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Sample records for order finite elements

  1. Second order tensor finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. Tinsley; Fly, J.; Berry, C.; Tworzydlo, W.; Vadaketh, S.; Bass, J.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a research and software development effort are presented for the finite element modeling of the static and dynamic behavior of anisotropic materials, with emphasis on single crystal alloys. Various versions of two dimensional and three dimensional hybrid finite elements were implemented and compared with displacement-based elements. Both static and dynamic cases are considered. The hybrid elements developed in the project were incorporated into the SPAR finite element code. In an extension of the first phase of the project, optimization of experimental tests for anisotropic materials was addressed. In particular, the problem of calculating material properties from tensile tests and of calculating stresses from strain measurements were considered. For both cases, numerical procedures and software for the optimization of strain gauge and material axes orientation were developed.

  2. Visualizing higher order finite elements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David C; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2005-11-01

    This report contains an algorithm for decomposing higher-order finite elements into regions appropriate for isosurfacing and proves the conditions under which the algorithm will terminate. Finite elements are used to create piecewise polynomial approximants to the solution of partial differential equations for which no analytical solution exists. These polynomials represent fields such as pressure, stress, and momentum. In the past, these polynomials have been linear in each parametric coordinate. Each polynomial coefficient must be uniquely determined by a simulation, and these coefficients are called degrees of freedom. When there are not enough degrees of freedom, simulations will typically fail to produce a valid approximation to the solution. Recent work has shown that increasing the number of degrees of freedom by increasing the order of the polynomial approximation (instead of increasing the number of finite elements, each of which has its own set of coefficients) can allow some types of simulations to produce a valid approximation with many fewer degrees of freedom than increasing the number of finite elements alone. However, once the simulation has determined the values of all the coefficients in a higher-order approximant, tools do not exist for visual inspection of the solution. This report focuses on a technique for the visual inspection of higher-order finite element simulation results based on decomposing each finite element into simplicial regions where existing visualization algorithms such as isosurfacing will work. The requirements of the isosurfacing algorithm are enumerated and related to the places where the partial derivatives of the polynomial become zero. The original isosurfacing algorithm is then applied to each of these regions in turn.

  3. Visualization of higher order finite elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David C.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre; Crawford, Richard H.; Khardekar, Rahul Vinay

    2004-04-01

    Finite element meshes are used to approximate the solution to some differential equation when no exact solution exists. A finite element mesh consists of many small (but finite, not infinitesimal or differential) regions of space that partition the problem domain, {Omega}. Each region, or element, or cell has an associated polynomial map, {Phi}, that converts the coordinates of any point, x = ( x y z ), in the element into another value, f(x), that is an approximate solution to the differential equation, as in Figure 1(a). This representation works quite well for axis-aligned regions of space, but when there are curved boundaries on the problem domain, {Omega}, it becomes algorithmically much more difficult to define {Phi} in terms of x. Rather, we define an archetypal element in a new coordinate space, r = ( r s t ), which has a simple, axis-aligned boundary (see Figure 1(b)) and place two maps onto our archetypal element:

  4. Application of Mass Lumped Higher Order Finite Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Strauss, H. R.; Jardin, S. C.; Park, W.; Sugiyama, L. E.; G. Fu; Breslau, J.

    2005-11-01

    There are many interesting phenomena in extended-MHD such as anisotropic transport, mhd, 2-fluid effects stellarator and hot particles. Any one of them challenges numerical analysts, and researchers are seeking for higher order methods, such as higher order finite difference, higher order finite elements and hp/spectral elements. It is true that these methods give more accurate solution than their linear counterparts. However, numerically they are prohibitively expensive. Here we give a successful solution of this conflict by applying mass lumped higher order finite elements. This type of elements not only keep second/third order accuracy but also scale closely to linear elements by doing mass lumping. This is especially true for second order lump elements. Full M3D and anisotropic transport models are studied.

  5. Higher-Order Finite Elements for Computing Thermal Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Dana C.

    2004-01-01

    Two variants of the finite-element method have been developed for use in computational simulations of radiative transfers of heat among diffuse gray surfaces. Both variants involve the use of higher-order finite elements, across which temperatures and radiative quantities are assumed to vary according to certain approximations. In this and other applications, higher-order finite elements are used to increase (relative to classical finite elements, which are assumed to be isothermal) the accuracies of final numerical results without having to refine computational meshes excessively and thereby incur excessive computation times. One of the variants is termed the radiation sub-element (RSE) method, which, itself, is subject to a number of variations. This is the simplest and most straightforward approach to representation of spatially variable surface radiation. Any computer code that, heretofore, could model surface-to-surface radiation can incorporate the RSE method without major modifications. In the basic form of the RSE method, each finite element selected for use in computing radiative heat transfer is considered to be a parent element and is divided into sub-elements for the purpose of solving the surface-to-surface radiation-exchange problem. The sub-elements are then treated as classical finite elements; that is, they are assumed to be isothermal, and their view factors and absorbed heat fluxes are calculated accordingly. The heat fluxes absorbed by the sub-elements are then transferred back to the parent element to obtain a radiative heat flux that varies spatially across the parent element. Variants of the RSE method involve the use of polynomials to interpolate and/or extrapolate to approximate spatial variations of physical quantities. The other variant of the finite-element method is termed the integration method (IM). Unlike in the RSE methods, the parent finite elements are not subdivided into smaller elements, and neither isothermality nor other

  6. High-order Finite Element Analysis of Boundary Layer Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Alvin; Sahni, Onkar

    2014-11-01

    Numerical analysis of boundary layer flows requires careful approximations, specifically the use of a mesh with layered and graded elements near the (viscous) walls. This is referred to as a boundary layer mesh, which for complex geometries is composed of triangular elements on the walls that are inflated or extruded into the volume along the wall-normal direction up to a desired height while the rest of the domain is filled with unstructured tetrahedral elements. Linear elements with C0 inter-element continuity are employed and in some situations higher order C0 elements are also used. However, these elements only enforce continuity whereas high-order smoothness is not attained as will be the case with C1 inter-element continuity and higher. As a result, C0 elements result in a poor approximation of the high-order boundary layer behavior. To achieve greater inter-element continuity in boundary layer region, we employ B-spline basis functions along the wall-normal direction (i.e., only in the layered portion of the mesh). In the rest of the fully unstructured mesh, linear or higher order C0 elements are used as appropriate. In this study we demonstrate the benefits of finite-element analysis based on such higher order and continuity basis functions for boundary layer flows.

  7. Higher Order Lagrange Finite Elements In M3D

    SciTech Connect

    J. Chen; H.R. Strauss; S.C. Jardin; W. Park; L.E. Sugiyama; G. Fu; J. Breslau

    2004-12-17

    The M3D code has been using linear finite elements to represent multilevel MHD on 2-D poloidal planes. Triangular higher order elements, up to third order, are constructed here in order to provide M3D the capability to solve highly anisotropic transport problems. It is found that higher order elements are essential to resolve the thin transition layer characteristic of the anisotropic transport equation, particularly when the strong anisotropic direction is not aligned with one of the Cartesian coordinates. The transition layer is measured by the profile width, which is zero for infinite anisotropy. It is shown that only higher order schemes have the ability to make this layer converge towards zero when the anisotropy gets stronger and stronger. Two cases are considered. One has the strong transport direction partially aligned with one of the element edges, the other doesn't have any alignment. Both cases have the strong transport direction misaligned with the grid line by some angles.

  8. Acceleration of low order finite element computation with GPUs (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knepley, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    Considerable effort has been focused on the acceleration using GPUs of high order spectral element methods and discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods. However, these methods are not universally applicable, and much of the existing FEM software base employs low order methods. In this talk, we present a formulation of FEM, using the PETSc framework from ANL, which is amenable to GPU acceleration even at very low order. In addition, using the FEniCS system for FEM, we show that the relevant kernels can be automatically generated and optimized using a symbolic manipulation system.

  9. High-Order Curvilinear Finite Element Methods for Lagrangian Hydrodynamics [High Order Curvilinear Finite Elements for Lagrangian Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrev, Veselin A.; Kolev, Tzanio V.; Rieben, Robert N.

    2012-09-20

    The numerical approximation of the Euler equations of gas dynamics in a movingLagrangian frame is at the heart of many multiphysics simulation algorithms. Here, we present a general framework for high-order Lagrangian discretization of these compressible shock hydrodynamics equations using curvilinear finite elements. This method is an extension of the approach outlined in [Dobrev et al., Internat. J. Numer. Methods Fluids, 65 (2010), pp. 1295--1310] and can be formulated for any finite dimensional approximation of the kinematic and thermodynamic fields, including generic finite elements on two- and three-dimensional meshes with triangular, quadrilateral, tetrahedral, or hexahedral zones. We discretize the kinematic variables of position and velocity using a continuous high-order basis function expansion of arbitrary polynomial degree which is obtained via a corresponding high-order parametric mapping from a standard reference element. This enables the use of curvilinear zone geometry, higher-order approximations for fields within a zone, and a pointwise definition of mass conservation which we refer to as strong mass conservation. Moreover, we discretize the internal energy using a piecewise discontinuous high-order basis function expansion which is also of arbitrary polynomial degree. This facilitates multimaterial hydrodynamics by treating material properties, such as equations of state and constitutive models, as piecewise discontinuous functions which vary within a zone. To satisfy the Rankine--Hugoniot jump conditions at a shock boundary and generate the appropriate entropy, we introduce a general tensor artificial viscosity which takes advantage of the high-order kinematic and thermodynamic information available in each zone. Finally, we apply a generic high-order time discretization process to the semidiscrete equations to develop the fully discrete numerical algorithm. Our method can be viewed as the high-order generalization of the so-called staggered

  10. Methods and framework for visualizing higher-order finite elements.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, William J; Bertel, François; Malaterre, Mathieu; Thompson, David; Pébay, Philippe P; O'Bara, Robert; Tendulkar, Saurabh

    2006-01-01

    The finite element method is an important, widely used numerical technique for solving partial differential equations. This technique utilizes basis functions for approximating the geometry and the variation of the solution field over finite regions, or elements, of the domain. These basis functions are generally formed by combinations of polynomials. In the past, the polynomial order of the basis has been low-typically of linear and quadratic order. However, in recent years so-called p and hp methods have been developed, which may elevate the order of the basis to arbitrary levels with the aim of accelerating the convergence of the numerical solution. The increasing complexity of numerical basis functions poses a significant challenge to visualization systems. In the past, such systems have been loosely coupled to simulation packages, exchanging data via file transfer, and internally reimplementing the basis functions in order to perform interpolation and implement visualization algorithms. However, as the basis functions become more complex and, in some cases, proprietary in nature, it becomes increasingly difficult if not impossible to reimplement them within the visualization system. Further, most visualization systems typically process linear primitives, in part to take advantage of graphics hardware and, in part, due to the inherent simplicity of the resulting algorithms. Thus, visualization of higher-order finite elements requires tessellating the basis to produce data compatible with existing visualization systems. In this paper, we describe adaptive methods that automatically tessellate complex finite element basis functions using a flexible and extensible software framework. These methods employ a recursive, edge-based subdivision algorithm driven by a set of error metrics including geometric error, solution error, and error in image space. Further, we describe advanced pretessellation techniques that guarantees capture of the critical points of the

  11. Visualizing Higher Order Finite Elements: FY05 Yearly Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2005-11-01

    This report contains an algorithm for decomposing higher-order finite elementsinto regions appropriate for isosurfacing and proves the conditions under which thealgorithm will terminate. Finite elements are used to create piecewise polynomialapproximants to the solution of partial differential equations for which no analyticalsolution exists. These polynomials represent fields such as pressure, stress, and mo-mentim. In the past, these polynomials have been linear in each parametric coordinate.Each polynomial coefficient must be uniquely determined by a simulation, and thesecoefficients are called degrees of freedom. When there are not enough degrees of free-dom, simulations will typically fail to produce a valid approximation to the solution.Recent work has shown that increasing the number of degrees of freedom by increas-ing the order of the polynomial approximation (instead of increasing the number offinite elements, each of which has its own set of coefficients) can allow some typesof simulations to produce a valid approximation with many fewer degrees of freedomthan increasing the number of finite elements alone. However, once the simulation hasdetermined the values of all the coefficients in a higher-order approximant, tools donot exist for visual inspection of the solution.This report focuses on a technique for the visual inspection of higher-order finiteelement simulation results based on decomposing each finite element into simplicialregions where existing visualization algorithms such as isosurfacing will work. Therequirements of the isosurfacing algorithm are enumerated and related to the placeswhere the partial derivatives of the polynomial become zero. The original isosurfacingalgorithm is then applied to each of these regions in turn.3 AcknowledgementThe authors would like to thank David Day and Louis Romero for their insight into poly-nomial system solvers and the LDRD Senior Council for the opportunity to pursue thisresearch. The authors were

  12. A viscoelastic higher-order beam finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur R.; Tressler, Alexander

    1996-01-01

    A viscoelastic internal variable constitutive theory is applied to a higher-order elastic beam theory and finite element formulation. The behavior of the viscous material in the beam is approximately modeled as a Maxwell solid. The finite element formulation requires additional sets of nodal variables for each relaxation time constant needed by the Maxwell solid. Recent developments in modeling viscoelastic material behavior with strain variables that are conjugate to the elastic strain measures are combined with advances in modeling through-the-thickness stresses and strains in thick beams. The result is a viscous thick-beam finite element that possesses superior characteristics for transient analysis since its nodal viscous forces are not linearly dependent an the nodal velocities, which is the case when damping matrices are used. Instead, the nodal viscous forces are directly dependent on the material's relaxation spectrum and the history of the nodal variables through a differential form of the constitutive law for a Maxwell solid. The thick beam quasistatic analysis is explored herein as a first step towards developing more complex viscoelastic models for thick plates and shells, and for dynamic analyses. The internal variable constitutive theory is derived directly from the Boltzmann superposition theorem. The mechanical strains and the conjugate internal strains are shown to be related through a system of first-order, ordinary differential equations. The total time-dependent stress is the superposition of its elastic and viscous components. Equations of motion for the solid are derived from the virtual work principle using the total time-dependent stress. Numerical examples for the problems of relaxation, creep, and cyclic creep are carried out for a beam made from an orthotropic Maxwell solid.

  13. High-order finite element methods for cardiac monodomain simulations

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Kevin P.; Gonzales, Matthew J.; Gillette, Andrew K.; Villongco, Christopher T.; Pezzuto, Simone; Omens, Jeffrey H.; Holst, Michael J.; McCulloch, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling of tissue-scale cardiac electrophysiology requires numerically converged solutions to avoid spurious artifacts. The steep gradients inherent to cardiac action potential propagation necessitate fine spatial scales and therefore a substantial computational burden. The use of high-order interpolation methods has previously been proposed for these simulations due to their theoretical convergence advantage. In this study, we compare the convergence behavior of linear Lagrange, cubic Hermite, and the newly proposed cubic Hermite-style serendipity interpolation methods for finite element simulations of the cardiac monodomain equation. The high-order methods reach converged solutions with fewer degrees of freedom and longer element edge lengths than traditional linear elements. Additionally, we propose a dimensionless number, the cell Thiele modulus, as a more useful metric for determining solution convergence than element size alone. Finally, we use the cell Thiele modulus to examine convergence criteria for obtaining clinically useful activation patterns for applications such as patient-specific modeling where the total activation time is known a priori. PMID:26300783

  14. High-order finite element methods for cardiac monodomain simulations.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Kevin P; Gonzales, Matthew J; Gillette, Andrew K; Villongco, Christopher T; Pezzuto, Simone; Omens, Jeffrey H; Holst, Michael J; McCulloch, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling of tissue-scale cardiac electrophysiology requires numerically converged solutions to avoid spurious artifacts. The steep gradients inherent to cardiac action potential propagation necessitate fine spatial scales and therefore a substantial computational burden. The use of high-order interpolation methods has previously been proposed for these simulations due to their theoretical convergence advantage. In this study, we compare the convergence behavior of linear Lagrange, cubic Hermite, and the newly proposed cubic Hermite-style serendipity interpolation methods for finite element simulations of the cardiac monodomain equation. The high-order methods reach converged solutions with fewer degrees of freedom and longer element edge lengths than traditional linear elements. Additionally, we propose a dimensionless number, the cell Thiele modulus, as a more useful metric for determining solution convergence than element size alone. Finally, we use the cell Thiele modulus to examine convergence criteria for obtaining clinically useful activation patterns for applications such as patient-specific modeling where the total activation time is known a priori.

  15. Radiosity algorithms using higher order finite element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Troutman, R.; Max, N.

    1993-08-01

    Many of the current radiosity algorithms create a piecewise constant approximation to the actual radiosity. Through interpolation and extrapolation, a continuous solution is obtained. An accurate solution is found by increasing the number of patches which describe the scene. This has the effect of increasing the computation time as well as the memory requirements. By using techniques found in the finite element method, we can incorporate an interpolation function directly into our form factor computation. We can then use less elements to achieve a more accurate solution. Two algorithms, derived from the finite element method, are described and analyzed.

  16. Beyond first-order finite element schemes in micromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kritsikis, E.; Vaysset, A.; Buda-Prejbeanu, L.D.; Toussaint, J.-C.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic materials is ruled by the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation (LLG). Reliable schemes must conserve the magnetization norm, which is a nonconvex constraint, and be energy-decreasing unless there is pumping. Some of the authors previously devised a convergent finite element scheme that, by choice of an appropriate test space – the tangent plane to the magnetization – reduces to a linear problem at each time step. The scheme was however first-order in time. We claim it is not an intrinsic limitation, and the same approach can lead to efficient micromagnetic simulation. We show how the scheme order can be increased, and the nonlocal (magnetostatic) interactions be tackled in logarithmic time, by the fast multipole method or the non-uniform fast Fourier transform. Our implementation is called feeLLGood. A test-case of the National Institute of Standards and Technology is presented, then another one relevant to spin-transfer effects (the spin-torque oscillator)

  17. Beyond first-order finite element schemes in micromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritsikis, E.; Vaysset, A.; Buda-Prejbeanu, L. D.; Alouges, F.; Toussaint, J.-C.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic materials is ruled by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation (LLG). Reliable schemes must conserve the magnetization norm, which is a nonconvex constraint, and be energy-decreasing unless there is pumping. Some of the authors previously devised a convergent finite element scheme that, by choice of an appropriate test space - the tangent plane to the magnetization - reduces to a linear problem at each time step. The scheme was however first-order in time. We claim it is not an intrinsic limitation, and the same approach can lead to efficient micromagnetic simulation. We show how the scheme order can be increased, and the nonlocal (magnetostatic) interactions be tackled in logarithmic time, by the fast multipole method or the non-uniform fast Fourier transform. Our implementation is called feeLLGood. A test-case of the National Institute of Standards and Technology is presented, then another one relevant to spin-transfer effects (the spin-torque oscillator).

  18. High-order finite element methods for seismic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Basabe Delgado, Jonas De Dios

    Purely numerical methods based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) are becoming increasingly popular in seismic modeling for the propagation of acoustic and elastic waves in geophysical models. These methods offer a better control on the accuracy and more geometrical flexibility than the Finite Difference methods that have been traditionally used for the generation of synthetic seismograms. However, the success of these methods has outpaced their analytic validation. The accuracy of the FEMs used for seismic wave propagation is unknown in most cases and therefore the simulation parameters in numerical experiments are determined by empirical rules. I focus on two methods that are particularly suited for seismic modeling: the Spectral Element Method (SEM) and the Interior-Penalty Discontinuous Galerkin Method (IP-DGM). The goals of this research are to investigate the grid dispersion and stability of SEM and IP-DGM, to implement these methods and to apply them to subsurface models to obtain synthetic seismograms. In order to analyze the grid dispersion and stability, I use the von Neumann method (plane wave analysis) to obtain a generalized eigenvalue problem. I show that the eigenvalues are related to the grid dispersion and that, with certain assumptions, the size of the eigenvalue problem can be reduced from the total number of degrees of freedom to one proportional to the number of degrees of freedom inside one element. The grid dispersion results indicate that SEM of degree greater than 4 is isotropic and has a very low dispersion. Similar dispersion properties are observed for the symmetric formulation of IP-DGM of degree greater than 4 using nodal basis functions. The low dispersion of these methods allows for a sampling ratio of 4 nodes per wavelength to be used. On the other hand, the stability analysis shows that, in the elastic case, the size of the time step required in IP-DGM is approximately 6 times smaller than that of SEM. The results from the analysis

  19. Three Dimensional Eddy Current Analysis by Multi-Order Vector Finite Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hano, Mitsuo; Hotta, Masashi

    In this paper, we propose new method based on multi-order vector finite elements in three dimensional eddy current analysis. Edges, faces, and volume of the multi-order element have orders of shape functions, respectively. In order to realize high efficiency of numerical calculation, high-order elements are assigned in the important area of the eddy current model, and low-order elements in the surrounding area, and multi-order elements in the middle area to bond two areas, respectively. The results obtained by multi-order elements are compared with those by full high-order elements and by full low-order elements.

  20. Radiation Heat Transfer Between Diffuse-Gray Surfaces Using Higher Order Finite Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Dana C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents recent work on developing methods for analyzing radiation heat transfer between diffuse-gray surfaces using p-version finite elements. The work was motivated by a thermal analysis of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) wing structure which showed the importance of radiation heat transfer throughout the structure. The analysis also showed that refining the finite element mesh to accurately capture the temperature distribution on the internal structure led to very large meshes with unacceptably long execution times. Traditional methods for calculating surface-to-surface radiation are based on assumptions that are not appropriate for p-version finite elements. Two methods for determining internal radiation heat transfer are developed for one and two-dimensional p-version finite elements. In the first method, higher-order elements are divided into a number of sub-elements. Traditional methods are used to determine radiation heat flux along each sub-element and then mapped back to the parent element. In the second method, the radiation heat transfer equations are numerically integrated over the higher-order element. Comparisons with analytical solutions show that the integration scheme is generally more accurate than the sub-element method. Comparison to results from traditional finite elements shows that significant reduction in the number of elements in the mesh is possible using higher-order (p-version) finite elements.

  1. Higher-order adaptive finite-element methods for Kohn-Sham density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motamarri, P.; Nowak, M. R.; Leiter, K.; Knap, J.; Gavini, V.

    2013-11-01

    We present an efficient computational approach to perform real-space electronic structure calculations using an adaptive higher-order finite-element discretization of Kohn-Sham density-functional theory (DFT). To this end, we develop an a priori mesh-adaption technique to construct a close to optimal finite-element discretization of the problem. We further propose an efficient solution strategy for solving the discrete eigenvalue problem by using spectral finite-elements in conjunction with Gauss-Lobatto quadrature, and a Chebyshev acceleration technique for computing the occupied eigenspace. The proposed approach has been observed to provide a staggering 100-200-fold computational advantage over the solution of a generalized eigenvalue problem. Using the proposed solution procedure, we investigate the computational efficiency afforded by higher-order finite-element discretizations of the Kohn-Sham DFT problem. Our studies suggest that staggering computational savings-of the order of 1000-fold-relative to linear finite-elements can be realized, for both all-electron and local pseudopotential calculations, by using higher-order finite-element discretizations. On all the benchmark systems studied, we observe diminishing returns in computational savings beyond the sixth-order for accuracies commensurate with chemical accuracy, suggesting that the hexic spectral-element may be an optimal choice for the finite-element discretization of the Kohn-Sham DFT problem. A comparative study of the computational efficiency of the proposed higher-order finite-element discretizations suggests that the performance of finite-element basis is competing with the plane-wave discretization for non-periodic local pseudopotential calculations, and compares to the Gaussian basis for all-electron calculations to within an order of magnitude. Further, we demonstrate the capability of the proposed approach to compute the electronic structure of a metallic system containing 1688 atoms using

  2. Higher-order adaptive finite-element methods for Kohn–Sham density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Motamarri, P.; Nowak, M.R.; Leiter, K.; Knap, J.; Gavini, V.

    2013-11-15

    We present an efficient computational approach to perform real-space electronic structure calculations using an adaptive higher-order finite-element discretization of Kohn–Sham density-functional theory (DFT). To this end, we develop an a priori mesh-adaption technique to construct a close to optimal finite-element discretization of the problem. We further propose an efficient solution strategy for solving the discrete eigenvalue problem by using spectral finite-elements in conjunction with Gauss–Lobatto quadrature, and a Chebyshev acceleration technique for computing the occupied eigenspace. The proposed approach has been observed to provide a staggering 100–200-fold computational advantage over the solution of a generalized eigenvalue problem. Using the proposed solution procedure, we investigate the computational efficiency afforded by higher-order finite-element discretizations of the Kohn–Sham DFT problem. Our studies suggest that staggering computational savings—of the order of 1000-fold—relative to linear finite-elements can be realized, for both all-electron and local pseudopotential calculations, by using higher-order finite-element discretizations. On all the benchmark systems studied, we observe diminishing returns in computational savings beyond the sixth-order for accuracies commensurate with chemical accuracy, suggesting that the hexic spectral-element may be an optimal choice for the finite-element discretization of the Kohn–Sham DFT problem. A comparative study of the computational efficiency of the proposed higher-order finite-element discretizations suggests that the performance of finite-element basis is competing with the plane-wave discretization for non-periodic local pseudopotential calculations, and compares to the Gaussian basis for all-electron calculations to within an order of magnitude. Further, we demonstrate the capability of the proposed approach to compute the electronic structure of a metallic system containing 1688

  3. Visualization of High-Order Finite Element Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-27

    Peters , Valerio Pascucci, Robert M. Kirby and Claudio T. Silva, "Topology Verification for Isosurface Extraction", IEEE Transactions on Visualization...Visualization of High-Order Methods Professor Robert M. Kirby , Mr. Robert Haimes University of Utah Office of Sponsored Programs University of Utah Salt Lake...ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER Robert Kirby 801-585-3421 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 26-Sep-2008

  4. Higher order temporal finite element methods through mixed formalisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkyu

    2014-01-01

    The extended framework of Hamilton's principle and the mixed convolved action principle provide new rigorous weak variational formalism for a broad range of initial boundary value problems in mathematical physics and mechanics. In this paper, their potential when adopting temporally higher order approximations is investigated. The classical single-degree-of-freedom dynamical systems are primarily considered to validate and to investigate the performance of the numerical algorithms developed from both formulations. For the undamped system, all the algorithms are symplectic and unconditionally stable with respect to the time step. For the damped system, they are shown to be accurate with good convergence characteristics.

  5. A Higher-Order Plate Theory with Ideal Finite Element Suitability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    MTL TR 89-85 rAP I A HIGHER-ORDER PLATE THEORY WITH IDEAL FINITE ELEMENT SUITABILITY ALEXANDER TESSLER MECHANICS AND STRUCTURES BRANCH September 1989...OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Final Report A HIGHER-ORDER PLATE THEORY WITH IDEAL FINITE ELEMENT SUITABILITY 6. PERFORMING ORG REPORT NUMBER 7...KEY ANOROS ’(, -.nnn an rresze s-ia Jn"r¢_ssav ard ulrns i-v Eitk nufer Plate theory Field consistency ttigncr order Equations cf motion Shear d

  6. POD-Galerkin reduced-order modeling with adaptive finite element snapshots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, Sebastian; Rotkvic, Marko; Lang, Jens

    2016-11-01

    We consider model order reduction by proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) for parametrized partial differential equations, where the underlying snapshots are computed with adaptive finite elements. We address computational and theoretical issues arising from the fact that the snapshots are members of different finite element spaces. We propose a method to create a POD-Galerkin model without interpolating the snapshots onto their common finite element mesh. The error of the reduced-order solution is not necessarily Galerkin orthogonal to the reduced space created from space-adapted snapshot. We analyze how this influences the error assessment for POD-Galerkin models of linear elliptic boundary value problems. As a numerical example we consider a two-dimensional convection-diffusion equation with a parametrized convective direction. To illustrate the applicability of our techniques to non-linear time-dependent problems, we present a test case of a two-dimensional viscous Burgers equation with parametrized initial data.

  7. Higher order finite element modeling of acoustic propagation in a moving medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Listerud, Eivind

    This research considers the finite element modeling of the convective potential formulation of acoustic propagation and radiation. Higher order elements have been used to increase the computational efficiency of duct and turbofan models. Cubic serendipity elements have been implemented in a non-uniform duct model of acoustic propagation in a moving medium. These elements outperform the quadratic serendipity elements in terms of reducing the dimensionality without losing accuracy based on visual observations and error norm analysis. Comparisons show that for computation of acoustic pressure the cubic element formulation converges at a higher rate than the quadratic. CPU time reduction of up to 40% has been observed without sacrifice in accuracy. Serendipity elements have also been compared in performance to Lagrangian elements. Any penalty in numerical accuracy incurred by using serendipity elements rather than Lagrangian elements is far outweighed by the gains in dimensionality. Analytical expressions for the effects of convection and that of acoustic propagating modes on the wavelength have been formulated and compared to numerical results. The cubic serendipity elements have also been applied to the near field of inlet and aft acoustic radiation models for a turbofan engine resulting in considerable reduction in the dimensionality of the problem without sacrificing accuracy. Preliminary assessment of alternative finite element approaches to model the convective potential formulation has been conducted. Stabilization and wave approximation methods have been implemented to solve simple one-dimensional problems.

  8. New plate and shell elements for NASTRAN. [development of higher order triangular plate-bending finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanaswami, R.

    1973-01-01

    A new higher order triangular plate-bending finite element is presented which possesses high accuracy for practical mesh subdivisions and which uses only translations and rotations as grid point degrees of freedom. The element has 18 degrees of freedom, the transverse displacement and two rotations at the vertices and mid-side grid points of the triangle. The transverse displacement within the element is approximated by a quintic polynomial; the bending strains thus vary cubically within the element. Transverse shear flexibility is taken into account in the stiffness formulation. Two examples of static and dynamic analysis are included to show the behavior of the element.

  9. A lowest-order composite finite element exact sequence on pyramids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainsworth, Mark; Fu, Guosheng

    2017-09-01

    Composite basis functions for pyramidal elements on the spaces $H^1(\\Omega)$, $H(\\mathrm{curl},\\Omega)$, $H(\\mathrm{div},\\Omega)$ and $L^2(\\Omega)$ are presented. In particular, we construct the lowest-order composite pyramidal elements and show that they respect the de Rham diagram, i.e. we have an exact sequence and satisfy the commuting property. Moreover, the finite elements are fully compatible with the standard finite elements for the lowest-order Raviart-Thomas-N\\'ed\\'elec sequence on tetrahedral and hexahedral elements. That is to say, the new elements have the same degrees of freedom on the shared interface with the neighbouring hexahedral or tetrahedra elements, and the basis functions are conforming in the sense that they maintain the required level of continuity (full, tangential component, normal component, ...) across the interface. Furthermore, we study the approximation properties of the spaces as an initial partition consisting of tetrahedra, hexahedra and pyramid elements is successively subdivided and show that the spaces result in the same (optimal) order of approximation in terms of the mesh size $h$ as one would obtain using purely hexahedral or purely tetrahedral partitions.

  10. Guidelines and Recommendations on the Use of Higher Order Finite Elements for Bending Analysis of Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, E.; Miglioretti, F.; Petrolo, M.

    2011-11-01

    This paper compares and evaluates various plate finite elements to analyse the static response of thick and thin plates subjected to different loading and boundary conditions. Plate elements are based on different assumptions for the displacement distribution along the thickness direction. Classical (Kirchhoff and Reissner-Mindlin), refined (Reddy and Kant), and other higher-order displacement fields are implemented up to fourth-order expansion. The Unified Formulation UF by the first author is used to derive finite element matrices in terms of fundamental nuclei which consist of 3×3 arrays. The MITC4 shear-locking free type formulation is used for the FE approximation. Accuracy of a given plate element is established in terms of the error vs. thickness-to-length parameter. A significant number of finite elements for plates are implemented and compared using displacement and stress variables for various plate problems. Reduced models that are able to detect the 3D solution are built and a Best Plate Diagram (BPD) is introduced to give guidelines for the construction of plate theories based on a given accuracy and number of terms. It is concluded that the UF is a valuable tool to establish, for a given plate problem, the most accurate FE able to furnish results within a certain accuracy range. This allows us to obtain guidelines and recommendations in building refined elements in the bending analysis of plates for various geometries, loadings, and boundary conditions.

  11. Higher Order Finite Element Methods for Compositional Simulation in 3D Multiphase Multicomponent Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahraeeni, E.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2012-12-01

    We present a 3D model for fully compositional multi-phase multi-component flow in porous media with species transfer between the phases. Phase properties are modeled with the Peng-Robinson equation of state. Because phase properties may exhibit strong discontinuities, we approximate the mass transport update by the means of discontinuous Galerkin method. Pressure and velocity fields are continuous across the whole domain of solution, which is guaranteed by using the mixed hybrid finite element method. Complexity of the flow necessitates the use of either very fine mesh or higher-order schemes. The use of higher-order finite element methods significantly reduces numerical dispersion and grid orientation effects that plague traditional finite difference methods. We have shown that in 3D the convergence rate of our scheme is twice as first order method and the CPU time may improve up to three orders of magnitude for the same level of accuracy. Our numerical model facilitates accurate simulation of delicate feature of compositional flow like fingering and CO2 injection in complex reservoirs for a broad range of applications, including CO2 sequestration in finite aquifer and water flooded reservoirs with transfer of all species between the phases.

  12. Efficient simulation of cardiac electrical propagation using high order finite elements.

    PubMed

    Arthurs, Christopher J; Bishop, Martin J; Kay, David

    2012-05-20

    We present an application of high order hierarchical finite elements for the efficient approximation of solutions to the cardiac monodomain problem. We detail the hurdles which must be overcome in order to achieve theoretically-optimal errors in the approximations generated, including the choice of method for approximating the solution to the cardiac cell model component. We place our work on a solid theoretical foundation and show that it can greatly improve the accuracy in the approximation which can be achieved in a given amount of processor time. Our results demonstrate superior accuracy over linear finite elements at a cheaper computational cost and thus indicate the potential indispensability of our approach for large-scale cardiac simulation.

  13. Efficient simulation of cardiac electrical propagation using high order finite elements

    PubMed Central

    Arthurs, Christopher J.; Bishop, Martin J.; Kay, David

    2012-01-01

    We present an application of high order hierarchical finite elements for the efficient approximation of solutions to the cardiac monodomain problem. We detail the hurdles which must be overcome in order to achieve theoretically-optimal errors in the approximations generated, including the choice of method for approximating the solution to the cardiac cell model component. We place our work on a solid theoretical foundation and show that it can greatly improve the accuracy in the approximation which can be achieved in a given amount of processor time. Our results demonstrate superior accuracy over linear finite elements at a cheaper computational cost and thus indicate the potential indispensability of our approach for large-scale cardiac simulation. PMID:24976644

  14. Optimal higher order modeling methodology based on method of moments and finite element method for electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopf, Eve Marian

    General guidelines and quantitative recipes for adoptions of optimal higher order parameters for computational electromagnetics (CEM) modeling using the method of moments and the finite element method are established and validated, based on an exhaustive series of numerical experiments and comprehensive case studies on higher order hierarchical CEM models of metallic and dielectric scatterers. The modeling parameters considered are: electrical dimensions of elements (subdivisions) in the model (h -refinement), polynomial orders of basis and testing functions ( p-refinement), orders of Gauss-Legendre integration formulas (numbers of integration points -- integration accuracy), and geometrical orders of elements (orders of Lagrange-type curvature) in the model. The goal of the study, which is the first such study of higher order parameters in CEM, is to reduce the dilemmas and uncertainties associated with the great modeling flexibility of higher order elements, basis and testing functions, and integration procedures (this flexibility is the principal advantage but also the greatest shortcoming of the higher order CEM), and to ease and facilitate the decisions to be made on how to actually use them, by both CEM developers and practitioners. The ultimate goal is to close the large gap between the rising academic interest in higher order CEM, which evidently shows great numerical potential, and its actual usefulness and application to electromagnetics research and engineering applications.

  15. GPU-based volume visualization from high-order finite element fields.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Blake; Kirby, Robert M; Haimes, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a new volume rendering system for spectral/hp finite-element methods that has as its goal to be both accurate and interactive. Even though high-order finite element methods are commonly used by scientists and engineers, there are few visualization methods designed to display this data directly. Consequently, visualizations of high-order data are generally created by first sampling the high-order field onto a regular grid and then generating the visualization via traditional methods based on linear interpolation. This approach, however, introduces error into the visualization pipeline and requires the user to balance image quality, interactivity, and resource consumption. We first show that evaluation of the volume rendering integral, when applied to the composition of piecewise-smooth transfer functions with the high-order scalar field, typically exhibits second-order convergence for a wide range of high-order quadrature schemes, and has worst case first-order convergence. This result provides bounds on the ability to achieve high-order convergence to the volume rendering integral. We then develop an algorithm for optimized evaluation of the volume rendering integral, based on the categorization of each ray according to the local behavior of the field and transfer function. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our system by running performance benchmarks on several high-order fluid-flow simulations.

  16. A priori mesh quality metric error analysis applied to a high-order finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowrie, W.; Lukin, V. S.; Shumlak, U.

    2011-06-01

    Characterization of computational mesh's quality prior to performing a numerical simulation is an important step in insuring that the result is valid. A highly distorted mesh can result in significant errors. It is therefore desirable to predict solution accuracy on a given mesh. The HiFi/SEL high-order finite element code is used to study the effects of various mesh distortions on solution quality of known analytic problems for spatial discretizations with different order of finite elements. The measured global error norms are compared to several mesh quality metrics by independently varying both the degree of the distortions and the order of the finite elements. It is found that the spatial spectral convergence rates are preserved for all considered distortion types, while the total error increases with the degree of distortion. For each distortion type, correlations between the measured solution error and the different mesh metrics are quantified, identifying the most appropriate overall mesh metric. The results show promise for future a priori computational mesh quality determination and improvement.

  17. Discontinuous deformation analysis with second-order finite element meshed block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayeli, Roozbeh; Mortazavi, Ali

    2006-12-01

    The discontinuous deformation analysis (DDA) with second-order displacement functions was derived based on six-node triangular mesh in order to satisfy the requirement for the accurate calculations in practical applications. The matrices of equilibrium equations for the second-order DDA were given in detail for program coding. By close comparison with widely used finite element method and closed form solutions, the advantages of the modified DDA were illustrated. The program coding was carried out in C++ environment and the new code applied to three examples with known analytical solutions. A very good agreement was achieved between the analytical and numerical results produced by the modified DDA code. Copyright

  18. Flux-corrected transport algorithms for continuous Galerkin methods based on high order Bernstein finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, Christoph; Kuzmin, Dmitri; Shadid, John N.; Mabuza, Sibusiso

    2017-09-01

    This work extends the flux-corrected transport (FCT) methodology to arbitrary order continuous finite element discretizations of scalar conservation laws on simplex meshes. Using Bernstein polynomials as local basis functions, we constrain the total variation of the numerical solution by imposing local discrete maximum principles on the Bézier net. The design of accuracy-preserving FCT schemes for high order Bernstein-Bézier finite elements requires the development of new algorithms and/or generalization of limiting techniques tailored for linear and multilinear Lagrange elements. In this paper, we propose (i) a new discrete upwinding strategy leading to local extremum bounded low order approximations with compact stencils, (ii) high order variational stabilization based on the difference between two gradient approximations, and (iii) new localized limiting techniques for antidiffusive element contributions. The optional use of a smoothness indicator, based on a second derivative test, makes it possible to potentially avoid unnecessary limiting at smooth extrema and achieve optimal convergence rates for problems with smooth solutions. The accuracy of the proposed schemes is assessed in numerical studies for the linear transport equation in 1D and 2D.

  19. A suitable low-order, eight-node tetrahedral finite element for solids

    SciTech Connect

    Key, S.W.; Heinstein, M.S.; Stone, C.M.; Mello, F.J.; Blanford, M.L.; Budge, K.G.

    1998-03-01

    To use the all-tetrahedral mesh generation existing today, the authors have explored the creation of a computationally efficient eight-node tetrahedral finite element (a four-node tetrahedral finite element enriched with four mid-face nodal points). The derivation of the element`s gradient operator, studies in obtaining a suitable mass lumping, and the element`s performance in applications are presented. In particular they examine the eight-node tetrahedral finite element`s behavior in longitudinal plane wave propagation, in transverse cylindrical wave propagation, and in simulating Taylor bar impacts. The element samples only constant strain states and, therefore, has 12 hour-glass modes. In this regard it bears similarities to the eight-node, mean-quadrature hexahedral finite element. Comparisons with the results obtained from the mean-quadrature eight-node hexahedral finite element and the four-node tetrahedral finite element are included. Given automatic all-tetrahedral meshing, the eight-node, constant-strain tetrahedral finite element is a suitable replacement for the eight-node hexahedral finite element in those cases where mesh generation requires an inordinate amount of user intervention and direction to obtain acceptable mesh properties.

  20. Numerical Studies of Gyroviscous Effects Using High-Order Finite Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Nathaniel; Ramos, Jesus

    2005-10-01

    We have developed a technique for incorporating a general expression of the gyroviscous forceootnotetextJ. J. Ramos, PSFC/JA-05-9, MIT (2005). into an implicit solution algorithm for the two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. We present the results of numerical simulations of six-field extended-MHD equations in two dimensions, including Braginskii's gyroviscous stress tensor, using triangular finite elements with fifth-order accuracy and continuous first derivatives (C^1-continuity). Our model extends that used by Jardin and BreslauootnotetextS. C. Jardin and J. A. Breslau, Phys. Plasmas 12, 56101 (2005). by including the evolution of pressure and flow compressibility, in addition to the inclusion of the gyroviscous force. The use of C^1-continuous finite elements allows up to four differentiations of any field variable, thus enabling the inclusion of the full gyroviscous stress tensor. The effect of this term on wave propagation and Harris-equilibrium reconnection is demonstrated.

  1. Anisotropic Resistivity Forward Modelling Using Automatic Generated Higher-order Finite Element Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Liu, J.

    2016-12-01

    Forward modelling is the general way to obtain responses of geoelectrical structures. Field investigators might find it useful for planning surveys and choosing optimal electrode configurations with respect to their targets. During the past few decades much effort has been put into the development of numerical forward codes, such as integral equation method, finite difference method and finite element method. Nowadays, most researchers prefer the finite element method (FEM) for its flexible meshing scheme, which can handle models with complex geometry. Resistivity Modelling with commercial sofewares such as ANSYS and COMSOL is convenient, but like working with a black box. Modifying the existed codes or developing new codes is somehow a long period. We present a new way to obtain resistivity forward modelling codes quickly, which is based on the commercial sofeware FEPG (Finite element Program Generator). Just with several demanding scripts, FEPG could generate FORTRAN program framework which can easily be altered to adjust our targets. By supposing the electric potential is quadratic in each element of a two-layer model, we obtain quite accurate results with errors less than 1%, while more than 5% errors could appear by linear FE codes. The anisotropic half-space model is supposed to concern vertical distributed fractures. The measured apparent resistivities along the fractures are bigger than results from its orthogonal direction, which are opposite of the true resistivities. Interpretation could be misunderstood if this anisotropic paradox is ignored. The technique we used can obtain scientific codes in a short time. The generated powerful FORTRAN codes could reach accurate results by higher-order assumption and can handle anisotropy to make better interpretations. The method we used could be expand easily to other domain where FE codes are needed.

  2. Dispersive and dissipative behaviour of high order discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainsworth, Mark

    2004-07-01

    The dispersive and dissipative properties of hp version discontinuous Galerkin finite element approximation are studied in three different limits. For the small wave-number limit hk→0, we show the discontinuous Galerkin gives a higher order of accuracy than the standard Galerkin procedure, thereby confirming the conjectures of Hu and Atkins [J. Comput. Phys. 182 (2) (2002) 516]. If the mesh is fixed and the order p is increased, it is shown that the dissipation and dispersion errors decay at a super-exponential rate when the order p is much larger than hk. Finally, if the order is chosen so that 2 p+1≈ κhk for some fixed constant κ>1, then it is shown that an exponential rate of decay is obtained.

  3. A high-order staggered finite-element vertical discretization for non-hydrostatic atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Jorge E.; Ullrich, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric modeling systems require economical methods to solve the non-hydrostatic Euler equations. Two major differences between hydrostatic models and a full non-hydrostatic description lies in the vertical velocity tendency and numerical stiffness associated with sound waves. In this work we introduce a new arbitrary-order vertical discretization entitled the staggered nodal finite-element method (SNFEM). Our method uses a generalized discrete derivative that consistently combines the discontinuous Galerkin and spectral element methods on a staggered grid. Our combined method leverages the accurate wave propagation and conservation properties of spectral elements with staggered methods that eliminate stationary (2Δx) modes. Furthermore, high-order accuracy also eliminates the need for a reference state to maintain hydrostatic balance. In this work we demonstrate the use of high vertical order as a means of improving simulation quality at relatively coarse resolution. We choose a test case suite that spans the range of atmospheric flows from predominantly hydrostatic to nonlinear in the large-eddy regime. Our results show that there is a distinct benefit in using the high-order vertical coordinate at low resolutions with the same robust properties as the low-order alternative.

  4. A high-order staggered finite-element vertical discretization for non-hydrostatic atmospheric models

    DOE PAGES

    Guerra, Jorge E.; Ullrich, Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric modeling systems require economical methods to solve the non-hydrostatic Euler equations. Two major differences between hydrostatic models and a full non-hydrostatic description lies in the vertical velocity tendency and numerical stiffness associated with sound waves. In this work we introduce a new arbitrary-order vertical discretization entitled the staggered nodal finite-element method (SNFEM). Our method uses a generalized discrete derivative that consistently combines the discontinuous Galerkin and spectral element methods on a staggered grid. Our combined method leverages the accurate wave propagation and conservation properties of spectral elements with staggered methods that eliminate stationary (2Δx) modes. Furthermore, high-order accuracy alsomore » eliminates the need for a reference state to maintain hydrostatic balance. In this work we demonstrate the use of high vertical order as a means of improving simulation quality at relatively coarse resolution. We choose a test case suite that spans the range of atmospheric flows from predominantly hydrostatic to nonlinear in the large-eddy regime. Our results show that there is a distinct benefit in using the high-order vertical coordinate at low resolutions with the same robust properties as the low-order alternative.« less

  5. Stability of the high-order finite elements for acoustic or elastic wave propagation with high-order time stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Basabe, Jonás D.; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2010-04-01

    We investigate the stability of some high-order finite element methods, namely the spectral element method and the interior-penalty discontinuous Galerkin method (IP-DGM), for acoustic or elastic wave propagation that have become increasingly popular in the recent past. We consider the Lax-Wendroff method (LWM) for time stepping and show that it allows for a larger time step than the classical leap-frog finite difference method, with higher-order accuracy. In particular the fourth-order LWM allows for a time step 73 per cent larger than that of the leap-frog method; the computational cost is approximately double per time step, but the larger time step partially compensates for this additional cost. Necessary, but not sufficient, stability conditions are given for the mentioned methods for orders up to 10 in space and time. The stability conditions for IP-DGM are approximately 20 and 60 per cent more restrictive than those for SEM in the acoustic and elastic cases, respectively.

  6. MGGHAT: Elliptic PDE software with adaptive refinement, multigrid and high order finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, William F.

    1993-01-01

    MGGHAT (MultiGrid Galerkin Hierarchical Adaptive Triangles) is a program for the solution of linear second order elliptic partial differential equations in two dimensional polygonal domains. This program is now available for public use. It is a finite element method with linear, quadratic or cubic elements over triangles. The adaptive refinement via newest vertex bisection and the multigrid iteration are both based on a hierarchical basis formulation. Visualization is available at run time through an X Window display, and a posteriori through output files that can be used as GNUPLOT input. In this paper, we describe the methods used by MGGHAT, define the problem domain for which it is appropriate, illustrate use of the program, show numerical and graphical examples, and explain how to obtain the software.

  7. Advanced modeling strategy for the analysis of heart valve leaflet tissue mechanics using high-order finite element method.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Bahramian, Fereshteh; Wan, Wankei

    2009-11-01

    Modeling soft tissue using the finite element method is one of the most challenging areas in the field of biomechanical engineering. To date, many models have been developed to describe heart valve leaflet tissue mechanics, which are accurate to some extent. Nevertheless, there is no comprehensive method to modeling soft tissue mechanics, This is because (1) the degree of anisotropy in the heart valve leaflet changes layer by layer due to a variety of collagen fiber densities and orientations that cannot be taken into account in the model and also (2) a constitutive material model fully describing the mechanical properties of the leaflet structure is not available in the literature. In this framework, we develop a new high-order element using p-type finite element formulation to create anisotropic material properties similar to those of the heart valve leaflet tissue in only one single element. This element also takes the nonlinearity of the leaflet tissue into consideration using a bilinear material model. This new element is composed a two-dimensional finite element in the principal directions of leaflet tissue and a p-type finite element in the direction of thickness. The proposed element is easy to implement, much more efficient than standard elements available in commercial finite element packages. This study is one step towards the modeling of soft tissue mechanics using a meshless finite element approach to be applied in real-time haptic feedback of soft-tissue models in virtual reality simulation.

  8. GPU-based interactive cut-surface extraction from high-order finite element fields.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Blake; Haimes, Robert; Kirby, Robert M

    2011-12-01

    We present a GPU-based ray-tracing system for the accurate and interactive visualization of cut-surfaces through 3D simulations of physical processes created from spectral/hp high-order finite element methods. When used by the numerical analyst to debug the solver, the ability for the imagery to precisely reflect the data is critical. In practice, the investigator interactively selects from a palette of visualization tools to construct a scene that can answer a query of the data. This is effective as long as the implicit contract of image quality between the individual and the visualization system is upheld. OpenGL rendering of scientific visualizations has worked remarkably well for exploratory visualization for most solver results. This is due to the consistency between the use of first-order representations in the simulation and the linear assumptions inherent in OpenGL (planar fragments and color-space interpolation). Unfortunately, the contract is broken when the solver discretization is of higher-order. There have been attempts to mitigate this through the use of spatial adaptation and/or texture mapping. These methods do a better job of approximating what the imagery should be but are not exact and tend to be view-dependent. This paper introduces new rendering mechanisms that specifically deal with the kinds of native data generated by high-order finite element solvers. The exploratory visualization tools are reassessed and cast in this system with the focus on image accuracy. This is accomplished in a GPU setting to ensure interactivity.

  9. A high order accurate finite element algorithm for high Reynolds number flow prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    A Galerkin-weighted residuals formulation is employed to establish an implicit finite element solution algorithm for generally nonlinear initial-boundary value problems. Solution accuracy, and convergence rate with discretization refinement, are quantized in several error norms, by a systematic study of numerical solutions to several nonlinear parabolic and a hyperbolic partial differential equation characteristic of the equations governing fluid flows. Solutions are generated using selective linear, quadratic and cubic basis functions. Richardson extrapolation is employed to generate a higher-order accurate solution to facilitate isolation of truncation error in all norms. Extension of the mathematical theory underlying accuracy and convergence concepts for linear elliptic equations is predicted for equations characteristic of laminar and turbulent fluid flows at nonmodest Reynolds number. The nondiagonal initial-value matrix structure introduced by the finite element theory is determined intrinsic to improved solution accuracy and convergence. A factored Jacobian iteration algorithm is derived and evaluated to yield a consequential reduction in both computer storage and execution CPU requirements while retaining solution accuracy.

  10. Higher and lowest order mixed finite element approximation of subsurface flow problems with solutions of low regularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bause, Markus

    2008-02-01

    In this work we study mixed finite element approximations of Richards' equation for simulating variably saturated subsurface flow and simultaneous reactive solute transport. Whereas higher order schemes have proved their ability to approximate reliably reactive solute transport (cf., e.g. [Bause M, Knabner P. Numerical simulation of contaminant biodegradation by higher order methods and adaptive time stepping. Comput Visual Sci 7;2004:61-78]), the Raviart- Thomas mixed finite element method ( RT0) with a first order accurate flux approximation is popular for computing the underlying water flow field (cf. [Bause M, Knabner P. Computation of variably saturated subsurface flow by adaptive mixed hybrid finite element methods. Adv Water Resour 27;2004:565-581, Farthing MW, Kees CE, Miller CT. Mixed finite element methods and higher order temporal approximations for variably saturated groundwater flow. Adv Water Resour 26;2003:373-394, Starke G. Least-squares mixed finite element solution of variably saturated subsurface flow problems. SIAM J Sci Comput 21;2000:1869-1885, Younes A, Mosé R, Ackerer P, Chavent G. A new formulation of the mixed finite element method for solving elliptic and parabolic PDE with triangular elements. J Comp Phys 149;1999:148-167, Woodward CS, Dawson CN. Analysis of expanded mixed finite element methods for a nonlinear parabolic equation modeling flow into variably saturated porous media. SIAM J Numer Anal 37;2000:701-724]). This combination might be non-optimal. Higher order techniques could increase the accuracy of the flow field calculation and thereby improve the prediction of the solute transport. Here, we analyse the application of the Brezzi- Douglas- Marini element ( BDM1) with a second order accurate flux approximation to elliptic, parabolic and degenerate problems whose solutions lack the regularity that is assumed in optimal order error analyses. For the flow field calculation a superiority of the BDM1 approach to the RT0 one is

  11. Application of High Order Acoustic Finite Elements to Transmission Losses and Enclosure Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craggs, A.; Stevenson, G.

    1985-01-01

    A family of acoustic finite elements was developed based on C continuity (acoustic pressure being the nodal variable) and the no-flow condition. The family include triangular, quadrilateral and hexahedral isoparametric elements with linear quadratic and cubic variation in modelling and distortion. Of greatest use in problems with irregular boundaries are the cubic isoparametric elements: the 32 node hexahedral element for three-dimensional systems; and the twelve node quadrilateral and ten node triangular elements for two-dimensional/axisymmetric applications. These elements were applied to problems involving cavity resonances, transmission loss in silencers and the study of end effects, using a Floating Point Systems 164 attached array processor accessed through an Amdahl 5860 mainframe. The elements are presently being used to study the end effects associated with duct terminations within finite enclosures. The transmission losses with various silencers and sidebranches in ducts is also being studied using the same elements.

  12. Dynamico-FE: A Hydrostatic Dynamical Core using Higher-Order Structure-Preserving Finite Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, C.; Dubos, T.; Kritsikis, E.

    2016-12-01

    It is well known that the inviscid, adiabatic equations of atmospheric motion constitute a non-canonical Hamiltonian system, and therefore posses many important conserved quantities such as as mass, potential vorticity and total energy. However, until recently, only a few discretization schemes possessed similar conserved quantities. Fortunately, a general approach to deriving such schemes was developed under the framework of Hamiltonian methods, and over the past decade, there has been a great deal of work on the development of mimetic and conservative numerical schemes for atmospheric dynamical cores using these techniques. An important example is Dynamico, which conserves mass, potential vorticity and total energy; and possesses additional mimetic properties such as a curl-free pressure gradient that does not produce spurious vorticity. Unfortunately, the underlying finite-difference discretization scheme used in Dynamico has been shown to be inconsistent on general grids. To resolve these accuracy issues, a scheme based on mimetic finite elements has been developed that achieves higher-order accuracy while retaining the structure-preserving properties of the existing discretization. This presentation will discuss the new dynamical core, termed Dynamico-FE, along with a more general discussion on mimetic methods as used in atmospheric science.

  13. A unidirectional approach for d-dimensional finite element methods for higher order on sparse grids

    SciTech Connect

    Bungartz, H.J.

    1996-12-31

    In the last years, sparse grids have turned out to be a very interesting approach for the efficient iterative numerical solution of elliptic boundary value problems. In comparison to standard (full grid) discretization schemes, the number of grid points can be reduced significantly from O(N{sup d}) to O(N(log{sub 2}(N)){sup d-1}) in the d-dimensional case, whereas the accuracy of the approximation to the finite element solution is only slightly deteriorated: For piecewise d-linear basis functions, e. g., an accuracy of the order O(N{sup - 2}(log{sub 2}(N)){sup d-1}) with respect to the L{sub 2}-norm and of the order O(N{sup -1}) with respect to the energy norm has been shown. Furthermore, regular sparse grids can be extended in a very simple and natural manner to adaptive ones, which makes the hierarchical sparse grid concept applicable to problems that require adaptive grid refinement, too. An approach is presented for the Laplacian on a uinit domain in this paper.

  14. Parallel Higher-order Finite Element Method for Accurate Field Computations in Wakefield and PIC Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Limborg, C.; Ng, C.; Prudencio, E.; Schussman, G.; Uplenchwar, R.; Ko, K.; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    Over the past years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD), under SciDAC sponsorship, has developed a suite of 3D (2D) parallel higher-order finite element (FE) codes, T3P (T2P) and Pic3P (Pic2P), aimed at accurate, large-scale simulation of wakefields and particle-field interactions in radio-frequency (RF) cavities of complex shape. The codes are built on the FE infrastructure that supports SLAC's frequency domain codes, Omega3P and S3P, to utilize conformal tetrahedral (triangular)meshes, higher-order basis functions and quadratic geometry approximation. For time integration, they adopt an unconditionally stable implicit scheme. Pic3P (Pic2P) extends T3P (T2P) to treat charged-particle dynamics self-consistently using the PIC (particle-in-cell) approach, the first such implementation on a conformal, unstructured grid using Whitney basis functions. Examples from applications to the International Linear Collider (ILC), Positron Electron Project-II (PEP-II), Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and other accelerators will be presented to compare the accuracy and computational efficiency of these codes versus their counterparts using structured grids.

  15. Multi-Material Closure Model for High-Order Finite Element Lagrangian Hydrodynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Dobrev, V. A.; Kolev, T. V.; Rieben, R. N.; ...

    2016-04-27

    We present a new closure model for single fluid, multi-material Lagrangian hydrodynamics and its application to high-order finite element discretizations of these equations [1]. The model is general with respect to the number of materials, dimension and space and time discretizations. Knowledge about exact material interfaces is not required. Material indicator functions are evolved by a closure computation at each quadrature point of mixed cells, which can be viewed as a high-order variational generalization of the method of Tipton [2]. This computation is defined by the notion of partial non-instantaneous pressure equilibration, while the full pressure equilibration is achieved bymore » both the closure model and the hydrodynamic motion. Exchange of internal energy between materials is derived through entropy considerations, that is, every material produces positive entropy, and the total entropy production is maximized in compression and minimized in expansion. Results are presented for standard one-dimensional two-material problems, followed by two-dimensional and three-dimensional multi-material high-velocity impact arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian calculations. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.« less

  16. Multi-Material Closure Model for High-Order Finite Element Lagrangian Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrev, V. A.; Kolev, T. V.; Rieben, R. N.; Tomov, V. Z.

    2016-04-27

    We present a new closure model for single fluid, multi-material Lagrangian hydrodynamics and its application to high-order finite element discretizations of these equations [1]. The model is general with respect to the number of materials, dimension and space and time discretizations. Knowledge about exact material interfaces is not required. Material indicator functions are evolved by a closure computation at each quadrature point of mixed cells, which can be viewed as a high-order variational generalization of the method of Tipton [2]. This computation is defined by the notion of partial non-instantaneous pressure equilibration, while the full pressure equilibration is achieved by both the closure model and the hydrodynamic motion. Exchange of internal energy between materials is derived through entropy considerations, that is, every material produces positive entropy, and the total entropy production is maximized in compression and minimized in expansion. Results are presented for standard one-dimensional two-material problems, followed by two-dimensional and three-dimensional multi-material high-velocity impact arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian calculations. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Estimation of Sonic Fatigue by Reduced-Order Finite Element Based Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Przekop, Adam

    2006-01-01

    A computationally efficient, reduced-order method is presented for prediction of sonic fatigue of structures exhibiting geometrically nonlinear response. A procedure to determine the nonlinear modal stiffness using commercial finite element codes allows the coupled nonlinear equations of motion in physical degrees of freedom to be transformed to a smaller coupled system of equations in modal coordinates. The nonlinear modal system is first solved using a computationally light equivalent linearization solution to determine if the structure responds to the applied loading in a nonlinear fashion. If so, a higher fidelity numerical simulation in modal coordinates is undertaken to more accurately determine the nonlinear response. Comparisons of displacement and stress response obtained from the reduced-order analyses are made with results obtained from numerical simulation in physical degrees-of-freedom. Fatigue life predictions from nonlinear modal and physical simulations are made using the rainflow cycle counting method in a linear cumulative damage analysis. Results computed for a simple beam structure under a random acoustic loading demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach and compare favorably with results obtained from the solution in physical degrees-of-freedom.

  18. Multi-Material Closure Model for High-Order Finite Element Lagrangian Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrev, V. A.; Kolev, T. V.; Rieben, R. N.; Tomov, V. Z.

    2016-04-27

    We present a new closure model for single fluid, multi-material Lagrangian hydrodynamics and its application to high-order finite element discretizations of these equations [1]. The model is general with respect to the number of materials, dimension and space and time discretizations. Knowledge about exact material interfaces is not required. Material indicator functions are evolved by a closure computation at each quadrature point of mixed cells, which can be viewed as a high-order variational generalization of the method of Tipton [2]. This computation is defined by the notion of partial non-instantaneous pressure equilibration, while the full pressure equilibration is achieved by both the closure model and the hydrodynamic motion. Exchange of internal energy between materials is derived through entropy considerations, that is, every material produces positive entropy, and the total entropy production is maximized in compression and minimized in expansion. Results are presented for standard one-dimensional two-material problems, followed by two-dimensional and three-dimensional multi-material high-velocity impact arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian calculations. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. Characterization of high order spatial discretizations and lumping techniques for discontinuous finite element SN transport

    SciTech Connect

    Maginot, P. G.; Ragusa, J. C.; Morel, J. E.

    2013-07-01

    We examine several possible methods of mass matrix lumping for discontinuous finite element discrete ordinates transport using a Lagrange interpolatory polynomial trial space. Though positive outflow angular flux is guaranteed with traditional mass matrix lumping in a purely absorbing 1-D slab cell for the linear discontinuous approximation, we show that when used with higher degree interpolatory polynomial trial spaces, traditional lumping does yield strictly positive outflows and does not increase in accuracy with an increase in trial space polynomial degree. As an alternative, we examine methods which are 'self-lumping'. Self-lumping methods yield diagonal mass matrices by using numerical quadrature restricted to the Lagrange interpolatory points. Using equally-spaced interpolatory points, self-lumping is achieved through the use of closed Newton-Cotes formulas, resulting in strictly positive outflows in pure absorbers for odd power polynomials in 1-D slab geometry. By changing interpolatory points from the traditional equally-spaced points to the quadrature points of the Gauss-Legendre or Lobatto-Gauss-Legendre quadratures, it is possible to generate solution representations with a diagonal mass matrix and a strictly positive outflow for any degree polynomial solution representation in a pure absorber medium in 1-D slab geometry. Further, there is no inherent limit to local truncation error order of accuracy when using interpolatory points that correspond to the quadrature points of high order accuracy numerical quadrature schemes. (authors)

  20. New Multigrid Method Including Elimination Algolithm Based on High-Order Vector Finite Elements in Three Dimensional Magnetostatic Field Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hano, Mitsuo; Hotta, Masashi

    A new multigrid method based on high-order vector finite elements is proposed in this paper. Low level discretizations in this method are obtained by using low-order vector finite elements for the same mesh. Gauss-Seidel method is used as a smoother, and a linear equation of lowest level is solved by ICCG method. But it is often found that multigrid solutions do not converge into ICCG solutions. An elimination algolithm of constant term using a null space of the coefficient matrix is also described. In three dimensional magnetostatic field analysis, convergence time and number of iteration of this multigrid method are discussed with the convectional ICCG method.

  1. Finite element analysis of low-cost membrane deformable mirrors for high-order adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsor, Robert S.; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Makidon, Russell B.

    1999-10-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of glass membrane deformable mirror (DM) support structures intended for very high order low-stroke adaptive optics systems. We investigated commercially available piezoelectric ceramics. Piezoelectric tubes were determined to offer the largest amount of stroke for a given amount of space on the mirror surface that each actuator controls. We estimated the minimum spacing and the maximum expected stroke of such actuators. We developed a quantitative understanding of the response of a membrane mirror surface by performing a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) study. The results of the FEA analysis were used to develop a design and fabrication process for membrane deformable mirrors of 200 - 500 micron thicknesses. Several different values for glass thickness and actuator spacing were analyzed to determine the best combination of actuator stoke and surface deformation quality. We considered two deformable mirror configurations. The first configuration uses a vacuum membrane attachment system where the actuator tubes' central holes connect to an evacuated plenum, and atmospheric pressure holds the membrane against the actuators. This configuration allows the membrane to be removed from the actuators, facilitating easy replacement of the glass. The other configuration uses precision bearing balls epoxied to the ends of the actuator tubes, with the glass membrane epoxied to the ends of the ball bearings. While this kind of DM is not serviceable, it allows actuator spacings of 4 mm, in addition to large stroke. Fabrication of a prototype of the latter kind of DM was started.

  2. An assessment of four-noded plate finite elements based on a generalized third-order theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averill, R. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1992-06-01

    Plate finite elements based on the generalized third-order theory of Reddy and the first-order shear deformation theory are analyzed and compared on the basis of thick and thin plate modeling behavior, distortion sensitivity, overall accuracy, reliability, and efficiency. In particular, several four-noded Reddy-type elements and the nine-noded Lagrangian and heterosis (Mindlin-type) plate elements are analyzed to assess their behavior in bending, vibration, and stability of isotropic and laminated composite plates. A four-noded Reddy-type element is identified which is free of all spurious stiffness and zero energy modes, computationally efficient, and suitable for use in any general-purpose finite element program.

  3. An assessment of four-noded plate finite elements based on a generalized third-order theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Averill, R. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1992-01-01

    Plate finite elements based on the generalized third-order theory of Reddy and the first-order shear deformation theory are analyzed and compared on the basis of thick and thin plate modeling behavior, distortion sensitivity, overall accuracy, reliability, and efficiency. In particular, several four-noded Reddy-type elements and the nine-noded Lagrangian and heterosis (Mindlin-type) plate elements are analyzed to assess their behavior in bending, vibration, and stability of isotropic and laminated composite plates. A four-noded Reddy-type element is identified which is free of all spurious stiffness and zero energy modes, computationally efficient, and suitable for use in any general-purpose finite element program.

  4. Higher-Order Adaptive Finite-Element Methods for Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-03

    employ the finite-temperature Fermi- Dirac smearing [3] to suppress the charge sloshing associated with degenerate or close to degenerate eigenstates...elements up to degree eight (HEX27, HEX125SPECT, HEX343SPECT, HEX729SPECT). The numbers following the words ‘TET’ and ‘HEX’ denote the number of nodes in...work are constructed as Lagrange polynomials interpolated through an optimal distribution of nodes corre- sponding to the roots of derivatives of

  5. On a compact mixed-order finite element for solving the three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Morten M. T.; Sheu, Tony W. H.

    1997-09-01

    Our work is an extension of the previously proposed multivariant element. We assign this refined element as a compact mixed-order element in the sense that use of this element offers a much smaller bandwidth. The analysis is implemented on quadratic hexahedral elements with a view to analysing a three-dimensional incompressible viscous flow problem using a method formulated within the mixed finite element context. The idea of constructing such a stable element is to bring the marker-and-cell (MAC) grid lay-out to the finite element context. This multivariant element can thus be classified as a discontinuous pressure element. We have several reasons for advocating the proposed multivariant element. The primary advantage gained is its ability to reduce the bandwidth of the matrix equation, as compared with its univariant counterparts, so that it can be effectively stored in a compressed row storage (CRS) format. The resulting matrix equation can be solved efficiently by a multifrontal solver owing to its reduced bandwidth. The coding is, however, complicated by the appearance of restricted degrees of freedom at mid-face nodes. Through analytic study this compact multivariant element has a marked advantage over the multivariant element of Gupta et al. in that both bandwidth and computation time have been drastically reduced.

  6. A parallel mixed finite element implementation for approximation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of fourth-order eigenvalue problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulshreshtha, Kshitij; Nataraj, Neela

    2005-08-01

    The paper deals with a parallel implementation of a mixed finite element method of approximation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of fourth order eigenvalue problems with variable/constant coefficients. The implementation has been done in Silicon Graphics Origin 3800, a four processor Intel Xeon Symmetric Multiprocessor and a beowulf cluster of four Intel Pentium III PCs. The generalised eigenvalue problem obtained after discretization using the mixed finite element method is solved using the package LANSO. The numerical results obtained are compared with existing results (if available). The time, speedup comparisons in different environments for some examples of practical and research interest and importance are also given.

  7. Application of Novel High Order Time Domain Vector Finite Element Method to Photonic Band-Gap Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Rieben, R; White, D; Rodrigue, G

    2004-01-13

    In this paper we motivate the use of a novel high order time domain vector finite element method that is of arbitrary order accuracy in space and up to 5th order accurate in time; and in particular, we apply it to the case of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures. Such structures have been extensively studied in the literature with several practical applications; in particular, for the low loss transmission of electromagnetic energy around sharp 90 degree bends [1]. Typically, such structures are simulated via a numerical solution of Maxwell's equations either in the frequency domain or directly in the time domain over a computational grid. The majority of numerical simulations performed for such structures make use of the widely popular finite difference time domain (FDTD) method [2], where the time dependent electric and magnetic fields are discretized over a ''dual'' grid to second order accuracy in space and time. However, such methods do not generalize to unstructured, non-orthogonal grids or to higher order spatial discretization schemes. To simulate more complicated structures with curved boundaries, such as the structure of [3], a cell based finite element method with curvilinear elements is preferred over standard stair-stepped Cartesian meshes; and to more efficiently reduce the effects of numerical dispersion, a higher order method is highly desirable. In this paper, the high order basis functions of [5] are used in conjunction with the high order energy conserving symplectic time integration algorithms of [6] resulting in a high order, fully mimetic, mixed vector finite element method.

  8. ElVis: A System for the Accurate and Interactive Visualization of High-Order Finite Element Solutions.

    PubMed

    Nelson, B; Liu, E; Kirby, R M; Haimes, R

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents the Element Visualizer (ElVis), a new, open-source scientific visualization system for use with high-order finite element solutions to PDEs in three dimensions. This system is designed to minimize visualization errors of these types of fields by querying the underlying finite element basis functions (e.g., high-order polynomials) directly, leading to pixel-exact representations of solutions and geometry. The system interacts with simulation data through runtime plugins, which only require users to implement a handful of operations fundamental to finite element solvers. The data in turn can be visualized through the use of cut surfaces, contours, isosurfaces, and volume rendering. These visualization algorithms are implemented using NVIDIA's OptiX GPU-based ray-tracing engine, which provides accelerated ray traversal of the high-order geometry, and CUDA, which allows for effective parallel evaluation of the visualization algorithms. The direct interface between ElVis and the underlying data differentiates it from existing visualization tools. Current tools assume the underlying data is composed of linear primitives; high-order data must be interpolated with linear functions as a result. In this work, examples drawn from aerodynamic simulations-high-order discontinuous Galerkin finite element solutions of aerodynamic flows in particular-will demonstrate the superiority of ElVis' pixel-exact approach when compared with traditional linear-interpolation methods. Such methods can introduce a number of inaccuracies in the resulting visualization, making it unclear if visual artifacts are genuine to the solution data or if these artifacts are the result of interpolation errors. Linear methods additionally cannot properly visualize curved geometries (elements or boundaries) which can greatly inhibit developers' debugging efforts. As we will show, pixel-exact visualization exhibits none of these issues, removing the visualization scheme as a source of

  9. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Finite element analysis as applied to the broad spectrum of computational fluid mechanics is analyzed. The finite element solution methodology is derived, developed, and applied directly to the differential equation systems governing classes of problems in fluid mechanics. The heat conduction equation is used to reveal the essence and elegance of finite element theory, including higher order accuracy and convergence. The algorithm is extended to the pervasive nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. A specific fluid mechanics problem class is analyzed with an even mix of theory and applications, including turbulence closure and the solution of turbulent flows.

  10. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Finite element analysis as applied to the broad spectrum of computational fluid mechanics is analyzed. The finite element solution methodology is derived, developed, and applied directly to the differential equation systems governing classes of problems in fluid mechanics. The heat conduction equation is used to reveal the essence and elegance of finite element theory, including higher order accuracy and convergence. The algorithm is extended to the pervasive nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. A specific fluid mechanics problem class is analyzed with an even mix of theory and applications, including turbulence closure and the solution of turbulent flows.

  11. High-order local maximum principle preserving (MPP) discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for the transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R.; Dobrev, V.; Kolev, Tz.; Kuzmin, D.; Quezada de Luna, M.; Rieben, R.; Tomov, V.

    2017-04-01

    In this work we present a FCT-like Maximum-Principle Preserving (MPP) method to solve the transport equation. We use high-order polynomial spaces; in particular, we consider up to 5th order spaces in two and three dimensions and 23rd order spaces in one dimension. The method combines the concepts of positive basis functions for discontinuous Galerkin finite element spatial discretization, locally defined solution bounds, element-based flux correction, and non-linear local mass redistribution. We consider a simple 1D problem with non-smooth initial data to explain and understand the behavior of different parts of the method. Convergence tests in space indicate that high-order accuracy is achieved. Numerical results from several benchmarks in two and three dimensions are also reported.

  12. Is model-order reduction viable for the broadband finite-element analysis of electrically large antenna arrays?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floch, O.; Sommer, A.; Farle, O.; Dyczij-Edlinger, R.

    2015-11-01

    Model-order reduction provides an efficient way of computing frequency sweeps for finite-element models, because the dimension of the reduced-order system depends on the complexity of the frequency response rather than the size of the original model. For electrically large domains, however, the applicability of such methods is unclear because the system response may be very complicated. This paper provides a numerical study of the effects of bandwidth, electrical size, and scan angle on the size and convergence of the ROM, by considering linear antenna arrays. A mathematical model is proposed and validated against numerical experiments.

  13. Automatic finite element generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    The design and implementation of a software system for generating finite elements and related computations are described. Exact symbolic computational techniques are employed to derive strain-displacement matrices and element stiffness matrices. Methods for dealing with the excessive growth of symbolic expressions are discussed. Automatic FORTRAN code generation is described with emphasis on improving the efficiency of the resultant code.

  14. The Relation of Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, M.

    1976-01-01

    Finite element and finite difference methods are examined in order to bring out their relationship. It is shown that both methods use two types of discrete representations of continuous functions. They differ in that finite difference methods emphasize the discretization of independent variable, while finite element methods emphasize the discretization of dependent variable (referred to as functional approximations). An important point is that finite element methods use global piecewise functional approximations, while finite difference methods normally use local functional approximations. A general conclusion is that finite element methods are best designed to handle complex boundaries, while finite difference methods are superior for complex equations. It is also shown that finite volume difference methods possess many of the advantages attributed to finite element methods.

  15. Modeling Three-Phase Compositional Flow on Complex 3D Unstructured Grids with Higher-Order Finite Element Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, J.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Most problems of interest in hydrogeology and subsurface energy resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most naturally represented in numerical reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods are a natural choice to describe fluid flow on unstructured meshes, because the governing equations can be readily discretized for any grid-element geometry. In this work, we consider the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by tetrahedra, prisms, or hexahedra, and compare to simulations on 3D structured grids. We employ a combination of mixed hybrid finite element methods to solve for the pressure and flux fields in a fractional flow formulation, and higher-order discontinuous Galerkin methods for the mass transport equations. These methods are well suited to simulate flow in heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide a globally continuous pressure and flux field, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in the phase properties, such as compositions and saturations. The increased accuracy from using higher-order methods improves the modeling of highly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We present several numerical examples to study convergence rates and the (lack of) sensitivity to gridding/mesh orientation, and mesh quality. These examples consider gravity depletion, water and gas injection in oil saturated subsurface reservoirs with species exchange between up to three fluid phases. The examples demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods in the study of challenging multiphase flow problems in porous, geometrically complex, subsurface media.

  16. All-electron density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory with high-order finite elements.

    PubMed

    Lehtovaara, Lauri; Havu, Ville; Puska, Martti

    2009-08-07

    We present for static density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory calculations an all-electron method which employs high-order hierarchical finite-element bases. Our mesh generation scheme, in which structured atomic meshes are merged to an unstructured molecular mesh, allows a highly nonuniform discretization of the space. Thus it is possible to represent the core and valence states using the same discretization scheme, i.e., no pseudopotentials or similar treatments are required. The nonuniform discretization also allows the use of large simulation cells, and therefore avoids any boundary effects.

  17. High-order mimetic finite elements for the hydrostatic primitive equations on a cubed-sphere grid using Hamiltonian methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Christopher; Dubos, Thomas; Kritsikis, Evaggelos

    2016-04-01

    There has been a great deal of work in the past decade on the development of mimetic and conservative numerical schemes for atmospheric dynamical cores using Hamiltonian methods, such as Dynamico (Dubos et. al 2015). This model conserves mass, potential vorticity and total energy; and posses properties such as a curl-free pressure gradient that does not produce spurious vorticity. Unfortunately, the underlying finite-difference discretization scheme used in Dynamico has been shown to be inconsistent on general grids. An alternative scheme based on mimetic finite elements has been developed for the rotating shallow water equations that solves these accuracy issues but retains the desirable mimetic and conservation properties. Preliminary results on the extension of this scheme to the hydrostatic primitive equations are shown. The compatible 2D finite elements spaces are extended to compatible 3D spaces using tensor products, in a way that preserves their properties. It is shown that use of the same prognostic variables as Dynamico combined with a Lorenz staggering leads to a relatively simple formulation that allows conservation of total energy along with high-order accuracy.

  18. A High Order Mixed Vector Finite Element Method for Solving the Time Dependent Maxwell Equations on Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Rieben, R N; Rodrigue, G H; White, D A

    2004-03-09

    We present a mixed vector finite element method for solving the time dependent coupled Ampere and Faraday laws of Maxwell's equations on unstructured hexahedral grids that employs high order discretization in both space and time. The method is of arbitrary order accuracy in space and up to 5th order accurate in time, making it well suited for electrically large problems where grid anisotropy and numerical dispersion have plagued other methods. In addition, the method correctly models both the jump discontinuities and the divergence-free properties of the electric and magnetic fields, is charge and energy conserving, conditionally stable, and free of spurious modes. Several computational experiments are performed to demonstrate the accuracy, efficiency and benefits of the method.

  19. High-order finite-element seismic wave propagation modeling with MPI on a large GPU cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Komatitsch, Dimitri; Erlebacher, Gordon; Goeddeke, Dominik; Michea, David

    2010-10-01

    We implement a high-order finite-element application, which performs the numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation resulting for instance from earthquakes at the scale of a continent or from active seismic acquisition experiments in the oil industry, on a large cluster of NVIDIA Tesla graphics cards using the CUDA programming environment and non-blocking message passing based on MPI. Contrary to many finite-element implementations, ours is implemented successfully in single precision, maximizing the performance of current generation GPUs. We discuss the implementation and optimization of the code and compare it to an existing very optimized implementation in C language and MPI on a classical cluster of CPU nodes. We use mesh coloring to efficiently handle summation operations over degrees of freedom on an unstructured mesh, and non-blocking MPI messages in order to overlap the communications across the network and the data transfer to and from the device via PCIe with calculations on the GPU. We perform a number of numerical tests to validate the single-precision CUDA and MPI implementation and assess its accuracy. We then analyze performance measurements and depending on how the problem is mapped to the reference CPU cluster, we obtain a speedup of 20x or 12x.

  20. A Novel High Order Time Domain Vector Finite Element Method for the Simulation of Electromagnetic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rieben, Robert N.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation is two-fold. The first part concerns the development of a numerical method for solving Maxwell's equations on unstructured hexahedral grids that employs both high order spatial and high order temporal discretizations. The second part involves the use of this method as a computational tool to perform high fidelity simulations of various electromagnetic devices such as optical transmission lines and photonic crystal structures to yield a level of accuracy that has previously been computationally cost prohibitive. This work is based on the initial research of Daniel White who developed a provably stable, charge and energy conserving method for solving Maxwell's equations in the time domain that is second order accurate in both space and time. The research presented here has involved the generalization of this procedure to higher order methods. High order methods are capable of yielding far more accurate numerical results for certain problems when compared to corresponding h-refined first order methods , and often times at a significant reduction in total computational cost. The first half of this dissertation presents the method as well as the necessary mathematics required for its derivation. The second half addresses the implementation of the method in a parallel computational environment, its validation using benchmark problems, and finally its use in large scale numerical simulations of electromagnetic transmission devices.

  1. A novel high order time domain vector finite element method for the simulation of electromagnetic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieben, Robert N.

    The goal of this dissertation is twofold. The first part concerns the development of a numerical method for solving Maxwell's equations on unstructured hexahedral grids that employs both high order spatial and high order temporal discretizations. The second part involves the use of this method as a computational tool to perform high fidelity simulations of various electromagnetic devices such as optical transmission lines and photonic crystal structures to yield a level of accuracy that has previously been computationally cost prohibitive. This work is based on the initial research of Daniel White who developed a provably stable, charge and energy conserving method for solving Maxwell's equations in the time domain that is second order accurate in both space and time. The research presented here has involved the generalization of this procedure to higher order methods. High order methods are capable of yielding far more accurate numerical results for certain problems when compared to corresponding h-refined first order methods, and often times at a significant reduction in total computational cost. The first half of this dissertation presents the method as well as the necessary mathematics required for its derivation. The second half addresses the implementation of the method in a parallel computational environment, its validation using benchmark problems, and finally its use in large scale numerical simulations of electromagnetic transmission devices.

  2. First- and Second-Order Sensitivity Analysis of a P-Version Finite Element Equation Via Automatic Differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Gene

    1998-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is a technique for determining derivatives of system responses with respect to design parameters. Among many methods available for sensitivity analysis, automatic differentiation has been proven through many applications in fluid dynamics and structural mechanics to be an accurate and easy method for obtaining derivatives. Nevertheless, the method can be computational expensive and can require a high memory space. This project will apply an automatic differentiation tool, ADIFOR, to a p-version finite element code to obtain first- and second- order then-nal derivatives, respectively. The focus of the study is on the implementation process and the performance of the ADIFOR-enhanced codes for sensitivity analysis in terms of memory requirement, computational efficiency, and accuracy.

  3. Implicit Solution of the Four-field Extended-magnetohydroynamic Equations using High-order High-continuity Finite Elements

    SciTech Connect

    S.C. Jardin; J.A. Breslau

    2004-12-17

    Here we describe a technique for solving the four-field extended-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in two dimensions. The introduction of triangular high-order finite elements with continuous first derivatives (C{sup 1} continuity) leads to a compact representation compatible with direct inversion of the associated sparse matrices. The split semi-implicit method is introduced and used to integrate the equations in time, yielding unconditional stability for arbitrary time step. The method is applied to the cylindrical tilt mode problem with the result that a non-zero value of the collisionless ion skin depth will increase the growth rate of that mode. The effect of this parameter on the reconnection rate and geometry of a Harris equilibrium and on the Taylor reconnection problem is also demonstrated. This method forms the basis for a generalization to a full extended-MHD description of the plasma with six, eight, or more scalar fields.

  4. Stabilized low-order finite elements for simulating coupled solid deformation and fluid flow in fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. A.; Borja, R. I.

    2007-12-01

    In fluid-saturated sediments and sedimentary rocks, we recognize that the presence of the pore-fluid can serve to impose an incompressibilty constraint on the solid matrix in the limit of undrained conditions or fast loading rates. While such situations are commonly encountered in practice, they pose a challenge for the numerical analyst. From a finite element point of view, incompressibility constraints will often lead to non-physical oscillations in the pressure field unless special care is taken to use stable combinations of pressure and displacement interpolations. Unfortunately, many seemingly natural combinations of mixed interpolations---e.g. linear interpolations for both displacements and pressure---are unstable. The relatively high computational burden associated with standard stable elements has limited the widespread adoption of fully-coupled geomechanical models, especially for large three-dimensional simulations. In this work we explore a stabilizing modification of the coupled balance equations that allows for the use of low-order mixed elements while avoiding non-physical pressure oscillations. The improved efficiency of this technique is a step toward making large-scale, fully-coupled three-dimensional simulations feasible. We demonstrate the efficacy of the technique for simulating coupled solid deformation and fluid flow in fault zones.

  5. High-order space-time finite element schemes for acoustic and viscodynamic wave equations with temporal decoupling.

    PubMed

    Banks, H T; Birch, Malcolm J; Brewin, Mark P; Greenwald, Stephen E; Hu, Shuhua; Kenz, Zackary R; Kruse, Carola; Maischak, Matthias; Shaw, Simon; Whiteman, John R

    2014-04-13

    We revisit a method originally introduced by Werder et al. (in Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Engrg., 190:6685-6708, 2001) for temporally discontinuous Galerkin FEMs applied to a parabolic partial differential equation. In that approach, block systems arise because of the coupling of the spatial systems through inner products of the temporal basis functions. If the spatial finite element space is of dimension D and polynomials of degree r are used in time, the block system has dimension (r + 1)D and is usually regarded as being too large when r > 1. Werder et al. found that the space-time coupling matrices are diagonalizable over [Formula: see text] for r ⩽100, and this means that the time-coupled computations within a time step can actually be decoupled. By using either continuous Galerkin or spectral element methods in space, we apply this DG-in-time methodology, for the first time, to second-order wave equations including elastodynamics with and without Kelvin-Voigt and Maxwell-Zener viscoelasticity. An example set of numerical results is given to demonstrate the favourable effect on error and computational work of the moderately high-order (up to degree 7) temporal and spatio-temporal approximations, and we also touch on an application of this method to an ambitious problem related to the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. High-order space-time finite element schemes for acoustic and viscodynamic wave equations with temporal decoupling

    PubMed Central

    Banks, H T; Birch, Malcolm J; Brewin, Mark P; Greenwald, Stephen E; Hu, Shuhua; Kenz, Zackary R; Kruse, Carola; Maischak, Matthias; Shaw, Simon; Whiteman, John R

    2014-01-01

    We revisit a method originally introduced by Werder et al. (in Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Engrg., 190:6685–6708, 2001) for temporally discontinuous Galerkin FEMs applied to a parabolic partial differential equation. In that approach, block systems arise because of the coupling of the spatial systems through inner products of the temporal basis functions. If the spatial finite element space is of dimension D and polynomials of degree r are used in time, the block system has dimension (r + 1)D and is usually regarded as being too large when r > 1. Werder et al. found that the space-time coupling matrices are diagonalizable over for r ⩽100, and this means that the time-coupled computations within a time step can actually be decoupled. By using either continuous Galerkin or spectral element methods in space, we apply this DG-in-time methodology, for the first time, to second-order wave equations including elastodynamics with and without Kelvin–Voigt and Maxwell–Zener viscoelasticity. An example set of numerical results is given to demonstrate the favourable effect on error and computational work of the moderately high-order (up to degree 7) temporal and spatio-temporal approximations, and we also touch on an application of this method to an ambitious problem related to the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25834284

  7. A higher-order finite element method for computing the radar cross section of bodies of revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branch, Eric Douglas

    2001-12-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is used to compute the radar cross section (RCS) of bodies of revolution (BORs). The FEM described here uses scalar basis functions for the φ component of the field and vector basis functions for the transverse component of the field. Higher-order basis functions are used to improve the performance of the FEM code. The mesh is truncated using two methods. The first method is the perfectly matched layer (PML). This method has a number of parameters that must be optimized to obtain good results. Furthermore, the PML must be kept a reasonable distance away from the scatterer, which causes the number of unknowns to be relatively high. To decrease the number of unknowns the iterative absorbing boundary condition (IABC) is proposed. In this method an absorbing boundary condition (ABC) is used as the starting point for the mesh truncation, and then the fields at the mesh truncation are updated by propagating the fields from another surface in the computational domain to the mesh truncation boundary. The IABC allows the mesh truncation to be moved much closer to the scatterer without corrupting the final results. A comparison is given between the results of the PML and the IABC, and it is determined that using higher-order basis functions with the IABC is more efficient in terms of the number of unknowns and the CPU time than the PML.

  8. Reduced-order modeling for rotating rotor-bearing systems with cracked impellers using three-dimensional finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yu; Zi, Yanyang; Li, Bing; He, Zhengjia

    2015-10-01

    A novel reduced-order modeling method is presented in this paper for dynamics analysis of rotating impeller-shaft-bearing assembly with cracked impellers. Based on three-dimensional finite element model, the complex component mode synthesis (CMS) method is employed to generate an efficient reduced-order model (ROM) for studying the effects of crack on the global vibration of the rotating assembly. First, a modeling framework for impeller-shaft-bearing systems in rotating frame is presented. Rotational effects, including Coriolis matrix and centrifugal softening, have been taken into account. Then, the governing equation of motion of the damped gyroscopic system is reduced by the complex CMS method. Finally, the obtained ROM is employed to study the effects of crack on assembly's vibration. During the steady-state response analysis, external excitations on the impeller due to rotor-stator interactions have been taken into account, which was however neglected in previous investigations on rotordynamics. Numerical results show that the lower-order eigenvalues and the unbalance response of the assembly are not sensitive to the local crack on impeller. Nevertheless, the flexible coupling between impeller and shaft becomes more complex when the air flow-induced excitations are considered. Under EO1 traveling wave excitations, a crack leads to slight changes in the assembly's response. In contrast, the effect of crack becomes significant when the assembly is excited by EO2 and higher EO excitations. Moreover, the nonlinear crack breathing effects affect the assembly's response obviously. Finally, a potential technique for detecting the crack on impeller during operation is discussed.

  9. Utilizing Emerging Hardware for Multiphysics Simulation Through Implicit High-Order Finite Element Methods With Tensor Product Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J.; Ahmadia, A.; Knepley, M. G.; Smith, B.

    2011-12-01

    The cost of memory, especially memory bandwidth, is becoming increasingly expensive on modern high performance computing architectures including GPUs and multi-core systems. In contrast, floating point operations are relatively inexpensive when they can be vectorized (e.g. thread blocks on a GPU or vector registers on a CPU). This relative cost of memory to flops will continue to become even more pronounced due to fundamental issues of power utilization, therefore it is important to rethink algorithms to effectively utilize hardware. Commonly used methods for implicit solves with finite element methods involve assembly of a sparse matrix. Unfortunately, sparse matrix kernels have an arithmetic intensity (ratio of flops to bytes of memory movement) that is orders of magnitude less than that delivered by modern hardware, causing the floating point units to be massively under-utilized. The ``free flops'' can be effectively utilized by higher order methods which deliver improved accuracy for the same number of degrees of freedom. Effective use of high order methods require eschewing assembled data structures for matrix storage in exchange for unassembled representations. The resulting computation reduces to small dense tensor-product operations and indepedent ``physics'' kernels at each quadrature point, both of which are amenable to vectorization and capable of delivering a high fraction of peak performance. To reduce the effort required to implement new physics (e.g. constitutive relations and additional fields), retain code verifiability, and experiment with different vectorization strategies and solver algorithms, we express the continuum equations in Python and use automatic differentiation, symbolic methods, and code generation techniques to create vectorized kernels for residual evaluation, Jacobian storage, Jacobian application, and adjoints for each block of the system. The performance and effectiveness of these methods is demonstrated for free-surface Stokes

  10. Element-topology-independent preconditioners for parallel finite element computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alexander, Scott

    1992-01-01

    A family of preconditioners for the solution of finite element equations are presented, which are element-topology independent and thus can be applicable to element order-free parallel computations. A key feature of the present preconditioners is the repeated use of element connectivity matrices and their left and right inverses. The properties and performance of the present preconditioners are demonstrated via beam and two-dimensional finite element matrices for implicit time integration computations.

  11. Element-topology-independent preconditioners for parallel finite element computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alexander, Scott

    1992-01-01

    A family of preconditioners for the solution of finite element equations are presented, which are element-topology independent and thus can be applicable to element order-free parallel computations. A key feature of the present preconditioners is the repeated use of element connectivity matrices and their left and right inverses. The properties and performance of the present preconditioners are demonstrated via beam and two-dimensional finite element matrices for implicit time integration computations.

  12. Predicting the yield of the proximal femur using high-order finite-element analysis with inhomogeneous orthotropic material properties.

    PubMed

    Yosibash, Zohar; Tal, David; Trabelsi, Nir

    2010-06-13

    High-order finite-element (FE) analyses with inhomogeneous isotropic material properties have been shown to predict the strains and displacements on the surface of the proximal femur with high accuracy when compared with in vitro experiments. The same FE models with inhomogeneous orthotropic material properties produce results similar to those obtained with isotropic material properties. Herein, we investigate the yield prediction capabilities of these models using four different yield criteria, and the spread in the predicted load between the isotropic and orthotropic material models. Subject-specific high-order FE models of two human femurs were generated from CT scans with inhomogeneous orthotropic or isotropic material properties, and loaded by a simple compression force at the head. Computed strains and stresses by both the orthotropic and isotropic FE models were used to determine the load that predicts 'yielding' by four different 'yield criteria': von Mises, Drucker-Prager, maximum principal stress and maximum principal strain. One of the femurs was loaded by a simple load until fracture, and the force resulting in yielding was compared with the FE predicted force. The surface average of the 'maximum principal strain' criterion in conjunction with the orthotropic FE model best predicts both the yield force and fracture location compared with other criteria. There is a non-negligible influence on the predictions if orthotropic or isotropic material properties are applied to the FE model. All stress-based investigated 'yield criteria' have a small spread in the predicted failure. Because only one experiment was performed with a rather simplified loading configuration, the conclusions of this work cannot be claimed to be either reliable or sufficient, and future experiments should be performed to further substantiate the conclusions.

  13. Development and Application of a Multi-Block High Order Finite Element Modeling Code as an Engineering Design Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowrie, Weston B.

    An engineering design tool is developed to streamline the process of creating, verifying, and using complex computational meshes for use with numerical simulations. A fully three-dimensional high order finite element code is developed and verified with several different types of physics equations including anisotropic thermal conduction, and magnetohydrodynamcis (MHD). A multi-block framework and CAD/mesh generator interface is developed such that complex, non-axisymmetric, and non-simply connected topologies are possible with minimal complexity for the user. An a priori error estimation technique is developed using mesh quality metrics and is included as a step in the engineering design tool. One can assess a mesh's quality prior to numerical simulation and determine if it will yield acceptable results. It is found that the mesh quality analysis can predict the global error norms in the solution and therefore can be used as an a priori guide to improving computational meshes. The multi-block framework is verified by solving a m = 1 kink mode in a Z-pinch and comparing to a linear stability analysis, yielding a positive agreement. Further studies of the Z-pinch include wall stabilization in a cylindrical geometry, and subsequently, a study of wall stabilization in a non-axisymmetric geometry made possible by the multi-block framework. The mesh deformation analysis is applied to the Z-pinch meshes and previous results are confirmed. A non-axisymmetric and non-simply connected geometry representing the HIT-SI experiment is created using the CAD and mesh generator interface and multi-block framework. A mesh deformation analysis is applied to identify degenerate and poor mesh regions during mesh creation. Methods for repairing the mesh from degeneracies and further improvement for more accurate simulations is demonstrated. A spheromak MHD solution is computed on the HIT-SI mesh as a demonstration of the practicality of using the developments in this dissertation as an

  14. Model Reduction of Viscoelastic Finite Element Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C. H.; Inman, D. J.; Lam, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines a method of adding viscoelastic properties to finite element models by using additional co-ordinates to account for the frequency dependence usually associated with such damping materials. Several such methods exist and all suffer from an increase in order of the final finite model which is undesirable in many applications. Here we propose to combine one of these methods, the GHM (Golla-Hughes-McTavish) method, with model reduction techniques to remove the objection of increased model order. The result of combining several methods is an ability to add the effects of visoelastic components to finite element or other analytical models without increasing the order of the system. The procedure is illustrated by a numerical example. The method proposed here results in a viscoelastic finite element of a structure without increasing the order of the original model.

  15. Finite elements of nonlinear continua.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    The finite element method is extended to a broad class of practical nonlinear problems, treating both theory and applications from a general and unifying point of view. The thermomechanical principles of continuous media and the properties of the finite element method are outlined, and are brought together to produce discrete physical models of nonlinear continua. The mathematical properties of the models are analyzed, and the numerical solution of the equations governing the discrete models is examined. The application of the models to nonlinear problems in finite elasticity, viscoelasticity, heat conduction, and thermoviscoelasticity is discussed. Other specific topics include the topological properties of finite element models, applications to linear and nonlinear boundary value problems, convergence, continuum thermodynamics, finite elasticity, solutions to nonlinear partial differential equations, and discrete models of the nonlinear thermomechanical behavior of dissipative media.

  16. Finite elements of nonlinear continua.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.

    1972-01-01

    The finite element method is extended to a broad class of practical nonlinear problems, treating both theory and applications from a general and unifying point of view. The thermomechanical principles of continuous media and the properties of the finite element method are outlined, and are brought together to produce discrete physical models of nonlinear continua. The mathematical properties of the models are analyzed, and the numerical solution of the equations governing the discrete models is examined. The application of the models to nonlinear problems in finite elasticity, viscoelasticity, heat conduction, and thermoviscoelasticity is discussed. Other specific topics include the topological properties of finite element models, applications to linear and nonlinear boundary value problems, convergence, continuum thermodynamics, finite elasticity, solutions to nonlinear partial differential equations, and discrete models of the nonlinear thermomechanical behavior of dissipative media.

  17. Toward automatic finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kela, Ajay; Perucchio, Renato; Voelcker, Herbert

    1987-01-01

    Two problems must be solved if the finite element method is to become a reliable and affordable blackbox engineering tool. Finite element meshes must be generated automatically from computer aided design databases and mesh analysis must be made self-adaptive. The experimental system described solves both problems in 2-D through spatial and analytical substructuring techniques that are now being extended into 3-D.

  18. Quadratic finite elements and incompressible viscous flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, Clark R.; Gartling, David K.

    2005-01-01

    Pressure stabilization methods are applied to higher-order velocity finite elements for application to viscous incompressible flows. Both a standard pressure stabilizing Petrov-Galerkin (PSPG) method and a new polynomial pressure projection stabilization (PPPS) method have been implemented and tested for various quadratic elements in two dimensions. A preconditioner based on relaxing the incompressibility constraint is also tested for the iterative solution of saddle point problems arising from mixed Galerkin finite element approximations to the Navier-Stokes equations. The preconditioner is demonstrated for BB stable elements with discontinuous pressure approximations in two and three dimensions.

  19. Finite element shell instability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Formulation procedures and the associated computer program for finite element thin shell instability analysis are discussed. Data cover: (1) formulation of basic element relationships, (2) construction of solution algorithms on both the conceptual and algorithmic levels, and (3) conduction of numerical analyses to verify the accuracy and efficiency of the theory and related programs therein are described.

  20. Full Wave Analysis of RF Signal Attenuation in a Lossy Cave using a High Order Time Domain Vector Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Pingenot, J; Rieben, R; White, D

    2004-12-06

    We present a computational study of signal propagation and attenuation of a 200 MHz dipole antenna in a cave environment. The cave is modeled as a straight and lossy random rough wall. To simulate a broad frequency band, the full wave Maxwell equations are solved directly in the time domain via a high order vector finite element discretization using the massively parallel CEM code EMSolve. The simulation is performed for a series of random meshes in order to generate statistical data for the propagation and attenuation properties of the cave environment. Results for the power spectral density and phase of the electric field vector components are presented and discussed.

  1. Certified dual-corrected radiation patterns of phased antenna arrays by offline–online order reduction of finite-element models

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, A. Farle, O. Dyczij-Edlinger, R.

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents a fast numerical method for computing certified far-field patterns of phased antenna arrays over broad frequency bands as well as wide ranges of steering and look angles. The proposed scheme combines finite-element analysis, dual-corrected model-order reduction, and empirical interpolation. To assure the reliability of the results, improved a posteriori error bounds for the radiated power and directive gain are derived. Both the reduced-order model and the error-bounds algorithm feature offline–online decomposition. A real-world example is provided to demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the suggested approach.

  2. Wave dispersion properties of compound finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melvin, Thomas; Thuburn, John

    2017-06-01

    Mixed finite elements use different approximation spaces for different dependent variables. Certain classes of mixed finite elements, called compatible finite elements, have been shown to exhibit a number of desirable properties for a numerical weather prediction model. In two-dimensions the lowest order element of the Raviart-Thomas based mixed element is the finite element equivalent of the widely used C-grid staggering, which is known to possess good wave dispersion properties, at least for quadrilateral grids. It has recently been proposed that building compound elements from a number of triangular Raviart-Thomas sub-elements, such that both the primal and (implied) dual grid are constructed from the same sub-elements, would allow greater flexibility in the use of different advection schemes along with the ability to build arbitrary polygonal elements. Although the wave dispersion properties of the triangular sub-elements are well understood, those of the compound elements are unknown. It would be useful to know how they compare with the non-compound elements and what properties of the triangular sub-grid elements are inherited? Here a numerical dispersion analysis is presented for the linear shallow water equations in two dimensions discretised using the lowest order compound Raviart-Thomas finite elements on regular quadrilateral and hexagonal grids. It is found that, in comparison with the well known C-grid scheme, the compound elements exhibit a more isotropic dispersion relation, with a small over estimation of the frequency for short waves compared with the relatively large underestimation for the C-grid. On a quadrilateral grid the compound elements are found to differ from the non-compound Raviart-Thomas quadrilateral elements even for uniform elements, exhibiting the influence of the underlying sub-elements. This is shown to lead to small improvements in the accuracy of the dispersion relation: the compound quadrilateral element is slightly better for

  3. Finite elements: Theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, D. L. (Editor); Hussaini, M. Y. (Editor); Voigt, R. G. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Recent advances in FEM techniques and applications are discussed in reviews and reports presented at the ICASE/LaRC workshop held in Hampton, VA in July 1986. Topics addressed include FEM approaches for partial differential equations, mixed FEMs, singular FEMs, FEMs for hyperbolic systems, iterative methods for elliptic finite-element equations on general meshes, mathematical aspects of FEMS for incompressible viscous flows, and gradient weighted moving finite elements in two dimensions. Consideration is given to adaptive flux-corrected FEM transport techniques for CFD, mixed and singular finite elements and the field BEM, p and h-p versions of the FEM, transient analysis methods in computational dynamics, and FEMs for integrated flow/thermal/structural analysis.

  4. Finite elements: Theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, D. L. (Editor); Hussaini, M. Y. (Editor); Voigt, R. G. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Recent advances in FEM techniques and applications are discussed in reviews and reports presented at the ICASE/LaRC workshop held in Hampton, VA in July 1986. Topics addressed include FEM approaches for partial differential equations, mixed FEMs, singular FEMs, FEMs for hyperbolic systems, iterative methods for elliptic finite-element equations on general meshes, mathematical aspects of FEMS for incompressible viscous flows, and gradient weighted moving finite elements in two dimensions. Consideration is given to adaptive flux-corrected FEM transport techniques for CFD, mixed and singular finite elements and the field BEM, p and h-p versions of the FEM, transient analysis methods in computational dynamics, and FEMs for integrated flow/thermal/structural analysis.

  5. Parallel, Implicit, Finite Element Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowrie, Weston; Shumlak, Uri; Meier, Eric; Marklin, George

    2007-11-01

    A parallel, implicit, finite element solver is described for solutions to the ideal MHD equations and the Pseudo-1D Euler equations. The solver uses the conservative flux source form of the equations. This helps simplify the discretization of the finite element method by keeping the specification of the physics separate. An implicit time advance is used to allow sufficiently large time steps. The Portable Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) is implemented for parallel matrix solvers and parallel data structures. Results for several test cases are described as well as accuracy of the method.

  6. On numerically accurate finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagtegaal, J. C.; Parks, D. M.; Rice, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A general criterion for testing a mesh with topologically similar repeat units is given, and the analysis shows that only a few conventional element types and arrangements are, or can be made suitable for computations in the fully plastic range. Further, a new variational principle, which can easily and simply be incorporated into an existing finite element program, is presented. This allows accurate computations to be made even for element designs that would not normally be suitable. Numerical results are given for three plane strain problems, namely pure bending of a beam, a thick-walled tube under pressure, and a deep double edge cracked tensile specimen. The effects of various element designs and of the new variational procedure are illustrated. Elastic-plastic computation at finite strain are discussed.

  7. A reduced-order model based on the coupled 1D-3D finite element simulations for an efficient analysis of hemodynamics problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soudah, Eduardo; Rossi, Riccardo; Idelsohn, Sergio; Oñate, Eugenio

    2014-10-01

    A reduced-order model for an efficient analysis of cardiovascular hemodynamics problems using multiscale approach is presented in this work. Starting from a patient-specific computational mesh obtained by medical imaging techniques, an analysis methodology based on a two-step automatic procedure is proposed. First a coupled 1D-3D Finite Element Simulation is performed and the results are used to adjust a reduced-order model of the 3D patient-specific area of interest. Then, this reduced-order model is coupled with the 1D model. In this way, three-dimensional effects are accounted for in the 1D model in a cost effective manner, allowing fast computation under different scenarios. The methodology proposed is validated using a patient-specific aortic coarctation model under rest and non-rest conditions.

  8. Finite element models and feedback control of flexible aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    Large flexible aerospace structures, such as the solar power satellite, are distributed parameter systems with very complex continuum descriptions. This paper investigates the use of finite element methods to produce reduced-order models and finite dimensional feedback controllers for these structures. The main results give conditions under which stable control of the finite element model will produce stable control of the actual structure.

  9. Full Wave Analysis of RF Signal Attenuation in a Lossy Rough Surface Cave using a High Order Time Domain Vector Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Pingenot, J; Rieben, R; White, D; Dudley, D

    2005-10-31

    We present a computational study of signal propagation and attenuation of a 200 MHz planar loop antenna in a cave environment. The cave is modeled as a straight and lossy random rough wall. To simulate a broad frequency band, the full wave Maxwell equations are solved directly in the time domain via a high order vector finite element discretization using the massively parallel CEM code EMSolve. The numerical technique is first verified against theoretical results for a planar loop antenna in a smooth lossy cave. The simulation is then performed for a series of random rough surface meshes in order to generate statistical data for the propagation and attenuation properties of the antenna in a cave environment. Results for the mean and variance of the power spectral density of the electric field are presented and discussed.

  10. Parallelization of the Red-Black Algorithm on Solving the Second-Order PN Transport Equation with the Hybrid Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Yaqi Wang; Cristian Rabiti; Giuseppe Palmiotti

    2011-06-01

    The Red-Black algorithm has been successfully applied on solving the second-order parity transport equation with the PN approximation in angle and the Hybrid Finite Element Method (HFEM) in space, i.e., the Variational Nodal Method (VNM) [1,2,3,4,5]. Any transport solving techniques, including the Red-Black algorithm, need to be parallelized in order to take the advantage of the development of supercomputers with multiple processors for the advanced modeling and simulation. To our knowledge, an attempt [6] was done to parallelize it, but it was devoted only to the z axis plans in three-dimensional calculations. General parallelization of the Red-Black algorithm with the spatial domain decomposition has not been reported in the literature. In this summary, we present our implementation of the parallelization of the Red-Black algorithm and its efficiency results.

  11. Nonlinear, finite deformation, finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhung; Waas, Anthony M.

    2016-06-01

    The roles of the consistent Jacobian matrix and the material tangent moduli, which are used in nonlinear incremental finite deformation mechanics problems solved using the finite element method, are emphasized in this paper, and demonstrated using the commercial software ABAQUS standard. In doing so, the necessity for correctly employing user material subroutines to solve nonlinear problems involving large deformation and/or large rotation is clarified. Starting with the rate form of the principle of virtual work, the derivations of the material tangent moduli, the consistent Jacobian matrix, the stress/strain measures, and the objective stress rates are discussed and clarified. The difference between the consistent Jacobian matrix (which, in the ABAQUS UMAT user material subroutine is referred to as DDSDDE) and the material tangent moduli ( C e ) needed for the stress update is pointed out and emphasized in this paper. While the former is derived based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress, the latter is derived using the Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress. Understanding the difference between these two objective stress rates is crucial for correctly implementing a constitutive model, especially a rate form constitutive relation, and for ensuring fast convergence. Specifically, the implementation requires the stresses to be updated correctly. For this, the strains must be computed directly from the deformation gradient and corresponding strain measure (for a total form model). Alternatively, the material tangent moduli derived from the corresponding Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress of the constitutive relation (for a rate form model) should be used. Given that this requirement is satisfied, the consistent Jacobian matrix only influences the rate of convergence. Its derivation should be based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress to ensure fast convergence; however, the use of a different objective stress rate may also be possible. The error associated

  12. ANSYS duplicate finite-element checker routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, R.

    1995-01-01

    An ANSYS finite-element code routine to check for duplicated elements within the volume of a three-dimensional (3D) finite-element mesh was developed. The routine developed is used for checking floating elements within a mesh, identically duplicated elements, and intersecting elements with a common face. A space shuttle main engine alternate turbopump development high pressure oxidizer turbopump finite-element model check using the developed subroutine is discussed. Finally, recommendations are provided for duplicate element checking of 3D finite-element models.

  13. Finite element wavelets with improved quantitative properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoang; Stevenson, Rob

    2009-08-01

    In [W. Dahmen, R. Stevenson, Element-by-element construction of wavelets satisfying stability and moment conditions, SIAM J. Numer. Anal. 37 (1) (1999) 319-352 (electronic)], finite element wavelets were constructed on polygonal domains or Lipschitz manifolds that are piecewise parametrized by mappings with constant Jacobian determinants. The wavelets could be arranged to have any desired order of cancellation properties, and they generated stable bases for the Sobolev spaces Hs for (or s<=1 on manifolds). Unfortunately, it appears that the quantitative properties of these wavelets are rather disappointing. In this paper, we modify the construction from the above-mentioned work to obtain finite element wavelets which are much better conditioned.

  14. A multigrid solution method for mixed hybrid finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, W.

    1996-12-31

    We consider the multigrid solution of linear equations arising within the discretization of elliptic second order boundary value problems of the form by mixed hybrid finite elements. Using the equivalence of mixed hybrid finite elements and non-conforming nodal finite elements, we construct a multigrid scheme for the corresponding non-conforming finite elements, and, by this equivalence, for the mixed hybrid finite elements, following guidelines from Arbogast/Chen. For a rectangular triangulation of the computational domain, this non-conforming schemes are the so-called nodal finite elements. We explicitly construct prolongation and restriction operators for this type of non-conforming finite elements. We discuss the use of plain multigrid and the multilevel-preconditioned cg-method and compare their efficiency in numerical tests.

  15. Infinite Possibilities for the Finite Element.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlayson, Bruce A.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the uses of finite element methods in solving problems of heat transfer, fluid flow, etc. Suggests that engineers should know the general concepts and be able to apply the principles of finite element methods. (Author/WB)

  16. SUPG Finite Element Simulations of Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Brnjamin, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Streamline-Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) finite element simulations of compressible flows is presented. The topics include: 1) Introduction; 2) SUPG Galerkin Finite Element Methods; 3) Applications; and 4) Bibliography.

  17. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Timothy; Bond, Stephen D.; Littlewood, David John; Moore, Stan Gerald

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  18. Finite element model and identification procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    How, Jonathan P.; Blackwood, Gary; Anderson, Eric; Balmes, Etienne

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on finite element model and identification procedure are presented. Topics covered include: interferometer finite element model; testbed mode shapes; finite element model update; identification procedure; shaker locations; data analysis; modal frequency and damping comparison; computational procedure; fit comparison; residue analysis; typical residues; identification/FEM residual comparison; and pathlength control using isolation mounts.

  19. Three-phase compositional modeling of CO2 injection by higher-order finite element methods with CPA equation of state for aqueous phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim; Li, Zhidong; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2012-12-01

    Most simulators for subsurface flow of water, gas, and oil phases use empirical correlations, such as Henry's law, for the CO2 composition in the aqueous phase, and equations of state (EOS) that do not represent the polar interactions between CO2and water. Widely used simulators are also based on lowest-order finite difference methods and suffer from numerical dispersion and grid sensitivity. They may not capture the viscous and gravitational fingering that can negatively affect hydrocarbon (HC) recovery, or aid carbon sequestration in aquifers. We present a three-phase compositional model based on higher-order finite element methods and incorporate rigorous and efficient three-phase-split computations for either three HC phases or water-oil-gas systems. For HC phases, we use the Peng-Robinson EOS. We allow solubility of CO2in water and adopt a new cubic-plus-association (CPA) EOS, which accounts for cross association between H2O and CO2 molecules, and association between H2O molecules. The CPA-EOS is highly accurate over a broad range of pressures and temperatures. The main novelty of this work is the formulation of a reservoir simulator with new EOS-based unique three-phase-split computations, which satisfy both the equalities of fugacities in all three phases and the global minimum of Gibbs free energy. We provide five examples that demonstrate twice the convergence rate of our method compared with a finite difference approach, and compare with experimental data and other simulators. The examples consider gravitational fingering during CO2sequestration in aquifers, viscous fingering in water-alternating-gas injection, and full compositional modeling of three HC phases.

  20. Improved finite element methodology for integrated thermal structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, P.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of thermal and structural analysis is presented. New thermal finite elements which yield exact nodal and element temperatures for one dimensional linear steady state heat transfer problems are developed. A nodeless variable formulation is used to establish improved thermal finite elements for one dimensional nonlinear transient and two dimensional linear transient heat transfer problems. The thermal finite elements provide detailed temperature distributions without using additional element nodes and permit a common discretization with lower order congruent structural finite elements. The accuracy of the integrated approach is evaluated by comparisons with analytical solutions and conventional finite element thermal structural analyses for a number of academic and more realistic problems. Results indicate that the approach provides a significant improvement in the accuracy and efficiency of thermal stress analysis for structures with complex temperature distributions.

  1. Improved finite element methodology for integrated thermal structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, P.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of thermal and structural analyses is presented. New thermal finite elements which yield exact nodal and element temperature for one dimensional linear steady state heat transfer problems are developed. A nodeless variable formulation is used to establish improved thermal finite elements for one dimensional nonlinear transient and two dimensional linear transient heat transfer problems. The thermal finite elements provide detailed temperature distributions without using additional element nodes and permit a common discretization with lower order congruent structural finite elements. The accuracy of the integrated approach is evaluated by comparisons with analytical solutions and conventional finite element thermal-structural analyses for a number of academic and more realistic problems. Results indicate that the approach provides a significant improvement in the accuracy and efficiency of thermal stress analysis for structures with complex temperature distributions.

  2. A parallel high-order accurate finite element nonlinear Stokes ice sheet model and benchmark experiments: A PARALLEL FEM STOKES ICE SHEET MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, Wei; Ju, Lili; Gunzburger, Max; Price, Stephen; Ringler, Todd

    2012-01-04

    The numerical modeling of glacier and ice sheet evolution is a subject of growing interest, in part because of the potential for models to inform estimates of global sea level change. This paper focuses on the development of a numerical model that determines the velocity and pressure fields within an ice sheet. Our numerical model features a high-fidelity mathematical model involving the nonlinear Stokes system and combinations of no-sliding and sliding basal boundary conditions, high-order accurate finite element discretizations based on variable resolution grids, and highly scalable parallel solution strategies, all of which contribute to a numerical model that can achieve accurate velocity and pressure approximations in a highly efficient manner. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of our model by analytical solution tests, established ice sheet benchmark experiments, and comparisons with other well-established ice sheet models.

  3. Improving the accuracy of mass-lumped finite-elements in the first-order formulation of the wave equation by defect correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamasundar, R.; Mulder, W. A.

    2016-10-01

    Finite-element discretizations of the acoustic wave equation in the time domain often employ mass lumping to avoid the cost of inverting a large sparse mass matrix. For the second-order formulation of the wave equation, mass lumping on Legendre-Gauss-Lobatto points does not harm the accuracy. Here, we consider a first-order formulation of the wave equation. In that case, the numerical dispersion for odd-degree polynomials exhibits super-convergence with a consistent mass matrix but mass lumping destroys that property. We consider defect correction as a means to restore the accuracy, in which the consistent mass matrix is approximately inverted using the lumped one as preconditioner. For the lowest-degree element on a uniform mesh, fourth-order accuracy in 1D can be obtained with just a single iteration of defect correction. The numerical dispersion curve describes the error in the eigenvalues of the discrete set of equations. However, the error in the eigenvectors also play a role, in two ways. For polynomial degrees above one and when considering a 1-D mesh with constant element size and constant material properties, a number of modes, equal to the maximum polynomial degree, are coupled. One of these is the correct physical mode that should approximate the true eigenfunction of the operator, the other are spurious and should have a small amplitude when the true eigenfunction is projected onto them. We analyze the behaviour of this error as a function of the normalized wavenumber in the form of the leading terms in its series expansion and find that this error exceeds the dispersion error, except for the lowest degree where the eigenvector error is zero. Numerical 1-D tests confirm this behaviour. We briefly analyze the 2-D case, where the lowest-degree polynomial also appears to provide fourth-order accuracy with defect correction, if the grid of squares or triangles is highly regular and material properties are constant.

  4. Leapfrog/Finite Element Method for Fractional Diffusion Equation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhengang; Zheng, Yunying

    2014-01-01

    We analyze a fully discrete leapfrog/Galerkin finite element method for the numerical solution of the space fractional order (fractional for simplicity) diffusion equation. The generalized fractional derivative spaces are defined in a bounded interval. And some related properties are further discussed for the following finite element analysis. Then the fractional diffusion equation is discretized in space by the finite element method and in time by the explicit leapfrog scheme. For the resulting fully discrete, conditionally stable scheme, we prove an L 2-error bound of finite element accuracy and of second order in time. Numerical examples are included to confirm our theoretical analysis. PMID:24955431

  5. Finite element simulation of microindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuk, D. I.; Isaenkova, M. G.; Perlovich, Yu. A.; Krymskaya, O. A.

    2017-05-01

    Finite element models are created to describe the testing of a material by a Berkovich indenter. The results of calculations by these models are compared to experimental data on indentation of the same material (grade 10 steel). The experimental and calculated data agree well with each other. The developed models for an indenter and the material to be tested are used to find the laws of behavior of a material during indentation. The state of stress in the material under an indenter is studied by various methods. The indentation results are plotted versus the mechanical properties of a material.

  6. A Nonlinear Finite Element Framework for Viscoelastic Beams Based on the High-Order Reddy Beam Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-09

    employed theories are the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory (EBT) and the Timoshenko beam theory ( TBT ). The major deficiency associated with the EBT is failure to...account for defor- mations associated with shearing. The TBT relaxes the normality assumption of the EBT and admits a constant state of shear strain...on a given cross-section. As a result, the TBT necessitates the use of shear correction coefficients in order to accurately predict transverse

  7. Revolution in Orthodontics: Finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Johar Rajvinder; Kambalyal, Prabhuraj; Jain, Megha; Khandelwal, Piyush

    2016-01-01

    Engineering has not only developed in the field of medicine but has also become quite established in the field of dentistry, especially Orthodontics. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a computational procedure to calculate the stress in an element, which performs a model solution. This structural analysis allows the determination of stress resulting from external force, pressure, thermal change, and other factors. This method is extremely useful for indicating mechanical aspects of biomaterials and human tissues that can hardly be measured in vivo. The results obtained can then be studied using visualization software within the finite element method (FEM) to view a variety of parameters, and to fully identify implications of the analysis. This is a review to show the applications of FEM in Orthodontics. It is extremely important to verify what the purpose of the study is in order to correctly apply FEM. PMID:27114948

  8. Gauge finite element method for incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E, Weinan; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2000-12-01

    A finite element method for computing viscous incompressible flows based on the gauge formulation introduced in [Weinan E, Liu J-G. Gauge method for viscous incompressible flows. Journal of Computational Physics (submitted)] is presented. This formulation replaces the pressure by a gauge variable. This new gauge variable is a numerical tool and differs from the standard gauge variable that arises from decomposing a compressible velocity field. It has the advantage that an additional boundary condition can be assigned to the gauge variable, thus eliminating the issue of a pressure boundary condition associated with the original primitive variable formulation. The computational task is then reduced to solving standard heat and Poisson equations, which are approximated by straightforward, piecewise linear (or higher-order) finite elements. This method can achieve high-order accuracy at a cost comparable with that of solving standard heat and Poisson equations. It is naturally adapted to complex geometry and it is much simpler than traditional finite element methods for incompressible flows. Several numerical examples on both structured and unstructured grids are presented. Copyright

  9. Finite element simulations of stacked crystal filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jiunn-Horng; Tzeng, Kung-Yu; Cheng, Chih-Wei; Shih, Yu-Ching; Yao, Chih-Min

    2004-03-01

    Wireless networks are growing rapidly. Their applications include cellular phone, satellite communication and wireless local area networks. In order to avoid interference between all these applications, high selectivity RF filters are essential. The stacked crystal filter (SCF) is a useful configuration when low insertion loss is desired and the near-in skirt selectivity requirement is not as high as that produced by ladder filters. A SCF is an acoustically coupled resonator filter which includes a pair of thickness mode piezoelectric plates attached to each other. Mounted between adjacent sides of the two plates is a shared electrode. The common ways to model the SCF are mason model and lumped element equivalent circuit method. To accommodate complicated geometries, we need to use the other kinds of numerical analysis techniques. Finite element methods have been applied to the modeling of thin film bulk acoustic wave resonator in recent years. Advanced FEM software has the capability to do a coupled piezoelectric-circuit analysis that can connect electrical circuits directly to the piezoelectric finite element models. In this work, we integrate the SCF two-dimensional piezoelectric finite element models and electrical circuits together to simulate the performance of SCF. The influences of electrode property and acoustic loss to the performance of filter are also investigated. The results of simulation are verified by mason model. This methodology can be applied to more complicated geometry models and other types of filters simulation such as coupled resonator filters (CRF) and ladder filters.

  10. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  11. First-Order Systems Least-Squares Finite Element Methods and Nested Iteration for Electromagnetic Two-Fluid Kinetic-Based Plasma Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibs, Christopher A.

    Efforts are currently being directed towards a fully implicit, electromagnetic, JFNK-based solver, motivating the necessity of developing a fluid-based, electromag- netic, preconditioning strategy. The two-fluid plasma (TFP) model is an ideal approximation to the kinetic Jacobian. The TFP model couples both an ion and an electron fluid with Maxwell's equations. The fluid equations consist of the conservation of momentum and number density. A Darwin approximation of Maxwell is used to eliminate light waves from the model in order to facilitate coupling to non-relativistic particle models. We analyze the TFP-Darwin system in the context of a stand-alone solver with consideration of preconditioning a kinetic-JFNK approach. The TFP-Darwin system is addressed numerically by use of nested iteration (NI) and a First-Order Systems Least Squares (FOSLS) discretization. An important goal of NI is to produce an approximation that is within the basis of attraction for Newton's method on a relatively coarse mesh and, thus, on all subsequent meshes. After scaling and modification, the TFP-Darwin model yields a nonlinear, first-order system of equa- tions whose Frechet derivative is shown to be uniformly H1-elliptic in a neighborhood of the exact solution. H1 ellipticity yields optimal finite element performance and lin- ear systems amenable to solution with Algebraic Multigrid (AMG). To efficiently focus computational resources, an adaptive mesh refinement scheme, based on the accuracy per computational cost, is leveraged. Numerical tests demonstrate the efficacy of the approach, yielding an approximate solution within discretization error in a relatively small number of computational work units.

  12. A 3D finite element-based model order reduction method for parametric resonance and whirling analysis of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yu; Zi, Yanyang; He, Zhengjia

    2015-12-01

    A generalized and efficient model for rotating anisotropic rotor-bearing systems is presented in this paper with full considerations of the system's anisotropy in stiffness, inertia and damping. Based on the 3D finite element model and the model order reduction method, the effects of anisotropy in shaft and bearings on the forced response and whirling of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems are systematically investigated. First, the coefficients of journal bearings are transformed from the fixed frame to the rotating one. Due to the anisotropy in shaft and bearings, the motion is governed by differential equations with periodically time-variant coefficients. Then, a free-interface complex component mode synthesis (CMS) method is employed to generate efficient reduced-order models (ROM) for the periodically time-variant systems. In order to solve the obtained equations, a variant of Hill's method for systems with multiple harmonic excitations is developed. Four dimensionless parameters are defined to quantify the types and levels of anisotropy of bearings. Finally, the effects of the four types of anisotropy on the forced response and whirl orbits are studied. Numerical results show that the anisotropy of bearings in stiffness splits the sole resonant peak into two isolated ones, but the anisotropy of bearings in damping coefficients mainly affect the response amplitudes. Moreover, the whirl orbits become much more complex when the shaft and bearings are both anisotropic. In addition, the cross-coupling stiffness coefficients of bearings significantly affect the dynamic behaviors of the systems and cannot be neglected, though they are often much smaller than the principle stiffness terms.

  13. Probabilistic Model Updating for Sizing of Hole-Edge Crack Using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors and the High-Order Extended Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    He, Jingjing; Yang, Jinsong; Wang, Yongxiang; Waisman, Haim; Zhang, Weifang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel framework for probabilistic crack size quantification using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. The key idea is to use a high-order extended finite element method (XFEM) together with a transfer (T)-matrix method to analyze the reflection intensity spectra of FBG sensors, for various crack sizes. Compared with the standard FEM, the XFEM offers two superior capabilities: (i) a more accurate representation of fields in the vicinity of the crack tip singularity and (ii) alleviation of the need for costly re-meshing as the crack size changes. Apart from the classical four-term asymptotic enrichment functions in XFEM, we also propose to incorporate higher-order functions, aiming to further improve the accuracy of strain fields upon which the reflection intensity spectra are based. The wavelength of the reflection intensity spectra is extracted as a damage sensitive quantity, and a baseline model with five parameters is established to quantify its correlation with the crack size. In order to test the feasibility of the predictive model, we design FBG sensor-based experiments to detect fatigue crack growth in structures. Furthermore, a Bayesian method is proposed to update the parameters of the baseline model using only a few available experimental data points (wavelength versus crack size) measured by one of the FBG sensors and an optical microscope, respectively. Given the remaining data points of wavelengths, even measured by FBG sensors at different positions, the updated model is shown to give crack size predictions that match well with the experimental observations. PMID:27879649

  14. Albany/FELIX: A parallel, scalable and robust, finite element, first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver built for advanced analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Tezaur, I. K.; Perego, M.; Salinger, A. G.; ...

    2015-04-27

    This paper describes a new parallel, scalable and robust finite element based solver for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. The solver, known as Albany/FELIX, is constructed using the component-based approach to building application codes, in which mature, modular libraries developed as a part of the Trilinos project are combined using abstract interfaces and template-based generic programming, resulting in a final code with access to dozens of algorithmic and advanced analysis capabilities. Following an overview of the relevant partial differential equations and boundary conditions, the numerical methods chosen to discretize the ice flow equations are described, alongmore » with their implementation. The results of several verification studies of the model accuracy are presented using (1) new test cases for simplified two-dimensional (2-D) versions of the governing equations derived using the method of manufactured solutions, and (2) canonical ice sheet modeling benchmarks. Model accuracy and convergence with respect to mesh resolution are then studied on problems involving a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry discretized using hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes. Also explored as a part of this study is the effect of vertical mesh resolution on the solution accuracy and solver performance. The robustness and scalability of our solver on these problems is demonstrated. Lastly, we show that good scalability can be achieved by preconditioning the iterative linear solver using a new algebraic multilevel preconditioner, constructed based on the idea of semi-coarsening.« less

  15. Albany/FELIX: A parallel, scalable and robust, finite element, first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver built for advanced analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tezaur, I. K.; Perego, M.; Salinger, A. G.; Tuminaro, R. S.; Price, S. F.

    2015-04-27

    This paper describes a new parallel, scalable and robust finite element based solver for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. The solver, known as Albany/FELIX, is constructed using the component-based approach to building application codes, in which mature, modular libraries developed as a part of the Trilinos project are combined using abstract interfaces and template-based generic programming, resulting in a final code with access to dozens of algorithmic and advanced analysis capabilities. Following an overview of the relevant partial differential equations and boundary conditions, the numerical methods chosen to discretize the ice flow equations are described, along with their implementation. The results of several verification studies of the model accuracy are presented using (1) new test cases for simplified two-dimensional (2-D) versions of the governing equations derived using the method of manufactured solutions, and (2) canonical ice sheet modeling benchmarks. Model accuracy and convergence with respect to mesh resolution are then studied on problems involving a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry discretized using hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes. Also explored as a part of this study is the effect of vertical mesh resolution on the solution accuracy and solver performance. The robustness and scalability of our solver on these problems is demonstrated. Lastly, we show that good scalability can be achieved by preconditioning the iterative linear solver using a new algebraic multilevel preconditioner, constructed based on the idea of semi-coarsening.

  16. Albany/FELIX: a parallel, scalable and robust, finite element, first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver built for advanced analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezaur, I. K.; Perego, M.; Salinger, A. G.; Tuminaro, R. S.; Price, S. F.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a new parallel, scalable and robust finite element based solver for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. The solver, known as Albany/FELIX, is constructed using the component-based approach to building application codes, in which mature, modular libraries developed as a part of the Trilinos project are combined using abstract interfaces and template-based generic programming, resulting in a final code with access to dozens of algorithmic and advanced analysis capabilities. Following an overview of the relevant partial differential equations and boundary conditions, the numerical methods chosen to discretize the ice flow equations are described, along with their implementation. The results of several verification studies of the model accuracy are presented using (1) new test cases for simplified two-dimensional (2-D) versions of the governing equations derived using the method of manufactured solutions, and (2) canonical ice sheet modeling benchmarks. Model accuracy and convergence with respect to mesh resolution are then studied on problems involving a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry discretized using hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes. Also explored as a part of this study is the effect of vertical mesh resolution on the solution accuracy and solver performance. The robustness and scalability of our solver on these problems is demonstrated. Lastly, we show that good scalability can be achieved by preconditioning the iterative linear solver using a new algebraic multilevel preconditioner, constructed based on the idea of semi-coarsening.

  17. Albany/FELIX: a parallel, scalable and robust, finite element, first-order Stokes approximation ice sheet solver built for advanced analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, I.; Perego, M.; Salinger, A. G.; Tuminaro, R. S.; Price, S. F.

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes a new parallel, scalable and robust finite-element based solver for the first-order Stokes momentum balance equations for ice flow. The solver, known as Albany/FELIX, is constructed using the component-based approach to building application codes, in which mature, modular libraries developed as a part of the Trilinos project are combined using abstract interfaces and Template-Based Generic Programming, resulting in a final code with access to dozens of algorithmic and advanced analysis capabilities. Following an overview of the relevant partial differential equations and boundary conditions, the numerical methods chosen to discretize the ice flow equations are described, along with their implementation. The results of several verification studies of the model accuracy are presented using: (1) new test cases derived using the method of manufactured solutions, and (2) canonical ice sheet modeling benchmarks. Model accuracy and convergence with respect to mesh resolution is then studied on problems involving a realistic Greenland ice sheet geometry discretized using structured and unstructured meshes. Also explored as a part of this study is the effect of vertical mesh resolution on the solution accuracy and solver performance. The robustness and scalability of our solver on these problems is demonstrated. Lastly, we show that good scalability can be achieved by preconditioning the iterative linear solver using a new algebraic multilevel preconditioner, constructed based on the idea of semi-coarsening.

  18. An efficient finite element solution for gear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, C. G.; Parker, R. G.; Vijayakar, S. M.

    2010-06-01

    A finite element formulation for the dynamic response of gear pairs is proposed. Following an established approach in lumped parameter gear dynamic models, the static solution is used as the excitation in a frequency domain solution of the finite element vibration model. The nonlinear finite element/contact mechanics formulation provides accurate calculation of the static solution and average mesh stiffness that are used in the dynamic simulation. The frequency domain finite element calculation of dynamic response compares well with numerically integrated (time domain) finite element dynamic results and previously published experimental results. Simulation time with the proposed formulation is two orders of magnitude lower than numerically integrated dynamic results. This formulation admits system level dynamic gearbox response, which may include multiple gear meshes, flexible shafts, rolling element bearings, housing structures, and other deformable components.

  19. Optimal least-squares finite element method for elliptic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1991-01-01

    An optimal least squares finite element method is proposed for two dimensional and three dimensional elliptic problems and its advantages are discussed over the mixed Galerkin method and the usual least squares finite element method. In the usual least squares finite element method, the second order equation (-Delta x (Delta u) + u = f) is recast as a first order system (-Delta x p + u = f, Delta u - p = 0). The error analysis and numerical experiment show that, in this usual least squares finite element method, the rate of convergence for flux p is one order lower than optimal. In order to get an optimal least squares method, the irrotationality Delta x p = 0 should be included in the first order system.

  20. Finite element coiled cochlea model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isailovic, Velibor; Nikolic, Milica; Milosevic, Zarko; Saveljic, Igor; Nikolic, Dalibor; Radovic, Milos; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    Cochlea is important part of the hearing system, and thanks to special structure converts external sound waves into neural impulses which go to the brain. Shape of the cochlea is like snail, so geometry of the cochlea model is complex. The simplified cochlea coiled model was developed using finite element method inside SIFEM FP7 project. Software application is created on the way that user can prescribe set of the parameters for spiral cochlea, as well as material properties and boundary conditions to the model. Several mathematical models were tested. The acoustic wave equation for describing fluid in the cochlea chambers - scala vestibuli and scala timpani, and Newtonian dynamics for describing vibrations of the basilar membrane are used. The mechanical behavior of the coiled cochlea was analyzed and the third chamber, scala media, was not modeled because it does not have a significant impact on the mechanical vibrations of the basilar membrane. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Future work is needed for more realistic geometry model. Coiled model of the cochlea was created and results are compared with initial simplified coiled model of the cochlea.

  1. Finite elements and finite differences for transonic flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Murman, E. M.; Wellford, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    The paper reviews the chief finite difference and finite element techniques used for numerical solution of nonlinear mixed elliptic-hyperbolic equations governing transonic flow. The forms of the governing equations for unsteady two-dimensional transonic flow considered are the Euler equation, the full potential equation in both conservative and nonconservative form, the transonic small-disturbance equation in both conservative and nonconservative form, and the hodograph equations for the small-disturbance case and the full-potential case. Finite difference methods considered include time-dependent methods, relaxation methods, semidirect methods, and hybrid methods. Finite element methods include finite element Lax-Wendroff schemes, implicit Galerkin method, mixed variational principles, dual iterative procedures, optimal control methods and least squares.

  2. Finite-Element Composite-Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Finite Element Composite Analysis Program, FECAP, special-purpose finite-element program for analyzing behavior of composite material with microcomputer. Procedure leads to set of linear simultaneous equations relating unknown nodal displacement to applied loads. Written in HP BASIC 3.0.

  3. Finite element analysis of helicopter structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Application of the finite element analysis is now being expanded to three dimensional analysis of mechanical components. Examples are presented for airframe, mechanical components, and composite structure calculations. Data are detailed on the increase of model size, computer usage, and the effect on reducing stress analysis costs. Future applications for use of finite element analysis for helicopter structures are projected.

  4. Nonlinear finite element modeling of corrugated board

    Treesearch

    A. C. Gilchrist; J. C. Suhling; T. J. Urbanik

    1999-01-01

    In this research, an investigation on the mechanical behavior of corrugated board has been performed using finite element analysis. Numerical finite element models for corrugated board geometries have been created and executed. Both geometric (large deformation) and material nonlinearities were included in the models. The analyses were performed using the commercial...

  5. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-15

    TAURUS is an interactive post-processing application supporting visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. TAURUS provides the ability to display deformed geometries and contours or fringes of a large number of derived results on meshes consisting of beam, plate, shell, and solid type finite elements. Time history plotting is also available.

  6. Improved fully-implicit spherical harmonics methods for first and second order forms of the transport equation using Galerkin Finite Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laboure, Vincent Matthieu

    In this dissertation, we focus on solving the linear Boltzmann equation -- or transport equation -- using spherical harmonics (PN) expansions with fully-implicit time-integration schemes and Galerkin Finite Element spatial discretizations within the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework. The presentation is composed of two main ensembles. On one hand, we study the first-order form of the transport equation in the context of Thermal Radiation Transport (TRT). This nonlinear application physically necessitates to maintain a positive material temperature while the PN approximation tends to create oscillations and negativity in the solution. To mitigate these flaws, we provide a fully-implicit implementation of the Filtered PN (FPN) method and investigate local filtering strategies. After analyzing its effect on the conditioning of the system and showing that it improves the convergence properties of the iterative solver, we numerically investigate the error estimates derived in the linear setting and observe that they hold in the non-linear case. Then, we illustrate the benefits of the method on a standard test problem and compare it with implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) simulations. On the other hand, we focus on second-order forms of the transport equation for neutronics applications. We mostly consider the Self-Adjoint Angular Flux (SAAF) and Least-Squares (LS) formulations, the former being globally conservative but void incompatible and the latter having -- in all generality -- the opposite properties. We study the relationship between these two methods based on the weakly-imposed LS boundary conditions. Equivalences between various parity-based PN methods are also established, in particular showing that second-order filters are not an appropriate fix to retrieve void compatibility. The importance of global conservation is highlighted on a heterogeneous multigroup k-eigenvalue test problem. Based on these considerations, we propose a new

  7. Books and monographs on finite element technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    The present paper proviees a listing of all of the English books and some of the foreign books on finite element technology, taking into account also a list of the conference proceedings devoted solely to finite elements. The references are divided into categories. Attention is given to fundamentals, mathematical foundations, structural and solid mechanics applications, fluid mechanics applications, other applied science and engineering applications, computer implementation and software systems, computational and modeling aspects, special topics, boundary element methods, proceedings of symmposia and conferences on finite element technology, bibliographies, handbooks, and historical accounts.

  8. Books and monographs on finite element technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    The present paper proviees a listing of all of the English books and some of the foreign books on finite element technology, taking into account also a list of the conference proceedings devoted solely to finite elements. The references are divided into categories. Attention is given to fundamentals, mathematical foundations, structural and solid mechanics applications, fluid mechanics applications, other applied science and engineering applications, computer implementation and software systems, computational and modeling aspects, special topics, boundary element methods, proceedings of symmposia and conferences on finite element technology, bibliographies, handbooks, and historical accounts.

  9. Mixed Finite Element Method for Melt Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taicher, A. L.; Hesse, M. A.; Arbogast, T.

    2012-12-01

    Multi-phase flow arises during partial melting in the earth mantle, where the porosity is small and material has the characteristics of a compacting porous medium. The equations governing multi-phase flow have been specialized to partially molten materials by McKenzie and Fowler. Their model, also called a Darcy-Stokes system, is highly coupled and non-linear. Melt flow is governed by Darcy's Law while the high temperature, ductile creep of the solid matrix is modeled using viscous non-Newtonian Stokes rheology. In addition, the melt and solid pressures are related through a compaction relation. This nearly elliptic mechanical problem is then coupled with both solute transport and thermal evolution according to the enthalpy method developed by Katz. A suitable numerical method must solve the Darcy-Stokes problem in a manner compatible with the transport problem. Moreover, unlike most porous media problems, partially molten materials transition dynamically from non-porous solid to porous medium. Therefore, a numerical method must also carefully account for the limit of zero porosity. The Darcy-Stokes system for modeling partial melting in the mantle is a novel problem. As far as we know, there currently does not exist a finite element solution in the literature solving these coupled equations. The finite element framework provides support for additional analysis of error and convergence. Moreover, both mesh refinement and anisotropy are naturally incorporated into finite elements. In particular, the mixed finite element method presents a good candidate because it works in both limiting cases: Darcy and incompressible Stokes flow. Mixed methods also produce discretely conservative fluxes that are required for the transport problem to remains stable without violating conservation of mass. Based preliminary investigations in 1D and derived energy estimates, we present a mixed formulation for the Darcy-Stokes system. Next, using novel elements of lowest order and

  10. Wavelet and Multiresolution Analysis for Finite Element Networking Paradigms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurdila, Andrew J.; Sharpley, Robert C.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a final report on Wavelet and Multiresolution Analysis for Finite Element Networking Paradigms. The focus of this research is to derive and implement: 1) Wavelet based methodologies for the compression, transmission, decoding, and visualization of three dimensional finite element geometry and simulation data in a network environment; 2) methodologies for interactive algorithm monitoring and tracking in computational mechanics; and 3) Methodologies for interactive algorithm steering for the acceleration of large scale finite element simulations. Also included in this report are appendices describing the derivation of wavelet based Particle Image Velocity algorithms and reduced order input-output models for nonlinear systems by utilizing wavelet approximations.

  11. Assignment Of Finite Elements To Parallel Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Moktar A.; Flower, Jon W.; Otto, Steve W.

    1990-01-01

    Elements assigned approximately optimally to subdomains. Mapping algorithm based on simulated-annealing concept used to minimize approximate time required to perform finite-element computation on hypercube computer or other network of parallel data processors. Mapping algorithm needed when shape of domain complicated or otherwise not obvious what allocation of elements to subdomains minimizes cost of computation.

  12. Assignment Of Finite Elements To Parallel Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Moktar A.; Flower, Jon W.; Otto, Steve W.

    1990-01-01

    Elements assigned approximately optimally to subdomains. Mapping algorithm based on simulated-annealing concept used to minimize approximate time required to perform finite-element computation on hypercube computer or other network of parallel data processors. Mapping algorithm needed when shape of domain complicated or otherwise not obvious what allocation of elements to subdomains minimizes cost of computation.

  13. Optimizing header strength utilizing finite element analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchett, S. N.

    Finite element techniques have been successfully applied as a design tool in the optimization of high strength headers for pyrotechnic-driven actuators. These techniques have been applied to three aspects of the design process of a high strength header. The design process was a joint effort of experts from several disciplines including design engineers, material scientists, test engineers, manufacturing engineers, and structural analysts. Following material selection, finite element techniques were applied to evaluate the residual stresses due to manufacturing which were developed in the high strength glass ceramic-to-metal seal headers. Results from these finite element analyses were used to identify header designs which were manufacturable and had a minimum residual stress state. Finite element techniques were than applied to obtain the response of the header due to pyrotechnic burn. The results provided realistic upper bounds on the pressure containment ability of various preliminary header designs and provided a quick and inexpensive method of strengthening and refining the designs. Since testing of the headers was difficult and sometimes destructive, results of the analyses were also used to interpret test results and identify failure modes. In this paper, details of the finite element element techniques including the models used, material properties, material failure models, and loading will be presented. Results from the analyses showing the header failure process will also be presented. This paper will show that significant gains in capability and understanding can result when finite element techniques are included as an integral part of the design process of complicated high strength headers.

  14. A survey of mixed finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brezzi, F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to and an overview of mixed finite element methods. It discusses the mixed formulation of certain basic problems in elasticity and hydrodynamics. It also discusses special techniques for solving the discrete problem.

  15. Finite element schemes for Fermi equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadzadeh, M.; Beilina, L.; Naseer, M.; Standar, C.

    2017-07-01

    A priori error estimates are derived for the streamline diffusion (SD) finite element methods for the Fermi pencil-beam equation. Two-dimensional numerical examples confirm our theoretical investigations.

  16. Evaluation of a hybrid, anisotropic, multilayered, quadrilateral finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. C.; Blackburn, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    A multilayered finite element with bending-extensional coupling is evaluated for: (1) buckling of general laminated plates; (2) thermal stresses of laminated plates cured at elevated temperatures; (3) displacements of a bimetallic beam; and (4) displacement and stresses of a single-cell box beam with warped cover panels. Also, displacements and stresses for flat and spherical orthotropic and anisotropic segments are compared with results from higher order plate and shell finite-element analyses.

  17. Finite element modeling of the human pelvis

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, B.

    1995-11-01

    A finite element model of the human pelvis was created using a commercial wire frame image as a template. To test the final mesh, the model`s mechanical behavior was analyzed through finite element analysis and the results were displayed graphically as stress concentrations. In the future, this grid of the pelvis will be integrated with a full leg model and used in side-impact car collision simulations.

  18. Finite element analysis of flexible, rotating blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, Oliver G.

    1987-01-01

    A reference guide that can be used when using the finite element method to approximate the static and dynamic behavior of flexible, rotating blades is given. Important parameters such as twist, sweep, camber, co-planar shell elements, centrifugal loads, and inertia properties are studied. Comparisons are made between NASTRAN elements through published benchmark tests. The main purpose is to summarize blade modeling strategies and to document capabilities and limitations (for flexible, rotating blades) of various NASTRAN elements.

  19. Stabilized Finite Elements in FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. Kyle; Newman, James C.; Karman, Steve L.

    2017-01-01

    A Streamlined Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) stabilized finite-element discretization has been implemented as a library into the FUN3D unstructured-grid flow solver. Motivation for the selection of this methodology is given, details of the implementation are provided, and the discretization for the interior scheme is verified for linear and quadratic elements by using the method of manufactured solutions. A methodology is also described for capturing shocks, and simulation results are compared to the finite-volume formulation that is currently the primary method employed for routine engineering applications. The finite-element methodology is demonstrated to be more accurate than the finite-volume technology, particularly on tetrahedral meshes where the solutions obtained using the finite-volume scheme can suffer from adverse effects caused by bias in the grid. Although no effort has been made to date to optimize computational efficiency, the finite-element scheme is competitive with the finite-volume scheme in terms of computer time to reach convergence.

  20. Least-squares finite element methods for compressible Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Carey, G. F.

    1990-01-01

    A method based on backward finite differencing in time and a least-squares finite element scheme for first-order systems of partial differential equations in space is applied to the Euler equations for gas dynamics. The scheme minimizes the L-sq-norm of the residual within each time step. The method naturally generates numerical dissipation proportional to the time step size. An implicit method employing linear elements has been implemented and proves robust. For high-order elements, computed solutions based on the L-sq method may have oscillations for calculations at similar time step sizes. To overcome this difficulty, a scheme which minimizes the weighted H1-norm of the residual is proposed and leads to a successful scheme with high-degree elements. Finally, a conservative least-squares finite element method is also developed. Numerical results for two-dimensional problems are given to demonstrate the shock resolution of the methods and compare different approaches.

  1. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alan

    2005-03-18

    Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many engineering applications, including finite elements, finite volumes, and others. The solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the desire to switch an application from one solver librwy to another, depending on the problem being solved. The interfaces provided by solver libraries differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application Can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer between solver libraries and the application, putting a common "face" on various solver libraries. One such abstraction layer is the Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (EEl), which has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  2. Finite element analysis enhancement of cryogenic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiem, Clare D.; Norton, Douglas A.

    1991-12-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) of large space optics enhances cryogenic testing by providing an analytical method by which to ensure that a test article survives proposed testing. The analyses presented in this paper were concerned with determining the reliability of a half meter mirror in an environment where the exact environmental profile was unknown. FEA allows the interaction between the test object and the environment to be simulated to detect potential problems prior to actual testing. These analyses examined worse case scenerios related to cooling the mirror, its structural integrity for the proposed test environment, and deformation of the reflective surface. The FEA was conducted in-house on the System's Reliability Division's VAX 11-750 and Decstation 3100 using Engineering Mechanics Research Corporation's numerically integrated elements for systems analysis finite element software. The results of the analyses showed that it would take at least 48 hours to cool the mirror to its desired testing temperature. It was also determined that the proposed mirror mount would not cause critical concentrated thermal stresses that would fracture the mirror. FEA and actual measurements of the front reflective face were compared and good agreement between computer simulation and physical tests were seen. Space deployment of large optics requires lightweight mirrors which can perform under the harsh conditions of space. The physical characteristics of these mirrors must be well understood in order that their deployment and operation are successful. Evaluating design approaches by analytical simulation, like FEA, verifies the reliability and structural integrity of a space optic during design prior to prototyping and testing. Eliminating an optic's poor design early in its life saves money, materials, and human resources while ensuring performance.

  3. Mixed Finite Element Methods for Melt Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taicher, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    Multi-phase flow arises during partial melting in the earth mantle, where the porosity is small and material has the characteristics of a compacting porous medium. The equations governing multi-phase flow have been specialized to partially molten materials by McKenzie and Fowler. Their model, also called a Darcy-Stokes system, is highly coupled and non-linear. Melt flow is governed by Darcy's Law while the high temperature, ductile creep of the solid matrix is modeled using viscous non-Newtonian Stokes rheology. In addition, the melt and solid pressures are related through a compaction relation. This nearly elliptic mechanical problem is then coupled with both solute transport and thermal evolution according to the enthalpy method developed by Katz. A suitable numerical method must solve the Darcy-Stokes problem in a manner compatible with the transport problem. Moreover, unlike most porous media problems, partially molten materials transition dynamically from non-porous solid to porous medium so must carefully account for the limit of zero porosity. The Darcy-Stokes system for modeling partial melting in the mantle is a novel problem. As far as we know, there currently does not exist a finite element solution in the literature solving these coupled equations. In particular, the mixed finite element method presents a good candidate because it works in both limiting cases: Darcy and incompressible Stokes flow. We present a mixed formulation for the Darcy-Stokes system. Next, we present novel elements of lowest order and compatible with both Darcy and Stokes flow Finally, we present our 2D mixed FEM code result for solving Stokes and Darcy flow as well as the coupled Darcy-Stokes system the mid-ocean ridge or corner flow problem.

  4. Geometrical nonlinearity of 14-node brick finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandan, Swet; Chauhan, Alok P. S.

    2017-01-01

    The present work depicts the geometrical nonlinearity analysis for the finite element, PN5X1. Here, the general problem of elasticity is numerically solved using iteration method. The proposed element is passed through different tests in order to prove that it works not only for modeling sheet metal forming process but also for other large deformation problems.

  5. Error analysis of finite element solutions for postbuckled cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sistla, Rajaram; Thurston, Gaylen A.

    1989-01-01

    A general method of error analysis and correction is investigated for the discrete finite-element results for cylindrical shell structures. The method for error analysis is an adaptation of the method of successive approximation. When applied to the equilibrium equations of shell theory, successive approximations derive an approximate continuous solution from the discrete finite-element results. The advantage of this continuous solution is that it contains continuous partial derivatives of an order higher than the basis functions of the finite-element solution. Preliminary numerical results are presented in this paper for the error analysis of finite-element results for a postbuckled stiffened cylindrical panel modeled by a general purpose shell code. Numerical results from the method have previously been reported for postbuckled stiffened plates. A procedure for correcting the continuous approximate solution by Newton's method is outlined.

  6. Discontinuous finite element space-angle treatment of the first order linear Boltzmann transport equation with magnetic fields: Application to MRI-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    St Aubin, J; Keyvanloo, A; Fallone, B G

    2016-01-01

    The advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided radiotherapy systems demands the incorporation of the magnetic field into dose calculation algorithms of treatment planning systems. This is due to the fact that the Lorentz force of the magnetic field perturbs the path of the relativistic electrons, hence altering the dose deposited by them. Building on the previous work, the authors have developed a discontinuous finite element space-angle treatment of the linear Boltzmann transport equation to accurately account for the effects of magnetic fields on radiotherapy doses. The authors present a detailed description of their new formalism and compare its accuracy to geant4 Monte Carlo calculations for magnetic fields parallel and perpendicular to the radiation beam at field strengths of 0.5 and 3 T for an inhomogeneous 3D slab geometry phantom comprising water, bone, and air or lung. The accuracy of the authors' new formalism was determined using a gamma analysis with a 2%/2 mm criterion. Greater than 98.9% of all points analyzed passed the 2%/2 mm gamma criterion for the field strengths and orientations tested. The authors have benchmarked their new formalism against Monte Carlo in a challenging radiation transport problem with a high density material (bone) directly adjacent to a very low density material (dry air at STP) where the effects of the magnetic field dominate collisions. A discontinuous finite element space-angle approach has been proven to be an accurate method for solving the linear Boltzmann transport equation with magnetic fields for cases relevant to MRI guided radiotherapy. The authors have validated the accuracy of this novel technique against geant4, even in cases of strong magnetic field strengths and low density air.

  7. Discontinuous finite element space-angle treatment of the first order linear Boltzmann transport equation with magnetic fields: Application to MRI-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    St Aubin, J.; Keyvanloo, A.; Fallone, B. G.

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided radiotherapy systems demands the incorporation of the magnetic field into dose calculation algorithms of treatment planning systems. This is due to the fact that the Lorentz force of the magnetic field perturbs the path of the relativistic electrons, hence altering the dose deposited by them. Building on the previous work, the authors have developed a discontinuous finite element space-angle treatment of the linear Boltzmann transport equation to accurately account for the effects of magnetic fields on radiotherapy doses. Methods: The authors present a detailed description of their new formalism and compare its accuracy to GEANT4 Monte Carlo calculations for magnetic fields parallel and perpendicular to the radiation beam at field strengths of 0.5 and 3 T for an inhomogeneous 3D slab geometry phantom comprising water, bone, and air or lung. The accuracy of the authors’ new formalism was determined using a gamma analysis with a 2%/2 mm criterion. Results: Greater than 98.9% of all points analyzed passed the 2%/2 mm gamma criterion for the field strengths and orientations tested. The authors have benchmarked their new formalism against Monte Carlo in a challenging radiation transport problem with a high density material (bone) directly adjacent to a very low density material (dry air at STP) where the effects of the magnetic field dominate collisions. Conclusions: A discontinuous finite element space-angle approach has been proven to be an accurate method for solving the linear Boltzmann transport equation with magnetic fields for cases relevant to MRI guided radiotherapy. The authors have validated the accuracy of this novel technique against GEANT4, even in cases of strong magnetic field strengths and low density air.

  8. Finite-element models of continental extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, H. David; Morgan, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Numerical models of the initial deformation of extending continental lithosphere, computed to investigate the control of preexisting thermal and mechanical heterogeneities on the style of deformation, are presented. The finite element method is used to calculate deformation with a viscoelastic-plastic model for the lithosphere. Comparisons of the results of analytic models and finite-element models using this method show that good results may be obtained by the numerical technique, even with elements containing both brittle and viscoelastic sampling points. It is shown that the gross style of initial extensional deformation is controlled by the depth and width of the initial heterogeneity which localizes deformation.

  9. The GPRIME approach to finite element modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, D. R.; Mckee, J. H.; Hurwitz, M. M.

    1983-01-01

    GPRIME, an interactive modeling system, runs on the CDC 6000 computers and the DEC VAX 11/780 minicomputer. This system includes three components: (1) GPRIME, a user friendly geometric language and a processor to translate that language into geometric entities, (2) GGEN, an interactive data generator for 2-D models; and (3) SOLIDGEN, a 3-D solid modeling program. Each component has a computer user interface of an extensive command set. All of these programs make use of a comprehensive B-spline mathematics subroutine library, which can be used for a wide variety of interpolation problems and other geometric calculations. Many other user aids, such as automatic saving of the geometric and finite element data bases and hidden line removal, are available. This interactive finite element modeling capability can produce a complete finite element model, producing an output file of grid and element data.

  10. Quadrilateral finite element mesh coarsening

    SciTech Connect

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16

    Techniques for coarsening a quadrilateral mesh are described. These techniques include identifying a coarsening region within the quadrilateral mesh to be coarsened. Quadrilateral elements along a path through the coarsening region are removed. Node pairs along opposite sides of the path are identified. The node pairs along the path are then merged to collapse the path.

  11. Waveguide finite elements for curved structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnveden, Svante; Fraggstedt, Martin

    2008-05-01

    A waveguide finite element formulation for the analysis of curved structures is introduced. The formulation is valid for structures that along one axis have constant properties. It is based on a modified Hamilton's principle valid for general linear viscoelastic motion, which is derived here. Using this principle, material properties such as losses may be distributed in the system and may vary with frequency. Element formulations for isoparametric solid elements and deep shell elements are presented for curved waveguides as well as for straight waveguides. In earlier works, the curved elements have successfully been used to model a passenger car tyre. Here a simple validation example and convergence study is presented, which considers a finite length circular cylinder and all four elements presented are used, in turn, to model this structure. Calculated results compare favourably to those in the literature.

  12. Exact finite elements for conduction and convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Tamma, K. K.

    1981-01-01

    An appproach for developing exact one dimensional conduction-convection finite elements is presented. Exact interpolation functions are derived based on solutions to the governing differential equations by employing a nodeless parameter. Exact interpolation functions are presented for combined heat transfer in several solids of different shapes, and for combined heat transfer in a flow passage. Numerical results demonstrate that exact one dimensional elements offer advantages over elements based on approximate interpolation functions. Previously announced in STAR as N81-31507

  13. Exact finite elements for conduction and convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Tamma, K. K.

    1981-01-01

    An appproach for developing exact one dimensional conduction-convection finite elements is presented. Exact interpolation functions are derived based on solutions to the governing differential equations by employing a nodeless parameter. Exact interpolation functions are presented for combined heat transfer in several solids of different shapes, and for combined heat transfer in a flow passage. Numerical results demonstrate that exact one dimensional elements offer advantages over elements based on approximate interpolation functions. Previously announced in STAR as N81-31507

  14. Exact finite elements for conduction and convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Tamma, K. K.

    1981-01-01

    An approach for developing exact one dimensional conduction-convection finite elements is presented. Exact interpolation functions are derived based on solutions to the governing differential equations by employing a nodeless parameter. Exact interpolation functions are presented for combined heat transfer in several solids of different shapes, and for combined heat transfer in a flow passage. Numerical results demonstrate that exact one dimensional elements offer advantages over elements based on approximate interpolation functions.

  15. Stabilized plane and axisymmetric Lobatto finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y. C.; Sze, K. Y.; Zhou, Y. X.

    2015-11-01

    High order elements are renowned for their high accuracy and convergence. Among them, Lobatto spectral finite elements are commonly used in explicit dynamic analyses as their mass matrices when evaluated by the Lobatto integration rule are diagonal. While there are numerous advanced first and second order elements, advanced high order elements are rarely seen. In this paper, generic stabilization schemes are devised for the reduced integrated plane and axisymmetric elements. Static and explicit dynamic tests are considered for evaluating the relatively merits of the stabilized and conventional elements. The displacement errors of the stabilized elements are less than those of the conventional Lobatto elements. When the material is nearly incompressible, the stabilized elements are also more accurate in terms of the energy error norm. This advantage is of practical importance for bio-tissue and hydrated soil analyses.

  16. Footbridge between finite volumes and finite elements with applications to CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Frédéric; Ghidaglia, Jean-Michel

    2001-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a new algorithm for the discretization of second-order elliptic operators in the context of finite volume schemes on unstructured meshes. We are strongly motivated by partial differential equations (PDEs) arising in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), like the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Our technique consists of matching up a finite volume discretization based on a given mesh with a finite element representation on the same mesh. An inverse operator is also built, which has the desirable property that in the absence of diffusion, one recovers exactly the finite volume solution. Numerical results are also provided. Copyright

  17. Finite element modeling and analysis of tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Andersen, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Predicting the response of tires under various loading conditions using finite element technology is addressed. Some of the recent advances in finite element technology which have high potential for application to tire modeling problems are reviewed. The analysis and modeling needs for tires are identified. Reduction methods for large-scale nonlinear analysis, with particular emphasis on treatment of combined loads, displacement-dependent and nonconservative loadings; development of simple and efficient mixed finite element models for shell analysis, identification of equivalent mixed and purely displacement models, and determination of the advantages of using mixed models; and effective computational models for large-rotation nonlinear problems, based on a total Lagrangian description of the deformation are included.

  18. Derivation of a Tappered p-Version Beam Finite Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinnant, Howard E.

    1989-01-01

    A tapered p-version beam finite element suitable for dynamic applications is derived. The taper in the element is represented by allowing the area moments of inertia to vary as quartic polynomials along the length of the beam, and the cross-sectional area to vary as a quadratic polynomial. The p-version finite-element characteristics are implemented through a set of polynomial shape functions. The lower-order shape functions are identical to the classical cubic and linear shape functions normally associated with a beam element. The higher-order shape functions are a hierarchical set of polynomials that are integrals of orthogonal polynomials. Explicit expressions for the mass and stiffness matrices are presented for an arbitrary value of p. The element has been verified to be numerically stable using shape functions through 22nd order.

  19. Time domain finite element analysis of multimode microwave applicators

    SciTech Connect

    Dibben, D.C.; Metaxas, R.

    1996-05-01

    Analysis of multimode applicators in the frequency domain via the finite element technique produces a set of very ill-conditioned equations. This paper outlines a time domain finite element method (TDFE) for analyzing three dimensional microwave applicators where this ill-conditioning is avoided. Edge elements are used in order to handle sharp metal edges and to avoid spurious solutions. Analysis in the time domain allows field distributions at a range of different frequencies to be obtained with a single calculation. Lumping is investigated as a means of reducing the time taken for the calculation. The reflection coefficient is also obtained.

  20. Finite Element Analysis of Pipe Elbows.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    AD-AO81 077 DAVD TAYLOR NAVAL SHIP RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CE--ETC F/B 13/11 FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF PIPE ELBOWS .(U) FE SO M S MARCUS, B C...TAYLOR NAVAL SHIP i RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER Bethesda, Md. 20084 4 FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF PIPE ELBOWS by 0 Melvyn S. Marcus and Gordon C...a 90-degree pipe elbow to determine principal stresses due to internal pressure, inplane bending, out-of-plane bending, and torsion moment loadings

  1. Finite element methods for high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehner, R.; Morgan, K.; Peraire, J.; Zienkiewicz, O. C.

    1985-01-01

    An explicit finite element based solution procedure for solving the equations of compressible viscous high speed flow is presented. The method uses domain splitting to advance the solution with different timesteps on different portions of the mesh. For steady inviscid flows, adaptive mesh refinement procedures are successfully employed to enhance the definition of discontinuities. Preliminary ideas on the application of adaptive mesh refinement to the solution of problems involving steady viscous flow are presented. Sample timings are given for the performance of the finite element code on modern supercomputers.

  2. Finite Elements and Localized Failure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-31

    Progresst.re Damage Continuum Model for Granular Materials ,- Comp. Meth. AppI. Mecti. Eng. Vol. 42. 1984, pp. 1-18. 1161 Rudnicki, J.W., and Rice, J.R...the uniqueness of rate-sensitive material formulations (23, the advantages of viscoelastic and/or viscoplastic strain softening models [3), and...necessity for rate sensitive constitutive formulations such as viscoelasticity or viscoplasticity in order to assure positive definiteness of the

  3. Studies of finite element analysis of composite material structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, D. O.; Holzmacher, D. E.; Lane, Z. C.; Thornton, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Research in the area of finite element analysis is summarized. Topics discussed include finite element analysis of a picture frame shear test, BANSAP (a bandwidth reduction program for SAP IV), FEMESH (a finite element mesh generation program based on isoparametric zones), and finite element analysis of a composite bolted joint specimens.

  4. Finite element modelling of buried structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Playdon, D. K.; Simmonds, S. H.

    1984-01-01

    In many structures the final stress states are dependent on the sequence of construction or the stress states at various stages of construction are of interest. Such problems can be analyzed using finite element programs that have the capability of adding (birthing) elements to simulate the progress of construction. However, the usual procedure of assembling elements may lead to numerical instabilities or stress states that are unrealistic. Both problems are demonstrated in the analysis of a structure using the program ADINA. A technique which combines application of a preload with element birthing to overcome these problems is described and illustrated.

  5. Numerical computation of transonic flows by finite-element and finite-difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Wellford, L. C.; Merkle, C. L.; Murman, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Studies on applications of the finite element approach to transonic flow calculations are reported. Different discretization techniques of the differential equations and boundary conditions are compared. Finite element analogs of Murman's mixed type finite difference operators for small disturbance formulations were constructed and the time dependent approach (using finite differences in time and finite elements in space) was examined.

  6. Slave finite elements: The temporal element approach to nonlinear analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellin, S.

    1984-01-01

    A formulation method for finite elements in space and time incorporating nonlinear geometric and material behavior is presented. The method uses interpolation polynomials for approximating the behavior of various quantities over the element domain, and only explicit integration over space and time. While applications are general, the plate and shell elements that are currently being programmed are appropriate to model turbine blades, vanes, and combustor liners.

  7. Computational solid mechanics (finite elements and boundary elements) - Present status and future directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atluri, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Computational finite-element and boundary-element methods are reviewed, and their application to the mechanics of solids is discussed. Stability conditions for general FEMs are considered in addition to the use of least-order, stable, invariant, or hybrid/mixed isoparametric elements as alternatives to the displacement-based isoparametric elements. The use of symbolic manipulation, adaptive mesh refinement, transient dynamic response, and boundary-element methods for linear elaslticity and finite-strain problems of inelastic materials are also discussed.

  8. Finite Element Simulation of Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Y. Lawrence; Panahandeh, M.

    1996-01-01

    Finite element equations representing the behavior of piezoelectric materials when bounded to a typical structure and used as sensors and actuators were developed. Emphasis was placed on generating sensor output equations of piezoelectric sensors and responses of a typical structure bonded with piezoelectric sensors and actuators on the basis of finite element formulation. The model can predict not only structural responses due to both mechanical and electrical loading but also electrical potential due to mechanical or thermal effects. The resulted finite element equations were then used for simple control design and performance evaluation. In the control algorithm, voltages coming out from piezoelectric sensors, which are proportional to strains at sensing locations, are taken as input. The voltages applied to the piezoelectric actuators are used as output. The feasibility of integrating control algorithm with the element routine developed herein and FEAP was demonstrated. In particular, optimal independent modal space control was implemented in a software package on the basis of finite element formulation. A rudimentary finite element-control algorithm package was also developed to evaluate the performance of candidate control laws. A few numerical simulations using the software package developed herein were given. The integrated software package will provide a design tool to address issues such as how adaptive smart systems will scale to a full size aircraft, the amount of piezoelectric materials and the powers needed to actuate it for desired performance. It will also provide a viable new structural control design concept for practical applications in large flexible structures such as aerospace vehicles and aircraft.

  9. A multidimensional finite element method for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Darrell W.; Humphrey, Joseph W.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element method is used to solve the equations of motion for 2- and 3-D fluid flow. The time-dependent equations are solved explicitly using quadrilateral (2-D) and hexahedral (3-D) elements, mass lumping, and reduced integration. A Petrov-Galerkin technique is applied to the advection terms. The method requires a minimum of computational storage, executes quickly, and is scalable for execution on computer systems ranging from PCs to supercomputers.

  10. Quadrilateral/hexahedral finite element mesh coarsening

    DOEpatents

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Scott, Michael A; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16

    A technique for coarsening a finite element mesh ("FEM") is described. This technique includes identifying a coarsening region within the FEM to be coarsened. Perimeter chords running along perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region are identified. The perimeter chords are redirected to create an adaptive chord separating the coarsening region from a remainder of the FEM. The adaptive chord runs through mesh elements residing along the perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region. The adaptive chord is then extracted to coarsen the FEM.

  11. Adaptive finite element strategies for shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, G.; Levit, I.; Stehlin, B.; Hurlbut, B.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper extends existing finite element adaptive refinement (AR) techniques to shell structures, which have heretofore been neglected in the AR literature. Specific challenges in applying AR to shell structures include: (1) physical discontinuities (e.g., stiffener intersections); (2) boundary layers; (3) sensitivity to geometric imperfections; (4) the sensitivity of most shell elements to mesh distortion, constraint definition and/or thinness; and (5) intrinsic geometric nonlinearity. All of these challenges but (5) are addressed here.

  12. Finite element modeling of nonisothermal polymer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roylance, D.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element formulation designed to simulate polymer melt flows in which both conductive and convective heat transfer are important is described, and the numerical model is illustrated by means of computer experiments using extruder drag flow and entry flow as trial problems. Fluid incompressibility is enforced by a penalty treatment of the element pressures, and the thermal convective transport is modeled by conventional Galerkin and optimal upwind treatments.

  13. Finite element analysis applied to cornea reshaping.

    PubMed

    Cabrera Fernández, Delia; Niazy, A M; Kurtz, R M; Djotyan, G P; Juhasz, T

    2005-01-01

    A 2-D finite element model of the cornea is developed to simulate corneal reshaping and the resulting deformation induced by refractive surgery. In the numerical simulations, linear and nonlinear elastic models are applied when stiffness inhomogeneities varying with depth are considered. Multiple simulations are created that employ different geometric configurations for the removal of the corneal tissue. Side-by-side comparisons of the different constitutive laws are also performed. To facilitate the comparison, the material property constants are identified from the same experimental data, which are obtained from mechanical tests on corneal strips and membrane inflation experiments. We then validate the resulting models by comparing computed refractive power changes with clinical results. Tissue deformations created by simulated corneal tissue removal using finite elements are consistent with clinically observed postsurgical results. The model developed provides a much more predictable refractive outcome when the stiffness inhomogeneities of the cornea and nonlinearities of the deformations are included in the simulations. Finite element analysis is a useful tool for modeling surgical effects on the cornea and developing a better understanding of the biomechanics of the cornea. The creation of patient-specific simulations would allow surgical outcomes to be predicted based on individualized finite element models.

  14. Finite element displacement analysis of a lung.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, F. L.; West, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    A method is given based on the technique of finite elements which determines theoretically the mechanical behavior of a lung-shaped body loaded by its own weight. The results of this theoretical analysis have been compared with actual measurements of alveolar size and pleural pressures in animal lungs.

  15. Finite element modelling of acoustic emission sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, S. I.; Sych, T. V.

    2017-08-01

    With a validated finite element system COSMOS/M, the out-of-plane displacements corresponding to model sources of acoustic emission (AE) were calculated in three-dimensional samples. The displacement signals were calculated for positions of the receiver on the top plate surface at several different distances (in the far-field) from the source’s epicenter.

  16. On Hybrid and mixed finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1981-01-01

    Three versions of the assumed stress hybrid model in finite element methods and the corresponding variational principles for the formulation are presented. Examples of rank deficiency for stiffness matrices by the hybrid stress model are given and their corresponding kinematic deformation modes are identified. A discussion of the derivation of general semi-Loof elements for plates and shells by the hybrid stress method is given. It is shown that the equilibrium model by Fraeijs de Veubeke can be derived by the approach of the hybrid stress model as a special case of semi-Loof elements.

  17. Finite Element Analysis of Piping Tees.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    Combustion Engineering, Inc., performed an experimental stress analysis3 on an ANSI B16.9 carbon steelt tee designated T-12. Pipe extensions were welded to...AD-ASS? 353 DAVID If TAYLOR NAVAL SHIP RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CE--ETC F/S 13/11 FINITE ELEENT ANALYSIS OF PIPING TEES.(U) JUN 8 A J QUEZON. S C...DAVID W. TAYLOR NAVAL SHIP SRESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER Bethesa Md. 20084 FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF PIPING TEES by Antonio J. Quezon, Gordon C

  18. Finite Element Heat & Mass Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Trease, Lynn

    1996-10-10

    FEHM is a numerical simulation code for subsurface transport processes. It models 3-D, time-dependent, multiphase, multicomponent, non-isothermal, reactive flow through porous and fractured media. It can accurately represent complex 3-D geologic media and structures and their effects on subsurface flow and transport. Its capabilities include flow of gas, water, and heat; flow of air, water, and heat; multiple chemically reactive and sorbing tracers; finite element/finite volume formulation; coupled stress module; saturated and unsaturated media; and double porosity and double porosity/double permeability capabilities.

  19. FEHM. Finite Element Heat & Mass Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    Zyvoloski, G.A.

    1996-10-10

    FEHM is a numerical simulation code for subsurface transport processes. It models 3-D, time-dependent, multiphase, multicomponent, non-isothermal, reactive flow through porous and fractured media. It can accurately represent complex 3-D geologic media and structures and their effects on subsurface flow and transport. Its capabilities include flow of gas, water, and heat; flow of air, water, and heat; multiple chemically reactive and sorbing tracers; finite element/finite volume formulation; coupled stress module; saturated and unsaturated media; and double porosity and double porosity/double permeability capabilities.

  20. A composite nodal finite element for hexagons

    SciTech Connect

    Hennart, J.P.; Mund, E.H. |; Valle, E. Del

    1997-10-01

    A nodal algorithm for the solution of the multigroup diffusion equations in hexagonal arrays is analyzed. Basically, the method consists of dividing each hexagon into four quarters and mapping the hexagon quarters onto squares. The resulting boundary value problem on a quadrangular domain is solved in primal weak formulation. Nodal finite element methods like the Raviart-Thomas RTk schemes provide accurate analytical expansions of the solution in the hexagons. Transverse integration cannot be performed on the equations in the quadrangular domain as simply as it is usually done on squares because these equations have essentially variable coefficients. However, by considering an auxiliary problem with constant coefficients (on the same quadrangular domain) and by using a preconditioning approach, transverse integration can be performed as for rectangular geometry. A description of the algorithm is given for a one-group diffusion equation. Numerical results are presented for a simple model problem with a known analytical solution and for k{sub eff} evaluations of some benchmark problems proposed in the literature. For the analytical problem, the results indicate that the theoretical convergence orders of RTk schemes (k = 0,1) are obtained, yielding accurate solutions at the expense of a few preconditioning iterations.

  1. Intra Plate Stresses Using Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayalakshmi, S.; Raghukanth, S. T. G.

    2016-10-01

    One of the most challenging problems in the estimation of seismic hazard is the ability to quantify seismic activity. Empirical models based on the available earthquake catalogue are often used to obtain activity of source regions. The major limitation with this approach is the lack of sufficient data near a specified source. The non-availability of data poses difficulties in obtaining distribution of earthquakes with large return periods. Such events recur over geological time scales during which tectonic processes, including mantle convection, formation of faults and new plate boundaries, are likely to take place. The availability of geometries of plate boundaries, plate driving forces, lithospheric stress field and GPS measurements has provided numerous insights on the mechanics of tectonic plates. In this article, a 2D finite element model of Indo-Australian plate is developed with the focus of representing seismic activity in India. The effect of large scale geological features including sedimentary basins, fold belts and cratons on the stress field in India is explored in this study. In order to address long term behaviour, the orientation of stress field and tectonic faults of the present Indo- Australian plate are compared with a reconstructed stress field from the early Miocene (20 Ma).

  2. A weak Galerkin generalized multiscale finite element method

    DOE PAGES

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu

    2016-03-31

    In this study, we propose a general framework for weak Galerkin generalized multiscale (WG-GMS) finite element method for the elliptic problems with rapidly oscillating or high contrast coefficients. This general WG-GMS method features in high order accuracy on general meshes and can work with multiscale basis derived by different numerical schemes. A special case is studied under this WG-GMS framework in which the multiscale basis functions are obtained by solving local problem with the weak Galerkin finite element method. Convergence analysis and numerical experiments are obtained for the special case.

  3. Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Blades, Eric L.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted under a NASA grant on the topic 'Substructure System Identification for Finite Element Model Updating.' The research concerns ongoing development of the Substructure System Identification Algorithm (SSID Algorithm), a system identification algorithm that can be used to obtain mathematical models of substructures, like Space Shuttle payloads. In the present study, particular attention was given to the following topics: making the algorithm robust to noisy test data, extending the algorithm to accept experimental FRF data that covers a broad frequency bandwidth, and developing a test analytical model (TAM) for use in relating test data to reduced-order finite element models.

  4. An Object Oriented, Finite Element Framework for Linear Wave Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, Joseph M.

    2004-03-01

    This dissertation documents an object oriented framework which can be used to solve any linear wave equation. The linear wave equations are expressed in the differential forms language. This differential forms expression allows a strict discrete interpretation of the system. The framework is implemented using the Galerkin Finite Element Method to define the discrete differential forms and operators. Finite element basis functions including standard scalar Nodal and vector Nedelec basis functions are used to implement the discrete differential forms resulting in a mixed finite element system. Discretizations of scalar and vector wave equations in the time and frequency domains will be demonstrated in both differential forms and vector calculi. This framework conserves energy, maintains physical continuity, is valid on unstructured grids, conditionally stable and second order accurate. Examples including linear electrodynamics, acoustics, elasticity and magnetohydrodynamics are demonstrated.

  5. Flow Applications of the Least Squares Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1998-01-01

    The main thrust of the effort has been towards the development, analysis and implementation of the least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) for fluid dynamics and electromagnetics applications. In the past year, there were four major accomplishments: 1) special treatments in computational fluid dynamics and computational electromagnetics, such as upwinding, numerical dissipation, staggered grid, non-equal order elements, operator splitting and preconditioning, edge elements, and vector potential are unnecessary; 2) the analysis of the LSFEM for most partial differential equations can be based on the bounded inverse theorem; 3) the finite difference and finite volume algorithms solve only two Maxwell equations and ignore the divergence equations; and 4) the first numerical simulation of three-dimensional Marangoni-Benard convection was performed using the LSFEM.

  6. Flow Applications of the Least Squares Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1998-01-01

    The main thrust of the effort has been towards the development, analysis and implementation of the least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) for fluid dynamics and electromagnetics applications. In the past year, there were four major accomplishments: 1) special treatments in computational fluid dynamics and computational electromagnetics, such as upwinding, numerical dissipation, staggered grid, non-equal order elements, operator splitting and preconditioning, edge elements, and vector potential are unnecessary; 2) the analysis of the LSFEM for most partial differential equations can be based on the bounded inverse theorem; 3) the finite difference and finite volume algorithms solve only two Maxwell equations and ignore the divergence equations; and 4) the first numerical simulation of three-dimensional Marangoni-Benard convection was performed using the LSFEM.

  7. A finite element code for electric motor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. Warren

    1994-01-01

    FEMOT is a finite element program for solving the nonlinear magnetostatic problem. This version uses nonlinear, Newton first order elements. The code can be used for electric motor design and analysis. FEMOT can be embedded within an optimization code that will vary nodal coordinates to optimize the motor design. The output from FEMOT can be used to determine motor back EMF, torque, cogging, and magnet saturation. It will run on a PC and will be available to anyone who wants to use it.

  8. Finite element simulation of thick sheet thermoforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Daniel

    This PhD was organized as collaboration between Lehigh University and the Ecole des Mines d'Albi on the subject: "Numerical simulation of thick sheet thermoforming". The research applications cover a wide range of products from thermoforming, e.g., packaging, automobile parts, appliance parts, large-scale panels and covers. Due to the special nature of this PhD, and the requirements of each hosting institutes, the research was split accordingly into two parts: At Lehigh University, under the supervision of Prof. Herman F. Nied, a full three-dimensional finite element program was developed in order to simulate the mechanical deformation during the process of thermoforming. The material behavior is considered hyperelastic with the property of incompressibility. The deformed structure may exhibit symmetries and may use a large choice of boundary conditions. A contact procedure for molds and/or displacements caused by a plug was implemented to complete the similarity with the thermoforming process. The research focused on simulating the observed nonlinear behaviors and their instabilities. The author emphasized the impact of large deformation on the numerical results and demonstrated the need for a remeshing capability. At the Ecole des Mines d'Albi, under the supervision of Prof. Fabrice Schmidt, an equi-biaxial rheometer was developed and built in order to determine the material properties during the process of thermoforming. Thermoplastic materials consist of long macromolecular chains that when stretched, during the process of sheet extrusion, exhibit a transversal isotropic behavior. The rheometer technique is the inflation of a circular membrane made of extruded thermoplastics. The resulting strain is identified by video analysis during the membrane inflation. This dissertation focused on technical issues related to heating with the goal of overcoming the difficulty of producing a homogeneous temperature distribution.

  9. Finite element modelling of SAW correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikka, Ajay C.; Al-Sarawi, Said F.; Abbott, Derek

    2007-12-01

    Numerical simulations of SAW correlators so far are limited to delta function and equivalent circuit models. These models are not accurate as they do not replicate the actual behaviour of the device. Manufacturing a correlator to specifically realise a different configuration is both expensive and time consuming. With the continuous improvement in computing capacity, switching to finite element modelling would be more appropriate. In this paper a novel way of modelling a SAW correlator using finite element analysis is presented. This modelling approach allows the consideration of different code implementation and device structures. This is demonstrated through simulation results for a 5×2-bit Barker sequence encoded SAW correlator. These results show the effect of both bulk and leaky modes on the device performance at various operating frequencies. Moreover, the ways in which the gain of the correlator can be optimised though variation of design parameters will also be outlined.

  10. EC Vacuum Vessel Finite Element Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rudland, D.; Luther, R.; /Fermilab

    1992-02-04

    This Note contains a summary of the results of the finite element analysis of the EC Cryostat vacuum vessel performed by Dave Rudland in 1987. The results are used in the structural evaluation of the EC cryostats presented in Engineering Note 194. It should also be noted that the adequacy of the design of the vacuum vessels was reviewed and verified by the Battelle Memorial Institute. Battelle used a shell of revolution program to essentially duplicate the FEA analysis with similar results. It should be noted that no plots of the finite element mesh were retained from the analysis, and these can not be easily reproduced due to a change in the version of the ANSYS computer program shortly after the analysis was completed.

  11. Finite element substructuring methods for composite mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1988-01-01

    Finite element substructuring strategies are presented to obtain numerical solutions for three typical problems of interest to the composites community: (1) impact and toughness characterization of composites using Charpy's impact test specimen; (2) free-edge stress analysis of composite laminates; and (3) fracture toughness predictions of composites for individual and combined fracture of modes I, II, and III. The key issue common to these problems is the presence of singular or near singular stress fields. The regions prone to see steep stress gradients are substructured with progressively refined meshes to study the local response simultaneously with the global response. The results from the select examples indicate that finite element substructuring methods are computationally effective for composite singularity mechanics.

  12. Finite element modeling of permanent magnet devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, J. R.; Larkin, L. A.; Overbye, V. D.

    1984-03-01

    New techniques are presented for finite element modeling of permanent magnets in magnetic devices such as motors and generators. These techniques extend a previous sheet-current permanent magnet model that applies only for straight line B-H loops and rectangular-shaped magnets. Here Maxwell's equations are used to derive the model of a permanent magnet having a general curved B-H loop and any geometric shape. The model enables a nonlinear magnetic finite element program to use Newton-Raphson iteration to solve for saturable magnetic fields in a wide variety of devices containing permanent magnets and steels. The techniques are applied to a brushless dc motor with irregular-shaped permanent magnets. The calculated motor torque agrees well with measured torque.

  13. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, L. A.; Hallquist, J. O.

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  14. Finite element analysis of human joints

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, P.L.; Hollerbach, K.

    1996-09-01

    Our work focuses on the development of finite element models (FEMs) that describe the biomechanics of human joints. Finite element modeling is becoming a standard tool in industrial applications. In highly complex problems such as those found in biomechanics research, however, the full potential of FEMs is just beginning to be explored, due to the absence of precise, high resolution medical data and the difficulties encountered in converting these enormous datasets into a form that is usable in FEMs. With increasing computing speed and memory available, it is now feasible to address these challenges. We address the first by acquiring data with a high resolution C-ray CT scanner and the latter by developing semi-automated method for generating the volumetric meshes used in the FEM. Issues related to tomographic reconstruction, volume segmentation, the use of extracted surfaces to generate volumetric hexahedral meshes, and applications of the FEM are described.

  15. Finite element concepts in computational aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    Finite element theory was employed to establish an implicit numerical solution algorithm for the time averaged unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. Both the multidimensional and a time-split form of the algorithm were considered, the latter of particular interest for problem specification on a regular mesh. A Newton matrix iteration procedure is outlined for solving the resultant nonlinear algebraic equation systems. Multidimensional discretization procedures are discussed with emphasis on automated generation of specific nonuniform solution grids and accounting of curved surfaces. The time-split algorithm was evaluated with regards to accuracy and convergence properties for hyperbolic equations on rectangular coordinates. An overall assessment of the viability of the finite element concept for computational aerodynamics is made.

  16. Finite element analysis of wrinkling membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. K.; Hedgepeth, J. M.; Weingarten, V. I.; Das, P.; Kahyai, S.

    1984-01-01

    The development of a nonlinear numerical algorithm for the analysis of stresses and displacements in partly wrinkled flat membranes, and its implementation on the SAP VII finite-element code are described. A comparison of numerical results with exact solutions of two benchmark problems reveals excellent agreement, with good convergence of the required iterative procedure. An exact solution of a problem involving axisymmetric deformations of a partly wrinkled shallow curved membrane is also reported.

  17. Finite element methods in fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Moyer, E. T., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Finite-element methodology specific to the analysis of fracture mechanics problems is reviewed. Primary emphasis is on the important algorithmic developments which have enhanced the numerical modeling of fracture processes. Methodologies to address elastostatic problems in two and three dimensions, elastodynamic problems, elastoplastic problems, special considerations for three-dimensional nonlinear problems, and the modeling of stable crack growth are reviewed. In addition, the future needs of the fracture community are discussed and open questions are identified.

  18. Finite Element Output Bounds for Hyperbolic Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Machiels, L.

    2000-03-27

    We propose a Neumann-subproblem a posteriori finite element error bound technique for linear stationary scalar advection problems. The method is similar in many respects to the previous output bound technique developed for elliptic problems. In the new approach, however, the primal residual is enhanced with a streamline diffusion term. We first formulate the bound algorithm, with particular emphasis on the proof of the bounding properties; then, we provide numerical results for an illustrative example.

  19. Finite Element Methods: Principles for Their Selection.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    the finite element methods. 39 Various statements in the literature that certain mixed methods work well inspite of the fact that the LBB (BB...method, displacement and mixed methods , various adaptive approaches, etc. The examples discussed in Sections 2 and 3 show that the same computational...performance and their relation to mixed methods , SIAM J. Num. Anal., to appear. 5. F. Brezzi, On the existence uniqueness and approximation of saddle-point

  20. EXODUS II: A finite element data model

    SciTech Connect

    Schoof, L.A.; Yarberry, V.R.

    1994-09-01

    EXODUS II is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code data transfer. An EXODUS II data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface (API).

  1. Finite Element Analysis of Reverberation Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunting, Charles F.; Nguyen, Duc T.

    2000-01-01

    The primary motivating factor behind the initiation of this work was to provide a deterministic means of establishing the validity of the statistical methods that are recommended for the determination of fields that interact in -an avionics system. The application of finite element analysis to reverberation chambers is the initial step required to establish a reasonable course of inquiry in this particularly data-intensive study. The use of computational electromagnetics provides a high degree of control of the "experimental" parameters that can be utilized in a simulation of reverberating structures. As the work evolved there were four primary focus areas they are: 1. The eigenvalue problem for the source free problem. 2. The development of a complex efficient eigensolver. 3. The application of a source for the TE and TM fields for statistical characterization. 4. The examination of shielding effectiveness in a reverberating environment. One early purpose of this work was to establish the utility of finite element techniques in the development of an extended low frequency statistical model for reverberation phenomena. By employing finite element techniques, structures of arbitrary complexity can be analyzed due to the use of triangular shape functions in the spatial discretization. The effects of both frequency stirring and mechanical stirring are presented. It is suggested that for the low frequency operation the typical tuner size is inadequate to provide a sufficiently random field and that frequency stirring should be used. The results of the finite element analysis of the reverberation chamber illustrate io-W the potential utility of a 2D representation for enhancing the basic statistical characteristics of the chamber when operating in a low frequency regime. The basic field statistics are verified for frequency stirring over a wide range of frequencies. Mechanical stirring is shown to provide an effective frequency deviation.

  2. Finite element based electric motor design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. Warren

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this effort was to develop a finite element code for the analysis and design of permanent magnet electric motors. These motors would drive electromechanical actuators in advanced rocket engines. The actuators would control fuel valves and thrust vector control systems. Refurbishing the hydraulic systems of the Space Shuttle after each flight is costly and time consuming. Electromechanical actuators could replace hydraulics, improve system reliability, and reduce down time.

  3. Finite Element Results Visualization for Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Speck, Douglas E.; Dovey, Donald J.

    1996-07-15

    GRIZ is a general-purpose post-processing application supporting interactive visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. In addition to basic pseudocolor renderings of state variables over the mesh surface, GRIZ provides modern visualization techniques such as isocontours and isosurfaces, cutting planes, vector field display, and particle traces. GRIZ accepts both command-line and mouse-driven input, and is portable to virtually any UNIX platform which provides Motif and OpenGl libraries.

  4. Finite Element Method for Capturing Ultra-relativistic Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, G. A.; Chung, T. J.

    2003-01-01

    While finite element methods are used extensively by researchers solving computational fluid dynamics in fields other than astrophysics, their use in astrophysical fluid simulations has been predominantly overlooked. Current simulations using other methods such as finite difference and finite volume (based on finite difference) have shown remarkable results, but these methods are limited by their fundamental properties in aspects that are important for simulations with complex geometries and widely varying spatial and temporal scale differences. We have explored the use of finite element methods for astrophysical fluids in order to establish the validity of using such methods in astrophysical environments. We present our numerical technique applied to solving ultra-relativistic (Lorentz Factor Gamma >> 1) shocks which are prevalent in astrophysical studies including relativistic jets and gamma-ray burst studies. We show our finite element formulation applied to simulations where the Lorentz factor ranges up to 2236 and demonstrate its stability in solving ultra-relativistic flows. Our numerical method is based on the Flowfield Dependent Variation (FDV) Method, unique in that numerical diffusion is derived from physical parameters rather than traditional artificial viscosity methods. Numerical instabilities account for most of the difficulties when capturing shocks in this regime. Our method results in stable solutions and accurate results as compared with other methods.

  5. TAURUS. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1984-05-01

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D, DYNA3D, TACO3D, TOPAZ3D, and GEMINI and plots contours, time histories,and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  6. TAURUS. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, T.

    1992-03-03

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D, DYNA3D, TACO3D, TOPAZ3D, and GEMINI and plots contours, time histories, and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  7. TAURUS. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1993-11-30

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D, DYNA3D, TACO3D, TOPAZ3D, and GEMINI and plots contours, time histories,and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  8. TAURUS. 3-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1991-05-01

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D (ESTSC 139), DYNA3D (ESTSC 138), TACO3D (ESTSC 287), TOPAZ3D (ESTSC 231), and GEMINI (ESTSC 455) and plots contours, time histories,and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  9. TAURUS. 3-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1992-03-03

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D (ESTSC 139), DYNA3D (ESTSC 138), TACO3D (ESTSC 287), TOPAZ3D (ESTSC 231), and GEMINI (ESTSC 455) and plots contours, time histories,and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  10. TAURUS. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Whirley, R.G.

    1992-03-03

    TAURUS reads the binary plot files generated by the LLNL three-dimensional finite element analysis codes, NIKE3D, DYNA3D, TACO3D, TOPAZ3D, and GEMINI and plots contours, time histories,and deformed shapes. Contours of a large number of quantities may be plotted on meshes consisting of plate, shell, and solid type elements. TAURUS can compute a variety of strain measures, reaction forces along constrained boundaries, and momentum. TAURUS has three phases: initialization, geometry display with contouring, and time history processing.

  11. Transient finite element method using edge elements for moving conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Koji; Nishio, Takayuki; Yamada, Takashi ); Kawase, Yoshihiro . Dept. of Information Science)

    1999-05-01

    For the next generation of high speed railway systems and automobiles new braking systems are currently under development. These braking systems take into account the eddy currents, which are produced by the movement of the conductor in the magnetic field. For their optimum design, it is necessary to know the distribution of eddy currents in the moving conductor. The finite element method (FEM) is often used to simulate them. Here, transient finite element method using edge elements for moving conductor is presented. Here the magnetic vector potential is interpolated at the upwind position and the time derivative term is discretized by the backward difference method. As a result, the system matrix becomes symmetric and the ICCG method is applicable to solve the matrix. This method is used to solve an eddy current rail brake system. The results demonstrate that this approach is suitable to solve transient problems involving movement.

  12. Variational approach to probabilistic finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belytschko, T.; Liu, W. K.; Mani, A.; Besterfield, G.

    1991-01-01

    Probabilistic finite element methods (PFEM), synthesizing the power of finite element methods with second-moment techniques, are formulated for various classes of problems in structural and solid mechanics. Time-invariant random materials, geometric properties and loads are incorporated in terms of their fundamental statistics viz. second-moments. Analogous to the discretization of the displacement field in finite element methods, the random fields are also discretized. Preserving the conceptual simplicity, the response moments are calculated with minimal computations. By incorporating certain computational techniques, these methods are shown to be capable of handling large systems with many sources of uncertainties. By construction, these methods are applicable when the scale of randomness is not very large and when the probabilistic density functions have decaying tails. The accuracy and efficiency of these methods, along with their limitations, are demonstrated by various applications. Results obtained are compared with those of Monte Carlo simulation and it is shown that good accuracy can be obtained for both linear and nonlinear problems. The methods are amenable to implementation in deterministic FEM based computer codes.

  13. Variational approach to probabilistic finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belytschko, T.; Liu, W. K.; Mani, A.; Besterfield, G.

    1987-01-01

    Probabilistic finite element method (PFEM), synthesizing the power of finite element methods with second-moment techniques, are formulated for various classes of problems in structural and solid mechanics. Time-invariant random materials, geometric properties, and loads are incorporated in terms of their fundamental statistics viz. second-moments. Analogous to the discretization of the displacement field in finite element methods, the random fields are also discretized. Preserving the conceptual simplicity, the response moments are calculated with minimal computations. By incorporating certain computational techniques, these methods are shown to be capable of handling large systems with many sources of uncertainties. By construction, these methods are applicable when the scale of randomness is not very large and when the probabilistic density functions have decaying tails. The accuracy and efficiency of these methods, along with their limitations, are demonstrated by various applications. Results obtained are compared with those of Monte Carlo simulation and it is shown that good accuracy can be obtained for both linear and nonlinear problems. The methods are amenable to implementation in deterministic FEM based computer codes.

  14. Finite element modeling of lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Feng; Klug, William S.

    2006-12-01

    A numerical simulation framework is presented for the study of biological membranes composed of lipid bilayers based on the finite element method. The classic model for these membranes employs a two-dimensional-fluid-like elastic constitutive law which is sensitive to curvature, and subjects vesicles to physically imposed constraints on surface area and volume. This model is implemented numerically via the use of C1-conforming triangular Loop subdivision finite elements. The validity of the framework is tested by computing equilibrium shapes from previously-determined axisymmetric shape-phase diagram of lipid bilayer vesicles with homogeneous material properties. Some of the benefits and challenges of finite element modeling of lipid bilayer systems are discussed, and it is indicated how this framework is natural for future investigation of biologically realistic bilayer structures involving nonaxisymmetric geometries, binding and adhesive interactions, heterogeneous mechanical properties, cytoskeletal interactions, and complex loading arrangements. These biologically relevant features have important consequences for the shape mechanics of nonidealized vesicles and cells, and their study requires not simply advances in theory, but also advances in numerical simulation techniques, such as those presented here.

  15. FESDIF -- Finite Element Scalar Diffraction theory code

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, H.G.

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the theory and use of a powerful scalar diffraction theory based computer code for calculation of intensity fields due to diffraction of optical waves by two-dimensional planar apertures and lenses. This code is called FESDIF (Finite Element Scalar Diffraction). It is based upon both Fraunhofer and Kirchhoff scalar diffraction theories. Simplified routines for circular apertures are included. However, the real power of the code comes from its basis in finite element methods. These methods allow the diffracting aperture to be virtually any geometric shape, including the various secondary aperture obstructions present in telescope systems. Aperture functions, with virtually any phase and amplitude variations, are allowed in the aperture openings. Step change aperture functions are accommodated. The incident waves are considered to be monochromatic. Plane waves, spherical waves, or Gaussian laser beams may be incident upon the apertures. Both area and line integral transformations were developed for the finite element based diffraction transformations. There is some loss of aperture function generality in the line integral transformations which are typically many times more computationally efficient than the area integral transformations when applicable to a particular problem.

  16. Finite element dynamic analysis on CDC STAR-100 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Lambiotte, J. J., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Computational algorithms are presented for the finite element dynamic analysis of structures on the CDC STAR-100 computer. The spatial behavior is described using higher-order finite elements. The temporal behavior is approximated by using either the central difference explicit scheme or Newmark's implicit scheme. In each case the analysis is broken up into a number of basic macro-operations. Discussion is focused on the organization of the computation and the mode of storage of different arrays to take advantage of the STAR pipeline capability. The potential of the proposed algorithms is discussed and CPU times are given for performing the different macro-operations for a shell modeled by higher order composite shallow shell elements having 80 degrees of freedom.

  17. Finite element analysis of posterior cervical fixation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Y; Wang, H H; Jin, A M; Zhang, L; Min, S X; Liu, C L; Qiu, S J; Shu, X Q

    2015-02-01

    Despite largely, used in the past, biomechanical test, to investigate the fixation techniques of subaxial cervical spine, information is lacking about the internal structural response to external loading. It is not yet clear which technique represents the best choice and whether stabilization devices can be efficient and beneficial for three-column injuries (TCI). The different posterior cervical fixation techniques (pedicle screw PS, lateral mass screw LS, and transarticular screw TS) have respective indications. A detailed, geometrically accurate, nonlinear C3-C7 finite element model (FEM) had been successfully developed and validated. Then three FEMs were reconstructed from different fixation techniques after C4-C6 TCI. A compressive preload of 74N combined with a pure moment of 1.8 Nm in flexion, extension, left-right lateral bending, and left-right axial rotation was applied to the FEMs. The ROM results showed that there were obvious significant differences when comparing the different fixation techniques. PS and TS techniques can provide better immediate stabilization, compared to LS technique. The stress results showed that the variability of von Mises stress in the TS fixation device was minimum and LS fixation device was maximum. Furthermore, the screws inserted by TS technique had high stress concentration at the middle part of the screws. Screw inserted by PS and LS techniques had higher stress concentration at the actual cap-rod-screw interface. The research considers that spinal surgeon should first consider using the TS technique to treat cervical TCI. If PS technique is used, we should eventually prolong the need for external bracing in order to reduce the higher risk of fracture on fixation devices. If LS technique is used, we should add anterior cervical operation for acquire a better immediate stabilization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Implicit extrapolation methods for multilevel finite element computations

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, M.; Ruede, U.

    1994-12-31

    The finite element package FEMGP has been developed to solve elliptic and parabolic problems arising in the computation of magnetic and thermomechanical fields. FEMGP implements various methods for the construction of hierarchical finite element meshes, a variety of efficient multilevel solvers, including multigrid and preconditioned conjugate gradient iterations, as well as pre- and post-processing software. Within FEMGP, multigrid {tau}-extrapolation can be employed to improve the finite element solution iteratively to higher order. This algorithm is based on an implicit extrapolation, so that the algorithm differs from a regular multigrid algorithm only by a slightly modified computation of the residuals on the finest mesh. Another advantage of this technique is, that in contrast to explicit extrapolation methods, it does not rely on the existence of global error expansions, and therefore neither requires uniform meshes nor global regularity assumptions. In the paper the authors will analyse the {tau}-extrapolation algorithm and present experimental results in the context of the FEMGP package. Furthermore, the {tau}-extrapolation results will be compared to higher order finite element solutions.

  19. Modal Substructuring of Geometrically Nonlinear Finite-Element Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kuether, Robert J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.

    2015-12-21

    The efficiency of a modal substructuring method depends on the component modes used to reduce each subcomponent model. Methods such as Craig–Bampton have been used extensively to reduce linear finite-element models with thousands or even millions of degrees of freedom down orders of magnitude while maintaining acceptable accuracy. A novel reduction method is proposed here for geometrically nonlinear finite-element models using the fixed-interface and constraint modes of the linearized system to reduce each subcomponent model. The geometric nonlinearity requires an additional cubic and quadratic polynomial function in the modal equations, and the nonlinear stiffness coefficients are determined by applying a series of static loads and using the finite-element code to compute the response. The geometrically nonlinear, reduced modal equations for each subcomponent are then coupled by satisfying compatibility and force equilibrium. This modal substructuring approach is an extension of the Craig–Bampton method and is readily applied to geometrically nonlinear models built directly within commercial finite-element packages. The efficiency of this new approach is demonstrated on two example problems: one that couples two geometrically nonlinear beams at a shared rotational degree of freedom, and another that couples an axial spring element to the axial degree of freedom of a geometrically nonlinear beam. The nonlinear normal modes of the assembled models are compared with those of a truth model to assess the accuracy of the novel modal substructuring approach.

  20. Modal Substructuring of Geometrically Nonlinear Finite-Element Models

    DOE PAGES

    Kuether, Robert J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.

    2015-12-21

    The efficiency of a modal substructuring method depends on the component modes used to reduce each subcomponent model. Methods such as Craig–Bampton have been used extensively to reduce linear finite-element models with thousands or even millions of degrees of freedom down orders of magnitude while maintaining acceptable accuracy. A novel reduction method is proposed here for geometrically nonlinear finite-element models using the fixed-interface and constraint modes of the linearized system to reduce each subcomponent model. The geometric nonlinearity requires an additional cubic and quadratic polynomial function in the modal equations, and the nonlinear stiffness coefficients are determined by applying amore » series of static loads and using the finite-element code to compute the response. The geometrically nonlinear, reduced modal equations for each subcomponent are then coupled by satisfying compatibility and force equilibrium. This modal substructuring approach is an extension of the Craig–Bampton method and is readily applied to geometrically nonlinear models built directly within commercial finite-element packages. The efficiency of this new approach is demonstrated on two example problems: one that couples two geometrically nonlinear beams at a shared rotational degree of freedom, and another that couples an axial spring element to the axial degree of freedom of a geometrically nonlinear beam. The nonlinear normal modes of the assembled models are compared with those of a truth model to assess the accuracy of the novel modal substructuring approach.« less

  1. Finite element modeling of the deformation of magnetoelastic film

    SciTech Connect

    Barham, Matthew I.; White, Daniel A.; Steigmann, David J.

    2010-09-01

    Recently a new class of biocompatible elastic polymers loaded with small ferrous particles, a magnetoelastic polymer, has been developed. This engineered material is formed into a thin film using spin casting. An applied magnetic field will deform the film. The magnetic deformation of this film has many possible applications, particularly in microfluidic pumps and pressure regulators. In this paper a finite element method suitable for the transient simulation of arbitrarily shaped three-dimensional magnetoelastic polymers subjected to time-varying magnetic fields is developed. The approach is similar to that employed in finite elment magnetohydrodynamic simulations, the key difference is a more complex hyperelastic material model. In order to confirm the validity of the approach, finite element solutions for an axially symmetric thin film are compared to an analytical solution based on the membrane (infinitely thin) approximation. For this particular problem the two approaches give qualitatively similar results and converge as the film thickness approaches zero.

  2. Modelling bucket excavation by finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecingina, O. M.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in geological components of the layers from lignite pits have an impact on the sustainability of the cup path elements and under the action of excavation force appear efforts leading to deformation of the entire assembly. Application of finite element method in the optimization of components leads to economic growth, to increase the reliability and durability of the studied machine parts thus the machine. It is obvious usefulness of knowledge the state of mechanical tensions that the designed piece or the assembly not to break under the action of tensions that must cope during operation. In the course of excavation work on all bucket cutting force components, the first coming into contact with the material being excavated cutting edge. Therefore in the study with finite element analysis is retained only cutting edge. To study the field of stress and strain on the cutting edge will be created geometric patterns for each type of cup this will be subject to static analysis. The geometric design retains the cutting edge shape and on this on the tooth cassette location will apply an areal force on the abutment tooth. The cutting edge real pattern is subjected to finite element study for the worst case of rock cutting by symmetrical and asymmetrical cups whose profile is different. The purpose of this paper is to determine the displacement and tensions field for both profiles considering the maximum force applied on the cutting edge and the depth of the cutting is equal with the width of the cutting edge of the tooth. It will consider the worst case when on the structure will act both the tangential force and radial force on the bucket profile. For determination of stress and strain field on the form design of cutting edge profile will apply maximum force assuming uniform distribution and on the edge surface force will apply a radial force. After geometric patterns discretization on the cutting knives and determining stress field, can be seen that at the

  3. Cracked finite elements proposed for NASTRAN. [based on application of finite element method to fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aberson, J. A.; Anderson, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The recent introduction of special crack-tip singularity elements, usually referred to as cracked elements, has brought the power and flexibility of the finite-element method to bear much more effectively on fracture mechanics problems. This paper recalls the development of two cracked elements and presents the results of some applications proving their accuracy and economy. Judging from the available literature on numerical methods in fracture mechanics, it seems clear that the elements described have been used more extensively than any others in practical fracture mechanics applications.

  4. Visualization of transient finite element analyses on large unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Dovey, D.

    1995-03-22

    Three-dimensional transient finite element analysis is performed on unstructured grids. A trend toward running larger analysis problems, combined with a desire for interactive animation of analysis results, demands efficient visualization techniques. This paper discusses a set of data structures and algorithms for visualizing transient analysis results on unstructured grids and introduces some modifications in order to better support large grids. In particular, an element grouping approach is used to reduce the amount of memory needed for external surface determination and to speed up ``point in element`` tests. The techniques described lend themselves to visualization of analyses carried out in parallel on a massively parallel computer (MPC).

  5. Discontinuous dual-primal mixed finite elements for elliptic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottasso, Carlo L.; Micheletti, Stefano; Sacco, Riccardo

    2000-01-01

    We propose a novel discontinuous mixed finite element formulation for the solution of second-order elliptic problems. Fully discontinuous piecewise polynomial finite element spaces are used for the trial and test functions. The discontinuous nature of the test functions at the element interfaces allows to introduce new boundary unknowns that, on the one hand enforce the weak continuity of the trial functions, and on the other avoid the need to define a priori algorithmic fluxes as in standard discontinuous Galerkin methods. Static condensation is performed at the element level, leading to a solution procedure based on the sole interface unknowns. The resulting family of discontinuous dual-primal mixed finite element methods is presented in the one and two-dimensional cases. In the one-dimensional case, we show the equivalence of the method with implicit Runge-Kutta schemes of the collocation type exhibiting optimal behavior. Numerical experiments in one and two dimensions demonstrate the order accuracy of the new method, confirming the results of the analysis.

  6. System software for the finite element machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, T. W.; Knott, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The Finite Element Machine is an experimental parallel computer developed at Langley Research Center to investigate the application of concurrent processing to structural engineering analysis. This report describes system-level software which has been developed to facilitate use of the machine by applications researchers. The overall software design is outlined, and several important parallel processing issues are discussed in detail, including processor management, communication, synchronization, and input/output. Based on experience using the system, the hardware architecture and software design are critiqued, and areas for further work are suggested.

  7. Iterative methods for mixed finite element equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.; Nagtegaal, J. C.; Zienkiewicz, O. C.

    1985-01-01

    Iterative strategies for the solution of indefinite system of equations arising from the mixed finite element method are investigated in this paper with application to linear and nonlinear problems in solid and structural mechanics. The augmented Hu-Washizu form is derived, which is then utilized to construct a family of iterative algorithms using the displacement method as the preconditioner. Two types of iterative algorithms are implemented. Those are: constant metric iterations which does not involve the update of preconditioner; variable metric iterations, in which the inverse of the preconditioning matrix is updated. A series of numerical experiments is conducted to evaluate the numerical performance with application to linear and nonlinear model problems.

  8. A finite element model of ultrasonic extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, M.; Daud, Y.

    2009-08-01

    Since the 1950's researchers have carried out investigations into the effects of applying ultrasonic excitation to metals undergoing elastic and plastic deformation. Experiments have been conducted where ultrasonic excitation is superimposed in complex metalworking operations such as wire drawing and extrusion, to identify the benefits of ultrasonic vibrations. This study presents a finite element analysis of ultrasonic excitation applied to the extrusion of a cylindrical aluminium bar. The effects of friction on the extrusion load are reported for the two excitation configurations of radially and axially applied ultrasonic vibrations and the results are compared with experimental data reported in the literature.

  9. Finite Element Modeling of Mitral Valve Repair

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Ashley E.; Pantoja, Joe Luis; Weinsaft, Jonathan; Grossi, Eugene; Guccione, Julius M.; Ge, Liang; Ratcliffe, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The mitral valve is a complex structure regulating forward flow of blood between the left atrium and left ventricle (LV). Multiple disease processes can affect its proper function, and when these diseases cause severe mitral regurgitation (MR), optimal treatment is repair of the native valve. The mitral valve (MV) is a dynamic structure with multiple components that have complex interactions. Computational modeling through finite element (FE) analysis is a valuable tool to delineate the biomechanical properties of the mitral valve and understand its diseases and their repairs. In this review, we present an overview of relevant mitral valve diseases, and describe the evolution of FE models of surgical valve repair techniques. PMID:26632260

  10. Algebraic surface design and finite element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajaj, Chandrajit L.

    1992-01-01

    Some of the techniques are summarized which are used in constructing C sup 0 and C sup 1 continuous meshes of low degree, implicitly defined, algebraic surface patches in three dimensional space. These meshes of low degree algebraic surface patches are used to construct accurate computer models of physical objects. These meshes are also used in the finite element simulation of physical phenomena (e.g., heat dissipation, stress/strain distributions, fluid flow characteristics) required in the computer prototyping of both the manufacturability and functionality of the geometric design.

  11. Chemorheology of reactive systems: Finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, C.; Roylance, D.

    1982-01-01

    The equations which govern the nonisothermal flow of reactive fluids are outlined, and the means by which finite element analysis is used to solve these equations for the sort of arbitrary boundary conditions encountered in industrial practice are described. The performance of the computer code is illustrated by several trial problems, selected more for their value in providing insight to polymer processing flows than as practical production problems. Although a good deal remains to be learned as to the performance and proper use of this numerical technique, it is undeniably useful in providing better understanding of today's complicated polymer processing problems.

  12. Advance finite element modeling of rotor blade aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.; Sangha, K. B.; Panda, B.

    1994-01-01

    An advanced beam finite element has been developed for modeling rotor blade dynamics and aeroelasticity. This element is part of the Element Library of the Second Generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System (2GCHAS). The element allows modeling of arbitrary rotor systems, including bearingless rotors. It accounts for moderately large elastic deflections, anisotropic properties, large frame motion for maneuver simulation, and allows for variable order shape functions. The effects of gravity, mechanically applied and aerodynamic loads are included. All kinematic quantities required to compute airloads are provided. In this paper, the fundamental assumptions and derivation of the element matrices are presented. Numerical results are shown to verify the formulation and illustrate several features of the element.

  13. Finite-Element Analysis of Multiphase Immiscible Flow Through Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppusamy, T.; Sheng, J.; Parker, J. C.; Lenhard, R. J.

    1987-04-01

    A finite-element model is developed for multiphase flow through soil involving three immiscible fluids: namely, air, water, and a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). A variational method is employed for the finite-element formulation corresponding to the coupled differential equations governing flow in a three-fluid phase porous medium system with constant air phase pressure. Constitutive relationships for fluid conductivities and saturations as functions of fluid pressures, which are derived in a companion paper by J. C. Parker et al. (this issue) and which may be calibrated from two-phase laboratory measurements, are employed in the finite-element program. The solution procedure uses backward time integration with iteration by a modified Picard method to handle the nonlinear properties. Laboratory experiments involving water displacement from soil columns by p cymene (a benzene-derivative hydrocarbon) under constant pressure were simulated by the finite-element program to validate the numerical model and formulation for constitutive properties. Transient water outflow predicted using independently measured saturation-capillary head data agreed with observed outflow data within the limits of precision of the predictions as estimated by a first-order Taylor series approximation considering parameter uncertainty due to experimental reproducability and constitutive model accuracy. Two-dimensional simulations are presented for a hypothetical field case involving introduction of NAPL near the soil surface due to leakage from an underground storage tank. Subsequent transport of NAPL in the variably saturated vadose and groundwater zones is analyzed.

  14. A Family of Uniform Strain Tetrahedral Elements and a Method for Connecting Dissimilar Finite Element Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Heinstein, M.W.; Jung, J.; Key, S.W.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents a collection of papers on a family of uniform strain tetrahedral finite elements and their connection to different element types. Also included in the report are two papers which address the general problem of connecting dissimilar meshes in two and three dimensions. Much of the work presented here was motivated by the development of the tetrahedral element described in the report "A Suitable Low-Order, Eight-Node Tetrahedral Finite Element For Solids," by S. W. Key {ital et al.}, SAND98-0756, March 1998. Two basic issues addressed by the papers are: (1) the performance of alternative tetrahedral elements with uniform strain and enhanced uniform strain formulations, and (2) the proper connection of tetrahedral and other element types when two meshes are "tied" together to represent a single continuous domain.

  15. An algorithm for domain decomposition in finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Nasra, M.; Nguyen, D. T.

    1991-01-01

    A simple and efficient algorithm is described for automatic decomposition of an arbitrary finite element domain into a specified number of subdomains for finite element and substructuring analysis in a multiprocessor computer environment. The algorithm is designed to balance the work loads, to minimize the communication among processors and to minimize the bandwidths of the resulting system of equations. Small- to large-scale finite element models, which have two-node elements (truss, beam element), three-node elements (triangular element) and four-node elements (quadrilateral element), are solved on the Convex computer to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. A FORTRAN computer program is also included.

  16. Finite element calculation of residual stress in dental restorative material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    A finite element methodology for residual stresses calculation in dental restorative materials is proposed. The material under concern is a multifunctional methacrylate-based composite for dental restorations, activated by visible light. Reaction kinetics, curing shrinkage, and viscoelastic relaxation functions were required as input data on a structural finite element solver. Post cure effects were considered in order to quantify the residual stresses coming out from natural contraction with respect to those debited to the chemical shrinkage. The analysis showed for a given test case that residual stresses frozen in the dental restoration at uniform temperature of 37°C are of the same order of magnitude of the strength of the dental composite material per se.

  17. Finite Element Analysis of a Floating Microstimulator

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Mesut; Ur-Rahman, Syed S.

    2011-01-01

    Analytical solutions for voltage fields in a volume conductor are available only for ideal electrodes with radially symmetric contacts and infinitely extending substrates. Practical electrodes for neural stimulation may have asymmetric contacts and finite substrate dimensions and hence deviate from the ideal geometries. For instance, it needs to be determined if the analytical solutions are adequate for simulations of narrow shank electrodes where the substrate width is comparable to the size of the contacts. As an extension to this problem, a “floating” stimulator can be envisioned where the substrate would be finite in all directions. The question then becomes how small this floating stimulator can be made before its stimulation strength is compromised by the decrease in the medium impedance between the contacts as the contacts are approaching each other. We used finite element modeling to solve the voltage and current profiles generated by these radially asymmetric electrode geometries in a volume conductor. The simulation results suggest that both the substrate size and the bipolar contact separation influence the voltage field when these parameters are as small as a few times the contact size. Both of these effects are larger for increasing elevations from the contact surface, and even stronger for floating electrodes (finite substrate in all directions) than the shank-type electrodes. Location of the contacts on the floating electrode also plays a role in determining the voltage field. The voltage field for any device size and current, and any specific resistance of the volume conductor can be predicted from these results so long as the aspect ratios are preserved. PMID:17601192

  18. Impeller deflection and modal finite element analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Nathan A.

    2013-10-01

    Deflections of an impeller due to centripetal forces are calculated using finite element analysis. The lateral, or out of plane, deflections are an important design consideration for this particular impeller because it incorporates an air bearing with critical gap tolerances. The target gap distance is approximately 10 microns at a rotational velocity of 2500 rpm. The centripetal forces acting on the impeller cause it deflect in a concave fashion, decreasing the initial gap distance as a function of radial position. This deflection is characterized for a previous and updated impeller design for comparative purposes. The impact of design options such as material selection, geometry dimensions, and operating rotational velocity are also explored, followed by a sensitivity study with these parameters bounded by specific design values. A modal analysis is also performed to calculate the impeller's natural frequencies which are desired to be avoided during operation. The finite element modeling techniques continue to be exercised by the impeller design team to address specific questions and evaluate conceptual designs, some of which are included in the Appendix.

  19. Finite element analysis of multilayer coextrusion.

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Schunk, Peter Randall; Baer, Thomas A.; Mrozek, Randy A.; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Collins, Robert; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2011-09-01

    Multilayer coextrusion has become a popular commercial process for producing complex polymeric products from soda bottles to reflective coatings. A numerical model of a multilayer coextrusion process is developed based on a finite element discretization and two different free-surface methods, an arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) moving mesh implementation and an Eulerian level set method, to understand the moving boundary problem associated with the polymer-polymer interface. The goal of this work is to have a numerical capability suitable for optimizing and troubleshooting the coextrusion process, circumventing flow instabilities such as ribbing and barring, and reducing variability in layer thickness. Though these instabilities can be both viscous and elastic in nature, for this work a generalized Newtonian description of the fluid is used. Models of varying degrees of complexity are investigated including stability analysis and direct three-dimensional finite element free surface approaches. The results of this work show how critical modeling can be to reduce build test cycles, improve material choices, and guide mold design.

  20. Finite element analysis of bolted flange connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, D. Y.; Stallings, J. M.

    1994-06-01

    A 2-D axisymmetric finite element model and a 3-D solid finite element model of a high pressure bolted flange joint were generated to investigate the stress behaviors. This investigation includes comparisons for axisymmetric loading of both the 2-D and 3-D models, the effects of non-axisymmetric bolt pretensions in the 3-D models, and the differences between 2-D and 3-D models subjected to non-axisymmetric loading. Comparisons indicated differences in von Mises stress up to 12% at various points due to the non-axisymmetric bolt pretensions. Applied bending moments were converted to equivalent axial forces for use in the 2-D model. It was found that the largest von Mises stresses in 3-D model did not occur on the side of the connection where the bending stresses and applied axial stresses were additive. Hence, in the 2-D model where the equivalent axial force (for bending moment) and applied axial forces were added, the 2-D model under estimated the maximum von Mises stress obtained from the 3-D model by 30%.

  1. Least-squares finite element method for fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1989-01-01

    An overview is given of new developments of the least squares finite element method (LSFEM) in fluid dynamics. Special emphasis is placed on the universality of LSFEM; the symmetry and positiveness of the algebraic systems obtained from LSFEM; the accommodation of LSFEM to equal order interpolations for incompressible viscous flows; and the natural numerical dissipation of LSFEM for convective transport problems and high speed compressible flows. The performance of LSFEM is illustrated by numerical examples.

  2. An Efficient Vector Finite Element Method for Nonlinear Electromagnetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A C; White, D A; Rodrigue, G H

    2006-06-27

    We have developed a mixed Vector Finite Element Method (VFEM) for Maxwell's equations with a nonlinear polarization term. The method allows for discretization of complicated geometries with arbitrary order representations of the B and E fields. In this paper we will describe the method and a series of optimizations that significantly reduce the computational cost. Additionally, a series of test simulations will be presented to validate the method. Finally, a nonlinear waveguide mode mixing example is presented and discussed.

  3. Accurate finite element modeling of acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idesman, A.; Pham, D.

    2014-07-01

    In the paper we suggest an accurate finite element approach for the modeling of acoustic waves under a suddenly applied load. We consider the standard linear elements and the linear elements with reduced dispersion for the space discretization as well as the explicit central-difference method for time integration. The analytical study of the numerical dispersion shows that the most accurate results can be obtained with the time increments close to the stability limit. However, even in this case and the use of the linear elements with reduced dispersion, mesh refinement leads to divergent numerical results for acoustic waves under a suddenly applied load. This is explained by large spurious high-frequency oscillations. For the quantification and the suppression of spurious oscillations, we have modified and applied a two-stage time-integration technique that includes the stage of basic computations and the filtering stage. This technique allows accurate convergent results at mesh refinement as well as significantly reduces the numerical anisotropy of solutions. We should mention that the approach suggested is very general and can be equally applied to any loading as well as for any space-discretization technique and any explicit or implicit time-integration method.

  4. The constraint method: A new finite element technique. [applied to static and dynamic loads on plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, C.; Szabo, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    An approch to the finite element method which utilizes families of conforming finite elements based on complete polynomials is presented. Finite element approximations based on this method converge with respect to progressively reduced element sizes as well as with respect to progressively increasing orders of approximation. Numerical results of static and dynamic applications of plates are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the method. Comparisons are made with plate elements in NASTRAN and the high-precision plate element developed by Cowper and his co-workers. Some considerations are given to implementation of the constraint method into general purpose computer programs such as NASTRAN.

  5. Global-Local Finite Element Analysis of Bonded Single-Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilic, Bahattin; Madenci, Erdogan; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2004-01-01

    Adhesively bonded lap joints involve dissimilar material junctions and sharp changes in geometry, possibly leading to premature failure. Although the finite element method is well suited to model the bonded lap joints, traditional finite elements are incapable of correctly resolving the stress state at junctions of dissimilar materials because of the unbounded nature of the stresses. In order to facilitate the use of bonded lap joints in future structures, this study presents a finite element technique utilizing a global (special) element coupled with traditional elements. The global element includes the singular behavior at the junction of dissimilar materials with or without traction-free surfaces.

  6. Patient-specific finite element modeling of bones.

    PubMed

    Poelert, Sander; Valstar, Edward; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2013-04-01

    Finite element modeling is an engineering tool for structural analysis that has been used for many years to assess the relationship between load transfer and bone morphology and to optimize the design and fixation of orthopedic implants. Due to recent developments in finite element model generation, for example, improved computed tomography imaging quality, improved segmentation algorithms, and faster computers, the accuracy of finite element modeling has increased vastly and finite element models simulating the anatomy and properties of an individual patient can be constructed. Such so-called patient-specific finite element models are potentially valuable tools for orthopedic surgeons in fracture risk assessment or pre- and intraoperative planning of implant placement. The aim of this article is to provide a critical overview of current themes in patient-specific finite element modeling of bones. In addition, the state-of-the-art in patient-specific modeling of bones is compared with the requirements for a clinically applicable patient-specific finite element method, and judgment is passed on the feasibility of application of patient-specific finite element modeling as a part of clinical orthopedic routine. It is concluded that further development in certain aspects of patient-specific finite element modeling are needed before finite element modeling can be used as a routine clinical tool.

  7. Control volume finite element method with multidimensional edge element Scharfetter-Gummel upwinding. Part 1, formulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

    2011-06-01

    We develop a new formulation of the Control Volume Finite Element Method (CVFEM) with a multidimensional Scharfetter-Gummel (SG) upwinding for the drift-diffusion equations. The formulation uses standard nodal elements for the concentrations and expands the flux in terms of the lowest-order Nedelec H(curl; {Omega})-compatible finite element basis. The SG formula is applied to the edges of the elements to express the Nedelec element degree of freedom on this edge in terms of the nodal degrees of freedom associated with the endpoints of the edge. The resulting upwind flux incorporates the upwind effects from all edges and is defined at the interior of the element. This allows for accurate evaluation of integrals on the boundaries of the control volumes for arbitrary quadrilateral elements. The new formulation admits efficient implementation through a standard loop over the elements in the mesh followed by loops over the element nodes (associated with control volume fractions in the element) and element edges (associated with flux degrees of freedom). The quantities required for the SG formula can be precomputed and stored for each edge in the mesh for additional efficiency gains. For clarity the details are presented for two-dimensional quadrilateral grids. Extension to other element shapes and three dimensions is straightforward.

  8. Efficient finite element modeling of elastodynamic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Paul D.; Velichko, Alexander

    2009-03-01

    The scattering of elastic waves by defects is the physical basis of ultrasonic NDE. Although analytical models exist for some canonical problems, the general case of scattering from an arbitrarily-shaped defect requires numerical methods such as finite elements (FE). In this paper, a robust and efficient FE technique is presented that is based on the premise of meshing a relatively small domain sufficient to enclose the scatterer. Plane waves are then excited from a particular direction by a numerical implementation of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral that uses an encircling array of uni-modal point sources. The scattered field displacements are recorded at the same points and the field decomposed into plane waves of different modes at different angles. By repeating this procedure for different incident angles it is possible to generate the scattering- or S-matrix for the scatterer. For a given size of scatterer, all the information in an S-matrix can be represented in the Fourier domain by a limited number of complex coefficients. Thus the complete scattering behavior of an arbitrary-shaped scatterer can be characterized by a finite number of complex coefficients, that can be obtained from a relatively small number of FE model executions.

  9. Immersed molecular electrokinetic finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopacz, Adrian M.; Liu, Wing K.

    2013-07-01

    A unique simulation technique has been developed capable of modeling electric field induced detection of biomolecules such as viruses, at room temperatures where thermal fluctuations must be considered. The proposed immersed molecular electrokinetic finite element method couples electrokinetics with fluctuating hydrodynamics to study the motion and deformation of flexible objects immersed in a suspending medium under an applied electric field. The force induced on an arbitrary object due to an electric field is calculated based on the continuum electromechanics and the Maxwell stress tensor. The thermal fluctuations are included in the Navier-Stokes fluid equations via the stochastic stress tensor. Dielectrophoretic and fluctuating forces acting on the particle are coupled through the fluid-structure interaction force calculated within the surrounding environment. This method was used to perform concentration and retention efficacy analysis of nanoscale biosensors using gold particles of various sizes. The analysis was also applied to a human papillomavirus.

  10. Quality management of finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, John

    1991-09-01

    A quality management system covering the use of finite element analysis is described. The main topics are as follows: acquisition, development and verification of software (including the software suppliers software quality control system), support, documentation, error control, internal software, software acceptance and release; development and qualification of analysis methods, including software evaluation, analysis procedure qualification and documentation, procedure quality checks, control of analysis procedure errors; product design and integrity analysis, including project quality assurance and analysis planning, task specification and allocation, analysis, execution, results checking and analysis records. Other issues include the commercial and business advantages of quality systems, project and technical management and the training and experience of personnel. The items are correlated with the requirements of International Standard Organization 9001.

  11. Finite element or Galerkin type semidiscrete schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durgun, K.

    1983-01-01

    A finite element of Galerkin type semidiscrete method is proposed for numerical solution of a linear hyperbolic partial differential equation. The question of stability is reduced to the stability of a system of ordinary differential equations for which Dahlquist theory applied. Results of separating the part of numerical solution which causes the spurious oscillation near shock-like response of semidiscrete scheme to a step function initial condition are presented. In general all methods produce such oscillatory overshoots on either side of shocks. This overshoot pathology, which displays a behavior similar to Gibb's phenomena of Fourier series, is explained on the basis of dispersion of separated Fourier components which relies on linearized theory to be satisfactory. Expository results represented.

  12. Finite-element solutions for geothermal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. C.; Conel, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Vector potential and scalar potential are used to formulate the governing equations for a single-component and single-phase geothermal system. By assuming an initial temperature field, the fluid velocity can be determined which, in turn, is used to calculate the convective heat transfer. The energy equation is then solved by considering convected heat as a distributed source. Using the resulting temperature to compute new source terms, the final results are obtained by iterations of the procedure. Finite-element methods are proposed for modeling of realistic geothermal systems; the advantages of such methods are discussed. The developed methodology is then applied to a sample problem. Favorable agreement is obtained by comparisons with a previous study.

  13. Finite-element solutions for geothermal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. C.; Conel, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Vector potential and scalar potential are used to formulate the governing equations for a single-component and single-phase geothermal system. By assuming an initial temperature field, the fluid velocity can be determined which, in turn, is used to calculate the convective heat transfer. The energy equation is then solved by considering convected heat as a distributed source. Using the resulting temperature to compute new source terms, the final results are obtained by iterations of the procedure. Finite-element methods are proposed for modeling of realistic geothermal systems; the advantages of such methods are discussed. The developed methodology is then applied to a sample problem. Favorable agreement is obtained by comparisons with a previous study.

  14. A finite element model with nonviscous damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussos, L. A.; Hyer, M. W.; Thornton, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    A constitutive law by which structural damping is modeled as a relationship between stress, strain, and strain rate in a material is used in conjunction with the finite element method to develop general integral expressions for viscous and nonviscous damping matrices. To solve the set of nonlinear equations resulting from the presence of nonviscous damping, a solution technique is developed by modifying the Newmark method to accommodate an iterative solution and treat the nonviscous damping as a pseudo-force. The technique is then checked for accuracy and convergence in single- and multi-degree-of-freedom problems, and is found to be accurate and efficient for initial-condition problems with small nonviscous damping.

  15. Adaptive finite element methods in electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Gavaghan, David J; Gillow, Kathryn; Süli, Endre

    2006-12-05

    In this article, we review some of our previous work that considers the general problem of numerical simulation of the currents at microelectrodes using an adaptive finite element approach. Microelectrodes typically consist of an electrode embedded (or recessed) in an insulating material. For all such electrodes, numerical simulation is made difficult by the presence of a boundary singularity at the electrode edge (where the electrode meets the insulator), manifested by the large increase in the current density at this point, often referred to as the edge effect. Our approach to overcoming this problem has involved the derivation of an a posteriori bound on the error in the numerical approximation for the current that can be used to drive an adaptive mesh-generation algorithm, allowing calculation of the quantity of interest (the current) to within a prescribed tolerance. We illustrate the generic applicability of the approach by considering a broad range of steady-state applications of the technique.

  16. Nonlinear probabilistic finite element models of laminated composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelstad, S. P.; Reddy, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    A probabilistic finite element analysis procedure for laminated composite shells has been developed. A total Lagrangian finite element formulation, employing a degenerated 3-D laminated composite shell with the full Green-Lagrange strains and first-order shear deformable kinematics, forms the modeling foundation. The first-order second-moment technique for probabilistic finite element analysis of random fields is employed and results are presented in the form of mean and variance of the structural response. The effects of material nonlinearity are included through the use of a rate-independent anisotropic plasticity formulation with the macroscopic point of view. Both ply-level and micromechanics-level random variables can be selected, the latter by means of the Aboudi micromechanics model. A number of sample problems are solved to verify the accuracy of the procedures developed and to quantify the variability of certain material type/structure combinations. Experimental data is compared in many cases, and the Monte Carlo simulation method is used to check the probabilistic results. In general, the procedure is quite effective in modeling the mean and variance response of the linear and nonlinear behavior of laminated composite shells.

  17. Parallel, adaptive finite element methods for conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Devine, Karen D.; Flaherty, Joseph E.

    1994-01-01

    We construct parallel finite element methods for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in one and two dimensions. Spatial discretization is performed by a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method using a basis of piecewise Legendre polynomials. Temporal discretization utilizes a Runge-Kutta method. Dissipative fluxes and projection limiting prevent oscillations near solution discontinuities. A posteriori estimates of spatial errors are obtained by a p-refinement technique using superconvergence at Radau points. The resulting method is of high order and may be parallelized efficiently on MIMD computers. We compare results using different limiting schemes and demonstrate parallel efficiency through computations on an NCUBE/2 hypercube. We also present results using adaptive h- and p-refinement to reduce the computational cost of the method.

  18. Finite-element time evolution operator for the anharmonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milton, Kimball A.

    1995-01-01

    The finite-element approach to lattice field theory is both highly accurate (relative errors approximately 1/N(exp 2), where N is the number of lattice points) and exactly unitary (in the sense that canonical commutation relations are exactly preserved at the lattice sites). In this talk I construct matrix elements for dynamical variables and for the time evolution operator for the anharmonic oscillator, for which the continuum Hamiltonian is H = p(exp 2)/2 + lambda q(exp 4)/4. Construction of such matrix elements does not require solving the implicit equations of motion. Low order approximations turn out to be extremely accurate. For example, the matrix element of the time evolution operator in the harmonic oscillator ground state gives a results for the anharmonic oscillator ground state energy accurate to better than 1 percent, while a two-state approximation reduces the error to less than 0.1 percent.

  19. A hybrid-stress finite element for linear anisotropic elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fly, Gerald W.; Oden, J. Tinsley; Pearson, Mark L.

    1988-01-01

    Standard assumed displacement finite elements with anisotropic material properties perform poorly in complex stress fields such as combined bending and shear and combined bending and torsion. A set of three dimensional hybrid-stress brick elements were developed with fully anisotropic material properties. Both eight-node and twenty-node bricks were developed based on the symmetry group theory of Punch and Atluri. An eight-node brick was also developed using complete polynomials and stress basis functions and reducing the order of the resulting stress parameter matrix by applying equilibrium constraints and stress compatibility constraints. Here the stress compatibility constraints must be formulated assuming anisotropic material properties. The performance of these elements was examined in numerical examples covering a broad range of stress distributions. The stress predictions show significant improvement over the assumed displacement elements but the calculation time is increased.

  20. Improved finite-element methods for rotorcraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinnant, Howard E.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the research directed at improving finite-element methods for rotorcraft airframes is presented. The development of a modification to the finite element method which eliminates interelement discontinuities is covered. The following subject areas are discussed: geometric entities, interelement continuity, dependent rotational degrees of freedom, and adaptive numerical integration. This new methodology is being implemented as an anisotropic, curvilinear, p-version, beam, shell, and brick finite element program.

  1. Impact of new computing systems on finite element computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Storassili, O. O.; Fulton, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Recent advances in computer technology that are likely to impact finite element computations are reviewed. The characteristics of supersystems, highly parallel systems, and small systems (mini and microcomputers) are summarized. The interrelations of numerical algorithms and software with parallel architectures are discussed. A scenario is presented for future hardware/software environment and finite element systems. A number of research areas which have high potential for improving the effectiveness of finite element analysis in the new environment are identified.

  2. A comparative study of finite element and finite difference methods for Cauchy-Riemann type equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G. J.; Rose, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    A least squares formulation of the system divu = rho, curlu = zeta is surveyed from the viewpoint of both finite element and finite difference methods. Closely related arguments are shown to establish convergence estimates.

  3. Survey and development of finite elements for nonlinear structural analysis. Volume 2: Nonlinear shell finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The development of two new shell finite elements for applications to large deflection problems is considered. The elements in question are doubly curved and of triangular and quadrilateral planform. They are restricted to small strains of elastic materials, and can accommodate large rotations. The elements described, which are based on relatively simple linear elements, make use of a new displacement function approach specifically designed for strongly nonlinear problems. The displacement function development for nonlinear applications is based on certain beam element formulations, and the strain-displacement equations are of a shallow shell type. Additional terms were included in these equations in an attempt to avoid the large errors characteristic of shallow shell elements in certain types of problems. An incremental nonlinear solution procedure specifically adopted to the element formulation was developed. The solution procedure is of combined incremental and total Lagrangian type, and uses a new updating scheme. A computer program was written to evaluate the developed formulations. This program can accommodate small element groups in arbitrary arrangements. Two simple programs were successfully solved. The results indicate that this new type of element has definite promise and should be a fruitful area for further research.

  4. Ablative Thermal Response Analysis Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    A review of the classic techniques used to solve ablative thermal response problems is presented. The advantages and disadvantages of both the finite element and finite difference methods are described. As a first step in developing a three dimensional finite element based ablative thermal response capability, a one dimensional computer tool has been developed. The finite element method is used to discretize the governing differential equations and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals is used to derive the element equations. A code to code comparison between the current 1-D tool and the 1-D Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal Response Program (FIAT) has been performed.

  5. A finite element simulation of sound attenuation in a finite duct with a peripherally variable liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    Using multimodal analysis, a variational finite element method is presented for analyzing sound attenuation in a three-dimensional finite duct with a peripherally variable liner in the absence of flow. A rectangular element, with cubic shaped functions, is employed. Once a small portion of a peripheral liner is removed, the attenuation rate near the frequency where maximum attenuation occurs drops significantly. The positioning of the liner segments affects the attenuation characteristics of the liner. Effects of the duct termination are important in the low frequency ranges. The main effect of peripheral variation of the liner is a broadening of the attenuation characteristics in the midfrequency range. Because of matrix size limitations of the presently available computer program, the eigenvalue equations should be solved out of core in order to handle realistic sources.

  6. Shear deformable finite beam elements for composite box beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam-Il; Choi, Dong-Ho

    2014-04-01

    The shear deformable thin-walled composite beams with closed cross-sections have been developed for coupled flexural, torsional, and buckling analyses. A theoretical model applicable to the thin-walled laminated composite box beams is presented by taking into account all the structural couplings coming from the material anisotropy and the shear deformation effects. The current composite beam includes the transverse shear and the restrained warping induced shear deformation by using the first-order shear deformation beam theory. Seven governing equations are derived for the coupled axial-flexural-torsional-shearing buckling based on the principle of minimum total potential energy. Based on the present analytical model, three different types of finite composite beam elements, namely, linear, quadratic and cubic elements are developed to analyze the flexural, torsional, and buckling problems. In order to demonstrate the accuracy and superiority of the beam theory and the finite beam elements developed by this study, numerical solutions are presented and compared with the results obtained by other researchers and the detailed three-dimensional analysis results using the shell elements of ABAQUS. Especially, the influences of the modulus ratio and the simplified assumptions in stress-strain relations on the deflection, twisting angle, and critical buckling loads of composite box beams are investigated. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Parallel iterative procedures for approximate solutions of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.

    1994-12-31

    Parallel iterative procedures based on domain decomposition techniques are defined and analyzed for the numerical solution of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods. For finite element methods, in a Lagrangian framework, an efficient way for choosing the algorithm parameter as well as the algorithm convergence are indicated. Some heuristic arguments for finding the algorithm parameter for finite difference schemes are addressed. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effectiveness of the methods.

  8. Numerical algorithms for finite element computations on arrays of microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a multicolored successive over relaxation (SOR) program for the finite element machine is discussed. The multicolored SOR method uses a generalization of the classical Red/Black grid point ordering for the SOR method. These multicolored orderings have the advantage of allowing the SOR method to be implemented as a Jacobi method, which is ideal for arrays of processors, but still enjoy the greater rate of convergence of the SOR method. The program solves a general second order self adjoint elliptic problem on a square region with Dirichlet boundary conditions, discretized by quadratic elements on triangular regions. For this general problem and discretization, six colors are necessary for the multicolored method to operate efficiently. The specific problem that was solved using the six color program was Poisson's equation; for Poisson's equation, three colors are necessary but six may be used. In general, the number of colors needed is a function of the differential equation, the region and boundary conditions, and the particular finite element used for the discretization.

  9. Edge or face based spectral finite elements for electromagnetic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jevtic, Jovan Obrad

    This work describes the development and presents a study of a finite element method (FEM) specifically designed for vector electromagnetic wave problems. Three aspects make this formulation different from the conventional FEM, namely, the selection of the unknowns, the choice of shape functions, and the approach to field matching between the elements. First, the unknowns are closely related to the tangential field components on the boundary of a finite element, an edge of a triangle in two dimensions (2D) or a face of a tetrahedron in three- dimensions (3D). This reflects the uniqueness theorem for electromagnetic fields. Second, the unknown total fields are expanded in terms of vector eigenfunctions of the wave equation within a semi-infinite domain bounded by the exact element geometry in 2D or an approximation thereof in 3D. This leads to a low phase error across an element and allows for electrically large elements. Finally, the sole numerical part of the method consist of the enforcement of the tangential field continuity over inter-element boundaries. This reflects the natural electromagnetic field boundary conditions which allows for the discontinuity of the normal field components. The 2D formulation presented herein can be thought of as an extension to higher orders of the conventional edge elements, which are based on the low order shape functions, while at the same time preserving their advantages, such as the absence of spurious modes and the ability to handle sharp edges as well as material interfaces. Furthermore, a full advantage of the higher order absorbing boundary conditions can be made. The 3D problem proved significantly more difficult, not only in terms of the conceptual development of the novel formulation, but also in terms of the associated computational issues, such as real-time determination of the zeros of associated Legendre functions and the ambiguity of eigenfunction ordering. The resolution of these issues, therefore, occupies a

  10. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) in Design and Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waggoner, Todd C.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) enables industrial designers to analyze complex components by dividing them into smaller elements, then assessing stress and strain characteristics. Traditionally mainframe based, FEA is being increasingly used in microcomputers. (SK)

  11. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) in Design and Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waggoner, Todd C.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) enables industrial designers to analyze complex components by dividing them into smaller elements, then assessing stress and strain characteristics. Traditionally mainframe based, FEA is being increasingly used in microcomputers. (SK)

  12. Finite element modelling of fabric shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hua; Clifford, Mike J.; Long, Andrew C.; Sherburn, Martin

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a finite element model to predict shear force versus shear angle for woven fabrics is developed. The model is based on the TexGen geometric modelling schema, developed at the University of Nottingham and orthotropic constitutive models for yarn behaviour, coupled with a unified displacement-difference periodic boundary condition. A major distinction from prior modelling of fabric shear is that the details of picture frame kinematics are included in the model, which allows the mechanisms of fabric shear to be represented more accurately. Meso- and micro-mechanisms of deformation are modelled to determine their contributions to energy dissipation during shear. The model is evaluated using results obtained for a glass fibre plain woven fabric, and the importance of boundary conditions in the analysis of deformation mechanisms is highlighted. The simulation results show that the simple rotation boundary condition is adequate for predicting shear force at large deformations, with most of the energy being dissipated at higher shear angles due to yarn compaction. For small deformations, a detailed kinematic analysis is needed, enabling the yarn shear and rotation deformation mechanisms to be modelled accurately.

  13. Finite element analysis of arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, E.

    1980-01-01

    Analytical models of the gas tungsten-arc welding process into finite element computer programs provides a valuable tool for determining the welding thermal cycle, weld bead shape, and penetration characteristics, as well as for evaluating the stresses and distortions generated as a result of the temperature transients. The analysis procedures are applicable to planar or axisymmetric welds with arbitrary cross-sectional geometries, under quasistationary conditions. The method used for determining temperatures features an iteration procedure to accurately account for the latent heat absorbed during melting and liberated during solidification of the weld. By simulating the heat input from the arc to the workpiece by a normal distribution function, temperature transients, weld bead dimensions, and cooling rates are evaluated as functions of both the magnitude and distribution of heat input, weldment geometry, and weld speed (or duration of heating for stationary arcs). Modeling of the welding thermal cycle is a prerequisite to analytical treatments of metallurgical changes in weld metal and heat-affected zone material, residual stresses and distortions, and weld defects. A quasistationary formulation for moving welds enables temperatures to be calculated using a two-dimensional heat conduction computer program. The present limitation of high welding speed can, however, be relaxed without altering the two-dimensional framework of the procedure.

  14. An iterative algorithm for finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laouafa, F.; Royis, P.

    2004-03-01

    In this paper, we state in a new form the algebraic problem arising from the one-field displacement finite element method (FEM). The displacement approach, in this discrete form, can be considered as the dual approach (force or equilibrium) with subsidiary constraints. This approach dissociates the nonlinear operator to the linear ones and their sizes are linear functions of integration rule which is of interest in the case of reduced integration. This new form of the problem leads to an inexpensive improvement of FEM computations, which acts at local, elementary and global levels. We demonstrate the numerical performances of this approach which is independent of the mesh structure. Using the GMRES algorithm we build, for nonsymmetric problems, a new algorithm based upon the discretized field of strain. The new algorithms proposed are more closer to the mechanical problem than the classical ones because all fields appear during the resolution process. The sizes of the different operators arising in these new forms are linear functions of integration rule, which is of great interest in the case of reduced integration.

  15. TACO: a finite element heat transfer code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E. Jr.

    1980-02-01

    TACO is a two-dimensional implicit finite element code for heat transfer analysis. It can perform both linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady state problems. Either plane or axisymmetric geometries can be analyzed. TACO has the capability to handle time or temperature dependent material properties and materials may be either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent loadings and boundary conditions are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additionally, TACO has some specialized features such as internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance), bulk nodes, enclosure radiation with view factor calculations, and chemical reactive kinetics. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A bandwidth and profile minimization option is also available in the code. Graphical representation of data generated by TACO is provided by a companion post-processor named POSTACO. The theory on which TACO is based is outlined, the capabilities of the code are explained, the input data required to perform an analysis with TACO are described. Some simple examples are provided to illustrate the use of the code.

  16. VALIDATION OF ANSYS FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS SOFTWARE

    SciTech Connect

    HAMM, E.R.

    2003-06-27

    This document provides a record of the verification and Validation of the ANSYS Version 7.0 software that is installed on selected CH2M HILL computers. The issues addressed include: Software verification, installation, validation, configuration management and error reporting. The ANSYS{reg_sign} computer program is a large scale multi-purpose finite element program which may be used for solving several classes of engineering analysis. The analysis capabilities of ANSYS Full Mechanical Version 7.0 installed on selected CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CH2M HILL) Intel processor based computers include the ability to solve static and dynamic structural analyses, steady-state and transient heat transfer problems, mode-frequency and buckling eigenvalue problems, static or time-varying magnetic analyses and various types of field and coupled-field applications. The program contains many special features which allow nonlinearities or secondary effects to be included in the solution, such as plasticity, large strain, hyperelasticity, creep, swelling, large deflections, contact, stress stiffening, temperature dependency, material anisotropy, and thermal radiation. The ANSYS program has been in commercial use since 1970, and has been used extensively in the aerospace, automotive, construction, electronic, energy services, manufacturing, nuclear, plastics, oil and steel industries.

  17. Finite element model calibration of a nonlinear perforated plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, David A.; Allen, Matthew S.; Beberniss, Timothy J.; Neild, Simon A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a case study in which the finite element model for a curved circular plate is calibrated to reproduce both the linear and nonlinear dynamic response measured from two nominally identical samples. The linear dynamic response is described with the linear natural frequencies and mode shapes identified with a roving hammer test. Due to the uncertainty in the stiffness characteristics from the manufactured perforations, the linear natural frequencies are used to update the effective modulus of elasticity of the full order finite element model (FEM). The nonlinear dynamic response is described with nonlinear normal modes (NNMs) measured using force appropriation and high speed 3D digital image correlation (3D-DIC). The measured NNMs are used to update the boundary conditions of the full order FEM through comparison with NNMs calculated from a nonlinear reduced order model (NLROM). This comparison revealed that the nonlinear behavior could not be captured without accounting for the small curvature of the plate from manufacturing as confirmed in literature. So, 3D-DIC was also used to identify the initial static curvature of each plate and the resulting curvature was included in the full order FEM. The updated models are then used to understand how the stress distribution changes at large response amplitudes providing a possible explanation of failures observed during testing.

  18. Finite element based inversion for time-harmonic electromagnetic problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzbach, Christoph; Haber, Eldad

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we address the inverse problem and present some recent advances in numerical methods to recover the subsurface electrical conductivity from time-harmonic electromagnetic data. We rigorously formulate and discretize both the forward and the inverse problem in the finite element framework. To solve the forward problem, we derive a finite element discretization of the first-order system of Maxwell's equations in terms of the electric field and the magnetic induction. We show that our approach is equivalent to the standard discretization of the vector Helmholtz equation in terms of the electric field and that the discretization of magnetic induction of the same approximation order is hidden in the standard discretization. We implement the forward solver on unstructured tetrahedral meshes using edge elements. Unstructured meshes are not only capable of representing complex geometry. They can also reduce the overall problem size and, thus, the size of the system of linear equations arising from the forward problem such that direct methods for its solution using a sparse matrix factorization become feasible. The inverse problem is formulated as a regularized output least squares problem. We consider two regularization functions. First, we derive a smoothness regularizer using a primal-dual mixed finite element formulation which generalizes the standard Laplacian operator for a piecewise constant conductivity model on unstructured meshes. Secondly, we derive a total variation regularizer for the same class of models. For the choice of the regularization parameter we revisit the so-called dynamic regularization and compare it to a standard regularization scheme with fixed regularization parameter. The optimization problem is solved by the Gauss-Newton method which can be efficiently implemented using sparse matrix-vector operations and exploiting the sparse matrix factorization of the forward problem system matrix. A synthetic data example from marine

  19. A finite element model for sound transmission through panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramakrishnan, J. V.; Koval, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    A finite element method (FEM) is applied to predicting coupled frequencies and pressures within an acoustic cavity in order to characterize sound transmission through a panel. Structural equations of motion are defined and the FEM model is configured with four-noded plate elements, the lateral displacement and two slopes being the unknowns at every node. Each element then has 12 degrees of freedom (DOF) and the displacement variation is expressed by a 12-term nonconforming polynomial. A consistent mass matrix is used to represent the panel mass matrix and a wave equation governs the acoustic volume. Analysis of pressure and displacement over the panel yields a square coupling matrix, and an eigenanalysis leads to a solution of the forced vibration problem.

  20. Thermal-structural finite element analysis using linear flux formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, Ajay K.; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Wieting, Allan R.

    1990-01-01

    A linear flux approach is developed for a finite element thermal-structural analysis of steady state thermal and structural problems. The element fluxes are assumed to vary linearly in the same form as the element unknown variables, and the finite element matrices are evaluated in closed form. Since numerical integration is avoided, significant computational time saving is achieved. Solution accuracy and computational speed improvements are demonstrated by solving several two and three dimensional thermal-structural examples.

  1. Lamb mode conversion at edges. A hybrid boundary element-finite-element solution.

    PubMed

    Galán, José M; Abascal, Ramón

    2005-04-01

    Two general and flexible numerical techniques based on the finite-element and boundary element methods developed by the authors in a previous paper are applied to study Lamb wave propagation in multilayered plates and Lamb mode conversion at free edges for frequencies beyond the first cutoff frequency. Both techniques are supported by a meshing criterion which guarantees the accuracy of the results when a condition is fulfilled. A finite-element formulation is directly applicable to study Lamb wave propagation and reflection by simple obstacles such as a flat edge. In order to tackle Lamb wave diffraction problems by defects with more complex geometries, a hybrid boundary element-finite-element formulation is used. This technique provides a major improvement with respect to the only previous boundary element application on Lamb waves: the connecting boundary might be placed as close to the reflector as desired, reducing greatly the requirement on mesh size. Two main application problems on practical metallic plates are studied and compared with reported numerical, theoretical, and experimental results: (1) Lamb wave propagation in degraded titanium diffusion bonds, and (2) Lamb mode conversion at inclined or perpendicular free edges of steel plates for frequencies beyond the first cutoff frequency.

  2. Reflections of AE Waves in Finite Plates: Finite Element Modeling and Experimental Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Hamstad, M. A.; Gary, J.; OGallagher, A.

    1999-01-01

    The capability of a three-dimensional dynamic finite element method for predicting far-field acoustic emission signals in thin plates of finite lateral extent, including their reflections from the plate edges, was investigated. A lead break (Hsu-Neilsen) source to simulate AE was modeled and used in the experimental measurements. For the thin plate studied, the signals were primarily composed of the lowest order symmetric (S0) and antisymmetric (A0) Lamb modes. Experimental waveforms were detected with an absolutely calibrated, wideband, conical element transducer. The conditions of lead fractures both on the surface of the plate as well as on the edge of the plate were investigated. Surface lead breaks preferentially generate the A0 mode while edge lead breaks generate the S0 mode. Reflections of developed plate waves from both normal and oblique incidence angles were evaluated. Particularly interesting for the case of the lead break on the plate edge were S0 waves produced by the interaction of a Rayleigh wave with the plate corner and by a bulk shear wave mode converting at the side edge. The Rayleigh wave, in this case, propagated along the specimen edge. For all cases considered, the experimental measurements were in good agreement with the predictions of the finite element model.

  3. Automation Tools for Finite Element Analysis of Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahmasebi, Farhad; Brodeur, Stephen J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This article presents two new automation creation tools that obtain stresses and strains (Shear and peel) in adhesively bonded joints. For a given adhesively bonded joint Finite Element model, in which the adhesive is characterised using springs, these automation tools read the corresponding input and output files, use the spring forces and deformations to obtain the adhesive stresses and strains, sort the stresses and strains in descending order, and generate plot files for 3D visualisation of the stress and strain fields. Grids (nodes) and elements can be numbered in any order that is convenient for the user. Using the automation tools, trade-off studies, which are needed for design of adhesively bonded joints, can be performed very quickly.

  4. Regularised finite element model updating using measured incomplete modal data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-Peng; Maung, Than Soe

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents an effective approach for directly updating finite element model from measured incomplete vibration modal data with regularised algorithms. The proposed method is based on the relationship between the perturbation of structural parameters such as stiffness change and the modal data measurements of the tested structure such as measured mode shape readings. In order to adjust structural parameters at detailed locations, structural updating parameters will be selected at critical point level to reflect the modelling errors at the connections of structural elements. These updating parameters are then evaluated by an iterative or a direct solution procedure, which gives optimised solutions in the least squares sense without requiring an optimisation technique. In order to reduce the influence of modal measurement uncertainty, the Tikhonov regularisation method incorporating the L-curve criterion is employed to produce reliable solutions for the chosen updating parameters. Numerical simulation investigations and experimental studies for the laboratory tested space steel frame structure are undertaken to verify the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed methods for adjusting the stiffness at the joints of structural members. The results demonstrate that the proposed methods provide reliable estimates of finite element model updating using the measured incomplete modal data.

  5. Solution-adaptive finite element method in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element method in linear elastic two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element method for validating the applications of new methodology to fracture mechanics problems by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  6. Modular Finite Element Methods Library Version: 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-22

    MFEM is a general, modular library for finite element methods. It provides a variety of finite element spaces and bilinear/linear forms in 2D and 3D. MFEM also includes classes for dealing with various types of meshes and their refinement.

  7. Generating Finite-Element Models Of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    Program starts at micromechanical level, from simple inputs supplied by user. COMGEN, COmposite Model GENerator, is interactive FORTRAN program used to create wide variety of finite-element models of continuous-fiber composite materials at micromechanical level. Quickly generates batch or "session files" to be submitted to finite-element preprocessor and postprocessor program, PATRAN. COMGEN requires PATRAN to complete model.

  8. A computer graphics program for general finite element analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Sawyer, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    Documentation for a computer graphics program for displays from general finite element analyses is presented. A general description of display options and detailed user instructions are given. Several plots made in structural, thermal and fluid finite element analyses are included to illustrate program options. Sample data files are given to illustrate use of the program.

  9. Large Scale Finite Element Modeling Using Scalable Parallel Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, T.; Katz, D.; Zuffada, C.; Jamnejad, V.

    1995-01-01

    An iterative solver for use with finite element codes was developed for the Cray T3D massively parallel processor at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Finite element modeling is useful for simulating scattered or radiated electromagnetic fields from complex three-dimensional objects with geometry variations smaller than an electrical wavelength.

  10. Finite element meshing of ANSYS (trademark) solid models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, F. S.

    1987-01-01

    A large scale, general purpose finite element computer program, ANSYS, developed and marketed by Swanson Analysis Systems, Inc. is discussed. ANSYS was perhaps the first commercially available program to offer truly interactive finite element model generation. ANSYS's purpose is for solid modeling. This application is briefly discussed and illustrated.

  11. TAURUS96. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.; Hallquist, J.O.; Spelce, T.E.

    1993-11-30

    TAURUS is an interactive post-processing application supporting visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. TAURUS provides the ability to display deformed geometries and contours or fringes of a large number of derived results on meshes consisting of beam, plate, shell, and solid type finite elements. Time history plotting is also available.

  12. Finite-element analysis of a weld-penetration problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogge, T. R.

    1977-01-01

    The stress concentration factor for a weld penetration defect is calculated by the finite-element method. A stress intensity factor is computed by use of the finite-element solution and the J-integral. The results are compared with experimental results.

  13. Finite-element numerical modeling of atmospheric turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. N.; Kao, S. K.

    1979-01-01

    A dynamic turbulent boundary-layer model in the neutral atmosphere is constructed, using a dynamic turbulent equation of the eddy viscosity coefficient for momentum derived from the relationship among the turbulent dissipation rate, the turbulent kinetic energy and the eddy viscosity coefficient, with aid of the turbulent second-order closure scheme. A finite-element technique was used for the numerical integration. In preliminary results, the behavior of the neutral planetary boundary layer agrees well with the available data and with the existing elaborate turbulent models, using a finite-difference scheme. The proposed dynamic formulation of the eddy viscosity coefficient for momentum is particularly attractive and can provide a viable alternative approach to study atmospheric turbulence, diffusion and air pollution.

  14. Practical Application of Finite Element Analysis to Aircraft Structural Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    t] Cook, Robert D., "Concepts and Applications of Finite element Analysis," John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1981. [5] Rao, S. S., "The Finite...generation large-scale computer programs is discussed. V.P. Analysis of aircraft structure using applied fracture mechanics (AA) WILHEM , D. P. Northrop...Analytical, finite element for surface flaws, holes (AA) WILHEM , D. P. Northrop Corp., Hawthorne, Calif. (N5631231) Aircraft Group. In AGARD Fracture

  15. Modeling of coal stockpiles using a finite elements method

    SciTech Connect

    Ozdeniz, A.H.; Sensogut, C.

    2008-07-01

    In the case of coal stockpiles finding suitable environmental conditions, spontaneous combustion phenomenon will be unavoidable. In this study, an industrial-sized stockpile having a shape of triangle prism was constituted in a coal stockyard of Western Lignite Corporation (WLC), Turkey. The parameters of time, humidity and temperature of air, atmospheric pressure, velocity and direction of wind values that are effective on coal stockpile were measured in a continuous manner. These experimental works were transferred into a computer media in order to obtain similar outcomes by carrying out 2-dimensional analysis of the stockpile with Finite Elements Method (FEM). The performed experimental studies and obtained results were then compared.

  16. Multiphase poroelastic finite element models for soft tissue structure

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, B.R.

    1992-06-01

    During the last two decades. biological structures with soft tissue components have been modeled using poroelastic or mixture-based constitutive laws, i.e., the material is viewed as a deformable (porous) solid matrix that is saturated by mobile tissue fluid. These structures exhibit a highly nonlinear, history-dependent material behavior; undergo finite strains-, and may swell or shrink when tissue ionic concentrations are altered. Given the geometric and material complexity of soft tissue structures and that they are subjected to complicated initial and boundary conditions, finite element models (FEMs) have been very useful for quantitative structural analyses. This paper surveys recent applications of poroelastic and mixture-based theories and the associated FEMs for the study of the biomechanics of soft tissues, and indicates future directions for research in this area. Equivalent finite-strain poroelastic and mixture continuum biomechanical models are presented. Special attention is given to the identification of material properties using a porohyperelastic constitutive law and a total Lagrangian view for the formulation. The associated FEMS are then formulated to include this porohyperelastic material response and finite strains. Extensions of the theory are suggested in order to include inherent viscoelasticity, transport phenomena, and swelling in soft tissue structures. A number of biomechanical research areas are identified, and possible applications of the porohyperelastic and mixture-based FEMs are suggested.

  17. Multiphase poroelastic finite element models for soft tissue structures

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, B.R.

    1992-12-01

    During the last two decades, biological structures with soft tissue components have been modeled using poroelastic or mixture-based constitutive laws, i.e., the material is viewed as a deformable (porous) solid matrix that is saturated by mobile tissue fluid. These structures exhibit a highly nonlinear, history-dependent material behavior; undergo finite strains; and may swell or shrink when tissue ionic concentrations are altered. Give the geometric and material complexity of soft tissue structures and that they are subjected to complicated initial and boundary conditions, finite element models (FEMs) have been very useful for quantitative structural analyses. This paper surveys recent applications of poroelastic and mixture-based theories and the associated FEMs for the study of the biomechanics of soft tissues, and indicates future directions for research in this area. Equivalent finite-strain poroelastic and mixture continuum biomechanical models are presented. Special attention is given to the identification of material properties using a porohyperelastic constitutive law ans a total Lagrangian view for the formulation. The associated FEMs are then formulated to include this porohyperelastic material response and finite strains. Extensions of the theory are suggested in order to include inherent viscoelasticity, transport phenomena, and swelling in soft tissue structures. A number of biomechanical research areas are identified, and possible applications of the porohyperelastic and mixture-based FEMs are suggested. 62 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. A new conformal absorbing boundary condition for finite element meshes and parallelization of FEMATS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Volakis, J. L.; Nguyen, J.; Nurnberger, M.; Ross, D.

    1993-01-01

    Some of the progress toward the development and parallelization of an improved version of the finite element code FEMATS is described. This is a finite element code for computing the scattering by arbitrarily shaped three dimensional surfaces composite scatterers. The following tasks were worked on during the report period: (1) new absorbing boundary conditions (ABC's) for truncating the finite element mesh; (2) mixed mesh termination schemes; (3) hierarchical elements and multigridding; (4) parallelization; and (5) various modeling enhancements (antenna feeds, anisotropy, and higher order GIBC).

  19. Characterization of macroscopic tensile strength of polycrystalline metals with two-scale finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Ikumu; Terada, Kenjiro; Neto, Eduardo Alberto de Souza; Perić, Djordje

    The objective of this contribution is to develop an elastic-plastic-damage constitutive model for crystal grain and to incorporate it with two-scale finite element analyses based on mathematical homogenization method, in order to characterize the macroscopic tensile strength of polycrystalline metals. More specifically, the constitutive model for single crystal is obtained by combining hyperelasticity, a rate-independent single crystal plasticity and a continuum damage model. The evolution equations, stress update algorithm and consistent tangent are derived within the framework of standard elastoplasticity at finite strain. By employing two-scale finite element analysis, the ductile behaviour of polycrystalline metals and corresponding tensile strength are evaluated. The importance of finite element formulation is examined by comparing performance of several finite elements and their convergence behaviour is assessed with mesh refinement. Finally, the grain size effect on yield and tensile strength is analysed in order to illustrate the versatility of the proposed two-scale model.

  20. Analysis of finite deformations of elastic solids by the finite element method.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Key, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    Finite element applications, particularly to analyses of finite deformations in elastic solids, are reviewed, along with the difficulties encountered in the formulation of certain problems and in their numerical solution. Various approaches are discussed for overcoming these and other difficulties. A computer program designed for finite elasticity problems is described, and several numerical examples are presented.

  1. Nondestructive Evaluation Correlated with Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Azid, Ali; Baaklini, George Y.

    1999-01-01

    Advanced materials are being developed for use in high-temperature gas turbine applications. For these new materials to be fully utilized, their deformation properties, their nondestructive evaluation (NDE) quality and material durability, and their creep and fatigue fracture characteristics need to be determined by suitable experiments. The experimental findings must be analyzed, characterized, modeled and translated into constitutive equations for stress analysis and life prediction. Only when these ingredients - together with the appropriate computational tools - are available, can durability analysis be performed in the design stage, long before the component is built. One of the many structural components being evaluated by the NDE group at the NASA Lewis Research Center is the flywheel system. It is being considered as an energy storage device for advanced space vehicles. Such devices offer advantages over electrochemical batteries in situations demanding high power delivery and high energy storage per unit weight. In addition, flywheels have potentially higher efficiency and longer lifetimes with proper motor-generator and rotor design. Flywheels made of fiber-reinforced polymer composite material show great promise for energy applications because of the high energy and power densities that they can achieve along with a burst failure mode that is relatively benign in comparison to those of flywheels made of metallic materials Therefore, to help improve durability and reduce structural uncertainties, we are developing a comprehensive analytical approach to predict the reliability and life of these components under these harsh loading conditions. The combination of NDE and two- and three-dimensional finite element analyses (e.g., stress analyses and fracture mechanics) is expected to set a standardized procedure to accurately assess the applicability of using various composite materials to design a suitable rotor/flywheel assembly.

  2. Finite Element analyses of soil bioengineered slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamagnini, Roberto; Switala, Barbara Maria; Sudan Acharya, Madhu; Wu, Wei; Graf, Frank; Auer, Michael; te Kamp, Lothar

    2014-05-01

    Soil Bioengineering methods are not only effective from an economical point of view, but they are also interesting as fully ecological solutions. The presented project is aimed to define a numerical model which includes the impact of vegetation on slope stability, considering both mechanical and hydrological effects. In this project, a constitutive model has been developed that accounts for the multi-phase nature of the soil, namely the partly saturated condition and it also includes the effects of a biological component. The constitutive equation is implemented in the Finite Element (FE) software Comes-Geo with an implicit integration scheme that accounts for the collapse of the soils structure due to wetting. The mathematical formulation of the constitutive equations is introduced by means of thermodynamics and it simulates the growth of the biological system during the time. The numerical code is then applied in the analysis of an ideal rainfall induced landslide. The slope is analyzed for vegetated and non-vegetated conditions. The final results allow to quantitatively assessing the impact of vegetation on slope stability. This allows drawing conclusions and choosing whenever it is worthful to use soil bioengineering methods in slope stabilization instead of traditional approaches. The application of the FE methods show some advantages with respect to the commonly used limit equilibrium analyses, because it can account for the real coupled strain-diffusion nature of the problem. The mechanical strength of roots is in fact influenced by the stress evolution into the slope. Moreover, FE method does not need a pre-definition of any failure surface. FE method can also be used in monitoring the progressive failure of the soil bio-engineered system as it calculates the amount of displacements and strains of the model slope. The preliminary study results show that the formulated equations can be useful for analysis and evaluation of different soil bio

  3. Finite-dimensional approximation for optimal fixed-order compensation of distributed parameter systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Dennis S.; Rosen, I. G.

    1988-01-01

    In controlling distributed parameter systems it is often desirable to obtain low-order, finite-dimensional controllers in order to minimize real-time computational requirements. Standard approaches to this problem employ model/controller reduction techniques in conjunction with LQG theory. In this paper we consider the finite-dimensional approximation of the infinite-dimensional Bernstein/Hyland optimal projection theory. This approach yields fixed-finite-order controllers which are optimal with respect to high-order, approximating, finite-dimensional plant models. The technique is illustrated by computing a sequence of first-order controllers for one-dimensional, single-input/single-output, parabolic (heat/diffusion) and hereditary systems using spline-based, Ritz-Galerkin, finite element approximation. Numerical studies indicate convergence of the feedback gains with less than 2 percent performance degradation over full-order LQG controllers for the parabolic system and 10 percent degradation for the hereditary system.

  4. Generalized Potential Energy Finite Elements for Modeling Molecular Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Chatzieleftheriou, Stavros; Adendorff, Matthew R; Lagaros, Nikos D

    2016-10-24

    The potential energy of molecules and nanostructures is commonly calculated in the molecular mechanics formalism by superimposing bonded and nonbonded atomic energy terms, i.e. bonds between two atoms, bond angles involving three atoms, dihedral angles involving four atoms, nonbonded terms expressing the Coulomb and Lennard-Jones interactions, etc. In this work a new, generalized numerical simulation is presented for studying the mechanical behavior of three-dimensional nanostructures at the atomic scale. The energy gradient and Hessian matrix of such assemblies are usually computed numerically; a potential energy finite element model is proposed herein where these two components are expressed analytically. In particular, generalized finite elements are developed that express the interactions among atoms in a manner equivalent to that invoked in simulations performed based on the molecular dynamics method. Thus, the global tangent stiffness matrix for any nanostructure is formed as an assembly of the generalized finite elements and is directly equivalent to the Hessian matrix of the potential energy. The advantages of the proposed model are identified in terms of both accuracy and computational efficiency. In the case of popular force fields (e.g., CHARMM), the computation of the Hessian matrix by implementing the proposed method is of the same order as that of the gradient. This analysis can be used to minimize the potential energy of molecular systems under nodal loads in order to derive constitutive laws for molecular systems where the entropy and solvent effects are neglected and can be approximated as solids, such as double stranded DNA nanostructures. In this context, the sequence dependent stretch modulus for some typical base pairs step is calculated.

  5. Second Order Accurate Finite Difference Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-20

    a study of the idealized material has direct applications to some polymer structures (4, 5). Wave propagation studies in hyperelastic materials have...34Acceleration Wave Propagation in Hyperelastic Rods of Variable Cross- section. Wave Motion, V4, pp. 173-180, 1982. 9. M. Hirao and N. Sugimoto...Waves in Hyperelastic Road," Quart. Appl. Math., V37, pp. 377-399, 1979. 11. G. A. Sod. "A Survey of Several Finite Difference Methods for Systems of

  6. Sandia Higher Order Elements (SHOE) v 0.5 alpha

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-24

    SHOE is research code for characterizing and visualizing higher-order finite elements; it contains a framework for defining classes of interpolation techniques and element shapes; methods for interpolating triangular, quadrilateral, tetrahedral, and hexahedral cells using Lagrange and Legendre polynomial bases of arbitrary order; methods to decompose each element into domains of constant gradient flow (using a polynomial solver to identify critical points); and an isocontouring technique that uses this decomposition to guarantee topological correctness. Please note that this is an alpha release of research software and that some time has passed since it was actively developed; build- and run-time issues likely exist.

  7. Nonlinear Legendre Spectral Finite Elements for Wind Turbine Blade Dynamics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Sprague, M. A.; Jonkman, J.; Johnson, N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical implementation and examination of new wind turbine blade finite element model based on Geometrically Exact Beam Theory (GEBT) and a high-order spectral finite element method. The displacement-based GEBT is presented, which includes the coupling effects that exist in composite structures and geometric nonlinearity. Legendre spectral finite elements (LSFEs) are high-order finite elements with nodes located at the Gauss-Legendre-Lobatto points. LSFEs can be an order of magnitude more efficient that low-order finite elements for a given accuracy level. Interpolation of the three-dimensional rotation, a major technical barrier in large-deformation simulation, is discussed in the context of LSFEs. It is shown, by numerical example, that the high-order LSFEs, where weak forms are evaluated with nodal quadrature, do not suffer from a drawback that exists in low-order finite elements where the tangent-stiffness matrix is calculated at the Gauss points. Finally, the new LSFE code is implemented in the new FAST Modularization Framework for dynamic simulation of highly flexible composite-material wind turbine blades. The framework allows for fully interactive simulations of turbine blades in operating conditions. Numerical examples showing validation and LSFE performance will be provided in the final paper.

  8. An approach to directional drilling simulation: finite element and finite segment methods with contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbatani, Siamak; Callejo, Alfonso; Kövecses, József; Kalantari, Masoud; Marchand, Nick R.; Dargahi, Javad

    2016-06-01

    Directional drilling is a popular technique for oil well drilling. Accurate prediction of the directional performance is critical in order to achieve the desired well profile. Simplified geometry methods are, to date, the industry standard for predicting directional performance. A comprehensive, high-fidelity method for the simulation of directional drilling is presented here. It consists of a detailed discretization of the actual geometry and a rigorous application of two modeling techniques: the finite element and the finite segment methods. By doing so, the dynamic problem is addressed from two different yet complementary perspectives: structural mechanics and rigid-body motion. Collision detection and contact dynamics algorithms are also presented. Results show that both methods agree in terms of the dynamic response, and that the build rate estimations are consistent with available experimental data. Owing to the framework efficiency and physics-based nature, the presented tools are very well-suited for design engineering and real-time simulation.

  9. A stabilized finite element method for finite-strain three-field poroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Lorenz; Bordas, Rafel; Kay, David; Tavener, Simon

    2017-07-01

    We construct a stabilized finite-element method to compute flow and finite-strain deformations in an incompressible poroelastic medium. We employ a three-field mixed formulation to calculate displacement, fluid flux and pressure directly and introduce a Lagrange multiplier to enforce flux boundary conditions. We use a low order approximation, namely, continuous piecewise-linear approximation for the displacements and fluid flux, and piecewise-constant approximation for the pressure. This results in a simple matrix structure with low bandwidth. The method is stable in both the limiting cases of small and large permeability. Moreover, the discontinuous pressure space enables efficient approximation of steep gradients such as those occurring due to rapidly changing material coefficients or boundary conditions, both of which are commonly seen in physical and biological applications.

  10. A Spectral Finite Element Approach to Modeling Soft Solids Excited with High-Frequency Harmonic Loads

    PubMed Central

    Brigham, John C.; Aquino, Wilkins; Aguilo, Miguel A.; Diamessis, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    An approach for efficient and accurate finite element analysis of harmonically excited soft solids using high-order spectral finite elements is presented and evaluated. The Helmholtz-type equations used to model such systems suffer from additional numerical error known as pollution when excitation frequency becomes high relative to stiffness (i.e. high wave number), which is the case, for example, for soft tissues subject to ultrasound excitations. The use of high-order polynomial elements allows for a reduction in this pollution error, but requires additional consideration to counteract Runge's phenomenon and/or poor linear system conditioning, which has led to the use of spectral element approaches. This work examines in detail the computational benefits and practical applicability of high-order spectral elements for such problems. The spectral elements examined are tensor product elements (i.e. quad or brick elements) of high-order Lagrangian polynomials with non-uniformly distributed Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodal points. A shear plane wave example is presented to show the dependence of the accuracy and computational expense of high-order elements on wave number. Then, a convergence study for a viscoelastic acoustic-structure interaction finite element model of an actual ultrasound driven vibroacoustic experiment is shown. The number of degrees of freedom required for a given accuracy level was found to consistently decrease with increasing element order. However, the computationally optimal element order was found to strongly depend on the wave number. PMID:21461402

  11. A Spectral Finite Element Approach to Modeling Soft Solids Excited with High-Frequency Harmonic Loads.

    PubMed

    Brigham, John C; Aquino, Wilkins; Aguilo, Miguel A; Diamessis, Peter J

    2011-01-15

    An approach for efficient and accurate finite element analysis of harmonically excited soft solids using high-order spectral finite elements is presented and evaluated. The Helmholtz-type equations used to model such systems suffer from additional numerical error known as pollution when excitation frequency becomes high relative to stiffness (i.e. high wave number), which is the case, for example, for soft tissues subject to ultrasound excitations. The use of high-order polynomial elements allows for a reduction in this pollution error, but requires additional consideration to counteract Runge's phenomenon and/or poor linear system conditioning, which has led to the use of spectral element approaches. This work examines in detail the computational benefits and practical applicability of high-order spectral elements for such problems. The spectral elements examined are tensor product elements (i.e. quad or brick elements) of high-order Lagrangian polynomials with non-uniformly distributed Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre nodal points. A shear plane wave example is presented to show the dependence of the accuracy and computational expense of high-order elements on wave number. Then, a convergence study for a viscoelastic acoustic-structure interaction finite element model of an actual ultrasound driven vibroacoustic experiment is shown. The number of degrees of freedom required for a given accuracy level was found to consistently decrease with increasing element order. However, the computationally optimal element order was found to strongly depend on the wave number.

  12. Finite element analysis of heat transport in a hydrothermal zone

    SciTech Connect

    Bixler, N.E.; Carrigan, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Two-phase heat transport in the vicinity of a heated, subsurface zone is important for evaluation of nuclear waste repository design and estimation of geothermal energy recovery, as well as prediction of magma solidification rates. Finite element analyses of steady, two-phase, heat and mass transport have been performed to determine the relative importance of conduction and convection in a permeable medium adjacent to a hot, impermeable, vertical surface. The model includes the effects of liquid flow due to capillarity and buoyancy and vapor flow due to pressure gradients. Change of phase, with its associated latent heat effects, is also modeled. The mechanism of capillarity allows for the presence of two-phase zones, where both liquid and vapor can coexist, which has not been considered in previous investigations. The numerical method employs the standard Galerkin/finite element method, using eight-node, subparametric or isoparametric quadrilateral elements. In order to handle the extreme nonlinearities inherent in two-phase, nonisothermal, porous-flow problems, steady-state results are computed by integrating transients out to a long time (a method that is highly robust).

  13. An atomic finite element model for biodegradable polymers. Part 1. Formulation of the finite elements.

    PubMed

    Gleadall, Andrew; Pan, Jingzhe; Ding, Lifeng; Kruft, Marc-Anton; Curcó, David

    2015-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are widely used to analyse materials at the atomic scale. However, MD has high computational demands, which may inhibit its use for simulations of structures involving large numbers of atoms such as amorphous polymer structures. An atomic-scale finite element method (AFEM) is presented in this study with significantly lower computational demands than MD. Due to the reduced computational demands, AFEM is suitable for the analysis of Young's modulus of amorphous polymer structures. This is of particular interest when studying the degradation of bioresorbable polymers, which is the topic of an accompanying paper. AFEM is derived from the inter-atomic potential energy functions of an MD force field. The nonlinear MD functions were adapted to enable static linear analysis. Finite element formulations were derived to represent interatomic potential energy functions between two, three and four atoms. Validation of the AFEM was conducted through its application to atomic structures for crystalline and amorphous poly(lactide). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element solution for poromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruijie

    This dissertation focuses on applying discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods to poromechanics problems. A few challenges have been presented in traditional and popular continuous Galerkin (CG) finite element methods for solving complex coupled thermal, flow and solid mechanics. For example, nonphysical pore pressure oscillations often occur in CG solutions for poroelasticity problems with low permeability. A robust and practical numerical scheme for removing or alleviating the oscillation is not available. In modeling thermoporoelastoplasticity, CG methods require the use of very small time steps to obtain a convergent solution. The temperature profile predicted by CG methods in the fine mesh zones is often seriously polluted by large errors produced in coarse mesh zones in the case where the convection dominates the thermal process. The nonphysical oscillations in pore pressure and temperature solutions induced by CG methods at very early time stages seriously corrupt the solutions at longer time. We propose DG methods to handle these challenges because they are physics driven, provide local conservation of mass and momentum, have high stability and robustness, are locking-free, and because of their meshing and implementation capabilities. We first apply a family of DG methods, including Oden-Babuska-Baumann (OBB), Nonsymmetric Interior Penalty Galerkin (NIPG), Symmetric Interior Penalty Galerkin (SIPG) and Incomplete Interior Penalty Galerkin (IIPG), to 3D linear elasticity problems. This family of DG methods is tested and evaluated by using a cantilever beam problem with nearly incompressible materials. It is shown that DG methods are simple, robust and locking-free in dealing with nearly incompressible materials. Based on the success of DG methods in elasticity, we extend the DG theory into plasticity problems. A DG formulation has been implemented for solving 3D poroelasticity problems with low permeability. Numerical examples solved by DG methods demonstrate

  15. 3D unstructured mesh discontinuous finite element hydro

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, M.K.; Kershaw, D.S.; Shaw, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    The authors present detailed features of the ICF3D hydrodynamics code used for inertial fusion simulations. This code is intended to be a state-of-the-art upgrade of the well-known fluid code, LASNEX. ICF3D employs discontinuous finite elements on a discrete unstructured mesh consisting of a variety of 3D polyhedra including tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. The authors discussed details of how the ROE-averaged second-order convection was applied on the discrete elements, and how the C++ coding interface has helped to simplify implementing the many physics and numerics modules within the code package. The author emphasized the virtues of object-oriented design in large scale projects such as ICF3D.

  16. Mixed finite element - discontinuous finite volume element discretization of a general class of multicontinuum models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Baier, Ricardo; Lunati, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    We present a novel discretization scheme tailored to a class of multiphase models that regard the physical system as consisting of multiple interacting continua. In the framework of mixture theory, we consider a general mathematical model that entails solving a system of mass and momentum equations for both the mixture and one of the phases. The model results in a strongly coupled and nonlinear system of partial differential equations that are written in terms of phase and mixture (barycentric) velocities, phase pressure, and saturation. We construct an accurate, robust and reliable hybrid method that combines a mixed finite element discretization of the momentum equations with a primal discontinuous finite volume-element discretization of the mass (or transport) equations. The scheme is devised for unstructured meshes and relies on mixed Brezzi-Douglas-Marini approximations of phase and total velocities, on piecewise constant elements for the approximation of phase or total pressures, as well as on a primal formulation that employs discontinuous finite volume elements defined on a dual diamond mesh to approximate scalar fields of interest (such as volume fraction, total density, saturation, etc.). As the discretization scheme is derived for a general formulation of multicontinuum physical systems, it can be readily applied to a large class of simplified multiphase models; on the other, the approach can be seen as a generalization of these models that are commonly encountered in the literature and employed when the latter are not sufficiently accurate. An extensive set of numerical test cases involving two- and three-dimensional porous media are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the method (displaying an optimal convergence rate), the physics-preserving properties of the mixed-primal scheme, as well as the robustness of the method (which is successfully used to simulate diverse physical phenomena such as density fingering, Terzaghi's consolidation

  17. Application of the Finite Element Method to Rotary Wing Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    A finite element method for the spatial discretization of the dynamic equations of equilibrium governing rotary-wing aeroelastic problems is presented. Formulation of the finite element equations is based on weighted Galerkin residuals. This Galerkin finite element method reduces algebraic manipulative labor significantly, when compared to the application of the global Galerkin method in similar problems. The coupled flap-lag aeroelastic stability boundaries of hingeless helicopter rotor blades in hover are calculated. The linearized dynamic equations are reduced to the standard eigenvalue problem from which the aeroelastic stability boundaries are obtained. The convergence properties of the Galerkin finite element method are studied numerically by refining the discretization process. Results indicate that four or five elements suffice to capture the dynamics of the blade with the same accuracy as the global Galerkin method.

  18. Finite-element mesh generation from mappable features

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, Eve L.; Lowther, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    A vector-based geographical information system (GIS) is used to generate a variably-sized triangular element finite-element mesh from mappable features. Important digitally-mapped features are automatically linked to nodes in the finite-element model, ensuring an efficient, virtually error-free alternative to the tedious process of mesh design and data-input preparation by other methods. The procedure permits the user to work interactively with graphically-displayed hydrologic information about the study area allowing different mesh sizes to be used as needed, based on hydrologic complexity. The mesh-generaiion programs are stand-alone macros within the GIS that set up the basic data defining a finite-element mesh for many different finite-element model programs.

  19. Massively parallel computation of RCS with finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jay

    1993-01-01

    One of the promising combinations of finite element approaches for scattering problems uses Whitney edge elements, spherical vector wave-absorbing boundary conditions, and bi-conjugate gradient solution for the frequency-domain near field. Each of these approaches may be criticized. Low-order elements require high mesh density, but also result in fast, reliable iterative convergence. Spherical wave-absorbing boundary conditions require additional space to be meshed beyond the most minimal near-space region, but result in fully sparse, symmetric matrices which keep storage and solution times low. Iterative solution is somewhat unpredictable and unfriendly to multiple right-hand sides, yet we find it to be uniformly fast on large problems to date, given the other two approaches. Implementation of these approaches on a distributed memory, message passing machine yields huge dividends, as full scalability to the largest machines appears assured and iterative solution times are well-behaved for large problems. We present times and solutions for computed RCS for a conducting cube and composite permeability/conducting sphere on the Intel ipsc860 with up to 16 processors solving over 200,000 unknowns. We estimate problems of approximately 10 million unknowns, encompassing 1000 cubic wavelengths, may be attempted on a currently available 512 processor machine, but would be exceedingly tedious to prepare. The most severe bottlenecks are due to the slow rate of mesh generation on non-parallel machines and the large transfer time from such a machine to the parallel processor. One solution, in progress, is to create and then distribute a coarse mesh among the processors, followed by systematic refinement within each processor. Elimination of redundant node definitions at the mesh-partition surfaces, snap-to-surface post processing of the resulting mesh for good modelling of curved surfaces, and load-balancing redistribution of new elements after the refinement are auxiliary

  20. A finite element conjugate gradient FFT method for scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jeffery D.; Ross, Dan; Jin, J.-M.; Chatterjee, A.; Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Validated results are presented for the new 3D body of revolution finite element boundary integral code. A Fourier series expansion of the vector electric and mangnetic fields is employed to reduce the dimensionality of the system, and the exact boundary condition is employed to terminate the finite element mesh. The mesh termination boundary is chosen such that is leads to convolutional boundary operatores of low O(n) memory demand. Improvements of this code are discussed along with the proposed formulation for a full 3D implementation of the finite element boundary integral method in conjunction with a conjugate gradiant fast Fourier transformation (CGFFT) solution.

  1. Hybrid stress finite elements for large deformations of inelastic solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, K. W.; Atluri, S. N.

    1984-01-01

    A new hybrid stress finite element algorithm, based on a generalization of Fraeijs de Veubeke's complementary energy principle is presented. Analyses of large quasistatic deformation of inelastic solids (hypoelastic, plastic, viscoplastic) are within its capability. Principle variables in the formulation are the nominal stress rate and spin. A brief account is given of the boundary value problem in these variables, and the 'equivalent' variational principle. The finite element equation, along with initial positions and stresses, comprise an initial value problem. Factors affecting the choice of time integration schemes are discussed. Results found by application of the new algorithm are compared to those obtained by a velocity based finite element algorithm.

  2. Non-Linear Finite Element Modeling of THUNDER Piezoelectric Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.; Campbell, Joel F.

    1999-01-01

    A NASTRAN non-linear finite element model has been developed for predicting the dome heights of THUNDER (THin Layer UNimorph Ferroelectric DrivER) piezoelectric actuators. To analytically validate the finite element model, a comparison was made with a non-linear plate solution using Von Karmen's approximation. A 500 volt input was used to examine the actuator deformation. The NASTRAN finite element model was also compared with experimental results. Four groups of specimens were fabricated and tested. Four different input voltages, which included 120, 160, 200, and 240 Vp-p with a 0 volts offset, were used for this comparison.

  3. Quality assessment and control of finite element solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Babuska, Ivo

    1987-01-01

    Status and some recent developments in the techniques for assessing the reliability of finite element solutions are summarized. Discussion focuses on a number of aspects including: the major types of errors in the finite element solutions; techniques used for a posteriori error estimation and the reliability of these estimators; the feedback and adaptive strategies for improving the finite element solutions; and postprocessing approaches used for improving the accuracy of stresses and other important engineering data. Also, future directions for research needed to make error estimation and adaptive movement practical are identified.

  4. A finite element musculoskeletal model of the shoulder mechanism.

    PubMed

    van der Helm, F C

    1994-05-01

    The finite element method described in this study provides an easy method to simulate the kinetics of multibody mechanisms. It is used in order to develop a musculoskeletal model of the shoulder mechanism. Each relevant morphological structure has been represented by an appropriate element. For the shoulder mechanism two special-purpose elements have been developed: a SURFACE element representing the scapulothoracic gliding plane and a CURVED-TRUSS element to represent muscles which are wrapped around bony contours. The model contains four bones, three joints, three extracapsular ligaments, the scapulothoracic gliding plane and 20 muscles and muscle parts. In the model, input variables are the positions of the shoulder girdle and humerus and the external load on the humerus. Output variables are muscles forces subject to an optimization procedure in which the mechanical stability of the glenohumeral joint is one of the constraints. Four different optimization criteria are compared. For 12 muscles, surface EMG is used to verify the model. Since the optimum muscle length and force-length relationship are unknown, and since maximal EMG amplitude is length dependent, verification is only possible in a qualitative sense. Nevertheless, it is concluded that a detailed model of the shoulder mechanism has been developed which provides good insight into the function of morphological structures.

  5. Research on dynamic model of printed circuit board based on finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hui; Xu, Liangjun

    2017-08-01

    The vibration characteristics of printed circuit boards are related to the reliability of electronic components installed on their surface. Finite element software is a powerful tool to analyze the vibration characteristics of printed circuit boards, and the correct establishment of finite element model is very important. In this paper, the dynamic model of anisotropic printed circuit board is established by analyzing the material properties of printed circuit board. The influence of boundary condition and lumped mass on the vibration characteristics of printed circuit board is analyzed. In order to establish a more realistic printed circuit The finite element model of the plate provides the necessary basis.

  6. Shear-flexible finite-element models of laminated composite plates and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Mathers, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    Several finite-element models are applied to the linear static, stability, and vibration analysis of laminated composite plates and shells. The study is based on linear shallow-shell theory, with the effects of shear deformation, anisotropic material behavior, and bending-extensional coupling included. Both stiffness (displacement) and mixed finite-element models are considered. Discussion is focused on the effects of shear deformation and anisotropic material behavior on the accuracy and convergence of different finite-element models. Numerical studies are presented which show the effects of increasing the order of the approximating polynomials, adding internal degrees of freedom, and using derivatives of generalized displacements as nodal parameters.

  7. Finite Element Anlaysis of Laminated Composite Plates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    4.2, results depicting maximum displacement obtained using 2 x 2 integration points, 3 x 3 integration points and ’ heterosis ’ [Ref. 4] elements are...thick and thin plates. This element gives better predictions for thick plates than heterosis ele- ment, however, for thin plates, heterosis element...results showing the normalized maximum displacements are shown in Figure 4.8. The heterosis element results in about ten percent error while the

  8. Domain decomposition methods for nonconforming finite element spaces of Lagrange-type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowsar, Lawrence C.

    1993-01-01

    In this article, we consider the application of three popular domain decomposition methods to Lagrange-type nonconforming finite element discretizations of scalar, self-adjoint, second order elliptic equations. The additive Schwarz method of Dryja and Widlund, the vertex space method of Smith, and the balancing method of Mandel applied to nonconforming elements are shown to converge at a rate no worse than their applications to the standard conforming piecewise linear Galerkin discretization. Essentially, the theory for the nonconforming elements is inherited from the existing theory for the conforming elements with only modest modification by constructing an isomorphism between the nonconforming finite element space and a space of continuous piecewise linear functions.

  9. A Method for Connecting Dissimilar Finite Element Meshes in Three Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Heinstein, M.W.; Key, S.W.

    1998-11-12

    A method is presented for connecting dissimilar finite element meshes in three dimensions. The method combines the concept of master and slave surfaces with the uniform strain approach for surface, corrections finite elements- By modifyhg the are made to element formulations boundaries of elements on the slave such that first-order patch tests are passed. The method can be used to connect meshes which use different element types. In addition, master and slave surfaces can be designated independently of relative mesh resolutions. Example problems in three-dimensional linear elasticity are presented.

  10. Singularity-free finite element model of bone through automated voxel-based reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Esposito, L; Bifulco, P; Gargiulo, P; Fraldi, M

    2016-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) provides both anatomical and density information about tissues. Bone is segmented by raw images and Finite Element Method (FEM) voxel-based meshing technique is achieved by matching each CT voxel to a single finite element (FE). As a consequence of the automated model reconstruction, unstable elements - i.e. elements insufficiently anchored to the whole model and thus potentially involved in partial rigid body motion - can be generated, a crucial problem in obtaining consistent FE models, hindering mechanical analyses. Through the classification of instabilities on topological connections between elements, a numerical procedure is proposed in order to avoid unconstrained models.

  11. Validating Finite Element Models of Assembled Shell Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoff, Claus

    2006-01-01

    The validation of finite element models of assembled shell elements is presented. The topics include: 1) Problems with membrane rotations in assembled shell models; 2) Penalty stiffness for membrane rotations; 3) Physical stiffness for membrane rotations using shell elements with 6 dof per node; and 4) Connections avoiding rotations.

  12. Finite element analysis of the SDC barrel and endcap calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Guarino, V.; Hill, N.; Nasiakta, J.

    1992-03-11

    In designing the SCD barrel and endcap calorimeters, the inter-module connecting forces must be known in order to determine the required size and number of connecting links between modules, and in order to understand how individual modules will be affected by these forces when assembled to form a full barrel and endcap. The connecting forces were found by analyzing three-dimensional Finite Element Models of both the barrel and endcap. This paper is divided into two parts, the first part will describe in detail the results of the barrel analysis and the second part will describe the results obtained from the endcap analysis. A similar approach was used in constructing the models for both analysis.

  13. Finite-element modeling and analysis in nanomedicine and dentistry.

    PubMed

    Choi, Andy H; Conway, Richard C; Ben-Nissan, Besim

    2014-08-01

    This article aims to provide a brief background to the current applications of finite-element analysis (FEA) in nanomedicine and dentistry. FEA was introduced in orthopedic biomechanics in the 1970s in order to assess the stresses and deformation in human bones during functional loadings and in the design and analysis of implants. Since then, it has been applied with great frequency in orthopedics and dentistry in order to analyze issues such as implant design, bone remodeling and fracture healing, the mechanical properties of biomedical coatings on implants and the interactions at the bone-implant interface. More recently, FEA has been used in nanomedicine to study the mechanics of a single cell and to gain fundamental insights into how the particulate nature of blood influences nanoparticle delivery.

  14. Finite element analysis of the SDC barrel and endcap calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Guarino, V.; Hill, N.; Nasiakta, J.

    1992-03-11

    In designing the SCD barrel and endcap calorimeters, the inter-module connecting forces must be known in order to determine the required size and number of connecting links between modules, and in order to understand how individual modules will be affected by these forces when assembled to form a full barrel and endcap. The connecting forces were found by analyzing three-dimensional Finite Element Models of both the barrel and endcap. This paper is divided into two parts, the first part will describe in detail the results of the barrel analysis and the second part will describe the results obtained from the endcap analysis. A similar approach was used in constructing the models for both analysis.

  15. Dynamic visual cryptography on deformable finite element grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksiene, S.; Vaidelys, M.; Aleksa, A.; Ragulskis, M.

    2017-07-01

    Dynamic visual cryptography scheme based on time averaged moiré fringes on deformable finite element grids is introduced in this paper. A predefined Eigenshape function is used for the selection of the pitch of the moiré grating. The relationship between the pitch of moiré grating, the roots of the zero order Bessel function of the first kind and the amplitude of harmonic oscillations is derived and validated by computational experiments. Phase regularization algorithm is used in the entire area of the cover image in order to embed the secret image and to avoid large fluctuations of the moiré grating. Computational simulations are used to demonstrate the efficiency and the applicability of the proposed image hiding technique.

  16. Dispersion Analysis of Gravity Waves in Fluid Media Discretized by Energy-Orthogonal Finite Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Brito Castro, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    This article studies the dispersion of gravity waves in fluid media discretized by the finite element method. The element stiffness matrix is split into basic and higher-order components which are respectively related to the mean and deviatoric components of the gradient of displacement potential. This decomposition is applied to the kinetic energy. The dispersion analysis yields a correlation between the higher-order kinetic energy and the kinetic energy error. The use of this correlation as a reference to apply the higher-order energy as an error indicator for the sloshing modes computed by the finite element method is explored.

  17. North Atlantic Finite Element Ocean Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veluthedathekuzhiyil, Praveen

    This thesis presents a modified version of the Finite Element Ocean Model (FEOM) developed at Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) for the North Atlantic Ocean. A reasonable North Atlantic Ocean simulation is obtained against the observational data sets in a Control simulation (CS) where the surface boundary conditions are relaxed to a climatology. The vertical mixing in the model was tuned to represent convection in the model, also the horizontal mixing and diffusion coefficients to represent the changes in the resolution of the model’s unstructured grid. In addition, the open boundaries in the model are treated with a sponge layer where tracers are relaxed to climatology. The model is then further modified to accept the atmospheric flux forcing at the surface boundary with an added net heat flux correction and freshwater forcing from major rivers that are flowing into the North Atlantic Ocean. The impact of this boundary condition on the simulation results is then analyzed and shows many improvements albeit the drift in tracer properties around the Gulf Stream region remains as that of the CS case. However a comparison of the vertical sections at Cape Desolation and Cape Farewell with the available observational data sets shows many improvements in this simulation compared to that of the CS case. But the freshwater content in the Labrador Sea interior shows a continued drift as that of the CS case with an improvement towards the 10th model year. A detailed analysis of the boundary currents around the Labrador Sea shows the weak offshore transport of freshwater from the West Greenland Current (WGC) as one of the causes. To further improve the model and reasonably represent the boundary currents and associated sub-grid scale eddies in the model, a modified sub-grid scale parameterization based on Gent and McWilliams, (1990) is adopted. The sensitivity of using various approaches in the thickness diffusion parameter ( Kgm) for this

  18. Superconvergence in the Generalized Finite Element Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Galerkin method for elliptic equations based on tensor products of piecewise polynomials. RAIRO Anal. Numer., 8:61– 66, 1974. [19] M. Kř́ıžek...London, 1986. [22] P. Lesaint and M. Zlámal. Superconvergence of the gradient of finite ele- ment solutions. RAIRO Anal. Numer., 13:139–166, 1979. [23] Q

  19. Polyhedral elements using an edge-based smoothed finite element method for nonlinear elastic deformations of compressible and nearly incompressible materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chan; Kim, Hobeom; Kim, Jungdo; Im, Seyoung

    2017-06-01

    Polyhedral elements with an arbitrary number of nodes or non-planar faces, obtained with an edge-based smoothed finite element method, retain good geometric adaptability and accuracy in solution. This work is intended to extend the polyhedral elements to nonlinear elastic analysis with finite deformations. In order to overcome the volumetric locking problem, a smoothing domain-based selective smoothed finite element method scheme and a three-field-mixed cell-based smoothed finite element method with nodal cells were developed. Using several numerical examples, their performance and the accuracy of their solutions were examined, and their effectiveness for practical applications was demonstrated as well.

  20. Finite Element Analysis of Elasto-plastic Plate Bending Problems using Transition Rectangular Plate Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanber, Bahattin; Bozkurt, O. Yavuz

    2006-08-01

    In this work, the finite element analysis of the elasto-plastic plate bending problems is carried out using transition rectangular plate elements. The shape functions of the transition plate elements are derived based on a practical rule. The transition plate elements are all quadrilateral and can be used to obtain efficient finite element models using minimum number of elements. The mesh convergence rates of the models including the transition elements are compared with the regular element models. To verify the developed elements, simple tests are demonstrated and various elasto-plastic problems are solved. Their results are compared with ANSYS results.

  1. Finite element analysis to evaluate optical mirror deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izazaga-Pérez, R.; Aguirre-Aguirre, D.; Villalobos-Mendoza, B.

    2015-10-01

    In this work we describe the use of Finite Element Analysis software to simulate the deformations of an optical mirror. We use Finite Element Method software as a tool to simulate the mirror deformations assuming that it is a thin plate that can be mechanically tensed or compressed; the Finite Element Analysis give us information about the displacements of the mirror from an initial position and the tensions that remains in the surface. The information obtained by means of Finite Element Analysis can be easily exported to a coordinate system and processed in a simulation environment. Finally, a ray-tracing subroutine is used in the obtained data giving us information in terms of aberration coefficients. We present some results of the simulations describing the followed procedure.

  2. Adaptive Finite-Element Computation In Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1995-01-01

    Report discusses recent progress in use of solution-adaptive finite-element computational methods to solve two-dimensional problems in linear elastic fracture mechanics. Method also shown extensible to three-dimensional problems.

  3. Validation of High Displacement Piezoelectric Actuator Finite Element Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taleghani, B. K.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the results obtained by using NASTRAN(Registered Trademark) and ANSYS(Regitered Trademark) finite element codes to predict doming of the THUNDER piezoelectric actuators during the manufacturing process and subsequent straining due to an applied input voltage. To effectively use such devices in engineering applications, modeling and characterization are essential. Length, width, dome height, and thickness are important parameters for users of such devices. Therefore, finite element models were used to assess the effects of these parameters. NASTRAN(Registered Trademark) and ANSYS(Registered Trademark) used different methods for modeling piezoelectric effects. In NASTRAN(Registered Trademark), a thermal analogy was used to represent voltage at nodes as equivalent temperatures, while ANSYS(Registered Trademark) processed the voltage directly using piezoelectric finite elements. The results of finite element models were validated by using the experimental results.

  4. Scalable, Finite Element Analysis of Electromagnetic Scattering and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, T.; Lou, J.; Katz, D.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper a method for simulating electromagnetic fields scattered from complex objects is reviewed; namely, an unstructured finite element code that does not use traditional mesh partitioning algorithms.

  5. Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mishev, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a few different preconditioners for the linear systems arising from the discretization of 3-D convection-diffusion problems with the finite volume element method. Their theoretical and computational convergence rates are compared and discussed.

  6. Scalable, Finite Element Analysis of Electromagnetic Scattering and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, T.; Lou, J.; Katz, D.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper a method for simulating electromagnetic fields scattered from complex objects is reviewed; namely, an unstructured finite element code that does not use traditional mesh partitioning algorithms.

  7. The finite element machine: An experiment in parallel processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, O. O.; Peebles, S. W.; Crockett, T. W.; Knott, J. D.; Adams, L.

    1982-01-01

    The finite element machine is a prototype computer designed to support parallel solutions to structural analysis problems. The hardware architecture and support software for the machine, initial solution algorithms and test applications, and preliminary results are described.

  8. Validation of high displacement piezoelectric actuator finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.

    2000-08-01

    The paper presents the results obtained by using NASTRAN and ANSYS finite element codes to predict doming of the THUNDER piezoelectric actuators during the manufacturing process and subsequent straining due to an applied input voltage. To effectively use such devices in engineering applications, modeling and characterization are essential. Length, width, dome height, and thickness and important parameters for users of such devices. Therefore, finite element models were used to assess the effects of these parameters. NASTRAN and ANSYS used different methods for modeling piezoelectric effects. In NASTRAN, a thermal analogy was used to represent voltage at nodes as equivalent temperatures, while ANSYS processed the voltage directly using piezoelectric finite elements. The results of finite element models were validated by using the experimental results.

  9. Finite element visualization in the cave virtual reality environment

    SciTech Connect

    Plaskacz, E.J.; Kuhn, M.A.

    1996-03-01

    Through the use of the post-processing software, Virtual Reality visualization (VRviz), and the Cave Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE), finite element representations can be viewed as they would be in real life. VRviz is a program written in ANSI C to translate the mathematical results generated by finite element analysis programs into a virtual representation. This virtual representation is projected into the CAVE environment and the results are animated. The animation is fully controllable. A user is able to translate the image, rotate about any axis and scale the image at any time. The user is also able to freeze the animation at any time step and control the image update rate. This allows the user to navigate around, or even inside, the image in order to effectively analyze possible failure points and redesign as necessary. Through the use of the CAVE and the real life image that is being produced by VRviz, engineers are able to save considerable time, money, and effort in the design process.

  10. Distributed Finite Element Analysis Using a Transputer Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, James; Favenesi, James; Danial, Albert; Tombrello, Joseph; Yang, Dabby; Reynolds, Brian; Turrentine, Ronald; Shephard, Mark; Baehmann, Peggy

    1989-01-01

    The principal objective of this research effort was to demonstrate the extraordinarily cost effective acceleration of finite element structural analysis problems using a transputer-based parallel processing network. This objective was accomplished in the form of a commercially viable parallel processing workstation. The workstation is a desktop size, low-maintenance computing unit capable of supercomputer performance yet costs two orders of magnitude less. To achieve the principal research objective, a transputer based structural analysis workstation termed XPFEM was implemented with linear static structural analysis capabilities resembling commercially available NASTRAN. Finite element model files, generated using the on-line preprocessing module or external preprocessing packages, are downloaded to a network of 32 transputers for accelerated solution. The system currently executes at about one third Cray X-MP24 speed but additional acceleration appears likely. For the NASA selected demonstration problem of a Space Shuttle main engine turbine blade model with about 1500 nodes and 4500 independent degrees of freedom, the Cray X-MP24 required 23.9 seconds to obtain a solution while the transputer network, operated from an IBM PC-AT compatible host computer, required 71.7 seconds. Consequently, the $80,000 transputer network demonstrated a cost-performance ratio about 60 times better than the $15,000,000 Cray X-MP24 system.

  11. Adaptive Finite Element Methods for Continuum Damage Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Tworzydlo, W. W.; Xiques, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents an application of adaptive finite element methods to the modeling of low-cycle continuum damage and life prediction of high-temperature components. The major objective is to provide automated and accurate modeling of damaged zones through adaptive mesh refinement and adaptive time-stepping methods. The damage modeling methodology is implemented in an usual way by embedding damage evolution in the transient nonlinear solution of elasto-viscoplastic deformation problems. This nonlinear boundary-value problem is discretized by adaptive finite element methods. The automated h-adaptive mesh refinements are driven by error indicators, based on selected principal variables in the problem (stresses, non-elastic strains, damage, etc.). In the time domain, adaptive time-stepping is used, combined with a predictor-corrector time marching algorithm. The time selection is controlled by required time accuracy. In order to take into account strong temperature dependency of material parameters, the nonlinear structural solution a coupled with thermal analyses (one-way coupling). Several test examples illustrate the importance and benefits of adaptive mesh refinements in accurate prediction of damage levels and failure time.

  12. Finite element stress analysis of stainless steel crowns.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Attiguppe R; Yavagal, Chandrashekar M; Chakraborty, Amrita; Sugandhan, S

    2015-01-01

    Though stainless steel crowns (SSCs) have often been stated as the best restorative modality, there are limited studies demonstrating its efficacy in restoring the functional integrity of the primary dentition. Hence has arisen, the necessity to establish the supremacy of SSCs. Evaluation of the efficacy of SSC to with stand compressive (0°), shearing (90°), and torsional (45°) stress when used as a restorative material. The study design employed four finite element models, each with differing amounts of tooth structure, which were exported to ANSYS software and subjected to an average simulated bite force of 245N. Four maxillary deciduous primary molars restored with SSCs (3M ESPE) were subjected to spiral computed tomography (CT) in order to obtain three-dimensional (3D) images, which were then converted into finite element models. They were each subjected to forces along the long axis of the tooth and at 45°and 90°. The maximal equivalent von Mises stress was demonstrated in the SSCs of all the models with only a minimal amount observed in the underlying dentine. In all situations, the maximal equivalent von Mises stress was well below the ultimate tensile strength values of stainless steel and dentine. Even at maximal physiologic masticatory force levels, a grossly destructed tooth restored with SSC is able to resist deformation.

  13. Two-Dimensional Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of CMC Microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    A research program has been developed to quantify the effects of the microstructure of a woven ceramic matrix composite and its variability on the effective properties and response of the material. In order to characterize and quantify the variations in the microstructure of a five harness satin weave, chemical vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC/SiC composite material, specimens were serially sectioned and polished to capture images that detailed the fiber tows, matrix, and porosity. Open source quantitative image analysis tools were then used to isolate the constituents, from which two dimensional finite element models were generated which approximated the actual specimen section geometry. A simplified elastic-plastic model, wherein all stress above yield is redistributed to lower stress regions, is used to approximate the progressive damage behavior for each of the composite constituents. Finite element analyses under in-plane tensile loading were performed to examine how the variability in the local microstructure affected the macroscopic stress-strain response of the material as well as the local initiation and progression of damage. The macroscopic stress-strain response appeared to be minimally affected by the variation in local microstructure, but the locations where damage initiated and propagated appeared to be linked to specific aspects of the local microstructure.

  14. A nonlinear dynamic finite element approach for simulating muscular hydrostats.

    PubMed

    Vavourakis, V; Kazakidi, A; Tsakiris, D P; Ekaterinaris, J A

    2014-01-01

    An implicit nonlinear finite element model for simulating biological muscle mechanics is developed. The numerical method is suitable for dynamic simulations of three-dimensional, nonlinear, nearly incompressible, hyperelastic materials that undergo large deformations. These features characterise biological muscles, which consist of fibres and connective tissues. It can be assumed that the stress distribution inside the muscles is the superposition of stresses along the fibres and the connective tissues. The mechanical behaviour of the surrounding tissues is determined by adopting a Mooney-Rivlin constitutive model, while the mechanical description of fibres is considered to be the sum of active and passive stresses. Due to the nonlinear nature of the problem, evaluation of the Jacobian matrix is carried out in order to subsequently utilise the standard Newton-Raphson iterative procedure and to carry out time integration with an implicit scheme. The proposed methodology is implemented into our in-house, open source, finite element software, which is validated by comparing numerical results with experimental measurements and other numerical results. Finally, the numerical procedure is utilised to simulate primitive octopus arm manoeuvres, such as bending and reaching.

  15. Accelerated finite element elastodynamic simulations using the GPU

    SciTech Connect

    Huthwaite, Peter

    2014-01-15

    An approach is developed to perform explicit time domain finite element simulations of elastodynamic problems on the graphical processing unit, using Nvidia's CUDA. Of critical importance for this problem is the arrangement of nodes in memory, allowing data to be loaded efficiently and minimising communication between the independently executed blocks of threads. The initial stage of memory arrangement is partitioning the mesh; both a well established ‘greedy’ partitioner and a new, more efficient ‘aligned’ partitioner are investigated. A method is then developed to efficiently arrange the memory within each partition. The software is applied to three models from the fields of non-destructive testing, vibrations and geophysics, demonstrating a memory bandwidth of very close to the card's maximum, reflecting the bandwidth-limited nature of the algorithm. Comparison with Abaqus, a widely used commercial CPU equivalent, validated the accuracy of the results and demonstrated a speed improvement of around two orders of magnitude. A software package, Pogo, incorporating these developments, is released open source, downloadable from (http://www.pogo-fea.com/) to benefit the community. -- Highlights: •A novel memory arrangement approach is discussed for finite elements on the GPU. •The mesh is partitioned then nodes are arranged efficiently within each partition. •Models from ultrasonics, vibrations and geophysics are run. •The code is significantly faster than an equivalent commercial CPU package. •Pogo, the new software package, is released open source.

  16. Anisotropic adaptive finite element method for modelling blood flow.

    PubMed

    Müller, J; Sahni, O; Li, X; Jansen, K E; Shephard, M S; Taylor, C A

    2005-10-01

    In this study, we present an adaptive anisotropic finite element method (FEM) and demonstrate how computational efficiency can be increased when applying the method to the simulation of blood flow in the cardiovascular system. We use the SUPG formulation for the transient 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations which are discretised by linear finite elements for both the pressure and the velocity field. Given the pulsatile nature of the flow in blood vessels we have pursued adaptivity based on the average flow over a cardiac cycle. Error indicators are derived to define an anisotropic mesh metric field. Mesh modification algorithms are used to anisotropically adapt the mesh according to the desired size field. We demonstrate the efficiency of the method by first applying it to pulsatile flow in a straight cylindrical vessel and then to a porcine aorta with a stenosis bypassed by a graft. We demonstrate that the use of an anisotropic adaptive FEM can result in an order of magnitude reduction in computing time with no loss of accuracy compared to analyses obtained with uniform meshes.

  17. Periodic trim solutions with hp-version finite elements in time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, David A.; Hou, Lin-Jun

    1990-01-01

    Finite elements in time as an alternative strategy for rotorcraft trim problems are studied. The research treats linear flap and linearized flap-lag response both for quasi-trim and trim cases. The connection between Fourier series analysis and hp-finite elements for periodic a problem is also examined. It is proved that Fourier series is a special case of space-time finite elements in which one element is used with a strong displacement formulation. Comparisons are made with respect to accuracy among Fourier analysis, displacement methods, and mixed methods over a variety parameters. The hp trade-off is studied for the periodic trim problem to provide an optimum step size and order of polynomial for a given error criteria. It is found that finite elements in time can outperform Fourier analysis for periodic problems, and for some given error criteria. The mixed method provides better results than does the displacement method.

  18. Periodic trim solutions with hp-version finite elements in time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Lin-Jun; Peters, David A.

    1991-01-01

    Finite elements in time as an alternative strategy for rotorcraft trim problems are studied. The research treats linear flap and linearized flap-lag response both for quasi-trim and trim cases. The connection between Fourier series analysis and hp-finite elements for periodic a problem is also examined. It is proved that Fourier series is a special case of space-time finite elements in which one element is used with a strong displacement formulation. Comparisons are made with respect to accuracy among Fourier analysis, displacement methods, and mixed methods over a variety parameters. The hp trade-off is studied for the periodic trim problem to provide an optimum step size and order of polynomial for a given error criteria. It is found that finite elements in time can outperform Fourier analysis for periodic problems, and for some given error criteria. The mixed method provides better results than does the displacement method.

  19. Periodic trim solutions with hp-version finite elements in time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Lin-Jun; Peters, David A.

    1991-01-01

    Finite elements in time as an alternative strategy for rotorcraft trim problems are studied. The research treats linear flap and linearized flap-lag response both for quasi-trim and trim cases. The connection between Fourier series analysis and hp-finite elements for periodic a problem is also examined. It is proved that Fourier series is a special case of space-time finite elements in which one element is used with a strong displacement formulation. Comparisons are made with respect to accuracy among Fourier analysis, displacement methods, and mixed methods over a variety parameters. The hp trade-off is studied for the periodic trim problem to provide an optimum step size and order of polynomial for a given error criteria. It is found that finite elements in time can outperform Fourier analysis for periodic problems, and for some given error criteria. The mixed method provides better results than does the displacement method.

  20. The simulation of Lamb waves in a cracked plate using the scaled boundary finite element method.

    PubMed

    Gravenkamp, Hauke; Prager, Jens; Saputra, Albert A; Song, Chongmin

    2012-09-01

    The scaled boundary finite element method is applied to the simulation of Lamb waves for ultrasonic testing applications. With this method, the general elastodynamic problem is solved, while only the boundary of the domain under consideration has to be discretized. The reflection of the fundamental Lamb wave modes from cracks of different geometry in a steel plate is modeled. A test problem is compared with commercial finite element software, showing the efficiency and convergence of the scaled boundary finite element method. A special formulation of this method is utilized to calculate dispersion relations for plate structures. For the discretization of the boundary, higher-order elements are employed to improve the efficiency of the simulations. The simplicity of mesh generation of a cracked plate for a scaled boundary finite element analysis is illustrated.

  1. A 2D finite element wave equation solver based on triangular base elements

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Evrard, M.

    2009-11-26

    A finite element method based on the subdivision of the physical domain in triangular sub-domains in which simple local 'areale' coordinates are adopted is explored. The advantage of the method is that it straightforwardly allows grid refinement in regions where higher precision is required. The plasma model was kept simple for this 'proof-of-principle' exercise. Rather than accounting for the actual differential or integro-differential dielectric tensor, its locally uniform plasma equivalent was adopted for 3 possible choices: the cold plasma response, the full hot Stix/Swanson plasma tensor retaining all orders in finite Larmor radius (FLR) and the more common hot tensor, truncated at terms of second order in the Larmor radius.

  2. Error estimates of triangular finite elements under a weak angle condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Shipeng; Shi, Zhongci

    2009-08-01

    In this note, by analyzing the interpolation operator of Girault and Raviart given in [V. Girault, P.A. Raviart, Finite element methods for Navier-Stokes equations, Theory and algorithms, in: Springer Series in Computational Mathematics, Springer-Verlag, Berlin,1986] over triangular meshes, we prove optimal interpolation error estimates for Lagrange triangular finite elements of arbitrary order under the maximal angle condition in a unified and simple way. The key estimate is only an application of the Bramble-Hilbert lemma.

  3. A new approach in cascade flow analysis using the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baskharone, E.; Hamed, A.

    1980-01-01

    A new approach in analyzing the potential flow past cascades and single airfoils using the finite element method is developed. In this analysis the circulation around the airfoil is not externally imposed but is directly computed in the numerical solution. Different finite element discretization patterns, orders of piecewise approximation, and grid sizes are used in the solution. The results obtained are compared with existing experimental measurements and exact solutions in cascades and single airfoils.

  4. A Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method for Hamilton-Jacobi Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Changqing; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we present a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for solving the nonlinear Hamilton-Jacobi equations. This method is based on the Runge-Kutta discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for solving conservation laws. The method has the flexibility of treating complicated geometry by using arbitrary triangulation, can achieve high order accuracy with a local, compact stencil, and are suited for efficient parallel implementation. One and two dimensional numerical examples are given to illustrate the capability of the method.

  5. Simple bounds on limit loads by elastic finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, D.; Nadarajah, C.; Shi, J.; Boyle, J.T. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-02-01

    A method for bounding limit loads by an iterative elastic continuum finite element analysis procedure, referred to as the elastic compensation method, is proposed. A number of sample problems are considered, based on both exact solutions and finite element analysis, and it is concluded that the method may be used to obtain limit-load bounds for pressure vessel design by analysis applications with useful accuracy.

  6. Examples of finite element mesh generation using SDRC IDEAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapp, John; Volakis, John L.

    1990-01-01

    IDEAS (Integrated Design Engineering Analysis Software) offers a comprehensive package for mechanical design engineers. Due to its multifaceted capabilities, however, it can be manipulated to serve the needs of electrical engineers, also. IDEAS can be used to perform the following tasks: system modeling, system assembly, kinematics, finite element pre/post processing, finite element solution, system dynamics, drafting, test data analysis, and project relational database.

  7. Integration of geometric modeling and advanced finite element preprocessing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, Mark S.; Finnigan, Peter M.

    1987-01-01

    The structure to a geometry based finite element preprocessing system is presented. The key features of the system are the use of geometric operators to support all geometric calculations required for analysis model generation, and the use of a hierarchic boundary based data structure for the major data sets within the system. The approach presented can support the finite element modeling procedures used today as well as the fully automated procedures under development.

  8. Global/local finite element analysis of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, O. Hayden, Jr.; Vidussoni, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    The motivation for performing global/local finite element analysis in composite materials is described. An example of such an analysis of a composite plate with a central circular hole is presented. Deformed finite element grids and interlaminar normal stress distributions are presented to aid understanding of the plate response. Such distribution at the plate edge is shown to be basically unaffected, although transverse displacements of the edge were slightly different from an analysis of a similar plate with no hole.

  9. Finite element analysis to model complex mitral valve repair.

    PubMed

    Labrosse, Michel; Mesana, Thierry; Baxter, Ian; Chan, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Although finite element analysis has been used to model simple mitral repair, it has not been used to model complex repair. A virtual mitral valve model was successful in simulating normal and abnormal valve function. Models were then developed to simulate an edge-to-edge repair and repair employing quadrangular resection. Stress contour plots demonstrated increased stresses along the mitral annulus, corresponding to the annuloplasty. The role of finite element analysis in guiding clinical practice remains undetermined.

  10. Finite element analysis of a composite wheelchair wheel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, Rene

    1994-01-01

    The finite element analysis of a composite wheelchair wheel design is presented. The design is the result of a technology utilization request. The designer's intent is to soften the riding feeling by incorporating a mechanism attaching the wheel rim to the spokes that would allow considerable deflection upon compressive loads. A finite element analysis was conducted to verify proper structural function. Displacement and stress results are presented and conclusions are provided.

  11. An Adaptive Multiscale Finite Element Method for Large Scale Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-28

    the method . Using the above definitions , the weak statement of the non-linear local problem at the kth 4 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0305 An Adaptive Multiscale Finite Element Method for Large Scale Simulations Carlos Duarte UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS CHAMPAIGN...14-07-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE An Adaptive Multiscale Generalized Finite Element Method for Large Scale Simulations 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  12. Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of Composite Flextensional Transducer Shell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    4 TITLE AND SUBTITLE s FUNDING NUMbE;h NONLINEAR FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF COMPOSITE FLEXTENSIONAL PR: SV70 TRANSDUCER SHELL PE: 020431 IN 6 AUFTHOA...D NSN 7540-01-280-5500 ,ssard tr,298 IBACI UiNCLA-SSIFlED NONLINEAR FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF COMPOSITE FLEXTENSIONAL TRANSDUCER SHELL R. C. SliAW...its correlation with test data for a Class IV flextensional underwater acoustic transducer . The thick. elliptical fiberglass/epoxy shell of the

  13. Finite element modeling of electromagnetic propagation in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1987-01-01

    A finite element Galerkin formulation has been developed to study electromagnetic propagation in complex two-dimensional absorbing ducts. The reflection and transmission at entrance and exit boundaries are determined by coupling the finite element solutions at the entrance and exit to the eigenfunctions of an infinite uniform perfect conducting duct. Example solutions are presented for electromagnetic propagation with absorbing duct walls and propagating through dielectric-metallic matrix materials.

  14. Mathematical aspects of finite element methods for incompressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunzburger, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    Mathematical aspects of finite element methods are surveyed for incompressible viscous flows, concentrating on the steady primitive variable formulation. The discretization of a weak formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations are addressed, then the stability condition is considered, the satisfaction of which insures the stability of the approximation. Specific choices of finite element spaces for the velocity and pressure are then discussed. Finally, the connection between different weak formulations and a variety of boundary conditions is explored.

  15. Finite element prediction of fatigue damage growth in cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha; Frikha, Sana; Toumi, Hechmi; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic stresses applied to bones generate fatigue damage that affects the bone stiffness and its elastic modulus. This paper proposes a finite element model for the prediction of fatigue damage accumulation and failure in cancellous bone at continuum scale. The model is based on continuum damage mechanics and incorporates crack closure effects in compression. The propagation of the cracks is completely simulated throughout the damaged area. In this case, the stiffness of the broken element is reduced by 98% to ensure no stress-carrying capacities of completely damaged elements. Once a crack is initiated, the propagation direction is simulated by the propagation of the broken elements of the mesh. The proposed model suggests that damage evolves over a real physical time variable (cycles). In order to reduce the computation time, the integration of the damage growth rate is based on the cycle blocks approach. In this approach, the real number of cycles is reduced (divided) into equivalent blocks of cycles. Damage accumulation is computed over the cycle blocks and then extrapolated over the corresponding real cycles. The results show a clear difference between local tensile and compressive stresses on damage accumulation. Incorporating stiffness reduction also produces a redistribution of the peak stresses in the damaged region, which results in a delay in damage fracture.

  16. Finite element analysis of (SA) mechanoreceptors in tactile sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N, Syamimi; Yahud, S.

    2015-05-01

    This paper addresses the structural design of a fingertip model in order to analyse the sensory function of slow adapting (SA) mechanoreceptors by using the finite element analysis (FEA) method. A biologically inspired tactile sensor was designed to mimic a similar response of the human mechanoreceptors in the human glabrous skin. The simulation work was done by using COMSOL Multiphysics. The artificial skin was modelled as a solid square block of silicone elastomer with a semi cylinder protrusion on top. It was modelled as a nearly incompressible and linear hyperelastic material defined by Neo Hookean constitutive law. The sensing element on the other hand was modelled by using constantan alloy mimicking the SA1 receptor. Boundary loads of 1 N/m² to 4 N/m² with the increment of 1 N/m² were applied to the top surface of the protrusion in z and x-direction for normal and shear stress, respectively. The epidermal model base was constrained to maintain the same boundary conditions throughout all simulations. The changes of length experienced by the sensing element were calculated. The simulations result in terms of strain was identified. The simulated result was plotted in terms of sensing element strain against the boundary load and the graph should produce a linear response.

  17. High-Order Entropy Stable Finite Difference Schemes for Nonlinear Conservation Laws: Finite Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Travis C.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Developing stable and robust high-order finite difference schemes requires mathematical formalism and appropriate methods of analysis. In this work, nonlinear entropy stability is used to derive provably stable high-order finite difference methods with formal boundary closures for conservation laws. Particular emphasis is placed on the entropy stability of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A newly derived entropy stable weighted essentially non-oscillatory finite difference method is used to simulate problems with shocks and a conservative, entropy stable, narrow-stencil finite difference approach is used to approximate viscous terms.

  18. Least-squares streamline diffusion finite element approximations to singularly perturbed convection-diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarov, R D; Vassilevski, P S

    1999-05-06

    In this paper we introduce and study a least-squares finite element approximation for singularly perturbed convection-diffusion equations of second order. By introducing the flux (diffusive plus convective) as a new unknown, the problem is written in a mixed form as a first order system. Further, the flux is augmented by adding the lower order terms with a small parameter. The new first order system is approximated by the least-squares finite element method using the minus one norm approach of Bramble, Lazarov, and Pasciak [2]. Further, we estimate the error of the method and discuss its implementation and the numerical solution of some test problems.

  19. An adaptive discontinuous finite element method for the transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, J.; Walter, A.

    1995-03-01

    In this paper we introduce a discontinuous finite element method. In our approach, it is possible to combine the advantages of finite element and finite difference methods. The main ingredients are numerical flux approximation and local orthogonal basis functions. The scheme is defined on arbitrary triangulations and two different error indicators are derived. Especially the second one is closely connected to our approach and able to handle arbitrary varying flow directions. Numerical results are given for boundary value problems in two dimensions. They demonstrate the performance of the scheme, combined with the two error indicators.

  20. Nonlinear finite element analysis: An alternative formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merazzi, S.; Stehlin, P.

    1980-01-01

    A geometrical nonlinear analysis based on an alternative definition of strain is presented. Expressions for strain are obtained by computing the change in length of the base vectors in the curvilinear element coordinate system. The isoparametric element formulation is assumed in the global Cartesian coordinate system. The approach is based on the minimization of the strain energy, and the resulting nonlinear equations are solved by the modified Newton method. Integration of the first and second variation of the strain energy is performed numerically in the case of two and three dimensional elements. Application is made to a simple long cantilever beam.

  1. Evaluation of the use of a singularity element in finite element analysis of center-cracked plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendelson, A.; Gross, B.; Srawley, J., E.

    1972-01-01

    Two different methods are applied to the analyses of finite width linear elastic plates with central cracks. Both methods give displacements as a primary part of the solution. One method makes use of Fourier transforms. The second method employs a coarse mesh of triangular second-order finite elements in conjunction with a single singularity element subjected to appropriate additional constraints. The displacements obtained by these two methods are in very good agreement. The results suggest considerable potential for the use of a cracked element for related crack problems, particularly in connection with the extension to nonlinear material behavior.

  2. Recent developments in finite element analysis for transonic airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Murman, E. M.

    1979-01-01

    The prediction of aerodynamic forces in the transonic regime generally requires a flow field calculation to solve the governing non-linear mixed elliptic-hyperbolic partial differential equations. Finite difference techniques were developed to the point that design and analysis application are routine, and continual improvements are being made by various research groups. The principal limitation in extending finite difference methods to complex three-dimensional geometries is the construction of a suitable mesh system. Finite element techniques are attractive since their application to other problems have permitted irregular mesh elements to be employed. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent developments in the application of finite element methods to transonic flow problems and to report some recent results.

  3. Dynamical observer for a flexible beam via finite element approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manitius, Andre; Xia, Hong-Xing

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this view-graph presentation is a computational investigation of the closed-loop output feedback control of a Euler-Bernoulli beam based on finite element approximation. The observer is part of the classical observer plus state feedback control, but it is finite-dimensional. In the theoretical work on the subject it is assumed (and sometimes proved) that increasing the number of finite elements will improve accuracy of the control. In applications, this may be difficult to achieve because of numerical problems. The main difficulty in computing the observer and simulating its work is the presence of high frequency eigenvalues in the finite-element model and poor numerical conditioning of some of the system matrices (e.g. poor observability properties) when the dimension of the approximating system increases. This work dealt with some of these difficulties.

  4. Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of Sandwich Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    to the element midsurface z - z(x,y) at all points. An additional coordinate r is used to describe the distance away from the midsurface at any point...It is assumed that on the element level, the shell is shallow, so that z2 2 (56) ,y everywhere. The unit vector normal to the shell midsurface at a...relations above do not involve the orientation of the displaced midsurface normal, and, therefore, apply to arbitrarily large displacements and rotations

  5. Error analysis of finite element method for Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuzhou; Sun, Pengtao; Zheng, Bin; Lin, Guang

    2016-08-01

    A priori error estimates of finite element method for time-dependent Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations are studied in this work. We obtain the optimal error estimates in L∞(H1) and L2(H1) norms, and suboptimal error estimates in L∞(L2) norm, with linear element, and optimal error estimates in L∞(L2) norm with quadratic or higher-order element, for both semi- and fully discrete finite element approximations. Numerical experiments are also given to validate the theoretical results.

  6. Finite element implementation of state variable-based viscoplasticity models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iskovitz, I.; Chang, T. Y. P.; Saleeb, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    The implementation of state variable-based viscoplasticity models is made in a general purpose finite element code for structural applications of metals deformed at elevated temperatures. Two constitutive models, Walker's and Robinson's models, are studied in conjunction with two implicit integration methods: the trapezoidal rule with Newton-Raphson iterations and an asymptotic integration algorithm. A comparison is made between the two integration methods, and the latter method appears to be computationally more appealing in terms of numerical accuracy and CPU time. However, in order to make the asymptotic algorithm robust, it is necessary to include a self adaptive scheme with subincremental step control and error checking of the Jacobian matrix at the integration points. Three examples are given to illustrate the numerical aspects of the integration methods tested.

  7. Thermal buoyancy on Venus: Preliminary results of finite element modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, J. D.; Head, James W., III

    1992-01-01

    Enhanced surface temperatures and a thinner lithosphere on Venus relative to Earth have been cited as leading to increased lithospheric buoyancy. This would limit or prevent subduction on Venus and favor the construction of thickened crust through underthrusting. In order to evaluate the conditions distinguishing between underthrusting and subduction, we have modeled the thermal and buoyancy consequences of the subduction end member. This study considers the fate of a slab from the time it starts to subduct, but bypasses the question of subduction initiation. Thermal changes in slabs subducting into a mantle having a range of initial geotherms are used to predict density changes and thus their overall buoyancy. Finite element modeling is then applied in a first approximation of the assessment of the relative rates of subduction as compared to the buoyant rise of the slab through a viscous mantle.

  8. Finite element solution of low bond number sloshing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohlen, R. L.; Park, A. C.; Warner, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    The dynamics of liquid propellant in a low Bond number environment which are critical to the design of spacecraft systems with respect to orbital propellant transfer and attitude control system were investigated. Digital computer programs were developed for the determination of liquid free surface equilibrium shape, lateral slosh natural vibration mode shapes, and frequencies for a liquid in a container of arbitrary axisymmetric shape with surface tension forces the same order of magnitude as acceleration forces. A finite volume element representation of the liquid was used for the vibration analysis. The liquid free surface equilibrium shapes were computed for several tanks at various contact angles and ullage volumes. A configuration was selected for vibration analysis and lateral slosh mode shapes and natural frequencies were obtained. Results are documented.

  9. Incorporating finite element analysis into component life and reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    August, Richard; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1991-01-01

    A method for calculating a component's design survivability by incorporating finite element analysis and probabilistic material properties was developed. The method evaluates design parameters through direct comparisons of component survivability expressed in terms of Weibull parameters. The analysis was applied to a rotating disk with mounting bolt holes. The highest probability of failure occurred at, or near, the maximum shear stress region of the bolt holes. Distribution of failure as a function of Weibull slope affects the probability of survival. Where Weibull parameters are unknown for a rotating disk, it may be permissible to assume Weibull parameters, as well as the stress-life exponent, in order to determine the disk speed where the probability of survival is highest.

  10. On the effects of grid ill-conditioning in three dimensional finite element vector potential magnetostatic field computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, R.; Demerdash, N. A.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of finite element grid geometries and associated ill-conditioning were studied in single medium and multi-media (air-iron) three dimensional magnetostatic field computation problems. The sensitivities of these 3D field computations to finite element grid geometries were investigated. It was found that in single medium applications the unconstrained magnetic vector potential curl-curl formulation in conjunction with first order finite elements produce global results which are almost totally insensitive to grid geometries. However, it was found that in multi-media (air-iron) applications first order finite element results are sensitive to grid geometries and consequent elemental shape ill-conditioning. These sensitivities were almost totally eliminated by means of the use of second order finite elements in the field computation algorithms. Practical examples are given in this paper to demonstrate these aspects mentioned above.

  11. On the effects of grid ill-conditioning in three dimensional finite element vector potential magnetostatic field computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, R.; Demerdash, N. A.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of finite element grid geometries and associated ill-conditioning were studied in single medium and multi-media (air-iron) three dimensional magnetostatic field computation problems. The sensitivities of these 3D field computations to finite element grid geometries were investigated. It was found that in single medium applications the unconstrained magnetic vector potential curl-curl formulation in conjunction with first order finite elements produce global results which are almost totally insensitive to grid geometries. However, it was found that in multi-media (air-iron) applications first order finite element results are sensitive to grid geometries and consequent elemental shape ill-conditioning. These sensitivities were almost totally eliminated by means of the use of second order finite elements in the field computation algorithms. Practical examples are given in this paper to demonstrate these aspects mentioned above.

  12. Large deformations of reconfigurable active membranes: a finite element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Seyul; Goulbourne, N. C.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, a finite element model is used to describe the inhomogeneous deformations of dielectric elastomers (DE). In our previous work, inhomogeneous deformations of the DE with simple boundary conditions represented by a system of highly nonlinear coupled differential equations (ordinary and partial) were solved using numerical approaches [1-3]. To solve for the electromechanical response for complex shapes (asymmetric), nonuniform loading, and complex boundary conditions a finite element scheme is required. This paper describes a finite element implementation of the DE material model proposed in our previous work in a commercial FE code (ABAQUS 6.8-1, PAWTUCKET, R.I, USA). The total stress is postulated as the summation of the elastic stress tensor and the Maxwell stress tensor, or more generally the electrostatic stress tensor. The finite element model is verified by analytical solutions and experimental results for planar membrane extensions subject to mechanical loads and an electric field: (i) equibiaxial extension and (ii) generalized biaxial extension. Specifically, the analytical solutions for equibiaxial extension of the DE is obtained by combining a modified large deformation membrane theory that accounts for the electromechanical coupling effect in actuation commonly referred to as the Maxwell stress [4]. A Mooney-Rivlin strain energy function is employed to describe the constitutive stress strain behavior of the DE. For the finite element implementation, the constitutive relationships from our previously proposed mathematical model [4] are implemented into the finite element code. Experimentally, a 250% equibiaxially prestretched DE sample is attached to a rigid joint frame and inhomogeneous deformations of the reconfigurable DE are observed with respect to mechanical loads and an applied electric field. The computational result for the reconfigurable DE is compared with the test result to validate the accuracy and robustness of the finite

  13. Finite Element Model Development For Aircraft Fuselage Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Fleming, Gary A.; Pappa, Richard S.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2000-01-01

    The ability to extend the valid frequency range for finite element based structural dynamic predictions using detailed models of the structural components and attachment interfaces is examined for several stiffened aircraft fuselage structures. This extended dynamic prediction capability is needed for the integration of mid-frequency noise control technology. Beam, plate and solid element models of the stiffener components are evaluated. Attachment models between the stiffener and panel skin range from a line along the rivets of the physical structure to a constraint over the entire contact surface. The finite element models are validated using experimental modal analysis results.

  14. Preconditioned CG-solvers and finite element grids

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, R.; Selberherr, S.

    1994-12-31

    To extract parasitic capacitances in wiring structures of integrated circuits the authors developed the two- and three-dimensional finite element program SCAP (Smart Capacitance Analysis Program). The program computes the task of the electrostatic field from a solution of Poisson`s equation via finite elements and calculates the energies from which the capacitance matrix is extracted. The unknown potential vector, which has for three-dimensional applications 5000-50000 unknowns, is computed by a ICCG solver. Currently three- and six-node triangular, four- and ten-node tetrahedronal elements are supported.

  15. Finite element analysis of two disk rotor system

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, Harsh Kumar

    2016-05-06

    A finite element model of simple horizontal rotor system is developed for evaluating its dynamic behaviour. The model is based on Timoshenko beam element and accounts for the effect of gyroscopic couple and other rotational forces. Present rotor system consists of single shaft which is supported by bearings at both ends and two disks are mounted at different locations. The natural frequencies, mode shapes and orbits of rotating system for a specific range of rotation speed are obtained by developing a MATLAB code for solving the finite element equations of rotary system. Consequently, Campbell diagram is plotted for finding a relationship between natural whirl frequencies and rotation of the rotor.

  16. Finite element analysis of shear deformable laminated composite plates

    SciTech Connect

    Kam, T.Y.; Chang, R.R. )

    1993-03-01

    A shear deformable finite element is developed for the analysis of thick laminated composite plates. The finite element formulation is based on Mindlin's plate theory in which shear correction factors are derived from the exact expressions for orthotropic materials. The element is used to solve a variety of problems on deflection, stress distribution, natural frequency and buckling of laminated composite plates. The effects of material properties, plate aspect ratio, length-to-thickness ratio, number of layers and lamination angle on the mechanical behaviors of laminated composite plates are investigated. Optimal lamination arrangements of layers for laminated composite plates of particular applications are determined.

  17. Probabilistic finite elements for fatigue and fracture analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belytschko, Ted; Liu, Wing Kam

    1992-01-01

    Attenuation is focused on the development of Probabilistic Finite Element Method (PFEM), which combines the finite element method with statistics and reliability methods, and its application to linear, nonlinear structural mechanics problems and fracture mechanics problems. The computational tool based on the Stochastic Boundary Element Method is also given for the reliability analysis of a curvilinear fatigue crack growth. The existing PFEM's have been applied to solve for two types of problems: (1) determination of the response uncertainty in terms of the means, variance and correlation coefficients; and (2) determination the probability of failure associated with prescribed limit states.

  18. Adaptive grid finite element model of the tokamak scrapeoff layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.P.; Glasser, A.H.

    1995-07-01

    The authors discuss unstructured grids for application to transport in the tokamak edge SOL. They have developed a new metric with which to judge element elongation and resolution requirements. Using this method, the authors apply a standard moving finite element technique to advance the SOL equations while inserting/deleting dynamically nodes that violate an elongation criterion. In a tokamak plasma, this method achieves a more uniform accuracy, and results in highly stretched triangular finite elements, except near separatrix X-point where transport is more isotropic.

  19. Finite element analysis of two disk rotor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Harsh Kumar

    2016-05-01

    A finite element model of simple horizontal rotor system is developed for evaluating its dynamic behaviour. The model is based on Timoshenko beam element and accounts for the effect of gyroscopic couple and other rotational forces. Present rotor system consists of single shaft which is supported by bearings at both ends and two disks are mounted at different locations. The natural frequencies, mode shapes and orbits of rotating system for a specific range of rotation speed are obtained by developing a MATLAB code for solving the finite element equations of rotary system. Consequently, Campbell diagram is plotted for finding a relationship between natural whirl frequencies and rotation of the rotor.

  20. A finite element method to study multimaterial wind towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoal-Faria, P.; Dias, C.; Oliveira, M.; Alves, N.

    2017-07-01

    Wind towers are used to produce electrical energy from the wind. A significant number of towers is manufactured using tubular separately steel or concrete, having limitations such as maximum diameter and height imposed essentially by transportation limitations. Developed computational studies on structural design of towers have been mainly focused on a single material. This investigation aims to develop a finite element method able to study structural design of wind towers combining different materials. The finite element model combines solid and shell elements encompassing different geometries. Several case studies are considered to validate the proposed method and accurate results are obtained.

  1. Numerical Differentiation for Adaptively Refined Finite Element Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgioli, Andrea; Cwik, Tom

    1998-01-01

    Postprocessing of point-wise data is a fundamental process in many fields of research. Numerical differentiation is a key operation in computational electromagnetics. In the case of data obtained from a finite element method with automatic mesh refinement much work needs still to be done. This paper addresses some issues in differentiating data obtained from a finite element electromagnetic code with adaptive mesh refinement, and it proposes a methodology for deriving the electric field given the magnetic field on a mesh of linear triangular elements. The procedure itself is nevertheless more general and might be extended for numerically differentiating any point-wise solution based on triangular meshes.

  2. Structural optimization of thin shells using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the present work was the structural optimization of thin shell structures that are subjected to stress and displacement constraints. In order to accomplish this, the structural optimization computer program DESAP1 was modified and improved. In the static analysis part of the DESAP1 computer program the torsional spring elements, which are used to analyze thin, shallow shell structures, were eliminated by modifying the membrane stiffness matrix of the triangular elements in the local coordinate system and adding a fictitious rotational stiffness matrix. This simplified the DESAP1 program input, improved the accuracy of the analysis, and saved computation time. In the optimization part of the DESAP1 program the stress ratio formula, which redesigns the thickness of each finite element of the structure, was solved by an analytical method. This scheme replaced the iterative solution that was previously used in the DESAP1 program, thus increasing the accuracy and speed of the design. The modified program was used to design a thin, cylindrical shell structure with optimum weight, and the results are reported in this paper.

  3. Design and finite element analysis of oval man way

    SciTech Connect

    Hari, Y.; Gryder, B.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents the design of an oval man way in the side wall of a cylindrical pressure vessel. ASME Code Section 8 is used to obtain the design parameters of the oval man way, man way cover and bolts. The code calculations require some assumptions which may not be valid. A typical design example is taken. STAAD III finite element code with plate elements is used to model the oval man way, man way cover and bolts. The stresses calculated using ASME Code Section 8 and other analytical formulas for plate and shells are compared with the stresses obtained by Finite Element Modeling. This paper gives the designer of oval man way the ability to perform a finite element analysis and compare it with the analytical calculations and assumptions made. This gives added confidence to the designer as to the validity of his calculations and assumptions.

  4. A finite element simulation scheme for biological muscular hydrostats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Y; McMeeking, R M; Evans, A G

    2006-09-07

    An explicit finite element scheme is developed for biological muscular hydrostats such as squid tentacles, octopus arms and elephant trunks. The scheme is implemented by embedding muscle fibers in finite elements. In any given element, the fiber orientation can be assigned arbitrarily and multiple muscle directions can be simulated. The mechanical stress in each muscle fiber is the sum of active and passive parts. The active stress is taken to be a function of activation state, muscle fiber shortening velocity and fiber strain; while the passive stress depends only on the strain. This scheme is tested by simulating extension of a squid tentacle during prey capture; our numerical predictions are in close correspondence with existing experimental results. It is shown that the present finite element scheme can successfully simulate more complex behaviors such as torsion of a squid tentacle and the bending behavior of octopus arms or elephant trunks.

  5. User's Guide for ENSAERO_FE Parallel Finite Element Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.; Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1999-01-01

    A high fidelity parallel static structural analysis capability is created and interfaced to the multidisciplinary analysis package ENSAERO-MPI of Ames Research Center. This new module replaces ENSAERO's lower fidelity simple finite element and modal modules. Full aircraft structures may be more accurately modeled using the new finite element capability. Parallel computation is performed by breaking the full structure into multiple substructures. This approach is conceptually similar to ENSAERO's multizonal fluid analysis capability. The new substructure code is used to solve the structural finite element equations for each substructure in parallel. NASTRANKOSMIC is utilized as a front end for this code. Its full library of elements can be used to create an accurate and realistic aircraft model. It is used to create the stiffness matrices for each substructure. The new parallel code then uses an iterative preconditioned conjugate gradient method to solve the global structural equations for the substructure boundary nodes.

  6. Finite element analysis for acoustic characteristics of a magnetostrictive transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Jung, Eunmi

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents a finite element analysis for a magnetostrictive transducer by taking into account the nonlinear behavior of the magnetostrictive material and fluid interaction. A finite element formulation is derived for the coupling of magnetostrictive and elastic materials based upon a separated magnetic and displacement field calculation and a curve fitting technique of material properties. The fluid and structure coupled problem is taken into account based upon pressure and velocity potential fields formulation. Infinite wave envelope elements are introduced at an artificial boundary to deal with the infinite fluid domain. A finite element code for the analysis of a magnetostrictive transducer is developed. A magnetostrictive tonpilz transducer is taken as an example and verification for the developed program is made by comparing with a commercial code. The acoustic characteristics of the magnetostrictive tonpilz transducer are calculated in terms of radiation pattern and transmitted current response.

  7. Solution Techniques in Finite Element Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    7. we show a plane strain rubber block subjected to large deforma- tion. We employ a 4-node element and a Mooney - Rivlin material as described in...0 Rubber Block U: 0.30 Figure 7. Large Deformation Analysis of the R ubber Block with Mooney - Rivlin Material Model. GEOMETRY node iE 10 4 -0.3 1.0 1

  8. A finite element implementation for biphasic contact of hydrated porous media under finite deformation and sliding

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongqiang; Shah, Mitul; Spilker, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    The study of biphasic soft tissues contact is fundamental to understanding the biomechanical behavior of human diarthrodial joints. However, to date, few biphasic finite element contact analysis for 3D physiological geometries under finite deformation has been developed. The objective of this paper is to develop a hyperelastic biphasic contact implementation for finite deformation and sliding problem. An augmented Lagrangian method was used to enforce the continuity of contact traction and fluid pressure across the contact interface. The finite element implementation was based on a general purpose software, COMSOL Multiphysics. The accuracy of the implementation is verified using example problems, for which solutions are available by alternative analyses. The implementation was proven to be robust and able to handle finite deformation and sliding. PMID:24496915

  9. Coupled finite-difference/finite-element approach for wing-body aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru P.

    1992-01-01

    Computational methods using finite-difference approaches for fluids and finite-element approaches for structures have individually advanced to solve almost full-aircraft configurations. However, coupled approaches to solve fluid/structural interaction problems are still in their early stages of development, particularly for complex geometries using complete equations such as the Euler/Navier-Stokes equations. Earlier work demonstrated the success of coupling finite-difference and finite-element methods for simple wing configurations using the Euler/Navier-Stokes equations. In this paper, the same approach is extended for general wing-body configurations. The structural properties are represented by beam-type finite elements. The flow is modeled using the Euler/Navier-Stokes equations. A general procedure to fully couple structural finite-element boundary conditions with fluid finite-difference boundary conditions is developed for wing-body configurations. Computations are made using moving grids that adapt to wing-body structural deformations. Results are illustrated for a typical wing-body configuration.

  10. A software framework for solving bioelectrical field problems based on finite elements.

    PubMed

    Sachse, F B; Cole, M J; Stinstra, J G

    2006-01-01

    Computational modeling and simulation can provide important insights into the electrical and electrophysiological properties of cells, tissues, and organs. Commonly, the modeling is based on Maxwell's and Poisson's equations for electromagnetic and electric fields, respectively, and numerical techniques are applied for field calculation such as the finite element and finite differences methods. Focus of this work are finite element methods, which are based on an element-wise discretization of the spatial domain. These methods can be classified on the element's geometry, e.g. triangles, tetrahedrons and hexahedrons, and the underlying interpolation functions, e.g. polynomials of various order. Aim of this work is to describe finite element-based approaches and their application to extend the problem-solving environment SCIRun/BioPSE. Finite elements of various types were integrated and methods for interpolation and integration were implemented. General methods for creation of finite element system matrices and boundary conditions were incorporated. The extension provides flexible means for geometric modeling, physical simulation, and visualization with particular application in solving bioelectric field problems.

  11. New triangular and quadrilateral plate-bending finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanaswami, R.

    1974-01-01

    A nonconforming plate-bending finite element of triangular shape and associated quadrilateral elements are developed. The transverse displacement is approximated within the element by a quintic polynomial. The formulation takes into account the effects of transverse shear deformation. Results of the static and dynamic analysis of a square plate, with edges simply supported or clamped, are compared with exact solutions. Good accuracy is obtained in all calculations.

  12. Variational formulation of high performance finite elements: Parametrized variational principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felippa, Carlos A.; Militello, Carmello

    1991-01-01

    High performance elements are simple finite elements constructed to deliver engineering accuracy with coarse arbitrary grids. This is part of a series on the variational basis of high-performance elements, with emphasis on those constructed with the free formulation (FF) and assumed natural strain (ANS) methods. Parametrized variational principles that provide a foundation for the FF and ANS methods, as well as for a combination of both are presented.

  13. Determination of acoustic vibration in watermelon by finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourain, Jamal; Ying, Yibin B.; Wang, Jianping; Rao, Xiuqin

    2004-11-01

    The analysis of the vibration responses of a fruit is suggested to measure firmness non-destructively. A wooden ball excited the fruits and the response signals were captured using an accelerometer sensor. The method has been well studied and understood on ellipsoidal shaped fruit (watermelon). In this work, using the finite element simulations, the applicability of the method on watermelon was investigated. The firmness index is dependent on the mass, density, and natural frequency of the lowest spherical modes (under free boundary conditions). This developed index extends the firmness estimation for fruits or vegetables from a spherical to an ellipsoidal shape. The mode of Finite element analysis (FEA) of watermelon was generated based on measured geometry, and it can be served as a theoretical reference for predicting the modal characteristics as a function of design parameters such as material, geometrical, and physical properties. It was found that there were four types of mode shapes. The 1st one was first-type longitudinal mode, the 2nd one was the second-type longitudinal mode, the 3rd one was breathing mode or pure compression mode, and the fourth was flexural or torsional mode shape. As suggested in many references, the First-type spherical vibration mode or oblate-Prolate for watermelon is the lowest bending modes, it's most likely related to fruit firmness. Comparisons of finite element and experimental modal parameters show that both results were agreed in mode shape as well as natural frequencies. In order to measure the vibration signal of the mode, excitation and sensors should be placed on the watermelon surface far away from the nodal lines. The excitation and the response sensors should be in accordance with vibration directions. The correlations between the natural frequency and firmness was 0.856, natural frequency and Young's modulus was 0.800, and the natural frequency and stiffness factor (SF) was 0.862. The stiffness factor (SF) is adequate

  14. Effective Finite Elements for Shell Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-20

    important mode of deformation , and when an element is not capable of representing inextensional bending, parasitic membrane energy is generated in many modes...of deformation . In the same manner that parasitic shear causes shear locking, this spurious membrane energy causes membrane locking. Membrane locking...dominant mode of deformation . (cont.) 20. OISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY OF ABSTRACT 21. ABSTRACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION UNCLASSIFIEO/UNLIMITEO X SAME AS

  15. The Mathematics of Finite Elements and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-30

    suitable geometrical mapping between the parametric u,v-plane and the physical xy- plane. In the u,v-plane the geometry of the elements is linear. In...the plate. For thin plates there may be a boundary layer, the existence and structure of which depends on the boundary conditions, the plate geometry ...exhibits a boundary layer except for very special data or plate geometry . The bending moment tensor and shear force vector have more pronounced boundary

  16. Spectral finite-element methods for parametric constrained optimization problems.

    SciTech Connect

    Anitescu, M.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2009-01-01

    We present a method to approximate the solution mapping of parametric constrained optimization problems. The approximation, which is of the spectral finite element type, is represented as a linear combination of orthogonal polynomials. Its coefficients are determined by solving an appropriate finite-dimensional constrained optimization problem. We show that, under certain conditions, the latter problem is solvable because it is feasible for a sufficiently large degree of the polynomial approximation and has an objective function with bounded level sets. In addition, the solutions of the finite-dimensional problems converge for an increasing degree of the polynomials considered, provided that the solutions exhibit a sufficiently large and uniform degree of smoothness. Our approach solves, in the case of optimization problems with uncertain parameters, the most computationally intensive part of stochastic finite-element approaches. We demonstrate that our framework is applicable to parametric eigenvalue problems.

  17. Vertical discretization with finite elements for a global hydrostatic model on the cubed sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Tae-Hyeong; Park, Ja-Rin

    2017-06-01

    A formulation of Galerkin finite element with basis-spline functions on a hybrid sigma-pressure coordinate is presented to discretize the vertical terms of global Eulerian hydrostatic equations employed in a numerical weather prediction system, which is horizontally discretized with high-order spectral elements on a cubed sphere grid. This replaces the vertical discretization of conventional central finite difference that is first-order accurate in non-uniform grids and causes numerical instability in advection-dominant flows. Therefore, a model remains in the framework of Galerkin finite elements for both the horizontal and vertical spatial terms. The basis-spline functions, obtained from the de-Boor algorithm, are employed to derive both the vertical derivative and integral operators, since Eulerian advection terms are involved. These operators are used to discretize the vertical terms of the prognostic and diagnostic equations. To verify the vertical discretization schemes and compare their performance, various two- and three-dimensional idealized cases and a hindcast case with full physics are performed in terms of accuracy and stability. It was shown that the vertical finite element with the cubic basis-spline function is more accurate and stable than that of the vertical finite difference, as indicated by faster residual convergence, fewer statistical errors, and reduction in computational mode. This leads to the general conclusion that the overall performance of a global hydrostatic model might be significantly improved with the vertical finite element.

  18. 3D Finite Element Meshing of Stromboli and Mount Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianetti, S.; Casarotti, E.; Giunchi, C.

    2008-12-01

    The development of monitoring networks both at Mount Etna and Stromboli provided a fairly detailed database of geodetic and seismological observations during the unrest and eruptive/explosive phases of the last few years. These data reveal a tight interaction between magmatic and seismic activities. Their interpretation requires a new generation of numerical models of the volcanic edifices, based on the finite element method and characterized by realistic topography, anelastic rheology, internal discontinuities and lateral variations of mechanical parameters. We focus on the problem to make a flawless spatial discretization, which is an essential step for an accurate finite element simulation. If 3D unstructured tetrahedral meshes can be achieved quite easily with commercial or non-commercial algorithms, the creation of 3D non-structured hexahedral meshes is still recognized as a challenging issue. For complex models, as in the case of realistic geological volumes, generating a hexahedral mesh with the available meshing algorithms can require weeks or even months. Nevertheless, all-hexahedral meshes are still eagerly requested and, in some cases, preferred to all-tetrahedral ones, mainly because of the superior numerical accuracy and stability, but also for the lower computational cost. Taking advantage of CUBIT (www.cubit.sandia.gov) and of the expertise acquired in the meshing process for seismological problem, we present the mesh of the two most active italian volcanoes: Stromboli and Mount Etna. The grids are based upon updated and detailed digital elevation models with a resolution of tenth of meters in the zones where the most significant deformations are observed and include the major structural discontinuities. An unstructured scheme is implemented in order to obtain a lower resolution away from the volcano summit.

  19. Finite element analysis of osteoporosis models based on synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Xu, J.; Zhao, J.; Sun, J.

    2016-04-01

    With growing pressure of social aging, China has to face the increasing population of osteoporosis patients as well as the whole world. Recently synchrotron radiation has become an essential tool for biomedical exploration with advantage of high resolution and high stability. In order to study characteristic changes in different stages of primary osteoporosis, this research focused on the different periods of osteoporosis of rats based on synchrotron radiation. Both bone histomorphometry analysis and finite element analysis were then carried on according to the reconstructed three dimensional models. Finally, the changes of bone tissue in different periods were compared quantitatively. Histomorphometry analysis showed that the structure of the trabecular in osteoporosis degraded as the bone volume decreased. For femurs, the bone volume fraction (Bone volume/ Total volume, BV/TV) decreased from 69% to 43%. That led to the increase of the thickness of trabecular separation (from 45.05μ m to 97.09μ m) and the reduction of the number of trabecular (from 7.99 mm-1 to 5.97mm-1). Simulation of various mechanical tests with finite element analysis (FEA) indicated that, with the exacerbation of osteoporosis, the bones' ability of resistance to compression, bending and torsion gradually became weaker. The compression stiffness of femurs decreased from 1770.96 Fμ m-1 to 697.41 Fμ m-1, the bending and torsion stiffness were from 1390.80 Fμ m-1 to 566.11 Fμ m-1 and from 2957.28N.m/o to 691.31 N.m/o respectively, indicated the decrease of bone strength, and it matched the histomorphometry analysis. This study suggested that FEA and synchrotron radiation were excellent methods for analysing bone strength conbined with histomorphometry analysis.

  20. The Constraint Method for Solid Finite Elements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-30

    Sciences 13 . NUMBER S Bolling Air Force Base, DC 20332 - -Jfi’ 14. MONITORING AGENCY NAME & ADDRESS(if different from Controlling Office) IS. SECURITY CVASS...1- 4)Q2 (n) (’+C) Higher degree elements add edge modes, face modes and internal modes. More details are given in [12, 13 ]. triangular prism A...23) N2 (L2 , L3)(l-z) edge u (31) N2 (L3 ’ L)(1-z) nodes s u s (45). N2 (L1, L2 )z uso (56) N2 (L2, L3 )z K - 13 - nodal variable shape function u

  1. Numerical approximation of head and flux covariances in three dimensions using mixed finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Andrew I.; Graham, Wendy D.

    A numerical method is developed for accurately approximating head and flux covariances and cross-covariances in finite two- and three-dimensional domains using the mixed finite element method. The method is useful for determining head and flux covariances for non-stationary flow fields, for example those induced by injection or extraction wells, impermeable subsurface barriers, or non-stationary hydraulic conductivity fields. Because the numerical approximations to the flux covariances are obtained directly from the solution to the coupled problem rather than having to differentiate head covariances, the approximations are in general more accurate than those obtained from conventional finite difference or finite element methods. Results for uniform flow example problems are consistent with results from previously published finite domain analyses and demonstrate that head variances and covariances are quite sensitive to boundary conditions and the size of the bounded domain. Flux variances and covariances are less sensitive to boundary conditions and domain size. Results comparing approximations from lower-order Raviart-Thomas-Nedelec and higher order Brezzi-Douglas-Marini [9] finite element spaces indicate that higher order element space improve the estimate of the flux covariances, but do not significantly affect the estimate of the head covariances.

  2. A time domain vector finite element method for the full wave simulation of nonlinear photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Aaron C.

    We have developed a mixed Vector Finite Element Method (VFEM) for Maxwell's equations with third order polarization terms. The method allows for discretization of complicated device geometries with arbitrary order representations of the B and E fields, and up to 4th order accurate time discretization. Additionally we have implemented a series of computational optimizations that significantly increase the scale of simulations that can be performed with this method. Among these optimizations is a new generalized mass lumping method that we developed which reduces the computational cost of the finite element system solve by a factor of 10x. In this dissertation we will present the Vector Finite Element Method, and the computational optimizations that we employed. Additionally, we will present a series of analyses and simulations that were performed to validate the method. Finally, we will present some production runs using this method, including nonlinear mode mixing in waveguides and supercontinuum generation in a photonic crystal fiber.

  3. Hybrid finite element-finite difference method for thermal analysis of blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, C H; Gutierrez, G; White, J A; Roemer, R B

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid finite-difference/finite-element technique for the thermal analysis of blood vessels embedded in perfused tissue has been developed and evaluated. This method provides efficient and accurate solutions to the conjugated heat transfer problem of convection by blood coupled to conduction in the tissue. The technique uses a previously developed 3D automatic meshing method for creating a finite element mesh in the tissue surrounding the vessels, coupled iteratively with a 1-D marching finite difference method for the interior of the vessels. This hybrid technique retains the flexibility and ease of automated finite-element meshing techniques for modelling the complex geometry of blood vessels and irregularly shaped tissues, and speeds the solution time by using a simple finite-difference method to calculate the bulk mean temperatures within all blood vessels. The use of the 1D finite-difference technique in the blood vessels also eliminates the large computer memory requirements needed to accurately solve large vessel network problems when fine FE meshes are used in the interior of vessels. The accuracy of the hybrid technique has been verified against previously verified numerical solutions. In summary, the hybrid technique combines the accuracy and flexibility found in automated finite-element techniques, with the speed and reduction of computational memory requirements associated with the 1D finite-difference technique, something which has not been done before. This method, thus, has the potential to provide accurate, flexible and relatively fast solutions for the thermal analysis of coupled perfusion/blood vessel problems, and large vessel network problems.

  4. Optimal mapping of irregular finite element domains to parallel processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, J.; Otto, S.; Salama, M.

    1987-01-01

    Mapping the solution domain of n-finite elements into N-subdomains that may be processed in parallel by N-processors is an optimal one if the subdomain decomposition results in a well-balanced workload distribution among the processors. The problem is discussed in the context of irregular finite element domains as an important aspect of the efficient utilization of the capabilities of emerging multiprocessor computers. Finding the optimal mapping is an intractable combinatorial optimization problem, for which a satisfactory approximate solution is obtained here by analogy to a method used in statistical mechanics for simulating the annealing process in solids. The simulated annealing analogy and algorithm are described, and numerical results are given for mapping an irregular two-dimensional finite element domain containing a singularity onto the Hypercube computer.

  5. Finite element methods for nonlinear acoustics in fluids.

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Timothy Francis

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, weak formulations and finite element discretizations of the governing partial differential equations of three-dimensional nonlinear acoustics in absorbing fluids are presented. The fluid equations are considered in an Eulerian framework, rather than a displacement framework, since in the latter case the corresponding finite element formulations suffer from spurious modes and numerical instabilities. When taken with the governing partial differential equations of a solid body and the continuity conditions, a coupled formulation is derived. The change in solid/fluid interface conditions when going from a linear acoustic fluid to a nonlinear acoustic fluid is demonstrated. Finite element discretizations of the coupled problem are then derived, and verification examples are presented that demonstrate the correctness of the implementations. We demonstrate that the time step size necessary to resolve the wave decreases as steepening occurs. Finally, simulation results are presented on a resonating acoustic cavity, and a coupled elastic/acoustic system consisting of a fluid-filled spherical tank.

  6. Finite element methods on supercomputers - The scatter-problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehner, R.; Morgan, K.

    1985-01-01

    Certain problems arise in connection with the use of supercomputers for the implementation of finite-element methods. These problems are related to the desirability of utilizing the power of the supercomputer as fully as possible for the rapid execution of the required computations, taking into account the gain in speed possible with the aid of pipelining operations. For the finite-element method, the time-consuming operations may be divided into three categories. The first two present no problems, while the third type of operation can be a reason for the inefficient performance of finite-element programs. Two possibilities for overcoming certain difficulties are proposed, giving attention to a scatter-process.

  7. Finite element method for eigenvalue problems in electromagnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, Fred B.

    1994-01-01

    Finite element method (FEM) has been a very powerful tool to solve many complex problems in electromagnetics. The goal of the current research at the Langley Research Center is to develop a combined FEM/method of moments approach to three-dimensional scattering/radiation problem for objects with arbitrary shape and filled with complex materials. As a first step toward that goal, an exercise is taken to establish the power of FEM, through closed boundary problems. This paper demonstrates the developed of FEM tools for two- and three-dimensional eigenvalue problems in electromagnetics. In section 2, both the scalar and vector finite elements have been used for various waveguide problems to demonstrate the flexibility of FEM. In section 3, vector finite element method has been extended to three-dimensional eigenvalue problems.

  8. Probabilistic finite elements for transient analysis in nonlinear continua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. K.; Belytschko, T.; Mani, A.

    1985-01-01

    The probabilistic finite element method (PFEM), which is a combination of finite element methods and second-moment analysis, is formulated for linear and nonlinear continua with inhomogeneous random fields. Analogous to the discretization of the displacement field in finite element methods, the random field is also discretized. The formulation is simplified by transforming the correlated variables to a set of uncorrelated variables through an eigenvalue orthogonalization. Furthermore, it is shown that a reduced set of the uncorrelated variables is sufficient for the second-moment analysis. Based on the linear formulation of the PFEM, the method is then extended to transient analysis in nonlinear continua. The accuracy and efficiency of the method is demonstrated by application to a one-dimensional, elastic/plastic wave propagation problem. The moments calculated compare favorably with those obtained by Monte Carlo simulation. Also, the procedure is amenable to implementation in deterministic FEM based computer programs.

  9. Optimal mapping of irregular finite element domains to parallel processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, J.; Otto, S.; Salama, M.

    1987-01-01

    Mapping the solution domain of n-finite elements into N-subdomains that may be processed in parallel by N-processors is an optimal one if the subdomain decomposition results in a well-balanced workload distribution among the processors. The problem is discussed in the context of irregular finite element domains as an important aspect of the efficient utilization of the capabilities of emerging multiprocessor computers. Finding the optimal mapping is an intractable combinatorial optimization problem, for which a satisfactory approximate solution is obtained here by analogy to a method used in statistical mechanics for simulating the annealing process in solids. The simulated annealing analogy and algorithm are described, and numerical results are given for mapping an irregular two-dimensional finite element domain containing a singularity onto the Hypercube computer.

  10. Finite element method for non-linear dispersive wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jung-Yu; Kawahara, Mutsuto

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the finite element method for the analysis of the short wave problem expressed by the Boussinesq equation. The Boussinesq equation considers the effect of wave crest curvature. The standard Galerkin finite element method is employed for the spatial discretization using the triangular finite element based on the linear interpolation function. The combination of the explicit and the quasi-explicit schemes-- i.e., the explicit scheme for the continuum equation and the quasi-explicit scheme for the momentum equation--is employed for the discretization in time. To show the applicability of the present method to the practical problem, the simulation of wave propagation in one-dimensional and two-dimensional channel flows is carried out. The numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental results being. The practical example for Miyako Bay is presented.

  11. Finite element and analytical stress analysis of a solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, R.; Marquis, A. J.; Brandon, N. P.

    2012-07-01

    An analytical and finite element model of a single, anode supported solid oxide fuel cell has been developed in order to predict the stress in ceramic components subjected to an idealised operating duty cycle representing cooling from sintering, warming to a uniform temperature of 800 °C where anode chemical reduction takes place, operation at low, medium and high power and finally cooling to room temperature. An Abaqus™ finite element model used the temperature distribution predicted by a computational fluid dynamics model at low, medium and high power to solve for the stress distribution throughout the duty cycle. The finite element model included the effects of thermal expansion, residual stress from manufacture, material properties changes due to chemical reduction of the anode and visco-plastic creep. The level of stress relaxation predicted by the finite element model is significant at SOFC operating temperatures and timescales of several thousand hours. An analytical model of the stress distribution in thin multilayer plates where the layers have different coefficients of thermal expansion was developed to cross check the finite element model. In the analytical model the multilayer plate is either free to bend or constrained to remain flat. The maximum principal stresses predicted by the analytical and finite element models were found to agree to within 4%.

  12. A study of frictional property of the human fingertip using three-dimensional finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Tada, Mitsunori; Mochimaru, Masaaki

    2011-03-01

    Since the tactile perception detects skin deformation due to the contact of an object, it is important to understand contact mechanics, especially, frictional behavior of the human fingertip. The coefficient of friction is recently modeled as a function of the applied normal load in which case the traditional Coulomb's law does not provide a description for the skin surface. When a surface is a rubber-like material, the frictional behavior follows the frictional law of the rubber-like material. Therefore, we developed a three-dimensional Finite Element model of the fingertip and analyzed frictional behavior based on the frictional law of rubber-like material. We proposed a combined technique using both experimental and Finite Element analyses in order to investigate the frictional property of the fingertip. A three-dimensional Finite Element model of the fingertip was developed using MRI images. We hypothesized a frictional equation of the critical shear stress. Squared differences between equivalent coefficient of friction of the FE analysis and the coefficient of kinetic friction of the experiment while sliding was decreased and the Finite Element analysis iterated until the error was minimized, and thus the frictional equation was determined. We obtained the equation of the critical shear stress and simulated kinetic friction of the fingertip while sliding under arbitrary normal loading condition by using the Finite Element analysis. We think this study is an appropriate method for understanding the frictional property of the human fingertip using the Finite Element analysis.

  13. Life assessment of structural components using inelastic finite element analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Halford, Gary R.

    1993-10-01

    The need for enhanced and improved performance of structural components subject to severe cyclic thermal/mechanical loadings, such as in the aerospace industry, requires development of appropriate solution technologies involving time-dependent inelastic analyses. Such analyses are mandatory to predict local stress-strain response and to assess more accurately the cyclic life time of structural components. The NASA-Lewis Research Center is cognizant of this need. As a result of concerted efforts at Lewis during the last few years, several such finite element solution technologies (in conjunction with the finite element program MARC) were developed and successfully applied to numerous uniaxial and multiaxial problems. These solution technologies, although developed for use with MARC program, are general in nature and can easily be extended for adaptation with other finite element programs such as ABAQUS, ANSYS, etc. The description and results obtained from two such inelastic finite element solution technologies are presented. The first employs a classical (non-unified) creep-plasticity model. An application of this technology is presented for a hypersonic inlet cowl-lip problem. The second of these technologies uses a unified creep-plasticity model put forth by Freed. The structural component for which this finite element solution technology is illustrated, is a cylindrical rocket engine thrust chamber. The advantages of employing a viscoplastic model for nonlinear time-dependent structural analyses are demonstrated. The life analyses for cowl-lip and cylindrical thrust chambers are presented. These analyses are conducted by using the stress-strain response of these components obtained from the corresponding finite element analyses.

  14. Life assessment of structural components using inelastic finite element analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Halford, Gary R.

    1993-01-01

    The need for enhanced and improved performance of structural components subject to severe cyclic thermal/mechanical loadings, such as in the aerospace industry, requires development of appropriate solution technologies involving time-dependent inelastic analyses. Such analyses are mandatory to predict local stress-strain response and to assess more accurately the cyclic life time of structural components. The NASA-Lewis Research Center is cognizant of this need. As a result of concerted efforts at Lewis during the last few years, several such finite element solution technologies (in conjunction with the finite element program MARC) were developed and successfully applied to numerous uniaxial and multiaxial problems. These solution technologies, although developed for use with MARC program, are general in nature and can easily be extended for adaptation with other finite element programs such as ABAQUS, ANSYS, etc. The description and results obtained from two such inelastic finite element solution technologies are presented. The first employs a classical (non-unified) creep-plasticity model. An application of this technology is presented for a hypersonic inlet cowl-lip problem. The second of these technologies uses a unified creep-plasticity model put forth by Freed. The structural component for which this finite element solution technology is illustrated, is a cylindrical rocket engine thrust chamber. The advantages of employing a viscoplastic model for nonlinear time-dependent structural analyses are demonstrated. The life analyses for cowl-lip and cylindrical thrust chambers are presented. These analyses are conducted by using the stress-strain response of these components obtained from the corresponding finite element analyses.

  15. Constitutive model of brain tissue suitable for finite element analysis of surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Miller, K

    1999-05-01

    Realistic finite element modelling and simulation of neurosurgical procedures present a formidable challenge. Appropriate, finite deformation, constitutive model of brain tissue is a prerequisite for such development. In this paper, a large deformation, linear, viscoelastic model, suitable for direct use with commercially available finite element software packages such as ABAQUS is constructed. The proposed constitutive equation is of polynomial form with time-dependent coefficients. The model requires four material constants to be identified. The material constants were evaluated based on unconfined compression experiment results. The analytical as well as numerical solutions to the unconfined compression problem are presented. The agreement between the proposed theoretical model and the experiment is good for compression levels reaching 30% and for loading velocities varying over five orders of magnitude. The numerical solution using the finite element method matched the analytical solution very closely.

  16. A robust finite element method for nonhomogeneous Dirichlet problems in domains with curved boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; King, J.T.

    1994-07-01

    In this paper the authors consider a simple finite element method on an approximately polygonal domain using linear elements. The Dirichlet data are transferred in a natural way and the resulting linear system can be solved using multigrid techniques. Their analysis takes into account the change in domain and data transfer, and optimal-error estimates are obtained that are robust in the regularity of the boundary data provided they are at least square integrable. It is proved that the natural extension of this finite element approximation to the original domain is optimal-order accurate.

  17. Finite-element analysis of nonlinear conduction problems subject to moving fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, J.

    1980-01-01

    Through the use of a space-time warp, specialized moving finite elements are developed that can be employed to generate a nonlinear heat conduction model for situations involving traveling boundary and heat generation fields superposed on an initial state. To facilitate the solution of the resulting nonlinear finite-element formulation, a multilevel heuristic iterative solution strategy is developed. In order to demonstrate the versatility and accuracy of the moving elements and their associated nonlinear solution strategy, the results of several numerical experiments are presented.

  18. A simple finite element method for non-divergence form elliptic equation

    DOE PAGES

    Mu, Lin; Ye, Xiu

    2017-03-01

    Here, we develop a simple finite element method for solving second order elliptic equations in non-divergence form by combining least squares concept with discontinuous approximations. This simple method has a symmetric and positive definite system and can be easily analyzed and implemented. We could have also used general meshes with polytopal element and hanging node in the method. We prove that our finite element solution approaches to the true solution when the mesh size approaches to zero. Numerical examples are tested that demonstrate the robustness and flexibility of the method.

  19. Convergence rates for finite element problems with singularities. Part 1: Antiplane shear. [crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plunkett, R.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of a finite crack in an infinite medium under antiplane shear load is considered. It is shown that the nodal forces at the tip of the crack accurately gives the order of singularity, that n energy release methods can give the strength to better than 1 percent with element size 1/10 the crack length, and that nodal forces give a much better estimate of the stress field than do the elements themselves. The finite element formulation and the factoring of tridiagonal matrices are discussed.

  20. Finite Element Modelling and Analysis of Conventional Pultrusion Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishin, P.; Barkanov, E.; Bondarchuk, A.

    2015-11-01

    Pultrusion is one of many composite manufacturing techniques and one of the most efficient methods for producing fiber reinforced polymer composite parts with a constant cross-section. Numerical simulation is helpful for understanding the manufacturing process and developing scientific means for the pultrusion tooling design. Numerical technique based on the finite element method has been developed for the simulation of pultrusion processes. It uses the general purpose finite element software ANSYS Mechanical. It is shown that the developed technique predicts the temperature and cure profiles, which are in good agreement with those published in the open literature.

  1. Predicting Rediated Noise With Power Flow Finite Element Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    Defence R&D Canada – Atlantic DEFENCE DÉFENSE & Predicting Rediated Noise With Power Flow Finite Element Analysis D. Brennan T.S. Koko L. Jiang J...PREDICTING RADIATED NOISE WITH POWER FLOW FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS D.P. Brennan T.S. Koko L. Jiang J.C. Wallace Martec Limited Martec Limited...model- or full-scale data before it is available for general use. Brennan, D.P., Koko , T.S., Jiang, L., Wallace, J.C. 2007. Predicting Radiated

  2. Correlation of composite material test results with finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guƫu, M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper are presented some aspects regarding the method of simulation of composite materials testing with finite element analysis software. There were simulated tensile and shear tests of specimens manufactured from glass fiber reinforced polyester. For specimens manufacturing two types of fabrics were used: unidirectional and bidirectional. Experimentally determined elastic properties of composite material were used as input data. Modeling of composite architecture of the specimens was performed with ANSYS Composite PrepPost software. Finite element analysis stresses and strains on strain gauges bonding area were considered and compared with the real values in a diagram. After results comparison, potential causes of deviations were identified.

  3. Finite element models of the space shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    Finite element models were developed as input to dynamic simulations of the high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP), the high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP), and the space shuttle main engine (SSME). Descriptions are provided for the five basic finite element models: HPFTP rotor, HPFTP case, HPOTP rotor, HPOTP case, and SSME (excluding turbopumps). Modal results are presented for the HPFTP rotor, HPFTP case, HPOTP rotor, coupled HPFTP rotor and case, HPOTP case, coupled HPOTP rotor and case, SSME (excluding turbopumps), and SSME (including turbopumps). Results for the SSME (including turbopumps) model are compared to data from a SSME HPOTP modal survey.

  4. Fourier analysis of finite element preconditioned collocation schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deville, Michel O.; Mund, Ernest H.

    1990-01-01

    The spectrum of the iteration operator of some finite element preconditioned Fourier collocation schemes is investigated. The first part of the paper analyses one-dimensional elliptic and hyperbolic model problems and the advection-diffusion equation. Analytical expressions of the eigenvalues are obtained with use of symbolic computation. The second part of the paper considers the set of one-dimensional differential equations resulting from Fourier analysis (in the tranverse direction) of the 2-D Stokes problem. All results agree with previous conclusions on the numerical efficiency of finite element preconditioning schemes.

  5. Development of non-linear finite element computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, E. B.; Miller, T.

    1985-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the use of separable symmetric functions of the principal stretches can adequately describe the response of certain propellant materials and, further, that a data reduction scheme gives a convenient way of obtaining the values of the functions from experimental data. Based on representation of the energy, a computational scheme was developed that allows finite element analysis of boundary value problems of arbitrary shape and loading. The computational procedure was implemental in a three-dimensional finite element code, TEXLESP-S, which is documented herein.

  6. Finite element methods for nonlinear elastostatic problems in rubber elasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Becker, E. B.; Miller, T. H.; Endo, T.; Pires, E. B.

    1983-01-01

    A number of finite element methods for the analysis of nonlinear problems in rubber elasticity are outlined. Several different finite element schemes are discussed. These include the augmented Lagrangian method, continuation or incremental loading methods, and associated Riks-type methods which have the capability of incorporating limit point behavior and bifurcations. Algorithms for the analysis of limit point behavior and bifurcations are described and the results of several numerical experiments are presented. In addition, a brief survey of some recent work on modelling contact and friction in elasticity problems is given. These results pertain to the use of new nonlocal and nonlinear friction laws.

  7. Engineering and Design: Geotechnical Analysis by the Finite Element Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    used it to determine stresses and movements in embank- ments, and Reyes and Deer described its application to analysis of underground openings in rock...36 Hughes, T. J. R. (1987). The Finite Element Reyes , S. F., and Deene, D. K. (1966). “Elastic Method, Linear Static and Dynamic Finite Element...SM4), 1,435-1,457. Fernando Dams During the Earthquakes of February Davis, E. H., and Poulos, H. G. (1972). “Rate of Report EERC-73-2, Berkeley, CA

  8. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, N. A. S.; Rokosz, M. K.; Correia, T. M.

    2014-07-01

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  9. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods for gradient plasticity.

    SciTech Connect

    Garikipati, Krishna.; Ostien, Jakob T.

    2010-10-01

    In this report we apply discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods to the equations of an incompatibility based formulation of gradient plasticity. The presentation is motivated with a brief overview of the description of dislocations within a crystal lattice. A tensor representing a measure of the incompatibility with the lattice is used in the formulation of a gradient plasticity model. This model is cast in a variational formulation, and discontinuous Galerkin machinery is employed to implement the formulation into a finite element code. Finally numerical examples of the model are shown.

  10. Verification of a Finite Element Model for Pyrolyzing Ablative Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risch, Timothy K.

    2017-01-01

    Ablating thermal protection system (TPS) materials have been used in many reentering spacecraft and in other applications such as rocket nozzle linings, fire protection materials, and as countermeasures for directed energy weapons. The introduction of the finite element model to the analysis of ablation has arguably resulted in improved computational capabilities due the flexibility and extended applicability of the method, especially to complex geometries. Commercial finite element codes often provide enhanced capability compared to custom, specially written programs based on versatility, usability, pre- and post-processing, grid generation, total life-cycle costs, and speed.

  11. Error analysis of finite element solutions for postbuckled plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sistla, Rajaram; Thurston, Gaylen A.

    1988-01-01

    An error analysis of results from finite-element solutions of problems in shell structures is further developed, incorporating the results of an additional numerical analysis by which oscillatory behavior is eliminated. The theory is extended to plates with initial geometric imperfections, and this novel analysis is programmed as a postprocessor for a general-purpose finite-element code. Numerical results are given for the case of a stiffened panel in compression and a plate loaded in shear by a 'picture-frame' test fixture.

  12. Differentiating a Finite Element Biodegradation Simulation Model for Optimal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsker, Barbara S.; Shoemaker, Christine A.

    1996-01-01

    An optimal control model for improving the design of in situ bioremediation of groundwater has been developed. The model uses a finite element biodegradation simulation model called Bio2D to find optimal pumping strategies. Analytical derivatives of the bioremediation finite element model are derived; these derivatives must be computed for the optimal control algorithm. The derivatives are complex and nonlinear; the bulk of the computational effort in solving the optimal control problem is required to calculate the derivatives. An overview of the optimal control and simulation model formulations is also given.

  13. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, N. A. S. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk Correia, T. M. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk; Rokosz, M. K. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk

    2014-07-28

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  14. Analysis of the Performance of Mixed Finite Element Methods.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    October 1986 SUMMARY The initial goal of this project is to analyze various mixed methods based on the p- and h-p versions of the finite element methods...The convergence of mixed methods depends on two factors: (1) Approximability of polynomial spaces used (2) Stability. In the past year, the question...significant portion of the research is geared towards the investigation of mixed methods based on the ’p’ and ’h-p’ versions of the finite element method

  15. Chemically pre-strained dielectric elastomers finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, Brittany; Krutz, Gary; Stewart, Frank; Pascal, Kevin

    2017-04-01

    The applications and feasibility of utilizing dielectric elastomer electroactive polymers in the industrial and medical sectors has drastically increased in recent years due to significant improvements in actuation potential, manufacturing, the introduction of new materials and modeling capabilities. One such development is the introduction of chemical pre-strain as a method of providing enhanced actuation. The purpose of this study was to utilize finite element analysis to analyze the mechanical actuation of an industrial fluoropolymer with chemical induced pre-strain and validate the model with experiential results. Results generated from the finite element analysis showed similar trends to results produced experimentally.

  16. Convergence of finite element approximations of large eddy motion.

    SciTech Connect

    Iliescu, T.; John, V.; Layton, W. J.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Otto-von-Guericke Univ.; Univ. of Pittsburgh

    2002-11-01

    This report considers 'numerical errors' in LES. Specifically, for one family of space filtered flow models, we show convergence of the finite element approximation of the model and give an estimate of the error. Keywords: Navier Stokes equations, large eddy simulation, finite element method I. INTRODUCTION Consider the (turbulent) flow of an incompressible fluid. One promising and common approach to the simulation of the motion of the large fluid structures is Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Various models are used in LES; a common one is to find (w, q), where w : {Omega}

  17. Using Finite-Element Analysis In Estimating Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; August, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Method of estimating design survivability of structural component incorporates finite-element and probabilistic properties of materials. Involves evaluation of design parameters through direct comparisons of survivability of component expressed in terms of percentages of like components that survive at various lifetimes. Probabilistic properties of materials, given in terms of Weibull parameters, coupled with stress field computed by finite-element analysis to determine fatigue life based on initiation of cracks. Method applied to rotating disk containing bolt holes, representative of disks used in aerospace propulsion turbines. Also used in early stages of design process to optimize life-based designs, reducing testing of full-sized components needed to validate designs.

  18. Robust Hybrid Finite Element Methods for Antennas and Microwave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, J.; Volakis, John L.

    1996-01-01

    One of the primary goals in this dissertation is concerned with the development of robust hybrid finite element-boundary integral (FE-BI) techniques for modeling and design of conformal antennas of arbitrary shape. Both the finite element and integral equation methods will be first overviewed in this chapter with an emphasis on recently developed hybrid FE-BI methodologies for antennas, microwave and millimeter wave applications. The structure of the dissertation is then outlined. We conclude the chapter with discussions of certain fundamental concepts and methods in electromagnetics, which are important to this study.

  19. Diffusive mesh relaxation in ALE finite element numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, E.I.

    1996-06-01

    The theory for a diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is developed for use in three-dimensional Arbitary Lagrange/Eulerian (ALE) finite element simulation techniques. This mesh relaxer is derived by a variational principle for an unstructured 3D grid using finite elements, and incorporates hourglass controls in the numerical implementation. The diffusive coefficients are based on the geometric properties of the existing mesh, and are chosen so as to allow for a smooth grid that retains the general shape of the original mesh. The diffusive mesh relaxation algorithm is then applied to an ALE code system, and results from several test cases are discussed.

  20. Supercomputer implementation of finite element algorithms for high speed compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1986-01-01

    Prediction of compressible flow phenomena using the finite element method is of recent origin and considerable interest. Two shock capturing finite element formulations for high speed compressible flows are described. A Taylor-Galerkin formulation uses a Taylor series expansion in time coupled with a Galerkin weighted residual statement. The Taylor-Galerkin algorithms use explicit artificial dissipation, and the performance of three dissipation models are compared. A Petrov-Galerkin algorithm has as its basis the concepts of streamline upwinding. Vectorization strategies are developed to implement the finite element formulations on the NASA Langley VPS-32. The vectorization scheme results in finite element programs that use vectors of length of the order of the number of nodes or elements. The use of the vectorization procedure speeds up processing rates by over two orders of magnitude. The Taylor-Galerkin and Petrov-Galerkin algorithms are evaluated for 2D inviscid flows on criteria such as solution accuracy, shock resolution, computational speed and storage requirements. The convergence rates for both algorithms are enhanced by local time-stepping schemes. Extension of the vectorization procedure for predicting 2D viscous and 3D inviscid flows are demonstrated. Conclusions are drawn regarding the applicability of the finite element procedures for realistic problems that require hundreds of thousands of nodes.

  1. Crystallographic effects during micromachining — A finite-element model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shin-Hyung; Choi, Woo Chun

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical micromachining is a powerful and effective way for manufacturing small sized machine parts. Even though the micromachining process is similar to the traditional machining, the material behavior during the process is much different. In particular, many researchers report that the basic mechanics of the work material is affected by microstructures and their crystallographic orientations. For example, crystallographic orientations of the work material have significant influence on force response, chip formation and surface finish. In order to thoroughly understand the effect of crystallographic orientations on the micromachining process, finite-element model (FEM) simulating orthogonal cutting process of single crystallographic material was presented. For modeling the work material, rate sensitive single crystal plasticity of face-centered cubic (FCC) crystal was implemented. For the chip formation during the simulation, element deletion technique was used. The simulation model is developed using ABAQUS/explicit with user material subroutine via user material subroutine (VUMAT). Simulations showed that variation of the specific cutting energy at different crystallographic orientations of work material shows significant anisotropy. The developed FEM model can be a useful prediction tool of micromachining of crystalline materials.

  2. Survey and development of finite elements for nonlinear structural analysis. Volume 1: Handbook for nonlinear finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A survey of research efforts in the area of geometrically nonlinear finite elements is presented. The survey is intended to serve as a guide in the choice of nonlinear elements for specific problems, and as background to provide directions for new element developments. The elements are presented in a handbook format and are separated by type as beams, plates (or shallow shells), shells, and other elements. Within a given type, the elements are identified by the assumed displacement shapes and the forms of the nonlinear strain equations. Solution procedures are not discussed except when a particular element formulation poses special problems or capabilities in this regard. The main goal of the format is to provide quick access to a wide variety of element types, in a consistent presentation format, and to facilitate comparison and evaluation of different elements with regard to features, probable accuracy, and complexity.

  3. Finite Element Model Development and Validation for Aircraft Fuselage Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Fleming, Gary A.; Pappa, Richard S.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2000-01-01

    The ability to extend the valid frequency range for finite element based structural dynamic predictions using detailed models of the structural components and attachment interfaces is examined for several stiffened aircraft fuselage structures. This extended dynamic prediction capability is needed for the integration of mid-frequency noise control technology. Beam, plate and solid element models of the stiffener components are evaluated. Attachment models between the stiffener and panel skin range from a line along the rivets of the physical structure to a constraint over the entire contact surface. The finite element models are validated using experimental modal analysis results. The increased frequency range results in a corresponding increase in the number of modes, modal density and spatial resolution requirements. In this study, conventional modal tests using accelerometers are complemented with Scanning Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Electro-Optic Holography measurements to further resolve the spatial response characteristics. Whenever possible, component and subassembly modal tests are used to validate the finite element models at lower levels of assembly. Normal mode predictions for different finite element representations of components and assemblies are compared with experimental results to assess the most accurate techniques for modeling aircraft fuselage type structures.

  4. Rapid mesh generation for finite element analysis of investment castings

    SciTech Connect

    Lober, R.R.; Bohnhoff, W.J.; Meyers, R.J.

    1992-11-01

    FASTCAST is a Sandia National Laboratories program to produce investment cast prototypical hardware faster by integrating experimental and computational technologies into the casting process. FASTCAST uses the finite element method to characterize the metal flow and solidification processes to reduce uncertainty in the mold design. For the casting process to benefit from finite element analysis, analysis results must be available in a very short time frame. By focusing on the bottleneck of finite element model creation, automated mesh generation can drastically reduce the time span between geometry definition (design) and accurate analysis results. The increased availability of analysis results will diminish the need for trial and error approaches to acquiring production worthy mold and gating systems for investment casting. The CUBIT meshing tool kit is being developed to address the need for rapid mesh generation. CUBIT is being designed to effectively automate the generation of quadrilateral and hexahedral elements. It is a solid-modeler based, two- and three-dimensional preprocessor that prepares solid models for finite element analysis. CUBIT contains several meshing algorithms including two- and three-dimensional mapping, two- and three-dimensional paving (patented), and a general two and one-half dimensional sweeper based upon the plastering algorithm. This paper describes progress in the development of the CUBIT meshing toolkit.

  5. Rapid mesh generation for finite element analysis of investment castings

    SciTech Connect

    Lober, R.R.; Bohnhoff, W.J.; Meyers, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    FASTCAST is a Sandia National Laboratories program to produce investment cast prototypical hardware faster by integrating experimental and computational technologies into the casting process. FASTCAST uses the finite element method to characterize the metal flow and solidification processes to reduce uncertainty in the mold design. For the casting process to benefit from finite element analysis, analysis results must be available in a very short time frame. By focusing on the bottleneck of finite element model creation, automated mesh generation can drastically reduce the time span between geometry definition (design) and accurate analysis results. The increased availability of analysis results will diminish the need for trial and error approaches to acquiring production worthy mold and gating systems for investment casting. The CUBIT meshing tool kit is being developed to address the need for rapid mesh generation. CUBIT is being designed to effectively automate the generation of quadrilateral and hexahedral elements. It is a solid-modeler based, two- and three-dimensional preprocessor that prepares solid models for finite element analysis. CUBIT contains several meshing algorithms including two- and three-dimensional mapping, two- and three-dimensional paving (patented), and a general two and one-half dimensional sweeper based upon the plastering algorithm. This paper describes progress in the development of the CUBIT meshing toolkit.

  6. Finite Element Aircraft Simulation of Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, R. E.

    1997-01-01

    A turbulence model has been developed for realtime aircraft simulation that accommodates stochastic turbulence and distributed discrete gusts as a function of the terrain. This model is applicable to conventional aircraft, V/STOL aircraft, and disc rotor model helicopter simulations. Vehicle angular activity in response to turbulence is computed from geometrical and temporal relationships rather than by using the conventional continuum approximations that assume uniform gust immersion and low frequency responses. By using techniques similar to those recently developed for blade-element rotor models, the angular-rate filters of conventional turbulence models are not required. The model produces rotational rates as well as air mass translational velocities in response to both stochastic and deterministic disturbances, where the discrete gusts and turbulence magnitudes may be correlated with significant terrain features or ship models. Assuming isotropy, a two-dimensional vertical turbulence field is created. A novel Gaussian interpolation technique is used to distribute vertical turbulence on the wing span or lateral rotor disc, and this distribution is used to compute roll responses. Air mass velocities are applied at significant centers of pressure in the computation of the aircraft's pitch and roll responses.

  7. New hybrid quadrilateral finite element for Mindlin plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Yi; Zhang, Jingyu

    1994-02-01

    A new quadrilateral plate element concerning the effect of transverse shear strain was presented. It was derived from the hybrid finite element model based on the principles of virtual work. The outstanding advantage of this element was to use more rational trial functions of the displacements. For this reason, every variety of plate deformation can be simulated really while the least degrees of freedom was employed. A wide range of numerical tests was conducted and the results illustrate that this element has a very wide application scope to the thickness of plates and satisfactory accuracy can be obtained by coarse mesh for all kinds of examples.

  8. Finite element approach for transient analysis of multibody systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Shih-Chin; Chang, Che-Wei; Housner, Jerrold M.

    1992-01-01

    A three-dimensional, finite element based formulation for the transient dynamics of constrained multibody systems with trusslike configurations is presented. A convected coordinate system is used to define the rigid-body motion of individual elements in the system. Deformation of each element is defined relative to its convected coordinate system. The formulation is oriented toward joint-dominated structures. Through a series of sequential transformations, the joint degree of freedom is built into the equations of motion of the element to reduce geometric constraints. Based on the derivation, a general-purpose code has been developed. Two examples are presented to illustrate the application of the code.

  9. A new formulation of hybrid/mixed finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.; Kang, D.; Chen, D.-P.

    1983-01-01

    A new formulation of finite element method is accomplished by the Hellinger-Reissner principle for which the stress equilibrium conditions are not introduced initially but are brought-in through the use of additional internal displacement parameters. The method can lead to the same result as the assumed stress hybrid model. However, it is more general and more flexible. The use of natural coordinates for stress assumptions leads to elements which are less sensitive to the choice of reference coordinates. Numerical solutions by 3-D solid element indicate that more efficient elements can be constructed by assumed stresses which only partially satisfy the equilibrium conditions.

  10. Numerical techniques in linear duct acoustics. [finite difference and finite element analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1980-01-01

    Both finite difference and finite element analyses of small amplitude (linear) sound propagation in straight and variable area ducts with flow, as might be found in a typical turboject engine duct, muffler, or industrial ventilation system, are reviewed. Both steady state and transient theories are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the advantages and limitations associated with the various numerical techniques. Examples of practical problems are given for which the numerical techniques have been applied.

  11. A simple triangular finite element for nonlinear thin shells: statics, dynamics and anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viebahn, Nils; Pimenta, Paulo M.; Schröder, Jörg

    2016-11-01

    This work presents a simple finite element implementation of a geometrically exact and fully nonlinear Kirchhoff-Love shell model. Thus, the kinematics are based on a deformation gradient written in terms of the first- and second-order derivatives of the displacements. The resulting finite element formulation provides C^1 -continuity using a penalty approach, which penalizes the kinking at the edges of neighboring elements. This approach enables the application of well-known C^0 -continuous interpolations for the displacements, which leads to a simple finite element formulation, where the only unknowns are the nodal displacements. On the basis of polyconvex strain energy functions, the numerical framework for the simulation of isotropic and anisotropic thin shells is presented. A consistent plane stress condition is incorporated at the constitutive level of the model. A triangular finite element, with a quadratic interpolation for the displacements and a one-point integration for the enforcement of the C^1 -continuity at the element interfaces leads to a robust shell element. Due to the simple nature of the element, even complex geometries can be meshed easily, which include folded and branched shells. The reliability and flexibility of the element formulation is shown in a couple of numerical examples, including also time dependent boundary value problems. A plane reference configuration is assumed for the shell mid-surface, but initially curved shells can be accomplished if one regards the initial configuration as a stress-free deformed state from the plane position, as done in previous works.

  12. A simple triangular finite element for nonlinear thin shells: statics, dynamics and anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viebahn, Nils; Pimenta, Paulo M.; Schröder, Jörg

    2017-02-01

    This work presents a simple finite element implementation of a geometrically exact and fully nonlinear Kirchhoff-Love shell model. Thus, the kinematics are based on a deformation gradient written in terms of the first- and second-order derivatives of the displacements. The resulting finite element formulation provides C^1-continuity using a penalty approach, which penalizes the kinking at the edges of neighboring elements. This approach enables the application of well-known C^0-continuous interpolations for the displacements, which leads to a simple finite element formulation, where the only unknowns are the nodal displacements. On the basis of polyconvex strain energy functions, the numerical framework for the simulation of isotropic and anisotropic thin shells is presented. A consistent plane stress condition is incorporated at the constitutive level of the model. A triangular finite element, with a quadratic interpolation for the displacements and a one-point integration for the enforcement of the C^1-continuity at the element interfaces leads to a robust shell element. Due to the simple nature of the element, even complex geometries can be meshed easily, which include folded and branched shells. The reliability and flexibility of the element formulation is shown in a couple of numerical examples, including also time dependent boundary value problems. A plane reference configuration is assumed for the shell mid-surface, but initially curved shells can be accomplished if one regards the initial configuration as a stress-free deformed state from the plane position, as done in previous works.

  13. A hybrid finite-difference and analytic element groundwater model.

    PubMed

    Haitjema, H M; Feinstein, D T; Hunt, R J; Gusyev, M A

    2010-01-01

    Regional finite-difference models tend to have large cell sizes, often on the order of 1-2 km on a side. Although the regional flow patterns in deeper formations may be adequately represented by such a model, the intricate surface water and groundwater interactions in the shallower layers are not. Several stream reaches and nearby wells may occur in a single cell, precluding any meaningful modeling of the surface water and groundwater interactions between the individual features. We propose to replace the upper MODFLOW layer or layers, in which the surface water and groundwater interactions occur, by an analytic element model (GFLOW) that does not employ a model grid; instead, it represents wells and surface waters directly by the use of point-sinks and line-sinks. For many practical cases it suffices to provide GFLOW with the vertical leakage rates calculated in the original coarse MODFLOW model in order to obtain a good representation of surface water and groundwater interactions. However, when the combined transmissivities in the deeper (MODFLOW) layers dominate, the accuracy of the GFLOW solution diminishes. For those cases, an iterative coupling procedure, whereby the leakages between the GFLOW and MODFLOW model are updated, appreciably improves the overall solution, albeit at considerable computational cost. The coupled GFLOW-MODFLOW model is applicable to relatively large areas, in many cases to the entire model domain, thus forming an attractive alternative to local grid refinement or inset models.

  14. Finite Elements Modeling in Diagnostics of Small Closed Pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Lorkowski, J; Mrzygłód, M; Grzegorowska, O

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic pneumothorax still remains to be a serious clinical problem and requires a comprehensive diagnostic and monitoring during treatment. The aim of this paper is to present a computer method of modeling of small closed pneumothorax. Radiological images of 34 patients of both sexes with small closed pneumothorax were taken into consideration. The control group consisted of X-rays of 22 patients treated because of tension pneumothorax. In every single case the model was correlated with the clinical manifestations. The procedure of computational rapid analysis (CRA) for in silico analysis of surgical intervention was introduced. It included implementation of computerize tomography images and their automatic conversion into 3D finite elements model (FEM). In order to segmentize the 3D model, an intelligent procedure of domain recognition was used. In the final step, a computer simulation project of fluid-structure interaction was built, using the ANSYS\\Workbench environment of multi-physics analysis. The FEM model and computer simulation project were employed in the analysis in order to optimize surgical intervention. The model worked out well and was compatible with the clinical manifestations of pneumothorax. We conclude that the created FEM model is a promising tool for facilitation of diagnostic procedures and prognosis of treatment in the case of small closed pneumothorax.

  15. A new weak Galerkin finite element method for elliptic interface problems

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu; Zhao, Shan

    2016-08-26

    We introduce and analyze a new weak Galerkin (WG) finite element method in this paper for solving second order elliptic equations with discontinuous coefficients and interfaces. Comparing with the existing WG algorithm for solving the same type problems, the present WG method has a simpler variational formulation and fewer unknowns. Moreover, the new WG algorithm allows the use of finite element partitions consisting of general polytopal meshes and can be easily generalized to high orders. Optimal order error estimates in both H1 and L2 norms are established for the present WG finite element solutions. We conducted extensive numerical experiments in order to examine the accuracy, flexibility, and robustness of the proposed WG interface approach. In solving regular elliptic interface problems, high order convergences are numerically confirmed by using piecewise polynomial basis functions of high degrees. Moreover, the WG method is shown to be able to accommodate very complicated interfaces, due to its flexibility in choosing finite element partitions. Finally, in dealing with challenging problems with low regularities, the piecewise linear WG method is capable of delivering a second order of accuracy in L∞ norm for both C1 and H2 continuous solutions.

  16. A new weak Galerkin finite element method for elliptic interface problems

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu; Zhao, Shan

    2016-08-26

    We introduce and analyze a new weak Galerkin (WG) finite element method in this paper for solving second order elliptic equations with discontinuous coefficients and interfaces. Comparing with the existing WG algorithm for solving the same type problems, the present WG method has a simpler variational formulation and fewer unknowns. Moreover, the new WG algorithm allows the use of finite element partitions consisting of general polytopal meshes and can be easily generalized to high orders. Optimal order error estimates in both H1 and L2 norms are established for the present WG finite element solutions. We conducted extensive numerical experiments in order to examine the accuracy, flexibility, and robustness of the proposed WG interface approach. In solving regular elliptic interface problems, high order convergences are numerically confirmed by using piecewise polynomial basis functions of high degrees. Moreover, the WG method is shown to be able to accommodate very complicated interfaces, due to its flexibility in choosing finite element partitions. Finally, in dealing with challenging problems with low regularities, the piecewise linear WG method is capable of delivering a second order of accuracy in L∞ norm for both C1 and H2 continuous solutions.

  17. A new weak Galerkin finite element method for elliptic interface problems

    DOE PAGES

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Ye, Xiu; ...

    2016-08-26

    We introduce and analyze a new weak Galerkin (WG) finite element method in this paper for solving second order elliptic equations with discontinuous coefficients and interfaces. Comparing with the existing WG algorithm for solving the same type problems, the present WG method has a simpler variational formulation and fewer unknowns. Moreover, the new WG algorithm allows the use of finite element partitions consisting of general polytopal meshes and can be easily generalized to high orders. Optimal order error estimates in both H1 and L2 norms are established for the present WG finite element solutions. We conducted extensive numerical experiments inmore » order to examine the accuracy, flexibility, and robustness of the proposed WG interface approach. In solving regular elliptic interface problems, high order convergences are numerically confirmed by using piecewise polynomial basis functions of high degrees. Moreover, the WG method is shown to be able to accommodate very complicated interfaces, due to its flexibility in choosing finite element partitions. Finally, in dealing with challenging problems with low regularities, the piecewise linear WG method is capable of delivering a second order of accuracy in L∞ norm for both C1 and H2 continuous solutions.« less

  18. A Demonstration of the Method of Stochastic Finite Element Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    Lfl A DENONSTATION OF THE METHO -D OF DTIC STOCHASTIC FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS At LECTE S APR 0418 THESIS Paul R. Bryant Captain, USAF - AFIT/GA/A.A...Sample ASTROS Output) ....................... 78 Appendix D (Random Element Selection) .................... 83 Appendix E ( Weight Estimation...ensuring satisfactory performance? If weight is a concern, then the answer is yes. In the quest for higher performance aircraft and greater useful

  19. Finite Element Modeling of the Buckling Response of Sandwich Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Moore, David F.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Rankin, Charles C.

    2002-01-01

    A comparative study of different modeling approaches for predicting sandwich panel buckling response is described. The study considers sandwich panels with anisotropic face sheets and a very thick core. Results from conventional analytical solutions for sandwich panel overall buckling and face-sheet-wrinkling type modes are compared with solutions obtained using different finite element modeling approaches. Finite element solutions are obtained using layered shell element models, with and without transverse shear flexibility, layered shell/solid element models, with shell elements for the face sheets and solid elements for the core, and sandwich models using a recently developed specialty sandwich element. Convergence characteristics of the shell/solid and sandwich element modeling approaches with respect to in-plane and through-the-thickness discretization, are demonstrated. Results of the study indicate that the specialty sandwich element provides an accurate and effective modeling approach for predicting both overall and localized sandwich panel buckling response. Furthermore, results indicate that anisotropy of the face sheets, along with the ratio of principle elastic moduli, affect the buckling response and these effects may not be represented accurately by analytical solutions. Modeling recommendations are also provided.

  20. Reissner-Mindlin Legendre Spectral Finite Elements with Mixed Reduced Quadrature

    SciTech Connect

    Brito, K. D.; Sprague, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    Legendre spectral finite elements (LSFEs) are examined through numerical experiments for static and dynamic Reissner-Mindlin plate bending and a mixed-quadrature scheme is proposed. LSFEs are high-order Lagrangian-interpolant finite elements with nodes located at the Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre quadrature points. Solutions on unstructured meshes are examined in terms of accuracy as a function of the number of model nodes and total operations. While nodal-quadrature LSFEs have been shown elsewhere to be free of shear locking on structured grids, locking is demonstrated here on unstructured grids. LSFEs with mixed quadrature are, however, locking free and are significantly more accurate than low-order finite-elements for a given model size or total computation time.