Science.gov

Sample records for orbital population analysis

  1. NASA Orbital Debris Baseline Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, Paula H.; Vavrin, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has created high fidelity populations of the debris environment. The populations include objects of 1 cm and larger in Low Earth Orbit through Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit. They were designed for the purpose of assisting debris researchers and sensor developers in planning and testing. This environment is derived directly from the newest ORDEM model populations which include a background derived from LEGEND, as well as specific events such as the Chinese ASAT test, the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 accidental collision, the RORSAT sodium-potassium droplet releases, and other miscellaneous events. It is the most realistic ODPO debris population to date. In this paper we present the populations in chart form. We describe derivations of the background population and the specific populations added on. We validate our 1 cm and larger Low Earth Orbit population against SSN, Haystack, and HAX radar measurements.

  2. Orbit analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Michelotti, L.

    1995-01-01

    The past fifteen years have witnessed a remarkable development of methods for analyzing single particle orbit dynamics in accelerators. Unlike their more classic counterparts, which act upon differential equations, these methods proceed by manipulating Poincare maps directly. This attribute makes them well matched for studying accelerators whose physics is most naturally modelled in terms of maps, an observation that has been championed most vigorously by Forest. In the following sections the author sketchs a little background, explains some of the physics underlying these techniques, and discusses the best computing strategy for implementing them in conjunction with modeling accelerators.

  3. Analysis of Bonding between Conjugated Organic Molecules and Noble Metal Surfaces Using Orbital Overlap Populations.

    PubMed

    Rangger, Gerold M; Romaner, Lorenz; Hofmann, Oliver T; Heimel, Georg; Ramsey, Michael G; Zojer, Egbert

    2010-11-09

    The electronic structure of metal-organic interfaces is of paramount importance for the properties of organic electronic and single-molecule devices. Here, we use so-called orbital overlap populations derived from slab-type band-structure calculations to analyze the covalent contribution to the bonding between an adsorbate layer and a metal. Using two prototypical molecules, the strong acceptor 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ) on Ag(111) and the strong donor 1H,1'H-[4,4']bipyridinylidene (HV0) on Au(111), we present overlap populations as particularly versatile tools for describing the metal-organic interaction. Going beyond traditional approaches, in which overlap populations are represented in an atomic orbital basis, we also explore the use of a molecular orbital basis to gain significant additional insight. On the basis of the derived quantities, it is possible to identify the parts of the molecules responsible for the bonding and to analyze which of the molecular orbitals and metal bands most strongly contribute to the interaction and where on the energy scale they interact in bonding or antibonding fashion.

  4. Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) Population Analysis, First Order Hyperpolarizabilities and Thermodynamic Properties of Cyclohexanone.

    PubMed

    Gangadharan, Rubarani P; Krishnan, S Sampath

    2015-06-01

    The molecular structure of cyclohexanone was calculated by the B3LYP density functional model with 6-31G(d, p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis set by Gaussian program. The results from natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis have been analyzed in terms of the hybridization of atoms and the electronic structure of the title molecule. The electron density based local reactivity descriptors such as Fukui functions were calculated. The dipole moment (μ) and polarizability (a), anisotropy polarizability (Δα) and first order hyperpolarizability (β(tot)) of the molecule have been reported. Thermodynamic properties of the title compound were calculated at different temperatures.

  5. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Orbit Determination Accuracy Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slojkowski, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Results from operational OD produced by the NASA Goddard Flight Dynamics Facility for the LRO nominal and extended mission are presented. During the LRO nominal mission, when LRO flew in a low circular orbit, orbit determination requirements were met nearly 100% of the time. When the extended mission began, LRO returned to a more elliptical frozen orbit where gravity and other modeling errors caused numerous violations of mission accuracy requirements. Prediction accuracy is particularly challenged during periods when LRO is in full-Sun. A series of improvements to LRO orbit determination are presented, including implementation of new lunar gravity models, improved spacecraft solar radiation pressure modeling using a dynamic multi-plate area model, a shorter orbit determination arc length, and a constrained plane method for estimation. The analysis presented in this paper shows that updated lunar gravity models improved accuracy in the frozen orbit, and a multiplate dynamic area model improves prediction accuracy during full-Sun orbit periods. Implementation of a 36-hour tracking data arc and plane constraints during edge-on orbit geometry also provide benefits. A comparison of the operational solutions to precision orbit determination solutions shows agreement on a 100- to 250-meter level in definitive accuracy.

  6. Modeling of LEO orbital debris populations for ORDEM2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.-L.; Horstman, M.; Krisko, P. H.; Liou, J.-C.; Matney, M.; Stansbery, E. G.; Stokely, C. L.; Whitlock, D.

    2009-03-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model, ORDEM2000, is in the process of being updated to a new version: ORDEM2008. The data-driven ORDEM covers a spectrum of object size from 10 μm to greater than 1 m, and ranging from LEO (low Earth orbit) to GEO (geosynchronous orbit) altitude regimes. ORDEM2008 centimeter-sized populations are statistically derived from Haystack and HAX (the Haystack Auxiliary) radar data, while micron-sized populations are estimated from shuttle impact records. Each of the model populations consists of a large number of orbits with specified orbital elements, the number of objects on each orbit (with corresponding uncertainty), and the size, type, and material assignment for each object. This paper describes the general methodology and procedure commonly used in the statistical inference of the ORDEM2008 LEO debris populations. Major steps in the population derivations include data analysis, reference-population construction, definition of model parameters in terms of reference populations, linking model parameters with data, seeking best estimates for the model parameters, uncertainty analysis, and assessment of the outcomes. To demonstrate the population-derivation process and to validate the Bayesian statistical model applied in the population derivations throughout, this paper uses illustrative examples for the special cases of large-size (>1 m, >32 cm, and >10 cm) populations that are tracked by SSN (the Space Surveillance Network) and also monitored by Haystack and HAX radars operating in a staring mode.

  7. Orbiter Autoland reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, D. Phillip

    1993-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter is the only space reentry vehicle in which the crew is seated upright. This position presents some physiological effects requiring countermeasures to prevent a crewmember from becoming incapacitated. This also introduces a potential need for automated vehicle landing capability. Autoland is a primary procedure that was identified as a requirement for landing following and extended duration orbiter mission. This report documents the results of the reliability analysis performed on the hardware required for an automated landing. A reliability block diagram was used to evaluate system reliability. The analysis considers the manual and automated landing modes currently available on the Orbiter. (Autoland is presently a backup system only.) Results of this study indicate a +/- 36 percent probability of successfully extending a nominal mission to 30 days. Enough variations were evaluated to verify that the reliability could be altered with missions planning and procedures. If the crew is modeled as being fully capable after 30 days, the probability of a successful manual landing is comparable to that of Autoland because much of the hardware is used for both manual and automated landing modes. The analysis indicates that the reliability for the manual mode is limited by the hardware and depends greatly on crew capability. Crew capability for a successful landing after 30 days has not been determined yet.

  8. Study of Electron Delocalization in 1,2-, 1,3-, and 1,4-Azaborines Based on the Canonical Molecular Orbital Contributions to the Induced Magnetic Field and Polyelectron Population Analysis.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Anastasios G; Charistos, Nickolas D; Kyriakidou, Katerina; Sigalas, Michael P

    2015-10-01

    The electron delocalization in 1,2-azaborine, 1,3-azaborine, and 1,4-azaborine is studied using canonical molecular orbital contributions to the induced magnetic field (CMO-IMF) method and polyelectron population analysis (PEPA). Contour maps of the out-of-plane component of the induced magnetic field (Bz(ind)) of the π system show that the three azaborines, in contrast with borazine, sustain much of benzene's π-aromatic character. Among them, 1,3-azaborine exhibits the strongest π delocalization, while 1,4-azaborine is the weakest. Contour maps of Bz(ind) for individual π orbitals reveal that the differentiation of the magnetic response among the three isomers originates from the π-HOMO orbitals, whose magnetic response is governed by rotational allowed transitions to unoccupied orbitals. The low symmetry of azaborines enables a paratropic response from HOMO to unoccupied orbitals excitations, with their magnitude depending on the shape of interacting orbitals. 1,3-Azaborine presents negligible paratropic contributions to Bz(ind) from HOMO to unoccupied orbitals transitions, where 1,2- and 1,4-azaborine present substantial paratropic contributions, which lead to reduced diatropic response. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis employing PEPA shows that only the 1,3-azaborine contains π-electron fully delocalized resonance structures.

  9. Value analysis for orbital debris removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, Leonard; Mense, Allan

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents methods for deriving first order monetary benefits from removing individual debris objects in high value sun-synchronous orbits. These analyses are intended to serve as an economic metric by which competing debris removal methods can be evaluated. Orbital debris flux level estimates from NASA’s updated ORDEM2000 model are used to establish small debris population estimates. When combined with the replacement cost of satellites in sun-synchronous orbit, the present value of removing individual small (0.5 cm-2.0 cm) objects from orbit is derived. Large object removal value is more complicated due to the necessity of incorporating effects of impact fragmentation observed with any object about 10 cm or larger. Breakup models published by NASA (Johnson, N.L., Krisko, P.H., Liou, J.C., Anz-Meador, P.D. NASA’s new breakup model of evolve 4.0. Adv. Space Res. 28 (9), 1377-1384, 2001.) provide a basis for establishing fragmentation statistics. Assuming the current population of operational sun-synchronous satellites, removal value is then derived via present value analysis.

  10. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the orbital maneuvering system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prust, C. D.; Paul, D. J.; Burkemper, V. J.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results for the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) hardware are documented. The OMS provides the thrust to perform orbit insertion, orbit circularization, orbit transfer, rendezvous, and deorbit. The OMS is housed in two independent pods located one on each side of the tail and consists of the following subsystems: Helium Pressurization; Propellant Storage and Distribution; Orbital Maneuvering Engine; and Electrical Power Distribution and Control. The IOA analysis process utilized available OMS hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluted and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was asigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode.

  11. On-Orbit Software Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Susanne I.

    2004-01-01

    The On-Orbit Software Analysis Research Infusion Project was done by Intrinsyx Technologies Corporation (Intrinsyx) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center (ARC). The Project was a joint collaborative effort between NASA Codes IC and SL, Kestrel Technology (Kestrel), and Intrinsyx. The primary objectives of the Project were: Discovery and verification of software program properties and dependencies, Detection and isolation of software defects across different versions of software, and Compilation of historical data and technical expertise for future applications

  12. Orbit IMU alignment: Error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive accuracy analysis of orbit inertial measurement unit (IMU) alignments using the shuttle star trackers was completed and the results are presented. Monte Carlo techniques were used in a computer simulation of the IMU alignment hardware and software systems to: (1) determine the expected Space Transportation System 1 Flight (STS-1) manual mode IMU alignment accuracy; (2) investigate the accuracy of alignments in later shuttle flights when the automatic mode of star acquisition may be used; and (3) verify that an analytical model previously used for estimating the alignment error is a valid model. The analysis results do not differ significantly from expectations. The standard deviation in the IMU alignment error for STS-1 alignments was determined to the 68 arc seconds per axis. This corresponds to a 99.7% probability that the magnitude of the total alignment error is less than 258 arc seconds.

  13. Surgical Outcomes of Balanced Deep Lateral and Medial Orbital Wall Decompression in Korean Population: Clinical and Computed Tomography-based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sang Uk; Kim, Kyoung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical outcomes of balanced deep lateral and medial orbital wall decompression and to estimate surgical effects using computed tomography (CT) images in Korean patients with thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO). Methods Retrospective chart review was conducted in TAO patients with exophthalmos who underwent balanced deep lateral and medial orbital wall decompression. Exophthalmos was measured preoperatively and postoperatively at 1 and 3 months. Postoperative complications were evaluated in all study periods. In addition, decompressed bone volume was estimated using CT images. Thereafter, decompression volume in each decompressed orbital wall was analyzed to evaluate the surgical effect and predictability. Results Twenty-four patients (48 orbits) with an average age of 34.08 ± 7.03 years were evaluated. The mean preoperative and postoperative exophthalmos at 1 and 3 months was 18.91 ± 1.43, 15.10 ± 1.53, and 14.91 ± 1.49 mm, respectively. Bony decompression volume was 0.80 ± 0.29 cm3 at the medial wall and 0.68 ± 0.23 cm3 at the deep lateral wall. Postoperative complications included strabismus (one patient, 2.08%), upper eyelid fold change (four patients, 8.33%), and dysesthesia (four patients, 8.33%). Postsurgical exophthalmos reduction was more highly correlated with the deep lateral wall than the medial wall. Conclusions In TAO patients with exophthalmos, balanced deep lateral and medial orbital wall decompression is a good surgical method with a low-risk of complications. In addition, deep lateral wall decompression has higher surgical predictability than medial wall decompression, as seen with CT analysis. PMID:27051255

  14. Collisional cascading - The limits of population growth in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    Random collisions between made-made objects in earth orbit will lead to a significant source of orbital debris, but there are a number of uncertainties in these models, and additional analysis and data are required to fully characterize the future environment. However, the nature of these uncertainties are such that while the future environment is uncertain, the fact that collisions will control the future environment is less uncertain. The data that already exist is sufficient to show that cascading collisions will control the future debris environment with no, or very minor increases in the current low-earth-orbit population. Two populations control this process: explosion fragments and expended rocket bodies and payloads. Practices are already changing to limit explosions in low earth orbit; it is necessary to begin limiting the number of expended rocket bodies and payloads in orbit.

  15. Secondary impact generated particles: implications for the orbital debris population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeville, J. C.; Rival, M.; Alby, F.

    1999-01-01

    Every time a debris or a meteoroid hits a part of a satellite in orbit, a great amount of secondary particles is ejected in the neighborhood of the impact site. This phenomenon is important for brittle materials, such as used for solar generators. The secondary particles that do not impact other parts of the spacecraft are added to the primary debris population and increase the small debris flux. We present an ejecta production model that gives the size and the velocity distribution of ejected particles as a function of primary impact parameters. We derive the parameters of all ejecta created during one orbital revolution of a satellite. An orbital evolution program is used to extrapolate the secondary debris position at later times. Preliminary results show that spall fragments ejected at low velocities remain in the vicinity of the parent satellite. The ejecta trajectories are similar and their inclination is very close to those of the parent satellite. Their orbital evolution depends mainly on the size of the debris and on the altitude of the parent body: the smallest particles in low earth orbit quickly reenter the earth atmosphere, while the largest spalls have a very slow decay. The antagonistic action of debris production and debris decay by drag leads to an equilibrium for particles within a given size range. Quantitative results on densities and fluxes compared to the primary debris population are presented for the peculiar case of heliosynchronous orbits.

  16. Orbital Analysis of Macron Propulsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-28

    effects on the orbital debris environment as well as to formulate possible implementations of this technology. Ultimately, the direction, velocity...and altitude at which these macrons are fired determine the macron’s trajectory and dictate the level of impact upon the orbital debris environment

  17. Disentangling satellite galaxy populations using orbit tracking in simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oman, Kyle A.; Hudson, Michael J.; Behroozi, Peter S.

    2013-05-01

    Physical processes regulating star formation in satellite galaxies represent an area of ongoing research, but the projected nature of observed coordinates makes separating different populations of satellites (with different processes at work) difficult. The orbital history of a satellite galaxy leads to its present-day phase space coordinates; we can also work backwards and use these coordinates to statistically infer information about the orbital history. We use merger trees from the MultiDark Run 1 N-body simulation to compile a catalogue of the orbits of satellite haloes in cluster environments. We parametrize the orbital history by the time since crossing within 2.5 rvir of the cluster centre and use our catalogue to estimate the probability density over a range of this parameter given a set of present-day projected (i.e. observable) phase space coordinates. We show that different populations of satellite haloes, e.g. infalling, backsplash and virialized, occupy distinct regions of phase space and semidistinct regions of projected phase space. This will allow us to probabilistically determine the time since infall of a large sample of observed satellite galaxies, and ultimately to study the effect of orbital history on star formation history (the topic of a future paper). We test the accuracy of our method and find that we can reliably recover this time within ±2.58 Gyr in 68 per cent of cases by using all available phase space coordinate information, compared to ±2.64 Gyr using only position coordinates and ±3.10 Gyr guessing `blindly', i.e. using no coordinate information, but with knowledge of the overall distribution of infall times. In some regions of phase space, the accuracy of the infall time estimate improves to ±1.85 Gyr. Although we focus on time since infall, our method is easily generalizable to other orbital parameters (e.g. pericentric distance and time).

  18. Statistical Estimation of Orbital Debris Populations with a Spectrum of Object Size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y. -l; Horstman, M.; Krisko, P. H.; Liou, J. -C; Matney, M.; Stansbery, E. G.; Stokely, C. L.; Whitlock, D.

    2008-01-01

    Orbital debris is a real concern for the safe operations of satellites. In general, the hazard of debris impact is a function of the size and spatial distributions of the debris populations. To describe and characterize the debris environment as reliably as possible, the current NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM2000) is being upgraded to a new version based on new and better quality data. The data-driven ORDEM model covers a wide range of object sizes from 10 microns to greater than 1 meter. This paper reviews the statistical process for the estimation of the debris populations in the new ORDEM upgrade, and discusses the representation of large-size (greater than or equal to 1 m and greater than or equal to 10 cm) populations by SSN catalog objects and the validation of the statistical approach. Also, it presents results for the populations with sizes of greater than or equal to 3.3 cm, greater than or equal to 1 cm, greater than or equal to 100 micrometers, and greater than or equal to 10 micrometers. The orbital debris populations used in the new version of ORDEM are inferred from data based upon appropriate reference (or benchmark) populations instead of the binning of the multi-dimensional orbital-element space. This paper describes all of the major steps used in the population-inference procedure for each size-range. Detailed discussions on data analysis, parameter definition, the correlation between parameters and data, and uncertainty assessment are included.

  19. Statistical Estimation of Orbital Debris Populations with a Spectrum of Object Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yu-Lin; Horstman, Matthew; Krisko, Paula; Liou, J.-C.; Matney, Mark; Stansbery, Eugene; Stokely, Christopher; Whitlock, David

    Orbital debris is a real concern for the safe operations of satellites. In general, the hazard of debris impact is a function of the size and spatial distributions of the debris populations. To describe and characterize the debris environment as reliably as possible, the current NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM2000) is being upgraded to a new version based on new and better-quality data. The data-driven ORDEM model covers a wide range of object sizes from 10 microns to greater than 1 meter. This paper reviews the statistical process for the estimation of the debris populations in the new ORDEM upgrade, and discusses the representation of large-size (≥1 m and ≥10 cm) populations by SSN catalog objects and the validation of the statistical approach. Also, it presents results for the populations with sizes of ≥3.3 cm, ≥1 cm, ≥100 µm, and ≥10 µm. The orbital debris populations used in the new version of ORDEM are inferred from data based upon appropriate reference (or benchmark) populations instead of the binning of the multi-dimensional orbital-element space. This paper describes all of the major steps used in the population-inference procedure for each size-range. Detailed discussions on data analysis, parameter definition, the correlation between parameters and data, and uncertainty assessment are included.

  20. Analysis of initial orbit determination accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vananti, Alessandro; Schildknecht, Thomas

    The Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB) is conducting several search campaigns for orbital debris. The debris objects are discovered during systematic survey observations. In general only a short observation arc, or tracklet, is available for most of these objects. From this discovery tracklet a first orbit determination is computed in order to be able to find the object again in subsequent follow-up observations. The additional observations are used in the orbit improvement process to obtain accurate orbits to be included in a catalogue. In this paper, the accuracy of the initial orbit determination is analyzed. This depends on a number of factors: tracklet length, number of observations, type of orbit, astrometric error, and observation geometry. The latter is characterized by both the position of the object along its orbit and the location of the observing station. Different positions involve different distances from the target object and a different observing angle with respect to its orbital plane and trajectory. The present analysis aims at optimizing the geometry of the discovery observations depending on the considered orbit.

  1. Space Shuttle Orbiter windshield bird impact analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, Karen S.; Mccarty, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Space Shuttle Orbiter's windshield employs three glass panes separated by air gaps. The brittleness of the glass offers much less birdstrike energy-absorption capability than the laminated polycarbonate windshields of more conventional aircraft; attention must accordingly be given to the risk of catastrophic bird impact, and to methods of strike prevention that address bird populations around landing sites rather than the modification of the window's design. Bird populations' direct reduction, as well as careful scheduling of Orbiter landing times, are suggested as viable alternatives. The question of birdstrike-resistant glass windshield design for hypersonic aerospacecraft is discussed.

  2. Modeling of the Orbital Debris Population of RORSAT Sodium-Potassium Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y.-L.; Krisko, P. H.; Matney, Mark; Stansbery, E. G.

    2010-01-01

    A large population resident in the orbital debris environment is composed of eutectic sodium-potassium (NaK) droplets, released during the reactor core ejection of 16 nuclear-powered Radar Ocean Reconnaissance Satellites (RORSATs) launched in the 1980s by the former Soviet Union. These electrically conducting RORSAT debris objects are spherical in shape, generating highly polarized radar returns. Their diameters are mostly in the centimeter and millimeter size regimes. Since the Space Surveillance Network catalog is limited to objects greater than 5 cm in low Earth orbit, our current knowledge about this special class of orbital debris relies largely on the analysis of Haystack radar data. This paper elaborates the simulation of the RORSAT debris populations in the new NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model ORDEM2010, which replaces ORDEM2000. The estimation of the NaK populations uses the NASA NaK-module as a benchmark. It follows the general statistical approach to developing all other ORDEM2010-required LEO populations (for various types of debris and across a wide range of object sizes). This paper describes, in detail, each major step in the NaK-population derivation, including a specific discussion on the conversion between Haystack-measured radar-cross-sections and object-size distribution for the NaK droplets. Modeling results show that the RORSAT debris population is stable for the time period under study and that Haystack data sets are fairly consistent over the observations of multiple years.

  3. Theoretical analysis (NBO, NPA, Mulliken Population Method) and molecular orbital studies (hardness, chemical potential, electrophilicity and Fukui function analysis) of (E)-2-((4-hydroxy-2-methylphenylimino)methyl)-3-methoxyphenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demircioğlu, Zeynep; Kaştaş, Çiğdem Albayrak; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2015-07-01

    The molecular structure and spectroscopic properties of (E)-2-((4-hydroxy-2-methylphenylimino)methyl)-3-methoxyphenol, were characterized by X-ray diffraction, FT-IR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. All of theoretical calculations and optimized geometric parameters have been calculated by using density functional theory (DFT) with hybrid method B3LYP by 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The title compound of C15H15N1O3 have been analyzed according to electronic and energetics behaviors for enol-imine and keto-amine tautomers. Both these tautomers engender six-membered ring due to intramolecular hydrogen bonded interactions. Two types of intramolecular hydrogen bonds (a) strong O-H⋯N interactions in enol-imine form and (b) N-H⋯O interactions in keto-amine form are compared particularly. The theoretical vibrational frequencies have been found in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data. A study on the electronic and optical properties, absorption wavelengths, excitation energy, dipole moment, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and frontier molecular orbital energies are performed using DFT method. Additionally, geometry optimizations in solvent media were performed with the same level of theory by the polarizable continuum model (PCM). The effect of solvents on the tautomeric stability has been investigated. Mulliken Population Method and natural population analysis (NPA) have been studied. NBO analysis is carried out to picture the charge transfer between the localized bonds and lone pairs. The local reactivity of the molecule has been studied using the Fukui function. NLO properties related to polarizability and hyperpolarizability are also discussed.

  4. James Webb Space Telescope Orbit Determination Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Sungpil; Rosales, Jose; Richon, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is designed to study and answer fundamental astrophysical questions from an orbit about the Sun-Earth/Moon L2 libration point, 1.5 million km away from Earth. This paper describes the results of an orbit determination (OD) analysis of the JWST mission emphasizing the challenges specific to this mission in various mission phases. Three mid-course correction (MCC) maneuvers during launch and early orbit phase and transfer orbit phase are required for the spacecraft to reach L2. These three MCC maneuvers are MCC-1a at Launch+12 hours, MCC-1b at L+2.5 days and MCC-2 at L+30 days. Accurate OD solutions are needed to support MCC maneuver planning. A preliminary analysis shows that OD performance with the given assumptions is adequate to support MCC maneuver planning. During the nominal science operations phase, the mission requires better than 2 cm/sec velocity estimation performance to support stationkeeping maneuver planning. The major challenge to accurate JWST OD during the nominal science phase results from the unusually large solar radiation pressure force acting on the huge sunshield. Other challenges are stationkeeping maneuvers at 21-day intervals to keep JWST in orbit around L2, frequent attitude reorientations to align the JWST telescope with its targets and frequent maneuvers to unload momentum accumulated in the reaction wheels. Monte Carlo analysis shows that the proposed OD approach can produce solutions that meet the mission requirements.

  5. Stochastic Analysis of Orbital Lifetimes of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasamoto, Washito; Goodliff, Kandyce; Cornelius, David

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses (1) a Monte-Carlo-based methodology for probabilistic prediction and analysis of orbital lifetimes of spacecraft and (2) Orbital Lifetime Monte Carlo (OLMC)--a Fortran computer program, consisting of a previously developed long-term orbit-propagator integrated with a Monte Carlo engine. OLMC enables modeling of variances of key physical parameters that affect orbital lifetimes through the use of probability distributions. These parameters include altitude, speed, and flight-path angle at insertion into orbit; solar flux; and launch delays. The products of OLMC are predicted lifetimes (durations above specified minimum altitudes) for the number of user-specified cases. Histograms generated from such predictions can be used to determine the probabilities that spacecraft will satisfy lifetime requirements. The document discusses uncertainties that affect modeling of orbital lifetimes. Issues of repeatability, smoothness of distributions, and code run time are considered for the purpose of establishing values of code-specific parameters and number of Monte Carlo runs. Results from test cases are interpreted as demonstrating that solar-flux predictions are primary sources of variations in predicted lifetimes. Therefore, it is concluded, multiple sets of predictions should be utilized to fully characterize the lifetime range of a spacecraft.

  6. Characterizing the population of Asteroids in Cometary Orbits (ACOs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tancredi, Gonzalo; Licandro, Javier; Alí-Lagoa, Victor; Martino, Silvia; Vieira Monteiro, Filipe; Silva, Jose Sergio; Lazzaro, Daniela

    2015-08-01

    The classification criterion between asteroids and comets has evolved in recent decades, but the main phenomenological distinction remains unchanged: comets are active objects as they present gas and dust ejection from the surface at some point of their orbits, while asteroids are inert objects as they do not show any kind of large scale gas and dust ejection.To identify the transitional objects several classification schemes based on the orbital elements have been used. They are usually based on the Tisserand’s parameter (TJ). Tancredi (2014) presents a much more restrictive criterion to identify ACOs that ensured that the objects have a dynamical evolution similar to the population of periodic comets. After applying the criteriaa to the sample of over half a million asteroids already discovered, we obtain 316 ACOs that are further classified in subclasses similar to the cometary classification: 203 objects belong to the Jupiter Family group; 72 objects are classified as Centaurs; and 56 objects have Halley Type Orbits (also known as Damocloids). These are the best-known extinct/dormant comets candidates from a dynamical point of view.We study the physical properties of this sample of ACOs. Two results will be presented:- We look for the ACOs detected by the NASA’s WISE and by fitting a thermal model to their observations, we derive: the effective diameter, beaming parameter and the visible geometric albedo, using the method described in Al-Lagoa et al (2013). We obtain these parameters for 37 of 203 ACOs in JFC orbits and 13 of 56 Damocloids. We also compute the Cumulative Size Distribution (CSDs) of these populations and compare them with the CSDs of JF Comets and Centaurs.- We have been monitoring the observable ACOs since 12/2014 up to 06/2015. Every other month we select all the ACOs with elongations >90deg and estimated magnitudes V<21. We try to observe them with the 1m IMPACTON telescope of the Observatório Astronômico do Sertão de Itaparica (OASI

  7. James Webb Space Telescope Orbit Determination Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Sungpil; Rosales, Jose; Richon, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is designed to study and answer fundamental astrophysical questions from an orbit about the Sun-EarthMoon L2 libration point, 1.5 million km away from Earth. Three mid-course correction (MCC) maneuvers during launch and early orbit phase and transfer orbit phase are required for the spacecraft to reach L2. These three MCC maneuvers are MCC-1a at Launch+12 hours, MCC-1b at L+2.5 days and MCC-2 at L+30 days. Accurate orbit determination (OD) solutions are needed to support MCC maneuver planning. A preliminary analysis shows that OD performance with the given assumptions is adequate to support MCC maneuver planning. During the nominal science operations phase, the mission requires better than 2 cmsec velocity estimation performance to support stationkeeping maneuver planning. The major challenge to accurate JWST OD during the nominal science phase results from the unusually large solar radiation pressure force acting on the huge sunshield. Other challenges are stationkeeping maneuvers at 21-day intervals to keep JWST in orbit around L2, frequent attitude reorientations to align the JWST telescope with its targets and frequent maneuvers to unload momentum accumulated in the reaction wheels. Monte Carlo analysis shows that the proposed OD approach can produce solutions that meet the mission requirements.

  8. Subsatellite Orbital Analysis Program (SOAP) user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, K. G.; Voss, J. M.; Gibson, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    The features and use of the subsatellite operational analysis are examined. The model simulates several Earth-orbiting vehicles, their pilots, control systems, and interaction with the environment. The use of the program, input and output capabilities, executive structures, and properties of the vehicles and environmental effects which it models are described.

  9. Modeling of LEO Orbital Debris Populations in Centimeter and Millimeter Size Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y.-L.; Hill, . M.; Horstman, M.; Krisko, P. H.; Liou, J.-C.; Matney, M.; Stansbery, E. G.

    2010-01-01

    The building of the NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model, whether ORDEM2000 or its recently updated version ORDEM2010, uses as its foundation a number of model debris populations, each truncated at a minimum object-size ranging from 10 micron to 1 m. This paper discusses the development of the ORDEM2010 model debris populations in LEO (low Earth orbit), focusing on centimeter (smaller than 10 cm) and millimeter size regimes. Primary data sets used in the statistical derivation of the cm- and mm-size model populations are from the Haystack radar operated in a staring mode. Unlike cataloged objects of sizes greater than approximately 10 cm, ground-based radars monitor smaller-size debris only in a statistical manner instead of tracking every piece. The mono-static Haystack radar can detect debris as small as approximately 5 mm at moderate LEO altitudes. Estimation of millimeter debris populations (for objects smaller than approximately 6 mm) rests largely on Goldstone radar measurements. The bi-static Goldstone radar can detect 2- to 3-mm objects. The modeling of the cm- and mm-debris populations follows the general approach to developing other ORDEM2010-required model populations for various components and types of debris. It relies on appropriate reference populations to provide necessary prior information on the orbital structures and other important characteristics of the debris objects. NASA's LEO-to-GEO Environment Debris (LEGEND) model is capable of furnishing such reference populations in the desired size range. A Bayesian statistical inference process, commonly adopted in ORDEM2010 model-population derivations, changes a priori distribution into a posteriori distribution and thus refines the reference populations in terms of data. This paper describes key elements and major steps in the statistical derivations of the cm- and mm-size debris populations and presents results. Due to lack of data for near 1-mm sizes, the model populations of 1- to 3.16-mm

  10. Spacecraft Orbital Debris Reentry: Aerothermal Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochelle, Wm. C.; Kinsey, Robin E.; Reid, Ethan A.; Reynolds, Robert C.; Johnson, Nicholas L.

    1997-01-01

    In the past 40 years, thousands of objects have been placed in Earth orbit and are being tracked. Space hardware reentry survivability must be evaluated to assess risks to human life and property on the ground. The objective of this paper is to present results of a study to determine altitude of demise (burn-up) or survivability of reentering objects. Two NASA/JSC computer codes - Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) and Miniature ORSAT (MORSAT) were used to determine trajectories, aerodynamic aerothermal environment, and thermal response of selected spacecraft components. The methodology of the two codes is presented, along with results of a parametric study of reentering objects modeled as spheres and cylinders. Parameters varied included mass, diameter, wall thickness, ballistic coefficient, length, type of material, and mode of tumbling/spinning. Two fragments of a spent Delta second stage undergoing orbital decay, stainless steel cylindrical propellant tank and titanium pressurization sphere, were evaluated with ORSAT and found to survive entry, as did the actual objects. Also, orbital decay reentry predictions of the Japanese Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) aluminum and nickel box-type components and the Russian COSMOS 954 satellite beryllium cylinders were made with MORSAT. These objects were also shown to survive reentry.

  11. Orion Orbit Control Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Mark; Gonzalez, Rodolfo; Sims, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of candidate thruster configurations for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) is presented. Six candidate configurations were considered for the prime contractor baseline design. The analysis included analytical assessments of control authority, control precision, efficiency and robustness, as well as simulation assessments of control performance. The principles used in the analytic assessments of controllability, robustness and fuel performance are covered and results provided for the configurations assessed. Simulation analysis was conducted using a pulse width modulated, 6 DOF reaction system control law with a simplex-based thruster selection algorithm. Control laws were automatically derived from hardware configuration parameters including thruster locations, directions, magnitude and specific impulse, as well as vehicle mass properties. This parameterized controller allowed rapid assessment of multiple candidate layouts. Simulation results are presented for final phase rendezvous and docking, as well as low lunar orbit attitude hold. Finally, on-going analysis to consider alternate Service Module designs and to assess the pilot-ability of the baseline design are discussed to provide a status of orbit control design work to date.

  12. Orbit decay analysis of STS upper stage boosters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, O. F., Jr.; Mueller, A. C.

    1979-01-01

    An orbit decay analysis of the space transportation system upper stage boosters is presented. An overview of the computer trajectory programs, DSTROB, algorithm is presented. Atmospheric drag and perturbation models are described. The development of launch windows, such that the transfer orbit will decay within two years, is discussed. A study of the lifetimes of geosynchronous transfer orbits is presented.

  13. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Uplink Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanampompan, Teerapat; Gladden, Roy; Fisher, Forest; Hwang, Pauline

    2008-01-01

    This software analyzes Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) orbital geometry with respect to Mars Exploration Rover (MER) contact windows, and is the first tool of its kind designed specifically to support MRO-MER interface coordination. Prior to this automated tool, this analysis was done manually with Excel and the UNIX command line. In total, the process would take approximately 30 minutes for each analysis. The current automated analysis takes less than 30 seconds. This tool resides on the flight machine and uses a PHP interface that does the entire analysis of the input files and takes into account one-way light time from another input file. Input flies are copied over to the proper directories and are dynamically read into the tool s interface. The user can then choose the corresponding input files based on the time frame desired for analysis. After submission of the Web form, the tool merges the two files into a single, time-ordered listing of events for both spacecraft. The times are converted to the same reference time (Earth Transmit Time) by reading in a light time file and performing the calculations necessary to shift the time formats. The program also has the ability to vary the size of the keep-out window on the main page of the analysis tool by inputting a custom time for padding each MRO event time. The parameters on the form are read in and passed to the second page for analysis. Everything is fully coded in PHP and can be accessed by anyone with access to the machine via Web page. This uplink tool will continue to be used for the duration of the MER mission's needs for X-band uplinks. Future missions also can use the tools to check overflight times as well as potential site observation times. Adaptation of the input files to the proper format, and the window keep-out times, would allow for other analyses. Any operations task that uses the idea of keep-out windows will have a use for this program.

  14. Ionospheric refraction effects on orbit determination using the orbit determination error analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, C. P.; Kelbel, D. A.; Lee, T.; Dunham, J. B.; Mistretta, G. D.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of ionospheric refraction on orbit determination was studied through the use of the Orbit Determination Error Analysis System (ODEAS). The results of a study of the orbital state estimate errors due to the ionospheric refraction corrections, particularly for measurements involving spacecraft-to-spacecraft tracking links, are presented. In current operational practice at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF), the ionospheric refraction effects on the tracking measurements are modeled in the Goddard Trajectory Determination System (GTDS) using the Bent ionospheric model. While GTDS has the capability of incorporating the ionospheric refraction effects for measurements involving ground-to-spacecraft tracking links, such as those generated by the Ground Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (GSTDN), it does not have the capability to incorporate the refraction effects for spacecraft-to-spacecraft tracking links for measurements generated by the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The lack of this particular capability in GTDS raised some concern about the achievable accuracy of the estimated orbit for certain classes of spacecraft missions that require high-precision orbits. Using an enhanced research version of GTDS, some efforts have already been made to assess the importance of the spacecraft-to-spacecraft ionospheric refraction corrections in an orbit determination process. While these studies were performed using simulated data or real tracking data in definitive orbit determination modes, the study results presented here were obtained by means of covariance analysis simulating the weighted least-squares method used in orbit determination.

  15. NASA Orbital Debris Large-Object Baseline Population in ORDEM 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisco, Paula H.; Vavrin, A. B.; Anz-Meador, P. D.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) has created and validated high fidelity populations of the debris environment for the latest Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM 3.0). Though the model includes fluxes of objects 10 um and larger, this paper considers particle fluxes for 1 cm and larger debris objects from low Earth orbit (LEO) through Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO). These are validated by several reliable radar observations through the Space Surveillance Network (SSN), Haystack, and HAX radars. ORDEM 3.0 populations were designed for the purpose of assisting, debris researchers and sensor developers in planning and testing. This environment includes a background derived from the LEO-to-GEO ENvironment Debris evolutionary model (LEGEND) with a Bayesian rescaling as well as specific events such as the FY-1C anti-satellite test, the Iridium 33/Cosmos 2251 accidental collision, and the Soviet/Russian Radar Ocean Reconnaissance Satellite (RORSAT) sodium-potassium droplet releases. The environment described in this paper is the most realistic orbital debris population larger than 1 cm, to date. We describe derivations of the background population and added specific populations. We present sample validation charts of our 1 cm and larger LEO population against Space Surveillance Network (SSN), Haystack, and HAX radar measurements.

  16. Orbit Determination Analysis Utilizing Radiometric and Laser Ranging Measurements for GPS Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan W.

    2007-01-01

    While navigation systems for the determination of the orbit of the Global Position System (GPS) have proven to be very effective, the current issues involve lowering the error in the GPS satellite ephemerides below their current level. In this document, the results of an orbit determination covariance assessment are provided. The analysis is intended to be the baseline orbit determination study comparing the benefits of adding laser ranging measurements from various numbers of ground stations. Results are shown for two starting longitude assumptions of the satellite location and for nine initial covariance cases for the GPS satellite state vector.

  17. Asteroid orbital error analysis: Theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muinonen, K.; Bowell, Edward

    1992-01-01

    We present a rigorous Bayesian theory for asteroid orbital error estimation in which the probability density of the orbital elements is derived from the noise statistics of the observations. For Gaussian noise in a linearized approximation the probability density is also Gaussian, and the errors of the orbital elements at a given epoch are fully described by the covariance matrix. The law of error propagation can then be applied to calculate past and future positional uncertainty ellipsoids (Cappellari et al. 1976, Yeomans et al. 1987, Whipple et al. 1991). To our knowledge, this is the first time a Bayesian approach has been formulated for orbital element estimation. In contrast to the classical Fisherian school of statistics, the Bayesian school allows a priori information to be formally present in the final estimation. However, Bayesian estimation does give the same results as Fisherian estimation when no priori information is assumed (Lehtinen 1988, and reference therein).

  18. Effects of Orbital Lifetime Reduction on the Long-Term Earth Satellite Population as Modeled by EVOLVE 4.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, Paula H.; Opiela, John N.; Liou, Jer-Chyi; Anz-Meador, Phillip D.; Theall, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    The latest update of the NASA orbital debris environment model, EVOLVE 4.0, has been used to study the effect of various proposed debris mitigation measures, including the NASA 25-year guideline. EVOLVE 4.0, which includes updates of the NASA breakup, solar activity, and the orbit propagator models, a GEO analysis option, and non-fragmentation debris source models, allows for the statistical modeling and predicted growth of the particle population >1 mm in characteristic length in LEO and GEO orbits. The initial implementation of this &odel has been to study the sensitivity of the overall LEO debris environment to mitigation measures designed to limit the lifetime of intact objects in LEO orbits. The mitigation measures test matrix for this study included several commonly accepted testing schemes, i.e., the variance of the maximum LEO lifetime from 10 to 50 years, the date of the initial implementation of this policy, the shut off of all explosions at some specified date, and the inclusion of disposal orbits. All are timely studies in that all scenarios have been suggested by researchers and satellite operators as options for the removal of debris from LEO orbits.

  19. Resolving LDEF's flux distribution: Orbital (debris?) and natural meteoroid populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonnell, J. A. M.

    1993-01-01

    A consistent methodology for the collation of data from both penetration and perforation experiments and from data in the Meteoroid and Debris Special Investigator Group (M-D SIG) data-base has led to the derivation of the average impact flux over LDEF's exposure history 1984-1990. Data are first presented for LDEF's N,S,E,W and Space faces ('offset' by 8 deg and 'tilted' by 1 deg respectively). A model fit is derived for ballistic limits of penetration from 1 micron to 1mm of aluminium target, corresponding to impactor masses from 10(exp -18) kg (for rho sub p = 2g/cu cm) to 10(exp -10) kg (for rho sub p = 1g/cu cm). A second order harmonic function is fitted to the N,S,E, and W fluxes to establish the angular distribution at regular size intervals; this fit is then used to provide 'corrected' data corresponding to fluxes applicable to true N,S,E,W and Space directions for a LEO 28.5 degree inclination orbit at a mean altitude of 465 km.

  20. Instability of the Current Space Debris Population in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniwa, Kazuaki; Hanada, Toshiya; Kawamoto, Satomi

    Since the launch of Sputnik, orbital debris population continues to increase due to ongoing space activities, on-orbit explosions, and accidental collisions. In the future, it is expected that a great deal of fragments will be created by explosions and collisions. Thus, the number of space debris may increase exponentially (Kessler Syndrome). This paper analyzes the Kessler Syndrome using the Low Earth Orbital Debris Environmental Evolutionary Model (LEODEEM) developed at Kyushu University with collaboration from JAXA. The purpose of the study aims at understanding the issues related to space environment conservation. The results provide effective conditions of Active Debris Removal which is one of the space debris mitigation procedures.

  1. Orbital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Robert M.

    2003-06-01

    ORBITAL requires the following software, which is available for free download from the Internet: Netscape Navigator, version 4.75 or higher, or Microsoft Internet Explorer, version 5.0 or higher; Chime Plug-in, version compatible with your OS and browser (available from MDL).

  2. Population Analysis: Communicating in Context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajulu, Sudhakar; Thaxton, Sherry

    2008-01-01

    Providing accommodation to a widely varying user population presents a challenge to engineers and designers. It is often even difficult to quantify who is accommodated and who is not accommodated by designs, especially for equipment with multiple critical anthropometric dimensions. An approach to communicating levels of accommodation referred to as population analysis applies existing human factors techniques in novel ways. This paper discusses the definition of population analysis as well as major applications and case studies. The major applications of population analysis consist of providing accommodation information for multivariate problems and enhancing the value of feedback from human-in-the-loop testing. The results of these analyses range from the provision of specific accommodation percentages of the user population to recommendations of design specifications based on quantitative data. Such feedback is invaluable to designers and results in the design of products that accommodate the intended user population.

  3. Simulation of Micron-Sized Debris Populations in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yu-Lin; Matney, Mark; Liou, J.-C.; Hyde, James; Prior, Thomas G.

    The update of ORDEM2000, the NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model, to its new version -ORDEM2010, is nearly complete. As a part of the ORDEM upgrade, this paper addresses the simulation of micro-debris (greater than 10 µm and smaller than 1 mm in size) populations in low Earth orbit. The principal data used in the modeling of the micron-sized debris popu-lations are in-situ hypervelocity impact records, accumulated in post-flight damage surveys on the space-exposed surfaces of returned spacecrafts. The development of the micro-debris model populations follows the general approach to deriving other ORDEM2010-required input popu-lations for various components and types of debris. This paper describes the key elements and major steps in the statistical inference of the ORDEM2010 micro-debris populations. A crucial step is the construction of a degradation/ejecta source model to provide prior information on the micron-sized objects (such as orbital and object-size distributions). Another critical step is to link model populations with data, which is rather involved. It demands detailed information on area-time/directionality for all the space-exposed elements of a shuttle orbiter and damage laws, which relate impact damage with the physical properties of a projectile and impact con-ditions such as impact angle and velocity. Also needed are model-predicted debris fluxes as a function of object size and impact velocity from all possible directions. In spite of the very limited quantity of the available shuttle impact data, the population-derivation process is satis-factorily stable. Final modeling results obtained from shuttle window and radiator impact data are reasonably convergent and consistent, especially for the debris populations with object-size thresholds at 10 and 100 µm.

  4. Simulation of Micron-Sized Debris Populations in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y.-L.; Hyde, J. L.; Prior, T.; Matney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The update of ORDEM2000, the NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model, to its new version ORDEM2010, is nearly complete. As a part of the ORDEM upgrade, this paper addresses the simulation of micro-debris (greater than 10 m and smaller than 1 mm in size) populations in low Earth orbit. The principal data used in the modeling of the micron-sized debris populations are in-situ hypervelocity impact records, accumulated in post-flight damage surveys on the space-exposed surfaces of returned spacecrafts. The development of the micro-debris model populations follows the general approach to deriving other ORDEM2010-required input populations for various components and types of debris. This paper describes the key elements and major steps in the statistical inference of the ORDEM2010 micro-debris populations. A crucial step is the construction of a degradation/ejecta source model to provide prior information on the micron-sized objects (such as orbital and object-size distributions). Another critical step is to link model populations with data, which is rather involved. It demands detailed information on area-time/directionality for all the space-exposed elements of a shuttle orbiter and damage laws, which relate impact damage with the physical properties of a projectile and impact conditions such as impact angle and velocity. Also needed are model-predicted debris fluxes as a function of object size and impact velocity from all possible directions. In spite of the very limited quantity of the available shuttle impact data, the population-derivation process is satisfactorily stable. Final modeling results obtained from shuttle window and radiator impact data are reasonably convergent and consistent, especially for the debris populations with object-size thresholds at 10 and 100 m.

  5. Simulation of Micron-Sized Debris Populations in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y.-L.; Matney, M.; Liou, J.-C.; Hyde, J. L.; Prior, T. G.

    2010-01-01

    The update of ORDEM2000, the NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model, to its new version . ORDEM2010, is nearly complete. As a part of the ORDEM upgrade, this paper addresses the simulation of micro-debris (greater than 10 micron and smaller than 1 mm in size) populations in low Earth orbit. The principal data used in the modeling of the micron-sized debris populations are in-situ hypervelocity impact records, accumulated in post-flight damage surveys on the space-exposed surfaces of returned spacecrafts. The development of the micro-debris model populations follows the general approach to deriving other ORDEM2010-required input populations for various components and types of debris. This paper describes the key elements and major steps in the statistical inference of the ORDEM2010 micro-debris populations. A crucial step is the construction of a degradation/ejecta source model to provide prior information on the micron-sized objects (such as orbital and object-size distributions). Another critical step is to link model populations with data, which is rather involved. It demands detailed information on area-time/directionality for all the space-exposed elements of a shuttle orbiter and damage laws, which relate impact damage with the physical properties of a projectile and impact conditions such as impact angle and velocity. Also needed are model-predicted debris fluxes as a function of object size and impact velocity from all possible directions. In spite of the very limited quantity of the available shuttle impact data, the population-derivation process is satisfactorily stable. Final modeling results obtained from shuttle window and radiator impact data are reasonably convergent and consistent, especially for the debris populations with object-size thresholds at 10 and 100 micron.

  6. Analysis of Transfer Maneuvers from Initial Circular Orbit to a Final Circular or Elliptic Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharaf, M. A.; Saad, A. S.

    2016-10-01

    In the present paper an analysis of the transfer maneuvers from initial circular orbit to a final circular or elliptic orbit was developed to study the problem of impulsive transfers for space missions. It considers planar maneuvers using newly derived equations. With these equations, comparisons of circular and elliptic maneuvers are made. This comparison is important for the mission designers to obtain useful mappings showing where one maneuver is better than the other. In this aspect, we developed this comparison throughout ten results, together with some graphs to show their meaning.

  7. Extracting Binary Orbital Periods Using Timing Analysis of Microlensing Lightcurves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xinyi; Esin, A.; Di Stefano, R.

    2012-01-01

    Gravitational microlensing events provide unique opportunities to discover and study binaries. A large number of binary lenses have already been found by the microlensing surveys. For the majority of these systems, the binary orbital period is much longer than the duration of the lensing event, so orbital motion can be safely ignored. However, a few lenses have already been discovered that show strong evidence of orbital motion on the timescale of the lensing event. We expect that more such systems will be seen in the future. For binaries whose orbital period is comparable to the event duration, the orbital motion can cause the lensing signal to deviate drastically from that of a static binary lens. The most striking property of such lightcurves is the presence of quasi-periodic features, produced as the source traverses the same regions in the rotating lens plane. Those repeated features contain information about the orbital period of the lens. If this period can be extracted, we immediately learn a lot about the lensing system even without performing the detailed lightcurve modeling. However, the relative transverse motion between the source and the lens significantly complicates the problem of period extraction. To resolve this difficulty, we present a modification to the standard Lomb-Scargle periodogram analysis. We test our method for 6 representative binary lens systems and demonstrate its efficiency in correctly extracting binary orbital periods.

  8. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the Orbiter Experiment (OEX) subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Experiments hardware. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. The Orbiter Experiments (OEX) Program consists of a multiple set of experiments for the purpose of gathering environmental and aerodynamic data to develop more accurate ground models for Shuttle performance and to facilitate the design of future spacecraft. This assessment only addresses currently manifested experiments and their support systems. Specifically this list consists of: Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS); Shuttle Upper Atmosphere Mass Spectrometer (SUMS); Forward Fuselage Support System for OEX (FFSSO); Shuttle Infrared Laced Temperature Sensor (SILTS); Aerodynamic Coefficient Identification Package (ACIP); and Support System for OEX (SSO). There are only two potential critical items for the OEX, since the experiments only gather data for analysis post mission and are totally independent systems except for power. Failure of any experiment component usually only causes a loss of experiment data and in no way jeopardizes the crew or mission.

  9. Investigation of Orbital Debris: Mitigation, Removal, and Modeling the Debris Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotten, Joel

    The population of objects in orbit around Earth has grown since the late 1950s. Today there are over 21,000 objects over 10 cm in length in orbit, and an estimated 500,000 more between 1 and 10 cm. Only a small fraction of these objects are operational satellites. The rest are debris: old derelict spacecraft or rocket bodies, fragments created as the result of explosions or collisions, discarded objects, slag from solid rockets, or even flaked off paint. Traveling at up to 7 km/s, a collision with even a 1 cm piece of debris could severely damage or destroy a satellite. This dissertation examines three aspects of orbital debris. First, the concept of a self-consuming satellite is explored. This nanosatellite would use its own external structure as propellant to execute a deorbit maneuver at the end of its operational life, thus allowing it to meet current debris mitigation standards. Results from lab experiments examining potential materials for this concept have shown favorable results. Second, Particle in Cell techniques are modified and used to model the plasma plume from a micro-cathode arc thruster. This model is then applied to the concept of an ion beam shepherd satellite. This satellite would use its plasma plume to deorbit another derelict satellite. Results from these simulations indicate the micro-cathode arc thruster could potentially deorbit a derelict CubeSat in a matter of a few weeks. Finally, the orbital debris population at geosynchronous orbit is examined, focusing on variations in the density of the population as a function of longitude. New insights are revealed demonstrating that the variation in population density is slightly less than previously reported.

  10. Primary orbital fracture repair: development and validation of tools for morphologic and functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Hontscharuk, Rayisa; Fialkov, Jeffrey A; Binhammer, Paul A; McMillan, Catherine R; Antonyshyn, Oleh

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a technique for objective quantitative evaluation of outcomes of orbital reconstruction. Facial three-dimensional images were captured using a Vectra three-dimensional camera. Morphometric analysis was based on interactive anthropometric identification. The analysis was applied to a population of healthy adults (n = 13) and a population of patients following primary repair of unilateral orbital fractures (n = 13). Morphologic results following reconstruction were evaluated by identifying residual asymmetries. All subjects further completed the Derriford Appearance Questionnaire and the Orbital Appearance and Function Questionnaire.Normative reference values for periorbital asymmetry were determined in a reference population. The mean asymmetry was less than 1.6 mm for each measured morphologic feature. In the trauma population, primary orbital reconstruction effectively restored normal periorbital symmetry in 16 of 20 measured parameters. The fracture population showed no significant differences in the degree of asymmetry in globe projection, lower eyelid position, or ciliary margin length.The overall DAS59 scores were significantly higher in the fracture population (P = 0.04). This was due to significantly higher physical distress and dysfunction scores (P = 0.02), as well as a trend toward higher general and social self-consciousness scores (P = 0.06). No significant difference in facial self-consciousness was noted (P = 0.21). Thus, although primary orbital reconstruction was effective in restoring periorbital morphology, patients still experienced a higher level of physical distress and dysfunction than their nontraumatized counterparts. This was in accordance with patient self-report, which indicated that a greater percentage of patients were significantly bothered by functional outcomes postoperatively as opposed to appearance.

  11. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the orbiter main propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnicoll, W. J.; Mcneely, M.; Holden, K. A.; Emmons, T. E.; Lowery, H. J.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items (PCIs). To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results for the Orbiter Main Propulsion System (MPS) hardware are documented. The Orbiter MPS consists of two subsystems: the Propellant Management Subsystem (PMS) and the Helium Subsystem. The PMS is a system of manifolds, distribution lines and valves by which the liquid propellants pass from the External Tank (ET) to the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs) and gaseous propellants pass from the SSMEs to the ET. The Helium Subsystem consists of a series of helium supply tanks and their associated regulators, check valves, distribution lines, and control valves. The Helium Subsystem supplies helium that is used within the SSMEs for inflight purges and provides pressure for actuation of SSME valves during emergency pneumatic shutdowns. The balance of the helium is used to provide pressure to operate the pneumatically actuated valves within the PMS. Each component was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticalities were assigned based on the worst possible effect of each failure mode. Of the 690 failure modes analyzed, 349 were determined to be PCIs.

  12. New orbital analysis of stars at the Galactic center using speckle holography and orbital priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehle, Anna; Schödel, Rainer; Meyer, Leo; Ghez, Andrea M.

    2014-05-01

    We present initial results of a study that has more than doubled the time baseline for astrometric measurements of faint stars orbiting the supermassive black hole (SMBH) at the Galactic center. The advent of adaptive optics has enabled stars as faint as K = 19 mag to be tracked at 50 mas resolution for the last decade. While similar resolution images exist from the prior decade, they were obtained from speckle imaging data analyzed with the technique of shift-and-add, which limited detections to stars brighter than K = 16 mag. By improving the speckle data analysis technique with speckle holography and using prior orbital knowledge, we are now able to track stars as faint as ˜18 mag at 50 mas resolution through the early Keck speckle data sets (1995-2005). This methodology has already led to the detection of two short-period stars never previously seen in speckle images, such that our data now spans their full orbits. We can now better constrain the orbital parameters of all stars in the intriguing "S-star cluster," which will ultimately give us insight into the origin of these stars and be used to probe the curvature of space-time in the unexplored regime near a SMBH.

  13. An Analysis of the Orbital Distribution of Solid Rocket Motor Slag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, Matthew F.; Mulrooney, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The contribution made by orbiting solid rocket motors (SRMs) to the orbital debris environment is both potentially significant and insufficiently studied. A combination of rocket motor design and the mechanisms of the combustion process can lead to the emission of sufficiently large and numerous by-products to warrant assessment of their contribution to the orbital debris environment. These particles are formed during SRM tail-off, or the termination of burn, by the rapid expansion, dissemination, and solidification of the molten Al2O3 slag pool accumulated during the main burn phase of SRMs utilizing immersion-type nozzles. Though the usage of SRMs is low compared to the usage of liquid fueled motors, the propensity of SRMs to generate particles in the 100 m and larger size regime has caused concern regarding their contributing to the debris environment. Particle sizes as large as 1 cm have been witnessed in ground tests conducted under vacuum conditions and comparable sizes have been estimated via ground-based telescopic and in-situ observations of sub-orbital SRM tail-off events. Using sub-orbital and post recovery observations, a simplistic number-size-velocity distribution of slag from on-orbit SRM firings was postulated. In this paper we have developed more elaborate distributions and emission scenarios and modeled the resultant orbital population and its time evolution by incorporating a historical database of SRM launches, propellant masses, and likely location and time of particulate deposition. From this analysis a more comprehensive understanding has been obtained of the role of SRM ejecta in the orbital debris environment, indicating that SRM slag is a significant component of the current and future population.

  14. An Analysis of Journal Orbits for Nonlinear Dynamic Bearing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. K.

    An analysis of journal centre orbits is presented in this paper based on a non-isothermal non-Newtonian fluid model for dynamically loaded bearing systems. A spectral element approach is used to solve a full set of coupled equations (kinematics and constitutive) governing the flow of the lubricant, and an operator-splitting spectral element technique is used to evaluate the dynamic energy equation. The motion of the journal is calculated on the basis of Newtonian mechanics incorporated with a simple cavitation model. The stability of the journal orbits is investigated under a wide range of the rotation speeds of journal. The unstable orbits arise as a sub-harmonic motion when the journal rotation speed is increased beyond a critical value. The influences of the oscillation speeds of the applied loads on the journal orbits are examined. The numerical simulations demonstrate that both the rotation speed of the journal and the oscillation speed of the applied load play an important role in determining the pattern of the journal orbits. The effects of square-wave and rotating applied loads on the journal orbits are also investigated.

  15. Extensive Radiation Shielding Analysis for Different Spacecraft Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çay, Yiǧit; Kaymaz, Zerefsan

    2016-07-01

    Radiation environment around Earth poses a great danger for spacecraft and causes immature de-orbiting or loss of the spacecraft in near Earth space environment. In this study, a student project has been designed to build a CubeSat, PolarBeeSail (PBS), with an orbit having inclination of 80°, 4 Re in perigee and 20 Re in apogee to study the polar magnetospheric environment. An extensive radiation dose analyses were carried out for PBS orbit, and integral and differential fluxes were calculated using SPENVIS tools. A shielding analysis was performed and an optimum Aluminum thickness, 3 mm, was obtained. These results for PBS were then compared for other orbits at different altitudes both for polar and equatorial orbits. For this purpose, orbital characteristics of POES-19 and GOES-15 were used. The resulting proton flux analyses, TID analyses, and further shielding studies were conducted; comparisons and recommendations were made for future design of spacecraft that will use these environments.

  16. Numerical Analysis of Orbital Perturbation Effects on Inclined Geosynchronous SAR

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xichao; Hu, Cheng; Long, Teng; Li, Yuanhao

    2016-01-01

    The geosynchronous synthetic aperture radar (GEO SAR) is susceptible to orbit perturbations, leading to orbit drifts and variations. The influences behave very differently from those in low Earth orbit (LEO) SAR. In this paper, the impacts of perturbations on GEO SAR orbital elements are modelled based on the perturbed dynamic equations, and then, the focusing is analyzed theoretically and numerically by using the Systems Tool Kit (STK) software. The accurate GEO SAR slant range histories can be calculated according to the perturbed orbit positions in STK. The perturbed slant range errors are mainly the first and second derivatives, leading to image drifts and defocusing. Simulations of the point target imaging are performed to validate the aforementioned analysis. In the GEO SAR with an inclination of 53° and an argument of perigee of 90°, the Doppler parameters and the integration time are different and dependent on the geometry configurations. Thus, the influences are varying at different orbit positions: at the equator, the first-order phase errors should be mainly considered; at the perigee and apogee, the second-order phase errors should be mainly considered; at other positions, first-order and second-order exist simultaneously. PMID:27598168

  17. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the auxiliary power unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Auxiliary Power Unit (APU). The APUs are required to provide power to the Orbiter hydraulics systems during ascent and entry flight phases for aerosurface actuation, main engine gimballing, landing gear extension, and other vital functions. For analysis purposes, the APU system was broken down into ten functional subsystems. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. A preponderance of 1/1 criticality items were related to failures that allowed the hydrazine fuel to escape into the Orbiter aft compartment, creating a severe fire hazard, and failures that caused loss of the gas generator injector cooling system.

  18. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the pyrotechnics subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, W. W.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Pyrotechnics hardware. The IOA analysis process utilized available pyrotechnics hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode.

  19. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the crew equipment subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, Susan; Graham, L.; Richard, Bill; Saxon, H.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical (PCIs) items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results coresponding to the Orbiter crew equipment hardware are documented. The IOA analysis process utilized available crew equipment hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. Of the 352 failure modes analyzed, 78 were determined to be PCIs.

  20. Space Station polar orbiting platform - Mission analysis and planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Space Station Polar Orbiting Platform will be a serviceable spacecraft supporting a range of missions. The planning and analysis of these missions is investigated. The subjects of STS compatibility, rendezvous strategy, and requisite launch windows are addressed. General, as well as, two specific cases are detailed with respect to their incremental velocity requirements.

  1. Probing the population of the spin-orbit split levels in the actinide 5f states.

    PubMed

    Moore, K T; van der Laan, G; Tobin, J G; Chung, B W; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J

    2006-03-01

    Spin-orbit interaction in the 5f states is believed to strongly influence exotic behaviors observed in actinide metals and compounds. Understanding these interactions and how they relate to the actinide series is of considerable importance. To address this issue, the branching ratio of the white-line peaks of the N4,5 edge for the light actinide metals, alpha-Th, alpha-U, and alpha-Pu were recorded using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Using the spin-orbit sum rule and the branching ratios from both experimental spectra and many-electron atomic spectral calculations, accurate values of the spin-orbit interaction, and thus the relative occupation of the j = 5/2 and 7/2 levels, are determined for the actinide 5f states. Results show that the spin-orbit sum rule works very well with both EELS and XAS spectra, needing little or no correction. This is important, since the high spatial resolution of a TEM can be used to overcome the problems of single-crystal growth often encountered with actinide metals, allowing acquisition of EELS spectra, and subsequent spin-orbit analysis, from nm-sized regions. The relative occupation numbers obtained by our method have been compared with recent theoretical results and they show a good agreement in their trend.

  2. Atmospheric gravitational influence on geodetic satellite orbits - Starlette analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, B. F.; Chan, Joseph C.

    1992-01-01

    The atmosphere is constantly in motion. The changing gravitational force due to the air mass movement will slightly perturb the orbit of a satellite. As the instrument accuracy for geodetic satellites improves, failure to model this perturbation can result in significant systematic errors in the orbit determination. The latter, in turn, will degrade the Earth's gravity solutions. A direct modeling technique to analyze the atmospheric gravitational influence on geodetic satellite is developed. We use the global surface pressure data from the ECMWF Initial Analysis Database to compute the gravitational force due to atmospheric perturbation exerted on given satellite as a function of time during selected orbital arcs. Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) tracking data for selected Starlette (altitude 900 km) orbital arcs are used to test the computed force model. Although only a slight reduction in the rms residuals is observed when the atmospheric gravitational perturbation is included in the force model for data reduction of the SLR data, significant improvement is obtained in the predictability of the satellite orbit. Comprehensive studies involving more definitive test criteria and more refined models are still needed.

  3. Solar Thermal : Solar Electric Propulsion Hybrid Orbit Transfer Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFall, Keith A.

    2000-07-01

    This effort examined the payoffs associated with the joint application of solar thermal propulsion (STP) and electric propulsion (EP) for orbit raising. The combined use of STP (800 second specific impulse) and EP (1800 second specific impulse) for a single orbit transfer mission is motivated by the desire to leverage the higher thrust of STP with the higher specific impulse of EP to maximize mission capability. The primary objectives of this analysis were to quantify the payload, mission duration, and hydrogen propellant to payload mass ratio for a range of combined STP and EP orbit transfer missions to geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO), and contrast them to results for STP only. For STP, the hydrogen propellant to payload mass ratio is of particular interest due to payload fairing size constraints and the relatively low density of liquid hydrogen, which limit the mass of the STP propellant, and therefore the amount of payload that can be delivered. The results of the analysis include an 18% payload improvement associated with STP-EP hybrid propulsion over STP alone. The trip time needed for the STP-EP transfer varied from 101 to 143 days, compared to 41 days for the Solar only case. In addition, the amount of hydrogen propellant needed to accomplish the orbit raising to GEO per unit mass of payload decreased by 29% when the Solar Thermal - Solar Electric hybrid was used. While comprehensive comparisons of STP-EP to chemical propulsion (CP) only and to CP with EP orbit topping were also of interest, they were beyond the scope of this effort. However, a comparison of reference missions was performed. In comparison to the reference CP (328 second specific impulse) and CP-EP missions the STP-EP system provided 67% and 39% payload increases. respectively. The trip time for the CP-EP cases varied from 55 to 106 days.

  4. Automated Orbit Determination System (AODS) requirements definition and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, S. R.; Goorevich, C. E.; Teles, J.; Pajerski, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    The requirements definition for the prototype version of the automated orbit determination system (AODS) is presented including the AODS requirements at all levels, the functional model as determined through the structured analysis performed during requirements definition, and the results of the requirements analysis. Also specified are the implementation strategy for AODS and the AODS-required external support software system (ADEPT), input and output message formats, and procedures for modifying the requirements.

  5. A population of Main Belt Asteroids co-orbiting with Ceres and Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christou, Apostolos A.; Wiegert, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We have carried out a search for Main Belt Asteroids (MBAs) co-orbiting with the large MBA Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres. Through improving the search criteria used in Christou (Christou, A.A. [2000b]. Astron. Astrophys. 356, L71-L74) and numerical integrations of candidate coorbitals, we have identified approximately 51 (44) objects currently in co-orbital libration with Ceres (Vesta). We show that these form part of a larger population of transient coorbitals; 129 (94) MBAs undergo episodes of co-orbital libration with Ceres (Vesta) within a 2 Myr interval centred on the present. The lifetime in the resonance is typically a few times ˜10 5 yr but can exceed 2 × 10 6 yr. The variational properties of the orbits of several co-orbitals were examined. It was found that their present states with respect to the secondary are well determined but knowledge of it is lost typically after ˜2 × 10 5 yr. Objects initially deeper into the coorbital region maintain their coorbital state for longer. Using the model of Namouni et al. (Namouni, F., Christou, A.A., Murray, C.D. [1999]. Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2506-2509) we show that their dynamics are similar to those of temporary coorbital NEAs of the Earth and Venus. As in that case, the lifetime of resonant libration is dictated by planetary secular perturbations, the inherent chaoticity of the orbits and close encounters with massive objects other than the secondary. In particular we present evidence that, while in the coorbital state, close encounters with the secondary are generally avoided and that Ceres affects the stability of tadpole librators of Vesta. Finally we demonstrate the existence of Quasi-Satellite orbiters of both Ceres and Vesta and conclude that decametre-sized objects detected in the vicinity of Vesta by the DAWN mission may, in fact, belong to this dynamical class rather than be bona-fide (i.e. Keplerian) satellites of Vesta.

  6. A Consistent Orbital Stability Analysis for the GJ 581 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joiner, David A.; Sul, Cesar; Dragomir, Diana; Kane, Stephen R.; Kress, Monika E.

    2014-06-01

    We apply a combination of N-body modeling techniques and automated data fitting with Monte Carlo Markov Chain uncertainty analysis of Keplerian orbital models to RV data to determine long-term stability of the planetary system GJ 581. We find that while there are stability concerns with the four-planet model as published by Forveille et al., when uncertainties in the system are accounted for, particularly stellar jitter, the hypothesis that the four-planet model is gravitationally unstable is not statistically significant. Additionally, the system including proposed planet g by Vogt et al. also shows some stability concerns when eccentricities are allowed to float in the orbital fit, yet when uncertainties are included in the analysis, the system including planet g also cannot be proven to be unstable. We present revised reduced χ2 values for Keplerian astrocentric orbital fits assuming four-planet and five-planet models for GJ 581 under the condition that best fits must be stable, and we find no distinguishable difference by including planet g in the model. Additionally, we present revised orbital element estimates for each, assuming uncertainties due to stellar jitter under the constraint of the system being gravitationally stable.

  7. Determination of LAGEOS satellite's precise orbits and residual analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, C. G.; Zhang, F. P.; Zhu, Y. L.

    2003-02-01

    Determination of LAGEOS satellite's precise orbits based on an analysis residual error of SLR data are introduced in detail. The method analyzing the data of satellite laser ranging (SLR)?the dynamical models used and the number of parameters estimated should be changed with the different purposes. The schemes were compared with each other and were analyzed with the number of parameters estimated and the residual errors in detail. The determination of precise orbits is the key of these. To acquire a precise orbit, the models determining the EOP were modified. The scheme being used by SHAO was selected from the several schemes. In this paper, the results of LAGEOS satellite's precise orbits from Dec. 31, 1998 to Jun. 29, 2001 are set out only. The results show that the root-mean square value of the residuals are less than 2cm. SHAO has begun the service of LAGEOS-1/LAGEOS-2 quick-look residual analysis since Oct.1, 1999. The results can be find on the intent address: http://center.shao.ac.cn/APSG/result

  8. Probabilistic Thermal Analysis During Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Aerobraking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec, John A.

    2007-01-01

    A method for performing a probabilistic thermal analysis during aerobraking has been developed. The analysis is performed on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter solar array during aerobraking. The methodology makes use of a response surface model derived from a more complex finite element thermal model of the solar array. The response surface is a quadratic equation which calculates the peak temperature for a given orbit drag pass at a specific location on the solar panel. Five different response surface equations are used, one of which predicts the overall maximum solar panel temperature, and the remaining four predict the temperatures of the solar panel thermal sensors. The variables used to define the response surface can be characterized as either environmental, material property, or modeling variables. Response surface variables are statistically varied in a Monte Carlo simulation. The Monte Carlo simulation produces mean temperatures and 3 sigma bounds as well as the probability of exceeding the designated flight allowable temperature for a given orbit. Response surface temperature predictions are compared with the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter flight temperature data.

  9. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the body flap subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. E.; Riccio, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items (PCIs). To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results for the Orbiter Body Flap (BF) subsystem hardware are documented. The BF is a large aerosurface located at the trailing edge of the lower aft fuselage of the Orbiter. The proper function of the BF is essential during the dynamic flight phases of ascent and entry. During the ascent phase of flight, the BF trails in a fixed position. For entry, the BF provides elevon load relief, trim control, and acts as a heat shield for the main engines. Specifically, the BF hardware comprises the following components: Power Drive Unit (PDU), rotary actuators, and torque tubes. The IOA analysis process utilized available BF hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. Of the 35 failure modes analyzed, 19 were determined to be PCIs.

  10. To Preserve or Not to Preserve the Orbit in Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Camilo; Mason, Eric; Solares, C. Arturo; Bush, Carrie; Carrau, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Context The effect on survival of orbital evisceration on patients with paranasal sinus neoplasms has not been well established. Objective To review systematically the available literature concerning survival in patients who undergo surgery for paranasal sinus neoplasm with and without preservation of the eye. Data Source A retrospective meta-analysis of English and non-English articles using Medline and the Cochrane database. Eligibility Criteria Studies analyzing 5-year survival rates in patients who had orbital evisceration compared with orbital preservation for the treatment of paranasal sinus neoplasms were included in the final analysis. Data Extraction Independent review by two authors using predefined data fields. Data Synthesis A meta-analysis of four articles involving 443 patients was performed using the DerSimonian-Laird random-effects method. Results Our analysis revealed a total effect size of 0.964 in favor of preservation of the eye; however, these results are not robust, having a true effect size anywhere from 0.785 to 1.142 with a 95% confidence interval. Limitations Only retrospective observational studies were included because a prospective randomized study cannot be performed in this population. Conclusion Our study supports the notion that in select patients preservation of the eye may yield a different outcome when compared with orbital evisceration. PMID:25844298

  11. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the extravehicular mobility unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raffaelli, Gary G.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items (PCIs). To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) hardware. The EMU is an independent anthropomorphic system that provides environmental protection, mobility, life support, and communications for the Shuttle crewmember to perform Extravehicular Activity (EVA) in Earth orbit. Two EMUs are included on each baseline Orbiter mission, and consumables are provided for three two-man EVAs. The EMU consists of the Life Support System (LSS), Caution and Warning System (CWS), and the Space Suit Assembly (SSA). Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. The majority of these PCIs are resultant from failures which cause loss of one or more primary functions: pressurization, oxygen delivery, environmental maintenance, and thermal maintenance. It should also be noted that the quantity of PCIs would significantly increase if the SOP were to be treated as an emergency system rather than as an unlike redundant element.

  12. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the DPS subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, H. J.; Haufler, W. A.; Pietz, K. C.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis/Critical Items List (FMEA/CIL) is presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to independently determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. The independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Data Processing System (DPS) hardware are documented. The DPS hardware is required for performing critical functions of data acquisition, data manipulation, data display, and data transfer throughout the Orbiter. Specifically, the DPS hardware consists of the following components: Multiplexer/Demultiplexer (MDM); General Purpose Computer (GPC); Multifunction CRT Display System (MCDS); Data Buses and Data Bus Couplers (DBC); Data Bus Isolation Amplifiers (DBIA); Mass Memory Unit (MMU); and Engine Interface Unit (EIU). The IOA analysis process utilized available DPS hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. Due to the extensive redundancy built into the DPS the number of critical items are few. Those identified resulted from premature operation and erroneous output of the GPCs.

  13. Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Mission Commissioning Phase Orbit Determination Error Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Lauren R.; Novak, Stefan; Long, Anne; Gramling, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    The Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission commissioning phase starts in a 185 km altitude x 12 Earth radii (RE) injection orbit and lasts until the Phase 1 mission orbits and orientation to the Earth-Sun li ne are achieved. During a limited time period in the early part of co mmissioning, five maneuvers are performed to raise the perigee radius to 1.2 R E, with a maneuver every other apogee. The current baseline is for the Goddard Space Flight Center Flight Dynamics Facility to p rovide MMS orbit determination support during the early commissioning phase using all available two-way range and Doppler tracking from bo th the Deep Space Network and Space Network. This paper summarizes th e results from a linear covariance analysis to determine the type and amount of tracking data required to accurately estimate the spacecraf t state, plan each perigee raising maneuver, and support thruster cal ibration during this phase. The primary focus of this study is the na vigation accuracy required to plan the first and the final perigee ra ising maneuvers. Absolute and relative position and velocity error hi stories are generated for all cases and summarized in terms of the ma ximum root-sum-square consider and measurement noise error contributi ons over the definitive and predictive arcs and at discrete times inc luding the maneuver planning and execution times. Details of the meth odology, orbital characteristics, maneuver timeline, error models, and error sensitivities are provided.

  14. Mission Analysis and Orbit Control of Interferometric Wheel Formation Flying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourcade, J.

    Flying satellite in formation requires maintaining the specific relative geometry of the spacecraft with high precision. This requirement raises new problem of orbit control. This paper presents the results of the mission analysis of a low Earth observation system, the interferometric wheel, patented by CNES. This wheel is made up of three receiving spacecraft, which follow an emitting Earth observation radar satellite. The first part of this paper presents trades off which were performed to choose orbital elements of the formation flying which fulfils all constraints. The second part presents orbit positioning strategies including reconfiguration of the wheel to change its size. The last part describes the station keeping of the formation. Two kinds of constraints are imposed by the interferometric system : a constraint on the distance between the wheel and the radar satellite, and constraints on the distance between the wheel satellites. The first constraint is fulfilled with a classical chemical station keeping strategy. The second one is fulfilled using pure passive actuators. Due to the high stability of the relative eccentricity of the formation, only the relative semi major axis had to be controlled. Differential drag due to differential attitude motion was used to control relative altitude. An autonomous orbit controller was developed and tested. The final accuracy is a relative station keeping better than few meters for a wheel size of one kilometer.

  15. Structural Health Monitoring Analysis for the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yap, Keng C.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Structural Health Monitoring Analysis for the Orbiter Wing Leading Edge. The Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System (WLE IDS) and the Impact Analysis Process are also described to monitor WLE debris threats. The contents include: 1) Risk Management via SHM; 2) Hardware Overview; 3) Instrumentation; 4) Sensor Configuration; 5) Debris Hazard Monitoring; 6) Ascent Response Summary; 7) Response Signal; 8) Distribution of Flight Indications; 9) Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA); 10) Model Correlation; 11) Impact Tests; 12) Wing Leading Edge Modeling; 13) Ascent Debris PRA Results; and 14) MM/OD PRA Results.

  16. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the instrumentation subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, B. S.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results for the Instrumentation Subsystem are documented. The Instrumentation Subsystem (SS) consists of transducers, signal conditioning equipment, pulse code modulation (PCM) encoding equipment, tape recorders, frequency division multiplexers, and timing equipment. For this analysis, the SS is broken into two major groupings: Operational Instrumentation (OI) equipment and Modular Auxiliary Data System (MADS) equipment. The OI equipment is required to acquire, condition, scale, digitize, interleave/multiplex, format, and distribute operational Orbiter and payload data and voice for display, recording, telemetry, and checkout. It also must provide accurate timing for time critical functions for crew and payload specialist use. The MADS provides additional instrumentation to measure and record selected pressure, temperature, strain, vibration, and event data for post-flight playback and analysis. MADS data is used to assess vehicle responses to the flight environment and to permit correlation of such data from flight to flight. The IOA analysis utilized available SS hardware drawings and schematics for identifying hardware assemblies and components and their interfaces. Criticality for each item was assigned on the basis of the worst-case effect of the failure modes identified.

  17. Mission analysis data for inclined geosynchronous orbits, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, O. F., Jr.; Wang, K. C.

    1980-01-01

    Data needed for preliminary design of inclined geosynchronous missions are provided. The inertial and Earth fixed coordinate systems are described, as well as orbit parameters and elements. The complete family of geosynchronous orbits is discussed. It is shown that circular inclined geosynchronous orbits comprise only one set in this family. The major orbit perturbation and their separate effects on the geosynchronous orbit are discussed. Detailed information on the orbit perturbation of inclined circular geosynchronous orbits is given, with emphasis on time history data of certain orbital elements. Orbit maintenance delta velocity (V) requirements to counteract the major orbit perturbations are determined in order to provide order of magnitude estimates and to show the effects of orbit inclination on delta V. Some of the considerations in mission design for a multisatellite system, such as a halo orbit constellation, are discussed.

  18. Forecast analysis on satellites that need de-orbit technologies: future scenarios for passive de-orbit devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, Chiara; Kingston, Jennifer

    2016-09-01

    Propulsion-based de-orbit is a space-proven technology; however, this strategy can strongly limit operational lifetime, as fuel mass is dedicated to the de-orbiting. In addition previous reliability studies have identified the propulsion subsystem as one of the major contributors driving satellite failures. This issue brings the need to develop affordable de-orbit technologies with a limited reliance on the system level performance of the host satellite, ideally largely passive methods. Passive disposal strategies which take advantage of aerodynamic drag as the de-orbit force are particularly attractive because they are independent of spacecraft propulsion capabilities. This paper investigates the future market for passive de-orbit devices in LEO to aid in defining top-level requirements for the design of such devices. This is performed by considering the compliances of projected future satellites with the Inter Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee de-orbit time, to quantify the number of spacecraft that are compliant or non-compliant with the guidelines and, in this way, determine their need for the previously discussed devices. The study is performed by using the SpaceTrak™ database which provides future launch schedules, and spacecraft information; the de-orbit analysis is carried out by means of simulations with STELA. A case study of a passive strategy is given by the de-orbit mechanism technological demonstrator, which is currently under development at Cranfield University and designed to deploy a drag sail at the end of the ESEO satellite mission.

  19. Space Shuttle Orbiter entry guidance and control system sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, H. W.; Powell, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    An approach has been developed to determine the guidance and control system sensitivity to off-nominal aerodynamics for the Space Shuttle Orbiter during entry. This approach, which uses a nonlinear six-degree-of-freedom interactive, digital simulation, has been applied to both the longitudinal and lateral-directional axes for a portion of the orbiter entry. Boundary values for each of the aerodynamic parameters have been identified, the key parameters have been determined, and system modifications that will increase system tolerance to off-nominal aerodynamics have been recommended. The simulations were judged by specified criteria and the performance was evaluated by use of key dependent variables. The analysis is now being expanded to include the latest shuttle guidance and control systems throughout the entry speed range.

  20. Analysis of Errors in a Special Perturbations Satellite Orbit Propagator

    SciTech Connect

    Beckerman, M.; Jones, J.P.

    1999-02-01

    We performed an analysis of error densities for the Special Perturbations orbit propagator using data for 29 satellites in orbits of interest to Space Shuttle and International Space Station collision avoidance. We find that the along-track errors predominate. These errors increase monotonically over each 36-hour prediction interval. The predicted positions in the along-track direction progressively either leap ahead of or lag behind the actual positions. Unlike the along-track errors the radial and cross-track errors oscillate about their nearly zero mean values. As the number of observations per fit interval decline the along-track prediction errors, and amplitudes of the radial and cross-track errors, increase.

  1. Stability Analysis of the Planetary System Orbiting Upsilon Andromedae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Rivera, Eugenio J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present results of long-term numerical orbital integrations designed to test the stability of the three-planet system orbiting Upsilon Andromedae and short-term integrations to test whether mutual perturbations among the planets can be used to determine planetary masses. Our initial conditions are based on the latest fits to the radial velocity data obtained by the planet-search group at Lick Observatory. The new fits result in significantly more stable systems than did the initially announced planetary parameters. An analytic analysis of the star and the two outer planets shows that this subsystem is Hill stable up to five. Our integrations involving all three planets show that the system is stable for at least 100 Myr for up to four. In our simulations, we still see a secular resonance between the outer two planets and in some cases large oscillations in the eccentricity of the inner planet.

  2. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the mechanical actuation subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacher, J. L.; Montgomery, A. D.; Bradway, M. W.; Slaughter, W. T.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Mechanical Actuation System (MAS) hardware. Specifically, the MAS hardware consists of the following components: Air Data Probe (ADP); Elevon Seal Panel (ESP); External Tank Umbilical (ETU); Ku-Band Deploy (KBD); Payload Bay Doors (PBD); Payload Bay Radiators (PBR); Personnel Hatches (PH); Vent Door Mechanism (VDM); and Startracker Door Mechanism (SDM). The IOA analysis process utilized available MAS hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode.

  3. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the backup flight system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prust, E. E.; Mielke, R. W.; Hinsdale, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Backup Flight System (BFS) hardware. The BFS hardware consists of one General Purpose Computer (GPC) loaded with backup flight software and the components used to engage/disengage that unique GPC. Specifically, the BFS hardware includes the following: DDU (Display Driver Unit), BFC (Backup Flight Controller), GPC (General Purpose Computer), switches (engage, disengage, GPC, CRT), and circuit protectors (fuses, circuit breakers). The IOA analysis process utilized available BFS hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. Of the failure modes analyzed, 19 could potentially result in a loss of life and/or loss of vehicle.

  4. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the remote manipulator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tangorra, F.; Grasmeder, R. F.; Montgomery, A. D.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items (PCIs). To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results for the Orbiter Remote Manipulator System (RMS) are documented. The RMS hardware and software are primarily required for deploying and/or retrieving up to five payloads during a single mission, capture and retrieve free-flying payloads, and for performing Manipulator Foot Restraint operations. Specifically, the RMS hardware consists of the following components: end effector; displays and controls; manipulator controller interface unit; arm based electronics; and the arm. The IOA analysis process utilized available RMS hardware drawings, schematics and documents for defining hardware assemblies, components and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. Of the 574 failure modes analyzed, 413 were determined to be PCIs.

  5. Uncertainty Requirement Analysis for the Orbit, Attitude, and Burn Performance of the 1st Lunar Orbit Insertion Maneuver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Joo; Bae, Jonghee; Kim, Young-Rok; Kim, Bang-Yeop

    2016-12-01

    In this study, the uncertainty requirements for orbit, attitude, and burn performance were estimated and analyzed for the execution of the 1st lunar orbit insertion (LOI) maneuver of the Korea Pathfinder Lunar Orbiter (KPLO) mission. During the early design phase of the system, associate analysis is an essential design factor as the 1st LOI maneuver is the largest burn that utilizes the onboard propulsion system; the success of the lunar capture is directly affected by the performance achieved. For the analysis, the spacecraft is assumed to have already approached the periselene with a hyperbolic arrival trajectory around the moon. In addition, diverse arrival conditions and mission constraints were considered, such as varying periselene approach velocity, altitude, and orbital period of the capture orbit after execution of the 1st LOI maneuver. The current analysis assumed an impulsive LOI maneuver, and two-body equations of motion were adapted to simplify the problem for a preliminary analysis. Monte Carlo simulations were performed for the statistical analysis to analyze diverse uncertainties that might arise at the moment when the maneuver is executed. As a result, three major requirements were analyzed and estimated for the early design phase. First, the minimum requirements were estimated for the burn performance to be captured around the moon. Second, the requirements for orbit, attitude, and maneuver burn performances were simultaneously estimated and analyzed to maintain the 1st elliptical orbit achieved around the moon within the specified orbital period. Finally, the dispersion requirements on the B-plane aiming at target points to meet the target insertion goal were analyzed and can be utilized as reference target guidelines for a mid-course correction (MCC) maneuver during the transfer. More detailed system requirements for the KPLO mission, particularly for the spacecraft bus itself and for the flight dynamics subsystem at the ground control center

  6. New osculating orbits for 110 comets and analysis of original orbits for 200 comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsden, B. G.; Sekanina, Z.; Everhart, E.

    1978-01-01

    Osculating orbits are presented for 110 nearly parabolic comets. Combining these with selected orbit determinations from other sources, a total of 200 orbits are considered where the available observations yield a result of very good (first-class) or good (second-class) quality. For each of these, the original and future orbits (referred to the barycenter of the solar system) are calculated. The Oort effect (a tendency for original reciprocal semimajor axis values to range from zero to +100 millionths per AU) is clearly seen among the first-class orbits but not among the second-class orbits. Modifications in original reciprocal semimajor axis values due to the effects of nongravitational forces are considered.

  7. Scout: orbit analysis and hazard assessment for NEOCP objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnocchia, Davide; Chesley, Steven R.; Chamberlin, Alan B.

    2016-10-01

    It typically takes a few days for a newly discovered asteroid to be officially recognized as a real object. During this time, the tentative discovery is published on the Minor Planet Center's Near-Earth Object Confirmation Page (NEOCP) until additional observations confirm that the object is a real asteroid rather than an observational artifact or an artificial object. Also, NEOCP objects could have a limited observability window and yet be scientifically interesting, e.g., radar and lightcurve targets, mini-moons (temporary Earth captures), mission accessible targets, close approachers or even impactors. For instance, the only two asteroids discovered before an impact, 2008 TC3 and 2014 AA, both reached the Earth less than a day after discovery. For these reasons we developed Scout, an automated system that provides an orbital and hazard assessment for NEOCP objects within minutes after the observations are available. Scout's rapid analysis increases the chances of securing the trajectory of interesting NEOCP objects before the ephemeris uncertainty grows too large or the observing geometry becomes unfavorable. The generally short observation arcs, perhaps only a few hours or even less, lead severe degeneracies in the orbit estimation process. To overcome these degeneracies Scout relies on systematic ranging, a technique that derives possible orbits by scanning a grid in the poorly constrained space of topocentric range and range rate, while the plane-of-sky position and motion are directly tied to the recorded observations. This scan allows us to derive a distribution of the possible orbits and in turn identify the NEOCP objects of most interest to prioritize followup efforts. In particular, Scout ranks objects according to the likelihood of an impact, estimates the close approach distance, the Earth-relative minimum orbit intersection distance and v-infinity, and computes scores to identify objects more likely to be an NEO, a km-sized NEO, a Potentially

  8. ORAN- ORBITAL AND GEODETIC PARAMETER ESTIMATION ERROR ANALYSIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putney, B.

    1994-01-01

    The Orbital and Geodetic Parameter Estimation Error Analysis program, ORAN, was developed as a Bayesian least squares simulation program for orbital trajectories. ORAN does not process data, but is intended to compute the accuracy of the results of a data reduction, if measurements of a given accuracy are available and are processed by a minimum variance data reduction program. Actual data may be used to provide the time when a given measurement was available and the estimated noise on that measurement. ORAN is designed to consider a data reduction process in which a number of satellite data periods are reduced simultaneously. If there is more than one satellite in a data period, satellite-to-satellite tracking may be analyzed. The least squares estimator in most orbital determination programs assumes that measurements can be modeled by a nonlinear regression equation containing a function of parameters to be estimated and parameters which are assumed to be constant. The partitioning of parameters into those to be estimated (adjusted) and those assumed to be known (unadjusted) is somewhat arbitrary. For any particular problem, the data will be insufficient to adjust all parameters subject to uncertainty, and some reasonable subset of these parameters is selected for estimation. The final errors in the adjusted parameters may be decomposed into a component due to measurement noise and a component due to errors in the assumed values of the unadjusted parameters. Error statistics associated with the first component are generally evaluated in an orbital determination program. ORAN is used to simulate the orbital determination processing and to compute error statistics associated with the second component. Satellite observations may be simulated with desired noise levels given in many forms including range and range rate, altimeter height, right ascension and declination, direction cosines, X and Y angles, azimuth and elevation, and satellite-to-satellite range and

  9. Enhanced orbit determination filter sensitivity analysis: Error budget development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estefan, J. A.; Burkhart, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    An error budget analysis is presented which quantifies the effects of different error sources in the orbit determination process when the enhanced orbit determination filter, recently developed, is used to reduce radio metric data. The enhanced filter strategy differs from more traditional filtering methods in that nearly all of the principal ground system calibration errors affecting the data are represented as filter parameters. Error budget computations were performed for a Mars Observer interplanetary cruise scenario for cases in which only X-band (8.4-GHz) Doppler data were used to determine the spacecraft's orbit, X-band ranging data were used exclusively, and a combined set in which the ranging data were used in addition to the Doppler data. In all three cases, the filter model was assumed to be a correct representation of the physical world. Random nongravitational accelerations were found to be the largest source of error contributing to the individual error budgets. Other significant contributors, depending on the data strategy used, were solar-radiation pressure coefficient uncertainty, random earth-orientation calibration errors, and Deep Space Network (DSN) station location uncertainty.

  10. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of bisoprolol.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Thomas, P; Whiting, B

    1989-07-01

    The technique of population pharmacokinetic analysis was employed to study the variability in the dose concentration relationship of bisoprolol during its clinical development. The influence of demographic factors on the variability of clearance was investigated in 3 different populations: group I, patients (including an elderly group) with essential hypertension receiving multiple oral doses of bisoprolol 10 or 20mg for 3 months; group II, patients with different degrees of renal impairment and healthy controls; and group III, patients with different types of hepatic impairment and healthy controls. Patients and controls in groups II and III received only a single oral dose of bisoprolol 10mg. The 3 data sets were analysed separately, using a non-linear mixed effects model (the NONMEM program). A 2-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order absorption described the data adequately. The typical values of volume of central compartment, volume of distribution at steady-state and the absorption rate constant for the 3 populations were: for group I, 68L, 235L, and 0.7h-1; for group II, 28L, 179L, and 0.3h-1; and for group III, 55L, 256L, and 0.4h-1, respectively. Plasma clearance was related to age in group I, to serum creatinine in group II and to aspartate transaminase activity in group III. The 68% confidence limits for clearance and elimination half-life were 8.2 to 21.5 L/h and 7.6 to 19.7h, respectively, for 50-year-old patients in group I. The analysis predicted that progressive increases in serum creatinine or aspartate transaminase activity will result in only a 50% reduction of clearance.

  11. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the elevon subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. E.; Riccio, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results for the Orbiter Elevon system hardware. The elevon actuators are located at the trailing edge of the wing surface. The proper function of the elevons is essential during the dynamic flight phases of ascent and entry. In the ascent phase of flight, the elevons are used for relieving high wing loads. For entry, the elevons are used to pitch and roll the vehicle. Specifically, the elevon system hardware comprises the following components: flow cutoff valve; switching valve; electro-hydraulic (EH) servoactuator; secondary delta pressure transducer; bypass valve; power valve; power valve check valve; primary actuator; primary delta pressure transducer; and primary actuator position transducer. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. Of the 25 failure modes analyzed, 18 were determined to be PCIs.

  12. Analysis of GOCE data after each orbit reduction (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruinsma, S.; Marty, J.; Foerste, C.; Abrykosov, O.; Bonvalot, S.

    2013-12-01

    The GOCE mission has been in science operation since November 2009. For the entire nominal and extended mission, the orbit altitude has been kept constant at 255 km thanks to the ion propulsion. More than two years of mission data were collected from November 2009 through July 2012 at that altitude. On the recommendation of ESA's Scientific Advisory Committee, ESA decided to decrease the altitude by 20 km in three stages, thereby increasing the sensitivity of the gradiometer to the gravity signal. Lowering of the orbit took place in August 2012, November 2012, and February 2013. In between the maneuvers, two 61-day cycles of data are collected at altitudes that are 8.6 and 15 km lower than the nominal altitude, respectively, followed by a 70-day cycle 20 km lower. In May 2013, after a quick internal evaluation, ESA performed a fourth and final orbit lowering of 10 km (i.e. altitude of 225 km), and a 143-day repeat cycle with 56 days sub-cycles started on 29 May. An analysis of the data quality is given for this last phase of the GOCE mission, or its second mission as ESA calls it, and gravity field models obtained with data before and after August 2012 are compared. The impact of the lower orbit altitudes is clearly visible, in particular over oceans, for which noise levels at equivalent resolution are significantly lower. We also assess the differences over areas with steep gradients, e.g. over mountain ranges, subduction trenches, shallow seas. Determining the small-scale signals over such areas requires maximum resolution with the least possible noise. This is partly achieved through regularization of the solution.

  13. Orbital flight test Shuttle External Tank flowfield and aerothermal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, S. C.; Foster, L. D.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses the evaluation of aerothermal flight measurements made on the orbital flight test Space Shuttle External Tanks (ET). These ETs were instrumented to measure various quantities during flight including heat transfer, pressure and structural temperature. The flight data were reduced and analyzed against math models established from an extensive wind tunnel data base and empirical heat-transfer relationships. This analysis has supported the validity of the current aeroheating methodology and existing data base, but has also identified some problem areas which require methodology modifications.

  14. Analysis of Satellite and Sub-Orbital Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleason, James (Technical Monitor); Martin, Randall V.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this project is to support the INTEX aircraft mission by developing experience in the integrated analysis of existing sub-orbital observations and satellite observations with numerical models. Specific tasks include providing guidance to INTEX by identifying discrepancies in satellite observations with (1) in situ measurements, (2) bottom-up emission inventories of nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds, and (3) model calculations of the export of pollution from North America to the global atmosphere. An important focus area is developing and improving bottom-up emission inventories by combining top-down and bottom-up information.

  15. An analysis of the orbital distribution of solid rocket motor slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horstman, Matthew F.; Mulrooney, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The contribution by solid rocket motors (SRMs) to the orbital debris environment is potentially significant and insufficiently studied. Design and combustion processes can lead to the emission of enough by-products to warrant assessment of their contribution to orbital debris. These particles are formed during SRM tail-off, or burn termination, by the rapid solidification of molten Al2O3 slag accumulated during the burn. The propensity of SRMs to generate particles larger than 100μm raises concerns regarding the debris environment. Sizes as large as 1 cm have been witnessed in ground tests, and comparable sizes have been estimated via observations of sub-orbital tail-off events. Utilizing previous research we have developed more sophisticated size distributions and modeled the time evolution of resultant orbital populations using a historical database of SRM launches, propellant, and likely location and time of tail-off. This analysis indicates that SRM ejecta is a significant component of the debris environment.

  16. Filter parameter tuning analysis for operational orbit determination support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, J.; Cox, C.; Niklewski, D.; Mistretta, G.; Hart, R.

    1994-01-01

    The use of an extended Kalman filter (EKF) for operational orbit determination support is being considered by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD). To support that investigation, analysis was performed to determine how an EKF can be tuned for operational support of a set of earth-orbiting spacecraft. The objectives of this analysis were to design and test a general purpose scheme for filter tuning, evaluate the solution accuracies, and develop practical methods to test the consistency of the EKF solutions in an operational environment. The filter was found to be easily tuned to produce estimates that were consistent, agreed with results from batch estimation, and compared well among the common parameters estimated for several spacecraft. The analysis indicates that there is not a sharply defined 'best' tunable parameter set, especially when considering only the position estimates over the data arc. The comparison of the EKF estimates for the user spacecraft showed that the filter is capable of high-accuracy results and can easily meet the current accuracy requirements for the spacecraft included in the investigation. The conclusion is that the EKF is a viable option for FDD operational support.

  17. SPICE Module for the Satellite Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coggi, John; Carnright, Robert; Hildebrand, Claude

    2008-01-01

    A SPICE module for the Satellite Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP) precisely represents complex motion and maneuvers in an interactive, 3D animated environment with support for user-defined quantitative outputs. (SPICE stands for Spacecraft, Planet, Instrument, Camera-matrix, and Events). This module enables the SOAP software to exploit NASA mission ephemeris represented in the JPL Ancillary Information Facility (NAIF) SPICE formats. Ephemeris types supported include position, velocity, and orientation for spacecraft and planetary bodies including the Sun, planets, natural satellites, comets, and asteroids. Entire missions can now be imported into SOAP for 3D visualization, playback, and analysis. The SOAP analysis and display features can now leverage detailed mission files to offer the analyst both a numerically correct and aesthetically pleasing combination of results that can be varied to study many hypothetical scenarios. The software provides a modeling and simulation environment that can encompass a broad variety of problems using orbital prediction. For example, ground coverage analysis, communications analysis, power and thermal analysis, and 3D visualization that provide the user with insight into complex geometric relations are included. The SOAP SPICE module allows distributed science and engineering teams to share common mission models of known pedigree, which greatly reduces duplication of effort and the potential for error. The use of the software spans all phases of the space system lifecycle, from the study of future concepts to operations and anomaly analysis. It allows SOAP software to correctly position and orient all of the principal bodies of the Solar System within a single simulation session along with multiple spacecraft trajectories and the orientation of mission payloads. In addition to the 3D visualization, the user can define numeric variables and x-y plots to quantitatively assess metrics of interest.

  18. Analysis of filter tuning techniques for sequential orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, T.; Yee, C.; Oza, D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines filter tuning techniques for a sequential orbit determination (OD) covariance analysis. Recently, there has been a renewed interest in sequential OD, primarily due to the successful flight qualification of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Onboard Navigation System (TONS) using Doppler data extracted onboard the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) spacecraft. TONS computes highly accurate orbit solutions onboard the spacecraft in realtime using a sequential filter. As the result of the successful TONS-EUVE flight qualification experiment, the Earth Observing System (EOS) AM-1 Project has selected TONS as the prime navigation system. In addition, sequential OD methods can be used successfully for ground OD. Whether data are processed onboard or on the ground, a sequential OD procedure is generally favored over a batch technique when a realtime automated OD system is desired. Recently, OD covariance analyses were performed for the TONS-EUVE and TONS-EOS missions using the sequential processing options of the Orbit Determination Error Analysis System (ODEAS). ODEAS is the primary covariance analysis system used by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD). The results of these analyses revealed a high sensitivity of the OD solutions to the state process noise filter tuning parameters. The covariance analysis results show that the state estimate error contributions from measurement-related error sources, especially those due to the random noise and satellite-to-satellite ionospheric refraction correction errors, increase rapidly as the state process noise increases. These results prompted an in-depth investigation of the role of the filter tuning parameters in sequential OD covariance analysis. This paper analyzes how the spacecraft state estimate errors due to dynamic and measurement-related error sources are affected by the process noise level used. This information is then used to establish

  19. Physiological and lifestyle factors contributing to risk and severity of peri-orbital dark circles in the Brazilian population*

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Mary S; Schalka, Sérgio; Vanderover, Garrett; Fthenakis, Christina G.; Christopher, J; Bombarda, Patricia Camarano Pinto; Bueno, Juliana Regina; Viscomi, Bianca Lenci Inácio; Bombarda Júnior, Mário Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Peri-orbital dark circles are a cosmetic concern worldwide, and have been attributed to hyperpigmentation from allergy or atopic dermatitis, blood stasis, structural shadowing effects, and a thin epidermis/dermis under the eye. It is of interest to better understand lifestyle and demographic risk factors and the relative impact of melanin, blood and epidermal/dermal factors on the severity of Peri-orbital dark circles. OBJECTIVE To compare by non-invasive imaging the impact of biological factors to a visual grading scale for Peri-orbital dark circles, and test the correlation of various demographic factors with Peri-orbital dark circles. METHODS Subjects completed a lifestyle and health survey, and Peri-orbital dark circles severity was evaluated using standardized photographs. Hyperspectral image analysis was used to assess the contributions of melanin, blood volume, degree of blood oxygen saturation, and dermal scattering. RESULTS Family history was the most significant risk factor for Peri-orbital dark circles. The average age of onset was 24 years, and earlier onset correlated with higher severity scores. Asthma was significantly associated with Peri-orbital dark circles scores, but self-reported allergy was not. In this study, sleep was not correlated with Peri-orbital dark circles scores. Hyperspectral imaging indicated that melanin was the dominant correlate for Peri-orbital dark circles severity, while oxygen saturation was secondary. The difference between under-eye and cheek measurements for ∆L*and ∆E* were the most significant instrumental parameters correlated with visual assessment of Peri-orbital dark circles severity. CONCLUSION Although typically associated with lack of sleep, risk of Peri-orbital dark circles is primarily hereditary. The main factors contributing to the appearance of Peri-orbital dark circles are melanin and (deoxygenated) blood. PMID:26375218

  20. Analysis of charge transfer effects in molecular complexes based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals

    SciTech Connect

    Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Bell, Alexis T.

    2008-05-14

    A new method based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs) is proposed to measure the degree of intermolecular electron density delocalization (charge transfer) in molecular complexes. ALMO charge transfer analysis (CTA) enables separation of the forward and backward charge transfer components for each pair of molecules in the system. The key feature of ALMO CTA is that all charge transfer terms have corresponding well defined energetic effects that measure the contribution of the given term to the overall energetic stabilization of the system. To simplify analysis of charge transfer effects, the concept of chemically significant complementary occupied-virtual orbital pairs (COVPs) is introduced. COVPs provide a simple description of intermolecular electron transfer effects in terms of just a few localized orbitals. ALMO CTA is applied to understand fundamental aspects of donor-acceptor interactions in borane adducts, synergic bonding in classical and nonclassical metal carbonyls, and multiple intermolecular hydrogen bonds in a complex of isocyanuric acid and melamine. These examples show that the ALMO CTA results are generally consistent with the existing conceptual description of intermolecular bonding. The results also show that charge transfer and the energy lowering due to charge transfer are not proportional to each other, and some interesting differences emerge which are discussed. Additionally, according to ALMO CTA, the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is significantly smaller than charge transfer estimated from various population analysis methods.

  1. Analysis of charge transfer effects in molecular complexes based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals.

    PubMed

    Khaliullin, Rustam Z; Bell, Alexis T; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2008-05-14

    A new method based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs) is proposed to measure the degree of intermolecular electron density delocalization (charge transfer) in molecular complexes. ALMO charge transfer analysis (CTA) enables separation of the forward and backward charge transfer components for each pair of molecules in the system. The key feature of ALMO CTA is that all charge transfer terms have corresponding well defined energetic effects that measure the contribution of the given term to the overall energetic stabilization of the system. To simplify analysis of charge transfer effects, the concept of chemically significant complementary occupied-virtual orbital pairs (COVPs) is introduced. COVPs provide a simple description of intermolecular electron transfer effects in terms of just a few localized orbitals. ALMO CTA is applied to understand fundamental aspects of donor-acceptor interactions in borane adducts, synergic bonding in classical and nonclassical metal carbonyls, and multiple intermolecular hydrogen bonds in a complex of isocyanuric acid and melamine. These examples show that the ALMO CTA results are generally consistent with the existing conceptual description of intermolecular bonding. The results also show that charge transfer and the energy lowering due to charge transfer are not proportional to each other, and some interesting differences emerge which are discussed. Additionally, according to ALMO CTA, the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is significantly smaller than charge transfer estimated from various population analysis methods.

  2. Analysis of charge transfer effects in molecular complexes based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Bell, Alexis T.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2008-05-01

    A new method based on absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs) is proposed to measure the degree of intermolecular electron density delocalization (charge transfer) in molecular complexes. ALMO charge transfer analysis (CTA) enables separation of the forward and backward charge transfer components for each pair of molecules in the system. The key feature of ALMO CTA is that all charge transfer terms have corresponding well defined energetic effects that measure the contribution of the given term to the overall energetic stabilization of the system. To simplify analysis of charge transfer effects, the concept of chemically significant complementary occupied-virtual orbital pairs (COVPs) is introduced. COVPs provide a simple description of intermolecular electron transfer effects in terms of just a few localized orbitals. ALMO CTA is applied to understand fundamental aspects of donor-acceptor interactions in borane adducts, synergic bonding in classical and nonclassical metal carbonyls, and multiple intermolecular hydrogen bonds in a complex of isocyanuric acid and melamine. These examples show that the ALMO CTA results are generally consistent with the existing conceptual description of intermolecular bonding. The results also show that charge transfer and the energy lowering due to charge transfer are not proportional to each other, and some interesting differences emerge which are discussed. Additionally, according to ALMO CTA, the amount of electron density transferred between molecules is significantly smaller than charge transfer estimated from various population analysis methods.

  3. Expressions Module for the Satellite Orbit Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Karina

    2008-01-01

    The Expressions Module is a software module that has been incorporated into the Satellite Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP). The module includes an expressions- parser submodule built on top of an analytical system, enabling the user to define logical and numerical variables and constants. The variables can capture output from SOAP orbital-prediction and geometric-engine computations. The module can combine variables and constants with built-in logical operators (such as Boolean AND, OR, and NOT), relational operators (such as >, <, or =), and mathematical operators (such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, modulus, exponentiation, differentiation, and integration). Parentheses can be used to specify precedence of operations. The module contains a library of mathematical functions and operations, including logarithms, trigonometric functions, Bessel functions, minimum/ maximum operations, and floating- point-to-integer conversions. The module supports combinations of time, distance, and angular units and has a dimensional- analysis component that checks for correct usage of units. A parser based on the Flex language and the Bison program looks for and indicates errors in syntax. SOAP expressions can be built using other expressions as arguments, thus enabling the user to build analytical trees. A graphical user interface facilitates use.

  4. Dynamical modeling and lifetime analysis of geostationary transfer orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Gurfil, Pini

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics and lifetime reduction of geostationary transfer orbits (GTOs) are of great importance to space debris mitigation. The orbital dynamics, subjected to a complex interplay of multiple perturbations, are complicated and sensitive to the initial conditions and model parameters. In this paper, a simple but effective non-singular orbital dynamics model in terms of Milankovitch elements is derived. The orbital dynamics, which include the Earth oblateness, luni-solar perturbations, and atmospheric drag, are averaged over the orbital motion of the GTO object, or, as needed, also over the orbital motions of the Moon and Sun, to eliminate the short-period terms. After the averaging process, the effect of the atmospheric drag assumes a simple analytical form. The averaged orbital model is verified through a numerical simulation compared with commercial orbit propagators. GTO lifetime reduction by using the luni-solar perturbations is studied. It is shown that the long-period luni-solar perturbation is induced by the precession of the GTO orbital plane and apsidal line, whereas the short-period perturbation is induced by the periodic luni-solar orbital motions. The long- and short-period perturbations are isolated and studied separately, and their global distribution with respect to the orbital geometry is given. The desired initial orbital geometry with a short orbital lifetime is found and verified by a numerical simulation.

  5. Orbital nematic instability in the two-orbital Hubbard model: renormalization-group + constrained RPA analysis.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiizu, Masahisa; Ohno, Yusuke; Onari, Seiichiro; Kontani, Hiroshi

    2013-08-02

    Motivated by the nematic electronic fluid phase in Sr(3)Ru(2)O(7), we develop a combined scheme of the renormalization-group method and the random-phase-approximation-type method, and analyze orbital susceptibilities of the (d(xz), d(yz))-orbital Hubbard model with high accuracy. It is confirmed that the present model exhibits a ferro-orbital instability near the magnetic or superconducting quantum criticality, due to the Aslamazov-Larkin-type vertex corrections. This mechanism of orbital nematic order presents a natural explanation for the nematic order in Sr(3)Ru(2)O(7), and is expected to be realized in various multiorbital systems, such as Fe-based superconductors.

  6. Space Debris Attitude Simulation - IOTA (In-Orbit Tumbling Analysis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzler, R.; Schildknecht, T.; Lips, T.; Fritsche, B.; Silha, J.; Krag, H.

    Today, there is little knowledge on the attitude state of decommissioned intact objects in Earth orbit. Observational means have advanced in the past years, but are still limited with respect to an accurate estimate of motion vector orientations and magnitude. Especially for the preparation of Active Debris Removal (ADR) missions as planned by ESA's Clean Space initiative or contingency scenarios for ESA spacecraft like ENVISAT, such knowledge is needed. The In-Orbit Tumbling Analysis tool (IOTA) is a prototype software, currently in development within the framework of ESA's “Debris Attitude Motion Measurements and Modelling” project (ESA Contract No. 40000112447), which is led by the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB). The project goal is to achieve a good understanding of the attitude evolution and the considerable internal and external effects which occur. To characterize the attitude state of selected targets in LEO and GTO, multiple observation methods are combined. Optical observations are carried out by AIUB, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is performed by the Space Research Institute of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (IWF) and radar measurements and signal level determination are provided by the Fraunhofer Institute for High Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques (FHR). Developed by Hyperschall Technologie Göttingen GmbH (HTG), IOTA will be a highly modular software tool to perform short- (days), medium- (months) and long-term (years) propagation of the orbit and attitude motion (six degrees-of-freedom) of spacecraft in Earth orbit. The simulation takes into account all relevant acting forces and torques, including aerodynamic drag, solar radiation pressure, gravitational influences of Earth, Sun and Moon, eddy current damping, impulse and momentum transfer from space debris or micro meteoroid impact, as well as the optional definition of particular spacecraft specific influences like tank sloshing, reaction wheel behaviour

  7. Angles-Only Initial Relative Orbit Determination Performance Analysis using Cylindrical Coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, David K.; Lovell, T. Alan

    2017-03-01

    The solution of the initial relative orbit determination problem using angles-only measurements is important for orbital proximity operations, satellite inspection and servicing, and the identification of unknown space objects in similar orbits. In this paper, a preliminary relative orbit determination performance analysis is conducted utilizing the linearized relative orbital equations of motion in cylindrical coordinates. The relative orbital equations of motion in cylindrical coordinates are rigorously derived in several forms included the exact nonlinear two-body differential equations of motion, the linear-time-varying differential equations of motion for an elliptical orbit chief, and the linear-time-invariant differential equations of motion for a circular orbit chief. Using the nonlinear angles-only measurement equation in cylindrical coordinates, evidence of full-relative-state observability is found, contrary to the range observability problem exhibited in Cartesian coordinates. Based on these results, a geometric approach to assess initial relative orbit determination performance is formulated. To facilitate a better understanding of the problem, the focus is on the 2-dimensional initial orbit determination problem. The results clearly show the dependence of the relative orbit determination performance on the geometry of the relative motion and on the time-interval between observations. Analysis is conducted for leader-follower orbits and flyby orbits where the deputy passes directly above or below the chief.

  8. Preliminary radar systems analysis for Venus orbiter missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandenburg, R. K.; Spadoni, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    A short, preliminary analysis is presented of the problems involved in mapping the surface of Venus with radar from an orbiting spacecraft. Two types of radar, the noncoherent sidelooking and the focused synthetic aperture systems, are sized to fulfill two assumed levels of Venus exploration. The two exploration levels, regional and local, assumed for this study are based on previous Astro Sciences work (Klopp 1969). The regional level is defined as 1 to 3 kilometer spatial and 0.5 to 1 km vertical resolution of 100 percent 0 of the planet's surface. The local level is defined as 100 to 200 meter spatial and 50-10 m vertical resolution of about 100 percent of the surfAce (based on the regional survey). A 10cm operating frequency was chosen for both radar systems in order to minimize the antenna size and maximize the apparent radar cross section of the surface.

  9. Theoretical analysis of the density within an orbiting molecular shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueser, J. E.; Brock, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    An analytical model based on the kinetic theory of a drifting Maxwellian gas is used to determine the nonequilibrium molecular density distribution within a hemispherical shell open aft with its axis parallel to its velocity. Separate numerical results are presented for the primary and secondary density distribution components due to the drifting Maxwellian gas for speed ratios between 2.5 and 10. An analysis is also made of the density component due to gas desorbed from the wall of the hemisphere, and numerical results are presented for the density distribution. It is shown that the adsorption process may be completely ignored. The results are applicable to orbital trajectories in any planet-atmosphere system and interplanetary transfer trajectories. Application to the earth's atmosphere is mentioned briefly.

  10. Orbit Determination Covariance Analysis for the Europa Clipper Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ionasescu, Rodica; Martin-Mur, Tomas; Valerino, Powtawche; Criddle, Kevin; Buffington, Brent; McElrath, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    A new Jovian satellite tour is proposed by NASA, which would include numerous flybys of the moon Europa, and would explore its potential habitability by characterizing the existence of any water within and beneath Europa's ice shell. This paper describes the results of a covariance study that was undertaken on a sample tour to assess the navigational challenges and capabilities of such a mission from an orbit determination (OD) point of view, and to help establish a delta V budget for the maneuvers needed to keep the spacecraft on the reference trajectory. Additional parametric variations from the baseline case were also investigated. The success of the Europa Clipper mission will depend on the science measurements that it will enable. Meeting the requirements of the instruments onboard the spacecraft is an integral part of this analysis.

  11. Orbital Transfer Vehicle: Concept definition and system analysis study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Findings and recommendations from the second extension of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) concept definition and system analysis study are outlined. The extension study opens the scope of potential recommendations by introducing a variety of ambitious programs, and by making the large cargo vehicle recommended by the Space Transportation Architecture Studies available at no acquisition cost to the OTV program. It is a further objective of the extension study to evaluate the sensitivity of OTV program recommendations to scenario variations such as different mission models, different launch vehicle availability, and different space station availability. Program/mission issues are addressed including safety considerations for the Aft Cargo Carrier (ACC) OTV. Design issues related to the development of a near-term expendable OTV, engine configuration tradeoffs, lunar missions, and program evolution are discussed. Finally, aeroassist considerations for a manned Mars mission and high speed entries are presented.

  12. Contribution Analysis of BDS/GPS Combined Orbit Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qin

    2016-07-01

    BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) does not have the ability of global navigation and positioning currently. The whole tracking observation of satellite orbit and the geometry of reference station are not perfect. These situations influence the accuracy of satellite orbit determination. Based on the theory and method of dynamic orbit determination, the analytical contribution of multi-GNSS combined orbit determination to the solution precision of parameters was derived. And using the measured data, the statistical contribution of BDS/GPS combined orbit determination to the solution precision of orbit and clock error was analyzed. The results show that the contribution of combined orbit determination to the solution precision of the common parameters between different systems was significant. The solution precisions of the orbit and clock error were significantly improved except GEO satellites. The statistical contribution of BDS/GPS combined orbit determination to the precision of BDS satellite orbit, the RMS of BDS satellite clock error and the RMS of receiver clock error were 36.21%, 26.88% and 20.88% respectively. Especially, the contribution to the clock error of receivers which were in the area with few visible satellites was particularly significant. And the statistical contribution was 45.95%.

  13. MSFC Skylab Orbital Workshop, volume 1. [systems analysis and equipment specifications for orbital laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The technical aspects of the Skylab-Orbital Workshop are discussed. Original concepts, goals, design philosophy, hardware, and testing are reported. The final flight configuration, overall test program, and mission performance are analyzed. The systems which are examined are: (1) the structural system, (2) the meteoroid shield systems, and (3) the environmental/thermal control subsystem.

  14. Impact risk analysis for a spacecraft in Cosmo-Skymed orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomuzzo, Cinzia; Francesconi, Alessandro; Anselmo, Luciano

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a case study of Micrometeoroids and Orbital Debris risk assessment for a spacecraft flying in an orbit close to that of the Italian Cosmo-Skymed constellation. The aim of the analysis was to calculate the failure flux impinging on the satellite external shell, taking into account both geometry and materials of satellite surfaces. Furthermore the analysis included the evaluation of the contribution to debris population at the selected orbit of the fragments produced by a Chinese Anti-SATellite experiment, which caused the catastrophic break-up of the satellite Fengyun 1C in January 2007. A first computation was carried out using ESABASE2/Debris v.1.4.2. This software made it possible to perform geometrical analysis of a satellite subjected to a given debris environment, but the most up to date available models, ORDEM2000 and MASTER2001, gave significantly different results. An independent procedure for risk assessment analysis was implemented to further analyse such issue and to provide damage equation adequate to represent the behaviour of the selected structural aluminium honeycomb sandwich panels covered by Multi-Layer Insulation. Debris fluxes were calculated applying MASTER2005 and ORDEM2000 environment models, then results were compared to those of ESABASE2. Failure fluxes were calculated implementing special damage equations for honeycomb structures available from the open technical literature. The expected flux contribution of catalogued debris from the Chinese Anti-SATellite (ASAT) experiment was estimated independently using the code SDIRAT (Space Debris Impact Risk Analysis Tool) developed at the Institute of Information Science and Technologies (ISTI).

  15. Early Mission Orbit Determination Error Analysis Results for Low-Earth Orbiting Missions using TDRSS Differenced One-way Doppler Tracking Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marr, Greg C.

    2003-01-01

    Differencing multiple, simultaneous Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) one-way Doppler passes can yield metric tracking data usable for orbit determination for (low-cost) spacecraft which do not have TDRSS transponders or local oscillators stable enough to allow the one-way TDRSS Doppler tracking data to be used for early mission orbit determination. Orbit determination error analysis results are provided for low Earth orbiting spacecraft for various early mission tracking scenarios.

  16. Orbit Determination Accuracy Analysis of the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission During Perigee Raise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pachura, Daniel A.; Vavrina, Matthew A.; Carpenter, J. R.; Wright, Cinnamon A.

    2014-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) will provide orbit determination and prediction support for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission during the missions commissioning period. The spacecraft will launch into a highly elliptical Earth orbit in 2015. Starting approximately four days after launch, a series of five large perigee-raising maneuvers will be executed near apogee on a nearly every-other-orbit cadence. This perigee-raise operations concept requires a high-accuracy estimate of the orbital state within one orbit following the maneuver for performance evaluation and a high-accuracy orbit prediction to correctly plan and execute the next maneuver in the sequence. During early mission design, a linear covariance analysis method was used to study orbit determination and prediction accuracy for this perigee-raising campaign. This paper provides a higher fidelity Monte Carlo analysis using the operational COTS extended Kalman filter implementation that was performed to validate the linear covariance analysis estimates and to better characterize orbit determination performance for actively maneuvering spacecraft in a highly elliptical orbit. The study finds that the COTS extended Kalman filter tool converges on accurate definitive orbit solutions quickly, but prediction accuracy through orbits with very low altitude perigees is degraded by the unpredictability of atmospheric density variation.

  17. Orbit Determination Accuracy Analysis of the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission During Perigee Raise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pachura, Daniel A.; Vavrina, Matthew A.; Carpenter, J. Russell; Wright, Cinnamon A.

    2014-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) will provide orbit determination and prediction support for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission during the mission's commissioning period. The spacecraft will launch into a highly elliptical Earth orbit in 2015. Starting approximately four days after launch, a series of five large perigee-raising maneuvers will be executed near apogee on a nearly every-other-orbit cadence. This perigee-raise operations concept requires a high-accuracy estimate of the orbital state within one orbit following the maneuver for performance evaluation and a high-accuracy orbit prediction to correctly plan and execute the next maneuver in the sequence. During early mission design, a linear covariance analysis method was used to study orbit determination and prediction accuracy for this perigee-raising campaign. This paper provides a higher fidelity Monte Carlo analysis using the operational COTS extended Kalman filter implementation that was performed to validate the linear covariance analysis estimates and to better characterize orbit determination performance for actively maneuvering spacecraft in a highly elliptical orbit. The study finds that the COTS extended Kalman filter tool converges on accurate definitive orbit solutions quickly, but prediction accuracy through orbits with very low altitude perigees is degraded by the unpredictability of atmospheric density variation.

  18. Microsatellite data analysis for population genetics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Seok; Sappington, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    Theories and analytical tools of population genetics have been widely applied for addressing various questions in the fields of ecological genetics, conservation biology, and any context where the role of dispersal or gene flow is important. Underlying much of population genetics is the analysis of variation at selectively neutral marker loci, and microsatellites continue to be a popular choice of marker. In recent decades, software programs to estimate population genetics parameters have been developed at an increasing pace as computational science and theoretical knowledge advance. Numerous population genetics software programs are presently available to analyze microsatellite genotype data, but only a handful are commonly employed for calculating parameters such as genetic variation, genetic structure, patterns of spatial and temporal gene flow, population demography, individual population assignment, and genetic relationships within and between populations. In this chapter, we introduce statistical analyses and relevant population genetic software programs that are commonly employed in the field of population genetics and molecular ecology.

  19. Orbiter subsystem hardware/software interaction analysis. Volume 8: Forward reaction control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the orbiter hardware/software interaction analysis for the AFT reaction control system are presented. The interaction between hardware failure modes and software are examined in order to identify associated issues and risks. All orbiter subsystems and interfacing program elements which interact with the orbiter computer flight software are analyzed. The failure modes identified in the subsystem/element failure mode and effects analysis are discussed.

  20. Analysis on the long term orbital evolution of Molniya satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ting-Lei; Zhao, Chang-Yin; Wang, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Ming-Jiang

    2015-06-01

    Long term evolution of the Molniya satellites are investigated by means of historical data analysis, theoretical analysis and numerical integration. Both the mean motion resonance problem and the critical inclination problem are studied. The period and the amplitude of the semi-major axis for each satellite are obtained analytically and compared with the observational data. In addition, the reason of the observed sudden changes in the center and the amplitude of the oscillating semi-major axes is determined as the effect of the atmosphere drag. For the long period perigee motion, the dominant perturbations come from the luni-solar gravity. A two-degree-of freedom system is established by adding the two periodic terms of the neighbor resonances to the Hamiltonian of the classical single resonance model. In theory, the resulting resonance overlap model is responsible for the chaotic layer between the libration region and the circulation region. In practice, it is applied to explain the quick decay of the earliest Molniya satellites and to study the satellites that still orbiting the Earth at present.

  1. Analysis of magnetic field data from Pioneer Venus orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Christopher T.

    1994-01-01

    The subject grant (NAG 2-501) supported the analysis of magnetic field data from the Pioneer Venus orbiter for the period 10/1/87 to 9/30/94. During that period, 188 papers were contributed to scientific meetings that either analyzed the magnetometer data or used the data as part of the analysis of a scientific problem. Further, 107 papers were published in research journals and books. The magnetic moment of Venus was described. Venus was found to be essentially devoid of any intrinsic magnetic field. There was evidence though for the presence of lightning in the Venus atmosphere. The altitude distribution of impulsive signals in the night atmosphere was mapped and geographic clusters were found, most probably associated with local time ordering. A new means to create flux ropes in the ionosphere was postulated. On the nightside, ionospheric holes, ionospheric clouds, and tail rays were studied. The subsolar ionopause and the magnetic barrier were examined as was the altitude asymmetry of the ionopause, properties of the magnetosheath, and location of the bow shock upstream waves.

  2. Orbit Determination Error Analysis Results for the Triana Sun-Earth L2 Libration Point Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marr, G.

    2003-01-01

    Using the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Orbit Determination Error Analysis System (ODEAS), orbit determination error analysis results are presented for all phases of the Triana Sun-Earth L1 libration point mission and for the science data collection phase of a future Sun-Earth L2 libration point mission. The Triana spacecraft was nominally to be released by the Space Shuttle in a low Earth orbit, and this analysis focuses on that scenario. From the release orbit a transfer trajectory insertion (TTI) maneuver performed using a solid stage would increase the velocity be approximately 3.1 km/sec sending Triana on a direct trajectory to its mission orbit. The Triana mission orbit is a Sun-Earth L1 Lissajous orbit with a Sun-Earth-vehicle (SEV) angle between 4.0 and 15.0 degrees, which would be achieved after a Lissajous orbit insertion (LOI) maneuver at approximately launch plus 6 months. Because Triana was to be launched by the Space Shuttle, TTI could potentially occur over a 16 orbit range from low Earth orbit. This analysis was performed assuming TTI was performed from a low Earth orbit with an inclination of 28.5 degrees and assuming support from a combination of three Deep Space Network (DSN) stations, Goldstone, Canberra, and Madrid and four commercial Universal Space Network (USN) stations, Alaska, Hawaii, Perth, and Santiago. These ground stations would provide coherent two-way range and range rate tracking data usable for orbit determination. Larger range and range rate errors were assumed for the USN stations. Nominally, DSN support would end at TTI+144 hours assuming there were no USN problems. Post-TTI coverage for a range of TTI longitudes for a given nominal trajectory case were analyzed. The orbit determination error analysis after the first correction maneuver would be generally applicable to any libration point mission utilizing a direct trajectory.

  3. X-ray atomic orbital analysis of 4f and 5d electron configuration of SmB6 at 100, 165, 230 and 298 K.

    PubMed

    Funahashi, Shiro; Tanaka, Kiyoaki; Iga, Fumitoshi

    2010-06-01

    Accurate electron-density measurement of SmB(6) at 100, 165, 230 and 298 K, and X-ray atomic orbital (XAO) analysis were carried out. The 4f-electron density around Sm and 5d electron density at approximately 1 A from Sm were analysed by XAO analysis. The 5d electron density is due to the electrons of the 5d(J = 5/2)Gamma(8) orbitals which stem from the e(g) orbitals in the strong field approximation. The change in electron populations of the 5d(5/2)Gamma(8) orbitals with temperature is similar to that of the resistivity. Since the conduction band consists of 5d(5/2)Gamma(8) and B-2p orbitals according to band theory, this indicates that the larger populations of the 5d(5/2)Gamma(8) orbitals correspond to the larger number of localized electrons and are correlated to the resistivity of SmB(6). The occupation of the bulky 5d(5/2)Gamma(8) orbitals may be the reason for the elongation of the lattice parameter below 150 K. The 4f(7/2)Gamma(6) orbitals are obviously occupied except at 100 K, which seems to be caused by the energy gap between 4f(5/2) and 4f(7/2) states, which begins to exist between 100 and 150 K, and may represent one of the properties of a Kondo insulator.

  4. Light Curve and Orbital Period Analysis of VX Lac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, M.; Nelson, R. H.; Şenavcı, H. V.; İzci, D.; Özavcı, İ.; Gümüş, D.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we performed simultaneously light curve and radial velocity, and also period analyses of the eclipsing binary system VX Lac. Four color (BVRI) light curves of the system were analysed using the W-D code. The results imply that VX Lac is a classic Algol-type binary with a mass ratio of q=0.27, of which the less massive secondary component fills its Roche lobe. The orbital period behaviour of the system was analysed by assuming the light time effect (LITE) from a third body. The O-C analysis yielded a mass transfer rate of dM/dt=1.86×10-8Mȯyr-1 and the minimal mass of the third body to be M3=0.31Mȯ. The residuals from mass transfer and the third body were also analysed because another cyclic variation is seen in O-C diagram. This periodic variation was examined under the hypotheses of stellar magnetic activity and fourth body.

  5. Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) Shield Ballistic Limit Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    This software implements penetration limit equations for common micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shield configurations, windows, and thermal protection systems. Allowable MMOD risk is formulated in terms of the probability of penetration (PNP) of the spacecraft pressure hull. For calculating the risk, spacecraft geometry models, mission profiles, debris environment models, and penetration limit equations for installed shielding configurations are required. Risk assessment software such as NASA's BUMPERII is used to calculate mission PNP; however, they are unsuitable for use in shield design and preliminary analysis studies. The software defines a single equation for the design and performance evaluation of common MMOD shielding configurations, windows, and thermal protection systems, along with a description of their validity range and guidelines for their application. Recommendations are based on preliminary reviews of fundamental assumptions, and accuracy in predicting experimental impact test results. The software is programmed in Visual Basic for Applications for installation as a simple add-in for Microsoft Excel. The user is directed to a graphical user interface (GUI) that requires user inputs and provides solutions directly in Microsoft Excel workbooks.

  6. Orbit determination for low-thrust spacecraft: Concepts and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdanell, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Earth-based orbit determination capability for SEP spacecraft in multistation tracking and in thrust subsystem error modeling is described. Five different tracking strategies are applied to a 15 day segment of an Encke rendezvous mission. Both optimal and suboptimal orbit determination performance are determined for a wide range of process noise parameter values. The multi-station tracking techniques are found to be extremely effective, reducing orbit determination errors by orders of magnitude over that obtained with conventional single-station tracking. Explicitly differenced multistation data (QVLBI) is found to be least sensitive to gross modeling errors, but if a reasonably good process noise model is available, explicit differencing is not required.

  7. Scripting Module for the Satellite Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnright, Robert; Paget, Jim; Coggi, John; Stodden, David

    2008-01-01

    This add-on module to the SOAP software can perform changes to simulation objects based on the occurrence of specific conditions. This allows the software to encompass simulation response of scheduled or physical events. Users can manipulate objects in the simulation environment under programmatic control. Inputs to the scripting module are Actions, Conditions, and the Script. Actions are arbitrary modifications to constructs such as Platform Objects (i.e. satellites), Sensor Objects (representing instruments or communication links), or Analysis Objects (user-defined logical or numeric variables). Examples of actions include changes to a satellite orbit ( v), changing a sensor-pointing direction, and the manipulation of a numerical expression. Conditions represent the circumstances under which Actions are performed and can be couched in If-Then-Else logic, like performing v at specific times or adding to the spacecraft power only when it is being illuminated by the Sun. The SOAP script represents the entire set of conditions being considered over a specific time interval. The output of the scripting module is a series of events, which are changes to objects at specific times. As the SOAP simulation clock runs forward, the scheduled events are performed. If the user sets the clock back in time, the events within that interval are automatically undone. This script offers an interface for defining scripts where the user does not have to remember the vocabulary of various keywords. Actions can be captured by employing the same user interface that is used to define the objects themselves. Conditions can be set to invoke Actions by selecting them from pull-down lists. Users define the script by selecting from the pool of defined conditions. Many space systems have to react to arbitrary events that can occur from scheduling or from the environment. For example, an instrument may cease to draw power when the area that it is tasked to observe is not in view. The contingency

  8. IgG4-related Orbital Disease and Its Mimics in a Western Population.

    PubMed

    Ferry, Judith A; Klepeis, Veronica; Sohani, Aliyah R; Harris, Nancy Lee; Preffer, Frederic I; Stone, John H; Grove, Arthur; Deshpande, Vikram

    2015-12-01

    Although chronic inflammatory disorders of the ocular adnexa are relatively common, their pathogenesis is in many cases poorly understood. Recent investigation suggests that many cases of sclerosing orbital inflammation are a manifestation of IgG4-related disease; however, most patients reported have been Asian, and it is not clear whether the results of studies from the Far East can be reliably extrapolated to draw conclusions about Western patients. We evaluated 38 cases previously diagnosed as orbital inflammatory pseudotumor or chronic dacryoadenitis to determine whether our cases fulfill the criteria for IgG4-RD (IgG4-related dacryoadenitis when involving the lacrimal gland, and IgG4-related sclerosing orbital inflammation when involving orbital soft tissue). Fifteen patients had IgG4-related dacryoadenitis or orbital inflammation. These patients included 9 men and 6 women, aged 24 to 77 years (median, 64 y). Lesions involved orbital soft tissue (8 cases), lacrimal gland (6 cases), and canthus (1 case). In 1 case, focal in situ follicular neoplasia was seen in a background of IgG4-RD. In another case, a clonal IGH gene rearrangement was detected. Four patients with IgG4-RD had evidence of IgG4-RD in other anatomic sites. Five patients, 1 man and 4 women, aged 26 to 74 years (median 50 y) had orbital lesions (2 involving lacrimal gland, 3 involving soft tissue) suspicious for, but not diagnostic of, IgG4-RD. Of 16 patients with IgG4-RD or probable IgG4-RD with information available regarding the course of their disease, 11 patients experienced recurrent or persistent orbital disease. However, no patient developed lymphoma, and no patient died of complications of IgG4-RD. Eighteen patients had lesions not representing IgG4-RD. They included 6 male and 12 female individuals aged 6 to 77 years (median, 47 y). These patients had a variety of diseases, including granulomatosis with polyangiitis (3 cases), Rosai-Dorfman disease (1 case), nonspecific chronic

  9. Information services platforms at geosynchronous earth orbit: A requirements analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The potential user requirements for Information Services Platforms at geosynchronous orbits were investigated. A rationale for identifying the corollary system requirements and supporting research and technology needs was provided.

  10. Analysis of spacecraft on-orbit anomalies and lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, C.; Graham, W.

    1983-01-01

    Analyses of the on-orbit performance of forty-four unmanned NASA spacecraft are presented. Included are detailed descriptions and classifications of over 600 anomalies; each anomalous incident represents one reported deviation from expected spacecraft performance. Charts depicting satellite lifetimes and the performance of their major subsystems are included. Engineering analyses to further investigate the kinds and frequencies of various classes of anomalies have been conducted. An improved method for charting spacecraft capability as a function of time on orbit is explored.

  11. Modelling of orbital deformation using finite-element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sukhun, Jehad; Lindqvist, Christian; Kontio, Risto

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a three-dimensional finite-element model (FEM) of the human orbit, containing the globe, to predict orbital deformation in subjects following a blunt injury. This study investigated the hypothesis that such deformation could be modelled using finite-element techniques. One patient who had CT-scan examination to the maxillofacial skeleton including the orbits, as part of her treatment, was selected for this study. A FEM of one of the orbits containing the globe was constructed, based on CT-scan images. Simulations were performed with a computer using the finite-element software NISA (EMRC, Troy, USA). The orbit was subjected to a blunt injury of a 0.5 kg missile with 30 m s−1 velocity. The FEM was then used to predict principal and shear stresses or strains at each node position. Two types of orbital deformation were predicted during different impact simulations: (i) horizontal distortion and (ii) rotational distortion. Stress values ranged from 213.4 to 363.3 MPa for the maximum principal stress, from −327.8 to −653.1 MPa for the minimum principal stress, and from 212.3 to 444.3 MPa for the maximum shear stress. This is the first finite-element study, which demonstrates different and concurrent patterns of orbital deformation in a subject following a blunt injury. Finite element modelling is a powerful and invaluable tool to study the multifaceted phenomenon of orbital deformation. PMID:16849235

  12. Unmanned, space-based, reusable orbital transfer vehicle, DARVES. Volume 1: Trade analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The design of an unmanned, space-based, reusable Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) is presented. This OTV will be utilized for the delivery and retrieval of satellites from geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) in conjunction with a space station assumed to be in existence in low Earth orbit (LEO). The trade analysis used to determine the vehicle design is presented, and from this study a vehicle definition is given.

  13. Orbital debris and meteoroid population as estimated from LDEF impact data

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Kessler, D.J.

    1995-02-01

    Examination of LDEF`s various surfaces shows numerous craters and holes due to hypervelocity impacts of meteoroids and man-made orbital debris. In this paper, the crater numbers as reported by Humes have been analyzed in an effort to understand the orbital debris and natural meteoroid environment in LEO. To determine the fraction of man-made to natural impacts, the side to top ratio of impacts and results of the Chemistry of Micrometeoroids Experiment are used. For craters in the 100 micron to 500 micron size range, about 25 percent to 30 percent of the impacts on the forward-facing surfaces and about 10 percent of the impacts on the trailing surfaces were estimated due to man-made orbital debris. A technique has been developed to convert crater numbers to particle fluxes, taking the fact into account that the distributions of impact velocity and incidence angle vary over the different surfaces of LDEF, as well as the ratio of the surface area flux to the cross-sectional area flux. Applying this technique, Humes` data concerning craters with limiting lip diameters of 100 micron, 200 micron and 500 micron have been converted into orbital debris and meteoroid fluxes ranging from about 20 micron to 200 micron particle diameter. The results exhibit good agreement with orbital debris model and meteoroid model. The converted meteoroid flux is slightly larger than Grun`s model (by 40 to 70 percent). The converted orbital debris flux is slightly lower than Kessler`s model for particle diameter smaller than about 30 micron and slightly larger than the model for particle diameter larger than about 40 micron. Taking also into account the IDE data point at about 0.8 micron particle diameter, it suggests to change the slope log (flux) versus log (diameter) of orbital debris flux in the 1 micron to 100 micron particle diameter range from 2.5 to 1.9.

  14. Microsatellite data analysis for population genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Theories and analytical tools of population genetics have been widely applied for addressing various questions in the fields of ecological genetics, conservation biology, and any context where the role of dispersal or gene flow is important. Underlying much of population genetics is the analysis of ...

  15. Orbit Analysis Tools Software (Version 1.0) User’s Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington. DC 20375-5320 AD-A265 012 NRL/MR/8103--93-73071111111111111 ilIl I! f111t l11,!If Orbit Analysis Tools Software ...DATES COVERED April 13, 1993 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 6. FUNDING NUMBERS Orbit Analysis Tools Software (Version 1.0) Users Manual 6. AUTHOR(S) Alan S. Hope...fhbxiWn 200 word) A program to perform satellite mission and coverage analysis has been written. The Orbit Analysis Tools Software (OATS) program uses

  16. Analysis of unstable periodic orbits and chaotic orbits in the one-dimensional linear piecewise-smooth discontinuous map

    SciTech Connect

    Rajpathak, Bhooshan Pillai, Harish K.; Bandyopadhyay, Santanu

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we analytically examine the unstable periodic orbits and chaotic orbits of the 1-D linear piecewise-smooth discontinuous map. We explore the existence of unstable orbits and the effect of variation in parameters on the coexistence of unstable orbits. Further, we show that this structuring is different from the well known period adding cascade structure associated with the stable periodic orbits of the same map. Further, we analytically prove the existence of chaotic orbit for this map.

  17. Analysis of orbit determination for space based optical space surveillance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciré, Gioacchino; Santoni, Fabio; Piergentili, Fabrizio

    2015-08-01

    The detection capability and orbit determination performance of a space based optical observation system exploiting the visible band is analyzed. The sensor characteristics, in terms of sensitivity and resolution are those typical of present state of the art star trackers. A mathematical model of the system has been built and the system performance assessed by numerical simulation. The selection of the observer satellite's has been done in order to maximize the number of observed objects in LEO, based on a statistical analysis of the space debris population in this region. The space objects' observability condition is analyzed and two batch estimator based on the Levenberg-Marquardt and on the Powell dog-leg algorithms have been implemented and their performance compared. Both the algorithms are sensitive to the initial guess. Its influence on the algorithms' convergence is assessed, showing that the Powell dog-leg, which is a trust region method, performs better.

  18. Exoplanet orbital eccentricities derived from LAMOST-Kepler analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ji-Wei; Dong, Subo; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Huber, Daniel; Zheng, Zheng; De Cat, Peter; Fu, Jianning; Liu, Hui-Gen; Luo, Ali; Wu, Yue; Zhang, Haotong; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Ji-Lin; Cao, Zihuang; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-10-11

    The nearly circular (mean eccentricity [Formula: see text]) and coplanar (mean mutual inclination [Formula: see text]) orbits of the solar system planets motivated Kant and Laplace to hypothesize that planets are formed in disks, which has developed into the widely accepted theory of planet formation. The first several hundred extrasolar planets (mostly Jovian) discovered using the radial velocity (RV) technique are commonly on eccentric orbits ([Formula: see text]). This raises a fundamental question: Are the solar system and its formation special? The Kepler mission has found thousands of transiting planets dominated by sub-Neptunes, but most of their orbital eccentricities remain unknown. By using the precise spectroscopic host star parameters from the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) observations, we measure the eccentricity distributions for a large (698) and homogeneous Kepler planet sample with transit duration statistics. Nearly half of the planets are in systems with single transiting planets (singles), whereas the other half are multiple transiting planets (multiples). We find an eccentricity dichotomy: on average, Kepler singles are on eccentric orbits with [Formula: see text] 0.3, whereas the multiples are on nearly circular [Formula: see text] and coplanar [Formula: see text] degree) orbits similar to those of the solar system planets. Our results are consistent with previous studies of smaller samples and individual systems. We also show that Kepler multiples and solar system objects follow a common relation [[Formula: see text](1-2)[Formula: see text

  19. Mars Science and Telecommunications Orbiter: Report of the Science Analysis Group, March 2006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Crofton Barney; Calvin, Wendy M.; Campbell, Bruce; Fox, Jane; Haberle, Bob; Kasting, Jim; Luhmann, Janet; Nagy, Andy; Allen, Mark; Winterhalter, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    This document reports the findings of the Mars Science and Telecommunications Orbiter (MSTO) Science Advocacy Group (SAG), which was convened by the Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG) and the Mars Exploration Office at JPL to identify and prioritize areas of Mars atmospheric and surface science objectives for Mars that can be accomplished from orbit on a MSTO like mission.

  20. Population Analysis: Communicating About Anthropometry in Context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaxton, Sherry; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance of communications about anthropometry and population analysis in particular for the design of aerospace systems. The difficulty of providing anthropometric accomodation an entire range of the population is reviewed, and the importance of communication of the issues with human system integration is emphasized, and the analysis of population as it applies to existing human factors methodologies is a novel way to assist with the communication. The issues of space suit design and anthropometry is reviewed as an example.

  1. Exoplanet orbital eccentricities derived from LAMOST–Kepler analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ji-Wei; Dong, Subo; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Huber, Daniel; Zheng, Zheng; De Cat, Peter; Fu, Jianning; Liu, Hui-Gen; Luo, Ali; Wu, Yue; Zhang, Haotong; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Ji-Lin; Cao, Zihuang; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The nearly circular (mean eccentricity e¯≈0.06) and coplanar (mean mutual inclination i¯≈3°) orbits of the solar system planets motivated Kant and Laplace to hypothesize that planets are formed in disks, which has developed into the widely accepted theory of planet formation. The first several hundred extrasolar planets (mostly Jovian) discovered using the radial velocity (RV) technique are commonly on eccentric orbits (e¯≈0.3). This raises a fundamental question: Are the solar system and its formation special? The Kepler mission has found thousands of transiting planets dominated by sub-Neptunes, but most of their orbital eccentricities remain unknown. By using the precise spectroscopic host star parameters from the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) observations, we measure the eccentricity distributions for a large (698) and homogeneous Kepler planet sample with transit duration statistics. Nearly half of the planets are in systems with single transiting planets (singles), whereas the other half are multiple transiting planets (multiples). We find an eccentricity dichotomy: on average, Kepler singles are on eccentric orbits with e¯≈ 0.3, whereas the multiples are on nearly circular (e¯=0.04−0.04+0.03) and coplanar (i¯=1.4−1.1+0.8 degree) orbits similar to those of the solar system planets. Our results are consistent with previous studies of smaller samples and individual systems. We also show that Kepler multiples and solar system objects follow a common relation [e¯≈(1–2)×i¯] between mean eccentricities and mutual inclinations. The prevalence of circular orbits and the common relation may imply that the solar system is not so atypical in the galaxy after all. PMID:27671635

  2. Exoplanet orbital eccentricities derived from LAMOST-Kepler analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ji-Wei; Dong, Subo; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Huber, Daniel; Zheng, Zheng; De Cat, Peter; Fu, Jianning; Liu, Hui-Gen; Luo, Ali; Wu, Yue; Zhang, Haotong; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Ji-Lin; Cao, Zihuang; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-10-01

    The nearly circular (mean eccentricity e¯≈0.06) and coplanar (mean mutual inclination i¯≈3°) orbits of the solar system planets motivated Kant and Laplace to hypothesize that planets are formed in disks, which has developed into the widely accepted theory of planet formation. The first several hundred extrasolar planets (mostly Jovian) discovered using the radial velocity (RV) technique are commonly on eccentric orbits (e¯≈0.3). This raises a fundamental question: Are the solar system and its formation special? The Kepler mission has found thousands of transiting planets dominated by sub-Neptunes, but most of their orbital eccentricities remain unknown. By using the precise spectroscopic host star parameters from the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) observations, we measure the eccentricity distributions for a large (698) and homogeneous Kepler planet sample with transit duration statistics. Nearly half of the planets are in systems with single transiting planets (singles), whereas the other half are multiple transiting planets (multiples). We find an eccentricity dichotomy: on average, Kepler singles are on eccentric orbits with e¯≈0.3, whereas the multiples are on nearly circular (e¯=0.04-0.04+0.03) and coplanar (i¯=1.4-1.1+0.8 degree) orbits similar to those of the solar system planets. Our results are consistent with previous studies of smaller samples and individual systems. We also show that Kepler multiples and solar system objects follow a common relation [×i¯] between mean eccentricities and mutual inclinations. The prevalence of circular orbits and the common relation may imply that the solar system is not so atypical in the galaxy after all.

  3. Orbiter subsystem hardware/software interaction analysis. Volume 8: AFT reaction control system, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    The orbiter subsystems and interfacing program elements which interact with the orbiter computer flight software are analyzed. The failure modes identified in the subsystem/element failure mode and effects analysis are examined. Potential interaction with the software is examined through an evaluation of the software requirements. The analysis is restricted to flight software requirements and excludes utility/checkout software. The results of the hardware/software interaction analysis for the forward reaction control system are presented.

  4. Digital analysis of the orbit using the non-referring method

    PubMed Central

    Dąbek, Józefa; Piechota, Mieczysław; Bajor, Grzegorz; Aniszewski, Łukasz; Markowski, Jarosław

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Anthropological analysis of the orbits using classic anthropometric instruments based on width and height measurements as well as orbital index allows for classification of orbits in terms of their shape, yet it has poor clinical application. Nowadays computer graphics enables a precise research technique implementing the latest achievements in digital technology and data recording. The aim of the study was to compare in let parameters of left and right orbits in male and female skulls by means of digital analysis techniques. Material and methods The analysis was carried out on 184 early medieval well-preserved skulls. The examined crania were fixed into Molisson's craniost at in the author's own modification. They were directed in space towards the Frankfurt plane and photographed in a frontal norm. Parameters describing the plane structure of the orbits were obtained through computer analysis, integrating raster and vector graphics of mathematical recordings of craniofacial structures. Results The research demonstrated some differences between male and female skulls. Parameters of right orbit like area, circumference, radius, excavation, circularity deviation and functional were statistically significant higher values in male skull. The following parameters of left orbit: area, circumference, reference circle radius, parameter describing height between two point (mf-ek), maximal width, maximal excavation in relation to median and mean, circularity deviation and functional were statistically significant higher parameter in the male group. Conclusions Orbit shape variability, and especially variability of the orbit in let, are highly important features for anthropologists and maxillofacial surgeons, hence the usefulness of the in let orbit shape digital analysis. PMID:24701232

  5. Risk Analysis of On-Orbit Spacecraft Refueling Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cirillo, William M.; Stromgren, Chel; Cates, Grant R.

    2010-01-01

    On-orbit refueling of spacecraft has been proposed as an alternative to the exclusive use of Heavy-lift Launch Vehicles to enable human exploration beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO). In these scenarios, beyond LEO spacecraft are launched dry (without propellant) or partially dry into orbit, using smaller or fewer element launch vehicles. Propellant is then launched into LEO on separate launch vehicles and transferred to the spacecraft. Refueling concepts are potentially attractive because they reduce the maximum individual payload that must be placed in Earth orbit. However, these types of approaches add significant complexity to mission operations and introduce more uncertainty and opportunities for failure to the mission. In order to evaluate these complex scenarios, the authors developed a Monte Carlo based discrete-event model that simulates the operational risks involved with such strategies, including launch processing delays, transportation system failures, and onorbit element lifetimes. This paper describes the methodology used to simulate the mission risks for refueling concepts, the strategies that were evaluated, and the results of the investigation. The results of the investigation show that scenarios that employ refueling concepts will likely have to include long launch and assembly timelines, as well as the use of spare tanker launch vehicles, in order to achieve high levels of mission success through Trans Lunar Injection.

  6. Thermal stress analysis of space shuttle orbiter subjected to reentry aerodynamic heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fields, Roger A.

    1987-01-01

    A structural performance and resizing (SPAR) finite-element computer program and NASA structural analysis (NASTRAN) finite-element computer programs were used in the thermal stress analysis of the space shuttle orbiter subjected to reentry aerodynamic heating. A SPAR structural model was set up for the entire left wing of the orbiter, and NASTRAN structural models were set up for: (1) a wing segment located at midspan of the orbiter left wing, and (2) a fuselage segment located at midfuselage. The thermal stress distributions in the orbiter structure were obtained and the critical high thermal stress regions were identified. It was found that the thermal stresses induced in the orbiter structure during reentry were relatively low. The thermal stress predictions from the whole wing model were considered to be more accurate than those from the wing segment model because the former accounts for temperature and stress effects throughout the entire wing.

  7. Analysis of a Large Orbit Backward Wave Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choyal, Y.; Watanabe, T.; Minami, K.; Granatstein, V. L.

    2003-12-01

    The effect of the finite axial magnetic field on the excitation of a backward wave oscillator (BWO) is investigated. The driver beam is assumed to be mono-energetic helical electron beam such that all the constituent electrons have their gyration centers on the axis of the slow wave structure (SWS). Such a beam supports negative energy fast and slow cyclotron modes (FCM and SCM) that can excite the structure modes in the SWS. This may contribute to the microwave generation in BWO. All the previous analyses on BWO have assumed the electrons without the initial perpendicular velocity component. The formulation is as follows: The thin annular large orbit beam is perturbed and the first order perturbations in velocity and density are obtained. Integrating radially across the beam, we derive the expression for surface current density. It can be expressed in terms of the azimuthal and axial components of the perturbed electric field. The boundary conditions on the beam surface are as follows. (a) Matching of the continuous axial and azimuthal components of electric field and (b) Matching of the discontinuous axial and azimuthal magnetic fields across the beam by the presence of surface current density. They are augmented by the requirement of Floquet periodicity on the RF fields and the boundary conditions that the tangential electric field should vanish on the metal SWS surface, 6(2N+1) × 6(2N+1) order determinant that must to be zero and this is the dispersion relation of the system. Here, 2N+1 is the number of Floquet harmonics involved. Numerical analysis is made assuming N=4 and appropriate practical experimental parameters. The excitations of the unstable non-axisymmetric Q-TE11 and Q-TM11 modes caused by negative energy FCM in addition to unstable axisymmetric Q-TM01 mode caused by slow beam mode that is identical to conventional BWOs are observed. Defining α as the ratio of the transverse to the longitudinal velocity components of the beam electrons, it is

  8. Pioneer Venus Orbiter Ultraviolet Spectrometer: Operations and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, A. I. F.

    1997-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectrometer investigation on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter mission was extremely successful. The instrument was designed, built and tested at CU/LASP and delivered on time and within budget. The spacecraft and its instruments were required to operate for 243 days in Venus orbit. OUVS operated successfully for a further 13 years with only minor problems. The major scientific results listed above that deal with Venus were all unexpected and significant discoveries. The Comet Halley observations came about because of a favorable alignment of Halley, the Sun, and Venus, and were an important contribution to the international study of this comet. The scientific results of the OUVS investigation are to be found in the 41 papers listed in section 4 below. OUVS data provided material for 6 PhD and one MS dissertations, listed in section 5 below.

  9. Orbiter entry leeside heat-transfer data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throckmorton, D. A.; Zoby, E. V.

    1983-01-01

    Heat-transfer data measured along the Space Shuttle Orbiter's leeward centerline and over the wing leeside surface during the STS-2 and STS-3 mission entries are presented. The flight data are compared with available wind-tunnel results. Flight heating levels are, in general, lower than those which are inferred from the wind-tunnel results. This result is apparently due to the flight leeside flowfield remaining laminar over a larger Reynolds number range than that of corresponding ground test results. The flight/wind-tunnel data comparisons confirm the adequacy of, and conservatism embodied in, the direct application of wind-tunnel data at flight conditions for the design of Orbiter leeside thermal protection.

  10. Orbital period analysis of some classical Algols with pulsating components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soydugan, F.; Kacar, Y.; Soydugan, E.; Bakıs, V.; Tuysuz, M.; Senyuz, T.; Donmez, A.; Bilir, S.; Erdem, A.; Cicek, C.; Demircan, C.

    2008-12-01

    The long-term orbital period variations of the Algol-type binaries with δ Scuti compo- nent(oEA) AB Cas, CT Her, and TW Dra are investigated. An upward parabola is seen in all of these systems O-C diagrams, as is expected from the evolutionary scenario of clas- sical Algols. In addition to parabolic variations, the periodic variations on the parabola were explained with light-time effect due to probable unseen components around the eclipsing pairs.

  11. Geostationary Orbital Crowding: An Analysis of Problems and Solutions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-16

    his famous Wireless World article of 1945, entitled ’Extraterrestrial Relays,’ Arthur C. Clarke suggested that a true broadcast service giving...following paragraph as Article 33, and titled "Rational Use of the Radio Frequency Spectrum and of the Geostationary Satellite Orbit," to the ITU Convention...Books, 1988), p. 5. Figure 3.4. Regions of the International Telecomunications Union 96 Space WARC-1979 Convening in Geneva, Switzerland on the 24th of

  12. Cryogenic thermal system analysis for orbital propellant depot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Patrick R.; Wilhite, Alan W.

    2014-09-01

    In any manned mission architecture, upwards of seventy percent of all payload delivered to orbit is propellant, and propellant mass fraction dominates almost all transportation segments of any mission requiring a heavy lift launch system like the Saturn V. To mitigate this, the use of an orbital propellant depot has been extensively studied. In this paper, a thermal model of an orbital propellant depot is used to examine the effects of passive and active thermal management strategies. Results show that an all passive thermal management strategy results in significant boil-off for both hydrogen and oxygen. At current launch vehicle prices, these boil-offs equate to millions of dollars lost per month. Zero boil-off of propellant is achievable with the use of active cryocoolers; however, the cooling power required to produce zero-boil-off is an order of magnitude higher than current state-of-the-art cryocoolers. This study shows a zero-boil-off cryocooler minimum power requirement of 80-100 W at 80 K for liquid oxygen, and 100-120 W at 20 K for liquid hydrogen for a representative Near-Earth Object mission. Research and development effort is required to improve the state-of-the-arts in-space cryogenic thermal management.

  13. Analysis of the SPS Long Term Orbit Drifts

    SciTech Connect

    Velotti, Francesco; Bracco, Chiara; Cornelis, Karel; Drøsdal, Lene; Fraser, Matthew; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana; Goddard, Brennan; Kain, Verena; Meddahi, Malika

    2016-06-01

    The Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) is the last accelerator in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) injector chain, and has to deliver the two high-intensity 450 GeV proton beams to the LHC. The transport from SPS to LHC is done through the two Transfer Lines (TL), TI2 and TI8, for Beam 1 (B1) and Beam 2 (B2) respectively. During the first LHC operation period Run 1, a long term drift of the SPS orbit was observed, causing changes in the LHC injection due to the resulting changes in the TL trajectories. This translated into longer LHC turnaround because of the necessity to periodically correct the TL trajectories in order to preserve the beam quality at injection into the LHC. Different sources for the SPS orbit drifts have been investigated: each of them can account only partially for the total orbit drift observed. In this paper, the possible sources of such drift are described, together with the simulated and measured effect they cause. Possible solutions and countermeasures are also discussed.

  14. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 4: 747/orbiter aeroelastic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reding, J. P.; Ericsson, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    A quasi-steady analysis of the aeroelastic stability of the lateral (antisymmetric) modes of the 747/orbiter vehicle was accomplished. The interference effect of the orbiter wake on the 747 tail furnishes an aerodynamic undamping contribution to the elastic modes. Likewise, the upstream influence of the 747 tail and aft fuselage on the orbiter beaver-tail rail fairing also is undamping. Fortunately these undamping effects cannot overpower the large damping contribution of the 747 tail and the modes are damped for the configurations analyzed. However, significant interference effects of the orbiter on the 747 tail have been observed in the pitch plane. The high response of the 747 vertical tail in the orbiter wave was also considered. Wind tunnel data points to flapping of the OMS pod wakes as the source of the wake resonance phenomenon.

  15. On protection of Freedom's solar dynamic radiator from the orbital debris environment. I - Preliminary analysis and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatigan, Jennifer L.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Fleming, Michael L.

    1992-01-01

    A great deal of experimentation and analysis was performed to quantify penetration thresholds of components which will experience orbital debris impacts. Penetration was found to depend upon mission specific parameters such as orbital altitude, inclination, and orientation of the component; and upon component specific parameters such as material, density and the geometry particular to its shielding. Experimental results are highly dependent upon shield configuration and cannot be extrapolated with confidence to alternate shield configurations. Also, current experimental capabilities are limited to velocities which only approach the lower limit of predicted orbital debris velocities. Therefore, prediction of the penetrating particle size for a particular component having a complex geometry remains highly uncertain. An approach is described which was developed to assess on-orbit survivability of the solar dynamic radiator due to micrometeoroid and space debris impacts. Preliminary analyses are presented to quantify the solar dynamic radiator survivability, and include the type of particle and particle population expected to defeat the radiator bumpering (i.e., penetrate a fluid flow tube). Results of preliminary hypervelocity impact testing performed on radiator panel samples (in the 6 to 7 km/sec velocity range) are also presented.

  16. On protection of Freedom's solar dynamic radiator from the orbital debris environment. Part 1; Preliminary analysis and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Rhatigan, J.L. . Lewis Research Center); Christiansen, E.L. . Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center); Fleming, M.L. )

    1992-08-01

    A great deal of experimentation and analysis has been performed to quantify penetration thresholds of components which will experience orbital debris impacts. Penetration has been found to depend upon mission-specific parameters such as orbital altitude, inclination, and orientation of the component; and upon component specific parameters such as material, density, and the geometry particular to its shielding. Experimental results are highly dependent upon shield configuration and cannot be extrapolated with confidence to alternate shield configurations. Also, current experimental capabilities are limited to velocities which only approach the lower limit of predicted orbital debris velocities. Therefore, prediction of the penetrating particle size for a particular component having a complex geometry remains highly uncertain. This paper describes the approach developed to assess on-orbit survivability, and include the type of particle and particle population expected to defeat the radiator bumpering (i.e., penetrate a fluid flow tube). Results of preliminary hypervelocity impact testing performed on radiator panel samples (in the 6 to 7 km/sec velocity range) are also presented. Plans for further analyses and testing are discussed. These efforts are expected to lead to a radiator design which will perform to Space Station Freedom requirements over the expected lifetime.

  17. [Population and environment. Requests for interdisciplinary analysis].

    PubMed

    Tudela, F

    1991-01-01

    Serious difficulties impede interdisciplinary research involving demographers, ecologists, and other students of the environment. The 1st problem concerns definitions of the different subject areas. Demographers have focused on the dynamics of some indicators that reflect complex and heterogeneous population processes. The relative autonomy of demography as a discipline was gained through an empirical orientation reflected in the statistical treatment of causality. But the traditional demographic paradigm is insufficient for untangling the causal mechanisms underlying population dynamics. Environmental disciplines on the other hand face methodologic difficulties in transcending a strictly biological focus to incorporate aspects of cultural and social influence on ecological processes. "Human ecology", a possible meeting ground for ecological and demographic studies, is more of an ambitious program of transdisciplinary research than an independent discipline. Relations between the environment and development processes, including population aspects, are of increasing international concern. A conceptual base has developed in Latin America which emphasizes the global and structural aspects of the environment and of development styles. It has been extremely difficult to apply the entire conceptualization to the concrete environmental problems that are of current interest to both civil society and governments. It may be time to replace the umbrella term "environment", defining it in more specific, systemic, and operational terms. It is time to delimit study topics in terms of concrete problems. A good example would be the situation of Lake Chapala, the largest lake in Mexico. Damage caused to it cannot be assessed by referring to the "population explosion" or an "overall development style". Environmental, economic, and sociodemographic aspects will however necessarily enter the analysis. Fragile and unstable situations are of special interest in the study of relations

  18. Lunar Impact Basins: Stratigraphy, Sequence and Ages from Superposed Impact Crater Populations Measured from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fassett, C. I.; Head, J. W.; Kadish, S. J.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2012-01-01

    Impact basin formation is a fundamental process in the evolution of the Moon and records the history of impactors in the early solar system. In order to assess the stratigraphy, sequence, and ages of impact basins and the impactor population as a function of time, we have used topography from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to measure the superposed impact crater size-frequency distributions for 30 lunar basins (D = 300 km). These data generally support the widely used Wilhelms sequence of lunar basins, although we find significantly higher densities of superposed craters on many lunar basins than derived by Wilhelms (50% higher densities). Our data also provide new insight into the timing of the transition between distinct crater populations characteristic of ancient and young lunar terrains. The transition from a lunar impact flux dominated by Population 1 to Population 2 occurred before the mid-Nectarian. This is before the end of the period of rapid cratering, and potentially before the end of the hypothesized Late Heavy Bombardment. LOLA-derived crater densities also suggest that many Pre-Nectarian basins, such as South Pole-Aitken, have been cratered to saturation equilibrium. Finally, both crater counts and stratigraphic observations based on LOLA data are applicable to specific basin stratigraphic problems of interest; for example, using these data, we suggest that Serenitatis is older than Nectaris, and Humboldtianum is younger than Crisium. Sample return missions to specific basins can anchor these measurements to a Pre-Imbrian absolute chronology.

  19. Lunar impact basins: Stratigraphy, sequence and ages from superposed impact crater populations measured from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassett, C. I.; Head, J. W.; Kadish, S. J.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2012-02-01

    Impact basin formation is a fundamental process in the evolution of the Moon and records the history of impactors in the early solar system. In order to assess the stratigraphy, sequence, and ages of impact basins and the impactor population as a function of time, we have used topography from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to measure the superposed impact crater size-frequency distributions for 30 lunar basins (D ≥ 300 km). These data generally support the widely used Wilhelms sequence of lunar basins, although we find significantly higher densities of superposed craters on many lunar basins than derived by Wilhelms (50% higher densities). Our data also provide new insight into the timing of the transition between distinct crater populations characteristic of ancient and young lunar terrains. The transition from a lunar impact flux dominated by Population 1 to Population 2 occurred before the mid-Nectarian. This is before the end of the period of rapid cratering, and potentially before the end of the hypothesized Late Heavy Bombardment. LOLA-derived crater densities also suggest that many Pre-Nectarian basins, such as South Pole-Aitken, have been cratered to saturation equilibrium. Finally, both crater counts and stratigraphic observations based on LOLA data are applicable to specific basin stratigraphic problems of interest; for example, using these data, we suggest that Serenitatis is older than Nectaris, and Humboldtianum is younger than Crisium. Sample return missions to specific basins can anchor these measurements to a Pre-Imbrian absolute chronology.

  20. Study of geopotential error models used in orbit determination error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, C.; Kelbel, D.; Lee, T.; Samii, M. V.; Mistretta, G. D.; Hart, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    The uncertainty in the geopotential model is currently one of the major error sources in the orbit determination of low-altitude Earth-orbiting spacecraft. The results of an investigation of different geopotential error models and modeling approaches currently used for operational orbit error analysis support at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) are presented, with emphasis placed on sequential orbit error analysis using a Kalman filtering algorithm. Several geopotential models, known as the Goddard Earth Models (GEMs), were developed and used at GSFC for orbit determination. The errors in the geopotential models arise from the truncation errors that result from the omission of higher order terms (omission errors) and the errors in the spherical harmonic coefficients themselves (commission errors). At GSFC, two error modeling approaches were operationally used to analyze the effects of geopotential uncertainties on the accuracy of spacecraft orbit determination - the lumped error modeling and uncorrelated error modeling. The lumped error modeling approach computes the orbit determination errors on the basis of either the calibrated standard deviations of a geopotential model's coefficients or the weighted difference between two independently derived geopotential models. The uncorrelated error modeling approach treats the errors in the individual spherical harmonic components as uncorrelated error sources and computes the aggregate effect using a combination of individual coefficient effects. This study assesses the reasonableness of the two error modeling approaches in terms of global error distribution characteristics and orbit error analysis results. Specifically, this study presents the global distribution of geopotential acceleration errors for several gravity error models and assesses the orbit determination errors resulting from these error models for three types of spacecraft - the Gamma Ray Observatory, the Ocean Topography Experiment, and the Cosmic

  1. A Monte Carlo error analysis program for near-Mars, finite-burn, orbital transfer maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. N.; Hoffman, L. H.; Young, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program was developed which performs an error analysis of a minimum-fuel, finite-thrust, transfer maneuver between two Keplerian orbits in the vicinity of Mars. The method of analysis is the Monte Carlo approach where each off-nominal initial orbit is targeted to the desired final orbit. The errors in the initial orbit are described by two covariance matrices of state deviations and tracking errors. The function of the program is to relate these errors to the resulting errors in the final orbit. The equations of motion for the transfer trajectory are those of a spacecraft maneuvering with constant thrust and mass-flow rate in the neighborhood of a single body. The thrust vector is allowed to rotate in a plane with a constant pitch rate. The transfer trajectory is characterized by six control parameters and the final orbit is defined, or partially defined, by the desired target parameters. The program is applicable to the deboost maneuver (hyperbola to ellipse), orbital trim maneuver (ellipse to ellipse), fly-by maneuver (hyperbola to hyperbola), escape maneuvers (ellipse to hyperbola), and deorbit maneuver.

  2. Experimental and Computational Analysis of Shuttle Orbiter Hypersonic Trim Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Paulson, John W., Jr.; Weilmuenster, K. James

    1995-01-01

    During the high-Mach-number, high-altitude portion of the first entry of the Shuttle Orbiter, the vehicle exhibited a nose-up pitching moment relative to preflight prediction of approximately Delta Cm = 0.03. This trim anomaly has been postulated to be due to compressibility, viscous, and/or real-gas (lowered specific heat ratio gamma) effects on basic body pitching moment, body-flap effectiveness, or both. In order to assess the relative contribution of each of these effects, an experimental study was undertaken to examine the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and ratio of specific heats. Complementary computational solutions were obtained for wind-tunnel and flight conditions. The primary cause of the anomaly was determined to be lower pressures on the aft windward surface of the Orbiter than deduced from hypersonic wind-tunnel tests with ideal- or near-ideal-gas test flow. The lower pressure levels are a result of the lowering of the flowfield gamma due to high-temperature effects. This phenomenon was accurately simulated in a hypersonic wind tunnel using a heavy gas, which provided a lower, gamma, and was correctly predicted by Navier-Stokes computations using nonequilibrium chemistry.

  3. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the Electrical Power Distribution and Control Subsystem, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmeckpeper, K. R.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Electrical Power Distribution and Control (EPD and C) hardware. The EPD and C hardware performs the functions of distributing, sensing, and controlling 28 volt DC power and of inverting, distributing, sensing, and controlling 117 volt 400 Hz AC power to all Orbiter subsystems from the three fuel cells in the Electrical Power Generation (EPG) subsystem. Volume 2 continues the presentation of IOA analysis worksheets and contains the potential critical items list.

  4. Physiogenomic analysis of the Puerto Rican population

    PubMed Central

    Ruaño, Gualberto; Duconge, Jorge; Windemuth, Andreas; Cadilla, Carmen L; Kocherla, Mohan; Villagra, David; Renta, Jessica; Holford, Theodore; Santiago-Borrero, Pedro J

    2009-01-01

    Aims Admixture in the population of the island of Puerto Rico is of general interest with regards to pharmacogenetics to develop comprehensive strategies for personalized healthcare in Latin Americans. This research was aimed at determining the frequencies of SNPs in key physiological, pharmacological and biochemical genes to infer population structure and ancestry in the Puerto Rican population. Materials & methods A noninterventional, cross-sectional, retrospective study design was implemented following a controlled, stratified-by-region, random sampling protocol. The sample was based on birthrates in each region of the island of Puerto Rico, according to the 2004 National Birth Registry. Genomic DNA samples from 100 newborns were obtained from the Puerto Rico Newborn Screening Program in dried-blood spot cards. Genotyping using a physiogenomic array was performed for 332 SNPs from 196 cardiometabolic and neuroendocrine genes. Population structure was examined using a Bayesian clustering approach as well as by allelic dissimilarity as a measure of allele sharing. Results The Puerto Rican sample was found to be broadly heterogeneous. We observed three main clusters in the population, which we hypothesize to reflect the historical admixture in the Puerto Rican population from Amerindian, African and European ancestors. We present evidence for this interpretation by comparing allele frequencies for the three clusters with those for the same SNPs available from the International HapMap project for Asian, African and European populations. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that population analysis can be performed with a physiogenomic array of cardiometabolic and neuroendocrine genes to facilitate the translation of genome diversity into personalized medicine. PMID:19374515

  5. Screening charged impurities and lifting the orbital degeneracy in graphene by populating Landau levels.

    PubMed

    Luican-Mayer, Adina; Kharitonov, Maxim; Li, Guohong; Lu, Chih-Pin; Skachko, Ivan; Gonçalves, Alem-Mar B; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Andrei, Eva Y

    2014-01-24

    We report the observation of an isolated charged impurity in graphene and present direct evidence of the close connection between the screening properties of a 2D electron system and the influence of the impurity on its electronic environment. Using scanning tunneling microscopy and Landau level spectroscopy, we demonstrate that in the presence of a magnetic field the strength of the impurity can be tuned by controlling the occupation of Landau-level states with a gate voltage. At low occupation the impurity is screened, becoming essentially invisible. Screening diminishes as states are filled until, for fully occupied Landau levels, the unscreened impurity significantly perturbs the spectrum in its vicinity. In this regime we report the first observation of Landau-level splitting into discrete states due to lifting the orbital degeneracy.

  6. Comet Tempel 2: Orbit, ephemerides and error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeomans, D. K.

    1978-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of comet Tempel 2 is investigated and the comet is found to be very well behaved and easily predictable. The nongravitational forces affecting the motion of this comet are the smallest of any comet that is affected by nongravitational forces. The sign and time history of these nongravitational forces imply (1) a direct rotation of the comet's nucleus and (2) the comet's ability to outgas has not changed substantially over its entire observational history. The well behaved dynamical motion of the comet, the well observed past apparitions, the small nongravitational forces and the excellent 1988 ground based observing conditions all contribute to relatively small position and velocity errors in 1988 -- the year of a proposed rendezvous space mission to this comet. To assist in planned ground based and earth orbital observations of this comet, ephemerides are given for the 1978-79, 1983-84 and 1988 apparitions.

  7. Electronic structure of polymeric KC 60 - a crystal orbital analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Joachim; Böhm, Michael C.

    1996-04-01

    The band structure of orthorhombic KC 60 is investigated by a crystal approach based on an intermediate neglect of differential orbital Hamiltonian. The title compound crystallizes in the space group Pnnm with covalent intermolecular carboncarbon bonds. Polymeric KC 60 is a metal with a low electronic density of states (DOS) at the Fermi energy ɛF. This metallic behaviour differs from the electronic ground state calculated for isotropic fcc KC 60 with potassium occupying the octahedral intersitial site. The reduced width of the conduction band in the fcc structure favours an insulating Mott state relative to the metallic configuration. The dimensionality of the title compound is discussed on the basis of intercell energies, the DOS profile and dispersion curves. The theoretical results are compared with experimental observations. Wiberg bond-indices are employed to describe the chemical bonding within the distorted C 60 soccerball.

  8. An analysis of the low-earth-orbit communications environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diersing, Robert Joseph

    Advances in microprocessor technology and availability of launch opportunities have caused interest in low-earth-orbit satellite based communications systems to increase dramatically during the past several years. In this research the capabilities of two low-cost, store-and-forward LEO communications satellites operating in the public domain are examined--PACSAT-1 (operated by the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation) and UoSAT-3 (operated by the University of Surrey, England, Electrical Engineering Department). The file broadcasting and file transfer facilities are examined in detail and a simulation model of the downlink traffic pattern is developed. The simulator will aid the assessment of changes in design and implementation for other systems. The development of the downlink traffic simulator is based on three major parts. First, is a characterization of the low-earth-orbit operating environment along with preliminary measurements of the PACSAT-1 and UoSAT-3 systems including: satellite visibility constraints on communications, monitoring equipment configuration, link margin computations, determination of block and bit error rates, and establishing typical data capture rates for ground stations using computer-pointed directional antennas and fixed omni-directional antennas. Second, arrival rates for successful and unsuccessful file server connections are established along with transaction service times. Downlink traffic has been further characterized by measuring: frame and byte counts for all data-link layer traffic; 30-second interval average response time for all traffic and for file server traffic only; file server response time on a per-connection basis; and retry rates for information and supervisory frames. Finally, the model is verified by comparison with measurements of actual traffic not previously used in the model building process. The simulator is then used to predict operation of the PACSAT-1 satellite with modifications to the original design.

  9. An Analysis of Debris Orbit Prediction Accuracy from Short-arc Orbit Determination Using Optical and Laser Tracking Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, J.; Sang, J.; Smith, C.; Zhang, K.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper results are presented from a short-arc orbit determination study using optical and laser tracking data from the Space Debris Tracking System located at Mount Stromlo, Australia. Fifteen low-Earth orbit debris objects were considered in the study with perigee altitudes in the range 550850 km. In most cases, a 2-day orbit determination was considered using 2 passes of optical and 2 passes of laser tracking data. A total of 33 1-day and 26 2-day orbit prediction cases were compared with residuals obtained by comparing the orbit prediction with subsequent tracking data. A comparison was made between the orbit prediction accuracies for 2 orbit determination variants: (1) Entire passes are used during the orbit determination process; (2) Only 5 seconds is used from the beginning of each pass. Overall, the short-arc orbit determination results in (slightly) worse 1 and 2 day orbit prediction accuracies when compared to using the full observation arcs; however, the savings in tracking load outweighs the reduction in accuracy. If the optical or laser data is left out of the 5-second pass orbit determination process, most cases diverged which shows the importance of 3-dimenional positioning. Two-line element data was used to constrain the orbit determination process resulting in better convergence rates, but the resulting orbit prediction accuracy was much worse. The results have important implications for an optical and laser debris tracking network with potential savings in tracking load. An experimental study will be needed to verify this statement.

  10. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 1: Orbiter aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the steady and unsteady aerodynamics of the space shuttle orbiter has been performed. It is shown that slender wing theory can be modified to account for the effect of Mach number and leading edge roundness on both attached and separated flow loads. The orbiter unsteady aerodynamics can be computed by defining two equivalent slender wings, one for attached flow loads and another for the vortex-induced loads. It is found that the orbiter is in the transonic speed region subject to vortex-shock-boundary layer interactions that cause highly nonlinear or discontinuous load changes which can endanger the structural integrity of the orbiter wing and possibly cause snap roll problems. It is presently impossible to simulate these interactions in a wind tunnel test even in the static case. Thus, a well planned combined analytic and experimental approach is needed to solve the problem.

  11. The General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT): A New Resource for Supporting Debris Orbit Determination, Tracking and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jah, Moriba; Huges, Steven; Wilkins, Matthew; Kelecy, Tom

    2009-03-01

    The General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT) was initially developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) as a high accuracy orbital analysis tool to support a variety of space missions. A formal agreement has recently been established between NASA and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) to further develop GMAT to include orbit determination (OD) capabilities. A variety of estimation strategies and dynamic models will be included in the new version of GMAT. GMAT will accommodate orbit determination, tracking and analysis of orbital debris through a combination of model, processing and implementation requirements. The GMAT processing architecture natively supports parallel processing such that allow it can efficiently accommodate the OD and tracking of numerous objects resulting from breakups. A full first release of the augmented GMAT capability is anticipated in September 2009 and it will be available for community use at no charge.

  12. An Improved Distance and Mass Estimate for Sgr A* from a Multistar Orbit Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehle, A.; Ghez, A. M.; Schödel, R.; Meyer, L.; Yelda, S.; Albers, S.; Martinez, G. D.; Becklin, E. E.; Do, T.; Lu, J. R.; Matthews, K.; Morris, M. R.; Sitarski, B.; Witzel, G.

    2016-10-01

    We present new, more precise measurements of the mass and distance of our Galaxy’s central supermassive black hole, Sgr A*. These results stem from a new analysis that more than doubles the time baseline for astrometry of faint stars orbiting Sgr A*, combining 2 decades of speckle imaging and adaptive optics data. Specifically, we improve our analysis of the speckle images by using information about a star’s orbit from the deep adaptive optics data (2005-2013) to inform the search for the star in the speckle years (1995-2005). When this new analysis technique is combined with the first complete re-reduction of Keck Galactic Center speckle images using speckle holography, we are able to track the short-period star S0-38 (K-band magnitude = 17, orbital period = 19 yr) through the speckle years. We use the kinematic measurements from speckle holography and adaptive optics to estimate the orbits of S0-38 and S0-2 and thereby improve our constraints of the mass (M bh) and distance (R o ) of Sgr A*: M bh = (4.02 ± 0.16 ± 0.04) × 106 M ⊙ and 7.86 ± 0.14 ± 0.04 kpc. The uncertainties in M bh and R o as determined by the combined orbital fit of S0-2 and S0-38 are improved by a factor of 2 and 2.5, respectively, compared to an orbital fit of S0-2 alone and a factor of ˜2.5 compared to previous results from stellar orbits. This analysis also limits the extended dark mass within 0.01 pc to less than 0.13 × 106 M ⊙ at 99.7% confidence, a factor of 3 lower compared to prior work.

  13. Objectives for Mars Orbital Missions in the 2020s: Report from a MEPAG Science Analysis Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, R. W.; Campbell, B. A.; Diniega, S.; Lock, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    NASA Headquarters is looking at possible missions to Mars to follow the proposed 2020 Mars rover mission currently in development. One option being considered is a multi-functional orbiter, launched in the early 2020's, whose capabilities could address objectives in the following areas: • Replenishment of the telecommunications and reconnaissance infrastructure presently provided by the aging Mars Odyssey and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiters; • Scientific and technical progress on the NRC Planetary Science Decadal Survey priorities, updated MEPAG Goals, and/or follow-up of new discoveries; • Location and quantification of in situ resources for utilization by future robotic and human surface-based missions; and • Data needed to address Strategic Knowledge Gaps (SKGs), again for possible human missions. The Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG) was asked to prepare an analysis of possible science objectives and remote sensing capabilities that could be implemented by such a multi-purpose Mars orbiter launched in the 2022/24 timeframe. MEPAG conducted this analysis through formation of a Next Orbiter Science Analysis Group (NEX-SAG), which was chartered jointly by the NASA Science and Human Exploration Directorates. The SAG was asked to conduct this study within a range of mission capabilities, including the possible first use of Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) in the Mars system. SEP could provide additional power enabling new payload components and possible changes in orbit (e.g., orbital inclination change) that permit different mission observational campaigns (e.g., polar and non-polar). Special attention was paid towards identifying synergies between science investigations, reconnaissance, and resource/SKG needs. We will present the findings and conclusions of this NEX-SAG regarding possible objectives for the next NASA Orbiter to Mars.

  14. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the reaction control system, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkemper, V. J.; Haufler, W. A.; Odonnell, R. A.; Paul, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results for the Reaction Control System (RCS). The purpose of the RCS is to provide thrust in and about the X, Y, Z axes for External Tank (ET) separation; orbit insertion maneuvers; orbit translation maneuvers; on-orbit attitude control; rendezvous; proximity operations (payload deploy and capture); deorbit maneuvers; and abort attitude control. The RCS is situated in three independent modules, one forward in the orbiter nose and one in each OMS/RCS pod. Each RCS module consists of the following subsystems: Helium Pressurization Subsystem; Propellant Storage and Distribution Subsystem; Thruster Subsystem; and Electrical Power Distribution and Control Subsystem. Of the failure modes analyzed, 307 could potentially result in a loss of life and/or loss of vehicle.

  15. A photometric and orbital analysis of GT MUSCAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, K. A.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Gilmore, A. C.

    1995-10-01

    GT Mus is a quadruple system comprising a long-period RS CVn-type binary (HD 101379) and a pair of eclipsing A dwarfs (HD 101380). Six and a half years of UBV (RI)_C photometry obtained at the Mt John University Observatory has enabled identification of four distinct types of photometric variability in this system. These are (1) a slowly changing mean magnitude, which probably arises from an activity-cycle-like effect in the active component of HD 101379, (2) a periodic variation (P_rot~64d), which is attributed to rotational modulation due to spots on the active star, (3) a periodic variation (P_eclipse=2.7546d) due to the eclipses of HD 101380, and (4) an excess in the I band, which occurs on a short time-scale (<1d) and is probably associated with HD 101379 activity. The evolution of the light curve of HD 101379 is fast with respect to the rotational period, suggesting rapid spot evolution for which we anticipate a possible model. The colours of HD 101379, even at maximum brightness, are excessively red for its spectral type, unless there is significant reddening by dust. Radial velocity measurements of HD 101379 are also presented, along with an improved determination of the orbit of this somewhat long-period (P_orb=61.448d) system.

  16. TSS tether cable meteoroid/orbital debris damage analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashida, K. B.; Robinson, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the damage analyses performed on the tether cable used for the tethered satellite system (TSS), for the damage that could be caused by meteoroid or orbital debris impacts. The TSS consists of a tethered satellite deployer and a tethered satellite. The analytical studies were performed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with the results from the following tests: (1) hypervelocity impact tests to determine the 'critical' meteoroid particle diameter, i.e., the maximum size of a meteoroid particle which can impact the tether cable without causing 'failure'; (2) electrical resistance tests on the damaged and undamaged tether cable to determine if degradation of current flow occurred through the damaged tether cables; and (3) tensile load tests to verify the load carrying capability of the damaged tether cables. Finally, the HULL hydrodynamic computer code was used to simulate the hypervelocity impact of the tether cable by particles at velocities higher than can be tested, to determine the extent of the expected tether damage.

  17. Evaluation and analysis of the orbital maneuvering vehicle video system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, Robert J., II

    1989-01-01

    The work accomplished in the summer of 1989 in association with the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Research Fellowship Program at Marshall Space Flight Center is summarized. The task involved study of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) Video Compression Scheme. This included such activities as reviewing the expected scenes to be compressed by the flight vehicle, learning the error characteristics of the communication channel, monitoring the CLASS tests, and assisting in development of test procedures and interface hardware for the bit error rate lab being developed at MSFC to test the VCU/VRU. Numerous comments and suggestions were made during the course of the fellowship period regarding the design and testing of the OMV Video System. Unfortunately from a technical point of view, the program appears at this point in time to be trouble from an expense prospective and is in fact in danger of being scaled back, if not cancelled altogether. This makes technical improvements prohibitive and cost-reduction measures necessary. Fortunately some cost-reduction possibilities and some significant technical improvements that should cost very little were identified.

  18. Dynamical analysis of an orbiting three-rigid-body system

    SciTech Connect

    Pagnozzi, Daniele E-mail: james.biggs@strath.ac.uk; Biggs, James D. E-mail: james.biggs@strath.ac.uk

    2014-12-10

    The development of multi-joint-spacecraft mission concepts calls for a deeper understanding of their nonlinear dynamics to inform and enhance system design. This paper presents a study of a three-finite-shape rigid-body system under the action of an ideal central gravitational field. The aim of this paper is to gain an insight into the natural dynamics of this system. The Hamiltonian dynamics is derived and used to identify relative attitude equilibria of the system with respect to the orbital reference frame. Then a numerical investigation of the behaviour far from the equilibria is provided using tools from modern dynamical systems theory such as energy methods, phase portraits and Poincarè maps. Results reveal a complex structure of the dynamics as well as the existence of connections between some of the equilibria. Stable equilibrium configurations appear to be surrounded by very narrow regions of regular and quasi-regular motions. Trajectories evolve on chaotic motions in the rest of the domain.

  19. A Ballistic Limit Analysis Program for Shielding Against Micrometeoroids and Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Erie

    2010-01-01

    A software program has been developed that enables the user to quickly and simply perform ballistic limit calculations for common spacecraft structures that are subject to hypervelocity impact of micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) projectiles. This analysis program consists of two core modules: design, and; performance. The design module enables a user to calculate preliminary dimensions of a shield configuration (e.g., thicknesses/areal densities, spacing, etc.) for a ?design? particle (diameter, density, impact velocity, incidence). The performance module enables a more detailed shielding analysis, providing the performance of a user-defined shielding configuration over the range of relevant in-orbit impact conditions.

  20. Orbiter Trajectory Analysis for a Two-Stage Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowling, Adam L.

    2011-01-01

    Trajectory analysis performed on NASA's reference two-stage-to-orbit launch vehicle upper stage will be presented. The work was completed in support of the Hypersonics Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization effort for the NASA-Air Force Joint System Study. Three degree-of-freedom (3-DOF) untrimmed trajectory analysis was performed for the orbiter ascent, closure and re-entry. An iterative closure process resulted in a 333,000 lb initial mass for the orbiter. The re-entry trajectory satisfied heating constraints for all payload out cases and met the constraints with reduced margins for payload in cases. Abort trajectories for engine out at staging, engine out during ascent, and failure to circularize in orbit, gave insight to the robustness of the orbiter. A trimmed ascent trajectory defined an engine gimbal location and the body flap angle best suited for maximizing injected mass. A trimmed re-entry trajectory revealed a need to update the trim routine to accommodate full flap aerodynamic data.

  1. Orbit Determination Analysis for a Joint UK-Australian Space Surveillance Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, M.; Harwood, N.; Bennett, J.; Donnelly, P.; Ash, A.; Eastment, J.; Ladd, D.; Gordon, N.; Bessell, T.; Smith, C.; Ritchie, I.

    2014-09-01

    In February 2014 the UK and Australia carried out a joint space surveillance target tracking, cueing, and sensor data fusion experiment involving the STFC Chilbolton Observatory radar in the UK, the EOS laser-ranging system in Australia and a small telescope operated by DSTO, also in Australia. The experiment, coordinated by DSTL (UK) and DSTO (Aus), was designed to explore the combination of several different, geographically separated sensors for space situational awareness. The primary goal of the experiment was to use data from the radar in the UK to generate an orbital cue to the EOS SLR. A variety of targets sizes and orbits were chosen, under the limitations of observability by both the radar and EOS SLR, in order to explore the variation of cueing accuracy with amount of data incorporated and timeliness from generation. As a secondary objective the effect on cue accuracy of targets in lower orbital regimes was examined. This paper examines the orbit determination techniques used to generate cues from radar and the refined orbits resulting from accumulating SLR data. The construction of tracks using data from all three sensors is explored. Analysis of the accuracy of the orbital reconstructions is made based on comparisons with the measured data and accurate ephemerides provided by the ILRS. The accuracy is tested against the cueing precision requirements for each sensor. Two companion papers describe the experimental goals, execution and achievements (Harwood et. al.) and the sensor aspects of the experiment (Eastment et al.).

  2. Power Extension Package (PEP) system definition extension, orbital service module systems analysis study. Volume 3: PEP analysis and tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The objectives, conclusions, and approaches for accomplishing 19 specific design and analysis activities related to the installation of the power extension package (PEP) into the Orbiter cargo bay are described as well as those related to its deployment, extension, and retraction. The proposed cable handling system designed to transmit power from PEP to the Orbiter by way of the shuttle remote manipulator system is described and a preliminary specification for the gimbal assembly, solar array drive is included.

  3. Conducting On-orbit Gene Expression Analysis on ISS: WetLab-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, Macarena; Almeida, Eduardo; Boone, Travis; Jung, Jimmy; Lera, Matthew P.; Ricco, Antonio; Souza, Kenneth; Wu, Diana; Richey, C. Scott

    2013-01-01

    WetLab-2 will enable expanded genomic research on orbit by developing tools that support in situ sample collection, processing, and analysis on ISS. This capability will reduce the time-to-results for investigators and define new pathways for discovery on the ISS National Lab. The primary objective is to develop a research platform on ISS that will facilitate real-time quantitative gene expression analysis of biological samples collected on orbit. WetLab-2 will be capable of processing multiple sample types ranging from microbial cultures to animal tissues dissected on orbit. WetLab-2 will significantly expand the analytical capabilities onboard ISS and enhance science return from ISS.

  4. Space Trajectory Error Analysis Program (STEAP) for halo orbit missions. Volume 2: Programmer's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrnes, D. V.; Carney, P. C.; Underwood, J. W.; Vogt, E. D.

    1974-01-01

    The six month effort was responsible for the development, test, conversion, and documentation of computer software for the mission analysis of missions to halo orbits about libration points in the earth-sun system. The software consisting of two programs called NOMNAL and ERRAN is part of the Space Trajectories Error Analysis Programs. The program NOMNAL targets a transfer trajectory from earth on a given launch date to a specified halo orbit on a required arrival date. Either impulsive or finite thrust insertion maneuvers into halo orbit are permitted by the program. The transfer trajectory is consistent with a realistic launch profile input by the user. The second program ERRAN conducts error analyses of the targeted transfer trajectory. Measurements including range, doppler, star-planet angles, and apparent planet diameter are processed in a Kalman-Schmidt filter to determine the trajectory knowledge uncertainty.

  5. Thermal and orbital analysis of Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous space experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killough, Brian D.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamentals of an Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous orbit are presented. A Sun-synchronous Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP) was developed to calculate orbital parameters for an entire year. The output from this program provides the required input data for the TRASYS thermal radiation computer code, which in turn computes the infrared, solar and Earth albedo heat fluxes incident on a space experiment. Direct incident heat fluxes can be used as input to a generalized thermal analyzer program to size radiators and predict instrument operating temperatures. The SOAP computer code and its application to the thermal analysis methodology presented, should prove useful to the thermal engineer during the design phases of Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous space experiments.

  6. Orbital Injection of the SEDSAT Satellite: Tethered Systems Dynamics and Flight Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzini, Enrico C.; Gullahorn, Gordon E.; Cosmo, Mario L.; Ruiz, Manuel; Pelaez, Jesus

    1996-01-01

    This report deals with the following topics which are all related to the orbital injection of the SEDSAT satellite: Dynamics and Stability of Tether Oscillations after the First Cut. The dynamics of the tether after the first cut (i.e., without the Shuttle attached to it) is investigated. The tether oscillations with the free end are analyzed in order to assess the stability of the rectilinear configuration in between the two tether cuts; analysis of Unstable Modes. The unstable modes that appear for high libration angles are further investigated in order to determine their occurrences and the possible transition from bound librations to rotations; Orbital Release Strategies for SEDSAT. A parametric analysis of the orbital decay rate of the SEDSAT satellite after the two tether cuts has been carried out as a function of the following free parameters: libration amplitude at the end of deployment, deviation angle from LV at the first cut, and orbital anomaly at the second cut. The values of these parameters that provide a minimum orbital decay rate of the satellite (after the two cuts) have been computed; and Dynamics and Control of SEDSAT. The deployment control law has been modified to cope with the new ejection velocity of the satellite from the Shuttle cargo bay. New reference profiles have been derived as well as new control parameters. Timing errors at the satellite release as a function of the variations of the initial conditions and the tension model parameters have been estimated for the modified control law.

  7. 3D-Assisted Quantitative Assessment of Orbital Volume Using an Open-Source Software Platform in a Taiwanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Shyu, Victor Bong-Hang; Hsu, Chung-En; Chen, Chih-hao; Chen, Chien-Tzung

    2015-01-01

    Orbital volume evaluation is an important part of pre-operative assessments in orbital trauma and congenital deformity patients. The availability of the affordable, open-source software, OsiriX, as a tool for preoperative planning increased the popularity of radiological assessments by the surgeon. A volume calculation method based on 3D volume rendering-assisted region-of-interest computation was used to determine the normal orbital volume in Taiwanese patients after reorientation to the Frankfurt plane. Method one utilized 3D points for intuitive orbital rim outlining. The mean normal orbital volume for left and right orbits was 24.3±1.51 ml and 24.7±1.17 ml in male and 21.0±1.21 ml and 21.1±1.30 ml in female subjects. Another method (method two) based on the bilateral orbital lateral rim was also used to calculate orbital volume and compared with method one. The mean normal orbital volume for left and right orbits was 19.0±1.68 ml and 19.1±1.45 ml in male and 16.0±1.01 ml and 16.1±0.92 ml in female subjects. The inter-rater reliability and intra-rater measurement accuracy between users for both methods was found to be acceptable for orbital volume calculations. 3D-assisted quantification of orbital volume is a feasible technique for orbital volume assessment. The normal orbital volume can be used as controls in cases of unilateral orbital reconstruction with a mean size discrepancy of less than 3.1±2.03% in females and 2.7±1.32% in males. The OsiriX software can be used reliably by the individual surgeon as a comprehensive preoperative planning and imaging tool for orbital volume measurement and computed tomography reorientation. PMID:25774683

  8. Analysis of GaAs and Si solar cell arrays for earth orbital and orbit transfer missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffries, K. D.

    1980-01-01

    Silicon and gallium arsenide arrays were studied and compared for low earth orbit (LE), geosynchronous orbit (GEO), and LEO to GEO electric propulsion orbit transfer missions. The sensitivities of total cost to parameters such as mission duration, array cost, cover glass thickness, and concentration ratio were determined along with cost tradeoffs between silicon and gallium arsenide arrays for selected mission classes. Results indicate that development of the technology for low cost, light weight concentrators should be increased and that cost reduction efforts for gallium arsenide cells be pursued.

  9. Failure Analysis of Space Shuttle Orbiter Valve Poppet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Rick

    2010-01-01

    The poppet failed during STS-126 due to fatigue cracking that most likely was initiated during MDC ground-testing. This failure ultimately led to the discovery that the cracking problem was a generic issue effecting numerous poppets throughout the Shuttle program's history. This presentation has focused on the laboratory analysis of the failed hardware, but this analysis was only one aspect of a comprehensive failure investigation. One critical aspect of the overall investigation was modeling of the fluid flow through this valve to determine the possible sources of cyclic loading. This work has led to the conclusion that the poppets are failing due to flow-induced vibration.

  10. Pioneer Mars surface penetrator mission. Mission analysis and orbiter design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The Mars Surface Penetrator mission was designed to provide a capability for multiple and diverse subsurface science measurements at a low cost. Equipment required to adapt the Pioneer Venus spacecraft for the Mars mission is described showing minor modifications to hardware. Analysis and design topics which are similar and/or identical to the Pioneer Venus program are briefly discussed.

  11. Population Viability Analysis of Riverine Fishes

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, P.; Chandler, J.; Jager, H.I.; Lepla, K.; Van Winkle, W.

    1999-04-12

    Many utilities face conflkts between two goals: cost-efficient hydropower generation and protecting riverine fishes. Research to develop ecological simulation tools that can evaluate alternative mitigation strategies in terms of their benefits to fish populations is vital to informed decision-making. In this paper, we describe our approach to population viability analysis of riverine fishes in general and Snake River white sturgeon in particular. We are finding that the individual-based modeling approach used in previous in-stream flow applications is well suited to addressing questions about the viability of species of concern for several reasons. Chief among these are: (1) the abiIity to represent the effects of individual variation in life history characteristics on predicted population viabili~, (2) the flexibili~ needed to quanti~ the ecological benefits of alternative flow management options by representing spatial and temporal variation in flow and temperaturty and (3) the flexibility needed to quantifi the ecological benefits of non-flow related manipulations (i.e., passage, screening and hatchery supplementation).

  12. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the communication and tracking subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. R.; Robinson, W. M.; Trahan, W. H.; Daley, E. S.; Long, W. C.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Communication and Tracking hardware. The IOA analysis process utilized available Communication and Tracking hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode.

  13. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the reaction control system, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkemper, V. J.; Haufler, W. A.; Odonnell, R. A.; Paul, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results for the Reaction Control System (RCS). The RCS is situated in three independent modules, one forward in the orbiter nose and one in each OMS/RCS pod. Each RCS module consists of the following subsystems: Helium Pressurization Subsystem; Propellant Storage and Distribution Subsystem; Thruster Subsystem; and Electrical Power Distribution and Control Subsystem. Volume 2 continues the presentation of IOA analysis worksheets.

  14. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the reaction control system, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkemper, V. J.; Haufler, W. A.; Odonnell, R. A.; Paul, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results for the Reaction Control System (RCS). The RCS is situated in three independent modules, one forward in the orbiter nose and one in each OMS/RCS pod. Each RCS module consists of the following subsystems: Helium Pressurization Subsystem; Propellant Storage and Distribution Subsystem; Thruster Subsystem; and Electrical Power Distribution and Control Subsystem. Volume 3 continues the presentation of IOA analysis worksheets and the potential critical items list.

  15. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the nose wheel steering subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mediavilla, Anthony Scott

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results for the Orbiter Nose Wheel Steering (NWS) hardware are documented. The NWS hardware provides primary directional control for the Orbiter vehicle during landing rollout. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. The original NWS design was envisioned as a backup system to differential braking for directional control of the Orbiter during landing rollout. No real effort was made to design the NWS system as fail operational. The brakes have much redundancy built into their design but the poor brake/tire performance has forced the NSTS to upgrade NWS to the primary mode of directional control during rollout. As a result, a large percentage of the NWS system components have become Potential Critical Items (PCI).

  16. An orbit analysis approach to the study of superintegrable systems in the Euclidean plane

    SciTech Connect

    Adlam, C. M. McLenaghan, R. G. Smirnov, R. G.

    2007-03-15

    We classify the superintegrable potentials in the Euclidean plane by means of an orbit analysis of the space of valence two Killing tensors under the action of the group of rigid motions. Our approach generalizes the classical approach of Winternitz and collaborators by considering pairs of Killing tensors that are not both in canonical form.

  17. Earth Orbit v2.1: a 3-D visualization and analysis model of Earth's orbit, Milankovitch cycles and insolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostadinov, T. S.; Gilb, R.

    2014-06-01

    Milankovitch theory postulates that periodic variability of Earth's orbital elements is a major climate forcing mechanism, causing, for example, the contemporary glacial-interglacial cycles. There are three Milankovitch orbital parameters: orbital eccentricity, precession and obliquity. The interaction of the amplitudes, periods and phases of these parameters controls the spatio-temporal patterns of incoming solar radiation (insolation) and the timing and duration of the seasons. This complexity makes Earth-Sun geometry and Milankovitch theory difficult to teach effectively. Here, we present "Earth Orbit v2.1": an astronomically precise and accurate model that offers 3-D visualizations of Earth's orbital geometry, Milankovitch parameters and the ensuing insolation forcing. The model is developed in MATLAB® as a user-friendly graphical user interface. Users are presented with a choice between the Berger (1978a) and Laskar et al. (2004) astronomical solutions for eccentricity, obliquity and precession. A "demo" mode is also available, which allows the Milankovitch parameters to be varied independently of each other, so that users can isolate the effects of each parameter on orbital geometry, the seasons, and insolation. A 3-D orbital configuration plot, as well as various surface and line plots of insolation and insolation anomalies on various time and space scales are produced. Insolation computations use the model's own orbital geometry with no additional a priori input other than the Milankovitch parameter solutions. Insolation output and the underlying solar declination computation are successfully validated against the results of Laskar et al. (2004) and Meeus (1998), respectively. The model outputs some ancillary parameters as well, e.g., Earth's radius-vector length, solar declination and day length for the chosen date and latitude. Time-series plots of the Milankovitch parameters and several relevant paleoclimatological data sets can be produced. Both

  18. Analysis of Binary Multivariate Longitudinal Data via 2-Dimensional Orbits: An Application to the Agincourt Health and Socio-Demographic Surveillance System in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Visaya, Maria Vivien; Sherwell, David; Sartorius, Benn; Cromieres, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    We analyse demographic longitudinal survey data of South African (SA) and Mozambican (MOZ) rural households from the Agincourt Health and Socio-Demographic Surveillance System in South Africa. In particular, we determine whether absolute poverty status (APS) is associated with selected household variables pertaining to socio-economic determination, namely household head age, household size, cumulative death, adults to minor ratio, and influx. For comparative purposes, households are classified according to household head nationality (SA or MOZ) and APS (rich or poor). The longitudinal data of each of the four subpopulations (SA rich, SA poor, MOZ rich, and MOZ poor) is a five-dimensional space defined by binary variables (questions), subjects, and time. We use the orbit method to represent binary multivariate longitudinal data (BMLD) of each household as a two-dimensional orbit and to visualise dynamics and behaviour of the population. At each time step, a point (x, y) from the orbit of a household corresponds to the observation of the household, where x is a binary sequence of responses and y is an ordering of variables. The ordering of variables is dynamically rearranged such that clusters and holes associated to least and frequently changing variables in the state space respectively, are exposed. Analysis of orbits reveals information of change at both individual- and population-level, change patterns in the data, capacity of states in the state space, and density of state transitions in the orbits. Analysis of household orbits of the four subpopulations show association between (i) households headed by older adults and rich households, (ii) large household size and poor households, and (iii) households with more minors than adults and poor households. Our results are compared to other methods of BMLD analysis. PMID:25919116

  19. The Laser Ranging Experiment of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter: Five Years of Operations and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Dandan; McGarry, Jan F.; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A.; Sun, Xiaoli; Torrence, Mark H.; Zagwodzki, Thomas W.; Rowlands, David D.; Hoffman, Evan D.; Horvath, Julie E.; Golder, James E.; Barker, Michael K.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the results of the Laser Ranging (LR) experiment carried out from June 2009 to September 2014 in order to make one-way time-of-flight measurements of laser pulses between Earth-based laser ranging stations and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) orbiting the Moon. Over 4,000 hours of successful LR data are obtained from 10 international ground stations. The 20-30 centimeter precision of the full-rate LR data is further improved to 5-10 centimeter after conversion into normal points. The main purpose of LR is to utilize the high accuracy normal point data to improve the quality of the LRO orbits, which are nomi- nally determined by the radiometric S-band tracking data. When independently used in the LRO precision orbit determination process with the high-resolution GRAIL (Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory) gravity model, LR data provide good orbit solutions, with an average difference of approximately 50 meters in total position, and approximately 20 centimeters in radial direction, compared to the definitive LRO trajectory. When used in combination with the S-band tracking data, LR data help to improve the orbit accuracy in the radial direction to approximately 15 centimeters. In order to obtain highly accurate LR range measurements for precise orbit determination results, it is critical to closely model the behavior of the clocks both at the ground stations and on the spacecraft. LR provides a unique data set to calibrate the spacecraft clock. The LRO spacecraft clock is characterized by the LR data to a timing knowledge of 0.015 milliseconds over the entire 5 years of LR operation. We here present both the engineering setup of the LR experiments and the detailed analysis results of the LR data.

  20. The laser ranging experiment of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter: Five years of operations and data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Dandan; McGarry, Jan F.; Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory A.; Sun, Xiaoli; Torrence, Mark H.; Zagwodzki, Thomas W.; Rowlands, David D.; Hoffman, Evan D.; Horvath, Julie E.; Golder, James E.; Barker, Michael K.; Smith, David E.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2017-02-01

    We describe the results of the Laser Ranging (LR) experiment carried out from June 2009 to September 2014 in order to make one-way time-of-flight measurements of laser pulses between Earth-based laser ranging stations and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) orbiting the Moon. Over 4,000 h of successful LR data are obtained from 10 international ground stations. The 20-30 cm precision of the full-rate LR data is further improved to 5-10 cm after conversion into normal points. The main purpose of LR is to utilize the high accuracy normal point data to improve the quality of the LRO orbits, which are nominally determined by the radiometric S-band tracking data. When independently used in the LRO precision orbit determination process with the high-resolution GRAIL gravity model, LR data provide good orbit solutions, with an average difference of ∼50 m in total position, and ∼20 cm in radial direction, compared to the definitive LRO trajectory. When used in combination with the S-band tracking data, LR data help to improve the orbit accuracy in the radial direction to ∼15 cm. In order to obtain highly accurate LR range measurements for precise orbit determination results, it is critical to closely model the behavior of the clocks both at the ground stations and on the spacecraft. LR provides a unique data set to calibrate the spacecraft clock. The LRO spacecraft clock is characterized by the LR data to a timing knowledge of 0.015 ms over the entire 5 years of LR operation. We here present both the engineering setup of the LR experiments and the detailed analysis results of the LR data.

  1. Analysis of the Space Shuttle Orbiter skin panels under simulated hydrodynamic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, Huey D.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jones, Lisa E.

    1988-01-01

    The Space Shuttle orbiter skin panels were analyzed under pressure loads simulating hydrodynamic loads to determine their capability to sustain a potential ditching and to determine pressures that typically would produce failures. Two Dynamic Crash Analysis of Structures (DYCAST) finite element models were used. One model was used to represent skin panels (bays) in the center body, while a second model was used to analyze a fuselage bay in the wing region of the orbiter. From an assessment of the DYCAST nonlinear computer results, it is concluded that the probability is extremely high that most, if not all, of the lower skin panels would rupture under ditching conditions. Extremely high pressure loads which are produced under hydrodynamic planning conditions far exceed the very low predicted failure pressures for the skin panels. Consequently, a ditching of the orbiter is not considered to have a high probability of success and should not be considered a means of emergency landing unless no other option exists.

  2. A method of orbital analysis for large-scale first-principles simulations.

    PubMed

    Ohwaki, Tsukuru; Otani, Minoru; Ozaki, Taisuke

    2014-06-28

    An efficient method of calculating the natural bond orbitals (NBOs) based on a truncation of the entire density matrix of a whole system is presented for large-scale density functional theory calculations. The method recovers an orbital picture for O(N) electronic structure methods which directly evaluate the density matrix without using Kohn-Sham orbitals, thus enabling quantitative analysis of chemical reactions in large-scale systems in the language of localized Lewis-type chemical bonds. With the density matrix calculated by either an exact diagonalization or O(N) method, the computational cost is O(1) for the calculation of NBOs associated with a local region where a chemical reaction takes place. As an illustration of the method, we demonstrate how an electronic structure in a local region of interest can be analyzed by NBOs in a large-scale first-principles molecular dynamics simulation for a liquid electrolyte bulk model (propylene carbonate + LiBF4).

  3. A method of orbital analysis for large-scale first-principles simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohwaki, Tsukuru; Otani, Minoru; Ozaki, Taisuke

    2014-06-01

    An efficient method of calculating the natural bond orbitals (NBOs) based on a truncation of the entire density matrix of a whole system is presented for large-scale density functional theory calculations. The method recovers an orbital picture for O(N) electronic structure methods which directly evaluate the density matrix without using Kohn-Sham orbitals, thus enabling quantitative analysis of chemical reactions in large-scale systems in the language of localized Lewis-type chemical bonds. With the density matrix calculated by either an exact diagonalization or O(N) method, the computational cost is O(1) for the calculation of NBOs associated with a local region where a chemical reaction takes place. As an illustration of the method, we demonstrate how an electronic structure in a local region of interest can be analyzed by NBOs in a large-scale first-principles molecular dynamics simulation for a liquid electrolyte bulk model (propylene carbonate + LiBF4).

  4. Late treatment of orbital fractures: a new analysis for surgical planning.

    PubMed

    Pagnoni, M; Marenco, M; Ramieri, V; Terenzi, V; Bartoli, D; Amodeo, G; Mazzoli, A; Iannetti, G

    2014-12-01

    Surgical treatment of orbital fractures should be performed without delay; in some cases acute management is not possible due to general conditions and might be delayed for weeks or months. In the latter case, the fractured fragments can consolidate improperly, causing secondary deformities of the orbital region with aesthetic and functional alteration. Surgical planning of secondary deformities is critical for adequate pre-operative planning. In the last decade an increasing number of dedicated software applications for surgical planning have been developed. Standard computed tomography (CT) or the relatively new cone beam CT can be used for diagnostic purposes, pre-surgical visual treatment outcome and virtual surgery. In this report, the authors propose their pre-operative planning analysis for surgical correction of secondary deformities of orbital fractures. The treatment of orbital fracture must, in fact, analyse not only the bone structures but the soft tissue and surrounding periorbital region. The position of the orbit in the space should be determined in relation to the surrounding structures compared to the contralateral side, if this is not affected by the trauma or pre-existing malformations.

  5. Population Analysis: A Methodology for Understanding Populations in COIN Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    predict cause and effect of human 30 behavior. In the late 19th century, Wilhelm Wundt founded the first psychology department at the University of...on the application of power with respect to managing people, organizations, markets, and populations. Philosophers and authors such as Friedrich ... Nietzsche , Jeffery Pfeffer, Bertram Raven, and John French have each laid out models by which power, and its implementation can be better understood

  6. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the life support and airlock support subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbet, Jim; Duffy, R.; Barickman, K.; Saiidi, Mo J.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Life Support System (LSS) and Airlock Support System (ALSS). Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. The LSS provides for the management of the supply water, collection of metabolic waste, management of waste water, smoke detection, and fire suppression. The ALSS provides water, oxygen, and electricity to support an extravehicular activity in the airlock.

  7. Analysis of an Arctic Polesitter. [spacecraft in stationary orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    The concept and rationale are presented and the fundamental dynamical requirements set forth for a spacecraft that remains stationary in space above the North or South Pole of the earth for an extended period of time. The mathematical basis and acceleration characteristics are shown. Performance capability using present day Ion Drive technology is evaluated in terms of stay time at the pole and imaging resolution as a function of viewing distance. The analysis shows that a Polesitter spacecraft can be maintained without difficulty for one or two years at several lunar distances from the earth, admitting large resolution visual imagery and some less useful measurements in the infra-red regime. Microwave measurements are not practical using today's technology. Sensitivity calculations show that substantial improvement in performance capability must await major advances in available technology.

  8. Analysis of space environment effects on active fiber optic links orbited aboard the LDEF. [long duration exposure facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monarski, T. W.; Berry, J. N.; Sanchez, A. D.; Padden, R. J.; Chapman, S. P.; Taylor, E. W.

    1992-01-01

    The interim analysis correlates the results of the 'Preliminary Analysis of WL Experiment no. 701, Space Environment Effects on Operating Optic Systems' (NASA Report CP-3134) with space simulated post retrieval terrestrial studies performed on the M0004 experiment. Temperature cycling measurements were performed on the active optical data links for the purpose of assessing link signal to noise ratio and bit error rate performance some 69 months following the experiment deployment in low earth orbit. The early results indicate a high correlation between pre-orbit, orbit recorded, and post orbit functionality of the first known and longest space demonstration of operating optic fibers.

  9. Analysis of Periodic Orbits About the Martian Moons by Continuation Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    44 I iii I I I Deimos ....... . 49 Stable Orbit Verification .......... 49 Complete Solutions ............. ... 49 Collision Orbits...rbits for Deimos 51 23. Orbits Closest to Deimos ........................ 52 24. Orbits Furthest From Deimos ..................... 54 25. Collision...Orbits of Deimos ...................... 55 26. Floquet Multipliers for Deimos Solutions ........ 57 Appendix B 27. Phobos Resonant Orbit, H= -6.852687

  10. Orbital stability analysis and chaotic dynamics of exoplanets in multi-stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyal, Suman

    -aperiodic orbits. The stability of the system is defined in terms of its lifetime and maximum eccentricity during the integration period then a regime is established for the known and injected planet's orbital parameters. The de-stabilizing resonances due to the outer planet extend by 1.36 AU towards the star, nonetheless, existence of two Earth-mass planets seems plausible. The radial velocity (RV) curves generated for the test planets reveals a weak RV signal that cannot be measured by currently available instruments. A theory has been developed by extrapolating the radio emission processes in the Jupiter-Io system, which could reveal the presence of exomoons around the giant exoplanets. Based on this theory, maximum distance, radius and masses of exoplanets and exomoons are calculated that could be detected by the available radio telescopes. Observation time at the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) radio telescope has been proposed to detect exomoon in five different stellar systems. Subjects of my future studies include analysis of the data from LOFAR, search for the additional transiting planets in Kepler 47 circumbinary system and observation at the Subaru telescope to verify the predicted planets in GJ 832 system by the method of direct imaging.

  11. Failure analysis of satellite subsystems to define suitable de-orbit devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, Chiara; Peroni, Moreno; Kingston, Jennifer

    2016-11-01

    Space missions in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) are severely affected by the build-up of orbital debris. A key practice, to be compliant with IADC (Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee) mitigation guidelines, is the removal of space systems that interfere with the LEO region not later than 25 years after the End of Mission. It is important to note that the current guidelines are not generally legally binding, even if different Space Agencies are now looking at the compliance for their missions. If the guidelines will change in law, it will be mandatory to have a postmission disposal strategy for all satellites, including micro and smaller classes. A potential increased number of these satellites is confirmed by different projections, in particular in the commercial sector. Micro and smaller spacecraft are, in general, not provided with propulsion capabilities to achieve a controlled re-entry, so they need different de-orbit disposal methods. When considering the utility of different debris mitigation methods, it is useful to understand which spacecraft subsystems are most likely to fail and how this may affect the operation of a de-orbit system. This also helps the consideration of which components are the most relevant or should be redundant depending on the satellite mass class. This work is based on a sample of LEO and MEO satellites launched between January 2000 and December 2014 with mass lower than 1000 kg. Failure analysis of satellite subsystems is performed by means of the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis; the parametric fits are conducted with Weibull distributions. The study is carried out by using the satellite database SpaceTrak™ which provides anomalies, failures, and trends information for spacecraft subsystems and launch vehicles. The database identifies five states for each satellite subsystem: three degraded states, one fully operational state, and one failed state (complete failure). The results obtained can guide the identification of the

  12. Space Trajectory Error Analysis Program (STEAP) for halo orbit missions. Volume 1: Analytic and user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrnes, D. V.; Carney, P. C.; Underwood, J. W.; Vogt, E. D.

    1974-01-01

    Development, test, conversion, and documentation of computer software for the mission analysis of missions to halo orbits about libration points in the earth-sun system is reported. The software consisting of two programs called NOMNAL and ERRAN is part of the Space Trajectories Error Analysis Programs (STEAP). The program NOMNAL targets a transfer trajectory from Earth on a given launch date to a specified halo orbit on a required arrival date. Either impulsive or finite thrust insertion maneuvers into halo orbit are permitted by the program. The transfer trajectory is consistent with a realistic launch profile input by the user. The second program ERRAN conducts error analyses of the targeted transfer trajectory. Measurements including range, doppler, star-planet angles, and apparent planet diameter are processed in a Kalman-Schmidt filter to determine the trajectory knowledge uncertainty. Execution errors at injection, midcourse correction and orbit insertion maneuvers are analyzed along with the navigation uncertainty to determine trajectory control uncertainties and fuel-sizing requirements. The program is also capable of generalized covariance analyses.

  13. Orbital entanglement and CASSCF analysis of the Ru–NO bond in a Ruthenium nitrosyl complex

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Leon; Knecht, Stefan; Keller, Sebastian F.; Delcey, Mickaël G.; Aquilante, Francesco; Bondo Pedersen, Thomas; Lindh, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) wavefunctions and an orbital entanglement analysis obtained from a density-matrix renormalisation group (DMRG) calculation are used to understand the electronic structure, and, in particular, the Ru–NO bond of a Ru nitrosyl complex. Based on the configurations and orbital occupation numbers obtained for the CASSCF wavefunction and on the orbital entropy measurements evaluated for the DMRG wavefunction, we unravel electron correlation effects in the Ru coordination sphere of the complex. It is shown that Ru–NO π bonds show static and dynamic correlation, while other Ru–ligand bonds feature predominantly dynamic correlation. The presence of static correlation requires the use of multiconfigurational methods to describe the Ru–NO bond. Subsequently, the CASSCF wavefunction is analysed in terms of configuration state functions based on localised orbitals. The analysis of the wavefunctions in the electronic singlet ground state and the first triplet state provides a picture of the Ru–NO moiety beyond the standard representation based on formal oxidation states. A distinct description of the Ru and NO fragments is advocated. The electron configuration of Ru is an equally weighted superposition of RuII and RuIII configurations, with the RuIII configuration originating from charge donation mostly from Cl ligands. However, and contrary to what is typically assumed, the electronic configuration of the NO ligand is best described as electroneutral. PMID:25767830

  14. Orbital entanglement and CASSCF analysis of the Ru-NO bond in a Ruthenium nitrosyl complex.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Leon; Knecht, Stefan; Keller, Sebastian F; Delcey, Mickaël G; Aquilante, Francesco; Pedersen, Thomas Bondo; Lindh, Roland; Reiher, Markus; González, Leticia

    2015-06-14

    Complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) wavefunctions and an orbital entanglement analysis obtained from a density-matrix renormalisation group (DMRG) calculation are used to understand the electronic structure, and, in particular, the Ru-NO bond of a Ru nitrosyl complex. Based on the configurations and orbital occupation numbers obtained for the CASSCF wavefunction and on the orbital entropy measurements evaluated for the DMRG wavefunction, we unravel electron correlation effects in the Ru coordination sphere of the complex. It is shown that Ru-NO π bonds show static and dynamic correlation, while other Ru-ligand bonds feature predominantly dynamic correlation. The presence of static correlation requires the use of multiconfigurational methods to describe the Ru-NO bond. Subsequently, the CASSCF wavefunction is analysed in terms of configuration state functions based on localised orbitals. The analysis of the wavefunctions in the electronic singlet ground state and the first triplet state provides a picture of the Ru-NO moiety beyond the standard representation based on formal oxidation states. A distinct description of the Ru and NO fragments is advocated. The electron configuration of Ru is an equally weighted superposition of Ru(II) and Ru(III) configurations, with the Ru(III) configuration originating from charge donation mostly from Cl ligands. However, and contrary to what is typically assumed, the electronic configuration of the NO ligand is best described as electroneutral.

  15. Computational study of glucosepane-water and hydrogen bond formation: an electron topology and orbital analysis.

    PubMed

    Nash, Anthony; Saßmannshausen, Jörg; Bozec, Laurent; Birch, Helen L; de Leeuw, Nora H

    2017-04-01

    The collagen protein provides tensile strength to the extracellular matrix in addition to localising cells, proteins and protein cofactors. Collagen is susceptible to a build up of glycation modifications as a result of an exceptionally long half-life. Glucosepane is a collagen cross-linking advanced glycation end product; the structural and mechanical effects of glucosepane are still the subjects of much debate. With the prospect of an ageing population, the management and treatment of age-related diseases is becoming a pressing concern. One area of interest is the isolation of hydrated glucosepane, which has yet to be reported at an atomistic level. This study presents a series of glucosepane-water complexes within an implicit aqueous environment. Electronic structure calculations were performed using density functional theory and a high level basis set. Hydrogen bonds between glucosepane and explicit water were identified by monitoring changes to covalent bonds, calculating levels of electron donation from Natural Bonding Orbital analysis and the detection of bond critical points. Hydrogen bond strength was calculated using second-order perturbation calculations. The combined results suggest that glucosepane is very hydrophilic, with the imidazole feature being energetically more attractive to water than either hydroxyl group, although all hydrogen bonds, regardless of bond strength, were electrostatic in nature. Our results are in growing support of an earlier hypothesis that cross-links may result in an increase in interstitial water retention, which would permit the collagen fibril to swell, thereby potentially affecting the tensile and compression properties and biological function of connective tissues.

  16. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the active thermal control subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, S. K.; Parkman, W. E.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical (PCIs) items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Active Thermal Control Subsystem (ATCS) are documented. The major purpose of the ATCS is to remove the heat, generated during normal Shuttle operations from the Orbiter systems and subsystems. The four major components of the ATCS contributing to the heat removal are: Freon Coolant Loops; Radiator and Flow Control Assembly; Flash Evaporator System; and Ammonia Boiler System. In order to perform the analysis, the IOA process utilized available ATCS hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. Of the 310 failure modes analyzed, 101 were determined to be PCIs.

  17. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the electrical power generation/fuel cell powerplant subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, K. L.; Bertsch, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    Results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Electrical Power Generation (EPG)/Fuel Cell Powerplant (FCP) hardware. The EPG/FCP hardware is required for performing functions of electrical power generation and product water distribution in the Orbiter. Specifically, the EPG/FCP hardware consists of the following divisions: (1) Power Section Assembly (PSA); (2) Reactant Control Subsystem (RCS); (3) Thermal Control Subsystem (TCS); and (4) Water Removal Subsystem (WRS). The IOA analysis process utilized available EPG/FCP hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode.

  18. Satellite Power Systems (SPS) concept definition study. Volume 5: Transportation and operations analysis. [heavy lift launch and orbit transfer vehicles for orbital assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, G.

    1978-01-01

    The development of transportation systems to support the operations required for the orbital assembly of a 5-gigawatt satellite is discussed as well as the construction of a ground receiving antenna (rectenna). Topics covered include heavy lift launch vehicle configurations for Earth-to LEO transport; the use of chemical, nuclear, and electric orbit transfer vehicles for LEO to GEO operations; personnel transport systems; ground operations; end-to-end analysis of the construction, operation, and maintenance of the satellite and rectenna; propellant production and storage; and payload packaging.

  19. Microsatellite analysis of genetic diversity and population structure of Arabian horse populations.

    PubMed

    Khanshour, Anas; Conant, Eleanore; Juras, Rytis; Cothran, Ernest Gus

    2013-01-01

    The Arabian horse ignites imagination throughout the world. Populations of this breed exist in many countries, and recent genetic work has examined the diversity and ancestry of a few of these populations in isolation. Here, we explore 7 different populations of Arabians represented by 682 horses. Three of these are Middle Eastern populations from near the historical origin of the breed, including Syrian, Persian, and Saudi Arabian. The remaining Western populations are found in Europe (the Shagya Arabian and Polish Arabian) and in America (American Arabian). Analysis of genetic structure was carried out using 15 microsatellite loci. Genetic distances, analysis of molecular variance, factorial correspondence analysis, and a Bayesian method were applied. The results consistently show higher level of diversity within the Middle Eastern populations than the Western populations. The Western Arabian populations were the main source among population variation. Genetic differentiation was not strong among all Middle Eastern populations, but all American Arabians showed differentiation from Middle Eastern populations and were somewhat uniform among themselves. Here, we explore the diversities of many different populations of Arabian horses and find that populations not from the Middle East have noticeably lower levels of diversity, which may adversely affect the health of these populations.

  20. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the landing/deceleration subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, J. M.; Beaird, H. G.; Weissinger, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Landing/Deceleration Subsystem hardware. The Landing/Deceleration Subsystem is utilized to allow the Orbiter to perform a safe landing, allowing for landing-gear deploy activities, steering and braking control throughout the landing rollout to wheel-stop, and to allow for ground-handling capability during the ground-processing phase of the flight cycle. Specifically, the Landing/Deceleration hardware consists of the following components: Nose Landing Gear (NLG); Main Landing Gear (MLG); Brake and Antiskid (B and AS) Electrical Power Distribution and Controls (EPD and C); Nose Wheel Steering (NWS); and Hydraulics Actuators. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. Due to the lack of redundancy in the Landing/Deceleration Subsystems there is a high number of critical items.

  1. Preliminary solutions for the lunar gravity field from analysis of lunar orbiter tracking data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, F. G.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Rowlands, D. D.; Fricke, S. K.

    1994-01-01

    Knowledge of the gravitation field, in combination with surface topography, provides one of the principal means of inferring the internal structure of a planetary body. Previous analyses of the lunar gravitational field have been based on data from the Lunar Orbiters, the Apollo subsatellites, and the low altitude passes of the Apollo spacecraft. Recently, Konopliv et al. have reanalyzed all available Lunar Orbiter and Apollo subsatellite tracking data, producing a 60th degree and order solution. In preparation for the Clementine Mission to the Moon, we have also initiated a reanalysis of the Lunar Orbiter and Apollo subsatellite data. Our reanalysis takes advantage of advanced force and measurement modeling techniques as well as modern computational facilities. We applied the least squares collocation technique which stabilizes the behavior of the solution and high degree and order. The extension of the size of the field reduces the aliasing coming from the omitted portion of the gravitational field. This is especially important for the analysis of the tracking data from the Lunar Orbiters, as the periapse heights frequently ranged from 50 to 100 km.

  2. Post-flight differential correction analysis using Vinti's spheroidal method for the small astronomy satellite orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walden, H.

    1974-01-01

    The results of an intensive analysis of a differential orbit improvement method utilizing observational data for a 550-kilometer altitude, near-circular, near-equatorial satellite orbit are presented. Observations of the Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-1) are in the form of direction cosines as measured at two ground interferometer tracking stations near the Equator during the first 22 orbital revolutions (approximately 37 hours) after launch of the spacecraft. Numerical results, in both tabular and graphical form, are displayed for numerous iterated fittings of various observational arcs by differential correction of the orbital elements. Parameters varied in these comparative cases include the time duration of the observational data block, the number of pairs of direction cosine data and the number of tracking station passes included in the solution, the distribution of such passes between the two available tracking stations, and the acceptance criterion for the observational residuals in the least squares fitting procedure. It was found that three observational pairs of direction cosine data, the minimum number possible for a uniquely determined solution in theory, are sufficient to promote covergence to an accurate solution, if properly selected.

  3. Comprehensive analysis of Shuttle Orbiter leeside surface infrared imagery obtained during atmospheric entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myrick, D. L.; Throckmorton, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    The thermographic analysis techniques developed for processing of data from the Shuttle Infrared Leeside Temperature Sensing (SILTS) experiment are discussed. The SILTS experiment will obtain high-spatial-resolution infrared images of the leeside of the Space Shuttle Orbiter during atmospheric entry by means of a scanning infrared radiometer located atop the orbiter's vertical stabilizer. Comprehensive analysis of the SILTS thermography requires accurate consideration of all those factors (such as geometry of the observed surfaces, local surface emissivity, solar radiation, and other potential sources of image degradation) which may potentially affect the output of the infrared radiometer. An overview of the entire data processing procedure and brief descriptions of the data processing algorithms are presented.

  4. Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, D. J. (Compiler); Su, S. Y. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Earth orbital debris issues and recommended future activities are discussed. The workshop addressed the areas of environment definition, hazards to spacecraft, and space object management. It concluded that orbital debris is a potential problem for future space operations. However, before recommending any major efforts to control the environment, more data are required. The most significant required data are on the population of debris smaller than 4 cm in diameter. New damage criteria are also required. When these data are obtained, they can be combined with hypervelocity data to evaluate the hazards to future spacecraft. After these hazards are understood, then techniques to control the environment can be evaluated.

  5. Finite-element reentry heat-transfer analysis of space shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Quinn, Robert D.; Gong, Leslie

    1986-01-01

    A structural performance and resizing (SPAR) finite-element thermal analysis computer program was used in the heat-transfer analysis of the space shuttle orbiter subjected to reentry aerodynamic heating. Three wing cross sections and one midfuselage cross section were selected for the thermal analysis. The predicted thermal protection system temperatures were found to agree well with flight-measured temperatures. The calculated aluminum structural temperatures also agreed reasonably well with the flight data from reentry to touchdown. The effects of internal radiation and of internal convection were found to be significant. The SPAR finite-element solutions agreed reasonably well with those obtained from the conventional finite-difference method.

  6. Macroinformational analysis of conditions for controllability of space-vehicle orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazov, B. I.

    2011-12-01

    The general axiomatics of information measures for the macro analysis of relations of an information-cybernetic system in the control is introduced. The general structure of a semantically marked graph of open and closed relations of an information-cybernetic system between the participants in the environment, as well as thenecessary axiomatic and technological information-cybernetic system conditions of controllability and observability of objects, for the case of a space vehicle in orbit, are justified.

  7. The analysis of behavior in orbit GSS two series of US early-warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhov, P. P.; Epishev, V. P.; Sukhov, K. P.; Motrunych, I. I.

    2016-09-01

    Satellites Early Warning System Series class SBIRS US Air Force must replace on GEO early series DSP Series. During 2014-2016 the authors received more than 30 light curves "DSP-18 and "Sbirs-Geo 2". The analysis of the behavior of these satellites in orbit by a coordinate and photometric data. It is shown that for the monitoring of the Earth's surface is enough to place GEO 4 unit SBIRS across 90 deg.

  8. Preliminary Analysis of STS-3 Entry Heat-Transfer Data for the Orbiter Windward Centerline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throckmorton, D. A.; Hamilton, H. H., II; Zoby, E. V.

    1982-01-01

    A preliminary analysis of heat transfer data on the space shuttle orbiter windward centerline for the STS-3 mission entry is presented. Temperature-time history plots for each measurement location and tabulated wall temperature and convective heating rate data at 21 selected trajectory points are included. The STS-3 flight data are also compared with predictions by two approximation methods for computing convective heat transfer rates in equilibrium air.

  9. On-Orbit Quantitative Real-Time Gene Expression Analysis Using the Wetlab-2 System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, Macarena; Jung, Jimmy; Almeida, Eduardo; Boone, Travis; Tran, Luan; Schonfeld, Julie

    2015-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center's WetLab-2 Project enables on-orbit quantitative Reverse Transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis without the need for sample return. The WetLab-2 system is capable of processing sample types ranging from microbial cultures to animal tissues dissected on-orbit. The project developed a RNA preparation module that can lyse cells and extract RNA of sufficient quality and quantity for use as templates in qRT-PCR reactions. Our protocol has the advantage of using non-toxic chemicals and does not require alcohols or other organics. The resulting RNA is dispensed into reaction tubes that contain all lyophilized reagents needed to perform qRT-PCR reactions. System operations require simple and limited crew actions including syringe pushes, valve turns and pipette dispenses. The project selected the Cepheid SmartCycler (TradeMark), a Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) qRT-PCR unit, because of its advantages including rugged modular design, low power consumption, rapid thermal ramp times and four-color multiplex detection. Single tube multiplex assays can be used to normalize for RNA concentration and integrity, and to study multiple genes of interest in each module. The WetLab-2 system can downlink data from the ISS to the ground after a completed run and uplink new thermal cycling programs. The ability to conduct qRT-PCR and generate results on-orbit is an important step towards utilizing the ISS as a National Laboratory facility. Specifically, the ability to get on-orbit data will provide investigators with the opportunity to adjust experimental parameters in real time without the need for sample return and re-flight. On orbit gene expression analysis can also eliminate the confounding effects on gene expression of reentry stresses and shock acting on live cells and organisms or the concern of RNA degradation of fixed samples and provide on-orbit gene expression benchmarking prior to sample return. Finally, the system can also be used for analysis of

  10. Automated analysis of a diverse synapse population.

    PubMed

    Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Synapses of the mammalian central nervous system are highly diverse in function and molecular composition. Synapse diversity per se may be critical to brain function, since memory and homeostatic mechanisms are thought to be rooted primarily in activity-dependent plastic changes in specific subsets of individual synapses. Unfortunately, the measurement of synapse diversity has been restricted by the limitations of methods capable of measuring synapse properties at the level of individual synapses. Array tomography is a new high-resolution, high-throughput proteomic imaging method that has the potential to advance the measurement of unit-level synapse diversity across large and diverse synapse populations. Here we present an automated feature extraction and classification algorithm designed to quantify synapses from high-dimensional array tomographic data too voluminous for manual analysis. We demonstrate the use of this method to quantify laminar distributions of synapses in mouse somatosensory cortex and validate the classification process by detecting the presence of known but uncommon proteomic profiles. Such classification and quantification will be highly useful in identifying specific subpopulations of synapses exhibiting plasticity in response to perturbations from the environment or the sensory periphery.

  11. Observations and Orbital Analysis of the High-Amplitude Delta Scuti Star SZLyncis: The Unusual Orbital Precession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin-Jia; Qian, Sheng-Bang

    2013-12-01

    We determined forty-two new times of light maximum from our photometry observations and WASP project, and collected all times of light maximum observed between 1961 and 2013 in order to calculate the orbital elements of the SZ Lyncis system and the secular change of the pulsation period with the classical O - C method. We confirmed the decrease of the longitude of the periastron passage with a rate of (-1.˚15 ±0.˚25) yr-1 , and discussed the causative mechanism. The results show that the precession of the star's orbit might be due to a close binary system, which means that the companion of SZ Lyncis is actually a binary system. We used the Hipparcos Intermediate Astrometric Data to obtain the complete orbital elements of the SZ Lyncis system, and found that the inclination, i, and parallax, πt , are 39.˚5 ± 17.˚7 and 2.61 ± 0.98 mas (corresponds to 380 ± 140 pc), respectively. We reanalyzed the mean radial velocities of SZ Lyncis given by Bardin and Imbert (1984), and noticed a weak variation existing in the residuals from a single-Keplerian fit. We suggest that more detailed high-precision spectroscopic observations are definitely needed in the future to check this short periodic change.

  12. Stream network analysis from orbital and suborbital imagery, Colorado River Basin, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, V. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Orbital SL-2 imagery (earth terrain camera S-190B), received September 5, 1973, was subjected to quantitative network analysis and compared to 7.5 minute topographic mapping (scale: 1/24,000) and U.S.D.A. conventional black and white aerial photography (scale: 1/22,200). Results can only be considered suggestive because detail on the SL-2 imagery was badly obscured by heavy cloud cover. The upper Bee Creek basin was chosen for analysis because it appeared in a relatively cloud-free portion of the orbital imagery. Drainage maps were drawn from the three sources digitized into a computer-compatible format, and analyzed by the WATER system computer program. Even at its small scale (1/172,000) and with bad haze the orbital photo showed much drainage detail. The contour-like character of the Glen Rose Formation's resistant limestone units allowed channel definition. The errors in pattern recognition can be attributed to local areas of dense vegetation and to other areas of very high albedo caused by surficial exposure of caliche. The latter effect caused particular difficulty in the determination of drainage divides.

  13. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the guidance, navigation, and control subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trahan, W. H.; Odonnell, R. A.; Pietz, K. C.; Hiott, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) is presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) Subsystem hardware are documented. The function of the GNC hardware is to respond to guidance, navigation, and control software commands to effect vehicle control and to provide sensor and controller data to GNC software. Some of the GNC hardware for which failure modes analysis was performed includes: hand controllers; Rudder Pedal Transducer Assembly (RPTA); Speed Brake Thrust Controller (SBTC); Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU); Star Tracker (ST); Crew Optical Alignment Site (COAS); Air Data Transducer Assembly (ADTA); Rate Gyro Assemblies; Accelerometer Assembly (AA); Aerosurface Servo Amplifier (ASA); and Ascent Thrust Vector Control (ATVC). The IOA analysis process utilized available GNC hardware drawings, workbooks, specifications, schematics, and systems briefs for defining hardware assemblies, components, and circuits. Each hardware item was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode.

  14. Orbit Optimization and Scattering Coefficient Analysis for the Proposed GLORIA System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the optimization of an orbit for a Low-Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellite for coastal coverage over Antarctic and United States shorelines as part of the Geostationary/Low-Earth Orbiting Radar Image Acquisition (GLORIA) System. Simulations over a range of orbital parameters are performed to determine the optimal orbit. Scattering coefficients are computed for the optimal orbit throughout the day and characterized to compare various scenarios for which link budget comparisons could then be made.

  15. Space Shuttle Orbiter - Leading edge structural design/analysis and material allowables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. W.; Curry, D. M.; Kelly, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC), a structural composite whose development was targeted for the high temperature reentry environments of reusable space vehicles, has successfully demonstrated that capability on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Unique mechanical properties, particularly at elevated temperatures up to 3000 F, make this material ideally suited for the 'hot' regions of multimission space vehicles. Design allowable characterization testing, full-scale development and qualification testing, and structural analysis techniques will be presented herein that briefly chart the history of the RCC material from infancy to eventual multimission certification for the Orbiter. Included are discussions pertaining to the development of the design allowable data base, manipulation of the test data into usable forms, and the analytical verification process.

  16. Design and performance analysis of an aero-maneuvering orbital-transfer vehicle concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menees, G. P.

    1985-01-01

    Systems requirements for design-optimized, lateral-turn performance were determined for reusable, space-based applications and low-Earth orbits involving large multiple plane-inclination changes. The aerothermodynamic analysis is the most advanced available for rarefield-hypersonic flow over lifting surfaces at incidence. The effects of leading-edge bluntness, low-density viscous phenomena, and finite-rate flow-field chemistry and surface catalysis are accounted for. The predicted aerothermal heating characteristics are correlated with thermal-control and flight-performance capabilities. The mission payload capacity for delivery, retrieval, and combined operations was determined for round-trip sorties extending to polar orbits. Recommendations are given for future design refinements. The results help to identify technology issues required to develop prototype operational vehicles.

  17. Spacecraft Orbit Design and Analysis (SODA), version 1.0 user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Scott S.; Davis, John S.

    1989-01-01

    The Spacecraft Orbit Design and Analysis (SODA) computer program, Version 1.0 is described. SODA is a spaceflight mission planning system which consists of five program modules integrated around a common database and user interface. SODA runs on a VAX/VMS computer with an EVANS & SUTHERLAND PS300 graphics workstation. BOEING RIM-Version 7 relational database management system performs transparent database services. In the current version three program modules produce an interactive three dimensional (3D) animation of one or more satellites in planetary orbit. Satellite visibility and sensor coverage capabilities are also provided. One module produces an interactive 3D animation of the solar system. Another module calculates cumulative satellite sensor coverage and revisit time for one or more satellites. Currently Earth, Moon, and Mars systems are supported for all modules except the solar system module.

  18. Spacecraft Orbit Design and Analysis (SODA). Version 2.0: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Scott S.; Davis, John S.; Zsoldos, Jeffrey S.

    1991-01-01

    The Spacecraft Orbit Design and Analysis (SODA) computer program, Version 2.0, is discussed. SODA is a spaceflight mission planning system that consists of six program modules integrated around a common database and user interface. SODA runs on a VAX/VMS computer with an Evans and Sutherland PS300 graphics workstation. In the current version, three program modules produce an interactive three dimensional animation of one or more satellites in planetary orbit. Satellite visibility and sensor coverage capabilities are also provided. Circular and rectangular, off nadir, fixed and scanning sensors are supported. One module produces an interactive three dimensional animation of the solar system. Another module calculates cumulative satellite sensor coverage and revisit time for one or more satellites. Currently, Earth, Moon, and Mars systems are supported for all modules except the solar system module.

  19. Natural bond orbital analysis: a critical overview of relationships to alternative bonding perspectives.

    PubMed

    Weinhold, Frank

    2012-11-15

    We sketch the basic principles of natural bond orbital (NBO) theory, including critical discussion of its relationship to alternative bonding concepts and selected illustrations of its application to a broad spectrum of chemical bonding motifs. Particular emphasis is placed on the close NBO connections to prequantal bonding, and electromerism concepts, as well as the deep roots in quantal eigenvalue, superposition, and Pauli exclusion concepts that are manifested in many aspects of NBO donor-acceptor analysis. With respect to leading alternative perspectives, we identify similarities and differences that distinguish NBO theory from the corresponding precepts of valence bond theory, molecular orbital theory, and Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules, with critical discussion of the assumptions underlying characteristic differences in each case.

  20. Direct Detection and Orbit Analysis of the Exoplanets HR 8799 bcd from Archival 2005 Keck/NIRC2 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Thayne; Fukagawa, Misato; Thalmann, Christian; Matsumura, Soko; Plavchan, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present previously unpublished July 2005 H-band coronagraphic data of the young, planet-hosting star HR 8799 from the newly-released Keck/NIRC2 archive. Despite poor observing conditions, we detect three of the planets (HR 8799 bcd), two of them (HR 8799 bc) without advanced image processing. Comparing these data with previously published 1998-2011 astrometry and that from re-reduced October 2010 Keck data constrains the orbits of the planets. Analyzing the planets' astrometry separately, HR 8799 d's orbit is likely inclined at least 25 deg from face-on and the others may be on in inclined orbits. For semimajor axis ratios consistent with a 4:2:1 mean-motion resonance our analysis yields precise values for HR 8799 bcd's orbital parameters and strictly constrains the planets' eccentricities to be less than 0.18-0.3. However, we find no acceptable orbital solutions with this resonance that place the planets in face-on orbits; HR 8799 d shows the largest deviation from such orbits. Moreover, few orbits make HR 8799 d coplanar with b and c, whereas dynamical stability analyses used to constrain the planets' masses typically assume coplanar and/or fare.on orbits. This paper illustrates the significant science gain enabled with the release of the NIRC2 archive.

  1. Analysis of Ballistic Structures of Multichannel Communication Satellite Systems on Precessing Elliptic Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doulliev, A. M.; Zabotin, V. I.

    2003-11-01

    Two models of intersatellite communication channels in satellite systems on precessing elliptic orbits are considered. By assuming that these systems provide for a continuous survey of the Earth of the necessary multiplicity, algorithms of the analysis of ballistic system structures are constructed for these models in order to maintain multichannel global communication and organization of corresponding intersatellite channels. The algorithm operation is illustrated by numerical examples. This paper develops the results from [1-3], where a similar approach was advanced for the analysis of ballistic structures of satellite systems with simplified models of motion.

  2. Orbital transfer vehicle concept definition and systems analysis study. Volume 11: Study extension 2 results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willcockson, W. H.

    1988-01-01

    Work conducted in the second extension of the Phase A Orbit Transfer Vehicle Concept Definition and Systems Analysis Study is summarized. Four major tasks were identified: (1) define an initial OTV program consistent with near term Civil Space Leadership Initiative missions; (2) develop program evolution to long term advanced missions; (3) investigate the implications of current STS safety policy on an Aft Cargo Carrier based OTV; and (4) expand the analysis of high entry velocity aeroassist. An increased emphasis on the breath of OTV applications was undertaken to show the need for the program on the basis of the expansion of the nation's capabilities in space.

  3. Vibrational spectra, molecular structure, natural bond orbital, first order hyperpolarizability, thermodynamic analysis and normal coordinate analysis of Salicylaldehyde p-methylphenylthiosemicarbazone by density functional method.

    PubMed

    Porchelvi, E Elamurugu; Muthu, S

    2015-01-05

    The thiosemicarbazone compound, Salicylaldehyde p-methylphenylthiosemicarbazone (abbreviated as SMPTSC) was synthesized and characterized by FTIR, FT-Raman and UV. Density functional (DFT) calculations have been carried out for the title compound by performing DFT level of theory using B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) basis set. The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies were calculated and compared with the experimental data. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with aid of normal coordinate analysis (NCA) following the scaled quantum mechanical force field methodology. The electronic dipole moment (μD) and the first hyperpolarizability (βtot) values of the investigated molecule were computed using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The stability and charge delocalization of the molecule was studied by natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Thearomaticities of the phenyl rings were studied using the standard harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity (HOMA) index. Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges is also calculated. The molecule orbital contributions are studied by density of energy states (DOSs).

  4. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the purge, vent and drain subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bynum, M. C., III

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter PV and D (Purge, Vent and Drain) Subsystem hardware. The PV and D Subsystem controls the environment of unpressurized compartments and window cavities, senses hazardous gases, and purges Orbiter/ET Disconnect. The subsystem is divided into six systems: Purge System (controls the environment of unpressurized structural compartments); Vent System (controls the pressure of unpressurized compartments); Drain System (removes water from unpressurized compartments); Hazardous Gas Detection System (HGDS) (monitors hazardous gas concentrations); Window Cavity Conditioning System (WCCS) (maintains clear windows and provides pressure control of the window cavities); and External Tank/Orbiter Disconnect Purge System (prevents cryo-pumping/icing of disconnect hardware). Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. Four of the sixty-two failure modes analyzed were determined as single failures which could result in the loss of crew or vehicle. A possible loss of mission could result if any of twelve single failures occurred. Two of the criticality 1/1 failures are in the Window Cavity Conditioning System (WCCS) outer window cavity, where leakage and/or restricted flow will cause failure to depressurize/repressurize the window cavity. Two criticality 1/1 failures represent leakage and/or restricted flow in the Orbiter/ET disconnect purge network which

  5. Spin-Orbit Alignment of Exoplanet Systems: Ensemble Analysis Using Asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campante, T. L.; Lund, M. N.; Kuszlewicz, J. S.; Davies, G. R.; Chaplin, W. J.; Albrecht, S.; Winn, J. N.; Bedding, T. R.; Benomar, O.; Bossini, D.; Handberg, R.; Santos, A. R. G.; Van Eylen, V.; Basu, S.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Hekker, S.; Hirano, T.; Huber, D.; Karoff, C.; Kjeldsen, H.; Lundkvist, M. S.; North, T. S. H.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Stello, D.; White, T. R.

    2016-03-01

    The angle ψ between a planet’s orbital axis and the spin axis of its parent star is an important diagnostic of planet formation, migration, and tidal evolution. We seek empirical constraints on ψ by measuring the stellar inclination is via asteroseismology for an ensemble of 25 solar-type hosts observed with NASA’s Kepler satellite. Our results for is are consistent with alignment at the 2σ level for all stars in the sample, meaning that the system surrounding the red-giant star Kepler-56 remains as the only unambiguous misaligned multiple-planet system detected to date. The availability of a measurement of the projected spin-orbit angle λ for two of the systems allows us to estimate ψ. We find that the orbit of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-7b is likely to be retrograde (\\psi =116\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} {4}-14.7+30.2), whereas that of Kepler-25c seems to be well aligned with the stellar spin axis (\\psi =12\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} {6}-11.0+6.7). While the latter result is in apparent contradiction with a statement made previously in the literature that the multi-transiting system Kepler-25 is misaligned, we show that the results are consistent, given the large associated uncertainties. Finally, we perform a hierarchical Bayesian analysis based on the asteroseismic sample in order to recover the underlying distribution of ψ. The ensemble analysis suggests that the directions of the stellar spin and planetary orbital axes are correlated, as conveyed by a tendency of the host stars to display large values of inclination.

  6. Extinction-effective population index: incorporating life-history variations in population viability analysis.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Masami

    2007-09-01

    Viability status of populations is a commonly used measure for decision-making in the management of populations. One of the challenges faced by managers is the need to consistently allocate management effort among populations. This allocation should in part be based on comparison of extinction risks among populations. Unfortunately, common criteria that use minimum viable population size or count-based population viability analysis (PVA) often do not provide results that are comparable among populations, primarily because they lack consistency in determining population size measures and threshold levels of population size (e.g., minimum viable population size and quasi-extinction threshold). Here I introduce a new index called the "extinction-effective population index," which accounts for differential effects of demographic stochasticity among organisms with different life-history strategies and among individuals in different life stages. This index is expected to become a new way of determining minimum viable population size criteria and also complement the count-based PVA. The index accounts for the difference in life-history strategies of organisms, which are modeled using matrix population models. The extinction-effective population index, sensitivity, and elasticity are demonstrated in three species of Pacific salmonids. The interpretation of the index is also provided by comparing them with existing demographic indices. Finally, a measure of life-history-specific effect of demographic stochasticity is derived.

  7. Mission Analysis for LEO Microwave Power-Beaming Station in Orbital Launch of Microwave Lightcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myrabo, L. N.; Dickenson, T.

    2005-01-01

    A detailed mission analysis study has been performed for a 1 km diameter, rechargeable satellite solar power station (SPS) designed to boost 20m diameter, 2400 kg Micr,oWave Lightcraft (MWLC) into low earth orbit (LEO) Positioned in a 476 km daily-repeating oi.bit, the 35 GHz microwave power station is configured like a spinning, thin-film bicycle wheel covered by 30% efficient sola cells on one side and billions of solid state microwave transmitter elements on the other, At the rim of this wheel are two superconducting magnets that can stor,e 2000 G.J of energy from the 320 MW, solar array over a period of several orbits. In preparation for launch, the entire station rotates to coarsely point at the Lightcraft, and then phases up using fine-pointing information sent from a beacon on-board the Lightcraft. Upon demand, the station transmits a 10 gigawatt microwave beam to lift the MWLC from the earth surface into LEO in a flight of several minutes duration. The mission analysis study was comprised of two parts: a) Power station assessment; and b) Analysis of MWLC dynamics during the ascent to orbit including the power-beaming relationships. The power station portion addressed eight critical issues: 1) Drag force vs. station orbital altitude; 2) Solar pressure force on the station; 3) Station orbital lifetime; 4) Feasibility of geo-magnetic re-boost; 5) Beta angle (i..e., sola1 alignment) and power station effective area relationship; 6) Power station percent time in sun vs, mission elapsed time; 7) Station beta angle vs.. charge time; 8) Stresses in station structures.. The launch dynamics portion examined four issues: 1) Ascent mission/trajecto1y profile; 2) MWLC/power-station mission geometry; 3) MWLC thrust angle vs. time; 4) Power station pitch rate during power beaming. Results indicate that approximately 0 58 N of drag force acts upon the station when rotated edge-on to project the minimum frontal area of 5000 sq m. An ion engine or perhaps an electrodynamic

  8. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the atmospheric revitalization pressure control subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiidi, M. J.; Duffy, R. E.; Mclaughlin, T. D.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis/Critical Items List (FMEA/CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Atmospheric Revitalization and Pressure Control Subsystem (ARPCS) are documented. The ARPCS hardware was categorized into the following subdivisions: (1) Atmospheric Make-up and Control (including the Auxiliary Oxygen Assembly, Oxygen Assembly, and Nitrogen Assembly); and (2) Atmospheric Vent and Control (including the Positive Relief Vent Assembly, Negative Relief Vent Assembly, and Cabin Vent Assembly). The IOA analysis process utilized available ARPCS hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode.

  9. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the hydraulics/water spray boiler subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, J. D.; Davidson, W. R.; Parkman, William E.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items (PCIs). To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results for the Orbiter Hydraulics/Water Spray Boiler Subsystem. The hydraulic system provides hydraulic power to gimbal the main engines, actuate the main engine propellant control valves, move the aerodynamic flight control surfaces, lower the landing gear, apply wheel brakes, steer the nosewheel, and dampen the external tank (ET) separation. Each hydraulic system has an associated water spray boiler which is used to cool the hydraulic fluid and APU lubricating oil. The IOA analysis process utilized available HYD/WSB hardware drawings, schematics and documents for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. Of the 430 failure modes analyzed, 166 were determined to be PCIs.

  10. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the displays and controls subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trahan, W. H.; Prust, E. E.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Displays and Controls (D and C) subsystem hardware. The function of the D and C hardware is to provide the crew with the monitor, command, and control capabilities required for management of all normal and contingency mission and flight operations. The D and C hardware for which failure modes analysis was performed consists of the following: Acceleration Indicator (G-METER); Head Up Display (HUD); Display Driver Unit (DDU); Alpha/Mach Indicator (AMI); Horizontal Situation Indicator (HSI); Attitude Director Indicator (ADI); Propellant Quantity Indicator (PQI); Surface Position Indicator (SPI); Altitude/Vertical Velocity Indicator (AVVI); Caution and Warning Assembly (CWA); Annunciator Control Assembly (ACA); Event Timer (ET); Mission Timer (MT); Interior Lighting; and Exterior Lighting. Each hardware item was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode.

  11. Structural Analysis Peer Review for the Static Display of the Orbiter Atlantis at the Kennedy Space Center Visitors Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minute, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Mr. Christopher Miller with the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) NASA Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) office requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center's (NESC) technical support on March 15, 2012, to review and make recommendations on the structural analysis being performed for the Orbiter Atlantis static display at the KSC Visitor Center. The principal focus of the assessment was to review the engineering firm's structural analysis for lifting and aligning the orbiter and its static display configuration

  12. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the electrical power distribution and control subsystem, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmeckpeper, K. R.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Electrical Power Distribution and Control (EPD and C) hardware. The EPD and C hardware performs the functions of distributing, sensing, and controlling 28 volt DC power and of inverting, distributing, sensing, and controlling 117 volt 400 Hz AC power to all Orbiter subsystems from the three fuel cells in the Electrical Power Generation (EPG) subsystem. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. Of the 1671 failure modes analyzed, 9 single failures were determined to result in loss of crew or vehicle. Three single failures unique to intact abort were determined to result in possible loss of the crew or vehicle. A possible loss of mission could result if any of 136 single failures occurred. Six of the criticality 1/1 failures are in two rotary and two pushbutton switches that control External Tank and Solid Rocket Booster separation. The other 6 criticality 1/1 failures are fuses, one each per Aft Power Control Assembly (APCA) 4, 5, and 6 and one each per Forward Power Control Assembly (FPCA) 1, 2, and 3, that supply power to certain Main Propulsion System (MPS) valves and Forward Reaction Control System (RCS) circuits.

  13. An Analysis of Recent Major Breakups in he Low Earth Orbit Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Anz-Meador, P. D.

    2010-01-01

    Of the 190 known satellite breakups between 1961 and 2006, only one generated more than 500 cataloged fragments. The event was the explosion of the Pegasus Hydrazine Auxiliary Propulsion System in 1996, adding 713 fragments to the U.S. Satellite Catalog. Since the beginning of 2007; however, the near-Earth environment has been subjected to several major breakups, including the Fengyun-1C anti-satellite test and the explosion of Briz-M in 2007, the unusual breakup of Cosmos 2421 in 2008, and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 in 2009. Combined, these events added more than 5000 large (> or equal 10 cm) fragments to the environment. Detailed analysis of the radar cross section measurements and orbit histories of the fragments from these major events reveals several unusual characteristics in their size and area-to-mass ratio distributions. The characteristics could be related to the material composition of the parent vehicles, the nature of the breakup, and the composition and physical property of the fragments. In addition, the majority of these fragments are expected to remain in orbit for at least decades. Their long-term impact to the environment is analyzed using the NASA orbital debris evolutionary model, LEGEND. Descriptions of these analyses and a summary are included in this paper.

  14. A method of orbital analysis for large-scale first-principles simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ohwaki, Tsukuru; Otani, Minoru; Ozaki, Taisuke

    2014-06-28

    An efficient method of calculating the natural bond orbitals (NBOs) based on a truncation of the entire density matrix of a whole system is presented for large-scale density functional theory calculations. The method recovers an orbital picture for O(N) electronic structure methods which directly evaluate the density matrix without using Kohn-Sham orbitals, thus enabling quantitative analysis of chemical reactions in large-scale systems in the language of localized Lewis-type chemical bonds. With the density matrix calculated by either an exact diagonalization or O(N) method, the computational cost is O(1) for the calculation of NBOs associated with a local region where a chemical reaction takes place. As an illustration of the method, we demonstrate how an electronic structure in a local region of interest can be analyzed by NBOs in a large-scale first-principles molecular dynamics simulation for a liquid electrolyte bulk model (propylene carbonate + LiBF{sub 4})

  15. Vibrational spectra and natural bond orbital analysis of organic crystal L-prolinium picrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwin, Bismi; Amalanathan, M.; Hubert Joe, I.

    2012-10-01

    Vibrational spectral analysis and quantum chemical computations based on density functional theory (DFT) have been performed on the organic crystal L-prolinium picrate (LPP). The equilibrium geometry, various bonding features and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers of LPP have been investigated using B3LYP method. The calculated molecular geometry has been compared with the experimental data. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with the aid of VEDA 4 program. The various intramolecular interactions confirming the biological activity of the compound have been exposed by natural bond orbital analysis. The distribution of Mulliken atomic charges and bending of natural hybrid orbitals associated with hydrogen bonding also reflects the presence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding thereby enhancing bioactivity. The analysis of the electron density of HOMO and LUMO gives an idea of the delocalization and low value of energy gap indicates electron transport in the molecule and thereby bioactivity. Vibrational analysis reveals the presence of strong O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O interaction between L-prolinium and picrate ions providing evidence for the charge transfer interaction between the donor and acceptor groups and is responsible for its bioactivity.

  16. Vibrational spectra and natural bond orbital analysis of organic crystal L-prolinium picrate.

    PubMed

    Edwin, Bismi; Amalanathan, M; Hubert Joe, I

    2012-10-01

    Vibrational spectral analysis and quantum chemical computations based on density functional theory (DFT) have been performed on the organic crystal L-prolinium picrate (LPP). The equilibrium geometry, various bonding features and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers of LPP have been investigated using B3LYP method. The calculated molecular geometry has been compared with the experimental data. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out with the aid of VEDA 4 program. The various intramolecular interactions confirming the biological activity of the compound have been exposed by natural bond orbital analysis. The distribution of Mulliken atomic charges and bending of natural hybrid orbitals associated with hydrogen bonding also reflects the presence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding thereby enhancing bioactivity. The analysis of the electron density of HOMO and LUMO gives an idea of the delocalization and low value of energy gap indicates electron transport in the molecule and thereby bioactivity. Vibrational analysis reveals the presence of strong O-H···O and N-H···O interaction between L-prolinium and picrate ions providing evidence for the charge transfer interaction between the donor and acceptor groups and is responsible for its bioactivity.

  17. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the ascent thrust vector control actuator subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. E.; Riccio, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results for the Ascent Thrust Vector Control (ATVC) Actuator hardware are documented. The function of the Ascent Thrust Vector Control Actuators (ATVC) is to gimbal the main engines to provide for attitude and flight path control during ascent. During first stage flight, the SRB nozzles provide nearly all the steering. After SRB separation, the Orbiter is steered by gimbaling of its main engines. There are six electrohydraulic servoactuators, one pitch and one yaw for each of the three main engines. Each servoactuator is composed of four electrohydraulic servovalve assemblies, one second stage power spool valve assembly, one primary piston assembly and a switching valve. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. Critical failures resulting in loss of ATVC were mainly due to loss of hydraulic fluid, fluid contamination and mechanical failures.

  18. Study of space shuttle orbiter system management computer function. Volume 1: Analysis, baseline design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A system analysis of the shuttle orbiter baseline system management (SM) computer function is performed. This analysis results in an alternative SM design which is also described. The alternative design exhibits several improvements over the baseline, some of which are increased crew usability, improved flexibility, and improved growth potential. The analysis consists of two parts: an application assessment and an implementation assessment. The former is concerned with the SM user needs and design functional aspects. The latter is concerned with design flexibility, reliability, growth potential, and technical risk. The system analysis is supported by several topical investigations. These include: treatment of false alarms, treatment of off-line items, significant interface parameters, and a design evaluation checklist. An in-depth formulation of techniques, concepts, and guidelines for design of automated performance verification is discussed.

  19. Data Acquisition, Management, and Analysis in Support of the Audiology and Hearing Conservation and the Orbital Debris Program Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicken, Todd

    2012-01-01

    My internship at Johnson Space Center, Houston TX comprised of working simultaneously in the Space Life Science Directorate (Clinical Services Branch, SD3) in Audiology and Hearing Conservation and in the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Sciences Directorate in the Orbital Debris Program Office (KX). The purpose of the project done to support the Audiology and Hearing Conservation Clinic (AuHCon) is to organize and analyze auditory test data that has been obtained from tests conducted onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and in Johnson Space Center's clinic. Astronauts undergo a special type of auditory test called an On-Orbit Hearing Assessment (OOHA), which monitors hearing function while crewmembers are exposed to noise and microgravity during long-duration spaceflight. Data needed to be formatted to assist the Audiologist in studying, analyzing and reporting OOHA results from all ISS missions, with comparison to conventional preflight and post-flight audiometric test results of crewmembers. Orbital debris is the #1 threat to manned spacecraft; therefore NASA is investing in different measurement techniques to acquire information on orbital debris. These measurements are taken with telescopes in different parts of the world to acquire brightness variations over time, from which size, rotation rates and material information can be determined for orbital debris. Currently many assumptions are taken to resolve size and material from observed brightness, therefore a laboratory (Optical Measurement Center) is used to simulate the space environment and acquire information of known targets suited to best model the orbital debris population. In the Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) telescopic data were acquired and analyzed to better assess the orbital debris population.

  20. Acousto-optic signature analysis for inspection of the orbiter thermal protection tile bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Julio G.; Tow, D. M.; Barna, B. A.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop a viable NDE technique for the inspection of orbiter thermal protection system (TPS) tile bonds. Phase 2, discussed here, concentrated on developing an empirical understanding of the bonded and unbonded vibration signatures of acreage tiles. Controlled experiments in the laboratory have provided useful information on the dynamic response of TPS tiles. It has been shown that several signatures are common to all the pedigree tiles. This degree of consistency in the tile-SIP (strain isolation pad) dynamic response proves that an unbond can be detected for a known tile and establish the basis for extending the analysis capability to arbitrary tiles for which there are no historical data. The field tests of the noncontacting laser acoustic sensor system, conducted at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), investigated the vibrational environment of the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) and its effect on the measurement and analysis techniques being developed. The data collected showed that for orbiter locations, such as the body flap and elevon, the data analysis scheme, and/or the sensor, will require modification to accommodate the ambient motion. Several methods were identified for accomplishing this, and a solution is seen as readily achievable. It was established that the tile response was similar to that observed in the laboratory. Of most importance, however, is that the field environment will not affect the physics of the dynamic response that is related to bond condition. All of this information is fundamental to any future design and development of a prototype system.

  1. Integrated orbital servicing study for low-cost payload programs. Volume 2: Technical and cost analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cody, E. R.; Deats, C. L.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.; Kyrias, G. M.; Snodgrass, M. R.; Sosnay, R. D.; Spencer, R. A.; Wudell, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    Orbital maintenance concepts were examined in an effort to determine a cost effective orbital maintenance system compatible with the space transportation system. An on-orbit servicer maintenance system is recommended as the most cost effective system. A pivoting arm on-orbit servicer was selected and a preliminary design was prepared. It is indicated that orbital maintenance does not have any significant impact on the space transportation system.

  2. Rotational Doppler shift for electromagnetic waves carrying orbital angular momentum based on spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Wang, Gang

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the rotational Doppler effect for the electromagnetic wave carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) with a method based on spectrum analysis, which is appropriate for both optics and free-space radio cases. We find that the frequency spectrum received is the convolution of emission spectrum and a discrete spectrum about OAM states, and verify it in the numerical simulations as well. This discovery makes it possible to distinguish the linear and rotational Doppler shift, and is helpful to developments of remote sensing and velocimetry in radar.

  3. Enumeration and stability analysis of simple periodic orbits in β-Fermi Pasta Ulam lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Sonone, Rupali L. Jain, Sudhir R.

    2014-04-24

    We study the well-known one-dimensional problem of N particles with a nonlinear interaction. The special case of quadratic and quartic interaction potential among nearest neighbours is the β-Fermi-Pasta-Ulam model. We enumerate and classify the simple periodic orbits for this system and find the stability zones, employing Floquet theory. Such stability analysis is crucial to understand the transition of FPU lattice from recurrences to globally chaotic behavior, energy transport in lower dimensional system, dynamics of optical lattices and also its impact on shape parameter of bio-polymers such as DNA and RNA.

  4. Supporting flight data analysis for Space Shuttle Orbiter experiments at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. J.; Budnick, M. P.; Yang, L.; Chiasson, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    The space shuttle orbiter experiments program is responsible for collecting flight data to extend the research and technology base for future aerospace vehicle design. The infrared imagery of shuttle (IRIS), catalytic surface effects, and tile gap heating experiments sponsored by Ames Research Center are part of this program. The software required to process the flight data which support these experiments is described. In addition, data analysis techniques, developed in support of the IRIS experiment, are discussed. Using the flight data base, the techniques provide information useful in analyzing and correcting problems with the experiment, and in interpreting the IRIS image obtained during the entry of the third shuttle mission.

  5. Use of MSC/NASTRAN for the thermal analysis of the Space Shuttle Orbiter braking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, James; Mccann, David

    1987-01-01

    A description is given of the thermal modeling and analysis effort being conducted to investigate the transient temperature and thermal stress characteristics of the Space Shuttle Orbiter brake components and subsystems. Models are constructed of the brake stator as well as of the entire brake assembly to analyze the temperature distribution and thermal stress during the landing and braking process. These investigations are carried out on a UNIVAC computer system with MSC/NASTRAN Version 63. Analytical results and solution methods are presented and comparisons are made with SINDA results.

  6. Use of an engineering data management system in the analysis of Space Shuttle Orbiter tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, G. L.; Vallas, M.

    1981-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of an engineering data management system to facilitate the extensive stress analyses of the Space Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection system. Descriptions are given of the approach and methods used (1) to gather, organize, and store the data, (2) to query data interactively, (3) to generate graphic displays of the data, and (4) to access, transform, and prepare the data for input to a stress analysis program. The relational information management system was found to be well suited to the tile analysis problem because information related to many separate tiles could be accessed individually from a data base having a natural organization from an engineering viewpoint. The flexible user features of the system facilitated changes in data content and organization which occurred during the development and refinement of the tile analysis procedure. Additionally, the query language supported retrieval of data to satisfy a variety of user-specified conditions.

  7. Solar Dynamics Observatory On-Orbit Jitter Testing, Analysis, and Mitigation Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Kuo-Chia (Alice); Blaurock, Carl A.; Bourkland, Kristin L.; Morgenstern, Wendy M.; Maghami, Peiman G.

    2011-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) was designed to understand the Sun and the Sun s influence on Earth. SDO was launched on February 11, 2010 carrying three scientific instruments: the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), and the Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE). Both AIA and HMI are sensitive to high frequency pointing perturbations and have sub-arcsecond level line-of-sight (LOS) jitter requirements. Extensive modeling and analysis efforts were directed in estimating the amount of jitter disturbing the science instruments. To verify the disturbance models and to validate the jitter performance prior to launch, many jitter-critical components and subassemblies were tested either by the mechanism vendors or at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Although detailed analysis and assembly level tests were performed to obtain good jitter predictions, there were still several sources of uncertainties in the system. The structural finite element model did not have all the modes correlated to test data at high frequencies (greater than 50 Hz). The performance of the instrument stabilization system was not known exactly but was expected to be close to the analytical model. A true disturbance-to-LOS observatory level test was not available due to the tight schedule of the flight spacecraft, the cost in time and manpower, difficulties in creating gravity negation systems, and risks of damaging flight hardware. To protect the observatory jitter performance against model uncertainties, the SDO jitter team devised several on-orbit jitter reduction plans in addition to reserve margins on analysis results. Since some of these plans severely restricted the capabilities of several spacecraft components (e.g. wheels and High Gain Antennas), the SDO team performed on-orbit jitter tests to determine which jitter reduction plans, if any, were necessary to satisfy science LOS jitter requirements. The SDO on-orbit

  8. Global Population Genetic Analysis of Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Ashu, Eta Ebasi; Hagen, Ferry; Chowdhary, Anuradha

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aspergillus fumigatus is a ubiquitous opportunistic fungal pathogen capable of causing invasive aspergillosis, a globally distributed disease with a mortality rate of up to 90% in high-risk populations. Effective control and prevention of this disease require a thorough understanding of its epidemiology. However, despite significant efforts, the global molecular epidemiology of A. fumigatus remains poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed 2,026 A. fumigatus isolates from 13 countries in four continents using nine highly polymorphic microsatellite markers. Genetic cluster analyses suggest that our global sample of A. fumigatus isolates belonged to eight genetic clusters, with seven of the eight clusters showing broad geographic distributions. We found common signatures of sexual recombination within individual genetic clusters and clear evidence of hybridization between several clusters. Limited but statistically significant genetic differentiations were found among geographic and ecological populations. However, there was abundant evidence for gene flow at the local, regional, and global scales. Interestingly, the triazole-susceptible and triazole-resistant populations showed different population structures, consistent with antifungal drug pressure playing a significant role in local adaptation. Our results suggest that global populations of A. fumigatus are shaped by historical differentiation, contemporary gene flow, sexual reproduction, and the localized antifungal drug selection that is driving clonal expansion of genotypes resistant to multiple triazole drugs. IMPORTANCE The genetic diversity and geographic structure of the human fungal pathogen A. fumigatus have been the subject of many studies. However, most previous studies had relatively limited sample ranges and sizes and/or used genetic markers with low-level polymorphisms. In this paper, we characterize a global collection of strains of A. fumigatus using a panel of 9 highly

  9. Periodic orbit analysis of a system with continuous symmetry—A tutorial

    SciTech Connect

    Budanur, Nazmi Burak Cvitanović, Predrag; Borrero-Echeverry, Daniel

    2015-07-15

    Dynamical systems with translational or rotational symmetry arise frequently in studies of spatially extended physical systems, such as Navier-Stokes flows on periodic domains. In these cases, it is natural to express the state of the fluid in terms of a Fourier series truncated to a finite number of modes. Here, we study a 4-dimensional model with chaotic dynamics and SO(2) symmetry similar to those that appear in fluid dynamics problems. A crucial step in the analysis of such a system is symmetry reduction. We use the model to illustrate different symmetry-reduction techniques. The system's relative equilibria are conveniently determined by rewriting the dynamics in terms of a symmetry-invariant polynomial basis. However, for the analysis of its chaotic dynamics, the “method of slices,” which is applicable to very high-dimensional problems, is preferable. We show that a Poincaré section taken on the 'slice' can be used to further reduce this flow to what is for all practical purposes a unimodal map. This enables us to systematically determine all relative periodic orbits and their symbolic dynamics up to any desired period. We then present cycle averaging formulas adequate for systems with continuous symmetry and use them to compute dynamical averages using relative periodic orbits. The convergence of such computations is discussed.

  10. Conformational analysis of methylphenidate: comparison of molecular orbital and molecular mechanics methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Kathleen M.; Skawinski, William J.; Misra, Milind; Paris, Kristina A.; Naik, Neelam H.; Buono, Ronald A.; Deutsch, Howard M.; Venanzi, Carol A.

    2004-11-01

    Methylphenidate (MP) binds to the cocaine binding site on the dopamine transporter and inhibits reuptake of dopamine, but does not appear to have the same abuse potential as cocaine. This study, part of a comprehensive effort to identify a drug treatment for cocaine abuse, investigates the effect of choice of calculation technique and of solvent model on the conformational potential energy surface (PES) of MP and a rigid methylphenidate (RMP) analogue which exhibits the same dopamine transporter binding affinity as MP. Conformational analysis was carried out by the AM1 and AM1/SM5.4 semiempirical molecular orbital methods, a molecular mechanics method (Tripos force field with the dielectric set equal to that of vacuum or water) and the HF/6-31G* molecular orbital method in vacuum phase. Although all three methods differ somewhat in the local details of the PES, the general trends are the same for neutral and protonated MP. In vacuum phase, protonation has a distinctive effect in decreasing the regions of space available to the local conformational minima. Solvent has little effect on the PES of the neutral molecule and tends to stabilize the protonated species. The random search (RS) conformational analysis technique using the Tripos force field was found to be capable of locating the minima found by the molecular orbital methods using systematic grid search. This suggests that the RS/Tripos force field/vacuum phase protocol is a reasonable choice for locating the local minima of MP. However, the Tripos force field gave significantly larger phenyl ring rotational barriers than the molecular orbital methods for MP and RMP. For both the neutral and protonated cases, all three methods found the phenyl ring rotational barriers for the RMP conformers/invertamers (denoted as cte, tte, and cta) to be: cte, tte> MP > cta. Solvation has negligible effect on the phenyl ring rotational barrier of RMP. The B3LYP/6-31G* density functional method was used to calculate the phenyl

  11. Projecting the success of plant restoration with population viability analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, T.J.; Bowles, M.L.; McEachern, A.K.; Brigham, C.A.; Schwartz, M.W.

    2003-01-01

    Conserving viable populations of plant species requires that they have high probabilities of long-term persistence within natural habitats, such as a chance of extinction in 100 years of less than 5% (Menges 1991, 1998; Brown 1994; Pavlik 1994; Chap. 1, this Vol.). For endangered and threatened species that have been severely reduces in range and whose habitats have been fragmented, important species conservation strategies may include augmenting existing populations or restoring new viable populations (Bowles and Whelan 1994; Chap. 2, this Vol.). Restoration objectives may include increasing population numbers to reduce extinction probability, deterministic manipulations to develop a staged cohort structure, or more complex restoration of a desired genetic structure to allow outcrossing or increase effective population size (DeMauro 1993, 1994; Bowles et al. 1993, 1998; Pavlik 1994; Knapp and Dyer 1998; Chap. 2, this Vol.). These efforts may require translocation of propagules from existing (in situ) populations, or from ex situ botanic gardens or seed storage facilities (Falk et al. 1996; Guerrant and Pavlik 1998; Chap. 2, this Vol.). Population viability analysis (PVA) can provide a critical foundation for plant restoration, as it models demographic projections used to evaluate the probability of population persistence and links plant life history with restoration strategies. It is unknown how well artificially created populations will meet demographic modeling requirements (e.g., due to artificial cohort transitions) and few, if any, PVAs have been applied to restorations. To guide application of PVA to restored populations and to illustrate potential difficulties, we examine effects of planting different life stages, model initial population sizes needed to achieve population viability, and compare demographic characteristics between natural and restored populations. We develop and compare plant population restoration viability analysis (PRVA) case studies of

  12. Analysis of the effects of mean local node-crossing time on the evolution of Sun-synchronous orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, P.; Blaes, V.; Roszman, L.; Cooley, J.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of mean local node-crossing time on the evolution of Sun-synchronous orbits was undertaken during Phase-A orbit analysis for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) O,P,Q environmental spacecraft. That analysis added to the growing body of evidence that individual Sun-synchronous missions, at differing node-crossing times, experience nodal drift rates that can differ in both magnitude and direction. A Sun-synchronous orbit is obtained by means of a nodal drift rate approximating the 0.9856-degree-per-day apparent precession of the position of the mean Sun. This drift rate is achieved through the interaction of the orbital semimajor axis and inclination in Earth's geopotential field. Influencing perturbations include atmospheric drag and, most important, the effects of solar gravitation on inclination. The present analysis examines a series of Sun-synchronous orbits with mean local node-crossing times at 1-hour intervals from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. It considers the fixed geometry of each orbital plane with respect to both the Sun and the diurnal atmospheric bulge, then analyzes the influence of these features upon the evolution of the semimajor axix and inclination and thus upon the rate of the nodal drift in the course of 1 year.

  13. Real-time automated failure analysis for on-orbit operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Sarah; Lauritsen, Janet; Pack, Ginger; Ha, Anhhoang; Jowers, Steven; Mcnenny, Robert; Truong, The; Dell, James

    1993-01-01

    A system which is to provide real-time failure analysis support to controllers at the NASA Johnson Space Center Control Center Complex (CCC) for both Space Station and Space Shuttle on-orbit operations is described. The system employs monitored systems' models of failure behavior and model evaluation algorithms which are domain-independent. These failure models are viewed as a stepping stone to more robust algorithms operating over models of intended function. The described system is designed to meet two sets of requirements. It must provide a useful failure analysis capability enhancement to the mission controller. It must satisfy CCC operational environment constraints such as cost, computer resource requirements, verification, and validation. The underlying technology and how it may be used to support operations is also discussed.

  14. Use of an engineering data management system in the analysis of space shuttle orbiter tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, G. L.; Vallas, M.

    1981-01-01

    The use of an engineering data management system to facilitate the extensive stress analyses of the space shuttle orbiter thermal protection system is demonstrated. The methods used to gather, organize, and store the data; to query data interactively; to generate graphic displays of the data; and to access, transform, and prepare the data for input to a stress analysis program are described. Information related to many separate tiles can be accessed individually from the data base which has a natural organization from an engineering viewpoint. The flexible user features of the system facilitate changes in data content and organization which occur during the development and refinement of the tile analysis procedure. Additionally, the query language supports retrieval of data to satisfy a variety of user-specified conditions.

  15. Hydrogen on-orbit storage and supply (HOSS) thermal design and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Curtis M.; Schick, Scott H.; Batty, J. Clair

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes the thermal design and analysis of the HOSS (Hydrogen On-Orbit Storage and Supply) liquid hydrogen dewar. This task is being carried out by the Space Dynamics Laboratory at Utah State University under contract from NASA Lewis Research Center. The vacuum jacketed 80-liter dewar is designed for a mission life greater than 30 days. The design uses concentric G-10 fiberglass support tubes and multilayer insulation to thermally isolate the hydrogen tank. Heat load trade off studies were performed based on the support tube thickness, plumbing size, and vacuum shell temperature. The dewar employs a liquid nitrogen cooled shield to provide a non-venting ground hold capability of more than 96 hours for launch preparation. Analysis has shown that a greater than 30 day mission is feasible even with a mechanically robust design capable of withstanding most launch environments.

  16. LANDSAT-D MSS/TM tuned orbital jitter analysis model LDS900

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollak, T. E.

    1981-01-01

    The final LANDSAT-D orbital dynamic math model (LSD900), comprised of all test validated substructures, was used to evaluate the jitter response of the MSS/TM experiments. A dynamic forced response analysis was performed at both the MSS and TM locations on all structural modes considered (thru 200 Hz). The analysis determined the roll angular response of the MSS/TM experiments to improve excitation generated by component operation. Cross axis and cross experiment responses were also calculated. The excitations were analytically represented by seven and nine term Fourier series approximations, for the MSS and TM experiment respectively, which enabled linear harmonic solution techniques to be applied to response calculations. Single worst case jitter was estimated by variations of the eigenvalue spectrum of model LSD 900. The probability of any worst case mode occurrence was investigated.

  17. Results from the direct combination of satellite and gravimetric data. [orbit analysis and gravity anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    Results have been obtained for the solution of 184 15-deg equal-area blocks directly from the analysis of satellite orbits, and from a combination of the satellite results with terrestrial gravity material. This test computation, made to verify the method, used 17,632 optical observations from ten satellites in 29 arcs averaging in length seven days. Analysis of the satellite results were made by comparing the solved for anomalies with the terrestrial anomaly set, and by developing the solved for anomalies into potential coefficients which were compared to the GEM 3 set of potential coefficients to degree 12. These comparisons indicated improvement in each solution as more arcs were added. The programs used in this solution can easily be used to solve for smaller size blocks and handle additional data types. The only limitation will be computer core availability and computer time.

  18. Evaluation of mixed-population flood-frequency analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, P.J.

    2001-01-01

    A mixed population of flood flows was shown to cause quality-of-fit problems if a single-population flood-frequency distribution was used to describe the flood data. The three populations in this mix were "ordinary," tropical cyclone, and ice-jam-release floods. Parametric descriptions of the single and separated flood populations were evaluated using probability-plot correlation-coefficient tests. These tests quantified how well the flood-probability distributions agreed with plotting-position descriptions of the data and quantified the differences due to the mixed-population analysis. High outliers caused the high skewness found in the single- population analyses. The tropical cyclone component was underestimated by single-population analyses at gauging stations in Massachusetts that had little data.

  19. Mission analysis data for inclined geosynchronous orbits, part 2. Appendix A: Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A bibliography of papers and reports on geosynchronous orbits, as well as background papers concerned with the fundamentals of orbital mechanics is presented. A listing of computer programs developed for this study is included.

  20. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the rudder/speed brake subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. E.; Riccio, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results for the Orbiter Rudder/Speedbrake Actuation Mechanism is documented. The function of the Rudder/Speedbrake (RSB) is to provide directional control and to provide a means of energy control during entry. The system consists of two panels on a vertical hinge mounted on the aft part of the vertical stabilizer. These two panels move together to form a rudder but split apart to make a speedbrake. The Rudder/Speedbrake Actuation Mechanism consists of the following elements: (1) Power Drive Unit (PDU) which is composed of hydraulic valve module and a hydraulic motor-powered gearbox which contains differentials and mixer gears to provide PDU torque output; (2) four geared rotary actuators which apply the PDU generated torque to the rudder/speedbrake panels; and (3) ten torque shafts which join the PDU to the rotary actuators and interconnect the four rotary actuators. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failures and causes. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. Critical RSB failures which result in potential loss of vehicle control were mainly due to loss of hydraulic fluid, fluid contaminators, and mechanical failures in gears and shafts.

  1. Population and genomic lessons from genetic analysis of two Indian populations.

    PubMed

    Juyal, Garima; Mondal, Mayukh; Luisi, Pierre; Laayouni, Hafid; Sood, Ajit; Midha, Vandana; Heutink, Peter; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Thelma, B K; Casals, Ferran

    2014-10-01

    Indian demographic history includes special features such as founder effects, interpopulation segregation, complex social structure with a caste system and elevated frequency of consanguineous marriages. It also presents a higher frequency for some rare mendelian disorders and in the last two decades increased prevalence of some complex disorders. Despite the fact that India represents about one-sixth of the human population, deep genetic studies from this terrain have been scarce. In this study, we analyzed high-density genotyping and whole-exome sequencing data of a North and a South Indian population. Indian populations show higher differentiation levels than those reported between populations of other continents. In this work, we have analyzed its consequences, by specifically assessing the transferability of genetic markers from or to Indian populations. We show that there is limited genetic marker portability from available genetic resources such as HapMap or the 1,000 Genomes Project to Indian populations, which also present an excess of private rare variants. Conversely, tagSNPs show a high level of portability between the two Indian populations, in contrast to the common belief that North and South Indian populations are genetically very different. By estimating kinship from mates and consanguinity in our data from trios, we also describe different patterns of assortative mating and inbreeding in the two populations, in agreement with distinct mating preferences and social structures. In addition, this analysis has allowed us to describe genomic regions under recent adaptive selection, indicating differential adaptive histories for North and South Indian populations. Our findings highlight the importance of considering demography for design and analysis of genetic studies, as well as the need for extending human genetic variation catalogs to new populations and particularly to those with particular demographic histories.

  2. The atomic orbitals of the topological atom.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Salvador, Pedro; Mayer, István

    2013-06-07

    The effective atomic orbitals have been realized in the framework of Bader's atoms in molecules theory for a general wavefunction. This formalism can be used to retrieve from any type of calculation a proper set of orthonormalized numerical atomic orbitals, with occupation numbers that sum up to the respective Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) atomic populations. Experience shows that only a limited number of effective atomic orbitals exhibit significant occupation numbers. These correspond to atomic hybrids that closely resemble the core and valence shells of the atom. The occupation numbers of the remaining effective orbitals are almost negligible, except for atoms with hypervalent character. In addition, the molecular orbitals of a calculation can be exactly expressed as a linear combination of this orthonormalized set of numerical atomic orbitals, and the Mulliken population analysis carried out on this basis set exactly reproduces the original QTAIM atomic populations of the atoms. Approximate expansion of the molecular orbitals over a much reduced set of orthogonal atomic basis functions can also be accomplished to a very good accuracy with a singular value decomposition procedure.

  3. Mission Life Thermal Analysis and Environment Correlation for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, Matthew B.; Peabody, Hume

    2012-01-01

    Standard thermal analysis practices include stacking worst-case conditions including environmental heat loads, thermo-optical properties and orbital beta angles. This results in the design being driven by a few bounding thermal cases, although those cases may only represent a very small portion of the actual mission life. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Thermal Branch developed a procedure to predict the flight temperatures over the entire mission life, assuming a known beta angle progression, variation in the thermal environment, and a degradation rate in the coatings. This was applied to the Global Precipitation Measurement core spacecraft. In order to assess the validity of this process, this work applies the similar process to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. A flight-correlated thermal model was exercised to give predictions of the thermal performance over the mission life. These results were then compared against flight data from the first two years of the spacecraft s use. This is used to validate the process and to suggest possible improvements for future analyses.

  4. Preliminary internal straylight analysis of the METIS instrument for the Solar Orbiter ESA mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verroi, Enrico; Da Deppo, Vania; Naletto, Giampiero; Fineschi, Silvano; Antonucci, Ester

    2012-09-01

    METIS, the multi element telescope for imaging and spectroscopy, is a solar coronagraph foreseen for the Solar Orbiter mission. METIS is conceived to observe the solar corona from a near-sun orbit in three different spectral bands: in the HeII EUV narrow band at 30.4 nm, in the HI UV narrow band at 121.6 nm, and in the visible light band (500 - 650 nm). The visible light from the corona is ten million times fainter than the light emitted by the solar disk, so a very stringent light suppression design is needed for the visible channel. METIS adopts an “inverted occulted” configuration, where the disk light is shielded by an annular shape occulter, after which an annular aspherical mirror M1 collects the signal coming from the corona. The disk light heading through M1 is back-rejected by a suitable spherical mirror M0. This paper presents the stray light analysis for this new-concept configuration, performed with a ray tracing simulation, to insure the opto-mechanical design grants a stray light level below the limit of 10-9 times the coronal signal intensity. A model of the optics and of the mechanical parts of the telescope has been realized with ASAP (Breault Research TM); by means of a Montecarlo ray tracing, the effect of stray light on VIS and UVEUV channels has been simulated.

  5. Improvement of the TOPEX and Jason Orbit Time Series: Precision Orbit Determination, Calibration, Validation and Improvement Through the Combined Reduction and Analysis of GPS, SLR, DORIS and Altimeter Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthcke, Scott B.; Rowlands, D. D.; Lemoine, F. G.; Zelensky, N. P.; Beckley, B. D.

    2004-01-01

    Orbit error is a major component in the overall error budget of all altimeter satellite missions. Jason-I is no exception and a 1 cm radial orbit accuracy goal has been set, which represents a factor of two improvement over what is currently being achieved for TOPEX/Poseidon (TP). Our current analysis suggests this goal has been met and even improved upon, but the challenge is to be able to continually achieve this high accuracy, verify the performance and characterize and quantify the remaining errors over the lifetime of the mission. The computation, verification and error characterization of such high accuracy orbits requires the reduction and analysis of all available tracking data (GPS, SLR, DORIS and altimeter). Current analysis also indicates the history of TP orbits can be further improved employing new solution strategies developed and tested on Jason-I. Our research focuses on the calibration, validation and improvement of orbit accuracies using all available tracking data including altimetry. We will compute and distribute well centered Jason orbits with an accuracy of better than 1-cm in the radial component. In addition to the orbits themselves, a characterization of the orbit error will be distributed and accumulated as a time series of orbit performance metrics to track anomalies and trends. The long time series of orbit error characterization will enable a better understanding of the remaining orbit errors and its impact on the altimeter data analysis. As part of this research effort we are also significantly improving the current level of TP orbit accuracy, re-computing new high-accuracy TP orbits from the beginning of the TP mission and continuing into the future (as long as TP is healthy). Our funded research effort will result in a complete and consistent time series of improved orbits for both TP and Jason, significantly benefiting the long time series of altimeter data analysis and the TP/Jason dual mission. The resultant high accuracy orbits

  6. Skylab 1 rocket /1973-27B/ - Orbit determination and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King-Hele, D. G.

    1980-04-01

    The paper analyzes Skylab 1 rocket orbit and describes the geopotential resonance, atmospheric rotation, and variations in eccentricity due to drag. The final stage rocket which projected Skylab into orbit itself entered a nearly circular orbit which was determined at 62 epochs, with the orbital accuracy in perigee height and orbital inclination of 90 km. As the orbit contracted under influence of air drag, it passed slowly through the 31:2 geopotential resonance, when the track over the earth repeats every 31 revolutions at intervals of 2 days. The variations in inclination and eccentricity during the resonance phase were analyzed to determine the atmospheric rotation rate; the eccentricity variations were compared with the predicted values for orbit contraction in an atmosphere with a strong day-to-night variation in density.

  7. Stratigraphy, Sequence, and Crater Populations of Lunar Impact Basins from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) Data: Implications for the Late Heavy Bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fassett, C. I.; Head, J. W.; Kadish, S. J.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2012-01-01

    New measurements of the topography of the Moon from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA)[1] provide an excellent base-map for analyzing the large crater population (D.20 km)of the lunar surface [2, 3]. We have recently used this data to calculate crater size-frequency distributions (CSFD) for 30 lunar impact basins, which have implications for their stratigraphy and sequence. These data provide an avenue for assessing the timing of the transitions between distinct crater populations characteristic of ancient and young lunar terrains, which has been linked to the late heavy bombardment (LHB). We also use LOLA data to re-examine relative stratigraphic relationships between key lunar basins.

  8. Analysis of the orbit errors in the CERN accelerators using model simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Kleban, S.; Clearwater, S.; Scandale, W.; Pettersson, T.; Kugler, H.; Riche, A.; Chanel, M.; Martensson, E.; Lin, In-Ho

    1987-09-01

    This paper will describe the use of the PLUS program to find various types of machine and beam errors such as, quadrupole strength, dipole strength, beam position monitors (BPMs), energy profile, and beam launch. We refer to this procedure as the GOLD (Generic Orbit and Lattice Debugger) Method which is a general technique that can be applied to analysis of errors in storage rings and transport lines. One useful feature of the Method is that it analyzes segments of a machine at a time so that the application and efficiency is independent of the size of the overall machine. Because the techniques are the same for all the types of problems it solves, the user need learn only how to find one type of error in order to use the program.

  9. Space shuttle orbiter digital data processing system timing sensitivity analysis OFT ascent phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagas, J. J.; Peterka, J. J.; Becker, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Dynamic loads were investigated to provide simulation and analysis of the space shuttle orbiter digital data processing system (DDPS). Segments of the ascent test (OFT) configuration were modeled utilizing the information management system interpretive model (IMSIM) in a computerized simulation modeling of the OFT hardware and software workload. System requirements for simulation of the OFT configuration were defined, and sensitivity analyses determined areas of potential data flow problems in DDPS operation. Based on the defined system requirements and these sensitivity analyses, a test design was developed for adapting, parameterizing, and executing IMSIM, using varying load and stress conditions for model execution. Analyses of the computer simulation runs are documented, including results, conclusions, and recommendations for DDPS improvements.

  10. Field line and Particle orbit Analysis in the Periphery of the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yutaka; Oikawa, Shun-ichi; Watanabe, Tsuguhiro

    2002-07-01

    Magnetic field lines and particle orbits were analyzed in the periphery of the Large Helical Device (LHD), which is called the chaotic field line region in this paper. The widths of the chaotic field line region were numerically identified for the standard LHD configuration with the magnetic axis position Rax = 3.75 m and for an improved confinement configuration with Rax = 3.6 m. It was found that the reflected particles include of what we have named chaotic particles and non-chaotic particles. Most of the reflected particles are mirror-confined with strong adiabaticity in the chaotic field line region. The remaining reflected particles, named type-A and type-B particles, are harmful to confinement. We found by detailed analysis of the vacuum magnetic field in the LHD that there exist loss canals that are the open intersections of |\\mbi{B}| = const. and \\mbi{B} \\cdot \

  11. TCP/IP Interface for the Satellite Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnright, Robert; Stodden, David; Coggi, John

    2009-01-01

    The Transmission Control Protocol/ Internet protocol (TCP/IP) interface for the Satellite Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP) provides the means for the software to establish real-time interfaces with other software. Such interfaces can operate between two programs, either on the same computer or on different computers joined by a network. The SOAP TCP/IP module employs a client/server interface where SOAP is the server and other applications can be clients. Real-time interfaces between software offer a number of advantages over embedding all of the common functionality within a single program. One advantage is that they allow each program to divide the computation labor between processors or computers running the separate applications. Secondly, each program can be allowed to provide its own expertise domain with other programs able to use this expertise.

  12. Laboratory Reproduction and Failure Analysis of Cracked Orbiter Reaction Control System Niobium Thruster Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Jeremy B.; Castner, Willard L.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing cracks and failure analysis of an orbiter reaction control system is shown. The topics include: 1) Endeavour STS-113 Landing; 2) RCS Thruster; 3) Thruster Cross-Section; 4) RCS Injector; 5) RCS Thruster, S/N 120l 6) Counterbore Cracks; 7) Relief Radius Cracks; 8) RCS Thruster Cracking History; 9) Thruster Manufacturing Timelines; 10) Laboratory Reproduction of Injector Cracking; 11) The Brownfield Specimen; 12) HF EtchantTests/Specimen Loading; 13) Specimen #3 HF + 600F; 14) Specimen #3 IG Fracture; 15) Specimen #5 HF + 600F; 16) Specimen #5 Popcorn ; 17) Specimen #5 Cleaned and Bent; 18) HF Exposure Test Matrix; 19) Krytox143AC Tests; 20) KrytoxTests/Specimen Loading; 21) Specimen #13 Krytox + 600F; and 22) KrytoxExposure Test Matrix.

  13. Thermal Analysis for Orbiter and ISS Plume Impingement on International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochelle, William C.; Reid, Ethan A.; Carl, Terry L.; Smith, Ries N.; Lumpkin, Forrest E.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Reaction Control System (RCS) Plume Model (RPM) is an exhaust plume flow field and impingement heating code that has been updated and applied to components of the International Space Station (ISS). The objective of this study was to use this code to determine if plume environments from either Orbiter PRCS jets or ISS reboost and Attitude Control System (ACS) jets cause thermal issues on ISS component surfaces. This impingement analysis becomes increasingly important as the ISS is being assembled with its first permanent crew scheduled to arrive by the end of fall 2000. By early summer 2001 , the ISS will have a number of major components installed such as the Unity (Node 1), Destiny (Lab Module), Zarya (Functional Cargo Block), and Zvezda (Service Module) along with the P6 solar arrays and radiators and the Z-1 truss. Plume heating to these components has been analyzed with the RPM code as well as additional components for missions beyond Flight 6A such as the Propulsion Module (PM), Mobile Servicing System, Space Station Remote Manipulator System, Node 2, and the Cupola. For the past several years NASA/JSC has been developing the methodology to predict plume heating on ISS components. The RPM code is a modified source flow code with capabilities for scarfed nozzles and intersecting plumes that was developed for the 44 Orbiter RCS jets. This code has been validated by comparison with Shuttle Plume Impingement Flight Experiment (SPIFEX) heat flux and pressure data and with CFD and Method of Characteristics solutions. Previous analyses of plume heating predictions to the ISS using RPM have been reported, but did not consider thermal analysis for the components nor jet-firing histories as the Orbiter approaches the ISS docking ports. The RPM code has since been modified to analyze surface temperatures with a lumped mass approach and also uses jet-firing histories to produce pulsed heating rates. In addition, RPM was modified to include plume heating from ISS

  14. Orbit Software Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osgood, Cathy; Williams, Kevin; Gentry, Philip; Brownfield, Dana; Hallstrom, John; Stuit, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Orbit Software Suite is used to support a variety of NASA/DM (Dependable Multiprocessor) mission planning and analysis activities on the IPS (Intrusion Prevention System) platform. The suite of Orbit software tools (Orbit Design and Orbit Dynamics) resides on IPS/Linux workstations, and is used to perform mission design and analysis tasks corresponding to trajectory/ launch window, rendezvous, and proximity operations flight segments. A list of tools in Orbit Software Suite represents tool versions established during/after the Equipment Rehost-3 Project.

  15. Orbit-based analysis of resonant excitations of Alfvén waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Bierwage, Andreas; Shinohara, Kouji

    2014-11-15

    The exponential growth phase of fast-ion-driven Alfvénic instabilities is simulated and the resonant wave-particle interactions are analyzed numerically. The simulations are carried out in realistic magnetic geometry and with a realistic particle distribution for a JT-60U plasma driven by negative-ion-based neutral beams. In order to deal with the large magnetic drifts of the fast ions, two new mapping methods are developed and applied. The first mapping yields the radii and pitch angles at the points, where the unperturbed orbit of a particle intersects the mid-plane. These canonical coordinates allow to express analysis results (e.g., drive profiles and resonance widths) in a form that is easy to understand and directly comparable to the radial mode structure. The second mapping yields the structure of the wave field along the particle trajectory. This allows us to unify resonance conditions for trapped and passing particles, determine which harmonics are driven, and which orders of the resonance are involved. This orbit-based resonance analysis (ORA) method is applied to fast-ion-driven instabilities with toroidal mode numbers n = 1-3. After determining the order and width of each resonance, the kinetic compression of resonant particles and the effect of linear resonance overlap are examined. On the basis of the ORA results, implications for the fully nonlinear regime, for the long-time evolution of the system in the presence of a fast ion source, and for the interpretation of experimental observations are discussed.

  16. Two Color Populations of Kuiper Belt and Centaur Objects and the Smaller Orbital Inclinations of Red Centaur Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegler, S. C.; Romanishin, W.; Consolmagno, G. J.; J., S.

    2016-12-01

    We present new optical colors for 28 Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) and 35 Centaur objects measured with the 1.8 m Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope and the 4.3 m Discovery Channel Telescope. By combining these new colors with our previously published colors, we increase the sample size of our survey to 154 objects. Our survey is unique in that the uncertainties in our color measurements are less than half the uncertainties in the color measurements reported by other researchers in the literature. Small uncertainties are essential for discerning between a unimodal and a bimodal distribution of colors for these objects as well as detecting correlations between colors and orbital elements. From our survey, it appears red Centaurs have a broader color distribution than gray Centaurs. We find red Centaurs have a smaller orbital inclination angle distribution than gray Centaurs at the 99.3% confidence level. Furthermore, we find that our entire sample of KBOs and Centaurs exhibits bimodal colors at the 99.4 % confidence level. KBOs and Centaurs with H V > 7.0 have bimodal colors at the 99.96% confidence level and KBOs with H V < 6.0 have bimodal colors at the 96% confidence level.

  17. Demographics of reintroduced populations: estimation, modeling, and decision analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Converse, Sarah J.; Moore, Clinton T.; Armstrong, Doug P.

    2013-01-01

    Reintroduction can be necessary for recovering populations of threatened species. However, the success of reintroduction efforts has been poorer than many biologists and managers would hope. To increase the benefits gained from reintroduction, management decision making should be couched within formal decision-analytic frameworks. Decision analysis is a structured process for informing decision making that recognizes that all decisions have a set of components—objectives, alternative management actions, predictive models, and optimization methods—that can be decomposed, analyzed, and recomposed to facilitate optimal, transparent decisions. Because the outcome of interest in reintroduction efforts is typically population viability or related metrics, models used in decision analysis efforts for reintroductions will need to include population models. In this special section of the Journal of Wildlife Management, we highlight examples of the construction and use of models for informing management decisions in reintroduced populations. In this introductory contribution, we review concepts in decision analysis, population modeling for analysis of decisions in reintroduction settings, and future directions. Increased use of formal decision analysis, including adaptive management, has great potential to inform reintroduction efforts. Adopting these practices will require close collaboration among managers, decision analysts, population modelers, and field biologists.

  18. Analysis of the structural continuity in twinned crystals in terms of pseudo-eigensymmetry of crystallographic orbits

    PubMed Central

    Marzouki, Mohamed Amine; Souvignier, Bernd; Nespolo, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The reticular theory of twinning gives the necessary conditions on the lattice level for the formation of twins. The latter are based on the continuation, more or less approximate, of a substructure through the composition surface. The analysis of this structural continuity can be performed in terms of the eigensymmetry of the crystallographic orbits corresponding to occupied Wyckoff positions in the structure. If is the space group of the individual and a space group which fixes the twin lattice obtained as an intersection of the space groups of the individuals in their respective orientations, then a structural continuity is obtained if (1) the eigensymmetry of an orbit under contains the twin operation; (2) the eigensymmetry of a union of orbits under contains the twin operation; (3) the eigensymmetry of a split orbit under contains the twin operation; or (4) the eigensymmetry of a union of split orbits under contains the twin operation. The case of the twins in melilite is analysed: the (approximate) restoration of some of the orbits explains the formation of these twins. PMID:25075318

  19. MASSIVE: A Bayesian analysis of giant planet populations around low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannier, J.; Delorme, P.; Lagrange, A. M.; Borgniet, S.; Rameau, J.; Schlieder, J. E.; Gagné, J.; Bonavita, M. A.; Malo, L.; Chauvin, G.; Bonnefoy, M.; Girard, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    Context. Direct imaging has led to the discovery of several giant planet and brown dwarf companions. These imaged companions populate a mass, separation and age domain (mass >1 MJup, orbits > 5 AU, age < 1 Gyr) quite distinct from the one occupied by exoplanets discovered by the radial velocity or transit methods. This distinction could indicate that different formation mechanisms are at play. Aims: We aim at investigating correlations between the host star's mass and the presence of wide-orbit giant planets, and at providing new observational constraints on planetary formation models. Methods: We observed 58 young and nearby M-type dwarfs in L'-band with the VLT/NaCo instrument and used angular differential imaging algorithms to optimize the sensitivity to planetary-mass companions and to derive the best detection limits. We estimate the probability of detecting a planet as a function of its mass and physical separation around each target. We conduct a Bayesian analysis to determine the frequency of substellar companions orbiting low-mass stars, using a homogenous sub-sample of 54 stars. Results: We derive a frequency of for companions with masses in the range of 2-80 MJup, and % for planetary mass companions (2-14 MJup), at physical separations of 8 to 400 AU for both cases. Comparing our results with a previous survey targeting more massive stars, we find evidence that substellar companions more massive than 1 MJup with a low mass ratio Q with respect to their host star (Q < 1%), are less frequent around low-mass stars. This may represent observational evidence that the frequency of imaged wide-orbit substellar companions is correlated with stellar mass, corroborating theoretical expectations. Contrarily, we show statistical evidence that intermediate-mass ratio (1% < Q < 5%) companion with masses >2 MJup might be independent from the mass of the host star.

  20. Applicability of meteor radiant determination methods depending on orbit type. II. Low-eccentric orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoren, J.; Neslusan, L.; Porubcan, V.

    1994-08-01

    All known parent bodies of meteor showers belong to bodies moving in high-eccentricity orbits (e => 0.5). Recently, asteroids in low-eccentricity orbits (e < 0.5) approaching the Earth's orbit, were suggested as another population of possible parent bodies of meteor streams. This paper deals with the problem of calculation of meteor radiants connected with the bodies in low-eccentricity orbits from the point of view of optimal results depending on the method applied. The paper is a continuation of our previous analysis of high-eccentricity orbits (Svoren, J., Neslusan, L., Porubcan, V.: 1993, Contrib. Astron. Obs. Skalnate Pleso 23, 23). Some additional methods resulting from mathematical modelling are presented and discussed together with Porter's, Steel-Baggaley's and Hasegawa's methods. In order to be able to compare how suitable the application of the individual radiant determination methods is, it is necessary to determine the accuracy with which they approximate real meteor orbits. To verify the accuracy with which the orbit of a meteoroid with at least one node at 1 AU fits the original orbit of the parent body, the Southworth-Hawkins D-criterion (Southworth, R.B., Hawkins, G.S.: 1963, Smithson. Contr. Astrophys. 7, 261) was applied. D <= 0.1 indicates a very good fit of orbits, 0.1 < D <= 0.2 is considered for a good fit and D > 0.2 means that the fit is rather poor and the change of orbit unrealistic. The optimal method, i.e. the one which results in the smallest D values for the population of low-eccentricity orbits, is that of adjusting the orbit by varying both the eccentricity and perihelion distance. A comparison of theoretical radiants obtained by various methods was made for typical representatives from each group of the NEA (near-Earth asteroids) objects.

  1. Natural bond orbital analysis, electronic structure and vibrational spectral analysis of N-(4-hydroxyl phenyl) acetamide: A density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindasamy, P.; Gunasekaran, S.; Ramkumaar, G. R.

    2014-09-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of N-(4-hydroxy phenyl) acetamide (N4HPA) of painkiller agent were recorded in the region 4000-450 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1 respectively. Density functional theory (DFT) has been used to calculate the optimized geometrical parameter, atomic charges, and vibrational wavenumbers and intensity of the vibrational bands. The computed vibrational wave numbers were compared with the FT-IR and FT-Raman experimental data. The computational calculations at DFT/B3LYP level with 6-31G(d,p), 6-31++G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The complete vibrational assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes calculated using Vibrational energy distribution analysis (VEDA 4) program. The oscillator’s strength calculated by TD-DFT and N4HPA is approach complement with the experimental findings. The NMR chemical shifts 13C and 1H were recorded and calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) and electron density surfaces of the molecule were constructed. The Natural charges and intermolecular contacts have been interpreted using Natural Bond orbital (NBO) analysis the HOMO-LUMO energy gap has been calculated. The thermodynamic properties like entropy, heat capacity and zero vibrational energy have been calculated.

  2. Natural bond orbital analysis, electronic structure and vibrational spectral analysis of N-(4-hydroxyl phenyl) acetamide: a density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Govindasamy, P; Gunasekaran, S; Ramkumaar, G R

    2014-09-15

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of N-(4-hydroxy phenyl) acetamide (N4HPA) of painkiller agent were recorded in the region 4000-450 cm(-1) and 4000-50 cm(-1) respectively. Density functional theory (DFT) has been used to calculate the optimized geometrical parameter, atomic charges, and vibrational wavenumbers and intensity of the vibrational bands. The computed vibrational wave numbers were compared with the FT-IR and FT-Raman experimental data. The computational calculations at DFT/B3LYP level with 6-31G(d,p), 6-31++G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p) and 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. The complete vibrational assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes calculated using Vibrational energy distribution analysis (VEDA 4) program. The oscillator's strength calculated by TD-DFT and N4HPA is approach complement with the experimental findings. The NMR chemical shifts 13C and 1H were recorded and calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The molecular electrostatic potential (MESP) and electron density surfaces of the molecule were constructed. The Natural charges and intermolecular contacts have been interpreted using Natural Bond orbital (NBO) analysis the HOMO-LUMO energy gap has been calculated. The thermodynamic properties like entropy, heat capacity and zero vibrational energy have been calculated.

  3. Dilution-of-Precision-Based Lunar Surface Navigation System Analysis Utilizing Lunar Orbiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan W.; Connolly, Joseph W.; Sands, Obed S.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Vision for Space Exploration is focused on the return of astronauts to the Moon. Although navigation systems have already been proven in the Apollo missions to the Moon, the current exploration campaign will involve more extensive and extended missions requiring new concepts for lunar navigation. In contrast to Apollo missions, which were limited to the near-side equatorial region of the Moon, those under the Exploration Systems Initiative will require navigation on the Moon's limb and far side. Since these regions have poor Earth visibility, a navigation system comprised solely of Earth-based tracking stations will not provide adequate navigation solutions in these areas. In this report, a dilution-of-precision (DoP)-based analysis of the performance of a network of Moon orbiting satellites is provided. This analysis extends a previous analysis of a lunar network (LN) of navigation satellites by providing an assessment of the capability associated with a variety of assumptions. These assumptions pertain to the minimum surface user elevation angle and a total single satellite failure in the lunar network. The assessment is accomplished by making appropriately formed estimates of DoP. Different adaptations of DoP, such as geometric DoP and positional DoP (GDoP and PDoP), are associated with a different set of assumptions regarding augmentations to the navigation receiver or transceiver.

  4. Thermal and structural analysis of the GOES scan mirror's on orbit performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurmehly, G. E.; Hookman, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    The on-orbit performance of the GOES satellite's scan mirror has been predicted by means of thermal, structural, and optical models. A simpler-than-conventional thermal model was used to reduce the time required to obtain orbital predictions, and the structural model was used to predict on-earth gravity sag and on-orbit distortions. The transfer of data from the thermal model to the structural model was automated for a given set of thermal nodes and structural grids.

  5. Orbital service module systems analysis study documentation. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Potentially feasible system concepts for providing additional power, thermal control, and attitude to the baseline orbiter were investigated in order to support a greater variety of space missions and to extend the orbiter's ability to remain in orbit. Results of these analyses include an incremental growth plan that offers the flexibility of adding capability as, and when, it is needed in order to satisfy emerging user requirements.

  6. Orbital cellulitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... hemolytic streptococci may also cause orbital cellulitis. Orbital cellulitis infections in children may get worse very quickly and ... in the space around the eye. An orbital cellulitis infection can get worse very quickly. A person with ...

  7. Variational results and solutions in gauge gravity and a bifurcation analysis of black hole orbital dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Bruce Herold

    1999-10-01

    An analysis of all known spherically symmetric solutions to the field equations originating from the Riemann tensor quadratic curvature Lagrangian is presented. A new exact solution is found for the field equation originating from the ``energy-momentum'' equation of the gauge gravity theory. Imposing equivalence between the Palatini and standard variational field equations yields an algebraic condition that restricts the number spacetime solutions to gauge gravity. A class of spherically symmetric solutions to the conformally invariant theory of gravitation is shown to be shared by the gauge gravity field equations. An analysis of a spherically symmetric solution to the conformal gravity field equations is also presented. Point particle orbital dynamics in both the Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordström black hole spacetimes are analyzed as 2-d conservative bifurcation phenomena. The classification is based on a study of coalescing fixed points and the parameter values at which these bifurcations occur. Physically distinct behaviors are separated by bifurcation points while dynamically distinct cases are divided into various regions of the phase-plane by the separatrix. The Schwarzschild dynamics exhibit both saddle-center and transcritical bifurcation points and a calculation of periastron precession is presented that incorporates a phase-plane analysis of the relativistic equations of motion. Level curves of constant energy are illustrated for both timelike and null geodesics and a phase-plane analysis of dynamical invariance between the proper and coordinate time reference frames is discussed. The Reissner- Nordström dynamics exhibit saddle-center, transcritical, pseudo-transcritical, and additional bifurcations that combine all three previous bifurcations in various combinations. Periastron precession in the Reissner-Nordström spacetime is analyzed using the phase-plane and bifurcation techniques and extended to include a bifurcation point of the dynamics. A

  8. Physical meaning of the natural orbitals: Analysis of exactly solvable models

    SciTech Connect

    Helbig, N.; Rubio, A.

    2010-02-15

    We investigate the suitability of natural orbitals as a basis for describing many-body excitations. We analyze to which extent the natural orbitals describe both bound as well as ionized excited states and show that depending on the specifics of the excited state the ground-state natural orbitals may yield a good approximation. We show that the success of reduced density-matrix functional theory in describing molecular dissociation lies in the flexibility provided by fractional occupation numbers while the role of the natural orbitals is minor.

  9. Time-to-failure analysis for NiCd batteries in a CPS orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sense, K. A.

    1982-01-01

    Cells operating at five degrees Celsius or less, and going to 60 to 65 percent depth of discharge, were studied as to whether they could achieve a useful working life of 7.5 years in a GPS orbit. The characteristics of various orbits were compared and it is noted that the GPS orbit experiences only 220 cycles a year and must be treated as a geosynchronous rather than a low Earth orbit. Cell degradation is considered to be the result of both trickle-charge degradation and degradation due to cycling. Time-to-failure values are presented for selected temperatures and depth of discharges.

  10. Safety in earth orbit study. Volume 2: Analysis of hazardous payloads, docking, on-board survivability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Detailed and supporting analyses are presented of the hazardous payloads, docking, and on-board survivability aspects connected with earth orbital operations of the space shuttle program. The hazards resulting from delivery, deployment, and retrieval of hazardous payloads, and from handling and transport of cargo between orbiter, sortie modules, and space station are identified and analyzed. The safety aspects of shuttle orbiter to modular space station docking includes docking for assembly of space station, normal resupply docking, and emergency docking. Personnel traffic patterns, escape routes, and on-board survivability are analyzed for orbiter with crew and passenger, sortie modules, and modular space station, under normal, emergency, and EVA and IVA operations.

  11. Analysis of Population Substructure in Two Sympatric Populations of Gran Chaco, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Sevini, Federica; Yao, Daniele Yang; Lomartire, Laura; Barbieri, Annalaura; Vianello, Dario; Ferri, Gianmarco; Moretti, Edgardo; Dasso, Maria Cristina; Garagnani, Paolo; Pettener, Davide; Franceschi, Claudio; Luiselli, Donata; Franceschi, Zelda Alice

    2013-01-01

    Sub-population structure and intricate kinship dynamics might introduce biases in molecular anthropology studies and could invalidate the efforts to understand diseases in highly admixed populations. In order to clarify the previously observed distribution pattern and morbidity of Chagas disease in Gran Chaco, Argentina, we studied two populations (Wichí and Criollos) recruited following an innovative bio-cultural model considering their complex cultural interactions. By reconstructing the genetic background and the structure of these two culturally different populations, the pattern of admixture, the correspondence between genealogical and genetic relationships, this integrated perspective had the power to validate data and to link the gap usually relying on a singular discipline. Although Wichí and Criollos share the same area, these sympatric populations are differentiated from the genetic point of view as revealed by Non Recombinant Y Chromosome genotyping resulting in significantly high Fst values and in a lower genetic variability in the Wichí population. Surprisingly, the Amerindian and the European components emerged with comparable amounts (20%) among Criollos and Wichí respectively. The detailed analysis of mitochondrial DNA showed that the two populations have as much as 87% of private haplotypes. Moreover, from the maternal perspective, despite a common Amerindian origin, an Andean and an Amazonian component emerged in Criollos and in Wichí respectively. Our approach allowed us to highlight that quite frequently there is a discrepancy between self-reported and genetic kinship. Indeed, if self-reported identity and kinship are usually utilized in population genetics as a reliable proxy for genetic identity and parental relationship, in our model populations appear to be the result not only and not simply of the genetic background but also of complex cultural determinants. This integrated approach paves the way to a rigorous reconstruction of

  12. Agriculture, population growth, and statistical analysis of the radiocarbon record.

    PubMed

    Zahid, H Jabran; Robinson, Erick; Kelly, Robert L

    2016-01-26

    The human population has grown significantly since the onset of the Holocene about 12,000 y ago. Despite decades of research, the factors determining prehistoric population growth remain uncertain. Here, we examine measurements of the rate of growth of the prehistoric human population based on statistical analysis of the radiocarbon record. We find that, during most of the Holocene, human populations worldwide grew at a long-term annual rate of 0.04%. Statistical analysis of the radiocarbon record shows that transitioning farming societies experienced the same rate of growth as contemporaneous foraging societies. The same rate of growth measured for populations dwelling in a range of environments and practicing a variety of subsistence strategies suggests that the global climate and/or endogenous biological factors, not adaptability to local environment or subsistence practices, regulated the long-term growth of the human population during most of the Holocene. Our results demonstrate that statistical analyses of large ensembles of radiocarbon dates are robust and valuable for quantitatively investigating the demography of prehistoric human populations worldwide.

  13. Agriculture, population growth, and statistical analysis of the radiocarbon record

    PubMed Central

    Zahid, H. Jabran; Robinson, Erick; Kelly, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    The human population has grown significantly since the onset of the Holocene about 12,000 y ago. Despite decades of research, the factors determining prehistoric population growth remain uncertain. Here, we examine measurements of the rate of growth of the prehistoric human population based on statistical analysis of the radiocarbon record. We find that, during most of the Holocene, human populations worldwide grew at a long-term annual rate of 0.04%. Statistical analysis of the radiocarbon record shows that transitioning farming societies experienced the same rate of growth as contemporaneous foraging societies. The same rate of growth measured for populations dwelling in a range of environments and practicing a variety of subsistence strategies suggests that the global climate and/or endogenous biological factors, not adaptability to local environment or subsistence practices, regulated the long-term growth of the human population during most of the Holocene. Our results demonstrate that statistical analyses of large ensembles of radiocarbon dates are robust and valuable for quantitatively investigating the demography of prehistoric human populations worldwide. PMID:26699457

  14. Implementation of a Single-Stage-To-Orbit (SSTO) model for stability and control analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingalls, Stephen A.

    1995-01-01

    Three NASA centers: Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Langley Research Center (LaRC), and Johnson Space Center (JSC) are currently involved in studying a family of single-stage- and two-stage-to-orbit (SSTO/TSTO) vehicles to serve as the next generation space transportation system (STS). A rocketed winged-body is the current focus. The configuration (WB001) is a vertically-launched, horizontally-landing system with circular cross-section. Preliminary aerodynamic data was generated by LaRC and is a combination of wind-tunnel data, empirical methods, and Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System-(APAS) generated values. JSC's efforts involve descent trajectory design, stability analysis, and flight control system synthesis. Analysis of WB001's static stability indicates instability in 'tuck' (C(sub mu) less than 0: Mach = 0.30, alpha greater than 3.25 deg; Mach = 0.60, alpha greater than 8.04), an unstable dihedral effects (C(sub l(beta)) greater than 0: Mach = 30,alpha less than 12 deg.; Mach = 0.60, alpha less than 10.00 deg.), and, most significantly, an unstable weathercock stability derivative, C(sub n(beta)), at all angles of attack and subsonic Mach numbers. Longitudinal trim solutions for Mach = 0.30 and 0.60 indicate flight path angle possibilities ranging from around 12 (M = 0.30) to slightly over 20 degrees at Mach = 0.60. Trim angles of attack increase from 6.24 at Mach 0.60 and 10,000 feet to 17.7 deg. at Mach 0.30, sea-level. Lateral trim was attempted for a design cross-wind of 25.0 knots. The current vehicle aerodynamic and geometric characteristics will only yield a lateral trim solution at impractical tip-fin deflections (approximately equal to 43 deg.) and bank angles (21 deg.). A study of the lateral control surfaces, tip-fin controllers for WB001, indicate increased surface area would help address these instabilities, particularly the deficiency in C(sub n(beta)), but obviously at the expense of increased vehicle weight. Growth factors of

  15. Orbital decay analysis, reentry predictions and risk assessment for the GOCE satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardini, Carmen; Anselmo, Luciano

    The ESA’s GOCE satellite was launched on 17 March 2009. After mapping the geopotential with unrivalled accuracy and detail for four years from an extremely low circular polar orbit, on 21 October 2013 the low thrust ion propulsion motor used to contrast the atmospheric drag was automatically shut down when the pressure in the xenon propellant tank dropped below a critical threshold. Then the satellite entered in “fine-pointing mode” (FPM), a phase of orbital altitude decay with active fine attitude control carried out by a set of magnetotorquers. According to the pre-launch specifications, the attitude control system was expected to compensate the gravity gradient and the aerodynamic torques up to an average drag force along the orbit of 20 mN. However the system proved itself much more robust than envisaged, remaining operational until reentry, with drag forces exceeding 2000 mN. The uncommon nature of the GOCE reentry campaign, sharing an uncontrolled orbital decay with a finely controlled attitude along the atmospheric drag direction, made the reentry predictions for this satellite an interesting case study, in particular because nobody was able to say a priori if and when the attitude control would have failed, leading to an unrestrained tumbling. Therefore, even though the casualty expectancy for this reentry was slightly above the internationally recognized alert threshold of 1/10,000, i.e. around 1/5000, it presented a number of challenges and opportunities from the prediction and risk evaluation points of view. As in previous cases, ISTI/CNR was in charge of reentry predictions for the Italian civil protection authorities and exchanged information with the other agencies involved in the framework of the international reentry campaign promoted by the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC). Considering the peculiar nature of the GOCE reentry, the definition of reliable uncertainty windows was not easy, in particular taking into account

  16. Orbiter/carrier separation for the ALT free flight no. 1 reference trajectories. Mission planning, mission analysis and software formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    Details of the generation of the separation trajectories are discussed. The analysis culminated in definition of separation trajectories between physical separation and orbiter/carrier vortex clearance. Specifications, assumptions and analytical approach used to generate the separation trajectories are presented. Results of the analytical approach are evaluated. Conclusions and recommendations are summarized. Supporting references are listed.

  17. Space-based solar power conversion and delivery systems study. Volume 2: Engineering analysis of orbital systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Program plans, schedules, and costs are determined for a synchronous orbit-based power generation and relay system. Requirements for the satellite solar power station (SSPS) and the power relay satellite (PRS) are explored. Engineering analysis of large solar arrays, flight mechanics and control, transportation, assembly and maintenance, and microwave transmission are included.

  18. Genetic analysis in the Collaborative Cross breeding population

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Vivek M.; Sokoloff, Greta; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.; Striz, Martin; Branstetter, Lisa; Beckmann, Melissa A.; Spence, Jason S.; Jackson, Barbara L.; Galloway, Leslie D.; Barker, Paul; Wymore, Ann M.; Hunsicker, Patricia R.; Durtschi, David C.; Shaw, Ginger S.; Shinpock, Sarah; Manly, Kenneth F.; Miller, Darla R.; Donohue, Kevin D.; Culiat, Cymbeline T.; Churchill, Gary A.; Lariviere, William R.; Palmer, Abraham A.; O'Hara, Bruce F.; Voy, Brynn H.; Chesler, Elissa J.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic reference populations in model organisms are critical resources for systems genetic analysis of disease related phenotypes. The breeding history of these inbred panels may influence detectable allelic and phenotypic diversity. The existing panel of common inbred strains reflects historical selection biases, and existing recombinant inbred panels have low allelic diversity. All such populations may be subject to consequences of inbreeding depression. The Collaborative Cross (CC) is a mouse reference population with high allelic diversity that is being constructed using a randomized breeding design that systematically outcrosses eight founder strains, followed by inbreeding to obtain new recombinant inbred strains. Five of the eight founders are common laboratory strains, and three are wild-derived. Since its inception, the partially inbred CC has been characterized for physiological, morphological, and behavioral traits. The construction of this population provided a unique opportunity to observe phenotypic variation as new allelic combinations arose through intercrossing and inbreeding to create new stable genetic combinations. Processes including inbreeding depression and its impact on allelic and phenotypic diversity were assessed. Phenotypic variation in the CC breeding population exceeds that of existing mouse genetic reference populations due to both high founder genetic diversity and novel epistatic combinations. However, some focal evidence of allele purging was detected including a suggestive QTL for litter size in a location of changing allele frequency. Despite these inescapable pressures, high diversity and precision for genetic mapping remain. These results demonstrate the potential of the CC population once completed and highlight implications for development of related populations. PMID:21734011

  19. Analysis of stability boundaries of satellite's equilibrium attitude in a circular orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    An asymmetric satellite equipped with control momentum gyroscopes (CMGs) with the center of mass of the system moving uniformly in a circular orbit was considered. The stability of a relative equilibrium attitude of the satellite was analyzed using Lyapunov's direct method. The Lyapunov function V is a positive definite integral of the total energy of the perturbed motion of the system. The asymptotic stability analysis of the stationary motion of the conservative system was based on the Barbashin-Krasovskii theorem on the nonexistence of integer trajectories of the set dot V, which was obtained using the differential equations of motion of the satellite with CMGs. By analyzing the sign definiteness of the quadratic part of V, it was found earlier by V.V. Sazonov that the stability region is described by four strict inequalities. The asymptotic stability at the stability boundary was analyzed by sequentially turning these inequalities into equalities with terms of orders higher than the second taken into account in V. The sign definiteness analysis of the inhomogeneous function V at the stability boundary involved a huge amount of computations related to the multiplication, expansion, substitution, and factorization of symbolic expressions. The computations were performed by applying a computer algebra system on a personal computer.

  20. Development of NASA's Accident Precursor Analysis Process Through Application on the Space Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maggio, Gaspare; Groen, Frank; Hamlin, Teri; Youngblood, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Accident Precursor Analysis (APA) serves as the bridge between existing risk modeling activities, which are often based on historical or generic failure statistics, and system anomalies, which provide crucial information about the failure mechanisms that are actually operative in the system. APA docs more than simply track experience: it systematically evaluates experience, looking for under-appreciated risks that may warrant changes to design or operational practice. This paper presents the pilot application of the NASA APA process to Space Shuttle Orbiter systems. In this effort, the working sessions conducted at Johnson Space Center (JSC) piloted the APA process developed by Information Systems Laboratories (ISL) over the last two years under the auspices of NASA's Office of Safety & Mission Assurance, with the assistance of the Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) Shuttle & Exploration Analysis Branch. This process is built around facilitated working sessions involving diverse system experts. One important aspect of this particular APA process is its focus on understanding the physical mechanism responsible for an operational anomaly, followed by evaluation of the risk significance of the observed anomaly as well as consideration of generalizations of the underlying mechanism to other contexts. Model completeness will probably always be an issue, but this process tries to leverage operating experience to the extent possible in order to address completeness issues before a catastrophe occurs.

  1. Thermal stress analysis of space shuttle orbiter wing skin panel and thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jenkins, Jerald M.

    1987-01-01

    Preflight thermal stress analysis of the space shuttle orbiter wing skin panel and the thermal protection system (TPS) was performed. The heated skin panel analyzed was rectangular in shape and contained a small square cool region at its center. The wing skin immediately outside the cool region was found to be close to the state of elastic instability in the chordwise direction based on the conservative temperature distribution. The wing skin was found to be quite stable in the spanwise direction. The potential wing skin thermal instability was not severe enough to tear apart the strain isolation pad (SIP) layer. Also, the preflight thermal stress analysis was performed on the TPS tile under the most severe temperature gradient during the simulated reentry heating. The tensile thermal stress induced in the TPS tile was found to be much lower than the tensile strength of the TPS material. The thermal bending of the TPS tile was not severe enough to cause tearing of the SIP layer.

  2. Re-Entry Aeroheating Analysis of Tile-Repair Augers for the Shuttle Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Ali R.; Wood, William A.

    2007-01-01

    Computational re-entry aerothermodynamic analysis of the Space Shuttle Orbiter s tile overlay repair (TOR) sub-assembly is presented. Entry aeroheating analyses are conducted to characterize the aerothermodynamic environment of the TOR and to provide necessary inputs for future TOR thermal and structural analyses. The TOR sub-assembly consists of a thin plate and several augers and spacers that serve as the TOR fasteners. For the computational analysis, the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) is used. A 5-species non-equilibrium chemistry model with a finite rate catalytic recombination model and a radiation equilibrium wall condition are used. It is assumed that wall properties are the same as reaction cured glass (RCG) properties with a surface emissivity of epsilon = 0.89. Surface heat transfer rates for the TOR and tile repair augers (TRA) are computed at a STS-107 trajectory point corresponding to Mach 18 free stream conditions. Computational results show that the average heating bump factor (BF), which is a ratio of local heat transfer rate to a design reference point located at the damage site, for the auger head alone is about 1.9. It is also shown that the average BF for the combined auger and washer heads is about 2.0.

  3. A multiblock analysis for shuttle orbiter re-entry heating from Mach 24 to Mach 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Weilmuenster, K. J.; Alter, Stephen J.

    1993-01-01

    A multiblock, laminar heating analysis for the shuttle orbiter at three trajectory points ranging from Mach 24.3 to Mach 12.86 on re-entry is described. The analysis is performed using the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) with both a seven species chemical nonequilibrium model and an equilibrium model. A finite-catalytic-wall model appropriate for shuttle tiles at a radiative equilibrium wall temperature is applied. Computed heating levels are generally in good agreement with the flight data though a few rather large discrepancies remain unexplained. The multiblock relaxation strategy partitions the flowfield into manageable blocks requiring a fraction of the computational resources (time and memory) required by a full domain approach. In hot, the computational cost for a solution at even a single trajectory point would be prohibitively expensive at the given resolution without the multiblock approach. Converged blocks are reassembled to enable a fully coupled converged solution over the entire vehicle, starting from a nearly converged initial condition.

  4. Power Extension Package (PEP) system definition extension, orbital service module systems analysis study. Volume 2: PEP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    User power, duration, and orbit requirements, which were the prime factors influencing power extension package (PEP) design, are discussed. A representative configuration of the PEP concept is presented and the major elements of the system are described as well as the PEP-to-Orbiter and remote manipulator interface provisions.

  5. JSC Orbital Debris Website Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2006-01-01

    required. These data also help in the analysis and interpretation of impact features on returned spacecraft surfaces. 4) Mitigation - Controlling the growth of the orbital debris population is a high priority for NASA, the United States, and the major space-faring nations of the world to preserve near-Earth space for future generations. Mitigation measures can take the form of curtailing or preventing the creation of new debris, designing satellites to withstand impacts by small debris, and implementing operational procedures ranging from utilizing orbital regimes with less debris, adopting specific spacecraft attitudes, and even maneuvering to avoid collisions with debris. Downloadable items include several documents in PDF format and executable software.and 5) Reentry - Because of the increasing number of objects in space, NASA has adopted guidelines and assessment procedures to reduce the number of non-operational spacecraft and spent rocket upper stages orbiting the Earth. One method of postmission disposal is to allow reentry of these spacecraft, either from orbital decay (uncontrolled entry) or with a controlled entry. Orbital decay may be achieved by firing engines to lower the perigee altitude so that atmospheric drag will eventually cause the spacecraft to enter. However, the surviving debris impact footprint cannot be guaranteed to avoid inhabited landmasses. Controlled entry normally occurs by using a larger amount of propellant with a larger propulsion system to drive the spacecraft to enter the atmosphere at a steeper flight path angle. It will then enter at a more precise latitude, longitude, and footprint in a nearly uninhabited impact region, generally located in the ocean.

  6. Shuttle cryogenics supply system. Optimization study. Volume 5 B-4: Programmers manual for space shuttle orbit injection analysis (SOPSA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A computer program for space shuttle orbit injection propulsion system analysis (SOPSA) is described to show the operational characteristics and the computer system requirements. The program was developed as an analytical tool to aid in the preliminary design of propellant feed systems for the space shuttle orbiter main engines. The primary purpose of the program is to evaluate the propellant tank ullage pressure requirements imposed by the need to accelerate propellants rapidly during the engine start sequence. The SOPSA program will generate parametric feed system pressure histories and weight data for a range of nominal feedline sizes.

  7. Conformational stability, spectroscopic and computational studies, hikes' occupied molecular orbital, lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, natural bond orbital analysis and thermodynamic parameters of anticancer drug on nanotube-A review.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, A S; Mashhadban, F; Hoseini-Alfatemi, S M; Sharifi-Rad, J

    2015-12-24

    Today the use of nanotubes (CNTs) is widely spread a versatile vector for drug delivery that can officiate as a platform for transporting a variety of bioactive molecules, such as drugs. In the present study, the interaction between the nanotube and anticancer drugs is investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were using the Gauss view and the complexes were optimized by B3LYP method using B3LYP/6-31G (d, p) and B3LYP/6-311++G (d, p) basis set in the gas phase and water solution at 298.15K. The calculated hikes' occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied (LUMO) energies Show that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. Furthermore, the effects of interactions on the natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) have been used to a deeper investigation into the studied compounds. These factors compete against each other to determine the adsorption behavior of the tube computer simulation is seen to be capable to optimize anticancer drug design. This review article mainly concentrates on the different protocols of loading anticancer drugs onto CNTs as well as how to control the anticancer drug release and cancer treatment.

  8. The Orbital Evolution of 2007 VA85, an Amor-type Asteroid on a Retrograde Orbit.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankiewicz, P.; Włodarczyk, I.

    2010-06-01

    Among the known population of asteroids on retrograde orbits (i > 90°) we found an object classified as an Amor-type asteroid. During the analysis of the first results of astrometry, we found some possible Earth-impact solutions for this asteroid. After taking into account the latest observations, we excluded any significant impact solution. However, this asteroid is the first known example of potentially hazardous object on a retrograde orbit. We also investigated the orbital evolution of 2007 VA85 (1 My in the past), obtaining possible scenarios of its dynamical origin.

  9. MRK 1216 and NGC 1277 - an orbit-based dynamical analysis of compact, high-velocity dispersion galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldırım, Akın; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; van de Ven, Glenn; Husemann, Bernd; Lyubenova, Mariya; Walsh, Jonelle L.; Gebhardt, Karl; Gültekin, Kayhan

    2015-09-01

    We present a dynamical analysis to infer the structural parameters and properties of the two nearby, compact, high-velocity dispersion galaxies MRK 1216 and NGC 1277. Combining deep Hubble Space Telescope imaging, wide-field integral field unit stellar kinematics, and complementary long-slit spectroscopic data out to three effective radii, we construct orbit-based models to constrain their black hole masses, dark matter content and stellar mass-to-light ratios. We obtain a black hole mass of log(M•/M⊙) = 10.1_{-0.2}^{+0.1} for NGC 1277 and an upper limit of log(M•/M⊙) = 10.0 for MRK 1216, within 99.7 per cent (3σ) confidence. The stellar mass-to-light ratios span a range of ΥV = 6.5_{-1.5}^{+1.5} in NGC 1277 and ΥH = 1.8_{-0.8}^{+0.5} in MRK 1216 and are in good agreement with single stellar population models of a single power-law Salpeter initial mass function. Even though our models do not place strong constraints on the dark halo parameters, they suggest that dark matter is a necessary ingredient in MRK 1216, with a dark matter contribution of 22^{+30}_{-20} per cent to the total mass budget within one effective radius. NGC 1277, on the other hand, can be reproduced without the need for a dark halo, and a maximal dark matter fraction of 13 per cent within the same radial extent. In addition, we investigate the orbital structures of both galaxies, which are rotationally supported and consistent with photometric multi-Sérsic decompositions, indicating that these compact objects do not host classical, non-rotating bulges formed during recent (z ≤ 2) dissipative events or through violent relaxation. Finally, both MRK 1216 and NGC 1277 are anisotropic, with a global anisotropy parameter δ of 0.33 and 0.58, respectively. While MRK 1216 follows the trend of fast-rotating, oblate galaxies with a flattened velocity dispersion tensor in the meridional plane of the order of βz ˜ δ, NGC 1277 is highly tangentially anisotropic and seems to belong

  10. Orbital Disturbance Analysis due to the Lunar Gravitational Potential and Deviation Minimization through the Trajectory Control in Closed Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, L. D.; Rocco, E. M.; de Moraes, R. V.

    2013-10-01

    A study evaluating the influence due to the lunar gravitational potential, modeled by spherical harmonics, on the gravity acceleration is accomplished according to the model presented in Konopliv (2001). This model provides the components x, y and z for the gravity acceleration at each moment of time along the artificial satellite orbit and it enables to consider the spherical harmonic degree and order up to100. Through a comparison between the gravity acceleration from a central field and the gravity acceleration provided by Konopliv's model, it is obtained the disturbing velocity increment applied to the vehicle. Then, through the inverse problem, the Keplerian elements of perturbed orbit of the satellite are calculated allowing the orbital motion analysis. Transfer maneuvers and orbital correction of lunar satellites are simulated considering the disturbance due to non-uniform gravitational potential of the Moon, utilizing continuous thrust and trajectory control in closed loop. The simulations are performed using the Spacecraft Trajectory Simulator-STRS, Rocco (2008), which evaluate the behavior of the orbital elements, fuel consumption and thrust applied to the satellite over the time.

  11. Important population viability analysis parameters for giant pandas (Aliuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Gong, Minghao; Song, Yanling; Yang, Zhisong; Lin, Chen

    2012-06-01

    Population viability analysis (PVA) is a tool to evaluate the risk of extinction for endangered species and aid conservation decision-making. The quality of PVA output is dependent on parameters related to population dynamics and life-history; however, it has been difficult to collect this information for the giant panda (Aliuropoda melanoleuca), a rare and endangered mammal native to China, confined to some 30 fragmented habitat patches. Since giant pandas are long-lived, mature late, have lower reproductive rates, and show little sexual dimorphism, obtaining data to perform adequate PVA has been difficult. Here, we develop a parameter sensitivity index by modeling the dynamics of six giant panda populations in the Minshan Mountains, in order to determine the parameters most influential to giant panda populations. Our data shows that the giant panda populations are most sensitive to changes in four female parameters: initial breeding age, reproductive rate, mortality rate between age 0 and 1, and mortality rate of adults. The parameter sensitivity index strongly correlated with initial population size, as smaller populations were more sensitive to changes in these four variables. This model suggests that demographic parameters of females have more influence on the results of PVA, indicating that females may play a more important role in giant panda population dynamics than males. Consequently, reintroduction of female individuals to a small giant panda population should be a high priority for conservation efforts. Our findings form a technical basis for the coming program of giant panda reintroduction, and inform which parameters are crucial to successfully and feasibly monitoring wild giant panda populations.

  12. Vibrational spectral investigation and natural bond orbital analysis of pharmaceutical compound 7-Amino-2,4-dimethylquinolinium formate - DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, D. M.; Amalanathan, M.; Sebastian, S.; Sajan, D.; Hubert Joe, I.; Bena Jothy, V.; Nemec, Ivan

    2013-11-01

    The molecular geometry, the normal mode frequencies and corresponding vibrational assignments, natural bond orbital analysis and the HOMO-LUMO analysis of 7-Amino-2,4-dimethylquinolinium formate in the ground state were performed by B3LYP levels of theory using the 6-31G(d) basis set. The optimised bond lengths and bond angles are in good agreement with the X-ray data. The vibrational spectra of the title compound which is calculated by DFT method, reproduces vibrational wave numbers and intensities with an accuracy which allows reliable vibrational assignments. The possibility of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonding was identified using NBO analysis. Natural bond orbital analysis confirms the presence of intramolecular charge transfer and the hydrogen bonding interaction.

  13. Vibrational spectral investigation and natural bond orbital analysis of pharmaceutical compound 7-Amino-2,4-dimethylquinolinium formate - DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Suresh, D M; Amalanathan, M; Sebastian, S; Sajan, D; Hubert Joe, I; Bena Jothy, V; Nemec, Ivan

    2013-11-01

    The molecular geometry, the normal mode frequencies and corresponding vibrational assignments, natural bond orbital analysis and the HOMO-LUMO analysis of 7-Amino-2,4-dimethylquinolinium formate in the ground state were performed by B3LYP levels of theory using the 6-31G(d) basis set. The optimised bond lengths and bond angles are in good agreement with the X-ray data. The vibrational spectra of the title compound which is calculated by DFT method, reproduces vibrational wave numbers and intensities with an accuracy which allows reliable vibrational assignments. The possibility of N-H⋯O hydrogen bonding was identified using NBO analysis. Natural bond orbital analysis confirms the presence of intramolecular charge transfer and the hydrogen bonding interaction.

  14. On-Orbit Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Star Tracker Warm Pixel Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felikson, Denis; Ekinci, Matthew; Hashmall, Joseph A.; Vess, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the process of identification and analysis of warm pixels in two autonomous star trackers on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission. A brief description of the mission orbit and attitude regimes is discussed and pertinent star tracker hardware specifications are given. Warm pixels are defined and the Quality Index parameter is introduced, which can be explained qualitatively as a manifestation of a possible warm pixel event. A description of the algorithm used to identify warm pixel candidates is given. Finally, analysis of dumps of on-orbit star tracker charge coupled devices (CCD) images is presented and an operational plan going forward is discussed. SDO, launched on February 11, 2010, is operated from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). SDO is in a geosynchronous orbit with a 28.5 inclination. The nominal mission attitude points the spacecraft X-axis at the Sun, with the spacecraft Z-axis roughly aligned with the Solar North Pole. The spacecraft Y-axis completes the triad. In attitude, SDO moves approximately 0.04 per hour, mostly about the spacecraft Z-axis. The SDO star trackers, manufactured by Galileo Avionica, project the images of stars in their 16.4deg x 16.4deg fields-of-view onto CCD detectors consisting of 512 x 512 pixels. The trackers autonomously identify the star patterns and provide an attitude estimate. Each unit is able to track up to 9 stars. Additionally, each tracker calculates a parameter called the Quality Index, which is a measure of the quality of the attitude solution. Each pixel in the CCD measures the intensity of light and a warns pixel is defined as having a measurement consistently and significantly higher than the mean background intensity level. A warns pixel should also have lower intensity than a pixel containing a star image and will not move across the field of view as the attitude changes (as would a dim star image). It should be noted that the maximum error introduced in the star tracker

  15. Comparison and Analysis of BeiDou Satellite Single-system Precise Orbit Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. P.; Hao, J. M.; Deng, K.; Chen, Y. L.

    2016-09-01

    The method of double-difference dynamic precise orbit determination for BeiDou satellites by using both carrier phase and smoothed pseudo-range is presented. The data processing flows of zero-difference and double-difference dynamic precise orbit determination for BeiDou satellites are presented. And the two methods are analyzed. The precision of two methods is compared based on the real data. The results show that in the condition of stations layout and by using the two methods, the three-dimension precision of GEO (Geostationary Earth Orbit Satellite) can reach about 1 m, and those of IGSO (Inclined Geosynchronous Earth Orbit Satellite) and MEO (Medium Earth Orbit Satellite) can be better than 0.5 m. And the radial precision of the three kinds of orbit satellites can be all better than 10 cm. Compared with the zero-difference dynamic method, the orbit precision of GEO is better with the double-difference dynamic method, and that of IGSO is comparable, but that of MEO is worse.

  16. A Multidisciplinary Performance Analysis of a Lifting-Body Single-Stage-to-Orbit Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tartabini, Paul V.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Korte, J. J.; Wurster, Kathryn E.

    2000-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works (LMSW) is currently developing a single-stage-to-orbit reusable launch vehicle called VentureStar(TM) A team at NASA Langley Research Center participated with LMSW in the screening and evaluation of a number of early VentureStar(TM) configurations. The performance analyses that supported these initial studies were conducted to assess the effect of a lifting body shape, linear aerospike engine and metallic thermal protection system (TPS) on the weight and performance of the vehicle. These performance studies were performed in a multidisciplinary fashion that indirectly linked the trajectory optimization with weight estimation and aerothermal analysis tools. This approach was necessary to develop optimized ascent and entry trajectories that met all vehicle design constraints. Significant improvements in ascent performance were achieved when the vehicle flew a lifting trajectory and varied the engine mixture ratio during flight. Also, a considerable reduction in empty weight was possible by adjusting the total oxidizer-to-fuel and liftoff thrust-to-weight ratios. However, the optimal ascent flight profile had to be altered to ensure that the vehicle could be trimmed in pitch using only the flow diverting capability of the aerospike engine. Likewise, the optimal entry trajectory had to be tailored to meet TPS heating rate and transition constraints while satisfying a crossrange requirement.

  17. Parametric analysis of performance and design characteristics for advanced earth-to-orbit shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, E. A., Jr.; Strack, W. C.; Padrutt, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Performance, trajectory, and design characteristics are presented for (1) a single-stage shuttle with a single advanced rocket engine, (2) a single-stage shuttle with an initial parallel chemical engine and advanced engine burn followed by an advanced engine sustainer burn, (3) a single-stage shuttle with an initial chemical engine burn followed by an advanced engine burn, and (4) a two-stage shuttle with a chemical propulsion booster stage and an advanced propulsion upper stage. The ascent trajectory profile includes a brief initial vertical rise; zero-lift flight through the sensible atmosphere; variational steering into an 83-kilometer by 185-kilometer intermediate orbit; and a fixed, 460-meter per second allowance for subsequent maneuvers. Results are given in terms of burnout mass fractions (including structure and payload), trajectory profiles, propellant loadings, and burn times. These results are generated with a trajectory analysis that includes a parametric variation of the specific impulse from 800 to 3000 seconds and the specific engine weight from 0 to 1.0.

  18. Gravity field error analysis: Applications of GPS receivers and gradiometers on low orbiting platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrama, E.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver as a tracking facility and a gradiometer as a separate instrument on a low orbiting platform offers a unique tool to map the Earth's gravitational field with unprecedented accuracies. The former technique allows determination of the spacecraft's ephemeris at any epoch to within 3 to 10 cm, the latter permits the measurement of the tensor of second order derivatives of the gravity field to within 0.01 to 0.0001 Eotvos units depending on the type of gradiometer. First, a variety of error sources in gradiometry where emphasis is placed on the rotational problem pursuing as well a static as a dynamic approach is described. Next, an analytical technique is described and applied for an error analysis of gravity field parameters from gradiometer and GPS observation types. Results are discussed for various configurations proposed on Topex/Poseidon, Gravity Probe-B, and Aristoteles, indicating that GPS only solutions may be computed up to degree and order 35, 55, and 85 respectively, whereas a combined GPS/gradiometer experiment on Aristoteles may result in an acceptable solution up to degree and order 240.

  19. Gravity field error analysis - Applications of Global Positioning System receivers and gradiometers on low orbiting platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrama, Ernst J. O.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver as a tracking facility and a gradiometer as a separate instrument on a low-orbiting platform offers a unique tool to map the earth's gravitational field with unprecedented accuracies. The former technique allows determination of the spacecraft's ephemeris at any epoch to within 3-10 cm, the latter permits the measurement of the tensor of second order derivatives of the gravity field to within 0.01 to 0.0001 Eotvos units depending on the type of gradiometer. First, a variety of error sources in gradiometry where emphasis is placed on the rotational problem pursuing as well a static as a dynamic approach is described. Next, an analytical technique is described and applied for an error analysis of gravity field parameters from gradiometer and GPS observation types. Results are discussed for various configurations proposed on Topex/Poseidon, Gravity Probe-B, and Aristoteles, indicating that GPS only solutions may be computed up to degree and order 35, 55, and 85, respectively, whereas a combined GPS/gradiometer experiment on Aristoteles may result in an acceptable solution up to degree and order 240.

  20. Gravity field error analysis - Applications of Global Positioning System receivers and gradiometers on low orbiting platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrama, Ernst J. O.

    1991-11-01

    The concept of a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver as a tracking facility and a gradiometer as a separate instrument on a low-orbiting platform offers a unique tool to map the earth's gravitational field with unprecedented accuracies. The former technique allows determination of the spacecraft's ephemeris at any epoch to within 3-10 cm, the latter permits the measurement of the tensor of second order derivatives of the gravity field to within 0.01 to 0.0001 Eotvos units depending on the type of gradiometer. First, a variety of error sources in gradiometry where emphasis is placed on the rotational problem pursuing as well a static as a dynamic approach is described. Next, an analytical technique is described and applied for an error analysis of gravity field parameters from gradiometer and GPS observation types. Results are discussed for various configurations proposed on Topex/Poseidon, Gravity Probe-B, and Aristoteles, indicating that GPS only solutions may be computed up to degree and order 35, 55, and 85, respectively, whereas a combined GPS/gradiometer experiment on Aristoteles may result in an acceptable solution up to degree and order 240.

  1. Critical analysis of fragment-orbital DFT schemes for the calculation of electronic coupling values.

    PubMed

    Schober, Christoph; Reuter, Karsten; Oberhofer, Harald

    2016-02-07

    We present a critical analysis of the popular fragment-orbital density-functional theory (FO-DFT) scheme for the calculation of electronic coupling values. We discuss the characteristics of different possible formulations or "flavors" of the scheme which differ by the number of electrons in the calculation of the fragments and the construction of the Hamiltonian. In addition to two previously described variants based on neutral fragments, we present a third version taking a different route to the approximate diabatic state by explicitly considering charged fragments. In applying these FO-DFT flavors to the two molecular test sets HAB7 (electron transfer) and HAB11 (hole transfer), we find that our new scheme gives improved electronic couplings for HAB7 (-6.2% decrease in mean relative signed error) and greatly improved electronic couplings for HAB11 (-15.3% decrease in mean relative signed error). A systematic investigation of the influence of exact exchange on the electronic coupling values shows that the use of hybrid functionals in FO-DFT calculations improves the electronic couplings, giving values close to or even better than more sophisticated constrained DFT calculations. Comparing the accuracy and computational cost of each variant, we devise simple rules to choose the best possible flavor depending on the task. For accuracy, our new scheme with charged-fragment calculations performs best, while numerically more efficient at reasonable accuracy is the variant with neutral fragments.

  2. Orbital forcing on West African monsoon system revealed by KZai 02 pollen record spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalibard, Mathieu; Popescu, Speranta-Maria; Pittet, Bernard; Fernandez, Vincent; Marsset, Tania; Droz, Laurence; Suc, Jean-Pierre

    2013-04-01

    The present-day intertropical climate is forced by yearly fluctuations of insolation reorganizing pressure cells. They control, via the wind system, the variations of the precipitation front known as the InterTropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Its latitudinal oscillation drives a strong seasonality of rainfalls over Africa. However, connections between African climate during Pleistocene and orbital forcing are blurred by high-latitudes and local direct influence of insolation and need further investigations. The study of KZai 02 core pollen content provides a high-resolution record of changes in West African plant ecosystems during the last 160 kyrs. Spectral analyses were performed on pollen signals to identify periodicity in vegetation dynamics related to environmental fluctuations. The large range of frequencies detected testifies for the sensibility of African biotopes to past climate fluctuations. Milankovitch parameters, especially precession, are identified within variations of the ecological groups of KZai 02 pollen record and interpreted in terms of West African monsoon system variability. Asynchrony in the different plant ecosystem fluctuations suggests the out of step influence of several climatic parameters (precipitation, CO2, temperature) involving local insolation and high-latitude influence. Spectral analysis also reveals sub-Milankovitch periods related to (1) Heinrich and Dansgaard/Oeschger glacial pulsation events and (2) East Asian monsoon oscillations controlled by ice sheet pulses testifying for the strong relationship between low- and high-latitude climate changes.

  3. Critical analysis of fragment-orbital DFT schemes for the calculation of electronic coupling values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schober, Christoph; Reuter, Karsten; Oberhofer, Harald

    2016-02-01

    We present a critical analysis of the popular fragment-orbital density-functional theory (FO-DFT) scheme for the calculation of electronic coupling values. We discuss the characteristics of different possible formulations or "flavors" of the scheme which differ by the number of electrons in the calculation of the fragments and the construction of the Hamiltonian. In addition to two previously described variants based on neutral fragments, we present a third version taking a different route to the approximate diabatic state by explicitly considering charged fragments. In applying these FO-DFT flavors to the two molecular test sets HAB7 (electron transfer) and HAB11 (hole transfer), we find that our new scheme gives improved electronic couplings for HAB7 (-6.2% decrease in mean relative signed error) and greatly improved electronic couplings for HAB11 (-15.3% decrease in mean relative signed error). A systematic investigation of the influence of exact exchange on the electronic coupling values shows that the use of hybrid functionals in FO-DFT calculations improves the electronic couplings, giving values close to or even better than more sophisticated constrained DFT calculations. Comparing the accuracy and computational cost of each variant, we devise simple rules to choose the best possible flavor depending on the task. For accuracy, our new scheme with charged-fragment calculations performs best, while numerically more efficient at reasonable accuracy is the variant with neutral fragments.

  4. Critical analysis of fragment-orbital DFT schemes for the calculation of electronic coupling values

    SciTech Connect

    Schober, Christoph; Reuter, Karsten; Oberhofer, Harald

    2016-02-07

    We present a critical analysis of the popular fragment-orbital density-functional theory (FO-DFT) scheme for the calculation of electronic coupling values. We discuss the characteristics of different possible formulations or “flavors” of the scheme which differ by the number of electrons in the calculation of the fragments and the construction of the Hamiltonian. In addition to two previously described variants based on neutral fragments, we present a third version taking a different route to the approximate diabatic state by explicitly considering charged fragments. In applying these FO-DFT flavors to the two molecular test sets HAB7 (electron transfer) and HAB11 (hole transfer), we find that our new scheme gives improved electronic couplings for HAB7 (−6.2% decrease in mean relative signed error) and greatly improved electronic couplings for HAB11 (−15.3% decrease in mean relative signed error). A systematic investigation of the influence of exact exchange on the electronic coupling values shows that the use of hybrid functionals in FO-DFT calculations improves the electronic couplings, giving values close to or even better than more sophisticated constrained DFT calculations. Comparing the accuracy and computational cost of each variant, we devise simple rules to choose the best possible flavor depending on the task. For accuracy, our new scheme with charged-fragment calculations performs best, while numerically more efficient at reasonable accuracy is the variant with neutral fragments.

  5. Photonic orbital angular momentum in starlight. Further analysis of the 2011 Starfire Optical Range Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oesch, Denis W.; Sanchez, Darryl J.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Each attempt by the Atmospheric Simulation and Adaptive-optics Laboratory Testbed (ASALT) research group to detect turbulence-induced photonic orbital angular momentum (POAM) has been successful, spanning laboratory, simulation and field experiments, with the possible exception of the 2011 Starfire Optical Range (SOR) astronomical observations, a search for POAM induced by astronomical sources. Aims: The purposes of this work are to discuss how POAM from astronomical turbulent assemblages of molecules or atoms (TAMA) would appear in observations and then to reanalyze the data from the 2011 SOR observations using a more refined technique as a demonstration of POAM in starlight. Methods: This work uses the method of projections used previously in analysis of terrestrial data. Results: Using the method of projections, the noise floor of the system was reevaluated and is found to be no greater than 1%. Reevaluation of the 2011 SOR observations reveals that a POAM signal is evident in all of the data. Conclusions: POAM signals have been found in every instance of extended propagation through turbulence conducted by the ASALT research group, including the 2011 SOR observations. POAM is an inevitable result of the propagation of optical waves through turbulence. We express our gratitude to the Air Force Office of Scientific Research for their support of this research.

  6. Water Phase Change Heat Exchanger System Level Analysis for Low Lunar Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Moses; Ungar, Eugene; Sheth, Rubik; Hansen, Scott

    2016-01-01

    In low Lunar orbit (LLO) the thermal environment is cyclic - extremely cold in the eclipse and as warm as room temperature near the subsolar point. Phase change material heat exchangers (PCHXs) are the best option for long term missions in these environments. The Orion spacecraft will use a n-pentadecane wax PCHX for its envisioned mission to LLO. Using water as a PCM material is attractive because its higher heat of fusion and greater density result in a lighter, more compact PCHX. To assess the use of a water PCHX for a human spacecraft in a circular LLO, a system level analysis was performed for the Orion spacecraft. Three cases were evaluated: 1) A one-to-one replacement of the wax PCHX on the internal thermal control loop with a water PCHX (including the appropriate control modifications), 2) reducing the radiator return setpoint temperature below Orion's value to enhance PCHX freezing, and 3) placing the water PCM on the external loop. The model showed that the water PCHX could not be used as a drop-in replacement for the wax PCHX. It did not freeze fully during the eclipse owing to its low freezing point. To obtain equivalent performance, 40% more radiator area than the Orion baseline was required. The study shows that, although water PCHXs are attractive at a component level, system level effects mean that they are not the best choice for LLO.

  7. An analysis of return flux from the Space Shuttle Orbiter RCS engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, H. K. F.

    1984-01-01

    The return flux from the Space Shuttle Orbiter reaction control system (RCS) engines to sensors in the open payload bay has been analyzed on the basis of Shuttle/Payload Contamination Evaluation (SPACE II) model predictions and orbital flight measurements. Model data are presented showing the variations of molecular return flux values with Orbiter orientation and instrument direction. The effects of multiple molecular collisions within RCS engine plumes and in their vicinity are discussed. These collisions significantly influence the amount of plume molecules returning to payload instruments and, therefore, the amount of contaminants received.

  8. Microsatellite and Wolbachia analysis in Rhagoletis cerasi natural populations: population structuring and multiple infections

    PubMed Central

    Augustinos, Antonios A; Asimakopoulou, Anastasia K; Moraiti, Cleopatra A; Mavragani-Tsipidou, Penelope; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos T; Bourtzis, Kostas

    2014-01-01

    Rhagoletis cerasi (Diptera: Tephritidae) is a major pest of sweet and sour cherries in Europe and parts of Asia. Despite its economic significance, there is a lack of studies on the genetic structure of R. cerasi populations. Elucidating the genetic structure of insects of economic importance is crucial for developing phenological-predictive models and environmental friendly control methods. All natural populations of R. cerasi have been found to harbor the endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis, which widely affects multiple biological traits contributing to the evolution of its hosts, and has been suggested as a tool for the biological control of insect pests and disease vectors. In the current study, the analysis of 18 R. cerasi populations collected in Greece, Germany, and Russia using 13 microsatellite markers revealed structuring of R. cerasi natural populations, even at close geographic range. We also analyzed the Wolbachia infection status of these populations using 16S rRNA-, MLST- and wsp-based approaches. All 244 individuals screened were positive for Wolbachia. Our results suggest the fixation of the wCer1 strain in Greece while wCer2, wCer4, wCer5, and probably other uncharacterized strains were also detected in multiply infected individuals. The role of Wolbachia and its potential extended phenotypes needs a thorough investigation in R. cerasi. Our data suggest an involvement of this symbiont in the observed restriction in the gene flow in addition to a number of different ecological factors. PMID:24963388

  9. Robust Extraction and Multi-Technique Analysis of Micrometeoroids Captured in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, A. J.; Graham, G. A.; Bench, G.; Brennan, S.; Luening, K.; Pianetta, P.; Keller, L. P.; Flynn, G. J.; Snead, C.; Dominquez, G.

    2003-01-01

    The use of low-density silica aerogel as the primary capture cell technology for the NASA Discovery mission Stardust to Comet Wild-2 [1] is a strong motivation for researchers within the Meteoritics community to develop techniques to handle this material. The unique properties of silica aerogel allow dust particles to be captured at hypervelocity speeds and to remain partially intact. The same unique properties present difficulties in the preparation of particles for analysis. Using tools borrowed from microbiologists, we have developed techniques for robustly extracting captured hypervelocity dust particles and their residues from aerogel collectors[2-3]. It is important not only to refine these extraction techniques but also to develop protocols for analyzing the captured particles. Since Stardust does not return material to Earth until 2006, researchers must either analyze particles that are impacted in the laboratory using light-gasgun facilities [e.g. 41 or examine aerogel collectors that have been exposed in low-Earth orbit (LEO) [5]. While there are certainly benefits in laboratory shots, i.e. accelerating known compositions of projectiles into aerogel, the LEO capture particles offer the opportunity to investigate real particles captured under real conditions. The aerogel collectors used in this research are part of the NASA Orbital Debris Collection Experiment that was exposed on the MIR Space Station for 18 months [5]. We have developed the capability at the UCB Space Sciences Laboratory to extract tiny volumes of aerogel that completely contain each impact event, and to mount them on micromachined fixtures so that they can be analyzed with no interfering support (Fig.1). These aerogel keystones simultaneously bring the terminal particle and the particle track to within 10 m (15 g cm- ) of the nearest aerogel surface. The extracted aerogel wedges containing both the impact tracks and the captured particles have been characterized using the synchrotron

  10. A Collaborative Analysis Tool for Thermal Protection Systems for Single Stage to Orbit Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Reginald A.; Stanley, Thomas Troy

    1999-01-01

    Presented is a design tool and process that connects several disciplines which are needed in the complex and integrated design of high performance reusable single stage to orbit (SSTO) vehicles. Every system is linked to every other system and in the case of SSTO vehicles with air breathing propulsion, which is currently being studied by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); the thermal protection system (TPS) is linked directly to almost every major system. The propulsion system pushes the vehicle to velocities on the order of 15 times the speed of sound in the atmosphere before pulling up to go to orbit which results high temperatures on the external surfaces of the vehicle. Thermal protection systems to maintain the structural integrity of the vehicle must be able to mitigate the heat transfer to the structure and be lightweight. Herein lies the interdependency, in that as the vehicle's speed increases, the TPS requirements are increased. And as TPS masses increase the effect on the propulsion system and all other systems is compounded. To adequately determine insulation masses for a vehicle such as the one described above, the aeroheating loads must be calculated and the TPS thicknesses must be calculated for the entire vehicle. To accomplish this an ascent or reentry trajectory is obtained using the computer code Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST). The trajectory is then used to calculate the convective heat rates on several locations on the vehicles using the Miniature Version of the JA70 Aerodynamic Heating Computer Program (MINIVER). Once the heat rates are defined for each body point on the vehicle, then insulation thicknesses that are required to maintain the vehicle within structural limits are calculated using Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (SINDA) models. If the TPS masses are too heavy for the performance of the vehicle the process may be repeated altering the trajectory or some other input to

  11. Mission Analysis Program for Solar Electric Propulsion (MAPSEP). Volume 1: Analytical manual for earth orbital MAPSEP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An introduction to the MAPSEP organization and a detailed analytical description of all models and algorithms are given. These include trajectory and error covariance propagation methods, orbit determination processes, thrust modeling, and trajectory correction (guidance) schemes. Earth orbital MAPSEP contains the capability of analyzing almost any currently projected low thrust mission from low earth orbit to super synchronous altitudes. Furthermore, MAPSEP is sufficiently flexible to incorporate extended dynamic models, alternate mission strategies, and almost any other system requirement imposed by the user. As in the interplanetary version, earth orbital MAPSEP represents a trade-off between precision modeling and computational speed consistent with defining necessary system requirements. It can be used in feasibility studies as well as in flight operational support. Pertinent operational constraints are available both implicitly and explicitly. However, the reader should be warned that because of program complexity, MAPSEP is only as good as the user and will quickly succumb to faulty user inputs.

  12. An orbital radar mapper of Venus in the 1980's - Mission design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asnin, S. K.

    1973-01-01

    A reasonable approach to the examination of Venus topography, obscured for photographic imaging, is available in the application of airborne radar mapping systems to an orbiter mission about the planet. Extrapolating the improving capabilities of earth-based radar study of Venus into the 1980's suggests that only a non-uniform, poorly resolved surface profile will be possible relative to the potential for 100% coverage at 100 meter resolution with an orbital radar. The intent of this paper is to define mission opportunities favorable for a Venus orbital mapper during the 1980's, to examine orbit design problem associated with mapping radar systems, to establish what flexibility exists for an adaptive mapping strategy, to contribute to the sizing of particular spacecraft systems, to suggest a reference mission design and demonstrate mission feasibility.

  13. Launch window analysis of satellites in high eccentricity or large circular orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renard, M. L.; Bhate, S. K.; Sridharan, R.

    1973-01-01

    Numerical methods and computer programs for studying the stability and evolution of orbits of large eccentricity are presented. Methods for determining launch windows and target dates are developed. Mathematical models are prepared to analyze the characteristics of specific missions.

  14. An analysis of the effect of aeroassist maneuvers on orbital transfer vehicle performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Gregory O.; Suit, William T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper summarizes a Langley Research Summer Scholars (LARSS) research project (Summer 1986) dealing with the topic of the effectiveness of aeroassist maneuvers to accomplish a change in the orbital inclination of an Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV). This task was subject to OTV design constraints, chief of which were the axial acceleration and the aerodynamic heating rate limits of the OTV. The use of vehicle thrust to replace lost kinetic energy and, thereby, to increase the maximum possible change in orbital inclination was investigated. A relation between time in the hover orbit and payload to LEO was established. The amount of plane change possible during this type of maneuver was checked for several runs and a possible thrusting procedure to increase the plane change and still get to LEO was suggested. Finally, the sensitivity of various target parameters to controllable independent variables was established, trades between the amount of control allowed, and payload to LEO suggested.

  15. Small-Body Extensions for the Satellite Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnright, Robert; Stodden, David; Coggi, John

    2008-01-01

    An extension to the SOAP software allows users to work with tri-axial ellipsoid-based representations of planetary bodies, primarily for working with small, natural satellites, asteroids, and comets. SOAP is a widely used tool for the visualization and analysis of space missions. The small body extension provides the same visualization and analysis constructs for use with small bodies. These constructs allow the user to characterize satellite path and instrument cover information for small bodies in both 3D display and numerical output formats. Tri-axial ellipsoids are geometric shapes the diameters of which are different in each of three principal x, y, and z dimensions. This construct provides a better approximation than using spheres or oblate spheroids (ellipsoids comprising two common equatorial diameters as a distinct polar diameter). However, the tri-axial ellipsoid is considerably more difficult to work with from a modeling perspective. In addition, the SOAP small-body extensions allow the user to actually employ a plate model for highly irregular surfaces. Both tri-axial ellipsoids and plate models can be assigned to coordinate frames, thus allowing for the modeling of arbitrary changes to body orientation. A variety of features have been extended to support tri-axial ellipsoids, including the computation and display of the spacecraft sub-orbital point, ground trace, instrument footprints, and swathes. Displays of 3D instrument volumes can be shown interacting with the ellipsoids. Longitude/latitude grids, contour plots, and texture maps can be displayed on the ellipsoids using a variety of projections. The distance along an arbitrary line of sight can be computed between the spacecraft and the ellipsoid, and the coordinates of that intersection can be plotted as a function of time. The small-body extension supports the same visual and analytical constructs that are supported for spheres and oblate spheroids in SOAP making the implementation of the more

  16. Vector correlation analysis for inelastic and reactive collisions between partners possessing spin and orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Balint-Kurti, Gabriel G; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S

    2009-12-31

    A general reactive collision of the type A + B --> C + D is considered where both the collision partners (A and B) or the products (C and D) may possess internal, i.e., spin, orbital or rotational, angular momenta. Compact expressions are derived using a rigorous quantum mechanical analysis for the angular momentum anisotropy of either of the products (C or D) arising from an initially polarized distribution of the reactant angular momentum. The angular momentum distribution of the product is expressed in terms of canonical spherical tensors multiplied by anisotropy-transforming coefficients c(K(i)q(k))(K)(K(r),L). These coefficients act as transformation coefficients between the angular momentum anisotropy of the reactants and that of the product. They are independent of scattering angle but depend on the details of the scattering dynamics. The relationship between the coefficients c(K(i)q(k))(K)(K(r),L) and the body-fixed scattering S matrix is given and the methodology for the quantum mechanical calculation of the anisotropy-transforming coefficients is clearly laid out. The anisotropy-transforming coefficients are amenable to direct experimental measurement in a similar manner to vector correlation and alignment parameters in photodissociation processes. A key aspect of the theory is the use of projections of both reactant and product angular momenta onto the product recoil vector direction. An important new conservation rule is revealed through the analysis, namely that if the state multipole for reactant angular momentum distribution has a projection q(k) onto the product recoil vector the state multipoles for the product angular momentum distribution all have this same projection. Expressions are also presented for the distribution of the product angular momentum when its components are evaluated relative to the space-fixed Z-axis. Notes with detailed derivations of all the formulas are available as Supporting Information.

  17. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the electrical power distribution and control/electrical power generation subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patton, Jeff A.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Electrical Power Distribution and Control (EPD and C)/Electrical Power Generation (EPG) hardware. The EPD and C/EPG hardware is required for performing critical functions of cryogenic reactant storage, electrical power generation and product water distribution in the Orbiter. Specifically, the EPD and C/EPG hardware consists of the following components: Power Section Assembly (PSA); Reactant Control Subsystem (RCS); Thermal Control Subsystem (TCS); Water Removal Subsystem (WRS); and Power Reactant Storage and Distribution System (PRSDS). The IOA analysis process utilized available EPD and C/EPG hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode.

  18. Multipole error analysis using local 3-bump orbit data in Fermilab Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, M.J.; Xiao, M.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The magnetic harmonic errors of the Fermilab Recycler ring were examined using circulating beam data taken with closed local orbit bumps. Data was first parsed into harmonic orbits of first, second, and third order. Each of which was analyzed for sources of magnetic errors of corresponding order. This study was made possible only with the incredible resolution of a new BPM system that was commissioned after June of 2003.

  19. An analysis of the orbital Evolution of a solar sail around Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhena de Moraes, Rodolpho; Prado, Antonio; Carvalho, Jean Paulo; Treasaco, Eva

    2016-07-01

    Solar sails are a new concept of spacecraft propulsion that uses solar radiation pressure to generate acceleration: this way the sail experiences a small but unlimited and continuous acceleration. This work presents a method for finding initial conditions for frozen orbits for a solar sail around Mercury Frozen orbits are those whose orbital elements remain constant on average. Thus, at a given latitude, the satellite always passes at the same altitude. The orbital dynamics of the solar sail is governed by the potential attraction of the main body and the Sun. Besides the J2, J3 and C22 of Mercury gravity field, the dynamical model also includes the eccentricity and inclination of the orbit of the third body (Sun) and the solar acceleration pressure. In order to remove short-period terms of the dynamical system, a double averaging technique is applied to the disturbig potential. This algorithm is a two-fold process which firstly averages over the period of the satellite and secondly averages with respect to the period of the third body. The double-averaged potential is introduced in the Lagrange Planetary equations. Thus, frozen orbits are characterized by a surface depending on three variables: the orbital semi-major axis, eccentricity and inclination. These surfaces determine orbits ranging in altitude from 300 to 1000 km, which include the altitude values considered in future scientific missions around Mercury such as BepiColombo. Finally, this work delves into the influence on the dynamics of the spacecraft for different values of the sail area-to-mass ratio, which is a parameter related to the efficiency of the solar sail Sponsored by CNPq - Brazil. The author is grateful to CNPq- Brazil for contract 306953/2014-5.

  20. Effect of perturbations on debris-to-debris orbital transfers: A quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kartik; Hekma, Enne; Agrawal, Abhishek; Topputo, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the applicability of the Lambert solver (Izzo, 2014) for preliminary design of Multi-Target Active Debris Removal missions. Firstly, we computed ≈25 million debris-to-debris transfers using the Lambert solver for selected sets of debris objects in Low Earth Orbit, Geostationary Transfer Orbit, and Geosynchronous Orbit. Subsequently, we propagated the departure states of the Lambert transfers below selected ΔV cut-offs using the SGP4/SDP4 propagator (Vallado et al., 2006). We recorded the arrival position and velocity error vectors incurred by neglecting perturbations and analyzed the results for each orbital regime. Our results indicate that perturbations can play a significant role in determining the feasibility of debris-to-debris transfers. By using the Lambert solver and neglecting perturbations, the errors in the arrival position and velocity for individual legs can be large. The largest errors were obtained for transfers between debris objects in Sun-Synchronous Orbit (O (100) km error in magnitude of position vector and O (0.1) km/s error in magnitude of velocity vector). Hence, solely employing the Lambert solver to rank transfer legs could lead to incorrect choices for sequencing of multi-target trajectories. This is particularly relevant for transfers in Low Earth Orbit, where the effects of perturbations are the strongest.

  1. Genetic analysis in the Collaborative Cross breeding population

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Vivek; Sokoloff, Greta; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl; Striz, Martin; Branstetter, Lisa R; Beckmann, Melissa; Spence, Jason S; Jackson, Barbara L; Galloway, Leslie D; Barker, Gene; Wymore, Ann M; Hunsicker, Patricia R; Durtschi, David W; Shaw, Ginger S; Shinpock, Sarah G; Manly, Kenneth F; Miller, Darla R; Donahue, Kevin; Culiat, Cymbeline T; Churchill, Gary A; Lariviere, William R; Palmer, Abraham; O'Hara, Bruce; Voy, Brynn H; Chesler, Elissa J

    2011-01-01

    Genetic reference populations in model organisms are critical resources for systems genetic analysis of disease related phenotypes. The breeding history of these inbred panels may influence detectable allelic and phenotypic diversity. The existing panel of common inbred strains reflects historical selection biases, and existing recombinant inbred panels have low allelic diversity. All such populations may be subject to consequences of inbreeding depression. The Collaborative Cross (CC) is a mouse reference population with high allelic diversity that is being constructed using a randomized breeding design that systematically outcrosses eight founder strains, followed by inbreeding to obtain new recombinant inbred strains. Five of the eight founders are common laboratory strains, and three are wild-derived. Since its inception, the partially inbred CC has been characterized for physiological, morphological, and behavioral traits. The construction of this population provided a unique opportunity to observe phenotypic variation as new allelic combinations arose through intercrossing and inbreeding to create new stable genetic combinations. Processes including inbreeding depression and its impact on allelic and phenotypic diversity were assessed. Phenotypic variation in the CC breeding population exceeds that of existing mouse genetic reference populations due to both high founder genetic diversity and novel epistatic combinations. However, some focal evidence of allele purging was detected including a suggestive QTL for litter size in a location of changing allele frequency. Despite these inescapable pressures, high diversity and precision for genetic mapping remain. These results demonstrate the potential of the CC population once completed and highlight implications for development of related populations. Supplementary material consists of Supplementary Table 1 Phenotypic means, variances, ranges and heritabilities for all traits and generations, Supplementary Table

  2. Methods for the survey and genetic analysis of populations

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Matthew

    2003-09-02

    The present invention relates to methods for performing surveys of the genetic diversity of a population. The invention also relates to methods for performing genetic analyses of a population. The invention further relates to methods for the creation of databases comprising the survey information and the databases created by these methods. The invention also relates to methods for analyzing the information to correlate the presence of nucleic acid markers with desired parameters in a sample. These methods have application in the fields of geochemical exploration, agriculture, bioremediation, environmental analysis, clinical microbiology, forensic science and medicine.

  3. Seawifs Technical Report Series. Volume 2: Analysis of Orbit Selection for Seawifs: Ascending Versus Descending Node

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Gregg, Watson W.

    1992-01-01

    Due to range safety considerations, the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) ocean color instrument may be required to be launched into a near-noon descending node, as opposed to the ascending node used by the predecessor sensor, the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS). The relative importance of ascending versus descending near-noon orbits was assessed here to determine if descending node will meet the scientific requirements of SeaWiFS. Analyses focused on ground coverage, local times of coverage, solar and viewing geometries (zenith and azimuth angles), and sun glint. Differences were found in the areas covered by individual orbits, but were not important when taken over a 16 day repeat time. Local time of coverage was also different: for ascending node orbits the Northern Hemisphere was observed in the morning and the Southern Hemisphere in the afternoon, while for descending node orbits the Northern Hemisphere was observed in the afternoon and the Southern in the morning. There were substantial differences in solar azimuth and spacecraft azimuth angles both at equinox and at the Northern Hemisphere summer solstice. Negligible differences in solar and spacecraft zenith angles, relative azimuth angles, and sun glint were obtained at the equinox. However, large differences were found in solar zenith angles, relative azimuths, and sun glint for the solstice. These differences appeared to compensate across the scan, however, an increase in sun glint in descending node over that in ascending node on the western part of the scan was compensated by a decrease on the eastern part of the scan. Thus, no advantage or disadvantage could be conferred upon either ascending node or descending node for noon orbits. Analyses were also performed for ascending and descending node orbits that deviated from a noon equator crossing time. For ascending node, afternoon orbits produced the lowest mean solar zenith angles in the Northern Hemisphere, and morning orbits produced

  4. A probabilistic analysis of the implications of instrument failures on ESA's Swarm mission for its individual satellite orbit deployments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    On launch, one of Swarm's absolute scalar magnetometers (ASMs) failed to function, leaving an asymmetrical arrangement of redundant spares on different spacecrafts. A decision was required concerning the deployment of individual satellites into the low-orbit pair or the higher "lonely" orbit. I analyse the probabilities for successful operation of two of the science components of the Swarm mission in terms of a classical probabilistic failure analysis, with a view to concluding a favourable assignment for the satellite with the single working ASM. I concentrate on the following two science aspects: the east-west gradiometer aspect of the lower pair of satellites and the constellation aspect, which requires a working ASM in each of the two orbital planes. I use the so-called "expert solicitation" probabilities for instrument failure solicited from Mission Advisory Group (MAG) members. My conclusion from the analysis is that it is better to have redundancy of ASMs in the lonely satellite orbit. Although the opposite scenario, having redundancy (and thus four ASMs) in the lower orbit, increases the chance of a working gradiometer late in the mission; it does so at the expense of a likely constellation. Although the results are presented based on actual MAG members' probabilities, the results are rather generic, excepting the case when the probability of individual ASM failure is very small; in this case, any arrangement will ensure a successful mission since there is essentially no failure expected at all. Since the very design of the lower pair is to enable common mode rejection of external signals, it is likely that its work can be successfully achieved during the first 5 years of the mission.

  5. De-Orbiting the International Space Station ISS: Safety Considerations and Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremaschi, F.; Huertas, I.; Ortega, G.; Sgobba, T.; Laurel, C.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has proposed to its partners the de-orbiting of the International Space Station (ISS) around the year 2020. Technical plans on how to do it have been presented as long as the year 1999. The current situation of ISS claims for a possible extension of the date of 2020 but to all International Partners is clear that the de-orbiting operations need to be performed with safety as the main and central paradigm. The proposed paper evaluates several scenarios and options for the de- orbiting of ISS. The paper proposes trajectory design considerations, de- orbit strategies and the calculation of casualties and fatalities for some of those. The paper proposes as well some fragment disposal regions using the classic approach of disposing ISS on ground and compares it with the feasibility and cost with the approach of end of life vehicle recycling culture of the European Union. The paper computes and calculates the reliability of all options and establishes a trade-off between all of them. The paper provides a detailed mathematical model that is able to calculate casualty and fatality rates. The mathematical model has been programmed in the ASTOS software tool and the corresponding casualty and fatality curves have been computed for some considered options. The following options are studied, discussed, and traded- off: simple one-go complete disposal of ISS with controlled de-orbiting using a service module, complex partial disposal of ISS elements with controlled de-orbiting using a modified version of service module, same variation using a set of auxiliary vehicles, design of a new vehicle to dispose the ISS and finally the uncontrolled re-entry of the entire ISS. Further, the paper proposes some de-orbiting requirements, and mission design considerations for a successful end-of-mission closure.

  6. Molecular population genetic analysis of emerged bacterial pathogens: selected insights.

    PubMed Central

    Musser, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    Research in bacterial population genetics has increased in the last 10 years. Population genetic theory and tools and related strategies have been used to investigate bacterial pathogens that have contributed to recent episodes of temporal variation in disease frequency and severity. A common theme demonstrated by these analyses is that distinct bacterial clones are responsible for disease outbreaks and increases in infection frequency. Many of these clones are characterized by unique combinations of virulence genes or alleles of virulence genes. Because substantial interclonal variance exists in relative virulence, molecular population genetic studies have led to the concept that the unit of bacterial pathogenicity is the clone or cell line. Continued new insights into host parasite interactions at the molecular level will be achieved by combining clonal analysis of bacterial pathogens with large-scale comparative sequencing of virulence genes. PMID:8903193

  7. Collection of pedigree data for genetic analysis in isolate populations.

    PubMed

    Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Blangero, John

    2006-02-01

    Pedigree data are useful for a wealth of research purposes in human population biology and genetics. The collection of extended pedigrees represents the most powerful sampling design for quantitative genetic and linkage studies of both normal and disease-related quantitative traits. In this paper we outline an approach for collecting pedigree data in stable isolate populations. As an example, the pedigree for the Jirel population, which was obtained using the methods presented, is described. The Jirel pedigree contains 2,000 study participants and more than 62,000 pairwise relationships that are informative for genetic analysis. Once such pedigrees are genetically characterized by a genome scan for a given trait, they become an invaluable resource for future genetic studies of any quantitative trait.

  8. Characterization of population exposure to organochlorines: a cluster analysis application.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Raphael Mendonça; Asmus, Carmen Ildes Rodrigues Fróes; Burdorf, Alex

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to show the results from a cluster analysis application in the characterization of population exposure to organochlorines through variables related to time and exposure dose. Characteristics of 354 subjects in a population exposed to organochlorine pesticides residues related to time and exposure dose were subjected to cluster analysis to separate them into subgroups. We performed hierarchical cluster analysis. To evaluate the classification accuracy, compared to intra-group and inter-group variability by ANOVA for each dimension. The aggregation strategy was accomplished by the method of Ward. It was, for the creation of clusters, variables associated with exposure and routes of contamination. The information on the estimated intake doses of compound were used to weight the values of exposure time at each of the routes, so as to obtain values proxy exposure intensity. The results showed three clusters: cluster 1 (n = 45), characteristics of greatest exposure, the cluster 2 (n = 103), intermediate exposure, and cluster 3 (n = 206), less exposure. The bivariate analyzes performed with groups that are groups showed a statistically significant difference. This study demonstrated the applicability of cluster analysis to categorize populations exposed to organochlorines and also points to the relevance of typological studies that may contribute to a better classification of subjects exposed to chemical agents, which is typical of environmental epidemiology studies to a wider understanding of etiological, preventive and therapeutic contamination.

  9. Genetic profiling by single-nucleotide polymorphism-based array analysis defines three distinct subtypes of orbital meningioma.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheng-Ying; Mosier, Stacy; Safneck, Janice; Salomao, Diva R; Miller, Neil R; Eberhart, Charles G; Gocke, Christopher D; Batista, Denise A S; Rodriguez, Fausto J

    2015-03-01

    Orbital meningiomas can be classified as primary optic nerve sheath (ON) meningiomas, primary intraorbital ectopic (Ob) meningiomas and spheno-orbital (Sph-Ob) meningiomas based on anatomic site. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based array analysis with the Illumina 300K platform was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from 19 orbital meningiomas (5 ON, 4 Ob and 10 Sph-Ob meningiomas). Tumors were World Health Organization (WHO) grade I except for two grade II meningiomas, and one was NF2-associated. We found genomic alterations in 68% (13 of 19) of orbital meningiomas. Sph-Ob tumors frequently exhibited monosomy 22/22q loss (70%; 7/10) and deletion of chromosome 1p, 6q and 19p (50% each; 5/10). Among genetic alterations, loss of chromosome 1p and 6q were more frequent in clinically progressive tumors. Chromosome 22q loss also was detected in the majority of Ob meningiomas (75%; 3/4) but was infrequent in ON meningiomas (20%; 1/5). In general, Ob tumors had fewer chromosome alterations than Sph-Ob and ON tumors. Unlike Sph-Ob meningiomas, most of the Ob and ON meningiomas did not progress even after incomplete excision, although follow-up was limited in some cases. Our study suggests that ON, Ob and Sph-Ob meningiomas are three molecularly distinct entities. Our results also suggest that molecular subclassification may have prognostic implications.

  10. Analysis of the Accuracy of Ballistic Descent from a Circular Circumterrestrial Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikharulidze, Yu. G.; Korchagin, A. N.

    2002-01-01

    The problem of the transportation of the results of experiments and observations to Earth every so often appears in space research. Its simplest and low-cost solution is the employment of a small ballistic reentry spacecraft. Such a spacecraft has no system of control of the descent trajectory in the atmosphere. This can result in a large spread of landing points, which make it difficult to search for the spacecraft and very often a safe landing. In this work, a choice of a compromise scheme of the flight is considered, which includes the optimum braking maneuver, adequate conditions of the entry into the atmosphere with limited heating and overload, and also the possibility of landing within the limits of a circle with a radius of 12.5 km. The following disturbing factors were taken into account in the analysis of the accuracy of landing: the errors of the braking impulse execution, the variations of the atmosphere density and the wind, the error of the specification of the ballistic coefficient of the reentry spacecraft, and a displacement of its center of mass from the symmetry axis. It is demonstrated that the optimum maneuver assures the maximum absolute value of the reentry angle and the insensitivity of the trajectory of descent with respect to small errors of orientation of the braking engine in the plane of the orbit. It is also demonstrated that the possible error of the landing point due to the error of specification of the ballistic coefficient does not depend (in the linear approximation) upon its value and depends only upon the reentry angle and the accuracy of specification of this coefficient. A guided parachute with an aerodynamic efficiency of about two should be used at the last leg of the reentry trajectory. This will allow one to land in a prescribed range and to produce adequate conditions for the interception of the reentry spacecraft by a helicopter in order to prevent a rough landing.

  11. Vibrational spectral investigation and Natural Bond Orbital analysis of anti-rheumatoid drug ethyl 4-nitrophenylacetate--DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Suresh, D M; Amalanathan, M; Sebastian, S; Sajan, D; Hubert Joe, I; Bena Jothy, V

    2012-12-01

    Vibrational analysis of ethyl 4-nitrophenylacetate (ENPA) molecule was carried out using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopic techniques. The equilibrium geometry, harmonic vibrational wave numbers, various bonding features have been computed using density functional theory. The calculated molecular geometry parameters have been compared with XRD data. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out by computing Potential Energy Distribution (PED). Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions and charge delocalization has been analyzed using Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. The results show that the charge in the electron density (ED) in the σ(*) and π(*) antibonding orbitals and second order delocalization energies (E(2)) confirm the occurrence of ICT (intramolecular charge transfer) within the molecule. The simulated spectra satisfactorily coincide with the experimental spectra.

  12. Redesign and treatment planning orbital floor reconstruction using computer analysis anatomical landmarks.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Mehmet Asim; Govsa, Figen; Kazak, Zuhal; Erdogmus, Senem; Celik, Servet

    2016-08-01

    Orbital floor fractures are one of the most commonly encountered maxillofacial fractures due to their weak anatomical structure. Restoration of the orbital floor following a traumatic injury or a tumor surgery is often difficult due to inadequate visibility and lack of knowledge on its anatomical details. The aim of this study is to investigate the locations of the inferior orbital fissure (IOF), infraorbital groove (G), and infraorbital foramen (Fo) and their relationship with the orbital floor using a software. Measurements from the inferior orbital rim (IOR) using the Fo, the IOF, G, and the optic canal (OC) were calculated in 268 orbits as reference points. The surgical landmarks from the G and the OC, the G and the IOF, the G and the intersection point were measured as 31.6 ± 6, 12.9 ± 4, and 12 ± 5 mm, respectively. The mean distances between the G and the IOR, the Fo and the IOF, and the Fo and the OC were found as 8.3 ± 2.1, 28.7 ± 3.5, and 53.6 ± 5.9 mm, respectively. The mean angles were calculated as OC-IOF-G 68.1° ± 16.4°; intersection-G-IOF as 61.4° ± 15.8°; IOF-OC-G as 19° ± 5.5°; OC-G-intersection as 31.5° ± 11.9°, G-intersection-OC as 129.5°, IOF-intersection-G as 50.5°. Furthermore, variable bony changes on the orbital floor which may lead to the differences at intersection point of the G and Fo were determined. In 28 specimens (20.9 %), unilateral accessory Fo (AcFo) was present. In 27 specimens, AcFo was situated supermaedially (96.4 %) on the main aperture. In one specimen, two intraorbital canals and Fo emerged from different points and coursed into different apertures. The measured mean distances of the AcFo-IOR and the AcFo-Fo were as 7 ± 2 and 7.3 ± 3.2 mm, respectively. The primary principle in the oculoplastic treatment of orbital floor reconstructions must be repositioning the herniated orbital aperture by maintaining the infraorbital artery and the nerve in the orbital floor. The IOF and

  13. A theoretical analysis of optimum consumer population and its control.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Z; Mao, Z; Wang, H

    1994-01-01

    consumption structure elasticity. This model was used in the correlation analysis of the coordinated healthy development of optimum consumer population and the economy.

  14. Kepler's Orbit

    NASA Video Gallery

    Kepler does not orbit the Earth, rather it orbits the Sun in concert with the Earth, slowly drifting away from Earth. Every 61 Earth years, Kepler and Earth will pass by each other. Throughout the ...

  15. Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Pat; Landahl, John

    This pamphlet has been prepared in response to a new problem, a rapidly increasing population, and a new need, population education. It is designed to help teachers provide their students with some basic population concepts with stress placed on the elements of decision making. In the first section of the pamphlet, some of the basic concepts of…

  16. [Population].

    PubMed

    1979-01-01

    Data on the population of Venezuela between 1975 and 1977 are presented in descriptive tables and graphs. Information is included on the employed population according to category, sex, and type of economic activity, and by sex, age, and area on the employment rate and the total, the economically active, and the unemployed population.

  17. Space shuttle engineering and operations support: Dispersion analysis for the first orbital flight test (OFT-1) mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, L. S.

    1977-01-01

    A dispersion analysis considering 3-sigma uncertainties (or perturbations) in platform, vehicle, and environmental parameters was performed for the first orbital flight test (OFT-1) mission. The dispersion analysis is based on the nominal trajectory for the OFT-1 reference flight profile. The analysis was performed to determine state vector and performance dispersions (or variations) which result from the indicated 3-sigma uncertainties. The dispersions are determined at major mission events and fixed times from liftoff (time slices). The dispersion results are used to evaluate the capability of the vehicle to perform the mission within a 3-sigma level of confidence and to determine flight performance reserves.

  18. Population genetic analysis and sub-structuring in Babesia bovis.

    PubMed

    Simuunza, Martin; Bilgic, Huseyin; Karagenc, Tulin; Syakalima, Michelo; Shiels, Brian; Tait, Andy; Weir, William

    2011-06-01

    The tick-borne protozoan parasite, Babesia bovis is one of the causes of bovine babesiosis, an economically important disease of cattle in tropical and sub-tropical countries. Using the recently published genome sequence of the parasite, we developed a panel of eight mini- and micro-satellite markers and used these to investigate the role of genetic exchange in the population structure and diversity of the parasite using isolates from Zambia and Turkey. This population genetic analysis showed that genetic exchange occurs and that there are high levels of genetic diversity, with geographical sub-structuring quantified using Wright's F Index. Linkage disequilibrium was observed when isolates from both countries were treated as one population, but when isolates from Zambia were analysed separately linkage equilibrium was observed. The Turkish isolates were sub-structured, containing two genetically distinct sub-groups, both of which appeared to be in linkage equilibrium. The results of the Zambian study suggest that a sub-set of the parasite population is responsible for the westward spread of babesiosis into the previously disease-free central region of the country. The Zambian isolates had a significantly higher number of genotypes per sample than those from Turkey and age was found to be a significant predictor of the multiplicity of infection. The high levels of diversity seen in the Zambian and Turkish B. bovis populations have implications in the development of subunit vaccines against the disease and the spread of drug resistance.

  19. Assessing population exposure for landslide risk analysis using dasymetric cartography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Ricardo A. C.; Oliveira, Sérgio C.; Zêzere, José L.

    2016-12-01

    Assessing the number and locations of exposed people is a crucial step in landslide risk management and emergency planning. The available population statistical data frequently have insufficient detail for an accurate assessment of potentially exposed people to hazardous events, mainly when they occur at the local scale, such as with landslides. The present study aims to apply dasymetric cartography to improving population spatial resolution and to assess the potentially exposed population. An additional objective is to compare the results with those obtained with a more common approach that uses, as spatial units, basic census units, which are the best spatial data disaggregation and detailed information available for regional studies in Portugal. Considering the Portuguese census data and a layer of residential building footprint, which was used as ancillary information, the number of exposed inhabitants differs significantly according to the approach used. When the census unit approach is used, considering the three highest landslide susceptible classes, the number of exposed inhabitants is in general overestimated. Despite the associated uncertainties of a general cost-benefit analysis, the presented methodology seems to be a reliable approach for gaining a first approximation of a more detailed estimation of exposed people. The approach based on dasymetric cartography allows the spatial resolution of population over large areas to be increased and enables the use of detailed landslide susceptibility maps, which are valuable for improving the exposed population assessment.

  20. A Bibliometric Analysis on Cancer Population Science with Topic Modeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Ding-Cheng; Rastegar-Mojarad, Majid; Okamoto, Janet; Liu, Hongfang; Leichow, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Bibliometric analysis is a research method used in library and information science to evaluate research performance. It applies quantitative and statistical analyses to describe patterns observed in a set of publications and can help identify previous, current, and future research trends or focus. To better guide our institutional strategic plan in cancer population science, we conducted bibliometric analysis on publications of investigators currently funded by either Division of Cancer Preventions (DCP) or Division of Cancer Control and Population Science (DCCPS) at National Cancer Institute. We applied two topic modeling techniques: author topic modeling (AT) and dynamic topic modeling (DTM). Our initial results show that AT can address reasonably the issues related to investigators' research interests, research topic distributions and popularities. In compensation, DTM can address the evolving trend of each topic by displaying the proportion changes of key words, which is consistent with the changes of MeSH headings.

  1. Maximization of orbiter altitude at ALT interface airspeed, mission planning, mission analysis and software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    The determination of the separation initial conditions (i.e. incidence angle) that maximize orbiter altitude at the ALT interface airspeed is considered. Optimum altitude airspeed profiles are generated for each orbiter incidence angle and tailcone configuration. Results show that the highest separation altitude does not result in the highest altitude at ALT interface airspeed. The altitude attainable at ALT interface airspeed should therefore be considered in the selection of the initial conditions (i.e. incidence angle). Without violating any known constraints, the incidence angles that maximize orbiter altitude at the ALT interface airspeeds are 7.0 deg for ALT free flight 1 and 5.5 deg for ALT free flight 6.

  2. Conceptual design and analysis of orbital cryogenic liquid storage and supply systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Cunnington, G. R.; Johns, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    A wide variety of orbital cryogenic liquid storage and supply systems are defined in NASA and DOD long-range plans. These systems include small cooling applications, large chemical and electrical orbit transfer vehicles and supply tankers. All have the common requirements of low-g fluid management to accomplish gas-free liquid expulsion and efficient thermal control to manage heat leak and tank pressure. A preliminary design study was performed to evaluate tanks ranging from 0.6 to 37.4 cu m (22 to 1320 cu ft). Liquids of interest were hydrogen, oxygen, methane, argon and helium. Conceptual designs were generated for each tank system and fluid dynamic, thermal and structural analyses were performed for Shuttle compatible operations. Design trades considered the paradox of conservative support structure and minimum thermal input. Orbital performance and weight data were developed, and a technology evaluation was completed.

  3. Baseline Design and Performance Analysis of Laser Altimeter for Korean Lunar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyung-Chul; Neumann, Gregory A.; Choi, Myeong-Hwan; Yu, Sung-Yeol; Bang, Seong-Cheol; Ka, Neung-Hyun; Park, Jong-Uk; Choi, Man-Soo; Park, Eunseo

    2016-09-01

    Korea’s lunar exploration project includes the launching of an orbiter, a lander (including a rover), and an experimental orbiter (referred to as a lunar pathfinder). Laser altimeters have played an important scientific role in lunar, planetary, and asteroid exploration missions since their first use in 1971 onboard the Apollo 15 mission to the Moon. In this study, a laser altimeter was proposed as a scientific instrument for the Korean lunar orbiter, which will be launched by 2020, to study the global topography of the surface of the Moon and its gravitational field and to support other payloads such as a terrain mapping camera or spectral imager. This study presents the baseline design and performance model for the proposed laser altimeter. Additionally, the study discusses the expected performance based on numerical simulation results. The simulation results indicate that the design of system parameters satisfies performance requirements with respect to detection probability and range error even under unfavorable conditions.

  4. System technology analysis of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles - Moderate lift/drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florence, D. E.; Fischer, G.

    1983-01-01

    The utilization of procedures involving aerodynamic braking and/or aerodynamic maneuvering on return from higher altitude orbits to low-earth orbit makes it possible to realize significant performance benefits. The present study is concerned with a number of mission scenarios for Aeroassisted Orbital Transfer Vehicles (AOTV) and the impact of potential technology advances in the performance enhancement of the class of AOTV's having a hypersonic lift to drag ratio (L/D) of 0.75 to 1.5. It is found that the synergistic combination of a hypersonic L/D of 1.2, an advanced cryopropelled engine, and an LH2 drop tank (1-1/2 stage) leads to a single 65,000 pound shuttle, two-man geosynchronous mission with 2100 pounds of useful paylod. Additional payload enhancement is possible with AOTV dry weight reductions due to technology advances in the areas of vehicle structures and thermal protection systems and other subsystems.

  5. Analysis of error in TOMS total ozone as a function of orbit and attitude parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, W. W.; Ardanuy, P. E.; Braun, W. C.; Vallette, B. J.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ray, S. N.

    1991-01-01

    Computer simulations of orbital scenarios were performed to examine the effects of orbital altitude, equator crossing time, attitude uncertainty, and orbital eccentricity on ozone observations by future satellites. These effects were assessed by determining changes in solar and viewing geometry and earth daytime coverage loss. The importance of these changes on ozone retrieval was determined by simulating uncertainties in the TOMS ozone retrieval algorithm. The major findings are as follows: (1) Drift of equator crossing time from local noon would have the largest effect on the quality of ozone derived from TOMS. The most significant effect of this drift is the loss of earth daytime coverage in the winter hemisphere. The loss in coverage increases from 1 degree latitude for + or - 1 hour from noon, 6 degrees for + or - 3 hours from noon, to 53 degrees for + or - 6 hours from noon. An additional effect is the increase in ozone retrieval errors due to high solar zenith angles. (2) To maintain contiguous earth coverage, the maximum scan angle of the sensor must be increased with decreasing orbital altitude. The maximum scan angle required for full coverage at the equator varies from 60 degrees at 600 km altitude to 45 degrees at 1200 km. This produces an increase in spacecraft zenith angle, theta, which decreases the ozone retrieval accuracy. The range in theta was approximately 72 degrees for 600 km to approximately 57 degrees at 1200 km. (3) The effect of elliptical orbits is to create gaps in coverage along the subsatellite track. An elliptical orbit with a 200 km perigee and 1200 km apogee produced a maximum earth coverage gap of about 45 km at the perigee at nadir. (4) An attitude uncertainty of 0.1 degree in each axis (pitch, roll, yaw) produced a maximum scan angle to view the pole, and maximum solar zenith angle).

  6. Analysis of Envisat Orbit Maintenance Strategies to Improve/Increase Envisat ASAR Interferometry Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuijper, D.; Matatoros, Garcia

    2007-01-01

    The biggest and most advanced Earth Observation Satellite in-orbit, developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and its member states, is Envisat. It was launched on March 1, 2002 by an Ariane V from French Guyana and holds a total of 10 multi-disciplinary Earth observation instruments, among which an Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR). The ASAR user community requested the Flight Dynamics division of the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC) to investigate how the orbit control maintenance strategy for Envisat could be changed to optimize ASAR interferometry opportunities overall and in addition support the International Polar Year 2007/2008 initiative. The Polar Regions play a pivotal role in understanding our planet and our impact on it as they are recognized as sensitive barometers of environmental change. One of the main themes of the International Polar Year 2007/2008 is therefore the study of Earth s changing ice and snow, and its impact on our planet and our lives. Naturally, ESA would like to support this very important initiative. This paper presents the investigations that have been conducted to support these requests in the best possible way. It discusses the orbit maintenance strategy that has been in place since its launch, ensuring the actual orbit to be within 1 km of a so-called reference orbit, and presents the new orbit maintenance strategy that is aimed at improving/increasing the opportunities for Envisat ASAR interferometry, while preserving the fuel on board the spacecraft. The hydrazine on-board Envisat happens to be a precious resource as only approximately 300 kg of it was available at launch, like ERS-2. The difference being however that the mass of Envisat is approximately 3.2 times that of ERS-2.

  7. Integrated orbital servicing study follow-on. Volume 2: Technical analysis and system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In-orbit service functional and physical requirements to support both low and high Earth orbit servicing/maintenance operations were defined, an optimum servicing system configuration was developed and mockups and early prototype hardware were fabricated to demonstrate and validate the concepts selected. Significant issues addressed include criteria for concept selection; representative mission equipment and approaches to their design for serviceability; significant serviceable spacecraft design aspects; servicer mechanism operation in one-g; approaches for the demonstration/simulation; and service mechanism structure design approach.

  8. The Spectrum Orbit Utilization Program (SOUP) used for DBS plan analysis at RARC '83

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, J.; Ottey, H. R.; Sawitz, P.; Zusman, F. S.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the history, functions, and usage of the program that was used to analyze the plans for direct broadcast satellite service developed in the course of the 1983 Regional Administrative Radio Conference for ITU Region 2. Given the requirements for direct broadcast service by the administrations, the conference delegates (1) developed the appropriate technical parameters; (2) made tentative assignments to the orbit locations, frequencies, and polarizations of space stations, (3) calculated the interferences and margins of such assignments through the use of the Spectrum Orbit Utilization Program (SOUP); and (4) iterated this procedure until an acceptable plan was found.

  9. Experimental assessment of a computer program used in Space Shuttle orbiter entry heating analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, W. L.; Hudgins, J.

    1983-01-01

    A high temperature reusable surface insulation (HRSI) tile taken from the Space Shuttle orbiter was subjected to a nominal heating rate of 60 kW/sq m in the laboratory. The surface temperature response to this heating was measured and used as input to a computer program which computed the applied heating rate. The program is part of a software system that is used to infer convective heating rates to the orbiter thermal protection system during entry. The measured and computed heating rates are compared. Results confirm the applicability of this program to the determination of flight heat transfer rates from flight measured surface temperature data.

  10. A Critical Examination of Current On-Orbit Satellite Collision Risk Analysis Under Constraints of Public Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitworth, Brandon; Moon, Mark; Pace, William; Baker, Robert

    2010-09-01

    SSN will need greatly increased resources to meet this challenge. For these reasons, the creation of a clearinghouse for maneuvers, changes to the planning process for space missions, changes to the spacecraft for evasive and end of life actions, and improved quantity and quality of the information available to the public from the SSN should all be considered by the community to increase the level of safety and lengthen the service life of all current and future spacecraft. This paper provides a critical examination of current on-orbit collision risk analysis techniques and suggests improvements to enhance the safety of future space operations.

  11. Sclerosing Orbital Inflammation Caused by Leishmania braziliensis.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Antonio Augusto V; Alves-Ferreira, Eliza V C; Milbratz-Moré, Gherusa; Chahud, Fernando; Ruy, Patricia C; Duarte, Maria Irma Seixas; Cruz, Angela Kaysel

    2017-01-11

    Orbital biopsy of nonspecific orbital inflammation, commonly referred to as "orbital pseudotumor," typically shows a combination of polyclonal lymphocytes, plasmocytes, leukocytes, macrophages, and variable degrees of collagen deposition. Herein, we report a patient with a positive history of mucocutaneous leishmaniasis who presented with an orbital mass with a histological profile of idiopathic orbital inflammation. Immunohistochemical and molecular analysis of the orbital specimens demonstrated that the orbital inflammation was associated with the presence of antigens of Leishmania braziliensis and DNA from the parasite.

  12. Removal of orbital debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew J.; Talent, David L.

    1989-01-01

    The several methods presently identified for the reduction of orbital debris populations are broadly classifiable as either preventive or remedial, and fall within distinctive operational regimes. For all particles, (1) in the 250-2000-km altitude band, intelligent sweepers may be used; (2) for large objects, in the 80-250-km altitude band, orbital decay renders removal impractical; (3) for the 250-750-km altitude band, deorbit devices should be used; (4) for 750-2500-km altitude, OMV rendezvous for propulsive deorbit package attachment is foreseeable; and beyond 2500 km, (5) propulsive escape from earth orbit is required.

  13. Analysis of genetic diversity in Bolivian llama populations using microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Barreta, J; Gutiérrez-Gil, B; Iñiguez, V; Romero, F; Saavedra, V; Chiri, R; Rodríguez, T; Arranz, J J

    2013-08-01

    South American camelids (SACs) have a major role in the maintenance and potential future of rural Andean human populations. More than 60% of the 3.7 million llamas living worldwide are found in Bolivia. Due to the lack of studies focusing on genetic diversity in Bolivian llamas, this analysis investigates both the genetic diversity and structure of 12 regional groups of llamas that span the greater part of the range of distribution for this species in Bolivia. The analysis of 42 microsatellite markers in the considered regional groups showed that, in general, there were high levels of polymorphism (a total of 506 detected alleles; average PIC across per marker: 0.66), which are comparable with those reported for other populations of domestic SACs. The estimated diversity parameters indicated that there was high intrapopulational genetic variation (average number of alleles and average expected heterozygosity per marker: 12.04 and 0.68, respectively) and weak genetic differentiation among populations (FST range: 0.003-0.052). In agreement with these estimates, Bolivian llamas showed a weak genetic structure and an intense gene flow between all the studied regional groups, which is due to the exchange of reproductive males between the different flocks. Interestingly, the groups for which the largest pairwise FST estimates were observed, Sud Lípez and Nor Lípez, showed a certain level of genetic differentiation that is probably due to the pattern of geographic isolation and limited communication infrastructures of these southern localities. Overall, the population parameters reported here may serve as a reference when establishing conservation policies that address Bolivian llama populations.

  14. Morphological and morphometrical analysis of Heterodera spp. populations in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Lafi, Hamzeh A.; Al-Banna, Luma; Sadder, Monther T.; Migdadi, Hussein M.

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic diversity of five Jordanian populations of cyst nematodes, Heterodera spp. collected from five regions from Jordan (Ar-Ramtha, Madaba, Dana, Al-Karak, and Jerash) was investigated. Soil samples were collected from one representative field in each region. Morphological and morphometrical characteristics revealed that Heterodera latipons is dominated in cereal fields at Ar-Ramtha, Madaba, Dana and Al-Karak regions and Heterodera schachtii in Jerash. Cysts populations from all cereal fields had bifenestrate vulval cone and a strong underbridge. Wherever, cysts of the cabbage population had ambifenestrate vulval cone with long vulval slit. The bullae were absent in Ar-Ramtha, Madaba and Dana populations, but present in Al-Karak and Jerash. Based on 12 morphometrical characters, the first three functions in canonical discriminant analysis accounted 99.3% of the total variation. Distance from dorsal gland duct opening to stylet base, underbridge length, a = L/W (body length/midbody width) and length of hyaline tail tip had strong and significant contributions in the first function. While the second function was strongly influenced by length of hyaline tail, fenestral length, fenestral width and tail length. However, the third canonical discriminate function was found to be influenced by stylet length, fenestral length, a = L/W (body length/midbody width) and underbridge width. The graphical representation of the distribution of the samples showed that the first canonical discriminant function clearly separated H. schachtii from Jerash from other populations. Whereas, H. latipons collected from Madaba and Dana were clearly separated in the second function. The results indicated that differences at morphological and morphometrical levels revealed diverse populations of Heterodera spp. in Jordan. PMID:26858546

  15. A new release of the mean orbital motion theory, and a new tool provided by CNES for long term analysis of disposal orbits and re-entry predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleflie, Florent; Wailliez, Sébastien; Portmann, Christophe; Gilles, M.; Vienne, Alain; Berthier, J.; Valk, St; Hautesserres, Denis; Martin, Thierry; Fraysse, Hubert

    To perform an orbit modelling accurate enough to provide a good estimate of the lifetime of a satellite, or to ensure the stability of a disposal orbit through centuries, we built a new orbit propagator based on the theory of mean orbital motion. It is named SECS-SD2 , for Simplified and Extended CODIOR Software -Space Debris Dedicated . The CODIOR software propagates numerically averaged equations of motion, with a typical integration step size on the order of a few hours, and was originally written in classical orbital elements. The so-called Space Debris -dedicated version is written in orbital elements suitable for orbits with small eccentricities and inclinations, so as to characterize the main dynamic properties of the motion within the LEO, MEO, and GEO regions. The orbital modelling accounts for the very first terms of the geopotential, the perturbations induced by the luni-solar attraction, the solar radiation pressure, and the atmospheric drag (using classical models). The new software was designed so as to ensure short computation times, even over periods of decades or centuries. This paper aims first at describing and validating the main functionalities of the software: we explain how the simplified averaged equations of motion were built, we show how we get sim-plified luni-solar ephemerides without using any huge file for orbit propagations over centuries, and we show how we averaged and simulated the solar flux. We show as well how we expressed short periodic terms to be added to the mean equations of motion, in order to get orbital ele-ments comparable to those deduced from the classical numerical integration of the oscultating equations of motion. The second part of the paper sheds light on some dynamical properties of space debris flying in the LEO and GEO regions, which were obtained from the new software. Knowing that each satellite in the LEO region is now supposed to re-enter the atmosphere within a period of 25 years, we estimated in various

  16. All-sky Meteor Orbit System AMOS and preliminary analysis of three unusual meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Juraj; Kornoš, Leonard; Zigo, Pavol; Gajdoš, Štefan; Kalmančok, Dušan; Világi, Jozef; Šimon, Jaroslav; Vereš, Peter; Šilha, Jiří; Buček, Marek; Galád, Adrián; Rusňák, Patrik; Hrábek, Peter; Ďuriš, František; Rudawska, Regina

    2015-12-01

    All-sky Meteor Orbit System (AMOS) is a semi-autonomous video observatory for detection of transient events on the sky, mostly the meteors. Its hardware and software development and permanent placement on several locations in Slovakia allowed the establishment of Slovak Video Meteor Network (SVMN) monitoring meteor activity above the Central Europe. The data reduction, orbital determination and additional results from AMOS cameras - the SVMN database - as well as from observational expeditions on Canary Islands and in Canada provided dynamical and physical data for better understanding of mutual connections between parent bodies of asteroids and comets and their meteoroid streams. We present preliminary results on exceptional and rare meteor streams such as September ɛ Perseids (SPE) originated from unknown long periodic comet on a retrograde orbit, suspected asteroidal meteor stream of April α Comae Berenicids (ACO) in the orbit of meteorites Příbram and Neuschwanstein and newly observed meteor stream Camelopardalids (CAM) originated from Jupiter family comet 209P/Linear.

  17. Solar power satellite: Analysis of alternatives for transporting material to geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, W. J.; Huang, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    A systems design study of the alternative methods and relative merits of various approaches to transporting and assembling a solar power satellite in geosynchronous orbit was conducted. State of the art alternatives for chemical and electrical interorbital propulsion were studied, and several possible scenarios for construction were proposed.

  18. Analysis of a Mars-stationary orbiting microwave power transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Kenwyn J.

    1990-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of providing efficient RF power transmission from a Mars-stationary orbit to the surface of the planet, an assessment was made focussing on RF propagation in the 2.45- to 300-GHz range. The proposed orbiting system configuration provides for power generation by either photovoltaic array or nuclear reactor, the conversion of the dc output to RF, and subsequent propagation of RF energy from the orbiting array to the Martian surface. On the planet, a rectenna array will convert RF to dc power to be distributed for planetary power needs. Total efficiency of the energy conversion chain from dc to RF in orbit through RF to dc on the planetary surface was derived for several representative frequencies in the range of study. Tradeoffs between component efficiency and transmitting antenna requirements were considered for each of these frequencies. Rectenna element power density thresholds and desired received power levels were used to determine receiving antenna criteria. Recommendations are presented for research into developing technologies which may afford enhanced viability of the proposed microwave power transmission system.

  19. Stability Analysis of the Planetary System Orbiting Upsilon Andromedae. 2; Simulations Using New Lick Observatory Fits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Rivera, Eugenio J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present results of long-term numerical orbital integrations designed to test the stability of the three-planet system orbiting upsilon Andromedae and short-term integrations to test whether mutual perturbations among the planets can be used to determine planetary masses. Our initial conditions are based on recent fits to the radial velocity data obtained by the planet search group at Lick Observatory. The new fits result in significantly more stable systems than did the initially announced planetary parameters. Our integrations using the 2000 February parameters show that if the system is nearly planar, then it is stable for at least 100 Myr for m(sub f) = 1/sin i less than or = 4. In some stable systems, the eccentricity of the inner planet experiences large oscillations. The relative periastra of the outer two planets' orbits librate about 0 deg. in most of the stable systems; if future observations imply that the periastron longitudes of these planets are very closely aligned at the present epoch, dynamical simulations may provide precise estimates for the masses and orbital inclinations of these two planets.

  20. Operations analysis (study 2.6). Volume 4: Computer specification; logistics of orbiting vehicle servicing (LOVES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The logistics of orbital vehicle servicing computer specifications was developed and a number of alternatives to improve utilization of the space shuttle and the tug were investigated. Preliminary results indicate that space servicing offers a potential for reducing future operational and program costs over ground refurbishment of satellites. A computer code which could be developed to simulate space servicing is presented.

  1. Integrated orbital servicing and payloads study. Volume 2: Technical and cost analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The details and background used in the investigation of orbital servicing and payloads are presented. Topics discussed include review of previous models, application of servicing to communications satellites, assessment of spacecraft servicing, cost of servicing, and launch vehicle effects on spacecraft.

  2. The Earth-Moon Transfer Trajectory Design and Analysis using Intermediate Loop Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Joo; Woo, Jin; Park, Sang-Young; Kyu-Hong Choi; Sim, Eun-Sup

    2009-06-01

    Various Earth-Moon transfer trajectories are designed and analyzed to prepare the future Korea's Lunar missions. Minimum fuel trajectory solutions are obtained for the departure year of 2017, 2020, 2022, and every required mission phases are analyzed from Earth departure to the final lunar mission orbit. N-body equations of motion are formulated which include the gravitational effect of the Sun, Earth and Moon. In addition, accelerations due to geopotential harmonics, Lunar J2 and solar radiation pressures are considered. Impulsive high thrust is assumed as the main thrusting method of spacecraft with launcher capability of KSLV-2 which is planned to be developed. For the method of injecting a spacecraft into a trans Lunar trajectory, both direct shooting from circular parking orbit and shooting from the multiple elliptical intermediate orbits are adapted, and their design results are compared and analyzed. In addition, spacecraft's visibility from Deajeon ground station are constrained to see how they affect the magnitude of TLI (Trans Lunar Injection) maneuver. The results presented in this paper includes launch opportunities, required optimal maneuver characteristics for each mission phase as well as the trajectory characteristics and numerous related parameters. It is confirmed that the final mass of Korean lunar explorer strongly depends onto the initial parking orbit's altitude and launcher's capability, rather than mission start time.

  3. Climate change threatens polar bear populations: a stochastic demographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Christine M; Caswell, Hal; Runge, Michael C; Regehr, Eric V; Amstrup, Steve C; Stirling, Ian

    2010-10-01

    The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) depends on sea ice for feeding, breeding, and movement. Significant reductions in Arctic sea ice are forecast to continue because of climate warming. We evaluated the impacts of climate change on polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea by means of a demographic analysis, combining deterministic, stochastic, environment-dependent matrix population models with forecasts of future sea ice conditions from IPCC general circulation models (GCMs). The matrix population models classified individuals by age and breeding status; mothers and dependent cubs were treated as units. Parameter estimates were obtained from a capture-recapture study conducted from 2001 to 2006. Candidate statistical models allowed vital rates to vary with time and as functions of a sea ice covariate. Model averaging was used to produce the vital rate estimates, and a parametric bootstrap procedure was used to quantify model selection and parameter estimation uncertainty. Deterministic models projected population growth in years with more extensive ice coverage (2001-2003) and population decline in years with less ice coverage (2004-2005). LTRE (life table response experiment) analysis showed that the reduction in lambda in years with low sea ice was due primarily to reduced adult female survival, and secondarily to reduced breeding. A stochastic model with two environmental states, good and poor sea ice conditions, projected a declining stochastic growth rate, log lambdas, as the frequency of poor ice years increased. The observed frequency of poor ice years since 1979 would imply log lambdas approximately - 0.01, which agrees with available (albeit crude) observations of population size. The stochastic model was linked to a set of 10 GCMs compiled by the IPCC; the models were chosen for their ability to reproduce historical observations of sea ice and were forced with "business as usual" (A1B) greenhouse gas emissions. The resulting stochastic population

  4. Climate change threatens polar bear populations: A stochastic demographic analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, C.M.; Caswell, H.; Runge, M.C.; Regehr, E.V.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Stirling, I.

    2010-01-01

    The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) depends on sea ice for feeding, breeding, and movement. Significant reductions in Arctic sea ice are forecast to continue because of climate warming. We evaluated the impacts of climate change on polar bears in the southern Beaufort Sea by means of a demographic analysis, combining deterministic, stochastic, environment-dependent matrix population models with forecasts of future sea ice conditions from IPCC general circulation models (GCMs). The matrix population models classified individuals by age and breeding status; mothers and dependent cubs were treated as units. Parameter estimates were obtained from a capture-recapture study conducted from 2001 to 2006. Candidate statistical models allowed vital rates to vary with time and as functions of a sea ice covariate. Model averaging was used to produce the vital rate estimates, and a parametric bootstrap procedure was used to quantify model selection and parameter estimation uncertainty. Deterministic models projected population growth in years with more extensive ice coverage (2001-2003) and population decline in years with less ice coverage (2004-2005). LTRE (life table response experiment) analysis showed that the reduction in ?? in years with low sea ice was due primarily to reduced adult female survival, and secondarily to reduced breeding. A stochastic model with two environmental states, good and poor sea ice conditions, projected a declining stochastic growth rate, log ??s, as the frequency of poor ice years increased. The observed frequency of poor ice years since 1979 would imply log ??s ' - 0.01, which agrees with available (albeit crude) observations of population size. The stochastic model was linked to a set of 10 GCMs compiled by the IPCC; the models were chosen for their ability to reproduce historical observations of sea ice and were forced with "business as usual" (A1B) greenhouse gas emissions. The resulting stochastic population projections showed drastic

  5. On the properties of Se⋯N interaction: the analysis of substituent effects by energy decomposition and orbital interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fangfang; Liu, Ruirui; Tang, Jia; Li, Ping; Cui, Yahui; Zhang, Houyu

    2016-01-01

    The nature and strength of intermolecular Se⋯N interaction between selenium-containing compounds HSeX (X = CH3, NH2, CF3, OCH3, CN, OH, NO2, Cl, F), and NH3 have been investigated at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level. The Se⋯N interaction is found to be dependent on the substituent groups, which greatly affect the positive electrostatic potential of Se atoms and the accepting electron ability of X-Se σ(∗) antibonding orbital. Energy decomposition of the Se ⋯N interaction reveals that electrostatic and induction forces are comparable in the weak-bonded complexes and induction becomes more significant in the complexes with strong electron-withdrawing substituents. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis indicates that the primary source of the induction is the electron transfer from the N lone pair to the X-Se σ(∗) antibonding orbital. The geometry of the complex and the interaction directionality of NH3 to X-Se bond can be regarded as a consequence of the exchange-repulsion. The topological analysis on the electron density reveals the nature of closed-shell interaction in these X-Se⋯N contacts. The Se⋯N interaction in the complexes with the strong electron-withdrawing substituent has a partly covalent character.

  6. The analysis of single-electron orbits in a free electron laser based upon a rectangular hybrid wiggler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordbacheh, A.; Ghahremaninezhad, Roghayeh; Maraghechi, B.

    2012-09-01

    A three-dimensional analysis of a novel free-electron laser (FEL) based upon a rectangular hybrid wiggler (RHW) is presented. This RHW is designed in a configuration composed of rectangular rings with alternating ferrite and dielectric spacers immersed in a solenoidal magnetic field. An analytic model of RHW is introduced by solution of Laplace's equation for the magnetostatic fields under the appropriate boundary conditions. The single-electron orbits in combined RHW and axial guide magnetic fields are studied when only the first and the third spatial harmonic components of the RHW field are taken into account and the higher order terms are ignored. The results indicate that the third spatial harmonic leads to group III orbits with a strong negative mass regime particularly in large solenoidal magnetic fields. RHW is found to be a promising candidate with favorable characteristics to be used in microwave FEL.

  7. The analysis of single-electron orbits in a free electron laser based upon a rectangular hybrid wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Kordbacheh, A.; Ghahremaninezhad, Roghayeh; Maraghechi, B.

    2012-09-15

    A three-dimensional analysis of a novel free-electron laser (FEL) based upon a rectangular hybrid wiggler (RHW) is presented. This RHW is designed in a configuration composed of rectangular rings with alternating ferrite and dielectric spacers immersed in a solenoidal magnetic field. An analytic model of RHW is introduced by solution of Laplace's equation for the magnetostatic fields under the appropriate boundary conditions. The single-electron orbits in combined RHW and axial guide magnetic fields are studied when only the first and the third spatial harmonic components of the RHW field are taken into account and the higher order terms are ignored. The results indicate that the third spatial harmonic leads to group III orbits with a strong negative mass regime particularly in large solenoidal magnetic fields. RHW is found to be a promising candidate with favorable characteristics to be used in microwave FEL.

  8. Shuttle cryogenic supply system optimization study. Volume 5A-2: Users manual for Space shuttle orbit injection system analysis (SOPSA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    SOPSA (Shuttle Orbit Injection Propulsion System Analysis) is a computer program to aid in the preliminary design of propellant feed systems for the space shuttle orbiter main engines. The primary purpose of the program is to evaluate propellant tank ullage pressure requirements imposed by the need to accelerate propellants rapidly during the engine start sequence. These requirements can influence the system design for a given engine as well as the suitability of a given system for use with different engines. During the vehicle design phase, the SOPSA program is used to establish feed system weight variations as a function of nominal line diameter and component and line configurations. The weight data are used in conjunction with pertinent cost data to establish optimum feed system designs.

  9. Proposal of a simple and effective local reactivity descriptor through a topological analysis of an orbital-weighted fukui function.

    PubMed

    Pino-Rios, Ricardo; Yañez, Osvaldo; Inostroza, Diego; Ruiz, Lina; Cardenas, Carlos; Fuentealba, Patricio; Tiznado, William

    2017-03-30

    The prediction of reactivity is one of the long-standing objectives of chemistry, contributing to enforce the link between theory and experiment. In particular, the regioselectivity of aromatic molecules has motivated the proposal of different reactivity descriptors based on foundational theories, like Frontier Molecular Orbital (FMO) theory and density functional theory, to predict and rationalize such regioselectivity. This article examines cases where reactivity descriptors, based on FMO theories, are known to have failed, specifically on electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions, through a simple but effective new reactivity model: the Orbital-weighted Fukui function ( fw-(r)) and its topological analysis. Interestingly, this descriptor proves to be effective in adequately predicting regioselectivities where other approximations failed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Population viability analysis with species occurrence data from museum collections.

    PubMed

    Skarpaas, Olav; Stabbetorp, Odd E

    2011-06-01

    The most comprehensive data on many species come from scientific collections. Thus, we developed a method of population viability analysis (PVA) in which this type of occurrence data can be used. In contrast to classical PVA, our approach accounts for the inherent observation error in occurrence data and allows the estimation of the population parameters needed for viability analysis. We tested the sensitivity of the approach to spatial resolution of the data, length of the time series, sampling effort, and detection probability with simulated data and conducted PVAs for common, rare, and threatened species. We compared the results of these PVAs with results of standard method PVAs in which observation error is ignored. Our method provided realistic estimates of population growth terms and quasi-extinction risk in cases in which the standard method without observation error could not. For low values of any of the sampling variables we tested, precision decreased, and in some cases biased estimates resulted. The results of our PVAs with the example species were consistent with information in the literature on these species. Our approach may facilitate PVA for a wide range of species of conservation concern for which demographic data are lacking but occurrence data are readily available.

  11. Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    In an effort to help meet the growing interest and concern about the problems created by the rapid growth of population, The International Planned Parenthood Federation has prepared this booklet with the aim of assisting the study of the history and future trends of population growth and its impact on individual and family welfare, national,…

  12. Textural analysis of crystal populations: Looking towards the third dimention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerram, D. A.; Mock, A.

    2003-04-01

    Crystal populations that erupt at the Earths surface or are frozen in shallow level intrusions contain a record of the evolution, crystallisation history and dynamics of the magma system from which they originate. This information is often recorded from both a geochemical and a textural perspective. Here the information recorded from a textural perspective is investigated with case studies. It is possible to characterise the crystal population in terms of the size variation (Crystal Size Distribution CSD) and their spatial packing arrangement (Spatial Distribution Pattern - SDP). In both cases the rock textures are digitised into Image Analysis packages providing statistical data on crystal sizes and positions. CSD studies provide insight into the growth history of the crystal population and can identify mixed populations of crystals from different parts of the magma system. SDP analysis can define if crystals are forming touching frameworks in 3D and the nature of packing arrangements. Examination of known touching crystal frameworks in olivine (Komatiite cumulates and experimental data) and plagioclase dominant crystal populations (e.g. Holyoke flood basalt, USA) reveals that many touching frameworks involve complex, high porosity, clustered crystal frameworks. Olivine frameworks in Komatiite flows form in days to 10s of days. Plagioclase frameworks are calculated to have formed in less than 17 years for a crystal growth rate of 1x10-10 mm/s and can be less than 3 years for a growth rate of 5x10-10 mm/s based on Crystal Size Distributions. Using serial sections and 3D reconstruction of crystal populations it is possible to test the CSD and SDP techniques that are commonly applied to 2D sections. For example the preliminary results of a 3D reconstruction of Felsic phenocrysts in the Petersberg laccolith, Halle, Germany show that they do not form a touching framework, a confirmation of their 2D SDP data, and that they are irregularly shaped and deviate

  13. WetLab-2: Tools for Conducting On-Orbit Quantitative Real-Time Gene Expression Analysis on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, Macarena; Almeida, Eduardo; Boone, Travis; Jung, Jimmy; Schonfeld, Julie

    2014-01-01

    The objective of NASA Ames Research Centers WetLab-2 Project is to place on the ISS a research platform capable of conducting gene expression analysis via quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) of biological specimens sampled or cultured on orbit. The project has selected a Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) qRT-PCR system, the Cepheid SmartCycler and will fly it in its COTS configuration. The SmartCycler has a number of advantages including modular design (16 independent PCR modules), low power consumption, rapid ramp times and the ability to detect up to four separate fluorescent channels at one time enabling multiplex assays that can be used for normalization and to study multiple genes of interest in each module. The team is currently working with Cepheid to enable the downlink of data from the ISS to the ground and provide uplink capabilities for programming, commanding, monitoring, and instrument maintenance. The project has adapted commercial technology to design a module that can lyse cells and extract RNA of sufficient quality and quantity for use in qRT-PCR reactions while using a housekeeping gene to normalize RNA concentration and integrity. The WetLab-2 system is capable of processing multiple sample types ranging from microbial cultures to animal tissues dissected on-orbit. The ability to conduct qRT-PCR on-orbit eliminates the confounding effects on gene expression of reentry stresses and shock acting on live cells and organisms or the concern of RNA degradation of fixed samples. The system can be used to validate terrestrial analyses of samples returned from ISS by providing on-orbit gene expression benchmarking prior to sample return. The ability to get on orbit data will provide investigators with the opportunity to adjust experiment parameters for subsequent trials based on the real-time data analysis without need for sample return and re-flight. Researchers will also be able to sample multigenerational changes in organisms. Finally, the system can be

  14. Analytical determination of orbital elements using Fourier analysis. I. The radial velocity case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delisle, J.-B.; Ségransan, D.; Buchschacher, N.; Alesina, F.

    2016-05-01

    We describe an analytical method for computing the orbital parameters of a planet from the periodogram of a radial velocity signal. The method is very efficient and provides a good approximation of the orbital parameters. The accuracy is mainly limited by the accuracy of the computation of the Fourier decomposition of the signal which is sensitive to sampling and noise. Our method is complementary with more accurate (and more expensive in computer time) numerical algorithms (e.g. Levenberg-Marquardt, Markov chain Monte Carlo, genetic algorithms). Indeed, the analytical approximation can be used as an initial condition to accelerate the convergence of these numerical methods. Our method can be applied iteratively to search for multiple planets in the same system.

  15. Aeroheating Analysis for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter with Comparison to Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.

    2007-01-01

    The aeroheating environment of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has been analyzed using the direct simulation Monte Carlo and free-molecular techniques. The results of these analyses were used to develop an aeroheating database to be used for the preflight planning and the in-flight operations support for the aerobraking phase of the MRO mission. The aeroheating predictions calculated for the MRO include the heat transfer coefficient (CH) over a range of angles-of-attack, sideslip angles, and number densities. The effects of flow chemistry, surface temperature, and surface grid resolution were also investigated to determine the aeroheating database uncertainties. Flight heat flux data has been calculated from surface temperature sensor data returned to Earth from the MRO in orbit around Mars during the aerobraking phase of its mission. The heat flux data have been compared to the aeroheating database and agree favorably.

  16. Analysis of separation of the space shuttle orbiter from a large transport airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhite, A. W.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of safely separating the space shuttle orbiter (140A/B) from the top of a large carrier vehicle (the C-5 airplane) at subsonic speeds was investigated. The longitudinal equations of motion for both vehicles were numerically integrated using a digital computer program which incorporates experimentally derived interference aerodynamic data to analyze the separation maneuver for various initial conditions. Separation of the space shuttle orbiter from a carrier vehicle was feasible for a range of dynamic-pressure and flight-path-angle conditions. By using an autopilot, the vehicle attitudes were held constant which ensured separation. Carrier-vehicle engine thrust, landing gear, and spoilers provide some flexibility in the separation maneuver.

  17. Analysis of erosion and transportation features from lunar orbiter and Apollo photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, T.

    1980-01-01

    Certain classes of surface features in Lunar Orbiter and Apollo Panoramic Photographs are identifed and possible correlations between the occurrence of these features and their geographical location on the Moon are studied. Whether evidence of erosion and transport processes not encountered on Earth exists is investigated using the lunar photographs. The variety and intensity of transport processes on the Moon resulting from exposure to plasmas is discussed.

  18. Performance Modeling and Analysis of Parallel Processing and Low Earth Orbit Satellite Communication Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    and availability of the neMilhbor. This section reviews some of the methods purposed to accomplish the above. Brayer [Bra84] introduces a routing...traversed) between a given source and destination address pair. The second portion of Brayers concept allows the nodes (satellites) to learn the connectivity... Brayer , ’Packet switching for mobile stations via low-orbit satellite network," Proceedings of the IEE, Vol 72, No. 11, November 1984, pp. 1627-1636

  19. Scout: short-arc orbit analysis and hazard assessment for newly discovered asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnocchia, Davide; Chesley, Steven R.; Micheli, Marco

    2016-05-01

    It typically takes a few days for a newly discovered asteroid to be officially recognized as a real object. This time is needed to collect additional data and make sure the observations belong to an actual asteroid rather than being an artifact or corresponding to an artificial object. However, asteroids could experience an Earth close approach or even an impact only a few days or less after the discovery observations, as in the cases of 2008 TC3 and 2014 AA, i.e., the only two asteroids discovered before an Earth impact. In such cases, a rapid identification of the close approach or impact dramatically improves the chances of securing the asteroid's trajectory with additional observations prior to impact. Scout is an automated system that provides an orbital and hazard assessment for new potential asteroid discoveries within minutes after the observations are available. Since the time interval covered by the observations is generally short, perhaps only a few hours or even less, there are severe degeneracies in the orbit estimation process. To overcome these degeneracies Scout relies on systematic ranging, a technique that scans the poorly constrained space of topocentric range and range rate, while the plane-of-sky position and motion are directly tied to the recorded observations. This scan allows us to identify the possible orbits and the regions corresponding to collision solutions, as well as potential impact times and locations. From the probability distribution of the observation errors, Scout derives a probability distribution in the orbital space and in turn estimates several metrics of interest, e.g., probability of an Earth impact, of a close approach to Earth, and of being a mission-accessible target.

  20. Periodic orbit theory and the statistical analysis of scaling quantum graph spectra.

    PubMed

    Dabaghian, Yu

    2007-05-01

    The explicit solution to the spectral problem of quantum graphs found recently by Dabaghian and Blümel [Phys. Rev. E 68, 055201(R) (2003); 70, 046206 (2004); JETP Lett. 77, 530 (2003)] is used to produce an exact periodic orbit theory description for the probability distributions of spectral statistics, including the distribution for the nearest neighbor separations sn = kn - kn-1, and the distribution of the spectral oscillations around the average, deltakn=kn - kn.

  1. Spectroscopic, electronic structure and natural bond orbital analysis of o-fluoronitrobenzene and p-fluoronitrobenzene: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Govindaraja, S. Thillai; Sakiladevi, S.; Kalaivani, M.; Mohan, S.

    2011-12-01

    Experimental FTIR, FT-Raman and FT-NMR spectroscopic studies of o-fluoronitrobenzene and p-fluoronitrobenzene have been carried out. A detailed quantum chemical calculations have been performed using DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G** and 6-31G** basis sets. Complete vibrational analyses of the compounds were performed. The temperature dependence of thermodynamic properties has been analysed. The atomic charges, electronic exchange interaction and charge delocalisation of the molecule have been performed by natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Molecular electrostatic surface potential (MESP), total electron density distribution and frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) are constructed at B3LYP/6-311++G** level to understand the electronic properties. The charge density distribution and site of chemical reactivity of the molecules have been obtained by mapping electron density isosurface with electrostatic potential surfaces (ESP). The electronic properties, HOMO and LUMO energies were measured by time-dependent TD-DFT approach. 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded and 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the molecules in chloroform solvent and in gas phase were calculated by using the Gauge-Independent Atomic Orbital (GIAO) method and are found to be in good agreement with experimental values. The theoretical parameters obtained at B3LYP levels have been compared with the experimental values.

  2. VIIRS On-Orbit Optical Anomaly - Investigation, Analysis, Root Cause Determination and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iona, Glenn; Butler, James; Guenther, Bruce; Graziani, Larissa; Johnson, Eric; Kennedy, Brian; Kent, Criag; Lambeck, Robert; Waluschka, Eugne; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2012-01-01

    A gradual, but persistent, decrease in the optical throughput was detected during the early commissioning phase for the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (SNPP) Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Near Infrared (NIR) bands. Its initial rate and unknown cause were coincidently coupled with a decrease in sensitivity in the same spectral wavelength of the Solar Diffuser Stability Monitor (SDSM) raising concerns about contamination or the possibility of a system-level satellite problem. An anomaly team was formed to investigate and provide recommendations before commissioning could resume. With few hard facts in hand, there was much speculation about possible causes and consequences of the degradation. Two different causes were determined as will be explained in this paper. This paper will describe the build and test history of VIIRS, why there were no indicators, even with hindsight, of an on-orbit problem, the appearance of the on-orbit anomaly, the initial work attempting to understand and determine the cause, the discovery of the root cause and what Test-As-You-Fly (TAYF) activities, can be done in the future to greatly reduce the likelihood of similar optical anomalies. These TAYF activities are captured in the lessons learned section of this paper.

  3. High resolution NEXAFS of perylene and PTCDI: a surface science approach to molecular orbital analysis.

    PubMed

    Fratesi, Guido; Lanzilotto, Valeria; Stranges, Stefano; Alagia, Michele; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Floreano, Luca

    2014-07-28

    We made use of synchrotron radiation to perform near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, NEXAFS, at the carbon K-edge of perylene and perylene-tetracarboxylic-diimide, PTCDI. Reference spectra measured for isolated molecules in the gas phase are compared with polarization dependent NEXAFS spectra measured on highly oriented thin films in order to study the symmetry of the molecular orbitals. The molecular overlayers are grown onto the rutile TiO2(110) surface for which the large anisotropic corrugation effectively drives the molecular orientation, while its dielectric nature prevents the rehybridization of the molecular orbitals. We employed density functional theory, DFT, calculations to disentangle the contribution of specific carbon atoms to the molecular density of states. Numerical simulations correctly predict the observed NEXAFS azimuthal dichroism of the σ* resonances above the ionization threshold, from which we determine the full geometric orientation of the overlayer molecules. A discrepancy observed for the spectral contribution of the imide carbon atom to the calculated unoccupied molecular orbitals has been explained in terms of initial state effects, as determined by Hartree-Fock corrections and in full agreement with the corresponding shift of the C 1s core level measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS.

  4. Orbital transfer vehicle concept definition and system analysis study. Volume 1A: Executive summary. Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketchum, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the Phase 2 study were to improve the orbit transfer vehicle (OTV) concept definition by focusing on the following issues: the impact of mission requirements on OTV system design; OTV basing concepts on the Space Shuttle, separate platforms, and/or remote locations; cost reduction of an OTV program to improve its economic benefits and support its acquisition. The OTV mission scenario includes a wide range of missions the main drivers of which are manned GEO servicing, mid-inclination/polar DOD, and lunar/planetary projects. A mission model is presented which includes the type and number of missions per year and the estimated propellant requirements. To accomplish the missions, many OTV concepts were defined including ground-based OTVs launched either in the STS orbiter, the aft cargo carrier, or a heavy lift launch vehicle, and a space-based OTV. System and program trade studies were conducted using performance, cost, safety/risk, and operations/growth criteria. The study shows that mission requirements and substantial economic benefits justify a reusable, cryogenic (H2/O2) space-based OTV. Such a system would not be subjected to Earth-to-orbit launch loads and would not be constained in size or weight. Safety is enhanced by the fact that the system components are launched unfueled. Its inherent reusability and ability to be refueled in space make the space-based OTV very economical to operate.

  5. Using Christmas Bird Count data in analysis of population change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauer, J.R.; Link, W.A.

    2002-01-01

    The scientific credibility of Christmas Bird Count (CBC) results depend on the development and implementation of appropriate methods of statistical analysis. The key to any successful analysis of CBC data is to begin with a careful review of how the limitations of the data are likely to influence the results of the analysis, then to choose methods of analysis that accommodate as much as possible the limitations of the survey. For our analyses of CBC data, we develop a flexible model for effort adjustment and use information from the data to guide the selection of the best model. We include geographic structuring to accommodate the regional variation in number of samples, use a model that allows for overdispersed poisson data appropriate for counts, and employ empirical Bayes procedures to accommodate differences in quality of information in regional summaries. This generalized linear model approach is very flexible, and can be applied to a variety of studies focused on factors influencing wintering bird populations. In particular, the model can be easily modified to contain covariates, allowing for assessment of associations between CBC counts and winter weather, disturbance, and a variety of other environmental factors. These new survey analysis methods have added value in that they provide insights into changes in survey design that can enhance the value of the information. The CBC has been extremely successful as a tool for increasing public interest in birding and bird conservation. Use of the information for bird conservation creates new demands on quality of information, and it is important to maintain a dialogue between users of the information, information needs for the analyses, and survey coordinators and participants. Our work as survey analysts emphasizes the value and limitations of existing data, and provides some indications of what features of the survey could be modified to make the survey a more reliable source of bird population data. Surveys

  6. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the electrical power generation/power reactant storage and distribution subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotch, S. M.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NAA FMEA/CIL documentation. The independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Electrical Power Generation (EPG)/Power Reactants Storage and Distribution (PRSD) System Hardware is documented. The EPG/PRSD hardware is required for performing critical functions of cryogenic hydrogen and oxygen storage and distribution to the Fuel Cell Powerplants (FCP) and Atmospheric Revitalization Pressure Control Subsystem (ARPCS). Specifically, the EPG/PRSD hardware consists of the following: Hydryogen (H2) tanks; Oxygen (O2) tanks; H2 Relief Valve/Filter Packages (HRVFP); O2 Relief Valve/Filter Packages (ORVFP); H2 Valve Modules (HVM); O2 Valve Modules (OVM); and O2 and H2 lines, components, and fittings.

  7. Extreme internal charging currents in medium Earth orbit: Analysis of SURF plate currents on Giove-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Nigel P.; Horne, Richard B.; Isles, John D.; Ryden, Keith A.; Hands, Alex D. P.; Heynderickx, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Relativistic electrons can penetrate spacecraft shielding and can damage satellite components. Spacecraft in medium Earth orbit pass through the heart of the outer radiation belt and may be exposed to large fluxes of relativistic electrons, particularly during extreme space weather events. In this study we perform an extreme value analysis of the daily average internal charging currents at three different shielding depths in medium Earth orbit as a function of L∗ and along the orbit path. We use data from the SURF instrument on board the European Space Agency's Giove-A spacecraft from December 2005 to January 2016. The top, middle, and bottom plates of this instrument respond to electrons with energies >500 keV, >700 keV, and >1.1 MeV, respectively. The 1 in 10 year daily average top plate current decreases with increasing L∗ ranging from 1.0 pA cm-2 at L∗=4.75 to 0.03 pA cm-2 at L∗=7.0. The 1 in 100 year daily average top plate current is a factor of 1.2 to 1.8 larger than the corresponding 1 in 10 year current. The 1 in 10 year daily average middle and bottom plate currents also decrease with increasing L∗ ranging from 0.4 pA cm-2 at L∗=4.75 to 0.01 pA cm-2 at L∗=7.0. The 1 in 100 year daily average middle and bottom plate currents are a factor of 1.2 to 2.7 larger than the corresponding 1 in 10 year currents. Averaged along the orbit path the 1 in 10 year daily average top, middle, and bottom plate currents are 0.22, 0.094, and 0.094 pA cm-2, respectively.

  8. How amino and nitro substituents direct electrophilic aromatic substitution in benzene: an explanation with Kohn-Sham molecular orbital theory and Voronoi deformation density analysis.

    PubMed

    Stasyuk, O A; Szatylowicz, H; Krygowski, T M; Fonseca Guerra, C

    2016-04-28

    The substituent effect of the amino and nitro groups on the electronic system of benzene has been investigated quantum chemically using quantitative Kohn-Sham molecular orbital theory and a corresponding energy decomposition analysis (EDA). The directionality of electrophilic substitution in aniline can accurately be explained with the amount of contribution of the 2pz orbitals on the unsubstituted carbon atoms to the highest occupied π orbital. For nitrobenzene, the molecular π orbitals cannot explain the regioselectivity of electrophilic substitution as there are two almost degenerate π orbitals with nearly the same 2pz contributions on the unsubstituted carbon atoms. The Voronoi deformation density analysis has been applied to aniline and nitrobenzene to obtain an insight into the charge rearrangements due to the substituent. This analysis method identified the orbitals involved in the C-N bond formation of the π system as the cause for the π charge accumulation at the ortho and para positions in the case of the NH2 group and the largest charge depletion at these same positions for the NO2 substituent. Furthermore, we showed that it is the repulsive interaction between the πHOMO of the phenyl radical and the πHOMO of the NH2 radical that is responsible for pushing up the πHOMO of aniline and therefore activating this π orbital of the phenyl ring towards electrophilic substitution.

  9. Demographic analysis from summaries of an age-structured population.

    PubMed

    Link, William A; Royle, J Andrew; Hatfield, Jeff S

    2003-12-01

    Demographic analyses of age-structured populations typically rely on life history data for individuals, or when individual animals are not identified, on information about the numbers of individuals in each age class through time. While it is usually difficult to determine the age class of a randomly encountered individual, it is often the case that the individual can be readily and reliably assigned to one of a set of age classes. For example, it is often possible to distinguish first-year from older birds. In such cases, the population age structure can be regarded as a latent variable governed by a process prior, and the data as summaries of this latent structure. In this article, we consider the problem of uncovering the latent structure and estimating process parameters from summaries of age class information. We present a demographic analysis for the critically endangered migratory population of whooping cranes (Grus americana), based only on counts of first-year birds and of older birds. We estimate age and year-specific survival rates. We address the controversial issue of whether management action on the breeding grounds has influenced recruitment, relating recruitment rates to the number of seventh-year and older birds, and examining the pattern of variation through time in this rate.

  10. Demixed principal component analysis of neural population data

    PubMed Central

    Kobak, Dmitry; Brendel, Wieland; Constantinidis, Christos; Feierstein, Claudia E; Kepecs, Adam; Mainen, Zachary F; Qi, Xue-Lian; Romo, Ranulfo; Uchida, Naoshige; Machens, Christian K

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in higher cortical areas, such as the prefrontal cortex, are often tuned to a variety of sensory and motor variables, and are therefore said to display mixed selectivity. This complexity of single neuron responses can obscure what information these areas represent and how it is represented. Here we demonstrate the advantages of a new dimensionality reduction technique, demixed principal component analysis (dPCA), that decomposes population activity into a few components. In addition to systematically capturing the majority of the variance of the data, dPCA also exposes the dependence of the neural representation on task parameters such as stimuli, decisions, or rewards. To illustrate our method we reanalyze population data from four datasets comprising different species, different cortical areas and different experimental tasks. In each case, dPCA provides a concise way of visualizing the data that summarizes the task-dependent features of the population response in a single figure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10989.001 PMID:27067378

  11. Demographic analysis from summaries of an age-structured population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, William A.; Royle, J. Andrew; Hatfield, Jeff S.

    2003-01-01

    Demographic analyses of age-structured populations typically rely on life history data for individuals, or when individual animals are not identified, on information about the numbers of individuals in each age class through time. While it is usually difficult to determine the age class of a randomly encountered individual, it is often the case that the individual can be readily and reliably assigned to one of a set of age classes. For example, it is often possible to distinguish first-year from older birds. In such cases, the population age structure can be regarded as a latent variable governed by a process prior, and the data as summaries of this latent structure. In this article, we consider the problem of uncovering the latent structure and estimating process parameters from summaries of age class information. We present a demographic analysis for the critically endangered migratory population of whooping cranes (Grus americana), based only on counts of first-year birds and of older birds. We estimate age and year-specific survival rates. We address the controversial issue of whether management action on the breeding grounds has influenced recruitment, relating recruitment rates to the number of seventh-year and older birds, and examining the pattern of variation through time in this rate.

  12. Using Bayesian Population Viability Analysis to Define Relevant Conservation Objectives

    PubMed Central

    Green, Adam W.; Bailey, Larissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management provides a useful framework for managing natural resources in the face of uncertainty. An important component of adaptive management is identifying clear, measurable conservation objectives that reflect the desired outcomes of stakeholders. A common objective is to have a sustainable population, or metapopulation, but it can be difficult to quantify a threshold above which such a population is likely to persist. We performed a Bayesian metapopulation viability analysis (BMPVA) using a dynamic occupancy model to quantify the characteristics of two wood frog (Lithobates sylvatica) metapopulations resulting in sustainable populations, and we demonstrate how the results could be used to define meaningful objectives that serve as the basis of adaptive management. We explored scenarios involving metapopulations with different numbers of patches (pools) using estimates of breeding occurrence and successful metamorphosis from two study areas to estimate the probability of quasi-extinction and calculate the proportion of vernal pools producing metamorphs. Our results suggest that ≥50 pools are required to ensure long-term persistence with approximately 16% of pools producing metamorphs in stable metapopulations. We demonstrate one way to incorporate the BMPVA results into a utility function that balances the trade-offs between ecological and financial objectives, which can be used in an adaptive management framework to make optimal, transparent decisions. Our approach provides a framework for using a standard method (i.e., PVA) and available information to inform a formal decision process to determine optimal and timely management policies. PMID:26658734

  13. Bayesian Analysis of Multiple Populations in Galactic Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner-Kaiser, Rachel A.; Sarajedini, Ata; von Hippel, Ted; Stenning, David; Piotto, Giampaolo; Milone, Antonino; van Dyk, David A.; Robinson, Elliot; Stein, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    We use GO 13297 Cycle 21 Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations and archival GO 10775 Cycle 14 HST ACS Treasury observations of Galactic Globular Clusters to find and characterize multiple stellar populations. Determining how globular clusters are able to create and retain enriched material to produce several generations of stars is key to understanding how these objects formed and how they have affected the structural, kinematic, and chemical evolution of the Milky Way. We employ a sophisticated Bayesian technique with an adaptive MCMC algorithm to simultaneously fit the age, distance, absorption, and metallicity for each cluster. At the same time, we also fit unique helium values to two distinct populations of the cluster and determine the relative proportions of those populations. Our unique numerical approach allows objective and precise analysis of these complicated clusters, providing posterior distribution functions for each parameter of interest. We use these results to gain a better understanding of multiple populations in these clusters and their role in the history of the Milky Way.Support for this work was provided by NASA through grant numbers HST-GO-10775 and HST-GO-13297 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant NNX11AF34G issued through the Office of Space Science. This project was supported by the National Aeronautics & Space Administration through the University of Central Florida's NASA Florida Space Grant Consortium.

  14. Morphological analysis of palatal rugae pattern in central Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Neha; Nagarajappa, Anil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze the morphological study of palatal rugae pattern in a central Indian population and to determine sex differentiation. Objectives: To investigate the distinctive rugae patterns of the study population and determine the contribution of rugae patterns in gender identification. Material and Methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted among a Central Indian population with a sample size of 500 participants. The study involved 250 males and 250 females who were randomly selected from the outpatient department of Oral Medicine Diagnosis and Radiology, Hitkarini Dental College and Hospital, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh. After collection of impression, casts were made and analyzed to evaluate the palatal rugae pattern in a central Indian population by using Thomas and Kotze classification (1983) for number, shape, direction, and unification of palatal rugae pattern. The statistical analysis was carried out using Mann–Whitney test and Chi-square (χ2) tests for categorical variables. Result: Males showed more number of rugae than females [P = 0.00 (≤0.001)]. Males had more number of wavy rugae pattern whereas females showed more number of straight rugae patterns [P = 0.00 (≤0.001)]. Males showed more backwardly directed rugae whereas females showed more forwardly directed rugae [P = 0.00 (≤0.001)]. The unification did not show any significant difference. Conclusion: This study showed that there was a significant relationship between palatoscopy, human identification, and sex determination. Thus, palatoscopy can be considered as a cost effective, easy, unique, and stable method for human identification. PMID:27891307

  15. GIS-based poverty and population distribution analysis in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jing; Wang, Yingjie; Yan, Hong

    2009-07-01

    Geographically, poverty status is not only related with social-economic factors but also strongly affected by geographical environment. In the paper, GIS-based poverty and population distribution analysis method is introduced for revealing their regional differences. More than 100000 poor villages and 592 national key poor counties are chosen for the analysis. The results show that poverty distribution tends to concentrate in most of west China and mountainous rural areas of mid China. Furthermore, the fifth census data are overlaid to those poor areas in order to gain its internal diversity of social-economic characteristics. By overlaying poverty related social-economic parameters, such as sex ratio, illiteracy, education level, percentage of ethnic minorities, family composition, finding shows that poverty distribution is strongly correlated with high illiteracy rate, high percentage minorities, and larger family member.

  16. Optical orbital debris spotter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, Christoph R.; Bays, J. Timothy; Marr, Kenneth D.; Brown, Charles M.; Nicholas, Andrew C.; Finne, Theodore T.

    2014-11-01

    The number of man-made debris objects orbiting the Earth, or orbital debris, is alarmingly increasing, resulting in the increased probability of degradation, damage, or destruction of operating spacecraft. In part, small objects (<10 cm) in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) are of concern because they are abundant and difficult to track or even to detect on a routine basis. Due to the increasing debris population it is reasonable to assume that improved capabilities for on-orbit damage attribution, in addition to increased capabilities to detect and track small objects are needed. Here we present a sensor concept to detect small debris with sizes between approximately 1.0 and 0.01 cm in the vicinity of a host spacecraft for near real time damage attribution and characterization of dense debris fields and potentially to provide additional data to existing debris models.

  17. Meteoroid capture into earth orbit by atmospheric drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedlander, A. L.; Soldner, J. K.

    1984-08-01

    A probabilistic analysis, based on orbital mechanics, is performed to evaluate the chances of meteoroids entering into earth orbit and the potential population of such objects. The problem is addressed in terms of meteoroids on earth collision courses, slowed by atmosphere entry/exit, entering elliptical orbits with apogees above the atmosphere. The overall capture probability is derived by integrating the capture fraction dependence on velocity and size over the probability frequency distribution of the collision courses. Account is taken of eventual orbit decay, lunar infall and ejection after encounters with the moon. The results indicate that the probability that a natural 10-100 m diam object has achieved earth orbit is negligibly small.

  18. Meteoroid capture into earth orbit by atmospheric drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedlander, A. L.; Soldner, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    A probabilistic analysis, based on orbital mechanics, is performed to evaluate the chances of meteoroids entering into earth orbit and the potential population of such objects. The problem is addressed in terms of meteoroids on earth collision courses, slowed by atmosphere entry/exit, entering elliptical orbits with apogees above the atmosphere. The overall capture probability is derived by integrating the capture fraction dependence on velocity and size over the probability frequency distribution of the collision courses. Account is taken of eventual orbit decay, lunar infall and ejection after encounters with the moon. The results indicate that the probability that a natural 10-100 m diam object has achieved earth orbit is negligibly small.

  19. Choice of population database for forensic DNA profile analysis.

    PubMed

    Steele, Christopher D; Balding, David J

    2014-12-01

    When evaluating the weight of evidence (WoE) for an individual to be a contributor to a DNA sample, an allele frequency database is required. The allele frequencies are needed to inform about genotype probabilities for unknown contributors of DNA to the sample. Typically databases are available from several populations, and a common practice is to evaluate the WoE using each available database for each unknown contributor. Often the most conservative WoE (most favourable to the defence) is the one reported to the court. However the number of human populations that could be considered is essentially unlimited and the number of contributors to a sample can be large, making it impractical to perform every possible WoE calculation, particularly for complex crime scene profiles. We propose instead the use of only the database that best matches the ancestry of the queried contributor, together with a substantial FST adjustment. To investigate the degree of conservativeness of this approach, we performed extensive simulations of one- and two-contributor crime scene profiles, in the latter case with, and without, the profile of the second contributor available for the analysis. The genotypes were simulated using five population databases, which were also available for the analysis, and evaluations of WoE using our heuristic rule were compared with several alternative calculations using different databases. Using FST=0.03, we found that our heuristic gave WoE more favourable to the defence than alternative calculations in well over 99% of the comparisons we considered; on average the difference in WoE was just under 0.2 bans (orders of magnitude) per locus. The degree of conservativeness of the heuristic rule can be adjusted through the FST value. We propose the use of this heuristic for DNA profile WoE calculations, due to its ease of implementation, and efficient use of the evidence while allowing a flexible degree of conservativeness.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis for the Orbiter LH2 Feedline Flowliner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.

    2005-01-01

    In phase II, additional inducer rotations are simulated in order to understand the root cause of the flowliner crack problem. CFD results confirmed that there is a strong unsteady interaction between the backflow regions caused by the LPFTP inducer and secondary flow regions in the bellows cavity through the flowliner slots. It is observed that the swirl on the duct side of the downstream flowliner is stronger than on the duct side of the upstream flowliner. Due to this swirl, there are more significant unsteady flow interactions through the downstream slots than those observed in the upstream slots. Averaged values of the local velocity at the slots were provided to the NESC-ITA flow physics acoustics team to guide them in designing the acoustics experiment. A parametric study was performed to compare the flow field in the flowliner area when one upstream slot and one corresponding downstream slot were enlarged. No significant differences were observed between the flow field obtained from the enlarged slot configuration when compared with the original configuration. More cases must be analyzed with various enlarged slot configurations to generalize this observation. The flow through the A1 test stand and the flow through the orbiter fuel feedline manifold were simulated without the LPFTP. It was observed that incoming flow to the flowliner and inducer was more uniform in the A1 test stand then in the orbiter manifold. Additionally, each engine LPFTP in the orbiter receives significantly different velocity distributions. Because of the differences observed in the computed results, it is not possible for the A1 test stand to represent the three different engine feedlines simultaneously.

  1. Analysis of orbital occupancy of valence neutron in {sup 15}C through Coulomb breakup reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, P. E-mail: pardeep.phy@dcrustm.org

    2015-03-15

    The Coulomb breakup reactions {sup 208}Pb({sup 15}C, {sup 14}C + n){sup 208}Pb and {sup 181}Ta({sup 15}C, {sup 14}C + n){sup 181}Ta have been studied at 68 and 85 A MeV beam energies, respectively, within the framework of the eikonal approximation to investigate the orbital occupancy of valence neutron in the {sup 15}C nucleus. The outcomes of the present work favor 0{sup +} ⊗ 2s{sub 1/2} as the core-neutron coupling for the ground-state structure with 0.91 as a spectroscopic factor.

  2. Analysis of the Shuttle Orbiter reinforced carbon-carbon oxidation protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S. D.; Curry, Donald M.; Chao, Dennis; Pham, Vuong T.

    1994-01-01

    Reusable, oxidation-protected reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) has been successfully flown on all Shuttle Orbiter flights. Thermal testing of the silicon carbide-coated RCC to determine its oxidation characteristics has been performed in convective (plasma Arc-Jet) heating facilities. Surface sealant mass loss was characterized as a function of temperature and pressure. High-temperature testing was performed to develop coating recession correlations for predicting performance at the over-temperature flight conditions associated with abort trajectories. Methods for using these test data to establish multi-mission re-use (i.e., mission life) and single mission limits are presented.

  3. An Analysis of Recent Major Breakups in the Low Earth Orbit Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Anz-Meador, P. D.

    2010-01-01

    Of the 4 recent major breakup events, the FY-1C ASAT test and the collision between Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 generated the most long-term impact to the environment. About half of the fragments will still remain in orbit at least 20 years after the breakup. The A/M distribution of the Cosmos 2251 fragments is well-described by the NASA Breakup Model. Satellites made of modern materials (such as Iridium 33), equipped with large solar panels, or covered with large MLI layers (such as FY-1C) may generated significant amount of high A/M fragments upon breakup.

  4. Efficient vibrational analysis for unrestricted Hartree-Fock based on the fragment molecular orbital method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Hiroya; Fedorov, Dmitri G.; Yokojima, Satoshi; Kitaura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2014-05-01

    We developed the analytic second derivative of the energy for unrestricted Hartree-Fock based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method. We formulated the second order derivative for the separated dimer approximation in both restricted and unrestricted methods, which accelerated the calculations by the factor of 9 for a radical system containing 704 atoms. The accuracy was evaluated for organic radicals in explicit solvent, in comparison to full ab initio results. The method was applied to study the change of IR absorption spectra in the tyrosine oxidation reaction for a polypeptide representing the active part of the photosynthetic reaction center.

  5. Orbital maneuvering subsystem functional path analysis for performance monitoring fault detection and annunciation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keesler, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    The functional paths of the Orbital Maneuver Subsystem (OMS) is defined. The operational flight instrumentation required for performance monitoring, fault detection, and annunciation is described. The OMS is a pressure fed rocket engine propulsion subsystem. One complete OMS shares each of the two auxiliary propulsion subsystem pods with a reaction control subsystem. Each OMS is composed of a pressurization system, a propellant tanking system, and a gimbaled rocket engine. The design, development, and operation of the system are explained. Diagrams of the system are provided.

  6. An initial analysis of the data from the Polar Orbiting Geophysical (POGS) Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Sabaka, T. J.; Baldwin, R. T.

    1991-01-01

    The Polar Orbiting Geophysical Satellite (POGS) was launched in 1990 to measure the geomagnetic field. POGS data from selected magnetically quiet days was chosen, quality checked and deleted where thought to be erroneous. A time and position correction was applied. The resulting data was fit to a degree 13 spherical harmonic model. Evaluation of the quality of the data indicates that it is sufficient for definition of the low degree (approximately less than 8) portion of the geomagnetic field. Further correction of the data time and position may improve this quality.

  7. Orbital transfer vehicle concept definition and system analysis study, 1985. Volume 3: System and program trades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, James H.; Mohrman, Gordon W.; Callan, Daniel R.

    1986-01-01

    The key system and program trade studies performed to arrive at a preferred Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) system concept and evolutionary approach to the acquisition of the requisite capabilites is documented. These efforts were expanded to encompass a Space Transportation Architecture Study (STAS) mission model and recommended unmanned cargo vehicle. The most important factors affecting the results presented are the mission model requirements and selection criteria. The reason for conducting the OTV concept definition and system analyses study is to select a concept and acquisition approach that meets a delivery requirement reflected by the mission model.

  8. Orbital Debris: A Policy Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing orbital debris from a policy perspective is shown. The contents include: 1) Voyage through near-Earth Space-animation; 2) What is Orbital Debris?; 3) Orbital Debris Detectors and Damage Potential; 4) Hubble Space Telescope; 5) Mir Space Station Solar Array; 6) International Space Station; 7) Space Shuttle; 8) Satellite Explosions; 9) Satellite Collisions; 10) NASA Orbital Debris Mitigation Guidelines; 11) International Space Station Jettison Policy; 12) Controlled/Uncontrolled Satellite Reentries; 13) Return of Space Objects; 14) Orbital Debris and U.S. National Space Policy; 15) U.S Government Policy Strategy; 16) Bankruptcy of the Iridium Satellite System; 17) Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC); 18) Orbital Debris at the United Nations; 19) Chinese Anti-satellite System; 20) Future Evolution of Satellite Population; and 21) Challenge of Orbital Debris

  9. An analysis of the basic population structure of Shanghai Municipality.

    PubMed

    Shen, A

    1984-01-01

    This paper analyzes the changes in Shanghai's population structure over the last 30 years in the 4 aspects of age structure, sex composition, urban and rural composition, and labor and employment structure. In 1953 those of the 0 to 6 age group accounted for 21.2% of the total population; in 1957 the group represented a proportion of 24.6%. Since the 1960s, especially after the 1970s, the family planning program gradually took effect, and the birthrate of the entire municipality fell drastically. The number of school-age children in 1979 was 1 1/2 times more than the same age group in 1953; there should be no worry that population control may result in a shortage of manpower to meet the needs of the work force and the armed forces either toward the end of this century or at the beginning of the next. The economy in China is underdeveloped, production and technology remain at a low level, average wages for employees are low, and for a long time the low living standard of the people has shown little sign of improvement. The problem is mainly manifest in the following areas: 1) distribution of the work force in heavy and light industries is not sufficiently rational, 2) the distribution of the work force between captial construction and transport and communications on the 1 hand and the national economy on the other is out of proportion, 3) the distribution of the work force between commerce, service trades, and public utilities on the 1 hand and the national economy on the other is disproportionated, and 4) the distribution of the work force between undertakings of culture, education, scientific research, health, and medical care on the 1 hand and economic construction on the other is improper. How to control population growth and adjust parts of the population structure to suit the national economic development poses a problem that calls for further in-depth study and analysis to resolve it step by step.

  10. Simulation and analysis of the LUCID experiment in the Low Earth Orbit radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyntie, T.; Harrison, M. A.

    2014-06-01

    The Langton Ultimate Cosmic ray Intensity Detector (LUCID) experiment is a satellite-based device that will use five Timepix hybrid silicon pixel detectors to make measurements of the radiation environment at an altitude of approximately 635 km, i.e. in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The experiment is due to launch aboard Surrey Satellite Technology Limited's (SSTL's) TechDemoSat-1 in 2014. The Timepix detectors, developed by the Medipix Collaboration, are arranged to form the five sides of a cube enclosed by a 0.7 mm thick aluminium "dome", and will be operated in Time-over-Threshold mode to allow the flux, energy and directionality of incident ionising radiation to be measured. To estimate the anticipated data rates with respect to these measurements, the LUCID experiment has been modelled using the GEANT4 software framework. As an input to these simulations, SPENVIS, ESA's Space Environment information system, was used to obtain the estimated flux of trapped protons and electrons in TechDemoSat-1's orbit with NASA's AP-8 and AE-8 models. A web portal, LUCIDITY, was developeded to allow school students from the LUCID Collaboration to manage SPENVIS flux spectra and GEANT4 input cards. The initial results reported here confirm that the LUCID's data transmission allowance is sufficient, and further work applying the techniques to more specific space radiation environments with a more sophisticated simulation is proposed.

  11. Docking simulation analysis of range data requirements for the orbital maneuvering vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micheal, J. D.; Vinz, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    The results of an initial study are reported assess the controllability of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) for terminal closure and docking are reported. The vehicle characteristics used in this study are those of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) baseline OMV which were published with the request for proposals for preliminary design of this vehicle. This simulation was conducted at MSFC using the Target Motion Simulator. The study focused on the OMV manual mode capability to accommodate both stabilized and tumbling target engagements with varying complements of range and range rate data displayed to the OMV operator. Four trained test subjects performed over 400 simulated orbital dockings during this study. A firm requirement for radar during the terminal closure and dock phase of the OMV mission was not established by these simulations. Fifteen pound thrusters recommended in the MSFC baseline design were found to be advantageous for initial rate matching maneuvers with unstabilized targets; however, lower thrust levels were desirable for making the final docking maneuvers.

  12. Orbital-Period Variations and Photometric Analysis for the Neglected Contact Binary EH Cancri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.-G.; Shao, Z.-Y.; Pan, H.-J.; Yin, X.-G.

    2011-08-01

    New CCD photometry for the eclipsing binary EH Cnc was made from 2009 to 2011, and five new eclipsing times are presented. Through using the updated Wilson-Devinney code, we first deduced the photometric solution at χ2 = 0.9906. The results show that EH Cnc is a W-type contact binary, whose mass ratio and overcontact degree are q = 2.51 (± 0.02) and f = 27.7% (± 3.4%), respectively. By analyzing the O - C curve of EH Cnc, it is found that there exists a secular-period decrease with a cyclic variation. The period and semiamplitude are and A = 0.0032 days (± 0.0003 days), respectively. This kind of cyclic variation may probably be attributed to the light-time effect via the presence of an unseen third body, because the values of ΔQ1,2 are much smaller than the typical one for close binaries. The orbital period of EH Cnc continuously decreases at a rate of . This kind of secular period decrease may result from mass transfer from the primary to the secondary, accompanied by mass and angular momentum loss from the system. With the orbital period decreasing, the inner and outer Roche lobes will shrink, causing the contact degree to increase. Finally, binaries with decreasing periods, such as EH Cnc, will evolve into deep-contact configurations.

  13. ANALYSIS OF SPIN-ORBIT MISALIGNMENT IN THE ECLIPSING BINARY DI HERCULIS

    SciTech Connect

    Philippov, Alexander A.; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2013-05-10

    The eclipsing binary DI Herculis (DI Her) is known to exhibit anomalously slow apsidal precession below the rate predicted by general relativity. Recent measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect indicate that stellar spins in DI Her are almost orthogonal to the orbital angular momentum, which explains the anomalous precession in agreement with the earlier theoretical suggestion by Shakura. However, these measurements yield only projections of the spin-orbit angles onto the sky plane, leaving the spin projection onto our line of sight unconstrained. Here we describe a method for determining the full three-dimensional spin orientation of the binary components relying on the use of the gravity-darkening effect, which is significant for the rapidly rotating stars in DI Her. Gravity darkening gives rise to a nonuniform brightness distribution over the stellar surface, the pattern of which depends on the stellar spin orientation. Using archival photometric data obtained during multiple eclipses over several decades, we are able to constrain the unknown spin angles in DI Her with this method, finding that the spin axes of both stars lie close to the plane of the sky. Our procedure fully accounts for the precession of stellar spins over the long time span of observations.

  14. Analysis of Static Spacecraft Floating Potential at Low Earth Orbit (LEO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, Joel L.; Hwang, K. S.; Wu, S. T.

    1995-01-01

    Spacecraft floating potential is the charge on the external surfaces of orbiting spacecraft relative to the space. Charging is caused by unequal negative and positive currents to spacecraft surfaces. The charging process continues until the accelerated particles can be collected rapidly enough to balance the currents at which point the spacecraft has reached its equilibrium or floating potential. In low inclination. Low Earth Orbit (LEO), the collection of positive ion and negative electrons. in a particular direction. are typically not equal. The level of charging required for equilibrium to be established is influenced by the characteristics of the ambient plasma environment. by the spacecraft motion, and by the geometry of the spacecraft. Using the kinetic theory, a statistical approach for studying the interaction is developed. The approach used to study the spacecraft floating potential depends on which phenomena are being applied. and on the properties of the plasma. especially the density and temperature. The results from kinetic theory derivation are applied to determine the charging level and the electric potential distribution at an infinite flat plate perpendicular to a streaming plasma using finite-difference scheme.

  15. Numerical analysis of spin-orbit-coupled one-dimensional Fermi gas in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y. H.

    2015-06-01

    Based on the density-matrix renormalization group and the infinite time-evolving block decimation methods we study the interacting spin-orbit-coupled 1D Fermi gas in a transverse magnetic field. We find that the system with an attractive interaction can have a polarized insulator phase, a superconducting (SC) phase, a Luther-Emery (LE) phase, and a band insulator phase as we vary the chemical potential and the strength of the magnetic field. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) enhances the triplet pairing order at zero momentum in both the SC and the LE phase, which leads to an algebraically decaying correlation with the same exponent as that of the singlet pairing one. In contrast to the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov phase found in the spin imbalanced system without SOC, pairings at finite momentum in these two phases have larger exponents hence do not dictate the long-range behavior. We also test for the presence of Majorana fermions in this system. Unlike results from the mean-field study, we do not find positive evidence of Majorana fermions.

  16. The statistical analysis of the color—orbit parameters and color—inclination distributions of TNOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabiyev, Shaig; Simonia, Irakli

    2016-10-01

    The research of the surface properties of the trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) is the key factor to obtain information about past and current status of our Solar System. Because of the far distance from the Sun the photometric investigations remain the most popular approaching way to study of physical conditions of TNOs. For this reason, we examine the correlation between 294 known B-R and 259 V-R color indexes and the orbital parameters of the trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) with by classification is giving in the literature: Cubewanos (Classical KBOs), Plutinos, Sentaurs, SDOs, Other TNOs, and Resonants, and subgroups by diameters greater than 80 km. Almost all inclinations of subgroups by classifications and diameters are strongly correlated with B-R and V-R indexes. Simultaneously, the remarkable and moderate correlations with high significance levels were found in 8 cases for B-R and other orbit parameters: semi-major axis, eccentricity, perihelion and diameters by diameter subgroups and 9 cases by classifications. Moreover, only 4 of 11 moderate correlation coefficients with high significance levels for V-R were calculated by classifications and 6 cases by diameters.

  17. CFD Analysis of Tile-Repair Augers for the Shuttle Orbiter Re-Entry Aeroheating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazaheri, Ali R.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional aerothermodynamic model of the shuttle orbiter's tile overlay repair (TOR) sub-assembly is presented. This sub-assembly, which is an overlay that covers the damaged tiles, is modeled as a protuberance with a constant thickness. The washers and augers that serve as the overlay fasteners are modeled as cylindrical protuberances with constant thicknesses. Entry aerothermodynamic cases are studied to provide necessary inputs for future thermal analyses and to support the space-shuttle return-to-flight effort. The NASA Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) is used to calculate heat transfer rate on the surfaces of the tile overlay repair and augers. Gas flow is modeled as non-equilibrium, five species air in thermal equilibrium. Heat transfer rate and surface temperatures are analyzed and studied for a shuttle orbiter trajectory point at Mach 17.85. Computational results show that the average heat transfer rate normalized with respect to its value at body point 1800 is about BF=1.9 for the auger head. It is also shown that the average BF for the auger and washer heads is about BF=2.0.

  18. JSC Materials Laboratory Reproduction and Failure Analysis of Cracked Orbiter Reaction Control System Niobium Thruster Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Willard L.; Jacobs, Jeremy B.

    2006-01-01

    In April 2004 a Space Shuttle Orbiter Reaction Control System (RCS) thruster was found to be cracked while undergoing a nozzle (niobium/C103 alloy) retrofit. As a failure resulting from an in-flight RCS thruster burn-through (initiated from a crack) could be catastrophic, an official Space Shuttle Program flight constraint was issued until flight safety could be adequately demonstrated. This paper describes the laboratory test program which was undertaken to reproduce the cracking in order to fully understand and bound the driving environments. The associated rationale developed to justify continued safe flight of the Orbiter RCS system is also described. The laboratory testing successfully reproduced the niobium cracking, and established specific bounding conditions necessary to cause cracking in the C103 thruster injectors. Each of the following conditions is necessary in combination together: 1) a mechanically disturbed / cold-worked free surface, 2) an externally applied sustained tensile stress near yield strength, 3) presence of fluorine-containing fluids on exposed tensile / cold-worked free surfaces, and 4) sustained exposure to temperatures greater than 400 F. As a result of this work, it was concluded that fluorine-containing materials (e.g. HF acid, Krytox , Brayco etc.) should be carefully controlled or altogether eliminated during processing of niobium and its alloys.

  19. A Collaborative Analysis Tool for Thermal Protection Systems for Single Stage to Orbit Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Reginald; Stanley, Thomas Troy

    2001-01-01

    Presented is a design tool and process that connects several disciplines which are needed in the complex and integrated design of high performance reusable single stage to orbit (SSTO) vehicles. Every system is linked to all other systems, as is the case with SSTO vehicles with air breathing propulsion, which is currently being studied by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). In particular, the thermal protection system (TPS) is linked directly to almost every major system. The propulsion system pushes the vehicle to velocities on the order of 15 times the speed of sound in the atmosphere before pulling up to go to orbit which results in high temperatures on the external surfaces of the vehicle. Thermal protection systems to maintain the structural integrity of the vehicle must be able to mitigate the heat transfer to the structure and be lightweight. Herein lies the interdependency, in that as the vehicle's speed increases, the TPS requirements are increased. And as TPS masses increase the effect on the propulsion system and all other systems is compounded. To adequately calculate the TPS mass of this type of vehicle several engineering disciplines and analytical tools must be used preferably in an environment that data is easily transferred and multiple iterations are easily facilitated.

  20. NASA's New Orbital Debris Engineering Model, ORDEM2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, Paula H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the functionality and use of ORDEM2010, which replaces ORDEM2000, as the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) debris engineering model. Like its predecessor, ORDEM2010 serves the ODPO mission of providing spacecraft designers/operators and debris observers with a publicly available model to calculate orbital debris flux by current-state-of-knowledge methods. The key advance in ORDEM2010 is the input file structure of the yearly debris populations from 1995-2035 of sizes 10 micron - 1 m. These files include debris from low-Earth orbits (LEO) through geosynchronous orbits (GEO). Stable orbital elements (i.e., those that do not randomize on a sub-year timescale) are included in the files as are debris size, debris number, material density, random error and population error. Material density is implemented from ground-test data into the NASA breakup model and assigned to debris fragments accordingly. The random and population errors are due to machine error and uncertainties in debris sizes. These high-fidelity population files call for a much higher-level model analysis than what was possible with the populations of ORDEM2000. Population analysis in the ORDEM2010 model consists of mapping matrices that convert the debris population elements to debris fluxes. One output mode results in a spacecraft encompassing 3-D igloo of debris flux, compartmentalized by debris size, velocity, pitch, and yaw with respect to spacecraft ram direction. The second output mode provides debris flux through an Earth-based telescope/radar beam from LEO through GEO. This paper compares the new ORDEM2010 with ORDEM2000 in terms of processes and results with examples of specific orbits.

  1. ANALYSIS OF SPIN-ORBIT ALIGNMENT IN THE WASP-32, WASP-38, AND HAT-P-27/WASP-40 SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D. J. A.; Collier Cameron, A.; Enoch, B.; Miller, G. R. M.; Diaz, R. F.; Doyle, A. P.; Smalley, B.; Anderson, D. R.; Hellier, C.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Gillon, M.; Lendl, M.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Queloz, D.; Pollacco, D.; Boisse, I.; Hebrard, G.

    2012-12-01

    We present measurements of the spin-orbit alignment angle, {lambda}, for the hot Jupiter systems WASP-32, WASP-38, and HAT-P-27/WASP-40, based on data obtained using the HARPS spectrograph. We analyze the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for all three systems and also carry out Doppler tomography for WASP-32 and WASP-38. We find that WASP-32 (T {sub eff} = 6140{sup +90} {sub -100} K) is aligned, with an alignment angle of {lambda} = 10.{sup 0}5{sup +6.4} {sub -6.5} obtained through tomography, and that WASP-38 (T {sub eff} = 6180{sup +40} {sub -60} K) is also aligned, with tomographic analysis yielding {lambda} = 7.{sup 0}5{sup +4.7} {sub -6.1}. The latter result provides an order-of-magnitude improvement in the uncertainty in {lambda} compared to the previous analysis of Simpson et al. We are only able to loosely constrain the angle for HAT-P-27/WASP-40 (T{sub eff} = 5190{sup +160} {sub -170} K) to {lambda} = 24.{sup 0}2{sup +76.0}{sub -44.5}, owing to the poor signal-to-noise ratio of our data. We consider this result a non-detection under a slightly updated version of the alignment test of Brown et al. We place our results in the context of the full sample of spin-orbit alignment measurements, finding that they provide further support for previously established trends.

  2. Orbital transfer vehicle concept definition and system analysis study. Volume 2: OTV concept definition and evaluation. Book 1: Mission and system requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofal, Allen E.

    1987-01-01

    The mission and system requirements for the concept definition and system analysis of the Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) are established. The requirements set forth constitute the single authority for the selection, evaluation, and optimization of the technical performance and design of the OTV. This requirements document forms the basis for the Ground and Space Based OTV concept definition analyses and establishes the physical, functional, performance and design relationships to STS, Space Station, Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV), and payloads.

  3. Population and genomic analysis of the genus Halorubrum

    PubMed Central

    Fullmer, Matthew S.; Soucy, Shannon M.; Swithers, Kristen S.; Makkay, Andrea M.; Wheeler, Ryan; Ventosa, Antonio; Gogarten, J. Peter; Papke, R. Thane

    2014-01-01

    The Halobacteria are known to engage in frequent gene transfer and homologous recombination. For stably diverged lineages to persist some checks on the rate of between lineage recombination must exist. We surveyed a group of isolates from the Aran-Bidgol endorheic lake in Iran and sequenced a selection of them. Multilocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA) and Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI) revealed multiple clusters (phylogroups) of organisms present in the lake. Patterns of intein and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) presence/absence and their sequence similarity, GC usage along with the ANI and the identities of the genes used in the MLSA revealed that two of these clusters share an exchange bias toward others in their phylogroup while showing reduced rates of exchange with other organisms in the environment. However, a third cluster, composed in part of named species from other areas of central Asia, displayed many indications of variability in exchange partners, from within the lake as well as outside the lake. We conclude that barriers to gene exchange exist between the two purely Aran-Bidgol phylogroups, and that the third cluster with members from other regions is not a single population and likely reflects an amalgamation of several populations. PMID:24782836

  4. Population and genomic analysis of the genus Halorubrum.

    PubMed

    Fullmer, Matthew S; Soucy, Shannon M; Swithers, Kristen S; Makkay, Andrea M; Wheeler, Ryan; Ventosa, Antonio; Gogarten, J Peter; Papke, R Thane

    2014-01-01

    The Halobacteria are known to engage in frequent gene transfer and homologous recombination. For stably diverged lineages to persist some checks on the rate of between lineage recombination must exist. We surveyed a group of isolates from the Aran-Bidgol endorheic lake in Iran and sequenced a selection of them. Multilocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA) and Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI) revealed multiple clusters (phylogroups) of organisms present in the lake. Patterns of intein and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) presence/absence and their sequence similarity, GC usage along with the ANI and the identities of the genes used in the MLSA revealed that two of these clusters share an exchange bias toward others in their phylogroup while showing reduced rates of exchange with other organisms in the environment. However, a third cluster, composed in part of named species from other areas of central Asia, displayed many indications of variability in exchange partners, from within the lake as well as outside the lake. We conclude that barriers to gene exchange exist between the two purely Aran-Bidgol phylogroups, and that the third cluster with members from other regions is not a single population and likely reflects an amalgamation of several populations.

  5. Quantitative analysis of the heterogeneous population of endocytic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Konstantin; Kosheverova, Vera; Kamentseva, Rimma; Kharchenko, Marianna; Sokolkova, Alena; Kornilova, Elena; Samsonova, Maria

    2017-03-07

    The quantitative characterization of endocytic vesicles in images acquired with microscope is critically important for deciphering of endocytosis mechanisms. Image segmentation is the most important step of quantitative image analysis. In spite of availability of many segmentation methods, the accurate segmentation is challenging when the images are heterogeneous with respect to object shapes and signal intensities what is typical for images of endocytic vesicles. We present a Morphological reconstruction and Contrast mapping segmentation method (MrComas) for the segmentation of the endocytic vesicle population that copes with the heterogeneity in their shape and intensity. The method uses morphological opening and closing by reconstruction in the vicinity of local minima and maxima respectively thus creating the strong contrast between their basins of attraction. As a consequence, the intensity is flattened within the objects and their edges are enhanced. The method accurately recovered quantitative characteristics of synthetic images that preserve characteristic features of the endocytic vesicle population. In benchmarks and quantitative comparisons with two other popular segmentation methods, namely manual thresholding and Squash plugin, MrComas shows the best segmentation results on real biological images of EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor) endocytosis. As a proof of feasibility, the method was applied to quantify the dynamical behavior of Early Endosomal Autoantigen 1 (EEA1)-positive endosome subpopulations during EGF-stimulated endocytosis.

  6. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of axitinib in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, May; Poland, Bill; Brennan, Meghan; Hee, Brian; Pithavala, Yazdi K; Amantea, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    AIMS Axitinib is a potent and selective second generation inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2 and 3 approved for second line treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. The objectives of this analysis were to assess plasma pharmacokinetics and identify covariates that may explain variability in axitinib disposition following single dose administration in healthy volunteers. METHODS Plasma concentration–time data from 337 healthy volunteers in 10 phase I studies were analyzed, using non-linear mixed effects modelling (nonmem) to estimate population pharmacokinetic parameters and evaluate relationships between parameters and food, formulation, demographic factors, measures of renal and hepatic function and metabolic genotypes (UGT1A1*28 and CYP2C19). RESULTS A two compartment structural model with first order absorption and lag time best described axitinib pharmacokinetics. Population estimates for systemic clearance (CL), central volume of distribution (Vc), absorption rate constant (ka) and absolute bioavailability (F) were 17.0 l h−1, 45.3 l, 0.523 h−1 and 46.5%, respectively. With axitinib Form IV, ka and F increased in the fasted state by 207% and 33.8%, respectively. For Form XLI (marketed formulation), F was 15% lower compared with Form IV. CL was not significantly influenced by any of the covariates studied. Body weight significantly affected Vc, but the effect was within the estimated interindividual variability for Vc. CONCLUSIONS The analysis established a model that adequately characterizes axitinib pharmacokinetics in healthy volunteers. Vc was found to increase with body weight. However, no change in plasma exposures is expected with change in body weight; hence no dose adjustment is warranted. PMID:23834452

  7. Population viability analysis of the Endangered shortnose sturgeon

    SciTech Connect

    Jager, Yetta; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Peterson, Douglas L.

    2011-07-01

    This study used population viability analysis (PVA) to partition the influences of potential threats to the endangered shortnose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum). A workshop brought together experts to help identify potential threats including groundwater withdrawal, poor water quality, saltwater intrusion, mercury effects, harvest as by-catch, and sedimentation of spawning habitat. During the course of the project, we eliminated some threats and added new ones. Groundwater withdrawal was dismissed after a study failed to identify connection with groundwater and the majority of pumping is from a confined aquifer. We also eliminated activities on Fort Stewart as influences on spawning habitat because any successful spawning must occur upstream of Fort Stewart. We added climate change to the list of threats based on our assessment of temperature effects and expectations of sea-level rise. Our study highlighted the role of populations in nearby rivers in providing metapopulation support, raising the concern that the population in the Ogeechee River acts as a demographic sink. As part of this study, we carried out a field sampling study to analyze effects of training activities on headwater streams. We developed a new methodology for sampling design as part of this effort and used a mixed-modeling approach to identify relationships between land cover-land use, including those associated with military training activity and water quality. We found that tank training was associated with higher suspended sediment and equipment training was associated with higher organic carbon) and water quality. We detected effects of training on suspended sediment and organic carbon. We also carried out a field sampling effort in the Canoochee and Ogeechee Rivers. In the Ogeechee River, we found that dissolved oxygen in 40% of measurements during summer were below 4 mg L-1. To evaluate mercury as a potential threat, we developed a mercury uptake model and analyzed mercury levels in

  8. Analysis of Thrust Vectoring Capabilities for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco B .; Gromov, Konstantin; Murray, Emmanuell

    2005-01-01

    A strategy to mitigate the impact of the trajectory design of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) on the attitude control design is described in this paper. This paper shows how the thrust vectoring control torques, i.e. the torques required to steer the vehicle, depend on various parameters (thrust magnitude, thrust pod articulation angles, and thrust moment arms). Rather than using the entire reaction control system (RCS) system to steer the spacecraft, we investigate the potential utilization of only thrust vectoring of the main ion engines for the required attitude control to follow the representative trajectory. This study has identified some segments of the representative trajectory where the required control torque may exceed the designed ion engine capability, and how the proposed mitigation strategy succeeds in reducing the attitude control torques to within the existing capability.

  9. Periodic orbits of the Skyrmion breathing mode: Classical and quantal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Abada, A.; Vautherin, D. )

    1992-10-01

    We construct the periodic classical orbits of the Skyrmion breathing mode by a perturbation expansion in the amplitude of the vibration. We first examine the lowest-order construction associated with linear response theory. We find that the monopole response function exhibits a sharp unbound peak which we identify to the Roper resonance {ital N}(1440). A calculation of second-order terms provides an evaluation of the anharmonic corrections. In a second part, we construct a collective Bohr-type Hamiltonian using the knowledge of periodic trajectories. This provides a natural requantization scheme with which we calculate the spectrum of monopole excitations of the Skyrmion. Finally we apply our results to the calculation of color transparency effects. We find that anharmonicities decrease significantly the time taken by a nucleon of small radius to regain its normal size. This effect should diminish the importance of the color transparency phenomenon.

  10. An innovative air data system for the Space Shuttle Orbiter - Data analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. D.; Wolf, H.; Heck, M. L.; Siemers, P. M., III

    1981-01-01

    The Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS) is an experimental system designed to supply research quality air data and to meet Orbiter operational air data requirements throughout entry. SEADS incorporates no mechanical devices but is based on the concept that the fuselage proper, whether symmetrical or not, can be instrumented so as to function both as a pitot-static probe and as a differential pressure flow direction sensor. Specifically SEADS consists of 20 flush orifices, each routed to a pair of absolute pressure transducers. A computational technique has been developed capable of extracting air data parameters solely from surface pressure measurements. The digital filtering algorithm implemented in SEADS is the natural adaptation to air data sensing of a technology widely used in navigation, guidance, and control systems.

  11. Surface field analysis of splitting of orbitals of atoms and ions approaching a metal surface.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V. S.; Waber, J. T.

    1971-01-01

    The splitting of p- and d-orbitals of an atom or an ion which is caused by the locally varying potential near the surface of a realistic metal has been studied for bcc and fcc substrates. A quasi-ionic model is reasonable at close distance, inasmuch as the electron gas does not completely screen the ionic cores. The arrangement of ion cores near the surface causes the potential to vary in three dimensions. Expressions for energy levels were derived for an unsymmetric group using the quasi-ionic model and techniques used in the treatment of crystal field of nearest neighbors. A number of cases involving ions, as well as atoms in the vicinity of a metal substrate were numerically evaluated.

  12. An analysis of propulsion options for transport of lunar materials to earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, R. H.; Jones, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the results of analyses of space-based transportation systems for the transport of extraterrestrial materials from their point of origin on the lunar surface to final delivery point in earth orbit and transport of equipment and supplies for extraterrestrial processing to the operational site. The emphasis has been on the use of near-term (pre-year 2000) propulsion systems, such as advanced chemical (H2, O2) and nuclear-electric systems. More exotic systems (mass drivers, nuclear-thermal rockets, etc.) were also considered to evaluate the potential to be gained by use of post-year 2000 technologies. Finally, the effects of using extraterrestrial propellants (e.g., H2 from lunar polar water-ice for chemical systems) were compared to those of propulsion systems deriving all or part of their propellants from the earth.

  13. Analysis of the relative attitude estimation and control problem for satellite inspection and orbital rendezvous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, D.

    2007-06-01

    A key component of satellite inspection and orbital rendezvous missions is relative attitude estimation and control. This paper analyzes a specific angles-only relative attitude estimation concept where it is assumed that a chaser spacecraft is capable of processing onboard imagery of a resident space object (RSO) and identifying the pixel locations of preselected RSO features. The pixel measurements along with chaser gyro and star camera data are processed by an extended Kalman filter to provide continuous estimates of the relative position and attitude. A novel linear covariance program is used to evaluate the effects of feature-tracking camera errors, gyro errors, star camera errors, measurement rates, and translation and rotational disturbances on relative navigation performance. Linear covariance techniques are further employed to evaluate the closed-loop performance of a relative attitude and position control system.

  14. Aeroheating Analysis for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter with Comparison to Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.

    2006-01-01

    The aeroheating environment of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has been analyzed using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo and free-molecular techniques. The results of these analyses were used to develop an aeroheating database to be used for the pre-flight planning and the in-flight operations support for the aerobraking phase of the MRO mission. The aeroheating predictions calculated for the MRO include the heat transfer coefficient (C(H)) over a range of angles-of-attack, side-slip angles, and number densities. The effects of flow chemistry were also investigated. Flight heat flux data deduced from surface temperature sensors have been compared to pre-flight predictions and agree favorably.

  15. Analysis of mercury in hair of EPA region V population.

    PubMed

    Pellizzari, E D; Fernando, R; Cramer, G M; Meaburn, G M; Bangerter, K

    1999-01-01

    A scoping study, the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) was conducted in EPA Region V from July 1995 to May 1997. This probability-based population study provided an opportunity to examine the mercury levels in 182 participants who provided hair samples. A sensitive analytical procedure based on atomic fluorescence spectrometry was developed and evaluated for the analysis of Hg in approximately 5 mg of human hair. The correlation coefficient (r), the precision, and bias were 0.9983, < or = 1.6%, and < or = 8%, respectively, for standard curves in the hair matrix. The method detection limit (MDL), recovery of Hg in a certified sample (NIES-13), precision (% RSD) for duplicate extract analysis, and precision for duplicate sample analysis averaged 12 ppb (range 4 to 22 ppb), 100 +/- 3% (N=27), 4.6 +/- 2.8 (N=18), and 12.5 +/- 7.4 (N=17), respectively, over the 7 to 8 months of sample analysis. The low MDL yielded 95% of the samples with measurable values, permitting the entire distribution of Hg levels to be characterized. Comparison of annualized Hg distribution in hair with and without background correction revealed a negligible bias on the distribution (1.47% at the 90th percentile). Also, a comparison of the unweighted and nonannualized weighted Hg levels throughout the percentile distribution indicated a small deviation in the upper tail (95th percentile) and is attributable to the small sample size (N=182). The mean, median, and maximum of the annualized Hg levels in hair were 287, 204, and 3505 ppb, respectively. The 75th percentiles were 335 and 368 ppb for the weighted annualized and unweighted distributions, respectively. The percent of individuals in three age categories (0-24, 25-49, and 50 years and older) who exceeded the 75th percentile showed a linear increase with age. Males (N=81) had 10% and 20% lower mean levels than females (N=101) for unweighted and annualized weighted Hg data, respectively. The application of this methodology for

  16. Preparation, analysis, and release of simulated interplanetary grains into low earth orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.R.; Strong, I.B.; Kunkle, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    Astronomical observations which reflect the optical and dynamical properties of interstellar and interplanetary grains are the primary means of identifying the shape, size, and the chemistry of extraterrestrial grain materials and is a major subject of this workshop. Except for recent samplings of extraterrestrial particles in near-Earth orbit and in the stratosphere, observations have been the only method of deducing the properties of extraterrestrial particles. Terrestrial laboratory experiments typically seek not to reproduce astrophysical conditions but to illuminate fundamental dust processes and properties which must be extrapolated to interesting astrophysical conditions. In this report, we discuss the formation and optical characterization of simulated interstellar and interplanetary dust with particular emphasis on studying the properties on irregularly shaped particles. We also discuss efforts to develop the techniques to allow dust experiments to be carried out in low-Earth orbit, thus extending the conditions under which dust experiments may be performed. The objectives of this study are threefold: (1) Elucidate the optical properties, including scattering and absorption, of simulated interstellar grains including SiC, silicates, and carbon grains produced in the laboratory. (2) Develop the capabilities to release grains and volatile materials into the near-Earth environment and study their dynamics and optical properties. (3) Study the interaction of released materials with the near-Earth environment to elucidate grain behavior in astrophysical environments. Interaction of grains with their environment may, for example, lead to grain alignment or coagulation, which results in observable phenomena such as polarization of lighter or a change of the scattering properties of the grains.

  17. Collaborative Analysis Tool for Thermal Protection Systems for Single Stage to Orbit Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Reginald Andrew; Stanley, Thomas Troy

    1999-01-01

    Presented is a design tool and process that connects several disciplines which are needed in the complex and integrated design of high performance reusable single stage to orbit (SSTO) vehicles. Every system is linked to every other system and in the case of SSTO vehicles with air breathing propulsion, which is currently being studied by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); the thermal protection system (TPS) is linked directly to almost every major system. The propulsion system pushes the vehicle to velocities on the order of 15 times the speed of sound in the atmosphere before pulling up to go to orbit which results high temperatures on the external surfaces of the vehicle. Thermal protection systems to maintain the structural integrity of the vehicle must be able to mitigate the heat transfer to the structure and be lightweight. Herein lies the interdependency, in that as the vehicle's speed increases, the TPS requirements are increased. And as TPS masses increase the effect on the propulsion system and all other systems is compounded. To adequately determine insulation masses for a vehicle such as the one described above, the aeroheating loads must be calculated and the TPS thicknesses must be calculated for the entire vehicle. To accomplish this an ascent or reentry trajectory is obtained using the computer code Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST). The trajectory is then used to calculate the convective heat rates on several locations on the vehicles using the Miniature Version of the JA70 Aerodynamic Heating Computer Program (MINIVER). Once the heat rates are defined for each body point on the vehicle, then insulation thickness that are required to maintain the vehicle within structural limits are calculated using Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (SINDA) models. If the TPS masses are too heavy for the performance of the vehicle the process may be repeated altering the trajectory or some other input to reduce

  18. A tapestry of orbits

    SciTech Connect

    King-Hele, D.

    1992-01-01

    In this book, the author describes how orbital research developed to yield a rich harvest of knowledge about the earth and its atmosphere. King-Hele relates a personal account of this research based on analysis of satellite orbits between 1957 and 1990 conducted from the Royal Aircraft Establishment in Farnborough England. The early research methods used before the launch of Sputnik in 1957 are discussed.

  19. [On-orbit response variation analysis of FY-3 MERSI reflective solar bands based on Dunhuang site calibration].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ling; Guo, Mao-Hua; Xu, Na; Zhang, Li-Jun; Liu, Jing-Jing; Hu, Xiu-Qing; Li, Yuan; Rong, Zhi-Guo; Zhao, Ze-Hui

    2012-07-01

    MERSI is the keystone payload of FengYun-3 and there have been two sensors operating on-orbit since 2008. The on-orbit response changes obviously at reflective solar bands (RSBs) and must be effectively monitored and corrected. However MERSI can not realize the RSBs onboard absolute radiometric calibration. This paper presents a new vicarious calibration (VC) method for RSBs based on in-situ BRDF model, and vector radiometric transfer model 6SV with gaseous absorption correction using MOTRAN. The results of synchronous VC experiments in 4 years show that the calibration uncertainties are within 5% except for band at the center of water vapor absorption, and 3% for most bands. Aqua MODIS was taken as the radiometric reference to evaluate the accuracy of this VC method. By comparison of the simulated radiation at top of atmosphere (TOA) with MODIS measurement, it was revealed that the average relative differences are within 3% for window bands with wavelengths less than 1 microm, and 5% for bands with wavelengths larger than 1 microm (except for band 7 at 2.1 microm). Besides, the synchronous nadir observation cross analysis shows the excellent agreement between re-calibrated MERSI TOA apparent reflectance and MODIS measurements. Based on the multi-year site calibration results, it was found that the calibration coefficients could be fitted with two-order polynomials, thus the daily calibration updates could be realized and the response variation between two calibration experiments could be corrected timely; there are large response changes at bands with wavelengths less than 0.6 microm, the degradation rate of the first year at band 8 (0.41 microm) is about 14%; the on-orbit response degradation is maximum at the beginning, the degradation rates slow down after one year in operation, and after two years the responses even increase at some band with wavelengths larger than 0.6 microm.

  20. Orbiter's Skeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The structure of NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft is constructed from composite panels of carbon layers over aluminum honeycomb, lightweight yet strong. This forms a basic structure or skeleton on which the instruments, electronics, propulsion and power systems can be mounted. The propellant tank is contained in the center of the orbiter's structure. This photo was taken at Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, during construction of the spacecraft.

  1. Orbit Determination of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazarico, Erwan; Rowlands, D. D.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Torrence, M. H.; Lemoine, F. G.; Zuber, M. T.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results on precision orbit determination from the radio science investigation of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft. We describe the data, modeling and methods used to achieve position knowledge several times better than the required 50-100m (in total position), over the period from 13 July 2009 to 31 January 2011. In addition to the near-continuous radiometric tracking data, we include altimetric data from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) in the form of crossover measurements, and show that they strongly improve the accuracy of the orbit reconstruction (total position overlap differences decrease from approx.70m to approx.23 m). To refine the spacecraft trajectory further, we develop a lunar gravity field by combining the newly acquired LRO data with the historical data. The reprocessing of the spacecraft trajectory with that model shows significantly increased accuracy (approx.20m with only the radiometric data, and approx.14m with the addition of the altimetric crossovers). LOLA topographic maps and calibration data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera were used to supplement the results of the overlap analysis and demonstrate the trajectory accuracy.

  2. Stellar populations in ω Centauri: a multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraix-Burnet, D.; Davoust, E.

    2015-07-01

    We have performed multivariate statistical analyses of photometric and chemical abundance parameters of three large samples of stars in the globular cluster ω Centauri. The statistical analysis of a sample of 735 stars based on seven chemical abundances with the method of Maximum Parsimony (cladistics) yields the most promising results: seven groups are found, distributed along three branches with distinct chemical, spatial and kinematical properties. A progressive chemical evolution can be traced from one group to the next, but also within groups, suggestive of an inhomogeneous chemical enrichment of the initial interstellar matter. The adjustment of stellar evolution models shows that the groups with metallicities [Fe/H] > -1.5 are Helium enriched, thus presumably of second generation. The spatial concentration of the groups increases with chemical evolution, except for two groups, which stand out in their other properties as well. The amplitude of rotation decreases with chemical evolution, except for two of the three metal-rich groups, which rotate fastest, as predicted by recent hydrodynamical simulations. The properties of the groups are interpreted in terms of star formation in gas clouds of different origins. In conclusion, our multivariate analysis has shown that metallicity alone cannot segregate the different populations of ω Centauri.

  3. Optical Analysis of Impact Features in Aerogel From the Orbital Debris Collection Experiment on the MIR Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, Friedrich; Cress, Glen; Zolensky, Mike; See, Thomas H.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Warren, Jack L.

    1999-01-01

    The Mir Environmental Effects Package (MEEP) was deployed on the Mir station and retrieved after 18 months in space. The payload included the orbital debris collector (ODC), designed and built at the Johnson Space Center to capture and return analyzable residues of the man-made and natural particulate environment in low-Earth orbit for a detailed assessment of its compositional makeup and potential origins. The ODC exposed 2 identical trays, with highly porous, low-density SiO2 aerogel as the basic collector medium, pointed in opposite directions. The aerogel was expected to gently decelerate and capture hypervelocity particles, as opposed to other media that resulted in melting or vaporization of many impactors. Even cursory examination of the returned ODC collectors revealed a surprising variety of impact features. The compositional analyses using scanning electron "miccroscope-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy concentrated on a survey-type inventory of diverse particle types and associated impact features. Detections, in the form of carrot-shaped tracks and shallow pits, included metallic Al, stainless steel, soldering compounds, human waste, and paint flakes. Many pits contained no detectable impactor residue (it was assumed to have vaporized), but most of the tracks contained analyzable residue. The study showed that aerogel would be useful for future low-velocity impact analysis.

  4. A super-jupiter orbiting a late-type star: A refined analysis of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406

    SciTech Connect

    Tsapras, Y.; Street, R. A.; Choi, J.-Y.; Han, C.; Bozza, V.; Gould, A.; Dominik, M.; Browne, P.; Horne, K.; Hundertmark, M.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Udalski, A.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Sumi, T.; Bramich, D. M.; Kains, N.; Ipatov, S.; Alsubai, K. A.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; Collaboration: RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; μFUN Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; and others

    2014-02-10

    We present a detailed analysis of survey and follow-up observations of microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0406 based on data obtained from 10 different observatories. Intensive coverage of the light curve, especially the perturbation part, allowed us to accurately measure the parallax effect and lens orbital motion. Combining our measurement of the lens parallax with the angular Einstein radius determined from finite-source effects, we estimate the physical parameters of the lens system. We find that the event was caused by a 2.73 ± 0.43 M {sub J} planet orbiting a 0.44 ± 0.07 M {sub ☉} early M-type star. The distance to the lens is 4.97 ± 0.29 kpc and the projected separation between the host star and its planet at the time of the event is 3.45 ± 0.26 AU. We find that the additional coverage provided by follow-up observations, especially during the planetary perturbation, leads to a more accurate determination of the physical parameters of the lens.

  5. Pressure loads and aerodynamic force information for the -89A space shuttle orbiter configuration, volume 2. [for structural strength analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennell, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on an 0.0405 scale representation of the Rockwell -89A Light Weight Space Shuttle Orbiter. The test purpose was to obtain pressure loads data in the presence of the ground for orbiter structural strength analysis. Aerodynamic force data was also recorded to allow correlation with all pressure loads information. Angles of attack from minus 3 deg to 18 deg and angles of sideslip of 0 deg, plus or minus 50 deg, and plus or minus 10 deg were tested in the presence of the NAAL ground plane. Static pressure bugs were used to obtain a pressure loads survey of the basic configuration, elevon deflections of 5 deg, 10 deg, 15 deg, and minus 20 deg and a rudder deflection of minus 15 deg, at a tunnel dynamic pressure of 40 psi. The test procedure was to locate a maximum of 30 static pressure bugs on the model surface at various locations calculated to prevent aerodynamic and physical interference. Then by various combinations of location the pressure bugs output was to define a complete pressure survey for the fuselages, wing, vertical tail, and main landing gear door.

  6. Understanding the On-Off Switching Mechanism in Cationic Tetravalent Group-V-Based Fluoride Molecular Sensors Using Orbital Analysis.

    PubMed

    Usui, Kosuke; Ando, Mikinori; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Irle, Stephan

    2015-12-24

    The precise control of on-off switching is essential to the design of ideal molecular sensors. To understand the switching mechanism theoretically, we selected as representative example a 9-anthryltriphenylstibonium cation, which was reported as a fluoride ion sensor. In this molecule, the first excited singlet state exhibits two minimum geometries, where one of them is emissive and the other one dark. The excited state at the geometry with bright emission is of π-π* character, whereas it is of π-σ* character at the "dark" geometry. Geometry changes in the excited state were identified by geometry optimization and partial potential energy surface (PES) mapping. We also studied Group V homologues of this molecule. A barrierless relaxation pathway after vertical excitation to the "dark" geometry was found for the Sb-containing compound on the excited-states PES, whereas barriers appear in the case of P and As. Molecular orbital analysis suggests that the σ* orbital of the antimony compound is stabilized along such relaxation and that the excited state changes its nature correspondingly. Our results indicate that the size of the central atom is crucial for the design of fluoride sensors with this ligand framework.

  7. The lunar laser communication demonstration time-of-flight measurement system: overview, on-orbit performance, and ranging analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, M. L.; Parenti, R. R.; Willis, M. M.; Greco, J. A.; Khatri, F. I.; Robinson, B. S.; Boroson, D. M.

    2016-03-01

    The Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD) flown on the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) satellite achieved record uplink and downlink communication data rates between a satellite orbiting the Moon and an Earth-based ground terminal. In addition, the high-speed signals of the communication system were used to accurately measure the round-trip time-of-flight (TOF) of signals sent to the Moon and back to the Earth. The measured TOF data, sampled at a 20-kS/s rate, and converted to distance, was processed to show a Gaussian white noise floor typically less than 1 cm RMS. This resulted in a precision for relative distance measurements more than two orders-of-magnitude finer than the RF-based navigation and ranging systems used during the LADEE mission. This paper presents an overview of the LLCD TOF system, a summary of the on-orbit measurements, and an analysis of the accuracy of the measured data for the mission.

  8. Analysis of bipolar and amacrine populations in marmoset retina.

    PubMed

    Weltzien, Felix; Percival, Kumiko A; Martin, Paul R; Grünert, Ulrike

    2015-02-01

    About 15 parallel ganglion cell pathways transmit visual signals to the brain, but the interneuron (bipolar and amacrine) populations providing input to ganglion cells remain poorly understood in primate retina. We carried out a quantitative analysis of the inner nuclear layer in the retina of the marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). Vertical Vibratome sections along the horizontal meridian were processed with immunohistochemical markers. Image stacks were taken with a confocal microscope, and densities of cell populations were determined. The density of flat midget bipolar cells fell from 15,746 cells/mm(2) at 1 mm (8 deg) to 7,827 cells/mm(2) at 3 mm (25 deg). The rod bipolar cell density fell from 8,640 cells/mm(2) at 1 mm to 4,278 cells/mm(2) at 3 mm, but the ratio of the two bipolar cell types did not change with eccentricity. The amacrine cell density ranged from 30,000 cells/mm(2) at 8 deg to less than 15,000 cells/mm(2) at 25 deg, but throughout the retina, the ratio of glycinergic to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic to amacrine cells remained relatively constant. The fractions of rod bipolar, cone bipolar, amacrine, Müller, and horizontal cells of all cells in the inner nuclear layer were comparable in central and peripheral retina. Marmosets had lower proportions of midget bipolar and rod bipolar in comparison with macaque. These differences were correlated with differences in rod and cone densities between the two species and did not reflect fundamental differences in the wiring between the two species.

  9. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the electrical power distribution and control/remote manipulator system subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, W. W.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the Electrical Power Distribution and Control (EPD and C)/Remote Manipulator System (RMS) hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained in the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the results of the independent analysis of the EPD and C/RMS (both port and starboard) hardware. The EPD and C/RMS subsystem hardware provides the electrical power and power control circuitry required to safely deploy, operate, control, and stow or guillotine and jettison two (one port and one starboard) RMSs. The EPD and C/RMS subsystem is subdivided into the four following functional divisions: Remote Manipulator Arm; Manipulator Deploy Control; Manipulator Latch Control; Manipulator Arm Shoulder Jettison; and Retention Arm Jettison. The IOA analysis process utilized available EPD and C/RMS hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based on the severity of the effect for each failure mode.

  10. Substituent effects on the optical properties of naphthalenediimides: A frontier orbital analysis across the periodic table.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Joshua R; Guerra, Célia Fonseca; Slootweg, J Chris; Lammertsma, Koop; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2016-01-15

    A comprehensive theoretical treatment is presented for the electronic excitation spectra of ca. 50 different mono-, di-, and tetrasubstituted naphthalenediimides (NDI) using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) at ZORA-CAM-B3LYP/TZ2P//ZORA-BP86/TZ2P with COSMO for simulating the effect of dichloromethane (DCM) solution. The substituents -XHn are from groups 14-17 and rows 2-5 of the periodic table. The lowest dipole-allowed singlet excitation (S0 -S1 ) of the monosubstituted NDIs can be tuned from 3.39 eV for -F to 2.42 eV for -TeH, while the S0 -S2 transition is less sensitive to substitution with energies ranging between 3.67 eV for -CH3 and 3.44 eV for -SbH2 . In the case of NDIs with group-15 and -16 substituents, the optical transitions strongly depend on the extent to which -XHn is planar or pyramidal as well as on the possible formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. The accumulative effect of double and quadruple substitution leads in general to increasing bathochromic shifts, but the increased steric hindrance in tetrasubstituted NDIs can lead to deformations that diminish the effectiveness of the substituents. Detailed analyses of the Kohn-Sham orbital electronic structure in monosubstituted NDIs reveal the mesomeric destabilization of the HOMO as the primary cause of the bathochromic shift of the S0-S1 transition.

  11. Images Analysis of the Propeller Bleriot orbiting in Saturn's outer A Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Hoffmann, Holger; Spahn, Frank; seiss, Martin

    2016-01-01

    More than 150 propeller structures have been observed by the cameras of the Cassini-spacecraft in Saturn's A ring (Tiscareno et al. 2006, 2008, 2010, Sremcevic et al. 2007). These S-shaped density structures are caused by moonlets embedded in Saturn's rings which are not massive enough to clear and maintain a complete circumferential gap like the larger ring-moons Pan and Daphnis do (Spahn, Sremcevic, 2000 and Spahn,Sremcevic, Duschl, 2002). More than 150 propeller structures have been observed by the cameras of the Cassini-spacecraft (Tiscareno et al. 2006, 2008, 2010, Sremcevic et al. 2007).We analyze Cassini ISS images of the propeller Bleriot, which orbits in Saturn's outer A ring between the Encke and Keeler gaps. As of today, Bleriot is the only propeller which shows clearly visible propeller-gaps.In order to determine the radial position of the gap-minimum, we fit a Gaussian to the radial brigthness profile of the propeller at different azimuthal location downstream of the propeller-moonlet. We estimate the ring viscosity from the azimuthal brightness evolution at the gap minimum by fitting it to the theoretical azimuthal gap evolution (Sremcevic, Spahn, Duschl, 2002). Further, we measure a separation of the propeller-gaps of 1.1 km for Bleriot which corresponds to a moonlet Hill radius of about 0.28 km.

  12. INTELSAT 4 in orbit liquid slosh tests and problems in the theoretical analysis of the data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slabinski, V. J.

    1979-01-01

    The destabilizing effect of the liquid on attitude nutation stability was determined from an extensive series of inorbit tests. The liquid slosh driving frequency ratio (rotor nutation frequency/rotor spin rate) was varied over the range of 0.58 to 0.70 for the tests by rotating the spacecraft antenna platform at different rates in inertial space. A rotor mounted accelerometer sensed the spacecraft nutation. The observed time constant for the nutation angle increase or decrease was corrected for the stabilizing contribution of the platform mounted pendulum dampers to yield the net destabilizing dedamping contribution from the liquid slosh. The in orbit tests show two unexpected maxima in the dedamping contribution at driving frequency ratios that vary with the propellant loading. The rotor nutation frequency at the maxima was about one-third of the lowest mode liquid slosh frequency given by ground test data for unspun tanks, and thus did not correspond to a simple resonance of the liquid. Ground tests with spinning systems produced the same maxima, but the phenomenon is not yet understood.

  13. Analysis of optimum diameter of orbit of transmission line source in positron emission tomograph

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.; Amano, M.; Hirose, Y.; Muira, S.; Kanno, I.

    1989-02-01

    Accurate attenuation correction is one of the most important factors to achieve quantitative measurements in positron emission tomography (PET). A transmission scan is most commonly used technique for the attenuation correction in PET. A difficulty in transmission scan is relatively long period to obtain a data with good signal-to-noise ratio. Insufficient signal-to-noise ratio of the transmission data limits that of emission data. Several approaches were reported to improve the transmission data. Those were (1) optimizing of detector threshold, (2) processing delayed coincidence sinogram before subtraction, filtering of transmission sinogram before performing attenuation correction, and (3) rejection of random and scatter coincidence by using rotating line source and information of its position. In some of these methods, additional calculation time or processing hardware is needed. The authors have estimated a relationship between ring diameter of a transmission line source and signal to noise ratio of the transmission dat. This paper aimes to analyze optimum diameter of the orbit of transmission line source in concerning to signal to noise ratio in transmission data.

  14. Thermal-distortion analysis of a spacecraft box truss in geostationary orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, Patrick A.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Rowell, Lawrence F.

    1990-01-01

    The Mission to Planet Earth enlists the use of a geostationary platform to support Earth science monitoring instruments. The strongback for a proposed geostationary platform is a deployable box truss that supports two large diameter passive microwave radiometer (PMR) and several other science instruments. A study was performed to estimate the north-south and east-west pointing errors at the mounting locations of the two PMRs due to on-orbit thermal distortions of the main truss. The baseline configuration indicated that the east-west pointing error greatly exceeded the required limits. Primary origins of the pointing errors were identified, and methods for their reduction were discussed. Thermal performance enhancements to the truss structure were modeled and analyzed, including state-of-the-art surface coatings and insulation techniques. Comparisons of the thermal enhancements to the baseline were performed. Results demonstrated that using a thermal enclosure insulating technique reduced external heat fluxes, and distributed those heat fluxes more evenly throughout the structure, sufficiently reducing the pointing error to satisfy pointing accuracy requirements for the PMR's.

  15. Space Shuttle Orbiter Wing-Leading-Edge Panel Thermo-Mechanical Analysis for Entry Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2010-01-01

    Linear elastic, thermo-mechanical stress analyses of the Space Shuttle Orbiter wing-leading-edge panels is presented for entry heating conditions. The wing-leading-edge panels are made from reinforced carbon-carbon and serve as a part of the overall thermal protection system. Three-dimensional finite element models are described for three configurations: integrated configuration, an independent single-panel configuration, and a local lower-apex joggle segment. Entry temperature conditions are imposed and the through-the-thickness response is examined. From the integrated model, it was concluded that individual panels can be analyzed independently since minimal interaction between adjacent components occurred. From the independent single-panel model, it was concluded that increased through-the-thickness stress levels developed all along the chord of a panel s slip-side joggle region, and hence isolated local joggle sections will exhibit the same trend. From the local joggle models, it was concluded that two-dimensional plane-strain models can be used to study the influence of subsurface defects along the slip-side joggle region of these panels.