Science.gov

Sample records for order independent similarity

  1. A unified statistical model to support local sequence order independent similarity searching for ligand-binding sites and its application to genome-based drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lei; Xie, Li; Bourne, Philip E.

    2009-01-01

    Functional relationships between proteins that do not share global structure similarity can be established by detecting their ligand-binding-site similarity. For a large-scale comparison, it is critical to accurately and efficiently assess the statistical significance of this similarity. Here, we report an efficient statistical model that supports local sequence order independent ligand–binding-site similarity searching. Most existing statistical models only take into account the matching vertices between two sites that are defined by a fixed number of points. In reality, the boundary of the binding site is not known or is dependent on the bound ligand making these approaches limited. To address these shortcomings and to perform binding-site mapping on a genome-wide scale, we developed a sequence-order independent profile–profile alignment (SOIPPA) algorithm that is able to detect local similarity between unknown binding sites a priori. The SOIPPA scoring integrates geometric, evolutionary and physical information into a unified framework. However, this imposes a significant challenge in assessing the statistical significance of the similarity because the conventional probability model that is based on fixed-point matching cannot be applied. Here we find that scores for binding-site matching by SOIPPA follow an extreme value distribution (EVD). Benchmark studies show that the EVD model performs at least two-orders faster and is more accurate than the non-parametric statistical method in the previous SOIPPA version. Efficient statistical analysis makes it possible to apply SOIPPA to genome-based drug discovery. Consequently, we have applied the approach to the structural genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to construct a protein–ligand interaction network. The network reveals highly connected proteins, which represent suitable targets for promiscuous drugs. Contact: lxie@sdsc.edu PMID:19478004

  2. Conceptual Similarity Promotes Generalization of Higher Order Fear Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunsmoor, Joseph E.; White, Allison J.; LaBar, Kevin S.

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that conceptual similarity promotes generalization of conditioned fear. Using a sensory preconditioning procedure, three groups of subjects learned an association between two cues that were conceptually similar, unrelated, or mismatched. Next, one of the cues was paired with a shock. The other cue was then reintroduced to…

  3. Conceptual similarity promotes generalization of higher order fear learning

    PubMed Central

    Dunsmoor, Joseph E.; White, Allison J.; LaBar, Kevin S.

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that conceptual similarity promotes generalization of conditioned fear. Using a sensory preconditioning procedure, three groups of subjects learned an association between two cues that were conceptually similar, unrelated, or mismatched. Next, one of the cues was paired with a shock. The other cue was then reintroduced to test for fear generalization, as measured by the skin conductance response. Results showed enhanced fear generalization that correlated with trait anxiety levels in the group that learned an association between conceptually similar stimuli. These findings suggest that conceptual representations of conditional stimuli influence human fear learning processes. PMID:21330378

  4. Adult age similarities in free recall output order and strategies.

    PubMed

    Wright, R E

    1982-01-01

    Adult age differences on a variety of free recall measures were examined. Although primary memory capacity was found to be the same in young and old adults, there was a smaller recency effect in the older group. Recall of primacy items was also less for that group. However, the pattern of serial position effects was the same for the two age groups. Similarly, there was no age difference in the development of the strategy of recalling recency items early in the output sequence. Young adults showed the typical negative recency effect in final free recall, and old adults the absence of a positive recency effect. The results indicate that the lower level of recall of old, relative to young, adults cannot be attributed to a qualitative difference in the way the two age groups approach a free recall task.

  5. The development of the Poincare-similar elements with eccentric anomaly as the independent variable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, V. R.

    1976-01-01

    A new set of element differential equations for the perturbed two-body motion is derived. The elements are canonical and are similar to the classical canonical Poincare elements, which have time as the independent variable. The phase space is extended by introducing the total energy and time as canonically conjugated variables. The new independent variable is, to within an additive constant, the eccentric anomaly. These elements are compared to the Kustaanheimo-Stiefel (KS) element differential equations, which also have the eccentric anomaly as the independent variable. For several numerical examples, the accuracy and stability of the new set are equal to those of the KS solution. This comparable accuracy result can probably be attributed to the fact that both sets have the same time element and very similar energy elements. The new set has only 8 elements, compared to 10 elements for the KS set. Both sets are free from singularities due to vanishing eccentricity and inclination.

  6. Length-independent structural similarities enrich the antibody CDR canonical class model

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Jaroslaw; Baker, Terry; Georges, Guy; Kelm, Sebastian; Klostermann, Stefan; Shi, Jiye; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) are antibody loops that make up the antigen binding site. Here, we show that all CDR types have structurally similar loops of different lengths. Based on these findings, we created length-independent canonical classes for the non-H3 CDRs. Our length variable structural clusters show strong sequence patterns suggesting either that they evolved from the same original structure or result from some form of convergence. We find that our length-independent method not only clusters a larger number of CDRs, but also predicts canonical class from sequence better than the standard length-dependent approach. To demonstrate the usefulness of our findings, we predicted cluster membership of CDR-L3 sequences from 3 next-generation sequencing datasets of the antibody repertoire (over 1,000,000 sequences). Using the length-independent clusters, we can structurally classify an additional 135,000 sequences, which represents a ∼20% improvement over the standard approach. This suggests that our length-independent canonical classes might be a highly prevalent feature of antibody space, and could substantially improve our ability to accurately predict the structure of novel CDRs identified by next-generation sequencing. PMID:26963563

  7. Strong Similarity Measures for Ordered Sets of Documents in Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egghe, L.; Michel, Christine

    2002-01-01

    Presents a general method to construct ordered similarity measures in information retrieval based on classical similarity measures for ordinary sets. Describes a test of some of these measures in an information retrieval system that extracted ranked document sets and discuses the practical usability of the ordered similarity measures. (Author/LRW)

  8. The conditional independences between variables derived from two independent identically distributed Markov random fields when pairwise order is ignored.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Alun

    2010-09-01

    A result for the equivalence of conditional independence graphs of ordered and unordered vector random variables from first-order Markov models is extended to arbitrary forests. The result is relevant to estimating graphical models for linkage disequilibrium between genetic loci. It explains why, in terms of the conditional independence structure, it sometimes does not matter whether you consider haplotypes or genotypes.

  9. 3 CFR 13579 - Executive Order 13579 of July 11, 2011. Regulation and Independent Regulatory Agencies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Executive Order 13579 of July 11, 2011. Regulation and Independent Regulatory Agencies 13579 Order 13579 Presidential Documents Executive Orders Executive Order 13579 of July 11, 2011 EO 13579 Regulation and Independent Regulatory Agencies By the authority vested in me as President by the...

  10. Braided submarine channels produced with experiments suggest scale independent controls on planform morphology similar to rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, B.; Lai, S. Y. J.; Komatsu, Y.; Paola, C.

    2015-12-01

    There are two dominant planform morphologies in channelized aggradational sedimentary systems; meandering and braided. Within marine settings meandering channels formed from turbidity and density currents are the most abundant. Braided channels are rare, and it is unclear if the few documented cases are generated by spontaneous bar deposition or are an artifact of erosive events or seafloor bathymetry. This is in contrast to fluvial systems wherein both meandering and braided planforms are common, and led us to the question if submarine channels require different conditions from river systems to obtain braided planform morphologies. We ran two experimental series wherein we provided density currents with an initial channel geometry known to produce braiding in natural and experimental river systems. Fluvial braiding occurs across a wide range of scales, and we predicted the same would hold true for subaqueous systems. The two experiments had initial width to depth ratios of 1000:1 and 350:1 and similar sediment to saline water discharge ratios of 0.02 and 0.03, and a saline current with a density contrast similar to natural currents. The experiments freely evolved a network of individual channels separated by depositional bars. Moreover, existing stability model theory for fluvial systems successfully explains both braided and meandering submarine channels from a compilation of lab and field examples. This suggests the aspect ratio of the flow determines the planform morphology, and that it is a scale independent phenomenon. The rarity of braided submarine channels in nature is more likely explained by factors that inhibit channel widening in submarine systems as compared to fluvial systems. We suggest the cause is a combination of the relatively thicker flow depths of turbidity currents that require commensurately wider flows, and a variety of feedbacks that tend to yield higher overbank sedimentation rates in submarine channels compared to fluvial systems.

  11. 77 FR 13590 - New York Independent System Operator, Inc.; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission New York Independent System Operator, Inc.; Notice of Petition for... Independent Transmission System Operator, Inc. until after the hearing established in December 30 Order has concluded and a final Commission order has been issued. \\1\\ Midwest Independent System Operator, Inc.,...

  12. Zeroing In on Mindfulness Facets: Similarities, Validity, and Dimensionality across Three Independent Measures.

    PubMed

    Siegling, Alex B; Petrides, K V

    2016-01-01

    The field of mindfulness has seen a proliferation of psychometric measures, characterised by differences in operationalisation and conceptualisation. To illuminate the scope of, and offer insights into, the diversity apparent in the burgeoning literature, two distinct samples were used to examine the similarities, validity, and dimensionality of mindfulness facets and subscales across three independent measures: the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ), Philadelphia Mindfulness Scale (PHLMS), and Toronto Mindfulness Scale (TMS). Results revealed problematic associations of FFMQ Observe with the other FFMQ facets and supported a four-factor structure (omitting this facet), while disputing the originally envisaged five-factor model; thus, solidifying a pattern in the literature. Results also confirmed the bidimensional nature of the PHLMS and TMS subscales, respectively. A joint Confirmatory Factor Analysis showed that PHLMS Acceptance could be assimilated within the FFMQ's four-factor model (as a distinct factor). The study offers a way of understanding interrelationships between the available mindfulness scales, so as to help practitioners and researchers make a more informed choice when conceptualising and operationalising mindfulness.

  13. Zeroing In on Mindfulness Facets: Similarities, Validity, and Dimensionality across Three Independent Measures.

    PubMed

    Siegling, Alex B; Petrides, K V

    2016-01-01

    The field of mindfulness has seen a proliferation of psychometric measures, characterised by differences in operationalisation and conceptualisation. To illuminate the scope of, and offer insights into, the diversity apparent in the burgeoning literature, two distinct samples were used to examine the similarities, validity, and dimensionality of mindfulness facets and subscales across three independent measures: the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ), Philadelphia Mindfulness Scale (PHLMS), and Toronto Mindfulness Scale (TMS). Results revealed problematic associations of FFMQ Observe with the other FFMQ facets and supported a four-factor structure (omitting this facet), while disputing the originally envisaged five-factor model; thus, solidifying a pattern in the literature. Results also confirmed the bidimensional nature of the PHLMS and TMS subscales, respectively. A joint Confirmatory Factor Analysis showed that PHLMS Acceptance could be assimilated within the FFMQ's four-factor model (as a distinct factor). The study offers a way of understanding interrelationships between the available mindfulness scales, so as to help practitioners and researchers make a more informed choice when conceptualising and operationalising mindfulness. PMID:27055017

  14. Zeroing In on Mindfulness Facets: Similarities, Validity, and Dimensionality across Three Independent Measures

    PubMed Central

    Siegling, Alex B.; Petrides, K. V.

    2016-01-01

    The field of mindfulness has seen a proliferation of psychometric measures, characterised by differences in operationalisation and conceptualisation. To illuminate the scope of, and offer insights into, the diversity apparent in the burgeoning literature, two distinct samples were used to examine the similarities, validity, and dimensionality of mindfulness facets and subscales across three independent measures: the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ), Philadelphia Mindfulness Scale (PHLMS), and Toronto Mindfulness Scale (TMS). Results revealed problematic associations of FFMQ Observe with the other FFMQ facets and supported a four-factor structure (omitting this facet), while disputing the originally envisaged five-factor model; thus, solidifying a pattern in the literature. Results also confirmed the bidimensional nature of the PHLMS and TMS subscales, respectively. A joint Confirmatory Factor Analysis showed that PHLMS Acceptance could be assimilated within the FFMQ’s four-factor model (as a distinct factor). The study offers a way of understanding interrelationships between the available mindfulness scales, so as to help practitioners and researchers make a more informed choice when conceptualising and operationalising mindfulness. PMID:27055017

  15. Construction of Weak and Strong Similarity Measures for Ordered Sets of Documents Using Fuzzy Set Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egghe, L.; Michel, C.

    2003-01-01

    Ordered sets (OS) of documents are encountered more and more in information distribution systems, such as information retrieval systems. Classical similarity measures for ordinary sets of documents need to be extended to these ordered sets. This is done in this article using fuzzy set techniques. The practical usability of the OS-measures is…

  16. 77 FR 38050 - California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of Petition for... Commission's (Commission) Rules of Practice and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.207, the California Independent System Operator Corporation (CAISO) submitted a Petition for Declaratory Order requesting that the...

  17. 77 FR 70160 - California Independent System, Operator Corporation; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission California Independent System, Operator Corporation; Notice of Petition for... Energy Regulatory Commission's (Commission) Rules of Practice and Procedure, California Independent System Operator Corporation filed a petition requesting that the Commission issue a declaratory order...

  18. Similarity reduction, nonlocal and master symmetries of sixth order Korteweg-deVries equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahadevan, R.; Nalinidevi, L.

    2009-05-01

    A systematic investigation to derive the Lie point symmetries, nonlocal and master symmetries of sixth order Korteweg-de Vries equation (KdV6) is presented. Using the obtained point symmetries, similarity reductions are derived and constructed their particular solutions wherever possible. It is shown that KdV6 admits infinitely many nonlocal and master symmetries. The existence of infinitely many master symmetries ensures that KdV6 is completely integrable.

  19. A negative semantic similarity effect on short-term order memory: evidence from recency judgements.

    PubMed

    Tse, Chi-Shing

    2010-08-01

    Speeded recency judgements were used to examine whether judgements concerning the relative temporal order in which two items were presented on a short eight-item, study list would be facilitated or hindered when the two items were from the same semantic category (related, R, items), relative to when they were from different categories (unrelated, U, items). Semantic similarity led to slower and less accurate recency judgements. To evaluate the extent that item memory contributes to recency judgement performance, I used speeded pair recognition and speeded two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) recognition trials, in which the stimuli and designs were the same as in the recency judgement test. The type of test trial was manipulated between subjects (recency judgement vs pair recognition) or within participants (recency judgement and 2AFC recognition). Regardless of the between- or within-participants manipulation of recognition vs order memory tests, the pattern of recognition performance was very different from the pattern of recency judgement performance, indicating that semantic similarity had a negative effect on order memory per se. The explanation of the current findings offered by position-based order memory theories is discussed.

  20. Similar negative impacts of temperature on global wheat yield estimated by three independent methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential impact of global temperature change on global wheat production has recently been assessed with different methods, scaling and aggregation approaches. Here we show that grid-based simulations, point-based simulations, and statistical regressions produce similar estimates of temperature ...

  1. The development of the Poincare-similar elements with true anomaly as the independent variable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, A.

    1976-01-01

    In reference 1, the Hamiltonian of the unperturbed two-body problem in extended phase space is established. Depending on the type of time transformation, eight canonical elements were developed with the true anomaly or the eccentric anomaly as the independent variable. These two new sets, DS(phi) and DS(u), however contain singularities for small eccentricities and inclinations. In reference 2, these singularities are removed by a transformation from DS(u) to eight canonical PS(u) elements. In reference 3, the DS(phi) variables are transformed to the PS(phi) elements to remove the singularities. However, no direct relation was established between the eight canonical PS(phi) elements and the Cartesian coordinates. It is the purpose of this report to establish those relations and to develop the perturbed equations of motion in the PS(phi) space. This report also demonstrates the accuracy of this new set when it is applied to numerical orbit prediction problems.

  2. IP-MSA: Independent order of progressive multiple sequence alignments using different substitution matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boraik, Aziz Nasser; Abdullah, Rosni; Venkat, Ibrahim

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is an essential process for many biological sequence analyses. There are many algorithms developed to solve MSA, but an efficient computation method with very high accuracy is still a challenge. Progressive alignment is the most widely used approach to compute the final MSA. In this paper, we present a simple and effective progressive approach. Based on the independent order of sequences progressive alignment which proposed in QOMA, this method has been modified to align the whole sequences to maximize the score of MSA. Moreover, in order to further improve the accuracy of the method, we estimate the similarity of any pair of input sequences by using their percent identity, and based on this measure, we choose different substitution matrices during the progressive alignment. In addition, we have included horizontal information to alignment by adjusting the weights of amino acid residues based on their neighboring residues. The experimental results have been tested on popular benchmark of global protein sequences BAliBASE 3.0 and local protein sequences IRMBASE 2.0. The results of the proposed approach outperform the original method in QOMA in terms of sum-of-pair score and column score by up to 14% and 7% respectively.

  3. Similar Representations of Sequence Knowledge in Young and Older Adults: A Study of Effector Independent Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Barnhoorn, Jonathan S.; Döhring, Falko R.; Van Asseldonk, Edwin H. F.; Verwey, Willem B.

    2016-01-01

    Older adults show reduced motor performance and changes in motor skill development. To better understand these changes, we studied differences in sequence knowledge representations between young and older adults using a transfer task. Transfer, or the ability to apply motor skills flexibly, is highly relevant in day-to-day motor activity and facilitates generalization of learning to new contexts. By using movement types that are completely unrelated in terms of muscle activation and response location, we focused on transfer facilitated by the early, visuospatial system. We tested 32 right-handed older adults (65–75) and 32 young adults (18–30). During practice of a discrete sequence production task, participants learned two six-element sequences using either unimanual key-presses (KPs) or by moving a lever with lower arm flexion-extension (FE) movements. Each sequence was performed 144 times. They then performed a test phase consisting of familiar and random sequences performed with the type of movements not used during practice. Both age groups displayed transfer from FE to KP movements as indicated by faster performance on the familiar sequences in the test phase. Only young adults transferred their sequence knowledge from KP to FE movements. In both directions, the young showed higher transfer than older adults. These results suggest that the older participants, like the young, represented their sequences in an abstract visuospatial manner. Transfer was asymmetric in both age groups: there was more transfer from FE to KP movements than vice versa. This similar asymmetry is a further indication that the types of representations that older adults develop are comparable to those that young adults develop. We furthermore found that older adults improved less during FE practice, gained less explicit knowledge, displayed a smaller visuospatial working memory capacity and had lower processing speed than young adults. Despite the many differences between young and

  4. Similar Representations of Sequence Knowledge in Young and Older Adults: A Study of Effector Independent Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Barnhoorn, Jonathan S.; Döhring, Falko R.; Van Asseldonk, Edwin H. F.; Verwey, Willem B.

    2016-01-01

    Older adults show reduced motor performance and changes in motor skill development. To better understand these changes, we studied differences in sequence knowledge representations between young and older adults using a transfer task. Transfer, or the ability to apply motor skills flexibly, is highly relevant in day-to-day motor activity and facilitates generalization of learning to new contexts. By using movement types that are completely unrelated in terms of muscle activation and response location, we focused on transfer facilitated by the early, visuospatial system. We tested 32 right-handed older adults (65–75) and 32 young adults (18–30). During practice of a discrete sequence production task, participants learned two six-element sequences using either unimanual key-presses (KPs) or by moving a lever with lower arm flexion-extension (FE) movements. Each sequence was performed 144 times. They then performed a test phase consisting of familiar and random sequences performed with the type of movements not used during practice. Both age groups displayed transfer from FE to KP movements as indicated by faster performance on the familiar sequences in the test phase. Only young adults transferred their sequence knowledge from KP to FE movements. In both directions, the young showed higher transfer than older adults. These results suggest that the older participants, like the young, represented their sequences in an abstract visuospatial manner. Transfer was asymmetric in both age groups: there was more transfer from FE to KP movements than vice versa. This similar asymmetry is a further indication that the types of representations that older adults develop are comparable to those that young adults develop. We furthermore found that older adults improved less during FE practice, gained less explicit knowledge, displayed a smaller visuospatial working memory capacity and had lower processing speed than young adults. Despite the many differences between young and

  5. Similar Representations of Sequence Knowledge in Young and Older Adults: A Study of Effector Independent Transfer.

    PubMed

    Barnhoorn, Jonathan S; Döhring, Falko R; Van Asseldonk, Edwin H F; Verwey, Willem B

    2016-01-01

    Older adults show reduced motor performance and changes in motor skill development. To better understand these changes, we studied differences in sequence knowledge representations between young and older adults using a transfer task. Transfer, or the ability to apply motor skills flexibly, is highly relevant in day-to-day motor activity and facilitates generalization of learning to new contexts. By using movement types that are completely unrelated in terms of muscle activation and response location, we focused on transfer facilitated by the early, visuospatial system. We tested 32 right-handed older adults (65-75) and 32 young adults (18-30). During practice of a discrete sequence production task, participants learned two six-element sequences using either unimanual key-presses (KPs) or by moving a lever with lower arm flexion-extension (FE) movements. Each sequence was performed 144 times. They then performed a test phase consisting of familiar and random sequences performed with the type of movements not used during practice. Both age groups displayed transfer from FE to KP movements as indicated by faster performance on the familiar sequences in the test phase. Only young adults transferred their sequence knowledge from KP to FE movements. In both directions, the young showed higher transfer than older adults. These results suggest that the older participants, like the young, represented their sequences in an abstract visuospatial manner. Transfer was asymmetric in both age groups: there was more transfer from FE to KP movements than vice versa. This similar asymmetry is a further indication that the types of representations that older adults develop are comparable to those that young adults develop. We furthermore found that older adults improved less during FE practice, gained less explicit knowledge, displayed a smaller visuospatial working memory capacity and had lower processing speed than young adults. Despite the many differences between young and older

  6. LASSO-ligand activity by surface similarity order: a new tool for ligand based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Reid, Darryl; Sadjad, Bashir S; Zsoldos, Zsolt; Simon, Aniko

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Ligand Screening (VLS) has become an integral part of the drug discovery process for many pharmaceutical companies. Ligand similarity searches provide a very powerful method of screening large databases of ligands to identify possible hits. If these hits belong to new chemotypes the method is deemed even more successful. eHiTS LASSO uses a new interacting surface point types (ISPT) molecular descriptor that is generated from the 3D structure of the ligand, but unlike most 3D descriptors it is conformation independent. Combined with a neural network machine learning technique, LASSO screens molecular databases at an ultra fast speed of 1 million structures in under 1 min on a standard PC. The results obtained from eHiTS LASSO trained on relatively small training sets of just 2, 4 or 8 actives are presented using the diverse directory of useful decoys (DUD) dataset. It is shown that over a wide range of receptor families, eHiTS LASSO is consistently able to enrich screened databases and provides scaffold hopping ability.

  7. Modality independence of order coding in working memory: Evidence from cross-modal order interference at recall.

    PubMed

    Vandierendonck, André

    2016-01-01

    Working memory researchers do not agree on whether order in serial recall is encoded by dedicated modality-specific systems or by a more general modality-independent system. Although previous research supports the existence of autonomous modality-specific systems, it has been shown that serial recognition memory is prone to cross-modal order interference by concurrent tasks. The present study used a serial recall task, which was performed in a single-task condition and in a dual-task condition with an embedded memory task in the retention interval. The modality of the serial task was either verbal or visuospatial, and the embedded tasks were in the other modality and required either serial or item recall. Care was taken to avoid modality overlaps during presentation and recall. In Experiment 1, visuospatial but not verbal serial recall was more impaired when the embedded task was an order than when it was an item task. Using a more difficult verbal serial recall task, verbal serial recall was also more impaired by another order recall task in Experiment 2. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis of modality-independent order coding. The implications for views on short-term recall and the multicomponent view of working memory are discussed.

  8. Distinctive Order Based Self-Similarity descriptor for multi-sensor remote sensing image matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedaghat, Amin; Ebadi, Hamid

    2015-10-01

    Robust, well-distributed and accurate feature matching in multi-sensor remote sensing image is a difficult task duo to significant geometric and illumination differences. In this paper, a robust and effective image matching approach is presented for multi-sensor remote sensing images. The proposed approach consists of three main steps. In the first step, UR-SIFT (Uniform robust scale invariant feature transform) algorithm is applied for uniform and dense local feature extraction. In the second step, a novel descriptor namely Distinctive Order Based Self Similarity descriptor, DOBSS descriptor, is computed for each extracted feature. Finally, a cross matching process followed by a consistency check in the projective transformation model is performed for feature correspondence and mismatch elimination. The proposed method was successfully applied for matching various multi-sensor satellite images as: ETM+, SPOT 4, SPOT 5, ASTER, IRS, SPOT 6, QuickBird, GeoEye and Worldview sensors, and the results demonstrate its robustness and capability compared to common image matching techniques such as SIFT, PIIFD, GLOH, LIOP and LSS.

  9. Model-independent electron spin resonance for measuring order of immobile components in a biological assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, T P; Thompson, N L

    1985-01-01

    A model-independent description of the angular orientation distribution of elements in an ordered biological assembly is applied to the electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. As in a previous model-independent treatment of fluorescence polarization (Burghardt, T.P., 1984, Biopolymers, 23:2383-2406) the elemental order is described by an angular distribution of molecular frames with one frame fixed in each element of the assembly. The distribution is expanded in a complete orthonormal set of functions. The coefficients of the series expansion (the order parameters) describe the orientation distribution of the elements in the assembly without reference to a model and can be obtained from the observed spectrum. The method establishes the limitations of ESR in detecting order in the assembly by determining which distribution coefficients the technique can detect. A method of determining the order parameters from an ESR spectra, using a set of ESR basis spectra, is developed. We also describe a treatment that incorporates the actual line shape measured from randomly oriented, immobile elements. In this treatment, no model-dependent assumptions about the line shape are required. We have applied the model-independent analysis to ESR spectra from spin-labeled myosin cross-bridges in muscle fibers. The results contain detailed information on the spin-probe angular distribution and differ in interesting ways from previous model-dependent interpretations of the spectra. PMID:2994768

  10. Mesh independent convergence of the modified inexact Newton method for a second order nonlinear problem

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T; Pasciak, J E; Vassilevski, P S

    2004-09-20

    In this paper, we consider an inexact Newton method applied to a second order nonlinear problem with higher order nonlinearities. We provide conditions under which the method has a mesh-independent rate of convergence. To do this, we are required to first, set up the problem on a scale of Hilbert spaces and second, to devise a special iterative technique which converges in a higher than first order Sobolev norm. We show that the linear (Jacobian) system solved in Newton's method can be replaced with one iterative step provided that the initial nonlinear iterate is accurate enough. The closeness criteria can be taken independent of the mesh size. Finally, the results of numerical experiments are given to support the theory.

  11. Genome and Phylogenetic Analyses of Trypanosoma evansi Reveal Extensive Similarity to T. brucei and Multiple Independent Origins for Dyskinetoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Carnes, Jason; Anupama, Atashi; Balmer, Oliver; Jackson, Andrew; Lewis, Michael; Brown, Rob; Cestari, Igor; Desquesnes, Marc; Gendrin, Claire; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Imamura, Hideo; Ivens, Alasdair; Kořený, Luděk; Lai, De-Hua; MacLeod, Annette; McDermott, Suzanne M.; Merritt, Chris; Monnerat, Severine; Moon, Wonjong; Myler, Peter; Phan, Isabelle; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Sivam, Dhileep; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Lukeš, Julius; Stuart, Ken; Schnaufer, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Two key biological features distinguish Trypanosoma evansi from the T. brucei group: independence from the tsetse fly as obligatory vector, and independence from the need for functional mitochondrial DNA (kinetoplast or kDNA). In an effort to better understand the molecular causes and consequences of these differences, we sequenced the genome of an akinetoplastic T. evansi strain from China and compared it to the T. b. brucei reference strain. The annotated T. evansi genome shows extensive similarity to the reference, with 94.9% of the predicted T. b. brucei coding sequences (CDS) having an ortholog in T. evansi, and 94.6% of the non-repetitive orthologs having a nucleotide identity of 95% or greater. Interestingly, several procyclin-associated genes (PAGs) were disrupted or not found in this T. evansi strain, suggesting a selective loss of function in the absence of the insect life-cycle stage. Surprisingly, orthologous sequences were found in T. evansi for all 978 nuclear CDS predicted to represent the mitochondrial proteome in T. brucei, although a small number of these may have lost functionality. Consistent with previous results, the F1FO-ATP synthase γ subunit was found to have an A281 deletion, which is involved in generation of a mitochondrial membrane potential in the absence of kDNA. Candidates for CDS that are absent from the reference genome were identified in supplementary de novo assemblies of T. evansi reads. Phylogenetic analyses show that the sequenced strain belongs to a dominant group of clonal T. evansi strains with worldwide distribution that also includes isolates classified as T. equiperdum. At least three other types of T. evansi or T. equiperdum have emerged independently. Overall, the elucidation of the T. evansi genome sequence reveals extensive similarity of T. brucei and supports the contention that T. evansi should be classified as a subspecies of T. brucei. PMID:25568942

  12. Birth order and sexual orientation in men: evidence for two independent interactions.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, Anthony F; Liu, Jian

    2006-11-01

    Birth order is correlated with male sexual orientation, but the reason(s) for this relationship is unclear. In the present study, data from a Canadian sample of homosexual and heterosexual men (N=604) were used to present evidence of two independent birth order interactions--one with height and the other with parental age--predicting sexual orientation in men. If these findings prove reliable, it raises the possibility that different aetiological factors underlie the birth order/sexual orientation relationship in men.

  13. First Things First: Similar List Length and Output Order Effects for Verbal and Nonverbal Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortis, Cathleen; Dent, Kevin; Kennett, Steffan; Ward, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    When participants are presented with a short list of unrelated words and they are instructed that they may recall in any order, they nevertheless show a very strong tendency to recall in forward serial order. Thus, if asked to recall "in any orde"r: "hat, mouse, tea, stairs," participants often respond "hat, mouse, tea,…

  14. Independence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Margaret E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the four planes of development and the periods of creation and crystallization within each plane. Identifies the type of independence that should be achieved by the end of the first two planes of development. Maintains that it is through individual work on the environment that one achieves independence. (KB)

  15. Bacterial interactomes: Interacting protein partners share similar function and are validated in independent assays more frequently than previously reported.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shatsky, Maxim; Allen, Simon; Gold, Barbara; Liu, Nancy L.; Juba, Thomas R.; Elias, Dwayne A; Reveco, Sonia A.; Prathapam, Ramadevi; He, Jennifer; Yang, Wenhong; et al

    2016-05-01

    Numerous affinity purification – mass-spectrometry (AP-MS) and yeast two hybrid (Y2H) screens have each defined thousands of pairwise protein-protein interactions (PPIs), most between functionally unrelated proteins. The accuracy of these networks, however, is under debate. Here we present an AP-MS survey of the bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris together with a critical reanalysis of nine published bacterial Y2H and AP-MS screens. We have identified 459 high confidence PPIs from D. vulgaris and 391 from Escherichia coli. Compared to the nine published interactomes, our two networks are smaller; are much less highly connected; have significantly lower false discovery rates; and are much moremore » enriched in protein pairs that are encoded in the same operon, have similar functions, and are reproducibly detected in other physical interaction assays. Lastly, our work establishes more stringent benchmarks for the properties of protein interactomes and suggests that bona fide PPIs much more frequently involve protein partners that are annotated with similar functions or that can be validated in independent assays than earlier studies suggested.« less

  16. Bacterial Interactomes: Interacting Protein Partners Share Similar Function and Are Validated in Independent Assays More Frequently Than Previously Reported.

    PubMed

    Shatsky, Maxim; Allen, Simon; Gold, Barbara L; Liu, Nancy L; Juba, Thomas R; Reveco, Sonia A; Elias, Dwayne A; Prathapam, Ramadevi; He, Jennifer; Yang, Wenhong; Szakal, Evelin D; Liu, Haichuan; Singer, Mary E; Geller, Jil T; Lam, Bonita R; Saini, Avneesh; Trotter, Valentine V; Hall, Steven C; Fisher, Susan J; Brenner, Steven E; Chhabra, Swapnil R; Hazen, Terry C; Wall, Judy D; Witkowska, H Ewa; Biggin, Mark D; Chandonia, John-Marc; Butland, Gareth

    2016-05-01

    Numerous affinity purification-mass spectrometry (AP-MS) and yeast two-hybrid screens have each defined thousands of pairwise protein-protein interactions (PPIs), most of which are between functionally unrelated proteins. The accuracy of these networks, however, is under debate. Here, we present an AP-MS survey of the bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris together with a critical reanalysis of nine published bacterial yeast two-hybrid and AP-MS screens. We have identified 459 high confidence PPIs from D. vulgaris and 391 from Escherichia coli Compared with the nine published interactomes, our two networks are smaller, are much less highly connected, and have significantly lower false discovery rates. In addition, our interactomes are much more enriched in protein pairs that are encoded in the same operon, have similar functions, and are reproducibly detected in other physical interaction assays than the pairs reported in prior studies. Our work establishes more stringent benchmarks for the properties of protein interactomes and suggests that bona fide PPIs much more frequently involve protein partners that are annotated with similar functions or that can be validated in independent assays than earlier studies suggested. PMID:26873250

  17. Space-filling curves of self-similar sets (I): iterated function systems with order structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Hui; Zhang, Shu-Qin

    2016-07-01

    This paper is the first part of a series which provides a systematic treatment of the space-filling curves of self-similar sets. In the present paper, we introduce a notion of linear graph-directed IFS (linear GIFS in short). We show that to construct a space-filling curve of a self-similar set, it amounts to exploring its linear GIFS structures. Compared to the previous methods, such as the L-system or recurrent set method, the linear GIFS approach is simpler, more rigorous and leads to further studies on this topic. We also propose a new algorithm for the beautiful visualization of space-filling curves. In a series of papers Dai et al (2015 arXiv:1511.05411 [math.GN]), Rao and Zhang (2015) and Rao and Zhang (2015), we investigate for a given self-similar set how to get ‘substitution rules’ for constructing space-filling curves, which was obscure in the literature. We solve the problem for self-similar sets of finite type, which covers most of the known results on constructions of space-filling curves.

  18. How Similar Are Adult Second Language Learners and Spanish Heritage Speakers? Spanish Clitics and Word Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montrul, Silvina

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies of heritage speakers, many of whom possess incomplete knowledge of their family language, suggest that these speakers may be linguistically superior to second language (L2) learners only in phonology but not in morphosyntax. This study reexamines this claim by focusing on knowledge of clitic pronouns and word order in 24 L2 learners…

  19. Is Word-Order Similarity Necessary for Cross-Linguistic Structural Priming?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Baoguo; Jia, Yuefang; Wang, Zhu; Dunlap, Susan; Shin, Jeong-Ah

    2013-01-01

    This article presents two experiments employing two structural priming paradigms that investigated whether cross-linguistic syntactic priming occurred in Chinese and English passive sentences that differ in word order (production-to-production priming in Experiment 1 and comprehension-to-production priming in Experiment 2). Results revealed that…

  20. Convergence acceleration for time-independent first-order PDE using optimal PNB-approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Holmgren, S.; Branden, H.

    1996-12-31

    We consider solving time-independent (steady-state) flow problems in 2D or 3D governed by hyperbolic or {open_quotes}almost hyperbolic{close_quotes} systems of partial differential equations (PDE). Examples of such PDE are the Euler and the Navier-Stokes equations. The PDE is discretized using a finite difference or finite volume scheme with arbitrary order of accuracy. If the matrix B describes the discretized differential operator and u denotes the approximate solution, the discrete problem is given by a large system of equations.

  1. Reflecting Solutions of High Order Elliptic Differential Equations in Two Independent Variables Across Analytic Arcs. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carleton, O.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration is given specifically to sixth order elliptic partial differential equations in two independent real variables x, y such that the coefficients of the highest order terms are real constants. It is assumed that the differential operator has distinct characteristics and that it can be factored as a product of second order operators. By analytically continuing into the complex domain and using the complex characteristic coordinates of the differential equation, it is shown that its solutions, u, may be reflected across analytic arcs on which u satisfies certain analytic boundary conditions. Moreover, a method is given whereby one can determine a region into which the solution is extensible. It is seen that this region of reflection is dependent on the original domain of difinition of the solution, the arc and the coefficients of the highest order terms of the equation and not on any sufficiently small quantities; i.e., the reflection is global in nature. The method employed may be applied to similar differential equations of order 2n.

  2. Visual similarity effects on short-term memory for order: the case of verbally labeled pictorial stimuli.

    PubMed

    Poirer, Marie; Saint-Aubin, Jean; Musselwhite, Karen; Mohanadas, Thulasi; Mahammed, Ghuson

    2007-06-01

    Four experiments examined the effect of visual similarity on immediate memory for order. Experiments 1 and 2 used easily nameable line drawings. Following a sequential presentation in either silent or suppression conditions, participants were presented with the drawings in a new, random order and were required to remember their original serial position. In Experiment 3, participants first learned to associate a verbal label with an abstract matrix pattern. Then they completed an immediate memory task in which they had to name the matrices aloud during presentation. At recall, the task required remembering either the order of the matrices or the order of their names. In Experiment 4, participants learned to associate nonword labels with schematic line drawings of faces; the phonemic similarity of the verbal labels was also manipulated. All four experiments indicate that the representations supporting performance comprise both verbal and visual features. The results are consistent with a multiattribute encoding view.

  3. Functional independence in resting-state connectivity facilitates higher-order cognition.

    PubMed

    James, G Andrew; Kearney-Ramos, Tonisha E; Young, Jonathan A; Kilts, Clinton D; Gess, Jennifer L; Fausett, Jennifer S

    2016-06-01

    Growing evidence suggests that intrinsic functional connectivity (i.e. highly structured patterns of communication between brain regions during wakeful rest) may encode cognitive ability. However, the generalizability of these findings is limited by between-study differences in statistical methodology and cognitive domains evaluated. To address this barrier, we evaluated resting-state neural representations of multiple cognitive domains within a relatively large normative adult sample. Forty-four participants (mean(sd) age=31(10) years; 18 male and 26 female) completed a resting-state functional MRI scan and neuropsychological assessments spanning motor, visuospatial, language, learning, memory, attention, working memory, and executive function performance. Robust linear regression related cognitive performance to resting-state connectivity among 200 a priori determined functional regions of interest (ROIs). Only higher-order cognitions (such as learning and executive function) demonstrated significant relationships between brain function and behavior. Additionally, all significant relationships were negative - characterized by moderately positive correlations among low performers and weak to moderately negative correlations among high performers. These findings suggest that functional independence among brain regions at rest facilitates cognitive performance. Our interpretation is consistent with graph theoretic analyses which represent the brain as independent functional nodes that undergo dynamic reorganization with task demand. Future work will build upon these findings by evaluating domain-specific variance in resting-state neural representations of cognitive impairment among patient populations.

  4. Functional independence in resting-state connectivity facilitates higher-order cognition.

    PubMed

    James, G Andrew; Kearney-Ramos, Tonisha E; Young, Jonathan A; Kilts, Clinton D; Gess, Jennifer L; Fausett, Jennifer S

    2016-06-01

    Growing evidence suggests that intrinsic functional connectivity (i.e. highly structured patterns of communication between brain regions during wakeful rest) may encode cognitive ability. However, the generalizability of these findings is limited by between-study differences in statistical methodology and cognitive domains evaluated. To address this barrier, we evaluated resting-state neural representations of multiple cognitive domains within a relatively large normative adult sample. Forty-four participants (mean(sd) age=31(10) years; 18 male and 26 female) completed a resting-state functional MRI scan and neuropsychological assessments spanning motor, visuospatial, language, learning, memory, attention, working memory, and executive function performance. Robust linear regression related cognitive performance to resting-state connectivity among 200 a priori determined functional regions of interest (ROIs). Only higher-order cognitions (such as learning and executive function) demonstrated significant relationships between brain function and behavior. Additionally, all significant relationships were negative - characterized by moderately positive correlations among low performers and weak to moderately negative correlations among high performers. These findings suggest that functional independence among brain regions at rest facilitates cognitive performance. Our interpretation is consistent with graph theoretic analyses which represent the brain as independent functional nodes that undergo dynamic reorganization with task demand. Future work will build upon these findings by evaluating domain-specific variance in resting-state neural representations of cognitive impairment among patient populations. PMID:27105037

  5. eMatchSite: Sequence Order-Independent Structure Alignments of Ligand Binding Pockets in Protein Models

    PubMed Central

    Brylinski, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Detecting similarities between ligand binding sites in the absence of global homology between target proteins has been recognized as one of the critical components of modern drug discovery. Local binding site alignments can be constructed using sequence order-independent techniques, however, to achieve a high accuracy, many current algorithms for binding site comparison require high-quality experimental protein structures, preferably in the bound conformational state. This, in turn, complicates proteome scale applications, where only various quality structure models are available for the majority of gene products. To improve the state-of-the-art, we developed eMatchSite, a new method for constructing sequence order-independent alignments of ligand binding sites in protein models. Large-scale benchmarking calculations using adenine-binding pockets in crystal structures demonstrate that eMatchSite generates accurate alignments for almost three times more protein pairs than SOIPPA. More importantly, eMatchSite offers a high tolerance to structural distortions in ligand binding regions in protein models. For example, the percentage of correctly aligned pairs of adenine-binding sites in weakly homologous protein models is only 4–9% lower than those aligned using crystal structures. This represents a significant improvement over other algorithms, e.g. the performance of eMatchSite in recognizing similar binding sites is 6% and 13% higher than that of SiteEngine using high- and moderate-quality protein models, respectively. Constructing biologically correct alignments using predicted ligand binding sites in protein models opens up the possibility to investigate drug-protein interaction networks for complete proteomes with prospective systems-level applications in polypharmacology and rational drug repositioning. eMatchSite is freely available to the academic community as a web-server and a stand-alone software distribution at http://www.brylinski.org/ematchsite. PMID

  6. Device-independent test of causal order and relations to fixed-points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumeler, Ämin; Wolf, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Bell non-local correlations cannot be naturally explained in a fixed causal structure. This serves as a motivation for considering models where no global assumption is made beyond logical consistency. The assumption of a fixed causal order between a set of parties, together with free randomness, implies device-independent inequalities—just as the assumption of locality does. It is known that local validity of quantum theory is consistent with violating such inequalities. Moreover, for three parties or more, even the (stronger) assumption of local classical probability theory plus logical consistency allows for violating causal inequalities. Here, we show that a classical environment (with which the parties interact), possibly containing loops, is logically consistent if and only if whatever the involved parties do, there is exactly one fixed-point, the latter being representable as a mixture of deterministic fixed-points. We further show that the non-causal view allows for a model of computation strictly more powerful than computation in a world of fixed causal orders.

  7. Demonstrating the effects of phonological similarity and frequency on item and order memory in Down syndrome using process dissociation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Elizabeth; Jarrold, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    It is important to distinguish between memory for item information and memory for order information when considering the nature of verbal short-term memory (vSTM) performance. Although other researchers have attempted to make this distinction between item and order memory in children, none has done so using process dissociation. This study shows that such an approach can be particularly useful and informative. Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) tend to experience a vSTM deficit. These two experiments explored whether phonological similarity (Experiment 1) and item frequency (Experiment 2) affected vSTM for item and order information in a group of individuals with DS compared with typically developing (TD) vocabulary-matched children. Process dissociation was used to obtain measures of item and order memory via Nairne and Kelley's procedure (Journal of Memory and Language, 50 (2004) 113-133). Those with DS were poorer than the matched TD group for recall of both item and order information. However, in both populations, phonologically similar items reduced order memory but enhanced item memory, whereas high-frequency items resulted in improvements in both item and order memory-effects that are in line with previous research in the adult literature. These results indicate that, despite poorer vSTM performance in DS, individuals experience phonological coding of verbal input and a contribution of long-term memory knowledge to recall. These findings inform routes for interventions for those with DS, highlighting the need to enhance both item and order memory. Moreover, this work demonstrates that process dissociation is applicable and informative for studying special populations and children.

  8. Multiple independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications in the order Psittaciformes

    PubMed Central

    Schirtzinger, Erin E.; Tavares, Erika S.; Gonzales, Lauren A.; Eberhard, Jessica R.; Miyaki, Cristina Y.; Sanchez, Juan J.; Hernandez, Alexis; Müeller, Heinrich; Graves, Gary R.; Fleischer, Robert C.; Wright, Timothy F.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes are generally thought to be under selection for compactness, due to their small size, consistent gene content, and a lack of introns or intergenic spacers. As more animal mitochondrial genomes are fully sequenced, rearrangements and partial duplications are being identified with increasing frequency, particularly in birds (Class Aves). In this study, we investigate the evolutionary history of mitochondrial control region states within the avian order Psittaciformes (parrots and cockatoos). To this aim, we reconstructed a comprehensive multi-locus phylogeny of parrots, used PCR of three diagnostic fragments to classify the mitochondrial control region state as single or duplicated, and mapped these states onto the phylogeny. We further sequenced 44 selected species to validate these inferences of control region state. Ancestral state reconstruction using a range of weighting schemes identified six independent origins of mitochondrial control region duplications within Psittaciformes. Analysis of sequence data showed that varying levels of mitochondrial gene and tRNA homology and degradation were present within a given clade exhibiting duplications. Levels of divergence between control regions within an individual varied from 0–10.9% with the differences occurring mainly between 51 and 225 nucleotides 3′ of the goose hairpin in domain I. Further investigations into the fates of duplicated mitochondrial genes, the potential costs and benefits of having a second control region, and the complex relationship between evolutionary rates, selection, and time since duplication are needed to fully explain these patterns in the mitochondrial genome. PMID:22543055

  9. Adjective-noun order as representational structure: native-language grammar influences perception of similarity and recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Mata, André; Percy, Elise J; Sherman, Steven J

    2014-02-01

    This article describes two experiments linking native-language grammar rules with implications for perception of similarity and recognition memory. In prenominal languages (e.g., English), adjectives usually precede nouns, whereas in postnominal languages (e.g., Portuguese), nouns usually precede adjectives. We explored the influence of such rules upon similarity judgments about, and recognition of, objects with multiple category attributes (one nominal attribute and one adjectival attribute). The results supported the hypothesized primacy effect of native-language word order such that nouns generally carried more weight for Portuguese speakers than for English speakers. This pattern was observed for judgments of similarity (i.e., Portuguese speakers tended to judge objects that shared a noun-designated attribute as more similar than did English speakers), as well as for false alarms in recognition memory (i.e., Portuguese speakers tended to falsely recognize more objects if they possessed a familiar noun attribute, relative to English speakers). The implications of such linguistic effects for the cognition of similarity and memory are discussed.

  10. An integral-factorized implementation of the driven similarity renormalization group second-order multireference perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Kevin P; Li, Chenyang; Evangelista, Francesco A

    2016-05-28

    We report an efficient implementation of a second-order multireference perturbation theory based on the driven similarity renormalization group (DSRG-MRPT2) [C. Li and F. A. Evangelista, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 2097 (2015)]. Our implementation employs factorized two-electron integrals to avoid storage of large four-index intermediates. It also exploits the block structure of the reference density matrices to reduce the computational cost to that of second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory. Our new DSRG-MRPT2 implementation is benchmarked on ten naphthyne isomers using basis sets up to quintuple-ζ quality. We find that the singlet-triplet splittings (ΔST) of the naphthyne isomers strongly depend on the equilibrium structures. For a consistent set of geometries, the ΔST values predicted by the DSRG-MRPT2 are in good agreements with those computed by the reduced multireference coupled cluster theory with singles, doubles, and perturbative triples.

  11. The Ordering Challenge: An Online Game to Introduce Independent Demand Inventory Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Brad C.; Bishop, Debra S.

    2011-01-01

    Students are put in the role of a manager who watches inventory levels decrease and must order at the right time and in the right quantity to minimize costs. This interactive game requires the students to race against time and has levels of increasing difficulty. It introduces the students to the concepts of holding cost, ordering cost, backlog…

  12. Independence of First- and Second-Order Memories in Newborn Rabbits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coureaud, Gerard; Languille, Solene; Joly, Virginie; Schaal, Benoist; Hars, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    The mammary pheromone promotes the acquisition of novel odorants (CS1) in newborn rabbits. Here, experiments pinpoint that CS1 becomes able to support neonatal learning of other odorants (CS2). We therefore evaluated whether these first- and second-order memories remained dependent after reactivation. Amnesia induced after CS2 recall selectively…

  13. 75 FR 34782 - Exelon Generation Company, LLC, Braidwood Station, Independent Spent Fuel Installation Order...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139, August 28, 2007). The E-Filing process requires..., and need not submit another set of fingerprints, provided the CHRC was completed not more than three... regulation. 3. All fingerprints obtained by the licensee under this Order, must be submitted to...

  14. Previous gestational diabetes is independently associated with increased carotid intima-media thickness, similarly to metabolic syndrome – a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus (pGDM) face a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes and, consequently, a higher cardiovascular risk. This study aimed to compare the carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) from young women with pGDM to those with metabolic syndrome (MS) and to healthy controls (CG) to verify whether a past history of pGDM could be independently associated with increased cIMT. Methods This is a cross-sectional study performed in two academic referral centers. Seventy-nine women with pGDM, 30 women with MS, and 60 CG aged between 18 and 47 years were enrolled. They all underwent physical examination and had blood glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc), and triglycerides determined. The cIMT was measured by ultrasound in several carotid segments. The primary endpoint was cIMT and clinically relevant parameters included as predictors were: age, systolic blood pressure, waist, BMI, total cholesterol, LDLc, triglycerides, fasting glucose, previous history of GDM as a whole group, previous history of GDM without MS, presence of DM, presence of MS, and parity. Results cIMT was significantly higher in pGDM when compared to CG in all sites of measurements (P < 0.05) except for the right common carotid. The pGDM women showed similar cIMT measurements to MS in all sites of measurements, except for the left carotid bifurcation, where it was significantly higher than MS (P < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis which included classical cardiovascular risk factors and was adjusted for confounders, pGDM was shown to be independently associated with increased composite cIMT (P < 0.01). The pGDM without risk factors further showed similar cIMT to MS (P > 0.05) and an increased cIMT when compared to controls (P < 0.05). Conclusions Previous GDM was independently associated with increased composite cIMT in this young population, similarly to those with

  15. Gyro-gauge-independent formulation of the guiding-center reduction to arbitrary order in the Larmor radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Guillebon, L.; Vittot, M.

    2013-10-01

    Guiding-center reduction is studied using gyro-gauge-independent coordinates. The Lagrangian 1-form of charged particle dynamics is Lie transformed without introducing a gyro-gauge, but using directly the unit vector of the component of the velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field as the coordinate corresponding to Larmor gyration. The reduction is shown to provide a maximal reduction for the Lagrangian and to work for all orders in the Larmor radius, following exactly the same procedure as when working with the standard gauge-dependent coordinate. The gauge-dependence is removed from the coordinate system by using a constrained variable for the gyro-angle. The closed 1-form dθ is replaced by a more general non-closed 1-form, which is equal to dθ in the gauge-dependent case. The gauge vector is replaced by a more general connection in the definition of the gradient, which behaves as a covariant derivative, in perfect agreement with the circle-bundle picture. This explains some results of previous works, whose gauge-independent expressions did not correspond to gauge fixing but did indeed correspond to connection fixing. In addition, some general results are obtained for the guiding-center reduction. The expansion is polynomial in the cotangent of the pitch-angle as an effect of the structure of the Lagrangian, preserved by Lie derivatives. The induction for the reduction is shown to rely on the inversion of a matrix, which is the same for all orders higher than three. It is inverted and explicit induction relations are obtained to go to an arbitrary order in the perturbation expansion. The Hamiltonian and symplectic representations of the guiding-center reduction are recovered, but conditions for the symplectic representation at each order are emphasized.

  16. Comparative Structural Models of Similarities and Differences between Vehicle and Target in Order to Teach Darwinian Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcelos, Maria Fátima; Nagem, Ronaldo L.

    2010-06-01

    Our objective is to contribute to the teaching of Classical Darwinian Evolution by means of a study of analogies and metaphors. Throughout the history of knowledge about Evolution and in Science teaching, tree structures have been used an analogs to refer to Evolution, such as by Darwin in the Tree of Life passage contained in On The Origin of Species (1859). We analyze the analogies and metaphors found in the Darwinian text the Tree of Life and propose Comparative Structural Models of Similarities and Differences between the vehicle and target, considering the viability of their use in teaching Sciences. Our foundation is the Theory of Conceptual Metaphor by Lakoff and Johnson (1980) and the Methodology of Teaching with Analogies—- MECA—by Nagem et al. (2001). The analogies and metaphors were classified and analyzed and the similarities and differences were highlighted. We found conceptual metaphors in the text. The analogies and metaphors in the Tree of Life are complex and appropriate for didactic use, but require an adequate methodological approach.

  17. Robust Data Driven Model Order Estimation for Independent Component Analysis of fMRI Data with Low Contrast to Noise

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Waqas; Avison, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) has been successfully utilized for analysis of functional MRI (fMRI) data for task related as well as resting state studies. Although it holds the promise of becoming an unbiased data-driven analysis technique, a few choices have to be made prior to performing ICA, selection of a method for determining the number of independent components (nIC) being one of them. Choice of nIC has been shown to influence the ICA maps, and various approaches (mostly relying on information theoretic criteria) have been proposed and implemented in commonly used ICA analysis packages, such as MELODIC and GIFT. However, there has been no consensus on the optimal method for nIC selection, and many studies utilize arbitrarily chosen values for nIC. Accurate and reliable determination of true nIC is especially important in the setting where the signals of interest contribute only a small fraction of the total variance, i.e. very low contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and/or very focal response. In this study, we evaluate the performance of different model order selection criteria and demonstrate that the model order selected based upon bootstrap stability of principal components yields more reliable and accurate estimates of model order. We then demonstrate the utility of this fully data-driven approach to detect weak and focal stimulus-driven responses in real data. Finally, we compare the performance of different multi-run ICA approaches using pseudo-real data. PMID:24788636

  18. n-Order and maximum fuzzy similarity entropy for discrimination of signals of different complexity: Application to fetal heart rate signals.

    PubMed

    Zaylaa, Amira; Oudjemia, Souad; Charara, Jamal; Girault, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents two new concepts for discrimination of signals of different complexity. The first focused initially on solving the problem of setting entropy descriptors by varying the pattern size instead of the tolerance. This led to the search for the optimal pattern size that maximized the similarity entropy. The second paradigm was based on the n-order similarity entropy that encompasses the 1-order similarity entropy. To improve the statistical stability, n-order fuzzy similarity entropy was proposed. Fractional Brownian motion was simulated to validate the different methods proposed, and fetal heart rate signals were used to discriminate normal from abnormal fetuses. In all cases, it was found that it was possible to discriminate time series of different complexity such as fractional Brownian motion and fetal heart rate signals. The best levels of performance in terms of sensitivity (90%) and specificity (90%) were obtained with the n-order fuzzy similarity entropy. However, it was shown that the optimal pattern size and the maximum similarity measurement were related to intrinsic features of the time series.

  19. A gauge-independent zeroth-order regular approximation to the exact relativistic Hamiltonian--formulation and applications.

    PubMed

    Filatov, Michael; Cremer, Dieter

    2005-01-22

    A simple modification of the zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) in relativistic theory is suggested to suppress its erroneous gauge dependence to a high level of approximation. The method, coined gauge-independent ZORA (ZORA-GI), can be easily installed in any existing nonrelativistic quantum chemical package by programming simple one-electron matrix elements for the quasirelativistic Hamiltonian. Results of benchmark calculations obtained with ZORA-GI at the Hartree-Fock (HF) and second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) level for dihalogens X(2) (X=F,Cl,Br,I,At) are in good agreement with the results of four-component relativistic calculations (HF level) and experimental data (MP2 level). ZORA-GI calculations based on MP2 or coupled-cluster theory with single and double perturbations and a perturbative inclusion of triple excitations [CCSD(T)] lead to accurate atomization energies and molecular geometries for the tetroxides of group VIII elements. With ZORA-GI/CCSD(T), an improved estimate for the atomization energy of hassium (Z=108) tetroxide is obtained. PMID:15740232

  20. Antimicrobial preservatives induce aggregation of interferon alpha-2a: the order in which preservatives induce protein aggregation is independent of the protein.

    PubMed

    Bis, Regina L; Mallela, Krishna M G

    2014-09-10

    Antimicrobial preservatives (APs) are included in liquid multi-dose protein formulations to combat the growth of microbes and bacteria. These compounds have been shown to cause protein aggregation, which leads to serious immunogenic and toxic side-effects in patients. Our earlier work on a model protein cytochrome c (Cyt c) demonstrated that APs cause protein aggregation in a specific manner. The aim of this study is to validate the conclusions obtained from our model protein studies on a pharmaceutical protein. Interferon α-2a (IFNA2) is available as a therapeutic treatment for numerous immune-compromised disorders including leukemia and hepatitis C, and APs have been used in its multi-dose formulation. Similar to Cyt c, APs induced IFNA2 aggregation, demonstrated by the loss of soluble monomer and increase in solution turbidity. The extent of IFNA2 aggregation increased with the increase in AP concentration. IFNA2 aggregation also depended on the nature of AP, and followed the order m-cresol>phenol>benzyl alcohol>phenoxyethanol. This specific order exactly matched with that observed for the model protein Cyt c. These and previously published results on antibodies and other recombinant proteins suggest that the general mechanism by which APs induce protein aggregation may be independent of the protein.

  1. A ribosomal protein gene cluster is encoded in the mitochondrial DNA of Dictyostelium discoideum: UGA termination codons and similarity of gene order to Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, M; Pi, M; Kurihara, M; Morio, T; Tanaka, Y

    1998-04-01

    We sequenced a region of about 14.5 kb downstream from the ribosomal protein L11 gene (rpl11) in the mitochondrial DNA (54+/-2 kb) of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Sequence analysis revealed that eleven ribosomal protein genes and six open reading frames (ORFs) formed a cluster arranged in the order: rpl11-orf189-rps12-rps7-rpl2-rps19-+ ++orf425-orf1740-rpl16-rpl14-orf188- rps14-rps8-rpl6-rps13-orf127-orf796. This order was very similar to that of homologous genes in Acanthamoeba castellanii mitochondrial DNA. The N-terminal region of ORF425 and the C-terminal region of ORF1740 had partial similarities to the S3 ribosomal protein of other organisms. The termination codons of rpl16 and orf188 were UGA, which has not hitherto been found in genes encoded in D. discoideum mitochondrial DNA. PMID:9560439

  2. Interpersonal Congruency, Attitude Similarity, and Interpersonal Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touhey, John C.

    1975-01-01

    As no experimental study has examined the effects of congruency on attraction, the present investigation orthogonally varied attitude similarity and interpersonal congruency in order to compare the two independent variables as determinants of interpersonal attraction. (Author/RK)

  3. Physicochemical, bioactive, and sensory properties of persimmon-based ice cream: technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution to determine optimum concentration.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Safa; Toker, Ömer Said; Yüksel, Ferhat; Çam, Mustafa; Kayacier, Ahmed; Dogan, Mahmut

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, persimmon puree was incorporated into the ice cream mix at different concentrations (8, 16, 24, 32, and 40%) and some physicochemical (dry matter, ash, protein, pH, sugar, fat, mineral, color, and viscosity), textural (hardness, stickiness, and work of penetration), bioactive (antiradical activity and total phenolic content), and sensory properties of samples were investigated. The technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution approach was used for the determination of optimum persimmon puree concentration based on the sensory and bioactive characteristics of final products. Increase in persimmon puree resulted in a decrease in the dry matter, ash, fat, protein contents, and viscosity of ice cream mix. Glucose, fructose, sucrose, and lactose were determined to be major sugars in the ice cream samples including persimmon and increase in persimmon puree concentration increased the fructose and glucose content. Better melting properties and textural characteristics were observed for the samples with the addition of persimmon. Magnesium, K, and Ca were determined to be major minerals in the samples and only K concentration increased with the increase in persimmon content. Bioactive properties of ice cream samples improved and, in general, acetone-water extracts showed higher bioactivity compared with ones obtained using methanol-water extracts. The technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution approach showed that the most preferred sample was the ice cream containing 24% persimmon puree. PMID:24268400

  4. Physicochemical, bioactive, and sensory properties of persimmon-based ice cream: technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution to determine optimum concentration.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Safa; Toker, Ömer Said; Yüksel, Ferhat; Çam, Mustafa; Kayacier, Ahmed; Dogan, Mahmut

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, persimmon puree was incorporated into the ice cream mix at different concentrations (8, 16, 24, 32, and 40%) and some physicochemical (dry matter, ash, protein, pH, sugar, fat, mineral, color, and viscosity), textural (hardness, stickiness, and work of penetration), bioactive (antiradical activity and total phenolic content), and sensory properties of samples were investigated. The technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution approach was used for the determination of optimum persimmon puree concentration based on the sensory and bioactive characteristics of final products. Increase in persimmon puree resulted in a decrease in the dry matter, ash, fat, protein contents, and viscosity of ice cream mix. Glucose, fructose, sucrose, and lactose were determined to be major sugars in the ice cream samples including persimmon and increase in persimmon puree concentration increased the fructose and glucose content. Better melting properties and textural characteristics were observed for the samples with the addition of persimmon. Magnesium, K, and Ca were determined to be major minerals in the samples and only K concentration increased with the increase in persimmon content. Bioactive properties of ice cream samples improved and, in general, acetone-water extracts showed higher bioactivity compared with ones obtained using methanol-water extracts. The technique for order preference by similarity to ideal solution approach showed that the most preferred sample was the ice cream containing 24% persimmon puree.

  5. 78 FR 19879 - Final Order in Response to a Petition From Certain Independent System Operators and Regional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... Swap Participant,' and `Eligible Contract Participant,' '' 77 FR 30596, May 23, 2012. \\5\\ 7 U.S.C. 6(c... Section 4(c)(6) of the Act'' (``Proposed Order'') is available at 77 FR 52138, Aug. 28, 2012, and on the... differences in terminology used by the Requesting Parties and their respective regulators. \\27\\ See 77...

  6. Next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the single top quark production via model-independent tqg flavor-changing neutral-current couplings at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Jun; Li Chongsheng; Zhang Jiajun; Zhu Huaxing

    2009-12-01

    We present the calculations of the complete next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD effects on the single top productions induced by model-independent tqg flavor-changing neutral-current couplings at hadron colliders. Our results show that, for the tcg coupling, the NLO QCD corrections can enhance the total cross sections by about 60% and 30%, and for the tug coupling by about 50% and 20% at the Tevatron and LHC, respectively, which means that the NLO corrections can increase the experimental sensitivity to the flavor-changing neutral-current couplings by about 10%-30%. Moreover, the NLO corrections reduce the dependence of the total cross sections on the renormalization or factorization scale significantly, which lead to increased confidence on the theoretical predictions. Besides, we also evaluate the NLO corrections to several important kinematic distributions, and find that for most of them the NLO corrections are almost the same and do not change the shape of the distributions.

  7. Next-to-leading order QCD predictions for t{gamma} associated production via model-independent flavor-changing neutral-current couplings at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yue; Li Bohua; Li Chongsheng; Gao Jun; Zhu Huaxing

    2011-05-01

    We present the complete next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD predictions for the t{gamma} associated production induced by model-independent tq{gamma} and tqg flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) couplings at hadron colliders, respectively. We also consider the mixing effects between the tq{gamma} and tqg FCNC couplings for this process. Our results show that, for the tq{gamma} couplings, the NLO QCD corrections can enhance the total cross sections by about 50% and 40% at the Tevatron and LHC, respectively. Including the contributions from the tq{gamma}, tqg FCNC couplings and their mixing effects, the NLO QCD corrections can enhance the total cross sections by about 50% for the tu{gamma} and tug FCNC couplings, and by about 80% for the tc{gamma} and tcg FCNC couplings at the LHC, respectively. Moreover, the NLO corrections reduce the dependence of the total cross section on the renormalization and factorization scale significantly. We also evaluate the NLO corrections for several important kinematic distributions.

  8. Similar names for similar biologics.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Nicole; Felix, Thomas; Strober, Bruce E; Warnock, David G

    2014-10-01

    Approval of the first biosimilar in the USA may occur by the end of 2014, yet a naming approach for biosimilars has not been determined. Biosimilars are highly similar to their biologic reference product but are not identical to it, because of their structural complexity and variations in manufacturing processes among companies. There is a need for a naming approach that can distinguish a biosimilar from its reference product and other biosimilars and ensure accurate tracing of adverse events (AEs) to the administered product. In contrast, generic small-molecule drugs are identical to their reference product and, therefore, share the same nonproprietary name. Clinical trials required to demonstrate biosimilarity for approval may not detect rare AEs or those occurring after prolonged use, and the incidence of such events may differ between a biosimilar and its reference product. The need for precise biologic identification is further underscored by the possibility of biosimilar interchangeability, a US designation that will allow substitution without prescriber intervention. For several biologics, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has used a naming approach that adds a prefix to a common root nonproprietary name, enabling healthcare providers to distinguish between products, avoid medication errors, and facilitate pharmacovigilance. We recommend that the FDA implement a biosimilars naming policy that likewise would add a distinguishable prefix or suffix to the root nonproprietary name of the reference product. This approach would ensure that a biosimilar could be distinguished from its reference product and other biosimilars in patient records and pharmacovigilance databases/reports, facilitating accurate attribution of AEs. PMID:25001080

  9. Understanding independence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annan, James; Hargreaves, Julia

    2016-04-01

    In order to perform any Bayesian processing of a model ensemble, we need a prior over the ensemble members. In the case of multimodel ensembles such as CMIP, the historical approach of ``model democracy'' (i.e. equal weight for all models in the sample) is no longer credible (if it ever was) due to model duplication and inbreeding. The question of ``model independence'' is central to the question of prior weights. However, although this question has been repeatedly raised, it has not yet been satisfactorily addressed. Here I will discuss the issue of independence and present a theoretical foundation for understanding and analysing the ensemble in this context. I will also present some simple examples showing how these ideas may be applied and developed.

  10. Order Effects of Learning with Modeling and Simulation Software on Field-Dependent and Field-Independent Children's Cognitive Performance: An Interaction Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angeli, Charoula; Valanides, Nicos; Polemitou, Eirini; Fraggoulidou, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The study examined the interaction between field dependence-independence (FD/I) and learning with modeling software and simulations, and their effect on children's performance. Participants were randomly assigned into two groups. Group A first learned with a modeling tool and then with simulations. Group B learned first with simulations and then…

  11. Independence Is.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickney, Sharon

    This workbook is designed to help participants of the Independence Training Program (ITP) to achieve a definition of "independence." The program was developed for teenage girls. The process for developing the concept of independence consists of four steps. Step one instructs the participant to create an imaginary situation where she is completely…

  12. Are Independent Probes Truly Independent?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Gino; Pecher, Diane; Schmidt, Henk G.; Zeelenberg, Rene

    2009-01-01

    The independent cue technique has been developed to test traditional interference theories against inhibition theories of forgetting. In the present study, the authors tested the critical criterion for the independence of independent cues: Studied cues not presented during test (and unrelated to test cues) should not contribute to the retrieval…

  13. Biosimilar Insulins: How Similar is Similar?

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lutz; Hompesch, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Biosimilar insulins (BIs) are viewed as commercially attractive products by a number of companies. In order to obtain approval in the European Union or the United States, where there is not a single BI currently on the market, a manufacturer needs to demonstrate that a given BI has a safety and efficacy profile that is similar to that of the “original” insulin formulation that is already on the market. As trivial as this may appear at first glance, it is not trivial at all for a good number of reasons that will be discussed in this commentary. As with protein manufacturing, modifications in the structure of the insulin molecule can take place (which can have serious consequences for the biological effects induced), so a rigid and careful assessment is absolutely necessary. The example of Marvel's failed application with the European Medicines Agency provides insights into the regulatory and clinical challenges surrounding the matter of BI. Although a challenging BI approval process might be regarded as a hurdle to keep companies out of certain markets, it is fair to say that the potential safety and efficacy issues surrounding BI are substantial and relevant and do warrant a careful and evidence-driven approval process. PMID:21722590

  14. Salam's independence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    In his kind review of my biography of the Nobel laureate Abdus Salam (December 2008 pp45-46), John W Moffat wrongly claims that Salam had "independently thought of the idea of parity violation in weak interactions".

  15. Maintaining Independence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upah-Bant, Marilyn

    1978-01-01

    Describes the over-all business and production operation of the "Daily Illini" at the University of Illinois to show how this college publication has assumed the burdens and responsibilities of true independence. (GW)

  16. Independent Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This issue of "OSERS" addresses the subject of independent living of individuals with disabilities. The issue includes a message from Judith E. Heumann, the Assistant Secretary of the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS), and 10 papers. Papers have the following titles and authors: "Changes in the Rehabilitation Act of…

  17. Independence and Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, H. Thomas

    Independent schools that are of viable size, well managed, and strategically located to meet competition will survive and prosper past the current financial crisis. We live in a complex technological society with insatiable demands for knowledgeable people to keep it running. The future will be marked by the orderly selection of qualified people,…

  18. Developing independence.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, A P; Turnbull, H R

    1985-03-01

    The transition from living a life as others want (dependence) to living it as the adolescent wants to live it (independence) is extraordinarily difficult for most teen-agers and their families. The difficulty is compounded in the case of adolescents with disabilities. They are often denied access to the same opportunities of life that are accessible to the nondisabled. They face special problems in augmenting their inherent capacities so that they can take fuller advantage of the accommodations that society makes in an effort to grant them access. In particular, they need training designed to increase their capacities to make, communicate, implement, and evaluate their own life-choices. The recommendations made in this paper are grounded in the long-standing tradition of parens patriae and enlightened paternalism; they seek to be deliberately and cautiously careful about the lives of adolescents with disabilities and their families. We based them on the recent tradition of anti-institutionalism and they are also consistent with some of the major policy directions of the past 15-20 years. These include: normalization, integration, and least-restrictive alternatives; the unity and integrity of the family; the importance of opportunities for self-advocacy; the role of consumer consent and choice in consumer-professional relationships; the need for individualized services; the importance of the developmental model as a basis for service delivery; the value of economic productivity of people with disabilities; and the rights of habilitation, amelioration, and prevention. PMID:3156827

  19. Developing independence.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, A P; Turnbull, H R

    1985-03-01

    The transition from living a life as others want (dependence) to living it as the adolescent wants to live it (independence) is extraordinarily difficult for most teen-agers and their families. The difficulty is compounded in the case of adolescents with disabilities. They are often denied access to the same opportunities of life that are accessible to the nondisabled. They face special problems in augmenting their inherent capacities so that they can take fuller advantage of the accommodations that society makes in an effort to grant them access. In particular, they need training designed to increase their capacities to make, communicate, implement, and evaluate their own life-choices. The recommendations made in this paper are grounded in the long-standing tradition of parens patriae and enlightened paternalism; they seek to be deliberately and cautiously careful about the lives of adolescents with disabilities and their families. We based them on the recent tradition of anti-institutionalism and they are also consistent with some of the major policy directions of the past 15-20 years. These include: normalization, integration, and least-restrictive alternatives; the unity and integrity of the family; the importance of opportunities for self-advocacy; the role of consumer consent and choice in consumer-professional relationships; the need for individualized services; the importance of the developmental model as a basis for service delivery; the value of economic productivity of people with disabilities; and the rights of habilitation, amelioration, and prevention.

  20. Higher-order force gradient symplectic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Siu A.; Kidwell, Donald W.

    2000-12-01

    We show that a recently discovered fourth order symplectic algorithm, which requires one evaluation of force gradient in addition to three evaluations of the force, when iterated to higher order, yielded algorithms that are far superior to similarly iterated higher order algorithms based on the standard Forest-Ruth algorithm. We gauge the accuracy of each algorithm by comparing the step-size independent error functions associated with energy conservation and the rotation of the Laplace-Runge-Lenz vector when solving a highly eccentric Kepler problem. For orders 6, 8, 10, and 12, the new algorithms are approximately a factor of 103, 104, 104, and 105 better.

  1. The gender similarities hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Janet Shibley

    2005-09-01

    The differences model, which argues that males and females are vastly different psychologically, dominates the popular media. Here, the author advances a very different view, the gender similarities hypothesis, which holds that males and females are similar on most, but not all, psychological variables. Results from a review of 46 meta-analyses support the gender similarities hypothesis. Gender differences can vary substantially in magnitude at different ages and depend on the context in which measurement occurs. Overinflated claims of gender differences carry substantial costs in areas such as the workplace and relationships. PMID:16173891

  2. The gender similarities hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Janet Shibley

    2005-09-01

    The differences model, which argues that males and females are vastly different psychologically, dominates the popular media. Here, the author advances a very different view, the gender similarities hypothesis, which holds that males and females are similar on most, but not all, psychological variables. Results from a review of 46 meta-analyses support the gender similarities hypothesis. Gender differences can vary substantially in magnitude at different ages and depend on the context in which measurement occurs. Overinflated claims of gender differences carry substantial costs in areas such as the workplace and relationships.

  3. Gender similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Janet Shibley

    2014-01-01

    Whether men and women are fundamentally different or similar has been debated for more than a century. This review summarizes major theories designed to explain gender differences: evolutionary theories, cognitive social learning theory, sociocultural theory, and expectancy-value theory. The gender similarities hypothesis raises the possibility of theorizing gender similarities. Statistical methods for the analysis of gender differences and similarities are reviewed, including effect sizes, meta-analysis, taxometric analysis, and equivalence testing. Then, relying mainly on evidence from meta-analyses, gender differences are reviewed in cognitive performance (e.g., math performance), personality and social behaviors (e.g., temperament, emotions, aggression, and leadership), and psychological well-being. The evidence on gender differences in variance is summarized. The final sections explore applications of intersectionality and directions for future research.

  4. Multivariate Hypergeometric Similarity Measure

    PubMed Central

    Kaddi, Chanchala D.; Parry, R. Mitchell; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a similarity measure based on the multivariate hypergeometric distribution for the pairwise comparison of images and data vectors. The formulation and performance of the proposed measure are compared with other similarity measures using synthetic data. A method of piecewise approximation is also implemented to facilitate application of the proposed measure to large samples. Example applications of the proposed similarity measure are presented using mass spectrometry imaging data and gene expression microarray data. Results from synthetic and biological data indicate that the proposed measure is capable of providing meaningful discrimination between samples, and that it can be a useful tool for identifying potentially related samples in large-scale biological data sets. PMID:24407308

  5. Where Similarity Beats Redundancy: The Importance of Context, Higher Order Similarity, and Response Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eidels, Ami; Townsend, James T.; Pomerantz, James R.

    2008-01-01

    People are especially efficient in processing certain visual stimuli such as human faces or good configurations. It has been suggested that topology and geometry play important roles in configural perception. Visual search is one area in which configurality seems to matter. When either of 2 target features leads to a correct response and the…

  6. The Qualitative Similarity Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Peter V.; Lee, Chongmin

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the qualitative similarity hypothesis (QSH) with respect to children and adolescents who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing. The primary focus is on the development of English language and literacy skills, and some information is provided on the acquisition of English as a second language. The QSH is briefly discussed within…

  7. Evaluating Reanalysis - Independent Observations and Observation Independence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, S.; Bollmeyer, C.; Danek, C.; Friederichs, P.; Keller, J. D.; Ohlwein, C.

    2014-12-01

    Reanalyses on global to regional scales are widely used for validation of meteorological or hydrological models and for many climate applications. However, the evaluation of the reanalyses itself is still a crucial task. A major challenge is the lack of independent observations, since most of the available observational data is already included, e. g. by the data assimilation scheme. Here, we focus on the evaluation of dynamical reanalyses which are obtained by using numerical weather prediction models with a fixed data assimilation scheme. Precipitation is generally not assimilated in dynamical reanalyses (except for e.g. latent heat nudging) and thereby provides valuable data for the evaluation of reanalysis. Since precipitation results from the complex dynamical and microphysical atmospheric processes, an accurate representation of precipitation is often used as an indicator for a good model performance. Here, we use independent observations of daily precipitation accumulations from European rain gauges (E-OBS) of the years 2008 and 2009 for the intercomparison of various regional reanalyses products for the European CORDEX domain (Hirlam reanalysis at 0.2°, Metoffice UM reanalysis at 0.11°, COSMO reanalysis at 0.055°). This allows for assessing the benefits of increased horizontal resolution compared to global reanalyses. Furthermore, the effect of latent heat nudging (assimilation of radar-derived rain rates) is investigated using an experimental setup of the COSMO reanalysis with 6km and 2km resolution for summer 2011. Further, we present an observation independent evaluation based on kinetic energy spectra. Such spectra should follow a k-3 dependence of the wave number k for the larger scale, and a k-5/3 dependence on the mesoscale. We compare the spectra of the aforementioned regional reanalyses in order to investigate the general capability of the reanalyses to resolve events on the mesoscale (e.g. effective resolution). The intercomparison and

  8. Optimization of a similarity measure for estimating ungauged streamflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichl, J. P. C.; Western, A. W.; McIntyre, N. R.; Chiew, F. H. S.

    2009-10-01

    One approach to predicting streamflow in an ungauged catchment is to select an ensemble of hydrological models previously identified for similar gauged catchments, where the similarity is based on some combination of important physical catchment attributes. The focus of this paper is the identification of catchment attributes and optimization of a similarity measure to produce the best possible ungauged streamflow predictions given a data set and a conceptual model structure. As a case study, the SimHyd rainfall-runoff model is applied to simulate monthly streamflow in 184 Australian catchments. Initial results show that none of 27 catchment attributes can be safely said to consistently give a better ensemble of models than random selection when used independently of other attributes. This is contrary to prior expectations and indicates the sparseness of information within our database of catchments, the importance in this case of prior knowledge for defining important attributes, and the potential importance of combining multiple attributes in order to usefully gauge similarity. Seven relatively independent attributes are then selected on the basis of prior knowledge. The weight with which each of these attributes contributes to the similarity measure is optimized to maximize streamflow prediction performance across a set of 95 catchments. The other 89 catchments are used to independently test the accuracy of streamflow predictions. Using the optimal set of weights led to marked improvement in the accuracy of predictions, showing that the method, while inferior to local calibration, is superior to alternative methods of model regionalization based on regression and spatial proximity. However, there is evidence of nonuniqueness in the optimal solution and the possibility that the attribute weights are somewhat dependent on the catchments used.

  9. Indexing Similar DNA Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Songbo; Lam, T. W.; Sung, W. K.; Tam, S. L.; Yiu, S. M.

    To study the genetic variations of a species, one basic operation is to search for occurrences of patterns in a large number of very similar genomic sequences. To build an indexing data structure on the concatenation of all sequences may require a lot of memory. In this paper, we propose a new scheme to index highly similar sequences by taking advantage of the similarity among the sequences. To store r sequences with k common segments, our index requires only O(n + NlogN) bits of memory, where n is the total length of the common segments and N is the total length of the distinct regions in all texts. The total length of all sequences is rn + N, and any scheme to store these sequences requires Ω(n + N) bits. Searching for a pattern P of length m takes O(m + m logN + m log(rk)psc(P) + occlogn), where psc(P) is the number of prefixes of P that appear as a suffix of some common segments and occ is the number of occurrences of P in all sequences. In practice, rk ≤ N, and psc(P) is usually a small constant. We have implemented our solution and evaluated our solution using real DNA sequences. The experiments show that the memory requirement of our solution is much less than that required by BWT built on the concatenation of all sequences. When compared to the other existing solution (RLCSA), we use less memory with faster searching time.

  10. Comparison of hydrological similarity measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rianna, Maura; Ridolfi, Elena; Manciola, Piergiorgio; Napolitano, Francesco; Russo, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    The use of a traditional at site approach for the statistical characterization and simulation of spatio-temporal precipitation fields has a major recognized drawback. Indeed, the weakness of the methodology is related to the estimation of rare events and it involves the uncertainty of the at-site sample statistical inference, because of the limited length of records. In order to overcome the lack of at-site observations, regional frequency approach uses the idea of substituting space for time to estimate design floods. The conventional regional frequency analysis estimates quantile values at a specific site from multi-site analysis. The main idea is that homogeneous sites, once pooled together, have similar probability distribution curves of extremes, except for a scaling factor. The method for pooling groups of sites can be based on geographical or climatological considerations. In this work the region of influence (ROI) pooling method is compared with an entropy-based one. The ROI is a flexible pooling group approach which defines for each site its own "region" formed by a unique set of similar stations. The similarity is found through the Euclidean distance metric in the attribute space. Here an alternative approach based on entropy is introduced to cluster homogeneous sites. The core idea is that homogeneous sites share a redundant (i.e. similar) amount of information. Homogeneous sites are pooled through a hierarchical selection based on the mutual information index (i.e. a measure of redundancy). The method is tested on precipitation data in Central Italy area.

  11. What causes similarity in catchments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenije, Hubert

    2014-05-01

    One of the biggest issues in hydrology is how to handle the heterogeneity of catchment properties at different scales. But is this really such a big issue? Is this problem not merely the consequence of how we conceptualise and how we model catchments? Is there not far more similarity than we observe. Maybe we are not looking at the right things or at the right scale to see the similarity. The identity of catchments is largely determined by: the landscape, the ecosystem living on the landscape, and the geology, in that order. Soils, which are often seen as a crucial aspect of hydrological behaviour, are far less important, as will be demonstrated. The main determinants of hydrological behaviour are: the landscape composition, the rooting depth and the phenology. These determinants are a consequence of landscape and ecosystem evolution, which, in turn, are the manifestations of entropy production. There are striking similarities between catchments. The different runoff processes from hillslopes are linked and similar in different environments (McDonnell, 2013). Wetlands behave similarly all over the world. The key is to classify landscapes and to link the ecosystems living on them to climate. The ecosystem then is the main controller of hydrological behaviour. Besides phenology, the rooting depth is key in determining runoff behaviour. Both are strongly linked to climate and much less to soil properties. An example is given of how rooting depth is determined by climate, and how rooting depth can be predicted without calibration, providing a strong constraints on the prediction of rainfall partitioning and catchment runoff.

  12. 7 CFR 1216.53 - Independent evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Independent evaluation. 1216.53 Section 1216.53... Independent evaluation. The Board shall, not less often than every five years, authorize and fund, from funds otherwise available to the Board, an independent evaluation of the effectiveness of the Order and...

  13. Variable Order and Distributed Order Fractional Operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2002-01-01

    Many physical processes appear to exhibit fractional order behavior that may vary with time or space. The continuum of order in the fractional calculus allows the order of the fractional operator to be considered as a variable. This paper develops the concept of variable and distributed order fractional operators. Definitions based on the Riemann-Liouville definitions are introduced and behavior of the operators is studied. Several time domain definitions that assign different arguments to the order q in the Riemann-Liouville definition are introduced. For each of these definitions various characteristics are determined. These include: time invariance of the operator, operator initialization, physical realization, linearity, operational transforms. and memory characteristics of the defining kernels. A measure (m2) for memory retentiveness of the order history is introduced. A generalized linear argument for the order q allows the concept of "tailored" variable order fractional operators whose a, memory may be chosen for a particular application. Memory retentiveness (m2) and order dynamic behavior are investigated and applications are shown. The concept of distributed order operators where the order of the time based operator depends on an additional independent (spatial) variable is also forwarded. Several definitions and their Laplace transforms are developed, analysis methods with these operators are demonstrated, and examples shown. Finally operators of multivariable and distributed order are defined in their various applications are outlined.

  14. Independent Peer Reviews

    SciTech Connect

    2012-03-16

    Independent Assessments: DOE's Systems Integrator convenes independent technical reviews to gauge progress toward meeting specific technical targets and to provide technical information necessary for key decisions.

  15. Visual similarity is stronger than semantic similarity in guiding visual search for numbers.

    PubMed

    Godwin, Hayward J; Hout, Michael C; Menneer, Tamaryn

    2014-06-01

    Using a visual search task, we explored how behavior is influenced by both visual and semantic information. We recorded participants' eye movements as they searched for a single target number in a search array of single-digit numbers (0-9). We examined the probability of fixating the various distractors as a function of two key dimensions: the visual similarity between the target and each distractor, and the semantic similarity (i.e., the numerical distance) between the target and each distractor. Visual similarity estimates were obtained using multidimensional scaling based on the independent observer similarity ratings. A linear mixed-effects model demonstrated that both visual and semantic similarity influenced the probability that distractors would be fixated. However, the visual similarity effect was substantially larger than the semantic similarity effect. We close by discussing the potential value of using this novel methodological approach and the implications for both simple and complex visual search displays.

  16. Frame independent cosmological perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopec, Tomislav; Weenink, Jan E-mail: j.g.weenink@uu.nl

    2013-09-01

    We compute the third order gauge invariant action for scalar-graviton interactions in the Jordan frame. We demonstrate that the gauge invariant action for scalar and tensor perturbations on one physical hypersurface only differs from that on another physical hypersurface via terms proportional to the equation of motion and boundary terms, such that the evolution of non-Gaussianity may be called unique. Moreover, we demonstrate that the gauge invariant curvature perturbation and graviton on uniform field hypersurfaces in the Jordan frame are equal to their counterparts in the Einstein frame. These frame independent perturbations are therefore particularly useful in relating results in different frames at the perturbative level. On the other hand, the field perturbation and graviton on uniform curvature hypersurfaces in the Jordan and Einstein frame are non-linearly related, as are their corresponding actions and n-point functions.

  17. Generalized structure of higher order nonclassicality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Amit; Pathak, Anirban

    2010-02-01

    A generalized notion of higher order nonclassicality (in terms of higher order moments) is introduced. Under this generalized framework of higher order nonclassicality, conditions of higher order squeezing and higher order subpoissonian photon statistics are derived. A simpler form of the Hong-Mandel higher order squeezing criterion is derived under this framework by using an operator ordering theorem introduced by us in [A. Pathak, J. Phys. A 33 (2000) 5607]. It is also generalized for multi-photon Bose operators of Brandt and Greenberg. Similarly, condition for higher order subpoissonian photon statistics is derived by normal ordering of higher powers of number operator. Further, with the help of simple density matrices, it is shown that the higher order antibunching (HOA) and higher order subpoissonian photon statistics (HOSPS) are not the manifestation of the same phenomenon and consequently it is incorrect to use the condition of HOA as a test of HOSPS. It is also shown that the HOA and HOSPS may exist even in absence of the corresponding lower order phenomenon. Binomial state, nonlinear first order excited squeezed state (NLESS) and nonlinear vacuum squeezed state (NLVSS) are used as examples of quantum state and it is shown that these states may show higher order nonclassical characteristics. It is observed that the Binomial state which is always antibunched, is not always higher order squeezed and NLVSS which shows higher order squeezing does not show HOSPS and HOA. The opposite is observed in NLESS and consequently it is established that the HOSPS and HOS are two independent signatures of higher order nonclassicality.

  18. After order 636

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, M.G.

    1995-02-01

    Through its Order 636, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) completed a restructuring of the natural gas industry. The order severed the last links in the chain linking gas producers to pipeline companies to local gas distribution companies (LDCs) to customers. Before Order 636 took effect, many predicted electric power generation, particularly by cogenerators and independent power producers (IPPs), would be a major growth area for natural gas. In fact, what Order 636 has shown is, that timing is everything, and that it`s difficult to sort out the effect of one agent of change when many others are at work.

  19. Culture independent PCR: an alternative enzyme discovery strategy.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Jonas; Lydolph, Magnus; Lange, Lene

    2005-01-01

    Degenerate primers were designed for use in a culture-independent PCR screening of DNA from composite fungal communities, inhabiting residues of corn stovers and leaves. According to similarity searches and alignments amplified clone sequences affiliated with glycosyl hydrolase family 7 and glycosyl hydrolase family 45 though significant sequence divergence was observed. Glycosyl hydrolases from families 7 and 45 play a crucial role in biomass conversion to fuel ethanol. Research in this renewable energy source has two objectives: (i) To contribute to development of a renewable alternative to world's limited crude fossil oil reserves and (ii) to reduce air pollution. Amplification with 18S rDNA-specific primers revealed species within the ascomycetous orders Sordariales and Hypocreales as well as basidiomycetous order Agaricales to be present in these communities. Our study documents the value of culture-independent PCR in microbial diversity studies and could add to development of a new enzyme screening technology. PMID:15567226

  20. Culture independent PCR: an alternative enzyme discovery strategy.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Jonas; Lydolph, Magnus; Lange, Lene

    2005-01-01

    Degenerate primers were designed for use in a culture-independent PCR screening of DNA from composite fungal communities, inhabiting residues of corn stovers and leaves. According to similarity searches and alignments amplified clone sequences affiliated with glycosyl hydrolase family 7 and glycosyl hydrolase family 45 though significant sequence divergence was observed. Glycosyl hydrolases from families 7 and 45 play a crucial role in biomass conversion to fuel ethanol. Research in this renewable energy source has two objectives: (i) To contribute to development of a renewable alternative to world's limited crude fossil oil reserves and (ii) to reduce air pollution. Amplification with 18S rDNA-specific primers revealed species within the ascomycetous orders Sordariales and Hypocreales as well as basidiomycetous order Agaricales to be present in these communities. Our study documents the value of culture-independent PCR in microbial diversity studies and could add to development of a new enzyme screening technology.

  1. Order Theoretical Semantic Recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Hogan, Emilie A.; Paulson, Patrick R.; Peterson, Elena S.; Stephan, Eric G.; Thomas, Dennis G.

    2013-07-23

    Mathematical concepts of order and ordering relations play multiple roles in semantic technologies. Discrete totally ordered data characterize both input streams and top-k rank-ordered recommendations and query output, while temporal attributes establish numerical total orders, either over time points or in the more complex case of startend temporal intervals. But also of note are the fully partially ordered data, including both lattices and non-lattices, which actually dominate the semantic strcuture of ontological systems. Scalar semantic similarities over partially-ordered semantic data are traditionally used to return rank-ordered recommendations, but these require complementation with true metrics available over partially ordered sets. In this paper we report on our work in the foundations of partial order measurement in ontologies, with application to top-k semantic recommendation in workflows.

  2. Independent bilateral primary bronchial carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, M. Ray

    1971-01-01

    Independent bilateral primary bronchial carcinomas are not common. Since Beyreuther's description in 1924, 16 well-documented cases of independent primary bronchial carcinomas of different histology have been described. From 1965 to 1970, eight cases were seen at the London Chest Hospital. In order to make the diagnosis of a second primary bronchial carcinoma, each tumour should be malignant and neither should be a metastasis from the other. To meet this last criterion, the histopathological features of the two tumours must be different. Many cases have been described in the literature as double primary bronchial carcinomas where the second primary had the same histological features as the first. Images PMID:4327711

  3. Guide to good practices for independent verification

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, Independent Verification, Chapter X of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing independent verification activities. Contractors are advised to adopt procedures that meet the intent of DOE Order 5480.19. Independent Verification is an element of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the necessity for coordinated independent verification activities to promote safe and efficient operations.

  4. Universal self-similarity of propagating populations.

    PubMed

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2010-07-01

    This paper explores the universal self-similarity of propagating populations. The following general propagation model is considered: particles are randomly emitted from the origin of a d-dimensional Euclidean space and propagate randomly and independently of each other in space; all particles share a statistically common--yet arbitrary--motion pattern; each particle has its own random propagation parameters--emission epoch, motion frequency, and motion amplitude. The universally self-similar statistics of the particles' displacements and first passage times (FPTs) are analyzed: statistics which are invariant with respect to the details of the displacement and FPT measurements and with respect to the particles' underlying motion pattern. Analysis concludes that the universally self-similar statistics are governed by Poisson processes with power-law intensities and by the Fréchet and Weibull extreme-value laws.

  5. Universal self-similarity of propagating populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2010-07-01

    This paper explores the universal self-similarity of propagating populations. The following general propagation model is considered: particles are randomly emitted from the origin of a d -dimensional Euclidean space and propagate randomly and independently of each other in space; all particles share a statistically common—yet arbitrary—motion pattern; each particle has its own random propagation parameters—emission epoch, motion frequency, and motion amplitude. The universally self-similar statistics of the particles’ displacements and first passage times (FPTs) are analyzed: statistics which are invariant with respect to the details of the displacement and FPT measurements and with respect to the particles’ underlying motion pattern. Analysis concludes that the universally self-similar statistics are governed by Poisson processes with power-law intensities and by the Fréchet and Weibull extreme-value laws.

  6. Mixture toxicity of three toxicants with similar and dissimilar modes of action to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Syberg, Kristian; Elleby, Anders; Pedersen, Henrik; Cedergreen, Nina; Forbes, Valery E

    2008-03-01

    Mixture toxicity of similar- and dissimilar-acting toxicants can be predicted by the models concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) using single substance toxicity data. Knowledge of the toxicants mode of action is thus required in order to use the models. In order to test the predictive capability of the models, we conducted Daphnia magna 48 h immobilization experiments with three toxicants with known modes of action (dimethoate, pirimicarb and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate) singly, and in binary and ternary mixtures. Our results indicate that CA and IA predict binary mixtures of similar- and dissimilar-acting toxicants equally well. CA and IA also equally predicted the ternary mixture consisting of both similar- and dissimilar-acting chemicals. The paper discusses the concept of mode of action and the implications the definition of mode of action has on the choice of reference model for mixture toxicity studies.

  7. Order Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibeault, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Change orders. The words can turn the stomachs of administrators. Horror stories about change orders create fear and distrust among school officials, designers and builders. Can change orders be avoided? If car manufacturers can produce millions of intricately designed vehicles, why can't the same quality control be achieved on a construction…

  8. Functional Similarity and Interpersonal Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neimeyer, Greg J.; Neimeyer, Robert A.

    1981-01-01

    Students participated in dyadic disclosure exercises over a five-week period. Results indicated members of high functional similarity dyads evidenced greater attraction to one another than did members of low functional similarity dyads. "Friendship" pairs of male undergraduates displayed greater functional similarity than did "nominal" pairs from…

  9. Transformation and Alignment in Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgetts, Carl J.; Hahn, Ulrike; Chater, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This paper contrasts two structural accounts of psychological similarity: structural alignment (SA) and Representational Distortion (RD). SA proposes that similarity is determined by how readily the structures of two objects can be brought into alignment; RD measures similarity by the complexity of the transformation that "distorts" one…

  10. Acoustic Similarity and Dichotic Listening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Peter

    1978-01-01

    An experiment tests conjectures that right ear advantage (REA) has an auditory origin in competition or interference between acoustically similar stimuli and that feature-sharing effect (FSE) has its origin in assignment of features of phonetically similar stimuli. No effect on the REA for acoustic similarity, and a clear effect of acoustic…

  11. The Case of the Similar Trees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Rochelle Wilson

    1982-01-01

    A possible logical flaw based on similar triangles is discussed with the Sherlock Holmes mystery, "The Muskgrave Ritual." The possible flaw has to do with the need for two trees to have equal growth rates over a 250-year period in order for the solution presented to work. (MP)

  12. Hiring and Retaining Great Independent School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balossi, Matt; Hernández, Natalie R.

    2016-01-01

    While numerous studies measure teacher effectiveness in public schools, there is little research on teacher quality among independent schools. In fact, the topic of teacher quality in public schools receives widespread media coverage, funding, and special interest. In order to better understand how independent schools describe high-quality…

  13. 7 CFR 1217.61 - Independent evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Independent evaluation. 1217.61 Section 1217.61... evaluation. At least once every five years, the Board shall authorize and fund from funds otherwise available to the Board, an independent evaluation of the effectiveness of the Order and the programs...

  14. Self-similarity in Laplacian growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mineev-weinstein, Mark; Zabrodin, Anton; Abanov, Artem

    2008-01-01

    We consider Laplacian Growth of self-similar domains in different geometries. Self-similarity determines the analytic structure of the Schwarz function of the moving boundary. The knowledge of this analytic structure allows us to derive the integral equation for the conformal map. It is shown that solutions to the integral equation obey also a second-order differential equation which is the 1D Schroedinger equation with the sinh{sup -2}-potential. The solutions, which are expressed through the Gauss hypergeometric function, characterize the geometry of self-similar patterns in a wedge. We also find the potential for the Coulomb gas representation of the self-similar Laplacian growth in a wedge and calculate the corresponding free energy.

  15. Multivariate Time Series Similarity Searching

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jimin; Zhu, Yuelong; Li, Shijin; Wan, Dingsheng; Zhang, Pengcheng

    2014-01-01

    Multivariate time series (MTS) datasets are very common in various financial, multimedia, and hydrological fields. In this paper, a dimension-combination method is proposed to search similar sequences for MTS. Firstly, the similarity of single-dimension series is calculated; then the overall similarity of the MTS is obtained by synthesizing each of the single-dimension similarity based on weighted BORDA voting method. The dimension-combination method could use the existing similarity searching method. Several experiments, which used the classification accuracy as a measure, were performed on six datasets from the UCI KDD Archive to validate the method. The results show the advantage of the approach compared to the traditional similarity measures, such as Euclidean distance (ED), cynamic time warping (DTW), point distribution (PD), PCA similarity factor (SPCA), and extended Frobenius norm (Eros), for MTS datasets in some ways. Our experiments also demonstrate that no measure can fit all datasets, and the proposed measure is a choice for similarity searches. PMID:24895665

  16. Multivariate time series similarity searching.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jimin; Zhu, Yuelong; Li, Shijin; Wan, Dingsheng; Zhang, Pengcheng

    2014-01-01

    Multivariate time series (MTS) datasets are very common in various financial, multimedia, and hydrological fields. In this paper, a dimension-combination method is proposed to search similar sequences for MTS. Firstly, the similarity of single-dimension series is calculated; then the overall similarity of the MTS is obtained by synthesizing each of the single-dimension similarity based on weighted BORDA voting method. The dimension-combination method could use the existing similarity searching method. Several experiments, which used the classification accuracy as a measure, were performed on six datasets from the UCI KDD Archive to validate the method. The results show the advantage of the approach compared to the traditional similarity measures, such as Euclidean distance (ED), cynamic time warping (DTW), point distribution (PD), PCA similarity factor (SPCA), and extended Frobenius norm (Eros), for MTS datasets in some ways. Our experiments also demonstrate that no measure can fit all datasets, and the proposed measure is a choice for similarity searches. PMID:24895665

  17. Dynamic similarity in erosional processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheidegger, A.E.

    1963-01-01

    A study is made of the dynamic similarity conditions obtaining in a variety of erosional processes. The pertinent equations for each type of process are written in dimensionless form; the similarity conditions can then easily be deduced. The processes treated are: raindrop action, slope evolution and river erosion. ?? 1963 Istituto Geofisico Italiano.

  18. Discuss Similarity Using Visual Intuition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Dana C.; Lo, Jane-Jane

    2012-01-01

    The change in size from a smaller shape to a larger similar shape (or vice versa) is created through continuous proportional stretching or shrinking in every direction. Students cannot solve similarity tasks simply by iterating or partitioning a composed unit, strategies typically used on numerical proportional tasks. The transition to thinking…

  19. Two perspectives on similarity between words

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Stefan A.

    2003-10-01

    This presentation examines the similarity between words from both bottom up (phonetic) and top down (phonological/psycholinguistic) perspectives. From the phonological perspective, the influence of structure on similarity is explored using metalinguistic acceptability judgments for multisyllabic nonwords. Results from an experiment suggest that subjects try to align novel words with known words in order to maximize similarities while minimizing dissimilarities. This finding parallels results from psychology on similarity judgments for visual scenes. From the phonetic perspective, the influence of similar gestures on speech error rates is examined using ultrasound measurement of tongue position. In a pilot experiment, subjects, produced tongue twisters containing words where onset and vowel phonemes had similar gestures (e.g., tip, comb) and where the onset and vowel had dissimilar gestures (e.g., tube, keep). Preliminary results suggest that misarticulations are more frequent in the context of dissimilar gestures (e.g., in the tongue twister tip cape keep tape, error rates are higher for /k/ than /t/). These errors appear to be gestural interactions rather than errors at the phonemic or featural level of phonological spellout. Together, these two experiments indicate that similarity relations between words are found at multiple levels, any which are potentially relevant to the structure of phonological systems.

  20. Horton Law in Self-Similar Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovchegov, Yevgeniy; Zaliapin, Ilya

    2016-04-01

    Self-similarity of random trees is related to the operation of pruning. Pruning ℛ cuts the leaves and their parental edges and removes the resulting chains of degree-two nodes from a finite tree. A Horton-Strahler order of a vertex v and its parental edge is defined as the minimal number of prunings necessary to eliminate the subtree rooted at v. A branch is a group of neighboring vertices and edges of the same order. The Horton numbers 𝒩k[K] and 𝒩ij[K] are defined as the expected number of branches of order k, and the expected number of order-i branches that merged order-j branches, j > i, respectively, in a finite tree of order K. The Tokunaga coefficients are defined as Tij[K] = 𝒩ij[K]/𝒩j[K]. The pruning decreases the orders of tree vertices by unity. A rooted full binary tree is said to be mean-self-similar if its Tokunaga coefficients are invariant with respect to pruning: Tk := Ti,i+k[K]. We show that for self-similar trees, the condition limsupk→∞Tk1/k < ∞ is necessary and sufficient for the existence of the strong Horton law: 𝒩k[K]/𝒩1[K] → R1-k, as K →∞ for some R > 0 and every k ≥ 1. This work is a step toward providing rigorous foundations for the Horton law that, being omnipresent in natural branching systems, has escaped so far a formal explanation.

  1. Towards Personalized Medicine: Leveraging Patient Similarity and Drug Similarity Analytics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Fei; Hu, Jianying; Sorrentino, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The rapid adoption of electronic health records (EHR) provides a comprehensive source for exploratory and predictive analytic to support clinical decision-making. In this paper, we investigate how to utilize EHR to tailor treatments to individual patients based on their likelihood to respond to a therapy. We construct a heterogeneous graph which includes two domains (patients and drugs) and encodes three relationships (patient similarity, drug similarity, and patient-drug prior associations). We describe a novel approach for performing a label propagation procedure to spread the label information representing the effectiveness of different drugs for different patients over this heterogeneous graph. The proposed method has been applied on a real-world EHR dataset to help identify personalized treatments for hypercholesterolemia. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach and suggest that the combination of appropriate patient similarity and drug similarity analytics could lead to actionable insights for personalized medicine. Particularly, by leveraging drug similarity in combination with patient similarity, our method could perform well even on new or rarely used drugs for which there are few records of known past performance. PMID:25717413

  2. Towards personalized medicine: leveraging patient similarity and drug similarity analytics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Fei; Hu, Jianying; Sorrentino, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The rapid adoption of electronic health records (EHR) provides a comprehensive source for exploratory and predictive analytic to support clinical decision-making. In this paper, we investigate how to utilize EHR to tailor treatments to individual patients based on their likelihood to respond to a therapy. We construct a heterogeneous graph which includes two domains (patients and drugs) and encodes three relationships (patient similarity, drug similarity, and patient-drug prior associations). We describe a novel approach for performing a label propagation procedure to spread the label information representing the effectiveness of different drugs for different patients over this heterogeneous graph. The proposed method has been applied on a real-world EHR dataset to help identify personalized treatments for hypercholesterolemia. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach and suggest that the combination of appropriate patient similarity and drug similarity analytics could lead to actionable insights for personalized medicine. Particularly, by leveraging drug similarity in combination with patient similarity, our method could perform well even on new or rarely used drugs for which there are few records of known past performance. PMID:25717413

  3. Fostering Musical Independence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shieh, Eric; Allsup, Randall Everett

    2016-01-01

    Musical independence has always been an essential aim of musical instruction. But this objective can refer to everything from high levels of musical expertise to more student choice in the classroom. While most conceptualizations of musical independence emphasize the demonstration of knowledge and skills within particular music traditions, this…

  4. Independent vs. Laboratory Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Clint C., II

    1981-01-01

    Comparisons of independent and laboratory newspapers at selected California colleges indicated that (1) the independent newspapers were superior in editorial opinion and leadership characteristics; (2) the laboratory newspapers made better use of photography, art, and graphics; and (3) professional journalists highly rated their laboratory…

  5. Independence of Internal Auditors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montondon, Lucille; Meixner, Wilda F.

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 288 college and university auditors investigated patterns in their appointment, reporting, and supervisory practices as indicators of independence and objectivity. Results indicate a weakness in the positioning of internal auditing within institutions, possibly compromising auditor independence. Because the auditing function is…

  6. American Independence. Fifth Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Annette

    This fifth grade teaching unit covers early conflicts between the American colonies and Britain, battles of the American Revolutionary War, and the Declaration of Independence. Knowledge goals address the pre-revolutionary acts enforced by the British, the concepts of conflict and independence, and the major events and significant people from the…

  7. Self-similar aftershock rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidsen, Jörn; Baiesi, Marco

    2016-08-01

    In many important systems exhibiting crackling noise—an intermittent avalanchelike relaxation response with power-law and, thus, self-similar distributed event sizes—the "laws" for the rate of activity after large events are not consistent with the overall self-similar behavior expected on theoretical grounds. This is particularly true for the case of seismicity, and a satisfying solution to this paradox has remained outstanding. Here, we propose a generalized description of the aftershock rates which is both self-similar and consistent with all other known self-similar features. Comparing our theoretical predictions with high-resolution earthquake data from Southern California we find excellent agreement, providing particularly clear evidence for a unified description of aftershocks and foreshocks. This may offer an improved framework for time-dependent seismic hazard assessment and earthquake forecasting.

  8. Self-similar aftershock rates.

    PubMed

    Davidsen, Jörn; Baiesi, Marco

    2016-08-01

    In many important systems exhibiting crackling noise-an intermittent avalanchelike relaxation response with power-law and, thus, self-similar distributed event sizes-the "laws" for the rate of activity after large events are not consistent with the overall self-similar behavior expected on theoretical grounds. This is particularly true for the case of seismicity, and a satisfying solution to this paradox has remained outstanding. Here, we propose a generalized description of the aftershock rates which is both self-similar and consistent with all other known self-similar features. Comparing our theoretical predictions with high-resolution earthquake data from Southern California we find excellent agreement, providing particularly clear evidence for a unified description of aftershocks and foreshocks. This may offer an improved framework for time-dependent seismic hazard assessment and earthquake forecasting. PMID:27627324

  9. Self-similar aftershock rates.

    PubMed

    Davidsen, Jörn; Baiesi, Marco

    2016-08-01

    In many important systems exhibiting crackling noise-an intermittent avalanchelike relaxation response with power-law and, thus, self-similar distributed event sizes-the "laws" for the rate of activity after large events are not consistent with the overall self-similar behavior expected on theoretical grounds. This is particularly true for the case of seismicity, and a satisfying solution to this paradox has remained outstanding. Here, we propose a generalized description of the aftershock rates which is both self-similar and consistent with all other known self-similar features. Comparing our theoretical predictions with high-resolution earthquake data from Southern California we find excellent agreement, providing particularly clear evidence for a unified description of aftershocks and foreshocks. This may offer an improved framework for time-dependent seismic hazard assessment and earthquake forecasting.

  10. Does morphological convergence imply functional similarity? A test using the evolution of quadrupedalism in ornithischian dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Maidment, Susannah C R; Barrett, Paul M

    2012-09-22

    Convergent morphologies are thought to indicate functional similarity, arising because of a limited number of evolutionary or developmental pathways. Extant taxa displaying convergent morphologies are used as analogues to assess function in extinct taxa with similar characteristics. However, functional studies of extant taxa have shown that functional similarity can arise from differing morphologies, calling into question the paradigm that form and function are closely related. We test the hypothesis that convergent skeletal morphology indicates functional similarity in the fossil record using ornithischian dinosaurs. The rare transition from bipedality to quadrupedality occurred at least three times independently in this clade, resulting in a suite of convergent osteological characteristics. We use homology rather than analogy to provide an independent line of evidence about function, reconstructing soft tissues using the extant phylogenetic bracket and applying biomechanical concepts to produce qualitative assessments of muscle leverage. We also optimize character changes to investigate the sequence of character acquisition. Different lineages of quadrupedal ornithischian dinosaur stood and walked differently from each other, falsifying the hypothesis that osteological convergence indicates functional similarity. The acquisition of features correlated with quadrupedalism generally occurs in the same order in each clade, suggesting underlying developmental mechanisms that act as evolutionary constraints.

  11. Similarity Metrics for Closed Loop Dynamic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorton, Mark S.; Yang, Lee C.; Bedrossian, Naz; Hall, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    To what extent and in what ways can two closed-loop dynamic systems be said to be "similar?" This question arises in a wide range of dynamic systems modeling and control system design applications. For example, bounds on error models are fundamental to the controller optimization with modern control design methods. Metrics such as the structured singular value are direct measures of the degree to which properties such as stability or performance are maintained in the presence of specified uncertainties or variations in the plant model. Similarly, controls-related areas such as system identification, model reduction, and experimental model validation employ measures of similarity between multiple realizations of a dynamic system. Each area has its tools and approaches, with each tool more or less suited for one application or the other. Similarity in the context of closed-loop model validation via flight test is subtly different from error measures in the typical controls oriented application. Whereas similarity in a robust control context relates to plant variation and the attendant affect on stability and performance, in this context similarity metrics are sought that assess the relevance of a dynamic system test for the purpose of validating the stability and performance of a "similar" dynamic system. Similarity in the context of system identification is much more relevant than are robust control analogies in that errors between one dynamic system (the test article) and another (the nominal "design" model) are sought for the purpose of bounding the validity of a model for control design and analysis. Yet system identification typically involves open-loop plant models which are independent of the control system (with the exception of limited developments in closed-loop system identification which is nonetheless focused on obtaining open-loop plant models from closed-loop data). Moreover the objectives of system identification are not the same as a flight test and

  12. Characterizing limit order prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withanawasam, R. M.; Whigham, P. A.; Crack, Timothy Falcon

    2013-11-01

    A computational model of a limit order book is used to study the effect of different limit order distribution offsets. Reference prices such as same side/contra side best market prices and last traded price are considered in combination with different price offset distributions. We show that when characterizing limit order prices, varying the offset distribution only produces different behavior when the reference price is the contra side best price. Irrespective of the underlying mechanisms used in computing the limit order prices, the shape of the price graph and the behavior of the average order book profile distribution are strikingly similar in all the considered reference prices/offset distributions. This implies that existing averaging methods can cancel variabilities in limit order book shape/attributes and may be misleading.

  13. Similarity, invariance, and musical variation.

    PubMed

    McAdams, S; Matzkin, D

    2001-06-01

    Perceptual similarity underlies a number of important psychological properties of musical materials, including perceptual invariance under transformation, categorization, recognition, and the sense of familiarity. Mental processes involved in the perception of musical similarity may be an integral part of the functional logic of music composition and thus underly important aspects of musical experience. How much and in what ways can musical materials be varied and still be considered as perceptually related or as belonging to the same category? The notions of musical material, musical variation, perceptual similarity and invariance, and form-bearing dimensions are considered in this light. Recent work on similarity perception has demonstrated that the transformation space for a given musical material is limited by several factors ranging from degree of match of the values of auditory attributes of the events composing the sequences to their relations of various levels of abstraction and to the degree that the transformation respects the grammar of the musical system within which the material was composed. These notions and results are considered in the light of future directions of research, particularly concerning the role of similarity and invariance in the understanding of musical form during listening.

  14. Similarity, invariance, and musical variation.

    PubMed

    McAdams, S; Matzkin, D

    2001-06-01

    Perceptual similarity underlies a number of important psychological properties of musical materials, including perceptual invariance under transformation, categorization, recognition, and the sense of familiarity. Mental processes involved in the perception of musical similarity may be an integral part of the functional logic of music composition and thus underly important aspects of musical experience. How much and in what ways can musical materials be varied and still be considered as perceptually related or as belonging to the same category? The notions of musical material, musical variation, perceptual similarity and invariance, and form-bearing dimensions are considered in this light. Recent work on similarity perception has demonstrated that the transformation space for a given musical material is limited by several factors ranging from degree of match of the values of auditory attributes of the events composing the sequences to their relations of various levels of abstraction and to the degree that the transformation respects the grammar of the musical system within which the material was composed. These notions and results are considered in the light of future directions of research, particularly concerning the role of similarity and invariance in the understanding of musical form during listening. PMID:11458867

  15. Quantifying Similarity in Seismic Polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, D. W. S.; Jones, J. P.; Caffagni, E.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring similarity in seismic attributes can help identify tremor, low S/N signals, and converted or reflected phases, in addition to diagnosing site noise and sensor misalignment in arrays. Polarization analysis is a widely accepted method for studying the orientation and directional characteristics of seismic phases via. computed attributes, but similarity is ordinarily discussed using qualitative comparisons with reference values. Here we introduce a technique for quantitative polarization similarity that uses weighted histograms computed in short, overlapping time windows, drawing on methods adapted from the image processing and computer vision literature. Our method accounts for ambiguity in azimuth and incidence angle and variations in signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Using records of the Mw=8.3 Sea of Okhotsk earthquake from CNSN broadband sensors in British Columbia and Yukon Territory, Canada, and vertical borehole array data from a monitoring experiment at Hoadley gas field, central Alberta, Canada, we demonstrate that our method is robust to station spacing. Discrete wavelet analysis extends polarization similarity to the time-frequency domain in a straightforward way. Because histogram distance metrics are bounded by [0 1], clustering allows empirical time-frequency separation of seismic phase arrivals on single-station three-component records. Array processing for automatic seismic phase classification may be possible using subspace clustering of polarization similarity, but efficient algorithms are required to reduce the dimensionality.

  16. Sibling similarity in family formation.

    PubMed

    Raab, Marcel; Fasang, Anette Eva; Karhula, Aleksi; Erola, Jani

    2014-12-01

    Sibling studies have been widely used to analyze the impact of family background on socioeconomic and, to a lesser extent, demographic outcomes. We contribute to this literature with a novel research design that combines sibling comparisons and sequence analysis to analyze longitudinal family-formation trajectories of siblings and unrelated persons. This allows us to scrutinize in a more rigorous way whether sibling similarity exists in family-formation trajectories and whether siblings' shared background characteristics, such as parental education and early childhood family structure, can account for similarity in family formation. We use Finnish register data from 1987 through 2007 to construct longitudinal family-formation trajectories in young adulthood for siblings and unrelated dyads (N = 14,257 dyads). Findings show that family formation is moderately but significantly more similar for siblings than for unrelated dyads, also after controlling for crucial parental background characteristics. Shared parental background characteristics add surprisingly little to account for sibling similarity in family formation. Instead, gender and the respondents' own education are more decisive forces in the stratification of family formation. Yet, family internal dynamics seem to reinforce this stratification such that siblings have a higher probability to experience similar family-formation patterns. In particular, patterns that correspond with economic disadvantage are concentrated within families. This is in line with a growing body of research highlighting the importance of family structure in the reproduction of social inequality.

  17. Data Machine Independence

    1994-12-30

    Data-machine independence achieved by using four technologies (ASN.1, XDR, SDS, and ZEBRA) has been evaluated by encoding two different applications in each of the above; and their results compared against the standard programming method using C.

  18. Media independent interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The work done on the Media Independent Interface (MII) Interface Control Document (ICD) program is described and recommendations based on it were made. Explanations and rationale for the content of the ICD itself are presented.

  19. Dreaming and waking: similarities and differences revisited.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Tracey L; LaBerge, Stephen P

    2011-09-01

    Dreaming is often characterized as lacking high-order cognitive (HOC) skills. In two studies, we test the alternative hypothesis that the dreaming mind is highly similar to the waking mind. Multiple experience samples were obtained from late-night REM sleep and waking, following a systematic protocol described in Kahan (2001). Results indicated that reported dreaming and waking experiences are surprisingly similar in their cognitive and sensory qualities. Concurrently, ratings of dreaming and waking experiences were markedly different on questions of general reality orientation and logical organization (e.g., the bizarreness or typicality of the events, actions, and locations). Consistent with other recent studies (e.g., Bulkeley & Kahan, 2008; Kozmová & Wolman, 2006), experiences sampled from dreaming and waking were more similar with respect to their process features than with respect to their structural features.

  20. Aiming for Efficiency by Detecting Structural Similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Judith; Jeliazkov, Nikolay; Kühne, Gerold

    When applying XML-Retrieval in a distributed setting, efficiency issues have to be considered, e.g. reducing the network traffic involved in an swering a given query. The new Efficiency Track of INEX gave us the opportu nity to explore the possibility of improving both effectiveness and efficiency by exploiting structural similarity. We ran some of the track’s highly structured queries on our top-k search engine to analyze the impact of various structural similarity functions. We applied those functions first to the ranking and based on that to the query routing process. Our results indicate that detection of structural similarity can be used in order to re duce the amount of messages sent between distributed nodes and thus lead to more efficiency of the search.

  1. Transformation and alignment in similarity.

    PubMed

    Hodgetts, Carl J; Hahn, Ulrike; Chater, Nick

    2009-10-01

    This paper contrasts two structural accounts of psychological similarity: structural alignment (SA) and Representational Distortion (RD). SA proposes that similarity is determined by how readily the structures of two objects can be brought into alignment; RD measures similarity by the complexity of the transformation that "distorts" one representation into the other. We assess RD by defining a simple coding scheme of psychological transformations for the experimental materials. In two experiments, this "concrete" version of RD provides compelling fits of the data and compares favourably with SA. Finally, stepping back from particular models, we argue that perceptual theory suggests that transformations and alignment processes should generally be viewed as complementary, in contrast to the current distinction in the literature. PMID:19720370

  2. Counterbalancing for Serial Order Carryover Effects in Experimental Condition Orders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Reactions of neural, psychological, and social systems are rarely, if ever, independent of previous inputs and states. The potential for serial order carryover effects from one condition to the next in a sequence of experimental trials makes counterbalancing of condition order an essential part of experimental design. Here, a method is proposed…

  3. Stimulus Similarity as a Determinant of Pavlovian Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rescorla, Robert A.; Furrow, David R.

    1977-01-01

    Three experiments carried out second-order Pavlovian conditioning using either similar or dissimilar first-and second-order stimuli. All three experiments were designed to identify the effects of similarity upon conditioning as distinct from its effects upon sensitization or stimulus generalization. (Editor/RK)

  4. What Difference Reveals about Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagi, Eyal; Gentner, Dedre; Lovett, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Detecting that two images are different is faster for highly dissimilar images than for highly similar images. Paradoxically, we showed that the reverse occurs when people are asked to describe "how" two images differ--that is, to state a difference between two images. Following structure-mapping theory, we propose that this disassociation arises…

  5. Packing density of rigid aggregates is independent of scale.

    PubMed

    Zangmeister, Christopher D; Radney, James G; Dockery, Lance T; Young, Jessica T; Ma, Xiaofei; You, Rian; Zachariah, Michael R

    2014-06-24

    Large planetary seedlings, comets, microscale pharmaceuticals, and nanoscale soot particles are made from rigid, aggregated subunits that are compacted under low compression into larger structures spanning over 10 orders of magnitude in dimensional space. Here, we demonstrate that the packing density (θf) of compacted rigid aggregates is independent of spatial scale for systems under weak compaction. The θf of rigid aggregated structures across six orders of magnitude were measured using nanoscale spherical soot aerosol composed of aggregates with ∼ 17-nm monomeric subunits and aggregates made from uniform monomeric 6-mm spherical subunits at the macroscale. We find θf = 0.36 ± 0.02 at both dimensions. These values are remarkably similar to θf observed for comet nuclei and measured values of other rigid aggregated systems across a wide variety of spatial and formative conditions. We present a packing model that incorporates the aggregate morphology and show that θf is independent of both monomer and aggregate size. These observations suggest that the θf of rigid aggregates subject to weak compaction forces is independent of spatial dimension across varied formative conditions. PMID:24927577

  6. Packing density of rigid aggregates is independent of scale

    PubMed Central

    Zangmeister, Christopher D.; Radney, James G.; Dockery, Lance T.; Young, Jessica T.; Ma, Xiaofei; You, Rian; Zachariah, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Large planetary seedlings, comets, microscale pharmaceuticals, and nanoscale soot particles are made from rigid, aggregated subunits that are compacted under low compression into larger structures spanning over 10 orders of magnitude in dimensional space. Here, we demonstrate that the packing density (θf) of compacted rigid aggregates is independent of spatial scale for systems under weak compaction. The θf of rigid aggregated structures across six orders of magnitude were measured using nanoscale spherical soot aerosol composed of aggregates with ∼17-nm monomeric subunits and aggregates made from uniform monomeric 6-mm spherical subunits at the macroscale. We find θf = 0.36 ± 0.02 at both dimensions. These values are remarkably similar to θf observed for comet nuclei and measured values of other rigid aggregated systems across a wide variety of spatial and formative conditions. We present a packing model that incorporates the aggregate morphology and show that θf is independent of both monomer and aggregate size. These observations suggest that the θf of rigid aggregates subject to weak compaction forces is independent of spatial dimension across varied formative conditions. PMID:24927577

  7. Latent semantic analysis cosines as a cognitive similarity measure: Evidence from priming studies.

    PubMed

    Günther, Fritz; Dudschig, Carolin; Kaup, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    In distributional semantics models (DSMs) such as latent semantic analysis (LSA), words are represented as vectors in a high-dimensional vector space. This allows for computing word similarities as the cosine of the angle between two such vectors. In two experiments, we investigated whether LSA cosine similarities predict priming effects, in that higher cosine similarities are associated with shorter reaction times (RTs). Critically, we applied a pseudo-random procedure in generating the item material to ensure that we directly manipulated LSA cosines as an independent variable. We employed two lexical priming experiments with lexical decision tasks (LDTs). In Experiment 1 we presented participants with 200 different prime words, each paired with one unique target. We found a significant effect of cosine similarities on RTs. The same was true for Experiment 2, where we reversed the prime-target order (primes of Experiment 1 were targets in Experiment 2, and vice versa). The results of these experiments confirm that LSA cosine similarities can predict priming effects, supporting the view that they are psychologically relevant. The present study thereby provides evidence for qualifying LSA cosine similarities not only as a linguistic measure, but also as a cognitive similarity measure. However, it is also shown that other DSMs can outperform LSA as a predictor of priming effects.

  8. Independent NOAA considered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    A proposal to pull the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) out of the Department of Commerce and make it an independent agency was the subject of a recent congressional hearing. Supporters within the science community and in Congress said that an independent NOAA will benefit by being more visible and by not being tied to a cabinet-level department whose main concerns lie elsewhere. The proposal's critics, however, cautioned that making NOAA independent could make it even more vulnerable to the budget axe and would sever the agency's direct access to the President.The separation of NOAA from Commerce was contained in a June 1 proposal by President Ronald Reagan that also called for all federal trade functions under the Department of Commerce to be reorganized into a new Department of International Trade and Industry (DITI).

  9. Independent technical review, handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    Purpose Provide an independent engineering review of the major projects being funded by the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. The independent engineering review will address questions of whether the engineering practice is sufficiently developed to a point where a major project can be executed without significant technical problems. The independent review will focus on questions related to: (1) Adequacy of development of the technical base of understanding; (2) Status of development and availability of technology among the various alternatives; (3) Status and availability of the industrial infrastructure to support project design, equipment fabrication, facility construction, and process and program/project operation; (4) Adequacy of the design effort to provide a sound foundation to support execution of project; (5) Ability of the organization to fully integrate the system, and direct, manage, and control the execution of a complex major project.

  10. Self similar evolution of evaporative supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chieze, J. P.; Lazareff, B.

    1981-02-01

    The expansion of a supernova remnant into an inhomogeneous medium of evaporating clouds can be idealized as a self-similar problem. The equations are set up and solved in the two limiting cases of negligible and dominant large scale conductivity, in the presence of an ad hoc external intercloud density equal to the product of Gamma, a parameter dependent on the evaporation parameter and the energy deposited by the supernova, with the -5/3 power of the radial distance, with Gamma equals 0 as a limiting case. While the detailed structure depends on Gamma, the global properties such as the expansion law and the total mass are to a large extent independent of this parameter, and agree with previous approximate results of McKee and Ostriker (1977). The limitations of the formal solutions are briefly discussed.

  11. Active browsing using similarity pyramids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jau-Yuen; Bouman, Charles A.; Dalton, John C.

    1998-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a new approach to managing large image databases, which we call active browsing. Active browsing integrates relevance feedback into the browsing environment, so that users can modify the database's organization to suit the desired task. Our method is based on a similarity pyramid data structure, which hierarchically organizes the database, so that it can be efficiently browsed. At coarse levels, the similarity pyramid allows users to view the database as large clusters of similar images. Alternatively, users can 'zoom into' finer levels to view individual images. We discuss relevance feedback for the browsing process, and argue that it is fundamentally different from relevance feedback for more traditional search-by-query tasks. We propose two fundamental operations for active browsing: pruning and reorganization. Both of these operations depend on a user-defined relevance set, which represents the image or set of images desired by the user. We present statistical methods for accurately pruning the database, and we propose a new 'worm hole' distance metric for reorganizing the database, so that members of the relevance set are grouped together.

  12. Transsaccadic identification of highly similar artificial shapes.

    PubMed

    Demeyer, Maarten; De Graef, Peter; Wagemans, Johan; Verfaillie, Karl

    2009-04-30

    Multiple times per second, the visual system succeeds in making a seamless transition between presaccadic and postsaccadic perception. The nature of the transsaccadic representation needed to support this was commonly thought to be sparse and abstract. However, recent studies have suggested that detailed visual information is transferred across saccades as well. Here, we seek to confirm that preview effects of visual detail on postsaccadic perception do indeed occur. We presented subjects with highly similar artificial shapes, preceded by a congruent, an incongruent, or no preview. Postsaccadic recognition performance was measured, while the contrast of presaccadic and postsaccadic stimuli was manipulated independently. The results show that congruent previews provided a benefit to the recognition performance of postsaccadic stimuli, compared to no-preview conditions. Incongruent previews induced a recognition accuracy cost, combined with a recognition speed benefit. A second experiment showed that these effects can disappear when stimulus presentation is interrupted with a postsaccadic visual mask. We conclude that visual detail contained in transsaccadic memory can affect the postsaccadic percept. Furthermore, we find that the transsaccadic representation supporting this process is contrast-independent, but that postsaccadic contrast, through its effect on the reliability of information, can affect the degree to which it is employed.

  13. Application of the principle of similarity fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Sengers, J. V.

    1979-01-01

    Possible applications of the principle of similarity to fluid mechanics is described and illustrated. In correlating thermophysical properties of fluids, the similarity principle transcends the traditional corresponding states principle. In fluid mechanics the similarity principle is useful in correlating flow processes that can be modeled adequately with one independent variable (i.e., one-dimensional flows). In this paper we explore the concept of transforming the conservation equations by combining similarity principles for thermophysical properties with those for fluid flow. We illustrate the usefulness of the procedure by applying such a transformation to calculate two phase critical mass flow through a nozzle.

  14. Homology-Independent Metrics for Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Tarcisio José Domingos; Franco, Glória Regina; Lobo, Francisco Pereira

    2015-01-01

    A mainstream procedure to analyze the wealth of genomic data available nowadays is the detection of homologous regions shared across genomes, followed by the extraction of biological information from the patterns of conservation and variation observed in such regions. Although of pivotal importance, comparative genomic procedures that rely on homology inference are obviously not applicable if no homologous regions are detectable. This fact excludes a considerable portion of “genomic dark matter” with no significant similarity — and, consequently, no inferred homology to any other known sequence — from several downstream comparative genomic methods. In this review we compile several sequence metrics that do not rely on homology inference and can be used to compare nucleotide sequences and extract biologically meaningful information from them. These metrics comprise several compositional parameters calculated from sequence data alone, such as GC content, dinucleotide odds ratio, and several codon bias metrics. They also share other interesting properties, such as pervasiveness (patterns persist on smaller scales) and phylogenetic signal. We also cite examples where these homology-independent metrics have been successfully applied to support several bioinformatics challenges, such as taxonomic classification of biological sequences without homology inference. They where also used to detect higher-order patterns of interactions in biological systems, ranging from detecting coevolutionary trends between the genomes of viruses and their hosts to characterization of gene pools of entire microbial communities. We argue that, if correctly understood and applied, homology-independent metrics can add important layers of biological information in comparative genomic studies without prior homology inference. PMID:26029354

  15. Finite order variational bicomplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitolo, Raffaele

    1999-01-01

    The theory of variational bicomplexes was established at the end of the seventies by several authors [2, 17, 23, 26, 29-32]. The idea is that the operations which take a Lagrangian into its Euler-Lagrange morphism [9, 10, 12, 24] and an Euler-Lagrange morphism into its Helmholtz' conditions of local variationality [1-3, 7, 11, 13, 18, 27] are morphisms of a (long) exact sheaf sequence. This viewpoint overcomes several problems of Lagrangian formulations in mechanics and field theories [21, 28]. To avoid technical difficulties variational bicomplexes were formulated over the space of infinite jets of a fibred manifold. But in this formalism the information relative to the order of the jet where objects are defined is lost.We refer to the recent formulation of variational bicomplexes on finite order jet spaces [13]. Here, a finite order variational sequence is obtained by quotienting the de Rham sequence on a finite order jet space with an intrinsically defined sub-sequence, whose choice is inspired by the calculus of variations. It is important to find an isomorphism of the quotient sequence with a sequence of sheaves of ‘concrete’ sections of some vector bundle. This task has already been faced locally [22, 25] and intrinsically [33] in the case of one independent variable.In this paper, we give an intrinsic isomorphism of the variational sequence (in the general case of n independent variables) with a sequence which is made by sheaves of forms on a jet space of minimal order. This yields new natural solutions to problems like the minimal order Lagrangian corresponding to a locally variational Euler-Lagrange morphism and the search of variationally trivial Lagrangians. Moreover, we give a new intrinsic formulation of Helmholtz' local variationality conditions, proving the existence of a new intrinsic geometric object which, for an Euler-Lagrange morphism, plays a role analogous to that of the momentum of a Lagrangian.

  16. Steps, stages, and structure: finding compensatory order in scientific theories.

    PubMed

    Rutjens, Bastiaan T; van Harreveld, Frenk; van der Pligt, Joop; Kreemers, Loes M; Noordewier, Marret K

    2013-05-01

    Stage theories are prominent and controversial in science. One possible reason for their appeal is that they provide order and predictability. Participants in Experiment 1 rated stage theories as more orderly and predictable (but less credible) than continuum theories. In Experiments 2-5, we showed that order threats increase the appeal of stage theories of grief (Experiment 2) and moral development (Experiments 4 and 5). Experiment 3 yielded similar results for a stage theory on Alzheimer's disease characterized by predictable decline, suggesting that preference for stage theories is independent of valence. Experiment 4 showed that the effect of threat on theory preference was mediated by the motivated perception of order, and Experiment 5 revealed that it is particularly the fixed order of stages that increases their appeal. PMID:22642712

  17. Independence, Disengagement, and Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Ron

    2012-01-01

    School disengagement is linked to a lack of opportunities for students to fulfill their needs for independence and self-determination. Young people have little say about what, when, where, and how they will learn, the criteria used to assess their success, and the content of school and classroom rules. Traditional behavior management discourages…

  18. Caring about Independent Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Karen

    2010-01-01

    With the rhetoric of independence, new cash for care systems were introduced in many developed welfare states at the end of the 20th century. These systems allow local authorities to pay people who are eligible for community care services directly, to enable them to employ their own careworkers. Despite the obvious importance of the careworker's…

  19. Postcard from Independence, Mo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    This article reports results showing that the Independence, Missori school district failed to meet almost every one of its improvement goals under the No Child Left Behind Act. The state accreditation system stresses improvement over past scores, while the federal law demands specified amounts of annual progress toward the ultimate goal of 100…

  20. Independent School Governance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beavis, Allan K.

    Findings of a study that examined the role of the governing body in the independent school's self-renewing processes are presented in this paper. From the holistic paradigm, the school is viewed as a self-renewing system that is able to maintain its identity despite environmental changes through existing structures that define and create…

  1. Mechanisms for similarity based cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traulsen, A.

    2008-06-01

    Cooperation based on similarity has been discussed since Richard Dawkins introduced the term “green beard” effect. In these models, individuals cooperate based on an aribtrary signal (or tag) such as the famous green beard. Here, two different models for such tag based cooperation are analysed. As neutral drift is important in both models, a finite population framework is applied. The first model, which we term “cooperative tags” considers a situation in which groups of cooperators are formed by some joint signal. Defectors adopting the signal and exploiting the group can lead to a breakdown of cooperation. In this case, conditions are derived under which the average abundance of the more cooperative strategy exceeds 50%. The second model considers a situation in which individuals start defecting towards others that are not similar to them. This situation is termed “defective tags”. It is shown that in this case, individuals using tags to cooperate exclusively with their own kind dominate over unconditional cooperators.

  2. Similarity and scale in catchment storm response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Eric F.; Sivapalan, Murugesu; Beven, Keith

    1993-01-01

    Until recently, very little progress had been made in understanding the relationship between small-scale variability of topography, soil, and rainfalls and the storm response seen at the catchment scale. The work reviewed here represents the first attempt at a systematic theoretical framework for such understanding in the context of surface runoff generation by different processes. The parameterization of hydrological processes over a range of scales is examined, and the concept of the 'representative elementary area' (REA) is introduced. The REA is a fundamental scale for catchment modeling at which continuum assumptions can be applied for the spatially variable controls and parameters, and spatial patterns no longer have to be considered explicitly. The investigation of scale leads into the concept of hydrologic similarity in which the effects of the environmental controls on runoff generation and flood frequency response be investigated independently of catchment scale. The paper reviews the authors' initial results and hopefully will motivate others to also investigate the issues of hydrologic scale and similarity.

  3. Similarity of fMRI activity patterns in left perirhinal cortex reflects semantic similarity between words.

    PubMed

    Bruffaerts, Rose; Dupont, Patrick; Peeters, Ronald; De Deyne, Simon; Storms, Gerrit; Vandenberghe, Rik

    2013-11-20

    How verbal and nonverbal visuoperceptual input connects to semantic knowledge is a core question in visual and cognitive neuroscience, with significant clinical ramifications. In an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment we determined how cosine similarity between fMRI response patterns to concrete words and pictures reflects semantic clustering and semantic distances between the represented entities within a single category. Semantic clustering and semantic distances between 24 animate entities were derived from a concept-feature matrix based on feature generation by >1000 subjects. In the main fMRI study, 19 human subjects performed a property verification task with written words and pictures and a low-level control task. The univariate contrast between the semantic and the control task yielded extensive bilateral occipitotemporal activation from posterior cingulate to anteromedial temporal cortex. Entities belonging to a same semantic cluster elicited more similar fMRI activity patterns in left occipitotemporal cortex. When words and pictures were analyzed separately, the effect reached significance only for words. The semantic similarity effect for words was localized to left perirhinal cortex. According to a representational similarity analysis of left perirhinal responses, semantic distances between entities correlated inversely with cosine similarities between fMRI response patterns to written words. An independent replication study in 16 novel subjects confirmed these novel findings. Semantic similarity is reflected by similarity of functional topography at a fine-grained level in left perirhinal cortex. The word specificity excludes perceptually driven confounds as an explanation and is likely to be task dependent.

  4. Self-similar solitary waves in Bessel optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Siliu; Liang Jianchu; Yi Lin

    2010-01-15

    An analytical solitary wave solution to the generalized nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE) with varying coefficients in Bessel optical lattices is obtained based on the self-similar method. Our results indicate that a new family of Bessel (BSL) self-similar spatial solitons can be formed in the Kerr nonlinear media in the confined cylindrical symmetric geometry in sizes. These soliton profiles are rather stable, independent of propagation distance.

  5. Phylogenetically related and ecologically similar carnivores harbour similar parasite assemblages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shan; Bininda-Emonds, Olaf R P; Stephens, Patrick R; Gittleman, John L; Altizer, Sonia

    2014-05-01

    Most parasites infect multiple hosts, but what factors determine the range of hosts a given parasite can infect? Understanding the broad scale determinants of parasite distributions across host lineages is important for predicting pathogen emergence in new hosts and for estimating pathogen diversity in understudied host species. In this study, we used a new data set on 793 parasite species reported from free-ranging populations of 64 carnivore species to examine the factors that influence parasite sharing between host species. Our results showed that parasites are more commonly shared between phylogenetically related host species pairs. Additionally, host species with higher similarity in biological traits and greater geographic range overlap were also more likely to share parasite species. Of three measures of phylogenetic relatedness considered here, the number divergence events that separated host species pairs most strongly influenced the likelihood of parasite sharing. We also showed that viruses and helminths tend to infect carnivore hosts within more restricted phylogenetic ranges than expected by chance. Overall, our results underscore the importance of host evolutionary history in determining parasite host range, even when simultaneously considering other factors such as host ecology and geographic distribution.

  6. Path similarity skeleton graph matching.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiang; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a novel framework to for shape recognition based on object silhouettes. The main idea is to match skeleton graphs by comparing the shortest paths between skeleton endpoints. In contrast to typical tree or graph matching methods, we completely ignore the topological graph structure. Our approach is motivated by the fact that visually similar skeleton graphs may have completely different topological structures. The proposed comparison of shortest paths between endpoints of skeleton graphs yields correct matching results in such cases. The skeletons are pruned by contour partitioning with Discrete Curve Evolution, which implies that the endpoints of skeleton branches correspond to visual parts of the objects. The experimental results demonstrate that our method is able to produce correct results in the presence of articulations, stretching, and occlusion.

  7. Semantically enabled image similarity search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casterline, May V.; Emerick, Timothy; Sadeghi, Kolia; Gosse, C. A.; Bartlett, Brent; Casey, Jason

    2015-05-01

    Georeferenced data of various modalities are increasingly available for intelligence and commercial use, however effectively exploiting these sources demands a unified data space capable of capturing the unique contribution of each input. This work presents a suite of software tools for representing geospatial vector data and overhead imagery in a shared high-dimension vector or embedding" space that supports fused learning and similarity search across dissimilar modalities. While the approach is suitable for fusing arbitrary input types, including free text, the present work exploits the obvious but computationally difficult relationship between GIS and overhead imagery. GIS is comprised of temporally-smoothed but information-limited content of a GIS, while overhead imagery provides an information-rich but temporally-limited perspective. This processing framework includes some important extensions of concepts in literature but, more critically, presents a means to accomplish them as a unified framework at scale on commodity cloud architectures.

  8. The roles of similarity in transfer: separating retrievability from inferential soundness.

    PubMed

    Gentner, D; Rattermann, M J; Forbus, K D

    1993-10-01

    Similarity is universally acknowledged to be central in transfer, but recent research suggests that its role is complex. The present research attempts to isolate and compare the determinants of similarity-based access to memory and the determinants of the subjective soundness and similarity of a match. We predicted, based on structure-mapping theory, that subjective soundness would depend on the degree of shared relational structure, particularly higher-order structure such as causal bindings. In contrast, we predicted that memory retrieval would be highly sensitive to surface similarities such as common object attributes. To assess retrievability, in three studies, subjects were asked to read a large set of stories and were later given a set of probe stories that resembled the original stories in systematically different ways; e.g., purely relational analogies, surface-similarity matches, or overall (literal similarity) matches. Subjects were told to write out any of the original stories that came to mind. To assess subjective soundness, independent subjects (and also the same reminding subjects) were asked to rate the inferential soundness of each pair; i.e., how well inferences true of one story would apply to the other. As predicted, subjective soundness was highly related to the degree of common relational structure, while retrievability was chiefly related to the degree of surface similarity. Ratings of the similarity of the pairs did not predict the retrievability ordering, arguing against the possibility that the retrieval ordering simply reflected overall similarity. Further, a fourth study demonstrated that subjects given a forced-choice recognition task could discriminate between possible matches on the basis of relational structure, ruling out the possibility that the poor relational retrieval resulted from forgetting or failing to encode the relational structure. We conclude that there is a dissociation between the similarity that governs access to

  9. A Student Guide for Independent Study Telecourses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez, Mauro

    Designed for students enrolled in telecourses offered by Evergreen Valley College (EVC) on an independent study basis, this guide explains the role of telecourses in the college curriculum, differences and similarities between telecourses and traditional courses, procedures for contacting instructors, and the roles of the college and the student…

  10. Critical Branches and Lucky Loads in Control-Independence Architectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malik, Kshitiz

    2009-01-01

    Branch mispredicts have a first-order impact on the performance of integer applications. Control Independence (CI) architectures aim to overlap the penalties of mispredicted branches with useful execution by spawning control-independent work as separate threads. Although control independent, such threads may consume register and memory values…

  11. Agent independent task planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, William S.

    1990-01-01

    Agent-Independent Planning is a technique that allows the construction of activity plans without regard to the agent that will perform them. Once generated, a plan is then validated and translated into instructions for a particular agent, whether a robot, crewmember, or software-based control system. Because Space Station Freedom (SSF) is planned for orbital operations for approximately thirty years, it will almost certainly experience numerous enhancements and upgrades, including upgrades in robotic manipulators. Agent-Independent Planning provides the capability to construct plans for SSF operations, independent of specific robotic systems, by combining techniques of object oriented modeling, nonlinear planning and temporal logic. Since a plan is validated using the physical and functional models of a particular agent, new robotic systems can be developed and integrated with existing operations in a robust manner. This technique also provides the capability to generate plans for crewmembers with varying skill levels, and later apply these same plans to more sophisticated robotic manipulators made available by evolutions in technology.

  12. International exploration by independents

    SciTech Connect

    Bertagne, R.G. )

    1991-03-01

    Recent industry trends indicate that the smaller US independents are looking at foreign exploration opportunities as one of the alternatives for growth in the new age of exploration. It is usually accepted that foreign finding costs per barrel are substantially lower than domestic because of the large reserve potential of international plays. To get involved overseas requires, however, an adaptation to different cultural, financial, legal, operational, and political conditions. Generally foreign exploration proceeds at a slower pace than domestic because concessions are granted by the government, or are explored in partnership with the national oil company. First, a mid- to long-term strategy, tailored to the goals and the financial capabilities of the company, must be prepared; it must be followed by an ongoing evaluation of quality prospects in various sedimentary basins, and a careful planning and conduct of the operations. To successfully explore overseas also requires the presence on the team of a minimum number of explorationists and engineers thoroughly familiar with the various exploratory and operational aspects of foreign work, having had a considerable amount of onsite experience in various geographical and climatic environments. Independents that are best suited for foreign expansion are those that have been financially successful domestically, and have a good discovery track record. When properly approached foreign exploration is well within the reach of smaller US independents and presents essentially no greater risk than domestic exploration; the reward, however, can be much larger and can catapult the company into the big leagues.

  13. International exploration by independent

    SciTech Connect

    Bertragne, R.G.

    1992-04-01

    Recent industry trends indicate that the smaller U.S. independents are looking at foreign exploration opportunities as one of the alternatives for growth in the new age of exploration. Foreign finding costs per barrel usually are accepted to be substantially lower than domestic costs because of the large reserve potential of international plays. To get involved in overseas exploration, however, requires the explorationist to adapt to different cultural, financial, legal, operational, and political conditions. Generally, foreign exploration proceeds at a slower pace than domestic exploration because concessions are granted by a country's government, or are explored in partnership with a national oil company. First, the explorationist must prepare a mid- to long-term strategy, tailored to the goals and the financial capabilities of the company; next, is an ongoing evaluation of quality prospects in various sedimentary basins, and careful planning and conduct of the operations. To successfully explore overseas also requires the presence of a minimum number of explorationists and engineers thoroughly familiar with the various exploratory and operational aspects of foreign work. Ideally, these team members will have had a considerable amount of on-site experience in various countries and climates. Independents best suited for foreign expansion are those who have been financially successful in domestic exploration. When properly approached, foreign exploration is well within the reach of smaller U.S. independents, and presents essentially no greater risk than domestic exploration; however, the reward can be much larger and can catapult the company into the 'big leagues.'

  14. Independent EEG Sources Are Dipolar

    PubMed Central

    Delorme, Arnaud; Palmer, Jason; Onton, Julie; Oostenveld, Robert; Makeig, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) and blind source separation (BSS) methods are increasingly used to separate individual brain and non-brain source signals mixed by volume conduction in electroencephalographic (EEG) and other electrophysiological recordings. We compared results of decomposing thirteen 71-channel human scalp EEG datasets by 22 ICA and BSS algorithms, assessing the pairwise mutual information (PMI) in scalp channel pairs, the remaining PMI in component pairs, the overall mutual information reduction (MIR) effected by each decomposition, and decomposition ‘dipolarity’ defined as the number of component scalp maps matching the projection of a single equivalent dipole with less than a given residual variance. The least well-performing algorithm was principal component analysis (PCA); best performing were AMICA and other likelihood/mutual information based ICA methods. Though these and other commonly-used decomposition methods returned many similar components, across 18 ICA/BSS algorithms mean dipolarity varied linearly with both MIR and with PMI remaining between the resulting component time courses, a result compatible with an interpretation of many maximally independent EEG components as being volume-conducted projections of partially-synchronous local cortical field activity within single compact cortical domains. To encourage further method comparisons, the data and software used to prepare the results have been made available (http://sccn.ucsd.edu/wiki/BSSComparison). PMID:22355308

  15. Effect of Resources Similarity on Satisfaction with Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teichman, Meir; Foa, Uriel G.

    1975-01-01

    It was predicted that the amount of satisfaction following an interpersonal exchange will be higher when the resource given is similar to the one reciprocated and lower when they are dissimilar. Interpersonal exchange situations were experimentally created in which two independent variables were manipulated. (Author)

  16. Independent component representations for face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart Bartlett, Marian; Lades, Martin H.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    1998-07-01

    In a task such as face recognition, much of the important information may be contained in the high-order relationships among the image pixels. A number of face recognition algorithms employ principal component analysis (PCA), which is based on the second-order statistics of the image set, and does not address high-order statistical dependencies such as the relationships among three or more pixels. Independent component analysis (ICA) is a generalization of PCA which separates the high-order moments of the input in addition to the second-order moments. ICA was performed on a set of face images by an unsupervised learning algorithm derived from the principle of optimal information transfer through sigmoidal neurons. The algorithm maximizes the mutual information between the input and the output, which produces statistically independent outputs under certain conditions. ICA was performed on the face images under two different architectures. The first architecture provided a statistically independent basis set for the face images that can be viewed as a set of independent facial features. The second architecture provided a factorial code, in which the probability of any combination of features can be obtained from the product of their individual probabilities. Both ICA representations were superior to representations based on principal components analysis for recognizing faces across sessions and changes in expression.

  17. 77 FR 56839 - California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of Filing Take notice that on July 9, 2012, California Independent System Operator Corporation submitted their..., California Independent System Operator Corporation, Order Granting Complaint And Directing A...

  18. Hierarchical similarity transformations between Gaussian mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rigas, George; Nikou, Christophoros; Goletsis, Yorgos; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to estimate the density of a data space represented by a geometric transformation of an initial Gaussian mixture model. The geometric transformation is hierarchical, and it is decomposed into two steps. At first, the initial model is assumed to undergo a global similarity transformation modeled by translation, rotation, and scaling of the model components. Then, to increase the degrees of freedom of the model and allow it to capture fine data structures, each individual mixture component may be transformed by another, local similarity transformation, whose parameters are distinct for each component of the mixture. In addition, to constrain the order of magnitude of the local transformation (LT) with respect to the global transformation (GT), zero-mean Gaussian priors are imposed onto the local parameters. The estimation of both GT and LT parameters is obtained through the expectation maximization framework. Experiments on artificial data are conducted to evaluate the proposed model, with varying data dimensionality, number of model components, and transformation parameters. In addition, the method is evaluated using real data from a speech recognition task. The obtained results show a high model accuracy and demonstrate the potential application of the proposed method to similar classification problems. PMID:24808615

  19. FRESCO: Referential compression of highly similar sequences.

    PubMed

    Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    In many applications, sets of similar texts or sequences are of high importance. Prominent examples are revision histories of documents or genomic sequences. Modern high-throughput sequencing technologies are able to generate DNA sequences at an ever-increasing rate. In parallel to the decreasing experimental time and cost necessary to produce DNA sequences, computational requirements for analysis and storage of the sequences are steeply increasing. Compression is a key technology to deal with this challenge. Recently, referential compression schemes, storing only the differences between a to-be-compressed input and a known reference sequence, gained a lot of interest in this field. In this paper, we propose a general open-source framework to compress large amounts of biological sequence data called Framework for REferential Sequence COmpression (FRESCO). Our basic compression algorithm is shown to be one to two orders of magnitudes faster than comparable related work, while achieving similar compression ratios. We also propose several techniques to further increase compression ratios, while still retaining the advantage in speed: 1) selecting a good reference sequence; and 2) rewriting a reference sequence to allow for better compression. In addition,we propose a new way of further boosting the compression ratios by applying referential compression to already referentially compressed files (second-order compression). This technique allows for compression ratios way beyond state of the art, for instance,4,000:1 and higher for human genomes. We evaluate our algorithms on a large data set from three different species (more than 1,000 genomes, more than 3 TB) and on a collection of versions of Wikipedia pages. Our results show that real-time compression of highly similar sequences at high compression ratios is possible on modern hardware.

  20. FRESCO: Referential compression of highly similar sequences.

    PubMed

    Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    In many applications, sets of similar texts or sequences are of high importance. Prominent examples are revision histories of documents or genomic sequences. Modern high-throughput sequencing technologies are able to generate DNA sequences at an ever-increasing rate. In parallel to the decreasing experimental time and cost necessary to produce DNA sequences, computational requirements for analysis and storage of the sequences are steeply increasing. Compression is a key technology to deal with this challenge. Recently, referential compression schemes, storing only the differences between a to-be-compressed input and a known reference sequence, gained a lot of interest in this field. In this paper, we propose a general open-source framework to compress large amounts of biological sequence data called Framework for REferential Sequence COmpression (FRESCO). Our basic compression algorithm is shown to be one to two orders of magnitudes faster than comparable related work, while achieving similar compression ratios. We also propose several techniques to further increase compression ratios, while still retaining the advantage in speed: 1) selecting a good reference sequence; and 2) rewriting a reference sequence to allow for better compression. In addition,we propose a new way of further boosting the compression ratios by applying referential compression to already referentially compressed files (second-order compression). This technique allows for compression ratios way beyond state of the art, for instance,4,000:1 and higher for human genomes. We evaluate our algorithms on a large data set from three different species (more than 1,000 genomes, more than 3 TB) and on a collection of versions of Wikipedia pages. Our results show that real-time compression of highly similar sequences at high compression ratios is possible on modern hardware. PMID:24524158

  1. Cary Potter on Independent Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Cary

    1978-01-01

    Cary Potter was President of the National Association of Independent Schools from 1964-1978. As he leaves NAIS he gives his views on education, on independence, on the independent school, on public responsibility, on choice in a free society, on educational change, and on the need for collective action by independent schools. (Author/RK)

  2. Myth or Truth: Independence Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Traci

    Most Americans think of the Fourth of July as Independence Day, but is it really the day the U.S. declared and celebrated independence? By exploring myths and truths surrounding Independence Day, this lesson asks students to think critically about commonly believed stories regarding the beginning of the Revolutionary War and the Independence Day…

  3. Explosion Source Similarity Analysis via SVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yedlin, Matthew; Ben Horin, Yochai; Margrave, Gary

    2016-04-01

    An important seismological ingredient for establishing a regional seismic nuclear discriminant is the similarity analysis of a sequence of explosion sources. To investigate source similarity, we are fortunate to have access to a sequence of 1805 three-component recordings of quarry blasts, shot from March 2002 to January 2015. The centroid of these blasts has an estimated location 36.3E and 29.9N. All blasts were detonated by JPMC (Jordan Phosphate Mines Co.) All data were recorded at the Israeli NDC, HFRI, located at 30.03N and 35.03E. Data were first winnowed based on the distribution of maximum amplitudes in the neighborhood of the P-wave arrival. The winnowed data were then detrended using the algorithm of Cleveland et al (1990). The detrended data were bandpass filtered between .1 to 12 Hz using an eighth order Butterworth filter. Finally, data were sorted based on maximum trace amplitude. Two similarity analysis approaches were used. First, for each component, the entire suite of traces was decomposed into its eigenvector representation, by employing singular-valued decomposition (SVD). The data were then reconstructed using 10 percent of the singular values, with the resulting enhancement of the S-wave and surface wave arrivals. The results of this first method are then compared to the second analysis method based on the eigenface decomposition analysis of Turk and Pentland (1991). While both methods yield similar results in enhancement of data arrivals and reduction of data redundancy, more analysis is required to calibrate the recorded data to charge size, a quantity that was not available for the current study. References Cleveland, R. B., Cleveland, W. S., McRae, J. E., and Terpenning, I., Stl: A seasonal-trend decomposition procedure based on loess, Journal of Official Statistics, 6, No. 1, 3-73, 1990. Turk, M. and Pentland, A., Eigenfaces for recognition. Journal of cognitive neuroscience, 3(1), 71-86, 1991.

  4. Mixed-List Phonological Similarity Effects in Delayed Serial Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that placing dissimilar items on lists of phonologically similar items enhances accuracy of ordered recall of the dissimilar items [Farrell, S., & Lewandowsky, S. (2003). Dissimilar items benefit from phonological similarity in serial recall. "Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition," 29,…

  5. Phonological similarity and orthographic similarity affect probed serial recall of Chinese characters.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Chen; Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Lai, Yvonne C; Wu, Denise H

    2015-04-01

    The previous literature on working memory (WM) has indicated that verbal materials are dominantly retained in phonological representations, whereas other linguistic information (e.g., orthography, semantics) only contributes to verbal WM minimally, if not negligibly. Although accumulating evidence has suggested that multiple linguistic components jointly support verbal WM, the visual/orthographic contribution has rarely been addressed in alphabetic languages, possibly due to the difficulty of dissociating the effects of word forms from the effects of their pronunciations in relatively shallow orthography. In the present study, we examined whether the orthographic representations of Chinese characters support the retention of verbal materials in this language of deep orthography. In Experiments 1a and 2, we independently manipulated the phonological and orthographic similarity of horizontal and vertical characters, respectively, and found that participants' accuracy of probed serial recall was reduced by both similar pronunciations and shared phonetic radicals in the to-be-remembered stimuli. Moreover, Experiment 1b showed that only the effect of phonological, but not that of orthographic, similarity was affected by concurrent articulatory suppression. Taken together, the present results indicate the indispensable contribution of orthographic representations to verbal WM of Chinese characters, and suggest that the linguistic characteristics of a specific language not only determine long-term linguistic-processing mechanisms, but also delineate the organization of verbal WM for that language. PMID:25537954

  6. Similarity-based cooperation and spatial segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traulsen, Arne; Claussen, Jens Christian

    2004-10-01

    We analyze a cooperative game, where the cooperative act is not based on the previous behavior of the coplayer, but on the similarity between the players. This system has been studied in a mean-field description recently [A. Traulsen and H. G. Schuster, Phys. Rev. E 68, 046129 (2003)]. Here, the spatial extension to a two-dimensional lattice is studied, where each player interacts with eight players in a Moore neighborhood. The system shows a strong segregation independent of parameters. The introduction of a local conversion mechanism towards tolerance allows for four-state cycles and the emergence of spiral waves in the spatial game. In the case of asymmetric costs of cooperation a rich variety of complex behavior is observed depending on both cooperation costs. Finally, we study the stabilization of a cooperative fixed point of a forecast rule in the symmetric game, which corresponds to cooperation across segregation borders. This fixed point becomes unstable for high cooperation costs, but can be stabilized by a linear feedback mechanism.

  7. Suffix Ordering and Morphological Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plag, Ingo; Baayen, Harald

    2009-01-01

    There is a long-standing debate about the principles constraining the combinatorial properties of suffixes. Hay 2002 and Hay & Plag 2004 proposed a model in which suffixes can be ordered along a hierarchy of processing complexity. We show that this model generalizes to a larger set of suffixes, and we provide independent evidence supporting the…

  8. Methods for Similarity-based Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Thomas G; Nielsen, Jesper; Pedersen, Christian N S

    2013-01-01

    Developing new medical drugs is expensive. Among the first steps is a screening process, in which molecules in existing chemical libraries are tested for activity against a given target. This requires a lot of resources and manpower. Therefore it has become common to perform a virtual screening, where computers are used for predicting the activity of very large libraries of molecules, to identify the most promising leads for further laboratory experiments. Since computer simulations generally require fewer resources than physical experimentation this can lower the cost of medical and biological research significantly. In this paper we review practically fast algorithms for screening databases of molecules in order to find molecules that are sufficiently similar to a query molecule. PMID:24688702

  9. Social values as arguments: similar is convincing

    PubMed Central

    Maio, Gregory R.; Hahn, Ulrike; Frost, John-Mark; Kuppens, Toon; Rehman, Nadia; Kamble, Shanmukh

    2014-01-01

    Politicians, philosophers, and rhetors engage in co-value argumentation: appealing to one value in order to support another value (e.g., “equality leads to freedom”). Across four experiments in the United Kingdom and India, we found that the psychological relatedness of values affects the persuasiveness of the arguments that bind them. Experiment 1 found that participants were more persuaded by arguments citing values that fulfilled similar motives than by arguments citing opposing values. Experiments 2 and 3 replicated this result using a wider variety of values, while finding that the effect is stronger among people higher in need for cognition and that the effect is mediated by the greater plausibility of co-value arguments that link motivationally compatible values. Experiment 4 extended the effect to real-world arguments taken from political propaganda and replicated the mediating effect of argument plausibility. The findings highlight the importance of value relatedness in argument persuasiveness. PMID:25147529

  10. Effect of Number and Similarity on Children's Plural Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanter, Jennifer A.; Basche, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    During the first years of language development, toddlers coordinate multiple cues in order to acquire the plural form. The aim of this study was to manipulate object similarity as well as set size in order to determine whether these variables impact children's comprehension of plurality. One-hundred-and-fifty children ranging in age from 22 to 36…

  11. Similarity Rules for Scaling Solar Sail Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen L.; Peddieson, John; Garbe, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Future science missions will require solar sails on the order of 200 square meters (or larger). However, ground demonstrations and flight demonstrations must be conducted at significantly smaller sizes, due to limitations of ground-based facilities and cost and availability of flight opportunities. For this reason, the ability to understand the process of scalability, as it applies to solar sail system models and test data, is crucial to the advancement of this technology. This paper will approach the problem of scaling in solar sail models by developing a set of scaling laws or similarity criteria that will provide constraints in the sail design process. These scaling laws establish functional relationships between design parameters of a prototype and model sail that are created at different geometric sizes. This work is applied to a specific solar sail configuration and results in three (four) similarity criteria for static (dynamic) sail models. Further, it is demonstrated that even in the context of unique sail material requirements and gravitational load of earth-bound experiments, it is possible to develop appropriate scaled sail experiments. In the longer term, these scaling laws can be used in the design of scaled experimental tests for solar sails and in analyzing the results from such tests.

  12. Pharmacophore-Based Similarity Scoring for DOCK

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacophore modeling incorporates geometric and chemical features of known inhibitors and/or targeted binding sites to rationally identify and design new drug leads. In this study, we have encoded a three-dimensional pharmacophore matching similarity (FMS) scoring function into the structure-based design program DOCK. Validation and characterization of the method are presented through pose reproduction, crossdocking, and enrichment studies. When used alone, FMS scoring dramatically improves pose reproduction success to 93.5% (∼20% increase) and reduces sampling failures to 3.7% (∼6% drop) compared to the standard energy score (SGE) across 1043 protein–ligand complexes. The combined FMS+SGE function further improves success to 98.3%. Crossdocking experiments using FMS and FMS+SGE scoring, for six diverse protein families, similarly showed improvements in success, provided proper pharmacophore references are employed. For enrichment, incorporating pharmacophores during sampling and scoring, in most cases, also yield improved outcomes when docking and rank-ordering libraries of known actives and decoys to 15 systems. Retrospective analyses of virtual screenings to three clinical drug targets (EGFR, IGF-1R, and HIVgp41) using X-ray structures of known inhibitors as pharmacophore references are also reported, including a customized FMS scoring protocol to bias on selected regions in the reference. Overall, the results and fundamental insights gained from this study should benefit the docking community in general, particularly researchers using the new FMS method to guide computational drug discovery with DOCK. PMID:25229837

  13. Mass versus molar doses, similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Chmielewska, A; Lamparczyk, H

    2008-11-01

    Generally, they are two systems expressing the amounts of active substance in a given drug product, i.e. mass and molar dose. Currently, the dose system based on the mass is widely used in which doses are expressed in grams or milligrams. On the other hand, the molar dose system is in direct relation to the number of molecules. Hence, the objective of this work was to compare both systems in order to find their advantages and disadvantages. Active substances belonging to the groups of antibiotics, nootropic agents, beta-blockers, vitamins, GABA-analog, COX-2 inhibitors, calcium channel antagonists, benzodiazepine receptor agonists, lipid-modifying agents (fibrates), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (profens), estrogens, neuroleptics, analgesics and benzodiazepines were considered. Moreover, products containing two active substances were also taken into account. These are mixtures of hydrochlorothiazide with active substances influencing the renin-angiotensin system and combined oral contraceptives. For each active substance, belonging to the groups mentioned above molar doses were calculated from mass doses and molar mass. Hence, groups of drugs with a single active substance, drugs with similar pharmacological activities, pharmaceutical alternatives, and drugs with a single active ingredient manufactured in different doses were compared in order to find which dose system describes more adequately differences between and within the groups mentioned above. Comparisons were supported by a number of equations, which theoretically justify the data, and relationships derived from calculations. PMID:19069248

  14. Dependency Similarity, Attraction and Perceived Happiness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandey, Janak

    1978-01-01

    Subjects were asked to evaluate either a similar personality or a dissimilar personality. Subjects rated similar others more positively than dissimilar others and, additionally, perceived similar others as more helpful and sympathetic than dissimilar others. (Author)

  15. Parallel changes in the taxonomical structure of bacterial communities exposed to a similar environmental disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Laplante, Karine; Derome, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial communities play a central role in ecosystems, by regulating biogeochemical fluxes. Therefore, understanding how multiple functional interactions between species face environmental perturbations is a major concern in conservation biology. Because bacteria can use several strategies, including horizontal gene transfers (HGT), to cope with rapidly changing environmental conditions, potential decoupling between function and taxonomy makes the use of a given species as a general bioindicator problematic. The present work is a first step to characterize the impact of a recent polymetallic gradient over the taxonomical networks of five lacustrine bacterial communities. Given that evolutionary convergence represents one of the best illustration of natural selection, we focused on a system composed of two pairs of impacted and clean lakes in order to test whether similar perturbation exerts a comparable impact on the taxonomical networks of independent bacterial communities. First, we showed that similar environmental stress drove parallel structural changes at the taxonomic level on two independent bacterial communities. Second, we showed that a long-term exposure to contaminant gradients drove significant taxonomic structure changes within three interconnected bacterial communities. Thus, this model lake system is relevant to characterize the strategies, namely acclimation and/or adaptation, of bacterial communities facing environmental perturbations, such as metal contamination. PMID:22393517

  16. Studying the Independent School Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahoy, Ellysa Stern; Williamson, Susan G.

    2008-01-01

    In 2005, the American Association of School Librarians' Independent Schools Section conducted a national survey of independent school libraries. This article analyzes the results of the survey, reporting specialized data and information regarding independent school library budgets, collections, services, facilities, and staffing. Additionally, the…

  17. Modulating the phonological similarity effect: the contribution of interlist similarity and lexicality.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Paul Johan; Lian, Arild

    2005-04-01

    The classical phonological similarity effect (PSE) was studied with words and nonwords in two immediate serial recall (ISR) tasks. The relative contributions of intralist and interlist interference were compared, and differential effects on item and order memory were observed. PSE occurred with words and was reversed with nonwords. In addition, PSE was modulated by interlist similarity, which enhanced recall of rhyme items and impaired recall of distinct items. Finally, interlist similarity reduced item recall of words, whereas it improved serial recall of nonwords. The latter finding rules out the hypothesis that the reverse PSE for nonwords is due to interlist interference. It is concluded that two opposing effects of phonological intralist similarity cause the interaction between PSE and lexicality in ISR. With words, the positive effect on item recall is usually masked by a much more disruptive effect on position accuracy. With nonwords, however, the positive effect often masks the negative one. These findings are discussed in relation to current models of verbal short-term memory.

  18. Abel's Theorem Simplifies Reduction of Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, William R.

    2011-01-01

    We give an alternative to the standard method of reduction or order, in which one uses one solution of a homogeneous, linear, second order differential equation to find a second, linearly independent solution. Our method, based on Abel's Theorem, is shorter, less complex and extends to higher order equations.

  19. String order via Floquet interactions in atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tony E.; Joglekar, Yogesh N.; Richerme, Philip

    2016-08-01

    We study the transverse-field Ising model with interactions that are modulated in time. In a rotating frame, the system is described by a time-independent Hamiltonian with many-body interactions, similar to the cluster Hamiltonians of measurement-based quantum computing. In one dimension, there is a three-body interaction, which leads to string order instead of conventional magnetic order. We show that the string order is robust to power-law interactions that decay with the cube of distance. In two and three dimensions, there are five- and seven-body interactions. We discuss adiabatic preparation of the ground state as well as experimental implementation with trapped ions, Rydberg atoms, and polar molecules.

  20. 23. Historic American Buildings Survey. 'Fort Independence,' 1801, by John ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Historic American Buildings Survey. 'Fort Independence,' 1801, by John Foncin. French artillerist and military engineer and designer of Fort McHenry. This plan includes alternate arrangements for grouping of the inner buildings 'Fig. 2' being similar to Fort McHenry. - Fort McHenry National Monument & Historic Shrine, East Fort Avenue at Whetstone Point, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  1. Achievement Patterns of Students in an Elite, Male Independent School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trusty, Edward Maurice, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    There is an underlying assumption that regardless of student ethnicity, socio-economic status, or any other variable, elite, independent schools by mission and design are effective at producing successful students. This would cause some to conclude that all students enrolled in elite, independent schools perform similarly on all academic measures.…

  2. Psychophysical similarity measure based on multi-dimensional scaling for retrieval of similar images of breast masses on mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Kohei; Muramatsu, Chisako; Oiwa, Mikinao; Shiraiwa, Misaki; Endo, Tokiko; Doi, Kunio; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    For retrieving reference images which may be useful to radiologists in their diagnosis, it is necessary to determine a reliable similarity measure which would agree with radiologists' subjective impression. In this study, we propose a new similarity measure for retrieval of similar images, which may assist radiologists in the distinction between benign and malignant masses on mammograms, and investigated its usefulness. In our previous study, to take into account the subjective impression, the psychophysical similarity measure was determined by use of an artificial neural network (ANN), which was employed to learn the relationship between radiologists' subjective similarity ratings and image features. In this study, we propose a psychophysical similarity measure based on multi-dimensional scaling (MDS) in order to improve the accuracy in retrieval of similar images. Twenty-seven images of masses, 3 each from 9 different pathologic groups, were selected, and the subjective similarity ratings for all possible 351 pairs were determined by 8 expert physicians. MDS was applied using the average subjective ratings, and the relationship between each output axis and image features was modeled by the ANN. The MDS-based psychophysical measures were determined by the distance in the modeled space. With a leave-one-out test method, the conventional psychophysical similarity measure was moderately correlated with subjective similarity ratings (r=0.68), whereas the psychophysical measure based on MDS was highly correlated (r=0.81). The result indicates that a psychophysical similarity measure based on MDS would be useful in the retrieval of similar images.

  3. Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Curty, Marcos; Qi, Bing

    2012-03-30

    How to remove detector side channel attacks has been a notoriously hard problem in quantum cryptography. Here, we propose a simple solution to this problem--measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (QKD). It not only removes all detector side channels, but also doubles the secure distance with conventional lasers. Our proposal can be implemented with standard optical components with low detection efficiency and highly lossy channels. In contrast to the previous solution of full device independent QKD, the realization of our idea does not require detectors of near unity detection efficiency in combination with a qubit amplifier (based on teleportation) or a quantum nondemolition measurement of the number of photons in a pulse. Furthermore, its key generation rate is many orders of magnitude higher than that based on full device independent QKD. The results show that long-distance quantum cryptography over say 200 km will remain secure even with seriously flawed detectors.

  4. Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Curty, Marcos; Qi, Bing

    2012-03-30

    How to remove detector side channel attacks has been a notoriously hard problem in quantum cryptography. Here, we propose a simple solution to this problem--measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (QKD). It not only removes all detector side channels, but also doubles the secure distance with conventional lasers. Our proposal can be implemented with standard optical components with low detection efficiency and highly lossy channels. In contrast to the previous solution of full device independent QKD, the realization of our idea does not require detectors of near unity detection efficiency in combination with a qubit amplifier (based on teleportation) or a quantum nondemolition measurement of the number of photons in a pulse. Furthermore, its key generation rate is many orders of magnitude higher than that based on full device independent QKD. The results show that long-distance quantum cryptography over say 200 km will remain secure even with seriously flawed detectors. PMID:22540686

  5. Similarity metrics for ligands reflecting the similarity of the target proteins.

    PubMed

    Schuffenhauer, Ansgar; Floersheim, Philipp; Acklin, Pierre; Jacoby, Edgar

    2003-01-01

    In this study we evaluate how far the scope of similarity searching can be extended to identify not only ligands binding to the same target as the reference ligand(s) but also ligands of other homologous targets without initially known ligands. This "homology-based similarity searching" requires molecular representations reflecting the ability of a molecule to interact with target proteins. The Similog keys, which are introduced here as a new molecular representation, were designed to fulfill such requirements. They are based only on the molecular constitution and are counts of atom triplets. Each triplet is characterized by the graph distances and the types of its atoms. The atom-typing scheme classifies each atom by its function as H-bond donor or acceptor and by its electronegativity and bulkiness. In this study the Similog keys are investigated in retrospective in silico screening experiments and compared with other conformation independent molecular representations. Studied were molecules of the MDDR database for which the activity data was augmented by standardized target classification information from public protein classification databases. The MDDR molecule set was split randomly into two halves. The first half formed the candidate set. Ligands of four targets (dopamine D2 receptor, opioid delta-receptor, factor Xa serine protease, and progesterone receptor) were taken from the second half to form the respective reference sets. Different similarity calculation methods are used to rank the molecules of the candidate set by their similarity to each of the four reference sets. The accumulated counts of molecules binding to the reference target and groups of targets with decreasing homology to it were examined as a function of the similarity rank for each reference set and similarity method. In summary, similarity searching based on Unity 2D-fingerprints or Similog keys are found to be equally effective in the identification of molecules binding to the same

  6. Similarity and confidence in artificial grammar learning.

    PubMed

    Tunney, Richard J

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments examined the relationship between similarity ratings and confidence ratings in artificial grammar learning. In Experiment 1 participants rated the similarity of test items to study exemplars. Regression analyses revealed these to be related to some of the objective measures of similarity that have previously been implicated in categorization decisions. In Experiment 2 participants made grammaticality decisions and rated either their confidence in the accuracy of their decisions or the similarity of the test items to the study items. Regression analyses showed that the grammaticality decisions were predicted by the similarity ratings obtained in Experiment 1. Points on the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves for the similarity and confidence ratings were closely matched. These data suggest that meta-cognitive judgments of confidence are predicated on structural knowledge of similarity. Experiment 3 confirmed this by showing that confidence ratings to median similarity probe items changed according to the similarity of preceding items.

  7. Visual similarity effects in categorical search.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Robert G; Zelinsky, Gregory J

    2011-07-14

    We asked how visual similarity relationships affect search guidance to categorically defined targets (no visual preview). Experiment 1 used a web-based task to collect visual similarity rankings between two target categories, teddy bears and butterflies, and random-category objects, from which we created search displays in Experiment 2 having either high-similarity distractors, low-similarity distractors, or "mixed" displays with high-, medium-, and low-similarity distractors. Analysis of target-absent trials revealed faster manual responses and fewer fixated distractors on low-similarity displays compared to high-similarity displays. On mixed displays, first fixations were more frequent on high-similarity distractors (bear = 49%; butterfly = 58%) than on low-similarity distractors (bear = 9%; butterfly = 12%). Experiment 3 used the same high/low/mixed conditions, but now these conditions were created using similarity estimates from a computer vision model that ranked objects in terms of color, texture, and shape similarity. The same patterns were found, suggesting that categorical search can indeed be guided by purely visual similarity. Experiment 4 compared cases where the model and human rankings differed and when they agreed. We found that similarity effects were best predicted by cases where the two sets of rankings agreed, suggesting that both human visual similarity rankings and the computer vision model captured features important for guiding search to categorical targets.

  8. Independent and Interdependent Remedial/Developmental Student Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBraak, LaRonna

    2008-01-01

    As scholars continue to debate over the specific skills underprepared students need in order to complete their course of study, perhaps the focus should be on how to tap into students' independent thought processes and encourage students to utilize independent thought to contribute to interdependent groups. Placing value on students' independent…

  9. A Study of Presidents of Independent Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Wei; Hartley, Harold V., III

    2012-01-01

    The Council of Independent Colleges (CIC), a national association representing 640 small and mid-sized independent colleges and universities, supports many professional development programs for higher education leaders. Beginning in 2008 the design of the programs has been informed by research on the career paths of campus leaders in order to help…

  10. Reconstructing propagation networks with temporal similarity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hao; Zeng, An

    2015-01-01

    Node similarity significantly contributes to the growth of real networks. In this paper, based on the observed epidemic spreading results we apply the node similarity metrics to reconstruct the underlying networks hosting the propagation. We find that the reconstruction accuracy of the similarity metrics is strongly influenced by the infection rate of the spreading process. Moreover, there is a range of infection rate in which the reconstruction accuracy of some similarity metrics drops nearly to zero. To improve the similarity-based reconstruction method, we propose a temporal similarity metric which takes into account the time information of the spreading. The reconstruction results are remarkably improved with the new method. PMID:26086198

  11. Reconstructing propagation networks with temporal similarity.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hao; Zeng, An

    2015-01-01

    Node similarity significantly contributes to the growth of real networks. In this paper, based on the observed epidemic spreading results we apply the node similarity metrics to reconstruct the underlying networks hosting the propagation. We find that the reconstruction accuracy of the similarity metrics is strongly influenced by the infection rate of the spreading process. Moreover, there is a range of infection rate in which the reconstruction accuracy of some similarity metrics drops nearly to zero. To improve the similarity-based reconstruction method, we propose a temporal similarity metric which takes into account the time information of the spreading. The reconstruction results are remarkably improved with the new method. PMID:26086198

  12. Constructing lncRNA functional similarity network based on lncRNA-disease associations and disease semantic similarity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing; Clarence Yan, Chenggang; Luo, Cai; Ji, Wen; Zhang, Yongdong; Dai, Qionghai

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has indicated that plenty of lncRNAs play important roles in many critical biological processes. Developing powerful computational models to construct lncRNA functional similarity network based on heterogeneous biological datasets is one of the most important and popular topics in the fields of both lncRNAs and complex diseases. Functional similarity network consturction could benefit the model development for both lncRNA function inference and lncRNA-disease association identification. However, little effort has been attempted to analysis and calculate lncRNA functional similarity on a large scale. In this study, based on the assumption that functionally similar lncRNAs tend to be associated with similar diseases, we developed two novel lncRNA functional similarity calculation models (LNCSIM). LNCSIM was evaluated by introducing similarity scores into the model of Laplacian Regularized Least Squares for LncRNA–Disease Association (LRLSLDA) for lncRNA-disease association prediction. As a result, new predictive models improved the performance of LRLSLDA in the leave-one-out cross validation of various known lncRNA-disease associations datasets. Furthermore, some of the predictive results for colorectal cancer and lung cancer were verified by independent biological experimental studies. It is anticipated that LNCSIM could be a useful and important biological tool for human disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. PMID:26061969

  13. Stability of linear systems in second-order form based on structure preserving similarity transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Pommer, Christian; Kliem, Wolfhard

    2015-10-31

    This paper deals with two stability aspects of linear systems of the form I ¨ x +B˙ x +Cx = 0 given by the triple (I;B;C). A general transformation scheme is given for a structure and Jordan form preserving transformation of the triple. We investigate how a system can be transformed by suitable choices of the transformation parameters into a new system (I;B1;C1) with a symmetrizable matrix C1. This procedure facilitates stability investigations. We also consider systems with a Hamiltonian spectrum which discloses marginal stability after a Jordan form preserving transformation.

  14. Asthma and COPD: Differences and Similarities

    MedlinePlus

    ... and COPD: differences and similarities Share | Asthma and COPD: Differences and Similarities This article has been reviewed ... you could have asthma, or you could have Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) , such as emphysema or chronic bronchitis. Because ...

  15. Distributed Efficient Similarity Search Mechanism in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Khandakar; Gregory, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The Wireless Sensor Network similarity search problem has received considerable research attention due to sensor hardware imprecision and environmental parameter variations. Most of the state-of-the-art distributed data centric storage (DCS) schemes lack optimization for similarity queries of events. In this paper, a DCS scheme with metric based similarity searching (DCSMSS) is proposed. DCSMSS takes motivation from vector distance index, called iDistance, in order to transform the issue of similarity searching into the problem of an interval search in one dimension. In addition, a sector based distance routing algorithm is used to efficiently route messages. Extensive simulation results reveal that DCSMSS is highly efficient and significantly outperforms previous approaches in processing similarity search queries. PMID:25751081

  16. Structure Modulates Similarity-Based Interference in Sluicing: An Eye Tracking study.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jesse A

    2015-01-01

    In cue-based content-addressable approaches to memory, a target and its competitors are retrieved in parallel from memory via a fast, associative cue-matching procedure under a severely limited focus of attention. Such a parallel matching procedure could in principle ignore the serial order or hierarchical structure characteristic of linguistic relations. I present an eye tracking while reading experiment that investigates whether the sentential position of a potential antecedent modulates the strength of similarity-based interference, a well-studied effect in which increased similarity in features between a target and its competitors results in slower and less accurate retrieval overall. The manipulation trades on an independently established Locality bias in sluiced structures to associate a wh-remnant (which ones) in clausal ellipsis with the most local correlate (some wines), as in The tourists enjoyed some wines, but I don't know which ones. The findings generally support cue-based parsing models of sentence processing that are subject to similarity-based interference in retrieval, and provide additional support to the growing body of evidence that retrieval is sensitive to both the structural position of a target antecedent and its competitors, and the specificity or diagnosticity of retrieval cues.

  17. Structure Modulates Similarity-Based Interference in Sluicing: An Eye Tracking study.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jesse A

    2015-01-01

    In cue-based content-addressable approaches to memory, a target and its competitors are retrieved in parallel from memory via a fast, associative cue-matching procedure under a severely limited focus of attention. Such a parallel matching procedure could in principle ignore the serial order or hierarchical structure characteristic of linguistic relations. I present an eye tracking while reading experiment that investigates whether the sentential position of a potential antecedent modulates the strength of similarity-based interference, a well-studied effect in which increased similarity in features between a target and its competitors results in slower and less accurate retrieval overall. The manipulation trades on an independently established Locality bias in sluiced structures to associate a wh-remnant (which ones) in clausal ellipsis with the most local correlate (some wines), as in The tourists enjoyed some wines, but I don't know which ones. The findings generally support cue-based parsing models of sentence processing that are subject to similarity-based interference in retrieval, and provide additional support to the growing body of evidence that retrieval is sensitive to both the structural position of a target antecedent and its competitors, and the specificity or diagnosticity of retrieval cues. PMID:26733893

  18. Structure Modulates Similarity-Based Interference in Sluicing: An Eye Tracking study

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Jesse A.

    2015-01-01

    In cue-based content-addressable approaches to memory, a target and its competitors are retrieved in parallel from memory via a fast, associative cue-matching procedure under a severely limited focus of attention. Such a parallel matching procedure could in principle ignore the serial order or hierarchical structure characteristic of linguistic relations. I present an eye tracking while reading experiment that investigates whether the sentential position of a potential antecedent modulates the strength of similarity-based interference, a well-studied effect in which increased similarity in features between a target and its competitors results in slower and less accurate retrieval overall. The manipulation trades on an independently established Locality bias in sluiced structures to associate a wh-remnant (which ones) in clausal ellipsis with the most local correlate (some wines), as in The tourists enjoyed some wines, but I don't know which ones. The findings generally support cue-based parsing models of sentence processing that are subject to similarity-based interference in retrieval, and provide additional support to the growing body of evidence that retrieval is sensitive to both the structural position of a target antecedent and its competitors, and the specificity or diagnosticity of retrieval cues. PMID:26733893

  19. Thematic Relations Affect Similarity via Commonalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golonka, Sabrina; Estes, Zachary

    2009-01-01

    Thematic relations are an important source of perceived similarity. For instance, the "rowing" theme of boats and oars increases their perceived similarity. The mechanism of this effect, however, has not been specified previously. The authors investigated whether thematic relations affect similarity by increasing commonalities or by decreasing…

  20. Manipulation of pure spin current in ferromagnetic metals independent of magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Dai; Li, Yufan; Qu, D.; Huang, S. Y.; Jin, Xiaofeng; Chien, C. L.

    2016-07-01

    Upon the injection of a pure spin current, a ferromagnet, similar to a nonmagnetic metal, also exhibits inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE). We show in Co/Cu/YIG, where the thin Cu layer allows transmission of spin current from YIG into Co but decouples the two ferromagnets, that the interaction between ISHE and ferromagnetic ordering in Co can be unambiguously investigated. By switching on and off the pure spin current contribution, we demonstrate that the ISHE in Co is independent of the direction of the Co magnetization, which clearly suggests that the ISHE in Co is dominated not by the extrinsic impurity scatterings, but from the intrinsic origin.

  1. Model independent determination of the gluon condensate in four dimensional SU(3) gauge theory.

    PubMed

    Bali, Gunnar S; Bauer, Clemens; Pineda, Antonio

    2014-08-29

    We determine the nonperturbative gluon condensate of four-dimensional SU(3) gauge theory in a model-independent way. This is achieved by carefully subtracting high-order perturbation theory results from nonperturbative lattice QCD determinations of the average plaquette. No indications of dimension-two condensates are found. The value of the gluon condensate turns out to be of a similar size as the intrinsic ambiguity inherent to its definition. We also determine the binding energy of a B meson in the heavy quark mass limit. PMID:25215978

  2. Asteroid clusters similar to asteroid pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravec, Petr; Vokrouhlicky, David; Fatka, Petr; Kusnirák, Peter; Hornoch, Kamil; Galád, Adrián

    2016-10-01

    We study five small, tight and young clusters of asteroids. They are placed around following largest (primary) bodies: (11842) Kap'bos, (14627) Emilkowalski, (16598) 1992 YC2, (21509) Lucascavin and (39991) 1998 HR37. Each cluster has 2-4 secondaries that are tightly clustered around the primary body, with distance in the 5-dimensional space of mean orbital elements mostly within 10 m/s, and always < 23 m/s. Backward orbital integrations indicate that they formed between 105 and 106 yr ago. In the P1-q space, where P1 is the primary's spin period and q = Σ Mj/M1 is the total secondary-to-primary mass ratio, the clusters lie in the same range as asteroid pairs formed by rotational fission. We have extended the model of a proto-system separation after rotational fission by Pravec et al. (2010) for application to systems with more than one secondary and found a perfect match for the five tight clusters. We find these clusters to be similar to asteroid pairs and we suggest that they are "extended pairs", having 2-4 escaped secondaries rather than just one secondary as in the case of an asteroid pair. We compare them to six young mini-families (1270) Datura, (2384) Schulhof, (3152) Jones, (6825) Irvine, (10321) Rampo and (20674) 1999 VT1. These mini-families have similar ages, but they have a higher number of members and/or they show a significantly larger spread in the mean orbital elements (dmean on an order of tens m/s) than the five tight clusters. In the P1-q space, all but one of the mini-families lie in the same range as asteroid pairs and the tight clusters; the exception is the mini-family of (3152) Jones which appears to be a collisional family. A possibility that the other five mini-families were also formed by rotational fission as we suggest for the tight clusters ("extended asteroid pairs") is being explored.Reference:Pravec, P., et al. Formation of asteroid pairs by rotational fission. Nature 466, 1085-1088.

  3. Independent Learning Models: A Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickett, R. E. Y.

    Five models of independent learning are suitable for use in adult education programs. The common factor is a facilitator who works in some way with the student in the learning process. They display different characteristics, including the extent of independence in relation to content and/or process. Nondirective tutorial instruction and learning…

  4. From Sensory Signals to Modality-Independent Conceptual Representations: A Probabilistic Language of Thought Approach.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Goker; Yildirim, Ilker; Jacobs, Robert A

    2015-11-01

    People learn modality-independent, conceptual representations from modality-specific sensory signals. Here, we hypothesize that any system that accomplishes this feat will include three components: a representational language for characterizing modality-independent representations, a set of sensory-specific forward models for mapping from modality-independent representations to sensory signals, and an inference algorithm for inverting forward models-that is, an algorithm for using sensory signals to infer modality-independent representations. To evaluate this hypothesis, we instantiate it in the form of a computational model that learns object shape representations from visual and/or haptic signals. The model uses a probabilistic grammar to characterize modality-independent representations of object shape, uses a computer graphics toolkit and a human hand simulator to map from object representations to visual and haptic features, respectively, and uses a Bayesian inference algorithm to infer modality-independent object representations from visual and/or haptic signals. Simulation results show that the model infers identical object representations when an object is viewed, grasped, or both. That is, the model's percepts are modality invariant. We also report the results of an experiment in which different subjects rated the similarity of pairs of objects in different sensory conditions, and show that the model provides a very accurate account of subjects' ratings. Conceptually, this research significantly contributes to our understanding of modality invariance, an important type of perceptual constancy, by demonstrating how modality-independent representations can be acquired and used. Methodologically, it provides an important contribution to cognitive modeling, particularly an emerging probabilistic language-of-thought approach, by showing how symbolic and statistical approaches can be combined in order to understand aspects of human perception.

  5. From Sensory Signals to Modality-Independent Conceptual Representations: A Probabilistic Language of Thought Approach

    PubMed Central

    Erdogan, Goker; Yildirim, Ilker; Jacobs, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    People learn modality-independent, conceptual representations from modality-specific sensory signals. Here, we hypothesize that any system that accomplishes this feat will include three components: a representational language for characterizing modality-independent representations, a set of sensory-specific forward models for mapping from modality-independent representations to sensory signals, and an inference algorithm for inverting forward models—that is, an algorithm for using sensory signals to infer modality-independent representations. To evaluate this hypothesis, we instantiate it in the form of a computational model that learns object shape representations from visual and/or haptic signals. The model uses a probabilistic grammar to characterize modality-independent representations of object shape, uses a computer graphics toolkit and a human hand simulator to map from object representations to visual and haptic features, respectively, and uses a Bayesian inference algorithm to infer modality-independent object representations from visual and/or haptic signals. Simulation results show that the model infers identical object representations when an object is viewed, grasped, or both. That is, the model’s percepts are modality invariant. We also report the results of an experiment in which different subjects rated the similarity of pairs of objects in different sensory conditions, and show that the model provides a very accurate account of subjects’ ratings. Conceptually, this research significantly contributes to our understanding of modality invariance, an important type of perceptual constancy, by demonstrating how modality-independent representations can be acquired and used. Methodologically, it provides an important contribution to cognitive modeling, particularly an emerging probabilistic language-of-thought approach, by showing how symbolic and statistical approaches can be combined in order to understand aspects of human perception. PMID

  6. Birth order and myopia

    PubMed Central

    Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; McMahon, George; Northstone, Kate; Mandel, Yossi; Kaiserman, Igor; Stone, Richard A.; Lin, Xiaoyu; Saw, Seang Mei; Forward, Hannah; Mackey, David A.; Yazar, Seyhan; Young, Terri L.; Williams, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose An association between birth order and reduced unaided vision (a surrogate for myopia) has been observed previously. We examined the association between birth order and myopia directly in 4 subject groups. Methods Subject groups were participants in 1) the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC; UK; age 15 years; N=4,401), 2) the Singapore Cohort Study of Risk Factors for Myopia (SCORM; Singapore; age 13 years; N=1,959), 3) the Raine Eye Health Study (REHS; Australia; age 20 years; N=1,344), and 4) Israeli Defense Force recruitment candidates (IDFC; Israel; age 16-22 years; N=888,277). Main outcome: Odds ratio (OR) for myopia in first born versus non-first born individuals after adjusting for potential risk factors. Results The prevalence of myopia was numerically higher in first-born versus non-first-born individuals in all study groups, but the strength of evidence varied widely. The adjusted ORs (95% CI) were: ALSPAC, 1.31 (1.05-1.64); SCORM, 1.25 (0.89-1.77); REHS, 1.18 (0.90-1.55); IDFC, 1.04 (1.03-1.06). In the large IDFC sample, the effect size was greater (a) for the first born versus fourth or higher born comparison than for the first born versus second/third born comparison (P<0.001) and (b) with increasing myopia severity (P<0.001). Conclusions Across all studies, the increased risk of myopia in first born individuals was low (OR <1.3). Indeed, only the studies with >4000 participants provided strong statistical support for the association. The available evidence suggested the relationship was independent of established risk factors such as time outdoors/reading, and thus may arise through a different causal mechanism. PMID:24168726

  7. Transition-Independent Decentralized Markov Decision Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Raphen; Silberstein, Shlomo; Lesser, Victor; Goldman, Claudia V.; Morris, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    There has been substantial progress with formal models for sequential decision making by individual agents using the Markov decision process (MDP). However, similar treatment of multi-agent systems is lacking. A recent complexity result, showing that solving decentralized MDPs is NEXP-hard, provides a partial explanation. To overcome this complexity barrier, we identify a general class of transition-independent decentralized MDPs that is widely applicable. The class consists of independent collaborating agents that are tied up by a global reward function that depends on both of their histories. We present a novel algorithm for solving this class of problems and examine its properties. The result is the first effective technique to solve optimally a class of decentralized MDPs. This lays the foundation for further work in this area on both exact and approximate solutions.

  8. Boosting medical diagnostics by pooling independent judgments

    PubMed Central

    Kurvers, Ralf H. J. M.; Herzog, Stefan M.; Hertwig, Ralph; Krause, Jens; Carney, Patricia A.; Bogart, Andy; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Zalaudek, Iris; Wolf, Max

    2016-01-01

    Collective intelligence refers to the ability of groups to outperform individual decision makers when solving complex cognitive problems. Despite its potential to revolutionize decision making in a wide range of domains, including medical, economic, and political decision making, at present, little is known about the conditions underlying collective intelligence in real-world contexts. We here focus on two key areas of medical diagnostics, breast and skin cancer detection. Using a simulation study that draws on large real-world datasets, involving more than 140 doctors making more than 20,000 diagnoses, we investigate when combining the independent judgments of multiple doctors outperforms the best doctor in a group. We find that similarity in diagnostic accuracy is a key condition for collective intelligence: Aggregating the independent judgments of doctors outperforms the best doctor in a group whenever the diagnostic accuracy of doctors is relatively similar, but not when doctors’ diagnostic accuracy differs too much. This intriguingly simple result is highly robust and holds across different group sizes, performance levels of the best doctor, and collective intelligence rules. The enabling role of similarity, in turn, is explained by its systematic effects on the number of correct and incorrect decisions of the best doctor that are overruled by the collective. By identifying a key factor underlying collective intelligence in two important real-world contexts, our findings pave the way for innovative and more effective approaches to complex real-world decision making, and to the scientific analyses of those approaches. PMID:27432950

  9. Boosting medical diagnostics by pooling independent judgments.

    PubMed

    Kurvers, Ralf H J M; Herzog, Stefan M; Hertwig, Ralph; Krause, Jens; Carney, Patricia A; Bogart, Andy; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Zalaudek, Iris; Wolf, Max

    2016-08-01

    Collective intelligence refers to the ability of groups to outperform individual decision makers when solving complex cognitive problems. Despite its potential to revolutionize decision making in a wide range of domains, including medical, economic, and political decision making, at present, little is known about the conditions underlying collective intelligence in real-world contexts. We here focus on two key areas of medical diagnostics, breast and skin cancer detection. Using a simulation study that draws on large real-world datasets, involving more than 140 doctors making more than 20,000 diagnoses, we investigate when combining the independent judgments of multiple doctors outperforms the best doctor in a group. We find that similarity in diagnostic accuracy is a key condition for collective intelligence: Aggregating the independent judgments of doctors outperforms the best doctor in a group whenever the diagnostic accuracy of doctors is relatively similar, but not when doctors' diagnostic accuracy differs too much. This intriguingly simple result is highly robust and holds across different group sizes, performance levels of the best doctor, and collective intelligence rules. The enabling role of similarity, in turn, is explained by its systematic effects on the number of correct and incorrect decisions of the best doctor that are overruled by the collective. By identifying a key factor underlying collective intelligence in two important real-world contexts, our findings pave the way for innovative and more effective approaches to complex real-world decision making, and to the scientific analyses of those approaches.

  10. Boosting medical diagnostics by pooling independent judgments.

    PubMed

    Kurvers, Ralf H J M; Herzog, Stefan M; Hertwig, Ralph; Krause, Jens; Carney, Patricia A; Bogart, Andy; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Zalaudek, Iris; Wolf, Max

    2016-08-01

    Collective intelligence refers to the ability of groups to outperform individual decision makers when solving complex cognitive problems. Despite its potential to revolutionize decision making in a wide range of domains, including medical, economic, and political decision making, at present, little is known about the conditions underlying collective intelligence in real-world contexts. We here focus on two key areas of medical diagnostics, breast and skin cancer detection. Using a simulation study that draws on large real-world datasets, involving more than 140 doctors making more than 20,000 diagnoses, we investigate when combining the independent judgments of multiple doctors outperforms the best doctor in a group. We find that similarity in diagnostic accuracy is a key condition for collective intelligence: Aggregating the independent judgments of doctors outperforms the best doctor in a group whenever the diagnostic accuracy of doctors is relatively similar, but not when doctors' diagnostic accuracy differs too much. This intriguingly simple result is highly robust and holds across different group sizes, performance levels of the best doctor, and collective intelligence rules. The enabling role of similarity, in turn, is explained by its systematic effects on the number of correct and incorrect decisions of the best doctor that are overruled by the collective. By identifying a key factor underlying collective intelligence in two important real-world contexts, our findings pave the way for innovative and more effective approaches to complex real-world decision making, and to the scientific analyses of those approaches. PMID:27432950

  11. Noncontiguous atom matching structural similarity function.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Ana L; Falcao, Andre O

    2013-10-28

    Measuring similarity between molecules is a fundamental problem in cheminformatics. Given that similar molecules tend to have similar physical, chemical, and biological properties, the notion of molecular similarity plays an important role in the exploration of molecular data sets, query-retrieval in molecular databases, and in structure-property/activity modeling. Various methods to define structural similarity between molecules are available in the literature, but so far none has been used with consistent and reliable results for all situations. We propose a new similarity method based on atom alignment for the analysis of structural similarity between molecules. This method is based on the comparison of the bonding profiles of atoms on comparable molecules, including features that are seldom found in other structural or graph matching approaches like chirality or double bond stereoisomerism. The similarity measure is then defined on the annotated molecular graph, based on an iterative directed graph similarity procedure and optimal atom alignment between atoms using a pairwise matching algorithm. With the proposed approach the similarities detected are more intuitively understood because similar atoms in the molecules are explicitly shown. This noncontiguous atom matching structural similarity method (NAMS) was tested and compared with one of the most widely used similarity methods (fingerprint-based similarity) using three difficult data sets with different characteristics. Despite having a higher computational cost, the method performed well being able to distinguish either different or very similar hydrocarbons that were indistinguishable using a fingerprint-based approach. NAMS also verified the similarity principle using a data set of structurally similar steroids with differences in the binding affinity to the corticosteroid binding globulin receptor by showing that pairs of steroids with a high degree of similarity (>80%) tend to have smaller differences

  12. Humans and Insects Decide in Similar Ways

    PubMed Central

    Louâpre, Philippe; van Alphen, Jacques J. M.; Pierre, Jean-Sébastien

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral ecologists assume that animals use a motivational mechanism for decisions such as action selection and time allocation, allowing the maximization of their fitness. They consider both the proximate and ultimate causes of behavior in order to understand this type of decision-making in animals. Experimental psychologists and neuroeconomists also study how agents make decisions but they consider the proximate causes of the behavior. In the case of patch-leaving, motivation-based decision-making remains simple speculation. In contrast to other animals, human beings can assess and evaluate their own motivation by an introspection process. It is then possible to study the declared motivation of humans during decision-making and discuss the mechanism used as well as its evolutionary significance. In this study, we combine both the proximate and ultimate causes of behavior for a better understanding of the human decision-making process. We show for the first time ever that human subjects use a motivational mechanism similar to small insects such as parasitoids [1] and bumblebees [2] to decide when to leave a patch. This result is relevant for behavioral ecologists as it supports the biological realism of this mechanism. Humans seem to use a motivational mechanism of decision making known to be adaptive to a heterogeneously distributed resource. As hypothesized by Hutchinson et al. [3] and Wilke and Todd [4], our results are consistent with the evolutionary shaping of decision making because hominoids were hunters and gatherers on food patches for more than two million years. We discuss the plausibility of a neural basis for the motivation mechanism highlighted here, bridging the gap between behavioral ecology and neuroeconomy. Thus, both the motivational mechanism observed here and the neuroeconomy findings are most likely adaptations that were selected for during ancestral times. PMID:21170378

  13. A toolbox for representational similarity analysis.

    PubMed

    Nili, Hamed; Wingfield, Cai; Walther, Alexander; Su, Li; Marslen-Wilson, William; Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus

    2014-04-01

    Neuronal population codes are increasingly being investigated with multivariate pattern-information analyses. A key challenge is to use measured brain-activity patterns to test computational models of brain information processing. One approach to this problem is representational similarity analysis (RSA), which characterizes a representation in a brain or computational model by the distance matrix of the response patterns elicited by a set of stimuli. The representational distance matrix encapsulates what distinctions between stimuli are emphasized and what distinctions are de-emphasized in the representation. A model is tested by comparing the representational distance matrix it predicts to that of a measured brain region. RSA also enables us to compare representations between stages of processing within a given brain or model, between brain and behavioral data, and between individuals and species. Here, we introduce a Matlab toolbox for RSA. The toolbox supports an analysis approach that is simultaneously data- and hypothesis-driven. It is designed to help integrate a wide range of computational models into the analysis of multichannel brain-activity measurements as provided by modern functional imaging and neuronal recording techniques. Tools for visualization and inference enable the user to relate sets of models to sets of brain regions and to statistically test and compare the models using nonparametric inference methods. The toolbox supports searchlight-based RSA, to continuously map a measured brain volume in search of a neuronal population code with a specific geometry. Finally, we introduce the linear-discriminant t value as a measure of representational discriminability that bridges the gap between linear decoding analyses and RSA. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the toolbox, we apply it to both simulated and real fMRI data. The key functions are equally applicable to other modalities of brain-activity measurement. The toolbox is freely

  14. Similarity increases altruistic punishment in humans.

    PubMed

    Mussweiler, Thomas; Ockenfels, Axel

    2013-11-26

    Humans are attracted to similar others. As a consequence, social networks are homogeneous in sociodemographic, intrapersonal, and other characteristics--a principle called homophily. Despite abundant evidence showing the importance of interpersonal similarity and homophily for human relationships, their behavioral correlates and cognitive foundations are poorly understood. Here, we show that perceived similarity substantially increases altruistic punishment, a key mechanism underlying human cooperation. We induced (dis)similarity perception by manipulating basic cognitive mechanisms in an economic cooperation game that included a punishment phase. We found that similarity-focused participants were more willing to punish others' uncooperative behavior. This influence of similarity is not explained by group identity, which has the opposite effect on altruistic punishment. Our findings demonstrate that pure similarity promotes reciprocity in ways known to encourage cooperation. At the same time, the increased willingness to punish norm violations among similarity-focused participants provides a rationale for why similar people are more likely to build stable social relationships. Finally, our findings show that altruistic punishment is differentially involved in encouraging cooperation under pure similarity vs. in-group conditions. PMID:24218611

  15. Order, chaos and nuclear dynamics: An introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Swiatecki, W.J.

    1990-08-01

    This is an introductory lecture illustrating by simple examples the anticipated effect on collective nuclear dynamics of a transition from order to chaos in the motions of nucleons inside an idealized nucleus. The destruction of order is paralleled by a transition from a rubber-like to a honey-like behaviour of the independent-particle nuclear model. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Chandra Independently Determines Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-08-01

    A critically important number that specifies the expansion rate of the Universe, the so-called Hubble constant, has been independently determined using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This new value matches recent measurements using other methods and extends their validity to greater distances, thus allowing astronomers to probe earlier epochs in the evolution of the Universe. "The reason this result is so significant is that we need the Hubble constant to tell us the size of the Universe, its age, and how much matter it contains," said Max Bonamente from the University of Alabama in Huntsville and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Ala., lead author on the paper describing the results. "Astronomers absolutely need to trust this number because we use it for countless calculations." Illustration of Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect Illustration of Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect The Hubble constant is calculated by measuring the speed at which objects are moving away from us and dividing by their distance. Most of the previous attempts to determine the Hubble constant have involved using a multi-step, or distance ladder, approach in which the distance to nearby galaxies is used as the basis for determining greater distances. The most common approach has been to use a well-studied type of pulsating star known as a Cepheid variable, in conjunction with more distant supernovae to trace distances across the Universe. Scientists using this method and observations from the Hubble Space Telescope were able to measure the Hubble constant to within 10%. However, only independent checks would give them the confidence they desired, considering that much of our understanding of the Universe hangs in the balance. Chandra X-ray Image of MACS J1149.5+223 Chandra X-ray Image of MACS J1149.5+223 By combining X-ray data from Chandra with radio observations of galaxy clusters, the team determined the distances to 38 galaxy clusters ranging from 1.4 billion to 9.3 billion

  17. Biographical factors of occupational independence.

    PubMed

    Müller, G F

    2001-10-01

    The present study examined biographical factors of occupational independence including any kind of nonemployed profession. Participants were 59 occupationally independent and 58 employed persons of different age (M = 36.3 yr.), sex, and profession. They were interviewed on variables like family influence, educational background, occupational role models, and critical events for choosing a particular type of occupational career. The obtained results show that occupationally independent people reported stronger family ties, experienced fewer restrictions of formal education, and remembered fewer negative role models than the employed people. Implications of these results are discussed. PMID:11783553

  18. Approximately Independent Features of Languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Eric W.

    To facilitate the testing of models for the evolution of languages, the present paper offers a set of linguistic features that are approximately independent of each other. To find these features, the adjusted Rand index (R‧) is used to estimate the degree of pairwise relationship among 130 linguistic features in a large published database. Many of the R‧ values prove to be near zero, as predicted for independent features, and a subset of 47 features is found with an average R‧ of -0.0001. These 47 features are recommended for use in statistical tests that require independent units of analysis.

  19. Sequence independent amplification of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Bohlander, Stefan K.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a rapid sequence-independent amplification procedure (SIA). Even minute amounts of DNA from various sources can be amplified independent of any sequence requirements of the DNA or any a priori knowledge of any sequence characteristics of the DNA to be amplified. This method allows, for example the sequence independent amplification of microdissected chromosomal material and the reliable construction of high quality fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes from YACs or from other sources. These probes can be used to localize YACs on metaphase chromosomes but also--with high efficiency--in interphase nuclei.

  20. Sequence independent amplification of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Bohlander, S.K.

    1998-03-24

    The present invention is a rapid sequence-independent amplification procedure (SIA). Even minute amounts of DNA from various sources can be amplified independent of any sequence requirements of the DNA or any a priori knowledge of any sequence characteristics of the DNA to be amplified. This method allows, for example, the sequence independent amplification of microdissected chromosomal material and the reliable construction of high quality fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes from YACs or from other sources. These probes can be used to localize YACs on metaphase chromosomes but also--with high efficiency--in interphase nuclei. 25 figs.

  1. Evaluating Whole Chemical Mixtures and Sufficient Similarity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This powerpoint presentation supports apresentation describing dose-response assessment for complex chemical mixtures including deriving reference doses for mixtures evaluating sufficient similarity among chemical mixtures.

  2. Similarity principle and rejection of Gibbs paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shu-Kun

    2000-03-01

    Gibbs Paradox says that entropy of mixing or assembling decreases discotinuously with the increase in the property similarity. After the rejection of the Gibbs paradox statement (see papers cited at website http://www.mdpi.org/lin/), the similarity principle has been developed: If all the other conditions remain constant, the higher the similarity among the components is, the higher value of entropy of the mixing, the assembling or the chemical bond formation process will be, the more spontaneous the mixing, the assembling or the chemical bond formation process will be, and the more stable the mixture, the assemblage or the chemical bond will be. The similarity principle is very useful. If one wants to mix substances, increase the similarity (of relevant properties); if one plans to separate the substances as phases, reduce their similarity! Then, the desirable processes of mixing or separation will happen spontaneously. Normally by changing temperature ( similarity is related to Boltzmann factor) and pressure, one can control the similarity and in turn, direct the process towards the desired direction. Higher temperature and pressure leads to higher similarity. This theory is important in understanding molecular recognition, self-organization, molecular assembling and molecular replication.

  3. 77 FR 70431 - California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice Establishing Answer Period to Limited...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice Establishing...) filed a Limited Emergency Protest (Protest) regarding the comment period for the California Independent System Operator Corporation's (CAISO) petition for declaratory order and request for expedited...

  4. 78 FR 38023 - Demand Response Supporters v. New York Independent System Operator, Inc.; Notice of Complaint

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Demand Response Supporters v. New York Independent System Operator, Inc... against New York Independent System Operator, Inc. (NYISO or Respondents), seeking an order...

  5. Independent Schools: Landscape and Learnings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oates, William A.

    1981-01-01

    Examines American independent schools (parochial, southern segregated, and private institutions) in terms of their funding, expenditures, changing enrollment patterns, teacher-student ratios, and societal functions. Journal available from Daedalus Subscription Department, 1172 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02132. (AM)

  6. Technology for Independent Living: Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enders, Alexandra, Ed.

    This sourcebook provides information for the practical implementation of independent living technology in the everyday rehabilitation process. "Information Services and Resources" lists databases, clearinghouses, networks, research and development programs, toll-free telephone numbers, consumer protection caveats, selected publications, and…

  7. Independence test for sparse data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, J. E.; González-López, V. A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper a new non-parametric independence test is presented. García and González-López (2014) [1] introduced the LIS test for the hypothesis of independence between two continuous random variables, the test proposed in this work is a generalization of the LIS test. The new test does not require the assumption of continuity for the random variables, it test is applied to two datasets and also compared with the Pearson's Chi-squared test.

  8. Some Effects of Similarity Self-Disclosure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Kevin C.; Strong, Stanley R.

    1972-01-01

    College males were interviewed about how college had altered their friendships, values, and plans. The interviewers diclosed experiences and feelings similar to those revealed by the students. Results support Byrne's Law of Similarity in generating interpersonal attraction in the interview and suggest that the timing of self-disclosures is…

  9. Attitude Similarity, Topic Importance, and Psychotherapeutic Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheney, Thomas

    1975-01-01

    The effect of attitude similarity and topic importance on attraction was studied by exposing 75 prison inmates, incarcerated for public intoxication, to varying attitudes of a psychotherapist. Subjects were more attracted to the therapist after receiving alcohol items regardless of degree of similarity expressed. (Author)

  10. Interleaving Helps Students Distinguish among Similar Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohrer, Doug

    2012-01-01

    When students encounter a set of concepts (or terms or principles) that are similar in some way, they often confuse one with another. For instance, they might mistake one word for another word with a similar spelling (e.g., allusion instead of illusion) or choose the wrong strategy for a mathematics problem because it resembles a different kind of…

  11. Similar methodological analysis involving the user experience.

    PubMed

    Almeida e Silva, Caio Márcio; Okimoto, Maria Lúcia R L; Tanure, Raffaela Leane Zenni

    2012-01-01

    This article deals with the use of a protocol for analysis of similar methodological analysis related to user experience. For both, were selected articles recounting experiments in the area. They were analyze based on the similar analysis protocol and finally, synthesized and associated.

  12. Marking Student Programs Using Graph Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naude, Kevin A.; Greyling, Jean H.; Vogts, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel approach to the automated marking of student programming assignments. Our technique quantifies the structural similarity between unmarked student submissions and marked solutions, and is the basis by which we assign marks. This is accomplished through an efficient novel graph similarity measure ("AssignSim"). Our experiments…

  13. Perceived Similarity, Proactive Adjustment, and Organizational Socialization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kammeyer-Mueller, John D.; Livingston, Beth A.; Liao, Hui

    2011-01-01

    The present study explores how perceived demographic and attitudinal similarity can influence proactive behavior among organizational newcomers. We propose that newcomers who perceive themselves as similar to their co-workers will be more willing to seek new information or build relationships, which in turn will lead to better long-term…

  14. Stability of similarity measurements for bipartite networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Hou, Lei; Pan, Xue; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Similarity is a fundamental measure in network analyses and machine learning algorithms, with wide applications ranging from personalized recommendation to socio-economic dynamics. We argue that an effective similarity measurement should guarantee the stability even under some information loss. With six bipartite networks, we investigate the stabilities of fifteen similarity measurements by comparing the similarity matrixes of two data samples which are randomly divided from original data sets. Results show that, the fifteen measurements can be well classified into three clusters according to their stabilities, and measurements in the same cluster have similar mathematical definitions. In addition, we develop a top-n-stability method for personalized recommendation, and find that the unstable similarities would recommend false information to users, and the performance of recommendation would be largely improved by using stable similarity measurements. This work provides a novel dimension to analyze and evaluate similarity measurements, which can further find applications in link prediction, personalized recommendation, clustering algorithms, community detection and so on. PMID:26725688

  15. Documents Similarity Measurement Using Field Association Terms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlam, El-Sayed; Fuketa, M.; Morita, K.; Aoe, Jun-ichi

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of text analysis and information retrieval and measurement of document similarity focuses on a new text manipulation system called FA (field association)-Sim that is useful for retrieving information in large heterogeneous texts and for recognizing content similarity in text excerpts. Discusses recall and precision, automatic indexing…

  16. Investigation of psychophysical similarity measures for selection of similar images in the diagnosis of clustered microcalcifications on mammograms

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Chisako; Li Qiang; Schmidt, Robert; Shiraishi, Junji; Doi, Kunio

    2008-12-15

    The presentation of images with lesions of known pathology that are similar to an unknown lesion may be helpful to radiologists in the diagnosis of challenging cases for improving the diagnostic accuracy and also for reducing variation among different radiologists. The authors have been developing a computerized scheme for automatically selecting similar images with clustered microcalcifications on mammograms from a large database. For similar images to be useful, they must be similar from the point of view of the diagnosing radiologists. In order to select such images, subjective similarity ratings were obtained for a number of pairs of clustered microcalcifications by breast radiologists for establishment of a ''gold standard'' of image similarity, and the gold standard was employed for determination and evaluation of the selection of similar images. The images used in this study were obtained from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography developed by the University of South Florida. The subjective similarity ratings for 300 pairs of images with clustered microcalcifications were determined by ten breast radiologists. The authors determined a number of image features which represent the characteristics of clustered microcalcifications that radiologists would use in their diagnosis. For determination of objective similarity measures, an artificial neural network (ANN) was employed. The ANN was trained with the average subjective similarity ratings as teacher and selected image features as input data. The ANN was trained to learn the relationship between the image features and the radiologists' similarity ratings; therefore, once the training was completed, the ANN was able to determine the similarity, called a psychophysical similarity measure, which was expected to be close to radiologists' impressions, for an unknown pair of clustered microcalcifications. By use of a leave-one-out test method, the best combination of features was selected. The correlation

  17. Are Epistemological Beliefs Similar across Domains?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schommer, Marlene; Walker, Kiersten

    1995-01-01

    College students in 2 studies (n=95 and 114) completed an epistemological questionnaire with a specific domain in mind (social sciences or mathematics), read a passage, answered a passage test, and completed another epistemological questionnaire. Results supported the idea that individuals' epistemological beliefs tended to be domain independent.…

  18. Kohlberg and Piaget: Differences and Similarities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kavathatzopoulos, Iordanis

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between Lawrence Kohlberg's cognitive-stage theory as a further development of Piaget's moral theory. Argues Kohlberg describes moral thought and not the formation of the independent moral function. Finds Kohlberg's major interest is in the characteristics of stages of individual moral reasoning and the principle of…

  19. Similarity analysis of compressor tip clearance flow structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G. T.; Greitzer, E. M.; Tan, C. S.; Marble, F. E.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach is presented for analyzing compressor tip clearance flow. The basic idea is that the clearance velocity field can be (approximately) decomposed into independent throughflow and crossflow, since chordwise pressure gradients are much smaller than normal pressure gradients in the clearance region. As in the slender body approximation in external aerodynamics, this description implies that the three-dimensional steady clearance flow can be viewed as a two-dimensional, unsteady flow. Using this approach, a similarity scaling for the crossflow in the clearance region is developed and a generalized description of the clearance vortex is derived. Calculations based on the similarity scaling agree well with a wide range of experimental data in regard to flow features such as crossflow velocity field, static pressure field, and tip clearance vortex trajectory.

  20. Similarity in drugs: reflections on analogue design.

    PubMed

    Wermuth, Camille G

    2006-04-01

    A survey of novel small-molecule therapeutics reveals that the majority of them result from analogue design and that their market value represents two-thirds of all small-molecule sales. In natural science, the term analogue, derived from the Latin and Greek analogia, has always been used to describe structural and functional similarity. Extended to drugs, this definition implies that the analogue of an existing drug molecule shares structural and pharmacological similarities with the original compound. Formally, this definition allows the establishment of three categories of drug analogues: analogues possessing chemical and pharmacological similarities (direct analogues); analogues possessing structural similarities only (structural analogues); and chemically different compounds displaying similar pharmacological properties (functional analogues). PMID:16580977

  1. On the Ephemeral Nature of the Relationship between Attitude Similarity and Interpersonal Attraction during Initial Encounters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunnafrank, Michael J.; Miller, Gerald R.

    A study was conducted to identify the independent and conjoint influence of attitude similarity and initial interactions on interpersonal attraction to relative strangers. The 124 college students who were participants in the study were informed that they would be working on a project with either an attitudinally similar or dissimilar stranger…

  2. Ultra-accurate collaborative information filtering via directed user similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Q.; Song, W.-J.; Liu, J.-G.

    2014-07-01

    A key challenge of the collaborative filtering (CF) information filtering is how to obtain the reliable and accurate results with the help of peers' recommendation. Since the similarities from small-degree users to large-degree users would be larger than the ones in opposite direction, the large-degree users' selections are recommended extensively by the traditional second-order CF algorithms. By considering the users' similarity direction and the second-order correlations to depress the influence of mainstream preferences, we present the directed second-order CF (HDCF) algorithm specifically to address the challenge of accuracy and diversity of the CF algorithm. The numerical results for two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, show that the accuracy of the new algorithm outperforms the state-of-the-art CF algorithms. Comparing with the CF algorithm based on random walks proposed by Liu et al. (Int. J. Mod. Phys. C, 20 (2009) 285) the average ranking score could reach 0.0767 and 0.0402, which is enhanced by 27.3% and 19.1% for MovieLens and Netflix, respectively. In addition, the diversity, precision and recall are also enhanced greatly. Without relying on any context-specific information, tuning the similarity direction of CF algorithms could obtain accurate and diverse recommendations. This work suggests that the user similarity direction is an important factor to improve the personalized recommendation performance.

  3. Ligand scaffold hopping combining 3D maximal substructure search and molecular similarity

    PubMed Central

    Quintus, Flavien; Sperandio, Olivier; Grynberg, Julien; Petitjean, Michel; Tuffery, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Background Virtual screening methods are now well established as effective to identify hit and lead candidates and are fully integrated in most drug discovery programs. Ligand-based approaches make use of physico-chemical, structural and energetics properties of known active compounds to search large chemical libraries for related and novel chemotypes. While 2D-similarity search tools are known to be fast and efficient, the use of 3D-similarity search methods can be very valuable to many research projects as integration of "3D knowledge" can facilitate the identification of not only related molecules but also of chemicals possessing distant scaffolds as compared to the query and therefore be more inclined to scaffolds hopping. To date, very few methods performing this task are easily available to the scientific community. Results We introduce a new approach (LigCSRre) to the 3D ligand similarity search of drug candidates. It combines a 3D maximum common substructure search algorithm independent on atom order with a tunable description of atomic compatibilities to prune the search and increase its physico-chemical relevance. We show, on 47 experimentally validated active compounds across five protein targets having different specificities, that for single compound search, the approach is able to recover on average 52% of the co-actives in the top 1% of the ranked list which is better than gold standards of the field. Moreover, the combination of several runs on a single protein target using different query active compounds shows a remarkable improvement in enrichment. Such Results demonstrate LigCSRre as a valuable tool for ligand-based screening. Conclusion LigCSRre constitutes a new efficient and generic approach to the 3D similarity screening of small compounds, whose flexible design opens the door to many enhancements. The program is freely available to the academics for non-profit research at: . PMID:19671127

  4. Shape similarity analysis of regions of interest in medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Charisi, Amalia; Latecki, Longin Jan; Gee, James; Megalooikonomou, Vasilis

    2010-03-01

    In this work, we introduce a new representation technique of 2D contour shapes and a sequence similarity measure to characterize 2D regions of interest in medical images. First, we define a distance function on contour points in order to map the shape of a given contour to a sequence of real numbers. Thus, the computation of shape similarity is reduced to the matching of the obtained sequences. Since both a query and a target sequence may be noisy, i.e., contain some outlier elements, it is desirable to exclude the outliers in order to obtain a robust matching performance. For the computation of shape similarity, we propose the use of an algorithm which performs elastic matching of two sequences. The contribution of our approach is that, unlike previous works that require images to be warped according to a template image for measuring their similarity, it obviates this need, therefore it can estimate image similarity for any type of medical image in a fast and efficient manner. To demonstrate our method's applicability, we analyzed a brain image dataset consisting of corpus callosum shapes, and we investigated the structural differences between children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and controls. Our findings indicate that our method is quite effective and it can be easily applied on medical diagnosis in all cases of which shape difference is an important clue.

  5. Gait Signal Analysis with Similarity Measure

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seungsoo

    2014-01-01

    Human gait decision was carried out with the help of similarity measure design. Gait signal was selected through hardware implementation including all in one sensor, control unit, and notebook with connector. Each gait signal was considered as high dimensional data. Therefore, high dimensional data analysis was considered via heuristic technique such as the similarity measure. Each human pattern such as walking, sitting, standing, and stepping up was obtained through experiment. By the results of the analysis, we also identified the overlapped and nonoverlapped data relation, and similarity measure analysis was also illustrated, and comparison with conventional similarity measure was also carried out. Hence, nonoverlapped data similarity analysis provided the clue to solve the similarity of high dimensional data. Considered high dimensional data analysis was designed with consideration of neighborhood information. Proposed similarity measure was applied to identify the behavior patterns of different persons, and different behaviours of the same person. Obtained analysis can be extended to organize health monitoring system for specially elderly persons. PMID:25110724

  6. Measure of Node Similarity in Multilayer Networks

    PubMed Central

    Mollgaard, Anders; Zettler, Ingo; Dammeyer, Jesper; Jensen, Mogens H.; Lehmann, Sune; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The weight of links in a network is often related to the similarity of the nodes. Here, we introduce a simple tunable measure for analysing the similarity of nodes across different link weights. In particular, we use the measure to analyze homophily in a group of 659 freshman students at a large university. Our analysis is based on data obtained using smartphones equipped with custom data collection software, complemented by questionnaire-based data. The network of social contacts is represented as a weighted multilayer network constructed from different channels of telecommunication as well as data on face-to-face contacts. We find that even strongly connected individuals are not more similar with respect to basic personality traits than randomly chosen pairs of individuals. In contrast, several socio-demographics variables have a significant degree of similarity. We further observe that similarity might be present in one layer of the multilayer network and simultaneously be absent in the other layers. For a variable such as gender, our measure reveals a transition from similarity between nodes connected with links of relatively low weight to dis-similarity for the nodes connected by the strongest links. We finally analyze the overlap between layers in the network for different levels of acquaintanceships. PMID:27300084

  7. Measure of Node Similarity in Multilayer Networks.

    PubMed

    Mollgaard, Anders; Zettler, Ingo; Dammeyer, Jesper; Jensen, Mogens H; Lehmann, Sune; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The weight of links in a network is often related to the similarity of the nodes. Here, we introduce a simple tunable measure for analysing the similarity of nodes across different link weights. In particular, we use the measure to analyze homophily in a group of 659 freshman students at a large university. Our analysis is based on data obtained using smartphones equipped with custom data collection software, complemented by questionnaire-based data. The network of social contacts is represented as a weighted multilayer network constructed from different channels of telecommunication as well as data on face-to-face contacts. We find that even strongly connected individuals are not more similar with respect to basic personality traits than randomly chosen pairs of individuals. In contrast, several socio-demographics variables have a significant degree of similarity. We further observe that similarity might be present in one layer of the multilayer network and simultaneously be absent in the other layers. For a variable such as gender, our measure reveals a transition from similarity between nodes connected with links of relatively low weight to dis-similarity for the nodes connected by the strongest links. We finally analyze the overlap between layers in the network for different levels of acquaintanceships. PMID:27300084

  8. The baryonic self similarity of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alard, C.

    2014-06-20

    The cosmological simulations indicates that dark matter halos have specific self-similar properties. However, the halo similarity is affected by the baryonic feedback. By using momentum-driven winds as a model to represent the baryon feedback, an equilibrium condition is derived which directly implies the emergence of a new type of similarity. The new self-similar solution has constant acceleration at a reference radius for both dark matter and baryons. This model receives strong support from the observations of galaxies. The new self-similar properties imply that the total acceleration at larger distances is scale-free, the transition between the dark matter and baryons dominated regime occurs at a constant acceleration, and the maximum amplitude of the velocity curve at larger distances is proportional to M {sup 1/4}. These results demonstrate that this self-similar model is consistent with the basics of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) phenomenology. In agreement with the observations, the coincidence between the self-similar model and MOND breaks at the scale of clusters of galaxies. Some numerical experiments show that the behavior of the density near the origin is closely approximated by a Einasto profile.

  9. Fingerprint comparison. I: Similarity of fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Lin, C H; Liu, J H; Osterburg, J W; Nicol, J D

    1982-04-01

    Fingerprints from 61 pairs of male monozygotic twins (MZ), 47 pairs of female MZ, 40 pairs of same-sex male dizygotic twins (DZ), 44 pairs of same-sex female DZ, 4 pairs of opposite-sex DZ, and 28 brothers and 31 sisters of those twins are used for the study of fingerprint similarities. Similarities of fingerprint pattern, ridge count, and minutiae are evaluated for two population groups genetically related to each other in different degrees. It is concluded that fingerprint similarities, including pattern, ridge count, and possibly minutiae, between MZ individuals are significantly higher than those between other population groups, including DZ twins.

  10. A Similarity Search Using Molecular Topological Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2009-01-01

    A molecular similarity measure has been developed using molecular topological graphs and atomic partial charges. Two kinds of topological graphs were used. One is the ordinary adjacency matrix and the other is a matrix which represents the minimum path length between two atoms of the molecule. The ordinary adjacency matrix is suitable to compare the local structures of molecules such as functional groups, and the other matrix is suitable to compare the global structures of molecules. The combination of these two matrices gave a similarity measure. This method was applied to in silico drug screening, and the results showed that it was effective as a similarity measure. PMID:20037730

  11. Analysis of Residual Dependencies of Independent Components Extracted from fMRI Data.

    PubMed

    Vanello, N; Ricciardi, E; Landini, L

    2016-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data can be employed as an exploratory method. The lack in the ICA model of strong a priori assumptions about the signal or about the noise leads to difficult interpretations of the results. Moreover, the statistical independence of the components is only approximated. Residual dependencies among the components can reveal informative structure in the data. A major problem is related to model order selection, that is, the number of components to be extracted. Specifically, overestimation may lead to component splitting. In this work, a method based on hierarchical clustering of ICA applied to fMRI datasets is investigated. The clustering algorithm uses a metric based on the mutual information between the ICs. To estimate the similarity measure, a histogram-based technique and one based on kernel density estimation are tested on simulated datasets. Simulations results indicate that the method could be used to cluster components related to the same task and resulting from a splitting process occurring at different model orders. Different performances of the similarity measures were found and discussed. Preliminary results on real data are reported and show that the method can group task related and transiently task related components. PMID:26839530

  12. Similar genetic mechanisms underlie the parallel evolution of floral phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenheng; Kramer, Elena M; Davis, Charles C

    2012-01-01

    The repeated origin of similar phenotypes is invaluable for studying the underlying genetics of adaptive traits; molecular evidence, however, is lacking for most examples of such similarity. The floral morphology of neotropical Malpighiaceae is distinctive and highly conserved, especially with regard to symmetry, and is thought to result from specialization on oil-bee pollinators. We recently demonstrated that CYCLOIDEA2-like genes (CYC2A and CYC2B) are associated with the development of the stereotypical floral zygomorphy that is critical to this plant-pollinator mutualism. Here, we build on this developmental framework to characterize floral symmetry in three clades of Malpighiaceae that have independently lost their oil bee association and experienced parallel shifts in their floral morphology, especially in regard to symmetry. We show that in each case these species exhibit a loss of CYC2B function, and a strikingly similar shift in the expression of CYC2A that is coincident with their shift in floral symmetry. These results indicate that similar floral phenotypes in this large angiosperm clade have evolved via parallel genetic changes from an otherwise highly conserved developmental program.

  13. New opportunities seen for independents

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, G.A. )

    1990-10-22

    The collapse of gas and oil prices in the mid-1980s significantly reduced the number of independent exploration companies. At the same time, a fundamental shift occurred among major oil companies as they allocated their exploration budgets toward international operations and made major production purchases. Several large independents also embraced a philosophy of budget supplementation through joint venture partnership arrangements. This has created a unique and unusual window of opportunity for the smaller independents (defined for this article as exploration and production companies with a market value of less than $1 billion) to access the extensive and high quality domestic prospect inventories of the major and large independent oil and gas companies and to participate in the search for large reserve targets on attractive joint venture terms. Participation in these types of joint ventures, in conjunction with internally generated plays selected through the use of today's advanced technology (computer-enhanced, high-resolution seismic; horizontal drilling; etc.) and increasing process for oil and natural gas, presents the domestic exploration-oriented independent with an attractive money-making opportunity for the 1990s.

  14. Orthographic similarity: the case of "reversed anagrams".

    PubMed

    Morris, Alison L; Still, Mary L

    2012-07-01

    How orthographically similar are words such as paws and swap, flow and wolf, or live and evil? According to the letter position coding schemes used in models of visual word recognition, these reversed anagrams are considered to be less similar than words that share letters in the same absolute or relative positions (such as home and hose or plan and lane). Therefore, reversed anagrams should not produce the standard orthographic similarity effects found using substitution neighbors (e.g., home, hose). Simulations using the spatial coding model (Davis, Psychological Review 117, 713-758, 2010), for example, predict an inhibitory masked-priming effect for substitution neighbor word pairs but a null effect for reversed anagrams. Nevertheless, we obtained significant inhibitory priming using both stimulus types (Experiment 1). We also demonstrated that robust repetition blindness can be obtained for reversed anagrams (Experiment 2). Reversed anagrams therefore provide a new test for models of visual word recognition and orthographic similarity.

  15. HYPOTHESIS TESTING WITH THE SIMILARITY INDEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mulltilocus DNA fingerprinting methods have been used extensively to address genetic issues in wildlife populations. Hypotheses concerning population subdivision and differing levels of diversity can be addressed through the use of the similarity index (S), a band-sharing coeffic...

  16. Evaluating Similarity Measures for Brain Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Razlighi, Q. R.; Kehtarnavaz, N.; Yousefi, S.

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of similarity measures for image registration is a challenging problem due to its complex interaction with the underlying optimization, regularization, image type and modality. We propose a single performance metric, named robustness, as part of a new evaluation method which quantifies the effectiveness of similarity measures for brain image registration while eliminating the effects of the other parts of the registration process. We show empirically that similarity measures with higher robustness are more effective in registering degraded images and are also more successful in performing intermodal image registration. Further, we introduce a new similarity measure, called normalized spatial mutual information, for 3D brain image registration whose robustness is shown to be much higher than the existing ones. Consequently, it tolerates greater image degradation and provides more consistent outcomes for intermodal brain image registration. PMID:24039378

  17. Bilateral Trade Flows and Income Distribution Similarity.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada; Vollmer, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Current models of bilateral trade neglect the effects of income distribution. This paper addresses the issue by accounting for non-homothetic consumer preferences and hence investigating the role of income distribution in the context of the gravity model of trade. A theoretically justified gravity model is estimated for disaggregated trade data (Dollar volume is used as dependent variable) using a sample of 104 exporters and 108 importers for 1980-2003 to achieve two main goals. We define and calculate new measures of income distribution similarity and empirically confirm that greater similarity of income distribution between countries implies more trade. Using distribution-based measures as a proxy for demand similarities in gravity models, we find consistent and robust support for the hypothesis that countries with more similar income-distributions trade more with each other. The hypothesis is also confirmed at disaggregated level for differentiated product categories.

  18. Bilateral Trade Flows and Income Distribution Similarity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Current models of bilateral trade neglect the effects of income distribution. This paper addresses the issue by accounting for non-homothetic consumer preferences and hence investigating the role of income distribution in the context of the gravity model of trade. A theoretically justified gravity model is estimated for disaggregated trade data (Dollar volume is used as dependent variable) using a sample of 104 exporters and 108 importers for 1980–2003 to achieve two main goals. We define and calculate new measures of income distribution similarity and empirically confirm that greater similarity of income distribution between countries implies more trade. Using distribution-based measures as a proxy for demand similarities in gravity models, we find consistent and robust support for the hypothesis that countries with more similar income-distributions trade more with each other. The hypothesis is also confirmed at disaggregated level for differentiated product categories. PMID:27137462

  19. Similarity Theory of Withdrawn Water Temperature Experiment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Selective withdrawal from a thermal stratified reservoir has been widely utilized in managing reservoir water withdrawal. Besides theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, model test was also necessary in studying the temperature of withdrawn water. However, information on the similarity theory of the withdrawn water temperature model remains lacking. Considering flow features of selective withdrawal, the similarity theory of the withdrawn water temperature model was analyzed theoretically based on the modification of governing equations, the Boussinesq approximation, and some simplifications. The similarity conditions between the model and the prototype were suggested. The conversion of withdrawn water temperature between the model and the prototype was proposed. Meanwhile, the fundamental theory of temperature distribution conversion was firstly proposed, which could significantly improve the experiment efficiency when the basic temperature of the model was different from the prototype. Based on the similarity theory, an experiment was performed on the withdrawn water temperature which was verified by numerical method. PMID:26065020

  20. Bilateral Trade Flows and Income Distribution Similarity.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada; Vollmer, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Current models of bilateral trade neglect the effects of income distribution. This paper addresses the issue by accounting for non-homothetic consumer preferences and hence investigating the role of income distribution in the context of the gravity model of trade. A theoretically justified gravity model is estimated for disaggregated trade data (Dollar volume is used as dependent variable) using a sample of 104 exporters and 108 importers for 1980-2003 to achieve two main goals. We define and calculate new measures of income distribution similarity and empirically confirm that greater similarity of income distribution between countries implies more trade. Using distribution-based measures as a proxy for demand similarities in gravity models, we find consistent and robust support for the hypothesis that countries with more similar income-distributions trade more with each other. The hypothesis is also confirmed at disaggregated level for differentiated product categories. PMID:27137462

  1. Visual similarity at encoding and retrieval in an item recognition task.

    PubMed

    Mate, Judit; Baqués, Josep

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this experiment was to examine the effects of shape similarity in visual working memory using a six alternative recognition task of Chinese characters. Shape similarity among items was manipulated at both encoding and retrieval in order to assess in which phase similarity impairs recognition to a greater degree. Results revealed that performance is particularly facilitated by high discriminability at retrieval but also by the presence of similar items at encoding, as similarity simplifies the global representation of the display and reduces memory load. Moreover, results provide further evidence that the classical similarity effect can be reversed in the visual domain when item memory (as opposed to order) is assessed.

  2. Interpersonal attraction and personality: what is attractive--self similarity, ideal similarity, complementarity or attachment security?

    PubMed

    Klohnen, Eva C; Luo, Shanhong

    2003-10-01

    Little is known about whether personality characteristics influence initial attraction. Because adult attachment differences influence a broad range of relationship processes, the authors examined their role in 3 experimental attraction studies. The authors tested four major attraction hypotheses--self similarity, ideal-self similarity, complementarity, and attachment security--and examined both actual and perceptual factors. Replicated analyses across samples, designs, and manipulations showed that actual security and self similarity predicted attraction. With regard to perceptual factors, ideal similarity, self similarity, and security all were significant predictors. Whereas perceptual ideal and self similarity had incremental predictive power, perceptual security's effects were subsumed by perceptual ideal similarity. Perceptual self similarity fully mediated actual attachment similarity effects, whereas ideal similarity was only a partial mediator. PMID:14561124

  3. Privacy-preserving matching of similar patients.

    PubMed

    Vatsalan, Dinusha; Christen, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The identification of similar entities represented by records in different databases has drawn considerable attention in many application areas, including in the health domain. One important type of entity matching application that is vital for quality healthcare analytics is the identification of similar patients, known as similar patient matching. A key component of identifying similar records is the calculation of similarity of the values in attributes (fields) between these records. Due to increasing privacy and confidentiality concerns, using the actual attribute values of patient records to identify similar records across different organizations is becoming non-trivial because the attributes in such records often contain highly sensitive information such as personal and medical details of patients. Therefore, the matching needs to be based on masked (encoded) values while being effective and efficient to allow matching of large databases. Bloom filter encoding has widely been used as an efficient masking technique for privacy-preserving matching of string and categorical values. However, no work on Bloom filter-based masking of numerical data, such as integer (e.g. age), floating point (e.g. body mass index), and modulus (numbers wrap around upon reaching a certain value, e.g. date and time), which are commonly required in the health domain, has been presented in the literature. We propose a framework with novel methods for masking numerical data using Bloom filters, thereby facilitating the calculation of similarities between records. We conduct an empirical study on publicly available real-world datasets which shows that our framework provides efficient masking and achieves similar matching accuracy compared to the matching of actual unencoded patient records.

  4. Privacy-preserving matching of similar patients.

    PubMed

    Vatsalan, Dinusha; Christen, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The identification of similar entities represented by records in different databases has drawn considerable attention in many application areas, including in the health domain. One important type of entity matching application that is vital for quality healthcare analytics is the identification of similar patients, known as similar patient matching. A key component of identifying similar records is the calculation of similarity of the values in attributes (fields) between these records. Due to increasing privacy and confidentiality concerns, using the actual attribute values of patient records to identify similar records across different organizations is becoming non-trivial because the attributes in such records often contain highly sensitive information such as personal and medical details of patients. Therefore, the matching needs to be based on masked (encoded) values while being effective and efficient to allow matching of large databases. Bloom filter encoding has widely been used as an efficient masking technique for privacy-preserving matching of string and categorical values. However, no work on Bloom filter-based masking of numerical data, such as integer (e.g. age), floating point (e.g. body mass index), and modulus (numbers wrap around upon reaching a certain value, e.g. date and time), which are commonly required in the health domain, has been presented in the literature. We propose a framework with novel methods for masking numerical data using Bloom filters, thereby facilitating the calculation of similarities between records. We conduct an empirical study on publicly available real-world datasets which shows that our framework provides efficient masking and achieves similar matching accuracy compared to the matching of actual unencoded patient records. PMID:26707453

  5. The Independent Technical Analysis Process

    SciTech Connect

    Duberstein, Corey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2007-04-13

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contracted with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide technical analytical support for system-wide fish passage information (BPA Project No. 2006-010-00). The goal of this project was to produce rigorous technical analysis products using independent analysts and anonymous peer reviewers. In the past, regional parties have interacted with a single entity, the Fish Passage Center to access the data, analyses, and coordination related to fish passage. This project provided an independent technical source for non-routine fish passage analyses while allowing routine support functions to be performed by other well-qualified entities.

  6. A similarity-based data warehousing environment for medical images.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Jefferson William; Annibal, Luana Peixoto; Felipe, Joaquim Cezar; Ciferri, Ricardo Rodrigues; Ciferri, Cristina Dutra de Aguiar

    2015-11-01

    A core issue of the decision-making process in the medical field is to support the execution of analytical (OLAP) similarity queries over images in data warehousing environments. In this paper, we focus on this issue. We propose imageDWE, a non-conventional data warehousing environment that enables the storage of intrinsic features taken from medical images in a data warehouse and supports OLAP similarity queries over them. To comply with this goal, we introduce the concept of perceptual layer, which is an abstraction used to represent an image dataset according to a given feature descriptor in order to enable similarity search. Based on this concept, we propose the imageDW, an extended data warehouse with dimension tables specifically designed to support one or more perceptual layers. We also detail how to build an imageDW and how to load image data into it. Furthermore, we show how to process OLAP similarity queries composed of a conventional predicate and a similarity search predicate that encompasses the specification of one or more perceptual layers. Moreover, we introduce an index technique to improve the OLAP query processing over images. We carried out performance tests over a data warehouse environment that consolidated medical images from exams of several modalities. The results demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of our proposed imageDWE to manage images and to process OLAP similarity queries. The results also demonstrated that the use of the proposed index technique guaranteed a great improvement in query processing.

  7. Correlating human color similarity judgments and colorimetric representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertan, Constantin C.; Ciuc, Mihai; Stoica, A.; Zamfir, Marta; Buzuloiu, Vasile V.; Fernandez-Maloigne, Christine

    2003-10-01

    A color similarity test was conducted on the 24 color patches of a Gretag Macbeth color checker. Color similarities were measured either by distances between standard colorimetric representations (such as RGB, Lab or spectral reflectance curves) or by human observer judgments. In each case, the dissimilarity matrix was processed by a classical, metric, multidimensional scaling algorithm, in order to produce a visually-interpretable two-dimensional plot of color dissimilarity. The analysis of the plots produces some interesting conclusions. First, the plots produced by the Lab, RGB and spectral representations exhibit very evident variation axes according to the luminance and basic chromatic differences (red-green, blue-yellow). This behavior (trivial for the Lab representation) suggests that the color similarity measurement by chromatic differences is implicitly embedded in the RGB and spectral representations. The color dissimilarity plots associated to the human judgments (for any individual, as well as for an "average" observer) exhibit a different organization, which mixes hue, saturation and luminance (HSV). According to these plots, the human similarity judgment is not entirely HSV-based. We prove that it is possible to obtain the same color dissimilarity plots if a fuzzy color model is assumed. The fuzzy color model provides similarity coefficients (similarity degrees) between pairs of colors, based on their inter-distance, according to an imposed "color confusion" control parameter, which seems to be relevant for the human vision.

  8. A similarity-based data warehousing environment for medical images.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Jefferson William; Annibal, Luana Peixoto; Felipe, Joaquim Cezar; Ciferri, Ricardo Rodrigues; Ciferri, Cristina Dutra de Aguiar

    2015-11-01

    A core issue of the decision-making process in the medical field is to support the execution of analytical (OLAP) similarity queries over images in data warehousing environments. In this paper, we focus on this issue. We propose imageDWE, a non-conventional data warehousing environment that enables the storage of intrinsic features taken from medical images in a data warehouse and supports OLAP similarity queries over them. To comply with this goal, we introduce the concept of perceptual layer, which is an abstraction used to represent an image dataset according to a given feature descriptor in order to enable similarity search. Based on this concept, we propose the imageDW, an extended data warehouse with dimension tables specifically designed to support one or more perceptual layers. We also detail how to build an imageDW and how to load image data into it. Furthermore, we show how to process OLAP similarity queries composed of a conventional predicate and a similarity search predicate that encompasses the specification of one or more perceptual layers. Moreover, we introduce an index technique to improve the OLAP query processing over images. We carried out performance tests over a data warehouse environment that consolidated medical images from exams of several modalities. The results demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of our proposed imageDWE to manage images and to process OLAP similarity queries. The results also demonstrated that the use of the proposed index technique guaranteed a great improvement in query processing. PMID:26414378

  9. Prediction of Drug Indications Based on Chemical Interactions and Chemical Similarities

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guohua; Lu, Yin; Lu, Changhong; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Discovering potential indications of novel or approved drugs is a key step in drug development. Previous computational approaches could be categorized into disease-centric and drug-centric based on the starting point of the issues or small-scaled application and large-scale application according to the diversity of the datasets. Here, a classifier has been constructed to predict the indications of a drug based on the assumption that interactive/associated drugs or drugs with similar structures are more likely to target the same diseases using a large drug indication dataset. To examine the classifier, it was conducted on a dataset with 1,573 drugs retrieved from Comprehensive Medicinal Chemistry database for five times, evaluated by 5-fold cross-validation, yielding five 1st order prediction accuracies that were all approximately 51.48%. Meanwhile, the model yielded an accuracy rate of 50.00% for the 1st order prediction by independent test on a dataset with 32 other drugs in which drug repositioning has been confirmed. Interestingly, some clinically repurposed drug indications that were not included in the datasets are successfully identified by our method. These results suggest that our method may become a useful tool to associate novel molecules with new indications or alternative indications with existing drugs. PMID:25821813

  10. Order effects in dynamic semantics.

    PubMed

    Graben, Peter Beim

    2014-01-01

    In their target article, Wang and Busemeyer (2013) discuss question order effects in terms of incompatible projectors on a Hilbert space. In a similar vein, Blutner recently presented an orthoalgebraic query language essentially relying on dynamic update semantics. Here, I shall comment on some interesting analogies between the different variants of dynamic semantics and generalized quantum theory to illustrate other kinds of order effects in human cognition, such as belief revision, the resolution of anaphors, and default reasoning that result from the crucial non-commutativity of mental operations upon the belief state of a cognitive agent.

  11. Similarity Search for Continuous Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OReilly, O. J.; Yoon, C. E.; Beroza, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    Cross-correlation of seismic data streams with a priori known waveform templates has emerged as an effective tool to identify the occurrence of similar seismic signals; yet, this approach is difficult if the form of the templates is unknown. This challenge has been partially met by constructing waveform templates using reoccurring seismic signals sharing similar waveforms. This waveform similarity arises because the Earth's structure is essentially time invariant at the temporal scales considered in seismology. The problem of finding similar waveforms without known templates has been approached previously by segmenting incoming seismic data streams into multiple overlapping windows, each with a fixed length and lag, followed by matched filtering using each window as a template. An immediate shortcoming of this strategy is that it is computationally expensive; it scales quadratically with the number of lags needed, which limits the analysis to time series of short duration. The principal concept behind our approach, which enables scalable similarity search is to use a hierarchical approach to investigate only a small, near-constant sized subset of all possible waveform pairs for each query. In computer science and related fields, there are efficient techniques to solve this problem, which appears in numerous applications. Here, we bring these techniques into detection seismology. As a first step, we present a prototype database application that relies on a fingerprinting scheme that produces numerous high-dimensional sparse binary data representations of the windowed data streams (each fingerprint is significantly compressed compared to the actual window). These fingerprints encode key features of the actual window, enabling comparison among fingerprints rather than cross-correlating windows for comparison. Further dimensionality reduction is then applied to each fingerprint and similar fingerprints are grouped together using locality-sensitive hashing. Developing

  12. Activity-relevant similarity values for fingerprints and implications for similarity searching

    PubMed Central

    Jasial, Swarit; Hu, Ye; Vogt, Martin; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A largely unsolved problem in chemoinformatics is the issue of how calculated compound similarity relates to activity similarity, which is central to many applications. In general, activity relationships are predicted from calculated similarity values. However, there is no solid scientific foundation to bridge between calculated molecular and observed activity similarity. Accordingly, the success rate of identifying new active compounds by similarity searching is limited. Although various attempts have been made to establish relationships between calculated fingerprint similarity values and biological activities, none of these has yielded generally applicable rules for similarity searching. In this study, we have addressed the question of molecular versus activity similarity in a more fundamental way. First, we have evaluated if activity-relevant similarity value ranges could in principle be identified for standard fingerprints and distinguished from similarity resulting from random compound comparisons. Then, we have analyzed if activity-relevant similarity values could be used to guide typical similarity search calculations aiming to identify active compounds in databases. It was found that activity-relevant similarity values can be identified as a characteristic feature of fingerprints. However, it was also shown that such values cannot be reliably used as thresholds for practical similarity search calculations. In addition, the analysis presented herein helped to rationalize differences in fingerprint search performance. PMID:27127620

  13. Naked singularities in self-similar spherical gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Ori, A.; Piran, T.

    1987-11-09

    We present general-relativistic solutions of self-similar spherical collapse of an adiabatic perfect fluid. We show that if the equation of state is soft enough (GAMMA-1<<1), a naked singularity forms. The singularity resembles the shell-focusing naked singularities that arise in dust collapse. This solution increases significantly the range of matter fields that should be ruled out in order that the cosmic-censorship hypothesis will hold.

  14. Similarity analysis, synthesis, and bioassay of antibacterial cyclic peptidomimetics

    PubMed Central

    Berhanu, Workalemahu M; Ibrahim, Mohamed A; Pillai, Girinath G; Oliferenko, Alexander A; Khelashvili, Levan; Jabeen, Farukh; Mirza, Bushra; Ansari, Farzana Latif; ul-Haq, Ihsan; El-Feky, Said A

    2012-01-01

    Summary The chemical similarity of antibacterial cyclic peptides and peptidomimetics was studied in order to identify new promising cyclic scaffolds. A large descriptor space coupled with cluster analysis was employed to digitize known antibacterial structures and to gauge the potential of new peptidomimetic macrocycles, which were conveniently synthesized by acylbenzotriazole methodology. Some of the synthesized compounds were tested against an array of microorganisms and showed antibacterial activity against Bordetella bronchistepica, Micrococcus luteus, and Salmonella typhimurium. PMID:23019443

  15. Earthquake detection through computationally efficient similarity search.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Clara E; O'Reilly, Ossian; Bergen, Karianne J; Beroza, Gregory C

    2015-12-01

    Seismology is experiencing rapid growth in the quantity of data, which has outpaced the development of processing algorithms. Earthquake detection-identification of seismic events in continuous data-is a fundamental operation for observational seismology. We developed an efficient method to detect earthquakes using waveform similarity that overcomes the disadvantages of existing detection methods. Our method, called Fingerprint And Similarity Thresholding (FAST), can analyze a week of continuous seismic waveform data in less than 2 hours, or 140 times faster than autocorrelation. FAST adapts a data mining algorithm, originally designed to identify similar audio clips within large databases; it first creates compact "fingerprints" of waveforms by extracting key discriminative features, then groups similar fingerprints together within a database to facilitate fast, scalable search for similar fingerprint pairs, and finally generates a list of earthquake detections. FAST detected most (21 of 24) cataloged earthquakes and 68 uncataloged earthquakes in 1 week of continuous data from a station located near the Calaveras Fault in central California, achieving detection performance comparable to that of autocorrelation, with some additional false detections. FAST is expected to realize its full potential when applied to extremely long duration data sets over a distributed network of seismic stations. The widespread application of FAST has the potential to aid in the discovery of unexpected seismic signals, improve seismic monitoring, and promote a greater understanding of a variety of earthquake processes. PMID:26665176

  16. Self-Similar Compressible Free Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonEllenrieder, Karl

    1998-01-01

    Lie group methods are used to find both exact and numerical similarity solutions for compressible perturbations to all incompressible, two-dimensional, axisymmetric vortex reference flow. The reference flow vorticity satisfies an eigenvalue problem for which the solutions are a set of two-dimensional, self-similar, incompressible vortices. These solutions are augmented by deriving a conserved quantity for each eigenvalue, and identifying a Lie group which leaves the reference flow equations invariant. The partial differential equations governing the compressible perturbations to these reference flows are also invariant under the action of the same group. The similarity variables found with this group are used to determine the decay rates of the velocities and thermodynamic variables in the self-similar flows, and to reduce the governing partial differential equations to a set of ordinary differential equations. The ODE's are solved analytically and numerically for a Taylor vortex reference flow, and numerically for an Oseen vortex reference flow. The solutions are used to examine the dependencies of the temperature, density, entropy, dissipation and radial velocity on the Prandtl number. Also, experimental data on compressible free vortex flow are compared to the analytical results, the evolution of vortices from initial states which are not self-similar is discussed, and the energy transfer in a slightly-compressible vortex is considered.

  17. Earthquake detection through computationally efficient similarity search

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Clara E.; O’Reilly, Ossian; Bergen, Karianne J.; Beroza, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    Seismology is experiencing rapid growth in the quantity of data, which has outpaced the development of processing algorithms. Earthquake detection—identification of seismic events in continuous data—is a fundamental operation for observational seismology. We developed an efficient method to detect earthquakes using waveform similarity that overcomes the disadvantages of existing detection methods. Our method, called Fingerprint And Similarity Thresholding (FAST), can analyze a week of continuous seismic waveform data in less than 2 hours, or 140 times faster than autocorrelation. FAST adapts a data mining algorithm, originally designed to identify similar audio clips within large databases; it first creates compact “fingerprints” of waveforms by extracting key discriminative features, then groups similar fingerprints together within a database to facilitate fast, scalable search for similar fingerprint pairs, and finally generates a list of earthquake detections. FAST detected most (21 of 24) cataloged earthquakes and 68 uncataloged earthquakes in 1 week of continuous data from a station located near the Calaveras Fault in central California, achieving detection performance comparable to that of autocorrelation, with some additional false detections. FAST is expected to realize its full potential when applied to extremely long duration data sets over a distributed network of seismic stations. The widespread application of FAST has the potential to aid in the discovery of unexpected seismic signals, improve seismic monitoring, and promote a greater understanding of a variety of earthquake processes. PMID:26665176

  18. Earthquake detection through computationally efficient similarity search.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Clara E; O'Reilly, Ossian; Bergen, Karianne J; Beroza, Gregory C

    2015-12-01

    Seismology is experiencing rapid growth in the quantity of data, which has outpaced the development of processing algorithms. Earthquake detection-identification of seismic events in continuous data-is a fundamental operation for observational seismology. We developed an efficient method to detect earthquakes using waveform similarity that overcomes the disadvantages of existing detection methods. Our method, called Fingerprint And Similarity Thresholding (FAST), can analyze a week of continuous seismic waveform data in less than 2 hours, or 140 times faster than autocorrelation. FAST adapts a data mining algorithm, originally designed to identify similar audio clips within large databases; it first creates compact "fingerprints" of waveforms by extracting key discriminative features, then groups similar fingerprints together within a database to facilitate fast, scalable search for similar fingerprint pairs, and finally generates a list of earthquake detections. FAST detected most (21 of 24) cataloged earthquakes and 68 uncataloged earthquakes in 1 week of continuous data from a station located near the Calaveras Fault in central California, achieving detection performance comparable to that of autocorrelation, with some additional false detections. FAST is expected to realize its full potential when applied to extremely long duration data sets over a distributed network of seismic stations. The widespread application of FAST has the potential to aid in the discovery of unexpected seismic signals, improve seismic monitoring, and promote a greater understanding of a variety of earthquake processes.

  19. Efficient Video Similarity Measurement and Search

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, S-C S

    2002-12-19

    The amount of information on the world wide web has grown enormously since its creation in 1990. Duplication of content is inevitable because there is no central management on the web. Studies have shown that many similar versions of the same text documents can be found throughout the web. This redundancy problem is more severe for multimedia content such as web video sequences, as they are often stored in multiple locations and different formats to facilitate downloading and streaming. Similar versions of the same video can also be found, unknown to content creators, when web users modify and republish original content using video editing tools. Identifying similar content can benefit many web applications and content owners. For example, it will reduce the number of similar answers to a web search and identify inappropriate use of copyright content. In this dissertation, they present a system architecture and corresponding algorithms to efficiently measure, search, and organize similar video sequences found on any large database such as the web.

  20. Why does the phonological similarity effect reverse with nonwords?

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Paul Johan; Imenes, Anders Gravir; Johannessen, Kaja; Endestad, Tor; Lian, Arild

    2007-07-01

    The detrimental phonological similarity effect (PSE), a robust finding in serial recall of words, sometimes reverses with nonwords. The current study tested the hypothesis that nonwords benefit from phonological similarity because they are harder to retrieve. In two experiments serial recall and serial reconstruction of visually presented words and nonwords were compared. Phonological similarity is known to have a positive effect on item memory and a negative effect on position accuracy in serial recall, and the demands on item retrieval were greatly reduced in the latter task. PSE occurred for words in both tasks and was reversed for nonwords in serial recall, but not in serial reconstruction-a new finding in the literature. The following conclusions can be made: (1) the detrimental PSE on order retrieval occurs irrespective of lexicality, in accordance with prominent short-term memory models; and (2), the positive PSE on item retrieval is crucially affected by lexicality, a finding less well explained by the existing models.

  1. A residual stress study in similar and dissimilar welds

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Eisazadeh, Hamid; Goldak, John A.; Aidun, Daryush K.; Coules, Harry E.; Bunn, Jeffrey R; Achuthan, A.

    2016-04-01

    Residual strain distributions in similar and dissimilar welds were measured using neutron diffraction (ND) method. Then, using three strain components, three-dimensional stress states were calculated. The results were used to determine the effect of the martensitic phase transformation and material properties on residual stress (RS) distribution. It was observed that smaller longitudinal RS was induced in the low carbon steel side of dissimilar weld when compared to its similar weld. Also, it was found that the transverse RS near and within the weld zone (WZ) in dissimilar weld exhibited a distinctive trend, with tensile mode reaching the yield strength ofmore » the base metal (BM). In order to characterize the WZ in dissimilar weld, we deployed optical microscopy, hardness, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). This study not only provides further insight into the RS state in similar and dissimilar welds; it also delivers important consequences of phase transformation in the latter case.« less

  2. Haptic Tracking Permits Bimanual Independence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbaum, David A.; Dawson, Amanda A.; Challis, John H.

    2006-01-01

    This study shows that in a novel task--bimanual haptic tracking--neurologically normal human adults can move their 2 hands independently for extended periods of time with little or no training. Participants lightly touched buttons whose positions were moved either quasi-randomly in the horizontal plane by 1 or 2 human drivers (Experiment 1), in…

  3. 10 Questions about Independent Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truby, Dana

    2012-01-01

    Teachers know that establishing a robust independent reading program takes more than giving kids a little quiet time after lunch. But how do they set up a program that will maximize their students' gains? Teachers have to know their students' reading levels inside and out, help them find just-right books, and continue to guide them during…

  4. Dimension independence in exterior algebra.

    PubMed Central

    Hawrylycz, M

    1995-01-01

    The identities between homogeneous expressions in rank 1 vectors and rank n - 1 covectors in a Grassmann-Cayley algebra of rank n, in which one set occurs multilinearly, are shown to represent a set of dimension-independent identities. The theorem yields an infinite set of nontrivial geometric identities from a given identity. PMID:11607520

  5. Field Independence: Reviewing the Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Carol; Richardson, John T. E.; Waring, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background: The construct of ?eld independence (FI) remains one of the most widely cited notions in research on cognitive style and on learning and instruction more generally. However, a great deal of confusion continues to exist around the de?nition of FI, its measurement, and the interpretation of research results, all of which have served to…

  6. Independent Study Project, Topic: Topology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notre Dame High School, Easton, PA.

    Using this guide and the four popular books noted in it, a student, working independently, will learn about some of the classical ideas and problems of topology: the Meobius strip and Klein bottle, the four color problem, genus of a surface, networks, Euler's formula, and the Jordan Curve Theorem. The unit culminates in a project of the students'…

  7. Boston: Cradle of American Independence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community College Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The 2005 American Association of Community Colleges Annual Convention will be held April 6-9 in Boston. While thoroughly modern, the iconic city's identity is firmly rooted in the past. As the cradle of American independence, Boston's long history is an integral part of the American fabric. Adams, Revere, Hancock are more than historical figures;…

  8. Employee and independent contractor relationships.

    PubMed

    Wren, K R; Wren, T L; Monti, E J; Turco, S J

    1999-05-01

    Most practitioners find themselves at a disadvantage in dealing with business issues and relationships. As health care continues to change, knowledge of contracts and business relationships will help CRNA practitioners navigate new as well as traditional practice settings. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of two business relationships: employee and independent contractor. PMID:10504911

  9. Selective Influence through Conditional Independence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dzhafarov, Ehtibar N.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a generalization and improvement for the definition proposed by E. Dzhafarov (2001) for selectiveness in the dependence of several random variables on several (sets of) external factors. This generalization links the notion of selective influence with that of conditional independence. (SLD)

  10. Similar psychological distance reduces temporal discounting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunji; Schnall, Simone; White, Mathew P

    2013-08-01

    People often prefer inferior options in the present even when options in the future are more lucrative. Five studies investigated whether decision making could be improved by manipulating construal level and psychological distance. In Studies 1a, 1b, and 2, temporal discounting was reduced when future rewards (trips to Paris) were construed at a relatively concrete level, thus inducing a similar level of construal to present rewards. By contrast, Studies 3 and 4 reduced temporal discounting by making present financial rewards more psychologically distant via a social proximity manipulation, and thus linked to a similar high level of construal as future rewards. These results suggest that people prefer the more lucrative option when comparing two intertemporal choices that are construed on a similar level instead of on a different level. Thus, changes in construal level and mental representations can be used to promote more desirable choices in economic decision making.

  11. Percolation in Self-Similar Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, M. Ángeles; Krioukov, Dmitri; Boguñá, Marián

    2011-01-01

    We provide a simple proof that graphs in a general class of self-similar networks have zero percolation threshold. The considered self-similar networks include random scale-free graphs with given expected node degrees and zero clustering, scale-free graphs with finite clustering and metric structure, growing scale-free networks, and many real networks. The proof and the derivation of the giant component size do not require the assumption that networks are treelike. Our results rely only on the observation that self-similar networks possess a hierarchy of nested subgraphs whose average degree grows with their depth in the hierarchy. We conjecture that this property is pivotal for percolation in networks.

  12. Similar biotherapeutic products: overview and reflections.

    PubMed

    Desanvicente-Celis, Zayrho; Gomez-Lopez, Arley; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-12-01

    Biotherapeutic products (BPs) have revolutionized medicine, changing the way we treat several pathologies such as autoimmune diseases and cancer, among others. Herein, we present an overview of similar BPs (SBPs), also called biosimilars, including the manufacturing process and regulatory aspects involved. The objective of developing an SBP is to manufacture a molecule that is highly similar to a reference BP by conducting a comparability exercise (CE) that can demonstrate similar safety and efficacy. This CE consists of quality, as well as nonclinical and clinical evaluation. A case-by-case analysis approach guided by scientific and objective standards must be the foundation for the SBP approval process. The establishment of a balance between a comprehensive CE for SBPs and their reference BPs, and the design of costeffective strategies to provide better access to BPs, should be the key goal for national regulatory authorities. PMID:23240752

  13. Quantifying the similarity of seismic polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Joshua P.; Eaton, David W.; Caffagni, Enrico

    2016-02-01

    Assessing the similarities of seismic attributes can help identify tremor, low signal-to-noise (S/N) signals and converted or reflected phases, in addition to diagnosing site noise and sensor misalignment in arrays. Polarization analysis is a widely accepted method for studying the orientation and directional characteristics of seismic phases via computed attributes, but similarity is ordinarily discussed using qualitative comparisons with reference values or known seismic sources. Here we introduce a technique for quantitative polarization similarity that uses weighted histograms computed in short, overlapping time windows, drawing on methods adapted from the image processing and computer vision literature. Our method accounts for ambiguity in azimuth and incidence angle and variations in S/N ratio. Measuring polarization similarity allows easy identification of site noise and sensor misalignment and can help identify coherent noise and emergent or low S/N phase arrivals. Dissimilar azimuths during phase arrivals indicate misaligned horizontal components, dissimilar incidence angles during phase arrivals indicate misaligned vertical components and dissimilar linear polarization may indicate a secondary noise source. Using records of the Mw = 8.3 Sea of Okhotsk earthquake, from Canadian National Seismic Network broad-band sensors in British Columbia and Yukon Territory, Canada, and a vertical borehole array at Hoadley gas field, central Alberta, Canada, we demonstrate that our method is robust to station spacing. Discrete wavelet analysis extends polarization similarity to the time-frequency domain in a straightforward way. Time-frequency polarization similarities of borehole data suggest that a coherent noise source may have persisted above 8 Hz several months after peak resource extraction from a `flowback' type hydraulic fracture.

  14. Some more similarities between Peirce and Skinner

    PubMed Central

    Moxley, Roy A.

    2002-01-01

    C. S. Peirce is noted for pioneering a variety of views, and the case is made here for the similarities and parallels between his views and B. F. Skinner's radical behaviorism. In addition to parallels previously noted, these similarities include an advancement of experimental science, a behavioral psychology, a shift from nominalism to realism, an opposition to positivism, a selectionist account for strengthening behavior, the importance of a community of selves, a recursive approach to method, and the probabilistic nature of truth. Questions are raised as to the extent to which Skinner's radical behaviorism, as distinguished from his S-R positivism, may be seen as an extension of Peirce's pragmatism. PMID:22478387

  15. Electrochemical healing similarities between animals and plants.

    PubMed Central

    Gensler, W

    1979-01-01

    A brief summary of the major results in enhanced wound healing by electrolysis in animals and humans is presented along with the results of enhanced growth by electrolysis in plants. Hypotheses of normal and enhanced wound healing in animal and plants are reviewed. A comparison of the experimental results indicates strong similarities in the optimum magnitude and polarity of the externally applied galvanic current in animals and plants. There are, however, differences in optimum current densities, There are strong similarities in animal and plant electropotential changes during normal healing. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:262440

  16. Random walks with similar transition probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiefermayr, Klaus

    2003-04-01

    We consider random walks on the nonnegative integers with a possible absorbing state at -1. A random walk is called [alpha]-similar to a random walk if there exist constants Cij such that for the corresponding n-step transition probabilities , i,j[greater-or-equal, slanted]0, hold. We give necessary and sufficient conditions for the [alpha]-similarity of two random walks both in terms of the parameters and in terms of the corresponding spectral measures which appear in the spectral representation of the n-step transition probabilities developed by Karlin and McGregor.

  17. Similarity Based Semantic Web Service Match

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hui; Niu, Wenjia; Huang, Ronghuai

    Semantic web service discovery aims at returning the most matching advertised services to the service requester by comparing the semantic of the request service with an advertised service. The semantic of a web service are described in terms of inputs, outputs, preconditions and results in Ontology Web Language for Service (OWL-S) which formalized by W3C. In this paper we proposed an algorithm to calculate the semantic similarity of two services by weighted averaging their inputs and outputs similarities. Case study and applications show the effectiveness of our algorithm in service match.

  18. The collagenous gastroenteritides: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Purva; McKenna, Barbara J

    2010-10-01

    Collagenous gastritis, collagenous sprue, and collagenous colitis share striking histologic similarities and occur together in some patients. They also share some drug and disease associations. Pediatric cases of collagenous gastritis, however, lack most of these associations. The etiologies of the collagenous gastroenteritides are not known, so it is not clear whether they are similar because they share pathogeneses, or because they indicate a common histologic response to varying injuries. The features, disease and drug associations, and the inquiries into the pathogenesis of these disorders are reviewed. PMID:20923305

  19. Self-Similarity and Observed Properties in Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georganopoulos, Markos; Marscher, Alan P.

    We propose a unification scheme for BL Lac objects (BLs) based on the angle Theta that describes the orientation of the relativistic jet and on the kinetic luminosity Lambdakin of the jet. We assume that Lambdakin scales with the size of the jet {r} in a self-similar fashion (Lambdakin propto r^2), as supported by observational data. The jets are self-similar in geometry and have the same pressure and median magnetic field at the inlet, independent of size. The self-similarity is broken for the highest energy electrons, which radiate mainly at high frequencies, since for large sources they suffer more severe radiative energy losses over a given fraction of the jet length. The negative apparent evolution of X-ray selected BLs is explained as a result of positive evolution of the jet kinetic luminosity Lambdakin. We review observational arguments in favor of the existence of scaled-down accretion disks and broad emission-line regions in BLs. The proposed unification scheme can explain the lack of observed broad emission lines in X-ray selected BLs, as well as the existence of those lines preferentially in luminous radio-selected BLs. Finally, we review observational arguments that suggest the extension of this unification scheme to all blazars.

  20. Visual and Phonological Similarity Effects in Verbal Immediate Serial Recall: A Test with Kanji Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saito, Satoru; Logie, Robert H.; Morita, Aiko; Law, Anna

    2008-01-01

    In a series of three experiments, native speakers of Japanese performed serial ordered written recall of visually presented Japanese kanji characters that varied systematically in visual and phonological similarity. Overall effects of phonological similarity were observed for retention of serial order under silent reading in Experiments 1 and 3…

  1. Estimating the self-similar exponent of broad-sense self-similar processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jing; Zhang, Guijun; Tong, Changqing

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a new algorithm about the self-similar exponent of self-similar processes is introduced which is used to explore long memory in financial time series. This method can work for more general broad-sense self-similar processes. We prove that this algorithm performs much better than the classical methods.

  2. Great Apes' Capacities to Recognize Relational Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haun, Daniel B. M.; Call, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Recognizing relational similarity relies on the ability to understand that defining object properties might not lie in the objects individually, but in the relations of the properties of various object to each other. This aptitude is highly relevant for many important human skills such as language, reasoning, categorization and understanding…

  3. Building structural similarity database for metric learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Guoxin; Pappas, Thrasyvoulos N.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a new approach for constructing databases for training and testing similarity metrics for structurally lossless image compression. Our focus is on structural texture similarity (STSIM) metrics and the matched-texture compression (MTC) approach. We first discuss the metric requirements for structurally lossless compression, which differ from those of other applications such as image retrieval, classification, and understanding. We identify "interchangeability" as the key requirement for metric performance, and partition the domain of "identical" textures into three regions, of "highest," "high," and "good" similarity. We design two subjective tests for data collection, the first relies on ViSiProG to build a database of "identical" clusters, and the second builds a database of image pairs with the "highest," "high," "good," and "bad" similarity labels. The data for the subjective tests is generated during the MTC encoding process, and consist of pairs of candidate and target image blocks. The context of the surrounding image is critical for training the metrics to detect lighting discontinuities, spatial misalignments, and other border artifacts that have a noticeable effect on perceptual quality. The identical texture clusters are then used for training and testing two STSIM metrics. The labelled image pair database will be used in future research.

  4. Self-similar parabolic plasmonic beams.

    PubMed

    Davoyan, Arthur R; Turitsyn, Sergei K; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2013-02-15

    We demonstrate that an interplay between diffraction and defocusing nonlinearity can support stable self-similar plasmonic waves with a parabolic profile. Simplicity of a parabolic shape combined with the corresponding parabolic spatial phase distribution creates opportunities for controllable manipulation of plasmons through a combined action of diffraction and nonlinearity.

  5. Similarity of Science Textbooks: A Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, Michael

    1973-01-01

    Studied the similarity of the astronomy portion in five science textbooks at the fourth through sixth grade levels by comparing students' responses to text authors' requirements. Concluded that the texts had more in common across grade levels than within grade levels. (CC)

  6. Measuring structural similarity in large online networks.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yongren; Macy, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Structural similarity based on bipartite graphs can be used to detect meaningful communities, but the networks have been tiny compared to massive online networks. Scalability is important in applications involving tens of millions of individuals with highly skewed degree distributions. Simulation analysis holding underlying similarity constant shows that two widely used measures - Jaccard index and cosine similarity - are biased by the distribution of out-degree in web-scale networks. However, an alternative measure, the Standardized Co-incident Ratio (SCR), is unbiased. We apply SCR to members of Congress, musical artists, and professional sports teams to show how massive co-following on Twitter can be used to map meaningful affiliations among cultural entities, even in the absence of direct connections to one another. Our results show how structural similarity can be used to map cultural alignments and demonstrate the potential usefulness of social media data in the study of culture, politics, and organizations across the social and behavioral sciences. PMID:27480374

  7. Predicting spatial similarity of freshwater fish biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Azaele, Sandro; Muneepeerakul, Rachata; Maritan, Amos; Rinaldo, Andrea; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    A major issue in modern ecology is to understand how ecological complexity at broad scales is regulated by mechanisms operating at the organismic level. What specific underlying processes are essential for a macroecological pattern to emerge? Here, we analyze the analytical predictions of a general model suitable for describing the spatial biodiversity similarity in river ecosystems, and benchmark them against the empirical occurrence data of freshwater fish species collected in the Mississippi–Missouri river system. Encapsulating immigration, emigration, and stochastic noise, and without resorting to species abundance data, the model is able to reproduce the observed probability distribution of the Jaccard similarity index at any given distance. In addition to providing an excellent agreement with the empirical data, this approach accounts for heterogeneities of different subbasins, suggesting a strong dependence of biodiversity similarity on their respective climates. Strikingly, the model can also predict the actual probability distribution of the Jaccard similarity index for any distance when considering just a relatively small sample. The proposed framework supports the notion that simplified macroecological models are capable of predicting fundamental patterns—a theme at the heart of modern community ecology. PMID:19359481

  8. Parents' School Satisfaction: Ethnic Similarities and Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Barry A.; Bobrowski, Paula E.; Geraci, John

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Parent satisfaction with their children's school is an important issue in today's competitive educational environment characterized by school choice and government standards; however, few empirical studies address school satisfaction similarities and differences among parents from different ethnic groups. The purpose of this paper is to…

  9. Selecting the Right Similarity-Scoring Matrix.

    PubMed

    Pearson, William R

    2013-01-01

    Protein sequence similarity searching programs like BLASTP, SSEARCH (UNIT 3.10), and FASTA use scoring matrices that are designed to identify distant evolutionary relationships (BLOSUM62 for BLAST, BLOSUM50 for SEARCH and FASTA). Different similarity scoring matrices are most effective at different evolutionary distances. "Deep" scoring matrices like BLOSUM62 and BLOSUM50 target alignments with 20 - 30% identity, while "shallow" scoring matrices (e.g. VTML10 - VTML80), target alignments that share 90 - 50% identity, reflecting much less evolutionary change. While "deep" matrices provide very sensitive similarity searches, they also require longer sequence alignments and can sometimes produce alignment overextension into non-homologous regions. Shallower scoring matrices are more effective when searching for short protein domains, or when the goal is to limit the scope of the search to sequences that are likely to be orthologous between recently diverged organisms. Likewise, in DNA searches, the match and mismatch parameters set evolutionary look-back times and domain boundaries. In this unit, we will discuss the theoretical foundations that drive practical choices of protein and DNA similarity scoring matrices and gap penalties. Deep scoring matrices (BLOSUM62 and BLOSUM50) should be used for sensitive searches with full-length protein sequences, but short domains or restricted evolutionary look-back require shallower scoring matrices.

  10. Similarity and rules: distinct? Exhaustive? Empirically distinguishable?

    PubMed

    Hahn, U; Chater, N

    1998-01-01

    The distinction between rule-based and similarity-based processes in cognition is of fundamental importance for cognitive science, and has been the focus of a large body of empirical research. However, intuitive uses of the distinction are subject to theoretical difficulties and their relation to empirical evidence is not clear. We propose a 'core' distinction between rule- and similarity-based processes, in terms of the way representations of stored information are 'matched' with the representation of a novel item. This explication captures the intuitively clear-cut cases of processes of each type, and resolves apparent problems with the rule/similarity distinction. Moreover, it provides a clear target for assessing the psychological and AI literatures. We show that many lines of psychological evidence are less conclusive than sometimes assumed, but suggest that converging lines of evidence may be persuasive. We then argue that the AI literature suggests that approaches which combine rules and similarity are an important new focus for empirical work.

  11. Self similar nonlocal electron heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matte, Jean-Pierre

    2007-11-01

    The well known self similar heat diffusion solutions of Zel'dovich and Raizer [1], for a heat wave advancing from a boundary at a fixed temperature or a fixed heat flux do not keep the ratio R of the scale length to the mean free path constant. Instead, R increases and the solution becomes increasingly valid because Spitzer-Harm [2] heat flow is increasingly applicable. A self similar solution exists which keeps R constant, if one assumes that the boundary heat flux increases in time. Similarly, for the problem of a uniform density plasma heated by a finite width laser beam, a self similar solution keeping R constant can be obtained by assuming that the beam intensity and width increase in time. Such solutions will be studied with the electron kinetic code FPI [3], and compared to simulations with more usual laser characteristics. [1] Ya. B. Zel'dovich and Yu. P. Raizer, ``Physics of Shock Waves '', Academic Press, New York, 1967. [2] L. Spitzer and R. Harm, Phys. Rev. 89, 977 (1953). [3] J.-P. Matte et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 1461 (1984) ; ibid 49, 1936 (1982).

  12. Networks of plants: how to measure similarity in vegetable species

    PubMed Central

    Vivaldo, Gianna; Masi, Elisa; Pandolfi, Camilla; Mancuso, Stefano; Caldarelli, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Despite the common misconception of nearly static organisms, plants do interact continuously with the environment and with each other. It is fair to assume that during their evolution they developed particular features to overcome similar problems and to exploit possibilities from environment. In this paper we introduce various quantitative measures based on recent advancements in complex network theory that allow to measure the effective similarities of various species. By using this approach on the similarity in fruit-typology ecological traits we obtain a clear plant classification in a way similar to traditional taxonomic classification. This result is not trivial, since a similar analysis done on the basis of diaspore morphological properties do not provide any clear parameter to classify plants species. Complex network theory can then be used in order to determine which feature amongst many can be used to distinguish scope and possibly evolution of plants. Future uses of this approach range from functional classification to quantitative determination of plant communities in nature. PMID:27271207

  13. Complexity measures and self-similarity on spreading depression waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqueira, José Roberto C.; de Lima, Vera Maura Fernandes; Batistela, Cristiane M.

    2014-05-01

    Self-similarity has been considered to be present in most of the spatial pattern formation phenomena occurring in natural contexts. In the case of the spreading depression (SD), there are conjectures about the presence of self-similarity in the circular wave formations. Shiner-Davison-Landsberg (SDL) complexity measure framework has been used in several contexts, in order to understand and classify systems and behaviors that are supposed to be complex. Here, by using SDL measure over data collected on SD experiments, self-similarity conjecture is tested. The data came from chicken retina spreading depression experience by measuring two concomitant signals: the extra-cellular potential and the intrinsic optical signal, that were collected in two different spatial scales. The SDL complexity was calculated for the data and two main results appeared: all the studied substances present similar SDL dynamical behavior and, considering the same substance, optical signals present different SDL values for different spatial scales. Consequently, it is not possible to conclude that SD phenomenon presents self-similarity.

  14. Networks of plants: how to measure similarity in vegetable species.

    PubMed

    Vivaldo, Gianna; Masi, Elisa; Pandolfi, Camilla; Mancuso, Stefano; Caldarelli, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Despite the common misconception of nearly static organisms, plants do interact continuously with the environment and with each other. It is fair to assume that during their evolution they developed particular features to overcome similar problems and to exploit possibilities from environment. In this paper we introduce various quantitative measures based on recent advancements in complex network theory that allow to measure the effective similarities of various species. By using this approach on the similarity in fruit-typology ecological traits we obtain a clear plant classification in a way similar to traditional taxonomic classification. This result is not trivial, since a similar analysis done on the basis of diaspore morphological properties do not provide any clear parameter to classify plants species. Complex network theory can then be used in order to determine which feature amongst many can be used to distinguish scope and possibly evolution of plants. Future uses of this approach range from functional classification to quantitative determination of plant communities in nature. PMID:27271207

  15. Constructive Numeracy Teaching as a Gateway to Independent Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Groenestijn, Mieke

    There is a new wave going on in the Dutch Adult Education, similar to the ideas of Open Learning Centers in Further Education in Great Britain. The intention of this movement is to structure adult education in a way that it fits everyone. That means: more flexible programs, more individual education, more teacher independent learning, and more…

  16. 49 CFR 1013.1 - The independence of the trustee of a voting trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false The independence of the trustee of a voting trust... VOTING TRUSTS § 1013.1 The independence of the trustee of a voting trust. (a) In order to avoid an unlawful control violation, the independent voting trust should be established before a controlling...

  17. 49 CFR 1013.1 - The independence of the trustee of a voting trust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false The independence of the trustee of a voting trust... VOTING TRUSTS § 1013.1 The independence of the trustee of a voting trust. (a) In order to avoid an unlawful control violation, the independent voting trust should be established before a controlling...

  18. 75 FR 5075 - New York Independent System Operator, Inc.; Notice of Filings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission New York Independent System Operator, Inc.; Notice of Filings January 22... Independent System Operator, Inc. (NYISO), filed in compliance with the Commission's January 15, 2010 Order in... proceeding and additional information directed by the Commission.\\2\\ \\1\\ New York Independent System...

  19. Steps to Independent Living Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobb, Nancy

    This set of six activity books and a teacher's guide is designed to help students from eighth grade to adulthood with special needs to learn independent living skills. The activity books have a reading level of 2.5 and address: (1) "How to Get Well When You're Sick or Hurt," including how to take a temperature, see a doctor, and use medicines…

  20. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18... THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs are required to be performed under similar...

  1. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18... THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs are required to be performed under similar...

  2. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18... THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs are required to be performed under similar...

  3. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18... THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs are required to be performed under similar...

  4. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18... THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs are required to be performed under similar...

  5. Relations between twins' similarity of appearance and behavioral similarity: testing an assumption.

    PubMed

    Matheny, A P; Wilson, R S; Dolan, A B

    1976-07-01

    Questionnaires rating twins' physical similarity and similarity of dress were obtained from the parents of 121 identical and 70 same-sex fraternal twin pairs. Within-pair difference scores on several behavioral measures (two intelligence tests, two perceptual tests, one reading test, one test of speech articulation, and one personality inventory) were correlated with the twins' scores for physical similarity and similarity of dress. The correlations revealed no systematic relation between the similarity of appearance and the similarity of behaviors for either the identical twin pairs or the same-sex fraternal twin pairs. The assumption that twins' behaviors are more alike because they are more similar in appearance does not seem warranted.

  6. Measurement-device-independent quantum digital signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthoor, Ittoop Vergheese; Amiri, Ryan; Wallden, Petros; Curty, Marcos; Andersson, Erika

    2016-08-01

    Digital signatures play an important role in software distribution, modern communication, and financial transactions, where it is important to detect forgery and tampering. Signatures are a cryptographic technique for validating the authenticity and integrity of messages, software, or digital documents. The security of currently used classical schemes relies on computational assumptions. Quantum digital signatures (QDS), on the other hand, provide information-theoretic security based on the laws of quantum physics. Recent work on QDS Amiri et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 032325 (2016);, 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.032325 Yin, Fu, and Zeng-Bing, Phys. Rev. A 93, 032316 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.032316 shows that such schemes do not require trusted quantum channels and are unconditionally secure against general coherent attacks. However, in practical QDS, just as in quantum key distribution (QKD), the detectors can be subjected to side-channel attacks, which can make the actual implementations insecure. Motivated by the idea of measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), we present a measurement-device-independent QDS (MDI-QDS) scheme, which is secure against all detector side-channel attacks. Based on the rapid development of practical MDI-QKD, our MDI-QDS protocol could also be experimentally implemented, since it requires a similar experimental setup.

  7. Unsupervised hyperspectral image analysis using independent component analysis (ICA)

    SciTech Connect

    S. S. Chiang; I. W. Ginsberg

    2000-06-30

    In this paper, an ICA-based approach is proposed for hyperspectral image analysis. It can be viewed as a random version of the commonly used linear spectral mixture analysis, in which the abundance fractions in a linear mixture model are considered to be unknown independent signal sources. It does not require the full rank of the separating matrix or orthogonality as most ICA methods do. More importantly, the learning algorithm is designed based on the independency of the material abundance vector rather than the independency of the separating matrix generally used to constrain the standard ICA. As a result, the designed learning algorithm is able to converge to non-orthogonal independent components. This is particularly useful in hyperspectral image analysis since many materials extracted from a hyperspectral image may have similar spectral signatures and may not be orthogonal. The AVIRIS experiments have demonstrated that the proposed ICA provides an effective unsupervised technique for hyperspectral image classification.

  8. Endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxation in the forelimb and hindlimb vasculatures of swine.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Sean C; Taylor, Jessica C; Bowles, Douglas K; Laughlin, M Harold

    2007-10-01

    Limb differences in endothelial function exist between arm and leg vasculatures of humans. The current investigation tested the hypothesis that forelimb and hindlimb vasorelaxation are similar in the absence of limb differences in blood pressure. Conduit arteries (brachials/femorals) and second order arterioles were harvested from 22 miniature Yucatan swine. In vitro assessment of vasorelaxation was determined by administering increasing doses of bradykinin (BK), acetylcholine (ACh), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). The role of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways was assessed in conduit arteries but not resistance arterioles through L-NAME (300 microM) and INDO (5 microM) incubation, respectively. The relaxation responses to BK and ACh were similar in brachial and femoral arteries. SNP relaxation response was greater in the brachial compared to femoral arteries. There were also no significant differences in the relaxation responses of second order arterioles of the forelimb and hindlimb to BK, ACh, and SNP. Incubation of conduit arterial rings in L-NAME produced a greater reduction in BK and ACh relaxation in the brachial (approximately 25%) compared to femoral (approximately 13%) arterial rings. The current results of this investigation suggest that the forelimb and hindlimb vasculatures of swine have relatively similar vasorelaxation responses to both endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilators.

  9. First-order inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W. Chicago Univ., IL . Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-09-01

    In the original proposal, inflation occurred in the process of a strongly first-order phase transition. This model was soon demonstrated to be fatally flawed. Subsequent models for inflation involved phase transitions that were second-order, or perhaps weakly first-order; some even involved no phase transition at all. Recently the possibility of inflation during a strongly first-order phase transition has been revived. In this talk I will discuss some models for first-order inflation, and emphasize unique signatures that result in inflation is realized in a first-order transition. Before discussing first-order inflation, I will briefly review some of the history of inflation to demonstrate how first-order inflation differs from other models. 58 refs., 3 figs.

  10. First-order inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, Edward W.

    1991-01-01

    In the original proposal, inflation occurred in the process of a strongly first-order phase transition. This model was soon demonstrated to be fatally flawed. Subsequent models for inflation involved phase transitions that were second-order, or perhaps weakly first-order; some even involved no phase transition at all. Recently the possibility of inflation during a strongly first-order phase transition has been revived. In this talk I will discuss some models for first-order inflation, and emphasize unique signatures that result if inflation is realized in a first-order transition. Before discussing first-order inflation, I will briefly review some of the history of inflation to demonstrate how first-order inflation differs from other models.

  11. Relations between premise similarity and inductive strength.

    PubMed

    Heit, Evan; Feeney, Aidan

    2005-04-01

    According to the diversity principle, diverse evidence is strong evidence. There has been considerable evidence that people respect this principle in inductive reasoning. However, exceptions may be particularly informative. Medin, Coley, Storms, and Hayes (2003) introduced a relevance theory of inductive reasoning and used this theory to predict exceptions, including the nondiversity-by-property-reinforcement effect. A new experiment in which this phenomenon was investigated is reported here. Subjects made inductive strength judgments and similarity judgments for stimuli from Medin et al. (2003). The inductive strength judgments showed the same pattern as that in Medin et al. (2003); however, the similarity judgments suggested that the pattern should be interpreted as a diversity effect, rather than as a nondiversity effect. It is concluded that the evidence regarding the predicted nondiversity-by-property-reinforcement effect does not give distinctive support for relevance theory, although this theory does address other results.

  12. Similarity theory of lubricated Hertzian contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeijer, J. H.; Eggers, J.; Venner, C. H.

    2013-10-01

    We consider a heavily loaded, lubricated contact between two elastic bodies at relative speed U, such that there is substantial elastic deformation. As a result of the interplay between hydrodynamics and non-local elasticity, a fluid film develops between the two solids, whose thickness scales as U3/5. The film profile h is selected by a universal similarity solution along the upstream inlet. Another similarity solution is valid at the outlet, which exhibits a local minimum in the film thickness. The two solutions are connected by a hyperbolic problem underneath the contact. Our asymptotic results for a soft sphere pressed against a hard wall are shown to agree with both experiment and numerical simulations.

  13. Selection of USSR foreign similarity regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disler, J. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The similarity regions in the United States and Canada were selected to parallel the conditions that affect labeling and classification accuracies in the U.S.S.R. indicator regions. In addition to climate, a significant condition that affects labeling and classification accuracies in the U.S.S.R. is the proportion of barley and wheat grown in a given region (based on sown areas). The following regions in the United States and Canada were determined to be similar to the U.S.S.R. indicator regions: (1) Montana agrophysical unit (APU) 104 corresponds to the Belorussia high barley region; (2) North Dakota and Minnesota APU 20 and secondary region southern Manitoba and Saskatchewan correspond to the Ural RSFSR barley and spring wheat region; (3) Montana APU 23 corresponds to he North Caucasus barley and winter wheat region. Selection criteria included climates, crop type, crop distribution, growth cycles, field sizes, and field shapes.

  14. A principle of similarity for nonlinear vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, G.; Kerschen, G.

    2016-10-01

    This paper develops a principle of similarity for the design of a nonlinear absorber, the nonlinear tuned vibration absorber (NLTVA), attached to a nonlinear primary system. Specifically, for effective vibration mitigation, we show that the NLTVA should feature a nonlinearity possessing the same mathematical form as that of the primary system. A compact analytical formula for the nonlinear coefficient of the absorber is then derived. The formula, valid for any polynomial nonlinearity in the primary system, is found to depend only on the mass ratio and on the nonlinear coefficient of the primary system. When the primary system comprises several polynomial nonlinearities, we demonstrate that the NLTVA obeys a principle of additivity, i.e., each nonlinear coefficient can be calculated independently of the other nonlinear coefficients using the proposed formula.

  15. Fingerprint matching based on global comprehensive similarity.

    PubMed

    He, Yuliang; Tian, Jie; Li, Liang; Chen, Hong; Yang, Xin

    2006-06-01

    This paper introduces a novel algorithm based on global comprehensive similarity with three steps. To describe the Euclidean space-based relative features among minutiae, we first build a minutia-simplex that contains a pair of minutiae as well as their associated textures, with its transformation-variant and invariant relative features employed for the comprehensive similarity measurement and parameter estimation, respectively. By the second step, we use the ridge-based nearest neighborhood among minutiae to represent the ridge-based relative features among minutiae. With these ridge-based relative features, minutiae are grouped according to their affinity with a ridge. The Euclidean space-based and ridge-based relative features among minutiae reinforce each other in the representation of a fingerprint. Finally, we model the relationship between transformation and the comprehensive similarity between two fingerprints in terms of histogram for initial parameter estimation. Through these steps, our experiment shows that the method mentioned above is both effective and suitable for limited memory AFIS owing to its less than 1k byte template size. PMID:16724581

  16. Effects of similarity on environmental context cueing.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven M; Handy, Justin D; Angello, Genna; Manzano, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Three experiments examined the prediction that context cues which are similar to study contexts can facilitate episodic recall, even if those cues are never seen before the recall test. Environmental context cueing effects have typically produced such small effect sizes that influences of moderating factors, such as the similarity between encoding and retrieval contexts, would be difficult to observe experimentally. Videos of environmental contexts, however, can be used to produce powerful context-dependent memory effects, particularly when only one memory target is associated with each video context, intentional item-context encoding is encouraged, and free recall tests are used. Experiment 1 showed that a not previously viewed video of the study context provided an effective recall cue, although it was not as effective as the originally viewed video context. Experiments 2 and 3 showed that videos of environments that were conceptually similar to encoding contexts (e.g., both were videos of ball field games) also cued recall, but not as well if the encoding contexts were given specific labels (e.g., "home run") incompatible with test contexts (e.g., a soccer scene). A fourth experiment that used incidental item-context encoding showed that video context reinstatement has a robust effect on paired associate memory, indicating that the video context reinstatement effect does not depend on interactive item-context encoding or free recall testing.

  17. Effects of similarity on environmental context cueing.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven M; Handy, Justin D; Angello, Genna; Manzano, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Three experiments examined the prediction that context cues which are similar to study contexts can facilitate episodic recall, even if those cues are never seen before the recall test. Environmental context cueing effects have typically produced such small effect sizes that influences of moderating factors, such as the similarity between encoding and retrieval contexts, would be difficult to observe experimentally. Videos of environmental contexts, however, can be used to produce powerful context-dependent memory effects, particularly when only one memory target is associated with each video context, intentional item-context encoding is encouraged, and free recall tests are used. Experiment 1 showed that a not previously viewed video of the study context provided an effective recall cue, although it was not as effective as the originally viewed video context. Experiments 2 and 3 showed that videos of environments that were conceptually similar to encoding contexts (e.g., both were videos of ball field games) also cued recall, but not as well if the encoding contexts were given specific labels (e.g., "home run") incompatible with test contexts (e.g., a soccer scene). A fourth experiment that used incidental item-context encoding showed that video context reinstatement has a robust effect on paired associate memory, indicating that the video context reinstatement effect does not depend on interactive item-context encoding or free recall testing. PMID:23721293

  18. A motor similarity effect in object memory.

    PubMed

    Downing-Doucet, Frédéric; Guérard, Katherine

    2014-08-01

    In line with theories of embodied cognition (e.g., Versace et al. European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 21, 522-560, 2009), several studies have suggested that the motor system used to interact with objects in our environment is involved in object recognition (e.g., Helbig, Graf, & Kiefer Experimental Brain Research, 174, 221-228, 2006). However, the role of the motor system in immediate memory for objects is more controversial. The objective of the present study was to investigate the role of the motor system in object memory by manipulating the similarity between the actions associated to series of objects to be retained in memory. In Experiment 1, we showed that lists of objects associated to dissimilar actions were better recalled than lists associated to similar actions. We then showed that this effect was abolished when participants were required to perform a concurrent motor suppression task (Experiment 2) and when the objects to be memorized were unmanipulable (Experiment 3). The motor similarity effect provides evidence for the role of motor affordances in object memory.

  19. Wind Turbine Experiments at Full Dynamic Similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Mark; Kiefer, Janik; Westergaard, Carsten; Hultmark, Marcus

    2015-11-01

    Performing experiments with scaled-down wind turbines has traditionally been difficult due to the matching requirements of the two driving non-dimensional parameters, the Tip Speed Ratio (TSR) and the Reynolds number. Typically, full-size turbines must be used to provide the baseline cases for engineering models and computer simulations where flow similarity is required. We present a new approach to investigating wind turbine aerodynamics at full dynamic similarity by employing a high-pressure wind tunnel at Princeton University known as the High Reynolds number Test Facility (or HRTF). This facility allows for Reynolds numbers of up to 3 million (based on chord and velocity at the tip) while still matching the TSR, on a geometrically similar, small-scale model. The background development of this project is briefly presented including the design and manufacture of a model turbine. Following this the power, thrust and wake data are discussed, in particular the scaling dependence on the Reynolds number. Supported under NSF grant CBET-1435254 (program manager Gregory Rorrer).

  20. Self-similarity of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Song, Chaoming; Havlin, Shlomo; Makse, Hernán A

    2005-01-27

    Complex networks have been studied extensively owing to their relevance to many real systems such as the world-wide web, the Internet, energy landscapes and biological and social networks. A large number of real networks are referred to as 'scale-free' because they show a power-law distribution of the number of links per node. However, it is widely believed that complex networks are not invariant or self-similar under a length-scale transformation. This conclusion originates from the 'small-world' property of these networks, which implies that the number of nodes increases exponentially with the 'diameter' of the network, rather than the power-law relation expected for a self-similar structure. Here we analyse a variety of real complex networks and find that, on the contrary, they consist of self-repeating patterns on all length scales. This result is achieved by the application of a renormalization procedure that coarse-grains the system into boxes containing nodes within a given 'size'. We identify a power-law relation between the number of boxes needed to cover the network and the size of the box, defining a finite self-similar exponent. These fundamental properties help to explain the scale-free nature of complex networks and suggest a common self-organization dynamics.

  1. Nonlocal similarity based DEM super resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zekai; Wang, Xuewen; Chen, Zixuan; Xiong, Dongping; Ding, Mingyue; Hou, Wenguang

    2015-12-01

    This paper discusses a new topic, DEM super resolution, to improve the resolution of an original DEM based on its partial new measurements obtained with high resolution. A nonlocal algorithm is introduced to perform this task. The original DEM was first divided into overlapping patches, which were classified either as "test" or "learning" data depending on whether or not they are related to high resolution measurements. For each test patch, the similar patches in the learning dataset were identified via template matching. Finally, the high resolution DEM of the test patch was restored by the weighted sum of similar patches under the condition that the reconstruction weights were the same in different resolution cases. A key assumption of this strategy is that there are some repeated or similar modes in the original DEM, which is quite common. Experiments were done to demonstrate that we can restore a DEM by preserving the details without introducing artifacts. Statistic analysis was also conducted to show that this method can obtain higher accuracy than traditional interpolation methods.

  2. Compressive Sequential Learning for Action Similarity Labeling.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jie; Liu, Li; Zhang, Zhaoxiang; Wang, Yunhong; Shao, Ling

    2016-02-01

    Human action recognition in videos has been extensively studied in recent years due to its wide range of applications. Instead of classifying video sequences into a number of action categories, in this paper, we focus on a particular problem of action similarity labeling (ASLAN), which aims at verifying whether a pair of videos contain the same type of action or not. To address this challenge, a novel approach called compressive sequential learning (CSL) is proposed by leveraging the compressive sensing theory and sequential learning. We first project data points to a low-dimensional space by effectively exploring an important property in compressive sensing: the restricted isometry property. In particular, a very sparse measurement matrix is adopted to reduce the dimensionality efficiently. We then learn an ensemble classifier for measuring similarities between pairwise videos by iteratively minimizing its empirical risk with the AdaBoost strategy on the training set. Unlike conventional AdaBoost, the weak learner for each iteration is not explicitly defined and its parameters are learned through greedy optimization. Furthermore, an alternative of CSL named compressive sequential encoding is developed as an encoding technique and followed by a linear classifier to address the similarity-labeling problem. Our method has been systematically evaluated on four action data sets: ASLAN, KTH, HMDB51, and Hollywood2, and the results show the effectiveness and superiority of our method for ASLAN.

  3. Error catastrophe in populations under similarity-essential recombination.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, Marcus A M; Schneider, David M; do Carmo, Eduardo; Campos, Paulo R A; Martins, Ayana B

    2015-06-01

    Organisms are often more likely to exchange genetic information with others that are similar to themselves. One of the most widely accepted mechanisms of RNA virus recombination requires substantial sequence similarity between the parental RNAs and is termed similarity-essential recombination. This mechanism may be considered analogous to assortative mating, an important form of non-random mating that can be found in animals and plants. Here we study the dynamics of haplotype frequencies in populations evolving under similarity-essential recombination. Haplotypes are represented by a genome of B biallelic loci and the Hamming distance between individuals is used as a criterion for recombination. We derive the evolution equations for the haplotype frequencies assuming that recombination does not occur if the genetic distance is larger than a critical value G and that mutation occurs at a rate μ per locus. Additionally, uniform crossover is considered. Although no fitness is directly associated to the haplotypes, we show that frequency-dependent selection emerges dynamically and governs the haplotype distribution. A critical mutation rate μc can be identified as the error threshold transition, beyond which this selective information cannot be stored. For μ<μc the distribution consists of a dominant sequence surrounded by a cloud of closely related sequences, characterizing a quasispecies. For μ>μc the distribution becomes uniform, with all haplotypes having the same frequency. In the case of extreme assortativeness, where individuals only recombine with others identical to themselves (G=0), the error threshold results μc=1/4, independently of the genome size. For weak assortativity (G=B-1)μc=2(-(B+1)) and for the case of no assortativity (G=B) μc=0. We compute the mutation threshold for 0

  4. Hillslope subsurface flow similarity: Real-world tests of the hillslope Péclet number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, S. W.; Troch, P. A.

    2007-07-01

    Similarity analysis offers the ability to model hydrological response using quantifiable landscape descriptors. It is possible to develop similarity indices based on analytical solutions to the governing dynamic equations (Brutsaert, 2005). Berne et al. (2005) provide derivation of such a similarity index (the hillslope Péclet number) of subsurface flow and saturation for hillslopes with exponential width functions. They showed that the hillslope Péclet number depends only on geometric properties of the hillslope. Their work was validated using laboratory experiments conducted on constructed hillslopes with homogeneous soil structure and varying bedrock slope angle. This study applies the similarity analysis of Berne et al. (2005) to two data sets: (1) the trench hillslope study at the Maimai research catchment conducted by Woods and Rowe (1996) and (2) the isolated hillslope study near Troy, Idaho, United States, conducted by Brooks et al. (2004). The Maimai trench study was selected because it provides subsurface flow data from hillslopes with different planform geometries. The Troy hillslope study was selected because the experimental results of Brooks et al. (2004) provide an estimate of hydraulic conductivity consistent with the support scale of the hillslope. We estimated the hillslope Péclet number of the hillslopes on the basis of elevation data and reported values of average soil depth. This hillslope Péclet number quantifies the geomorphological control on how water moves through these hillslopes and creates a basis for comparison independent of hydraulic properties. We then estimated the first and second moments of the characteristic subsurface response function of each hillslope on the basis of subsurface flow data. To compare the empirical and theoretical moments, the hydraulic properties (saturated hydraulic conductivity and drainable porosity) of the hillslopes were related using a base flow recession analysis. Then we were able to derive the

  5. Independent versus sequential reading in ROC studies of computer-assist modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiden, Sergey V.; Wagner, Robert F.; Doi, Kunio; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Lo, Shih-Chung B.; Xu, Xin-Wei

    2002-04-01

    This paper provides results of a statistical analysis of two methods for arranging the temporal sequencing of the unaided vs computer-assisted reading in multiple-reader, multiple- case (MRMC) receiver operating characteristic (ROC) studies of computer-aided detection of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) on chest radiographs. The modes are the Independent mode, in which the readings are separated by a time on the order of one month, and the Sequential mode, in which the CAD-assisted reading immediately follows the unassisted reading. The method of Beiden, Wagner, Campbell (BWC) was used to decompose the variance of the ROC area summary accuracy measure into the components that are correlated across unaided and aided reading conditions and the components that are uncorrelated across these reading conditions. The latter are the only components of variability that contribute to the uncertainty in a measurement of the difference in reader performance between reading conditions. These uncorrelated components were dramatically reduced in the Sequential reading mode compared to the Independent reading mode-while the total reader variability remained almost constant. The results were remarkably similar across two independent studies analyzed. This may have important practical consequences because the Sequential mode is the least demanding on reader logistics and time.

  6. Clustering and Filtering Tandem Mass Spectra Acquired in Data-Independent Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Huisong; Nikitin, Frederic; Gluck, Florent; Lisacek, Frederique; Scherl, Alexander; Muller, Markus

    2013-12-01

    Data-independent mass spectrometry activates all ion species isolated within a given mass-to-charge window ( m/z) regardless of their abundance. This acquisition strategy overcomes the traditional data-dependent ion selection boosting data reproducibility and sensitivity. However, several tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra of the same precursor ion are acquired during chromatographic elution resulting in large data redundancy. Also, the significant number of chimeric spectra and the absence of accurate precursor ion masses hamper peptide identification. Here, we describe an algorithm to preprocess data-independent MS/MS spectra by filtering out noise peaks and clustering the spectra according to both the chromatographic elution profiles and the spectral similarity. In addition, we developed an approach to estimate the m/z value of precursor ions from clustered MS/MS spectra in order to improve database search performance. Data acquired using a small 3 m/z units precursor mass window and multiple injections to cover a m/z range of 400-1400 was processed with our algorithm. It showed an improvement in the number of both peptide and protein identifications by 8 % while reducing the number of submitted spectra by 18 % and the number of peaks by 55 %. We conclude that our clustering method is a valid approach for data analysis of these data-independent fragmentation spectra. The software including the source code is available for the scientific community.

  7. Degradation of DNA damage-independently stalled RNA polymerase II is independent of the E3 ligase Elc1.

    PubMed

    Karakasili, Eleni; Burkert-Kautzsch, Cornelia; Kieser, Anja; Sträßer, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Transcription elongation is a highly dynamic and discontinuous process, which includes frequent pausing of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). RNAPII complexes that stall persistently on a gene during transcription elongation block transcription and thus have to be removed. It has been proposed that the cellular pathway for removal of these DNA damage-independently stalled RNAPII complexes is similar or identical to the removal of RNAPII complexes stalled due to DNA damage. Here, we show that-consistent with previous data-DNA damage-independent stalling causes polyubiquitylation and proteasome-mediated degradation of Rpb1, the largest subunit of RNAPII, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as model system. Moreover, recruitment of the proteasome to RNAPII and transcribed genes is increased when transcription elongation is impaired indicating that Rpb1 degradation takes place at the gene. Importantly, in contrast to the DNA damage-dependent pathway Rpb1 degradation of DNA damage-independently stalled RNAPII is independent of the E3 ligase Elc1. In addition, deubiquitylation of RNAPII is also independent of the Elc1-antagonizing deubiquitylase Ubp3. Thus, the pathway for degradation of DNA damage-independently stalled RNAPII is overlapping yet distinct from the previously described pathway for degradation of RNAPII stalled due to DNA damage. Taken together, we provide the first evidence that the cell discriminates between DNA damage-dependently and -independently stalled RNAPII.

  8. Independent communication messages: methodology and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.A.

    1997-09-01

    Information flowing on communication buses is ordinarily ``non-random`` in the sense that data entities are not equally likely and independent. This is because they have relationships to each other and to physical occurrences to which they may be responding. Random data would convey no information or meaning. From a different viewpoint, there can be applications for creating randomness characteristics, and four of these are described in this paper. Two examples derive from cryptology and the other two from safety. One cryptology application described is the generation of random numbers for use as, for example, keys, hash functions, nonces, and seeds. The other is for inter-message ``padding`` to resist traffic analysis by masking when data are being transmitted and when the channel is conveying no information. One of the safety applications described is the ``unique signal`` approach used in modern nuclear weapon electrical safety. The other is the use of unique signals as non-weapon critical-operation control functions. Both of these safety applications require provisions to help assure randomness characteristics in any inadvertently occurring inputs. In order to satisfy these cryptology and safety needs, communication strategies are described that generate or selectively encourage independent (unrelated) symbols or messages.

  9. Radiography Facility - Building 239 Independent Validation Review

    SciTech Connect

    Altenbach, T J; Beaulieu, R A; Watson, J F; Wong, H J

    2010-02-02

    The purpose of this task was to perform an Independent Validation Review to evaluate the successful implementation and effectiveness of Safety Basis controls, including new and revised controls, to support the implementation of a new DSA/TSR for B239. This task addresses Milestone 2 of FY10 PEP 7.6.6. As the first IVR ever conducted on a LLNL nuclear facility, it was designated a pilot project. The review follows the outline developed for Milestone 1 of the PEP, which is based on the DOE Draft Guide for Performance of Independent Verification Review of Safety Basis Controls. A formal Safety Basis procedure will be developed later, based on the lessons learned with this pilot project. Note, this review is termed a ''Validation'' in order to be consistent with the PEP definition and address issues historically raised about verification mechanisms at LLNL. Validation is intended to confirm that implementing mechanisms realistically establish the ability of TSR LCO, administrative control or safety management program to accomplish its intended safety function and that the controls are being implemented. This effort should not, however, be confused with a compliance assessment against all relevant DOE requirements and national standards. Nor is it used as a vehicle to question the derivation of controls already approved by LSO unless a given TSR statement simply cannot be implemented as stated.

  10. Dimension-independent likelihood-informed MCMC

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Tiangang; Law, Kody J. H.; Marzouk, Youssef M.

    2015-10-08

    Many Bayesian inference problems require exploring the posterior distribution of highdimensional parameters that represent the discretization of an underlying function. Our work introduces a family of Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) samplers that can adapt to the particular structure of a posterior distribution over functions. There are two distinct lines of research that intersect in the methods we develop here. First, we introduce a general class of operator-weighted proposal distributions that are well defined on function space, such that the performance of the resulting MCMC samplers is independent of the discretization of the function. Second, by exploiting local Hessian information and any associated lowdimensional structure in the change from prior to posterior distributions, we develop an inhomogeneous discretization scheme for the Langevin stochastic differential equation that yields operator-weighted proposals adapted to the non-Gaussian structure of the posterior. The resulting dimension-independent and likelihood-informed (DILI) MCMC samplers may be useful for a large class of high-dimensional problems where the target probability measure has a density with respect to a Gaussian reference measure. Finally, we use two nonlinear inverse problems in order to demonstrate the efficiency of these DILI samplers: an elliptic PDE coefficient inverse problem and path reconstruction in a conditioned diffusion.

  11. Dimension-independent likelihood-informed MCMC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cui, Tiangang; Law, Kody J. H.; Marzouk, Youssef M.

    2015-10-08

    Many Bayesian inference problems require exploring the posterior distribution of highdimensional parameters that represent the discretization of an underlying function. Our work introduces a family of Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) samplers that can adapt to the particular structure of a posterior distribution over functions. There are two distinct lines of research that intersect in the methods we develop here. First, we introduce a general class of operator-weighted proposal distributions that are well defined on function space, such that the performance of the resulting MCMC samplers is independent of the discretization of the function. Second, by exploiting local Hessian informationmore » and any associated lowdimensional structure in the change from prior to posterior distributions, we develop an inhomogeneous discretization scheme for the Langevin stochastic differential equation that yields operator-weighted proposals adapted to the non-Gaussian structure of the posterior. The resulting dimension-independent and likelihood-informed (DILI) MCMC samplers may be useful for a large class of high-dimensional problems where the target probability measure has a density with respect to a Gaussian reference measure. Finally, we use two nonlinear inverse problems in order to demonstrate the efficiency of these DILI samplers: an elliptic PDE coefficient inverse problem and path reconstruction in a conditioned diffusion.« less

  12. Independence of replisomes in Escherichia coli chromosomalreplication

    SciTech Connect

    Breier, Adam M.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R.

    2005-03-13

    In Escherichia coli DNA replication is carried out by the coordinated action of the proteins within a replisome. After replication initiation, the two bidirectionally oriented replisomes from a single origin are colocalized into higher-order structures termed replication factories. The factory model postulated that the two replisomes are also functionally coupled. We tested this hypothesis by using DNA combing and whole-genome microarrays. Nascent DNA surrounding oriC in single, combed chromosomes showed instead that one replisome, usually the leftward one, was significantly ahead of the other 70% of the time. We next used microarrays to follow replication throughout the genome by measuring DNA copy number. We found in multiple E. coli strains that the replisomes are independent, with the leftward replisome ahead of the rightward one. The size of the bias was strain-specific, varying from 50 to 130 kb in the array results. When we artificially blocked one replisome, the other continued unabated, again demonstrating independence. We suggest an improved version of the factory model that retains the advantages of threading DNA through colocalized replisomes at about equal rates, but allows the cell flexibility to overcome obstacles encountered during elongation.

  13. Perceived and actual similarities in biological and adoptive families: does perceived similarity bias genetic inferences?

    PubMed

    Scarr, S; Scarf, E; Weinberg, R A

    1980-09-01

    Critics of the adoption method to estimate the relative effects of genetic and environmental differences on behavioral development claim that important biases are created by the knowledge of biological relatedness or adoptive status. Since the 1950s, agency policy has led to nearly all adopted children knowing that they are adopted. To test the hypothesis that knowledge of biological or adoptive status influences actual similarity, we correlated absolute differences in objective test scores with ratings of similarity by adolescents and their parents in adoptive and biological families. Although biological family members see themselves as more similar than adoptive family members, there are also important generational and gender differences in perceived similarity that cut across family type. There is moderate agreement among family members on the degree of perceived similarity, but there is no correlation between perceived and actual similarity in intelligence or temperament. However, family members are more accurate about shared social attitudes. Knowledge of adoptive or biological relatedness is related to the degree of perceived similarity, but perceptions of similarity are not related to objective similarities and thus do not constitute a bias in comparisons of measured differences in intelligence or temperament in adoptive and biological families.

  14. Mass-independent isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L

    2013-02-28

    Three fundamental properties of atomic nuclei-mass, spin (and related magnetic moment), and volume-are the source of isotope effects. The mostly deserved and popular, with almost hundred-year history, is the mass-dependent isotope effect. The first mass-independent isotope effect which chemically discriminates isotopes by their nuclear spins and nuclear magnetic moments rather than by their masses was detected in 1976. It was named as the magnetic isotope effect because it is controlled by magnetic interaction, i.e., electron-nuclear hyperfine coupling in the paramagnetic species, the reaction intermediates. The effect follows from the universal physical property of chemical reactions to conserve angular momentum (spin) of electrons and nuclei. It is now detected for oxygen, silicon, sulfur, germanium, tin, mercury, magnesium, calcium, zinc, and uranium in a great variety of chemical and biochemical reactions including those of medical and ecological importance. Another mass-independent isotope effect was detected in 1983 as a deviation of isotopic distribution in reaction products from that which would be expected from the mass-dependent isotope effect. On the physical basis, it is in fact a mass-dependent effect, but it surprisingly results in isotope fractionation which is incompatible with that predicted by traditional mass-dependent effects. It is supposed to be a function of dynamic parameters of reaction and energy relaxation in excited states of products. The third, nuclear volume mass-independent isotope effect is detected in the high-resolution atomic and molecular spectra and in the extraction processes, but there are no unambiguous indications of its importance as an isotope fractionation factor in chemical reactions.

  15. Modality-independent elastography: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington, Chad W.; Miga, Michael I.

    2004-05-01

    The correlation between the stiffness and health of tissue is an accepted form of organ disease assessment. As a result, there has been a significant amount of interest in developing methods to image elasticity parameters (i.e. elastography). This work presents a technique that frames the elastography imaging problem within a non-rigid iterative image registration approach. Through the use of finite element modeling and mutual information, material properties are varied in order to optimize the registration between a post-compressed image and a model-generated compressed image. The results shown here demonstrate the strong connection between image similarity and appropriate tissue parameters and the algorithm's ability to detect contrast in tissue stiffness. By casting elasticity image reconstruction within the context of image similarity, the method is generalized to all forms of medical imaging.

  16. Symbols of a cosmic order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madjid, F. Hadi; Myers, John M.

    2016-10-01

    The world runs on networks over which signals communicate sequences of symbols, e.g. numerals. Examining both engineered and natural communications networks reveals an unsuspected order that depends on contact with an unpredictable entity. This order has three roots. The first is a proof within quantum theory that no evidence can ever determine its explanation, so that an agent choosing an explanation must do so unpredictably. The second root is the showing that clocks that step computers do not "tell time" but serve as self-adjusting symbol-handling agents that regulate "logically synchronized" motion in response to unpredictable disturbances. Such a clock-agent has a certain independence as well as the capacity to communicate via unpredictable symbols with other clock-agents and to adjust its own tick rate in response to that communication. The third root is the noticing of unpredictable symbol exchange in natural systems, including the transmission of symbols found in molecular biology. We introduce a symbol-handling agent as a role played in some cases by a person, for example a physicist who chooses an explanation of given experimental outcomes, and in other cases by some other biological entity, and in still other cases by an inanimate device, such as a computer-based detector used in physical measurements. While we forbear to try to explain the propensity of agents at all levels from cells to civilizations to form and operate networks of logically synchronized symbol-handling agents, we point to this propensity as an overlooked cosmic order, an order structured by the unpredictability ensuing from the proof. Appreciating the cosmic order leads to a conception of agency that replaces volition by unpredictability and reconceives the notion of objectivity in a way that makes a place for agency in the world as described by physics. Some specific implications for physics are outlined.

  17. Expanded HTA, Legitimacy and Independence

    PubMed Central

    Syrett, Keith

    2016-01-01

    This brief commentary seeks to develop the analysis of Daniels, Porteny and Urrutia of the implications of expansion of the scope of health technology assessment (HTA) beyond issues of safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness. Drawing in particular on experience in the United Kingdom, it suggests that such expansion can be understood not only as a response to the problem of insufficiency of evidence, but also to that of legitimacy. However, as expansion of HTA also renders it more visibly political in character, it is plausible that its legitimacy may be undermined, rather than enhanced by, independence from the policy process.

  18. Independent Component Analysis of Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manduchi, Roberto; Portilla, Javier

    2000-01-01

    A common method for texture representation is to use the marginal probability densities over the outputs of a set of multi-orientation, multi-scale filters as a description of the texture. We propose a technique, based on Independent Components Analysis, for choosing the set of filters that yield the most informative marginals, meaning that the product over the marginals most closely approximates the joint probability density function of the filter outputs. The algorithm is implemented using a steerable filter space. Experiments involving both texture classification and synthesis show that compared to Principal Components Analysis, ICA provides superior performance for modeling of natural and synthetic textures.

  19. Indistinguishability of independent single photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, F. W.; Wong, C. W.

    2009-01-01

    The indistinguishability of independent single photons is presented by decomposing the single photon pulse into the mixed state of different transform-limited pulses. The entanglement between single photons and outer environment or other photons induces the distribution of the center frequencies of those transform-limited pulses and makes photons distinguishable. Only the single photons with the same transform-limited form are indistinguishable. In details, the indistinguishability of single photons from the solid-state quantum emitter and spontaneous parametric down-conversion is examined with two-photon Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer. Moreover, experimental methods to enhance the indistinguishability are discussed, where the usage of spectral filter is highlighted.

  20. On the similarity of variable viscosity flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voivenel, L.; Danaila, L.; Varea, E.; Renou, B.; Cazalens, M.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulent mixing is ubiquitous in both nature and industrial applications. Most of them concern different fluids, therefore with variable physical properties (density and/or viscosity). The focus here is on variable viscosity flows and mixing, involving density-matched fluids. The issue is whether or not these flows may be self-similar, or self-preserving. The importance of this question stands on the predictability of these flows; self-similar dynamical systems are easier tractable from an analytical viewpoint. More specifically, self-similar analysis is applied to the scale-by-scale energy transport equations, which represent the transport of energy at each scale and each point of the flow. Scale-by-scale energy budget equations are developed for inhomogeneous and anisotropic flows, in which the viscosity varies as a result of heterogeneous mixture or temperature variations. Additional terms are highlighted, accounting for the viscosity gradients, or fluctuations. These terms are present at both small and large scales, thus rectifying the common belief that viscosity is a small-scale quantity. Scale-by-scale energy budget equations are then adapted for the particular case of a round jet evolving in a more viscous host fluid. It is further shown that the condition of self-preservation is not necessarily satisfied in variable-viscosity jets. Indeed, the jet momentum conservation, as well as the constancy of the Reynolds number in the central region of the jet, cannot be satisfied simultaneously. This points to the necessity of considering less stringent conditions (with respect to classical, single-fluid jets) when analytically tackling these flows and reinforces the idea that viscosity variations must be accounted for when modelling these flows.

  1. Similarities between decapod and insect neuropeptidomes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neuropeptides are important regulators of physiological processes and behavior. Although they tend to be generally well conserved, recent results using trancriptome sequencing on decapod crustaceans give the impression of significant differences between species, raising the question whether such differences are real or artefacts. Methods. The BLAST+ program was used to find short reads coding neuropeptides and neurohormons in publicly available short read archives. Such reads were then used to find similar reads in the same archives, and the DNA assembly program Trinity was employed to construct contigs encoding the neuropeptide precursors as completely as possible. Results. The seven decapod species analyzed in this fashion, the crabs Eriocheir sinensis, Carcinus maenas and Scylla paramamosain, the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, the lobster Homarus americanus, the fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii and the crayfish Procambarus clarkii had remarkably similar neuropeptidomes. Although some neuropeptide precursors could not be assembled, in many cases individual reads pertaining to the missing precursors show unambiguously that these neuropeptides are present in these species. In other cases, the tissues that express those neuropeptides were not used in the construction of the cDNA libraries. One novel neuropeptide was identified: elongated PDH (pigment dispersing hormone), a variation on PDH that has a two-amino-acid insertion in its core sequence. Hyrg is another peptide that is ubiquitously present in decapods and is likely a novel neuropeptide precursor. Discussion. Many insect species have lost one or more neuropeptide genes, but apart from elongated PDH and hyrg all other decapod neuropeptides are present in at least some insect species, and allatotropin is the only insect neuropeptide missing from decapods. This strong similarity between insect and decapod neuropeptidomes makes it possible to predict the receptors for decapod neuropeptides

  2. Similarities between decapod and insect neuropeptidomes.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neuropeptides are important regulators of physiological processes and behavior. Although they tend to be generally well conserved, recent results using trancriptome sequencing on decapod crustaceans give the impression of significant differences between species, raising the question whether such differences are real or artefacts. Methods. The BLAST+ program was used to find short reads coding neuropeptides and neurohormons in publicly available short read archives. Such reads were then used to find similar reads in the same archives, and the DNA assembly program Trinity was employed to construct contigs encoding the neuropeptide precursors as completely as possible. Results. The seven decapod species analyzed in this fashion, the crabs Eriocheir sinensis, Carcinus maenas and Scylla paramamosain, the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, the lobster Homarus americanus, the fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii and the crayfish Procambarus clarkii had remarkably similar neuropeptidomes. Although some neuropeptide precursors could not be assembled, in many cases individual reads pertaining to the missing precursors show unambiguously that these neuropeptides are present in these species. In other cases, the tissues that express those neuropeptides were not used in the construction of the cDNA libraries. One novel neuropeptide was identified: elongated PDH (pigment dispersing hormone), a variation on PDH that has a two-amino-acid insertion in its core sequence. Hyrg is another peptide that is ubiquitously present in decapods and is likely a novel neuropeptide precursor. Discussion. Many insect species have lost one or more neuropeptide genes, but apart from elongated PDH and hyrg all other decapod neuropeptides are present in at least some insect species, and allatotropin is the only insect neuropeptide missing from decapods. This strong similarity between insect and decapod neuropeptidomes makes it possible to predict the receptors for decapod neuropeptides

  3. Diverse precerebellar neurons share similar intrinsic excitability.

    PubMed

    Kolkman, Kristine E; McElvain, Lauren E; du Lac, Sascha

    2011-11-16

    The cerebellum dedicates a majority of the brain's neurons to processing a wide range of sensory, motor, and cognitive signals. Stereotyped circuitry within the cerebellar cortex suggests that similar computations are performed throughout the cerebellum, but little is known about whether diverse precerebellar neurons are specialized for the nature of the information they convey. In vivo recordings indicate that firing responses to sensory or motor stimuli vary dramatically across different precerebellar nuclei, but whether this reflects diverse synaptic inputs or differentially tuned intrinsic excitability has not been determined. We targeted whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to neurons in eight precerebellar nuclei which were retrogradely labeled from different regions of the cerebellum in mice. Intrinsic physiology was compared across neurons in the medial vestibular, external cuneate, lateral reticular, prepositus hypoglossi, supragenual, Roller/intercalatus, reticularis tegmenti pontis, and pontine nuclei. Within the firing domain, precerebellar neurons were remarkably similar. Firing faithfully followed temporally modulated inputs, could be sustained at high rates, and was a linear function of input current over a wide range of inputs and firing rates. Pharmacological analyses revealed common expression of Kv3 currents, which were essential for a wide linear firing range, and of SK (small-conductance calcium-activated potassium) currents, which were essential for a wide linear input range. In contrast, membrane properties below spike threshold varied considerably within and across precerebellar nuclei, as evidenced by variability in postinhibitory rebound firing. Our findings indicate that diverse precerebellar neurons perform similar scaling computations on their inputs but may be differentially tuned to synaptic inhibition. PMID:22090493

  4. Similarities between decapod and insect neuropeptidomes.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neuropeptides are important regulators of physiological processes and behavior. Although they tend to be generally well conserved, recent results using trancriptome sequencing on decapod crustaceans give the impression of significant differences between species, raising the question whether such differences are real or artefacts. Methods. The BLAST+ program was used to find short reads coding neuropeptides and neurohormons in publicly available short read archives. Such reads were then used to find similar reads in the same archives, and the DNA assembly program Trinity was employed to construct contigs encoding the neuropeptide precursors as completely as possible. Results. The seven decapod species analyzed in this fashion, the crabs Eriocheir sinensis, Carcinus maenas and Scylla paramamosain, the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, the lobster Homarus americanus, the fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii and the crayfish Procambarus clarkii had remarkably similar neuropeptidomes. Although some neuropeptide precursors could not be assembled, in many cases individual reads pertaining to the missing precursors show unambiguously that these neuropeptides are present in these species. In other cases, the tissues that express those neuropeptides were not used in the construction of the cDNA libraries. One novel neuropeptide was identified: elongated PDH (pigment dispersing hormone), a variation on PDH that has a two-amino-acid insertion in its core sequence. Hyrg is another peptide that is ubiquitously present in decapods and is likely a novel neuropeptide precursor. Discussion. Many insect species have lost one or more neuropeptide genes, but apart from elongated PDH and hyrg all other decapod neuropeptides are present in at least some insect species, and allatotropin is the only insect neuropeptide missing from decapods. This strong similarity between insect and decapod neuropeptidomes makes it possible to predict the receptors for decapod neuropeptides

  5. Temperature-independent silicon subwavelength grating waveguides.

    PubMed

    Schmid, J H; Ibrahim, M; Cheben, P; Lapointe, J; Janz, S; Bock, P J; Densmore, A; Lamontagne, B; Ma, R; Ye, W N; Xu, D-X

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrate, by experiment and numerical calculations, temperature-independent subwavelength grating waveguides with a periodic composite core composed of alternating regions of silicon and SU-8 polymer. The polymer has a negative thermo-optic (TO) material coefficient that cancels the large positive TO effect of the silicon. Measurements and Bloch mode calculations were carried out over a range of silicon-polymer duty ratios. The lowest measured TO coefficient at a wavelength of 1550 nm is 1.8×10(-6) K(-1); 2 orders of magnitude smaller than a conventional silicon photonic wire waveguide. Calculations predict the possibility of complete cancellation of the silicon waveguide temperature dependence. PMID:21633465

  6. Similar on the Inside (post-grinding)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity show the hole drilled into the rock called 'Pilbara,' which is located in the small crater dubbed 'Fram.' Spirit drilled into this rock with its rock abrasion tool. The rock appears to be dotted with the same 'blueberries,' or spherules, found at 'Eagle Crater.' After analyzing the hole with the rover's scientific instruments, scientists concluded that Pilbara has a similar chemical make-up, and thus watery past, to rocks studied at Eagle Crater. This image was taken with the panoramic camera's 480-, 530- and 600-nanometer filters.

  7. Similar on the Inside (pre-grinding)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity show the rock called 'Pilbara' located in the small crater dubbed 'Fram.' The rock appears to be dotted with the same 'blueberries,' or spherules, found at 'Eagle Crater.' Spirit drilled into this rock with its rock abrasion tool. After analyzing the hole with the rover's scientific instruments, scientists concluded that Pilbara has a similar chemical make-up, and thus watery past, to rocks studied at Eagle Crater. This image was taken with the panoramic camera's 480-, 530- and 600-nanometer filters.

  8. Speculations on a Definition of Independent Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Michael G.

    The conceptual view of independent study that is developed in this paper is based on discussions of four key ideas: (1) independent study is concerned with both learning and teaching; (2) independent study is concerned with the capacity of learners to be self-directing; (3) independent study systems are both internal and external to educational…

  9. First-Order Approximation of the Ordered Binary-Symmetric Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossorier, Marc P. C.; Lin, Shu

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents different results related to the ordering of a sequence of N received symbols with respect to their reliability measure, for BPSK transmission over the AWGN channel model. First, a tight approximation of Pe (i; N), the probability that the hard decision associated with the i-th symbol of the ordered sequence is in error, is derived. Then, it is shown that despite the fact that the random variables representing the noise at positions n 1(sub 1), n(sub 2), ..., n(sub j) of the ordering are no longer independent, the events of having a hard decision decoding error at these positions remain almost independent Pe (n(sub i), n2, ..., n(sub j); N), the probability that the hard decisions associated with the symbols at positions n(sub 1), n(sub 2), ..., n(sub j), in the ordered sequence are in error, is thus well approximated from each of the Pe (n(sub i): N), for i is a member of [1, j]. Finally, based on the independence of these events, the fully connected 2(sup N) -state BSC representing the channel after ordering is simplified by N independent time-shared 2-state BSC's. This new model allows one to easily and tightly approximate the capacity of the channel after ordering.

  10. Molecular Similarity in Computer-Aided Molecular Design.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkin, Edward E.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The quantitative measurement of how similar one molecule is to another is investigated as a potential aid to molecular design. The work concentrates on the comparison of electronic properties of molecules, in particular electron density distribution, molecular electrostatic potential, molecular electric field and frontier orbital wavefunctions. A novel formula for molecular similarity has been devised and applied to these four properties. An approximate representation of valence electron density is used, based on the notion that charge distribution in a large molecule may be built from transferable contributions from its constituent functional groups. Each of these contributions consists of a series of first-order gaussian functions. The electrostatic potentials and electric fields used in the similarity calculations are computed from atom -centered partial charges. The frontier orbital wavefunction comparisons are performed using the extended Huckel method. The four measures of similarity are related to chemical and biological data and shown to have possible applications in the area of drug design.

  11. Identification and sorting of regular textures according to their similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Mesa, Pilar; Anastasiadis, Johannes; Puente León, Fernando

    2015-05-01

    Regardless whether mosaics, material surfaces or skin surfaces are inspected their texture plays an important role. Texture is a property which is hard to describe using words but it can easily be described in pictures. Furthermore, a huge amount of digital images containing a visual description of textures already exists. However, this information becomes useless if there are no appropriate methods to browse the data. In addition, depending on the given task some properties like scale, rotation or intensity invariance are desired. In this paper we propose to analyze texture images according to their characteristic pattern. First a classification approach is proposed to separate regular from non-regular textures. The second stage will focus on regular textures suggesting a method to sort them according to their similarity. Different features will be extracted from the texture in order to describe its scale, orientation, texel and the texel's relative position. Depending on the desired invariance of the visual characteristics (like the texture's scale or the texel's form invariance) the comparison of the features between images will be weighted and combined to define the degree of similarity between them. Tuning the weighting parameters allows this search algorithm to be easily adapted to the requirements of the desired task. Not only the total invariance of desired parameters can be adjusted, the weighting of the parameters may also be modified to adapt to an application-specific type of similarity. This search method has been evaluated using different textures and similarity criteria achieving very promising results.

  12. A family of similarity measures between two strings.

    PubMed

    Findler, N V; Van Leeuwen, J

    1979-01-01

    We present a class of similarity measures for quantitatively comparing two strings, that is, two linearly ordered sets of elements. The strings can be of different lengths, the elements come from a single alphabet, and an element may appear any number of times. The limiting values of each measure are 0, when two completely different strings are compared, and 1, when the two strings are identical. Applications of similarity measures are numerous in nonnumerical computations, such as in heuristic search processes in associative networks, in pattern recognition and classification, in game playing programs, and in music and text analysis. We offer a number of feasible measures from among which some are discarded on plausibility grounds. One can select the measure most adequate for one's needs on the basis of a few characteristic examples of strings compared and by considering the specific requirements of the application at hand. PMID:21868840

  13. Similarity and binding in memory: bound to be detrimental.

    PubMed

    Guérard, Katherine; Tremblay, Sébastien; Saint-Aubin, Jean

    2009-01-01

    The process of binding information from different modalities and sources into an object is ubiquitous in cognition and has been a problem for research and modelling efforts in psychology. This process has been considered by most researchers as necessarily always beneficial to memory. In the present study we provide evidence that binding can be detrimental through the propagation of vulnerabilities to interference. Phonologically similar and dissimilar letters were presented sequentially at different locations on a computer monitor. Participants had to recall either the letters in their order of presentation or the spatial locations at which the letters had appeared. Whether binding was encouraged or not--providing prior knowledge of which dimension to remember--phonological similarity had a detrimental effect on recall of locations. Such a finding poses a challenge to the view that binding is the panacea in enhancing memory capacity. PMID:18622886

  14. Initial Experiences with Retrieving Similar Objects in Simulation Data

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, S-C S; Kamath, C

    2003-02-21

    Comparing the output of a physics simulation with an experiment, referred to as 'code validation,' is often done by visually comparing the two outputs. In order to determine which simulation is a closer match to the experiment, more quantitative measures are needed. In this paper, we describe our early experiences with this problem by considering the slightly simpler problem of finding objects in a image that are similar to a given query object. Focusing on a dataset from a fluid mixing problem, we report on our experiments with different features that are used to represent the objects of interest in the data. These early results indicate that the features must be chosen carefully to correctly represent the query object and the goal of the similarity search.

  15. Desert ecosystems: similarities, characteristics, and health benefits.

    PubMed

    Carpio-Obeso, M P; Shorr, M; Valdez-Salas, B

    1999-01-01

    Salty bodies of water in desert zones are known worldwide. The Salton Sea in California, USA, and the Dead Sea between Israel and Jordan are located in arid areas at approximately the same latitude, which might explain some similarities. Both the Salton and Dead Seas have ecosystems consisting of a singular saline sea/hot desert interface. The Salton Sea, the largest inland body of water in California, is a saline lake in the Coachella and Imperial Valleys. The Imperial Valley is one of the 10 top agricultural areas in the United States. Several thermoelectric plants exploiting geothermal wells operate around the Salton Sea, and some areas comprise a National Wildlife Refuge. The Dead Sea (Sea of Salt in Hebrew), the lowest saline lake on earth, contains high concentrations of salts and is a reservoir of minerals with a unique evaporation regime. The Dead Sea salts are the raw materials for the production of several chemical and health products. Magnesium salts and sulfur-containing mud are used for treating human skin disorders, allergies, arthritis, and respiratory diseases. After visiting both zones, we recorded, analyzed, and compared the similarities and differences between the areas. Some differences were found in the geographic, orographic, hydraulic, and climatic properties, but the main difference is in the economic-industrial aspect. The characteristics and health aspects are described in this report. PMID:10746738

  16. Genetic similarities within and between human populations.

    PubMed

    Witherspoon, D J; Wooding, S; Rogers, A R; Marchani, E E; Watkins, W S; Batzer, M A; Jorde, L B

    2007-05-01

    The proportion of human genetic variation due to differences between populations is modest, and individuals from different populations can be genetically more similar than individuals from the same population. Yet sufficient genetic data can permit accurate classification of individuals into populations. Both findings can be obtained from the same data set, using the same number of polymorphic loci. This article explains why. Our analysis focuses on the frequency, omega, with which a pair of random individuals from two different populations is genetically more similar than a pair of individuals randomly selected from any single population. We compare omega to the error rates of several classification methods, using data sets that vary in number of loci, average allele frequency, populations sampled, and polymorphism ascertainment strategy. We demonstrate that classification methods achieve higher discriminatory power than omega because of their use of aggregate properties of populations. The number of loci analyzed is the most critical variable: with 100 polymorphisms, accurate classification is possible, but omega remains sizable, even when using populations as distinct as sub-Saharan Africans and Europeans. Phenotypes controlled by a dozen or fewer loci can therefore be expected to show substantial overlap between human populations. This provides empirical justification for caution when using population labels in biomedical settings, with broad implications for personalized medicine, pharmacogenetics, and the meaning of race.

  17. Self-similar Ultrarelativistic Jetted Blast Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshet, Uri; Kogan, Dani

    2015-12-01

    Following a suggestion that a directed relativistic explosion may have a universal intermediate asymptotic, we derive a self-similar solution for an ultrarelativistic jetted blast wave. The solution involves three distinct regions: an approximately paraboloid head where the Lorentz factor γ exceeds ∼ 1/2 of its maximal, nose value; a geometrically self-similar, expanding envelope slightly narrower than a paraboloid; and an axial core in which the (cylindrically, henceforth) radial flow {{u}} converges inward toward the axis. Most (∼80%) of the energy lies well beyond the leading, head region. Here, a radial cross section shows a maximal γ (separating the core and the envelope), a sign reversal in {{u}}, and a minimal γ, at respectively ∼1/6, ∼1/4, and ∼3/4 of the shock radius. The solution is apparently unique, and approximately agrees with previous simulations, of different initial conditions, that resolved the head. This suggests that unlike a spherical relativistic blast wave, our solution is an attractor, and may thus describe directed blast waves such as in the external shock phase of a γ-ray burst.

  18. Similar Hamiltonian Between Avalanche-effect & Sociophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksoed, Ssi, Wh-

    2016-05-01

    Of similar Hamiltonian concerned in ``sociophysics'', there were RandomFieldIsingModel/RFIM in external field retrieved in S. Sabhapandit:``Hysteresis & Avalanche in RandomFieldIsingModel'',2002:'' ..in earthquake, it is an energy release and in case of ferromagnet, it is the size of the domain flips''. Following the extremes & compromises curve in Serge Galam: ``Sociophysics: a Review of Galam Model'', 2008 fig. 12, h 9 whereas it seems similar with ``heating curve''-Prof. Ir. Abdul Kadir: ``Mesin Arus Searah'', h 192 when the heat sources are continuous denote continuous opinion dynamics. Further, hysteresis as duties in ``Kajian Analisis Model Mikromagnetik dari Struktur Magnet Nanokomposit'', 2007 [ UI file no. S29286 ] also sought:'' calculate the probability that `one more site became unstable' causes an avalanche of the spin flips...'' usually found in Per Bak sand-pile fractal characters experiment exhibits. Great acknowledgment to HE. Mr. LieutGen-TNI[rtd]. H. TUK SETYOHADI, +62-21-7220385, Jl. Sriwijaya Raya 3, Kebayoran Baru, South-Jakarta.

  19. Exploiting Data Similarity to Reduce Memory Footprints

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, S; de Supinski, B R; Schulz, M; Franklin, D; Sherwood, T; Chong, F T

    2011-01-28

    Memory size has long limited large-scale applications on high-performance computing (HPC) systems. Since compute nodes frequently do not have swap space, physical memory often limits problem sizes. Increasing core counts per chip and power density constraints, which limit the number of DIMMs per node, have exacerbated this problem. Further, DRAM constitutes a significant portion of overall HPC system cost. Therefore, instead of adding more DRAM to the nodes, mechanisms to manage memory usage more efficiently - preferably transparently - could increase effective DRAM capacity and thus the benefit of multicore nodes for HPC systems. MPI application processes often exhibit significant data similarity. These data regions occupy multiple physical locations across the individual rank processes within a multicore node and thus offer a potential savings in memory capacity. These regions, primarily residing in heap, are dynamic, which makes them difficult to manage statically. Our novel memory allocation library, SBLLmalloc, automatically identifies identical memory blocks and merges them into a single copy. SBLLmalloc does not require application or OS changes since we implement it as a user-level library. Overall, we demonstrate that SBLLmalloc reduces the memory footprint of a range of MPI applications by 32.03% on average and up to 60.87%. Further, SBLLmalloc supports problem sizes for IRS over 21.36% larger than using standard memory management techniques, thus significantly increasing effective system size. Similarly, SBLLmalloc requires 43.75% fewer nodes than standard memory management techniques to solve an AMG problem.

  20. Spectral similarity of unbound asteroid pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolters, Stephen D.; Weissman, Paul R.; Christou, Apostolis; Duddy, Samuel R.; Lowry, Stephen C.

    2014-04-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy between 0.8 and 2.5 μ has been obtained for both components of three unbound asteroid pairs, using the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility with the SpeX instrument. Pair primary (2110) Moore-Sitterly is classified as an S-type following the Bus-DeMeo taxonomy; the classification for secondary (44612) 1999 RP27 is ambiguous: S/Sq/Q/K/L-type. Primary (10484) Hecht and secondary (44645) 1999 RC118 are classified as V-types. IR spectra for Moore-Sitterly and Hecht are each linked with available visual photometry. The classifications for primary (88604) 2001 QH293 and (60546) 2000 EE85 are ambiguous: S/Sq/Q/K/L-type. Subtle spectral differences between them suggest that the primary may have more weathered material on its surface. Dynamical integrations have constrained the ages of formation: 2110-44612 > 782 kyr; 10484-44645 = 348 (+823,-225) kyr; 88604-60546 = 925 (+842,-754) kyr. The spectral similarity of seven complete pairs is ranked in comparison with nearby background asteroids. Two pairs, 17198-229056 and 19289-278067, have significantly different spectra between the components, compared to the similarity of spectra in the background population. The other pairs are closer than typical, supporting an interpretation of each pair's formation from a common parent body.

  1. Desert ecosystems: similarities, characteristics, and health benefits.

    PubMed

    Carpio-Obeso, M P; Shorr, M; Valdez-Salas, B

    1999-01-01

    Salty bodies of water in desert zones are known worldwide. The Salton Sea in California, USA, and the Dead Sea between Israel and Jordan are located in arid areas at approximately the same latitude, which might explain some similarities. Both the Salton and Dead Seas have ecosystems consisting of a singular saline sea/hot desert interface. The Salton Sea, the largest inland body of water in California, is a saline lake in the Coachella and Imperial Valleys. The Imperial Valley is one of the 10 top agricultural areas in the United States. Several thermoelectric plants exploiting geothermal wells operate around the Salton Sea, and some areas comprise a National Wildlife Refuge. The Dead Sea (Sea of Salt in Hebrew), the lowest saline lake on earth, contains high concentrations of salts and is a reservoir of minerals with a unique evaporation regime. The Dead Sea salts are the raw materials for the production of several chemical and health products. Magnesium salts and sulfur-containing mud are used for treating human skin disorders, allergies, arthritis, and respiratory diseases. After visiting both zones, we recorded, analyzed, and compared the similarities and differences between the areas. Some differences were found in the geographic, orographic, hydraulic, and climatic properties, but the main difference is in the economic-industrial aspect. The characteristics and health aspects are described in this report.

  2. Scaling exponents for ordered maxima

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.; Lemons, N. W.

    2015-12-22

    We study extreme value statistics of multiple sequences of random variables. For each sequence with N variables, independently drawn from the same distribution, the running maximum is defined as the largest variable to date. We compare the running maxima of m independent sequences and investigate the probability SN that the maxima are perfectly ordered, that is, the running maximum of the first sequence is always larger than that of the second sequence, which is always larger than the running maximum of the third sequence, and so on. The probability SN is universal: it does not depend on the distribution from which the random variables are drawn. For two sequences, SN~N–1/2, and in general, the decay is algebraic, SN~N–σm, for large N. We analytically obtain the exponent σ3≅1.302931 as root of a transcendental equation. Moreover, the exponents σm grow with m, and we show that σm~m for large m.

  3. Scaling exponents for ordered maxima

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.; Lemons, N. W.

    2015-12-22

    We study extreme value statistics of multiple sequences of random variables. For each sequence with N variables, independently drawn from the same distribution, the running maximum is defined as the largest variable to date. We compare the running maxima of m independent sequences and investigate the probability SN that the maxima are perfectly ordered, that is, the running maximum of the first sequence is always larger than that of the second sequence, which is always larger than the running maximum of the third sequence, and so on. The probability SN is universal: it does not depend on the distribution frommore » which the random variables are drawn. For two sequences, SN~N–1/2, and in general, the decay is algebraic, SN~N–σm, for large N. We analytically obtain the exponent σ3≅1.302931 as root of a transcendental equation. Moreover, the exponents σm grow with m, and we show that σm~m for large m.« less

  4. ]Space Shuttle Independent Assessment Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Shuttle program is one of the most complex engineering activities undertaken anywhere in the world at the present time. The Space Shuttle Independent Assessment Team (SIAT) was chartered in September 1999 by NASA to provide an independent review of the Space Shuttle sub-systems and maintenance practices. During the period from October through December 1999, the team led by Dr. McDonald and comprised of NASA, contractor, and DOD experts reviewed NASA practices, Space Shuffle anomalies, as well as civilian and military aerospace experience. In performing the review, much of a very positive nature was observed by the SIAT, not the least of which was the skill and dedication of the workforce. It is in the unfortunate nature of this type of review that the very positive elements are either not mentioned or dwelt upon. This very complex program has undergone a massive change in structure in the last few years with the transition to a slimmed down, contractor-run operation, the Shuttle Flight Operations Contract (SFOC). This has been accomplished with significant cost savings and without a major incident. This report has identified significant problems that must be addressed to maintain an effective program. These problems are described in each of the Issues, Findings or Observations summarized, and unless noted, appear to be systemic in nature and not confined to any one Shuttle sub-system or element. Specifics are given in the body of the report, along with recommendations to improve the present systems.

  5. Examination of crime and similar concepts in the medical law.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Mohammad Javad

    2016-01-01

    Crime is a human behavior that has captivated the thoughts of scholars of various disciplines throughout history. Philosophers, sociologists, psychologists and others have investigated and analyzed the concept of crime from different aspects. Crime is the main topic of criminal law, and in its legal meaning is a well-known term with a certain conceptual load that should not be confused with similar concepts such as guilt, civil crime (quasi tort), and particularly, the disciplinary transgression. Although crime has common points with all the above, it is an independent concept with unique effects, features, and descriptions that distinguish it from similar acts. This article aims to determine the difference between the concepts of crime, guilt, civil crime and disciplinary transgression through enumeration of the related issues as well as examples of medical disciplinary crimes and transgressions. Identifying and distinguishing these concepts can improve the procedure of prosecuting crimes and disciplinary transgression, bring punishment to criminals and transgressors, and facilitate compensation of pecuniary and non-pecuniary losses due to committers' fault or failure. Thus we may avoid taking a wrong route that can lead to infringement of individuals' rights. PMID:27471587

  6. Self-similar hot accretion flow onto a neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2001-10-01

    We present analytical and numerical solutions which describe a hot, viscous, two-temperature accretion flow onto a neutron star or any other compact star with a surface. We assume Coulomb coupling between the protons and electrons, and free-free cooling from the electrons. Outside a thin boundary layer, where the accretion flow meets the star, we show that there is an extended settling region which is well-described by two self-similar solutions: (1) a two-temperature solution which is valid in an inner zone r<=102.5 (r is in Schwarzchild units), and (2) a one-temperature solution at larger radii. In both zones, ρ~r-2, Ω~r-3/2, v~r0, Tp~r-1 in the two-temperature zone, Te~r-1/2. The luminosity of the settling zone arises from the rotational energy of the star as the star is braked by viscosity; hence the luminosity is independent of Ṁ. The settling solution is convectively and viscously stable and is unlikely to have strong winds or outflows. The flow is thermally unstable, but the instability may be stabilized by thermal conduction. The settling solution described here is not advection-dominated, and is thus different from the self-similar ADAF found around black holes. When the spin of the star is small enough, however, the present solution transforms smoothly to a (settling) ADAF. .

  7. Performance evaluation of similarity measures for dense multimodal stereovision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaman, Mustafa; Kalkan, Sinan

    2016-05-01

    Multimodal imaging systems have recently been drawing attention in fields such as medical imaging, remote sensing, and video surveillance systems. In such systems, estimating depth has become possible due to the promising progress of multimodal matching techniques. We perform a systematic performance evaluation of similarity measures frequently used in the literature for dense multimodal stereovision. The evaluated measures include mutual information (MI), sum of squared distances, normalized cross-correlation, census transform, local self-similarity (LSS) as well as descriptors adopted to multimodal settings, like scale invariant feature transform (SIFT), speeded-up robust features (SURF), histogram of oriented gradients (HOG), binary robust independent elementary features, and fast retina keypoint (FREAK). We evaluate the measures over datasets we generated, compiled, and provided as a benchmark and compare the performances using the Winner Takes All method. The datasets are (1) synthetically modified four popular pairs from the Middlebury Stereo Dataset (namely, Tsukuba, Venus, Cones, and Teddy) and (2) our own multimodal image pairs acquired using the infrared and the electro-optical cameras of a Kinect device. The results show that MI and HOG provide promising results for multimodal imagery, and FREAK, SURF, SIFT, and LSS can be considered as alternatives depending on the multimodality level and the computational complexity requirements of the intended application.

  8. Self-similar relativistic blast waves with energy injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eerten, Hendrik

    2014-08-01

    A sufficiently powerful astrophysical source with power-law luminosity in time will give rise to a self-similar relativistic blast wave with a reverse shock travelling into the ejecta and a forward shock moving into the surrounding medium. Once energy injection ceases and the last energy is delivered to the shock front, the blast wave will transit into another self-similar stage depending only on the total amount of energy injected. I describe the effect of limited duration energy injection into environments with density depending on radius as a power law, emphasizing optical/X-ray Gamma-ray Burst afterglows as applications. The blast wave during injection is treated analytically, the transition following last energy injection with one-dimensional simulations. Flux equations for synchrotron emission from the forward and reverse shock regions are provided. The reverse shock emission can easily dominate, especially with different magnetizations for both regions. Reverse shock emission is shown to support both the reported X-ray and optical correlations between afterglow plateau duration and end time flux, independently of the luminosity power-law slope. The model is demonstrated by application to bursts 120521A and 090515, and can accommodate their steep post-plateau light-curve slopes.

  9. The continuous similarity model of bulk soil-water evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clapp, R. B.

    1983-01-01

    The continuous similarity model of evaporation is described. In it, evaporation is conceptualized as a two stage process. For an initially moist soil, evaporation is first climate limited, but later it becomes soil limited. During the latter stage, the evaporation rate is termed evaporability, and mathematically it is inversely proportional to the evaporation deficit. A functional approximation of the moisture distribution within the soil column is also included in the model. The model was tested using data from four experiments conducted near Phoenix, Arizona; and there was excellent agreement between the simulated and observed evaporation. The model also predicted the time of transition to the soil limited stage reasonably well. For one of the experiments, a third stage of evaporation, when vapor diffusion predominates, was observed. The occurrence of this stage was related to the decrease in moisture at the surface of the soil. The continuous similarity model does not account for vapor flow. The results show that climate, through the potential evaporation rate, has a strong influence on the time of transition to the soil limited stage. After this transition, however, bulk evaporation is independent of climate until the effects of vapor flow within the soil predominate.

  10. Examination of crime and similar concepts in the medical law

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Mohammad Javad

    2016-01-01

    Crime is a human behavior that has captivated the thoughts of scholars of various disciplines throughout history. Philosophers, sociologists, psychologists and others have investigated and analyzed the concept of crime from different aspects. Crime is the main topic of criminal law, and in its legal meaning is a well-known term with a certain conceptual load that should not be confused with similar concepts such as guilt, civil crime (quasi tort), and particularly, the disciplinary transgression. Although crime has common points with all the above, it is an independent concept with unique effects, features, and descriptions that distinguish it from similar acts. This article aims to determine the difference between the concepts of crime, guilt, civil crime and disciplinary transgression through enumeration of the related issues as well as examples of medical disciplinary crimes and transgressions. Identifying and distinguishing these concepts can improve the procedure of prosecuting crimes and disciplinary transgression, bring punishment to criminals and transgressors, and facilitate compensation of pecuniary and non-pecuniary losses due to committers’ fault or failure. Thus we may avoid taking a wrong route that can lead to infringement of individuals’ rights. PMID:27471587

  11. Topological similarity of random cell complexes and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweinhart, B.; Mason, J. K.; MacPherson, R. D.

    2016-06-01

    Although random cell complexes occur throughout the physical sciences, there does not appear to be a standard way to quantify their statistical similarities and differences. The various proposals in the literature are usually motivated by the analysis of particular physical systems and do not necessarily apply to general situations. The central concepts in this paper—the swatch and the cloth—provide a description of the local topology of a cell complex that is general (any physical system that can be represented as a cell complex is admissible) and complete (any statistical question about the local topology can be answered from the cloth). Furthermore, this approach allows a distance to be defined that measures the similarity of the local topology of two cell complexes. The distance is used to identify a steady state of a model grain boundary network, quantify the approach to this steady state, and show that the steady state is independent of the initial conditions. The same distance is then employed to show that the long-term properties in simulations of a specific model of a dislocation network do not depend on the implementation of dislocation intersections.

  12. Examination of crime and similar concepts in the medical law.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Mohammad Javad

    2016-01-01

    Crime is a human behavior that has captivated the thoughts of scholars of various disciplines throughout history. Philosophers, sociologists, psychologists and others have investigated and analyzed the concept of crime from different aspects. Crime is the main topic of criminal law, and in its legal meaning is a well-known term with a certain conceptual load that should not be confused with similar concepts such as guilt, civil crime (quasi tort), and particularly, the disciplinary transgression. Although crime has common points with all the above, it is an independent concept with unique effects, features, and descriptions that distinguish it from similar acts. This article aims to determine the difference between the concepts of crime, guilt, civil crime and disciplinary transgression through enumeration of the related issues as well as examples of medical disciplinary crimes and transgressions. Identifying and distinguishing these concepts can improve the procedure of prosecuting crimes and disciplinary transgression, bring punishment to criminals and transgressors, and facilitate compensation of pecuniary and non-pecuniary losses due to committers' fault or failure. Thus we may avoid taking a wrong route that can lead to infringement of individuals' rights.

  13. Creating Birds of Similar Feathers: Leveraging Similarity to Improve Teacher-Student Relationships and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehlbach, Hunter; Brinkworth, Maureen E.; King, Aaron M.; Hsu, Laura M.; McIntyre, Joseph; Rogers, Todd

    2016-01-01

    When people perceive themselves as similar to others, greater liking and closer relationships typically result. In the first randomized field experiment that leverages actual similarities to improve real-world relationships, we examined the affiliations between 315 9th grade students and their 25 teachers. Students in the treatment condition…

  14. Do Environmental Similarities Explain the Similarity in Intelligence of Identical Twins Reared Apart?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouchard, Thomas J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Taylor (1980) claims to show that the similarity in IQ between monozygotic twins reared apart found in prior studies is due to similarity in their environments. A reanalysis using Taylor's classification of environments but an alternative IQ measure shows that his findings do not constructively replicate. (Author/RD)

  15. Similar Students, Different Choices: Who Uses a School Voucher in an Otherwise Similar Population of Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, David J.; Cowen, Joshua M.; Witte, John F.; Wolf, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    We examine what factors predict why some parents enroll their children in voucher schools while other parents with similar types of children and from similar neighborhoods do not. Furthermore, we investigate how aware parents are of their educational options, where they get their information, and what school characteristics they deem the most…

  16. Graviton propagator from background-independent quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2006-10-13

    We study the graviton propagator in Euclidean loop quantum gravity. We use spin foam, boundary-amplitude, and group-field-theory techniques. We compute a component of the propagator to first order, under some approximations, obtaining the correct large-distance behavior. This indicates a way for deriving conventional spacetime quantities from a background-independent theory.

  17. The liking-similarity effect: perceptions of similarity as a function of liking.

    PubMed

    Collisson, Brian; Howell, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    In these two studies, we examined whether the inferences people make about likable and dislikable targets align with the predictions of balance theory. We hypothesized that people exhibit a liking-similarity effect by perceiving greater similarity with a likable person than a dislikable person. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated the likability of a target person and then assessed participants' perceptions of similarity to that target person. In both studies, people rated likable others as more similar to themselves than dislikable others across a variety of domains (e.g., attitudes, personality characteristics, behaviors). In Study 2, individual differences in self-concept clarity, self-esteem, and preference for consistency moderated the liking-similarity effect. PMID:25175989

  18. Securing Biometric Templates Where Similarity Is Measured with Set Intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socek, Daniel; Božović, Vladimir; Ćulibrk, Dubravko

    A novel scheme for securing biometric templates of variable size and order is proposed. The proposed scheme is based on a new similarity measure approach, namely the set intersection, which strongly resembles the methodology used in most of the current state-of-the-art biometrics matching systems. The applicability of the new scheme is compared with that of the existing principal schemes, and it is shown that the new scheme has definite advantages over the existing approaches. The proposed scheme is analyzed both in terms of security and performance.

  19. Evolution of cooperation with similarity to an archetype.

    PubMed

    Houy, Nicolas

    2013-09-01

    We use the framework of Colman with a Prisoner's Dilemma game and an evolutionary agent-based algorithm in order to study the evolution of cooperation and discrimination. We assume that players can discriminate on the basis of the phenotypic distance to an archetype, linked itself with a given behaviour in the game. However, we do not impose that the archetype corresponds to a conditionally cooperative behaviour. We show that cooperation can become the norm and discrimination can evolve spontaneously with no other assumption. For some archetypes, cooperation can even evolve faster and with more intensity than in the similarity-based case studied in Colman et al., 2012.

  20. Adaptive Sampling for High Throughput Data Using Similarity Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaevskaya, V.; Sales, A. P.

    2015-05-06

    The need for adaptive sampling arises in the context of high throughput data because the rates of data arrival are many orders of magnitude larger than the rates at which they can be analyzed. A very fast decision must therefore be made regarding the value of each incoming observation and its inclusion in the analysis. In this report we discuss one approach to adaptive sampling, based on the new data point’s similarity to the other data points being considered for inclusion. We present preliminary results for one real and one synthetic data set.

  1. Evolution of cooperation with similarity to an archetype.

    PubMed

    Houy, Nicolas

    2013-09-01

    We use the framework of Colman with a Prisoner's Dilemma game and an evolutionary agent-based algorithm in order to study the evolution of cooperation and discrimination. We assume that players can discriminate on the basis of the phenotypic distance to an archetype, linked itself with a given behaviour in the game. However, we do not impose that the archetype corresponds to a conditionally cooperative behaviour. We show that cooperation can become the norm and discrimination can evolve spontaneously with no other assumption. For some archetypes, cooperation can even evolve faster and with more intensity than in the similarity-based case studied in Colman et al., 2012. PMID:23623950

  2. Does language about similarity play a role in fostering similarity comparison in children?

    PubMed Central

    Özçalışkan, Şeyda; Goldin-Meadow, Susan; Gentner, Dedre; Mylander, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    Commenting on perceptual similarities between objects stands out as an important linguistic achievement, one that may pave the way towards noticing and commenting on more abstract relational commonalities between objects. To explore whether having a conventional linguistic system is necessary for children to comment on different types of similarity comparisons, we observed four children who had not been exposed to usable linguistic input—deaf children whose hearing losses prevented them from learning spoken language and whose hearing parents had not exposed them to sign language. These children developed gesture systems that have language-like structure at many different levels. Here we ask whether the deaf children used their gestures to comment on similarity relations and, if so, which types of relations they expressed. We found that all four deaf children were able to use their gestures to express similarity comparisons (POINT TO CAT+POINT TO TIGER) resembling those conveyed by 40 hearing children in early gesture+speech combinations (cat+POINT TO TIGER). However, the two groups diverged at later ages. Hearing children, after acquiring the word like, shifted from primarily expressing global similarity (as in cat/tiger) to primarily expressing single-property similarity (as in crayon is brown like my hair). In contrast, the deaf children, lacking an explicit term for similarity, continued to primarily express global similarity. The findings underscore the robustness of similarity comparisons in human communication, but also highlight the importance of conventional terms for comparison as likely contributors to routinely expressing more focused similarity relations. PMID:19524220

  3. Scale independence of décollement thrusting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, John H.; Pugin, Andre J.M.; Hatcher, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    Orogen-scale décollements (detachment surfaces) are an enduring subject of investigation by geoscientists. Uncertainties remain as to how crustal convergence processes maintain the stresses necessary for development of low-angle fault surfaces above which huge slabs of rock are transported horizontally for tens to hundreds of kilometers. Seismic reflection profiles from the southern Appalachian crystalline core and several foreland fold-and-thrust belts provide useful comparisons with high-resolution shallow-penetration seismic reflection profiles acquired over the frontal zone of the Michigan lobe of the Wisconsinan ice sheet northwest of Chicago, Illinois. These profiles provide images of subhorizontal and overlapping dipping reflections that reveal a ramp-and-flat thrust system developed in poorly consolidated glacial till. The system is rooted in a master décollement at the top of bedrock. These 2–3 km long images contain analogs of images observed in seismic reflection profiles from orogenic belts, except that the scale of observation in the profiles in glacial materials is two orders of magnitude less. Whereas the décollement beneath the ice lobe thrust belt lies ∼70 m below thrusted anticlines having wavelengths of tens of meters driven by an advancing ice sheet, seismic images from overthrust terranes are related to lithospheric convergence that produces décollements traceable for thousands of kilometers at depths ranging from a few to over 10 km. Dual vergence or reversals in vergence (retrocharriage) that developed over abrupt changes in depth to the décollement can be observed at all scales. The strikingly similar images, despite the contrast in scale and driving mechanism, suggest a scale- and driving mechanism–independent behavior for décollement thrust systems. All these systems initially had the mechanical properties needed to produce very similar geometries with a compressional driving mechanism directed subparallel to Earth's surface

  4. Similarities between protein folding and granular jamming

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Prasanth P; Andricioaei, Ioan

    2012-01-01

    Grains and glasses, widely different materials, arrest their motions upon decreasing temperature and external load, respectively, in common ways, leading to a universal jamming phase diagram conjecture. However, unified theories are lacking, mainly because of the disparate nature of the particle interactions. Here we demonstrate that folded proteins exhibit signatures common to both glassiness and jamming by using temperature- and force-unfolding molecular dynamics simulations. Upon folding, proteins develop a peak in the interatomic force distributions that falls on a universal curve with experimentally measured forces on jammed grains and droplets. Dynamical signatures are found as a dramatic slowdown of stress relaxation upon folding. Together with granular similarities, folding is tied not just to the jamming transition, but a more nuanced picture of anisotropy, preparation protocol and internal interactions emerges. Results have implications for designing stable polymers and can open avenues to link protein folding to jamming theory. PMID:23093180

  5. Generalized Similarity for Accretion/Decretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2016-10-01

    Decretion (or external) disks are gas disks freely expanding to large radii due to their internal stresses. They are expected to naturally arise in tidal disruption events, around Be stars, in mass-losing post-main-sequence binaries, as a result of supernova fallback, etc. Their evolution is theoretically understood in two regimes: when the central object does not exert torque on the disk (a standard assumption for conventional accretion disks) or when no mass inflow (or outflow) occurs at the disk center. However, many astrophysical objects—circumbinary disks, Be stars, neutron stars accreting in a propeller regime, etc.—feature non-zero torque simultaneously with the non-zero accretion (or ejection of mass) at the disk center. We provide a general description for the evolution of such disks (both linear and nonlinear) in the self-similar regime, to which the disk should asymptotically converge with time. We identify a similarity parameter λ, which is uniquely related to the degree, to which the central mass accretion is suppressed by the non-zero central torque. The known decretion disk solutions correspond to the two discrete values of λ, while our new solutions cover a continuum of its physically allowed values, corresponding to either accretion or mass ejection by the central object. A direct relationship between λ and central \\dot{M} and torque is also established. We describe the time evolution of the various disk characteristics for different λ, and show that the observable properties (spectrum and luminosity evolution) of the decretion disks, in general, are different from the standard accretion disks with no central torque.

  6. Higher-order scene statistics of breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbey, Craig K.; Sohl-Dickstein, Jascha N.; Olshausen, Bruno A.; Eckstein, Miguel P.; Boone, John M.

    2009-02-01

    Researchers studying human and computer vision have found description and construction of these systems greatly aided by analysis of the statistical properties of naturally occurring scenes. More specifically, it has been found that receptive fields with directional selectivity and bandwidth properties similar to mammalian visual systems are more closely matched to the statistics of natural scenes. It is argued that this allows for sparse representation of the independent components of natural images [Olshausen and Field, Nature, 1996]. These theories have important implications for medical image perception. For example, will a system that is designed to represent the independent components of natural scenes, where objects occlude one another and illumination is typically reflected, be appropriate for X-ray imaging, where features superimpose on one another and illumination is transmissive? In this research we begin to examine these issues by evaluating higher-order statistical properties of breast images from X-ray projection mammography (PM) and dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT). We evaluate kurtosis in responses of octave bandwidth Gabor filters applied to PM and to coronal slices of bCT scans. We find that kurtosis in PM rises and quickly saturates for filter center frequencies with an average value above 0.95. By contrast, kurtosis in bCT peaks near 0.20 cyc/mm with kurtosis of approximately 2. Our findings suggest that the human visual system may be tuned to represent breast tissue more effectively in bCT over a specific range of spatial frequencies.

  7. Unfolding the resident-invader dynamics of similar strategies.

    PubMed

    Dercole, Fabio; Geritz, Stefan A H

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the competition between two groups of similar agents in the restricted, but classical context of unstructured populations varying in continuous time in an isolated, homogeneous, and constant abiotic environment. Individual behavioral and phenotypic traits are quantified by one-dimensional strategies and intra- as well as inter-specific interactions are described in the vicinity of a stationary regime. Some known results are revisited: invasion by a new strategy generically implies the substitution of the former resident; and resident-invader coexistence is possible close to singular strategies-the stationary points of the invasion fitness-and is generically protected-each of the two competing groups can invade the other. An (almost known) old conjecture is shown true: competition close to a singular strategy is "essentially Lotka-Volterra"-dominance of one strategy, protected coexistence at an intermediate equilibrium, and mutual exclusion are the generic outcomes. And the unfolding of the competition scenarios is completed with the analysis of three degenerate singular strategies-characterized by vanishing second-order fitness derivatives-near which resident-invader coexistence can be unprotected. Our approach is based on the series expansion of a generic demographic model, w.r.t. the small strategy difference between the two competing groups, and on known results on time-scale separation and bifurcation theories. The analysis is carried out up to third order and is extendable to any order. For each order, explicit genericity conditions under which higher orders can be neglected are derived and, interestingly, they are known prior to invasion. An important result is that degeneracies up to third-order are required to have more than one stable way of coexistence. Such degeneracies can be due to particular symmetries in the model formulation, and breaking the genericity conditions provides a direct way to draw biological interpretations. The developed

  8. Unfolding the resident-invader dynamics of similar strategies.

    PubMed

    Dercole, Fabio; Geritz, Stefan A H

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the competition between two groups of similar agents in the restricted, but classical context of unstructured populations varying in continuous time in an isolated, homogeneous, and constant abiotic environment. Individual behavioral and phenotypic traits are quantified by one-dimensional strategies and intra- as well as inter-specific interactions are described in the vicinity of a stationary regime. Some known results are revisited: invasion by a new strategy generically implies the substitution of the former resident; and resident-invader coexistence is possible close to singular strategies-the stationary points of the invasion fitness-and is generically protected-each of the two competing groups can invade the other. An (almost known) old conjecture is shown true: competition close to a singular strategy is "essentially Lotka-Volterra"-dominance of one strategy, protected coexistence at an intermediate equilibrium, and mutual exclusion are the generic outcomes. And the unfolding of the competition scenarios is completed with the analysis of three degenerate singular strategies-characterized by vanishing second-order fitness derivatives-near which resident-invader coexistence can be unprotected. Our approach is based on the series expansion of a generic demographic model, w.r.t. the small strategy difference between the two competing groups, and on known results on time-scale separation and bifurcation theories. The analysis is carried out up to third order and is extendable to any order. For each order, explicit genericity conditions under which higher orders can be neglected are derived and, interestingly, they are known prior to invasion. An important result is that degeneracies up to third-order are required to have more than one stable way of coexistence. Such degeneracies can be due to particular symmetries in the model formulation, and breaking the genericity conditions provides a direct way to draw biological interpretations. The developed

  9. Bioregions and World Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breakthrough, 1985

    1985-01-01

    What bioregions can do to contribute to world order and security is discussed in this newsletter. A bioregion is defined as an identifiable geographical area of interacting life-systems that is relatively self-sustaining in the ever-renewing processes of nature. Articles included are: "Bioregionalism and World Order" (Gerald Mische); "Bioregions:…

  10. Independent mental health nurse prescribing.

    PubMed

    Jones, A; Harborne, G C

    2009-08-01

    Independent prescribing (IP) is a new form of prescriptive authority for mental health services. Very little is known about where IP is being implemented and factors to support or constrain its adoption. An opportunistic sample of 119 respondents made up of nurses, doctors, support workers, occupational therapists and social workers completed an online survey. The sample worked in adult, old age and substance misuse services. Hospital wards and community mental health teams were identified as the highest ranked areas for implementation. A total of 68% of the sample identified pharmacology as the area for further training. And 40% of the sample felt that IP had been introduced to make services more effective. This opportunistic sample supported IP as a means to offer greater patient choice and as a method to broaden the boundaries of nursing practice. Integral to this development is the link between the psychiatrist and IP nurse in terms of work allocation and supervision.

  11. Riparian forest composition affects stream litter decomposition despite similar microbial and invertebrate communities.

    PubMed

    Kominoski, John S; Marczak, Laurie B; Richardson, John S

    2011-01-01

    Cross-boundary flows of energy and nutrients link biodiversity and functioning in adjacent ecosystems. The composition of forest tree species can affect the structure and functioning of stream ecosystems due to physical and chemical attributes, as well as changes in terrestrial resource subsidies. We examined how variation in riparian canopy composition (coniferous, deciduous, mixed) affects adjacent trophic levels (invertebrate and microbial consumers) and decomposition of organic matter in small, coastal rainforest streams in southwestern British Columbia. Breakdown rates of higher-quality red alder (Alnus rubra) litter were faster in streams with a greater percentage of deciduous than coniferous riparian canopy, whereas breakdown rates of lower-quality western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla) litter were independent of riparian forest composition. When invertebrates were excluded using fine mesh, breakdown rates of both litter species were an order of magnitude less and were not significantly affected by riparian forest composition. Stream invertebrate and microbial communities were similar among riparian forest composition, with most variation attributed to leaf litter species. Invertebrate taxa richness and shredder biomass were higher in A. rubra litter; however, taxa evenness was greatest for T. heterophylla litter and both litter species in coniferous streams. Microbial community diversity (determined from terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms) was unaffected by riparian forest or litter species. Fungal allele richness was higher than bacterial allele richness, and microbial communities associated with lower-quality T. heterophylla litter had higher diversity (allele uniqueness and richness) than those associated with higher-quality A. rubra litter. Percent variation in breakdown rates was mostly attributed to riparian forest composition in the presence of invertebrates and microbes; however, stream consumer biodiversity at adjacent trophic levels

  12. Narcissism and birth order.

    PubMed

    Eyring, W E; Sobelman, S

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to clarify the relationship between birth-order position and the development of narcissism, while refining research and theory. The relationship between birth-order status and narcissism was examined with a sample of 79 undergraduate students (55 women and 24 men). These subjects were placed in one of the four following birth-order categories of firstborn, second-born, last-born, and only children. These categories were chosen given their significance in Adlerian theory. Each subject completed the Narcissistic Personality Inventory and a demographic inventory. Based on psychodynamic theory, it was hypothesized that firstborn children were expected to score highest, but statistical significance was not found for an association between narcissism and birth order. Further research is urged to investigate personality theory as it relates to parenting style and birth order.

  13. Statistical self-similarity of hotspot seamount volumes modeled as self-similar criticality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tebbens, S.F.; Burroughs, S.M.; Barton, C.C.; Naar, D.F.

    2001-01-01

    The processes responsible for hotspot seamount formation are complex, yet the cumulative frequency-volume distribution of hotspot seamounts in the Easter Island/Salas y Gomez Chain (ESC) is found to be well-described by an upper-truncated power law. We develop a model for hotspot seamount formation where uniform energy input produces events initiated on a self-similar distribution of critical cells. We call this model Self-Similar Criticality (SSC). By allowing the spatial distribution of magma migration to be self-similar, the SSC model recreates the observed ESC seamount volume distribution. The SSC model may have broad applicability to other natural systems.

  14. Similarities and Differences in the Transition Expectations of Youth and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Kristin; Geenen, Sarah; Powers, Laurie E.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored similarities and differences in the transition expectations of parents and youth. Independent samples of parents (N = 270) of transition-age youth with disabilities and students with disabilities (N = 242) were surveyed about the importance of achieving various adult goals, having specific types of transition-related training…

  15. Protein Conformational Entropy is Independent of Solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucci, Nathaniel; Moorman, Veronica; Gledhill, John; Valentine, Kathleen; Wand, A. Joshua

    Proteins exhibit most of their conformational entropy in individual bond vector motions on the ps-ns timescale. These motions can be examined through determination of the Lipari-Szabo generalized squared order parameter (O2) using NMR spin relaxation measurements. It is often argued that most protein motions are intimately dependent on the nature of the solvating environment. Here the solvent dependence of the fast protein dynamics is directly assessed. Using the model protein ubiquitin, the order parameters of the backbone and methyl groups are shown to be generally unaffected by up to a six-fold increase in bulk viscosity or by encapsulation in the nanoscale interior of a reverse micelle. In addition, the reverse micelle condition permits direct comparison of protein dynamics to the mobility of the hydration layer; no correlation is observed. The dynamics of aromatic side chains are also assessed and provide an estimate of the length- and timescale of protein motions where solvent dependence is seen. These data demonstrate the solvent independence of conformational entropy, clarifying a long-held misconception in the fundamental behavior of biological macromolecules. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  16. Did DNA replication evolve twice independently?

    PubMed

    Leipe, D D; Aravind, L; Koonin, E V

    1999-09-01

    DNA replication is central to all extant cellular organisms. There are substantial functional similarities between the bacterial and the archaeal/eukaryotic replication machineries, including but not limited to defined origins, replication bidirectionality, RNA primers and leading and lagging strand synthesis. However, several core components of the bacterial replication machinery are unrelated or only distantly related to the functionally equivalent components of the archaeal/eukaryotic replication apparatus. This is in sharp contrast to the principal proteins involved in transcription and translation, which are highly conserved in all divisions of life. We performed detailed sequence comparisons of the proteins that fulfill indispensable functions in DNA replication and classified them into four main categories with respect to the conservation in bacteria and archaea/eukaryotes: (i) non-homologous, such as replicative polymerases and primases; (ii) containing homologous domains but apparently non-orthologous and conceivably independently recruited to function in replication, such as the principal replicative helicases or proofreading exonucleases; (iii) apparently orthologous but poorly conserved, such as the sliding clamp proteins or DNA ligases; (iv) orthologous and highly conserved, such as clamp-loader ATPases or 5'-->3' exonucleases (FLAP nucleases). The universal conservation of some components of the DNA replication machinery and enzymes for DNA precursor biosynthesis but not the principal DNA polymerases suggests that the last common ancestor (LCA) of all modern cellular life forms possessed DNA but did not replicate it the way extant cells do. We propose that the LCA had a genetic system that contained both RNA and DNA, with the latter being produced by reverse transcription. Consequently, the modern-type system for double-stranded DNA replication likely evolved independently in the bacterial and archaeal/eukaryotic lineages.

  17. Roommate Similarity: Are Roommates Who Are Similar in Their Communication Traits More Satisfied?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Matthew M.; Anderson, Carolyn M.

    1995-01-01

    Finds that roommates who were prosocially similar (both roommates high in willingness to communicate, high in interpersonal communication competence, and low in verbal aggressiveness) reported the highest roommate satisfaction and liking. (SR)

  18. Representation of linear orders.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D A; Kim, J O; Sudevan, P

    1984-01-01

    Two binary classification tasks were used to explore the associative structure of linear orders. In Experiment 1, college students classified English letters as targets or nontargets, the targets being consecutive letters of the alphabet. The time to reject nontargets was a decreasing function of the distance from the target set, suggesting response interference mediated by automatic associations from the target to the nontarget letters. The way in which this interference effect depended on the placement of the boundaries between the target and nontarget sets revealed the relative strengths of individual interletter associations. In Experiment 2, students were assigned novel linear orders composed of letterlike symbols and asked to classify pairs of symbols as being adjacent or nonadjacent in the assigned sequence. Reaction time was found to be a joint function of the distance between any pair of symbols and the relative positions of those symbols within the sequence. The effects of both distance and position decreased systematically over 6 days of practice with a particular order, beginning at a level typical of unfamiliar orders and converging on a level characteristic of familiar orders such as letters and digits. These results provide an empirical unification of two previously disparate sets of findings in the literature on linear orders, those concerning familiar and unfamiliar orders, and the systematic transition between the two patterns of results suggests the gradual integration of a new associative structure.

  19. Learning semantic and visual similarity for endomicroscopy video retrieval.

    PubMed

    Andre, Barbara; Vercauteren, Tom; Buchner, Anna M; Wallace, Michael B; Ayache, Nicholas

    2012-06-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) is a valuable computer vision technique which is increasingly being applied in the medical community for diagnosis support. However, traditional CBIR systems only deliver visual outputs, i.e., images having a similar appearance to the query, which is not directly interpretable by the physicians. Our objective is to provide a system for endomicroscopy video retrieval which delivers both visual and semantic outputs that are consistent with each other. In a previous study, we developed an adapted bag-of-visual-words method for endomicroscopy retrieval, called "Dense-Sift," that computes a visual signature for each video. In this paper, we present a novel approach to complement visual similarity learning with semantic knowledge extraction, in the field of in vivo endomicroscopy. We first leverage a semantic ground truth based on eight binary concepts, in order to transform these visual signatures into semantic signatures that reflect how much the presence of each semantic concept is expressed by the visual words describing the videos. Using cross-validation, we demonstrate that, in terms of semantic detection, our intuitive Fisher-based method transforming visual-word histograms into semantic estimations outperforms support vector machine (SVM) methods with statistical significance. In a second step, we propose to improve retrieval relevance by learning an adjusted similarity distance from a perceived similarity ground truth. As a result, our distance learning method allows to statistically improve the correlation with the perceived similarity. We also demonstrate that, in terms of perceived similarity, the recall performance of the semantic signatures is close to that of visual signatures and significantly better than those of several state-of-the-art CBIR methods. The semantic signatures are thus able to communicate high-level medical knowledge while being consistent with the low-level visual signatures and much shorter than them

  20. Does similarity breed marital and sexual satisfaction?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiping; Ho, Petula S Y; Yip, Paul S F

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effect of socioeconomic-cultural homogamy on the marital and sexual satisfaction of Hong Kong Chinese couples. Using a representative, territory-wide sample of 1,083 first-time married heterosexual couples, this study found that wives were generally less satisfied than their husbands with their marital and sexual relationships. Husbands were more likely to be satisfied with their marriages when they were two to four years older than their wives than when they were of similar age to their wives (i.e., within one year of each other), but they were less likely to be satisfied with their marriages when only their wives were employed than when both partners were employed. In addition, they were less likely to be satisfied with both their marital and sexual relationships when their wives were five or more years older. Wives with an older husband were more likely to be sexually satisfied than wives of the same age as their husband, but they were less likely to be satisfied with their marriages when they were better educated than their husbands. The implications of the findings are discussed.

  1. Self-similar flows in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerin-Roze, Jean

    2007-06-01

    If we are looking at the implosion of a sphere starting with a strong shock, the study of self-similar flows is a classical problem. We will assume that: - The sphere contains a perfect gas with a polytropic coefficient γ=5/3. - The shock follows the equation: rc=A(-t)^α with t0

  2. Mining patents using molecular similarity search.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, James; Boyer, Stephen; Kreulen, Jeffrey; Chen, Ying; Ordonez, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Text analytics is becoming an increasingly important tool used in biomedical research. While advances continue to be made in the core algorithms for entity identification and relation extraction, a need for practical applications of these technologies arises. We developed a system that allows users to explore the US Patent corpus using molecular information. The core of our system contains three main technologies: A high performing chemical annotator which identifies chemical terms and converts them to structures, a similarity search engine based on the emerging IUPAC International Chemical Identifier (InChI) standard, and a set of on demand data mining tools. By leveraging this technology we were able to rapidly identify and index 3,623,248 unique chemical structures from 4,375,036 US Patents and Patent Applications. Using this system a user may go to a web page, draw a molecule, search for related Intellectual Property (IP) and analyze the results. Our results prove that this is a far more effective way for identifying IP than traditional keyword based approaches.

  3. Does similarity breed marital and sexual satisfaction?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiping; Ho, Petula S Y; Yip, Paul S F

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effect of socioeconomic-cultural homogamy on the marital and sexual satisfaction of Hong Kong Chinese couples. Using a representative, territory-wide sample of 1,083 first-time married heterosexual couples, this study found that wives were generally less satisfied than their husbands with their marital and sexual relationships. Husbands were more likely to be satisfied with their marriages when they were two to four years older than their wives than when they were of similar age to their wives (i.e., within one year of each other), but they were less likely to be satisfied with their marriages when only their wives were employed than when both partners were employed. In addition, they were less likely to be satisfied with both their marital and sexual relationships when their wives were five or more years older. Wives with an older husband were more likely to be sexually satisfied than wives of the same age as their husband, but they were less likely to be satisfied with their marriages when they were better educated than their husbands. The implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:21614722

  4. Exploring similarities among many species distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmerman, Scott; Wang, Jingyuan; Osborne, James; Shook, Kimberly; Huang, Jian; Godsoe, William; Simons, Theodore R.

    2012-01-01

    Collecting species presence data and then building models to predict species distribution has been long practiced in the field of ecology for the purpose of improving our understanding of species relationships with each other and with the environment. Due to limitations of computing power as well as limited means of using modeling software on HPC facilities, past species distribution studies have been unable to fully explore diverse data sets. We build a system that can, for the first time to our knowledge, leverage HPC to support effective exploration of species similarities in distribution as well as their dependencies on common environmental conditions. Our system can also compute and reveal uncertainties in the modeling results enabling domain experts to make informed judgments about the data. Our work was motivated by and centered around data collection efforts within the Great Smoky Mountains National Park that date back to the 1940s. Our findings present new research opportunities in ecology and produce actionable field-work items for biodiversity management personnel to include in their planning of daily management activities.

  5. Similarly shaped letters evoke similar colors in grapheme-color synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Brang, David; Rouw, Romke; Ramachandran, V S; Coulson, Seana

    2011-04-01

    Grapheme-color synesthesia is a neurological condition in which viewing numbers or letters (graphemes) results in the concurrent sensation of color. While the anatomical substrates underlying this experience are well understood, little research to date has investigated factors influencing the particular colors associated with particular graphemes or how synesthesia occurs developmentally. A recent suggestion of such an interaction has been proposed in the cascaded cross-tuning (CCT) model of synesthesia, which posits that in synesthetes connections between grapheme regions and color area V4 participate in a competitive activation process, with synesthetic colors arising during the component-stage of grapheme processing. This model more directly suggests that graphemes sharing similar component features (lines, curves, etc.) should accordingly activate more similar synesthetic colors. To test this proposal, we created and regressed synesthetic color-similarity matrices for each of 52 synesthetes against a letter-confusability matrix, an unbiased measure of visual similarity among graphemes. Results of synesthetes' grapheme-color correspondences indeed revealed that more similarly shaped graphemes corresponded with more similar synesthetic colors, with stronger effects observed in individuals with more intense synesthetic experiences (projector synesthetes). These results support the CCT model of synesthesia, implicate early perceptual mechanisms as driving factors in the elicitation of synesthetic hues, and further highlight the relationship between conceptual and perceptual factors in this phenomenon.

  6. State-independent error-disturbance trade-off for measurement operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S. S.; Wu, Shengjun; Chau, H. F.

    2016-05-01

    In general, classical measurement statistics of a quantum measurement is disturbed by performing an additional incompatible quantum measurement beforehand. Using this observation, we introduce a state-independent definition of disturbance by relating it to the distinguishability problem between two classical statistical distributions - one resulting from a single quantum measurement and the other from a succession of two quantum measurements. Interestingly, we find an error-disturbance trade-off relation for any measurements in two-dimensional Hilbert space and for measurements with mutually unbiased bases in any finite-dimensional Hilbert space. This relation shows that error should be reduced to zero in order to minimize the sum of error and disturbance. We conjecture that a similar trade-off relation with a slightly relaxed definition of error can be generalized to any measurements in an arbitrary finite-dimensional Hilbert space.

  7. Similarity of Symbol Frequency Distributions with Heavy Tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Martin; Font-Clos, Francesc; Altmann, Eduardo G.

    2016-04-01

    Quantifying the similarity between symbolic sequences is a traditional problem in information theory which requires comparing the frequencies of symbols in different sequences. In numerous modern applications, ranging from DNA over music to texts, the distribution of symbol frequencies is characterized by heavy-tailed distributions (e.g., Zipf's law). The large number of low-frequency symbols in these distributions poses major difficulties to the estimation of the similarity between sequences; e.g., they hinder an accurate finite-size estimation of entropies. Here, we show analytically how the systematic (bias) and statistical (fluctuations) errors in these estimations depend on the sample size N and on the exponent γ of the heavy-tailed distribution. Our results are valid for the Shannon entropy (α =1 ), its corresponding similarity measures (e.g., the Jensen-Shanon divergence), and also for measures based on the generalized entropy of order α . For small α 's, including α =1 , the errors decay slower than the 1 /N decay observed in short-tailed distributions. For α larger than a critical value α*=1 +1 /γ ≤2 , the 1 /N decay is recovered. We show the practical significance of our results by quantifying the evolution of the English language over the last two centuries using a complete α spectrum of measures. We find that frequent words change more slowly than less frequent words and that α =2 provides the most robust measure to quantify language change.

  8. Simultaneous registration of multiple images: similarity metrics and efficient optimization.

    PubMed

    Wachinger, Christian; Navab, Nassir

    2013-05-01

    We address the alignment of a group of images with simultaneous registration. Therefore, we provide further insights into a recently introduced framework for multivariate similarity measures, referred to as accumulated pair-wise estimates (APE), and derive efficient optimization methods for it. More specifically, we show a strict mathematical deduction of APE from a maximum-likelihood framework and establish a connection to the congealing framework. This is only possible after an extension of the congealing framework with neighborhood information. Moreover, we address the increased computational complexity of simultaneous registration by deriving efficient gradient-based optimization strategies for APE: Gauss-Newton and the efficient second-order minimization (ESM). We present next to SSD the usage of intrinsically nonsquared similarity measures in this least squares optimization framework. The fundamental assumption of ESM, the approximation of the perfectly aligned moving image through the fixed image, limits its application to monomodal registration. We therefore incorporate recently proposed structural representations of images which allow us to perform multimodal registration with ESM. Finally, we evaluate the performance of the optimization strategies with respect to the similarity measures, leading to very good results for ESM. The extension to multimodal registration is in this context very interesting because it offers further possibilities for evaluations, due to publicly available datasets with ground-truth alignment.

  9. Court Ordered Desegregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reber, Sarah J.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the court ordered desegregation plans, on trends in segregation and white flight, are estimated. The effect of availability of school districts and other factors on the white flight across districts is also mentioned.

  10. ASDC Order Tools

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2012-04-17

    ... users to search our data holdings without logging in to the system. The user, however, must log in before ordering the data. ... Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor II (ACRIM II) Total Solar Irradiance Data Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) data (Selected ...

  11. Expanding the boundaries of local similarity analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pairwise comparison of time series data for both local and time-lagged relationships is a computationally challenging problem relevant to many fields of inquiry. The Local Similarity Analysis (LSA) statistic identifies the existence of local and lagged relationships, but determining significance through a p-value has been algorithmically cumbersome due to an intensive permutation test, shuffling rows and columns and repeatedly calculating the statistic. Furthermore, this p-value is calculated with the assumption of normality -- a statistical luxury dissociated from most real world datasets. Results To improve the performance of LSA on big datasets, an asymptotic upper bound on the p-value calculation was derived without the assumption of normality. This change in the bound calculation markedly improved computational speed from O(pm2n) to O(m2n), where p is the number of permutations in a permutation test, m is the number of time series, and n is the length of each time series. The bounding process is implemented as a computationally efficient software package, FASTLSA, written in C and optimized for threading on multi-core computers, improving its practical computation time. We computationally compare our approach to previous implementations of LSA, demonstrate broad applicability by analyzing time series data from public health, microbial ecology, and social media, and visualize resulting networks using the Cytoscape software. Conclusions The FASTLSA software package expands the boundaries of LSA allowing analysis on datasets with millions of co-varying time series. Mapping metadata onto force-directed graphs derived from FASTLSA allows investigators to view correlated cliques and explore previously unrecognized network relationships. The software is freely available for download at: http://www.cmde.science.ubc.ca/hallam/fastLSA/. PMID:23368516

  12. Synthetic and Biopolymer Gels - Similarities and Difference.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horkay, Ferenc

    2006-03-01

    Ion exchange plays a central role in a variety of physiological processes, such as nerve excitation, muscle contraction and cell locomotion. Hydrogels can be used as model systems for identifying fundamental chemical and physical interactions that govern structure formation, phase transition, etc. in biopolymer systems. Polyelectrolyte gels are particularly well-suited to study ion-polymer interactions because their structure and physical-chemical properties (charge density, crosslink density, etc) can be carefully controlled. They are sensitive to different external stimuli such as temperature, ionic composition and pH. Surprisingly few investigations have been made on polyelectrolyte gels in salt solutions containing both monovalent and multivalent cations. We have developed an experimental approach that combines small angle neutron scattering and osmotic swelling pressure measurements. The osmotic pressure exerted on a macroscopic scale is a consequence of changes occurring at a molecular level. The intensity of the neutron scattering signal, which provides structural information as a function of spatial resolution, is directly related to the osmotic pressure. We have found a striking similarity in the scattering and osmotic behavior of polyacrylic acid gels and DNA gels swollen in nearly physiological salt solutions. Addition of calcium ions to both systems causes a sudden volume change. This volume transition, which occurs when the majority of the sodium counterions are replaced by calcium ions, is reversible. Such reversibility implies that the calcium ions are not strongly bound by the polyanion, but are free to move along the polymer chain, which allows these ions to form temporary bridges between negative charges on adjacent chains. Mechanical measurements reveal that the elastic modulus is practically unchanged in the calcium-containing gels, i.e., ion bridging is qualitatively different from covalent crosslinks.

  13. Origin of the Nubian and similar sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, E.D.

    1963-01-01

    The Nubian Sandstone and similar sandstone bodies exposed across much of northern Africa and adjoining parts of Asia are characteristically formed of clean sand that is conspicuously cross stratified throughout. Such sandstone, here called Nubian-type sandstone, ranges from Cambrian through Cretaceous in age and its genesis has been interpreted in many ways. Studies of its primary structures, and of the direction of sand transport, based on statistical measurements of foreset dip directions, have contributed new data on its genesis. By far the most common structure in Nubian-type sandstone is a medium-scale planar-type cross stratification in which sets of evenly dipping cross beds are bounded by essentially flat-lying top and bottom surfaces to form tabular bodies. Other less numerous but typical structures are large-scale, truncated-wedge cross strata, trough-type cross strata, intraformational recumbent folds, small-scale ripple laminae, and dipping sets of tabular-planar cross beds. An analysis of these structures suggests that in the typical Nubian Sandstone of Cretaceous age eolian deposits are not represented and normal marine types probably also are lacking; flood plain, pond or lagoon, and other continental and marginal environments are indicated. In the Carboniferous rocks of Sinai Peninsula some beach sandstone and possibly some eolian, in addition to the types described, form part of the sequence. Direction of sand transport, as determined from cross-bed dips, was northerly in the Cretaceous Nubian of Libya, Sudan, and Egypt; easterly in the Jurassic Adigrat of Ethiopia; westerly in the Carboniferous of Sinai; northwesterly in the early Paleozoic of Jordan. ?? 1963 Ferdinand Enke Verlag Stuttgart.

  14. 'Good palliative care' orders.

    PubMed

    Maddocks, I

    1993-01-01

    A Select Committee of the Parliament of South Australia, considering revisions to legislation governing care of the dying, did not support allowing doctors to assist suicide. They recommended that no liability attach to the provision of reasonable palliative care which happens to shorten life. The Committee affirmed the suggestion that positive open orders to provide 'good palliative care' should replace 'do not resuscitate' orders. PMID:7506978

  15. Independent losses of visual perception genes Gja10 and Rbp3 in echolocating bats (Order: Chiroptera).

    PubMed

    Shen, Bin; Fang, Tao; Dai, Mengyao; Jones, Gareth; Zhang, Shuyi

    2013-01-01

    A trade-off between the sensory modalities of vision and hearing is likely to have occurred in echolocating bats as the sophisticated mechanism of laryngeal echolocation requires considerable neural processing and has reduced the reliance of echolocating bats on vision for perceiving the environment. If such a trade-off exists, it is reasonable to hypothesize that some genes involved in visual function may have undergone relaxed selection or even functional loss in echolocating bats. The Gap junction protein, alpha 10 (Gja10, encoded by Gja10 gene) is expressed abundantly in mammal retinal horizontal cells and plays an important role in horizontal cell coupling. The interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (Irbp, encoded by the Rbp3 gene) is mainly expressed in interphotoreceptor matrix and is known to be critical for normal functioning of the visual cycle. We sequenced Gja10 and Rbp3 genes in a taxonomically wide range of bats with divergent auditory characteristics (35 and 18 species for Gja10 and Rbp3, respectively). Both genes have became pseudogenes in species from the families Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae that emit constant frequency echolocation calls with Doppler shift compensation at high-duty-cycles (the most sophisticated form of biosonar known), and in some bat species that emit echolocation calls at low-duty-cycles. Our study thus provides further evidence for the hypothesis that a trade-off occurs at the genetic level between vision and echolocation in bats.

  16. Equivalence of two independent calculations of the higher order guiding center Lagrangian

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, F. I.; Calvo, I.; Burby, J. W.; Squire, J.; Qin, H.

    2014-10-15

    The difference between the guiding center phase-space Lagrangians derived in J. W. Burby et al. [Phys. Plasmas 20, 072105 (2013)] and F. I. Parra and I. Calvo [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 045001 (2011)] is due to a different definition of the guiding center coordinates. In this brief communication, the difference between the guiding center coordinates is calculated explicitly.

  17. Independent Testing of JWST Detector Prototypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figer, Donald F.; Rauscher, Bernie J.; Regan, Michael W.; Morse, Ernie; Balleza, Jesus; Bergeron, Louis; Stockman, H. S.

    2004-01-01

    The Independent Detector Testing Laboratory (IDTL) is jointly operated by the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) and the Johns Hopkins University (JHU), and is assisting the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) mission in choosing and operating the best near-infrared detectors. The JWST is the centerpiece of the NASA Office of Space Science theme, the Astronomical Search for Origins, and the highest priority astronomy project for the next decade, according to the National Academy of Science. JWST will need to have the sensitivity to see the first light in the Universe to determine how galaxies formed in the web of dark matter that existed when the Universe was in its infancy (z is approximately 10-20). To achieve this goal, the JWST Project must pursue an aggressive technology program and advance infrared detectors to performance levels beyond what is now possible. As part of this program, NASA has selected the IDTL to verify comparative performance between prototype JWST detectors developed by Rockwell Scientific (HgCdTe) and Raytheon (InSb). The IDTL is charged with obtaining an independent assessment of the ability of these two competing technologies to achieve the demanding specifications of the JWST program within the 0.6-5 micron bandpass and in an ultra-low background (less than 0.01 e(-)/s/pixel) environment. We describe results from the JWST Detector Characterization Project that is being performed in the LDTL. In this project, we are measuring first-order detector parameters, i.e. dark current, read noise, QE, intra-pixel sensitivity, linearity, as functions of temperature, well size, and operational mode.

  18. Independent Testing of JWST Detector Prototypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figer, D. F.; Rauscher, B. J.; Regan, M. W.; Balleza, J.; Bergeron, L.; Morse, E.; Stockman, H. S.

    2003-01-01

    The Independent Detector Testing Laboratory (IDTL) is jointly operated by the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) and the Johns Hopkins University (MU), and is assisting the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) mission in choosing and operating the best near-infrared detectors under a NASA Grant. The JWST is the centerpiece of the NASA Office of Space Science theme, the Astronomical Search for Origins, and the highest priority astronomy project for the next decade, according to the National Academy of Science. JWST will need to have the sensitivity to see the first light in the Universe to determine how galaxies formed in the web of dark matter that existed when the Universe was in its infancy (z approx. 10 - 20). To achieve this goal, the JWST Project must pursue an aggressive technology program and advance infrared detectors to performance levels beyond what is now possible. As part of this program, NASA has selected the IDTL to verify comparative performance between prototype JWST detectors developed by Rockwell Scientific (HgCdTe) and Raytheon (InSb). The IDTL is charged with obtaining an independent assessment of the ability of these two competing technologies to achieve the demanding specifications of the JWST program within the 0.6 - 5 approx. mum bandpass and in an ultra-low background (less than 0.01 e'/s/pixel) environment. We describe results from the JWST Detector Characterization Project that is being performed in the IDTL. In this project, we are measuring first-order detector parameters, i.e. dark current, read noise, QE, intra-pixel sensitivity, linearity, as functions of temperature, well size, and operational mode.

  19. Independent testing of JWST detector prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, Donald F.; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Regan, Michael W.; Morse, Ernie; Balleza, Jesus; Bergeron, Louis; Stockman, H. S.

    2004-01-01

    The Independent Detector Testing Laboratory (IDTL) is jointly operated by the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) and the Johns Hopkins University (JHU), and is assisting the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) mission in choosing and operating the best near-infrared detectors. The JWST is the centerpiece of the NASA Office of Space Science theme, the Astronomical Search for Origins, and the highest priority astronomy project for the next decade, according to the National Academy of Science. JWST will need to have the sensitivity to see the first light in the Universe to determine how galaxies formed in the web of dark matter that existed when the Universe was in its infancy (z~10-20). To achieve this goal, the JWST Project must pursue an aggressive technology program and advance infrared detectors to performance levels beyond what is now possible. As part of this program, NASA has selected the IDTL to verify comparative performance between prototype JWST detectors developed by Rockwell Scientific (HgCdTe) and Raytheon (InSb). The IDTL is charged with obtaining an independent assessment of the ability of these two competing technologies to achieve the demanding specifications of the JWST program within the 0.6-5 μm bandpass and in an ultra-low background (<0.01 e-/s/pixel) environment. We describe results from the JWST Detector Characterization Project that is being performed in the IDTL. In this project, we are measuring first-order detector parameters, i.e. dark current, read noise, QE, intra-pixel sensitivity, linearity, as functions of temperature, well size, and operational mode.

  20. Model-independent constraints on possible modifications of Newtonian gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talmadge, C.; Berthias, J.-P.; Hellings, R. W.; Standish, E. M.

    1988-01-01

    New model-independent constraints on possible modifications of Newtonian gravity over solar-system distance scales are presented, and their implications discussed. The constraints arise from the analysis of various planetary astrometric data sets. The results of the model-independent analysis are then applied to set limits on a variation in the l/r-squared behavior of gravity, on possible Yukawa-type interactions with ranges of the order of planetary distance scales, and on a deviation from Newtonian gravity of the type discussed by Milgrom (1983).

  1. Thermally Tunable Hydrogels Displaying Angle-Independent Structural Colors.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Yumiko; Seki, Takahiro; Takeoka, Yukikazu

    2015-12-14

    We report the preparation of thermally tunable hydrogels displaying angle-independent structural colors. The porous structures were formed with short-range order using colloidal amorphous array templates and a small amount of carbon black (CB). The resultant porous hydrogels prepared using colloidal amorphous arrays without CB appeared white, whereas the hydrogels with CB revealed bright structural colors. The brightly colored hydrogels rapidly changed hues in a reversible manner, and the hues varied widely depending on the water temperature. Moreover, the structural colors were angle-independent under diffusive lighting because of the isotropic nanostructure generated from the colloidal amorphous arrays. PMID:26503915

  2. Thermally Tunable Hydrogels Displaying Angle‐Independent Structural Colors

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuka, Yumiko; Seki, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We report the preparation of thermally tunable hydrogels displaying angle‐independent structural colors. The porous structures were formed with short‐range order using colloidal amorphous array templates and a small amount of carbon black (CB). The resultant porous hydrogels prepared using colloidal amorphous arrays without CB appeared white, whereas the hydrogels with CB revealed bright structural colors. The brightly colored hydrogels rapidly changed hues in a reversible manner, and the hues varied widely depending on the water temperature. Moreover, the structural colors were angle‐independent under diffusive lighting because of the isotropic nanostructure generated from the colloidal amorphous arrays. PMID:26503915

  3. [Independent ethics committees for clinical research in Argentina. An evaluation and a system to guarantee their independence].

    PubMed

    Gonorazky, Sergio E

    2008-01-01

    The Administración Nacional de Medicamentos, Alimentos y Tecnología Médica de la República Argentina (ANMAT) requires that an independent ethics committee of sponsors and/or researchers must previously evaluate and approve all the new pharmacological research protocols carried out on human beings. However, due to the lucrative nature of the evaluation, and because the selection of the Independent Ethics Committee is carried out by the sponsors and/or researchers, the assumed autonomy of the former can be reduced to merely a relationship of "service provider-customer". The Institutional Review Board of the Mar del Plata s Community Hospital has evaluated, between 2005 and 2006, thirty three research protocols (with their corresponding information sheets for patients and informed consent forms) previously approved by a non-institutional Independent Ethics Committee. The median number of objections made by the Institutional Review Board, which prompted the previously mentioned protocols to be modified in order to be approved, was of three per protocol. In other words, the accreditation of an Independent Ethics Committee requires a system that guarantees actual independence from the sponsors and/or researchers, as well as management control mechanisms that may lead them into an eventual loss of accreditation. Several measures are proposed in order to correct the deficiencies of the present system.

  4. [Independent ethics committees for clinical research in Argentina. An evaluation and a system to guarantee their independence].

    PubMed

    Gonorazky, Sergio E

    2008-01-01

    The Administración Nacional de Medicamentos, Alimentos y Tecnología Médica de la República Argentina (ANMAT) requires that an independent ethics committee of sponsors and/or researchers must previously evaluate and approve all the new pharmacological research protocols carried out on human beings. However, due to the lucrative nature of the evaluation, and because the selection of the Independent Ethics Committee is carried out by the sponsors and/or researchers, the assumed autonomy of the former can be reduced to merely a relationship of "service provider-customer". The Institutional Review Board of the Mar del Plata s Community Hospital has evaluated, between 2005 and 2006, thirty three research protocols (with their corresponding information sheets for patients and informed consent forms) previously approved by a non-institutional Independent Ethics Committee. The median number of objections made by the Institutional Review Board, which prompted the previously mentioned protocols to be modified in order to be approved, was of three per protocol. In other words, the accreditation of an Independent Ethics Committee requires a system that guarantees actual independence from the sponsors and/or researchers, as well as management control mechanisms that may lead them into an eventual loss of accreditation. Several measures are proposed in order to correct the deficiencies of the present system. PMID:18499958

  5. Caspase-independent cell deaths.

    PubMed

    Lockshin, Richard A; Zakeri, Zahra

    2002-12-01

    A very common and the best understood of the mechanisms of physiological cell death is apoptosis, resulting from the activation, through either of two primary pathways, of site-specific proteases called caspases. There are, however, many other routes to cell death, prominently including autophagy and proteasomal degradation of critical constituents of cells. These routes are frequently seen in experimental situations in which initiator or effector caspases are inhibited or blocked through genetic means, but they are also encountered during normal physiological and pathological processes. Most frequently, autophagic or proteasomal degradation is used to eliminate massive cytoplasm of very large cells, especially post-mitotic cells, and these pathways are prominent even though caspase genes, messages, and pro-enzymes are found in the cells. These forms of cell death are fully physiological and not simply a default pathway for a defective cell; and they are distinct from necrosis. We do not yet understand the extent to which the pathways are linked, what mechanisms trigger the caspase-independent deaths, and how the choices are made.

  6. Preprototype independent air revitalization subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Hallick, T. M.; Woods, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The performance and maturity of a preprototype, three-person capacity, automatically controlled and monitored, self-contained independent air revitalization subsystem were evaluated. The subsystem maintains the cabin partial pressure of oxygen at 22 kPa (3.2 psia) and that of carbon dioxide at 400 Pa (3 mm Hg) over a wide range of cabin air relative humidity conditions. Consumption of water vapor by the water vapor electrolysis module also provides partial humidity control of the cabin environment. During operation, the average carbon dioxide removal efficiency at baseline conditions remained constant throughout the test at 84%. The average electrochemical depolarized concentrator cell voltage at the end of the parametric/endurance test was 0.41 V, representing a very slowly decreasing average cell voltage. The average water vapor electrolysis cell voltage increased only at a rate of 20 mu/h from the initial level of 1.67 V to the final level of 1.69 V at conclusion of the testing.

  7. Horton laws for Hydraulic-Geometric variables and their scaling exponents in self-similar river networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V. K.; Mesa, O. J.

    2014-04-01

    An analytical theory is presented to predict Horton laws for five Hydraulic-Geometric (H-G) variables (stream discharge Q, width W, depth D, velocity U, slope S, and friction n'). The theory builds on the concept of dimensional analysis, and identifies six independent dimensionless River-Basin numbers. We consider self-similar Tokunaga networks and derive a mass conservation equation in the limit of large network order in terms of Horton bifurcation and discharge ratios. It is applied to obtain self-similar solutions of type-1 (SS-1), and predict Horton laws for width, depth and velocity as asymptotic relationships. Exponents of width and the Reynold's number are predicted. Assuming that SS-1 is valid for slope, depth and velocity, corresponding Horton laws and the H-G exponents are derived. The exponent values agree with that for the Optimal Channel Network (OCN) model, but do not agree with values from three field experiments. The deviations are substantial, suggesting that H-G in network does not obey optimality or SS-1. It fails because slope, a dimensionless River-Basin number, goes to 0 as network order increases, but, it cannot be eliminated from the asymptotic limit. Therefore, a generalization of SS-1, based in self-similar solutions of Type-2 (SS-2) is considered. It introduces two anomalous scaling exponents as free parameters, which enables us to show the existence of Horton laws for channel depth, velocity, slope and Manning's friction. The Manning's friction exponent, y, is predicted and tested against observed exponents from three field studies. We briefly sketch how the two anomalous scaling exponents could be estimated from the transport of suspended sediment load and the bed load. Statistical variability in the Horton laws for the H-G variables is also discussed. Both are important open problems for future research.

  8. Comparative Metagenomic Analysis of Coral Microbial Communities Using a Reference-Independent Approach

    PubMed Central

    Carlos, Camila; Castro, Daniel Bedo Assumpção; Ottoboni, Laura M. M.

    2014-01-01

    By comparing the SEED and Pfam functional profiles of metagenomes of two Brazilian coral species with 29 datasets that are publicly available, we were able to identify some functions, such as protein secretion systems, that are overrepresented in the metagenomes of corals and may play a role in the establishment and maintenance of bacteria-coral associations. However, only a small percentage of the reads of these metagenomes could be annotated by these reference databases, which may lead to a strong bias in the comparative studies. For this reason, we have searched for identical sequences (99% of nucleotide identity) among these metagenomes in order to perform a reference-independent comparative analysis, and we were able to identify groups of microbial communities that may be under similar selective pressures. The identification of sequences shared among the metagenomes was found to be even better for the identification of groups of communities with similar niche requirements than the traditional analysis of functional profiles. This approach is not only helpful for the investigation of similarities between microbial communities with high proportion of unknown reads, but also enables an indirect overview of gene exchange between communities. PMID:25379670

  9. Learning Dilemmas in Undergraduate Student Independent Essays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendt, Maria; Åse, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Essay-writing is generally viewed as the primary learning activity to foster independence and analytical thinking. In this article, we show that independent research projects do not necessarily lead to critical thinking. University-level education on conducting independent projects can, in several respects, counteract enhanced analytical skills.…

  10. Independence, Individualism & Connection among Share Householders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natalier, Kristin

    2007-01-01

    How do young people who are financially dependent on their parents but living in share households conceive of the concept of independence? The meanings of independence are discussed in relation to a qualitative study of young people who described themselves as independent although they accepted money on a regular basis from their parents. Their…

  11. 45 CFR 1309.44 - Independent analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Independent analysis. 1309.44 Section 1309.44... § 1309.44 Independent analysis. (a) The responsible HHS official may direct the grantee applying for funds to acquire or make major renovations to a facility to obtain an independent analysis of the...

  12. 45 CFR 1309.44 - Independent analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Independent analysis. 1309.44 Section 1309.44... § 1309.44 Independent analysis. (a) The responsible HHS official may direct the grantee applying for funds to acquire or make major renovations to a facility to obtain an independent analysis of the...

  13. 45 CFR 1309.44 - Independent analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Independent analysis. 1309.44 Section 1309.44... § 1309.44 Independent analysis. (a) The responsible HHS official may direct the grantee applying for funds to acquire or make major renovations to a facility to obtain an independent analysis of the...

  14. 45 CFR 1309.44 - Independent analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Independent analysis. 1309.44 Section 1309.44... § 1309.44 Independent analysis. (a) The responsible HHS official may direct the grantee applying for funds to acquire or make major renovations to a facility to obtain an independent analysis of the...

  15. 45 CFR 1309.44 - Independent analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Independent analysis. 1309.44 Section 1309.44... § 1309.44 Independent analysis. (a) The responsible HHS official may direct the grantee applying for funds to acquire or make major renovations to a facility to obtain an independent analysis of the...

  16. Independent Evaluation: Insights from Public Accounting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Abigail B.; Klerman, Jacob Alex

    2012-01-01

    Background: Maintaining the independence of contract government program evaluation presents significant contracting challenges. The ideal outcome for an agency is often both the impression of an independent evaluation "and" a glowing report. In this, independent evaluation is like financial statement audits: firm management wants both a public…

  17. 46 CFR 62.30-5 - Independence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... instrumentation systems for any vital system must be independent of each other. (2) Independent sensors are not required except that sensors for primary speed, pitch, or direction of rotation control in closed loop..., or instrumentation sensors. (3) The safety trip control of § 62.35-5(b)(2) must be independent...

  18. 32 CFR 169a.16 - Independent review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Independent review. 169a.16 Section 169a.16... ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Procedures § 169a.16 Independent review. (a) The estimates of in-house and..., independent of the Task Group preparing the cost comparison. This review shall be completed far enough...

  19. 7 CFR 1218.55 - Independent evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Independent evaluation. 1218.55 Section 1218.55... § 1218.55 Independent evaluation. The Council shall, not less often than every five years, authorize and fund, from funds otherwise available to the Council, an independent evaluation of the effectiveness...

  20. 7 CFR 1212.61 - Independent evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Independent evaluation. 1212.61 Section 1212.61... Independent evaluation. The Board must authorize and fund not less than once every five years an independent evaluation of the effectiveness of this subpart and the plans and programs conducted by the Board under...

  1. 7 CFR 1212.61 - Independent evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Independent evaluation. 1212.61 Section 1212.61... Independent evaluation. The Board must authorize and fund not less than once every five years an independent evaluation of the effectiveness of this subpart and the plans and programs conducted by the Board under...

  2. 7 CFR 1214.61 - Independent evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Independent evaluation. 1214.61 Section 1214.61..., Research and Information § 1214.61 Independent evaluation. The Board shall, not less often than once every five years, authorize and fund, from funds otherwise available to the Board, an independent...

  3. 7 CFR 1218.55 - Independent evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Independent evaluation. 1218.55 Section 1218.55... § 1218.55 Independent evaluation. The Council shall, not less often than every five years, authorize and fund, from funds otherwise available to the Council, an independent evaluation of the effectiveness...

  4. Independent Study Unit for Exceptional Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Marleen; And Others

    The program is designed to provide an opportunity in independent study for junior high school students with high ability and motivation. The independent study program is undertaken with the guidance of an advisor. Four independent study activities offered to the student are: write a research paper on Arizona history, government, U.S. History, and…

  5. 46 CFR 62.30-5 - Independence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... instrumentation systems for any vital system must be independent of each other. (2) Independent sensors are not required except that sensors for primary speed, pitch, or direction of rotation control in closed loop..., or instrumentation sensors. (3) The safety trip control of § 62.35-5(b)(2) must be independent...

  6. 46 CFR 62.30-5 - Independence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... instrumentation systems for any vital system must be independent of each other. (2) Independent sensors are not required except that sensors for primary speed, pitch, or direction of rotation control in closed loop..., or instrumentation sensors. (3) The safety trip control of § 62.35-5(b)(2) must be independent...

  7. 46 CFR 62.30-5 - Independence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... instrumentation systems for any vital system must be independent of each other. (2) Independent sensors are not required except that sensors for primary speed, pitch, or direction of rotation control in closed loop..., or instrumentation sensors. (3) The safety trip control of § 62.35-5(b)(2) must be independent...

  8. 46 CFR 62.30-5 - Independence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... instrumentation systems for any vital system must be independent of each other. (2) Independent sensors are not required except that sensors for primary speed, pitch, or direction of rotation control in closed loop..., or instrumentation sensors. (3) The safety trip control of § 62.35-5(b)(2) must be independent...

  9. The Development of Functionally Similar and Dissimilar Operations of Exclusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbs-Tait, Laura

    1986-01-01

    Assesses three sets of Piagetian exclusion operations (of varying the independent variables, of holding the independent variable constant, and tautology) and of levels of thought (concrete through formal) in 33 fifth graders, 27 sixth graders, and 31 seventh graders. (HOD)

  10. Ordering microbial diversity into ecologically and genetically cohesive units.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, B Jesse; Polz, Martin F

    2014-05-01

    We propose that microbial diversity must be viewed in light of gene flow and selection, which define units of genetic similarity, and of phenotype and ecological function, respectively. We discuss to what extent ecological and genetic units overlap to form cohesive populations in the wild, based on recent evolutionary modeling and on evidence from some of the first microbial populations studied with genomics. These show that if recombination is frequent and selection moderate, ecologically adaptive mutations or genes can spread within populations independently of their original genomic background (gene-specific sweeps). Alternatively, if the effect of recombination is smaller than selection, genome-wide selective sweeps should occur. In both cases, however, distinct units of overlapping ecological and genotypic similarity will form if microgeographic separation, likely involving ecological tradeoffs, induces barriers to gene flow. These predictions are supported by (meta)genomic data, which suggest that a 'reverse ecology' approach, in which genomic and gene flow information is used to make predictions about the nature of ecological units, is a powerful approach to ordering microbial diversity.

  11. Self-similar Hot Accretion Flow onto a Neutron Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Narayan, Ramesh

    2001-06-01

    We consider hot, two-temperature, viscous accretion onto a rotating, unmagnetized neutron star. We assume Coulomb coupling between the protons and electrons, as well as free-free cooling from the electrons. We show that the accretion flow has an extended settling region that can be described by means of two analytical self-similar solutions: a two-temperature solution that is valid in an inner zone, r<~102.5, where r is the radius in Schwarzschild units; and a one-temperature solution that is valid in an outer zone, r>~102.5. In both zones the density varies as ρ~r-2 and the angular velocity as Ω~r-3/2. We solve the flow equations numerically and confirm that the analytical solutions are accurate. Except for the radial velocity, all gas properties in the self-similar settling zone, such as density, angular velocity, temperature, luminosity, and angular momentum flux, are independent of the mass accretion rate; these quantities do depend sensitively on the spin of the neutron star. The angular momentum flux is outward under most conditions; therefore, the central star is nearly always spun down. The luminosity of the settling zone arises from the rotational energy that is released as the star is braked by viscosity, and the contribution from gravity is small; hence, the radiative efficiency, η=Lacc/Mc2, is arbitrarily large at low M. For reasonable values of the gas adiabatic index γ, the Bernoulli parameter is negative; therefore, in the absence of dynamically important magnetic fields, a strong outflow or wind is not expected. The flow is also convectively stable but may be thermally unstable. The described solution is not advection dominated; however, when the spin of the star is small enough, the flow transforms smoothly to an advection-dominated branch of solution.

  12. Tactical Maneuvering and Calculated Risks: Independent Child Migrants and the Complex Terrain of Flight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denov, Myriam; Bryan, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Similar to refugees in general, independent child migrants are frequently constructed in academic and popular discourse as passive and powerless or as untrustworthy and potentially threatening. Such portrayals fail to capture how these youth actively navigate the complex experiences of forced migration. Drawing on interviews with independent child…

  13. A similarity-based framework for the alignment of an ontology for remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, Mohamed; Nefzi, Hafedh; Farah, Imed Riadh

    2016-11-01

    Building remote sensing (RS) ontologies can undoubtedly help automatic interpretation of RS images content. Ontology alignment is proven to be an effective ontology building process that enables reusing already existing semantic resources. The quality of the ontology alignment output highly depends on the similarity measures that have been considered as well as the way they are combined together. In the literature, research on similarity measures mainly focuses on how to build new or refine already existing similarity measures leading to a wide range of measures. However, few research addresses their dependencies and combination in order to evaluate the overall similarity of the concepts to be compared. In this paper, we first show how to select a reduced set of similarity measures to be used in the alignment process. Afterwards, we present a ranking model that allows sorting mappings between concepts coming from two different ontologies in a decreasing order of global similarity score. First experimentation shows that the proposed approach is promising.

  14. Arguments from Developmental Order.

    PubMed

    Stöckle-Schobel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I investigate a special type of argument regarding the role of development in theorizing about psychological processes and cognitive capacities. Among the issues that developmental psychologists study, discovering the ontogenetic trajectory of mechanisms or capacities underpinning our cognitive functions ranks highly. The order in which functions are developed or capacities are acquired is a matter of debate between competing psychological theories, and also philosophical conceptions of the mind - getting the role and the significance of the different steps in this order right could be seen as an important virtue of such theories. Thus, a special kind of strategy in arguments between competing philosophical or psychological theories is using developmental order in arguing for or against a given psychological claim. In this article, I will introduce an analysis of arguments from developmental order, which come in two general types: arguments emphasizing the importance of the early cognitive processes and arguments emphasizing the late cognitive processes. I will discuss their role in one of the central tools for evaluating scientific theories, namely in making inferences to the best explanation. I will argue that appeal to developmental order is, by itself, an insufficient criterion for theory choice and has to be part of an argument based on other core explanatory or empirical virtues. I will end by proposing a more concerted study of philosophical issues concerning (cognitive) development, and I will present some topics that also pertain to a full-fledged 'philosophy of development.'

  15. Arguments from Developmental Order

    PubMed Central

    Stöckle-Schobel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In this article1, I investigate a special type of argument regarding the role of development in theorizing about psychological processes and cognitive capacities. Among the issues that developmental psychologists study, discovering the ontogenetic trajectory of mechanisms or capacities underpinning our cognitive functions ranks highly. The order in which functions are developed or capacities are acquired is a matter of debate between competing psychological theories, and also philosophical conceptions of the mind – getting the role and the significance of the different steps in this order right could be seen as an important virtue of such theories. Thus, a special kind of strategy in arguments between competing philosophical or psychological theories is using developmental order in arguing for or against a given psychological claim. In this article, I will introduce an analysis of arguments from developmental order, which come in two general types: arguments emphasizing the importance of the early cognitive processes and arguments emphasizing the late cognitive processes. I will discuss their role in one of the central tools for evaluating scientific theories, namely in making inferences to the best explanation. I will argue that appeal to developmental order is, by itself, an insufficient criterion for theory choice and has to be part of an argument based on other core explanatory or empirical virtues. I will end by proposing a more concerted study of philosophical issues concerning (cognitive) development, and I will present some topics that also pertain to a full-fledged ‘philosophy of development.’ PMID:27242648

  16. Birth Order and Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Risal, Ajay; Tharoor, Hema

    2012-01-01

    Context: Ordinal position the child holds within the sibling ranking of a family is related to intellectual functioning, personality, behavior, and development of psychopathology. Aim: To study the association between birth order and development of psychopathology in patients attending psychiatry services in a teaching hospital. Settings and Design: Hospital-based cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: Retrospective file review of three groups of patients was carried out. Patient-related variables like age of onset, birth order, family type, and family history of mental illness were compared with psychiatry diagnosis (ICD-10) generated. Statistical Analysis: SPSS 13; descriptive statistics and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used. Results: Mean age of onset of mental illness among the adult general psychiatry patients (group I, n = 527) was found to be 33.01 ± 15.073, while it was 11.68 ± 4.764 among the child cases (group II, n = 47) and 26.74 ± 7.529 among substance abuse cases (group III, n = 110). Among group I patients, commonest diagnosis was depression followed by anxiety and somatoform disorders irrespective of birth order. Dissociative disorders were most prevalent in the first born child (36.7%) among group II patients. Among group III patients, alcohol dependence was maximum diagnosis in all birth orders. Conclusions: Depression and alcohol dependence was the commonest diagnosis in adult group irrespective of birth order. PMID:24479023

  17. Independence of color and luminance edges in natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Thorsten; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2009-01-01

    Form vision is traditionally regarded as processing primarily achromatic information. Previous investigations into the statistics of color and luminance in natural scenes have claimed that luminance and chromatic edges are not independent of each other and that any chromatic edge most likely occurs together with a luminance edge of similar strength. Here we computed the joint statistics of luminance and chromatic edges in over 700 calibrated color images from natural scenes. We found that isoluminant edges exist in natural scenes and were not rarer than pure luminance edges. Most edges combined luminance and chromatic information but to varying degrees such that luminance and chromatic edges were statistically independent of each other. Independence increased along successive stages of visual processing from cones via postreceptoral color-opponent channels to edges. The results show that chromatic edge contrast is an independent source of information that can be linearly combined with other cues for the proper segmentation of objects in natural and artificial vision systems. Color vision may have evolved in response to the natural scene statistics to gain access to this independent information. PMID:19152717

  18. Concomitant Ordering and Symmetry Lowering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boo, William O. J.; Mattern, Daniell L.

    2008-01-01

    Examples of concomitant ordering include magnetic ordering, Jahn-Teller cooperative ordering, electronic ordering, ionic ordering, and ordering of partially-filled sites. Concomitant ordering sets in when a crystal is cooled and always lowers the degree of symmetry of the crystal. Concomitant ordering concepts can also be productively applied to…

  19. Rapid pair-wise synteny analysis of large bacterial genomes using web-based GeneOrder4.0

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The growing whole genome sequence databases necessitate the development of user-friendly software tools to mine these data. Web-based tools are particularly useful to wet-bench biologists as they enable platform-independent analysis of sequence data, without having to perform complex programming tasks and software compiling. Findings GeneOrder4.0 is a web-based "on-the-fly" synteny and gene order analysis tool for comparative bacterial genomics (ca. 8 Mb). It enables the visualization of synteny by plotting protein similarity scores between two genomes and it also provides visual annotation of "hypothetical" proteins from older archived genomes based on more recent annotations. Conclusions The web-based software tool GeneOrder4.0 is a user-friendly application that has been updated to allow the rapid analysis of synteny and gene order in large bacterial genomes. It is developed with the wet-bench researcher in mind. PMID:20178631

  20. Self-similarity and self-inversion of quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madison, A. E.

    2014-08-01

    The discovery of quasicrystals played a revolutionary role in the condensed matter science and forced to renounce the dogma of the classical crystallography that the regular filling of the space by identical blocks is reduced solely to the Fedorov space groups. It is shown that aperiodic crystals, apart from the similarity, exhibit the self-inversion property. In a broadened sense, the self-inversion implies the possible composition of the inversion with translations, rotations, and homothety, whereas pure reflection by itself in a circle can be absent as an independent symmetry element. It is demonstrated that the symmetry of aperiodic tilings is described by Schottky groups (which belong to a particular type of Kleinian groups generated by the linear fractional Möbius transformations); in the theory of aperiodic crystals, the Schottky groups play the same role that the Fedorov groups play in the theory of crystal lattices. The local matching rules for the Penrose fractal tiling are derived, the problem of choice of the fundamental region of the group of motions of a quasicrystal is discussed, and the relation between the symmetry of aperiodic tilings and the symmetry of constructive fractals is analyzed.