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Sample records for orav tiiu kailas

  1. Radiation Loss and Impurity Abundance during ICRF Heating in the JIPP T-IIU Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Isamu; Kawahata, Kazuo; Ogawa, Yuichi; Watari, Tetsuo; Noda, Nobuaki; Masai, Kuniaki; Kako, Eiji; Tanahashi, Shyugo; Toi, Kazuo; Fujita, Junji

    1987-02-01

    Spectroscopic and bolometric measurements with spatial and temporal resolution show that large radiation loss brings about the decrease in electron and ion temperature and plasma energy. Regarding emissivity in a core plasma, the result by bolometric measurements well agrees with that estimated from impurity abundance and radiative cooling rates. Carbon limiters have an effect to suppress the radiation loss for Ohmic plasma, but is insufficient for ICRF heated plasma. The main contribution to radiation loss may be attributed to Fe impurity released from the ICRF antennae, the Faraday shield and vacuum vessel. By making carbonization, the Fe impurity is suppressed to a low level (nFe/ne˜0.03%) and the radiation loss is reduced to Prad/(POH+Pfr)˜20%. This clearly supported by the observation of Zeff (3.9→1.2).

  2. Miocene burial and exhumation of the India-Asia collision zone in southern Tibet: response to slab dynamics and erosion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carrapa, Barbara; Orme, D.A.; DeCelles, Peter G.; Kapp, Paul; Cosca, Michael A.; Waldrip, R.

    2014-01-01

    The India-Asia collision zone in southern Tibet preserves a record of geodynamic and erosional processes following intercontinental collision. Apatite fission-track and zircon and apatite (U-Th)/He data from the Oligocene–Miocene Kailas Formation, within the India-Asia collision zone, show a synchronous cooling signal at 17 ± 1 Ma, which is younger than the ca. 26–21 Ma depositional age of the Kailas Formation, constrained by U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, and requires heating (burial) after ca. 21 Ma and subsequent rapid exhumation. Data from the Gangdese batholith underlying the Kailas Formation also indicate Miocene exhumation. The thermal history of the Kailas Formation is consistent with rapid subsidence during a short-lived phase of early Miocene extension followed by uplift and exhumation driven by rollback and northward underthrusting of the Indian plate, respectively. Significant removal of material from the India-Asia collision zone was likely facilitated by efficient incision of the paleo–Indus River and paleo–Yarlung River in response to drainage reorganization and/or intensification of the Asian monsoon.

  3. An Arctic Child. An Active Learning Pack for 8-13 Year Olds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyle, Sue; Roberts, Maggy

    This resource packet includes: a teacher's guide; reproducible student worksheets; student activity cards; a simulation game; and a picture book, "The Gifts of 'Kaila.'" The materials are organized in three parts. Part one aims to help students understand something of the beauty and magnificence of the Arctic. Introductory activities include art…

  4. Turnaround Schools and the Leadership They Require

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leithwood, Kenneth; Strauss, Tiiu

    2008-01-01

    "Turnaround Schools and the Leadership They Require" was commissioned by the Canadian Education Association (CEA) in 2006. The research, conducted by Kenneth Leithwood and Tiiu Strauss, was a two-year study of Ontario schools identified as in need of "turnaround" meaning that a significant improvement in school achievement was required. The study…

  5. Resettling the Thoughts of Ernst Mach and the Vienna Circle in Europe: The Cases of Finland and Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemsen, Hayo; Siemsen, Karl Hayo

    2009-04-01

    Although it is generally assumed that the thoughts of Ernst Mach and the scientific fields he influenced (in this case psychophysics and Gestalt psychology) emigrated from Europe during Second World War they apparently survived in Finland, influencing the Finnish education system. The following article evaluates this relationship and its implications from a historical and an empirical perspective. In empirical studies comparing the education systems of different countries, such as PISA, the Finns are in general regarded as being very successful with their school system. Does this apparent success have anything to do with a Machian influence? Our current research has so far revealed that the Finns have gone through an independent cultural development in two specific aspects: in the idea of the development of the individual personality (Snellman) and in a specific phenomenalism (developed primarily by Eino Kaila, in which Kaila was heavily influenced in this by Ernst Mach). The result can be regarded as a nation-wide “Experiment”, the empirical evaluation of which can be found partly in the statistics of the PISA Studies, especially the evaluation of Finland in relation to other countries.

  6. Quick profile-reoriganization driven by helical field perturbation for suppressing tokamak major disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Kawahata, K.; Ando, R.; Matsuoka, K.; Hirokura, S.; Kitagawa, S.; Mohri, A.; Tanahashi, S.; Taniguchi, Y.; Toi, K.

    1986-09-01

    Disruptive behavior of magnetic field configuration leading to tokamak major disruption is found to be controlled by a mild mini-disruption which is induced by the compact external modular multipole-field coils with m=3/n=2 dominant helical field component in the JIPP T-IIU tokamak. This mini-disruption ergodizes the m=2/n=1 magnetic island quickly but mildly and then prevents the profile of electron temperature from flattening. This quick profile-reorganization is effective to avoid the two-step disruption (pre- and major disruptions) responsible for the catastrophic current termination.

  7. Tertiary deformation history of southeastern and southwestern Tibet during the Indo-Asian collision

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, A.; Harrison, T.M.; Murphy, M.A.; Grove, M.; Nie, S.; Ryerson, F.J.; Feng, W.X.; Le, C.Z.

    1999-11-01

    Geologic mapping and geochronological analysis in southwest (Kailas area) and southeast (Zedong area) Tibet reveal two major episodes of Tertiary crustal shortening along the classic Indus-Tsangpo suture in the Yalu River valley. The older event occurred between ca. 30 and 24 Ma during movement along the north-dipping Gangdese thrust. The development of this thrust caused extensive denudation of the Gangdese batholith in its hanging wall and underthrusting of the Xigase forearc strata in its footwall. Examination of timing of major tectonic events in central Asia suggests that the initiation of the Gangdese thrust was approximately coeval with the late Oligocene initiation and development of north-south shortening in the eastern Kunlun Shan of northern Tibet, the Nan Shan at the northeastern end of the Altyn Tagh fault, the western Kunlun Shan at the southwestern end of the Altyn Tagh fault, and finally the Tian Shan (north of the tarim basin). Such regionally synchronous initiation of crustal shortening in and around the plateau may have been related to changes in convergence rate and direction between the Eurasian plate and the Indian and Pacific plates. The younger thrusting event along the Yalu River valley occurred between 19 and 10 Ma along the south-dipping Great Counter thrust system, equivalent to the locally named Renbu-Zedong thrust in southeastern Tibet, the Backthrust system in south-central Tibet, and the South Kailas thrust in southwest Tibet. The coeval development of the Great Counter thrust and the North Himalayan granite-gneiss dome belt is consistent with their development being related to thermal weakening of the north Himalayan and south Tibetan crust, due perhaps to thermal relaxation of an already thickened crust created by the early phase of collision between India and Asia or frictional heating along major thrusts, such as the Main Central thrust, beneath the Himalaya.

  8. Detrital Geochemical Fingerprints of Rivers Along Southern Tibet and Nepal: Implications for Erosion of the Indus-Yarlung Suture Zone and the Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassim, M. F. B.; Carrapa, B.; DeCelles, P. G.; Kapp, P. A.; Gehrels, G. E.

    2014-12-01

    Our detrital geochemical study of modern sand collected from tributaries of the Yarlung River in southern Tibet and the Kali Gandaki River and its tributaries in Nepal shed light on the ages and exhumation histories of source rocks within the Indus-Yarlung Suture (IYS) zone and the Himalayas. Seven sand samples from rivers along the suture zone in southern Tibet between Xigatze to the east and Mt. Kailas to the west were collected for detrital zircon U-Pb geochronologic and Apatite Fission Track (AFT) thermochronologic analyses. Zircon U-Pb ages for all rivers range between 15 and 3568 Ma. Rivers draining the northern side of the suture zone mainly yield ages between 40 and 60 Ma, similar to the age of the Gangdese magmatic arc. Samples from rivers draining the southern side of the suture zone record a Tethyan Himalayan signal characterized by age clusters at 500 Ma and 1050 Ma. Our results indicate that the ages and proportion of U-Pb zircons ages of downstream samples from tributaries of the Yarlung River directly reflect source area ages and relative area of source rock exposure in the catchment basin. Significant age components at 37 - 40 Ma, 47 - 50 Ma, 55 - 58 Ma and 94 - 97 Ma reflect episodicity in Gangdese arc magmatism. Our AFT ages show two main signals at 23-18 Ma and 12 Ma, which are in agreement with accelerated exhumation of the Gangdese batholith during these time intervals. The 23 - 18 Ma signal partly overlaps with deposition of the Kailas Formation along the suture zone and may be related to exhumation due to upper plate extension in southern Tibet in response to Indian slab rollback and/or break-off events. Detrital thermochronology of four sand samples from the Kali Gandaki River and some of its tributaries in Nepal is underway and will provide constraints on the timing of erosion of the central Nepal Himalaya.

  9. Flexural bending of southern Tibet in a retro foreland setting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Erchie; Kamp, Peter J. J.; Xu, Ganqing; Hodges, Kip V.; Meng, Kai; Chen, Lin; Wang, Gang; Luo, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The highest elevation of the Tibetan Plateau, lying 5,700 m above sea level, occurs within the part of the Lhasa block immediately north of the India-Tibet suture zone (Yarlung Zangbo suture zone, YZSZ), being 700 m higher than the maximum elevation of more northern parts of the plateau. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain this differentially higher topography and the rock uplift that led to it, invoking crustal compression or extension. Here we present the results of structural investigations along the length of the high elevation belt and suture zone, which rather indicate flexural bending of the southern margin of the Lhasa block (Gangdese magmatic belt) and occurrence of an adjacent foreland basin (Kailas Basin), both elements resulting from supra-crustal loading of the Lhasa block by the Zangbo Complex (Indian plate rocks) via the Great Counter Thrust. Hence we interpret the differential elevation of the southern margin of the plateau as due originally to uplift of a forebulge in a retro foreland setting modified by subsequent processes. Identification of this flexural deformation has implications for early evolution of the India-Tibet continental collision zone, implying an initial (Late Oligocene) symmetrical architecture that subsequently transitioned into the present asymmetrical wedge architecture. PMID:26174578

  10. Flexural bending of southern Tibet in a retro foreland setting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Erchie; Kamp, Peter J J; Xu, Ganqing; Hodges, Kip V; Meng, Kai; Chen, Lin; Wang, Gang; Luo, Hui

    2015-07-15

    The highest elevation of the Tibetan Plateau, lying 5,700 m above sea level, occurs within the part of the Lhasa block immediately north of the India-Tibet suture zone (Yarlung Zangbo suture zone, YZSZ), being 700 m higher than the maximum elevation of more northern parts of the plateau. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain this differentially higher topography and the rock uplift that led to it, invoking crustal compression or extension. Here we present the results of structural investigations along the length of the high elevation belt and suture zone, which rather indicate flexural bending of the southern margin of the Lhasa block (Gangdese magmatic belt) and occurrence of an adjacent foreland basin (Kailas Basin), both elements resulting from supra-crustal loading of the Lhasa block by the Zangbo Complex (Indian plate rocks) via the Great Counter Thrust. Hence we interpret the differential elevation of the southern margin of the plateau as due originally to uplift of a forebulge in a retro foreland setting modified by subsequent processes. Identification of this flexural deformation has implications for early evolution of the India-Tibet continental collision zone, implying an initial (Late Oligocene) symmetrical architecture that subsequently transitioned into the present asymmetrical wedge architecture.

  11. Flexural bending of southern Tibet in a retro foreland setting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Erchie; Kamp, Peter J J; Xu, Ganqing; Hodges, Kip V; Meng, Kai; Chen, Lin; Wang, Gang; Luo, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The highest elevation of the Tibetan Plateau, lying 5,700 m above sea level, occurs within the part of the Lhasa block immediately north of the India-Tibet suture zone (Yarlung Zangbo suture zone, YZSZ), being 700 m higher than the maximum elevation of more northern parts of the plateau. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain this differentially higher topography and the rock uplift that led to it, invoking crustal compression or extension. Here we present the results of structural investigations along the length of the high elevation belt and suture zone, which rather indicate flexural bending of the southern margin of the Lhasa block (Gangdese magmatic belt) and occurrence of an adjacent foreland basin (Kailas Basin), both elements resulting from supra-crustal loading of the Lhasa block by the Zangbo Complex (Indian plate rocks) via the Great Counter Thrust. Hence we interpret the differential elevation of the southern margin of the plateau as due originally to uplift of a forebulge in a retro foreland setting modified by subsequent processes. Identification of this flexural deformation has implications for early evolution of the India-Tibet continental collision zone, implying an initial (Late Oligocene) symmetrical architecture that subsequently transitioned into the present asymmetrical wedge architecture. PMID:26174578

  12. Positive Darwinian selection and the birth of an olfactory receptor clade in teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Ashiq; Saraiva, Luis R.; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2009-01-01

    Trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs) in mammals recently have been shown to function as olfactory receptors. We have delineated the taar gene family in jawless, cartilaginous, and bony fish (zero, 2, and >100 genes, respectively). We conclude that taar genes are evolutionary much younger than the related OR and ORA/V1R olfactory receptor families, which are present already in lamprey, a jawless vertebrate. The 2 cartilaginous fish genes appear to be ancestral for 2 taar classes, each with mammalian and bony fish (teleost) representatives. Unexpectedly, a whole new clade, class III, of taar genes originated even later, within the teleost lineage. Taar genes from all 3 classes are expressed in subsets of zebrafish olfactory receptor neurons, supporting their function as olfactory receptors. The highly conserved TAAR1 (shark, mammalian, and teleost orthologs) is not expressed in the olfactory epithelium and may constitute the sole remnant of a primordial, nonolfactory function of this family. Class III comprises three-fourths of all teleost taar genes and is characterized by the complete loss of the aminergic ligand-binding motif, stringently conserved in the other 2 classes. Two independent intron gains in class III taar genes represent extraordinary evolutionary dynamics, considering the virtual absence of intron gains during vertebrate evolution. The dN/dS analysis suggests both minimal global negative selection and an unparalleled degree of local positive selection as another hallmark of class III genes. The accelerated evolution of class III teleost taar genes conceivably might mark the birth of another olfactory receptor gene family. PMID:19237578

  13. Fifty-five million years of Tibetan evolution recorded in the Indus Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clift, Peter; Shimizu, Nobu; Layne, Graham; Gaedicke, Christoph; Schlter, H.-U.; Clark, Marin; Amjad, Shahid

    Although the Indus Fan is only about one-third of the volume of its giant neighbor in the Bay of Bengal, it is one of the largest sediment bodies in the ocean basins, totaling ˜5×106 km3. Its detrital sedimentary record is an important repository of information on the uplift and erosion of the western Himalaya. New seismic and provenance data from the Pakistan margin now suggest that the Indus River and fan system was initiated shortly after the India-Asia collision at ˜5 Ma. The modern Indus drainage basin is dominated by the high peaks of the Karakoram, Kohistan, and other tectonic units of the Indus Suture Zone rather than the High Himalaya. The Indus River, which rises in western Tibet near Mount Kailas, follows the Indus Suture Zone along strike before cutting orthogonally through the Himalaya to the Arabian Sea. The other tributaries to the Indus, such as the Chenab and Sutlej, do drain the crystalline High Himalayan range, but do so in an area where its topography is much reduced (Figure 1). In contrast, the Bengal Fans main feeder rivers, the Ganges and Brahmaputra, follow the High Himalaya along strike for much of the length of the orogen. In practice, this means that the Bengal Fan is swamped by the large volume of material derived from the rapidly unroofing High Himalaya [France-Lanord et al, 1993], while the Indus Fan is dominated by tectonic units adjacent to the suture zone, including western Tibet. This allows their erosional signal to be more readily isolated in the Indus Fan compared to in the Bengal.

  14. The Cuddapah Salient: a tectonic model for the Cuddapah Basin, India, based on Landsat image interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatakrishnan, Ramesh; Dotiwalla, Firoz E.

    1987-05-01

    Analysis of geologic, geophysical data and lineaments derived from Landsat image interpretation has revealed a pattern of tectonic inheritance of Archean structural elements by the folded and thrusted eastern margin of the middle-late Proterozoic Cuddapah Basin in India. A structural pattern set by deep crustal faults in the Archean and intracratonic basin fabric is apparent in both sedimentary and tectonic trends in the basin. The lineaments represent broad zones of en echelon and parallel alignments that appear to have nucleated on deep crustal faults which were reactivated as structural uplifts, lateral and frontal ramps, and transverse tear faults. The major zones recognized are the northeast-trending Veldruti-Guntur lateral ramp to the north and the northwest-trending Cuddapah-Nellore transverse tear fault to the south. East-west directed compression during the Eastern Ghats (latest Proterozoic) orogeny was apparently confined within these converging lineament zones that effectively buttressed the west-verging thrust fronts. Block uplift along the NE-trending Veldruti-Guntur lateral ramp acted as a boundary to east to west thrust translation. The northeastern ends of folds and thrusts were "pinned down" with relative displacement being clockwise and greater, increasing to the southwest. The lack of a lateral ramp or basement buttress to the south resulted in the development of the left-lateral Cuddapah-Nellore transverse tear fault. Steep imbricate thrust ramps in the foreland resisted further movement westward. The resulting convex to the west, arcuate Nallamalai and Vellikonda thrust fronts, broadly paralleled by the east coast gravity high anomaly (Kaila and Bhatia, 1981) is herein named the Cuddapah Salient.

  15. A New Quaternary Strand of the Karakoram Fault System, Ladakh Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohon, W.; Hodges, K.; Arrowsmith, R.; Tripathy, A.

    2009-12-01

    The NW-SE striking, dextral Karakoram fault system stretches for more than 1200 km from the Pamirs of Central Asia at least as far southeast as the Kailas area of Tibet. Estimates for the total lateral displacement along the fault system range from 150-1000 km, and estimated Quaternary rates of slip range from 1 to 30 mm/yr. In the Ladakh region of NW India (~ 33°28’N, 78°45’E), the fault system expresses as northern and southern strands bounding the Pangong Range. Studies of ductile deformation fabrics along these strands suggest that slip began in the Miocene, and Brown et al. (2002) documented Quaternary right-lateral slip along the northern strand at ~4 mm/yr on the basis of offset geomorphic features. The lack of documented Quaternary offset along the southern strand has led most researchers to assume that Quaternary slip on the Karakoram fault system in this region was partitioned exclusively to the northern strand. Our summer 2009 field work in the Pangong Range and adjacent Nubra Valley provides the first documentation of significant Quaternary activity along the southern strand. In the valley between the villages of Tangste (34°01’ N, 78°10’ E) and Durbuk (34°06’ N, 78°07’), the fault is visible high on the northeastern mountain side as a break in slope with offset Quaternary paleosurfaces and beheaded and offset stream channels, the largest of which have been displaced by as much as 250 m. Field mapping north of Durbuk, near the town of Tangyar (34°15’N, 77°52’E), shows that the southern strand continues northwest and cuts across the landscape as a sinuous, continuous trace with shutter ridges, offset alluvial fan surfaces, and sag ponds developed along its length. In this region, the northern and southern strands are linked by a Quaternary, E-directed thrust fault that places high-grade metamorphic rocks over poorly consolidated Quaternary alluvium. The partitioning of dextral slip between two strands of the Karakoram system

  16. Refining estimates of Quaternary slip on the Karakoram Fault System, Ladakh, NW India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohon, W.; Arrowsmith, R.; Hodges, K. V.; Heimsath, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    The NW-SE striking, dextral Karakoram fault system (KFS) stretches for more than 1200 km from the Pamirs of Central Asia at least as far southeast as the Kailas area of Tibet. It is one of the major tectonic features in the Himalayan orogen, yet considerable controversy remains about the time-integrated slip rate of the system. Geodetic data suggest present-day motion along the entire KFS occurs at 1-3 mm/yr (Wright et al., 2004, Science 305; Jade et al., 2010, GSA 116), but estimates for the integrated late Quaternary slip along various segments of the system - based on the reconstruction of dated, offset geomorphic and geologic features - range from ca. 4 mm/yr to ca. 32 mm/yr (Liu et al., 1991 in Avouac and Tapponier, 1993, GRL 20; Brown et al., 2002, JGR 107; Chevalier et al., 2005, Science 307). In the Ladakh region of NW India (34°45.27'N, 77°33.57'E), the KFS expresses as northern ('Pangong') and southern ('Tangtse') strands bounding the Pangong Range. The lack of documented Quaternary offset along the southern fault strand has led most researchers to assume that Quaternary slip on the KFS in this region was partitioned exclusively to the northern fault strand (Searle, 1998, Geological Society [London] Special Publication 135; Phillips et al., 2004, EPSL 226; Rutter et al., 2007, Journal of Structural Geology 29). However, our more recent field work in the northwestern Pangong Range has documented significant Quaternary activity along the Tangtse fault strand. Along this strand in the Tangyar Valley (34°14.26'N, 77°55.05'E), an incised debris cone has erosional risers offset ~160 m right laterally and ~25 m vertically (east side up) which is consistent with the dextral-oblique transpressional sense of motion for the KFS in this region. 10Be concentration depth profiles yield a preliminary minimum exposure age of ~30,000 yrs for the offset debris fan surfaces, which provides a maximum slip rate of ~5 mm/yr. Adjacent to the debris cone is a lower and

  17. New age constraints on the evolution of the Karakorum Fault, West Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valli, F.; Arnaud, N.; Lacassin, R.; Paquette, J.; Leloup, P. H.; Li, H.; Tapponnier, P.; Guillot, S.; Deloule, E.; Maheo, G.; Xu, Z.

    2003-12-01

    Pakistan (minimum offset of 250km). Assuming that this offset accrued in time span of about 23Ma suggests average long-term rates of at least 1 cm/yr. Evidence for strike-slip faulting is also clear within the Ladakh-Karakorum range and along its SW border where mapping shows large-scale boudinage of ophiolite units implying a maximum offset of 400km along a southern branch of KFZ. South of Baer, several active strike-slip branches bound the Kailas-Ponri range to the south and continue eastwards at least up to 82.5E (lake Kunggyu). The southern part of the range is made of steep, fault-bounded slivers with clear field for brittle dextral shear. Our structural study of the area does not support inference that the Karakorum Fault terminates west of Manasarovar lake and merges with the Gurla Mandatha detachment. Instead, both deformation and large-scale geometry concur to show that the Karakorum Fault Zone continues east of 81E as a dextral, transpressive flower structure reactivating the Indus-Tsangpo suture.

  18. Geological evidence against large-scale pre-Holocene offsets along the Karakoram Fault: Implications for the limited extrusion of the Tibetan plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, M. P.

    1996-02-01

    Karasu transpressional faults in the central Pamir. North of Tashkurgan, the Karakoram Fault shows mainly normal motion around the Kongur and Mustagh Ata gneiss domes (metamorphic core complexes) and the extensional Muji graben. Minor dextral displacement has occurred along the Shiquanhe Fault, but this motion cannot be linked to the Jiale Fault of east Tibet. The southern end of the Karakoram Fault merges with the Indus (Yarlung) suture zone near Mount Kailas and does not cut across the Himalaya. The lack of large-scale geological offsets along the Karakoram Fault, together with its very recent initiation (?5 or 4 Ma), suggests that it is related to the Pliocene-Quaternary northward indentation of the Pamir, and not to any long-term extrusion of Tibetan crust following the Indian collision.

  19. Satellite-based Observation of the Tectonics of Southern Tibet

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F J; Finkel, R; van der Woerd, J

    2003-02-06

    from tens of meters to kilometers have been mapped using satellite imagery and field mapping, and samples ages determined by cosmic-ray exposure dating. Near Bulong Kol (39{sup o}N, 75{sup o}E) cosmogenic dating of a 40 m fluvial offset yields a slip rate of {approx}6.5 mm/yr. Near Mt. Kailas (31.5{sup o}N, 80.7{sup o}E), a glacial moraine offset by {approx}350 m has been dated at 32.3 {+-} 9.5 thousand years, yielding a slip rate of 10.8 {+-} 3.6 mm/yr. In the Gar Valley (32{sup o}N, 80{sup o}E) a river channel incised in glacial sediments yields an offset of 1750 m and an age of 283,000 years equivalent to a slip-rate of 6 mm/yr. Relative to the ATF, the slip rates on the KKF are lower than expected, and since these measurements cover almost the entire length of the KKF, the disparity cannot be attributed to along strike variation in the rate. Based upon the analysis of satellite images along the Karakorum Fault, we believe that this apparent slip deficit may be to the en echelon arrangement of multiple strike slip fault segments that characterize what should more appropriately be called the Karakorum Fault Zone. The geometric arrangement of parallel fault segments produces the ''pull apart'' basins that form the valleys along the KKF. Hence, at any given latitude, slip along the KKF may be distributed among numerous fault segments. This investigation supports efforts to understand the structure and mechanical response of the Earth's crust and supports the application of remote sensing methods.

  20. PREFACE: 5th DAE-BRNS Workshop on Hadron Physics (Hadron 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyoti Roy, Bidyut; Chatterjee, A.; Kailas, S.

    2012-07-01

    the authors for giving us the manuscripts in good time. The workshop was financially supported by BRNS, DAE, GoI. We also received partial funding support from the India-FAIR coordination centre, Kolkata, for the organization of the India-PANDA discussion meeting. We acknowledge the financial support received from BRNS and DST (Department of Science and Technology). The assistance from various departments of BARC and the Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education (HBCSE), TIFR is gratefully acknowledged. We also thank the members of the advisory committee and organizing committee and colleagues from NPD and Physics Group, BARC for their contributions. May 2012, Mumbai Bidyut Jyoti Roy A Chatterjee S Kailas Bhabha Atomic Research Centre Hadron 2011 photograph The PDF also contains a list of the workshop's committees and sponsors, photographs from the workshop and the programme of events.

  1. Late Cenozoic Strain Partitioning in Southwest Tibet and Western Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. A.; Yin, A.; Copeland, P.

    2001-12-01

    Southwest Tibet and western Nepal exhibits a complex deformation pattern characterized by interacting strike-slip, extensional faults, and thrust faults. We have used geologic mapping and analysis of Landsat and Corona images to characterize the geometry and kinematics of structures that occupy this region. From northwest to southeast, the structures analyzed include the Karakoram fault system, the Zada basin, the Gurla Mandhata detachment system, and a system of right-slip faults and normal faults in west Nepal. The southwest reach of the Karakoram fault is comprised of a system of NW-striking right-slip faults, N-striking normal faults, and minor NE-striking left-slip faults that accommodate dominantly right-lateral shear. Southwards along the Karakoram fault system the trend of the mean slip direction rotates to a more easterly direction (135\\deg~ in the north to 285\\deg~ in the south). The Zada basin lies due south of the Karakoram fault system and is represented by a >1km-thick sequence of relatively undeformed Pliocene through Pleistocene sandstones, siltstones, and conglomerates. Recent faulting is characterized by NNE-striking normal faults and NW-striking faults displaying right-lateral separations. However, no basin bounding faults have been recognized. In the Mt. Kailas area, structural data collected from the Gurla Mandhata detachment system indicates that the orientation of the mean slip direction is ~103\\deg . Detachment faults associated with the fault system are corrugated with axes oriented parallel to the slip direction. Deformation in the footwall is bulk-constrictional, as indicated by linear feldspar fabric within augen gneisses and tight to isoclinal, lineation parallel folds within layered gneisses. Landsat 7 color composite images and Corona photography were used to document recent faulting east of the Gurla Mandhata detachment system in western Nepal. Two sets of faults were recognized, WNW-striking faults and N-striking faults. WNW

  2. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bao-An; Natowitz, Joseph B.

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear Science and Technologies 6. Nuclear Reactions and Structure of Unstable Nuclei 7. Equation of State of Neutron-Rich Nuclear Matter, Clusters in Nuclei and Nuclear Reactions 8. Fusion and Fission 9. Nuclear Astrophysics 10. New Facilities and Detectors We would like to thank Texas A&M University and Texas A&M University-Commerce for their organizational support and for providing financial support for many students and postdocs and those who had special need. This support helped assure the success of NN2012. Special thanks also go to all members of the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee (listed below) for their great work in advising upon, preparing and executing the NN2012 scientific program as well as the social events that all together made the NN2012 an enjoyable experience for both the participants and their companions. NN2012 International Advisory Committee N Auerbach (Israel) J Aysto (Finland) C Beck (France) S Cherubini (Italy) L Ferreira (Portugal) C Gagliardi (USA) S Gales (France) C Gale (Canada) W Gelletly (Great Britain) Paulo R S Gomes (Brazil) W Greiner (Germany) W Henning (USA) D Hinde (Australia) S Hofmann (Germany) M Hussein (Brazil) B Jacak (USA) S Kailas (India) W G Lynch (USA) Z Majka (Poland) L McLerran (USA) V Metag (Germany) K Morita (Japan) B Mueller (USA) D G Mueller (France) T Motobayashi (Japan) W Nazarewicz (USA) Y Oganessian (Russia) J Nolen (USA) E K Rehm (USA) N Rowley (France) B Sherrill (USA) J Schukraft (Switzerland) W Q Shen (China) A Stefanini (Italy) H Stoecker (Germany) A Szanto de Toledo (Brazil) U van Kolck (USA) W von Oertzen (Germany) M Wiescher (USA) N Xu (USA) N V Zamfir (Romania) W L Zhan (China) H Q Zhang (China) NN2012 Local Organizing Committee Marina Barbui Carlos Bertulani Robert Burch Jr Cheri Davis Cody Folden Kris Hagel John Hardy Bao-An Li (Co-Chair and Scientific Secretary) Joseph Natowitz (Co-Chair) Ralf Rapp Livius Trache Sherry Yennello Editors of NN2012 Proceedings Bao

  3. Combined 40Ar/39Ar and Fission-Track study of the Freetown Layered Igneous Complex, Freetown, Sierra Leone, West Africa: Implications for the Initial Break-up of Pangea to form the Central Atlantic Ocean and Insight into the Post-rift Evolution of the Sie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrie, Ibrahim; Wijbrans, Jan; Andriessen, Paul; Beunk, Frank; Strasser-King, Victor; Fode, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    , 316: 287-296. Umeji, A.C. (1983). Geochemistry and Mineralogy of the Freetown Layered Basic Igneous Complex of Sierra Leone. Chemical Geology, 39: 17-38. Wells, M.K. (1962). Structure and Petrology of the Freetown Layered Basic Complex of Sierra Leone. Overseas Geol. Mineral. Res. Bull. Suppl., 4, 115 pp. Williams, H.R. (1986). The Archaean Kaila Group of Western Sierra Leone: Geology and Relations with adjacent Granite-Greenstone Terrane. Precambrian Research, 38: 201-213.

  4. PREFACE: International Symposium on Vacuum Science & Technology and its Application for Accelerators (IVS 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, V. S.; Pal, Gautam

    2012-11-01

    clearly indicates that industry has advanced quite significantly. During the symposium, the Indian Vacuum Society honoured two distinguished personalities for their remarkable and significant contributions to the field of vacuum science and development of technology in the country. Awards were presented for both oral and poster papers during the symposium. A committee evaluated the scientific content and clarity of presentation of contributed papers. We believe that deliberations and discussions at the symposium will help gain a better understanding of the complicated and involved technology of vacuum science and be of benefit to scientists and technologists. Subimal Saha Convener Gautam Pal Co-Convener V S Pandit Secretary Surajit Pal Treasurer Conference photograph International Advisory Committee National Advisory Committee S BanerjeeDAE/IndiaR K Bhandari (Chairman)VECC Rockett AngusAVS/USAD L BandyopadhyayIVS A V Dadve CdrPfeiffer Vac /IndiaS B BhattIPR M Barma TIFR/IndiaK G BhushanBARC R K BhandariVECC/IndiaAlok ChakrabartiVECC R C BudhaniNPL, IndiaD P ChakravartyBARC Shekhar ChanderCEERI/IndiaTushar DesaiMumbai Univ S C ChetalIGCAR/IndiaR DeyVECC K L ChopraIIT Delhi/IndiaS C GadkariBARC Christian DayKIT/GermanyS K GuptaIUVSTA/India Kraemer DieterFAIR/GermanyShrikrishna GuptaBARC L M GantayatBARC/IndiaRajendra JatharAgilent Technologies R B GroverDAE, BARC/IndiaS N JoshiCEERI P D Gupta RRCAT/IndiaD KanjilalIUAC Szajman JakubVSA/AustraliaC MallikVECC R N JayarajNFC/IndiaS G MarkandeyaBRNS S KailasBARC/IndiaK C MittalBARC P K KawIPR/IndiaS NagarjunHHV Bangalore Lalit KumarMTRDC/IndiaK G M NairIGCAR Jean Larour Ecole/FranceGautam Pal (Co-convener)VECC Marminga LiaTRIUMF/CanadaSurajit Pal (Treasurer)VECC Shekhar MishraFermilab/USA V S Pandit (Secretary)VECC Ganapatirao MyneniJlab/USaR G PillayTIFR S V NarasaiahHHV/IndiaMohan PradeepNPL K RadhakrishnanISRO/IndiaY Ranga RaoVac Techniques A S Raja RaoIVS/IndiaR RanganathanSINP T RamasamiDST/IndiaSubimal Saha (Convener

  5. PREFACE: International Symposium on `Vacuum Science and Technology' (IVS 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, K. C.; Gupta, S. K.

    2008-03-01

    equipments, accessories, products etc by different manufacturers and suppliers has been organized at the venue of the symposium hall for the benefit of the participants. The interest shown by the exhibitors reveals that the industry has come of age and the advances that have taken place over the years is quite significant. During the symposium, the Indian Vacuum Society felicitated two distinguished personalities who have contributed significantly for the development of vacuum science and technology in the country. The C AMBASANKARAN memorial and Smt SHAKUNTALABAI VYAWAHARE memorial Awards were also conferred on the two best contributed papers. A committee constituted by the Symposium Organizing Committee evaluated the relevance, scientific content, and clarity of presentation to decide the award winning papers. It is hoped that the discussion generated by the delegates at the symposium will help in a better understanding vacuum science and technology. K C Mittal Convener S K Gupta Co Convener International Advisory Committee Kakodkar, Anil DAE/India, Chairman Badve, Cdr A.V.(IN Retd.) Pfeiffer Vac India Banerjee, S. BARC/India Bhandari, R.K. BRNS/India Chander, Shekhar CEERI/India Chopra, K.L. IIT Delhi/India Day, Chris ITER Grover, R.B DAE,BARC/India Jakub, Szajman VSA/ Australia Jayaraj, R.N. NFC/India Kamath, H.S. BARC/India Kaw, P.K. IPR/India Kobayashi, M. VSJ/Japan Kumar, Lalit MTRDC, India Kumar, Vikram NPL., India Langley, Robert AVS, USA Larour, Jean Ecole/France Mendonsa, R.H. Lawrence and Mayo Myneni, Ganapatirao Jlab/USA Narsaiah, S.V. HHV Padamsee, Hasan Cornell/USA Pillay, R.G. TIFR Raj, Baldev IGCAR/India Raju, P.T. IVS/India Ramasami, T. DST/India Ray, A.K. BARC/India Reid, RJ IUVSTA/UK Roy, Amit IUAC/india Sahni, V.C. RRCAT, BARC/India Schamiloglu, E. UNM/USA Shankara, K.N. VSSC,ISRO/India Sinha, Bikash VEC,SINP/India Strubin, P. CERN/Switzerland Local Organizing Committee Ray, A.K. BARC (Chairman) Kailas, S. BARC, (Co Chairman) Chakravarty, D.P. BARC

  6. PREFACE: International Symposium on Vacuum Science & Technology and its Application for Accelerators (IVS 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, V. S.; Pal, Gautam

    2012-11-01

    clearly indicates that industry has advanced quite significantly. During the symposium, the Indian Vacuum Society honoured two distinguished personalities for their remarkable and significant contributions to the field of vacuum science and development of technology in the country. Awards were presented for both oral and poster papers during the symposium. A committee evaluated the scientific content and clarity of presentation of contributed papers. We believe that deliberations and discussions at the symposium will help gain a better understanding of the complicated and involved technology of vacuum science and be of benefit to scientists and technologists. Subimal Saha Convener Gautam Pal Co-Convener V S Pandit Secretary Surajit Pal Treasurer Conference photograph International Advisory Committee National Advisory Committee S BanerjeeDAE/IndiaR K Bhandari (Chairman)VECC Rockett AngusAVS/USAD L BandyopadhyayIVS A V Dadve CdrPfeiffer Vac /IndiaS B BhattIPR M Barma TIFR/IndiaK G BhushanBARC R K BhandariVECC/IndiaAlok ChakrabartiVECC R C BudhaniNPL, IndiaD P ChakravartyBARC Shekhar ChanderCEERI/IndiaTushar DesaiMumbai Univ S C ChetalIGCAR/IndiaR DeyVECC K L ChopraIIT Delhi/IndiaS C GadkariBARC Christian DayKIT/GermanyS K GuptaIUVSTA/India Kraemer DieterFAIR/GermanyShrikrishna GuptaBARC L M GantayatBARC/IndiaRajendra JatharAgilent Technologies R B GroverDAE, BARC/IndiaS N JoshiCEERI P D Gupta RRCAT/IndiaD KanjilalIUAC Szajman JakubVSA/AustraliaC MallikVECC R N JayarajNFC/IndiaS G MarkandeyaBRNS S KailasBARC/IndiaK C MittalBARC P K KawIPR/IndiaS NagarjunHHV Bangalore Lalit KumarMTRDC/IndiaK G M NairIGCAR Jean Larour Ecole/FranceGautam Pal (Co-convener)VECC Marminga LiaTRIUMF/CanadaSurajit Pal (Treasurer)VECC Shekhar MishraFermilab/USA V S Pandit (Secretary)VECC Ganapatirao MyneniJlab/USaR G PillayTIFR S V NarasaiahHHV/IndiaMohan PradeepNPL K RadhakrishnanISRO/IndiaY Ranga RaoVac Techniques A S Raja RaoIVS/IndiaR RanganathanSINP T RamasamiDST/IndiaSubimal Saha (Convener