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Sample records for orbital blowout fracture

  1. Orbital blowout fractures in sport.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, N P

    1994-01-01

    One-third of orbital blowout fractures are sustained during sport. Soccer is most commonly involved. Though visual acuity recovery is usually complete, permanent loss of binocular visual field is almost universal. Typically high-energy blows by opponent's finger, fist, elbow, knee or boot are responsible. Injuries to the eye itself may also be sustained and should be looked for. Ocular protection may be feasible in some sports, but the main preventive measure to be addressed is the reduction in aggressive play or deliberate injury. PMID:7894960

  2. Considerations for the Management of Medial Orbital Wall Blowout Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Park, Youngsoo; Chung, Kyu Jin

    2016-01-01

    Recently, diagnoses of and operations for medial orbital blowout fracture have increased because of the development of imaging technology. In this article, the authors review the literature, and overview the accumulated knowledge about the orbital anatomy, fracture mechanisms, surgical approaches, reconstruction materials, and surgical methods. In terms of surgical approaches, transcaruncular, transcutaneous, and transnasal endoscopic approaches are discussed. Reconstruction methods including onlay covering, inlay implantation, and repositioning methods are also discussed. Consideration and understanding of these should lead to more optimal outcomes. PMID:27218019

  3. Management of orbital blow-out fractures. Case reports and discussion.

    PubMed

    Forrest, L A; Schuller, D E; Strauss, R H

    1989-01-01

    Blow-out fractures are fractures of the orbital floor or medial wall that occur as a consequence of blunt trauma. Impact increases the intraorbital pressure, forcing the nondistensible orbital contents through the orbital floor. The fracture is commonly caused by impact from a baseball or tennis ball. However, any blunt trauma to the orbit, as from a knee or elbow, can result in a blow-out fracture. The characteristic clinical findings include double vision, a sunken globe, and numbness in the distribution of the infraorbital nerve. Sometimes, the only sign of a blow-out fracture is the abrupt inflation of periorbital tissue with air when the patient blows his nose. Standard evaluation of these fractures includes history, physical examination, and radiographs. Some patients benefit from computed tomography (CT), which can be both diagnostic and prognostic. Blow-out fractures do not often produce serious sequelae, and the current trend is toward no treatment. However, it is imperative to rule out any serious injury to the eye itself that would require emergency treatment.

  4. Blow-out fractures of the orbit: a comparison of computed tomography and conventional radiography with anatomic correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Hammeschlag, S.B.; Hughes, S.; O'Reilly, G.V.; Naheedy, M.H.; Rumbaugh, C.L.

    1982-05-01

    Orbital blow-out fractures were experimentally created in eight human cadavers. Each orbit underwent conventional radiographic studies, complex motion tomography, and computed tomographic examinations. A comparison of the three modalities was made. Anatomical correlation was obtained by dissecting the orbits. The significance of medial-wall fractures and enophthalmos is discussed. Limitation of inferior rectus muscle mobility is thought to be a result of muscle kinking associated with orbital fat-pad prolapse at the fracture site, rather than muscle incarceration. Blow-out fractures should be evaluated by computed tomographic computer reformations in the oblique sagittal plane.

  5. Surgical management of persistent diplopia in blowout fractures of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Harley, R D

    1975-12-01

    Persistent diplopia continues as a problem in a significant number of patients following the surgical management of a blowout fracture of the orbital floor even when repaired within 15 days of the traumatic incident. Inferior rectus and inferior oblique muscles which have been incarcerated in a blowout fracture for longer periods have a worse prognosis for adequate functioning postoperatively. There is some presumptive evidence to suggest a myogenic or neurogenic cause for such dysfunction. Experiments with posterior fractures clearly demonstrate that the nerve entering the inferior rectus can be damaged. Vertical diplopia which persists beyond 3 months following release of entrapped muscle tissue requires surgical correction depending upon the degree of vertical dissociation. Motility surgery was required in 18 of 20 patients with persistent diplopia. Multiple muscle combinations were frequently required to achieve success. The criterion for a successful result was elimination of vertical diplopia in the primary and reading position. The elimination of persistent diplopia in association with blowout fractures of the orbit is usually possible even in late treated cases when one uses specific criteria for success. Three cases were considered cured since there was no diplopia in any direction of gaze, while 17 cases developed single binocular vision in the primary and reading positions. In these latter patients, on extreme upward or downward gaze, diplopia could still be demonstrated in all patients, especially when the individuals were specifically requested to look for diplopia.

  6. Orthoptic Sequelae Following Conservative Management of Pure Blowout Orbital Fractures: Anecdotal or Clinically Relevant?

    PubMed

    Steinegger, Ken; De Haller, Raoul; Courvoisier, Delphine; Scolozzi, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively assess the prevalence of orthoptic anomalies following conservative management of pure blowout orbital fractures and to evaluate their clinical relevance. Clinical and radiologic data of patients with unilateral conservatively managed pure blowout orbital fractures with a minimum follow-up of 6 months were reviewed. Eligible patients were contacted and invited to undergo an extended ophthalmologic examination as follows: distance and near visual acuities, Hertel exophthalmometry, corneal light reflex (Hirschberg test), ductions and versions in the 6 cardinal fields of gaze, eye deviation with prisms and alternate cover test in all of the 9-gaze directions with Maddox rod, degrees of incyclo/excyclotorsion with right and left eye fixation, horizontal and vertical deviation with Hess-Weiss coordimetry, degree of horizontal/vertical and incyclo/excyclotorsion deviation with Harms wall deviometry, and vertical deviation with Bielschowsky head-tilt test. Of the 69 patients contacted, 49 declined to participate given that they were asymptomatic. Twenty patients agreed to undergo the examination. One patient complained of minimal double vision limited to the extreme downgaze. Four patients had asymptomatic ocular motility disturbances limited to the extreme gaze. Seven patients had asymptomatic horizontal heterophoria. These disturbances did not interfere with daily or professional activities in any of the patients. The current study demonstrated that conservative management of pure orbital blowout fractures can result in orthoptic anomalies. These sequelae were restricted to a very limited portion of the binocular field of the vision and were not found to be clinically relevant. PMID:26102539

  7. Pure orbital blowout fractures reconstructed with autogenous bone grafts: functional and aesthetic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kronig, S A J; van der Mooren, R J G; Strabbing, E M; Stam, L H M; Tan, J A S L; de Jongh, E; van der Wal, K G H; Paridaens, D; Koudstaal, M J

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the ophthalmic clinical findings following surgical reconstruction with autogenous bone grafts of pure blowout fractures. A retrospective review of 211 patients who underwent surgical repair of an orbital fracture between October 1996 and December 2013 was performed. Following data analysis, 60 patients who were followed up over a period of 1 year were included. A solitary floor fracture was present in 38 patients and a floor and a medial wall fracture in 22 patients. Comparing preoperative findings between these two groups, preoperative diplopia and enophthalmos were almost twice as frequent in the group with additional medial wall fractures: diplopia 8% and 14% and enophthalmos 18% and 55%, respectively. One year following surgery there was no diplopia present in either group. In the solitary floor fracture group, 3% still had enophthalmos. It can be concluded that at 1 year following the repair of pure orbital floor fractures using autogenous bone, good functional and aesthetic results can be obtained. In the group with both floor and medial wall fractures, no enophthalmos was found when both walls were reconstructed. When the medial wall was left unoperated, 29% of patients still suffered from enophthalmos after 1 year.

  8. Survey of Common Practices among Oculofacial Surgeons in the Asia-Pacific Region: Management of Orbital Floor Blowout Fractures.

    PubMed

    Koh, Victor; Chiam, Nathalie; Sundar, Gangadhara

    2014-09-01

    A web-based anonymous survey was performed to assess common practices of oculofacial surgeons in the management of traumatic orbital floor blowout fractures. A questionnaire which contained questions on several controversial topics in the management of orbital floor fractures was sent out via e-mail to 131 oculofacial surgeons in 14 countries in the Asia-Pacific region. A total response rate of 58.3% was achieved from May to December 2012. The preferred time for surgical intervention was within 2 weeks for adult patients, porous polyethylene implant was the most popular choice, and most surgeons preferred the transconjunctival approach. Postoperatively, diplopia was the most commonly encountered complication and most oculofacial surgeons reviewed their patients regularly for up to 12 months. We report the results of the first survey of oculofacial surgeons within the Asia-Pacific region on the management of orbital floor blowout fractures. Compared with previous surveys (from year 2000 to 2004), the duration to surgical intervention was comparable but there was a contrasting change in preferred surgical approach and choice of orbital implant.

  9. Transcaruncular Approach for Treatment of Medial Wall and Large Orbital Blowout Fractures.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dennis C; Shahzad, Farooq; Snyder-Warwick, Alison; Patel, Kamlesh B; Woo, Albert S

    2016-03-01

    We evaluate the safety and efficacy of the transcaruncular approach for reconstruction of medial orbital wall fractures and the combined transcaruncular-transconjunctival approach for reconstruction of large orbital defects involving the medial wall and floor. A retrospective review of the clinical and radiographic data of patients who underwent either a transcaruncular or a combined transcaruncular-transconjunctival approach by a single surgeon for orbital fractures between June 2007 and June 2013 was undertaken. Seven patients with isolated medial wall fractures underwent a transcaruncular approach, and nine patients with combined medial wall and floor fractures underwent a transcaruncular-transconjunctival approach with a lateral canthotomy. Reconstruction was performed using a porous polyethylene implant. All patients with isolated medial wall fractures presented with enophthalmos. In the combined medial wall and floor group, five out of eight patients had enophthalmos with two also demonstrating hypoglobus. The size of the medial wall defect on preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan ranged from 2.6 to 4.6 cm(2); the defect size of combined medial wall and floor fractures was 4.5 to 12.7 cm(2). Of the 11 patients in whom postoperative CT scans were obtained, all were noted to have acceptable placement of the implant. All patients had correction of enophthalmos and hypoglobus. One complication was noted, with a retrobulbar hematoma having developed 2 days postoperatively. The transcaruncular approach is a safe and effective method for reconstruction of medial orbital floor fractures. Even large fractures involving the orbital medial wall and floor can be adequately exposed and reconstructed with a combined transcaruncular-transconjunctival-lateral canthotomy approach. The level of evidence of this study is IV (case series with pre/posttest). PMID:26889348

  10. Blowout fracture-orbital floor reconstruction using costochondral cartilage causing pain, warping, and diplopia

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Orbital floor reconstruction is the most challenging component in the midfacial trauma management. Most often owing to the complexity of the fractures, the floor reconstruction requires grafts or other substitutes. Literature reveals several sources of autogenous sources of such grafts. Though most of the grafts are well taken and gives an ideal result, at certain instances, owing to the complex nature of the graft, its biochemical nature, reaction to the grafting, biochemical response, a reactionary change may result at late stages. The aim of this manuscript is to present a rare instance of warping of a costochondral graft that was used as a part of the orbital floor reconstruction giving rise to an ophthalmic emergency. The situation was immediately diagnosed and successfully managed. The situation, structural, and biochemical mechanisms behind such a phenomenon are discussed. PMID:26981485

  11. Evaluation of the Biodegradable Plates (PG910/PDO) for Reconstruction of Various Sizes of Orbital Floor Defects in the Blow-Out Fractures.

    PubMed

    Tabrizi, Reza; Langner, Nicole J; Pouzesh, Ayatollah; Arabion, Hamidreza

    2013-09-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the biodegradable plates (PG910/PDO) for reconstruction of various sizes of the orbital floor defects in the blow-out fractures. We included patients who had an impure blow-out fracture. All patients had a recent trauma and also the surgical intervention was done between 1 and 10 days after trauma. The amount of the orbital floor defect was measured in each case through computed tomography scan. In the surgical intervention, a biodegradable plate was used for the reconstruction of the orbital floor defect along with titanium miniplates used for bone fixation in orbital rim. Due to aesthetic reasons, all patients underwent secondary surgery including removal of titanium miniplates after 18 months. The orbital floor was reevaluated during the removal of the miniplates. The clinical evaluation of remnant defects and biodegradable plates (presence of complete or partial resorption) were documented for each patient. In our study a total of 15 patients (10 males and 5 females) underwent the orbital floor reconstruction using biodegradable miniplates. The size of the orbital floor defects was meanly 3.51 ± 1.29 cm(2). Results demonstrated that 4 out of 15 patients had a remnant defect after resorption of the biodegradable plate. In 10 out of 15 patients, the biodegradable plates completely replaced with fibrous tissues after 18 months. Remaining five patients had partial resorption of plates. There was not any relationship between the defect size and the remnant defects (p > 0.05). A significant relationship was seen between the defect size and the plates' resorption rate (p < 0.001). There is a significant relationship between the resorption rate and the remnant defect. The risk to have remnant defects have been increased as the plates had incomplete resorption. The use of biodegradable plates is an appropriate option for reconstruction of the orbital floor defects. The defect size does not have any effect on the stability of the

  12. Indirect orbital floor fractures: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Mithra O; Durairaj, Vikram D

    2010-04-01

    Orbit fractures are common in the context of orbital trauma. Fractures of the orbital floor without orbital rim involvement are known as indirect orbital floor fractures, pure internal floor fractures, and orbital blowout fractures. In this paper, we have reported a meta-analysis of orbital floor fractures focusing on indications and timing of surgical repair, outcomes, and complications. PMID:20616920

  13. Blowouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03699 Blowouts

    The dark crescents in this image are the backside of wind blowout features. Blowouts are common on Earth in beach regions and in the American MidWest.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 1.1N, Longitude 202.8E. 18 NASA/JPL/ASUmeter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  14. An orbital roof and anterior skull base fracture: case report.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, P; Mitro, V; Gabriele, G; Giovannetti, F; Facchini, A

    2012-10-01

    Blow-out fractures usually involve the orbit in the floor or in the medial wall. Anyway, if the roof of the orbit is thin and direct compressive or buckling forces impact the orbit the fracture can involve the upper roof. We describe the case of a blow-out fracture of the orbital roof with enophtalmus and cerebrospinal fluid leak from lacero-contusive subciliar wound

  15. Nontraumatic orbital floor fracture after nose blowing.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Ranjit S; Shah, Akash D

    2016-03-01

    A 40-year-old woman with no history of trauma or prior surgery presented to the emergency department with headache and left eye pain after nose blowing. Noncontrast maxillofacial computed tomography examination revealed an orbital floor fracture that ultimately required surgical repair. There are nontraumatic causes of orbital blowout fractures, and imaging should be obtained irrespective of trauma history. PMID:26973725

  16. Transient ipsilateral mydriasis during correction of left blowout fracture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Min; Kim, Cheul-Hong; Kim, Uk-Kyu; Chung, In-Kyo

    2014-03-01

    Mydriasis, either bilateral or unilateral, seldom occurs during reconstruction of periorbital fracture. Anisocoria, a unilateral mydriasis, requires more urgent assessment than bilateral mydriasis does. Pharmacologic agents, local anesthetic infiltration, as well as direct or indirect oculomotor nerve damage are possible causes of unilateral mydriasis. Few cases have been reported about intraoperative temporary ipsilateral mydriasis during correction of blowout fracture. We have experienced an unusual case of anisocoria and report the case with literature reviews.

  17. Ethmoid sinus osteoma associated with blow-out fracture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Dong-Yeon; Jun, Young-Joon; Seo, Byung-Chul

    2012-03-01

    Osteoma is a benign tumor that is composed of compact or cancellous bone. It is the most common benign neoplasm of the paranasal sinus, and ethmoid sinuses are the second most common sites of paranasal sinus osteoma. The symptoms of ethmoid sinus osteoma can give rise to various kinds and extent of symptoms. In symptomatic cases, surgical management is necessary, but appropriate surgical approach to the ethmoid sinus is not clearly established. We describe 2 male patients with a diagnosis of blow-out fractures after trauma; ethmoid sinus osteoma on preoperative computed tomography scans was coincidentally found, and the surgical correction was done simultaneously. The purpose of this article was to present the successful surgical removal of ethmoid osteoma through lamina papyracea and transcaruncular approach, resulting in both successful surgical correction and good cosmetic outcome.

  18. Adult orbital trapdoor fracture.

    PubMed

    Kum, Clarissa; McCulley, Timothy J; Yoon, Michael K; Hwang, Thomas N

    2009-01-01

    Trapdoor fractures occur almost exclusively in the pediatric population. The authors describe an adult with an entrapped inferior rectus muscle sheath in a trapdoor fracture. A 37-year-old man presented with persistent diplopia 3 weeks after blunt right orbital trauma. The only abnormal findings on clinical examination were limited vertical ductions. No bony defect or displacement was evident on CT. However, several small pockets of air were visible adjacent to the inferior rectus muscle. On surgical exploration, a linear nondisplaced orbital floor fracture was confirmed, and the entrapped inferior rectus muscle was released. One month postoperatively, extraocular motility had improved with no diplopia in primary or reading positions. This case demonstrates that trapdoor fractures can occur in adults and should be considered when suggestive findings are encountered. Clinicians should be aware of this because timely diagnosis and treatment might achieve more favorable outcomes.

  19. Pediatric Orbital Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Adam J.; Monson, Laura A.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    It is wise to recall the dictum “children are not small adults” when managing pediatric orbital fractures. In a child, the craniofacial skeleton undergoes significant changes in size, shape, and proportion as it grows into maturity. Accordingly, the craniomaxillofacial surgeon must select an appropriate treatment strategy that considers both the nature of the injury and the child's stage of growth. The following review will discuss the management of pediatric orbital fractures, with an emphasis on clinically oriented anatomy and development. PMID:24436730

  20. Orbital fractures in children: a review of outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Barbara; Kiwanuka, Paul; Dhariwal, Daljit

    2013-12-01

    The third most common facial fractures in children are fractures of the orbit, and the medial wall and floor are the commonest sites affected. The aetiology, clinical presentation, and timing of operation all differ from those of adults. If there are few or no clinical signs, but oculocardiac reflex is present, it is highly suggestive of trapdoor injury. This retrospective study includes all consecutive children (younger than 18 years) referred with confirmed fractures of the orbital floor over a 5-year period (2005-2010). A total of 24 patients were identified with a mean age of 13.5 years, and most injuries were secondary to falls. Isolated injury to the orbital floor occurred in 14 (58%); the rest involved other fractures of the orbital wall or face, or both. There were 11 trapdoor fractures (46%), and 9 open blow-out fractures (38%). Overall, nausea and vomiting occurred in 13 patients (54%); 8 of these had trapdoor fractures. Most patients had operations (22, 92%), and the mean time to operation was 4 days. Complications increased with delays to theatre. Those operated on within 1 day had fewer complications than those who had operations after 3 days. Postoperatively, diplopia (n=6/11) and restricted eye movement (n=3/11) were associated with trapdoor injury, while enophthalmos (n=1/9) and paraesthesia (n=3/9) were related to open blow-out fractures. To reduce compromised outcomes, prompt operation is warranted in all children with fractures of the orbital floor regardless of the configuration. PMID:23915493

  1. The Measurement of the Sensory Recovery Period in Zygoma and Blow-Out Fractures with Neurometer Current Perception Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Daemyung; Yun, Taebin; Choi, Jaehoon; Jeong, Woonhyeok; Chu, Hojun; Lee, Soyoung

    2016-01-01

    Background Facial hypoesthesia is one of the most troublesome complaints in the management of facial bone fractures. However, there is a lack of literature on facial sensory recovery after facial trauma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the facial sensory recovery period for facial bone fractures using Neurometer. Methods Sixty-three patients who underwent open reduction of zygomatic and blowout fractures between December 2013 and July 2015 were included in the study. The facial sensory status of the patients was repeatedly examined preoperatively and postoperatively by Neurometer current perception threshold (CPT) until the results were normalized. Results Among the 63 subjects, 30 patients had normal Neurometer results preoperatively and postoperatively. According to fracture types, 17 patients with blowout fracture had a median recovery period of 0.25 months. Twelve patients with zygomatic fracture had a median recovery period of 1.00 month. Four patients with both fracture types had a median recovery period of 0.625 months. The median recovery period of all 33 patients was 0.25 months. There was no statistically significant difference in the sensory recovery period between types and subgroups of zygomatic and blowout fractures. In addition, there was no statistically significant difference in the sensory recovery period according to Neurometer results and the patients' own subjective reports. Conclusions Neurometer CPT is effective for evaluating and comparing preoperative and postoperative facial sensory status and evaluating the sensory recovery period in facial bone fracture patients. PMID:27689047

  2. The Measurement of the Sensory Recovery Period in Zygoma and Blow-Out Fractures with Neurometer Current Perception Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Daemyung; Yun, Taebin; Choi, Jaehoon; Jeong, Woonhyeok; Chu, Hojun; Lee, Soyoung

    2016-01-01

    Background Facial hypoesthesia is one of the most troublesome complaints in the management of facial bone fractures. However, there is a lack of literature on facial sensory recovery after facial trauma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the facial sensory recovery period for facial bone fractures using Neurometer. Methods Sixty-three patients who underwent open reduction of zygomatic and blowout fractures between December 2013 and July 2015 were included in the study. The facial sensory status of the patients was repeatedly examined preoperatively and postoperatively by Neurometer current perception threshold (CPT) until the results were normalized. Results Among the 63 subjects, 30 patients had normal Neurometer results preoperatively and postoperatively. According to fracture types, 17 patients with blowout fracture had a median recovery period of 0.25 months. Twelve patients with zygomatic fracture had a median recovery period of 1.00 month. Four patients with both fracture types had a median recovery period of 0.625 months. The median recovery period of all 33 patients was 0.25 months. There was no statistically significant difference in the sensory recovery period between types and subgroups of zygomatic and blowout fractures. In addition, there was no statistically significant difference in the sensory recovery period according to Neurometer results and the patients' own subjective reports. Conclusions Neurometer CPT is effective for evaluating and comparing preoperative and postoperative facial sensory status and evaluating the sensory recovery period in facial bone fracture patients.

  3. Mechanisms of orbital floor fractures: a clinical, experimental, and theoretical study.

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, J D; Warwar, R E; Ballal, D R; Ballal, R D

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the two accepted mechanisms of the orbital blow-out fracture (the hydraulic and the buckling theories) from a clinical, experimental, and theoretical standpoint. METHODS: Clinical cases in which blow-out fractures resulted from both a pure hydraulic mechanism and a pure buckling mechanism are presented. Twenty-one intact orbital floors were obtained from human cadavers. A metal rod was dropped, experimentally, onto each specimen until a fracture was produced, and the energy required in each instance was calculated. A biomathematical model of the human bony orbit, depicted as a thin-walled truncated conical shell, was devised. Two previously published (by the National Aeronautics Space Administration) theoretical structural engineering formulas for the fracture of thin-walled truncated conical shells were used to predict the energy required to fracture the bone of the orbital floor via the hydraulic and buckling mechanisms. RESULTS: Experimentally, the mean energy required to fracture the bone of the human cadaver orbital floor directly was 78 millijoules (mj) (range, 29-127 mj). Using the engineering formula for the hydraulic theory, the predicted theoretical energy is 71 mj (range, 38-120 mj); for the buckling theory, the predicted theoretical energy is 68 mj (range, 40-106 mj). CONCLUSION: Through this study, we have experimentally determined the amount of energy required to fracture the bone of the human orbital floor directly and have provided support for each mechanism of the orbital blow-out fracture from a clinical and theoretical basis. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5A FIGURE 5B FIGURE 5E FIGURE 5F PMID:10703119

  4. The isolated orbital floor fracture from a transconjunctival or subciliary perspective-A standardized anthropometric evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Djedovic, Gabriel; Peisker, Andre; Wohlrath, Rene; Rieger, Ulrich; Guentsch, Arndt; Gomez-Dammeier, Marta; Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background The influence of orbital fractures and their repair on the rate of deformities of the lower eyelid is an ongoing source of discussion in the literature. Most of the present studies include isolated blowout as well as combined orbital fractures. Material and Methods We present a retrospective evaluation of a series of 100 patients after isolated blowout fracture repair using reference anthropometric data on standardized photographs. Analysis included eye fissure width and height, lid sulcus height, upper lid height, upper and lower iris coverage, position of cornea to palpebra inferior, canthal tilt, scleral show, ectropion and entropion. It was clearly distinguished between operated and contralateral eyelid, whether a transconjunctival or a subciliary approach was performed and amount of fracture. Our main interests were changes of the aforementioned parameters with regards to eyelid deformities. Results Surgery per se did not significantly influence eyelid deformities. However, the surgical approach selected significantly affected eye fissure index, lower iris coverage and rate of scleral show, indicating retraction of the lower eyelid. Conclusions The standardized measurements described here are accurate and objective to evaluate postoperative results. The subciliary approach included the highest risk of lower lid retraction as compared to transconjunctival approaches. Key words:Transconjunctical approach, subciliary approach, orbital floor fracture. PMID:26595833

  5. Paranasal sinus endoscopy and orbital fracture repair.

    PubMed

    Woog, J J; Hartstein, M E; Gliklich, R

    1998-05-01

    Although excellent results may be achieved in the management of many orbital floor injuries with standard transconjunctival or transcutaneous approaches, visualization of the posterior edge of the orbital floor or medial wall defect may be challenging at times. We describe our experience using endoscopic examination of the orbital floor through maxillary sinus approaches during the repair of selected orbital floor fractures. Owing to the posterosuperior angulation of the orbital floor, these approaches allow better visualization of the posterior edge of fractures involving the posterior portion of the orbital floor than do the standard transconjunctival approaches, and they facilitate confirmation that all orbital soft tissues have been elevated from the fracture site. We have used these techniques successfully in 9 patients with fractures involving either the posterior portion of the orbital floor or the medial wall or both.

  6. A Wrapping Method for Inserting Titanium Micro-Mesh Implants in the Reconstruction of Blowout Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Tae Joon; Yang, Won Yong; Kang, Sang Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Titanium micro-mesh implants are widely used in orbital wall reconstructions because they have several advantageous characteristics. However, the rough and irregular marginal spurs of the cut edges of the titanium mesh sheet impede the efficacious and minimally traumatic insertion of the implant, because these spurs may catch or hook the orbital soft tissue, skin, or conjunctiva during the insertion procedure. In order to prevent this problem, we developed an easy method of inserting a titanium micro-mesh, in which it is wrapped with the aseptic transparent plastic film that is used to pack surgical instruments or is attached to one side of the inner suture package. Fifty-four patients underwent orbital wall reconstruction using a transconjunctival or transcutaneous approach. The wrapped implant was easily inserted without catching or injuring the orbital soft tissue, skin, or conjunctiva. In most cases, the implant was inserted in one attempt. Postoperative computed tomographic scans showed excellent placement of the titanium micro-mesh and adequate anatomic reconstruction of the orbital walls. This wrapping insertion method may be useful for making the insertion of titanium micro-mesh implants in the reconstruction of orbital wall fractures easier and less traumatic. PMID:26848451

  7. A Wrapping Method for Inserting Titanium Micro-Mesh Implants in the Reconstruction of Blowout Fractures.

    PubMed

    Choi, Tae Joon; Burm, Jin Sik; Yang, Won Yong; Kang, Sang Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Titanium micro-mesh implants are widely used in orbital wall reconstructions because they have several advantageous characteristics. However, the rough and irregular marginal spurs of the cut edges of the titanium mesh sheet impede the efficacious and minimally traumatic insertion of the implant, because these spurs may catch or hook the orbital soft tissue, skin, or conjunctiva during the insertion procedure. In order to prevent this problem, we developed an easy method of inserting a titanium micro-mesh, in which it is wrapped with the aseptic transparent plastic film that is used to pack surgical instruments or is attached to one side of the inner suture package. Fifty-four patients underwent orbital wall reconstruction using a transconjunctival or transcutaneous approach. The wrapped implant was easily inserted without catching or injuring the orbital soft tissue, skin, or conjunctiva. In most cases, the implant was inserted in one attempt. Postoperative computed tomographic scans showed excellent placement of the titanium micro-mesh and adequate anatomic reconstruction of the orbital walls. This wrapping insertion method may be useful for making the insertion of titanium micro-mesh implants in the reconstruction of orbital wall fractures easier and less traumatic. PMID:26848451

  8. Orbital fracture deterioration after scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Hiroko; Yoshioka, Nobutaka

    2009-07-01

    Sinus barotrauma is a common disease in divers. However, it is not familiar to maxillofacial surgeon. We presented orbital fracture deterioration by sinus barotrauma in scuba diving and a review of literatures. We also discussed the clinical features, the prevention, and the possible mechanism of orbital fracture deterioration after scuba diving.

  9. Blow-in fracture of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Han Joon; Lee, Hong Sik

    2013-01-01

    We report 2 patients with blow-in fractures of the orbital floor caused by different mechanisms. In a 17-year-old boy, a sudden impact was given to the anterior maxillary wall and caused a depression fracture of a maxilla, yet the infraorbital rim remained intact. We think fragments of the orbital floor were forced into the orbit by a sudden increase in pressure in the maxillary sinus in this patient. In a 51-year-old man, the impact of a force was on the laterosuperior part of the zygoma, which pushed the zygoma medially. These 2 cases represent 2 different mechanisms of blow-in fractures of the orbital floor.

  10. Blow-in fracture of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Han Joon; Lee, Hong Sik

    2013-01-01

    We report 2 patients with blow-in fractures of the orbital floor caused by different mechanisms. In a 17-year-old boy, a sudden impact was given to the anterior maxillary wall and caused a depression fracture of a maxilla, yet the infraorbital rim remained intact. We think fragments of the orbital floor were forced into the orbit by a sudden increase in pressure in the maxillary sinus in this patient. In a 51-year-old man, the impact of a force was on the laterosuperior part of the zygoma, which pushed the zygoma medially. These 2 cases represent 2 different mechanisms of blow-in fractures of the orbital floor. PMID:24036789

  11. Management of orbital fractures: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Boyette, Jennings R; Pemberton, John D; Bonilla-Velez, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Many specialists encounter and treat orbital fractures. The management of these fractures is often challenging due to the impact that they can have on vision. Acute treatment involves a thorough clinical examination and management of concomitant ocular injuries. The clinical and radiographic findings for each individual patient must then be analyzed for the need for surgical intervention. Deformity and vision impairment can occur from these injuries, and while surgery is intended to prevent these problems, it can also create them. Therefore, surgical approach and implant selection should be carefully considered. Accurate anatomic reconstruction requires complete assessment of fracture margins and proper implant contouring and positioning. The implementation of new technologies for implant shaping and intraoperative assessment of reconstruction will hopefully lead to improved patient outcomes. PMID:26604678

  12. Tension pneumocephalus from orbital roof fracture.

    PubMed

    Wesley, R E; McCord, C D

    1982-02-01

    Despite the detection and treatment of an extensive orbitocranial fracture in an 18-year-old man following a motor vehicle injury, the persistent leakage of CSF and trapping of air within the intracranial cavity resulted in fulminant neurologic deterioration due to the mass effect of air when tension pneumocephalus developed. The ethmoidal defect closed spontaneously, and the patient recovered neurologically when the tension pneumocephalus was relieved with a ventriculoatrial shunt. Orbitocranial injuries, which may be unsuspected despite careful orbital, neurologic, and conventional roentgenographic examination, have a considerable mortality. The presence of intracranial penetration. The CT scans, which detect as little as 0.5 mL of intracranial air, can be used to document serial changes in amount or position of air and detect shifts of the brain. tension pneumocephalus following orbitocranial injury and management with ventriculoatrial shunting have not been previously reported.

  13. Diplopia following midfacial fractures.

    PubMed

    al-Qurainy, I A; Stassen, L F; Dutton, G N; Moos, K F; el-Attar, A

    1991-10-01

    Over a period of 2 years, 363 patients who had sustained a total of 438 midfacial fractures due to blunt trauma received a full ophthalmological examination within 1 week of injury. Of these, 72 patients (19.8%) developed diplopia. Diplopia was most common following road traffic accidents (31%) and least common with simple falls (10%). Blow-out fractures of the orbit led to double vision in 58% of cases. Eighty two percent of patients recovered from diplopia within 6 months of injury; only 1 patient required squint surgery for double vision. The principal risk factors for diplopia comprise road traffic accidents, blow-out fractures and comminuted malar fractures. Early surgical reconstruction of midfacial fractures with conservative management of concomitant motility disorders has, in our series, resulted in very few patients having diplopia in the long term. PMID:1742259

  14. Reconstruction of internal orbital fractures with Vitallium mesh.

    PubMed

    Sargent, L A; Fulks, K D

    1991-07-01

    Trauma to the face frequently results in internal orbital fractures that may produce large orbital defects involving multiple walls. Accurate anatomic reconstruction of the bony orbit is essential to maintain normal appearance and function of the eye following such injuries. Autogenous bone grafts do not always produce predictable long-term support of the globe. Displacement and varying amounts of bone-graft resorption can lead to enophthalmos. This study examines the use of Vitallium mesh in the acute reconstruction of internal orbital defects. Fifty-four patients with 66 orbits underwent reconstruction of internal orbital defects with Vitallium mesh. Associated fractures were anatomically reduced and rigidly fixed. Forty-six patients and 57 orbits had adequate follow-up for analysis of results. The average follow-up was 9 months, with 85 percent of the patients followed 6 months or longer. There were no postoperative orbital infections, and none of the Vitallium mesh required removal. Large internal orbital defects can be reconstructed using Vitallium mesh with good results and little risk of infection. Vitallium mesh appears to be well tolerated in spite of free communication with the sinuses. Stable reconstruction of the internal orbit can be achieved and predictable eye position maintained without donor-site morbidity.

  15. Orbital hematoma caused by bleeding from orbital branch of the infraorbital artery after reconstruction of an orbital fracture.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Joo Ho; Kang, Young Hye

    2014-03-01

    We experienced and report on a case of retrobulbar hematoma caused by bleeding from the orbital branch of the infraorbital artery after a medial orbital wall reconstruction.A healthy 28-year-old man struck his left eye while playing baseball before admission. A computed tomographic scan revealed an approximately 13 × 12-mm-sized fracture of the left orbit medial wall. The medial orbit wall was reconstructed through a subciliary approach on the 18th day after the injury. Approximately 15 hours after the orbit wall reconstruction, the patient complained of pain in the left orbital area, headache, and vomiting. Upon an examination, swelling and ecchymosis were observed on the left eye. His visual acuity was 0.8 (oculus dexter [OD])/0.4 (oculus sinister [OS]) and the intraocular pressure was 18 (OD)/24 (OS) mm Hg by a Goldmann applanation tonometry. A computed tomographic scan showed an intraorbital hematoma and proptosis on the left side. In an emergency operation, a hematoma with a volume of approximately 2 to 3 mL was evacuated and an active bleeding point was noted on the orbital floor, which was thought to be the orbital branch of the infraorbital nerve. The bleeding point was cauterized. After the operation, his visual acuity was 1.0 (OD)/0.8 (OS) and the ocular pressure normalized to 16 (OD)/16 (OS) mm Hg by a Goldmann applanation tonometry.Close observation and meticulous hemostasis along the infraorbital groove may be needed in an orbital floor exploration to prevent postoperative orbital hematoma.

  16. Well blowout prevention device

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, R.A.

    1983-03-22

    The invention provides a device for preventing well blowouts in sucker rod pumping systems and particularly for sensing the parting of the polish rod from the stuffing box and preventing fluid flow through the stuffing box to the atmosphere. The device includes a valve body inserted between the stuffing box and the production-tee, a valve which is selectively capable of being opened or closed in the valve body, means for actuating the valve, and a wear block abutting against a polish rod for sensing when the polish rod parts from the stuffing box. When the polish rod parts from the stuffing box, the lever causes the valve to rapidly close to prevent blowout of the fluid in the well bore. When the wear block wears down to a predetermined amount, the lever senses and effectuates a signaling system to indicate that the wear block should be replaced.

  17. Use of copolymer polylactic and polyglycolic acid resorbable plates in repair of orbital floor fractures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jonathan; German, Michael; Wong, Brian

    2014-10-01

    The fractures of the orbital floor are common after craniofacial trauma. Repair with resorbable plates is a viable reconstructive option; however, there are few reports in the literature. This study describes our experience using copolymer polylactic and polyglycolic acid (PLLA/PGA) orbital reconstruction plates (LactoSorb, Lorenz Surgical, Jacksonville, FL) in 29 cases of the orbital floor fracture repair. We conducted a retrospective review of 29 orbital floor fractures at a single institution repaired through transconjunctival, preseptal dissection using PLLA/PGA plates fashioned to repair the orbital floor defect. Associated fractures included zygomaticomaxillary, LeFort, and nasoethmoid fractures. There were six patients with complications. Four patients had transient diplopia with complete resolution of symptoms within 1 year. One patient had diplopia postoperatively, but was later lost to follow-up. Two patients have had persistent enophthalmos since 1 year. In each of these cases, the floor fracture was coincident with significant panfacial or neurotrauma. We did not encounter any adverse inflammatory reactions to the implant material itself. The study concluded that orbital floor fracture repair with resorbable plates is safe, relatively easy to perform, and in the majority of cases was effective without complications. In the presence of severe orbital trauma, more rigid implant materials may be appropriate.

  18. Evaluation of the lateral orbital approach in management of zygomatic bone fractures

    PubMed Central

    Thangavelu, K; Ganesh, N Sayee; Kumar, J Arun; Sabitha, S; Nikil

    2013-01-01

    Zygomatic maxillary fractures, also known as tripod fractures, are usually the result of a direct blow to the body of the zygoma. Tripod fracture consists of (a) zygomatic arch fracture, (b) fracture of the lateral orbital wall, and (c) fracture of the inferior orbital floor. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the functional and esthetic outcome following this lateral orbital approach in the management of zygoma fracture. This study was carried out in VMS Dental College, Salem, and in a private hospital. This study was based on the experience gained from a retrospective study of the 30 lateral orbital approaches that were used in 30 patients with fractures of the zygomatic complex, which were conducted for a period of 8 years between January 2003 and January 2011. In the retrospective study, all the 30 patients were able to open the mouth completely; eyeball movements were normal; esthetically, all patients appeared normal. There were no sinusitis or visual problems in any of the studied patients. We conclude that the lateral orbital approach is an ideal option in reduction and treatment of zygomatic bone and arch fractures. PMID:23633846

  19. Evaluation of the lateral orbital approach in management of zygomatic bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Thangavelu, K; Ganesh, N Sayee; Kumar, J Arun; Sabitha, S; Nikil

    2013-01-01

    Zygomatic maxillary fractures, also known as tripod fractures, are usually the result of a direct blow to the body of the zygoma. Tripod fracture consists of (a) zygomatic arch fracture, (b) fracture of the lateral orbital wall, and (c) fracture of the inferior orbital floor. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the functional and esthetic outcome following this lateral orbital approach in the management of zygoma fracture. This study was carried out in VMS Dental College, Salem, and in a private hospital. This study was based on the experience gained from a retrospective study of the 30 lateral orbital approaches that were used in 30 patients with fractures of the zygomatic complex, which were conducted for a period of 8 years between January 2003 and January 2011. In the retrospective study, all the 30 patients were able to open the mouth completely; eyeball movements were normal; esthetically, all patients appeared normal. There were no sinusitis or visual problems in any of the studied patients. We conclude that the lateral orbital approach is an ideal option in reduction and treatment of zygomatic bone and arch fractures.

  20. "Roller coaster maneuver via lateral orbital approach" for reduction of isolated zygomatic arch fractures.

    PubMed

    Pilanci, Ozgur; Basaran, Karaca; Datli, Asli; Kuvat, Samet Vasfi

    2013-11-01

    Numerous techniques have been reported for the reduction of zygomatic arch fractures. In this article, we aimed to describe a technique we named as "roller coaster maneuver via lateral orbital approach" to closed reduction of the isolated-type zygomatic arch fractures. Surgical outcomes of 14 patients treated with this method were outlined. PMID:24220411

  1. Combination of absorbable mesh and demineralized bone matrix in orbital wall fracture for preventing herniation of orbit.

    PubMed

    Tak, Kyoung Seok; Jung, Min Su; Lee, Byeong Ho; Kim, Joo Hyun; Ahn, Duk Kyun; Jeong, Hii Sun; Park, Young Kyu; Suh, In Suck

    2014-07-01

    After restoration of orbit wall fracture, preventing sequelae is important. An absorbable mesh is commonly used in orbit wall fracture, yet it has limitation due to orbit sagging when bony defect is larger than the moderate size (1 × 1 cm2). In this study, the authors present a satisfactory result in treating orbit wall fracture larger than the moderate size with a combination of absorbable mesh and demineralized bone matrix.From 2009 to 2012, 63 patients with bony defect larger than the moderate size, who were treated with a combination of absorbable mesh and demineralized bone matrix, were reviewed retrospectively. The site of bony defect, size, and applied amount of demineralized bone matrix were reviewed, and a 2-year follow-up was done. Facial computed tomography scans were checked preoperative, immediate postoperative, and 2-year postoperative.Among the 63 patients, there were 52 men and 11 women. Mean age was 33.3 years. The most common cause was blunt blow (35 cases); mean defect size was 13.36 × 12.82 mm2 in inferior wall fracture and 20.69 × 14.41 mm2 in medial wall fracture. There was no complication except for 3 cases of infraorbital nerve hypoesthesia. A 2-year follow-up computed tomography showed that the surgical site preserved bony formation without herniation. In treating moderate-sized bony defect in orbit wall fracture, absorbable mesh and demineralized bone matrix can maintain structural stability through good bony formation even after degradation of absorbable mesh.

  2. Penetrating injury of orbital roof and brain sparing the eye ball in a pediatric patient: A rare occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vikul; Singh, Atul Kumar; Bhaikhel, Kulwant Singh

    2016-01-01

    Blowout fractures are a common occurrence in traumatic brain injury patients. In pediatric age group, orbital floor fracture is a common occurrence. We report a case of 2-year-old male admitted to trauma center, with penetrating injury to the left eye by the clutch of motorbike which fell on the child. Noncontrast computed tomography scan revealed fracture of the roof of left orbit with left frontal contusion sparing the left eyeball. There was also the continuous leak of brain matter from the left eye which suggested tear of dura mater. Urgent left frontal craniotomy was done with the evacuation of contusion, reconstruction of orbital roof, and duroplasty under general anesthesia.

  3. Successful application of endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy to orbital floor trapdoor fracture in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yasunori; Sakaida, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

    2016-10-01

    Although surgical treatment of orbital floor fractures can be performed by many different approaches, the application of endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy (EMMM) for this condition has rarely been described in the literature. We report on a case of a 7-year-old boy with a trapdoor orbital floor fracture successfully treated with the application of EMMM. The patient suffered trauma to the right orbit floor and the inferior rectus was entrapped at the orbital floor. Initially, surgical repair via endoscopic endonasal approach was attempted. However, we were unable to adequately access the orbital floor through the maxillary ostium. Therefore, an alternative route of access to the orbital floor was established by EMMM. With sufficient visualization and operating space, the involved orbital content was completely released from the entrapment site and reduced into the orbit. To facilitate wound healing, the orbital floor was supported with a water-inflated urethral balloon catheter for 8 days. At follow-up 8 months later, there was no gaze restriction or complications associated with the EMMM. This case illustrates the efficacy and safety of EMMM in endoscopic endonasal repair of orbital floor fracture, particularly for cases with a narrow nasal cavity such as in pediatric patients.

  4. Iatrogenic inferior oblique palsy: intentional disinsertion during transcaruncular approach to orbital fracture repair.

    PubMed

    Tiedemann, Laura M; Lefebvre, Daniel R; Wan, Michael J; Dagi, Linda R

    2014-10-01

    Hypotropia following orbital fracture repair is traditionally attributed to residual tissue entrapment, scarring, direct muscle injury, or damage to the branches of the oculomotor nerve serving the inferior oblique or inferior rectus muscles. We present a case of acquired hypotropia and incyclotropia that occurred following repair of an orbital fracture involving the floor and medial wall. In order to enable adequate visualization and treatment of the combined fractures, access via a transcaruncular approach and disinsertion of the inferior oblique muscle at its origin was necessary. Whereas the possibility of inferior oblique paresis due to repair of an orbital fracture via the transcaruncular approach has received some acknowledgment, there are no prior reports in the ophthalmic literature. Strabismus surgeons should be aware of this possibility when planning surgical correction of hypotropia and incyclotropia in similar cases.

  5. Medial Wall Fracture and Orbital Emphysema Mimicking Inferior Rectus Entrapment in a Child.

    PubMed

    Collin, John; Afshar, Farid; Thomas, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Orbital emphysema is commonly associated with fractures of the orbital floor or medial wall. The air often dissipates spontaneously, but rarely can cause increased intraocular pressure and even loss of vision. Entrapment of the extraocular muscles can also occur with orbital fractures and may require prompt treatment in the pediatric patient due to the risk muscle ischemia. Both conditions can cause diplopia due to restriction of eye movement and differentiation of the two etiologies is important to prevent unnecessary surgical exploration. Identification and prompt management of raised intraocular pressure is essential in patients with orbital trauma. We present a case of orbital emphysema mimicking inferior rectus entrapment following trauma in an 11-year-old boy.

  6. Long-term infectious complications of using porous polyethylene mesh for orbital fracture reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuefei; Li, Lunhao; Sun, Yiyuan; Fan, Xianqun; Li, Zhengkang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Porous polyethylene is a widely used implants in orbital reconstruction, on which comprehensive clinical analysis, various treatments, and different prognosis according to specific classification principles on long-term complications have not been reported. To investigate the new clinical symptoms, intraoperative findings, treatments, and outcomes of complications long period after previous surgery, resulting from the use of porous polyethylene mesh for orbital fracture reconstruction. A retrospective study was conducted on 21 patients at the Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital with orbital complications after orbital fracture reconstruction with porous polyethylene mesh for 4 ± 2.2 years from 2011 to 2013. These data included new clinical symptoms after previous surgery, computerized tomography data, intraoperative findings, treatments, and outcomes. Data from 21 patients were analyzed in this study. Two patients received conservative treatment, while the other 19 patients underwent surgical approaches. Classification principles for orbital complications after orbital wall defect reconstruction with porous polyethylene mesh were formulated according to patients’ new clinical symptoms, computed tomography (CT), and intraoperative findings after previous surgery. In the last follow-up, 19 patients (90.5%) were cured or improved according to our assessment principle. The follow-up ranged from 3 to 45 months (35 months in average). According to specific classification for orbital complications resulting from the use of porous polyethylene mesh for orbital fracture reconstruction, various medical treatments should be carried out, and the prognosis may be different. PMID:27336867

  7. Late treatment of orbital fractures: a new analysis for surgical planning.

    PubMed

    Pagnoni, M; Marenco, M; Ramieri, V; Terenzi, V; Bartoli, D; Amodeo, G; Mazzoli, A; Iannetti, G

    2014-12-01

    Surgical treatment of orbital fractures should be performed without delay; in some cases acute management is not possible due to general conditions and might be delayed for weeks or months. In the latter case, the fractured fragments can consolidate improperly, causing secondary deformities of the orbital region with aesthetic and functional alteration. Surgical planning of secondary deformities is critical for adequate pre-operative planning. In the last decade an increasing number of dedicated software applications for surgical planning have been developed. Standard computed tomography (CT) or the relatively new cone beam CT can be used for diagnostic purposes, pre-surgical visual treatment outcome and virtual surgery. In this report, the authors propose their pre-operative planning analysis for surgical correction of secondary deformities of orbital fractures. The treatment of orbital fracture must, in fact, analyse not only the bone structures but the soft tissue and surrounding periorbital region. The position of the orbit in the space should be determined in relation to the surrounding structures compared to the contralateral side, if this is not affected by the trauma or pre-existing malformations.

  8. Split stack blowout prevention system

    SciTech Connect

    Crager, B.L.; Ray, D.R.; Steddum, R.E.

    1980-03-18

    A blowout prevention system for an offshore structure positioned on the underwater bottom in a body of water which contains moving ice masses that could force the structure off location wherein a surface blowout preventer stack for conventional well control is connected to the upper end of a riser with the lower end of the riser being disconnectably connected to a subsurface blowout preventer stack which provides the necessary well control should the structure be forced off location. The subsurface stack is positioned on a wellhead located in a chamber in the subsea bottom and is disconnectably connected to the riser so that the riser may be quickly removed from the subsea bottom should the structure be forced off location.

  9. Huge blowout reported in Uzbekistan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-27

    This paper reports that Moscow reports one of the largest oil well blowouts recorded on the territory of the former Soviet Union remained out of control during late April in Uzbekistan's Fergana Valley. The newspaper Trud the the well, now on fire, was flowing nearly 20,000 metric tons/day (146,000 b/d) of oil with a pressure of 10,300 psi. Located near the town of Mingbulak in Namanganskaya province, the well is near the Syr-Darya River. Initially unreported by the Moscow media, the blowout occurred Mar. 2. Besides personnel from Azerbaijan and other areas of the Commonwealth of Independent States, Uzbekistan invited American specialists to provide advice on how to control the blowout. However, Uzbek authorities had no hard currency to pay western firms.

  10. [Endoscopic approaches to the orbit].

    PubMed

    Cebula, H; Lahlou, A; De Battista, J C; Debry, C; Froelich, S

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, the use of endoscopic endonasal approaches to the pituitary has increased considerably. The endoscopic endonasal and transantral approaches offer a minimally invasive alternative to the classic transcranial or transconjunctival approaches to the medial aspect of the orbit. The medial wall of the orbit, the orbital apex, and the optic canal can be exposed through a middle meatal antrostomy, an anterior and posterior ethmoidectomy, and a sphenoidotomy. The inferomedial wall of the orbit can be also perfectly visualized through a sublabial antrostomy or an inferior meatal antrostomy. Several reports have described the use of an endoscopic approach for the resection or the biopsy of lesions located on the medial extraconal aspect of the orbit and orbital apex. However, the resection of intraconal lesions is still limited by inadequate instrumentation. Other indications for the endoscopic approach to the orbit are the decompression of the orbit for Graves' ophthalmopathy and traumatic optic neuropathy. However, the optimal management of traumatic optic neuropathy remains very controversial. Endoscopic endonasal decompression of the optic nerve in case of tumor compression could be a more valid indication in combination with radiation therapy. Finally, the endoscopic transantral treatment of blowout fracture of the floor of the orbit is an interesting option that avoids the eyelid or conjunctive incision of traditional approaches. The collaboration between the neurosurgeon and the ENT surgeon is mandatory and reduces the morbidity of the approach. Progress in instrumentation and optical devices will certainly make this approach promising for intraconal tumor of the orbit.

  11. Offshore blowouts, data for risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Holand, P.

    1995-12-31

    Blowouts are, besides gas leakages, the major contributor to the total risk for offshore installations. Therefore, the blowout risk is always included in Quantitative Risk Analyses (QRAs) of offshore installations in the Norwegian Sector of the North Sea. SINTEF Offshore Blowout Database has existed since 1984 (until 1990 it was called Marintek`s blowout database). In 1990 the responsibility of the database was transferred to SINTEF Safety and Reliability. Throughout these years the database has been used for assessing blowout risk associated to development and operation of fields offshore Norway. Six oil companies and two consultants are presently sponsoring the database. These companies are using the database when performing risk analyses. During the past three years the database has been subjected to a thorough quality improvement, both with respect to the user interface, and most important, regarding the blowout data included in the database. What is unique with this database, besides the high quality of blowout descriptions, is first that the blowout causes are categorized related to loss of primary and secondary barriers. Secondly that the user interface makes it possible to establish searches to withdraw information regarding any blowout type subjected for specific searches.

  12. Patient specific implants (PSI) in reconstruction of orbital floor and wall fractures.

    PubMed

    Gander, Thomas; Essig, Harald; Metzler, Philipp; Lindhorst, Daniel; Dubois, Leander; Rücker, Martin; Schumann, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Fractures of the orbital wall and floor can be challenging due to the demanding three-dimensional anatomy and limited intraoperative overview. Misfitting implants and inaccurate surgical technique may lead to visual disturbance and unaesthetic results. A new approach using individually manufactured titanium implants (KLS Martin, Group, Germany) for daily routine is presented in the current paper. Preoperative CT-scan data were processed in iPlan 3.0.5 (Brainlab, Feldkirchen, Germany) to generate a 3D-reconstruction of the affected orbit using the mirrored non-affected orbit as template and the extent of the patient specific implant (PSI) was outlined and three landmarks were positioned on the planned implant in order to allow easy control of the implant's position by intraoperative navigation. Superimposition allows the comparison of the postoperative result with the preoperative planning. Neither reoperation was indicated due to malposition of the implant and the ocular bulb nor visual impairments could be assessed. PSI allows precise reconstruction of orbital fractures by using a complete digital workflow and should be considered superior to manually bent titanium mesh implants.

  13. Endoscopic sinus surgery for the management of orbital diseases.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kai-Li; Su, Mao-Chang; Shiao, Jiun-Yi; Hsin, Chung-Han; Jiang, Rong-San

    2008-01-01

    The indications for endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) have been widely expanding since its introduction into sinus surgery. ESS has become an ideal method to manage certain orbital diseases and has the advantages of excellent visualization with minimal cosmetic and functional morbidity. In the Department of Otolaryngology of Taichung Veterans General Hospital from 1988 to 2005, 3,136 patients received ESS. Among them, a total of 108 patients received ESS for orbital diseases. These orbital diseases included orbital complications secondary to bacterial rhinosinusitis, fungal rhinosinusitis, skull base osteomyelitis and mucoceles, subperiosteal hematoma, Graves' disease, traumatic optic neuropathy and orbital blowout fracture. Our results showed that ESS is effective in the management of some of these orbital diseases.

  14. Orbital fracture and eyeball rupture caused by golf-club injury.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Joo Ho

    2014-05-01

    We report a case of an orbital fracture and an eyeball rupture caused by a golf-club injury. A 75-year-old man was struck in his right eye by a golf club while watching behind his son swinging a hybrid-type golf club at his home. A 70-mm muscle-depth laceration was present in the infraorbital area with active bleeding. Computed tomographic imaging of the face revealed a rupture of the right eyeball; fractures in the superior, medial, lateral, and inferior wall of the right orbit; a fracture in the right zygomaticofrontal junction; and a small amount of pneumocephalus in the parafalx region. Under general anesthesia, evisceration of the right eyeball was performed. Not only golfers but also people just watching or passing by can be injured by an errantly struck golf ball or swung golf club. Elderly people as well as children should be instructed in technique and safety and also be supervised when playing golf. Also, the public should be educated about the risk of eye injuries and the benefits of wearing a protective eyewear.

  15. Paediatric orbital fractures: the importance of regular thorough eye assessment and appropriate referral.

    PubMed

    Kassam, Karim; Rahim, Ishrat; Mills, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    The paediatric orbital fracture should always raise alarm bells to all clinicians working in an emergency department. A delay or failure in diagnosis and appropriate referral can result in rapidly developing and profound complications. We present a boy of childhood age who sustained trauma to his eye during a bicycle injury. Acceptance of the referral was based on no eye signs; however, on examination in our unit the eye had reduction in visual acuity, no pupillary reaction, and ophthalmoplegia. CT scan suggested bone impinging on the globe and the child was rushed to theatre for removal of the bony fragment. Postoperatively no improvement was noted and a diagnosis of traumatic optic neuropathy was made. An overview of factors complicating paediatric orbital injuries, their associated "red flags", and appropriate referral are discussed in this short paper. PMID:24349804

  16. Examination of Relationship Between Photonic Signatures and Fracture Strength of Fused Silica Used in Orbiter Windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Cramer, K. Elliott; Estes, Linda R.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Lankford, James, Jr.; Lesniak, Jon

    2011-01-01

    A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outermost pane of the orbiter windows. Four categories of damage: hyper-velocity impacts that occur during space-flight (HVI); hypervelocity impacts artificially made at the Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F); impacts made by larger objects falling onto the pane surface to simulate dropped items on the window during service/storage of vehicle (Bruises); and light scratches from dull objects designed to mimic those that might occur by dragging a dull object across the glass surface (Chatter Checks) are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses, examined with the GFP and other methodologies, and broken using the ASTM Standard C1499-09 to measure the fracture strength. A correlation is made between the fracture strength and damage-site measurements including geometrical measurements and GFP measurements of photoelastic retardation (stress patterns) surrounding the damage sites. An analytical damage model to predict fracture strength from photoelastic retardation measurements is presented and compared with experimental results.

  17. Infraorbital nerve transpositioning into orbital floor: a modified technique to minimize nerve injury following zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kotrashetti, Sharadindu Mahadevappa; Kale, Tejraj Pundalik; Bhandage, Supriya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Transpositioning of the inferior alveolar nerve to prevent injury in lower jaw has been advocated for orthognathic, pre-prosthetic and for implant placement procedures. However, the concept of infra-orbital nerve repositioning in cases of mid-face fractures remains unexplored. The infraorbital nerve may be involved in trauma to the zygomatic complex which often results in sensory disturbance of the area innervated by it. Ten patients with infraorbital nerve entrapment were treated in similar way at our maxillofacial surgery centre. Materials and Methods In this article we are reporting three cases of zygomatico-maxillary complex fracture in which intra-operative repositioning of infra-orbital nerve into the orbital floor was done. This was done to release the nerve from fractured segments and to reduce the postoperative neural complications, to gain better access to fracture site and ease in plate fixation. This procedure also decompresses the nerve which releases it off the soft tissue entrapment caused due to trauma and the organized clot at the fractured site. Results There was no evidence of sensory disturbance during their three month follow-up in any of the patient. Conclusion Infraorbital nerve transposition is very effective in preventing paresthesia in patients which fracture line involving the infraorbital nerve. PMID:25922818

  18. Penetrating injury of orbital roof and brain sparing the eye ball in a pediatric patient: A rare occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vikul; Singh, Atul Kumar; Bhaikhel, Kulwant Singh

    2016-01-01

    Blowout fractures are a common occurrence in traumatic brain injury patients. In pediatric age group, orbital floor fracture is a common occurrence. We report a case of 2-year-old male admitted to trauma center, with penetrating injury to the left eye by the clutch of motorbike which fell on the child. Noncontrast computed tomography scan revealed fracture of the roof of left orbit with left frontal contusion sparing the left eyeball. There was also the continuous leak of brain matter from the left eye which suggested tear of dura mater. Urgent left frontal craniotomy was done with the evacuation of contusion, reconstruction of orbital roof, and duroplasty under general anesthesia. PMID:27606024

  19. Penetrating injury of orbital roof and brain sparing the eye ball in a pediatric patient: A rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikul; Singh, Atul Kumar; Bhaikhel, Kulwant Singh

    2016-01-01

    Blowout fractures are a common occurrence in traumatic brain injury patients. In pediatric age group, orbital floor fracture is a common occurrence. We report a case of 2-year-old male admitted to trauma center, with penetrating injury to the left eye by the clutch of motorbike which fell on the child. Noncontrast computed tomography scan revealed fracture of the roof of left orbit with left frontal contusion sparing the left eyeball. There was also the continuous leak of brain matter from the left eye which suggested tear of dura mater. Urgent left frontal craniotomy was done with the evacuation of contusion, reconstruction of orbital roof, and duroplasty under general anesthesia. PMID:27606024

  20. Tire blow-outs and motorway accidents.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jean-Louis; Laumon, Bernard

    2005-03-01

    During the period from 1996 to 2002, 60,397 vehicles were involved in crashes with property damage and/or injury on a French motorway network of 2000 km. It was observed that 6.7% of these accidents involved tire blow-outs. In 87% of cases, only one vehicle was involved in the accident. Tire blow-outs occurred in 6.5% of cars that represented more than 80% of the vehicles involved in crashes. The occurrence of this phenomenon is very high for vans (22%), though it concerns trucks less (2.5%). The proportion of tire blow-outs decreased from 1997, when it was 8.0%, to 5.9% in 2002. However, two main facts require examination: (1) On inter-urban motorways, crashes involving blow-outs of rear tires occur four times more frequently than for blow-outs of front tires. (2) The frequency of tire blow-outs is especially high for vans, and almost always involves rear tires. This higher frequency for rear tires is the result of two phenomena, which are indistinguishable given the data available: firstly, a four-wheel vehicle is more difficult to control if a blow-out occurs on a rear tire (confirmed experimentally); secondly, rear tires may be in poor condition more often than front tires, and so more prone to blow-outs. Consequently, users are strongly recommended to install the best tires on rear wheels. In practice, if only the front tires are replaced, which often occurs because they tend to be worn out more quickly than the rear ones (especially for front wheel drive vehicles), it is necessary to move the rear tires to the front and fit the new ones on the rear wheels. Very interesting technological developments are in progress that should reduce the number of tire blow-outs. However, considering the time necessary to renew the number of cars on the roads, this very simple and inexpensive recommendation should apply to all cars and especially to vans. PMID:15823875

  1. PHYSICAL PARAMETERS OF STANDARD AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Pucci, Stefano; Romoli, Marco; Poletto, Giannina; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2013-10-10

    The X-ray Telescope on board the Hinode mission revealed the occurrence, in polar coronal holes, of much more numerous jets than previously indicated by the Yohkoh/Soft X-ray Telescope. These plasma ejections can be of two types, depending on whether they fit the standard reconnection scenario for coronal jets or if they include a blowout-like eruption. In this work, we analyze two jets, one standard and one blowout, that have been observed by the Hinode and STEREO experiments. We aim to infer differences in the physical parameters that correspond to the different morphologies of the events. To this end, we adopt spectroscopic techniques and determine the profiles of the plasma temperature, density, and outflow speed versus time and position along the jets. The blowout jet has a higher outflow speed, a marginally higher temperature, and is rooted in a stronger magnetic field region than the standard event. Our data provide evidence for recursively occurring reconnection episodes within both the standard and the blowout jet, pointing either to bursty reconnection or to reconnection occurring at different locations over the jet lifetimes. We make a crude estimate of the energy budget of the two jets and show how energy is partitioned among different forms. Also, we show that the magnetic energy that feeds the blowout jet is a factor of 10 higher than the magnetic energy that fuels the standard event.

  2. 16 CFR 1507.6 - Burnout and blowout.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Burnout and blowout. 1507.6 Section 1507.6... FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.6 Burnout and blowout. The pyrotechnic chamber in fireworks devices shall be constructed in a manner to allow functioning in a normal manner without burnout or blowout....

  3. 16 CFR 1507.6 - Burnout and blowout.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Burnout and blowout. 1507.6 Section 1507.6... FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.6 Burnout and blowout. The pyrotechnic chamber in fireworks devices shall be constructed in a manner to allow functioning in a normal manner without burnout or blowout....

  4. The Dimensions of the Orbital Cavity Based on High-Resolution Computed Tomography of Human Cadavers.

    PubMed

    Felding, Ulrik Ascanius; Bloch, Sune Land; Buchwald, Christian von

    2016-06-01

    Blow-out fractures affect the volume and surface area of the orbital cavity. Estimation of these values after the trauma may help in deciding whether or not a patient is a candidate for surgery. Recent studies have provided estimates of orbital volume and area of bone defect, and correlated them with the degree of enophthalmos. However, a large degree of biological variation between individuals may preclude such absolute values from being successful indicators for surgery.Stereological methods have been used to estimate orbital cavity volume in a few studies, but to date these have not been used for surface area. To authors' knowledge, this study is the first to have measured the entire surface area of the orbital cavity.The volume and surface area of the orbital cavity were estimated in computed tomography scans of 11 human cadavers using unbiased stereological sampling techniques. The mean (± SD) total volume and total surface area of the orbital cavities was 24.27 ± 3.88 cm and 32.47 ± 2.96 cm, respectively. There was no significant difference in volume (P = 0.315) or surface area (P = 0.566) between the 2 orbital cavities.The stereological technique proved to be a robust and unbiased method that may be used as a gold standard for comparison with automated computer software. Future imaging studies in blow-out fracture patients may be based on individual and relative calculation involving both herniated volume and fractured surface area in relation to the total volume and surface area of the uninjured orbital cavity.

  5. Systems and methods for detection of blowout precursors in combustors

    DOEpatents

    Lieuwen, Tim C.; Nair, Suraj

    2006-08-15

    The present invention comprises systems and methods for detecting flame blowout precursors in combustors. The blowout precursor detection system comprises a combustor, a pressure measuring device, and blowout precursor detection unit. A combustion controller may also be used to control combustor parameters. The methods of the present invention comprise receiving pressure data measured by an acoustic pressure measuring device, performing one or a combination of spectral analysis, statistical analysis, and wavelet analysis on received pressure data, and determining the existence of a blowout precursor based on such analyses. The spectral analysis, statistical analysis, and wavelet analysis further comprise their respective sub-methods to determine the existence of blowout precursors.

  6. Organized investigation expedites insurance claims following a blowout

    SciTech Connect

    Armstreet, R.

    1996-01-22

    Various types of insurance policies cover blowouts to different degrees, and a proper understanding of the incident and the coverage can expedite the adjustment process. Every well control incident, and the claim arising therefrom, has a unique set of circumstances which must be analyzed thoroughly. A blowout incident, no matter what size or how severe, can have an emotional impact on all who become involved. Bodily injuries or death of friends and coworkers can result in additional stress following a blowout. Thus, it is important that all parties involved remain mindful of sensitive matters when investigating a blowout. This paper reviews the definition of a blowout based on insurance procedures and claims. It reviews blowout expenses and contractor cost and accepted well control policies. Finally, it reviews the investigation procedures normally followed by an agent and the types of information requested from the operator.

  7. Blowout control: Response, intervention and management. Part 9: Firefighting

    SciTech Connect

    Flak, L.H.; Matthews, C.

    1994-10-01

    This article deals with the highly visible and potentially dangerous operations of extinguishing and capping burning blowouts. To understand the nature of oil and gas fires in blowout conditions, basic mechanics and terms are explained, and important features of meltdown and radiant heat exposure limits are discussed. Methods of extinguishing fire with water, chemicals and explosives are described, and examples of capping a well while it is burning are given. Finally, reasons for voluntarily igniting a blowout in high risk wells are presented.

  8. Orbital Fracture Leading to Severe Multifascial Space Infection Including the Parapharyngeal Space: A Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan; Marchiori, Erica; Barber, Jacob; Cardon, Curtis

    2014-01-01

    Orbital trauma can result in periorbital and orbital infections. Orbital infections have been classified by Chandler et al in 1970 to their anatomic location and boundaries. This case report describes a patient who developed a severe orbital infection following orbital fractures. The infection progressed to the parapharyngeal space. The patient required multiple incision and drainage surgeries and tissue debridements to have clinical resolution. To our knowledge, there has not been a case described in the literature of an orbital infection progressing to the parapharyngeal space. A literature review of orbital trauma leading to infection discusses the pathogenesis of the infections. This case demonstrates that close clinical follow-up and appropriate medical management of comorbidities that put a patient at higher risk of developing an infection is of the utmost importance in the treatment of maxillofacial trauma patients. PMID:25136414

  9. 16 CFR 1507.6 - Burnout and blowout.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Burnout and blowout. 1507.6 Section 1507.6 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.6 Burnout and blowout. The pyrotechnic chamber in fireworks devices shall...

  10. 16 CFR 1507.6 - Burnout and blowout.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Burnout and blowout. 1507.6 Section 1507.6 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.6 Burnout and blowout. The pyrotechnic chamber in fireworks devices shall...

  11. 16 CFR 1507.6 - Burnout and blowout.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Burnout and blowout. 1507.6 Section 1507.6 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS FIREWORKS DEVICES § 1507.6 Burnout and blowout. The pyrotechnic chamber in fireworks devices shall...

  12. Blowout contingency plans can cut firefighting and capping risks

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, L.W.

    1995-05-01

    Prepared in advance of drilling, blowout contingency plans and immediate response plans can reduce firefighting, well capping, and possible relief well costs during a blowout. Regional and site-specific blowout contingency plans are especially beneficial for operators working world-wide, where logistics difficulties can easily bog down operations. This article is the first of an 8-part series on well control. Future articles will cover pressurized tree removal, well capping operations, techniques for killing wells after capping, snubbing operations, handling H{sub 2}S, shallow gas hazards, and project management. Because it is impossible to eliminate the potential for a blowout, the only logical and responsible position is to make plans to react before an accident occurs. Such a blowout contingency plan for operations should include information about the following: Immediate reaction plan (evacuations, internal and public notifications, and data collection); Blowout contingency plan (general logistic plans or site-specific plans with relief well details); Engineering modeling; Mobilization of resources to control the blowout (first wave of equipment and personnel); and Means for taking and verifying appropriate responses. The paper discusses immediate response plans, blowout contingency plans, regional and site specific plans, and recommends the absolute minimum requirements for a plan that should be created.

  13. Orbital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Robert M.

    2003-06-01

    ORBITAL requires the following software, which is available for free download from the Internet: Netscape Navigator, version 4.75 or higher, or Microsoft Internet Explorer, version 5.0 or higher; Chime Plug-in, version compatible with your OS and browser (available from MDL).

  14. Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael C.

    1963-01-01

    Recent studies on the epidemiology and repair of fractures are reviewed. The type and severity of the fracture bears a relation to the age, sex and occupation of the patient. Bone tissue after fracture shows a process of inflammation and repair common to all members of the connective tissue family, but it repairs with specific tissue. Cartilage forms when the oxygen supply is outgrown. After a fracture, the vascular bed enlarges. The major blood supply to healing tissue is from medullary vessels and destruction of them will cause necrosis of the inner two-thirds of the cortex. Callus rapidly mineralizes, but full mineralization is achieved slowly; increased mineral metabolism lasts several years after fracture. PMID:13952119

  15. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... commonly happen because of car accidents, falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the bones. Overuse can cause stress fractures, which are very small cracks in the ...

  16. A STANDARD-TO-BLOWOUT JET

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chang; Deng Na; Liu Rui; Wang Shuo; Wang Haimin; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio

    2011-07-01

    The commonly observed jets provide critical information on the small-scale energy release in the solar atmosphere. We report a near disk-center jet on 2010 July 20, observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In this event, the standard interchange magnetic reconnection between an emerging flux spanning 9 x 10{sup 3} km and ambient open fields is followed by a blowout-like eruption. In the 'standard' stage, as the emerging negative element approached the nearby positive network fields, a jet with a dome-like base in EUV grew for 30 minutes before the jet spire began to migrate laterally with enhanced flux emergence. In the 'blowout' stage, the above converging fields collided and the subsequent cancellation produced a UV microflare lasting seven minutes, in which the dome of the jet seemed to be blown out as (1) the spire swung faster and exhibited an unwinding motion before vanishing, (2) a rising loop and a blob erupted leaving behind cusped structures, with the blob spiraling outward in acceleration after the flare maximum, and (3) ejecting material with a curtain-like structure at chromospheric to transition-region temperatures also underwent a transverse motion. It is thus suggested that the flare reconnection rapidly removes the outer fields of the emerging flux to allow its twisted core field to erupt, a scenario favoring the jet-scale magnetic breakout model as recently advocated by Moore et al. in 2010.

  17. Posterior Wall Blowout in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Justin J.; Dean, Chase S.; Chahla, Jorge; Menge, Travis J.; Cram, Tyler R.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Violation of the posterior femoral cortex, commonly referred to as posterior wall blowout, can be a devastating intraoperative complication in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and lead to loss of graft fixation or early graft failure. If cortical blowout occurs despite careful planning and adherence to proper surgical technique, a thorough knowledge of the anatomy and alternative fixation techniques is imperative to ensure optimal patient outcomes. This article highlights anatomic considerations for femoral tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction and techniques for avoidance and salvage of a posterior wall blowout. PMID:27335885

  18. Momentum kill procedure can quickly control blowouts

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.D. ); Moore, P. )

    1993-08-30

    The momentum kill method can help in quickly regaining control of a blowing well, providing the blowing well rate and fluid properties can be estimated reasonably. The momentum of the kill fluid counteracts and overcomes the flowing momentum of formation fluids. In other words, sufficient mud density pumped at a sufficient rate is directed into the flow stream to force the escaping fluid column back into the well bore. Sufficient kill fluid hydrostatic pressure must be stacked'' in the hole so that the well remains dead after the operation. The momentum kill is not a panacea for all blowouts. An assessment must be made of the potential problems unique to this method, and certain requirements must be met if the technique is to be successful. The paper discusses some of the considerations for evaluating the use of the momentum kill method.

  19. Significance of the orbital floor in zygomatic injuries.

    PubMed

    Crewe, T C

    1978-08-01

    Fifty years after the publication of Harold Gillies' work, an assessment of zygomatic injuries is made, in the light of a half century of medical advances. Recent experience suggests that the fractured orbital floor is the commonest and most significant component of all zygomatic injuries. Exploration of 582 floors in the last 5 years revealed that over 20% had true blowout fractures, without damage to the orbital rim. A further 5% had torn periosteum with only minimal bony damage. Only two cases (0.3%) had fractures of the rim without a blown-out floor. The significance of floor damage is considered. This is usually more severe than expected. Even minimal damage--torn periosteum alone--may be followed by severe late sequelae, out of proportion to the magnitude of the apparent injury. If such sequelae develop late, their relationship to the injury is not suspected. The related soft tissues are very vulnerable. Vigorous manipulation of the malar (or maxilla in LeFort II injuries) does as much damage to them, as did the original trauma. Our therapy should be designed to protect these tissues during necessary manipulation.

  20. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  1. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  2. Facial fractures.

    PubMed Central

    Carr, M. M.; Freiberg, A.; Martin, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    Emergency room physicians frequently see facial fractures that can have serious consequences for patients if mismanaged. This article reviews the signs, symptoms, imaging techniques, and general modes of treatment of common facial fractures. It focuses on fractures of the mandible, zygomaticomaxillary region, orbital floor, and nose. Images p520-a p522-a PMID:8199509

  3. Failure Analysis of Fractured Poppet from Space Shuttle Orbiter Flow Control Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the failure analysis of a fractured poppet from a flow control valve (FCV) used on the space shuttle. This presentation has focused on the laboratory analysis of the failed hardware. The use of Scanning electron fractography during the investigation led to the conclusion that the poppet failed due to fatigue cracking that, most likely, occurred under changing loading conditions. The initial investigation led to a more thorough test of poppets that had been retired, this testing led to the conclusion that the thumbnail cracks in the flight hardware had existed for the life of the shuttle program. This led to a program to develop an eddy current technique that was capable of detecting small very tight cracks.

  4. Patterns and injuries associated with orbital wall fractures in elderly patients who visited the emergency room: a retrospective case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youn-Jung; Ahn, Shin; Seo, Dong-Woo; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Lee, Hyung-Joo; Park, In-June; Yang, Dong-Jin; Ryoo, Seung Mok; Kim, Won Young; Lim, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to determine orbital wall fracture (OWF) patterns and associated facial injuries in elderly patients and compare them with those in their younger adult counterparts. Design A retrospective case–control study. Setting An emergency department of a university-affiliated hospital located in an urban area. Participants A total of 1378 adult patients with OWF diagnosed by CT from 1 January 2004 through 31 March 2014 were enrolled. Patients were categorised into elderly (≥65 years) and non-elderly (<65 years) groups. Results The elderly group (n=146) had a mean age of 74.0 years compared with 37.5 years in the non-elderly group (n=1232). Slipping was the most common cause of OWF in the elderly group (43.8%, p<0.001), whereas violence was the most common cause in the non-elderly group (37.3%, p<0.001). The lateral orbital wall was the more common site of fracture in the elderly group, and their injuries were more often associated with concurrent facial bone fractures, including the mandible, maxilla and zygoma, compared with the non-elderly group. After adjusting for sex and the mechanism of injury, inclusion in the elderly group was a significant risk factor for fracture of the lateral wall (OR 1.658; 95% CI 1.074 to 2.560) and concomitant facial bone fractures of the maxilla (OR 1.625; 95% CI 1.111 to 2.377) and zygoma (OR 1.670; 95% CI 1.126 to 2.475). Conclusions Elderly patients were vulnerable to facial trauma, and concurrent facial bone fracture associated with OWF was more commonly observed in this age group. Therefore, a high index of suspicion and thorough investigation, including CT, for OWF-associated facial bone fractures are important. PMID:27645553

  5. Determining blowout risks for producing wells

    SciTech Connect

    Woodyard, A.

    1981-04-01

    A method for estimating the probability that a producing well will blow out uses a fault tree to analyze how each piece of completion equipment affects the well's overall integrity. The technique attempts to predict blowout frequency and to pinpoint changes that could be made to a well completion to maximize its reliability. The simplified well-completion diagram includes the Christmas tree, casing, tubing, packer, and safety valve. A basic problem in reliability analysis is the lack of accurate, universally accepted component failure rates. By properly representing the relationships that cause the top event probability, a realistic failure tree, along with a sensitivity analysis, can partially compensate for the deficiencies in the component failure rate. Also, in comparisons of similar systems having many common components, inaccuracies in three failure rates of those common components, inaccuracies in the failure rates of those common components tend to have little effect on the overall ranking. An important element of each well system's leak probability is the risk that accompanies workover procedures; when workover is included in the computation, the well completion's leak probability rises significantly due to the higher risk.

  6. [Micro-community characteristics of vegetations in blowouts and depositional areas of Hulunbuir grassland, Inner Mongolia].

    PubMed

    Man, Liang; Hasi, Eerdun; Zhang, Ping; Yan, Xu; Xia, Xian-Dong

    2008-10-01

    By using traditional sampling methods, the micro-communities of vegetations in fixed, semi-bare, and bare blowouts of Hulunbuir grassland were investigated, and the investigation data were statistical analyzed. The results showed that the vegetation coverage decreased in the order of fixed blowout, semi-bare blowout, and bare blowout, and was lower than that of the primary vegetation Form. Stipa grandis. Potentilla acaulis and Kengia squarrosa were the dominant species in fixed blowout, with the coverage being 5%; while P. acaulis and Carex sp. were the dominant species in semi-bare blowout, with the coverage being 2%. The dominant species in depositional areas of semi-bare blowout were P. acaulis, K. squarrosa, Agropyron cristatum, and Thymus mongolicus, and the coverage was 4%. The dominant species on the southwest slope of bare blowout was Agriophyllum pungens. The middle depositional area of bare blowout was also occupied by A. pungens (coverage 4.7%), and the edge of it was dominated by A. cristatum (coverage 2.7%), Carex sp. (coverage 2.6%), and T. mongolicus (coverage 1.7%) from the edge of the depositional area to primary grassland. The mean species importance value in fixed, semi-bare, and bare blowouts was 12.64%, 13.38%, and 20.08%, while that in the depositional area of semi-bare blowout and in the middle and edge of bare blowout was 12.55%, 40.18%, and 11.15%, respectively.

  7. Need for airbag and seatbelt to reduce orbital injuries from steering wheel knob.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Joo Ho

    2014-11-01

    The aims of this study are to report a blowout fracture of the orbital floor and medial wall caused by being struck by a steering wheel knob of an automobile and to discuss the use of airbags and seatbelts as a preventive measure for orbital injuries. A 58-year-old man was struck in the left eye by a steering wheel. His car hit a telephone pole, and he had a frontal collision injury. In this frontal impact, his left eye was hit by a Brodie knob attached to the steering wheel. At the time of injury, the speed of the car was about 65 km/h. He was not wearing a seatbelt, and the airbag had not deployed. Swelling and ecchymosis were observed at the left periorbital area, and he had diplopia on a left-side gaze. A CT revealed fractures in the medial and inferior wall of the left orbit. Entrapped soft tissues were reduced, and the medial wall and floor were reconstructed with a resorbable sheet. His diplopia disappeared 12 days after surgery. To prevent the injury from the steering wheel knob, an airbag should be installed in any vehicle, which has a steering wheel knob. Legislation mandating the use of airbags as well as seatbelts in vehicles with attached steering wheel knobs should be made.

  8. Environmental implications of a gas well blowout in northwest Louisiana - A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, M.S.; McKenzie, D.T.; Schramm, W.H.

    1995-10-01

    Oil and gas exploration in northern Louisiana has been ongoing since the 1920s. During this time occasional blowouts have occurred which have impacted the environment. In March, 1994, a Sligo Field well experienced an unusual blowout in that the event propagated to the surface through an adjacent abandoned well. While drilling through the fractured Thompson-Pettet interval at a depth of 5000 feet, a pressure kick, caused by a loss of drilling fluids, occurred. The well control devices activated and prevented loss of the well. However, the pressure front moved up the well`s uncased annulus until reaching the base of the cemented surface casing where it dispersed laterally in the Nacatoch formation at a depth of approximately 1000 feet. This was the uppermost portion of the uncased hole. The pressure front propagated through the Nacatoch until it encountered the poorly cemented annulus of the abandoned Hardman No. 1 well, located approximately 300 feet to the south of the drilling location. After moving up the annulus of the Hardman No. 1 well and charging the fresh water sands of the Wilcox system, local residential water wells and the drilling rig`s water supply well became flowing artesian. Several hours later sand and fluids began erupting, creating a large cavity on the outside of the casing surrounding the Hardman No. 1 well. The artesian impact lasted approximately four days until the pressure front dissipated. Subsequent sampling of the rig supply well determined the well to be contaminated with benzene, a known human carcinogen. The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality, in conjunction with the operator, is currently investigating the extent of contamination with the goal of ensuring the health of the local residents and the protection of the environment.

  9. Blowout control: Response, intervention and management; Part 5

    SciTech Connect

    Smestad, P.; Rygg, O.B. ); Wright, J.W. )

    1994-04-01

    All well control design functions depend on construction of an accurate computer hydraulics model of the blowout at hand. Such a model incorporates all available downhole data on characteristics of the reservoir, well effluent, pressure, temperature etc., and factors influencing the surface flowpath of the blow. In turn, the hydraulics data allows development of a blowout model and, finally, a workable well kill model that will indicate the most efficient kill/control method to use. The modeling process can be split into two phases: (1) establishing kill rates for different fluids, and maximum pressure and power requirements; (2) defining an operational kill plan and schedule. Establishing maximum rates, etc., can be done with steady state calculations. But dynamic (time based) calculations are needed to obtain kill volumes. Manually stepping a steady state simulator may also provide volumes. This paper reviews the application and requirement for such a model.

  10. High-rate Iranian blowout controlled while still burning

    SciTech Connect

    Bahmani, H.; Azarpanah, A. )

    1994-09-19

    Oil well firefighters used ingenuity and equipment designed in the field to cap a high-rate blowout well in Iran without extinguishing the fire. Well AZ-50, located about 25 km southeast of Ahwaz, Iran, blew out on Feb. 14, 1993, and was finally controlled on Mar. 31, 1993, by a firefighting team from the National Iranian Oil Co. The estimated open flow potential of producing Well AZ-50 was 60,000 bo/d and 50 MMsfd of associated gas, making this well among the world's largest blowouts. The well control operation was difficult because the flame height reached 117 m, the fluid velocity 2, 180 fps at the well-head, and the flame temperature 4,150 F. The paper describes operations.

  11. A NUMERICAL MODEL OF STANDARD TO BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Archontis, V.; Hood, A. W.

    2013-06-01

    We report on three-dimensional (3D) MHD simulations of the formation of jets produced during the emergence and eruption of solar magnetic fields. The interaction between an emerging and an ambient magnetic field in the solar atmosphere leads to (external) reconnection and the formation of ''standard'' jets with an inverse Y-shaped configuration. Eventually, low-atmosphere (internal) reconnection of sheared fieldlines in the emerging flux region produces an erupting magnetic flux rope and a reconnection jet underneath it. The erupting plasma blows out the ambient field and, moreover, it unwinds as it is ejected into the outer solar atmosphere. The fast emission of the cool material that erupts together with the hot outflows due to external/internal reconnection form a wider ''blowout'' jet. We show the transition from ''standard'' to ''blowout'' jets and report on their 3D structure. The physical plasma properties of the jets are consistent with observational studies.

  12. Blowout brought under control in Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-19

    This paper reports that Greenhill Petroleum Corp., Houston, killed a well blowout Oct. 9 and began cleaning up oil spilled into Timbalier Bay off La Fourche Parish, La. Development well No. 250 in Timbalier Bay field blew out Sept. 29 while Blake Drilling and Workover Co., Belle Chasse, La., was trying to recomplete it in a deeper zone. Fire broke out as Boots and Coots Inc., Houston, was positioning control equipment at the wellhead. State and federal oil spill response officials estimated the uncontrolled flow of well No. 250 at 1,400 b/d of oil. Coast Guard officials on Oct. 8 upgraded the blowout to a major spill, after deciding that at least 2,500 bbl of oil had gone into the water.

  13. Capping blowouts from Iran's eight-year war

    SciTech Connect

    Sayers, B. )

    1991-05-01

    This paper reports on capping blowouts from Iran's eight year war. Fires in three Iranian wells (two oil, one gas), started during 1987 by Iraqi sabotage, finally were extinguished during the last several months of 1990. Burning during the final months of the countries' eight-year war, plus another subsequent peaceful two years, the fires consumed millions of barrels of oil and billions of cubic feet of gas before they were capped. Ironically, bringing the wells under control took relatively little time.

  14. Windflow circulation patterns in a coastal dune blowout, south coast of Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fraser, G.S.; Bennett, S.W.; Olyphant, G.A.; Bauch, N.J.; Ferguson, V.; Gellasch, C.A.; Millard, C.L.; Mueller, B.; O'Malley, P. J.; Way, J.N.; Woodfield, M.C.

    1998-01-01

    The windflow patterns in a large active blowout in a coastal dune on the southern shore of Lake Michigan were intensively monitored during a two-day period when the predominant winds shifted from onshore (Day 1) to offshore (Day 2). The wind data were used in conjunction with mapped geomorphic features and sedimentologic characteristics to infer the following aspects of blowout evolution: (1) Prevailing winds are transformed considerably once they enter the blowout. Flow separation occurs when offshore winds enter the blowout over the steep back wall. Separated flows may, in turn, induce countercurrent flows within the trough. Flow expansion and deceleration occur when onshore winds enter over gently sloping walls at the front of the blowout. (2) Maximum erosion occurs along the deflationary floor near the entrance to the blowout, and lateral extensional lobes are also expanding the blowout to the east. Sand avalanches down the eastern and western lateral walls toward the deflationary floor where it is moved toward the rear of the blowout and up the ramp at the south end. Sand leaves the blowout as a series of depositional lobes prograding out onto the surface of the host dune along the south and east walls. (3) Vegetation prevents expansion of the blowout in certain directions and impediments to flow, such as slump blocks, alter circulation patterns and sand transport paths. (4) Prevailing onshore winds deflate the floor and promote eastward expansion of lateral erosional lobes, whereas strong flows from the southwest apparently are the main cause of transport up the transportational ramp and over the south wall of the blowout.

  15. Understanding Blowout Phenomena to the Induced Angle of V-Gutter-Stabilized Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirubhakaran, K.; Parammasivam, K. M.

    2016-04-01

    The combustion and flame blowout characteristics are investigated in a vitiated environment by placing the 60°, 90° and 120° V-gutters. The blowout is initiated through varying the equivalence ratio of reactants' flow rates. The blowout is mainly investigated in ultra-lean condition where the equivalence ratio ranges from 0.18 to 0.8, by varying the length of the combustor; the blowout of flame takes place more quickly; it occurred in all tested gutter angles. On increasing the gutter angle from 60° to 120° the flame blowout takes place at Reynolds number from 2,500 to 6,000, which is inversely proportional to the gutter-induced angle of the gutter. The flame flashback possibility occurs due to aggression of the flame marching towards the blowout. The 120° V-gutter has possible flashback since the blowout takes place at very low Reynolds number. As the length of the combustor increases, it is also evident that flashback phenomenon occurred in the rigorous flame just before the flame blowout.

  16. A Slow Streamer Blowout at the Sun and Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Bemporad, A.; Poletto, G.

    2003-01-01

    On 10 June 2000 a streamer on the southeast limb slowly disappeared from LASCO/C2 over a period of 17 hours. Within this interval, a small CME was reported in C2. Nothing was reported in C3. The ejecta was later detected at Ulysses, which was at quadrature with the Sun and SOHO at the time. The interplanetary CME (ICME) displayed all the properties of a typical ICME. Slow streamer blowouts such as this have long been known but are little studied.

  17. Well blowout rates in California Oil and Gas District 4--Update and Trends

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Preston D.; Benson, Sally M.

    2009-10-01

    Well blowouts are one type of event in hydrocarbon exploration and production that generates health, safety, environmental and financial risk. Well blowouts are variously defined as 'uncontrolled flow of well fluids and/or formation fluids from the wellbore' or 'uncontrolled flow of reservoir fluids into the wellbore'. Theoretically this is irrespective of flux rate and so would include low fluxes, often termed 'leakage'. In practice, such low-flux events are not considered well blowouts. Rather, the term well blowout applies to higher fluxes that rise to attention more acutely, typically in the order of seconds to days after the event commences. It is not unusual for insurance claims for well blowouts to exceed US$10 million. This does not imply that all blowouts are this costly, as it is likely claims are filed only for the most catastrophic events. Still, insuring against the risk of loss of well control is the costliest in the industry. The risk of well blowouts was recently quantified from an assembled database of 102 events occurring in California Oil and Gas District 4 during the period 1991 to 2005, inclusive. This article reviews those findings, updates them to a certain extent and compares them with other well blowout risk study results. It also provides an improved perspective on some of the findings. In short, this update finds that blowout rates have remained constant from 2005 to 2008 within the limits of resolution and that the decline in blowout rates from 1991 to 2005 was likely due to improved industry practice.

  18. A Slow Streamer Blowout at the Sun and Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seuss, S. T.; Bemporad, A.; Poletto, G.

    2004-01-01

    On 10 June 2000 a streamer on the southeast limb slowly disappeared from LASCO/C2 over approximately 10 hours. A small CME was reported in C2. A substantial interplanetary CME (ICME) was later detected at Ulysses, which was at quadrature with the Sun and SOHO at the time. This detection illustrates the properties of an ICME for a known solar source and demonstrates that the identification can be done even beyond 3 AU. Slow streamer blowouts such as this have long been known but are little studied. We report on the SOHO observation of a coronal mass ejection (CME) on the solar limb and the subsequent in situ detection at Ulysses, which was near quadrature at the time, above the location of the CME. SOHO-Ulysses quadrature was 13 June, when Ulysses was 3.36 AU from the Sun and 58.2 degrees south of the equator off the east limb. The slow streamer blowout was on 10 June, when the SOHO-Sun-Ulysses angle was 87 degrees.

  19. Numerical Simulation of a Slow Streamer-Blowout CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Benjamin J.; Masson, Sophie; Li, Yan; DeVore, C. Richard; Luhmann, Janet; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2014-06-01

    We present a 3D numerical MHD simulation of the 2008 Jun 2 gradual streamer blowout CME that had virtually no identifiable low coronal signatures. We energize the field by simple footpoint shearing along the source region's polarity inversion line and model the background solar wind structure using an ˜2MK isothermal wind and a low-order potential field source surface representation of the CR2070 synoptic magnetogram. Our results show that the CME ``initiation’’ is obtained by slowly disrupting the quasi-steady-state configuration of the helmet streamer, resulting in the standard eruptive flare picture that ejects the sheared fields, but very slowly, on a relatively large scale, and with very little magnetic energy release. We obtain a relatively slow CME eruption of order the background solar wind speed and argue that these slow streamer blowout CMEs (now also known as ``stealth CMEs’’) are simply at the lowest end of the CME energy distribution. We present comparisons of the CME propagation through the corona (≤15Rs) in synthetic white-light images derived from the simulation density structure with multi-spacecraft coronagraph data from STEREO/SECCHI and SOHO/LASCO.

  20. Meso-scale aeolian transport of beach sediment via dune blowout pathways within a linear foredune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, Nicholas; Delgado-Fernandez, Irene; Jackson, Derek; Aplin, Paul; Marston, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of coastal foredunes is largely controlled by sediment exchanges between the geomorphic sub-units of the nearshore, beach, foredune and dune field. Although blowouts are widely recognised as efficient sediment transport pathways, both event-scale and meso-scale quantification of their utility in transferring beach sediments landwards is limited. Foredunes characterised by multiple blowouts may be more susceptible to coastline retreat through the enhanced landwards transport of beach or foredune sediments. To date, a key constraint for investigations of such scenarios has been the absence of accurate blowout sediment transport records. Here we use the Sefton coast in north-west England as a study area where an unprecedented temporal coverage of LIDAR data is available between 1999 and 2015. Additionally, an extensive set of aerial photography also exists, dating back to 1945 allowing comparison of blowout frequency and magnitude together with the alongshore limits of coastline retreat. Digital terrain models are derived for each year that LIDAR data is available. Informed by LIDAR based topography and areas of bare sand (aerial photos) terrain models have been created containing individual blowouts. Differentials in 'z' values between each terrain model of each available year has identified topographic change and total levels of transport. Preliminary results have confirmed the importance of blowouts in transporting beach or foredune sediment landwards and thus potentially promoting coastline retreat. Repetition of processes across a larger number of blowout topographies will allow better identification of individual blowouts for 'event' scale field investigations to examine spatial and temporal variability of beach sediment transport via blowouts routes.

  1. Blowout control: Response, intervention and management. Part 12

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.W.; Flak, L.H.

    1995-04-01

    This concluding article of the 12-part series discusses reasons why operators need to establish some type of Well Control Incident Management System (WCIMS). A proposed system is presented, including five major subsystems. For operators who find these intimidating, a minimum program is suggested. The section on blowout control alliances discusses the evolution of oilwell firefighting and how it has become extremely competitive while the number of incidents is less than it used to be. It is suggested that this situation is diluting the experience level within the oilwell firefighting industry and is, thus, generating a need for alliances between operators, contractors and subcontractors--even between operators--where one company`s problem could involve other operators.

  2. India gas well blowout capped and killed in 17 days

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    On January 8, 1995, the Pasarlapudi 19 gas well being drilled by India`s ONGC (oil and Natural Gas Corp.) near Amalapuram, India, 295 miles east of the state capital, Hyderabad, blew out while the operator was retrieving a stuck fish in deviated hole. On February 26, ONGC awarded a well control contract to International Well Control (IWC), Houston. On March 15, IWC and ONGC`s Crisis Management Team (CMT) completed extinguishing the fire, capping the well and killing the blowout, which was described by the experienced team as one of the two or three biggest they had ever seen. The article describes how the fire was extinguished and the well was capped, procedures heavily dependent on successful application of an abrasive fluid cutter supplied by Halliburton Energy Services (HES).

  3. Blowout Jets: Evidence from Hinode/XRT for X-Ray Jets Made by Blowout Eruption of the Emerging Bipole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2009-01-01

    Yamauchi et al (2004, ApJ, 605, 511) found that there are two structurally and dynamically distinct types of H macrospicules in polar coronal holes: single-column jet macrospicules and erupting-loop macrospicules. The structure and motion of the single-column jet macrospicules fit the standard Shibata reconnection picture for solar X-ray jets (Shibata et al 1992, PASJ, 44, L173). The form and motion of the erupting-loop macrospicules is reminiscent of the ejective eruption of the sheared-core-field flux rope in the filament-eruption birth of a bubble-type coronal mass ejection (CME). That roughly half of all polar H macrospicules were observed to be erupting-loop macrospicules suggests that there should be a corresponding large class of X-ray jets in which the emerging bipole at the base of the jet undergoes a blowout eruption as in a bubble-type CME, instead of staying closed as in the standard picture for X-ray jets. Along with a cartoon of the standard picture, we present a cartoon depicting the signatures to be expected of a blowout jet in high-resolution coronal X-ray movies such as from Hinode/XRT. From Hinode/XRT movies in polar coronal holes, we show: (1) examples of X-ray jets that fit the standard picture very well, and (2) other examples that do not fit the standard picture but do show signatures appropriate for blowout jets. These signatures are (1) a flare arcade inside the emerging bipole in addition to the flare arcade produced between the emerging bipole and the ambient high-reaching unipolar field by reconnection of these two fields as in the standard picture, and (2) in addition to the jet prong expected from the standard reconnection, a second jet prong or strand, one that could not be produced by the standard reconnection but could be produced by reconnection between the ambient unipolar field and one leg of an erupting core-field flux rope that has blown out the emerging bipole. We therefore infer that these "two pronged" jets are made by

  4. Orbital Emphysema Following Ocular Trauma and Sneezing.

    PubMed

    Gauguet, Jean-Marc; Lindquist, Patricia A; Shaffer, Kitt

    2008-01-01

    Orbital emphysema is typically a benign condition that occurs following forceful injection of air into the orbital soft tissue spaces. In many cases there is a history of trauma and fracture of an orbital bone, which permits air entry. However, other mechanisms of orbital emphysema have been reported including infection, pulmonary barotrauma, injury from compressed-air hoses, and complications from surgery including dental procedures. Here, we describe a report of a teenager who suffered an isolated medial orbital wall fracture while playing basketball, and several hours later developed orbital emphysema acutely after sneezing. We will review the radiological evaluation of orbital fractures and emphysema.

  5. Morphometrics of aeolian blowouts from high-resolution digital elevation data: methodological considerations, shape metrics, and scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, T. K.; Duke, G.; Brown, O.; Koenig, D.; Barchyn, T. E.; Hugenholtz, C.

    2011-12-01

    Aeolian blowouts are wind erosion hollows that form in vegetated aeolian landscapes. They are especially pervasive in dunefields of the northern Great Plains, yielding highly pitted or hummocky terrain, and adding to the spatial variability of microenvironments. Their development is thought to be linked to feedbacks between morphology and airflow; however, few measurements are available to test this hypothesis. Currently, a dearth of morphology data is limiting modeling progress. From a systematic program of blowout mapping with high-resolution airborne LiDAR data, we used a GIS to calculate morphometrics for 1373 blowouts in Great Sand Hills, Saskatchewan, Canada. All of the blowouts selected for this investigation were covered by grassland vegetation and inactive; their morphology represents the final stage of evolution. We first outline methodological considerations for delineating blowouts and measuring their volume. In particular, we present an objective method to enhance edge and reduce operator error and bias. We show that blowouts are slightly elongate and 49% of the sample blowouts are oriented parallel to the prevailing westerly winds. We also show that their size distribution is heavy-tailed, meaning that most blowouts are relatively small and rarely increase in size beyond 400 m3. Given that blowout growth is dominated by a positive feedback between sediment transport and vegetation erosion, these results suggest several possible mechanisms: i) blowouts simultaneously evolved and stabilized as a result of external climate forcing, ii) blowouts are slaved to exogenous biogenic disturbance patterns (e.g., bison wallows), or iii) a morphodynamic limiting mechanism restricts blowout size. Overall, these data will serve as a foundation for future study, providing insight into an understudied landform that is common in many dunefields.

  6. Nose fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It ... with other fractures of the face. Sometimes a blunt injury can ...

  7. Sensing and dynamics of lean blowout in a swirl dump combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiruchengode, Muruganandam

    This thesis describes an investigation on the blowout phenomenon in gas turbine combustors. The combustor primarily used for this study was a swirl- and dump-stabilized, atmospheric pressure device, which did not exhibit dynamic combustion instabilities. The first part of the thesis work concentrated on finding a sensing methodology to be able to predict the onset of approach of combustor blowout using optical methods. Temporary extinction-reignition events that occurred prior to blowout were found to be precursor events to blowout. A threshold based method was developed to identify these events in the time-resolved sensor output. The number and the average length of each event were found to increase as the LBO limit (fuel-air ratio) is approached. This behavior is used to predict the proximity to lean blowout. In the second part of this study, the blowout sensor was incorporated into a control system that monitored the approach of blowout and then actuated an alternate mechanism to stabilize the combustor near blowout. Enhanced stabilization was achieved by redirecting a part of the main fuel to a central preinjection pilot injection. The sensing methodology, without modification, was effective for the combustor with pilot stabilization. An event based control algorithm for controlling the combustor from blowing out was also developed in this study. The control system was proven to stabilize the combustor even when the combustor loading was rapidly changed. The final part of this study focused on understanding the physical mechanisms behind the precursor events. High speed movies of flame chemiluminescence and laser sheet scattering from oil droplets seeded into the reactants were analyzed to explain the physical processes that cause the extinction and the reignition of the combustor during a precursor event. A physical model for coupling of the fluid dynamics of vortex breakdown and combustion during precursor and blowout events is proposed. This model of blowout

  8. Salt Marsh Sediment Biogeochemical Response to the BP Blowout.

    PubMed

    Mills, Calista G; McNeal, Karen S

    2014-09-01

    The impact of the blowout on salt marshes was investigated by observing the biogeochemistry in salt marsh sediments along the Gulf Coast. High sulfide levels due to hydrocarbon loading, increased microbial activity, and microbial community shifts can lead to plant browning and mortality. Sediment biogeochemical processes that degrade enriched carbon pools through sulfate reduction are primarily responsible for the biodegradation of spilled hydrocarbons. An assessment of the impact of contamination on salt marshes at Skiff Island, LA, and Cat Island, Marsh Point, and Saltpan Island, MS, was achieved through sediment electrode profiling, microbial community profiling, and quantification of hydrocarbon contamination, which captured the spatial sedimentary biogeochemical response that affects salt marsh productivity. At western locations (Skiff and Cat Islands), total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) ranged from 2183 to 2996 mg kg, which was more than double the TPH concentration observed at eastern locales. At eastern study locations (e.g., Marsh Point), sedimentary pore-water HS concentrations were higher (maximum value = 231 mg L) and detected further up in the sediment column than at western locales (e.g., Skiff Island). Similarly, anaerobic and aerobic microbial activity, as measured by C substrate utilization profiles and well-color development, was as high or higher at eastern locations as compared with western locations. These results indicate that other factors besides location or degree of contamination, perhaps sedimentary dynamics and physical processes specific to each marsh, should be considered when determining salt marsh response to hydrocarbon contamination.

  9. High resolution measured and modelled three-dimensional airflow over a coastal bowl blowout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, Thomas A. G.; Jackson, Derek W. T.; Cooper, J. Andrew G.

    2012-12-01

    Blowouts are common landforms found within coastal dunes. Their dynamics are primarily driven by aeolian transport caused by surface wind stress, though patterns of deflation and deposition within blowouts are poorly understood as near surface wind flow is complex. Three-dimensional wind flows around blowouts have yet to be properly quantified, especially within zones of separation, re-attachment and acceleration. This has been largely due to inadequate measurement of airflow and a lack of suitable airflow models. With this in mind, we present results from a study that has quantified alongshore and oblique onshore wind flow dynamics over a bowl blowout on the Belmullet Peninsula, Ireland. Using ultrasonic three-dimensional anemometry (measuring at 50 Hz) and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modelling, we measure and model for the first time in 3D a detailed picture of the heterogeneity of wind flow over this type of terrain. During alongshore wind conditions, wind speeds within the deflation basin were retarded by 50% compared to the foredune zone and flow separation restricted to a small zone in lee of the windward rim. Wind was directed into the deflation basin through a gap in a western erosional wall, termed the blowout throat. In oblique onshore wind, airflow orientated with the blowout throat remained unchanged in direction and slowed by only 30% compared to wind speed on the foredune. In lee of the erosional wall adjacent to the blowout throat, small zones of flow separation occurred close to the erosional wall. In both cases, the highest variation in wind speed and direction occurred in zones of separation and attachment whilst flow increased in steadiness with height over the erosional walls. The results illustrate that wind is manipulated according to localised topography within the bowl blowout itself. Resulting zones of potential sediment transport (erosion and deposition) are spatially complex and alter with wind direction. The

  10. 76 FR 49666 - Safety Zone; East Coast Drag Boat Bucksport Blowout Boat Race, Waccamaw River, Bucksport, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; East Coast Drag Boat Bucksport Blowout Boat... East Coast Drag Boat Bucksport Blowout in Bucksport, South Carolina. The East Coast Drag Boat Bucksport... September 18, 2011, the East Coast Drag Boat Association will host the East Coast Drag Boat...

  11. LES of combustion dynamics near blowout in a realistic gas-turbine combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esclapez, Lucas; Nik, Medhi B.; Ma, Peter C.; O'Brien, Jeff; Carbajal, Serena; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Driven by increasingly stringent emission regulations, modern gas turbines operate at lean conditions to reduce combustion chamber temperature and NOx emissions. However, as the combustor operates closer to the lean blow-out (LBO) limit, flame stabilization mechanisms are weakened, which increases the risk for complete flame blowout. To better understand the LBO-process, large-eddy simulations of the combustion dynamics near blowout are performed in a realistic two-phase flow combustor. An unstructured incompressible Navier-Stokes solver is used in combination with a Lagrangian dispersed phase formulation. Flame dynamics near and at LBO conditions are studied to identify the role of the liquid fuel composition, spray evaporation, and complex flow pattern on the LBO limit.

  12. Development of an automatic subsea blowout preventer stack control system using PLC based SCADA.

    PubMed

    Cai, Baoping; Liu, Yonghong; Liu, Zengkai; Wang, Fei; Tian, Xiaojie; Zhang, Yanzhen

    2012-01-01

    An extremely reliable remote control system for subsea blowout preventer stack is developed based on the off-the-shelf triple modular redundancy system. To meet a high reliability requirement, various redundancy techniques such as controller redundancy, bus redundancy and network redundancy are used to design the system hardware architecture. The control logic, human-machine interface graphical design and redundant databases are developed by using the off-the-shelf software. A series of experiments were performed in laboratory to test the subsea blowout preventer stack control system. The results showed that the tested subsea blowout preventer functions could be executed successfully. For the faults of programmable logic controllers, discrete input groups and analog input groups, the control system could give correct alarms in the human-machine interface. PMID:21889767

  13. A Review of Seafood Safety after the Deepwater Horizon Blowout

    PubMed Central

    Doke, Dzigbodi; Tipre, Meghan; Leader, Mark; Fitzgerald, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Deepwater Horizon (DH) blowout resulted in fisheries closings across the Gulf of Mexico. Federal agencies, in collaboration with impacted Gulf states, developed a protocol to determine when it is safe to reopen fisheries based on sensory and chemical analyses of seafood. All federal waters have been reopened, yet concerns have been raised regarding the robustness of the protocol to identify all potential harmful exposures and protect the most sensitive populations. Objectives: We aimed to assess this protocol based on comparisons with previous oil spills, published testing results, and current knowledge regarding chemicals released during the DH oil spill. Methods: We performed a comprehensive review of relevant scientific journal articles and government documents concerning seafood contamination and oil spills and consulted with academic and government experts. Results: Protocols to evaluate seafood safety before reopening fisheries have relied on risk assessment of health impacts from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposures, but metal contamination may also be a concern. Assumptions used to determine levels of concern (LOCs) after oil spills have not been consistent across risk assessments performed after oil spills. Chemical testing results after the DH oil spill suggest PAH levels are at or below levels reported after previous oil spills, and well below LOCs, even when more conservative parameters are used to estimate risk. Conclusions: We recommend use of a range of plausible risk parameters to set bounds around LOCs, comparisons of post-spill measurements with baseline levels, and the development and implementation of long-term monitoring strategies for metals as well as PAHs and dispersant components. In addition, the methods, results, and uncertainties associated with estimating seafood safety after oil spills should be communicated in a transparent and timely manner, and stakeholders should be actively involved in developing a long

  14. Hosing Instability in the Blow-Out Regime for Plasma-Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Lu, W.; Zhou, M.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W. B.; Muggli, P.; Deng, S.; Oz, E.; Katsouleas, T.; Hogan, M. J.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F. J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R. H.; Kirby, N. A.; Walz, D.

    2007-12-21

    The electron hosing instability in the blow-out regime of plasma-wakefield acceleration is investigated using a linear perturbation theory about the electron blow-out trajectory in Lu et al. [in Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 165002 (2006)]. The growth of the instability is found to be affected by the beam parameters unlike in the standard theory Whittum et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 991 (1991)] which is strictly valid for preformed channels. Particle-in-cell simulations agree with this new theory, which predicts less hosing growth than found by the hosing theory of Whittum et al.

  15. Hosing Instability in the Blow-Out Regime for Plasma-Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Lu, W.; Zhou, M.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W.B.; Muggli, P.; Deng, S.; Oz, E.; Katsouleas, T.; Hogan, M.J.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Kirby, N.A.; Walz, D.; /SLAC

    2008-02-13

    The electron hosing instability in the blow-out regime of plasma-wakefield acceleration is investigated using a linear perturbation theory about the electron blow-out trajectory in Lu et al. [in Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 165002 (2006)]. The growth of the instability is found to be affected by the beam parameters unlike in the standard theory Whittum et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 991 (1991)] which is strictly valid for preformed channels. Particle-in-cell simulations agree with this new theory, which predicts less hosing growth than found by the hosing theory of Whittum et al.

  16. [Diseases of the orbit].

    PubMed

    Lukasik, S; Betkowski, A; Cyran-Rymarz, A; Szuber, D

    1995-01-01

    Diseases of the orbital cavity require more attention because of its specific anatomic structure and placement. Their curing requires cooperation of many medical specialties. Analysis consider orbital fractures, mainly caused by car accidents (69.2%). The next half of them consider inflammatory processes and tumor in equal numbers. Malignant tumors of orbital cavity occur most frequently (48.0%), less frequent are pseudotumors--pseudotumor orbitae (36.0%) and rare--malignant ones (16.0%). Malignant tumors more frequently infiltrate the orbit in neighborhood (63.3%), less frequently they come out from orbit tissue (16.7%). It should be emphasized that the number of orbit inflammations decreases in subsequent years, whereas occurrence of orbit tumors increases. PMID:9454170

  17. Patient-Specific Orbital Implants: Development and Implementation of Technology for More Accurate Orbital Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Podolsky, Dale J; Mainprize, James G; Edwards, Glenn P; Antonyshyn, Oleh M

    2016-01-01

    Fracture of the orbital floor is commonly seen in facial trauma. Accurate anatomical reconstruction of the orbital floor contour is challenging. The authors demonstrate a novel method to more precisely reconstruct the orbital floor on a 50-year-old female who sustained an orbital floor fracture following a fall. Results of the reconstruction show excellent reapproximation of the native orbital floor contour and complete resolution of her enopthalmos and facial asymmetry. PMID:26674886

  18. Management of ocular, orbital, and adnexal trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Spoor, T.C.; Nesi, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 20 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Ruptured Globe: Primary Care; Corneal Trauma, Endophthalmitis; Antibiotic Usage; Radiology of Orbital Trauma; Maxillofacial Fractures; Orbital Infections; and Basic Management of Soft Tissue Injury.

  19. Fracture detection logging tool

    DOEpatents

    Benzing, William M.

    1992-06-09

    A method and apparatus by which fractured rock formations are identified and their orientation may be determined includes two orthogonal motion sensors which are used in conjunction with a downhole orbital vibrator. The downhole vibrator includes a device for orienting the sensors. The output of the sensors is displayed as a lissajou figure. The shape of the figure changes when a subsurface fracture is encountered in the borehole. The apparatus and method identifies fractures rock formations and enables the azimuthal orientation of the fractures to be determined.

  20. 30 CFR 250.1625 - Blowout preventer system testing, records, and drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... drills. 250.1625 Section 250.1625 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... Operations § 250.1625 Blowout preventer system testing, records, and drills. (a) Prior to conducting high..., upper and lower kelly cocks, and drill-string safety valves shall be pressure tested to pipe-ram...

  1. 30 CFR 250.616 - Blowout preventer system testing, records, and drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... drills. 250.616 Section 250.616 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.616 Blowout preventer system testing, records, and drills. (a) BOP... disconnecting a pressure seal in the assembly, the affected seal will be pressure tested. (c) Drills....

  2. 30 CFR 250.617 - Blowout preventer system testing, records, and drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... drills. 250.617 Section 250.617 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.617 Blowout preventer system testing, records, and drills. (a) BOP... disconnecting a pressure seal in the assembly, the affected seal will be pressure tested. (c) Drills....

  3. 30 CFR 250.617 - Blowout preventer system testing, records, and drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... drills. 250.617 Section 250.617 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.617 Blowout preventer system testing, records, and drills. (a) BOP... disconnecting a pressure seal in the assembly, the affected seal will be pressure tested. (c) Drills....

  4. 30 CFR 250.1625 - Blowout preventer system testing, records, and drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... drills. 250.1625 Section 250.1625 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... Operations § 250.1625 Blowout preventer system testing, records, and drills. (a) Prior to conducting high..., upper and lower kelly cocks, and drill-string safety valves shall be pressure tested to pipe-ram...

  5. 30 CFR 250.1625 - Blowout preventer system testing, records, and drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... drills. 250.1625 Section 250.1625 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND... SHELF Sulphur Operations § 250.1625 Blowout preventer system testing, records, and drills. (a) Prior to... manifold valves, upper and lower kelly cocks, and drill-string safety valves shall be pressure tested...

  6. 30 CFR 250.616 - Blowout preventer system testing, records, and drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... drills. 250.616 Section 250.616 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Operations § 250.616 Blowout preventer system testing, records, and drills. (a) BOP pressure tests. When you...-workover operations shall participate in a weekly BOP drill to familiarize crew members with...

  7. 30 CFR 250.1625 - Blowout preventer system testing, records, and drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... drills. 250.1625 Section 250.1625 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... Operations § 250.1625 Blowout preventer system testing, records, and drills. (a) Prior to conducting high..., upper and lower kelly cocks, and drill-string safety valves shall be pressure tested to pipe-ram...

  8. 30 CFR 250.1625 - Blowout preventer system testing, records, and drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... drills. 250.1625 Section 250.1625 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... § 250.1625 Blowout preventer system testing, records, and drills. (a) Prior to conducting high-pressure... kelly cocks, and drill-string safety valves shall be pressure tested to pipe-ram test pressures....

  9. Arcuate Fractures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    In the upper left corner of this VIS image are a series of fractures. Where the fractures are exposed on the surface it is impossible to tell the plane of the fracture; however where the fractures are visible in the cliff wall it is possible to see that the fractures dip to the north. This image shows part of the caldera of Tharsis Tholus.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 1.7, Longitude 176.5 East (183.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Space Shuttle Orbiter crash and rescue information - Basic characteristics of the Space Shuttle system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, N. C.

    1976-01-01

    Major fire and rescue activity procedures developed for the Space Shuttle Orbiter are reproduced, together with diagrams of the Orbiter's ejection seat and of emergency egress-ingress hatches and blowout panels. Duties assigned to the Manager of the Fire, Crash and Rescue division of the Space Shuttle Program are discussed, including training of both ground and flight personnel in accordance with the Orbiter Crash Rescue Information manual. The special problem of providing a means of egress and rescue for the flight and ground crews of the Orbiter while it is in the piggyback configuration on top the Boeing 747 carrier was solved by use of a modified 85-foot articulated boom.

  11. Spatial-temporal evolution of aeolian blowout dunes at Cape Cod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhar, Kimia C.; Walker, Ian J.; Hesp, Patrick A.; Gares, Paul A.

    2015-05-01

    This paper explores historical evolution of blowouts at Cape Cod National Seashore (CCNS), USA - a site that hosts one of the world's highest densities of active and stabilized blowouts. The Spatial-Temporal Analysis of Moving Polygons (STAMP) method is applied to a multi-decadal dataset of aerial photography and LiDAR to extract patterns of two-dimensional movement and morphometric changes in erosional deflation basins and depositional lobes. Blowout development in CCNS is characterized by several geometric (overlap) and movement (proximity) responses, including: i) generation and disappearance, ii) extension and contraction, iii) union or division, iv) clustering and v) divergence by stabilization. Other possible movement events include migration, amalgamation and proximal stabilization, but they were not observed in this study. Generation events were more frequent than disappearance events; the former were highest between 1985 and 1994, while the latter were highest between 2000 and 2005. High rates of areal change in erosional basins occurred between 1998 and 2000 (+ 3932 m2 a-1), the lowest rate (+ 333 m2 a-1) between 2005 and 2009, and the maximum rate (+ 4589 m2 a-1) between 2009 and 2011. Union events occurred mostly in recent years (2000-2012), while only one division was observed earlier (1985-1994). Net areal changes of lobes showed gradual growth from a period of contraction (- 1119 m2 a-1) between 1998 and 2000 to rapid extension (+ 2030 m2 a-1) by 2010, which is roughly concurrent with rapid growth of erosional basins between 2005 and 2009. Blowouts extended radially in this multi-modal wind regime and, despite odd shapes initially, they became simpler in form (more circular) and larger over time. Net extension of erosional basins was toward ESE (109°) while depositional lobes extended SSE (147°). Lobes were aligned with the strongest (winter) sand drift vector although their magnitude of areal extension was only 33% that of the basins. These

  12. HELICAL BLOWOUT JETS IN THE SUN: UNTWISTING AND PROPAGATION OF WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E. J.; Archontis, V.; Hood, A. W.

    2015-01-01

    We report on a numerical experiment of the recurrent onset of helical ''blowout'' jets in an emerging flux region. We find that these jets are running with velocities of ∼100-250 km s{sup –1} and they transfer a vast amount of heavy plasma into the outer solar atmosphere. During their emission, they undergo an untwisting motion as a result of reconnection between the twisted emerging and the non-twisted pre-existing magnetic field in the solar atmosphere. For the first time in the context of blowout jets, we provide direct evidence that their untwisting motion is associated with the propagation of torsional Alfvén waves in the corona.

  13. Methane emissions from the 2015 Aliso Canyon blowout in Los Angeles, CA.

    PubMed

    Conley, S; Franco, G; Faloona, I; Blake, D R; Peischl, J; Ryerson, T B

    2016-03-18

    Single-point failures of natural gas infrastructure can hamper methane emission control strategies designed to mitigate climate change. The 23 October 2015 blowout of a well connected to the Aliso Canyon underground storage facility in California resulted in a massive release of natural gas. Analysis of methane and ethane data from dozens of plume transects, collected during 13 research-aircraft flights between 7 November 2015 and 13 February 2016, shows atmospheric leak rates of up to 60 metric tons of methane and 4.5 metric tons of ethane per hour. At its peak, this blowout effectively doubled the methane emission rate of the entire Los Angeles basin and, in total, released 97,100 metric tons of methane to the atmosphere. PMID:26917596

  14. Simulation of scenarios of oil droplet formation from the Deepwater Horizon blowout.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Boufadel, Michel C; Adams, Eric; Socolofsky, Scott A; King, Thomas; Lee, Kenneth; Nedwed, Timothy

    2015-12-15

    Knowledge of the droplet size distribution (DSD) from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout is an important step in predicting the fate and transport of the released oil. Due to the absence of measurements of the DSD from the DWH incident, we considered herein hypothetical scenarios of releases that explore the realistic parameter space using a thoroughly calibrated DSD model, VDROP-J, and we attempted to provide bounds on the range of droplet sizes from the DWH blowout within 200 m of the wellhead. The scenarios include conditions without and with the presence of dispersants, different dispersant treatment efficiencies, live oil and dead oil properties, and varying oil flow rate, gas flow rate, and orifice diameter. The results, especially for dispersant-treated oil, are very different from recent modeling studies in the literature. PMID:26581815

  15. Prediction of the blowout of jet diffusion flames in a coflowing stream of air

    SciTech Connect

    Karbasi, M.; Wierzba, I.

    1995-12-31

    The blowout limits of a lifted diffusion flame in a coflowing stream of air are estimated using a simple model for extinction, for a range of fuels, jet diameters and co-flowing stream velocities. The proposed model uses a parameter which relates to the ratio of a time associated with the mixing processes in a turbulent jet to a characteristic chemical time. The Kolmogorov microscale of time is used as time scale in this model. It is shown that turbulent diffusion flames are quenched by excessive turbulence for a critical value of this parameter. The predicted blowout velocity of diffusion flames obtained using this model is in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  16. A case of orbital emphysema as an ocular emergency.

    PubMed

    Dobler, A A; Nathenson, A L; Cameron, J D; Carpel, E T; Janda, A M; Pederson, J E

    1993-01-01

    Orbital emphysema is radiologically apparent in 50% of cases of orbital fractures, but it is generally a benign, self-limited condition. However, visual loss may occur if a fracture produces orbital compression via a ball-valve effect, allowing air to enter but not leave the orbit. A case of compressive orbital emphysema complicated by ischemic optic neuropathy is reported. Intraorbital needle aspiration relieved the compression with improvement of visual acuity and normalization of intraocular pressure.

  17. Mechanisms of Flame Stabilization and Blowout in a Reacting Turbulent Hydrogen Jet in Cross-Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kolla, H.; Grout, R. W.; Gruber, A.; Chen, J. H.

    2012-08-01

    The mechanisms contributing to flame stabilization and blowout in a nitrogen-diluted hydrogen transverse jet in a turbulent boundary layer cross-flow (JICF) are investigated using three-dimensional direct numerical simulation (DNS) with detailed chemistry. Non-reacting JICF DNS were performed to understand the relative magnitude and physical location of low velocity regions on the leeward side of the fuel jet where a flame can potentially anchor. As the injection angle is reduced from 90{sup o} to 70{sup o}, the low velocity region was found to diminish significantly, both in terms of physical extent and magnitude, and hence, its ability to provide favorable conditions for flame anchoring and stabilization are greatly reduced. In the reacting JICF DNS a stable flame is observed for 90{sup o} injection angle and, on average, the flame root is in the vicinity of low velocity magnitude and stoichiometric mixture. When the injection angle is smoothly transitioned to 75{sup o} a transient flame blowout is observed. Ensemble averaged quantities on the flame base reveal two phases of the blowout characterized by a kinematic imbalance between flame propagation speed and flow normal velocity. In the first phase dominant flow structures repeatedly draw the flame base closer to the jet centerline resulting in richer-than-stoichiometric mixtures and high velocity magnitudes. In the second phase, in spite of low velocity magnitudes and a return to stoichiometry, due to jet bending and flame alignment normal to the cross-flow, the flow velocity normal to the flame base increases dramatically perpetuating the blowout.

  18. Airflow and sediment movement within an inland blowout in Hulun Buir sandy grassland, Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu; Hasi, Eerdun; Liu, Meiping; Du, Huishi; Guan, Chao; Tao, Binbin

    2016-09-01

    We measured wind flows and sediment transport rates through a blowout in Hulun Buir grassland, Inner Mongolia. Topography and the angle of incidence between the approaching wind and the blowout long-axis significantly affected the air flow. Flow separated and decelerated at the western wall and accelerated towards the east, until maximum wind speed occurred at the top of the depositional lobe, and then decelerated on the lee side. When airflow emerged on the eastern wall, resultant directions were always NW. When winds approached from directions within 17.5° of the blowout axis, both the northwestern and southwestern walls developed turbulent flow, and significant topographic steering occurred. The deceleration zone expanded eastwards from 10.3 to 12.8 m from the western rim. When the wind direction was more oblique than 17.5°, turbulent flow at the southwestern wall disappeared. 'S-shaped' flow intensified, causing more pronounced steering at the bottom, but topographic steering elsewhere was reduced, and the boundary of the deceleration moved to 10 m from the western rim. Minor sediment deposition occurred on the western wall, while other parts were eroded; maximum sediment transport occurred at the top of the depositional lobe. The approaching wind speed affected the sediment transport rate more than the direction; and spatial variability in sediment transport reflected differences in compaction, vegetation coverage, slope, aspect, and upwind sediment availability, resulting in asymmetrical development. Overall, flow-form interactions governed the flow structures and controlled the evolution of the blowout via sediment transport.

  19. A MICRO CORONAL MASS EJECTION ASSOCIATED BLOWOUT EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET JET

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Junchao; Jiang Yunchun; Zheng Ruisheng; Yang Jiayan; Bi Yi; Yang Bo

    2011-09-10

    The so-called mini coronal mass ejections (CMEs) were recently identified as small-scale eruptive events showing the same on-disk characteristics as large-scale CMEs, and Moore et al. further found that one-third of polar X-ray jets are the so-called blowout jets, in which the jet-base magnetic arch, often carrying a filament, undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. By means of the two viewpoint observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Ahead of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO A), in this Letter, we present the first observations that a blowout jet from the eruption of an EUV mini-filament channel in the quiet Sun was indeed associated with a real micro-CME. Captured by the on-disk SDO observations, the whole life of the mini-filament channel, from the formation to eruption, was associated with convergences and cancellations of opposite-polarity magnetic flux in the photosphere, and its eruption was accompanied by a small flare-like brightening, a small corona dimming, and posteruptive loops. The near-limb counterpart of the eruption observed by STEREO A, however, showed up as a small EUV jet followed by a white-light jet. These observations not only confirm the previous results that mini-filaments have characteristics common to large-scale ones, but also give clear evidences that blowout jets can result from the eruptions of mini-filaments and are associated with mini-CME.

  20. Evolution of bubble size distribution from gas blowout in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lin; Boufadel, Michel C.; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Loney, Norman; Geng, Xiaolong

    2016-03-01

    Gas is often emanated from the sea bed during a subsea oil and gas blowout. The size of a gas bubble changes due to gas dissolution in the ambient water and expansion as a result of a decrease in water pressure during the rise. It is important to understand the fate and transport of gas bubbles for the purpose of environmental and safety concerns. In this paper, we used the numerical model, VDROP-J to simulate gas formation in jet/plume upon release, and dissolution and expansion while bubble rising during a relatively shallow subsea gas blowout. The model predictions were an excellent match to the experimental data. Then a gas dissolution and expansion module was included in the VDROP-J model to predict the fate and transport of methane bubbles rising due to a blowout through a 0.10 m vertical orifice. The numerical results indicated that gas bubbles would increase the mixing energy in released jets, especially at small distances and large distances from the orifice. This means that models that predict the bubble size distribution (BSD) should account for this additional mixing energy. It was also found that only bubbles of certain sizes would reach the water surfaces; small bubbles dissolve fast in the water column, while the size of the large bubbles decreases. This resulted in a BSD that was bimodal near the orifice, and then became unimodal.

  1. Tracking the Hercules 265 marine gas well blowout in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Isabel C.; Özgökmen, Tamay; Snyder, Susan; Schwing, Patrick; O'Malley, Bryan J.; Beron-Vera, Francisco J.; Olascoaga, Maria J.; Zhu, Ping; Ryan, Edward; Chen, Shuyi S.; Wetzel, Dana L.; Hollander, David; Murawski, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    On 23 July 2013, a marine gas rig (Hercules 265) ignited in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The rig burned out of control for 2 days before being extinguished. We conducted a rapid-response sampling campaign near Hercules 265 after the fire to ascertain if sediments and fishes were polluted above earlier baseline levels. A surface drifter study confirmed that surface ocean water flowed to the southeast of the Hercules site, while the atmospheric plume generated by the blowout was in eastward direction. Sediment cores were collected to the SE of the rig at a distance of ˜0.2, 8, and 18 km using a multicorer, and demersal fishes were collected from ˜0.2 to 8 km SE of the rig using a longline (508 hooks). Recently deposited sediments document that only high molecular weight (HMW) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations decreased with increasing distance from the rig suggesting higher pyrogenic inputs associated with the blowout. A similar trend was observed in the foraminifera Haynesina germanica, an indicator species of pollution. In red snapper bile, only HMW PAH metabolites increased in 2013 nearly double those from 2012. Both surface sediments and fish bile analyses suggest that, in the aftermath of the blowout, increased concentration of pyrogenically derived hydrocarbons was transported and deposited in the environment. This study further emphasizes the need for an ocean observing system and coordinated rapid-response efforts from an array of scientific disciplines to effectively assess environmental impacts resulting from accidental releases of oil contaminants.

  2. Fractured Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03084 Fractured Surface

    These fractures and graben are part of Gordii Fossae, a large region that has undergone stresses which have cracked the surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16.6S, Longitude 234.3E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. A small-scale eruption leading to a blowout macrospicule jet in an on-disk coronal hole

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Mitzi; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Gary, G. Allen E-mail: alphonse.sterling@nasa.gov E-mail: gag0002@uah.edu

    2014-03-01

    We examine the three-dimensional magnetic structure and dynamics of a solar EUV-macrospicule jet that occurred on 2011 February 27 in an on-disk coronal hole. The observations are from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). The observations reveal that in this event, closed-field-carrying cool absorbing plasma, as in an erupting mini-filament, erupted and opened, forming a blowout jet. Contrary to some jet models, there was no substantial recently emerged, closed, bipolar-magnetic field in the base of the jet. Instead, over several hours, flux convergence and cancellation at the polarity inversion line inside an evolved arcade in the base apparently destabilized the entire arcade, including its cool-plasma-carrying core field, to undergo a blowout eruption in the manner of many standard-sized, arcade-blowout eruptions that produce a flare and coronal mass ejection. Internal reconnection made bright 'flare' loops over the polarity inversion line inside the blowing-out arcade field, and external reconnection of the blowing-out arcade field with an ambient open field made longer and dimmer EUV loops on the outside of the blowing-out arcade. That the loops made by the external reconnection were much larger than the loops made by the internal reconnection makes this event a new variety of blowout jet, a variety not recognized in previous observations and models of blowout jets.

  4. Orbital emphysema as an ophthalmologic emergency.

    PubMed

    Fleishman, J A; Beck, R W; Hoffman, R O

    1984-11-01

    Orbital emphysema is generally a benign, self-limited condition. However, if a fracture produces a ball-valve effect allowing air to enter but not to leave the orbit, and if the orbital septum remains intact, then extremely high intraorbital pressure and visual loss is possible. Two cases are described of visual loss from orbital emphysema, in a 33-year-old man and a 28-year-old man, which were successfully treated by a lateral canthotomy and cantholysis.

  5. Reliability Analysis of the Electrical Control System of Subsea Blowout Preventers Using Markov Models

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zengkai; Liu, Yonghong; Cai, Baoping

    2014-01-01

    Reliability analysis of the electrical control system of a subsea blowout preventer (BOP) stack is carried out based on Markov method. For the subsea BOP electrical control system used in the current work, the 3-2-1-0 and 3-2-0 input voting schemes are available. The effects of the voting schemes on system performance are evaluated based on Markov models. In addition, the effects of failure rates of the modules and repair time on system reliability indices are also investigated. PMID:25409010

  6. Sea-floor methane blow-out and global firestorm at the K-T boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Max, M.D.; Dillon, William P.; Nishimura, C.; Hurdle, B.G.

    1999-01-01

    A previously unsuspected source of fuel for the global firestorm recorded by soot in the Cretaceous-Tertiary impact layer may have resided in methane gas associated with gas hydrate in the end-Cretaceous seafloor. End-Cretaceous impact-generated shock and megawaves would have had the potential to initiate worldwide oceanic methane gas blow-outs from these deposits. The methane would likely have ignited and incompletely combusted. This large burst of methane would have been followed by longer-term methane release as a part of a positive thermal feedback in the disturbed ocean-atmosphere system.

  7. Posterior Wall Blowout During Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Suspensory Cortical Fixation With a Screw and Washer Post.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Justin J; Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S; Menge, Travis J; Vap, Alexander R; Cram, Tyler R; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-06-01

    Posterior wall blowout can be a devastating intraoperative complication in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. This loss of osseous containment can cause difficulty with graft fixation and can potentially lead to early graft failure if unrecognized and left untreated. If cortical blowout occurs despite careful planning and proper surgical technique, a thorough knowledge of the local anatomy and surgical salvage options is paramount to ensure positive patient outcomes. This article highlights our preferred salvage technique using suspensory cortical fixation with a screw and washer construct. PMID:27656377

  8. Virtual Surgical Planning for Orbital Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Susarla, Srinivas M.; Duncan, Katherine; Mahoney, Nicholas R.; Merbs, Shannath L.; Grant, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The advent of computer-assisted technology has revolutionized planning for complex craniofacial operations, including orbital reconstruction. Orbital reconstruction is ideally suited for virtual planning, as it allows the surgeon to assess the bony anatomy and critical neurovascular structures within the orbit, and plan osteotomies, fracture reductions, and orbital implant placement with efficiency and predictability. In this article, we review the use of virtual surgical planning for orbital decompression, posttraumatic midface reconstruction, reconstruction of a two-wall orbital defect, and reconstruction of a large orbital floor defect with a custom implant. The surgeon managing orbital pathology and posttraumatic orbital deformities can benefit immensely from utilizing virtual planning for various types of orbital pathology. PMID:26692714

  9. Underwater Oil Plume Intrusion from Deepwater Blowouts - A Large-Eddy Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, D.; Chen, B.; Chamecki, M.; Meneveau, C. V.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of buoyancy-driven hydrocarbon plumes with the stably stratified deep-ocean environment plays a crucial role in the formation of underwater oil intrusions. As gas bubbles and oil droplets are released from an underwater oil well blowout, they induce a strong buoyancy flux that lifts entrained sea water to form an upward plume. Towards higher elevations, the stratification-induced negative buoyancy increases and eventually exceeds the gas/oil-induced buoyancy, causing the plume to decelerate and a large fraction of entrained sea water to peel off from the rising plume to form a fountain-like downward outer plume. During this peeling process, weakly buoyant particles (e.g. small oil droplets) are trapped and fall together with the detrained fluid, and then migrate horizontally at the equilibrium buoyancy depth, forming underwater oil intrusion layers. In this study, the complex plume dynamics and oil intrusion are studied using a large-eddy simulation (LES) model. The LES model captures the essential characteristics of the plume structure and the peeling/intrusion processes, and yields good agreement with prior laboratory experiments. Applying to the Deepwater Horizon oil well blowout condition, the LES model shows considerable underwater trapping and intrusion of oil droplets under various conditions, with the trapping rate significantly affected by the diameter of the oil droplet. This study is supported by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative RFP-II research grant.

  10. Blow-out protector and fire control system for petroleum exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Caraway, M.F.; Caraway, B.L.

    1987-10-06

    A blow-out protector is described for an oil well comprising a housing having a vertical passageway therethrough for a Kelly. The housing has a lower end adapter flange to be connected to a well casing, an elastomeric body having an opening for the Kelly and carried on the Kelly for providing sealing contact with the Kelly and housing passageway, a catch ring secured to the Kelly and having a surface defined by a given diameter, a compressor ring plate positioned below the elastomeric body on the Kelly, means on an interior of the housing having a given diameter and preventing the compressor ring plate from falling down and yet providing engagement with the surface of the catch ring, the compressor ring plate having a hole for passage of the Kelly drive-mechanism for the drill pipe, the catch ring on the Kelly positioned below the compressor plate. The diameter of the catch ring is smaller than the diameter of the interior means on the housing so that when the Kelly is pulled up the catch ring will contact and force the compressor ring plate against the elastomeric body and force the elastomeric body into tight contact with both the Kelly and the housing thus sealing the space between the Kelly and the housing against a blow-out.

  11. Blowout, wavebreaking and self-injection in laser wakefield in plasma channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.; Tsung, F.; Mori, W. B.

    2004-11-01

    Laser wakefield in a channel provides the most efficient plasma accelerating structure: (i) the presence of channel prevents the diffraction of the laser, (ii) the blowout regime, in which electrons are radially expelled from the axis due to the ponderomotive force, is reached with a significantly lower initial a0 and (iii) the onset of wave breaking happens in shorter time scales [1]. In this work we develop a theoretical model for the blowout regime, inspired in the seminal work on wave breaking by Dawson [2], generalized with the inclusion of both the channel and the laser, allowing us to obtain estimates for the (i) time and (ii) the minimum a0 for wavebreaking and self injection. Analytical results are compared with PIC simulations. [1] F. Tsung et al, submitted Phys. Rev. Lett. (2004); R.A. Fonseca, I.S.T. PhD Thesis (2003); R.A. Fonseca et al, submitted Phys. Plasmas (2004) [2] J.M. Dawson Phys. Rev. 113, 383 (1959)

  12. Lean blowout limits of a gas turbine combustor operated with aviation fuel and methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wei; Huang, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Lean blowout (LBO) limits is critical to the operational performance of combustion systems in propulsion and power generation. The swirl cup plays an important role in flame stability and has been widely used in aviation engines. Therefore, the effects of swirl cup geometry and flow dynamics on LBO limits are significant. An experiment was conducted for studying the lean blowout limits of a single dome rectangular model combustor with swirl cups. Three types of swirl cup (dual-axial swirl cup, axial-radial swirl cup, dual-radial swirl cup) were employed in the experiment which was operated with aviation fuel (Jet A-1) and methane under the idle condition. Experimental results showed that, with using both Jet A-1 and methane, the LBO limits increase with the air flow of primary swirler for dual-radial swirl cup, while LBO limits decrease with the air flow of primary swirler for dual-axial swirl cup. In addition, LBO limits increase with the swirl intensity for three swirl cups. The experimental results also showed that the flow dynamics instead of atomization poses a significant influence on LBO limits. An improved semi-empirical correlation of experimental data was derived to predict the LBO limits for gas turbine combustors.

  13. The persistence of large-scale blowouts in largely vegetated coastal dune fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Fernandez, Irene; Smyth, Thomas; Jackson, Derek; Davidson-Arnott, Robin; Smith, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Coastal dunes move through natural phases of stability and instability during their evolution, displaying various temporal and spatial patterns across the dune field. Recent observations, however, have shown exceptionally rapid rates of stability through increased vegetative growth. This progressive vegetation colonisation and consequent loss of bare sand on coastal dune systems has been noted worldwide. Percentage reductions in bare sand of as much as 80% within just a few decades can been seen in examples from South Africa, Canada and Brazil as well as coastal dune sites across NW Europe. Despite these dramatic trends towards dune stabilisation, it is not uncommon to find particular examples of large-scale active blowouts and parabolic dunes within largely vegetated coastal dunes. While turbulence and airflow dynamics within features such as blowouts and other dune forms has been studied in detail within recent years, there is a lack of knowledge about what maintains dune mobility at these specific points in otherwise largely stabilized dune fields. This work explores the particular example of the 'Devil's Hole' blowout, Sefton Dunes, NW England. Approximately 300 m long by 100 m wide, its basin is below the water-table which leads to frequent flooding. Sefton Dunes in general have seen a dramatic loss of bare sand since the 1940s. However, and coinciding with this period of dune stabilisation, the 'Devil's Hole' has not only remained active but also grown in size at a rate of 4.5 m year-1 along its main axis. An exploration of factors controlling the maintenance of open bare sand areas at this particular location is examined using a variety of techniques including Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) airflow modelling and in situ empirical measurements of (short-term experiments) of wind turbulence and sand transport. Field measurements of wind parameters and transport processes were collected over a 2 week period during October 2015. Twenty three 3D ultrasonic

  14. Orbit to orbit transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, R. P.

    1980-07-01

    Orbital transfer vehicle propulsion options for SPS include both chemical (COTV) and electrical (EOTV) options. The proposed EOTV construction method is similar to that of the SPS and, by the addition of a transmitting antenna, may serve as a demonstration or precursor satellite option. The results of the studies led to the selection of a single stage COTV for crew and priority cargo transfer. An EOTV concept is favored for cargo transfer because of the more favorable orbital burden factor over chemical systems. The gallium arsenide solar array is favored over the silicon array because of its self annealing characteristics of radiation damage encountered during multiple transitions through the Van Allen radiation belt. Transportation system operations are depicted. A heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) delivers cargo and propellants to LEO, which are transferred to a dedicated EOTV by means of an intraorbit transfer vehicle (IOTV) for subsequent transfer to GEO. The space shuttle is used for crew transfer from Earth to LEO. At the LEO base, the crew module is removed from the shuttle cargo bay and mated to a COTV for transfer to GEO. Upon arrival at GEO, the SPS construction cargo is transferred from the EOTV to the SPS construction base by IOTV. Crew consumables and resupply propellants are transported to GEO by the EOTV. Transportation requirements are dominated by the vast quantity of materials to be transported to LEO and GEO.

  15. Effects of Various Blowout Panel Configurations on the Structural Response of LANL Building 16-340 to Internal Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke, Jason P.

    2005-09-01

    The risk of accidental detonation is present whenever any type of high explosives processing activity is performed. These activities are typically carried out indoors to protect processing equipment from the weather and to hide possibly secret processes from view. Often, highly strengthened reinforced concrete buildings are employed to house these activities. These buildings may incorporate several design features, including the use of lightweight frangible blowout panels, to help mitigate blast effects. These panels are used to construct walls that are durable enough to withstand the weather, but are of minimal weight to provide overpressure relief by quickly moving outwards and creating a vent area during an accidental explosion. In this study the behavior of blowout panels under various blast loading conditions was examined. External loadings from explosions occurring in nearby rooms were of primary interest. Several reinforcement systems were designed to help blowout panels resist failure from external blast loads while still allowing them to function as vents when subjected to internal explosions. The reinforcements were studied using two analytical techniques, yield-line analysis and modal analysis, and the hydrocode AUTODYN. A blowout panel reinforcement design was created that could prevent panels from being blown inward by external explosions. This design was found to increase the internal loading of the building by 20%, as compared with nonreinforced panels. Nonreinforced panels were found to increase the structural loads by 80% when compared to an open wall at the panel location.

  16. Zebrafish blowout provides genetic evidence for Patched1 mediated negative regulation of Hedgehog signaling within the proximal optic vesicle of the vertebrate eye

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiwoon; Willer, Jason R.; Willer, Gregory B.; Smith, Kierann; Gregg, Ronald G.; Gross, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    In this study we have characterized the ocular defects in the recessive zebrafish mutant blowout that presents with a variably penetrant coloboma phenotype. blowout mutants develop unilateral or bilateral colobomas and as a result, the retina and retinal pigmented epithelium are not contained within the optic cup. Colobomas result from defects in optic stalk morphogenesis whereby the optic stalk extends into the retina and impedes the lateral edges of the choroid fissure from meeting and fusing. The expression domain of the proximal optic vesicle marker pax2a is expanded in blowout at the expense of the distal optic vesicle marker pax6, suggesting that the initial patterning of the optic vesicle into proximal and distal territories is disrupted in blowout. Later aspects of distal optic cup formation (i.e. retina development) are normal in blowout mutants, however. Positional cloning of blowout identified a nonsense mutation in patched1, a negative regulator of the Hedgehog pathway, as the underlying cause of the blowout phenotype. Expanded domains of expression of the Hedgehog target genes patched1 and patched2 were observed in blowout, consistent with a loss of Patched1 function and upregulation of Hedgehog pathway activity. Moreover, colobomas in blowout could be suppressed by pharmacologically inhibiting the Hedgehog pathway with cyclopamine, and maximal rescue occurred when embryos were exposed to cyclopamine between 5.5 and 13 hours post fertilization. These observations highlight the critical role that Hedgehog pathway activity plays in mediating patterning of the proximal/distal axis of the optic vesicle during the early phases of eye development and they provide genetic confirmation for the integral role that patched1-mediated negative regulation of Hedgehog signaling plays during vertebrate eye development. PMID:18479681

  17. Geophysical and Geochemical Evidence For Methane Venting at Large Gas Blowouts Along the US Mid-Atlantic Shelf Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, K. K.; Cormier, M.; Driscoll, N.; Hill, J.; Kastner, M.; Singh, H.; Weissel, J.

    2005-12-01

    Kilometer-scale, elongate gas blowouts are present at the edge of the North Carolina/Virginia continental shelf. We conducted a detailed survey in July 2004 to determine if fluids are venting at the blowouts site and to understand their origin. The Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) SeaBED collected underway data 3 m above the seafloor using a METS methane sensor, CTD and color digital camera. In addition, piston cores and hydrocasts were acquired for geochemical analysis of pore waters and the water column. Based on the AUV data, salinity and temperature exhibit a negative correlation with dissolved methane concentration. However, the raw METS measurements of dissolved methane lag behind the salinity and temperature anomalies, progressively ramping up or down compared to the impulse signal recorded for the salinity and temperature anomalies. This type of response is consistent with that expected for diffusion across a membrane, which is a characteristic of the METS sensor. Using the assumption that diffusion is responsible for the observed lag we calculated the time constant of the system to be approximately 11 minutes and used that to correct the instrument response function for the METS sensor. The corrected dissolved methane measurements show concentrations of 50-200 nM, values well above that of normal seawater (2-4 nM). Hydrocast water samples indicate methane maxima between 100 and 130 m with concentrations up to 43 nM. The positive anomalies, both from the AUV and hydrocast data, are concentrated on the upper parts of the blowout walls, extend westward onto the shelf and are observed up to 70 m depth in the water column. Methane anomalies are not generally present in the axes of the blowouts, suggesting that methane presently discharges along the blowout walls rather than through the floors. To determine if density driven stratification is present, and assuming that salinity and temperature are good proxies for methane concentration, we examined vertical

  18. Kepler's Orbit

    NASA Video Gallery

    Kepler does not orbit the Earth, rather it orbits the Sun in concert with the Earth, slowly drifting away from Earth. Every 61 Earth years, Kepler and Earth will pass by each other. Throughout the ...

  19. Orbital emphysema: nose blowing leading to a blown orbit.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, M Saad

    2015-01-01

    A 32-year-old woman with a painful swelling around the right eye few hours after blowing her nose, presented to the accident and emergency department. There was no associated history of facial trauma. Examination revealed a grossly swollen right eye and palpable subcutaneous emphysema. The patient's visual acuity and eye movements were normal. A CT scan of the orbit confirmed orbital emphysema secondary to a fracture of the floor of the orbit into the maxillary sinus, as a result of increased intranasal pressure during nose blowing. The patient was admitted and managed conservatively with antibiotics. She made a full recovery with complete resolution of all her symptoms. A nasal bone fracture was also seen on CT scan and even though the patient could not recall any history of facial trauma, it was an incidental finding. PMID:26516251

  20. Elbow Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... and held together with pins and wires or plates and screws. Fractures of the distal humerus (see ... doctor. These fractures usually require surgical repair with plates and/or screw, unless they are stable. SIGNS ...

  1. Novel Surgical Approaches to the Orbit.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ashley A; Grob, Seanna R; Yoon, Michael K

    2015-01-01

    Determining safe surgical access to the orbit can be difficult given the complex anatomy and delicacy of the orbital structures. When considering biopsy or removal of an orbital tumor or repair of orbital fractures, careful planning is required to determine the ideal approach. Traditionally, this has at times necessitated invasive procedures with large incisions and extensive bone removal. The purpose of this review was to present newly techniques and devices in orbital surgery that have been reported over the past decade, with aims to provide better exposure and/or minimally invasive approaches and to improve morbidity and/or mortality.

  2. Novel Surgical Approaches to the Orbit

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Ashley A.; Grob, Seanna R.; Yoon, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Determining safe surgical access to the orbit can be difficult given the complex anatomy and delicacy of the orbital structures. When considering biopsy or removal of an orbital tumor or repair of orbital fractures, careful planning is required to determine the ideal approach. Traditionally, this has at times necessitated invasive procedures with large incisions and extensive bone removal. The purpose of this review was to present newly techniques and devices in orbital surgery that have been reported over the past decade, with aims to provide better exposure and/or minimally invasive approaches and to improve morbidity and/or mortality. PMID:26692713

  3. Sedimentary Biogeochemical Indicators for Assessing the Impacts of the Deepwater Horizon Blowout on Coastal Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeal, K. S.; Guthrie, C. L.; Mishra, D.

    2013-05-01

    The impact of the Deepwater Horizon blowout on coastal wetlands can be understood through investigating carbon loading and microbial activity in salt marsh sediments. Carbon influx causes porewater sulfide to increase in wetland sediment, making it toxic and inhospitable to marsh vegetation. High sulfide levels due to increased microbial activity can lead to plant browning and mortality. Preliminary analyses at Marsh Point, MS indicated that sulfate reducing bacteria are more active in contaminated grass, producing sulfide concentrations 100x higher than in non-contaminated grass. Sediment electrode profiles, hydrocarbon contamination, and microbial community profiles were measured at three additional locations to capture the spatial sedimentary geochemical processes impacting salt marsh dieback. Findings indicate that response to contamination is variable due to physical and biogeochemical processes specific to each marsh. Temporal evaluation indicates that there is a lag in maximum response to contamination due to seasonal effects on microbial activity.

  4. Formation dynamics of subsurface hydrocarbon intrusions following the Deepwater Horizon blowout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Socolofsky, S.A.; Adams, E.E.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrocarbons released following the Deepwater Horizon (DH) blowout were found in deep, subsurface horizontal intrusions, yet there has been little discussion about how these intrusions formed. We have combined measured (or estimated) observations from the DH release with empirical relationships developed from previous lab experiments to identify the mechanisms responsible for intrusion formation and to characterize the DH plume. Results indicate that the intrusions originate from a stratification-dominated multiphase plume characterized by multiple subsurface intrusions containing dissolved gas and oil along with small droplets of liquid oil. Unlike earlier lab measurements, where the potential density in ambient water decreased linearly with elevation, at the DH site it varied quadratically. We have modified our method for estimating intrusion elevation under these conditions and the resulting estimates agree with observations that the majority of the hydrocarbons were found between 800 and 1200 m. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Formation dynamics of subsurface hydrocarbon intrusions following the Deepwater Horizon blowout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Socolofsky, Scott A.; Adams, E. Eric; Sherwood, Christopher R.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrocarbons released following the Deepwater Horizon (DH) blowout were found in deep, subsurface horizontal intrusions, yet there has been little discussion about how these intrusions formed. We have combined measured (or estimated) observations from the DH release with empirical relationships developed from previous lab experiments to identify the mechanisms responsible for intrusion formation and to characterize the DH plume. Results indicate that the intrusions originate from a stratification-dominated multiphase plume characterized by multiple subsurface intrusions containing dissolved gas and oil along with small droplets of liquid oil. Unlike earlier lab measurements, where the potential density in ambient water decreased linearly with elevation, at the DH site it varied quadratically. We have modified our method for estimating intrusion elevation under these conditions and the resulting estimates agree with observations that the majority of the hydrocarbons were found between 800 and 1200 m.

  6. Ion response to relativistic electron bunches in the blowout regime of laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Popov, K I; Rozmus, W; Bychenkov, V Yu; Naseri, N; Capjack, C E; Brantov, A V

    2010-11-01

    The ion response to relativistic electron bunches in the so called bubble or blowout regime of a laser-plasma accelerator is discussed. In response to the strong fields of the accelerated electrons the ions form a central filament along the laser axis that can be compressed to densities 2 orders of magnitude higher than the initial particle density. A theory of the filament formation and a model of ion self-compression are proposed. It is also shown that in the case of a sharp rear plasma-vacuum interface the ions can be accelerated by a combination of three basic mechanisms. The long time ion evolution that results from the strong electrostatic fields of an electron bunch provides a unique diagnostic of laser-plasma accelerators.

  7. A review of materials currently used in orbital floor reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mok, David; Lessard, Lucie; Cordoba, Carlos; Harris, Patrick G; Nikolis, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Orbital fractures are common fractures of the midface. As such, numerous techniques and materials exist for the repair of this region, each with inherent advantages and disadvantages. But does the ideal implant material exist? Should we stop and simply use readily available materials, or should the cycle of need and discovery continue? A comprehensive review of materials used in orbital reconstruction and possible new directions in orbital floor reconstruction are presented. PMID:24115885

  8. Metatarsal fractures.

    PubMed

    Rammelt, Stefan; Heineck, Jan; Zwipp, Hans

    2004-09-01

    Metatarsal fractures are relatively common and if malunited, a frequent source of pain and disability. Nondisplaced fractures and fractures of the second to fourth metatarsal with displacement in the horizontal plane can be treated conservatively with protected weight bearing in a cast shoe for 4-6 weeks. In most displaced fractures, closed reduction can be achieved but maintenance of the reduction needs internal fixation. Percutaneous pinning is suitable for most fractures of the lesser metatarsals. Fractures with joint involvement and multiple fragments frequently require open reduction and plate fixation. Transverse fractures at the metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction of the fifth metatarsal ("Jones fractures") require an individualized approach tailored to the level of activity and time to union. Avulsion fractures of the fifth metatarsal bone are treated by open reduction and tension-band wiring or screw fixation if displaced more than 2 mm or with more that 30% of the joint involved. The metatarsals are the most common site of stress fractures, most of which are treated nonoperatively. Symptomatic posttraumatic deformities need adequate correction, in most cases by osteotomy across the former fracture site.

  9. Experimental data regarding the characterization of the flame behavior near lean blowout in a non-premixed liquid fuel burner.

    PubMed

    De Giorgi, Maria Grazia; Sciolti, Aldebara; Campilongo, Stefano; Ficarella, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    The article presents the data related to the flame acquisitions in a liquid-fuel gas turbine derived burner operating in non-premixed mode under three different equivalence fuel/air ratio, which corresponds to a richer, an intermediate, and an ultra-lean condition, near lean blowout (LBO). The data were collected with two high speed visualization systems which acquired in the visible (VIS) and in the infrared (NIR) spectral region. Furthermore chemiluminescence measurements, which have been performed with a photomultiplier (PMT), equipped with an OH* filter, and gas exhaust measurements were also given. For each acquisition the data were related to operating parameters as pressure, temperature and equivalent fuel/air ratio. The data are related to the research article "Image processing for the characterization of flame stability in a non-premixed liquid fuel burner near lean blowout" in Aerospace Science and Technology [1].

  10. Experimental data regarding the characterization of the flame behavior near lean blowout in a non-premixed liquid fuel burner.

    PubMed

    De Giorgi, Maria Grazia; Sciolti, Aldebara; Campilongo, Stefano; Ficarella, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    The article presents the data related to the flame acquisitions in a liquid-fuel gas turbine derived burner operating in non-premixed mode under three different equivalence fuel/air ratio, which corresponds to a richer, an intermediate, and an ultra-lean condition, near lean blowout (LBO). The data were collected with two high speed visualization systems which acquired in the visible (VIS) and in the infrared (NIR) spectral region. Furthermore chemiluminescence measurements, which have been performed with a photomultiplier (PMT), equipped with an OH* filter, and gas exhaust measurements were also given. For each acquisition the data were related to operating parameters as pressure, temperature and equivalent fuel/air ratio. The data are related to the research article "Image processing for the characterization of flame stability in a non-premixed liquid fuel burner near lean blowout" in Aerospace Science and Technology [1]. PMID:26862557

  11. Accessing the Orbital Roof via an Eyelid Incision

    PubMed Central

    Ohjimi, Hiroyuki; Taniguchi, Yasushi; Tanahashi, Shinji; Era, Kozo; Fukushima, Takeo

    2000-01-01

    This article outlines a new surgical technique for accessing the orbital roof: the transpalpebral approach. It involves making an incision on the double fold of the upper eyelid, then dissecting the orbital septum and the orbicular muscle of the eye. This exposes the orbital roof and enables the surgeon to approach without a coronal incision of the scalp; the direct eyelid incision provides adequate workspace. We use this approach in three orbital roof fractures and one orbital hemangioma. This orbital approach offers a simpler surgical technique, a less invasive one, and still provides excellent exposure of the superior orbital cavity. ImagesFigure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171150

  12. Computer simulation of reservoir depletion and oil flow from the Macondo well following the Deepwater Horizon blowout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsieh, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the application of a computer model to simulate reservoir depletion and oil flow from the Macondo well following the Deepwater Horizon blowout. Reservoir and fluid data used for model development are based on (1) information released in BP's investigation report of the incident, (2) information provided by BP personnel during meetings in Houston, Texas, and (3) calibration by history matching to shut-in pressures measured in the capping stack during the Well Integrity Test. The model is able to closely match the measured shut-in pressures. In the simulation of the 86-day period from the blowout to shut in, the simulated reservoir pressure at the well face declines from the initial reservoir pressure of 11,850 pounds per square inch (psi) to 9,400 psi. After shut in, the simulated reservoir pressure recovers to a final value of 10,300 psi. The pressure does not recover back to the initial pressure owing to reservoir depletion caused by 86 days of oil discharge. The simulated oil flow rate declines from 63,600 stock tank barrels per day just after the Deepwater Horizon blowout to 52,600 stock tank barrels per day just prior to shut in. The simulated total volume of oil discharged is 4.92 million stock tank barrels. The overall uncertainty in the simulated flow rates and total volume of oil discharged is estimated to be + or - 10 percent.

  13. Flame blowout and pollutant emissions in vitiated combustion of conventional and bio-derived fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bhupinder

    The widening gap between the demand and supply of fossil fuels has catalyzed the exploration of alternative sources of energy. Interest in the power, water extraction and refrigeration (PoWER) cycle, proposed by the University of Florida, as well as the desirability of using biofuels in distributed generation systems, has motivated the exploration of biofuel vitiated combustion. The PoWER cycle is a novel engine cycle concept that utilizes vitiation of the air stream with externally-cooled recirculated exhaust gases at an intermediate pressure in a semi-closed cycle (SCC) loop, lowering the overall temperature of combustion. It has several advantages including fuel flexibility, reduced air flow, lower flame temperature, compactness, high efficiency at full and part load, and low emissions. Since the core engine air stream is vitiated with the externally cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) stream, there is an inherent reduction in the combustion stability for a PoWER engine. The effect of EGR flow and temperature on combustion blowout stability and emissions during vitiated biofuel combustion has been characterized. The vitiated combustion performance of biofuels methyl butanoate, dimethyl ether, and ethanol have been compared with n-heptane, and varying compositions of syngas with methane fuel. In addition, at high levels of EGR a sharp reduction in the flame luminosity has been observed in our experimental tests, indicating the onset of flameless combustion. This drop in luminosity may be a result of inhibition of processes leading to the formation of radiative soot particles. One of the objectives of this study is finding the effect of EGR on soot formation, with the ultimate objective of being able to predict the boundaries of flameless combustion. Detailed chemical kinetic simulations were performed using a constant-pressure continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) network model developed using the Cantera combustion code, implemented in C++. Results have

  14. Orbiter's Skeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The structure of NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft is constructed from composite panels of carbon layers over aluminum honeycomb, lightweight yet strong. This forms a basic structure or skeleton on which the instruments, electronics, propulsion and power systems can be mounted. The propellant tank is contained in the center of the orbiter's structure. This photo was taken at Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, during construction of the spacecraft.

  15. Fatigue Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Morris, James M.

    1968-01-01

    Fatigue (or stress) fracture of bone in military recruits has been recognized for many years. Most often it is a metatarsal bone that is involved but the tarsal bones, calcaneus, tibia, fibula, femur, and pelvis are occasionally affected. Reports of such fractures in the ribs, ulna and vertebral bodies may be found in the literature. In recent years, there has been increasing awareness of the occurrence of fatigue fractures in the civilian population. Weekend sportsmen, athletes in an early phase of training, and persons engaged in unaccustomed, repetitive, vigorous activity are potential victims of such a fracture. The signs and symptoms, roentgenographic findings, treatment and etiology of fatigue fractures are dealt with in this presentation. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:5652745

  16. Large-eddy simulation of oil slicks from deep water blowouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Di; Chamecki, Marcelo; Meneveau, Charles

    2013-11-01

    Deep water blowouts generate plumes of oil droplets and gas bubbles that rise through, and interact with various layers of the ocean. When plumes reach the ocean mixed layer (OML), the interactions among plume, Ekman Spiral and Langmuir turbulence strongly affect the final rates of dilution and bio-degradation. The present study aims at developing a large-eddy simulation (LES) capability for the study of the physical distribution and dispersion of petroleum (oil and gas) under the action of physical oceanographic processes in the OML. In the current LES, the velocity and temperature fields are simulated using a hybrid pseudo-spectral and finite-difference scheme; the oil/gas field is described by an Eulerian concentration field and it is simulated using a bounded finite-volume scheme. A variety of subgrid-scale models for the flow solver are implemented and tested. The LES capability is then applied to the simulation of oil plume dispersion in the OML, which is initially released from a point source below the thermocline. Graphical visualization of the LES results shows surface oil slick distribution consistent with the satellite and aerial images of surface oil slicks reported in the literature. Funding from the GoMRI RFP-II is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Footprint of Deepwater Horizon blowout impact to deep-water coral communities.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Charles R; Hsing, Pen-Yuan; Kaiser, Carl L; Yoerger, Dana R; Roberts, Harry H; Shedd, William W; Cordes, Erik E; Shank, Timothy M; Berlet, Samantha P; Saunders, Miles G; Larcom, Elizabeth A; Brooks, James M

    2014-08-12

    On April 20, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout occurred, releasing more oil than any accidental spill in history. Oil release continued for 87 d and much of the oil and gas remained in, or returned to, the deep sea. A coral community significantly impacted by the spill was discovered in late 2010 at 1,370 m depth. Here we describe the discovery of five previously unknown coral communities near the Macondo wellhead and show that at least two additional coral communities were impacted by the spill. Although the oil-containing flocullent material that was present on corals when the first impacted community was discovered was largely gone, a characteristic patchy covering of hydrozoans on dead portions of the skeleton allowed recognition of impacted colonies at the more recently discovered sites. One of these communities was 6 km south of the Macondo wellhead and over 90% of the corals present showed the characteristic signs of recent impact. The other community, 22 km southeast of the wellhead between 1,850 and 1,950 m depth, was more lightly impacted. However, the discovery of this site considerably extends the distance from Macondo and depth range of significant impact to benthic macrofaunal communities. We also show that most known deep-water coral communities in the Gulf of Mexico do not appear to have been acutely impacted by the spill, although two of the newly discovered communities near the wellhead apparently not impacted by the spill have been impacted by deep-sea fishing operations.

  18. Trigger of a Blowout Jet in a Solar Coronal Mass Ejection Associated with a Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohong; Yang, Shuhong; Chen, Huadong; Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Using the multi-wavelength images and the photospheric magnetograms from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we study the flare that was associated with the only coronal mass ejection (CME) in active region (AR) 12192. The eruption of a filament caused a blowout jet, and then an M4.0 class flare occurred. This flare was located at the edge of the AR instead of in the core region. The flare was close to the apparently “open” fields, appearing as extreme-ultraviolet structures that fan out rapidly. Due to the interaction between flare materials and “open” fields, the flare became an eruptive flare, leading to the CME. Then, at the same site of the first eruption, another small filament erupted. With the high spatial and temporal resolution Hα data from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope at the Fuxian Solar Observatory, we investigate the interaction between the second filament and the nearby “open” lines. The filament reconnected with the “open” lines, forming a new system. To our knowledge, the detailed process of this kind of interaction is reported for the first time. Then the new system rotated due to the untwisting motion of the filament, implying that the twist was transferred from the closed filament system to the “open” system. In addition, the twist seemed to propagate from the lower atmosphere to the upper layers and was eventually spread by the CME to the interplanetary space.

  19. Trace element distributions in the water column near the Deepwater Horizon well blowout.

    PubMed

    Joung, DongJoo; Shiller, Alan M

    2013-03-01

    To understand the impact of the Deepwater Horizon well blowout on dissolved trace element concentrations, samples were collected from areas around the oil rig explosion site during four cruises in early and late May 2010, October 2010, and October 2011. In surface waters, Ba, Fe, Cu, Ni, Mn, and Co were relatively well correlated with salinity during all cruises, suggesting mixing with river water was the main influence on metal distributions in these waters. However, in deep oil/gas plumes (1000-1400 m depth), modestly elevated concentrations of Co and Ba were observed in late May, compared with postblowout conditions. Analysis of the oil itself along with leaching experiments confirm the oil as the source of the Co, whereas increased Ba was likely due to drilling mud used in the top kill attempt. Deep plume dissolved Mn largely reflected natural benthic input, though some samples showed slight elevation probably associated with the top kill. Dissolved Fe concentrations were low and also appeared largely topographically controlled and reflective of benthic input. Estimates suggest that microbial Fe demand may have affected the Fe distribution but probably not to the extent of Fe becoming a growth-limiting factor. Experiments showed that the dispersant can have some limited impact on dissolved-particulate metal partitioning. PMID:23383592

  20. Trace element distributions in the water column near the Deepwater Horizon well blowout.

    PubMed

    Joung, DongJoo; Shiller, Alan M

    2013-03-01

    To understand the impact of the Deepwater Horizon well blowout on dissolved trace element concentrations, samples were collected from areas around the oil rig explosion site during four cruises in early and late May 2010, October 2010, and October 2011. In surface waters, Ba, Fe, Cu, Ni, Mn, and Co were relatively well correlated with salinity during all cruises, suggesting mixing with river water was the main influence on metal distributions in these waters. However, in deep oil/gas plumes (1000-1400 m depth), modestly elevated concentrations of Co and Ba were observed in late May, compared with postblowout conditions. Analysis of the oil itself along with leaching experiments confirm the oil as the source of the Co, whereas increased Ba was likely due to drilling mud used in the top kill attempt. Deep plume dissolved Mn largely reflected natural benthic input, though some samples showed slight elevation probably associated with the top kill. Dissolved Fe concentrations were low and also appeared largely topographically controlled and reflective of benthic input. Estimates suggest that microbial Fe demand may have affected the Fe distribution but probably not to the extent of Fe becoming a growth-limiting factor. Experiments showed that the dispersant can have some limited impact on dissolved-particulate metal partitioning.

  1. TRIGGER OF A BLOWOUT JET IN A SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION ASSOCIATED WITH A FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaohong; Yang, Shuhong; Chen, Huadong; Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun

    2015-11-20

    Using the multi-wavelength images and the photospheric magnetograms from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we study the flare that was associated with the only coronal mass ejection (CME) in active region (AR) 12192. The eruption of a filament caused a blowout jet, and then an M4.0 class flare occurred. This flare was located at the edge of the AR instead of in the core region. The flare was close to the apparently “open” fields, appearing as extreme-ultraviolet structures that fan out rapidly. Due to the interaction between flare materials and “open” fields, the flare became an eruptive flare, leading to the CME. Then, at the same site of the first eruption, another small filament erupted. With the high spatial and temporal resolution Hα data from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope at the Fuxian Solar Observatory, we investigate the interaction between the second filament and the nearby “open” lines. The filament reconnected with the “open” lines, forming a new system. To our knowledge, the detailed process of this kind of interaction is reported for the first time. Then the new system rotated due to the untwisting motion of the filament, implying that the twist was transferred from the closed filament system to the “open” system. In addition, the twist seemed to propagate from the lower atmosphere to the upper layers and was eventually spread by the CME to the interplanetary space.

  2. Lean Blow-out Studies in a Swirl Stabilized Annular Gas Turbine Combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, R. K.; Kishore Kumar, S.; Chandel, Sunil

    2015-05-01

    Lean blow out characteristics in a swirl stabilized aero gas turbine combustor have been studied using computational fluid dynamics. For CFD analysis, a 22.5° sector of an annular combustor is modeled using unstructured tetrahedral meshes comprising 1.2 × 106 elements. The governing equations are solved using the eddy dissipation combustion model in CFX. The primary combustion zone is analyzed by considering it as a well stirred reactor. The analysis has been carried out for different operating conditions of the reactants entering into the control volume. The results are treated as the base-line or reference values. Combustion lean blow-out limits are further characterized studying the behavior of combustion zone during transient engine operation. The validity of the computational study has been established by experimental study on a full-scale annular combustor in an air flow test facility that is capable of simulating different conditions at combustor inlet. The experimental result is in a good agreement with the analytical predictions. Upon increasing the combustor mass flow, the lean blow out limit increases, i.e., the blow out occurs at higher fuel-air ratios. In addition, when the operating pressure decreases, the lean blow out limit increases, i.e., blow out occurs at higher fuel-air ratios.

  3. ON A CORONAL BLOWOUT JET: THE FIRST OBSERVATION OF A SIMULTANEOUSLY PRODUCED BUBBLE-LIKE CME AND A JET-LIKE CME IN A SOLAR EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu

    2012-02-01

    The coronal blowout jet is a peculiar category among various jet phenomena, in which the sheared base arch, often carrying a small filament, experiences a miniature version of blowout eruption that produces large-scale coronal mass ejection (CME). In this paper, we report such a coronal blowout jet with high-resolution multi-wavelength and multi-angle observations taken from Solar Dynamics Observatory, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, and Big Bear Solar Observatory. For the first time, we find that simultaneous bubble-like and jet-like CMEs were dynamically related to the blowout jet that showed cool and hot components next to each other. Our observational results indicate that (1) the cool component resulted from the eruption of the filament contained within the jet's base arch, and it further caused the bubble-like CME; (2) the jet-like CME was associated with the hot component, which was the outward moving heated plasma generated by the reconnection of the base arch and its ambient open field lines. On the other hand, bifurcation of the jet's cool component was also observed, which resulted from the uncoupling of the erupting filament's two legs that were highly twisted at the very beginning. Based on these results, we propose a model to interpret the coronal blowout jet, in which the external reconnection not only produces the jet-like CME, but also leads to the rising of the filament. Subsequently, internal reconnection starts underneath the rising filament and thereby causes the bubble-like CME.

  4. Environmental impact and regulatory concerns for the protection of a freshwater aquifer impacted by a gas well blowout in northwest Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, W.H.; McKenzie, D.T.; Kline, M.S.

    1996-09-01

    The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality, Ground Water Protection Division (GWPD) is responsible for oversight of the investigation and remediation of unpermitted releases to the waters of the State. In March, 1994, a Sligo Field gas well blowout caused artificial artesian conditions in the shallow Wilcox aquifer resulting in flowing water wells near the drilling location. The eruption of sand and formation water created a crater around an old abandoned well south of the active rig and a collapse crater north of the rig. The company, in cooperation with the GWPD, began an investigation of the environmental impacts of the blowout. An electric log run in a stratigraphic boring and newly installed monitor wells were used to determine the sand/shale distribution and to assess the extent of contamination in the aquifer. Monitor wells and nearby water supply wells were sampled for BETX. Only the wells nearest to the blowout showed constituents above regulatory limits. The well, positioned between the blowout and residential wells, showed no BETX. This paper will present the continued investigation and remedial activities planned for this site. They include additional wells or borings to delineate the horizontal area impacted by the blowout and evaluation of pump and treat methods to establish hydrologic control of the Wilcox Aquifer in the immediate area. Periodic testing of the residential and monitor wells will ensure that appropriate efforts are made to protect the local residents.

  5. Fractures in Tharsis Tholus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    In the upper left corner of this VIS image are a series of fractures. Where the fractures are exposed on the surface it is impossible to tell the plane of the fracture; however where the fractures are visible in the cliff wall it is possible to see that the fractures dip to the north. This image shows part of the caldera of Tharsis Tholus.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 13.5, Longitude 268.9 East (91.1 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, D. J. (Compiler); Su, S. Y. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Earth orbital debris issues and recommended future activities are discussed. The workshop addressed the areas of environment definition, hazards to spacecraft, and space object management. It concluded that orbital debris is a potential problem for future space operations. However, before recommending any major efforts to control the environment, more data are required. The most significant required data are on the population of debris smaller than 4 cm in diameter. New damage criteria are also required. When these data are obtained, they can be combined with hypervelocity data to evaluate the hazards to future spacecraft. After these hazards are understood, then techniques to control the environment can be evaluated.

  7. Fracture Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... to hold the fracture in the correct position. • Fiberglass casting is lighter and stronger and the exterior ... with your physician if this occurs. • When a fiberglass cast is used in conjunction with a GORE- ...

  8. Lisfranc fractures.

    PubMed

    Wright, Amanda; Gerhart, Ann E

    2009-01-01

    Injuries of the tarsometatarsal, or Lisfranc, joint are rarely seen. Lisfranc fractures and fracture dislocations are among the most frequently misdiagnosed foot injuries in the emergency department. A misdiagnosed injury may have severe consequences including chronic pain and loss of foot biomechanics. Evaluation of a foot injury should include a high level of suspicion of a Lisfranc injury, and a thorough work-up is needed for correct diagnosis.

  9. Was the extreme and wide-spread marine oil-snow sedimentation and flocculent accumulation (MOSSFA) event during the Deepwater Horizon blow-out unique?

    PubMed

    Vonk, Sophie M; Hollander, David J; Murk, AlberTinka J

    2015-11-15

    During the Deepwater Horizon blowout, thick layers of oiled material were deposited on the deep seafloor. This large scale benthic concentration of oil is suggested to have occurred via the process of Marine Oil Snow Sedimentation and Flocculent Accumulation (MOSSFA). This meta-analysis investigates whether MOSSFA occurred in other large oil spills and identifies the main drivers of oil sedimentation. MOSSFA was found to have occurred during the IXTOC I blowout and possibly during the Santa Barbara blowout. Unfortunately, benthic effects were not sufficiently studied for the 52 spills we reviewed. However, based on the current understanding of drivers involved, we conclude that MOSSFA and related benthic contamination may be widespread. We suggest to collect and analyze sediment cores at specific spill locations, as improved understanding of the MOSSFA process will allow better informed spill responses in the future, taking into account possible massive oil sedimentation and smothering of (deep) benthic ecosystems. PMID:26359115

  10. Was the extreme and wide-spread marine oil-snow sedimentation and flocculent accumulation (MOSSFA) event during the Deepwater Horizon blow-out unique?

    PubMed

    Vonk, Sophie M; Hollander, David J; Murk, AlberTinka J

    2015-11-15

    During the Deepwater Horizon blowout, thick layers of oiled material were deposited on the deep seafloor. This large scale benthic concentration of oil is suggested to have occurred via the process of Marine Oil Snow Sedimentation and Flocculent Accumulation (MOSSFA). This meta-analysis investigates whether MOSSFA occurred in other large oil spills and identifies the main drivers of oil sedimentation. MOSSFA was found to have occurred during the IXTOC I blowout and possibly during the Santa Barbara blowout. Unfortunately, benthic effects were not sufficiently studied for the 52 spills we reviewed. However, based on the current understanding of drivers involved, we conclude that MOSSFA and related benthic contamination may be widespread. We suggest to collect and analyze sediment cores at specific spill locations, as improved understanding of the MOSSFA process will allow better informed spill responses in the future, taking into account possible massive oil sedimentation and smothering of (deep) benthic ecosystems.

  11. Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas

    PubMed Central

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Freifeld, Barry M.; Pruess, Karsten; Pan, Lehua; Finsterle, Stefan; Moridis, George J.

    2012-01-01

    In response to the urgent need for estimates of the oil and gas flow rate from the Macondo well MC252-1 blowout, we assembled a small team and carried out oil and gas flow simulations using the TOUGH2 codes over two weeks in mid-2010. The conceptual model included the oil reservoir and the well with a top boundary condition located at the bottom of the blowout preventer. We developed a fluid properties module (Eoil) applicable to a simple two-phase and two-component oil-gas system. The flow of oil and gas was simulated using T2Well, a coupled reservoir-wellbore flow model, along with iTOUGH2 for sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification. The most likely oil flow rate estimated from simulations based on the data available in early June 2010 was about 100,000 bbl/d (barrels per day) with a corresponding gas flow rate of 300 MMscf/d (million standard cubic feet per day) assuming the well was open to the reservoir over 30 m of thickness. A Monte Carlo analysis of reservoir and fluid properties provided an uncertainty distribution with a long tail extending down to 60,000 bbl/d of oil (170 MMscf/d of gas). The flow rate was most strongly sensitive to reservoir permeability. Conceptual model uncertainty was also significant, particularly with regard to the length of the well that was open to the reservoir. For fluid-entry interval length of 1.5 m, the oil flow rate was about 56,000 bbl/d. Sensitivity analyses showed that flow rate was not very sensitive to pressure-drop across the blowout preventer due to the interplay between gas exsolution and oil flow rate. PMID:21730177

  12. Self-sealing shells: blowouts and blisters on the surfaces of leaky wind-blown bubbles and supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittard, J. M.

    2013-11-01

    Blowouts can occur when a dense shell confining hot, high-pressure gas ruptures. The venting gas inflates a blister on the surface of the shell. Here we examine the growth of such blisters on the surfaces of wind-blown bubbles (WBBs) and supernova remnants (SNRs) due to shell rupture caused by the Vishniac instability. On WBBs the maximum relative size of the blister (Rbstall/R) is found to grow linearly with time, but in many cases the blister radius will not exceed 20 per cent of the bubble radius. Thus blowouts initiated by the Vishniac instability are unlikely to have a major effect on the global dynamics and properties of the bubble. The relative size of blisters on SNRs is even smaller than on WBBs, with blisters only growing to a radius comparable to the thickness of the cold shell of SNRs. The small size of the SNR blowouts is, however, in good agreement with observations of blisters in the Vela SNR. The difference in relative size between WBB and SNR blisters is due to the much higher speed at which gas vents out of WBBs, which translates into a greater energy flux through a rupture of a given size from interior gas of a given pressure. Larger blisters are possible if shell ruptures are bigger than expected. We expect the observed velocity structure of SNR shells to be affected by the presence of blisters until the shell is no longer susceptible to ruptures, since the initial expansion of blisters is faster than the ongoing expansion of the shell.

  13. Footprint of Deepwater Horizon blowout impact to deep-water coral communities

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Charles R.; Hsing, Pen-Yuan; Kaiser, Carl L.; Yoerger, Dana R.; Roberts, Harry H.; Shedd, William W.; Cordes, Erik E.; Shank, Timothy M.; Berlet, Samantha P.; Saunders, Miles G.; Larcom, Elizabeth A.; Brooks, James M.

    2014-01-01

    On April 20, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout occurred, releasing more oil than any accidental spill in history. Oil release continued for 87 d and much of the oil and gas remained in, or returned to, the deep sea. A coral community significantly impacted by the spill was discovered in late 2010 at 1,370 m depth. Here we describe the discovery of five previously unknown coral communities near the Macondo wellhead and show that at least two additional coral communities were impacted by the spill. Although the oil-containing flocullent material that was present on corals when the first impacted community was discovered was largely gone, a characteristic patchy covering of hydrozoans on dead portions of the skeleton allowed recognition of impacted colonies at the more recently discovered sites. One of these communities was 6 km south of the Macondo wellhead and over 90% of the corals present showed the characteristic signs of recent impact. The other community, 22 km southeast of the wellhead between 1,850 and 1,950 m depth, was more lightly impacted. However, the discovery of this site considerably extends the distance from Macondo and depth range of significant impact to benthic macrofaunal communities. We also show that most known deep-water coral communities in the Gulf of Mexico do not appear to have been acutely impacted by the spill, although two of the newly discovered communities near the wellhead apparently not impacted by the spill have been impacted by deep-sea fishing operations. PMID:25071200

  14. Footprint of Deepwater Horizon blowout impact to deep-water coral communities.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Charles R; Hsing, Pen-Yuan; Kaiser, Carl L; Yoerger, Dana R; Roberts, Harry H; Shedd, William W; Cordes, Erik E; Shank, Timothy M; Berlet, Samantha P; Saunders, Miles G; Larcom, Elizabeth A; Brooks, James M

    2014-08-12

    On April 20, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout occurred, releasing more oil than any accidental spill in history. Oil release continued for 87 d and much of the oil and gas remained in, or returned to, the deep sea. A coral community significantly impacted by the spill was discovered in late 2010 at 1,370 m depth. Here we describe the discovery of five previously unknown coral communities near the Macondo wellhead and show that at least two additional coral communities were impacted by the spill. Although the oil-containing flocullent material that was present on corals when the first impacted community was discovered was largely gone, a characteristic patchy covering of hydrozoans on dead portions of the skeleton allowed recognition of impacted colonies at the more recently discovered sites. One of these communities was 6 km south of the Macondo wellhead and over 90% of the corals present showed the characteristic signs of recent impact. The other community, 22 km southeast of the wellhead between 1,850 and 1,950 m depth, was more lightly impacted. However, the discovery of this site considerably extends the distance from Macondo and depth range of significant impact to benthic macrofaunal communities. We also show that most known deep-water coral communities in the Gulf of Mexico do not appear to have been acutely impacted by the spill, although two of the newly discovered communities near the wellhead apparently not impacted by the spill have been impacted by deep-sea fishing operations. PMID:25071200

  15. Intrusion dynamics of particle plumes in stratified water with weak crossflow: Application to deep ocean blowouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dayang; Adams, E. Eric

    2016-06-01

    We present an experimental study of particle plumes in ambient stratification and a mild current. In an inverted framework, the results describe the fate of oil droplets released from a deep ocean blowout. A continuous stream of dense glass beads was released from a carriage towed in a salt-stratified tank. Nondimensional particle slip velocity UN ranged from 0.1 to 1.9, and particles with UN ≤ 0.5 were observed to enter the intrusion layer. The spatial distributions of beads, collected on a bottom sled towed with the source, present a Gaussian distribution in the transverse direction and a skewed distribution in the along-current direction. Dimensions of the distributions increase with decreasing UN. The spreading relations can be used as input to far-field models describing subsequent transport of particles or, in an inverted framework, oil droplets. The average particle settling velocity, Uave, was found to exceed the individual particle slip velocity, Us, which is attributed to the initial plume velocity near the point of release. Additionally, smaller particles exhibit a "group" or "secondary plume" effect as they exit the intrusion as a swarm. The secondary effect becomes more prominent as UN decreases, and might help explain observations from the 2000 Deep Spill field experiment where oil was found to surface more rapidly than predicted based on Us. An analytical model predicting the particle deposition patterns was validated against experimental measurements, and used to estimate near-field oil transport under the Deepwater Horizon spill conditions, with/without chemical dispersants.

  16. Endovascular treatment of carotid blowout syndrome: who and how to treat.

    PubMed

    Patsalides, A; Fraser, J F; Smith, M J; Kraus, D; Gobin, Y P; Riina, H A

    2010-03-01

    Carotid blowout syndrome (CBS) is a high-risk condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality that may result from invasion and destruction of the cervical carotid vasculature from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Endovascular approaches offer multiple modalities for treatment to prevent morbidity and death. In this paper we review our experience in addressing CBS and present an up-to-date algorithm of endovascular management. 16 lesions were identified in 8 patients treated with 9 procedures over the past year. Pseudoaneurysm and/or active extravasation were documented in at least one vessel in all 8 cases presenting with acute CBS. There were 13 pseudoaneurysms in external carotid artery (ECA) trunk (5), ECA branches (4), internal carotid artery (ICA) (1) and common carotid artery (CCA) (3). There were 3 additional ICA lesions due to tumor infiltration, resulting in ICA occlusion (2) and long segment stenosis (1). Permanent vessel occlusion was performed in 11 lesions of the ECA trunk (4), ECA branches (4) and ICA (3). Stent-grafts were placed in 5 lesions in the CCA (3), ICA (1) and ECA trunk (1). Technical success and immediate hemostasis were achieved in all patients. There were no procedural deaths or immediate complications. With a median follow-up of 2 months (range, 1-13 months), three patients died: one from recurrent CBS, one from global brain ischemia after a cardiac arrest event unrelated to CBS and one from systemic disease. There was no other recurrence of bleeding or neurological complication. Endovascular techniques offer an armamentarium to effectively address CBS, significantly affecting the care and outcome in this particular oncologic population. These techniques should be offered as early as possible in the context of a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:21990567

  17. Polycyclic hydrocarbon biomarkers confirm selective incorporation of petroleum in kangaroo rat liver samples near oil well blowout site

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, I.; Lu, Shan-tan; Lee, Ru-po; Warrick, G.

    1996-12-31

    In June 1994, a well blowout occurred at an oil field in the western, part of the San Joaquin Valley, resulting in deposition of crude oil south of the well. Some light oil spray was found up to 13.6 km from the well, but the most heavily affected area was within 0.8 km of the site. Because the location contains habitats for several threatened and endangered species, an evaluation of damages to natural resources was initiated soon after the well was capped. As part of the assessment of damages to wildlife, an investigation was conducted to determine whether kangaroo rats had ingested crude oil hydrocarbons from the spill.

  18. Fractured Craters on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Two highly fractured craters are visible in this high resolution image of Jupiter's moon, Ganymede. NASA's Galileo spacecraft imaged this region as it passed Ganymede during its second orbit through the Jovian system. North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the southeast. The two craters in the center of the image lie in the ancient dark terrain of Marius Regio, at 40 degrees latitude and 201 degrees longitude, at the border of a region of bright grooved terrain known as Byblus Sulcus (the eastern portion of which is visible on the left of this image). Pervasive fracturing has occurred in this area that has completely disrupted these craters and destroyed their southern and western walls. Such intense fracturing has occurred over much of Ganymede's surface and has commonly destroyed older features. The image covers an area approximately 26 kilometers (16 miles) by 18 kilometers (11 miles) across at a resolution of 86 meters (287 feet) per picture element. The image was taken on September 6, 1996 by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  19. Pediatric facial fractures: evolving patterns of treatment.

    PubMed

    Posnick, J C; Wells, M; Pron, G E

    1993-08-01

    This study reviews the treatment of facial trauma between October 1986 and December 1990 at a major pediatric referral center. The mechanism of injury, location and pattern of facial fractures, pattern of facial injury, soft tissue injuries, and any associated injuries to other organ systems were recorded, and fracture management and perioperative complications reviewed. The study population consisted of 137 patients who sustained 318 facial fractures. Eighty-one patients (171 fractures) were seen in the acute stage, and 56 patients (147 fractures) were seen for reconstruction of a secondary deformity. Injuries in boys were more prevalent than in girls (63% versus 37%), and the 6- to 12-year cohort made up the largest group (42%). Most fractures resulted from traffic-related accidents (50%), falls (23%), or sports-related injuries (15%). Mandibular (34%) and orbital fractures (23%) predominated; fewer midfacial fractures (7%) were sustained than would be expected in a similar adult population. Three quarters of the patients with acute fractures required operative intervention. Closed reduction techniques with maxillomandibular fixation were frequently chosen for mandibular condyle fractures and open reduction techniques (35%) for other regions of the facial skeleton. When open reduction was indicated, plate-and-screw fixation was the preferred method of stabilization (65%). The long-term effects of the injuries and the treatment given on facial growth remain undetermined. Perioperative complication rates directly related to the surgery were low. PMID:8336220

  20. Pediatric facial fractures: evolving patterns of treatment.

    PubMed

    Posnick, J C; Wells, M; Pron, G E

    1993-08-01

    This study reviews the treatment of facial trauma between October 1986 and December 1990 at a major pediatric referral center. The mechanism of injury, location and pattern of facial fractures, pattern of facial injury, soft tissue injuries, and any associated injuries to other organ systems were recorded, and fracture management and perioperative complications reviewed. The study population consisted of 137 patients who sustained 318 facial fractures. Eighty-one patients (171 fractures) were seen in the acute stage, and 56 patients (147 fractures) were seen for reconstruction of a secondary deformity. Injuries in boys were more prevalent than in girls (63% versus 37%), and the 6- to 12-year cohort made up the largest group (42%). Most fractures resulted from traffic-related accidents (50%), falls (23%), or sports-related injuries (15%). Mandibular (34%) and orbital fractures (23%) predominated; fewer midfacial fractures (7%) were sustained than would be expected in a similar adult population. Three quarters of the patients with acute fractures required operative intervention. Closed reduction techniques with maxillomandibular fixation were frequently chosen for mandibular condyle fractures and open reduction techniques (35%) for other regions of the facial skeleton. When open reduction was indicated, plate-and-screw fixation was the preferred method of stabilization (65%). The long-term effects of the injuries and the treatment given on facial growth remain undetermined. Perioperative complication rates directly related to the surgery were low.

  1. [Orbital varices].

    PubMed

    Seceleanu, Andreea; Szabo, I; Călugăru, M; Dudea, S M; Preda, D

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to point out a case with orbital venous abnormalities at the left eye, associated with varices of the legs. The clinical picture of this case was: intermittent exophthalmos, venous malformations at the level of the lids and episclera, elevated ocular pressure. All this signs reveal an abnormality at the level of venous wall, indicating a constitutional weakness of the venous system. The case was investigated by imagistic methods: ultrasound examination, Doppler -ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. According to the facts offered by clinical and imagistic investigation this case can be included into the first type of orbital varices, associated with secondary glaucoma provoked by an elevated episcleral venous pressure. PMID:15598045

  2. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Echography - eye orbit; Ultrasound - eye orbit; Ocular ultrasonography; Orbital ultrasonography ... eye is numbed with medicine (anesthetic drops). The ultrasound wand (transducer) is placed against the front surface ...

  3. Galeazzi fracture.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc I; Jupiter, Jesse B; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2011-10-01

    Galeazzi fracture is a fracture of the radial diaphysis with disruption at the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). Typically, the mechanism of injury is forceful axial loading and torsion of the forearm. Diagnosis is established on radiographic evaluation. Underdiagnosis is common because disruption of the ligamentous restraints of the DRUJ may be overlooked. Nonsurgical management with anatomic reduction and immobilization in a long-arm cast has been successful in children. In adults, nonsurgical treatment typically fails because of deforming forces acting on the distal radius and DRUJ. Open reduction and internal fixation is the preferred surgical option. Anatomic reduction and rigid fixation should be followed by intraoperative assessment of the DRUJ. Further intraoperative interventions are based on the reducibility and postreduction stability of the DRUJ. Misdiagnosis or inadequate management of Galeazzi fracture may result in disabling complications, such as DRUJ instability, malunion, limited forearm range of motion, chronic wrist pain, and osteoarthritis.

  4. A Novel Method of Orbital Floor Reconstruction Using Virtual Planning, 3-Dimensional Printing, and Autologous Bone.

    PubMed

    Vehmeijer, Maarten; van Eijnatten, Maureen; Liberton, Niels; Wolff, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Fractures of the orbital floor are often a result of traffic accidents or interpersonal violence. To date, numerous materials and methods have been used to reconstruct the orbital floor. However, simple and cost-effective 3-dimensional (3D) printing technologies for the treatment of orbital floor fractures are still sought. This study describes a simple, precise, cost-effective method of treating orbital fractures using 3D printing technologies in combination with autologous bone. Enophthalmos and diplopia developed in a 64-year-old female patient with an orbital floor fracture. A virtual 3D model of the fracture site was generated from computed tomography images of the patient. The fracture was virtually closed using spline interpolation. Furthermore, a virtual individualized mold of the defect site was created, which was manufactured using an inkjet printer. The tangible mold was subsequently used during surgery to sculpture an individualized autologous orbital floor implant. Virtual reconstruction of the orbital floor and the resulting mold enhanced the overall accuracy and efficiency of the surgical procedure. The sculptured autologous orbital floor implant showed an excellent fit in vivo. The combination of virtual planning and 3D printing offers an accurate and cost-effective treatment method for orbital floor fractures. PMID:27137437

  5. A Novel Method of Orbital Floor Reconstruction Using Virtual Planning, 3-Dimensional Printing, and Autologous Bone.

    PubMed

    Vehmeijer, Maarten; van Eijnatten, Maureen; Liberton, Niels; Wolff, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Fractures of the orbital floor are often a result of traffic accidents or interpersonal violence. To date, numerous materials and methods have been used to reconstruct the orbital floor. However, simple and cost-effective 3-dimensional (3D) printing technologies for the treatment of orbital floor fractures are still sought. This study describes a simple, precise, cost-effective method of treating orbital fractures using 3D printing technologies in combination with autologous bone. Enophthalmos and diplopia developed in a 64-year-old female patient with an orbital floor fracture. A virtual 3D model of the fracture site was generated from computed tomography images of the patient. The fracture was virtually closed using spline interpolation. Furthermore, a virtual individualized mold of the defect site was created, which was manufactured using an inkjet printer. The tangible mold was subsequently used during surgery to sculpture an individualized autologous orbital floor implant. Virtual reconstruction of the orbital floor and the resulting mold enhanced the overall accuracy and efficiency of the surgical procedure. The sculptured autologous orbital floor implant showed an excellent fit in vivo. The combination of virtual planning and 3D printing offers an accurate and cost-effective treatment method for orbital floor fractures.

  6. Pediatric Thighbone (Femur) Fracture

    MedlinePlus

    ... fractures in infants under 1 year old is child abuse. Child abuse is also a leading cause of thighbone fracture ... contact sports • Being in a motor vehicle accident • Child abuse Types of Femur Fractures (Classification) Femur fractures vary ...

  7. Simulation and assessment of SO2 toxic environment after ignition of uncontrolled sour gas flow of well blowout in hills.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan; Chen, Guo-ming

    2010-06-15

    To study the sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) toxic environment after the ignition of uncontrolled sour gas flow of well blowout, we propose an integrated model to simulate the accident scenario and assess the consequences of SO(2) poisoning. The accident simulation is carried out based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD), which is composed of well blowout dynamics, combustion of sour gas, and products dispersion. Furthermore, detailed complex terrains are built and boundary layer flows are simulated according to Pasquill stability classes. Then based on the estimated exposure dose derived from the toxic dose-response relationship, quantitative assessment is carried out by using equivalent emergency response planning guideline (ERPG) concentration. In this case study, the contaminated areas are graded into three levels, and the areas, maximal influence distances, and main trajectories are predicted. We show that wind drives the contamination and its distribution to spread downwind, and terrains change the distribution shape through spatial aggregation and obstacles. As a result, the most dangerous regions are the downwind areas, the foot of the slopes, and depression areas such as valleys. These cause unfavorable influences on emergency response for accident control and public evacuation. In addition, the effectiveness of controlling the number of deaths by employing ignition is verified in theory. Based on the assessment results, we propose some suggestions for risk assessment, emergency response and accident decision making. PMID:20129733

  8. Intercomparison of oil spill prediction models for accidental blowout scenarios with and without subsea chemical dispersant injection.

    PubMed

    Socolofsky, Scott A; Adams, E Eric; Boufadel, Michel C; Aman, Zachary M; Johansen, Øistein; Konkel, Wolfgang J; Lindo, David; Madsen, Mads N; North, Elizabeth W; Paris, Claire B; Rasmussen, Dorte; Reed, Mark; Rønningen, Petter; Sim, Lawrence H; Uhrenholdt, Thomas; Anderson, Karl G; Cooper, Cortis; Nedwed, Tim J

    2015-07-15

    We compare oil spill model predictions for a prototype subsea blowout with and without subsea injection of chemical dispersants in deep and shallow water, for high and low gas-oil ratio, and in weak to strong crossflows. Model results are compared for initial oil droplet size distribution, the nearfield plume, and the farfield Lagrangian particle tracking stage of hydrocarbon transport. For the conditions tested (a blowout with oil flow rate of 20,000 bbl/d, about 1/3 of the Deepwater Horizon), the models predict the volume median droplet diameter at the source to range from 0.3 to 6mm without dispersant and 0.01 to 0.8 mm with dispersant. This reduced droplet size owing to reduced interfacial tension results in a one to two order of magnitude increase in the downstream displacement of the initial oil surfacing zone and may lead to a significant fraction of the spilled oil not reaching the sea surface.

  9. News from the "blowout", a man-made methane pockmark in the North Sea: chemosynthetic communities and microbial methane oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinle, Lea I.; Wilfert, Philipp; Schmidt, Mark; Bryant, Lee; Haeckel, Matthias; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Linke, Peter; Sommer, Stefan; Treude, Tina; Niemann, Helge

    2013-04-01

    The accidental penetration of a base-Quaternary shallow gas pocket by a drilling rig in 1990 caused a "blowout" in the British sector of the North Sea (57°55.29' N, 01°37.86' E). Large quantities of methane have been seeping out of this man-made pockmark ever since. As the onset of gas seepage is well constrained, this site can be used as a natural laboratory to gain information on the development of methane oxidizing microbial communities at cold seeps. During an expedition with the R/V Celtic Explorer in July and August 2012, we collected sediments by video-guided push-coring with an ROV (Kiel 6000) along a gradient from inside the crater (close to where a jet of methane bubbles enters the water column) outwards. We also sampled the water column in a grid above the blowout at three different depths. In this presentation, we provide evidence for the establishment of methanotrophic communities in the sediment (AOM communities) on a time scale of decades. Furthermore, we will report data on methane concentrations and anaerobic methane oxidation rates in the sediment. Finally, we will also discuss the spatial distribution of methane and aerobic methane oxidation rates in the water column.

  10. Intercomparison of oil spill prediction models for accidental blowout scenarios with and without subsea chemical dispersant injection.

    PubMed

    Socolofsky, Scott A; Adams, E Eric; Boufadel, Michel C; Aman, Zachary M; Johansen, Øistein; Konkel, Wolfgang J; Lindo, David; Madsen, Mads N; North, Elizabeth W; Paris, Claire B; Rasmussen, Dorte; Reed, Mark; Rønningen, Petter; Sim, Lawrence H; Uhrenholdt, Thomas; Anderson, Karl G; Cooper, Cortis; Nedwed, Tim J

    2015-07-15

    We compare oil spill model predictions for a prototype subsea blowout with and without subsea injection of chemical dispersants in deep and shallow water, for high and low gas-oil ratio, and in weak to strong crossflows. Model results are compared for initial oil droplet size distribution, the nearfield plume, and the farfield Lagrangian particle tracking stage of hydrocarbon transport. For the conditions tested (a blowout with oil flow rate of 20,000 bbl/d, about 1/3 of the Deepwater Horizon), the models predict the volume median droplet diameter at the source to range from 0.3 to 6mm without dispersant and 0.01 to 0.8 mm with dispersant. This reduced droplet size owing to reduced interfacial tension results in a one to two order of magnitude increase in the downstream displacement of the initial oil surfacing zone and may lead to a significant fraction of the spilled oil not reaching the sea surface. PMID:26021288

  11. Multiscale plume modeling of the Deepwater Horizon oil-well blowout for environmental impact assessment and mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socolofsky, S. A.; Rezvani, M.

    2010-12-01

    The accidental blowout plume of the Deepwater Horizon (DH) oil well is an unprecedented event that will have far-reaching environmental, economic, and societal impact. The subsurface structure of the blowout plume, including its layered system of intrusions, conforms qualitatively to that predicted in the literature; however, new modeling tools are currently needed to produce highly-resolved predictions of such a complex plume in the stratified and flowing ocean. We present laboratory experiments of multiphase plumes in stratification and crossflow to understand the physical mechanisms that lead to separation among the buoyant dispersed phases (oil and gas) and the entrained and dissolved constituents in the continuous phase. Scale analysis indicates that the DH plume is stratification dominated, and observed locations of hydrocarbon intrusion layers agree well with the experimentally derived empirical scaling laws. New flow visualization measurements in gas plumes in stratification demonstrate that unsteady plume oscillation and detrainment events result from regular shedding of coherent structures on the order of the plume width and are not directly related to the stratification frequency. Similar particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements in weak crossflows characterize the transport mechanisms in the plume wake. The results of these experiments will be used in the context of a National Science Foundation RAPID grant to validate a nested large eddy simulations (LES) / Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) model of the DH plume, and early results from this model demonstrate its feasibility to capture the unsteady and complex structure of the plume evolution.

  12. Well blowout rates and consequences in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005: Implications for geological storage of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Preston; Jordan, Preston D.; Benson, Sally M.

    2008-05-15

    Well blowout rates in oil fields undergoing thermally enhanced recovery (via steam injection) in California Oil and Gas District 4 from 1991 to 2005 were on the order of 1 per 1,000 well construction operations, 1 per 10,000 active wells per year, and 1 per 100,000 shut-in/idle and plugged/abandoned wells per year. This allows some initial inferences about leakage of CO2 via wells, which is considered perhaps the greatest leakage risk for geological storage of CO2. During the study period, 9% of the oil produced in the United States was from District 4, and 59% of this production was via thermally enhanced recovery. There was only one possible blowout from an unknown or poorly located well, despite over a century of well drilling and production activities in the district. The blowout rate declined dramatically during the study period, most likely as a result of increasing experience, improved technology, and/or changes in safety culture. If so, this decline indicates the blowout rate in CO2-storage fields can be significantly minimized both initially and with increasing experience over time. Comparable studies should be conducted in other areas. These studies would be particularly valuable in regions with CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and natural gas storage.

  13. Effects of Various Blowout Panel Configurations on the Structural Response of Los Alamos National Laboratory Building 16-340 to Internal Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke, Jason P.

    2005-09-01

    The risk of accidental detonation is present whenever any type of high explosives processing activity is performed. These activities are typically carried out indoors to protect processing equipment from the weather and to hide possibly secret processes from view. Often, highly strengthened reinforced concrete buildings are employed to house these activities. These buildings may incorporate several design features, including the use of lightweight frangible blowout panels, to help mitigate blast effects. These panels are used to construct walls that are durable enough to withstand the weather, but are of minimal weight to provide overpressure relief by quickly moving outwards and creating a vent area during an accidental explosion. In this study the behavior of blowout panels under various blast loading conditions was examined. External loadings from explosions occurring in nearby rooms were of primary interest. Several reinforcement systems were designed to help blowout panels resist failure from external blast loads while still allowing them to function as vents when subjected to internal explosions. The reinforcements were studied using two analytical techniques, yield-line analysis and modal analysis, and the hydrocode AUTODYN. A blowout panel reinforcement design was created that could prevent panels from being blown inward by external explosions. This design was found to increase the internal loading of the building by 20%, as compared with nonreinforced panels. Nonreinforced panels were found to increase the structural loads by 80% when compared to an open wall at the panel location.

  14. Can we treat CO₂ well blowouts like routine plumbing problems? A study of the incidence, impact, and perception of loss of well control

    SciTech Connect

    Porse, Sean L.; Wade, Sarah; Hovorka, Susan D.

    2014-12-31

    Risk communication literature suggests that for a number of reasons, the public may perceive a risk to be greater than indicated by its statistical probability. Public concern over risk can lead to significant and costly delays in project permitting and operations. Considering these theories, media coverage of CO₂-related well blowouts in 2013 gave rise to the questions: What is the risk of CO₂ well blowouts associated with CCUS through CO₂ EOR? What is the potential public perception of those risks? What information could be used to respond to public concern? To address these questions, this study aims to: 1) provide a framework for understanding the nature of onshore well blowouts, 2) quantify the incidence of such events for three specific geographic regions of Texas, 3) relate this data to CCUS and findings from other studies, and 4) explore the potential implications for public perception of this risk associated with CCUS projects. While quantifying answers to these questions proved to be challenging, the results from this study suggest that (1) the perceived risk of CO₂ well blowouts may exceed the statistical risk and (2) information that could be used to address this gap could be made more readily available to the greater benefit of industry and stakeholders who support the development of CCUS as an option for addressing anthropogenic CO₂ emissions. The study also suggests approaches to best conduct such data inquiries.

  15. Can we treat CO₂ well blowouts like routine plumbing problems? A study of the incidence, impact, and perception of loss of well control

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Porse, Sean L.; Wade, Sarah; Hovorka, Susan D.

    2014-12-31

    Risk communication literature suggests that for a number of reasons, the public may perceive a risk to be greater than indicated by its statistical probability. Public concern over risk can lead to significant and costly delays in project permitting and operations. Considering these theories, media coverage of CO₂-related well blowouts in 2013 gave rise to the questions: What is the risk of CO₂ well blowouts associated with CCUS through CO₂ EOR? What is the potential public perception of those risks? What information could be used to respond to public concern? To address these questions, this study aims to: 1) providemore » a framework for understanding the nature of onshore well blowouts, 2) quantify the incidence of such events for three specific geographic regions of Texas, 3) relate this data to CCUS and findings from other studies, and 4) explore the potential implications for public perception of this risk associated with CCUS projects. While quantifying answers to these questions proved to be challenging, the results from this study suggest that (1) the perceived risk of CO₂ well blowouts may exceed the statistical risk and (2) information that could be used to address this gap could be made more readily available to the greater benefit of industry and stakeholders who support the development of CCUS as an option for addressing anthropogenic CO₂ emissions. The study also suggests approaches to best conduct such data inquiries.« less

  16. Orbit analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Michelotti, L.

    1995-01-01

    The past fifteen years have witnessed a remarkable development of methods for analyzing single particle orbit dynamics in accelerators. Unlike their more classic counterparts, which act upon differential equations, these methods proceed by manipulating Poincare maps directly. This attribute makes them well matched for studying accelerators whose physics is most naturally modelled in terms of maps, an observation that has been championed most vigorously by Forest. In the following sections the author sketchs a little background, explains some of the physics underlying these techniques, and discusses the best computing strategy for implementing them in conjunction with modeling accelerators.

  17. Expansion orbitotomy: another approach to the orbital floor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Ha; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Tae Gon; Lee, Junho

    2013-07-01

    Surgeons encounter obstacles on the orbital floor reconstruction because of its narrow operative field. In particular, such procedure tends to be more difficult when the orbital contents are stuck between bone defects and are not easily restored. Tugging the soft tissue using forceps or mosquitoes could injure the soft tissues. Tessier infraorbital marginotomy could be helpful to solve such problem. However, his method is too invasive and cannot be easily applied. In this study, we describe a modification of Tessier inferior orbitotomy. Our method is to expand the fractured hole through osteotomy of fractured margin. Advantages of this technique are simpler and less invasive when the orbital contents are stuck between bone fragments.

  18. Frontal Sinus Fractures: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Strong, E. Bradley

    2009-01-01

    Frontal sinus injuries may range from isolated anterior table fractures resulting in a simple aesthetic deformity to complex fractures involving the frontal recess, orbits, skull base, and intracranial contents. The risk of long-term morbidity can be significant. Optimal treatment strategies for the management of frontal sinus fractures remain controversial. However, it is critical to have a thorough understanding of frontal sinus anatomy as well as the current treatment strategies used to manage these injuries. A thorough physical exam and thin-cut, multiplanar (axial, coronal, and sagittal) computed tomography scan should be performed in all patients suspected of having a frontal sinus fracture. The most appropriate treatment strategy can be determined by assessing five anatomic parameters including the: frontal recess, anterior table integrity, posterior table integrity, dural integrity, and presence of a cerebrospinal fluid leak. A well thought out management strategy and meticulous surgical techniques are critical to success. The primary surgical goal is to provide a safe sinus while minimizing patient morbidity. This article offers an anatomically based treatment algorithm for the management of frontal sinus fractures and highlights the key steps to surgical repair. PMID:22110810

  19. Pearls of Orbital Trauma Management

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Forrest S.; Koshy, John C.; Goldberg, Jonathan S.; Soparkar, Charles N.S.

    2010-01-01

    Orbital fractures account for a significant portion of traumatic facial injuries. Although plastic surgery literature is helpful, additional pearls and insights are provided in this article from the experience of an oculoplastic surgeon. The fundamentals remain the same, but the perceptions differ and provide a healthy perspective on a long-standing issue. The most important thing to remember is that the optimal management plan is often variable, and the proper choice regarding which plan to choose rests upon the clinical scenario and the surgeon having an honest perception of his or her level of expertise and comfort level. PMID:22550464

  20. Orbital Winch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, Robert (Inventor); Slostad, Jeffrey T. (Inventor); Frank, Scott (Inventor); Barnes, Ian M. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Orbital winch having: lower and upper frames; spool having upper and lower flanges with lower flange attached to lower frame; axial tether guide mounted to upper frame; secondary slewing ring coaxial with spool and rotatably mounted to upper frame, wherein secondary slewing ring's outer surface has gearing; upper tether guide mounted to inner surface of secondary slewing ring; linear translation means having upper end mounted to upper frame and lower end mounted on lower frame; primary slewing ring rotatably mounted within linear translation means allowing translation axially between flanges, wherein primary slewing ring's outer surface has gearing; lower tether guide mounted on primary slewing ring's inner surface; pinion rod having upper end mounted to upper frame and lower end mounted to lower frame, wherein pinion rod's teeth engage primary and secondary slewing rings' outer surface teeth; and tether passing through axial, upper, and lower tether guides and winding around spool.

  1. Experimental data regarding the characterization of the flame behavior near lean blowout in a non-premixed liquid fuel burner

    PubMed Central

    De Giorgi, Maria Grazia; Sciolti, Aldebara; Campilongo, Stefano; Ficarella, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the data related to the flame acquisitions in a liquid-fuel gas turbine derived burner operating in non-premixed mode under three different equivalence fuel/air ratio, which corresponds to a richer, an intermediate, and an ultra-lean condition, near lean blowout (LBO). The data were collected with two high speed visualization systems which acquired in the visible (VIS) and in the infrared (NIR) spectral region. Furthermore chemiluminescence measurements, which have been performed with a photomultiplier (PMT), equipped with an OH* filter, and gas exhaust measurements were also given. For each acquisition the data were related to operating parameters as pressure, temperature and equivalent fuel/air ratio. The data are related to the research article “Image processing for the characterization of flame stability in a non-premixed liquid fuel burner near lean blowout” in Aerospace Science and Technology [1]. PMID:26862557

  2. Fibrillar Chromospheric Spicule-Like Counterparts to an EUV and Soft X-Ray Blowout Coronal Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Harra, Louise K.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    We observe an erupting jet feature in a solar polar coronal hole, using data from Hinode/SOT, EIS, and XRT, with supplemental data from STEREO/EUVI. From EUV and soft X-ray (SXR) images we identify the erupting feature as a blowout coronal jet: in SXRs it is a jet with bright base, and in EUV it appears as an eruption of relatively cool (approximately 50,000 K) material of horizontal size scale approximately 30" originating from the base of the SXR jet. In SOT Ca II H images the most pronounced analog is a pair of thin (approximately 1") ejections, at the locations of either of the two legs of the erupting EUV jet. These Ca II features eventually rise beyond 45", leaving the SOT field of view, and have an appearance similar to standard spicules except that they are much taller. They have velocities similar to that of "type II" spicules, approximately 100 kilometers per second, and they appear to have spicule-like substructures splitting off from them with horizontal velocity approximately 50 kilometers per second, similar to the velocities of splitting spicules measured by Sterling et al. (2010). Motions of splitting features and of other substructures suggest that the macroscopic EUV jet is spinning or unwinding as it is ejected. This and earlier work suggests that a sub-population of Ca II type II spicules are the Ca II manifestation of portions of larger-scale erupting magnetic jets. A different sub-population of type II spicules could be blowout jets occurring on a much smaller horizontal size scale than the event we observe here.

  3. The characteristics of midfacial fractures and the association with ocular injury: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    al-Qurainy, I A; Stassen, L F; Dutton, G N; Moos, K F; el-Attar, A

    1991-10-01

    Ocular injuries commonly occur in patients with facial fractures. This prospective study was set up to determine the incidence of ocular injuries, as assessed by an ophthalmologist, in patients who had sustained midfacial fractures. Over a 2-year period, a study of 363 patients who had sustained midfacial trauma sufficient to lead to a facial bone fracture (438 fractures) was undertaken and patients received a comprehensive examination by an ophthalmologist and an orthoptist within 1 week of injury. The characteristics of the eye injuries sustained were related to the aetiology of the fracture, the type of fracture, and the sex and age of each patient. Ninety percent of patients sustained ocular injuries of various severities. Sixty three percent of patients sustained only minor or transient ocular injuries, 16% suffered moderately severe ocular injury and 12% experienced severe eye injuries. Road traffic accident was associated with the highest incidence of severe ocular disorder (9/45 = 20%) whilst assaults had the second highest incidence at 11% (20/181). One third of all patients with comminuted malar fracture suffered a severe ocular disorder (9/27) whilst blow-out fracture came second at 16.7% (6/36). Fifty six patients (15.4%) had a decrease in their visual acuity and 9 patients (2.5%) had significant traumatic optic neuropathy. Decrease in visual acuity was the main clinical finding accompanying the majority of significant eye injuries. When ocular injuries were related to aetiology, it was apparent that road traffic accidents and assaults associated with alcohol abuse showed the highest incidence of major ocular dysfunction. It is suggested that all patients sustaining midfacial fracture associated with a significant decrease in visual acuity either pre- or postoperatively should have an early ophthalmological review. PMID:1742258

  4. ‘Sutureless’ transconjunctival approach for infraorbital rim fractures

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Vaibhav; Ghosh, Abhishek; Nanjappa, Madan; Ramesh, Keerthi

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the ease and surgical outcome of using sutureless transconjunctival approach for repair of infra-orbital fractures. Design: Prospective clinical case series. Materials and Methods: Totally 5 patients with infra-orbital rim or orbital floor fractures were selected and the fractures were accessed through a pre-septal transconjunctival incision. After reduction and fixation, the conjunctiva was just re-approximated and re-draped into position. Incidence of post-operative complications such as diplopia, lid retraction, eyelid dystopia, foreign body granuloma and poor conjunctival healing was assessed at intervals of 1 week, 15 days and a month post-operatively. Results: No complications were observed in any of the 5 patients. Healing was satisfactory in all patients. Conclusion: The sutureless technique appears to be a time saving and technically simpler viable alternative to multilayered suturing in orbital trauma with minimal post-operative complications. PMID:25821377

  5. Radial head fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Elbow fracture - radial head - aftercare ... to 2 weeks. If you have a small fracture and your bones did not move around much, ... to see a bone doctor (orthopedic surgeon). Some fractures require surgery to: Insert pins and plates to ...

  6. NASGRO(registered trademark): Fracture Mechanics and Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce; Shivakumar, V.; Mettu, Sambi; Beek, Joachim; Williams, Leonard; Yeh, Feng; McClung, Craig; Cardinal, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes NASGRO, which is a fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analysis software package that is used to reduce risk of fracture in Space Shuttles. The contents include: 1) Consequences of Fracture; 2) NASA Fracture Control Requirements; 3) NASGRO Reduces Risk; 4) NASGRO Use Inside NASA; 5) NASGRO Components: Crack Growth Module; 6) NASGRO Components:Material Property Module; 7) Typical NASGRO analysis: Crack growth or component life calculation; and 8) NASGRO Sample Application: Orbiter feedline flowliner crack analysis.

  7. Multiwell fracturing experiments. [Nitrogen foam fracture treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Warpinski, N.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Multiwell fracturing experiments is to test and develop the technology for the efficient stimulation of tight, lenticular gas sands. This requires basic understanding of: (1) fracture behavior and geometry in this complex lithologic environment, and (2) subsequent production into the created fracture. The intricate interplay of the hydraulic fracture with the lens geometry, the internal reservoir characteristics (fractures, reservoir breaks, etc.), the in situ stresses, and the mechanical defects (fracture, bedding, etc.) need to be defined in order to develop a successful stimulation program. The stimulation phase of the Multiwell Experiment is concerned with: (1) determining important rock/reservoir properties that influence or control fracture geometry and behavior, (2) designing fracture treatments to achieve a desired size and objectives, and (3) conducting post-treatment analyses to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment. Background statement, project description, results and evaluation of future plans are presented. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Proximal fifth metatarsal fractures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2013-01-01

    The most common fracture of the foot is a fracture of the proximal fifth metatarsal. In general, there are 3 types of fractures involving the proximal fifth metatarsal area, including a proximal diaphyseal stress fracture, a Jones fracture, and an avulsion fracture of the tuberosity. Some fractures of the fifth metatarsal heal without difficulty, whereas some have the potential for nonunion or delayed healing. Each fracture has some variation in the anatomical location on the fifth metatarsal, the mechanism of injury, the radiographic findings, and the treatment plan. Avulsion fractures of the tuberosity often heal without difficulty, yet fractures distal to the area of insertion of the peroneus brevis tendon are prone to nonunion and delayed healing (). Differential diagnosis of a fifth metatarsal midfoot injury includes ankle sprains, midfoot sprains, plantar facial ruptures, peroneus tendon ruptures, and other foot fractures.

  9. Cerberus Fossae Fractures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 29 October 2003

    The fractured surface of the Cerberus region southeast of the Elysium volcanoes provides an impressive example of the powerful tectonic forces that have shaped the region. Both the smooth lava plains and the mountains that poke through the lava are subject to the extensional forces that rip open the landscape. The fractures are radial to the Elysium complex, suggesting a relationship to the volcanic processes that have built it.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 8.6, Longitude 160.6 East (199.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  10. Comminuted Frontal Sinus Fracture Reconstructed With Titanium Mesh.

    PubMed

    Sakat, Muhammed Sedat; Kilic, Korhan; Altas, Enver; Gozeler, Mustafa Sitki; Ucuncu, Harun

    2016-03-01

    Frontal sinus fractures (FSF) are relatively uncommon maxillofacial injuries. The most common cause of FSF is motor vehicle accidents with 62% percentage. Management of FSF depends on type of fracture, associated injuries, and involvement of naso-frontal duct. In this report, the authors presented a patient with comminuted fracture of anterior wall of frontal sinus reconstructed with titanium mesh. A 40-year-old man presented with depression of the frontal bone, facial pain, and epistaxis consisting of a motor vehicle accident. Computerized tomography scan revealed multiple comminuted fractures of anterior wall of frontal sinus and fractures of left orbital medial and superior walls. Titanium mesh was used for reconstruction. Postoperative course was uneventful. The titanium mesh, which is easy to handle with no complications, may provide excellent frontal contour after comminuted anterior wall fractures. PMID:26872283

  11. Theory of satellite orbit-orbit resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blitzer, L.; Anderson, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    On the basis of the strong mathematical and physical parallels between orbit-orbit and spin-orbit resonances, the dynamics of mutual orbit perturbations between two satellites about a massive planet are examined, exploiting an approach previously adopted in the study of spin-orbit coupling. Resonances are found to exist when the mean orbital periods are commensurable with respect to some rotating axis, which condition also involves the apsidal and nodal motions of both satellites. In any resonant state the satellites are effectively trapped in separate potential wells, and a single variable is found to describe the simultaneous librations of both satellites. The librations in longitude are 180 deg out-of-phase, with fixed amplitude ratio that depends only on their relative masses and semimajor axes. The theory is applicable to Saturn's resonant pairs Titan-Hyperion and Mimas-Tethys, and in these cases the calculated libration periods are in reasonably good agreement with the observed periods.

  12. Fractures of the forefoot.

    PubMed

    Mandracchia, Vincent J; Mandi, Denise M; Toney, Patris A; Halligan, Jennifer B; Nickles, W Ashton

    2006-04-01

    Fractures of the forefoot are common injuries of various causes. Although not crippling, forefoot fractures can be debilitating if they go undiagnosed or are mistreated. Whenever patients complain of foot pain with ambulation or difficulty ambulating, radiographs should be taken as part of a standard routine to assess for bony pathology. This article discusses the classification and treatment of metatarsal fractures, digital and sesamoid fractures, and open fractures about the forefoot.

  13. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Orbit Determination Accuracy Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slojkowski, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Results from operational OD produced by the NASA Goddard Flight Dynamics Facility for the LRO nominal and extended mission are presented. During the LRO nominal mission, when LRO flew in a low circular orbit, orbit determination requirements were met nearly 100% of the time. When the extended mission began, LRO returned to a more elliptical frozen orbit where gravity and other modeling errors caused numerous violations of mission accuracy requirements. Prediction accuracy is particularly challenged during periods when LRO is in full-Sun. A series of improvements to LRO orbit determination are presented, including implementation of new lunar gravity models, improved spacecraft solar radiation pressure modeling using a dynamic multi-plate area model, a shorter orbit determination arc length, and a constrained plane method for estimation. The analysis presented in this paper shows that updated lunar gravity models improved accuracy in the frozen orbit, and a multiplate dynamic area model improves prediction accuracy during full-Sun orbit periods. Implementation of a 36-hour tracking data arc and plane constraints during edge-on orbit geometry also provide benefits. A comparison of the operational solutions to precision orbit determination solutions shows agreement on a 100- to 250-meter level in definitive accuracy.

  14. Large-Eddy Simulation of Oil Slicks from Deep Water Blowouts: Effects of Droplet Buoyancy and Langmuir Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamecki, M.; Yang, D.; Meneveau, C. V.

    2013-12-01

    Deep water blowouts generate plumes of oil droplets that rise through, and interact with various layers of the ocean. When plumes reach the ocean mixed layer (OML), the interactions among oil droplet plume, Ekman Spiral and Langmuir turbulence strongly affect the final rates of dilution and bio-degradation. The present study aims at developing a large-eddy simulation (LES) capability for the study of the physical distribution and dispersion of oil droplets under the action of physical oceanographic processes in the OML. In the current LES approach, the velocity and temperature fields are simulated using a hybrid pseudo-spectral and finite-difference scheme; the oil field is described by an Eulerian concentration field and it is simulated using a bounded finite-volume scheme. Fluid accelerations induced by buoyancy of the oil plume are included, and a number of subgrid-scale models for the flow solver are implemented and tested. The LES capability is then applied to the simulation of oil plume dispersion in the OML. Graphical visualization of the LES results shows surface oil slick distribution consistent with the satellite and aerial images of surface oil slicks reported in the literature. Different combinations of Lamgmuir turbulence and droplet size lead to different oil slick patterns at the surface and significantly impact oil concentration. Possible effects for bio-degradation are also discussed. Funding from the GoMRI RFP-II is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Scientific basis for safely shutting in the Macondo Well after the April 20, 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Stephen H.; Hsieh, Paul A.; Mooney, Walter D.; Enomoto, Catherine B.; Nelson, Philip H.; Mayer, Larry A.; Weber, Thomas C.; Moran, Kathryn; Flemings, Peter B.; McNutt, Marcia K.

    2012-01-01

    As part of the government response to the Deepwater Horizon blowout, a Well Integrity Team evaluated the geologic hazards of shutting in the Macondo Well at the seafloor and determined the conditions under which it could safely be undertaken. Of particular concern was the possibility that, under the anticipated high shut-in pressures, oil could leak out of the well casing below the seafloor. Such a leak could lead to new geologic pathways for hydrocarbon release to the Gulf of Mexico. Evaluating this hazard required analyses of 2D and 3D seismic surveys, seafloor bathymetry, sediment properties, geophysical well logs, and drilling data to assess the geological, hydrological, and geomechanical conditions around the Macondo Well. After the well was successfully capped and shut in on July 15, 2010, a variety of monitoring activities were used to assess subsurface well integrity. These activities included acquisition of wellhead pressure data, marine multichannel seismic profiles, seafloor and water-column sonar surveys, and wellhead visual/acoustic monitoring. These data showed that the Macondo Well was not leaking after shut in, and therefore, it could remain safely shut until reservoir pressures were suppressed (killed) with heavy drilling mud and the well was sealed with cement. PMID:23213217

  16. Scientific basis for safely shutting in the Macondo Well after the April 20, 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Stephen H; Hsieh, Paul A; Mooney, Walter D; Enomoto, Catherine B; Nelson, Philip H; Mayer, Larry A; Weber, Thomas C; Moran, Kathryn; Flemings, Peter B; McNutt, Marcia K

    2012-12-11

    As part of the government response to the Deepwater Horizon blowout, a Well Integrity Team evaluated the geologic hazards of shutting in the Macondo Well at the seafloor and determined the conditions under which it could safely be undertaken. Of particular concern was the possibility that, under the anticipated high shut-in pressures, oil could leak out of the well casing below the seafloor. Such a leak could lead to new geologic pathways for hydrocarbon release to the Gulf of Mexico. Evaluating this hazard required analyses of 2D and 3D seismic surveys, seafloor bathymetry, sediment properties, geophysical well logs, and drilling data to assess the geological, hydrological, and geomechanical conditions around the Macondo Well. After the well was successfully capped and shut in on July 15, 2010, a variety of monitoring activities were used to assess subsurface well integrity. These activities included acquisition of wellhead pressure data, marine multichannel seismic profiles, seafloor and water-column sonar surveys, and wellhead visual/acoustic monitoring. These data showed that the Macondo Well was not leaking after shut in, and therefore, it could remain safely shut until reservoir pressures were suppressed (killed) with heavy drilling mud and the well was sealed with cement. PMID:23213217

  17. Scientific basis for safely shutting in the Macondo Well after the April 20, 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Stephen H; Hsieh, Paul A; Mooney, Walter D; Enomoto, Catherine B; Nelson, Philip H; Mayer, Larry A; Weber, Thomas C; Moran, Kathryn; Flemings, Peter B; McNutt, Marcia K

    2012-12-11

    As part of the government response to the Deepwater Horizon blowout, a Well Integrity Team evaluated the geologic hazards of shutting in the Macondo Well at the seafloor and determined the conditions under which it could safely be undertaken. Of particular concern was the possibility that, under the anticipated high shut-in pressures, oil could leak out of the well casing below the seafloor. Such a leak could lead to new geologic pathways for hydrocarbon release to the Gulf of Mexico. Evaluating this hazard required analyses of 2D and 3D seismic surveys, seafloor bathymetry, sediment properties, geophysical well logs, and drilling data to assess the geological, hydrological, and geomechanical conditions around the Macondo Well. After the well was successfully capped and shut in on July 15, 2010, a variety of monitoring activities were used to assess subsurface well integrity. These activities included acquisition of wellhead pressure data, marine multichannel seismic profiles, seafloor and water-column sonar surveys, and wellhead visual/acoustic monitoring. These data showed that the Macondo Well was not leaking after shut in, and therefore, it could remain safely shut until reservoir pressures were suppressed (killed) with heavy drilling mud and the well was sealed with cement.

  18. Paratrooper's Ankle Fracture: Posterior Malleolar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki Won; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Seuk; Cho, Hun Ki; Lee, Kyung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the frequency and types of ankle fractures that frequently occur during parachute landings of special operation unit personnel and analyzed the causes. Methods Fifty-six members of the special force brigade of the military who had sustained ankle fractures during parachute landings between January 2005 and April 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The injury sites and fracture sites were identified and the fracture types were categorized by the Lauge-Hansen and Weber classifications. Follow-up surveys were performed with respect to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, patient satisfaction, and return to preinjury activity. Results The patients were all males with a mean age of 23.6 years. There were 28 right and 28 left ankle fractures. Twenty-two patients had simple fractures and 34 patients had comminuted fractures. The average number of injury and fractures sites per person was 2.07 (116 injuries including a syndesmosis injury and a deltoid injury) and 1.75 (98 fracture sites), respectively. Twenty-three cases (41.07%) were accompanied by posterior malleolar fractures. Fifty-five patients underwent surgery; of these, 30 had plate internal fixations. Weber type A, B, and C fractures were found in 4, 38, and 14 cases, respectively. Based on the Lauge-Hansen classification, supination-external rotation injuries were found in 20 cases, supination-adduction injuries in 22 cases, pronation-external rotation injuries in 11 cases, tibiofibular fractures in 2 cases, and simple medial malleolar fractures in 2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 23.8 months, and the average follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was 85.42. Forty-five patients (80.36%) reported excellent or good satisfaction with the outcome. Conclusions Posterior malleolar fractures occurred in 41.07% of ankle fractures sustained in parachute landings. Because most of the ankle fractures in parachute injuries were

  19. Geomorphological and ecological features of blowouts in a western Mediterranean coastal dune complex: a case study of the Es Comú de Muro beach-dune system on the island of Mallorca, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir-Gual, Miquel; Pons, Guillem X.; Martín-Prieto, José Ángel; Roig-Munar, Francesc X.; Rodríguez-Perea, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Many of the coastal dune systems along western Mediterranean shores are in an advanced state of fragmentation and show distinct signs of erosion, largely because of blowout development along the dune front. The Es Comú de Muro beach-dune system on the island of Mallorca (Spain) is a good example of this. In order to better understand and quantify the current situation, 58 blowouts along a ca. 1.5-km-long dune front were investigated. In each case, a number of morphometric and ecological variables were analyzed as a basis for comparison and classification, in particular blowout dimensions and orientation, inner morphometry and topography, morphological types, the role of vegetation in defining the state of the foremost dune line, and the link between vegetation and blowout typology. In comparison with a recent preliminary investigation, the results of the present study provide a more comprehensive picture of the advanced state of fragmentation along the dune front. The blowouts are not evenly distributed, highest densities occurring along the southernmost part of the beach, lowest densities along the northern part. The blowouts were subdivided into two categories on the basis of their shape and general structure, trough blowouts being the most prevalent, followed by mixed trough-saucer shapes. Distinctly saucer-shaped blowouts could not be distinguished. In addition, the blowouts were subdivided into two morphological categories, i.e. simple and branched. It was also possible to link the morphological state of the dune front to certain ecological parameters, in particular vegetation which, in the present case, comprised herbaceous and woody plants. Cluster analyses of species associations (Bray-Curtis similarity indices) were carried out on the basis of the presence/absence of each species. It is shown that, on account of presence counts and the degree of similarity of species associations, some species play a more important role in stabilizing the mobile dune

  20. Predicting zygoma fractures from baseball impact.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Joseph M; Stitzel, Joel D; Hurst, William J; Porta, David J; Jones, Jeryl; Duma, Stefan M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop injury risk functions that predict zygoma fracture based on baseball type and impact velocity. Zygoma fracture strength data from published experiments were mapped with the force exerted by a baseball on the orbit as a function of ball velocity. Using a normal distribution, zygoma fracture risk functions were developed. Experimental evaluation of these risk functions was performed using six human cadaver tests and two baseballs of different stiffness values. High speed video measured the baseball impact velocity. Post test analysis of the cadaver skulls was performed using CT imaging including three-dimensional reconstruction as well as autopsy. The developed injury risk functions accurately identify the risk of zygoma fracture as a result of baseball impact. The experimental results validated the zygoma risk functions at the lower and upper levels. The injuries observed in the post test analysis included fractures of the zygomatic arch, frontal process and the maxilla, zygoma suture, with combinations of these creating comminuted, tripod fractures of the zygoma. Tests with a softer baseball did result in injury but these had fewer resulting zygoma bone fragments and occurred at velocities 50% higher than the major league ball.

  1. Predicting zygoma fractures from baseball impact.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Joseph M; Stitzel, Joel D; Hurst, William J; Porta, David J; Jones, Jeryl; Duma, Stefan M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop injury risk functions that predict zygoma fracture based on baseball type and impact velocity. Zygoma fracture strength data from published experiments were mapped with the force exerted by a baseball on the orbit as a function of ball velocity. Using a normal distribution, zygoma fracture risk functions were developed. Experimental evaluation of these risk functions was performed using six human cadaver tests and two baseballs of different stiffness values. High speed video measured the baseball impact velocity. Post test analysis of the cadaver skulls was performed using CT imaging including three-dimensional reconstruction as well as autopsy. The developed injury risk functions accurately identify the risk of zygoma fracture as a result of baseball impact. The experimental results validated the zygoma risk functions at the lower and upper levels. The injuries observed in the post test analysis included fractures of the zygomatic arch, frontal process and the maxilla, zygoma suture, with combinations of these creating comminuted, tripod fractures of the zygoma. Tests with a softer baseball did result in injury but these had fewer resulting zygoma bone fragments and occurred at velocities 50% higher than the major league ball. PMID:16817599

  2. [Fractures of the forefoot].

    PubMed

    Richter, M

    2011-10-01

    Fractures of the forefoot are common and comprise approximately two thirds of all foot fractures. Forefoot fractures are caused by direct impact or the effect of indirect force. The forces exerted can range from repetitive minor load (stress fractures) to massive destructive forces (complex trauma). The clinical course in forefoot fractures is typically more favourable than in fractures of the mid- and hindfoot. The incidence of complications like infection or pseudarthrosis is low. Exceptions are rare fractures of the proximal shaft of the fifth metatarsal and the sesamoids with higher pseudarthrosis rates. Malunited metatarsal fractures can cause painful conditions that should even be treated operatively. Differences in structure and function of the different forefoot areas and specific fracture types require an adapted management of these special injuries.

  3. Efficient orbit integration by orbital longitude methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    Recently we developed a new formulation of numerical integration of orbital motion named manifold correction methods. The main trick is to keep rigorously the consistency of some physical relations such as that of the orbital energy, of the orbital angular momentum, or of the Laplace integral of a binary subsystem. This maintenance is done by applying a sort of correction to the integrated variables at every integration step. Typical methods of correction are certain geometric transformation such as the spatial scaling and the spatial rotation, which are commonly used in the comparison of reference frames, or mathematically-reasonable operations such as the modularization of angle variables into the standard domain [-π, π). The finally-evolved form of the manifold correction methods is the orbital longitude methods, which enable us to conduct an extremely precise integration of orbital motions. In the unperturbed orbits, the integration errors are suppressed at the machine epsilon level for an infinitely long period. In the perturbed cases, on the other hand, the errors initially grow in proportion to the square root of time and then increase more rapidly, the onset time of which depends on the type and the magnitude of perturbations. This feature is also realized for highly eccentric orbits by applying the same idea to the KS-regularization. Expecially the introduction of time element greatly enhances the performance of numerical integration of KS-regularized orbits whether the scaling is applied or not.

  4. Epidemiology of fragility fractures.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Susan M; Mendelson, Daniel Ari

    2014-05-01

    As the world population of older adults-in particular those over age 85-increases, the incidence of fragility fractures will also increase. It is predicted that the worldwide incidence of hip fractures will grow to 6.3 million yearly by 2050. Fractures result in significant financial and personal costs. Older adults who sustain fractures are at risk for functional decline and mortality, both as a function of fractures and their complications and of the frailty of the patients who sustain fractures. Identifying individuals at high risk provides an opportunity for both primary and secondary prevention.

  5. Lunar orbiting prospector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    One of the prime reasons for establishing a manned lunar presence is the possibility of using the potential lunar resources. The Lunar Orbital Prospector (LOP) is a lunar orbiting platform whose mission is to prospect and explore the Moon from orbit in support of early lunar colonization and exploitation efforts. The LOP mission is divided into three primary phases: transport from Earth to low lunar orbit (LLO), operation in lunar orbit, and platform servicing in lunar orbit. The platform alters its orbit to obtain the desired surface viewing, and the orbit can be changed periodically as needed. After completion of the inital remote sensing mission, more ambitious and/or complicated prospecting and exploration missions can be contemplated. A refueled propulsion module, updated instruments, or additional remote sensing packages can be flown up from the lunar base to the platform.

  6. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  7. Five Equivalent d Orbitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauling, Linus; McClure, Vance

    1970-01-01

    Amplifies and clarifies a previous paper on pyramidal d orbitals. Discusses two sets of pyramid d orbitals with respect to their maximum bond strength and their symmetry. Authors described the oblate and prolate pentagonal antiprisms arising from the two sets of five equivalent d orbitals. (RR)

  8. SEASAT B orbit synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, F. G.; Warmke, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Addition were made to Battelle's Interactive Graphics Orbit Selection (IGOS) program; IGOS was exercised via telephone lines from JPL, and candidate SEASAT orbits were analyzed by Battelle. The additions to the program enable clear understanding of the implications of a specific orbit to the diverse desires of the SEASAT user community.

  9. Infant skull fracture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Skull fractures may occur with head injuries. Although the skull is both tough and resilient and provides excellent ... or blow can result in fracture of the skull and may be accompanied by injury to the ...

  10. Nasal fracture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A nasal fracture is a break in the bone over the ridge of the nose. It usually results from a blunt ... and is one of the most common facial fracture. Symptoms of a broken nose include pain, blood ...

  11. Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    The metatarsal bones are the long bones in your foot that connect your ankle to your toes. A stress fracture is a break in the bone that happens with repeated injury or stress. Stress fractures are caused ...

  12. Fractures in anisotropic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Siyi

    Rocks may be composed of layers and contain fracture sets that cause the hydraulic, mechanical and seismic properties of a rock to be anisotropic. Coexisting fractures and layers in rock give rise to competing mechanisms of anisotropy. For example: (1) at low fracture stiffness, apparent shear-wave anisotropy induced by matrix layering can be masked or enhanced by the presence of a fracture, depending on the fracture orientation with respect to layering, and (2) compressional-wave guided modes generated by parallel fractures can also mask the presence of matrix layerings for particular fracture orientations and fracture specific stiffness. This report focuses on two anisotropic sources that are widely encountered in rock engineering: fractures (mechanical discontinuity) and matrix layering (impedance discontinuity), by investigating: (1) matrix property characterization, i.e., to determine elastic constants in anisotropic solids, (2) interface wave behavior in single-fractured anisotropic media, (3) compressional wave guided modes in parallel-fractured anisotropic media (single fracture orientation) and (4) the elastic response of orthogonal fracture networks. Elastic constants of a medium are required to understand and quantify wave propagation in anisotropic media but are affected by fractures and matrix properties. Experimental observations and analytical analysis demonstrate that behaviors of both fracture interface waves and compressional-wave guided modes for fractures in anisotropic media, are affected by fracture specific stiffness (controlled by external stresses), signal frequency and relative orientation between layerings in the matrix and fractures. A fractured layered medium exhibits: (1) fracture-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are weakly coupled; (2) isotropic behavior when fractures delay waves that are usually fast in a layered medium; and (3) matrix-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are closed and no longer delay the signal. The

  13. Displaced patella fractures.

    PubMed

    Della Rocca, Gregory J

    2013-10-01

    Displaced patella fractures often result in disruption of the extensor mechanism of the knee. An intact extensor mechanism is a requirement for unassisted gait. Therefore, operative treatment of the displaced patella fracture is generally recommended. The evaluation of the patella fracture patient includes examination of extensor mechanism integrity. Operative management of patella fractures normally includes open reduction with internal fixation, although partial patellectomy is occasionally performed, with advancement of quadriceps tendon or patellar ligament to the fracture bed. Open reduction with internal fixation has historically been performed utilizing anterior tension band wiring, although comminution of the fracture occasionally makes this fixation construct inadequate. Supplementation or replacement of the tension band wire construct with interfragmentary screws, cerclage wire or suture, and/or plate-and-screw constructs may add to the stability of the fixation construct. Arthrosis of the patellofemoral joint is very common after healing of patella fractures, and substantial functional deficits may persist long after fracture healing has occurred.

  14. [Surgical treatment of posttraumatic deformity of the orbital floor].

    PubMed

    Baranov, I V; Devdariani, D Sh; Kulikov, A V; Aleksandrov, A B; Bagnenko, A S

    2011-01-01

    The article is devoted to an actual problem of surgical treatment of patients with posttraumatic deformities of the orbital floor. On the material of 21 observations it was shown that for the successful treatment of deformities of the orbit bottom autogenous costal cartilage graft should be used as a plastic material. Removal of enophthalmos in longstanding fractures can be reached only by reducing the volume of the orbit which can be achieved by retrobulbar placement of the graft. An analysis of the results demonstrated high efficiency of this method in the treatment of such patients. PMID:22416411

  15. Hydraulic fracture design optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae-Soo; Advani, S.H.

    1992-01-01

    This research and development investigation, sponsored by US DOE and the oil and gas industry, extends previously developed hydraulic fracture geometry models and applied energy related characteristic time concepts towards the optimal design and control of hydraulic fracture geometries. The primary objective of this program is to develop rational criteria, by examining the associated energy rate components during the hydraulic fracture evolution, for the formulation of stimulation treatment design along with real-time fracture configuration interpretation and control.

  16. Hydraulic fracture design optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae-Soo; Advani, S.H.

    1992-06-01

    This research and development investigation, sponsored by US DOE and the oil and gas industry, extends previously developed hydraulic fracture geometry models and applied energy related characteristic time concepts towards the optimal design and control of hydraulic fracture geometries. The primary objective of this program is to develop rational criteria, by examining the associated energy rate components during the hydraulic fracture evolution, for the formulation of stimulation treatment design along with real-time fracture configuration interpretation and control.

  17. Clavicle fractures: individualizing treatment for fracture type.

    PubMed

    Housner, Jeffrey A; Kuhn, John E

    2003-12-01

    Clavicle fractures are common injuries in both children and adults. In most cases, the diagnosis can be made readily from the patient's history and physical examination. X-rays are helpful to confirm the diagnosis, to assess the severity of the fracture, and to follow interval healing. Most fractures are treated nonoperatively, and surgical intervention is typically reserved for unstable distal clavicle fractures. Nonoperative options involve either a sling-and-swathe or figure-of-eight splint. Return-to-play decisions should be individualized based on the age of the patient, location and severity of the fracture, degree of clinical and radiographic healing, and the sport in which the athlete will be participating.

  18. Orbit Software Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osgood, Cathy; Williams, Kevin; Gentry, Philip; Brownfield, Dana; Hallstrom, John; Stuit, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Orbit Software Suite is used to support a variety of NASA/DM (Dependable Multiprocessor) mission planning and analysis activities on the IPS (Intrusion Prevention System) platform. The suite of Orbit software tools (Orbit Design and Orbit Dynamics) resides on IPS/Linux workstations, and is used to perform mission design and analysis tasks corresponding to trajectory/ launch window, rendezvous, and proximity operations flight segments. A list of tools in Orbit Software Suite represents tool versions established during/after the Equipment Rehost-3 Project.

  19. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Orbit Determination Accuracy Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slojkowski, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    LRO definitive and predictive accuracy requirements were easily met in the nominal mission orbit, using the LP150Q lunar gravity model. center dot Accuracy of the LP150Q model is poorer in the extended mission elliptical orbit. center dot Later lunar gravity models, in particular GSFC-GRAIL-270, improve OD accuracy in the extended mission. center dot Implementation of a constrained plane when the orbit is within 45 degrees of the Earth-Moon line improves cross-track accuracy. center dot Prediction accuracy is still challenged during full-Sun periods due to coarse spacecraft area modeling - Implementation of a multi-plate area model with definitive attitude input can eliminate prediction violations. - The FDF is evaluating using analytic and predicted attitude modeling to improve full-Sun prediction accuracy. center dot Comparison of FDF ephemeris file to high-precision ephemeris files provides gross confirmation that overlap compares properly assess orbit accuracy.

  20. Efficient orbit integration by orbital longitude methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, T.

    2005-09-01

    Triggered by the desire to investigate numerically the planetary precession through a long-term numerical integration of the solar system, we developed a new formulation of numerical integration of orbital motion named manifold correction methods. The main trick is to keep rigorously the consistency of some physical relations such as that of the orbital energy, of the orbital angular momentum, or of the Laplace integral of a binary subsystem. This maintenance is done by applying a sort of correction to the integrated variables at every integration step. Typical methods of correction are certain geometric transformation such as the spatial scaling and the spatial rotation, which are commonly used in the comparison of reference frames, or mathematically-reasonable operations such as the modularization of angle variables into the standard domain [-π,π). The finally-evolved form of the manifold correction methods is the orbital longitude methods, which enable us to conduct an extremely precise integration of orbital motions. In the unperturbed orbits, the integration errors are suppressed at the machine epsilon level for an infinitely long period. In the perturbed cases, on the other hand, the errors initially grow in proportion to the square root of time and then increase more rapidly, the onset time of which depends on the type and the magnitude of perturbations. This feature is also realized for highly eccentric orbits by applying the same idea to the KS-regularization. Especially the introduction of time element greatly enhances the performance of numerical integration of KS-regularized orbits whether the scaling is applied or not.

  1. Osteoporotic vertebral fractures redux.

    PubMed

    Lentle, B C; Gordon, P; Ward, L

    2008-02-01

    Osteoporosis remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality especially in the elderly. This fact is largely due to fractures of the proximal femur and spine. As recently recognized, vertebral fractures are as much a threat to health and longevity as fractures of the proximal femur. In recent decades, the development of tools to evaluate fracture risk as well as medications to treat osteoporosis has altered the management of people who are at fracture risk. At the same time identification and management procedures concerning spinal fracturing are not very clear. Besides there is not even clear consensus about what exactly constitutes a vertebral fracture, particularly those of minor degree. While height loss is a simple and valuable tool to detect vertebral fractures, it is neither sensitive nor specific enough to replace radiographs. Some 65% of fractures cause no symptoms. Often vertebral fractures are misdiagnosed, especially if they have occurred silently and if the opportunity for diagnosis arises fortuitously. It is to the patient's benefit that radiologists report and physicians identify vertebral fractures evident on a chest or other radiograph, no matter how incidental to the immediate clinical indication for the examination. Technological evolution now allows dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry machines to be used to take spine images while doing a densitometry. The images are adequate, even if not of high radiographic quality, and, more important, the patient undergoes a smaller radiation dose than with conventional spinal radiographs. Such technology may promote fracture recognition. The recognition of vertebral fractures, as well as the prevention and treatment of further fractures, will likely do much to reduce both the burden of osteoporosis-related morbidity and mortality, as well as fracture-related costs to healthcare systems.

  2. Proximal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    Price, Matthew C; Horn, Pamela L; Latshaw, James C

    2013-01-01

    Proximal humerus fractures are among the most common fractures associated with osteoporosis. With an aging population, incidence of these fractures will only increase. The proximal humerus not only forms the lateral portion of the shoulder articulation but also has significant associations with musculoskeletal and neurovascular structures. As a result, fractures of the proximal humerus can significantly impact not only the function of the shoulder joint, but the health and function of the entire upper extremity as well. Understanding of these fractures, the management options, and associated nursing care, can help reduce morbidity rate and improve functional outcomes.

  3. Talus fractures: surgical principles.

    PubMed

    Rush, Shannon M; Jennings, Meagan; Hamilton, Graham A

    2009-01-01

    Surgical treatment of talus fractures can challenge even the most skilled foot and ankle surgeon. Complicated fracture patterns combined with joint dislocation of variable degrees require accurate assessment, sound understanding of principles of fracture care, and broad command of internal fixation techniques needed for successful surgical care. Elimination of unnecessary soft tissue dissection, a low threshold for surgical reduction, liberal use of malleolar osteotomy to expose body fracture, and detailed attention to fracture reduction and joint alignment are critical to the success of treatment. Even with the best surgical care complications are common and seem to correlate with injury severity and open injuries. PMID:19121756

  4. Epidemiology of clavicle fractures.

    PubMed

    Postacchini, Franco; Gumina, Stefano; De Santis, Pierfrancesco; Albo, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    An epidemiologic study of 535 isolated clavicle fractures treated in a hospital of a large metropolis during an 11-year period was performed. Data regarding patient's age and sex, side involved, mechanism of injury, and season in which the fracture occurred were obtained from the clinical records. Radiographic classification was performed with the Allman system. Clavicle fractures represented 2.6% of all fractures and 44% of those in the shoulder girdle. Most patients were men (68%), and the left side was involved in 61% of cases. Fractures of the middle third of the clavicle, which were the most common (81%), were displaced in 48% of cases and comminuted in 19%. Fractures of the medial third were the least common (2%). The prevalence of midclavicular fractures was found to decrease progressively with age, starting from the first decade of life when they represented 88.2% of all clavicle fractures and were undisplaced in 55.5% of cases. In adults, the incidence of displaced fractures, independent of location, was higher than that of undisplaced fractures. Traffic accidents were the most common cause of the injury. In the period under study, the incidence of fractures showed no significant change over time and no seasonal variation. PMID:12378163

  5. Subsurface fracture spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C. ); Hill, R.E. )

    1991-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to document and analyze the unique set of data on subsurface fracture characteristics, especially spacing, provided by the US Department of Energy's Slant Hole Completion Test well (SHCT-1) in the Piceance Basin, Colorado. Two hundred thirty-six (236) ft (71.9 m) of slant core and 115 ft (35.1 m) of horizontal core show irregular, but remarkably close, spacings for 72 natural fractures cored in sandstone reservoirs of the Mesaverde Group. Over 4200 ft (1280 m) of vertical core (containing 275 fractures) from the vertical Multiwell Experiment wells at the same location provide valuable information on fracture orientation, termination, and height, but only data from the SHCT-1 core allow calculations of relative fracture spacing. Within the 162-ft (49-m) thick zone of overlapping core from the vertical and deviated wellbores, only one fracture is present in vertical core whereas 52 fractures occur in the equivalent SHCT-1 core. The irregular distribution of regional-type fractures in these heterogeneous reservoirs suggests that measurements of average fracture spacing'' are of questionable value as direct input parameters into reservoir engineering models. Rather, deviated core provides data on the relative degree of fracturing, and confirms that cross fractures can be rare in the subsurface. 13 refs., 11 figs.

  6. Atraumatic sternum fracture

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamsen, Sebastian Ørskov; Madsen, Christina Friis

    2014-01-01

    The spine, pelvic bones and long bones of the lower extremities are common sites for insufficiency fractures. Cases of sternum insufficiency fractures have rarely been reported among elderly patients. Insufficiency fractures tend to occur in bones with decreased mechanical strength especially among elderly patients, in postmenopausal women and patients with underlying diseases. We describe a case of spontaneous sternum insufficiency fracture in a healthy man, with no known risk factors to fracture, or previous history of fractures. Sternum insufficiency fracture is a rare cause of chest pain. This case serves to remind the emergency physician to remain vigilant for other non-cardiac, non-pulmonary and non-traumatic causes of chest pain, especially among patients with known risk factors such as osteoporosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and patients on long-term steroid treatment. If diagnosed correctly, these patients can be discharged and treated as outpatients as this case emphasises. PMID:25326566

  7. [Fractures of carpal bones].

    PubMed

    Lögters, T; Windolf, J

    2016-10-01

    Fractures of the carpal bones are uncommon. On standard radiographs fractures are often not recognized and a computed tomography (CT) scan is the diagnostic method of choice. The aim of treatment is to restore pain-free and full functioning of the hand. A distinction is made between stable and unstable carpal fractures. Stable non-displaced fractures can be treated conservatively. Unstable and displaced fractures have an increased risk of arthritis and non-union and should be stabilized by screws or k‑wires. If treated adequately, fractures of the carpal bones have a good prognosis. Unstable and dislocated fractures have an increased risk for non-union. The subsequent development of carpal collapse with arthrosis is a severe consequence of non-union, which has a heterogeneous prognosis.

  8. Posterior malleolus fracture.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Todd A; Lien, John; Kadakia, Anish R

    2013-01-01

    Posterior malleolus fractures are a common component of ankle fractures. The morphology is variable; these fractures range from small posterolateral avulsion injuries to large displaced fracture fragments. The integrity of the posterior malleolus and its ligamentous attachment is important for tibiotalar load transfer, posterior talar stability, and rotatory ankle stability. Fixation of posterior malleolus fractures in the setting of rotational ankle injuries has certain benefits, such as restoring articular congruity and rotatory ankle stability, as well as preventing posterior talar translation, but current indications are unclear. Fragment size as a percentage of the anteroposterior dimension of the articular surface is often cited as an indication for fixation, although several factors may contribute to the decision, such as articular impaction, comminution, and syndesmotic stability. Outcome studies show that, in patients with ankle fractures, the presence of a posterior malleolus fracture negatively affects prognosis. Notable variability is evident in surgeon practice. PMID:23281469

  9. Combustor exhaust-emissions and blowout-limits with diesel number 2 and jet A fuels utilizing air-atomizing and pressure atomizing nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.; Norgren, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental tests with diesel number 2 and Jet A fuels were conducted in a combustor segment to obtain comparative data on exhaust emissions and blowout limits. An air-atomizing nozzle was used to inject the fuels. Tests were also made with diesel number 2 fuel using a pressure-atomizing nozzle to determine the effectiveness of the air-atomizing nozzle in reducing exhaust emissions. Test conditions included fuel-air ratios of 0.008 to 0.018, inlet-air total pressures and temperatures of 41 to 203 newtons per square centimeter and 477 to 811 K, respectively, and a reference velocity of 21.3 meters per second. Smoke number and unburned hydrocarbons were twice as high with diesel number 2 as with Jet A fuel. This was attributed to diesel number 2 having a higher concentration of aromatics and lower volatility than Jet A fuel. Oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and blowout limits were approximately the same for the two fuels. The air-atomizing nozzle, as compared with the pressure-atomizing nozzle, reduced oxides-of-nitrogen by 20 percent, smoke number by 30 percent, carbon monoxide by 70 percent, and unburned hydrocarbons by 50 percent when used with diesel number 2 fuel.

  10. Orbit Determination of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazarico, Erwan; Rowlands, D. D.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Torrence, M. H.; Lemoine, F. G.; Zuber, M. T.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results on precision orbit determination from the radio science investigation of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft. We describe the data, modeling and methods used to achieve position knowledge several times better than the required 50-100m (in total position), over the period from 13 July 2009 to 31 January 2011. In addition to the near-continuous radiometric tracking data, we include altimetric data from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) in the form of crossover measurements, and show that they strongly improve the accuracy of the orbit reconstruction (total position overlap differences decrease from approx.70m to approx.23 m). To refine the spacecraft trajectory further, we develop a lunar gravity field by combining the newly acquired LRO data with the historical data. The reprocessing of the spacecraft trajectory with that model shows significantly increased accuracy (approx.20m with only the radiometric data, and approx.14m with the addition of the altimetric crossovers). LOLA topographic maps and calibration data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera were used to supplement the results of the overlap analysis and demonstrate the trajectory accuracy.

  11. [Fracture endoprosthesis of distal humerus fractures].

    PubMed

    Müller, L P; Wegmann, K; Burkhart, K J

    2013-08-01

    The treatment of choice for fractures of the distal humerus is double plate osteosynthesis. Due to anatomical preshaped angle stable plates the primary stability and management of soft tissues has been improved. However, osteoporotic comminuted fractures in the elderly are often not amenable to stable osteosynthesis and total elbow arthroplasty has been established as an alternative therapy. Although complication rates have been reduced, complications of total elbow arthroplasty are still much more frequent than in total hip replacement. Furthermore, patients are advised not to exceed a weight bearing of 5 kg. Therefore, the indications for elbow arthroplasty must be evaluated very strictly and should be reserved for comminuted distal humeral fractures in the elderly with poor bone quality that are not amenable to stable osteosynthesis or for simple fractures in cases of preexisting symptomatic osteoarthritis. This article introduces and discusses modern concepts of elbow arthroplasty, such as modular convertible prosthesis systems, hemiarthroplasty and radial head replacement in total elbow arthroplasty.

  12. Fracture corridors in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatelée, Sébastien; Lamarche, Juliette; Gauthier, Bertrand D. M.

    2015-04-01

    Among fractures, Fracture Corridors (FC) are anomalous structures made of highly persistent fracture clusters having a strong effect on multi-phase fluid flow in the subsurface. While mechanical and geological conditions for diffuse fracture systems are well constrained, FC genetic conditions remain a matter of questioning. FC can be localized in larger structures such as folds and fault zones but recent studies suggest that a large amount of fractures and FC also arise as distributed in the host rock and formed in tabular layers during burial with early rock mechanical differentiation. In addition, while the mechanical stratigraphy is of prime importance for fracture stratigraphy, it is still unknown which factor prevails on FC genesis among the local versus regional stress-state, the host rock mechanical stratigraphy or the sedimentary facies. We present a study of fractures in a 400×300 m wide quarry (Calvisson, SE France) dug in homogeneous marly limestones of Hauterivian age. The quarry exhibits diffuse fractures as well as 16 FC. The aim of this study is to reveal the genetics factor for FC development, their global geometry and internal morphologic variations, but also to clear the impact of fracture corridors on diffuse fracture. For that, we measured >2500 fractures (strike, dip, spacing, filling, aperture, etc.) and studied microstructures in 80 thin sections. We calculated fracture density and acquired LiDAR data with >90 million points with a resolution of 4 to 15mm. Diffuse fractures are organized as two perpendicular sets, a main set NE-SW-trending and minor set NW-SE-trending. The FC have the same trend, but the NW-SE trend prevail on the NE-SW one. The LiDAR acquisition allows to visualize the 3D lateral continuity with corridors with a minimal extension of 30m. We distinguish 4 internal morphologic types in FC, depending on fracture morphology, occurrence of breccia and number of zones. The types may occur in a single FC with a lateral transition

  13. Orbital inflammation: Corticosteroids first.

    PubMed

    Dagi Glass, Lora R; Freitag, Suzanne K

    2016-01-01

    Orbital inflammation is common, and may affect all ages and both genders. By combining a thorough history and physical examination, targeted ancillary laboratory testing and imaging, a presumptive diagnosis can often be made. Nearly all orbital inflammatory pathology can be empirically treated with corticosteroids, thus obviating the need for histopathologic diagnosis prior to initiation of therapy. In addition, corticosteroids may be effective in treating concurrent systemic disease. Unless orbital inflammation responds atypically or incompletely, patients can be spared biopsy.

  14. Ethmoid osteoma as a culprit of orbital emphysema: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Ai; Li, Yinwei; Lin, Ming; Shi, Wodong; Fan, Xianqun

    2015-05-01

    Orbital emphysema is generally recognized as a complication of orbital fractures involving any paranasal sinuses. The recognition about its etiology has extended beyond sole trauma, but few articles mentioned tumors to be a possible cause.In this case report, we present a patient with orbital emphysema associated with ethmoid osteoma without orbital cellulitis or trauma history. The patient developed sudden proptosis, eyelid swelling, and movement limitation of the left eye, peripheral diplopia, and left periorbital crepitus after a vigorous nose blowing.Complete surgical resection of ethmoid osteoma followed by repair of the orbital medial wall was performed with assistance of combined endoscopy and navigational techniques. Twelve-month follow-up showed no residual lesion or recurrence; the orbital medial wall was accurately repaired with good visual function and facial symmetry.Tumors should be considered for differential diagnosis of orbital emphysema, and combined endoscopy and navigational techniques may improve safety, accuracy, and effectiveness of orbital surgeries.

  15. Stress fractures in athletes.

    PubMed

    Fredericson, Michael; Jennings, Fabio; Beaulieu, Christopher; Matheson, Gordon O

    2006-10-01

    A stress fracture is a partial or complete bone fracture that results from repeated application of stress lower than the stress required to fracture the bone in a single loading. Otherwise healthy athletes, especially runners, sustain stress injuries or fractures. Prevention or early intervention is the preferable treatment. However, it is difficult to predict injury because runners vary with regard to biomechanical predisposition, training methods, and other factors such as diet, muscle strength, and flexibility. Stress fractures account for 0.7% to 20% of all sports medicine clinic injuries. Track-and-field athletes have the highest incidence of stress fractures compared with other athletes. Stress fractures of the tibia, metatarsals, and fibula are the most frequently reported sites. The sites of stress fractures vary from sport to sport (eg, among track athletes, stress fractures of the navicular, tibia, and metatarsal are common; in distance runners, it is the tibia and fibula; in dancers, the metatarsals). In the military, the calcaneus and metatarsals were the most commonly cited injuries, especially in new recruits, owing to the sudden increase in running and marching without adequate preparation. However, newer studies from the military show the incidence and distribution of stress fractures to be similar to those found in sports clinics. Fractures of the upper extremities are relatively rare, although most studies have focused only on lower-extremity injuries. The ulna is the upper-extremity bone injured most frequently. Imaging plays a key role in the diagnosis and management of stress injuries. Plain radiography is useful when positive, but generally has low sensitivity. Radionuclide bone scanning is highly sensitive, but lacks specificity and the ability to directly visualize fracture lines. In this article, we focus on magnetic resonance imaging, which provides highly sensitive and specific evaluation for bone marrow edema, periosteal reaction as well

  16. Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Orbit

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the orbits of Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, a Solar-Terrestrial Probe mission comprising of four identically instrumented spacecraft that will study the Earth's magn...

  17. Orbital Debris: A Chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portree, Davis S. F. (Editor); Loftus, Joseph P., Jr. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This chronology covers the 37-year history of orbital debris concerns. It tracks orbital debris hazard creation, research, observation, experimentation, management, mitigation, protection, and policy. Included are debris-producing, events; U.N. orbital debris treaties, Space Shuttle and space station orbital debris issues; ASAT tests; milestones in theory and modeling; uncontrolled reentries; detection system development; shielding development; geosynchronous debris issues, including reboost policies: returned surfaces studies, seminar papers reports, conferences, and studies; the increasing effect of space activities on astronomy; and growing international awareness of the near-Earth environment.

  18. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is small, and its only effect on the seasons is their unequal durations. Here I show a pleasant way to guide students to the actual value of Earth's orbital eccentricity, starting from the durations of the four seasons. The date of perihelion is also found.

  19. Family of Orbiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows the paths of three spacecraft currently in orbit around Mars, as well as the path by which NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander will approach and land on the planet. The t-shaped crosses show where the orbiters will be when Phoenix enters the atmosphere, while the x-shaped crosses show their location at landing time.

    All three orbiters, NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, NASA's Mars Odyssey and the European Space Agency's Mars Express, will be monitoring Phoenix during the final steps of its journey to the Red Planet.

    Phoenix will land just south of Mars's north polar ice cap.

  20. Natural fracturing, by depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, John; Laubach, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    Natural opening-mode fractures commonly fall upon a spectrum whose end-members are veins, which have wide ranges of sizes and are mostly or thoroughly cemented, and joints, which have little opening displacement and little or no cement. The vein end-member is common in metamorphic rocks, whose high temperature and pressure of formation place them outside typical reservoir settings; conversely, many uncemented joints likely form near the surface and so too have limited relevance to subsurface exploration. Sampling of cores retrieved from tight-gas sandstone reservoirs suggest that it is intermediate fractures, not true joints or veins, that provide natural porosity and permeability. Such fractures have abundant pore space among fracture-bridging cements, which may hold fractures open despite varying states of stress through time. Thus the more sophisticated our understanding of the processes that form veins and joints, i.e., how natural fracturing varies by depth, the better our ability to predict intermediate fractures. Systematic differences between veins and joints, in terms of size-scaling and lateral and stratigraphic spatial arrangement, have been explained in the literature by the mechanical effects of sedimentary layering, which likely exert more control over fracture patterns at shallower depths. Thus stratabound joints commonly have narrow size ranges and regular spacing; non-stratabound veins have a wide range of sizes and spacings. However, new fieldwork and careful literature review suggest that the effects of mechanical layering are only half the story. Although atypical, veins may be highly stratabound and yet spatially clustered; non-stratabound fractures may nonetheless feature narrow size ranges. These anomalous fracture arrangements are better explained by the presence of precipitating cements during fracture opening than by mechanical layering. Cement is thought to be highly important for fracture permeability, but potential effects of

  1. Multiple noncontiguous spine fractures.

    PubMed

    Henderson, R L; Reid, D C; Saboe, L A

    1991-02-01

    The data from a prospective study of 508 spine injuries were reviewed to determine the incidence of multiple noncontiguous spine fractures. All patients were examined at admission and at 1 and 2 years postinjury. This series identified 77 (15.2%) multilevel fractures. Motor vehicle accidents were the primary cause of these fractures. The incidence of neurologic injury was not significantly different between multiple noncontiguous and single fractures. Failure to use seat belts and ejection from the vehicle were the main factors associated with multiple noncontiguous spine injuries. Seven major fracture patterns were identified, which accounted for 60% of these injuries. The prognosis for multilevel spine fractures was not significantly worse that that for single-level injuries. PMID:2011766

  2. [Femoral neck fracture].

    PubMed

    Gierer, P; Mittlmeier, T

    2015-03-01

    The incidence of femoral neck fractures increases exponentially with rising age. Young patients are rarely affected but when they are it is mostly due to high energy accidents, whereas older patients suffer from femoral neck fractures by low energy trauma due to osteoporotic changes of the bone mineral density. Treatment options have not essentially changed over the last few years. Non-operative treatment may be a choice in non-dislocated and impacted fractures. Due to the high risk of secondary fracture displacement prophylactic screw osteosynthesis is recommended even in Garden type I fractures. Osteosynthetic fracture stabilization with cannulated screws or angle stable sliding screws, is usually applied in non-displaced fractures and fractures in younger patients. Older patients need rapid mobilization after surgery; therefore, total hip arthroplasty and hemiarthroplasty are commonly used with a low incidence of secondary complications. In addition to sufficient operative treatment a guideline conform osteoprosis therapy should be initiated for the prophylaxis of further fractures and patients should undertake a suitable rehabilitation.

  3. Pathological fractures in children

    PubMed Central

    De Mattos, C. B. R.; Binitie, O.; Dormans, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Pathological fractures in children can occur as a result of a variety of conditions, ranging from metabolic diseases and infection to tumours. Fractures through benign and malignant bone tumours should be recognised and managed appropriately by the treating orthopaedic surgeon. The most common benign bone tumours that cause pathological fractures in children are unicameral bone cysts, aneurysmal bone cysts, non-ossifying fibromas and fibrous dysplasia. Although pathological fractures through a primary bone malignancy are rare, these should be recognised quickly in order to achieve better outcomes. A thorough history, physical examination and review of plain radiographs are crucial to determine the cause and guide treatment. In most benign cases the fracture will heal and the lesion can be addressed at the time of the fracture, or after the fracture is healed. A step-wise and multidisciplinary approach is necessary in caring for paediatric patients with malignancies. Pathological fractures do not have to be treated by amputation; these fractures can heal and limb salvage can be performed when indicated. PMID:23610658

  4. Natural fracture systems studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.; Warpinski, N.R.

    1992-09-01

    The objectives of this program are (1) to develop a basinal-analysis methodology for natural fracture exploration and exploitation, and (2) to determine the important characteristics of natural fracture systems for use in completion, stimulation, and production operations. Natural-fracture basinal analysis begins with studies of fractures in outcrop, core and logs in order to determine the type of fracturing and the relationship of the fractures to the lithologic environment. Of particular interest are the regional fracture systems that are pervasive in western US tight sand basins. A Methodology for applying this analysis is being developed, with the goal of providing a structure for rationally characterizing natural fracture systems basin-wide. Such basin-wide characterizations can then be expanded and supplemented locally, at sites where production may be favorable. Initial application of this analysis is to the Piceance basin where there is a wealth of data from the Multiwell Experiment (MWX), DOE cooperative wells, and other basin studies conducted by Sandia, CER Corporation, and the USGS (Lorenz and Finley, 1989, Lorenz et aI., 1989, and Spencer and Keighin, 1984). Such a basinal approach has been capable of explaining the fracture characteristics found throughout the southern part of the Piceance basin and along the Grand Hogback.

  5. Sphenoid Sinus and Sphenoid Bone Fractures in Patients with Craniomaxillofacial Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Cantini Ardila, Jorge Ernesto; Mendoza, Miguel Ángel Rivera; Ortega, Viviana Gómez

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Sphenoid bone fractures and sphenoid sinus fractures have a high morbidity due to its association with high-energy trauma. The purpose of this study is to describe individuals with traumatic injuries from different mechanisms and attempt to determine if there is any relationship between various isolated or combined fractures of facial skeleton and sphenoid bone and sphenoid sinus fractures. Methods We retrospectively studied hospital charts of all patients who reported to the trauma center at Hospital de San José with facial fractures from December 2009 to August 2011. All patients were evaluated by computed tomography scan and classified into low-, medium-, and high-energy trauma fractures, according to the classification described by Manson. Design This is a retrospective descriptive study. Results The study data were collected as part of retrospective analysis. A total of 250 patients reported to the trauma center of the study hospital with facial trauma. Thirty-eight patients were excluded. A total of 212 patients had facial fractures; 33 had a combination of sphenoid sinus and sphenoid bone fractures, and facial fractures were identified within this group (15.5%). Gender predilection was seen to favor males (77.3%) more than females (22.7%). The mean age of the patients was 37 years. Orbital fractures (78.8%) and maxillary fractures (57.5%) were found more commonly associated with sphenoid sinus and sphenoid bone fractures. Conclusions High-energy trauma is more frequently associated with sphenoid fractures when compared with medium- and low-energy trauma. There is a correlation between facial fractures and sphenoid sinus and sphenoid bone fractures. A more exhaustive multicentric case-control study with a larger sample and additional parameters will be essential to reach definite conclusions regarding the spectrum of fractures of the sphenoid bone associated with facial fractures. PMID:24436756

  6. Analyzing Shuttle Orbiter Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    LRBET4 program best-estimated-of-trajectory (BET) calculation for post-flight trajectory analysis of Shuttle orbiter. Produces estimated measurements for comparing predicted and actual trajectory of Earth-orbiting spacecraft. Kalman filter and smoothing filter applied to input data to estimate state vector, reduce noise, and produce BET. LRBET4 written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution.

  7. Titan Orbiter Aerorover Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler Jr., E. C.; Acuna, M.; Burchell, M. J.; Coates, A.; Farrell, W.; Flasar, M.; Goldstein, B. E.; Gorevan, S.; Hartle, R. E.; Johnson, W. T. K.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a combined Titan orbiter and Titan Aerorover mission with an emphasis on both in situ and remote sensing measurements of Titan's surface, atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetospheric interaction. The biological aspect of the Titan environment will be emphasized by the mission (i.e., search for organic materials which may include simple organics to 'amono' analogues of amino acids and possibly more complex, lightening detection and infrared, ultraviolet, and charged particle interactions with Titan's surface and atmosphere). An international mission is assumed to control costs. NASA will provide the orbiter, launch vehicle, DSN coverage and operations, while international partners will provide the Aerorover and up to 30% of the cost for the scientific instruments through collaborative efforts. To further reduce costs we propose a single PI for orbiter science instruments and a single PI for Aerorover science instruments. This approach will provide single command/data and power interface between spacecraft and orbiter instruments that will have redundant central DPU and power converter for their instruments. A similar approach could be used for the Aerorover. The mission profile will be constructed to minimize conflicts between Aerorover science, orbiter radar science, orbiter radio science, orbiter imaging science, and orbiter fields and particles (FP) science. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Orbital Shape Representations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kikuchi, Osamu; Suzuki, Keizo

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the use of orbital shapes for instructional purposes, emphasizing that differences between polar, contour, and three-dimensional plots must be made clear to students or misconceptions will occur. Also presents three-dimensional contour surfaces for the seven 4f atomic orbitals of hydrogen and discusses their computer generation. (JN)

  9. Mars Climate Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this mission is to study the climate history and the water distribution of Mars. Beautiful panoramic views of the shuttle on the launch pad, engine ignition, Rocket launch, and the separation and burnout of the Solid Rocket Boosters are shown. The footage also includes an animation of the mission. Detailed views of the path that the Orbiter traversed were shown. Once the Orbiter lands on the surface of Mars, it will dig a six to eight inch hole and collect samples from the planets' surface. The animation also included the prospective return of the Orbiter to Earth over the desert of Utah. The remote sensor on the Orbiter helps in finding the exact location of the Orbiter so that scientists may collect the sample and analyze it.

  10. Remote Controlled Orbiter Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garske, Michael; delaTorre, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The Remote Control Orbiter (RCO) capability allows a Space Shuttle Orbiter to perform an unmanned re-entry and landing. This low-cost capability employs existing and newly added functions to perform key activities typically performed by flight crews and controllers during manned re-entries. During an RCO landing attempt, these functions are triggered by automation resident in the on-board computers or uplinked commands from flight controllers on the ground. In order to properly route certain commands to the appropriate hardware, an In-Flight Maintenance (IFM) cable was developed. Currently, the RCO capability is reserved for the scenario where a safe return of the crew from orbit may not be possible. The flight crew would remain in orbit and await a rescue mission. After the crew is rescued, the RCO capability would be used on the unmanned Orbiter in an attempt to salvage this national asset.

  11. Orbital Causes of Incomitant Strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Lueder, Gregg T.

    2015-01-01

    Strabismus may result from abnormal innervation, structure, or function of the extraocular muscles. Abnormalities of the orbital bones or masses within the orbit may also cause strabismus due to indirect effects on the extraocular muscles. This paper reviews some disorders of the orbit that are associated with strabismus, including craniofacial malformations, orbital masses, trauma, and anomalous orbital structures. PMID:26180465

  12. Pneumothorax complicating isolated clavicle fracture.

    PubMed

    Hani, Redouane; Ennaciri, Badr; Jeddi, Idriss; El Bardouni, Ahmed; Mahfoud, Mustapha; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Isolated clavicle fractures are among the commonest of traumatic fractures in the emergency department. Complications of isolated clavicle fractures are rare. Pneumothorax has been described as a complication of a fractured clavicle only rarely in English literature. In all the reported cases, the pneumothorax was treated by a thoracostomy and the clavicle fracture was treated conservatively. In our case, the pneumothorax required a chest drain insertion and the clavicle fracture was treated surgically with good result.

  13. Facial trauma in a softball player.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Brian L; Anan, Thomas

    2003-12-01

    Facial trauma frequently results in fracture of the facial bones. A blowout fracture involves the eye orbit and usually transpires when the object hitting the eye (eg, baseball, softball, fist, elbow) is larger than the orbit itself. The mechanism of injury will provide the physician with a clue to the diagnosis. Prompt recognition of any significant complications, proper imaging, and referral to an ophthalmology specialist are usually required. Facial reconstruction by a plastic surgeon may also be necessary. PMID:20086450

  14. Facial trauma in a softball player.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Brian L; Anan, Thomas

    2003-12-01

    Facial trauma frequently results in fracture of the facial bones. A blowout fracture involves the eye orbit and usually transpires when the object hitting the eye (eg, baseball, softball, fist, elbow) is larger than the orbit itself. The mechanism of injury will provide the physician with a clue to the diagnosis. Prompt recognition of any significant complications, proper imaging, and referral to an ophthalmology specialist are usually required. Facial reconstruction by a plastic surgeon may also be necessary.

  15. Osteosynthesis of fragility fractures.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, Umberto; Iundusi, Riccardo; Lecce, Domenico; Tempesta, Valerio; Perrone, Fabio Luigi; Rao, Cecilia; Cerocchi, Irene; Gasbarra, Elena

    2011-04-01

    The deepening knowledge about bone pathophysiology, together with the development of less invasive bone implants, fitted for the treatment of fragility fractures, the continuous advances in the creation of osteoconductive and osteoinductive biomaterials, the availability of bone active agents, capable of modulating fracture healing, actually represent the orthopaedic "weapons" to improve the surgical outcome and quality of life in patients with osteoporosis.

  16. TIBIAL SHAFT FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Kodi Edson; Ferreira, Ramon Venzon

    2015-01-01

    The long-bone fractures occur most frequently in the tibial shaft. Adequate treatment of such fractures avoids consolidation failure, skewed consolidation and reoperation. To classify these fractures, the AO/OTA classification method is still used, but it is worthwhile getting to know the Ellis classification method, which also includes assessment of soft-tissue injuries. There is often an association with compartmental syndrome, and early diagnosis can be achieved through evaluating clinical parameters and constant clinical monitoring. Once the diagnosis has been made, fasciotomy should be performed. It is always difficult to assess consolidation, but the RUST method may help in this. Radiography is assessed in two projections, and points are scored for the presence of the fracture line and a visible bone callus. Today, the dogma of six hours for cleaning the exposed fracture is under discussion. It is considered that an early start to intravenous antibiotic therapy and the lesion severity are very important. The question of early or late closure of the lesion in an exposed fracture has gone through several phases: sometimes early closure has been indicated and sometimes late closure. Currently, whenever possible, early closure of the lesion is recommended, since this diminishes the risk of infection. Milling of the canal when the intramedullary nail is introduced is still a controversial subject. Despite strong personal positions in favor of milling, studies have shown that there may be some advantage in relation to closed fractures, but not in exposed fractures. PMID:27026999

  17. Visualization of atom's orbits.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byungwhan

    2014-02-01

    High-resolution imaging techniques have been used to obtain views of internal shapes of single atoms or columns of atoms. This review article focuses on the visualization of internal atomic structures such as the configurations of electron orbits confined to atoms. This is accomplished by applying visualization techniques to the reported images of atoms or molecules as well as static and dynamic ions in a plasma. It was found that the photon and electron energies provide macroscopic and microscopic views of the orbit structures of atoms, respectively. The laser-imaged atoms showed a rugged orbit structure, containing alternating dark and bright orbits believed to be the pathways for an externally supplied laser energy and internally excited electron energy, respectively. By contrast, the atoms taken by the electron microscopy provided a structure of fine electron orbits, systematically formed in increasing order of grayscale representing the energy state of an orbit. This structure was identical to those of the plasma ions. The visualized electronic structures played a critical role in clarifying vague postulates made in the Bohr model. Main features proposed in the atomic model are the dynamic orbits absorbing an externally supplied electromagnetic energy, electron emission from them while accompanying light radiation, and frequency of electron waves not light. The light-accompanying electrons and ionic speckles induced by laser light signify that light is composed of electrons and ions.

  18. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T.

    1985-08-06

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs.

  19. Imaging of orbital disorders.

    PubMed

    Cunnane, Mary Beth; Curtin, Hugh David

    2016-01-01

    Diseases of the orbit can be categorized in many ways, but in this chapter we shall group them according to etiology. Inflammatory diseases of the orbits may be infectious or noninfectious. Of the infections, orbital cellulitis is the most common and typically arises as a complication of acute sinusitis. Of the noninfectious, inflammatory conditions, thyroid orbitopathy is the most common and results in enlargement of the extraocular muscles and proliferation of the orbital fat. Idiopathic orbital inflammatory syndrome is another cause of inflammation in the orbit, which may mimic thyroid orbitopathy or even neoplasm, but typically presents with pain. Masses in the orbit may be benign or malignant and the differential diagnosis primarily depends on the location of the mass lesion, and on the age of the patient. Lacrimal gland tumors may be lymphomas or epithelial lesions of salivary origin. Extraocular muscle tumors may represent lymphoma or metastases. Tumors of the intraconal fat are often benign, typically hemangiomas or schwannomas. Finally, globe tumors may be retinoblastomas (in children), or choroidal melanomas or metastases in adults. PMID:27432687

  20. Orbit Stabilization of Nanosat

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON,DAVID J.

    1999-12-01

    An algorithm is developed to control a pulsed {Delta}V thruster on a small satellite to allow it to fly in formation with a host satellite undergoing time dependent atmospheric drag deceleration. The algorithm uses four short thrusts per orbit to correct for differences in the average radii of the satellites due to differences in drag and one thrust to symmetrize the orbits. The radial difference between the orbits is the only input to the algorithm. The algorithm automatically stabilizes the orbits after ejection and includes provisions to allow azimuthal positional changes by modifying the drag compensation pulses. The algorithm gives radial and azimuthal deadbands of 50 cm and 3 m for a radial measurement accuracy of {+-} 5 cm and {+-} 60% period variation in the drag coefficient of the host. Approaches to further reduce the deadbands are described. The methodology of establishing a stable orbit after ejection is illustrated in an appendix. The results show the optimum ejection angle to minimize stabilization thrust is upward at 86{sup o} from the orbital velocity. At this angle the stabilization velocity that must be supplied by the thruster is half the ejection velocity. An ejection velocity of 0.02 m/sat 86{sup o} gives an azimuthal separation after ejection and orbit stabilization of 187 m. A description of liquid based gas thrusters suitable for the satellite control is included in an appendix.

  1. Transphyseal Distal Humerus Fracture.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua; Ho, Christine Ann; Ritzman, Todd F; Brighton, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Transphyseal distal humerus fractures typically occur in children younger than 3 years secondary to birth trauma, nonaccidental trauma, or a fall from a small height. Prompt and accurate diagnosis of a transphyseal distal humerus fracture is crucial for a successful outcome. Recognizing that the forearm is not aligned with the humerus on plain radiographs may aid in the diagnosis of a transphyseal distal humerus fracture. Surgical management is most commonly performed with the aid of an arthrogram. Closed reduction and percutaneous pinning techniques similar to those used for supracondylar humerus fractures are employed. Cubitus varus caused by a malunion, osteonecrosis of the medial condyle, or growth arrest is the most common complication encountered in the treatment of transphyseal distal humerus fractures. A corrective lateral closing wedge osteotomy can be performed to restore a nearly normal carrying angle.

  2. Orbit Determination Issues for Libration Point Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckman, Mark; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Libration point mission designers require knowledge of orbital accuracy for a variety of analyses including station keeping control strategies, transfer trajectory design, and formation and constellation control. Past publications have detailed orbit determination (OD) results from individual libration point missions. This paper collects both published and unpublished results from four previous libration point missions (ISEE (International Sun-Earth Explorer) -3, SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory), ACE (Advanced Composition Explorer) and MAP (Microwave Anisotropy Probe)) supported by Goddard Space Flight Center's Guidance, Navigation & Control Center. The results of those missions are presented along with OD issues specific to each mission. All past missions have been limited to ground based tracking through NASA ground sites using standard range and Doppler measurement types. Advanced technology is enabling other OD options including onboard navigation using seaboard attitude sensors and the use of the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) measurement Delta Differenced One-Way Range (DDOR). Both options potentially enable missions to reduce coherent dedicated tracking passes while maintaining orbital accuracy. With the increased projected loading of the DSN (Deep Space Network), missions must find alternatives to the standard OD scenario.

  3. Delayed Development of Brain Abscesses Following Stent-Graft Placement in a Head and Neck Cancer Patient Presenting with Carotid Blowout Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Oweis, Yaseen; Gemmete, Joseph J. Chaudhary, Neeraj; Pandey, Aditya; Ansari, Sameer

    2011-02-15

    We describe the delayed development of intracranial abscesses following emergent treatment with a covered stent-graft for carotid blowout syndrome (CBS) in a patient with head and neck cancer. The patient presented with hemoptysis and frank arterial bleeding through the tracheostomy site. A self-expandable stent-graft was deployed across a small pseudoaneurysm arising from the right common carotid artery (RCCA) and resulted in immediate hemostasis. Three months later, the patient suffered a recurrent hemorrhage. CT of the neck demonstrated periluminal fluid around the caudal aspect of the stent-graft with intraluminal thrombus and a small pseudoaneurysm. Subsequently, the patient underwent a balloon test occlusion study and endovascular sacrifice of the RCCA and right internal carotid artery. MRI of the brain demonstrated at least four ring-enhancing lesions within the right cerebral hemisphere consistent with intracranial abscesses that resolved with broad-spectrum antibiotic coverage.

  4. Outcome analysis of sports-related multiple facial fractures.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; You, Sun Hye; Lee, Hong Sik

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, we report a retrospective study of 236 patients with facial bone fractures from various sports who were treated at the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Inha University Hospital, Incheon, South Korea, between February 1996 and April 2007. The medical records of these patients were reviewed and analyzed to determine the clinical characteristics and treatment of the sports-related facial bone fractures. The highest frequency of sports-related facial bone fractures was in the age group 11 to 20 years (40.3%); there was a significant male predominance in all age groups (13.75:1). The most common causes of the injury were soccer (38.1%), baseball (16.1%), basketball (12.7%), martial arts (6.4%), and skiing or snowboarding (11%). Fractures of the nasal bone were the most common in all sports; mandible fractures were common in soccer and martial arts, orbital bone fractures were common in baseball, basketball, and ice sports, and fractures of the zygoma were frequently seen in soccer and martial arts. The main causes of the sports injuries were direct body contact (50.8%), and the most commonly associated soft tissue injuries were found in the head and neck regions (92.3%). Nasal bone fractures were the most common (54.2%), and tripod fractures were the most common type of complex injuries (4.2%). The complication rate was 3.0%. Long-term epidemiological data regarding the natural history of sports-related facial bone fractures are important for the evaluation of existing preventative measures and for the development of new methods of injury prevention and treatment.

  5. Report on orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The success of space endeavors depends upon a space environment sufficiently free of debris to enable the safe and dependable operation of spacecraft. An environment overly cluttered with debris would threaten the ability to utilize space for a wide variety of scientific, technological, military, and commercial purposes. Man made space debris (orbital debris) differs from natural meteoroids because it remains in earth orbit during its lifetime and is not transient through the space around the Earth. The orbital debris environment is considered. The space environment is described along with sources of orbital debris. The current national space policy is examined, along with ways to minimize debris generation and ways to survive the debris environment. International efforts, legal issues and commercial regulations are also examined.

  6. Orbiter thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotts, R. L.; Curry, D. M.; Tillian, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The major material and design challenges associated with the orbiter thermal protection system (TPS), the various TPS materials that are used, the different design approaches associated with each of the materials, and the performance during the flight test program are described. The first five flights of the Orbiter Columbia and the initial flight of the Orbiter Challenger provided the data necessary to verify the TPS thermal performance, structural integrity, and reusability. The flight performance characteristics of each TPS material are discussed, based on postflight inspections and postflight interpretation of the flight instrumentation data. Flights to date indicate that the thermal and structural design requirements for the orbiter TPS are met and that the overall performance is outstanding.

  7. Habitability study shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Studies of the habitability of the space shuttle orbiter are briefly summarized. Selected illustrations and descriptions are presented for: crew compartment, hygiene facilities, food system and galley, and storage systems.

  8. ARTEMIS Orbits Magnetic Moon

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's THEMIS spacecraft have completed their mission and are still working perfectly, so NASA is re-directing the outermost two spacecraft to special orbits around the Moon. Now called ARTEMIS, th...

  9. Altimetry, Orbits and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, O. L.

    1984-01-01

    The nature of the orbit error and its effect on the sea surface heights calculated with satellite altimetry are explained. The elementary concepts of celestial mechanics required to follow a general discussion of the problem are included. Consideration of errors in the orbits of satellites with precisely repeating ground tracks (SEASAT, TOPEX, ERS-1, POSEIDON, amongst past and future altimeter satellites) are detailed. The theoretical conclusions are illustrated with the numerical results of computer simulations. The nature of the errors in this type of orbits is such that this error can be filtered out by using height differences along repeating (overlapping) passes. This makes them particularly valuable for the study and monitoring of changes in the sea surface, such as tides. Elements of tidal theory, showing how these principles can be combined with those pertinent to the orbit error to make direct maps of the tides using altimetry are presented.

  10. MMS Orbit Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the orbits of Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS)mission, a Solar Terrestrial Probes mission comprising of fouridentically instrumented spacecraft that will study the Earth’sm...

  11. A tapestry of orbits

    SciTech Connect

    King-Hele, D.

    1992-01-01

    In this book, the author describes how orbital research developed to yield a rich harvest of knowledge about the earth and its atmosphere. King-Hele relates a personal account of this research based on analysis of satellite orbits between 1957 and 1990 conducted from the Royal Aircraft Establishment in Farnborough England. The early research methods used before the launch of Sputnik in 1957 are discussed.

  12. Orbits of 6 Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olevic, D.; Cvetkovic, Z.

    In this paper the orbits of binaries WDS 10093+2020 = A 2145, WDS 21074-0814 = BU 368 AB and WDS 22288-0001 = STF 2909 AB are recalculated because of significant deviations of more recent observations from the ephemerides. For binaries WDS 22384-0754 = A 2695, WDS 23474-7118 = FIN 375 Aa and WDS 23578+2508 = McA 76 the orbital elements are calculated for the first time.

  13. The Lunar Orbital Prospector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redd, Frank J.; Cantrell, James N.; Mccurdy, Greg

    1992-01-01

    The establishment of lunar bases will not end the need for remote sensing of the lunar surface by orbiting platforms. Human and robotic surface exploration will necessarily be limited to some proximate distance from the support base. Near real-time, high-resolution, global characterization of the lunar surface by orbiting sensing systems will continue to be essential to the understanding of the Moon's geophysical structure and the location of exploitable minerals and deposits of raw materials. The Lunar Orbital Prospector (LOP) is an orbiting sensing platform capable of supporting a variety of modular sensing packages. Serviced by a lunar-based shuttle, the LOP will permit the exchange of instrument packages to meet evolving mission needs. The ability to recover, modify, and rotate sensing packages allows their reuse in varying combinations. Combining this flexibility with robust orbit modification capabilities and near real-time telemetry links provides considerable system responsiveness. Maintenance and modification of the LOP orbit are accomplished through use of an onboard propulsion system that burns lunar-supplied oxygen and aluminum. The relatively low performance of such a system is more than compensated for by the elimination of the need for Earth-supplied propellants. The LOP concept envisions a continuous expansion of capability through the incorporation of new instrument technologies and the addition of platforms.

  14. The Lunar Orbital Prospector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redd, Frank J.; Cantrell, James N.; McCurdy, Greg

    1992-09-01

    The establishment of lunar bases will not end the need for remote sensing of the lunar surface by orbiting platforms. Human and robotic surface exploration will necessarily be limited to some proximate distance from the support base. Near real-time, high-resolution, global characterization of the lunar surface by orbiting sensing systems will continue to be essential to the understanding of the Moon's geophysical structure and the location of exploitable minerals and deposits of raw materials. The Lunar Orbital Prospector (LOP) is an orbiting sensing platform capable of supporting a variety of modular sensing packages. Serviced by a lunar-based shuttle, the LOP will permit the exchange of instrument packages to meet evolving mission needs. The ability to recover, modify, and rotate sensing packages allows their reuse in varying combinations. Combining this flexibility with robust orbit modification capabilities and near real-time telemetry links provides considerable system responsiveness. Maintenance and modification of the LOP orbit are accomplished through use of an onboard propulsion system that burns lunar-supplied oxygen and aluminum. The relatively low performance of such a system is more than compensated for by the elimination of the need for Earth-supplied propellants. The LOP concept envisions a continuous expansion of capability through the incorporation of new instrument technologies and the addition of platforms.

  15. Metatarsal shaft fractures and fractures of the proximal fifth metatarsal.

    PubMed

    Fetzer, Gary B; Wright, Rick W

    2006-01-01

    Metatarsal fractures represent a relatively common injury, especially in athletes. The pertinent anatomy, evaluation, diagnosis, classification, and treatment of acute and chronic (stress) metatarsal shaft fractures are discussed. Fractures of the proximal fifth metatarsal, which are unique and important injuries, are also discussed. Treatment remains relatively straightforward for the traumatic metatarsal injury, whereas traditional stress fractures typically heal with decreased activity. The problematic proximal fifth metatarsal fracture (Jones fracture) frequently requires surgical intervention in patients who want to avoid non-weight-bearing cast immobilization. The authors' current treatment for this fracture includes the option of intramedullary fixation versus cast immobilization.

  16. Overall view of the Orbiter Servicing Structure within the Orbiter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overall view of the Orbiter Servicing Structure within the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. Can you see any hint of the Orbiter Discovery? It is in there. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  17. Periprosthetic patellar fractures.

    PubMed

    Adigweme, Obinna O; Sassoon, Adam A; Langford, Joshua; Haidukewych, George J

    2013-10-01

    Periprosthetic patellar fractures represent a spectrum of injuries to a patient with a total knee arthroplasty. They range in severity from an inconsequential injury, which does not compromise function, to a severely debilitating injury that may require advanced reconstructive measures. This article will outline the epidemiology and risk factors associated with periprosthetic patellar fractures. Treatment options as they relate to injury mechanism, fracture severity, patellar component stability, and remaining bone stock will also be discussed. Finally, a review of the current literature regarding the results of treatment will be presented.

  18. [Orbital complications of sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Šuchaň, M; Horňák, M; Kaliarik, L; Krempaská, S; Koštialová, T; Kovaľ, J

    2014-12-01

    Orbital complications categorised by Chandler are emergency. They need early diagnosis and agresive treatment. Stage and origin of orbital complications are identified by rhinoendoscopy, ophtalmologic examination and CT of orbite and paranasal sinuses. Periorbital cellulitis and early stage of orbital cellulitis can be treated conservatively with i. v. antibiotics. Monitoring of laboratory parameters and ophtalmologic symptoms is mandatory. Lack of improvement or worsening of symptoms within 24-48 hours and advanced stages of orbital complications are indicated for surgery. The purpose of the study is to evaluate epidemiology, clinical features and management of sinogenic orbital complications. Retrospective data of 8 patients with suspicion of orbital complication admited to hospital from 2008 to 2013 were evaluated. Patients were analyzed in terms of gender, age, CT findings, microbiology, clinical features, stage and treatment. Male and female were afected in rate 1,66:1. Most of patients were young adult in 3rd. and 4th. decade of life (62,5 %). Acute and chronic sinusitis were cause of orbital complication in the same rate. The most common origin of orbital complication was ethmoiditis (62,5 %), than maxillary (25 %) and frontal (12,5 %) sinusitis. Polysinusitis with affection of ethmoidal, maxillary and frontal sinuses (75 %) was usual CT finding. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus were etiological agens in half of cases. Periorbital oedema (100 %), proptosis, chemosis (50 %), diplopia and glaucoma (12,5 %) were observed. Based on examinations, diagnosis of periorbital oedema/preseptal cellulitis was made in 3 (37,5 %), orbital cellulitis in 3 (37,5 %) and subperiosteal abscess in 2 cases (25 %). All patients underwent combined therapy - i. v. antibiotics and surgery within 24 hours. Eradication of disease from ostiomeatal complex (OMC), drainage of affected sinuses and drainage of subperiosteal abscess were done via fuctional endonasal

  19. Surgery for scapula process fractures

    PubMed Central

    Anavian, Jack; Wijdicks, Coen A; Schroder, Lisa K; Vang, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    Background Generally, scapula process fractures (coracoid and acromion) have been treated nonoperatively with favorable outcome, with the exception of widely displaced fractures. Very little has been published, however, regarding the operative management of such fractures and the literature that is available involves very few patients. Our hypothesis was that operative treatment of displaced acromion and coracoid fractures is a safe and effective treatment that yields favorable surgical results. Methods We reviewed 26 consecutive patients (27 fractures) treated between 1998 and 2007. Operative indications for these process fractures included either a painful nonunion, a concomitant ipsilateral operative scapula fracture, ≥ 1 cm of displacement on X-ray, or a multiple disruption of the superior shoulder suspensory complex. All patients were followed until they were asymptomatic, displayed radiographic fracture union, and had recovered full motion with no pain. Patients and results 21 males and 5 females, mean age 36 (18–67) years, were included in the study. 18 patients had more than one indication for surgery. Of the 27 fractures, there were 13 acromion fractures and 14 coracoid fractures. 1 patient was treated for both a coracoid and an acromion fracture. Fracture patterns for the acromion included 6 acromion base fractures and 7 fractures distal to the base. Coracoid fracture patterns included 11 coracoid base fractures and 3 fractures distal to the base. Mean follow-up was 11 (2–42) months. All fractures united and all patients had recovered full motion with no pain at the time of final follow-up. 3 patients underwent removal of hardware due to irritation from hardware components that were too prominent. There were no other complications. Interpretation While most acromion and coracoid fractures can be treated nonoperatively with satisfactory results, operative management may be indicated for displaced fractures and double lesions of the superior shoulder

  20. Mechanical Coal-Face Fracturer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Radial points on proposed drill bit take advantage of natural fracture planes of coal. Radial fracture points retracted during drilling and impacted by piston to fracture coal once drilling halts. Group of bits attached to array of pneumatic drivers to fracture large areas of coal face.

  1. Mars Geoscience Orbiter and Lunar Geoscience Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuldner, W. V.; Kaskiewicz, P. F.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using the AE/DE Earth orbiting spacecraft design for the LGO and/or MGO missions was determined. Configurations were developed and subsystems analysis was carried out to optimize the suitability of the spacecraft to the missions. The primary conclusion is that the basic AE/DE spacecraft can readily be applied to the LGO mission with relatively minor, low risk modifications. The MGO mission poses a somewhat more complex problem, primarily due to the overall maneuvering hydrazine budget and power requirements of the sensors and their desired duty cycle. These considerations dictate a modification (scaling up) of the structure to support mission requirements.

  2. Ankle fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... that surgery can allow faster and more reliable healing. In children, the fracture involves the part of ... will use a special walking boot as the healing progresses. You will need to learn: How to ...

  3. Fracture Characterization of Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, K. L.; Agrawal, P.; Ostrowski, D. R.; Sears, D. W. G.

    2015-07-01

    NASA ARC has been tasked with understanding the behavior of ~100m asteroids entering the atmosphere and quantifying the impact hazard. As part of this task, we report the initial results of a survey of the fracture properties of meteorites.

  4. Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Doug; Leggett, Jim

    2013-07-29

    The Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager project has a goal to develop a wireline ultrasonic imager that is capable of operating in temperatures up to 300°C (572°F) and depths up to 10 km (32,808 ft). This will address one of the critical needs in any EGS development of understanding the hydraulic flow paths in the reservoir. The ultrasonic imaging is well known in the oil and gas industry as one of the best methods for fracture evaluation; providing both high resolution and complete azimuthal coverage of the borehole. This enables fracture detection and characterization, both natural and induced, providing information as to their location, dip direction and dip magnitude. All of these factors are critical to fully understand the fracture system to enable the optimization of the thermal drainage through injectors and producers in a geothermal resource.

  5. Management of condylar fractures.

    PubMed

    Montazem, André H; Anastassov, George

    2009-03-01

    Management of condylar fractures remains a source of ongoing controversy. While it appears that many condylar fractures can be managed nonsurgically, recognition of cases that require surgical intervention and selection of an appropriate procedure are paramount to success in treating these injuries. There are a variety of special considerations that are peculiar to the condylar region. This article discusses anatomic considerations, classification of condylar fractures, indications for surgery, treatment options, and complications. The goals of treatment include restoration of function and esthetics. Careful consideration and attention to the principles of fracture management, and the role of the condyle as an articulating unit and growth center, must be taken into account for the successful management of these injuries.

  6. Etiology of zygomatic fractures.

    PubMed

    Cotter, C J; Ogunbowale, A; Beirne, C

    2005-01-01

    We report on the etiology of zygomatic fractures in an Irish population. More than half of these injuries are related to interpersonal assault. Treatment of these injuries places a considerable burden on the health service. PMID:16445148

  7. Sprains, Strains and Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... are useful for finding soft issue injuries (including torn ligaments) and stress fractures. Treatment will depend on ... weeks. Professional athletes may undergo surgery to repair torn ligaments. Oral anti-inflammatory medication, such as ibuprofen, ...

  8. Lisfranc (Midfoot) Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... broken or ligaments that support the midfoot are torn. The severity of the injury can vary from ... bones are broken (fractured) or the ligaments are torn (ruptured). Injuries can vary, from a simple injury ...

  9. Clavicle Fracture (Broken Collarbone)

    MedlinePlus

    ... place and the fragments are severely out of alignment. A large bump over the fracture site may ... bone fragments are first repositioned into their normal alignment, and then held in place with special screws ...

  10. Hay balers' fractures.

    PubMed

    Mayba, I I

    1984-03-01

    Two cases of fractures of the sternum and T12 vertebra are presented, which appear to be a characteristic combination of injuries to farmers when hay bales fall on them. The mechanism of injury proposed is a severe forward flexion, producing vertebral collapse at the dorsolumbar junction, and fracture of the sternum from direct trauma against the steering wheel. These fractures should always be suspected in persons injured while baling hay. It is proposed to call this complex of injuries hay balers' fractures. Preventive measures suggested are: operator caution when hay bales are lifted; addition of locks to the loader forks; increasing the size of the loader, or placing a screen or cage over the operators to keep hay bales from falling on them.

  11. Hay balers' fractures.

    PubMed

    Mayba, I I

    1984-03-01

    Two cases of fractures of the sternum and T12 vertebra are presented, which appear to be a characteristic combination of injuries to farmers when hay bales fall on them. The mechanism of injury proposed is a severe forward flexion, producing vertebral collapse at the dorsolumbar junction, and fracture of the sternum from direct trauma against the steering wheel. These fractures should always be suspected in persons injured while baling hay. It is proposed to call this complex of injuries hay balers' fractures. Preventive measures suggested are: operator caution when hay bales are lifted; addition of locks to the loader forks; increasing the size of the loader, or placing a screen or cage over the operators to keep hay bales from falling on them. PMID:6708148

  12. The orbits in cancer imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chong, V F H

    2006-01-01

    Primary malignant lesions in the orbit are relatively uncommon. However, the orbits are frequently involved in haematogeneous metastasis or by direct extension from malignancies originating from the adjacent nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses. This paper focuses on the more commonly encountered primary orbital malignancies and the mapping of tumour spread into the orbits. PMID:17114076

  13. Elliptical Orbit Performance Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myler, T.

    1984-01-01

    Elliptical Orbit Performance (ELOPE) computer program for analyzing orbital performance of space boosters uses orbit insertion data obtained from trajectory simulation to generate parametric data on apogee and perigee altitudes as function of payload data. Data used to generate presentation plots that display elliptical orbit performance capability of space booster.

  14. Relative permeability through fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Diomampo, Gracel, P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of two-phase flow through fractures is of importance in understanding many geologic processes. Currently, two-phase flow through fractures is still poorly understood. In this study, nitrogen-water experiments were done on both smooth and rough parallel plates to determine the governing flow mechanism for fractures and the appropriate methodology for data analysis. The experiments were done using a glass plate to allow visualization of flow. Digital video recording allowed instantaneous measurement of pressure, flow rate and saturation. Saturation was computed using image analysis techniques. The experiments showed that gas and liquid phases flow through fractures in nonuniform separate channels. The localized channels change with time as each phase path undergoes continues breaking and reforming due to invasion of the other phase. The stability of the phase paths is dependent on liquid and gas flow rate ratio. This mechanism holds true for over a range of saturation for both smooth and rough fractures. In imbibition for rough-walled fractures, another mechanism similar to wave-like flow in pipes was also observed. The data from the experiments were analyzed using Darcy's law and using the concept of friction factor and equivalent Reynold's number for two-phase flow. For both smooth- and rough-walled fractures a clear relationship between relative permeability and saturation was seen. The calculated relative permeability curves follow Corey-type behavior and can be modeled using Honarpour expressions. The sum of the relative permeabilities is not equal one, indicating phase interference. The equivalent homogeneous single-phase approach did not give satisfactory representation of flow through fractures. The graphs of experimentally derived friction factor with the modified Reynolds number do not reveal a distinctive linear relationship.

  15. Interlaminar fracture of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.

    1984-01-01

    Fracture mechanics has been found to be a useful tool for understanding composite delamination. Analyses for calculating strain energy release rates associated with delamination growth have been developed. These analyses successfully characterized delamination onset and growth for particular sources of delamination. Low velocity impact has been found to be the most severe source of composite delamination. A variety of test methods for measuring interlaminar fracture toughness are being developed to identify new composite materials with enhanced delamination resistance.

  16. Orbital Fluid Resupply Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, Ralph N.

    1989-01-01

    Orbital fluid resupply can significantly increase the cost-effectiveness and operational flexibility of spacecraft, satellites, and orbiting platforms and observatories. Reusable tankers are currently being designed for transporting fluids to space. A number of options exist for transporting the fluids and propellant to the space-based user systems. The fluids can be transported to space either in the Shuttle cargo bay or using expendable launch vehicles (ELVs). Resupply can thus be accomplished either from the Shuttle bay, or the tanker can be removed from the Shuttle bay or launched on an ELV and attached to a carrier such as the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) or Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) for transport to the user to be serviced. A third option involves locating the tanker at the space station or an unmanned platform as a quasi-permanent servicing facility or depot which returns to the ground for recycling once its tanks are depleted. Current modular tanker designs for monopropellants, bipropellants, and water for space station propulsion are discussed. Superfluid helium tankers are addressed, including trade-offs in tanker sizes, shapes to fit the range of ELVs currently available, and boil-off losses associated with longer-term (greater than 6-month) space-basing. It is concluded that the mixed fleet approach to on-orbit consumables resupply offers significant advantages to the overall logistics requirements.

  17. Orbital spacecraft resupply technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Tracey, T. R.; Bailey, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    The resupplying of orbital spacecraft using the Space Shuttle, Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle, Orbital Transfer Vehicle or a depot supply at a Space Station is studied. The governing factor in fluid resupply designs is the system size with respect to fluid resupply quantities. Spacecraft propellant management for tankage via diaphragm or surface tension configurations is examined. The capabilities, operation, and application of adiabatic ullage compression, ullage exchange, vent/fill/repressurize, and drain/vent/no-vent fill/repressurize, which are proposed transfer methods for spacecraft utilizing tankage configurations, are described. Selection of the appropriate resupply method is dependent on the spacecraft design features. Hydrazine adiabatic compression/detonation, liquid-free vapor venting to prevent freezing, and a method for no-vent liquid filling are analyzed. Various procedures for accurate measurements of propellant mass in low gravity are evaluated; a system of flowmeters with a PVT system was selected as the pressurant solubility and quantity gaging technique. Monopropellant and bipropellant orbital spacecraft consumable resupply system tanks which resupply 3000 lb of hydrazine and 7000 lb of MMH/NTO to spacecraft on orbit are presented.

  18. Long-Term Results of Orbital Roof Repair with Titanium Mesh in a Case of Traumatic Intraorbital Encephalocele: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Erhan; Arslan, Selçuk; Kalkısım, Selçuk; Arslan, Ahmet; Kuzeyli, Kayhan

    2016-09-01

    Orbital roof fractures associated with cranial and maxillofacial trauma are rarely encountered. Traumatic intraorbital encephaloceles due to orbital roof fractures developing in the early posttraumatic period are even rarer. A variety of materials, such as alloplastic implants or autogenous materials, have been used for the reconstruction of orbital roof, but data regarding the long-term results of these materials are very limited. We report a case of intraorbital encephalocele developing in the early posttraumatic period (2 days) in a child patient and the long-term results of titanium mesh used for the reconstruction of the orbital roof. The case is presented with a pertinent review of literature. PMID:27516843

  19. Mars Telecommunications Orbiter, Artist's Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This illustration depicts a concept for NASA's Mars Telecommunications Orbiter in flight around Mars. The orbiter is in development to be the first spacecraft with a primary function of providing communication links while orbiting a foreign planet. The project's plans call for launch in September 2009, arrival at Mars in August 2010 and a mission of six to 10 years while in orbit. Mars Telecommunication Orbiter would serve as the Mars hub for an interplanetery Internet, greatly increasing the information payoff from other future Mars missions. The mission is designed to orbit Mars more than 10 times farther from the planet than orbiters dedicated primarily to science. The high-orbit design minimizes the time that Mars itself blocks the orbiter from communicating with Earth and maximizes the time that the orbiter is above the horizon -- thus capable of communications relay -- for rovers and stationary landers on Mars' surface.

  20. Treatment of Thoracolumbar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung-Guk; Shin, Dong-Eun

    2015-01-01

    The most common fractures of the spine are associated with the thoracolumbar junction. The goals of treatment of thoracolumbar fracture are leading to early mobilization and rehabilitation by restoring mechanical stability of fracture and inducing neurologic recovery, thereby enabling patients to return to the workplace. However, it is still debatable about the treatment methods. Neurologic injury should be identified by thorough physical examination for motor and sensory nerve system in order to determine the appropriate treatment. The mechanical stability of fracture also should be evaluated by plain radiographs and computed tomography. In some cases, magnetic resonance imaging is required to evaluate soft tissue injury involving neurologic structure or posterior ligament complex. Based on these physical examinations and imaging studies, fracture stability is evaluated and it is determined whether to use the conservative or operative treatment. The development of instruments have led to more interests on the operative treatment which saves mobile segments without fusion and on instrumentation through minimal invasive approach in recent years. It is still controversial for the use of these treatments because there have not been verified evidences yet. However, the morbidity of patients can be decreased and good clinical and radiologic outcomes can be achieved if the recent operative treatments are used carefully considering the fracture pattern and the injury severity. PMID:25705347

  1. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

  2. Fracture toughness of graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Ma, Lulu; Fan, Feifei; Zeng, Zhi; Peng, Cheng; Loya, Phillip E; Liu, Zheng; Gong, Yongji; Zhang, Jiangnan; Zhang, Xingxiang; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Zhu, Ting; Lou, Jun

    2014-04-29

    Perfect graphene is believed to be the strongest material. However, the useful strength of large-area graphene with engineering relevance is usually determined by its fracture toughness, rather than the intrinsic strength that governs a uniform breaking of atomic bonds in perfect graphene. To date, the fracture toughness of graphene has not been measured. Here we report an in situ tensile testing of suspended graphene using a nanomechanical device in a scanning electron microscope. During tensile loading, the pre-cracked graphene sample fractures in a brittle manner with sharp edges, at a breaking stress substantially lower than the intrinsic strength of graphene. Our combined experiment and modelling verify the applicability of the classic Griffith theory of brittle fracture to graphene. The fracture toughness of graphene is measured as the critical stress intensity factor of and the equivalent critical strain energy release rate of 15.9 J m(-2). Our work quantifies the essential fracture properties of graphene and provides mechanistic insights into the mechanical failure of graphene.

  3. Subduction of fracture zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi; Leeman, William

    2013-04-01

    Since Wilson proposed in 1965 the existence of a new class of faults on the ocean floor, namely transform faults, the geodynamic effects and importance of fracture zone subduction is still little studied. It is known that oceanic plates are characterized by numerous fracture zones, and some of them have the potential to transport into subduction zones large volumes of water-rich serpentinite, providing a fertile water source for magma generated in subduction-related arc volcanoes. In most previous geodynamic studies, subducting plates are considered to be homogeneous, and there is no clear indication how the subduction of a fracture zone influences the melting pattern in the mantle wedge and the slab-derived fluids distribution in the subarc mantle. Here we show that subduction of serpentinized fracture zones plays a significant role in distribution of melt and fluids in the mantle wedge above the slab. Using high-resolution tree-dimensional coupled petrological-termomechanical simulations of subduction, we show that fluids, including melts and water, vary dramatically in the region where a serpentinized fracture zone enters into subduction. Our models show that substantial hydration and partial melting tend to concentrate where fracture zones are being subducted, creating favorable conditions for partially molten hydrous plumes to develop. These results are consistent with the along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes in several regions, as the Aleutian Arc, the Cascades, the Southern Mexican Volcanic Arc, and the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone.

  4. Deceleration Orbit Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Church, M.

    1991-04-26

    During the accelerator studies period of 12/90-1/91 much study time was dedicated to improving the E760 deceleration ramps. 4 general goals were in mind: (1) Reduce the relative orbit deviations from the nominal reference orbit as much as possible. This reduces the potential error in the orbit length calculation - which is the primary source of error in the beam energy calculation. (2) Maximize the transverse apertures. This minimizes beam loss during deceleration and during accidental beam blow-ups. (3) Measure and correct lattice parameters. Knowledge of {gamma}{sub T}, {eta}, Q{sub h}, Q{sub v}, and the dispersion in the straight sections allows for a more accurate energy calculation and reliable SYNCH calculations. (4) Minimize the coupling. This allows one to discern between horizontal and vertical tunes.

  5. Spiral Orbit Tribometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Stephen V.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Kingsbury, Edward; Jansen, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    The spiral orbit tribometer (SOT) bridges the gap between full-scale life testing and typically unrealistic accelerated life testing of ball-bearing lubricants in conjunction with bearing ball and race materials. The SOT operates under realistic conditions and quickly produces results, thereby providing information that can guide the selection of lubricant, ball, and race materials early in a design process. The SOT is based upon a simplified, retainerless thrust bearing comprising one ball between flat races (see figure). The SOT measures lubricant consumption and degradation rates and friction coefficients in boundary lubricated rolling and pivoting contacts. The ball is pressed between the lower and upper races with a controlled force and the lower plate is rotated. The combination of load and rotation causes the ball to move in a nearly circular orbit that is, more precisely, an opening spiral. The spiral s pitch is directly related to the friction coefficient. At the end of the orbit, the ball contacts the guide plate, restoring the orbit to its original radius. The orbit is repeatable throughout the entire test. A force transducer, mounted in-line with the guide plate, measures the force between the ball and the guide plate, which directly relates to the friction coefficient. The SOT, shown in the figure, can operate in under ultra-high vacuum (10(exp -9) Torr) or in a variety of gases at atmospheric pressure. The load force can be adjusted between 45 and 450 N. By varying the load force and ball diameter, mean Hertzian stresses between 0.5 and 5.0 GPa can be obtained. The ball s orbital speed range is between 1 and 100 rpm.

  6. Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuber, Maria T.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to support the rebuild and implementation of the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) investigation and to perform scientific analysis of current Mars data relevant to the investigation. The instrument is part of the payload of the NASA Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission. The instrument is a rebuild of the Mars Observer Laser Altimeter that was originally flown on the ill-fated Mars Observer mission. The instrument is currently in orbit around Mars and has so far returned remarkable data.

  7. The calculation of orbital positioning using standard orbital parameters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, W.

    1999-08-01

    Practical difficulties arise solving the deceptively simple Kepler's equation. Kepler's equation can be solved easily using the method Newton developed for doing so. The authors recommend that this method be used in any general approach to orbital calculations. Another practical point to be reckoned with, is the variation in true orbital parameters. It is important to note that inclined orbits, eccentric orbits, and low orbits all suffer from rapid changes in their parameters. They can be ignored only for simple calculations for just a few orbits. Any calculation covering a longer period of time must take these changes into account.

  8. ARTEMIS Lunar Orbit Insertion and Science Orbit Design Through 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broschart, Stephen B.; Sweetser, Theodore H.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Folta, David; Woodard, Mark

    2015-01-01

    As of late-July 2011, the ARTEMIS mission is transferring two spacecraft from Lissajous orbits around Earth-Moon Lagrange Point #1 into highly-eccentric lunar science orbits. This paper presents the trajectory design for the transfer from Lissajous orbit to lunar orbit insertion, the period reduction maneuvers, and the science orbits through 2013. The design accommodates large perturbations from Earth's gravity and restrictive spacecraft capabilities to enable opportunities for a range of heliophysics and planetary science measurements. The process used to design the highly-eccentric ARTEMIS science orbits is outlined. The approach may inform the design of future planetary moon missions.

  9. Surface Evolution from Orbital Decay on Phobos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurford, Terry; Asphaug, Erik; Spitale, Joseph; Hemingway, Douglas; Rhoden, Alyssa; Henning, Wade; Bills, Bruce; Kattenhorn, Simon; Walker, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Phobos, the innermost satellite of Mars, displays an extensive system of grooves that are mostly symmetric about its sub-Mars point. Phobos is steadily spiraling inward due to the tides it raises, and will suffer tidal disruption before colliding with Mars. We calculate the surface stress field of the de-orbiting satellite and show that the first signs of tidal disruption are already present on its surface. Most of Phobos’ prominent grooves have an excellent correlation with computed stress orientations. The model predicts an interior that has very low strength on the tidal evolution timescale, overlain by a ~10-100 m exterior shell that has elastic properties similar to lunar regolith.Shortly after the Viking spacecraft obtained the first geomorphic images of Phobos, it was proposed that stresses from orbital decay cause grooves. But, assuming a homogeneous Phobos, it proved impossible to account for the build-up of failure stress in the exterior regardless of the value assumed for Phobos’ rigidity. Hence, the tidal model languished. Here, we revisit the tidal origin of surface fractures with a more detailed treatment that shows the production of significant stress in a surface layer, with a very strong correlation to the geometry of grooves.Our model results applied to surface observations imply that Phobos has a rubble pile interior that is nearly strengthless. A lunar-like cohesive regolith outer layer overlays the rubble pile interior. This outer layer behaves elastically and can experience significant tidal stress at levels able to drive tensile failure. Fissures can develop as the global body deforms due to increasing tides related to orbital decay. Phobos may have an active and evolving surface; an exciting target for further exploration. The interior predictions of this model can be evaluated by future detailed studies performed by an orbiter or lander.

  10. Treatment Options in Maxillofacial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Guerrissi, Jorge Orlando

    2016-07-01

    From 2000 to 2010, 720 patients with facial trauma were admitted in Plastic Surgery Service of Argerich Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 58 of them with panfacial fractures were included in this study. Height velocity impact is the principal etiology, and most concomitant extrafacial injuries are neurocranium and cervical spine. Common affected areas were orbits, nose, and malar-zygoma. The timing of the treatment was airway evaluation, control of bleeding and consciousness, treatment of associated injuries, and finally facial reconstruction. The applications of craniofacial surgical techniques complete facial treatment in only operatory time by means of standard approaches like coronal, subciliar palpebral, upper and lower vestibular. The treatment was exploration to open sky; reduction and fijation with titanium plates; replacement of comminuted bones with bone autografts harvested iliac crest, calvary, and costal bones. The results were classificated acceptables in 48 (85%) and not acceptables in 9 (15%) according to successful reconstruction of the both form and armony facial, persistent esthetic and functional sequels, and postoperative complications. Postoperative complications were detected in 18 patients. According to most authors the use of internal rigid fixation and bone autograf permits obtaining the best aesthetic and functional results decreasing complications and sequels. The recuperation of tridimensional aspect of the face and aesthetic and functional pretrauma state must be the goal standard. PMID:27391510

  11. Europa Orbiter Exploration Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. V.

    2001-01-01

    The Europa Orbiter mission is planned as the next stage of Europa exploration. Its primary goals are to search for definitive evidence of a subsurface ocean, to characterize the ice crust and ice/water interface, and to prepare for future surface/sub-surface missions. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Sedna Orbit Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This animation shows the location of the newly discovered planet-like object, dubbed 'Sedna,' in relation to the rest of the solar system. Starting at the inner solar system, which includes the orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars (all in yellow), the view pulls away through the asteroid belt and the orbits of the outer planets beyond (green). Pluto and the distant Kuiper Belt objects are seen next until finally Sedna comes into view. As the field widens the full orbit of Sedna can be seen along with its current location. Sedna is nearing its closest approach to the Sun; its 10,000 year orbit typically takes it to far greater distances. Moving past Sedna, what was previously thought to be the inner edge of the Oort cloud appears. The Oort cloud is a spherical distribution of cold, icy bodies lying at the limits of the Sun's gravitational pull. Sedna's presence suggests that this Oort cloud is much closer than scientists believed.

  13. Global orbit corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Symon, K.

    1987-11-01

    There are various reasons for preferring local (e.g., three bump) orbit correction methods to global corrections. One is the difficulty of solving the mN equations for the required mN correcting bumps, where N is the number of superperiods and m is the number of bumps per superperiod. The latter is not a valid reason for avoiding global corrections, since, we can take advantage of the superperiod symmetry to reduce the mN simultaneous equations to N separate problems, each involving only m simultaneous equations. Previously, I have shown how to solve the general problem when the machine contains unknown magnet errors of known probability distribution; we made measurements of known precision of the orbit displacements at a set of points, and we wish to apply correcting bumps to minimize the weighted rms orbit deviations. In this report, we will consider two simpler problems, using similar methods. We consider the case when we make M beam position measurements per superperiod, and we wish to apply an equal number M of orbit correcting bumps to reduce the measured position errors to zero. We also consider the problem when the number of correcting bumps is less than the number of measurements, and we wish to minimize the weighted rms position errors. We will see that the latter problem involves solving equations of a different form, but involving the same matrices as the former problem.

  14. A Neptune Orbiter Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, R. A.; Spilker, T. R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the results of new analyses and mission/system designs for a low cost Neptune Orbiter mission. Science and measurement objectives, instrumentation, and mission/system design options are described and reflect an aggressive approach to the application of new advanced technologies expected to be available and developed over the next five to ten years.

  15. Mars Climate Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor '98 Climate Orbiter is shown here during acoustic tests that simulate launch conditions. The orbiter was to conduct a two year primary mission to profile the Martian atmosphere and map the surface. To carry out these scientific objectives, the spacecraft carried a rebuilt version of the pressure modulated infrared radiometer, lost with the Mars Observer spacecraft, and a miniaturized dual camera system the size of a pair of binoculars, provided by Malin Space Science Systems, Inc., San Diego, California. During its primary mission, the orbiter was to monitor Mars atmosphere and surface globally on a daily basis for one Martian year (two Earth years), observing the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterizing seasonal changes of the planet's surface. Imaging of the surface morphology would also provide important clues about the planet's climate in its early history. The mission was part of NASA's Mars Surveyor program, a sustained program of robotic exploration of the red planet, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. Lockheed Martin Astronautics was NASA's industrial partner in the mission. Unfortunately, Mars Climate Orbiter burned up in the Martian atmosphere on September 23, 1999, due to a metric conversion error that caused the spacecraft to be off course.

  16. Spin-orbit photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardano, Filippo; Marrucci, Lorenzo

    2015-12-01

    Spin-orbit optical phenomena involve the interaction of the photon spin with the light wave propagation and spatial distribution, mediated by suitable optical media. Here we present a short overview of the emerging photonic applications that rely on such effects.

  17. Thrower's fracture of the humerus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew; Dodson, Christopher C; Ilyas, Asif M

    2014-10-01

    Thrower's fractures are spiral fractures of the humerus caused by forceful throwing of a ball. Although these fractures have been cited in the literature, little research exists regarding the significance of stress fractures and fatigue injuries that may precede these injuries. This article presents 3 cases of middle-aged recreational baseball pitchers who sustained mid to distal third spiral humerus fractures, reviews the biomechanics of a thrower's fracture, and provides a detailed review of the literature to help better understand this condition and guide treatment.

  18. Pelvic Insufficiency Fractures

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic insufficiency fractures may occur in the absence of trauma or as a result of low-energy trauma in osteoporotic bone. With a growing geriatric population, the incidence of pelvic insufficiency fracture has increased over the last 3 decades and will continue to do so. These fractures can cause considerable pain, loss of independence, and economic burden to both the patient and the health care system. While many of these injuries are identified and treated based on plain radiographs, some remain difficult to diagnose. The role of advanced imaging in these cases is discussed. In addition to treating the fracture, medical comorbidities contributing to osteoporosis should be identified and corrected. Specific attention has been given to 25-OH serum vitamin D screening and repletion. Treatment generally consists of providing pain control and assisting patients with mobilization while allowing weight bearing as tolerated. In those unable to do so, invasive techniques such as sacroplasty as well as internal fixation may be beneficial. The role of operative fixation in insufficiency fractures is also discussed. PMID:26246940

  19. Frontal bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Marinheiro, Bruno Henrique; de Medeiros, Eduardo Henrique Pantosso; Sverzut, Cássio Edvard; Trivellato, Alexandre Elias

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the epidemiology, treatment, and complications of frontal bone fractures associated, or not, with other facial fractures. This evaluation also sought to minimize the influence of the surgeon's skills and the preference for any rigid internal fixation system. The files from 3758 patients who attended the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department of the School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, from March 2004 to November 2011 and presented with facial trauma were scanned, and 52 files were chosen for the review. Eleven (21.15%) of these patients had pure fractures of the frontal bone, and trauma incidence was more prevalent in men (92.3%), whites (61.53%), and adults (50%). Despite the use of helmets at the moment of the trauma, motorcycle crashes were the most common etiological factor (32.69%). Fracture of the anterior wall of the frontal sinus with displacement was the main injury observed (54.9%), and the most common treatment was internal fixation with a plate and screws (45.09%). Postoperative complications were observed in 35.29% of the cases. The therapy applied was effective in handling this type of fracture, and the success rate was comparable to that reported in other published studies. PMID:25377971

  20. Orbital Fluid Transfer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. S., (Nick); Ryder, Mel; Tyler, Tony R.

    1998-01-01

    An automated fluid and power interface system needs to be developed for future space missions which require on orbit consumable replenishment. Current method of fluid transfer require manned vehicles and extravehicular activity. Currently the US does not have an automated capability for consumable transfer on-orbit. This technology would benefit both Space Station and long duration satellites. In order to provide this technology the Automated Fluid Interface System (AFIS) was developed. The AFIS project was an advanced development program aimed at developing a prototype satellite servicer for future space operations. This mechanism could transfer propellants, cryogens, fluids, gasses, electrical power, and communications from a tanker unit to the orbiting satellite. The development of this unit was a cooperative effort between Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, and Moog, Inc. in East Aurora, New York. An engineering model was built and underwent substantial development testing at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). While the AFIS is not suitable for spaceflight, testing and evaluation of the AFIS provided significant experience which would be beneficial in building a flight unit. The lessons learned from testing the AFIS provided the foundation for the next generation fluid transfer mechanism, the Orbital Fluid Transfer System (OFTS). The OFTS project was a study contract with MSFC and Moog, Inc. The OFTS was designed for the International Space Station (ISS), but its flexible design could used for long duration satellite missions and other applications. The OFTS was designed to be used after docking. The primary function was to transfer bipropellants and high pressure gases. The other items addressed by this task included propellant storage, hardware integration, safety and control system issues. A new concept for high pressure couplings was also developed. The results of the AFIS testing provided an excellent basis for the OFTS design. The OFTS

  1. [Orbital decompression for Graves' ophthalmopathy].

    PubMed

    Boulétreau, P; Breton, P; Freidel, M

    2005-04-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy is a complex orbital condition with a controversial pathogenesis. It is the clinical expression of a discordance between the inextensible orbit and hypertrophic muscular and fatty elements within the orbit responding to immunological stimulation. The relationship between the orbital and its content can be improved by surgical expansion which increases the useful volume of the orbit. This procedure can be combined with lipectomy to decrease the volume of the orbital contents. We briefly recall the history of surgical decompression techniques and present our experience with Graves' ophthalmopathy patients.

  2. Fracture-Flow-Enhanced Solute Diffusion into Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Ye, Ming; Sudicky, E.A.

    2007-12-15

    We propose a new conceptual model of fracture-flow-enhanced matrix diffusion, which correlates with fracture-flow velocity, i.e., matrix diffusion enhancement induced by rapid fluid flow within fractures. According to the boundary-layer or film theory, fracture flow enhanced matrix diffusion may dominate mass-transfer processes at fracture-matrix interfaces, because rapid flow along fractures results in large velocity and concentration gradients at and near fracture-matrix interfaces, enhancing matrix diffusion at matrix surfaces. In this paper, we present a new formulation of the conceptual model for enhanced fracture-matrix diffusion, and its implementation is discussed using existing analytical solutions and numerical models. In addition, we use the enhanced matrix diffusion concept to analyze laboratory experimental results from nonreactive and reactive tracer breakthrough tests, in an effort to validate the new conceptual model.

  3. Unusual sclerosing orbital pseudotumor infiltrating orbits and maxillofacial regions.

    PubMed

    Toprak, Huseyin; Aralaşmak, Ayşe; Yılmaz, Temel Fatih; Ozdemir, Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic orbital pseudotumor (IOP) is a benign inflammatory condition of the orbit without identifiable local or systemic causes. Bilateral massive orbital involvement and extraorbital extension of the IOP is very rare. We present an unusual case of IOP with bilateral massive orbital infiltration extending into maxillofacial regions and discuss its distinctive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that help to exclude other entities during differential diagnoses.

  4. Unusual Sclerosing Orbital Pseudotumor Infiltrating Orbits and Maxillofacial Regions

    PubMed Central

    Toprak, Huseyin; Aralaşmak, Ayşe; Yılmaz, Temel Fatih; Ozdemir, Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic orbital pseudotumor (IOP) is a benign inflammatory condition of the orbit without identifiable local or systemic causes. Bilateral massive orbital involvement and extraorbital extension of the IOP is very rare. We present an unusual case of IOP with bilateral massive orbital infiltration extending into maxillofacial regions and discuss its distinctive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that help to exclude other entities during differential diagnoses. PMID:24991481

  5. Comparison of Low Earth Orbit and Geosynchronous Earth Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The technological, environmental, social, and political ramifications of low Earth orbits as compared to geosynchronous Earth orbits for the solar power satellite (SPS) are assessed. The capital cost of the transmitting facilities is dependent on the areas of the antenna and rectenna relative to the requirement of high efficiency power transmission. The salient features of a low orbit Earth orbits are discussed in terms of cost reduction efforts.

  6. Shuttle on-orbit rendezvous targeting: Circular orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentley, E. L.

    1972-01-01

    The strategy and logic used in a space shuttle on-orbit rendezvous targeting program are described. The program generates ascent targeting conditions for boost to insertion into an intermediate parking orbit, and generates on-orbit targeting and timeline bases for each maneuver to effect rendezvous with a space station. Time of launch is determined so as to eliminate any plane change, and all work was performed for a near-circular space station orbit.

  7. Fracture Genesis and Fracture Filling In Hydrate Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, H.; Dugan, B.

    2009-12-01

    Steady-state models of coupled flow through fractures and porous media predict that millions of years are required to accumulate the very high hydrate saturation (>50%) necessary to form hydraulic fractures by fluid pressure buildup; however, once a fracture system is formed, it will fill with hydrate in roughly 15 kyr. This modeling is a first step towards understanding heterogeneous, fracture-hosted methane hydrate deposits that have been observed in marine hydrate systems worldwide. In fine-grained sediments, methane hydrate is frequently observed in pores as well as in veins and fractures. One possible explanation is hydrate forms in pores and fluid pressure increases until fractures form. Fluid then flows through the fractures and forms hydrate-filled fractures. To study this, we ran 1-D numerical simulations with a prescribed flow rate of methane-charged fluid through a porous medium. As hydrate forms, pores are occluded and permeability is reduced, causing an increase in fluid pressure to maintain the constant flow rate. We assume that hydraulic fractures form when the fluid pressure reaches 90% of the overburden stress. Simulations of Blake Ridge (offshore South Carolina) indicate that fractures occur after 7.4 million years with a hydrate saturation (Sh) of 95% at the base of the methane hydrate stability zone (MHSZ). Simulations of Keathley Canyon (Gulf of Mexico) achieve the fracture criterion after 7.9 million years with Sh = 54% at the base of the MHSZ. Once fractures are formed they fill with hydrate after 15,000 years. Our results indicate that the time scale of pressure buildup assuming present-day fluxes is very long, and that lower-permeability sediments require lower hydrate saturations to reach the fracture criterion. However, once fractures form, they are filled with hydrate rapidly. This suggests that fractures may provide short-term migration pathways between higher-permeability layers, but also that additional research is needed to constrain

  8. Estimating fracture geometry in the naturally fractured Antrim Shale

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, C.W.; Frantz, J.H. Jr.; Hill, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    The Antrim Shale of the Michigan Basin has been an active gas play with over 3,500 wells drilled over the last 5 years. There is substantial evidence that the Antrim must be fracture stimulated to be economical and that two-stage treatments provide the best results. However, due to the shallow depths (500-2300 ft) and naturally fractured nature of the Antrim, fracture geometry is complex, and determination of optimal fracture treatments is not straight forward. Because historical field comparisons did not provide insight on the optimal fracture treatments, the Gas Research Institute (GRI) instituted a field-based project for the specific purpose of evaluating the geometry of hydraulic fractures in the Antrim. Open- and cased-hole tests were performed on two separate Antrim wells - a shallow producer (600 {+-} ft) and a deep producer (1550 {+-} ft). Open-hole testing and data collection consisted of in-situ stress and mechanical property testing with Halliburton`s THE{trademark} Tool (9 tests) and a detailed suite of geophysical logs including dipole sonic logs and natural fracture detection logs. Cased-hole testing consisted of pre- and post-fracture injection/falloff tests, minifracture treatments, multiple isotope tracer and tracer logs, and treating pressure and production data analysis. The shallow depths, low in-situ stresses, and extremely fractured nature of the Antrim probably results in the preferential opening of existing fractures instead of the creation of new fracture planes. As a result, the creation of multiple fractures and severe near wellbore tortuosity is likely. Therefore, the natural fractures are responsible for increased leakoff and will greatly impact created fracture geometry. The results also suggest that creating long propped hydraulic fractures in the Antrim is not likely due to the creation of multiple fractures.

  9. Treatment of Clavicle Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Paladini, P; Pellegrini, A; Merolla, G; Campi, F; Porcellini, G

    2012-01-01

    Summary Clavicle fractures are very common injuries in adults (2–5%) and children (10–15%) (1) and represent the 44–66% of all shoulder fractures (2). Despite the high frequency the choice of proper treatment is still a challenge for the orthopedic surgeon. With this review we wants to focus the attention on the basic epidemiology, anatomy, classification, evaluation and management of surgical treatments in relationship with the gravity of injuries. Both conservative and surgical management are possible, and surgeons must choose the most appropriate management modality according to the biologic age, functional demands, and type of lesion. We performed a review of the English literature thought PubMed to produce an evidence-based review of current concept and management of clavicle fracture. We finished taking a comparison with our survey in order to underline our direct experience. PMID:23905044

  10. Pediatric foot fractures.

    PubMed

    Ribbans, William J; Natarajan, Ramanathan; Alavala, Sairam

    2005-03-01

    Fractures of the foot in children usually have a good prognosis and generally are treated nonoperatively. Displaced fractures of the talus and calcaneus and tarsometatarsal dislocations are rare in children and their outcome is generally good in the younger child. Older adolescents with these injuries need treatment similar to how an adult would be treated for the same injury in order to achieve a good result. Foot fractures in children may pose a diagnostic challenge particularly in the absence of obvious radiographic changes. Repeated clinical examination and judicious use of imaging techniques such as isotope bone scans and magnetic resonance imaging are needed to establish a diagnosis. Knowledge of the anatomy and significance of accessory bones of the foot and disorders of the growing foot skeleton are helpful in managing injuries of child's foot. In this study, we review common injuries of a child's foot and include a discussion on differential diagnosis.

  11. DEM Particle Fracture Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Boning; Herbold, Eric B.; Homel, Michael A.; Regueiro, Richard A.

    2015-12-01

    An adaptive particle fracture model in poly-ellipsoidal Discrete Element Method is developed. The poly-ellipsoidal particle will break into several sub-poly-ellipsoids by Hoek-Brown fracture criterion based on continuum stress and the maximum tensile stress in contacts. Also Weibull theory is introduced to consider the statistics and size effects on particle strength. Finally, high strain-rate split Hopkinson pressure bar experiment of silica sand is simulated using this newly developed model. Comparisons with experiments show that our particle fracture model can capture the mechanical behavior of this experiment very well, both in stress-strain response and particle size redistribution. The effects of density and packings o the samples are also studied in numerical examples.

  12. Fracture of the cuboid.

    PubMed

    Borrelli, Joseph; De, Sayan; VanPelt, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Cuboid fracture accounts for a minority of all foot fractures in adults and often is indicative of a multiply injured foot. Understanding the normal anatomy and function of the cuboid and its relation to foot biomechanics is necessary for appropriate management. Clinical evaluation includes history, physical examination, and thorough assessment of the skin and soft tissues. Plain radiographs and CT are helpful in preoperative planning. Cuboid fractures may be managed either nonsurgically (splinting or casting) or surgically (closed reduction and external fixation or open reduction and internal fixation). Careful handling of the soft tissues is important, as is restoration of articular congruity, lateral column length, and a stable midfoot. Postoperative care consists of prolonged immobilization followed by 3 months of progressive weight bearing. Published reports of long-term outcomes and functional postoperative assessments are lacking. PMID:22751166

  13. Fracking, fracture, and permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcotte, D. L.; Norris, J.; Rundle, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    Injections of large volumes of water into tight shale reservoirs allows the extraction of oil and gas not previously accessible. This large volume 'super' fracking induces damage that allows the oil and/or gas to flow to an extraction well. The purpose of this paper is to provide a model for understanding super fracking. We assume that water is injected from a small spherical cavity into a homogeneous elastic medium. The high pressure of the injected water generates hoop stresses that reactivate natural fractures in the tight shales. These fractures migrate outward as water is added creating a spherical shell of damaged rock. The porosity associated with these fractures is equal to the water volume injected. We obtain an analytic expression for this volume. We apply our model to a typical tight shale reservoir and show that the predicted water volumes are in good agreement with the volumes used in super fracking.

  14. Semiautomatic fracture zone tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessel, Paul; Matthews, Kara J.; Müller, R. Dietmar; Mazzoni, Aline; Whittaker, Joanne M.; Myhill, Robert; Chandler, Michael T.

    2015-07-01

    Oceanic fracture zone traces are widely used in studies of seafloor morphology and plate kinematics. Satellite altimetry missions have resulted in high-resolution gravity maps in which all major fracture zones and other tectonic fabric can be identified, and numerous scientists have digitized such lineaments. We have initiated a community effort to maintain low-cost infrastructure that allows seafloor fabric lineaments to be stored, accessed, and updated. A key improvement over past efforts is our processing software (released as a GMT5 supplement) that allows for semiautomatic corrections to previously digitized fracture zone traces given improved gridded data sets. Here we report on our seafloor fabric processing tools, which complement our database of seafloor fabric lineations, magnetic anomaly identifications, and plate kinematic models.

  15. Talar neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Berlet, G C; Lee, T H; Massa, E G

    2001-01-01

    Clinical management of talar neck fractures is complex and fraught with complications. As Gaius Julius Caesar stated: "The die is cast"; often the outcome of a talar neck fracture is determined at the time of injury. The authors believe, however, that better results can be achieved by following some simple guidelines. The authors advocate prompt and precise anatomic surgical reduction, preferring the medial approach with secondary anterolateral approach. Preservation of blood supply can be achieved by a thorough understanding of vascular pathways and efforts to stay within appropriate surgical intervals. The authors advocate bone grafting of medial neck comminution (if present) to prevent varus malalignment and rigid internal fixation to allow for joint mobilization postoperatively. These guidelines may seem simple, but when dealing with the complexity of talar neck fractures, the foot and ankle surgeon needs to focus and rely on easily grasped concepts to reduce poor outcomes. PMID:11465133

  16. Close up view of the Orbiter Discovery in the Orbiter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close up view of the Orbiter Discovery in the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center. The view is a detail of the aft, starboard landing gear and a general view of the Thermal Protection System tiles around the landing-gear housing. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  17. Helioseismology with Solar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löptien, Björn; Birch, Aaron C.; Gizon, Laurent; Schou, Jesper; Appourchaux, Thierry; Blanco Rodríguez, Julián; Cally, Paul S.; Dominguez-Tagle, Carlos; Gandorfer, Achim; Hill, Frank; Hirzberger, Johann; Scherrer, Philip H.; Solanki, Sami K.

    2015-12-01

    The Solar Orbiter mission, to be launched in July 2017, will carry a suite of remote sensing and in-situ instruments, including the Polarimetric and Helioseismic Imager (PHI). PHI will deliver high-cadence images of the Sun in intensity and Doppler velocity suitable for carrying out novel helioseismic studies. The orbit of the Solar Orbiter spacecraft will reach a solar latitude of up to 21∘ (up to 34∘ by the end of the extended mission) and thus will enable the first local helioseismology studies of the polar regions. Here we consider an array of science objectives to be addressed by helioseismology within the baseline telemetry allocation (51 Gbit per orbit, current baseline) and within the science observing windows (baseline 3×10 days per orbit). A particularly important objective is the measurement of large-scale flows at high latitudes (rotation and meridional flow), which are largely unknown but play an important role in flux transport dynamos. For both helioseismology and feature tracking methods convection is a source of noise in the measurement of longitudinally averaged large-scale flows, which decreases as T -1/2 where T is the total duration of the observations. Therefore, the detection of small amplitude signals (e.g., meridional circulation, flows in the deep solar interior) requires long observation times. As an example, one hundred days of observations at lower spatial resolution would provide a noise level of about three m/s on the meridional flow at 80∘ latitude. Longer time-series are also needed to study temporal variations with the solar cycle. The full range of Earth-Sun-spacecraft angles provided by the orbit will enable helioseismology from two vantage points by combining PHI with another instrument: stereoscopic helioseismology will allow the study of the deep solar interior and a better understanding of the physics of solar oscillations in both quiet Sun and sunspots. We have used a model of the PHI instrument to study its

  18. SPECS: Orbital debris removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The debris problem has reached a stage at which the risk to satellites and spacecraft has become substantial in low Earth orbit (LEO). This research discovered that small particles posed little threat to spacecraft because shielding can effectively prevent these particles from damaging the spacecraft. The research also showed that, even though collision with a large piece of debris could destroy the spacecraft, the large pieces of debris pose little danger because they can be tracked and the spacecraft can be maneuvered away from these pieces. Additionally, there are many current designs to capture and remove large debris particles from the space environment. From this analysis, it was decided to concentrate on the removal of medium-sized orbital debris, that is, those pieces ranging from 1 cm to 50 cm in size. The current design incorporates a transfer vehicle and a netting vehicle to capture the medium-sized debris. The system is based near an operational space station located at 28.5 deg inclination and 400 km altitude. The system uses ground-based tracking to determine the location of a satellite breakup or debris cloud. These data are uploaded to the transfer vehicle, which proceeds to rendezvous with the debris at a lower altitude parking orbit. Next, the netting vehicle is deployed, tracks the targeted debris, and captures it. After expending the available nets, the netting vehicle returns to the transfer vehicle for a new netting module and continues to capture more debris in the target area. Once all the netting modules are expended, the transfer vehicle returns to the space station's orbit where it is resupplied with new netting modules from a space shuttle load. The new modules are launched by the shuttle from the ground and the expended modules are taken back to Earth for removal of the captured debris, refueling, and repacking of the nets. Once the netting modules are refurbished, they are taken back into orbit for reuse. In a typical mission, the

  19. SPECS: Orbital debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The debris problem has reached a stage at which the risk to satellites and spacecraft has become substantial in low Earth orbit (LEO). This research discovered that small particles posed little threat to spacecraft because shielding can effectively prevent these particles from damaging the spacecraft. The research also showed that, even though collision with a large piece of debris could destroy the spacecraft, the large pieces of debris pose little danger because they can be tracked and the spacecraft can be maneuvered away from these pieces. Additionally, there are many current designs to capture and remove large debris particles from the space environment. From this analysis, it was decided to concentrate on the removal of medium-sized orbital debris, that is, those pieces ranging from 1 cm to 50 cm in size. The current design incorporates a transfer vehicle and a netting vehicle to capture the medium-sized debris. The system is based near an operational space station located at 28.5 deg inclination and 400 km altitude. The system uses ground-based tracking to determine the location of a satellite breakup or debris cloud. These data are uploaded to the transfer vehicle, which proceeds to rendezvous with the debris at a lower altitude parking orbit. Next, the netting vehicle is deployed, tracks the targeted debris, and captures it. After expending the available nets, the netting vehicle returns to the transfer vehicle for a new netting module and continues to capture more debris in the target area. Once all the netting modules are expended, the transfer vehicle returns to the space station's orbit where it is resupplied with new netting modules from a space shuttle load. The new modules are launched by the shuttle from the ground and the expended modules are taken back to Earth for removal of the captured debris, refueling, and repacking of the nets. Once the netting modules are refurbished, they are taken back into orbit for reuse. In a typical mission, the

  20. [Supracondylar fractures in children].

    PubMed

    Petrov, N; Gucev, S; Kirkov, Lj; Dajljevik, S; Ruso, B

    1982-01-01

    In the Department of Pediatric surgery, during the last ten years, 190 patients with supracondylar fractures (second and third degree, according to Bauman's classification) have been treated. The operation was performed in only 5% of all hospitalized cases. There were only one patient with neurological and vascular complications in the early stage, but without any complications in the late stage. The presented cases showed a high percentage of flexion type of fractures. The conservative treatment by a reposition has given the most satisfactory results.

  1. Complications of mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Zweig, Barry E

    2009-03-01

    Before any definitive treatment of mandibular fractures, the patient needs to be evaluated for more potentially life-threatening injuries. Complications can and do occur with treatment of mandibular fractures and can occur during any of the phases of treatment. The development of an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan is vital in achieving optimal success and decreasing complications. Knowledge of the anatomy and the principles of bone healing is also an important factor in preventing complications. To limit long-term untoward effects, complications should be recognized early and the appropriate treatment should be started before a minor complication becomes a complex one that is more difficult to manage.

  2. Fractured Petroleum Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Firoozabadi, Dr. Abbas

    2000-01-18

    In this report the results of experiments of water injection in fractured porous media comprising a number of water-wet matrix blocks are reported for the first time. The blocks experience an advancing fracture-water level (FWL). Immersion-type experiments are performed for comparison; the dominant recovery mechanism changed from co-current to counter-current imbibition when the boundary conditions changed from advancing FWL to immersion-type. Single block experiments of co-current and counter-current imbibition was performed and co-current imbibition leads to more efficient recovery was found.

  3. Bone fracture repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The three main treatment options for bone fractures are: Casting Open reduction, and internal fixation- this involves a surgery to repair the fracture-frequently, metal rods, screws or plates are used to repair the ...

  4. Fracture After Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... er Total Hip Replacement cont. • Dislocation • Limb length inequality • Poor fracture healing • Repeat fracture • Lack of in- ... Surgeons (AAOS). To learn more about your orthopaedic health, please visit orthoinfo.org. Page ( 5 ) AAOS does ...

  5. Distal Radius Fracture (Broken Wrist)

    MedlinePlus

    ... choice depends on many factors, such as the nature of the fracture, your age and activity level, ... causing the cast to loosen. Depending on the nature of the fracture, your doctor may closely monitor ...

  6. Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2008-01-01

    A new approach is described for evaluating fracture in composite structures. This approach is independent of classical fracture mechanics parameters like fracture toughness. It relies on computational simulation and is programmed in a stand-alone integrated computer code. It is multiscale, multifunctional because it includes composite mechanics for the composite behavior and finite element analysis for predicting the structural response. It contains seven modules; layered composite mechanics (micro, macro, laminate), finite element, updating scheme, local fracture, global fracture, stress based failure modes, and fracture progression. The computer code is called CODSTRAN (Composite Durability Structural ANalysis). It is used in the present paper to evaluate the global fracture of four composite shell problems and one composite built-up structure. Results show that the composite shells and the built-up composite structure global fracture are enhanced when internal pressure is combined with shear loads.

  7. Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain More than 40 million people in the United States have osteoporosis (a decrease in the amount ...

  8. LRO Enters Lunar Orbit (Highlights)

    NASA Video Gallery

    After a four and a half day journey from the Earth, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, successfully entered orbit around the moon. Engineers at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbel...

  9. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission Highlights

    NASA Video Gallery

    Since launch on June 18, 2009 as a precursor mission, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has remained in orbit around the moon, collecting vast amounts of science data in support of NASA's expl...

  10. The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Hendrix, M. K.; Fox, J. C.; Thomas, D. J.; Nicholson, J.

    The hardware and software of NASA's proposed Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) are described. The OARE is to provide aerodynamic acceleration measurements along the Orbiter's principal axis in the free-molecular flow-flight regime at orbital attitude and in the transition regime during reentry. Models considering the effects of electromagnetic effects, solar radiation pressure, orbiter mass attraction, gravity gradient, orbital centripetal acceleration, out-of-orbital-plane effects, orbiter angular velocity, structural noise, mass expulsion signal sources, crew motion, and bias on acceleration are examined. The experiment contains an electrostatically balanced cylindrical proofmass accelerometer sensor with three orthogonal sensing axis outputs. The components and functions of the experimental calibration system and signal processor and control subsystem are analyzed. The development of the OARE software is discussed. The experimental equipment will be enclosed in a cover assembly that will be mounted in the Orbiter close to the center of gravity.

  11. The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Hendrix, M. K.; Fox, J. C.; Thomas, D. J.; Nicholson, J.

    1986-01-01

    The hardware and software of NASA's proposed Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) are described. The OARE is to provide aerodynamic acceleration measurements along the Orbiter's principal axis in the free-molecular flow-flight regime at orbital attitude and in the transition regime during reentry. Models considering the effects of electromagnetic effects, solar radiation pressure, orbiter mass attraction, gravity gradient, orbital centripetal acceleration, out-of-orbital-plane effects, orbiter angular velocity, structural noise, mass expulsion signal sources, crew motion, and bias on acceleration are examined. The experiment contains an electrostatically balanced cylindrical proofmass accelerometer sensor with three orthogonal sensing axis outputs. The components and functions of the experimental calibration system and signal processor and control subsystem are analyzed. The development of the OARE software is discussed. The experimental equipment will be enclosed in a cover assembly that will be mounted in the Orbiter close to the center of gravity.

  12. Orbitals and orbital energies in DFT and TDDFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baerends, Evert Jan

    The status and meaning of orbitals and orbital energies in the Kohn-Sham one-electron model of DFT has been controversial, in contrast to Hartree-Fock orbitals and orbital energies. We will argue the opposite: the exact Kohn-Sham orbitals of DFT are ''better'' than HF orbitals and their orbital energies are much closer to ionization energies than HF orbital energies are. This follows from the relation between the KS potential and the wavefunction, which can be cast in the form vs =vc , kin +vH +vxchole +vresp, where each term depends on the KS orbitals and the wavefunction (the one- or two-particle density matrices). The response potential vresp (r) = ∑ j ∞|/dj(r) | 2 ρ (r) Ij - ∑ i H|/ψs , i(r) | 2 ρ (r) (-ɛi) (dj is the Dyson orbital corresponding to ion state ΨjN - 1 , ψs , i is a Kohn-Sham orbital) enables the connection between ionization energies Ii and orbital energies ɛi to be made. For virtual orbitals and orbital energies similar statements can be made: the shapes and energies of the (exact) KS orbitals are much more realistic than those of the Hartree-Fock model or hybrid functionals. The HOMO-LUMO gap in molecules is very close to the optical gap, and very different from the fundamental gap. In solids the situation is very different, which is the well-known ''KS gap problem''. Again the response potential vresp (a good approximation to it) helps to solve this problem, affording a straigtforward correction method of the KS gap to the fundamental gap.

  13. Correlation of Hip Fracture with Other Fracture Types: Toward a Rational Composite Hip Fracture Endpoint

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen; Pieper, Carl F.; Grubber, Janet; Van Scoyoc, Lynn; Schnell, Merritt L; Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Pearson, Megan; Lafleur, Joanne; Lyles, Kenneth W.; Adler, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose With ethical requirements to the enrollment of lower risk subjects, osteoporosis trials are underpowered to detect reduction in hip fractures. Different skeletal sites have different levels of fracture risk and response to treatment. We sought to identify fracture sites which cluster with hip fracture at higher than expected frequency; if these sites respond to treatment similarly, then a composite fracture endpoint could provide a better estimate of hip fracture reduction. Methods Cohort study using Veterans Affairs and Medicare administrative data. Male Veterans (n=5,036,536) aged 50-99 years receiving VA primary care between1999-2009 were included. Fractures were ascertained using ICD9 and CPT codes and classified by skeletal site. Pearson correlation coefficients, logistic regression and kappa statistics, were used to describe the correlation between each fracture type and hip fracture within individuals, without regards to the timing of the events. Results 595,579 (11.8%) men suffered 1 or more fractures and 179,597 (3.6%) suffered 2 or more fractures during the time under study. Of those with one or more fractures, rib was the most common site (29%), followed by spine (22%), hip (21%) and femur (20%). The fracture types most highly correlated with hip fracture were pelvic/acetabular (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.25, p<0.0001), femur (0.15, p<0.0001), and shoulder (0.11, p<0.0001). Conclusions Pelvic, acetabular, femur, and shoulder fractures cluster with hip fractures within individuals at greater than expected frequency. If we observe similar treatment risk reductions within that cluster, subsequent trials could consider use of a composite endpoint to better estimate hip fracture risk. PMID:26151123

  14. Mercury orbiter transport study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedlander, A. L.; Feingold, H.

    1977-01-01

    A data base and comparative performance analyses of alternative flight mode options for delivering a range of payload masses to Mercury orbit are provided. Launch opportunities over the period 1980-2000 are considered. Extensive data trades are developed for the ballistic flight mode option utilizing one or more swingbys of Venus. Advanced transport options studied include solar electric propulsion and solar sailing. Results show the significant performance tradeoffs among such key parameters as trip time, payload mass, propulsion system mass, orbit size, launch year sensitivity and relative cost-effectiveness. Handbook-type presentation formats, particularly in the case of ballistic mode data, provide planetary program planners with an easily used source of reference information essential in the preliminary steps of mission selection and planning.

  15. Constant attitude orbit transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cress, Peter; Evans, Michael

    A two-impulse orbital transfer technique is described in which the spacecraft attitude remains constant for both burns, eliminating the need for attitude maneuvers between the burns. This can lead to significant savings in vehicle weight, cost and complexity. Analysis is provided for a restricted class of applications of this transfer between circular orbits. For those transfers with a plane change less than 30 deg, the total velocity cost of the maneuver is less than twelve percent greater than that of an optimum plane split Hohmann transfer. While this maneuver does not minimize velocity requirement, it does provide a means of achieving necessary transfer while substantially reducing the cost and complexity of the spacecraft.

  16. Osteoporotic Hip and Spine Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Hip and spine fractures represent just a portion of the burden of osteoporosis; however, these fractures require treatment and often represent a major change in lifestyle for the patient and their family. The orthopedic surgeon plays a crucial role, not only in the treatment of these injuries but also providing guidance in prevention of future osteoporotic fractures. This review provides a brief epidemiology of the fractures, details the surgical techniques, and outlines the current treatment guidelines for orthopedic surgeons. PMID:26246944

  17. Clinical consequences of vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Ross, P D

    1997-08-18

    People with vertebral fractures have greater pain, disability, and healthcare utilization, on average, than those without fractures. Most studies of acute pain and disability have been limited to patients with clinically diagnosed fractures (a subset of all symptomatic patients), representing about one third of all patients with fractures identified radiographically. Acute symptoms vary widely. Some patients experience intolerable pain that can be completely debilitating for several weeks or months, whereas about half of all patients with radiographically identified fractures report having had no symptoms. The reasons for this variability are unknown. Chronic pain and disability among patients with vertebral fractures are significantly greater on average than among people without fractures, even after adjusting for comorbid conditions that are common among the elderly. Similar to acute symptoms, chronic symptoms vary widely and often persist for at least several years. The risk of pain and disability increases progressively with the number and severity of vertebral deformities: the risk is multiplied several times with each additional fracture. On average, physical function is impaired among people with vertebral fractures, whether or not they currently report back pain. Declines in physical function and changes in appearance contribute to social isolation and loss of self-esteem, impairing quality of life. The cumulative impact of vertebral fractures on quality of life may rival that of hip fractures because hip fractures are less frequent and occur later in life. As many as 40% of symptomatic vertebral fractures are initially misdiagnosed, signaling a need for greater awareness among physicians and patients. Prevention of initial vertebral fractures should be actively encouraged; even if the initial fracture is asymptomatic, it indicates a greatly increased risk of subsequent fractures, pain, and physical impairment. PMID:9302895

  18. Talar fractures: three case studies.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, A L; Morgan, J H

    2001-09-01

    Three case studies of fractures are presented that demonstrate the potential morbidity that these injuries can cause as well as the acceptable outcomes if treated appropriately. Two of the cases are talar fracture dislocations; the third is an osteochondral fracture of the talus. The importance of early treatment with open reduction and internal fixation is demonstrated. Success following surgical intervention in a nonhealed osteochondral fracture of the talus is also demonstrated.

  19. Numerical Modeling of Fracture Propagation in Naturally Fractured Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Prodanovic, M.; Olson, J. E.; Schultz, R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing consists of injecting fluid at high pressure and high flowrate to the wellbore for the purpose of enhancing production by generating a complex fracture network. Both tensile failure and shear failure occur during the hydraulic fracturing treatment. The shear event can be caused by slip on existing weak planes such as faults or natural fractures. From core observation, partially cemented and fully cemented opening mode natural fractures, often with considerable thickness are widely present. Hydraulic fractures can propagate either within the natural fracture (tensile failure) or along the interface between the natural fracture and the rock matrix (tensile/shear failure), depending on the relative strength of cement and rock matrix materials, the bonding strength of interface, as well as the presence of any heterogeneities. In this study, we evaluate the fracture propagation both experimentally and numerically. We embed one or multiple inclusions of different mechanical properties within synthetic hydrostone samples in order to mimic cemented natural fractures and rock. A semi-circular bending test is performed for each set of properties. A finite element model built with ABAQUS is used to mimic the semi-circular bending test and study the fracture propagation path, as well as the matrix-inclusion bonding interface status. Mechanical properties required for the numerical model are measured experimentally. The results indicate that the match between experiment and modeling fracture path are extremely sensitive to the chosen interface (bonding) model and related parameters. The semi-circular bending test is dry and easily conducted, providing a good platform for validating numerical approaches. A validated numerical model will enable us to add pressurized fluid within the crack and simulate hydraulic fracture-natural fracture interaction in the reservoir conditions, ultimately providing insights into the extent of the fracture network.

  20. Small Mercury Relativity Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, Peter L.; Vincent, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    The accuracy of solar system tests of gravitational theory could be very much improved by range and Doppler measurements to a Small Mercury Relativity Orbiter. A nearly circular orbit at roughly 2400 km altitude is assumed in order to minimize problems with orbit determination and thermal radiation from the surface. The spacecraft is spin-stabilized and has a 30 cm diameter de-spun antenna. With K-band and X-band ranging systems using a 50 MHz offset sidetone at K-band, a range accuracy of 3 cm appears to be realistically achievable. The estimated spacecraft mass is 50 kg. A consider-covariance analysis was performed to determine how well the Earth-Mercury distance as a function of time could be determined with such a Relativity Orbiter. The minimum data set is assumed to be 40 independent 8-hour arcs of tracking data at selected times during a two year period. The gravity field of Mercury up through degree and order 10 is solved for, along with the initial conditions for each arc and the Earth-Mercury distance at the center of each arc. The considered parameters include the gravity field parameters of degree 11 and 12 plus the tracking station coordinates, the tropospheric delay, and two parameters in a crude radiation pressure model. The conclusion is that the Earth-Mercury distance can be determined to 6 cm accuracy or better. From a modified worst-case analysis, this would lead to roughly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in the knowledge of the precession of perihelion, the relativistic time delay, and the possible change in the gravitational constant with time.

  1. Spatial orbital tether constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, A. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of shape-retaining spatial tether configurations in a circular Keplerian orbit. Sufficient conditions of shape retention are described, which are imposed on the geometry of the structure, distribution of mass in the nodes, and parameters of rotation. The paper also mentions classes of structures with different properties of symmetry and motion, as well as specific examples of shaperetaining structures.

  2. 'Spider' in Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    View of the Apollo 9 Lunar Module 'Spider' in a lunar landing configuration photographed by Command Module pilot David Scott inside the Command/Service Module 'Gumdrop' on the fifth day of the Apollo 9 earth-orbital mission. The landing gear on 'Spider' has been deployed. lunar surface probes (sensors) extend out from the landing gear foot pads. Inside the 'Spider' were astronauts James A. McDivitt, Apollo 9 Commander; and Russell L. Schweickart, Lunar Module pilot.

  3. Spectrophotovoltaic orbital power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onffroy, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibilty of a spectrophotovoltaic orbital power generation system that optically concentrates solar energy is demonstrated. A dichroic beam-splitting mirror is used to divide the solar spectrum into two wavebands. Absorption of these wavebands by GaAs and Si solar cell arrays with matched energy bandgaps increases the cell efficiency while decreasing the amount of heat that must be rejected. The projected cost per peak watt if this system is $2.50/W sub p.

  4. Evaluation of the spatial distribution, in percent coverage of the oil spilled during the Trecate blow-out, based on the analysis of airborne hyperspectral MIVIS data

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, R.; Cavalli, R.M.; Marino, C.M.

    1996-07-01

    On February 1994 a large area close to the Trecate town has been interested by an oil blow-out from an AGIP rig located within the Ticino Regional Park. One month later an airborne survey has been carried out in the framework of the CNR Lara Project, by utilizing the Daedalus AA5000 MIVIS spectrometer with 102 channels from Visible to Thermal Infrared. Different authors stress, for oil slicks discrimination, the utility of laser and microwaves based techniques, but the high spatial and spectral MIVIS resolutions can improve the detection of the relative coverage by spilled oil. This task has been performed by applying hyperspectral unmixing methods to the MIVIS calibrated data, obtaining an oil fractional image with respect to other chosen end-members. The analysis has shown a good agreement between the results of the unconstrained unmixing technique applied to MIVIS data and the ground truths, offering a tool useful to quantify in a synoptic overview the effects of oil spills over land, by relating the ppm of oil with the oil hyperspectral information gathered by MIVIS.

  5. Circular-Orbit Maintenance Strategies for Primitive Body Orbiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Mark S.; Broschart, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    For missions to smaller primitive bodies, solar radiation pressure (SRP) is a significant perturbation to Keplerian dynamics. For most orbits, SRP drives large oscillations in orbit eccentricity, which leads to large perturbations from the irregular gravity field at periapsis. Ultimately, chaotic motion results that often escapes or impacts that body. This paper presents an orbit maintenance strategy to keep the orbit eccentricity small, thus avoiding the destabilizing secondary interaction with the gravity field. An estimate of the frequency and magnitude of the required maneuvers as a function of the orbit and body parameters is derived from the analytic perturbation equations.

  6. An Orbit Plan toward AKATSUKI Venus Reencounter and Orbit Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawakatsu, Yasuhiro; Campagnola, Stefano; Hirose, Chikako; Ishii, Nobuaki

    2012-01-01

    On December 7, 2010, AKATSUKI, the Japanese Venus explorer reached its destination and tried to inject itself into Venus orbit. However, due to a malfunction of the propulsion system, the maneuver was interrupted and AKATSUKI again escaped out from the Venus into an interplanetary orbit. Telemetry data from AKATSUKI suggests the possibility to perform orbit maneuvers to reencounter the Venus and retry Venus orbit injection. Reported in this paper is an orbit plan investigated under this situation. The latest results reflecting the maneuvers conducted in the autumn 2011 is introduced as well.

  7. Radiation Propulsion For Maintaining Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Brief report proposes radiative propulsion systems for maintaining precise orbits of spacecraft. Radiation from electrical heaters directed outward by paraboloidal reflectors to produce small forces to oppose uncontrolled drag and solar-radiative forces perturbing orbits. Minimizes or eliminates need to fire rocket thrusters to correct orbits.

  8. Orbiter KU-band transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halterman, R.

    1976-01-01

    The design, build, and test of an engineering breadboard Ku band quadraphase shift keyed and wideband frequency modulated transmitter are described. This orbiter Ku band transmitter drawer is to simulate the orbiter transmitter and meet the functional requirements of the orbiter communication link.

  9. What is a MISR orbit?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    ... platform that carries MISR and other scientific instruments flies at an altitude of 705 km above sea level on a sun-synchronous orbit. It ... completes an orbit and initiates the next one, it actually flies over quite different regions. The orbit number thus also indicates the ...

  10. Orbiter Autoland reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, D. Phillip

    1993-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter is the only space reentry vehicle in which the crew is seated upright. This position presents some physiological effects requiring countermeasures to prevent a crewmember from becoming incapacitated. This also introduces a potential need for automated vehicle landing capability. Autoland is a primary procedure that was identified as a requirement for landing following and extended duration orbiter mission. This report documents the results of the reliability analysis performed on the hardware required for an automated landing. A reliability block diagram was used to evaluate system reliability. The analysis considers the manual and automated landing modes currently available on the Orbiter. (Autoland is presently a backup system only.) Results of this study indicate a +/- 36 percent probability of successfully extending a nominal mission to 30 days. Enough variations were evaluated to verify that the reliability could be altered with missions planning and procedures. If the crew is modeled as being fully capable after 30 days, the probability of a successful manual landing is comparable to that of Autoland because much of the hardware is used for both manual and automated landing modes. The analysis indicates that the reliability for the manual mode is limited by the hardware and depends greatly on crew capability. Crew capability for a successful landing after 30 days has not been determined yet.

  11. Management of osteoporotic vertebral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Dionyssiotis, Yannis

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporotic vertebral fractures are associated with considerable reduction of quality of life, morbidity, and mortality. The management of patients with vertebral fractures should include treatment for osteoporosis and measures to reduce pain and improve mobility. This article provides information for management and rehabilitation of vertebral fractures based on clinical experience and literature. PMID:20689689

  12. Frozen Orbital Plane Solutions for Satellites in Nearly Circular Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulivieri, Carlo; Circi, Christian; Ortore, Emiliano; Bunkheila, Federico; Todino, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    This paper deals with the determination of the initial conditions (right ascension of the ascending node and inclination) that minimize the orbital plane variation for nearly circular orbits with a semimajor axis between 3 and 10 Earth radii. An analysis of two-line elements over the last 40 years for mid-, geostationary-, and high-Earth orbits has shown, for initially quasi-circular orbits, low eccentricity variations up to the geostationary altitude. This result makes the application of mathematical models based on satellite circular orbits advantageous for a fast prediction of long-term temporal evolution of the orbital plane. To this purpose, a previous model considering the combined effect due to the Earth's oblateness, moon, and sun (both in circular orbit) has been improved in terms of required computational time and accuracy. The eccentricity of the sun and moon and the equinoctial precession have been taken into account. Resonance phenomena with the lunar plane motion have been found in mid-Earth orbit. Dynamical properties concerning the precession motions of the orbital pole have been investigated, and frozen solutions for geosynchronous and navigation satellites have been proposed. Finally, an accurate model validation has also been carried out by comparing the obtained results with two-line elements of abandoned geostationary-Earth orbit and mid-Earth orbit satellites.

  13. Injection through fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    Tracer tests are conducted in geothermal reservoirs as an aid in forecasting thermal breakthrough of reinjection water. To interpret tracer tests, mathematical models have been developed based on the various transport mechanisms in these highly fractured reservoirs. These tracer flow models have been applied to interpret field tests. The resulting matches between the model and field data were excellent and the model parameters were used to estimate reservoir properties. However, model fitting is an indirect process and the model's ability to estimate reservoir properties cannot be judged solely on the quality of the match between field data and model predictions. The model's accuracy in determining reservoir characteristics must be independently verified in a closely controlled environment. In this study, the closely controlled laboratory environment was chosen to test the validity and accuracy of tracer flow models developed specifically for flow in fractured rocks. The laboratory tracer tests were performed by flowing potassium iodide (KI) through artificially fractured core samples. The tracer test results were then analyzed with several models to determine which best fit the measured data. A Matrix Diffusion model was found to provide the best match of the tracer experiments. The core properties, as estimated by the Matrix Diffusion model parameters generated from the indirect matching process, were then determined. These calculated core parameters were compared to the measured core properties and were found to be in agreement. This verifies the use of the Matrix Diffusion flow model in estimating fracture widths from tracer tests.

  14. Hip fracture surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... thigh bone. The thigh bone is called the femur. It is part of the hip joint. Hip pain is a related topic. ... to 4 hours. If you have an intertrochanteric fracture (the area below the femur neck), your surgeon will use a special metal ...

  15. Femur fracture repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery, your surgeon will make a cut to open your fracture. Your surgeon will then use special metal devices to hold your bones in place while they heal. These devices are called ... is open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). In the most ...

  16. Fracture design modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Crichlow, H.B.; Crichlow, H.B.

    1980-02-07

    A design tool is discussed whereby the various components that enter the design process of a hydraulic fracturing job are combined to provide a realistic appraisal of a stimulation job in the field. An interactive computer model is used to solve the problem numerically to obtain the effects of various parameters on the overall behavior of the system.

  17. Infiltration into Fractured Bedrock

    SciTech Connect

    Salve, Rohit; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Jones, Robert

    2007-09-01

    One potential consequence of global climate change and rapid changes in land use is an increased risk of flooding. Proper understanding of floodwater infiltration thus becomes a crucial component of our preparedness to meet the environmental challenges of projected climate change. In this paper, we present the results of a long-term infiltration experiment performed on fractured ash flow tuff. Water was released from a 3 x 4 m{sup 2} infiltration plot (divided into 12 square subplots) with a head of {approx}0.04 m, over a period of {approx}800 days. This experiment revealed peculiar infiltration patterns not amenable to current infiltration models, which were originally developed for infiltration into soils over a short duration. In particular, we observed that in part of the infiltration plot, the infiltration rate abruptly increased a few weeks into the infiltration tests. We suggest that these anomalies result from increases in fracture permeability during infiltration, which may be caused by swelling of clay fillings and/or erosion of infill debris. Interaction of the infiltration water with subsurface natural cavities (lithophysal cavities) could also contribute to such anomalies. This paper provides a conceptual model that partly describes the observed infiltration patterns in fractured rock and highlights some of the pitfalls associated with direct extension of soil infiltration models to fractured rock over a long period.

  18. Statistical Physics of Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Alava, Mikko; Nukala, Phani K; Zapperi, Stefano

    2006-05-01

    Disorder and long-range interactions are two of the key components that make material failure an interesting playfield for the application of statistical mechanics. The cornerstone in this respect has been lattice models of the fracture in which a network of elastic beams, bonds, or electrical fuses with random failure thresholds are subject to an increasing external load. These models describe on a qualitative level the failure processes of real, brittle, or quasi-brittle materials. This has been particularly important in solving the classical engineering problems of material strength: the size dependence of maximum stress and its sample-to-sample statistical fluctuations. At the same time, lattice models pose many new fundamental questions in statistical physics, such as the relation between fracture and phase transitions. Experimental results point out to the existence of an intriguing crackling noise in the acoustic emission and of self-affine fractals in the crack surface morphology. Recent advances in computer power have enabled considerable progress in the understanding of such models. Among these partly still controversial issues, are the scaling and size-effects in material strength and accumulated damage, the statistics of avalanches or bursts of microfailures, and the morphology of the crack surface. Here we present an overview of the results obtained with lattice models for fracture, highlighting the relations with statistical physics theories and more conventional fracture mechanics approaches.

  19. Bipartite patella fracture.

    PubMed

    Canizares, George H; Selesnick, F Harlan

    2003-02-01

    Bipartite patella fracture is an uncommon injury that has rarely been described in the literature. It can be quite debilitating in the competitive athlete and is often overlooked by the treating physician. A bone scan can be helpful in confirming the diagnosis, and appropriate treatment often results in a successful outcome.

  20. Dorsal radiocarpal fracture dislocation.

    PubMed

    Tanzer, T L; Horne, J G

    1980-11-01

    A case of a rare radiocarpal fracture dislocation in a 17-year-old girl, with persisting loss of radiocarpal joint space following reduction under hematoma block, is described. The wrist joint was exposed, and two osteochondral fragments were rotated 90 degrees and secured with 2.7-mm AO screws. Satisfactory healing followed 3 months postinjury.

  1. Entablature: fracture types and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, A. E. S.; Blake, S.; Tuffen, H.

    2014-05-01

    Entablature is the term used to describe zones or tiers of irregular jointing in basaltic lava flows. It is thought to form when water from rivers dammed by the lava inundates the lava flow surface, and during lava-meltwater interaction in subglacial settings. A number of different fracture types are described in entablature outcrops from the Búrfell lava and older lava flows in Þjórsárdalur, southwest Iceland. These are: striae-bearing, column-bounding fractures and pseudopillow fracture systems that themselves consist of two different fracture types—master fractures with dimpled surface textures and subsidiary fractures with curved striae. The interaction of pseudopillow fracture systems and columnar jointing in the entablature produces the chevron fracture patterns that are commonly observed in entablature. Cube-jointing is a more densely fractured version of entablature, which likely forms when more coolant enters the hot lava. The entablature tiers display closely spaced striae and dendritic crystal shapes which indicate rapid cooling. Master fracture surfaces show a thin band with an evolved composition at the fracture surface; mineral textures in this band also show evidence of quenching of this material. This is interpreted as gas-driven filter pressing of late-stage residual melt that is drawn into an area of low pressure immediately preceding or during master fracture formation by ductile extensional fracture of hot, partially crystallised lava. This melt is then quenched by an influx of water and/or steam when the master fracture fully opens. Our findings suggest that master fractures are the main conduit for coolant entering the lava flow during entablature formation.

  2. The Role of Resorbable Plate and Artificial Bone Substitute in Reconstruction of Large Orbital Floor Defect

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ho; Kim, Ho Jun; Jeong, Yeon Jin; Jung, Sung-No

    2016-01-01

    It is essential to reduce and reconstruct bony defects adequately in large orbital floor fracture and defect. Among many reconstructive methods, alloplastic materials have attracted attention because of their safety and ease of use. We have used resorbable plates combined with artificial bone substitutes in large orbital floor defect reconstructions and have evaluated their long-term reliability compared with porous polyethylene plate. A total of 147 patients with traumatic orbital floor fracture were included in the study. Surgical results were evaluated by clinical evaluations, exophthalmometry, and computed tomography at least 12 months postoperatively. Both orbital floor height discrepancy and orbital volume change were calculated and compared with preoperative CT findings. The average volume discrepancy and vertical height discrepancies were not different between two groups. Also, exophthalmometric measurements were not significantly different between the two groups. No significant postoperative complication including permanent diplopia, proptosis, and enophthalmos was noted. Use of a resorbable plate with an artificial bone substitute to repair orbital floor defects larger than 2.5 cm2 in size yielded long-lasting, effective reconstruction without significant complications. We therefore propose our approach as an effective alternative method for large orbital floor reconstructions. PMID:27517041

  3. The Role of Resorbable Plate and Artificial Bone Substitute in Reconstruction of Large Orbital Floor Defect.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ho; Kim, Ho Jun; Seo, Bommie F; Jeong, Yeon Jin; Jung, Sung-No; Shim, Hyung-Sup

    2016-01-01

    It is essential to reduce and reconstruct bony defects adequately in large orbital floor fracture and defect. Among many reconstructive methods, alloplastic materials have attracted attention because of their safety and ease of use. We have used resorbable plates combined with artificial bone substitutes in large orbital floor defect reconstructions and have evaluated their long-term reliability compared with porous polyethylene plate. A total of 147 patients with traumatic orbital floor fracture were included in the study. Surgical results were evaluated by clinical evaluations, exophthalmometry, and computed tomography at least 12 months postoperatively. Both orbital floor height discrepancy and orbital volume change were calculated and compared with preoperative CT findings. The average volume discrepancy and vertical height discrepancies were not different between two groups. Also, exophthalmometric measurements were not significantly different between the two groups. No significant postoperative complication including permanent diplopia, proptosis, and enophthalmos was noted. Use of a resorbable plate with an artificial bone substitute to repair orbital floor defects larger than 2.5 cm(2) in size yielded long-lasting, effective reconstruction without significant complications. We therefore propose our approach as an effective alternative method for large orbital floor reconstructions. PMID:27517041

  4. Global Orbit Feedback in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Minty, M.; Hulsart, R.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Ptitsyn, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Satogata, T.

    2010-05-23

    For improved reproducibility of good operating conditions and ramp commissioning efficiency, new dual-plane slow orbit feedback during the energy ramp was implemented during run-10 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The orbit feedback is based on steering the measured orbit, after subtraction of the dispersive component, to either a design orbit or to a previously saved reference orbit. Using multiple correctors and beam position monitors, an SVD-based algorithm is used for determination of the applied corrections. The online model is used as a basis for matrix computations. In this report we describe the feedback design, review the changes made to realize its implementation, and assess system performance.

  5. Orbital maneuvers and space rendezvous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butikov, Eugene I.

    2015-12-01

    Several possibilities of launching a space vehicle from the orbital station are considered and compared. Orbital maneuvers discussed in the paper can be useful in designing a trajectory for a specific space mission. The relative motion of orbiting bodies is investigated on examples of spacecraft rendezvous with the space station that stays in a circular orbit around the Earth. An elementary approach is illustrated by an accompanying simulation computer program and supported by a mathematical treatment based on fundamental laws of physics and conservation laws. Material is appropriate for engineers and other personnel involved in space exploration, undergraduate and graduate students studying classical physics and orbital mechanics.

  6. Three-Dimensional Analysis of Zygomatic-Maxillary Complex Fracture Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Pau, Candace Y.; Barrera, Jose E.; Kwon, Jaehwan; Most, Sam P.

    2010-01-01

    Zygomatic-maxillary (ZMC) complex fractures are a common consequence of facial trauma. In this retrospective study, we present a novel method of ZMC fracture pattern analysis, utilizing three-dimensional visualization of computed tomography (CT) images to record displacement of the malar eminence in a three-dimensional coordinate plane. The pattern of fracture was then correlated with treatment outcome. Facial CT scans were obtained from 29 patients with unilateral ZMC fractures and 30 subjects without fractures and analyzed. Briefly, displacement of the malar eminence (ME) on the fractured side was measured in medial-lateral (x), superior-inferior (y), and anterior-posterior (z) dimensions, as well as Euclidean distance, by comparison to ME location on the unfractured side. Baseline natural variance in asymmetry was accounted for by comparing ME location on the left and right sides in subjects without fractures. Patients who required open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) to repair the ZMC fracture alone had significantly greater cumulative ME displacements than patients who did not require ORIF (p = 0.02). Additionally, patients with a high fracture score of 3, 4, or 5 (assigned based on severity displacement in each dimension) had significantly higher rates of ORIF than patients with a low fracture score of 0, 1, or 2 (p = 0.05). Severe displacement in one or more dimensions was associated with higher rates of ORIF than seen in patients with only neutral or mild displacements in all dimensions (p = 0.05). Severe x displacement was most strongly correlated with surgical intervention (p = 0.02). Overall, orbital floor repair was less strongly associated with most displacement measures than ZMC repair alone; however, patients requiring orbital floor repair had greater Euclidean ME displacements than patients who did not require orbital floor repair (p = 0.02). Fracture severity, as determined by multiple parameters in this novel evaluation

  7. [Pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture].

    PubMed

    Iwata, Ken; Mashiba, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated microdamage accumulation in the fracture sites in the patients of subtrochanteric atypical femoral fracture with long term bisphosphonate therapy and of incomplete shaft fracture of lateral femoral bowing without bisphosphonate therapy. Based on these findings, pathogenesis of atypical femoral fracture is revealed stress fracture caused by accumulation of microdamages between distal to the lesser trochanter and proximal to the supracondylar flare in the femur in association with severely suppressed bone turnover and/or abnormal lower limb alignment, that causes stress concentration on the lateral side cortex of the femur. PMID:26728533

  8. Tibial Stress Fractures in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Feldman, John J; Bowman, Eric N; Phillips, Barry B; Weinlein, John C

    2016-10-01

    Tibial stress fractures are common in the athlete. There are various causes of these fractures, the most common being a sudden increase in training intensity. Most of these injuries are treated conservatively; however, some may require operative intervention. Intervention is mostly dictated by location of the fracture and failure of conservative treatment. There are several surgical options available to the treating surgeon, each with advantages and disadvantages. The physician must understand the nature of the fracture and the likelihood for it to heal in a timely manner in order to best treat these fractures in this patient subset. PMID:27637660

  9. Lunar Prospector Orbit Determination Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckman, Mark; Concha, Marco

    1998-01-01

    The orbit support for Lunar Prospector (LP) consists of three main areas: (1) cislunar orbit determination, (2) rapid maneuver assessment using Doppler residuals, and (3) routine mapping orbit determination. The cislunar phase consisted of two trajectory correction maneuvers during the translunar cruise followed by three lunar orbit insertion burns. This paper will detail the cislunar orbit determination accuracy and the real-time assessment of the cislunar trajectory correction and lunar orbit insertion maneuvers. The non-spherical gravity model of the Moon is the primary influence on the mapping orbit determination accuracy. During the first two months of the mission, the GLGM-2 lunar potential model was used. After one month in the mapping orbit, a new potential model was developed that incorporated LP Doppler data. This paper will compare and contrast the mapping orbit determination accuracy using these two models. LP orbit support also includes a new enhancement - a web page to disseminate all definitive and predictive trajectory and mission planning information. The web site provides definitive mapping orbit ephemerides including moon latitude and longitude, and four week predictive products including: ephemeris, moon latitude/longitude, earth shadow, moon shadow, and ground station view periods. This paper will discuss the specifics of this web site.

  10. Orbital Debris: A Policy Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing orbital debris from a policy perspective is shown. The contents include: 1) Voyage through near-Earth Space-animation; 2) What is Orbital Debris?; 3) Orbital Debris Detectors and Damage Potential; 4) Hubble Space Telescope; 5) Mir Space Station Solar Array; 6) International Space Station; 7) Space Shuttle; 8) Satellite Explosions; 9) Satellite Collisions; 10) NASA Orbital Debris Mitigation Guidelines; 11) International Space Station Jettison Policy; 12) Controlled/Uncontrolled Satellite Reentries; 13) Return of Space Objects; 14) Orbital Debris and U.S. National Space Policy; 15) U.S Government Policy Strategy; 16) Bankruptcy of the Iridium Satellite System; 17) Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC); 18) Orbital Debris at the United Nations; 19) Chinese Anti-satellite System; 20) Future Evolution of Satellite Population; and 21) Challenge of Orbital Debris

  11. Biomechanical Concepts for Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Bottlang, Michael; Schemitsch, Christine E; Nauth, Aaron; Routt, Milton; Egol, Kenneth A; Cook, Gillian E; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2015-12-01

    Application of the correct fixation construct is critical for fracture healing and long-term stability; however, it is a complex issue with numerous significant factors. This review describes a number of common fracture types and evaluates their currently available fracture fixation constructs. In the setting of complex elbow instability, stable fixation or radial head replacement with an appropriately sized implant in conjunction with ligamentous repair is required to restore stability. For unstable sacral fractures with vertical or multiplanar instabilities, "standard" iliosacral screw fixation is not sufficient. Periprosthetic femur fractures, in particular Vancouver B1 fractures, have increased stability when using 90/90 fixation versus a single locking plate. Far cortical locking combines the concept of dynamization with locked plating to achieve superior healing of a distal femur fracture. Finally, there is no ideal construct for syndesmotic fracture stabilization; however, these fractures should be fixed using a device that allows for sufficient motion in the syndesmosis. In general, orthopaedic surgeons should select a fracture fixation construct that restores stability and promotes healing at the fracture site, while reducing the potential for fixation failure.

  12. Linear elastic fracture mechanics primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Christopher D.

    1992-01-01

    This primer is intended to remove the blackbox perception of fracture mechanics computer software by structural engineers. The fundamental concepts of linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented with emphasis on the practical application of fracture mechanics to real problems. Numerous rules of thumb are provided. Recommended texts for additional reading, and a discussion of the significance of fracture mechanics in structural design are given. Griffith's criterion for crack extension, Irwin's elastic stress field near the crack tip, and the influence of small-scale plasticity are discussed. Common stress intensities factor solutions and methods for determining them are included. Fracture toughness and subcritical crack growth are discussed. The application of fracture mechanics to damage tolerance and fracture control is discussed. Several example problems and a practice set of problems are given.

  13. Orbital floor reconstruction with poly-L/D-lactide implants: clinical, radiological and immunohistochemical study in sheep.

    PubMed

    Kontio, R; Suuronen, R; Konttinen, Y T; Hallikainen, D; Lindqvist, C; Kommonen, B; Kellomäki, M; Kylmä, T; Virtanen, I; Laine, P

    2004-06-01

    In this study the reconstruction capacity of orbital wall in sheep was evaluated when poly-L/D-lactide (PLDLA96) implants were used for large blow-out defects in 18 sheep. The contralateral side, where the defects healed spontaneously, served as controls. The follow-up was 12, 16, 22 and 36 weeks. Healing was evaluated clinically, radiologically, histologically and immunohistochemically. Physiochemical properties of the implants were also studied. At first, the implants were surrounded by elastic capsules, which gradually ossified. At 36 weeks, 60% were still visible and deformed but surrounded by bone. Light microscopy revealed a low grade inflammatory reaction. Expression of Tn-c and cFn was intense throughout the study. Shear strength decreased gradually and was not measurable after 16 weeks. Crystallinity increased steadily from 1.5 to 29.30% and molecular weight decreased from 49,000 to 4186. In CT, the final bony defect was smaller in the reconstructed sides than in the controls. Based on this study it can be concluded that PLDLA96 implant provokes a local inflammation, which does not prevent bone healing. The deformation of the implant, however, indicates that this PLDLA96 plate is not suitable for orbital floor reconstruction.

  14. Hydraulic fracture propagation modeling and data-based fracture identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing

    Successful shale gas and tight oil production is enabled by the engineering innovation of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Hydraulically induced fractures will most likely deviate from the bi-wing planar pattern and generate complex fracture networks due to mechanical interactions and reservoir heterogeneity, both of which render the conventional fracture simulators insufficient to characterize the fractured reservoir. Moreover, in reservoirs with ultra-low permeability, the natural fractures are widely distributed, which will result in hydraulic fractures branching and merging at the interface and consequently lead to the creation of more complex fracture networks. Thus, developing a reliable hydraulic fracturing simulator, including both mechanical interaction and fluid flow, is critical in maximizing hydrocarbon recovery and optimizing fracture/well design and completion strategy in multistage horizontal wells. A novel fully coupled reservoir flow and geomechanics model based on the dual-lattice system is developed to simulate multiple nonplanar fractures' propagation in both homogeneous and heterogeneous reservoirs with or without pre-existing natural fractures. Initiation, growth, and coalescence of the microcracks will lead to the generation of macroscopic fractures, which is explicitly mimicked by failure and removal of bonds between particles from the discrete element network. This physics-based modeling approach leads to realistic fracture patterns without using the empirical rock failure and fracture propagation criteria required in conventional continuum methods. Based on this model, a sensitivity study is performed to investigate the effects of perforation spacing, in-situ stress anisotropy, rock properties (Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and compressive strength), fluid properties, and natural fracture properties on hydraulic fracture propagation. In addition, since reservoirs are buried thousands of feet below the surface, the

  15. Galactic Habitable Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, A.; Mao, S.; Kawata, D.

    2014-03-01

    The fossil record shows that the Earth has experienced several mass extinctions over the past 500 million years1, and it has been suggested that there is a periodicity in extinction events on timescales of tens1 and/or hundreds of millions of years. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the cause of the mass extinctions, including the suggestion that the Earth's ozone layer may have been destroyed by intense radiation from a nearby supernovae2- 3, exposing the Earth's surface to damaging UV radiation. Recent observations of cores taken from the ocean floor revealed atoms of a very rare isotope of iron (60Fe) believed to have arrived on Earth around 2 million years ago as fallout from a nearby supernovae4. Astronomical evidence for that past supernovae was recently found in the debris of a young cluster of massive stars5, by tracing its past orbit, putting it at the right place at the right time to explain the mild extinction event. Here we report new high-resolution (both in space and time) N-body chemodynamical simulations (carried out with our novel code GCD+6) of the evolution of a model Milky Way Galaxy, tracing the orbit of èsun-like' stars over a 500 million year period, checking the proximity to supernovae throughout the history of the orbit and comparing the times when this occurs with past mass extinctions on Earth. We additionally explain the important effects of the spiral arm pattern, radial migration of stars and Galactic chemistry on habitability.

  16. Gravitational signatures of lunar floor-fractured craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorey, Clément; Michaut, Chloé; Wieczorek, Mark

    2015-08-01

    Lunar floor-fractured craters are impact craters characterized by distinctive shallow floors crossed by important networks of fractures. Different scenarios have been proposed to explain their formations but recent studies showed that the intrusion of magma at depth below the crater floor is the most plausible explanation. The intrusion of dense magma within the light upper-most part of the lunar crust should have left a positive signature in the gravity field. This study takes advantage of the unprecedented resolution of the lunar gravity field obtained from the NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission, in combination with topographic data obtained from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument, to investigate the gravitational signatures of both normal and floor-fractured craters. Despite the large variability in their gravitational signatures, the floor-fractured and normal craters in the Highlands show significant differences: the gravitational anomalies are significantly larger at floor-fractured craters. The anomaly amplitudes for floor-fractured craters are in agreement with synthetic gravity anomalies based on the predicted intrusion shapes from a theoretical flow model. Our results are consistent with magmatic intrusions intruding a crust characterized by a 12% porosity and where the intrusion has no porosity. Similar studies have been carried out in the lunar maria and South Pole-Aikten basin. Although the average gravitational signature of floor-fractured craters is larger than at normal craters in these regions, they cannot be distinguished statistically due to the small number of craters and the large variability of the anomalies. In general, a better characterization of the signal due solely to the initial impact crater is needed to isolate the magmatic intrusion signal and characterize the density contrast between the magma and crust.

  17. The spectrum of facial fractures in motor vehicle accidents: an MDCT study of 374 patients.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Elina M; Koivikko, Mika P; Koskinen, Seppo K

    2014-04-01

    Road traffic accidents are a major health problem worldwide resulting frequently in maxillofacial injuries. The purpose of the study was to assess the incidence and spectrum of facial fractures in patients involved in a motor vehicle accident (MVA). Using picture archiving and communication system, all requests for suspected facial trauma were retrieved during a 62-month period; 374 met the inclusion criteria. Two researchers interpreted the multidetector computed tomography images by consensus. The motor vehicles involved were divided into two groups: those involving a passenger car or a larger vehicle and those involving a motorized two-wheeler. Furthermore, the motor vehicle accidents were divided into collisions and run-off-road accidents. Of the 374 patients (aged 15-80, mean 34), 271 (72 %) were male and 103 (28 %) female. Of all patients, 262 (70 %) had a facial or skull base fracture; of these, multiple separate fractures were present in 56 %. Nasal fractures were the most common fractures followed by orbital, skull base, and maxillary fractures. Frontal bone, LeFort, and zygomatic arch fractures were always accompanied by other fractures. Fractures were more frequent in the group of collisions compared with run-off-road accidents. In the two-wheeled group, only 15 % did not have facial or skull base fractures. Fractures often occur in multitudes as 39 % of all patients have multiple facial or skull bone fractures, and thus, emergency radiologists should be familiar with the complexity of the injuries. Negative clear sinus sign and low-energy sentinel injuries should be trusted as indications of undetected injuries in MVA victims. PMID:24221020

  18. Impact of Injury Mechanisms on Patterns and Management of Facial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Greathouse, S Travis; Adkinson, Joshua M; Garza, Ramon; Gilstrap, Jarom; Miller, Nathan F; Eid, Sherrine M; Murphy, Robert X

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms causing facial fractures have evolved over time and may be predictive of the types of injuries sustained. The objective of this study is to examine the impact of mechanisms of injury on the type and management of facial fractures at our Level 1 Trauma Center. The authors performed an Institutional Review Board-approved review of our network's trauma registry from 2006 to 2010, documenting age, sex, mechanism, Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Scale, facial fracture patterns (nasal, maxillary/malar, orbital, mandible), and reconstructions. Mechanism rates were compared using a Pearson χ2 test. The database identified 23,318 patients, including 1686 patients with facial fractures and a subset of 1505 patients sustaining 2094 fractures by motor vehicle collision (MVC), fall, or assault. Nasal fractures were the most common injuries sustained by all mechanisms. MVCs were most likely to cause nasal and malar/maxillary fractures (P < 0.01). Falls were the least likely and assaults the most likely to cause mandible fractures (P < 0.001), the most common injury leading to surgical intervention (P < 0.001). Although not statistically significant, fractures sustained in MVCs were the most likely overall to undergo surgical intervention. Age, number of fractures, and alcohol level were statistically significant variables associated with operative management. Age and number of fractures sustained were associated with operative intervention. Although there is a statistically significant correlation between mechanism of injury and type of facial fracture sustained, none of the mechanisms evaluated herein are statistically associated with surgical intervention. Clinical Question/Level of Evidence: Therapeutic, III.

  19. Fracture mechanics validity limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Dennis M.; Ernst, Hugo A.

    1994-01-01

    Fracture behavior is characteristics of a dramatic loss of strength compared to elastic deformation behavior. Fracture parameters have been developed and exhibit a range within which each is valid for predicting growth. Each is limited by the assumptions made in its development: all are defined within a specific context. For example, the stress intensity parameters, K, and the crack driving force, G, are derived using an assumption of linear elasticity. To use K or G, the zone of plasticity must be small as compared to the physical dimensions of the object being loaded. This insures an elastic response, and in this context, K and G will work well. Rice's J-integral has been used beyond the limits imposed on K and G. J requires an assumption of nonlinear elasticity, which is not characteristic of real material behavior, but is thought to be a reasonable approximation if unloading is kept to a minimum. As well, the constraint cannot change dramatically (typically, the crack extension is limited to ten-percent of the initial remaining ligament length). Rice, et al investigated the properties required of J-type parameters, J(sub x), and showed that the time rate, dJ(sub x)/dt, must not be a function of the crack extension rate, da/dt. Ernst devised the modified-J parameter, J(sub M), that meets this criterion. J(sub M) correlates fracture data to much higher crack growth than does J. Ultimately, a limit of the validity of J(sub M) is anticipated, and this has been estimated to be at a crack extension of about 40-percent of the initial remaining ligament length. None of the various parameters can be expected to describe fracture in an environment of gross plasticity, in which case the process is better described by deformation parameters, e.g., stress and strain. In the current study, various schemes to identify the onset of the plasticity-dominated behavior, i.e., the end of fracture mechanics validity, are presented. Each validity limit parameter is developed in

  20. Hydraulic Fracture Measurements at Site C0009 of IODP Expedition 319, NanTroSEIZE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Y.; Ito, T.; Lin, W.; Flemings, P. B.; Boutt, D. F.; Doan, M.; McNeill, L. C.; Byrne, T.; Saffer, D. M.; Araki, E.; Eguchi, N. O.; Takahashi, K.; Toczko, S.; Scientists, E.

    2009-12-01

    The drilling vessel Chikyu completed the first riser-drilling in IODP history to a depth of 1603 mbsf (meter below seafloor) at Site C0009 in the landward Kumano forearc basin in the Nankai convergent margin, Japan.To measure in situ stress we performed two types of hydraulic fracturing: 1) as part of routine drilling operations, we estimated least principle stress from a leak off test (LOT); and 2) we used Schlumberger’s dual wireline packer, the Modular Dynamics Tester (MDT). Two LOT’s were performed at the base of 20 inch casing (703.9 mbsf) as a part of standard drilling operations; the outer annulus was closed by the blowout preventor (BOP), fluid was pumped at a constant rate of 2.3 m3/s, and pressure was measured at the cement pumps. The leak-off pressures were interpreted to lie at the break in slope in a graph of pressure vs volume-pumped. These values were found to be 30.22 and 30.25 MPa. These leak off pressure is interpreted to record fluids entering hydraulic fractures and is approximately the the least principal stress. There is considerable uncertainty in picking the slopes of the lines to determine the least principal stress (S3). The MDT dual packer tests were carried out at depth of 873.7 and 1532.7 mbsf. The dual packer module isolates a 1-m section of the borehole for testing. Zones free from pre-existing fractures and with near circular hole shape were chosen for the stress measurements. In the HF test at 873.7 m, the pressure cycle was repeated 5 times maintaining flow rate of 20 cm3/s. Periods of each cycles were 80-300 s. We determined the instantaneous shut in pressure to be 34.8 MPa. In the test at 1532.7 m, only one pressure cycle with a flow rate of 20 cm3/s was maintained, which yielded an instantaneous shut in pressure of 41.6 MPa. We interpret the shut-in pressure to record the least principal stress (S3). We do not know the orientation of fractures which were induced or activated by hydraulic fracturing, because no borehole

  1. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkardt, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Generalized parton distributions provide information on the distribution of quarks in impact parameter space. For transversely polarized nucleons, these impact parameter distributions are transversely distorted and this deviation from axial symmetry leads on average to a net transverse force from the spectators on the active quark in a DIS experiment. This force when acting along the whole trajectory of the active quark leads to transverse single-spin asymmetries. For a longitudinally polarized nucleon target, the transverse force implies a torque acting on the quark orbital angular momentum (OAM). The resulting change in OAM as the quark leaves the target equals the difference between the Jaffe-Manohar and Ji OAMs.

  2. Orbiter door closure tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acres, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    Safe reentry of the shuttle orbiter requires that the payload bay doors be closed and securely latched. Since a malfunction in the door drive or bulkhead latch systems could make safe reentry impossible, the requirement to provide tools to manually close and secure the doors was implemented. The tools would disconnect a disabled door or latch closure system and close and secure the doors if the normal system failed. The tools required to perform these tasks have evolved into a set that consists of a tubing cutter, a winch, a latching tool, and a bolt extractor. The design, fabrication, and performance tests of each tool are described.

  3. Counter-Orbitals: Another Class of Co-Orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.

    2012-10-01

    Co-orbital companions share the same orbital period and semi-major axis about a primary (star or planet). Heretofore there have been three recognized classes of co-orbitals: (1) Trojans librate in tadpole-shaped orbits about the equilateral Lagrange points L4 and L5, 60 degrees ahead of or behind the secondary (planet or satellite). (2) Horse-shoe companions librate about both L4 and L5, as well as the L3 Lagrange point diametrically opposite the secondary. (3) ``Quasi-satellites'' appear to be in distant retrograde orbits about the secondary, but actually are in prograde orbits about the primary with the same period as the secondary. Quasi-satellite orbits lie outside the secondary's Hill sphere, and enclose both L1 and L2, and sometimes L4 and L5 as well. In addition, some asteroids and comets are found in hybrid orbits which alternate among the above three classes, or combine some of their features. New research now reveals a fourth class of co-orbitals, which does not appear to be known before, and may be called ``counter-orbitals''. Imagine reversing the inertial velocity of a distant quasi-satellite. Then it remains in orbit about the primary, with the same period, semi-major axis, eccentricity, and orbital plane, although retrograde. But instead of remaining relatively close to the secondary, now it passes the secondary twice per orbit, near periapsis and apoapsis. The attractive impulses at these conjunctions tend to stabilize this arrangement. Numerical simulations of the general three-body problem verify that counter-orbitals can persist for over 10,000 orbits, with small vertical excursions, but a wide range of eccentricities and mass ratios. For example, Charon can maintain counter-orbital companions at least up to 3 percent of its own mass, in eccentric orbits extending from about 7050 km out to 41700 km from the center of Pluto. This may present a collision hazard to the New Horizons spacecraft.

  4. Vertebral fracture classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruijne, Marleen; Pettersen, Paola C.; Tankó, László B.; Nielsen, Mads

    2007-03-01

    A novel method for classification and quantification of vertebral fractures from X-ray images is presented. Using pairwise conditional shape models trained on a set of healthy spines, the most likely unfractured shape is estimated for each of the vertebrae in the image. The difference between the true shape and the reconstructed normal shape is an indicator for the shape abnormality. A statistical classification scheme with the two shapes as features is applied to detect, classify, and grade various types of deformities. In contrast with the current (semi-)quantitative grading strategies this method takes the full shape into account, it uses a patient-specific reference by combining population-based information on biological variation in vertebra shape and vertebra interrelations, and it provides a continuous measure of deformity. Good agreement with manual classification and grading is demonstrated on 204 lateral spine radiographs with in total 89 fractures.

  5. Fracture in Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumbridge, William J.

    Although the World’s largest industrial sector, Electronics has received relatively little attention with regard to mechanical failure of its equipment. Design strategies against fracture are advanced for applications, such as aerospace, automotive, pressure vessel and engine applications. So a fundamental question arises as to the extent to which these can be applied to Electronics. The paper describes the special characteristics of electronics equipment in service, and outlines common modes of failure, with emphasis on thermomechanical fatigue. The particular challenge of size is considered when behaviour determined from conventional bulk samples is no longer representative of actual components. Two case studies are presented that illustrate the special nature of electronics. It is suggested that as miniaturisation continues, fracture will become a major cause of failure.

  6. HUMERAL SHAFT FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Benegas, Eduardo; Ferreira Neto, Arnaldo Amado; Neto, Raul Bolliger; Santis Prada, Flavia de; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Marchitto, Gustavo Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Humeral shaft fractures (HSFs) represent 3% of the fractures of the locomotor apparatus, and the middle third of the shaft is the section most affected. In the majority of cases, it is treated using nonsurgical methods, but surgical indications in HSF cases are increasingly being adopted. The diversity of opinions makes it difficult to reach a consensus regarding the types of osteosynthesis, surgical technique and quantity and quality of synthesis materials that should be used. It would appear that specialists are far from reaching a consensus regarding the best method for surgical treatment of HSFs. We believe that less invasive methods, which favor relative stability, are the most appropriate methods, since the most feared complications are less frequent. PMID:27019833

  7. Orbital construction demonstration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A conceptual design and program plan for an Orbital Construction Demonstration Article (OCDA) was developed that can be used for evaluating and establishing practical large structural assembly operations. A flight plan for initial placement and continued utility is presented as a basic for an entirely new shuttle payload line-item having great future potential benefit for space applications. The OCDA is a three-axis stabilized platform in low-earth orbit with many structural nodals for mounting large construction and fabrication equipments. This equipment would be used to explore methods for constructing the large structures for future missions. The OCDA would be supported at regular intervals by the shuttle. Construction experiments and consumables resupply are performed during shuttle visit periods. A 250 kw solar array provides sufficient power to support the shuttle while attached to the OCDA and to run construction experiments at the same time. Wide band communications with a Telemetry and Data Relay Satellite compatible high gain antenna can be used between shuttle revisits to perform remote controlled, TV assisted construction experiments.

  8. Phase Field Fracture Mechanics.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Brett Anthony

    2015-11-01

    For this assignment, a newer technique of fracture mechanics using a phase field approach, will be examined and compared with experimental data for a bend test and a tension test. The software being used is Sierra Solid Mechanics, an implicit/explicit finite element code developed at Sandia National Labs in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The bend test experimental data was also obtained at Sandia Labs while the tension test data was found in a report online from Purdue University.

  9. Melt fracture revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, J. M.

    2003-07-16

    In a previous paper the author and Demay advanced a model to explain the melt fracture instability observed when molten linear polymer melts are extruded in a capillary rheometer operating under the controlled condition that the inlet flow rate was held constant. The model postulated that the melts were a slightly compressible viscous fluid and allowed for slipping of the melt at the wall. The novel feature of that model was the use of an empirical switch law which governed the amount of wall slip. The model successfully accounted for the oscillatory behavior of the exit flow rate, typically referred to as the melt fracture instability, but did not simultaneously yield the fine scale spatial oscillations in the melt typically referred to as shark skin. In this note a new model is advanced which simultaneously explains the melt fracture instability and shark skin phenomena. The model postulates that the polymer is a slightly compressible linearly viscous fluid but assumes no slip boundary conditions at the capillary wall. In simple shear the shear stress {tau}and strain rate d are assumed to be related by d = F{tau} where F ranges between F{sub 2} and F{sub 1} > F{sub 2}. A strain rate dependent yield function is introduced and this function governs whether F evolves towards F{sub 2} or F{sub 1}. This model accounts for the empirical observation that at high shears polymers align and slide more easily than at low shears and explains both the melt fracture and shark skin phenomena.

  10. Maxillofacial fracture repairs.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Loïc

    2005-07-01

    Oral trauma remains a common presentation in a small animal practice. Most fractures are the result of vehicular accidents. Among other causes are falls, kicks, gunshots wounds, and encounters with various hard objects ranging from baseball bats and golf clubs to horse hooves and car doors. Next in popularity are dog fights, especially when a large dog and a small dog are involved, and fights with other animals. With cats, falls from various heights are responsible for a large percentage of presentations.

  11. Orbit selection for a Mars geoscience/climatology orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uphoff, C.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a presentation of recent work to provide orbit design and selection criteria for a close, nearly polar, nearly circular orbit of Mars. The main aspects of the work are the evaluation of atmospheric drag for altitude selection, the orbit evolution for variations in periapsis altitude, and the interactions of those factors with the science objectives of the MGCO mission. A dynamic model of the Mars atmosphere is available from parallel efforts and the latest estimates of the upper atmospheric density and its time history are incorporated into the analysis to provide a final orbit that satisfies planetary quarantine requirements.

  12. General view of the Orbiter Discovery in the Orbiter Processing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the Orbiter Discovery in the Orbiter Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center showing the payload bay doors open exposing the heat-dissipating radiator panels located on the inside of the payload bay doors. Also in the view is the boom portion of the boom sensor system deployed as part of the return to flight procedures after STS-107 to inspect the orbiter's thermal protection system. The Remote Manipulator System, the "Canadarm", and the airlock are seen in the background of the image. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  13. Opportunistic Identification of Vertebral Fractures.

    PubMed

    Adams, Judith E

    2016-01-01

    Vertebral fractures are powerful predictors of future fracture, so, their identification is important to ensure that patients are commenced on appropriate bone protective or bone-enhancing therapy. Risk factors (e.g., low bone mineral density and increasing age) and symptoms (back pain, loss of height) may herald the presence of vertebral fractures, which are usually confirmed by performing spinal radiographs or, increasingly, using vertebral fracture assessment with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanners. However, a large number (30% or more) of vertebral fractures are asymptomatic and do not come to clinical attention. There is, therefore, scope for opportunistic (fortuitous) identification of vertebral fractures from various imaging modalities (radiographs, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and radionuclide scans) performed for other clinical indications and which include the spine in the field of view, with midline sagittal reformatted images from computed tomography having the greatest potential for such opportunistic detection. Numerous studies confirm this potential for identification but consistently find underreporting of vertebral fractures. So, a valuable opportunity to improve the management of patients at increased risk of future fracture is being squandered. Educational training programs for all clinicians and constant reiteration, stressing the importance of the accurate and clear reporting of vertebral fractures ("you only see what you look for"), can improve the situation, and automated computer-aided diagnostic tools also show promise to solve the problem of this underreporting of vertebral fractures.

  14. Opportunistic Identification of Vertebral Fractures.

    PubMed

    Adams, Judith E

    2016-01-01

    Vertebral fractures are powerful predictors of future fracture, so, their identification is important to ensure that patients are commenced on appropriate bone protective or bone-enhancing therapy. Risk factors (e.g., low bone mineral density and increasing age) and symptoms (back pain, loss of height) may herald the presence of vertebral fractures, which are usually confirmed by performing spinal radiographs or, increasingly, using vertebral fracture assessment with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanners. However, a large number (30% or more) of vertebral fractures are asymptomatic and do not come to clinical attention. There is, therefore, scope for opportunistic (fortuitous) identification of vertebral fractures from various imaging modalities (radiographs, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and radionuclide scans) performed for other clinical indications and which include the spine in the field of view, with midline sagittal reformatted images from computed tomography having the greatest potential for such opportunistic detection. Numerous studies confirm this potential for identification but consistently find underreporting of vertebral fractures. So, a valuable opportunity to improve the management of patients at increased risk of future fracture is being squandered. Educational training programs for all clinicians and constant reiteration, stressing the importance of the accurate and clear reporting of vertebral fractures ("you only see what you look for"), can improve the situation, and automated computer-aided diagnostic tools also show promise to solve the problem of this underreporting of vertebral fractures. PMID:26412139

  15. Fractures of the cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Marcon, Raphael Martus; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Teixeira, William Jacobsen; Narasaki, Douglas Kenji; Oliveira, Reginaldo Perilo; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to review the literature on cervical spine fractures. METHODS: The literature on the diagnosis, classification, and treatment of lower and upper cervical fractures and dislocations was reviewed. RESULTS: Fractures of the cervical spine may be present in polytraumatized patients and should be suspected in patients complaining of neck pain. These fractures are more common in men approximately 30 years of age and are most often caused by automobile accidents. The cervical spine is divided into the upper cervical spine (occiput-C2) and the lower cervical spine (C3-C7), according to anatomical differences. Fractures in the upper cervical spine include fractures of the occipital condyle and the atlas, atlanto-axial dislocations, fractures of the odontoid process, and hangman's fractures in the C2 segment. These fractures are characterized based on specific classifications. In the lower cervical spine, fractures follow the same pattern as in other segments of the spine; currently, the most widely used classification is the SLIC (Subaxial Injury Classification), which predicts the prognosis of an injury based on morphology, the integrity of the disc-ligamentous complex, and the patient's neurological status. It is important to correctly classify the fracture to ensure appropriate treatment. Nerve or spinal cord injuries, pseudarthrosis or malunion, and postoperative infection are the main complications of cervical spine fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Fractures of the cervical spine are potentially serious and devastating if not properly treated. Achieving the correct diagnosis and classification of a lesion is the first step toward identifying the most appropriate treatment, which can be either surgical or conservative. PMID:24270959

  16. Procedure for estimating fracture energy from fracture surface roughness

    DOEpatents

    Williford, Ralph E.

    1989-01-01

    The fracture energy of a material is determined by first measuring the length of a profile of a section through a fractured surface of the material taken on a plane perpendicular to the mean plane of that surface, then determining the fractal dimensionality of the surface. From this, the yield strength of the material, and the Young's Modulus of that material, the fracture energy is calculated.

  17. Forensic epidemiologic and biomechanical analysis of a pelvic cavity blowout injury associated with ejection from a personal watercraft (jet-ski).

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael D; Everson, Todd M; Kohles, Sean S

    2013-01-01

    Jet-propelled personal watercraft (PWC) or jet-skis have become increasingly popular. The means of propulsion of PWC, which is a jet of water forced out of small nozzle at the rear of the craft, combined with a high risk of falling off of the seat and into close proximity with the water jet stream, raise the potential for a unique type of injury mechanism. The most serious injuries associated with PWC falls are those that occur when the perineum passes in close proximity to the jet nozzle and the high-pressure water stream enters the vaginal or rectal orifice. We describe the forensic investigation into a case of an anovaginal "blowout" injury in a passenger who was ejected from the rear seat position of a PWC and subsequently suffered life-threatening injuries to the pelvic organs. The investigation included a biomechanical analysis of the injury mechanism, a summary of prior published reports of internal pelvic injuries resulting from PWC falls as well as other water sports and activities, and a comparison of the severity of the injuries resulting from differing mechanisms using the New Injury Severity Score (NISS). The mean (± standard deviation [SD]) NISS values for reported PWC injuries [not including the NISS of 38 in this case study] were 11.2 (± 9.5), while the mean value for reported water-skiing falls was half that of the PWC group at 5.6 (± 5.2). It was concluded that the analyzed injuries were unique to a PWC ejection versus other previously described non-PWC-associated water sport injuries. It is recommended that PWC manufacturers help consumers understand the potential risks to passengers with highly visible warnings and reduce injury risk with revised seat design, and/or passenger seat "deadman" switches. PMID:22925030

  18. Forensic epidemiologic and biomechanical analysis of a pelvic cavity blowout injury associated with ejection from a personal watercraft (jet-ski).

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael D; Everson, Todd M; Kohles, Sean S

    2013-01-01

    Jet-propelled personal watercraft (PWC) or jet-skis have become increasingly popular. The means of propulsion of PWC, which is a jet of water forced out of small nozzle at the rear of the craft, combined with a high risk of falling off of the seat and into close proximity with the water jet stream, raise the potential for a unique type of injury mechanism. The most serious injuries associated with PWC falls are those that occur when the perineum passes in close proximity to the jet nozzle and the high-pressure water stream enters the vaginal or rectal orifice. We describe the forensic investigation into a case of an anovaginal "blowout" injury in a passenger who was ejected from the rear seat position of a PWC and subsequently suffered life-threatening injuries to the pelvic organs. The investigation included a biomechanical analysis of the injury mechanism, a summary of prior published reports of internal pelvic injuries resulting from PWC falls as well as other water sports and activities, and a comparison of the severity of the injuries resulting from differing mechanisms using the New Injury Severity Score (NISS). The mean (± standard deviation [SD]) NISS values for reported PWC injuries [not including the NISS of 38 in this case study] were 11.2 (± 9.5), while the mean value for reported water-skiing falls was half that of the PWC group at 5.6 (± 5.2). It was concluded that the analyzed injuries were unique to a PWC ejection versus other previously described non-PWC-associated water sport injuries. It is recommended that PWC manufacturers help consumers understand the potential risks to passengers with highly visible warnings and reduce injury risk with revised seat design, and/or passenger seat "deadman" switches.

  19. Approach for assessing coastal vulnerability to oil spills for prevention and readiness using GIS and the Blowout and Spill Occurrence Model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nelson, J. R.; Grubesic, T. H.; Sim, L.; Rose, K.; Graham, J.

    2015-08-01

    Increasing interest in offshore hydrocarbon exploration has pushed the operational fronts associated with exploration efforts further offshore into deeper waters and more uncertain subsurface settings. This has become particularly common in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. In this study we develop a spatial vulnerability approach and example assessment to support future spill prevention and improve future response readiness. This effort, which is part of a larger integrated assessment modeling spill prevention effort, incorporated economic and environmental data, and utilized a novel new oil spill simulation model from the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Blowout and Spillmore » Occurrence Model (BLOSOM). Specifically, this study demonstrated a novel approach to evaluate potential impacts of hypothetical spill simulations at varying depths and locations in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The simulations are analyzed to assess spatial and temporal trends associated with the oil spill. The approach itself demonstrates how these data, tools and techniques can be used to evaluate potential spatial vulnerability of Gulf communities for various spill scenarios. Results of the hypothetical scenarios evaluated in this study suggest that under conditions like those simulated, a strong westward push by ocean currents and tides may increase the impacts of deep water spills along the Texas coastline, amplifying the vulnerability of communities on the local barrier islands. Ultimately, this approach can be used further to assess a range of conditions and scenarios to better understand potential risks and improve informed decision making for operators, responders, and stakeholders to support spill prevention as well as response readiness.« less

  20. Approach for assessing coastal vulnerability to oil spills for prevention and readiness using GIS and the Blowout and Spill Occurrence Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, J. R.; Grubesic, T. H.; Sim, L.; Rose, K.; Graham, J.

    2015-08-01

    Increasing interest in offshore hydrocarbon exploration has pushed the operational fronts associated with exploration efforts further offshore into deeper waters and more uncertain subsurface settings. This has become particularly common in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. In this study we develop a spatial vulnerability approach and example assessment to support future spill prevention and improve future response readiness. This effort, which is part of a larger integrated assessment modeling spill prevention effort, incorporated economic and environmental data, and utilized a novel new oil spill simulation model from the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Blowout and Spill Occurrence Model (BLOSOM). Specifically, this study demonstrated a novel approach to evaluate potential impacts of hypothetical spill simulations at varying depths and locations in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The simulations are analyzed to assess spatial and temporal trends associated with the oil spill. The approach itself demonstrates how these data, tools and techniques can be used to evaluate potential spatial vulnerability of Gulf communities for various spill scenarios. Results of the hypothetical scenarios evaluated in this study suggest that under conditions like those simulated, a strong westward push by ocean currents and tides may increase the impacts of deep water spills along the Texas coastline, amplifying the vulnerability of communities on the local barrier islands. Ultimately, this approach can be used further to assess a range of conditions and scenarios to better understand potential risks and improve informed decision making for operators, responders, and stakeholders to support spill prevention as well as response readiness.

  1. Neptune's story. [Triton's orbit perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldreich, P.; Murray, N.; Longaretti, P. Y.; Banfield, D.

    1989-01-01

    It is conjectured that Triton was captured from a heliocentric orbit as the result of a collision with what was then one of Neptune's regular satellites. The immediate post-capture orbit was highly eccentric. Dissipation due to tides raised by Neptune in Triton caused Triton's orbit to evolve to its present state in less than one billion years. For much of this time Triton was almost entirely molten. While its orbit was evolving, Triton cannibalized most of the regular satellites of Neptune and also perturbed Nereid, thus accounting for that satellite's highly eccentric and inclined orbit. The only regular satellites of Neptune that survived were those that formed well within 5 Neptune radii, and they move on inclined orbits as the result of chaotic perturbations forced by Triton.

  2. Precise Orbit Determination for ALOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Ryo; Nakamura, Shinichi; Kudo, Nobuo; Katagiri, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) has been developed to contribute to the fields of mapping, precise regional land coverage observation, disaster monitoring, and resource surveying. Because the mounted sensors need high geometrical accuracy, precise orbit determination for ALOS is essential for satisfying the mission objectives. So ALOS mounts a GPS receiver and a Laser Reflector (LR) for Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR). This paper deals with the precise orbit determination experiments for ALOS using Global and High Accuracy Trajectory determination System (GUTS) and the evaluation of the orbit determination accuracy by SLR data. The results show that, even though the GPS receiver loses lock of GPS signals more frequently than expected, GPS-based orbit is consistent with SLR-based orbit. And considering the 1 sigma error, orbit determination accuracy of a few decimeters (peak-to-peak) was achieved.

  3. Orbit accuracy assessment for Seasat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, B. E.; Tapley, B. D.

    1980-01-01

    Laser range measurements are used to determine the orbit of Seasat during the period from July 28, 1978, to Aug. 14, 1978, and the influence of the gravity field, atmospheric drag, and solar radiation pressure on the orbit accuracy is investigated. It is noted that for the orbits of three-day duration, little distinction can be made between the influence of different atmospheric models. It is found that the special Seasat gravity field PGS-S3 is most consistent with the data for three-day orbits, but an unmodeled systematic effect in radiation pressure is noted. For orbits of 18-day duration, little distinction can be made between the results derived from the PGS gravity fields. It is also found that the geomagnetic field is an influential factor in the atmospheric modeling during this time period. Seasat altimeter measurements are used to determine the accuracy of the altimeter measurement time tag and to evaluate the orbital accuracy.

  4. Evaluation of five fracture models in Taylor impact fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Xin-Ke; Wei, Gang; Guo, Zitao

    2012-03-01

    Taylor impact test presented in a previous study on a commercial high strength and super hard aluminum alloy 7A04-T6 are numerically evaluated using the finite element code ABAQUS/Explicit. In the present study, the influence of fracture criterion in numerical simulations of the deformation and fracture behavior of Taylor rod has been studied. Included in the paper are a modified version of Johnson-Cook, the Cockcroft-Latham(C-L), the constant fracture strain, the maximum shear stress and the maximum principle stress fracture models. Model constants for each criterion are calibrated from material tests. The modified version of Johnson-Cook fracture criterion with the stress triaxiality cut off idea is found to give good prediction of the Taylor impact fracture behavior. However, this study will also show that the C-L fracture criterion where only one simple material test is required for calibration is found to give reasonable predictions. Unfortunately, the other three criteria are not able to repeat the experimentally obtained fracture behavior. The study indicates that the stress triaxiality cut off idea is necessary to predict the Taylor impact fracture.

  5. Evaluation of Five Fracture Models in Taylor Impact Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Xinke; Wei, Gang; Guo, Zitao

    2011-06-01

    Taylor impact test presented in a previous study on a commercial high strength and super hard aluminum alloy 7A04-T6 are numerically evaluated using the finite element code ABAQUS/Explicit. In the present study, the influence of fracture criterion in numerical simulations of the deformation and fracture behavior of Taylor rod has been studied. Included in the paper are a modified version of Johnson-Cook, the Cockcroft-Latham(C-L), the constant fracture strain, the maximum shear stress and the maximum principle stress fracture models. Model constants for each criterion are calibrated from material tests. The modified version of Johnson-Cook fracture criterion with the stress triaxiality cut off idea is found to give good prediction of the Taylor impact fracture behavior. However, this study will also show that the C-L fracture criterion where only one simple material test is required for calibration, is found to give reasonable predictions. Unfortunately, the other three criteria are not able to repeat the experimentally obtained fracture behavior. The study indicates that the stress triaxiality cut off idea is necessary to predict the Taylor impact fracture. The National Natural Science Foundation of China (No.: 11072072).

  6. New perspectives on the transition between discrete fracture, fragmentation, and pulverization during brittle failure of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, W. A.; Ghaffari, H.; Barber, T. J.; Borjas, C.

    2015-12-01

    The motions of Earth's tectonic plates are typically measured in millimeters to tens of centimeters per year, seemingly confirming the generally-held view that tectonic processes are slow, and have been throughout Earth's history. In line with this perspective, the vast majority of laboratory rock mechanics research focused on failure in the brittle regime has been limited to experiments utilizing slow loading rates. On the other hand, many natural processes that pose significant risk for humans (e.g., earthquakes and extraterrestrial impacts), as well as risks associated with human activities (blow-outs, explosions, mining and mine failures, projectile penetration), occur at rates that are hundreds to thousands of times faster than those typically simulated in the laboratory. Little experimental data exists to confirm or calibrate theoretical models explaining the connection between these dramatic events and the pulverized rocks found in fault zones, impacts, or explosions; however the experimental data that does exist is thought-provoking: At the earth's surface, the process of brittle fracture passes through a critical transition in rocks at high strain rates (101-103s-1) between regimes of discrete fracture and distributed fragmentation, accompanied by a dramatic increase in strength. Previous experimental works on this topic have focused on key thresholds (e.g., peak stress, peak strain, average strain rate) that define this transition, but more recent work suggests that this transition is more fundamentally dependent on characteristics (e.g., shape) of the loading pulse and related microcrack dynamics, perhaps explaining why for different lithologies different thresholds more effectively define the pulverization transition. In this presentation we summarize some of our work focused on this transition, including the evolution of individual defects at the microscopic, microsecond scale and the energy budget associated with the brittle fragmentation process as a

  7. [Echographic diagnosis in orbital mucoceles].

    PubMed

    Rochels, R; Geyer, G; Bleier, R

    1985-04-01

    Sonography in 68 patients with orbital mucoceles revealed the following, pathognomonical A-scan criteria: Regular structure, low to extremely low reflectivity, sharply outlined borders, bony defects, missing or minimal compressibility and typical location in the supero-nasal anterior orbit. The echographical findings of "mucoceles" secondary to paranasal tumours are specially emphasised. Echography proves to be a very useful method in the detection and differentiation of orbital complications in paranasal diseases.

  8. Primary liposarcoma of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Saurbhi; Gupta, Anoop K; Sen, Seema; Kashyap, Seema

    2014-01-01

    Liposarcoma is the most common sarcoma in adults, but is an extremely rare tumor of the orbit. We report 4 cases of primary orbital liposarcoma treated at our center. All cases had tumor localized to the orbit and underwent exenteration followed by radiotherapy in one patient. None of the patients had a recurrence until a follow-up of 1-5 years (mean: 4 years).

  9. FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    1999-06-11

    The four chapters that are described in this report cover a variety of subjects that not only give insight into the understanding of multiphase flow in fractured porous media, but they provide also major contribution towards the understanding of flow processes with in-situ phase formation. In the following, a summary of all the chapters will be provided. Chapter I addresses issues related to water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. There are two parts in this chapter. Part I covers extensive set of measurements for water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. Both single matrix block and multiple matrix blocks tests are covered. There are two major findings from these experiments: (1) co-current imbibition can be more efficient than counter-current imbibition due to lower residual oil saturation and higher oil mobility, and (2) tight fractured porous media can be more efficient than a permeable porous media when subjected to water injection. These findings are directly related to the type of tests one can perform in the laboratory and to decide on the fate of water injection in fractured reservoirs. Part II of Chapter I presents modeling of water injection in water-wet fractured media by modifying the Buckley-Leverett Theory. A major element of the new model is the multiplication of the transfer flux by the fractured saturation with a power of 1/2. This simple model can account for both co-current and counter-current imbibition and computationally it is very efficient. It can be orders of magnitude faster than a conventional dual-porosity model. Part II also presents the results of water injection tests in very tight rocks of some 0.01 md permeability. Oil recovery from water imbibition tests from such at tight rock can be as high as 25 percent. Chapter II discusses solution gas-drive for cold production from heavy-oil reservoirs. The impetus for this work is the study of new gas phase formation from in-situ process which can be significantly

  10. Orbital molecules in electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Attfield, J. Paul

    2015-04-01

    Orbital molecules are made up of coupled orbital states on several metal ions within an orbitally ordered (and sometimes also charge-ordered) solid such as a transition metal oxide. Spin-singlet dimers are known in many materials, but recent discoveries of more exotic species such as 18-electron heptamers in AlV{sub 2}O{sub 4} and magnetic 3-atom trimerons in magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) have shown that orbital molecules constitute a general new class of quantum electronic states in solids.

  11. Orbiter emergency crew escape system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofland, W. W.

    1980-01-01

    Two conventional ejection seats were incorporated into the first two orbiter vehicles to provide the crew with emergency ejection capability during the flight test programs. To avoid extensive development and test costs, existing ejection seats were selected and minimum modifications were made to accommodate the orbiter application. The new components and modifications were qualified at the component level, and a minimum sled test program was conducted to verify the orbiter installation and validate the six degree-of-freedom analysis. The system performance was certified and the orbital flight test capability was established by analysis.

  12. Imaging of the Postoperative Orbit.

    PubMed

    Learned, Kim O; Nasseri, Farbod; Mohan, Suyash

    2015-08-01

    Imaging evaluation of the postoperative orbit remains challenging even for the expert neuroradiologist. This article provides a simplified framework for understanding the complex postoperative appearances of the orbit, in an attempt to enhance the diagnostic accuracy of postoperative computed tomography and MR imaging of the orbit. Readers are familiarized with the normal appearances of common eye procedures and orbit reconstructions to help avoid interpretative pitfalls. Also reviewed are imaging features of common surgical complications, and evaluation of residual/recurrent neoplasm in the setting of oncologic imaging surveillance.

  13. Orbiter utilization as an ACRV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Jonathan N.; Heck, Michael L.; Kumar, Renjith R.; Mazanek, Daniel D.; Troutman, Patrick A.

    1990-01-01

    Assuming that a Shuttle Orbiter could be qualified to serve long duration missions attached to Space Station Freedom in the capacity as an Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV), a study was conducted to identify and examine candidate attach locations. Baseline, modified hardware, and new hardware design configurations were considered. Dual simultaneous Orbiter docking accommodation were required. Resulting flight characteristics analyzed included torque equilibrium attitude (TEA), microgravity environment, attitude controllability, and reboost fuel requirements. The baseline Station could not accommodate two Orbiters. Modified hardware configurations analyzed had large TEA's. The utilization of an oblique docking mechanism best accommodated an Orbiter as an ACRV.

  14. OSO-6 Orbiting Solar Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The description, development history, test history, and orbital performance analysis of the OSO-6 Orbiting Solar Observatory are presented. The OSO-6 Orbiting Solar Observatory was the sixth flight model of a series of scientific spacecraft designed to provide a stable platform for experiments engaged in the collection of solar and celestial radiation data. The design objective was 180 days of orbital operation. The OSO-6 has telemetered an enormous amount of very useful experiment and housekeeping data to GSFC ground stations. Observatory operation during the two-year reporting period was very successful except for some experiment instrument problems.

  15. Complex Fluids and Hydraulic Fracturing.

    PubMed

    Barbati, Alexander C; Desroches, Jean; Robisson, Agathe; McKinley, Gareth H

    2016-06-01

    Nearly 70 years old, hydraulic fracturing is a core technique for stimulating hydrocarbon production in a majority of oil and gas reservoirs. Complex fluids are implemented in nearly every step of the fracturing process, most significantly to generate and sustain fractures and transport and distribute proppant particles during and following fluid injection. An extremely wide range of complex fluids are used: naturally occurring polysaccharide and synthetic polymer solutions, aqueous physical and chemical gels, organic gels, micellar surfactant solutions, emulsions, and foams. These fluids are loaded over a wide range of concentrations with particles of varying sizes and aspect ratios and are subjected to extreme mechanical and environmental conditions. We describe the settings of hydraulic fracturing (framed by geology), fracturing mechanics and physics, and the critical role that non-Newtonian fluid dynamics and complex fluids play in the hydraulic fracturing process. PMID:27070765

  16. [Distal humerus fractures in children].

    PubMed

    Schneidmueller, D; Boettger, M; Laurer, H; Gutsfeld, P; Bühren, V

    2013-11-01

    Fractures of the distal humerus belong to the most common injuries of the upper arm in childhood. Most frequently occurring is the supracondylar fracture of the distal humerus. In these cases and in the second most common epicondylar fractures, the metaphysis is affected and these fractures are therefore extra-articular. They have to be distinguished from articular fractures regarding therapy and prognosis. The growth potential of the distal epiphysis is very limited as is the possibility of spontaneous correction so that major dislocations should not be left uncorrected. Unstable and especially dislocated articular fractures must be anatomically reconstructed employing various osteosynthetic techniques, mostly combined with immobilization. Insufficient reconstruction, growth disturbance and non-union can result in axial deformities, such as cubitus valgus and varus, restriction of motion, pain and nerve palsy.

  17. Fracture healing: mechanisms and interventions

    PubMed Central

    Einhorn, Thomas A.; Gerstenfeld, Louis C.

    2015-01-01

    Fractures are the most common large-organ, traumatic injuries to humans. The repair of bone fractures is a postnatal regenerative process that recapitulates many of the ontological events of embryonic skeletal development. Although fracture repair usually restores the damaged skeletal organ to its pre-injury cellular composition, structure and biomechanical function, about 10% of fractures will not heal normally. This article reviews the developmental progression of fracture healing at the tissue, cellular and molecular levels. Innate and adaptive immune processes are discussed as a component of the injury response, as are environmental factors, such as the extent of injury to the bone and surrounding tissue, fixation and the contribution of vascular tissues. We also present strategies for fracture treatment that have been tested in animal models and in clinical trials or case series. The biophysical and biological basis of the molecular actions of various therapeutic approaches, including recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins and parathyroid hormone therapy, are also discussed. PMID:25266456

  18. Complex Fluids and Hydraulic Fracturing.

    PubMed

    Barbati, Alexander C; Desroches, Jean; Robisson, Agathe; McKinley, Gareth H

    2016-06-01

    Nearly 70 years old, hydraulic fracturing is a core technique for stimulating hydrocarbon production in a majority of oil and gas reservoirs. Complex fluids are implemented in nearly every step of the fracturing process, most significantly to generate and sustain fractures and transport and distribute proppant particles during and following fluid injection. An extremely wide range of complex fluids are used: naturally occurring polysaccharide and synthetic polymer solutions, aqueous physical and chemical gels, organic gels, micellar surfactant solutions, emulsions, and foams. These fluids are loaded over a wide range of concentrations with particles of varying sizes and aspect ratios and are subjected to extreme mechanical and environmental conditions. We describe the settings of hydraulic fracturing (framed by geology), fracturing mechanics and physics, and the critical role that non-Newtonian fluid dynamics and complex fluids play in the hydraulic fracturing process.

  19. Geology orbiter comparison study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutts, J. A. J.; Blasius, K. R.; Davis, D. R.; Pang, K. D.; Shreve, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    Instrument requirements of planetary geology orbiters were examined with the objective of determining the feasibility of applying standard instrument designs to a host of terrestrial targets. Within the basic discipline area of geochemistry, gamma-ray, X-ray fluorescence, and atomic spectroscopy remote sensing techniques were considered. Within the discipline area of geophysics, the complementary techniques of gravimetry and radar were studied. Experiments using these techniques were analyzed for comparison at the Moon, Mercury, Mars and the Galilean satellites. On the basis of these comparative assessments, the adaptability of each sensing technique was judged as a basic technique for many targets, as a single instrument applied to many targets, as a single instrument used in different mission modes, and as an instrument capability for nongeoscience objectives.

  20. Exploratory orbit analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Michelotti, L.

    1989-03-01

    Unlike the other documents in these proceedings, this paper is neither a scientific nor a technical report. It is, rather, a short personal essay which attempts to describe an Exploratory Orbit Analysis (EOA) environment. Analyzing the behavior of a four or six dimensional nonlinear dynamical system is at least as difficult as analyzing events in high-energy collisions; the consequences of doing it badly, or slowly, would be at least as devastating; and yet the level of effort and expenditure invested in the latter, the very attention paid to it by physicists at large, must be two orders of magnitude greater than that given to the former. It is difficult to choose the model which best explains the behavior of a physical device if one does not first understand the behavior of the available models. The time is ripe for the development of a functioning EOA environment, which I will try to describe in this paper to help us achieve this goal.

  1. Orbital angular momentum microlaser.

    PubMed

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-29

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes.

  2. Orbital angular momentum microlaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M.; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes.

  3. Orbiting Carbon Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Human impact on the environment has produced measurable changes in the geological record since the late 1700s. Anthropogenic emissions of CO2 today may cause the global climate to depart for its natural behavior for many millenia. CO2 is the primary anthropogenic driver of climate change. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory goals are to help collect measurements of atmospheric CO2, answering questions such as why the atmospheric CO2 buildup varies annually, the roles of the oceans and land ecosystems in absorbing CO2, the roles of North American and Eurasian sinks and how these carbon sinks respond to climate change. The present carbon cycle, CO2 variability, and climate uncertainties due atmospheric CO2 uncertainties are highlighted in this presentation.

  4. Orbital science's 'Bermuda Triangle'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrill, Thomas J.

    1991-02-01

    The effects of a part of the inner Van Allen belt lying closest to the earth, known as the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) upon spacecraft including the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), are discussed. The area consists of positively charged ions and electrons from the Van Allen Belt which become trapped in the earth's dipole field. Contor maps representing the number of protons per square centimeter per second having energies greater than 10 million electron volts are presented. It is noted that the HST orbit causes it to spend about 15 percent of its time in the SAA, but that, unlike the experience with earlier spacecraft, the satellite's skin, internal structure, and normal electronic's packaging provides sufficient protection against eletrons, although some higher energy protons still get through. Various charged particle effects which can arise within scientific instruments including fluorescence, Cerenkov radiation, and induced radioactivity are described.

  5. TOPEX orbital radiation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Barth, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The space radiation environment of the TOPEX spacecraft is investigated. A single trajectory was considered. The external (surface incident) charged particle radiation, predicted for the satellite, is determined by orbital flux integration for the specified trajectory. The latest standard models of the environment are used in the calculations. The evaluation is performed for solar maximum conditions. The spacecraft exposure to cosmic rays of galactic origin is evaluated over its flight path through the magnetosphere in terms of geomagnetic shielding effects, both for surface incident heavy ions and for particles emerging behind different material thickness. Limited shielding and dose evaluations are performed for simple infinite slab and spherical geometries. Results, given in graphical and tabular form, are analyzed, explained, and discussed. Conclusions are presented and commented on.

  6. Orbit Determination Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, James R.; Berry, Kevin; Gregpru. Late; Speckman, Keith; Hur-Diaz, Sun; Surka, Derek; Gaylor, Dave

    2010-01-01

    The Orbit Determination Toolbox is an orbit determination (OD) analysis tool based on MATLAB and Java that provides a flexible way to do early mission analysis. The toolbox is primarily intended for advanced mission analysis such as might be performed in concept exploration, proposal, early design phase, or rapid design center environments. The emphasis is on flexibility, but it has enough fidelity to produce credible results. Insight into all flight dynamics source code is provided. MATLAB is the primary user interface and is used for piecing together measurement and dynamic models. The Java Astrodynamics Toolbox is used as an engine for things that might be slow or inefficient in MATLAB, such as high-fidelity trajectory propagation, lunar and planetary ephemeris look-ups, precession, nutation, polar motion calculations, ephemeris file parsing, and the like. The primary analysis functions are sequential filter/smoother and batch least-squares commands that incorporate Monte-Carlo data simulation, linear covariance analysis, measurement processing, and plotting capabilities at the generic level. These functions have a user interface that is based on that of the MATLAB ODE suite. To perform a specific analysis, users write MATLAB functions that implement truth and design system models. The user provides his or her models as inputs to the filter commands. The software provides a capability to publish and subscribe to a software bus that is compliant with the NASA Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC) standards, to exchange data with other flight dynamics tools to simplify the flight dynamics design cycle. Using the publish and subscribe approach allows for analysts in a rapid design center environment to seamlessly incorporate changes in spacecraft and mission design into navigation analysis and vice versa.

  7. Unusual presentation of a femoral stress fracture

    PubMed Central

    Ejnisman, Leandro; Wajnsztejn, Andre; Queiroz, Roberto Dantas; Ejnisman, Benno

    2013-01-01

    Stress fractures are common injuries in sports medicine. Among these fractures, femoral neck stress fractures frequently have a benign course, especially when it happens in the medial aspect of the neck. This case report describes a stress fracture of the medial aspect of the femoral neck that developed a complete fracture and underwent surgical fixation. PMID:23283621

  8. Seismic determination of saturation in fractured reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, R.L.; Wiggins, M.L.; Gupta, A.

    2002-01-01

    Detecting the saturation of a fractured reservoir using shear waves is possible when the fractures have a geometry that induces a component of movement perpendicular to the fractures. When such geometry is present, vertically traveling shear waves can be used to examine the saturation of the fractured reservoir. Tilted, corrugated, and saw-tooth fracture models are potential examples.

  9. Nonunion of fifth metatarsal fractures.

    PubMed

    Solan, Matthew; Davies, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Metatarsal fractures are those most frequently encountered in the foot. More than half of these are of the 5th metatarsal. The incidence is increasing, along with the activity levels of the general population. Fractures of the 5th metatarsal require careful evaluation and classification to ensure selection of the optimum treatment plan. Distal fractures rarely require fixation, even when displacement is wide. Cases of established nonunion or refracture require fixation.

  10. Insufficiency fractures of the sacrum

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, K.L.; Beabout, J.W.; Swee, R.G.

    1985-07-01

    Insufficiency stress fractures may occur in the sacrum after radiation therapy or secondary to postmenopausal or steroid-induced osteoporosis. These fractures are often either overlooked or confused both clinically and radiographically with metastatic disease. Findings on plain films and conventional tomograms are often subtle. Radionuclide bone scans show a characteristic distribution of increased uptake. Computed tomography is the definitive technique for demonstrating the fractures.

  11. Method for fracturing subterranean formations

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, S. W.; Conway, M. W.

    1985-11-19

    The present invention relates to a thermally stable crosslinked gel fracturing fluid for use in the treatment of subterranean formations penetrated by a well bore. The fracturing fluid comprises an aqueous liquid, a gelling agent comprising a selected modified cellulose ether, a crosslinking agent and any additional additives that may be present. The fracturing fluid is thermally stable under shear at temperatures in excess of about 200/sup 0/ F.

  12. Radiology of Fractures in Intoxicated Emergency Department Patients: Locations, Mechanisms, Presentation, and Initial Interpretation Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuka; Nozaki, Taiki; Starkey, Jay; Okajima, Yuka; Ohde, Sachiko; Matsusako, Masaki; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Saida, Yukihisa; Kurihara, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of alcohol intoxication to time-to-presentation following injury, fracture type, mechanism of injury leading to fracture, and initial diagnostic radiology interpretation performance of emergency physicians versus diagnostic radiologists in patients who present to the emergency department (ED) and are subsequently diagnosed with fracture. Medical records of 1286 patients who presented to the ED and were diagnosed with fracture who also underwent plain film or computed tomography (CT) imaging were retrospectively reviewed. The subjects were divided into intoxicated and sober groups. Patient characteristics, injury-to-presentation time, fracture location, and discrepancies between initial clinical and radiological evaluations were compared. Of 1286 subjects, 181 patients were included in the intoxicated group. Only intoxicated patients presented with head/neck fractures more than 24 hours after injury. The intoxicated group showed a higher rate of head/neck fractures (skull 23.2% vs 5.8%, face and orbit 30.4% vs 9.5%; P < 0.001) and a lower rate of extremity injuries. The rate of nondiagnosis of fractures by emergency physicians later identified by radiologists was the same in both groups (7.7% vs 7.7%, P = 0.984). While the same proportion of intoxicated patients presented more than 24 hours following injury, only intoxicated patients presented with craniofacial and cervical spinal fractures during this period. Alcohol-related injuries are more often associated with head/neck fractures but less extremity injuries. The rate of fractures missed by emergency physicians but later diagnosed by radiologists was the same in intoxicated and sober patients.

  13. Coupled Fracture and Flow in Shale in Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, J. W.; Mori, H.; Viswanathan, H.

    2014-12-01

    Production of hydrocarbon from shale requires creation and maintenance of fracture permeability in an otherwise impermeable shale matrix. In this study, we use a combination of triaxial coreflood experiments and x-ray tomography characterization to investigate the fracture-permeability behavior of Utica shale at in situ reservoir conditions (25-50 oC and 35-120 bars). Initially impermeable shale core was placed between flat anvils (compression) or between split anvils (pure shear) and loaded until failure in the triaxial device. Permeability was monitored continuously during this process. Significant deformation (>1%) was required to generate a transmissive fracture system. Permeability generally peaked at the point of a distinct failure event and then dropped by a factor of 2-6 when the system returned to hydrostatic failure. Permeability was very small in compression experiments (< 1 mD), possibly because of limited fracture connectivity through the anvils. In pure share experiments, shale with bedding planes perpendicular to shear loading developed complex fracture networks with narrow apertures and peak permeability of 30 mD. Shale with bedding planes parallel to shear loading developed simple fractures with large apertures and a peak permeability as high as 1 D. Fracture systems held at static conditions for periods of several hours showed little change in effective permeability at hydrostatic conditions as high as 140 bars. However, permeability of fractured systems was a function of hydrostatic pressure, declining in a pseudo-linear, exponential fashion as pressure increased. We also observed that permeability decreased with increasing fluid flow rate indicating that flow did not follow Darcy's Law, possibly due to non-laminar flow conditions, and conformed to Forscheimer's law. The coupled deformation and flow behavior of Utica shale, particularly the large deformation required to initiate flow, indicates the probable importance of activation of existing

  14. Fracture Control in Engineering Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherly, G. C.

    1980-07-01

    The three-day meeting "Fracture Control in Engineering Structures" was held at the 1979 C.I.M. Annual Conference of Metallurgists in Sudbury, Ontario, August 19-21, 1979. The meeting was organized by the Materials Engineering Section of C.I.M. and the Canadian Fracture Research Committee (CFRC), a non-profit organization and the national arm of the International Congress on Fracture. The objectives of CFRC are to promote research and conferences in Canada on the Strength & Fracture of Materials. To this end, CFRC holds (sometimes jointly) conferences every year.

  15. Postpartal sacral fracture without osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Rousière, M; Kahan, A; Job-Deslandre, C

    2001-02-01

    Stress fractures of the sacrum during pregnancy or the postpartum seem uncommon. We report a new case of nontrauma-related postpartal sacral fracture. Only four similar cases have been reported to date. The patient was 36 years of age and her fracture was diagnosed four weeks after her first delivery. Vitamin D levels were low, but there was no osteomalacia. Other standard laboratory tests were normal, as were absorptiometry measurements at the lumbar spine and femur. Rheumatologists should consider sacral fracture in pregnant or nursing patients with buttock pain. Magnetic resonance imaging is the diagnostic investigation of choice.

  16. Acute tibial tubercle avulsion fractures.

    PubMed

    McKoy, Brodie E; Stanitski, Carl L

    2003-07-01

    Acute tibial tubercle avulsion fractures are uncommon, and these injuries typically occur in mature-appearing adolescent boys involved in jumping sports, particularly basketball. The developmental anatomy of the tibial tuberosity and the changes surrounding normal physiologic epiphysiodesis render this structure susceptible to acute avulsion fractures. Possible associated injuries include patellar and quadriceps avulsions, collateral and cruciate ligament tears, and meniscal damage. The treatment of this injury is based on the amount of displacement and associated injuries. Nondisplaced fractures are treated nonoperatively with cast immobilization. Displaced fractures require open reduction and internal fixation. Even in Type III injuries, the outcome is usually excellent.

  17. PyORBIT: A Python Shell For ORBIT

    SciTech Connect

    Jean-Francois Ostiguy; Jeffrey Holmes

    2003-07-01

    ORBIT is code developed at SNS to simulate beam dynamics in accumulation rings and synchrotrons. The code is structured as a collection of external C++ modules for SuperCode, a high level interpreter shell developed at LLNL in the early 1990s. SuperCode is no longer actively supported and there has for some time been interest in replacing it by a modern scripting language, while preserving the feel of the original ORBIT program. In this paper, we describe a new version of ORBIT where the role of SuperCode is assumed by Python, a free, well-documented and widely supported object-oriented scripting language. We also compare PyORBIT to ORBIT from the standpoint of features, performance and future expandability.

  18. New orbit correction method uniting global and local orbit corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, N.; Takaki, H.; Sakai, H.; Satoh, M.; Harada, K.; Kamiya, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A new orbit correction method, called the eigenvector method with constraints (EVC), is proposed and formulated to unite global and local orbit corrections for ring accelerators, especially synchrotron radiation(SR) sources. The EVC can exactly correct the beam positions at arbitrarily selected ring positions such as light source points, simultaneously reducing closed orbit distortion (COD) around the whole ring. Computer simulations clearly demonstrate these features of the EVC for both cases of the Super-SOR light source and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) that have typical structures of high-brilliance SR sources. In addition, the effects of errors in beam position monitor (BPM) reading and steering magnet setting on the orbit correction are analytically expressed and also compared with the computer simulations. Simulation results show that the EVC is very effective and useful for orbit correction and beam position stabilization in SR sources.

  19. [Rehabilitation after periprosthetic fractures].

    PubMed

    Schmitt-Sody, M; Valle, C

    2016-03-01

    Periprosthetic fractures of the upper and lower extremities not only represent a challenge for surgeons but also for the rehabilitation team. The sometimes multimorbid patients have often undergone several surgical operations and need special planning and cooperation between an interdisciplinary team in order to achieve the best possible functional result and social reintegration. A structured rehabilitation planning after surgical treatment is a prerequisite for the patient to return to life as normal as possible. The aim is always rapid mobilization to achieve independence in activities of daily living. Special attention should be paid to postoperative immobilization and weight bearing. PMID:26923872

  20. Permeability damage to natural fractures caused by fracturing fluid polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Gall, B.L.; Sattler, A.R.; Maloney, D.R.; Raible, C.J.

    1988-04-01

    Formation damage studies using artificially fractured, low-permeability sandstone cores indicate that viscosified fracturing fluids can severely restrict gas flow through these types of narrow fractures. These studies were performed in support of the Department of Energy's Multiwell Experiment (MWX). Extensive geological and production evaluations at the MWX site indicate that the presence of a natural fracture system is largely responsible for unstimulated gas production. The laboratory formation damage studies were designed to examine changes in cracked core permeability to gas caused by fracturing fluid residues introduced into such narrow fractures during fluid leakoff. Polysaccharide polymers caused significant reduction (up to 95%) to gas flow through cracked cores. Polymer fracturing fluid gels used in this study included hydroxypropyl guar, hydroxyethyl cellulose, and xanthan gum. In contrast, polyacrylamide gels caused little or no reduction in gas flow through cracked cores after liquid cleanup. Other components of fracturing fluids (surfactants, breakers, etc.) caused less damage to gas flows. Other factors affecting gas flow through cracked cores were investigated, including the effects of net confining stress and non-Darcy flow parameters. Results are related to some of the problems observed during the stimulation program conducted for the MWX. 24 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.