolution are presented. The conclusion is devoted to what remains to be determined before integrating arachidonic acid in the design of preventive strategies against Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Action of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone: involvement of novel arachidonic acid metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, G D; Capdevila, J; Chacos, N; Manna, S; Falck, J R

    1983-01-01

    Anterior pituitary cells were incubated in the presence of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and one of three inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism:indomethacin, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase system; nordihydroguaiaretic acid, an antioxidant that inhibits lipoxygenase; and icosatetraynoic acid, an acetylenic analogue of arachidonic acid that blocks all known pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism. Indomethacin was ineffective in blocking luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid was only marginally capable of inhibiting luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Icosatetraynoic acid at 10 microM completely inhibited stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Addition of several epoxygenated arachidonic acid metabolites to cells in vitro resulted in secretion of luteinizing hormone equal to or greater than that induced by 10 nM luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. The half-maximal effective dose for these compounds was approximately 50 nM. The 5,6-epoxyicosatrienoic acid was the most potent of the compounds tested. These studies suggest that luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone release is closely coupled with the production of oxidized arachidonic acid metabolites. Moreover, one or more of the epoxygenated arachidonic acid metabolites might be a component of the cascade of reactions initiated by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone that ultimately results in secretion of luteinizing hormone. PMID:6344087

  13. A randomized, open-label, 5-period, balanced crossover study to evaluate the relative bioavailability of eltrombopag powder for oral suspension (PfOS) and tablet formulations and the effect of a high-calcium meal on eltrombopag pharmacokinetics when administered with or 2 hours before or after PfOS.

    PubMed

    Wire, Mary Beth; Bruce, Jennifer; Gauvin, Jennifer; Pendry, Carolyn J; McGuire, Sandra; Qian, Yanwen; Brainsky, Andres

    2012-03-01

    Bioavailability of the tablet formulation of eltrombopag, an oral thrombopoietin receptor agonist indicated for the treatment of chronic immune thrombocytopenia, is reduced by chelation of polyvalent cations (eg, calcium). A powder for oral suspension (PfOS) formulation has been developed for use in pediatrics. We aimed to assess the bioavailability of eltrombopag PfOS relative to the tablet formulation and the effect of a high-calcium meal on PfOS bioavailability. In this single-dose, open-label, randomized-sequence, crossover study, healthy subjects received 25 mg eltrombopag orally as a tablet fasted and as PfOS fasted or with, 2 hours before, or 2 hours after a high-calcium meal. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated from plasma concentration-time data collected over 72 hours post-dose. Tolerability was assessed by laboratory tests, physical examinations, and adverse events (AEs). The 40 enrolled subjects included 22 males and 18 females of white/European (60%) or African-American/African (40%) heritage with mean (SD) (mininum, maximum) age of 34 (12) (19, 62) years, weight of 75 (12) (54, 101) kg, and body mass index of 25.8 (2.9) (19.7, 30) kg/m(2). Plasma eltrombopag AUC(0-∞) was higher for the PfOS than the tablet (geometric least-squares mean ratio [GMR]: 1.22; 90% CI: 1.08-1.38). Plasma eltrombopag AUC(0-∞) was reduced when the PfOS was administered with a high-calcium meal (GMR: 0.25; 90% CI: 0.224-0.287) or 2 hours after a meal (GMR: 0.53; 90% CI: 0.470-0.601), and, to a lesser extent, when administered 2 hours before a meal (GMR: 0.80; 90% CI: 0.711-0.908). The absorption lag time and t(½) did not differ between treatments; T(max) was delayed 1 hour when the PfOS was dosed with a high-calcium meal. AEs were not serious and mild or moderate in intensity. AEs reported in >1 subject included headache (11 subjects; 27.5%), presyncope (3 subjects, 7.5%), and vomiting (2 subjects, 5%). No clinically significant trends in laboratory

  14. Arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids are biosynthesized from their 18-carbon precursors in human infants.

    PubMed Central

    Salem, N; Wegher, B; Mena, P; Uauy, R

    1996-01-01

    It is becoming clear that an adequate level of long-chain highly unsaturated fatty acids in the nervous system is required for optimal function and development; however, the ability of infants to biosynthesize long-chain fatty acids is unknown. This study explores the capacity of human infants to convert 18-carbon essential fatty acids to their elongated and desaturated forms, in vivo. A newly developed gas chromatography/negative chemical ionization/mass spectrometry method employing 2H-labeled essential fatty acids allowed assessment of this in vivo conversion with very high sensitivity and selectivity. Our results demonstrate that human infants have the capacity to convert dietary essential fatty acids administered enterally as 2H-labeled ethyl esters to their longer-chain derivatives, transport them to plasma, and incorporate them into membrane lipids. The in vivo conversion of linoleic acid (18:2n6) to arachidonic acid (20:4n6) is demonstrated in human beings. All elongases/desaturases necessary for the conversion of linolenic acid (18:3n3) to docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n3) are also active in the first week after birth. Although the absolute amounts of n-3 fatty acid metabolites accumulated in plasma are greater than those of the n-6 family, estimates of the endogenous pools of 18:2n6 and 18:3n3 indicate that n-6 fatty acid conversion rates are greater than those of the n-3 family. While these data clearly demonstrate the capability of infants to biosynthesize 22:6n3, a lipid that is required for optimal neural development, the amounts produced in vivo from 18:3n3 may be inadequate to support the 22:6n3 level observed in breast-fed infants. PMID:8552667

  15. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of acetylsalicylic acid after intravenous and oral administration to healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Nagelschmitz, J; Blunck, M; Kraetzschmar, J; Ludwig, M; Wensing, G; Hohlfeld, T

    2014-01-01

    Background The pharmacology of single doses of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) administered intravenously (250 or 500 mg) or orally (100, 300, or 500 mg) was evaluated in a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Methods Blood and urine samples were collected before and up to 24 hours after administration of ASA in 22 healthy volunteers. Pharmacokinetic parameters and measurements of platelet aggregation were determined using validated techniques. Results A comparison between administration routes showed that the geometric mean dose-corrected peak concentrations (Cmax/D) and the geometric mean dose-corrected area under the curve (AUC0–∞/D) were higher following intravenous administration of ASA 500 mg compared with oral administration (estimated ratios were 11.23 and 2.03, respectively). Complete inhibition of platelet aggregation was achieved within 5 minutes with both intravenous ASA doses, reflecting a rapid onset of inhibition that was not observed with oral dosing. At 5 minutes after administration, the mean reduction in arachidonic acid-induced thromboxane B2 synthesis ex vivo was 99.3% with ASA 250 mg intravenously and 99.7% with ASA 500 mg intravenously. In exploratory analyses, thromboxane B2 synthesis was significantly lower after intravenous versus oral ASA 500 mg (P<0.0001) at each observed time point up to the first hour after administration. Concentrations of 6-keto-prostaglandin1α at 5 and 20 minutes after dosing were also significantly lower with ASA 500 mg intravenously than with ASA 500 mg orally. Conclusion This study demonstrates that intravenous ASA provides more rapid and consistent platelet inhibition than oral ASA within the first hour after dosing. PMID:24672263

  16. Formula feeding potentiates docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acid biosynthesis in term and preterm baboon neonates.

    PubMed

    Sarkadi-Nagy, Eszter; Wijendran, Vasuki; Diau, Guan Yeu; Chao, Angela Chueh; Hsieh, Andrea T; Turpeinen, Anu; Lawrence, Peter; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Brenna, J Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Infant formulas supplemented with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) are now available in the United States; however, little is known about the factors that affect biosynthesis. Baboon neonates were assigned to one of four treatments: term, breast-fed; term, formula-fed; preterm (155 of 182 days gestation), formula-fed; and preterm, formula+DHA/ARA-fed. Standard formula had no DHA/ARA; supplemented formula had 0.61%wt DHA (0.3% of calories) and 1.21%wt ARA (0.6% of calories), and baboon breast milk contained 0.68 +/- 0.22%wt DHA and 0.62 +/- 0.12%wt ARA. At 14 days adjusted age, neonates received a combined oral dose of [U-13C]alpha-linolenic acid (LNA*) and [U-13C]linoleic acid (LA*), and tissues were analyzed 14 days after dose. Brain accretion of linolenic acid-derived DHA was approximately 3-fold greater for the formula groups than for the breast-fed group, and dietary DHA partially attenuated excess DHA synthesis among preterms. A similar, significant pattern was found in other organs. Brain linoleic acid-derived ARA accretion was significantly greater in the unsupplemented term group but not in the preterm groups compared with the breast-fed group. These data show that formula potentiates the biosynthesis/accretion of DHA/ARA in term and preterm neonates compared with breast-fed neonates and that the inclusion of DHA/ARA in preterm formula partially restores DHA/ARA biosynthesis to lower, breast-fed levels. Current formula DHA concentrations are inadequate to normalize long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids synthesis to that of breast-fed levels.

  17. Targeting arachidonic acid pathway by natural products for cancer prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Yarla, Nagendra Sastry; Bishayee, Anupam; Sethi, Gautam; Reddanna, Pallu; Kalle, Arunasree M; Dhananjaya, Bhadrapura Lakkappa; Dowluru, Kaladhar S V G K; Chintala, Ramakrishna; Duddukuri, Govinda Rao

    2016-10-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) pathway, a metabolic process, plays a key role in carcinogenesis. Hence, AA pathway metabolic enzymes phospholipase A2s (PLA2s), cyclooxygenases (COXs) and lipoxygenases (LOXs) and their metabolic products, such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes, have been considered novel preventive and therapeutic targets in cancer. Bioactive natural products are a good source for development of novel cancer preventive and therapeutic drugs, which have been widely used in clinical practice due to their safety profiles. AA pathway inhibitory natural products have been developed as chemopreventive and therapeutic agents against several cancers. Curcumin, resveratrol, apigenin, anthocyans, berberine, ellagic acid, eugenol, fisetin, ursolic acid, [6]-gingerol, guggulsteone, lycopene and genistein are well known cancer chemopreventive agents which act by targeting multiple pathways, including COX-2. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid and baicalein can be chemopreventive molecules against various cancers by inhibiting LOXs. Several PLA2s inhibitory natural products have been identified with chemopreventive and therapeutic potentials against various cancers. In this review, we critically discuss the possible utility of natural products as preventive and therapeutic agents against various oncologic diseases, including prostate, pancreatic, lung, skin, gastric, oral, blood, head and neck, colorectal, liver, cervical and breast cancers, by targeting AA pathway. Further, the current status of clinical studies evaluating AA pathway inhibitory natural products in cancer is reviewed. In addition, various emerging issues, including bioavailability, toxicity and explorability of combination therapy, for the development of AA pathway inhibitory natural products as chemopreventive and therapeutic agents against human malignancy are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Phase I study of orally administered S-1 in combination with epirubicin and oxaliplatin in patients with advanced solid tumors and chemotherapy-naïve advanced or metastatic esophagogastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Moehler, Markus; Mahlberg, Rolf; Heinemann, Volker; Obermannová, Radka; Kubala, Eugen; Melichar, Bohuslav; Weinmann, Arndt; Scigalla, Paul; Tesařová, Marietta; Janda, Petr; Hédouin-Biville, Fabienne; Mansoor, Wasat

    2017-03-01

    This phase I study investigated the safety and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of the oral fluoropyrimidine S-1 when combined with epirubicin and oxaliplatin (EOS). Patients aged ≥18 years with advanced or metastatic solid tumors were enrolled in a 3 + 3 design with S-1 dose escalation (two planned cohorts) performed according to the occurrence of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). On day 1 of each 21-day cycle, patients received epirubicin 50 mg/m(2) followed by oxaliplatin 130 mg/m(2) (maximum 8 cycles) and then S-1 [20 mg/m(2) (cohort 1) or 25 mg/m(2) (cohort 2), twice daily]: first dose, evening of day 1; subsequent administration on days 2-14, twice daily; last dose, morning of day 15 (unlimited number of S-1 cycles). After protocol amendment, enrollment in a third cohort was restricted to patients with chemotherapy-naïve advanced or metastatic esophagogastric cancer. DLT was reported for two of the five patients in cohort 2, defining 20 mg/m(2) twice daily as the MTD of S-1 combined with epirubicin and oxaliplatin in heavily pretreated patients. Thirteen patients with chemotherapy-naïve advanced or metastatic esophagogastric cancer were subsequently enrolled and treated at an S-1 dose level of 25 mg/m(2) twice daily; no DLTs were reported; median overall survival was 13.1 months. Of the 11 evaluable patients, three (27 %) had partial responses and seven (64 %) had stable disease. The safety profile was in line with expectations. The promising activity of EOS (S-1 dose level, 25 mg/m(2) twice daily) and acceptable safety profile support further clinical development of this combination for the first-line treatment of patients with advanced or metastatic esophagogastric cancer.

  19. Preclinical evaluation of single-cell oils that are highly enriched with arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Boswell, K; Koskelo, E K; Carl, L; Glaza, S; Hensen, D J; Williams, K D; Kyle, D J

    1996-07-01

    Arachidonic acid (ARA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are important in human brain and retina development, and there is growing evidence showing the importance of these fatty acids in infant nutrition. Triglyceride oils, highly enriched in ARA (ARASCO) and DHA (DHASCO), were evaluated using very high dose acute (20 g/kg) and 4-wk subchronic gavage feedings in weanling Sprague-Dawley rats. The combination of these oils, Formulaid, was also tested in the 4-wk subchronic study, ARASCO, DHASCO and Formulaid were found to have a no-observable-adverse-effect level of more than 2.5 g/ kg/day, 1.25 g/kg/day and 3.75 g/kg/day, respectively. This represents a 50-fold safety margin over the intended use of Formulaid in infant formula. Survival, clinical signs, body weight gain, food consumption, haematology, clinical chemistry and histopathological evaluations failed to show any significant differences in animals administered ARASCO, DHASCO or Formulaid compared with that in control animals administered equal amounts of high oleic sunflower oil. The bioavailability of ARASCO, DHASCO and Formulaid was verified by increases in DHA and ARA levels in heart and liver tissues in these animals. Because these oils are enriched in only a single bioactive fatty acid, and they have been shown to be safe, they may offer a new source of these fatty acids in speciality foods such as infant formula.

  20. The effects of centrally injected arachidonic acid on respiratory system: Involvement of cyclooxygenase to thromboxane signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Erkan, Leman Gizem; Guvenc, Gokcen; Altinbas, Burcin; Niaz, Nasir; Yalcin, Murat

    2016-05-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is a polyunsaturated fatty acid that is present in the phospholipids of the cell membranes of the body and is abundant in the brain. Exogenously administered AA has been shown to affect brain metabolism and to exhibit cardiovascular and neuroendocrine actions. However, little is known regarding its respiratory actions and/or central mechanism of its respiratory effects. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the possible effects of centrally injected AA on respiratory system and the mediation of the central cyclooxygenase (COX) to thromboxane A2 (TXA2) signaling pathway on AA-induced respiratory effects in anaesthetized rats. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of AA induced dose- and time-dependent increase in tidal volume, respiratory rates and respiratory minute ventilation and also caused an increase in partial oxygen pressure (pO2) and decrease in partial carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2) in male anaesthetized Spraque Dawley rats. I.c.v. pretreatment with ibuprofen, a non-selective COX inhibitor, completely blocked the hyperventilation and blood gases changes induced by AA. In addition, central pretreatment with different doses of furegrelate, a TXA2 synthesis inhibitor, also partially prevented AA-evoked hyperventilation and blood gases effects. These data explicitly show that centrally administered AA induces hyperventilation with increasing pO2 and decreasing pCO2 levels which are mediated by the activation of central COX to TXA2 signaling pathway.

  1. Effects of chronic administration of arachidonic acid on lipid profiles and morphology in the skeletal muscles of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takayuki; Hashimoto, Michio; Katakura, Masanori; Tanabe, Yoko; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Otani, Hiroki; Shido, Osamu

    2014-10-01

    Arachidonic acid (20:4n-6, ARA) is a major component of the cell membrane, whereas ARA-derived eicosanoids are formed when cells are damaged. Aging is associated with an accretion of oxidative stress in skeletal muscles. In this study, we examined the effects of chronic administration (13 weeks) of ARA (240 mg/kg/day) on fatty acid composition, antioxidative status, and morphology of slow (soleus muscles) and fast (extensor digitorum longus muscles; EDL)-twitch muscles in aged rats (21 months old). The level of reactive oxygen species was higher in the EDL of ARA-administered rats than in that of control rats. ARA administration decreased the muscle cell volumes and increased the number of slow myosin heavy chain (MHC)-positive cells in the EDL. The relative content of MHC2X was increased whereas the relative content of MHC2B was decreased in the EDL of ARA-administered rats. These results suggest that ARA deposition in the fast-twitch muscle of aged rats reduced cell volume with an increase in oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Monochloramine potently inhibits arachidonic acid metabolism in rat platelets.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yohko; Ikeda, Mai; Sakuma, Satoru

    2006-05-26

    In the present study, the effects of hypochlorous acid (HOCl), monochloramine (NH(2)Cl), glutamine-chloramine (Glu-Cl) and taurine-chloramine (Tau-Cl) on the formation of 12-lipoxygenase (LOX) metabolite, 12-HETE, and cyclooxygenase (COX) metabolites, TXB(2), and 12-HHT, from exogenous arachidonic acid (AA) in rat platelets were examined. Rat platelets (4x10(8)/ml) were preincubated with drugs for 5min at 37 degrees C prior to the incubation with AA (40microM) for 2min at 37 degrees C. HOCl (50-250microM) showed an inhibition on the formation of LOX metabolite (12-HETE, 5-67% inhibition) and COX metabolites (TXB(2), 33-73% inhibition; 12-HHT, 27-74% inhibition). Although Tau-Cl and Glu-Cl up to 100microM were without effect on the formation of 12-HETE, TXB(2) and 12-HTT, NH(2)Cl showed a strong inhibition on the formation of all three metabolites (10-100microM NH(2)Cl, 12-HETE, 21-92% inhibition; TXB(2), 58-94% inhibition; 12-HHT, 36-92% inhibition). Methionine reversed a reduction of formation of LOX and COX metabolites induced by NH(2)Cl, and taurine restoring that induced by both NH(2)Cl and HOCl. These results suggest that NH(2)Cl is a more potent inhibitor of COX and LOX pathways in platelets than HOCl, and taurine and methionine can be modulators of NH(2)Cl-induced alterations in the COX and LOX pathways in vivo.

  3. Arachidonic acid production by Mortierella alpina using raw crop materials.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ganggang; Guan, Zhengbing; Liu, Feixian G; Liao, Xiangru; Cai, Yujie

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (ARA) is one of the three essential fatty acids, and it is important for human body to keep healthy and is widely used. At present, expensive materials such as glucose and yeast extract are generally reported to be optimal for ARA production. A new cost-effective fermentation process including cheaper material for ARA production is of great significance. Feasibility of using corn meal and powdered soybean for fungal growth and lipid accumulation was evaluated by means of single factor test. N-hexadecane concentration was optimized, and the effect of temperature on biomass and ARA content was examined. Mortierella alpina made better use of the aforementioned material as carbon and nitrogen sources for both hyphae growth and ARA production compared with glucose and yeast extract. Maximal levels of 10.9 g/L ARA and 26.1 g/L total lipids were obtained when 66 g/L corn meal, 54 g/L soybean meal and 6% (v/v) n-hexadecane were supplemented. A temperature-shift strategy involved three steps, namely, 30°C (3 days) - 25°C (4 days) - 20°C (4 days), which further improved ARA production by 24.7%. Several factors such as carbon and nitrogen sources, temperature and dissolved oxygen had great influence on biomass and microbial oil production. Mortierella alpina preferred corn and soybean meal compared with glucose and yeast extract, which would surely alleviate the high cost of ARA production. Based on this study, the new process is both low cost and practicable.

  4. Role of Arachidonic Acid in Promoting Hair Growth

    PubMed Central

    Munkhbayar, Semchin; Jang, Sunhyae; Cho, A-Ri; Choi, Soon-Jin; Shin, Chang Yup; Eun, Hee Chul; Kim, Kyu Han

    2016-01-01

    Background Arachidonic acid (AA) is an omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid present in all mammalian cell membranes, and involved in the regulation of many cellular processes, including cell survival, angiogenesis, and mitogenesis. The dermal papilla, composed of specialized fibroblasts located in the bulb of the hair follicle, contributes to the control of hair growth and the hair cycle. Objective This study investigated the effect of AA on hair growth by using in vivo and in vitro models. Methods The effect of AA on human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs) and hair shaft elongation was evaluated by MTT assay and hair follicle organ culture, respectively. The expression of various growth and survival factors in hDPCs were investigated by western blot or immunohistochemistry. The ability of AA to induce and prolong anagen phase in C57BL/6 mice was analyzed. Results AA was found to enhance the viability of hDPCs and promote the expression of several factors responsible for hair growth, including fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF-7) and FGF-10. Western blotting identified the role of AA in the phosphorylation of various transcription factors (ERK, CREB, and AKT) and increased expression of Bcl-2 in hDPCs. In addition, AA significantly promoted hair shaft elongation, with increased proliferation of matrix keratinocytes, during ex vivo hair follicle culture. It was also found to promote hair growth by induction and prolongation of anagen phase in telogen-stage C57BL/6 mice. Conclusion This study concludes that AA plays a role in promoting hair growth by increasing the expression of growth factors in hDPCs and enhancing follicle proliferation and survival. PMID:26848219

  5. Docosahexaenoic acid affects arachidonic acid uptake in megakaryocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Schick, P.K.; Webster, P.

    1987-05-01

    Dietary omega 3 fatty acids are thought to prevent atherosclerosis, possibly by modifying platelet (PT) function and arachidonic acid (20:4) metabolism. The study was designed to determine whether omega 3 fatty acids primarily affect 20:4 metabolism in megakaryocytes (MK), bone marrow precursors of PT, rather than in circulating PT. MK and PT were isolated from guinea pigs and incubated with (/sup 14/C)-20:4 (0.13uM). Docosahexaenoic acid (22:6) is a major omega 3 fatty acid in marine oils. The incubation of MK with 22:6 (0.1, 1.0 uM) resulted in the decrease of incorporation of (/sup 14/C)-20:4 into total MK phospholipids, 16% and 41% respectively. Alpha-linolenic acid (18:3), a major omega 3 fatty acid present in American diets, had no effect on 20:4 uptake in MK. 22:6 primarily affected the uptake of (/sup 14/C)-20:4 into phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) in MK. In MK, 22:6 (0.1, 1.0 uM) caused a decrease of incorporation of (/sup 14/C)-20:4 into PE, 21% and 55% respectively; a decrease into PS, 16% and 48% respectively; but only a decrease of 4% and 18%, respectively, into phosphatidylcholine; and a decrease of 3% and 21% into phosphatidylinositol 22:6 (3.0 uM) had no effect on the uptake of AA into PT phospholipids. The study shows that 22:6 has a selective effect on AA uptake in MK and that the acylation or transacylation of PE and PS are primarily affected. 22:6 and other marine omega 3 fatty acids appear to primarily affect megakaryocytes which may result in the production of platelets with abnormal content and compartmentalization of AA.

  6. Niacin Sensitivity and the Arachidonic Acid Pathway in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Messamore, Erik; Hoffman, William F.; Yao, Jeffrey K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Schizophrenia is associated with a blunted flush response to niacin. Since niacin-induced skin flushing is mediated by vasodilators derived from arachidonic acid (AA), we tested whether the blunted flush response to niacin is a marker of AA deficiency. Methods Eight concentrations of methylnicotinate were applied to the forearms of 20 adults with schizophrenia and 20 controls. Laser Doppler measurement of blood flow responses was used to derive values for niacin sensitivity (defined as the concentration eliciting half-maximal response, i.e., EC50 value) and efficacy (defined as the maximal evoked blood flow response). RBC membrane fatty acids were analyzed by gas chromatography. Results Niacin sensitivity and efficacy were reduced in schizophrenia. In the control group, there was significant correlation between AA levels and niacin sensitivity as well as a trend toward correlation between AA levels and niacin efficacy. In contrast, neither sensitivity nor efficacy of niacin correlated with AA levels in schizophrenia. An expected correlation between the levels of AA and its elongation product (adrenic acid) was absent in schizophrenia. Adrenic acid levels correlated with niacin efficacy in schizophrenia. Conclusions The schizophrenia-associated niacin response abnormality involves both diminished sensitivity and reduced efficacy. The lack of expected correlation between levels of AA and adrenic acid suggests homeostatic imbalance within the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) pathway in schizophrenia. Though AA levels were unrelated to measures of niacin response in schizophrenia, the correlation between adrenic acid and niacin efficacy in schizophrenia suggests relevance of the n-6 PUFA pathway to the blunted niacin response. PMID:20417059

  7. Kinetic investigation of human 5-lipoxygenase with arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Monica; Kumar, Ramakrishnan B; Balagunaseelan, Navisraj; Hamberg, Mats; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Rådmark, Olof; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes

    2016-08-01

    Human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) is responsible for the formation of leukotriene (LT)A4, a pivotal intermediate in the biosynthesis of the leukotrienes, a family of proinflammatory lipid mediators. 5-LOX has thus gained attention as a potential drug target. However, details of the kinetic mechanism of 5-LOX are still obscure. In this Letter, we investigated the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 5-LOX with its physiological substrate, arachidonic acid (AA). The observed KIE is 20±4 on kcat and 17±2 on kcat/KM at 25°C indicating a non-classical reaction mechanism. The observed rates show slight temperature dependence at ambient temperatures ranging from 4 to 35°C. Also, we observed low Arrhenius prefactor ratio (AH/AD=0.21) and a small change in activation energy (Ea(D)-Ea(H)=3.6J/mol) which suggests that 5-LOX catalysis involves tunneling as a mechanism of H-transfer. The measured KIE for 5-LOX involves a change in regioselectivity in response to deuteration at position C7, resulting in H-abstraction form C10 and formation of 8-HETE. The viscosity experiments influence the (H)kcat, but not (D)kcat. However the overall kcat/KM is not affected for labeled or unlabeled AA, suggesting that either the product release or conformational rearrangement might be involved in dictating kinetics of 5-LOX at saturating conditions. Investigation of available crystal structures suggests the role of active site residues (F421, Q363 and L368) in regulating the donor-acceptor distances, thus affecting H-transfer as well as regiospecificity. In summary, our study shows that that the H-abstraction is the rate limiting step for 5-LOX and that the observed KIE of 5-LOX is masked by a change in regioselectivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of orally administered chemotherapeutics (quinine, salinomycin) against Henneguya sp. Thelohán, 1892 (Myxozoa: Myxobolidae), a gill parasite in the tapir fish Gnathonemus petersii Günther, 1862 (Teleostei).

    PubMed

    Dohle, Angelika; Schmahl, Günter; Raether, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Hartmut; Ritter, Günter

    2002-09-01

    When given orally, quinine or salinomycin cause irreversible damage to the plasmodial developmental stages of Henneguya sp., a gill parasite in the tapir fish Gnathonemus petersii. Naturally infected tapir fish measured 75-169 mm in total length and their total weight ranged over 4.3-11.7 g. The fish bore 7-77 plasmodia in their gill arches. Medicinal food containing either quinine (5 g/1000 g food) or salinomycin (0.075 g/1000 g food) was given once a day to naturally infected fish in a food chain via water fleas ( Daphnia spp) for a period of 3, 6, or 9 days. From the monitored feeding of the tapir fish and weight determinations of the water fleas, it was calculated that gross uptake was 18.5 micro g/kg body weight fish daily for pure salinomycin and was 1.25 mg/kg body weight daily for quinine. After the end of the experiments, the fish were sacrificed and the plasmodia were carefully prepared from the gill arches and processed for transmission electron microscopy. As seen by ultrastructure investigations, for both substances the grade of damage in the parasites correlated positively with the period of application. When quinine was given for a 3-day period, the trophozoite ecto- and endoplasm exerted numerous vacuoles, caused by the drug, and the presporogonous and the pansporoblastic stages were malformed. Following a 6-day period, numerous abortive polar capsules were found in the trophozoite cytoplasm. To a large extent, the limiting membranes of the polaroblasts and valvogenic cells were destroyed. In addition, deep clefts between the polaroblasts, the valvogenic cells and between the two sporoblasts were observed. Following a 9-day treatment, all damage increased and, in addition, generative cells and two-cell stages were no longer detectable. As a first sign for the effects of salinomycin, following a 3-day treatment, a shrinking of the whole plasmodia occurred and the sutures in the pansporoblasts were enlarged. The polar capsules were malformed and the

  9. Treatment of relapse in herpes simplex on labial and facial areas and of primary herpes simplex on genital areas and "area pudenda" with low-power He-Ne laser or Acyclovir administered orally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velez-Gonzalez, Mariano; Urrea-Arbelaez, Alejandro; Nicolas, M.; Serra-Baldrich, E.; Perez, J. L.; Pavesi, M.; Camarasa, J. M.; Trelles, Mario A.

    1996-01-01

    Sixty patients (greater than 16 yrs old) suffering primary or relapse genital herpes simplex viruses (HSV) and relapse labial HSV were appointed for this study. Three or more relapses were experienced per year. Patients (under treatment) were divided into two groups (distribution areas), corresponding to either labial herpes or genital herpes. These groups were sub-divided into 3 groups. The total number of labial or facial HSV patients was 36 (10 in group 1, 12 in group 2, 14 in group 3) and 24 for genital, buttocks, or 'area pudenda' HSV patients (6 in group 1, 8 in group 2, 10 in group 3). The design was a randomized, double- blind study. The setting was hospital and outpatient. The patients diagnosed as having the HVS disease were sent to the dermatology department and were assigned to a group at random. Treatment was begun as follows: During the treatment signs and symptoms were assessed and after the treatment, the relapses were also assessed (biochemical and hematological tests before and after the treatment) and the diagnosis of the HSV type I and II. The statistical evaluation of the results was performed and carried out with the SPSS and BMDP program. The relapses of the herpes infection in the lips and the face were significantly reduced (p less than 0.026) in patients treated with laser He-Ne and laser He-Ne plus Acyclovir. The interim between the relapses also increased significantly (p less than 0.005) in relation with the group treated with Acyclovir. The duration of the herpetic eruptions was clearly reduced in all locations in patients treated with laser He-Ne plus Acyclovir. No differences were noted between patients treated with laser He-Ne only or Acyclovir only. Therefore it is probable that therapeutic synergism took place. In relation with this, laser He-Ne shows the same therapeutic efficacy as Acyclovir taken orally. The association of Acyclovir and laser Ne-Ne could be an alternative method for the treatment of HSV in the face. The number

  10. EMA401, an orally administered highly selective angiotensin II type 2 receptor antagonist, as a novel treatment for postherpetic neuralgia: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Rice, Andrew S C; Dworkin, Robert H; McCarthy, Tom D; Anand, Praveen; Bountra, Chas; McCloud, Philip I; Hill, Julie; Cutter, Gary; Kitson, Geoff; Desem, Nuket; Raff, Milton

    2014-05-10

    Existing treatments for postherpetic neuralgia, and for neuropathic pain in general, are limited by modest efficacy and unfavourable side-effects. The angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) is a new target for neuropathic pain. EMA401, a highly selective AT2R antagonist, is under development as a novel neuropathic pain therapeutic agent. We assessed the therapeutic potential of EMA401 in patients with postherpetic neuralgia. In this multicentre, placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomised, phase 2 clinical trial, we enrolled patients (aged 22-89 years) with postherpetic neuralgia of at least 6 months' duration from 29 centres across six countries. We randomly allocated 183 participants to receive either oral EMA401 (100 mg twice daily) or placebo for 28 days. Randomisation was done according to a centralised randomisation schedule, blocked by study site, which was generated by an independent, unmasked statistician. Patients and staff at each site were masked to treatment assignment. We assessed the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of EMA401. The primary efficacy endpoint was change in mean pain intensity between baseline and the last week of dosing (days 22-28), measured on an 11-point numerical rating scale. The primary efficacy analysis was intention to treat. This trial is registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, number ACTRN12611000822987. 92 patients were assigned to EMA401 and 91 were assigned to placebo. The patients given EMA401 reported significantly less pain compared with baseline values in the final week of treatment than did those given placebo (mean reductions in pain scores -2.29 [SD 1.75] vs -1.60 [1.66]; difference of adjusted least square means -0.69 [SE 0.25]; 95% CI -1.19 to -0.20; p=0.0066). No serious adverse events related to EMA401 occurred. Overall, 32 patients reported 56 treatment-emergent adverse events in the EMA401 group compared with 45 such events reported by 29 patients given placebo. EMA401 (100 mg

  11. Transfer of arachidonate from phosphatidylcholine to phosphatidylethanolamine and triacylglycerol in guinea pig alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Nijssen, J.G.; Oosting, R.S.; Nkamp, F.Pv.; van den Bosch, H.

    1986-10-01

    Guinea pig alveolar macrophages were labeled by incubation with either arachidonate or linoleate. Arachidonate labeled phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and triglycerides (TG) equally well, with each lipid containing about 30% of total cellular radioactivity. In comparison to arachidonate, linoleate was recovered significantly less in PE (7%) and more in TG (47%). To investigate whether redistributions of acyl chains among lipid classes took place, the macrophages were incubated with 1-acyl-2-(1-/sup 14/C)arachidonoyl PC or 1-acyl-2-(1-/sup 14/C)linoleoyl PC. After harvesting, the cells incubated with 1-acyl-2-(1-/sup 14/C)linoleoyl PC contained 86% of the recovered cellular radioactivity in PC, with only small amounts of label being transferred to PE and TG (3 and 6%, respectively). More extensive redistributions were observed with arachidonate-labeled PC. In this case, only 60% of cellular radioactivity was still associated with PC, while 22 and 12%, respectively, had been transferred to PE and TG. Arachidonate transfer from PC to PE was unaffected by an excess of free arachidonate which inhibited this transfer to TG for over 90%, indicating that different mechanisms or arachidonoyl CoA pools were involved in the transfer of arachidonate from PC to PE and TG. Cells prelabeled with 1-acyl-2-(1-/sup 14/C)arachidonoyl PC released /sup 14/C-label into the medium upon further incubation. This release was slightly stimulated by zymosan and threefold higher in the presence of the Ca2+-ionophore A23187. Labeling of macrophages with intact phospholipid molecules appears to be a suitable method for studying acyl chain redistribution and release reactions.

  12. Metabolic effects of orally administered small-molecule agonists of GPR55 and GPR119 in multiple low-dose streptozotocin-induced diabetic and incretin-receptor-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    McKillop, Aine M; Moran, Brian M; Abdel-Wahab, Yasser H A; Gormley, Noella M; Flatt, Peter R

    2016-12-01

    Abnormal cannabidiol (Abn-CBD) and AS-1269574 are potent selective agonists for GPR55 and GPR119, respectively. The present study evaluated the actions and ability of these small-molecule agonists to counteract experimental diabetes in mice. Diabetes was induced in NIH Swiss mice by five consecutive daily intraperitoneal injections of 40 mg/(kg body weight) streptozotocin. Diabetic mice received daily oral administration of Abn-CBD or AS-1269574 (0.1 μmol/kg) or saline vehicle (0.9% wt/vol. NaCl) over 28 days. Body weight, food intake, fluid intake, plasma glucose, insulin, glucose tolerance, insulin release, lipid profile and pancreatic morphology were examined. Mechanism of action of agonists was assessed in acute studies using incretin-receptor-knockout mice. Abn-CBD and AS-1269574 decreased plasma glucose (20-26%, p < 0.05) and increased circulating insulin (47-48%, p < 0.05) by 10-28 days, compared with saline-treated diabetic controls. Food intake and polydipsia were reduced by both agonists (21-23%, p < 0.05 and 33-35%, p < 0.01, respectively). After 28 days of treatment, plasma glucagon concentrations were reduced (p < 0.01) and glucose tolerance was enhanced by 19-44% by Abn-CBD (p < 0.05 or p < 0.001) and AS-1269574 (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001). Plasma insulin responses were improved (p < 0.01) and insulin resistance was decreased (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in both Abn-CBD- and AS-1269574-treated groups. Triacylglycerols were decreased by 19% with Abn-CBD (p < 0.05) and 32% with AS-1269574 (p < 0.01) while total cholesterol was reduced by 17% (p < 0.01) and 15% (p < 0.05), respectively. Both agonists enhanced beta cell proliferation (p < 0.001) although islet area was unchanged. Acute studies in Gipr- and Glp1r-knockout mice revealed an important role for the glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor in the actions of both agonists, with the glucose-lowering effects of Abn-CBD also partly

  13. Oral application of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Georgiades, J A; Fleischmann, W R

    1996-01-01

    A number of different laboratories reported on studies with orally administered interferons and cytokines. Their observations extend previous observations which showed that orally administered interferons and cytokines can exert both local and systemic effects. As difficult as it may be to understand how orally administered interferons and cytokines may exert both effects, the increasing number of laboratories that demonstrate biological effects with orally administered cytokines suggests that serious consideration be given to the possibility that orally administered interferons and cytokines can indeed exert effects. They also raise the possibility that these effects may have biological relevance for the treatment of human disease. Moreover, they may indicate that the nasal/oral region is a window on the environment. It is most important, however, to assure that these experiments are performed with special care to avoid presenting preliminary data that is not properly controlled. It is essential to carry out these studies with sufficient animals or patients to ascertain their significance; and to plan the studies as double-blind evaluations to avoid misinterpretations when subjective tests are used. Nevertheless, the overall data presented give one the impression of an area that should be pursued.

  14. Maternal arachidonic acid supplementation improves neurodevelopment of offspring from healthy and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinping; Del Bigio, Marc R; Weiler, Hope A

    2009-01-01

    Maternal diabetes may compromise infant arachidonic acid status and development. This study tested if maternal arachidonic acid supplementation improves neurodevelopment in rat offspring. Dams were randomized into 6 groups using a 3x2 design: Saline-Placebo, streptozotocin-induced diabetes with glucose controlled at <13mmol/L, or poorly controlled at 13-20mmol/L using insulin; and fed either control or an arachidonic acid (0.5% of fat) diet throughout reproduction. Offspring were tested on post-natal days 3 and 5 for righting response, days 7 and 9 for negative geotaxis, day 14 for wire hanging endurance, days 18 and 24 for rota rod endurance, and day 28 for Morris water maze performance. Only the poorly controlled group had impaired day 7 geotaxis and day 18 rota rod performance (p<0.02), but this improved with maternal arachidonic acid supplementation (p<0.0006). Arachidonic acid improved the wire hanging endurance (p=0.0003) and water maze latency (p=0.0021), suggesting enhanced neurodevelopment in all offspring.

  15. Adipose tissue arachidonic acid and the metabolic syndrome in Costa Rican adults.

    PubMed

    Williams, Eric S; Baylin, Ana; Campos, Hannia

    2007-08-01

    Arachidonic acid, a precursor to a series of inflammatory mediators, may contribute to the development of insulin resistance. We examined the association between adipose tissue arachidonic acid and the metabolic syndrome in Costa Rica, a country in which the metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent. The 484 study participants each provided a fasting blood sample and an adipose tissue biopsy that was analyzed for fatty acid composition. Criteria for the metabolic syndrome were those established in the Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel. The data were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. Subjects with greater adipose tissue arachidonic acid content had an increasing risk of the metabolic syndrome across quintiles: odds ratio (95% confidence interval), 1.00; 1.51 (0.78-2.91); 2.40 (1.26-4.55); 3.50 (1.84-6.66); and 6.01 (3.11-11.61); test for trend, P<0.0001, after adjustment for age, gender and area of residence. Further adjustment for metabolic risk factors, including adipose fatty acids and body mass index, did not significantly modify the result. Adipose tissue arachidonic acid was also independently associated with abdominal obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, elevated fasting glucose, and high blood pressure. This study identifies arachidonic acid as an important independent marker of metabolic dysregulation. A better understanding of the role of this fatty acid in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome is warranted.

  16. Effects of arachidonic acid on FFA4 receptor: Signaling, phosphorylation and internalization.

    PubMed

    Villegas-Comonfort, S; Takei, Y; Tsujimoto, G; Hirasawa, A; García-Sáinz, J A

    2017-02-01

    Arachidonic acid increased intracellular calcium, in cells expressing green fluorescent protein-tagged human FFA4 receptors, with an EC50 of ~40µM. This action was not blocked by cyclooxygenase or lipoxigenase inhibitors but it was inhibited by AH7614, a FFA4 antagonist. Arachidonic acid induced ERK activation accompanied by EGF receptor transactivation. However, EGF transactivation was not the major mechanism through which the fatty acid induced ERK phosphorylation, as evidenced by the inability of AG1478 to block it. Arachidonic acid increased FFA4 receptor phosphorylation that reached its maximum within 15min with an EC50 of ~30µM; inhibitors of protein kinase C partially diminish this effect and AH7614 blocked it. Arachidonic acid induced rapid and sustained Akt/PKB phosphorylation and FFA4 - β-arrestin interaction. Confocal microscopy evidenced that FFA4 receptor activation and phosphorylation were associated to internalization. In conclusion, arachidonic acid is a bona fide FFA4 receptor agonist.

  17. The essentiality of arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hau D.; Meisel, Jonathan A.; de Meijer, Vincent E.; Gura, Kathleen M.; Puder, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this review is to correlate the clinical finding that patients receiving parenteral nutrition with a fish oil-based lipid emulsion do not develop essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD) with an experimental murine model, thus showing that arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are likely to be the essential fatty acids. Background Conventional belief is that linoleic acid (LA, omega-6) and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, omega-3) are the essential fatty acids (EFAs). We have shown that a fish oil-based lipid emulsion containing AA (omega-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, omega-3) and insignificant quantities of LA and ALA is efficacious in the treatment of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD), a major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality. The prospect of using a fish oil-based lipid emulsion as monotherapy has raised concerns of EFAD development, hindering its adoption into clinical practice. Design Data from patients in our institution who received PN with a fish oil-based lipid emulsion was reviewed for clinical and biochemical evidence of EFAD, defined as an elevated triene-tetraene ratio (Mead acid/AA >0.2). We also investigated the minimum amount of fish oil required to prevent EFAD in a murine model and determined whether DHA and AA alone can prevent EFAD. Results No patients receiving PN with a fish oil-based lipid emulsion in our institution have developed biochemical or clinical evidence of EFAD such as an elevated triene-tetraene ratio, growth retardation or dermatitis. This observation parallels our previously published animal studies, which demonstrated prevention of EFAD when thirteen percent of total calories were from fish oil. Moreover, current work in our laboratory shows that AA and DHA provision alone is sufficient to prevent biochemical and physiologic evidence of EFAD in a murine model. Conclusions When dosed appropriately, fish oil-based lipid emulsions contain sufficient EFAs to

  18. Hepatic arachidonic acid metabolism is disrupted after hexachlorobenzene treatment.

    PubMed

    Billi de Catabbi, Silvia C; Faletti, Alicia; Fuentes, Federico; San Martín de Viale, Leonor C; Cochón, Adriana C

    2005-04-15

    Hexaclorobenzene (HCB), one of the most persistent environmental pollutants, can cause a wide range of toxic effects including cancer in animals, and hepatotoxicity and porphyria both in humans and animals. In the present study, liver microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism, hepatic PGE production, and cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) activity were investigated in an experimental model of porphyria cutanea tarda induced by HCB. Female Wistar rats were treated with a single daily dose of HCB (100 mg kg(-1) body weight) for 5 days and were sacrificed 3, 10, 17, and 52 days after the last dose. HCB treatment induced the accumulation of hepatic porphyrins from day 17 and increased the activities of liver ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), methoxyresorufin O-demethylase (MROD), and aminopyrine N-demethylase (APND) from day 3 after the last dose. Liver microsomes from control and HCB-treated rats generated, in the presence of NADPH, hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), 11,12-Di HETE, and omega-OH/omega-1-OH AA. HCB treatment caused an increase in total NADPH CYP-dependent AA metabolism, with a higher response at 3 days after the last HCB dose than at the other time points studied. In addition, HCB treatment markedly enhanced PGE production and release in liver slices. This HCB effect was time dependent and reached its highest level after 10 days. At this time cPLA2 activity was shown to be increased. Unexpectedly, HCB produced a significant decrease in cPLA2 activity on the 17th and 52nd day. Our results demonstrated for the first time that HCB induces both the cyclooxygenase and CYP-dependent AA metabolism. The effects of HCB on AA metabolism were previous to the onset of a marked porphyria and might contribute to different aspects of HCB-induced liver toxicity such as alterations of membrane fluidity and membrane-bound protein function. Observations also suggested that a possible role of cPLA2

  19. Anti-inflammatory signaling actions of electrophilic nitro-arachidonic acid in vascular cells and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Trostchansky, Andrés; Rubbo, Homero

    2017-03-01

    Nitrated derivatives of unsaturated fatty acids (nitro-fatty acids) are being formed and detected in human plasma, cell membranes and tissue, triggering signaling cascades via covalent and reversible post-translational modifications of nucleophilic amino acids in transcriptional regulatory proteins. Arachidonic acid (AA) represents a precursor of potent signaling molecules, i.e., prostaglandins and thromboxanes through enzymatic and non-enzymatic oxidative pathways. Arachidonic acid can be nitrated by reactive nitrogen species leading to the formation of nitro-arachidonic acid (NO2-AA). A critical issue is the influence of NO2-AA on prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthases, modulating inflammatory processes through redirection of AA metabolism and signaling. In this prospective article, we describe the key chemical and biochemical actions of NO2-AA in vascular and astrocytes. This includes the ability of NO2-AA to mediate unique redox signaling anti-inflammatory actions along with its therapeutic potential.

  20. Fatty acid remodeling by LPCAT3 enriches arachidonate in phospholipid membranes and regulates triglyceride transport

    PubMed Central

    Hashidate-Yoshida, Tomomi; Harayama, Takeshi; Hishikawa, Daisuke; Morimoto, Ryo; Hamano, Fumie; Tokuoka, Suzumi M; Eto, Miki; Tamura-Nakano, Miwa; Yanobu-Takanashi, Rieko; Mukumoto, Yoshiko; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Okamura, Tadashi; Kita, Yoshihiro; Shindou, Hideo; Shimizu, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in phospholipids affect the physical properties of membranes, but it is unclear which biological processes are influenced by their regulation. For example, the functions of membrane arachidonate that are independent of a precursor role for eicosanoid synthesis remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the lack of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (LPCAT3) leads to drastic reductions in membrane arachidonate levels, and that LPCAT3-deficient mice are neonatally lethal due to an extensive triacylglycerol (TG) accumulation and dysfunction in enterocytes. We found that high levels of PUFAs in membranes enable TGs to locally cluster in high density, and that this clustering promotes efficient TG transfer. We propose a model of local arachidonate enrichment by LPCAT3 to generate a distinct pool of TG in membranes, which is required for normal directionality of TG transfer and lipoprotein assembly in the liver and enterocytes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06328.001 PMID:25898003

  1. Effect of progesterone on the release of arachidonic acid from human endometrial cells stimulated by histamine

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T.; Liggins, G.C.; Aimer, G.P.; Watkins, E.J.

    1986-02-01

    Progesterone at concentrations of 10(-7)M and 10(-8)M inhibits release of (/sup 3/H)-arachidonic acid from stimulated, perfused, endometrial cells. The effect is independent of the mechanism of stimulation. Cortisol (10(-5)M but not 10(-7)M) has a similar effect in this system but estradiol (10(-7)M) is without effect. There was a positive correlation (p less than 0.05) between the magnitude of inhibition by progesterone and the day of cycle. The inhibitory action of progesterone on the release of arachidonic acid was greater in endometrial cells than in decidual cells and was apparent after fifteen minutes. The activities of commercial and endometrial cell-free preparations of phospholipase A2 and phospholipase C were unaffected by the presence of progesterone. We conclude that progesterone modulates release of (/sup 3/H)-arachidonic acid from endometrial cells by a rapid, indirect action on phospholipase activity.

  2. The stimulation of arachidonic acid metabolism in human platelets by hydrodynamic stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajagopalan, Sridhar; Mcintire, Larry V.; Hall, Elizabeth R.; Wu, Kenneth K.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of stimulating human platelets by thrombin and by hydrodynamic stresses on the platelets' arachidonic acid metabolism were investigated using (1-C-14)-arachidonic acid label and a specially designed viscometer that ensured laminar shear flow with a nearly uniform shear rate throughout the flow region. It was found that platelets activated by thrombin formed principally thromboxane A2, 12-hydroxy 5,8,10-heptadecatrienoic acid and 12-hydroxy 5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE). On the other hand, platelets activated by shear, formed only 12-HETE (although arachidonic acid metabolism was stimulated); no cyclooxygenase metabolites were detected. Results indicate that platelets may greatly increase their 12-HETE production when activated by passage through a high-stress region of the circulation, such as an atherosclerotic stenosis.

  3. Changes in arachidonic acid metabolism in UV-irradiated hairless mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Ruzicka, T.; Walter, J.F.; Printz, M.P.

    1983-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the metabolism of arachidonic acid in the skin of hairless mice exposed to UVA, PUVA, UVB, and UVC irradiation. The main products of arachidonic acid in the epidermis were hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE), PGE2, and PGD2. Dermis displayed a lower lipoxygenase activity (expressed as HETE production) than the epidermis and showed no detectable cyclooxygenase activity, i.e., no prostaglandin production. The main changes observed in UV-induced inflammatory reactions were as follows. 1. A 5-fold increase in dermal HETE production in PUVA-treated animals and a 29% reduction in epidermal HETE formation after UVC treatment. 2. A marked decrease of PGD2 and a marked increase of PGE2 formation due to alterations of PGH2 metabolism in the UVB-treated group; however, cyclooxygenase activity was unchanged. These changes in arachidonic acid metabolism in the skin may be of pathophysiologic importance in UV-induced inflammatory reaction.

  4. Effects of arachidonic acid on the lysosomal ion permeability and osmotic stability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gu; Yi, Ya-Ping; Zhang, Guo-Jiang

    2006-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of arachidonic acid, a PLA2-produced lipid metabolite, on the lysosomal permeability, osmotic sensitivity and stability. Through the measurements of lysosomal beta-hexosaminidase free activity, membrane potential, intralysosomal pH, and lysosomal latency loss in hypotonic sucrose medium, we established that arachidonic acid could increase the lysosomal permeability to both potassium ions and protons, and enhance the lysosomal osmotic sensitivity. As a result, the fatty-acid-promoted entry of potassium ions into the lysosomes via K+/H+ exchange, which could produce osmotic imbalance across their membranes and osmotically destabilize the lysosomes. In addition, the enhancement of lysosomal osmotic sensitivity caused the lysosomes to become more liable to destabilization in osmotic shock. The results suggest that arachidonic acid may play a role in the lysosomal destabilization.

  5. Arachidonic acid metabolites mediate the radiation-induced increase in glomerular albumin permeability.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mukut; McCarthy, Ellen T; Sharma, Ram; Fish, Brian L; Savin, Virginia J; Cohen, Eric P; Moulder, John E

    2006-01-01

    Radiation-induced renal injury is characterized by proteinuria, hypertension, and progressive decline in renal function. We have previously shown that in vivo or in vitro irradiation of glomeruli with a single dose of radiation (9.5 Gy) increases glomerular albumin permeability (P(alb)) within 1 hr. The current studies tested the hypothesis that this early radiation-induced increase in P(alb) is caused by the release of arachidonic acid and by the generation of specific arachidonic acid metabolites. Glomeruli obtained from WAG/Rij/MCW rats and cultured rat glomerular epithelial and mesangial cells were studied after irradiation (9.5 Gy, single dose). Arachidonic acid release and eicosanoid synthesis by glomeruli or cultured glomerular cells were measured after irradiation, and the effect of inhibitors of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and cyclooxygenase (COX) on the irradiation-induced increase in P(alb) was assessed. Arachidonic acid release was demonstrated within 10 mins of irradiation of isolated glomeruli and monolayer cultures of glomerular epithelial and mesangial cells. Prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)) and PGE2 release was increased after irradiation of isolated glomeruli. Blocking arachidonic acid release or COX activity before irradiation completely prevented the increase in P(alb). COX inhibition immediately after irradiation also diminished the radiation-induced increase in P(alb). We conclude that arachidonic acid and its COX metabolites play an essential role in the early cellular changes that lead to the radiation-induced increase in P(alb). Understanding of the early epigenetic effects of irradiation may lead to new intervention strategies against radiation-induced injury of normal tissues.

  6. The effect of fluid mechanical stress on cellular arachidonic acid metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintire, L. V.; Frangos, J. A.; Rhee, B. G.; Eskin, S. G.; Hall, E. R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of sublytic levels of mechanical perturations of cells on cell metabolism were investigated by analyzing the products of arachidonic acid (used as a marker metabolite) in blood platelets, polymorphonuclear leucocytes, and cultured umbilical-vein endothelial cells after the suspensions of these cells were subjected to a shear stress in a modified viscometer. It is shown that the sublytic levels of mechanical stress stimulated the arachidonic acid metabolism in all these cell types. Possible biological implications of this stress-metabolism coupling are discussed.

  7. [Antiaggregation activity of arachidonic acid conjugates with neurotropic peptides proglyprol and semax].

    PubMed

    Bezuglov, V V; Gretskaia, N M; Vasil'eva, T M; Petrukhina, G N; Andreeva, L A; Miasoedov, N F; Makarov, V A

    2014-01-01

    The influence two original derivatives of a therapeutically important peptide, bearing arachidonic acid residue with semax and proglyprol, upon platelet aggregation have been studied in vitro. It is established that both derivatives, in contrast to the parent peptide, possess moderate anti-aggregant properties and produce a dose-dependent decrease in the interplatelet interaction induced by ADP, epinephrine, and arachidonic acid within the concentration range of 0.018 - 1.8 mM. This activity was more pronounced for arachidonoylsemax in comparison with arachidonoylproglyprol.

  8. Effect of Arachidonic Acid on Twitch Tension of the Rat Phrenic Nerve- Diaphragm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    arachidonic acid-induced re- KANDASAMY , S . Bt. AND HUNT, W. A.; Arachidonic at-id and prostaglandins duction of twitch tension, both tended to attenuate the...samy and Hunt, 1990). It has also been reported to modulate t la.Teognbt ouin10mtws18m ’~ 2 1mto clean. The organ bath s l tion (61) ml I was 1.8• mM...Act (U.S.) and the 10% of the corresponding mean. Received for publication March 27, 1992. Results S A preliminary account of this research wan

  9. Neuroprotective effects of arachidonic acid against oxidative stress on rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ze-Jian; Liang, Cui-Ling; Li, Guang-Mei; Yu, Cai-Yi; Yin, Ming

    2006-11-07

    Arachidonic acid (AA), 5,8,11,14-eicosateraenoic acid is abundant, active and necessary in the human body. In the present study, we reported the neuroprotective effects and mechanism of arachidonic acid on hippocampal slices insulted by glutamate, NaN(3) or H(2)O(2)in vitro. Different types of models of brain injury in vitro were developed by 1mM glutamate, 10mM NaN(3) or 2mM H(2)O(2). After 30 min of preincubation with arachidonic acid or linoleic acid, hippocampal slices were subjected to glutamate, NaN(3) or H(2)O(2), then the tissue activities were evaluated by using the 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride method. Endogenous antioxidant enzymes activities (SOD, GSH-PX and catalase) in hippocampal slices were evaluated during the course of incubation. MK886 (5 microM; a noncompetitive inhibitor of proliferator-activated receptor [PPAR]alpha), BADGE (bisphenol A diglycidyl ether; 100 microM; an antagonist of PPARgamma) and cycloheximide (CHX; 30 microM; an inhibitor of protein synthesis) were tested for their effects on the neuroprotection afforded by arachidonic acid. Population spikes were recorded in randomly selected hippocapal slices. Arachidonic acid (1-10 microM) dose dependently protected hippocampal slices from glutamate and H(2)O(2) injury (P<0.01), and arachidonic acid (10 microM) can significantly improve the activities of Cu/Zn-SOD in hippocampal slices after 1h incubation. In addition, 10 microM arachidonic acid significantly increased the activity of Mn-SOD and catalase, and decreased the activities of Cu/Zn-SOD to control value after 3h incubation. These secondary changes of SOD during incubation can be reversed by indomethacine (10 microM; a nonspecific cyclooxygenase inhibitor) or AA 861 (20 microM; a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor). Its neuroprotective effect was completely abolished by BADGE and CHX. These observations reveal that arachidonic acid can defense against oxidative stress by boosting the internal antioxidant system of hippocampal slices

  10. The effect of fluid mechanical stress on cellular arachidonic acid metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintire, L. V.; Frangos, J. A.; Rhee, B. G.; Eskin, S. G.; Hall, E. R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of sublytic levels of mechanical perturations of cells on cell metabolism were investigated by analyzing the products of arachidonic acid (used as a marker metabolite) in blood platelets, polymorphonuclear leucocytes, and cultured umbilical-vein endothelial cells after the suspensions of these cells were subjected to a shear stress in a modified viscometer. It is shown that the sublytic levels of mechanical stress stimulated the arachidonic acid metabolism in all these cell types. Possible biological implications of this stress-metabolism coupling are discussed.

  11. COMPUTER ADMINISTERED INSTRUCTION VERSUS TRADITIONALLY ADMINISTERED INSTRUCTION, ECONOMICS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KOPSTEIN, FELIX F.; SEIDEL, ROBERT J.

    AN ATTEMPT IS MADE TO ASSESS THE ECONOMICS OF COMPUTER ASSISTED INSTRUCTION (CAI) VERSUS TRADITIONALLY ADMINISTERED INSTRUCTION (TAI) IN CONTROLLING THE STRUCTURE OF THE LEARNER'S STIMULUS ENVIRONMENT IN TEACHING AND TRAINING SITUATIONS. THERE IS A DISCUSSION OF THE NEED FOR A SOUND, OBJECTIVE ECONOMIC APPRAISAL OF THE VALUE TO SOCIETY OF…

  12. Biodegradable Bioadherent Microcapsules for Orally Administered Sustained Release Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-05-01

    2,2’-azinobis(3- ethylbenzothiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) was purchased from Pierce. BSA, 25% glutaraldehyde in 1 ml ampoules, olive oil , castor...type of emulsifying oil. BSA microspheres were prepared in hexadecane, olive oil , and castor oil at a variety of stirrer speeds ranging from 300 to...subsequent microspheres were prepared in olive oil at 1,200 rpm. I I.I I S100. .’ o 0

  13. Loss of orally administered drugs in GI tract

    PubMed Central

    Gavhane, Yogeshkumar Nanasaheb; Yadav, Adhikrao Vyankatrao

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a broad perspective on intestinal absorption and the impact of intestinal first-pass metabolism on both clearance and drug–drug interaction prediction along with its historical perspectives. The review also considers abilities to bridge the gap between the increasing amount of intestinal in vitro data and the importance of intestinal first-pass metabolism in vivo. The significance of efflux transporters on the intestinal absorption is also discussed. PMID:23960808

  14. Development and preclinical evaluation of safety and immunogenicity of an oral ETEC vaccine containing inactivated E. coli bacteria overexpressing colonization factors CFA/I, CS3, CS5 and CS6 combined with a hybrid LT/CT B subunit antigen, administered alone and together with dmLT adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Holmgren, J; Bourgeois, L; Carlin, N; Clements, J; Gustafsson, B; Lundgren, A; Nygren, E; Tobias, J; Walker, R; Svennerholm, A-M

    2013-05-07

    A first-generation oral inactivated whole-cell enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) vaccine, comprising formalin-killed ETEC bacteria expressing different colonization factor (CF) antigens combined with cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), when tested in phase III studies did not significantly reduce overall (generally mild) ETEC diarrhea in travelers or children although it reduced more severe ETEC diarrhea in travelers by almost 80%. We have now developed a novel more immunogenic ETEC vaccine based on recombinant non-toxigenic E. coli strains engineered to express increased amounts of CF antigens, including CS6 as well as an ETEC-based B subunit protein (LCTBA), and the optional combination with a nontoxic double-mutant heat-labile toxin (LT) molecule (dmLT) as an adjuvant. Two test vaccines were prepared under GMP: (1) A prototype E. coli CFA/I-only formalin-killed whole-cell+LCTBA vaccine, and (2) A "complete" inactivated multivalent ETEC-CF (CFA/I, CS3, CS5 and CS6 antigens) whole-cell+LCTBA vaccine. These vaccines, when given intragastrically alone or together with dmLT in mice, were well tolerated and induced strong intestinal-mucosal IgA antibody responses as well as serum IgG and IgA responses to each of the vaccine CF antigens as well as to LT B subunit (LTB). Both mucosal and serum responses were further enhanced (adjuvanted) when the vaccines were co-administered with dmLT. We conclude that the new multivalent oral ETEC vaccine, both alone and especially in combination with the dmLT adjuvant, shows great promise for further testing in humans.

  15. Comparison of orally administered cannabis extract and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in treating patients with cancer-related anorexia-cachexia syndrome: a multicenter, phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial from the Cannabis-In-Cachexia-Study-Group.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Florian; Luftner, Diana; Possinger, Kurt; Ernst, Gernot; Ruhstaller, Thomas; Meissner, Winfried; Ko, You-Dschun; Schnelle, Martin; Reif, Marcus; Cerny, Thomas

    2006-07-20

    To compare the effects of cannabis extract (CE), delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and placebo (PL) on appetite and quality of life (QOL) in patients with cancer-related anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS). Adult patients with advanced cancer, CACS, weight loss (> or = 5% over 6 months), and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS) < or = 2 were randomly assigned (2:2:1) to receive CE (standardized for 2.5 mg THC and 1 mg cannabidiol) or THC (2.5 mg) or PL orally, twice daily for 6 weeks. Appetite, mood, and nausea were monitored daily with a visual analog scale (VAS); QOL was assessed with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 (composite score: questions 29 and 30). Cannabinoid-related toxicity was assessed every 2 weeks. Of 289 patients screened, 243 were randomly assigned and 164 (CE, 66 of 95 patients; THC, 65 of 100 patients; and PL, 33 of 48 patients) completed treatment. At baseline, groups were comparable for age (mean, 61 years), sex (54% men), weight loss (32% > or = 10%), PS (13% ECOG = 2), antineoplastic treatment (50%), appetite (mean VAS score, 31/100 mm), and QOL (mean score, 30/100). Intent-to-treat analysis showed no significant differences between the three arms for appetite, QOL, or cannabinoid-related toxicity. Increased appetite was reported by 73%, 58%, and 69% of patients receiving CE, THC, or PL, respectively. An independent data review board recommended termination of recruitment because of insufficient differences between study arms. CE at the oral dose administered was well tolerated by these patients with CACS. No differences in patients' appetite or QOL were found either between CE, THC, and PL or between CE and THC at the dosages investigated.

  16. Chronic Valproate Treatment Blocks D2-like Receptor-Mediated Brain Signaling via Arachidonic Acid in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Epolia; Basselin, Mireille; Taha, Ameer Y.; Cheon, Yewon; Chang, Lisa; Chen, Mei; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective Hyperdopaminergic signaling and an upregulated brain arachidonic acid (AA) cascade may contribute to bipolar disorder (BD). Lithium and carbamazepine, FDA-approved for the treatment of BD, attenuate brain dopaminergic D2-like (D2, D3, and D4) receptor signaling involving AA when given chronically to awake rats. We hypothesized that valproate (VPA), with mood-stabilizing properties, would also reduce the D2-like-mediated signaling via AA. Methods An acute dose of quinpirole (1 mg/kg) or saline was administered to unanesthetized rats that had been treated for 30 days with a therapeutically relevant dose of VPA (200 mg/kg/day) or vehicle. Regional brain AA incorporation coefficients, k*, and incorporation rates, Jin, markers of AA signaling and metabolism, were measured by quantitative autoradiography after intravenous [1-14C]AA infusion. Whole brain concentrations of prostaglandin (PG)E2 and thromboxane (TX)B2 also were measured. Results Quinpirole compared to saline significantly increased k* in 40 of 83 brain regions, and increased brain concentrations of PGE2 in chronic vehicle-treated rats. VPA treatment by itself reduced concentrations of plasma unesterified AA and whole brain PGE2 and TXB2, and blocked the quinpirole-induced increments in k* and PGE2. Conclusion These results further support our hypothesis that similar to lithium and carbamazepine, VPA downregulates brain dopaminergic D2-like receptor-signaling involving AA. PMID:21839100

  17. Arachidonic Acid Metabolism Regulates Escherichia coli Penetration of the Blood-Brain Barrier▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Longkun; Maruvada, Ravi; Sapirstein, Adam; Malik, Kafait U.; Peters-Golden, Marc; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli K1 meningitis occurs following penetration of the blood-brain barrier, but the underlying mechanisms involved in E. coli penetration of the blood-brain barrier remain incompletely understood. We have previously shown that host cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) contributes to E. coli invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), which constitute the blood-brain barrier, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. cPLA2α selectively liberates arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids. Here, we provide the first direct evidence that host 5-lipoxygenase and lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid, cysteinyl leukotrienes (LTs), contribute to E. coli K1 invasion of HBMEC and penetration into the brain, and their contributions involve protein kinase C alpha (PKCα). These findings demonstrate that arachidonic acid metabolism regulates E. coli penetration of the blood-brain barrier, and studies are needed to further elucidate the mechanisms involved with metabolic products of arachidonic acid for their contribution to E. coli invasion of the blood-brain barrier. PMID:20696828

  18. Amyloid Plaque-Associated Oxidative Degradation of Uniformly Radiolabeled Arachidonic Acid.

    PubMed

    Furman, Ran; Murray, Ian V J; Schall, Hayley E; Liu, Qiwei; Ghiwot, Yonatan; Axelsen, Paul H

    2016-03-16

    Oxidative stress is a frequently observed feature of Alzheimer's disease, but its pathological significance is not understood. To explore the relationship between oxidative stress and amyloid plaques, uniformly radiolabeled arachidonate was introduced into transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease via intracerebroventricular injection. Uniform labeling with carbon-14 is used here for the first time, and made possible meaningful quantification of arachidonate oxidative degradation products. The injected arachidonate entered a fatty acid pool that was subject to oxidative degradation in both transgenic and wild-type animals. However, the extent of its degradation was markedly greater in the hippocampus of transgenic animals where amyloid plaques were abundant. In human Alzheimer's brain, plaque-associated proteins were post-translationally modified by hydroxynonenal, a well-known oxidative degradation product of arachidonate. These results suggest that several recurring themes in Alzheimer's pathogenesis, amyloid β proteins, transition metal ions, oxidative stress, and apolipoprotein isoforms, may be involved in a common mechanism that has the potential to explain both neuronal loss and fibril formation in this disease.

  19. Dexamethasone blocks arachidonate biosynthesis in isolated hepatocytes and cultured hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, C.A.; de Alaniz, M.J.; Brenner, R.R.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of dexamethasone on the incorporation and conversion of (1-14C)eicosa-8,11,14-trienoic acid to arachidonic acid in isolated hepatocytes and in hepatoma tissue culture (HTC) cells was studied. In both kinds of cells, no changes in the exogenous acid incorporation were found when the hormone was added to the incubation media at 0.1 or 0.2 mM concentration, while the biosynthesis of arachidonic acid was significantly depressed. The effect on the biosynthesis was faster in isolated normal liver cells (60 min) than in tumoral cells (120 min) and reached an inhibition of ca. 50% after 3 hr of treatment. The addition of cycloheximide (10(-6) M) also caused a marked decrease in the biosynthesis of this polyunsaturated fatty acid, but when dexamethasone was added to the media simultaneously with cycloheximide, a synergistic action was not observed. The results obtained show that protein synthesis would be involved in the modulation of the biosynthesis of arachidonic acid by glucocorticoids. The changes in the delta 5 desaturation of labeled 20:3 omega 6 to arachidonic acid correlated with changes in the fatty acid composition in isolated cells.

  20. Pathological regulation of arachidonic acid release in cystic fibrosis: the putative basic defect.

    PubMed Central

    Carlstedt-Duke, J; Brönnegård, M; Strandvik, B

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of arachidonic acid release from membrane phospholipids was investigated in lymphocytes from patients with cystic fibrosis as well as control patients. No effect of either dexamethasone or fetal calf serum was seen on arachidonic acid release from cystic fibrosis lymphocytes, in contrast to control lymphocytes. In the latter cells, arachidonic acid release was inhibited by dexamethasone, fetal calf serum, or both. There were no differences in glucocorticoid receptor in lymphocytes from the two groups with regard to Kd and number of binding sites per cell. Furthermore, dexamethasone inhibited the incorporation of thymidine into lymphocytes from either group, indicating a normal functional glucocorticoid receptor. The defective regulation of arachidonic acid, resulting in an increased turnover, can explain many of the findings in cystic fibrosis, and we hypothesize that it is the basic defect causing the disease. The defect occurs at a level after the glucocorticoid receptor, which is functionally normal, and involves either the glucocorticoid-dependent phospholipase-inhibitory protein lipomodulin (lipocortin) or phospholipase A2. PMID:3097647

  1. Identification of an Arachidonic Acid-Producing Bacterium and Description of Kineococcus arachidonicus sp. nov.

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.

    2001-05-15

    The identification of bacterial with the ability to produce polyunsaturated fatty acids as been limited almost exclusively to gram-negative, psychrophilic, marine microorganisms. Here we describe a new gram-type-positive bactgerium, strain SRS30216T, that produces the polyunsaturated fatty acid, arachidonic acid, and is neither psychrophilic nor a marine isolate.

  2. Hyperglycemia-induced teratogenesis is mediated by a functional deficiency of arachidonic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, A S; Baker, L; Piddington, R; Marx, B; Herold, R; Egler, J

    1985-01-01

    Congenital malformations now represent the largest single cause of mortality in the infant of the diabetic mother. The mechanism by which diabetes exerts its teratogenic effects is not known. This study evaluated whether arachidonic acid might be involved, a possibility raised by the role of arachidonic acid in palatal elevation and fusion, processes analogous to neural tube folding and fusion. This hypothesis was tested in two animal models of diabetic embryopathy, the in vivo pregnant diabetic rat and the in vitro hyperglycemic mouse embryo culture. The subcutaneous injection of arachidonic acid (200-400 mg/kg per day) into pregnant diabetic rats during the period of organ differentiation (days 6-12) did not alter the maternal glucose concentration, the maternal weight gain, or the weight of the embryos. However, the incidence of neural tube fusion defects was reduced from 11% to 3.8% (P less than 0.005), the frequency of cleft palate was reduced from 11% to 4% (P less than 0.005), and the incidence of micrognathia was reduced from 7% to 0.8% (P less than 0.001). The addition of arachidonic acid to B10.A mouse embryos in culture also resulted in a reversal of hyperglycemia-induced teratogenesis. The teratogenic effect of D-glucose (8 mg/ml) in the medium resulted in normal neural tube fusion in only 32% of the embryos (P less than 0.006 when compared to controls). Arachidonic acid supplementation (1 or 10 micrograms/ml) produced a rate of neural tube fusion (67%) that was not significantly different from that observed in controls. The evidence presented indicates that arachidonic acid supplementation exerts a significant protective effect against the teratogenic action of hyperglycemia in both in vivo (rat) and in vitro (mouse) animal models. These data therefore suggest that the mechanism mediating the teratogenic effect of an increased glucose concentration involves a functional deficiency of arachi