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Sample records for order discrete event

  1. Concurrency and discrete event control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Much of discrete event control theory has been developed within the framework of automata and formal languages. An alternative approach inspired by the theories of process-algebra as developed in the computer science literature is presented. The framework, which rests on a new formalism of concurrency, can adequately handle nondeterminism and can be used for analysis of a wide range of discrete event phenomena.

  2. A discrete event method for wave simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James J

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a discrete event interpretation of the finite difference time domain (FDTD) and digital wave guide network (DWN) wave simulation schemes. The discrete event method is formalized using the discrete event system specification (DEVS). The scheme is shown to have errors that are proportional to the resolution of the spatial grid. A numerical example demonstrates the relative efficiency of the scheme with respect to FDTD and DWN schemes. The potential for the discrete event scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and attenuation errors is discussed.

  3. Asynchronous discrete event schemes for PDEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, D.; Geiger, S.; Lord, G. J.

    2017-08-01

    A new class of asynchronous discrete-event simulation schemes for advection-diffusion-reaction equations is introduced, based on the principle of allowing quanta of mass to pass through faces of a (regular, structured) Cartesian finite volume grid. The timescales of these events are linked to the flux on the face. The resulting schemes are self-adaptive, and local in both time and space. Experiments are performed on realistic physical systems related to porous media flow applications, including a large 3D advection diffusion equation and advection diffusion reaction systems. The results are compared to highly accurate reference solutions where the temporal evolution is computed with exponential integrator schemes using the same finite volume discretisation. This allows a reliable estimation of the solution error. Our results indicate a first order convergence of the error as a control parameter is decreased, and we outline a framework for analysis.

  4. Running Parallel Discrete Event Simulators on Sierra

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P. D.; Jefferson, D. R.

    2015-12-03

    In this proposal we consider porting the ROSS/Charm++ simulator and the discrete event models that run under its control so that they run on the Sierra architecture and make efficient use of the Volta GPUs.

  5. Synchronization Of Parallel Discrete Event Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinman, Jeffrey S.

    1992-01-01

    Adaptive, parallel, discrete-event-simulation-synchronization algorithm, Breathing Time Buckets, developed in Synchronous Parallel Environment for Emulation and Discrete Event Simulation (SPEEDES) operating system. Algorithm allows parallel simulations to process events optimistically in fluctuating time cycles that naturally adapt while simulation in progress. Combines best of optimistic and conservative synchronization strategies while avoiding major disadvantages. Algorithm processes events optimistically in time cycles adapting while simulation in progress. Well suited for modeling communication networks, for large-scale war games, for simulated flights of aircraft, for simulations of computer equipment, for mathematical modeling, for interactive engineering simulations, and for depictions of flows of information.

  6. Assessing the Effectiveness of Biosurveillance Via Discrete Event Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    EFFECTIVENESS OF BIOSURVEILLANCE VIA DISCRETE EVENT SIMULATION by Jason H. Dao March 2011 Thesis Advisor: Ronald D. Fricker, Jr. Second Reader...TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Assessing the Effectiveness of Biosurveillance Via Discrete Event Simulation 6...the potential for disastrous outcomes is greater than it has ever been. In order to confront this threat, biosurveillance systems are utilized to

  7. Terminal Dynamics Approach to Discrete Event Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail; Meyers, Ronald

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses a mathematical formalism for simulation of discrete event dynamic (DED)-a special type of 'man-made' systems to serve specific purposes of information processing. The main objective of this work is to demonstrate that the mathematical formalism for DED can be based upon a terminal model of Newtonian dynamics which allows one to relax Lipschitz conditions at some discrete points.!.

  8. An algebra of discrete event processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, Michael; Meyer, George

    1991-01-01

    This report deals with an algebraic framework for modeling and control of discrete event processes. The report consists of two parts. The first part is introductory, and consists of a tutorial survey of the theory of concurrency in the spirit of Hoare's CSP, and an examination of the suitability of such an algebraic framework for dealing with various aspects of discrete event control. To this end a new concurrency operator is introduced and it is shown how the resulting framework can be applied. It is further shown that a suitable theory that deals with the new concurrency operator must be developed. In the second part of the report the formal algebra of discrete event control is developed. At the present time the second part of the report is still an incomplete and occasionally tentative working paper.

  9. Failure diagnosis using discrete event models

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, M.; Sengupta, R.; Lafortune, S.; Teneketzis, D.; Sinnamohideen, K.

    1994-12-31

    We propose a Discrete Event Systems (DES) approach to the failure diagnosis problem. We present a methodology for modeling physical systems in a DES framework. We discuss the notion of diagnosability and present the construction procedure of the diagnoser. Finally, we illustrate our approach using a Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system.

  10. Discrete Event Simulation of Distributed Team Communication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-22

    executable system architecture approach to discrete events system modeling using sysml in conjunction with colored petri net . In Systems Conference, 2008 2nd...operators. Mitchell found that IMPRINT predictions of communication times and frequencies correlated with recorded communications amongst a platoon of

  11. Discrete Events as Units of Perceived Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liverence, Brandon M.; Scholl, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    In visual images, we perceive both space (as a continuous visual medium) and objects (that inhabit space). Similarly, in dynamic visual experience, we perceive both continuous time and discrete events. What is the relationship between these units of experience? The most intuitive answer may be similar to the spatial case: time is perceived as an…

  12. Discrete Events as Units of Perceived Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liverence, Brandon M.; Scholl, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    In visual images, we perceive both space (as a continuous visual medium) and objects (that inhabit space). Similarly, in dynamic visual experience, we perceive both continuous time and discrete events. What is the relationship between these units of experience? The most intuitive answer may be similar to the spatial case: time is perceived as an…

  13. Analysis hierarchical model for discrete event systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciortea, E. M.

    2015-11-01

    The This paper presents the hierarchical model based on discrete event network for robotic systems. Based on the hierarchical approach, Petri network is analysed as a network of the highest conceptual level and the lowest level of local control. For modelling and control of complex robotic systems using extended Petri nets. Such a system is structured, controlled and analysed in this paper by using Visual Object Net ++ package that is relatively simple and easy to use, and the results are shown as representations easy to interpret. The hierarchical structure of the robotic system is implemented on computers analysed using specialized programs. Implementation of hierarchical model discrete event systems, as a real-time operating system on a computer network connected via a serial bus is possible, where each computer is dedicated to local and Petri model of a subsystem global robotic system. Since Petri models are simplified to apply general computers, analysis, modelling, complex manufacturing systems control can be achieved using Petri nets. Discrete event systems is a pragmatic tool for modelling industrial systems. For system modelling using Petri nets because we have our system where discrete event. To highlight the auxiliary time Petri model using transport stream divided into hierarchical levels and sections are analysed successively. Proposed robotic system simulation using timed Petri, offers the opportunity to view the robotic time. Application of goods or robotic and transmission times obtained by measuring spot is obtained graphics showing the average time for transport activity, using the parameters sets of finished products. individually.

  14. Discrete events as units of perceived time.

    PubMed

    Liverence, Brandon M; Scholl, Brian J

    2012-06-01

    In visual images, we perceive both space (as a continuous visual medium) and objects (that inhabit space). Similarly, in dynamic visual experience, we perceive both continuous time and discrete events. What is the relationship between these units of experience? The most intuitive answer may be similar to the spatial case: time is perceived as an underlying medium, which is later segmented into discrete event representations. Here we explore the opposite possibility--that our subjective experience of time itself can be influenced by how durations are temporally segmented, beyond more general effects of change and complexity. We show that the way in which a continuous dynamic display is segmented into discrete units (via a path shuffling manipulation) greatly influences duration judgments, independent of psychophysical factors previously implicated in time perception, such as overall stimulus energy, attention and predictability. It seems that we may use the passage of discrete events--and the boundaries between them--in our subjective experience as part of the raw material for inferring the strength of the underlying "current" of time.

  15. Multiple Autonomous Discrete Event Controllers for Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, Timothy C.

    2003-01-01

    The Multiple Autonomous Discrete Event Controllers for Constellations (MADECC) project is an effort within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center's (NASA/GSFC) Information Systems Division to develop autonomous positioning and attitude control for constellation satellites. It will be accomplished using traditional control theory and advanced coordination algorithms developed by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). This capability will be demonstrated in the discrete event control test-bed located at JHU/APL. This project will be modeled for the Leonardo constellation mission, but is intended to be adaptable to any constellation mission. To develop a common software architecture. the controllers will only model very high-level responses. For instance, after determining that a maneuver must be made. the MADECC system will output B (Delta)V (velocity change) value. Lower level systems must then decide which thrusters to fire and for how long to achieve that (Delta)V.

  16. Program For Parallel Discrete-Event Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckman, Brian C.; Blume, Leo R.; Geiselman, John S.; Presley, Matthew T.; Wedel, John J., Jr.; Bellenot, Steven F.; Diloreto, Michael; Hontalas, Philip J.; Reiher, Peter L.; Weiland, Frederick P.

    1991-01-01

    User does not have to add any special logic to aid in synchronization. Time Warp Operating System (TWOS) computer program is special-purpose operating system designed to support parallel discrete-event simulation. Complete implementation of Time Warp mechanism. Supports only simulations and other computations designed for virtual time. Time Warp Simulator (TWSIM) subdirectory contains sequential simulation engine interface-compatible with TWOS. TWOS and TWSIM written in, and support simulations in, C programming language.

  17. Generalized Detectability for Discrete Event Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Shaolong; Lin, Feng

    2011-01-01

    In our previous work, we investigated detectability of discrete event systems, which is defined as the ability to determine the current and subsequent states of a system based on observation. For different applications, we defined four types of detectabilities: (weak) detectability, strong detectability, (weak) periodic detectability, and strong periodic detectability. In this paper, we extend our results in three aspects. (1) We extend detectability from deterministic systems to nondeterministic systems. Such a generalization is necessary because there are many systems that need to be modeled as nondeterministic discrete event systems. (2) We develop polynomial algorithms to check strong detectability. The previous algorithms are based on observer whose construction is of exponential complexity, while the new algorithms are based on a new automaton called detector. (3) We extend detectability to D-detectability. While detectability requires determining the exact state of a system, D-detectability relaxes this requirement by asking only to distinguish certain pairs of states. With these extensions, the theory on detectability of discrete event systems becomes more applicable in solving many practical problems. PMID:21691432

  18. Parallel discrete event simulation using shared memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Daniel A.; Malony, Allen D.; Mccredie, Bradley D.

    1988-01-01

    With traditional event-list techniques, evaluating a detailed discrete-event simulation-model can often require hours or even days of computation time. By eliminating the event list and maintaining only sufficient synchronization to ensure causality, parallel simulation can potentially provide speedups that are linear in the numbers of processors. A set of shared-memory experiments, using the Chandy-Misra distributed-simulation algorithm, to simulate networks of queues is presented. Parameters of the study include queueing network topology and routing probabilities, number of processors, and assignment of network nodes to processors. These experiments show that Chandy-Misra distributed simulation is a questionable alternative to sequential-simulation of most queueing network models.

  19. Detectability of Discrete Event Systems with Dynamic Event Observation

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Shaolong; Lin, Feng

    2009-01-01

    Our previous work considers detectability of discrete event systems which is to determine the current state and subsequent states of a system based on event observation. We assume that event observation is static, that is, if an event is observable, then all its occurrences are observable. However, in practical systems such as sensor networks, event observation often needs to be dynamic, that is, the occurrences of same events may or may not be observable, depending on the state of the system. In this paper, we generalize static event observation into dynamic event observation and consider the detectability problem under dynamic event observation. We define four types of detectabilities. To check detectabilities, we construct the observer with exponential complexity. To reduce computational complexity, we can also construct a detector with polynomial complexity to check strong detectabilities. Dynamic event observation can be implemented in two possible ways: a passive observation and an active observation. For the active observation, we discuss how to find minimal event observation policies that preserve four types of detectabilities respectively. PMID:20161618

  20. Detecting unitary events without discretization of time.

    PubMed

    Grün, S; Diesmann, M; Grammont, F; Riehle, A; Aertsen, A

    1999-12-15

    In earlier studies we developed the 'Unitary Events' analysis (Grün S. Unitary Joint-Events in Multiple-Neuron Spiking Activity: Detection, Significance and Interpretation. Reihe Physik, Band 60. Thun, Frankfurt/Main: Verlag Harri Deutsch, 1996.) to detect the presence of conspicuous spike coincidences in multiple single unit recordings and to evaluate their statistical significance. The method enabled us to study the relation between spike synchronization and behavioral events (Riehle A, Grün S, Diesmann M, Aertsen A. Spike synchronization and rate modulation differentially involved in motor cortical function. Science 1997;278:1950-1953.). There is recent experimental evidence that the timing accuracy of coincident spiking events, which might be relevant for higher brain function, may be in the range of 1-5 ms. To detect coincidences on that time scale, we sectioned the observation interval into short disjunct time slices ('bins'). Unitary Events analysis of this discretized process demonstrated that coincident events can indeed be reliably detected. However, the method looses sensitivity for higher temporal jitter of the events constituting the coincidences (Grün S. Unitary Joint-Events in Multiple-Neuron Spiking Activity: Detection, Significance and Interpretation. Reihe Physik, Band 60. Thun, Frankfurt/Main: Verlag Harri Deutsch, 1996.). Here we present a new approach, the 'multiple shift' method (MS), which overcomes the need for binning and treats the data in their (original) high time resolution (typically 1 ms, or better). Technically, coincidences are detected by shifting the spike trains against each other over the range of allowed coincidence width and integrating the number of exact coincidences (on the time resolution of the data) over all shifts. We found that the new method enhances the sensitivity for coincidences with temporal jitter. Both methods are outlined and compared on the basis of their analytical description and their application on

  1. An adaptive synchronization protocol for parallel discrete event simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bisset, K.R.

    1998-12-01

    Simulation, especially discrete event simulation (DES), is used in a variety of disciplines where numerical methods are difficult or impossible to apply. One problem with this method is that a sufficiently detailed simulation may take hours or days to execute, and multiple runs may be needed in order to generate the desired results. Parallel discrete event simulation (PDES) has been explored for many years as a method to decrease the time taken to execute a simulation. Many protocols have been developed which work well for particular types of simulations, but perform poorly when used for other types of simulations. Often it is difficult to know a priori whether a particular protocol is appropriate for a given problem. In this work, an adaptive synchronization method (ASM) is developed which works well on an entire spectrum of problems. The ASM determines, using an artificial neural network (ANN), the likelihood that a particular event is safe to process.

  2. Modeling Correlated Discrete Uncertainties in Event Trees with Copulas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyang; Dyer, James S; Butler, John C

    2016-02-01

    Modeling the dependence between uncertainties in decision and risk analyses is an important part of the problem structuring process. We focus on situations where correlated uncertainties are discrete, and extend the concept of the copula-based approach for modeling correlated continuous uncertainties to the representation of correlated discrete uncertainties. This approach reduces the required number of probability assessments significantly compared to approaches requiring direct estimates of conditional probabilities. It also allows the use of multiple dependence measures, including product moment correlation, rank order correlation and tail dependence, and parametric families of copulas such as normal copulas, t-copulas, and Archimedean copulas. This approach can be extended to model the dependence between discrete and continuous uncertainties in the same event tree.

  3. LAN attack detection using Discrete Event Systems.

    PubMed

    Hubballi, Neminath; Biswas, Santosh; Roopa, S; Ratti, Ritesh; Nandi, Sukumar

    2011-01-01

    Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) is used for determining the link layer or Medium Access Control (MAC) address of a network host, given its Internet Layer (IP) or Network Layer address. ARP is a stateless protocol and any IP-MAC pairing sent by a host is accepted without verification. This weakness in the ARP may be exploited by malicious hosts in a Local Area Network (LAN) by spoofing IP-MAC pairs. Several schemes have been proposed in the literature to circumvent these attacks; however, these techniques either make IP-MAC pairing static, modify the existing ARP, patch operating systems of all the hosts etc. In this paper we propose a Discrete Event System (DES) approach for Intrusion Detection System (IDS) for LAN specific attacks which do not require any extra constraint like static IP-MAC, changing the ARP etc. A DES model is built for the LAN under both a normal and compromised (i.e., spoofed request/response) situation based on the sequences of ARP related packets. Sequences of ARP events in normal and spoofed scenarios are similar thereby rendering the same DES models for both the cases. To create different ARP events under normal and spoofed conditions the proposed technique uses active ARP probing. However, this probing adds extra ARP traffic in the LAN. Following that a DES detector is built to determine from observed ARP related events, whether the LAN is operating under a normal or compromised situation. The scheme also minimizes extra ARP traffic by probing the source IP-MAC pair of only those ARP packets which are yet to be determined as genuine/spoofed by the detector. Also, spoofed IP-MAC pairs determined by the detector are stored in tables to detect other LAN attacks triggered by spoofing namely, man-in-the-middle (MiTM), denial of service etc. The scheme is successfully validated in a test bed. Copyright © 2010 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Distributed discrete event simulation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    De Vries, R.C.

    1988-02-01

    The presentation given here is restricted to discrete event simulation. The complexity of and time required for many present and potential discrete simulations exceeds the reasonable capacity of most present serial computers. The desire, then, is to implement the simulations on a parallel machine. However, certain problems arise in an effort to program the simulation on a parallel machine. In one category of methods deadlock care arise and some method is required to either detect deadlock and recover from it or to avoid deadlock through information passing. In the second category of methods, potentially incorrect simulations are allowed to proceed. If the situation is later determined to be incorrect, recovery from the error must be initiated. In either case, computation and information passing are required which would not be required in a serial implementation. The net effect is that the parallel simulation may not be much better than a serial simulation. In an effort to determine alternate approaches, important papers in the area were reviewed. As a part of that review process, each of the papers was summarized. The summary of each paper is presented in this report in the hopes that those doing future work in the area will be able to gain insight that might not otherwise be available, and to aid in deciding which papers would be most beneficial to pursue in more detail. The papers are broken down into categories and then by author. Conclusions reached after examining the papers and other material, such as direct talks with an author, are presented in the last section. Also presented there are some ideas that surfaced late in the research effort. These promise to be of some benefit in limiting information which must be passed between processes and in better understanding the structure of a distributed simulation. Pursuit of these ideas seems appropriate.

  5. Parallel Stochastic discrete event simulation of calcium dynamics in neuron.

    PubMed

    Ishlam Patoary, Mohammad Nazrul; Tropper, Carl; McDougal, Robert A; Zhongwei, Lin; Lytton, William W

    2017-09-26

    The intra-cellular calcium signaling pathways of a neuron depends on both biochemical reactions and diffusions. Some quasi-isolated compartments (e.g. spines) are so small and calcium concentrations are so low that one extra molecule diffusing in by chance can make a nontrivial difference in its concentration (percentage-wise). These rare events can affect dynamics discretely in such way that they cannot be evaluated by a deterministic simulation. Stochastic models of such a system provide a more detailed understanding of these systems than existing deterministic models because they capture their behavior at a molecular level. Our research focuses on the development of a high performance parallel discrete event simulation environment, Neuron Time Warp (NTW), which is intended for use in the parallel simulation of stochastic reaction-diffusion systems such as intra-calcium signaling. NTW is integrated with NEURON, a simulator which is widely used within the neuroscience community. We simulate two models, a calcium buffer and a calcium wave model. The calcium buffer model is employed in order to verify the correctness and performance of NTW by comparing it to a serial deterministic simulation in NEURON. We also derived a discrete event calcium wave model from a deterministic model using the stochastic IP3R structure.

  6. Non-Lipschitz Dynamics Approach to Discrete Event Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.; Meyers, R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses a mathematical formalism for simulation of discrete event dynamics (DED) - a special type of 'man- made' system designed to aid specific areas of information processing. A main objective is to demonstrate that the mathematical formalism for DED can be based upon the terminal model of Newtonian dynamics which allows one to relax Lipschitz conditions at some discrete points.

  7. A Summary of Some Discrete-Event System Control Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudie, Karen

    A summary of the area of control of discrete-event systems is given. In this research area, automata and formal language theory is used as a tool to model physical problems that arise in technological and industrial systems. The key ingredients to discrete-event control problems are a process that can be modeled by an automaton, events in that process that cannot be disabled or prevented from occurring, and a controlling agent that manipulates the events that can be disabled to guarantee that the process under control either generates all the strings in some prescribed language or as many strings as possible in some prescribed language. When multiple controlling agents act on a process, decentralized control problems arise. In decentralized discrete-event systems, it is presumed that the agents effecting control cannot each see all event occurrences. Partial observation leads to some problems that cannot be solved in polynomial time and some others that are not even decidable.

  8. Safety Discrete Event Models for Holonic Cyclic Manufacturing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciufudean, Calin; Filote, Constantin

    In this paper the expression “holonic cyclic manufacturing systems” refers to complex assembly/disassembly systems or fork/join systems, kanban systems, and in general, to any discrete event system that transforms raw material and/or components into products. Such a system is said to be cyclic if it provides the same sequence of products indefinitely. This paper considers the scheduling of holonic cyclic manufacturing systems and describes a new approach using Petri nets formalism. We propose an approach to frame the optimum schedule of holonic cyclic manufacturing systems in order to maximize the throughput while minimize the work in process. We also propose an algorithm to verify the optimum schedule.

  9. Parallel discrete-event simulation of FCFS stochastic queueing networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1988-01-01

    Physical systems are inherently parallel. Intuition suggests that simulations of these systems may be amenable to parallel execution. The parallel execution of a discrete-event simulation requires careful synchronization of processes in order to ensure the execution's correctness; this synchronization can degrade performance. Largely negative results were recently reported in a study which used a well-known synchronization method on queueing network simulations. Discussed here is a synchronization method (appointments), which has proven itself to be effective on simulations of FCFS queueing networks. The key concept behind appointments is the provision of lookahead. Lookahead is a prediction on a processor's future behavior, based on an analysis of the processor's simulation state. It is shown how lookahead can be computed for FCFS queueing network simulations, give performance data that demonstrates the method's effectiveness under moderate to heavy loads, and discuss performance tradeoffs between the quality of lookahead, and the cost of computing lookahead.

  10. Agent Frameworks for Discrete Event Social Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    of a general modeling approach to social simulation that embeds a multi - agent system within a DES framework, and propose several reusable agent... agent system to simulate changes in the beliefs, values, and interests (BVIs) of large social groups (Alt, Jackson, Hudak, & Steven Lieberman, 2010...to events from A. 2.3 Cultural Geography Model The Cultural Geography (CG) Model is an implementation of a DESS that uses an embedded multi

  11. Synchronization of autonomous objects in discrete event simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Ralph V.

    1990-01-01

    Autonomous objects in event-driven discrete event simulation offer the potential to combine the freedom of unrestricted movement and positional accuracy through Euclidean space of time-driven models with the computational efficiency of event-driven simulation. The principal challenge to autonomous object implementation is object synchronization. The concept of a spatial blackboard is offered as a potential methodology for synchronization. The issues facing implementation of a spatial blackboard are outlined and discussed.

  12. Temporal Trends of Discrete Extreme Events - A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmat, S. N.; Jayasuriya, N.; Bhuiyan, M.; Adnan, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    Investigating trends in discrete events is essential for the study of changing patterns of extreme events. Temporal trends in the inter-arrival times of occurrence of drought events were examined for 21 selected stations across Victoria, Australia. In the present study, the Standardize Precipitation Index (SPI) was applied for 12-month time scale to identify drought. A drought event here is defined as a period in which the SPI is continuously negative and reaching a value of -1.0 or less. Often, nonparametric tests are commonly used to test for trends including in discrete events. However, discrete events are not constant because of the presence of zero values or non-normality of data. The methodology applies to long-term records of event counts and is based on the stochastic concepts of Poisson process and standard linear regression. Overall, of the 21 stations, 15 showed statistically significant increasing frequency indicates those events are becoming more frequent. Only one station gave insignificant result. The remaining 5 stations showed the time between events was significantly increasing designates droughts are becoming less frequent.

  13. Hierarchical Discrete Event Supervisory Control of Aircraft Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasar, Murat; Tolani, Devendra; Ray, Asok; Shah, Neerav; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a hierarchical application of Discrete Event Supervisory (DES) control theory for intelligent decision and control of a twin-engine aircraft propulsion system. A dual layer hierarchical DES controller is designed to supervise and coordinate the operation of two engines of the propulsion system. The two engines are individually controlled to achieve enhanced performance and reliability, necessary for fulfilling the mission objectives. Each engine is operated under a continuously varying control system that maintains the specified performance and a local discrete-event supervisor for condition monitoring and life extending control. A global upper level DES controller is designed for load balancing and overall health management of the propulsion system.

  14. A methodology for detecting routing events in discrete flow networks.

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, H. E.; Yoo, T.; Nuclear Technology

    2004-01-01

    A theoretical framework for formulating and implementing model-based monitoring of discrete flow networks is discussed. Possible flows of items are described as the sequence of discrete-event (DE) traces. Each trace defines the DE sequence(s) that are triggered when an entity follows a given flow-path and visits tracking locations distributed within the monitored system. Given the set of possible discrete flows, a possible-behavior model - an interacting set of automata - is constructed, where each automaton models the discrete flow of items at each tracking location. Event labels or symbols contain all the information required to unambiguously distinguish each discrete flow. Within the possible behavior, there is a special sub-behavior whose occurrence is required to be detected. The special behavior may be specified by the occurrence of routing events, such as faults. These intermittent or non-persistent events may occur repeatedly. An observation mask is then defined, characterizing the actual observation configuration available for collecting item tracking data. The analysis task is then to determine whether this observation configuration is capable of detecting the identified special behavior. The assessment is accomplished by evaluating several observability notions, such as detectability and diagnosability. If the corresponding property is satisfied, associated formal observers are constructed to perform the monitoring task at hand. The synthesis of an optimal observation mask may also be conducted to suggest an appropriate observation configuration guaranteeing the detection of the special events and to construct associated monitoring agents. The proposed framework, modeling methodology, and supporting techniques for discrete flow networks monitoring are presented and illustrated with an example.

  15. Stochastic discrete event simulation of germinal center reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figge, Marc Thilo

    2005-05-01

    We introduce a generic reaction-diffusion model for germinal center reactions and perform numerical simulations within a stochastic discrete event approach. In contrast to the frequently used deterministic continuum approach, each single reaction event is monitored in space and time in order to simulate the correct time evolution of this complex biological system. Germinal centers play an important role in the immune system by performing a reaction that aims at improving the affinity between antibodies and antigens. Our model captures experimentally observed features of this reaction, such as the development of the remarkable germinal center morphology and the maturation of antibody-antigen affinity in the course of time. We model affinity maturation within a simple affinity class picture and study it as a function of the distance between the initial antibody-antigen affinity and the highest possible affinity. The model reveals that this mutation distance may be responsible for the experimentally observed all-or-none behavior of germinal centers; i.e., they generate either mainly output cells of high affinity or no high-affinity output cells at all. Furthermore, the exact simulation of the system dynamics allows us to study the hypothesis of cell recycling in germinal centers as a mechanism for affinity optimization. A comparison of three possible recycling pathways indicates that affinity maturation is optimized by a recycling pathway that has previously not been taken into account in deterministic continuum models.

  16. Optimization of Operations Resources via Discrete Event Simulation Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, B.; Morris, D.; White, N.; Unal, R.

    1996-01-01

    The resource levels required for operation and support of reusable launch vehicles are typically defined through discrete event simulation modeling. Minimizing these resources constitutes an optimization problem involving discrete variables and simulation. Conventional approaches to solve such optimization problems involving integer valued decision variables are the pattern search and statistical methods. However, in a simulation environment that is characterized by search spaces of unknown topology and stochastic measures, these optimization approaches often prove inadequate. In this paper, we have explored the applicability of genetic algorithms to the simulation domain. Genetic algorithms provide a robust search strategy that does not require continuity and differentiability of the problem domain. The genetic algorithm successfully minimized the operation and support activities for a space vehicle, through a discrete event simulation model. The practical issues associated with simulation optimization, such as stochastic variables and constraints, were also taken into consideration.

  17. Parallel/distributed simulation via event-reservation approach for parametric study of discrete event systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, Ghulam M.; Vakili, Pirooz

    1997-06-01

    There are significant opportunities for the development of parallel/distributed simulation algorithms in the context of parametric study of discrete event systems. In such studies, simulation of multiple (often a large number of) parametric variants is required in order to, for example, identify significant parameters (factor screening), determine directions for response improvement (gradient estimation), find optimal parameter settings (response optimization), or construct a model of the response (meta-modeling). The computational burden in this case is to a large extent due to the large number of alternatives that need to be simulated. An effective strategy in this context is to concurrently simulate a number of parametric variants: the structural similarity of the variants often allows for significant amount of sharing of the simulation work, and the code for concurrent simulation of the variants can often be implemented in a parallel/distributed environment. In this paper, we describe two methods of parallel/distributed/concurrent simulation called the standard clock (SC) and the general shared clock (GSC) simulation. Both approaches rely on an event-reservation approach: by contrast to most discrete-event simulation approaches that are based on an event-scheduling approach, in the SC and GSC simulation, the occurrence instances of all events are reserved on the time axis. These instances may or may not be used. This event-reservation approach frees the clock mechanism of the simulation from needing feedback from the state-update mechanism. Due to this autonomy of the clock mechanism, a single clock can be used to drive a number (possibly large) of variants concurrently and in parallel. The autonomy of the clock mechanism is also the key to the different implementation strategies we adopt. To illustrate, we describe the simulation of parametric versions of wireless communication networks on message passing and shared memory environments.

  18. Higher-order discrete variational problems with constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Leonardo; Martín de Diego, David; Zuccalli, Marcela

    2013-09-01

    An interesting family of geometric integrators for Lagrangian systems can be defined using discretizations of the Hamilton's principle of critical action. This family of geometric integrators is called variational integrators. In this paper, we derive new variational integrators for higher-order Lagrangian mechanical system subjected to higher-order constraints. From the discretization of the variational principles, we show that our methods are automatically symplectic and, in consequence, with a very good energy behavior. Additionally, the symmetries of the discrete Lagrangian imply that momentum is conserved by the integrator. Moreover, we extend our construction to variational integrators where the Lagrangian is explicitly time-dependent. Finally, some motivating applications of higher-order problems are considered; in particular, optimal control problems for explicitly time-dependent underactuated systems and an interpolation problem on Riemannian manifolds.

  19. A discrete-time multiple event process survival mixture (MEPSUM) model

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Danielle O.; Bauer, Daniel J.; Shanahan, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional survival analysis was developed to investigate the occurrence and timing of a single event, but researchers have recently begun to ask questions about the order and timing of multiple events. A multiple event process survival mixture model is developed here to analyze non-repeatable events measured in discrete-time that may occur at the same point in time. Building on both traditional univariate survival analysis and univariate survival mixture analysis, the model approximates the underlying multivariate distribution of hazard functions via a discrete-point finite mixture in which the mixing components represent prototypical patterns of event occurrence. The model is applied in an empirical analysis concerning transitions to adulthood, where the events under study include parenthood, marriage, beginning full-time work, and obtaining a college degree. Promising opportunities, as well as possible limitations of the model and future directions for research are discussed. PMID:24079930

  20. Synchronous Parallel System for Emulation and Discrete Event Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinman, Jeffrey S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A synchronous parallel system for emulation and discrete event simulation having parallel nodes responds to received messages at each node by generating event objects having individual time stamps, stores only the changes to the state variables of the simulation object attributable to the event object and produces corresponding messages. The system refrains from transmitting the messages and changing the state variables while it determines whether the changes are superseded, and then stores the unchanged state variables in the event object for later restoral to the simulation object if called for. This determination preferably includes sensing the time stamp of each new event object and determining which new event object has the earliest time stamp as the local event horizon, determining the earliest local event horizon of the nodes as the global event horizon, and ignoring events whose time stamps are less than the global event horizon. Host processing between the system and external terminals enables such a terminal to query, monitor, command or participate with a simulation object during the simulation process.

  1. Synchronous parallel system for emulation and discrete event simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinman, Jeffrey S. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A synchronous parallel system for emulation and discrete event simulation having parallel nodes responds to received messages at each node by generating event objects having individual time stamps, stores only the changes to state variables of the simulation object attributable to the event object, and produces corresponding messages. The system refrains from transmitting the messages and changing the state variables while it determines whether the changes are superseded, and then stores the unchanged state variables in the event object for later restoral to the simulation object if called for. This determination preferably includes sensing the time stamp of each new event object and determining which new event object has the earliest time stamp as the local event horizon, determining the earliest local event horizon of the nodes as the global event horizon, and ignoring the events whose time stamps are less than the global event horizon. Host processing between the system and external terminals enables such a terminal to query, monitor, command or participate with a simulation object during the simulation process.

  2. Disaster Response Modeling Through Discrete-Event Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jeffrey; Gilmer, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Organizations today are required to plan against a rapidly changing, high-cost environment. This is especially true for first responders to disasters and other incidents, where critical decisions must be made in a timely manner to save lives and resources. Discrete-event simulations enable organizations to make better decisions by visualizing complex processes and the impact of proposed changes before they are implemented. A discrete-event simulation using Simio software has been developed to effectively analyze and quantify the imagery capabilities of domestic aviation resources conducting relief missions. This approach has helped synthesize large amounts of data to better visualize process flows, manage resources, and pinpoint capability gaps and shortfalls in disaster response scenarios. Simulation outputs and results have supported decision makers in the understanding of high risk locations, key resource placement, and the effectiveness of proposed improvements.

  3. Approximate Schur complement preconditioning of the lowest order nodal discretizations

    SciTech Connect

    Moulton, J.D.; Ascher, U.M.; Morel, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    Particular classes of nodal methods and mixed hybrid finite element methods lead to equivalent, robust and accurate discretizations of 2nd order elliptic PDEs. However, widespread popularity of these discretizations has been hindered by the awkward linear systems which result. The present work exploits this awkwardness, which provides a natural partitioning of the linear system, by defining two optimal preconditioners based on approximate Schur complements. Central to the optimal performance of these preconditioners is their sparsity structure which is compatible with Dendy`s black box multigrid code.

  4. Discrete-Event Simulation Applied to Apparel Manufacturing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    manufacturing , e.g., machine tools, vehicles, appliances, etc. Very few applications of simulation and, particularly, of discrete- event simulation in the...industry has shown renewed interest in applications of computer-based tools to manufacturing systems. Simulation, which has been a widely used tool in...other industries, has received considerable attention for its possible applications in apparel manufacturing . !2 ! To date, however, little application

  5. Optimal Discrete Event Supervisory Control of Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan (Technical Monitor); Ray, Asok

    2004-01-01

    This report presents an application of the recently developed theory of optimal Discrete Event Supervisory (DES) control that is based on a signed real measure of regular languages. The DES control techniques are validated on an aircraft gas turbine engine simulation test bed. The test bed is implemented on a networked computer system in which two computers operate in the client-server mode. Several DES controllers have been tested for engine performance and reliability.

  6. Insulators and metals with topological order and discrete symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Shubhayu; Sachdev, Subir

    2017-05-01

    Numerous experiments have reported discrete symmetry breaking in the high-temperature pseudogap phase of the hole-doped cuprates, including breaking of one or more of lattice rotation, inversion, and time-reversal symmetries. In the absence of translational symmetry breaking or topological order, these conventional order parameters cannot explain the gap in the charged fermion excitation spectrum in the antinodal region. Zhao et al. [L. Zhao, D. H. Torchinsky, H. Chu, V. Ivanov, R. Lifshitz, R. Flint, T. Qi, G. Cao, and D. Hsieh, Nat. Phys. 12, 32 (2016), 10.1038/nphys3517] and Jeong et al. [J. Jeong, Y. Sidis, A. Louat, V. Brouet, and P. Bourges, Nat. Commun. 8, 15119 (2017), 10.1038/ncomms15119] have also reported inversion and time-reversal symmetry breaking in insulating Sr2IrO4 similar to that in the metallic cuprates, but coexisting with Néel order. We extend an earlier theory of topological order in insulators and metals, in which the topological order combines naturally with the breaking of these conventional discrete symmetries. We find translationally invariant states with topological order coexisting with both Ising-nematic order and spontaneous charge currents. The link between the discrete broken symmetries and the topological-order-induced pseudogap explains why the broken symmetries do not survive in the confining phases without a pseudogap at large doping. Our theory also connects to the O(3) nonlinear sigma model and CP1 descriptions of quantum fluctuations of the Néel order. In this framework, the optimal doping criticality of the cuprates is primarily associated with the loss of topological order.

  7. Parallel discrete event simulation: A shared memory approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Daniel A.; Malony, Allen D.; Mccredie, Bradley D.

    1987-01-01

    With traditional event list techniques, evaluating a detailed discrete event simulation model can often require hours or even days of computation time. Parallel simulation mimics the interacting servers and queues of a real system by assigning each simulated entity to a processor. By eliminating the event list and maintaining only sufficient synchronization to insure causality, parallel simulation can potentially provide speedups that are linear in the number of processors. A set of shared memory experiments is presented using the Chandy-Misra distributed simulation algorithm to simulate networks of queues. Parameters include queueing network topology and routing probabilities, number of processors, and assignment of network nodes to processors. These experiments show that Chandy-Misra distributed simulation is a questionable alternative to sequential simulation of most queueing network models.

  8. Modelling machine ensembles with discrete event dynamical system theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Dan

    1990-01-01

    Discrete Event Dynamical System (DEDS) theory can be utilized as a control strategy for future complex machine ensembles that will be required for in-space construction. The control strategy involves orchestrating a set of interactive submachines to perform a set of tasks for a given set of constraints such as minimum time, minimum energy, or maximum machine utilization. Machine ensembles can be hierarchically modeled as a global model that combines the operations of the individual submachines. These submachines are represented in the global model as local models. Local models, from the perspective of DEDS theory , are described by the following: a set of system and transition states, an event alphabet that portrays actions that takes a submachine from one state to another, an initial system state, a partial function that maps the current state and event alphabet to the next state, and the time required for the event to occur. Each submachine in the machine ensemble is presented by a unique local model. The global model combines the local models such that the local models can operate in parallel under the additional logistic and physical constraints due to submachine interactions. The global model is constructed from the states, events, event functions, and timing requirements of the local models. Supervisory control can be implemented in the global model by various methods such as task scheduling (open-loop control) or implementing a feedback DEDS controller (closed-loop control).

  9. Modelling machine ensembles with discrete event dynamical system theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Dan

    1990-01-01

    Discrete Event Dynamical System (DEDS) theory can be utilized as a control strategy for future complex machine ensembles that will be required for in-space construction. The control strategy involves orchestrating a set of interactive submachines to perform a set of tasks for a given set of constraints such as minimum time, minimum energy, or maximum machine utilization. Machine ensembles can be hierarchically modeled as a global model that combines the operations of the individual submachines. These submachines are represented in the global model as local models. Local models, from the perspective of DEDS theory , are described by the following: a set of system and transition states, an event alphabet that portrays actions that takes a submachine from one state to another, an initial system state, a partial function that maps the current state and event alphabet to the next state, and the time required for the event to occur. Each submachine in the machine ensemble is presented by a unique local model. The global model combines the local models such that the local models can operate in parallel under the additional logistic and physical constraints due to submachine interactions. The global model is constructed from the states, events, event functions, and timing requirements of the local models. Supervisory control can be implemented in the global model by various methods such as task scheduling (open-loop control) or implementing a feedback DEDS controller (closed-loop control).

  10. Control of discrete event systems modeled as hierarchical state machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brave, Y.; Heymann, M.

    1991-01-01

    The authors examine a class of discrete event systems (DESs) modeled as asynchronous hierarchical state machines (AHSMs). For this class of DESs, they provide an efficient method for testing reachability, which is an essential step in many control synthesis procedures. This method utilizes the asynchronous nature and hierarchical structure of AHSMs, thereby illustrating the advantage of the AHSM representation as compared with its equivalent (flat) state machine representation. An application of the method is presented where an online minimally restrictive solution is proposed for the problem of maintaining a controlled AHSM within prescribed legal bounds.

  11. Nonlinear, discrete flood event models, 2. Assessment of statistical nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Bryson C.

    1988-05-01

    The first paper (Part 1) of this series presented a Bayesian procedure for the estimation of parameters in nonlinear, discrete flood event models. Part 2 begins with a discussion of the concept of nonlinearity in parameter estimation, its consequences, and the need to assess its extent. Three measures of nonlinearity are considered. They are Beale's measure , a bias calculation , and maximum curvature measures . A case study is presented, using the model and data described in Part 1. The results show quite clearly that care is required in the application of all three measures to calibrated flood models, and in the interpretation of the measured values. Devised by Bates and Watts, 1980.

  12. Discrete event simulation in an artificial intelligence environment: Some examples

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.J.; Farish, T.

    1991-01-01

    Several Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) object-oriented discrete-event simulation efforts have been completed during the past three years. One of these systems has been put into production and has a growing customer base. Another (started two years earlier than the first project) was completed but has not yet been used. This paper will describe these simulation projects. Factors which were pertinent to the success of the one project, and to the failure of the second project will be discussed (success will be measured as the extent to which the simulation model was used as originally intended). 5 figs.

  13. On the problem of discrete-event systems properties preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagul, Nadezhda; Bychkov, Igor

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a novel approach to solving a problem generally arising in studying dynamical systems, namely the problem of a system's properties preservation under some transformation. Combining algebra, logic and dynamics, the method of logical-algebraic equations (LAE-method) is developed, serving to synthesize criteria for preservation properties of systems connected by special type of morphisms. The LAE-method is applicable to various systems, but we focus on the case of discrete-event systems (DES), which are the systems that evolve in time due to the occurrence of some event sequences. We consider the issues of the LAE-method application to the reduction of supervisor for DES, the problems of DES basic properties, such as observability and controllability, preservation when sensor readings provide information about system's state and it is available to a supervisor. Decentralized supervisory control is also addressed, in particular, the question whether local supervisors properties are inherited in a global supervisor.

  14. Generalized Molecular Descriptors Derived From Event-Based Discrete Derivative.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Santiago, Oscar; Cabrera, Reisel Millán; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Barigye, Stephen J; Le-Thi-Thu, Huong; Torres, F Javier; Zambrano, Cesar H; Yaber-Goenaga, Ivan; Cruz-Monteagudo, Maykel; López, Yoan Martínez; Giménez, Facundo Pérez; Torrens, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a generalized approach for molecular structure characterization is introduced, based on the relation frequency matrix (F) representation of the molecular graph and the subsequent calculation of the corresponding discrete derivative (finite difference) over a pair of elements (atoms). In earlier publications (22- 24), an unique event, named connected subgraphs, (based on the Kier-Hall's subgraphs) was systematically employed for the computation of the matrix F. The present report is a generalization of this notion, in which eleven additional events are introduced, classified in three categories, namely, topological (terminal paths, vertex path incidence, quantum subgraphs, walks of length k, Sach's subgraphs), fingerprints (MACCs, E-state and substructure fingerprints) and atomic contributions (Ghose and Crippen atom-types for hydrophobicity and refractivity) for F generation. The events are intended to capture diverse information by the generation or search of different kinds of substructures from the graph representation of a molecule. The discrete derivative over duplex atom relations are calculated for each event, and the resulting derivatives, local vertex invariants (LOVIs) are finally obtained. These LOVIs are subsequently employed as the basis for the calculation of global and local indices over groups of atoms (heteroatoms, halogens, methyl carbons, etc.), by using norms, means, statistics and classical algorithms as aggregator (fusion) operators. These indices were implemented in our house software DIVATI (Derivative Type Indices, a new module of TOMOCOMDCARDD system). DIVATI provides a friendly and cross-platform graphical user interface, developed in the Java programming language and is freely available at: http: //www.tomocomd.com. Factor analysis shows that the presented events are rather orthogonal and collect diverse information about the chemical structure. Finally, QSPR models were built to describe the logP and logK of 34

  15. The cost of conservative synchronization in parallel discrete event simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1990-01-01

    The performance of a synchronous conservative parallel discrete-event simulation protocol is analyzed. The class of simulation models considered is oriented around a physical domain and possesses a limited ability to predict future behavior. A stochastic model is used to show that as the volume of simulation activity in the model increases relative to a fixed architecture, the complexity of the average per-event overhead due to synchronization, event list manipulation, lookahead calculations, and processor idle time approach the complexity of the average per-event overhead of a serial simulation. The method is therefore within a constant factor of optimal. The analysis demonstrates that on large problems--those for which parallel processing is ideally suited--there is often enough parallel workload so that processors are not usually idle. The viability of the method is also demonstrated empirically, showing how good performance is achieved on large problems using a thirty-two node Intel iPSC/2 distributed memory multiprocessor.

  16. Stochastic Event Counter for Discrete-Event Systems Under Unreliable Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Tae-Sic Yoo; Humberto E. Garcia

    2008-06-01

    This paper addresses the issues of counting the occurrence of special events in the framework of partiallyobserved discrete-event dynamical systems (DEDS). First, we develop a noble recursive procedure that updates active counter information state sequentially with available observations. In general, the cardinality of active counter information state is unbounded, which makes the exact recursion infeasible computationally. To overcome this difficulty, we develop an approximated recursive procedure that regulates and bounds the size of active counter information state. Using the approximated active counting information state, we give an approximated minimum mean square error (MMSE) counter. The developed algorithms are then applied to count special routing events in a material flow system.

  17. Advances in Discrete-Event Simulation for MSL Command Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrikalakis, Alexander; O'Reilly, Taifun

    2013-01-01

    In the last five years, the discrete event simulator, SEQuence GENerator (SEQGEN), developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to plan deep-space missions, has greatly increased uplink operations capacity to deal with increasingly complicated missions. In this paper, we describe how the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) project makes full use of an interpreted environment to simulate change in more than fifty thousand flight software parameters and conditional command sequences to predict the result of executing a conditional branch in a command sequence, and enable the ability to warn users whenever one or more simulated spacecraft states change in an unexpected manner. Using these new SEQGEN features, operators plan more activities in one sol than ever before.

  18. Analytic Perturbation Analysis of Discrete Event Dynamic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Uryasev, S.

    1994-09-01

    This paper considers a new Analytic Perturbation Analysis (APA) approach for Discrete Event Dynamic Systems (DEDS) with discontinuous sample-path functions with respect to control parameters. The performance functions for DEDS usually are formulated as mathematical expectations, which can be calculated only numerically. APA is based on new analytic formulas for the gradients of expectations of indicator functions; therefore, it is called an analytic perturbation analysis. The gradient of performance function may not coincide with the expectation of a gradient of sample-path function (i.e., the interchange formula for the gradient and expectation sign may not be valid). Estimates of gradients can be obtained with one simulation run of the models.

  19. Performance Analysis of Cloud Computing Architectures Using Discrete Event Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, John C.; Golomb, Andrew M.

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing offers the economic benefit of on-demand resource allocation to meet changing enterprise computing needs. However, the flexibility of cloud computing is disadvantaged when compared to traditional hosting in providing predictable application and service performance. Cloud computing relies on resource scheduling in a virtualized network-centric server environment, which makes static performance analysis infeasible. We developed a discrete event simulation model to evaluate the overall effectiveness of organizations in executing their workflow in traditional and cloud computing architectures. The two part model framework characterizes both the demand using a probability distribution for each type of service request as well as enterprise computing resource constraints. Our simulations provide quantitative analysis to design and provision computing architectures that maximize overall mission effectiveness. We share our analysis of key resource constraints in cloud computing architectures and findings on the appropriateness of cloud computing in various applications.

  20. Advances in Discrete-Event Simulation for MSL Command Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrikalakis, Alexander; O'Reilly, Taifun

    2013-01-01

    In the last five years, the discrete event simulator, SEQuence GENerator (SEQGEN), developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to plan deep-space missions, has greatly increased uplink operations capacity to deal with increasingly complicated missions. In this paper, we describe how the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) project makes full use of an interpreted environment to simulate change in more than fifty thousand flight software parameters and conditional command sequences to predict the result of executing a conditional branch in a command sequence, and enable the ability to warn users whenever one or more simulated spacecraft states change in an unexpected manner. Using these new SEQGEN features, operators plan more activities in one sol than ever before.

  1. Performance bounds on parallel self-initiating discrete-event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1990-01-01

    The use is considered of massively parallel architectures to execute discrete-event simulations of what is termed self-initiating models. A logical process in a self-initiating model schedules its own state re-evaluation times, independently of any other logical process, and sends its new state to other logical processes following the re-evaluation. The interest is in the effects of that communication on synchronization. The performance is considered of various synchronization protocols by deriving upper and lower bounds on optimal performance, upper bounds on Time Warp's performance, and lower bounds on the performance of a new conservative protocol. The analysis of Time Warp includes the overhead costs of state-saving and rollback. The analysis points out sufficient conditions for the conservative protocol to outperform Time Warp. The analysis also quantifies the sensitivity of performance to message fan-out, lookahead ability, and the probability distributions underlying the simulation.

  2. Quality Improvement With Discrete Event Simulation: A Primer for Radiologists.

    PubMed

    Booker, Michael T; O'Connell, Ryan J; Desai, Bhushan; Duddalwar, Vinay A

    2016-04-01

    The application of simulation software in health care has transformed quality and process improvement. Specifically, software based on discrete-event simulation (DES) has shown the ability to improve radiology workflows and systems. Nevertheless, despite the successful application of DES in the medical literature, the power and value of simulation remains underutilized. For this reason, the basics of DES modeling are introduced, with specific attention to medical imaging. In an effort to provide readers with the tools necessary to begin their own DES analyses, the practical steps of choosing a software package and building a basic radiology model are discussed. In addition, three radiology system examples are presented, with accompanying DES models that assist in analysis and decision making. Through these simulations, we provide readers with an understanding of the theory, requirements, and benefits of implementing DES in their own radiology practices.

  3. The effects of parallel processing architectures on discrete event simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cave, William; Slatt, Edward; Wassmer, Robert E.

    2005-05-01

    As systems become more complex, particularly those containing embedded decision algorithms, mathematical modeling presents a rigid framework that often impedes representation to a sufficient level of detail. Using discrete event simulation, one can build models that more closely represent physical reality, with actual algorithms incorporated in the simulations. Higher levels of detail increase simulation run time. Hardware designers have succeeded in producing parallel and distributed processor computers with theoretical speeds well into the teraflop range. However, the practical use of these machines on all but some very special problems is extremely limited. The inability to use this power is due to great difficulties encountered when trying to translate real world problems into software that makes effective use of highly parallel machines. This paper addresses the application of parallel processing to simulations of real world systems of varying inherent parallelism. It provides a brief background in modeling and simulation validity and describes a parameter that can be used in discrete event simulation to vary opportunities for parallel processing at the expense of absolute time synchronization and is constrained by validity. It focuses on the effects of model architecture, run-time software architecture, and parallel processor architecture on speed, while providing an environment where modelers can achieve sufficient model accuracy to produce valid simulation results. It describes an approach to simulation development that captures subject area expert knowledge to leverage inherent parallelism in systems in the following ways: * Data structures are separated from instructions to track which instruction sets share what data. This is used to determine independence and thus the potential for concurrent processing at run-time. * Model connectivity (independence) can be inspected visually to determine if the inherent parallelism of a physical system is properly

  4. Parallel Discrete Molecular Dynamics Simulation With Speculation and In-Order Commitment*†

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Md. Ashfaquzzaman; Herbordt, Martin C.

    2011-01-01

    Discrete molecular dynamics simulation (DMD) uses simplified and discretized models enabling simulations to advance by event rather than by timestep. DMD is an instance of discrete event simulation and so is difficult to scale: even in this multi-core era, all reported DMD codes are serial. In this paper we discuss the inherent difficulties of scaling DMD and present our method of parallelizing DMD through event-based decomposition. Our method is microarchitecture inspired: speculative processing of events exposes parallelism, while in-order commitment ensures correctness. We analyze the potential of this parallelization method for shared-memory multiprocessors. Achieving scalability required extensive experimentation with scheduling and synchronization methods to mitigate serialization. The speed-up achieved for a variety of system sizes and complexities is nearly 6× on an 8-core and over 9× on a 12-core processor. We present and verify analytical models that account for the achieved performance as a function of available concurrency and architectural limitations. PMID:21822327

  5. Parallel Discrete Molecular Dynamics Simulation With Speculation and In-Order Commitment.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Ashfaquzzaman; Herbordt, Martin C

    2011-07-20

    Discrete molecular dynamics simulation (DMD) uses simplified and discretized models enabling simulations to advance by event rather than by timestep. DMD is an instance of discrete event simulation and so is difficult to scale: even in this multi-core era, all reported DMD codes are serial. In this paper we discuss the inherent difficulties of scaling DMD and present our method of parallelizing DMD through event-based decomposition. Our method is microarchitecture inspired: speculative processing of events exposes parallelism, while in-order commitment ensures correctness. We analyze the potential of this parallelization method for shared-memory multiprocessors. Achieving scalability required extensive experimentation with scheduling and synchronization methods to mitigate serialization. The speed-up achieved for a variety of system sizes and complexities is nearly 6× on an 8-core and over 9× on a 12-core processor. We present and verify analytical models that account for the achieved performance as a function of available concurrency and architectural limitations.

  6. Parallel discrete molecular dynamics simulation with speculation and in-order commitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Md. Ashfaquzzaman; Herbordt, Martin C.

    2011-07-01

    Discrete molecular dynamics simulation (DMD) uses simplified and discretized models enabling simulations to advance by event rather than by timestep. DMD is an instance of discrete event simulation and so is difficult to scale: even in this multi-core era, all reported DMD codes are serial. In this paper we discuss the inherent difficulties of scaling DMD and present our method of parallelizing DMD through event-based decomposition. Our method is microarchitecture inspired: speculative processing of events exposes parallelism, while in-order commitment ensures correctness. We analyze the potential of this parallelization method for shared-memory multiprocessors. Achieving scalability required extensive experimentation with scheduling and synchronization methods to mitigate serialization. The speed-up achieved for a variety of system sizes and complexities is nearly 6× on an 8-core and over 9× on a 12-core processor. We present and verify analytical models that account for the achieved performance as a function of available concurrency and architectural limitations.

  7. Optimal Parametric Discrete Event Control: Problem and Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Christopher H

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel optimization problem for discrete event control, similar in spirit to the optimal parametric control problem common in statistical process control. In our problem, we assume a known finite state machine plant model $G$ defined over an event alphabet $\\Sigma$ so that the plant model language $L = \\LanM(G)$ is prefix closed. We further assume the existence of a \\textit{base control structure} $M_K$, which may be either a finite state machine or a deterministic pushdown machine. If $K = \\LanM(M_K)$, we assume $K$ is prefix closed and that $K \\subseteq L$. We associate each controllable transition of $M_K$ with a binary variable $X_1,\\dots,X_n$ indicating whether the transition is enabled or not. This leads to a function $M_K(X_1,\\dots,X_n)$, that returns a new control specification depending upon the values of $X_1,\\dots,X_n$. We exhibit a branch-and-bound algorithm to solve the optimization problem $\\min_{X_1,\\dots,X_n}\\max_{w \\in K} C(w)$ such that $M_K(X_1,\\dots,X_n) \\models \\Pi$ and $\\LanM(M_K(X_1,\\dots,X_n)) \\in \\Con(L)$. Here $\\Pi$ is a set of logical assertions on the structure of $M_K(X_1,\\dots,X_n)$, and $M_K(X_1,\\dots,X_n) \\models \\Pi$ indicates that $M_K(X_1,\\dots,X_n)$ satisfies the logical assertions; and, $\\Con(L)$ is the set of controllable sublanguages of $L$.

  8. Discrete Event Supervisory Control Applied to Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Shah, Neerav

    2005-01-01

    The theory of discrete event supervisory (DES) control was applied to the optimal control of a twin-engine aircraft propulsion system and demonstrated in a simulation. The supervisory control, which is implemented as a finite-state automaton, oversees the behavior of a system and manages it in such a way that it maximizes a performance criterion, similar to a traditional optimal control problem. DES controllers can be nested such that a high-level controller supervises multiple lower level controllers. This structure can be expanded to control huge, complex systems, providing optimal performance and increasing autonomy with each additional level. The DES control strategy for propulsion systems was validated using a distributed testbed consisting of multiple computers--each representing a module of the overall propulsion system--to simulate real-time hardware-in-the-loop testing. In the first experiment, DES control was applied to the operation of a nonlinear simulation of a turbofan engine (running in closed loop using its own feedback controller) to minimize engine structural damage caused by a combination of thermal and structural loads. This enables increased on-wing time for the engine through better management of the engine-component life usage. Thus, the engine-level DES acts as a life-extending controller through its interaction with and manipulation of the engine s operation.

  9. Diagnosis of repeated failures in discrete event systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, H. E.; Jiang, S.; Kumar, R.; Univ. of Kentucky; Iowa State Univ.

    2002-01-01

    We introduce the notion of repeated failure diagnosability for diagnosing the occurrence of a repeated number of failures in discrete event systems. This generalizes the earlier notion of diagnosability that was used to diagnose the occurrence of a failure, but from which the information regarding the multiplicity of the occurrence of the failure could not be obtained. It is possible that in some systems the same type of failure repeats a multiple number of times. It is desirable to have a diagnoser which not only diagnoses that such a failure has occurred but also determines the number of times the failure has occurred. To aide such analysis we introduce the notions of K-diagnosability (K failures diagnosability), [1, K]-diagnosability (1 through K failures diagnosability), and [1, /spl infin/]-diagnosability (1 through /spl infin/ failures diagnosability). Here the first notion is the weakest of all three, and the earlier notion of diagnosability is the same as that of K-diagnosability or that of [1, K]-diagnosability with K=1. We give polynomial algorithms for checking these various notions of repeated failure diagnosability, and also present a procedure of polynomial complexity for the online diagnosis of repeated failures.

  10. Diagnosis of repeated/intermittent failures in discrete event systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, H. E.; Jiang, S.; Kumar, R.

    2003-04-01

    We introduce the notion of repeated failure diagnosability for diagnosing the occurrence of a repeated number of failures in discrete event systems. This generalizes the earlier notion of diagnosability that was used to diagnose the occurrence of a failure, but from which the information regarding the multiplicity of the occurrence of the failure could not be obtained. It is possible that in some systems the same type of failure repeats a multiple number of times. It is desirable to have a diagnoser which not only diagnoses that such a failure has occurred but also determines the number of times the failure has occurred. To aide such analysis we introduce the notions of K-diagnosability (K failures diagnosability), [1,K]-diagnosability (1 through K failures diagnosability), and [1,1]-diagnosability (1 through 1 failures diagnosability). Here the rst (resp., last) notion is the weakest (resp., strongest) of all three, and the earlier notion of diagnosability is the same as that of K-diagnosability or that of [1,K]- diagnosability with K = 1. We give polynomial algorithms for checking these various notions of repeated failure diagnosability, and also present a procedure of polynomial complexity for the on-line diagnosis of repeated failures.

  11. Predicting Liver Transplant Capacity Using Discrete Event Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Hector Toro; Mayorga, Maria; Barritt, A. Sidney; Orman, Eric S.; Wheeler, Stephanie B.

    2014-01-01

    The number of liver transplants (LTs) performed in the US increased until 2006, but has since declined despite an ongoing increase in demand. This decline may be due in part to decreased donor liver quality and increasing discard of poor quality livers. We constructed a Discrete Event Simulation (DES) model informed by current donor characteristics to predict future LT trends through the year 2030. The data source for our model is the United Network for Organ Sharing database, which contains patient level information on all organ transplants performed in the US. Previous analysis showed that liver discard is increasing and that discarded organs are more often from donors who are older, obese, have diabetes, and donated after cardiac death. Given that the prevalence of these factors is increasing, the DES model quantifies the reduction in the number of LTs performed through 2030. In addition, the model estimates the total number of future donors needed to maintain the current volume of LTs, and the effect of a hypothetical scenario of improved reperfusion technology. We also forecast the number of patients on the waiting list and compare this to the estimated number of LTs to illustrate the impact that decreased LTs will have on patients needing transplants. By altering assumptions about the future donor pool, this model can be used to develop policy interventions to prevent a further decline in this life saving therapy. To our knowledge, there are no similar predictive models of future LT use based on epidemiologic trends. PMID:25391681

  12. Multi-threaded, discrete event simulation of distributed computing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, Iosif; MONARC Collaboration

    2001-10-01

    The LHC experiments have envisaged computing systems of unprecedented complexity, for which is necessary to provide a realistic description and modeling of data access patterns, and of many jobs running concurrently on large scale distributed systems and exchanging very large amounts of data. A process oriented approach for discrete event simulation is well suited to describe various activities running concurrently, as well the stochastic arrival patterns specific for such type of simulation. Threaded objects or "Active Objects" can provide a natural way to map the specific behaviour of distributed data processing into the simulation program. The simulation tool developed within MONARC is based on Java (TM) technology which provides adequate tools for developing a flexible and distributed process oriented simulation. Proper graphics tools, and ways to analyze data interactively, are essential in any simulation project. The design elements, status and features of the MONARC simulation tool are presented. The program allows realistic modeling of complex data access patterns by multiple concurrent users in large scale computing systems in a wide range of possible architectures, from centralized to highly distributed. Comparison between queuing theory and realistic client-server measurements is also presented.

  13. Enhancing Complex System Performance Using Discrete-Event Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, Glenn O; Olama, Mohammed M; Lake, Joe E

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we utilize discrete-event simulation (DES) merged with human factors analysis to provide the venue within which the separation and deconfliction of the system/human operating principles can occur. A concrete example is presented to illustrate the performance enhancement gains for an aviation cargo flow and security inspection system achieved through the development and use of a process DES. The overall performance of the system is computed, analyzed, and optimized for the different system dynamics. Various performance measures are considered such as system capacity, residual capacity, and total number of pallets waiting for inspection in the queue. These metrics are performance indicators of the system's ability to service current needs and respond to additional requests. We studied and analyzed different scenarios by changing various model parameters such as the number of pieces per pallet ratio, number of inspectors and cargo handling personnel, number of forklifts, number and types of detection systems, inspection modality distribution, alarm rate, and cargo closeout time. The increased physical understanding resulting from execution of the queuing model utilizing these vetted performance measures identified effective ways to meet inspection requirements while maintaining or reducing overall operational cost and eliminating any shipping delays associated with any proposed changes in inspection requirements. With this understanding effective operational strategies can be developed to optimally use personnel while still maintaining plant efficiency, reducing process interruptions, and holding or reducing costs.

  14. Model reference adaptive control in fractional order systems using discrete-time approximation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedini, Mohammad; Nojoumian, Mohammad Ali; Salarieh, Hassan; Meghdari, Ali

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, model reference control of a fractional order system has been discussed. In order to control the fractional order plant, discrete-time approximation methods have been applied. Plant and reference model are discretized by Grünwald-Letnikov definition of the fractional order derivative using "Short Memory Principle". Unknown parameters of the fractional order system are appeared in the discrete time approximate model as combinations of parameters of the main system. The discrete time MRAC via RLS identification is modified to estimate the parameters and control the fractional order plant. Numerical results show the effectiveness of the proposed method of model reference adaptive control.

  15. Improving the Teaching of Discrete-Event Control Systems Using a LEGO Manufacturing Prototype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, A.; Bucio, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the usefulness of employing LEGO as a teaching-learning aid in a post-graduate-level first course on the control of discrete-event systems (DESs). The final assignment of the course is presented, which asks students to design and implement a modular hierarchical discrete-event supervisor for the coordination layer of a…

  16. Improving the Teaching of Discrete-Event Control Systems Using a LEGO Manufacturing Prototype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, A.; Bucio, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the usefulness of employing LEGO as a teaching-learning aid in a post-graduate-level first course on the control of discrete-event systems (DESs). The final assignment of the course is presented, which asks students to design and implement a modular hierarchical discrete-event supervisor for the coordination layer of a…

  17. Asymmetric statistics of order books: The role of discreteness and evidence for strategic order placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccaria, A.; Cristelli, M.; Alfi, V.; Ciulla, F.; Pietronero, L.

    2010-06-01

    We show that the statistics of spreads in real order books is characterized by an intrinsic asymmetry due to discreteness effects for even or odd values of the spread. An analysis of data from the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) order book points out that traders’ strategies contribute to this asymmetry. We also investigate this phenomenon in the framework of a microscopic model and, by introducing a nonuniform deposition mechanism for limit orders, we are able to quantitatively reproduce the asymmetry found in the experimental data. Simulations of our model also show a realistic dynamics with a sort of intermittent behavior characterized by long periods in which the order book is compact and liquid interrupted by volatile configurations. The order placement strategies produce a nontrivial behavior of the spread relaxation dynamics which is similar to the one observed in real markets.

  18. Asymmetric statistics of order books: the role of discreteness and evidence for strategic order placement.

    PubMed

    Zaccaria, A; Cristelli, M; Alfi, V; Ciulla, F; Pietronero, L

    2010-06-01

    We show that the statistics of spreads in real order books is characterized by an intrinsic asymmetry due to discreteness effects for even or odd values of the spread. An analysis of data from the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) order book points out that traders' strategies contribute to this asymmetry. We also investigate this phenomenon in the framework of a microscopic model and, by introducing a nonuniform deposition mechanism for limit orders, we are able to quantitatively reproduce the asymmetry found in the experimental data. Simulations of our model also show a realistic dynamics with a sort of intermittent behavior characterized by long periods in which the order book is compact and liquid interrupted by volatile configurations. The order placement strategies produce a nontrivial behavior of the spread relaxation dynamics which is similar to the one observed in real markets.

  19. Supervisory control of fuzzy discrete event systems: a formal approach.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Daowen

    2005-02-01

    Fuzzy discrete event systems (DESs) were proposed recently by Lin and Ying [19], which may better cope with the real-world problems of fuzziness, impreciseness, and subjectivity such as those in biomedicine. As a continuation of [19], in this paper, we further develop fuzzy DESs by dealing with supervisory control of fuzzy DESs. More specifically: 1) we reformulate the parallel composition of crisp DESs, and then define the parallel composition of fuzzy DESs that is equivalent to that in [19]. Max-product and max-min automata for modeling fuzzy DESs are considered, 2) we deal with a number of fundamental problems regarding supervisory control of fuzzy DESs, particularly demonstrate controllability theorem and nonblocking controllability theorem of fuzzy DESs, and thus, present the conditions for the existence of supervisors in fuzzy DESs; 3) we analyze the complexity for presenting a uniform criterion to test the fuzzy controllability condition of fuzzy DESs modeled by max-product automata; in particular, we present in detail a general computing method for checking whether or not the fuzzy controllability condition holds, if max-min automata are used to model fuzzy DESs, and by means of this method we can search for all possible fuzzy states reachable from initial fuzzy state in max-min automata. Also, we introduce the fuzzy n-controllability condition for some practical problems, and 4) a number of examples serving to illustrate the applications of the derived results and methods are described; some basic properties related to supervisory control of fuzzy DESs are investigated. To conclude, some related issues are raised for further consideration.

  20. Incorporating discrete event simulation into quality improvement efforts in health care systems.

    PubMed

    Rutberg, Matthew Harris; Wenczel, Sharon; Devaney, John; Goldlust, Eric Jonathan; Day, Theodore Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Quality improvement (QI) efforts are an indispensable aspect of health care delivery, particularly in an environment of increasing financial and regulatory pressures. The ability to test predictions of proposed changes to flow, policy, staffing, and other process-level changes using discrete event simulation (DES) has shown significant promise and is well reported in the literature. This article describes how to incorporate DES into QI departments and programs in order to support QI efforts, develop high-fidelity simulation models, conduct experiments, make recommendations, and support adoption of results. The authors describe how DES-enabled QI teams can partner with clinical services and administration to plan, conduct, and sustain QI investigations.

  1. Statistical and Probabilistic Extensions to Ground Operations' Discrete Event Simulation Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trocine, Linda; Cummings, Nicholas H.; Bazzana, Ashley M.; Rychlik, Nathan; LeCroy, Kenneth L.; Cates, Grant R.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's human exploration initiatives will invest in technologies, public/private partnerships, and infrastructure, paving the way for the expansion of human civilization into the solar system and beyond. As it is has been for the past half century, the Kennedy Space Center will be the embarkation point for humankind's journey into the cosmos. Functioning as a next generation space launch complex, Kennedy's launch pads, integration facilities, processing areas, launch and recovery ranges will bustle with the activities of the world's space transportation providers. In developing this complex, KSC teams work through the potential operational scenarios: conducting trade studies, planning and budgeting for expensive and limited resources, and simulating alternative operational schemes. Numerous tools, among them discrete event simulation (DES), were matured during the Constellation Program to conduct such analyses with the purpose of optimizing the launch complex for maximum efficiency, safety, and flexibility while minimizing life cycle costs. Discrete event simulation is a computer-based modeling technique for complex and dynamic systems where the state of the system changes at discrete points in time and whose inputs may include random variables. DES is used to assess timelines and throughput, and to support operability studies and contingency analyses. It is applicable to any space launch campaign and informs decision-makers of the effects of varying numbers of expensive resources and the impact of off nominal scenarios on measures of performance. In order to develop representative DES models, methods were adopted, exploited, or created to extend traditional uses of DES. The Delphi method was adopted and utilized for task duration estimation. DES software was exploited for probabilistic event variation. A roll-up process was used, which was developed to reuse models and model elements in other less - detailed models. The DES team continues to innovate and expand

  2. Adaptive Event-Triggered Control Based on Heuristic Dynamic Programming for Nonlinear Discrete-Time Systems.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lu; Zhong, Xiangnan; Sun, Changyin; He, Haibo

    2016-04-08

    This paper presents the design of a novel adaptive event-triggered control method based on the heuristic dynamic programming (HDP) technique for nonlinear discrete-time systems with unknown system dynamics. In the proposed method, the control law is only updated when the event-triggered condition is violated. Compared with the periodic updates in the traditional adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) control, the proposed method can reduce the computation and transmission cost. An actor-critic framework is used to learn the optimal event-triggered control law and the value function. Furthermore, a model network is designed to estimate the system state vector. The main contribution of this paper is to design a new trigger threshold for discrete-time systems. A detailed Lyapunov stability analysis shows that our proposed event-triggered controller can asymptotically stabilize the discrete-time systems. Finally, we test our method on two different discrete-time systems, and the simulation results are included.

  3. Tailoring High Order Time Discretizations for Use with Spatial Discretizations of Hyperbolic PDEs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-19

    existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send comments...1-0224 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sigal Gottlieb 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7...methods, time discretizations, hyperbolic partial differential equations, Runge—Kutta methods, multistep methods, 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  4. Discrete-Event Simulation Modeling of the Repairable Inventory Process to Enhance the ARGCS Business Case Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT Discrete-Event Simulation Modeling of the Repairable...TYPE AND DATES COVERED MBA Professional Report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: Discrete-Event Simulation Modeling of the Repairable Inventory Process to...Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration; Agile Rapid Global Combat Support; Discrete- Event Simulation Modeling of the Repairable Inventory Process to

  5. Diagnosis of Discrete Event System with Linear-Time Temporal Logic Proposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanma, Tadanao; Aoyama, Shigeru; Ishida, Muneaki

    Diagnosis for discrete event systems has been investigated. In this paper, authors examine a state estimation problem of a system modeled by a finite state automaton in which each state has its corresponding logical formulas. We formalize a diagnosis problem of truth values of atomic propositions which constitute the logical formulas. Our approach to the problem is based on the discrete event system theory by use of linear-time temporal logic.

  6. Incomplete block SSOR preconditionings for high order discretizations

    SciTech Connect

    Kolotilina, L.

    1994-12-31

    This paper considers the solution of linear algebraic systems Ax = b resulting from the p-version of the Finite Element Method (FEM) using PCG iterations. Contrary to the h-version, the p-version ensures the desired accuracy of a discretization not by refining an original finite element mesh but by introducing higher degree polynomials as additional basis functions which permits to reduce the size of the resulting linear system as compared with the h-version. The suggested preconditionings are the so-called Incomplete Block SSOR (IBSSOR) preconditionings.

  7. Sensor Configuration Selection for Discrete-Event Systems under Unreliable Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Wen-Chiao Lin; Tae-Sic Yoo; Humberto E. Garcia

    2010-08-01

    Algorithms for counting the occurrences of special events in the framework of partially-observed discrete event dynamical systems (DEDS) were developed in previous work. Their performances typically become better as the sensors providing the observations become more costly or increase in number. This paper addresses the problem of finding a sensor configuration that achieves an optimal balance between cost and the performance of the special event counting algorithm, while satisfying given observability requirements and constraints. Since this problem is generally computational hard in the framework considered, a sensor optimization algorithm is developed using two greedy heuristics, one myopic and the other based on projected performances of candidate sensors. The two heuristics are sequentially executed in order to find best sensor configurations. The developed algorithm is then applied to a sensor optimization problem for a multiunit- operation system. Results show that improved sensor configurations can be found that may significantly reduce the sensor configuration cost but still yield acceptable performance for counting the occurrences of special events.

  8. High order discontinuous Galerkin discretizations with discontinuity resolution within the cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekaterinaris, John; Panourgias, Konstantinos

    2016-11-01

    The nonlinear filter of Yee et al. and used for low dissipative well-balanced high order accurate finite-difference schemes is adapted to the finite element context of discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretizations. The performance of the proposed nonlinear filter for DG discretizations is demonstrated for different orders of expansions for one- and multi-dimensional problems with exact solutions. It is shown that for higher order discretizations discontinuity resolution within the cell is achieved and the design order of accuracy is preserved. The filter is applied for inviscid and viscous flow test problems including strong shocks interactions to demonstrate that the proposed dissipative mechanism for DG discretizations yields superior results compared to the results obtained with the TVB limiter and high-order hierarchical limiting. The proposed approach is suitable for p-adaptivity in order to locally enhance resolution of three-dimensional flow simulations.

  9. An Annotation Framework for Dense Event Ordering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) IBM Research,1 New Orchard Road,Armonk,NY,10504-1722 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9...events. 503 if event e1 IS INCLUDED in t1, and t1 BEFORE e2, the tool automatically labels e1 BEFORE e2. The transitivity inference is run after each

  10. High order discretization schemes for the CIR process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonsi, Aurelien

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents weak second and third order schemes for the Cox-Ingersoll-Ross (CIR) process, without any restriction on its parameters. At the same time, it gives a general recursive construction method for getting weak second order schemes that extend the one introduced by Ninomiya and Victoir. Combine both these results, this allows us to propose a second order scheme for more general affine diffusions. Simulation examples are given to illustrate the convergence of these schemes on CIR and Heston models.

  11. Network Science Research Laboratory (NSRL) Discrete Event Toolkit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    network emulations experiments for NSRL. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Experiment Control, Simulation 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...falsification of theoretical models, and characterization of protocols and algorithms for mobile wireless networks. It is used for a range of experiments ...network science experimentation by providing fine control over timing of modeled events external to the experiment . Emulated networks developed by NSRL

  12. On constructing optimistic simulation algorithms for the discrete event system specification

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James J

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a Time Warp simulation algorithm for discrete event models that are described in terms of the Discrete Event System Specification (DEVS). The article shows how the total state transition and total output function of a DEVS atomic model can be transformed into an event processing procedure for a logical process. A specific Time Warp algorithm is constructed around this logical process, and it is shown that the algorithm correctly simulates a DEVS coupled model that consists entirely of interacting atomic models. The simulation algorithm is presented abstractly; it is intended to provide a basis for implementing efficient and scalable parallel algorithms that correctly simulate DEVS models.

  13. Application of Parallel Discrete Event Simulation to the Space Surveillance Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferson, D.; Leek, J.

    2010-09-01

    In this paper we describe how and why we chose parallel discrete event simulation (PDES) as the paradigm for modeling the Space Surveillance Network (SSN) in our modeling framework, TESSA (Testbed Environment for Space Situational Awareness). DES is a simulation paradigm appropriate for systems dominated by discontinuous state changes at times that must be calculated dynamically. It is used primarily for complex man-made systems like telecommunications, vehicular traffic, computer networks, economic models etc., although it is also useful for natural systems that are not described by equations, such as particle systems, population dynamics, epidemics, and combat models. It is much less well known than simple time-stepped simulation methods, but has the great advantage of being time scale independent, so that one can freely mix processes that operate at time scales over many orders of magnitude with no runtime performance penalty. In simulating the SSN we model in some detail: (a) the orbital dynamics of up to 105 objects, (b) their reflective properties, (c) the ground- and space-based sensor systems in the SSN, (d) the recognition of orbiting objects and determination of their orbits, (e) the cueing and scheduling of sensor observations, (f) the 3-d structure of satellites, and (g) the generation of collision debris. TESSA is thus a mixed continuous-discrete model. But because many different types of discrete objects are involved with such a wide variation in time scale (milliseconds for collisions, hours for orbital periods) it is suitably described using discrete events. The PDES paradigm is surprising and unusual. In any instantaneous runtime snapshot some parts my be far ahead in simulation time while others lag behind, yet the required causal relationships are always maintained and synchronized correctly, exactly as if the simulation were executed sequentially. The TESSA simulator is custom-built, conservatively synchronized, and designed to scale to

  14. The stress statistics of the first pop-in or discrete plastic event in crystal plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derlet, P. M.; Maaß, R.

    2016-12-01

    The stress at which the first discrete plastic event occurs is investigated using extreme value statistics. It is found that the average of this critical stress is inversely related to the deforming volume, via an exponentially truncated power-law. This is demonstrated for the first pop-in event observed in experimental nano-indentation data as a function of the indenter volume, and for the first discrete plastic event seen in a dislocation dynamics simulation. When the underlying master distribution of critical stresses is assumed to be a power-law, it becomes possible to extract the density of discrete plastic events available to the crystal, and to understand the exponential truncation as a break-down of the asymptotic Weibull limit.

  15. Visual Data-Analytics of Large-Scale Parallel Discrete-Event Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Caitlin; Carothers, Christopher D.; Mubarak, Misbah; Carns, Philip; Ross, Robert; Li, Jianping Kelvin; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2016-11-13

    Parallel discrete-event simulation (PDES) is an important tool in the codesign of extreme-scale systems because PDES provides a cost-effective way to evaluate designs of highperformance computing systems. Optimistic synchronization algorithms for PDES, such as Time Warp, allow events to be processed without global synchronization among the processing elements. A rollback mechanism is provided when events are processed out of timestamp order. Although optimistic synchronization protocols enable the scalability of large-scale PDES, the performance of the simulations must be tuned to reduce the number of rollbacks and provide an improved simulation runtime. To enable efficient large-scale optimistic simulations, one has to gain insight into the factors that affect the rollback behavior and simulation performance. We developed a tool for ROSS model developers that gives them detailed metrics on the performance of their large-scale optimistic simulations at varying levels of simulation granularity. Model developers can use this information for parameter tuning of optimistic simulations in order to achieve better runtime and fewer rollbacks. In this work, we instrument the ROSS optimistic PDES framework to gather detailed statistics about the simulation engine. We have also developed an interactive visualization interface that uses the data collected by the ROSS instrumentation to understand the underlying behavior of the simulation engine. The interface connects real time to virtual time in the simulation and provides the ability to view simulation data at different granularities. We demonstrate the usefulness of our framework by performing a visual analysis of the dragonfly network topology model provided by the CODES simulation framework built on top of ROSS. The instrumentation needs to minimize overhead in order to accurately collect data about the simulation performance. To ensure that the instrumentation does not introduce unnecessary overhead, we perform a

  16. Using high-order methods on adaptively refined block-structured meshes - discretizations, interpolations, and filters.

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Jaideep; Lefantzi, Sophia; Najm, Habib N.; Kennedy, Christopher A.

    2006-01-01

    Block-structured adaptively refined meshes (SAMR) strive for efficient resolution of partial differential equations (PDEs) solved on large computational domains by clustering mesh points only where required by large gradients. Previous work has indicated that fourth-order convergence can be achieved on such meshes by using a suitable combination of high-order discretizations, interpolations, and filters and can deliver significant computational savings over conventional second-order methods at engineering error tolerances. In this paper, we explore the interactions between the errors introduced by discretizations, interpolations and filters. We develop general expressions for high-order discretizations, interpolations, and filters, in multiple dimensions, using a Fourier approach, facilitating the high-order SAMR implementation. We derive a formulation for the necessary interpolation order for given discretization and derivative orders. We also illustrate this order relationship empirically using one and two-dimensional model problems on refined meshes. We study the observed increase in accuracy with increasing interpolation order. We also examine the empirically observed order of convergence, as the effective resolution of the mesh is increased by successively adding levels of refinement, with different orders of discretization, interpolation, or filtering.

  17. Discrete Event Command & Control for Networked Teams with Multiple Missions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-16

    of the key ideas responsible for our DEC formulation, which allows formal computations for efficient on- line real-time task sequencing and dynamic...effectively and fairly sequences the tasks of all programmed missions and assigns the required resources on- line in real time as events occur and as...Harris, B., Lewis, F. L., and Cook, D. J., “Machine planning for manufacturing: dynamic resource allocation and on- line supervisory control,” Journal

  18. Parametric Parallel Simulation of Discrete Event Systems on SIMD Supercomputers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    Arrival @ Node i )r, - i. (5.20) qmaxBE P(Accepting Departure @ Node i => Join Nodej )1•. - •i’,P, - (5.21) qmax,BE k XDri + g) P(Null Event)!P,.,.a =W1...network. The departure rate from node j is 0 when that node is in state 0 and g, otherwise. Departure Rate from Nodej = 0* n(0Oj) + j(l - (0j)) 168

  19. Dynamical behavior of fractional-order Hastings-Powell food chain model and its discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matouk, A. E.; Elsadany, A. A.; Ahmed, E.; Agiza, H. N.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the dynamical behavior of fractional-order Hastings-Powell food chain model is investigated and a new discretization method of the fractional-order system is introduced. A sufficient condition for existence and uniqueness of the solution of the proposed system is obtained. Local stability of the equilibrium points of the fractional-order system is studied. Furthermore, the necessary and sufficient conditions of stability of the discretized system are also studied. It is shown that the system's fractional parameter has effect on the stability of the discretized system which shows rich variety of dynamical behaviors such as Hopf bifurcation, an attractor crisis and chaotic attractors. Numerical simulations show the tea-cup chaotic attractor of the fractional-order system and the richer dynamical behavior of the corresponding discretized system.

  20. On the Total Variation of High-Order Semi-Discrete Central Schemes for Conservation Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Levy, Doron

    2004-01-01

    We discuss a new fifth-order, semi-discrete, central-upwind scheme for solving one-dimensional systems of conservation laws. This scheme combines a fifth-order WENO reconstruction, a semi-discrete central-upwind numerical flux, and a strong stability preserving Runge-Kutta method. We test our method with various examples, and give particular attention to the evolution of the total variation of the approximations.

  1. Conservative parallel discrete-event simulation: Principles and practice

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    Simulation is one of the most important computational technologies in use today. Unfortunately, its importance is matched by its appetite for computational resources. These factors make parallel simulation a topic with far-reaching consequences in all fields of science and engineering. This thesis is concerned with one approach to this problem, conservative loose event-driven parallel simulation, the objective of which is to apply multiple processors to a single simulation run in an effort to reduce its time-to-completion. There are several factors that make parallel simulation difficult. First, the fact that a physical system has a high degree of concurrency does not necessarily mean that a simulation of that system will benefit from parallelism. The author introduces two simple analytic techniques that can be used to bound from above the speedup potential of parallel simulations. Second, a parallel simulation requires synchronization to ensure that the results obtained are equivalent to those of a sequential simulation of the problem. He argues that the availability of inexpensive, medium-scale and shared-memory multiprocessors mandates a re-examination of synchronization algorithms for conservative loose event-driven parallel simulation. His investigations lead to a novel synchronization technique called lazy blocking avoidance. His measurements show that lazy blocking avoidance performs at least as well as, and often substantially better than, two other synchronization methods that have been widely discussed in the literature (deadlock detection and recovery), and eager blocking avoidance.

  2. A discrete event simulation tool to support and predict hospital and clinic staffing.

    PubMed

    DeRienzo, Christopher M; Shaw, Ryan J; Meanor, Phillip; Lada, Emily; Ferranti, Jeffrey; Tanaka, David

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate how to develop a simulation tool to help healthcare managers and administrators predict and plan for staffing needs in a hospital neonatal intensive care unit using administrative data. We developed a discrete event simulation model of nursing staff needed in a neonatal intensive care unit and then validated the model against historical data. The process flow was translated into a discrete event simulation model. Results demonstrated that the model can be used to give a respectable estimate of annual admissions, transfers, and deaths based upon two different staffing levels. The discrete event simulation tool model can provide healthcare managers and administrators with (1) a valid method of modeling patient mix, patient acuity, staffing needs, and costs in the present state and (2) a forecast of how changes in a unit's staffing, referral patterns, or patient mix would affect a unit in a future state.

  3. Sequential Window Diagnoser for Discrete-Event Systems Under Unreliable Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Wen-Chiao Lin; Humberto E. Garcia; David Thorsley; Tae-Sic Yoo

    2009-09-01

    This paper addresses the issue of counting the occurrence of special events in the framework of partiallyobserved discrete-event dynamical systems (DEDS). Developed diagnosers referred to as sequential window diagnosers (SWDs) utilize the stochastic diagnoser probability transition matrices developed in [9] along with a resetting mechanism that allows on-line monitoring of special event occurrences. To illustrate their performance, the SWDs are applied to detect and count the occurrence of special events in a particular DEDS. Results show that SWDs are able to accurately track the number of times special events occur.

  4. Long-time behavior of a finite volume discretization for a fourth order diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Jan; Matthes, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    We consider a non-standard finite-volume discretization of a strongly non-linear fourth order diffusion equation on the d-dimensional cube, for arbitrary d≥slant 1 . The scheme preserves two important structural properties of the equation: the first is the interpretation as a gradient flow in a mass transportation metric, and the second is an intimate relation to a linear Fokker-Planck equation. Thanks to these structural properties, the scheme possesses two discrete Lyapunov functionals. These functionals approximate the entropy and the Fisher information, respectively, and their dissipation rates converge to the optimal ones in the discrete-to-continuous limit. Using the dissipation, we derive estimates on the long-time asymptotics of the discrete solutions. Finally, we present results from numerical experiments which indicate that our discretization is able to capture significant features of the complex original dynamics, even with a rather coarse spatial resolution.

  5. Synchronous Parallel Emulation and Discrete Event Simulation System with Self-Contained Simulation Objects and Active Event Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinman, Jeffrey S. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is embodied in a method of performing object-oriented simulation and a system having inter-connected processor nodes operating in parallel to simulate mutual interactions of a set of discrete simulation objects distributed among the nodes as a sequence of discrete events changing state variables of respective simulation objects so as to generate new event-defining messages addressed to respective ones of the nodes. The object-oriented simulation is performed at each one of the nodes by assigning passive self-contained simulation objects to each one of the nodes, responding to messages received at one node by generating corresponding active event objects having user-defined inherent capabilities and individual time stamps and corresponding to respective events affecting one of the passive self-contained simulation objects of the one node, restricting the respective passive self-contained simulation objects to only providing and receiving information from die respective active event objects, requesting information and changing variables within a passive self-contained simulation object by the active event object, and producing corresponding messages specifying events resulting therefrom by the active event objects.

  6. Using Trace Element Mapping to Identify Discrete Magma Mixing Events from the Astroni 6 Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astbury, R. L.; Petrelli, M.; Arienzo, I.; D'Antonio, M.; Morgavi, D.; Perugini, D.

    2016-12-01

    The Astroni volcano, located within the perimeter of the Agnano-Monte Spina volcano-tectonic collapse zone, formed 4.23 cal. ka BP, during the third epoch of activity within the Campi Flegrei caldera (CFc; Southern Italy). The evolution of Astroni deserves further study for two main reasons: (1) Unlike other documented activity within the CFc, the preserved tuff ring of the volcano has been formed from seven eruptions, of varying magnitude, over a relatively short timescale; (2) it has been postulated that the style and magnitude of the eruption which formed the Astroni 6 tephra layer may represent the possible result of a medium-sized event within the CFc, should renewed activity ensue. Previous studies of Astroni have investigated crystals, as well as whole rocks, for Sr, Nd and B isotopic variations with results indicating that mixing/mingling processes occurred within the volcano's plumbing system. However, studies aimed at measuring the composition of discrete growth zones within individual crystals would give a more in-depth comprehension of the dynamic history of Astroni and possibly within the entire CFc. In this study, we focus on the Astroni 6c layer, located at the base of the Unit 6 sequence. Plagioclase, sanidine and diopside crystals, as well as groundmass glass and glassy melt inclusions, were first characterised for major and trace element geochemistry through in-situ point analysis. In addition, high resolution trace element mapping was carried out in order to investigate crystal histories, with the aim of detecting discrete zoning events which may otherwise be missed with simple point analysis. Feldspars show a distinct variation in both major and trace elements between core and rim, with around 20% of measured crystals showing an anti-rapakivi texture; plagioclase cores surrounded by K-feldspar rims. In contrast, with respect to major element geochemistry, diopside crystals are relatively homogeneous. However, initial multidimensional trace

  7. A design study for the addition of higher order parametric discrete elements to NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, E. L.

    1972-01-01

    The addition of discrete elements to NASTRAN poses significant interface problems with the level 15.1 assembly modules and geometry modules. Potential problems in designing new modules for higher-order parametric discrete elements are reviewed in both areas. An assembly procedure is suggested that separates grid point degrees of freedom on the basis of admissibility. New geometric input data are described that facilitate the definition of surfaces in parametric space.

  8. Modeling Repeatable Events Using Discrete-Time Data: Predicting Marital Dissolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teachman, Jay

    2011-01-01

    I join two methodologies by illustrating the application of multilevel modeling principles to hazard-rate models with an emphasis on procedures for discrete-time data that contain repeatable events. I demonstrate this application using data taken from the 1995 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) to ascertain the relationship between multiple…

  9. Modeling Anti-Air Warfare With Discrete Event Simulation and Analyzing Naval Convoy Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    Simkit, Component Based Approach, Layered Defense Systems, Formation Movements , Design of Experiments, Simulation Output Analysis 15. NUMBER OF PAGES...5  2.  Simple Movement and Detection in Discrete Event Simulation Using Simkit...Work ........................................... 6    SIMPLE MOVEMENT AND DETECTION .................................................. 7 II. A

  10. Modeling Repeatable Events Using Discrete-Time Data: Predicting Marital Dissolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teachman, Jay

    2011-01-01

    I join two methodologies by illustrating the application of multilevel modeling principles to hazard-rate models with an emphasis on procedures for discrete-time data that contain repeatable events. I demonstrate this application using data taken from the 1995 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) to ascertain the relationship between multiple…

  11. Discrete-event requirements model for sensor fusion to provide real-time diagnostic feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokonuzzaman, Mohd; Gosine, Raymond G.

    1998-06-01

    Minimally-invasive surgical techniques reduce the size of the access corridor and affected zones resulting in limited real-time perceptual information available to the practitioners. A real-time feedback system is required to offset deficiencies in perceptual information. This feedback system acquires data from multiple sensors and fuses these data to extract pertinent information within defined time windows. To perform this task, a set of computing components interact with each other resulting in a discrete event dynamic system. In this work, a new discrete event requirements model for sensor fusion has been proposed to ensure logical and temporal correctness of the operation of the real-time diagnostic feedback system. This proposed scheme models system requirements as a Petri net based discrete event dynamic machine. The graphical representation and quantitative analysis of this model has been developed. Having a natural graphical property, this Petri net based model enables the requirements engineer to communicate intuitively with the client to avoid faults in the early phase of the development process. The quantitative analysis helps justify the logical and temporal correctness of the operation of the system. It has been shown that this model can be analyzed to check the presence of deadlock, reachability, and repetitiveness of the operation of the sensor fusion system. This proposed novel technique to model the requirements of sensor fusion as a discrete event dynamic system has the potential to realize highly reliable real-time diagnostic feedback system for many applications, such as minimally invasive instrumentation.

  12. Second-order discrete Kalman filtering equations for control-structure interaction simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Belvin, W. Keith; Alvin, Kenneth F.

    1991-01-01

    A general form for the first-order representation of the continuous, second-order linear structural dynamics equations is introduced in order to derive a corresponding form of first-order Kalman filtering equations (KFE). Time integration of the resulting first-order KFE is carried out via a set of linear multistep integration formulas. It is shown that a judicious combined selection of computational paths and the undetermined matrices introduced in the general form of the first-order linear structural systems leads to a class of second-order discrete KFE involving only symmetric, N x N solution matrix.

  13. A nonlinear filter for high order discontinuous Galerkin discretizations with discontinuity resolution within the cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panourgias, Konstantinos T.; Ekaterinaris, John A.

    2016-12-01

    The nonlinear filter introduced by Yee et al. (1999) [27] and extensively used in the development of low dissipative well-balanced high order accurate finite-difference schemes is adapted to the finite element context of discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretizations. The filter operator is constructed in the canonical computational domain for the standard cubical element where it is applied to the computed conservative variables in a direction per direction basis. Filtering becomes possible for all element types in unstructured meshes using collapsed coordinate transformations. The performance of the proposed nonlinear filter for DG discretizations is demonstrated and evaluated for different orders of expansions for one-dimensional and multidimensional problems with exact solutions. It is shown that for higher order discretizations discontinuity resolution within the cell is achieved and the design order of accuracy is preserved. The filter is applied for a number of standard inviscid flow test problems including strong shocks interactions to demonstrate that the proposed dissipative mechanism for DG discretizations yields superior results compared to the results obtained with the total variation bounded (TVB) limiter and high-order hierarchical limiting. The proposed approach is suitable for p-adaptivity in order to locally enhance resolution of three-dimensional flow simulations that include discontinuities and complex flow features.

  14. An extension of the OpenModelica compiler for using Modelica models in a discrete event simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Nutaro, James

    2014-11-03

    In this article, a new back-end and run-time system is described for the OpenModelica compiler. This new back-end transforms a Modelica model into a module for the adevs discrete event simulation package, thereby extending adevs to encompass complex, hybrid dynamical systems. The new run-time system that has been built within the adevs simulation package supports models with state-events and time-events and that comprise differential-algebraic systems with high index. Finally, although the procedure for effecting this transformation is based on adevs and the Discrete Event System Specification, it can be adapted to any discrete event simulation package.

  15. High-order solution methods for grey discrete ordinates thermal radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Maginot, Peter G.; Ragusa, Jean C.; Morel, Jim E.

    2016-09-29

    This paper presents a solution methodology for solving the grey radiative transfer equations that is both spatially and temporally more accurate than the canonical radiative transfer solution technique of linear discontinuous finite element discretization in space with implicit Euler integration in time. We solve the grey radiative transfer equations by fully converging the nonlinear temperature dependence of the material specific heat, material opacities, and Planck function. The grey radiative transfer equations are discretized in space using arbitrary-order self-lumping discontinuous finite elements and integrated in time with arbitrary-order diagonally implicit Runge–Kutta time integration techniques. Iterative convergence of the radiation equation is accelerated using a modified interior penalty diffusion operator to precondition the full discrete ordinates transport operator.

  16. High-order solution methods for grey discrete ordinates thermal radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Maginot, Peter G.; Ragusa, Jean C.; Morel, Jim E.

    2016-12-15

    This work presents a solution methodology for solving the grey radiative transfer equations that is both spatially and temporally more accurate than the canonical radiative transfer solution technique of linear discontinuous finite element discretization in space with implicit Euler integration in time. We solve the grey radiative transfer equations by fully converging the nonlinear temperature dependence of the material specific heat, material opacities, and Planck function. The grey radiative transfer equations are discretized in space using arbitrary-order self-lumping discontinuous finite elements and integrated in time with arbitrary-order diagonally implicit Runge–Kutta time integration techniques. Iterative convergence of the radiation equation is accelerated using a modified interior penalty diffusion operator to precondition the full discrete ordinates transport operator.

  17. High-order solution methods for grey discrete ordinates thermal radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Maginot, Peter G.; Ragusa, Jean C.; Morel, Jim E.

    2016-09-29

    This paper presents a solution methodology for solving the grey radiative transfer equations that is both spatially and temporally more accurate than the canonical radiative transfer solution technique of linear discontinuous finite element discretization in space with implicit Euler integration in time. We solve the grey radiative transfer equations by fully converging the nonlinear temperature dependence of the material specific heat, material opacities, and Planck function. The grey radiative transfer equations are discretized in space using arbitrary-order self-lumping discontinuous finite elements and integrated in time with arbitrary-order diagonally implicit Runge–Kutta time integration techniques. Iterative convergence of the radiation equation is accelerated using a modified interior penalty diffusion operator to precondition the full discrete ordinates transport operator.

  18. High-order solution methods for grey discrete ordinates thermal radiative transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Maginot, Peter G.; Ragusa, Jean C.; Morel, Jim E.

    2016-09-29

    This paper presents a solution methodology for solving the grey radiative transfer equations that is both spatially and temporally more accurate than the canonical radiative transfer solution technique of linear discontinuous finite element discretization in space with implicit Euler integration in time. We solve the grey radiative transfer equations by fully converging the nonlinear temperature dependence of the material specific heat, material opacities, and Planck function. The grey radiative transfer equations are discretized in space using arbitrary-order self-lumping discontinuous finite elements and integrated in time with arbitrary-order diagonally implicit Runge–Kutta time integration techniques. Iterative convergence of the radiation equation ismore » accelerated using a modified interior penalty diffusion operator to precondition the full discrete ordinates transport operator.« less

  19. Discrete event performance prediction of speculatively parallel temperature-accelerated dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Zamora, Richard James; Voter, Arthur F.; Perez, Danny; ...

    2016-12-01

    Due to its unrivaled ability to predict the dynamical evolution of interacting atoms, molecular dynamics (MD) is a widely used computational method in theoretical chemistry, physics, biology, and engineering. Despite its success, MD is only capable of modeling time scales within several orders of magnitude of thermal vibrations, leaving out many important phenomena that occur at slower rates. The Temperature Accelerated Dynamics (TAD) method overcomes this limitation by thermally accelerating the state-to-state evolution captured by MD. Due to the algorithmically complex nature of the serial TAD procedure, implementations have yet to improve performance by parallelizing the concurrent exploration of multiplemore » states. Here we utilize a discrete event-based application simulator to introduce and explore a new Speculatively Parallel TAD (SpecTAD) method. We investigate the SpecTAD algorithm, without a full-scale implementation, by constructing an application simulator proxy (SpecTADSim). Finally, following this method, we discover that a nontrivial relationship exists between the optimal SpecTAD parameter set and the number of CPU cores available at run-time. Furthermore, we find that a majority of the available SpecTAD boost can be achieved within an existing TAD application using relatively simple algorithm modifications.« less

  20. Discrete event performance prediction of speculatively parallel temperature-accelerated dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora, Richard James; Voter, Arthur F.; Perez, Danny; Santhi, Nandakishore; Mniszewski, Susan M.; Thulasidasan, Sunil; Eidenbenz, Stephan J.

    2016-12-01

    Due to its unrivaled ability to predict the dynamical evolution of interacting atoms, molecular dynamics (MD) is a widely used computational method in theoretical chemistry, physics, biology, and engineering. Despite its success, MD is only capable of modeling time scales within several orders of magnitude of thermal vibrations, leaving out many important phenomena that occur at slower rates. The Temperature Accelerated Dynamics (TAD) method overcomes this limitation by thermally accelerating the state-to-state evolution captured by MD. Due to the algorithmically complex nature of the serial TAD procedure, implementations have yet to improve performance by parallelizing the concurrent exploration of multiple states. Here we utilize a discrete event-based application simulator to introduce and explore a new Speculatively Parallel TAD (SpecTAD) method. We investigate the SpecTAD algorithm, without a full-scale implementation, by constructing an application simulator proxy (SpecTADSim). Finally, following this method, we discover that a nontrivial relationship exists between the optimal SpecTAD parameter set and the number of CPU cores available at run-time. Furthermore, we find that a majority of the available SpecTAD boost can be achieved within an existing TAD application using relatively simple algorithm modifications.

  1. The first order solutions for two configurations of discrete zoom lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Anthony J.; Zhao, Yang; Steven, Samuel J.; Berman, Rebecca; Fennig, Eryn A.; Petropavlovskiy, Dmitry; Bentley, Julie; Moore, Duncan T.; Olson, Craig

    2016-05-01

    Discrete zoom systems are commonly used as laser beam expanders and infrared zoom lenses. The reason to design a discrete zoom lens is that they are often a desirable compromise between fixed-focal length lenses and continuous zoom lenses, offering many advantages to imaging systems of all types. They have the advantage over continuous zoom systems for containing fewer elements, thus reducing the weight of the system, and having one mechanical motion instead of two. In literature there is little information on the first order parameters and starting requirements for discrete systems. This work derives the first order equations for two different discrete zoom systems. The equations are derived from the requirements of first order parameters which define the starting group focal lengths. The two design configurations studied are: one zoom group flipping in and out of the system; one zoom group moving laterally along the optical axis. This work analyzes the first order equations for both configurations and discusses the starting point for the designs taking into consideration system limitations. Final designs for both configurations are then compared over several parameters: group focal lengths, lens diameters, overall length, number of elements, materials, and performance.

  2. Ordering effect and price sensitivity in discrete choice experiments: need we worry?

    PubMed

    Kjaer, Trine; Bech, Mickael; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte; Hart-Hansen, Kristian

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to analyse the impact that attribute ordering has on the relative importance of the price attribute. A discrete choice experiment was performed in order to elicit psoriasis patients' preferences for treatment. We tested for ordering effect with respect to the price attribute, and disclosed noticeable higher price sensitivity when the price attribute was placed at the end of the program description. Our results indicate that preferences are context dependent and that heuristics may be used in the choice process. Our result does not, however, suggest that ordering effect is a symptom of lexicographic ordering. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Discrete integration of continuous Kalman filtering equations for time invariant second-order structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Belvin, W. Keith

    1990-01-01

    A general form for the first-order representation of the continuous second-order linear structural-dynamics equations is introduced to derive a corresponding form of first-order continuous Kalman filtering equations. Time integration of the resulting equations is carried out via a set of linear multistep integration formulas. It is shown that a judicious combined selection of computational paths and the undetermined matrices introduced in the general form of the first-order linear structural systems leads to a class of second-order discrete Kalman filtering equations involving only symmetric sparse N x N solution matrices.

  4. Discrete event model-based simulation for train movement on a single-line railway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Li, Ke-Ping; Yang, Li-Xing

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a discrete event model-based approach to simulate train movement with the considered energy-saving factor. We conduct extensive case studies to show the dynamic characteristics of the traffic flow and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. The simulation results indicate that the proposed discrete event model-based simulation approach is suitable for characterizing the movements of a group of trains on a single railway line with less iterations and CPU time. Additionally, some other qualitative and quantitative characteristics are investigated. In particular, because of the cumulative influence from the previous trains, the following trains should be accelerated or braked frequently to control the headway distance, leading to more energy consumption.

  5. DISCRETE EVENT SIMULATION OF OPTICAL SWITCH MATRIX PERFORMANCE IN COMPUTER NETWORKS

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Neena; Poole, Stephen W

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present application of a Discrete Event Simulator (DES) for performance modeling of optical switching devices in computer networks. Network simulators are valuable tools in situations where one cannot investigate the system directly. This situation may arise if the system under study does not exist yet or the cost of studying the system directly is prohibitive. Most available network simulators are based on the paradigm of discrete-event-based simulation. As computer networks become increasingly larger and more complex, sophisticated DES tool chains have become available for both commercial and academic research. Some well-known simulators are NS2, NS3, OPNET, and OMNEST. For this research, we have applied OMNEST for the purpose of simulating multi-wavelength performance of optical switch matrices in computer interconnection networks. Our results suggest that the application of DES to computer interconnection networks provides valuable insight in device performance and aids in topology and system optimization.

  6. Desktop Modeling and Simulation: Parsimonious, yet Effective Discrete-Event Simulation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, James R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates how quickly students can be trained to construct useful discrete-event simulation models using Excel The typical supply chain used by many large national retailers is described, and an Excel-based simulation model is constructed of it The set of programming and simulation skills required for development of that model are then determined we conclude that six hours of training are required to teach the skills to MBA students . The simulation presented here contains all fundamental functionallty of a simulation model, and so our result holds for any discrete-event simulation model. We argue therefore that Industry workers with the same technical skill set as students having completed one year in an MBA program can be quickly trained to construct simulation models. This result gives credence to the efficacy of Desktop Modeling and Simulation whereby simulation analyses can be quickly developed, run, and analyzed with widely available software, namely Excel.

  7. Frequency Weighted Discrete-Time Controller Order Reduction Using Bilinear Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimaghaee, Paknosh; Noroozi, Navid

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses a new method for order reduction of linear time invariant discrete-time controller. This method leads to a new algorithm for controller reduction when a discrete time controller is used to control a continuous time plant. In this algorithm, at first, a full order controller is designed in s-plane. Then, bilinear transformation is applied to map the closed loop system to z-plane. Next, new closed loop controllability and observability grammians are calculated in z-plane. Finally, balanced truncation idea is used to reduce the order of controller. The stability property of the reduced order controller is discussed. To verify the effectiveness of our method, a reduced controller is designed for four discs system.

  8. Discrete-time adaptive backstepping nonlinear control via high-order neural networks.

    PubMed

    Alanis, Alma Y; Sanchez, Edgar N; Loukianov, Alexander G

    2007-07-01

    This paper deals with adaptive tracking for discrete-time multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) nonlinear systems in presence of bounded disturbances. In this paper, a high-order neural network (HONN) structure is used to approximate a control law designed by the backstepping technique, applied to a block strict feedback form (BSFF). This paper also includes the respective stability analysis, on the basis of the Lyapunov approach, for the whole controlled system, including the extended Kalman filter (EKF)-based NN learning algorithm. Applicability of the scheme is illustrated via simulation for a discrete-time nonlinear model of an electric induction motor.

  9. Discrete-event simulation of nuclear-waste transport in geologic sites subject to disruptive events. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, S.; Ryland, S.; Peck, R.

    1980-06-19

    This report outlines a methodology to study the effects of disruptive events on nuclear waste material in stable geologic sites. The methodology is based upon developing a discrete events model that can be simulated on the computer. This methodology allows a natural development of simulation models that use computer resources in an efficient manner. Accurate modeling in this area depends in large part upon accurate modeling of ion transport behavior in the storage media. Unfortunately, developments in this area are not at a stage where there is any consensus on proper models for such transport. Consequently, our work is directed primarily towards showing how disruptive events can be properly incorporated in such a model, rather than as a predictive tool at this stage. When and if proper geologic parameters can be determined, then it would be possible to use this as a predictive model. Assumptions and their bases are discussed, and the mathematical and computer model are described.

  10. The use of discrete-event simulation modeling to compare handwritten and electronic prescribing systems.

    PubMed

    Ghany, Ahmad; Vassanji, Karim; Kuziemsky, Craig; Keshavjee, Karim

    2013-01-01

    Electronic prescribing (e-prescribing) is expected to bring many benefits to Canadian healthcare, such as a reduction in errors and adverse drug reactions. As there currently is no functioning e-prescribing system in Canada that is completely electronic, we are unable to evaluate the performance of a live system. An alternative approach is to use simulation modeling for evaluation. We developed two discrete-event simulation models, one of the current handwritten prescribing system and one of a proposed e-prescribing system, to compare the performance of these two systems. We were able to compare the number of processes in each model, workflow efficiency, and the distribution of patients or prescriptions. Although we were able to compare these models to each other, using discrete-event simulation software was challenging. We were limited in the number of variables we could measure. We discovered non-linear processes and feedback loops in both models that could not be adequately represented using discrete-event simulation software. Finally, interactions between entities in both models could not be modeled using this type of software. We have come to the conclusion that a more appropriate approach to modeling both the handwritten and electronic prescribing systems would be to use a complex adaptive systems approach using agent-based modeling or systems-based modeling.

  11. Fault Diagnosis in Discrete-Event Systems with Incomplete Models: Learnability and Diagnosability.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Raymond H; Yonge-Mallo, David L

    2015-07-01

    Most model-based approaches to fault diagnosis of discrete-event systems require a complete and accurate model of the system to be diagnosed. However, the discrete-event model may have arisen from abstraction and simplification of a continuous time system, or through model building from input-output data. As such, it may not capture the dynamic behavior of the system completely. In a previous paper, we addressed the problem of diagnosing faults given an incomplete model of the discrete-event system. We presented the learning diagnoser which not only diagnoses faults, but also attempts to learn missing model information through parsimonious hypothesis generation. In this paper, we study the properties of learnability and diagnosability. Learnability deals with the issue of whether the missing model information can be learned, while diagnosability corresponds to the ability to detect and isolate a fault after it has occurred. We provide conditions under which the learning diagnoser can learn missing model information. We define the notions of weak and strong diagnosability and also give conditions under which they hold.

  12. Fast Multilevel Solvers for a Class of Discrete Fourth Order Parabolic Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Bin; Chen, Luoping; Hu, Xiaozhe; Chen, Long; Nochetto, Ricardo H.; Xu, Jinchao

    2016-03-05

    In this paper, we study fast iterative solvers for the solution of fourth order parabolic equations discretized by mixed finite element methods. We propose to use consistent mass matrix in the discretization and use lumped mass matrix to construct efficient preconditioners. We provide eigenvalue analysis for the preconditioned system and estimate the convergence rate of the preconditioned GMRes method. Furthermore, we show that these preconditioners only need to be solved inexactly by optimal multigrid algorithms. Our numerical examples indicate that the proposed preconditioners are very efficient and robust with respect to both discretization parameters and diffusion coefficients. We also investigate the performance of multigrid algorithms with either collective smoothers or distributive smoothers when solving the preconditioner systems.

  13. Conditions for extinction events in chemical reaction networks with discrete state spaces.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Matthew D; Anderson, David F; Craciun, Gheorghe; Brijder, Robert

    2017-09-26

    We study chemical reaction networks with discrete state spaces and present sufficient conditions on the structure of the network that guarantee the system exhibits an extinction event. The conditions we derive involve creating a modified chemical reaction network called a domination-expanded reaction network and then checking properties of this network. Unlike previous results, our analysis allows algorithmic implementation via systems of equalities and inequalities and suggests sequences of reactions which may lead to extinction events. We apply the results to several networks including an EnvZ-OmpR signaling pathway in Escherichia coli.

  14. Domain-decomposable preconditioners for second-order upwind discretizations of multicomponent systems

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D.E. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Gropp, W.D. )

    1990-01-01

    Discrete systems arising in computational fluid dynamics applications often require wide stencils adapted to the local convective direction in order to accommodate higher-order upwind differencing, and involve multiple components perhaps coupling strongly at each point. Conventional exactly or approximately factored inverses of such operators are burdensome to apply globally, especially in problems complicated by non-tensor-product domain geometry or adaptive refinement, though their forward'' action is not. Such problems can be solved by iterative methods by using either point-block preconditioners or combination space-decoupled/component-decoupled preconditioners that are based on lower-order discretizations. Except for a global implicit solve on a coarse grid, each phase in the application of such preconditioners has simple locally exploitable structure. 16 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Humans can integrate feedback of discrete events in their sensorimotor control of a robotic hand

    PubMed Central

    Segil, Jacob L.; Clemente, Francesco; Weir, Richard F. ff; Edin, Benoni

    2015-01-01

    Providing functionally effective sensory feedback to users of prosthetics is a largely unsolved challenge. Traditional solutions require high band-widths for providing feedback for the control of manipulation and yet have been largely unsuccessful. In this study, we have explored a strategy that relies on temporally discrete sensory feedback that is technically simple to provide. According to the Discrete Event-driven Sensory feedback Control (DESC) policy, motor tasks in humans are organized in phases delimited by means of sensory encoded discrete mechanical events. To explore the applicability of DESC for control, we designed a paradigm in which healthy humans operated an artificial robot hand to lift and replace an instrumented object, a task that can readily be learned and mastered under visual control. Assuming that the central nervous system of humans naturally organizes motor tasks based on a strategy akin to DESC, we delivered short-lasting vibrotactile feedback related to events that are known to forcefully affect progression of the grasp-lift-and-hold task. After training, we determined whether the artificial feedback had been integrated with the sensorimotor control by introducing short delays and we indeed observed that the participants significantly delayed subsequent phases of the task. This study thus gives support to the DESC policy hypothesis. Moreover, it demonstrates that humans can integrate temporally discrete sensory feedback while controlling an artificial hand and invites further studies in which inexpensive, noninvasive technology could be used in clever ways to provide physiologically appropriate sensory feedback in upper limb prosthetics with much lower band-width requirements than with traditional solutions. PMID:24992899

  16. Discrete Climatic Events on Timescales of Decades to Centuries: Clues from Polar Landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, S.; Ingersoll, A. P.

    2002-12-01

    Recent observations indicate fast (meters per year) evolution of features, named Swiss-cheese for their morphologic appearance, on the surface of the southern residual frost cap [Malin et al., Science, 2001]. The onset of growth of these features may be responding in a sensitive way to changes in Martian climatic conditions on the timescales of decades to centuries. We have developed a model to examine the growth and development of the Swiss-cheese depressions. Swiss-cheese features were first identified by Thomas et al. [Science, 2000] using Mars Orbiter Camera imagery. They have flat floors and steep sided walls. Their lateral sizes are of the order of a few hundred meters. They are quite shallow with shadow and MOLA measurements indicating a depth of about 8 meters. Although the depressions are fairly circular the smaller ones do display a slight but consistent asymmetry in the form of a small cusp which points poleward indicating that the origin of these features is connected with insolation. As the seasonal frost disappears their walls appear to darken considerably relative to the surrounding terrain. The flat interior of the depression however does not appear to change in this way. There is a clear size division between smaller and larger depressions. Our modeling indicates that the growth timescales of the small-size population are on the order of a few Martian decades to centuries. This populations has a narrow size distribution with most of the depressions in any one area being roughly the same size. The similar size of adjacent depressions argues for some discrete climatic event which triggered this form of erosion of the cap. Larger depressions in other parts of the cap display an interior moat which indicates their walls have begun to be eroded outward after a period of inactivity or perhaps deposition. The width of these moats along with the observed expansion rates of the depressions [Malin et al., Science, 2001] indicates that these larger

  17. Near Optimal Event-Triggered Control of Nonlinear Discrete-Time Systems Using Neurodynamic Programming.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Avimanyu; Xu, Hao; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an event-triggered near optimal control of uncertain nonlinear discrete-time systems. Event-driven neurodynamic programming (NDP) is utilized to design the control policy. A neural network (NN)-based identifier, with event-based state and input vectors, is utilized to learn the system dynamics. An actor-critic framework is used to learn the cost function and the optimal control input. The NN weights of the identifier, the critic, and the actor NNs are tuned aperiodically once every triggered instant. An adaptive event-trigger condition to decide the trigger instants is derived. Thus, a suitable number of events are generated to ensure a desired accuracy of approximation. A near optimal performance is achieved without using value and/or policy iterations. A detailed analysis of nontrivial inter-event times with an explicit formula to show the reduction in computation is also derived. The Lyapunov technique is used in conjunction with the event-trigger condition to guarantee the ultimate boundedness of the closed-loop system. The simulation results are included to verify the performance of the controller. The net result is the development of event-driven NDP.

  18. Bounded Skew High-Order Resolution Schemes for the Discrete Ordinates Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, P. J.

    2002-01-01

    The discrete ordinates method for the solution of the radiative heat transfer equation suffers from two main shortcomings, namely ray effects and numerical smearing. Spatial discretization, which is the cause of numerical smearing, constitutes the subject of the present work. Bounded skew high-order resolution schemes are applied to the discrete ordinate equations and compared with standard bounded high-order resolution schemes (CLAM, MUSCL, and SMART), as well as with the step scheme. Calculations are performed for two- and three-dimensional enclosures with transparent, emitting-absorbing, and emitting-absorbing-scattering media. One of the walls of the enclosure is hot, while the others are cold. The results demonstrate that the bounded skew high-order schemes are more accurate than the bounded high-order ones, regardless of the radiative properties of the medium. The improved accuracy is more significant for the radiation intensity along directions oblique to the coordinate lines, but it is also observed for the incident radiation. The difference between the results of the skewed and the standard schemes is attenuated as the optical thickness of the medium increases. A drawback of the skewed schemes is their higher computational requirements, associated with an increased number of iterations required for convergence.

  19. Discrete event simulation tool for analysis of qualitative models of continuous processing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T. (Inventor); Basham, Bryan D. (Inventor); Harris, Richard A. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artificial intelligence design and qualitative modeling tool is disclosed for creating computer models and simulating continuous activities, functions, and/or behavior using developed discrete event techniques. Conveniently, the tool is organized in four modules: library design module, model construction module, simulation module, and experimentation and analysis. The library design module supports the building of library knowledge including component classes and elements pertinent to a particular domain of continuous activities, functions, and behavior being modeled. The continuous behavior is defined discretely with respect to invocation statements, effect statements, and time delays. The functionality of the components is defined in terms of variable cluster instances, independent processes, and modes, further defined in terms of mode transition processes and mode dependent processes. Model construction utilizes the hierarchy of libraries and connects them with appropriate relations. The simulation executes a specialized initialization routine and executes events in a manner that includes selective inherency of characteristics through a time and event schema until the event queue in the simulator is emptied. The experimentation and analysis module supports analysis through the generation of appropriate log files and graphics developments and includes the ability of log file comparisons.

  20. Accuracy-preserving source term quadrature for third-order edge-based discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Liu, Yi

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we derive a family of source term quadrature formulas for preserving third-order accuracy of the node-centered edge-based discretization for conservation laws with source terms on arbitrary simplex grids. A three-parameter family of source term quadrature formulas is derived, and as a subset, a one-parameter family of economical formulas is identified that does not require second derivatives of the source term. Among the economical formulas, a unique formula is then derived that does not require gradients of the source term at neighbor nodes, thus leading to a significantly smaller discretization stencil for source terms. All the formulas derived in this paper do not require a boundary closure, and therefore can be directly applied at boundary nodes. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate third-order accuracy at interior and boundary nodes for one-dimensional grids and linear triangular/tetrahedral grids over straight and curved geometries.

  1. The influence of context boundaries on memory for the sequential order of events

    PubMed Central

    DuBrow, Sarah; Davachi, Lila

    2013-01-01

    Episodic memory allows us to re-experience the past by recovering the sequences of events that characterize those prior experiences. Interestingly, although experience is continuous, we are able to selectively retrieve and re-experience more discrete episodes from our past, raising the possibility that some elements become tightly related to each other in memory, while others do not. The current series of experiments was designed to ask how shifts in context during an experience influence how we remember the past. Specifically, we asked how context shifts influence our ability to remember the relative order of past events, a hallmark of episodic memory. We found that memory for the order of events was enhanced within, as compared to across, context shifts, or ‘boundaries’ (Experiment 1). Next, we showed that this relative enhancement in order memory was eliminated when across-item associative processing was disrupted (Experiment 2), suggesting that context shifts have a selective effect on sequential binding. Finally, we provide evidence that the act of making order memory judgments involves the reactivation of representations that intervened, or bridged, the tested items (Experiment 3). Together, these data suggest that boundaries may serve to parse continuous experience into sequences of contextually related events and that this organization facilitates remembering the temporal order of events that share the same context. PMID:23957281

  2. Investigating Progression in Substance Use Initiation Using a Discrete-Time Multiple Event Process Survival Mixture (MEPSUM) Approach

    PubMed Central

    Richmond-Rakerd, Leah S.; Fleming, Kimberly A.; Slutske, Wendy S.

    2015-01-01

    The order and timing of substance initiation has significant implications for later problematic patterns of use. Despite the need to study initiation from a multivariate framework, survival analytic methods typically cannot accommodate more than two substances in one model. The Discrete-Time Multiple Event Process Survival Mixture (MEPSUM; Dean, Bauer, & Shanahan, 2014) model represents an advance by incorporating more than two outcomes and enabling establishment of latent classes within a multivariate hazard distribution. Employing a MEPSUM approach, we evaluated patterns of tobacco, alcohol, and cannabis initiation in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (N=18,923). We found four classes that differed in their ages and ordering of peak initiation risk. Demographics, externalizing psychopathology, and personality significantly predicted class membership. Sex differences in the association between delinquency and initiation patterns also emerged. Findings support the utility of the MEPSUM approach in elucidating developmental pathways underlying clinically relevant phenomena. PMID:27127730

  3. Determining the significance of associations between two series of discrete events : bootstrap methods /

    SciTech Connect

    Niehof, Jonathan T.; Morley, Steven K.

    2012-01-01

    We review and develop techniques to determine associations between series of discrete events. The bootstrap, a nonparametric statistical method, allows the determination of the significance of associations with minimal assumptions about the underlying processes. We find the key requirement for this method: one of the series must be widely spaced in time to guarantee the theoretical applicability of the bootstrap. If this condition is met, the calculated significance passes a reasonableness test. We conclude with some potential future extensions and caveats on the applicability of these methods. The techniques presented have been implemented in a Python-based software toolkit.

  4. Using Discrete Event Simulation to predict KPI's at a Projected Emergency Room.

    PubMed

    Concha, Pablo; Neriz, Liliana; Parada, Danilo; Ramis, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Discrete Event Simulation (DES) is a powerful factor in the design of clinical facilities. DES enables facilities to be built or adapted to achieve the expected Key Performance Indicators (KPI's) such as average waiting times according to acuity, average stay times and others. Our computational model was built and validated using expert judgment and supporting statistical data. One scenario studied resulted in a 50% decrease in the average cycle time of patients compared to the original model, mainly by modifying the patient's attention model.

  5. Discrete event simulation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analytical laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K.L.

    1992-02-01

    A discrete event simulation of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analytical laboratory has been constructed in the GPSS language. It was used to estimate laboratory analysis times at process analytical hold points and to study the effect of sample number on those times. Typical results are presented for three different simultaneous representing increasing levels of complexity, and for different sampling schemes. Example equipment utilization time plots are also included. SRS DWPF laboratory management and chemists found the simulations very useful for resource and schedule planning.

  6. Verifying Ptolemy II Discrete-Event Models Using Real-Time Maude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Kyungmin; Ölveczky, Peter Csaba; Feng, Thomas Huining; Tripakis, Stavros

    This paper shows how Ptolemy II discrete-event (DE) models can be formally analyzed using Real-Time Maude. We formalize in Real-Time Maude the semantics of a subset of hierarchical Ptolemy II DE models, and explain how the code generation infrastructure of Ptolemy II has been used to automatically synthesize a Real-Time Maude verification model from a Ptolemy II design model. This enables a model-engineering process that combines the convenience of Ptolemy II DE modeling and simulation with formal verification in Real-Time Maude.

  7. Supervisor Localization: A Top-Down Approach to Distributed Control of Discrete-Event Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, K.; Wonham, W. M.

    2009-03-05

    A purely distributed control paradigm is proposed for discrete-event systems (DES). In contrast to control by one or more external supervisors, distributed control aims to design built-in strategies for individual agents. First a distributed optimal nonblocking control problem is formulated. To solve it, a top-down localization procedure is developed which systematically decomposes an external supervisor into local controllers while preserving optimality and nonblockingness. An efficient localization algorithm is provided to carry out the computation, and an automated guided vehicles (AGV) example presented for illustration. Finally, the 'easiest' and 'hardest' boundary cases of localization are discussed.

  8. Energy Stable Flux Formulas For The Discontinuous Galerkin Discretization Of First Order Nonlinear Conservation Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy; Charrier, Pierre; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We consider the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element discretization of first order systems of conservation laws derivable as moments of the kinetic Boltzmann equation. This includes well known conservation law systems such as the Euler For the class of first order nonlinear conservation laws equipped with an entropy extension, an energy analysis of the DG method for the Cauchy initial value problem is developed. Using this DG energy analysis, several new variants of existing numerical flux functions are derived and shown to be energy stable.

  9. Estimation of Transitional Probabilities of Discrete Event Systems from Cross-Sectional Survey and its Application in Tobacco Control

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Feng; Chen, Xinguang

    2009-01-01

    In order to find better strategies for tobacco control, it is often critical to know the transitional probabilities among various stages of tobacco use. Traditionally, such probabilities are estimated by analyzing data from longitudinal surveys that are often time-consuming and expensive to conduct. Since cross-sectional surveys are much easier to conduct, it will be much more practical and useful to estimate transitional probabilities from cross-sectional survey data if possible. However, no previous research has attempted to do this. In this paper, we propose a method to estimate transitional probabilities from cross-sectional survey data. The method is novel and is based on a discrete event system framework. In particular, we introduce state probabilities and transitional probabilities to conventional discrete event system models. We derive various equations that can be used to estimate the transitional probabilities. We test the method using cross-sectional data of the National Survey on Drug Use and Health. The estimated transitional probabilities can be used in predicting the future smoking behavior for decision-making, planning and evaluation of various tobacco control programs. The method also allows a sensitivity analysis that can be used to find the most effective way of tobacco control. Since there are much more cross-sectional survey data in existence than longitudinal ones, the impact of this new method is expected to be significant. PMID:20161437

  10. A high-order staggered finite-element vertical discretization for non-hydrostatic atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Jorge E.; Ullrich, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric modeling systems require economical methods to solve the non-hydrostatic Euler equations. Two major differences between hydrostatic models and a full non-hydrostatic description lies in the vertical velocity tendency and numerical stiffness associated with sound waves. In this work we introduce a new arbitrary-order vertical discretization entitled the staggered nodal finite-element method (SNFEM). Our method uses a generalized discrete derivative that consistently combines the discontinuous Galerkin and spectral element methods on a staggered grid. Our combined method leverages the accurate wave propagation and conservation properties of spectral elements with staggered methods that eliminate stationary (2Δx) modes. Furthermore, high-order accuracy also eliminates the need for a reference state to maintain hydrostatic balance. In this work we demonstrate the use of high vertical order as a means of improving simulation quality at relatively coarse resolution. We choose a test case suite that spans the range of atmospheric flows from predominantly hydrostatic to nonlinear in the large-eddy regime. Our results show that there is a distinct benefit in using the high-order vertical coordinate at low resolutions with the same robust properties as the low-order alternative.

  11. A high-order staggered finite-element vertical discretization for non-hydrostatic atmospheric models

    DOE PAGES

    Guerra, Jorge E.; Ullrich, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric modeling systems require economical methods to solve the non-hydrostatic Euler equations. Two major differences between hydrostatic models and a full non-hydrostatic description lies in the vertical velocity tendency and numerical stiffness associated with sound waves. In this work we introduce a new arbitrary-order vertical discretization entitled the staggered nodal finite-element method (SNFEM). Our method uses a generalized discrete derivative that consistently combines the discontinuous Galerkin and spectral element methods on a staggered grid. Our combined method leverages the accurate wave propagation and conservation properties of spectral elements with staggered methods that eliminate stationary (2Δx) modes. Furthermore, high-order accuracy alsomore » eliminates the need for a reference state to maintain hydrostatic balance. In this work we demonstrate the use of high vertical order as a means of improving simulation quality at relatively coarse resolution. We choose a test case suite that spans the range of atmospheric flows from predominantly hydrostatic to nonlinear in the large-eddy regime. Our results show that there is a distinct benefit in using the high-order vertical coordinate at low resolutions with the same robust properties as the low-order alternative.« less

  12. Dynamical Analysis and Circuit Simulation of a New Fractional-Order Hyperchaotic System and Its Discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, A. M. A.; Elsonbaty, A.; Elsadany, A. A.; Matouk, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an analytical framework to investigate the dynamical behavior of a new fractional-order hyperchaotic circuit system. A sufficient condition for existence, uniqueness and continuous dependence on initial conditions of the solution of the proposed system is derived. The local stability of all the system’s equilibrium points are discussed using fractional Routh-Hurwitz test. Then the analytical conditions for the existence of a pitchfork bifurcation in this system with fractional-order parameter less than 1/3 are provided. Conditions for the existence of Hopf bifurcation in this system are also investigated. The dynamics of discretized form of our fractional-order hyperchaotic system are explored. Chaos control is also achieved in discretized system using delay feedback control technique. The numerical simulation are presented to confirm our theoretical analysis via phase portraits, bifurcation diagrams and Lyapunov exponents. A text encryption algorithm is presented based on the proposed fractional-order system. The results show that the new system exhibits a rich variety of dynamical behaviors such as limit cycles, chaos and transient phenomena where fractional-order derivative represents a key parameter in determining system qualitative behavior.

  13. Identification of safety-critical events using kinematic vehicle data and the discrete fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Robert; Smith, Brian L; Park, Hyungjun; Dailey, Daniel J

    2016-11-01

    Recent technological advances have made it both feasible and practical to identify unsafe driving behaviors using second-by-second trajectory data. Presented in this paper is a unique approach to detecting safety-critical events using vehicles' longitudinal accelerations. A Discrete Fourier Transform is used in combination with K-means clustering to flag patterns in the vehicles' accelerations in time-series that are likely to be crashes or near-crashes. The algorithm was able to detect roughly 78% of crasjavascript:void(0)hes and near-crashes (71 out of 91 validated events in the Naturalistic Driving Study data used), while generating about 1 false positive every 2.7h. In addition to presenting the promising results, an implementation strategy is discussed and further research topics that can improve this method are suggested in the paper. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Discrete Event Simulation Model of Sudden Cardiac Death Predicts High Impact of Preventive Interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Victor P.; Head, Trajen; Johnson, Neil; Deo, Sapna K.; Daunert, Sylvia; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J.

    2013-05-01

    Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD) is responsible for at least 180,000 deaths a year and incurs an average cost of $286 billion annually in the United States alone. Herein, we present a novel discrete event simulation model of SCD, which quantifies the chains of events associated with the formation, growth, and rupture of atheroma plaques, and the subsequent formation of clots, thrombosis and on-set of arrhythmias within a population. The predictions generated by the model are in good agreement both with results obtained from pathological examinations on the frequencies of three major types of atheroma, and with epidemiological data on the prevalence and risk of SCD. These model predictions allow for identification of interventions and importantly for the optimal time of intervention leading to high potential impact on SCD risk reduction (up to 8-fold reduction in the number of SCDs in the population) as well as the increase in life expectancy.

  15. Tutorial in medical decision modeling incorporating waiting lines and queues using discrete event simulation.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Beate; Theurl, Engelbert; Siebert, Uwe; Pfeiffer, Karl-Peter

    2010-01-01

    In most decision-analytic models in health care, it is assumed that there is treatment without delay and availability of all required resources. Therefore, waiting times caused by limited resources and their impact on treatment effects and costs often remain unconsidered. Queuing theory enables mathematical analysis and the derivation of several performance measures of queuing systems. Nevertheless, an analytical approach with closed formulas is not always possible. Therefore, simulation techniques are used to evaluate systems that include queuing or waiting, for example, discrete event simulation. To include queuing in decision-analytic models requires a basic knowledge of queuing theory and of the underlying interrelationships. This tutorial introduces queuing theory. Analysts and decision-makers get an understanding of queue characteristics, modeling features, and its strength. Conceptual issues are covered, but the emphasis is on practical issues like modeling the arrival of patients. The treatment of coronary artery disease with percutaneous coronary intervention including stent placement serves as an illustrative queuing example. Discrete event simulation is applied to explicitly model resource capacities, to incorporate waiting lines and queues in the decision-analytic modeling example.

  16. Diagnosis of delay-deadline failures in real time discrete event models.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Santosh; Sarkar, Dipankar; Bhowal, Prodip; Mukhopadhyay, Siddhartha

    2007-10-01

    In this paper a method for fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) of real time systems has been developed. A modeling framework termed as real time discrete event system (RTDES) model is presented and a mechanism for FDD of the same has been developed. The use of RTDES framework for FDD is an extension of the works reported in the discrete event system (DES) literature, which are based on finite state machines (FSM). FDD of RTDES models are suited for real time systems because of their capability of representing timing faults leading to failures in terms of erroneous delays and deadlines, which FSM-based ones cannot address. The concept of measurement restriction of variables is introduced for RTDES and the consequent equivalence of states and indistinguishability of transitions have been characterized. Faults are modeled in terms of an unmeasurable condition variable in the state map. Diagnosability is defined and the procedure of constructing a diagnoser is provided. A checkable property of the diagnoser is shown to be a necessary and sufficient condition for diagnosability. The methodology is illustrated with an example of a hydraulic cylinder.

  17. Discrete event simulation as a tool in optimization of a professional complex adaptive system.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Anders Lassen; Hilwig, Helmer; Kissoon, Niranjan; Teelucksingh, Surujpal

    2008-01-01

    Similar urgent needs for improvement of health care systems exist in the developed and developing world. The culture and the organization of an emergency department in developing countries can best be described as a professional complex adaptive system, where each agent (employee) are ignorant of the behavior of the system as a whole; no one understands the entire system. Each agent's action is based on the state of the system at the moment (i.e. lack of medicine, unavailable laboratory investigation, lack of beds and lack of staff in certain functions). An important question is how one can improve the emergency service within the given constraints. The use of simulation signals is one new approach in studying issues amenable to improvement. Discrete event simulation was used to simulate part of the patient flow in an emergency department. A simple model was built using a prototyping approach. The simulation showed that a minor rotation among the nurses could reduce the mean number of visitors that had to be refereed to alternative flows within the hospital from 87 to 37 on a daily basis with a mean utilization of the staff between 95.8% (the nurses) and 87.4% (the doctors). We conclude that even faced with resource constraints and lack of accessible data discrete event simulation is a tool that can be used successfully to study the consequences of changes in very complex and self organizing professional complex adaptive systems.

  18. Validation of a DICE Simulation Against a Discrete Event Simulation Implemented Entirely in Code.

    PubMed

    Möller, Jörgen; Davis, Sarah; Stevenson, Matt; Caro, J Jaime

    2017-07-01

    Modeling is an essential tool for health technology assessment, and various techniques for conceptualizing and implementing such models have been described. Recently, a new method has been proposed-the discretely integrated condition event or DICE simulation-that enables frequently employed approaches to be specified using a common, simple structure that can be entirely contained and executed within widely available spreadsheet software. To assess if a DICE simulation provides equivalent results to an existing discrete event simulation, a comparison was undertaken. A model of osteoporosis and its management programmed entirely in Visual Basic for Applications and made public by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Decision Support Unit was downloaded and used to guide construction of its DICE version in Microsoft Excel(®). The DICE model was then run using the same inputs and settings, and the results were compared. The DICE version produced results that are nearly identical to the original ones, with differences that would not affect the decision direction of the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (<1% discrepancy), despite the stochastic nature of the models. The main limitation of the simple DICE version is its slow execution speed. DICE simulation did not alter the results and, thus, should provide a valid way to design and implement decision-analytic models without requiring specialized software or custom programming. Additional efforts need to be made to speed up execution.

  19. Computer simulation and discrete-event models in the analysis of a mammography clinic patient flow.

    PubMed

    Coelli, Fernando C; Ferreira, Rodrigo B; Almeida, Renan Moritz V R; Pereira, Wagner Coelho A

    2007-09-01

    This work develops a discrete-event computer simulation model for the analysis of a mammography clinic performance. Two mammography clinic computer simulation models were developed, based on an existing public sector clinic of the Brazilian Cancer Institute, located in Rio de Janeiro city, Brazil. Two clinics in a total of seven configurations (number of equipment units and working personnel) were studied. Models tried to simulate changes in patient arrival rates, number of equipment units, available personnel (technicians and physicians), equipment maintenance scheduling schemes and exam repeat rates. Model parameters were obtained by direct measurements and literature reviews. A commercially-available simulation software was used for model building. The best patient scheduling (patient arrival rate) for the studied configurations had an average of 29 min for Clinic 1 (consisting of one mammography equipment, one to three technicians and one physician) and 21 min for Clinic 2 (two mammography equipment units, one to four technicians and one physician). The exam repeat rates and equipment maintenance scheduling simulations indicated that a large impact over patient waiting time would appear in the smaller capacity configurations. Discrete-event simulation was a useful tool for defining optimal operating conditions for the studied clinics, indicating the most adequate capacity configurations and equipment maintenance schedules.

  20. Time-Domain Evaluation of Fractional Order Controllers’ Direct Discretization Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chengbin; Hori, Yoichi

    Fractional Order Control (FOC), in which the controlled systems and/or controllers are described by fractional order differential equations, has been applied to various control problems. Though it is not difficult to understand FOC’s theoretical superiority, realization issue keeps being somewhat problematic. Since the fractional order systems have an infinite dimension, proper approximation by finite difference equation is needed to realize the designed fractional order controllers. In this paper, the existing direct discretization methods are evaluated by their convergences and time-domain comparison with the baseline case. Proposed sampling time scaling property is used to calculate the baseline case with full memory length. This novel discretization method is based on the classical trapezoidal rule but with scaled sampling time. Comparative studies show good performance and simple algorithm make the Short Memory Principle method most practically superior. The FOC research is still at its primary stage. But its applications in modeling and robustness against non-linearities reveal the promising aspects. Parallel to the development of FOC theories, applying FOC to various control problems is also crucially important and one of top priority issues.

  1. Discretization parameter and operator ordering in loop quantum cosmology with the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Tomo; Amemiya, Fumitoshi; Shimano, Masahiro; Harada, Tomohiro; Tamaki, Takashi

    2011-05-15

    In loop quantum cosmology, the Hamiltonian reduces to a finite difference operator and quantum dynamics are controlled by the difference equation. In this framework, Bojowald [M. Bojowald, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 5227 (2001).] showed that the initial singularity is absent in the twofold sense: (i) the spectrum of the inverse scale factor operator is bounded from above; (ii) the wave function of the Universe can be uniquely extended beyond the point which was the initial singularity in classical theory. In this paper, we study the initial singularity in this sense and the large-volume limit against the ambiguities in the discretization and the operator ordering within a homogeneous, isotropic and spatially flat model with the cosmological constant. We find that the absence of the singularity strongly depends on the choice of the operator ordering and the requirement for the absence singles out a very small class of orderings. Moreover we find a general ordering rule required for the absence of the singularity. We also find that the large-volume limit naturally recovers a smooth wave function in the discretization where each step corresponds to a fixed volume increment but not in the one where each step corresponds to a fixed area increment. If loop quantum cosmology is to be a phenomenological realization of full loop quantum gravity, these results are important to fix the theoretical ambiguities.

  2. Optimal Runge-Kutta Schemes for High-order Spatial and Temporal Discretizations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-23

    Outline: Introduction; Governing Equations- Spatial Discretizations, Temporal Discretizations; Von Neumann Analysis; Computational Results- One-dimensional Wave, Three-dimensional Vortex ; Conclusions and Future Work.

  3. Discreteness of the Spectrum of Second-Order Differential Operators and Associated Embedding Theorems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćurgus, Branko; Read, Thomas T.

    Necessary and sufficient conditions and also simple sufficient conditions are given for the self-adjoint operators associated with the second-order linear differential expression τ(y)= {1}/{w}(-(py')'+qy) on [ a, b) to have discrete spectrum. Here the coefficients of τ are non-negative and satisfy minimal smoothness conditions. These results follow from compact embedding theorems from a weighted one-dimensional Sobolev space with norm∫ ab( p∣ f'∣ r+ q∣ f∣ r)) 1/ r into a weighted Banach space with norm(∫ abw∣ f∣ s) 1/ s .

  4. Observation of discrete time-crystalline order in a disordered dipolar many-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Soonwon; Choi, Joonhee; Landig, Renate; Kucsko, Georg; Zhou, Hengyun; Isoya, Junichi; Jelezko, Fedor; Onoda, Shinobu; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Khemani, Vedika; von Keyserlingk, Curt; Yao, Norman Y.; Demler, Eugene; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2017-03-01

    Understanding quantum dynamics away from equilibrium is an outstanding challenge in the modern physical sciences. Out-of-equilibrium systems can display a rich variety of phenomena, including self-organized synchronization and dynamical phase transitions. More recently, advances in the controlled manipulation of isolated many-body systems have enabled detailed studies of non-equilibrium phases in strongly interacting quantum matter; for example, the interplay between periodic driving, disorder and strong interactions has been predicted to result in exotic ‘time-crystalline’ phases, in which a system exhibits temporal correlations at integer multiples of the fundamental driving period, breaking the discrete time-translational symmetry of the underlying drive. Here we report the experimental observation of such discrete time-crystalline order in a driven, disordered ensemble of about one million dipolar spin impurities in diamond at room temperature. We observe long-lived temporal correlations, experimentally identify the phase boundary and find that the temporal order is protected by strong interactions. This order is remarkably stable to perturbations, even in the presence of slow thermalization. Our work opens the door to exploring dynamical phases of matter and controlling interacting, disordered many-body systems.

  5. Modeling a Million-Node Slim Fly Network Using Parallel Discrete-Event Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, Noah; Carothers, Christopher; Mubarak, Misbah; Ross, Robert; Carns, Philip

    2016-05-15

    As supercomputers close in on exascale performance, the increased number of processors and processing power translates to an increased demand on the underlying network interconnect. The Slim Fly network topology, a new lowdiameter and low-latency interconnection network, is gaining interest as one possible solution for next-generation supercomputing interconnect systems. In this paper, we present a high-fidelity Slim Fly it-level model leveraging the Rensselaer Optimistic Simulation System (ROSS) and Co-Design of Exascale Storage (CODES) frameworks. We validate our Slim Fly model with the Kathareios et al. Slim Fly model results provided at moderately sized network scales. We further scale the model size up to n unprecedented 1 million compute nodes; and through visualization of network simulation metrics such as link bandwidth, packet latency, and port occupancy, we get an insight into the network behavior at the million-node scale. We also show linear strong scaling of the Slim Fly model on an Intel cluster achieving a peak event rate of 36 million events per second using 128 MPI tasks to process 7 billion events. Detailed analysis of the underlying discrete-event simulation performance shows that a million-node Slim Fly model simulation can execute in 198 seconds on the Intel cluster.

  6. Balancing order and some other discrete-time properties of multiwavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrun, Jerome; Vetterli, Martin

    1999-10-01

    This paper deals with multiwavelets and the different properties of approximation and smoothness that are associated with them. In particular, we focus on the important issue of the preservation of discrete time polynomial signals by multiwavelet based filter banks. We give here a precise definition of balancing for higher degree discrete time polynomial signals and link it to a very natural factorization of the lowpass refinement mask that is the counterpart of the well-known zeros at (pi) condition on the scaling function in the usual wavelet framework. This property of balancing proves them to be central to the issues of the preservation of smooth signals by the filter bank, the approximation power of the multiresolution analysis and the smoothness of the scaling functions and wavelets. Using these new results, we are able to construct a family of orthogonal multiwavelets with symmetries and compact support that is indexed by the order of balancing. We also give the minimum length orthogonal multiwavelets for any balancing order.

  7. Time-harmonic elasticity with controllability and higher-order discretization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mönkölä, Sanna; Heikkola, Erkki; Pennanen, Anssi; Rossi, Tuomo

    2008-05-01

    The time-harmonic solution of the linear elastic wave equation is needed for a variety of applications. The typical procedure for solving the time-harmonic elastic wave equation leads to difficulties solving large-scale indefinite linear systems. To avoid these difficulties, we consider the original time dependent equation with a method based on an exact controllability formulation. The main idea of this approach is to find initial conditions such that after one time-period, the solution and its time derivative coincide with the initial conditions. The wave equation is discretized in the space domain with spectral elements. The degrees of freedom associated with the basis functions are situated at the Gauss-Lobatto quadrature points of the elements, and the Gauss-Lobatto quadrature rule is used so that the mass matrix becomes diagonal. This method is combined with the second-order central finite difference or the fourth-order Runge-Kutta time discretization. As a consequence of these choices, only matrix-vector products are needed in time dependent simulation. This makes the controllability method computationally efficient.

  8. Discrete event simulation for exploring strategies: an urban water management case.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong-Bin; Scholz, Roland W; Gujer, Willi; Chitwood, Derek E; Loukopoulos, Peter; Schertenleib, Roland; Siegrist, Hansruedi

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents a model structure aimed at offering an overview of the various elements of a strategy and exploring their multidimensional effects through time in an efficient way. It treats a strategy as a set of discrete events planned to achieve a certain strategic goal and develops a new form of causal networks as an interfacing component between decision makers and environment models, e.g., life cycle inventory and material flow models. The causal network receives a strategic plan as input in a discrete manner and then outputs the updated parameter sets to the subsequent environmental models. Accordingly, the potential dynamic evolution of environmental systems caused by various strategies can be stepwise simulated. It enables a way to incorporate discontinuous change in models for environmental strategy analysis, and enhances the interpretability and extendibility of a complex model by its cellular constructs. It is exemplified using an urban water management case in Kunming, a major city in Southwest China. By utilizing the presented method, the case study modeled the cross-scale interdependencies of the urban drainage system and regional water balance systems, and evaluated the effectiveness of various strategies for improving the situation of Dianchi Lake.

  9. Discrete sliding mode control for robust tracking of higher order delay time systems with experimental application.

    PubMed

    Khandekar, A A; Malwatkar, G M; Patre, B M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a discrete time sliding mode controller (DSMC) is proposed for higher order plus delay time (HOPDT) processes. A sliding mode surface is selected as a function of system states and error and the tuning parameters of sliding mode controller are determined using dominant pole placement strategy. The condition for the existence of stable sliding mode is obtained by using Lyapunov function. The proposed method is applicable to HOPDT processes with oscillatory and integrating behavior, open loop instability or non-minimum phase characteristics and works satisfactory under the effect of parametric uncertainty. The method does not require reduced order model and provides simple way to design the controllers. The simulation and experimentation results show that the proposed method ensures desired tracking dynamics.

  10. An overset mesh approach for 3D mixed element high-order discretizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazell, Michael J.; Sitaraman, Jayanarayanan; Mavriplis, Dimitri J.

    2016-10-01

    A parallel high-order Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method is used to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in an overset mesh framework. The DG solver has many capabilities including: hp-adaption, curved cells, support for hybrid, mixed-element meshes, and moving meshes. Combining these capabilities with overset grids allows the DG solver to be used in problems with bodies in relative motion and in a near-body off-body solver strategy. The overset implementation is constructed to preserve the design accuracy of the baseline DG discretization. Multiple simulations are carried out to validate the accuracy and performance of the overset DG solver. These simulations demonstrate the capability of the high-order DG solver to handle complex geometry and large scale parallel simulations in an overset framework.

  11. Order tracking for discrete-random separation in variable speed conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghesani, P.; Pennacchi, P.; Randall, R. B.; Ricci, R.

    2012-07-01

    The transmission path from the excitation to the measured vibration on the surface of a mechanical system introduces a distortion both in amplitude and in phase. Moreover, in variable speed conditions, the amplification/attenuation and the phase shift, due to the transfer function of the mechanical system, varies in time. This phenomenon reduces the effectiveness of the traditionally tachometer based order tracking, compromising the results of a discrete-random separation performed by a synchronous averaging. In this paper, for the first time, the extent of the distortion is identified both in the time domain and in the order spectrum of the signal, highlighting the consequences for the diagnostics of rotating machinery. A particular focus is given to gears, providing some indications on how to take advantage of the quantification of the disturbance to better tune the techniques developed for the compensation of the distortion. The full theoretical analysis is presented and the results are applied to an experimental case.

  12. Improving Energy Efficiency for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: A Discrete Event Simulation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oumer, Abduaziz; Mekbib Atnaw, Samson; Kie Cheng, Jack; Singh, Lakveer

    2016-11-01

    This paper presented a Discrete Event Simulation (DES) model for investigating and improving energy efficiency in vehicle assembly line. The car manufacturing industry is one of the highest energy consuming industries. Using Rockwell Arena DES package; a detailed model was constructed for an actual vehicle assembly plant. The sources of energy considered in this research are electricity and fuel; which are the two main types of energy sources used in a typical vehicle assembly plant. The model depicts the performance measurement for process- specific energy measures of painting, welding, and assembling processes. Sound energy efficiency model within this industry has two-fold advantage: reducing CO2 emission and cost reduction associated with fuel and electricity consumption. The paper starts with an overview of challenges in energy consumption within the facilities of automotive assembly line and highlights the parameters for energy efficiency. The results of the simulation model indicated improvements for energy saving objectives and reduced costs.

  13. CONFIG - Adapting qualitative modeling and discrete event simulation for design of fault management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Basham, Bryan D.

    1989-01-01

    CONFIG is a modeling and simulation tool prototype for analyzing the normal and faulty qualitative behaviors of engineered systems. Qualitative modeling and discrete-event simulation have been adapted and integrated, to support early development, during system design, of software and procedures for management of failures, especially in diagnostic expert systems. Qualitative component models are defined in terms of normal and faulty modes and processes, which are defined by invocation statements and effect statements with time delays. System models are constructed graphically by using instances of components and relations from object-oriented hierarchical model libraries. Extension and reuse of CONFIG models and analysis capabilities in hybrid rule- and model-based expert fault-management support systems are discussed.

  14. Discrete-event simulation for the design and evaluation of physical protection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, S.E.; Snell, M.K.; Madsen, M.M.; Smith, J.S.; Peters, B.A.

    1998-08-01

    This paper explores the use of discrete-event simulation for the design and control of physical protection systems for fixed-site facilities housing items of significant value. It begins by discussing several modeling and simulation activities currently performed in designing and analyzing these protection systems and then discusses capabilities that design/analysis tools should have. The remainder of the article then discusses in detail how some of these new capabilities have been implemented in software to achieve a prototype design and analysis tool. The simulation software technology provides a communications mechanism between a running simulation and one or more external programs. In the prototype security analysis tool, these capabilities are used to facilitate human-in-the-loop interaction and to support a real-time connection to a virtual reality (VR) model of the facility being analyzed. This simulation tool can be used for both training (in real-time mode) and facility analysis and design (in fast mode).

  15. A Framework for the Optimization of Discrete-Event Simulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, B. D.; Unal, R.; White, N. H.; Morris, W. D.

    1996-01-01

    With the growing use of computer modeling and simulation, in all aspects of engineering, the scope of traditional optimization has to be extended to include simulation models. Some unique aspects have to be addressed while optimizing via stochastic simulation models. The optimization procedure has to explicitly account for the randomness inherent in the stochastic measures predicted by the model. This paper outlines a general purpose framework for optimization of terminating discrete-event simulation models. The methodology combines a chance constraint approach for problem formulation, together with standard statistical estimation and analyses techniques. The applicability of the optimization framework is illustrated by minimizing the operation and support resources of a launch vehicle, through a simulation model.

  16. DeMO: An Ontology for Discrete-event Modeling and Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Gregory A; Miller, John A; Hybinette, Maria; Baramidze, Gregory; York, William S

    2011-01-01

    Several fields have created ontologies for their subdomains. For example, the biological sciences have developed extensive ontologies such as the Gene Ontology, which is considered a great success. Ontologies could provide similar advantages to the Modeling and Simulation community. They provide a way to establish common vocabularies and capture knowledge about a particular domain with community-wide agreement. Ontologies can support significantly improved (semantic) search and browsing, integration of heterogeneous information sources, and improved knowledge discovery capabilities. This paper discusses the design and development of an ontology for Modeling and Simulation called the Discrete-event Modeling Ontology (DeMO), and it presents prototype applications that demonstrate various uses and benefits that such an ontology may provide to the Modeling and Simulation community. PMID:22919114

  17. A conceptual modeling framework for discrete event simulation using hierarchical control structures

    PubMed Central

    Furian, N.; O’Sullivan, M.; Walker, C.; Vössner, S.; Neubacher, D.

    2015-01-01

    Conceptual Modeling (CM) is a fundamental step in a simulation project. Nevertheless, it is only recently that structured approaches towards the definition and formulation of conceptual models have gained importance in the Discrete Event Simulation (DES) community. As a consequence, frameworks and guidelines for applying CM to DES have emerged and discussion of CM for DES is increasing. However, both the organization of model-components and the identification of behavior and system control from standard CM approaches have shortcomings that limit CM’s applicability to DES. Therefore, we discuss the different aspects of previous CM frameworks and identify their limitations. Further, we present the Hierarchical Control Conceptual Modeling framework that pays more attention to the identification of a models’ system behavior, control policies and dispatching routines and their structured representation within a conceptual model. The framework guides the user step-by-step through the modeling process and is illustrated by a worked example. PMID:26778940

  18. Exception handling controllers: An application of pushdown systems to discrete event control

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Christopher H

    2008-01-01

    Recent work by the author has extended the Supervisory Control Theory to include the class of control languages defined by pushdown machines. A pushdown machine is a finite state machine extended by an infinite stack memory. In this paper, we define a specific type of deterministic pushdown machine that is particularly useful as a discrete event controller. Checking controllability of pushdown machines requires computing the complement of the controller machine. We show that Exception Handling Controllers have the property that algorithms for taking their complements and determining their prefix closures are nearly identical to the algorithms available for finite state machines. Further, they exhibit an important property that makes checking for controllability extremely simple. Hence, they maintain the simplicity of the finite state machine, while providing the extra power associated with a pushdown stack memory. We provide an example of a useful control specification that cannot be implemented using a finite state machine, but can be implemented using an Exception Handling Controller.

  19. A conceptual modeling framework for discrete event simulation using hierarchical control structures.

    PubMed

    Furian, N; O'Sullivan, M; Walker, C; Vössner, S; Neubacher, D

    2015-08-01

    Conceptual Modeling (CM) is a fundamental step in a simulation project. Nevertheless, it is only recently that structured approaches towards the definition and formulation of conceptual models have gained importance in the Discrete Event Simulation (DES) community. As a consequence, frameworks and guidelines for applying CM to DES have emerged and discussion of CM for DES is increasing. However, both the organization of model-components and the identification of behavior and system control from standard CM approaches have shortcomings that limit CM's applicability to DES. Therefore, we discuss the different aspects of previous CM frameworks and identify their limitations. Further, we present the Hierarchical Control Conceptual Modeling framework that pays more attention to the identification of a models' system behavior, control policies and dispatching routines and their structured representation within a conceptual model. The framework guides the user step-by-step through the modeling process and is illustrated by a worked example.

  20. Discrete-Event Execution Alternatives on General Purpose Graphical Processing Units

    SciTech Connect

    Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2006-01-01

    Graphics cards, traditionally designed as accelerators for computer graphics, have evolved to support more general-purpose computation. General Purpose Graphical Processing Units (GPGPUs) are now being used as highly efficient, cost-effective platforms for executing certain simulation applications. While most of these applications belong to the category of time-stepped simulations, little is known about the applicability of GPGPUs to discrete event simulation (DES). Here, we identify some of the issues & challenges that the GPGPU stream-based interface raises for DES, and present some possible approaches to moving DES to GPGPUs. Initial performance results on simulation of a diffusion process show that DES-style execution on GPGPU runs faster than DES on CPU and also significantly faster than time-stepped simulations on either CPU or GPGPU.

  1. DeMO: An Ontology for Discrete-event Modeling and Simulation.

    PubMed

    Silver, Gregory A; Miller, John A; Hybinette, Maria; Baramidze, Gregory; York, William S

    2011-09-01

    Several fields have created ontologies for their subdomains. For example, the biological sciences have developed extensive ontologies such as the Gene Ontology, which is considered a great success. Ontologies could provide similar advantages to the Modeling and Simulation community. They provide a way to establish common vocabularies and capture knowledge about a particular domain with community-wide agreement. Ontologies can support significantly improved (semantic) search and browsing, integration of heterogeneous information sources, and improved knowledge discovery capabilities. This paper discusses the design and development of an ontology for Modeling and Simulation called the Discrete-event Modeling Ontology (DeMO), and it presents prototype applications that demonstrate various uses and benefits that such an ontology may provide to the Modeling and Simulation community.

  2. The impact of inpatient boarding on ED efficiency: a discrete-event simulation study.

    PubMed

    Bair, Aaron E; Song, Wheyming T; Chen, Yi-Chun; Morris, Beth A

    2010-10-01

    In this study, a discrete-event simulation approach was used to model Emergency Department's (ED) patient flow to investigate the effect of inpatient boarding on the ED efficiency in terms of the National Emergency Department Crowding Scale (NEDOCS) score and the rate of patients who leave without being seen (LWBS). The decision variable in this model was the boarder-released-ratio defined as the ratio of admitted patients whose boarding time is zero to all admitted patients. Our analysis shows that the Overcrowded(+) (a NEDOCS score over 100) ratio decreased from 88.4% to 50.4%, and the rate of LWBS patients decreased from 10.8% to 8.4% when the boarder-released-ratio changed from 0% to 100%. These results show that inpatient boarding significantly impacts both the NEDOCS score and the rate of LWBS patient and this analysis provides a quantification of the impact of boarding on emergency department patient crowding.

  3. CONFIG - Adapting qualitative modeling and discrete event simulation for design of fault management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Basham, Bryan D.

    1989-01-01

    CONFIG is a modeling and simulation tool prototype for analyzing the normal and faulty qualitative behaviors of engineered systems. Qualitative modeling and discrete-event simulation have been adapted and integrated, to support early development, during system design, of software and procedures for management of failures, especially in diagnostic expert systems. Qualitative component models are defined in terms of normal and faulty modes and processes, which are defined by invocation statements and effect statements with time delays. System models are constructed graphically by using instances of components and relations from object-oriented hierarchical model libraries. Extension and reuse of CONFIG models and analysis capabilities in hybrid rule- and model-based expert fault-management support systems are discussed.

  4. Fault detection and isolation in manufacturing systems with an identified discrete event model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Matthias; Schneider, Stefan; Lesage, Jean-Jacques; Litz, Lothar

    2012-10-01

    In this article a generic method for fault detection and isolation (FDI) in manufacturing systems considered as discrete event systems (DES) is presented. The method uses an identified model of the closed-loop of plant and controller built on the basis of observed fault-free system behaviour. An identification algorithm known from literature is used to determine the fault detection model in form of a non-deterministic automaton. New results of how to parameterise this algorithm are reported. To assess the fault detection capability of an identified automaton, probabilistic measures are proposed. For fault isolation, the concept of residuals adapted for DES is used by defining appropriate set operations representing generic fault symptoms. The method is applied to a case study system.

  5. Did a discrete event 200,000-100,000 years ago produce modern humans?

    PubMed

    Weaver, Timothy D

    2012-07-01

    Scenarios for modern human origins are often predicated on the assumption that modern humans arose 200,000-100,000 years ago in Africa. This assumption implies that something 'special' happened at this point in time in Africa, such as the speciation that produced Homo sapiens, a severe bottleneck in human population size, or a combination of the two. The common thread is that after the divergence of the modern human and Neandertal evolutionary lineages ∼400,000 years ago, there was another discrete event near in time to the Middle-Late Pleistocene boundary that produced modern humans. Alternatively, modern human origins could have been a lengthy process that lasted from the divergence of the modern human and Neandertal evolutionary lineages to the expansion of modern humans out of Africa, and nothing out of the ordinary happened 200,000-100,000 years ago in Africa. Three pieces of biological (fossil morphology and DNA sequences) evidence are typically cited in support of discrete event models. First, living human mitochondrial DNA haplotypes coalesce ∼200,000 years ago. Second, fossil specimens that are usually classified as 'anatomically modern' seem to appear shortly afterward in the African fossil record. Third, it is argued that these anatomically modern fossils are morphologically quite different from the fossils that preceded them. Here I use theory from population and quantitative genetics to show that lengthy process models are also consistent with current biological evidence. That this class of models is a viable option has implications for how modern human origins is conceptualized. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Reversible Discrete Event Formulation and Optimistic Parallel Execution of Vehicular Traffic Models

    SciTech Connect

    Yoginath, Srikanth B; Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2009-01-01

    Vehicular traffic simulations are useful in applications such as emergency planning and traffic management. High speed of traffic simulations translates to speed of response and level of resilience in those applications. Discrete event formulation of traffic flow at the level of individual vehicles affords both the flexibility of simulating complex scenarios of vehicular flow behavior as well as rapid simulation time advances. However, efficient parallel/distributed execution of the models becomes challenging due to synchronization overheads. Here, a parallel traffic simulation approach is presented that is aimed at reducing the time for simulating emergency vehicular traffic scenarios. Our approach resolves the challenges that arise in parallel execution of microscopic, vehicular-level models of traffic. We apply a reverse computation-based optimistic execution approach to address the parallel synchronization problem. This is achieved by formulating a reversible version of a discrete event model of vehicular traffic, and by utilizing this reversible model in an optimistic execution setting. Three unique aspects of this effort are: (1) exploration of optimistic simulation applied to vehicular traffic simulation (2) addressing reverse computation challenges specific to optimistic vehicular traffic simulation (3) achieving absolute (as opposed to self-relative) speedup with a sequential speed close to that of a fast, de facto standard sequential simulator for emergency traffic. The design and development of the parallel simulation system is presented, along with a performance study that demonstrates excellent sequential performance as well as parallel performance. The benefits of optimistic execution are demonstrated, including a speed up of nearly 20 on 32 processors observed on a vehicular network of over 65,000 intersections and over 13 million vehicles.

  7. Developing Flexible Discrete Event Simulation Models in an Uncertain Policy Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, David J.; Fayez, Sam; Steele, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    On February 1st, 2010 U.S. President Barack Obama submitted to Congress his proposed budget request for Fiscal Year 2011. This budget included significant changes to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), including the proposed cancellation of the Constellation Program. This change proved to be controversial and Congressional approval of the program's official cancellation would take many months to complete. During this same period an end-to-end discrete event simulation (DES) model of Constellation operations was being built through the joint efforts of Productivity Apex Inc. (PAl) and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) teams under the guidance of NASA. The uncertainty in regards to the Constellation program presented a major challenge to the DES team, as to: continue the development of this program-of-record simulation, while at the same time remain prepared for possible changes to the program. This required the team to rethink how it would develop it's model and make it flexible enough to support possible future vehicles while at the same time be specific enough to support the program-of-record. This challenge was compounded by the fact that this model was being developed through the traditional DES process-orientation which lacked the flexibility of object-oriented approaches. The team met this challenge through significant pre-planning that led to the "modularization" of the model's structure by identifying what was generic, finding natural logic break points, and the standardization of interlogic numbering system. The outcome of this work resulted in a model that not only was ready to be easily modified to support any future rocket programs, but also a model that was extremely structured and organized in a way that facilitated rapid verification. This paper discusses in detail the process the team followed to build this model and the many advantages this method provides builders of traditional process-oriented discrete

  8. Automatic generation of efficient orderings of events for scheduling applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    In scheduling a set of tasks, it is often not known with certainty how long a given event will take. We call this duration uncertainty. Duration uncertainty is a primary obstacle to the successful completion of a schedule. If a duration of one task is longer than expected, the remaining tasks are delayed. The delay may result in the abandonment of the schedule itself, a phenomenon known as schedule breakage. One response to schedule breakage is on-line, dynamic rescheduling. A more recent alternative is called proactive rescheduling. This method uses statistical data about the durations of events in order to anticipate the locations in the schedule where breakage is likely prior to the execution of the schedule. It generates alternative schedules at such sensitive points, which can be then applied by the scheduler at execution time, without the delay incurred by dynamic rescheduling. This paper proposes a technique for making proactive error management more effective. The technique is based on applying a similarity-based method of clustering to the problem of identifying similar events in a set of events.

  9. Serial killers: ordering caspase activation events in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Slee, E A; Adrain, C; Martin, S J

    1999-11-01

    Caspases participate in the molecular control of apoptosis in several guises; as triggers of the death machinery, as regulatory elements within it, and ultimately as a subset of the effector elements of the machinery itself. The mammalian caspase family is steadily growing and currently contains 14 members. At present, it is unclear whether all of these proteases participate in apoptosis. Thus, current research in this area is focused upon establishing the repertoire and order of caspase activation events that occur during the signalling and demolition phases of cell death. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that proximal caspase activation events are typically initiated by molecules that promote caspase aggregation. As expected, distal caspase activation events are likely to be controlled by caspases activated earlier in the cascade. However, recent data has cast doubt upon the functional demarcation of caspases into signalling (upstream) and effector (downstream) roles based upon their prodomain lengths. In particular, caspase-3 may perform an important role in propagating the caspase cascade, in addition to its role as an effector caspase within the death programme. Here, we discuss the apoptosis-associated caspase cascade and the hierarchy of caspase activation events within it.

  10. Order of Presentation of Dimensions Does Not Systematically Bias Utility Weights from a Discrete Choice Experiment.

    PubMed

    Norman, Richard; Kemmler, Georg; Viney, Rosalie; Pickard, A Simon; Gamper, Eva; Holzner, Bernhard; Nerich, Virginie; King, Madeleine

    2016-12-01

    Discrete choice experiments (DCEs) are increasingly used to value aspects of health. An issue with their adoption is that results may be sensitive to the order in which dimensions of health are presented in the valuation task. Findings in the literature regarding order effects are discordant at present. To quantify the magnitude of order effect of quality-of-life (QOL) dimensions within the context of a DCE designed to produce country-specific value sets for the EORTC Quality of Life Utility Measure-Core 10 dimensions (QLU-C10D), a new utility instrument derived from the widely used cancer-specific QOL questionnaire, the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30. The DCE comprised 960 choice sets, divided into 60 versions of 16 choice sets, with each respondent assigned to a version. Within each version, the order of QLU-C10D QOL dimensions was randomized, followed by life duration in the last position. The DCE was completed online by 2053 individuals in France and Germany. We analyzed the data with a series of conditional logit models, adjusted for repeated choices within respondent. We used F tests to assess order effects, correcting for multiple hypothesis testing. Each F test failed to reject the null hypothesis of no position effect: 1) all QOL order positions considered jointly; 2) last QOL position only; 3) first QOL position only. Furthermore, the order coefficients were small relative to those of the QLU-C10D QOL dimension levels. The order of presentation of QOL dimensions within a DCE designed to provide utility weights for the QLU-C10D had little effect on level coefficients of those QOL dimensions. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Examining Passenger Flow Choke Points at Airports Using Discrete Event Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jeremy R.; Madhavan, Poomima

    2011-01-01

    The movement of passengers through an airport quickly, safely, and efficiently is the main function of the various checkpoints (check-in, security. etc) found in airports. Human error combined with other breakdowns in the complex system of the airport can disrupt passenger flow through the airport leading to lengthy waiting times, missing luggage and missed flights. In this paper we present a model of passenger flow through an airport using discrete event simulation that will provide a closer look into the possible reasons for breakdowns and their implications for passenger flow. The simulation is based on data collected at Norfolk International Airport (ORF). The primary goal of this simulation is to present ways to optimize the work force to keep passenger flow smooth even during peak travel times and for emergency preparedness at ORF in case of adverse events. In this simulation we ran three different scenarios: real world, increased check-in stations, and multiple waiting lines. Increased check-in stations increased waiting time and instantaneous utilization. while the multiple waiting lines decreased both the waiting time and instantaneous utilization. This simulation was able to show how different changes affected the passenger flow through the airport.

  12. Towards High Performance Discrete-Event Simulations of Smart Electric Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Perumalla, Kalyan S; Nutaro, James J; Yoginath, Srikanth B

    2011-01-01

    Future electric grid technology is envisioned on the notion of a smart grid in which responsive end-user devices play an integral part of the transmission and distribution control systems. Detailed simulation is often the primary choice in analyzing small network designs, and the only choice in analyzing large-scale electric network designs. Here, we identify and articulate the high-performance computing needs underlying high-resolution discrete event simulation of smart electric grid operation large network scenarios such as the entire Eastern Interconnect. We focus on the simulator's most computationally intensive operation, namely, the dynamic numerical solution for the electric grid state, for both time-integration as well as event-detection. We explore solution approaches using general-purpose dense and sparse solvers, and propose a scalable solver specialized for the sparse structures of actual electric networks. Based on experiments with an implementation in the THYME simulator, we identify performance issues and possible solution approaches for smart grid experimentation in the large.

  13. SPEEDES - A multiple-synchronization environment for parallel discrete-event simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinman, Jeff S.

    1992-01-01

    Synchronous Parallel Environment for Emulation and Discrete-Event Simulation (SPEEDES) is a unified parallel simulation environment. It supports multiple-synchronization protocols without requiring users to recompile their code. When a SPEEDES simulation runs on one node, all the extra parallel overhead is removed automatically at run time. When the same executable runs in parallel, the user preselects the synchronization algorithm from a list of options. SPEEDES currently runs on UNIX networks and on the California Institute of Technology/Jet Propulsion Laboratory Mark III Hypercube. SPEEDES also supports interactive simulations. Featured in the SPEEDES environment is a new parallel synchronization approach called Breathing Time Buckets. This algorithm uses some of the conservative techniques found in Time Bucket synchronization, along with the optimism that characterizes the Time Warp approach. A mathematical model derived from first principles predicts the performance of Breathing Time Buckets. Along with the Breathing Time Buckets algorithm, this paper discusses the rules for processing events in SPEEDES, describes the implementation of various other synchronization protocols supported by SPEEDES, describes some new ones for the future, discusses interactive simulations, and then gives some performance results.

  14. SPEEDES - A multiple-synchronization environment for parallel discrete-event simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinman, Jeff S.

    1992-01-01

    Synchronous Parallel Environment for Emulation and Discrete-Event Simulation (SPEEDES) is a unified parallel simulation environment. It supports multiple-synchronization protocols without requiring users to recompile their code. When a SPEEDES simulation runs on one node, all the extra parallel overhead is removed automatically at run time. When the same executable runs in parallel, the user preselects the synchronization algorithm from a list of options. SPEEDES currently runs on UNIX networks and on the California Institute of Technology/Jet Propulsion Laboratory Mark III Hypercube. SPEEDES also supports interactive simulations. Featured in the SPEEDES environment is a new parallel synchronization approach called Breathing Time Buckets. This algorithm uses some of the conservative techniques found in Time Bucket synchronization, along with the optimism that characterizes the Time Warp approach. A mathematical model derived from first principles predicts the performance of Breathing Time Buckets. Along with the Breathing Time Buckets algorithm, this paper discusses the rules for processing events in SPEEDES, describes the implementation of various other synchronization protocols supported by SPEEDES, describes some new ones for the future, discusses interactive simulations, and then gives some performance results.

  15. A preference-ordered discrete-gaming approach to air-combat analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, H. J.; Lefton, L.

    1978-01-01

    An approach to one-on-one air-combat analysis is described which employs discrete gaming of a parameterized model featuring choice between several closed-loop control policies. A preference-ordering formulation due to Falco is applied to rational choice between outcomes: win, loss, mutual capture, purposeful disengagement, draw. Approximate optimization is provided by an active-cell scheme similar to Falco's obtained by a 'backing up' process similar to that of Kopp. The approach is designed primarily for short-duration duels between craft with large-envelope weaponry. Some illustrative computations are presented for an example modeled using constant-speed vehicles and very rough estimation of energy shifts.

  16. A second-order Markov process for modeling diffusive motion through spatial discretization.

    PubMed

    Sant, Marco; Papadopoulos, George K; Theodorou, Doros N

    2008-01-14

    A new "mesoscopic" stochastic model has been developed to describe the diffusive behavior of a system of particles at equilibrium. The model is based on discretizing space into slabs by drawing equispaced parallel planes along a coordinate direction. A central role is played by the probability that a particle exits a slab via the face opposite to the one through which it entered (transmission probability), as opposed to exiting via the same face through which it entered (reflection probability). A simple second-order Markov process invoking this probability is developed, leading to an expression for the self-diffusivity, applicable for large slab widths, consistent with a continuous formulation of diffusional motion. This model is validated via molecular dynamics simulations in a bulk system of soft spheres across a wide range of densities.

  17. A preference-ordered discrete-gaming approach to air-combat analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, H. J.; Lefton, L.

    1978-01-01

    An approach to one-on-one air-combat analysis is described which employs discrete gaming of a parameterized model featuring choice between several closed-loop control policies. A preference-ordering formulation due to Falco is applied to rational choice between outcomes: win, loss, mutual capture, purposeful disengagement, draw. Approximate optimization is provided by an active-cell scheme similar to Falco's obtained by a 'backing up' process similar to that of Kopp. The approach is designed primarily for short-duration duels between craft with large-envelope weaponry. Some illustrative computations are presented for an example modeled using constant-speed vehicles and very rough estimation of energy shifts.

  18. Discrete Kalman filtering equations of second-order form for control-structure interaction simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alvin, K. F.; Belvin, W. Keith

    1991-01-01

    A second-order form of discrete Kalman filtering equations is proposed as a candidate state estimator for efficient simulations of control-structure interactions in coupled physical coordinate configurations as opposed to decoupled modal coordinates. The resulting matrix equation of the present state estimator consists of the same symmetric, sparse N x N coupled matrices of the governing structural dynamics equations as opposed to unsymmetric 2N x 2N state space-based estimators. Thus, in addition to substantial computational efficiency improvement, the present estimator can be applied to control-structure design optimization for which the physical coordinates associated with the mass, damping and stiffness matrices of the structure are needed instead of modal coordinates.

  19. Markov modeling and discrete event simulation in health care: a systematic comparison.

    PubMed

    Standfield, Lachlan; Comans, Tracy; Scuffham, Paul

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess if the use of Markov modeling (MM) or discrete event simulation (DES) for cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) may alter healthcare resource allocation decisions. A systematic literature search and review of empirical and non-empirical studies comparing MM and DES techniques used in the CEA of healthcare technologies was conducted. Twenty-two pertinent publications were identified. Two publications compared MM and DES models empirically, one presented a conceptual DES and MM, two described a DES consensus guideline, and seventeen drew comparisons between MM and DES through the authors' experience. The primary advantages described for DES over MM were the ability to model queuing for limited resources, capture individual patient histories, accommodate complexity and uncertainty, represent time flexibly, model competing risks, and accommodate multiple events simultaneously. The disadvantages of DES over MM were the potential for model overspecification, increased data requirements, specialized expensive software, and increased model development, validation, and computational time. Where individual patient history is an important driver of future events an individual patient simulation technique like DES may be preferred over MM. Where supply shortages, subsequent queuing, and diversion of patients through other pathways in the healthcare system are likely to be drivers of cost-effectiveness, DES modeling methods may provide decision makers with more accurate information on which to base resource allocation decisions. Where these are not major features of the cost-effectiveness question, MM remains an efficient, easily validated, parsimonious, and accurate method of determining the cost-effectiveness of new healthcare interventions.

  20. The effects of indoor environmental exposures on pediatric asthma: a discrete event simulation model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the United States, asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood across all socioeconomic classes and is the most frequent cause of hospitalization among children. Asthma exacerbations have been associated with exposure to residential indoor environmental stressors such as allergens and air pollutants as well as numerous additional factors. Simulation modeling is a valuable tool that can be used to evaluate interventions for complex multifactorial diseases such as asthma but in spite of its flexibility and applicability, modeling applications in either environmental exposures or asthma have been limited to date. Methods We designed a discrete event simulation model to study the effect of environmental factors on asthma exacerbations in school-age children living in low-income multi-family housing. Model outcomes include asthma symptoms, medication use, hospitalizations, and emergency room visits. Environmental factors were linked to percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1%), which in turn was linked to risk equations for each outcome. Exposures affecting FEV1% included indoor and outdoor sources of NO2 and PM2.5, cockroach allergen, and dampness as a proxy for mold. Results Model design parameters and equations are described in detail. We evaluated the model by simulating 50,000 children over 10 years and showed that pollutant concentrations and health outcome rates are comparable to values reported in the literature. In an application example, we simulated what would happen if the kitchen and bathroom exhaust fans were improved for the entire cohort, and showed reductions in pollutant concentrations and healthcare utilization rates. Conclusions We describe the design and evaluation of a discrete event simulation model of pediatric asthma for children living in low-income multi-family housing. Our model simulates the effect of environmental factors (combustion pollutants and allergens), medication compliance, seasonality

  1. A Discrete Events Delay Differential System Model for Transmission of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus (VRE) in Hospitals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-19

    young, the elderly , and immune-compromised individuals. Infection -control measures aimed at reducing their impact are being implemented with various...hospital infections , is used to motivate possibilities of modeling nosocomial infec- tion dynamics. This is done in the context of hospital monitoring and...model development. Key Words: Delay equations, discrete events, nosocomial infection dynamics, surveil- lance data, inverse problems, parameter

  2. Optimizing patient flow in a large hospital surgical centre by means of discrete-event computer simulation models.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rodrigo B; Coelli, Fernando C; Pereira, Wagner C A; Almeida, Renan M V R

    2008-12-01

    This study used the discrete-events computer simulation methodology to model a large hospital surgical centre (SC), in order to analyse the impact of increases in the number of post-anaesthetic beds (PABs), of changes in surgical room scheduling strategies and of increases in surgery numbers. The used inputs were: number of surgeries per day, type of surgical room scheduling, anaesthesia and surgery duration, surgical teams' specialty and number of PABs, and the main outputs were: number of surgeries per day, surgical rooms' use rate and blocking rate, surgical teams' use rate, patients' blocking rate, surgery delays (minutes) and the occurrence of postponed surgeries. Two basic strategies were implemented: in the first strategy, the number of PABs was increased under two assumptions: (a) following the scheduling plan actually used by the hospital (the 'rigid' scheduling - surgical rooms were previously assigned and assignments could not be changed) and (b) following a 'flexible' scheduling (surgical rooms, when available, could be freely used by any surgical team). In the second, the same analysis was performed, increasing the number of patients (up to the system 'feasible maximum') but fixing the number of PABs, in order to evaluate the impact of the number of patients over surgery delays. It was observed that the introduction of a flexible scheduling/increase in PABs would lead to a significant improvement in the SC productivity.

  3. Scaling Time Warp-based Discrete Event Execution to 104 Processors on Blue Gene Supercomputer

    SciTech Connect

    Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2007-01-01

    Lately, important large-scale simulation applications, such as emergency/event planning and response, are emerging that are based on discrete event models. The applications are characterized by their scale (several millions of simulated entities), their fine-grained nature of computation (microseconds per event), and their highly dynamic inter-entity event interactions. The desired scale and speed together call for highly scalable parallel discrete event simulation (PDES) engines. However, few such parallel engines have been designed or tested on platforms with thousands of processors. Here an overview is given of a unique PDES engine that has been designed to support Time Warp-style optimistic parallel execution as well as a more generalized mixed, optimistic-conservative synchronization. The engine is designed to run on massively parallel architectures with minimal overheads. A performance study of the engine is presented, including the first results to date of PDES benchmarks demonstrating scalability to as many as 16,384 processors, on an IBM Blue Gene supercomputer. The results show, for the first time, the promise of effectively sustaining very large scale discrete event execution on up to 104 processors.

  4. Characterization of high order spatial discretizations and lumping techniques for discontinuous finite element SN transport

    SciTech Connect

    Maginot, P. G.; Ragusa, J. C.; Morel, J. E.

    2013-07-01

    We examine several possible methods of mass matrix lumping for discontinuous finite element discrete ordinates transport using a Lagrange interpolatory polynomial trial space. Though positive outflow angular flux is guaranteed with traditional mass matrix lumping in a purely absorbing 1-D slab cell for the linear discontinuous approximation, we show that when used with higher degree interpolatory polynomial trial spaces, traditional lumping does yield strictly positive outflows and does not increase in accuracy with an increase in trial space polynomial degree. As an alternative, we examine methods which are 'self-lumping'. Self-lumping methods yield diagonal mass matrices by using numerical quadrature restricted to the Lagrange interpolatory points. Using equally-spaced interpolatory points, self-lumping is achieved through the use of closed Newton-Cotes formulas, resulting in strictly positive outflows in pure absorbers for odd power polynomials in 1-D slab geometry. By changing interpolatory points from the traditional equally-spaced points to the quadrature points of the Gauss-Legendre or Lobatto-Gauss-Legendre quadratures, it is possible to generate solution representations with a diagonal mass matrix and a strictly positive outflow for any degree polynomial solution representation in a pure absorber medium in 1-D slab geometry. Further, there is no inherent limit to local truncation error order of accuracy when using interpolatory points that correspond to the quadrature points of high order accuracy numerical quadrature schemes. (authors)

  5. Explicit spatial scattering for load balancing in conservatively synchronized parallel discrete-event simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Thulasidasan, Sunil; Kasiviswanathan, Shiva; Eidenbenz, Stephan; Romero, Philip

    2010-01-01

    We re-examine the problem of load balancing in conservatively synchronized parallel, discrete-event simulations executed on high-performance computing clusters, focusing on simulations where computational and messaging load tend to be spatially clustered. Such domains are frequently characterized by the presence of geographic 'hot-spots' - regions that generate significantly more simulation events than others. Examples of such domains include simulation of urban regions, transportation networks and networks where interaction between entities is often constrained by physical proximity. Noting that in conservatively synchronized parallel simulations, the speed of execution of the simulation is determined by the slowest (i.e most heavily loaded) simulation process, we study different partitioning strategies in achieving equitable processor-load distribution in domains with spatially clustered load. In particular, we study the effectiveness of partitioning via spatial scattering to achieve optimal load balance. In this partitioning technique, nearby entities are explicitly assigned to different processors, thereby scattering the load across the cluster. This is motivated by two observations, namely, (i) since load is spatially clustered, spatial scattering should, intuitively, spread the load across the compute cluster, and (ii) in parallel simulations, equitable distribution of CPU load is a greater determinant of execution speed than message passing overhead. Through large-scale simulation experiments - both of abstracted and real simulation models - we observe that scatter partitioning, even with its greatly increased messaging overhead, significantly outperforms more conventional spatial partitioning techniques that seek to reduce messaging overhead. Further, even if hot-spots change over the course of the simulation, if the underlying feature of spatial clustering is retained, load continues to be balanced with spatial scattering leading us to the observation that

  6. Using Discrete Event Simulation to Model Attacker Interactions with Cyber and Physical Security Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Perkins, Casey; Muller, George

    2015-10-08

    The number of connections between physical and cyber security systems is rapidly increasing due to centralized control from automated and remotely connected means. As the number of interfaces between systems continues to grow, the interactions and interdependencies between them cannot be ignored. Historically, physical and cyber vulnerability assessments have been performed independently. This independent evaluation omits important aspects of the integrated system, where the impacts resulting from malicious or opportunistic attacks are not easily known or understood. Here, we describe a discrete event simulation model that uses information about integrated physical and cyber security systems, attacker characteristics and simple responsemore » rules to identify key safeguards that limit an attacker's likelihood of success. Key features of the proposed model include comprehensive data generation to support a variety of sophisticated analyses, and full parameterization of safeguard performance characteristics and attacker behaviours to evaluate a range of scenarios. Lastly, we also describe the core data requirements and the network of networks that serves as the underlying simulation structure.« less

  7. Using Discrete Event Simulation to Model Attacker Interactions with Cyber and Physical Security Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Casey; Muller, George

    2015-10-08

    The number of connections between physical and cyber security systems is rapidly increasing due to centralized control from automated and remotely connected means. As the number of interfaces between systems continues to grow, the interactions and interdependencies between them cannot be ignored. Historically, physical and cyber vulnerability assessments have been performed independently. This independent evaluation omits important aspects of the integrated system, where the impacts resulting from malicious or opportunistic attacks are not easily known or understood. Here, we describe a discrete event simulation model that uses information about integrated physical and cyber security systems, attacker characteristics and simple response rules to identify key safeguards that limit an attacker's likelihood of success. Key features of the proposed model include comprehensive data generation to support a variety of sophisticated analyses, and full parameterization of safeguard performance characteristics and attacker behaviours to evaluate a range of scenarios. Lastly, we also describe the core data requirements and the network of networks that serves as the underlying simulation structure.

  8. Efficiency of endoscopy units can be improved with use of discrete event simulation modeling.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Bryan G; Singh, Kanwar P; Wagner, Barry L; Vanden Hoek, Matthew S; Twilley, Katherine; Cohn, Steven M; Shami, Vanessa M; Wang, Andrew Y

    2016-11-01

    Background and study aims: The projected increased demand for health services obligates healthcare organizations to operate efficiently. Discrete event simulation (DES) is a modeling method that allows for optimization of systems through virtual testing of different configurations before implementation. The objective of this study was to identify strategies to improve the daily efficiencies of an endoscopy center with the use of DES. Methods: We built a DES model of a five procedure room endoscopy unit at a tertiary-care university medical center. After validating the baseline model, we tested alternate configurations to run the endoscopy suite and evaluated outcomes associated with each change. The main outcome measures included adequate number of preparation and recovery rooms, blocked inflow, delay times, blocked outflows, and patient cycle time. Results: Based on a sensitivity analysis, the adequate number of preparation rooms is eight and recovery rooms is nine for a five procedure room unit (total 3.4 preparation and recovery rooms per procedure room). Simple changes to procedure scheduling and patient arrival times led to a modest improvement in efficiency. Increasing the preparation/recovery rooms based on the sensitivity analysis led to significant improvements in efficiency. Conclusions: By applying tools such as DES, we can model changes in an environment with complex interactions and find ways to improve the medical care we provide. DES is applicable to any endoscopy unit and would be particularly valuable to those who are trying to improve on the efficiency of care and patient experience.

  9. Discrete Event Simulation Models for CT Examination Queuing in West China Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Li; Tang, Shijun; Shi, Yingkang; Guo, Huili

    2016-01-01

    In CT examination, the emergency patients (EPs) have highest priorities in the queuing system and thus the general patients (GPs) have to wait for a long time. This leads to a low degree of satisfaction of the whole patients. The aim of this study is to improve the patients' satisfaction by designing new queuing strategies for CT examination. We divide the EPs into urgent type and emergency type and then design two queuing strategies: one is that the urgent patients (UPs) wedge into the GPs' queue with fixed interval (fixed priority model) and the other is that the patients have dynamic priorities for queuing (dynamic priority model). Based on the data from Radiology Information Database (RID) of West China Hospital (WCH), we develop some discrete event simulation models for CT examination according to the designed strategies. We compare the performance of different strategies on the basis of the simulation results. The strategy that patients have dynamic priorities for queuing makes the waiting time of GPs decrease by 13 minutes and the degree of satisfaction increase by 40.6%. We design a more reasonable CT examination queuing strategy to decrease patients' waiting time and increase their satisfaction degrees. PMID:27547237

  10. StratBAM: A Discrete-Event Simulation Model to Support Strategic Hospital Bed Capacity Decisions.

    PubMed

    Devapriya, Priyantha; Strömblad, Christopher T B; Bailey, Matthew D; Frazier, Seth; Bulger, John; Kemberling, Sharon T; Wood, Kenneth E

    2015-10-01

    The ability to accurately measure and assess current and potential health care system capacities is an issue of local and national significance. Recent joint statements by the Institute of Medicine and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality have emphasized the need to apply industrial and systems engineering principles to improving health care quality and patient safety outcomes. To address this need, a decision support tool was developed for planning and budgeting of current and future bed capacity, and evaluating potential process improvement efforts. The Strategic Bed Analysis Model (StratBAM) is a discrete-event simulation model created after a thorough analysis of patient flow and data from Geisinger Health System's (GHS) electronic health records. Key inputs include: timing, quantity and category of patient arrivals and discharges; unit-level length of care; patient paths; and projected patient volume and length of stay. Key outputs include: admission wait time by arrival source and receiving unit, and occupancy rates. Electronic health records were used to estimate parameters for probability distributions and to build empirical distributions for unit-level length of care and for patient paths. Validation of the simulation model against GHS operational data confirmed its ability to model real-world data consistently and accurately. StratBAM was successfully used to evaluate the system impact of forecasted patient volumes and length of stay in terms of patient wait times, occupancy rates, and cost. The model is generalizable and can be appropriately scaled for larger and smaller health care settings.

  11. Efficiency of endoscopy units can be improved with use of discrete event simulation modeling

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Bryan G.; Singh, Kanwar P.; Wagner, Barry L.; Vanden Hoek, Matthew S.; Twilley, Katherine; Cohn, Steven M.; Shami, Vanessa M.; Wang, Andrew Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: The projected increased demand for health services obligates healthcare organizations to operate efficiently. Discrete event simulation (DES) is a modeling method that allows for optimization of systems through virtual testing of different configurations before implementation. The objective of this study was to identify strategies to improve the daily efficiencies of an endoscopy center with the use of DES. Methods: We built a DES model of a five procedure room endoscopy unit at a tertiary-care university medical center. After validating the baseline model, we tested alternate configurations to run the endoscopy suite and evaluated outcomes associated with each change. The main outcome measures included adequate number of preparation and recovery rooms, blocked inflow, delay times, blocked outflows, and patient cycle time. Results: Based on a sensitivity analysis, the adequate number of preparation rooms is eight and recovery rooms is nine for a five procedure room unit (total 3.4 preparation and recovery rooms per procedure room). Simple changes to procedure scheduling and patient arrival times led to a modest improvement in efficiency. Increasing the preparation/recovery rooms based on the sensitivity analysis led to significant improvements in efficiency. Conclusions: By applying tools such as DES, we can model changes in an environment with complex interactions and find ways to improve the medical care we provide. DES is applicable to any endoscopy unit and would be particularly valuable to those who are trying to improve on the efficiency of care and patient experience. PMID:27853739

  12. Discrete event simulation for healthcare organizations: a tool for decision making.

    PubMed

    Hamrock, Eric; Paige, Kerrie; Parks, Jennifer; Scheulen, James; Levin, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare organizations face challenges in efficiently accommodating increased patient demand with limited resources and capacity. The modern reimbursement environment prioritizes the maximization of operational efficiency and the reduction of unnecessary costs (i.e., waste) while maintaining or improving quality. As healthcare organizations adapt, significant pressures are placed on leaders to make difficult operational and budgetary decisions. In lieu of hard data, decision makers often base these decisions on subjective information. Discrete event simulation (DES), a computerized method of imitating the operation of a real-world system (e.g., healthcare delivery facility) over time, can provide decision makers with an evidence-based tool to develop and objectively vet operational solutions prior to implementation. DES in healthcare commonly focuses on (1) improving patient flow, (2) managing bed capacity, (3) scheduling staff, (4) managing patient admission and scheduling procedures, and (5) using ancillary resources (e.g., labs, pharmacies). This article describes applicable scenarios, outlines DES concepts, and describes the steps required for development. An original DES model developed to examine crowding and patient flow for staffing decision making at an urban academic emergency department serves as a practical example.

  13. Discrete event command and control for networked teams with multiple missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Frank L.; Hudas, Greg R.; Pang, Chee Khiang; Middleton, Matthew B.; McMurrough, Christopher

    2009-05-01

    During mission execution in military applications, the TRADOC Pamphlet 525-66 Battle Command and Battle Space Awareness capabilities prescribe expectations that networked teams will perform in a reliable manner under changing mission requirements, varying resource availability and reliability, and resource faults. In this paper, a Command and Control (C2) structure is presented that allows for computer-aided execution of the networked team decision-making process, control of force resources, shared resource dispatching, and adaptability to change based on battlefield conditions. A mathematically justified networked computing environment is provided called the Discrete Event Control (DEC) Framework. DEC has the ability to provide the logical connectivity among all team participants including mission planners, field commanders, war-fighters, and robotic platforms. The proposed data management tools are developed and demonstrated on a simulation study and an implementation on a distributed wireless sensor network. The results show that the tasks of multiple missions are correctly sequenced in real-time, and that shared resources are suitably assigned to competing tasks under dynamically changing conditions without conflicts and bottlenecks.

  14. The Impact of Inpatient Boarding on ED Efficiency: A Discrete-Event Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Bair, Aaron E.; Chen, Yi-Chun; Morris, Beth A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a discrete-event simulation approach was used to model Emergency Department’s (ED) patient flow to investigate the effect of inpatient boarding on the ED efficiency in terms of the National Emergency Department Crowding Scale (NEDOCS) score and the rate of patients who leave without being seen (LWBS). The decision variable in this model was the boarder-released-ratio defined as the ratio of admitted patients whose boarding time is zero to all admitted patients. Our analysis shows that the Overcrowded+ (a NEDOCS score over 100) ratio decreased from 88.4% to 50.4%, and the rate of LWBS patients decreased from 10.8% to 8.4% when the boarder-released-ratio changed from 0% to 100%. These results show that inpatient boarding significantly impacts both the NEDOCS score and the rate of LWBS patient and this analysis provides a quantification of the impact of boarding on emergency department patient crowding. PMID:20703616

  15. Discrete Event Simulation Models for CT Examination Queuing in West China Hospital.

    PubMed

    Luo, Li; Liu, Hangjiang; Liao, Huchang; Tang, Shijun; Shi, Yingkang; Guo, Huili

    2016-01-01

    In CT examination, the emergency patients (EPs) have highest priorities in the queuing system and thus the general patients (GPs) have to wait for a long time. This leads to a low degree of satisfaction of the whole patients. The aim of this study is to improve the patients' satisfaction by designing new queuing strategies for CT examination. We divide the EPs into urgent type and emergency type and then design two queuing strategies: one is that the urgent patients (UPs) wedge into the GPs' queue with fixed interval (fixed priority model) and the other is that the patients have dynamic priorities for queuing (dynamic priority model). Based on the data from Radiology Information Database (RID) of West China Hospital (WCH), we develop some discrete event simulation models for CT examination according to the designed strategies. We compare the performance of different strategies on the basis of the simulation results. The strategy that patients have dynamic priorities for queuing makes the waiting time of GPs decrease by 13 minutes and the degree of satisfaction increase by 40.6%. We design a more reasonable CT examination queuing strategy to decrease patients' waiting time and increase their satisfaction degrees.

  16. Discrete Event Simulation-Based Resource Modelling in Health Technology Assessment.

    PubMed

    Salleh, Syed; Thokala, Praveen; Brennan, Alan; Hughes, Ruby; Dixon, Simon

    2017-07-03

    The objective of this article was to conduct a systematic review of published research on the use of discrete event simulation (DES) for resource modelling (RM) in health technology assessment (HTA). RM is broadly defined as incorporating and measuring effects of constraints on physical resources (e.g. beds, doctors, nurses) in HTA models. Systematic literature searches were conducted in academic databases (JSTOR, SAGE, SPRINGER, SCOPUS, IEEE, Science Direct, PubMed, EMBASE) and grey literature (Google Scholar, NHS journal library), enhanced by manual searchers (i.e. reference list checking, citation searching and hand-searching techniques). The search strategy yielded 4117 potentially relevant citations. Following the screening and manual searches, ten articles were included. Reviewing these articles provided insights into the applications of RM: firstly, different types of economic analyses, model settings, RM and cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) outcomes were identified. Secondly, variation in the characteristics of the constraints such as types and nature of constraints and sources of data for the constraints were identified. Thirdly, it was found that including the effects of constraints caused the CEA results to change in these articles. The review found that DES proved to be an effective technique for RM but there were only a small number of studies applied in HTA. However, these studies showed the important consequences of modelling physical constraints and point to the need for a framework to be developed to guide future applications of this approach.

  17. Empirical Evaluation of Conservative and Optimistic Discrete Event Execution on Cloud and VM Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Yoginath, Srikanth B; Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2013-01-01

    Virtual machine (VM) technologies, especially those offered via Cloud platforms, present new dimensions with respect to performance and cost in executing parallel discrete event simulation (PDES) applications. Due to the introduction of overall cost as a metric, the choice of the highest-end computing configuration is no longer the most economical one. Moreover, runtime dynamics unique to VM platforms introduce new performance characteristics, and the variety of possible VM configurations give rise to a range of choices for hosting a PDES run. Here, an empirical study of these issues is undertaken to guide an understanding of the dynamics, trends and trade-offs in executing PDES on VM/Cloud platforms. Performance results and cost measures are obtained from actual execution of a range of scenarios in two PDES benchmark applications on the Amazon Cloud offerings and on a high-end VM host machine. The data reveals interesting insights into the new VM-PDES dynamics that come into play and also leads to counter-intuitive guidelines with respect to choosing the best and second-best configurations when overall cost of execution is considered. In particular, it is found that choosing the highest-end VM configuration guarantees neither the best runtime nor the least cost. Interestingly, choosing a (suitably scaled) low-end VM configuration provides the least overall cost without adversely affecting the total runtime.

  18. Using discrete-event simulation in strategic capacity planning for an outpatient physical therapy service.

    PubMed

    Rau, Chi-Lun; Tsai, Pei-Fang Jennifer; Liang, Sheau-Farn Max; Tan, Jhih-Cian; Syu, Hong-Cheng; Jheng, Yue-Ling; Ciou, Ting-Syuan; Jaw, Fu-Shan

    2013-12-01

    This study uses a simulation model as a tool for strategic capacity planning for an outpatient physical therapy clinic in Taipei, Taiwan. The clinic provides a wide range of physical treatments, with 6 full-time therapists in each session. We constructed a discrete-event simulation model to study the dynamics of patient mixes with realistic treatment plans, and to estimate the practical capacity of the physical therapy room. The changes in time-related and space-related performance measurements were used to evaluate the impact of various strategies on the capacity of the clinic. The simulation results confirmed that the clinic is extremely patient-oriented, with a bottleneck occurring at the traction units for Intermittent Pelvic Traction (IPT), with usage at 58.9 %. Sensitivity analysis showed that attending to more patients would significantly increase the number of patients staying for overtime sessions. We found that pooling the therapists produced beneficial results. The average waiting time per patient could be reduced by 45 % when we pooled 2 therapists. We found that treating up to 12 new patients per session had no significantly negative impact on returning patients. Moreover, we found that the average waiting time for new patients decreased if they were given priority over returning patients when called by the therapists.

  19. Capacity planning for maternal-fetal medicine using discrete event simulation.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Nicole M; Reamer, Courtney B; Reynolds, Thomas A; Howell, Lori J; Moldenhauer, Julie S; Day, Theodore Eugene

    2015-07-01

    Maternal-fetal medicine is a rapidly growing field requiring collaboration from many subspecialties. We provide an evidence-based estimate of capacity needs for our clinic, as well as demonstrate how simulation can aid in capacity planning in similar environments. A Discrete Event Simulation of the Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment and Special Delivery Unit at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia was designed and validated. This model was then used to determine the time until demand overwhelms inpatient bed availability under increasing capacity. No significant deviation was found between historical inpatient censuses and simulated censuses for the validation phase (p = 0.889). Prospectively increasing capacity was found to delay time to balk (the inability of the center to provide bed space for a patient in need of admission). With current capacity, the model predicts mean time to balk of 276 days. Adding three beds delays mean time to first balk to 762 days; an additional six beds to 1,335 days. Providing sufficient access is a patient safety issue, and good planning is crucial for targeting infrastructure investments appropriately. Computer-simulated analysis can provide an evidence base for both medical and administrative decision making in a complex clinical environment. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. The use of discrete-event simulation modelling to improve radiation therapy planning processes.

    PubMed

    Werker, Greg; Sauré, Antoine; French, John; Shechter, Steven

    2009-07-01

    The planning portion of the radiation therapy treatment process at the British Columbia Cancer Agency is efficient but nevertheless contains room for improvement. The purpose of this study is to show how a discrete-event simulation (DES) model can be used to represent this complex process and to suggest improvements that may reduce the planning time and ultimately reduce overall waiting times. A simulation model of the radiation therapy (RT) planning process was constructed using the Arena simulation software, representing the complexities of the system. Several types of inputs feed into the model; these inputs come from historical data, a staff survey, and interviews with planners. The simulation model was validated against historical data and then used to test various scenarios to identify and quantify potential improvements to the RT planning process. Simulation modelling is an attractive tool for describing complex systems, and can be used to identify improvements to the processes involved. It is possible to use this technique in the area of radiation therapy planning with the intent of reducing process times and subsequent delays for patient treatment. In this particular system, reducing the variability and length of oncologist-related delays contributes most to improving the planning time.

  1. Application of Discrete Event Control to the Insertion Task of Electric Line Using 6-Link Electro-Hydraulic Manipulators with Dual Arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyoungkwan; Yokota, Shinichi

    Uninterrupted power supply has become indispensable during the maintenance task of active electric power lines as a result of today's highly information-oriented society and increasing demand of electric utilities. The maintenance task has the risk of electric shock and the danger of falling from high place. Therefore it is necessary to realize an autonomous robot system using electro-hydraulic manipulator because hydraulic manipulators have the advantage of electric insulation. Meanwhile it is relatively difficult to realize autonomous assembly tasks particularly in the case of manipulating flexible objects such as electric lines. In this report, a discrete event control system is introduced for automatic assembly task of electric lines into sleeves as one of a typical task of active electric power lines. In the implementation of a discrete event control system, LVQNN (learning vector quantization neural network) is applied to the insertion task of electric lines to sleeves. In order to apply these proposed control system to the unknown environment, virtual learning data for LVQNN was generated by fuzzy inference. By the experimental results of two types of electric lines and sleeves, these proposed discrete event control and neural network learning algorithm are confirmed very effective to the insertion tasks of electric lines to sleeves as a typical task of active electric power maintenance tasks.

  2. Semi-discrete biomass dynamic modeling: an improved approach for assessing fish stock responses to pulsed harvest events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierce, Clay; Colvin, Michael E.; Stewart, Timothy W.

    2012-01-01

    Continuous harvest over an annual period is a common assumption of continuous biomass dynamics models (CBDMs); however, fish are frequently harvested in a discrete manner. We developed semidiscrete biomass dynamics models (SDBDMs) that allow discrete harvest events and evaluated differences between CBDMs and SDBDMs using an equilibrium yield analysis with varying levels of fishing mortality (F). Equilibrium fishery yields for CBDMs and SDBDMS were similar at low fishing mortalities and diverged as F approached and exceeded maximum sustained yield (FMSY). Discrete harvest resulted in lower equilibrium yields at high levels of Frelative to continuous harvest. The effect of applying harvest continuously when it was in fact discrete was evaluated by fitting CBDMs and SDBDMs to time series data generated from a hypothetical fish stock undergoing discrete harvest and evaluating parameter estimates bias. Violating the assumption of continuous harvest resulted in biased parameter estimates for CBDM while SDBDM parameter estimates were unbiased. Biased parameter estimates resulted in biased biological reference points derived from CBDMs. Semidiscrete BDMs outperformed continuous BDMs and should be used when harvest is discrete, when the time and magnitude of harvest are known, and when F is greater than FMSY.

  3. An adjoint method for a high-order discretization of deforming domain conservation laws for optimization of flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahr, M. J.; Persson, P.-O.

    2016-12-01

    The fully discrete adjoint equations and the corresponding adjoint method are derived for a globally high-order accurate discretization of conservation laws on parametrized, deforming domains. The conservation law on the deforming domain is transformed into one on a fixed reference domain by the introduction of a time-dependent mapping that encapsulates the domain deformation and parametrization, resulting in an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian form of the governing equations. A high-order discontinuous Galerkin method is used to discretize the transformed equation in space and a high-order diagonally implicit Runge-Kutta scheme is used for the temporal discretization. Quantities of interest that take the form of space-time integrals are discretized in a solver-consistent manner. The corresponding fully discrete adjoint method is used to compute exact gradients of quantities of interest along the manifold of solutions of the fully discrete conservation law. These quantities of interest and their gradients are used in the context of gradient-based PDE-constrained optimization. The adjoint method is used to solve two optimal shape and control problems governed by the isentropic, compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The first optimization problem seeks the energetically optimal trajectory of a 2D airfoil given a required initial and final spatial position. The optimization solver, driven by gradients computed via the adjoint method, reduced the total energy required to complete the specified mission nearly an order of magnitude. The second optimization problem seeks the energetically optimal flapping motion and time-morphed geometry of a 2D airfoil given an equality constraint on the x-directed impulse generated on the airfoil. The optimization solver satisfied the impulse constraint to greater than 8 digits of accuracy and reduced the required energy between a factor of 2 and 10, depending on the value of the impulse constraint, as compared to the nominal configuration.

  4. Random vs. Combinatorial Methods for Discrete Event Simulation of a Grid Computer Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, D. Richard; Kacker, Raghu; Lei, Yu

    2010-01-01

    This study compared random and t-way combinatorial inputs of a network simulator, to determine if these two approaches produce significantly different deadlock detection for varying network configurations. Modeling deadlock detection is important for analyzing configuration changes that could inadvertently degrade network operations, or to determine modifications that could be made by attackers to deliberately induce deadlock. Discrete event simulation of a network may be conducted using random generation, of inputs. In this study, we compare random with combinatorial generation of inputs. Combinatorial (or t-way) testing requires every combination of any t parameter values to be covered by at least one test. Combinatorial methods can be highly effective because empirical data suggest that nearly all failures involve the interaction of a small number of parameters (1 to 6). Thus, for example, if all deadlocks involve at most 5-way interactions between n parameters, then exhaustive testing of all n-way interactions adds no additional information that would not be obtained by testing all 5-way interactions. While the maximum degree of interaction between parameters involved in the deadlocks clearly cannot be known in advance, covering all t-way interactions may be more efficient than using random generation of inputs. In this study we tested this hypothesis for t = 2, 3, and 4 for deadlock detection in a network simulation. Achieving the same degree of coverage provided by 4-way tests would have required approximately 3.2 times as many random tests; thus combinatorial methods were more efficient for detecting deadlocks involving a higher degree of interactions. The paper reviews explanations for these results and implications for modeling and simulation.

  5. Using Discrete Event Computer Simulation to Improve Patient Flow in a Ghanaian Acute Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Best, Allyson M.; Dixon, Cinnamon A.; Kelton, W. David; Lindsell, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Crowding and limited resources have increased the strain on acute care facilities and emergency departments (EDs) worldwide. These problems are particularly prevalent in developing countries. Discrete event simulation (DES) is a computer-based tool that can be used to estimate how changes to complex healthcare delivery systems, such as EDs, will affect operational performance. Using this modality, our objective was to identify operational interventions that could potentially improve patient throughput of one acute care setting in a developing country. Methods We developed a simulation model of acute care at a district level hospital in Ghana to test the effects of resource-neutral (e.g. modified staff start times and roles) and resource-additional (e.g. increased staff) operational interventions on patient throughput. Previously captured, de-identified time-and-motion data from 487 acute care patients were used to develop and test the model. The primary outcome was the modeled effect of interventions on patient length of stay (LOS). Results The base-case (no change) scenario had a mean LOS of 292 minutes (95% CI 291, 293). In isolation, neither adding staffing, changing staff roles, nor varying shift times affected overall patient LOS. Specifically, adding two registration workers, history takers, and physicians resulted in a 23.8 (95% CI 22.3, 25.3) minute LOS decrease. However, when shift start-times were coordinated with patient arrival patterns, potential mean LOS was decreased by 96 minutes (95% CI 94, 98); and with the simultaneous combination of staff roles (Registration and History-taking) there was an overall mean LOS reduction of 152 minutes (95% CI 150, 154). Conclusions Resource-neutral interventions identified through DES modeling have the potential to improve acute care throughput in this Ghanaian municipal hospital. DES offers another approach to identifying potentially effective interventions to improve patient flow in emergency and acute

  6. Teleradiology system analysis using a discrete event-driven block-oriented network simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Brent K.; Dwyer, Samuel J., III

    1992-07-01

    Performance evaluation and trade-off analysis are the central issues in the design of communication networks. Simulation plays an important role in computer-aided design and analysis of communication networks and related systems, allowing testing of numerous architectural configurations and fault scenarios. We are using the Block Oriented Network Simulator (BONeS, Comdisco, Foster City, CA) software package to perform discrete, event- driven Monte Carlo simulations in capacity planning, tradeoff analysis and evaluation of alternate architectures for a high-speed, high-resolution teleradiology project. A queuing network model of the teleradiology system has been devise, simulations executed and results analyzed. The wide area network link uses a switched, dial-up N X 56 kbps inverting multiplexer where the number of digital voice-grade lines (N) can vary from one (DS-0) through 24 (DS-1). The proposed goal of such a system is 200 films (2048 X 2048 X 12-bit) transferred between a remote and local site in an eight hour period with a mean delay time less than five minutes. It is found that: (1) the DS-1 service limit is around 100 films per eight hour period with a mean delay time of 412 +/- 39 seconds, short of the goal stipulated above; (2) compressed video teleconferencing can be run simultaneously with image data transfer over the DS-1 wide area network link without impacting the performance of the described teleradiology system; (3) there is little sense in upgrading to a higher bandwidth WAN link like DS-2 or DS-3 for the current system; and (4) the goal of transmitting 200 films in an eight hour period with a mean delay time less than five minutes can be achieved simply if the laser printer interface is updated from the current DR-11W interface to a much faster SCSI interface.

  7. TADSim: Discrete Event-based Performance Prediction for Temperature Accelerated Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mniszewski, Susan M.; Junghans, Christoph; Voter, Arthur F.; Perez, Danny; Eidenbenz, Stephan J.

    2015-04-16

    Next-generation high-performance computing will require more scalable and flexible performance prediction tools to evaluate software--hardware co-design choices relevant to scientific applications and hardware architectures. Here, we present a new class of tools called application simulators—parameterized fast-running proxies of large-scale scientific applications using parallel discrete event simulation. Parameterized choices for the algorithmic method and hardware options provide a rich space for design exploration and allow us to quickly find well-performing software--hardware combinations. We demonstrate our approach with a TADSim simulator that models the temperature-accelerated dynamics (TAD) method, an algorithmically complex and parameter-rich member of the accelerated molecular dynamics (AMD) family of molecular dynamics methods. The essence of the TAD application is captured without the computational expense and resource usage of the full code. We accomplish this by identifying the time-intensive elements, quantifying algorithm steps in terms of those elements, abstracting them out, and replacing them by the passage of time. We use TADSim to quickly characterize the runtime performance and algorithmic behavior for the otherwise long-running simulation code. We extend TADSim to model algorithm extensions, such as speculative spawning of the compute-bound stages, and predict performance improvements without having to implement such a method. Validation against the actual TAD code shows close agreement for the evolution of an example physical system, a silver surface. Finally, focused parameter scans have allowed us to study algorithm parameter choices over far more scenarios than would be possible with the actual simulation. This has led to interesting performance-related insights and suggested extensions.

  8. TADSim: Discrete Event-based Performance Prediction for Temperature Accelerated Dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Mniszewski, Susan M.; Junghans, Christoph; Voter, Arthur F.; ...

    2015-04-16

    Next-generation high-performance computing will require more scalable and flexible performance prediction tools to evaluate software--hardware co-design choices relevant to scientific applications and hardware architectures. Here, we present a new class of tools called application simulators—parameterized fast-running proxies of large-scale scientific applications using parallel discrete event simulation. Parameterized choices for the algorithmic method and hardware options provide a rich space for design exploration and allow us to quickly find well-performing software--hardware combinations. We demonstrate our approach with a TADSim simulator that models the temperature-accelerated dynamics (TAD) method, an algorithmically complex and parameter-rich member of the accelerated molecular dynamics (AMD) family ofmore » molecular dynamics methods. The essence of the TAD application is captured without the computational expense and resource usage of the full code. We accomplish this by identifying the time-intensive elements, quantifying algorithm steps in terms of those elements, abstracting them out, and replacing them by the passage of time. We use TADSim to quickly characterize the runtime performance and algorithmic behavior for the otherwise long-running simulation code. We extend TADSim to model algorithm extensions, such as speculative spawning of the compute-bound stages, and predict performance improvements without having to implement such a method. Validation against the actual TAD code shows close agreement for the evolution of an example physical system, a silver surface. Finally, focused parameter scans have allowed us to study algorithm parameter choices over far more scenarios than would be possible with the actual simulation. This has led to interesting performance-related insights and suggested extensions.« less

  9. High-Order Semi-Discrete Central-Upwind Schemes for Multi-Dimensional Hamilton-Jacobi Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Levy, Doron; Biegel, Bran R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present high-order semi-discrete central-upwind numerical schemes for approximating solutions of multi-dimensional Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) equations. This scheme is based on the use of fifth-order central interpolants like those developed in [1], in fluxes presented in [3]. These interpolants use the weighted essentially nonoscillatory (WENO) approach to avoid spurious oscillations near singularities, and become "central-upwind" in the semi-discrete limit. This scheme provides numerical approximations whose error is as much as an order of magnitude smaller than those in previous WENO-based fifth-order methods [2, 1]. Thee results are discussed via examples in one, two and three dimensions. We also pregnant explicit N-dimensional formulas for the fluxes, discuss their monotonicity and tl!e connection between this method and that in [2].

  10. Higher-order vector discrete rogue-wave states in the coupled Ablowitz-Ladik equations: Exact solutions and stability.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiao-Yong; Yan, Zhenya; Malomed, Boris A

    2016-12-01

    An integrable system of two-component nonlinear Ablowitz-Ladik equations is used to construct complex rogue-wave (RW) solutions in an explicit form. First, the modulational instability of continuous waves is studied in the system. Then, new higher-order discrete two-component RW solutions of the system are found by means of a newly derived discrete version of a generalized Darboux transformation. Finally, the perturbed evolution of these RW states is explored in terms of systematic simulations, which demonstrates that tightly and loosely bound RWs are, respectively, nearly stable and strongly unstable solutions.

  11. Higher-order vector discrete rogue-wave states in the coupled Ablowitz-Ladik equations: Exact solutions and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiao-Yong; Yan, Zhenya; Malomed, Boris A.

    2016-12-01

    An integrable system of two-component nonlinear Ablowitz-Ladik equations is used to construct complex rogue-wave (RW) solutions in an explicit form. First, the modulational instability of continuous waves is studied in the system. Then, new higher-order discrete two-component RW solutions of the system are found by means of a newly derived discrete version of a generalized Darboux transformation. Finally, the perturbed evolution of these RW states is explored in terms of systematic simulations, which demonstrates that tightly and loosely bound RWs are, respectively, nearly stable and strongly unstable solutions.

  12. The effect of medical trainees on pediatric emergency department flow: a discrete event simulation modeling study.

    PubMed

    Genuis, Emerson D; Doan, Quynh

    2013-11-01

    Providing patient care and medical education are both important missions of teaching hospital emergency departments (EDs). With medical school enrollment rising, and ED crowding becoming an increasing prevalent issue, it is important for both pediatric EDs (PEDs) and general EDs to find a balance between these two potentially competing goals. The objective was to determine how the number of trainees in a PED affects patient wait time, total ED length of stay (LOS), and rates of patients leaving without being seen (LWBS) for PED patients overall and stratified by acuity level as defined by the Pediatric Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale (CTAS) using discrete event simulation (DES) modeling. A DES model of an urban tertiary care PED, which receives approximately 40,000 visits annually, was created and validated. Thirteen different trainee schedules, which ranged from averaging zero to six trainees per shift, were input into the DES model and the outcome measures were determined using the combined output of five model iterations. An increase in LOS of approximately 7 minutes was noted to be associated with each additional trainee per attending emergency physician working in the PED. The relationship between the number of trainees and wait time varied with patients' level of acuity and with the degree of PED utilization. Patient wait time decreased as the number of trainees increased for low-acuity visits and when the PED was not operating at full capacity. With rising numbers of trainees, the PED LWBS rate decreased in the whole department and in the CTAS 4 and 5 patient groups, but it rose in patients triaged CTAS 3 or higher. A rising numbers of trainees was not associated with any change to flow outcomes for CTAS 1 patients. The results of this study demonstrate that trainees in PEDs have an impact mainly on patient LOS and that the effect on wait time differs between patients presenting with varying degrees of acuity. These findings will assist PEDs in finding a

  13. Cost comparison of orthopaedic fracture pathways using discrete event simulation in a Glasgow hospital.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gillian H; Jenkins, Paul J; McDonald, David A; Van Der Meer, Robert; Morton, Alec; Nugent, Margaret; Rymaszewski, Lech A

    2017-09-07

    Healthcare faces the continual challenge of improving outcome while aiming to reduce cost. The aim of this study was to determine the micro cost differences of the Glasgow non-operative trauma virtual pathway in comparison to a traditional pathway. Discrete event simulation was used to model and analyse cost and resource utilisation with an activity-based costing approach. Data for a full comparison before the process change was unavailable so we used a modelling approach, comparing a virtual fracture clinic (VFC) with a simulated traditional fracture clinic (TFC). The orthopaedic unit VFC pathway pioneered at Glasgow Royal Infirmary has attracted significant attention and interest and is the focus of this cost study. Our study focused exclusively on patients with non-operative trauma attending emergency department or the minor injuries unit and the subsequent step in the patient pathway. Retrospective studies of patient outcomes as a result of the protocol introductions for specific injuries are presented in association with activity costs from the models. Patients are satisfied with the new pathway, the information provided and the outcome of their injuries (Evidence Level IV). There was a 65% reduction in the number of first outpatient face-to-face (f2f) attendances in orthopaedics. In the VFC pathway, the resources required per day were significantly lower for all staff groups (p≤0.001). The overall cost per patient of the VFC pathway was £22.84 (95% CI 21.74 to 23.92) per patient compared with £36.81 (95% CI 35.65 to 37.97) for the TFC pathway. Our results give a clearer picture of the cost comparison of the virtual pathway over a wholly traditional f2f clinic system. The use of simulation-based stochastic costings in healthcare economic analysis has been limited to date, but this study provides evidence for adoption of this method as a basis for its application in other healthcare settings. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise

  14. Processing Causality in Narrative Events: Temporal Order Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briner, Stephen W.; Virtue, Sandra; Kurby, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    To successfully comprehend narrative text, readers often make inferences about different causes and effects that occur in a text. In this study, participants read texts in which events related to a cause were presented before an effect (i.e., the forward causal condition), texts in which an effect was presented before the events related to a cause…

  15. High-Order Semi-Discrete Central-Upwind Schemes for Multi-Dimensional Hamilton-Jacobi Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Levy, Doron; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present the first fifth order, semi-discrete central upwind method for approximating solutions of multi-dimensional Hamilton-Jacobi equations. Unlike most of the commonly used high order upwind schemes, our scheme is formulated as a Godunov-type scheme. The scheme is based on the fluxes of Kurganov-Tadmor and Kurganov-Tadmor-Petrova, and is derived for an arbitrary number of space dimensions. A theorem establishing the monotonicity of these fluxes is provided. The spacial discretization is based on a weighted essentially non-oscillatory reconstruction of the derivative. The accuracy and stability properties of our scheme are demonstrated in a variety of examples. A comparison between our method and other fifth-order schemes for Hamilton-Jacobi equations shows that our method exhibits smaller errors without any increase in the complexity of the computations.

  16. Symplectic partitioned Runge-Kutta method based on the eighth-order nearly analytic discrete operator and its wavefield simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao-Yuan; Ma, Xiao; Yang, Lei; Song, Guo-Jie

    2014-03-01

    We propose a symplectic partitioned Runge-Kutta (SPRK) method with eighth-order spatial accuracy based on the extended Hamiltonian system of the acoustic wave equation. Known as the eighth-order NSPRK method, this technique uses an eighth-order accurate nearly analytic discrete (NAD) operator to discretize high-order spatial differential operators and employs a second-order SPRK method to discretize temporal derivatives. The stability criteria and numerical dispersion relations of the eighth-order NSPRK method are given by a semi-analytical method and are tested by numerical experiments. We also show the differences of the numerical dispersions between the eighth-order NSPRK method and conventional numerical methods such as the fourth-order NSPRK method, the eighth-order Lax-Wendroff correction (LWC) method and the eighth-order staggered-grid (SG) method. The result shows that the ability of the eighth-order NSPRK method to suppress the numerical dispersion is obviously superior to that of the conventional numerical methods. In the same computational environment, to eliminate visible numerical dispersions, the eighth-order NSPRK is approximately 2.5 times faster than the fourth-order NSPRK and 3.4 times faster than the fourth-order SPRK, and the memory requirement is only approximately 47.17% of the fourth-order NSPRK method and 49.41 % of the fourth-order SPRK method, which indicates the highest computational efficiency. Modeling examples for the two-layer models such as the heterogeneous and Marmousi models show that the wavefields generated by the eighth-order NSPRK method are very clear with no visible numerical dispersion. These numerical experiments illustrate that the eighth-order NSPRK method can effectively suppress numerical dispersion when coarse grids are adopted. Therefore, this method can greatly decrease computer memory requirement and accelerate the forward modeling productivity. In general, the eighth-order NSPRK method has tremendous potential

  17. Children's Reasoning about the Temporal Order of Past and Future Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack, Teresa; Hanley, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Four- and five-year-olds completed two sets of tasks that involved reasoning about the temporal order in which events had occurred in the past or were to occur in the future. Four-year-olds succeeded on the tasks that involved reasoning about the order of past events but not those that involved reasoning about the order of future events, whereas…

  18. Discrete Event Execution with One-Sided and Two-Sided GVT Algorithms on 216,000 Processor Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Perumalla, Kalyan S; Park, Alfred J; Tipparaju, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Global virtual time (GVT) computation is a key determinant of the efficiency and runtime dynamics of parallel discrete event simulations (PDES), especially on large-scale parallel platforms. Here, three execution modes of a generalized GVT computation algorithm are studied on high-performance parallel computing systems: (1) a synchronous GVT algorithm that affords ease of implementation, (2) an asynchronous GVT algorithm that is more complex to implement but can relieve blocking latencies, and (3) a variant of the asynchronous GVT algorithm to exploit one-sided communication in extant supercomputing platforms. Performance results are presented of implementations of these algorithms on up to 216,000 cores of a Cray XT5 system, exercised on a range of parameters: optimistic and conservative synchronization, fine- to medium-grained event computation, synthetic and non-synthetic applications, and different lookahead values. Performance of up to 54 billion events executed per second is registered. Detailed PDES-specific runtime metrics are presented to further the understanding of tightly-coupled discrete event dynamics on massively parallel platforms.

  19. Exact meta-analysis approach for discrete data and its application to 2 × 2 tables with rare events

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dungang; Liu, Regina Y.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a general exact meta-analysis approach for synthesizing inferences from multiple studies of discrete data. The approach combines the p-value functions (also known as significance functions) associated with the exact tests from individual studies. It encompasses a broad class of exact meta-analysis methods, as it permits broad choices for the combining elements, such as tests used in individual studies, and any parameter of interest. The approach yields statements that explicitly account for the impact of individual studies on the overall inference, in terms of efficiency/power and the type I error rate. Those statements also give rises to empirical methods for further enhancing the combined inference. Although the proposed approach is for general discrete settings, for convenience, it is illustrated throughout using the setting of meta-analysis of multiple 2 × 2 tables. In the context of rare events data, such as observing few, zero or zero total (i.e., zero events in both arms) outcomes in binomial trials or 2 × 2 tables, most existing meta-analysis methods rely on the large-sample approximations which may yield invalid inference. The commonly used corrections to zero outcomes in rare events data, aiming to improve numerical performance can also incur undesirable consequences. The proposed approach applies readily to any rare event setting, including even the zero total event studies without any artificial correction. While debates continue on whether or how zero total event studies should be incorporated in meta-analysis, the proposed approach has the advantage of automatically including those studies and thus making use of all available data. Through numerical studies in rare events settings, the proposed exact approach is shown to be efficient and, generally, outperform commonly used meta-analysis methods, including Mental-Haenszel and Peto methods. PMID:25620825

  20. NavyTime: Event and Time Ordering from Raw Text

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    completely labeled graph of events and times, it is not about true extraction, but matching human la- beling decisions that were constrained by time and...relation ID and la- beling . Results are shown in Table 3. Our system ranked 2nd of 4 systems. Our best performing setup uses trained classi- fiers for

  1. fixedTimeEvents: An R package for the distribution of distances between discrete events in fixed time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liland, Kristian Hovde; Snipen, Lars

    When a series of Bernoulli trials occur within a fixed time frame or limited space, it is often interesting to assess if the successful outcomes have occurred completely at random, or if they tend to group together. One example, in genetics, is detecting grouping of genes within a genome. Approximations of the distribution of successes are possible, but they become inaccurate for small sample sizes. In this article, we describe the exact distribution of time between random, non-overlapping successes in discrete time of fixed length. A complete description of the probability mass function, the cumulative distribution function, mean, variance and recurrence relation is included. We propose an associated test for the over-representation of short distances and illustrate the methodology through relevant examples. The theory is implemented in an R package including probability mass, cumulative distribution, quantile function, random number generator, simulation functions, and functions for testing.

  2. Modeling Temporal Processes in Early Spacecraft Design: Application of Discrete-Event Simulations for Darpa's F6 Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubos, Gregory F.; Cornford, Steven

    2012-01-01

    While the ability to model the state of a space system over time is essential during spacecraft operations, the use of time-based simulations remains rare in preliminary design. The absence of the time dimension in most traditional early design tools can however become a hurdle when designing complex systems whose development and operations can be disrupted by various events, such as delays or failures. As the value delivered by a space system is highly affected by such events, exploring the trade space for designs that yield the maximum value calls for the explicit modeling of time.This paper discusses the use of discrete-event models to simulate spacecraft development schedule as well as operational scenarios and on-orbit resources in the presence of uncertainty. It illustrates how such simulations can be utilized to support trade studies, through the example of a tool developed for DARPA's F6 program to assist the design of "fractionated spacecraft".

  3. Fully discrete energy stable high order finite difference methods for hyperbolic problems in deforming domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkar, Samira; Nordström, Jan

    2015-06-01

    A time-dependent coordinate transformation of a constant coefficient hyperbolic system of equations which results in a variable coefficient system of equations is considered. By applying the energy method, well-posed boundary conditions for the continuous problem are derived. Summation-by-Parts (SBP) operators for the space and time discretization, together with a weak imposition of boundary and initial conditions using Simultaneously Approximation Terms (SATs) lead to a provable fully-discrete energy-stable conservative finite difference scheme. We show how to construct a time-dependent SAT formulation that automatically imposes boundary conditions, when and where they are required. We also prove that a uniform flow field is preserved, i.e. the Numerical Geometric Conservation Law (NGCL) holds automatically by using SBP-SAT in time and space. The developed technique is illustrated by considering an application using the linearized Euler equations: the sound generated by moving boundaries. Numerical calculations corroborate the stability and accuracy of the new fully discrete approximations.

  4. Matrix approach to discrete fractional calculus III: non-equidistant grids, variable step length and distributed orders.

    PubMed

    Podlubny, Igor; Skovranek, Tomas; Vinagre Jara, Blas M; Petras, Ivo; Verbitsky, Viktor; Chen, YangQuan

    2013-05-13

    In this paper, we further develop Podlubny's matrix approach to discretization of integrals and derivatives of non-integer order. Numerical integration and differentiation on non-equidistant grids is introduced and illustrated by several examples of numerical solution of differential equations with fractional derivatives of constant orders and with distributed-order derivatives. In this paper, for the first time, we present a variable-step-length approach that we call 'the method of large steps', because it is applied in combination with the matrix approach for each 'large step'. This new method is also illustrated by an easy-to-follow example. The presented approach allows fractional-order and distributed-order differentiation and integration of non-uniformly sampled signals, and opens the way to development of variable- and adaptive-step-length techniques for fractional- and distributed-order differential equations.

  5. Discrete Event Supervisory Control and Nonlinear Motion Control for DoD and Industrial Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-17

    Nonlinear Motion Control for DoD and Industrial Systems 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 611102 6. AUTHORS 5d. PROJECT NUMBER FrankL...Supervisory Control and Nonlinear Motion Control for DoD and Industrial Systems Report Title This grant focuses on the design of advanced control systems for...initiative in Distributed Control of Networked Heterogeneous Teams. Methods for cooperative control of teams are being developed including discrete

  6. Inference of permeability distribution from injection-induced discrete microseismic events with kernel density estimation and ensemble Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrahi, Mohammadali; Jafarpour, Behnam

    2012-10-01

    Hydraulic stimulation of subsurface rocks is performed in developing geothermal and hydrocarbon reservoirs to create permeable zones and enhance flow and transport in low-permeability formations. Borehole fluid injection often induces measurable microearthquakes (MEQs). While the nature and source of the processes that lead to triggering of these events is yet to be fully understood, a major hypothesis has linked these events to an increase in pore pressure that decreases the effective compressional stress and causes sliding along preexisting cracks. Based on this hypothesis, the distribution of the resulting microseismicity clouds can be viewed as monitoring data that carry important information about the spatial distribution of hydraulic rock properties. However, integration of fluid-induced microseismicity events into prior rock permeability distributions is complicated by the discrete nature of the MEQ events, which is not amenable to well-established inversion methods. We use kernel density estimation to first interpret the MEQ data events as continuous seismicity density measurements and, subsequently, assimilate them to estimate rock permeability distribution. We apply the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) for microseimic data integration where we update a prior ensemble of permeability distributions to obtain a new set of calibrated models for prediction. The EnKF offers several advantages for this application, including the ensemble formulation for uncertainty assessment, convenient gradient-free implementation, and the flexibility to incorporate various failure mechanisms and additional data types. Using several numerical experiments, we illustrate the suitability of the proposed approach for characterization of reservoir hydraulic properties from discrete MEQ monitoring measurements.

  7. Parameter estimation for dynamical systems with discrete events and logical operations.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Fabian; Theis, Fabian J; Rädler, Joachim O; Hasenauer, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Ordinary differential equation (ODE) models are frequently used to describe the dynamic behaviour of biochemical processes. Such ODE models are often extended by events to describe the effect of fast latent processes on the process dynamics. To exploit the predictive power of ODE models, their parameters have to be inferred from experimental data. For models without events, gradient based optimization schemes perform well for parameter estimation, when sensitivity equations are used for gradient computation. Yet, sensitivity equations for models with parameter- and state-dependent events and event-triggered observations are not supported by existing toolboxes. In this manuscript, we describe the sensitivity equations for differential equation models with events and demonstrate how to estimate parameters from event-resolved data using event-triggered observations in parameter estimation. We consider a model for GFP expression after transfection and a model for spiking neurons and demonstrate that we can improve computational efficiency and robustness of parameter estimation by using sensitivity equations for systems with events. Moreover, we demonstrate that, by using event-outputs, it is possible to consider event-resolved data, such as time-to-event data, for parameter estimation with ODE models. By providing a user-friendly, modular implementation in the toolbox AMICI, the developed methods are made publicly available and can be integrated in other systems biology toolboxes. We implement the methods in the open-source toolbox Advanced MATLAB Interface for CVODES and IDAS (AMICI, https://github.com/ICB-DCM/AMICI ). jan.hasenauer@helmholtz-muenchen.de. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  8. Comparison of Diachronic Thinking and Event Ordering in 5- to 10-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Brandy D.; Brooks, Patricia J.; Rabin, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Two main theoretical constructs seek to describe the elaborated sense of time that may be a uniquely human attribute: diachronic thinking (the ability to think about the past and use that information to predict future events) and event ordering (the ability to sequence events in temporal order). Researchers utilize various tasks to measure the…

  9. Comparison of Diachronic Thinking and Event Ordering in 5- to 10-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Brandy D.; Brooks, Patricia J.; Rabin, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Two main theoretical constructs seek to describe the elaborated sense of time that may be a uniquely human attribute: diachronic thinking (the ability to think about the past and use that information to predict future events) and event ordering (the ability to sequence events in temporal order). Researchers utilize various tasks to measure the…

  10. Nematic ordering of rigid rod polyelectrolytes induced by electrostatic interactions: Effect of discrete charge distribution along the chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dian; Venev, Sergey V.; Palyulin, Vladimir V.; Potemkin, Igor I.

    2011-02-01

    Similar to the Debye-Hückel plasma, charged groups in solutions of rigid rod polyelectrolytes attract each other. We derive expression for the correlation free energy of electrostatic attraction of the rods within the random phase approximation. In this theory, we explicitly take into account positions of charged groups on the chains and examine both charge and polymer concentration fluctuations. The correlation free energies and the osmotic pressures are calculated for isotropic and completely ordered nematic phase. The results of the discrete model are compared with results of a continuous model. The discrete model gives rise to a stronger attraction between the charged groups both in the isotropic and nematic phases and to a stronger orienting action of the electrostatic forces.

  11. Bringing Order to Life Events: Memory for the Temporal Order of Autobiographical Events over an Extended Period in School-Aged Children and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathman, Thanujeni; Doydum, Ayzit; Bauer, Patricia J.

    2013-01-01

    Remembering temporal information associated with personal past events is critical. Yet little is known about the development of temporal order memory for naturally occurring events. In the current research, 8- to 10-year-old children and adults took photographs daily for 4 weeks. Later, they participated in a primacy/recency task (were shown 2 of…

  12. Bringing Order to Life Events: Memory for the Temporal Order of Autobiographical Events over an Extended Period in School-Aged Children and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathman, Thanujeni; Doydum, Ayzit; Bauer, Patricia J.

    2013-01-01

    Remembering temporal information associated with personal past events is critical. Yet little is known about the development of temporal order memory for naturally occurring events. In the current research, 8- to 10-year-old children and adults took photographs daily for 4 weeks. Later, they participated in a primacy/recency task (were shown 2 of…

  13. Using Discrete Event Simulation for Programming Model Exploration at Extreme-Scale: Macroscale Components for the Structural Simulation Toolkit (SST).

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke, Jeremiah J; Kenny, Joseph P.

    2015-02-01

    Discrete event simulation provides a powerful mechanism for designing and testing new extreme- scale programming models for high-performance computing. Rather than debug, run, and wait for results on an actual system, design can first iterate through a simulator. This is particularly useful when test beds cannot be used, i.e. to explore hardware or scales that do not yet exist or are inaccessible. Here we detail the macroscale components of the structural simulation toolkit (SST). Instead of depending on trace replay or state machines, the simulator is architected to execute real code on real software stacks. Our particular user-space threading framework allows massive scales to be simulated even on small clusters. The link between the discrete event core and the threading framework allows interesting performance metrics like call graphs to be collected from a simulated run. Performance analysis via simulation can thus become an important phase in extreme-scale programming model and runtime system design via the SST macroscale components.

  14. High-order full-discretization method using Lagrange interpolation for stability analysis of turning processes with stiffness variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuxin; Xiong, Zhenhua

    2017-01-01

    In turning processes, chatter is an unstable vibration which adversely affects surface finish and machine tool components. Stiffness variation (SV) is an effective strategy for chatter suppression by periodically modulating the stiffness around a nominal value. The dynamics of SV turning is governed by a time periodic delay differential equation (DDE) where the time-period/time-delay ratio (TPTDR) can be arbitrary. Recently, first-, second- and higher-order full-discretization methods (FDMs) have been reported as a popular class of methods for milling stability prediction. However, these FDMs can only deal with time periodic DDE where the TPTDR equals one. In this paper, two high-order FDMs using Lagrange interpolation (HLFDMs) are proposed for stability analysis of SV turning. On each discrete time interval, the time delay term is interpolated by the second-degree Lagrange polynomial, and the time periodic term is linearly interpolated. The state term is approximated using linear interpolation and second-degree Lagrange polynomial interpolation, achieving the first- and second-order HLFDM, respectively. Finally, the transition matrix over a single period is deduced for stability analysis via the Floquet theory. Benchmark examples of damped delay Mathieu equations are used to verify the proposed algorithm, which demonstrates that HLFDMs are highly efficient and accurate. In addition, the second-order HLFDM is used to investigate the effects of SV amplitude and frequency parameters. These results provide theoretical insights for the selection of SV parameters.

  15. Swarming Reconnaissance Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in a Parallel Discrete Event Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    Entomopter and robofly. For a more complete list of current research projects in Micro Air Vehicles see [40]. The Entomopter Project is a multi- mode ...understanding. At the lowest level, individual sensor nodes collect data from different sensing modalities (i.e. modes ). Initial data processing is...in event driven mode executes local (and generates remote) event occurrences, thus progressing a local clock (local virtual time, LVT) • Each LPi (SEi

  16. Simulating an emergency department: the importance of modeling the interactions between physicians and delegates in a discrete event simulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Computer simulation studies of the emergency department (ED) are often patient driven and consider the physician as a human resource whose primary activity is interacting directly with the patient. In many EDs, physicians supervise delegates such as residents, physician assistants and nurse practitioners each with different skill sets and levels of independence. The purpose of this study is to present an alternative approach where physicians and their delegates in the ED are modeled as interacting pseudo-agents in a discrete event simulation (DES) and to compare it with the traditional approach ignoring such interactions. Methods The new approach models a hierarchy of heterogeneous interacting pseudo-agents in a DES, where pseudo-agents are entities with embedded decision logic. The pseudo-agents represent a physician and delegate, where the physician plays a senior role to the delegate (i.e. treats high acuity patients and acts as a consult for the delegate). A simple model without the complexity of the ED is first created in order to validate the building blocks (programming) used to create the pseudo-agents and their interaction (i.e. consultation). Following validation, the new approach is implemented in an ED model using data from an Ontario hospital. Outputs from this model are compared with outputs from the ED model without the interacting pseudo-agents. They are compared based on physician and delegate utilization, patient waiting time for treatment, and average length of stay. Additionally, we conduct sensitivity analyses on key parameters in the model. Results In the hospital ED model, comparisons between the approach with interaction and without showed physician utilization increase from 23% to 41% and delegate utilization increase from 56% to 71%. Results show statistically significant mean time differences for low acuity patients between models. Interaction time between physician and delegate results in increased ED length of stay and longer

  17. Event-Triggered H∞ State Estimation for Delayed Stochastic Memristive Neural Networks With Missing Measurements: The Discrete Time Case.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongjian; Wang, Zidong; Shen, Bo; Liu, Xiaohui

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the event-triggered H∞ state estimation problem is investigated for a class of discrete-time stochastic memristive neural networks (DSMNNs) with time-varying delays and missing measurements. The DSMNN is subject to both the additive deterministic disturbances and the multiplicative stochastic noises. The missing measurements are governed by a sequence of random variables obeying the Bernoulli distribution. For the purpose of energy saving, an event-triggered communication scheme is used for DSMNNs to determine whether the measurement output is transmitted to the estimator or not. The problem addressed is to design an event-triggered H∞ estimator such that the dynamics of the estimation error is exponentially mean-square stable and the prespecified H∞ disturbance rejection attenuation level is also guaranteed. By utilizing a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and stochastic analysis techniques, sufficient conditions are derived to guarantee the existence of the desired estimator, and then, the estimator gains are characterized in terms of the solution to certain matrix inequalities. Finally, a numerical example is used to demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed event-triggered state estimation scheme.

  18. Event-triggered fault detection for a class of discrete-time linear systems using interval observers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2017-02-13

    This paper provides a novel event-triggered fault detection (FD) scheme for discrete-time linear systems. First, an event-triggered interval observer is proposed to generate the upper and lower residuals by taking into account the influence of the disturbances and the event error. Second, the robustness of the residual interval against the disturbances and the fault sensitivity are improved by introducing l1 and H∞ performances. Third, dilated linear matrix inequalities are used to decouple the Lyapunov matrices from the system matrices. The nonnegative conditions for the estimation error variables are presented with the aid of the slack matrix variables. This technique allows considering a more general Lyapunov function. Furthermore, the FD decision scheme is proposed by monitoring whether the zero value belongs to the residual interval. It is shown that the information communication burden is reduced by designing the event-triggering mechanism, while the FD performance can still be guaranteed. Finally, simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Stochastic modeling for characterisation of biofilm development with discrete detachment events (sloughing).

    PubMed

    Bohn, A; Zippel, B; Almeida, J S; Xavier, J B

    2007-01-01

    The monitoring of biofilm development at a small-scale is often observed to be a stochastic process. This raises important issues concerning the reproducibility of biofilm growth monitoring experiments. By realising that there are limits to the latter, a model of biofilm accumulation curves that takes into account the dynamics of seemingly random fluctuations resulting from sloughing events is proposed. The model is derived from a stochastic differential equation (SDE) based on the logistic equation, adding a stochastic term for the sloughing events and measurement noise. Experimental light absorbance data that correlate with biofilm biomass obtained from the development of phototrophic biofilms are analysed to illustrate the use of SDE modeling.

  20. Information content compression and zero-order elimination of computer-generated hologram based on discrete cosine transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhenbo; Su, Ping; Ma, Jianshe

    2013-11-01

    A hologram always contains redundancy. Its huge information content brings difficulties in the storage and transmission. In addition, when a computer-generated hologram (CGH) is reproduced, the zero-order diffraction spot which occupies most of energy reduces the contrast of reproduced image and disturbs the observation and recording. In this paper, discrete cosine transform (DCT) is used to compress the information content of a CGH and to eliminate the zero-order spot. Numerical simulation results showed that, DCT could effectively remove about 64.8% of the redundancy without affecting the quality of reconstruction. It also eliminated the zero-order spot and improved the contrast of reproduced image. Finally, the optical reconstruction results were shown. Numerical and optical experiments both proved that, the reconstructed image after compression almost did not lose any resolution that human eyes could perceive.

  1. Ladder and cross terms in second-order distorted Born approximation. [for bounded layer of random discrete scatterers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Y. Q.; Kong, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    In the strong fluctuation theory for a bounded layer of random discrete scatterers, the second moments of the fields in the second-order distorted Born approximation are obtained for copolarized and cross-polarized fields. The backscattering cross sections per unit area are calculated by including the mutual coherence of the fields due to the coincidental ray paths, and that due to the opposite ray paths, corresponding to the ladder and cross terms in the Feynman diagramatic representation. It is proved that the contributions from ladder and cross terms for the copolarized backscattering cross sections are the same, while the contributions for the cross-polarized backscattering cross sections are of the same order. The bistatic scattering coefficients in the second-order approximation for both the ladder and cross terms are also obtained. The contributions from the cross terms explain the enhancement in the backscattering direction.

  2. Discrete Event Simulation Model of the Polaris 2.1 Gamma Ray Imaging Radiation Detection Device

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    bird’s eye view map. When used alongside an additional Polaris this new feature can help triangulate the location of a radiological source and...for the team. Additionally, the person sitting at the desktop can play as the white cell operator and throw different events or even change wind

  3. A Study on Modeling Approaches in Discrete Event Simulation Using Design Patterns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Port Security ( FPPS ) 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE...79 Figure 52 Event-graph Logic of the FPPS Simulation Application.................................81 Figure 53 FPPS Simulation...module. For the random-utility package, a discussion on empirical analysis is conducted. Finally, this chapter looks how the FPPS application has been

  4. Discrete gene replication events drive coupling between the cell cycle and circadian clocks

    PubMed Central

    Paijmans, Joris; Bosman, Mark; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Lubensky, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Many organisms possess both a cell cycle to control DNA replication and a circadian clock to anticipate changes between day and night. In some cases, these two rhythmic systems are known to be coupled by specific, cross-regulatory interactions. Here, we use mathematical modeling to show that, additionally, the cell cycle generically influences circadian clocks in a nonspecific fashion: The regular, discrete jumps in gene-copy number arising from DNA replication during the cell cycle cause a periodic driving of the circadian clock, which can dramatically alter its behavior and impair its function. A clock built on negative transcriptional feedback either phase-locks to the cell cycle, so that the clock period tracks the cell division time, or exhibits erratic behavior. We argue that the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus has evolved two features that protect its clock from such disturbances, both of which are needed to fully insulate it from the cell cycle and give it its observed robustness: a phosphorylation-based protein modification oscillator, together with its accompanying push–pull read-out circuit that responds primarily to the ratios of different phosphoform concentrations, makes the clock less susceptible to perturbations in protein synthesis; the presence of multiple, asynchronously replicating copies of the same chromosome diminishes the effect of replicating any single copy of a gene. PMID:27035936

  5. Event-driven Monte Carlo: Exact dynamics at all time scales for discrete-variable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Coto, Alejandro; Díaz-Méndez, Rogelio; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-06-01

    We present an algorithm for the simulation of the exact real-time dynamics of classical many-body systems with discrete energy levels. In the same spirit of kinetic Monte Carlo methods, a stochastic solution of the master equation is found, with no need to define any other phase-space construction. However, unlike existing methods, the present algorithm does not assume any particular statistical distribution to perform moves or to advance the time, and thus is a unique tool for the numerical exploration of fast and ultra-fast dynamical regimes. By decomposing the problem in a set of two-level subsystems, we find a natural variable step size, that is well defined from the normalization condition of the transition probabilities between the levels. We successfully test the algorithm with known exact solutions for non-equilibrium dynamics and equilibrium thermodynamical properties of Ising-spin models in one and two dimensions, and compare to standard implementations of kinetic Monte Carlo methods. The present algorithm is directly applicable to the study of the real-time dynamics of a large class of classical Markovian chains, and particularly to short-time situations where the exact evolution is relevant.

  6. Complex cardiac defects after ethanol exposure during discrete cardiogenic events in zebrafish: Prevention with folic acid

    PubMed Central

    Sarmah, Swapnalee; Marrs, James A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) describes a range of birth defects including various congenital heart defects (CHDs). Mechanisms of FASD-associated CHDs are not understood. Whether alcohol interferes with a single critical event or with multiple events in heart formation is not known. RESULTS Our zebrafish embryo experiments showed that ethanol interrupts different cardiac regulatory networks and perturbed multiple steps of cardiogenesis (specification, myocardial migration, looping, chamber morphogenesis and endocardial cushion formation). Ethanol exposure during gastrulation until cardiac specification or during myocardial midline migration did not produce severe or persistent heart development defects. However, exposure comprising gastrulation until myocardial precursor midline fusion or during heart patterning stages produced aberrant heart looping and defective endocardial cushions. Continuous exposure during entire cardiogenesis produced complex cardiac defects leading to severely defective myocardium, endocardium, and endocardial cushions. Supplementation of retinoic acid with ethanol partially rescued early heart developmental defects, but the endocardial cushions did not form correctly. In contrast, supplementation of folic acid rescued normal heart development, including the endocardial cushions. CONCLUSIONS Our results indicate that ethanol exposure interrupted divergent cardiac morphogenesis events causing heart defects. Folic acid supplementation was effective in preventing a wide spectrum of ethanol-induced heart developmental defects. PMID:23832875

  7. Discrete mixture modeling to address genetic heterogeneity in time-to-event regression

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Kevin H.; Hanlon, Bret M.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Time-to-event regression models are a critical tool for associating survival time outcomes with molecular data. Despite mounting evidence that genetic subgroups of the same clinical disease exist, little attention has been given to exploring how this heterogeneity affects time-to-event model building and how to accommodate it. Methods able to diagnose and model heterogeneity should be valuable additions to the biomarker discovery toolset. Results: We propose a mixture of survival functions that classifies subjects with similar relationships to a time-to-event response. This model incorporates multivariate regression and model selection and can be fit with an expectation maximization algorithm, we call Cox-assisted clustering. We illustrate a likely manifestation of genetic heterogeneity and demonstrate how it may affect survival models with little warning. An application to gene expression in ovarian cancer DNA repair pathways illustrates how the model may be used to learn new genetic subsets for risk stratification. We explore the implications of this model for censored observations and the effect on genomic predictors and diagnostic analysis. Availability and implementation: R implementation of CAC using standard packages is available at https://gist.github.com/programeng/8620b85146b14b6edf8f Data used in the analysis are publicly available. Contact: kevin.eng@roswellpark.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24532723

  8. Second order distorted born approximation for backscattering from a layer of discrete random medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Roger H.; Saatchi, Sasan S.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in scattering and depolarization characteristics of the vegetation canopies. Scattering models applied to the microwave remote sensing of vegetation canopies showed that multiple scattering effects can be important in simulating the backscattering coefficients correctly. In particular, in most applications, the cross-polarized backscattering coefficients are often underestimated by single scattering models. Recently, there have been concerted efforts to include the second order terms in the radiative transfer models of vegetation canopies in order to account for multiple scattering within the canopy. The coherent wave theory approach is extended to include multiple scattering effects to predict the coherent and incoherent backscattering contributions from a layer of vegetation canopy. The problem is initially formulated in terms of the exact equation for the correlation function of the field, i.e., the Bethe-Salpeter equation. Using fractional volume as a small parameter, a Foldy type approximation is made to obtain a more manageable correlation equation. This equation is iterated to obtain first and second order solutions. The iteration procedure assumes the variance of the field fluctuations are small compared to the coherent intensity. This assumption proved to be particularly successful in computing backscattering coefficients. First and second order backscattering coefficients are calculated from the iterants of the correlation equation. It is shown that the first order coefficients are the same as the distorted Born results used previously by the authors. These results contained enhancement terms in the direct-reflected contributions. The important contributions to second order backscattering are examined and interpreted in terms of scattering diagrams. Examples of situations in which second order backscattering coefficients are important are given.

  9. Using Discrete Event Simulation to Model Integrated Commodities Consumption for a Launch Campaign of the Space Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Daniel; Parsons, Jeremy W.; Cates, Grant

    2014-01-01

    In May 2013, NASA's GSDO Program requested a study to develop a discrete event simulation (DES) model that analyzes the launch campaign process of the Space Launch System (SLS) from an integrated commodities perspective. The scope of the study includes launch countdown and scrub turnaround and focuses on four core launch commodities: hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and helium. Previously, the commodities were only analyzed individually and deterministically for their launch support capability, but this study was the first to integrate them to examine the impact of their interactions on a launch campaign as well as the effects of process variability on commodity availability. The study produced a validated DES model with Rockwell Arena that showed that Kennedy Space Center's ground systems were capable of supporting a 48-hour scrub turnaround for the SLS. The model will be maintained and updated to provide commodity consumption analysis of future ground system and SLS configurations.

  10. Patient flow improvement for an ophthalmic specialist outpatient clinic with aid of discrete event simulation and design of experiment.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chong; Zhang, Dali; Kon, Audrey Wan Mei; Wai, Charity Sue Lea; Ang, Woo Boon

    2015-06-01

    Continuous improvement in process efficiency for specialist outpatient clinic (SOC) systems is increasingly being demanded due to the growth of the patient population in Singapore. In this paper, we propose a discrete event simulation (DES) model to represent the patient and information flow in an ophthalmic SOC system in the Singapore National Eye Centre (SNEC). Different improvement strategies to reduce the turnaround time for patients in the SOC were proposed and evaluated with the aid of the DES model and the Design of Experiment (DOE). Two strategies for better patient appointment scheduling and one strategy for dilation-free examination are estimated to have a significant impact on turnaround time for patients. One of the improvement strategies has been implemented in the actual SOC system in the SNEC with promising improvement reported.

  11. Alternative decision modelling techniques for the evaluation of health care technologies: Markov processes versus discrete event simulation.

    PubMed

    Karnon, Jonathan

    2003-10-01

    Markov models have traditionally been used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of competing health care technologies that require the description of patient pathways over extended time horizons. Discrete event simulation (DES) is a more flexible, but more complicated decision modelling technique, that can also be used to model extended time horizons. Through the application of a Markov process and a DES model to an economic evaluation comparing alternative adjuvant therapies for early breast cancer, this paper compares the respective processes and outputs of these alternative modelling techniques. DES displays increased flexibility in two broad areas, though the outputs from the two modelling techniques were similar. These results indicate that the use of DES may be beneficial only when the available data demonstrates particular characteristics.

  12. NasoNet, modeling the spread of nasopharyngeal cancer with networks of probabilistic events in discrete time.

    PubMed

    Galán, S F; Aguado, F; Díez, F J; Mira, J

    2002-07-01

    The spread of cancer is a non-deterministic dynamic process. As a consequence, the design of an assistant system for the diagnosis and prognosis of the extent of a cancer should be based on a representation method that deals with both uncertainty and time. The ultimate goal is to know the stage of development of a cancer in a patient before selecting the appropriate treatment. A network of probabilistic events in discrete time (NPEDT) is a type of Bayesian network for temporal reasoning that models the causal mechanisms associated with the time evolution of a process. This paper describes NasoNet, a system that applies NPEDTs to the diagnosis and prognosis of nasopharyngeal cancer. We have made use of temporal noisy gates to model the dynamic causal interactions that take place in the domain. The methodology we describe is general enough to be applied to any other type of cancer.

  13. Existence and global exponential stability of periodic solution for high-order discrete-time BAM neural networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ancai; Qiu, Jianlong; She, Jinhua

    2014-02-01

    This paper concerns the existence and exponential stability of periodic solution for the high-order discrete-time bidirectional associative memory (BAM) neural networks with time-varying delays. First, we present the criteria for the existence of periodic solution based on the continuation theorem of coincidence degree theory and the Young's inequality, and then we give the criteria for the global exponential stability of periodic solution by using a non-Lyapunov method. After that, we give a numerical example that demonstrates the effectiveness of the theoretical results. The criteria presented in this paper are easy to verify. In addition, the proposed analysis method is easy to extend to other high-order neural networks.

  14. Second-order accurate finite volume schemes with the discrete maximum principle for solving Richards' equation on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svyatskiy, D.; Lipnikov, K.

    2017-06-01

    Richards's equation describes steady-state or transient flow in a variably saturated medium. For a medium having multiple layers of soils that are not aligned with coordinate axes, a mesh fitted to these layers is no longer orthogonal and the classical two-point flux approximation finite volume scheme is no longer accurate. We propose new second-order accurate nonlinear finite volume (NFV) schemes for the head and pressure formulations of Richards' equation. We prove that the discrete maximum principles hold for both formulations at steady-state which mimics similar properties of the continuum solution. The second-order accuracy is achieved using high-order upwind algorithms for the relative permeability. Numerical simulations of water infiltration into a dry soil show significant advantage of the second-order NFV schemes over the first-order NFV schemes even on coarse meshes. Since explicit calculation of the Jacobian matrix becomes prohibitively expensive for high-order schemes due to build-in reconstruction and slope limiting algorithms, we study numerically the preconditioning strategy introduced recently in Lipnikov et al. (2016) that uses a stable approximation of the continuum Jacobian. Numerical simulations show that the new preconditioner reduces computational cost up to 2-3 times in comparison with the conventional preconditioners.

  15. A second-order accurate finite volume scheme with the discrete maximum principle for solving Richards’ equation on unstructured meshes

    DOE PAGES

    Svyatsky, Daniil; Lipnikov, Konstantin

    2017-03-18

    Richards’s equation describes steady-state or transient flow in a variably saturated medium. For a medium having multiple layers of soils that are not aligned with coordinate axes, a mesh fitted to these layers is no longer orthogonal and the classical two-point flux approximation finite volume scheme is no longer accurate. Here, we propose new second-order accurate nonlinear finite volume (NFV) schemes for the head and pressure formulations of Richards’ equation. We prove that the discrete maximum principles hold for both formulations at steady-state which mimics similar properties of the continuum solution. The second-order accuracy is achieved using high-order upwind algorithmsmore » for the relative permeability. Numerical simulations of water infiltration into a dry soil show significant advantage of the second-order NFV schemes over the first-order NFV schemes even on coarse meshes. Since explicit calculation of the Jacobian matrix becomes prohibitively expensive for high-order schemes due to build-in reconstruction and slope limiting algorithms, we study numerically the preconditioning strategy introduced recently in Lipnikov et al. (2016) that uses a stable approximation of the continuum Jacobian. Lastly, numerical simulations show that the new preconditioner reduces computational cost up to 2–3 times in comparison with the conventional preconditioners.« less

  16. Discrete-event simulation applied to analysis of waiting lists. Evaluation of a prioritization system for cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Comas, Mercè; Castells, Xavier; Hoffmeister, Lorena; Román, Rubén; Cots, Francesc; Mar, Javier; Gutiérrez-Moreno, Santiago; Espallargues, Mireia

    2008-12-01

    To outline the methods used to build a discrete-event simulation model for use in decision-making in the context of waiting list management strategies for cataract surgery by comparing a waiting list prioritization system with the routinely used first-in, first-out (FIFO) discipline. The setting was the Spanish health system. The model reproduced the process of cataract, from incidence of need of surgery (meeting indication criteria), through demand, inclusion on a waiting list, and surgery. "Nonexpressed Need" represented the population that, even with need, would not be included on a waiting list. Parameters were estimated from administrative data and research databases. The impact of introducing a prioritization system on the waiting list compared with the FIFO system was assessed. For all patients entering the waiting list, the main outcome variable was waiting time weighted by priority score. A sensitivity analysis with different scenarios of mean waiting time was used to compare the two alternatives. The prioritization system shortened waiting time (weighted by priority score) by 1.55 months (95% CI: 1.47 to 1.62) compared with the FIFO system. This difference was statistically significant for all scenarios (which were defined from a waiting time of 4 months to 24 months under the FIFO system). A tendency to greater time savings in scenarios with longer waiting times was observed. Discrete-event simulation is useful in decision-making when assessing health services. Introducing a waiting list prioritization system produced greater benefit than allocating surgery by waiting time only. Use of the simulation model would allow the impact of proposed policies to reduce waiting lists or assign resources more efficiently to be tested.

  17. Compact moving least squares: An optimization framework for generating high-order compact meshless discretizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trask, Nathaniel; Maxey, Martin; Hu, Xiaozhe

    2016-12-01

    A generalization of the optimization framework typically used in moving least squares is presented that provides high-order approximation while maintaining compact stencils and a consistent treatment of boundaries. The approach, which we refer to as compact moving least squares, resembles the capabilities of compact finite differences but requires no structure in the underlying set of nodes. An efficient collocation scheme is used to demonstrate the capabilities of the method to solve elliptic boundary value problems in strong form stably without the need for an expensive weak form. The flexibility of the approach is demonstrated by using the same framework to both solve a variety of elliptic problems and to generate implicit approximations to derivatives. Finally, an efficient preconditioner is presented for the steady Stokes equations, and the approach's efficiency and high order of accuracy is demonstrated for domains with curvi-linear boundaries.

  18. Implicit High Order Strong Stability Preserving Runge-Kutta Time Discretizations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-05

    Fahroo 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Distribution A... Wang (who presented his joint work with Ray Spiteri). Inma Higueras, Steven Ruuth and his student Colin Macdonald. This minisym- posia led to...Fraser University, Canada; Dong Wang , University of Illi- nois at Urbana-Champaign. (c) In Search of Implicit High-Order Strong Stability Preserving

  19. Optimal Runge-Kutta Schemes for High-order Spatial and Temporal Discretizations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Neumann analysis of the schemes into account. This work highlights that, for unsteady problems, both dissipation and dispersion errors must be accounted...problems, both dissipation and dispersion errors must be accounted for when selecting optimal Runge-Kutta time integrators. I. Introduction The use of...results to a broader class of high-order temporal and spatial schemes. Specifically, von Neumann analysis is performed to categorize the dissipation and

  20. Unraveling Ages of Discrete Cryptic Events During Polyphase Orogenesis in SE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.; Reno, B. L.; Piccoli, P. M.; Trouw, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    The Neoproterozoic assembly of cratons in eastern Brazil is recorded by the successive Brasília, Ribeira and Buzios subduction-to-collision orogenic events in the intervals ca. 660-605 Ma (Reno et al., Frontiers in Mineral Sciences, abstract, 2007), ca. 580-550 Ma (Heilbron & Machado, Precambrian Res., 2003) and ca. 525- 505 Ma (Schmitt et al., Precambrian Res., 2004), respectively. The southern Brasília Belt displays characteristics of a passive margin in the east and an accretionary orogen in the west prior to terminal collision and final emplacement of the ENE-verging nappes. In the southern Brasília Belt, peak temperatures of 800-950 C are recorded, whereas in the Ribeira and Buzios Belts peak temperatures register around 780 C. Cryptic thermal overprinting by the younger events on the older orogenic belts is demonstrated by monazite age data from these Brasiliano-age belts in southeast Brazil. In the southern-most portion of the southern Brasília Belt, a SSE-plunging mineral elongation lineation and the occurrence of sillimanite represent macroscopic structural and petrologic evidence, respectively, of tectonic overprinting imposed during the Ribeira Orogeny. Comprehensive dating of monazite using the electron probe microanalysis method from throughout the southern-most Brasília Belt indicates widespread Ribeira-age (580-530 Ma) monazite growth, even tens of km north of the sillimanite-out isograd. The Buzios Belt lies outboard of the Ribera Belt; monazite from Ribera Belt migmatitic metapelites records Buzios-age growth. Monazite dates from the Ribeira belt determined using the electron probe microanalysis method were culled by chemical zone within individual grains. Exploratory data analysis (see Reno et al., Fall AGU, 2007) reveals distinct Ribeira-age (553-533 Ma) cores and Buzios-age (530-505 Ma) rims in monazite from rocks with no petrologic evidence of overprinting. Monazite grains likely grew during the Ribeira Orogeny, and were either partially

  1. Event-by-event weighting at next-to-leading order

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Ciaran; Campbell, John M.; Giele, Walter T.

    2014-01-01

    We present a general method of associating next-to-leading order weights to leading order phase space configurations at hadron colliders. The method relies on a re-organization of phase space for the real radiation contributions, defining a one-to-many map such that each point in the real phase space is associated with a distinct Born topology. As a result virtual and real singularities cancel at each Born phase space point. The new phase space maps can be used in a traditional approach for NLO calculations. However, interesting applications arise when one instead integrates out the real radiation up to a specified scale. This allows one to define NLO weights for individual phase space points that are present at LO. This method allows for the extension of matrix element methods to next-to-leading order, even in the presence of jets. We discuss some recent applications of the matrix element method to Higgs physics at the LHC.

  2. StochKit2: software for discrete stochastic simulation of biochemical systems with events.

    PubMed

    Sanft, Kevin R; Wu, Sheng; Roh, Min; Fu, Jin; Lim, Rone Kwei; Petzold, Linda R

    2011-09-01

    StochKit2 is the first major upgrade of the popular StochKit stochastic simulation software package. StochKit2 provides highly efficient implementations of several variants of Gillespie's stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA), and tau-leaping with automatic step size selection. StochKit2 features include automatic selection of the optimal SSA method based on model properties, event handling, and automatic parallelism on multicore architectures. The underlying structure of the code has been completely updated to provide a flexible framework for extending its functionality. StochKit2 runs on Linux/Unix, Mac OS X and Windows. It is freely available under GPL version 3 and can be downloaded from http://sourceforge.net/projects/stochkit/. petzold@engineering.ucsb.edu.

  3. Computation of equivalent poles placement for class of 2nd order discrete bilinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadek, Lukasz; Koszalka, Leszek; Burnham, Keith

    2015-11-01

    This paper introduces an adaptation of the classical linear control theory representation of zeros, poles and gain into a bilinear approach. The placement of poles at the complex plane is a complete description of plants dynamics; hence it is a convenient form from which calculation of various properties, e.g. rise time, settling time, is plausible. Such technique can be adjusted into the bilinear structure if poles of a quasi-linear representation (linear with respect to input) are concerned. The research outcomes with conclusion on the equivalent poles displacement and generalized rules for a 2nd order bilinear system equivalent poles input dependent loci. The proposed approach seems to be promising, as simplification of design and identification of a bilinear system increases transparency during modelling and control in practical applications and hence it may be followed by applicability of such structure in common industrial problems.

  4. A robust computational technique for model order reduction of two-time-scale discrete systems via genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Alsmadi, Othman M K; Abo-Hammour, Zaer S

    2015-01-01

    A robust computational technique for model order reduction (MOR) of multi-time-scale discrete systems (single input single output (SISO) and multi-input multioutput (MIMO)) is presented in this paper. This work is motivated by the singular perturbation of multi-time-scale systems where some specific dynamics may not have significant influence on the overall system behavior. The new approach is proposed using genetic algorithms (GA) with the advantage of obtaining a reduced order model, maintaining the exact dominant dynamics in the reduced order, and minimizing the steady state error. The reduction process is performed by obtaining an upper triangular transformed matrix of the system state matrix defined in state space representation along with the elements of B, C, and D matrices. The GA computational procedure is based on maximizing the fitness function corresponding to the response deviation between the full and reduced order models. The proposed computational intelligence MOR method is compared to recently published work on MOR techniques where simulation results show the potential and advantages of the new approach.

  5. Quasi-discrete particle motion in an externally imposed, ordered structure in a dusty plasma at high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Edward Konopka, Uwe; Lynch, Brian; Adams, Stephen; LeBlanc, Spencer; Merlino, Robert L.; Rosenberg, Marlene

    2015-11-15

    Dusty plasmas have been studied in argon, radio frequency (rf) glow discharge plasmas at magnetic fields up to 2.5 T where the electrons and ions are strongly magnetized. Plasmas are generated between two parallel plate electrodes where the lower, powered electrode is solid and the upper electrode supports a dual mesh consisting of #24 brass and #30 aluminum wire cloth. In this experiment, we study the formation of imposed ordered structures and particle dynamics as a function of magnetic field. Through observations of trapped particles and the quasi-discrete (i.e., “hopping”) motion of particles between the trapping locations, it is possible to make a preliminary estimate of the potential structure that confines the particles to a grid structure in the plasma. This information is used to gain insight into the formation of the imposed grid pattern of the dust particles in the plasma.

  6. RFID-based information visibility for hospital operations: exploring its positive effects using discrete event simulation.

    PubMed

    Asamoah, Daniel A; Sharda, Ramesh; Rude, Howard N; Doran, Derek

    2016-10-12

    Long queues and wait times often occur at hospitals and affect smooth delivery of health services. To improve hospital operations, prior studies have developed scheduling techniques to minimize patient wait times. However, these studies lack in demonstrating how such techniques respond to real-time information needs of hospitals and efficiently manage wait times. This article presents a multi-method study on the positive impact of providing real-time scheduling information to patients using the RFID technology. Using a simulation methodology, we present a generic scenario, which can be mapped to real-life situations, where patients can select the order of laboratory services. The study shows that information visibility offered by RFID technology results in decreased wait times and improves resource utilization. We also discuss the applicability of the results based on field interviews granted by hospital clinicians and administrators on the perceived barriers and benefits of an RFID system.

  7. KRONOS: A Monte Carlo event generator for higher order QED corrections at HERA — Status report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anlauf, Harald; Manakos, Panagiotis; Mannel, Thomas; Dahmen, Hans D.; Ohl, Thorsten

    1992-12-01

    We report on the status of the Monte Carlo event generator KRONOS for deep inelastic lepton hadron scattering at HERA. KRONOS focusses on the description of electronmagnetic corrections beyond the existing fixed order calculations.

  8. SIMEDIS: a Discrete-Event Simulation Model for Testing Responses to Mass Casualty Incidents.

    PubMed

    Debacker, Michel; Van Utterbeeck, Filip; Ullrich, Christophe; Dhondt, Erwin; Hubloue, Ives

    2016-12-01

    study is to implement the SIMEDIS model to the DMRS of an international airport and to test the medical response plan to an airplane crash simulation at the airport. In order to identify good response options, the model then was used to study the effect of a number of interventional factors on the performance of the DMRS. Our study reflects the potential of SIMEDIS to model complex systems, to test different aspects of DMR, and to be used as a tool in experimental research that might make a substantial contribution to provide the evidence base for the effectiveness and efficiency of disaster medical management.

  9. Individualized, discrete event, simulations provide insight into inter- and intra-subject variability of extended-release, drug products

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective Develop and validate particular, concrete, and abstract yet plausible in silico mechanistic explanations for large intra- and interindividual variability observed for eleven bioequivalence study participants. Do so in the face of considerable uncertainty about mechanisms. Methods We constructed an object-oriented, discrete event model called subject (we use small caps to distinguish computational objects from their biological counterparts). It maps abstractly to a dissolution test system and study subject to whom product was administered orally. A subject comprises four interconnected grid spaces and event mechanisms that map to different physiological features and processes. Drugs move within and between spaces. We followed an established, Iterative Refinement Protocol. Individualized mechanisms were made sufficiently complicated to achieve prespecified Similarity Criteria, but no more so. Within subjects, the dissolution space is linked to both a product-subject Interaction Space and the GI tract. The GI tract and Interaction Space connect to plasma, from which drug is eliminated. Results We discovered parameterizations that enabled the eleven subject simulation results to achieve the most stringent Similarity Criteria. Simulated profiles closely resembled those with normal, odd, and double peaks. We observed important subject-by-formulation interactions within subjects. Conclusion We hypothesize that there were interactions within bioequivalence study participants corresponding to the subject-by-formulation interactions within subjects. Further progress requires methods to transition currently abstract subject mechanisms iteratively and parsimoniously to be more physiologically realistic. As that objective is achieved, the approach presented is expected to become beneficial to drug development (e.g., controlled release) and to a reduction in the number of subjects needed per study plus faster regulatory review. PMID:22938185

  10. Using the Integration of Discrete Event and Agent-Based Simulation to Enhance Outpatient Service Quality in an Orthopedic Department

    PubMed Central

    Kittipittayakorn, Cholada

    2016-01-01

    Many hospitals are currently paying more attention to patient satisfaction since it is an important service quality index. Many Asian countries' healthcare systems have a mixed-type registration, accepting both walk-in patients and scheduled patients. This complex registration system causes a long patient waiting time in outpatient clinics. Different approaches have been proposed to reduce the waiting time. This study uses the integration of discrete event simulation (DES) and agent-based simulation (ABS) to improve patient waiting time and is the first attempt to apply this approach to solve this key problem faced by orthopedic departments. From the data collected, patient behaviors are modeled and incorporated into a massive agent-based simulation. The proposed approach is an aid for analyzing and modifying orthopedic department processes, allows us to consider far more details, and provides more reliable results. After applying the proposed approach, the total waiting time of the orthopedic department fell from 1246.39 minutes to 847.21 minutes. Thus, using the correct simulation model significantly reduces patient waiting time in an orthopedic department. PMID:27195606

  11. Performance and cost evaluation of health information systems using micro-costing and discrete-event simulation.

    PubMed

    Rejeb, Olfa; Pilet, Claire; Hamana, Sabri; Xie, Xiaolan; Durand, Thierry; Aloui, Saber; Doly, Anne; Biron, Pierre; Perrier, Lionel; Augusto, Vincent

    2017-05-17

    Innovation and health-care funding reforms have contributed to the deployment of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to improve patient care. Many health-care organizations considered the application of ICT as a crucial key to enhance health-care management. The purpose of this paper is to provide a methodology to assess the organizational impact of high-level Health Information System (HIS) on patient pathway. We propose an integrated performance evaluation of HIS approach through the combination of formal modeling using the Architecture of Integrated Information Systems (ARIS) models, a micro-costing approach for cost evaluation, and a Discrete-Event Simulation (DES) approach. The methodology is applied to the consultation for cancer treatment process. Simulation scenarios are established to conclude about the impact of HIS on patient pathway. We demonstrated that although high level HIS lengthen the consultation, occupation rate of oncologists are lower and quality of service is higher (through the number of available information accessed during the consultation to formulate the diagnostic). The provided method allows also to determine the most cost-effective ICT elements to improve the care process quality while minimizing costs. The methodology is flexible enough to be applied to other health-care systems.

  12. Total Order Reliability in PSA: Importance of Basic Events and Systems

    SciTech Connect

    E. Borgonovo; C. Smith

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this work is twofold. First, to formalize the properties of the total order reliability importance measure for PSA models. Second, to extend the definition of the total order importance measure to groups of basic events. This allows one to obtain the importance of systems and to address the relevance of interactions among systems.

  13. An Infinite Order Discrete Variable Representation of an Effective Mass Hamiltonian: Application to Exciton Wave Functions in Quantum Confined Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kaledin, Alexey L; Lian, Tianquan; Hill, Craig L; Musaev, Djamaladdin G

    2014-08-12

    We describe an extension of the conventional Fourier grid discrete variable representation (DVR) to the bound state problem of a particle with a position-dependent mass. An infinite order DVR, derived for a variable mass kinetic energy operator, coupled with an efficient grid contraction scheme yields essentially exact eigenvalues for a chosen grid spacing. Implementation of the method is shown to be very practical due to the fact that in a DVR no integral evaluation is necessary and that the resultant kinetic energy matrix is sparse. Numerical calculations are presented for exciton states of spherical, cylindrical, and toric Type I (CdSe/ZnS) core-shell quantum dots. In these examples, electron-hole interaction is treated explicitly by solving a self-consistent Schrödinger-Poisson equation on a contracted DVR grid. Prospective applications of the developed approach to calculating electron transfer rates between adsorbed molecular acceptors and quantum confined nanocrystals of generic shape, dimensionality, and composition are also discussed.

  14. Modeling Pluto-Charon mutual eclipse events. I. First-order models

    SciTech Connect

    Dunbar, R.S.; Tedesco, E.F.

    1986-11-01

    The present first order analytical and numerical models of light curves due to mutual events between close planetary binaries, the effects of shadowing are included. Attention is given to the case of the Pluto-Charon system. The results of the analytical and numerical approaches agree to well within the expected light curve measurement error. The model predicts that the current mutual eclipse event series will end by November 1990. 12 references.

  15. "What" and "where" was when? Memory for the temporal order of episodic events in children.

    PubMed

    Scarf, Damian; Boden, Hannah; Labuschagne, Lisa G; Gross, Julien; Hayne, Harlene

    2017-08-21

    In the past, researchers have shown that the individual components of episodic memory (i.e "what," "where," and "when") may emerge at different points in development. Specifically, while children as young as three can accurately report the "what" and "where" of an event, they struggle to accurately report when the event occurred. One explanation for children's difficulty in reporting when an event took place is a rudimentary understanding, and ability to use, temporal terms. In the current experiment, we employed a physical timeline to aid children's reporting of the order in which a series of episodic events occurred. Overall, while 4-, 5-, and 6-year olds performed above chance, 3-year olds did not. Our findings suggest that 3-year olds' limited ability to produce temporal terms may not be the rate-limiting step preventing them from identifying when events occurred in their recent past. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Evaluation of health benefits and harms of the breast cancer screening programme in the Basque Country using discrete event simulation.

    PubMed

    Arrospide, Arantzazu; Rue, Montserrat; van Ravesteyn, Nicolien T; Comas, Merce; Larrañaga, Nerea; Sarriugarte, Garbiñe; Mar, Javier

    2015-10-12

    Since the breast cancer screening programme in the Basque Country (BCSPBC) was started in 1996, more than 400,000 women aged 50 to 69 years have been invited to participate. Based on epidemiological observations and simulation techniques it is possible to extend observed short term data into anticipated long term results. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of the programme through 2011 by quantifying the outcomes in breast cancer mortality, life-years gained, false positive results, and overdiagnosis. A discrete event simulation model was constructed to reproduce the natural history of breast cancer (disease-free, pre-clinical, symptomatic, and disease-specific death) and the actual observed characteristics of the screening programme during the evaluated period in the Basque women population. Goodness-of-fit statistics were applied for model validation. The screening effects were measured as differences in benefits and harms between the screened and unscreened populations. Breast cancer mortality reduction and life-years gained were considered as screening benefits, whereas, overdiagnosis and false positive results were assessed as harms. Results for a single cohort were also obtained. The screening programme yielded a 16 % reduction in breast cancer mortality and a 10 % increase in the incidence of breast cancer through 2011. Almost 2 % of all the women in the programme had a false positive result during the evaluation period. When a single cohort was analysed, the number of deaths decreased by 13 %, and 4 % of screen-detected cancers were overdiagnosed. Each woman with BC detected by the screening programme gained 2.5 life years due to early detection corrected by lead time. Fifteen years after the screening programme started, this study supports an important decrease in breast cancer mortality due to the screening programme, with reasonable risk of overdiagnosis and false positive results, and sustains the continuation of the breast cancer

  17. Cost-Effectiveness of Total Hip and Knee Replacements for the Australian Population with Osteoarthritis: Discrete-Event Simulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Hideki; Barendregt, Jan J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis constitutes a major musculoskeletal burden for the aged Australians. Hip and knee replacement surgeries are effective interventions once all conservative therapies to manage the symptoms have been exhausted. This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of hip and knee replacements in Australia. To our best knowledge, the study is the first attempt to account for the dual nature of hip and knee osteoarthritis in modelling the severities of right and left joints separately. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a discrete-event simulation model that follows up the individuals with osteoarthritis over their lifetimes. The model defines separate attributes for right and left joints and accounts for several repeat replacements. The Australian population with osteoarthritis who were 40 years of age or older in 2003 were followed up until extinct. Intervention effects were modelled by means of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) averted. Both hip and knee replacements are highly cost effective (AUD 5,000 per DALY and AUD 12,000 per DALY respectively) under an AUD 50,000/DALY threshold level. The exclusion of cost offsets, and inclusion of future unrelated health care costs in extended years of life, did not change the findings that the interventions are cost-effective (AUD 17,000 per DALY and AUD 26,000 per DALY respectively). However, there was a substantial difference between hip and knee replacements where surgeries administered for hips were more cost-effective than for knees. Conclusions/Significance Both hip and knee replacements are cost-effective interventions to improve the quality of life of people with osteoarthritis. It was also shown that the dual nature of hip and knee OA should be taken into account to provide more accurate estimation on the cost-effectiveness of hip and knee replacements. PMID:21966520

  18. Modeling Drinking Behavior Progression in Youth: a Non-identified Probability Discrete Event System Using Cross-sectional Data

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xingdi; Chen, Xinguang; Cook, Robert L.; Chen, Ding-Geng; Okafor, Chukwuemeka

    2016-01-01

    Background The probabilistic discrete event systems (PDES) method provides a promising approach to study dynamics of underage drinking using cross-sectional data. However, the utility of this approach is often limited because the constructed PDES model is often non-identifiable. The purpose of the current study is to attempt a new method to solve the model. Methods A PDES-based model of alcohol use behavior was developed with four progression stages (never-drinkers [ND], light/moderate-drinker [LMD], heavy-drinker [HD], and ex-drinker [XD]) linked with 13 possible transition paths. We tested the proposed model with data for participants aged 12–21 from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). The Moore-Penrose (M-P) generalized inverse matrix method was applied to solve the proposed model. Results Annual transitional probabilities by age groups for the 13 drinking progression pathways were successfully estimated with the M-P generalized inverse matrix approach. Result from our analysis indicates an inverse “J” shape curve characterizing pattern of experimental use of alcohol from adolescence to young adulthood. We also observed a dramatic increase for the initiation of LMD and HD after age 18 and a sharp decline in quitting light and heavy drinking. Conclusion Our findings are consistent with the developmental perspective regarding the dynamics of underage drinking, demonstrating the utility of the M-P method in obtaining a unique solution for the partially-observed PDES drinking behavior model. The M-P approach we tested in this study will facilitate the use of the PDES approach to examine many health behaviors with the widely available cross-sectional data. PMID:26511344

  19. Using discrete event simulation to compare the performance of family health unit and primary health care centre organizational models in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Fialho, André S; Oliveira, Mónica D; Sá, Armando B

    2011-10-15

    Recent reforms in Portugal aimed at strengthening the role of the primary care system, in order to improve the quality of the health care system. Since 2006 new policies aiming to change the organization, incentive structures and funding of the primary health care sector were designed, promoting the evolution of traditional primary health care centres (PHCCs) into a new type of organizational unit--family health units (FHUs). This study aimed to compare performances of PHCC and FHU organizational models and to assess the potential gains from converting PHCCs into FHUs. Stochastic discrete event simulation models for the two types of organizational models were designed and implemented using Simul8 software. These models were applied to data from nineteen primary care units in three municipalities of the Greater Lisbon area. The conversion of PHCCs into FHUs seems to have the potential to generate substantial improvements in productivity and accessibility, while not having a significant impact on costs. This conversion might entail a 45% reduction in the average number of days required to obtain a medical appointment and a 7% and 9% increase in the average number of medical and nursing consultations, respectively. Reorganization of PHCC into FHUs might increase accessibility of patients to services and efficiency in the provision of primary care services.

  20. Using discrete event simulation to compare the performance of family health unit and primary health care centre organizational models in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent reforms in Portugal aimed at strengthening the role of the primary care system, in order to improve the quality of the health care system. Since 2006 new policies aiming to change the organization, incentive structures and funding of the primary health care sector were designed, promoting the evolution of traditional primary health care centres (PHCCs) into a new type of organizational unit - family health units (FHUs). This study aimed to compare performances of PHCC and FHU organizational models and to assess the potential gains from converting PHCCs into FHUs. Methods Stochastic discrete event simulation models for the two types of organizational models were designed and implemented using Simul8 software. These models were applied to data from nineteen primary care units in three municipalities of the Greater Lisbon area. Results The conversion of PHCCs into FHUs seems to have the potential to generate substantial improvements in productivity and accessibility, while not having a significant impact on costs. This conversion might entail a 45% reduction in the average number of days required to obtain a medical appointment and a 7% and 9% increase in the average number of medical and nursing consultations, respectively. Conclusions Reorganization of PHCC into FHUs might increase accessibility of patients to services and efficiency in the provision of primary care services. PMID:21999336

  1. Breakdown of the continuum limit approximation to the discrete scattering events and its influence on the electric field autocorrelation functions of transmitted light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šormaz, Miloš; Reufer, Mathias; Völker, Andreas C.; Simon, Klaus

    2014-11-01

    The complexity of modeling light propagation in turbid media can be significantly simplified if one assumes it to be diffusive. This is, however, only valid after the light has traveled a sufficient distance so that the diffusion equation can be employed. So far, there has been no reliable way to determine this distance, despite the fact that the assumption is often applied in optics. The discrete nature of scattering events plays an important role in modeling propagation of weakly scattered light, so a continuum equation such as the diffusion equation cannot be used to describe this process. Electric field autocorrelation functions g1(τ ) of light transmitted through turbid colloidal samples are measured using diffusing wave spectroscopy and compared to Monte Carlo simulations in order to obtain a better estimation of the continuum limit. The two methods to calculate g1(τ ) from the simulated photon trajectories are compared; the first assumes the continuum limit by using the path-length distributions of photon trajectories, while the second considers the square momentum transfers and therefore accurately calculates g1(τ ) even if the detected signal is composed of weakly scattered light. The results of the two methods are used to determine the lengths of the shortest diffuse photon trajectories; they grow with the sample thickness and scattering anisotropy.

  2. Adaptive Neural Network-Based Event-Triggered Control of Single-Input Single-Output Nonlinear Discrete-Time Systems.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Avimanyu; Xu, Hao; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel adaptive neural network (NN) control of single-input and single-output uncertain nonlinear discrete-time systems under event sampled NN inputs. In this control scheme, the feedback signals are transmitted, and the NN weights are tuned in an aperiodic manner at the event sampled instants. After reviewing the NN approximation property with event sampled inputs, an adaptive state estimator (SE), consisting of linearly parameterized NNs, is utilized to approximate the unknown system dynamics in an event sampled context. The SE is viewed as a model and its approximated dynamics and the state vector, during any two events, are utilized for the event-triggered controller design. An adaptive event-trigger condition is derived by using both the estimated NN weights and a dead-zone operator to determine the event sampling instants. This condition both facilitates the NN approximation and reduces the transmission of feedback signals. The ultimate boundedness of both the NN weight estimation error and the system state vector is demonstrated through the Lyapunov approach. As expected, during an initial online learning phase, events are observed more frequently. Over time with the convergence of the NN weights, the inter-event times increase, thereby lowering the number of triggered events. These claims are illustrated through the simulation results.

  3. Comparison of three jet events to predictions from a next-to-leading order calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Brandl, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    The properties of three-jet events in data of integrated luminosity 86±4 pb-1 from CDF Run 1b and with total transverse energy greater than 175 GeV have been analyzed and compared to predictions from a next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculation.

  4. Increasing cognitive load to facilitate lie detection: the benefit of recalling an event in reverse order.

    PubMed

    Vrij, Aldert; Mann, Samantha A; Fisher, Ronald P; Leal, Sharon; Milne, Rebecca; Bull, Ray

    2008-06-01

    In two experiments, we tested the hypotheses that (a) the difference between liars and truth tellers will be greater when interviewees report their stories in reverse order than in chronological order, and (b) instructing interviewees to recall their stories in reverse order will facilitate detecting deception. In Experiment 1, 80 mock suspects told the truth or lied about a staged event and did or did not report their stories in reverse order. The reverse order interviews contained many more cues to deceit than the control interviews. In Experiment 2, 55 police officers watched a selection of the videotaped interviews of Experiment 1 and made veracity judgements. Requesting suspects to convey their stories in reverse order improved police observers' ability to detect deception and did not result in a response bias.

  5. Discrete event simulation model for external yard choice of import container terminal in a port buffer area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusgiyarto, Ferry; Sjafruddin, Ade; Frazila, Russ Bona; Suprayogi

    2017-06-01

    Increasing container traffic and land acquisition problem for terminal expansion leads to usage of external yard in a port buffer area. This condition influenced the terminal performance because a road which connects the terminal and the external yard was also used by non-container traffic. Location choice problem considered to solve this condition, but the previous research has not taken account a stochastic condition of container arrival rate and service time yet. Bi-level programming framework was used to find optimum location configuration. In the lower-level, there was a problem to construct the equation, which correlated the terminal operation and the road due to different time cycle equilibrium. Container moves from the quay to a terminal gate in a daily unit of time, meanwhile, it moves from the terminal gate to the external yard through the road in a minute unit of time. If the equation formulated in hourly unit equilibrium, it cannot catch up the container movement characteristics in the terminal. Meanwhile, if the equation formulated in daily unit equilibrium, it cannot catch up the road traffic movement characteristics in the road. This problem can be addressed using simulation model. Discrete Event Simulation Model was used to simulate import container flow processes in the container terminal and external yard. Optimum location configuration in the upper-level was the combinatorial problem, which was solved by Full Enumeration approach. The objective function of the external yard location model was to minimize user transport cost (or time) and to maximize operator benefit. Numerical experiment was run for the scenario assumption of two container handling ways, three external yards, and thirty-day simulation periods. Jakarta International Container Terminal (JICT) container characteristics data was referred for the simulation. Based on five runs which were 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 repetitions, operation one of three available external yards (external yard

  6. Acquisition and use of mental operators: the influence of natural order of events.

    PubMed

    Müller, Burkhard; Gehrke, Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    The present article reports two experiments investigating the influence of natural order of events on the acquisition and use of knowledge about operations, in short mental operators. The principle of use specificity states that task performance depends directly on the similarity between acquisition context and the present situation. In contrast, the principle of natural order proposes that knowledge about operations can always be applied easier (faster) if reasoning follows the natural order of events. In Experiment 1, participants had to apply alphabet-arithmetic operators and LISP functions in a prognosis task (A + 2 = ?) or a retrognosis task (? - 2 = A). In alphabet-arithmetic, an advantage for the first kind of task at the beginning of training decreased with increasing practice. In LISP, however, a preference for this task (corresponding with a prospective knowledge use) emerged with increasing practice. In Experiment 2, arithmetic relations between digit pairs had to be induced. In a causal context condition, relations were described as input and output of electric circuits, in a neutral context the relations were described as arithmetic dependencies. A preference for the prognosis task was found for the causal context condition (corresponding with a prospective knowledge use) but not for the neutral one. The findings suggest that the natural order of events moderates the acquisition and use of mental operators. Further research is required to clarify the bases for this moderation.

  7. Bounding the Resource Availability of Partially Ordered Events with Constant Resource Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    We compare existing techniques to bound the resource availability of partially ordered events. We first show that, contrary to intuition, two existing techniques, one due to Laborie and one due to Muscettola, are not strictly comparable in terms of the size of the search trees generated under chronological search with a fixed heuristic. We describe a generalization of these techniques called the Flow Balance Constraint to tightly bound the amount of available resource for a set of partially ordered events with piecewise constant resource impact We prove that the new technique generates smaller proof trees under chronological search with a fixed heuristic, at little increase in computational expense. We then show how to construct tighter resource bounds but at increased computational cost.

  8. Robust Ordering of Anaphase Events by Adaptive Thresholds and Competing Degradation Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kamenz, Julia; Mihaljev, Tamara; Kubis, Armin; Legewie, Stefan; Hauf, Silke

    2015-11-05

    The splitting of chromosomes in anaphase and their delivery into the daughter cells needs to be accurately executed to maintain genome stability. Chromosome splitting requires the degradation of securin, whereas the distribution of the chromosomes into the daughter cells requires the degradation of cyclin B. We show that cells encounter and tolerate variations in the abundance of securin or cyclin B. This makes the concurrent onset of securin and cyclin B degradation insufficient to guarantee that early anaphase events occur in the correct order. We uncover that the timing of chromosome splitting is not determined by reaching a fixed securin level, but that this level adapts to the securin degradation kinetics. In conjunction with securin and cyclin B competing for degradation during anaphase, this provides robustness to the temporal order of anaphase events. Our work reveals how parallel cell-cycle pathways can be temporally coordinated despite variability in protein concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gradual changes in hippocampal activity support remembering the order of events

    PubMed Central

    Manns, Joseph R.; Howard, Marc W.; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2007-01-01

    The hippocampus is thought to contribute to episodic memory in part by binding stimuli to their spatiotemporal context. The present study examined how hippocampal neuronal populations encode spatial and temporal context as rats performed a task in which they were required to remember the order of trial-unique sequences of odors. The results suggest that a gradual change in the pattern of hippocampal activity served as a temporal context for odor sampling events and was important for successful subsequent memory for the order of those odors. PMID:17988635

  10. Determining Nurse Aide Staffing Requirements to Provide Care Based on Resident Workload: A Discrete Event Simulation Model.

    PubMed

    Schnelle, John F; Schroyer, L Dale; Saraf, Avantika A; Simmons, Sandra F

    2016-11-01

    Nursing aides provide most of the labor-intensive activities of daily living (ADL) care to nursing home (NH) residents. Currently, most NHs do not determine nurse aide staffing requirements based on the time to provide ADL care for their unique resident population. The lack of an objective method to determine nurse aide staffing requirements suggests that many NHs could be understaffed in their capacity to provide consistent ADL care to all residents in need. Discrete event simulation (DES) mathematically models key work parameters (eg, time to provide an episode of care and available staff) to predict the ability of the work setting to provide care over time and offers an objective method to determine nurse aide staffing needs in NHs. This study had 2 primary objectives: (1) to describe the relationship between ADL workload and the level of nurse aide staffing reported by NHs; and, (2) to use a DES model to determine the relationship between ADL workload and nurse aide staffing necessary for consistent, timely ADL care. Minimum Data Set data related to the level of dependency on staff for ADL care for residents in over 13,500 NHs nationwide were converted into 7 workload categories that captured 98% of all residents. In addition, data related to the time to provide care for the ADLs within each workload category was used to calculate a workload score for each facility. The correlation between workload and reported nurse aide staffing levels was calculated to determine the association between staffing reported by NHs and workload. Simulations to project staffing requirements necessary to provide ADL care were then conducted for 65 different workload scenarios, which included 13 different nurse aide staffing levels (ranging from 1.6 to 4.0 total hours per resident day) and 5 different workload percentiles (ranging from the 5th to the 95th percentile). The purpose of the simulation model was to determine the staffing necessary to provide care within each workload

  11. Dielectric characterization of thermodynamic first order events in model frozen systems intended for lyophilization.

    PubMed

    Evans, S A; Morris, K R; Mackenzie, A P; Lordi, N G

    1995-01-01

    The degree and ease with which permanent dipoles in a frozen sample orient in an applied electric field is affected during thermal transitions. This motion can be monitored with dielectric analysis (DEA) at low AC frequencies (< approximately 300,000 Hz). The systems characterized with respect to their behavior in the frozen state consisted of common lyophile excipients in aqueous solutions known to exhibit typical thermodynamic first order transitions. Prior to freezing, solution samples were placed on an interdigitated electrodes and served as the dielectric component of the resulting capacitor. Plots of derivative of dielectric permittivity with respect to time (or temperature) showed the presence of frequency independent peaks (signifying a first order event) at temperatures that coincided with eutectic temperatures (ca. -22 degrees C for sodium chloride-water and ca. -5 degrees C for mannitol-water), amorphous to crystalline transition temperatures (ca. -25 degrees C for mannitol-water), and/or freezing point depression values in water. The values obtained by DEA correlated well with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and literature values. DEA appears to offer added insight over established techniques by not only determining the temperature at which these events occur, but also by defining the thermodynamic order of the event.

  12. The short and long of it: Neural correlates of temporal-order memory for autobiographical events

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Peggy St.; Rubin, David C.; LaBar, Kevin S.; Cabeza, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Previous functional neuroimaging studies of temporal-order memory have investigated memory for laboratory stimuli that are causally unrelated and poor in sensory detail. In contrast, the present functional MRI (fMRI) study investigated temporal-order memory for autobiographical events that were causally interconnected and rich in sensory detail. Participants took photographs at many campus locations over a period of several hours, and the following day they were scanned while making temporal-order judgments to pairs of photographs from different locations. By manipulating the temporal lag between the two locations in each trial, we compared the neural correlates associated with reconstruction processes, which we hypothesized depended on recollection and contribute mainly to short lags, and distance processes, which we hypothesized to depend on familiarity and contribute mainly to longer lags. Consistent with our hypotheses, parametric fMRI analyses linked shorter lags to activations in regions previously associated with recollection (left prefrontal, parahippocampal, precuneus, and visual cortices) and longer lags with regions previously associated with familiarity (right prefrontal cortex). The hemispheric asymmetry in prefrontal cortex activity fits very well with evidence and theories regarding the contributions of left vs. right prefrontal cortex to memory (recollection vs. familiarity processes) and cognition (systematic vs. heuristic processes). In sum, using a novel photo-paradigm this study provided the first evidence regarding the neural correlates of temporal-order for autobiographical events. PMID:18284345

  13. Power of the Mantel-Haenszel and other tests for discrete or grouped time-to-event data under a chained binomial model.

    PubMed

    Lachin, John M

    2013-01-30

    Power for time-to-event analyses is usually assessed under continuous-time models. Often, however, times are discrete or grouped, as when the event is only observed when a procedure is performed. Wallenstein and Wittes (Biometrics, 1993) describe the power of the Mantel-Haenszel test for discrete lifetables under their chained binomial model for specified vectors of event probabilities over intervals of time. Herein, the expressions for these probabilities are derived under a piecewise exponential model allowing for staggered entry and losses to follow-up. Radhakrishna (Biometrics, 1965) showed that the Mantel-Haenszel test is maximally efficient under the alternative of a constant odds ratio and derived the optimal weighted test under other alternatives. Lachin (Biostatistical Methods: The Assessment of Relative Risks, 2011) described the power function of this family of weighted Mantel-Haenszel tests. Prentice and Gloeckler (Biometrics, 1978) described a generalization of the proportional hazards model for grouped time data and the corresponding maximally efficient score test. Their test is also shown to be a weighted Mantel-Haenszel test, and its power function is likewise obtained. There is trivial loss in power under the discrete chained binomial model relative to the continuous-time case provided that there is a modest number of periodic evaluations. Relative to the case of homogeneity of odds ratios, there can be substantial loss in power when there is substantial heterogeneity of odds ratios, especially when heterogeneity occurs early in a study when most subjects are at risk, but little loss in power when there is heterogeneity late in a study.

  14. Trauma and memory: effects of post-event misinformation, retrieval order, and retention interval.

    PubMed

    Paz-Alonso, Pedro M; Goodman, Gail S

    2008-01-01

    The present study concerned effects of misinformation, retrieval order, and retention interval on eyewitness memory for a traumatic event (a vivid murder). Relations between misinformation acceptance and compliance were also examined. The classic three-stage misinformation paradigm (Loftus, 1979) was employed, with a multi-component recognition test added. Either immediately or 2 weeks after viewing a distressing film, 232 adults read a narrative (misleading or control) about the murder and then took a recognition test that tapped memory for central and peripheral details. Test-item order either matched the chronology of the film or was randomly determined. Significant misinformation effects were obtained. Moreover, control participants were more accurate in response to questions about central than peripheral information; however, this was not so for misinformed participants. Sequential but not random retrieval order resulted in a higher proportion of correct responses for central as opposed to peripheral misinformation questions. Compliance was significantly related to misinformation effects. Delay increased participants' suggestibility, impaired memory accuracy, and produced higher confidence ratings for misinformed participants compared to controls. Findings indicate that even for a highly negative event, adults' memory is not immune to inaccuracies and suggestive influences.

  15. A cell-local finite difference discretization of the low-order quasidiffusion equations for neutral particle transport on unstructured quadrilateral meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Wieselquist, William A.; Anistratov, Dmitriy Y.; Morel, Jim E.

    2014-09-15

    We present a quasidiffusion (QD) method for solving neutral particle transport problems in Cartesian XY geometry on unstructured quadrilateral meshes, including local refinement capability. Neutral particle transport problems are central to many applications including nuclear reactor design, radiation safety, astrophysics, medical imaging, radiotherapy, nuclear fuel transport/storage, shielding design, and oil well-logging. The primary development is a new discretization of the low-order QD (LOQD) equations based on cell-local finite differences. The accuracy of the LOQD equations depends on proper calculation of special non-linear QD (Eddington) factors from a transport solution. In order to completely define the new QD method, a proper discretization of the transport problem is also presented. The transport equation is discretized by a conservative method of short characteristics with a novel linear approximation of the scattering source term and monotonic, parabolic representation of the angular flux on incoming faces. Analytic and numerical tests are used to test the accuracy and spatial convergence of the non-linear method. All tests exhibit O(h{sup 2}) convergence of the scalar flux on orthogonal, random, and multi-level meshes.

  16. The cognitive demands of second order manual control: Applications of the event related brain potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickens, C.; Gill, R.; Kramer, A.; Ross, W.; Donchin, E.

    1981-01-01

    Three experiments are described in which tracking difficulty is varied in the presence of a covert tone discrimination task. Event related brain potentials (ERPs) elicited by the tones are employed as an index of the resource demands of tracking. The ERP measure reflected the control order variation, and this variable was thereby assumed to compete for perceptual/central processing resources. A fine-grained analysis of the results suggested that the primary demands of second order tracking involve the central processing operations of maintaining a more complex internal model of the dynamic system, rather than the perceptual demands of higher derivative perception. Experiment 3 varied tracking bandwidth in random input tracking, and the ERP was unaffected. Bandwidth was then inferred to compete for response-related processing resources that are independent of the ERP.

  17. A Decision Tool that Combines Discrete Event Software Process Models with System Dynamics Pieces for Software Development Cost Estimation and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizell, Carolyn Barrett; Malone, Linda

    2007-01-01

    The development process for a large software development project is very complex and dependent on many variables that are dynamic and interrelated. Factors such as size, productivity and defect injection rates will have substantial impact on the project in terms of cost and schedule. These factors can be affected by the intricacies of the process itself as well as human behavior because the process is very labor intensive. The complex nature of the development process can be investigated with software development process models that utilize discrete event simulation to analyze the effects of process changes. The organizational environment and its effects on the workforce can be analyzed with system dynamics that utilizes continuous simulation. Each has unique strengths and the benefits of both types can be exploited by combining a system dynamics model and a discrete event process model. This paper will demonstrate how the two types of models can be combined to investigate the impacts of human resource interactions on productivity and ultimately on cost and schedule.

  18. Using Discrete Event Simulation to Model the Economic Value of Shorter Procedure Times on EP Lab Efficiency in the VALUE PVI Study.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Marcin; DeVille, J Brian; Svinarich, J Thomas; Dan, Dan; Wickliffe, Andrew; Kantipudi, Charan; Foell, Jason D; Filardo, Giovanni; Holbrook, Reece; Baker, James; Baydoun, Hassan; Jenkins, Mark; Chang-Sing, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The VALUE PVI study demonstrated that atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation procedures and electrophysiology laboratory (EP lab) occupancy times were reduced for the cryoballoon compared with focal radiofrequency (RF) ablation. However, the economic impact associated with the cryoballoon procedure for hospitals has not been determined. Assess the economic value associated with shorter AF ablation procedure times based on VALUE PVI data. A model was formulated from data from the VALUE PVI study. This model used a discrete event simulation to translate procedural efficiencies into metrics utilized by hospital administrators. A 1000-day period was simulated to determine the accrued impact of procedure time on an institution's EP lab when considering staff and hospital resources. The simulation demonstrated that procedures performed with the cryoballoon catheter resulted in several efficiencies, including: (1) a reduction of 36.2% in days with overtime (422 days RF vs 60 days cryoballoon); (2) 92.7% less cumulative overtime hours (370 hours RF vs 27 hours cryoballoon); and (3) an increase of 46.7% in days with time for an additional EP lab usage (186 days RF vs 653 days cryoballoon). Importantly, the added EP lab utilization could not support the time required for an additional AF ablation procedure. The discrete event simulation of the VALUE PVI data demonstrates the potential positive economic value of AF ablation procedures using the cryoballoon. These benefits include more days where overtime is avoided, fewer cumulative overtime hours, and more days with time left for additional usage of EP lab resources.

  19. Edge-based lightweight image encryption using chaos-based reversible hidden transform and multiple-order discrete fractional cosine transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yushu; Xiao, Di; Wen, Wenying; Tian, Yuan

    2013-12-01

    In some special multimedia applications, only the regions with semantic information should be provided better protection whereas the other smooth regions can be free of encryption. However, most of the existing multimedia security schemes only consider bits and pixels rather than semantic information during their encryption. Motivated by this, we propose an edge-based lightweight image encryption scheme using chaos-based reversible hidden transform and multiple-order discrete fractional cosine transform. An image is first carried out by the edge detection based on advanced CNN structure with adaptive thresholds to assess data significance in the image. The detection output is a binary image, in which a “1” reflects the detected pixel whereas a “0” is opposite. Both the detected image and the original image are divided into non-overlapping pixel blocks in the same way, respectively. Whether each block is encrypted or not depends on the significance judged by the corresponding detected block. The significant block is performed by reversible hidden transform followed by multiple-order discrete fractional cosine transform parameters and orders of these two transforms are determined by a two dimensional cross chaotic map. Experiment results show the significant contour features of an image that have been largely hidden only by encrypting about half pixels in the average sense. The keys are extremely sensitive and the proposed scheme can resist noise attack to some extent.

  20. Stochastic sensitivity analysis of noise-induced order-chaos transitions in discrete-time systems with tangent and crisis bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkirtseva, Irina; Ryashko, Lev

    2017-02-01

    We study noise-induced order-chaos transitions in discrete-time systems with tangent and crisis bifurcations. To study these transitions parametrically, we suggest a generalized mathematical technique using stochastic sensitivity functions and confidence domains for randomly forced equilibria, cycles, and chaotic attractors. This technique is demonstrated in detail for the simple one-dimensional stochastic system, in which points of crisis and tangent bifurcations are borders of the order window lying between two chaotic parametric zones. A stochastic phenomenon of the extension and shift of this window towards crisis bifurcation point, under increasing noise, is presented and analyzed. Shifts of borders of this order window are found as functions of the noise intensity. By our analytical approach based on stochastic sensitivity functions, we construct a parametric diagram of chaotic and regular regimes for the stochastically forced system.

  1. Event-Triggered Communication for Leader-Following Consensus of Second-Order Multiagent Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Peng, Chen; He, Wangli; Song, Yang

    2017-07-04

    This paper is concerned with leader-following consensus of second-order multiagent systems with nonlinear dynamics. First, to save the limited communication resources, a new event-triggered control protocol is delicately developed without requiring continuous communication among the follower agents. Then, by employing the Lyapunov functional method and the Kronecker product technique, a novel sufficient criterion with less conservation is derived to guarantee the leader-following consensus while excluding the Zeno behavior. Furthermore, for the first time, an algorithm to actively adjust the leader adjacency matrix is presented, which efficiently expands the application range of some existing criteria. An example is finally given to illustrate the effectiveness of theoretical results.

  2. A New Discretization Method of Order Four for the Numerical Solution of One-Space Dimensional Second-Order Quasi-Linear Hyperbolic Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohanty, R. K.; Arora, Urvashi

    2002-01-01

    Three level-implicit finite difference methods of order four are discussed for the numerical solution of the mildly quasi-linear second-order hyperbolic equation A(x, t, u)u[subscript xx] + 2B(x, t, u)u[subscript xt] + C(x, t, u)u[subscript tt] = f(x, t, u, u[subscript x], u[subscript t]), 0 less than x less than 1, t greater than 0 subject to…

  3. A New Discretization Method of Order Four for the Numerical Solution of One-Space Dimensional Second-Order Quasi-Linear Hyperbolic Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohanty, R. K.; Arora, Urvashi

    2002-01-01

    Three level-implicit finite difference methods of order four are discussed for the numerical solution of the mildly quasi-linear second-order hyperbolic equation A(x, t, u)u[subscript xx] + 2B(x, t, u)u[subscript xt] + C(x, t, u)u[subscript tt] = f(x, t, u, u[subscript x], u[subscript t]), 0 less than x less than 1, t greater than 0 subject to…

  4. A Discrete Event Simulation Model for Evaluating the Performances of an M/G/C/C State Dependent Queuing System

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Ruzelan; M. Nawawi, Mohd Kamal; Kawsar, Luthful A.; Ghani, Noraida A.; Kamil, Anton A.; Mustafa, Adli

    2013-01-01

    M/G/C/C state dependent queuing networks consider service rates as a function of the number of residing entities (e.g., pedestrians, vehicles, and products). However, modeling such dynamic rates is not supported in modern Discrete Simulation System (DES) software. We designed an approach to cater this limitation and used it to construct the M/G/C/C state-dependent queuing model in Arena software. Using the model, we have evaluated and analyzed the impacts of various arrival rates to the throughput, the blocking probability, the expected service time and the expected number of entities in a complex network topology. Results indicated that there is a range of arrival rates for each network where the simulation results fluctuate drastically across replications and this causes the simulation results and analytical results exhibit discrepancies. Detail results that show how tally the simulation results and the analytical results in both abstract and graphical forms and some scientific justifications for these have been documented and discussed. PMID:23560037

  5. The spatiotemporal order of signaling events unveils the logic of development signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hao; Owen, Markus R.; Mao, Yanlan

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Animals from worms and insects to birds and mammals show distinct body plans; however, the embryonic development of diverse body plans with tissues and organs within is controlled by a surprisingly few signaling pathways. It is well recognized that combinatorial use of and dynamic interactions among signaling pathways follow specific logic to control complex and accurate developmental signaling and patterning, but it remains elusive what such logic is, or even, what it looks like. Results: We have developed a computational model for Drosophila eye development with innovated methods to reveal how interactions among multiple pathways control the dynamically generated hexagonal array of R8 cells. We obtained two novel findings. First, the coupling between the long-range inductive signals produced by the proneural Hh signaling and the short-range restrictive signals produced by the antineural Notch and EGFR signaling is essential for generating accurately spaced R8s. Second, the spatiotemporal orders of key signaling events reveal a robust pattern of lateral inhibition conducted by Ato-coordinated Notch and EGFR signaling to collectively determine R8 patterning. This pattern, stipulating the orders of signaling and comparable to the protocols of communication, may help decipher the well-appreciated but poorly defined logic of developmental signaling. Availability and implementation: The model is available upon request. Contact: hao.zhu@ymail.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153573

  6. The spatiotemporal order of signaling events unveils the logic of development signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao; Owen, Markus R; Mao, Yanlan

    2016-08-01

    Animals from worms and insects to birds and mammals show distinct body plans; however, the embryonic development of diverse body plans with tissues and organs within is controlled by a surprisingly few signaling pathways. It is well recognized that combinatorial use of and dynamic interactions among signaling pathways follow specific logic to control complex and accurate developmental signaling and patterning, but it remains elusive what such logic is, or even, what it looks like. We have developed a computational model for Drosophila eye development with innovated methods to reveal how interactions among multiple pathways control the dynamically generated hexagonal array of R8 cells. We obtained two novel findings. First, the coupling between the long-range inductive signals produced by the proneural Hh signaling and the short-range restrictive signals produced by the antineural Notch and EGFR signaling is essential for generating accurately spaced R8s. Second, the spatiotemporal orders of key signaling events reveal a robust pattern of lateral inhibition conducted by Ato-coordinated Notch and EGFR signaling to collectively determine R8 patterning. This pattern, stipulating the orders of signaling and comparable to the protocols of communication, may help decipher the well-appreciated but poorly defined logic of developmental signaling. The model is available upon request. hao.zhu@ymail.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Timing and Order of Transmission Events Is Not Directly Reflected in a Pathogen Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Severson, Ethan; Skar, Helena; Bulla, Ingo; Albert, Jan; Leitner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen phylogenies are often used to infer spread among hosts. There is, however, not an exact match between the pathogen phylogeny and the host transmission history. Here, we examine in detail the limitations of this relationship. First, all splits in a pathogen phylogeny of more than 1 host occur within hosts, not at the moment of transmission, predating the transmission events as described by the pretransmission interval. Second, the order in which nodes in a phylogeny occur may be reflective of the within-host dynamics rather than epidemiologic relationships. To investigate these phenomena, motivated by within-host diversity patterns, we developed a two-phase coalescent model that includes a transmission bottleneck followed by linear outgrowth to a maximum population size followed by either stabilization or decline of the population. The model predicts that the pretransmission interval shrinks compared with predictions based on constant population size or a simple transmission bottleneck. Because lineages coalesce faster in a small population, the probability of a pathogen phylogeny to resemble the transmission history depends on when after infection a donor transmits to a new host. We also show that the probability of inferring the incorrect order of multiple transmissions from the same host is high. Finally, we compare time of HIV-1 infection informed by genetic distances in phylogenies to independent biomarker data, and show that, indeed, the pretransmission interval biases phylogeny-based estimates of when transmissions occurred. We describe situations where caution is needed not to misinterpret which parts of a phylogeny that may indicate outbreaks and tight transmission clusters. PMID:24874208

  8. Timing and order of transmission events is not directly reflected in a pathogen phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Romero-Severson, Ethan; Skar, Helena; Bulla, Ingo; Albert, Jan; Leitner, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Pathogen phylogenies are often used to infer spread among hosts. There is, however, not an exact match between the pathogen phylogeny and the host transmission history. Here, we examine in detail the limitations of this relationship. First, all splits in a pathogen phylogeny of more than 1 host occur within hosts, not at the moment of transmission, predating the transmission events as described by the pretransmission interval. Second, the order in which nodes in a phylogeny occur may be reflective of the within-host dynamics rather than epidemiologic relationships. To investigate these phenomena, motivated by within-host diversity patterns, we developed a two-phase coalescent model that includes a transmission bottleneck followed by linear outgrowth to a maximum population size followed by either stabilization or decline of the population. The model predicts that the pretransmission interval shrinks compared with predictions based on constant population size or a simple transmission bottleneck. Because lineages coalesce faster in a small population, the probability of a pathogen phylogeny to resemble the transmission history depends on when after infection a donor transmits to a new host. We also show that the probability of inferring the incorrect order of multiple transmissions from the same host is high. Finally, we compare time of HIV-1 infection informed by genetic distances in phylogenies to independent biomarker data, and show that, indeed, the pretransmission interval biases phylogeny-based estimates of when transmissions occurred. We describe situations where caution is needed not to misinterpret which parts of a phylogeny that may indicate outbreaks and tight transmission clusters. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution 2014. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Higher-order unfolding of satellite heterochromatin is a consistent and early event in cell senescence

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Eric C.; Manning, Benjamin; Zhang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic changes to chromatin are thought to be essential to cell senescence, which is key to tumorigenesis and aging. Although many studies focus on heterochromatin gain, this work demonstrates large-scale unraveling of peri/centromeric satellites, which occurs in all models of human and mouse senescence examined. This was not seen in cancer cells, except in a benign senescent tumor in vivo. Senescence-associated distension of satellites (SADS) occurs earlier and more consistently than heterochromatin foci formation, and SADS is not exclusive to either the p16 or p21 pathways. Because Hutchinson Guilford progeria syndrome patient cells do not form excess heterochromatin, the question remained whether or not proliferative arrest in this aging syndrome involved distinct epigenetic mechanisms. Here, we show that SADS provides a unifying event in both progeria and normal senescence. Additionally, SADS represents a novel, cytological-scale unfolding of chromatin, which is not concomitant with change to several canonical histone marks nor a result of DNA hypomethylation. Rather, SADS is likely mediated by changes to higher-order nuclear structural proteins, such as LaminB1. PMID:24344186

  10. A discrete time-space geography for epidemiology: from mixing groups to pockets of local order in pandemic simulations.

    PubMed

    Holm, Einar; Timpka, Toomas

    2007-01-01

    The World Health Organization urges all nations to develop and maintain national influenza preparedness plans. Important components of such plans are forecasts of morbidity and mortality based on local social and geographic conditions. Most methodologies for simulations of epidemic outbreaks are implicitly based on the assumption that the frequency and duration of social contacts that lead to disease transmission is affected by geography, i.e. the spatial distribution of physical meeting places. In order to increase the effectiveness of the present methods for simulation of infectious disease outbreaks, the aim of this study is to examine two social geographic issues related to such models. We display how the social geographic characteristics of mixing networks, in particular when these significantly deviate from the random-mixing norm, can be represented in order to enhance the understanding and prediction of epidemic patterns in light of a possible future destructive influenza pandemic. We conclude that social geography, social networks and simulation models of directly transmitted infectious diseases are fundamentally linked.

  11. Real-time networked control of an industrial robot manipulator via discrete-time second-order sliding modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massimiliano Capisani, Luca; Facchinetti, Tullio; Ferrara, Antonella

    2010-08-01

    This article presents the networked control of a robotic anthropomorphic manipulator based on a second-order sliding mode technique, where the control objective is to track a desired trajectory for the manipulator. The adopted control scheme allows an easy and effective distribution of the control algorithm over two networked machines. While the predictability of real-time tasks execution is achieved by the Soft Hard Real-Time Kernel (S.Ha.R.K.) real-time operating system, the communication is established via a standard Ethernet network. The performances of the control system are evaluated under different experimental system configurations using, to perform the experiments, a COMAU SMART3-S2 industrial robot, and the results are analysed to put into evidence the robustness of the proposed approach against possible network delays, packet losses and unmodelled effects.

  12. A paradigm for discrete physics

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P.; McGoveran, D.; Etter, T.; Manthey, M.J.; Gefwert, C.

    1987-01-01

    An example is outlined for constructing a discrete physics using as a starting point the insight from quantum physics that events are discrete, indivisible and non-local. Initial postulates are finiteness, discreteness, finite computability, absolute nonuniqueness (i.e., homogeneity in the absence of specific cause) and additivity.

  13. Polarimetric signatures of a layer of random nonspherical discrete scatterers overlying a homogeneous half-space based on first- and second-order vector radiative transfer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Leung; Ding, Kung-Hau

    1991-01-01

    Complete polarimetric signatures of a layer of random, nonspherical discrete scatterers overlying a homogeneous half space are studied with the first- and second-order solutions of the vector radiative transfer theory. Some of the salient features of the numerical results are as follows: (1) the inclusion of the nondiagonal extinction matrix in the vector radiative transfer theory accounts for an appreciable phase difference between vv and hh polarizations, particularly for aligned scatterers; (2) the ensemble-averaged scattered Stokes vector is generally partially polarized, with the degree of polarization less than unity; (3) there generally exists a pedestal in the copolarization return when plotted as a function of ellipticity and orientation angles, which may be due to heterogeneity of scattering objects and/or multiple scattering effects; and (4) multiple scattering effects generally enhance the pedestal in copolarization return, decrease the degree of polarization, affect phase difference, and also enhance the depolarization return.

  14. Ultra-fast formation control of high-order discrete-time multi-agent systems based on multi-step predictive mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenle; Liu, Jianchang; Wang, Honghai

    2015-09-01

    This paper deals with the ultra-fast formation control problem of high-order discrete-time multi-agent systems. Using the local neighbor-error knowledge, a novel ultra-fast protocol with multi-step predictive information and self-feedback term is proposed. The asymptotic convergence factor is improved by a power of q+1 compared to the routine protocol. To some extent, the ultra-fast algorithm overcomes the influence of communication topology to the convergence speed. Furthermore, some sufficient conditions are given herein. The ones decouple the design of the synchronizing gains from the detailed graph properties, and explicitly reveal how the agent dynamic and the communication graph jointly affect the ultra-fast formationability. Finally, some simulations are worked out to illustrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results.

  15. Relationship between medication event rates and the Leapfrog computerized physician order entry evaluation tool

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Alexander A; Keohane, Carol; Lipsitz, Stuart; Zimlichman, Eyal; Amato, Mary; Simon, Steven R; Coffey, Michael; Kaufman, Nathan; Cadet, Bismarck; Schiff, Gordon; Seger, Diane L; Bates, David W

    2013-01-01

    Objective The Leapfrog CPOE evaluation tool has been promoted as a means of monitoring computerized physician order entry (CPOE). We sought to determine the relationship between Leapfrog scores and the rates of preventable adverse drug events (ADE) and potential ADE. Materials and methods A cross-sectional study of 1000 adult admissions in five community hospitals from October 1, 2008 to September 30, 2010 was performed. Observed rates of preventable ADE and potential ADE were compared with scores reported by the Leapfrog CPOE evaluation tool. The primary outcome was the rate of preventable ADE and the secondary outcome was the composite rate of preventable ADE and potential ADE. Results Leapfrog performance scores were highly related to the primary outcome. A 43% relative reduction in the rate of preventable ADE was predicted for every 5% increase in Leapfrog scores (rate ratio 0.57; 95% CI 0.37 to 0.88). In absolute terms, four fewer preventable ADE per 100 admissions were predicted for every 5% increase in overall Leapfrog scores (rate difference −4.2; 95% CI −7.4 to −1.1). A statistically significant relationship between Leapfrog scores and the secondary outcome, however, was not detected. Discussion Our findings support the use of the Leapfrog tool as a means of evaluating and monitoring CPOE performance after implementation, as addressed by current certification standards. Conclusions Scores from the Leapfrog CPOE evaluation tool closely relate to actual rates of preventable ADE. Leapfrog testing may alert providers to potential vulnerabilities and highlight areas for further improvement. PMID:23599225

  16. Willingness-to-pay for water quality improvements in Chinese rivers: an empirical test on the ordering effects of multiple-bounded discrete choices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; He, Jie; Kim, Yoonhee; Kamata, Takuya

    2013-12-15

    This paper presents a study of the willingness-to-pay (WTP) for surface water quality improvement in China. In the Huaping County of Yunnan Province, we found that people are willing to pay 74 Yuan (or US$12.33 in 2012 prices) per household per month (or 5% of household income) continuously for five years to achieve an improvement of water quality in the two major local rivers from the current Grade IV to Grade III, which denotes a level suitable for swimming and fishing and matches the water quality level from 10 years ago. This WTP study is based on an actual investment project that was under serious consideration by the government and is based on the multiple-bounded discrete choice (MBDC) approach, which explicitly recognizes the potential uncertainties involved in the study. The potential ordering effects associated with the MBDC approach are empirically tested, and the results indicate that although the presentation order of the polychotomous likelihood choices may not have a significant impact on the WTP estimation, the presentation order of bid levels may have a significant impact. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Track-event theory of cell survival with second-order repair.

    PubMed

    Besserer, Jürgen; Schneider, Uwe

    2015-05-01

    When fractionation schemes for hypofractionation and stereotactic body radiotherapy are considered, a reliable cell survival model at high dose is needed for calculating doses of similar biological effectiveness. In this work, a simple model for cell survival which is valid also at high dose is developed from Poisson statistics. It is assumed that a cell is killed by an event that is defined by two double-strand breaks on the same or different chromosomes. Two different mechanisms can produce events. A one-track event is always represented by two simultaneous double-strand breaks. A two-track event results in one double-strand break. Therefore, at least two two-track events on the same or different chromosomes are necessary to produce an event. It is assumed that two double-strand breaks can be repaired with a certain repair probability. Both the one-track events and the two-track events are statistically independent. From the stochastic nature of cell killing which is described by the Poisson distribution, the cell survival probability was derived. The model was fitted to experimental data. It was shown that a solution based on Poisson statistics exists for cell survival. It exhibits exponential cell survival at high dose and a finite gradient of cell survival at vanishing dose, which is in agreement with experimental cell studies. The model fits the experimental data as well as the LQ model and is based on two free parameters. It was shown that cell survival can be described with a simple analytical formula on the basis of Poisson statistics. This solution represents in the limit of large dose the typical exponential behavior and predicts cell survival as well as the LQ model.

  18. Development of a daily mortality probability prediction model from Intensive Care Unit patients using a discrete-time event history analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying Che; Chang, Kuang Yi; Lin, Shih Pin; Chen, Kung; Chan, Kwok Hon; Chang, Polun

    2013-08-01

    As studies have pointed out, severity scores are imperfect at predicting individual clinical chance of survival. The clinical condition and pathophysiological status of these patients in the Intensive Care Unit might differ from or be more complicated than most predictive models account for. In addition, as the pathophysiological status changes over time, the likelihood of survival day by day will vary. Actually, it would decrease over time and a single prediction value cannot address this truth. Clearly, alternative models and refinements are warranted. In this study, we used discrete-time-event models with the changes of clinical variables, including blood cell counts, to predict daily probability of mortality in individual patients from day 3 to day 28 post Intensive Care Unit admission. Both models we built exhibited good discrimination in the training (overall area under ROC curve: 0.80 and 0.79, respectively) and validation cohorts (overall area under ROC curve: 0.78 and 0.76, respectively) to predict daily ICU mortality. The paper describes the methodology, the development process and the content of the models, and discusses the possibility of them to serve as the foundation of a new bedside advisory or alarm system.

  19. Minimum intravenous thrombolysis utilization rates in acute ischemic stroke to achieve population effects on disability: A discrete-event simulation model.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, Lorena; Lavados, Pablo M; Mar, Javier; Comas, Merce; Arrospide, Arantzazu; Castells, Xavier

    2016-06-15

    The only pharmacological treatment with proven cost-effectiveness in reducing acute ischemic stroke (AIS) associated disability is intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator but it's utilization rate is still low in most of the world. We estimated the minimum thrombolysis utilization rate needed to decrease the prevalence of stroke-related disability at a population level by using a discrete-event simulation model. The model included efficacy according to time to treatment up to 4.5h, and four scenarios for the utilization of intravenous thrombolysis in eligible patients with AIS: a) 2%; b) 12% c) 25% and d) 40%. We calculated the prevalence of AIS related disability in each scenario, using population based data. The simulation was performed from 2002 to 2017 using the ARENA software. A 2% utilization rate yielded a prevalence of disability of 359.1 per 100,000. Increasing thrombolysis to 12% avoided 779 disabled patients. If the utilization rate was increased to 25%, 1783 disabled patients would be avoided. The maximum scenario of 40% decreased disability to 335.7 per 100,000, avoiding 17% of AIS-related disability. The current utilization rate of intravenous thrombolysis of 2% has minimal population impact. Increasing the rate of utilization to more than 12% is the minimum to have a significant population effect on disability and should be a public policy aim. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Reducing Patient Waiting Times for Radiation Therapy and Improving the Treatment Planning Process: a Discrete-event Simulation Model (Radiation Treatment Planning).

    PubMed

    Babashov, V; Aivas, I; Begen, M A; Cao, J Q; Rodrigues, G; D'Souza, D; Lock, M; Zaric, G S

    2017-06-01

    We analysed the radiotherapy planning process at the London Regional Cancer Program to determine the bottlenecks and to quantify the effect of specific resource levels with the goal of reducing waiting times. We developed a discrete-event simulation model of a patient's journey from the point of referral to a radiation oncologist to the start of radiotherapy, considering the sequential steps and resources of the treatment planning process. We measured the effect of several resource changes on the ready-to-treat to treatment (RTTT) waiting time and on the percentage treated within a 14 calendar day target. Increasing the number of dosimetrists by one reduced the mean RTTT by 6.55%, leading to 84.92% of patients being treated within the 14 calendar day target. Adding one more oncologist decreased the mean RTTT from 10.83 to 10.55 days, whereas a 15% increase in arriving patients increased the waiting time by 22.53%. The model was relatively robust to the changes in quantity of other resources. Our model identified sensitive and non-sensitive system parameters. A similar approach could be applied by other cancer programmes, using their respective data and individualised adjustments, which may be beneficial in making the most effective use of limited resources. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chemical Dosing and First-Order Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hladky, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    College students encounter a variety of first-order phenomena in their mathematics and science courses. Introductory chemistry textbooks that discuss first-order processes, usually in conjunction with chemical kinetics or radioactive decay, stop at single, discrete dose events. Although single-dose situations are important, multiple-dose events,…

  2. Chemical Dosing and First-Order Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hladky, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    College students encounter a variety of first-order phenomena in their mathematics and science courses. Introductory chemistry textbooks that discuss first-order processes, usually in conjunction with chemical kinetics or radioactive decay, stop at single, discrete dose events. Although single-dose situations are important, multiple-dose events,…

  3. Discrete Event Simulation Model Decomposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    1100 NO=NO+1 1110 IF KTR=1 THEN 1220 1120 PRINT USING OTATS;OVS *1130 EP=INSTR(A$(I),")") 1140 CRSB $=MIDS(A$(I),MP+1,EP-MP-1) 1150 OPEN "TEMP.DAT" FOR...OUTPUT AS #2 1160 PRINT*2,OV$; r[t,; CRSB $;"I" 1170 CLOSE #2 1180 OPEN "TEMP.DAT" FOR INPUT AS #3 *1190 LINE INPUT#3,WM$(NODE,3,NO) 1200 CLOSE #3 1210

  4. Discrete Gauge Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Mark G.; March-Russell, John

    In this review we discuss the formulation and distinguishing characteristics of discrete gauge theories, and describe several important applications of the concept. For the abelian (ℤN) discrete gauge theories, we consider the construction of the discrete charge operator F(Σ*) and the associated gauge-invariant order parameter that distinguishes different Higgs phases of a spontaneously broken U(1) gauge theory. We sketch some of the important thermodynamic consequences of the resultant discrete quantum hair on black holes. We further show that, as a consequence of unbroken discrete gauge symmetries, Grand Unified cosmic strings generically exhibit a Callan-Rubakov effect. For non-abelian discrete gauge theories we discuss in some detail the charge measurement process, and in the context of a lattice formulation we construct the non-abelian generalization of F(Σ*). This enables us to build the order parameter that distinguishes the different Higgs phases of a non-abelian discrete lattice gauge theory with matter. We also describe some of the fascinating phenomena associated with non-abelian gauge vortices. For example, we argue that a loop of Alice string, or any non-abelian string, is super-conducting by virtue of charged zero modes whose charge cannot be localized anywhere on or around the string (“Cheshire charge”). Finally, we discuss the relationship between discrete gauge theories and the existence of excitations possessing exotic spin and statistics (and more generally excitations whose interactions are purely “topological”).

  5. Discontinuous isogeometric analysis methods for the first-order form of the neutron transport equation with discrete ordinate (SN) angular discretisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, A. R.; Welch, J. A.; Kópházi, J.; Eaton, M. D.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper two discontinuous Galerkin isogeometric analysis methods are developed and applied to the first-order form of the neutron transport equation with a discrete ordinate (SN) angular discretisation. The discontinuous Galerkin projection approach was taken on both an element level and the patch level for a given Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) patch. This paper describes the detailed dispersion analysis that has been used to analyse the numerical stability of both of these schemes. The convergence of the schemes for both smooth and non-smooth solutions was also investigated using the method of manufactured solutions (MMS) for multidimensional problems and a 1D semi-analytical benchmark whose solution contains a strongly discontinuous first derivative. This paper also investigates the challenges posed by strongly curved boundaries at both the NURBS element and patch level with several algorithms developed to deal with such cases. Finally numerical results are presented both for a simple pincell test problem as well as the C5G7 quarter core MOX/UOX small Light Water Reactor (LWR) benchmark problem. These numerical results produced by the isogeometric analysis (IGA) methods are compared and contrasted against linear and quadratic discontinuous Galerkin finite element (DGFEM) SN based methods.

  6. Characterizing storm-event nitrate fluxes in a fifth order suburbanizing watershed using in situ sensors.

    PubMed

    Carey, Richard O; Wollheim, Wilfred M; Mulukutla, Gopal K; Mineau, Madeleine M

    2014-07-15

    Land use influences the distribution of nonpoint nitrogen (N) sources in urbanizing watersheds and storm events interact with these heterogeneous sources to expedite N transport to aquatic systems. In situ sensors provide high frequency and continuous measurements that may reflect storm-event N variability more accurately compared to grab samples. We deployed sensors from April to December 2011 in a suburbanizing watershed (479 km2) to characterize storm-event nitrate-N (NO3-N) and conductivity variability. NO3-N concentrations exhibited complex patterns both within and across storms and shifted from overall dilution (source limitation) before summer baseflows to subsequent periods of flushing (transport limitation). In contrast, conductivity generally diluted with increasing runoff. Despite diluted NO3-N concentrations, NO3-N fluxes consistently increased with flow. Sensor flux estimates for the entire deployment period were similar to estimates derived from weekly and monthly grab samples. However, significant differences in flux occurred at monthly time scales, which may have important implications for understanding impacts to temporally sensitive receiving waters. Evidence of both supply (nutrient-poor) and transport (nutrient-rich) limitation patterns during storms is consistent with watersheds undergoing land use transitions. Tracking shifts in these patterns could indicate N accumulation in developing watersheds and help identify mitigation opportunities prior to N impairment.

  7. Evaluation of Control Strategies for Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) in Swine Breeding Herds Using a Discrete Event Agent-Based Model

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Andréia Gonçalves; Friendship, Robert; Carpenter, Jane; Greer, Amy; Poljak, Zvonimir

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a discrete event agent-based stochastic model to explore the likelihood of the occurrence of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) outbreaks in swine herds with different PRRS control measures in place. The control measures evaluated included vaccination with a modified-live attenuated vaccine and live-virus inoculation of gilts, and both were compared to a baseline scenario where no control measures were in place. A typical North American 1,000-sow farrow-to-wean swine herd was used as a model, with production and disease parameters estimated from the literature and expert opinion. The model constructed herein was not only able to capture individual animal heterogeneity in immunity to and shedding of the PRRS virus, but also the dynamic animal flow and contact structure typical in such herds under field conditions. The model outcomes included maximum number of females infected per simulation, and time at which that happened and the incidence of infected weaned piglets during the first year of challenge-virus introduction. Results showed that the baseline scenario produced a larger percentage of simulations resulting in outbreaks compared to the control scenarios, and interestingly some of the outbreaks occurred over long periods after virus introduction. The live-virus inoculation scenario showed promising results, with fewer simulations resulting in outbreaks than the other scenarios, but the negative impacts of maintaining a PRRS-positive population should be considered. Finally, under the assumptions of the current model, neither of the control strategies prevented the infection from spreading to the piglet population, which highlights the importance of maintaining internal biosecurity practices at the farrowing room level. PMID:27875546

  8. A discrete event simulation to model the cost-utility of fingolimod and natalizumab in rapidly evolving severe relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in the UK.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Stephen M; Maruszczak, Maciej J; Slater, David; Kusel, Jeanette; Nicholas, Richard; Adlard, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Two disease-modifying therapies are licensed in the EU for use in rapidly-evolving severe (RES) relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), fingolimod and natalizumab. Here a discrete event simulation (DES) model to analyze the cost-effectiveness of natalizumab and fingolimod in the RES population, from the perspective of the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK, is reported. A DES model was developed to track individual RES patients, based on Expanded Disability Status Scale scores. Individual patient characteristics were taken from the RES sub-groups of the pivotal trials for fingolimod. Utility data were in line with previous models. Published costs were inflated to NHS cost year 2015. Owing to the confidential patient access scheme (PAS) discount applied to fingolimod in the UK, a range of discount levels were applied to the fingolimod list price, to capture the likelihood of natalizumab being cost-effective in a real-world setting. At the lower National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) threshold of £20,000/quality-adjusted life year (QALY), fingolimod only required a discount greater than 0.8% of list price to be cost-effective. At the upper threshold of £30,000/QALY employed by the NICE, fingolimod was cost-effective if the confidential discount is greater than 2.5%. Sensitivity analyses conducted using fingolimod list-price showed the model to be most sensitive to changes in the cost of each drug, particularly fingolimod. The DES model shows that only a modest discount to the UK fingolimod list-price is required to make fingolimod a more cost-effective option than natalizumab in RES RRMS.

  9. Budget Impact Analysis of Switching to Digital Mammography in a Population-Based Breast Cancer Screening Program: A Discrete Event Simulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Comas, Mercè; Arrospide, Arantzazu; Mar, Javier; Sala, Maria; Vilaprinyó, Ester; Hernández, Cristina; Cots, Francesc; Martínez, Juan; Castells, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the budgetary impact of switching from screen-film mammography to full-field digital mammography in a population-based breast cancer screening program. Methods A discrete-event simulation model was built to reproduce the breast cancer screening process (biennial mammographic screening of women aged 50 to 69 years) combined with the natural history of breast cancer. The simulation started with 100,000 women and, during a 20-year simulation horizon, new women were dynamically entered according to the aging of the Spanish population. Data on screening were obtained from Spanish breast cancer screening programs. Data on the natural history of breast cancer were based on US data adapted to our population. A budget impact analysis comparing digital with screen-film screening mammography was performed in a sample of 2,000 simulation runs. A sensitivity analysis was performed for crucial screening-related parameters. Distinct scenarios for recall and detection rates were compared. Results Statistically significant savings were found for overall costs, treatment costs and the costs of additional tests in the long term. The overall cost saving was 1,115,857€ (95%CI from 932,147 to 1,299,567) in the 10th year and 2,866,124€ (95%CI from 2,492,610 to 3,239,638) in the 20th year, representing 4.5% and 8.1% of the overall cost associated with screen-film mammography. The sensitivity analysis showed net savings in the long term. Conclusions Switching to digital mammography in a population-based breast cancer screening program saves long-term budget expense, in addition to providing technical advantages. Our results were consistent across distinct scenarios representing the different results obtained in European breast cancer screening programs. PMID:24832200

  10. Expected lifetime numbers and costs of fractures in postmenopausal women with and without osteoporosis in Germany: a discrete event simulation model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoporotic fractures cause a large health burden and substantial costs. This study estimated the expected fracture numbers and costs for the remaining lifetime of postmenopausal women in Germany. Methods A discrete event simulation (DES) model which tracks changes in fracture risk due to osteoporosis, a previous fracture or institutionalization in a nursing home was developed. Expected lifetime fracture numbers and costs per capita were estimated for postmenopausal women (aged 50 and older) at average osteoporosis risk (AOR) and for those never suffering from osteoporosis. Direct and indirect costs were modeled. Deterministic univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted. Results The expected fracture numbers over the remaining lifetime of a 50 year old woman with AOR for each fracture type (% attributable to osteoporosis) were: hip 0.282 (57.9%), wrist 0.229 (18.2%), clinical vertebral 0.206 (39.2%), humerus 0.147 (43.5%), pelvis 0.105 (47.5%), and other femur 0.033 (52.1%). Expected discounted fracture lifetime costs (excess cost attributable to osteoporosis) per 50 year old woman with AOR amounted to €4,479 (€1,995). Most costs were accrued in the hospital €1,743 (€751) and long-term care sectors €1,210 (€620). Univariate sensitivity analysis resulted in percentage changes between -48.4% (if fracture rates decreased by 2% per year) and +83.5% (if fracture rates increased by 2% per year) compared to base case excess costs. Costs for women with osteoporosis were about 3.3 times of those never getting osteoporosis (€7,463 vs. €2,247), and were markedly increased for women with a previous fracture. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that osteoporosis causes a substantial share of fracture costs in postmenopausal women, which strongly increase with age and previous fractures. PMID:24981316

  11. Impact of wait times on the effectiveness of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in severe aortic valve disease: a discrete event simulation model.

    PubMed

    Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Wong, William W L; Bennell, Maria C; Fremes, Stephen E; Radhakrishnan, Sam; Peterson, Mark; Ko, Dennis T

    2014-10-01

    There is increasing demand for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) as the primary treatment option for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are high-risk surgical candidates or inoperable. We used mathematical simulation models to estimate the hypothetical effectiveness of TAVR with increasing wait times. We applied discrete event modelling, using data from the Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves (PARTNER) trials. We compared TAVR with medical therapy in the inoperable cohort, and compared TAVR to conventional aortic valve surgery in the high-risk cohort. One-year mortality and wait-time deaths were calculated in different scenarios by varying TAVR wait times from 10 days to 180 days, while maintaining a constant wait time for surgery at a mean of 15.6 days. In the inoperable cohort, the 1-year mortality for medical therapy was 50%. When the TAVR wait time was 10 days, the TAVR wait-time mortality was 1.9% with a 1-year mortality of 31.5%. TAVR wait-time deaths increased to 28.9% with a 180-day wait, with a 1-year mortality of 41.4%. In the high-risk cohort, the wait-time deaths and 1-year mortality for the surgical patients were 2.5% and 27%, respectively. The TAVR wait-time deaths increased from 2.2% with a 10-day wait to 22.4% with a 180-day wait, and a corresponding increase in 1-year mortality from 24.5% to 32.6%. Mortality with TAVR exceeded surgery when TAVR wait times exceeded 60 days. Modest increases in TAVR wait times have a substantial effect on the effectiveness of TAVR in inoperable patients and high-risk surgical candidates. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Expected lifetime numbers and costs of fractures in postmenopausal women with and without osteoporosis in Germany: a discrete event simulation model.

    PubMed

    Bleibler, Florian; Rapp, Kilian; Jaensch, Andrea; Becker, Clemens; König, Hans-Helmut

    2014-06-30

    Osteoporotic fractures cause a large health burden and substantial costs. This study estimated the expected fracture numbers and costs for the remaining lifetime of postmenopausal women in Germany. A discrete event simulation (DES) model which tracks changes in fracture risk due to osteoporosis, a previous fracture or institutionalization in a nursing home was developed. Expected lifetime fracture numbers and costs per capita were estimated for postmenopausal women (aged 50 and older) at average osteoporosis risk (AOR) and for those never suffering from osteoporosis. Direct and indirect costs were modeled. Deterministic univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted. The expected fracture numbers over the remaining lifetime of a 50 year old woman with AOR for each fracture type (% attributable to osteoporosis) were: hip 0.282 (57.9%), wrist 0.229 (18.2%), clinical vertebral 0.206 (39.2%), humerus 0.147 (43.5%), pelvis 0.105 (47.5%), and other femur 0.033 (52.1%). Expected discounted fracture lifetime costs (excess cost attributable to osteoporosis) per 50 year old woman with AOR amounted to € 4,479 (€ 1,995). Most costs were accrued in the hospital € 1,743 (€ 751) and long-term care sectors € 1,210 (€ 620). Univariate sensitivity analysis resulted in percentage changes between -48.4% (if fracture rates decreased by 2% per year) and +83.5% (if fracture rates increased by 2% per year) compared to base case excess costs. Costs for women with osteoporosis were about 3.3 times of those never getting osteoporosis (€ 7,463 vs. € 2,247), and were markedly increased for women with a previous fracture. The results of this study indicate that osteoporosis causes a substantial share of fracture costs in postmenopausal women, which strongly increase with age and previous fractures.

  13. "Before" and "after": Investigating the relationship between temporal connectives and chronological ordering using event-related potentials

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Ming; Almeida, Diogo

    2017-01-01

    Sentence-initial temporal clauses headed by before, as in "Before the scientist submitted the paper, the journal changed its policy", have been shown to elicit sustained negative-going brain potentials compared to maximally similar clauses headed by after, as in "After the scientist submitted the paper, the journal changed its policy". Such effects may be due to either one of two potential causes: before clauses may be more difficult than after clauses because they cause the two events in the sentence to be mentioned in an order opposite the order in which they actually occurred, or they may be more difficult because they are ambiguous with regard to whether the event described in the clause actually happened. The present study examined the effect of before and after clauses on sentence processing in both sentence-initial contexts, like those above, and in sentence-final contexts ("The journal changed its policy before/after the scientist submitted the paper"), where an order-of-mention account of the sustained negativity predicts a negativity for after relative to before. There was indeed such a reversal, with before eliciting more negative brain potentials than after in sentence-initial clauses but more positive in sentence-final clauses. The results suggest that the sustained negativity indexes processing costs related to comprehending events that were mentioned out of order. PMID:28369132

  14. "Before" and "after": Investigating the relationship between temporal connectives and chronological ordering using event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Politzer-Ahles, Stephen; Xiang, Ming; Almeida, Diogo

    2017-01-01

    Sentence-initial temporal clauses headed by before, as in "Before the scientist submitted the paper, the journal changed its policy", have been shown to elicit sustained negative-going brain potentials compared to maximally similar clauses headed by after, as in "After the scientist submitted the paper, the journal changed its policy". Such effects may be due to either one of two potential causes: before clauses may be more difficult than after clauses because they cause the two events in the sentence to be mentioned in an order opposite the order in which they actually occurred, or they may be more difficult because they are ambiguous with regard to whether the event described in the clause actually happened. The present study examined the effect of before and after clauses on sentence processing in both sentence-initial contexts, like those above, and in sentence-final contexts ("The journal changed its policy before/after the scientist submitted the paper"), where an order-of-mention account of the sustained negativity predicts a negativity for after relative to before. There was indeed such a reversal, with before eliciting more negative brain potentials than after in sentence-initial clauses but more positive in sentence-final clauses. The results suggest that the sustained negativity indexes processing costs related to comprehending events that were mentioned out of order.

  15. Age-related differences on a new test of temporal order memory for everyday events.

    PubMed

    Seewald, P Michelle; De Jesus, Shannon Y; Graves, Lisa V; Moreno, Charles C; Mattson, Sarah N; Gilbert, Paul E

    2017-03-07

    We developed a new test to examine incidental temporal order memory for a self-generated sequence of tasks one might complete in everyday life. Young and older adults were given 10 cards, each listing a task one might accomplish in a typical day. Participants were asked to self-generate a "to do" list by placing the 10 cards in a sequence representing the order in which they would accomplish the tasks, but were not informed of a subsequent memory test. We assessed immediate free recall, delayed free recall, and delayed cued recall for the order of the tasks in the sequence. Older adults were significantly impaired relative to young adults on immediate free recall, delayed free recall, and delayed cued recall. Correlation analyses with standardized neuropsychological tests provide preliminary evidence for construct validity for our test, which is portable and can be rapidly administered in clinical or laboratory settings.

  16. Reduced-Order Modeling and Wavelet Analysis of Turbofan Engine Structural Response Due to Foreign Object Damage "FOD" Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James A.; Lawrence, Charles; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a wavelet-based feature extraction technique specifically targeting FOD-event induced vibration signal changes in gas turbine engines is described. The technique performs wavelet analysis of accelerometer signals from specified locations on the engine and is shown to be robust in the presence of significant process and sensor noise. It is envisioned that the technique will be combined with Kalman filter thermal/ health parameter estimation for FOD-event detection via information fusion from these (and perhaps other) sources. Due to the lack of high-frequency FOD-event test data in the open literature, a reduced-order turbofan structural model (ROM) was synthesized from a finite-element model modal analysis to support the investigation. In addition to providing test data for algorithm development, the ROM is used to determine the optimal sensor location for FOD-event detection. In the presence of significant noise, precise location of the FOD event in time was obtained using the developed wavelet-based feature.

  17. Reduced-Order Modeling and Wavelet Analysis of Turbofan Engine Structural Response Due to Foreign Object Damage "FOD" Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James A.; Lawrence, Charles; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a wavelet-based feature extraction technique specifically targeting FOD-event induced vibration signal changes in gas turbine engines is described. The technique performs wavelet analysis of accelerometer signals from specified locations on the engine and is shown to be robust in the presence of significant process and sensor noise. It is envisioned that the technique will be combined with Kalman filter thermal/ health parameter estimation for FOD-event detection via information fusion from these (and perhaps other) sources. Due to the lack of high-frequency FOD-event test data in the open literature, a reduced-order turbofan structural model (ROM) was synthesized from a finite-element model modal analysis to support the investigation. In addition to providing test data for algorithm development, the ROM is used to determine the optimal sensor location for FOD-event detection. In the presence of significant noise, precise location of the FOD event in time was obtained using the developed wavelet-based feature.

  18. Reduced-Order Modeling and Wavelet Analysis of Turbofan Engine Structural Response Due to Foreign Object Damage (FOD) Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James; Lawrence, Charles; Litt, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    The development of a wavelet-based feature extraction technique specifically targeting FOD-event induced vibration signal changes in gas turbine engines is described. The technique performs wavelet analysis of accelerometer signals from specified locations on the engine and is shown to be robust in the presence of significant process and sensor noise. It is envisioned that the technique will be combined with Kalman filter thermal/health parameter estimation for FOD-event detection via information fusion from these (and perhaps other) sources. Due to the lack of high-frequency FOD-event test data in the open literature, a reduced-order turbofan structural model (ROM) was synthesized from a finite element model modal analysis to support the investigation. In addition to providing test data for algorithm development, the ROM is used to determine the optimal sensor location for FOD-event detection. In the presence of significant noise, precise location of the FOD event in time was obtained using the developed wavelet-based feature.

  19. Event-related potentials index cognitive style differences during a serial-order recall task.

    PubMed

    Goode, Patrick E; Goddard, Phil H; Pascual-Leone, Juan

    2002-02-01

    Working memory and attentional inhibition processes (jointly symbolized here as WM/I) have been proposed to explain cognitive style differences in Field Dependence-Independence (FDI). FI relative to FD subjects have been found to use more effectively WM/I to operate on task-relevant information. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cognitive style differences are revealed as differences in ERP activity in a novel WM/I task. A serial-order recall task served to manipulate memory load by varying the amount and kind of information to be elaborated and retained in WM in order of temporal appearance (S1, S2); recall demand of the serial-order judgment (S3) was also concurrently varied. FI subjects engaged in deeper WM processing during the high memory load conditions relative to FD subjects; and this was measured as a higher amplitude slow negative wave (SNW), over the centro-parietal scalp extending to the frontal scalp, during the retention interval. In contrast, P300 amplitude was larger for FD subjects in the high memory load conditions following S1, which corresponded with a reduced amplitude SNW. We suggest that inhibitory processes indexed by P300, which FD subjects must mobilize to change their usually global-perceptual (i.e. shallow) attentional strategy for processing task information, may have resulted in less mental-attentional (WM/I) resources available to them during the task's retention phase (Rosen and Engle, 1997). Thus, ERP methods can be used to investigate differences in cognitive style.

  20. Arousal transitions in sleep, wakefulness, and anesthesia are characterized by an orderly sequence of cortical events.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Yanagawa, Toru; Leopold, David A; Chang, Catie; Ishida, Hiroaki; Fujii, Naotaka; Duyn, Jeff H

    2015-08-01

    Many aspects of brain function are influenced by modulatory processes, including arousal. The most abrupt changes in arousal occur at the wake-sleep transition and at the induction of anesthetic conditions. They are accompanied by major electrophysiological changes, including an emergence of low-frequency (sleep-like) activity and a loss of mid-frequency (wake-like) activity that has been linked to feedback processes of the brain. Nevertheless, the causal relationship between these two types of electrophysiological changes, as well as the cortical mechanisms underlying changes in arousal and consciousness, remain poorly understood. To address this, we studied spontaneous electro-cortical activity during arousal changes in macaques. During sleep and at loss of consciousness induced by propofol anesthesia, we identified a prototypical sequence of cortical events in which the loss of mid-frequency activity preceded, by seconds, the increases in low-frequency activity. Furthermore, in visual areas, an influence of mid-frequency change onto high-frequency activity was observed across visual hierarchy. These results are consistent with the notion that drops in arousal and consciousness are facilitated by a release of feedback cortical inhibition.

  1. Arousal Transitions in Sleep, Wakefulness, and Anesthesia are Characterized by an Orderly Sequence of Cortical Events

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Yanagawa, Toru; Leopold, David A.; Chang, Catie; Ishida, Hiroaki; Fujii, Naotaka; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2015-01-01

    Many aspects of brain function are influenced by modulatory processes, including arousal. The most abrupt changes in arousal occur at the wake-sleep transition and at the induction of anesthetic conditions. They are accompanied by major electrophysiological changes, including an emergence of low-frequency (sleep-like) activity and a loss of mid-frequency (wake-like) activity that has been linked to feedback processes of the brain. Nevertheless, the causal relationship between these two types of electrophysiological changes, as well as the cortical mechanisms underlying changes in arousal and consciousness, remain poorly understood. To address this, we studied spontaneous electro-cortical activity during arousal changes in macaques. During sleep and at loss of consciousness induced by propofol anesthesia, we identified a prototypical sequence of cortical events in which the loss of mid-frequency activity preceded, by seconds, the increases in low-frequency activity. Furthermore, in visual areas, an influence of mid-frequency change onto high-frequency activity was observed across visual hierarchy. These results are consistent with the notion that drops in arousal and consciousness are facilitated by a release of feedback cortical inhibition. PMID:25865143

  2. Degassing and magma mixing during the eruption of Surtsey Volcano (Iceland, 1963-1967): the signatures of a dynamic and discrete rift propagation event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schipper, C. Ian; Le Voyer, Marion; Moussallam, Yves; White, James D. L.; Thordarson, Thor; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Chang, Qing

    2016-04-01

    /1965 gases extremely well, but cannot account for the oxidized gases emitted in 1967, which may have been contaminated by ambient air in a system that was opening as the eruption waned. Surtsey's pyroclastic resurgence can be explained by recharge from ephemeral and compositionally heterogeneous magma bodies, tapped from possibly as deep as the mantle-crust boundary, in a process consistent with the progressively increasing interconnection between magma bodies that is typical at propagating rift tips. The eruption of Surtsey therefore shows that magma system evolution at rift tips can occur in dynamic and discrete events, with influx of new magma having explosive consequences.

  3. A discrete event simulation model of clinical and operating room efficiency outcomes of sugammadex versus neostigmine for neuromuscular block reversal in Canada.

    PubMed

    Insinga, Ralph P; Joyal, Cédric; Goyette, Alexandra; Galarneau, André

    2016-11-16

    The objective of this analysis is to explore potential impact on operating room (OR) efficiency and incidence of residual neuromuscular blockade (RNMB) with use of sugammadex (Bridion™, Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ USA) versus neostigmine for neuromuscular block reversal in Canada. A discrete event simulation (DES) model was developed to compare ORs using either neostigmine or sugammadex for NMB reversal over one month. Selected inputs included OR procedure and turnover times, hospital policies for paid staff overtime and procedural cancellations due to OR time over-run, and reductions in RNMB and associated complications with sugammadex use. Trials show sugammadex's impact on OR time and RNMB varies by whether full neuromuscular recovery (train-of-four ratio ≥0.9) is verified prior to extubation in the OR. Scenarios were therefore evaluated reflecting varied assumptions for neuromuscular reversal practices. With use of moderate neuromuscular block, when full neuromuscular recovery is verified prior to extubation (93 procedures performed with sugammadex, 91 with neostigmine), use of sugammadex versus neostigmine avoided 2.4 procedural cancellations due to OR time over-run and 33.5 h of paid staff overtime, while saving an average of 62 min per OR day. No difference was observed between comparators for these endpoints in the scenario when full neuromuscular recovery was not verified prior to extubation, however, per procedure risk of RNMB at extubation was reduced from 60% to 4% (reflecting 51 cases prevented), with associated reductions in risks of hypoxemia (12 cases avoided) and upper airway obstruction (23 cases avoided). Sugammadex impact in reversing deep neuromuscular block was evaluated in an exploratory analysis. When it was hypothetically assumed that 30 min of OR time were saved per procedure, the number of paid hours of staff over-time dropped from 84.1 to 32.0, with a 93% reduction in the per patient risk of residual blockade. In clinical

  4. Statistical Methods in Ai: Rare Event Learning Using Associative Rules and Higher-Order Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, V.; Shetty, S.; Iyengar, S. S.

    2015-07-01

    Rare event learning has not been actively researched since lately due to the unavailability of algorithms which deal with big samples. The research addresses spatio-temporal streams from multi-resolution sensors to find actionable items from a perspective of real-time algorithms. This computing framework is independent of the number of input samples, application domain, labelled or label-less streams. A sampling overlap algorithm such as Brooks-Iyengar is used for dealing with noisy sensor streams. We extend the existing noise pre-processing algorithms using Data-Cleaning trees. Pre-processing using ensemble of trees using bagging and multi-target regression showed robustness to random noise and missing data. As spatio-temporal streams are highly statistically correlated, we prove that a temporal window based sampling from sensor data streams converges after n samples using Hoeffding bounds. Which can be used for fast prediction of new samples in real-time. The Data-cleaning tree model uses a nonparametric node splitting technique, which can be learned in an iterative way which scales linearly in memory consumption for any size input stream. The improved task based ensemble extraction is compared with non-linear computation models using various SVM kernels for speed and accuracy. We show using empirical datasets the explicit rule learning computation is linear in time and is only dependent on the number of leafs present in the tree ensemble. The use of unpruned trees (t) in our proposed ensemble always yields minimum number (m) of leafs keeping pre-processing computation to n × t log m compared to N2 for Gram Matrix. We also show that the task based feature induction yields higher Qualify of Data (QoD) in the feature space compared to kernel methods using Gram Matrix.

  5. An essay on discrete foundations for physics

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P.; McGoveran, D.O.

    1988-07-01

    We base our theory of physics and cosmology on the five principles of finiteness, discreteness, finite computability, absolute non-uniqueness, and strict construction. Our modeling methodology starts from the current practice of physics, constructs a self-consistent representation based on the ordering operator calculus and provides rules of correspondence that allow us to test the theory by experiment. We use program universe to construct a growing collection of bit strings whose initial portions (labels) provide the quantum numbers that are conserved in the events defined by the construction. The labels are followed by content strings which are used to construct event-based finite and discrete coordinates. On general grounds such a theory has a limiting velocity, and positions and velocities do not commute. We therefore reconcile quantum mechanics with relativity at an appropriately fundamental stage in the construction. We show that events in different coordinate systems are connected by the appropriate finite and discrete version of the Lorentz transformation, that 3-momentum is conserved in events, and that this conservation law is the same as the requirement that different paths can ''interfere'' only when they differ by an integral number of deBroglie wavelengths. 38 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. An essay on discrete foundations for physics

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P.; McGoveran, D.O.

    1988-10-05

    We base our theory of physics and cosmology on the five principles of finiteness, discreteness, finite computability, absolute non- uniqueness, and strict construction. Our modeling methodology starts from the current practice of physics, constructs a self-consistent representation based on the ordering operator calculus and provides rules of correspondence that allow us to test the theory by experiment. We use program universe to construct a growing collection of bit strings whose initial portions (labels) provide the quantum numbers that are conserved in the events defined by the construction. The labels are followed by content strings which are used to construct event-based finite and discrete coordinates. On general grounds such a theory has a limiting velocity, and positions and velocities do not commute. We therefore reconcile quantum mechanics with relativity at an appropriately fundamental stage in the construction. We show that events in different coordinate systems are connected by the appropriate finite and discrete version of the Lorentz transformation, that 3-momentum is conserved in events, and that this conservation law is the same as the requirement that different paths can ''interfere'' only when they differ by an integral number of deBroglie wavelengths. 38 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Event detection and sub-state discovery from biomolecular simulations using higher-order statistics: application to enzyme adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Savol, Andrej J; Agarwal, Pratul K; Chennubhotla, Chakra S

    2012-11-01

    Biomolecular simulations at millisecond and longer time-scales can provide vital insights into functional mechanisms. Because post-simulation analyses of such large trajectory datasets can be a limiting factor in obtaining biological insights, there is an emerging need to identify key dynamical events and relating these events to the biological function online, that is, as simulations are progressing. Recently, we have introduced a novel computational technique, quasi-anharmonic analysis (QAA) (Ramanathan et al., PLoS One 2011;6:e15827), for partitioning the conformational landscape into a hierarchy of functionally relevant sub-states. The unique capabilities of QAA are enabled by exploiting anharmonicity in the form of fourth-order statistics for characterizing atomic fluctuations. In this article, we extend QAA for analyzing long time-scale simulations online. In particular, we present HOST4MD--a higher-order statistical toolbox for molecular dynamics simulations, which (1) identifies key dynamical events as simulations are in progress, (2) explores potential sub-states, and (3) identifies conformational transitions that enable the protein to access those sub-states. We demonstrate HOST4MD on microsecond timescale simulations of the enzyme adenylate kinase in its apo state. HOST4MD identifies several conformational events in these simulations, revealing how the intrinsic coupling between the three subdomains (LID, CORE, and NMP) changes during the simulations. Further, it also identifies an inherent asymmetry in the opening/closing of the two binding sites. We anticipate that HOST4MD will provide a powerful and extensible framework for detecting biophysically relevant conformational coordinates from long time-scale simulations.

  8. Single-Event Upset Characterization of Common First- and Second-Order All-Digital Phase-Locked Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. P.; Massengill, L. W.; Kauppila, J. S.; Bhuva, B. L.; Holman, W. T.; Loveless, T. D.

    2017-08-01

    The single-event upset (SEU) vulnerability of common first- and second-order all-digital-phase-locked loops (ADPLLs) is investigated through field-programmable gate array-based fault injection experiments. SEUs in the highest order pole of the loop filter and fraction-based phase detectors (PDs) may result in the worst case error response, i.e., limit cycle errors, often requiring system restart. SEUs in integer-based linear PDs may result in loss-of-lock errors, while SEUs in bang-bang PDs only result in temporary-frequency errors. ADPLLs with the same frequency tuning range but fewer bits in the control word exhibit better overall SEU performance.

  9. Can Utilizing a Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) System Prevent Hospital Medical Errors and Adverse Drug Events?

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Krista; Cannon, Margaret; Hall, Robert; Coustasse, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems allow physicians to prescribe patient services electronically. In hospitals, CPOE essentially eliminates the need for handwritten paper orders and achieves cost savings through increased efficiency. The purpose of this research study was to examine the benefits of and barriers to CPOE adoption in hospitals to determine the effects on medical errors and adverse drug events (ADEs) and examine cost and savings associated with the implementation of this newly mandated technology. This study followed a methodology using the basic principles of a systematic review and referenced 50 sources. CPOE systems in hospitals were found to be capable of reducing medical errors and ADEs, especially when CPOE systems are bundled with clinical decision support systems designed to alert physicians and other healthcare providers of pending lab or medical errors. However, CPOE systems face major barriers associated with adoption in a hospital system, mainly high implementation costs and physicians’ resistance to change. PMID:25593568

  10. Can utilizing a computerized provider order entry (CPOE) system prevent hospital medical errors and adverse drug events?

    PubMed

    Charles, Krista; Cannon, Margaret; Hall, Robert; Coustasse, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems allow physicians to prescribe patient services electronically. In hospitals, CPOE essentially eliminates the need for handwritten paper orders and achieves cost savings through increased efficiency. The purpose of this research study was to examine the benefits of and barriers to CPOE adoption in hospitals to determine the effects on medical errors and adverse drug events (ADEs) and examine cost and savings associated with the implementation of this newly mandated technology. This study followed a methodology using the basic principles of a systematic review and referenced 50 sources. CPOE systems in hospitals were found to be capable of reducing medical errors and ADEs, especially when CPOE systems are bundled with clinical decision support systems designed to alert physicians and other healthcare providers of pending lab or medical errors. However, CPOE systems face major barriers associated with adoption in a hospital system, mainly high implementation costs and physicians' resistance to change.

  11. Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxley, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The article gives ideas that lecturers of undergraduate Discrete Mathematics courses can use in order to make the subject more interesting for students and encourage them to undertake further studies in the subject. It is possible to teach Discrete Mathematics with little or no reference to computing. However, students are more likely to be…

  12. Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxley, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The article gives ideas that lecturers of undergraduate Discrete Mathematics courses can use in order to make the subject more interesting for students and encourage them to undertake further studies in the subject. It is possible to teach Discrete Mathematics with little or no reference to computing. However, students are more likely to be…

  13. Retrieval of Episodic versus Generic Information: Does the Order of Recall Affect the Amount and Accuracy of Details Reported by Children about Repeated Events?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brubacher, Sonja P.; Roberts, Kim P.; Powell, Martine

    2012-01-01

    Children (N = 157) 4 to 8 years old participated 1 time (single) or 4 times (repeated) in an interactive event. Across each condition, half were questioned a week later about the only or a specific occurrence of the event ("depth first") and then about what usually happens. Half were prompted in the reverse order ("breadth first"). Children with…

  14. E. coli Resuspension During an Artificial High-flow Event in a Small First-order Creek

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachepsky, Y. A.; Guber, A. K.; Shelton, D. R.; Hill, R. L.

    2009-04-01

    Stream, pond, and lake sediments can serve as environmental reservoirs for E. coli, including pathogenic strains. Substantial increases in E. coli concentrations observed in stream water during rainfall events are often attributed exclusively to runoff from agricultural fields, pastures, and riparian areas. However, this increase can, to various extents, be caused by the resuspension of E. coli from sediment. The separation of runoff vs. sediment E. coli sources is not possible based exclusively on creek water sampling during natural rainfalls. The objectives of this work were (a) to create and monitor an artificial high-flow event that would cause E. coli concentration changes solely due to resuspension and settling, (b) to develop a model of E. coli transport in creek water as affected by resuspension and settling. The study site, at the USDA-Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, is in the mid-Atlantic coastal plain of Maryland. The site contains a small first-order stream that is instrumented with four stations for monitoring stream flow and bacteria concentrations. The creek runs within a riparian corridor of variable width from about 65 m at its narrowest point, to more than 100 m. The creek bed is from 100 to 150 cm wide. Prior to the high-flow experiment, the creek sediment was grab-sampled weekly for 2 months for E. coli concentrations at three locations downstream from stations 1, 2 and 4. Time and sample position across the creek were not significant factors affecting E. coli concentrations in sediment; location along the creek was a significant factor. Initial E. coli concentrations in top 1 cm (just prior to flow) averaged 4500, 2500, and 500 cell per g of sediment at locations 1 and 2 and 4, respectively. The E. coli concentrations in sediments decreased exponentially with depth by about one order of magnitude per 2 cm. The artificial flow event was created by releasing 80 tons of tap water on a tarp-covered stream bank at 11 m above the station 1

  15. A comprehensive comparison between thermodynamic perturbation theory and first-order mean spherical approximation: Based on discrete potentials with hard core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiqi; Zhou, Run

    2017-08-01

    Using the TL (Tang and Lu, 1993) method, Ornstein-Zernike integral equation is solved perturbatively under the mean spherical approximation (MSA) for fluid with potential consisting of a hard sphere plus square-well plus square-shoulder (HS + SW + SS) to obtain first-order analytic expressions of radial distribution function (RDF), second-order direct correlation function, and semi-analytic expressions for common thermodynamic properties. A comprehensive comparison between the first-order MSA and high temperature series expansion (HTSE) to third-, fifth- and seventh-order is performed over a wide parameter range for both a HS + SW and the HS + SW + SS model fluids by using corresponding ;exact; Monte Carlo results as a reference; although the HTSE is carried out up to seventh-order, and not to the first order as the first-order MSA the comparison is considered fair from a calculation complexity perspective. It is found that the performance of the first-order MSA is dramatically model-dependent: as target potentials go from the HS + SW to the HS + SW + SS, (i) there is a dramatic dropping of performance of the first-order MSA expressions in calculating the thermodynamic properties, especially both the excess internal energy and constant volume excess heat capacity of the HS + SW + SS model cannot be predicted even qualitatively correctly. (ii) One tendency is noticed that the first-order MSA gets more reliable with increasing temperatures in dealing with the pressure, excess Helmholtz free energy, excess enthalpy and excess chemical potential. (iii) Concerning the RDF, the first-order MSA is not as disappointing as it displays in the cases of thermodynamics. (iv) In the case of the HS + SW model, the first-order MSA solution is shown to be quantitatively correct in calculating the pressure and excess chemical potential even if the reduced temperatures are as low as 0.8. On the other hand, the seventh-order HTSE is less model-dependent; in most cases of the HS + SW

  16. Sound Classification and Call Discrimination Are Decoded in Order as Revealed by Event-Related Potential Components in Frogs.

    PubMed

    Fang, Guangzhan; Yang, Ping; Xue, Fei; Cui, Jianguo; Brauth, Steven E; Tang, Yezhong

    2015-01-01

    Species that use communication sounds to coordinate social and reproductive behavior must be able to distinguish vocalizations from nonvocal sounds as well as to identify individual vocalization types. In this study we sought to identify the neural localization of the processes involved and the temporal order in which they occur in an anuran species, the music frog Babina daunchina. To do this we measured telencephalic and mesencephalic event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by synthesized white noise (WN), highly sexually attractive (HSA) calls produced by males from inside nests and male calls of low sexual attractiveness (LSA) produced outside of nests. Each stimulus possessed similar temporal structures. The results showed the following: (1) the amplitudes of the first negative ERP component (N1) at ∼ 100 ms differed significantly between WN and conspecific calls but not between HSA and LSA calls, indicating that discrimination between conspecific calls and nonvocal sounds occurs in ∼ 100 ms, (2) the amplitudes of the second positive ERP component (P2) at ∼ 200 ms in the difference waves between HSA calls and WN were significantly higher than between LSA calls and WN in the right telencephalon, implying that call characteristic identification occurs in ∼ 200 ms and (3) WN evoked a larger third positive ERP component (P3) at ∼ 300 ms than conspecific calls, suggesting the frogs had classified the conspecific calls into one category and perceived WN as novel. Thus, both the detection of sounds and the identification of call characteristics are accomplished quickly in a specific temporal order, as reflected by ERP components. In addition, the most dynamic ERP patterns appeared in the left mesencephalon and the right telencephalon, indicating the two brain regions might play key roles in anuran vocal communication. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Umbral Deformations on Discrete SPACE TIME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachos, Cosmas K.

    Given a minimum measurable length underlying spacetime, the latter may be effectively regarded as discrete, at scales of order the Planck length. A systematic discretization of continuum physics may be effected most efficiently through the umbral deformation. General functionals yielding such deformations at the level of solutions are furnished and illustrated, and broad features of discrete oscillations and wave propagation are outlined.

  18. Advance Liquid Metal Reactor Discrete Dynamic Event Tree/Bayesian Network Analysis and Incident Management Guidelines (Risk Management for Sodium Fast Reactors)

    SciTech Connect

    Denman, Matthew R.; Groth, Katrina M.; Cardoni, Jeffrey N.; Wheeler, Timothy A.

    2015-04-01

    Accident management is an important component to maintaining risk at acceptable levels for all complex systems, such as nuclear power plants. With the introduction of self-correcting, or inherently safe, reactor designs the focus has shifted from management by operators to allowing the system's design to manage the accident. Inherently and passively safe designs are laudable, but nonetheless extreme boundary conditions can interfere with the design attributes which facilitate inherent safety, thus resulting in unanticipated and undesirable end states. This report examines an inherently safe and small sodium fast reactor experiencing a beyond design basis seismic event with the intend of exploring two issues : (1) can human intervention either improve or worsen the potential end states and (2) can a Bayesian Network be constructed to infer the state of the reactor to inform (1). ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to acknowledge the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy for funding this research through Work Package SR-14SN100303 under the Advanced Reactor Concepts program. The authors also acknowledge the PRA teams at Argonne National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Idaho National Laboratory for their continue d contributions to the advanced reactor PRA mission area.

  19. Discrete minimal flavor violation

    SciTech Connect

    Zwicky, Roman; Fischbacher, Thomas

    2009-10-01

    We investigate the consequences of replacing the global flavor symmetry of minimal flavor violation (MFV) SU(3){sub Q}xSU(3){sub U}xSU(3){sub D}x{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot} by a discrete D{sub Q}xD{sub U}xD{sub D}x{center_dot}{center_dot}{center_dot} symmetry. Goldstone bosons resulting from the breaking of the flavor symmetry generically lead to bounds on new flavor structure many orders of magnitude above the TeV scale. The absence of Goldstone bosons for discrete symmetries constitute the primary motivation of our work. Less symmetry implies further invariants and renders the mass-flavor basis transformation observable in principle and calls for a hierarchy in the Yukawa matrix expansion. We show, through the dimension of the representations, that the (discrete) symmetry in principle does allow for additional {delta}F=2 operators. If though the {delta}F=2 transitions are generated by two subsequent {delta}F=1 processes, as, for example, in the standard model, then the four crystal-like groups {sigma}(168){approx_equal}PSL(2,F{sub 7}), {sigma}(72{phi}), {sigma}(216{phi}) and especially {sigma}(360{phi}) do provide enough protection for a TeV-scale discrete MFV scenario. Models where this is not the case have to be investigated case by case. Interestingly {sigma}(216{phi}) has a (nonfaithful) representation corresponding to an A{sub 4} symmetry. Moreover we argue that the, apparently often omitted, (D) groups are subgroups of an appropriate {delta}(6g{sup 2}). We would like to stress that we do not provide an actual model that realizes the MFV scenario nor any other theory of flavor.

  20. KRONOS — A Monte Carlo event generator for higher order electromagnetic radiative corrections to deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anlauf, Harald; Dahmen, Hans D.; Manakos, Panagiotis; Mannel, Thomas; Ohl, Thorsten

    1992-05-01

    We present the Monte Carlo even generator KRONOS for deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering at HERA. KRONOS focusses on the description of electromagnetic corrections beyond the existing fixed order calculations.

  1. Extreme brain events: Higher-order statistics of brain resting activity and its relation with structural connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor, T. A.; Russo, R.; Diez, I.; Bharath, P.; Zirovich, M.; Stramaglia, S.; Cortes, J. M.; de Arcangelis, L.; Chialvo, D. R.

    2015-09-01

    The brain exhibits a wide variety of spatiotemporal patterns of neuronal activity recorded using functional magnetic resonance imaging as the so-called blood-oxygenated-level-dependent (BOLD) signal. An active area of work includes efforts to best describe the plethora of these patterns evolving continuously in the brain. Here we explore the third-moment statistics of the brain BOLD signals in the resting state as a proxy to capture extreme BOLD events. We find that the brain signal exhibits typically nonzero skewness, with positive values for cortical regions and negative values for subcortical regions. Furthermore, the combined analysis of structural and functional connectivity demonstrates that relatively more connected regions exhibit activity with high negative skewness. Overall, these results highlight the relevance of recent results emphasizing that the spatiotemporal location of the relatively large-amplitude events in the BOLD time series contains relevant information to reproduce a number of features of the brain dynamics during resting state in health and disease.

  2. Staffs' and managers' perceptions of how and when discrete event simulation modelling can be used as a decision support in quality improvement: a focus group discussion study at two hospital settings in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Hvitfeldt-Forsberg, Helena; Mazzocato, Pamela; Glaser, Daniel; Keller, Christina; Unbeck, Maria

    2017-06-06

    To explore healthcare staffs' and managers' perceptions of how and when discrete event simulation modelling can be used as a decision support in improvement efforts. Two focus group discussions were performed. Two settings were included: a rheumatology department and an orthopaedic section both situated in Sweden. Healthcare staff and managers (n=13) from the two settings. Two workshops were performed, one at each setting. Workshops were initiated by a short introduction to simulation modelling. Results from the respective simulation model were then presented and discussed in the following focus group discussion. Categories from the content analysis are presented according to the following research questions: how and when simulation modelling can assist healthcare improvement? Regarding how, the participants mentioned that simulation modelling could act as a tool for support and a way to visualise problems, potential solutions and their effects. Regarding when, simulation modelling could be used both locally and by management, as well as a pedagogical tool to develop and test innovative ideas and to involve everyone in the improvement work. Its potential as an information and communication tool and as an instrument for pedagogic work within healthcare improvement render a broader application and value of simulation modelling than previously reported. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Discrete-Event Simulation in Chemical Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultheisz, Daniel; Sommerfeld, Jude T.

    1988-01-01

    Gives examples, descriptions, and uses for various types of simulation systems, including the Flowtran, Process, Aspen Plus, Design II, GPSS, Simula, and Simscript. Explains similarities in simulators, terminology, and a batch chemical process. Tables and diagrams are included. (RT)

  4. Limit sets for the discrete spectrum of complex Jacobi matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golinskii, L. B.; Egorova, I. E.

    2005-06-01

    The discrete spectrum of complex Jacobi matrices that are compact perturbations of the discrete Laplacian is studied. The precise stabilization rate (in the sense of order) of the matrix elements ensuring the finiteness of the discrete spectrum is found. An example of a Jacobi matrix with discrete spectrum having a unique limit point is constructed. These results are discrete analogues of Pavlov's well-known results on Schrödinger operators with complex potential on a half-axis.

  5. An inter-order horizontal gene transfer event enables the catabolism of compatible solutes by Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H.

    PubMed

    Collins, R Eric; Deming, Jody W

    2013-07-01

    Colwellia is a genus of mostly psychrophilic halophilic Gammaproteobacteria frequently isolated from polar marine sediments and sea ice. In exploring the capacity of Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H to survive and grow in the liquid brines of sea ice, we detected a duplicated 37 kbp genomic island in its genome based on the abnormally high G + C content. This island contains an operon encoding for heterotetrameric sarcosine oxidase and is located adjacent to several genes used in the serial demethylation of glycine betaine, a compatible solute commonly used for osmoregulation, to dimethylglycine, sarcosine, and glycine. Molecular clock inferences of important events in the adaptation of C. psychrerythraea 34H to compatible solute utilization reflect the geological evolution of the polar regions. Validating genomic predictions, C. psychrerythraea 34H was shown to grow on defined media containing either choline or glycine betaine, and on a medium with sarcosine as the sole organic source of carbon and nitrogen. Growth by 8 of 9 tested Colwellia species on a newly developed sarcosine-based defined medium suggested that the ability to catabolize glycine betaine (the catabolic precursor of sarcosine) is likely widespread in the genus Colwellia. This capacity likely provides a selective advantage to Colwellia species in cold, salty environments like sea ice, and may have contributed to the ability of Colwellia to invade these extreme niches.

  6. Discrete Surface Modelling Using Partial Differential Equations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guoliang; Pan, Qing; Bajaj, Chandrajit L

    2006-02-01

    We use various nonlinear partial differential equations to efficiently solve several surface modelling problems, including surface blending, N-sided hole filling and free-form surface fitting. The nonlinear equations used include two second order flows, two fourth order flows and two sixth order flows. These nonlinear equations are discretized based on discrete differential geometry operators. The proposed approach is simple, efficient and gives very desirable results, for a range of surface models, possibly having sharp creases and corners.

  7. Discretization vs. Rounding Error in Euler's Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Carlos F.

    2011-01-01

    Euler's method for solving initial value problems is an excellent vehicle for observing the relationship between discretization error and rounding error in numerical computation. Reductions in stepsize, in order to decrease discretization error, necessarily increase the number of steps and so introduce additional rounding error. The problem is…

  8. Discretization vs. Rounding Error in Euler's Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Carlos F.

    2011-01-01

    Euler's method for solving initial value problems is an excellent vehicle for observing the relationship between discretization error and rounding error in numerical computation. Reductions in stepsize, in order to decrease discretization error, necessarily increase the number of steps and so introduce additional rounding error. The problem is…

  9. Subcompartmentalisation of Proteins in the Rhoptries Correlates with Ordered Events of Erythrocyte Invasion by the Blood Stage Malaria Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Zuccala, Elizabeth S.; Gout, Alexander M.; Dekiwadia, Chaitali; Marapana, Danushka S.; Angrisano, Fiona; Turnbull, Lynne; Riglar, David T.; Rogers, Kelly L.; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Ralph, Stuart A.; Speed, Terence P.; Baum, Jake

    2012-01-01

    Host cell infection by apicomplexan parasites plays an essential role in lifecycle progression for these obligate intracellular pathogens. For most species, including the etiological agents of malaria and toxoplasmosis, infection requires active host-cell invasion dependent on formation of a tight junction – the organising interface between parasite and host cell during entry. Formation of this structure is not, however, shared across all Apicomplexa or indeed all parasite lifecycle stages. Here, using an in silico integrative genomic search and endogenous gene-tagging strategy, we sought to characterise proteins that function specifically during junction-dependent invasion, a class of proteins we term invasins to distinguish them from adhesins that function in species specific host-cell recognition. High-definition imaging of tagged Plasmodium falciparum invasins localised proteins to multiple cellular compartments of the blood stage merozoite. This includes several that localise to distinct subcompartments within the rhoptries. While originating from the same organelle, however, each has very different dynamics during invasion. Apical Sushi Protein and Rhoptry Neck protein 2 release early, following the junction, whilst a novel rhoptry protein PFF0645c releases only after invasion is complete. This supports the idea that organisation of proteins within a secretory organelle determines the order and destination of protein secretion and provides a localisation-based classification strategy for predicting invasin function during apicomplexan parasite invasion. PMID:23049965

  10. Event Perception.

    PubMed

    Radvansky, Gabriel; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2011-11-01

    Events are central elements of human experience. Formally, they can be individuated in terms of the entities that compose them, the features of those entities, and the relations amongst entities. Psychologically, representations of events capture their spatiotemporal location, the people and objects involved, and the relations between these elements. Here, we present an account of the nature of psychological representations of events and how they are constructed and updated. Event representations are like images in that they are isomorphic to the situations they represent. However, they are like models or language in that they are constructed of components rather than being holistic. Also, they are partial representations that leave out some elements and abstract others. Representations of individual events are informed by schematic knowledge about general classes of events. Event representations are constructed in a process that segments continuous activity into discrete events. The construction of a series of event representations forms a basis for predicting the future, planning for that future, and imagining alternatives.

  11. Event Perception

    PubMed Central

    Radvansky, Gabriel; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Events are central elements of human experience. Formally, they can be individuated in terms of the entities that compose them, the features of those entities, and the relations amongst entities. Psychologically, representations of events capture their spatiotemporal location, the people and objects involved, and the relations between these elements. Here, we present an account of the nature of psychological representations of events and how they are constructed and updated. Event representations are like images in that they are isomorphic to the situations they represent. However, they are like models or language in that they are constructed of components rather than being holistic. Also, they are partial representations that leave out some elements and abstract others. Representations of individual events are informed by schematic knowledge about general classes of events. Event representations are constructed in a process that segments continuous activity into discrete events. The construction of a series of event representations forms a basis for predicting the future, planning for that future, and imagining alternatives. PMID:23082236

  12. Discrete bisoliton fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X. M.; Han, X. X.; Yao, X. K.

    2016-01-01

    Dissipative solitons, which result from the intricate balance between dispersion and nonlinearity as well as gain and loss, are of the fundamental scientific interest and numerous important applications. Here, we report a fiber laser that generates bisoliton – two consecutive dissipative solitons that preserve a fixed separation between them. Deviations from this separation result in its restoration. It is also found that these bisolitons have multiple discrete equilibrium distances with the quantized separations, as is confirmed by the theoretical analysis and the experimental observations. The main feature of our laser is the anomalous dispersion that is increased by an order of magnitude in comparison to previous studies. Then the spectral filtering effect plays a significant role in pulse-shaping. The proposed laser has the potential applications in optical communications and high-resolution optics for coding and transmission of information in higher-level modulation formats. PMID:27767075

  13. Discrete bisoliton fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. M.; Han, X. X.; Yao, X. K.

    2016-10-01

    Dissipative solitons, which result from the intricate balance between dispersion and nonlinearity as well as gain and loss, are of the fundamental scientific interest and numerous important applications. Here, we report a fiber laser that generates bisoliton – two consecutive dissipative solitons that preserve a fixed separation between them. Deviations from this separation result in its restoration. It is also found that these bisolitons have multiple discrete equilibrium distances with the quantized separations, as is confirmed by the theoretical analysis and the experimental observations. The main feature of our laser is the anomalous dispersion that is increased by an order of magnitude in comparison to previous studies. Then the spectral filtering effect plays a significant role in pulse-shaping. The proposed laser has the potential applications in optical communications and high-resolution optics for coding and transmission of information in higher-level modulation formats.

  14. Discrete Pearson distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, K.O.; Shenton, L.R.; Kastenbaum, M.A.

    1991-11-01

    These distributions are generated by a first order recursive scheme which equates the ratio of successive probabilities to the ratio of two corresponding quadratics. The use of a linearized form of this model will produce equations in the unknowns matched by an appropriate set of moments (assumed to exist). Given the moments we may find valid solutions. These are two cases; (1) distributions defined on the non-negative integers (finite or infinite) and (2) distributions defined on negative integers as well. For (1), given the first four moments, it is possible to set this up as equations of finite or infinite degree in the probability of a zero occurrence, the sth component being a product of s ratios of linear forms in this probability in general. For (2) the equation for the zero probability is purely linear but may involve slowly converging series; here a particular case is the discrete normal. Regions of validity are being studied. 11 refs.

  15. Reduced discretization error in HZETRN

    SciTech Connect

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Tweed, John

    2013-02-01

    The deterministic particle transport code HZETRN is an efficient analysis tool for studying the effects of space radiation on humans, electronics, and shielding materials. In a previous work, numerical methods in the code were reviewed, and new methods were developed that further improved efficiency and reduced overall discretization error. It was also shown that the remaining discretization error could be attributed to low energy light ions (A < 4) with residual ranges smaller than the physical step-size taken by the code. Accurately resolving the spectrum of low energy light particles is important in assessing risk associated with astronaut radiation exposure. In this work, modifications to the light particle transport formalism are presented that accurately resolve the spectrum of low energy light ion target fragments. The modified formalism is shown to significantly reduce overall discretization error and allows a physical approximation to be removed. For typical step-sizes and energy grids used in HZETRN, discretization errors for the revised light particle transport algorithms are shown to be less than 4% for aluminum and water shielding thicknesses as large as 100 g/cm{sup 2} exposed to both solar particle event and galactic cosmic ray environments.

  16. Reduced discretization error in HZETRN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Tweed, John

    2013-02-01

    The deterministic particle transport code HZETRN is an efficient analysis tool for studying the effects of space radiation on humans, electronics, and shielding materials. In a previous work, numerical methods in the code were reviewed, and new methods were developed that further improved efficiency and reduced overall discretization error. It was also shown that the remaining discretization error could be attributed to low energy light ions (A < 4) with residual ranges smaller than the physical step-size taken by the code. Accurately resolving the spectrum of low energy light particles is important in assessing risk associated with astronaut radiation exposure. In this work, modifications to the light particle transport formalism are presented that accurately resolve the spectrum of low energy light ion target fragments. The modified formalism is shown to significantly reduce overall discretization error and allows a physical approximation to be removed. For typical step-sizes and energy grids used in HZETRN, discretization errors for the revised light particle transport algorithms are shown to be less than 4% for aluminum and water shielding thicknesses as large as 100 g/cm2 exposed to both solar particle event and galactic cosmic ray environments.

  17. Principles of Discrete Time Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaroszkiewicz, George

    2014-04-01

    1. Introduction; 2. The physics of discreteness; 3. The road to calculus; 4. Temporal discretization; 5. Discrete time dynamics architecture; 6. Some models; 7. Classical cellular automata; 8. The action sum; 9. Worked examples; 10. Lee's approach to discrete time mechanics; 11. Elliptic billiards; 12. The construction of system functions; 13. The classical discrete time oscillator; 14. Type 2 temporal discretization; 15. Intermission; 16. Discrete time quantum mechanics; 17. The quantized discrete time oscillator; 18. Path integrals; 19. Quantum encoding; 20. Discrete time classical field equations; 21. The discrete time Schrodinger equation; 22. The discrete time Klein-Gordon equation; 23. The discrete time Dirac equation; 24. Discrete time Maxwell's equations; 25. The discrete time Skyrme model; 26. Discrete time quantum field theory; 27. Interacting discrete time scalar fields; 28. Space, time and gravitation; 29. Causality and observation; 30. Concluding remarks; Appendix A. Coherent states; Appendix B. The time-dependent oscillator; Appendix C. Quaternions; Appendix D. Quantum registers; References; Index.

  18. Dogs cannot bark: event-related brain responses to true and false negated statements as indicators of higher-order conscious processing.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Cornelia; Kübler, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated event-related brain potentials elicited by true and false negated statements to evaluate if discrimination of the truth value of negated information relies on conscious processing and requires higher-order cognitive processing in healthy subjects across different levels of stimulus complexity. The stimulus material consisted of true and false negated sentences (sentence level) and prime-target expressions (word level). Stimuli were presented acoustically and no overt behavioral response of the participants was required. Event-related brain potentials to target words preceded by true and false negated expressions were analyzed both within group and at the single subject level. Across the different processing conditions (word pairs and sentences), target words elicited a frontal negativity and a late positivity in the time window from 600-1000 msec post target word onset. Amplitudes of both brain potentials varied as a function of the truth value of the negated expressions. Results were confirmed at the single-subject level. In sum, our results support recent suggestions according to which evaluation of the truth value of a negated expression is a time- and cognitively demanding process that cannot be solved automatically, and thus requires conscious processing. Our paradigm provides insight into higher-order processing related to language comprehension and reasoning in healthy subjects. Future studies are needed to evaluate if our paradigm also proves sensitive for the detection of consciousness in non-responsive patients.

  19. Discrete mappings with an explicit discrete Lyapunov function related to integrable mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Hironori; Takahashi, Daisuke; Matsukidaira, Junta

    2006-05-01

    We propose discrete mappings of second order that have a discrete analogue of Lyapunov function. The mappings are extensions of the integrable Quispel-Roberts-Thompson (QRT) mapping, and a discrete Lyapunov function of the mappings is identical to an explicit conserved quantity of the QRT mapping. Moreover we can obtain a differential and an ultradiscrete limit of the mappings preserving the existence of Lyapunov function. We also give applications of a mapping with an adjusted parameter, a probabilistic mapping and coupled mappings.

  20. A Discrete Event Simulation Model of Patient Flow in a General Hospital Incorporating Infection Control Policy for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus (VRE).

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Erica S; Lee, Hang; Ryan, Erin E; Hou, Taige; Walensky, Rochelle P; Ware, Winston; Hooper, David C

    2017-06-01

    Hospitalized patients are assigned to available staffed beds based on patient acuity and services required. In hospitals with double-occupancy rooms, patients must be additionally matched by gender. Patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) must be bedded in single-occupancy rooms or cohorted with other patients with similar MRSA/VRE flags. We developed a discrete event simulation (DES) model of patient flow through an acute care hospital. Patients are matched to beds based on acuity, service, gender, and known MRSA/VRE colonization. Outcomes included time to bed arrival, length of stay, patient-bed acuity mismatches, occupancy, idle beds, acuity-related transfers, rooms with discordant MRSA/VRE colonization, and transmission due to discordant colonization. Observed outcomes were well-approximated by model-generated outcomes for time-to-bed arrival (6.7 v. 6.2 to 6.5 h) and length of stay (3.3 v. 2.9 to 3.0 days), with overlapping 90% coverage intervals. Patient-bed acuity mismatches, where patient acuity exceeded bed acuity and where patient acuity was lower than bed acuity, ranged from 0.6 to 0.9 and 8.6 to 11.1 mismatches per h, respectively. Values for observed occupancy, total idle beds, and acuity-related transfers compared favorably to model-predicted values (91% v. 86% to 87% occupancy, 15.1 v. 14.3 to 15.7 total idle beds, and 27.2 v. 22.6 to 23.7 transfers). Rooms with discordant colonization status and transmission due to discordance were modeled without an observed value for comparison. One-way and multi-way sensitivity analyses were performed for idle beds and rooms with discordant colonization. We developed and validated a DES model of patient flow incorporating MRSA/VRE flags. The model allowed for quantification of the substantial impact of MRSA/VRE flags on hospital efficiency and potentially avoidable nosocomial transmission.

  1. The effectiveness of computerized order entry at reducing preventable adverse drug events and medication errors in hospital settings: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act subsidizes implementation by hospitals of electronic health records with computerized provider order entry (CPOE), which may reduce patient injuries caused by medication errors (preventable adverse drug events, pADEs). Effects on pADEs have not been rigorously quantified, and effects on medication errors have been variable. The objectives of this analysis were to assess the effectiveness of CPOE at reducing pADEs in hospital-related settings, and examine reasons for heterogeneous effects on medication errors. Methods Articles were identified using MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Econlit, web-based databases, and bibliographies of previous systematic reviews (September 2013). Eligible studies compared CPOE with paper-order entry in acute care hospitals, and examined diverse pADEs or medication errors. Studies on children or with limited event-detection methods were excluded. Two investigators extracted data on events and factors potentially associated with effectiveness. We used random effects models to pool data. Results Sixteen studies addressing medication errors met pooling criteria; six also addressed pADEs. Thirteen studies used pre-post designs. Compared with paper-order entry, CPOE was associated with half as many pADEs (pooled risk ratio (RR) = 0.47, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.71) and medication errors (RR = 0.46, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.60). Regarding reasons for heterogeneous effects on medication errors, five intervention factors and two contextual factors were sufficiently reported to support subgroup analyses or meta-regression. Differences between commercial versus homegrown systems, presence and sophistication of clinical decision support, hospital-wide versus limited implementation, and US versus non-US studies were not significant, nor was timing of publication. Higher baseline rates of medication errors predicted greater reductions (P < 0.001). Other context and

  2. PREFACE: 4th Symposium on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries (DISCRETE2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Domenico, Antonio; Mavromatos, Nick E.; Mitsou, Vasiliki A.; Skliros, Dimitri P.

    2015-07-01

    The DISCRETE 2014: Fourth Symposium in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries took place at King's College London, Strand Campus, London WC2R 2LS, from Tuesday, December 2 2014 till Saturday, December 6 2014. This is the fourth Edition of the DISCRETE conference series, which is a biannual event, having been held previously in Valencia (Discrete'08), Rome (Discrete2010) and Lisbon (Discrete2012). The topics covered at the DISCRETE series of conferences are: T, C, P, CP symmetries; accidental symmetries (B, L conservation); CPT symmetry, decoherence and entangled states, Lorentz symmetry breaking (phenomenology and current bounds); neutrino mass and mixing; implications for cosmology and astroparticle physics, dark matter searches; experimental prospects at LHC, new facilities. In DISCRETE 2014 we have also introduced two new topics: cosmological aspects of non-commutative space-times as well as PT symmetric Hamiltonians (non-Hermitian but with real eigenvalues), a topic that has wide applications in particle physics and beyond. The conference was opened by the King's College London Vice Principal on Research and Innovation, Mr Chris Mottershead, followed by a welcome address by the Chair of DISCRETE 2014 (Professor Nick E. Mavromatos). After these introductory talks, the scientific programme of the DISCRETE 2014 symposium started. Following the tradition of DISCRETE series of conferences, the talks (138 in total) were divided into plenary-review talks (25), invited research talks (50) and shorter presentations (63) — selected by the conveners of each session in consultation with the organisers — from the submitted abstracts. We have been fortunate to have very high-quality, thought stimulating and interesting talks at all levels, which, together with the discussions among the participants, made the conference quite enjoyable. There were 152 registered participants for the event.

  3. Temporal Differences in the Appearance of NEP-B78 and an LBR-like Protein during Xenopus Nuclear Envelope Reassembly Reflect the Ordered Recruitment of Functionally Discrete Vesicle Types

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Sheona; Ferrigno, Paul; Lyon, Carol; Murphy, Jackie; Goldberg, Martin; Allen, Terry; Smythe, Carl; Hutchison, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    In this work, we have used novel mAbs against two proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum and outer nuclear membrane, termed NEP-B78 and p65, in addition to a polyclonal antibody against the inner nuclear membrane protein LBR (lamin B receptor), to study the order and dynamics of NE reassembly in the Xenopus cell-free system. Using these reagents, we demonstrate differences in the timing of recruitment of their cognate membrane proteins to the surface of decondensing chromatin in both the cell-free system and XLK-2 cells. We show unequivocally that, in the cell-free system, two functionally and biochemically distinct vesicle types are necessary for NE assembly. We find that the process of distinct vesicle recruitment to chromatin is an ordered one and that NEP-B78 defines a vesicle population involved in the earliest events of reassembly in this system. Finally, we present evidence that NEP-B78 may be required for the targeting of these vesicles to the surface of decondensing chromatin in this system. The results have important implications for the understanding of the mechanisms of nuclear envelope disassembly and reassembly during mitosis and for the development of systems to identify novel molecules that control these processes. PMID:9922450

  4. Discrete tomography in neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuba, Attila; Rodek, Lajos; Kiss, Zoltán; Ruskó, László; Nagy, Antal; Balaskó, Márton

    2005-04-01

    Discrete tomography (DT) is an imaging technique for reconstructing discrete images from their projections using the knowledge that the object to be reconstructed contains only a few homogeneous materials characterized by known discrete absorption values. One of the main reasons for applying DT is that we will hopefully require relatively few projections. Using discreteness and some a priori information (such as an approximate shape of the object) we can apply two DT methods in neutron imaging by reducing the problem to an optimization task. The first method is a special one because it is only suitable if the object is composed of cylinders and sphere shapes. The second method is a general one in the sense that it can be used for reconstructing objects of any shape. Software was developed and physical experiments performed in order to investigate the effects of several reconstruction parameters: the number of projections, noise levels, and complexity of the object to be reconstructed. We give a summary of the experimental results and make a comparison of the results obtained using a classical reconstruction technique (FBP). The programs we developed are available in our DT reconstruction program package DIRECT.

  5. Structure of a d-type rough wall turbulent boundary layer at a low Reynolds number - Higher order moments and violent events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Shinsuke; Osaka, Hideo

    1989-10-01

    Some properties associated with the large eddy structures of a d-type rough wall turbulent boundary layer at a momentum thickness Reynolds number R sub theta = 800 have been examined experimentally. The higher order moments and the contribution of violent events to the Reynolds shear stress are measured and compared with the results of both smooth and k-type rough wall flow as well as a d-type rough wall flow at a high Reynolds number R sub theta = 5000. The low Reynolds number effect in the outer layer, which in general enlarges the contorted surface of the viscous super-layer, is found even in the present rough wall flow.

  6. Discrete Element Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J; Johnson, S

    2007-12-03

    The Distinct Element Method (also frequently referred to as the Discrete Element Method) (DEM) is a Lagrangian numerical technique where the computational domain consists of discrete solid elements which interact via compliant contacts. This can be contrasted with Finite Element Methods where the computational domain is assumed to represent a continuum (although many modern implementations of the FEM can accommodate some Distinct Element capabilities). Often the terms Discrete Element Method and Distinct Element Method are used interchangeably in the literature, although Cundall and Hart (1992) suggested that Discrete Element Methods should be a more inclusive term covering Distinct Element Methods, Displacement Discontinuity Analysis and Modal Methods. In this work, DEM specifically refers to the Distinct Element Method, where the discrete elements interact via compliant contacts, in contrast with Displacement Discontinuity Analysis where the contacts are rigid and all compliance is taken up by the adjacent intact material.

  7. Synchronous Discrete Harmonic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Antippa, Adel F.; Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-10-17

    We introduce the synchronous discrete harmonic oscillator, and present an analytical, numerical and graphical study of its characteristics. The oscillator is synchronous when the time T for one revolution covering an angle of 2{pi} in phase space, is an integral multiple N of the discrete time step {delta}t. It is fully synchronous when N is even. It is pseudo-synchronous when T/{delta}t is rational. In the energy conserving hyperincursive representation, the phase space trajectories are perfectly stable at all time scales, and in both synchronous and pseudo-synchronous modes they cycle through a finite number of phase space points. Consequently, both the synchronous and the pseudo-synchronous hyperincursive modes of time-discretization provide a physically realistic and mathematically coherent, procedure for dynamic, background independent, discretization of spacetime. The procedure is applicable to any stable periodic dynamical system, and provokes an intrinsic correlation between space and time, whereby space-discretization is a direct consequence of background-independent time-discretization. Hence, synchronous discretization moves the formalism of classical mechanics towards that of special relativity. The frequency of the hyperincursive discrete harmonic oscillator is ''blue shifted'' relative to its continuum counterpart. The frequency shift has the precise value needed to make the speed of the system point in phase space independent of the discretizing time interval {delta}t. That is the speed of the system point is the same on the polygonal (in the discrete case) and the circular (in the continuum case) phase space trajectories.

  8. A Few Continuous and Discrete Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Rui, Wenjuan

    2016-08-01

    Starting from a 2-unimodular group, we construct its new Lie algebras for which the positive-order Lax pairs and the negative-order Lax pairs are introduced, respectively. With the help of the resulting structure equation of the group we generate some partial differential equations including the well-known MKdV equation, the sine-Gordon equation, the hyperbolic sine-Gordon equation and other new nonlinear evolution equations. With the aid of the Tu scheme combined with the given Lax pairs, we obtain the isospectral and nonisospectral hierarchies of evolution equations, from which we generate two sets of symmetries of a generalized nonlinear Schrödinger (gNLS) equation. Finally, we discretize the Lax pairs to obtain a set of coupled semi-discrete equations. As their reduction, we produce the semi-discrete MKdV equation and semi-discrete NLS equation.

  9. Discrete dislocations in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariza, M. P.; Ortiz, M.

    2010-05-01

    In this work, we present an application of the theory of discrete dislocations of Ariza and Ortiz (2005) to the analysis of dislocations in graphene. Specifically, we discuss the specialization of the theory to graphene and its further specialization to the force-constant model of Aizawa et al. (1990). The ability of the discrete-dislocation theory to predict dislocation core structures and energies is critically assessed for periodic arrangements of dislocation dipoles and quadrupoles. We show that, with the aid of the discrete Fourier transform, those problems are amenable to exact solution within the discrete-dislocation theory, which confers the theory a distinct advantage over conventional atomistic models. The discrete dislocations exhibit 5-7 ring core structures that are consistent with observation and result in dislocation energies that fall within the range of prediction of other models. The asymptotic behavior of dilute distributions of dislocations is characterized analytically in terms of a discrete prelogarithmic energy tensor. Explicit expressions for this discrete prelogarithmic energy tensor are provided up to quadratures.

  10. The Discrete Hanging Cable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, James V.

    2004-01-01

    Using the methods of finite difference equations the discrete analogue of the parabolic and catenary cable are analysed. The fibonacci numbers and the golden ratio arise in the treatment of the catenary.

  11. The Discrete Hanging Cable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, James V.

    2004-01-01

    Using the methods of finite difference equations the discrete analogue of the parabolic and catenary cable are analysed. The fibonacci numbers and the golden ratio arise in the treatment of the catenary.

  12. Idea Exchange: On Discrete.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisler, Nancy; Froelich, Gary

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are summary recommendations concerning the integration of some aspects of discrete mathematics into existing secondary mathematics courses. Outlines of course activities are grouped into the three levels of prealgebra, algebra, and geometry. Some sample problems are included. (JJK)

  13. On the definition of discrete hydrodynamic variables.

    PubMed

    Español, Pep; Zúñiga, Ignacio

    2009-10-28

    The Green-Kubo formula for discrete hydrodynamic variables involves information about not only the fluid transport coefficients but also about discrete versions of the differential operators that govern the evolution of the discrete variables. This gives an intimate connection between discretization procedures in fluid dynamics and coarse-graining procedures used to obtain hydrodynamic behavior of molecular fluids. We observed that a natural definition of discrete hydrodynamic variables in terms of Voronoi cells leads to a Green-Kubo formula which is divergent, rendering the full coarse-graining strategy useless. In order to understand this subtle issue, in the present paper we consider the coarse graining of noninteracting Brownian particles. The discrete hydrodynamic variable for this problem is the number of particles within Voronoi cells. Thanks to the simplicity of the model we spot the origin of the singular behavior of the correlation functions. We offer an alternative definition, based on the concept of a Delaunay cell that behaves properly, suggesting the use of the Delaunay construction for the coarse graining of molecular fluids at the discrete hydrodynamic level.

  14. Power Analysis for Trials with Discrete-Time Survival Endpoints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jozwiak, Katarzyna; Moerbeek, Mirjam

    2012-01-01

    Studies on event occurrence aim to investigate if and when subjects experience a particular event. The timing of events may be measured continuously using thin precise units or discretely using time periods. The latter metric of time is often used in social science research and the generalized linear model (GLM) is an appropriate model for data…

  15. Power Analysis for Trials with Discrete-Time Survival Endpoints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jozwiak, Katarzyna; Moerbeek, Mirjam

    2012-01-01

    Studies on event occurrence aim to investigate if and when subjects experience a particular event. The timing of events may be measured continuously using thin precise units or discretely using time periods. The latter metric of time is often used in social science research and the generalized linear model (GLM) is an appropriate model for data…

  16. Mining Subsidence-generated legacy sediments in a Mid-European low-order stream floodplain as an archive for historic human activity and flooding events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchty-Lemke, Michael; Lehmkuhl, Frank; Frings, Roy; Henkel, Sebastian; Schwarzbauer, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Legacy sediments, which were deposited as a consequence of mining subsidence in a floodplain area, can be used as an archive for human activity and past flooding. The morphodynamics of the Wurm River, a low-order stream in the Lower Rhine Embayment at the border between Germany and the Netherlands, is significantly influenced by a long colliery history, which caused alterations in the natural river landscape. In addition, substances which are transported via municipal wastewaters as well as contaminants emitted by specific regional industries were deposited in the floodplain sediments. This study aims at the reconstruction of human activity and past flooding events derived from geochemical and sedimentological data for different time slices within the 20st century. The spatial and chronological distribution of contaminants is investigated on the basis of several sections and drilling cores along the middle reaches of the Wurm River. Sections within mining subsidence areas and outside of those are compared regarding their sedimentation rates and element contents. Additional information is gathered from digital terrain models, historical documents such as the Tranchot map (early 19th century), and interviews of contemporary witnesses. Sedimentation rates derived from Cs-137 measurements allow a temporal assignment of the legacy sediments. A section within a segment of the Siegfried Line (Westwall), constructed in 1939, that crosses the Wurm River shows a significant increase in sedimentation rates in contrast to the floodplain area that is unaffected by subsidence processes. Furthermore, source-specific contaminants can be used to refine the stratigraphy, since source and period of emission are known. The evaluation of past flooding events is supported by numerical modeling of flood scenarios, which provides detailed information about flooded areas depending on the discharge, particularly for the areas which are under influence of mining subsidence. Besides the

  17. Event Segmentation Improves Event Memory up to One Month Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Shaney; Bailey, Heather R.; Eisenberg, Michelle L.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2017-01-01

    When people observe everyday activity, they spontaneously parse it into discrete meaningful events. Individuals who segment activity in a more normative fashion show better subsequent memory for the events. If segmenting events effectively leads to better memory, does asking people to attend to segmentation improve subsequent memory? To answer…

  18. Episodes, events, and models

    PubMed Central

    Khemlani, Sangeet S.; Harrison, Anthony M.; Trafton, J. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel computational theory of how individuals segment perceptual information into representations of events. The theory is inspired by recent findings in the cognitive science and cognitive neuroscience of event segmentation. In line with recent theories, it holds that online event segmentation is automatic, and that event segmentation yields mental simulations of events. But it posits two novel principles as well: first, discrete episodic markers track perceptual and conceptual changes, and can be retrieved to construct event models. Second, the process of retrieving and reconstructing those episodic markers is constrained and prioritized. We describe a computational implementation of the theory, as well as a robotic extension of the theory that demonstrates the processes of online event segmentation and event model construction. The theory is the first unified computational account of event segmentation and temporal inference. We conclude by demonstrating now neuroimaging data can constrain and inspire the construction of process-level theories of human reasoning. PMID:26578934

  19. Depression: discrete or continuous?

    PubMed

    Bowins, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the true structure of depression is necessary if we are to advance our understanding and treatment options. Central to the issue of structure is whether depression represents discrete types or occurs on a continuum. Nature almost universally operates on the basis of continuums, whereas human perception favors discrete categories. This reality might be formalized into a 'continuum principle': natural phenomena tend to occur on a continuum, and any instance of hypothesized discreteness requires unassailable proof. Research evidence for discrete types falls far short of this standard, with most evidence supporting a continuum. However, quantitative variation can yield qualitative differences as an emergent property, fostering the appearance of discreteness. Depression as a continuum is best characterized by duration and severity dimensions, with the latter understood in terms of depressive inhibition. In the absence of some degree of cognitive, emotional, social, and physical inhibition, depression should not be diagnosed. Combining the dimensions of duration and severity provides an optimal way to characterize the quantitative and related qualitative aspects of depression and to describe the overall degree of dysfunction. The presence of other symptom types occurs when anxiety, hypomanic/manic, psychotic, and personality continuums interface with the depression continuum.

  20. Discrete Newtonian cosmology: perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, George F. R.; Gibbons, Gary W.

    2015-03-01

    In a previous paper (Gibbons and Ellis 2014 Discrete Newtonian cosmology Class. Quantum Grav. 31 025003), we showed how a finite system of discrete particles interacting with each other via Newtonian gravitational attraction would lead to precisely the same dynamical equations for homothetic motion as in the case of the pressure-free Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmological models of general relativity theory, provided the distribution of particles obeys the central configuration equation. In this paper we show that one can obtain perturbed such Newtonian solutions that give the same linearized structure growth equations as in the general relativity case. We also obtain the Dmitriev-Zel’dovich equations for subsystems in this discrete gravitational model, and show how it leads to the conclusion that voids have an apparent negative mass.

  1. Discrete Driver Assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klette, Reinhard; Jiang, Ruyi; Morales, Sandino; Vaudrey, Tobi

    Applying computer technology, such as computer vision in driver assistance, implies that processes and data are modeled as being discretized rather than being continuous. The area of stereo vision provides various examples how concepts known in discrete mathematics (e.g., pixel adjacency graphs, belief propagation, dynamic programming, max-flow/min-cut, or digital straight lines) are applied when aiming for efficient and accurate pixel correspondence solutions. The paper reviews such developments for a reader in discrete mathematics who is interested in applied research (in particular, in vision-based driver assistance). As a second subject, the paper also discusses lane detection and tracking, which is a particular task in driver assistance; recently the Euclidean distance transform proved to be a very appropriate tool for obtaining a fairly robust solution.

  2. Superheavy dark matter with discrete gauge symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, K.; Nomura, Yasunori; Yanagida, T.

    1998-11-01

    We show that there are discrete gauge symmetries which naturally protect heavy X particles from decaying into ordinary light particles in the supersymmetric standard model. This makes the proposal that superheavy X particles constitute part of the dark matter in the present universe very attractive. It is more interesting that there is a class of discrete gauge symmetries which naturally accommodates a long-lived unstable X particle. We find that in some discrete Z10 models, for example, a superheavy X particle has a lifetime of τX~=1011-1026 yr for a mass of MX~=1013-1014 GeV. This long lifetime is guaranteed by the absence of lower dimensional operators (of light particles) coupled to the X. We briefly discuss a possible explanation for the recently observed ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray events by the decay of this unstable X particle.

  3. Discrete breathers in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, S. V.; Korznikova, E. A.; Baimova, Yu A.; Velarde, M. G.

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that periodic discrete defect-containing systems, in addition to traveling waves, support vibrational defect-localized modes. It turned out that if a periodic discrete system is nonlinear, it can support spatially localized vibrational modes as exact solutions even in the absence of defects. Since the nodes of the system are all on equal footing, it is only through the special choice of initial conditions that a group of nodes can be found on which such a mode, called a discrete breather (DB), will be excited. The DB frequency must be outside the frequency range of the small-amplitude traveling waves. Not resonating with and expending no energy on the excitation of traveling waves, a DB can theoretically conserve its vibrational energy forever provided no thermal vibrations or other perturbations are present. Crystals are nonlinear discrete systems, and the discovery in them of DBs was only a matter of time. It is well known that periodic discrete defect-containing systems support both traveling waves and vibrational defect-localized modes. It turns out that if a periodic discrete system is nonlinear, it can support spatially localized vibrational modes as exact solutions even in the absence of defects. Because the nodes of the system are all on equal footing, only a special choice of the initial conditions allows selecting a group of nodes on which such a mode, called a discrete breather (DB), can be excited. The DB frequency must be outside the frequency range of small-amplitude traveling waves. Not resonating with and expending no energy on the excitation of traveling waves, a DB can theoretically preserve its vibrational energy forever if no thermal vibrations or other perturbations are present. Crystals are nonlinear discrete systems, and the discovery of DBs in them was only a matter of time. Experimental studies of DBs encounter major technical difficulties, leaving atomistic computer simulations as the primary investigation tool. Despite

  4. Discrete stacking of aromatic oligoamide macrocycles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangxiang; Liu, Rui; Sathyamoorthy, Bharathwaj; Yamato, Kazuhiro; Liang, Guoxing; Shen, Lin; Ma, Sufang; Sukumaran, Dinesh K; Szyperski, Thomas; Fang, Weihai; He, Lan; Chen, Xuebo; Gong, Bing

    2015-05-13

    Unlike the precise structural control typical of closed assemblies, curbing the stacking of disc- and ring-shaped molecules is quite challenging. Here we report the discrete stacking of rigid aromatic oligoamide macrocycles 1. With increasing concentration, the aggregation of 1 quickly plateaus, forming a discrete oligomer, as suggested by 1D (1)H, 2D nuclear Overhauser effect, and diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy. Quantum-chemical calculations indicate that the tetramer of 1 is the most stable among oligomeric stacks. X-ray crystallography revealed a tetrameric stack containing identical molecules adopting two different conformations. With a defined length and an inner pore capable of accommodating distinctly different guests, the tetramers of 1 densely pack into 2D layers. Besides being a rare system of conformation-regulated supramolecular oligomerization, the discrete stacks of 1, along with their higher-order assemblies, may offer new nanotechnological applications.

  5. Tree Ensembles on the Induced Discrete Space.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Olcay Taner

    2016-05-01

    Decision trees are widely used predictive models in machine learning. Recently, K -tree is proposed, where the original discrete feature space is expanded by generating all orderings of values of k discrete attributes and these orderings are used as the new attributes in decision tree induction. Although K -tree performs significantly better than the proper one, their exponential time complexity can prohibit their use. In this brief, we propose K -forest, an extension of random forest, where a subset of features is selected randomly from the induced discrete space. Simulation results on 17 data sets show that the novel ensemble classifier has significantly lower error rate compared with the random forest based on the original feature space.

  6. Discrete surface solitons.

    PubMed

    Makris, Konstantinos G; Suntsov, Sergiy; Christodoulides, Demetrios N; Stegeman, George I; Hache, Alain

    2005-09-15

    It is theoretically shown that discrete nonlinear surface waves are possible in waveguide lattices. These self-trapped states are located at the edge of the array and can exist only above a certain power threshold. The excitation characteristics and stability properties of these surface waves are systematically investigated.

  7. Bell-Curve Genetic Algorithm for Mixed Continuous and Discrete Optimization Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.; Griffith, Michelle; Sykes, Ruth; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw

    2002-01-01

    In this manuscript we have examined an extension of BCB that encompasses a mix of continuous and quasi-discrete, as well as truly-discrete applications. FVe began by testing two refinements to the discrete version of BCB. The testing of midpoint versus fitness (Tables 1 and 2) proved inconclusive. The testing of discrete normal tails versus standard mutation showed was conclusive and demonstrated that the discrete normal tails are better. Next, we implemented these refinements in a combined continuous and discrete BCB and compared the performance of two discrete distance on the hub problem. Here we found when "order does matter" it pays to take it into account.

  8. Discrete Mathematics Course Supported by CAS MATHEMATICA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, O. A.; Ivanova, V. V.; Saltan, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss examples of assignments for a course in discrete mathematics for undergraduate students majoring in business informatics. We consider several problems with computer-based solutions and discuss general strategies for using computers in teaching mathematics and its applications. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of our…

  9. Discretizing singular point sources in hyperbolic wave propagation problems

    SciTech Connect

    Petersson, N. Anders; O'Reilly, Ossian; Sjogreen, Bjorn; Bydlon, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    Here, we develop high order accurate source discretizations for hyperbolic wave propagation problems in first order formulation that are discretized by finite difference schemes. By studying the Fourier series expansions of the source discretization and the finite difference operator, we derive sufficient conditions for achieving design accuracy in the numerical solution. Only half of the conditions in Fourier space can be satisfied through moment conditions on the source discretization, and we develop smoothness conditions for satisfying the remaining accuracy conditions. The resulting source discretization has compact support in physical space, and is spread over as many grid points as the number of moment and smoothness conditions. In numerical experiments we demonstrate high order of accuracy in the numerical solution of the 1-D advection equation (both in the interior and near a boundary), the 3-D elastic wave equation, and the 3-D linearized Euler equations.

  10. Discretizing singular point sources in hyperbolic wave propagation problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, N. Anders; O'Reilly, Ossian; Sjögreen, Björn; Bydlon, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    We develop high order accurate source discretizations for hyperbolic wave propagation problems in first order formulation that are discretized by finite difference schemes. By studying the Fourier series expansions of the source discretization and the finite difference operator, we derive sufficient conditions for achieving design accuracy in the numerical solution. Only half of the conditions in Fourier space can be satisfied through moment conditions on the source discretization, and we develop smoothness conditions for satisfying the remaining accuracy conditions. The resulting source discretization has compact support in physical space, and is spread over as many grid points as the number of moment and smoothness conditions. In numerical experiments we demonstrate high order of accuracy in the numerical solution of the 1-D advection equation (both in the interior and near a boundary), the 3-D elastic wave equation, and the 3-D linearized Euler equations.

  11. Discretizing singular point sources in hyperbolic wave propagation problems

    SciTech Connect

    Petersson, N. Anders; O'Reilly, Ossian; Sjogreen, Bjorn; Bydlon, Samuel

    2016-06-01

    Here, we develop high order accurate source discretizations for hyperbolic wave propagation problems in first order formulation that are discretized by finite difference schemes. By studying the Fourier series expansions of the source discretization and the finite difference operator, we derive sufficient conditions for achieving design accuracy in the numerical solution. Only half of the conditions in Fourier space can be satisfied through moment conditions on the source discretization, and we develop smoothness conditions for satisfying the remaining accuracy conditions. The resulting source discretization has compact support in physical space, and is spread over as many grid points as the number of moment and smoothness conditions. In numerical experiments we demonstrate high order of accuracy in the numerical solution of the 1-D advection equation (both in the interior and near a boundary), the 3-D elastic wave equation, and the 3-D linearized Euler equations.

  12. Discretizing singular point sources in hyperbolic wave propagation problems

    DOE PAGES

    Petersson, N. Anders; O'Reilly, Ossian; Sjogreen, Bjorn; ...

    2016-06-01

    Here, we develop high order accurate source discretizations for hyperbolic wave propagation problems in first order formulation that are discretized by finite difference schemes. By studying the Fourier series expansions of the source discretization and the finite difference operator, we derive sufficient conditions for achieving design accuracy in the numerical solution. Only half of the conditions in Fourier space can be satisfied through moment conditions on the source discretization, and we develop smoothness conditions for satisfying the remaining accuracy conditions. The resulting source discretization has compact support in physical space, and is spread over as many grid points as themore » number of moment and smoothness conditions. In numerical experiments we demonstrate high order of accuracy in the numerical solution of the 1-D advection equation (both in the interior and near a boundary), the 3-D elastic wave equation, and the 3-D linearized Euler equations.« less

  13. A stabilization algorithm for linear discrete constant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, E. S.; Rublein, G. T.

    1976-01-01

    A procedure is derived for stabilizing linear constant discrete systems which is a discrete analog to the extended Bass algorithm for stabilizing linear constant continuous systems. The procedure offers a method for constructing a stabilizing feedback without the computational difficulty of raising the unstable open-loop response matrix to powers thus making the method attractive for high order or poorly conditioned systems.

  14. Feedback nonlinear discrete-time systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Wang, Jiasen; Qi, Donglian

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we design an adaptive iterative learning control method for a class of high-order nonlinear output feedback discrete-time systems with random initial conditions and iteration-varying desired trajectories. An n-step ahead predictor approach is employed to estimate future outputs. The discrete Nussbaum gain method is incorporated into the control design to deal with unknown control directions. The proposed control algorithm ensures that the tracking error converges to zero asymptotically along the iterative learning axis except for the beginning outputs affected by random initial conditions. A numerical simulation is carried out to demonstrate the efficacy of the presented control laws.

  15. Discreteness effects in population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Hidalgo, Esteban; Lecomte, Vivien

    2016-05-01

    We analyse numerically the effects of small population size in the initial transient regime of a simple example population dynamics. These effects play an important role for the numerical determination of large deviation functions of additive observables for stochastic processes. A method commonly used in order to determine such functions is the so-called cloning algorithm which in its non-constant population version essentially reduces to the determination of the growth rate of a population, averaged over many realizations of the dynamics. However, the averaging of populations is highly dependent not only on the number of realizations of the population dynamics, and on the initial population size but also on the cut-off time (or population) considered to stop their numerical evolution. This may result in an over-influence of discreteness effects at initial times, caused by small population size. We overcome these effects by introducing a (realization-dependent) time delay in the evolution of populations, additional to the discarding of the initial transient regime of the population growth where these discreteness effects are strong. We show that the improvement in the estimation of the large deviation function comes precisely from these two main contributions.

  16. Discrete Variational Optimal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Fernando; Kobilarov, Marin; Martín de Diego, David

    2013-06-01

    This paper develops numerical methods for optimal control of mechanical systems in the Lagrangian setting. It extends the theory of discrete mechanics to enable the solutions of optimal control problems through the discretization of variational principles. The key point is to solve the optimal control problem as a variational integrator of a specially constructed higher dimensional system. The developed framework applies to systems on tangent bundles, Lie groups, and underactuated and nonholonomic systems with symmetries, and can approximate either smooth or discontinuous control inputs. The resulting methods inherit the preservation properties of variational integrators and result in numerically robust and easily implementable algorithms. Several theoretical examples and a practical one, the control of an underwater vehicle, illustrate the application of the proposed approach.

  17. The Discrete Wavelet Transform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    Split- Band Coding," Proc. ICASSP, May 1977, pp 191-195. 12. Vetterli, M. "A Theory of Multirate Filter Banks ," IEEE Trans. ASSP, 35, March 1987, pp 356...both special cases of a single filter bank structure, the discrete wavelet transform, the behavior of which is governed by one’s choice of filters . In...B-1 ,.iii FIGURES 1.1 A wavelet filter bank structure ..................................... 2 2.1 Diagram illustrating the dialation and

  18. Steerable Discrete Fourier Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fracastoro, Giulia; Magli, Enrico

    2017-03-01

    Directional transforms have recently raised a lot of interest thanks to their numerous applications in signal compression and analysis. In this letter, we introduce a generalization of the discrete Fourier transform, called steerable DFT (SDFT). Since the DFT is used in numerous fields, it may be of interest in a wide range of applications. Moreover, we also show that the SDFT is highly related to other well-known transforms, such as the Fourier sine and cosine transforms and the Hilbert transforms.

  19. Discrete breathers in hexagonal dusty plasma lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Koukouloyannis, V.; Kourakis, I.

    2009-08-15

    The occurrence of single-site or multisite localized vibrational modes, also called discrete breathers, in two-dimensional hexagonal dusty plasma lattices is investigated. The system is described by a Klein-Gordon hexagonal lattice characterized by a negative coupling parameter epsilon in account of its inverse dispersive behavior. A theoretical analysis is performed in order to establish the possibility of existence of single as well as three-site discrete breathers in such systems. The study is complemented by a numerical investigation based on experimentally provided potential forms. This investigation shows that a dusty plasma lattice can support single-site discrete breathers, while three-site in phase breathers could exist if specific conditions, about the intergrain interaction strength, would hold. On the other hand, out of phase and vortex three-site breathers cannot be supported since they are highly unstable.

  20. Structure of random discrete spacetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brightwell, Graham; Gregory, Ruth

    1991-01-01

    The usual picture of spacetime consists of a continuous manifold, together with a metric of Lorentzian signature which imposes a causal structure on the spacetime. A model, first suggested by Bombelli et al., is considered in which spacetime consists of a discrete set of points taken at random from a manifold, with only the causal structure on this set remaining. This structure constitutes a partially ordered set (or poset). Working from the poset alone, it is shown how to construct a metric on the space which closely approximates the metric on the original spacetime manifold, how to define the effective dimension of the spacetime, and how such quantities may depend on the scale of measurement. Possible desirable features of the model are discussed.

  1. Structure of random discrete spacetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brightwell, Graham; Gregory, Ruth

    1991-01-01

    The usual picture of spacetime consists of a continuous manifold, together with a metric of Lorentzian signature which imposes a causal structure on the spacetime. A model, first suggested by Bombelli et al., is considered in which spacetime consists of a discrete set of points taken at random from a manifold, with only the causal structure on this set remaining. This structure constitutes a partially ordered set (or poset). Working from the poset alone, it is shown how to construct a metric on the space which closely approximates the metric on the original spacetime manifold, how to define the effective dimension of the spacetime, and how such quantities may depend on the scale of measurement. Possible desirable features of the model are discussed.

  2. Graph-theoretic analysis of discrete-phase-space states for condition change detection and quantification of information

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, Lee M.

    2014-09-16

    Data collected from devices and human condition may be used to forewarn of critical events such as machine/structural failure or events from brain/heart wave data stroke. By monitoring the data, and determining what values are indicative of a failure forewarning, one can provide adequate notice of the impending failure in order to take preventive measures. This disclosure teaches a computer-based method to convert dynamical numeric data representing physical objects (unstructured data) into discrete-phase-space states, and hence into a graph (structured data) for extraction of condition change.

  3. Discrete epidemic models.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Fred; Feng, Zhilan; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    The mathematical theory of single outbreak epidemic models really began with the work of Kermack and Mackendrick about decades ago. This gave a simple answer to the long-standing question of why epidemics woould appear suddenly and then disappear just as suddenly without having infected an entire population. Therefore it seemed natural to expect that theoreticians would immediately proceed to expand this mathematical framework both because the need to handle recurrent single infectious disease outbreaks has always been a priority for public health officials and because theoreticians often try to push the limits of exiting theories. However, the expansion of the theory via the inclusion of refined epidemiological classifications or through the incorporation of categories that are essential for the evaluation of intervention strategies, in the context of ongoing epidemic outbreaks, did not materialize. It was the global threat posed by SARS in that caused theoreticians to expand the Kermack-McKendrick single-outbreak framework. Most recently, efforts to connect theoretical work to data have exploded as attempts to deal with the threat of emergent and re-emergent diseases including the most recent H1N1 influenza pandemic, have marched to the forefront of our global priorities. Since data are collected and/or reported over discrete units of time, developing single outbreak models that fit collected data naturally is relevant. In this note, we introduce a discrete-epidemic framework and highlight, through our analyses, the similarities between single-outbreak comparable classical continuous-time epidemic models and the discrete-time models introduced in this note. The emphasis is on comparisons driven by expressions for the final epidemic size.

  4. PREFACE: DISCRETE '08: Symposium on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, José; Botella, Francisco J.; Mavromatos, Nick E.; Mitsou, Vasiliki A.

    2009-07-01

    The Symposium DISCRETE'08 on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries was held at the Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC) in Valencia, Spain from 11 to 16 December 2008. IFIC is a joint centre of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC) and the Universitat de València (UVEG). The aim of the Symposium was to bring together experts on the field of Discrete Symmetries in order to discuss its prospects on the eve of the LHC era. The general state of the art for CP, T and CPT symmetries was reviewed and their interplay with Baryogenesis, Early Cosmology, Quantum Gravity, String Theory and the Dark Sector of the Universe was emphasised. Connections with physics beyond the Standard Model, in particular Supersymmetry, were investigated. Experimental implications in current and proposed facilities received particular attention. The scientific programme consisted of 24 invited Plenary Talks and 93 contributions selected among the submitted papers. Young researchers, in particular, were encouraged to submit an abstract. The Special Lecture on ''CERN and the Future of Particle Physics'', given by the CERN Director General Rolf-Dieter Heuer to close the Symposium, was of particular relevance. On the last day of the Symposium, an open meeting took place between Professor Heuer and the Spanish community of particle physics. The Symposium covered recent developments on the subject of Discrete Symmetries in the following topics: Quantum Vacuum Entanglement, Symmetrisation Principle CPT in Quantum Gravity and String Theory, Decoherence, Lorentz Violation Ultra-high-energy Messengers Time Reversal CP violation in the SM and beyond Neutrino Mass, Mixing and CP Baryogenesis, Leptogenesis Family Symmetries Supersymmetry and other searches Experimental Prospects: LHC, Super-B Factories, DAΦNE-2, Neutrino Beams The excellence of most of the presentations during the Symposium was pointed out by many participants. The broad spectrum of topics under the

  5. In Superintendent Searches, Discretion Is the Better Part of Valor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chopra, Raj K.

    1989-01-01

    Confidentiality during a superintendent search is essential in order to attract the best candidates. Board members should use confidentiality as a selling tool; use discretion during onsite visits; and make their decision quickly. (MLF)

  6. Discrete BPS skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaoglou, M.; Charalampidis, E. G.; Ioannidou, T. A.; Kevrekidis, P. G.

    2017-09-01

    A discrete analogue of the extended Bogomolny-Prasad-Sommerfeld (BPS) Skyrme model that admits time-dependent solutions is presented. Using the spacing h of adjacent lattice nodes as a parameter, we identify the spatial profile of the solution and the continuation of the relevant branch of solutions over the lattice spacing for different values of the potential (free) parameter α . In particular, we explore the dynamics and stability of the obtained solutions, finding that, while they generally seem to be prone to instabilities, for suitable values of the lattice spacing and for sufficiently large values of α , they may be long-lived in direct numerical simulations.

  7. Discrete Dynamics Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuensche, Andrew

    DDLab is interactive graphics software for creating, visualizing, and analyzing many aspects of Cellular Automata, Random Boolean Networks, and Discrete Dynamical Networks in general and studying their behavior, both from the time-series perspective — space-time patterns, and from the state-space perspective — attractor basins. DDLab is relevant to research, applications, and education in the fields of complexity, self-organization, emergent phenomena, chaos, collision-based computing, neural networks, content addressable memory, genetic regulatory networks, dynamical encryption, generative art and music, and the study of the abstract mathematical/physical/dynamical phenomena in their own right.

  8. Quantum cosmology based on discrete Feynman paths

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, Geoffrey F.

    2002-10-10

    Although the rules for interpreting local quantum theory imply discretization of process, Lorentz covariance is usually regarded as precluding time quantization. Nevertheless a time-discretized quantum representation of redshifting spatially-homogeneous universe may be based on discrete-step Feynman paths carrying causal Lorentz-invariant action--paths that not only propagate the wave function but provide a phenomenologically-promising elementary-particle Hilbert-space basis. In a model under development, local path steps are at Planck scale while, at a much larger ''wave-function scale'', global steps separate successive wave-functions. Wave-function spacetime is but a tiny fraction of path spacetime. Electromagnetic and gravitational actions are ''at a distance'' in Wheeler-Feynman sense while strong (color) and weak (isospin) actions, as well as action of particle motion, are ''local'' in a sense paralleling the action of local field theory. ''Nonmaterial'' path segments and ''trivial events'' collaborate to define energy and gravity. Photons coupled to conserved electric charge enjoy privileged model status among elementary fermions and vector bosons. Although real path parameters provide no immediate meaning for ''measurement'', the phase of the complex wave function allows significance for ''information'' accumulated through ''gentle'' electromagnetic events involving charged matter and ''soft'' photons. Through its soft-photon content the wave function is an ''information reservoir''.

  9. Parameters of Semantic Multisensory Integration Depend on Timing and Modality Order among People on the Autism Spectrum: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, N.; Mottron, L.; Burack, J. A.; Jemel, B.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) report difficulty integrating simultaneously presented visual and auditory stimuli (Iarocci & McDonald, 2006), albeit showing enhanced perceptual processing of unisensory stimuli, as well as an enhanced role of perception in higher-order cognitive tasks (Enhanced Perceptual Functioning (EPF) model;…

  10. Parameters of Semantic Multisensory Integration Depend on Timing and Modality Order among People on the Autism Spectrum: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, N.; Mottron, L.; Burack, J. A.; Jemel, B.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) report difficulty integrating simultaneously presented visual and auditory stimuli (Iarocci & McDonald, 2006), albeit showing enhanced perceptual processing of unisensory stimuli, as well as an enhanced role of perception in higher-order cognitive tasks (Enhanced Perceptual Functioning (EPF) model;…

  11. Impending failure detection for a discrete process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yubao

    1993-03-01

    Signals from a discrete process contain a strong modulation as a result of the discrete events in the process, such as paper passage in a recirculating document feeder (RDF). This paper presents a study of the methodology of process monitoring for a RDF system. A fault tree has been established that shows the cause-and-effect relationship regarding possible malfunctions of a RDF system. Critical components of the RDF system have been identified for condition monitoring. The signature from the measurements of position, vibration, vacuum pressure, and drive motor current have been analysed. A data separation scheme was used in signal processing to demodulate the strong signal component associated with paper passage. Unique index extraction algorithms based on time series analysis and modeling have been developed to detect failures of these components. A decision-making scheme based on multiple voting has been implemented.

  12. Stability and change of personality across the life course: the impact of age and major life events on mean-level and rank-order stability of the Big Five.

    PubMed

    Specht, Jule; Egloff, Boris; Schmukle, Stefan C

    2011-10-01

    Does personality change across the entire life course, and are those changes due to intrinsic maturation or major life experiences? This longitudinal study investigated changes in the mean levels and rank order of the Big Five personality traits in a heterogeneous sample of 14,718 Germans across all of adulthood. Latent change and latent moderated regression models provided 4 main findings: First, age had a complex curvilinear influence on mean levels of personality. Second, the rank-order stability of Emotional Stability, Extraversion, Openness, and Agreeableness all followed an inverted U-shaped function, reaching a peak between the ages of 40 and 60 and decreasing afterward, whereas Conscientiousness showed a continuously increasing rank-order stability across adulthood. Third, personality predicted the occurrence of several objective major life events (selection effects) and changed in reaction to experiencing these events (socialization effects), suggesting that personality can change due to factors other than intrinsic maturation. Fourth, when events were clustered according to their valence, as is commonly done, effects of the environment on changes in personality were either overlooked or overgeneralized. In sum, our analyses show that personality changes throughout the life span, but with more pronounced changes in young and old ages, and that this change is partly attributable to social demands and experiences. 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  13. Integrable discrete PT symmetric model.

    PubMed

    Ablowitz, Mark J; Musslimani, Ziad H

    2014-09-01

    An exactly solvable discrete PT invariant nonlinear Schrödinger-like model is introduced. It is an integrable Hamiltonian system that exhibits a nontrivial nonlinear PT symmetry. A discrete one-soliton solution is constructed using a left-right Riemann-Hilbert formulation. It is shown that this pure soliton exhibits unique features such as power oscillations and singularity formation. The proposed model can be viewed as a discretization of a recently obtained integrable nonlocal nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  14. Discrete spectrum of inflationary fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Craig J.

    2004-10-15

    It is conjectured that inflation, taking account of quantum gravity, leads to a discrete spectrum of cosmological perturbations, instead of the continuous Gaussian spectrum predicted by standard field theory in an unquantized background. Heuristic models of discrete spectra are discussed, based on an inflaton mode with self-gravity, a lattice of amplitude states, an entangled ensemble of modes, and the holographic or covariant entropy bound. Estimates are given for the discreteness observable in cosmic background anisotropy, galaxy clustering, and gravitational wave backgrounds.

  15. The value of Doppler LiDAR systems to monitor turbulence intensity during storm events in order to enhance aviation safety in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shu; Nína Petersen, Guðrún; Finger, David C.

    2017-04-01

    Turbulence and wind shear are a major natural hazards for aviation safety in Iceland. The temporal and spatial scale of atmospheric turbulence is very dynamic, requiring an adequate method to detect and monitor turbulence with high resolution. The Doppler Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) system can provide continuous information about the wind field using the Doppler effect form emitted light signals. In this study, we use a Leosphere Windcube 200s LiDAR systems stationed near Reykjavik city Airport and at Keflavik International Airport, Iceland, to evaluate turbulence intensity by estimating eddy dissipation rate (EDR). For this purpose, we retrieved radial wind velocity observations from Velocity Azimuth Display (VAD) scans (360°scans at 15° and 75° elevation angle) to compute EDR. The method was used to monitor and characterize storm events in fall 2016 and the following winter. The preliminary result reveal that the LiDAR observations can detect and quantify atmospheric turbulence with high spatial and temporal resolution. This finding is an important step towards enhanced aviation safety in subpolar climate characterized by sever wind turbulence.

  16. Nonintegrable Schrodinger discrete breathers.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gardeñes, J; Floría, L M; Peyrard, M; Bishop, A R

    2004-12-01

    In an extensive numerical investigation of nonintegrable translational motion of discrete breathers in nonlinear Schrödinger lattices, we have used a regularized Newton algorithm to continue these solutions from the limit of the integrable Ablowitz-Ladik lattice. These solutions are shown to be a superposition of a localized moving core and an excited extended state (background) to which the localized moving pulse is spatially asymptotic. The background is a linear combination of small amplitude nonlinear resonant plane waves and it plays an essential role in the energy balance governing the translational motion of the localized core. Perturbative collective variable theory predictions are critically analyzed in the light of the numerical results.

  17. Discrete anti-gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noyes, H. Pierre; Starson, Scott

    1991-03-01

    Discrete physics, because it replaces time evolution generated by the energy operator with a global bit-string generator (program universe) and replaces fields with the relativistic Wheeler-Feynman action at a distance, allows the consistent formulation of the concept of signed gravitational charge for massive particles. The resulting prediction made by this version of the theory is that free anti-particles near the surface of the earth will fall up with the same acceleration that the corresponding particles fall down. So far as we can see, no current experimental information is in conflict with this prediction of our theory. The experiment crusis will be one of the anti-proton or anti-hydrogen experiments at CERN. Our prediction should be much easier to test than the small effects which those experiments are currently designed to detect or bound.

  18. Steerable Discrete Cosine Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fracastoro, Giulia; Fosson, Sophie M.; Magli, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    In image compression, classical block-based separable transforms tend to be inefficient when image blocks contain arbitrarily shaped discontinuities. For this reason, transforms incorporating directional information are an appealing alternative. In this paper, we propose a new approach to this problem, namely a discrete cosine transform (DCT) that can be steered in any chosen direction. Such transform, called steerable DCT (SDCT), allows to rotate in a flexible way pairs of basis vectors, and enables precise matching of directionality in each image block, achieving improved coding efficiency. The optimal rotation angles for SDCT can be represented as solution of a suitable rate-distortion (RD) problem. We propose iterative methods to search such solution, and we develop a fully fledged image encoder to practically compare our techniques with other competing transforms. Analytical and numerical results prove that SDCT outperforms both DCT and state-of-the-art directional transforms.

  19. Steerable Discrete Cosine Transform.

    PubMed

    Fracastoro, Giulia; Fosson, Sophie M; Magli, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    In image compression, classical block-based separable transforms tend to be inefficient when image blocks contain arbitrarily shaped discontinuities. For this reason, transforms incorporating directional information are an appealing alternative. In this paper, we propose a new approach to this problem, namely, a discrete cosine transform (DCT) that can be steered in any chosen direction. Such transform, called steerable DCT (SDCT), allows to rotate in a flexible way pairs of basis vectors, and enables precise matching of directionality in each image block, achieving improved coding efficiency. The optimal rotation angles for SDCT can be represented as solution of a suitable rate-distortion (RD) problem. We propose iterative methods to search such solution, and we develop a fully fledged image encoder to practically compare our techniques with other competing transforms. Analytical and numerical results prove that SDCT outperforms both DCT and state-of-the-art directional transforms.

  20. Discrete anti-gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P. ); Starson, S. )

    1991-03-01

    Discrete physics, because it replaces time evolution generated by the energy operator with a global bit-string generator (program universe) and replaces fields'' with the relativistic Wheeler-Feynman action at a distance,'' allows the consistent formulation of the concept of signed gravitational charge for massive particles. The resulting prediction made by this version of the theory is that free anti-particles near the surface of the earth will fall'' up with the same acceleration that the corresponding particles fall down. So far as we can see, no current experimental information is in conflict with this prediction of our theory. The experiment crusis will be one of the anti-proton or anti-hydrogen experiments at CERN. Our prediction should be much easier to test than the small effects which those experiments are currently designed to detect or bound. 23 refs.

  1. Discrete Reliability Projection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Defense, Handbook MIL - HDBK -189C, 2011 Hall, J. B., Methodology for Evaluating Reliability Growth Programs of Discrete Systems, Ph.D. thesis, University...pk,i ] · [ 1− (1− θ̆k) · ( N k · T )]k−m , (2.13) 5 2 Hall’s Model where m is the number of observed failure modes and d∗i estimates di (either based...Mode Failures FEF Ni d ∗ i 1 1 0.95 2 1 0.70 3 1 0.90 4 1 0.90 5 4 0.95 6 2 0.70 7 1 0.80 Using equations 2.1 and 2.2 we can calculate the failure

  2. Immigration and Prosecutorial Discretion.

    PubMed

    Apollonio, Dorie; Lochner, Todd; Heddens, Myriah

    Immigration has become an increasingly salient national issue in the US, and the Department of Justice recently increased federal efforts to prosecute immigration offenses. This shift, however, relies on the cooperation of US attorneys and their assistants. Traditionally federal prosecutors have enjoyed enormous discretion and have been responsive to local concerns. To consider how the centralized goal of immigration enforcement may have influenced federal prosecutors in regional offices, we review their prosecution of immigration offenses in California using over a decade's worth of data. Our findings suggest that although centralizing forces influence immigration prosecutions, individual US attorneys' offices retain distinct characteristics. Local factors influence federal prosecutors' behavior in different ways depending on the office. Contrary to expectations, unemployment rates did not affect prosecutors' willingness to pursue immigration offenses, nor did local popular opinion about illegal immigration.

  3. Discrete Minimal Surface Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnlind, Joakim; Hoppe, Jens

    2010-05-01

    We consider discrete minimal surface algebras (DMSA) as generalized noncommutative analogues of minimal surfaces in higher dimensional spheres. These algebras appear naturally in membrane theory, where sequences of their representations are used as a regularization. After showing that the defining relations of the algebra are consistent, and that one can compute a basis of the enveloping algebra, we give several explicit examples of DMSAs in terms of subsets of sln (any semi-simple Lie algebra providing a trivial example by itself). A special class of DMSAs are Yang-Mills algebras. The representation graph is introduced to study representations of DMSAs of dimension d ≤ 4, and properties of representations are related to properties of graphs. The representation graph of a tensor product is (generically) the Cartesian product of the corresponding graphs. We provide explicit examples of irreducible representations and, for coinciding eigenvalues, classify all the unitary representations of the corresponding algebras.

  4. Immigration and Prosecutorial Discretion

    PubMed Central

    Apollonio, Dorie; Lochner, Todd; Heddens, Myriah

    2015-01-01

    Immigration has become an increasingly salient national issue in the US, and the Department of Justice recently increased federal efforts to prosecute immigration offenses. This shift, however, relies on the cooperation of US attorneys and their assistants. Traditionally federal prosecutors have enjoyed enormous discretion and have been responsive to local concerns. To consider how the centralized goal of immigration enforcement may have influenced federal prosecutors in regional offices, we review their prosecution of immigration offenses in California using over a decade's worth of data. Our findings suggest that although centralizing forces influence immigration prosecutions, individual US attorneys' offices retain distinct characteristics. Local factors influence federal prosecutors' behavior in different ways depending on the office. Contrary to expectations, unemployment rates did not affect prosecutors' willingness to pursue immigration offenses, nor did local popular opinion about illegal immigration. PMID:26146530

  5. Thermodynamics of discrete quantum processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Janet; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2013-03-01

    We define thermodynamic configurations and identify two primitives of discrete quantum processes between configurations for which heat and work can be defined in a natural way. This allows us to uncover a general second law for any discrete trajectory that consists of a sequence of these primitives, linking both equilibrium and non-equilibrium configurations. Moreover, in the limit of a discrete trajectory that passes through an infinite number of configurations, i.e. in the reversible limit, we recover the saturation of the second law. Finally, we show that for a discrete Carnot cycle operating between four configurations one recovers Carnot's thermal efficiency.

  6. Dimensionality Problem in Discrete Discriminant Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Ana Sousa

    2011-09-01

    A high dimensional problem is very often in Discrete Discriminant Analysis (DDA) due to the fact that the number of parameters estimated in DDA models is very frequently too large. Then, the main problem is sparseness, in which some of the multinomial cells may have no data in the training sets (for one or several classes). Furthermore, there aren't truly reliable methods for selecting the most discrete discriminative features and often we deal with small sample sizes with classes not well separated. This dimensional DDA problem is often known as the "curse of dimensionality". In this context, a combining models approach seems to be promising since it is known that different DDA models perform differently on different subjects. This approach currently appears in an increasing number of papers aiming to obtain more robust and stable models. Thus, in discrete problems we propose new forms of modeling the conditional probability functions based on linear combinations of reference models (e.g. the Full Multinomial Model (FMM) and the First-order Independence Model (FOIM)). Recently, since class separability is another fundamental problem in discrete supervised problems we have focused in exploring measures for analyzing class separability. We investigate the performance of the present approaches on real and simulated data.

  7. Siku: A Sea Ice Discrete Element Method Model on a Spherical Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulchitsky, A. V.; Hutchings, J. K.; Johnson, J.

    2014-12-01

    Offshore oil and gas exploration and production activities in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas can be significantly and adversely affected by sea ice. In the event of an oil spill, sea ice complicates the tracking of ice/oil trajectories and can hinder cleanup operations. There is a need for a sea ice dynamics model that can accurately simulate ice pack deformation and failure to improve the ability to track ice/oil trajectories and support oil response operations. A discrete element method (DEM) model, where each ice floe is represented by discrete elements that are initially bonded (frozen) together will be used to address the difficulty continuum modeling approaches have with representing discrete phenomena in sea ice, such as the formation of leads and ridges. Each discrete element in the DEM is a rigid body driven by environmental forcing (wind, current and Coriolis forces) and interaction forces with other discrete elements (compression, shear, tension, bond rupture and regrowth). We introduce a new DEM model ``Siku'', currently under development, to simulate ice drift of an ice floe on a spherical Earth. We will present initial free-drift results. Siku is focused on improving sea ice interaction mechanics and providing an accurate geometrical representation needed for basin scale and regional simulations. Upon completion, Siku will be an open source GNU GPL licensed user friendly program with embedded python capability for setting up simulations "scenarios" and coupling with other models to provide forcing fields. We use a unique quaternion representation for position and orientation of polygon sea-ice elements that use a second order integration scheme of sea-ice element motion on the Earth's sphere that does not depend on the location of the element and, hence, avoids numerical problems near the pole.

  8. Large scale application of kinetic ART, a near order-1 topologically- based off-lattice kinetic Monte-Carlo algorithm with on-the-fly calculation of events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beland, Laurent Karim; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Mousseau, Normand

    2010-03-01

    Using a topological classification of eventsfootnotetextB. D. McKay, Congressus Numerantium 30, 45 (1981). combined with the Activation-Relaxation Technique (ART nouveau) for the generation of diffusion pathways, the kinetic ART (k-ART)footnotetextF. El-Mellouhi, N. Mousseau and L. J. Lewis, Phys Rev B, 78,15 (2008). lifts many restrictions generally associated with standard kinetic Monte Carlo algorithms. In particular, it can treat on and off-lattice atomic positions and handles exactly long-range elastic deformation. Here we introduce a set of modifications to k-ART that reduce the computational cost of the algorithm to near order 1 and show applications of the algorithm to the diffusion of vacancy and interstitial complexes in large models of crystalline Si (100 000 atoms).

  9. Order Theoretical Semantic Recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Hogan, Emilie A.; Paulson, Patrick R.; Peterson, Elena S.; Stephan, Eric G.; Thomas, Dennis G.

    2013-07-23

    Mathematical concepts of order and ordering relations play multiple roles in semantic technologies. Discrete totally ordered data characterize both input streams and top-k rank-ordered recommendations and query output, while temporal attributes establish numerical total orders, either over time points or in the more complex case of startend temporal intervals. But also of note are the fully partially ordered data, including both lattices and non-lattices, which actually dominate the semantic strcuture of ontological systems. Scalar semantic similarities over partially-ordered semantic data are traditionally used to return rank-ordered recommendations, but these require complementation with true metrics available over partially ordered sets. In this paper we report on our work in the foundations of partial order measurement in ontologies, with application to top-k semantic recommendation in workflows.

  10. Geophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13(2), February 29, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific Event Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-002 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $ 1.

  11. Catastrophic extraction of anomalous events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannson, Tomasz; Forrester, Thomas; Ro, Sookwang; Kostrzewski, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we discuss extraction of anomalous events based on the theory of catastrophes, a mathematical theory of continuous geometrical manifolds with discrete singularities called catastrophes. Intelligence exploitation systems and technologies include such novel data mining techniques as automatic extraction of discrete anomalous events by software algorithms based on the theory of catastrophes, that can reduce complex problems to a few essential so-called state variables. This paper discusses mostly corank-1 catastrophes with only one state variable, for simplicity. As an example we discuss mostly avionics platforms and catastrophic failures that can be recorded by flight instruments.

  12. Discreteness inducing coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Consider two species that diffuse through space. Consider further that they differ only in initial densities and, possibly, in diffusion constants. Otherwise they are identical. What happens if they compete with each other in the same environment? What is the influence of the discrete nature of the interactions on the final destination? And what are the influence of diffusion and additive fluctuations corresponding to random migration and immigration of individuals? This paper aims to answer these questions for a particular competition model that incorporates intra and interspecific competition between the species. Based on mean field theory, the model has a stationary state dependent on the initial density conditions. We investigate how this initial density dependence is affected by the presence of demographic multiplicative noise and additive noise in space and time. There are three main conclusions: (1) Additive noise favors denser populations at the expense of the less dense, ratifying the competitive exclusion principle. (2) Demographic noise, on the other hand, favors less dense populations at the expense of the denser ones, inducing equal densities at the quasi-stationary state, violating the aforementioned principle. (3) The slower species always suffers the more deleterious effects of statistical fluctuations in a homogeneous medium.

  13. Uranus - Discrete Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This false-color Voyager picture of Uranus shows a discrete cloud seen as a bright streak near the planet's limb. The picture is a highly processed composite of three images obtained Jan. 14, 1986, when the spacecraft was 12.9 million kilometers (8.0 million miles) from the planet. The cloud visible here is the most prominent feature seen in a series of Voyager images designed to track atmospheric motions. (The occasional donut-shaped features, including one at the bottom, are shadows cast by dust in the camera optics; the processing necessary to bring out the faint features on the planet also brings out these camera blemishes.) Three separate images were shuttered through violet, blue and orange filters. Each color image showed the cloud to a different degree; because they were not exposed at exactly the same time, the images were processed to provide a correction for a good spatial match. In a true-color image, the cloud would be barely discernible; the false color helps bring out additional details. The different colors imply variations in vertical structure, but as yet is not possible to be specific about such differences. One possibility is that the Uranian atmosphere contains smog-like constituents, in which case some color differences may represent differences in how these molecules are distributed. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  14. A Discrete Lagrangian Algorithm for Optimal Routing Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kosmas, O. T.; Vlachos, D. S.; Simos, T. E.

    2008-11-06

    The ideas of discrete Lagrangian methods for conservative systems are exploited for the construction of algorithms applicable in optimal ship routing problems. The algorithm presented here is based on the discretisation of Hamilton's principle of stationary action Lagrangian and specifically on the direct discretization of the Lagrange-Hamilton principle for a conservative system. Since, in contrast to the differential equations, the discrete Euler-Lagrange equations serve as constrains for the optimization of a given cost functional, in the present work we utilize this feature in order to minimize the cost function for optimal ship routing.

  15. Algebraic perturbation theory for dense liquids with discrete potentials.

    PubMed

    Adib, Artur B

    2007-06-01

    A simple theory for the leading-order correction g{1}(r) to the structure of a hard-sphere liquid with discrete (e.g., square-well) potential perturbations is proposed. The theory makes use of a general approximation that effectively eliminates four-particle correlations from g{1}(r) with good accuracy at high densities. For the particular case of discrete perturbations, the remaining three-particle correlations can be modeled with a simple volume-exclusion argument, resulting in an algebraic and surprisingly accurate expression for g{1}(r). The structure of a discrete "core-softened" model for liquids with anomalous thermodynamic properties is reproduced as an application.

  16. Discrete Quantum Gravity in the Regge Calculus Formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Khatsymovsky, V.M.

    2005-09-01

    We discuss an approach to the discrete quantum gravity in the Regge calculus formalism that was developed in a number of our papers. The Regge calculus is general relativity for a subclass of general Riemannian manifolds called piecewise flat manifolds. The Regge calculus deals with a discrete set of variables, triangulation lengths, and contains continuous general relativity as a special limiting case where the lengths tend to zero. In our approach, the quantum length expectations are nonzero and of the order of the Plank scale, 10{sup -33} cm, implying a discrete spacetime structure on these scales.

  17. Hybrid discrete/continuum algorithms for stochastic reaction networks

    SciTech Connect

    Safta, Cosmin Sargsyan, Khachik Debusschere, Bert Najm, Habib N.

    2015-01-15

    Direct solutions of the Chemical Master Equation (CME) governing Stochastic Reaction Networks (SRNs) are generally prohibitively expensive due to excessive numbers of possible discrete states in such systems. To enhance computational efficiency we develop a hybrid approach where the evolution of states with low molecule counts is treated with the discrete CME model while that of states with large molecule counts is modeled by the continuum Fokker–Planck equation. The Fokker–Planck equation is discretized using a 2nd order finite volume approach with appropriate treatment of flux components. The numerical construction at the interface between the discrete and continuum regions implements the transfer of probability reaction by reaction according to the stoichiometry of the system. The performance of this novel hybrid approach is explored for a two-species circadian model with computational efficiency gains of about one order of magnitude.

  18. Hybrid discrete/continuum algorithms for stochastic reaction networks

    SciTech Connect

    Safta, Cosmin; Sargsyan, Khachik; Debusschere, Bert; Najm, Habib N.

    2014-10-22

    Direct solutions of the Chemical Master Equation (CME) governing Stochastic Reaction Networks (SRNs) are generally prohibitively expensive due to excessive numbers of possible discrete states in such systems. To enhance computational efficiency we develop a hybrid approach where the evolution of states with low molecule counts is treated with the discrete CME model while that of states with large molecule counts is modeled by the continuum Fokker-Planck equation. The Fokker-Planck equation is discretized using a 2nd order finite volume approach with appropriate treatment of flux components to avoid negative probability values. The numerical construction at the interface between the discrete and continuum regions implements the transfer of probability reaction by reaction according to the stoichiometry of the system. As a result, the performance of this novel hybrid approach is explored for a two-species circadian model with computational efficiency gains of about one order of magnitude.

  19. Optimal Discretization Resolution in Algebraic Image Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, Behzad; Kamalabadi, Farzad

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we focus on data-limited tomographic imaging problems where the underlying linear inverse problem is ill-posed. A typical regularized reconstruction algorithm uses algebraic formulation with a predetermined discretization resolution. If the selected resolution is too low, we may loose useful details of the underlying image and if it is too high, the reconstruction will be unstable and the representation will fit irrelevant features. In this work, two approaches are introduced to address this issue. The first approach is using Mallow's CL method or generalized cross-validation. For each of the two methods, a joint estimator of regularization parameter and discretization resolution is proposed and their asymptotic optimality is investigated. The second approach is a Bayesian estimator of the model order using a complexity-penalizing prior. Numerical experiments focus on a space imaging application from a set of limited-angle tomographic observations.

  20. Discrete coherent states for higher Landau levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, L. D.; Balazs, P.; de Gosson, M.; Mouayn, Z.

    2015-12-01

    We consider the quantum dynamics of a charged particle evolving under the action of a constant homogeneous magnetic field, with emphasis on the discrete subgroups of the Heisenberg group (in the Euclidean case) and of the SL(2 , R) group (in the Hyperbolic case). We investigate completeness properties of discrete coherent states associated with higher order Euclidean and hyperbolic Landau levels, partially extending classic results of Perelomov and of Bargmann, Butera, Girardello and Klauder. In the Euclidean case, our results follow from identifying the completeness problem with known results from the theory of Gabor frames. The results for the hyperbolic setting follow by using a combination of methods from coherent states, time-scale analysis and the theory of Fuchsian groups and their associated automorphic forms.

  1. Fluid Coupling in a Discrete Cochlear Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, S. J.; Lineton, B.; Ni, G.

    2011-11-01

    The interaction between the basilar membrane, BM, dynamics and the fluid coupling in the cochlea can be formulated using a discrete model by assuming that the BM is divided into a number of longitudinal elements. The form of the fluid coupling can then be understood by dividing it into a far field component, due to plane wave acoustic coupling, and a near field component, due to higher order evanescent acoustic modes. The effects of non-uniformity and asymmetry in the cross-sectional areas of the fluid chambers can also be accounted for within this formulation. The discrete model is used to calculate the effect on the coupled BM response of a short cochlear implant, which reduces the volume of one of the fluid chambers over about half its length. The passive response of the coupled cochlea at lower frequencies is shown to be almost unaffected by this change in volume.

  2. Optimal estimation for discrete time jump processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaca, M. V.; Tretter, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    Optimum estimates of nonobservable random variables or random processes which influence the rate functions of a discrete time jump process (DTJP) are obtained. The approach is based on the a posteriori probability of a nonobservable event expressed in terms of the a priori probability of that event and of the sample function probability of the DTJP. A general representation for optimum estimates and recursive equations for minimum mean squared error (MMSE) estimates are obtained. MMSE estimates are nonlinear functions of the observations. The problem of estimating the rate of a DTJP when the rate is a random variable with a probability density function of the form cx super K (l-x) super m and show that the MMSE estimates are linear in this case. This class of density functions explains why there are insignificant differences between optimum unconstrained and linear MMSE estimates in a variety of problems.

  3. Optimal estimation for discrete time jump processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaca, M. V.; Tretter, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    Optimum estimates of nonobservable random variables or random processes which influence the rate functions of a discrete time jump process (DTJP) are derived. The approach used is based on the a posteriori probability of a nonobservable event expressed in terms of the a priori probability of that event and of the sample function probability of the DTJP. Thus a general representation is obtained for optimum estimates, and recursive equations are derived for minimum mean-squared error (MMSE) estimates. In general, MMSE estimates are nonlinear functions of the observations. The problem is considered of estimating the rate of a DTJP when the rate is a random variable with a beta probability density function and the jump amplitudes are binomially distributed. It is shown that the MMSE estimates are linear. The class of beta density functions is rather rich and explains why there are insignificant differences between optimum unconstrained and linear MMSE estimates in a variety of problems.

  4. Analyzing Noncombatant Evacuation Operations Using Discrete Event Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    hotels, stadiums , and other locations where NCEs can stay until transportation to the United States is available (Joint Chiefs of Staff 2007). NCEs...applying analytical techniques such as simulation, optimization, and decision analysis to solve real world problems. He is an avid sports fan and is known

  5. An Object Description Language for Distributed Discrete Event Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-24

    given a universe Up, we define a system SRXpT over a collection of parameters RcP ’ as SR XPT E-lrV xeRUT (2-5) We then define r:pT--->SR such that iz...View2D::zNear - This is the near clipping plane. float gvm::View2D::zFar - This is the far clipping plane Public Constructors: gvm::View2D::View2D...of the view. GLdouble gvm::View3D::scale - Zooming factor of the scale. GLdouble gvm::View3D::zNear - Near clipping plane. GLdouble gvm::View3D::zFar

  6. Unified Behavior Framework for Discrete Event Simulation Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    behavior trees , etc. This choice introduces restrictions into what behaviors agents can manifest, and can require significant testing in edge cases...Behavior Trees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.4.2 Extended Teleo-Reactive Architecture: GRUE . . . . . . . . . . . 18...Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2.8 Rooted Tree Graph

  7. Airlift Operation Modeling Using Discrete Event Simulation (DES)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    is null. The list is herein referred to as standby landing spot list. data type: java.util.LinkedList<LandingSpot> 21. NAk Number of available...aircraft of type k; initial value is 0. 22. NAk Number of aircraft of type k in process of loading up; initial value is 0. 23. NDk Number of...recovery, refueling, repairing and waiting ( NAk , NLk, NDk, NUk, NRk, NRFk, NRPk and NWk respectively), to zero, • initialize the standby landing spot

  8. Warship Combat System Selection Methodology Based on Discrete Event Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    serious economic impact on the nation. From intelligence reports, it is believed with 95% confidence that the submarine is within an area of 80 NM x 80...this infrastructure is critical for Colombian economic interests, since coal commerce represents an important piece of GDP. One week earlier, an...experienced this kind of grouth , with an average of more than 55% for the types of ship analyzed. Table 26. Representative Ship Class Displacements. From

  9. USMC Inventory Control Using Optimization Modeling and Discrete Event Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    of the optimization model provides important input information to the DES and vice versa. A DES only “ replays ” the process in accordance with the... memory permit, and is the approach used in this thesis. 32 3. Concept Example Figure 11 provides a simple example of the overall OMT construct process

  10. Discrete Event Simulation Modeling and Analysis of Key Leader Engagements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    ENGAGEMENTS 1. Key Leaders Key leaders are the formal or informal leaders that are powerful in a society and can influence a target audience in a way...Leader Engagements 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Clifford C. Wakeman 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate...School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) N/A 10

  11. Representing Dynamic Social Networks in Discrete Event Social Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    applied settings in the areas of marketing and behavior modification programs (exercise adoption, smoking cessation) ( Icek Ajzen 2006). The model has an...society. The action choice component of the conceptual model is based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) (I. Ajzen 1991). The TPB states that an...information networks into military simulations. In Pro- ceedings of the 40th Conference on Winter Simulation. pp. 133–144. Ajzen , I. 1991. The theory of

  12. Efficient stochastic sensitivity analysis of discrete event systems

    SciTech Connect

    Plyasunov, Sergey . E-mail: teleserg@uclink.berkeley.edu; Arkin, Adam P. . E-mail: aparkin@lbl.gov

    2007-02-10

    Sensitivity analysis quantifies the dependence of a system's behavior on the parameters that could possibly affect the dynamics. Calculation of sensitivities of stochastic chemical systems using Kinetic Monte Carlo and finite-difference-based methods is not only computationally intensive, but direct calculation of sensitivities by finite-difference-based methods of parameter perturbations converges very poorly. In this paper we develop an approach to this issue using a method based on the Girsanov measure transformation for jump processes to smooth the estimate of the sensitivity coefficients and make this estimation more accurate. We demonstrate the method with simple examples and discuss its appropriate use.

  13. Simple Movement and Detection in Discrete Event Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    with a description of uniform linear motion in the following section. We will then con- sider the simplest kind of sensing, the “ cookie -cutter.” A... cookie -cutter sensor sees everything that is within its range R, and must be notified at the precise time a target enters it range. In a time-step...simulation, cookie -cutter detection is very easy. Simply compute the distance between the sensor and the target at each time step. If the target is

  14. A Multiple Ranking Procedure Adapted to Discrete-Event Simulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    He is the finest instructor I have ever had. It was a privilege to be in his classes. I would also like to thank Dr. Melba Crawford and Dr. Robert ... Sullivan for their interest and help during my months of study. Many times their encouragement made the long hours easier to bear. Finally to my family

  15. Discrete Events in Word Encoding: The Locus of Elaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Donald A.

    1977-01-01

    A model dealing with the function of elaboration in word encoding was evaluated using a 2-list recognition procedure that varied encoding time within the presentation list. The model predicted that elaboration, reflected in the incidence of false positives to associates of words presented in the recognition list, would increase as presentation…

  16. Probabilistic approaches to fault detection in networked discrete event systems.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulou, Eleftheria; Hadjicostis, Christoforos N

    2005-09-01

    In this paper, we consider distributed systems that can be modeled as finite state machines with known behavior under fault-free conditions, and we study the detection of a general class of faults that manifest themselves as permanent changes in the next-state transition functionality of the system. This scenario could arise in a variety of situations encountered in communication networks, including faults occurred due to design or implementation errors during the execution of communication protocols. In our approach, fault diagnosis is performed by an external observer/diagnoser that functions as a finite state machine and which has access to the input sequence applied to the system but has only limited access to the system state or output. In particular, we assume that the observer/diagnoser is only able to obtain partial information regarding the state of the given system at intermittent time intervals that are determined by certain synchronizing conditions between the system and the observer/diagnoser. By adopting a probabilistic framework, we analyze ways to optimally choose these synchronizing conditions and develop adaptive strategies that achieve a low probability of aliasing, i.e., a low probability that the external observer/diagnoser incorrectly declares the system as fault-free. An application of these ideas in the context of protocol testing/classification is provided as an example.

  17. The Applicability of Structured Modeling to Discrete Event Simulation Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    of Attributes :\\ basic theme in this Section concerns the limitations of the attribute clement type and ways around these restrictions. A technique...ce 2nd Echelon Battalion of’IER of ILL) 1EDIER2- EBM [ANEUVER_*( IEDI ER2LB) cc IED1ER2EBARTILLERYN’\\(IEDIER2EB) ce IED2ER(lED ce 2nd Echelon Regiment of

  18. Wilderness event medicine: planning for mass gatherings in remote areas.

    PubMed

    Burdick, Timothy E

    2005-11-01

    An increasing number of large recreational events are taking place in remote environments where medical care is far away. Such events include adventure races and large outdoor trips. Wilderness event medicine (WEM) has been previously defined as the healthcare response at any discrete event with more than 200 persons located more than 1h from hospital treatment. However, there is little literature describing the steps for providing medical care at such events. This article provides a framework for planning and executing WEM. It reviews the published data on wilderness injury and illness rates and describes the nature of injuries as they relate to specific activities. The article then discusses the three stages of WEM: pre-event planning, medical treatment at the event, and post-event tasks. Wilderness events include myriad activities, including orienteering, mountain biking, mountaineering, and whitewater paddling. The injury and illness rates are in the range of 1-10 per 1000 person-days of exposure, with rates one order of magnitude greater for events which last many days, include extremes of environment (heat, altitude), or are competitive in nature. Professional adventure racers may present for medical evaluation at rates as high as 1000 encounters per 1000 racer-days. Injuries depend largely on activity. Illnesses are mostly gastrointestinal, 'flu-like' malaise, or related to the event environment, such as humidity or altitude. Providing medical care requires the proper staff, equipment, and contingency plans. The remoteness of these events mandates different protocols than would be used at an urban mass gathering. WEM will likely continue to grow and evolve as a specialty. Additional reports from wilderness events, perhaps facilitated through a web-based incident reporting system, will allow medical providers to improve the quality of care given at remote events. Research into wilderness activity physiology will also be useful in understanding the prevention

  19. A Comparison of the Accuracy of Discrete Event and Discrete Time

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    over these places and may not be able to capture the rate at which the changes are occurring. In these circumstances the time step is too big . Finally...different sized quanta D. All solutions converged quickly to the neighborhood of the steady-state value of 1.0. Those for which the steady-state value was

  20. Microscopic derivation of discrete hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Español, Pep; Anero, Jesús G; Zúñiga, Ignacio

    2009-12-28

    By using the standard theory of coarse graining based on Zwanzig's projection operator, we derive the dynamic equations for discrete hydrodynamic variables. These hydrodynamic variables are defined in terms of the Delaunay triangulation. The resulting microscopically derived equations can be understood, a posteriori, as a discretization on an arbitrary irregular grid of the Navier-Stokes equations. The microscopic derivation provides a set of discrete equations that exactly conserves mass, momentum, and energy and the dissipative part of the dynamics produces strict entropy increase. In addition, the microscopic derivation provides a practical implementation of thermal fluctuations in a way that the fluctuation-dissipation theorem is satisfied exactly. This paper points toward a close connection between coarse-graining procedures from microscopic dynamics and discretization schemes for partial differential equations.