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Sample records for orchid vanilla planifolia

  1. Unusual 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde synthase activity from tissue cultures of the vanilla orchid Vanilla planifolia.

    PubMed

    Podstolski, Andrzej; Havkin-Frenkel, Daphna; Malinowski, Jacek; Blount, Jack W; Kourteva, Galina; Dixon, Richard A

    2002-11-01

    Tissue cultures of the vanilla orchid, Vanilla planifolia, produce the flavor compound vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde) and vanillin precursors such as 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde. A constitutively expressed enzyme activity catalyzing chain shortening of a hydroxycinnamic acid, believed to be the first reaction specific for formation of vanilla flavor compounds, was identified in these cultures. The enzyme converts 4-coumaric acid non-oxidatively to 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde in the presence of a thiol reagent but with no co-factor requirement. Several forms of this 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde synthase (4HBS) were resolved and partially purified by a combination of hydrophobic interaction, ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. These forms appear to be interconvertible. The unusual properties of the 4HBS, and its appearance in different protein fractions, raise questions as to its physiological role in vanillin biosynthesis in vivo.

  2. A deep transcriptomic analysis of pod development in the vanilla orchid (Vanilla planifolia).

    PubMed

    Rao, Xiaolan; Krom, Nick; Tang, Yuhong; Widiez, Thomas; Havkin-Frenkel, Daphna; Belanger, Faith C; Dixon, Richard A; Chen, Fang

    2014-11-07

    Pods of the vanilla orchid (Vanilla planifolia) accumulate large amounts of the flavor compound vanillin (3-methoxy, 4-hydroxy-benzaldehyde) as a glucoside during the later stages of their development. At earlier stages, the developing seeds within the pod synthesize a novel lignin polymer, catechyl (C) lignin, in their coats. Genomic resources for determining the biosynthetic routes to these compounds and other flavor components in V. planifolia are currently limited. Using next-generation sequencing technologies, we have generated very large gene sequence datasets from vanilla pods at different times of development, and representing different tissue types, including the seeds, hairs, placental and mesocarp tissues. This developmental series was chosen as being the most informative for interrogation of pathways of vanillin and C-lignin biosynthesis in the pod and seed, respectively. The combined 454/Illumina RNA-seq platforms provide both deep sequence coverage and high quality de novo transcriptome assembly for this non-model crop species. The annotated sequence data provide a foundation for understanding multiple aspects of the biochemistry and development of the vanilla bean, as exemplified by the identification of candidate genes involved in lignin biosynthesis. Our transcriptome data indicate that C-lignin formation in the seed coat involves coordinate expression of monolignol biosynthetic genes with the exception of those encoding the caffeoyl coenzyme A 3-O-methyltransferase for conversion of caffeoyl to feruloyl moieties. This database provides a general resource for further studies on this important flavor species.

  3. A re-evaluation of the final step of vanillin biosynthesis in the orchid Vanilla planifolia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hailian; Barros-Rios, Jaime; Kourteva, Galina; Rao, Xiaolan; Chen, Fang; Shen, Hui; Liu, Chenggang; Podstolski, Andrzej; Belanger, Faith; Havkin-Frenkel, Daphna; Dixon, Richard A

    2017-07-01

    A recent publication describes an enzyme from the vanilla orchid Vanilla planifolia with the ability to convert ferulic acid directly to vanillin. The authors propose that this represents the final step in the biosynthesis of vanillin, which is then converted to its storage form, glucovanillin, by glycosylation. The existence of such a "vanillin synthase" could enable biotechnological production of vanillin from ferulic acid using a "natural" vanilla enzyme. The proposed vanillin synthase exhibits high identity to cysteine proteases, and is identical at the protein sequence level to a protein identified in 2003 as being associated with the conversion of 4-coumaric acid to 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde. We here demonstrate that the recombinant cysteine protease-like protein, whether expressed in an in vitro transcription-translation system, E. coli, yeast, or plants, is unable to convert ferulic acid to vanillin. Rather, the protein is a component of an enzyme complex that preferentially converts 4-coumaric acid to 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, as demonstrated by the purification of this complex and peptide sequencing. Furthermore, RNA sequencing provides evidence that this protein is expressed in many tissues of V. planifolia irrespective of whether or not they produce vanillin. On the basis of our results, V. planifolia does not appear to contain a cysteine protease-like "vanillin synthase" that can, by itself, directly convert ferulic acid to vanillin. The pathway to vanillin in V. planifolia is yet to be conclusively determined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Micropropagation and in vitro conservation of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews).

    PubMed

    Divakaran, Minoo; Babu, K Nirmal

    2009-01-01

    Vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews (syn. V. fragrans Salisb.), a source of natural vanillin, plays a major positive role in the economy of several countries. A native to the Central America, its primary gene pool is threatened by deforestation and over collection that has resulted in disappearance of natural habitats and wild species. Therefore, multiplication and conservation of vanilla diversity is of paramount importance because of its narrow genetic base. It plays an important role in the production of disease free planting material for commercial cultivation. Simple protocols for micropropagation, in vitro conservation and synthetic seed production are described in this chapter which could further be applied to other related vanilla species as well.

  5. Natural polyploidy in Vanilla planifolia (Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Bory, Séverine; Catrice, Olivier; Brown, Spencer; Leitch, Ilia J; Gigant, Rodolphe; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Grisoni, Michel; Duval, Marie-France; Besse, Pascale

    2008-10-01

    Vanilla planifolia accessions cultivated in Reunion Island display important phenotypic variation, but little genetic diversity is demonstrated by AFLP and SSR markers. This study, based on analyses of flow cytometry data, Feulgen microdensitometry data, chromosome counts, and stomatal length measurements, was performed to determine whether polyploidy could be responsible for some of the intraspecific phenotypic variation observed. Vanilla planifolia exhibited an important variation in somatic chromosome number in root cells, as well as endoreplication as revealed by flow cytometry. Nevertheless, the 2C-values of the 50 accessions studied segregated into three distinct groups averaging 5.03 pg (for most accessions), 7.67 pg (for the 'Stérile' phenotypes), and 10.00 pg (for the 'Grosse Vanille' phenotypes). For the three groups, chromosome numbers varied from 16 to 32, 16 to 38, and 22 to 54 chromosomes per cell, respectively. The stomatal length showed a significant variation from 37.75 microm to 48.25 microm. Given that 2C-values, mean chromosome numbers, and stomatal lengths were positively correlated and that 'Stérile' and 'Grosse Vanille' accessions were indistinguishable from 'Classique' accessions using molecular markers, the occurrence of recent autotriploid and autotetraploid types in Reunion Island is supported. This is the first report showing evidence of a recent autopolyploidy in V. planifolia contributing to the phenotypic variation observed in this species.

  6. Biological variation of Vanilla planifolia leaf metabolome.

    PubMed

    Palama, Tony Lionel; Fock, Isabelle; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert; Kodja, Hippolyte

    2010-04-01

    The metabolomic analysis of Vanilla planifolia leaves collected at different developmental stages was carried out using (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis in order to evaluate their variation. Ontogenic changes of the metabolome were considered since leaves of different ages were collected at two different times of the day and in two different seasons. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square modeling discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) of (1)H NMR data provided a clear separation according to leaf age, time of the day and season of collection. Young leaves were found to have higher levels of glucose, bis[4-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-benzyl]-2-isopropyltartrate (glucoside A) and bis[4-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-benzyl]-2-(2-butyl)-tartrate (glucoside B), whereas older leaves had more sucrose, acetic acid, homocitric acid and malic acid. Results obtained from PLS-DA analysis showed that leaves collected in March 2008 had higher levels of glucosides A and B as compared to those collected in August 2007. However, the relative standard deviation (RSD) exhibited by the individual values of glucosides A and B showed that those compounds vary more according to their developmental stage (50%) than to the time of day or the season in which they were collected (19%). Although morphological variations of the V. planifolia accessions were observed, no clear separation of the accessions was determined from the analysis of the NMR spectra. The results obtained in this study, show that this method based on the use of (1)H NMR spectroscopy in combination with multivariate analysis has a great potential for further applications in the study of vanilla leaf metabolome. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of chemical variability of cured vanilla beans (Vanilla tahitensis and Vanilla planifolia).

    PubMed

    Brunschwig, Christel; Collard, François Xavier; Bianchini, Jean-Pierre; Raharivelomanana, Phila

    2009-10-01

    In order to establish a chemical fingerprint of vanilla diversity, thirty samples of V. planifolia J. W. Moore and V. tahitensis G. Jackson cured beans from seven producing countries were examined for their aroma and fatty acid contents. Both fatty acid and aroma compositions were found to vary between vanilla species and origins. Vanillin was found in higher amounts in V. planifolia (1.7-3.6% of dry matter) than in V. tahitensis (1.0-2.0%), and anisyl compounds were found in lower amounts in V. planifolia (0.05%) than in V. tahitensis (1.4%-2.1%). Ten common and long chain monounsaturated fatty acids (LCFA) were identified and were found to be characteristic of the vanilla origin. LCFA derived from secondary metabolites have discriminating compositions as they reach 5.9% and 15.8% of total fatty acids, respectively in V. tahitensis and V. planifolia. This study highlights the role of the curing method as vanilla cured beans of two different species cultivated in the same country were found to have quite similar fatty acid compositions.

  8. Evolution of novel O-methyltransferases from the Vanilla planifolia caffeic acid O-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaijun Michael; Rotter, David; Hartman, Thomas G; Pak, Fulya E; Havkin-Frenkel, Daphna; Belanger, Faith C

    2006-06-01

    The biosynthesis of many plant secondary compounds involves the methylation of one or more hydroxyl groups, catalyzed by O-methyltransferases (OMTs). Here, we report the characterization of two OMTs, Van OMT-2 and Van OMT-3, from the orchid Vanilla planifolia Andrews. These enzymes catalyze the methylation of a single outer hydroxyl group in substrates possessing a 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene moiety, such as methyl gallate and myricetin. This is a substrate requirement not previously reported for any OMTs. Based on sequence analysis these enzymes are most similar to caffeic acid O-methyltransferases (COMTs), but they have negligible activity with typical COMT substrates. Seven of 12 conserved substrate-binding residues in COMTs are altered in Van OMT-2 and Van OMT-3. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences suggests that Van OMT-2 and Van OMT-3 evolved from the V. planifolia COMT. These V. planifolia OMTs are new instances of COMT-like enzymes with novel substrate preferences.

  9. Protocols for Biotechnological Interventions in Improvement of Vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews.).

    PubMed

    Divakaran, Minoo; Babu, K Nirmal; Peter, K V

    2016-01-01

    Vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews (syn. V. fragrans Salisb.), a native of Central America, is the primary source of natural vanillin and plays a major role in the global economy. The gene pool of vanilla is threatened by deforestation and overcollection that has resulted in disappearance of natural habitats and wild species. Continuous vegetative propagation and lack of natural seed set and sufficient variations in the gene pool hamper crop improvement programs. In vitro techniques, one of the key tools of plant biotechnology, can be employed for overcoming specific problems, viz. production of disease-free clones, inducing somaclonal variations, developing hybrids, gene pool conservation, incorporating desired traits by distant hybridization, genetic engineering, etc. However, realization of these objectives necessitates standardization of protocols. This chapter describes the various protocols optimized for crop improvement in Vanilla species.

  10. Occurrence of Cucumber mosaic virus on vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) in India.

    PubMed

    Madhubala, R; Bhadramurthy, V; Bhat, A I; Hareesh, P S; Retheesh, S T; Bhai, R S

    2005-06-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) causing mosaic, leaf distortion and stunting of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) in India was characterized on the basis of biological and coat protein (CP) nucleotide sequence properties. In mechanical inoculation tests, the virus was found to infect members of Chenopodiaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Fabaceae and Solanaceae. Nicotiana benthamiana was found to be a suitable host for the propagation of CMV. The virus was purified from inoculated N. benthamiana plants and negatively stained purified preparations contained isometric particles of about 28 nm in diameter. The molecular weight of the viral coat protein subunits was found to be 25.0 kDa. Polyclonal antiserum was produced in New Zealand white rabbit, immunoglobulin G (IgG) was purified and conjugated with alkaline phosphatase enzyme. Double antibody sandwich-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) method was standardized for the detection of CMV infection in vanilla plants. CP gene of the virus was amplified using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), cloned and sequenced. Sequenced region contained a single open reading frame of 657 nucleotides potentially coding for 218 amino acids. Sequence analyses with other CMV isolates revealed the greatest identity with black pepper isolate of CMV (99%) and the phylogram clearly showed that CMV infecting vanilla belongs to subgroup IB. This is the first report of occurrence of CMV on V. planifolia from India.

  11. Occurrence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens as a systemic endophyte of vanilla orchids.

    PubMed

    White, James F; Torres, Mónica S; Sullivan, Raymond F; Jabbour, Rabih E; Chen, Qiang; Tadych, Mariusz; Irizarry, Ivelisse; Bergen, Marshall S; Havkin-Frenkel, Daphna; Belanger, Faith C

    2014-11-01

    We report the occurrence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens in vanilla orchids (Vanilla phaeantha) and cultivated hybrid vanilla (V. planifolia × V. pompona) as a systemic bacterial endophyte. We determined with light microscopy and isolations that tissues of V. phaeantha and the cultivated hybrid were infected by a bacterial endophyte and that shoot meristems and stomatal areas of stems and leaves were densely colonized. We identified the endophyte as B. amyloliquefaciens using DNA sequence data. Since additional endophyte-free plants and seed of this orchid were not available, additional studies were performed on surrogate hosts Amaranthus caudatus, Ipomoea tricolor, and I. purpurea. Plants of A. caudatus inoculated with B. amyloliquefaciens demonstrated intracellular colonization of guard cells and other epidermal cells, confirming the pattern observed in the orchids. Isolations and histological studies suggest that the bacterium may penetrate deeply into developing plant tissues in shoot meristems, forming endospores in maturing tissues. B. amyloliquefaciens produced fungal inhibitors in culture. In controlled experiments using morning glory seedlings we showed that the bacterium promoted seedling growth and reduced seedling necrosis due to pathogens. We detected the gene for phosphopantetheinyl transferase (sfp), an enzyme in the pathway for production of antifungal lipopeptides, and purified the lipopeptide "surfactin" from cultures of the bacterium. We hypothesize that B. amyloliquefaciens is a robust endophyte and defensive mutualist of vanilla orchids. Whether the symbiosis between this bacterium and its hosts can be managed to protect vanilla crops from diseases is a question that should be evaluated in future research. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Metabolic changes in different developmental stages of Vanilla planifolia pods.

    PubMed

    Palama, Tony Lionel; Khatib, Alfi; Choi, Young Hae; Payet, Bertrand; Fock, Isabelle; Verpoorte, Robert; Kodja, Hippolyte

    2009-09-09

    The metabolomic analysis of developing Vanilla planifolia green pods (between 3 and 8 months after pollination) was carried out by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multivariate data analysis. Multivariate data analysis of the (1)H NMR spectra, such as principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least-squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), showed a trend of separation of those samples based on the metabolites present in the methanol/water (1:1) extract. Older pods had a higher content of glucovanillin, vanillin, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde glucoside, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, and sucrose, while younger pods had more bis[4-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-benzyl]-2-isopropyltartrate (glucoside A), bis[4-(beta-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-benzyl]-2-(2-butyl)tartrate (glucoside B), glucose, malic acid, and homocitric acid. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis targeted at phenolic compound content was also performed on the developing pods and confirmed the NMR results. Ratios of aglycones/glucosides were estimated and thus allowed for detection of more minor metabolites in the green vanilla pods. Quantification of compounds based on both LC-MS and NMR analyses showed that free vanillin can reach 24% of the total vanillin content after 8 months of development in the vanilla green pods.

  13. Comparative analysis of volatiles in traditionally cured Bourbon and Ugandan vanilla bean ( Vanilla planifolia ) extracts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suying; Mueller, Christoph

    2012-10-24

    Traditionally cured vanilla beans ( Vanilla planifolia ) from Madagascar and Uganda were extracted with organic solvents, and the volatiles were separated from the nonvolatile fraction using the solvent assisted flavor evaporation (SAFE) technique. Concentrated vanilla bean extracts were analyzed using GC-MS and GC-O. Two hundred and forty-six volatile compounds were identified using the Automated Mass Spectral Deconvolution and Identification System (AMDIS) software, of which 13 were confirmed with authentic compounds from commercial sources and the others were tentatively identified on the basis of calibrated linear retention indices and the comparison of deconvoluted mass spectra with the in-house and/or NIST spectra databases. Vanillin was the most abundant constituent followed by guaiacol. The total concentration of the volatile compounds, excluding vanillin, was 301 mg/kg for Bourbon and 398 mg/kg for Ugandan vanilla bean extracts. Analytical comparison between the two vanilla bean extracts was discussed. Seventy-eight compounds were identified as odor-active compounds in the vanilla bean extracts with 10 confirmed with authentic references. It was found that there were substantial analytical differences in the odor-active compounds of the two extracts.

  14. Specific pretreatments reduce curing period of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia) beans.

    PubMed

    Sreedhar, R V; Roohie, K; Venkatachalam, L; Narayan, M S; Bhagyalakshmi, N

    2007-04-18

    With the aiming of reducing the curing period, effects of pretreatments on flavor formation in vanilla beans during accelerated curing at 38 degrees C for 40 days were studied. Moisture loss, change in texture, levels of flavoring compounds, and activities of relevant enzymes were compared among various pretreatments as well as the commercial sample. Use of naphthalene acetic acid (NAA; 5 mg/L) or Ethrel (1%) with blanching pretreatment resulted in 3-fold higher vanillin on the 10th day. Other flavoring compounds-vanillic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde-fluctuated greatly, showing no correlation with the pretreatments. Scarification of beans resulted in nearly 4- and 3.6-fold higher vanillin formations on the 10th day in NAA- and Ethrel-treated beans, respectively, as compared to control with a significant change in texture. When activities of major relevant enzymes were followed, addition of NAA or Ethrel helped to retain higher levels of cellulase throughout the curing period and higher levels of beta-glucosidase on the 20th day that correlated with higher vanillin content during curing and subsequent periods. Peroxidase, being highest throughout, did not correlate with the change in levels of major flavoring compounds. The pretreatment methods of the present study may find importance for realizing higher flavor formation in a shorter period because the major quality parameters were found to be comparable to those of a commercial sample.

  15. Phenylpropanoid metabolism in suspension cultures of Vanilla planifolia Andr

    SciT

    Funk, C.; Brodelius, P.E.

    Feeding of cinnamic acid and ferulic acid to non-treated and chitosan-treated cell suspension cultures of Vanilla planifolia resulted in the formation of trace amounts of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (5.2 micrograms per gram fresh weight of cells) and vanillic acid (6.4 micrograms per gram fresh weight of cells), respectively. Addition of a 4-hydroxycinnamate: CoA-ligase inhibitor, 3,4-(methylenedioxy)-cinnamic acid (MDCA), resulted in a reduced biosynthesis of ligneous material with a simultaneous significant increased vanillic acid formation (around 75 micrograms per gram fresh weight of cells). A K{sub i} of 100 micromolar for 4-hydroxycinnamate: CoA-ligase in a crude preparation was estimated for this inhibitor. Itmore » is suggested that the conversion of cinnamic acids into benzoic acids does not involve cinnamoyl CoA esters as intermediates. Feeding of {sup 14}C-cinnamic acid and {sup 14}C-ferulic acid to cells treated with MDCA indicate that cinnamic acid, but not ferulic acid, is a precursor of vanillic acid in these cultivated cells of V. planifolia.« less

  16. Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in Suspension Cultures of Vanilla planifolia Andr. 1

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Christoph; Brodelius, Peter E.

    1992-01-01

    Kinetin is used as an elicitor to induce vanillic acid formation in cell suspension cultures of Vanilla planifolia. Maximal induction is observed at a kinetin concentration of 20 micrograms per gram of fresh weight of cells. Vanillic acid synthesis is observed a few hours after elicitation. The effects of kinetin on the activity of some enzymes of the phenylpropanoid pathway, i.e. phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, 4-hydroxycinnamate:coenzyme A ligase and uridine 5′-diphosphate-glucose:trans-cinnamic acid glucosyltransferase, are reported and compared to the effects of chitosan. The former two enzymes are induced by chitosan with a maximum activity of approximately 25 to 40 hours after elicitation. All three enzymes are induced by kinetin with maximum activities for phenylalanine ammonia lyase and 4-hydroxycinnamate:coenzyme A ligase at approximately 50 hours after induction, whereas maximum glucosyltransferase activity is seen already after 24 hours. Furthermore, both elicitors induced the formation of lignin-like material, whereas only kinetin induced vanillic acid biosynthesis. Finally, kinetin but not chitosan induces catechol-4-O-methyltransferase activity, catalyzing the formation of 4-methoxycinnamic acids, which were shown to be intermediates of hydroxybenzoic acid biosynthesis within cells of V. planifolia. It is suggested that this methyltransferase is directly involved in the biosynthesis of vanillic acid. PMID:16668858

  17. Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in Suspension Cultures of Vanilla planifolia Andr. 1

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Christoph; Brodelius, Peter E.

    1990-01-01

    Feeding of 4-methoxycinnamic acid, 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid and 3,4,5-trimethoxycinnamic acid to cell suspension cultures of Vanilla planifolia resulted in the formation of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, and syringic acid, respectively. The homologous 4-methoxybenzoic acids were demethylated to the same products. It is concluded that the side chain degrading enzyme system accepts the 4-methoxylated substrates while the demethylation occurs at the benzoic acid level. The demethylating enzyme is specific for the 4-position. Feeding of [O-14C-methyl]-3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid revealed that the first step in the conversion is the glycosylation of the cinnamic acid to its glucose ester. A partial purification of a UDP-glucose: trans-cinnamic acid glucosyltransferase is reported. 4-Methoxy substituted cinnamic acids are better substrates for this enzyme than 4-hydroxy substituted cinnamic acid. It is suggested that 4-methoxy substituted cinnamic acids are intermediates in the biosynthetic conversion of cinnamic acids to benzoic acids in cells of V. planifolia. PMID:16667674

  18. Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in Suspension Cultures of Vanilla planifolia Andr. 1

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Christoph; Brodelius, Peter E.

    1990-01-01

    Feeding of cinnamic acid and ferulic acid to non-treated and chitosan-treated cell suspension cultures of Vanilla planifolia resulted in the formation of trace amounts of p-hydroxy benzoic acid (5.2 micrograms per gram fresh weight of cells) and vanillic acid (6.4 micrograms per gram fresh weight of cells), respectively. Addition of a 4-hydroxycinnamate: CoA-ligase inhibitor, 3,4-(methylenedioxy)-cinnamic acid (MDCA), resulted in a reduced biosynthesis of ligneous material with a simultaneous significant increased vanillic acid formation (around 75 micrograms per gram fresh weight of cells). A K1 of 100 micromolar for 4-hydroxycinnamate: CoA-ligase in a crude preparation was estimated for this inhibitor. It is suggested that the conversion of cinnamic acids into benzoic acids does not involve cinnamoyl CoA esters as intermediates. Feeding of 14C-cinnamic acid and 14C-ferulic acid to cells treated with MDCA indicate that cinnamic acid, but not ferulic acid, is a precursor of vanillic acid in these cultivated cells of V. planifolia. PMID:16667725

  19. Identification of novel orosensory active molecules in cured vanilla Beans (Vanilla planifolia).

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Bernd; Hofmann, Thomas

    2009-05-13

    Sequential application of solvent extraction, gel permeation chromatography, and HPLC in combination with taste dilution analyses, followed by LC-MS and 1D/2D NMR experiments, led to the discovery of seven velvety mouth-coating molecules in cured beans of Vanilla planifolia . Among these, 5-(4-hydroxybenzyl)vanillin, 4-(4-hydroxybenzyl)-2-methoxyphenol, 4-hydroxy-3-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl)-5-methoxybenzaldehyde, (1-O-vanilloyl)-(6-O-feruloyl)-beta-d-glucopyranoside, americanin A, and 4',6'-dihydroxy-3',5-dimethoxy-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-carboxaldehyde were previously not reported in vanilla beans. Sensory studies revealed human recognition thresholds for the velvety mouth-coating sensation between 1.0 and 5.0 mumol/kg (water). Interestingly, the biphenyl derivatives were found to enhance the perception of creaminess and fatty body of sweetened skim milk, among which 4',6'-dihydroxy-3',5-dimethoxy-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-carboxaldehyde showed the lowest threshold level of 5 mumol/kg. Quantitative analysis of these compounds in cured vanilla beans from different origins as well as in noncured beans revealed that, with the exception of americanin A, all of the other taste compounds are not present in the green vanilla beans and are formed during the bean curing process.

  20. Microscopic characterization of orchid mycorrhizal fungi: Scleroderma as a putative novel orchid mycorrhizal fungus of Vanilla in different crop systems.

    PubMed

    González-Chávez, Ma Del Carmen A; Torres-Cruz, Terry J; Sánchez, Samantha Albarrán; Carrillo-González, Rogelio; Carrillo-López, Luis Manuel; Porras-Alfaro, Andrea

    2018-02-01

    Vanilla is an orchid of economic importance widely cultivated in tropical regions and native to Mexico. We sampled three species of Vanilla (V. planifolia, V. pompona, and V. insignis) in different crop systems. We studied the effect of crop system on the abundance, type of fungi, and quality of pelotons found in the roots using light and electron microscopy and direct sequencing of mycorrhizal structures. Fungi were identified directly from pelotons obtained from terrestrial roots of vanilla plants in the flowering stage. Root samples were collected from plants in crop systems located in the Totonacapan area in Mexico (states of Puebla and Veracruz). DNA was extracted directly from 40 pelotons and amplified using ITS rRNA sequencing. Peloton-like structures were observed, presenting a combination of active pelotons characterized by abundant hyphal coils and pelotons in various stages of degradation. The most active pelotons were observed in crop systems throughout living tutors (host tree) in comparison with roots collected from dead or artificial tutors. Fungi identified directly from pelotons included Scleroderma areolatum, a common ectomycorrhizal fungus that has not been reported as a mycorrhizal symbiont in orchids. Direct amplification of pelotons also yielded common plant pathogens, including Fusarium and Pyrenophora seminiperda, especially in those sites with low colonization rates, and where large numbers of degraded pelotons were observed. This research reports for the first time the potential colonization of Vanilla by Scleroderma, as a putative orchid mycorrhizal symbiont in four sites in Mexico and the influence of crop system on mycorrhizal colonization on this orchid.

  1. Metabolome of Vanilla planifolia (Orchidaceae) and related species under Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) infection.

    PubMed

    Palama, Tony Lionel; Grisoni, Michel; Fock-Bastide, Isabelle; Jade, Katia; Bartet, Laetitia; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert; Kodja, Hippolyte

    2012-11-01

    The genus Vanilla which belongs to the Orchidaceae family comprises more than 110 species of which two are commercially cultivated (Vanilla planifolia and Vanilla xtahitensis). The cured pods of these species are the source of natural vanilla flavor. In intensive cultivation systems the vines are threatened by viruses such as Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV). In order to investigate the effect of CymMV on the growth and metabolome of vanilla plants, four accessions grown in intensive cultivation systems under shadehouse, CR01 (V. planifolia), CR17 (V. xtahitensis), CR03 (V. planifolia × V. xtahitensis) and CR18 (Vanilla pompona), were challenged with an isolate of CymMV. CymMV infected plants of CR01, CR03 and CR17 had a reduced growth compared to healthy plants, while there was no significant difference in the growth of CR18 vines. Interestingly, CR18 had qualitatively more phenolic compounds in leaves and a virus titre that diminished over time. No differences in the metabolomic profiles of the shadehouse samples obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were observed between the virus infected vs. healthy plants. However, using in- vitro V. planifolia plants, the metabolomic profiles were affected by virus infection. Under these controlled conditions the levels of amino acids and sugars present in the leaves were increased in CymMV infected plants, compared to uninfected ones, whereas the levels of phenolic compounds and malic acid were decreased. The metabolism, growth and viral status of V. pompona accession CR18 contrasted from that of the other species suggesting the existence of partial resistance to CymMV in the vanilla germplasm. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Biochemical characterization of embryogenic calli of Vanilla planifolia in response to two years of thidiazuron treatment.

    PubMed

    Kodja, Hippolyte; Noirot, Michel; Khoyratty, Shahnoo S; Limbada, Hafsah; Verpoorte, Robert; Palama, Tony Lionel

    2015-11-01

    Vanilla planifolia embryogenic calli were cultured for two years on a medium containing thidiazuron (TDZ). Due to the presence of TDZ, these calli were under permanent chemical treatment and the differentiation of adventitious shoots from protocorm-like-bodies (PLBs) was blocked. When embryogenic calli were transferred onto a medium without TDZ, shoot organogenesis and plantlet regeneration occurred. To gain better knowledge about the biochemical and molecular processes involved in the morphoregulatory role of TDZ, hormonal and metabolomic analyses were performed. Our results indicate that in the presence of TDZ, embryogenic calli contained a high amount of abscisic acid (ABA) essentially metabolized into abscisic acid glucosyl ester (ABAGE) and phaseic acid (PA), which was the most abundant. When transferred onto a medium without TDZ, shoot regeneration and development take place in four stages that include: embryogenic calli growth, differentiation of PLBs from meristmatic cells zones (MCZ), shoot organogenesis from PLBs and the elongation of well-formed shoots. From a hormonal perspective, the significant reduction in ABA metabolism and its readjustment in the ABAGE pathway triggered PLBs formation. However, this first morphogenesis was stimulated by a strong reduction in IAA metabolism. The organogenesis of PLBs into shoots is associated with an increase in ABA catabolism and a gradual shift in cellular metabolism towards shoot differentiation. Thus, the initiation of the elongation process in shoots is correlated with an alteration in metabolite composition, including an increase in energy reserves (sucrose/starch) and a rapid decrease in alanine content. Our data highlighted the relationship between endogenous hormone signalling, carbohydrate metabolism and shoot organogenesis in Orchid plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Shoot differentiation from protocorm callus cultures of Vanilla planifolia (Orchidaceae): proteomic and metabolic responses at early stage

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Vanilla planifolia is an important Orchid commercially cultivated for the production of natural vanilla flavour. Vanilla plants are conventionally propagated by stem cuttings and thus causing injury to the mother plants. Regeneration and in vitro mass multiplication are proposed as an alternative to minimize damage to mother plants. Because mass production of V. planifolia through indirect shoot differentiation from callus culture is rare and may be a successful use of in vitro techniques for producing somaclonal variants, we have established a novel protocol for the regeneration of vanilla plants and investigated the initial biochemical and molecular mechanisms that trigger shoot organogenesis from embryogenic/organogenic callus. Results For embryogenic callus induction, seeds obtained from 7-month-old green pods of V. planifolia were inoculated on MS basal medium (BM) containing TDZ (0.5 mg l-1). Germination of unorganized mass callus such as protocorm -like structure (PLS) arising from each seed has been observed. The primary embryogenic calli have been formed after transferring on BM containing IAA (0.5 mg l-1) and TDZ (0.5 mg l-1). These calli were maintained by subculturing on BM containing IAA (0.5 mg l-1) and TDZ (0.3 mg l-1) during 6 months and formed embryogenic/organogenic calli. Histological analysis showed that shoot organogenesis was induced between 15 and 20 days after embryogenic/organogenic calli were transferred onto MS basal medium with NAA (0.5 mg l-1). By associating proteomics and metabolomics analyses, the biochemical and molecular markers responsible for shoot induction have been studied in 15-day-old calli at the stage where no differentiating part was visible on organogenic calli. Two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight-tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS) analysis revealed that 15 protein spots are significantly expressed (P < 0.05) at earlier stages of shoot

  4. Shoot differentiation from protocorm callus cultures of Vanilla planifolia (Orchidaceae): proteomic and metabolic responses at early stage.

    PubMed

    Palama, Tony L; Menard, Patrice; Fock, Isabelle; Choi, Young H; Bourdon, Emmanuel; Govinden-Soulange, Joyce; Bahut, Muriel; Payet, Bertrand; Verpoorte, Robert; Kodja, Hippolyte

    2010-05-05

    Vanilla planifolia is an important Orchid commercially cultivated for the production of natural vanilla flavour. Vanilla plants are conventionally propagated by stem cuttings and thus causing injury to the mother plants. Regeneration and in vitro mass multiplication are proposed as an alternative to minimize damage to mother plants. Because mass production of V. planifolia through indirect shoot differentiation from callus culture is rare and may be a successful use of in vitro techniques for producing somaclonal variants, we have established a novel protocol for the regeneration of vanilla plants and investigated the initial biochemical and molecular mechanisms that trigger shoot organogenesis from embryogenic/organogenic callus. For embryogenic callus induction, seeds obtained from 7-month-old green pods of V. planifolia were inoculated on MS basal medium (BM) containing TDZ (0.5 mg l(-1)). Germination of unorganized mass callus such as protocorm -like structure (PLS) arising from each seed has been observed. The primary embryogenic calli have been formed after transferring on BM containing IAA (0.5 mg l(-1)) and TDZ (0.5 mg l(-1)). These calli were maintained by subculturing on BM containing IAA (0.5 mg l(-1)) and TDZ (0.3 mg l(-1)) during 6 months and formed embryogenic/organogenic calli. Histological analysis showed that shoot organogenesis was induced between 15 and 20 days after embryogenic/organogenic calli were transferred onto MS basal medium with NAA (0.5 mg l(-1)). By associating proteomics and metabolomics analyses, the biochemical and molecular markers responsible for shoot induction have been studied in 15-day-old calli at the stage where no differentiating part was visible on organogenic calli. Two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight-tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS) analysis revealed that 15 protein spots are significantly expressed (P < 0.05) at earlier stages of shoot

  5. Biosynthesis of vanillin via ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Osamu; Sugiura, Kenji; Negishi, Yukiko

    2009-11-11

    (14)C-Labeled phenylalanine, 4-coumaric acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol, ferulic acid, and methionine were applied to disks of green vanilla pods 3 and 6 months after pollination (immature and mature pods), and the conversion of these compounds to vanillin or glucovanillin was investigated. In mature green vanilla pods, radioactivities of 11, 15, 29, and 24% from (14)C-labeled phenylalanine, 4-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and methionine, respectively, were incorporated into glucovanillin within 24 h. In the incorporation processes of methionine and phenylalanine into glucovanillin, some of the (14)C labels were also trapped by the unlabeled ferulic acid. However, (14)C-labeled 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol were not converted to glucovanillin. On the other hand, in immature green vanilla pods radioactivities of the above six compounds were not incorporated into glucovanillin. Although 4-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, and 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol were converted to the respective glucose esters or glucosides and vanillin was converted to glucovanillin, their conversions were believed to be from the detoxication of the aglycones. These results suggest that the biosynthetic pathway for vanillin is 4-coumaric acid --> --> ferulic acid --> --> vanillin --> glucovanillin in mature vanilla pods.

  6. Flavoring extracts of Hemidesmus indicus roots and Vanilla planifolia pods exhibit in vitro acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Anish; Mitra, Adinpunya

    2013-09-01

    Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) are important for treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders. Search for potent and safe AChEIs from plant sources still continues. In the present work, we explored fragrant plant extracts that are traditionally used in flavoring foods, namely, Hemidesmus indicus and Vanilla planifolia, as possible sources for AChEI. Root and pod extracts of H. indicus and V. planifolia, respectively, produce fragrant phenolic compounds, 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde (MBALD) and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde (vanillin). These methoxybenzaldehydes were shown to have inhibitory potential against acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Vanillin (IC50 = 0.037 mM) was detected as more efficient inhibitor than MBALD (IC50 = 0.047 mM). This finding was supported by kinetic analysis. Thus, plant-based food flavoring agents showed capacity in curing Alzheimer's disease and other neurological dysfunctions.

  7. Fungal endophytes of Vanilla planifolia across Réunion Island: isolation, distribution and biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Khoyratty, Shahnoo; Dupont, Joëlle; Lacoste, Sandrine; Palama, Tony Lionel; Choi, Young Hae; Kim, Hye Kyong; Payet, Bertrand; Grisoni, Michel; Fouillaud, Mireille; Verpoorte, Robert; Kodja, Hippolyte

    2015-06-14

    The objective of the work was to characterize fungal endophytes from aerial parts of Vanilla planifolia. Also, to establish their biotransformation abilities of flavor-related metabolites. This was done in order to find a potential role of endophytes on vanilla flavors. Twenty three MOTUs were obtained, representing 6 fungal classes. Fungi from green pods were cultured on mature green pod based media for 30 days followed by (1)H NMR and HPLC-DAD analysis. All fungi from pods consumed metabolized vanilla flavor phenolics. Though Fusarium proliferatum was recovered more often (37.6% of the isolates), it is Pestalotiopsis microspora (3.0%) that increased the absolute amounts (quantified by (1)H NMR in μmol/g DW green pods) of vanillin (37.0 × 10(-3)), vanillyl alcohol (100.0 × 10(-3)), vanillic acid (9.2 × 10(-3)) and p-hydroxybenzoic acid (87.9 × 10(-3)) by significant amounts. All plants studied contained endophytic fungi and the isolation of the endophytes was conducted from plant organs at nine sites in Réunion Island including under shade house and undergrowth conditions. Endophytic variation occured between cultivation practices and the type of organ. Given the physical proximity of fungi inside pods, endophytic biotransformation may contribute to the complexity of vanilla flavors.

  8. Genetic fidelity of long-term micropropagated shoot cultures of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) as assessed by molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Sreedhar, Reddampalli V; Venkatachalam, Lakshmanan; Bhagyalakshmi, Neelwarne

    2007-08-01

    Occurrence of genetic variants during micropropagation is occasionally encountered when the cultures are maintained in vitro for long period. Therefore, the micropropagated multiple shoots of Vanilla planifolia Andrews developed from axillary bud explants established 10 years ago were used to determine somaclonal variation using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and intersimple sequence repeats markers (ISSR). One thousand micro-plants were established in soil of which 95 plantlets (consisting of four phenotypes) along with the mother plant were subjected to genetic analyses using RAPD and ISSR markers. Out of the 45 RAPD and 20 ISSR primers screened, 30 RAPD and 7 ISSR primers showed 317 clear, distinct and reproducible band classes resulting in a total of 30 115 bands. However, no difference was observed in banding patterns of any of the samples for a particular primer, indicating the absence of variation among the micropropagated plants. Our results allow us to conclude that the micropropagation protocol that we have used for in vitro proliferation of vanilla plantlets for the last 10 years might be applicable for the production of clonal plants over a considerable period of time.

  9. The Intracellular Localization of the Vanillin Biosynthetic Machinery in Pods of Vanilla planifolia.

    PubMed

    Gallage, Nethaji J; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Janfelt, Christian; Nielsen, Agnieszka J Z; Naake, Thomas; Dunski, Eryk; Dalsten, Lene; Grisoni, Michel; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2018-02-01

    Vanillin is the most important flavor compound in the vanilla pod. Vanilla planifolia vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyzes the conversion of ferulic acid and ferulic acid glucoside into vanillin and vanillin glucoside, respectively. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) of vanilla pod sections demonstrates that vanillin glucoside is preferentially localized within the mesocarp and placental laminae whereas vanillin is preferentially localized within the mesocarp. VpVAN is present as the mature form (25 kDa) but, depending on the tissue and isolation procedure, small amounts of the immature unprocessed form (40 kDa) and putative oligomers (50, 75 and 100 kDa) may be observed by immunoblotting using an antibody specific to the C-terminal sequence of VpVAN. The VpVAN protein is localized within chloroplasts and re-differentiated chloroplasts termed phenyloplasts, as monitored during the process of pod development. Isolated chloroplasts were shown to convert [14C]phenylalanine and [14C]cinnamic acid into [14C]vanillin glucoside, indicating that the entire vanillin de novo biosynthetic machinery converting phenylalanine to vanillin glucoside is present in the chloroplast.

  10. The Intracellular Localization of the Vanillin Biosynthetic Machinery in Pods of Vanilla planifolia

    PubMed Central

    Gallage, Nethaji J; JØrgensen, Kirsten; Janfelt, Christian; Nielsen, Agnieszka J Z; Naake, Thomas; Duński, Eryk; Dalsten, Lene; Grisoni, Michel; MØller, Birger Lindberg

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Vanillin is the most important flavor compound in the vanilla pod. Vanilla planifolia vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyzes the conversion of ferulic acid and ferulic acid glucoside into vanillin and vanillin glucoside, respectively. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) of vanilla pod sections demonstrates that vanillin glucoside is preferentially localized within the mesocarp and placental laminae whereas vanillin is preferentially localized within the mesocarp. VpVAN is present as the mature form (25 kDa) but, depending on the tissue and isolation procedure, small amounts of the immature unprocessed form (40 kDa) and putative oligomers (50, 75 and 100 kDa) may be observed by immunoblotting using an antibody specific to the C-terminal sequence of VpVAN. The VpVAN protein is localized within chloroplasts and re-differentiated chloroplasts termed phenyloplasts, as monitored during the process of pod development. Isolated chloroplasts were shown to convert [14C]phenylalanine and [14C]cinnamic acid into [14C]vanillin glucoside, indicating that the entire vanillin de novo biosynthetic machinery converting phenylalanine to vanillin glucoside is present in the chloroplast. PMID:29186560

  11. [Potential distribution and geographic characteristics of wild populations of Vanilla planifolia (Orchidaceae) Oaxaca, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Ruiz, Jesús; Herrera-Cabrera, B Edgar; Delgado-Alvarado, Adriana; Salazar-Rojas, Víctor M; Bustamante-Gonzalez, Ángel; Campos-Contreras, Jorge E; Ramírez-Juarez, Javier

    2016-03-01

    Wild specimens of Vanilla planifolia represent a vital part of this resource primary gene pool, and some plants have only been reported in Oaxaca, Mexico. For this reason, we studied its geographical distribution within the state, to locate and describe the ecological characteristics of the areas where they have been found, in order to identify potential areas of establishment. The method comprised four stages: 1) the creation of a database with herbarium records, 2) the construction of the potential distribution based on historical herbarium records for the species, using the model of maximum entropy (MaxEnt) and 22 bioclimatic variables as predictors; 3) an in situ systematic search of individuals, based on herbarium records and areas of potential distribution in 24 municipalities, to determine the habitat current situation and distribution; 4) the description of the environmental factors of potential ecological niches generated by MaxEnt. A review of herbarium collections revealed a total of 18 records of V. planifolia between 1939 and 1998. The systematic search located 28 plants distributed in 12 sites in 95 364 Km(2). The most important variables that determined the model of vanilla potential distribution were: precipitation in the rainy season (61.9 %), soil moisture regime (23.4 %) and precipitation during the four months of highest rainfall (8.1 %). The species potential habitat was found to be distributed in four zones: wet tropics of the Gulf of Mexico, humid temperate, humid tropical, and humid temperate in the Pacific. Precipitation oscillated within the annual ranges of 2 500 to 4 000 mm, with summer rains, and winter precipitation as 5 to 10 % of the total. The moisture regime and predominating climate were udic type I (330 to 365 days of moisture) and hot humid (Am/A(C) m). The plants were located at altitudes of 200 to 1 190 masl, on rough hillsides that generally make up the foothills of mountain systems, with altitudes of 1 300 to 2 500 masl. In

  12. Localization of beta-D-glucosidase activity and glucovanillin in vanilla bean (Vanilla planifolia Andrews).

    PubMed

    Odoux, E; Escoute, J; Verdeil, J-L; Brillouet, J-M

    2003-09-01

    The morphology, anatomy and histology of mature green vanilla beans were examined by light and transmission electron microscopy. Beans have a triangular cross-section with a central cavity containing seeds. Each angle is lined with tubular cells, or papillae, while the cavity sides consist of placental laminae. The epicarp and endocarp are formed by one or two layers of very small cells, while the mesocarp contains large, highly vacuolarized cells, the cytoplasm being restricted to a thin layer along the cell walls. The radial distributions of glucovanillin and beta-glucosidase activity, measured on p-nitrophenyl-beta-glucopyranoside and glucovanillin, are superimposable and show how beta-glucosidase activity increases from the epicarp towards the placental zone, whereas glucovanillin is exclusively located in the placentae and papillae. Subcellular localization of beta-glucosidase activity was achieved by incubating sections of vanilla beans in a buffer containing 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-d-glucopyranoside as a substrate. Activity was observed in the cytoplasm (and/or the periplasm) of mesocarp and endocarp cells, with a more diffuse pattern observed in the papillae. A possible mechanism for the hydrolysis of glucovanillin and release of the aromatic aglycon vanillin involves the decompartmentation of cytoplasmic (and/or periplasmic) beta-glucosidase and vacuolar glucovanillin.

  13. Localization of β-d-Glucosidase Activity and Glucovanillin in Vanilla Bean (Vanilla planifolia Andrews)

    PubMed Central

    ODOUX, E.; ESCOUTE, J.; VERDEIL, J. -L.; BRILLOUET, J. -M.

    2003-01-01

    The morphology, anatomy and histology of mature green vanilla beans were examined by light and transmission electron microscopy. Beans have a triangular cross-section with a central cavity containing seeds. Each angle is lined with tubular cells, or papillae, while the cavity sides consist of placental laminae. The epicarp and endocarp are formed by one or two layers of very small cells, while the mesocarp contains large, highly vacuolarized cells, the cytoplasm being restricted to a thin layer along the cell walls. The radial distributions of glucovanillin and β-glucosidase activity, measured on p-nitrophenyl-β-glucopyranoside and glucovanillin, are superimposable and show how β-glucosidase activity increases from the epicarp towards the placental zone, whereas glucovanillin is exclusively located in the placentae and papillae. Subcellular localization of β-glucosidase activity was achieved by incubating sections of vanilla beans in a buffer containing 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-d-glucopyranoside as a substrate. Activity was observed in the cytoplasm (and/or the periplasm) of mesocarp and endocarp cells, with a more diffuse pattern observed in the papillae. A possible mechanism for the hydrolysis of glucovanillin and release of the aromatic aglycon vanillin involves the decompartmentation of cytoplasmic (and/or periplasmic) β-glucosidase and vacuolar glucovanillin. PMID:12871846

  14. Combined inoculation of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Trichoderma harzianum for enhancing plant growth of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia).

    PubMed

    Sandheep, A R; Asok, A K; Jisha, M S

    2013-06-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the plant growth promoting efficiency of combined inoculation of rhizobacteria on Vanilla plants. Based on the in vitro performance of indigenous Trichoderma spp. and Pseudomonas spp., four effective antagonists were selected and screened under greenhouse experiment for their growth enhancement potential. The maximum percentage of growth enhancement were observed in the combination of Trichoderma harzianum with Pseudomonas fluorescens treatment followed by Pseudomonas fluorescens, Trichoderma harzianum, Pseudomonas putida and Trichoderma virens, respectively in decreasing order. Combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens registered the maximum length of vine (82.88 cm), highest number of leaves (26.67/plant), recorded the highest fresh weight of shoots (61.54 g plant(-1)), fresh weight of roots (4.46 g plant(-1)) and dry weight of shoot (4.56 g plant(-1)) where as the highest dry weight of roots (2.0806 g plant(-1)) were achieved with treatments of Pseudomonas fluorescens. Among the inoculated strains, combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens recorded the maximum nitrogen uptake (61.28 mg plant(-1)) followed by the combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum (std) and Pseudomonas fluorescens (std) (55.03 mg plant(-1)) and the highest phosphorus uptake (38.80 mg plant(-1)) was recorded in dual inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

  15. RP-HPTLC densitometric determination and validation of vanillin and related phenolic compounds in accelerated solvent extract of Vanilla planifolia*.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Upendra Kumar; Sharma, Nandini; Gupta, Ajai Prakash; Kumar, Vinod; Sinha, Arun Kumar

    2007-12-01

    A simple, fast and sensitive RP-HPTLC method is developed for simultaneous quantitative determination of vanillin and related phenolic compounds in ethanolic extracts of Vanilla planifolia pods. In addition to this, the applicability of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) as an alternative to microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and Soxhlet extraction was also explored for the rapid extraction of phenolic compounds in vanilla pods. Good separation was achieved on aluminium plates precoated with silica gel RP-18 F(254S) in the mobile phase of methanol/water/isopropanol/acetic acid (30:65:2:3, by volume). The method showed good linearity, high precision and good recovery of compounds of interest. ASE showed good extraction efficiency in less time as compared to other techniques for all the phenolic compounds. The present method would be useful for analytical research and for routine analysis of vanilla extracts for their quality control.

  16. Microwave- and ultrasound-assisted extraction of vanillin and its quantification by high-performance liquid chromatography in Vanilla planifolia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anuj; Verma, Subash Chandra; Saxena, Nisha; Chadda, Neetu; Singh, Narendra Pratap; Sinha, Arun Kumar

    2006-03-01

    Microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and conventional extraction of vanillin and its quantification by HPLC in pods of Vanilla planifolia is described. A range of nonpolar to polar solvents were used for the extraction of vanillin employing MAE, UAE and conventional methods. Various extraction parameters such as nature of the solvent, solvent volume, time of irradiation, microwave and ultrasound energy inputs were optimized. HPLC was performed on RP ODS column (4.6 mm ID x 250 mm, 5 microm, Waters), a photodiode array detector (Waters 2996) using gradient solvent system of ACN and ortho-phosphoric acid in water (0.001:99.999 v/v) at 25 degrees C. Regression equation revealed a linear relationship (r2 > 0.9998) between the mass of vanillin injected and the peak areas. The detection limit (S/N = 3) and limit of quantification (S/N = 10) were 0.65 and 1.2 microg/g, respectively. Recovery was achieved in the range 98.5-99.6% for vanillin. Maximum yield of vanilla extract (29.81, 29.068 and 14.31% by conventional extraction, MAE and UAE, respectively) was found in a mixture of ethanol/water (40:60 v/v). Dehydrated ethanolic extract showed the highest amount of vanillin (1.8, 1.25 and 0.99% by MAE, conventional extraction and UAE, respectively).

  17. Involvement of Colonizing Bacillus Isolates in Glucovanillin Hydrolysis during the Curing of Vanilla planifolia Andrews

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yonggan; Li, Jihua; He, Shuzhen; Xu, Fei; Fang, Yiming

    2015-01-01

    Vanilla beans were analyzed using biochemical methods, which revealed that glucovanillin disperses from the inner part to the outer part of the vanilla bean during the curing process and is simultaneously hydrolyzed by β-d-glucosidase. Enzymatic hydrolysis was found to occur on the surface of the vanilla beans. Transcripts of the β-d-glucosidase gene (bgl) of colonizing microorganisms were detected. The results directly indicate that colonizing microorganisms are involved in glucovanillin hydrolysis. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the colonizing microorganisms mainly belonged to the Bacillus genus. bgl was detected in all the isolates and presented clustering similar to that of the isolate taxonomy. Furthermore, inoculation of green fluorescent protein-tagged isolates showed that the Bacillus isolates can colonize vanilla beans. Glucovanillin was metabolized as the sole source of carbon in a culture of the isolates within 24 h. These isolates presented unique glucovanillin degradation capabilities. Vanillin was the major volatile compound in the culture. Other compounds, such as α-cubebene, β-pinene, and guaiacol, were detected in some isolate cultures. Colonizing Bacillus isolates were found to hydrolyze glucovanillin in culture, indirectly demonstrating the involvement of colonizing Bacillus isolates in glucovanillin hydrolysis during the vanilla curing process. Based on these results, we conclude that colonizing Bacillus isolates produce β-d-glucosidase, which mediates glucovanillin hydrolysis and influences flavor formation. PMID:25979899

  18. Involvement of Colonizing Bacillus Isolates in Glucovanillin Hydrolysis during the Curing of Vanilla planifolia Andrews.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yonggan; Gu, Fenglin; Li, Jihua; He, Shuzhen; Xu, Fei; Fang, Yiming

    2015-08-01

    Vanilla beans were analyzed using biochemical methods, which revealed that glucovanillin disperses from the inner part to the outer part of the vanilla bean during the curing process and is simultaneously hydrolyzed by β-d-glucosidase. Enzymatic hydrolysis was found to occur on the surface of the vanilla beans. Transcripts of the β-d-glucosidase gene (bgl) of colonizing microorganisms were detected. The results directly indicate that colonizing microorganisms are involved in glucovanillin hydrolysis. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the colonizing microorganisms mainly belonged to the Bacillus genus. bgl was detected in all the isolates and presented clustering similar to that of the isolate taxonomy. Furthermore, inoculation of green fluorescent protein-tagged isolates showed that the Bacillus isolates can colonize vanilla beans. Glucovanillin was metabolized as the sole source of carbon in a culture of the isolates within 24 h. These isolates presented unique glucovanillin degradation capabilities. Vanillin was the major volatile compound in the culture. Other compounds, such as α-cubebene, β-pinene, and guaiacol, were detected in some isolate cultures. Colonizing Bacillus isolates were found to hydrolyze glucovanillin in culture, indirectly demonstrating the involvement of colonizing Bacillus isolates in glucovanillin hydrolysis during the vanilla curing process. Based on these results, we conclude that colonizing Bacillus isolates produce β-d-glucosidase, which mediates glucovanillin hydrolysis and influences flavor formation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Action of vanillin (Vanilla planifolia) on the morphology of tibialis anterior and soleus muscles after nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Peretti, Ana Luiza; Antunes, Juliana Sobral; Lovison, Keli; Kunz, Regina Inês; Castor, Lidyane Regina Gomes; Brancalhão, Rose Meire Costa; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor; Ribeiro, Lucinéia de Fátima Chasko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the action of vanillin (Vanilla planifolia) on the morphology of tibialis anterior and soleus muscles after peripheral nerve injury. Methods Wistar rats were divided into four groups, with seven animals each: Control Group, Vanillin Group, Injury Group, and Injury + Vanillin Group. The Injury Group and the Injury + Vanillin Group animals were submitted to nerve injury by compression of the sciatic nerve; the Vanillin Group and Injury + Vanillin Group, were treated daily with oral doses of vanillin (150mg/kg) from the 3rd to the 21st day after induction of nerve injury. At the end of the experiment, the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles were dissected and processed for light microscopy and submitted to morphological analysis. Results The nerve compression promoted morphological changes, typical of denervation, and the treatment with vanillin was responsible for different responses in the studied muscles. For the tibialis anterior, there was an increase in the number of satellite cells, central nuclei and fiber atrophy, as well as fascicular disorganization. In the soleus, only increased vascularization was observed, with no exacerbation of the morphological alterations in the fibers. Conclusion The treatment with vanillin promoted increase in intramuscular vascularization for the muscles studied, with pro-inflammatory potential for tibialis anterior, but not for soleus muscle. PMID:28767917

  20. Vanillin formation from ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia is catalysed by a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Gallage, Nethaji J; Hansen, Esben H; Kannangara, Rubini; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Holme, Inger; Hebelstrup, Kim; Grisoni, Michel; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2014-06-19

    Vanillin is a popular and valuable flavour compound. It is the key constituent of the natural vanilla flavour obtained from cured vanilla pods. Here we show that a single hydratase/lyase type enzyme designated vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyses direct conversion of ferulic acid and its glucoside into vanillin and its glucoside, respectively. The enzyme shows high sequence similarity to cysteine proteinases and is specific to the substitution pattern at the aromatic ring and does not metabolize caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid as demonstrated by coupled transcription/translation assays. VpVAN localizes to the inner part of the vanilla pod and high transcript levels are found in single cells located a few cell layers from the inner epidermis. Transient expression of VpVAN in tobacco and stable expression in barley in combination with the action of endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and UDP-glucosyltransferases result in vanillyl alcohol glucoside formation from endogenous ferulic acid. A gene encoding an enzyme showing 71% sequence identity to VpVAN was identified in another vanillin-producing plant species Glechoma hederacea and was also shown to be a vanillin synthase as demonstrated by transient expression in tobacco.

  1. Vanillin formation from ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia is catalysed by a single enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gallage, Nethaji J.; Hansen, Esben H.; Kannangara, Rubini; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Holme, Inger; Hebelstrup, Kim; Grisoni, Michel; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2014-01-01

    Vanillin is a popular and valuable flavour compound. It is the key constituent of the natural vanilla flavour obtained from cured vanilla pods. Here we show that a single hydratase/lyase type enzyme designated vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyses direct conversion of ferulic acid and its glucoside into vanillin and its glucoside, respectively. The enzyme shows high sequence similarity to cysteine proteinases and is specific to the substitution pattern at the aromatic ring and does not metabolize caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid as demonstrated by coupled transcription/translation assays. VpVAN localizes to the inner part of the vanilla pod and high transcript levels are found in single cells located a few cell layers from the inner epidermis. Transient expression of VpVAN in tobacco and stable expression in barley in combination with the action of endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and UDP-glucosyltransferases result in vanillyl alcohol glucoside formation from endogenous ferulic acid. A gene encoding an enzyme showing 71% sequence identity to VpVAN was identified in another vanillin-producing plant species Glechoma hederacea and was also shown to be a vanillin synthase as demonstrated by transient expression in tobacco. PMID:24941968

  2. Development and validation of an RP-HPLC method for quantitative determination of vanillin and related phenolic compounds in Vanilla planifolia.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Arun Kumar; Verma, Subash Chandra; Sharma, Upendra Kumar

    2007-01-01

    A simple and fast method was developed using RP-HPLC for separation and quantitative determination of vanillin and related phenolic compounds in ethanolic extract of pods of Vanilla planifolia. Ten phenolic compounds, namely 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol, vanillyl alcohol, 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, vanillin, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and piperonal were quantitatively determined using ACN, methanol, and 0.2% acetic acid in water as a mobile phase with a gradient elution mode. The method showed good linearity, high precision, and good recovery of compounds of interest. The present method would be useful for analytical research and for routine analysis of vanilla extracts for their quality control.

  3. Action of vanillin (Vanilla planifolia) on the morphology of tibialis anterior and soleus muscles after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Peretti, Ana Luiza; Antunes, Juliana Sobral; Lovison, Keli; Kunz, Regina Inês; Castor, Lidyane Regina Gomes; Brancalhão, Rose Meire Costa; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor; Ribeiro, Lucinéia de Fátima Chasko

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the action of vanillin (Vanilla planifolia) on the morphology of tibialis anterior and soleus muscles after peripheral nerve injury. Wistar rats were divided into four groups, with seven animals each: Control Group, Vanillin Group, Injury Group, and Injury + Vanillin Group. The Injury Group and the Injury + Vanillin Group animals were submitted to nerve injury by compression of the sciatic nerve; the Vanillin Group and Injury + Vanillin Group, were treated daily with oral doses of vanillin (150mg/kg) from the 3rd to the 21st day after induction of nerve injury. At the end of the experiment, the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles were dissected and processed for light microscopy and submitted to morphological analysis. The nerve compression promoted morphological changes, typical of denervation, and the treatment with vanillin was responsible for different responses in the studied muscles. For the tibialis anterior, there was an increase in the number of satellite cells, central nuclei and fiber atrophy, as well as fascicular disorganization. In the soleus, only increased vascularization was observed, with no exacerbation of the morphological alterations in the fibers. The treatment with vanillin promoted increase in intramuscular vascularization for the muscles studied, with pro-inflammatory potential for tibialis anterior, but not for soleus muscle. Avaliar a ação da vanilina (Vanilla planifolia) sobre a morfologia dos músculos tibial anterior e sóleo após lesão nervosa periférica. Ratos Wistar foram divididos em quatro grupos, com sete animais cada, sendo Grupo Controle, Grupo Vanilina, Grupo Lesão e Grupo Lesão + Vanilina. Os animais dos Grupos Lesão e Grupo Lesão + Vanilina foram submetidos à lesão nervosa por meio da compressão do nervo isquiático, e os Grupos Vanilina e Grupo Lesão + Vanilina foram tratados diariamente com doses orais de vanilina (150mg/kg) do 3o ao 21o dia após a indução da lesão nervosa. Ao término do

  4. Phenylpropanoid 2,3-dioxygenase involved in the cleavage of the ferulic acid side chain to form vanillin and glyoxylic acid in Vanilla planifolia.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Osamu; Negishi, Yukiko

    2017-09-01

    Enzyme catalyzing the cleavage of the phenylpropanoid side chain was partially purified by ion exchange and gel filtration column chromatography after (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 precipitation. Enzyme activities were dependent on the concentration of dithiothreitol (DTT) or glutathione (GSH) and activated by addition of 0.5 mM Fe 2+ . Enzyme activity for ferulic acid was as high as for 4-coumaric acid in the presence of GSH, suggesting that GSH acts as an endogenous reductant in vanillin biosynthesis. Analyses of the enzymatic reaction products with quantitative NMR (qNMR) indicated that an amount of glyoxylic acid (GA) proportional to vanillin was released from ferulic acid by the enzymatic reaction. These results suggest that phenylpropanoid 2,3-dioxygenase is involved in the cleavage of the ferulic acid side chain to form vanillin and GA in Vanilla planifolia.

  5. Expression profiles of key phenylpropanoid genes during Vanilla planifolia pod development reveal a positive correlation between PAL gene expression and vanillin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Fock-Bastide, Isabelle; Palama, Tony Lionel; Bory, Séverine; Lécolier, Aurélie; Noirot, Michel; Joët, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    In Vanilla planifolia pods, development of flavor precursors is dependent on the phenylpropanoid pathway. The distinctive vanilla aroma is produced by numerous phenolic compounds of which vanillin is the most important. Because of the economic importance of vanilla, vanillin biosynthetic pathways have been extensively studied but agreement has not yet been reached on the processes leading to its accumulation. In order to explore the transcriptional control exerted on these pathways, five key phenylpropanoid genes expressed during pod development were identified and their mRNA accumulation profiles were evaluated during pod development and maturation using quantitative real-time PCR. As a prerequisite for expression analysis using qRT-PCR, five potential reference genes were tested, and two genes encoding Actin and EF1 were shown to be the most stable reference genes for accurate normalization during pod development. For the first time, genes encoding a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (VpPAL1) and a cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (VpC4H1) were identified in vanilla pods and studied during maturation. Among phenylpropanoid genes, differential regulation was observed from 3 to 8 months after pollination. VpPAL1 was gradually up-regulated, reaching the maximum expression level at maturity. In contrast, genes encoding 4HBS, C4H, OMT2 and OMT3 did not show significant increase in expression levels after the fourth month post-pollination. Expression profiling of these key phenylpropanoid genes is also discussed in light of accumulation patterns for key phenolic compounds. Interestingly, VpPAL1 gene expression was shown to be positively correlated to maturation and vanillin accumulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Functional characterization of two new members of the caffeoyl CoA O-methyltransferase-like gene family from Vanilla planifolia reveals a new class of plastid-localized O-methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Widiez, Thomas; Hartman, Thomas G; Dudai, Nativ; Yan, Qing; Lawton, Michael; Havkin-Frenkel, Daphna; Belanger, Faith C

    2011-08-01

    Caffeoyl CoA O-methyltransferases (OMTs) have been characterized from numerous plant species and have been demonstrated to be involved in lignin biosynthesis. Higher plant species are known to have additional caffeoyl CoA OMT-like genes, which have not been well characterized. Here, we identified two new caffeoyl CoA OMT-like genes by screening a cDNA library from specialized hair cells of pods of the orchid Vanilla planifolia. Characterization of the corresponding two enzymes, designated Vp-OMT4 and Vp-OMT5, revealed that in vitro both enzymes preferred as a substrate the flavone tricetin, yet their sequences and phylogenetic relationships to other enzymes are distinct from each other. Quantitative analysis of gene expression indicated a dramatic tissue-specific expression pattern for Vp-OMT4, which was highly expressed in the hair cells of the developing pod, the likely location of vanillin biosynthesis. Although Vp-OMT4 had a lower activity with the proposed vanillin precursor, 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, than with tricetin, the tissue specificity of expression suggests it may be a candidate for an enzyme involved in vanillin biosynthesis. In contrast, the Vp-OMT5 gene was mainly expressed in leaf tissue and only marginally expressed in pod hair cells. Phylogenetic analysis suggests Vp-OMT5 evolved from a cyanobacterial enzyme and it clustered within a clade in which the sequences from eukaryotic species had predicted chloroplast transit peptides. Transient expression of a GFP-fusion in tobacco demonstrated that Vp-OMT5 was localized in the plastids. This is the first flavonoid OMT demonstrated to be targeted to the plastids.

  7. Preliminary molecular detection of the somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinase (VpSERK) and knotted-like homeobox (VpKNOX1) genes during in vitro morphogenesis of Vanilla planifolia Jacks.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Mosqueda, Marco A; Iglesias-Andreu, Lourdes G; Sáenz, Luis; Córdova, Iván

    2018-02-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the embryogenic competence of different tissues from different stages (friable callus, bud-regenerating callus, and whole buds) of Vanilla planifolia , through the molecular detection of the somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinase ( VpSERK ) and knotted-like homeobox ( VpKNOX1 ) genes. RNA was extracted with Trizol ® , cDNA was obtained, and the studied transcripts were amplified. Using non-specific primers, VpSERK and VpSTM gene expression was detected in the three stages evaluated. This study might contribute to providing an explanation for the recalcitrance of this Vanilla species to somatic embryogenesis.

  8. Vanillin-bioconversion and bioengineering of the most popular plant flavor and its de novo biosynthesis in the vanilla orchid.

    PubMed

    Gallage, Nethaji J; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, biotechnology-derived production of flavors and fragrances has expanded rapidly. The world's most popular flavor, vanillin, is no exception. This review outlines the current state of biotechnology-based vanillin synthesis with the use of ferulic acid, eugenol, and glucose as substrates and bacteria, fungi, and yeasts as microbial production hosts. The de novo biosynthetic pathway of vanillin in the vanilla orchid and the possible applied uses of this new knowledge in the biotechnology-derived and pod-based vanillin industries are also highlighted. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of four kinds of extraction techniques and kinetics of microwave-assisted extraction of vanillin from Vanilla planifolia Andrews.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhizhe; Gu, Fenglin; Xu, Fei; Wang, Qinghuang

    2014-04-15

    Vanillin yield, microscopic structure, antioxidant activity and overall odour of vanilla extracts obtained by different treatments were investigated. MAE showed the strongest extraction power, shortest time and highest antioxidant activity. Maceration gave higher vanillin yields than UAE and PAE, similar antioxidant activity with UAE, but longer times than UAE and PAE. Overall odour intensity of different vanilla extracts obtained by UAE, PAE and MAE were similar, while higher than maceration extracts. Then, powered vanilla bean with a sample/solvent ratio of 4 g/100 mL was selected as the optimum condition for MAE. Next, compared with other three equations, two-site kinetic equation with lowest RMSD and highest R²(adj) was shown to be more suitable in describing the kinetics of vanillin extraction. By fitting the parameters C(eq), k₁, k₂, and f, a kinetics model was constructed to describe vanillin extraction in terms of irradiation power, ethanol concentration, and extraction time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A tale of two orchids: comparative reproductive development in Vanilla and Phalaenopsis

    The orchid family of flowering plants (Orchidaceae) represents the largest, most diverse, and most successful family of flowering plants in the world yet they are one of the most understudied groups from a molecular and genomic perspective. To further the long-term goal of developing enabling genom...

  11. Authenticity and traceability of vanilla flavors by analysis of stable isotopes of carbon and hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anne-Mette Sølvbjerg; Fromberg, Arvid; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    2014-10-22

    Authenticity and traceability of vanilla flavors were investigated using gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS). Vanilla flavors produced by chemical synthesis (n = 2), fermentation (n = 1), and extracted from two different species of the vanilla orchid (n = 79) were analyzed. The authenticity of the flavor compound vanillin was evaluated on the basis of measurements of ratios of carbon stable isotopes (δ(13)C). It was found that results of δ(13)C for vanillin extracted from Vanilla planifolia and Vanilla tahitensis were significantly different (t test) and that it was possible to differentiate these two groups of natural vanillin from vanillin produced otherwise. Vanilla flavors were also analyzed for ratios of hydrogen stable isotopes (δ(2)H). A graphic representation of δ(13)C versus δ(2)H revealed that vanillin extracted from pods grown in adjacent geographic origins grouped together. Accordingly, values of δ(13)C and δ(2)H can be used for studies of authenticity and traceability of vanilla flavors.

  12. Chemical investigation and authenticity of Indian vanilla beans.

    PubMed

    John, T V; Jamin, E

    2004-12-15

    Representative and validated samples taken from a 500 acre vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) plantation in India have shown significant deviations in aromatic profile, especially the relative amounts of vanillin (high) and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde (low) and the deuterium isotopic (SNIF-NMR) values. However, the carbon isotopic values (carbon 13 profiles) were generally in accordance with the previous findings on vanilla from other geographic origins.

  13. DNA Remodeling by Strict Partial Endoreplication in Orchids, an Original Process in the Plant Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Spencer C.; Bourge, Mickaël; Maunoury, Nicolas; Wong, Maurice; Wolfe Bianchi, Michele; Lepers-Andrzejewski, Sandra; Besse, Pascale; Siljak-Yakovlev, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    DNA remodeling during endoreplication appears to be a strong developmental characteristic in orchids. In this study, we analyzed DNA content and nuclei in 41 species of orchids to further map the genome evolution in this plant family. We demonstrate that the DNA remodeling observed in 36 out of 41 orchids studied corresponds to strict partial endoreplication. Such process is developmentally regulated in each wild species studied. Cytometry data analyses allowed us to propose a model where nuclear states 2C, 4E, 8E, etc. form a series comprising a fixed proportion, the euploid genome 2C, plus 2–32 additional copies of a complementary part of the genome. The fixed proportion ranged from 89% of the genome in Vanilla mexicana down to 19% in V. pompona, the lowest value for all 148 orchids reported. Insterspecific hybridization did not suppress this phenomenon. Interestingly, this process was not observed in mass-produced epiphytes. Nucleolar volumes grow with the number of endocopies present, coherent with high transcription activity in endoreplicated nuclei. Our analyses suggest species-specific chromatin rearrangement. Towards understanding endoreplication, V. planifolia constitutes a tractable system for isolating the genomic sequences that confer an advantage via endoreplication from those that apparently suffice at diploid level. PMID:28419219

  14. DNA remodelling by Strict Partial Endoreplication in orchids, an original process in the plant kingdom.

    PubMed

    Brown, Spencer C; Bourge, Mickaël; Maunoury, Nicolas; Wong, Maurice; Bianchi, Michele Wolfe; Lepers-Andrzejewski, Sandra; Besse, Pascale; Siljak-Yakovlev, Sonja; Dron, Michel; Satiat-Jeunemaître, Béatrice

    2017-04-13

    DNA remodelling during endoreplication appears to be a strong developmental characteristic in orchids. In this study, we analysed DNA content and nuclei in 41 species of orchids to further map the genome evolution in this plant family. We demonstrate that the DNA remodelling observed in 36 out of 41 orchids studied corresponds to strict partial endoreplication. Such process is developmentally regulated in each wild species studied. Cytometry data analyses allowed us to propose a model where nuclear states 2C, 4E, 8E, etc. form a series comprising a fixed proportion, the euploid genome 2C, plus 2 to 32 additional copies of a complementary part of the genome. The fixed proportion ranged from 89% of the genome in Vanilla mexicana down to 19% in V. pompona, the lowest value for all 148 orchids reported. Insterspecific hybridisation did not suppress this phenomenon. Interestingly, this process was not observed in mass-produced epiphytes. Nucleolar volumes grow with the number of endocopies present, coherent with high transcription activity in endoreplicated nuclei. Our analyses suggest species-specific chromatin rearrangement. Towards understanding endoreplication, V. planifolia constitutes a tractable system for isolating the genomic sequences that confer an advantage via endoreplication from those that apparently suffice at diploid level. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. Volatile composition and sensory properties of Vanilla × tahitensis bring new insights for vanilla quality control.

    PubMed

    Brunschwig, Christel; Rochard, Sophie; Pierrat, Alexandre; Rouger, Anne; Senger-Emonnot, Perrine; George, Gérard; Raharivelomanana, Phila

    2016-02-01

    Vanilla × tahitensis produced in French Polynesia has a unique flavour among vanilla species. However, data on volatiles and sensory properties remain limited. In this study, the volatile composition and sensory properties of V. × tahitensis from three Polynesian cultivars and two origins (French Polynesia/Papua New Guinea) were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and quantitative descriptive analysis, respectively, and compared to Vanilla planifolia. Vanilla species, origins and cultivars were differentiated by their volatile and sensory profiles using principal component analysis. The V. × tahitensis flavour from French Polynesia was characterized by a well-balanced sensory profile, having strong anise and caramel notes due to high levels of anisyl compounds. V. × tahitensis from Papua New Guinea was distinct from that of French Polynesia, having strong spicy, fruity, brown rum notes due to p-vinylguaiacol, p-cresol and esters. Vanilla planifolia showed stronger phenolic, woody, smoky notes due to guaiacol, creosol and phenol, which were found to be biomarkers of the species. Vanilla sensory properties were linked by partial least squares regression to key volatile compounds like guaiacol or creosol, which are indicators of lower quality. This study brings new insights to vanilla quality control, with a focus on key volatile compounds, irrespective of origin. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Inhibition of bacterial quorum sensing by vanilla extract.

    PubMed

    Choo, J H; Rukayadi, Y; Hwang, J-K

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to search for a novel quorum sensing inhibitor and analyse its inhibitory activity. Quorum sensing inhibition was monitored using the Tn-5 mutant, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Vanilla beans (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) were extracted using 75% (v/v) aqueous methanol and added to C. violaceum CV026 cultures. Inhibitory activity was measured by quantifying violacein production using a spectrophotometer. The results have revealed that vanilla extract significantly reduced violacein production in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating inhibition of quorum sensing. Vanilla, a widely used spice and flavour, can inhibit bacterial quorum sensing. The results suggest that the intake of vanilla-containing food materials might promote human health by inhibiting quorum sensing and preventing bacterial pathogenesis. Further studies are required to isolate specific substances from vanilla extract acting as quorum sensing inhibitors.

  17. Fast single run of vanilla fingerprint markers on microfluidic-electrochemistry chip for confirmation of common frauds.

    PubMed

    Avila, Mónica; Zougagh, Mohammed; Escarpa, Alberto; Ríos, Angel

    2009-10-01

    A new strategy based on the fast separation of the fingerprint markers of Vanilla planifolia extracts and vanilla-related samples on microfluidic-electrochemistry chip is proposed. This methodology allowed the detection of all required markers for confirmation of common frauds in this field. The elution order was strategically connected with sequential sample screening and analyte confirmation steps, where first ethyl vanillin was detected to distinguish natural from adultered samples; second, vanillin as prominent marker in V. planifolia, but frequently added in its synthetic form; and third, the final detection of the fingerprint markers (p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, vanillic acid, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid) of V. planifolia with confirmation purposes. The reliability of the proposed methodology was demonstrated in the confirmation the natural or non-natural origin of vanilla in samples using V. planifolia extracts and other selected food samples containing this flavor.

  18. Diversity and dynamics of plant genome size: an example of polysomaty from a cytogenetic study of Tahitian vanilla (Vanilla xtahitensis, Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Lepers-Andrzejewski, Sandra; Siljak-Yakovlev, Sonja; Brown, Spencer C; Wong, Maurice; Dron, Michel

    2011-06-01

    Abnormal mitotic behavior with somatic aneuploidy and partial endoreplication were previously reported for the first time in the plant kingdom in Vanilla planifolia. Because vanilla plants are vegetatively propagated, such abnormalities have been transmitted. This study aimed to determine whether mitotic abnormalities also occur in Vanilla hybrid or are suppressed by sexual reproduction. Twenty-eight accessions of Vanilla ×tahitensis, one V. planifolia, and hybrid V. planifolia × V. ×tahitensis were analyzed by chromosome counts, cytometry, and fluorescent in situ hybridization of 18S-5.8S-26S rDNA. In a single root meristem of V. ×tahitensis, chromosome number varied from 22 to 31 in diploids (mean 2C = 5.23 pg), 31 to 41 in triploids (2C = 7.82 pg) and 43 to 60 in tetraploids (2C = 10.27 pg). Morphological diversity is apparently related to ploidy changes. Aneuploidy and partial (asymmetrical) endoreduplication were observed in root meristems of both V. ×tahitensis and the hybrid V. planifolia × V. ×tahitensis, but pollen grains had the euploid chromosome number (n = 15 in diploids). Genome irregularities may be transmitted not only during vegetative propagation but also by sexual reproduction in Vanilla. However, there must be a complex regulation of genome size and organization between the aneuploidy in somatic tissues and subsequently euploid gametic tissue. This is a novel example of polysomaty with developmentally regulated partial endoreplication.

  19. Differential Responses of Vanilla Accessions to Root Rot and Colonization by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-vanillae

    PubMed Central

    Koyyappurath, Sayuj; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Dijoux, Jean Bernard; Lapeyre-Montès, Fabienne; Jade, Katia; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Gatineau, Frédéric; Verdeil, Jean Luc; Besse, Pascale; Grisoni, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Root and stem rot (RSR) disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-vanillae (Forv) is the most damaging disease of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia and V. × tahitensis, Orchidaceae). Breeding programs aimed at developing resistant vanilla varieties are hampered by the scarcity of sources of resistance to RSR and insufficient knowledge about the histopathology of Forv. In this work we have (i) identified new genetic resources resistant to RSR including V. planifolia inbreds and vanilla relatives, (ii) thoroughly described the colonization pattern of Forv into selected vanilla accessions, confirming its necrotic non-vascular behavior in roots, and (iii) evidenced the key role played by hypodermis, and particularly lignin deposition onto hypodermal cell walls, for resistance to Forv in two highly resistant vanilla accessions. Two hundred and fifty-four vanilla accessions were evaluated in the field under natural conditions of infection and in controlled conditions using in vitro plants root-dip inoculated by the highly pathogenic isolate Fo072. For the 26 accessions evaluated in both conditions, a high correlation was observed between field evaluation and in vitro assay. The root infection process and plant response of one susceptible and two resistant accessions challenged with Fo072 were studied using wide field and multiphoton microscopy. In susceptible V. planifolia, hyphae penetrated directly into the rhizodermis in the hairy root region then invaded the cortex through the passage cells where it induced plasmolysis, but never reached the vascular region. In the case of the resistant accessions, the penetration was stopped at the hypodermal layer. Anatomical and histochemical observations coupled with spectral analysis of the hypodermis suggested the role of lignin deposition in the resistance to Forv. The thickness of lignin constitutively deposited onto outer cell walls of hypodermis was highly correlated with the level of resistance for 21 accessions

  20. Differential Responses of Vanilla Accessions to Root Rot and Colonization by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-vanillae.

    PubMed

    Koyyappurath, Sayuj; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Dijoux, Jean Bernard; Lapeyre-Montès, Fabienne; Jade, Katia; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Gatineau, Frédéric; Verdeil, Jean Luc; Besse, Pascale; Grisoni, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Root and stem rot (RSR) disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-vanillae (Forv) is the most damaging disease of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia and V. × tahitensis, Orchidaceae). Breeding programs aimed at developing resistant vanilla varieties are hampered by the scarcity of sources of resistance to RSR and insufficient knowledge about the histopathology of Forv. In this work we have (i) identified new genetic resources resistant to RSR including V. planifolia inbreds and vanilla relatives, (ii) thoroughly described the colonization pattern of Forv into selected vanilla accessions, confirming its necrotic non-vascular behavior in roots, and (iii) evidenced the key role played by hypodermis, and particularly lignin deposition onto hypodermal cell walls, for resistance to Forv in two highly resistant vanilla accessions. Two hundred and fifty-four vanilla accessions were evaluated in the field under natural conditions of infection and in controlled conditions using in vitro plants root-dip inoculated by the highly pathogenic isolate Fo072. For the 26 accessions evaluated in both conditions, a high correlation was observed between field evaluation and in vitro assay. The root infection process and plant response of one susceptible and two resistant accessions challenged with Fo072 were studied using wide field and multiphoton microscopy. In susceptible V. planifolia, hyphae penetrated directly into the rhizodermis in the hairy root region then invaded the cortex through the passage cells where it induced plasmolysis, but never reached the vascular region. In the case of the resistant accessions, the penetration was stopped at the hypodermal layer. Anatomical and histochemical observations coupled with spectral analysis of the hypodermis suggested the role of lignin deposition in the resistance to Forv. The thickness of lignin constitutively deposited onto outer cell walls of hypodermis was highly correlated with the level of resistance for 21 accessions

  1. Mycorrhizal fungi of Vanilla: diversity, specificity and effects on seed germination and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Porras-Alfaro, Andrea; Bayman, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are essential for the germination of orchid seeds. However, the specificity of orchids for their mycorrhizal fungi and the effects of the fungi on orchid growth are controversial. Mycorrhizal fungi have been studied in some temperate and tropical, epiphytic orchids, but the symbionts of tropical, terrestrial orchids are still unknown. Here we study diversity, specificity and function of mycorrhizal fungi in Vanilla, a pantropical genus that is both terrestrial and epiphytic. Mycorrhizal roots were collected from four Vanilla species in Puerto Rico, Costa Rica and Cuba. Cultured and uncultured mycorrhizal fungi were identified by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer region of nuclear rDNA (nrITS) and part of the mitochondrial ribosomal large subunit (mtLSU), and by counting number of nuclei in hyphae. Vanilla spp. were associated with a wide range of mycorrhizal fungi: Ceratobasidium, Thanatephorus and Tulasnella. Related fungi were found in different species of Vanilla, although at different relative frequencies. Ceratobasidium was more common in roots in soil and Tulasnella was more common in roots on tree bark, but several clades of fungi included strains from both substrates. Relative frequencies of genera of mycorrhizal fungi differed significantly between cultured fungi and those detected by direct amplification. Ceratobasidium and Tulasnella were tested for effects on seed germination of Vanilla and effects on growth of Vanilla and Dendrobium plants. We found significant differences among fungi in effects on seed germination and plant growth. Effects of mycorrhizal fungi on Vanilla and Dendrobium were similar: a clade of Ceratobasidium had a consistently positive effect on plant growth and seed germination. This clade has potential use in germination and propagation of orchids. Results confirmed that a single orchid species can be associated with several mycorrhizal fungi with different functional consequences for the plant.

  2. Making a global sensation: Vanilla flavor, synthetic chemistry, and the meanings of purity.

    PubMed

    Berenstein, Nadia

    2016-12-01

    How did vanilla, once a rare luxury, become a global sensation? Rather than taking the vanilla flavor of vanilla beans as a pre-existing natural fact, this essay argues that the sensory experience that came to be recognized as vanilla was a hybrid artifact produced by an expanding global trade in a diverse set of pleasurable substances, including cured beans from artificially pollinated vanilla orchids, synthetic vanillin, sugar, and a far-flung miscellany of other botanical and chemical materials. Global trade and large-scale production resulted not in the production of a homogenous, stable commodity, but in a range of local vanillas, heterogeneous mixtures with a range of qualities and virtues. As local commercial and regulatory interests competed to define the origins, and thus the market value, of authentic vanilla flavor, scientific experts were called upon to adjudicate these rival claims. In the United States, these debates played out in the context of the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act, where efforts to define and chemically enforce a 'standard' vanilla extract, in contradistinction from adulterated, 'imitation' extracts, clashed with the interests of makers and users of both synthetic and 'genuine' vanilla flavorings. As regulatory chemists grappled with the growing variety of vanillas, they were required to determine the appropriate chemical components of genuine vanilla, and consequently to delimit the subjective sensory effects proper to the flavor. Nonetheless, the materials, experiences, and meanings popularly associated with vanilla flavor continued to exceed the limits prescribed by officials.

  3. Contribution of Bacillus Isolates to the Flavor Profiles of Vanilla Beans Assessed through Aroma Analysis and Chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Gu, Fenglin; Chen, Yonggan; Fang, Yiming; Wu, Guiping; Tan, Lehe

    2015-10-09

    Colonizing Bacillus in vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) beans is involved in glucovanillin hydrolysis and vanillin formation during conventional curing. The flavor profiles of vanilla beans under Bacillus-assisted curing were analyzed through gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, electronic nose, and quantitative sensory analysis. The flavor profiles were analytically compared among the vanilla beans under Bacillus-assisted curing, conventional curing, and non-microorganism-assisted curing. Vanilla beans added with Bacillus vanillea XY18 and Bacillus subtilis XY20 contained higher vanillin (3.58%±0.05% and 3.48%±0.10%, respectively) than vanilla beans that underwent non-microorganism-assisted curing and conventional curing (3.09%±0.14% and 3.21%±0.15%, respectively). Forty-two volatiles were identified from endogenous vanilla metabolism. Five other compounds were identified from exogenous Bacillus metabolism. Electronic nose data confirmed that vanilla flavors produced through the different curing processes were easily distinguished. Quantitative sensory analysis confirmed that Bacillus-assisted curing increased vanillin production without generating any unpleasant sensory attribute. Partial least squares regression further provided a correlation model of different measurements. Overall, we comparatively analyzed the flavor profiles of vanilla beans under Bacillus-assisted curing, indirectly demonstrated the mechanism of vanilla flavor formation by microbes.

  4. The Vanilla Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstead, David

    1994-01-01

    Explains a series of experiments that enable students to discover the internal and external structure of the vanilla pod, isolate the chemical constituents of the pod, identify vanillin in the pod extract, and compare extracts across varieties of vanilla. (DDR)

  5. The use of wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence in the identification of the elemental composition of vanilla samples and the determination of the geographic origin by discriminant function analysis.

    PubMed

    Hondrogiannis, Ellen; Rotta, Kathryn; Zapf, Charles M

    2013-03-01

    Sixteen elements found in 37 vanilla samples from Madagascar, Uganda, India, Indonesia (all Vanilla planifolia species), and Papa New Guinea (Vanilla tahitensis species) were measured by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectroscopy for the purpose of determining the elemental concentrations to discriminate among the origins. Pellets were prepared of the samples and elemental concentrations were calculated based on calibration curves created using 4 Natl. Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST) standards. Discriminant analysis was used to successfully classify the vanilla samples by their species and their geographical region. Our method allows for higher throughput in the rapid screening of vanilla samples in less time than analytical methods currently available. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and discriminant function analysis were used to classify vanilla from different origins resulting in a model that could potentially serve to rapidly validate these samples before purchasing from a producer. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Orchid Fever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Phillip

    2004-01-01

    Exotic, captivating, and seductive, orchids have long fascinated plant lovers. They first attracted the attention of Westerners in the 17th century, when explorers brought back samples from South America and Asia. By the mid-1800s, orchid collecting had reached a fever pitch, not unlike that of the Dutch tulip craze of the 1630s, with rich (and…

  7. Phenolic Profiling for Traceability of Vanilla ×tahitensis.

    PubMed

    Busconi, Matteo; Lucini, Luigi; Soffritti, Giovanna; Bernardi, Jamila; Bernardo, Letizia; Brunschwig, Christel; Lepers-Andrzejewski, Sandra; Raharivelomanana, Phila; Fernandez, Jose A

    2017-01-01

    Vanilla is a flavoring recovered from the cured beans of the orchid genus Vanilla . Vanilla × tahitensis is traditionally cultivated on the islands of French Polynesia, where vanilla vines were first introduced during the nineteenth century and, since the 1960s, have been introduced to other Pacific countries such as Papua New Guinea (PNG), cultivated and sold as "Tahitian vanilla," although both sensory properties and aspect are different. From an economic point of view, it is important to ensure V . × tahitensis traceability and to guarantee that the marketed product is part of the future protected designation of the origin "Tahitian vanilla" (PDO), currently in progress in French Polynesia. The application of metabolomics, allowing the detection and simultaneous analysis of hundreds or thousands of metabolites from different matrices, has recently gained high interest in food traceability. Here, metabolomics analysis of phenolic compounds profiles was successfully applied for the first time to V . × tahitensis to deepen our knowledge of vanilla metabolome, focusing on phenolics compounds, for traceability purposes. Phenolics were screened through a quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometer coupled to a UHPLC liquid chromatography system, and 260 different compounds were clearly evidenced and subjected to different statistical analysis in order to enable the discrimination of the samples based on their origin. Eighty-eight and twenty three compounds, with a prevalence of flavonoids, resulted to be highly discriminant through ANOVA and Orthogonal Projections to Latent Structures Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA) respectively. Volcano plot analysis and pairwise comparisons were carried out to determine those compounds, mainly responsible for the differences among samples as a consequence of either origin or cultivar. The samples from PNG were clearly different from the Tahitian samples that were further divided in two different groups based on the different

  8. 21 CFR 169.175 - Vanilla extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... odorous principles extractable from vanilla beans. In vanilla extract the content of ethyl alcohol is not... less than one unit per gallon. The vanilla constituent may be extracted directly from vanilla beans or...

  9. 21 CFR 169.175 - Vanilla extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... odorous principles extractable from vanilla beans. In vanilla extract the content of ethyl alcohol is not... less than one unit per gallon. The vanilla constituent may be extracted directly from vanilla beans or...

  10. 21 CFR 169.175 - Vanilla extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... odorous principles extractable from vanilla beans. In vanilla extract the content of ethyl alcohol is not... less than one unit per gallon. The vanilla constituent may be extracted directly from vanilla beans or...

  11. Phenolic Profiling for Traceability of Vanilla ×tahitensis

    PubMed Central

    Busconi, Matteo; Lucini, Luigi; Soffritti, Giovanna; Bernardi, Jamila; Bernardo, Letizia; Brunschwig, Christel; Lepers-Andrzejewski, Sandra; Raharivelomanana, Phila; Fernandez, Jose A.

    2017-01-01

    Vanilla is a flavoring recovered from the cured beans of the orchid genus Vanilla. Vanilla ×tahitensis is traditionally cultivated on the islands of French Polynesia, where vanilla vines were first introduced during the nineteenth century and, since the 1960s, have been introduced to other Pacific countries such as Papua New Guinea (PNG), cultivated and sold as “Tahitian vanilla,” although both sensory properties and aspect are different. From an economic point of view, it is important to ensure V. ×tahitensis traceability and to guarantee that the marketed product is part of the future protected designation of the origin “Tahitian vanilla” (PDO), currently in progress in French Polynesia. The application of metabolomics, allowing the detection and simultaneous analysis of hundreds or thousands of metabolites from different matrices, has recently gained high interest in food traceability. Here, metabolomics analysis of phenolic compounds profiles was successfully applied for the first time to V. ×tahitensis to deepen our knowledge of vanilla metabolome, focusing on phenolics compounds, for traceability purposes. Phenolics were screened through a quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometer coupled to a UHPLC liquid chromatography system, and 260 different compounds were clearly evidenced and subjected to different statistical analysis in order to enable the discrimination of the samples based on their origin. Eighty-eight and twenty three compounds, with a prevalence of flavonoids, resulted to be highly discriminant through ANOVA and Orthogonal Projections to Latent Structures Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA) respectively. Volcano plot analysis and pairwise comparisons were carried out to determine those compounds, mainly responsible for the differences among samples as a consequence of either origin or cultivar. The samples from PNG were clearly different from the Tahitian samples that were further divided in two different groups based on the different

  12. 21 CFR 169.179 - Vanilla powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vanilla powder. 169.179 Section 169.179 Food and... § 169.179 Vanilla powder. (a) Vanilla powder is a mixture of ground vanilla beans or vanilla oleoresin...) Dried corn sirup. (6) Gum acacia. Vanilla powder may contain one or any mixture of two or more of the...

  13. 21 CFR 169.179 - Vanilla powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vanilla powder. 169.179 Section 169.179 Food and... § 169.179 Vanilla powder. (a) Vanilla powder is a mixture of ground vanilla beans or vanilla oleoresin...) Dried corn sirup. (6) Gum acacia. Vanilla powder may contain one or any mixture of two or more of the...

  14. 21 CFR 169.179 - Vanilla powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vanilla powder. 169.179 Section 169.179 Food and... § 169.179 Vanilla powder. (a) Vanilla powder is a mixture of ground vanilla beans or vanilla oleoresin...) Dried corn sirup. (6) Gum acacia. Vanilla powder may contain one or any mixture of two or more of the...

  15. 21 CFR 169.179 - Vanilla powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vanilla powder. 169.179 Section 169.179 Food and... § 169.179 Vanilla powder. (a) Vanilla powder is a mixture of ground vanilla beans or vanilla oleoresin...) Dried corn sirup. (6) Gum acacia. Vanilla powder may contain one or any mixture of two or more of the...

  16. 21 CFR 169.179 - Vanilla powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vanilla powder. 169.179 Section 169.179 Food and... § 169.179 Vanilla powder. (a) Vanilla powder is a mixture of ground vanilla beans or vanilla oleoresin...) Dried corn sirup. (6) Gum acacia. Vanilla powder may contain one or any mixture of two or more of the...

  17. 21 CFR 169.175 - Vanilla extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vanilla extract. 169.175 Section 169.175 Food and... § 169.175 Vanilla extract. (a) Vanilla extract is the solution in aqueous ethyl alcohol of the sapid and odorous principles extractable from vanilla beans. In vanilla extract the content of ethyl alcohol is not...

  18. 21 CFR 169.175 - Vanilla extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vanilla extract. 169.175 Section 169.175 Food and... § 169.175 Vanilla extract. (a) Vanilla extract is the solution in aqueous ethyl alcohol of the sapid and odorous principles extractable from vanilla beans. In vanilla extract the content of ethyl alcohol is not...

  19. 21 CFR 169.177 - Vanilla flavoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vanilla flavoring. 169.177 Section 169.177 Food... and Flavorings § 169.177 Vanilla flavoring. (a) Vanilla flavoring conforms to the definition and... vanilla extract by § 169.175, except that its content of ethyl alcohol is less than 35 percent by volume...

  20. 21 CFR 169.177 - Vanilla flavoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vanilla flavoring. 169.177 Section 169.177 Food... and Flavorings § 169.177 Vanilla flavoring. (a) Vanilla flavoring conforms to the definition and... vanilla extract by § 169.175, except that its content of ethyl alcohol is less than 35 percent by volume...

  1. 21 CFR 169.177 - Vanilla flavoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vanilla flavoring. 169.177 Section 169.177 Food... and Flavorings § 169.177 Vanilla flavoring. (a) Vanilla flavoring conforms to the definition and... vanilla extract by § 169.175, except that its content of ethyl alcohol is less than 35 percent by volume...

  2. 21 CFR 169.177 - Vanilla flavoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vanilla flavoring. 169.177 Section 169.177 Food... and Flavorings § 169.177 Vanilla flavoring. (a) Vanilla flavoring conforms to the definition and... vanilla extract by § 169.175, except that its content of ethyl alcohol is less than 35 percent by volume...

  3. 21 CFR 169.177 - Vanilla flavoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vanilla flavoring. 169.177 Section 169.177 Food... and Flavorings § 169.177 Vanilla flavoring. (a) Vanilla flavoring conforms to the definition and... vanilla extract by § 169.175, except that its content of ethyl alcohol is less than 35 percent by volume...

  4. Vanilla mosaic virus isolates from French Polynesia and the Cook Islands are Dasheen mosaic virus strains that exclusively infect vanilla.

    PubMed

    Farreyrol, K; Pearson, M N; Grisoni, M; Cohen, D; Beck, D

    2006-05-01

    Sequence was determined for the coat protein (CP) gene and 3' non-translated region (3'NTR) of two vanilla mosaic virus (VanMV) isolates from Vanilla tahitensis, respectively from the Cook Islands (VanMV-CI) and French Polynesia (VanMV-FP). Both viruses displayed distinctive features in the N-terminal region of their CPs; for VanMV-CI, a 16-amino-acid deletion including the aphid transmission-related DAG motif, and for VanMV-FP, a stretch of GTN repeats that putatively belongs to the class of natively unfolded proteins. VanMV-FP CP also has a novel DVG motif in place of the DAG motif, and an uncommon Q//V protease cleavage site. The sequences were compared to a range of Dasheen mosaic virus (DsMV) strains and to potyviruses infecting orchids. Identity was low to DsMV strains across the entire CP coding region and across the 3'NTR, but high across the CP core and the CI-6K2-NIa region. In accordance with current ICTV criteria for species demarcation within the family Potyviridae, VanMV-CI and VanMV-FP are strains of DsMV that exclusively infect vanilla.

  5. Comparison of Fungal Community in Black Pepper-Vanilla and Vanilla Monoculture Systems Associated with Vanilla Fusarium Wilt Disease.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wu; Zhao, Qingyun; Xue, Chao; Xun, Weibing; Zhao, Jun; Wu, Huasong; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Long-term vanilla monocropping often results in the occurrence of vanilla Fusarium wilt disease, seriously affecting its production all over the world. In the present study, vanilla exhibited significantly less Fusarium wilt disease in the soil of a long-term continuously cropped black pepper orchard. The entire fungal communities of bulk and rhizosphere soils between the black pepper-vanilla system (i.e., vanilla cropped in the soil of a continuously cropped black pepper orchard) and vanilla monoculture system were compared through the deep pyrosequencing. The results showed that the black pepper-vanilla system revealed a significantly higher fungal diversity than the vanilla monoculture system in both bulk and rhizosphere soils. The UniFrac-weighted PCoA analysis revealed significant differences in bulk soil fungal community structures between the two cropping systems, and fungal community structures were seriously affected by the vanilla root system. In summary, the black pepper-vanilla system harbored a lower abundance of Fusarium oxysporum in the vanilla rhizosphere soil and increased the putatively plant-beneficial fungal groups such as Trichoderma and Penicillium genus, which could explain the healthy growth of vanilla in the soil of the long-term continuously cropped black pepper field. Thus, cropping vanilla in the soil of continuously cropped black pepper fields for maintaining the vanilla industry is executable and meaningful as an agro-ecological system.

  6. Comparison of Fungal Community in Black Pepper-Vanilla and Vanilla Monoculture Systems Associated with Vanilla Fusarium Wilt Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wu; Zhao, Qingyun; Xue, Chao; Xun, Weibing; Zhao, Jun; Wu, Huasong; Li, Rong; Shen, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Long-term vanilla monocropping often results in the occurrence of vanilla Fusarium wilt disease, seriously affecting its production all over the world. In the present study, vanilla exhibited significantly less Fusarium wilt disease in the soil of a long-term continuously cropped black pepper orchard. The entire fungal communities of bulk and rhizosphere soils between the black pepper-vanilla system (i.e., vanilla cropped in the soil of a continuously cropped black pepper orchard) and vanilla monoculture system were compared through the deep pyrosequencing. The results showed that the black pepper-vanilla system revealed a significantly higher fungal diversity than the vanilla monoculture system in both bulk and rhizosphere soils. The UniFrac-weighted PCoA analysis revealed significant differences in bulk soil fungal community structures between the two cropping systems, and fungal community structures were seriously affected by the vanilla root system. In summary, the black pepper-vanilla system harbored a lower abundance of Fusarium oxysporum in the vanilla rhizosphere soil and increased the putatively plant-beneficial fungal groups such as Trichoderma and Penicillium genus, which could explain the healthy growth of vanilla in the soil of the long-term continuously cropped black pepper field. Thus, cropping vanilla in the soil of continuously cropped black pepper fields for maintaining the vanilla industry is executable and meaningful as an agro-ecological system. PMID:26903995

  7. Vanilla--its science of cultivation, curing, chemistry, and nutraceutical properties.

    PubMed

    Anuradha, Krushnamurthy; Shyamala, Bellur Nanjundaiah; Naidu, Madeneni Madhava

    2013-01-01

    Vanilla is a tropical orchid belonging to the family Orchidaceae and it is mainly used in food, perfumery, and pharmaceutical preparations. The quality of the bean depends on the volatile constituent's, viz., the vanillin content, the species of the vine used, and the processing conditions adopted. Hence, proper pollination during flowering and curing by exercising utmost care are the important aspects of vanilla cultivation. There are different methods of curing, and each one is unique and named after the places of its origin like Mexican process and Bourbon process. Recently, Central Food Technological Research Institute, Mysore has developed know-how of improved curing process, where the green vanilla beans are cured immediately after harvest and this process takes only 32 days, which otherwise requires minimum of 150-180 days as reported in traditional curing methods. Vanillin is the most essential component of the 200 and odd such compounds present in vanilla beans. Vanillin as such has not shown any antioxidant properties, it is along with other compounds has got nutraceutical properties and therefore its wide usage. The medicinal future of vanilla may definitely lie in further research on basic science and clinical studies on the constituents and their mechanism of action.

  8. The Nose Knows: Biotechnological Production of Vanillin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Remko T.; van Beek, Hugo L.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2012-01-01

    Vanillin, the compound responsible for the well-known vanilla aroma, is almost exclusively produced via a chemical process, with only a small fraction extracted from natural sources, namely, the bean of the orchid "Vanilla planifolia". Research is being done towards a green chemistry process to obtain natural vanillin. A model biotechnological…

  9. Comparative metabolomics in vanilla pod and vanilla bean revealing the biosynthesis of vanillin during the curing process of vanilla.

    PubMed

    Gu, Fenglin; Chen, Yonggan; Hong, Yinghua; Fang, Yiming; Tan, Lehe

    2017-12-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was used for comprehensive metabolomic fingerprinting of vanilla fruits prepared from the curing process. In this study, the metabolic changes of vanilla pods and vanilla beans were characterized using MS-based metabolomics to elucidate the biosynthesis of vanillin. The vanilla pods were significantly different from vanilla beans. Seven pathways of vanillin biosynthesis were constructed, namely, glucovanillin, glucose, cresol, capsaicin, vanillyl alcohol, tyrosine, and phenylalanine pathways. Investigations demonstrated that glucose, cresol, capsaicin, and vanillyl alcohol pathway were detected in a wide range of distribution in microbial metabolism. Thus, microorganisms might have participated in vanillin biosynthesis during vanilla curing. Furthermore, the ion strength of glucovanillin was stable, which indicated that glucovanillin only participated in the vanillin biosynthesis during the curing of vanilla.

  10. Fusarium Wilt of Orchids

    Fusarium wilt of orchids is highly destructive and economically limiting to the production of quality orchids that has steadily increased in many production facilities. Important crops such as phalaenopsis, cattleyas, and oncidiums appear to be especially susceptible to certain Fusarium species. Fu...

  11. 21 CFR 169.180 - Vanilla-vanillin extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vanilla-vanillin extract. 169.180 Section 169.180... Dressings and Flavorings § 169.180 Vanilla-vanillin extract. (a) Vanilla-vanillin extract conforms to the... prescribed for vanilla extract by § 169.175, except that for each unit of vanilla constituent, as defined in...

  12. 21 CFR 169.180 - Vanilla-vanillin extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vanilla-vanillin extract. 169.180 Section 169.180... Dressings and Flavorings § 169.180 Vanilla-vanillin extract. (a) Vanilla-vanillin extract conforms to the... prescribed for vanilla extract by § 169.175, except that for each unit of vanilla constituent, as defined in...

  13. 21 CFR 169.182 - Vanilla-vanillin powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vanilla-vanillin powder. 169.182 Section 169.182... Dressings and Flavorings § 169.182 Vanilla-vanillin powder. (a) Vanilla-vanillin powder conforms to the... prescribed for vanilla powder by § 169.179, except that for each unit of vanilla constituent as defined in...

  14. 21 CFR 169.180 - Vanilla-vanillin extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vanilla-vanillin extract. 169.180 Section 169.180... Dressings and Flavorings § 169.180 Vanilla-vanillin extract. (a) Vanilla-vanillin extract conforms to the... prescribed for vanilla extract by § 169.175, except that for each unit of vanilla constituent, as defined in...

  15. 21 CFR 169.182 - Vanilla-vanillin powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vanilla-vanillin powder. 169.182 Section 169.182... Dressings and Flavorings § 169.182 Vanilla-vanillin powder. (a) Vanilla-vanillin powder conforms to the... prescribed for vanilla powder by § 169.179, except that for each unit of vanilla constituent as defined in...

  16. 21 CFR 169.180 - Vanilla-vanillin extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vanilla-vanillin extract. 169.180 Section 169.180... Dressings and Flavorings § 169.180 Vanilla-vanillin extract. (a) Vanilla-vanillin extract conforms to the... prescribed for vanilla extract by § 169.175, except that for each unit of vanilla constituent, as defined in...

  17. 21 CFR 169.182 - Vanilla-vanillin powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vanilla-vanillin powder. 169.182 Section 169.182... Dressings and Flavorings § 169.182 Vanilla-vanillin powder. (a) Vanilla-vanillin powder conforms to the... prescribed for vanilla powder by § 169.179, except that for each unit of vanilla constituent as defined in...

  18. 21 CFR 169.182 - Vanilla-vanillin powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vanilla-vanillin powder. 169.182 Section 169.182... Dressings and Flavorings § 169.182 Vanilla-vanillin powder. (a) Vanilla-vanillin powder conforms to the... prescribed for vanilla powder by § 169.179, except that for each unit of vanilla constituent as defined in...

  19. 21 CFR 169.182 - Vanilla-vanillin powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vanilla-vanillin powder. 169.182 Section 169.182... Dressings and Flavorings § 169.182 Vanilla-vanillin powder. (a) Vanilla-vanillin powder conforms to the... prescribed for vanilla powder by § 169.179, except that for each unit of vanilla constituent as defined in...

  20. 21 CFR 169.180 - Vanilla-vanillin extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vanilla-vanillin extract. 169.180 Section 169.180... Dressings and Flavorings § 169.180 Vanilla-vanillin extract. (a) Vanilla-vanillin extract conforms to the... prescribed for vanilla extract by § 169.175, except that for each unit of vanilla constituent, as defined in...

  1. Orchid sexual deceit provokes ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Gaskett, A C; Winnick, C G; Herberstein, M E

    2008-06-01

    Sexually deceptive orchids lure pollinators by mimicking female insects. Male insects fooled into gripping or copulating with orchids unwittingly transfer the pollinia. The effect of deception on pollinators has been considered negligible, but we show that pollinators may suffer considerable costs. Insects pollinating Australian tongue orchids (Cryptostylis species) frequently ejaculate and waste copious sperm. The costs of sperm wastage could select for pollinator avoidance of orchids, thereby driving and maintaining sexual deception via antagonistic coevolution or an arms race between pollinator learning and escalating orchid mimicry. However, we also show that orchid species provoking such extreme pollinator behavior have the highest pollination success. How can deception persist, given the costs to pollinators? Sexually-deceptive-orchid pollinators are almost exclusively solitary and haplodiploid species. Therefore, female insects deprived of matings by orchid deception could still produce male offspring, which may even enhance orchid pollination.

  2. 21 CFR 169.178 - Concentrated vanilla flavoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Concentrated vanilla flavoring. 169.178 Section... Food Dressings and Flavorings § 169.178 Concentrated vanilla flavoring. (a) Concentrated vanilla... statement of ingredients prescribed for vanilla flavoring by § 169.177, except that it is concentrated to...

  3. 21 CFR 169.176 - Concentrated vanilla extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Concentrated vanilla extract. 169.176 Section 169... Dressings and Flavorings § 169.176 Concentrated vanilla extract. (a) Concentrated vanilla extract conforms... ingredients prescribed for vanilla extract by § 169.175, except that it is concentrated to remove part of the...

  4. 21 CFR 169.176 - Concentrated vanilla extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Concentrated vanilla extract. 169.176 Section 169... Dressings and Flavorings § 169.176 Concentrated vanilla extract. (a) Concentrated vanilla extract conforms... ingredients prescribed for vanilla extract by § 169.175, except that it is concentrated to remove part of the...

  5. 21 CFR 169.178 - Concentrated vanilla flavoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Concentrated vanilla flavoring. 169.178 Section... Food Dressings and Flavorings § 169.178 Concentrated vanilla flavoring. (a) Concentrated vanilla... statement of ingredients prescribed for vanilla flavoring by § 169.177, except that it is concentrated to...

  6. 21 CFR 169.178 - Concentrated vanilla flavoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Concentrated vanilla flavoring. 169.178 Section... Food Dressings and Flavorings § 169.178 Concentrated vanilla flavoring. (a) Concentrated vanilla... statement of ingredients prescribed for vanilla flavoring by § 169.177, except that it is concentrated to...

  7. 21 CFR 169.181 - Vanilla-vanillin flavoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vanilla-vanillin flavoring. 169.181 Section 169... Dressings and Flavorings § 169.181 Vanilla-vanillin flavoring. (a) Vanilla-vanillin flavoring conforms to... ingredients prescribed for vanilla-vanillin extract by § 169.180, except that its content of ethyl alcohol is...

  8. 21 CFR 169.181 - Vanilla-vanillin flavoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vanilla-vanillin flavoring. 169.181 Section 169... Dressings and Flavorings § 169.181 Vanilla-vanillin flavoring. (a) Vanilla-vanillin flavoring conforms to... ingredients prescribed for vanilla-vanillin extract by § 169.180, except that its content of ethyl alcohol is...

  9. 21 CFR 169.181 - Vanilla-vanillin flavoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vanilla-vanillin flavoring. 169.181 Section 169... Dressings and Flavorings § 169.181 Vanilla-vanillin flavoring. (a) Vanilla-vanillin flavoring conforms to... ingredients prescribed for vanilla-vanillin extract by § 169.180, except that its content of ethyl alcohol is...

  10. 21 CFR 169.181 - Vanilla-vanillin flavoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vanilla-vanillin flavoring. 169.181 Section 169... Dressings and Flavorings § 169.181 Vanilla-vanillin flavoring. (a) Vanilla-vanillin flavoring conforms to... ingredients prescribed for vanilla-vanillin extract by § 169.180, except that its content of ethyl alcohol is...

  11. 21 CFR 169.176 - Concentrated vanilla extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Concentrated vanilla extract. 169.176 Section 169... Dressings and Flavorings § 169.176 Concentrated vanilla extract. (a) Concentrated vanilla extract conforms... ingredients prescribed for vanilla extract by § 169.175, except that it is concentrated to remove part of the...

  12. 21 CFR 169.176 - Concentrated vanilla extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Concentrated vanilla extract. 169.176 Section 169... Dressings and Flavorings § 169.176 Concentrated vanilla extract. (a) Concentrated vanilla extract conforms... ingredients prescribed for vanilla extract by § 169.175, except that it is concentrated to remove part of the...

  13. 21 CFR 169.178 - Concentrated vanilla flavoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Concentrated vanilla flavoring. 169.178 Section... Food Dressings and Flavorings § 169.178 Concentrated vanilla flavoring. (a) Concentrated vanilla... statement of ingredients prescribed for vanilla flavoring by § 169.177, except that it is concentrated to...

  14. 21 CFR 169.181 - Vanilla-vanillin flavoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vanilla-vanillin flavoring. 169.181 Section 169... Dressings and Flavorings § 169.181 Vanilla-vanillin flavoring. (a) Vanilla-vanillin flavoring conforms to... ingredients prescribed for vanilla-vanillin extract by § 169.180, except that its content of ethyl alcohol is...

  15. 21 CFR 169.178 - Concentrated vanilla flavoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Concentrated vanilla flavoring. 169.178 Section... Food Dressings and Flavorings § 169.178 Concentrated vanilla flavoring. (a) Concentrated vanilla... statement of ingredients prescribed for vanilla flavoring by § 169.177, except that it is concentrated to...

  16. 21 CFR 169.176 - Concentrated vanilla extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Concentrated vanilla extract. 169.176 Section 169... Dressings and Flavorings § 169.176 Concentrated vanilla extract. (a) Concentrated vanilla extract conforms... ingredients prescribed for vanilla extract by § 169.175, except that it is concentrated to remove part of the...

  17. Orchid conservation: further links.

    PubMed

    Fay, Michael F

    2016-07-01

    Due in great part to their often complex interactions with mycorrhizal fungi, pollinators and host trees, Orchidaceae present particular challenges for conservation. Furthermore, orchids, as potentially the largest family of angiosperms with >26000 species, species complexes and frequent hybrid formation, are complex to catalogue. Following a highlight in 2015, a further seven papers focusing on orchids, their interactions with beneficial organisms, pollinators and mycorrhiza, and other factors relating to their conservation, including threats from human utilization and changing land use, are presented here. The production of an online flora of all known plants and an assessment of the conservation status of all known plant species as far as possible, to guide conservation action are the first two targets of the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation Without knowing how many species there are and how they should be circumscribed, neither of these targets is achievable. Orchids are a fascinating subject for fundamental research with rapid species evolution, specific organ structure and development, but they also suffer from high levels of threat. Effective orchid conservation must take account of the beneficial interactions with fungi and pollinators and the potentially detrimental effects of over-collection and changes in land use. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Subcellular Lipid Droplets in Vanilla Leaf Epidermis and Avocado Mesocarp Are Coated with Oleosins of Distinct Phylogenic Lineages1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular lipid droplets (LDs) in diverse plant cells and species are coated with stabilizing oleosins of at least five phylogenic lineages and perform different functions. We examined two types of inadequately studied LDs for coated oleosins and their characteristics. The epidermis but not mesophyll of leaves of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia) and most other Asparagales species contained solitary and clustered LDs (<0.5 μm), some previously studied by electron microscopy and speculated to be for cuticle formation. In vanilla leaves, transcripts of oleosins of the U lineage were present in both epidermis and mesophyll, but oleosin occurred only in epidermis. Immuno-confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the LDs were coated with oleosins. LDs in isolated fractions did not coalesce, and the fractions contained heterogeneous proteins including oleosins and diverse lipids. These findings reflect the in situ structure and possible functions of the LDs. Fruit mesocarp of avocado (Persea americana) and other Lauraceae species possessed large LDs, which likely function in attracting animals for seed dispersal. They contained transcripts of oleosin of a novel M phylogenic lineage. Each avocado mesocarp fatty cell possessed one to several large LDs (5 to 20 μm) and at their periphery, numerous small LDs (<0.5 μm). Immuno-confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that oleosin was present mostly on the small LDs. LDs in isolated fractions coalesced rapidly, and the fraction contained oleosin and several other proteins and triacylglycerols as the main lipids. These two new types of oleosin-LDs exemplify the evolutionary plasticity of oleosins-LDs in generating novel functions in diverse cell types and species. PMID:27208281

  19. Subcellular Lipid Droplets in Vanilla Leaf Epidermis and Avocado Mesocarp Are Coated with Oleosins of Distinct Phylogenic Lineages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Der; Huang, Anthony H C

    2016-07-01

    Subcellular lipid droplets (LDs) in diverse plant cells and species are coated with stabilizing oleosins of at least five phylogenic lineages and perform different functions. We examined two types of inadequately studied LDs for coated oleosins and their characteristics. The epidermis but not mesophyll of leaves of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia) and most other Asparagales species contained solitary and clustered LDs (<0.5 μm), some previously studied by electron microscopy and speculated to be for cuticle formation. In vanilla leaves, transcripts of oleosins of the U lineage were present in both epidermis and mesophyll, but oleosin occurred only in epidermis. Immuno-confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the LDs were coated with oleosins. LDs in isolated fractions did not coalesce, and the fractions contained heterogeneous proteins including oleosins and diverse lipids. These findings reflect the in situ structure and possible functions of the LDs. Fruit mesocarp of avocado (Persea americana) and other Lauraceae species possessed large LDs, which likely function in attracting animals for seed dispersal. They contained transcripts of oleosin of a novel M phylogenic lineage. Each avocado mesocarp fatty cell possessed one to several large LDs (5 to 20 μm) and at their periphery, numerous small LDs (<0.5 μm). Immuno-confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that oleosin was present mostly on the small LDs. LDs in isolated fractions coalesced rapidly, and the fraction contained oleosin and several other proteins and triacylglycerols as the main lipids. These two new types of oleosin-LDs exemplify the evolutionary plasticity of oleosins-LDs in generating novel functions in diverse cell types and species. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  20. The Complete Plastome Sequences of Four Orchid Species: Insights into the Evolution of the Orchidaceae and the Utility of Plastomic Mutational Hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Zhitao; Xue, Qingyun; Zhu, Shuying; Sun, Jing; Liu, Wei; Ding, Xiaoyu

    2017-01-01

    Orchidaceae (orchids) is the largest family in the monocots, including about 25,000 species in 880 genera and five subfamilies. Many orchids are highly valued for their beautiful and long-lasting flowers. However, the phylogenetic relationships among the five orchid subfamilies remain unresolved. The major dispute centers on whether the three one-stamened subfamilies, Epidendroideae, Orchidoideae, and Vanilloideae, are monophyletic or paraphyletic. Moreover, structural changes in the plastid genome (plastome) and the effective genetic loci at the species-level phylogenetics of orchids have rarely been documented. In this study, we compared 53 orchid plastomes, including four newly sequenced ones, that represent four remote genera: Dendrobium, Goodyera, Paphiopedilum, and Vanilla. These differ from one another not only in their lengths of inverted repeats and small single copy regions but also in their retention of ndh genes. Comparative analyses of the plastomes revealed that the expansion of inverted repeats in Paphiopedilum and Vanilla is associated with a loss of ndh genes. In orchid plastomes, mutational hotspots are genus specific. After having carefully examined the data, we propose that the three loci 5′trnK-rps16, trnS-trnG, and rps16-trnQ might be powerful markers for genera within Epidendroideae, and clpP-psbB and rps16-trnQ might be markers for genera within Cypripedioideae. After analyses of a partitioned dataset, we found that our plastid phylogenomic trees were congruent in a topology where two one-stamened subfamilies (i.e., Epidendroideae and Orchidoideae) were sisters to a multi-stamened subfamily (i.e., Cypripedioideae) rather than to the other one-stamened subfamily (Vanilloideae), suggesting that the living one-stamened orchids are paraphyletic. PMID:28515737

  1. Unusually severe food poisoning from vanilla slices.

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, P. A.; Dobson, K. W.; Eyre, A.; McKendrick, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty six people suffered from severe vomiting and diarrhoea 15 min to 3 h after eating vanilla slices from the same bakery. Five patients were admitted to hospital, and one developed unusual skin lesions after admission. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in large numbers from vanilla slices of the same batch as those giving rise to symptoms, and from five faecal specimens obtained from affected persons. Bacillus cereus and Bacillus subtilis were also isolated from the slices. Unbaked custard provides an ideal environment for bacterial multiplication, especially when (as on this occasion) the ambient temperature is persistently high. PMID:6438231

  2. Comparative Analysis of the Complete Plastomes of Apostasia wallichii and Neuwiedia singapureana (Apostasioideae) Reveals Different Evolutionary Dynamics of IR/SSC Boundary among Photosynthetic Orchids.

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhitao; Pan, Jiajia; Zhu, Shuying; Li, Ludan; Xue, Qingyun; Liu, Wei; Ding, Xiaoyu

    2017-01-01

    Apostasioideae, consists of only two genera, Apostasia and Neuwiedia , which are mainly distributed in Southeast Asia and northern Australia. The floral structure, taxonomy, biogeography, and genome variation of Apostasioideae have been intensively studied. However, detailed analyses of plastome composition and structure and comparisons with those of other orchid subfamilies have not yet been conducted. Here, the complete plastome sequences of Apostasia wallichii and Neuwiedia singapureana were sequenced and compared with 43 previously published photosynthetic orchid plastomes to characterize the plastome structure and evolution in the orchids. Unlike many orchid plastomes (e.g., Paphiopedilum and Vanilla ), the plastomes of Apostasioideae contain a full set of 11 functional NADH dehydrogenase ( ndh ) genes. The distribution of repeat sequences and simple sequence repeat elements enhanced the view that the mutation rate of non-coding regions was higher than that of coding regions. The 10 loci- ndhA intron, matK-5'trnK , clpP-psbB , rps8-rpl14 , trnT-trnL , 3'trnK-matK , clpP intron , psbK-trnK , trnS-psbC , and ndhF-rpl32 -that had the highest degrees of sequence variability were identified as mutational hotspots for the Apostasia plastome. Furthermore, our results revealed that plastid genes exhibited a variable evolution rate within and among different orchid genus. Considering the diversified evolution of both coding and non-coding regions, we suggested that the plastome-wide evolution of orchid species was disproportional. Additionally, the sequences flanking the inverted repeat/small single copy (IR/SSC) junctions of photosynthetic orchid plastomes were categorized into three types according to the presence/absence of ndh genes. Different evolutionary dynamics for each of the three IR/SSC types of photosynthetic orchid plastomes were also proposed.

  3. Comparative Analysis of the Complete Plastomes of Apostasia wallichii and Neuwiedia singapureana (Apostasioideae) Reveals Different Evolutionary Dynamics of IR/SSC Boundary among Photosynthetic Orchids

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Zhitao; Pan, Jiajia; Zhu, Shuying; Li, Ludan; Xue, Qingyun; Liu, Wei; Ding, Xiaoyu

    2017-01-01

    Apostasioideae, consists of only two genera, Apostasia and Neuwiedia, which are mainly distributed in Southeast Asia and northern Australia. The floral structure, taxonomy, biogeography, and genome variation of Apostasioideae have been intensively studied. However, detailed analyses of plastome composition and structure and comparisons with those of other orchid subfamilies have not yet been conducted. Here, the complete plastome sequences of Apostasia wallichii and Neuwiedia singapureana were sequenced and compared with 43 previously published photosynthetic orchid plastomes to characterize the plastome structure and evolution in the orchids. Unlike many orchid plastomes (e.g., Paphiopedilum and Vanilla), the plastomes of Apostasioideae contain a full set of 11 functional NADH dehydrogenase (ndh) genes. The distribution of repeat sequences and simple sequence repeat elements enhanced the view that the mutation rate of non-coding regions was higher than that of coding regions. The 10 loci—ndhA intron, matK-5′trnK, clpP-psbB, rps8-rpl14, trnT-trnL, 3′trnK-matK, clpP intron, psbK-trnK, trnS-psbC, and ndhF-rpl32—that had the highest degrees of sequence variability were identified as mutational hotspots for the Apostasia plastome. Furthermore, our results revealed that plastid genes exhibited a variable evolution rate within and among different orchid genus. Considering the diversified evolution of both coding and non-coding regions, we suggested that the plastome-wide evolution of orchid species was disproportional. Additionally, the sequences flanking the inverted repeat/small single copy (IR/SSC) junctions of photosynthetic orchid plastomes were categorized into three types according to the presence/absence of ndh genes. Different evolutionary dynamics for each of the three IR/SSC types of photosynthetic orchid plastomes were also proposed. PMID:29046685

  4. Ultrafast UPLC-ESI-MS and HPLC with monolithic column for determination of principal flavor compounds in vanilla pods.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Upendra K; Sharma, Nandini; Sinha, Arun K; Kumar, Neeraj; Gupta, Ajai P

    2009-10-01

    In this study, two novel chromatographic methods based on monolithic column high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) were developed for the ultrafast determination of principal flavor compounds namely vanillin, vanillic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde in ethanolic extracts of Vanilla planifolia pods. Good separation was achieved within 2.5 min using Chromolith RP18e column (100 mm x 4.6 mm) for HPLC and Acquity BEH C-18 (100 mm x 2.1 mm, 1.7 microm) column for UPLC. Both methods were compared in terms of total analysis time, mobile phase consumption, sensitivity, and validation parameters like precision, accuracy, LOD, and LOQ. Further, system suitability test data including resolution, capacity factor, theoretical plates, and tailing factor was determined for both the methods by ten replicate injections. Monolithic column based HPLC gave better results for most of the selected parameters while UPLC was found to be more eco-friendly with low mobile phase consumption and better sensitivity. Both methods may be used conveniently for the high throughput analysis of large number of samples in comparison to traditional particulate column.

  5. The Doctrine of Signatures, Materia Medica of Orchids, and the Contributions of Doctor - Orchidologists.

    PubMed

    Pearn, John

    2012-12-01

    The heritage of medicine is written in many forms. One repository is to be found in the history of orchids, the world's largest family of flowering plants. Orchids were so named by Theophrastus (c.372-288 BC) who recorded their medicinal use as an aphrodisiac and the promoter of virility, in the context of the Doctrine of Signatures. Such use endured for millennia, and was recorded both by Paracelsus (1493-1551) and Linnaeus (1707-1778). The history of orchidology and medicine are entwined in four domains: (a) orchids and their historical materia medica, within the paradigm of the Doctrine of Signatures; (b) the enduring and extensive contemporary medicinal and culinary use of orchids such as Vanilla and salep extracts of Orchis; (c) the scientific contributions of doctors as orchidologists; and (d) the heritage of more than a hundred doctors' names in the scientific etymology of the Orchidaceae family. Prominent orchidologists have included the Scottish doctor-soldier and botanist, Robert Brown (1773-1858); the Director of the State Herbarium at Leyden and the Rijks Museum, Carl Ludwig Blume (1796-1862); and Dr William Sterling MD (1888-1967). Among the more than 1250 genus names (and 33,000 species) of orchids are the names of more than a hundred doctors, their lives and works perpetuated in the scientific etymology of this family of exotic, beautiful, flamboyant, intriguing and often expensive flowers. Generic names record the lives and works of such as Aristotle (384-322BC) in Aristotelia Loureiro 1790; Cadet de Gassicourt (1769-1821) in Cadetia Gaudichaud 1826; Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911) in Sirhookera O. Kuntze 1891; and Dr Theodore Daniel Vrydag Zynen (fl. 1820-1850) in Vrydagzynea Blume 1858. One of the principal horticultural genera of orchids, Brassavola, records the life and work of the Ferrara and Padua physician and botanist, Antonio Musa Brassavola (1500-1555). The first Slipper Orchid bred as a hybrid, Paphiopedilum harrisianum (by John

  6. Perspectives on orchid conservation in botanic gardens.

    PubMed

    Swarts, Nigel D; Dixon, Kingsley W

    2009-11-01

    Orchids, one of the largest families of flowering plants, face an uncertain future through overexploitation, habitat loss and impacts of climate change. With their intricate abiotic and biotic dependencies, orchids typify the plight of global plant resources and, thus, provide ideal model species for ecological tracking and focussing conservation programs. Botanic gardens worldwide have traditionally been major centres of excellence in orchid horticulture, research and conservation as orchids generate wide public and educational appeal. Here, we highlight the role of botanic gardens in areas key to orchid conservation. With pristine habitats under threat globally, the challenge for orchid conservation programs will ultimately depend upon developing ecological restoration technologies, whereby orchids are reinstated into sustainably restored habitats.

  7. Role of Auxin in Orchid Development

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Stacey D.; Luna, Lila J.; Gamage, Roshan N.

    2014-01-01

    Auxin's capacity to regulate aspects of plant development has been well characterized in model plant systems. In contrast, orchids have received considerably less attention, but the realization that many orchid species are endangered has led to culture-based propagation studies which have unveiled some functions for auxin in this system. This mini-review summarizes the many auxin-mediated developmental responses in orchids that are consistent with model systems; however, it also brings to the forefront auxin responses that are unique to orchid development, namely protocorm formation and ovary/ovule maturation. With regard to shoot establishment, we also assess auxin's involvement in orchid germination, PLB formation, and somatic embryogenesis. Further, it makes evident that auxin flow during germination of the undifferentiated, but mature, orchid embryo mirrors late embryogenesis of typical angiosperms. Also discussed is the use of orchid protocorms in future phytohormone studies to better understand the mechanisms behind meristem formation and organogenesis. PMID:25482818

  8. Efficient and heritable transformation of Phalaenopsis orchids.

    PubMed

    Hsing, Hong-Xian; Lin, Yi-Jyun; Tong, Chii-Gong; Li, Min-Jeng; Chen, Yun-Jin; Ko, Swee-Suak

    2016-12-01

    Phalaenopsis orchid (Phal. orchid) is visually attractive and it is important economic floriculture species. Phal. orchids have many unique biological features. However, investigation of these features and validation on their biological functions are limited due to the lack of an efficient transformation method. We developed a heritable and efficient Agrobacterium- mediated transformation using protocorms derived from tetraploid or diploid Phal. orchids. A T-DNA vector construct containing eGFP driven by ubiquitin promoter was subjected to transformation. An approximate 1.2-5.2 % transformation rate was achieved. Genomic PCR confirmed that hygromycin selection marker, HptII gene and target gene eGFP were integrated into the orchid genome. Southern blotting indicated a low T-DNA insertion number in the orchid genome of the transformants. Western blot confirmed the expression of eGFP protein in the transgenic orchids. Furthermore, the GFP signal was detected in the transgenic orchids under microscopy. After backcrossing the pollinia of the transgenic plants to four different Phal. orchid varieties, the BC1 progenies showed hygromycin resistance and all surviving BC1 seedlings were HptII positive in PCR and expressed GFP protein as shown by western blot. This study demonstrated a stable transformation system was generated for Phal. orchids. This useful transformation protocol enables functional genomics studies and molecular breeding.

  9. Microorganisms with a Taste for Vanilla: Microbial Ecology of Traditional Indonesian Vanilla Curing

    PubMed Central

    Röling, Wilfred F. M.; Kerler, Josef; Braster, Martin; Apriyantono, Anton; Stam, Hein; van Verseveld, Henk W.

    2001-01-01

    The microbial ecology of traditional postharvesting processing of vanilla beans (curing) was examined using a polyphasic approach consisting of conventional cultivation, substrate utilization-based and molecular identification of isolates, and cultivation-independent community profiling by 16S ribosomal DNA based PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. At two different locations, a batch of curing beans was monitored. In both batches a major shift in microbial communities occurred after short-term scalding of the beans in hot water. Fungi and yeast disappeared, although regrowth of fungi occurred in one batch during a period in which process conditions were temporarily not optimal. Conventional plating showed that microbial communities consisting of thermophilic and thermotolerant bacilli (mainly closely related to Bacillus subtilis, B. licheniformis,, and B. smithii) developed under the high temperatures (up to 65°C) that were maintained for over a week after scalding. Only small changes in the communities of culturable bacteria occurred after this period. Molecular analysis revealed that a proportion of the microbial communities could not be cultured on conventional agar medium, especially during the high-temperature period. Large differences between both batches were observed in the numbers of microorganisms, in species composition, and in the enzymatic abilities of isolated bacteria. These large differences indicate that the effects of microbial activities on the development of vanilla flavor could be different for each batch of cured vanilla beans. PMID:11319073

  10. Key odorants in cured Madagascar vanilla beans (Vanilla planiforia) of differing bean quality.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Makoto; Inai, Yoko; Miyazawa, Norio; Kurobayashi, Yoshiko; Fujita, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The odor-active volatiles in Madagascar vanilla beans (Vanilla planiforia) of two grades, red whole beans as standard quality and cuts beans as substandard quality, were characterized by instrumental and sensory analyses. The higher contents of vanillin and β-damascenone in red whole beans than in cuts beans respectively contributed to significant differences in the sweet and dried fruit-like notes, while the higher contents of guaiacol and 3-phenylpropanoic acid in cuts beans than in red whole beans respectively contributed to significant differences in the phenolic and metallic notes. A sensory evaluation to compare red whole beans and their reconstituted aroma characterized both samples as being similar, while in respect of the phenolic note, the reconstituted aroma significantly differed from the reconstituted aroma with guaiacol added at the concentration ratio of vanillin and guaiacol in cuts beans. It is suggested from these results that the concentration ratio of vanillin and guaiacol could be used as an index for the quality of Madagascar vanilla beans.

  11. Do chlorophyllous orchids heterotrophically use mycorrhizal fungal carbon?

    PubMed

    Selosse, Marc-André; Martos, Florent

    2014-11-01

    The roots of orchids associate with mycorrhizal fungi, the rhizoctonias, which are considered to exchange mineral nutrients against plant carbon. The recent discovery that rhizoctonias grow endophytically in non-orchid plants raises the possibility that they provide carbon to orchids, explaining why some orchids differ in isotopic abundances from autotrophic plants.

  12. Tracking rare orchids (Orchidaceae) in Arizona

    Ronald A. Coleman

    2001-01-01

    Twenty-six native orchid species occur in Arizona, and 14 are considered rare with fewer than 100 occurrences in the state. The author is conducting three studies covering four of the wild orchids: Stenorrhynchos michuacanum, Hexalectris revoluta, Malaxis porphyry, and M. tenuis. The studies are ongoing so only interim results are available. Interim results indicate...

  13. The folklore medicinal orchids of Sikkim

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Ashok Kumar; Mandal, Debasis

    2013-01-01

    Background: Orchids are well-known for decorative and aromatic values than its medicinal properties. Jīvantī, Jīvaka, Ṛṣabhaka, Rāsnā, Mānakanda, Pañcagula are used in Ayurveda are said to be orchids. There are 50 species of orchids in medicine. Sikkim has identified 523 species of wild orchids so far. Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the folklore medicinal use of orchids in Sikkim. Materials and Methods: To assess the traditional medicinal uses of orchid species, close contacts were made with native people particularly, traditional healers, religious leaders, nursery growers and villagers of Sikkim. The information was gathered with the help of the questionnaire and personal interviews with various knowledgeable respondents during the field visit in between August 2009 and December 2011. Results and Conclusion: We found that 36 species of orchids are used as medicines for different purposes of health. The botanical and ayurvedic name, phenology, parts used and medicinal uses of 36 orchids are presented in this paper along with its local distribution. PMID:25284941

  14. The folklore medicinal orchids of Sikkim.

    PubMed

    Panda, Ashok Kumar; Mandal, Debasis

    2013-10-01

    Orchids are well-known for decorative and aromatic values than its medicinal properties. Jīvantī, Jīvaka, Ṛṣabhaka, Rāsnā, Mānakanda, Pañcagula are used in Ayurveda are said to be orchids. There are 50 species of orchids in medicine. Sikkim has identified 523 species of wild orchids so far. The aim of this study is to determine the folklore medicinal use of orchids in Sikkim. To assess the traditional medicinal uses of orchid species, close contacts were made with native people particularly, traditional healers, religious leaders, nursery growers and villagers of Sikkim. The information was gathered with the help of the questionnaire and personal interviews with various knowledgeable respondents during the field visit in between August 2009 and December 2011. We found that 36 species of orchids are used as medicines for different purposes of health. The botanical and ayurvedic name, phenology, parts used and medicinal uses of 36 orchids are presented in this paper along with its local distribution.

  15. Identification of the key odorants in Tahitian cured vanilla beans (Vanilla tahitensis) by GC-MS and an aroma extract dilution analysis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Makoto; Inai, Yoko; Miyazawa, Norio; Kurobayashi, Yoshiko; Fujita, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The key odorants of Tahitian vanilla beans (Vanilla tahitensis) were characterized by a sensory evaluation, aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA), quantification, and aroma reconstitution. Vanillin and anisaldehyde were identified in the same highest flavor dilution (FD) factor as the most characteristic odor-active compounds in Tahitian vanilla beans, followed by anisyl alcohol and anisyl acetate. Vanillin and anisyl alcohol were by far the most abundant odorants present with the highest concentration in the beans, followed by acetic acid, anisaldehyde, and anisyl acetate. A sensory evaluation of Tahitian vanilla beans and its reconstitute aroma concentrate characterized both samples as similar. These results indicated vanillin, anisaldehyde, anisyl alcohol, and anisyl acetate to be the key odorants in Tahitian vanilla beans. 3-Methylnonane-2,4-dione were identified for the first time in vanilla beans. β-Damascenone and phenylacetic acid were identified for the first time in Tahitian vanilla beans.

  16. Orchid pollination by sexual deception: pollinator perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gaskett, A C

    2011-02-01

    The extraordinary taxonomic and morphological diversity of orchids is accompanied by a remarkable range of pollinators and pollination systems. Sexually deceptive orchids are adapted to attract specific male insects that are fooled into attempting to mate with orchid flowers and inadvertently acting as pollinators. This review summarises current knowledge, explores new hypotheses in the literature, and introduces some new approaches to understanding sexual deception from the perspective of the duped pollinator. Four main topics are addressed: (1) global patterns in sexual deception, (2) pollinator identities, mating systems and behaviours, (3) pollinator perception of orchid deceptive signals, and (4) the evolutionary implications of pollinator responses to orchid deception, including potential costs imposed on pollinators by orchids. A global list of known and putative sexually deceptive orchids and their pollinators is provided and methods for incorporating pollinator perspectives into sexual deception research are provided and reviewed. At present, almost all known sexually deceptive orchid taxa are from Australia or Europe. A few sexually deceptive species and genera are reported for New Zealand and South Africa. In Central and Southern America, Asia, and the Pacific many more species are likely to be identified in the future. Despite the great diversity of sexually deceptive orchid genera in Australia, pollination rates reported in the literature are similar between Australian and European species. The typical pollinator of a sexually deceptive orchid is a male insect of a species that is polygynous, monandrous, haplodiploid, and solitary rather than social. Insect behaviours involved in the pollination of sexually deceptive orchids include pre-copulatory gripping of flowers, brief entrapment, mating, and very rarely, ejaculation. Pollinator behaviour varies within and among pollinator species. Deception involving orchid mimicry of insect scent signals is

  17. Australian orchids and the doctors they commemorate.

    PubMed

    Pearn, John H

    2013-01-21

    Botanical taxonomy is a repository of medical biographical information. Such botanical memorials include the names of some indigenous orchids of Australia. By searching reference texts and journals relating to Australian botany and Australian orchidology, as well as Australian and international medical and botanical biographical texts, I identified 30 orchids indigenous to Australia whose names commemorate doctors and other medical professionals. Of these, 24 have names that commemorate a total of 16 doctors who worked in Australia. The doctors and orchids I identified include: doctor-soldiers Richard Sanders Rogers (1862-1942), after whom the Rogers' Greenhood (Pterostylis rogersii) is named, and Robert Brown (1773-1858), after whom the Purple Enamel Orchid (Elythranthera brunonis) is named; navy surgeon Archibald Menzies (1754-1842), after whom the Hare Orchid (Leptoceras menziesii) is named; radiologist Hugo Flecker (1884-1957) after whom the Slender Sphinx Orchid (Cestichis fleckeri) is named; and general medical practitioner Hereward Leighton Kesteven (1881-1964), after whom the Kesteven's Orchid (Dendrobium kestevenii) is named. Biographic references in scientific names of plants comprise a select but important library of Australian medical history. Such botanical taxonomy commemorates, in an enduring manner, clinicians who have contributed to biology outside clinical practice.

  18. Bioactive Secondary Metabolites from Orchids (Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Sut, Stefania; Maggi, Filippo; Dall'Acqua, Stefano

    2017-11-01

    The Orchidaceae family is the largest group of flowering plants in the Angiosperm monocotyledons spread on our planet. Its members, called orchids, are herbs or epiphytes with showy flowers distributed mainly in tropical regions. Several classes of phytoconstituents have been so far isolated from therapeutically-used orchids showing a great chemical diversity. Among them, phenolic derivatives have been studied for their biological activities, especially in the field of cancer, inflammation, and neurodegeneration. On the other hand, limited information has been so far obtained on the numerous alkaloids and terpenoids isolated from several orchid species. Recent articles revealed pronounced effects of some alkaloids on the CNS. Published literature on orchids that are used in traditional medicine has been reviewed in this work indicating a great potential of such organisms as source of chemical entities for the development of new drugs. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  19. Frozen beauty: The cryobiotechnology of orchid diversity.

    PubMed

    Popova, Elena; Kim, Haeng Hoon; Saxena, Praveen Kumar; Engelmann, Florent; Pritchard, Hugh W

    2016-01-01

    Orchids (Orchidaceae) are one of the most diverse plant groups on the planet with over 25,000 species. For over a century, scientists and horticulturalists have been fascinated by their complex floral morphology, pollinator specificity and multiple ethnobotanical uses, including as food, flavourings, medicines, ornaments, and perfumes. These important traits have stimulated world-wide collection of orchid species, often for the commercial production of hybrids and leading to frequent overexploitation. Increasing human activities and global environmental changes are also accelerating the threat of orchid extinction in their natural habitats. In order to improve gene conservation strategies for these unique species, innovative developments of cryopreservation methodologies are urgently needed based on an appreciation of low temperature (cryo) stress tolerance, the stimulation of recovery growth of plant tissues in vitro and on the 'omics' characterization of the targeted cell system (biotechnology). The successful development and application of such cryobiotechnology now extends to nearly 100 species and commercial hybrids of orchids, underpinning future breeding and species conservation programmes. In this contribution, we provide an overview of the progress in cryobanking of a range of orchid tissues, including seeds, pollen, protocorms, protocorm-like bodies, apices excised from in vitro plants, cell suspensions, rhizomes and orchid fungal symbionts. We also highlight future research needs. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Orchids (Cymbidium spp., Oncidium, and Phalaenopsis).

    PubMed

    Chan, Ming-Tsair; Chan, Yuan-Li; Sanjaya

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in genetic engineering have made the transformation and regeneration of plants into a powerful tool for orchid improvement. This chapter presents a simple and reproducible Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation protocol and molecular screening technique of transgenics for two orchid species, Oncidium and Phalaenopsis. The target tissues for gene transfer were protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) derived from protocorms, into which constructed foreign genes were successfully introduced. To establish stable transformants, two stages of selection were applied on the PLBs co-cultivated with A. tumefaciens. About 10% transformation efficiency was achieved in Oncidium orchid, as 108 antibiotic resistant independent PLBs were proliferated from 1000 infected PLBs. In Phalaenopsis orchid about 11 to 12% of transformation efficiency was achieved by using the present protocol. Different molecular methods and GUS-staining used to screen putative transgenic plants to confirm the integration of foreign DNA into the orchid genome were also described in detail. The methods described would also be useful for transformation of desired genes into other orchid species.

  1. Colour mimicry and sexual deception by Tongue orchids (Cryptostylis).

    PubMed

    Gaskett, A C; Herberstein, M E

    2010-01-01

    Typically, floral colour attracts pollinators by advertising rewards such as nectar, but how does colour function when pollinators are deceived, unrewarded, and may even suffer fitness costs? Sexually deceptive orchids are pollinated only by male insects fooled into mating with orchid flowers and inadvertently transferring orchid pollinia. Over long distances, sexually deceptive orchids lure pollinators with counterfeit insect sex pheromones, but close-range deception with colour mimicry is a tantalising possibility. Here, for the first time, we analyse the colours of four sexually deceptive Cryptostylis orchid species and the female wasp they mimic (Lissopimpla excelsa, Ichneumonidae), from the perspective of the orchids' single, shared pollinator, male Lissopimpla excelsa. Despite appearing different to humans, the colours of the orchids and female wasps were effectively identical when mapped into a hymenopteran hexagonal colour space. The orchids and wasps reflected predominantly red-orange wavelengths, but UV was also reflected by raised bumps on two orchid species and by female wasp wings. The orchids' bright yellow pollinia contrasted significantly with their overall red colour. Orchid deception may therefore involve accurate and species-specific mimicry of wavelengths reflected by female wasps, and potentially, exploitation of insects' innate attraction to UV and yellow wavelengths. In general, mimicry may be facilitated by exploiting visual vulnerabilities and evolve more readily at the peripheries of sensory perception. Many sexually deceptive orchids are predominantly red, green or white: colours that are all potentially difficult for hymenoptera to detect or distinguish from the background.

  2. A comprehensive review on vanilla flavor: extraction, isolation and quantification of vanillin and others constituents.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Arun K; Sharma, Upendra K; Sharma, Nandini

    2008-06-01

    Vanilla, being the world's most popular flavoring materials, finds extensive applications in food, beverages, perfumery and pharmaceutical industry. With the high demand and limited supply of vanilla pods and the continuing increase in their cost, numerous efforts of blending and adulteration in natural vanilla extracts have been reported. Thus, to ensure the quality of vanilla extracts and vanilla-containing products, it is important to develop techniques to verify their authenticity. Quantitatively, vanillin is the major compound present in the vanilla pods and the determination of vanillin is a vital consideration in natural vanilla extracts. This paper provides a comprehensive account of different extraction processes and chromatographic techniques applied for the separation, identification and determination of chemical constituents of vanilla. The review also provides an account of different methods applied for the quantification and the authentification of chemical constituents of vanilla extract. As the various properties of vanilla are attributed to its main constituent vanillin, its physico-chemical and bioactive properties have also been outlined.

  3. Fusarium species as pathogen on orchids.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shikha; Kadooka, Chris; Uchida, Janice Y

    2018-03-01

    The recent surge in demand for exotic ornamental crops such as orchids has led to a rise in international production, and a sharp increase in the number of plant and plant products moving between countries. Along with the plants, diseases are also being transported and introduced into new areas. Fusarium is one of the major diseases causing pathogens infecting orchids that is spreading through international trade. Studies have identified several species of Fusarium associated with orchids, some are pathogenic and cause symptoms such as leaf and flower spots, leaf or sheath blights, pseudostem or root rots, and wilts. Infection and damage caused by Fusarium reduces the quality of plants and flowers, and can cause severe economic losses. This review documents the current status of the Fusarium-orchid interaction, and illustrates challenges and future perspectives based on the available literature. This review is the first of Fusarium and orchid interactions, and integrates diverse results that both furthers the understanding and knowledge of this disease complex, and will enable the development of effective disease management practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Linnaean sources and concepts of orchids.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Charlie; Cribb, Phillip

    2009-08-01

    Linnaeus developed a robust system for naming plants and a useful, if mechanical, system for classifying them. His binomial nomenclature proved the catalyst for the rapid development of our knowledge of orchids, with his work on the family dating back to 1737 in the first edition of his Genera Plantarum. His first work devoted to orchids, indeed the first monograph of the family, was published in 1740 and formed the basis for his account in Species Plantarum, published in 1753, in which he gave a binomial name to each species. Given the overwhelming number of orchids, he included surprisingly few - only 62 mostly European species - in Species Plantarum, his seminal work on the plants of the world. This reflects the European origin of modern botany and the concentration of extra-European exploration on other matters, such as conquest, gold and useful plants. Nevertheless, the scope of Linnaeus' work is broad, including plants from as far afield as India, Japan, China and the Philippines to the east, and eastern Canada, the West Indies and northern South America to the west. In his later publications he described and named a further 45 orchids, mostly from Europe, South Africa and the tropical Americas. The philosophical basis of Linnaeus' work on orchids is discussed and his contribution to our knowledge of the family assessed. His generic and species concepts are considered in the light of current systematic ideas, but his adoption of binomial nomenclature for all plants is his lasting legacy.

  5. Linnaean sources and concepts of orchids

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Charlie; Cribb, Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Background Linnaeus developed a robust system for naming plants and a useful, if mechanical, system for classifying them. His binomial nomenclature proved the catalyst for the rapid development of our knowledge of orchids, with his work on the family dating back to 1737 in the first edition of his Genera Plantarum. His first work devoted to orchids, indeed the first monograph of the family, was published in 1740 and formed the basis for his account in Species Plantarum, published in 1753, in which he gave a binomial name to each species. Given the overwhelming number of orchids, he included surprisingly few – only 62 mostly European species – in Species Plantarum, his seminal work on the plants of the world. This reflects the European origin of modern botany and the concentration of extra-European exploration on other matters, such as conquest, gold and useful plants. Nevertheless, the scope of Linnaeus' work is broad, including plants from as far afield as India, Japan, China and the Philippines to the east, and eastern Canada, the West Indies and northern South America to the west. In his later publications he described and named a further 45 orchids, mostly from Europe, South Africa and the tropical Americas. Scope The philosophical basis of Linnaeus' work on orchids is discussed and his contribution to our knowledge of the family assessed. His generic and species concepts are considered in the light of current systematic ideas, but his adoption of binomial nomenclature for all plants is his lasting legacy. PMID:19182221

  6. Quantifying anthropogenic threats to orchids using the IUCN Red List.

    PubMed

    Wraith, Jenna; Pickering, Catherine

    2018-04-01

    Orchids are diverse, occur in a wide range of habitats and dominate threatened species lists, but which orchids are threatened, where and by what? Using the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List, we assessed the range and diversity of threats to orchids globally including identifying four threat syndromes: (1) terrestrial orchids in forests that are endemic to a country and threatened by illegal collecting; (2) orchids threatened by climate change, pollution, transportation and disturbance/development for tourism, and recreation activities, often in East Asia; (3) epiphytic orchids in Sub-Saharan Africa including Madagascar with diverse threats; and (4) South and Southeast Asia orchids threatened by land clearing for shifting agriculture. Despite limitations in the Red List data, the results highlight how conservation efforts can focus on clusters of co-occurring threats in regions while remaining aware of the trifecta of broad threats from plant collecting, land clearing and climate change.

  7. Appetite-enhancing effects of vanilla flavours such as vanillin.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kakuyou; Tashima, Akira; Sadakata, Momoko; Morinaga, Osamu

    2018-06-01

    Vanilla flavour is familiar to consumers through foods, cosmetics, household products and some medicines. Vanilla flavouring agents typically contain vanillin or its analogue ethyl vanillin. Our previous study revealed that the inhalation of eugenol, which contains a vanillyl group, has an appetite-enhancing effect, and the inhalation of aroma compounds containing the vanillyl group or its analogues led to increased food intake in mice. Here, we found that vanillin, ethyl vanillin and eugenol showed appetite-enhancing effects, whereas isoeugenol and safrole did not. These results suggest that the appetite-enhancing effects could be attributable to the vanillyl group and could be affected by the position of the double bond in the aliphatic chain. Furthermore, the results of intraperitoneal administration of eugenol and vanillin suggest that their appetite-enhancing effects could occur via stimulation of olfactory receptors.

  8. Drying of vanilla pods using a greenhouse effect solar dryer

    SciT

    Abdullah, K.; Mursalim

    This paper describes the basic design of the GHE solar dryer and evaluates the performance of the dryer when used to dry vanilla pods. From laboratory test results it was indicted that the average drying time for vanilla pods was between 49 to 53.5 hrs. For the case of heating augmentation using coal briquette stoves. The total amount of coal briquettes used to produce drying air temperature between 33 C to 65 C and RH of about 34% during day time was 61 kg equivalent to 6.1 kW heating rate and the average electric energy usage of 36.5 kWh, respectively.more » Quality test results indicated that the dried products were of grade IA of the export quality standard with vaniline content of 2.36%.« less

  9. Two novel Alphaflexiviridae members revealed by deep sequencing of the Vanilla (Orchidaceae) virome.

    PubMed

    Grisoni, Michel; Marais, Armelle; Filloux, Denis; Saison, Anne; Faure, Chantal; Julian, Charlotte; Theil, Sébastien; Contreras, Sandy; Teycheney, Pierre-Yves; Roumagnac, Philippe; Candresse, Thierry

    2017-12-01

    The genomes of two novel viruses were assembled from 454 pyrosequencing data obtained from vanilla leaves from La Réunion. Based on genome organization and homologies, one agent was unambiguously classified as a member of the genus Potexvirus and named vanilla virus X (VVX). The second one, vanilla latent virus (VLV), is phylogenetically close to three unclassified members of the family Alphaflexiviridae with similarity to allexiviruses, and despite the presence of an additional 8-kDa open reading frame, we propose to include VLV as a new member of the genus Allexivirus. Both VVX and VLV were mechanically transmitted to vanilla plants, resulting in asymptomatic infections.

  10. Colour mimicry and sexual deception by Tongue orchids ( Cryptostylis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskett, A. C.; Herberstein, M. E.

    2010-01-01

    Typically, floral colour attracts pollinators by advertising rewards such as nectar, but how does colour function when pollinators are deceived, unrewarded, and may even suffer fitness costs? Sexually deceptive orchids are pollinated only by male insects fooled into mating with orchid flowers and inadvertently transferring orchid pollinia. Over long distances, sexually deceptive orchids lure pollinators with counterfeit insect sex pheromones, but close-range deception with colour mimicry is a tantalising possibility. Here, for the first time, we analyse the colours of four sexually deceptive Cryptostylis orchid species and the female wasp they mimic ( Lissopimpla excelsa, Ichneumonidae), from the perspective of the orchids’ single, shared pollinator, male Lissopimpla excelsa. Despite appearing different to humans, the colours of the orchids and female wasps were effectively identical when mapped into a hymenopteran hexagonal colour space. The orchids and wasps reflected predominantly red-orange wavelengths, but UV was also reflected by raised bumps on two orchid species and by female wasp wings. The orchids’ bright yellow pollinia contrasted significantly with their overall red colour. Orchid deception may therefore involve accurate and species-specific mimicry of wavelengths reflected by female wasps, and potentially, exploitation of insects’ innate attraction to UV and yellow wavelengths. In general, mimicry may be facilitated by exploiting visual vulnerabilities and evolve more readily at the peripheries of sensory perception. Many sexually deceptive orchids are predominantly red, green or white: colours that are all potentially difficult for hymenoptera to detect or distinguish from the background.

  11. Collection and trade of wild-harvested orchids in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Subedi, Abishkar; Kunwar, Bimal; Choi, Young; Dai, Yuntao; van Andel, Tinde; Chaudhary, Ram P; de Boer, Hugo J; Gravendeel, Barbara

    2013-08-31

    Wild orchids are illegally harvested and traded in Nepal for use in local traditional medicine, horticulture, and international trade. This study aims to: 1) identify the diversity of species of wild orchids in trade in Nepal; 2) study the chain of commercialization from collector to client and/or export; 3) map traditional knowledge and medicinal use of orchids; and 4) integrate the collected data to propose a more sustainable approach to orchid conservation in Nepal. Trade, species diversity, and traditional use of wild-harvested orchids were documented during field surveys of markets and through interviews. Trade volumes and approximate income were estimated based on surveys and current market prices. Orchid material samples were identified to species level using a combination of morphology and DNA barcoding. Orchid trade is a long tradition, and illegal export to China, India and Hong Kong is rife. Estimates show that 9.4 tons of wild orchids were illegally traded from the study sites during 2008/2009. A total of 60 species of wild orchids were reported to be used in traditional medicinal practices to cure at least 38 different ailments, including energizers, aphrodisiacs and treatments of burnt skin, fractured or dislocated bones, headaches, fever and wounds. DNA barcoding successfully identified orchid material to species level that remained sterile after culturing. Collection of wild orchids was found to be widespread in Nepal, but illegal trade is threatening many species in the wild. Establishment of small-scale sustainable orchid breeding enterprises could be a valuable alternative for the production of medicinal orchids for local communities. Critically endangered species should be placed on CITES Appendix I to provide extra protection to those species. DNA barcoding is an effective method for species identification and monitoring of illegal cross-border trade.

  12. Collection and trade of wild-harvested orchids in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Wild orchids are illegally harvested and traded in Nepal for use in local traditional medicine, horticulture, and international trade. This study aims to: 1) identify the diversity of species of wild orchids in trade in Nepal; 2) study the chain of commercialization from collector to client and/or export; 3) map traditional knowledge and medicinal use of orchids; and 4) integrate the collected data to propose a more sustainable approach to orchid conservation in Nepal. Methods Trade, species diversity, and traditional use of wild-harvested orchids were documented during field surveys of markets and through interviews. Trade volumes and approximate income were estimated based on surveys and current market prices. Orchid material samples were identified to species level using a combination of morphology and DNA barcoding. Results Orchid trade is a long tradition, and illegal export to China, India and Hong Kong is rife. Estimates show that 9.4 tons of wild orchids were illegally traded from the study sites during 2008/2009. A total of 60 species of wild orchids were reported to be used in traditional medicinal practices to cure at least 38 different ailments, including energizers, aphrodisiacs and treatments of burnt skin, fractured or dislocated bones, headaches, fever and wounds. DNA barcoding successfully identified orchid material to species level that remained sterile after culturing. Conclusions Collection of wild orchids was found to be widespread in Nepal, but illegal trade is threatening many species in the wild. Establishment of small-scale sustainable orchid breeding enterprises could be a valuable alternative for the production of medicinal orchids for local communities. Critically endangered species should be placed on CITES Appendix I to provide extra protection to those species. DNA barcoding is an effective method for species identification and monitoring of illegal cross-border trade. PMID:24004516

  13. Stable isotope ratio determination of the origin of vanillin in vanilla extracts and its relationship to vanillin/potassium ratios

    SciT

    Martin, G.E.; Alfonso, F.C.; Figert, D.M.

    A method is described for isolating vanillin from vanilla extract, followed by stable isotope ratio analysis to determine the amount of natural vanillin contained in adulterated vanilla extracts. After the potassium content is determined, the percent Madagascar and/or Java vanilla beans incorporated into the extract may then be approximated from the vanillin/potassium ratio.

  14. Evidence of transoceanic dispersion of the genus Vanilla based on plastid DNA phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Bouetard, Anthony; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Gigant, Rodolphe; Bory, Séverine; Pignal, Marc; Besse, Pascale; Grisoni, Michel

    2010-05-01

    The phylogeny and the biogeographical history of the genus Vanilla was investigated using four chloroplastic genes (psbB, psbC; psaB and rbcL), on 47 accessions of Vanilla chosen from the ex situ CIRAD collection maintained in Reunion Island and additional sequences from GenBank. Bayesian methods provided a fairly well supported reconstruction of the phylogeny of the Vanilloideae sub-family and more particularly of the genus Vanilla. Three major phylogenetic groups in the genus Vanilla were differentiated, which is in disagreement with the actual classification in two sections (Foliosae and Aphyllae) based on morphological traits. Recent Bayesian relaxed molecular clock methods allowed to test the two main hypotheses of the phylogeography of the genus Vanilla. Early radiation of the Vanilla genus and diversification by vicariance consecutive to the break-up of Gondwana, 95 million years ago (Mya), was incompatible with the admitted age of origin of Angiosperm. Based on the Vanilloideae age recently estimated to 71 million years ago (Mya), we conclude that the genus Vanilla would have appeared approximately 34 Mya in South America, when continents were already separated. Nevertheless, whatever the two extreme scenarios tested, at least three long distance migration events are needed to explain the present distribution of Vanilla species in tropical areas. These transoceanic dispersions could have occurred via transoceanic passageway such as the Rio Grande Ridge and the involvement of floating vegetation mats and migratory birds. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. "The orchids have been a splendid sport"--an alternative look at Charles Darwin's contribution to orchid biology.

    PubMed

    Yam, Tim Wing; Arditti, Joseph; Cameron, Kenneth M

    2009-12-01

    Charles Darwin's work with orchids and his thoughts about them are of great interest and not a little pride for those who are interested in these plants, but they are generally less well known than some of his other studies and ideas. Much has been published on what led to his other books and views. However, there is a paucity of information in the general literature on how Darwin's orchid book came about. This review will describe how The Various Contrivances by Which Orchids Are Fertilised by Insects came into being and will discuss the taxonomy of the orchids he studied. It also will concentrate on some of the less well-known aspects of Darwin's work and observations on orchids-namely, rostellum, seeds and their germination, pollination effects, and resupination-and their influence on subsequent investigators, plant physiology, and orchid science.

  16. Orchid seed removal by ants in Neotropical ant-gardens.

    PubMed

    Morales-Linares, J; García-Franco, J G; Flores-Palacios, A; Valenzuela-González, J E; Mata-Rosas, M; Díaz-Castelazo, C

    2018-05-01

    Most plants that inhabit ant-gardens (AGs) are cultivated by the ants. Some orchids occur in AGs; however, it is not known whether their seeds are dispersed by AG ants because most orchid seeds are tiny and dispersed by wind. We performed in situ seed removal experiments, in which we simultaneously provided Azteca gnava ants with seeds of three AG orchid species and three other AG epiphyte species (Bromeliaceae, Cactaceae and Gesneriaceae), as well as the non-AG orchid Catasetum integerrimum. The seeds most removed were those of the bromeliad Aechmea tillandsioides and the gesneriad Codonanthe uleana, while seeds of AG orchids Coryanthes picturata, Epidendrum flexuosum and Epidendrum pachyrachis were less removed. The non-AG orchid was not removed. Removal values were positively correlated with the frequency of the AG epiphytes in the AGs, and seeds of AG orchids were larger than those of non-AG orchids, which should favour myrmecochory. Our data show that Azt. gnava ants discriminate and preferentially remove seeds of the AG epiphytes. We report for the first time the removal of AG orchid seeds by AG ants in Neotropical AGs. © 2018 German Society for Plant Sciences and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  17. The Apostasia genome and the evolution of orchids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Liu, Ke-Wei; Li, Zhen; Lohaus, Rolf; Hsiao, Yu-Yun; Niu, Shan-Ce; Wang, Jie-Yu; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Xu, Qing; Chen, Li-Jun; Yoshida, Kouki; Fujiwara, Sumire; Wang, Zhi-Wen; Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Wang, Meina; Liu, Guo-Hui; Pecoraro, Lorenzo; Huang, Hui-Xia; Xiao, Xin-Ju; Lin, Min; Wu, Xin-Yi; Wu, Wan-Lin; Chen, You-Yi; Chang, Song-Bin; Sakamoto, Shingo; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Yagi, Masafumi; Zeng, Si-Jin; Shen, Ching-Yu; Yeh, Chuan-Ming; Luo, Yi-Bo; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Van de Peer, Yves; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2017-09-21

    Constituting approximately 10% of flowering plant species, orchids (Orchidaceae) display unique flower morphologies, possess an extraordinary diversity in lifestyle, and have successfully colonized almost every habitat on Earth. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Apostasia shenzhenica, a representative of one of two genera that form a sister lineage to the rest of the Orchidaceae, providing a reference for inferring the genome content and structure of the most recent common ancestor of all extant orchids and improving our understanding of their origins and evolution. In addition, we present transcriptome data for representatives of Vanilloideae, Cypripedioideae and Orchidoideae, and novel third-generation genome data for two species of Epidendroideae, covering all five orchid subfamilies. A. shenzhenica shows clear evidence of a whole-genome duplication, which is shared by all orchids and occurred shortly before their divergence. Comparisons between A. shenzhenica and other orchids and angiosperms also permitted the reconstruction of an ancestral orchid gene toolkit. We identify new gene families, gene family expansions and contractions, and changes within MADS-box gene classes, which control a diverse suite of developmental processes, during orchid evolution. This study sheds new light on the genetic mechanisms underpinning key orchid innovations, including the development of the labellum and gynostemium, pollinia, and seeds without endosperm, as well as the evolution of epiphytism; reveals relationships between the Orchidaceae subfamilies; and helps clarify the evolutionary history of orchids within the angiosperms.

  18. Defining western prairie fringed orchid (Platanthera praeclara) habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudson, Michael David

    Terrestrial orchids are at the forefront of the discussion about anthropogenically-driven extinction with more species threatened globally than any other plant family, mostly because of loss of habitat. The Western Prairie Fringed Orchid ( Platanthera praeclara) is a threatened species found on the Sheyenne National Grassland in southeast North Dakota, USA. This conservation area that is a vital refuge for this species is subject to management for multiple uses including livestock grazing and recreation. Orchids are subject to continuous monitoring, but knowledge of the relationship between landscape indicators and orchid locations is limited. Research is needed to provide a greater understanding of the landscape relative to orchid habitat to develop conservation management strategies suited to dealing with threats arising from future interactions between land management and use, and climate change. The spatial distribution of orchid habitat was defined using a suite of indicators that characterize topography, moisture, and vegetation cover and compared with orchid point-based field observations. High resolution infrared imagery, a LiDAR-derived DEM, and well observations were used to characterize landscape properties. The NDVI (a measure of vegetation cover), the Topographic Wetness Index (TWI: a measure of moisture on the landscape), the Topographic Position Index (TPI: a measure of position on the landscape), and the depth to groundwater (a measure of the depth from the land surface to the groundwater surface) provided the best set of indicators of orchid habitat. Comparison between orchid locations and landscape indicators identified orchid metrics (+/-2 sigma) used to classify landscape indicators which were combined to create orchid habitat maps. This study supports that distribution of orchid habitat are influenced by the selected landscape indicators, each providing important information to the analysis. Comparison of orchid metrics with groundwater

  19. Patterns of reproductive isolation in Mediterranean deceptive orchids.

    PubMed

    Scopece, Giovanni; Musacchio, Aldo; Widmer, Alex; Cozzolino, Salvatore

    2007-11-01

    The evolution of reproductive isolation is of central interest in evolutionary biology. In plants, this is typically achieved by a combination of pre- and postpollination mechanisms that prevent, or limit, the amount of interspecific gene flow. Here, we investigated and compared two ecologically defined groups of Mediterranean orchids that differ in pollination biology and pollinator specificity: sexually deceptive orchids versus food-deceptive orchids. We used experimental crosses to assess the strength of postmating prezygotic, and postzygotic reproductive isolation, and a phylogenetic framework to determine their relative rates of evolution. We found quantitative and qualitative differences between the two groups. Food-deceptive orchids have weak premating isolation but strong postmating isolation, whereas the converse situation characterizes sexually deceptive orchids. Only postzygotic reproductive isolation among food-deceptive orchids was found to evolve in a clock-like manner. Comparison of evolutionary rates, within a common interval of genetic distance, showed that the contribution of postmating barriers was more relevant in the food-deceptive species than in the sexually deceptive species. Asymmetry in prezygotic isolation was found among food-deceptive species. Our results indicate that postmating barriers are most important for reproductive isolation in food-deceptive orchids, whereas premating barriers are most important in sexually deceptive orchids. The different rate of evolution of reproductive isolation and the relative strength of pre- and postmating barriers may have implication for speciation processes in the two orchid groups.

  20. Are there keystone mycorrhizal fungi associated to tropical epiphytic orchids?

    PubMed

    Cevallos, Stefania; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Aminael; Decock, Cony; Declerck, Stéphane; Suárez, Juan Pablo

    2017-04-01

    In epiphytic orchids, distinctive groups of fungi are involved in the symbiotic association. However, little is known about the factors that determine the mycorrhizal community structure. Here, we analyzed the orchid mycorrhizal fungi communities associated with three sympatric Cymbidieae epiphytic tropical orchids (Cyrtochilum flexuosum, Cyrtochilum myanthum, and Maxillaria calantha) at two sites located within the mountain rainforest of southern Ecuador. To characterize these communities at each orchid population, the ITS2 region was analyzed by Illumina MiSeq technology. Fifty-five mycorrhizal fungi operational taxonomic units (OTUs) putatively attributed to members of Serendipitaceae, Ceratobasidiaceae and Tulasnellaceae were identified. Significant differences in mycorrhizal communities were detected between the three sympatric orchid species as well as among sites/populations. Interestingly, some mycorrhizal OTUs overlapped among orchid populations. Our results suggested that populations of studied epiphytic orchids have site-adjusted mycorrhizal communities structured around keystone fungal species. Interaction with multiple mycorrhizal fungi could favor orchid site occurrence and co-existence among several orchid species.

  1. Saprotrophic fungal mycorrhizal symbionts in achlorophyllous orchids

    PubMed Central

    Martos, Florent; Perry, Brian A; Padamsee, Mahajabeen; Roy, Mélanie; Pailler, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Mycoheterotrophic plants are achlorophyllous plants that obtain carbon from their mycorrhizal fungi. They are usually considered to associate with fungi that are (1) specific of each mycoheterotrophic species and (2) mycorrhizal on surrounding green plants, which are the ultimate carbon source of the entire system. Here we review recent works revealing that some mycoheterotrophic plants are not fungal-specific, and that some mycoheterotrophic orchids associate with saprophytic fungi. A re-examination of earlier data suggests that lower specificity may be less rare than supposed in mycoheterotrophic plants. Association between mycoheterotrophic orchids and saprophytic fungi arose several times in the evolution of the two partners. We speculate that this indirectly illustrates why transition from saprotrophy to mycorrhizal status is common in fungal evolution. Moreover, some unexpected fungi occasionally encountered in plant roots should not be discounted as ‘molecular scraps’, since these facultatively biotrophic encounters may evolve into mycorrhizal symbionts in some other plants. PMID:20061806

  2. Sex and the Catasetinae (Darwin's favourite orchids).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escobar, Oscar Alejandro; Gottschling, Marc; Whitten, W Mark; Salazar, Gerardo; Gerlach, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Two sexual systems are predominant in Catasetinae (Orchidaceae), namely protandry (which has evolved in other orchid lineages as well) and environmental sex determination (ESD) being a unique trait among Orchidaceae. Yet, the lack of a robust phylogenetic framework for Catasetinae has hampered deeper insights in origin and evolution of sexual systems. To investigate the origins of protandry and ESD in Catasetinae, we sequenced nuclear and chloroplast loci from 77 species, providing the most extensive data matrix of Catasetinae available so far with all major lineages represented. We used Maximum Parsimony, Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian methods to infer phylogenetic relationships and evolution of sexual systems. Irrespectively of the methods used, Catasetinae were monophyletic in molecular phylogenies, with all established generic lineages and their relationships resolved and highly supported. According to comparative reconstruction approaches, the last common ancestor of Catasetinae was inferred as having bisexual flowers (i.e., lacking protandry and ESD as well), and protandry originated once in core Catasetinae (comprising Catasetum, Clowesia, Cycnoches, Dressleria and Mormodes). In addition, three independent gains of ESD are reliably inferred, linked to corresponding loss of protandry within core Catasetinae. Thus, prior gain of protandry appears as the necessary prerequisite for gain of ESD in orchids. Our results contribute to a comprehensive evolutionary scenario for sexual systems in Catasetinae and more generally in orchids as well. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Observation: Leafy spurge control in western prairie fringed orchid habitat

    Donald R. Kirby; Rodney G. Lym; John J. Sterling; Carolyn Hull Sieg

    2003-01-01

    The western prairie fringed orchid (Platanthera praeclara Sheviak and Bowles) is a threatened species of the tallgrass prairie. Invasion by leafy spurge (Euphorbiaes esula L.) is a serious threat to western prairie fringed orchid habitat. The obiectives of this study were to develop a herbicide treatment to control leafy spurge...

  4. Turkish graveyards as refuges for orchids against tuber harvest.

    PubMed

    Molnár V, Attila; Nagy, Timea; Löki, Viktor; Süveges, Kristóf; Takács, Attila; Bódis, Judit; Tökölyi, Jácint

    2017-12-01

    Harvest of orchid tubers for salep production is widespread in southwestern Asia and the Balkans and constitutes a major conservation risk for wild orchid populations. Synanthropic habitats, such as graveyards, are important refuges for orchids and other organisms and could offer protection from salep harvesting because of their special cultural role. However, little is known about the occurrence and factors influencing harvesting of salep in graveyards. During field surveys of 474 graveyards throughout Turkey, we observed 333 graveyards with orchids, 311 graveyards with tuberous orchids, and salep harvest in 14 graveyards. Altogether, 530 individuals of 17 orchid species were collected, representing 9% of the individuals recorded. Harvesting intensity was relatively low, and populations were usually not wholly destroyed. However, some species were clearly more affected than others. Salep harvesting risk of orchid species was significantly associated with flowering time, with early-flowering species being more affected. A marginally significant positive relationship between harvesting risk and species-specific tuber size was also detected. Our data suggest that graveyards might offer some protection against salep harvesting in Turkey, but they also show that some orchid taxa are much more affected than others. Overall, our observations add more weight to the conservation value of these special habitats.

  5. Dynamics of a threatened orchid in flooded wetlands

    Carolyn Hull Sieg; Paige M. Wolken

    1999-01-01

    One of the three largest metapopulations of the western prairie fringed orchid (Platanthera praeclara) occurs on the Sheyenne National Grassland, in southeastern North Dakota. Our study was initiated in 1993 to quantify the effect of flooding on individual orchid plants. In 1993, 66 plants (33 flowering and 33 vegetative) growing in standing water...

  6. Epiphytism and pollinator specialization: drivers for orchid diversity?

    PubMed Central

    Gravendeel, Barbara; Smithson, Ann; Slik, Ferry J W; Schuiteman, Andre

    2004-01-01

    Epiphytes are a characteristic component of tropical rainforests. Out of the 25,000 orchid species currently known to science, more than 70% live in tree canopies. Understanding when and how these orchids diversified is vital to understanding the history of epiphytic biomes. We investigated whether orchids managed to radiate so explosively owing to their predominantly epiphytic habit and/or their specialized pollinator systems by testing these hypotheses from a statistical and phylogenetic standpoint. For the first approach, species numbers of 100 randomly chosen epiphytic and terrestrial genera were compared. Furthermore, the mean number of pollinators per orchid species within the five subfamilies was calculated and correlated with their time of diversification and species richness. In the second approach, molecular epiphytic orchid phylogenies were screened for clades with specific suites of epiphytic adaptations. Epiphytic genera were found to be significantly richer in species than terrestrial genera both for orchids and non-orchids. No evidence was found for a positive association between pollinator specialization and orchid species richness. Repeated associations between a small body size, short life cycle and specialized clinging roots of twig epiphytes in Bulbophyllinae and Oncidiinae were discovered. The development of twig epiphytism in the first group seems repeatedly correlated with speciation bursts. PMID:15519970

  7. Orchid conservation in the biodiversity hotspot of southwestern China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Chen, Jin; Corlett, Richard T; Fan, XuLi; Yu, DongLi; Yang, HongPei; Gao, JiangYun

    2015-12-01

    Xishuangbanna is on the northern margins of tropical Asia in southwestern China and has the largest area of tropical forest remaining in the country. It is in the Indo-Burma hotspot and contains 16% of China's vascular flora in <0.2% of the country's total area (19,690 km(2) ). Rapid expansion of monoculture crops in the last 20 years, particularly rubber, threatens this region's exceptional biodiversity. To understand the effects of land-use change and collection on orchid species diversity and determine protection priorities, we conducted systematic field surveys, observed markets, interviewed orchid collectors, and then determined the conservation status of all orchids. We identified 426 orchid species in 115 genera in Xishuangbanna: 31% of all orchid species that occur in China. Species richness was highest at 1000-1200 m elevation. Three orchid species were assessed as possibly extinct in the wild, 15 as critically endangered, 82 as endangered, 124 as vulnerable, 186 as least concern, and 16 as data deficient. Declines over 20 years in harvested species suggested over-collection was the major threat, and utility value (i.e., medicinal or ornamental value) was significantly related to endangerment. Expansion of rubber tree plantations was less of a threat to orchids than to other taxa because only 75 orchid species (17.6%) occurred below the 1000-m-elevation ceiling for rubber cultivation, and most of these (46) occurred in nature reserves. However, climate change is projected to lift this ceiling to around 1300 m by 2050, and the limited area at higher elevations reduces the potential for upslope range expansion. The Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden is committed to achieving zero plant extinctions in Xishuangbanna, and orchids are a high priority. Appropriate in and ex situ conservation strategies, including new protected areas and seed banking, have been developed for every threatened orchid species and are being implemented. © 2015 Society for

  8. Pollination Ecology of Four Epiphytic Orchids of New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    LEHNEBACH, CARLOS A.; ROBERTSON, ALASTAIR W

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims In New Zealand epiphytic orchids are represented by four genera and eight species. The genera Earina (three species) and Winika (one species) are the most conspicuous and widespread. These are likely to be some of the southernmost distributed genera of epiphytic orchids in the world. • Methods To identify the pollination strategies that have evolved in these orchids, hand‐pollination treatments were done and floral visitors were observed in several wild populations at two areas of southern North Island (approx. 40°S). Pollen : ovule ratio and osmophores were also studied and the total carbohydrate content of the nectar produced by each species was measured. • Key results Earina autumnalis and Earina mucronata are self‐compatible, whereas Earina aestivalis and Winika cunninghamii appear to be partially self‐incompatible. All four orchids are incapable of autonomous selfing and therefore completely dependent on pollinators to set fruits. Floral visitors observed in the genus Earina belong to Diptera, Coleoptera and Hymenoptera and to Diptera and Hymenoptera in W. cunninghamii. • Conclusions Contrary to many epiphytic orchids in the tropics, the orchid–pollinator relationship in these orchids is unspecialized and flowers are visited by a wide range of insects. Putative pollinators are flies of the families Bibionidae, Calliphoridae, Syrphidae and Tachinidae. All four orchids display anthecological adaptations to a myophilous pollination system such as simple flowers, well‐exposed reproductive structures, easily accessed nectar and high pollen : ovule ratios. PMID:15113741

  9. Germination and seedling establishment in orchids: a complex of requirements

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Hanne N.; Dixon, Kingsley W.; Jersáková, Jana; Těšitelová, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Background Seedling recruitment is essential to the sustainability of any plant population. Due to the minute nature of seeds and early-stage seedlings, orchid germination in situ was for a long time practically impossible to observe, creating an obstacle towards understanding seedling site requirements and fluctuations in orchid populations. The introduction of seed packet techniques for sowing and retrieval in natural sites has brought with it important insights, but many aspects of orchid seed and germination biology remain largely unexplored. Key Considerations The germination niche for orchids is extremely complex, because it is defined by requirements not only for seed lodging and germination, but also for presence of a fungal host and its substrate. A mycobiont that the seedling can parasitize is considered an essential element, and a great diversity of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota have now been identified for their role in orchid seed germination, with fungi identifiable as imperfect Rhizoctonia species predominating. Specificity patterns vary from orchid species employing a single fungal lineage to species associating individually with a limited selection of distantly related fungi. A suitable organic carbon source for the mycobiont constitutes another key requirement. Orchid germination also relies on factors that generally influence the success of plant seeds, both abiotic, such as light/shade, moisture, substrate chemistry and texture, and biotic, such as competitors and antagonists. Complexity is furthermore increased when these factors influence seeds/seedling, fungi and fungal substrate differentially. Conclusions A better understanding of germination and seedling establishment is needed for conservation of orchid populations. Due to the obligate association with a mycobiont, the germination niches in orchid species are extremely complex and varied. Microsites suitable for germination can be small and transient, and direct observation is difficult

  10. Germination and seedling establishment in orchids: a complex of requirements.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Hanne N; Dixon, Kingsley W; Jersáková, Jana; Těšitelová, Tamara

    2015-09-01

    Seedling recruitment is essential to the sustainability of any plant population. Due to the minute nature of seeds and early-stage seedlings, orchid germination in situ was for a long time practically impossible to observe, creating an obstacle towards understanding seedling site requirements and fluctuations in orchid populations. The introduction of seed packet techniques for sowing and retrieval in natural sites has brought with it important insights, but many aspects of orchid seed and germination biology remain largely unexplored. The germination niche for orchids is extremely complex, because it is defined by requirements not only for seed lodging and germination, but also for presence of a fungal host and its substrate. A mycobiont that the seedling can parasitize is considered an essential element, and a great diversity of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota have now been identified for their role in orchid seed germination, with fungi identifiable as imperfect Rhizoctonia species predominating. Specificity patterns vary from orchid species employing a single fungal lineage to species associating individually with a limited selection of distantly related fungi. A suitable organic carbon source for the mycobiont constitutes another key requirement. Orchid germination also relies on factors that generally influence the success of plant seeds, both abiotic, such as light/shade, moisture, substrate chemistry and texture, and biotic, such as competitors and antagonists. Complexity is furthermore increased when these factors influence seeds/seedling, fungi and fungal substrate differentially. A better understanding of germination and seedling establishment is needed for conservation of orchid populations. Due to the obligate association with a mycobiont, the germination niches in orchid species are extremely complex and varied. Microsites suitable for germination can be small and transient, and direct observation is difficult. An experimental approach using several

  11. Metagenomic Analyses of the Viruses Detected in Mycorrhizal Fungi and Their Host Orchid.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Hanako; Masuta, Chikara; Koda, Yasunori

    2018-01-01

    In nature, mycorrhizal association with soilborne fungi is indispensable for orchid families. Fungal structures from compatible endo-mycorrhizal fungi in orchid cells are digested in cells to be supplied to orchids as nutrition. Because orchid seeds lack the reserves for germination, they keep receiving nutrition through mycorrhizal formation from seed germination until shoots develop (leaves) and become photoautotrophic. Seeds of all orchid species surely geminate with the help of their own fungal partners, and this specific partnership has been acquired for a long evolutional history between orchids and fungi.We have studied the interactions between orchids and mycorrhizal fungi and recently conducted transcriptome analyses (RNAseq) by a next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach. It is possible that orchid RNA isolated form naturally grown plants is contaminated with RNAs derived from mycorrhizal fungi in the orchid cells. To avoid such contamination, we here prepared aseptically germinated orchid plants (i.e., fungus-free plants) together with a pure-cultured fungal isolate and field-growing orchid samples. In the cDNA library prepared from orchid and fungal tissues, we found that partitivirus-like sequences were common in an orchid and its mycorrhizal fungus. These partitivirus-like sequences were closely related by a phylogenetic analysis, suggesting that transmission of an ancestor virus between the two organisms occurred through the specific relation of the orchid and its associated fungus.

  12. Molecular characterization of natural orchid in South slopes of Mount Merapi, Sleman regency, Yogyakarta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdiani, Defika I.; Devi, Fera L.; Koentjana, Johan P.; Milasari, Asri F.; Nur'aini, Indah; Semiarti, Endang

    2015-09-01

    Natural orchid is one of the most important tropical biodiversity. In Indonesia there are ± 6000 species out of 30000 orchids species in the world, of which there are ± 60 species at Mount Merapi. Repetitive eruption of Merapi have wiped out the biodiversity of orchids, therefore the efforts to conserve the orchids and to establish the database of natural orchids in Mount Merapi are needed. The orchid's database can be created based on DNA analysis, and establish barcoding DNA. DNA-barcodes can be used as molecular markers. The different character of morphology usually shows different pattern in DNA fragments. This research aims to characterize the phenotype and genotype of natural orchids of Mt. Merapi based on morphology and the structure of DNA in trnL-F intergenic region of chloroplasts DNA of orchid. Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) technique was used to characterize the molecular types of orchids in silico of intergenic space area of orchid chloroplast. In this study, 11 species of orchids were characterized based on morphological and molecular characters. The molecular characters were obtained from trnL-F intergenic region of leaves chloroplasts. The data indicates that there is a conserve DNA pattern in all orchids and the distinctive characters of some orchids. In this study, based on trnL-F intergenic region of chloroplast genome, the phylogenetic tree revealed that 11 species of orchids at Mt. Merapi can be grouped into 2 clades, that matched with morphological characters.

  13. Terrestrial orchid conservation in the age of extinction

    PubMed Central

    Swarts, Nigel D.; Dixon, Kingsley W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Conservation through reserves alone is now considered unlikely to achieve protection of plant species necessary to mitigate direct losses of habitat and the pervasive impact of global climate change. Assisted translocation/migration represent new challenges in the face of climate change; species, particularly orchids, will need artificial assistance to migrate from hostile environments, across ecological barriers (alienated lands such as farmlands and built infrastructure) to new climatically buffered sites. The technology and science to underpin assisted migration concepts are in their infancy for plants in general, and orchids, with their high degree of rarity, represent a particularly challenging group for which these principles need to be developed. It is likely that orchids, more than any other plant family, will be in the front-line of species to suffer large-scale extinction events as a result of climate change. Scope The South West Australian Floristic Region (SWAFR) is the only global biodiversity hotspot in Australia and represents an ideal test-bed for development of orchid conservation principles. Orchids comprise 6 % of all threatened vascular plants in the SWAFR, with 76 out of the 407 species known for the region having a high level of conservation risk. The situation in the SWAFR is a portent of the global crisis in terrestrial orchid conservation, and it is a region where innovative conservation solutions will be required if the impending wave of extinction is to be averted. Major threatening processes are varied, and include land clearance, salinity, burning, weed encroachment, disease and pests. This is compounded by highly specialized pollinators (locally endemic native invertebrates) and, in the most threatened groups such as hammer orchids (Drakaea) and spider orchids (Caladenia), high levels of mycorrhizal specialization. Management and development of effective conservation strategies for SWAFR orchids require a wide range of

  14. Comparison of Breastmilk Odor and Vanilla Odor on Mitigating Premature Infants' Response to Pain During and After Venipuncture.

    PubMed

    Jebreili, Mahnaz; Neshat, Hanieh; Seyyedrasouli, Aleheh; Ghojazade, Morteza; Hosseini, Mohammad Bagher; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2015-09-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the calming effects of breastmilk odor and vanilla odor on preterm infants during and after venipuncture. One hundred thirty-five preterm infants were randomly selected and divided into three groups: control, vanilla odor, and breastmilk odor. Infants in the breastmilk group were exposed to breastmilk odor, and infants in the vanilla group were exposed to vanilla odor from 5 minutes before the start of sampling until 30 seconds after sampling. The Premature Infant Pain Profile was used for calculating quality of pain in infants during and after sampling. Statistical analyses showed that both vanilla and breastmilk odors had calming effects on premature infants during sampling, but just breastmilk odor had calming effects on infants after the end of sampling. Compared with vanilla odor, breastmilk odor has more calming effects on premature infants. Breastmilk odor can be used for calming premature infants during and after venipuncture.

  15. Macroevolution of perfume signalling in orchid bees.

    PubMed

    Weber, Marjorie G; Mitko, Lukasz; Eltz, Thomas; Ramírez, Santiago R

    2016-11-01

    Theory predicts that both stabilising selection and diversifying selection jointly contribute to the evolution of sexual signalling traits by (1) maintaining the integrity of communication signals within species and (2) promoting the diversification of traits among lineages. However, for many important signalling traits, little is known about whether these dynamics translate into predictable macroevolutionary signatures. Here, we test for macroevolutionary patterns consistent with sexual signalling theory in the perfume signals of neotropical orchid bees, a group well studied for their chemical sexual communication. Our results revealed both high species-specificity and elevated rates of evolution in perfume signals compared to nonsignalling traits. Perfume complexity was correlated with the number of congeners in a species' range, suggesting that perfume evolution may be tied to the remarkably high number of orchid bee species coexisting together in some neotropical communities. Finally, sister-pair comparisons were consistent with both rapid divergence at speciation and character displacement upon secondary contact. Together, our results provide new insight into the macroevolution of sexual signalling in insects. © 2016 The Authors. Ecology Letters published by CNRS and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Current progress in orchid flowering/flower development research

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsin-Mei; Tong, Chii-Gong

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genetic pathways relevant to flowering of Arabidopsis are under the control of environmental cues such as day length and temperatures, and endogenous signals including phytohormones and developmental aging. However, genes and even regulatory pathways for flowering identified in crops show divergence from those of Arabidopsis and often do not have functional equivalents to Arabidopsis and/or existing species- or genus-specific regulators and show modified or novel pathways. Orchids are the largest, most highly evolved flowering plants, and form an extremely peculiar group of plants. Here, we briefly summarize the flowering pathways of Arabidopsis, rice and wheat and present them alongside recent discoveries/progress in orchid flowering and flower developmental processes including our transgenic Phalaenopsis orchids for LEAFY overexpression. Potential biotechnological applications in flowering/flower development of orchids with potential target genes are also discussed from an interactional and/or comparative viewpoint. PMID:28448202

  17. Sympatric speciation: perfume preferences of orchid bee lineages.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Duncan E

    2008-12-09

    Female attraction to an environmentally derived mating signal released by male orchid bees may be tightly linked to shared olfactory preferences of both sexes. A change in perfume preference may have led to divergence of two morphologically distinct lineages.

  18. The comparative chloroplast genomic analysis of photosynthetic orchids and developing DNA markers to distinguish Phalaenopsis orchids.

    PubMed

    Jheng, Cheng-Fong; Chen, Tien-Chih; Lin, Jhong-Yi; Chen, Ting-Chieh; Wu, Wen-Luan; Chang, Ching-Chun

    2012-07-01

    The chloroplast genome of Phalaenopsis equestris was determined and compared to those of Phalaenopsis aphrodite and Oncidium Gower Ramsey in Orchidaceae. The chloroplast genome of P. equestris is 148,959 bp, and a pair of inverted repeats (25,846 bp) separates the genome into large single-copy (85,967 bp) and small single-copy (11,300 bp) regions. The genome encodes 109 genes, including 4 rRNA, 30 tRNA and 75 protein-coding genes, but loses four ndh genes (ndhA, E, F and H) and seven other ndh genes are pseudogenes. The rate of inter-species variation between the two moth orchids was 0.74% (1107 sites) for single nucleotide substitution and 0.24% for insertions (161 sites; 1388 bp) and deletions (189 sites; 1393 bp). The IR regions have a lower rate of nucleotide substitution (3.5-5.8-fold) and indels (4.3-7.1-fold) than single-copy regions. The intergenic spacers are the most divergent, and based on the length variation of the three intergenic spacers, 11 native Phalaenopsis orchids could be successfully distinguished. The coding genes, IR junction and RNA editing sites are relatively more conserved between the two moth orchids than between those of Phalaenopsis and Oncidium spp. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Deceived by orchids: sex, science, fiction and Darwin.

    PubMed

    Endersby, Jim

    2016-06-01

    Between 1916 and 1927, botanists in several countries independently resolved three problems that had mystified earlier naturalists - including Charles Darwin: how did the many species of orchid that did not produce nectar persuade insects to pollinate them? Why did some orchid flowers seem to mimic insects? And why should a native British orchid suffer 'attacks' from a bee? Half a century after Darwin's death, these three mysteries were shown to be aspects of a phenomenon now known as pseudocopulation, whereby male insects are deceived into attempting to mate with the orchid's flowers, which mimic female insects; the males then carry the flower's pollen with them when they move on to try the next deceptive orchid. Early twentieth-century botanists were able to see what their predecessors had not because orchids (along with other plants) had undergone an imaginative re-creation: Darwin's science was appropriated by popular interpreters of science, including the novelist Grant Allen; then H.G. Wells imagined orchids as killers (inspiring a number of imitators), to produce a genre of orchid stories that reflected significant cultural shifts, not least in the presentation of female sexuality. It was only after these changes that scientists were able to see plants as equipped with agency, actively able to pursue their own, cunning reproductive strategies - and to outwit animals in the process. This paper traces the movement of a set of ideas that were created in a context that was recognizably scientific; they then became popular non-fiction, then popular fiction, and then inspired a new science, which in turn inspired a new generation of fiction writers. Long after clear barriers between elite and popular science had supposedly been established in the early twentieth century, they remained porous because a variety of imaginative writers kept destabilizing them. The fluidity of the boundaries between makers, interpreters and publics of scientific knowledge was a highly

  20. Untangling above- and belowground mycorrhizal fungal networks in tropical orchids.

    PubMed

    Leake, J R; Cameron, D D

    2012-10-01

    Orchids typically depend on fungi for establishment from seeds, forming mycorrhizal associations with basidiomycete fungal partners in the polyphyletic group rhizoctonia from early stages of germination, sometimes with very high specificity. This has raised important questions about the roles of plant and fungal phylogenetics, and their habitat preferences, in controlling which fungi associate with which plants. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Martos et al. (2012) report the largest network analysis to date for orchids and their mycorrhizal fungi, sampling a total of over 450 plants from nearly half the 150 tropical orchid species on Reunion Island, encompassing its main terrestrial and epiphytic orchid genera. The authors found a total of 95 operational taxonomic units of mycorrhizal fungi and investigated the architecture and nestedness of their bipartite networks with 73 orchid species. The most striking finding was a major ecological barrier between above- and belowground mycorrhizal fungal networks, despite both epiphytic and terrestrial orchids often associating with closely related taxa across all three major lineages of rhizoctonia fungi. The fungal partnerships of the epiphytes and terrestrial species involved a diversity of fungal taxa in a modular network architecture, with only about one in ten mycorrhizal fungi partnering orchids in both groups. In contrast, plant and fungal phylogenetics had weak or no effects on the network. This highlights the power of recently developed ecological network analyses to give new insights into controls on plant-fungal symbioses and raises exciting new hypotheses about the differences in properties and functioning of mycorrhiza in epiphytic and terrestrial orchids. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. 21 CFR 169.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... part: (a) The term vanilla beans means the properly cured and dried fruit pods of Vanilla planifolia Andrews and of Vanilla tahitensis Moore. (b) The term unit weight of vanilla beans means, in the case of vanilla beans containing not more than 25 percent moisture, 13.35 ounces of such beans; and, in the case...

  2. 21 CFR 169.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... part: (a) The term vanilla beans means the properly cured and dried fruit pods of Vanilla planifolia Andrews and of Vanilla tahitensis Moore. (b) The term unit weight of vanilla beans means, in the case of vanilla beans containing not more than 25 percent moisture, 13.35 ounces of such beans; and, in the case...

  3. 21 CFR 169.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... part: (a) The term vanilla beans means the properly cured and dried fruit pods of Vanilla planifolia Andrews and of Vanilla tahitensis Moore. (b) The term unit weight of vanilla beans means, in the case of vanilla beans containing not more than 25 percent moisture, 13.35 ounces of such beans; and, in the case...

  4. 21 CFR 169.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... part: (a) The term vanilla beans means the properly cured and dried fruit pods of Vanilla planifolia Andrews and of Vanilla tahitensis Moore. (b) The term unit weight of vanilla beans means, in the case of vanilla beans containing not more than 25 percent moisture, 13.35 ounces of such beans; and, in the case...

  5. 21 CFR 169.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... part: (a) The term vanilla beans means the properly cured and dried fruit pods of Vanilla planifolia Andrews and of Vanilla tahitensis Moore. (b) The term unit weight of vanilla beans means, in the case of vanilla beans containing not more than 25 percent moisture, 13.35 ounces of such beans; and, in the case...

  6. Orchid phylogenomics and multiple drivers of their extraordinary diversification

    PubMed Central

    Givnish, Thomas J.; Spalink, Daniel; Ames, Mercedes; Lyon, Stephanie P.; Hunter, Steven J.; Zuluaga, Alejandro; Iles, William J. D.; Clements, Mark A.; Arroyo, Mary T. K.; Leebens-Mack, James; Endara, Lorena; Kriebel, Ricardo; Neubig, Kurt M.; Whitten, W. Mark; Williams, Norris H.; Cameron, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Orchids are the most diverse family of angiosperms, with over 25 000 species, more than mammals, birds and reptiles combined. Tests of hypotheses to account for such diversity have been stymied by the lack of a fully resolved broad-scale phylogeny. Here, we provide such a phylogeny, based on 75 chloroplast genes for 39 species representing all orchid subfamilies and 16 of 17 tribes, time-calibrated against 17 angiosperm fossils. A supermatrix analysis places an additional 144 species based on three plastid genes. Orchids appear to have arisen roughly 112 million years ago (Mya); the subfamilies Orchidoideae and Epidendroideae diverged from each other at the end of the Cretaceous; and the eight tribes and three previously unplaced subtribes of the upper epidendroids diverged rapidly from each other between 37.9 and 30.8 Mya. Orchids appear to have undergone one significant acceleration of net species diversification in the orchidoids, and two accelerations and one deceleration in the upper epidendroids. Consistent with theory, such accelerations were correlated with the evolution of pollinia, the epiphytic habit, CAM photosynthesis, tropical distribution (especially in extensive cordilleras), and pollination via Lepidoptera or euglossine bees. Deceit pollination appears to have elevated the number of orchid species by one-half but not via acceleration of the rate of net diversification. The highest rate of net species diversification within the orchids (0.382 sp sp−1 My−1) is 6.8 times that at the Asparagales crown. PMID:26311671

  7. Air pollution as it affects orchids at the New York Botanical Garden

    SciT

    Adderley, L.

    A general discussion of the effects of air pollution on orchids is presented, along with ameliorative measures. One orchid, Dendrobium Phalaenopsis, is suggested as an air pollution bioassay tool, in that it is extremely sensitive to air pollution.

  8. In vitro propagation of Paphiopedilum orchids.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Songjun; Huang, Weichang; Wu, Kunlin; Zhang, Jianxia; da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Duan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Paphiopedilum is one of the most popular and rare orchid genera. Members of the genus are sold and exhibited as pot plants and cut flowers. Wild populations of Paphiopedilum are under the threat of extinction due to over-collection and loss of suitable habitats. A reduction in their commercial value through large-scale propagation in vitro is an option to reduce pressure from illegal collection, to attempt to meet commercial needs and to re-establish threatened species back into the wild. Although they are commercially propagated via asymbiotic seed germination, Paphiopedilum are considered to be difficult to propagate in vitro, especially by plant regeneration from tissue culture. This review aims to cover the most important aspects and to provide an up-to-date research progress on in vitro propagation of Paphiopedilum and to emphasize the importance of further improving tissue culture protocols for ex vitro-derived explants.

  9. Orchid flowers tolerance to gamma-radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Olivia Kimiko

    2000-03-01

    Cut flowers are fresh goods that may be treated with fumigants such as methyl bromide to meet the needs of the quarantine requirements of importing countries. Irradiation is a non-chemical alternative to substitute the methyl bromide treatment of fresh products. In this research, different cut orchids were irradiated to examine their tolerance to gamma-rays. A 200 Gy dose did inhibit the Dendrobium palenopsis buds from opening, but did not cause visible damage to opened flowers. Doses of 800 and 1000 Gy were damaging because they provoked the flowers to drop from the stem. Cattleya irradiated with 750 Gy did not show any damage, and were therefore eligible for the radiation treatment. Cymbidium tolerated up to 300 Gy and above this dose dropped prematurely. On the other hand, Oncydium did not tolerate doses above 150 Gy.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of floral mimicry in orchids.

    PubMed

    Schlüter, Philipp M; Schiestl, Florian P

    2008-05-01

    Deceptive plants do not produce floral rewards, but attract pollinators by mimicking signals of other organisms, such as food plants or female insects. Such floral mimicry is particularly common in orchids, in which flower morphology, coloration and odour play key roles in deceiving pollinators. A better understanding of the molecular bases for these traits should provide new insights into the occurrence, mechanisms and evolutionary consequences of floral mimicry. It should also reveal the molecular bases of pollinator-attracting signals, in addition to providing strategies for manipulating insect behaviour in general. Here, we review data on the molecular bases for traits involved in floral mimicry, and we describe methodological advances helpful for the functional evaluation of key genes.

  11. An investigation of the bacteriological quality of retail vanilla slices.

    PubMed Central

    Pinegar, J. A.; Buxton, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    One hundred and thiry-three vanilla slices, purchased from shops in the West Yorkshire Metropolitan County, were examined to determine the numbers and types of bacteria present at the time of purchase. The surface colony count at 37 degrees C was greater than 10(3)/g in 67/133 (50%) of the samples examined, Bacillus cereus being found at that concentration in 21.8%, coliform bacilli including E. coli in 5.3%, Staphylococcus aureus in 3-0% and Streptococcus faecalis in 0-8%. Thirty-four strains of B. cereus were serotyped and 11 (32%) of these were typable with the sera available. Preparation of custard mixed in the laboratory suggests that the milk or milk powder used in the mix may be the major source of B. cereus in the final product. Many of the present methods of manufacture, distribution and storage allow organisms present in the custard at manufacture the opportunity to multiply and possibly reach numbers which present a risk of food poisoning. PMID:405420

  12. Evaluation of rice flour for use in vanilla ice cream.

    PubMed

    Cody, T L; Olabi, A; Pettingell, A G; Tong, P S; Walker, J H

    2007-10-01

    The effects of varying concentrations (2, 4, and 6%) of 2 types of rice flours (RF 1 and RF 2) on the physicochemical properties and sensory characteristics of vanilla ice cream samples were assessed at different fat levels (0, 4, and 10%) and storage conditions (control vs. heat-shocked). Fat and total solids were measured as well as hardness, viscosity, and melting rate. Eight trained panelists conducted descriptive sensory analyses of the samples at 0 and 7 wk. The 2% rice flour level and to a certain extent the 4% usage level generally improved texture while affecting to a lesser extent the flavor characteristics of the samples compared with the control. The RF 2 generally had a more significant effect than RF 1, especially on the texture attributes. Although the rice flour reduced the negative impact of temperature abuse on textural properties, the samples still deteriorated in textural properties (more icy) under temperature abuse conditions. In addition, rice starch does lower perceived sweetness and can have a "flour flavor" at high usage levels. The use of rice flour appears to be most advantageous for low fat ice cream samples.

  13. Mechanisms and evolution of deceptive pollination in orchids.

    PubMed

    Jersáková, Jana; Johnson, Steven D; Kindlmann, Pavel

    2006-05-01

    The orchid family is renowned for its enormous diversity of pollination mechanisms and unusually high occurrence of non-rewarding flowers compared to other plant families. The mechanisms of deception in orchids include generalized food deception, food-deceptive floral mimicry, brood-site imitation, shelter imitation, pseudoantagonism, rendezvous attraction and sexual deception. Generalized food deception is the most common mechanism (reported in 38 genera) followed by sexual deception (18 genera). Floral deception in orchids has been intensively studied since Darwin, but the evolution of non-rewarding flowers still presents a major puzzle for evolutionary biology. The two principal hypotheses as to how deception could increase fitness in plants are (i) reallocation of resources associated with reward production to flowering and seed production, and (ii) higher levels of cross-pollination due to pollinators visiting fewer flowers on non-rewarding plants, resulting in more outcrossed progeny and more efficient pollen export. Biologists have also tried to explain why deception is overrepresented in the orchid family. These explanations include: (i) efficient removal and deposition of pollinaria from orchid flowers in a single pollinator visit, thus obviating the need for rewards to entice multiple visits from pollinators; (ii) efficient transport of orchid pollen, thus requiring less reward-induced pollinator constancy; (iii) low-density populations in many orchids, thus limiting the learning of associations of floral phenotypes and rewards by pollinators; (iv) packaging of pollen in pollinaria with limited carry-over from flower to flower, thus increasing the risks of geitonogamous self-pollination when pollinators visit many flowers on rewarding plants. All of these general and orchid-specific hypotheses are difficult to reconcile with the well-established pattern for rewardlessness to result in low pollinator visitation rates and consequently low levels of fruit

  14. The location and translocation of ndh genes of chloroplast origin in the Orchidaceae family

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Choun-Sea; Chen, Jeremy J. W.; Huang, Yao-Ting; Chan, Ming-Tsair; Daniell, Henry; Chang, Wan-Jung; Hsu, Chen-Tran; Liao, De-Chih; Wu, Fu-Huei; Lin, Sheng-Yi; Liao, Chen-Fu; Deyholos, Michael K.; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Albert, Victor A.; Chou, Ming-Lun; Chen, Chun-Yi; Shih, Ming-Che

    2015-01-01

    The NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex is encoded by 11 ndh genes in plant chloroplast (cp) genomes. However, ndh genes are truncated or deleted in some autotrophic Epidendroideae orchid cp genomes. To determine the evolutionary timing of the gene deletions and the genomic locations of the various ndh genes in orchids, the cp genomes of Vanilla planifolia, Paphiopedilum armeniacum, Paphiopedilum niveum, Cypripedium formosanum, Habenaria longidenticulata, Goodyera fumata and Masdevallia picturata were sequenced; these genomes represent Vanilloideae, Cypripedioideae, Orchidoideae and Epidendroideae subfamilies. Four orchid cp genome sequences were found to contain a complete set of ndh genes. In other genomes, ndh deletions did not correlate to known taxonomic or evolutionary relationships and deletions occurred independently after the orchid family split into different subfamilies. In orchids lacking cp encoded ndh genes, non cp localized ndh sequences were identified. In Erycina pusilla, at least 10 truncated ndh gene fragments were found transferred to the mitochondrial (mt) genome. The phenomenon of orchid ndh transfer to the mt genome existed in ndh-deleted orchids and also in ndh containing species. PMID:25761566

  15. Limited carbon and mineral nutrient gain from mycorrhizal fungi by adult Australian orchids.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Janine; Pausch, Johanna; Brundrett, Mark C; Dixon, Kingsley W; Bidartondo, Martin I; Gebauer, Gerhard

    2012-07-01

    In addition to autotrophic and fully mycoheterotrophic representatives, the orchid family comprises species that at maturity obtain C and N partially from fungal sources. These partial mycoheterotrophs are often associated with fungi that simultaneously form ectomycorrhizas with trees. This study investigates mycorrhizal nutrition for orchids from the southwestern Australian biodiversity hotspot. The mycorrhizal fungi of 35 green and one achlorophyllous orchid species were analyzed using molecular methods. Nutritional mode was identified for 27 species by C and N isotope abundance analysis in comparison to non-orchids from the same habitat. As a complementary approach, (13)CO(2) pulse labeling was applied to a subset of six orchid species to measure photosynthetic capacity. Almost all orchids associated with rhizoctonia-forming fungi. Due to much higher than expected variation within the co-occurring nonorchid reference plants, the stable isotope approach proved challenging for assigning most orchids to a specialized nutritional mode; therefore, these orchids were classified as autotrophic at maturity. The (13)CO(2) pulse labeling confirmed full autotrophy for six selected species. Nonetheless, at least three orchid species (Gastrodia lacista, Prasophyllum elatum, Corybas recurvus) were identified as nutritionally distinctive from autotrophic orchids and reference plants. Despite the orchid-rich flora in southwestern Australia, partial mycoheterotrophy among these orchids is less common than in other parts of the world, most likely because most associate with saprotrophic fungi rather than ectomycorrhizal fungi.

  16. 76 FR 78008 - Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings and Orchid Cellmark Inc.; Analysis of Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION [File No. 111 0155] Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings and Orchid... Comment part of the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section below. Write ``LabCorp/Orchid, File No. 111 0155... consider your comment, we must receive it on or before January 9, 2012. Write ''LabCorp/Orchid, File No...

  17. New Workflows for Born-Digital Assets: Managing Charles E. Bracker's Orchid Photographs Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurford, Amanda A.; Runyon, Carolyn F.

    2011-01-01

    Charles E. Bracker was a professor of botany and plant pathology at Purdue University from 1964 to 1999. His late wife, Anri, was an orchid enthusiast who began collecting and housing orchids in the 1980s. In 2009, Bracker's 30,000 digital orchid photographs were donated to Ball State University Libraries, where both of this article's authors…

  18. Capillary electrophoresis method for the discrimination between natural and artificial vanilla flavor for controlling food frauds.

    PubMed

    Lahouidak, Samah; Salghi, Rachid; Zougagh, Mohammed; Ríos, Angel

    2018-03-06

    A capillary electrophoresis method was developed for the determination of coumarin (COUM), ethyl vanillin (EVA), p-hydroxybenzaldehyde (PHB), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHBA), vanillin (VAN), vanillic acid (VANA) and vanillic alcohol (VOH) in vanilla products. The measured concentrations are compared to values obtained by liquid chromatography (LC) method. Analytical results, method precision, and accuracy data are presented and limits of detection for the method ranged from 2 to 5 μg/mL. The results obtained are used in monitoring the composition of vanilla flavorings, as well as for confirmation of natural or non-natural origin of vanilla in samples using four selected food samples containing this flavor. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Donkey Orchid Symptomless Virus: A Viral ‘Platypus’ from Australian Terrestrial Orchids

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Stephen J.; Li, Hua; Jones, Michael G. K.

    2013-01-01

    Complete and partial genome sequences of two isolates of an unusual new plant virus, designated Donkey orchid symptomless virus (DOSV) were identified using a high-throughput sequencing approach. The virus was identified from asymptomatic plants of Australian terrestrial orchid Diuris longifolia (Common donkey orchid) growing in a remnant forest patch near Perth, western Australia. DOSV was identified from two D. longifolia plants of 264 tested, and from at least one plant of 129 Caladenia latifolia (pink fairy orchid) plants tested. Phylogenetic analysis of the genome revealed open reading frames (ORF) encoding seven putative proteins of apparently disparate origins. A 69-kDa protein (ORF1) that overlapped the replicase shared low identity with MPs of plant tymoviruses (Tymoviridae). A 157-kDa replicase (ORF2) and 22-kDa coat protein (ORF4) shared 32% and 40% amino acid identity, respectively, with homologous proteins encoded by members of the plant virus family Alphaflexiviridae. A 44-kDa protein (ORF3) shared low identity with myosin and an autophagy protein from Squirrelpox virus. A 27-kDa protein (ORF5) shared no identity with described proteins. A 14-kDa protein (ORF6) shared limited sequence identity (26%) over a limited region of the envelope glycoprotein precursor of mammal-infecting Crimea-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (Bunyaviridae). The putative 25-kDa movement protein (MP) (ORF7) shared limited (27%) identity with 3A-like MPs of members of the plant-infecting Tombusviridae and Virgaviridae. Transmissibility was shown when DOSV systemically infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Structure and organization of the domains within the putative replicase of DOSV suggests a common evolutionary origin with ‘potexvirus-like’ replicases of viruses within the Alphaflexiviridae and Tymoviridae, and the CP appears to be ancestral to CPs of allexiviruses (Alphaflexiviridae). The MP shares an evolutionary history with MPs of dianthoviruses, but the other putative

  20. Australasian orchid biogeography at continental scale: molecular phylogenetic insights from the sun orchids (Thelymitra, Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Nauheimer, Lars; Schley, Rowan J; Clements, Mark A; Micheneau, Claire; Nargar, Katharina

    2018-06-02

    Australia harbours a rich and highly endemic orchid flora, with c. 90 % of species endemic to the country. Despite that, the biogeographic history of Australasian orchid lineages is only poorly understood. Here we examined evolutionary relationships and the spatio-temporal evolution of the sun orchids (Thelymitra, 119 species), which display disjunct distribution patterns frequently found in Australasian orchid lineages. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted based on one nuclear (ITS) and three plastid markers (matK, psbJ-petA, ycf1) using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian inference. Divergence time estimations were carried out with a relaxed molecular clock in a Bayesian framework. Ancestral ranges were estimated using the dispersal-extinction-cladogenesis model and an area coding based on major disjunctions. The phylogenetic analyses clarified intergeneric relationships within Thelymitrinae, with Epiblema being sister to Thelymitra plus Calochilus, both of which were well-supported. Within Thelymitra, eight major and several minor clades were retrieved in the nuclear and plastid phylogenetic reconstructions. Five major clades corresponded to species complexes previously recognized based on morphological characters, whereas other previously recognized species groups were found to be paraphyletic. Conflicting signals between the nuclear and plastid phylogenetic reconstructions provided support for hybridization and plastid capture events both in the deeper evolutionary history of the genus and more recently. Divergence time estimation placed the origin of Thelymitra in the late Miocene (c. 10.8 Ma) and the origin of the majority of the main clades within Thelymitra during the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene, with the majority of extant species arising during the Pleistocene. Ancestral range reconstruction revealed that the early diversification of the genus in the late Miocene and Pliocene took place predominantly in southwest Australia, where most species with

  1. Therapeutic orchids: traditional uses and recent advances--an overview.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad Musharof

    2011-03-01

    Orchids have been used as a source of medicine for millennia to treat different diseases and ailments including tuberculosis, paralysis, stomach disorders, chest pain, arthritis, syphilis, jaundice, cholera, acidity, eczema, tumour, piles, boils, inflammations, menstrual disorder, spermatorrhea, leucoderma, diahorrhea, muscular pain, blood dysentery, hepatitis, dyspepsia, bone fractures, rheumatism, asthma, malaria, earache, sexually transmitted diseases, wounds and sores. Besides, many orchidaceous preparations are used as emetic, purgative, aphrodisiac, vermifuge, bronchodilator, sex stimulator, contraceptive, cooling agent and remedies in scorpion sting and snake bite. Some of the preparations are supposed to have miraculous curative properties but rare scientific demonstration available which is a primary requirement for clinical implementations. Incredible diversity, high alkaloids and glycosides content, research on orchids is full of potential. Meanwhile, some novel compounds and drugs, both in phytochemical and pharmacological point of view have been reported from orchids. Linking of the indigenous knowledge to the modern research activities will help to discover new drugs much more effective than contemporary synthetic medicines. The present study reviews the traditional therapeutic uses of orchids with its recent advances in pharmacological investigations that would be a useful reference for plant drug researches, especially in orchids. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The complete sequence of Cymbidium mosaic virus from Vanilla fragrans in Hainan, China.

    PubMed

    He, Zhen; Jiang, Dongmei; Liu, Aiqin; Sang, Liwei; Li, Wenfeng; Li, Shifang

    2011-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) isolated from vanilla in Hainan province, China was determined for the first time. It comprised 6,224 nucleotides; sequence analysis suggested that the isolate we obtained was a member of the genus Potexvirus, and its sequence shared 86.67-96.61% identities with previously reported sequences. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that CymMV from vanilla fragrans was clustered into subgroup A and the isolates in this subgroup displayed little regional difference.

  3. Bacillus vanillea sp. nov., Isolated from the Cured Vanilla Bean.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-gan; Gu, Feng-lin; Li, Ji-hua; Xu, Fei; He, Shu-zhen; Fang, Yi-ming

    2015-02-01

    A Gram-positive bacterium, designated strain XY18(T), was isolated from a cured vanilla bean in Hainan province, China. Cells were rod-shaped, endospore producing, and peritrichous flagella. Strain XY18(T) grew at salinities of 0-8 % (w/v) NaCl (optimally 1-4 %), pH 4.0-8.0 (optimally 5.0-7.0 %) and temperature range 20-45 °C (optimally 28-35 °C). The predominant menaquinone was MK-7. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15:0, iso-C15:0, anteiso-C17:0, and iso-C17:0. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain XY18(T) was a member of the genus Bacillus, and closely related to B. amyloliquefaciens NBRC 15535(T) and B. siamensis PD-A10(T), with 99.1 and 99.2 % sequence similarity, respectively. However, the DNA-DNA hybridization value between strain XY18(T) and B. amyloliquefaciens NBRC 15535(T) was 35.7 %. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain XY18(T) was 46.4 mol%, significantly differed from B. siamensis PD-A10(T) (41.4 %), which was higher than the range of 4 % indicative of species. On the basis of polyphasic taxonomic study, including phenotypic features, chemotaxonomy, and phylogenetic analyses, strain XY18(T) represents a novel species within the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus vanillea sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is XY18(T) (=CGMCC 8629 = NCCB 100507).

  4. Independent, specialized invasions of ectomycorrhizal mutualism by two nonphotosynthetic orchids

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D. Lee; Bruns, Thomas D.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the mycorrhizal associations of two nonphotosynthetic orchids from distant tribes within the Orchidaceae. The two orchids were found to associate exclusively with two distinct clades of ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetous fungi over wide geographic ranges. Yet both orchids retained the internal mycorrhizal structure typical of photosynthetic orchids that do not associate with ectomycorrhizal fungi. Restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis of two ribosomal regions along with fungal isolation provided congruent, independent evidence for the identities of the fungal symbionts. All 14 fungal entities that were associated with the orchid Cephalanthera austinae belonged to a clade within the Thelephoraceae, and all 18 fungal entities that were associated with the orchid Corallorhiza maculata fell within the Russulaceae. Restriction fragment length polymorphism and single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of ectomycorrhizal tree roots collected adjacent to Cephalanthera showed that (i) the fungi associated internally with Cephalanthera also form typical external ectomycorrhizae and that (ii) ectomycorrhizae formed by other Basidiomycetes were abundant where the orchid grows but these fungi did not associate with the orchid. This is the first proof of ectomycorrhizal epiparasitism in nature by an orchid. We argue that these orchids are cheaters because they do not provide fixed carbon to associated fungi. This view suggests that mycorrhizae, like other ancient mutualisms, are susceptible to cheating. The extreme specificity in these orchids relative to other ectomycorrhizal plants agrees with trends seen in more conventional parasites. PMID:9114020

  5. Phylogenetic and microsatellite markers for Tulasnella (Tulasnellaceae) mycorrhizal fungi associated with Australian orchids.

    PubMed

    Ruibal, Monica P; Peakall, Rod; Smith, Leon M; Linde, Celeste C

    2013-03-01

    Phylogenetic and microsatellite markers were developed for Tulasnella mycorrhizal fungi to investigate fungal species identity and diversity. These markers will be useful in future studies investigating the phylogenetic relationship of the fungal symbionts, specificity of orchid-mycorrhizal associations, and the role of mycorrhizae in orchid speciation within several orchid genera. • We generated partial genome sequences of two Tulasnella symbionts originating from Chiloglottis and Drakaea orchid species with 454 genome sequencing. Cross-genus transferability across mycorrhizal symbionts associated with multiple genera of Australian orchids (Arthrochilus, Chiloglottis, Drakaea, and Paracaleana) was found for seven phylogenetic loci. Five loci showed cross-transferability to Tulasnella from other orchid genera, and two to Sebacina. Furthermore, 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed for Tulasnella from Chiloglottis. • Highly informative markers were obtained, allowing investigation of mycorrhizal diversity of Tulasnellaceae associated with a wide variety of terrestrial orchids in Australia and potentially worldwide.

  6. Somatic Embryogenesis in Two Orchid Genera (Cymbidium, Dendrobium).

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jaime A Teixeira; Winarto, Budi

    2016-01-01

    The protocorm-like body (PLB) is the de facto somatic embryo in orchids. Here we describe detailed protocols for two orchid genera (hybrid Cymbidium Twilight Moon 'Day Light' and Dendrobium 'Jayakarta', D. 'Gradita 31', and D. 'Zahra FR 62') for generating PLBs. These protocols will most likely have to be tweaked for different cultivars as the response of orchids in vitro tends to be dependent on genotype. In addition to primary somatic embryogenesis, secondary (or repetitive) somatic embryogenesis is also described for both genera. The use of thin cell layers as a sensitive tissue assay is outlined for hybrid Cymbidium while the protocol outlined is suitable for bioreactor culture of D. 'Zahra FR 62'.

  7. Lack of S-RNase-Based Gametophytic Self-Incompatibility in Orchids Suggests That This System Evolved after the Monocot-Eudicot Split.

    PubMed

    Niu, Shan-Ce; Huang, Jie; Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Li, Pei-Xing; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Xu, Qing; Chen, Li-Jun; Wang, Jie-Yu; Luo, Yi-Bo; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2017-01-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) is found in approximately 40% of flowering plant species and at least 100 families. Although orchids belong to the largest angiosperm family, only 10% of orchid species present SI and have gametophytic SI (GSI). Furthermore, a majority (72%) of Dendrobium species, which constitute one of the largest Orchidaceae genera, show SI and have GSI. However, nothing is known about the molecular mechanism of GSI. The S-determinants of GSI have been well characterized at the molecular level in Solanaceae, Rosaceae, and Plantaginaceae, which use an S-ribonuclease (S-RNase)-based system. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that Orchidaceae uses a similar S-RNase to those described in Rosaceae, Solanaceae, and Plantaginaceae SI species. In this study, two SI species ( Dendrobium longicornu and D. chrysanthum ) were identified using fluorescence microscopy. Then, the S-RNase- and SLF-interacting SKP1-like1 (SSK1)-like genes present in their transcriptomes and the genomes of Phalaenopsis equestris, D. catenatum, Vanilla shenzhenica , and Apostasia shenzhenica were investigated. Sequence, phylogenetic, and tissue-specific expression analyses revealed that none of the genes identified was an S-determinant, suggesting that Orchidaceae might have a novel SI mechanism. The results also suggested that RNase-based GSI might have evolved after the split of monocotyledons (monocots) and dicotyledons (dicots) but before the split of Asteridae and Rosidae. This is also the first study to investigate S-RNase-based GSI in monocots. However, studies on gene identification, differential expression, and segregation analyses in controlled crosses are needed to further evaluate the genes with high expression levels in GSI tissues.

  8. A Modified ABCDE Model of Flowering in Orchids Based on Gene Expression Profiling Studies of the Moth Orchid Phalaenopsis aphrodite

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ann-Ying; Chen, Chun-Yi; Chang, Yao-Chien Alex; Chao, Ya-Ting; Shih, Ming-Che

    2013-01-01

    Previously we developed genomic resources for orchids, including transcriptomic analyses using next-generation sequencing techniques and construction of a web-based orchid genomic database. Here, we report a modified molecular model of flower development in the Orchidaceae based on functional analysis of gene expression profiles in Phalaenopsis aphrodite (a moth orchid) that revealed novel roles for the transcription factors involved in floral organ pattern formation. Phalaenopsis orchid floral organ-specific genes were identified by microarray analysis. Several critical transcription factors including AP3, PI, AP1 and AGL6, displayed distinct spatial distribution patterns. Phylogenetic analysis of orchid MADS box genes was conducted to infer the evolutionary relationship among floral organ-specific genes. The results suggest that gene duplication MADS box genes in orchid may have resulted in their gaining novel functions during evolution. Based on these analyses, a modified model of orchid flowering was proposed. Comparison of the expression profiles of flowers of a peloric mutant and wild-type Phalaenopsis orchid further identified genes associated with lip morphology and peloric effects. Large scale investigation of gene expression profiles revealed that homeotic genes from the ABCDE model of flower development classes A and B in the Phalaenopsis orchid have novel functions due to evolutionary diversification, and display differential expression patterns. PMID:24265826

  9. Evidence for pollinator sharing in Mediterranean nectar-mimic orchids: absence of premating barriers?

    PubMed Central

    Cozzolino, Salvatore; Schiestl, Florian P; Müller, Andreas; De Castro, Olga; Nardella, Antonio Marco; Widmer, Alex

    2005-01-01

    Pollinator specificity has traditionally been considered the main reproductive isolation mechanism in orchids. Among Mediterranean orchids, however, many species attract and deceive pollinators by mimicking nectar-rewarding plants. To test the extent to which deceptive orchid species share pollinators, we collected and identified hemipollinaria-carrying insects, and used ribosomal sequences to identify the orchid species from which hemipollinaria were removed. We found that social and solitary bees, and also flies, carried hemipollinaria belonging to nine orchid species with different degrees of specialization. In particular, Anacamptis morio, Dactylorhiza romana and Orchis mascula used a large set of pollinator species, whereas others such as Orchis quadripunctata seemed to be pollinated by one pollinator species only. Out of the insects with hemipollinaria, 19% were found to carry hemipollinaria from more than one orchid species, indicating that sympatric food-deceptive orchids can share pollinators. This sharing was apparent even among orchid sister-species, thus revealing an effective overlap in pollinator sets among closely related species. These results suggest varying degrees of pollinator specificity in these orchids, and indicate that pollinator specificity cannot always act as the main isolation mechanism in food-deceptive temperate orchids. PMID:16024392

  10. The western prairie fringed orchid (Platanthera praeclara): monitoring and research

    Ardell J. Bjugstad; William Fortune

    1989-01-01

    Western prairie fringed orchid (Platanthera praeclara Sheviak and Bowles) Populations at one time extended from southwestern Missouri north to northwestern Minnesota, and from eastern Iowa to the Sandhills of north central Nebraska. It is listed as endangered in Iowa and Minnesota and candidate for threatened or endangered status in Kansas, Missouri...

  11. Limitations on orchid recruitment: not a simple picture

    M.K. McCormick; D.L. Taylor; K Juhaszova; R.K Burnett; D.F. Whigham; J.P. O' Neill

    2012-01-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi have substantial potential to influence plant distribution, especially in specialized orchids and mycoheterotrophic plants. However, little is known about environmental factors that influence the distribution of mycorrhizal fungi. Previous studies using seed packets have been unable to distinguish whether germination patterns resulted from the...

  12. HKUST-1 as a Heterogeneous Catalyst for the Synthesis of Vanillin.

    PubMed

    Yépez, Rebeca; Illescas, Juan F; Gijón, Paulina; Sánchez-Sánchez, Manuel; González-Zamora, Eduardo; Santillan, Rosa; Álvarez, J Raziel; Ibarra, Ilich A; Aguilar-Pliego, Julia

    2016-07-23

    Vanillin (4-hydoxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde) is the main component of the extract of vanilla bean. The natural vanilla scent is a mixture of approximately 200 different odorant compounds in addition to vanillin. The natural extraction of vanillin (from the orchid Vanilla planifolia, Vanilla tahitiensis and Vanilla pompon) represents only 1% of the worldwide production and since this process is expensive and very long, the rest of the production of vanillin is synthesized. Many biotechnological approaches can be used for the synthesis of vanillin from lignin, phenolic stilbenes, isoeugenol, eugenol, guaicol, etc., with the disadvantage of harming the environment since these processes use strong oxidizing agents and toxic solvents. Thus, eco-friendly alternatives on the production of vanillin are very desirable and thus, under current investigation. Porous coordination polymers (PCPs) are a new class of highly crystalline materials that recently have been used for catalysis. HKUST-1 (Cu3(BTC)2(H2O)3, BTC = 1,3,5-benzene-tricarboxylate) is a very well known PCP which has been extensively studied as a heterogeneous catalyst. Here, we report a synthetic strategy for the production of vanillin by the oxidation of trans-ferulic acid using HKUST-1 as a catalyst.

  13. Phylogenetic and microsatellite markers for Tulasnella (Tulasnellaceae) mycorrhizal fungi associated with Australian orchids1

    PubMed Central

    Ruibal, Monica P.; Peakall, Rod; Smith, Leon M.; Linde, Celeste C.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Phylogenetic and microsatellite markers were developed for Tulasnella mycorrhizal fungi to investigate fungal species identity and diversity. These markers will be useful in future studies investigating the phylogenetic relationship of the fungal symbionts, specificity of orchid–mycorrhizal associations, and the role of mycorrhizae in orchid speciation within several orchid genera. • Methods and Results: We generated partial genome sequences of two Tulasnella symbionts originating from Chiloglottis and Drakaea orchid species with 454 genome sequencing. Cross-genus transferability across mycorrhizal symbionts associated with multiple genera of Australian orchids (Arthrochilus, Chiloglottis, Drakaea, and Paracaleana) was found for seven phylogenetic loci. Five loci showed cross-transferability to Tulasnella from other orchid genera, and two to Sebacina. Furthermore, 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed for Tulasnella from Chiloglottis. • Conclusions: Highly informative markers were obtained, allowing investigation of mycorrhizal diversity of Tulasnellaceae associated with a wide variety of terrestrial orchids in Australia and potentially worldwide. PMID:25202528

  14. Advanced Applications of Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies to Orchid Biology.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chuan-Ming; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Tsai, Wen-Chieh

    2018-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies are revolutionizing biology by permitting, transcriptome sequencing, whole-genome sequencing and resequencing, and genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism profiling. Orchid research has benefited from this breakthrough, and a few orchid genomes are now available; new biological questions can be approached and new breeding strategies can be designed. The first part of this review describes the unique features of orchid biology. The second part provides an overview of the current next-generation sequencing platforms, many of which are already used in plant laboratories. The third part summarizes the state of orchid transcriptome and genome sequencing and illustrates current achievements. The genetic sequences currently obtained will not only provide a broad scope for the study of orchid biology, but also serves as a starting point for uncovering the mystery of orchid evolution.

  15. Photosynthetic Mediterranean meadow orchids feature partial mycoheterotrophy and specific mycorrhizal associations.

    PubMed

    Girlanda, Mariangela; Segreto, Rossana; Cafasso, Donata; Liebel, Heiko Tobias; Rodda, Michele; Ercole, Enrico; Cozzolino, Salvatore; Gebauer, Gerhard; Perotto, Silvia

    2011-07-01

    We investigated whether four widespread, photosynthetic Mediterranean meadow orchids (Ophrys fuciflora, Anacamptis laxiflora, Orchis purpurea, and Serapias vomeracea) had either nutritional dependency on mycobionts or mycorrhizal fungal specificity. Nonphotosynthetic orchids generally engage in highly specific interactions with fungal symbionts that provide them with organic carbon. By contrast, fully photosynthetic orchids in sunny, meadow habitats have been considered to lack mycorrhizal specificity. We performed both culture-dependent and culture-independent ITS sequence analysis to identify fungi from orchid roots. By analyzing stable isotope ((13)C and (15)N) natural abundances, we also determined the degree of autotrophy and mycoheterotrophy in the four orchid species. Phylogenetic and multivariate comparisons indicated that Or. purpurea and Oph. fuciflora featured lower fungal diversity and more specific mycobiont spectra than A. laxiflora and S. vomeracea. All orchid species were significantly enriched in (15)N compared with neighboring non-orchid plants. Orchis purpurea had the most pronounced N gain from fungi and differed from the other orchids in also obtaining C from fungi. These results indicated that even in sunny Mediterranean meadows, orchids may be mycoheterotrophic, with correlated mycorrhizal fungal specificity.

  16. Mycorrhizal Associations and Trophic Modes in Coexisting Orchids: An Ecological Continuum between Auto- and Mixotrophy.

    PubMed

    Jacquemyn, Hans; Waud, Michael; Brys, Rein; Lallemand, Félix; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Robionek, Alicja; Selosse, Marc-André

    2017-01-01

    Two distinct nutritional syndromes have been described in temperate green orchids. Most orchids form mycorrhizas with rhizoctonia fungi and are considered autotrophic. Some orchids, however, associate with fungi that simultaneously form ectomycorrhizas with surrounding trees and derive their carbon from these fungi. This evolutionarily derived condition has been called mixotrophy or partial mycoheterotrophy and is characterized by 13 C enrichment and high N content. Although it has been suggested that the two major nutritional syndromes are clearly distinct and tightly linked to the composition of mycorrhizal communities, recent studies have challenged this assumption. Here, we investigated whether mycorrhizal communities and nutritional syndromes differed between seven green orchid species that co-occur under similar ecological conditions (coastal dune slacks). Our results showed that mycorrhizal communities differed significantly between orchid species. Rhizoctonia fungi dominated in Dactylorhiza sp., Herminium monorchis , and Epipactis palustris , which were autotrophic based on 13 C and N content. Conversely, Liparis loeselii and Epipactis neerlandica associated primarily with ectomycorrhizal fungi but surprisingly, 13 C and N content supported mixotrophy only in E. neerlandica . This, together with the finding of some ectomycorrhizal fungi in rhizoctonia-associated orchids, suggests that there exists an ecological continuum between the two syndromes. The presence of a large number of indicator species associating with individual orchid species further confirms previous findings that mycorrhizal fungi may be important factors driving niche-partitioning in terrestrial orchids and therefore contribute to orchid coexistence.

  17. Mycorrhizal Associations and Trophic Modes in Coexisting Orchids: An Ecological Continuum between Auto- and Mixotrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jacquemyn, Hans; Waud, Michael; Brys, Rein; Lallemand, Félix; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Robionek, Alicja; Selosse, Marc-André

    2017-01-01

    Two distinct nutritional syndromes have been described in temperate green orchids. Most orchids form mycorrhizas with rhizoctonia fungi and are considered autotrophic. Some orchids, however, associate with fungi that simultaneously form ectomycorrhizas with surrounding trees and derive their carbon from these fungi. This evolutionarily derived condition has been called mixotrophy or partial mycoheterotrophy and is characterized by 13C enrichment and high N content. Although it has been suggested that the two major nutritional syndromes are clearly distinct and tightly linked to the composition of mycorrhizal communities, recent studies have challenged this assumption. Here, we investigated whether mycorrhizal communities and nutritional syndromes differed between seven green orchid species that co-occur under similar ecological conditions (coastal dune slacks). Our results showed that mycorrhizal communities differed significantly between orchid species. Rhizoctonia fungi dominated in Dactylorhiza sp., Herminium monorchis, and Epipactis palustris, which were autotrophic based on 13C and N content. Conversely, Liparis loeselii and Epipactis neerlandica associated primarily with ectomycorrhizal fungi but surprisingly, 13C and N content supported mixotrophy only in E. neerlandica. This, together with the finding of some ectomycorrhizal fungi in rhizoctonia-associated orchids, suggests that there exists an ecological continuum between the two syndromes. The presence of a large number of indicator species associating with individual orchid species further confirms previous findings that mycorrhizal fungi may be important factors driving niche-partitioning in terrestrial orchids and therefore contribute to orchid coexistence. PMID:28912791

  18. Beyond vanilla dark matter: New channels in the multifaceted search for dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaylali, David E.

    Though we are extremely confident that non-baryonic dark matter exists in our universe, very little is known about its fundamental nature or its relationship with the Standard Model. Guided by theoretical motivations, a desire for generality in our experimental strategies, and a certain amount of hopeful optimism, we have established a basic framework and set of assumptions about the dark sector which we are now actively testing. After years of probing the parameter spaces of these vanilla dark-matter scenarios, through a variety of different search channels, a conclusive direct (non-gravitational) discovery of dark matter eludes us. This very well may suggest that our first-order expectations of the dark sector are too simplistic. This work describes two ways in which we can expand the experimental reach of vanilla dark-matter scenarios while maintaining the model-independent generality which is at this point still warranted. One way in which this is done is to consider coupling structures between the SM and the dark sector other than the two canonical types --- scalar and axial-vector --- leading to spin dependent and independent interactions at direct-detection experiments. The second way we generalize the vanilla scenarios is to consider multi-component dark sectors. We find that both of these generalizations lead to new and interesting phenomenology, and provide a richer complementarity structure between the different experimental probes we are using to search for dark matter.

  19. Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Phalaenopsis Orchid Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Minh, Truong Ngoc; Khang, Do Tan; Tuyen, Phung Thi; Minh, Luong The; Anh, La Hoang; Quan, Nguyen Van; Ha, Pham Thi Thu; Quan, Nguyen Thanh; Toan, Nguyen Phu; Elzaawely, Abdelnaser Abdelghany; Xuan, Tran Dang

    2016-01-01

    Phalaenopsis spp. is the most commercially and economically important orchid, but their plant parts are often left unused, which has caused environmental problems. To date, reports on phytochemical analyses were most available on endangered and medicinal orchids. The present study was conducted to determine the total phenolics, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity of ethanol extracts prepared from leaves and roots of six commercial hybrid Phalaenopsis spp. Leaf extracts of “Chian Xen Queen” contained the highest total phenolics with a value of 11.52 ± 0.43 mg gallic acid equivalent per g dry weight and the highest total flavonoids (4.98 ± 0.27 mg rutin equivalent per g dry weight). The antioxidant activity of root extracts evaluated by DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free radical scavenging assay and β-carotene bleaching method was higher than those of the leaf extracts. Eleven phenolic compounds were identified, namely, protocatechuic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, caffeic acid, syringic acid, vanillin, ferulic acid, sinapic acid, p-coumaric acid, benzoic acid, and ellagic acid. Ferulic, p-coumaric and sinapic acids were concentrated largely in the roots. The results suggested that the root extracts from hybrid Phalaenopsis spp. could be a potential source of natural antioxidants. This study also helps to reduce the amount of this orchid waste in industrial production, as its roots can be exploited for pharmaceutical purposes. PMID:27649250

  20. Floral fragrance analysis of Prosthechea cochleata (Orchidaceae), an endangered native, epiphytic orchid, in Florida

    South Florida is home to a number of native species of orchids. The Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge has 27 known species, including Prosthechea cochleata, the clamshell orchid, which is listed as endangered on Florida's Regulated Plant Index. In a prior study done on this species in Mexico,...

  1. Two mycoheterotrophic orchids from Thailand tropical dipterocarpacean forests associate with a broad diversity of ectomycorrhizal fungi

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Mélanie; Watthana, Santi; Stier, Anna; Richard, Franck; Vessabutr, Suyanee; Selosse, Marc-André

    2009-01-01

    Background Mycoheterotrophic plants are considered to associate very specifically with fungi. Mycoheterotrophic orchids are mostly associated with ectomycorrhizal fungi in temperate regions, or with saprobes or parasites in tropical regions. Although most mycoheterotrophic orchids occur in the tropics, few studies have been devoted to them, and the main conclusions about their specificity have hitherto been drawn from their association with ectomycorrhizal fungi in temperate regions. Results We investigated three Asiatic Neottieae species from ectomycorrhizal forests in Thailand. We found that all were associated with ectomycorrhizal fungi, such as Thelephoraceae, Russulaceae and Sebacinales. Based on 13C enrichment of their biomass, they probably received their organic carbon from these fungi, as do mycoheterotrophic Neottieae from temperate regions. Moreover, 13C enrichment suggested that some nearby green orchids received part of their carbon from fungi too. Nevertheless, two of the three orchids presented a unique feature for mycoheterotrophic plants: they were not specifically associated with a narrow clade of fungi. Some orchid individuals were even associated with up to nine different fungi. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that some green and mycoheterotrophic orchids in tropical regions can receive carbon from ectomycorrhizal fungi, and thus from trees. Our results reveal the absence of specificity in two mycoheterotrophic orchid-fungus associations in tropical regions, in contrast to most previous studies of mycoheterotrophic plants, which have been mainly focused on temperate orchids. PMID:19682351

  2. Two mycoheterotrophic orchids from Thailand tropical dipterocarpacean forests associate with a broad diversity of ectomycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mélanie; Watthana, Santi; Stier, Anna; Richard, Franck; Vessabutr, Suyanee; Selosse, Marc-André

    2009-08-14

    Mycoheterotrophic plants are considered to associate very specifically with fungi. Mycoheterotrophic orchids are mostly associated with ectomycorrhizal fungi in temperate regions, or with saprobes or parasites in tropical regions. Although most mycoheterotrophic orchids occur in the tropics, few studies have been devoted to them, and the main conclusions about their specificity have hitherto been drawn from their association with ectomycorrhizal fungi in temperate regions. We investigated three Asiatic Neottieae species from ectomycorrhizal forests in Thailand. We found that all were associated with ectomycorrhizal fungi, such as Thelephoraceae, Russulaceae and Sebacinales. Based on 13C enrichment of their biomass, they probably received their organic carbon from these fungi, as do mycoheterotrophic Neottieae from temperate regions. Moreover, 13C enrichment suggested that some nearby green orchids received part of their carbon from fungi too. Nevertheless, two of the three orchids presented a unique feature for mycoheterotrophic plants: they were not specifically associated with a narrow clade of fungi. Some orchid individuals were even associated with up to nine different fungi. Our results demonstrate that some green and mycoheterotrophic orchids in tropical regions can receive carbon from ectomycorrhizal fungi, and thus from trees. Our results reveal the absence of specificity in two mycoheterotrophic orchid-fungus associations in tropical regions, in contrast to most previous studies of mycoheterotrophic plants, which have been mainly focused on temperate orchids.

  3. Fluctuating selection across years and phenotypic variation in food-deceptive orchids.

    PubMed

    Scopece, Giovanni; Juillet, Nicolas; Lexer, Christian; Cozzolino, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    Nectarless flowers that deceive pollinators offer an opportunity to study asymmetric plant-insect interactions. Orchids are a widely used model for studying these interactions because they encompass several thousand species adopting deceptive pollination systems. High levels of intra-specific phenotypic variation have been reported in deceptive orchids, suggesting a reduced consistency of pollinator-mediated selection on their floral traits. Nevertheless, several studies report on widespread directional selection mediated by pollinators even in these deceptive orchids. In this study we test the hypothesis that the observed selection can fluctuate across years in strength and direction thus likely contributing to the phenotypic variability of this orchid group. We performed a three-year study estimating selection differentials and selection gradients for nine phenotypic traits involved in insect attraction in two Mediterranean orchid species, namely Orchis mascula and O. pauciflora , both relying on a well-described food-deceptive pollination strategy. We found weak directional selection and marginally significant selection gradients in the two investigated species with significant intra-specific differences in selection differentials across years. Our data do not link this variation with a specific environmental cause, but our results suggest that pollinator-mediated selection in food-deceptive orchids can change in strength and in direction over time. In perennial plants, such as orchids, different selection differentials in the same populations in different flowering seasons can contribute to the maintenance of phenotypic variation often reported in deceptive orchids.

  4. Western Pairie Fringed Orchid: Its Status, Ecology, and in Vitro Propagation

    Jyotsna Sharma; J. W. Van Sambeek; Christopher J. Starbuck

    2002-01-01

    Western prairie fringed orchid (Platanthera praeclara Sheviak and Bowles), listed in 1989 as federally threatened, has been extirpated from 75% of historic sites throughout its range. We describe (a) threats to the orchid; (b) seed germination on synthetic medium; and (c) in vitro germination with mycorrhizal fungi. Destruction of prairies for...

  5. Long-term ecology of euglossine orchid-bees (Apidae: Euglossini) in Panama.

    PubMed

    Roubik, D W; Ackerman, J D

    1987-09-01

    Abundance patterns during 6-7 years and orchid visitation were determined for 51 species of the 57 local euglossine bees. Male bees were counted at 3 chemical attractants presented in the same manner each month. Sites were separated by 75 km but included wet Atlantic forest at 500 m elevation, moist forest at 180 m near Barro Colorado Island, and cloud forest at 900 m near the Pacific ocean. 1. From 15 to 30 euglossine species of 4 genera were active in each month and site; monthly species number and general bee abundance were positively correlated. Many species had 3 annual abundance peaks (range 1-4) and were active throughout the year, but peak annual abundances rarely occurred during late wet or early dry seasons. In contrast, Eufriesea generally were present as adults only 1-2 months in a year. 2. Euglossine populations were exceptionally stable. Species at each site were more stable than any known insect population, and stability and abundance were positively associated. However, year-to-year population stability and the degree of seasonality were not correlated. Among the three sites, the more diverse (species rich) bee assemblages displayed lower stability; these were the wetter and upland sites. 3. The most abundant bees visited more orchid species. Eg. and El. each visited and average of 4 orchid species (range 0-13); Ex. and Ef. visited 0-3. Stable populations did not visit more or fewer orchid species than did unstable populations. 4. Less than 68% of species at each site visited orchid flowers; less than a few dozen of the 100-800 bees counted in a day carried orchid pollinaria. Over 20% of the euglossine species never were seen with pollinaria at any site and probably seldom visit orchids in central Panama. 5. Most bee species visited 1 or no fragrance orchids in a given habitat. Orchids tended to utilize common pollinators that seldom included more than 1 species, and they utilized stable or unstable, seasonal or aseasonal bees. However, the most

  6. Isolation of Mycorrhizal Rhizoctonia as resistance inducer of Dendrobium macrophyllum to drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soelistijono, R.; Daryanti; Handayani, M. T.

    2018-03-01

    One of the obstacles encountered in the cultivation of orchids Dendrobium macrophyllum is difficult to cultivate in areas with high drought due to the slow absorption of nutrients. Based on previous research, the mycorrhizal binucleate Rhizoctonia (BNR) has the ability to increase the resistance of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) to drought, but it has never been tried on orchid Dendrobium macrophyllum. The objectives of this study was to isolate resistance inducer organisms by induced resistance techniques on orchids against drought. It is expected that the administration of mycorrhizal Rhizoctonia can increase the absorption of nutrients in D. macrophyllum which is exposed to high water stress. Each treatment consisted of 3 replications of 3 potted plants. The characterization of mycorrhizal Rhizoctonia isolate from D. macrophyllum root from Surakarta, Kopeng, Magelang, and Yogyakarta did not different morphologically. Character equations are in colony color, cell length and number of cores, while character differences are present in cell width and all isolates are capable of forming a peloton structure.

  7. Effects of Breast Milk and Vanilla Odors on Premature Neonate's Heart Rate and Blood Oxygen Saturation During and After Venipuncture.

    PubMed

    Neshat, Hanieh; Jebreili, Mahnaz; Seyyedrasouli, Aleheh; Ghojazade, Morteza; Hosseini, Mohammad Bagher; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2016-06-01

    Different studies have shown that the use of olfactory stimuli during painful medical procedures reduces infants' response to pain. The main purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of breast milk odor and vanilla odor on premature infants' vital signs including heart rate and blood oxygen saturation during and after venipuncture. A total of 135 preterm infants were randomly selected and divided into three groups of control, vanilla odor, and breast milk odor. Infants in the breast milk group and the vanilla group were exposed to breast milk odor and vanilla odor from 5 minutes prior to sampling until 30 seconds after sampling. The results showed that breast milk odor has a significant effect on the changes of neonatal heart rate and blood oxygen saturation during and after venipuncture and decreased the variability of premature infants' heart rate and blood oxygen saturation. Vanilla odor has no significant effect on premature infants' heart rate and blood oxygen saturation. Breast milk odor can decrease the variability of premature infants' heart rate and blood oxygen saturation during and after venipuncture. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. On the success of a swindle: pollination by deception in orchids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiestl, Florian P.

    2005-06-01

    A standing enigma in pollination ecology is the evolution of pollinator attraction without offering reward in about one third of all orchid species. Here I review concepts of pollination by deception, and in particular recent findings in the pollination syndromes of food deception and sexual deception in orchids. Deceptive orchids mimic floral signals of rewarding plants (food deception) or mating signals of receptive females (sexual deception) to attract pollen vectors. In some food deceptive orchids, similarities in the spectral reflectance visible to the pollinator in a model plant and its mimic, and increased reproductive success of the mimic in the presence of the model have been demonstrated. Other species do not mimic specific model plants but attract pollinators with general attractive floral signals. In sexually deceptive orchids, floral odor is the key trait for pollinator attraction, and behaviorally active compounds in the orchids are identical to the sex pheromone of the pollinator species. Deceptive orchids often show high variability in floral signals, which may be maintained by negative frequency-dependent selection, since pollinators can learn and subsequently avoid common deceptive morphs more quickly than rare ones. The evolution of obligate deception in orchids seems paradoxical in the light of the typically lower fruit set than in rewarding species. Pollination by deception, however, can reduce self-pollination and encourage pollen flow over longer distances, thus promoting outbreeding. Although some food deceptive orchids are isolated through postzygotic reproductive barriers, sexually deceptive orchids lack post-mating barriers and species isolation is achieved via specific pollinator attraction. Recent population genetic and phylogenetic investigations suggest gene-flow within subgeneric clades, but pollinator-mediated selection may maintain species-specific floral traits.

  9. Studies on the antioxidant activities of natural vanilla extract and its constituent compounds through in vitro models.

    PubMed

    Shyamala, B N; Naidu, M Madhava; Sulochanamma, G; Srinivas, P

    2007-09-19

    Vanilla extract was prepared by extraction of cured vanilla beans with aqueous ethyl alcohol (60%). The extract was profiled by HPLC, wherein major compounds, viz., vanillic acid, 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl alcohol, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and vanillin, could be identified and separated. Extract and pure standard compounds were screened for antioxidant activity using beta-carotene-linoleate and DPPH in vitro model systems. At a concentration of 200 ppm, the extract showed 26% and 43% of antioxidant activity by beta-carotene-linoleate and DPPH methods, respectively, in comparison to corresponding values of 93% and 92% for BHA. Interestingly, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl alcohol and 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol exhibited antioxidant activity of 65% and 45% by beta-carotene-linoleate method and 90% and 50% by DPPH methods, respectively. In contrast, pure vanillin exhibited much lower antioxidant activity. The present study points toward the potential use of vanilla extract components as antioxidants for food preservation and in health supplements as nutraceuticals.

  10. Comparison of extraction techniques and modeling of accelerated solvent extraction for the authentication of natural vanilla flavors.

    PubMed

    Cicchetti, Esmeralda; Chaintreau, Alain

    2009-06-01

    Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) of vanilla beans has been optimized using ethanol as a solvent. A theoretical model is proposed to account for this multistep extraction. This allows the determination, for the first time, of the total amount of analytes initially present in the beans and thus the calculation of recoveries using ASE or any other extraction technique. As a result, ASE and Soxhlet extractions have been determined to be efficient methods, whereas recoveries are modest for maceration techniques and depend on the solvent used. Because industrial extracts are obtained by many different procedures, including maceration in various solvents, authenticating vanilla extracts using quantitative ratios between the amounts of vanilla flavor constituents appears to be unreliable. When authentication techniques based on isotopic ratios are used, ASE is a valid sample preparation technique because it does not induce isotopic fractionation.

  11. Effect of endogenous and exogenous enzymatic treatment of green vanilla beans on extraction of vanillin and main aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Pardío, Violeta T; Flores, Argel; López, Karla M; Martínez, David I; Márquez, Ofelia; Waliszewski, Krzysztof N

    2018-06-01

    Endogenous and exogenous enzymatic hydrolysis carried out to obtain vanilla extracts with higher concentrations of vanillin using green vanilla beans. Sequences initiated with freezing of green vanilla beans at - 1 °C for 24 h, followed by endogenous hydrolysis under optimal β-glucosidase activity at 4.2 and 35 °C for 96 h, exogenous hydrolysis with Crystalzyme PML-MX at pH 5.0 and 40 °C for 72 h, and ethanol extraction at 40% (v v -1 ) for 30 days. In the proposed method, 200 g of fresh green vanilla beans with 84% moisture (32 g dry base) were used to obtain a liter of single fold vanilla extract. This method allowed the release of 82.57% of the theoretically available vanillin from its precursor glucovanillin with 5.78 g 100 g -1 green vanilla beans (dry base). Vanillic acid, p -hydroxybenzaldehyde and vanillyl alcohol were also released and found in commercial and enzymatic extracts. Glucovanillin was detected in commercial and traditional extracts but was absent in enzymatic extracts, indicating incomplete hydrolysis during the curing process. An in vitro assay was conducted to determine if the presence of peroxidase during hydrolysis might affect overall vanillin concentration. Results showed that POD can use vanillin as a substrate under conditions similar to those in which hydrolysis was conducted (pH 5.0 and 50 °C), possibly explaining why vanillin concentration was not complete at the end of the process.

  12. A polymer of caffeyl alcohol in plant seeds

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fang; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Havkin-Frenkel, Daphna; Dixon, Richard A.; Ralph, John

    2012-01-01

    Lignins are complex phenylpropanoid polymers mostly associated with plant secondary cell walls. Lignins arise primarily via oxidative polymerization of the three monolignols, p-coumaryl, coniferyl, and sinapyl alcohols. Of the two hydroxycinnamyl alcohols that represent incompletely methylated biosynthetic products (and are not usually considered to be monolignols), 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol is now well established as incorporating into angiosperm lignins, but incorporation of caffeyl alcohol has not been shown. We report here the presence of a homopolymer of caffeyl alcohol in the seed coats of both monocot and dicot plants. This polymer (C-lignin) is deposited to high concentrations in the seed coat during the early stages of seed development in the vanilla orchid (Vanilla planifolia), and in several members of the Cactaceae. The lignin in other parts of the Vanilla plant is conventionally biosynthesized from coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols. Some species of cacti contain only C-lignin in their seeds, whereas others contain only classical guaiacyl/syringyl lignin (derived from coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols). NMR spectroscopic analysis revealed that the Vanilla seed-coat polymer was massively comprised of benzodioxane units and was structurally similar to the polymer synthesized in vitro by peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization of caffeyl alcohol. CD spectroscopy did not detect any optical activity in the seed polymer. These data support the contention that the C-lignin polymer is produced in vivo via combinatorial oxidative radical coupling that is under simple chemical control, a mechanism analogous to that theorized for classical lignin biosynthesis. PMID:22307645

  13. Floral scent emitted by white and coloured morphs in orchids.

    PubMed

    Dormont, L; Delle-Vedove, R; Bessière, J-M; Schatz, B

    2014-04-01

    Polymorphism of floral signals, such as colour and odour, is widespread in flowering plants and often considered to be adaptive, reflecting various pollinator preferences for particular floral traits. Several authors have recently hypothesized that particular associations exist between floral colour and scent, which would result from shared biochemistry between these two floral traits. In this study, we compared the chemical composition of floral volatiles emitted by white- and purple-flowered morphs of three different orchid species, including two food-deceptive species (Orchis mascula and Orchis simia) and a food-rewarding species (Anacamptis coriophora fragrans). We found clear interspecific differences in floral odours. As expected from their pollination strategy, the two deceptive orchids showed high inter-individual variation of floral volatiles, whereas the food-rewarding A. c. fragrans showed low variation of floral scent. Floral volatiles did not differ overall between white- and coloured-flowered morphs in O. mascula and A. c. fragrans, while O. simia exhibited different volatile profiles between the two colour morphs. However, a detailed analysis restricted to benzenoid compounds (which are associated with the production of floral anthocyanin pigments) showed that white inflorescences emitted more volatiles of the shikimic pathway than coloured ones, both for O. mascula and O. simia. These results are consistent with the current hypothesis that shared biochemistry creates pleiotropic links between floral colour and scent. Whether intraspecific variation of floral signals actually affects pollinator attraction and influences the reproductive success of these orchids remains to be determined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of floral traits on the reproductive success of epiphytic and terrestrial tropical orchids.

    PubMed

    Huda, Mohammed K; Wilcock, Christopher C

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between habit, population size, floral traits and natural fruit set levels of 23 tropical orchid species of south-east Bangladesh. We showed that epiphytic orchids had lower fruit set levels than terrestrial species and that habit explained much of the variation in floral traits among the orchids. We compared our results with data from 76 other species occurring in the study area and hypothesize that a suite of floral and population characteristics present in tropical orchids combine in epiphytes to reduce their reproductive success. Characteristics which, in addition to their habit, are associated with low reproductive success are small population size, small inflorescences, non-sectile pollinia and self-incompatibility. Several of these characteristics were phylogenetically conserved and we predict that epiphytes might therefore generally have lower fruit set levels than recorded in terrestrial species. Nectar rewards are uncommon in tropical orchids and nectarless species have displays of larger flowers, which may represent an adaptation to increase pollinator attraction, although other rewards such as oils, waxes and pseudo pollen may replace nectar. We suggest that, like many temperate orchids, a high proportion of tropical orchids may lack floral rewards and be pollinated by deceit.

  15. Review. Specificity in pollination and consequences for postmating reproductive isolation in deceptive Mediterranean orchids.

    PubMed

    Cozzolino, Salvatore; Scopece, Giovanni

    2008-09-27

    The type of reproductive isolation prevalent in the initial stages of species divergence can affect the nature and rate of emergence of additional reproductive barriers that subsequently strengthen isolation between species. Different groups of Mediterranean deceptive orchids are characterized by different levels of pollinator specificity. Whereas food-deceptive orchid species show weak pollinator specificity, the sexually deceptive Ophrys species display a more specialized pollination strategy. Comparative analyses reveal that orchids with high pollinator specificity mostly rely on premating reproductive barriers and have very little postmating isolation. In this group, a shift to a novel pollinator achieved by modifying the odour bouquet may represent the main isolation mechanism involved in speciation. By contrast, orchids with weak premating isolation, such as generalized food-deceptive orchids, show strong evidence for intrinsic postmating reproductive barriers, particularly for late-acting postzygotic barriers such as hybrid sterility. In such species, chromosomal differences may have played a key role in species isolation, although strong postmating-prezygotic isolation has also evolved in these orchids. Molecular analyses of hybrid zones indicate that the types and strength of reproductive barriers in deceptive orchids with contrasting premating isolation mechanisms directly affect the rate and evolutionary consequences of hybridization and the nature of species differentiation.

  16. Diverse tulasnelloid fungi form mycorrhizas with epiphytic orchids in an Andean cloud forest.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Juan Pablo; Weiss, Michael; Abele, Andrea; Garnica, Sigisfredo; Oberwinkler, Franz; Kottke, Ingrid

    2006-11-01

    The mycorrhizal state of epiphytic orchids has been controversially discussed, and the state and mycobionts of the pleurothallid orchids, occurring abundantly and with a high number of species on stems of trees in the Andean cloud forest, were unknown. Root samples of 77 adult individuals of the epiphytic orchids Stelis hallii, S. superbiens, S. concinna and Pleurothallis lilijae were collected in a tropical mountain rainforest of southern Ecuador. Ultrastructural evidence of symbiotic interaction was combined with molecular sequencing of fungi directly from the mycorrhizas and isolation of mycobionts. Ultrastructural analyses displayed vital orchid mycorrhizas formed by fungi with an imperforate parenthesome and cell wall slime bodies typical for the genus Tulasnella. Three different Tulasnella isolates were obtained in pure culture. Phylogenetic analysis of nuclear rDNA sequences from coding regions of the ribosomal large subunit (nucLSU) and the 5.8S subunit, including parts of the internal transcribed spacers, obtained directly from the roots and from the fungal isolates, yielded seven distinct Tulasnella clades. Tulasnella mycobionts in Stelis concinna were restricted to two Tulasnella sequence types while the other orchids were associated with up to six Tulasnella sequence types. All Tulasnella sequences are new to science and distinct from known sequences of mycobionts of terrestrial orchids. The results indicate that tulasnelloid fungi, adapted to the conditions on tree stems, might be important for orchid growth and maintenance in the Andean cloud forest.

  17. Mycorrhizal preference promotes habitat invasion by a native Australian orchid: Microtis media

    PubMed Central

    De Long, Jonathan R.; Swarts, Nigel D.; Dixon, Kingsley W.; Egerton-Warburton, Louise M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Mycorrhizal specialization has been shown to limit recruitment capacity in orchids, but an increasing number of orchids are being documented as invasive or weed-like. The reasons for this proliferation were examined by investigating mycorrhizal fungi and edaphic correlates of Microtis media, an Australian terrestrial orchid that is an aggressive ecosystem and horticultural weed. Methods Molecular identification of fungi cultivated from M. media pelotons, symbiotic in vitro M. media seed germination assays, ex situ fungal baiting of M. media and co-occurring orchid taxa (Caladenia arenicola, Pterostylis sanguinea and Diuris magnifica) and soil physical and chemical analyses were undertaken. Key Results It was found that: (1) M. media associates with a broad taxonomic spectrum of mycobionts including Piriformospora indica, Sebacina vermifera, Tulasnella calospora and Ceratobasidium sp.; (2) germination efficacy of mycorrhizal isolates was greater for fungi isolated from plants in disturbed than in natural habitats; (3) a higher percentage of M. media seeds germinate than D. magnifica, P. sanguinea or C. arenicola seeds when incubated with soil from M. media roots; and (4) M. media–mycorrhizal fungal associations show an unusual breadth of habitat tolerance, especially for soil phosphorus (P) fertility. Conclusions The findings in M. media support the idea that invasive terrestrial orchids may associate with a diversity of fungi that are widespread and common, enhance seed germination in the host plant but not co-occurring orchid species and tolerate a range of habitats. These traits may provide the weedy orchid with a competitive advantage over co-occurring orchid species. If so, invasive orchids are likely to become more broadly distributed and increasingly colonize novel habitats. PMID:23275632

  18. Determination of vanillin in vanilla perfumes and air by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Minematsu, Saaya; Xuan, Guang-Shan; Wu, Xing-Zheng

    2013-12-01

    The present study investigated capillary electrophoretic detection of vanillin in vanilla perfume and air. An UV-absorbance detector was used in a home-made capillary electrophoretic instrument. A fused silica capillary (outer diameter: 364 μm, inner diameter: 50 μm) was used as a separation capillary, and a high electric voltage (20 kV) was applied across the two ends of the capillary. Total length of the capillary was 70 cm, and the effective length was 55 cm. Experimental results showed that the vanillin peak was detected at about 600, 450, and 500 seconds when pH of running buffers in CE were 7.2, 9.3, and 11.5, respectively. The peak area of vanillin was proportional to its concentration in the range of 0-10(-2) mol/L. The detection limit was about 10(-5) mol/L. Vanillin concentration in a 1% vanilla perfume sample was determined to be about 3×10(-4) mol/L, agreed well with that obtained by a HPLC method. Furthermore, determination of vanillin in air by combination of CE and active carbon adsorption method was investigated. Copyright © 2013 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Reduced fat and sugar vanilla ice creams: sensory profiling and external preference mapping.

    PubMed

    Cadena, R S; Cruz, A G; Faria, J A F; Bolini, H M A

    2012-09-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to map sensory attributes of vanilla ice cream with reduced fat and sugar, and (2) to determine drivers of liking by applying external preference mapping and reveal the relationship between descriptive attributes and hedonic judgments using the partial least squares method. Descriptive sensory profiles (n=11) and consumer test (n=117) of 6 samples of vanilla ice cream (3 traditional and 3 with reduced fat and sugar) were determined. The attributes brightness and sweet aftertaste for sample and creaminess (appearance and texture) and sweet aroma contributed positively to the acceptance of ice cream samples. The attributes aeration, powdered milk aroma and flavor, and white chocolate aroma and flavor contributed positively to the acceptance of the ice creams. The attributes hydrogenated fat aroma and flavor were responsible for the lower acceptance of samples. The reduction in fat and sugar did not necessarily cause a decrease in acceptance. The most important factors were selection of the appropriate sweetener system and the use of good quality raw material. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional Expression of an Orchid Fragrance Gene in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Adelene Ai Lian; Abdullah, Janna O.; Abdullah, Mohd Puad; Shafee, Norazizah; Rahim, Raha A.

    2012-01-01

    Vanda Mimi Palmer (VMP), an orchid hybrid of Vanda tesselata and Vanda Tan Chay Yan is a highly scented tropical orchid which blooms all year round. Previous studies revealed that VMP produces a variety of isoprenoid volatiles during daylight. Isoprenoids are well known to contribute significantly to the scent of most fragrant plants. They are a large group of secondary metabolites which may possess valuable characteristics such as flavor, fragrance and toxicity and are produced via two pathways, the mevalonate (MVA) pathway or/and the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. In this study, a sesquiterpene synthase gene denoted VMPSTS, previously isolated from a floral cDNA library of VMP was cloned and expressed in Lactococcus lactis to characterize the functionality of the protein. L. lactis, a food grade bacterium which utilizes the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid production was found to be a suitable host for the characterization of plant terpene synthases. Through recombinant expression of VMPSTS, it was revealed that VMPSTS produced multiple sesquiterpenes and germacrene D dominates its profile. PMID:22408409

  1. I'm Chocolate, You're Vanilla: Raising Healthy Black and Biracial Children in a Race-Conscious World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Marguerite A.

    This guide teaches parents and educators of black and biracial children how to reduce racism's impact on a child's development to promote emotional health at preschool, elementary, and secondary levels. The chapters are: (1) "Chocolate and Vanilla: How Preschoolers See Color and Race"; (2) "How Preschoolers Begin To Learn Racial Attitudes"; (3)…

  2. Rapid sample screening method for authenticity controlling vanilla flavors using a CE microchip approach with electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Avila, Mónica; González, María Cristina; Zougagh, Mohammed; Escarpa, Alberto; Ríos, Angel

    2007-11-01

    Five vanilla-related flavors of food significance, vanillic alcohol (VOH), ethyl maltol (EMA), maltol (MAL), ethyl vanillin (EVA) and vanillin (VAN), were separated using CE microchips with electrochemical detection (CE-ED microchips). A +2 kV driving voltage for both injection and separation operation steps, using a borate buffer (pH 9.5, 20 mM) and 1 M nitric acid in the detection reservoir allowed the selective and sensitive detection of the target analytes in less than 200 s with reproducible control of EOF (RSD(migration times)<3%). The analysis in selected real vanilla samples was focusing on VAN and EVA because VAN is a basic fragrance compound of the vanilla aroma, whereas EVA is an unequivocal proof of adulteration of vanilla flavors. Fast detection of all relevant flavors (200 s) with an acceptable resolution (R(s) >1.5) and a high accuracy (recoveries higher than 90%) were obtained with independence of the matrices and samples examined. These results showed the reliability of the method and the potential use of CE microchips in the food control field for fraudulent purposes.

  3. Orchid biology: from Linnaeus via Darwin to the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Michael F.; Chase, Mark W.

    2009-01-01

    Orchidaceae are the largest family of flowering plants, with at least 24 000 species, and perhaps better than any other family of flowering plants, orchids represent the extreme specializations that are possible. As a result, they have long fascinated luminaries of the botanical world including Linnaeus and Darwin, but the size of the family has historically been an impediment to their study. Specifically, the lack of detailed information about relationships within the family made it difficult to formulate explicit evolutionary hypotheses for such a large group, but the advent of molecular systematics has revolutionized our understanding of the orchids. Their complex life histories make orchids particularly vulnerable to environmental change, and as result many are now threatened with extinction. In this Special Issue we present a series of 20 papers on orchid biology ranging from phylogenetics, floral evolutionary development, taxonomy, mycorrhizal associations, pollination biology, population genetics and conservation. PMID:19654223

  4. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes in vanilla-flavored soy and dairy products stored at 8 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Tipparaju, Sireesha; Ravishankar, Sadhana; Slade, Peter J

    2004-02-01

    The survival of Listeria monocytogenes V37 in vanilla-flavored yogurt (low-fat and nonfat) and soy milk (low-fat and Plus) stored at 8 degrees C for 31 days was investigated. Commercial samples of yogurt and soy milk were used. These samples were inoculated with either 10(4) or 10(7) CFU of L. monocytogenes per ml. Sampling was carried out every 3 to 4 days initially and was then carried out weekly, for a total storage time of 31 days. Each time a sample was collected, the pH of the sample was measured. After 31 days, low-fat plain, low-fat vanilla, and nonfat plain yogurt samples inoculated with 10(4) CFU/ml showed 2.5-log reductions in viable cell populations, and nonfat vanilla yogurt showed a 3.5-log reduction. For yogurt inoculated with 10(7) CFU/ml, reductions of 2.5 log CFU/ml were observed for plain low-fat and nonfat yogurts, and reductions of 5 log CFU/ml were observed for vanilla-flavored low-fat and nonfat yogurts. In vanilla-flavored and plain low-fat and Plus soy milk samples, cell counts increased from 10(4) and 10(7) CFU/ml to 10(9) CFU/ml at 7 and 3 days of storage, respectively, at 8 degrees C. Coagulation in soy milk samples was observed when the cell population reached 10(9) CFU/ml. In soy milk, the L. monocytogenes population did not change for up to 31 days. Vanillin had an inhibitory effect on L. monocytogenes in yogurt but not in soy milk.

  5. Roadside verges as habitats for endangered lizard-orchids (Himantoglossum spp.): Ecological traps or refuges?

    PubMed

    Fekete, Réka; Nagy, Timea; Bódis, Judit; Biró, Éva; Löki, Viktor; Süveges, Kristóf; Takács, Attila; Tökölyi, Jácint; Molnár V, Attila

    2017-12-31

    Alterations in traditional land use practices have led to severe declines in the area of semi-natural grasslands, thereby seriously threatening plant and animal species dependent on these habitats. Small anthropogenic managed habitats, like roadsides can act as refuges and might play an important role in conserving these species. Colonization of roadside verges by endangered lizard orchids (Himantoglossum spp.) has long been known, but few studies have systematically explored the suitability of roadside habitats for these orchids and the impact of roads on them. In this paper we present results of targeted surveys of three lizard orchid taxa on roadsides from eight European countries. During these surveys we searched for lizard orchids inhabiting roadside verges and recorded their distance from road, aspects of the roadside environment, as well as vegetative and reproductive characteristics of individual plants. We found large numbers of lizard orchids on roadside verges. Distance from roads was not uniformly distributed: orchids occurred more closely to roads than expected by chance. This suggests that regular management of roadsides (e.g. mowing) might enhance colonization and survival of lizard orchids. On the other hand, we also found that close proximity to roads negatively affects reproductive success, suggesting that the immediate vicinity of roads might act as an ecological trap (i.e. favorable in terms of colonization and survival but unfavorable in terms of reproduction). Nonetheless, the fact that significant and viable populations are maintained at roadsides suggests that traditionally managed roadside verges may allow long-term persistence of lizard orchid populations and may serve as refuges in a landscape context. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evolutionary relationships among pollinators and repeated pollinator sharing in sexually deceptive orchids.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R D; Brown, G R; Dixon, K W; Hayes, C; Linde, C C; Peakall, R

    2017-09-01

    The mechanism of pollinator attraction is predicted to strongly influence both plant diversification and the extent of pollinator sharing between species. Sexually deceptive orchids rely on mimicry of species-specific sex pheromones to attract their insect pollinators. Given that sex pheromones tend to be conserved among related species, we predicted that in sexually deceptive orchids, (i) pollinator sharing is rare, (ii) closely related orchids use closely related pollinators and (iii) there is strong bias in the wasp lineages exploited by orchids. We focused on species that are pollinated by sexual deception of thynnine wasps in the distantly related genera Caladenia and Drakaea, including new field observations for 45 species of Caladenia. Specialization was extreme with most orchids using a single pollinator species. Unexpectedly, seven cases of pollinator sharing were found, including two between Caladenia and Drakaea, which exhibit strikingly different floral morphology. Phylogenetic analysis of pollinators using four nuclear sequence loci demonstrated that although orchids within major clades primarily use closely related pollinator species, up to 17% of orchids within these clades are pollinated by a member of a phylogenetically distant wasp genus. Further, compared to the total diversity of thynnine wasps within the study region, orchids show a strong bias towards exploiting certain genera. Although these patterns may arise through conservatism in the chemical classes used in sex pheromones, apparent switches between wasp clades suggest unexpected flexibility in floral semiochemical production. Alternatively, wasp sex pheromones within lineages may exhibit greater chemical diversity than currently appreciated. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  7. Continent-wide distribution in mycorrhizal fungi: implications for the biogeography of specialized orchids

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Belinda J.; Phillips, Ryan D.; Wright, Magali; Linde, Celeste C.; Dixon, Kingsley W.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Although mycorrhizal associations are predominantly generalist, specialized mycorrhizal interactions have repeatedly evolved in Orchidaceae, suggesting a potential role in limiting the geographical range of orchid species. In particular, the Australian orchid flora is characterized by high mycorrhizal specialization and short-range endemism. This study investigates the mycorrhizae used by Pheladenia deformis, one of the few orchid species to occur across the Australian continent. Specifically, it examines whether P. deformis is widely distributed through using multiple fungi or a single widespread fungus, and if the fungi used by Australian orchids are widespread at the continental scale. Methods Mycorrhizal fungi were isolated from P. deformis populations in eastern and western Australia. Germination trials using seed from western Australian populations were conducted to test if these fungi supported germination, regardless of the region in which they occurred. A phylogenetic analysis was undertaken using isolates from P. deformis and other Australian orchids that use the genus Sebacina to test for the occurrence of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in eastern and western Australia. Key Results With the exception of one isolate, all fungi used by P. deformis belonged to a single fungal OTU of Sebacina. Fungal isolates from eastern and western Australia supported germination of P. deformis. A phylogenetic analysis of Australian Sebacina revealed that all of the OTUs that had been well sampled occurred on both sides of the continent. Conclusions The use of a widespread fungal OTU in P. deformis enables a broad distribution despite high mycorrhizal specificity. The Sebacina OTUs that are used by a range of Australian orchids occur on both sides of the continent, demonstrating that the short-range endemism prevalent in the orchids is not driven by fungal species with narrow distributions. Alternatively, a combination of specific edaphic

  8. Continent-wide distribution in mycorrhizal fungi: implications for the biogeography of specialized orchids.

    PubMed

    Davis, Belinda J; Phillips, Ryan D; Wright, Magali; Linde, Celeste C; Dixon, Kingsley W

    2015-09-01

    Although mycorrhizal associations are predominantly generalist, specialized mycorrhizal interactions have repeatedly evolved in Orchidaceae, suggesting a potential role in limiting the geographical range of orchid species. In particular, the Australian orchid flora is characterized by high mycorrhizal specialization and short-range endemism. This study investigates the mycorrhizae used by Pheladenia deformis, one of the few orchid species to occur across the Australian continent. Specifically, it examines whether P. deformis is widely distributed through using multiple fungi or a single widespread fungus, and if the fungi used by Australian orchids are widespread at the continental scale. Mycorrhizal fungi were isolated from P. deformis populations in eastern and western Australia. Germination trials using seed from western Australian populations were conducted to test if these fungi supported germination, regardless of the region in which they occurred. A phylogenetic analysis was undertaken using isolates from P. deformis and other Australian orchids that use the genus Sebacina to test for the occurrence of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in eastern and western Australia. With the exception of one isolate, all fungi used by P. deformis belonged to a single fungal OTU of Sebacina. Fungal isolates from eastern and western Australia supported germination of P. deformis. A phylogenetic analysis of Australian Sebacina revealed that all of the OTUs that had been well sampled occurred on both sides of the continent. The use of a widespread fungal OTU in P. deformis enables a broad distribution despite high mycorrhizal specificity. The Sebacina OTUs that are used by a range of Australian orchids occur on both sides of the continent, demonstrating that the short-range endemism prevalent in the orchids is not driven by fungal species with narrow distributions. Alternatively, a combination of specific edaphic requirements and a high incidence of pollination by sexual

  9. Taxonomic turmoil down-under: recent developments in Australian orchid systematics

    PubMed Central

    Hopper, Stephen D.

    2009-01-01

    Background The issue of determining the most appropriate rank for each accepted taxon fuels ongoing controversy throughout systematics. The particularly marked escalation of such issues in modern Australian orchid systematics merits examination, not only because of wider implications in taxonomy but also because of direct effects on studies of comparative biology and conservation management. Scope This paper briefly reviews the causes of recent taxonomic turmoil for Australian orchids and outlines new research opportunities and conservation implications arising from an improved understanding of their molecular phylogenetics. Conclusions DNA sequencing and intensified field work have contributed towards a much improved understanding of Australian orchid systematics. Great progress has been made in discerning monophyletic groups or clades. Fresh interpretations of morphological evolution have been made possible by comparisons with the results of DNA analyses. Significant conceptual shifts from polymorphic species concepts to biological and phylogenetic concepts have also elevated the discovery and description of new species. Consequently, over the past decade, the number of Australian orchid species recognized by taxonomists has risen from approx. 900 to 1200. Similarly, the number of genera recognized by some taxonomists has increased from 110 to 192, resulting in 45% of Australian species/subspecies being assigned a new generic epithet since 2000. At higher taxonomic levels, much of the recent controversy in Australian orchid systematics reflects a divergence in views about where to split and assign formal names within unequivocally monophyletic groups. Differences regarding typification in the case of Caladenia have added additional confusion and complexity. However, new insights into and research opportunities concerning speciation processes in orchids have arisen from the wealth of new data and discrimination of species. Robustly supported molecular analyses of

  10. Exploration of Vanilla pompona from the Peruvian Amazon as a potential source of vanilla essence: quantification of phenolics by HPLC-DAD.

    PubMed

    Maruenda, Helena; Vico, Maria del Lujan; Householder, J Ethan; Janovec, John P; Cañari, Cristhian; Naka, Angelica; Gonzalez, Ana E

    2013-05-01

    This study provides the first chemical investigation of wild-harvested fruits of Vanilla pompona ssp. grandiflora (Lindl.) Soto-Arenas developed in their natural habitat in the Peruvian Amazon. Flowers were hand-pollinated and the resulting fruits were analysed at different developmental stages using an HPLC-DAD method validated for the quantification of glucovanillin and seven other compounds. The method showed satisfactory linearity (r(2)>0.9969), precision (coefficient of variation <2%), recoveries (70-100%), limit of detection (0.008-0.212 μg/ml), and limit of quantification (0.027-0.707 μg/ml). The evaluation of crude and enzyme-hydrolyzed Soxhlet-extracted samples confirmed the leading role of glucosides in fruit development. LC-ESI-MS studies corroborated the identities of four glucosides and seven aglycones, among them vanillin (5.7/100 g), 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol (3.6/100 g), and anisyl alcohol (7.1/100 g) were found in high concentrations. The attractive flavor/aroma profile exhibited by wild V. pompona fruits supports studies focused on the development of this species as a specialty crop. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Marital Satisfaction and Physical Health: Evidence for an Orchid Effect

    PubMed Central

    South, Susan C.; Krueger, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    Marital distress and conflict are linked to poor physical health. Here, we used behavior genetic modeling to determine the etiology of this association. Biometric moderation models were used to estimate gene-by-environment interaction in the presence of gene-environment correlation between marital satisfaction and self-reported health. Using a sample of 347 married twin pairs from the Midlife in the United States study, we found that genetic influences on the variation in self-reported health were greatest at both high (h2 = .30) and low (h2 = .38) levels of marital satisfaction, with the lowest levels of heritability estimated for participants at the average level of marital satisfaction (h2 = .10). These findings are evidence of the orchid effect: the idea that genetic influences on a phenotype such as physical health are enhanced in nonnormative—both unusually positive and unusually negative—environmental contexts. PMID:23359109

  12. Parthenogenesis maintains male sterility in a gynodioecious orchid.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuang-Quan; Lu, Yang; Chen, Ying-Zhuo; Luo, Yi-Bo; Delph, Lynda F

    2009-10-01

    The invasion of male-sterile (female) individuals into hermaphroditic populations, leading to gynodioecy, is common in flowering plants. Both theoretical and empirical studies have shown that as the frequency of females increases in a population, pollen limitation reduces seed production more in females than in hermaphrodites, leading to higher fitness for hermaphrodites and a consequent decrease in female frequency. Here we show that contrary to this expectation, females of the gynodioecious orchid Satyrium ciliatum are maintained only in populations that experience high pollen limitation caused by low pollinator service and high pollen herbivory. This species avoids the typical problem of pollen limitation for seed production and can therefore maintain high frequencies of females in pollen-limited populations because females produce more seeds than hermaphrodites via facultative parthenogenesis in the absence of pollinia. Our results therefore demonstrate that parthenogenesis is a novel mechanism favoring the maintenance of gynodioecy.

  13. Perpetual American vanilla option pricing under single regime change risk: an exhaustive study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, Miquel

    2009-07-01

    Perpetual American options are financial instruments that can be readily exercised and do not mature. In this paper we study in detail the problem of pricing this kind of derivatives, for the most popular flavour, within a framework in which some of the properties—volatility and dividend policy—of the underlying stock can change at a random instant of time but in such a way that we can forecast their final values. Under this assumption we can model actual market conditions because most relevant facts usually entail sharp predictable consequences. The effect of this potential risk on perpetual American vanilla options is remarkable: the very equation that will determine the fair price depends on the solution to be found. Sound results are found under the optics both of finance and physics. In particular, a parallelism among the overall outcome of this problem and a phase transition is established.

  14. Effect of galactooligosaccharide addition on the physical, optical, and sensory acceptance of vanilla ice cream.

    PubMed

    Balthazar, C F; Silva, H L A; Celeguini, R M S; Santos, R; Pastore, G M; Junior, C A Conte; Freitas, M Q; Nogueira, L C; Silva, M C; Cruz, A G

    2015-07-01

    The effect of the addition of galactooligosaccharide (GOS) on the physicochemical, optical, and sensory characteristics of ice cream was investigated. Vanilla ice cream was supplemented with 0, 1.5, and 3.0% (wt/wt) GOS and characterized for pH, firmness, color, melting, overrun, as well as subjected to a discriminative sensory test (triangle test). For comparison purposes, ice creams containing fructooligosaccharide were also manufactured. The GOS ice creams were characterized by increased firmness and lower melting rates. Different perceptions were reported in the sensory evaluation for the 3.0% GOS ice cream when compared with the control, which was not observed for the fructooligosaccharide ice cream. Overall, the findings suggest it is possible to produce GOS ice cream with improved stability in relation to the physicochemical parameters and sensory perception. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Species distribution modelling for conservation of an endangered endemic orchid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiao-Hsuan; Wonkka, Carissa L; Treglia, Michael L; Grant, William E; Smeins, Fred E; Rogers, William E

    2015-04-21

    Concerns regarding the long-term viability of threatened and endangered plant species are increasingly warranted given the potential impacts of climate change and habitat fragmentation on unstable and isolated populations. Orchidaceae is the largest and most diverse family of flowering plants, but it is currently facing unprecedented risks of extinction. Despite substantial conservation emphasis on rare orchids, populations continue to decline. Spiranthes parksii (Navasota ladies' tresses) is a federally and state-listed endangered terrestrial orchid endemic to central Texas. Hence, we aimed to identify potential factors influencing the distribution of the species, quantify the relative importance of each factor and determine suitable habitat for future surveys and targeted conservation efforts. We analysed several geo-referenced variables describing climatic conditions and landscape features to identify potential factors influencing the likelihood of occurrence of S. parksii using boosted regression trees. Our model classified 97 % of the cells correctly with regard to species presence and absence, and indicated that probability of existence was correlated with climatic conditions and landscape features. The most influential variables were mean annual precipitation, mean elevation, mean annual minimum temperature and mean annual maximum temperature. The most likely suitable range for S. parksii was the eastern portions of Leon and Madison Counties, the southern portion of Brazos County, a portion of northern Grimes County and along the borders between Burleson and Washington Counties. Our model can assist in the development of an integrated conservation strategy through: (i) focussing future survey and research efforts on areas with a high likelihood of occurrence, (ii) aiding in selection of areas for conservation and restoration and (iii) framing future research questions including those necessary for predicting responses to climate change. Our model could also

  16. Anther development in tribe Epidendreae: orchids with contrasting pollination syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Victoria; Márquez-Guzmán, Judith

    2018-01-01

    Background Epidendreae is one of the most diverse tribes among the orchids with remarkable variation in life form, floral morphology and pollination syndromes. Its circumscription was recently revised and subtribes Agrostophyllinae and Calypsoinae were transferred into this tribe. One of the principal floral characters utilized in classification of orchids is the incumbency or bending of the column. This study records and compares late stages of anther, column and lip development, and discusses anther characters in fifteen representative taxa of five of the six subtribes in Epidendreae with respect to classification and pollination biology. Methods A series of late floral stages were sampled and fixed for examination under scanning electron microscope. Results Anther incumbency or bending in this group varies from 90° to almost 180°. Incumbency in the late stages of development is reached in Bletiinae, Ponerinae, Pleurothallidinae and Laeliinae whereas incumbency is reached early in its development in Corallorhiza and Govenia of Calypsoinae. Discussion Our observations indicate that the position of Chysis in subtribe Bletiinae needs revision based on differences in a number floral, and in particular of anther characters; and that Coelia only shares the early anther incumbency with Calypsoinae members, but not the rest of floral and anther characters. Anatomical characters such as crystals around the actinocytic stomata on the anther cap and sugar crystals in Laeliinae; lack of rostellum in Bletiinae; coalescent anther with the column, lack of trichomes and papillae on lip keels, and underdeveloped rostellum in Chysis; a mechanism by which the anther cap comes off (it is joined with the grooved lip by a claw) in Isochilus are all related to pollination syndromes and reproductive biology. PMID:29503766

  17. Species distribution modelling for conservation of an endangered endemic orchid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsiao-Hsuan; Wonkka, Carissa L.; Treglia, Michael L.; Grant, William E.; Smeins, Fred E.; Rogers, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Concerns regarding the long-term viability of threatened and endangered plant species are increasingly warranted given the potential impacts of climate change and habitat fragmentation on unstable and isolated populations. Orchidaceae is the largest and most diverse family of flowering plants, but it is currently facing unprecedented risks of extinction. Despite substantial conservation emphasis on rare orchids, populations continue to decline. Spiranthes parksii (Navasota ladies' tresses) is a federally and state-listed endangered terrestrial orchid endemic to central Texas. Hence, we aimed to identify potential factors influencing the distribution of the species, quantify the relative importance of each factor and determine suitable habitat for future surveys and targeted conservation efforts. We analysed several geo-referenced variables describing climatic conditions and landscape features to identify potential factors influencing the likelihood of occurrence of S. parksii using boosted regression trees. Our model classified 97 % of the cells correctly with regard to species presence and absence, and indicated that probability of existence was correlated with climatic conditions and landscape features. The most influential variables were mean annual precipitation, mean elevation, mean annual minimum temperature and mean annual maximum temperature. The most likely suitable range for S. parksii was the eastern portions of Leon and Madison Counties, the southern portion of Brazos County, a portion of northern Grimes County and along the borders between Burleson and Washington Counties. Our model can assist in the development of an integrated conservation strategy through: (i) focussing future survey and research efforts on areas with a high likelihood of occurrence, (ii) aiding in selection of areas for conservation and restoration and (iii) framing future research questions including those necessary for predicting responses to climate change. Our model could also

  18. Anther development in tribe Epidendreae: orchids with contrasting pollination syndromes.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Nieto, Benjamín; Sosa, Victoria; Márquez-Guzmán, Judith

    2018-01-01

    Epidendreae is one of the most diverse tribes among the orchids with remarkable variation in life form, floral morphology and pollination syndromes. Its circumscription was recently revised and subtribes Agrostophyllinae and Calypsoinae were transferred into this tribe. One of the principal floral characters utilized in classification of orchids is the incumbency or bending of the column. This study records and compares late stages of anther, column and lip development, and discusses anther characters in fifteen representative taxa of five of the six subtribes in Epidendreae with respect to classification and pollination biology. A series of late floral stages were sampled and fixed for examination under scanning electron microscope. Anther incumbency or bending in this group varies from 90° to almost 180°. Incumbency in the late stages of development is reached in Bletiinae, Ponerinae, Pleurothallidinae and Laeliinae whereas incumbency is reached early in its development in Corallorhiza and Govenia of Calypsoinae. Our observations indicate that the position of Chysis in subtribe Bletiinae needs revision based on differences in a number floral, and in particular of anther characters; and that Coelia only shares the early anther incumbency with Calypsoinae members, but not the rest of floral and anther characters. Anatomical characters such as crystals around the actinocytic stomata on the anther cap and sugar crystals in Laeliinae; lack of rostellum in Bletiinae; coalescent anther with the column, lack of trichomes and papillae on lip keels, and underdeveloped rostellum in Chysis ; a mechanism by which the anther cap comes off (it is joined with the grooved lip by a claw) in Isochilus are all related to pollination syndromes and reproductive biology.

  19. ORCHIDS: an observational randomized controlled trial on childhood differential susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Chhangur, Rabia R; Weeland, Joyce; Overbeek, Geertjan; Matthys, Walterchj; Orobio de Castro, Bram

    2012-10-29

    A central tenet in developmental psychopathology is that childhood rearing experiences have a major impact on children's development. Recently, candidate genes have been identified that may cause children to be differentially susceptible to these experiences (i.e., susceptibility genes). However, our understanding of the differential impact of parenting is limited at best. Specifically, more experimental research is needed. The ORCHIDS study will investigate gene-(gene-)environment interactions to obtain more insight into a) moderating effects of polymorphisms on the link between parenting and child behavior, and b) behavioral mechanisms that underlie these gene-(gene-)environment interactions in an experimental design. The ORCHIDS study is a randomized controlled trial, in which the environment will be manipulated with an intervention (i.e., Incredible Years parent training). In a screening, families with children aged 4-8 who show mild to (sub)clinical behavior problems will be targeted through community records via two Dutch regional healthcare organizations. Assessments in both the intervention and control condition will be conducted at baseline (i.e., pretest), after 6 months (i.e., posttest), and after 10 months (i.e., follow-up). This study protocol describes the design of a randomized controlled trial that investigates gene-(gene-)environment interactions in the development of child behavior. Two hypotheses will be tested. First, we expect that children in the intervention condition who carry one or more susceptibility genes will show significantly lower levels of problem behavior and higher levels of prosocial behavior after their parent(s) received the Incredible Years training, compared to children without these genes, or children in the control group. Second, we expect that children carrying one or more susceptibility genes will show a heightened sensitivity to changes in parenting behaviors, and will manifest higher emotional synchronization in dyadic

  20. Phytotoxic activity of bibenzyl derivatives from the orchid Epidendrum rigidum.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Romero, Yanet; Acevedo, Laura; Sánchez, María de los Angeles; Shier, W Thomas; Abbas, Hamed K; Mata, Rachel

    2005-08-10

    A whole plant chloroform-methanol extract of the orchid Epidendrum rigidum inhibited radicle growth of Amaranthus hypochondriacus seedlings (IC50 = 300 microg/mL). Bioassay-guided fractionation furnished four phytotoxins, namely, gigantol (1), batatasin III (2), 2,3-dimethoxy-9,10-dihydrophenathrene-4,7-diol (9), and 3,4,9-trimethoxyphenanthrene-2,5-diol (11), along with the known flavonoids apigenin, vitexin, and isovetin and the triterterpenoids 24,24-dimethyl-9,19-cyclolanostane-25-en-3beta-ol (14) and 24-methyl-9,19-cyclolanostane-25-en-3beta-ol (15). Stilbenoids 1, 2, 9, and 11 inhibited radicle growth of A. hypochondriacus with IC50 values of 0.65, 0.1, 0.12, and 5.9 microM, respectively. Foliar application of gigantol (1) at 1 microM to 4 week old seedlings of A. hypochondriacus reduced shoot elongation by 69% and fresh weight accumulation by 54%. Bibenzyls 1 and 2, as well as synthetic analogues 4'-hydroxy-3,3',5-trimethoxybibenzyl (3), 3,3',4',5-tetramethoxybibenzyl (4), 3,4'-dihydroxy-5-methoxybibenzyl (5), 3'-O-methylbatatasin III (6), 3,3',5-trihydroxybibenzyl (7), and 3,4',5-trihydroxybibenzyl (8), were tested for phytotoxicity in axenic cultures of the small aquatic plant Lemna pausicostata. All bibenzyls derivatives except 7 and 8 inhibited growth and increased cellular leakage with IC50 values of 89.9-180 and 89.9-166 microM, respectively. The natural and synthetic bibenzyls showed marginal cytotoxicity on animal cells. The results suggest that orchid bibenzyls may be good lead compounds for the development of novel herbicidal agents.

  1. Orchid-pollinator interactions and potential vulnerability to biological invasion.

    PubMed

    Chupp, Adam D; Battaglia, Loretta L; Schauber, Eric M; Sipes, Sedonia D

    2015-08-17

    Mutualistic relationships between plants and their pollinators have played a major role in the evolution of biodiversity. While the vulnerability of these relationships to environmental change is a major concern, studies often lack a framework for predicting impacts from emerging threats (e.g. biological invasions). The objective of this study was to determine the reliance of Platanthera ciliaris (orange-fringed orchid) on Papilio palamedes (Palamedes swallowtail butterfly) for pollination and the relative availability of alternative pollinators. Recent declines of P. palamedes larval host plants due to laurel wilt disease (LWD) could endanger P. ciliaris populations that rely heavily on this butterfly for pollination. We monitored pollinator visitation and fruit set and measured nectar spur lengths of P. ciliaris flowers and proboscis lengths of its floral visitors in Jackson County, MS, USA. Papilio palamedes was the primary visitor with minimal visitation by Phoebis sennae (cloudless sulfur butterfly). Lengths of P. ciliaris nectar spurs were similar to proboscis lengths of both pollinator species. Fruit set was moderate with access to pollinators (55 ± 10.8 %), yet failed (0 %) when pollinators were excluded. Visitation increased with inflorescence size, but there was no such pattern in fruit set, indicating that fruit set was not limited by pollinator visitation within the range of visitation rates we observed. Our results are supported by historical data that suggest P. palamedes and P. sennae are important pollinators of P. ciliaris. Although P. sennae may provide supplemental pollination service, this is likely constrained by habitat preferences that do not always overlap with those of P. cilaris. Observed declines of P. palamedes due to LWD could severely limit the reproductive success and persistence of P. ciliaris and similar orchid species populations. This empirical-based prediction is among the first to document exotic forest pests and pathogens as

  2. Olfactory specialization for perfume collection in male orchid bees.

    PubMed

    Mitko, Lukasz; Weber, Marjorie G; Ramirez, Santiago R; Hedenström, Erik; Wcislo, William T; Eltz, Thomas

    2016-05-15

    Insects rely on the olfactory system to detect a vast diversity of airborne molecules in their environment. Highly sensitive olfactory tuning is expected to evolve when detection of a particular chemical with great precision is required in the context of foraging and/or finding mates. Male neotropical orchid bees (Euglossini) collect odoriferous substances from multiple sources, store them in specialized tibial pouches and later expose them at display sites, presumably as mating signals to females. Previous analysis of tibial compounds among sympatric species revealed substantial chemical disparity in chemical composition among lineages with outstanding divergence between closely related species. Here, we tested whether specific perfume phenotypes coevolve with matching olfactory adaptations in male orchid bees to facilitate the location and harvest of species-specific perfume compounds. We conducted electroantennographic (EAG) measurements on males of 15 sympatric species in the genus Euglossa that were stimulated with 18 compounds present in variable proportions in male hind tibiae. Antennal response profiles were species-specific across all 15 species, but there was no conspicuous differentiation between closely related species. Instead, we found that the observed variation in EAG activity follows a Brownian motion model of trait evolution, where the probability of differentiation increases proportionally with lineage divergence time. However, we identified strong antennal responses for some chemicals that are present as major compounds in the perfume of the same species, thus suggesting that sensory specialization has occurred within multiple lineages. This sensory specialization was particularly apparent for semi-volatile molecules ('base note' compounds), thus supporting the idea that such compounds play an important role in chemical signaling of euglossine bees. Overall, our study found no close correspondence between antennal responses and behavioral

  3. Mycorrhizal fungi isolated from native terrestrial orchids of pristine regions in Cordoba (Argentina).

    PubMed

    Fernández Di Pardo, Agustina; Chiocchio, Viviana M; Barrera, Viviana; Colombo, Roxana P; Martinez, Alicia E; Gasoni, Laura; Godeas, Alicia M

    2015-03-01

    Orchidaceae is a highly dependent group on the Rhizoctonia complex that includes Ceratorhiza, Moniliopsis, Epulorhiza and Rhizoctonia, for seed germination and the development of new orchid plants. Thus, the isolation and identification of orchid mycorrhizal fungi are important to understand the orchid-fungus relationship, which can lead to the development of efficient conservation strategies by in vivo germination of seeds from endangered orchid plants. The aim of our work was to isolate and characterize the different mycorrhizal fungi found in roots of terrestrial orchids from Cordoba (Argentina), and, to learn about the natural habit and fungal associations in the Chaco Serrano woodland pristine region. In this study, bloomed orchid root and rhizosphere soil samples were obtained in two times from Valle de Punilla during spring of 2007; samples were kept in plastic bags until processed within 48 hours, and mycorrhizal condition confirmed assessing peloton presence. A total of 23 isolates of the orchideous mycorrhizal Rhizoctonia complex were obtained. The isolates were studied based on morphological characters and ITS-rDNA sequences. Morphological characteristics as color of colonies, texture, growth rate, hyphal diameter and length and presence of sclerotia were observed on culture media. To define the number of nuclei per cell, the isolates were grown in Petri dishes containing water-agar (WA) for three days at 25 degrees C and stained with Safranine-O solution. The mycorrhizal fungi were grouped into binucleate (MSGib, 10 isolates) and multinucleate (MSGim, 13 isolates) based on morphological characteristics of the colonies. We obtained the ITS1-5.8s-ITS4 region that was amplified using primers ITSI and ITS4. Based on DNA sequencing, isolates Q23 and Q29 were found to be related to species of Ceratobasidium. Isolates Q24 and Q4 were related to the binucleated anastomosis group AG-C of Rhizoctonia sp. The rest of the isolates grouped in the Ceratobasidium

  4. Different continuous cropping spans significantly affect microbial community membership and structure in a vanilla-grown soil as revealed by deep pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wu; Zhao, Qingyun; Zhao, Jun; Xun, Weibing; Li, Rong; Zhang, Ruifu; Wu, Huasong; Shen, Qirong

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, soil bacterial and fungal communities across vanilla continuous cropping time-series fields were assessed through deep pyrosequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. The results demonstrated that the long-term monoculture of vanilla significantly altered soil microbial communities. Soil fungal diversity index increased with consecutive cropping years, whereas soil bacterial diversity was relatively stable. Bray-Curtis dissimilarity cluster and UniFrac-weighted principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) revealed that monoculture time was the major determinant for fungal community structure, but not for bacterial community structure. The relative abundances (RAs) of the Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Basidiomycota phyla were depleted along the years of vanilla monoculture. Pearson correlations at the phyla level demonstrated that Actinobacteria, Armatimonadetes, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Firmicutes had significant negative correlations with vanilla disease index (DI), while no significant correlation for fungal phyla was observed. In addition, the amount of the pathogen Fusarium oxysporum accumulated with increasing years and was significantly positively correlated with vanilla DI. By contrast, the abundance of beneficial bacteria, including Bradyrhizobium and Bacillus, significantly decreased over time. In sum, soil weakness and vanilla stem wilt disease after long-term continuous cropping can be attributed to the alteration of the soil microbial community membership and structure, i.e., the reduction of the beneficial microbes and the accumulation of the fungal pathogen.

  5. The importance of associations with saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi among fully mycoheterotrophic orchids is currently under-estimated: novel evidence from sub-tropical Asia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yung-I; Yang, Chih-Kai; Gebauer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Most fully mycoheterotrophic (MH) orchids investigated to date are mycorrhizal with fungi that simultaneously form ectomycorrhizas with forest trees. Only a few MH orchids are currently known to be mycorrhizal with saprotrophic, mostly wood-decomposing, fungi instead of ectomycorrhizal fungi. This study provides evidence that the importance of associations between MH orchids and saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi is currently under-estimated. Methods Using microscopic techniques and molecular approaches, mycorrhizal fungi were localized and identified for seven MH orchid species from four genera and two subfamilies, Vanilloideae and Epidendroideae, growing in four humid and warm sub-tropical forests in Taiwan. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope natural abundances of MH orchids and autotrophic reference plants were used in order to elucidate the nutritional resources utilized by the orchids. Key Results Six out of the seven MH orchid species were mycorrhizal with either wood- or litter-decaying saprotrophic fungi. Only one orchid species was associated with ectomycorrhizal fungi. Stable isotope abundance patterns showed significant distinctions between orchids mycorrhizal with the three groups of fungal hosts. Conclusions Mycoheterotrophic orchids utilizing saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi as a carbon and nutrient source are clearly more frequent than hitherto assumed. On the basis of this kind of nutrition, orchids can thrive in deeply shaded, light-limiting forest understoreys even without support from ectomycorrhizal fungi. Sub-tropical East Asia appears to be a hotspot for orchids mycorrhizal with saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi. PMID:26113634

  6. Determination of coumarin, vanillin, and ethyl vanillin in vanilla extract products: liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method development and validation studies.

    PubMed

    de Jager, Lowri S; Perfetti, Gracia A; Diachenko, Gregory W

    2007-03-23

    A LC-MS method was developed for the determination of coumarin, vanillin, and ethyl vanillin in vanilla products. Samples were analyzed using LC-electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS in the positive ionization mode. Limits of detection for the method ranged from 0.051 to 0.073 microg mL(-1). Using the optimized method, 24 vanilla products were analyzed. All samples tested negative for coumarin. Concentrations ranged from 0.38 to 8.59 mg mL(-1) (x =3.73) for vanillin and 0.33 to 2.27 mg mL(-1) (x =1.03) for ethyl vanillin. The measured concentrations are compared to values calculated using UV monitoring and to results reported in a similar survey in 1988. Analytical results, method precision, and accuracy data are presented.

  7. First complete genome sequence of vanilla mosaic strain of Dasheen mosaic virus isolated from the Cook Islands.

    PubMed

    Puli'uvea, Christopher; Khan, Subuhi; Chang, Wee-Leong; Valmonte, Gardette; Pearson, Michael N; Higgins, Colleen M

    2017-02-01

    We present the first complete genome of vanilla mosaic virus (VanMV). The VanMV genomic structure is consistent with that of a potyvirus, containing a single open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polyprotein of 3139 amino acids. Motif analyses indicate the polyprotein can be cleaved into the expected ten individual proteins; other recognised potyvirus motifs are also present. As expected, the VanMV genome shows high sequence similarity to the published Dasheen mosaic virus (DsMV) genome sequences; comparisons with DsMV continue to support VanMV as a vanilla infecting strain of DsMV. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that VanMV and DsMV share a common ancestor, with VanMV having the closest relationship with DsMV strains from the South Pacific.

  8. Differences in carbon source utilisation by orchid mycorrhizal fungi from common and endangered species of Caladenia (Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Mehra, S; Morrison, P D; Coates, F; Lawrie, A C

    2017-02-01

    Terrestrial orchids depend on orchid mycorrhizal fungi (OMF) as symbionts for their survival, growth and nutrition. The ability of OMF from endangered orchid species to compete for available resources with OMF from common species may affect the distribution, abundance and therefore conservation status of their orchid hosts. Eight symbiotically effective OMF from endangered and more common Caladenia species were tested for their ability to utilise complex insoluble and simple soluble carbon sources produced during litter degradation by growth with different carbon sources in liquid medium to measure the degree of OMF variation with host conservation status or taxonomy. On simple carbon sources, fungal growth was assessed by biomass. On insoluble substrates, ergosterol content was assessed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). The OMF grew on all natural materials and complex carbon sources, but produced the greatest biomass on xylan and starch and the least on bark and chitin. On simple carbon sources, the greatest OMF biomass was measured on most hexoses and disaccharides and the least on galactose and arabinose. Only some OMF used sucrose, the most common sugar in green plants, with possible implications for symbiosis. OMF from common orchids produced more ergosterol and biomass than those from endangered orchids in the Dilatata and Reticulata groups but not in the Patersonii and Finger orchids. This suggests that differences in carbon source utilisation may contribute to differences in the distribution of some orchids, if these differences are retained on site.

  9. Spatial and temporal optimization in habitat placement for a threatened plant: the case of the western prairie fringed orchid

    John Hof; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Michael Bevers

    1999-01-01

    This paper investigates an optimization approach to determining the placement and timing of habitat protection for the western prairie fringed orchid. This plant’s population dynamics are complex, creating a challenging optimization problem. The sensitivity of the orchid to random climate conditions is handled probabilistically. The plant’s seed, protocorm and above-...

  10. Fine-scale spatial distribution of orchid mycorrhizal fungi in the soil of host-rich grasslands.

    PubMed

    Voyron, Samuele; Ercole, Enrico; Ghignone, Stefano; Perotto, Silvia; Girlanda, Mariangela

    2017-02-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are essential for the survival of orchid seedlings under natural conditions. The distribution of these fungi in soil can constrain the establishment and resulting spatial arrangement of orchids at the local scale, but the actual extent of occurrence and spatial patterns of orchid mycorrhizal (OrM) fungi in soil remain largely unknown. We addressed the fine-scale spatial distribution of OrM fungi in two orchid-rich Mediterranean grasslands by means of high-throughput sequencing of fungal ITS2 amplicons, obtained from soil samples collected either directly beneath or at a distance from adult Anacamptis morio and Ophrys sphegodes plants. Like ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycobionts, OrM fungi (tulasnelloid, ceratobasidioid, sebacinoid and pezizoid fungi) exhibited significant horizontal spatial autocorrelation in soil. However, OrM fungal read numbers did not correlate with distance from adult orchid plants, and several of these fungi were extremely sporadic or undetected even in the soil samples containing the orchid roots. Orchid mycorrhizal 'rhizoctonias' are commonly regarded as unspecialized saprotrophs. The sporadic occurrence of mycobionts of grassland orchids in host-rich stands questions the view of these mycorrhizal fungi as capable of sustained growth in soil. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. Growth of Listeria monocytogenes in pasteurized vanilla cream pudding as affected by storage temperature and the presence of cinnamon extract.

    PubMed

    Lianou, Alexandra; Moschonas, Galatios; Nychas, George-John E; Panagou, Efstathios Z

    2018-04-01

    The objective of the present study was the assessment and quantitative description of the growth behavior of Listeria monocytogenes as a function of temperature in vanilla cream pudding, formulated with or without cinnamon extract. Commercially prepared pasteurized vanilla cream pudding, formulated with (0.1% w/w) or without cinnamon extract, was inoculated with a five-strain mixture of L. monocytogenes (ca. 2logCFU/g) and stored aerobically at 4, 8, 12 and 16°C. At appropriate time intervals, L. monocytogenes populations were determined, and the primary model of Baranyi and Roberts was fitted to the derived microbiological data for the estimation of the pathogen's growth kinetic parameters. The effect of temperature on maximum specific growth rate (μ max ) was then modeled for each product type using a square-root-type model, and the developed models were validated using independent growth data generated during storage of inoculated vanilla cream samples under dynamic temperature conditions. Although the kinetic behavior of the pathogen was similar in cream with and without cinnamon extract during storage at higher temperatures, significant (P<0.05) differences were observed between the two product types at 4°C. With regard to secondary modelling, the estimated values of T min for cream with and without cinnamon extract were 0.39°C and -2.54°C, respectively, while the dynamic models exhibited satisfactory performance. Finally, as demonstrated by the findings of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, both temperature and cinnamon extract affected the pathogen's strains dominating during storage. According to the collected data, cinnamon extract exhibits an important potential of enhancing the microbiological safety of vanilla cream pudding, provided that efficient temperature control is in place. The developed models should be useful in quantitative microbial risk assessment regarding the studied cream products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Orchid Species Richness along Elevational and Environmental Gradients in Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shi-Bao; Chen, Wen-Yun; Huang, Jia-Lin; Bi, Ying-Feng; Yang, Xue-Fei

    2015-01-01

    The family Orchidaceae is not only one of the most diverse families of flowering plants, but also one of the most endangered plant taxa. Therefore, understanding how its species richness varies along geographical and environmental gradients is essential for conservation efforts. However, such knowledge is rarely available, especially on a large scale. We used a database extracted from herbarium records to investigate the relationships between orchid species richness and elevation, and to examine how elevational diversity in Yunnan Province, China, might be explained by mid-domain effect (MDE), species–area relationship (SAR), water–energy dynamics (WED), Rapoport’s Rule, and climatic variables. This particular location was selected because it is one of the primary centers of distribution for orchids. We recorded 691 species that span 127 genera and account for 88.59% of all confirmed orchid species in Yunnan. Species richness, estimated at 200-m intervals along a slope, was closely correlated with elevation, peaking at 1395 to 1723 m. The elevational pattern of orchid richness was considerably shaped by MDE, SAR, WED, and climate. Among those four predictors, climate was the strongest while MDE was the weakest for predicting the elevational pattern of orchid richness. Species richness showed parabolic responses to mean annual temperature (MAT) and mean annual precipitation (MAP), with maximum richness values recorded at 13.7 to 17.7°C for MAT and 1237 to 1414 mm for MAP. Rapoport’s Rule also helped to explain the elevational pattern of species richness in Yunnan, but those influences were not entirely uniform across all methods. These results suggested that the elevational pattern of orchid species richness in Yunnan is collectively shaped by several mechanisms related to geometric constraints, size of the land area, and environments. Because of the dominant role of climate in determining orchid richness, our findings may contribute to a better

  13. Autofluorescence study and selected cyanidin quantification in the Jewel orchids Anoectochilus sp. and Ludisia discolor

    PubMed Central

    Poobathy, Ranjetta; Zakaria, Rahmad; Murugaiyah, Vikneswaran

    2018-01-01

    Anoectochilus sp. and Ludisia discolor are known as Jewel orchids. Both species are terrestrial wild orchids that grow in shaded areas of forests. The Jewel orchids are renowned for the beauty of their leaves, which are dark-green laced with silvery or golden veins. The orchids are used as a cure in various parts of Asia. Overharvesting and anthropogenic disturbances threaten the existence of the Jewel orchids in the wild, necessitating human intervention in their survival. An understanding of the structure and adaptations of a plant may assist in its survival when propagated outside of its habitat. In this study, ex vitro leaves of Anoectochilus sp. and L. discolor were subjected to freehand sectioning, and then inspected through brightfield and fluorescence microscopy. The study indicated that all parts of both plants presented typical monocotyledonous characteristics except the leaves. The leaves displayed dorsiventrality with distinct palisade and spongy mesophyll layers. The spongy mesophyll layer contained cells which fluoresced a bright red when exposed to ultraviolet, blue, and green light wavelengths, hinting at the presence of anthocyanins for photoprotection. Cyanidin was detected in the leaves of L. discolor, as enumerated through high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The observations indicated that Anoectochilus sp. and L. discolor are well-adapted to live under shaded conditions with minimal exposure to light. PMID:29649288

  14. Changes in Orchid Bee Communities Across Forest-Agroecosystem Boundaries in Brazilian Atlantic Forest Landscapes.

    PubMed

    De Aguiar, Willian Moura; Sofia, Silvia H; Melo, Gabriel A R; Gaglianone, Maria Cristina

    2015-12-01

    Deforestation has dramatically reduced the extent of Atlantic Forest cover in Brazil. Orchid bees are key pollinators in neotropical forest, and many species are sensitive to anthropogenic interference. In this sense understanding the matrix permeability for these bees is important for maintaining genetic diversity and pollination services. Our main objective was to assess whether the composition, abundance, and diversity of orchid bees in matrices differed from those in Atlantic forest. To do this we sampled orchid bees at 4-mo intervals from 2007 to 2009 in remnants of Atlantic Forest, and in the surrounding pasture and eucalyptus matrices. The abundance, richness, and diversity of orchid bees diminished significantly from the forest fragment toward the matrix points in the eucalyptus and pasture. Some common or intermediate species in the forest areas, such as Eulaema cingulata (F.) and Euglossa fimbriata Moure, respectively, become rare species in the matrices. Our results show that the orchid bee community is affected by the matrices surrounding the forest fragments. They also suggest that connections between forest fragments need to be improved using friendly matrices that can provide more favorable conditions for bees and increase their dispersal between fragments. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. DOAP1 Promotes Flowering in the Orchid Dendrobium Chao Praya Smile.

    PubMed

    Sawettalake, Nunchanoke; Bunnag, Sumontip; Wang, Yanwen; Shen, Lisha; Yu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    APETALA1 ( AP1 ) encodes a key MADS-box transcription factor that specifies the floral meristem identity on the flank of the inflorescence meristem, and determines the identity of perianth floral organs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana . Orchids are members of the Orchidaceae, one of the largest families of angiosperms. Although the expression patterns of a few AP1 -like genes in orchids have been reported, their actual functions in orchid reproductive development are so far largely unknown. In this study, we isolated and characterized an AP1 ortholog, DOAP1 , from Dendrobium Chao Praya Smile. DOAP1 was highly expressed in reproductive tissues, including inflorescence apices and flowers at various developmental stages. Overexpression of DOAP1 resulted in early flowering in Arabidopsis , and was able to rescue the floral organ defects of Arabidopsis ap1 mutants. Moreover, we successfully created transgenic Dendrobium Chao Praya Smile orchids overexpressing DOAP1 , which displayed earlier flowering and earlier termination of inflorescence meristems into floral meristems than wild-type orchids. Our results demonstrate that DOAP1 plays an evolutionarily conserved role in promoting flowering and floral meristem specification in the Orchidaceae family.

  16. Orchid: a novel management, annotation and machine learning framework for analyzing cancer mutations.

    PubMed

    Cario, Clinton L; Witte, John S

    2018-03-15

    As whole-genome tumor sequence and biological annotation datasets grow in size, number and content, there is an increasing basic science and clinical need for efficient and accurate data management and analysis software. With the emergence of increasingly sophisticated data stores, execution environments and machine learning algorithms, there is also a need for the integration of functionality across frameworks. We present orchid, a python based software package for the management, annotation and machine learning of cancer mutations. Building on technologies of parallel workflow execution, in-memory database storage and machine learning analytics, orchid efficiently handles millions of mutations and hundreds of features in an easy-to-use manner. We describe the implementation of orchid and demonstrate its ability to distinguish tissue of origin in 12 tumor types based on 339 features using a random forest classifier. Orchid and our annotated tumor mutation database are freely available at https://github.com/wittelab/orchid. Software is implemented in python 2.7, and makes use of MySQL or MemSQL databases. Groovy 2.4.5 is optionally required for parallel workflow execution. JWitte@ucsf.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  17. Autofluorescence study and selected cyanidin quantification in the Jewel orchids Anoectochilus sp. and Ludisia discolor.

    PubMed

    Poobathy, Ranjetta; Zakaria, Rahmad; Murugaiyah, Vikneswaran; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan

    2018-01-01

    Anoectochilus sp. and Ludisia discolor are known as Jewel orchids. Both species are terrestrial wild orchids that grow in shaded areas of forests. The Jewel orchids are renowned for the beauty of their leaves, which are dark-green laced with silvery or golden veins. The orchids are used as a cure in various parts of Asia. Overharvesting and anthropogenic disturbances threaten the existence of the Jewel orchids in the wild, necessitating human intervention in their survival. An understanding of the structure and adaptations of a plant may assist in its survival when propagated outside of its habitat. In this study, ex vitro leaves of Anoectochilus sp. and L. discolor were subjected to freehand sectioning, and then inspected through brightfield and fluorescence microscopy. The study indicated that all parts of both plants presented typical monocotyledonous characteristics except the leaves. The leaves displayed dorsiventrality with distinct palisade and spongy mesophyll layers. The spongy mesophyll layer contained cells which fluoresced a bright red when exposed to ultraviolet, blue, and green light wavelengths, hinting at the presence of anthocyanins for photoprotection. Cyanidin was detected in the leaves of L. discolor, as enumerated through high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The observations indicated that Anoectochilus sp. and L. discolor are well-adapted to live under shaded conditions with minimal exposure to light.

  18. Development of microsatellite markers of vandaceous orchids for species and variety identification.

    PubMed

    Peyachoknagul, S; Nettuwakul, C; Phuekvilai, P; Wannapinpong, S; Srikulnath, K

    2014-07-24

    Vandaceous orchids are a group of orchid genera in the subfamily Vandoideae. Among this group, Mokara, Phalaenopsis, and Vanda are the most popular and commercially important orchids in Thailand. Novel microsatellite markers were developed from Mokara, the intergeneric hybrid from 3 genera Vanda, Ascocentrum, and Arachnis by using enriched method. Six primers from this study plus one primer previously developed from Vanda genome, a total of 7 markers, were selected to characterize 4 orchid genera (Mokara, Vanda, Rhynchostylis, and Ascocenda). The observed and expected heterozygosities varied in the 4 genera from 0.0000-1.0000 and 0.0000-0.8765, respectively. The transferability of these primers was also investigated in 76 vandaceous orchids from 12 genera. Three primer pairs, MOK26, MOK29, and MOK62, could successfully amplify the DNA of all samples, while MOK103 could be used with most of the samples. The total number of alleles from 76 samples ranged from 3 to 19 alleles per locus, with an average of 8.5714. Therefore, these markers could be used for variety/ species identification, certification and protection, genetic diversity, and evolutionary studies.

  19. Recent origin and rapid speciation of Neotropical orchids in the world's richest plant biodiversity hotspot.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escobar, Oscar Alejandro; Chomicki, Guillaume; Condamine, Fabien L; Karremans, Adam P; Bogarín, Diego; Matzke, Nicholas J; Silvestro, Daniele; Antonelli, Alexandre

    2017-07-01

    The Andean mountains of South America are the most species-rich biodiversity hotspot worldwide with c. 15% of the world's plant species, in only 1% of the world's land surface. Orchids are a key element of the Andean flora, and one of the most prominent components of the Neotropical epiphyte diversity, yet very little is known about their origin and diversification. We address this knowledge gap by inferring the biogeographical history and diversification dynamics of the two largest Neotropical orchid groups (Cymbidieae and Pleurothallidinae), using two unparalleled, densely sampled orchid phylogenies (including more than 400 newly generated DNA sequences), comparative phylogenetic methods, geological and biological datasets. We find that the majority of Andean orchid lineages only originated in the last 20-15 million yr. Andean lineages are derived from lowland Amazonian ancestors, with additional contributions from Central America and the Antilles. Species diversification is correlated with Andean orogeny, and multiple migrations and recolonizations across the Andes indicate that mountains do not constrain orchid dispersal over long timescales. Our study sheds new light on the timing and geography of a major Neotropical diversification, and suggests that mountain uplift promotes species diversification across all elevational zones. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Perspectives on MADS-box expression during orchid flower evolution and development.

    PubMed

    Mondragón-Palomino, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    The diverse morphology of orchid flowers and their complex, often deceptive strategies to become pollinated have fascinated researchers for a long time. However, it was not until the 20th century that the ontogeny of orchid flowers, the genetic basis of their morphology and the complex phylogeny of Orchidaceae were investigated. In parallel, the improvement of techniques for in vitro seed germination and tissue culture, together with studies on biochemistry, physiology, and cytology supported the progress of what is now a highly productive industry of orchid breeding and propagation. In the present century both basic research in orchid flower evo-devo and the interest for generating novel horticultural varieties have driven the characterization of many members of the MADS-box family encoding key regulators of flower development. This perspective summarizes the picture emerging from these studies and discusses the advantages and limitations of the comparative strategy employed so far. I address the growing role of natural and horticultural mutants in these studies and the emergence of several model species in orchid evo-devo and genomics. In this context, I make a plea for an increasingly integrative approach.

  1. Perspectives on MADS-box expression during orchid flower evolution and development

    PubMed Central

    Mondragón-Palomino, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    The diverse morphology of orchid flowers and their complex, often deceptive strategies to become pollinated have fascinated researchers for a long time. However, it was not until the 20th century that the ontogeny of orchid flowers, the genetic basis of their morphology and the complex phylogeny of Orchidaceae were investigated. In parallel, the improvement of techniques for in vitro seed germination and tissue culture, together with studies on biochemistry, physiology, and cytology supported the progress of what is now a highly productive industry of orchid breeding and propagation. In the present century both basic research in orchid flower evo-devo and the interest for generating novel horticultural varieties have driven the characterization of many members of the MADS-box family encoding key regulators of flower development. This perspective summarizes the picture emerging from these studies and discusses the advantages and limitations of the comparative strategy employed so far. I address the growing role of natural and horticultural mutants in these studies and the emergence of several model species in orchid evo-devo and genomics. In this context, I make a plea for an increasingly integrative approach. PMID:24065980

  2. The potential for floral mimicry in rewardless orchids: an experimental study.

    PubMed Central

    Gigord, Luc D B; Macnair, M R; Stritesky, M; Smithson, Ann

    2002-01-01

    More than one-third of orchid species do not provide their pollinators with either pollen or nectar rewards. Floral mimicry could explain the maintenance of these rewardless orchid species, but most rewardless orchids do not appear to have a rewarding plant that they mimic specifically. We tested the hypothesis that floral mimicry can occur through similarity based on corolla colour alone, using naive bumble-bees foraging on arrays of plants with one rewarding model species, and one rewardless putative mimic species (Dactylorhiza sambucina) which had two colour morphs. We found that when bees were inexperienced, they visited both rewardless morphs randomly. However, after bees had gained experience with the rewarding model, and it was removed from the experiment, bees resampled preferentially the rewardless morph most similar to it in corolla colour. This is the first clear evidence, to our knowledge, that pollinators could select for floral mimicry. We suggest that floral mimicry can be a selective force acting on rewardless orchids, but only under some ecological conditions. In particular, we argue that selection on early-flowering rewardless orchids that receive visits from a large pool of naive pollinators will be weakly influenced by mimicry. PMID:12079663

  3. Structure-Activity Studies of Semiochemicals from the Spider Orchid Caladenia plicata for Sexual Deception.

    PubMed

    Bohman, Bjorn; Karton, Amir; Flematti, Gavin R; Scaffidi, Adrian; Peakall, Rod

    2018-05-01

    Sexually deceptive orchids attract specific pollinators by mimicking insect sex pheromones. Normally this mimicry is very specific and identical compounds have been identified from orchids and matching females of the pollinators. In this study, we conduct a detailed structure-activity investigation on isomers of the semiochemicals involved in the sexual attraction of the male pollinator of the spider orchid Caladenia plicata. This orchid employs an unusual blend of two biosynthetically unrelated compounds, (S)-β-citronellol and 2-hydroxy-6-methylacetophenone, to lure its Zeleboria sp. thynnine wasp pollinator. We show that the blend is barely attractive when (S)-β-citronellol is substituted with its enantiomer, (R)-β-citronellol. Furthermore, none of the nine-possible alternative hydroxy-methylacetophenone regioisomers of the natural semiochemical are active when substituted for the natural 2-hydroxy-6-methylacetophenone. Our results were surprising given the structural similarity between the active compound and some of the analogues tested, and results from previous studies in other sexually deceptive orchid/wasp systems where substitution with analogues was possible. Interestingly, high-level ab initio and density functional theory calculations of the hydroxy-methylacetophenones revealed that the active natural isomer, 2-hydroxy-6-methylacetophenone, has the strongest intramolecular hydrogen bond of all regioisomers, which at least in part may explain the specific activity.

  4. DOAP1 Promotes Flowering in the Orchid Dendrobium Chao Praya Smile

    PubMed Central

    Sawettalake, Nunchanoke; Bunnag, Sumontip; Wang, Yanwen; Shen, Lisha; Yu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    APETALA1 (AP1) encodes a key MADS-box transcription factor that specifies the floral meristem identity on the flank of the inflorescence meristem, and determines the identity of perianth floral organs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Orchids are members of the Orchidaceae, one of the largest families of angiosperms. Although the expression patterns of a few AP1-like genes in orchids have been reported, their actual functions in orchid reproductive development are so far largely unknown. In this study, we isolated and characterized an AP1 ortholog, DOAP1, from Dendrobium Chao Praya Smile. DOAP1 was highly expressed in reproductive tissues, including inflorescence apices and flowers at various developmental stages. Overexpression of DOAP1 resulted in early flowering in Arabidopsis, and was able to rescue the floral organ defects of Arabidopsis ap1 mutants. Moreover, we successfully created transgenic Dendrobium Chao Praya Smile orchids overexpressing DOAP1, which displayed earlier flowering and earlier termination of inflorescence meristems into floral meristems than wild-type orchids. Our results demonstrate that DOAP1 plays an evolutionarily conserved role in promoting flowering and floral meristem specification in the Orchidaceae family. PMID:28386268

  5. The potential for floral mimicry in rewardless orchids: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Gigord, Luc D B; Macnair, M R; Stritesky, M; Smithson, Ann

    2002-07-07

    More than one-third of orchid species do not provide their pollinators with either pollen or nectar rewards. Floral mimicry could explain the maintenance of these rewardless orchid species, but most rewardless orchids do not appear to have a rewarding plant that they mimic specifically. We tested the hypothesis that floral mimicry can occur through similarity based on corolla colour alone, using naive bumble-bees foraging on arrays of plants with one rewarding model species, and one rewardless putative mimic species (Dactylorhiza sambucina) which had two colour morphs. We found that when bees were inexperienced, they visited both rewardless morphs randomly. However, after bees had gained experience with the rewarding model, and it was removed from the experiment, bees resampled preferentially the rewardless morph most similar to it in corolla colour. This is the first clear evidence, to our knowledge, that pollinators could select for floral mimicry. We suggest that floral mimicry can be a selective force acting on rewardless orchids, but only under some ecological conditions. In particular, we argue that selection on early-flowering rewardless orchids that receive visits from a large pool of naive pollinators will be weakly influenced by mimicry.

  6. Mycorrhizal compatibility and symbiotic reproduction of Gavilea australis, an endangered terrestrial orchid from south Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Fracchia, Sebastián; Aranda-Rickert, Adriana; Flachsland, Eduardo; Terada, Graciela; Sede, Silvana

    2014-11-01

    Gavilea australis is a terrestrial orchid endemic from insular south Argentina and Chile. Meeting aspects of mycorrhizal fungi identity and compatibility in this orchid species is essential for propagation and conservation purposes. These knowledge represent also a first approach to elucidate the mycorrhizal specificity of this species. In order to evaluate both the mycorrhizal compatibility and the symbiotic seed germination of G. australis, we isolated and identified its root endophytic fungal strains as well as those from two sympatric species: Gavilea lutea and Codonorchis lessonii. In addition, we tested two other strains isolated from allopatric terrestrial orchid species from central Argentina. All fungal strains formed coilings and pelotons inside protocorms and promoted, at varying degrees, seed germination, and protocorm development until seedlings had two to three leaves. These results suggest a low mycorrhizal specificity of G. australis and contribute to a better knowledge of the biology of this orchid as well as of other sympatric Patagonian orchid species, all of them currently under serious risk of extinction.

  7. Simultaneous analysis of guaiacol and vanillin in a vanilla extract by using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Makoto; Sakamaki, Shizuka; Fujita, Akira

    2013-01-01

    We developed and validated a new high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis for electrochemically detecting guaiacol and vanillin as important components in vanilla extract. Separation was achieved with Capcell Pak C-18 MG, the potential of the working electrode being set at +1000 mV. The respective calibration curves for guaiacol and vanillin were linear in the range of 1.60-460 µg/L and 5.90-1180 µg/L. The respective limits for the quantities of guaiacol and vanillin were 1.60 µg/L and 2.36 µg/L. The related standard deviations of the intra- and inter-day precision of the retention time and peak area were all less than 4%. The recovery of guaiacol and vanillin was both more than 97%, all of the validation data being within an acceptable range. This analysis method is well suited for the simultaneous and convenient analysis of guaiacol and vanillin in a vanilla extract to evaluate the quality of the vanilla extract.

  8. Long-chain aliphatic beta-diketones from epicuticular wax of Vanilla bean species. Synthesis of nervonoylacetone.

    PubMed

    Ramaroson-Raonizafinimanana, B; Gaydou, E M; Bombarda, I

    2000-10-01

    Analysis of the neutral lipids from Vanilla fragrans and Vanilla tahitensis (Orchidaceae) without saponification resulted in the isolation and identification of a new product family in this plant: beta-dicarbonyl compounds. The compound structures are composed of a long aliphatic chain with 2,4-dicarbonyl carbons and a cis double bond at the n-9 position. They represent approximately 28% of the neutral lipids, that is, 1.5%, in immature beans, and approximately 10% of the neutral lipids, that is, 0.9%, in mature beans. Using retention indices, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, derivatization reactions, and chemical degradation, five beta-dicarbonyl compounds have been identified including 16-pentacosene-2,4-dione, 18-heptacosene-2,4-dione, 20-nonacosene-2, 4-dione, 22-hentriacontene-2,4-dione, and 24-tritriacontene-2, 4-dione. Among them (Z)-18-heptacosene-2,4-dione, or nervonoylacetone, has been synthesized in two steps starting from nervonic acid. The major constituent, nervonoylacetone, represented 74.5% of the beta-dicarbonyl fraction. The range of these compounds has been studied in relation with bean maturity for V. fragrans and V. tahitensis species. This compound family has not been found in the leaves or stems of any of the three vanilla species studied and is markedly absent in the beans of V. madagascariensis.

  9. Dynamic modeling of Listeria monocytogenes growth in pasteurized vanilla cream after postprocessing contamination.

    PubMed

    Panagou, Efstathios Z; Nychas, George-John E

    2008-09-01

    A product-specific model was developed and validated under dynamic temperature conditions for predicting the growth of Listeria monocytogenes in pasteurized vanilla cream, a traditional milk-based product. Model performance was also compared with Growth Predictor and Sym'Previus predictive microbiology software packages. Commercially prepared vanilla cream samples were artificially inoculated with a five-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes, with an initial concentration of 102 CFU g(-1), and stored at 3, 5, 10, and 15 degrees C for 36 days. The growth kinetic parameters at each temperature were determined by the primary model of Baranyi and Roberts. The maximum specific growth rate (mu(max)) was further modeled as a function of temperature by means of a square root-type model. The performance of the model in predicting the growth of the pathogen under dynamic temperature conditions was based on two different temperature scenarios with periodic changes from 4 to 15 degrees C. Growth prediction for dynamic temperature profiles was based on the square root model and the differential equations of the Baranyi and Roberts model, which were numerically integrated with respect to time. Model performance was based on the bias factor (B(f)), the accuracy factor (A(f)), the goodness-of-fit index (GoF), and the percent relative errors between observed and predicted growth. The product-specific model developed in the present study accurately predicted the growth of L. monocytogenes under dynamic temperature conditions. The average values for the performance indices were 1.038, 1.068, and 0.397 for B(f), A(f), and GoF, respectively for both temperature scenarios assayed. Predictions from Growth Predictor and Sym'Previus overestimated pathogen growth. The average values of B(f), A(f), and GoF were 1.173, 1.174, 1.162, and 0.956, 1.115, 0.713 for [corrected] Growth Predictor and Sym'Previus, respectively.

  10. Development of phylogenetic markers for Sebacina (Sebacinaceae) mycorrhizal fungi associated with Australian orchids.

    PubMed

    Ruibal, Monica P; Peakall, Rod; Foret, Sylvain; Linde, Celeste C

    2014-06-01

    To investigate fungal species identity and diversity in mycorrhizal fungi of order Sebacinales, we developed phylogenetic markers. These new markers will enable future studies investigating species delineation and phylogenetic relationships of the fungal symbionts and facilitate investigations into evolutionary interactions among Sebacina species and their orchid hosts. • We generated partial genome sequences for a Sebacina symbiont originating from Caladenia huegelii with 454 genome sequencing and from three symbionts from Eriochilus dilatatus and one from E. pulchellus using Illumina sequencing. Six nuclear and two mitochondrial loci showed high variability (10-31% parsimony informative sites) for Sebacinales mycorrhizal fungi across four genera of Australian orchids (Caladenia, Eriochilus, Elythranthera, and Glossodia). • We obtained highly informative DNA markers that will allow investigation of mycorrhizal diversity of Sebacinaceae fungi associated with terrestrial orchids in Australia and worldwide.

  11. Are carbon and nitrogen exchange between fungi and the orchid Goodyera repens affected by irradiance?

    PubMed Central

    Liebel, Heiko T.; Bidartondo, Martin I.; Gebauer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The green orchid Goodyera repens has been shown to transfer carbon to its mycorrhizal partner, and this flux may therefore be affected by light availability. This study aimed to test whether the C and N exchange between plant and fungus is dependent on light availability, and in addition addressed the question of whether flowering and/or fruiting individuals of G. repens compensate for changes in leaf chlorophyll concentration with changes in C and N flows from fungus to plant. Methods The natural abundances of stable isotopes of plant C and N were used to infer changes in fluxes between orchid and fungus across natural gradients of irradiance at five sites. Mycorrhizal fungi in the roots of G. repens were identified by molecular analyses. Chlorophyll concentrations in the leaves of the orchid and of reference plants were measured directly in the field. Key Results Leaf δ13C values of G. repens responded to changes in light availability in a similar manner to autotrophic reference plants, and different mycorrhizal fungal associations also did not affect the isotope abundance patterns of the orchid. Flowering/fruiting individuals had lower leaf total N and chlorophyll concentrations, which is most probably explained by N investments to form flowers, seeds and shoot. Conclusions The results indicate that mycorrhizal physiology is relatively fixed in G. repens, and changes in the amount and direction of C flow between plant and fungus were not observed to depend on light availability. The orchid may instead react to low-light sites through increased clonal growth. The orchid does not compensate for low leaf total N and chlorophyll concentrations by using a 13C- and 15N-enriched fungal source. PMID:25538109

  12. Transcriptome and proteome data reveal candidate genes for pollinator attraction in sexually deceptive orchids.

    PubMed

    Sedeek, Khalid E M; Qi, Weihong; Schauer, Monica A; Gupta, Alok K; Poveda, Lucy; Xu, Shuqing; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Schiestl, Florian P; Schlüter, Philipp M

    2013-01-01

    Sexually deceptive orchids of the genus Ophrys mimic the mating signals of their pollinator females to attract males as pollinators. This mode of pollination is highly specific and leads to strong reproductive isolation between species. This study aims to identify candidate genes responsible for pollinator attraction and reproductive isolation between three closely related species, O. exaltata, O. sphegodes and O. garganica. Floral traits such as odour, colour and morphology are necessary for successful pollinator attraction. In particular, different odour hydrocarbon profiles have been linked to differences in specific pollinator attraction among these species. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in these traits is important for understanding the molecular basis of pollinator attraction by sexually deceptive orchids. We have created floral reference transcriptomes and proteomes for these three Ophrys species using a combination of next-generation sequencing (454 and Solexa), Sanger sequencing, and shotgun proteomics (tandem mass spectrometry). In total, 121 917 unique transcripts and 3531 proteins were identified. This represents the first orchid proteome and transcriptome from the orchid subfamily Orchidoideae. Proteome data revealed proteins corresponding to 2644 transcripts and 887 proteins not observed in the transcriptome. Candidate genes for hydrocarbon and anthocyanin biosynthesis were represented by 156 and 61 unique transcripts in 20 and 7 genes classes, respectively. Moreover, transcription factors putatively involved in the regulation of flower odour, colour and morphology were annotated, including Myb, MADS and TCP factors. Our comprehensive data set generated by combining transcriptome and proteome technologies allowed identification of candidate genes for pollinator attraction and reproductive isolation among sexually deceptive orchids. This includes genes for hydrocarbon and anthocyanin biosynthesis and regulation, and the development of

  13. Transcriptome and Proteome Data Reveal Candidate Genes for Pollinator Attraction in Sexually Deceptive Orchids

    PubMed Central

    Sedeek, Khalid E. M.; Qi, Weihong; Schauer, Monica A.; Gupta, Alok K.; Poveda, Lucy; Xu, Shuqing; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Schiestl, Florian P.; Schlüter, Philipp M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sexually deceptive orchids of the genus Ophrys mimic the mating signals of their pollinator females to attract males as pollinators. This mode of pollination is highly specific and leads to strong reproductive isolation between species. This study aims to identify candidate genes responsible for pollinator attraction and reproductive isolation between three closely related species, O. exaltata, O. sphegodes and O. garganica. Floral traits such as odour, colour and morphology are necessary for successful pollinator attraction. In particular, different odour hydrocarbon profiles have been linked to differences in specific pollinator attraction among these species. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in these traits is important for understanding the molecular basis of pollinator attraction by sexually deceptive orchids. Results We have created floral reference transcriptomes and proteomes for these three Ophrys species using a combination of next-generation sequencing (454 and Solexa), Sanger sequencing, and shotgun proteomics (tandem mass spectrometry). In total, 121 917 unique transcripts and 3531 proteins were identified. This represents the first orchid proteome and transcriptome from the orchid subfamily Orchidoideae. Proteome data revealed proteins corresponding to 2644 transcripts and 887 proteins not observed in the transcriptome. Candidate genes for hydrocarbon and anthocyanin biosynthesis were represented by 156 and 61 unique transcripts in 20 and 7 genes classes, respectively. Moreover, transcription factors putatively involved in the regulation of flower odour, colour and morphology were annotated, including Myb, MADS and TCP factors. Conclusion Our comprehensive data set generated by combining transcriptome and proteome technologies allowed identification of candidate genes for pollinator attraction and reproductive isolation among sexually deceptive orchids. This includes genes for hydrocarbon and anthocyanin biosynthesis and

  14. Evidence for mixed sexual and asexual reproduction in the rare European mycoheterotrophic orchid Epipogium aphyllum, Orchidaceae (ghost orchid)

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Emilia; Rojek, Joanna; Kowalkowska, Agnieszka K.; Kapusta, Małgorzata; Znaniecka, Joanna; Minasiewicz, Julita

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Despite their significant capacity to propagate vegetatively, most orchids reproduce via seeds. Sexual reproduction via seed is commonly reported, in contrast to apomixis, whereby seeds are clones of the mother. Although insect pollination and autonomous self-pollination exist in mycoheterotrophic plants, the reproductive embryology of these plants remains under-studied. This paper provides evidence for the co-occurrence of both sexual and apomictic reproduction in a population of mycoheterotrophic plants – Epipogium aphyllum. We investigated seed formation via open pollination, induced autogamy, autogamy sensu stricto and autonomous apomixis. Methods The study was performed on a population of E. aphyllum located in northern Poland. The research included studies of the micromorphology, histochemistry and embryology of four types of reproductive systems. Scanning, fluorescence and light microscopy accompanied by graphical and statistical analyses were employed. Key Results We observed gametophyte development, from the one-nucleate stage to maturity, in unpollinated flower buds. The lack of zygotes in flower buds indicated that fertilization did not occur at this stage. Manual self-pollination led to a zygote, followed by embryo formation. Fertilization and embryo development derived from embryogenesis via open pollination is delayed compared with hand pollination. Isolation from external pollination resulted only in structures resembling zygotes that may originate either sexually or independent of fertilization. Parthenogenetic structures that resembled zygotes were observed in flowers that were emasculated and isolated from pollination. Zygotes formed at significantly higher frequencies via open pollination and induced autogamy in comparison to the parthenogenetic structures formed in other treatments. Conclusions We showed the absence of pre-zygotic barriers for autogamy in E. aphyllum. Self-pollination and self-fertilization are possible

  15. Evidence for mixed sexual and asexual reproduction in the rare European mycoheterotrophic orchid Epipogium aphyllum, Orchidaceae (ghost orchid).

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Emilia; Rojek, Joanna; Kowalkowska, Agnieszka K; Kapusta, Małgorzata; Znaniecka, Joanna; Minasiewicz, Julita

    2016-07-01

    Despite their significant capacity to propagate vegetatively, most orchids reproduce via seeds. Sexual reproduction via seed is commonly reported, in contrast to apomixis, whereby seeds are clones of the mother. Although insect pollination and autonomous self-pollination exist in mycoheterotrophic plants, the reproductive embryology of these plants remains under-studied. This paper provides evidence for the co-occurrence of both sexual and apomictic reproduction in a population of mycoheterotrophic plants - Epipogium aphyllum We investigated seed formation via open pollination, induced autogamy, autogamy sensu stricto and autonomous apomixis. The study was performed on a population of E. aphyllum located in northern Poland. The research included studies of the micromorphology, histochemistry and embryology of four types of reproductive systems. Scanning, fluorescence and light microscopy accompanied by graphical and statistical analyses were employed. We observed gametophyte development, from the one-nucleate stage to maturity, in unpollinated flower buds. The lack of zygotes in flower buds indicated that fertilization did not occur at this stage. Manual self-pollination led to a zygote, followed by embryo formation. Fertilization and embryo development derived from embryogenesis via open pollination is delayed compared with hand pollination. Isolation from external pollination resulted only in structures resembling zygotes that may originate either sexually or independent of fertilization. Parthenogenetic structures that resembled zygotes were observed in flowers that were emasculated and isolated from pollination. Zygotes formed at significantly higher frequencies via open pollination and induced autogamy in comparison to the parthenogenetic structures formed in other treatments. We showed the absence of pre-zygotic barriers for autogamy in E. aphyllum Self-pollination and self-fertilization are possible; however, natural self-pollination is unlikely or rare due

  16. Physiological Response of Orchids to Mealybugs (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) Infestation.

    PubMed

    Kmiec, K; Kot, I; Golan, K; Górska-Drabik, E; Lagowska, B; Rubinowska, K; Michalek, W

    2016-12-01

    The harmfulness of mealybugs resulting from sucking plant sap, secreting honeydew, and transmitting plant viruses can give them the status of serious pests. This study documents the influence of Pseudococcus maritimus (Ehrhorn) and Pseudococcus longispinus (Targioni Tozzetti) infestation on alterations in selected physiological parameters of Phalaenopsis x hybridum 'Innocence'. The condition of the cytoplasmic membranes was expressed as the value of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. We have determined changes in the activities of catalase and guaiacol peroxidase and measured the following chlorophyll fluorescence parameters: maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), effective quantum yield (Y), photochemical quenching (qP), and nonphotochemical quenching (qN). The strongest physiological response of orchids was recorded in the initial period of mealybugs infestation. Prolonged insect feeding suppressed lipid peroxidation, peroxidase and catalase activity, as well as photosynthesis photochemistry. The pattern of changes was dependent on mealybug species. This indicated the complexity of the processes responsible for plant tolerance. Data generated in this study have provided a better understanding of the impact of two mealybug species infestation on Phalaenopsis and should be useful in developing pest management strategies. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Responses of orchids to habitat change in Corsica over 27 years.

    PubMed

    Vogt-Schilb, Hélène; Pradel, Roger; Geniez, Philippe; Hugot, Laetitia; Delage, Alain; Richard, Franck; Schatz, Bertrand

    2016-07-01

    Orchids are known to be particularly sensitive to environmental changes due to their narrow ranges of secondary successional habitats. Lack of data at the community level limits our ability to evaluate how traits of different species influence their responses to habitat change. Here, we used a diachronic survey of Mediterranean orchid communities in Corsica to examine this question. Using data from two field surveys conducted 27 years apart (1982-84 and 2009-11) at the same 45 sites in Corsica, we evaluated the impact of increase in woody plant cover (WPC) on (i) the richness and composition and (ii) the local extinction/colonization dynamics of orchids. We applied a Bayesian multispecies site-occupancy model to each of the 36 orchid species recorded at these sites to estimate the detection probability of each species, enabling us to account for under-detection in estimating their dynamics. Between 1982 and 2011, WPC changed at 82·3 % of sites (increasing at 75·6 %, decreasing at 6·7 %). Despite marked changes in composition of orchid communities at the local scale, no significant change was detected in species richness at the regional scale. Canopy closure affected the probability of new colonization of sites, but had no significant influence on the probability of local extinction. However, the abundance of shade-intolerant species declined more sharply than that of shade-requiring species. Among orchid species, the detection probability was significantly and positively correlated with population density and plant height. This study reveals contrasted dynamics of orchid communities between local and regional scales in Corsica. Although high turnover in communities was found at the local scale, regional species richness was maintained despite major land-use changes. Conserving landscape mosaics could provide locally suitable habitats for orchids of different ecologies to maintain diversity at larger spatial scales. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford

  18. Grafting orchids and ugly: theatre, disability and arts-based health research.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Kirsty

    2010-12-01

    Theatre-based health policy research is an emerging field, and this article investigates the work of one of its leaders. In 2005, prominent medical geneticist and playwright Jeff Nisker and his collaborators produced Orchids, his play concerning pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, to research theatre as a tool for engaging citizens in health policy development. Juxtaposing Orchids with a concurrent disability theatre production in Vancouver entitled Ugly, I argue that disability theatre suggests important means for building inclusiveness in this kind of research and complicates Nisker's own call for international guidelines to delimit how journalists, playwrights, filmmakers, physicians and other media authors share genetics-based narratives in public.

  19. Studies on Physical and Sensory Properties of Premium Vanilla Ice Cream Distributed in Korean Market

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mi-Jung

    2014-01-01

    The object of this study was to investigate the difference in physical and sensory properties of various premium ice creams. The physical properties of the various ice creams were compared by manufacturing brand. The water contents of the samples differed, with BR having the highest value at 60.5%, followed by NT and CS at 57.8% and 56.9%, respectively. The higher the water content, the lower Brix and milk fat contents in all samples. The density of the samples showed almost similar values in all samples (p>0.05). The viscosity of each ice cream had no effect on the water content in any of the brands. Before melting of the ice cream, the total color difference was dependent on the lightness, especially in the vanilla ice cream, owing to the reflection of light on the surface of the ice crystals. The CS product melted the fastest. In the sensory test, CS obtained a significantly higher sweetness intensity score but a lower score for color intensity, probably due to the smaller difference in total color, by which consumers might consider the color of CS as less intense. From this study, the cold chain system for ice cream distribution might be important to decide the physical properties although the concentration of milk fat is key factor in premium ice cream. PMID:26761671

  20. Development and evaluation of novel flavour microcapsules containing vanilla oil using complex coacervation approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ziming; Peng, Zheng; Li, Jihua; Li, Sidong; Kong, Lingxue; Li, Puwang; Wang, Qinghuang

    2014-02-15

    A novel flavour microcapsule containing vanilla oil (VO) was developed using complex coacervation approach, aimed to control release of VO and enhance its thermostability for spice application in food industry. Viscosity of chitosan (CS) and VO/CS ratio were optimised for fabrication of microcapsules. The flavour microcapsules were evaluated by scanning electron micrograph (SEM), laser confocal microscopy (LSCM), particle size analyser, infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), thermal analysis and controlled-release analysis. The microcapsules were in spherical with good dispersibility when moderate viscosity CS was used. 94.2% of encapsulation efficiency was achieved in VO/CS ratio of 2:1. The FT-IR study proved chemical cross-linking reaction occurred between genipin and chitosan, but a physical interaction between CS and VO. A core-shell structure of microcapsule was confirmed by LSCM, which was beneficial to improve the thermostability of VO in microcapsule. Moreover, VO could be remained about 60% in the microcapsules after release for 30 days, which demonstrated the flavour microcapsules had good potential to serve as a high quality food spice with long residual action and high thermostability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Studies on Physical and Sensory Properties of Premium Vanilla Ice Cream Distributed in Korean Market.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi-Jung; Shin, Kwang-Soon

    2014-01-01

    The object of this study was to investigate the difference in physical and sensory properties of various premium ice creams. The physical properties of the various ice creams were compared by manufacturing brand. The water contents of the samples differed, with BR having the highest value at 60.5%, followed by NT and CS at 57.8% and 56.9%, respectively. The higher the water content, the lower Brix and milk fat contents in all samples. The density of the samples showed almost similar values in all samples (p>0.05). The viscosity of each ice cream had no effect on the water content in any of the brands. Before melting of the ice cream, the total color difference was dependent on the lightness, especially in the vanilla ice cream, owing to the reflection of light on the surface of the ice crystals. The CS product melted the fastest. In the sensory test, CS obtained a significantly higher sweetness intensity score but a lower score for color intensity, probably due to the smaller difference in total color, by which consumers might consider the color of CS as less intense. From this study, the cold chain system for ice cream distribution might be important to decide the physical properties although the concentration of milk fat is key factor in premium ice cream.

  2. Rapid discrimination and characterization of vanilla bean extracts by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy and selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Michael D; Kocaoglu-Vurma, Nurdan A; Langford, Vaughan; Rodriguez-Saona, Luis E; Harper, W James

    2012-03-01

    Vanilla beans have been shown to contain over 200 compounds, which can vary in concentration depending on the region where the beans are harvested. Several compounds including vanillin, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, guaiacol, and anise alcohol have been found to be important for the aroma profile of vanilla. Our objective was to evaluate the performance of selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for rapid discrimination and characterization of vanilla bean extracts. Vanilla extracts were obtained from different countries including Uganda, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Madagascar, and India. Multivariate data analysis (soft independent modeling of class analogy, SIMCA) was utilized to determine the clustering patterns between samples. Both methods provided differentiation between samples for all vanilla bean extracts. FTIR differentiated on the basis of functional groups, whereas the SIFT-MS method provided more specific information about the chemical basis of the differentiation. SIMCA's discriminating power showed that the most important compounds responsible for the differentiation between samples by SIFT-MS were vanillin, anise alcohol, 4-methylguaiacol, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde/trimethylpyrazine, p-cresol/anisole, guaiacol, isovaleric acid, and acetic acid. ATR-IR spectroscopy analysis showed that the classification of samples was related to major bands at 1523, 1573, 1516, 1292, 1774, 1670, 1608, and 1431 cm(-1) , associated with vanillin and vanillin derivatives. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  3. C and N stable isotope signatures reveal constraints to nutritional modes in orchids from the Mediterranean and Macaronesia.

    PubMed

    Liebel, Heiko T; Bidartondo, Martin I; Preiss, Katja; Segreto, Rossana; Stöckel, Marcus; Rodda, Michele; Gebauer, Gerhard

    2010-06-01

    We compared the nutritional modes and habitats of orchids (e.g., autotrophic, partially or fully mycoheterotrophic) of the Mediterranean region and adjacent islands of Macaronesia. We hypothesized that ecological factors (e.g., relative light availability, surrounding vegetation) determine the nutritional modes of orchids and thus impose restrictions upon orchid distribution. Covering habitats from dark forests to open sites, orchid samples of 35 species from 14 genera were collected from 20 locations in the Mediterranean and Macaronesia to test for mycoheterotrophy. Mycorrhizal fungi were identified via molecular analyses, and stable isotope analyses were applied to test whether organic nutrients are gained from the fungal associates. Our results show that orchids with partial or full mycoheterotrophy among the investigated species are found exclusively in Neottieae thriving in light-limited forests. Neottioid orchids are missing in Macaronesia, possibly because mycoheterotrophy is constrained by the lack of suitable ectomycorrhizal fungi. Furthermore, most adult orchids of open habitats in the Mediterranean and Macaronesia show weak or no N gains from fungi and no C gain through mycoheterotrophy. Instead isotope signatures of some of these species indicate net plant-to-fungus C transfer.

  4. Atractiellomycetes belonging to the ‘rust’ lineage (Pucciniomycotina) form mycorrhizae with terrestrial and epiphytic neotropical orchids

    PubMed Central

    Kottke, Ingrid; Suárez, Juan Pablo; Herrera, Paulo; Cruz, Dario; Bauer, Robert; Haug, Ingeborg; Garnica, Sigisfredo

    2010-01-01

    Distinctive groups of fungi are involved in the diverse mycorrhizal associations of land plants. All previously known mycorrhiza-forming Basidiomycota associated with trees, ericads, liverworts or orchids are hosted in Agaricomycetes, Agaricomycotina. Here we demonstrate for the first time that Atractiellomycetes, members of the ‘rust’ lineage (Pucciniomycotina), are mycobionts of orchids. The mycobionts of 103 terrestrial and epiphytic orchid individuals, sampled in the tropical mountain rainforest of Southern Ecuador, were identified by sequencing the whole ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and part of 28S rDNA. Mycorrhizae of 13 orchid individuals were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Simple septal pores and symplechosomes in the hyphal coils of mycorrhizae from four orchid individuals indicated members of Atractiellomycetes. Molecular phylogeny of sequences from mycobionts of 32 orchid individuals out of 103 samples confirmed Atractiellomycetes and the placement in Pucciniomycotina, previously known to comprise only parasitic and saprophytic fungi. Thus, our finding reveals these fungi, frequently associated to neotropical orchids, as the most basal living basidiomycetes involved in mycorrhizal associations of land plants. PMID:20007181

  5. Evidence for progenitor–derivative speciation in sexually deceptive orchids

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, Philipp M.; Ruas, Paulo M.; Kohl, Gudrun; Ruas, Claudete F.; Stuessy, Tod F.; Paulus, Hannes F.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Sexually deceptive orchids of the genus Ophrys use mimicry of pollinator females to attract specific pollinators. Pollinator shifts may drive speciation in Ophrys, since novel pollinators may in principle act as isolating factors immediately. It is thus possible that evolution of novel species occurs rapidly and with a progenitor–derivative pattern. The aims of this study are to compare genetic structure and diversity among widespread and geographically restricted Ophrys taxa, to test whether genetic structure is associated with specific pollinators, and to investigate whether any widespread species may have acted as a progenitor for the evolution of more restricted taxa. Methods Genetic differentiation and diversity were investigated in O. leucadica and O. cinereophila, the two taxa of the Ophrys fusca sensu lato complex widespread in the Aegean, and three geographically restricted taxa from Rhodes, O. attaviria, O. parvula and O. persephonae, all differing in their specific pollinators. This was done using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) DNA fingerprinting, and sequencing of the low-copy nuclear gene LEAFY (LFY). Key Results All taxa were found to be separate genetic entities, with O. leucadica forming two geographic groups from the west and east of the Aegean. Genetic structure was significantly shaped by pollinators and geography, and comparison of sequence and AFLP data revealed ancestral polymorphisms shared among several taxa. Among the sampled taxa, O. leucadica harbours the greatest genetic differentiation and geographic structure, and the highest genetic diversity. Part of the genome of O. parvula, endemic to Rhodes, may be derived from O. leucadica. Conclusions Pollinators probably influence the genetic structure of the investigated Ophrys species. The genetic pattern identified is consistent with O. leucadica being the oldest of the sampled taxa, making O. leucadica a candidate progenitor species from which more

  6. Karyotype diversity and genome size variation in Neotropical Maxillariinae orchids.

    PubMed

    Moraes, A P; Koehler, S; Cabral, J S; Gomes, S S L; Viccini, L F; Barros, F; Felix, L P; Guerra, M; Forni-Martins, E R

    2017-03-01

    Orchidaceae is a widely distributed plant family with very diverse vegetative and floral morphology, and such variability is also reflected in their karyotypes. However, since only a low proportion of Orchidaceae has been analysed for chromosome data, greater diversity may await to be unveiled. Here we analyse both genome size (GS) and karyotype in two subtribes recently included in the broadened Maxillariinea to detect how much chromosome and GS variation there is in these groups and to evaluate which genome rearrangements are involved in the species evolution. To do so, the GS (14 species), the karyotype - based on chromosome number, heterochromatic banding and 5S and 45S rDNA localisation (18 species) - was characterised and analysed along with published data using phylogenetic approaches. The GS presented a high phylogenetic correlation and it was related to morphological groups in Bifrenaria (larger plants - higher GS). The two largest GS found among genera were caused by different mechanisms: polyploidy in Bifrenaria tyrianthina and accumulation of repetitive DNA in Scuticaria hadwenii. The chromosome number variability was caused mainly through descending dysploidy, and x=20 was estimated as the base chromosome number. Combining GS and karyotype data with molecular phylogeny, our data provide a more complete scenario of the karyotype evolution in Maxillariinae orchids, allowing us to suggest, besides dysploidy, that inversions and transposable elements as two mechanisms involved in the karyotype evolution. Such karyotype modifications could be associated with niche changes that occurred during species evolution. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  7. Genome size diversity in orchids: consequences and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, I. J.; Kahandawala, I.; Suda, J.; Hanson, L.; Ingrouille, M. J.; Chase, M. W.; Fay, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    Background The amount of DNA comprising the genome of an organism (its genome size) varies a remarkable 40 000-fold across eukaryotes, yet most groups are characterized by much narrower ranges (e.g. 14-fold in gymnosperms, 3- to 4-fold in mammals). Angiosperms stand out as one of the most variable groups with genome sizes varying nearly 2000-fold. Nevertheless within angiosperms the majority of families are characterized by genomes which are small and vary little. Species with large genomes are mostly restricted to a few monocots families including Orchidaceae. Scope A survey of the literature revealed that genome size data for Orchidaceae are comparatively rare representing just 327 species. Nevertheless they reveal that Orchidaceae are currently the most variable angiosperm family with genome sizes ranging 168-fold (1C = 0·33–55·4 pg). Analysing the data provided insights into the distribution, evolution and possible consequences to the plant of this genome size diversity. Conclusions Superimposing the data onto the increasingly robust phylogenetic tree of Orchidaceae revealed how different subfamilies were characterized by distinct genome size profiles. Epidendroideae possessed the greatest range of genome sizes, although the majority of species had small genomes. In contrast, the largest genomes were found in subfamilies Cypripedioideae and Vanilloideae. Genome size evolution within this subfamily was analysed as this is the only one with reasonable representation of data. This approach highlighted striking differences in genome size and karyotype evolution between the closely related Cypripedium, Paphiopedilum and Phragmipedium. As to the consequences of genome size diversity, various studies revealed that this has both practical (e.g. application of genetic fingerprinting techniques) and biological consequences (e.g. affecting where and when an orchid may grow) and emphasizes the importance of obtaining further genome size data given the considerable

  8. Flower-specific KNOX phenotype in the orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii

    PubMed Central

    Box, Mathew S.; Glover, Beverley J.

    2012-01-01

    The KNOTTED1-like homeobox (KNOX) genes are best known for maintaining a pluripotent stem-cell population in the shoot apical meristem that underlies indeterminate vegetative growth, allowing plants to adapt their development to suit the prevailing environmental conditions. More recently, the function of the KNOX gene family has been expanded to include additional roles in lateral organ development such as complex leaf morphogenesis, which has come to dominate the KNOX literature. Despite several reports implicating KNOX genes in the development of carpels and floral elaborations such as petal spurs, few authors have investigated the role of KNOX genes in flower development. Evidence is presented here of a flower-specific KNOX function in the development of the elaborate flowers of the orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii, which have a three-lobed labellum petal with a prominent spur. Using degenerate PCR, four Class I KNOX genes (DfKN1–4) have been isolated, one from each of the four major Class I KNOX subclades and by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR), it is demonstrated that DfKNOX transcripts are detectable in developing floral organs such as the spur-bearing labellum and inferior ovary. Although constitutive expression of the DfKN2 transcript in tobacco produces a wide range of floral abnormalities, including serrated petal margins, extra petal tissue, and fused organs, none of the vegetative phenotypes typical of constitutive KNOX expression were produced. These data are highly suggestive of a role for KNOX expression in floral development that may be especially important in taxa with elaborate flowers. PMID:22771852

  9. Rain pollination provides reproductive assurance in a deceptive orchid.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xu-Li; Barrett, Spencer C H; Lin, Hua; Chen, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Xiang; Gao, Jiang-Yun

    2012-10-01

    Abiotic pollination by wind or water is well established in flowering plants. In some species pollination by rain splashes, a condition known as ombrophily, has been proposed as a floral strategy. However, evidence for this type of abiotic pollination has remained controversial and many reported cases have subsequently been shown to be false. This study investigates ombrophily in the deceptive orchid Acampe rigida to determine the mechanism by which this species is able to maintain high fecundity, despite flowering during the rainy season in south-west China when pollinators are scarce. The floral mechanisms promoting rain pollination in A. rigida were observed and described in detail. Controlled pollination experiments and observations of floral visitors were conducted. A field experiment using rain shelters at 14 sites in Guangxi, south-west China, evaluated the contribution of rain pollination to fruit-set. During rainfall, raindrops physically flicked away the anther cap exposing the pollinarium. Raindrops then caused pollinia to be ejected upwards with the strap-like stipe pulling them back and causing them to fall into the stigmatic cavity, resulting in self-pollination. Neither flower nor pollen function were damaged by water. Although A. rigida is self-compatible, it is incapable of autonomous self-pollination without the assistance of rain splashes. The results of the rain-sheltering experiment indicated that rain pollination contributed substantially to increasing fruit-set, although there was variation among sites in the intensity of this effect. A. rigida flowers during the rainy season, when pollinators are scarce, and ombrophily functions to provide reproductive assurance without compromising opportunities for outcrossing.

  10. Rain pollination provides reproductive assurance in a deceptive orchid

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xu-Li; Barrett, Spencer C. H.; Lin, Hua; Chen, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Xiang; Gao, Jiang-Yun

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Abiotic pollination by wind or water is well established in flowering plants. In some species pollination by rain splashes, a condition known as ombrophily, has been proposed as a floral strategy. However, evidence for this type of abiotic pollination has remained controversial and many reported cases have subsequently been shown to be false. This study investigates ombrophily in the deceptive orchid Acampe rigida to determine the mechanism by which this species is able to maintain high fecundity, despite flowering during the rainy season in south-west China when pollinators are scarce. Methods The floral mechanisms promoting rain pollination in A. rigida were observed and described in detail. Controlled pollination experiments and observations of floral visitors were conducted. A field experiment using rain shelters at 14 sites in Guangxi, south-west China, evaluated the contribution of rain pollination to fruit-set. Key Results During rainfall, raindrops physically flicked away the anther cap exposing the pollinarium. Raindrops then caused pollinia to be ejected upwards with the strap-like stipe pulling them back and causing them to fall into the stigmatic cavity, resulting in self-pollination. Neither flower nor pollen function were damaged by water. Although A. rigida is self-compatible, it is incapable of autonomous self-pollination without the assistance of rain splashes. The results of the rain-sheltering experiment indicated that rain pollination contributed substantially to increasing fruit-set, although there was variation among sites in the intensity of this effect. Conclusions A. rigida flowers during the rainy season, when pollinators are scarce, and ombrophily functions to provide reproductive assurance without compromising opportunities for outcrossing. PMID:22851311

  11. Convergent evolution of floral signals underlies the success of Neotropical orchids

    PubMed Central

    Papadopulos, Alexander S. T.; Powell, Martyn P.; Pupulin, Franco; Warner, Jorge; Hawkins, Julie A.; Salamin, Nicolas; Chittka, Lars; Williams, Norris H.; Whitten, W. Mark; Loader, Deniz; Valente, Luis M.; Chase, Mark W.; Savolainen, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    The great majority of plant species in the tropics require animals to achieve pollination, but the exact role of floral signals in attraction of animal pollinators is often debated. Many plants provide a floral reward to attract a guild of pollinators, and it has been proposed that floral signals of non-rewarding species may converge on those of rewarding species to exploit the relationship of the latter with their pollinators. In the orchid family (Orchidaceae), pollination is almost universally animal-mediated, but a third of species provide no floral reward, which suggests that deceptive pollination mechanisms are prevalent. Here, we examine floral colour and shape convergence in Neotropical plant communities, focusing on certain food-deceptive Oncidiinae orchids (e.g. Trichocentrum ascendens and Oncidium nebulosum) and rewarding species of Malpighiaceae. We show that the species from these two distantly related families are often more similar in floral colour and shape than expected by chance and propose that a system of multifarious floral mimicry—a form of Batesian mimicry that involves multiple models and is more complex than a simple one model–one mimic system—operates in these orchids. The same mimetic pollination system has evolved at least 14 times within the species-rich Oncidiinae throughout the Neotropics. These results help explain the extraordinary diversification of Neotropical orchids and highlight the complexity of plant–animal interactions. PMID:23804617

  12. The Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genomes of the Facultatively Eusocial Orchid Bee Euglossa dilemma.

    PubMed

    Brand, Philipp; Saleh, Nicholas; Pan, Hailin; Li, Cai; Kapheim, Karen M; Ramírez, Santiago R

    2017-09-07

    Bees provide indispensable pollination services to both agricultural crops and wild plant populations, and several species of bees have become important models for the study of learning and memory, plant-insect interactions, and social behavior. Orchid bees (Apidae: Euglossini) are especially important to the fields of pollination ecology, evolution, and species conservation. Here we report the nuclear and mitochondrial genome sequences of the orchid bee Euglossa dilemma Bembé & Eltz. E. dilemma was selected because it is widely distributed, highly abundant, and it was recently naturalized in the southeastern United States. We provide a high-quality assembly of the 3.3 Gb genome, and an official gene set of 15,904 gene annotations. We find high conservation of gene synteny with the honey bee throughout 80 MY of divergence time. This genomic resource represents the first draft genome of the orchid bee genus Euglossa , and the first draft orchid bee mitochondrial genome, thus representing a valuable resource to the research community. Copyright © 2017 Brand et al.

  13. The Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genomes of the Facultatively Eusocial Orchid Bee Euglossa dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Philipp; Saleh, Nicholas; Pan, Hailin; Li, Cai; Kapheim, Karen M.; Ramírez, Santiago R.

    2017-01-01

    Bees provide indispensable pollination services to both agricultural crops and wild plant populations, and several species of bees have become important models for the study of learning and memory, plant–insect interactions, and social behavior. Orchid bees (Apidae: Euglossini) are especially important to the fields of pollination ecology, evolution, and species conservation. Here we report the nuclear and mitochondrial genome sequences of the orchid bee Euglossa dilemma Bembé & Eltz. E. dilemma was selected because it is widely distributed, highly abundant, and it was recently naturalized in the southeastern United States. We provide a high-quality assembly of the 3.3 Gb genome, and an official gene set of 15,904 gene annotations. We find high conservation of gene synteny with the honey bee throughout 80 MY of divergence time. This genomic resource represents the first draft genome of the orchid bee genus Euglossa, and the first draft orchid bee mitochondrial genome, thus representing a valuable resource to the research community. PMID:28701376

  14. DOFT and DOFTIP1 affect reproductive development in the orchid Dendrobium Chao Praya Smile.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanwen; Liu, Lu; Song, Shiyong; Li, Yan; Shen, Lisha; Yu, Hao

    2017-12-16

    FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) in Arabidopsis encodes the florigen that moves from leaves to the shoot apical meristem to induce flowering, and this is partly mediated by FT-INTERACTING PROTEIN 1 (FTIP1). Although FT orthologs have been identified in some flowering plants, their endogenous roles in Orchidaceae, which is one of the largest families of flowering plants, are still largely unknown. In this study, we show that DOFT and DOFTIP1, the orchid orthologs of FT and FTIP1, respectively, play important roles in promoting flowering in the orchid Dendrobium Chao Praya Smile. Expression of DOFT and DOFTIP1 increases in whole plantlets during the transition from vegetative to reproductive development. Both transcripts are present in significant levels in reproductive organs, including inflorescence apices, stems, floral buds, and open flowers. Through successful generation of transgenic orchids, we have revealed that overexpression or down-regulation of DOFT accelerates or delays flowering, respectively, while alteration of DOFT expression also greatly affects pseudobulb formation and flower development. In common with their counterparts in Arabidopsis and rice, DOFTIP1 interacts with DOFT and affects flowering time in orchids. Our results suggest that while DOFT and DOFTIP1 play evolutionarily conserved roles in promoting flowering, DOFT may have evolved with hitherto unknown functions pertaining to the regulation of storage organs and flower development in the Orchidaceae family. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. Age-dependent mycorrhizal specificity in an invasive orchid, Oeceoclades maculata.

    PubMed

    Bayman, Paul; Mosquera-Espinosa, Ana T; Saladini-Aponte, Carla M; Hurtado-Guevara, Nilbeth C; Viera-Ruiz, Naida L

    2016-11-01

    Oeceoclades maculata is a naturalized, invasive, terrestrial orchid in Puerto Rico and elsewhere in the neotropics. We asked whether its success might be partly explained by its mycorrhizal associations, hypothesizing a relationship with many fungal partners or with one widely distributed partner. Oeceoclades maculata roots were collected throughout Puerto Rico, and the degree of mycorrhizal colonization was measured. For identification of fungi, the ITS region was sequenced from pure cultures and directly from roots. Representative fungi were used for symbiotic seed germination experiments. Colonization of O. maculata roots was very variable. The most common fungus identified by BLAST searches was Psathyrella cf. candolleana, but typical orchid mycorrhizal fungi (Ceratobasidium and Tulasnella) were also found, as were a range of saprotrophs. Seeds germinated in vitro only in the presence of Psathyrella. These results are surprising in two respects. First, O. maculata appears to be highly specific for fungi during seed germination, but unusually promiscuous as adult plants. Second, mycorrhizal associations with Psathyrella and with other saprotrophic fungi have been previously reported, but only from mycoheterotrophic (i.e., nonphotosynthetic) orchids, not from green orchids like Oeceoclades. This combination may partly explain the success of Oeceoclades. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  16. ORCHID - a computer simulation of the reliability of an NDE inspection system

    SciT

    Moles, M.D.C.

    1987-03-01

    CANDU pressurized heavy water reactors contain several hundred horizontally-mounted zirconium alloy pressure tubes. Following a pressure tube failure, a pressure tube inspection system called CIGARette was rapidly designed, manufactured and put in operation. Defects called hydride blisters were found to be the cause of the failure, and were detected using a combination of eddy current and ultrasonic scans. A number of improvements were made to CIGARette during the inspection period. The ORCHID computer program models the operation of the delivery system, eddy current and ultrasonic systems by imitating the on-reactor decision-making procedure. ORCHID predicts that during the early stage ofmore » development, less than one blistered tube in three would be detected, while less than one in two would be detected in the middle development stage. However, ORCHID predicts that during the late development stage, probability of detection will be over 90%, primarily due to the inclusion of axial ultrasonic scans (a procedural modification). Rotational and axial slip could severely reduce probability of detection. Comparison of CIGARette's inspection data with ORCHID's predictions indicate that the latter are compatible with the actual inspection results, through the numbers are small and data uncertain. It should be emphasized that the CIGARette system has been essentially replaced with the much more reliable CIGAR system.« less

  17. A preliminary population study of alcove bog orchid (Platanthera zothecina) at Navajo National Monument, Arizona

    Laura E. Hudson

    2001-01-01

    This study on Platanthera zothecina (alcove bog orchid) was initiated by the National Park Service after a recent threatened and endangered species survey at Navajo National Monument. It is listed as Category 2 (species of special concern) by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Category 3 (likely to become endangered) by the Navajo Nation. Because P. zothecina is a...

  18. Restoring the rare Kentucky lady's slipper orchid to the Kisatchie National Forest

    James P. Barnett; Kevin Allen; David Moore

    2012-01-01

    The Kentucky lady’s slipper (Cypripedium kentuckiense C.F. Reed [Orchidaceae]) is a spectacular orchid native to the southeastern US. Although its range includes much of the Southeast, it is rare due to loss of appropriate edaphic and climatic habitats. Efforts to restore this species to the Kisatchie National Forest in Louisiana were initiated by a high school student...

  19. Pollination ecology of the rare orchid, Spiranthes diluvialis: Implications for conservation

    Kim Pierson; Vincent J. Tepedino; Sedonia Sipes; Kim Kuta

    2001-01-01

    We examined the pollination ecology of Spiranthes diluvialis Sheviak, Ute ladies-tresses, a federally listed, threatened orchid species known only from small, isolated populations in the western United States. The pollinator composition, male and female reproductive success, and demography of S. diluvialis populations were examined in 1995,1997, and 1999. Spiranthes...

  20. Genetic structure of Pseudococcus microcirculus (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) populations on epiphytic orchids in south Florida.

    PubMed

    Zettler, J A; Adams, K; Frederick, B; Gutting, A; Ingebretsen, N; Ragsdale, A; Schrey, A

    2017-03-01

    In 2012, the orchid mealy bug Pseudococcus microcirculus was first detected in situ in North America's more diverse orchid region, the Big Cypress Basin (Collier Co FL). A follow-up survey showed that the mealy bug is more widespread and found on epiphytic orchids in two locations, in both the Fakahatchee Strand State Preserve (sites B and F) and the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge (sites M and C). There, we collected mealy bugs (n = 54) from 35 orchid individuals and screened allelic variation at seven microsatellite loci. We estimated genetic diversity and differentiation among all sites and compared the variation among individuals collected on the same plant. Genetic differentiation between sites M and C (F ST = 0.03, P < 0.01) and,Mand B (F ST = 0.04, P < 0.01) was detected.We also detected significantly lower mean pairwise relatedness among individuals from site B compared to all the other locations, and this population had the lowest inbreeding coefficient. Genetic diversity and mean pairwise relatedness were highly variable among plants with multiple individuals; however, plants from sites F and M tend to have collections of individuals with higher mean pairwise relatedness compared to sites B and C. Our results indicate that there is genetic diversity and differentiation among mealy bugs in these locations, and that collections of individuals on the same plant are genetically diverse. As such, the mealy bugs throughout these areas are likely to be genetically diverse and exist in multiple distinct populations.

  1. Integrative taxonomy of the fly orchid group: insights from chemical ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joffard, Nina; Buatois, Bruno; Schatz, Bertrand

    2016-10-01

    Several authors have recently stressed the need to develop an integrative approach in taxonomy, but studies applying such an approach to Mediterranean orchids are scarce. In sexually deceptive orchids from the taxonomically difficult genus Ophrys, pollination is specific and performed by male insects attracted to the flowers by sex pheromone-mimicking floral scents. Floral compounds are therefore of primary importance for reproductive isolation and species delimitations in this genus. In the fly orchid group, molecular, morphological, and ecological characters have been extensively studied, but a comprehensive survey of floral scents is still lacking. In the present study, the blends of floral compounds of its three members, Ophrys insectifera, Ophrys aymoninii, and Ophrys subinsectifera, were extracted and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 107 compounds were found, with a majority of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons. Significant differentiation, both qualitative and quantitative, was found among the three taxa. This result, pooled with those from the literature, forms a comprehensive and congruent dataset that allows us to elucidate the taxonomic rank of the three members of the fly orchid group.

  2. Convergent evolution of floral signals underlies the success of Neotropical orchids.

    PubMed

    Papadopulos, Alexander S T; Powell, Martyn P; Pupulin, Franco; Warner, Jorge; Hawkins, Julie A; Salamin, Nicolas; Chittka, Lars; Williams, Norris H; Whitten, W Mark; Loader, Deniz; Valente, Luis M; Chase, Mark W; Savolainen, Vincent

    2013-08-22

    The great majority of plant species in the tropics require animals to achieve pollination, but the exact role of floral signals in attraction of animal pollinators is often debated. Many plants provide a floral reward to attract a guild of pollinators, and it has been proposed that floral signals of non-rewarding species may converge on those of rewarding species to exploit the relationship of the latter with their pollinators. In the orchid family (Orchidaceae), pollination is almost universally animal-mediated, but a third of species provide no floral reward, which suggests that deceptive pollination mechanisms are prevalent. Here, we examine floral colour and shape convergence in Neotropical plant communities, focusing on certain food-deceptive Oncidiinae orchids (e.g. Trichocentrum ascendens and Oncidium nebulosum) and rewarding species of Malpighiaceae. We show that the species from these two distantly related families are often more similar in floral colour and shape than expected by chance and propose that a system of multifarious floral mimicry--a form of Batesian mimicry that involves multiple models and is more complex than a simple one model-one mimic system--operates in these orchids. The same mimetic pollination system has evolved at least 14 times within the species-rich Oncidiinae throughout the Neotropics. These results help explain the extraordinary diversification of Neotropical orchids and highlight the complexity of plant-animal interactions.

  3. Physiological plasticity of epiphytic orchids from two contrasting tropical dry forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Rosa-Manzano, Edilia; Andrade, José Luis; Zotz, Gerhard; Reyes-García, Casandra

    2017-11-01

    An enormous variation in light, both temporally and spatially, exists in tropical forests, which represents a potential driver for plant physiological plasticity. The physiological plasticity of epiphytic orchids from two tropical dry forests in response to different light environments was experimentally investigated. Plants of five species were growing in a shade-house under three different light regimes (photosynthetic photon flux density; PPFD of 20, 50 and 70% of total daily incident radiation) under watered and drought conditions. Orchids with similar leaf morphology but from different forests responded differently to the same light environment. Linear leaves of Encyclia nematocaulon avoided drought stress through stomata control and had a notable increase of photosynthesis, lower osmotic potential, and high photosynthetic efficiency under 50% daily PPFD during both drought and watered periods. In contrast, orchids with cylindrical and oval leaves had a marked decrease of these physiological parameters under 50 and 70% of PPFD during the drought period, but then recovered after rewatering. Oval leaves of Lophiaris oerstedii were more sensitive to high light and water availability because they had a strong decrease of their physiological parameters at 70% of PPFD, even during the rewatering period. Contrary to our predictions, E. nematocaulon had low plasticity and Laelia rubescens, from the deciduous forest, was the most able to acclimate. In general, orchids from the drier forest had higher plasticity than those from the more humid forest, which might help them to tolerate the higher fluctuations of light and water availability that occur there.

  4. Pollinator Behaviour on a Food-Deceptive Orchid Calypso bulbosa and Coflowering Species

    PubMed Central

    Tuomi, Juha; Lämsä, Juho; Wannas, Lauri; Abeli, Thomas; Jäkäläniemi, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Food deception as a pollination strategy has inspired many studies over the last few decades. Pollinator deception has evolved in many orchids possibly to enhance outcrossing. Food-deceptive orchids usually have low pollinator visitation rates as compared to rewarding species. They may benefit in visitations from the presence (magnet-species hypothesis) or, alternatively, absence of coflowering rewarding species (competition hypothesis). We present data on pollinator visitations on a deceptive, terrestrial orchid Calypso bulbosa, a species with a single flower per plant and whose flowering period partly overlaps with rewarding, early flowering willows (Salix sp.) and later-flowering bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus). When surveying inactive bumblebee queens on willows in cool weather, about 7% of them carried Calypso pollinia. Most common bumblebee species appeared to visit and thus pollinate Calypso. Bumblebees typically visited one to three Calypso flowers before flying away, providing some support for the outcrossing hypothesis. We conclude that, regarding the pollinations strategy, both magnet-species and competition hypotheses have a role in the pollination of Calypso, but on different spatial scales. On a large scale rewarding species are important for attracting pollinators to a given region, but on a small scale absence of competition ensures sufficient pollination rate for the deceptive orchid. PMID:25861675

  5. Conservation Genetics of an Endangered Lady’s Slipper Orchid: Cypripedium japonicum in China

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xin; Li, Quan-Jian; Liu, Fen; Gong, Mao-Jiang; Wang, Cai-Xia; Tian, Min

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge about the population genetic variation of the endangered orchid, Cypripedium japonicum, is conducive to the development of conservation strategies. Here, we examined the levels and partitioning of inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) diversity (109 loci) in five populations of this orchid to gain insight into its genetic variation and population structure in Eastern and Central China. It harbored considerably lower levels of genetic diversity both at the population (percentage of polymorphic loci (PPL) = 11.19%, Nei’s gene diversity (H) = 0.0416 and Shannon’s information index (I) = 0.0613) and species level (PPL = 38.53%, H = 0.1273 and I = 0.1928) and a significantly higher degree of differentiation among populations (the proportion of the total variance among populations (Φpt) = 0.698) than those typical of ISSR-based studies in other orchid species. Furthermore, the Nei’s genetic distances between populations were independent of the corresponding geographical distances. Two main clusters are shown in an arithmetic average (UPGMA) dendrogram, which is in agreement with the results of principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) analysis and the STRUCTURE program. In addition, individuals within a population were more similar to each other than to those in other populations. Based on the genetic data and our field survey, the development of conservation management for this threatened orchid should include habitat protection, artificial gene flow and ex situ measures. PMID:24983476

  6. The Genome of Dendrobium officinale Illuminates the Biology of the Important Traditional Chinese Orchid Herb.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Hui; Tian, Yang; Lian, Jinmin; Yang, Ruijuan; Hao, Shumei; Wang, Xuanjun; Yang, Shengchao; Li, Qiye; Qi, Shuai; Kui, Ling; Okpekum, Moses; Ma, Xiao; Zhang, Jiajin; Ding, Zhaoli; Zhang, Guojie; Wang, Wen; Dong, Yang; Sheng, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Dendrobium officinale Kimura et Migo is a traditional Chinese orchid herb that has both ornamental value and a broad range of therapeutic effects. Here, we report the first de novo assembled 1.35 Gb genome sequences for D. officinale by combining the second-generation Illumina Hiseq 2000 and third-generation PacBio sequencing technologies. We found that orchids have a complete inflorescence gene set and have some specific inflorescence genes. We observed gene expansion in gene families related to fungus symbiosis and drought resistance. We analyzed biosynthesis pathways of medicinal components of D. officinale and found extensive duplication of SPS and SuSy genes, which are related to polysaccharide generation, and that the pathway of D. officinale alkaloid synthesis could be extended to generate 16-epivellosimine. The D. officinale genome assembly demonstrates a new approach to deciphering large complex genomes and, as an important orchid species and a traditional Chinese medicine, the D. officinale genome will facilitate future research on the evolution of orchid plants, as well as the study of medicinal components and potential genetic breeding of the dendrobe. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Germination failure is not a critical stage of reproductive isolation between three congeneric orchid species.

    PubMed

    De Hert, Koen; Honnay, Olivier; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2012-11-01

    In food-deceptive orchid species, postmating reproductive barriers (fruit set and embryo mortality) have been shown to be more important for reproductive isolation than premating barriers (pollinator isolation). However, currently there is very little knowledge about whether germination failure acts as a reproductive barrier in hybridizing orchid species. In this study, we investigated germination and protocorm development of pure and hybrid seeds of three species of the orchid genus Dactylorhiza. To test the hypothesis that germination failure contributed to total reproductive isolation, reproductive barriers based on germination were combined with already available data on early acting barriers (fruit set and embryo mortality) to calculate the relative and absolute contributions of these barriers to reproductive isolation. Protocorms were formed in all crosses, indicating that both hybrid and pure seeds were able to germinate and grow into protocorms. Also, the number of protocorms per seed packet was not significantly different between hybrid and pure seeds. High fruit set, high seed viability, and substantial seed germination resulted in very low reproductive isolation (average RI = 0.05). In two of six interspecific crosses, hybrids performed even better than the intraspecific crosses. Very weak postmating reproductive barriers were observed between our study species and may explain the frequent occurrence of first-generation hybrids in mixed Dactylorhiza populations. Germination failure, which is regarded as one of the most important bottlenecks in the orchid life cycle, was not important for reproductive isolation.

  8. First record of the orchid bee genus Eufriesea Cockerell (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Euglossini) in the United States

    A new species of orchid bee, Eufriesea aenigma Griswold and Herndon, is described from the Guadalupe Mountains of western Texas and southeastern New Mexico, USA. This is the first record for Eufriesea from the USA and extends its apparent range well beyond its previous, entirely tropical boundaries...

  9. Adding Spice to Vanilla LCDM simulations: From Alternative Cosmologies to Lighting up Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahan Elahi, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    Cold Dark Matter simulations have formed the backbone of our theoretical understanding of cosmological structure formation. Predictions from the Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) cosmology, in which the Universe contains two major dark components, namely Dark Matter and Dark Energy, are in excellent agreement with the Large-Scale Structures observed, i.e., the distribution of galaxies across cosmic time. However, this paradigm is in tension with observations at small-scales, from the number and properties of satellite galaxies around galaxies such as the Milky Way and Andromeda, to the lensing statistics of massive galaxy clusters. I will present several alternative models of cosmology (from Warm Dark Matter to coupled Dark Matter-Dark Energy models) and how they compare to vanilla LCDM by studying formation of groups and clusters dark matter only and adiabatic hydrodynamical zoom simulations. I will show how modifications to the dark sector can lead to some surprising results. For example, Warm Dark Matter, so often examined on small satellite galaxies scales, can be probed observationally using weak lensing at cluster scales. Coupled dark sectors, where dark matter decays into dark energy and experiences an effective gravitational potential that differs from that experienced by normal matter, is effectively hidden away from direct observations of galaxies. Studies like these are vital if we are to pinpoint observations which can look for unique signatures of the physics that governs the hidden Universe. Of course, all of these predictions are unfortunately affected by uncertain galaxy formation physics. I will end by presenting results from a comparison study of numerous hydrodynamical codes, the nIFTY cluster comparison project, and how even how purely adiabatic simulations run with different codes give in quite different galaxy populations. The galaxies that form in these simulations, which all attempt to reproduce the observed galaxy population via not

  10. Niche analysis and conservation of the orchids of east Macedonia (NE Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiftsis, Spyros; Tsiripidis, Ioannis; Karagiannakidou, Vassiliki; Alifragis, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    The orchid family is one of the largest in the flowering plant kingdom and includes a lot of rare, threatened or endangered species. The determination of plant species niche is considered fundamental for their conservation. Two parameters closely related with species niche are niche marginality and breadth. The first parameter is a measure of how typical or atypical a species niche is within an area, while the second is a measure of species tolerance. This study deals with niche analysis of the orchids of east Macedonia (NE Greece). Factors that are known to determine species distribution on a regional scale, such as altitude, aspect, habitat type, bedrock type and soil properties (acidity, organic matter, and phosphorus content) were used as explanatory variables. Geographical coordinates were also employed in order to explore spatial patterns in orchid distribution. Niche analysis was carried out using the Outlying Mean Index (OMI) analysis. Out of the total data of 55 taxa that were analyzed, 41 had a significant marginal niche compared with the average niche of the study area. Altitude, soil acidity and certain habitat types were found to be the most important factors in determining orchid distribution. Five different species groups were distinguished on the basis of their ecological preferences and niche breadth. Species niche marginality and breadth, the amplitude of their geographical distribution, the size of their populations and the rareness and conservation status of their habitats were taken into account in order to set conservation priorities for the orchids in the study area. The above characteristics combined with intuitive criteria (e.g. geographical distribution, endemicity) for the species with a small number of occurrences could form a sound basis for setting conservation priorities.

  11. Concomitant loss of NDH complex-related genes within chloroplast and nuclear genomes in some orchids.

    PubMed

    Lin, Choun-Sea; Chen, Jeremy J W; Chiu, Chi-Chou; Hsiao, Han C W; Yang, Chen-Jui; Jin, Xiao-Hua; Leebens-Mack, James; de Pamphilis, Claude W; Huang, Yao-Ting; Yang, Ling-Hung; Chang, Wan-Jung; Kui, Ling; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Hu, Jer-Ming; Wang, Wen; Shih, Ming-Che

    2017-06-01

    The chloroplast NAD(P)H dehydrogenase-like (NDH) complex consists of about 30 subunits from both the nuclear and chloroplast genomes and is ubiquitous across most land plants. In some orchids, such as Phalaenopsis equestris, Dendrobium officinale and Dendrobium catenatum, most of the 11 chloroplast genome-encoded ndh genes (cp-ndh) have been lost. Here we investigated whether functional cp-ndh genes have been completely lost in these orchids or whether they have been transferred and retained in the nuclear genome. Further, we assessed whether both cp-ndh genes and nucleus-encoded NDH-related genes can be lost, resulting in the absence of the NDH complex. Comparative analyses of the genome of Apostasia odorata, an orchid species with a complete complement of cp-ndh genes which represents the sister lineage to all other orchids, and three published orchid genome sequences for P. equestris, D. officinale and D. catenatum, which are all missing cp-ndh genes, indicated that copies of cp-ndh genes are not present in any of these four nuclear genomes. This observation suggests that the NDH complex is not necessary for some plants. Comparative genomic/transcriptomic analyses of currently available plastid genome sequences and nuclear transcriptome data showed that 47 out of 660 photoautotrophic plants and all the heterotrophic plants are missing plastid-encoded cp-ndh genes and exhibit no evidence for maintenance of a functional NDH complex. Our data indicate that the NDH complex can be lost in photoautotrophic plant species. Further, the loss of the NDH complex may increase the probability of transition from a photoautotrophic to a heterotrophic life history. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Comparative Chloroplast Genomes of Photosynthetic Orchids: Insights into Evolution of the Orchidaceae and Development of Molecular Markers for Phylogenetic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Zhi-Tao; Liu, Wei; Xue, Qing-Yun; Ding, Xiao-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The orchid family Orchidaceae is one of the largest angiosperm families, including many species of important economic value. While chloroplast genomes are very informative for systematics and species identification, there is very limited information available on chloroplast genomes in the Orchidaceae. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genomes of the medicinal plant Dendrobium officinale and the ornamental orchid Cypripedium macranthos, demonstrating their gene content and order and potential RNA editing sites. The chloroplast genomes of the above two species and five known photosynthetic orchids showed similarities in structure as well as gene order and content, but differences in the organization of the inverted repeat/small single-copy junction and ndh genes. The organization of the inverted repeat/small single-copy junctions in the chloroplast genomes of these orchids was classified into four types; we propose that inverted repeats flanking the small single-copy region underwent expansion or contraction among Orchidaceae. The AT-rich regions of the ycf1 gene in orchids could be linked to the recombination of inverted repeat/small single-copy junctions. Relative species in orchids displayed similar patterns of variation in ndh gene contents. Furthermore, fifteen highly divergent protein-coding genes were identified, which are useful for phylogenetic analyses in orchids. To test the efficiency of these genes serving as markers in phylogenetic analyses, coding regions of four genes (accD, ccsA, matK, and ycf1) were used as a case study to construct phylogenetic trees in the subfamily Epidendroideae. High support was obtained for placement of previously unlocated subtribes Collabiinae and Dendrobiinae in the subfamily Epidendroideae. Our findings expand understanding of the diversity of orchid chloroplast genomes and provide a reference for study of the molecular systematics of this family. PMID:24911363

  13. Orchids and Bee's Knees: Investigating the Euglossine Syndrome with Gas Chromatography/Fourier Transform Infrared GC/FT-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, Gregory L.; Williams, N. H...; Whitten, W. M.

    1985-12-01

    The GC/FT-IR analysis of a fragrance obtained from a Gongora tricolor orchid is described. The significance of this type of analysis is explained in terms of the elucidation of the complex relationship between orchids and bees known as "The Euglossine Syndrome". The fragrance sample was found to contain p-cresol, p-methylanisole and a variety of terpenoids, including myrcene, cineole, limonene, cymene, ipsdienol, and an olefinic product which appears to be the dehydration product of ipsdienol.

  14. Comparative chloroplast genomes of photosynthetic orchids: insights into evolution of the Orchidaceae and development of molecular markers for phylogenetic applications.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jing; Hou, Bei-Wei; Niu, Zhi-Tao; Liu, Wei; Xue, Qing-Yun; Ding, Xiao-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The orchid family Orchidaceae is one of the largest angiosperm families, including many species of important economic value. While chloroplast genomes are very informative for systematics and species identification, there is very limited information available on chloroplast genomes in the Orchidaceae. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genomes of the medicinal plant Dendrobium officinale and the ornamental orchid Cypripedium macranthos, demonstrating their gene content and order and potential RNA editing sites. The chloroplast genomes of the above two species and five known photosynthetic orchids showed similarities in structure as well as gene order and content, but differences in the organization of the inverted repeat/small single-copy junction and ndh genes. The organization of the inverted repeat/small single-copy junctions in the chloroplast genomes of these orchids was classified into four types; we propose that inverted repeats flanking the small single-copy region underwent expansion or contraction among Orchidaceae. The AT-rich regions of the ycf1 gene in orchids could be linked to the recombination of inverted repeat/small single-copy junctions. Relative species in orchids displayed similar patterns of variation in ndh gene contents. Furthermore, fifteen highly divergent protein-coding genes were identified, which are useful for phylogenetic analyses in orchids. To test the efficiency of these genes serving as markers in phylogenetic analyses, coding regions of four genes (accD, ccsA, matK, and ycf1) were used as a case study to construct phylogenetic trees in the subfamily Epidendroideae. High support was obtained for placement of previously unlocated subtribes Collabiinae and Dendrobiinae in the subfamily Epidendroideae. Our findings expand understanding of the diversity of orchid chloroplast genomes and provide a reference for study of the molecular systematics of this family.

  15. The importance of associations with saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi among fully mycoheterotrophic orchids is currently under-estimated: novel evidence from sub-tropical Asia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung-I; Yang, Chih-Kai; Gebauer, Gerhard

    2015-09-01

    Most fully mycoheterotrophic (MH) orchids investigated to date are mycorrhizal with fungi that simultaneously form ectomycorrhizas with forest trees. Only a few MH orchids are currently known to be mycorrhizal with saprotrophic, mostly wood-decomposing, fungi instead of ectomycorrhizal fungi. This study provides evidence that the importance of associations between MH orchids and saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi is currently under-estimated. Using microscopic techniques and molecular approaches, mycorrhizal fungi were localized and identified for seven MH orchid species from four genera and two subfamilies, Vanilloideae and Epidendroideae, growing in four humid and warm sub-tropical forests in Taiwan. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope natural abundances of MH orchids and autotrophic reference plants were used in order to elucidate the nutritional resources utilized by the orchids. Six out of the seven MH orchid species were mycorrhizal with either wood- or litter-decaying saprotrophic fungi. Only one orchid species was associated with ectomycorrhizal fungi. Stable isotope abundance patterns showed significant distinctions between orchids mycorrhizal with the three groups of fungal hosts. Mycoheterotrophic orchids utilizing saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi as a carbon and nutrient source are clearly more frequent than hitherto assumed. On the basis of this kind of nutrition, orchids can thrive in deeply shaded, light-limiting forest understoreys even without support from ectomycorrhizal fungi. Sub-tropical East Asia appears to be a hotspot for orchids mycorrhizal with saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Determination of major aromatic constituents in vanilla using an on-line supercritical fluid extraction coupled with supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yanshan; Liu, Jiaqi; Zhong, Qisheng; Shen, Lingling; Yao, Jinting; Huang, Taohong; Zhou, Ting

    2018-04-01

    An on-line supercritical fluid extraction coupled with supercritical fluid chromatography method was developed for the determination of four major aromatic constituents in vanilla. The parameters of supercritical fluid extraction were systematically investigated using single factor optimization experiments and response surface methodology by a Box-Behnken design. The modifier ratio, split ratio, and the extraction temperature and pressure were the major parameters which have significant effects on the extraction. While the static extraction time, dynamic extraction time, and recycle time had little influence on the compounds with low polarity. Under the optimized conditions, the relative extraction efficiencies of all the constituents reached 89.0-95.1%. The limits of quantification were in the range of 1.123-4.747 μg. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.3368-1.424 μg. The recoveries of the four analytes were in the range of 76.1-88.9%. The relative standard deviations of intra- and interday precision ranged from 4.2 to 7.6%. Compared with other off-line methods, the present method obtained higher extraction yields for all four aromatic constituents. Finally, this method has been applied to the analysis of vanilla from different sources. On the basis of the results, the on-line supercritical fluid extraction-supercritical fluid chromatography method shows great promise in the analysis of aromatic constituents in natural products. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Optimized production of vanillin from green vanilla pods by enzyme-assisted extraction combined with pre-freezing and thawing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Mo, Limei; Chen, Feng; Lu, Minquan; Dong, Wenjiang; Wang, Qinghuang; Xu, Fei; Gu, Fenglin

    2014-02-19

    Production of vanillin from natural green vanilla pods was carried out by enzyme-assisted extraction combined with pre-freezing and thawing. In the first step the green vanilla pods were pre-frozen and then thawed to destroy cellular compartmentation. In the second step pectinase from Aspergillus niger was used to hydrolyze the pectin between the glucovanillin substrate and β-glucosidase. Four main variables, including enzyme amount, reaction temperature, time and pH, which were of significance for the vanillin content were studied and a central composite design (CCD) based on the results of a single-factor tests was used. Response surface methodology based on CCD was employed to optimize the combination of enzyme amount, reaction temperature, time, and pH for maximum vanillin production. This resulted in the optimal condition in regards of the enzyme amount, reaction temperature, time, and pH at 84.2 mg, 49.5 °C, 7.1 h, and 4.2, respectively. Under the optimal condition, the experimental yield of vanillin was 4.63% ± 0.11% (dwb), which was in good agreement with the value predicted by the model. Compared to the traditional curing process (1.98%) and viscozyme extract (2.36%), the optimized method for the vanillin production significantly increased the yield by 133.85% and 96%, respectively.

  18. Use of just-about-right scales and penalty analysis to determine appropriate concentrations of stevia sweeteners for vanilla yogurt.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, P; Chinnasamy, B; Jin, L; Clark, S

    2014-01-01

    With the mainstream emergence of natural sweeteners such as stevia, which is available in different commercial formulations, suitability for yogurt needs to be validated. The present study aimed to determine the appropriate concentration level of 3 processed stevia sweeteners/supplements in commercial plain low-fat yogurt flavored with natural vanilla. Three different levels of sucrose, aspartame, an erythritol and 95% rebaudiana A stevia sweetener, a 95% pure mix of maltodextrin and steviol glycosides, and a cold water stevia extract were used in the study. The just-about-right level for each sweetener and consumer acceptability of each naturally flavored low-fat vanilla yogurt were evaluated. Results from penalty analysis demonstrated that only 0.7% of stevia containing maltodextrin and 95% steviol glycoside was necessary, whereas higher levels (between 4.0 to 5.5%) were more appropriate for stevia containing erythritol and 95% rebaudiana A or cold water extract of stevia, respectively. The concentrations of stevia sweeteners used influenced the perceived sweetness and sourness. In general, consumers disliked the yogurt sweetened with stevia or aspartame, and neither disliked nor liked the yogurt sweetened with sucrose, which was largely driven by perceived sourness of the base yogurt. The findings underline the importance of careful selection of stevia type and concentration as well as optimizing yogurt cultures and fermentation conditions before product launch. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Tropical Epiphytic Orchids as an Object of Space Botany Investigations and a Design Element for Spacecraft Flight Decks and Orbital Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherevchenko, T. M.; Zaimenko, N. V.

    Epiphytic orchids are shown to be more stable in a long stay on board an orbital station than terrestrial species. Simulations revealed that the activity of native growth stimulators (free auxins and gibberellines) under the prolonged clinostating conditions varied in epiphytic orchids to a lesser extent than in terrestrial orchids. This factor, together with a weaker geotropic reaction, seems to be a cause of their stability in microgravitation conditions. The authors found also that orchids with the monopodial type of shoot system branching are less stable at microgravity than the sympodial species.

  20. Adding Spice to Vanilla LCDM simulations: Alternative Cosmologies & Lighting up Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahan Elahi, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    Cold Dark Matter simulations have formed the backbone of our theoretical understanding of cosmological structure formation. Predictions from the Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) cosmology, where the Universe contains two dark components, namely Dark Matter & Dark Energy, are in excellent agreement with the Large-Scale Structures observed, i.e., the distribution of galaxies across cosmic time. However, this paradigm is in tension with observations at small-scales, from the number and properties of satellite galaxies around galaxies such as the Milky Way and Andromeda, to the lensing statistics of massive galaxy clusters. I will present several alternative models of cosmology (from Warm Dark Matter to coupled Dark Matter-Dark Energy models) and how they compare to vanilla LCDM by studying formation of groups and clusters dark matter only and adiabatic hydrodynamical zoom simulations. I will show how modifications to the dark sector can lead to some surprising results. For example, Warm Dark Matter, so often examined on small satellite galaxies scales, can be probed observationally using weak lensing at cluster scales. Coupled dark sectors, where dark matter decays into dark energy and experiences an effective gravitational potential that differs from that experienced by normal matter, is effectively hidden away from direct observations of galaxies. Studies like these are vital if we are to pinpoint observations which can look for unique signatures of the physics that governs the hidden Universe. Finally, I will discuss how all of these predictions are affected by uncertain galaxy formation physics. I will present results from a major comparison study of numerous hydrodynamical codes, the nIFTY cluster comparison project. This comparison aims to understand the code-to-code scatter in the properties of dark matter haloes and the galaxies that reside in them. We find that even in purely adiabatic simulations, different codes form clusters with very different X

  1. Effect of fat content on the physical properties and consumer acceptability of vanilla ice cream.

    PubMed

    Rolon, M Laura; Bakke, Alyssa J; Coupland, John N; Hayes, John E; Roberts, Robert F

    2017-07-01

    Ice cream is a complex food matrix that contains multiple physical phases. Removal of 1 ingredient may affect not only its physical properties but also multiple sensory characteristics that may or may not be important to consumers. Fat not only contributes to texture, mouth feel, and flavor, but also serves as a structural element. We evaluated the effect of replacing fat with maltodextrin (MD) on select physical properties of ice cream and on consumer acceptability. Vanilla ice creams were formulated to contain 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14% fat, and the difference was made up with 8, 6, 4, 2, and 0% maltodextrin, respectively, to balance the mix. Physical characterization included measurements of overrun, apparent viscosity, fat particle size, fat destabilization, hardness, and melting rate. A series of sensory tests were conducted to measure liking and the intensity of various attributes. Tests were also conducted after 19 weeks of storage at -18°C to assess changes in acceptance due to prolonged storage at unfavorable temperatures. Then, discrimination tests were performed to determine which differences in fat content were detectable by consumers. Mix viscosity decreased with increasing fat content and decreasing maltodextrin content. Fat particle size and fat destabilization significantly increased with increasing fat content. However, acceptability did not differ significantly across the samples for fresh or stored ice cream. Following storage, ice creams with 6, 12, and 14% fat did not differ in acceptability compared with fresh ice cream. However, the 8% fat, 6% MD and 10% fat, 4% MD ice creams showed a significant drop in acceptance after storage relative to fresh ice cream at the same fat content. Consumers were unable to detect a difference of 2 percentage points in fat level between 6 and 12% fat. They were able to detect a difference of 4 percentage points for ice creams with 6% versus 10%, but not for those with 8% versus 12% fat. Removing fat and replacing

  2. Prenatal exposure to vanilla or alcohol induces crawling after these odors in the neonate rat: The role of mu and kappa opioid receptor systems.

    PubMed

    Gaztañaga, Mirari; Aranda-Fernández, P Ezequiel; Chotro, M Gabriela

    2015-09-01

    Rat fetuses can perceive chemosensory stimuli derived from their mother's diet, and they may learn about those stimuli. In previous studies we have observed that prenatal exposure to alcohol during the last days of gestation increases the acceptance and liking of an alcohol flavor in infant and adolescent rats. While these results were not found after prenatal exposure to vanilla, cineole or anise, suggesting that the pharmacological properties of alcohol, mediated by the opioid system, underlie the effects observed with this drug. Considering that other studies report enhanced acceptance of non-alcohol flavors experienced prenatally when subjects were tested before infancy, we explore the possibility of observing similar results if testing 1-day old rats exposed prenatally to vanilla. Using an "odor-induced crawling" testing procedure, it was observed that neonates exposed prenatally to vanilla or alcohol crawl for a longer distance towards the experienced odor than to other odors or than control pups. Blocking mu, but not kappa opioid receptors, reduced the attraction of vanilla odor to neonates exposed to vanilla in utero, while the response to alcohol in pups exposed prenatally to this drug was affected by both antagonists. Results confirm that exposure to a non-alcohol odor enhances postnatal responses to it, observable soon after birth, while also suggesting that the mu opioid receptor system plays an important role in generating this effect. The results also imply that with alcohol exposure, the prenatal opioid system is wholly involved, which could explain the longer retention of the enhanced attraction to alcohol following prenatal experience with the drug. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Some results from studies on the effects of weightlessness on the growth of epiphytic orchids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherevchenko, T. M.; Mayko, T. K.

    1983-01-01

    Epidendrum orchids were placed in a Malakhit-2 micro-greenhouse aboard the Soyuz-36-Salyut-6 space station to test their growth under weightless conditions. Growth occurred but was less than in control plants left on Earth; cells were smaller and parenchymal development slowed in all tissues. Stems, roots, and leaves were smaller. The number of stomas on the leaves was about the same as in the controls, but, because of the smaller leaf size, there were more per unit area. A modeling experiment using a clinostat revealed a large decrease in gibberellin activity and auxin activity. It was assumed that weightlessness primarily affects gibberellin biosynthesis, inhibiting cell growth. Reestablishment of growth compound activity upon return of the plants to Earth was indicated by the fact that the orchids resumed growth thereafter.

  4. Large-Range Movements of Neotropical Orchid Bees Observed via Radio Telemetry

    PubMed Central

    Wikelski, Martin; Moxley, Jerry; Eaton-Mordas, Alexander; López-Uribe, Margarita M.; Holland, Richard; Moskowitz, David; Roubik, David W.; Kays, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Neotropical orchid bees (Euglossini) are often cited as classic examples of trapline-foragers with potentially extensive foraging ranges. If long-distance movements are habitual, rare plants in widely scattered locations may benefit from euglossine pollination services. Here we report the first successful use of micro radio telemetry to track the movement of an insect pollinator in a complex and forested environment. Our results indicate that individual male orchid bees (Exaerete frontalis) habitually use large rainforest areas (at least 42–115 ha) on a daily basis. Aerial telemetry located individuals up to 5 km away from their core areas, and bees were often stationary, for variable periods, between flights to successive localities. These data suggest a higher degree of site fidelity than what may be expected in a free living male bee, and has implications for our understanding of biological activity patterns and the evolution of forest pollinators. PMID:20520813

  5. Comparison of orchid and OCD modeling SO{sub x} release in the Gulf of Mexico

    SciT

    Ferris, D.C.; Burns, D.S.; Steorts, W.L.

    1996-10-01

    Two atmospheric chemistry and transport models are used to investigate the atmospheric behavior of SO{sub x} in the Gulf of Mexico. SO{sub x} emissions from a location about 30 miles offshore in the Gulf of Mexico will be modeled with ENSCO`s Short-range Layered Atmospheric Model (SLAM) and the EPA and Material Management Service (MMS) sanctioned Offshore and Coastal Dispersion Model (OCD). The atmospheric chemistry associated with SLAM is modeled using ENSCO`s ORganic CHemistry Integrated Dispersion Model (ORCHID) and has been developed from the Carbon Bond Mechanism (CBM-IV) to characterize the behavior of SO{sub x} compounds in the environment. Model runsmore » from both ORCHID and OCD will be presented and compared. Predicted SO{sub x} concentrations will be compared with actual data gathered from the MMS`s SO{sub x} air quality study in 1993.« less

  6. Effect of simulated microgravitation on phytohormones and cell structure of tropical orchids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherevchenko, T.; Zaimenko, N.; Majko, T.; Sytnjanskaja, N.

    When studing the effect of two month clinostating on the phytohormonal system of orchids with different types of shoot system branching and different shoot morphology, it was determined that, as a result of simulated microgravitation, endogenous growth regulators changed less in the species with sympodial branching than in species with monopodial branching and without pseudobulbs. Stimulators prevail in the balance of growth regulators in species of the first type and inhibitors in species of the second type. Besides this, comparative analysis of structural organization of juvenile leaf surface tissue of tested orchids was carried out. Variability of size, number and structure of stomatal organization were found according to species belonging to each branching type after clinostating. Electronic microscope studies show some structural peculiarities of epidermal and mesophilous cells.

  7. Diversity of fungi associated with roots of Calanthe orchid species in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Myung Soo; Eimes, John A; Oh, Sang Hoon; Suh, Hwa Jung; Oh, Seung-Yoon; Lee, Seobihn; Park, Ki Hyeong; Kwon, Hyuk Joon; Kim, Soo-Young; Lim, Young Woon

    2018-01-01

    While symbiotic fungi play a key role in the growth of endangered Calanthe orchid species, the relationship between fungal diversity and Calanthe species remains unclear. Here, we surveyed root associated fungal diversity of six Calanthe orchid species by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region using 454 pyrosequencing. Our results revealed that Paraboeremia and Coprinopsis are dominant fungal genera among Calanthe species. In terms of overall relative abundance, Paraboeremia was the most common fungal genus associated with Calanthe roots, followed by Coprinopsis. Overall fungal diversity showed a significant degree of variation depending on both location and Calanthe species. In terms of number of different fungal genera detected within Calanthe species, C. discolor had the most diverse fungal community, with 10 fungal genera detected. This study will contribute toward a better understanding of those fungi that are required for successful cultivation and conservation of Korean Calanthe species.

  8. Darwin's bee-trap: The kinetics of Catasetum, a new world orchid.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Charles C; Bales, James W; Palmer-Fortune, Joyce E; Nicholson, Robert G

    2008-01-01

    The orchid genera Catasetum employs a hair-trigger activated, pollen release mechanism, which forcibly attaches pollen sacs onto foraging insects in the New World tropics. This remarkable adaptation was studied extensively by Charles Darwin and he termed this rapid response "sensitiveness." Using high speed video cameras with a frame speed of 1000 fps, this rapid release was filmed and from the subsequent footage, velocity, speed, acceleration, force and kinetic energy were computed.

  9. Estimating the extent and structure of trade in horticultural orchids via social media.

    PubMed

    Hinsley, Amy; Lee, Tamsin E; Harrison, Joseph R; Roberts, David L

    2016-10-01

    The wildlife trade is a lucrative industry involving thousands of animal and plant species. The increasing use of the internet for both legal and illegal wildlife trade is well documented, but there is evidence that trade may be emerging on new online technologies such as social media. Using the orchid trade as a case study, we conducted the first systematic survey of wildlife trade on an international social-media website. We focused on themed forums (groups), where people with similar interests can interact by uploading images or text (posts) that are visible to other group members. We used social-network analysis to examine the ties between 150 of these orchid-themed groups to determine the structure of the network. We found 4 communities of closely linked groups based around shared language. Most trade occurred in a community that consisted of English-speaking and Southeast Asian groups. In addition to the network analysis, we randomly sampled 30 groups from the whole network to assess the prevalence of trade in cultivated and wild plants. Of 55,805 posts recorded over 12 weeks, 8.9% contained plants for sale, and 22-46% of these posts pertained to wild-collected orchids. Although total numbers of posts about trade were relatively small, the large proportion of posts advertising wild orchids for sale supports calls for better monitoring of social media for trade in wild-collected plants. © 2016 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology.

  10. In planta transformation method for T-DNA transfer in orchids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiarti, Endang; Purwantoro, Aziz; Mercuriani, Ixora S.; Anggriasari, Anida M.; Jang, Seonghoe; Suhandono, Sony; Machida, Yasunori; Machida, Chiyoko

    2014-03-01

    Transgenic plant technology is an efficient tool to study the function of gene(s) in plant. The most popular and widely used technique is Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in which cocultivation was done by immersing the plant tissues/organ in overnight bacterial cultured for about 30 minutes to one hour under in vitro condition. In this experiment, we developed more easier technique that omitted the in vitro step during cocultivation with Agrobacterium, namely in planta transformation method. Pollinaria (compact pollen mass of orchid) of Phalaenopsis amabilis and Spathoglottis plicata orchids were used as target explants that were immersed into bacterial culture for 30 minutes, then dried up the pollinaria, the transformed pollinaria was used to pollinate orchid flowers. The T-DNA used for this experiments were Ubipro∷PaFT/A. tumefaciens GV3101 for P. amabilis and MeEF1α2 pro∷GUS/ A. tumefaciens LBA 4404 for S.plicata. Seeds that were produced from pollinated flowers were grown onto 10 mg/l hygromicin containing NP (New Phalaenopsis) medium. The existance of transgene in putative transformant protocorm (developing orchid embryo) genome was confirmed using PCR with specific primers of either PaFT or GUS genes. Histochemical GUS assay was also performed to the putative transformants. The result showed that transformation frequencies were 2.1 % in P. amabilis, and 0,53% in S. plicata. These results indicates that in planta transformation method could be used for Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation, with advantage easier and more secure work from contaminants than that of the in vitro method.

  11. First Report of Sclerotium Rot on Cymbidium Orchids Caused by Sclerotium rolfsii in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Chan; Lee, Jung-Sup; Soh, Jae-Woo; Kim, Su

    2012-01-01

    Sclerotium rot was found on Cymbidium orchids at Seosan-si, Chungcheongnam-do, Korea, in July, 2010. Symptoms occurred on low leaves, which turned yellowish, after which the entire plant wilted. Severely infected plants were blighted and eventually died. White mycelial mats and sclerotia appeared on pseudobulbs. Based on the mycological characteristics and pathogenicity, the causal fungus was identified as Sclerotium rolfsii. This is the first report of new Sclerotium rot on Cymbidium spp. caused by S. rolfsii in Korea. PMID:23323053

  12. A garden of orchids: a generalized Harper equation at quadratic irrational frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestel, B. D.; Osbaldestin, A. H.

    2004-10-01

    We consider a generalized Harper equation at quadratic irrational flux, showing, in the strong coupling limit, the fluctuations of the exponentially decaying eigenfunctions are governed by the dynamics of a renormalization operator on a renormalization strange set. This work generalizes previous analyses which have considered only the golden mean case. Projections of the renormalization strange sets are illustrated analogous to the 'orchid' present in the golden mean case.

  13. Pollination by sexual deception promotes outcrossing and mate diversity in self-compatible clonal orchids.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, M R; Linde, C C; Peakall, R

    2015-08-01

    The majority of flowering plants rely on animals as pollen vectors. Thus, plant mating systems and pollen dispersal are strongly influenced by pollinator behaviour. In Australian sexually deceptive orchids pollinated by male thynnine wasps, outcrossing and extensive pollen flow is predicted due to floral deception, which minimizes multiple flower visitations within patches, and the movement of pollinators under mate-search rather than foraging behaviours. This hypothesis was tested using microsatellite markers to reconstruct and infer paternity in two clonal, self-compatible orchids. Offspring from naturally pollinated Chiloglottis valida and C. aff. jeanesii were acquired through symbiotic culture of seeds collected over three seasons. In both species, outcrossing was extensive (tm  = 0.924-1.00) despite clone sizes up to 11 m wide. The median pollen flow distance based on paternity for both taxa combined was 14.5 m (n = 18, range 0-69 m), being larger than typically found by paternity analyses in other herbaceous plants. Unexpectedly for orchids, some capsules were sired by more than one father, with an average of 1.35 pollen donors per fruit. This is the first genetic confirmation of polyandry in orchid capsules. Further, we report a possible link between multiple paternity and increased seed fitness. Together, these results demonstrate that deceptive pollination by mate-searching wasps enhances offspring fitness by promoting both outcrossing and within-fruit paternal diversity. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  14. (Methylthio)phenol semiochemicals are exploited by deceptive orchids as sexual attractants for Campylothynnus thynnine wasps.

    PubMed

    Bohman, Björn; Phillips, Ryan D; Flematti, Gavin R; Peakall, Rod

    2018-04-01

    Until recently, (methylthio)phenols as natural products had only been reported from bacteria. Now, four representatives of this class of sulfurous aromatic compounds have been discovered as semiochemicals in the orchid Caladenia crebra, which secures pollination by sexual deception. In this case, field bioassays confirmed that a 10:1 blend of 2-(methylthio)benzene-1,4-diol (1) and 4-hydroxy-3-(methylthio)benzaldehyde (2) sexually attracts the male thynnine wasp Campylothynnus flavopictus (Tiphiidae:Thynnineae), the exclusive pollinator of C. crebra. Here we show with field bioassays that another undescribed species of Campylothynnus (sp. A) is strongly sexually attracted to a 1:1 blend of compounds 1 and 2, which elicits very high attempted copulation rates (88%). We also confirm that this Campylothynnus species is a pollinator of Caladenia attingens subsp. attingens. Chemical analysis of the flowers of this orchid revealed two (methylthio)phenols, compound 2 and 2-(methylthio)phenol (3), as candidate semiochemicals involved in pollinator attraction. Thus, (methylthio)phenols are likely to be more widely used than presently known. The confirmation of this Campylothynnus as a pollinator of C. attingens subsp. attingens at our study sites was unexpected, since elsewhere this orchid is pollinated by a different thynnine wasp (Thynnoides sp). In general, sexually deceptive Caladenia only use a single species of pollinator, and as such, this unusual case may offer a tractable study system for understanding the chemical basis of pollinator switching in sexually deceptive orchids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Intraspecific geographic variation of fragrances acquired by orchid bees in native and introduced populations.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Santiago R; Eltz, Thomas; Fritzsch, Falko; Pemberton, Robert; Pringle, Elizabeth G; Tsutsui, Neil D

    2010-08-01

    Male orchid bees collect volatiles, from both floral and non-floral sources, that they expose as pheromone analogues (perfumes) during courtship display. The chemical profile of these perfumes, which includes terpenes and aromatic compounds, is both species-specific and divergent among closely related lineages. Thus, fragrance composition is thought to play an important role in prezygotic reproductive isolation in euglossine bees. However, because orchid bees acquire fragrances entirely from exogenous sources, the chemical composition of male perfumes is prone to variation due to environmental heterogeneity across habitats. We used Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) to characterize the perfumes of 114 individuals of the green orchid bee (Euglossa aff. viridissima) sampled from five native populations in Mesoamerica and two naturalized populations in the southeastern United States. We recorded a total of 292 fragrance compounds from hind-leg extracts, and found that overall perfume composition was different for each population. We detected a pronounced chemical dissimilarity between native (Mesoamerica) and naturalized (U.S.) populations that was driven both by proportional differences of common compounds as well as the presence of a few chemicals unique to each population group. Despite these differences, our data also revealed remarkable qualitative consistency in the presence of several major fragrance compounds across distant populations from dissimilar habitats. In addition, we demonstrate that naturalized bees are attracted to and collect large quantities of triclopyr 2-butoxyethyl ester, the active ingredient of several commercially available herbicides. By comparing incidence values and consistency indices across populations, we identify putative functional compounds that may play an important role in courtship signaling in this species of orchid bee.

  16. Intraspecific Geographic Variation of Fragrances Acquired by Orchid Bees in Native and Introduced Populations

    PubMed Central

    Eltz, Thomas; Fritzsch, Falko; Pemberton, Robert; Pringle, Elizabeth G.; Tsutsui, Neil D.

    2010-01-01

    Male orchid bees collect volatiles, from both floral and non-floral sources, that they expose as pheromone analogues (perfumes) during courtship display. The chemical profile of these perfumes, which includes terpenes and aromatic compounds, is both species-specific and divergent among closely related lineages. Thus, fragrance composition is thought to play an important role in prezygotic reproductive isolation in euglossine bees. However, because orchid bees acquire fragrances entirely from exogenous sources, the chemical composition of male perfumes is prone to variation due to environmental heterogeneity across habitats. We used Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) to characterize the perfumes of 114 individuals of the green orchid bee (Euglossa aff. viridissima) sampled from five native populations in Mesoamerica and two naturalized populations in the southeastern United States. We recorded a total of 292 fragrance compounds from hind-leg extracts, and found that overall perfume composition was different for each population. We detected a pronounced chemical dissimilarity between native (Mesoamerica) and naturalized (U.S.) populations that was driven both by proportional differences of common compounds as well as the presence of a few chemicals unique to each population group. Despite these differences, our data also revealed remarkable qualitative consistency in the presence of several major fragrance compounds across distant populations from dissimilar habitats. In addition, we demonstrate that naturalized bees are attracted to and collect large quantities of triclopyr 2-butoxyethyl ester, the active ingredient of several commercially available herbicides. By comparing incidence values and consistency indices across populations, we identify putative functional compounds that may play an important role in courtship signaling in this species of orchid bee. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10886

  17. Why are orchid flowers so diverse? Reduction of evolutionary constraints by paralogues of class B floral homeotic genes

    PubMed Central

    Mondragón-Palomino, Mariana; Theißen, Günter

    2009-01-01

    Background The nearly 30 000 species of orchids produce flowers of unprecedented diversity. However, whether specific genetic mechanisms contributed to this diversity is a neglected topic and remains speculative. We recently published a theory, the ‘orchid code’, maintaining that the identity of the different perianth organs is specified by the combinatorial interaction of four DEF-like MADS-box genes with other floral homeotic genes. Scope Here the developmental and evolutionary implications of our theory are explored. Specifically, it is shown that all frequent floral terata, including all peloric types, can be explained by monogenic gain- or-loss-of-function mutants, changing either expression of a DEF-like or CYC-like gene. Supposed dominance or recessiveness of mutant alleles is correlated with the frequency of terata in both cultivation and nature. Our findings suggest that changes in DEF- and CYC-like genes not only underlie terata but also the natural diversity of orchid species. We argue, however, that true changes in organ identity are rare events in the evolution of orchid flowers, even though we review some likely cases. Conclusions The four DEF paralogues shaped floral diversity in orchids in a dramatic way by modularizing the floral perianth based on a complex series of sub- and neo-functionalization events. These genes may have eliminated constraints, so that different kinds of perianth organs could then evolve individually and thus often in dramatically different ways in response to selection by pollinators or by genetic drift. We therefore argue that floral diversity in orchids may be the result of an unprecedented developmental genetic predisposition that originated early in orchid evolution. PMID:19141602

  18. Microsatellite primers for two threatened orchids in Florida: Encyclia tampensis and Cyrtopodium punctatum (Orchidaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Weremijewicz, Joanna; Almonte, Jasmin I.; Hilaire, Vanessa S.; Lopez, Frank D.; Lu, Stephen H.; Marrero, Sarah M.; Martinez, Catherine M.; Zarate, Edson A.; Lam, Ana K.; Ferguson, Samantha A. N.; Petrakis, Nicolas Z.; Peeples, Kelsey A.; Taylor, Ebony D.; Leon, Natalie M.; Valdes, Carolina; Hass, Michael; Reeve, Andrew B.; Palow, Danielle T.; Downing, Jason L.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: The Million Orchid Project at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden is an initiative to propagate native orchids for reintroduction into Miami’s urban landscapes. The aim of this study was to develop microsatellites for Encyclia tampensis and Cyrtopodium punctatum (Orchidaceae). Methods and Results: Ten microsatellites were developed for each species. For E. tampensis sampled from the natural population, allele numbers ranged from one to four, with an average observed heterozygosity (Ho) of 0.314 and average expected heterozygosity (He) of 0.281. For the individuals from cultivation, allele numbers ranged from one to six, with an average Ho of 0.35 and an average He of 0.224. For C. punctatum, allele numbers ranged from one to three, with an average Ho of 0.257 and an average He of 0.272. Conclusions: These microsatellites will be used to assess the genetic diversity of natural and cultivated populations with the intention of guiding genetic breeding under the Million Orchid Project. PMID:27144103

  19. Floral visual signal increases reproductive success in a sexually deceptive orchid

    PubMed Central

    Streinzer, Martin; Paulus, Hannes F.; Spaethe, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Sexually deceptive orchids mimic signals emitted by female insects in order to attract mate-searching males. Specific attraction of the targeted pollinator is achieved by sex pheromone mimicry, which constitutes the major attraction channel. In close vicinity of the flower, visual signals may enhance attraction, as was shown recently in the sexually deceptive orchid Ophrys heldreichii. Here, we conducted an in situ manipulation experiment in two populations of O. heldreichii on Crete to investigate whether the presence/absence of the conspicuous pink perianth affects reproductive success in two natural orchid populations. We estimated reproductive success of three treatment groups (with intact, removed and artificial perianth) throughout the flowering period as pollinaria removal (male reproductive success) and massulae deposition (female reproductive success). Reproductive success was significantly increased by the presence of a strong visual signal—the conspicuous perianth—in one study population, however, not in the second, most likely due to the low pollinator abundance in the latter population. This study provides further evidence that the coloured perianth in O. heldreichii is adaptive and thus adds to the olfactory signal to maximise pollinator attraction and reproductive success. PMID:23750181

  20. Evolutionary history of PEPC genes in green plants: Implications for the evolution of CAM in orchids.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hua; Zhang, Liang-Sheng; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Zheng, Bao-Qiang; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) gene is the key enzyme in CAM and C4 photosynthesis. A detailed phylogenetic analysis of the PEPC family was performed using sequences from 60 available published plant genomes, the Phalaenopsis equestris genome and RNA-Seq of 15 additional orchid species. The PEPC family consists of three distinct subfamilies, PPC-1, PPC-2, and PPC-3, all of which share a recent common ancestor in chlorophyte algae. The eudicot PPC-1 lineage separated into two clades due to whole genome duplication (WGD). Similarly, the monocot PPC-1 lineage also divided into PPC-1M1 and PPC-1M2 through an ancient duplication event. The monocot CAM- or C4-related PEPC originated from the clade PPC-1M1. WGD may not be the major driver for the performance of CAM function by PEPC, although it increased the number of copies of the PEPC gene. CAM may have evolved early in monocots, as the CAM-related PEPC of orchids originated from the monocot ancient duplication, and the earliest CAM-related PEPC may have evolved immediately after the diversification of monocots, with CAM developing prior to C4. Our results represent the most complete evolutionary history of PEPC genes in green plants to date and particularly elucidate the origin of PEPC in orchids. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Microsatellite primers for two threatened orchids in Florida: Encyclia tampensis and Cyrtopodium punctatum (Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Weremijewicz, Joanna; Almonte, Jasmin I; Hilaire, Vanessa S; Lopez, Frank D; Lu, Stephen H; Marrero, Sarah M; Martinez, Catherine M; Zarate, Edson A; Lam, Ana K; Ferguson, Samantha A N; Petrakis, Nicolas Z; Peeples, Kelsey A; Taylor, Ebony D; Leon, Natalie M; Valdes, Carolina; Hass, Michael; Reeve, Andrew B; Palow, Danielle T; Downing, Jason L

    2016-04-01

    The Million Orchid Project at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden is an initiative to propagate native orchids for reintroduction into Miami's urban landscapes. The aim of this study was to develop microsatellites for Encyclia tampensis and Cyrtopodium punctatum (Orchidaceae). Ten microsatellites were developed for each species. For E. tampensis sampled from the natural population, allele numbers ranged from one to four, with an average observed heterozygosity (H o) of 0.314 and average expected heterozygosity (H e) of 0.281. For the individuals from cultivation, allele numbers ranged from one to six, with an average H o of 0.35 and an average H e of 0.224. For C. punctatum, allele numbers ranged from one to three, with an average H o of 0.257 and an average H e of 0.272. These microsatellites will be used to assess the genetic diversity of natural and cultivated populations with the intention of guiding genetic breeding under the Million Orchid Project.

  2. Mycoheterotrophic germination of Pyrola asarifolia dust seeds reveals convergences with germination in orchids.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yasushi; Fukukawa, Satoru; Kunishi, Ayako; Suga, Haruhisa; Richard, Franck; Sauve, Mathieu; Selosse, Marc-André

    2012-08-01

    Dust seeds that germinate by obtaining nutrients from symbiotic fungi have evolved independently in orchids and 11 other plant lineages. The fungi involved in this 'mycoheterotrophic' germination have been identified in some orchids and non-photosynthetic Ericaceae, and proved identical to mycorrhizal fungi of adult plants. We investigated a third lineage, the Pyroleae, chlorophyllous Ericaceae species whose partial mycoheterotrophy at adulthood has recently attracted much attention. We observed experimental Pyrola asarifolia germination at four Japanese sites and investigated the germination pattern and symbiotic fungi, which we compared to mycorrhizal fungi of adult plants. Adult P. asarifolia, like other Pyroleae, associated with diverse fungal species that were a subset of those mycorrhizal on surrounding trees. Conversely, seedlings specifically associated with a lineage of Sebacinales clade B (endophytic Basidiomycetes) revealed an intriguing evolutionary convergence with orchids, some of which also germinate with Sebacinales clade B. Congruently, seedlings clustered spatially together, but not with adults. This unexpected transition in specificity and ecology of partners could support the developmental transition from full to partial mycoheterotrophy, but probably challenges survival and distribution during development. We discuss the physiological and ecological traits that predisposed to the repeated recruitment of Sebacinales clade B for dust seed germination. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. NIR-assisted orchid virus therapy using urchin bimetallic nanomaterials in phalaenopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shin-Yu; Cheng, Liang-Chien; Chen, Chieh-Wei; Lee, Po-Han; Yu, Fengjiao; Zhou, Wuzong; Liu, Ru-Shi; Do, Yi-Yin; Huang, Pung-Ling

    2013-12-01

    The use of nanoparticles has drawn special attention, particularly in the treatment of plant diseases. Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) and Odontoglossum ring spot virus (ORSV) are the most prevalent and serious diseases that affect the development of the orchid industry. In this study we treated nanoparticles as a strategy for enhancing the resistance of orchids against CymMV and ORSV. After chitosan-modified gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were injected into Phalaenopsis leaves, the injected leaves were exposed to 980 nm laser for light-heat conversion. To evaluate virus elimination in the treated Phalaenopsis leaves, the transcripts of coat protein genes and the production of viral proteins were assessed by reverse transcription-Polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The expression of coat protein genes for both CymMV and ORSV was significantly lower in the chitosan-modified Au NP-treated Phalaenopsis leaves than in the control. Similarly, the amount of coat proteins for both viruses in the Phalaenopsis leaves was lower than that in the control (without nanoparticle injection). We propose that the temperature increase in the chitosan-modified Au NP-treated Phalaenopsis tissues after laser exposure reduces the viral population, consequently conferring resistance against CymMV and ORSV. Our findings suggest that the application of chitosan-modified Au NPs is a promising new strategy for orchid virus therapy.

  4. The long pollen tube journey and in vitro pollen germination of Phalaenopsis orchids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jhun-Chen; Fang, Su-Chiung

    2016-06-01

    Pollen biology in P. aphrodite. Orchids have a distinct reproductive program. Pollination triggers ovule development and differentiation within flowers, and fertilization occurs days to months after pollination. It is unclear how pollen tubes travel through the developing ovaries during ovule development and when pollen tubes arrive at the mature embryo sac to achieve fertilization. Here, we report a robust staining protocol to image and record the timing of pollen germination, progressive growth of pollen tubes in ovaries, and arrival of pollen tubes at embryo sacs in Phalaenopsis aphrodite. The pollen germinated and pollen tubes entered the ovary 3 days after pollination. Pollen tubes continued to grow and filled the entire cavity of the ovary as the ovary elongated and ovules developed. Pollen tubes were found to enter the matured embryo sacs at approximately 60-65 days after pollination in an acropetal manner. Moreover, these temporal changes in developmental events such as growth of pollen tubes and fertilization were associated with expression of molecular markers. In addition, we developed an in vitro pollen germination protocol, which is valuable to enable studies on pollen tube guidance and tip growth regulation in Phalaenopsis orchids and possibly in other orchid species.

  5. Production of virus-free orchid Cymbidium aloifolium (L.) Sw. by various tissue culture techniques.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Shreeti; Regmi, Tripti; Ranjit, Mukunda; Pant, Bijaya

    2016-10-01

    Orchids are affected by many viruses resulting in poor growth, yield and quality, and an overall decline in population. Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) is one of the common orchid viruses found in Cymbidium species but it infects different orchid genera. In this study Cymbidium aloifolium was propagated in vitro using MS medium at different strength (1.0, ½, and ¼) with or without 0.5 mg/l BAP (6-benzylaminopurine) and 0.5 mg/l NAA (Naphthalene acetic acid). To provide disease-free planting material, source plant for in vitro propagation needs to be screened for pathogenic viruses. In the present study, in vivo -grown source (mother) plants and tissue culture-derived plants of C. aloifolium were tested for CymMV virus using Double antibody sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA). All the tissue cultured plants were found to be 100% virus-free whereas the in vivo grown source plants were highly affected by CymMV virus (83.33%). The virus-free in vitro plantlets were multiplied in large scale and then acclimatized on earthen pot containing a mixture of cocopeat, litter and clay in the ratio of 3:2:1. Eighty five percent of acclimatized plantlets survived making this method an efficient mass production system for high quality virus-free C. aloifolium for commercial floriculture and germplasm preservation.

  6. Floral visual signal increases reproductive success in a sexually deceptive orchid.

    PubMed

    Rakosy, Demetra; Streinzer, Martin; Paulus, Hannes F; Spaethe, Johannes

    2012-12-01

    Sexually deceptive orchids mimic signals emitted by female insects in order to attract mate-searching males. Specific attraction of the targeted pollinator is achieved by sex pheromone mimicry, which constitutes the major attraction channel. In close vicinity of the flower, visual signals may enhance attraction, as was shown recently in the sexually deceptive orchid Ophrys heldreichii . Here, we conducted an in situ manipulation experiment in two populations of O. heldreichii on Crete to investigate whether the presence/absence of the conspicuous pink perianth affects reproductive success in two natural orchid populations. We estimated reproductive success of three treatment groups (with intact, removed and artificial perianth) throughout the flowering period as pollinaria removal (male reproductive success) and massulae deposition (female reproductive success). Reproductive success was significantly increased by the presence of a strong visual signal-the conspicuous perianth-in one study population, however, not in the second, most likely due to the low pollinator abundance in the latter population. This study provides further evidence that the coloured perianth in O. heldreichii is adaptive and thus adds to the olfactory signal to maximise pollinator attraction and reproductive success.

  7. Highly diversified fungi are associated with the achlorophyllous orchid Gastrodia flavilabella.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tsunglin; Li, Ching-Min; Han, Yue-Lun; Chiang, Tzen-Yuh; Chiang, Yu-Chung; Sung, Huang-Mo

    2015-03-14

    Mycoheterotrophic orchids are achlorophyllous plants that obtain carbon and nutrients from their mycorrhizal fungi. They often show strong preferential association with certain fungi and may obtain nutrients from surrounding photosynthetic plants through ectomycorrhizal fungi. Gastrodia is a large genus of mycoheterotrophic orchids in Asia, but Gastrodia species' association with fungi has not been well studied. We asked two questions: (1) whether certain fungi were preferentially associated with G. flavilabella, which is an orchid in Taiwan and (2) whether fungal associations of G. flavilabella were affected by the composition of fungi in the environment. Using next-generation sequencing, we studied the fungal communities in the tubers of Gastrodia flavilabella and the surrounding soil. We found (1) highly diversified fungi in the G. flavilabella tubers, (2) that Mycena species were the predominant fungi in the tubers but minor in the surrounding soil, and (3) the fungal communities in the G. flavilabella tubers were clearly distinct from those in the surrounding soil. We also found that the fungal composition in soil can change quickly with distance. G. flavilabella was associated with many more fungi than previously thought. Among the fungi in the tuber of G. flavilabella, Mycena species were predominant, different from the previous finding that adult G. elata depends on Armillaria species for nutritional supply. Moreover, the preferential fungus association of G. flavilabella was not significantly influenced by the composition of fungi in the environment.

  8. The Anther Steps onto the Stigma for Self-Fertilization in a Slipper Orchid

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xin-Ju; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Hsiao, Yu-Yun; Huang, Jie; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2012-01-01

    Background Due to the spatial separation between male and female pollen grains from the anther of most flowering plants, including orchids, pollens are transported by wind or animals and deposited onto the receptive surface of the stigma of a different plant. However, self-pollination is common in pollinating animal-scarce habitats. In such habitats, self-pollinations require the assistance of a pollinating agent (e.g., wind, gravity, or floral assembly) to transport the pollen grains from the anther onto its own stigma. Methodology/Principal Findings Based on observations on floral morphology and flowering phenology, tests of the breeding system, and a comparison of pollination mechanisms, a new self-pollination process was discovered in the hermaphroditic (i.e., possessing spatially separated male and female organs) flower of a slipper orchid, Paphiopedilum parishii. The anther changes from a solid to a liquid state and directly steps onto the stigma surface without the aid of any pollinating agent or floral assembly. Conclusions The mode of self-pollination discussed here is a new addition to the broad range of genetic and morphological mechanisms that have evolved in flowering plants to ensure their reproductive success. The present self-contained pollination mechanism is a possible adaptation to the insect-scarce habitat of the orchid. PMID:22649529

  9. Effects of Melatonin on Colchicine-Treated PLBs of Dendrobium sonia-28 Orchid.

    PubMed

    Lim, M S; Antony, J J J; Islam, S M Shahinul; Suhana, Z; Sreeramanan, S

    2017-01-01

    Dendrobium hybrid orchid is popular in orchid commercial industry due to its short life cycle and ability to produce various types of flower colours. This study was conducted to identify the morphological, biochemical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis in the Dendrobium sonia-28 orchid plants. In this study, 0.05 and 0.075 % of colchicine-treated Dendrobium sonia-28 (4-week-old culture) protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) were treated in different concentrations of melatonin (MEL) posttreatments (0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5 and 10 μM). Morphological parameters such as number of shoots, growth index and number of PLBs were determined. In the 0.05 and 0.075 % of colchicine-treated PLBs which were posttreated with 0.05 μM MEL resulted in the highest value of the morphological parameters tested based on the number of shoots (84.5 and 96.67), growth index (16.94 and 12.15) and number of PLBs (126.5 and 162.33), respectively. SEM analysis of the 0.05 μM MEL posttreatment on both the colchicine-treated regenerated PLBs showed irregular cell lineages, and some damages occurred on the stomata. This condition might be due to the effect of plasmolyzing occurred in the cell causing irregular cell lineages.

  10. Do rewardless orchids show a positive relationship between phenotypic diversity and reproductive success?

    PubMed

    Smithson, Ann; Juillet, Nicolas; Macnair, Mark R; Gigord, Luc D B

    2007-02-01

    Among rewardless orchids, pollinator sampling behavior has been suggested to drive a positive relationship between population phenotypic variability and absolute reproductive success, and hence population fitness. We tested this hypothesis by constructing experimental arrays using the rewardless orchid Dactylorhiza sambucina, which is dimorphic for corolla color. We found no evidence that polymorphic arrays had higher mean reproductive success than monomorphic arrays for pollinia removal, pollen deposition, or fruit set. For pollinia removal, monomorphic yellow arrays had significantly greater reproductive success, and monomorphic red the least. A tendency for yellow arrays to have higher pollen deposition was also found. We argue that differential population fitness was most likely to reflect differential numbers of pollinators attracted to arrays, through preferential long-distance attraction to arrays with yellow inflorescences. Correlative studies of absolute reproductive success in 52 populations of D. sambucina supported our experimental results. To our knowledge this is the first study to suggest that attraction of a greater number of pollinators to rewardless orchids may be of greater functional importance to population fitness, and thus ecology and conservation, than are the behavioral sequences of individual pollinators.

  11. First description of necrosis in leaves and pseudo-bulbs of Oncidium orchids caused by Burkholderia gladioli in São Paulo State, Brazil

    A necrosis of orchid leaves and pseudobulbs was observed in a commercial orchid nursery in Mogi das Cruzes, Sao Paulo, Brazil. The symptoms were water-soaked, brown lesions that can develop into large areas of necrosis that extend throughout the entire plant, ultimately causing death. Bacteria were...

  12. Matching symbiotic associations of an endangered orchid to habitat to improve conservation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Noushka; Lawrie, Ann C; Linde, Celeste C

    2018-06-12

    An understanding of mycorrhizal variation, orchid seed germination temperature and the effect of co-occurring plant species could be critical for optimizing conservation translocations of endangered plants with specialized mycorrhizal associations. Focusing on the orchid Thelymitra epipactoides, we isolated mycorrhizal fungi from ten plants within each of three sites; Shallow Sands Woodland (SSW), Damp Heathland (DH) and Coastal Heathland Scrub (CHS). Twenty-seven fungal isolates were tested for symbiotic germination under three 24 h temperature cycles: 12 °C for 16 h-16 °C for 8 h, 16 °C for 16 h-24 °C for 8 h or 27 °C constant. Fungi were sequenced using the internal transcribed spacer (ITS), nuclear large subunit 1 (nLSU1), nLSU2 and mitochondrial large rRNA gene (mtLSU). Orchids were grown to maturity and co-planted with each of ten associated plant species in a glasshouse experiment with tuber width measured at 12 months after co-planting. Two Tulasnella fungal lineages were isolated and identified by phylogenetic analyses, operational taxonomic unit 1 (OTU1) and 'T. asymmetrica'. Fungal lineages were specific to sites and did not co-occur. OTU1 (from the SSW site) germinated seed predominantly at 12-16 °C (typical of autumn-winter temperature) whereas 'T. asymmetrica' (from the DH and CHS sites) germinated seed across all three temperature ranges. There was no difference in the growth of adult orchids germinated with different OTUs. There was a significant reduction in tuber size of T. epipactoides when co-planted with six of the commonly co-occurring plant species. We found that orchid fungal lineages and their germination temperature can change with habitat, and established that translocation sites can be optimized with knowledge of co-occurring plant interactions. For conservation translocations, particularly under a changing climate, we recommend that plants should be grown with mycorrhizal fungi tailored to the recipient site.

  13. The mycoheterotrophic symbiosis between orchids and mycorrhizal fungi possesses major components shared with mutualistic plant-mycorrhizal symbioses.

    PubMed

    Miura, Chihiro; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Miyahara, Ryohei; Yamamoto, Tatsuki; Fuji, Masako; Yagame, Takahiro; Imaizumi-Anraku, Haruko; Yamato, Masahide; Shigenobu, Shuji; Kaminaka, Hironori

    2018-04-12

    Achlorophylous and early developmental stages of chorolophylous orchids are highly dependent on carbon and other nutrients provided by mycorrhizal fungi, in a nutritional mode termed mycoheterotrophy. Previous findings have implied that some common properties at least partially underlie the mycorrhizal symbioses of mycoheterotrophic orchids and that of autotrophic arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) plants; however, information about the molecular mechanisms of the relationship between orchids and their mycorrhizal fungi is limited. In this study, we characterized the molecular basis of an orchid-mycorrhizal (OM) symbiosis by analyzing the transcriptome of Bletilla striata at an early developmental stage associated with the mycorrhizal fungus Tulasnella sp. The essential components required for the establishment of mutual symbioses with AM fungi and/or rhizobia in most terrestrial plants were identified from B. striata gene set. A cross-species gene complementation analysis showed one of the component genes, calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase gene CCaMK in B. striata, retains functional characteristics of that in AM plants. The expression analysis revealed the activation of homologs of AM-related genes during the OM symbiosis. Our results suggest that orchids possess, at least partly, the molecular mechanisms common to AM plants.

  14. The carbon and nitrogen ecophysiologies of two endemic tropical orchids mirrors those of their temperate relatives and the local environment.

    PubMed

    Hynson, Nicole A

    2016-11-01

    Orchids are one of the most widely distributed plant families. However, current research on the ecophysiology of terrestrial orchids is biased towards temperate species. Thus, it is currently unknown whether tropical terrestrial orchids belong to similar trophic guilds as their temperate relatives. To examine the ecophysiologies of two tropical terrestrial orchids, I analysed the carbon and nitrogen stable isotope compositions and nitrogen concentrations of the Hawaiian endemics Anoectochilus sandvicensis and Liparis hawaiensis . I compared these values with those of surrounding vegetation and their temperate relatives. I found that A. sandvicensis was consistently enriched in the heavy isotope of nitrogen ( 15 N) and had higher nitrogen (N) concentrations than surrounding vegetation, and these values were even higher than those of its temperate relatives. Carbon stable isotope composition among populations of A. sandvicensis varied by island. These results point to local environment and evolutionary history determining the ecophysiology of this species. Whereas L.hawaiensis was also enriched in 15 N and had on average higher N concentrations than surrounding vegetation, these values were not significantly different from temperate relatives, indicating that evolutionary history may be a stronger predictor of this orchid species' ecophysiology than environment. I suggest that both Hawaiian species are potentially partially mycoheterotrophic.

  15. The carbon and nitrogen ecophysiologies of two endemic tropical orchids mirrors those of their temperate relatives and the local environment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Orchids are one of the most widely distributed plant families. However, current research on the ecophysiology of terrestrial orchids is biased towards temperate species. Thus, it is currently unknown whether tropical terrestrial orchids belong to similar trophic guilds as their temperate relatives. To examine the ecophysiologies of two tropical terrestrial orchids, I analysed the carbon and nitrogen stable isotope compositions and nitrogen concentrations of the Hawaiian endemics Anoectochilus sandvicensis and Liparis hawaiensis. I compared these values with those of surrounding vegetation and their temperate relatives. I found that A. sandvicensis was consistently enriched in the heavy isotope of nitrogen (15N) and had higher nitrogen (N) concentrations than surrounding vegetation, and these values were even higher than those of its temperate relatives. Carbon stable isotope composition among populations of A. sandvicensis varied by island. These results point to local environment and evolutionary history determining the ecophysiology of this species. Whereas L.hawaiensis was also enriched in 15N and had on average higher N concentrations than surrounding vegetation, these values were not significantly different from temperate relatives, indicating that evolutionary history may be a stronger predictor of this orchid species' ecophysiology than environment. I suggest that both Hawaiian species are potentially partially mycoheterotrophic. PMID:28018622

  16. Mycorrhizal compatibility and symbiotic seed germination of orchids from the Coastal Range and Andes in south central Chile.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Hector; Valadares, Rafael; Contreras, Domingo; Bashan, Yoav; Arriagada, Cesar

    2017-04-01

    Little is known about Orchidaceae plants in Chile and their mycorrhizal associations, a key issue for designing protective actions for endangered species. We investigated root fungi from seven terrestrial orchid species to identify potential mycorrhizal fungi. The main characteristics of Rhizoctonia-like fungi were observed under light microscopy, and isolates were identified through PCR-ITS sequencing. Molecular identification of fungal sequences showed a high diversity of fungi colonizing roots. Fungal ability to germinate seeds of different orchids was determined in symbiotic germination tests; 24 fungal groups were isolated, belonging to the genera Tulasnella, Ceratobasidium, and Thanatephorus. Furthermore, dark septate and other endophytic fungi were identified. The high number of Rhizoctonia-like fungi obtained from adult orchids from the Coastal mountain range suggests that, after germination, these orchids may complement their nutritional demands through mycoheterotrophy. Nonetheless, beneficial associations with other endophytic fungi may also co-exist. In this study, isolated mycorrhizal fungi had the ability to induce seed germination at different efficiencies and with low specificity. Germin ation rates were low, but protocorms continued to develop for 60 days. A Tulasnella sp. isolated from Chloraea gavilu was most effective to induce seed germination of different species. The dark septate endophytic (DSE) fungi did not show any effect on seed development; however, their widespread occurrence in some orchids suggests a putative role in plant establishment.

  17. Evolution and Biogeography of the Slipper Orchids: Eocene Vicariance of the Conduplicate Genera in the Old and New World Tropics

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan-Yan; Luo, Yi-Bo; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Wang, Xiao-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Intercontinental disjunctions between tropical regions, which harbor two-thirds of the flowering plants, have drawn great interest from biologists and biogeographers. Most previous studies on these distribution patterns focused on woody plants, and paid little attention to herbs. The Orchidaceae is one of the largest families of angiosperms, with a herbaceous habit and a high species diversity in the Tropics. Here we investigate the evolutionary and biogeographical history of the slipper orchids, which represents a monophyletic subfamily (Cypripedioideae) of the orchid family and comprises five genera that are disjunctly distributed in tropical to temperate regions. A relatively well-resolved and highly supported phylogeny of slipper orchids was reconstructed based on sequence analyses of six maternally inherited chloroplast and two low-copy nuclear genes (LFY and ACO). We found that the genus Cypripedium with a wide distribution in the northern temperate and subtropical zones diverged first, followed by Selenipedium endemic to South America, and finally conduplicate-leaved genera in the Tropics. Mexipedium and Phragmipedium from the neotropics are most closely related, and form a clade sister to Paphiopedilum from tropical Asia. According to molecular clock estimates, the genus Selenipedium originated in Palaeocene, while the most recent common ancestor of conduplicate-leaved slipper orchids could be dated back to the Eocene. Ancestral area reconstruction indicates that vicariance is responsible for the disjunct distribution of conduplicate slipper orchids in palaeotropical and neotropical regions. Our study sheds some light on mechanisms underlying generic and species diversification in the orchid family and tropical disjunctions of herbaceous plant groups. In addition, we suggest that the biogeographical study should sample both regional endemics and their widespread relatives. PMID:22685605

  18. Evolution and biogeography of the slipper orchids: Eocene vicariance of the conduplicate genera in the Old and New World Tropics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-Yan; Luo, Yi-Bo; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Wang, Xiao-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Intercontinental disjunctions between tropical regions, which harbor two-thirds of the flowering plants, have drawn great interest from biologists and biogeographers. Most previous studies on these distribution patterns focused on woody plants, and paid little attention to herbs. The Orchidaceae is one of the largest families of angiosperms, with a herbaceous habit and a high species diversity in the Tropics. Here we investigate the evolutionary and biogeographical history of the slipper orchids, which represents a monophyletic subfamily (Cypripedioideae) of the orchid family and comprises five genera that are disjunctly distributed in tropical to temperate regions. A relatively well-resolved and highly supported phylogeny of slipper orchids was reconstructed based on sequence analyses of six maternally inherited chloroplast and two low-copy nuclear genes (LFY and ACO). We found that the genus Cypripedium with a wide distribution in the northern temperate and subtropical zones diverged first, followed by Selenipedium endemic to South America, and finally conduplicate-leaved genera in the Tropics. Mexipedium and Phragmipedium from the neotropics are most closely related, and form a clade sister to Paphiopedilum from tropical Asia. According to molecular clock estimates, the genus Selenipedium originated in Palaeocene, while the most recent common ancestor of conduplicate-leaved slipper orchids could be dated back to the Eocene. Ancestral area reconstruction indicates that vicariance is responsible for the disjunct distribution of conduplicate slipper orchids in palaeotropical and neotropical regions. Our study sheds some light on mechanisms underlying generic and species diversification in the orchid family and tropical disjunctions of herbaceous plant groups. In addition, we suggest that the biogeographical study should sample both regional endemics and their widespread relatives.

  19. Solitary invasive orchid bee outperforms co-occurring native bees to promote fruit set of an invasive Solanum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Pemberton, Robert W

    2009-03-01

    Our understanding of the effects of introduced invasive pollinators on plants has been exclusively drawn from studies on introduced social bees. One might expect, however, that the impacts of introduced solitary bees, with much lower population densities and fewer foragers, would be small. Yet little is known about the potential effects of naturalized solitary bees on the environment. We took advantage of the recent naturalization of an orchid bee, Euglossa viridissima, in southern Florida to study the effects of this solitary bee on reproduction of Solanum torvum, an invasive shrub. Flowers of S. torvum require specialized buzz pollination. Through timed floral visitor watches and two pollination treatments (control and pollen supplementation) at three forest edge and three open area sites, we found that the fruit set of S. torvum was pollen limited at the open sites where the native bees dominate, but was not pollen limited at the forest sites where the invasive orchid bees dominate. The orchid bee's pollination efficiency was nearly double that of the native halictid bees, and was also slightly higher than that of the native carpenter bee. Experiments using small and large mesh cages (to deny or allow E. viridissima access, respectively) at one forest site indicated that when the orchid bee was excluded, the flowers set one-quarter as many fruit as when the bee was allowed access. The orchid bee was the most important pollinator of the weed at the forest sites, which could pose additional challenges to the management of this weed in the fragmented, endangered tropical hardwood forests in the region. This specialized invasive mutualism may promote populations of both the orchid bee and this noxious weed. Invasive solitary bees, particularly species that are specialized pollinators, appear to have more importance than has previously been recognized.

  20. Orchid bees as bio-indicators for organic coffee farms in Costa Rica: does farm size affect their abundance?

    PubMed

    Hedström, Ingemar; Denzel, Andrew; Owens, Gareth

    2006-09-01

    The potential of Euglossini bees, especially Euglossa, as biological indicators of organic vs nonorganic coffee farms was studied in Atenas and San Isidro, Alajuela, Costa Rica using 1.8-cineole as lure. Observations were made for three days at each of four farms and complemented with data from a year of observations. Orchid bees were in greater abundance in the organic farms (t-Student test). However, lower abundances suggest that an organic farm may be negatively affected by the proximity of non-organic farms, depending on its size and distance. Orchid bees may be indicators of organic coffee farms.

  1. Rapid method for the determination of coumarin, vanillin, and ethyl vanillin in vanilla extract by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Ali, Laila; Perfetti, Gracia; Diachenko, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    A method is described for determining coumarin, vanillin, and ethyl vanillin in vanilla extract products. A product is diluted one-thousand-fold and then analyzed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography using a C18 column and a mobile phase consisting of 55% acetonitrile-45% aqueous acetic acid (1%) solution at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Peaks are detected with a UV detector set at 275 nm. Vanilla extracts were spiked with 250, 500, and 1000 microg/g each of coumarin, vanillin, and ethyl vanillin. Recoveries averaged 97.4, 97.8, and 99.8% for coumarin, vanillin, and ethyl vanillin, respectively, with coefficient of variation values of 1.8, 1.3, and 1.3%, respectively. No significant difference was observed among the 3 spiking levels. A survey of 23 domestic and imported vanilla extract products was conducted using the method. None of the samples contained coumarin. The surveyed samples contained between 0.4 to 13.1 and 0.4 to 2.2 mg/g vanillin and ethyl vanillin, respectively.

  2. Climate change likely to reduce orchid bee abundance even in climatic suitable sites.

    PubMed

    Faleiro, Frederico Valtuille; Nemésio, André; Loyola, Rafael

    2018-06-01

    Studies have tested whether model predictions based on species' occurrence can predict the spatial pattern of population abundance. The relationship between predicted environmental suitability and population abundance varies in shape, strength and predictive power. However, little attention has been paid to the congruence in predictions of different models fed with occurrence or abundance data, in particular when comparing metrics of climate change impact. Here, we used the ecological niche modeling fit with presence-absence and abundance data of orchid bees to predict the effect of climate change on species and assembly level distribution patterns. In addition, we assessed whether predictions of presence-absence models can be used as a proxy to abundance patterns. We obtained georeferenced abundance data of orchid bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Euglossina) in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. Sampling method consisted in attracting male orchid bees to baits of at least five different aromatic compounds and collecting the individuals with entomological nets or bait traps. We limited abundance data to those obtained by similar standard sampling protocol to avoid bias in abundance estimation. We used boosted regression trees to model ecological niches and project them into six climate models and two Representative Concentration Pathways. We found that models based on species occurrences worked as a proxy for changes in population abundance when the output of the models were continuous; results were very different when outputs were discretized to binary predictions. We found an overall trend of diminishing abundance in the future, but a clear retention of climatically suitable sites too. Furthermore, geographic distance to gained climatic suitable areas can be very short, although it embraces great variation. Changes in species richness and turnover would be concentrated in western and southern Atlantic Forest. Our findings offer support to the ongoing debate of suitability

  3. Responses to simulated nitrogen deposition by the neotropical epiphytic orchid Laelia speciosa

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Álvarez, Edison A.; Lindig-Cisneros, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Potential ecophysiological responses to nitrogen deposition, which is considered to be one of the leading causes for global biodiversity loss, were studied for the endangered endemic Mexican epiphytic orchid, Laelia speciosa, via a shadehouse dose-response experiment (doses were 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, and 80 kg N ha−1 yr−1) in order to assess the potential risk facing this orchid given impending scenarios of nitrogen deposition. Lower doses of nitrogen of up to 20 kg N ha yr−1, the dose that led to optimal plant performance, acted as fertilizer. For instance, the production of leaves and pseudobulbs were respectively 35% and 36% greater for plants receiving 20 kg N ha yr−1 than under any other dose. Also, the chlorophyll content and quantum yield peaked at 0.66 ± 0.03 g m−2 and 0.85 ± 0.01, respectively, for plants growing under the optimum dose. In contrast, toxic effects were observed at the higher doses of 40 and 80 kg N ha yr−1. The δ13C for leaves averaged −14.7 ± 0.2‰ regardless of the nitrogen dose. In turn, δ15N decreased as the nitrogen dose increased from 0.9 ± 0.1‰ under 2.5 kg N ha−1yr−1 to −3.1 ± 0.2‰ under 80 kg N ha−1yr−1, indicating that orchids preferentially assimilate NH4+ rather than NO3− of the solution under higher doses of nitrogen. Laelia speciosa showed a clear response to inputs of nitrogen, thus, increasing rates of atmospheric nitrogen deposition can pose an important threat for this species. PMID:26131375

  4. Rapid floral senescence following male function and breeding systems of some tropical orchids.

    PubMed

    Huda, M K; Wilcock, C C

    2012-03-01

    No comparative study of floral senescence following male function among a range of tropical orchid genera has previously been undertaken. The timing and pattern of floral senescence and occurrence of fruit formation were studied following self-, geitonogamous and cross-pollination in 14 epiphytic and two terrestrial orchid species to determine their breeding system and assess the occurrence of floral abscission following pollinaria removal. Both pollination and pollinaria removal caused rapid floral senescence, and the pattern and timing of the floral changes were the same in all treatments. Six Dendrobium species and Pelatantheria insectifera were self-incompatible (SI) and eight other species, including one terrestrial species, were self-compatible (SC). Capsules produced from outcrossing in four SC species, Phalaenopsis cornu-cervi, Eria pubescens, Cleisostoma appendiculatum and Arundina graminifolia, were larger and heavier than those produced after selfing. Reductions in flower life span following pollinaria removal were positively correlated with flower size and longevity of unpollinated flowers but not with position in the inflorescence or nature of the breeding system. Rapid flower senescence following pollinaria removal reported here suggests that it may be widespread in tropical species. The significant association of the response with size of flowers and inflorescences among the species studied suggests that the cost of flower maintenance outweighs the benefit of remaining open for female function after pollinaria have been removed. Both SC and SI species were found among tropical orchids, but variation in capsule size following self- and cross-pollination indicates that there may be a reduction in seed production following selfing, even in SC species, and that fruit formation alone should not be taken as reliable evidence of full self-compatibility. © 2011 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  5. Evaluation of antimycobacterial, leishmanicidal and antibacterial activity of three medicinal orchids of Arunachal Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Manisha; Sarkar, Nandan; Gandharv, Nigam; Apang, Ona; Singh, Sarman; Ghosal, Sabari

    2017-08-01

    The ethnic population of Arunachal Pradesh uses a number of orchids as such, or in decoction for various ailments. Three untapped orchids namely, Rhynchostylis retusa, Tropidia curculioides and Satyrium nepalense, traditionally used in tuberculosis, asthma and cold stage of malaria in folk medicine, were selected for the present study. Dried material of each plant was divided into three parts. Solvent extraction and fractionation afforded altogether 30 extracts and fractions, which were evaluated against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (H37Rv and MDR strain) for antimycobacterial activity; promastigotes and amastigotes of Leishmania donovani for leishmanicidal activity and two gram positive and three gram negative clinical isolates for antibacterial activity. The most significant antimycobacterial activity was observed with n-hexane fraction of the flower of Satyrium nepalense with MIC of 15.7 μg/mL. The most promising leishmanicidal activity was observed with diethyl ether fraction of the roots of Rhynchostylis retusa with IC 50 values of 56.04 and 18.4 μg/mL against promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes respectively. Evaluation of antibacterial activity identified S. nepalense flower n-hexane and R. retusa roots diethyl ether as potential fractions with MIC values of ≤100 μg/mL against selected clinical isolates. This is the first report of the plants possessing antimycobacterial and leishmanicidal activity. The investigation resulted in identification of S. nepalense as the most promising plant, which possessed all three activities in significant proportion. This laboratory outcome could be translated to marketable pharmaceutical products and also to produce maximum benefits to the local of nearby area. Antimycobacterial and leishmanicidal activity of medicinal orchids.

  6. Floral scent and species divergence in a pair of sexually deceptive orchids.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Daniel D L; Selosse, Marc-Andre; Sauve, Mathieu; Francke, Wittko; Vereecken, Nicolas J; Cozzolino, Salvatore; Schiestl, Florian P

    2017-08-01

    Speciation is typically accompanied by the formation of isolation barriers between lineages. Commonly, reproductive barriers are separated into pre- and post-zygotic mechanisms that can evolve with different speed. In this study, we measured the strength of different reproductive barriers in two closely related, sympatric orchids of the Ophrys insectifera group, namely Ophrys insectifera and Ophrys aymoninii to infer possible mechanisms of speciation. We quantified pre- and post-pollination barriers through observation of pollen flow, by performing artificial inter- and intraspecific crosses and analyzing scent bouquets. Additionally, we investigated differences in mycorrhizal fungi as a potential extrinsic factor of post-zygotic isolation. Our results show that floral isolation mediated by the attraction of different pollinators acts apparently as the sole reproductive barrier between the two orchid species, with later-acting intrinsic barriers seemingly absent. Also, the two orchids share most of their fungal mycorrhizal partners in sympatry, suggesting little or no importance of mycorrhizal symbiosis in reproductive isolation. Key traits underlying floral isolation were two alkenes and wax ester, present predominantly in the floral scent of O. aymoninii . These compounds, when applied to flowers of O. insectifera , triggered attraction and a copulation attempt of the bee pollinator of O. aymoninii and thus led to the (partial) breakdown of floral isolation. Based on our results, we suggest that adaptation to different pollinators, mediated by floral scent, underlies species isolation in this plant group. Pollinator switches may be promoted by low pollination success of individuals in dense patches of plants, an assumption that we also confirmed in our study.

  7. Genic rather than genome-wide differences between sexually deceptive Ophrys orchids with different pollinators.

    PubMed

    Sedeek, Khalid E M; Scopece, Giovanni; Staedler, Yannick M; Schönenberger, Jürg; Cozzolino, Salvatore; Schiestl, Florian P; Schlüter, Philipp M

    2014-12-01

    High pollinator specificity and the potential for simple genetic changes to affect pollinator attraction make sexually deceptive orchids an ideal system for the study of ecological speciation, in which change of flower odour is likely important. This study surveys reproductive barriers and differences in floral phenotypes in a group of four closely related, coflowering sympatric Ophrys species and uses a genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) approach to obtain information on the proportion of the genome that is differentiated between species. Ophrys species were found to effectively lack postpollination barriers, but are strongly isolated by their different pollinators (floral isolation) and, to a smaller extent, by shifts in flowering time (temporal isolation). Although flower morphology and perhaps labellum coloration may contribute to floral isolation, reproductive barriers may largely be due to differences in flower odour chemistry. GBS revealed shared polymorphism throughout the Ophrys genome, with very little population structure between species. Genome scans for FST outliers identified few markers that are highly differentiated between species and repeatable in several populations. These genome scans also revealed highly differentiated polymorphisms in genes with putative involvement in floral odour production, including a previously identified candidate gene thought to be involved in the biosynthesis of pseudo-pheromones by the orchid flowers. Taken together, these data suggest that ecological speciation associated with different pollinators in sexually deceptive orchids has a genic rather than a genomic basis, placing these species at an early phase of genomic divergence within the 'speciation continuum'. © 2014 The Authors. Molecular Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Multiple shoot induction from axillary bud cultures of the medicinal orchid, Dendrobium longicornu

    PubMed Central

    Dohling, Stadwelson; Kumaria, Suman; Tandon, Pramod

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Dendrobium longicornu, commonly known as the ‘Long-horned Dendrobium’, is an endangered and medicinally important epiphytic orchid. Over-exploitation and habitat destruction seriously threaten this orchid in Northeast India. Our objective was to develop an efficient protocol for the mass propagation of D. longicornu using axillary bud segments. Methodology and principal results Axillary buds cultured in Murashige and Skoog semi-solid medium supplemented with α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) and 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) readily developed into plantlets. These formed either directly from shoot buds or from intermediary protocorm-like bodies (PLBs). The maximum explant response (86.6 %) was obtained in medium supplemented with NAA at 30 µM, while the maximum number of shoots (4.42) and maximum bud-forming capacity (3.51) were observed in medium containing 15 µM BAP and 5 µM NAA in combination. Protocorm-like bodies were obtained when the medium contained 2,4-D. The maximum number of explants forming PLBs (41.48 %) was obtained in medium containing 15 µM BAP and 15 µM 2,4-D. Well-developed plantlets obtained after 20–25 weeks of culture were acclimatized and eventually transferred to the greenhouse. Over 60 % of these survived to form plants ∼3–4 cm tall after 90 days in glasshouse conditions using a substrate of crushed brick and charcoal, shredded bark and moss. Conclusions The method described can readily be used for the rapid and large-scale regeneration of D. longicornu. Its commercial adoption would reduce the collection of this medicinally important and increasingly rare orchid from the wild. PMID:23136638

  9. Desiccation tolerance, longevity and seed-siring ability of entomophilous pollen from UK native orchid species.

    PubMed

    Marks, Timothy R; Seaton, Philip T; Pritchard, Hugh W

    2014-09-01

    Pollinator-limited seed-set in some terrestrial orchids is compensated for by the presence of long-lived flowers. This study tests the hypothesis that pollen from these insect-pollinated orchids should be desiccation tolerant and relatively long lived using four closely related UK terrestrial species; Anacamptis morio, Dactylorhiza fuchsii, D. maculata and Orchis mascula. Pollen from the four species was harvested from inflorescences and germinated in vitro, both immediately and also after drying to simulate interflower transit. Their tolerance to desiccation and short-term survival was additionally assessed after 3 d equilibration at a range of relative humidities (RHs), and related to constructed sorption isotherms (RH vs. moisture content, MC). Ageing of D. fuchsii pollen was further tested over 2 months against temperature and RH, and the resultant survival curves were subjected to probit analysis, and the distribution of pollen death in time (σ) was determined. The viability and siring ability, following artificial pollinations, were determined in D. fuchsii pollen following storage for 6 years at -20 °C. The pollen from all four species exhibited systematic increases in germinability and desiccation tolerance as anthesis approached, and pollen from open flowers generally retained high germinability. Short-term storage revealed sensitivity to low RH, whilst optimum survival occurred at comparable RHs in all species. Similarly, estimated pollen life spans (σ) at differing temperatures were longest under the dry conditions. Despite a reduction in germination and seeds per capsule, long-term storage of D. fuchsii pollen did not impact on subsequent seed germination in vitro. Substantial pollen desiccation tolerance and life span of the four entomophilous orchids reflects a resilient survival strategy in response to unpredictable pollinator visitation, and presents an alternative approach to germplasm conservation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford

  10. Desiccation tolerance, longevity and seed-siring ability of entomophilous pollen from UK native orchid species

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Timothy R.; Seaton, Philip T.; Pritchard, Hugh W.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Pollinator-limited seed-set in some terrestrial orchids is compensated for by the presence of long-lived flowers. This study tests the hypothesis that pollen from these insect-pollinated orchids should be desiccation tolerant and relatively long lived using four closely related UK terrestrial species; Anacamptis morio, Dactylorhiza fuchsii, D. maculata and Orchis mascula. Methods Pollen from the four species was harvested from inflorescences and germinated in vitro, both immediately and also after drying to simulate interflower transit. Their tolerance to desiccation and short-term survival was additionally assessed after 3 d equilibration at a range of relative humidities (RHs), and related to constructed sorption isotherms (RH vs. moisture content, MC). Ageing of D. fuchsii pollen was further tested over 2 months against temperature and RH, and the resultant survival curves were subjected to probit analysis, and the distribution of pollen death in time (σ) was determined. The viability and siring ability, following artificial pollinations, were determined in D. fuchsii pollen following storage for 6 years at –20 °C. Key Results The pollen from all four species exhibited systematic increases in germinability and desiccation tolerance as anthesis approached, and pollen from open flowers generally retained high germinability. Short-term storage revealed sensitivity to low RH, whilst optimum survival occurred at comparable RHs in all species. Similarly, estimated pollen life spans (σ) at differing temperatures were longest under the dry conditions. Despite a reduction in germination and seeds per capsule, long-term storage of D. fuchsii pollen did not impact on subsequent seed germination in vitro. Conclusions Substantial pollen desiccation tolerance and life span of the four entomophilous orchids reflects a resilient survival strategy in response to unpredictable pollinator visitation, and presents an alternative approach to germplasm

  11. Weak trophic links between a crab-spider and the effective pollinators of a rewardless orchid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero, Carolina; Corley, Juan C.; Aizen, Marcelo A.

    2015-01-01

    Sit and wait predators hunting on flowers are considered to be exploiters of plant-pollinator mutualisms. Several studies have shown that plant-pollinator interactions can be highly susceptible to the impact of a third trophic level, via consumptive (direct) and non-consumptive (indirect) effects that alter pollinator behavior and, ultimately, plant fitness. However, most flowering plants attract a wide array of flower visitors, from which only a subset will be effective pollinators. Hence, a negative effect of an ambush predator on plant fitness should be expected only when: (i) the effective pollinators are part of the predators' diet and/or (ii) the non-consumptive effects of predator presence (e.g. dead prey) alter the behavior of effective pollinators and pollen movement among individual plants. We analyzed the direct and indirect effects of a crab-spider (Misumenops pallidus), on the pollination and reproductive success of Chloraea alpina, a Patagonian rewardless orchid. Our results indicate that most of the flower visitors do not behave as effective pollinators and most effective pollinators were not observed as prey for the crab-spider. In terms of non-consumptive effects, inflorescences with and without spiders and/or dead-prey did not vary the frequency of flower visitors, nor pollinia removal or deposition. Hence, it is not surprising that M. pallidus has a neutral effect on pollinia removal and deposition as well as on fruit and seed set. Similar to other rewardless orchids, the low reproductive success of C. alpina (∼6% fruit set) was associated with the limited number of visits by effective pollinators. Negative top-down effects of a flower-visitor predator on plant pollination may not be anticipated without studying the direct and indirect effects of this predator on the effective pollinators. In pollination systems where effective pollinators visited flowers erratically, such as in deceptive orchids, we expect weak or no effect of predators on

  12. [Visitation of orchid by Melipona capixaba Moure & Camargo (Hymenoptera: Apidae), bee threatened with extinction].

    PubMed

    Resende, Helder C; Barros, Fábio de; Campos, Lúcio A O; Fernandes-Salomão, Tânia M

    2008-01-01

    The stingless bee Melipona capixaba Moure & Camargo is a species restricted to the Atlantic forest in the Domingos Martins, Conceição do Castelo, Venda Nova do Imigrante and Afonso Cláudio County, in the Espírito Santo State, Brazil. Despite its cological importance as pollinator few studies have examined the ecology and biology of this bee. This note relates a case of the M. capixaba workers carrying pollinarium attached to the scuttellum. The pollinaria were identified as belonging to the orchid subtribe Maxillariinae species possibly of the genus Maxillaria sensu lato or Xylobium.

  13. Comparative seed germination and seedling development of the ghost orchid, Dendrophylax lindenii (Orchidaceae), and molecular identification of its mycorrhizal fungus from South Florida

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Nguyen H.; Kane, Michael E.; Radcliffe, Ellen N.; Zettler, Lawrence W.; Richardson, Larry W.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims The endangered leafless ghost orchid, Dendrophylax lindenii, one of the most renowned orchids in the world, is difficult to grow under artificial conditions. Published information on asymbiotic and symbiotic (co-culture with a mycobiont) seed germination, seedling anatomy and developmental morphology of this leafless orchid is completely lacking. This information is critical for the development of efficient procedures for ghost orchid production for successful reintroduction. Methods Ghost orchid seedling early development stages were morphologically and anatomically defined to compare germination, embryo and protocorm maturation and seedling development during asymbiotic and symbiotic culture with one of two mycorrhizal strains (Dlin-379 and Dlin-394) isolated from ghost orchid roots in situ. Key Results Seeds symbiotically germinated at higher rates when cultured with fungal strain Dlin-394 than with strain Dlin-379 or asymbiotically on P723 medium during a 10-week culture period. Fungal pelotons were observed in protocorm cells co-cultured with strain Dlin-394 but not Dlin-379. Some 2-year-old seedlings produced multinode inflorescences in vitro. Production of keikis from inflorescence nodes indicated the capacity for clonal production in the ghost orchid. Conclusions Ghost orchid embryo and seedling development were characterized into seven stages. Fungal strain Dlin-394 was confirmed as a possible ghost orchid germination mycobiont, which significantly promoted seed germination and seedling development. Internal transcribed spacer sequencing data confirmed that Dlin-394 belongs within the genus Ceratobasidium. These results offer the opportunity to examine the benefits of using a mycobiont to enhance in vitro germination and possibly ex vitro acclimatization and sustainability following outplanting. PMID:28025292

  14. Comparative seed germination and seedling development of the ghost orchid, Dendrophylax lindenii (Orchidaceae), and molecular identification of its mycorrhizal fungus from South Florida.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Nguyen H; Kane, Michael E; Radcliffe, Ellen N; Zettler, Lawrence W; Richardson, Larry W

    2017-02-01

    The endangered leafless ghost orchid, Dendrophylax lindenii, one of the most renowned orchids in the world, is difficult to grow under artificial conditions. Published information on asymbiotic and symbiotic (co-culture with a mycobiont) seed germination, seedling anatomy and developmental morphology of this leafless orchid is completely lacking. This information is critical for the development of efficient procedures for ghost orchid production for successful reintroduction. Ghost orchid seedling early development stages were morphologically and anatomically defined to compare germination, embryo and protocorm maturation and seedling development during asymbiotic and symbiotic culture with one of two mycorrhizal strains (Dlin-379 and Dlin-394) isolated from ghost orchid roots in situ KEY RESULTS: Seeds symbiotically germinated at higher rates when cultured with fungal strain Dlin-394 than with strain Dlin-379 or asymbiotically on P723 medium during a 10-week culture period. Fungal pelotons were observed in protocorm cells co-cultured with strain Dlin-394 but not Dlin-379. Some 2-year-old seedlings produced multinode inflorescences in vitro Production of keikis from inflorescence nodes indicated the capacity for clonal production in the ghost orchid. Ghost orchid embryo and seedling development were characterized into seven stages. Fungal strain Dlin-394 was confirmed as a possible ghost orchid germination mycobiont, which significantly promoted seed germination and seedling development. Internal transcribed spacer sequencing data confirmed that Dlin-394 belongs within the genus Ceratobasidium These results offer the opportunity to examine the benefits of using a mycobiont to enhance in vitro germination and possibly ex vitro acclimatization and sustainability following outplanting. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  15. Chromosome-level assembly, genetic and physical mapping of Phalaenopsis aphrodite genome provides new insights into species adaptation and resources for orchid breeding.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ya-Ting; Chen, Wan-Chieh; Chen, Chun-Yi; Ho, Hsiu-Yin; Yeh, Chih-Hsin; Kuo, Yi-Tzu; Su, Chun-Lin; Yen, Shao-Hua; Hsueh, Hao-Yen; Yeh, Jen-Hau; Hsu, Hui-Lan; Tsai, Yi-Hui; Kuo, Tzu-Yen; Chang, Song-Bin; Chen, Kai-Yi; Shih, Ming-Che

    2018-04-28

    The Orchidaceae is a diverse and ecologically important plant family. Approximately 69% of all orchid species are epiphytes, which provide diverse microhabitats for many small animals and fungi in the canopy of tropical rainforests. Moreover, many orchids are of economic importance as food flavourings or ornamental plants. Phalaenopsis aphrodite, an epiphytic orchid, is a major breeding parent of many commercial orchid hybrids. We provide a high-quality chromosome-scale assembly of the P. aphrodite genome. The total length of all scaffolds is 1025.1 Mb, with N50 scaffold size of 19.7 Mb. A total of 28 902 protein-coding genes were identified. We constructed an orchid genetic linkage map, and then anchored and ordered the genomic scaffolds along the linkage groups. We also established a high-resolution pachytene karyotype of P. aphrodite and completed the assignment of linkage groups to the 19 chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization. We identified an expansion in the epiphytic orchid lineage of FRS5-like subclade associated with adaptations to the life in the canopy. Phylogenetic analysis further provides new insights into the orchid lineage-specific duplications of MADS-box genes, which might have contributed to the variation in labellum and pollinium morphology and its accessory structure. To our knowledge, this is the first orchid genome to be integrated with a SNP-based genetic linkage map and validated by physical mapping. The genome and genetic map not only offer unprecedented resources for increasing breeding efficiency in horticultural orchids but also provide an important foundation for future studies in adaptation genomics of epiphytes. © 2018 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Barriers to and enablers of evidence-based practice in perinatal care in the SEA-ORCHID project.

    PubMed

    Turner, Tari; Short, Jacki

    2013-08-01

    The South-East Asia Optimising Reproductive and Child Health in Developing Countries (SEA-ORCHID) project aimed to improve health outcomes for mothers and babies in nine hospitals in South-East Asia by supporting evidence-based perinatal health care. In this research, we aimed to identify and explore the factors that may have acted as barriers to or enablers of evidence-based practice change at each of the hospitals. During the final 6 months of the intervention phase of the project, semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were undertaken with 179 nurses, midwives and doctors from the maternal and neonatal departments at each of the nine participating South-East Asian hospitals. The interviews identified several factors that participants believed had a substantial impact on the effectiveness of the SEA-ORCHID intervention. These included knowledge, skills, hierarchy, multidisciplinarity and leadership, beliefs about consequences, resources, and the nature of the behaviours. The success of the SEA-ORCHID intervention in improving practice may reflect the extent to which tailored strategies were effective in overcoming these barriers. Effective interventions to align practice with evidence rely on identifying and addressing barriers to practice change. The barriers identified in this study may be useful for those designing similar clinical practice improvement projects, as well as for continued efforts to improve practice in the SEA-ORCHID hospitals. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Significant demographic and fine-scale genetic structure in expanding and senescing populations of the terrestrial orchid Cymbidium goeringii (Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Chung, Mi Yoon; Nason, John D; Chung, Myong Gi

    2011-12-01

    Fine-scale genetic structure (FSGS) in plants is influenced by variation in spatial and temporal demographic processes. To determine how demographic structure and FSGS change with stages of population succession, we studied replicate expanding and senescing populations of the Asian terrestrial orchid Cymbidium goeringii. We used spatial autocorrelation methods (O-ring and kinship statistics) to quantify spatial demographic structure and FSGS in two expanding and two senescing populations, also measuring genetic diversity and inbreeding in each. All populations exhibited significant aggregation of individuals and FSGS at short spatial scales. In expanding populations, this finding was associated with high recruitment rates, suggesting restricted seed dispersal. In senescing populations, recruitment was minimal, suggesting alternative mechanisms of aggregation, perhaps including spatial associations with mycorrhizal fungi. All populations had significant evidence of genetic bottlenecks, and inbreeding levels were consistently high. Our results indicate that different successional stages can generate similar patterns of spatial demographic and genetic structure, but as a consequence of different processes. These results contrast with the only other study of senescence effects on population genetic structure in an herbaceous perennial, which found little to no FSGS in senescing populations. With the exception of populations subject to mass collection by orchid sellers, significant FSGS is characteristic of the 16 terrestrial orchid species examined to date. From a conservation perspective, this result suggests that inference of orchid population history will benefit from analyses of both FSGS and demographic structure in combination with other ecological field data.

  18. Virus-induced gene silencing unravels multiple transcription factors involved in floral growth and development in Phalaenopsis orchids.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Hsien; Pan, Zhao-Jun; Lai, Pei-Han; Lu, Hsiang-Chia; Yeh, Hsin-Hung; Hsu, Chia-Chi; Wu, Wan-Lin; Chung, Mei-Chu; Wang, Shyh-Shyan; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2013-09-01

    Orchidaceae, one of the largest angiosperm families, has significant commercial value. Isolation of genes involved in orchid floral development and morphogenesis, scent production, and colouration will advance knowledge of orchid flower formation and facilitate breeding new varieties to increase the commercial value. With high-throughput virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), this study identified five transcription factors involved in various aspects of flower morphogenesis in the orchid Phalaenopsis equestris. These genes are PeMADS1, PeMADS7, PeHB, PebHLH, and PeZIP. Silencing PeMADS1 and PebHLH resulted in reduced flower size together with a pelaloid column containing petal-like epidermal cells and alterations of epidermal cell arrangement in lip lateral lobes, respectively. Silencing PeMADS7, PeHB, and PeZIP alone resulted in abortion of the first three fully developed flower buds of an inflorescence, which indicates the roles of the genes in late flower development. Furthermore, double silencing PeMADS1 and PeMADS6, C- and B-class MADS-box genes, respectively, produced a combinatorial phenotype with two genes cloned in separate vectors. Both PeMADS1 and PeMADS6 are required to ensure the normal development of the lip and column as well as the cuticle formation on the floral epidermal cell surface. Thus, VIGS allows for unravelling the interaction between two classes of MADS transcription factors for dictating orchid floral morphogenesis.

  19. Conservation assessment for southern maidenhair fern and stream orchid in the Black Hills National Forest South Dakota and Wyoming

    J. Hope Hornbeck; Deanna J. Reyher; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Reed W. Crook

    2003-01-01

    Southern maidenhair fern (Adiantum capillus-veneris L.; Pteridaceae) is a cosmopolitan species that is widely distributed in southern North America. Stream orchid (Epipactis gigantea Dougl. ex Hook.; Orchidaceae) occurs in western North America from British Columbia, Canada; south to California, Arizona and New Mexico; and east to...

  20. Pollinator specificity, floral odour chemistry and the phylogeny of Australian sexually deceptive Chiloglottis orchids: implications for pollinator-driven speciation.

    PubMed

    Peakall, Rod; Ebert, Daniel; Poldy, Jacqueline; Barrow, Russell A; Francke, Wittko; Bower, Colin C; Schiestl, Florian P

    2010-10-01

    • Sexually deceptive orchids are predicted to represent a special case of plant speciation where strong reproductive isolation may be achieved by differences in floral scent. • In this study of Australian sexually deceptive Chiloglottis orchids, we performed choice experiments to test for wasp pollinator specificity in the field; identified the compounds involved in pollinator attraction by gas chromatography with electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD), gas chromatography with mass selective detection (GC-MS), chemical synthesis and behavioural bioassays; and mapped our chemical findings on to a phylogeny of the orchids. • Field experiments confirmed pollination is a highly specific interaction, but also revealed a pool of nonpollinating 'minor responder' wasps. Six novel compounds, all 2,5-dialkylcyclohexan-1,3-diones, called 'chiloglottones', were discovered to be involved in pollinator attraction. Bioassays confirmed that pollinator specificity has a strong chemical basis, with specificity among sympatric orchids maintained by either different single compounds or a variation in a blend of two compounds. The phylogenetic overlay confirmed that speciation is always associated with pollinator switching and usually underpinned by chemical change. • If the chemical differences that control reproductive isolation in Chiloglottis have a strong genetic basis, and given the confirmed pool of potential pollinators, we conclude that pollinator-driven speciation appears highly plausible in this system. © The Authors (2010). Journal compilation © New Phytologist Trust (2010).

  1. Virus-induced gene silencing unravels multiple transcription factors involved in floral growth and development in Phalaenopsis orchids

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Hsien; Pan, Zhao-Jun; Lai, Pei-Han; Lu, Hsiang-Chia; Yeh, Hsin-Hung; Hsu, Chia-Chi; Wu, Wan-Lin; Chung, Mei-Chu; Wang, Shyh-Shyan; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Orchidaceae, one of the largest angiosperm families, has significant commercial value. Isolation of genes involved in orchid floral development and morphogenesis, scent production, and colouration will advance knowledge of orchid flower formation and facilitate breeding new varieties to increase the commercial value. With high-throughput virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), this study identified five transcription factors involved in various aspects of flower morphogenesis in the orchid Phalaenopsis equestris. These genes are PeMADS1, PeMADS7, PeHB, PebHLH, and PeZIP. Silencing PeMADS1 and PebHLH resulted in reduced flower size together with a pelaloid column containing petal-like epidermal cells and alterations of epidermal cell arrangement in lip lateral lobes, respectively. Silencing PeMADS7, PeHB, and PeZIP alone resulted in abortion of the first three fully developed flower buds of an inflorescence, which indicates the roles of the genes in late flower development. Furthermore, double silencing PeMADS1 and PeMADS6, C- and B-class MADS-box genes, respectively, produced a combinatorial phenotype with two genes cloned in separate vectors. Both PeMADS1 and PeMADS6 are required to ensure the normal development of the lip and column as well as the cuticle formation on the floral epidermal cell surface. Thus, VIGS allows for unravelling the interaction between two classes of MADS transcription factors for dictating orchid floral morphogenesis. PMID:23956416

  2. Increasing populations of Kentucky lady’s slipper orchid on the Kisatchie National Forest: seedling production and outplanting trials

    James Barnett; Shannan Sharp; Kevin Allen; Andy Scott

    2013-01-01

    The Kentucky lady’s slipper orchid (Cypripedium kentuckiense C.F. Reed) is a tall, stately perennial plant with the largest flowers of any Cypripedium known. Its range includes much of the Southeastern United States, though it is rare throughout its range due to specific edaphic and climatic habitat requirements. In Louisiana, a...

  3. Endangered edible orchids and vulnerable gatherers in the context of HIV/AIDS in the southern highlands of Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Challe, Joyce F X; Price, Lisa Leimar

    2009-12-18

    Tanzania is a wild orchid biodiversity hotspot and has a high prevalence of HIV/AIDS. The wild orchids in the study are endemic and protected by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species. Every year, however, between 2.2 and 4.1 million orchid plants consumed in Zambia are estimated as originating from Tanzania. This research examines the differences between HIV/AIDS wild edible orchid gatherers and non-HIV/AIDS gatherers with regards to the frequency of gathering, salience in naming the various orchids, gathering knowledge acquisition and perceptions regarding the current state of abundance of the edible species. Data was collected through interviews with 224 individuals in the Makete District of Tanzania close to the boarder of Zambia. Free-listings were conducted and Sutrup's Cultural Significance Index (CSI) constructed. The independent t-test was used to compare the differences in gathering frequencies between affected and non-affected gatherers. A multiple comparison of the 4 subgroups (affected adults and children, and non-affected adults and children) in gathering frequencies was done with a one way ANOVA test and its post hoc test. To examine the difference between affected and non-affected gatherers difference in source of gathering knowledge, a chi square test was run. Forty two vernacular names of gathered orchid species were mentioned corresponding to 7 botanical species belongs to genera Disa, Satyrium, Habenaria, Eulophia and Roeperocharis. Ninety-seven percent of HIV/AIDS affected households state that orchid gathering is their primary economic activity compared to non-HIV/AIDS affected households at 9.7 percent. The HIV/AIDS affected gathered significantly more often than the non-affected. AIDS orphans, however, gathered most frequently. Gatherers perceive a decreasing trend of abundance of 6 of the 7 species. Gathering activities were mainly performed in age based peer groups. The results revealed a significant difference between

  4. DECONSTRUCTING THE VANILLA MILKSHAKE: THE DOMINANT EFFECT OF SUCROSE ON SELF-ADMINISTRATION OF NUTRIENT-FLAVOR MIXTURES

    PubMed Central

    Naleid, Amy M.; Grimm, Jeffrey W.; Kessler, David A.; Sipols, Alfred J.; Aliakbari, Sepideh; Bennett, Jennifer L.; Wells, Jason; Figlewicz, Dianne P.

    2007-01-01

    Rats and humans avidly consume flavored foods that contain sucrose and fat, presumably due to their rewarding qualities. In this study, we hypothesized that the complex mixture of corn oil, sucrose, and flavor is more reinforcing than any of these components alone. We observed a concentration-dependent increase in reinforcers received of sucrose solutions (0, 3, 6.25, and 12.5%) in both fixed ratio and progressive ratio procedures, but with equicaloric corn oil solutions (0, 1.4, 2.8, and 5.6%) this finding was replicated only in the fixed ratio procedure. Likewise, addition of 1.4% oil to 3% or 12.5% sucrose increased fixed ratio, but not progressive ratio, reinforcers received relative to those of sucrose alone. Finally, addition of 3% vanilla flavoring did not change self-administration of 3% sucrose or 3% sucrose + 1.4% oil solutions. These data suggest that, calorie-for-calorie, sucrose is the dominant reinforcing component of novel foods that contain a mixture of fat, sucrose, and flavor. PMID:17707949

  5. Deconstructing the vanilla milkshake: the dominant effect of sucrose on self-administration of nutrient-flavor mixtures.

    PubMed

    Naleid, Amy M; Grimm, Jeffrey W; Kessler, David A; Sipols, Alfred J; Aliakbari, Sepideh; Bennett, Jennifer L; Wells, Jason; Figlewicz, Dianne P

    2008-01-01

    Rats and humans avidly consume flavored foods that contain sucrose and fat, presumably due to their rewarding qualities. In this study, we hypothesized that the complex mixture of corn oil, sucrose, and flavor is more reinforcing than any of these components alone. We observed a concentration-dependent increase in reinforcers of sucrose solutions received (0%, 3%, 6.25%, and 12.5%) in both fixed ratio and progressive ratio procedures, but with equicaloric corn oil solutions (0%, 1.4%, 2.8%, and 5.6%) this finding was replicated only in the fixed ratio procedure. Likewise, addition of 1.4% oil to 3% or 12.5% sucrose increased fixed ratio, but not progressive ratio, reinforcers received relative to those of sucrose alone. Finally, addition of 3% vanilla flavoring did not change self-administration of 3% sucrose or 3% sucrose+1.4% oil solutions. These data suggest that, calorie-for-calorie, sucrose is the dominant reinforcing component of novel foods that contain a mixture of fat, sucrose, and flavor.

  6. Quantitative and qualitative variation of fat in model vanilla custard desserts: effects on sensory properties and consumer acceptance.

    PubMed

    Tomaschunas, Maja; Köhn, Ehrhard; Bennwitz, Petra; Hinrichs, Jörg; Busch-Stockfisch, Mechthild

    2013-06-01

    The effects of variation in fat content (0.1% to 15.8%) and type of fat, using different types of milk, dairy cream, or vegetable fat cream, on sensory characteristics and consumer acceptance of starch-based vanilla model custards were studied. Descriptive analysis with trained panelists and consumer testing with untrained assessors were applied. Descriptive data were related to hedonic data using principal component analysis to determine drivers of liking and disliking. Results demonstrated an increasing effect of fat concerning visual and oral thickness, creamy flavor, and fat-related texture properties, as well as a decreasing effect concerning yellow color and surface shine. A lack of fat caused moderate intensities in pudding-like flavor attributes and an intensive jelly texture. Adding a vegetable fat cream led to lower intensities in attributes yellow color, cooked flavor, thick, and jelly texture, whereas intensities in vegetable fat flavor and fat-related texture properties increased. All consumers favored custards with medium fat contents, being high in pudding-like and vegetable fat flavor as well as in fat-related texture attributes. Nonfat custards were rejected due to jelly texture and moderate intensities in pudding-flavor attributes. High-fat samples were liked by some consumers, but their high intensities in thickness, white color, and creamy flavor also drove disliking for others. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  7. Hypolipidaemic and anti-oxidative potential of encapsulated herb (Terminalia arjuna) added vanilla chocolate milk in high cholesterol fed rats.

    PubMed

    Sawale, Pravin Digambar; Pothuraju, Ramesh; Abdul Hussain, Shaik; Kumar, Anuj; Kapila, Suman; Patil, Girdhari Ramdas

    2016-03-15

    Atherosclerosis is associated with coronary artery disease and occurs in developing as well as developed countries. In the present investigation, hypolipidaemic and anti-oxidative properties of encapsulated herb (Terminalia arjuna, 1.8%) added vanilla chocolate dairy drink was evaluated in high cholesterol fed Wistar rats for 60 days. At the end of the experimental period, a significant decrease in the body weight gain by rats receiving the encapsulated herb extract was noted as compared to high cholesterol fed rats. Administration of microencapsulated herb showed a statistically significant decrease in organ weights (epididymal fat and liver). Moreover, a significant decrease in serum lipids such as triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and atherogenic index was observed with encapsulated Terminalia arjuna extract in high cholesterol fed group. Increases in reduced glutathione and decreases in TBARS levels were also reported in both liver and red blood cell lysates with encapsulated herb supplementation. The results demonstrated that the bioactive components (phytosterols, flavanoids, saponins and tannins etc.) which are present in the encapsulated T. arjuna not only withstand the processing conditions but also are effectively released in the intestine and show their effects, such as hypolipidaemic and antioxidant activities, for better treating cardiovascular disease. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Analysis of the TCP genes expressed in the inflorescence of the orchid Orchis italica

    PubMed Central

    De Paolo, Sofia; Gaudio, Luciano; Aceto, Serena

    2015-01-01

    TCP proteins are plant-specific transcription factors involved in many different processes. Because of their involvement in a large number of developmental pathways, their roles have been investigated in various plant species. However, there are almost no studies of this transcription factor family in orchids. Based on the available transcriptome of the inflorescence of the orchid Orchis italica, in the present study we identified 12 transcripts encoding TCP proteins. The phylogenetic analysis showed that they belong to different TCP classes (I and II) and groups (PCF, CIN and CYC/TB1), and that they display a number of conserved motifs when compared with the TCPs of Arabidopsis and Oryza. The presence of a specific cleavage site for the microRNA miRNA319, an important post-transcriptional regulator of several TCP genes in other species, was demonstrated for one transcript of O. italica, and the analysis of the expression pattern of the TCP transcripts in different inflorescence organs and in leaf tissue suggests that some TCP transcripts of O. italica exert their role only in specific tissues, while others may play multiple roles in different tissues. In addition, the evolutionary analysis showed a general purifying selection acting on the coding region of these transcripts. PMID:26531864

  9. Analysis of the TCP genes expressed in the inflorescence of the orchid Orchis italica.

    PubMed

    De Paolo, Sofia; Gaudio, Luciano; Aceto, Serena

    2015-11-04

    TCP proteins are plant-specific transcription factors involved in many different processes. Because of their involvement in a large number of developmental pathways, their roles have been investigated in various plant species. However, there are almost no studies of this transcription factor family in orchids. Based on the available transcriptome of the inflorescence of the orchid Orchis italica, in the present study we identified 12 transcripts encoding TCP proteins. The phylogenetic analysis showed that they belong to different TCP classes (I and II) and groups (PCF, CIN and CYC/TB1), and that they display a number of conserved motifs when compared with the TCPs of Arabidopsis and Oryza. The presence of a specific cleavage site for the microRNA miRNA319, an important post-transcriptional regulator of several TCP genes in other species, was demonstrated for one transcript of O. italica, and the analysis of the expression pattern of the TCP transcripts in different inflorescence organs and in leaf tissue suggests that some TCP transcripts of O. italica exert their role only in specific tissues, while others may play multiple roles in different tissues. In addition, the evolutionary analysis showed a general purifying selection acting on the coding region of these transcripts.

  10. Testing the link between population genetic differentiation and clade diversification in Costa Rican orchids.

    PubMed

    Kisel, Yael; Moreno-Letelier, Alejandra C; Bogarín, Diego; Powell, Martyn P; Chase, Mark W; Barraclough, Timothy G

    2012-10-01

    Species population genetics could be an important factor explaining variation in clade species richness. Here, we use newly generated amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) data to test whether five pairs of sister clades of Costa Rican orchids that differ greatly in species richness also differ in average neutral genetic differentiation within species, expecting that if the strength of processes promoting differentiation within species is phylogenetically heritable, then clades with greater genetic differentiation should diversify more. Contrary to expectation, neutral genetic differentiation does not correlate directly with total diversification in the clades studied. Neutral genetic differentiation varies greatly among species and shows no heritability within clades. Half of the variation in neutral genetic differentiation among populations can be explained by ecological variables, and species-level traits explain the most variation. Unexpectedly, we find no isolation by distance in any species, but genetic differentiation is greater between populations occupying different niches. This pattern corresponds with those observed for microscopic eukaryotes and could reflect effective widespread dispersal of tiny and numerous orchid seeds. Although not providing a definitive answer to whether population genetics processes affect clade diversification, this work highlights the potential for addressing new macroevolutionary questions using a comparative population genetic approach. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  11. An informational diversity framework, illustrated with sexually deceptive orchids in early stages of speciation.

    PubMed

    Smouse, Peter E; Whitehead, Michael R; Peakall, Rod

    2015-11-01

    Reconstructing evolutionary history for emerging species complexes is notoriously difficult, with newly isolated taxa often morphologically cryptic and the signature of reproductive isolation often restricted to a few genes. Evidence from multiple loci and genomes is highly desirable, but multiple inputs require 'common currency' translation. Here we deploy a Shannon information framework, converting into diversity analogue, which provides a common currency analysis for maternally inherited haploid and bi-parentally inherited diploid nuclear markers, and then extend that analysis to construction of minimum-spanning networks for both genomes. The new approach is illustrated with a quartet of cryptic congeners from the sexually deceptive Australian orchid genus Chiloglottis, still in the early stages of speciation. Divergence is more rapid for haploid plastids than for nuclear markers, consistent with the effective population size differential (N(ep) < (N(en)), but divergence patterns are broadly correlated for the two genomes. There are nevertheless intriguing discrepancies between the emerging plastid and nuclear signals of early phylogenetic radiation of these taxa, and neither pattern is entirely consistent with the available information on the sexual cues used by the orchids to lure the pollinators enforcing reproductive isolation. We describe possible extensions of this methodology to multiple ploidy levels and other types of markers, which should increase the range of application to any taxonomic assemblage in the very early stages of reproductive isolation and speciation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Andean Mountain Building Did not Preclude Dispersal of Lowland Epiphytic Orchids in the Neotropics.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escobar, Oscar Alejandro; Gottschling, Marc; Chomicki, Guillaume; Condamine, Fabien L; Klitgård, Bente B; Pansarin, Emerson; Gerlach, Günter

    2017-07-07

    The Andean uplift is one of the major orographic events in the New World and has impacted considerably the diversification of numerous Neotropical lineages. Despite its importance for biogeography, the specific role of mountain ranges as a dispersal barrier between South and Central American lowland plant lineages is still poorly understood. The swan orchids (Cycnoches) comprise ca 34 epiphytic species distributed in lowland and pre-montane forests of Central and South America. Here, we study the historical biogeography of Cycnoches to better understand the impact of the Andean uplift on the diversification of Neotropical lowland plant lineages. Using novel molecular sequences (five nuclear and plastid regions) and twelve biogeographic models, we infer that the most recent common ancestor of Cycnoches originated in Amazonia ca 5 Mya. The first colonization of Central America occurred from a direct migration event from Amazonia, and multiple bidirectional trans-Andean migrations between Amazonia and Central America took place subsequently. Notably, these rare biological exchanges occurred well after major mountain building periods. The Andes have limited plant migration, yet it has seldom allowed episodic gene exchange of lowland epiphyte lineages such as orchids with great potential for effortless dispersal because of the very light, anemochorous seeds.

  13. Expression analysis of fertilization/early embryogenesis-associated genes in Phalaenopsis orchids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jhun-Chen; Wei, Miao-Ju; Fang, Su-Chiung

    2016-10-02

    One of the distinct reproductive programs in orchid species is pollination-triggered ovule development and megasporogenesis. During sexual reproduction, fertilization occurs days to months after pollination. The molecular mechanisms evolved to carry out this strategic reproductive program remain unclear. In the August issue of Plant Physiology 1 , we report comprehensive studies of comparative genome-wide gene expression in various reproductive tissues and the molecular events associated with developmental transitions unique to sexual reproduction of Phalaenopsis aphrodite. Transcriptional factors and signaling components whose expression is specifically enriched in interior ovary tissues when fertilization occurs and embryos start to develop have been identified. Here, we report verification of additional fertilization-associated genes, DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 (PaDRM1), CHROMOMETHYLTRANSFERASE 1 (PaCMT1), SU(VAR)3-9 RELATED PROTEIN 1 (PaSUVR1), INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID inducible 30-like 1 (PaIAA30L1), and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE 3-like 1 (PaEIN3L1), and discuss their potential roles in gametophyte development, epigenetic reprogramming, and hormone regulation during fertilization and establishment of embryo development in Phalaenopsis orchids.

  14. Gene discovery using next-generation pyrosequencing to develop ESTs for Phalaenopsis orchids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Orchids are one of the most diversified angiosperms, but few genomic resources are available for these non-model plants. In addition to the ecological significance, Phalaenopsis has been considered as an economically important floriculture industry worldwide. We aimed to use massively parallel 454 pyrosequencing for a global characterization of the Phalaenopsis transcriptome. Results To maximize sequence diversity, we pooled RNA from 10 samples of different tissues, various developmental stages, and biotic- or abiotic-stressed plants. We obtained 206,960 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) with an average read length of 228 bp. These reads were assembled into 8,233 contigs and 34,630 singletons. The unigenes were searched against the NCBI non-redundant (NR) protein database. Based on sequence similarity with known proteins, these analyses identified 22,234 different genes (E-value cutoff, e-7). Assembled sequences were annotated with Gene Ontology, Gene Family and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways. Among these annotations, over 780 unigenes encoding putative transcription factors were identified. Conclusion Pyrosequencing was effective in identifying a large set of unigenes from Phalaenopsis. The informative EST dataset we developed constitutes a much-needed resource for discovery of genes involved in various biological processes in Phalaenopsis and other orchid species. These transcribed sequences will narrow the gap between study of model organisms with many genomic resources and species that are important for ecological and evolutionary studies. PMID:21749684

  15. DNA barcoding of tuberous Orchidoideae: a resource for identification of orchids used in Salep.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Abdolbaset; Gravendeel, Barbara; Selliah, Sugirthini; Zarré, Shahin; de Boer, Hugo

    2017-03-01

    Tubers of terrestrial orchids are harvested and traded from the eastern Mediterranean to the Caspian Sea for the traditional product Salep. Overexploitation of wild populations and increased middle-class prosperity have escalated prices for Salep, causing overharvesting, depletion of native populations and providing an incentive to expand harvesting to untapped areas in Iran. Limited morphological distinctiveness among traded Salep tubers renders species identification impossible, making it difficult to establish which species are targeted and affected the most. In this study, a reference database of 490 nrITS, trnL-F spacer and matK sequences of 133 taxa was used to identify 150 individual tubers from 31 batches purchased in 12 cities in Iran to assess species diversity in commerce. The sequence reference database consisted of 211 nrITS, 158 trnL-F and 121 matK sequences, including 238 new sequences from collections made for this study. The markers enabled unambiguous species identification with tree-based methods for nrITS in 67% of the tested tubers, 58% for trnL-F and 59% for matK. Species in the genera Orchis (34%), Anacamptis (27%) and Dactylorhiza (19%) were the most common in Salep. Our study shows that all tuberous orchid species in this area are threatened by this trade, and further stresses the urgency of controlling illegal harvesting and cross-border trade of Salep tubers. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Factors influencing IUCN threat levels to orchids across Europe on the basis of national red lists.

    PubMed

    Kull, Tiiu; Selgis, Ulvi; Peciña, Miguel Villoslada; Metsare, Mirjam; Ilves, Aigi; Tali, Kadri; Sepp, Kalev; Kull, Kalevi; Shefferson, Richard P

    2016-09-01

    The red list has become a ubiquitous tool in the conservation of species. We analyzed contemporary trends in the threat levels of European orchids, in total 166 species characterized in 27 national red lists, in relation to their reproductive biology and growth form, distribution area, and land cover where they occur. We found that species in central Europe are more threatened than those in the northern, southern, or Atlantic parts of Europe, while species were least threatened in southern Europe. Nectarless and tuberous species are significantly more threatened than nectariferous and rhizomatous taxa. Land cover (ratios of artificial land cover, area of pastures and grasslands, forests and inland wetlands) also significantly impacted the threat level. A bigger share of artificial land cover increases threat, and a bigger share of pasture and grassland lowers it. Unexpectedly, a bigger share of inland wetland area in a country increased threat level, which we believe may be due to the threatened nature of wetlands themselves relative to other natural land cover types. Finally, species occurring in multiple countries are on average less threatened. We believe that large-scale analysis of current IUCN national red lists as based on their specific categories and criteria may particularly inform the development of coordinated regional or larger-scale management strategies. In this case, we advocate for a coordinated EU protection and restoration strategy particularly aimed at central European orchids and those occurring in wetland area.

  17. Using In Situ Symbiotic Seed Germination to Restore Over-collected Medicinal Orchids in Southwest China

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Shi-Cheng; Burgess, Kevin S.; Cruse-Sanders, Jennifer M.; Liu, Qiang; Fan, Xu-Li; Huang, Hui; Gao, Jiang-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Due to increasing demand for medicinal and horticultural uses, the Orchidaceae is in urgent need of innovative and novel propagation techniques that address both market demand and conservation. Traditionally, restoration techniques have been centered on ex situ asymbiotic or symbiotic seed germination techniques that are not cost-effective, have limited genetic potential and often result in low survival rates in the field. Here, we propose a novel in situ advanced restoration-friendly program for the endangered epiphytic orchid species Dendrobium devonianum, in which a series of in situ symbiotic seed germination trials base on conspecific fungal isolates were conducted at two sites in Yunnan Province, China. We found that percentage germination varied among treatments and locations; control treatments (no inoculum) did not germinate at both sites. We found that the optimal treatment, having the highest in situ seed germination rate (0.94-1.44%) with no significant variation among sites, supported a warm, moist and fixed site that allowed for light penetration. When accounting for seed density, percentage germination was highest (2.78-2.35%) at low densities and did not vary among locations for the treatment that supported optimal conditions. Similarly for the same treatment, seed germination ranged from 0.24 to 5.87% among seasons but also did vary among sites. This study reports on the cultivation and restoration of an endangered epiphytic orchid species by in situ symbiotic seed germination and is likely to have broad application to the horticulture and conservation of the Orchidaceae. PMID:28638388

  18. De novo transcriptome assembly databases for the butterfly orchid Phalaenopsis equestris

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Shan-Ce; Xu, Qing; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Hsu, Jui-Ling; Liang, Chieh-Kai; Luo, Yi-Bo; Liu, Zhong-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Orchids are renowned for their spectacular flowers and ecological adaptations. After the sequencing of the genome of the tropical epiphytic orchid Phalaenopsis equestris, we combined Illumina HiSeq2000 for RNA-Seq and Trinity for de novo assembly to characterize the transcriptomes for 11 diverse P. equestris tissues representing the root, stem, leaf, flower buds, column, lip, petal, sepal and three developmental stages of seeds. Our aims were to contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving the analysed tissue characteristics and to enrich the available data for P. equestris. Here, we present three databases. The first dataset is the RNA-Seq raw reads, which can be used to execute new experiments with different analysis approaches. The other two datasets allow different types of searches for candidate homologues. The second dataset includes the sets of assembled unigenes and predicted coding sequences and proteins, enabling a sequence-based search. The third dataset consists of the annotation results of the aligned unigenes versus the Nonredundant (Nr) protein database, Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) databases with low e-values, enabling a name-based search. PMID:27673730

  19. Micropropagation of Phalaenopsis orchids via protocorms and protocorm-like bodies.

    PubMed

    Paek, Kee Yoeup; Hahn, Eun Joo; Park, So Young

    2011-01-01

    Phalaenopsis orchids have high economic value in the floriculture industry. Hybridization or cross-pollination in the breeding program have proven to be very reliable techniques for the production of a wide range of successful cultivars with attractive combinations of spray length, bud number, flower color and type, fragrance, seasonality, and compactness. In vitro propagation makes it possible to clonally mass propagate hybrids of commercial value and conserved species. However, in vitro culture technologies are still a challenge because of the slow growth of plantlets, low multiplication rate, poor rooting, and somaclonal variation. Although seed-raised plants can be used for conservation and breeding for the selection of superior features, genetic characteristics including seasonality, inflorescence, flower color, and type are not uniform. In this regard, micropropagation through protocorm-like bodies obtained from germinating embryos and somatic tissues is an important strategy in obtaining genetically stable plants and the improvement of quality. However, not all genotypes of Phalaenopsis respond to the same protocol under the same culture conditions and often result in the development of undesirable characteristics. In this chapter, plantlet production in Phalaenopsis orchids via the culture of protocorms from seeds and protocorm-like bodies from leaf sections and root tips are detailed.

  20. Patterns of orchid bee species diversity and turnover among forested plateaus of central Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Antonini, Yasmine; Machado, Carolina de Barros; Galetti, Pedro Manoel; Oliveira, Marcio; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Fernandes, Geraldo Wilson

    2017-01-01

    The knowledge of spatial pattern and geographic beta-diversity is of great importance for biodiversity conservation and interpreting ecological information. Tropical forests, especially the Amazon Rainforest, are well known for their high species richness and low similarity in species composition between sites, both at local and regional scales. We aimed to determine the effect and relative importance of area, isolation and climate on species richness and turnover in orchid bee assemblages among plateaus in central Brazilian Amazonia. Variance partitioning techniques were applied to assess the relative effects of spatial and environmental variables on bee species richness, phylogeny and composition. We hypothesized that greater abundance and richness of orchid bees would be found on larger plateaus, with a set of core species occurring on all of them. We also hypothesized that smaller plateaus would possess lower phylogenetic diversity. We found 55 bee species distributed along the nine sampling sites (plateaus) with 17 of them being singletons. There was a significant decrease in species richness with decreasing size of plateaus, and a significant decrease in the similarity in species composition with greater distance and climatic variation among sampling sites. Phylogenetic diversity varied among the sampling sites but was directly related to species richness. Although not significantly related to plateau area, smaller or larger PDFaith were observed in the smallest and the largest plateaus, respectively.

  1. Patterns of orchid bee species diversity and turnover among forested plateaus of central Amazonia

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Carolina de Barros; Galetti, Pedro Manoel; Oliveira, Marcio; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Fernandes, Geraldo Wilson

    2017-01-01

    The knowledge of spatial pattern and geographic beta-diversity is of great importance for biodiversity conservation and interpreting ecological information. Tropical forests, especially the Amazon Rainforest, are well known for their high species richness and low similarity in species composition between sites, both at local and regional scales. We aimed to determine the effect and relative importance of area, isolation and climate on species richness and turnover in orchid bee assemblages among plateaus in central Brazilian Amazonia. Variance partitioning techniques were applied to assess the relative effects of spatial and environmental variables on bee species richness, phylogeny and composition. We hypothesized that greater abundance and richness of orchid bees would be found on larger plateaus, with a set of core species occurring on all of them. We also hypothesized that smaller plateaus would possess lower phylogenetic diversity. We found 55 bee species distributed along the nine sampling sites (plateaus) with 17 of them being singletons. There was a significant decrease in species richness with decreasing size of plateaus, and a significant decrease in the similarity in species composition with greater distance and climatic variation among sampling sites. Phylogenetic diversity varied among the sampling sites but was directly related to species richness. Although not significantly related to plateau area, smaller or larger PDFaith were observed in the smallest and the largest plateaus, respectively. PMID:28410432

  2. Using In Situ Symbiotic Seed Germination to Restore Over-collected Medicinal Orchids in Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Shao, Shi-Cheng; Burgess, Kevin S; Cruse-Sanders, Jennifer M; Liu, Qiang; Fan, Xu-Li; Huang, Hui; Gao, Jiang-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Due to increasing demand for medicinal and horticultural uses, the Orchidaceae is in urgent need of innovative and novel propagation techniques that address both market demand and conservation. Traditionally, restoration techniques have been centered on ex situ asymbiotic or symbiotic seed germination techniques that are not cost-effective, have limited genetic potential and often result in low survival rates in the field. Here, we propose a novel in situ advanced restoration-friendly program for the endangered epiphytic orchid species Dendrobium devonianum , in which a series of in situ symbiotic seed germination trials base on conspecific fungal isolates were conducted at two sites in Yunnan Province, China. We found that percentage germination varied among treatments and locations; control treatments (no inoculum) did not germinate at both sites. We found that the optimal treatment, having the highest in situ seed germination rate (0.94-1.44%) with no significant variation among sites, supported a warm, moist and fixed site that allowed for light penetration. When accounting for seed density, percentage germination was highest (2.78-2.35%) at low densities and did not vary among locations for the treatment that supported optimal conditions. Similarly for the same treatment, seed germination ranged from 0.24 to 5.87% among seasons but also did vary among sites. This study reports on the cultivation and restoration of an endangered epiphytic orchid species by in situ symbiotic seed germination and is likely to have broad application to the horticulture and conservation of the Orchidaceae.

  3. First experimental evidence for carbon starvation at warm temperatures in epiphytic orchids of tropical cloud forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, Guenter; Roemer, Helena; Fioroni, Tiffany; Olmedo, Inayat; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2017-04-01

    Tropical cloud forests are among the most climate sensitive ecosystems world-wide. The lack of a strong seasonality and the additional dampening of temperature fluctuations by the omnipresence of clouds and fog produce year-round constant climatic conditions. With climate change the presence of clouds and fog is, however, predicted to be reduced. The disappearance of the cooling fog cover will have dramatic consequences for air temperatures, that are predicted to increase locally well over 5 °C by the end of the 21st century. Especially the large number of endemic epiphytic orchids in tropical cloud forests that contribute substantially to the biological diversity of these ecosystems, but are typically adapted to a very narrow climate envelope, are speculated to be very sensitive to the anticipated rise in temperature. In a phytotron experiment we investigated the effect of increasing temperatures on the carbon balance (gas-exchange and the carbon reserve household) of 10 epiphytic orchid species from the genera Dracula, native to tropical, South-American cloud forests. The orchids were exposed to three temperature treatments: i) a constant temperature treatment (23°C/13°C, day/night) simulating natural conditions, ii) a slow temperature ramp of +0.75 K every 10 days, and iii) a fast temperature ramp of +1.5 K every 10 days. CO2 leaf gas-exchanges was determined every 10 days, and concentrations of low molecular weight sugars and starch were analyses from leaf samples throughout the experiment. We found that increasing temperatures had only minor effects on day-time leaf respiration, but led to a moderate increase of respiration during night-time. In contrast to the rather minor effects of higher temperatures on respiration, there was a dramatic decline of net-photosynthesis above day-time temperatures of 29°C, and a complete stop of net-carbon uptake at 33°C in all investigated species. This high sensitivity of photosynthesis to warming was independent of the

  4. Building a Genetic Manipulation Tool Box for Orchid Biology: Identification of Constitutive Promoters and Application of CRISPR/Cas9 in the Orchid, Dendrobium officinale

    PubMed Central

    Kui, Ling; Chen, Haitao; Zhang, Weixiong; He, Simei; Xiong, Zijun; Zhang, Yesheng; Yan, Liang; Zhong, Chaofang; He, Fengmei; Chen, Junwen; Zeng, Peng; Zhang, Guanghui; Yang, Shengchao; Dong, Yang; Wang, Wen; Cai, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Orchidaceae is the second largest family of flowering plants, which is highly valued for its ornamental purposes and medicinal uses. Dendrobium officinale is a special orchid species that can grow without seed vernalization. Because the whole-genome sequence of D. officinale is publicly available, this species is poised to become a convenient research model for the evolutionary, developmental, and genetic studies of Orchidaceae. Despite these advantages, the methods of genetic manipulation are poorly developed in D. officinale. In this study, based on the previously developed Agrobacterium-mediated gene transformation system, we identified several highly efficient promoters for exogenous gene expression and successfully applied the CRISPR/Cas9 system for editing endogenous genes in the genome of D. officinale. These two basic techniques contribute to the genetic manipulation toolbox of Orchidaceae. The pCambia-1301-35SN vector containing the CaMV 35S promoter and the β-glucuronidase (GUS) and Superfolder green fluorescence protein (SG) as reporter genes were introduced into the plant tissues by the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system. Fluorescence emission from the transformed plants confirmed the successful transcription and translation of SG genes into functional proteins. We compared the GUS activity under different promoters including four commonly used promoters (MtHP, CVMV, MMV and PCISV) with CaMV 35S promoter and found that MMV, CVMV, and PCISV were as effective as the 35S promoter. Furthermore, we applied the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing system successfully in D. officinale. By selecting five target genes (C3H, C4H, 4CL, CCR, and IRX) in the lignocellulose biosynthesis pathway, we showed that, for a given target, this system can generate edits (insertions, deletions, or substitutions) at a rate of 10 to 100%. These results showed that our two genetic manipulation tools can efficiently express exogenous genes and edit endogenous genes in D

  5. Building a Genetic Manipulation Tool Box for Orchid Biology: Identification of Constitutive Promoters and Application of CRISPR/Cas9 in the Orchid, Dendrobium officinale.

    PubMed

    Kui, Ling; Chen, Haitao; Zhang, Weixiong; He, Simei; Xiong, Zijun; Zhang, Yesheng; Yan, Liang; Zhong, Chaofang; He, Fengmei; Chen, Junwen; Zeng, Peng; Zhang, Guanghui; Yang, Shengchao; Dong, Yang; Wang, Wen; Cai, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Orchidaceae is the second largest family of flowering plants, which is highly valued for its ornamental purposes and medicinal uses. Dendrobium officinale is a special orchid species that can grow without seed vernalization. Because the whole-genome sequence of D. officinale is publicly available, this species is poised to become a convenient research model for the evolutionary, developmental, and genetic studies of Orchidaceae. Despite these advantages, the methods of genetic manipulation are poorly developed in D. officinale . In this study, based on the previously developed Agrobacterium -mediated gene transformation system, we identified several highly efficient promoters for exogenous gene expression and successfully applied the CRISPR/Cas9 system for editing endogenous genes in the genome of D. officinale . These two basic techniques contribute to the genetic manipulation toolbox of Orchidaceae. The pCambia-1301-35SN vector containing the CaMV 35S promoter and the β-glucuronidase ( GUS ) and Superfolder green fluorescence protein (SG) as reporter genes were introduced into the plant tissues by the Agrobacterium -mediated transformation system. Fluorescence emission from the transformed plants confirmed the successful transcription and translation of SG genes into functional proteins. We compared the GUS activity under different promoters including four commonly used promoters (MtHP, CVMV, MMV and PCISV) with CaMV 35S promoter and found that MMV, CVMV, and PCISV were as effective as the 35S promoter. Furthermore, we applied the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing system successfully in D. officinale . By selecting five target genes ( C3H, C4H, 4CL, CCR, and IRX ) in the lignocellulose biosynthesis pathway, we showed that, for a given target, this system can generate edits (insertions, deletions, or substitutions) at a rate of 10 to 100%. These results showed that our two genetic manipulation tools can efficiently express exogenous genes and edit endogenous

  6. Cymbidium chlorotic mosaic virus, a new sobemovirus isolated from a spring orchid (Cymbidium goeringii) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hideki; Takemoto, Shogo; Maruyama, Kazuyuki; Chiba, Sotaro; Andika, Ida Bagus; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-08-01

    Cymbidium chlorotic mosaic virus (CyCMV), isolated from a spring orchid (Cymbidium goeringii), was characterized molecularly. CyCMV isometric virions comprise a single, positive-strand RNA genome of 4,083 nucleotides and 30-kDa coat protein. The virus genome contains five overlapping open reading frames with a genomic organization similar to that of sobemoviruses. BLAST searches and phylogenetic analysis revealed that CyCMV is most closely related to papaya lethal yellowing virus, a proposed dicot-infecting sobemovirus (58.8 % nucleotide sequence identity), but has a relatively distant relationship to monocot-infecting sobemoviruses, with only modest sequence identities. This suggests that CyCMV is a new monocot-infecting member of the floating genus Sobemovirus.

  7. Multiple Geographical Origins of Environmental Sex Determination enhanced the diversification of Darwin's Favourite Orchids.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escobar, Oscar Alejandro; Chomicki, Guillaume; Condamine, Fabien L; de Vos, Jurriaan M; Martins, Aline C; Smidt, Eric C; Klitgård, Bente; Gerlach, Günter; Heinrichs, Jochen

    2017-10-10

    Environmental sex determination (ESD) - a change in sexual function during an individual life span driven by environmental cues - is an exceedingly rare sexual system among angiosperms. Because ESD can directly affect reproduction success, it could influence diversification rate as compared with lineages that have alternative reproductive systems. Here we test this hypothesis using a solid phylogenetic framework of Neotropical Catasetinae, the angiosperm lineage richest in taxa with ESD. We assess whether gains of ESD are associated with higher diversification rates compared to lineages with alternative systems while considering additional traits known to positively affect diversification rates in orchids. We found that ESD has evolved asynchronously three times during the last ~5 Myr. Lineages with ESD have consistently higher diversification rates than related lineages with other sexual systems. Habitat fragmentation due to mega-wetlands extinction, and climate instability are suggested as the driving forces for ESD evolution.

  8. Characterization of microsatellite loci for an Australian epiphytic orchid, Dendrobium calamiforme, using illumina sequencing

    DOE PAGES

    Trapnell, Dorset W.; Beasley, Rochelle R.; Lance, Stacey L.; ...

    2015-06-05

    Our premise describes how microsatellite loci were developed for the epiphytic pencil orchid Dendrobium calamiforme for population genetic and phylogeographic investigation of this Australian taxon. Nineteen microsatellite loci were identified from an Illumina paired-end shotgun library of D. calamiforme. Polymorphism and genetic diversity were assessed in 24 individuals from five populations separated by a maximum distance of ~80 km. All loci were polymorphic with two to 14 alleles per locus, expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.486 to 0.902, and probability of identity values ranging from 0.018 to 0.380. In conclusion, these novel markers will serve as valuable tools for investigation ofmore » levels of genetic diversity as well as patterns of gene flow, genetic structure, and phylogeographic history.« less

  9. Characterization of microsatellite loci for an Australian epiphytic orchid, Dendrobium calamiforme, using Illumina sequencing1

    PubMed Central

    Trapnell, Dorset W.; Beasley, Rochelle R.; Lance, Stacey L.; Field, Ashley R.; Jones, Kenneth L.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for the epiphytic pencil orchid Dendrobium calamiforme for population genetic and phylogeographic investigation of this Australian taxon. Methods and Results: Nineteen microsatellite loci were identified from an Illumina paired-end shotgun library of D. calamiforme. Polymorphism and genetic diversity were assessed in 24 individuals from five populations separated by a maximum distance of ∼80 km. All loci were polymorphic with two to 14 alleles per locus, expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.486 to 0.902, and probability of identity values ranging from 0.018 to 0.380. Conclusions: These novel markers will serve as valuable tools for investigation of levels of genetic diversity as well as patterns of gene flow, genetic structure, and phylogeographic history. PMID:26082878

  10. Amino Acid Change in an Orchid Desaturase Enables Mimicry of the Pollinator’s Sex Pheromone

    DOE PAGES

    Sedeek, Khalid E. M.; Whittle, Edward; Guthörl, Daniela; ...

    2016-05-19

    Here, we show that mimicry illustrates the power of selection to produce phenotypic convergence in biology. A striking example is the imitation of female insects by plants that are pollinated by sexual deception of males of the same insect species. This involves mimicry of visual, tactile, and chemical signals of females, especially their sex pheromones. The Mediterranean orchid Ophrys exaltata employs chemical mimicry of cuticular hydrocarbons, particularly the 7-alkenes, in an insect sex pheromone to attract and elicit mating behavior in its pollinators, males of the cellophane bee Colletes cunicularius. A difference in alkene double-bond positions is responsible for reproductivemore » isolation between O. exaltata and closely related species, such as O. sphegodes. We show that these 7-alkenes are likely determined by the action of the stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein desaturase (SAD) homolog SAD5. After gene duplication, changes in subcellular localization relative to the ancestral housekeeping desaturase may have allowed proto-SAD5’s reaction products to undergo further biosynthesis to both 7- and 9-alkenes. Such ancestral coproduction of two alkene classes may have led to pollinator-mediated deleterious pleiotropy. Despite possible evolutionary intermediates with reduced activity, amino acid changes at the bottom of the substrate-binding cavity have conferred enzyme specificity for 7-alkene biosynthesis by preventing the binding of longer-chained fatty acid (FA) precursors by the enzyme. In conclusion, this change in desaturase function enabled the orchid to perfect its chemical mimicry of pollinator sex pheromones by escape from deleterious pleiotropy, supporting a role of pleiotropy in determining the possible trajectories of adaptive evolution.« less

  11. Seasonal cycles, phylogenetic assembly, and functional diversity of orchid bee communities.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Santiago R; Hernández, Carlos; Link, Andres; López-Uribe, Margarita M

    2015-05-01

    Neotropical rainforests sustain some of the most diverse terrestrial communities on Earth. Euglossine (or orchid) bees are a diverse lineage of insect pollinators distributed throughout the American tropics, where they provide pollination services to a staggering diversity of flowering plant taxa. Elucidating the seasonal patterns of phylogenetic assembly and functional trait diversity of bee communities can shed new light into the mechanisms that govern the assembly of bee pollinator communities and the potential effects of declining bee populations. Male euglossine bees collect, store, and accumulate odoriferous compounds (perfumes) to subsequently use during courtship display. Thus, synthetic chemical baits can be used to attract and monitor euglossine bee populations. We conducted monthly censuses of orchid bees in three sites in the Magdalena valley of Colombia - a region where Central and South American biotas converge - to investigate the structure, diversity, and assembly of euglossine bee communities through time in relation to seasonal climatic cycles. In particular, we tested the hypothesis that phylogenetic community structure and functional trait diversity changed in response to seasonal rainfall fluctuations. All communities exhibited strong to moderate phylogenetic clustering throughout the year, with few pronounced bursts of phylogenetic overdispersion that coincided with the transition from wet-to-dry seasons. Despite the heterogeneous distribution of functional traits (e.g., body size, body mass, and proboscis length) and the observed seasonal fluctuations in phylogenetic diversity, we found that functional trait diversity, evenness, and divergence remained constant during all seasons in all communities. However, similar to the pattern observed with phylogenetic diversity, functional trait richness fluctuated markedly with rainfall in all sites. These results emphasize the importance of considering seasonal fluctuations in community assembly and

  12. New phylogenetic insights toward developing a natural generic classification of African angraecoid orchids (Vandeae, Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Simo-Droissart, Murielle; Plunkett, Gregory M; Droissart, Vincent; Edwards, Molly B; Farminhão, João N M; Ječmenica, Vladimir; D'haijère, Tania; Lowry, Porter P; Sonké, Bonaventure; Micheneau, Claire; Carlsward, Barbara S; Azandi, Laura; Verlynde, Simon; Hardy, Olivier J; Martos, Florent; Bytebier, Benny; Fischer, Eberhard; Stévart, Tariq

    2018-09-01

    Despite significant progress made in recent years toward developing an infrafamilial classification of Orchidaceae, our understanding of relationships among and within tribal and subtribal groups of epidendroid orchids remains incomplete. To reassess generic delimitation among one group of these epidendroids, the African angraecoids, phylogenetic relationships were inferred from DNA sequence data from three regions, ITS, matK, and the trnL-trnF intergenic spacer, obtained from a broadly representative sample of taxa. Parsimony and Bayesian analyses yielded highly resolved trees that are in clear agreement and show significant support for many key clades within subtribe Angraecinae s.l. Angraecoid orchids comprise two well-supported clades: an African/American group and an Indian Ocean group. Molecular results also support many previously proposed relationships among genera, but also reveal some unexpected relationships. The genera Aerangis, Ancistrorhynchus, Bolusiella, Campylocentrum, Cyrtorchis, Dendrophylax, Eurychone, Microcoelia, Nephrangis, Podangis and Solenangis are all shown to be monophyletic, but Angraecopsis, Diaphananthe and Margelliantha are polyphyletic. Diaphananthe forms three well-supported clades, one of which might represent a new genus, and Rhipidoglossum is paraphyletic with respect to Cribbia and Rhaesteria, and also includes taxa currently assigned to Margelliantha. Tridactyle too is paraphyletic as Eggelingia is embedded within it. The large genus Angraecum is confirmed to be polyphyletic and several groups will have to be recognized as separate genera, including sections Dolabrifolia and Hadrangis. The recently segregated genus Pectinariella (previously recognized as A. sect. Pectinaria) is polyphyletic and its Continental African species will have to be removed. Similarly, some of the species recently transferred to Angraecoides that were previously placed in Angraecum sects. Afrangraecum and Conchoglossum will have to be moved and

  13. Amino Acid Change in an Orchid Desaturase Enables Mimicry of the Pollinator's Sex Pheromone.

    PubMed

    Sedeek, Khalid E M; Whittle, Edward; Guthörl, Daniela; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Shanklin, John; Schlüter, Philipp M

    2016-06-06

    Mimicry illustrates the power of selection to produce phenotypic convergence in biology [1]. A striking example is the imitation of female insects by plants that are pollinated by sexual deception of males of the same insect species [2-4]. This involves mimicry of visual, tactile, and chemical signals of females [2-7], especially their sex pheromones [8-11]. The Mediterranean orchid Ophrys exaltata employs chemical mimicry of cuticular hydrocarbons, particularly the 7-alkenes, in an insect sex pheromone to attract and elicit mating behavior in its pollinators, males of the cellophane bee Colletes cunicularius [11-13]. A difference in alkene double-bond positions is responsible for reproductive isolation between O. exaltata and closely related species, such as O. sphegodes [13-16]. We show that these 7-alkenes are likely determined by the action of the stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein desaturase (SAD) homolog SAD5. After gene duplication, changes in subcellular localization relative to the ancestral housekeeping desaturase may have allowed proto-SAD5's reaction products to undergo further biosynthesis to both 7- and 9-alkenes. Such ancestral coproduction of two alkene classes may have led to pollinator-mediated deleterious pleiotropy. Despite possible evolutionary intermediates with reduced activity, amino acid changes at the bottom of the substrate-binding cavity have conferred enzyme specificity for 7-alkene biosynthesis by preventing the binding of longer-chained fatty acid (FA) precursors by the enzyme. This change in desaturase function enabled the orchid to perfect its chemical mimicry of pollinator sex pheromones by escape from deleterious pleiotropy, supporting a role of pleiotropy in determining the possible trajectories of adaptive evolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Flower development of Phalaenopsis orchid involves functionally divergent SEPALLATA-like genes

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhao-Jun; Chen, You-Yi; Du, Jian-Syun; Chen, Yun-Yu; Chung, Mei-Chu; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Wang, Chun-Neng; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    The Phalaenopsis orchid produces complex flowers that are commercially valuable, which has promoted the study of its flower development. E-class MADS-box genes, SEPALLATA (SEP), combined with B-, C- and D-class MADS-box genes, are involved in various aspects of plant development, such as floral meristem determination, organ identity, fruit maturation, seed formation and plant architecture. Four SEP-like genes were cloned from Phalaenopsis orchid, and the duplicated PeSEPs were grouped into PeSEP1/3 and PeSEP2/4. All PeSEPs were expressed in all floral organs. PeSEP2 expression was detectable in vegetative tissues. The study of protein–protein interactions suggested that PeSEPs may form higher order complexes with the B-, C-, D-class and AGAMOUS LIKE6-related MADS-box proteins to determine floral organ identity. The tepal became a leaf-like organ when PeSEP3 was silenced by virus-induced silencing, with alterations in epidermis identity and contents of anthocyanin and chlorophyll. Silencing of PeSEP2 had minor effects on the floral phenotype. Silencing of the E-class genes PeSEP2 and PeSEP3 resulted in the downregulation of B-class PeMADS2-6 genes, which indicates an association of PeSEP functions and B-class gene expression. These findings reveal the important roles of PeSEP in Phalaenopsis floral organ formation throughout the developmental process by the formation of various multiple protein complexes. PMID:24571782

  15. Amino Acid Change in an Orchid Desaturase Enables Mimicry of the Pollinator’s Sex Pheromone

    SciT

    Sedeek, Khalid E. M.; Whittle, Edward; Guthörl, Daniela

    Here, we show that mimicry illustrates the power of selection to produce phenotypic convergence in biology. A striking example is the imitation of female insects by plants that are pollinated by sexual deception of males of the same insect species. This involves mimicry of visual, tactile, and chemical signals of females, especially their sex pheromones. The Mediterranean orchid Ophrys exaltata employs chemical mimicry of cuticular hydrocarbons, particularly the 7-alkenes, in an insect sex pheromone to attract and elicit mating behavior in its pollinators, males of the cellophane bee Colletes cunicularius. A difference in alkene double-bond positions is responsible for reproductivemore » isolation between O. exaltata and closely related species, such as O. sphegodes. We show that these 7-alkenes are likely determined by the action of the stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein desaturase (SAD) homolog SAD5. After gene duplication, changes in subcellular localization relative to the ancestral housekeeping desaturase may have allowed proto-SAD5’s reaction products to undergo further biosynthesis to both 7- and 9-alkenes. Such ancestral coproduction of two alkene classes may have led to pollinator-mediated deleterious pleiotropy. Despite possible evolutionary intermediates with reduced activity, amino acid changes at the bottom of the substrate-binding cavity have conferred enzyme specificity for 7-alkene biosynthesis by preventing the binding of longer-chained fatty acid (FA) precursors by the enzyme. In conclusion, this change in desaturase function enabled the orchid to perfect its chemical mimicry of pollinator sex pheromones by escape from deleterious pleiotropy, supporting a role of pleiotropy in determining the possible trajectories of adaptive evolution.« less

  16. Speciation via floral heterochrony and presumed mycorrhizal host switching of endemic butterfly orchids on the Azorean archipelago.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Richard M; Rudall, Paula J; Bidartondo, Martin I; Cozzolino, Salvatore; Tranchida-Lombardo, Valentina; Carine, Mark A; Moura, Mónica

    2014-06-01

    • Premise of the study: Most orchid species native to the Macaronesian islands reflect immigration from western Europe or North Africa followed by anagenesis. The only putative exception is the butterfly orchids (Platanthera) of the Azores, where three species apparently reflect at least one cladogenetic speciation event. This multidisciplinary study explores the origin, speciation, phenotypic, and genotypic cohesion of these Azorean species and their mainland relatives.• Methods: Plants of Platanthera from 30 localities spanning all nine Azorean islands were compared with those of four continental European relatives for 38 morphometric characters; substantial subsets were also analyzed for plastid microsatellites, and for nrITS of both the orchids and their mycorrhizae.• Key results: Although the three Azorean and four mainland species are all readily distinguished morphometrically using several floral characters, and hybridization appears rare, divergence in ITS and especially plastid sequences is small. Despite occupying similar laurisilva habitats, the Azorean species differ radically in the identities and diversity of their mycorrhizal partners; specialism apparently increases rarity.• Conclusions: Although morphological evidence suggests two invasions of the islands from NW Africa and/or SW Europe, ITS data imply only one. As the molecular data are unable to distinguish among the potential mainland ancestors, two scenarios of relationship are explored that imply different ancestors. Both scenarios require both anagenetic and cladogenetic speciation events, involving homoplastic shifts in overall flower size and (often substantial) changes in the relative dimensions of individual floral organs. Limited genotypic divergence among the three species compared with greater phenotypic divergence suggests comparatively recent speciation. Mycorrhizae may be the most critical factor dictating the respective ecological tolerances, and thus the relative

  17. Rapid evolution of chemosensory receptor genes in a pair of sibling species of orchid bees (Apidae: Euglossini).

    PubMed

    Brand, Philipp; Ramírez, Santiago R; Leese, Florian; Quezada-Euan, J Javier G; Tollrian, Ralph; Eltz, Thomas

    2015-08-28

    Insects rely more on chemical signals (semiochemicals) than on any other sensory modality to find, identify, and choose mates. In most insects, pheromone production is typically regulated through biosynthetic pathways, whereas pheromone sensory detection is controlled by the olfactory system. Orchid bees are exceptional in that their semiochemicals are not produced metabolically, but instead male bees collect odoriferous compounds (perfumes) from the environment and store them in specialized hind-leg pockets to subsequently expose during courtship display. Thus, the olfactory sensory system of orchid bees simultaneously controls male perfume traits (sender components) and female preferences (receiver components). This functional linkage increases the opportunities for parallel evolution of male traits and female preferences, particularly in response to genetic changes of chemosensory detection (e.g. Odorant Receptor genes). To identify whether shifts in pheromone composition among related lineages of orchid bees are associated with divergence in chemosensory genes of the olfactory periphery, we searched for patterns of divergent selection across the antennal transcriptomes of two recently diverged sibling species Euglossa dilemma and E. viridissima. We identified 3185 orthologous genes including 94 chemosensory loci from five different gene families (Odorant Receptors, Ionotropic Receptors, Gustatory Receptors, Odorant Binding Proteins, and Chemosensory Proteins). Our results revealed that orthologs with signatures of divergent selection between E. dilemma and E. viridissima were significantly enriched for chemosensory genes. Notably, elevated signals of divergent selection were almost exclusively observed among chemosensory receptors (i.e. Odorant Receptors). Our results suggest that rapid changes in the chemosensory gene family occurred among closely related species of orchid bees. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that strong divergent selection

  18. Evolution of the climatic tolerance and postglacial range changes of the most primitive orchids (Apostasioideae) within Sundaland, Wallacea and Sahul.

    PubMed

    Kolanowska, Marta; Mystkowska, Katarzyna; Kras, Marta; Dudek, Magdalena; Konowalik, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    The location of possible glacial refugia of six Apostasioideae representatives is estimated based on ecological niche modeling analysis. The distribution of their suitable niches during the last glacial maximum (LGM) is compared with their current potential and documented geographical ranges. The climatic factors limiting the studied species occurrences are evaluated and the niche overlap between the studied orchids is assessed and discussed. The predicted niche occupancy profiles and reconstruction of ancestral climatic tolerances suggest high level of phylogenetic niche conservatism within Apostasioideae.

  19. The effects of smoke derivatives on in vitro seed germination and development of the leopard orchid Ansellia africana.

    PubMed

    Papenfus, H B; Naidoo, D; Pošta, M; Finnie, J F; Van Staden, J

    2016-03-01

    Plant-derived smoke and smoke-isolated compounds stimulate germination in seeds from over 80 genera. It has also been reported that smoke affects overall plant vigour and has a stimulatory effect on pollen growth. The effect of smoke on orchid seeds, however, has not been assessed. In South Africa, orchid seeds from several genera may be exposed to smoke when they are released from their seedpods. It is therefore possible that smoke may affect their germination and growth. Therefore, the effects of smoke [applied as smoke-water (SW)] and two smoke-derived compounds, karrikinolide (KAR1 ) and trimethylbutenolide (TMB), were investigated on the germination and growth of orchid seeds in vitro. The effect of SW, KAR1 and TMB were investigated on the endangered epiphytic orchid, Ansellia africana, which is indigenous to tropical areas of Africa. Smoke-water, KAR1 and TMB were infused in half-strength MS medium. The number of germinated seeds and number of seeds and protocorm bodies to reach predetermined developmental stages were recorded on a weekly basis using a dissecting microscope for a 13-week period. Infusing SW 1:250 (v:v) into half-strength MS medium significantly increased the germination rate index (GRI) and the development rate index (DRI) of the A. africana seeds. All the SW treatments significantly increased the number of large protocorm bodies at the final stage of development. Infusing KAR1 into the growing medium had no significant effect on germination or development of the seeds. The TMB treatment, however, significantly reduced the GRI and DRI of A. africana seeds. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  20. Overexpression of DOSOC1, an ortholog of Arabidopsis SOC1, promotes flowering in the orchid Dendrobium Chao Parya Smile.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lihua; Wang, Yanwen; Yu, Hao

    2013-04-01

    SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 (SOC1) encodes a MADS-box protein that plays an essential role in integrating multiple flowering signals to regulate the transition from vegetative to reproductive development in the model plant Arabidopsis. Although SOC1-like genes have been isolated in various angiosperms, its orthologs in Orchidaceae, one of the largest families of flowering plants, are so far unknown. To investigate the regulatory mechanisms of flowering time control in orchids, we isolated a SOC1-like gene, DOSOC1, from Dendrobium Chao Praya Smile. DOSOC1 was highly expressed in reproductive organs, including inflorescence apices, pedicels, floral buds and open flowers. Its expression significantly increased in whole plantlets during the transition from vegetative to reproductive development, which usually occurred after 8 weeks of culture in Dendrobium Chao Praya Smile. In the shoot apex at the floral transitional stage, DOSOC1 was particularly expressed in emerging floral meristems. Overexpression of DOSOC1 in wild-type Arabidopsis plants resulted in early flowering, which was coupled with the up-regulation of two other flowering promoters, AGAMOUS-LIKE 24 and LEAFY. In addition, overexpression of DOSOC1 was able partially to complement the late-flowering phenotype of Arabidopsis soc1-2 loss-of-function mutants. Furthermore, we successfully created seven 35S:DOSOC1 transgenic Dendrobium orchid lines, which consistently exhibited earlier flowering than wild-type orchids. Our results suggest that SOC1-like genes play an evolutionarily conserved role in promoting flowering in the Orchidaceae family, and that DOSOC1 isolated from Dendrobium Chao Praya Smile could serve as an important target for genetic manipulation of flowering time in orchids.

  1. Three 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Genes Regulated by Primary and Secondary Pollination Signals in Orchid Flowers1

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Anhthu Q.; Neill, Sharman D. O'

    1998-01-01

    The temporal and spatial expression patterns of three 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase genes were investigated in pollinated orchid (Phalaenopsis spp.) flowers. Pollination signals initiate a cascade of development events in multiple floral organs, including the induction of ethylene biosynthesis, which coordinates several postpollination developmental responses. The initiation and propagation of ethylene biosynthesis is regulated by the coordinated expression of three distinct ACC synthase genes in orchid flowers. One ACC synthase gene (Phal-ACS1) is regulated by ethylene and participates in amplification and interorgan transmission of the pollination signal, as we have previously described in a related orchid genus. Two additional ACC synthase genes (Phal-ACS2 and Phal-ACS3) are expressed primarily in the stigma and ovary of pollinated orchid flowers. Phal-ACS2 mRNA accumulated in the stigma within 1 h after pollination, whereas Phal-ACS1 mRNA was not detected until 6 h after pollination. Similar to the expression of Phal-ACS2, the Phal-ACS3 gene was expressed within 2 h after pollination in the ovary. Exogenous application of auxin, but not ACC, mimicked pollination by stimulating a rapid increase in ACC synthase activity in the stigma and ovary and inducing Phal-ACS2 and Phal-ACS3 mRNA accumulation in the stigma and ovary, respectively. These results provide the basis for an expanded model of interorgan regulation of three ACC synthase genes that respond to both primary (Phal-ACS2 and Phal-ACS3) and secondary (Phal-ACS1) pollination signals. PMID:9449850

  2. Global warming not so harmful for all plants - response of holomycotrophic orchid species for the future climate change.

    PubMed

    Kolanowska, Marta; Kras, Marta; Lipińska, Monika; Mystkowska, Katarzyna; Szlachetko, Dariusz L; Naczk, Aleksandra M

    2017-10-05

    Current and expected changes in global climate are major threat for biological diversity affecting individuals, communities and ecosystems. However, there is no general trend in the plants response to the climate change. The aim of present study was to evaluate impact of the future climate changes on the distribution of holomycotrophic orchid species using ecological niche modeling approach. Three different scenarios of future climate changes were tested to obtain the most comprehensive insight in the possible habitat loss of 16 holomycotrophic orchids. The extinction of Cephalanthera austiniae was predicted in all analyses. The coverage of suitable niches of Pogoniopsis schenckii will decrease to 1-30% of its current extent. The reduction of at least 50% of climatic niche of Erythrorchis cassythoides and Limodorum abortivum will be observed. In turn, the coverage of suitable niches of Hexalectris spicata, Uleiorchis ulaei and Wullschlaegelia calcarata may be even 16-74 times larger than in the present time. The conducted niche modeling and analysis of the similarity of their climatic tolerance showed instead that the future modification of the coverage of their suitable niches will not be unified and the future climate changes may be not so harmful for holomycotrophic orchids as expected.

  3. On the value of nuclear and mitochondrial gene sequences for reconstructing the phylogeny of vanilloid orchids (Vanilloideae, Orchidaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Kenneth M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Most molecular phylogenetic studies of Orchidaceae have relied heavily on DNA sequences from the plastid genome. Nuclear and mitochondrial loci have only been superficially examined for their systematic value. Since 40% of the genera within Vanilloideae are achlorophyllous mycoheterotrophs, this is an ideal group of orchids in which to evaluate non-plastid gene sequences. Methods Phylogenetic reconstructions for Vanilloideae were produced using independent and combined data from the nuclear 18S, 5·8S and 26S rDNA genes and the mitochondrial atpA gene and nad1b-c intron. Key Results These new data indicate placements for genera such as Lecanorchis and Galeola, for which plastid gene sequences have been mostly unavailable. Nuclear and mitochondrial parsimony jackknife trees are congruent with each other and previously published trees based solely on plastid data. Because of high rates of sequence divergence among vanilloid orchids, even the short 5·8S rDNA gene provides impressive levels of resolution and support. Conclusions Orchid systematists are encouraged to sequence nuclear and mitochondrial gene regions along with the growing number of plastid loci available. PMID:19251715

  4. Armament Imbalances: Match and Mismatch in Plant-Pollinator Traits of Highly Specialized Long-Spurred Orchids

    PubMed Central

    Moré, Marcela; Amorim, Felipe W.; Benitez-Vieyra, Santiago; Medina, A. Martin; Sazima, Marlies; Cocucci, Andrea A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Some species of long-spurred orchids achieve pollination by a close association with long-tongued hawkmoths. Among them, several Habenaria species present specialized mechanisms, where pollination success depends on the attachment of pollinaria onto the heads of hawkmoths with very long proboscises. However, in the Neotropical region such moths are less abundant than their shorter-tongued relatives and are also prone to population fluctuations. Both factors may give rise to differences in pollinator-mediated selection on floral traits through time and space. Methodology/Principal Findings We characterized hawkmoth assemblages and estimated phenotypic selection gradients on orchid spur lengths in populations of three South American Habenaria species. We examined the match between hawkmoth proboscis and flower spur lengths to determine whether pollinators may act as selective agents on flower morphology. We found significant directional selection on spur length only in Habenaria gourlieana, where most pollinators had proboscises longer than the mean of orchid spur length. Conclusions/Significance Phenotypic selection is dependent on the mutual match between pollinator and flower morphologies. However, our findings indicate that pollinator-mediated selection may vary through time and space according to local variations in pollinator assemblages. PMID:22848645

  5. Orchid Bee (Apidae: Euglossini) Communities in Atlantic Forest Remnants and Restored Areas in Paraná State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferronato, M C F; Giangarelli, D C; Mazzaro, D; Uemura, N; Sofia, S H

    2018-06-01

    In this study, we compare orchid bee communities surveyed in four forest remnants of the Atlantic Forest and four reforested areas characterized by seasonal semi-deciduous forest vegetation in different successional stages (mature and secondary vegetation), located in southern Brazil. The sizes of forest remnants and reforested areas varied from 32.1 to 583.9 ha and from 11.3 to 33.3 ha, respectively. All reforested areas were located near one forest remnant. During samplings, totaling nine per study area, euglossine males were attracted to eight scent baits and captured with bait trap and entomological nets. Each forest remnant and its respective reforested area were sampled simultaneously by two collectors. We collected 435 males belonging to nine species of orchid bees distributed in four genera. The number of individuals and species did not differ significantly between different areas, except for a reforested area (size 33.3 ha), which was located far from its respective forest remnant. Our findings also revealed an apparent association between an orchid bee species (Euglossa annectans Dressler 1982) and the most preserved area surveyed in our study, suggesting that this bee is a potential indicator of good habitat quality in recuperating or preserved areas. Our results suggest that reforested habitats located near forest remnants have a higher probability of having reinstated their euglossine communities.

  6. Effect of nectar supplementation on male and female components of pollination success in the deceptive orchid Dactylorhiza sambucina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jersáková, Jana; Johnson, Steven D.; Kindlmann, Pavel; Pupin, Anne-Charlotte

    2008-05-01

    Many orchids lack floral nectar rewards and therefore rely on deception to attract pollinators. To determine the effect that a mutation for nectar production would have on overall pollination success of the deceptive orchid Dactylorhiza sambucina, we recorded pollen deposition and removal in flowers of plants that had either been supplemented with an artificial nectar solution or left unmanipulated as controls. Nectar supplementation resulted in significant increases in the proportion of flowers pollinated, regardless of morph colour and the density of plants supplemented in the population. However, nectar supplementation had a significant positive effect on pollinaria removal only for the yellow morph in one experiment in which a low proportion of plants were supplemented. Thus a mutation for nectar production would have a positive effect on overall pollination success in D. sambucina, particularly the female component. The observed patterns are discussed in relation to other factors, such as cross-pollination and the reallocation of nectar resources for other plant functions, which are traditionally considered to shape the rewardless strategies of orchids.

  7. Dandelions, tulips and orchids: evidence for the existence of low-sensitive, medium-sensitive and high-sensitive individuals.

    PubMed

    Lionetti, Francesca; Aron, Arthur; Aron, Elaine N; Burns, G Leonard; Jagiellowicz, Jadzia; Pluess, Michael

    2018-01-22

    According to empirical studies and recent theories, people differ substantially in their reactivity or sensitivity to environmental influences with some being generally more affected than others. More sensitive individuals have been described as orchids and less-sensitive ones as dandelions. Applying a data-driven approach, we explored the existence of sensitivity groups in a sample of 906 adults who completed the highly sensitive person (HSP) scale. According to factor analyses, the HSP scale reflects a bifactor model with a general sensitivity factor. In contrast to prevailing theories, latent class analyses consistently suggested the existence of three rather than two groups. While we were able to identify a highly sensitive (orchids, 31%) and a low-sensitive group (dandelions, 29%), we also detected a third group (40%) characterised by medium sensitivity, which we refer to as tulips in keeping with the flower metaphor. Preliminary cut-off scores for all three groups are provided. In order to characterise the different sensitivity groups, we investigated group differences regarding the Big Five personality traits, as well as experimentally assessed emotional reactivity in an additional independent sample. According to these follow-up analyses, the three groups differed in neuroticism, extraversion and emotional reactivity to positive mood induction with orchids scoring significantly higher in neuroticism and emotional reactivity and lower in extraversion than the other two groups (dandelions also differed significantly from tulips). Findings suggest that environmental sensitivity is a continuous and normally distributed trait but that people fall into three distinct sensitive groups along a sensitivity continuum.

  8. Using Ecological Niche Models and Niche Analyses to Understand Speciation Patterns: The Case of Sister Neotropical Orchid Bees

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Daniel P.; Vilela, Bruno; De Marco, Paulo; Nemésio, André

    2014-01-01

    The role of past connections between the two major South American forested biomes on current species distribution has been recognized a long time ago. Climatic oscillations that further separated these biomes have promoted parapatric speciation, in which many species had their continuous distribution split, giving rise to different but related species (i.e., different potential distributions and realized niche features). The distribution of many sister species of orchid bees follow this pattern. Here, using ecological niche models and niche analyses, we (1) tested the role of ecological niche differentiation on the divergence between sister orchid-bees (genera Eulaema and Eufriesea) from the Amazon and Atlantic forests, and (2) highlighted interesting areas for new surveys. Amazonian species occupied different realized niches than their Atlantic sister species. Conversely, species of sympatric but distantly related Eulaema bees occupied similar realized niches. Amazonian species had a wide potential distribution in South America, whereas Atlantic Forest species were more limited to the eastern coast of the continent. Additionally, we identified several areas in need of future surveys. Our results show that the realized niche of Atlantic-Amazonian sister species of orchid bees, which have been previously treated as allopatric populations of three species, had limited niche overlap and similarity. These findings agree with their current taxonomy, which treats each of those populations as distinct valid species. PMID:25422941

  9. Changes in orchid populations and endophytic fungi with rainfall and prescribed burning in Pterostylis revoluta in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Jasinge, N U; Huynh, T; Lawrie, A C

    2018-02-12

    Wildfires are common in seasonally dry parts of the world with a Mediterranean climate. Prescribed burning is used to reduce fuel load and fire risk, but often without reliable information on its effects. This study investigated the effects of prescribed burns in different seasons on Pterostylis revoluta, an autumn-flowering Australian terrestrial orchid, and its orchid mycorrhizal fungi (OMFs) to find the least damaging season for a prescribed burn. Burns were conducted mid-season in spring and summer 2011 and autumn and winter 2012. Orchids were enumerated and measured during their flowering season in autumn 2011-2014 and mycorrhizal fungi were isolated before and after the burns in autumn 2011, 2012 and 2014. Micro-organisms isolated were characterized. DNA was extracted from the OMFs, and the internal transcribed spacer region was amplified by PCR. Amplicons were clustered by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), and representative amplicons were sequenced. OMF were tested for sensitivity to smoke water. The number of plants increased up to 4-fold and 90 % of plants became vegetative during this study. Isolation of mycorrhizal fungi increased and isolation of bacteria decreased. Before the burns, the main OMF isolated was unexpectedly Tulasnella calospora (Boud.) Juel. By 2014, after the burns, the expected Ceratobasidium sp. D.P. Rogers was the only OMF isolated in most burnt quadrats, whereas T. calospora was confined to a minority of unburnt 'control' and the 'spring burn' quadrats, which were also the only ones with flowering plants. The decline in rainfall during 2010-2012 probably caused the switch from mainly flowering to mainly vegetative plants and the change in OMFs. Burning in spring to summer was less damaging to this orchid than burning in autumn to winter, which should be noted by authorities in fire management plans for fire-prone areas in which this orchid occurs. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf

  10. Positive selection and ancient duplications in the evolution of class B floral homeotic genes of orchids and grasses

    PubMed Central

    Mondragón-Palomino, Mariana; Hiese, Luisa; Härter, Andrea; Koch, Marcus A; Theißen, Günter

    2009-01-01

    Background Positive selection is recognized as the prevalence of nonsynonymous over synonymous substitutions in a gene. Models of the functional evolution of duplicated genes consider neofunctionalization as key to the retention of paralogues. For instance, duplicate transcription factors are specifically retained in plant and animal genomes and both positive selection and transcriptional divergence appear to have played a role in their diversification. However, the relative impact of these two factors has not been systematically evaluated. Class B MADS-box genes, comprising DEF-like and GLO-like genes, encode developmental transcription factors essential for establishment of perianth and male organ identity in the flowers of angiosperms. Here, we contrast the role of positive selection and the known divergence in expression patterns of genes encoding class B-like MADS-box transcription factors from monocots, with emphasis on the family Orchidaceae and the order Poales. Although in the monocots these two groups are highly diverse and have a strongly canalized floral morphology, there is no information on the role of positive selection in the evolution of their distinctive flower morphologies. Published research shows that in Poales, class B-like genes are expressed in stamens and in lodicules, the perianth organs whose identity might also be specified by class B-like genes, like the identity of the inner tepals of their lily-like relatives. In orchids, however, the number and pattern of expression of class B-like genes have greatly diverged. Results The DEF-like genes from Orchidaceae form four well-supported, ancient clades of orthologues. In contrast, orchid GLO-like genes form a single clade of ancient orthologues and recent paralogues. DEF-like genes from orchid clade 2 (OMADS3-like genes) are under less stringent purifying selection than the other orchid DEF-like and GLO-like genes. In comparison with orchids, purifying selection was less stringent in DEF

  11. Genetic affinities between the Yami tribe people of Orchid Island and the Philippine Islanders of the Batanes archipelago

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Yami and Ivatan islanders are Austronesian speakers from Orchid Island and the Batanes archipelago that are located between Taiwan and the Philippines. The paternal genealogies of the Yami tribe from 1962 monograph of Wei and Liu were compared with our dataset of non-recombining Y (NRY) chromosomes from the corresponding families. Then mitochondrial DNA polymorphism was also analyzed to determine the matrilineal relationships between Yami, Ivatan, and other East Asian populations. Results The family relationships inferred from the NRY Phylogeny suggested a low number of paternal founders and agreed with the genealogy of Wei and Liu (P < 0.01). Except for one Y short tandem repeat lineage (Y-STR), seen in two unrelated Yami families, no other Y-STR lineages were shared between villages, whereas mtDNA haplotypes were indiscriminately distributed throughout Orchid Island. The genetic affinity seen between Yami and Taiwanese aborigines or between Ivatan and the Philippine people was closer than that between Yami and Ivatan, suggesting that the Orchid islanders were colonized separately by their nearest neighbors and bred in isolation. However a northward gene flow to Orchid Island from the Philippines was suspected as Yami and Ivatan peoples both speak Western Malayo-Polynesian languages which are not spoken in Taiwan. Actually, only very little gene flow was observed between Yami and Ivatan or between Yami and the Philippines as indicated by the sharing of mtDNA haplogroup B4a1a4 and one O1a1* Y-STR lineage. Conclusions The NRY and mtDNA genetic information among Yami tribe peoples fitted well the patrilocal society model proposed by Wei and Liu. In this proposal, there were likely few genetic exchanges among Yami and the Philippine people. Trading activities may have contributed to the diffusion of Malayo-Polynesian languages among them. Finally, artifacts dating 4,000 YBP, found on Orchid Island and indicating association with the Out of Taiwan hypothesis

  12. Evaluating five different loci (rbcL, rpoB, rpoC1, matK, and ITS) for DNA barcoding of Indian orchids.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Iffat; Singh, Hemant K; Malik, Saloni; Raghuvanshi, Saurabh; Babbar, Shashi B

    2017-08-01

    Orchidaceae, one of the largest families of angiosperms, is represented in India by 1600 species distributed in diverse habitats. Orchids are in high demand owing to their beautiful flowers and therapeutic properties. Overexploitation and habitat destruction have made many orchid species endangered. In the absence of effective identification methods, illicit trade of orchids continues unabated. Considering DNA barcoding as a potential identification tool, species discrimination capability of five loci, ITS, matK, rbcL, rpoB, and rpoC1, was tested in 393 accessions of 94 Indian orchid species belonging to 47 genera, including one listed in Appendix I of CITES and 26 medicinal species. ITS provided the highest species discrimination rate of 94.9%. While, among the chloroplast loci, matK provided the highest species discrimination rate of 85.7%. None of the tested loci individually discriminated 100% of the species. Therefore, multi-locus combinations of up to five loci were tested for their species resolution capability. Among two-locus combinations, the maximum species resolution (86.7%) was provided by ITS+matK. ITS and matK sequences of the medicinal orchids were species specific, thus providing unique molecular identification tags for their identification and detection. These observations emphasize the need for the inclusion of ITS in the core barcode for plants, whenever required and available.

  13. DOH1, a Class 1 knox Gene, Is Required for Maintenance of the Basic Plant Architecture and Floral Transition in Orchid

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hao; Yang, Shu Hua; Goh, Chong Jin

    2000-01-01

    We report here the isolation and identification of an orchid homeobox gene, DOH1, from Dendrobium Madame Thong-In. Analyses of its sequence and genomic organization suggest that DOH1 may be the only class 1 knox gene in the genome. DOH1 mRNA accumulates in meristem-rich tissues, and its expression is greatly downregulated during floral transition. In situ hybridization analysis demonstrates that DOH1 is also expressed in the incipient leaf primordia and is later detected in the same region of the inflorescence apex, as in DOMADS1. Overexpression of DOH1 in orchid plants completely suppresses shoot organization and development. Transgenic orchid plants expressing antisense mRNA for DOH1 show multiple shoot apical meristem (SAM) formations and early flowering. In addition, both the sense and antisense transformants exhibit defects in leaf development. These findings suggest that DOH1 plays a key role in maintaining the basic plant architecture of orchid through control of the formation and development of the SAM and shoot structure. Investigations of DOMADS1 expression in the SAM during floral transition reveal that the precocious flowering phenotype exhibited by DOH1 antisense transformants is coupled with the early onset of DOMADS1 expression. This fact, together with the reciprocal expression of DOH1 and DOMADS1 during floral transition, indicates that downregulation of DOH1 in the SAM is required for floral transition in orchid and that DOH1 is a possible upstream regulator of DOMADS1. PMID:11090215

  14. Demographic analysis of dormancy and survival in the terrestrial orchid Cypripedium reginae

    Kery, Marc; Gregg, Katharine B.

    2004-01-01

    1. We use capture-recapture models to estimate the fraction of dormant ramets, survival and state transition rates, and to identify factors affecting these rates, for the terrestrial orchid Cypripedium reginae. We studied two populations in West Virginia, USA, for 11 years and investigated relationships between grazing and demography. Abe Run's population was small, with moderate herbivory by deer and relatively constant population size. The population at Big Draft was of medium size, with heavy deer grazing, and a sharply declining number of flowering plants up to the spring before our study started, when the population was fenced. 2. We observed dormant episodes lasting from 1 to 4 years. At Abe Run and Big Draft, 32.5% and 7.4% of ramets, respectively, were dormant at least once during the study period for an average of 1.6 and 1.3 years, respectively. We estimated the annual fraction of ramets in the dormant state at 12.3% (95% CI 9.5-15.8%) at Abe Run and at 1.8% (95% CI 1.2-2.6%) at Big Draft. Transition rates between the dormant, vegetative and flowering life-states did not vary between years in either population. Most surviving ramets remained in the same state from one year to the next. Survival rates were constant at Abe Run (0.96, 95% CI 0.93-0.97), but varied between years at Big Draft (0.89-0.99, mean 0.95). 3. At Big Draft, we found neither a temporal trend in survival after cessation of grazing, nor relationships between survival and the number of spring frost days or cumulative precipitation during the current or the previous 12 months. However, analysis of precipitation on a 3-month basis revealed a positive relationship between survival and precipitation during the spring (March-May) of the previous year. 4. Relationship between climate and the population dynamics of orchids may have to be studied with a fine temporal resolution, and considering possible time lags. Capture-recapture modelling provides a comprehensive and flexible framework for

  15. Divergent Adaptive Strategies by Two Co-occurring Epiphytic Orchids to Water Stress: Escape or Avoidance?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Hu, Hong; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Due to the fluctuating water availability in the arboreal habitat, epiphytic plants are considered vulnerable to climate change and anthropogenic disturbances. Although co-occurring taxa have been observed divergent adaptive performances in response to drought, the underlying physiological and morphological mechanisms by which epiphyte species cope with water stress remain poorly understood. In the present study, two co-occurring epiphytic orchids with different phenologies were selected to investigate their drought-resistance performances. We compared their functional traits, and monitored their physiological performances in a 25-days of drought treatment. In contrast to the deciduous species Pleione albiflora, the evergreen species Coelogyne corymbosa had different root anatomical structures and higher values for saturated water content of pseudobulbs. Moreover, plants of C. corymbosa had thicker leaves and epidermis, denser veins and stomata, and higher values for leaf mass per unit area and the time required to dry saturated leaves to 70% relative water content. However, samples from that species had lower values for net photosynthetic rate (A n), stomatal length and chlorophyll content per unit dry mass. Nevertheless, due to greater capacity for water storage and conservation, C. corymbosa maintained higher A n, stomatal conductance (g s), and instantaneous water-use efficiency during severe drought period, and their values for leaf water potential were higher after the water stress treatment. By Day 10 after irrigation was restarted, only C. corymbosa plants recovered their values for A n and g s to levels close to those calculated prior to the imposition of water stress. Our results suggest that the different performance responding to drought and re-watering in two co-occurring epiphytic orchids is related to water-related traits and these two species have divergent adaptive mechanisms. Overall, C. corymbosa demonstrates drought avoidance by enhancing water

  16. A pollinator shift explains floral divergence in an orchid species complex in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Craig I.; Johnson, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Floral diversification driven by shifts between pollinators has been one of the key explanations for the radiation of angiosperms. According to the Grant–Stebbins model of pollinator-driven speciation, these shifts result in morphologically distinct ‘ecotypes’ which may eventually become recognizable as species. The current circumscription of the food-deceptive southern African orchid Eulophia parviflora encompasses a highly variable monophyletic species complex. In this study, two forms were identified within this complex that differ in distribution, floral morphology, scent chemistry and phenology, and a test was made of whether these differences represent adaptations for different pollinators. Methods and Results Multivariate analysis of floral and vegetative traits revealed that there are at least two discrete morphological forms in the species complex. Field observations revealed that each form is pollinated by a different insect species, and thus represent distinct ecotypes. The early-flowering coastal form which has long spurs and floral scent dominated by sesquiterpene compounds is pollinated exclusively by the long-tongued bee Amegilla fallax (Apidae, Anthophorinae), while the late-flowering inland form with short spurs and floral scent dominated by benzenoid compounds is pollinated exclusively by the beetle Cyrtothyrea marginalis (Cetoniinae; Scarabaeidae). Choice experiments in a Y-maze olfactometer showed that beetles are preferentially attracted to the scent of the short-spurred form. A spur-shortening experiment showed that long spurs are required for effective pollination of the bee-pollinated form. Although it was initially thought likely that divergence occurred across a geographical pollinator gradient, plants of the long-spurred form were effectively pollinated when transplanted to an inland locality outside the natural coastal range of this form. Thus, the underlying geographical basis for the evolution of ecotypes in

  17. Overexpression of PaFT gene in the wild orchid Phalaenopsis amabilis (L.) Blume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semiarti, Endang; Mercuriani, Ixora S.; Rizal, Rinaldi; Slamet, Agus; Utami, Bekti S.; Bestari, Ida A.; Aziz-Purwantoro, Moeljopawiro, S.; Jang, Soenghoe; Machida, Y.; Machida, C.

    2015-09-01

    To shorten vegetative stage and induce transition from vegetative to reproductive stage in orchids, we overexpressed Phalaenopsis amabilis Flowering LocusT (PaFT) gene under the control of Ubiquitin promoter into protocorm of Indonesian Wild Orchid Phalaenopsis amabilis (L.) Blume. The dynamic expression of vegetative gene Phalaenopsis Homeobox1 (POH1) and flowering time gene PaFT has been analyzed. Accumulation of mRNA was detected in shoot and leaves of both transgenic and non transgenic plants by using Reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) with specific gene primers for POH1 and PaFT in 24 months old plants. To analyze the POH1 and PaFT genes, three pairs of degenerate primers PaFT degF1R1, F2R2 and F3R3 that amplified 531 bp PaFT cDNA were used. We detected 700 bp PaFTcDNA from leaves and shoots of transgenic plants, but not in NT plants. POH1 mRNA was detected in plants. PaFT protein consists of Phospatidyl Ethanolamine-Binding Protein (PEBP) in interval base 73-483 and CETS family protein at base 7-519, which are important motif for transmembrane protein. We inserted Ubipro::PaFT/pGAS101 into P. amabilis protocorm using Agrobacterium. Analysis of transgenic plants showed that PaFTmRNA was accumulated in leaves of 12 months after sowing, although it is not detected in non transgeic plants. Compare to the wild type (NT plants), ectopic expression of PaFT shows alter phenotype as follows: 31% normal, 19% with short-wavy leaves, 5% form rosette leaves and 45% produced multishoots. Analysis of protein profiles of trasgenic plants showed that a putative PaFT protein (MW 19,7 kDa) was produced in 1eaves and shoots.This means that at 12 months, POH1 gene expression gradually decreased/negatively regulated, the expression of PaFT gene was activated, although there is no flower initiation yet. Some environmental factors might play a role to induce inflorescens. This experiment is in progress.

  18. A pollinator shift explains floral divergence in an orchid species complex in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Peter, Craig I; Johnson, Steven D

    2014-01-01

    Floral diversification driven by shifts between pollinators has been one of the key explanations for the radiation of angiosperms. According to the Grant-Stebbins model of pollinator-driven speciation, these shifts result in morphologically distinct 'ecotypes' which may eventually become recognizable as species. The current circumscription of the food-deceptive southern African orchid Eulophia parviflora encompasses a highly variable monophyletic species complex. In this study, two forms were identified within this complex that differ in distribution, floral morphology, scent chemistry and phenology, and a test was made of whether these differences represent adaptations for different pollinators. Multivariate analysis of floral and vegetative traits revealed that there are at least two discrete morphological forms in the species complex. Field observations revealed that each form is pollinated by a different insect species, and thus represent distinct ecotypes. The early-flowering coastal form which has long spurs and floral scent dominated by sesquiterpene compounds is pollinated exclusively by the long-tongued bee Amegilla fallax (Apidae, Anthophorinae), while the late-flowering inland form with short spurs and floral scent dominated by benzenoid compounds is pollinated exclusively by the beetle Cyrtothyrea marginalis (Cetoniinae; Scarabaeidae). Choice experiments in a Y-maze olfactometer showed that beetles are preferentially attracted to the scent of the short-spurred form. A spur-shortening experiment showed that long spurs are required for effective pollination of the bee-pollinated form. Although it was initially thought likely that divergence occurred across a geographical pollinator gradient, plants of the long-spurred form were effectively pollinated when transplanted to an inland locality outside the natural coastal range of this form. Thus, the underlying geographical basis for the evolution of ecotypes in the E. parviflora complex remains uncertain

  19. Oriental orchid (Cymbidium floribundum) attracts the Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana japonica) with a mixture of 3-hydroxyoctanoic acid and 10-hydroxy- (E)-2-decenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Michio; Izutsu, Kazunari; Nishimura, Yasuichiro; Sakamoto, Fumio

    2013-02-01

    The flower of the oriental orchid Cymbidium floribundum is known to attract the Japanese honeybee Apis cerana japonica. This effect is observed not only in workers but also drones and queens; that is, it attracts even swarming and absconding bees. A mixture of 3-hydroxyoctanoic acid (3-HOAA) and 10-hydroxy-(E)-2-decenoic acid (10-HDA) was identified as the active principles from the orchid flower, whereas these compounds individually have no such activity. Both compounds are also mandibular gland components of worker honeybees with related compounds. This strongly supports the idea that orchid flowers mimic bee secretions, although the ecological consequences of this relationship remain unknown. Because the flower is used to capture swarms, the present identification may contribute to the development of new techniques in traditional beekeeping for Japanese bees as well as A. cerana in Southeast Asia.

  20. Spatial patterns of photosynthesis in thin- and thick-leaved epiphytic orchids: unravelling C3–CAM plasticity in an organ-compartmented way

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Maria Aurineide; Matiz, Alejandra; Cruz, Aline Bertinatto; Matsumura, Aline Tiemi; Takahashi, Cassia Ayumi; Hamachi, Leonardo; Félix, Lucas Macedo; Pereira, Paula Natália; Latansio-Aidar, Sabrina Ribeiro; Aidar, Marcos Pereira Marinho; Demarco, Diego; Freschi, Luciano; Mercier, Helenice; Kerbauy, Gilberto Barbante

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims A positive correlation between tissue thickness and crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) expression has been frequently suggested. Therefore, this study addressed the question of whether water availability modulates photosynthetic plasticity in different organs of two epiphytic orchids with distinct leaf thickness. Methods Tissue morphology and photosynthetic mode (C3 and/or CAM) were examined in leaves, pseudobulbs and roots of a thick-leaved (Cattleya walkeriana) and a thin-leaved (Oncidium ‘Aloha’) epiphytic orchid. Morphological features were studied comparing the drought-induced physiological responses observed in each organ after 30 d of either drought or well-watered treatments. Key Results Cattleya walkeriana, which is considered a constitutive CAM orchid, displayed a clear drought-induced up-regulation of CAM in its thick leaves but not in its non-leaf organs (pseudobulbs and roots). The set of morphological traits of Cattleya leaves suggested the drought-inducible CAM up-regulation as a possible mechanism of increasing water-use efficiency and carbon economy. Conversely, although belonging to an orchid genus classically considered as performing C3 photosynthesis, Oncidium ‘Aloha’ under drought seemed to express facultative CAM in its roots and pseudobulbs but not in its leaves, indicating that such photosynthetic responses might compensate for the lack of capacity to perform CAM in its thin leaves. Morphological features of Oncidium leaves also indicated lower efficiency in preventing water and CO2 losses, while aerenchyma ducts connecting pseudobulbs and leaves suggested a compartmentalized mechanism of nighttime carboxylation via phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) (pseudobulbs) and daytime carboxylation via Rubisco (leaves) in drought-exposed Oncidium plants. Conclusions Water availability modulated CAM expression in an organ-compartmented manner in both orchids studied. As distinct regions of the same orchid could perform

  1. Phenol homeostasis is ensured in vanilla fruit by storage under solid form in a new chloroplast-derived organelle, the phenyloplast

    PubMed Central

    Conéjéro, Geneviève

    2014-01-01

    A multiple cell imaging approach combining immunofluorescence by confocal microscopy, fluorescence spectral analysis by multiphotonic microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy identified the site of accumulation of 4-O-(3-methoxybenzaldehyde) β-d-glucoside, a phenol glucoside massively stockpiled by vanilla fruit. The glucoside is sufficiently abundant to be detected by spectral analysis of its autofluorescence. The convergent results obtained by these different techniques demonstrated that the phenol glucoside accumulates in the inner volume of redifferentiating chloroplasts as solid amorphous deposits, thus ensuring phenylglucoside cell homeostasis. Redifferentiation starts with the generation of loculi between thylakoid membranes which are progressively filled with the glucoside until a fully matured organelle is obtained. This peculiar mode of storage of a phenolic secondary metabolite is suspected to occur in other plants and its generalization in the Plantae could be considered. This new chloroplast-derived organelle is referred to as a ‘phenyloplast’. PMID:24683183

  2. Early Studies on Protoplast Isolation of Ludisia discolor, A Wild Orchid

    PubMed Central

    Poobathy, Ranjetta; Zakaria, Rahmad; Hamzah, Syed Mohd. Edzham Syed; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan

    2016-01-01

    The terrestrial Ludisia discolor, also referred to as the jewel orchid is prized for the quality of its leaves. L. discolor is known as a medicinal herb and is touted for its heat- and pathogen-resisting qualities. L. discolor is valuable in the production of both flavonoids and anthocyanins, antioxidants that are exalted in the health industry. Plant cell cultures have emerged as alternative sources of anthocyanin production. Plant protoplast cultures are used frequently in transient gene expression studies and in the establishment of callus and cell suspension cultures. Benefits of plant protoplast system include similarity to cells found in plant tissues, reproduction under controlled conditions, and prevention of masking of stress responses to previous handling techniques. A study was conducted to assess the amenability of the stem and leaves of L. discolor to protoplast isolation. The stem and leaf segments were weighed, sliced into thin layers, immersed in a digestion medium, washed and then cultured onto a recovery medium. Results indicated that the production of plant protoplasts from L. discolor may be viewed as an alternative in the generation of cell cultures and ultimately in the production of anthocyanins from the cell cultures. PMID:27965736

  3. Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturases are associated with floral isolation in sexually deceptive orchids

    SciT

    Schluter, P.M.; Shanklin, J.; Xu, S.

    The orchids Ophrys sphegodes and O. exaltata are reproductively isolated from each other by the attraction of two different, highly specific pollinator species. For pollinator attraction, flowers chemically mimic the pollinators sex pheromones, the key components of which are alkenes with different double-bond positions. This study identifies genes likely involved in alkene biosynthesis, encoding stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD) homologs. The expression of two isoforms, SAD1 and SAD2, is flower-specific and broadly parallels alkene production during flower development. SAD2 shows a significant association with alkene production, and in vitro assays show that O. sphegodes SAD2 has activity both asmore » an 18:0-ACP {Delta}{sup 9} and a 16:0-ACP {Delta}{sup 4} desaturase. Downstream metabolism of the SAD2 reaction products would give rise to alkenes with double-bonds at position 9 or position 12, matching double-bond positions observed in alkenes in the odor bouquet of O. sphegodes. SAD1 and SAD2 show evidence of purifying selection before, and positive or relaxed purifying selection after gene duplication. By contributing to the production of species-specific alkene bouquets, SAD2 is suggested to contribute to differential pollinator attraction and reproductive isolation among these species. Taken together, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that SAD2 is a florally expressed barrier gene of large phenotypic effect and, possibly, a genic target of pollinator-mediated selection.« less

  4. Recolonization after habitat restoration leads to decreased genetic variation in populations of a terrestrial orchid.

    PubMed

    Vandepitte, K; Gristina, A S; De Hert, K; Meekers, T; Roldán-Ruiz, I; Honnay, O

    2012-09-01

    Colonization is crucial to habitat restoration projects that rely on the spontaneous regeneration of the original vegetation. However, as a previously declining plant species spreads again, the likelihood of founder effects increases through recurrent population founding and associated serial bottlenecks. We related Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism markers genetic variation and fitness to colonization history for all extant populations of the outcrossing terrestrial orchid Dactylorhiza incarnata in an isolated coastal dune complex. Around 1970, D. incarnata suffered a severe bottleneck yet ultimately persisted and gradually spread throughout the spatially segregated dune slacks, aided by the restoration of an open vegetation. Genetic assignment demonstrated dispersal to vacant sites from few nearby extant populations and very limited inflow from outside the spatially isolated reserve. Results further indicated that recurrent founding from few local sources resulted in the loss of genetic diversity and promoted genetic divergence (F(ST) = 0.35) among populations, but did not influence population fitness. The few source populations initially available and the limited inflow of genes from outside the study reserve, as a consequence of habitat degradation and spatial isolation, may have magnified the genetic effects of recurrent population founding. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Pollinator-independent orchid attracts biotic pollinators due the production of lipoidal substances.

    PubMed

    Pansarin, E R; Bergamo, P J; Ferreira-Caliman, M J

    2018-03-01

    Flowering plants often depend on the attraction of biotic pollinators for sexual reproduction. Consequently, the emergence and maintenance of selected floral attributes related to pollinator attraction and rewarding are driven by pollinator pressure. In this paper we explore the effect of pollinators, rainfall, temperature and air humidity on the reproduction of a Brazilian terrestrial orchid, Cranichis candida based on data of phenology, flower resources, olfactory and visual attraction cues, pollinators and breeding system. The flowers of C. candida are strongly protandrous and pollinated by workers of the social native bee Tetragonisca angustula. The bees collect labellar lipoidal substances (wax scales), which are transported to the nest. The lipoidal substance is composed of sterols, hydrocarbons and terpenes. The last presumably protects the bees and their nests against pathogens and other arthropods. C. candida sets fruits through biotic self- and cross-pollination, and spontaneously due the action of raindrops on flowers. Our results indicate that in C. candida, although rain-mediated spontaneous self-pollination happens, fructification mediated by biotic pollinations also occurs, which may result in fruit set by cross-pollination. A mixed pollination system must result in higher genetic variability when compared to species whose fruits are produced entirely by self-pollination. On the other hand, autogamy is a form of reproductive assurance, and has commonly evolved where pollination services are rare or absent. © 2017 German Society for Plant Sciences and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  6. Actuarial senescence in a long-lived orchid challenges our current understanding of ageing

    PubMed Central

    Colchero, Fernando; Jones, Owen R.; Øien, Dag-Inge; Moen, Asbjørn; Sletvold, Nina

    2016-01-01

    The dominant evolutionary theory of actuarial senescence—an increase in death rate with advancing age—is based on the concept of a germ cell line that is separated from the somatic cells early in life. However, such a separation is not clear in all organisms. This has been suggested to explain the paucity of evidence for actuarial senescence in plants. We used a 32 year study of Dactylorhiza lapponica that replaces its organs each growing season, to test whether individuals of this tuberous orchid senesce. We performed a Bayesian survival trajectory analysis accounting for reproductive investment, for individuals under two types of land use, in two climatic regions. The mortality trajectory was best approximated by a Weibull model, showing clear actuarial senescence. Rates of senescence in this model declined with advancing age, but were slightly higher in mown plots and in the more benign climatic region. At older ages, senescence was evident only when accounting for a positive effect of reproductive investment on mortality. Our results demonstrate actuarial senescence as well as a survival–reproduction trade-off in plants, and indicate that environmental context may influence senescence rates. This knowledge is crucial for understanding the evolution of demographic senescence and for models of plant population dynamics. PMID:27852801

  7. Actuarial senescence in a long-lived orchid challenges our current understanding of ageing.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, Johan Petter; Colchero, Fernando; Jones, Owen R; Øien, Dag-Inge; Moen, Asbjørn; Sletvold, Nina

    2016-11-16

    The dominant evolutionary theory of actuarial senescence-an increase in death rate with advancing age-is based on the concept of a germ cell line that is separated from the somatic cells early in life. However, such a separation is not clear in all organisms. This has been suggested to explain the paucity of evidence for actuarial senescence in plants. We used a 32 year study of Dactylorhiza lapponica that replaces its organs each growing season, to test whether individuals of this tuberous orchid senesce. We performed a Bayesian survival trajectory analysis accounting for reproductive investment, for individuals under two types of land use, in two climatic regions. The mortality trajectory was best approximated by a Weibull model, showing clear actuarial senescence. Rates of senescence in this model declined with advancing age, but were slightly higher in mown plots and in the more benign climatic region. At older ages, senescence was evident only when accounting for a positive effect of reproductive investment on mortality. Our results demonstrate actuarial senescence as well as a survival-reproduction trade-off in plants, and indicate that environmental context may influence senescence rates. This knowledge is crucial for understanding the evolution of demographic senescence and for models of plant population dynamics. © 2016 The Author(s).

  8. An olfactory shift is associated with male perfume differentiation and species divergence in orchid bees.

    PubMed

    Eltz, Thomas; Zimmermann, Yvonne; Pfeiffer, Carolin; Pech, Jorge Ramirez; Twele, Robert; Francke, Wittko; Quezada-Euan, J Javier G; Lunau, Klaus

    2008-12-09

    Saltational changes may underlie the diversification of pheromone communication systems in insects, which are normally under stabilizing selection favoring high specificity in signals and signal perception. In orchid bees (Euglossini), the production of male signals depends on the sense of smell: males collect complex blends of volatiles (perfumes) from their environment, which are later emitted as pheromone analogs at mating sites. We analyzed the behavioral and antennal response to perfume components in two male morphotypes of Euglossa cf. viridissima from Mexico, which differ in the number of mandibular teeth. Tridentate males collected 2-hydroxy-6-nona-1,3-dienyl-benzaldehyde (HNDB) as the dominant component of their perfume. In bidentate males, blends were broadly similar but lacked HNDB. Population genetic analysis revealed that tri- and bidentate males belong to two reproductively isolated lineages. Electroantennogram tests (EAG and GC-EAD) showed substantially lower antennal responses to HNDB in bidentate versus tridentate males, revealing for the first time a mechanism by which closely related species acquire different chemical compounds from their habitat. The component-specific differences in perfume perception and collection in males of two sibling species are in agreement with a saltational, olfaction-driven mode of signal perfume evolution. However, the response of females to the diverged signals remains unknown.

  9. Habitat fragmentation effects on the orchid bee communities in remnant forests of southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Fátima do Rosário Naschenveng; Penatti, N C

    2012-10-01

    The effect of habitat fragmentation on the structure of orchid bee communities was analyzed by the investigation of the existence of a spatial structure in the richness and abundance of Euglossini species and by determining the relationship between these data and environmental factors. The surveys were carried out in four different forest fragments and one university campus. Richness, abundance, and diversity of species were analyzed in relation to abiotic (size of the area, extent of the perimeter, perimeter/area ratio, and shape index) and biotic characteristics (vegetation index of the fragment and of the matrix of each of the locations studied). We observed a highly significant positive correlation between the diversity index and the vegetation index of the fragment, landscape and shape index. Our analysis demonstrated that the observed variation could be explained mainly by the vegetation index and the size of the fragment. Variations in relative abundance showed a tendency toward an aggregated spatial distribution between the fragments studied, as well as between the sampling stations within the same habitat, demonstrating the existence of a spatial structure on a small scale in the populations of Euglossini. This distribution will determine the composition of species that coexist in the area after fragmentation. These data help in understanding the differences and similarities in the structure of communities of Euglossini resulting from forest fragmentation.

  10. Cryopreservation of protocorm-like bodies of the hybrid orchid Bratonia (Miltonia flavescens × Brassia longissima).

    PubMed

    Popova, Elena; Bukhov, Nikolai; Popov, Alexandr; Kim, Haeng-Hoon

    2010-01-01

    In this study, cryopreservation of Bratonia (Miltonia flavescens (Lindl.) Lindl. × Brassia longissima (Reichb.) Nash), a hybrid tropical orchid, was achieved using protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) multiplied in vitro. Cryopreservation was performed using a vitrification protocol including pretreatment of PLBs with a loading solution (LS, 2.0 M glycerol + 0.4 M sucrose) for 15 min followed by treatment with modified PVS2 vitrification solution (containing PEG instead of ethylene glycol) for 1 h. Increasing benzyladenine (BA) concentration in the recovery medium to 5.0 or 10.0 mg l⁻¹ during the initial 3 weeks after rewarming provided 20.4 % post-cryopreservation regrowth. By contrast, preliminary culture of PLBs with abscisic acid (ABA) and high sucrose concentrations (up to 0.3 M) as well as addition of reduced glutathione during the preculture, loading and post-culture steps were not beneficial. Forty to 45 plants were regenerated from each PLB which withstood cryopreservation. No morphological differences were observed between plants regenerated from cryopreserved and untreated PLBs. Investigations into the functional activity of photosystems I and II in PLBs suggest that electron transport was retained in the reaction centers of both photosystems shortly after cryopreservation.

  11. Early Studies on Protoplast Isolation of Ludisia discolor, A Wild Orchid.

    PubMed

    Poobathy, Ranjetta; Zakaria, Rahmad; Hamzah, Syed Mohd Edzham Syed; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan

    2016-11-01

    The terrestrial Ludisia discolor , also referred to as the jewel orchid is prized for the quality of its leaves. L. discolor is known as a medicinal herb and is touted for its heat- and pathogen-resisting qualities. L. discolor is valuable in the production of both flavonoids and anthocyanins, antioxidants that are exalted in the health industry. Plant cell cultures have emerged as alternative sources of anthocyanin production. Plant protoplast cultures are used frequently in transient gene expression studies and in the establishment of callus and cell suspension cultures. Benefits of plant protoplast system include similarity to cells found in plant tissues, reproduction under controlled conditions, and prevention of masking of stress responses to previous handling techniques. A study was conducted to assess the amenability of the stem and leaves of L. discolor to protoplast isolation. The stem and leaf segments were weighed, sliced into thin layers, immersed in a digestion medium, washed and then cultured onto a recovery medium. Results indicated that the production of plant protoplasts from L. discolor may be viewed as an alternative in the generation of cell cultures and ultimately in the production of anthocyanins from the cell cultures.

  12. Evidence of separate karyotype evolutionary pathway in Euglossa orchid bees by cytogenetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Anderson; Werneck, Hugo A; Pompolo, Silvia G; Lopes, Denilce M

    2013-09-01

    Euglossini are solitary bees considered important pollinators of many orchid species. Information regarding chromosome organization is available for only a small number of species in this group. In the present work, the species Euglossa townsendi and E. carolina were analyzed by cytogenetic techniques to collect information that may aid the understanding of their evolution and chromosomal organization. The chromosome number found was n = 21 for males and 2n = 42 for females in the two species. The distribution and amount of heterochromatin regions differed in the two species analyzed, where they were classified as “high” or “low” heterochromatin content, similarly to what has already been performed in social bee species of the genus Melipona. Banding patterns found in this study suggest that other mechanisms may have occurred in the karyotype evolution of this group, unlike those suggested for social bees and ants. Karyotype evolution of solitary bees appears to have occurred as an event separate from other hymenopterans and did not involve chromosome fissions and heterochromatin amplification.

  13. Selection for predation, not female fecundity, explains sexual size dimorphism in the orchid mantises.

    PubMed

    Svenson, Gavin J; Brannoch, Sydney K; Rodrigues, Henrique M; O'Hanlon, James C; Wieland, Frank

    2016-12-01

    Here we reconstruct the evolutionary shift towards floral simulation in orchid mantises and suggest female predatory selection as the likely driving force behind the development of extreme sexual size dimorphism. Through analysis of body size data and phylogenetic modelling of trait evolution, we recovered an ancestral shift towards sexual dimorphisms in both size and appearance in a lineage of flower-associated praying mantises. Sedentary female flower mantises dramatically increased in size prior to a transition from camouflaged, ambush predation to a floral simulation strategy, gaining access to, and visually attracting, a novel resource: large pollinating insects. Male flower mantises, however, remained small and mobile to facilitate mate-finding and reproductive success, consistent with ancestral male life strategy. Although moderate sexual size dimorphisms are common in many arthropod lineages, the predominant explanation is female size increase for increased fecundity. However, sex-dependent selective pressures acting outside of female fecundity have been suggested as mechanisms behind niche dimorphisms. Our hypothesised role of predatory selection acting on females to generate both extreme sexual size dimorphism coupled with niche dimorphism is novel among arthropods.

  14. Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturases are associated with floral isolation in sexually deceptive orchids

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, Philipp M.; Xu, Shuqing; Gagliardini, Valeria; Whittle, Edward; Shanklin, John; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Schiestl, Florian P.

    2011-01-01

    The orchids Ophrys sphegodes and O. exaltata are reproductively isolated from each other by the attraction of two different, highly specific pollinator species. For pollinator attraction, flowers chemically mimic the pollinators’ sex pheromones, the key components of which are alkenes with different double-bond positions. This study identifies genes likely involved in alkene biosynthesis, encoding stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD) homologs. The expression of two isoforms, SAD1 and SAD2, is flower-specific and broadly parallels alkene production during flower development. SAD2 shows a significant association with alkene production, and in vitro assays show that O. sphegodes SAD2 has activity both as an 18:0-ACP Δ9 and a 16:0-ACP Δ4 desaturase. Downstream metabolism of the SAD2 reaction products would give rise to alkenes with double-bonds at position 9 or position 12, matching double-bond positions observed in alkenes in the odor bouquet of O. sphegodes. SAD1 and SAD2 show evidence of purifying selection before, and positive or relaxed purifying selection after gene duplication. By contributing to the production of species-specific alkene bouquets, SAD2 is suggested to contribute to differential pollinator attraction and reproductive isolation among these species. Taken together, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that SAD2 is a florally expressed barrier gene of large phenotypic effect and, possibly, a genic target of pollinator-mediated selection. PMID:21436056

  15. Revision of the orchid bee subgenus Euglossella (Hymenoptera, Apidae), Part I, The decorata species group

    PubMed Central

    Hinojosa-Díaz, Ismael A.; Engel, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Euglossella, one of the most distinctive subgenera of orchid bees of the genus Euglossa, is composed of two characteristic assemblages of species, one of them comprising bees bearing the strongly metallic integument trademark of the genus (viridis species group), and the other consisting of bees with a brown integument shaded with metallic iridescence (decorata species group). Here we provide the first of two parts of a revision of Euglossella, providing diagnostic definitions for the subgenus, the decorata species group, and all the species included therein. Six species are included in the decorata group, one new: Euglossa (Euglossella) aurantia, sp. n.; Euglossa (Euglossella) apiformis Schrottky, resurrected status; Euglossa (Euglossella) decorata Smith, revised status; Euglossa (Euglossella) singularis Mocsáry, revised status; Euglossa (Euglossella) cosmodora Hinojosa-Díaz and Engel; and Euglossa (Euglossella) perpulchra Moure and Schlindwein. Euglossa meliponoides Ducke and Euglossa urarina Hinojosa-Díaz and Engel are newly synonymized under Euglossa decorata, Euglossa decorata ruficauda Cockerell is synonymized under Euglossa singularis, and a neotype is designated for Euglossa apiformis. PMID:22144858

  16. Pollinator shifts and the evolution of spur length in the moth-pollinated orchid Platanthera bifolia.

    PubMed

    Boberg, Elin; Alexandersson, Ronny; Jonsson, Magdalena; Maad, Johanne; Ågren, Jon; Nilsson, L Anders

    2014-01-01

    Plant-pollinator interactions are thought to have shaped much of floral evolution. Yet the relative importance of pollinator shifts and coevolutionary interactions for among-population variation in floral traits in animal-pollinated species is poorly known. This study examined the adaptive significance of spur length in the moth-pollinated orchid Platanthera bifolia. Geographical variation in the length of the floral spur of P. bifolia was documented in relation to variation in the pollinator fauna across Scandinavia, and a reciprocal translocation experiment was conducted in south-east Sweden between a long-spurred woodland population and a short-spurred grassland population. Spur length and pollinator fauna varied among regions and habitats, and spur length was positively correlated with the proboscis length of local pollinators. In the reciprocal translocation experiment, long-spurred woodland plants had higher pollination success than short-spurred grassland plants at the woodland site, while no significant difference was observed at the grassland site. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that optimal floral phenotype varies with the morphology of the local pollinators, and that the evolution of spur length in P. bifolia has been largely driven by pollinator shifts.

  17. Pollinator shifts and the evolution of spur length in the moth-pollinated orchid Platanthera bifolia

    PubMed Central

    Boberg, Elin; Alexandersson, Ronny; Jonsson, Magdalena; Maad, Johanne; Ågren, Jon; Nilsson, L. Anders