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Sample records for ore deposit formation

  1. Formation conditions of high-grade gold-silver ore of epithermal Tikhoe deposit, Russian Northeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, A. V.; Kolova, E. E.; Savva, N. E.; Sidorov, A. A.; Prokof'ev, V. Yu.; Ali, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    The Tikhoe epithermal deposit is located in the Okhotsk-Chukotka volcanic belt (OChVB) 250 km northeast of Magadan. Like other deposits belonging to the Ivan'insky volcanic-plutonic depression (VTD), the Tikhoe deposit is characterized by high-grade Au-Ag ore with an average Au grade of 23.13 gpt Au and Au/Ag ratio varying from 1: 1 to 1: 10. The detailed explored Tikhoe-1 orebody is accompanied by a thick (20 m) aureole of argillic alteration. Pyrite is predominant among ore minerals; galena, arsenopyrite, sphalerite, Ag sulfosalts, fahlore, electrum, and küstelite are less abundant. The ore is characterized by abundant Sebearing minerals. Cu-As geochemical specialization is noted for silver minerals. Elevated Se and Fe molar fractions of the main ore minerals are caused by their formation in the near-surface argillic alteration zone. The veins and veinlets of the Tikhoe-1 ore zone formed stepwise at a temperature of 230 to 105°C from Nachloride solution enriched in Mg and Ca cations with increasing salinity. The parameters of the ore-forming fluid correspond to those of epithermal low-sulfidation deposits and assume the formation of high-grade ore under a screening unit of volcanic rocks. In general, the composition of the ore-forming fluid fits the mineralogy and geochemistry of ore at this deposit. The similarity of the ore composition and parameters of the ore-forming fluid between the Tikhoe and Julietta deposits is noteworthy. Meanwhile, differences are mainly related to the lower temperature and fluid salinity at the Julietta deposit with respect to the Tikhoe deposit. The fluid at the Julietta deposit is depleted in most components compared with that at the Tikhoe deposit except for Sb, Cd, and Ag. The results testify to a different erosion level at the deposits as derivatives of the same ore-forming system. The large scale of the latter allows us to predict the discovery of new high-grade objects, including hidden mineralization, which is not exposed at

  2. The formation of ore mineral deposits on the Moon: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.; Lu, Fengxiang

    1992-01-01

    Most of the ore deposits on Earth are the direct result of formation by hydrothermal solutions. Analogous mineral concentrations do not occur on the Moon, however, because of the absence of water. Stratified ore deposits form in layered instrusives on Earth due to fractional crystallization of magma and crystal settling of high-density minerals, particularly chromium in the mineral chromite. We have evaluated the possibility of such mineral deposition on the Moon, based upon considerations of 'particle settling velocities' in lunar vs. terrestrial magmas. A first approximation of Stoke's Law would seem to indicate that the lower lunar gravity (1/6 terrestrial) would result in slower crystal settling on the Moon. However, the viscosity of the silicate melt is the most important factor affecting the settling velocity. The viscosities of typical lunar basaltic melts are 10-100 times less than their terrestrial analogs. These lower viscosities result from two factors: (1) lunar basaltic melts are typically higher in FeO and lower in Al2O3, Na2O, and K2O than terrestrial melts; and (2) lunar igneous melts and phase equilibria tend to be 100-150 C higher than terrestrial, largely because of the general paucity of water and other volatile phases on the Moon. Therefore, particle settling velocities on the Moon are 5-10 times greater than those on Earth. It is highly probable that stratiform ore deposits similar to those on Earth exist on the Moon. The most likely ore minerals involved are chromite, ilmenite, and native FeNi metal. In addition, the greater settling velocities of periodotite in lunar magmas indicate that the buoyancy effects of the melt are less than on Earth. Consequently, the possibility is considerably less than on Earth of deep-seated volcanism transporting upper mantle/lower crustal xenoliths to the surface of the Moon, such as occurs in kimberlites on Earth.

  3. Tectonophysics of hydrothermal ore formation: an example of the Antei Mo-U deposit, Transbaikalia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. A.; Rebetsky, Yu. L.; Poluektov, V. V.; Burmistrov, A. A.

    2015-07-01

    The Antei deposit of the southeastern Transbaikalian region is one of the largest uranium mines in Russia. It is hosted by the Late Paleozoic granitic basement of the Streltsovskaya caldera and was formed as a result of Late Mesozoic tectonothermal activity. Vein and stockwork-disseminated molybdenum-uranium mineralization at this deposit is controlled by zones of intense hydrothermal alteration, cataclasis, brecciation, and intense fracturing along steeply dipping faults, which acted as conduits for mineralizing fluids and hosts to the ore bodies. The upper edge of the ore-bearing zone is located at a depth of 400 m, and its lower edge was intersected at a depth of 1300 m from the day surface. The conditions of ore localization were determined using structural-geological and petrophysical studies coupled with numerical modeling of the effects of gravitational body forces at purely elastic and postcritical elastoplastic deformational stages. The dynamics of the tectonic stress field in the rock massif was reconstructed using the results of mapping of morphogenetic and kinematic characteristics of fault and fracture systems, as well as data on petrography and mineralogy of rocks and vein-filling material. It was shown that the fault framework of the deposit was formed in four tectonic stages, three of which took place in the geologic past and one of which reflects recent geologic history. Each tectonic stage was characterized by different parameters of the tectonic stress-strain field, fault kinematics, and conditions of mineral formation. The following types of metasomatic rocks are recognized within the deposit: high-temperature K-feldspar rocks and albitites (formed during the Late Paleozoic as the primary structural elements of a granitic massif) and Late Mesozoic low-temperature preore (hydromicatized rocks), synore (hematite, albite, chlorite, and quartz) and postore (kaolinite-smectite) rocks. The following petrophysical parameters were determined for all

  4. Sulphur isotope constraints on formation conditions of the Luiswishi ore deposit, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerouge, C.; Cailteux, J.; Kampunzu, A. B.; Milesi, J. P.; Fléhoc, C.

    2005-07-01

    Luiswishi is a Congo-type Neoproterozoic sediment-hosted stratiform Cu-Co ore deposit of the Central Africa Copperbelt, located northwest of Lubumbashi (DRC). The ores form two main Cu-Co orebodies hosted by the Mines Subgroup, one in the lower part of the Kamoto Formation and the other at the base of the Dolomitic Shales Formation. Sulphides occur essentially as early parallel layers of chalcopyrite and carrolite, and secondarily as late stockwork sulphides cross-cutting the bedding and the early sulphide generation. Both types of stratiform and stockwork chalcopyrite and carrolite were systematically analyzed for sulphur isotopes, along the lithostratigraphic succession of the Mine Series. The quite similar δ 34S values of stratiform sulphides and late stockwork sulphides suggest an in situ recrystallization or a slight remobilization of stockwork sulphides without attainment of isotopic equilibrium between different sulphide phases (chalcopyrite and carrolite). The distribution of δ 34S values (-14.4‰ to +17.5‰) combined with the lithology indicates a strong stratigraphic control of the sulphur isotope signature, supporting bacterial sulphate reduction during early diagenesis of the host sediments, in a shallow marine to lacustrine environment. Petrological features combined with sulphur isotopic data of sulphides at Luiswishi and previous results on nodules of anhydrite in the Mine Series indicate a dominant seawater/lacustrine origin for sulphates, precluding a possible hydrothermal participation. The high positive δ 34S values of sulphides in the lower orebody at Luiswishi, hosted in massive chloritic-dolomitic siltite (known as Grey R.A.T.), fine-grained stratified dolostone (D.Strat.) and silicified-stromatolitic dolomites alternating with chloritic-dolomitic silty beds (R.S.F.), suggest that they were probably deposited during a period of regression in a basin cut off from seawater. The variations of δ 34S values (i.e. the decrease of δ 34S values

  5. Evolution of ore deposits on terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Ore deposits on terrestrial planets materialized after core formation, mantle evolution, crustal development, interactions of surface rocks with the hydrosphere and atmosphere, and, where life exists on a planet, the involvement of biological activity. Core formation removed most of the siderophilic and chalcophilic elements, leaving mantles depleted in many of the strategic and noble metals relative to their chondritic abundances. Basaltic magma derived from partial melting of the mantle transported to the surface several metals contained in immiscible silicate and sulfide melts. Magmatic ore deposits were formed during cooling, fractional crystallization and density stratification from the basaltic melts. Such ore deposits found in earth's Archean rocks were probably generated during early histories of all terrestrial planets and may be the only types of igneous ores on Mars. Where plate tectonic activity was prevalent on a terrestrial planet, temporal evolution of ore deposits took place. Repetitive episodes of subduction modified the chemical compositions of the crust and upper mantles, leading to porphyry copper and molybdenum ores in calc-alkaline igneous rocks and granite-hosted tin and tungsten deposits. Such plate tectonic-induced mineralization in relatively young igneous rocks on earth may also have produced hydrothermal ore deposits on Venus in addition to the massive sulfide and cumulate chromite ores associated with Venusian mafic igneous rock. Sedimentary ore deposits resulting from mechanical and chemical weathering in reducing atmospheres in Archean earth included placer deposits (e.g., uraninite, gold, pyrite ores). Chromite, ilmenite, and other dense unreactive minerals could also be present on channel floors and in valley networks on Mars, while banded iron formations might underlie the Martian northern plains regions. As oxygen evolved in earth's atmosphere, so too did oxide ores. By analogy, gossans above sulfide ores probably occur on Mars

  6. Evolution of ore deposits on terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Ore deposits on terrestrial planets materialized after core formation, mantle evolution, crustal development, interactions of surface rocks with the hydrosphere and atmosphere, and, where life exists on a planet, the involvement of biological activity. Core formation removed most of the siderophilic and chalcophilic elements, leaving mantles depleted in many of the strategic and noble metals relative to their chondritic abundances. Basaltic magma derived from partial melting of the mantle transported to the surface several metals contained in immiscible silicate and sulfide melts. Magmatic ore deposits were formed during cooling, fractional crystallization and density stratification from the basaltic melts. Such ore deposits found in earth's Archean rocks were probably generated during early histories of all terrestrial planets and may be the only types of igneous ores on Mars. Where plate tectonic activity was prevalent on a terrestrial planet, temporal evolution of ore deposits took place. Repetitive episodes of subduction modified the chemical compositions of the crust and upper mantles, leading to porphyry copper and molybdenum ores in calc-alkaline igneous rocks and granite-hosted tin and tungsten deposits. Such plate tectonic-induced mineralization in relatively young igneous rocks on earth may also have produced hydrothermal ore deposits on Venus in addition to the massive sulfide and cumulate chromite ores associated with Venusian mafic igneous rock. Sedimentary ore deposits resulting from mechanical and chemical weathering in reducing atmospheres in Archean earth included placer deposits (e.g., uraninite, gold, pyrite ores). Chromite, ilmenite, and other dense unreactive minerals could also be present on channel floors and in valley networks on Mars, while banded iron formations might underlie the Martian northern plains regions. As oxygen evolved in earth's atmosphere, so too did oxide ores. By analogy, gossans above sulfide ores probably occur on Mars

  7. The role of magmas in the formation of hydrothermal ore deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedenquist, Jeffrey W.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    1994-01-01

    Magmatic fluids, both vapour and hypersaline liquid, are a primary source of many components in hydrothermal ore deposits formed in volcanic arcs. These components, including metals and their ligands, become concentrated in magmas in various ways from various sources, including subducted oceanic crust. Leaching of rocks also contributes components to the hydrothermal fluid—a process enhanced where acid magmatic vapours are absorbed by deeply circulating meteoric waters. Advances in understanding the hydrothermal systems that formed these ore deposits have come from the study of their active equivalents, represented at the surface by hot springs and volcanic fumaroles.

  8. Seeking the mantle contribution for the formation of giant ore deposits: Contemporaneous alkaline lamproites and carbonatites in the Kalmakyr and Muruntau ore districts, Tienshan, Uzbekistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltmann, Reimar; Choulet, Flavien

    2014-05-01

    various geological objects involved in both giant mineral systems. Upper Carboniferous lamproitic pipes have been recognized around the Kalmakyr ore deposit [1]; diamond-bearing lamproites occur near the Muruntau ore deposit and are contemporaneous to the Murun granite [2]. Indicator minerals of deep crustal and mantle origin have been identified within xenoliths hosted by the ore-bearing intrusions and the dikes and pipes spatially and temporally associated to the giants. SEM and CT scanning observations allow for revealing the shape and internal texture of indicator minerals and their relations (inclusion, interstitial or bulk minerals). Microanalysis (EPMA and LA-ICPMS) of indicator minerals is used to estimate the physico-chemical conditions of their formation and track the mantle involvement in magma fertilization. Results permit clues on the mantle contribution in ore formation during the late collisional to post-collisional stages of the Tienshan, and, based on complementary comparisons with other ore systems, to refine exploration models. References: [1] Yusupov, R.G.; Stanley, C.J.; Welch, M.D.; Spratt, J.; Cressey, G.; Rumsey, M.S.; Seltmann, R.; Igamberdiev, E., 2009: Mavlyanovite, Mn5Si3: a new mineral species from a lamproite diatreme, Chatkal Ridge, Uzbekistan. Mineralogical Magazine 73, 43-50. [2] Golovko, A. V.; Divaev, F. K., 2010: Ore mineralisation of the Karashokho diatreme, western Uzbekistan. Applied Earth Science 119.2: 100. [3] Dolgopolova, A.; Seltmann, R.; Armstrong, R.; Belousova, E.; Pankhurst, R.; Konopelko, D.; Koneev, R., 2013: Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb Isotope Mapping of Tien Shan in Uzbekistan. Mineralogical Magazine 77.5: 1001.

  9. Geochemistry of sedimentary ore deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Maynard, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    A text providing a sedimentological treatment of a study on ore deposits, and especially as related to geochemistry. Excellently documented (about 5000 citations). Well indexed with the index of deposits and localities separated. Contents, Iron. Copper and silver. Aluminum and nickel. Manganese. Uranium. Lead and zinc. Volcanic-sedimentary ores. Appendix. Indexes.

  10. Formation stages and ore matter sources of the Devdoraki copper deposit, Kazbek volcanic center, the Greater Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, V. A.; Chugaev, A. V.; Vashakidze, G. T.; Parfenov, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    Comprehensive petrological-mineralogical, geochronological, and isotope-geochemical studies have been carried out at the Devdoraki copper deposit situated in the Kazbek neovolcanic center, the frontier territory between Georgia and Russia. The formation history of this deposit has been deciphered on the basis of K-Ar isotopic geochronological data, and the multistage evolution of ore-magmatic system has been established. The subeconomic disseminated and less abundant stringer pyrite mineralization formed at the first stage in the Early Cretaceous back to 130-120 Ma at the retrograde stage of regional metamorphism. The second productive stage was related to intense Quaternary volcanism of the Kazbek center. The late stringer base-metal mineralization formed about 400 ka ago in connection with the activity of minor volcanoes in the eastern part of deposit. In its western part adjoining the Kazbek volcanic cone, ore formation apparently continued over the entire period of recent magmatic activity from 400 to 100 ka ago. It is quite probable that this process is currently proceeding at deep levels of the Devdoraki deposit. Pb-Pb isotope-geochemical data show that Jurassic metasedimentary rocks that host sulfide mineralization could have been a main source of matter for early pyrite. At the second stage of base-metal mineralization formation, the source of ore matter was earlier metamorphic pyrite combined with hydrothermal solutions related to Quaternary endogenic activity within the Kazbek volcanic center. Gangue mineral matter (quartz, carbonates) was supplied simultaneously from the postmagmatic hydrothermal solution and host shale.

  11. Gold-quartz deposits of the Zhdaninsky ore-placer cluster, eastern Yakutia: Structural control and formation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, V. V.; Babarina, I. I.; Grigor'eva, A. V.; Alekseev, V. Yu.; Prokof'ev, V. Yu.; Uzyunkoyan, A. A.; Zabolotskaya, O. V.; Titov, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Gold deposits and occurrences small in reserves and high in Au grade conventionally determine the line of prospecting in terrigenous sequences of the Verkhoyansk-Kolyma region. In this paper, the geological structure of such gold objects is considered with the example of the deposits and prospects making up the Zhdaninsky ore-placer cluster in the Republic of Sakha (Yakuia). From lithological, structural, and mineralogical-geochemical data, the formation conditions of ore-bearing complexes are specified, the geological evolution history of the northern Ol'chan Zone of the Kular-Nera Belt is reconstructed, and the zonal distribution of mineralization within the ore-placer cluster is revealed. The structural-compositional complexes were formed in the following succession: (1) sedimentation at the shelf of the passive margin accompanied by synsedimentation deformations; (2) metagenesis of sediments and the development of bedding-plane intraformational detachments of collision stage D1 under conditions of tangential compression and accompanied by the formation of carbon dioxide-aqueous metamorphic fluid at a temperature of 300°C and under a pressure of 1.4 kbar; (3) folding and faulting of orogenic stage D2 with the formation of synkinematic magmatic bodies, metasomatic alteration, and Au-bearig mineral assemblages. Small Au-bearing objects with veined mineralization and high Au grade are localized in structures of stage D2 transverse to bedding-plane schistosity S1. They form at the collision stage above intraformational detachment surfaces and are controlled by shear structures of the orogenic stage with misalignment of these deformations. The ore zoning is determined by the distribution of Co and Ni minerals and by variations in the anionic composition of ore (S, As, Sb).

  12. Oil shales, evaporites and ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugster, Hans P.

    1985-03-01

    elevated temperatures and with carbonates as principal host rocks. The Pine Point deposits are cited for their close association with evaporites. Alkaline, metal-rich brines are postulated for the HYC deposit of McArthur River, Australia. Such brines are known from the Green River Formation and deposits formed from such brines constitute the GRT class. They can be recognized by the presence of Magadi-type cherts and zeolite-analcime-K-spar tuffs. The Cu-Co ore bodies of Outokumpu, Finland, might also belong to this type. A new classification of sedimentary ore deposits is proposed, based on their geochemical environment. KST and MVT are formed from acid ore fluids, while GRT and CT (Creede type) are derived from basic ore fluids. pH of the fluids is best evaluated not from the ores themselves, but from their effect on the host-rocks.

  13. The late cretaceous Donlin Creek gold deposit, Southwestern Alaska: Controls on epizonal ore formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldfarb, R.J.; Ayuso, R.; Miller, M.L.; Ebert, S.W.; Marsh, E.E.; Petsel, S.A.; Miller, L.D.; Bradley, D.; Johnson, Chad; McClelland, W.

    2004-01-01

    The Donlin Creek gold deposit, southwestern Alaska, has an indicated and inferred resource of approximately 25 million ounces (Moz) Au at a cutoff grade of 1.5 g/t. The ca. 70 Ma deposit is hosted in the Late Cretaceous Kuskokwim flysch basin, which developed in the back part of the are region of an active continental margin, on previously accreted oceanic terranes and continental fragments. A hypabyssal, mainly rhyolitic to rhyodacitic, and commonly porphyritic, 8- ?? 3-km dike complex, part of a regional ca. 77 to 58 Ma magmatic arc, formed a structurally competent host for the mineralization. This deposit is subdivided into about one dozen distinct prospects, most of which consist of dense quartz ?? carbonate veinlet networks that fill north-northeast-striking extensional fractures in the northeast-trending igneous rocks. The sulfide mineral assemblage is dominated by arsenopyrite, pyrite, and, typically younger, stibnite; gold is refractory within the arsenopyrite. Sericitization, carbonatization, and suffidation were the main alteration processes. Fluid inclusion studies of the quartz that hosts the resource indicate dominantly aqueous ore fluids with also about 3 to 7 mol percent CO2 ?? CH4 and a few tenths to a few mole percent NaCl + KCl. The gold-bearing fluids were mainly homogeneously trapped at approximately 275?? to 300??C and at depths of 1 to 2 km. Some of the younger stibnite may have been deposited by late-stage aqueous fluids at lower temperature. Measured ??18O values for the gold-bearing quartz range between 11 and 25 per mil; the estimated ??18O fluid values range from 7 to 12 per mil, suggesting a mainly crustally derived fluid. A broad range of measured ??D values for hydrothermal micas, between -150 and -80 per mil, is suggestive of a contribution from devolatilization of organic matter and/or minor amounts of mixing with meteoric fluids. Gold-associated hydrothermal sulfide minerals are characterized by ??34S values mainly between -16 and

  14. The world-class Jinding Zn-Pb deposit: ore formation in an evaporite dome, Lanping Basin, Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, David L.; Song, Yu-Cai; Hou, Zeng-Qian

    2017-03-01

    The Jinding Zn-Pb sediment-hosted deposit in western Yunnan, China, is the fourth largest Zn deposit in Asia. Based on field observations of the ore textures, breccias, and the sandstone host rocks, the ores formed in a dome that was created by the diapiric migration of evaporites in the Lanping Basin during Paleogene deformation and thrust loading. Most of the ore occurs in sandstones that are interpreted to be a former evaporite glacier containing a mélange of extruded diapiric material, including breccias, fluidized sand, and evaporites that mixed with sediment from a fluvial sandstone system. A pre-ore hydrocarbon and reduced sulfur reservoir formed in the evaporite glacier that became the chemical sink for Zn and Pb in a crustal-derived metalliferous fluid. In stark contrast to previous models, the Jinding deposit does not define a unique class of ore deposits; rather, it should be classified as MVT sub-type hosted in a diapiric environment. Given that Jinding is a world-class ore body, this new interpretation elevates the exploration potential for Zn-Pb deposit in other diapir regions in the world.

  15. The world-class Jinding Zn-Pb deposit: ore formation in an evaporite dome, Lanping Basin, Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, David L.; Song, Yu-Cai; Hou, Zeng-Qian

    2016-07-01

    The Jinding Zn-Pb sediment-hosted deposit in western Yunnan, China, is the fourth largest Zn deposit in Asia. Based on field observations of the ore textures, breccias, and the sandstone host rocks, the ores formed in a dome that was created by the diapiric migration of evaporites in the Lanping Basin during Paleogene deformation and thrust loading. Most of the ore occurs in sandstones that are interpreted to be a former evaporite glacier containing a mélange of extruded diapiric material, including breccias, fluidized sand, and evaporites that mixed with sediment from a fluvial sandstone system. A pre-ore hydrocarbon and reduced sulfur reservoir formed in the evaporite glacier that became the chemical sink for Zn and Pb in a crustal-derived metalliferous fluid. In stark contrast to previous models, the Jinding deposit does not define a unique class of ore deposits; rather, it should be classified as MVT sub-type hosted in a diapiric environment. Given that Jinding is a world-class ore body, this new interpretation elevates the exploration potential for Zn-Pb deposit in other diapir regions in the world.

  16. A mathematical model of scandium ore deposit formation in liquating magmatic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanova, V. K.; Cherepanov, A. N.

    2017-03-01

    Solidification of liquating silicate magmatic melts may lead to formation of rare earth mineral deposits. By the example of quasi-binary system SiO2-Sc2O3, the processes of cooling and directional solidification of the melt in an intrusive chamber have been studied, and velocities of the phase fronts and the width of the phase separation field have been calculated. Using the fluctuation approach, the physical and mathematical model of the formation and growth of dispersed phase in the continuous cooling of liquating melt was developed, and the conditions of incorporating the dispersed inclusions by solidified matrix phase were determined. The proposed model allows obtaining quantitative estimates of the size and number of inclusions per unit of hardened rock, depending on the solidification conditions and the initial chemical composition of the melt.

  17. Possible role of fluids free thermal convection processes in formation of uranium deposits in the Streltsovska ore field (Eastern Trans-Baikal Region)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pek, A. A.; Malkovsky, V. I.; Petrov, V. A.

    2017-05-01

    This paper reports the preliminary results of computer simulation of the free thermal convection of fluids in a residual thermal field of a consolidated shallow magma chamber related to caldera formation. The deeply penetrating thermoconvective circulation of fluids provided conditions for mobilization and transportation of uranium from the vast area under the caldera to the ore deposition sites.

  18. The physical hydrogeology of ore deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Appold, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrothermal ore deposits represent a convergence of fluid flow, thermal energy, and solute flux that is hydrogeologically unusual. From the hydrogeologic perspective, hydrothermal ore deposition represents a complex coupled-flow problem—sufficiently complex that physically rigorous description of the coupled thermal (T), hydraulic (H), mechanical (M), and chemical (C) processes (THMC modeling) continues to challenge our computational ability. Though research into these coupled behaviors has found only a limited subset to be quantitatively tractable, it has yielded valuable insights into the workings of hydrothermal systems in a wide range of geologic environments including sedimentary, metamorphic, and magmatic. Examples of these insights include the quantification of likely driving mechanisms, rates and paths of fluid flow, ore-mineral precipitation mechanisms, longevity of hydrothermal systems, mechanisms by which hydrothermal fluids acquire their temperature and composition, and the controlling influence of permeability and other rock properties on hydrothermal fluid behavior. In this communication we review some of the fundamental theory needed to characterize the physical hydrogeology of hydrothermal systems and discuss how this theory has been applied in studies of Mississippi Valley-type, tabular uranium, porphyry, epithermal, and mid-ocean ridge ore-forming systems. A key limitation in the computational state-of-the-art is the inability to describe fluid flow and transport fully in the many ore systems that show evidence of repeated shear or tensional failure with associated dynamic variations in permeability. However, we discuss global-scale compilations that suggest some numerical constraints on both mean and dynamically enhanced crustal permeability. Principles of physical hydrogeology can be powerful tools for investigating hydrothermal ore formation and are becoming increasingly accessible with ongoing advances in modeling software.

  19. Timing of the formation of the Changba-Lijiagou Pb-Zn ore deposit, Gansu Province, China: Evidence from Rb-Sr isotopic dating of sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qiaoqing; Wang, Yitian; Mao, Jingwen; Wei, Ran; Liu, Shengyou; Ye, Dejin; Yuan, Qunhu; Dou, Ping

    2015-05-01

    The giant Changba-Lijiagou Pb-Zn deposit is located in the north of the Xihe-Chengxian (abbreviated as "Xicheng") ore cluster in Gansu Province, China. The orebodies in the deposit are mainly hosted in the marble, dolomitic marble, and biotite-calcite-quartz schist of the Middle Devonian Anjiacha Formation. The genesis of the deposit has previously been argued to be of SEDEX type (sedimentary exhalative type) or of epigenetic hydrothermal type. This paper reports results of Rb-Sr isotopic dating on sphalerite and pyrite taken from the main orebody, which yield an isochron age of 222.3 ± 2.2 Ma for eight sphalerite samples, and 222.0 ± 3.0 Ma for the eight sphalerite samples combined with four pyrite samples, indicating that the deposit formed during the Late Triassic. The (87Sr/86Sri) value of the sphalerite is 0.71370 ± 0.00013, and that of the sphalerite and pyrite is 0.71371 ± 0.00014, which are identical within experimental error, suggesting that the ore metals are derived mainly from the continental crust. By integrating the present results with the regional geology, we propose that the Changba-Lijiagou Pb-Zn deposit is a product of regional hydrothermal mineralization processes, forced by tectono-magmatic activities, which took place in the Xicheng ore cluster during Triassic orogenic processes.

  20. Ore-forming fluids of Xishimen skarn iron deposit, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidung, Shi; Starostin, V. I.; Prokofiev, V. Yu.

    2017-03-01

    Fluid inclusions in calcite and diopside from the Xishimen skarn iron deposit in China were studied. The deposit ores were formed from chloride solutions with salinity ranging from 8.4 to 59.6 wt % NaCl equiv within the temperature range of 210 to 590°C. The model of skarn ore formation involving high-temperature magmatic fluids is discussed.

  1. Differentiation of nelsonitic magmas in the formation of the ~1.74 Ga Damiao Fe-Ti-P ore deposit, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei Terry; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Zhao, Tai-Ping

    2013-06-01

    The ~1.74 Ga Damiao anorthosite complex, North China, is composed of anorthosite and leuconorite with subordinate melanorite, mangerite, oxide-apatite gabbronorite, perthite noritic (i.e., jotunitic) and ferrodioritic dykes. The complex hosts abundant vein-, pod- and lens-like Fe-Ti-P ores containing variable amounts of apatite (10-60 modal%) and Fe-Ti oxides. In addition to Fe-Ti-P ores, there are also abundant Fe-Ti ores which are closely associated with Fe-Ti-P ores in the deposit. Most of Fe-Ti-P ores are dominated by Fe-Ti oxides and apatite, devoid of silicate minerals, mineralogically similar to the common nelsonites elsewhere. In contrast, Fe-Ti ores are dominated by Fe-Ti oxides with minor apatite (<5 modal %). The parental magma of these ores, estimated from olivine and apatite compositions using mineral-melt partition coefficients, has composition similar to the ferrodioritic dykes. Fe-Ti-P ores have variable Fe-Ti oxides and apatite proportions, indicating that they are cumulates. Their simple assemblage of Fe-Ti oxides and apatite and local net-texture suggest that the Fe-Ti-P ores in Damiao have formed from nelsonitic melts immiscibly separated from the ferrodioritic magma during late-stage differentiation. Fe-Ti ores are also cumulates and have mineral compositions similar to Fe-Ti-P ores. The close association between Fe-Ti and Fe-Ti-P ores indicates that the Fe-Ti ores may have also formed from the nelsonitic melts. We proposed that differentiation of nelsonitic melts accompanied by gravity settling is responsible for the formation of Fe-Ti and Fe-Ti-P ores. Such a differentiation process in nelsonitic melts is well supported by variations of Sr, Y, Th, U, REE and Eu/Eu* of apatite in Fe-Ti-P ores. Using oxides/apatite ratio of 2:1 and compositions of apatite and calculated primary oxides, we estimate the composition of the nelsonitic melt as ~52.0 wt% Fe2O3t, ~18.5 wt% CaO, ~14.2 wt% P2O5, ~8.7 wt% TiO2, ~4.0 wt% Al2O3 and ~1.1 wt% MgO with minor

  2. The Kharapeh orogenic gold deposit: Geological, structural, and geochemical controls on epizonal ore formation in West Azerbaijan Province, Northwestern Iran

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Niroomand, Shojaeddin; Goldfarb, Richard J.; Moore, Farib; Mohajjel, Mohammad; Marsh, Erin E.

    2011-01-01

    The Kharapeh gold deposit is located along the northwestern margin of the Sanandaj–Sirjan Zone (SSZ) in the West Azerbaijan province, Iran. It is an epizonal orogenic gold deposit formed within the deformed zone between central Iran and the Arabian plate during the Cretaceous–Tertiary Zagros orogeny. The deposit area is underlain by Cretaceous schist and marble, as well as altered andesite and dacite dikes. Structural analysis indicates that the rocks underwent tight to isoclinal recumbent folding and were subsequently co-axially refolded to upright open folds during a second deformation. Late- to post-tectonic Cenozoic granites and granodiorites occur northeast of the deposit area. Mineralization mainly is recognized within NW-trending extensional structures as veins and breccia zones. Normal faults, intermediate dikes, and quartz veins, oriented subparallel to the axial surface of the Kharapeh antiform, indicate synchronous extension perpendicular to the fold axis during the second folding event. The gold-bearing quartz veins are >1 km in length and average about 6 m in width; breccia zones are 10–50 m in length and ≤1 m in width. Hydrothermal alteration mainly consists of silicification, sulfidation, chloritization, sericitization, and carbonatization. Paragenetic relationships indicate three distinct stages—replacement and silicification, brecciation and fracture filling, and cataclastic brecciation—with the latter two being gold-rich. Fluid inclusion data suggest mineral deposition at temperatures of at least 220–255°C and depths of at least 1.4–1.8 km, from a H2O–CO2±CH4 fluid of relatively high salinity (12–14 wt.% NaCl equiv.), which may reflect metamorphism of passive margin carbonate sequences. Ore fluid δ18O values between about 7‰ and 9‰ suggest no significant meteoric water input, despite gold deposition in a relatively shallow epizonal environment. Similarities to other deposits in the SSZ suggest that the deposit formed as

  3. The Krásná Hora, Milešov, and Příčovy Sb-Au ore deposits, Bohemian Massif: mineralogy, fluid inclusions, and stable isotope constraints on the deposit formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, Matěj; Zachariáš, Jiří

    2017-04-01

    The Krásná Hora-Milešov and Příčovy districts (Czech Republic) are the unique examples of Sb-Au subtype orogenic gold deposits in the Bohemian Massif. They are represented by quartz-stibnite veins and massive stibnite lenses grading into low-grade, disseminated ores in altered host rocks. Gold postdates the stibnite and is often replaced by aurostibite. The ore zones are hosted by hydrothermally altered dikes of lamprophyres (Krásná Hora-Milešov) or are associated with local strike-slip faults (Příčovy). Formation of Sb-Au deposits probably occurred shortly after the main gold-bearing event (348-338 Ma; Au-only deposits) in the central part of the Bohemian Massif. Fluid inclusion analyses suggest that stibnite precipitated at 250 to 130 °C and gold at 200 to 130 °C from low-salinity aqueous fluids. The main quartz gangue hosting the ore precipitated from the same type of fluid at about 300 °C. Early quartz-arsenopyrite veins are not associated with the Sb-Au deposition and formed from low-salinity, aqueous-carbonic fluid at higher pressure and temperature ( 250 MPa, 400 °C). The estimated oxygen isotope composition of the ore-bearing fluid (4 ± 1‰ SMOW; based on post-ore calcite) suggests its metamorphic or mixed magmatic-metamorphic origin and excludes the involvement of meteoric water. Rapid cooling of warm hydrothermal fluids reacting with "cold" host rock was probably the most important factor in the formation of both stibnite and gold.

  4. Geochemical and Nd isotopic constraints on provenance and depositional setting of the Shihuiding Formation in the Shilu Fe-Co-Cu ore district, Hainan Province, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liangliang; Zou, Shaohao; Cai, Jianxin; Xu, Deru; Zou, Fenghui; Wang, Zhilin; Wu, Chuanjun; Liu, Meng

    2016-04-01

    The Shihuiding Formation, a subordinate succession hosting the Fe-Co-Cu ores, is a suite of Neoproterozoic terrigenous clastic rocks occurring in the Shilu Fe-Co-Cu ore district of the Hainan Island, South China. Integrated petrographical, geochemical, and Nd isotopic analyses have been carried out on 23 sandstone specimens of the Shihuiding Formation in order to understand their provenance and the tectonic setting of their deposition. The samples can be divided into two groups, quartzose sandstones (13 samples) and ferruginous sandstones (10 samples). The ferruginous sandstones have average SiO2 and Fetotal contents of 77.23 wt.% and 18.09 wt.%, respectively, and this contrasts with the higher average SiO2 (94.04 wt.%) and lower Fetotal (2.67 wt.%) contents of the quartzose sandstones. The bivariant Th/Sc and Zr/Sc ratios indicate a predominantly recycled sedimentary provenance, and the low to medium degrees of weathering are commonly indicated by an average chemical index of maturity (CIM) of 81 and an average chemical index of alteration (CIA) of 68. The Shihuiding Formation sandstones have REE contents of 21-249 ppm, with LREE/HREE = 9.18 and δEu = 0.67. The εNd (970 Ma) values of -5.7 to -3.4, and model (TDM) ages of 2099-1773 Ma are compatible with a source mainly from the Paleo- to Mesoproterozoic Baoban Group, a suite of metamorphosed sedimentary rocks intruded by ca. 1450 Ma granites. Quantitative provenance modeling indicates that the Shihuiding Formation sandstones are best modeled with a mixture of 29% plagioclase-amphibole gneiss (29 P), 38% quartz-muscovite schist (38 Q), and 33% granite (33 G) detritus. Mixing the εNd values of the sandstones, calculated at 970 Ma, indicates that the sediment received 22-47% (average 34%) of its detritus from the Baoban Group quartz-muscovite schists. Components from hydrothermal fluids may also have been involved during deposition of the Shihuiding Formation sandstones, as revealed by a bivariant Al/(Al + Fe + Mn

  5. Proterozoic geology and ore deposits of Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlstrom, Karl E.

    1991-01-01

    Proterozoic rocks in Arizona have been the focus of interest for geologists since the late 1800's. Early investigations, led by the U.S. Geological Survey, focused on the extensive ore deposits hosted by Proterozoic rocks. By the 1960's, these studies, combined with theses from academic institutions and the efforts of the Arizona Geological Survey, had produced a rich data base of geologic maps, primarily of the central part of the Transition Zone. The chronological significance of these maps became much better known with the application of U-Pb geochronology by L.Y. Silver and his students starting in the 1960's. The 1970's and early 1980's were marked by numerous contributions from Masters and Ph.D students at a variety of academic institutions, and continued work by the U.S. Geological Survey. Interest in ore deposits persisted and there was an increasing interest in interpretation of the tectonic history of Proterozoic rocks in terms of plate tectonic models, as summarized in papers by Phillip Anderson, Ed DeWitt, Clay Conway, Paul Lindberg, and J.L Anderson in the 1989 Arizona Geological Society Digest 17: "Geologic Evolution of Arizona". The present volume: "Proterozoic Geology and Ore deposits of Arizona" builds upon A.G.S. Digest 17, and presents the results of geologic investigations from the latter part of the 1980's. A number of the papers are condensed versions of MS theses done by students at Northern Arizona University. These papers are based upon 1:10,000 mapping and structural analysis of several areas in Arizona. The geologic maps from each of these studies are available separately as part of the Arizona Geological Survey Contributed Map Series. These detailed maps, plus the continuing mapping efforts of the U.S.G.S. and students at other academic institutions, form an ever improving data base for continuing attempts to understand the Proterozoic geology and ore deposits of Arizona

  6. Chalcophile element partitioning between sulfide phases and hydrous mantle melt: Applications to mantle melting and the formation of ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the geochemical behavior of chalcophile elements in magmatic processes is hindered by the limited partition coefficients between sulfide phases and silicate melt, in particular at conditions relevant to partial melting of the hydrated, metasomatized upper mantle. In this study, the partitioning of elements Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Ag, and Pb between sulfide liquid, monosulfide solid solution (MSS), and hydrous mantle melt has been investigated at 1200 °C/1.5 GPa and oxygen fugacity ranging from FMQ-2 to FMQ+1 in a piston-cylinder apparatus. The determined partition coefficients between sulfide liquid and hydrous mantle melt are: 750-1500 for Cu; 600-1200 for Ni; 35-42 for Co; 35-53 for Pb; and 1-2 for Zn, As, and Mo. The partition coefficients between MSS and hydrous mantle melt are: 380-500 for Cu; 520-750 for Ni; ∼50 for Co; <0.5 for Zn; 0.3-6 for Pb; 0.1-2 for As; 1-2 for Mo; and >34 for Ag. The variation of the data is primarily due to differences in oxygen fugacity. These partitioning data in conjunction with previous data are applied to partial melting of the upper mantle and the formation of magmatic-hydrothermal Cu-Au deposits and magmatic sulfide deposits. I show that the metasomatized arc mantle may no longer contain sulfide after >10-14% melt extraction but is still capable of producing the Cu concentrations in the primitive arc basalts, and that the comparable Cu concentrations in primitive arc basalts and in MORB do not necessarily imply similar oxidation states in their source regions. Previous models proposed for producing Cu- and/or Au-rich magmas have been reassessed, with the conclusions summarized as follows. (1) Partial melting of the oxidized (fO2 > FMQ), metasomatized arc mantle with sulfide exhaustion at degrees >10-14% may not generate Cu-rich, primitive arc basalts. (2) Partial melting of sulfide-bearing cumulates in the root of thickened lower continental crust or lithospheric mantle does not typically generate Cu- and

  7. Textural, compositional, and sulfur isotope variations of sulfide minerals in the Red Dog Zn-Pb-Ag deposits, Brooks Range, Alaska: Implications for Ore Formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, K.D.; Leach, D.L.; Johnson, C.A.; Clark, J.L.; Fayek, M.; Slack, J.F.; Anderson, V.M.; Ayuso, R.A.; Ridley, W.I.

    2004-01-01

    The Red Dog Zn-Pb deposits are hosted in organic-rich mudstone and shale of the Mississippian Kuna Formation. A complex mineralization history is defined by four sphalerite types or stages: (1) early brown sphalerite, (2) yellow-brown sphalerite, (3) red-brown sphalerite, and (4) late tan sphalerite. Stages 2 and 3 constitute the main ore-forming event and are volumetrically the most important. Sulfides in stages 1 and 2 were deposited with barite, whereas stage 3 largely replaces barite. Distinct chemical differences exist among the different stages of sphalerite. From early brown sphalerite to later yellow-brown sphalerite and red-brown sphalerite, Fe and Co content generally increase and Mn and Tl content generally decrease. Early brown sphalerite contains no more than 1.9 wt percent Fe and 63 ppm Co, with high Mn (up to 37 ppm) and Tl (126 ppm), whereas yellow-brown sphalerite and red-brown sphalerite contain high Fe (up to 7.3 wt %) and Co (up to 382 ppm), and low Mn (<27 ppm) and Tl (<37 ppm). Late tan sphalerite has distinctly lower Fe (< 0.9 wt %) and higher Tl (up to 355 ppm), Mn (up to 177 ppm), and Ge (426 ppm), relative to earlier sphalerite. Wide ranges in concentrations of Ag, Cu, Pb, and Sb characterize all sphalerite types, particularly yellow-brown sphalerite and red-brown sphalerite, and most likely reflect submicroscopic inclusions of galena, chalcopyrite and/or tetrahedrite in the sphalerite. In situ ion microprobe sulfur isotope analyses show a progression from extremely low ??34S values for stage 1 (as low as -37.20???) to much higher values for yellow-brown sphalerite (mean of 3.3???; n = 30) and red-brown sphalerite (mean of 3.4; n = 20). Late tan sphalerite is isotopically light (-16.4 to -27.2???). The textural, chem ical, and isotopic data indicate the following paragenesis: (1) deposition of early brown sphalerite with abundant barite, minor pyrite, and trace galena immediately beneath the sea floor in unconsolidated mud; (2) deposition

  8. Physical-chemical conditions of ore deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    Ore deposits form under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions, but those precipitating from hot, aqueous fluids-i.e. the hydrothermal deposits-form generally below 700??C and at pressures of only 1 or 2 kbar or less. Natural aqueous fluids in rocks may extract metal and sulfur from a variety of rock types or may acquire them as a residual heritage from a crystallizing silicate magma. Ore-forming hydrothermal fluids never appear as hot springs (except in deep, submarine situations) because they boil, mix with surface waters, and cool, thereby losing their ore-bearing ability before reaching the surface. Mineral systems function as chemical buffers and indicators just as buffers and indicators function in a chemical laboratory. By reading the record written in the buffer/indicator assemblages of minerals one can reconstruct many aspects of the former chemical environment. By studying the record of changing conditions one may deduce information regarding the processes functioning to create the succession of chemical environments and the ore deposits they represent. The example of the OH vein at Creede, Colorado, shows a pH buffered by the K-feldspar + muscovite + quartz assemblage and the covariation of S2 and O2 buffered by the assemblage chlorite + pyrite + quartz. Boiling of the ore fluid led to its oxidation to hematite-bearing assemblages and simultaneously produced an intensely altered, sericitic capping over the vein in response to the condensation of vapors bearing acidic components. The solubility of metals as calculated from experimental and theoretical studies of mineral solubility appears too low by at least one or two powers of ten to explain the mineralization at Creede. In contrast to Creede where the mineral stabilities all point to a relatively consistent chemistry, the Mississippi Valley type deposits present a puzzle of conflicting chemical clues that are impossible to reconcile with any single equilibrium situation. Thus we must

  9. Textures, paragenesis and wall-rock alteration of lode-gold deposits in the Charters Towers district, north Queensland: implications for the conditions of ore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuzer, Oliver P.

    2006-01-01

    Ore deposits of the Charters Towers Goldfield (CTGF) are mainly hosted by fault-fill veins. Extensional (˜8% of all veins) and stockwork-like (˜3%) veins are less common and of little economic significance. Crosscutting relationships and published structural and geochronological data indicate a Late Silurian to Early Devonian timing of gold mineralization, coincident with regional shortening (D4) and I-type magmatism. Paragenetic relationships, which are uniform in veins everywhere within the CTGF, suggest that vein formation commenced with the deposition of large volumes of buck quartz (stage I), followed by buck and comb quartz, and significant pyrite and arsenopyrite precipitation (stage II). Gold was introduced during stage III, after earlier sphalerite and coincident with galena and chalcopyrite. Narrow, discontinuous calcite veins of stage IV mark the waning of gold-related hydrothermal activity or a later unrelated episode. Ore zones within the veins are everywhere composed of comb and/or gray quartz, calcite and/or ankerite and bands or clusters of fractured pyrite that are spatially associated with galena, sphalerite or chalcopyrite. Low-grade or barren vein sections, on the other hand, are mainly composed of milky buck quartz with little evidence for modification, overprinting or interaction with later fluids. Gold-related hydrothermal wall-rock alteration is symmetrically zoned, displaying proximal sericite-ankerite and distal epidote-chlorite-hematite assemblages that may be taken to imply wall-rock interaction with near neutral fluids (pH 5-6). Isocon plots assuming immobile Al, P, Ti, Y and Zr consistently indicate As, K, Pb, S and Zn enrichment and Na, Si and Sr depletion in altered wall-rock specimens relative to the least altered rocks. Alteration assemblages, quartz textures, fault rocks and published fluid inclusion and stable isotope data imply that the veins were formed under conditions of episodic fluid overpressuring (˜0.9-3.8 kbar), at a

  10. Magmatic-vapor expansion and the formation of high-sulfidation gold deposits: Structural controls on hydrothermal alteration and ore mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, B.R.; Henley, R.W.

    2011-01-01

    High-sulfidation copper-gold lode deposits such as Chinkuashih, Taiwan, Lepanto, Philippines, and Goldfield, Nevada, formed within 1500. m of the paleosurface in volcanic terranes. All underwent an early stage of extensive advanced argillic silica-alunite alteration followed by an abrupt change to spatially much more restricted stages of fracture-controlled sulfide-sulfosalt mineral assemblages and gold-silver mineralization. The alteration as well as ore mineralization stages of these deposits were controlled by the dynamics and history of syn-hydrothermal faulting. At the Sulfate Stage, aggressive advanced argillic alteration and silicification were consequent on the in situ formation of acidic condensate from magmatic vapor as it expanded through secondary fracture networks alongside active faults. The reduction of permeability at this stage due to alteration decreased fluid flow to the surface, and progressively developed a barrier between magmatic-vapor expansion constrained by the active faults and peripheral hydrothermal activity dominated by hot-water flow. In conjunction with the increased rock strength resulting from alteration, subsequent fault-slip inversion in response to an increase in compressional stress generated new, highly permeable fractures localized by the embrittled, altered rock. The new fractures focused magmatic-vapor expansion with much lower heat loss so that condensation occurred. Sulfide Stage sulfosalt, sulfide, and gold-silver deposition then resulted from destabilization of vapor phase metal species due to vapor decompression through the new fracture array. The switch from sulfate to sulfide assemblages is, therefore, a logical consequence of changes in structural permeability due to the coupling of alteration and fracture dynamics rather than to changes in the chemistry of the fluid phase at its magmatic source. ?? 2010.

  11. Distribution of ore deposits and spectrographic analyses of some rocks and ores on the Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riley, Leonard Benjamin; Shoemaker, Eugene Merle

    1952-01-01

    The geographic pattern of known igneous rocks and ore deposits on the Colorado Plateau suggests a zonal arrangement of several types of ore deposits around centers of igneous activity. Spectrographic analyses of rocks and ores on the Plateau have been obtained in an effort to determine the distribution of elements and to examine the relationships between types of ore deposits and between the ore deposits and igneous rocks. Over 170 analyses of rocks and ores are given in this report. A preliminary study of these analyses suggests that the proportion of uranium, vanadium, copper, and silver in the uranium ores varies geographically, and that the pattern of variation may be in part concentric about some of the major laccolithic intrusions. It is also suggested that the following ratios of metals contained in the uranium ores are possible guides to larger-than-average ore deposits: (1) lead/uranium greater than 1, (2) lead/zinc greater than 10, and (3) zinc/geometric mean of cobalt and nickel less than 10.

  12. Ore microscopy of the Paoli silver-copper deposit, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, C.A.; Hagni, R.D.; Berendsen, P.

    1991-01-01

    The Paoli silver-copper deposit is located in south-central Oklahoma, 56 km south-southeast from Norman, Oklahoma. It was mined for high-grade silver-copper near the beginning of this century, and intensive exploratory drilling during the early 1970's delineated unmined portions of the deposit. A collaborative study between the U.S.G.S., the Kansas Geological Survey, and the University of Missouri-Rolla was undertaken to provide new information on the character of red bed copper deposits of the Midcontinent region. The Paoli deposit has been interpreted to occur as a roll-front type of deposit. The silver and copper mineralization occurs within paleochannels in the Permian Wellington Formation. The silver-copper interfaces appear to be controlled by oxidation-reduction interfaces that are marked by grey to red color changes in the host sandstone. Ore microscopic examinations of polished thin sections show that unoxidized ore consists of chalcocite, digenite, chalcopyrite, covellite and pyrite; and oxidized ores are characterized by covellite, bornite, hematite and goethite. In sandstone-hosted ores, chalcocite and digenite replace dolomite and border clastic quartz grains. In siltstone-hosted ores, the copper sulfide grains have varied shapes; most are irregular in shape and 5-25 ??m across, others have euhedral shapes suggestive of pyrite crystal replacements, and some are crudely spherical and are 120-200 ??m across. Chalcopyrite is the predominant copper sulfide at depth. Covellite and malachite replace chalcocite and digenite near the surface. Silver only occurs as native silver; most as irregularly shaped grains 40-80 ??m across, but some as cruciform crystals that are up to 3.5 mm across. The native silver has been deposited after copper sulfides, and locally replaces chalcocite. Surficial nodules of pyrite, malachite and hematite locally are present in outcrops at the oxidation-reduction fronts. Polished sections of the nodules show that malachite forms a

  13. A geochemical assessment of possible lunar ore formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.; Colson, Russell O.; Vaniman, David

    1991-01-01

    The Moon apparently formed without appreciable water or other relatively volatile materials. Interior concentrations of water or other volatile substances appear to be extremely low. On Earth, water is important to the genesis of nearly all types of ores. Thus, some have reasoned that only abundant elements would occur in ore concentrations. The definition and recognition of ores on the Moon challenge the imaginations and the terrestrial perceptions of ore bodies. Lunar ores included solar-wind soaked soils, which contain abundant but dilute H, C, N, and noble gases (including He-3). Oxygen must be mined; soils contain approximately 45 percent (wt). Mainstream processes of rock formation concentrated Si, Mg, Al, Fe, and Ca, and possibly Ti and Cr. The highland surface contains approximately 70 percent (wt) feldspar (mainly CaAl2Si2O8), which can be separated from some highland soils. Small fragments of dunite were collected; dunite may occur in walls and central peaks of some craters. Theoretical extensions of observations of lunar samples suggest that the Moon may have produced ores of trace elements. Some small fragments have trace-element concentrations 10(exp 4) times higher than the lunar average, indicating that effective geochemical separations occurred; processes included fractional crystallization, silicate immiscibility, vaporization and condensation, and sulfide metamorphism. Operations of these processes acting on indigenous materials and on meteoritic material in the regolith could have produced ores. Infalling carbonaceous meteorites and comets have added water and hydrocarbons that may have been cold-trapped. Vesicles in basalts, pyroclastic beads, and reported transient events suggest gag emission from the lunar interior; such gas might concentrate and transport rare elements. Large impacts may disperse ores or produce them through deposition of heat at depth and by vaporization and subsequent condensation. The main problem in assessing lunar

  14. A geochemical assessment of possible lunar ore formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.; Colson, Russell O.; Vaniman, David

    1991-01-01

    The Moon apparently formed without appreciable water or other relatively volatile materials. Interior concentrations of water or other volatile substances appear to be extremely low. On Earth, water is important to the genesis of nearly all types of ores. Thus, some have reasoned that only abundant elements would occur in ore concentrations. The definition and recognition of ores on the Moon challenge the imaginations and the terrestrial perceptions of ore bodies. Lunar ores included solar-wind soaked soils, which contain abundant but dilute H, C, N, and noble gases (including He-3). Oxygen must be mined; soils contain approximately 45 percent (wt). Mainstream processes of rock formation concentrated Si, Mg, Al, Fe, and Ca, and possibly Ti and Cr. The highland surface contains approximately 70 percent (wt) feldspar (mainly CaAl2Si2O8), which can be separated from some highland soils. Small fragments of dunite were collected; dunite may occur in walls and central peaks of some craters. Theoretical extensions of observations of lunar samples suggest that the Moon may have produced ores of trace elements. Some small fragments have trace-element concentrations 10(exp 4) times higher than the lunar average, indicating that effective geochemical separations occurred; processes included fractional crystallization, silicate immiscibility, vaporization and condensation, and sulfide metamorphism. Operations of these processes acting on indigenous materials and on meteoritic material in the regolith could have produced ores. Infalling carbonaceous meteorites and comets have added water and hydrocarbons that may have been cold-trapped. Vesicles in basalts, pyroclastic beads, and reported transient events suggest gag emission from the lunar interior; such gas might concentrate and transport rare elements. Large impacts may disperse ores or produce them through deposition of heat at depth and by vaporization and subsequent condensation. The main problem in assessing lunar

  15. The Paleoproterozoic McArthur River (HYC) Pb/Zn/Ag deposit of northern Australia: organic geochemistry and ore genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junhong; Walter, Malcolm R.; Logan, Graham A.; Hinman, Mark C.; Summons, Roger E.

    2003-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ore and mudstone within the McArthur River ore deposit show compound distribution patterns similar to those of hydrothermally generated petroleum in the Guaymas Basin and significantly different from those found in conventional oil. PAH abundances and their isomer distributions result from a temperature gradient between the source of mineralizing fluids and the sediments fringing the ore system during ore formation. Along with other geochemical, geological, paleobiological and mineralogical lines of evidence, these data provide strong evidence that the ore formed within partially lithified sediments under marine conditions. Given that the McArthur River ore body is an exquisitely preserved example of a sediment-hosted base-metal deposit, these results may be widely applicable. The McArthur deposit is also a rich repository of paleobiological information, allowing studies of the microbiology of ore formation and the paleobiology of an ancient hydrothermal system, as is discussed elsewhere.

  16. Nickel dispersion and enrichment at the bottom of the regolith: formation of pimelite target-like ores in rock block joints (Koniambo Ni deposit, New Caledonia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathelineau, Michel; Quesnel, Benoît; Gautier, Pierre; Boulvais, Philippe; Couteau, Clément; Drouillet, Maxime

    2016-02-01

    In New Caledonian Ni deposits, the richest Ni silicate ores occur in fractures within the bedrock and saprolite, generally several tens of meters to hundred meters below the present-day surface. Fracture-related Ni silicate ore accounts for high Ni grades, at least a few weight percent above the average exploited grade (2.5 %). These Ni-rich veins are affected by active dissolution-precipitation processes at the level of the water table. Ni in solution is precipitated as silicates in thin layer cementing joints. This mineralization is characterized by chemical and mineralogical concentric zoning with an outer green rim around an inner white zone composed, from the edge to the centre of the block, (i) a highly oxidized and altered zone, (ii) a green pure Ni-rich pimelite zone, (iii) a zone (limited to a few centimetres) with a mixture of Ni-poor kerolite and Ni-rich pimelite and intermediate colours and (iv) a large white Mg-kerolite mineralization zone. This study proposes that the concentric zonation results from evapo-precipitation process related to alternate periods of hydration and drying, induced by water table movements. This extensive dispersion of Ni in concentrically zoned ores can partly explain the rather monotonous Ni grade of the bulk exploitation at the base of the regolith with values between 2 and 3 wt%.

  17. Mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of the Noamundi-Koira basin iron ore deposits (India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Azimuddin; Alvi, Shabbar Habib; Ilbeyli, Nurdane

    2015-04-01

    India is one of the richest sources of iron ore deposits in the world; and one of them is located in the Noamundi-Koira basin, Singhbhum-Orissa craton. The geological comparative studies of banded iron formation (BIF) and associated iron ores of Noamundi-Koira iron ore deposits, belonging to the iron ore group in eastern India, focus on the study of mineralogy and major elemental compositions along with the geological evaluation of different iron ores. The basement of the Singhbhum-Orissa craton is metasedimentary rocks which can be traced in a broadly elliptical pattern of granitoids, surrounded by metasediments and metavolcanics of Greenstone Belt association. The Singhbhum granitoid is intrusive into these old rocks and to younger, mid Archaean metasediments, including iron formations, schists and metaquartzites and siliciclastics of the Precambrian Iron Ore Group (Saha et al., 1994; Sharma, 1994). The iron ore of Noamundi-Koira can be divided into seven categories (Van Schalkwyk and Beukes 1986). They are massive, hard laminated, soft laminated, martite-goethite, powdery blue dust and lateritic ore. Although it is more or less accepted that the parent rock of iron ore is banded hematite jasper (BHJ), the presence of disseminated martite in BHJ suggests that the magnetite of protore was converted to martite. In the study area, possible genesis of high-grade hematite ore could have occurred in two steps. In the first stage, shallow, meteoric fluids affect primary, unaltered BIF by simultaneously oxidizing magnetite to martite and replacing quartz with hydrous iron oxides. In the second stage of supergene processes, deep burial upgrades the hydrous iron oxides to microplaty hematite. Removal of silica from BIF and successive precipitation of iron resulted in the formation of martite- goethite ore. Soft laminated ores were formed where precipitation of iron was partial or absent. The leached out space remains with time and the interstitial space is generally filled

  18. Geology and ore deposits of the Pioche district, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westgate, L.G.; Knopf, Adolph

    1932-01-01

    LOCATION AND SURFACE FEATURES The Bristol Range, Highland, and Ely Range quadrangles make up the larger part of a. rectangular area 35 miles north and south by 24 miles east and west, which lies 19 miles west of the Nevada-Utah line and about 250 miles southwest of Salt Lake City. The district lies within the Great Basin, a semiarid region of alternating mountain ranges and intermontane plains floored largely by outwash from the mountains. The plain, which slopes away from the ranges, stands between 4,700 and 6,000 feet above the sea. The Bristol and Highland Ranges, which are separated only by a low gap, form an almost continuous north-south range that rises about 2,500 feet above the highest part of the surrounding plain, to general altitudes of 8,000 to 9,000 feet, though the highest point, Highland Peak, reaches 9,395 feet. A lower range, the Ely Range, with a northwesterly trend, lies farther east and nearly in touch with the Bristol-Highland Range. The town of Pioche lies midway on the. eastern foot of the Ely Range. ROOKS OF THE PIOOHB REGION The rocks of the ranges are Paleozoic sediments, Tertiary (?) lavas and intrusive rocks, and Pliocene (?) tuffs. The Paleozoic sediments have a total thickness of nearly 18,000 feet. Over 8,000 feet of the Cambrian has been measured without reaching its base. The lowest Cambrian formation is a quartzite, of which only the upper 1,500 feet is exposed, and this is followed by 1,200 feet of shale, 400 feet of limestone, aoid 150 feet of shale. Above this second shale the upper three-fourths of the Cambrian consists of limestone and dolomitic limestone. It is in the quartzite and in the limestone interbedded in and bounding the shales that the main ore bodies of the district have been found. Above the Cambrian comes 1,795 feet of Ordovician limestone, with some interbedded dolomite and with a 50-foot quartzite a, third of the way down from the top; 75 feet of Silurian dolomite; 3,000 feet of Middle Devonian dolomite with

  19. Polygenetic and polychronic uranium mineralization at deposits of the Khiagda ore field, Buryatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochkin, B. T.; Tarasov, N. N.; Andreeva, O. V.; Asadulin, En. E.; Golubev, V. N.

    2017-03-01

    The unique combination of several exogenic processes augmenting uranium mineralization followed one another in time at deposits of the Khiagda ore field and gave rise to the formation of uranium resources exceptional for the paleovalley geologic and economic type. The specific geological evolution, volcanic activity, and regional climatic conditions taken together became the main cause of local occurrence of these deposits.

  20. Geology and ore deposits of the Klondike Ridge area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vogel, John David

    1960-01-01

    part of the basal sandstone unit of the Salt Wash member of the Morrison formation. Most deposits are in a narrow, elongate mineral belt' that cuts obliquely across Klondike Ridge. The remaining deposits probably form a second 'mineral belt' lying about ? mile to the north. Manganese and copper deposits show both stratigraphic and structural controls of mineralization. Most manganese deposits are in red beds near Tertiary faults; most copper deposits, on the other hand, are in brown sandstone, limestone, or gray-green shale and, like manganese, are in or near Tertiary faults. The manganese and copper deposits are hydrothermal in origin and were formed in the roots of an ancient hot springs system, now deeply eroded. The ore-bearing solutions probably consisted of dilute, carbonate-sulfate ground water heated by the near-surface intrusion of small bodies of igneous rock. These solutions obtained their metals by leaching the wallrock; little, if any, material was added by the intrusives. The deposits were formed near the surface under conditions of hydrostatic pressure, and temperatures and pressures in the ore-bearing solutions were probably low. The early solutions were weakly alkaline and reducing in character. A convection cell was established as mineralization progressed, and surface water mingled at depth with the solutions. As a result of mixing and oxidation, the pH of the solution decreased in later stages of mineralization and the Eh rose.

  1. Sulphate and arsenate minerals as environmental indicators in the weathering zones of selected ore deposits, Western Sudetes, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parafiniuk, Jan; Siuda, Rafał; Borkowski, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    The results of a complex investigation of the sulphate and arsenate assemblages forming in the weathering zone of selected ore deposits in the Sudetes are presented. The development of the weathering zone has been characterised in the polymetallic ore deposits at Miedzianka-Ciechanowice and Radzimowice, and the pyrite deposit at Wieściszowice, which differ in the chemical compositions of the ore and barren minerals and the hydrological conditions. Secondary sulphate and arsenate mineral assemblages vary significantly among the ore deposits under study. Their crystallization is discussed, taking into consideration the stability of particular minerals and the paths of their transformation. It is shown that these minerals have great potential as indicators of weathering processes. A significant role for microorganisms in the formation of the weathering zone of the ore deposits under study is also proven.

  2. Sedimentary carbonate-hosted giant Bayan Obo REE-Fe-Nb ore deposit of Inner Mongolia, China; a cornerstone example for giant polymetallic ore deposits of hydrothermal origin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, E.C.T.; Back, J.M.; Minkin, J.A.; Tatsumoto, M.; Junwen, Wang; Conrad, J.E.; McKee, E.H.; Zonglin, Hou; Qingrun, Meng; Shengguang, Huang

    1997-01-01

    Detailed, integrative field and laboratory studies of the textures, structures, chemical characteristics, and isotopically determined ages and signatures of mineralization of the Bayan Obo deposit provided evidence for the origin and characteristics favorable for its formation and parameters necessary for defining giant polymetallic deposits of hydrothermal origin. Bayan Obo is an epigenetic, metasomatic, hydrothermal rare earth element (REE)-Fe-Nb ore deposit that is hosted in the metasedimentary H8 dolostone marble of the Middle Proterozoic Bayan Obo Group. The metasedimentary sequence was deposited on the northern continental slope of the North China craton. The mine area is about 100 km south of the suture marking Caledonian subduction of the Mongolian oceanic plate from the north beneath the North China craton. The mineralogy of the deposit is very complex, consisting of more than 120 different minerals, some of which are epigenetic minerals introduced by hydrothermal solutions, and some of which are primary and secondary metamorphic minerals. The major REE minerals are monazite and bastnaesite, whereas magnetite and hematite are the dominant Fe-ore minerals, and columbite is the most abundant Nb mineral. Dolomite, alkali amphibole, fluorite, barite, aegirine augite, apatite, phlogopite, albite, and microcline are the most widespread gangue minerals. Three general types of ores occur at Bayan Obo: disseminated, banded, and massive ores. Broad zoning of these ore types occurs in the Main and East Orebodies. Disseminated ores are in the outermost zone, banded ores are in the intermediate zone, and massive ores are in the cores of the orebodies. On the basis of field relations, host rocks, textures, structures, and mineral assemblages, many varieties of these three types of ores have been recognized and mapped. Isotopic dating of monazite, bastnaesite, aeschynite, and metamorphic and metasomatic alkali amphiboles associated with the deposit provides constraints

  3. Geology and ore deposits of the Section 23 Mine, Ambrosia Lake District, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granger, H.C.; Santos, E.S.

    1982-01-01

    The section 23 mine is one of about 18 large uranium mines opened in sandstones of the fluvial Westwater Canyon Member of the Jurassic Morrison Formation in the Ambrosia Lake mining district during the early 1960s. The Ambrosia Lake district is one of several mining districts within the Grants mineral belt, an elongate zone containing many uranium deposits along the southern flank of the San Juan basin. Two distinct types of ore occur in the mine. Primary ore occurs as peneconcordant layers of uranium-rich authigenic organic matter that impregnates parts of the reduced sandstone host rocks and which are typically elongate in an east-southeast direction subparallel both to the sedimentary trends and to the present-day regional strike of the strata. These are called prefault or trend ores because of their early genesis and their elongation and alinement. A second type of ore in the mine is referred to as postfault, stacked, or redistributed ore. Its genesis was similar to that of the roll-type deposits in Tertiary rocks of Wyoming and Texas. Oxidation, related to the development of a large tongue of oxidized rock extending from Gallup to Ambrosia Lake, destroyed much of the primary ore and redistributed it as massive accumulations of lower grade ores bordering the redox interface at the edge of the tongue. Host rocks in the southern half of sec. 23 (T. 14 N., R. 10 W.) are oxidized and contain only remnants of the original, tabular, organic-rich ore. Thick bodies of roll-type ore are distributed along the leading edge of the oxidized zone, and pristine primary ore is found only near the north edge of the section. Organic matter in the primary ore was derived from humic acids that precipitated in the pores of the sandstones and fixed uranium as both coffinite and urano-organic compounds. Vanadium, molybdenum, and selenium are also associated with the ore. The secondary or roll-type ores are essentially free of organic carbon and contain uranium both as coffinite and

  4. Geology and ore deposits of the Whitepine area, Tomichi mining district, Gunnison County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Charles Sherwood

    1956-01-01

    The Tomichi mining district is on the western slope of the Continental Divide near the southern end of the Sawatch Range in southeastern Gunnison County, Colorado. The most productive part of the Tomichi district was the Whitepine area. It is estimated that since the discovery of ore in 1879 the area has produced approximately $7,000,000, principally in lead and zinc, with lesser amounts of silver, copper, and gold. Geologically, the Whitepine area is a faulted syncline of Paleozoic rocks that was intruded by Tertiary igneous rocks. The oldest rock of the area is the Silver Plume granite of pre-Cambrian age. Deposited upon this successively were the Sawatch quartzite (Late Cambrian), Manitou dolomite (Early Ordovician), Harding quartzite (Middle Ordovician), Fremont dolomite (Lade Ordovician), Chaffee formation (Late Devonian), Leadville limestone (Late Mississippian), and Beldon shale (Late Pennsylvanian); a total thickness of about 1,450 feet. During the Laramide Revolution, the sedimentary rocks were folded into a broad northward-plunging syncline, faulted, and intruded by a series of igneous rocks. The igneous rocks, in order of relative age from oldest to youngest, are: a rhyolite stock, the Princeton quartz monzonite batholith, quartz monzonite or quartz latite porphyry dikes, and rhyolite or pitchstone porphyry dikes. The ore deposits of the Whitepine area may be classified into replacement deposits, vein deposits, and contact metamorphic deposits. The replacement deposits may be further subdivided into deposits along faults and bedded deposits. Of the types of deposits, the most productive have been the replacement deposits along faults. The major replacement deposits along faults are those of the Akron, Morning Star, and Victor mines. The ore deposits of these mines are in the foot wall of the Star faults in the Akron mine in the Manitou dolomite and in the Morning Star and Victor mines in the Leadville limestone. The chief bedded replacement deposits are

  5. Analog Experiments on Sulfide Foams in Magmatic Ore Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitch, A. M.; Dahn, D.; Zavala, K.

    2009-05-01

    Metal sulfides form as an immiscible phase from silicate magmas. Dynamic mingling and unmingling of the two phases is important for the development of economic deposits: mingling promotes enrichment of the sulfide in valuable metals, and subsequent unmingling generates massive sulfide. Analog experiments were carried out to investigate mingling processes in immiscible systems, using oil, water and small beads to represent magma, sulfide liquid and silicate crystals. Stirring or injection led to the formation of a foam of analog sulfide droplets within an analog silicate framework. We propose that the partial collapse of such a foam explains massive sulfide lenses at the Voisey's Bay magmatic sulfide deposit, and that crystallization of silicate crystals in the remaining foam walls generates 'net-textured' ores. In the experiments, solid particles had a profound effect on unmingling: analog sulfide droplets were stably contained within analog crystal-rich magma and did not coalesce. We therefore suggest that 'net' and 'leopard' textures in disseminated sulfides indicate mingling of sulfide with crystal-poor magma, whereas isolated disseminated patches of sulfide indicate mingling with a crystal-rich magma.

  6. Compositional Variability of Rutile in Hydrothermal Ore Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. R.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2009-05-01

    Rutile is a relatively common accessory phase in many geological environments, and although it is almost always composed dominantly of TiO2, it is also associated with a wide range of minor and trace element substitutions. The most prominent minor elements that occur in rutile are Fe, Cr, V, Nb and Ta. Like Ti, the latter two elements are essentially immobile in most non-magmatic metallic ore deposits, and their concentrations in rutile are largely influenced by precursor mineral compositions. Iron, Cr and V concentrations vary considerably in rutile hosted by ore deposits, and reflect combinations of precursor mineral composition and the bulk chemistry of the local mineralized or altered rock environment. However, in hydrothermal alteration zones, rutile compositions are clearly anomalous compared to those in unaltered host rocks, and have distinctive elemental associations and substitutions in different types of ore deposits. We have evaluated the mineral chemistry of rutile in >40 ore deposits worldwide. In general, rutile in volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits contains Sn (and locally W, Sb and/or Cu). Rutile from mesothermal and related gold deposits invariably contains W, and in some of the larger and more important deposits, also contains Sb and/or V. Tungsten-bearing detrital rutile grains from the Witwatersrand suggest that paleoplacer mineralization may have had a mesothermal/orogenic gold source. In some magmatic-hydrothermal Pd-Ni-Cu deposits, rutile contains Ni and Cu. Rutile associated with granite-related Sn deposits has strongly elevated concentrations of Sn and W, and granite-pegmatite W-Sn deposits contain rutile with these elements plus Nb and Ta. The Olympic Dam deposit hosts rutile that is enriched in W, Sn and Cu. Rutile associated with porphyry and skarn Cu and Cu-Au deposits tends to contain elevated W, Cu (and sometimes V). Although many ore deposits have well-defined and diagnostic rutile compositions, there are some compositional

  7. The Talgan massive sulfide deposit, the southern Urals, Russia, as an example of subseafloor ore deposition from magmatic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amplieva, E. E.

    2008-10-01

    The sequence of orebody formation at the Talgan massive sulfide deposit; morphology of sulfide orebodies; mineralogy, texture, and structure of ore; chemical composition of minerals; and fluid inclusions and relationships between stable isotopes (S, C, O) in sulfides from ores and carbonate rocks are discussed. The deposit is localized in the Uzel’ga ore field of the northern Magnitogorsk Megazone. The sulfide ore is hosted in the upper felsic sequence of the Middle Devonian Karamalytash Formation, composed of basalt, basaltic andesite, and rhyodacite. Orebodies are irregular lenses lying conformably with host rocks. Pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and fahlore are the major ore minerals; galena, bornite, and hematite are of subordinate abundance. Sulfide mineralization bears attributes of deposition under subseafloor conditions. The carbonate and rhyolite interlayers at the roofs of orebodies and the supraore limestone sequence served as screens. Zoning typical of massive sulfide deposits was not established. The study of fluid inclusions has shown that the temperature of the hydrothermal solution varied from 375 to 110°C. δ34S‰ ranges from -2.4 to +3.2‰ in pyrite, from -1.2 to +2.8‰ in chalcopyrite, and from -3.5 to +3.0‰ in sphalerite (CDT). These parameters correspond to an isotopic composition of magmatic sulfur without a notable percentage of sulfate sulfur. δ13C and δ18O of carbonates vary from -18.1 to +5.9‰ (PDB) and from +13.7 to +27.8‰ (SMOW), respectively. The carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of carbonates from ores and host rocks markedly deviate from the field of marine carbonates; a deep source of carbon is suggested. The results obtained show that the main mass of polysulfide ore at the Talgan deposit was formed beneath the floor of a paleoocean. The ore-forming system was short-lived and its functioning did not give rise to the formation of zonal orebodies. Magmatic fluid played the leading role in mineral formation.

  8. Insights Into Ore Deposit Genesis Using Copper Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, K. C.; Larson, P. B.; Ramos, F. C.; Gaspar, M.; Chang, Z.

    2002-12-01

    Advances in MC-ICPMS have renewed interest in the analysis of transition metal isotopes to better constrain the processes involved in ore deposition. At WSU we employ sample-standard bracketing to accurately and precisely measure copper isotope ratios of whole mineral dissolutions without normalizing to zinc. This approach bypasses the use of chromatography for samples without significant isobaric interferences avoiding potential fractionation resulting from chromatography. Comparisons of analyses of native copper and chalcopyrite samples with and without chromatographic purification are within error. Reproducibility measured using native copper and chalcopyrite is \\pm0.03\\permil (1\\sigma, relative to NIST 976) over 2 months. We have found the range of δ65Cu values in chalcopyrite from a variety of ore deposits to be -0.9\\permil to +3.1\\permil. δ65Cu values of native copper and bornite samples are more restricted (-0.8\\permil to 1.3\\permil, and -1.1\\permil to 1.0\\permil, respectively). Additional minerals, including chalcocite, mohawkite, azurite and cuprite, have been analyzed from a variety of ore depositional environments. Variations in δ65Cu values of individual mineral species within a single deposit or district have smaller ranges. For example, "hypogene" native copper samples from the Michigan Native Copper district show a restricted range of values (0.2\\permil to 0.4\\permil), over 100km strike of the district. In addition, different genetically related minerals in the same deposit show distinctive trends in δ65Cu values. For example, co-precipitated chalcopyrite-bornite pairs from three deposits (Resolution, AZ, Beaver-Harrison Mine, UT, and Ferrobamba, Peru) display consistently higher δ65Cu values in chalcopyrite relative to bornite. Results from the Tintaya district, Peru and Resolution, AZ suggest that variations in δ65Cu values may be systematic on the deposit scale. In both deposits, δ65Cu in chalcopyrite increases with distance from

  9. The Gas Hills uranium district and some probable controls for ore deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeller, Howard Davis

    1957-01-01

    Uranium deposits occur in the upper coarse-grained facies of the Wind River formation of Eocene age in the Gas Hills district of the southern part of the Wind River Basin. Some of the principal deposits lie below the water table in the unoxidized zone and consist of uraninite and coffinite occurring as interstitial fillings in irregular blanket-like bodies. In the near-surface deposits that lie above the water table, the common yellow uranium minerals consist of uranium phosphates, silicates, and hydrous oxides. The black unoxidized uraninite -coffinite ores show enrichment of molybdenum, arsenic, and selenium when compared to the barren sandstone. Probable geologic controls for ore deposits include: 1) permeable sediments that allowed passage of ore-bearing solutions; 2) numerous faults that acted as impermeable barriers impounding the ore -bearing solutions; 3) locally abundant pyrite, carbonaceous material, and natuial gas containing hydrogen sulfide that might provide a favorable environment for precipitation of uranium. Field and laboratory evidence indicate that the uranium deposits in the Gas Hills district are very young and related to the post-Miocene to Pleistocene regional tilting to the south associated with the collapse of the Granite Mountains fault block. This may have stopped or reversed ground water movement from a northward (basinward) direction and alkaline ground water rich in carbonate could have carried the uranium into the favorable environment that induced precipitation.

  10. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons and biogeochemical sulfur cycling in the salt dome environment: Inferences from sulfur isotope and organic geochemical investigations of the Bahloul Formation at the Bou Grine Zn/Pb ore deposit, Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, A.; Shieh, Y.-N.; Pervaz, M.; Püttmann, W.

    1996-08-01

    Combined organic geochemical and stable isotope (S) analyses of samples from the Cretaceous Bahloul Formation (Tunisia) provide insight to oil accumulation processes, biogeochemical alteration of hydrocarbons, microbial sulfate reduction, and mineral deposition at the flanks of the Triassic Jebel Lorbeus diapir, forming the Bou Grine Zn/Pb deposit. The sulfur isotopic composition of the metal sulfides correlates with the degree of biodegradation of hydrocarbons, with the base-metal content and with the proportion of aromatics in the organic extracts. The δ 34S-values are interpreted to reflect bacterial sulfate reduction in a more or less closed system rather than a thermogenic contribution. The extent of H 2S production by the activity of the sulfate-reducing bacteria probably was limited by the availability of sulfate, which in turn was governed by the permeability of the respective sedimentary sequence and by the distance to the anhydrite cap rock. Evidence is provided that biodegradation of hydrocarbons and microbial sulfate reduction contribute to the formation of the high-grade mineralization inside the Bahloul Formation at the contact with the salt dome cap rock. The metals probably were derived through leaching of deeper sedimentary sequences by hot hypersaline basinal brines, evolved by dissolution of salt at the flanks of the diapirs. These hot metalliferous brines are proposed to migrate up around the diapir, finally mixing with near-surface, sulfate-rich brines in the roof zone. When the fluids came in contact with the organic-rich sediments of the Bahloul Formation, the dissolved sulfate was reduced by the sulfate-reducing bacteria. Hydrocarbons generated or accumulated in the Bahloul Formation were utilized by sulfate reducers. The occurrence of high amounts of native sulfur in high-grade ore samples suggest that the production rate of H 2S by bacterial sulfate reduction exceeded its consumption by metal-sulfide precipitation. The supply of dissolved

  11. Rock magnetic properties and ore microscopy of the iron ore deposit of Las Truchas, Michoacan, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    1998-02-01

    Iron ore and host rocks have been sampled (90 oriented samples from 19 sites) from the Las Truchas mine, western Mexico. A broad range of magnetic parameters have been studied to characterize the samples: saturation magnetization, Curie temperature, density, susceptibility, remanence intensity, Koenigsberger ratio, and hysteresis parameters. Magnetic properties are controlled by variations in titanomagnetite content, deuteric oxidation, and hydrothermal alteration. Las Truchas deposit formed by contact metasomatism in a Mesozoic volcano-sedimentary sequence intruded by a batholith, and titanomagnetites underwent intermediate degrees of deuteric oxidation. Post-mineralization hydrothermal alteration, evidenced by pyrite, epidote, sericite, and kaolin, seems to be the major event that affected the minerals and magnetic properties. Magnetite grain sizes in iron ores range from 5 to >200 μm, which suggest dominance of multidomain (MD) states. Curie temperatures are 580±5°C, characteristic of magnetite. Hysteresis parameters indicate that most samples have MD magnetite, some samples pseudo-single domain (PSD), and just a few single domain (SD) particles. AF demagnetization and IRM acquisition indicate that NRM and laboratory remanences are carried by MD magnetite in iron ores and PSD-SD magnetite in host rocks. The Koenigsberger ratio falls in a narrow range between 0.1 and 10, indicating the significance of MD and PSD magnetites.

  12. PGM in chromite ore of the Sopcheozero deposit, Kola Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neradovsky, Yu. N.; Savchenko, E. E.

    2008-12-01

    The Sopcheozero chromite deposit is hosted in dunite of the Monchegorsk layered intrusion as a sheetlike body of disseminated ore with a chromite grade varying from 20 to 60%. The total PGM content in the ore attains 0.5-0.8 g/t. The composition of host rocks varies from plagioclase peridotite to dunite, but PGM were found only in chromite-bearing dunite. PGM inclusions were detected in the interstices of chromite and olivine grains and within grains themselves. The data obtained confirm the known tendency toward variation in PGM composition with increasing sulfur and light PGE contents in the residual magmatic melt. The first particles of refractory Ir, Os, and Ru intermetallides appeared at the final stage of olivine crystallization, whereas laurite (Ru,Os,Ir)S2 and pentlandite (Fe,Ni)9S8 were formed at the final stage of chromite crystallization, when the sulfur concentration in the residual melt became sufficient.

  13. Application of natural analog studies to exploration for ore deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, D.L.

    1995-09-01

    Natural analogs are viewed as similarities in nature and are routinely utilized by exploration geologists in their search for economic mineral deposits. Ore deposit modeling is undertaken by geologists to direct their exploration activities toward favorable geologic environments and, therefore, successful programs. Two types of modeling are presented: (i) empirical model development based on the study of known ore deposit characteristics, and (ii) concept model development based on theoretical considerations and field observations that suggest a new deposit type, not known to exist in nature, may exist and justifies an exploration program. Key elements that are important in empirical model development are described, and examples of successful applications of these natural analogs to exploration are presented. A classical example of successful concept model development, the discovery of the McLaughlin gold mine in California, is presented. The utilization of natural analogs is an important facet of mineral exploration. Natural analogs guide explorationists in their search for new discoveries, increase the probability of success, and may decrease overall exploration expenditure.

  14. The coupled geochemistry of Au and As in pyrite from hydrothermal ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deditius, Artur P.; Reich, Martin; Kesler, Stephen E.; Utsunomiya, Satoshi; Chryssoulis, Stephen L.; Walshe, John; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2014-09-01

    The ubiquity of Au-bearing arsenian pyrite in hydrothermal ore deposits suggests that the coupled geochemical behaviour of Au and As in this sulfide occurs under a wide range of physico-chemical conditions. Despite significant advances in the last 20 years, fundamental factors controlling Au and As ratios in pyrite from ore deposits remain poorly known. Here we explore these constraints using new and previously published EMPA, LA-ICP-MS, SIMS, and μ-PIXE analyses of As and Au in pyrite from Carlin-type Au, epithermal Au, porphyry Cu, Cu-Au, and orogenic Au deposits, volcanogenic massive sulfide (VHMS), Witwatersrand Au, iron oxide copper gold (IOCG), and coal deposits. Pyrite included in the data compilation formed under temperatures from ∼30 to ∼600 °C and in a wide variety of geological environments. The pyrite Au-As data form a wedge-shaped zone in compositional space, and the fact that most data points plot below the solid solubility limit defined by Reich et al. (2005) indicate that Au1+ is the dominant form of Au in arsenian pyrite and that Au-bearing ore fluids that deposit this sulfide are mostly undersaturated with respect to native Au. The analytical data also show that the solid solubility limit of Au in arsenian pyrite defined by an Au/As ratio of 0.02 is independent of the geochemical environment of pyrite formation and rather depends on the crystal-chemical properties of pyrite and post-depositional alteration. Compilation of Au-As concentrations and formation temperatures for pyrite indicates that Au and As solubility in pyrite is retrograde; Au and As contents decrease as a function of increasing temperature from ∼200 to ∼500 °C. Based on these results, two major Au-As trends for Au-bearing arsenian pyrite from ore deposits are defined. One trend is formed by pyrites from Carlin-type and orogenic Au deposits where compositions are largely controlled by fluid-rock interactions and/or can be highly perturbed by changes in temperature and

  15. REE Mineralization in Kiruna-type Magnetite-Apatite Ore Deposits: Magmatism and Metasomatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlov, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetite-apatite ore bodies of the Kiruna type occur worldwide and are generally associated with volcanic rocks or volcanism. They also show strong evidence of extensive metasomatism over a wide P-T range. Notable examples include the Kiirunavaara ore body, northern Sweden (Harlov et al., 2002, Chem. Geol., 191, 47-72); the Grängesberg ore body, central Sweden (Jonsson et al., 2010, NGF abstracts, vol 1, 88-89); the Mineville ore body, Adirondacks, New York, USA (McKeown and Klemc, 1956, U.S. Geol Sur Bull (1956), pp. 9-23); the Pea Ridge ore body, SE Missouri, USA (Kerr, 1998, MS Thesis, Univ. Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada 113 pp); the Jurassic Marcona ore body in south-central Peru (Chen et al., 2010, Econ Geol, 105, 1441-1456); and a collection of ore bodies from the Bafq Region, central Iran (Daliran et al., 2010, Geol. Assoc. Canada, Short Course Notes, v. 20, p.147-159). In these ore bodies, low Th and U monazite, xenotime, allanite, REE carbonates, and/or REE fluorides are commonly associated with the apatite as inclusions, rim grains, or as independent grains in the surrounding mineral matrix. High contrast BSE imaging, coupled with EMPA and LA-ICPMS, indicates that the apatite has experienced fluid-induced alteration in the form of (Y+REE) + Na + Si + Cl depletion implying that it served as the source for the (Y+REE) (e.g. Kiirunavaara, northern Sweden; Harlov et al., 2002). Formation of monazite and xenotime associated with fluorapatite, as inclusions or rim grains, has experimentally been demonstrated to originate from the fluorapatite as the result of fluid-aided, coupled dissolution-reprecipitation processes (Harlov et al., 2005, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 150, 268-286). This is explains the low Th and U content of the monazite and xenotime. Fluid sources could range from 700-900 °C, residual, acidic (HCl, H2HSO4) grain boundary fluids, remaining after the last stages of ore body crystallization, to later stage, cooler (< 600 °C) (H2O-CO2-(Na

  16. Precambrian rift: genesis of strata-bound ore deposits.

    PubMed

    Kanasewich, E R

    1968-09-06

    Study of deep seismic reflections has detected a Precambrian rift valley below flat-lying sediments in southern Alberta. The anomalous magnetic and gravity trends show that the rift is continuous across Alberta and British Columbia (through the Kimberley lead-zinc field) and possibly the Coeur d'Alene mining district of Idaho. There is evidence that these ore bodies were deposited in a Precambrian rift under conditions similar to those prevailing in the hot-brine areas of the modern Red Sea.

  17. Geology and Ore Deposits of the Uncompahgre (Ouray) Mining District, Southwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burbank, Wilbur Swett; Luedke, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    The Uncompahgre mining district, part of the Ouray mining district, includes an area of about 15 square miles (mi2) on the northwestern flank of the San Juan Mountains in southwestern Colorado from which ores of gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc have had a gross value of $14 to 15 million. Bedrock within the district ranges in age from Proterozoic to Cenozoic. The oldest or basement rocks, the Uncompahgre Formation of Proterozoic age, consist of metamorphic quartzite and slate and are exposed in a small erosional window in the southern part of the district. Overlying those rocks with a profound angular unconformity are Paleozoic marine sedimentary rocks consisting mostly of limestones and dolomites and some shale and sandstone that are assigned to the Elbert Formation and Ouray Limestone, both of Devonian age, and the Leadville Limestone of Mississippian age. These units are, in turn, overlain by rocks of marine transitional to continental origin that are assigned to the Molas and Hermosa Formations of Pennsylvanian age and the Cutler Formation of Permian age; these three formations are composed predominantly of conglomerates, sandstones, and shales that contain interbedded fossiliferous limestones within the lower two-thirds of the sequence. The overlying Mesozoic strata rest also on a pronounced angular unconformity upon the Paleozoic section. This thick Mesozoic section, of which much of the upper part was eroded before the region was covered by rocks of Tertiary age, consists of the Dolores Formation of Triassic age, the Entrada Sandstone, Wanakah Formation, and Morrison Formation all of Jurassic age, and the Dakota Sandstone and Mancos Shale of Cretaceous age. These strata dominantly consist of shales, mudstones, and sandstones and minor limestones, breccias, and conglomerates. In early Tertiary time the region was beveled by erosion and then covered by a thick deposit of volcanic rocks of mid-Tertiary age. These volcanic rocks, assigned to the San Juan

  18. Geology and ore deposits of Johnny M mine, Ambrosia Lake District

    SciTech Connect

    Falkowski, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    The Johnny M mine is one of very few mines in the Ambrosia Lake district with uranium ore in two members of the Morrison Formation (Jurassic); these members are the Westwater Canyon Sandstone and the Brushy Basin Shale. The Westwater Canyon ore is contained in the two upper sandstone units of the member, and the Brushy Basin ore is contained in the Poison Canyon sandstone (informal usage). The sedimentary features and structures in the Westwater Canyon sandstones indicate that the sediments were deposited by a system of aggrading braided streams, possibly at the distal end of coalescing alluvial fans. The Poison Canyon sandstone was probably the result of deposition in a complex environment of meandering and braided streams. Paleocurrent-direction indicators, such as fossilized-log orientation, foreset azimuths, and the axes of crossbeds and channel scours, suggest that the local palostream flow was to the east and southeast. The uranium mineralization is closely associated with 1) local accumulations of carbonaceous (humate) matter derived from the decay of organic material and 2) paleostream channels preserved in the rocks. The ore elements were derived from the leaching of volcanic air-fall tuffs and ash, which were introduced into the fluvial system during volcanic activity in the western United States. The mobile ore-element ions were reduce and concentrated by humic acids and bacteria present in the fluvial system and ultimately remobilized into the forms present today. The uranium is thus envisioned as forming either essentially on the surface as the sediments were being deposited or at very shallow depth.

  19. Ore Deposits of the Jerome and Bradshaw Mountains Quadrangles, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindgren, Waldemar; Heikes, V.C.

    1926-01-01

    In the summer of 1922, at the request of the Director of the United States Geological Survey, I undertook an examination of the ore deposits in the Jerome and Bradshaw Mountains quadrangles, Ariz. (See fig. 1.) The object of this work was not a detailed investigation of each deposit but rather a coordination and classification of the occurrences and an attempt to ascertain their origin and economic importance. Almost all the deposits occur in pre-Cambrian rocks or in rocks that are not readily differentiated from the pre-Cambrian. In the northern part of the Jerome quadrangle there are large areas of almost horizontal Paleozoic beds, and in both quadrangles there are also large areas of lava flows of Tertiary age. Finally there are wide spaces occupied by Tertiary tuff and limestone, or by Tertiary and Quaternary wash filling the valleys between the mountain ranges. But all these rocks except the pre-Cambrian are practically barren of ore deposits, and the problem therefore narrowed itself to an examination of the pre-Cambrian areas. This task was greatly facilitated by the careful work of Jaggar and Palache, set forth in the Bradshaw Mountains folio,l in which the southern quadrangle of the two under present consideration is mapped geologically and described, and which also includes a comprehensive though brief discussion of the mineral deposits. There is no published geologic map of the Jerome quadrangle, but I had the opportunity through the courtesy of Dr. G. M. Butler, Director of the Arizona Bureau of Mines, to use a manuscript map of this area prepared for the State by Mr. L. E. Reber, jr., and Mr. Olaf Jenkins.

  20. Characterization of U ore from a roll-front U deposit: Implications of dominant U-Ti mineral for ore genesis and post solution-mining U immobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. T.; Basu, A.; Christensen, J. N.; Reimus, P. W.; Heikoop, J. M.; WoldeGabriel, G. W.; Hartmann, M.; DePaolo, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Reductive immobilization of dissolved U(VI) is an important process that gives rise to roll-front U deposits as well as offers a remediation strategy after in situ recovery (ISR) mining of roll-fronts by oxidative dissolution of the U ore. About 25% of the global and over 90% of all U resources in the United States consist of roll-front deposits. Accordingly, ~50% of global U mining and almost all current U mining in the United States is ISR mining. Therefore, it is important to identify the U immobilization pathways for an improved understanding of the U ore genesis and postmining U(VI) remediation. Here, we characterize (XRD, XRF, SEM/EDS, QEMSCAN) the U ore from a roll-front U deposit and sediments downgradient of the ore from an ISR site at Rosita, TX, USA. The dominant U mineral in Rosita U ore is brannerite (nominally U4+Ti2O6, up to 0.032 wt%), followed by coffinite and U-oxides. The U mineralized sand is composed of quartz (41-53%), calcite (15-30%), plagioclase (11-19%), microcline (2-9%), clinoptilolite (0.5-7%) with minor amounts of pyrite/marcasite (2-7%) and clays/micas (1-4%), and very little organic C (<0.1%). Ore zone samples contain minor amounts (<2%) of hematite, V-oxides/V-Ti-Fe-oxides and sulfidized Fe-Ti oxides with variable Fe, Ti and S ratios locally hosting low levels of U. The dominant sulfide mineral is marcasite. We observe a complex relationship between U-Ti minerals and sulfide/silicate phases where U minerals occur as inclusions, irregularly developed veins or intergrowths. Except for the U concentrations, the downgradient sediments are compositionally similar to the ore and contain abundant smectite/illite (7-45%). The predominance of brannerite implies direct reduction of U(VI) on surfaces of reduced Fe-Ti oxides as a major ore-forming mechanism. Our results reveal an as yet unidentified mechanism of ore genesis that differs from the current model that presupposes the sulfidized Fe-Ti oxides as the main reductant of U

  1. Analytical fingerprint for tantalum ores from African deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melcher, F.; Graupner, T.; Sitnikova, M.; Oberthür, T.; Henjes-Kunst, F.; Gäbler, E.; Rantitsch, G.

    2009-04-01

    Kibaran age either show flat patterns for most tantalites, rising values from the LREE to the HREE, or trough-like patterns. Eu anomalies are strongly negative in columbite-tantalite from the Alto Ligonha Province in Mozambique, from the Namaqualand Province (Namibia, South Africa), and from Zimbabwe. Four main age populations of coltan deposits in Africa were revealed: (1) Archean (>2.5 Ga), (2) Paleoproterozoic (2.1-1.9 Ga), (3) early Neoproterozoic ("Kibaran", 1.0-0.9 Ga), and (4) late Neoproterozoic to early Paleozoic (Pan-African; ca. 0.6-0.4 Ga). Currently, we focus on the resolution of the fingerprinting system from region via ore province down to deposit scale, establishing a large and high-quality analytical data base, and developing fast-screening and low-cost methods. Analytical flow-charts and identification schemes for coltan ores will be presented at the Conference. The analytical results obtained so far indicate that a certification scheme including fingerprinting of sources of coltan ores is feasible. The methodology developed is capable to assist in the establishment of a control instrument in an envisaged certification of the production and trade chain of coltan.

  2. Biogeometallurgical pre-mining characterization of ore deposits: an approach to increase sustainability in the mining process.

    PubMed

    Dold, Bernhard; Weibel, Leyla

    2013-11-01

    Based on the knowledge obtained from acid mine drainage formation in mine waste environments (tailings impoundments and waste rock dumps), a new methodology is applied to characterize new ore deposits before exploitation starts. This gives the opportunity to design optimized processes for metal recovery of the different mineral assemblages in an ore deposit and at the same time to minimize the environmental impact and costs downstream for mine waste management. Additionally, the whole economic potential is evaluated including strategic elements. The methodology integrates high-resolution geochemistry by sequential extractions and quantitative mineralogy in combination with kinetic bioleach tests. The produced data set allows to define biogeometallurgical units in the ore deposit and to predict the behavior of each element, economically or environmentally relevant, along the mining process.

  3. Ore deposits of the Gilman District, Eagle County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.S.; Tweto, Ogden; Lovering, T.G.

    1978-01-01

    The Gilman mining district, known also in the past as the Red Cliff district, is in the mountains of southeastern Eagle County, west-central Colorado. The district is the leading source of zinc in Colorado and one of the major base-metal mining districts in the State. As valued at the time of production, total output of zinc, silver, copper, lead, and gold through 1972 was about $328 million. About 90 percent of this total was produced after 1930. The productive part of the district is an area of about 3 square miles (7.8 square kilometers) on the northeast side of the deep canyon of the Eagle River between the small towns of Gilman and Red Cliff. The ore deposits are principally replacement deposits in dolomites of Mississippian and Devonian age and in quartzite of Cambrian age. A few productive veins occur in Precambrian rocks. The replacement deposits crop out in the cliffs of the canyon wall and extend northeastward downdip beneath Battle Mountain, which is composed of a thick sequence of Pennsylvanian clastic rocks. The deposits were originally worked through several separate mines along the canyon wall, but since 1918, all deposits in dolomite rocks, except some small ones near Red Cliff, have been worked through the Eagle mine of the New Jersey Zinc Company at Gilman. The Gilman district lies on the eastern flank of the huge anticline of the Sawatch Range, near the steeply plunging north end of the anticline. Sedimentary rocks on the flank of this part of the anticline dip homoclinally northeastward to a synclinal axis about 8 mi (miles) (13 km (kilometers> northeast of Gilman and then rise more steeply to the Gore fault at the edge of the Gore Range. The homocline is broken by only a few faults most of which have displacements of less than 100 ft (feet) (30 m (meters>. In contrast, the underlying Precambrian rocks are broken by numerous faults and shear zones related to the Homestake shear zone, a northeast-trending master shear zone several miles wide

  4. Mineralogy and geochemistry of banded iron formation and iron ores from eastern India with implications on their genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Subrata; Venkatesh, A. S.

    2009-12-01

    The geological complexities of banded iron formation (BIF) and associated iron ores of Jilling-Langalata iron ore deposits, Singhbhum-North Orissa Craton, belonging to Iron Ore Group (IOG) eastern India have been studied in detail along with the geochemical evaluation of different iron ores. The geochemical and mineralogical characterization suggests that the massive, hard laminated, soft laminated ore and blue dust had a genetic lineage from BIFs aided with certain input from hydrothermal activity. The PAAS normalized REE pattern of Jilling BIF striking positive Eu anomaly, resembling those of modern hydrothermal solutions from mid-oceanic ridge (MOR). Major part of the iron could have been added to the bottom sea water by hydrothermal solutions derived from hydrothermally active anoxic marine environments. The ubiquitous presence of intercalated tuffaceous shales indicates the volcanic signature in BIF. Mineralogical studies reveal that magnetite was the principal iron oxide mineral, whose depositional history is preserved in BHJ, where it remains in the form of martite and the platy hematite is mainly the product of martite. The different types of iron ores are intricately related with the BHJ. Removal of silica from BIF and successive precipitation of iron by hydrothermal fluids of possible meteoric origin resulted in the formation of martite-goethite ore. The hard laminated ore has been formed in the second phase of supergene processes, where the deep burial upgrades the hydrous iron oxides to hematite. The massive ore is syngenetic in origin with BHJ. Soft laminated ores and biscuity ores were formed where further precipitation of iron was partial or absent.

  5. Combined use of the leucoxene ores of the Yarega deposit with the formation of synthetic rutile and wollastonite and the recovery of rare and rare-earth elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadykhov, G. B.; Zablotskaya, Yu. V.; Anisonyan, K. G.; Olyunina, T. V.

    2016-11-01

    A new process of catalytic autoclave desiliconization of the leucoxene concentrate by lime milk with the formation of synthetic rutile and wollastonite is developed. The general laws of the processes occurring under the conditions of pressure leaching of the concentrate are revealed, and the main leaching parameters that ensure selective desiliconization of leucoxene grains are determined. The leucoxene concentrate is shown to contain rare and rare-earth elements. They are concentrated in synthetic rutile during desiliconization, which facilitates their extraction during subsequent chlorination of rutile.

  6. Metal Concentrations of Mississippi Valley-type Ore Fluids Predicted from Solid Solution Metal Concentrations in Ore-Stage Calcite and Implications for Ore Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. E.; Appold, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Mississippi-Valley-type (MVT) ore deposits represent significant enrichments of Zn, Pb, Ba, and F in the Earth's crust. Knowledge of the ore fluid concentrations of these elements is key to understanding their transport and precipitation to form deposits. LA-ICP-MS analyses of fluid inclusions have been the principle method used in recent research to determine the composition of MVT ore fluids. However, LA-ICP-MS results for Pb and Zn concentrations are ambiguous due to interferences from the host mineral matrix or possibly mineral accidentals within the fluid inclusions, motivating research for other methods to determine metal concentrations in MVT ore fluids. The present study was undertaken in an attempt to calculate ore fluid metal concentrations from their solid solution concentration in ore-stage calcite. Experimental distribution coefficients from Rimstidt et al. (1998) at 100° C were used in conjunction with solid solution metal concentrations of ore-stage calcite from the Illinois-Kentucky (IK) and Central-Tennessee (CT) MVT districts to predict ore fluid concentrations of Zn, Fe, Mg, and Mn. Predicted Mg and Mn ore fluid concentrations, which along with Zn and Fe form carbonate minerals (magnesite, rhodochrosite, smithsonite, and siderite) with the calcite structure, agreed well with available fluid inclusion data for these elements. Thus, the 1's of ppm Zn and 0.1's to 1's of ppm Fe ore fluid concentrations predicted in this study are also likely to be correct. Conversely, the predicted ore fluid concentrations of Sr and Ba, which along with Pb form carbonate minerals (strontianite, witherite, and cerrusite) with the aragonite structure, were in poor agreement with available fluid inclusion data for these elements. Thus, the predicted 1's of ppm ore fluid concentrations of Pb are unlikely to be accurate. The Zn concentrations calculated in this study for the IK and CT ore fluids have direct implications for the time needed to form the ores in these

  7. Geological characteristics and ore-forming process of the gold deposits in the western Qinling region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiajun; Liu, Chonghao; Carranza, Emmanuel John M.; Li, Yujie; Mao, Zhihao; Wang, Jianping; Wang, Yinhong; Zhang, Jing; Zhai, Degao; Zhang, Huafeng; Shan, Liang; Zhu, Laimin; Lu, Rukui

    2015-05-01

    , changes of physico-chemical conditions resulted in fluid immiscibility that played a key role in gold and sulfide deposition. The geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of the Carlin-type deposits in the western Qinling region are similar to those in the Carlin trend, Nevada, USA. Gold deposits such as La'erma and Jinlongshan occur mostly in the southeastern margin of the western Qinling regionic region whereas some deposits occur in its eastern part. These deposits are hosted in slightly metamorphosed Cambrian to Triassic sedimentary rocks, showing structurally- and stratigraphically-controlled features. The deposits mainly contain submicroscopic and microscopic gold in arsenian pyrite and arsenopyrite, with characteristic ore-forming elements of Au-As-Sb-Ba. The ore-forming fluids are early-stocked formation water and later-recharged meteoric water. Meteoric water apparently evolved in ore-forming fluids by circulation, indicating the extensional setting, and led to the deposition of Au and other elements in cool reactive permeable rocks at shallow levels, forming the disseminated ores. Carlin-like gold deposits occur between the Shang-Dan suture and the Fengxian-Zhen'an fault. The host rocks are mainly sedimentary rocks that underwent reconstruction through reworking by structural metamorphism. These deposits are structurally controlled by brittle-ductile shear zone and occur adjacent to granitoid plutons. The most important characteristic that differ to the orogenic and Carlin-type gold deposits is the genetic relationship with the synchronous magmatism. Gold occurs mainly as microscopic gold. Pyrite and arsenian pyrite can be recognized as gold-bearing minerals. The ore-forming fluids are main magmatic water mixed with metamorphic and/or formation water. Similar to orogenic gold deposits, fluid immiscibility caused the deposition of gold Carlin-like gold deposits.

  8. Palaeoproterozoic metavolcanic and metasedimentary succession hosting the Dannemora iron ore deposits, Bergslagen region, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlin, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Dannemora inlier constitutes some of the best preserved primary structures and textures in the metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks in the Bergslagen region. The aim for this study was to define and interpret the primary textures and deposition environment to obtain a better understanding of the palaeoenvironment in which the Dannemora iron ore deposit formed. In addition, the region has been subjected to at least two fold episodes therefore the establishment of stratigraphy and younging directions were crucial for structural interpretations. The Bergslagen region, located in the south-central Sweden, represents a back-arc setting active c. 1.9 Ga and consisted of numerous large calderas, that accommodated pyroclastic deposits of great thicknesses. The Dannemora inlier is composed of the supracrustal the Dannemora Formation, which is dominated by of metavolcanic rocks and subordinated by marble. The succession is 700-800 m and is divided into a lower and an upper member. The latter hosts the second largest iron ore deposit in the Bergslagen region. The ore is hosted by manganiferous skarn and dolomitic carbonate (marble) and is situated within uppermost part of the upper member positioned in an isoclinal syncline. From reflection seismic imaging and 3-D processing, the ore has been interpreted to reach depths of c. 2000 m. The presence of an anticline west of the ore bearing syncline is suggested by the geochemical similarities of rock units. Undisturbed layers of ash-siltstone with normal grading and fluid-escape structures, units of pyroclastic density currents and ash-fall in the eastern part of the Dannemora inlier indicate subaqueous deposition below wave base of the upper member. Reworking of the volcaniclastic deposits is evident in e.g. channels and cross-bedding, on the other hand, implies deposition above wave base of the upper member in the central part of Dannemora inlier. The thickness of the marble in the eastern part is c. 80 m and in the

  9. Ore-fluid evolution at the Getchell Carlin-type gold deposit, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cline, J.S.; Hofstra, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Minerals and fluid-inclusion populations were examined using petrography, microthermometry, quadrupole mass-spectrometer gas analyses and stable-isotope studies to characterize fluids responsible for gold mineralization at the Getchell Carlin-type gold deposit. The gold-ore assemblage at Getchell is superimposed on quartz-pyrite vein mineralization associated with a Late-Cretaceous granodiorite stock that intruded Lower-Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. The ore assemblage, of mid-Tertiary age, consists of disseminated arsenian pyrite that contains submicrometer gold, jasperoid quartz, and later fluorite and orpiment that fill fractures and vugs. Late ore-stage realgar and calcite enclose ore-stage minerals. Pre-ore quartz trapped fluids with a wide range of salinities (1 to 21 wt.% NaCl equivalent), gas compositions (H2O, CO2, and CH4), and temperatures (120 to >360??C). Oxygen- and hydrogen-isotope ratios indicate that pre-ore fluids likely had a magmatic source, and were associated with intrusion of the granodiorite stock and related dikes. Ore-stage jasperoid contains moderate salinity, aqueous fluid inclusions trapped at 180 to 220??C. Ore fluids contain minor CO2 and trace H2S that allowed the fluid to react with limestone host rocks and transport gold, respectively. Aqueous inclusions in fluorite indicate that fluid temperatures declined to ~175??C by the end of ore-stage mineralization. As the hydrothermal system collapsed, fluid temperatures declined to 155 to 115??C and realgar and calcite precipitated. Inclusion fluids in ore-stage minerals have high ??D(H2O) and ??18O(H2O) values that indicate that the fluid had a deep source, and had a metamorphic or magmatic origin, or both. Late ore-stage fluids extend to lower ??D(H2O) values, and have a wider range of ??18O(H2O) values suggesting dilution by variably exchanged meteoric waters. Results show that deeply sourced ore fluids rose along the Getchell fault system, where they dissolved carbonate wall rocks and

  10. The mechanism of formation of the seafloor massive sulfide ore body beneath the seafloor at HAKUREI Site in Izena Caldera, Middle Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizumi, R.; Urabe, T.

    2012-12-01

    dominant at lower of the ore, relatively. The existence of "Black ore (sphalerite-galena ore)" at upper part and "Yellow ore (chalcopyrite-pyrite ore)" at lower part of the Lower ore indicate that the SMS ore beneath the seafloor has already the characteristic mineral assemblage of Kuroko ore deposit at the time of formation. Fe content in Sphalerite is over 6wt% in the Upper ore and under 1wt% in the Lower ore, respectively, which shows that the Lower ore is formed under high Sulfur and Oxygen fugacity than Upper ore if the temperature of formation is not very different each other. Barite occurs not only in the Upper ore, but also in the Lower ore and the crystal size becomes coarser downwards. These lines of evidence imply that the existence of the Lower ore indicates that the mineralization has been repeated in the HAKUREI site. This study is a part of "TAIGA" project funded by Grant-in-Aid program by Monbusho.t; t;

  11. The Role of Groundwater Flow and Faulting on Hydrothermal Ore Formation in Sedimentary Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garven, G.

    2006-05-01

    Sediment-hosted ore formation is thought to occur as a normal outcome of basin evolution, due to deep groundwater flow, heat transport, and reactive mass transport ---all of which are intimately coupled. This paper reviews recent attempts to understand the hydrologic and geochemical processes forming some of the world's largest sediment-hosted ores. Several questions still dominate the literature (driving forces for flows, source and controls on metal acquisition, concentrations of ore-forming components, timing and duration, role of faults, effects of transient flows). This paper touches upon all of these questions. Coupled reactive transport models have been applied for understanding the genesis of sandstone-hosted uranium ores of North America and Australia, red-bed copper ores of North America and northern Europe, carbonate-hosted MVT lead-zinc ores of the U.S. Midcontinent and northwestern Canada, and the carbonate- hosted lead-zinc ores of Ireland and southeast France. Good progress has been made in using these computational methods for comparing and contrasting both carbonate hosted (MVT and Irish types) and shale- hosted (SEDEX type) Pb-Zn deposits. The former are mostly associated with undeformed carbonate platforms associated with distal orogenic belts and the later are mostly associated with extensional basins and failed rifts that are heavily faulted. Two giant ore provinces in extensional basins provide good examples of structural control on reactive mass transport: shale-hosted Pb-Zn ores of the Proterozoic McArthur basin, Australia, and shale-hosted Pb-Zn-Ba ores of the Paleozoic Kuna basin, Alaska. For the McArthur basin, hydrogeologic simulations of thermally-driven free convection suggest a strong structural control on fluid flow created by the north-trending fault systems that dominate this Proterozoic extensional basin. Brines appear to have descended to depths of a few kilometers along the western side of the basin, migrated laterally to the

  12. Stratigraphy of Upper Cretaceous and Cenozoic deposits of the Bakchar iron ore deposit (southwestern Siberia): New data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva, N. K.; Kuzmina, O. B.; Sobolev, E. S.; Khazina, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    The results of complex palynological and microfaunistic studies of Upper Cretaceous and Cenozoic deposits of the Bakchar iron ore deposit are presented. Geochronologically, the age of the deposits varies from Campanian to Quaternary. It was established that the Slavgorod, Gan'kino, and Jurki (?) formations contain four biostratons in the rank of beds with dinocysts and three biostratons in the rank of beds with spores and pollen. The Cenozoic continental deposits contain four biostratons in the rank of beds, containing spores and pollen. As a result of the study, a large stratigraphic gap in the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary deposits, covering a significant part of the Maastrichtian, Paleocene, Ypresian, and Lutetian stages of the Eocene, was established. The remnants of a new morphotype of heteromorphic ammonites of genus Baculites were first described in deposits of the Slavgorod Formation (preliminarily, upper Campanian). The distribution features of the different palynomorph groups in the Upper Cretaceous-Cenozoic deposits in the area of study due to transgressive-regressive cycles and climate fluctuations were revealed.

  13. Physical and chemical controls on ore shoots - insights from 3D modeling of an orogenic gold deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollgger, S. A.; Tomkins, A. G.; Micklethwaite, S.; Cruden, A. R.; Wilson, C. J. L.

    2016-12-01

    Many ore deposits have irregular grade distributions with localized elongate and well-mineralized rock volumes commonly referred to as ore shoots. The chemical and physical processes that control ore shoot formation are rarely understood, although transient episodes of elevated permeability are thought to be important within the brittle and brittle-ductile crust, due to faulting and fracturing associated with earthquake-aftershock sequences or earthquake swarms. We present data from an orogenic gold deposit in Australia where the bulk of the gold is contained in abundant fine arsenopyrite crystals associated with a fault-vein network within tight upright folds. The deposit-scale fault network is connected to a deeper network of thrust faults (tens of kilometers long). Using 3D implicit modeling of geochemical data, based on radial basis functions, gold grades and gold-arsenic element ratios were interpolated and related to major faults, vein networks and late intrusions. Additionally, downhole bedding measurements were used to model first order (mine-scale) fold structures. The results show that ore shoot plunges are not parallel with mine-scale or regional fold plunges, and that bedding parallel faults related to flexural slip folding play a pivotal role on ore shoot attitudes. 3D fault slip and dilation tendency analysis indicate that fault reactivation and formation of linking faults are associated with large volumes of high-grade ore. We suggest slip events on the large-scale thrust network allowed mineralizing fluids to rapidly migrate over large distances and become supersaturated in elements such as gold, promoting widespread precipitation and high nucleation densities of arsenopyrite upon fluid-rock interaction at trap sites within the deposit.

  14. Geodynamically unusual settings of sedimentary rock and ore formation due to tectonic-decompression effects

    SciTech Connect

    Goryainov, P.M.

    1984-05-01

    The traditional views of terrigenous rocks as products of classical sedimentary cycle, ''mobilization-transport-deposition,'' are not universal. Detrital rocks are sometimes formed due to flaking and fracturation of rocks of rising blocks. The process is produced by tectonic-decompression mechanisms - the origination of a gradient of excessive stress and its discharge. It is incorrect to classify rocks created by this phenomenon with weathering crusts. The origins of certain terrigenous rocks, as well as products of low-temperature chemical processing, are connected with deep-volume decompression (brecciation, stockwork formation, formation of pipes and columns of igneous rocks, and chamber pegmatite and karst formation). The ore concentrations associated with such entities and appearing as stratiform deposits are most likely not exogenous, but they complete the endogenous history of the block concerned. The means and methods tested on typical endogenous deposits may therefore prove valuable in predicting certain varieties of stratiform deposits.

  15. Automated recognition of stratigraphic marker shales from geophysical logs in iron ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silversides, Katherine; Melkumyan, Arman; Wyman, Derek; Hatherly, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The mining of stratiform ore deposits requires a means of determining the location of stratigraphic boundaries. A variety of geophysical logs may provide the required data but, in the case of banded iron formation hosted iron ore deposits in the Hamersley Ranges of Western Australia, only one geophysical log type (natural gamma) is collected for this purpose. The information from these logs is currently processed by slow manual interpretation. In this paper we present an alternative method of automatically identifying recurring stratigraphic markers in natural gamma logs from multiple drill holes. Our approach is demonstrated using natural gamma geophysical logs that contain features corresponding to the presence of stratigraphically important marker shales. The host stratigraphic sequence is highly consistent throughout the Hamersley and the marker shales can therefore be used to identify the stratigraphic location of the banded iron formation (BIF) or BIF hosted ore. The marker shales are identified using Gaussian Processes (GP) trained by either manual or active learning methods and the results are compared to the existing geological interpretation. The manual method involves the user selecting the signatures for improving the library, whereas the active learning method uses the measure of uncertainty provided by the GP to select specific examples for the user to consider for addition. The results demonstrate that both GP methods can identify a feature, but the active learning approach has several benefits over the manual method. These benefits include greater accuracy in the identified signatures, faster library building, and an objective approach for selecting signatures that includes the full range of signatures across a deposit in the library. When using the active learning method, it was found that the current manual interpretation could be replaced in 78.4% of the holes with an accuracy of 95.7%.

  16. Modeling the formation of porphyry-copper ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.

    2012-01-01

    Porphyry-copper ore systems, the source of much of the world's copper and molybdenum, form when metal-bearing fluids are expelled from shallow, degassing magmas. On page 1613 of this issue, Weis et al. (1) demonstrate that self-organizing processes focus metal deposition. Specifically, their simulation studies indicate that ores develop as consequences of dynamic variations in rock permeability driven by injection of volatile species from rising magmas. Scenarios with a static permeability structure could not reproduce key field observations, whereas dynamic permeability responses to magmatic-fluid injection localized a metal-precipitation front where enrichment by a factor of 103 could be achieved [for an overview of their numerical-simulation model CSMP++, see (2)].

  17. In-bearing potential of tin‒sulfide mineralization in ore deposits of the Russian Far East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, G. G.; Vladimirov, A. G.; Gvozdev, V. I.; Korostelev, P. G.; Semenyak, B. I.; Gonevchuk, V. G.; Tishin, P. A.

    2016-11-01

    The increased demand for indium has made it necessary to revise prospects of In-bearing tin ore deposits in the Russian Far East on the basis of geological data and results of recent analytical methods (X-ray fluorescence with synchrotron radiation, atomic absorption, and ICP-MS). The average In contents in ores of the Tigrinoe and Pravourmiiskoe deposits vary from 55 to 70 ppm, which allows tin ore deposits with Sn‒sulfide mineralization to be considered as quite promising with respect to In production from ores of Russian deposits. By their estimated In reserves, the Tigrinoe and Pravourmiiskoe deposits may be attributed to large ore objects.

  18. Mineralogy and ore fluid chemistry of the Roc Blanc Ag deposit, Jebilet Hercynian massif, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essarraj, Samira; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Cathelineau, Michel; Tarantola, Alexandre; Leisen, Mathieu; Hibti, Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    forming model proposed for the Roc Blanc deposit is: (i) the penetration of sedimentary brines coming from the adjacent basins into the basement (i.e. Hercynian formations), where they extracted Ag probably from abundant mafic rocks; ii) the ore deposition in structural traps below the post Hercynian unconformity thanks to brine mixing with low salinity fluids. The fluid circulation probably is related to the Atlasic rifting coeval with the Atlantic Triassic opening. Such a model contrasts with the previous one relating the Roc Blanc to the Hercynian granitic intrusions in the Jebilet. Ag deposition occurred during reworking of the early structures associated with the Hercynian orogenic events and metamorphic fluid circulation which led to the early Fe-As uneconomic stages forming the main N-S quartz veins. Similarities between The Roc Blanc Ag deposit and the major Ag deposits from Anti-Atlas south of Morocco strongly suggest that they resulted from a unique and large fluid circulation event and a major period of metal deposition.

  19. Localization conditions and ore mineralogy of the Ulziit hydrogenic uranium deposit, Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechukhin, M. N.; Doinikova, O. A.; Ignatov, P. A.; Rassulov, V. A.

    2016-05-01

    Information on the speciation of uranium minerals in ore of the recently discovered Ulziit uranium deposit in Mongolia is given for the first time. The ore composition has been studied by analytical scanning electron microscopy and local laser luminescent spectroscopy. The ore formed as a result of epigenetic redox processes. Transition from permeable variegated fan sediments to poorly permeable gray-colored coalbearing lacustrine-boggy sediments is the main ore-controlling factor. High-tech uranium mining with borehole in-situ leaching is feasible.

  20. Petrological and geochemical features of the early Paleozoic granitic gneisses and iron ores in the Tianhu iron deposit, Eastern Tianshan, NW China: Implications for ore genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jiahao; Mao, Jingwen; Yang, Fuquan; Chai, Fengmei; Shen, Ping

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports whole-rock geochemical, zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic data for ore-hosted granitic gneisses, mineral compositions of oxides, and sulfur isotopic data for sulfides in iron ores from the Tianhu deposit, central part of the Eastern Tianshan. Our results can provide crucial constraints on the genesis of granitic gneisses and early Paleozoic tectonic setting of the Eastern Tianshan. LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating on magmatic zircons yielded weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 463 to 438 Ma, interpreted as the crystallization ages of the granitic protoliths and the formation ages of the Tianhu Group. Zircon U-Pb age of ore-hosted granitic gneiss (ca. 459 Ma) can provide reliable constrains on upper limit for iron mineralization age in the Tianhu deposit. Geochemical characteristics suggest that the protoliths of the Tianhu granitic gneisses are metaluminous to weakly peraluminous high-K calc-alkaline granitic rocks, exhibiting typical subduction-related features such as strong enrichment in LREE and LILE and depletion in HFSE. Zircon Hf isotopic compositions show a positive trend from 463 to 438 Ma, indicating that 460 Ma magmas came from both ancient and juvenile sources, whereas 438 Ma magmas involved more juvenile material. Some early Paleozoic granitoids were recently identified in the Eastern Tianshan with the ages between ca. 475 and ca. 425 Ma. The formation of these early Paleozoic granitoids was in response to subduction processes, suggesting that subduction of Junggar Ocean probably began in the Early Ordovician and lasted until Late Silurian. Pyrite and pyrrhotite in iron ores have δ34SCDT values from + 4.6 to + 15.7‰, which are consistent with the marine source, but inconsistent with the magmatic source or those involved evaporites in skarn iron deposit. Geological, geochemical, and isotopic data suggest that the Tianhu iron ores were formed by volcano-sedimentary processes in a subduction environment during the early Paleozoic time, and Tianhu is a

  1. Contrasting hydrological processes of meteoric water incursion during magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposition: An oxygen isotope study by ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie; Baumgartner, Lukas; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2016-10-01

    Meteoric water convection has long been recognized as an efficient means to cool magmatic intrusions in the Earth's upper crust. This interplay between magmatic and hydrothermal activity thus exerts a primary control on the structure and evolution of volcanic, geothermal and ore-forming systems. Incursion of meteoric water into magmatic-hydrothermal systems has been linked to tin ore deposition in granitic plutons. In contrast, evidence from porphyry copper ore deposits suggests that crystallizing subvolcanic magma bodies are only affected by meteoric water incursion in peripheral zones and during late post-ore stages. We apply high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to analyze oxygen isotope ratios of individual growth zones in vein quartz crystals, imaged by cathodo-luminescence microscopy (SEM-CL). Existing microthermometric information from fluid inclusions enables calculation of the oxygen isotope composition of the fluid from which the quartz precipitated, constraining the relative timing of meteoric water input into these two different settings. Our results confirm that incursion of meteoric water directly contributes to cooling of shallow granitic plutons and plays a key role in concurrent tin mineralization. By contrast, data from two porphyry copper deposits suggest that downward circulating meteoric water is counteracted by up-flowing hot magmatic fluids. Our data show that porphyry copper ore deposition occurs close to a magmatic-meteoric water interface, rather than in a purely magmatic fluid plume, confirming recent hydrological modeling. On a larger scale, the expulsion of magmatic fluids against the meteoric water interface can shield plutons from rapid convective cooling, which may aid the build-up of large magma chambers required for porphyry copper ore formation.

  2. Age of uranium ores at Ranger and Jabiluka unconformity vein deposits, Northern Territory, Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, K.R.; Grauch, R.I.; Nutt, C.J.; Frishman, D.; Nash, J.T.; Simmons, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Ranger and Jabiluka uranium deposits are the largest in the Alligator Rivers Uranium Field (ARUF), which contains at least 20% of the world's low-cost uranium reserves. Ore occurs in early Proterozoic metasediments, below an unconformity with sandstones of the 1.65 Ga Kombolgie Formation. This study uses U-Pb isotope data from over 60 whole-rock drill core samples that contained a variety of mineral assemblages and textures. Data for Ranger samples indicate a well-defined age of 1.74 +/-.02 Ga. This 1.74 Ga age is distinctly pre-Kombolgie, so the Ranger deposit cannot have been formed by processes requiring its presence. This Ranger age is consistent, however, with mineralization related to heating associated with either the emplacement of early post-metamorphic granites, or possibly with intrusion of the nearby Oenpelli Dolerite. In contrast, data for the least-altered Jabiluka ores yield a concordia-intercept age of 1.44 +/-.02 Ga--significantly younger than the Ranger age, and also younger than the Komobolgie. This age may correspond to a regional thermal event, as indicated both by mafic dikes of roughly this age and a zircon lower-intercept age from a nearby granite-gneiss. Thus, together with the well-defined approx.900 Ma age of ores at the Nabarlek deposit, there are at least 3 distinct periods of major U-mineralization in the ARUF. Data for both Ranger and Jabiluka indicate the same, profound isotopic disturbance at some time in the interval of 0.4-0.6 Ga. Possibly this time corresponds to the development of basins and associated basalt flows to the W and SW, a suggested by Crick et. al. (1980).

  3. Rock-magnetism and ore microscopy of the magnetite-apatite ore deposit from Cerro de Mercado, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Goguitchaichvili, A.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Caballero-Miranda, C.; Vivallo, W.

    2001-03-01

    Rock-magnetic and microscopic studies of the iron ores and associated igneous rocks in the Cerro de Mercado, Mexico, were carried out to determine the magnetic mineralogy and origin of natural remanent magnetization (NRM), related to the thermo-chemical processes due to hydrothermalism. Chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) seems to be present in most of investigated ore and wall rock samples, replacing completely or partially an original thermoremanent magnetization (TRM). Magnetite (or Ti-poor titanomagnetite) and hematite are commonly found in the ores. Although hematite may carry a stable CRM, no secondary components are detected above 580°, which probably attests that oxidation occurred soon enough after the extrusion and cooling of the ore-bearing magma. NRM polarities for most of the studied units are reverse. There is some scatter in the cleaned remanence directions of the ores, which may result from physical movement of the ores during faulting or mining, or from perturbation of the ambient field during remanence acquisition by inhomogeneous internal fields within these strongly magnetic ore deposits. The microscopy study under reflected light shows that the magnetic carriers are mainly titanomagnetite, with significant amounts of ilmenite-hematite minerals, and goethite-limonite resulting from alteration processes. Magmatic titanomagnetites, which are found in igneous rocks, show trellis, sandwich, and composite textures, which are compatible with high temperature (deuteric) oxy-exsolution processes. Hydrothermal alteration in ore deposits is mainly indicated by martitization in oxide minerals. Grain sizes range from a few microns to >100 mm, and possible magnetic state from single to multidomain, in agreement with hysteresis measurements. Thermal spectra, continuous susceptibility measurements, and IRM (isothermal remanent magnetization) acquisition suggest a predominance of spinels as magnetic carriers, most probably titanomagnetites with low

  4. Multiple sources for ore-forming fluids in the Neves Corvo VHMS Deposit of the Iberian Pyrite Belt (Portugal): strontium, neodymium and lead isotope evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Relvas, Jorge M.; Tassinari, Colombo C.; Munhá, José; Barriga, Fernando J.

    2001-08-01

    Lead, Rb-Sr, and Sm-Nd isotopes have been used to constrain the sources and the timing of mineralisation at the Neves Corvo VHMS deposit of the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB). Sulfide- and cassiterite-rich ores, together with a mineralised felsic volcanic rock, yield a Rb-Sr errorchron age of 347±25 Ma with an initial 87Sr/86Sr=0.71031±65. The Rb-Sr results agree with palynological age constraints for ore formation at Neves Corvo, and are indistinguishable from several other mineralisation ages, indicating that major orebodies in the IPB formed coevally at ~350 Ma. In contrast, wide variations in initial 143Nd/144Nd indicate limited rare-earth-element redistribution during ore deposition. Initial ɛNd (350 Ma) values range from -0.2 to -9.7 for copper ores, -8.9 to -9.4 for copper-tin ores, and -6.9 (cassiterite) to -9.5 for tin ores, implying that neither the IPB volcanic host rocks [ɛNd (350 Ma) >-2.1; 87Sr/86Sr0<0.70664], nor contemporaneous seawater (87Sr/86Sr0 ~0.708), could have been the exclusive sources for the Neves Corvo ores. Distinct mixing arrays in the ɛNd (350 Ma)-Sm/Nd and 206Pb/204Pb-207Pb/204Pb diagrams demonstrate that sulfide and tin ore deposition involved ore-forming solutions from different sources. Whereas sulfide-ore compositional variations are consistent with significant incorporation of "typical" IBP volcanic-seawater derived hydrothermal components, the highly radiogenic lead and (exclusively) low-ɛNd values preserved in tin ores require a predominant derivation from external sources. This could be either a magmatic source (which must have been different from the typical IPB felsic magmas), or a metamorphic fluid deeply circulated through older basement rocks.

  5. Alunite in the Pascua-Lama high-sulfidation deposit: Constraints on alteration and ore deposition using stable isotope geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deyell, C.L.; Leonardson, R.; Rye, R.O.; Thompson, J.F.H.; Bissig, T.; Cooke, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    the deposit and probably formed from oxidation of H2S during boiling of the magmatic ore fluids. Coarsely crystalline magmatic steam alunite (8.4 Ma) is restricted to the near-surface portion of Brecha Central. Postmineral alunite ?? jarosite were previosly interpreted to be supergene crosscutting veins and overgrowths, although stable isotope data suggest a mixed magmatic-meteoric origin for this late-stage alteration. Only late jarosite veinlets (8.0 Ma) associated with fine-grained pseudocubic alunite have a supergene isotopic signature. The predominanca of magmatic fluids recorded throughout the paragenesis of the Pascua system is atypical for high-sulfidation deposits, which typically envolve significant meteoric water in near-surface and peripheral alteration and, in some systems, even ore deposition. A Pascua, the strong magmatic signature of both alteration and main-stage (alunite-pyrite-enargite assemblage) ore is attributed to limited availability of meteoric fluids. This is in agreement with published data for the El Indio-Pascua belt, indicating an event of uplift and subsequent pediment incision, as well as a transition from semiarid to arid climatic conditions, during the formation of the deposit in the mid to late Miocene. ?? 2005 Society of Economic Geologists, Inc.

  6. Isotopic composition of Pb in ore deposits of the Betic Cordillera, Spain; origin and relationship to other European deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arribas , Antonio; Tosdal, Richard M.

    1994-01-01

    The Betic Cordillera in southern Spain is a complex Alpine fold belt that resulted from the Cretaceous through Cenozoic collision of Africa with Europe. The region is illustrative of one of the characteristics of the Alpine-Mediterranean orogen: the occurrence over a limited area of mineral deposits with a wide variety of host rocks, mineralization ages, and styles. The metamorphic basement in the Betic zone is characterized by a nappe structure of superimposed tectonostratigraphic units and consists of lower Paleozoic to Lower Triassic clastic metasedimentary rocks. This is overlain by Middle to Upper Triassic platform carbonate rocks with abundant strata-bound F-Pb-Zn-(Ba) deposits (e.g., Sierra de Gador, Sierra Alhamilla). Cretaceous to Paleogene subduction-related compression in southeastern Spain was followed by Miocene postcollisional extension and resulted in the formation of the Almeria-Cartagena volcanic belt and widespread hydrothermal activity and associated polymetallic mineralization. Typical Miocene hydrothermal deposits include volcanic-hosted Au (e.g., Rodalquilar) and Ag-rich base metal (e.g., Cabo de Gata, Mazarron) deposits as well as complex polymetallic veins, mantos, and irregular replacement bodies which are hosted by Paleozoic and Mesozoic metamorphic rocks and Neogene sedimentary and volcanic rocks (e.g., Cartagena, Sierra Almagrera, Sierra del Aguilon, Loma de Bas).Lead isotope compositions were measured on sulfide samples from nine ore districts and from representative fresh samples of volcanic and basement rock types of the region. The results have been used to evaluate ore-forming processes in southeastern Spain with emphasis on the sources of metals. During a Late Triassic mineralizing event, Pb was leached from Paleozoic clastic metasedimentary rocks and incorporated in galena in strata-bound F-Pb-Zn-(Ba) deposits ( 206 Pb/ 204 Pb = 18.332 + or - 12, 207Pb/ 204 Pb = 15.672 + or - 12, 208 Pb/ 204 Pb = 38.523 + or - 46). The second

  7. Geology and ore fluid geochemistry of the Jinduicheng porphyry molybdenum deposit, East Qinling, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongying; Ye, Huishou; Wang, Xiaoxia; Yang, Lei; Wang, Xiuyuan

    2014-01-01

    Jinduicheng deposit is a giant Mesozoic porphyry Mo system deposit in the East Qinling molybdenum belt, Shaanxi Province, China. The mineralization is associated with the I-type Jinduicheng granite porphyry. Both the porphyry stock and country rocks underwent intense hydrothermal alteration. The alteration, with increasing distance from the parent intrusion, changes from silicification, through potassic and phyllic assemblages, carbonation, to propylitic assemblages. Molybdenite, the dominant ore mineral, occurs in veinlets, most of which are hosted by the altered country rocks, with less than 25% of the ore in the porphyry body. The hydrothermal system comprises four stages, including pre-ore quartz and K-feldspar; two ore stages of quartz, K-feldspar, molybdenite, and Pb- And Zn-bearing sulfides; and post-ore quartz and carbonate. Six main types of primary fluid inclusions are present in hydrothermal quartz, including two-phase aqueous, one-phase aqueous, three-phase CO2-bearing, CO2-dominated fluid inclusions, gas inclusions, and melt inclusions. The homogenization temperatures of fluid inclusions range from 210 to 290 °C in the pre-ore stage, 150-310 °C in ore stage I, 150-360 °C in the ore stage II, and 195-325 °C in the post-ore stage quartz. Estimated salinities of the ore-forming fluids range from 6.9 to 13.5, 4.3 to 12.3, 6.2 to 12.4, and 3.4 to 9.9 wt.% NaCl equiv. in stages 1-4, respectively. The δ34S values of pyrite in the two ore stages range from 2.8‰ to 4.3‰, whereas the δ34S values of molybdenite range from 2.9‰ to 6.2‰. The data suggest both magmatic and crustal sources of sulfur. The δD and δ18O values for the hydrothermal fluids are -57.2‰ to -84.4‰ and 8.0‰ to -3.2‰, respectively. The fluid inclusion and stable data indicate that the pre-ore hydrothermal fluids were mostly of magmatic origin, but the fluids responsible for ore deposition were mixed magmatic and meteoric, and eventually meteoric water dominated the system

  8. First native silica findings in bismuth from garnet skarns of Ribny Log - 2 gold ore target in Topolninsk ore deposit (Gorny Altai)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkasova, T.; Timkin, T.; Savinova, O.

    2015-02-01

    The nanomineralogic investigation results of ore minerals in metasomatites (garnet skarns) of Ribny Log- 2 gold ore in Topolninsk ore deposit (Gorny Altai) revealed the native silica impurities (Si) of 1 - 5 nm within the grains of native bismuth (Bi). Polished sections were examined by using Tescan Vega 3 scanning electron microscope (SEM) with Oxford energy-dispersive spectrometer at the Department of Geology and Mineral Exploration, Institute of Natural Resources, Tomsk Polytechnic University.

  9. Geochemical constraints on the origin of the Kicking Horse and Monarch Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc ore deposits, southeast British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandeginste, Veerle; Swennen, Rudy; Gleeson, Sarah A.; Ellam, Rob M.; Osadetz, Kirk; Roure, François

    2007-11-01

    Two Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) ore deposits, Kicking Horse and Monarch, have been studied with the aim of comparing the ores at the two localities and to characterize the origin of the mineralizing fluids and the ore formation process(es). Both deposits are hosted by the Middle Cambrian Cathedral Formation carbonate host rocks, Kicking Horse on the north and Monarch on the south flank of the Kicking Horse valley near Field (SE British Columbia). The ore bodies are situated at the transition of (western) basinal to (eastern) shallow-water strata of the paleo-Pacific passive margin succession in the Cordilleran Foreland Province of the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin. Both deposits are related spatially to normal faults. In both localities, the ore minerals are dominated by pyrite, sphalerite, and galena. Dolomite, minor quartz, and calcite are also present in close association with the ores. The salinity (21-30 wt% NaCl eq.) and homogenization temperatures (63-182°C) measured in fluid inclusions in carbonate, quartz, and sphalerite lie within the typical range of MVT fluid conditions. The good stoichiometry (50-53 mol% CaCO3), low δ18O values (-21 to -14‰ Vienna Peedee belemnite) and relatively high homogenization temperatures (>95°C) of the dolomite suggest the dolomites were formed under burial diagenesis. The ore-forming fluids probably interacted with siliciclastic units, based on elevated Li contents and 87Sr/86Sr ratios, which are highest in the dolomite type after the main ore stage. We propose that the ores formed from the mixing of a downward-infiltrating, sulfur-bearing halite-dissolution fluid with an upward-migrating, metal-rich evaporated seawater fluid, which had already undergone minor mixing with a dilute fluid.

  10. Geology and ore deposits of the Monument Valley area, Apache and Navajo counties, Arizona: Part II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witkind, I.J.; Thaden, R.E.

    1958-01-01

    In 1951 and 1952, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a program of uranium investigations and geologic mapping in the Monument Valley area, Apache and Navajo Counties, Ariz. About 700 square miles were mapped on the Navajo Indian Reservation. A resource appraisal of the area was an inherent part of the program, and is detailed in this report. Production of vanadium and uranium is from two areas, the Monument No. 1 mine area in Navajo County, and the Monument No. 2 mine area in Apache County. In the period 1942-53 about 200,300 tons of ore was produced from these two areas. This ore yielded about 1,700,000 pounds of U3O8 and about 6,500,000 pounds of V2O5. The grade ranged from 0.15 percent U3O8 to 0.60 percent U3O8, and from 0.38 percent V2O5 to 3.02 percent V2O5. The vanadium-uranium ratio is about 4:1. The ore deposits are composed principally of the hydrous calcium-uranium vanadate tyuyamunite in basal channel sediments of the Shinarump member off the Chinle formation. Four types of ore bodies are present: (1) rods, (2) tabular ore bodies, (3) corvusite-type ore bodies, and (4) rolls. The reserves of uranium- and vanadium-bearing material are classed as measured, indicated, inferred, and potential. The reserves are further divided into three grade classes for material 1 foot or more thick: (1) 0.10 percent U3O8 and 1.00 percent V2O5 and above; (2) 0.05 percent U3O8 and 0.50 percent V2O5 and less than 0.10 percent U3O8 and 1.00 percent V2O5; and (3) 0.01 percent U3O8 and 0.10 percent V2O5 and less than 0.05 percent U3O8 and 0.05 percent V2O5. Measured reserves as of June 1953, in the Monument Valley area, Arizona, (all in the Monument No. 2 mine) total about 36,000 tons. Indicated reserves in the first grade class amount to about 62,000 tons. In this same grade class inferred reserves total about 3,000,000 tons. In the second grade class indicated and inferred reserves amount to about 2,000,000 tons. Inferred reserves in the third grade class total about 345

  11. Variations in the uranium isotopic compositions of uranium ores from different types of uranium deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarova, Yulia A.; Kyser, T. Kurt; Geagea, Majdi Lahd; Chipley, Don

    2014-12-01

    precipitation in the form of U6+ minerals. The δ238U values of uranium ore minerals from a variety of deposits are controlled by the isotopic signature of the uranium source, the efficiency of uranium reduction in the case of UO2 systems, and the degree to which uranium was previously removed from the fluid, with less influence from temperature of ore formation and later alteration of the ore. Uranium isotopes are potentially superb tracers of redox in natural systems.

  12. Metallogeny, structural, lithological and time controls of ore deposition in anoxic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kříbek, B.

    1991-04-01

    Accumulation of metals in anoxic environments occurs by sorption and precipitation from seawater, fossil brines or hydrothermal solutions. Metals can be remobilized during subsequent metamorphic and magmatic processes and form ore deposits. This type of mineralization is governed chiefly by the type of tectonic setting of the anoxic environment. Carbonaceous sediments of passive margins contain only subeconomic concentrations of uranium, vanadium and molybdenum. Cubearing black shales and the submarine-exhalative type of mineralization are confined to the environments of continental rifts and aulacogens or to back-arc basins of active margins. Metamorphogenic deposits are mainly connected with collision margins but they may also occur in other types of tectonic environments. The formation of Cu-bearing black shales was controlled by period of low sea-level during the break-up of supercontinents in the Earth's evolution. Increased contents of uranium and vanadium accumulated in black shales in periods of sealevel highstands. Lithological control is apparent in deposits of Cu-bearing and uraniferous black shales. On the contrary, the occurrence of polymetallic mineralization does not depend on the lithological maturity of carbonaceous sediments.

  13. Massive deep-sea sulphide ore deposits discovered on the East Pacific Rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francheteau, Jean; Needham, H.D.; Choukroune, P.; Juteau, Tierre; Seguret, M.; Ballard, Richard D.; Fox, P.J.; Normark, William; Carranza, A.; Cordoba, D.; Guerrero, J.; Rangin, C.; Bougault, H.; Cambon, P.; Hekinian, R.

    1979-01-01

    Massive ore-grade zinc, copper and iron sulphide deposits have been found at the axis of the East Pacific Rise. Although their presence on the deep ocean-floor had been predicted there was no supporting observational evidence. The East Pacific Rise deposits represent a modern analogue of Cyprus-type sulphide ores associated with ophiolitic rocks on land. They contain at least 29% zinc metal and 6% metallic copper. Their discovery will provide a new focus for deep-sea exploration, leading to new assessments of the concentration of metals in the upper layers of the oceanic crust. ?? 1979 Nature Publishing Group.

  14. Mineralogy and fluid inclusions study of carbonate-hosted Mississippi valley-type Ain Allega Pb-Zn-Sr-Ba ore deposit, Northern Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidi, R.; Slim-Shimi, N.; Somarin, A.; Henchiri, M.

    2010-05-01

    The Ain Allega Pb-Zn-Sr-Ba ore deposit is located in the flysch zone on the Eastern edge of the Triassic diapir of Jebel Hamra. It is part of the extrusive Triassic evaporate formation along the Ghardimaou-Cape Serrat faults. The ore body consists of argilic-dolomite breccias surrounded by argilo-gypsum Triassic formation, which forms the hanging wall of the deposit, and rimmed by the Paleocene marls. The ore minerals show a cap-rock type mineralization with different styles particularly impregnation in dolomite, cement of breccias, replacement ore and open space filling in the dissolution cavities and fractures. Ore minerals include sphalerite, galena, marcasite and pyrite. Principal gangue minerals are composed of barite, celestite, calcite, dolomite and quartz. The ore minerals are hosted by the Triassic carbonate rocks which show hydrothermal alteration, dissolution and brecciation. X-ray - crystallographic study of barite-celestite mineral series shows that pure barite and celestite are the abundant species, whereas strontianiferous barite (85-96.5% BaSO 4) and barian-celestite (95% SrSO 4) are minor. Primary and secondary mono-phase (liquid only) fluid inclusions are common in celestite. Microthermometric analyses in two-phases (liquid and vapour) fluid inclusions suggest that gangue and ore minerals were precipitated by a low-temperature (180 °C) saline (16.37 wt.% NaCl equivalent) solution originated possibly from a basinal brine with some input from magmatic or metamorphic fluid. Based on geology, mineralogy, texture and fluid characteristics, the Ain Allega deposit is classified as a carbonate-hosted Mississippi valley-type deposit.

  15. Geology and geochemistry of the Macheng Algoma-type banded iron-formation, North China Craton: Constraints on mineralization events and genesis of high-grade iron ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huaying; Niu, Xianglong; Zhang, Lianchang; Pirajno, Franco; Luo, Huabao; Qin, Feng; Cui, Minli; Wang, Changle; Qi, Min

    2015-12-01

    The Macheng iron deposit is located in the eastern Hebei province of the North China Craton (NCC). It is hosted in Neoarchean metamorphic rocks of Baimiaozi formation in the Dantazi Group, consisting of biotite-leptynite, plagioclase-gneiss, plagioclase-amphibolite, migmatite, migmatitic granite and quartz schist. Geochemical analyses of the host biotite leptynite and plagioclase amphibolites show that their protoliths are both volcanics, inferred to be trachytic basalt and basaltic andesite, respectively. Based on the geochemical signature of the host rocks, together with geology of the iron deposit, it is inferred that the Macheng BIF is an Algoma-type iron exhalative formation, formed in an arc-related basin in the Neoarchean. Post-Archean Australian Shale (PAAS)-normalized rare earth elements (REEs) plus yttrium (Y) concentrations of different BIF ores with gneissic, striated and banded structure in the Macheng deposit, show similar patterns with depletions in light rare earth elements (LREEs) and middle rare earth elements (MREEs) relative to heavy rare earth elements (HREEs) and with apparently positive La, Y and Eu anomalies. Y/Ho ratios of the gneissic, striated and banded BIF ores vary from 37 to 56. These geochemical features of the BIF ores reveal their affinity with the sea water and the presence of a high-temperature hydrothermal component, indicating that both the seawater and high temperature hydrothermal fluids derived from alteration of oceanic basalts and komatiites may contribute to formation of the Macheng BIF. Geological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of the Macheng deposit recognized two kinds of high-grade iron ores. One is massive oxidized high-grade ore (Fe2O3T = 74.37-86.20 wt.%), mainly consisting of hematite with some magnetite, which shows geochemical characteristics of the gneissic, striated and banded BIF ores. The other type is magnetite high-grade ore, also massive and consisting of magnetite, with distinct characteristics

  16. Ore deposits in Africa and their relation to the underlying mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.-S.

    1981-01-01

    African magmatism is largely related to the tensional stress regimes of the crust which are induced by the hotter upwelling mantle rocks. These mantle rocks may provide emanating forces and thermal energy for the upward movements of primary ore bodies with fluid inclusions in the tensional stress regimes of the crust. In this paper, the Goddard Earth Gravity Model is used to calculate a detailed subcrustal stress system exerted by mantle convection under Africa. The resulting system is found to be correlated with the African metallogenic provinces. Recognition of the full spectrum of ore deposits in Africa that may be associated with the hotter upwelling mantle rocks has provided an independent evidence to support the hypothesis of mantle-derived heat source for ore deposits.

  17. A comparison of the mineralogy, ore textures, paragenetic sequence, and occurrence of the Permian sandstone-hosted Ag-Cu deposit at Paoli, Oklahoma with the Permian shale-hosted Cu-Ag deposit at Creta, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hagni, R.D. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-03-01

    Although the sandstone-hosted (Wellington Formation, Leonardian Series) Ag-Cu deposit at Paoli in south-central Oklahoma and the shale-hosted (Flowerpot Shale, Guadalupean Series) Cu-Ag ore deposit at Creta in southwest Oklahoma are both contained in Permian sedimentary rocks, they differ in their mineralogy, ore textures, paragenetic sequence, and occurrence. At Paoli, chalcocite mineralization occurs as replacements of disseminated, diagenetic, pyritohedral pyrite crystals, as replacements of carbonate cement between clastic quartz sand grains, and especially as replacements of hematite that replaces carbonate cement in the host sandstones. In contrast, at Creta the copper sulfide grains occur as replacements of megaspores, colloform pyrite, and pyrrhotite crystals. Ore microscopic study indicates that the paragenetic sequence of ore minerals at Paoli is: pyrite(oldest)-goethite-hematite-covellite-chalcocite-digenite-bornite-chalcopyrite (youngest). Such a sequence is the reverse order of those deposited at Creta and for most copper ore deposits, of all types, elsewhere. The paragenetic sequence at Paoli is interpreted to indicate that the host red-bed sandstones experienced an early introduction of reducing fluids that formed disseminated and cementing pyrite. Subsequent oxidation of that pyrite to form hematite (and minor goethite) probably occurred at the leading edges of roll fronts of oxidizing groundwaters. The paragenetic sequence shows that the copper sulfide formation was from fluids that became progressively more reducing during the deposition of those copper sulfide minerals. The shapes of the ore deposits indicate that the copper ore fluids were ones that moved in the form of roll fronts along Permian stream channels.

  18. High-grade iron ore deposits of the Mesabi Range, Minnesota-product of a continental-scale proterozoic ground-water flow system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morey, G.B.

    1999-01-01

    The Mesabi Range along the north edge of the Paleoproterozoic Penokean orogen in northern Minnesota has produced 3.6 billion metric tons of ore since its discovery in 1890. Of that amount, 2.3 billion metric tons were extracted from hematite- or geothite-rich deposits generally referred to as 'high-grade' ores. The high-grade ores formed as the Biwabik Iron-Formation was oxidized, hydrated, and leached by solutions flowing along open faults and fractures. The source of the ore-forming solutions has been debated since it was first proposed that the ores were weathering products formed by descending meteoritic ground-water flowing in late Mesozoic time. Subsequently others believed that the ores were better explained by ascending solutions, possbily hydrothermal solutions of pre-Phanerzoic age. Neither Wolff nor Gruner could reconcile their observations with a reasonable source for the solutions. In this paper, I build on modern mapping of the Mesabi Range and mine-specific geologic observations summarized in the literature to propose a conceptual model in which the high-grade ores formed from ascending solutions that were part of continent-scale topographic or gravity-driven ground-water system. I propose that the ground-water system was active during the later stages of the development of a coupled fold and thrust belt and foreland basin that formed during the Penokean orogen.

  19. Finds of economic platinum in ores from the South Khingan Mn deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanchuk, A. I.; Rasskazov, I. Yu.; Kryukov, V. G.; Litvinova, N. M.; Saksin, B. G.

    2016-10-01

    Platinum is revealed by the authors in the Mn ores from the South Khingan deposit of Malyi Khingan. Its quality (grain size, aggregates) and amount are of economic interest. Platinum has higher contents of Fe, Cu, Mn, Ni, Os, and other metals. The Pt potential is related to carbonaceous metasomatites, which replaced fluidolites.

  20. Four magnetite generations in the Precambrian Varena Iron Ore deposit, SE Lithuania, as a result of rock-fluid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skridlaite, Grazina; Prusinskiene, Sabina; Siliauskas, Laurynas

    2017-04-01

    Iron ores in Precambrian crystalline basement of the Varena area, SE Lithuania, were discovered during the detail geological-geophysical exploration in 1982-1992. They are covered with 210-500 m thick sediments. The Varena Iron Ore deposit (VIOD) may yield from 71 to 219.6 million tons of iron ore according to different economic evaluations (Marfin, 1996). They were assumed to be of metasomatic and hydrothermal origin, however several other hypotheses explaining the VIOZ origin, e.g. as a layered mafic or carbonatite intrusions were also suggested. Magnetites of the VIOD were thoroughly investigated by the Cameca SX100 microprobe at the Warsaw University and by the Quanta 250 Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) at the Nature Research Centre in Vilnius, Lithuania. Four generations of magnetite were distinguished in the studied serpentine-magnetite ores (D8 drilling) and were compared with the earlier studied and reference magnetites. The earliest, spinel inclusion-rich magnetite cores (Mag-1) have the highest trace element contents (in wt%): Si (0.032), Al (0.167-0.248), Mg (0.340-0.405), Ti (0.215-0.254), V (0.090-0.138) etc. They might have formed during an early metamorphism and/or related skarn formation. Voluminous second magnetite (Mag-2) replacing olivine, pyroxenes, spinel and other skarn minerals at c. 540o C (Magnetite-Ilmenite geothermometer) has much lower trace element abundances, probably washed out by hydrothermal fluids. The latest magnetites (Mag-3 and Mag-4) overgrow the earlier ones and occur near or within the sulfide veins (Mag-4). As was observed from microtextures, the Mag-3 and Mag-4 have originated from the late thermal reworking by dissolution-reprecipitation processes. To imply an origin of the studied magnetites, they were compared to the earlier studied magmatic-metamorphic (1058 drilling), presumably skarn (982 drilling) magnetites from the studied area and plotted in the major magnetite ore type fields according to Dupuis and Beaudoin

  1. Bio-mineralization and potential biogeochemical processes in bauxite deposits: genetic and ore quality significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskou, Magdalini; Economou-Eliopoulos, Maria

    2013-08-01

    The Parnassos-Ghiona bauxite deposit in Greece of karst type is the 11th largest bauxite producer in the world. The mineralogical, major and trace-element contents and δ18O, δ12C, δ34S isotopic compositions of bauxite ores from this deposit and associated limestone provide valuable evidence for their origin and biogeochemical processes resulting in the beneficiation of low grade bauxite ores. The organic matter as thin coal layers, overlying the bauxite deposits, within limestone itself (negative δ12C isotopic values) and the negative δ34S values in sulfides within bauxite ores point to the existence of the appropriate circumstances for Fe bio-leaching and bio-mineralization. Furthermore, a consortium of microorganisms of varying morphological forms (filament-like and spherical to lenticular at an average size of 2 μm), either as fossils or presently living and producing enzymes, is a powerful factor to catalyze the redox reactions, expedite the rates of metal extraction and provide alternative pathways for metal leaching processes resulting in the beneficiation of bauxite ore.

  2. Geological controls on refractory ore in an orogenic gold deposit, Macraes mine, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, B. S.; Craw, D.; Ryan, C. G.

    2005-07-01

    The Macraes mine is hosted in an orogenic (mesothermal) gold deposit in metasedimentary rocks of the Otago Schist belt. Much gold occurs within altered schist with minimal silica-addition, and this study focuses on altered schist ore types. The unmineralized host schists are chemically and mineralogically uniform in composition, but include two end-member rock types: feldspathic schist and micaceous schist. Both rock types have undergone hydrothermal alteration along a shallow-dipping foliation-parallel shear zone, but their different rheological properties have affected the style of mineralisation. Micaceous schist has been extensively recrystallized and hydrothermally altered during ductile deformation, to form ores characterized by abundant, disseminated millimetre-scale pyrite cubes (typically 1 2 wt% S) and minor silicification. The earliest pyrite contained Ni and/or As in solid solution and no gold was imaged in these pyrites or later arsenopyrite grains. The ore type is refractory and gold recovery by cyanide leaching is less than 50%, with lowest recovery in rocks that have been less affected by later brittle deformation. In contrast, hydrothermally altered feldspathic schist is characterized by mineralised black microshears and veinlets formed during shear-zone related brittle deformation. Microsheared ore has relatively low sulphur content (<0.7 wt%) and muscovite has been illitised during hydrothermal alteration. Pyrite and arsenopyrite in microshears are fractured and deformed, and contain 1 10 μm blebs of gold. Later pyrite veinlets also contain micron- to submicron-scale inclusions of sphalerite, chalcopyrite, galena, and gold (≤10 microns). Gold in microsheared ore is more readily recoverable than in the refractory ore, although encapsulation of the fine gold grains inhibits cyanidation. Both microsheared ore and disseminated pyritic ore pass laterally into mineralised black shears, which contain hydrothermal graphite and late-stage cataclastic

  3. Discrimination of iron ore deposits of granulite terrain of Southern Peninsular India using ASTER data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, Sankaran; Thirunavukkarasu, A.; Balamurugan, G.; Shankar, K.

    2011-04-01

    This work describes a new image processing technique for discriminating iron ores (magnetite quartzite deposits) and associated lithology in high-grade granulite region of Salem, Southern Peninsular India using visible, near-infrared and short wave infrared reflectance data of Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). Image spectra show that the magnetite quartzite and associated lithology of garnetiferrous pyroxene granulite, hornblende biotite gneiss, amphibolite, dunite, and pegmatite have absorption features around spectral bands 1, 3, 5, and 7. ASTER band ratios ((1 + 3)/2, (3 + 5)/4, (5 + 7)/6) in RGB are constructed by summing the bands representing the shoulders of absorption features as a numerator, and the band located nearest the absorption feature as a denominator to map iron ores and band ratios ((2 + 4)/3, (5 + 7)/6, (7 + 9)/8) in RGB for associated lithology. The results show that ASTER band ratios ((1 + 3)/2, (3 + 5)/4, (5 + 7)/6) in a Red-Green-Blue (RGB) color combination identifies the iron ores much better than previously published ASTER band ratios analysis. A Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is applied to reduce redundant information in highly correlated bands. PCA (3, 2, and 1 for iron ores and 5, 4, 2 for granulite rock) in RGB enabled the discrimination between the iron ores and garnetiferrous pyroxene granulite rock. Thus, this image processing technique is very much suitable for discriminating the different types of rocks of granulite region. As outcome of the present work, the geology map of Salem region is provided based on the interpretation of ASTER image results and field verification work. It is recommended that the proposed methods have great potential for mapping of iron ores and associated lithology of granulite region with similar rock units of granulite regions of Southern Peninsular India. This work also demonstrates the ability of ASTER's to provide information on iron ores, which is valuable

  4. Prospecting For Magnetite Ore Deposits With A Innovative Sensor's of Unique Fundamentally New Magnetometer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelianenko, T. I.; Tachaytdinov, R. S.; Sarichev, V. F.; Kotov, B. V.; Susoeva, G. N.

    After careful study of principles and abilities of all existing magnetmeters of all three revolutions in magnetic prospecting we have come to the conclusion that they cannot solve local guestions of the magnetic prospecting or determine centre coordinates of magnetite ore body before drilling Electromagnetism lows and achievents magnetprospectings and radioelectronics of all 20th century serve as a theoretical base of the "locator". While creating this cardinally new magnetmeter , we borrowed different things from radio-prospectors, magnetprospectors, wireless operators and combined all of them while creating the "locators''. The "locators' construction is bas ed on the "magnetic intensification" principle ,owing to which this "locators" are characterised by hight sensitiveness and ability to determine centers of even little commercial magnetite ore deposits with relatively weak magnetic anomalies. The main advantage of the "locators" over existing ones is that it can solve local questions determine centre coordinates. A remarkably simple locator construction determine direction of the on-surface measurings towards the ore body centre and gives approximate prognosis resourses before/withour/ drilling. The "locators" were worked out for the first time in history , they have 2 licences. The fundamental design and drawbacks of the existing magnetometers have been inherited from the original magnetometre dating back two or three hundred years. The developers of the existing magnetometres have all gone along the same well- beaten track of replacing the primitive sensor in the form of a piece of ore hung on a string at first by an arrow sensor and later by magnetically oriented protons and quanta, with amplification of the sensors' OUTPUT signal. Furthermore, all the existing magnetometres are imperfect in that they, lacking the directivity of the ground-level magnetic measurements, only record the overall magnetic vector field generated by all the ore bodies around the

  5. Lead and zinc dust depositions from ore trains characterised using lead isotopic compositions.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, L J; Taylor, M P; Morrison, A L

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates an unusual source of environmental lead contamination - the emission and deposition of lead and zinc concentrates along train lines into and out of Australia's oldest silver-lead-zinc mine at Broken Hill, Australia. Transport of lead and zinc ore concentrates from the Broken Hill mines has occurred for more than 125 years, during which time the majority was moved in uncovered rail wagons. A significant amount of ore was lost to the adjoining environments, resulting in soil immediately adjacent to train lines elevated with concentrations of lead (695 mg kg(-1)) and zinc (2230 mg kg(-1)). Concentrations of lead and zinc decreased away from the train line and also with depth shown in soil profiles. Lead isotopic compositions demonstrated the soil lead contained Broken Hill ore in increasing percentages closer to the train line, with up to 97% apportioned to the mined Broken Hill ore body. SEM examination showed ceiling dusts collected from houses along the train line were composed of unweathered galena particles, characteristic of the concentrate transported in the rail wagons. The loss of ore from the uncovered wagons has significantly extended the environmental footprint of contamination from local mining operations over an area extending hundreds of kilometres along each of the three train lines.

  6. Kinetic and dynamic control for magmatic sulfide deposit formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Magmatic sulfide deposits form by the saturation and separation of sulfide liquid from silicate liquid due to immiscibility. As a silicate melt cools and fractionates under reducing conditions, S concentration increases and S solubility decreases. Hence, at some point, S may become supersaturated, and sulfide melt droplets would nucleate and grow. The droplets would sink through silicate melt due to higher density of the sulfide melt, and accumulate at the bottom of the magma body, possibly with other crystallizing and settling dense minerals such as olivine and chromite. The sulfide layer, if preserved, constitutes the sulfide deposits. Hence, the critical condition for magmatic sulfide deposit formation is for the droplets to settle enough distance to and accumulate at the bottom of a magma body. Otherwise, sulfide droplets would be dispersed in the rock and would not form ores. Because the settling velocity is related to the size of the droplets, the growth kinetics and settling dynamics therefore control the formation of such deposits. In this report, a parametric study of sulfide droplet growth and settling as a magma body cools is carried out using our convective growth and settling models. Single stage exponential cooling with a given time scale is adopted. Because no reliable nucleation theory is available, nucleation is roughly treated by assuming one single nucleation event leading to N critical nuclei once the degree of supersaturation reaches x (both N and x are parameters to be varied). Crystal fractionation that can alter melt composition and viscosity is ignored. Growth starts from the critical nucleus radius. Sulfide droplets are assumed to behave as rigid spheres similar to bubbles. A settling distance of 1 km is assigned as the critical condition for the formation of a sulfide ore deposit. The final result is expressed as the initial S concentration necessary for settling this distance. If cooling time scale is 1000 yr, N = 10000 per cubic meter

  7. Geophysical prospecting for iron ore deposit around Tajimi village, Lokoja, North-Central Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayowa, Oyelowo; Ogungbesan, Gbenga; Majolagbe, Razak; Oyeleke, Simeon

    2016-09-01

    Ground magnetic and electrical resistivity survey were undertaken to investigate the occurrence and geometry of iron ore deposit around Tajimi village, Lokoja, North-Central Nigeria. The generated residual map of the ground-magnetic data acquired at 250 stations along 15 traverses revealed numerous prominent anomalies, mostly trending in the N-S direction. The radial power spectrum revealed the depth to magnetic sources between 6 m to 20 m. The interpreted VES data characterized the area into three subsurface layers: top soil, presumably iron ore layer and weathered/fresh basement. The result of vertical electrical sounding curves showed a sudden drop in resistivity (42-241 Ωm) over high magnetic response. The geo-electric section revealed that the study area is generally characterized with thin overburden (0.5-1.7 m) and the thickness of the second layer (presumed to be the iron ore layer) ranged between 6.2-25.1 m. The study concluded that areas of high magnetic intensity showed a sudden drop in resistivity value for the VES points, which give an indication of the presence of an electrically conductive structure presumed to be iron ore deposits.

  8. Regularities of spatial association of major endogenous uranium deposits and kimberlitic dykes in the uranium ore regions of the Ukrainian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnyk, Anna

    2015-04-01

    During exploration works we discovered the spatial association and proximity time formation of kimberlite dykes (ages are 1,815 and 1,900 Ga for phlogopite) and major industrial uranium deposits in carbonate-sodium metasomatites (age of the main uranium ore of an albititic formation is 1,85-1,70 Ga according to U-Pb method) in Kirovogradsky, Krivorozhsky and Alekseevsko-Lysogorskiy uranium ore regions of the Ukrainian Shield (UkrSh) [1]. In kimberlites of Kirovogradsky ore region uranium content reaches 18-20 g/t. Carbon dioxide is a major component in the formation of hydrothermal uranium deposits and the formation of the sodium in the process of generating the spectrum of alkaline ultrabasic magmas in the range from picritic to kimberlite and this is the connection between these disparate geochemical processes. For industrial uranium deposits in carbonate-sodium metasomatitics of the Kirovogradsky and Krivorozhsky uranium ore regions are characteristic of uranyl carbonate introduction of uranium, which causes correlation between CO2 content and U in range of "poor - ordinary - rich" uranium ore. In productive areas of uranium-ore fields of the Kirovogradsky ore region for phlogopite-carbonate veinlets of uranium ore albitites deep δ13C values (from -7.9 to -6.9o/oo) are characteristic. Isotope-geochemical investigation of albitites from Novokonstantynovskoe, Dokuchaevskoe, Partyzanskoe uranium deposits allowed obtaining direct evidence of the involvement of mantle material during formation of uranium albitites in Kirovogradsky ore region [2]. Petrological characteristics of kimberlites from uranium ore regions of the UkrSh (presence of nodules of dunite and harzburgite garnet in kimberlites, diamonds of peridotite paragenesis, chemical composition of indicator minerals of kimberlite, in particular Gruzskoy areas pyropes (Cr2O3 = 6,1-7,1%, MgO = 19,33-20,01%, CaO = 4,14-4,38 %, the content of knorringite component of most grains > 50mol%), chromites (Cr2O3 = 45

  9. Evaluation of feasibility of static tests applied to Küre VMS ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, Cansu; Çelik Balci, Nurgül; Şeref Sönmez, M.

    2015-04-01

    Küre volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) ore deposits have been mined for its copper content for over centuries. However, there is no published data on AMD around Küre VMS ore deposits. This study investigates the sources of acid producing mechanisms in Küre, using field and laboratorial approaches. Geochemical static tests to predict AMD generation are widely applied to mining sites for assessing potential environmental consequences. However, there are well known limitations of these methods particularly resulting from assumptions used for calculations. To test the feasibility of the methods to predict potential of AMD generation of Küre (VMS) copper deposits, for the first time, acid production and neutralization potential of various mine wastes of Küre (VMS) copper deposits were determined. To test our static test results, in situ and laboratory geochemical data were also obtained from the groundwater discharges from Bakibaba underground mining tunnels. Feasibility study showed that, despite a few inconsistencies, static tests were suitable for predicting generation of AMD around Küre copper mining site and reflected well the site conditions. The current study revealed that pulp density, defined as solid/liquid ratio and used for static tests, is an important limiting factor to predict reliable data for AMD generation. In this study, we also determined surface waters affected by AMD are predicted to have a pH value between 3 and 5, with an average of pH 4. Excessive concentrations of manganese, copper, cobalt and sulfate are also noted with considerable amounts of iron and zinc, which can reach to toxic levels. Moreover, iron and zinc were found to be the controlling the fate of metals by precipitation and co-precipitation, due to their relatively depleted concentrations at redox shifting zones. Key words: Küre pyritic copper ore, Bakibaba mining tunnels, volcanogenic massive sulfide ore deposits, acid production potential, neutralization potential

  10. Gold-silver-tellurium mineral assemblages in different ore styles of the Southern Urals VHMS deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslennikov, V. V.; Zaykov, V. V.; Maslennikova, S. P.; Tesalina, S. G.; Herrington, R. J.; Buschmann, B.; Becker, K.; Petersen, S.; Orgeval, J. J.; Leistel, M.

    2003-04-01

    VMS deposits of the South Urals generally show a continuum in degradation and reworking ranging from pristine steep-sided hydrothermal sulphide mounds to deposits dominated by layered strata of clastic sulphides. Four different deposits with varying degrees of degradation in order of increased reworking: (Yaman-Kasy longrightarrow Molodezhnoe longrightarrow Alexandrinskoe longrightarrow Balta-Tau) have been ranged. The influence of sulphide mound destruction and of sea-floor alteration on mineral assemblages was investigated In the pristine Yaman-Kasy sulphide mound gold and silver occur as altaite+tellurium+hessite-stuetzite+sylvanite and later galena+native gold+pyrite assemblages in chalcopyrite+isocubanite-rich linings of former chimney conduits. Chalcopyrite-dominated conduit fragments in clastic ore facies contain native tellurium+gold intergrowths. In the weakly reworked Molodezhnoe deposit gold-silver assemblages only occur in sea-floor altered clastic sulphides on the slope of massive sulphide mounds in bornite- and tennantite-rich ores in association with Cu-Ag sulfides such as jalpaite, mckinstryite, and stromeyerite and rare Au-Ag-tellurides (petzite). The Alexandrinskoe deposit is dominated by clastic ores and here native gold and rare hessite occur together with galena in tennantite-sphalerite-dominated veins of the footwall as well as in drusy sphalerite forming conduits of vent chimneys. An assemblage of electrum+galena+tennantite was observed in secondary chalcopyrite in the outer walls of chimneys. Native gold+stromeyerite are common in bornite-rich clastic sulphides while an assemblage of Ag-sulphosalts+electrum is common in barite-rich ores. In the reworked Balta-Tau deposit Ag-sulphosalts+electrum-kustelite occur often together with tennantite+galena+barite banded ores. Gold-silver-telluride mineralisation in these VMS deposits changes with degree of reworking from Au-tellurides, and native gold+galena+pyrite in pristine sulphide mounds to

  11. Mineralogical study of sediment-hosted gold deposits in the Yangshan ore field, Western Qinling Orogen, Central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jinlong; Sun, Weidong; Zhu, Sanyuan; Li, He; Liu, Yulong; Zhai, Wei

    2014-05-01

    The Yangshan gold ore field is located in the southern subzone of the Western Qinling Orogen. Mineralization is confined by the east-west-striking Anchanghe thrust fault zone. These subparallel faults constitute a branch of the regional Mianlue structural zone, crosscutting Middle Devonian carbonaceous carbonate and clastic rock sequences, an ore-bearing unit locally named the Sanhekou Formation. The metasedimentary clastic and carbonate rocks containing fine-grained sulfides are the main host rocks of the deposit, with minor mineralization occurring as coarse-grained pyrite-quartz veinlets in black shale and as dissemination in some plagiogranite dykes. Electron microprobe (EMPA) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses show that arsenian pyrite and arsenopyrite are the major hosts for gold with tens of ppm up to weight percent levels of Au, and the Au contents in arsenopyrite are one order of magnitude higher than those in pyrite. A negative correlation of As and S in arsenian pyrite is consistent with the substitution of As for S in the mineral. Both arsenian pyrite and arsenopyrite in the Yangshan ore field show chemical zonations with middle parts (mantle) enriched in As and Au relative to cores and the outermost rims, reflecting the chemical evolution of ore-forming fluids. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analysis failed to identify any nanoparticle of native gold even in the highest Au parts of arsenopyrite. This observation combined with the relatively homogenous distribution of Au, a positive correlation of As and Au, and Au/As ratios below the solubility limit of gold in arsenian pyrite and arsenopyrite, suggests that invisible gold is likely present as structurally bound Au+1 in sulfides, although our work cannot exclude the existence of Au nanoparticles in arsenian pyrite as identified in American Carlin-type gold deposits. Submicron native gold may be much more easily found in

  12. Geology and ore deposits of the Mahd Adh Dhahab District, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luce, Robert W.; Bagdady, Abdulaziz; Roberts, Ralph Jackson

    1976-01-01

    The principal ore minerals are pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, galena, and minor tetrahedrite, argentite, and native gold and silver. The gold and silver occurs finely disseminated in the veins and in the altered selvages of the veins. Widespread potassic and propylitic alteration accompanied the ore-forming processes. Potassium feldspar was introduced during an early stage of vein formation. Isotopic analyses of lead in vein potassium feldspar and galena yield a model age of about 900-1050 million years with the possibility of the original lead source having been remobilized about 600 million years ago. Chlorite and carbonate are also prominent vein minerals.

  13. Paragenetic link between organic matter and late-stage ore deposition in the Sweetwater mine, Viburnum Trend, southeast Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Niewendorp, C.A. ); Clendenin, C.W.

    1993-03-01

    At the Sweetwater mine bitumen exudes from mine walls as a tacky liquid and is present as spherical blebs in vugs throughout the Bonneterre Formation. Bitumen blebs occur as overgrowths on older mineral phases and are frequently over-grown by late vug-filling sulfides. Slickensided bitumen interlayered with deformed galena occurs in Middle Bonneterre Formation collapse breccias. Anthraxolite, a coal-like bitumen, has also been identified in these collapse breccias and is commonly overgrown by cubic-form galena in vugs. Petrographic examination, verified by SEM analysis, reveals inclusions of dendritic-form galena intimately intergrown in such anthraxolite samples; pyrite and chalcopyrite also occur as inclusions. The presence of sulfide inclusions in anthraxolite establishes a direct paragenetic link between organic matter and ore deposition. Generation of bituminous material appears to correspond to a major period of solution-induced brecciation during main-stage mineralization. Observations indicate that precipitation of dendritic-form galena in anthraxolite coincides with subsequent deposition of cubic-form galena. Such a paragenetic link supports the proposal that nonbiologic sulfate reduction by organic matter has occurred and is a precipitation mechanism for sulfide ores in the Viburnum Trend.

  14. The Niujiaotang Cd-rich zinc deposit, Duyun, Guizhou province, southwest China: ore genesis and mechanisms of cadmium concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Lin; Cook, Nigel J.; Liu, Tiegeng; Ciobanu, Cristiana L.; Gao, Wei; Yang, Yulong

    2012-08-01

    The Niujiaotang zinc deposit in southeastern Guizhou, China, is a Mississippi Valley-type Zn deposit within Early Cambrian carbonate rocks. Sphalerite is enriched in cadmium (average 1.4 wt.% Cd), which occurs mostly as isomorphous impurities in the sphalerite lattice. Discrete cadmium minerals (greenockite and otavite) are rare and are found almost exclusively in the oxidation zone of the deposit, probably formed as secondary minerals during weathering-leaching processes. Geochemical data show that the sulfides are enriched in heavy sulfur, with δ34S ranging from +10.0‰ to +32.8‰ (mean +22.5‰). The consistent Pb isotopic compositions in different sulfide minerals are similar to that of Cambrian strata. The ore lead probably came from U- and Th-rich upper crustal rocks, such as the Lower Cambrian Wuxun Formation. The ore fluid is of low-temperature (101°C to 142°C) type, with a Na-Ca-Mg-Cl-dominant composition, and is interpreted as oil-field brine. The data indicate that the metals were mainly derived from the Early Cambrian strata (Qingxudong and Wuxun Formations), whereas sulfur is sourced from sulfate in Cambrian strata or oil-field brines of the Majiang petroleum paleoreservoir. The genetic model for the deposit invokes an Early Cambrian shallow-sea environment on the Yangtze Platform. Zinc and Cd in seawater were concentrated in abundant algae via unknown biological mechanisms, resulting in large amounts of Zn- and Cd-rich algal ooliths. During the Ordovician, concurrent with destruction of the Majiang petroleum paleoreservoir, oil-field brines migrated from the center of the basin to the margin leaching metals from the Cambrian strata. In the Niujiaotang area, preexisting Zn and Cd, particularly in the Qingxudong and Wuxun Formation, were further mobilized by hot brines rising along the Zaolou fault system, forming stratiform and generally conformable Zn-Cd orebodies in reactive carbonate lithologies.

  15. The 3.1 Ga Nuggihalli chromite deposits, Western Dharwar craton (India): Geochemical and isotopic constraints on mantle sources, crustal evolution and implications for supercontinent formation and ore mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Ria; Mondal, Sisir K.; Frei, Robert; Rosing, Minik T.; Waight, Tod E.; Zhong, Hong; Kumar, G. R. Ravindra

    2012-12-01

    Nuggihalli greenstone belt is one of the oldest greenstone belts (3.4-3.0 Ga) in the Western Dharwar craton, southern India. It consists of conformable metavolcanic (e.g., komatiite and komatiitic basalt) and metasedimentary rocks belonging to the Sargur Group. Sill-like ultramafic-mafic plutonic bodies are present within these schistose rocks which are in turn enclosed by tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite gneisses (TTG). The plutonic suite occurs as a layered succession of serpentinite (after dunite) and tremolite-chlorite-actinolite schist (after peridotite) hosting chromitite bodies, anorthosite, pyroxenite, and gabbro hosting magnetite bands. Whole-rock Sm-Nd data for the peridotite-anorthosite-pyroxenite-gabbro unit yield a correlation line with a slope corresponding to an age of 3125 ± 120 Ma (MSWD = 1.3) which is similar to ages of komatiitic rocks of the older greenstone belts in the craton. A whole rock Pb-Pb errorchron age of 2801 ± 110 Ma (MSWD = 102) has been obtained for the entire plutonic ultramafic-mafic suite; this represents (partial) redistribution/resetting of the U-Pb system during a younger metamorphic event and by the magmatic activity during formation of the younger greenstone belts. The positive ɛNd values (+ 1.7 to + 3.4) of the ultramafic-mafic rocks, and low initial 87Sr/86Sr values (at 3.1 Ga) of the gabbros (0.70097-0.70111) implies derivation of the parental magma from a depleted mantle source. The REE pattern of the metavolcanic schists bears resemblance with the pattern of Al-depleted komatiites. Major and trace element variation in the schists correspond with the fractionation trend exhibited by komatiites to komatiitic basalts in the older greenstone belts within the craton. Coherent patterns of whole-rock major and trace element data, along with the layered nature of the sill-like ultramafic-mafic rocks indicate that the plutonic and volcanic suites are related by analogous fractional crystallization processes. Comparison of

  16. Constraints on the composition of ore fluids and implications for mineralising events at the Cleo gold deposit, Eastern Goldfields Province, Western Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, S.M.; Johnson, C.A.; Watling, R.J.; Premo, W.R.

    2003-01-01

    The Cleo gold deposit, 55 km south of Laverton in the Eastern Goldfields Province of Western Australia, is characterised by banded iron-formation (BIF)-hosted ore zones in the gently dipping Sunrise Shear Zone and high-grade vein-hosted ore in the Western Lodes. There is evidence that gold mineralisation in the Western Lodes (which occurred at ca 2655 Ma) post-dates the majority of displacement along the Sunrise Shear Zone, but it remains uncertain if the ore in both structures formed simultaneously or separately. Overall, the Pb, Nd, Sr, C. O and S isotopic compositions of ore-related minerals from both the Western Lodes and ore zones in the Sunrise Shear Zone are similar. Early low-salinity aqueous-carbonic fluids and late high-salinity fluids with similar characteristics are trapped in inclusions in quartz veins from both the Sunrise Shear Zone and the Western Lodes. The early CO2, CO2-H2O, and H2O- dominant inclusions are interpreted as being related to ore formation, and to have formed from a single low-salinity aqueous-carbonic fluid as a result of intermittent fluid immiscibility. Homogenisation temperatures indicate that these inclusions were trapped at approximately 280??C and at approximately 4 km depth, in the deeper epizonal range. Differences between the ore zones are detected in the trace-element composition of gold samples, with gold from the Sunrise Shear Zone enriched in Ni, Pb, Sn, Te and Zn, and depleted In As, Bi, Cd, Cu and Sb, relative to gold from the Western Lodes. Although there are differences in gold composition between the Sunrise Shear Zone and Western Lodes, and hence the metal content of ore fluids may have varied slightly between the different ore zones, no other systematic fluid or solute differences are detected between the ore zones. Given the fact that the ore fluids in each zone have very similar bulk properties, the considerable differences in gold grade, sulfide mineral abundance, and ore textures between the two ore zones

  17. Investigation of LANDSAT imagery on correlations between ore deposits and major shield structures in Finland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuominen, H. V. (Principal Investigator); Kuosmanen, V.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Several regional lineaments appear to correlate with the distribution of ore deposits and showings. Combined study of LANDSAT summer and winter mosaics and color composites of geological, geomorphological, and geophysical maps makes the correlation more perceptible. The revealed pattern of significant lineaments in northern Finland is fairly regular. The most significant lineaments seen in LANDSAT mosaics are not detectable in single images.

  18. Metallogeny of the Great Basin: crustal evolution, fluid flow, and ore deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hofstra, Albert H.; Wallace, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    The Great Basin physiographic province in the Western United States contains a diverse assortment of world-class ore deposits. It currently (2006) is the world's second leading producer of gold, contains large silver and base metal (Cu, Zn, Pb, Mo, W) deposits, a variety of other important metallic (Fe, Ni, Be, REE's, Hg, PGE) and industrial mineral (diatomite, barite, perlite, kaolinite, gallium) resources, as well as petroleum and geothermal energy resources. Ore deposits are most numerous and largest in size in linear mineral belts with complex geology. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists are in the final year of a research project initiated in the fall of 2001 to increase understanding of relations between crustal evolution, fluid flow, and ore deposits in the Great Basin. Because of its substantial past and current mineral production, this region has been the focus of numerous investigations over the past century and is the site of ongoing research by industry, academia, and state agencies. A variety of geoinformatic tools was used to organize, reinterpret, and display, in space and time, the large amounts of geologic, geophysical, geochemical, and hydrologic information deemed pertinent to this problem. This information, in combination with concentrated research on (1) critical aspects of the geologic history, (2) an area in northern Nevada that encompasses the major mineral belts, and (3) important mining districts and deposits, is producing new insights about the interplay between key tectonic events, hydrothermal fluid flow, and ore genesis in mineral belts. The results suggest that the Archean to Holocene history of the Great Basin was punctuated by several tectonic events that caused fluids of different origins (sea water, basinal brine, meteoric water, metamorphic water, magmatic water) to move through the crust. Basement faults reactivated during these events localized deformation, sedimentation, magmatism, and hydrothermal fluid flow in overlying

  19. Biogenic non-crystalline U(IV) revealed as major component in uranium ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Amrita; Campbell, Kate M.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Roebbert, Yvonne; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Borch, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Historically, it is believed that crystalline uraninite, produced via the abiotic reduction of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) is the dominant reduced U species formed in low-temperature uranium roll-front ore deposits. Here we show that non-crystalline U(IV) generated through biologically mediated U(VI) reduction is the predominant U(IV) species in an undisturbed U roll-front ore deposit in Wyoming, USA. Characterization of U species revealed that the majority (~58-89%) of U is bound as U(IV) to C-containing organic functional groups or inorganic carbonate, while uraninite and U(VI) represent only minor components. The uranium deposit exhibited mostly 238U-enriched isotope signatures, consistent with largely biotic reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). This finding implies that biogenic processes are more important to uranium ore genesis than previously understood. The predominance of a relatively labile form of U(IV) also provides an opportunity for a more economical and environmentally benign mining process, as well as the design of more effective post-mining restoration strategies and human health-risk assessment.

  20. Biogenic non-crystalline U(IV) revealed as major component in uranium ore deposits

    DOE PAGES

    Bhattacharyya, Amrita; Campbell, Kate M.; Kelly, Shelly D.; ...

    2017-06-01

    Historically, it is believed that crystalline uraninite, produced via the abiotic reduction of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) is the dominant reduced U species formed in low-temperature uranium roll-front ore deposits. Here we show that non-crystalline U(IV) generated through biologically mediated U(VI) reduction is the predominant U(IV) species in an undisturbed U roll-front ore deposit in Wyoming, USA. Characterization of U species revealed that the majority (~58-89%) of U is bound as U(IV) to C-containing organic functional groups or inorganic carbonate, while uraninite and U(VI) represent only minor components. The uranium deposit exhibited mostly 238U-enriched isotope signatures, consistent with largely biotic reductionmore » of U(VI) to U(IV). This finding implies that biogenic processes are more important to uranium ore genesis than previously understood. The predominance of a relatively labile form of U(IV) also provides an opportunity for a more economical and environmentally benign mining process, as well as the design of more effective post-mining restoration strategies and human health-risk assessment.« less

  1. Biogenic non-crystalline U(IV) revealed as major component in uranium ore deposits

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Amrita; Campbell, Kate M.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Roebbert, Yvonne; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Borch, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Historically, it is believed that crystalline uraninite, produced via the abiotic reduction of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) is the dominant reduced U species formed in low-temperature uranium roll-front ore deposits. Here we show that non-crystalline U(IV) generated through biologically mediated U(VI) reduction is the predominant U(IV) species in an undisturbed U roll-front ore deposit in Wyoming, USA. Characterization of U species revealed that the majority (∼58-89%) of U is bound as U(IV) to C-containing organic functional groups or inorganic carbonate, while uraninite and U(VI) represent only minor components. The uranium deposit exhibited mostly 238U-enriched isotope signatures, consistent with largely biotic reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). This finding implies that biogenic processes are more important to uranium ore genesis than previously understood. The predominance of a relatively labile form of U(IV) also provides an opportunity for a more economical and environmentally benign mining process, as well as the design of more effective post-mining restoration strategies and human health-risk assessment. PMID:28569759

  2. Biogenic non-crystalline U(IV) revealed as major component in uranium ore deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bhattacharyya, Amrita; Campbell, Kate M.; Kelly, Shelly; Roebbert, Yvonne; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Borch, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Historically, it is believed that crystalline uraninite, produced via the abiotic reduction of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) is the dominant reduced U species formed in low-temperature uranium roll-front ore deposits. Here we show that non-crystalline U(IV) generated through biologically mediated U(VI) reduction is the predominant U(IV) species in an undisturbed U roll-front ore deposit in Wyoming, USA. Characterization of U species revealed that the majority (∼58-89%) of U is bound as U(IV)to C-containing organic functional groups or inorganic carbonate, while uraninite and U(VI) represent only minor components. The uranium deposit exhibited mostly 238U-enriched isotope signatures, consistent with largely biotic reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). This finding implies that biogenic processes are more important to uranium ore genesis than previously understood. The predominance of a relatively labile form of U(IV) also provides an opportunity for a more economical and environmentally benign mining process, as well as the design of more effective post-mining restoration strategies and human health-risk assessment.

  3. Volcanic environments of ore formation in the late Archaean Abitibi greenstone belt of Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Ludden, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    The tectonic and petrological evolution of the late Archaean Abitibi greenstone belt indicate both emergent and submergent volcanism played a role in its metallogenesis. At approximately 2700 m.y. the southern volcanic zone (SVZ) of the Abitibi belt was dominated by a rift-related tectonic and volcanic evolution in a transcurrent (wrench) fault regime. The tholeiitic and komatiitic magmas and associated differentiated volcanic rocks had access to shallow crustal levels allowing the development of submarine hydrothermal systems and syngenetic Cu-Zn (Noranda type) massive sulfide ore bodies. These deposits formed along a 300 km. axis in submerging, fault bounded, basins. In contrast, the northern volcanic zone (the Chibougamau-Chapais area) formed at 2720 m.y and was characterized by emergent volcanoes emplaced on a continental crust and cored by coeval diorite-tonalite plutons. Mafic magma was inhibited from the crust by fractionated and contaminated magmas. This resulted in the emplacement of hydrous calc-alkaline magmas and associated porphyry-type epigenetic Cu(Au) massive sulfides. Au-lode deposits are predominantly located near major shear-zones in the SVZ. The are forming solutions were released as a result of burial due to wrench faulting. The dynamic regime of the rifted SVZ may have resulted in the syngenetic massive sulfides, the Au-lode deposits, metamorphism and sedimentation being synchronous on a regional scale, whilst on a local scale, Au-lodes superimpose and replace massive sulfides, iron formation and metamorphic isograds.

  4. The origin of terrestrial pisoliths and pisolitic iron ore deposits: Raindrops and sheetwash in a semi-arid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascelles, Desmond F.

    2016-07-01

    Ooliths evidently form by chemical precipitation in limnic, paralic, fluvial and marine environments, pisoliths, however, appear to be restricted to terrestrial environments. Typically composed of iron, aluminium and manganese sesquioxides with minor admixtures of quartz and kaolinite, they are widely distributed in tropical to subtropical regions overlying deeply weathered soil profiles. Although iron-, aluminium- and manganese-rich end members are important sources of these metals, their genesis is still enigmatic; their formation has never been observed or produced experimentally and current models for their origin are little more than guesses. A new model is presented based on a unique personal observation in which pisoliths are formed by the action of charged raindrops during thunderstorms impacting on dry deeply weathered powdery soils. The pisoliths are transported across pediments by sheetwash, accumulating as thick deposits in the valley floors. Pisolites are characteristically unfossiliferous and typically clearly pedogenic. The absence of fine depositional layering, fossil seeds, leaves and pollen in pisolites is explained by bioturbation and the action of soil organisms during extended pedogenesis while the major coarse bedding features derive from erosional and depositional events in the evolution of the pediment. Pisolitic iron ores (aka channel iron deposits, CID) are a special case of transported pisolitic ferricrust that form an important resource of medium grade iron ore (57-60 wt% Fe) in the Pilbara Region of Western Australia. Apart from minor deposits in the northern Yilgarn Province of Western Australia, they have not been found elsewhere. They differ from normal transported ferricrust and terrestrial pisolites not only in the exceptionally high iron and low alumina and silica content but also in containing abundant fossilised wood particles.

  5. New insight into the origin of manganese oxide ore deposits in the Appalachian Valley and Ridge of northeastern Tennessee and northern Virginia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carmichael, Sarah K.; Doctor, Daniel H.; Wilson, Crystal G.; Feierstein, Joshua; McAleer, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Manganese oxide deposits have long been observed in association with carbonates within the Appalachian Mountains, but their origin has remained enigmatic for well over a century. Ore deposits of Mn oxides from several productive sites located in eastern Tennessee and northern Virginia display morphologies that include botryoidal and branching forms, massive nodules, breccia matrix cements, and fracture fills. The primary ore minerals include hollandite, cryptomelane, and romanèchite. Samples of Mn oxides from multiple localities in these regions were analyzed using electron microscopy, X-ray analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and trace and rare earth element (REE) geochemistry. The samples from eastern Tennessee have biological morphologies, contain residual biopolymers, and exhibit REE signatures that suggest the ore formation was due to supergene enrichment (likely coupled with microbial activity). In contrast, several northern Virginia ores hosted within quartz-sandstone breccias exhibit petrographic relations, mineral morphologies, and REE signatures indicating inorganic precipitation, and a likely hydrothermal origin with supergene overprinting. Nodular accumulations of Mn oxides within weathered alluvial deposits that occur close to breccia-hosted Mn deposits in Virginia show geochemical signatures that are distinct from the breccia matrices and appear to reflect remobilization of earlier-emplaced Mn and concentration within supergene traps. Based on the proximity of all of the productive ore deposits to mapped faults or other zones of deformation, we suggest that the primary source of all of the Mn may have been deep seated, and that Mn oxides with supergene and/or biological characteristics resulted from the local remobilization and concentration of this primary Mn.

  6. Origin of high-grade gold ore, source of ore fluid components, and genesis of the Meikle and neighboring Carlin-type deposits, Northern Carlin Trend, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emsbo, P.; Hofstra, A.H.; Lauha, E.A.; Griffin, G.L.; Hutchinson, R.W.

    2003-01-01

    The Meikle mine exploits one of the world's highest grade Carlin-type gold deposits with reserves of ca. 220 t gold at an average grade of 24.7 g/t. Locally, gold grades exceed 400 g/t. Several geologic events converged at Meikle to create these spectacular gold grades. Prior to mineralization, a Devonian hydrothermal system altered the Bootstrap limestone to Fe-rich dolomite. Subsequently the rocks were brecciated by faulting and Late Jurassic intrusive activity. The resulting permeability focused flow of late Eocene Carlin-type ore fluids and allowed them to react with the Fe-rich dolomite. Fluid inclusion data and mineral assemblages indicate that these fluids were hot (ca. 220??C),of moderate salinity (400 g/t. Petrographic observations, geochemical data, and stable isotope results from the Meikle mine and other deposits at the Goldstrike mine place important constraints on genetic models for Meikle and other Carlin-type gold deposits on the northern Carlin trend. The ore fluids were meteoric water (??D = -135???, ??18O = -5???) that interacted with sedimentary rocks at a water/rock ratio of ca. 1 and temperatures of ca. 220??C. The absence of significant silicification suggests that there was little cooling of the ore fluids during mineralization. These two observations strongly suggest that ore fluids were not derived from deep sources but instead flowed parallel to isotherms. The gold was transported by H2S (??34S = 9???), which was derived from Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. The presence of auriferous sedimentary exhalative mineralization in the local stratigraphic sequence raises the possibility that preexisting concentrations of gold contributed to the Carlin-type deposits. Taken together our observations suggest that meteoric water evolved to become an ore fluid by shallow circulation through previously gold- and sulfur-enriched rocks. Carlin-type gold deposits formed where these fluids encountered permeable, reactive Fe-rich rocks.

  7. Ore petrology and geochemistry of Tertiary gold telluride deposits of the Colorado mineral belt

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, J.A.; Romberger, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    Epithermal gold telluride deposits from the Colorado mineral belt share a number of similarities: relationship to alkalic stocks; high fluorine and CO/sub 2/ content; and similar paragenesis. Petrography of deposits in the Jamestown, Cripple Creek, and La Plata districts has resulted in a composite paragenesis: early Fe-Cu-Pb-Zn sulfides + hematite; tetrahedrite; high Te tellurides; low Te tellurides; late native gold. Fluid inclusion studies suggest telluride deposition occurred below 200/sup 0/C from low salinity. Gangue and alteration mineralogy indicates the ore fluids were near neutral pH during telluride deposition. The presence of hematite and locally barite suggest relatively oxidizing conditions. Evaluation of thermodynamic stabilities of tellurides and aqueous tellurium species indicates that progressive oxidation is consistent with the observed ore mineral paragenesis. Available data on gold bisulfide and chloride complexes suggest neither were important in the transport of gold in these systems. Thermodynamic data suggest the ditelluride ion (Te/sub 2//sup 2 -/) predominates in the range of inferred physiochemical conditions for the transport and deposition of gold in these systems. Inferred complexes such as AuTe/sub 2//sup -/ could account for the gold transport, and oxidation would be the most effective mechanism of precipitation of gold telluride or native gold. Published data suggest the associated alkalic stocks may be the ultimate source of the metals, since they are enriched in Au, Ag, Te, As, and Bi.

  8. Ore genesis at the Monterrosas deposit in the Coastal Batholith, Ica, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidder, G. B.

    1984-06-01

    Monterosas is a hydrothermal deposit of copper and for that is hosted by gabbro-diorites of the Upper Cretaceous Patap Superunit within the Coastal Batholith of central Peru. The ore body is localized by fractures and splays related to a nearby regional fault and is composed of massive chalcopyrite, magnetite, and pyrite. Ore and alteration minerals such as actinolite, sodic scapolite, epidotes, sphene, magnetite, apatite, tourmaline, chlorites, hematite, and quartz formed dominantly as replacements of magmatic diosside, labradorite-andesine, and ilmenite. Hydrothermal mineralization was characterized by the exchange of major, minor, and trace elements between hot saline fluids and gabbro-diorite wall rocks. Geochemical data suggest that the ore and gangue minerals were deposited at high temperatures from saline fluids derived from a magma. The evidence includes fluid inclusions within gangue quartz that exhibit homogenization temperatures of 400 to 500 C, salinites of 32 to 56 wt percent NaCl and the halite trend, and magmatic like sulfur isotopic compositions that range from 1.6 to 3.3 permit in gyrite and chalcopyrite.

  9. Reconstructions of subducted ocean floor along the Andes: a framework for assessing Magmatic and Ore Deposit History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sdrolias, M.; Müller, R.

    2006-05-01

    The South American-Antarctic margin has been characterised by numerous episodes of volcanic arc activity and ore deposit formation throughout much of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Although its Cenozoic subduction history is relatively well known, placing the Mesozoic arc-related volcanics and the emplacement of ore bodies in their plate tectonic context remains poorly constrained. We use a merged moving hotspot (Late Cretaceous- present) and palaeomagnetic /fixed hotspot (Early Cretaceous) reference frame, coupled with reconstructed spreading histories of the Pacific, Phoenix and Farallon plates to understand the convergence history of the South American and Antarctic margins. We compute the age-area distribution of oceanic lithosphere through time, including subducting oceanic lithosphere and estimate convergence rates along the margin. Additionally, we map the location and migration of spreading ridges along the margin and relate this to processes on the overriding plate. The South American-Antarctic margin in the late Jurassic-early Cretaceous was dominated by rapid convergence, the subduction of relatively young oceanic lithosphere (< 35 m.y. old) and extensive arc volcanism on the overriding plate. Additionally, our reconstructed position of the Farallon-Phoenix ridge during this period corresponds with the emplacement of several ore bodies in southern South America, similar to formation of Miocene to recent ore deposits in the northern Andes due to aseismic ridge subduction. A change in absolute motion of the Pacific plate after ~120 Ma, led to a significant decrease in the convergence rate and the southward migration of the Farallon-Phoenix ridge and this may have contributed to the cessation of back- arc spreading in the "Rocas Verdes" in southern South America. The speed of subduction increased again along the South American-Antarctic margin at ~105 Ma after another change in tectonic regime. Newly created crust from the Farallon-Phoenix ridge continued to be

  10. Simulation of geochemical processes responsible for the formation of the Zhezqazghan deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhenko, B. N.; Cherkasova, E. V.

    2014-05-01

    Physicochemical computer simulation of water-rock systems at a temperature of 25-150°C and under a pressure of up to 600 bar has been carried out for quantitative description of the mineralization formation conditions at sandstone- and shale-hosted copper deposits. The simulation is based on geological and geochemical information concerning the Zhezqazghan deposit and considers (i) a source of ore matter, (ii) composition of the fluid that transfers ore matter to the ore formation zone, and (iii) factors of ore concentration. It has been shown that extraction of copper from minerals of rocks and its accumulation in aqueous solution are optimal at a high mass ratio of rock to water (R/W > 10), Eh of +200 to -100 mV, and an obligatory content of chloride ions in the aqueous phase. The averaged ore-bearing fluid Cl95SO44//Ca50(Na + K)30Mg19 (eq %), pH ˜ 4, mineralization of up to 400 g/L, is formed by the interaction of red sandstone beds with a sedimentogenic brine (a product of metamorphism of seawater in carbonate rocks enriched in organic matter). The ore concentration proceeds in the course of cooling from 150 to 50°C during filtration of ore-bearing fluid through red sandstone beds in the rock-water system thermodynamically opened with respect to the reductive components.

  11. Utilization of Polyethylene Waste and Polypropylene Wastes for Formation of Fine Copper Ore Concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szyszka, Danuta; Więckowska, Jadwiga

    2016-10-01

    The possibilities for utilization of polyethylene waste and polypropylene waste as a binding material for formation of fine grain of copper ore concentrate in Hake Rheomix were examined. The optimum parameters of the formation processes were established. Strength, thermal and microscopic properties the products obtained were determined.

  12. Geochemical patterns of epithermal ore formation in the Okhotsk-Chukotka volcanoplutonic belt (Northeast Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, A. V.; Murashov, K. Yu.; Sidorov, A. A.

    2017-05-01

    Ores of epithermal Au-Ag deposits of the Okhotsk-Chukotka volcanoplutonic belt are characterized by enrichment in a wide spectrum of elements in relation to the average upper crustal values. The data obtained show that the host volcanic rocks are the most likely sources of minor elements and REEs for the fluids that formed epithermal Au-Ag deposits of the Okhotsk-Chukotka volcanoplutonic belt.

  13. [Leaching of copper ore of the Udokanskoe deposit at low temperatures by an association of acidophilic chemolithotrophic microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Kondrat'eva, T F; Pivovarova, T A; Krylova, L N; Melamud, V S; Adamov, E V; Karavaĭko, G I

    2011-01-01

    Pure cultures of indigenous microorganisms Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain TFUd, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans strain LUd, and Sulfobacillus thermotolerans strain SUd have been isolated from the oxidation zone of sulfide copper ore of the Udokanskoe deposit. Regimes of bacterial-chemical leaching of ore have been studied over a temperature range from -10 to +20 degrees C. Effects of pH, temperature, and the presence of microorganisms on the extraction of copper have been shown. Bacterial leaching has been detected only at positive values of temperature, and has been much more active at +20 than at +4 degrees C. The process of leaching was more active when the ore contained more hydrophilic and oxidized minerals. The possibility of copper ore leaching of the Udokanskoe deposit using sulfuric acid with pH 0.4 at negative values of temperature and applying acidophilic chemolithotrophic microorganisms at positive values of temperature and low pH values was shown.

  14. Isotopic evidence for organic matter oxidation by manganese reduction in the formation of stratiform manganese carbonate ore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okita, P.M.; Maynard, J.B.; Spiker, E. C.; Force, E.R.

    1988-01-01

    Unlike other marine-sedimentary manganese ore deposits, which are largely composed of manganese oxides, the primary ore at Molango (Hidalgo State, Mexico) is exclusively manganese carbonate (rhodochrosite, Mn-calcite, kutnahorite). Stable isotope studies of the carbonates from Molango provide critical new information relevant to the controversy over syngenetic and diagenetic models of stratiform manganese deposit formation. Negative ??13C values for carbonates from mineralized zones at Molango are strongly correlated with manganese content both on a whole rock scale and by mineral species. Whole rock ??13C data fall into three groups: high-grade ore = -16.4 to -11.5%.; manganese-rich, sub-ore-grade = -5.2 to 0%.; and unmineralized carbonates = 0 to +2.5%. (PDB). ??18O data show considerable overlap in values among the three groups: +4.8 to -2.8, -5.4 to -0.3%., and -7.4 to +6.2 (PDB), respectively. Isotopic data for individual co-existing minerals suggest a similar separation of ??13C values: ??13C values from calcite range from -1.1 to +0.7%. (PDB), whereas values from rhodochrosite are very negative, -12.9 to -5.5%., and values from kutnahorite or Mn-calcite are intermediate between calcite and rhodochrosite. 13C data are interpreted to indicate that calcite (i.e. unmineralized carbonate) formed from a normal marine carbon reservoir. However, 13C data for the manganese-bearing carbonates suggest a mixed seawater and organic source of carbon. The presence of only trace amounts of pyrite suggests sulfate reduction may have played a minor part in oxidizing organic matter. It is possible that manganese reduction was the predominant reaction that oxidized organic matter and that it released organic-derived CO2 to produce negative ??13C values and manganese carbonate mineralization. ?? 1988.

  15. Origin of the ore-forming fluids and metals of the Bangpu porphyry Mo-Cu deposit of Tibet, China: Constraints from He-Ar, H-O, S and Pb isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liqiang; Tang, Juxing; Cheng, Wenbin; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Zhi; Lin, Xin; Luo, Maocheng; Yang, Chao

    2015-05-01

    The Bangpu porphyry Mo-Cu deposit is a representative Mo-dominated deposit besides the Sharang porphyry Mo deposit in the Gangdese metallogenic belt. The Mo-Cu mineralization has a close relationship with the monzogranite porphyry and diorite porphyrite. We identify three stages during the ore formation: a pre-ore stage, a main-ore stage with Mo-Cu deposited dominantly, and a post-ore stage. In this study, He-Ar, H-O, S and Pb isotopic compositions of the Bangpu deposit were determined. Based on these determinations, integrated isotope geochemistry studies were performed to constrain the possible sources of the ore-forming fluids and metals. The 3He/4He and 40Ar/36Ar ratios of fluid inclusions exhibit a range of 0.12209-0.36370 Ra and 275.6-346.1, respectively. The 4He and 40Ar concentrations vary from 1.51 to 3.57 (10-7 cm3 STP g-1) and 0.49 to 9.31 (10-7 cm3 STP g-1), respectively. He-Ar isotopic compositions suggest dominantly crustal-derived fluid with minor amount of meteoric water in the main ore stage. The δ18Ofluid and δDfluid values vary from -1.3‰ to 3.9‰ and -140.5‰ to -73.7‰, respectively, indicating that magma fluids mixed with meteoric water. The average δ34S value of the sulfides (0.3‰) in the main-ore stage is close to the ore-forming porphyries, indicating a magmatic source. The lead isotopic components of ore sulfides exhibit restricted ranges with 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb ratios of 18.450-18.728, 15.602-5.672, and 38.715-39.211, respectively and μ values in the range of and 9.46-9.58, indicating ore-forming metals of primarily an upper crust source with a small amount of mantle materials. Compared to the Bangpu deposit, the ore metals derived from mantle are even greater in the Jiama and Qulong deposits, which leads to Cu being the dominant mineralization in the Jiama and Qulong deposit.

  16. Chemical Equilibrium of the Dissolved Uranium in Groundwaters From a Spanish Uranium-Ore Deposit

    SciTech Connect

    Garralon, Antonio; Gomez, Paloma; Turrero, Maria Jesus; Buil, Belen; Sanchez, Lorenzo

    2007-07-01

    The main objectives of this work are to determine the hydrogeochemical evolution of an uranium ore and identify the main water/rock interaction processes that control the dissolved uranium content. The Mina Fe uranium-ore deposit is the most important and biggest mine worked in Spain. Sageras area is located at the north part of the Mina Fe, over the same ore deposit. The uranium deposit was not mined in Sageras and was only perturbed by the exploration activities performed 20 years ago. The studied area is located 10 Km northeast of Ciudad Rodrigo (Salamanca) at an altitude over 650 m.a.s.l. The uranium mineralization is related to faults affecting the metasediments of the Upper Proterozoic to Lower Cambrian schist-graywacke complex (CEG), located in the Centro-Iberian Zone of the Hesperian Massif . The primary uranium minerals are uraninite and coffinite but numerous secondary uranium minerals have been formed as a result of the weathering processes: yellow gummite, autunite, meta-autunite, torbernite, saleeite, uranotile, ianthinite and uranopilite. The water flow at regional scale is controlled by the topography. Recharge takes place mainly in the surrounding mountains (Sierra Pena de Francia) and discharge at fluvial courses, mainly Agueda and Yeltes rivers, boundaries S-NW and NE of the area, respectively. Deep flows (lower than 100 m depth) should be upwards due to the river vicinity, with flow directions towards the W, NW or N. In Sageras-Mina Fe there are more than 100 boreholes drilled to investigate the mineral resources of the deposit. 35 boreholes were selected in order to analyze the chemical composition of groundwaters based on their depth and situation around the uranium ore. Groundwater samples come from 50 to 150 m depth. The waters are classified as calcium-bicarbonate type waters, with a redox potential that indicates they are slightly reduced (values vary between 50 to -350 mV). The TOC varies between <0.1 and 4.0 mgC/L and the dissolved

  17. Study of seismic exploration anti-interference technique for metallic ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    jianxun, L.; Mingcai, X.; Baowei, Z.; Kai, W.

    2013-12-01

    In the metallic ore deposits areas, various interfering factors are serious, the noise has always been the most troublesome problem in seismic prospecting. During seismic data acquisition, the methods for increasing the energy of source could be used to enhance the effective signal strength, and some methods such as stack technique helps to suppress the external interference, including vertical stacking, horizontal stacking, etc. Noise elimination technology plays an important role in the workflow of seismic data processing. Aiming at all kinds of interference in seismic records, a series of denoising technology are adopted for random noise and coherent noise, the Signal-to-Noise Ratio of seismic data is improved.

  18. Spatial evolution of Zn-Fe-Pb isotopes of sphalerite within a single ore body: A case study from the Dongshengmiao ore deposit, Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhaofu; Zhu, Xiangkun; Sun, Jian; Luo, Zhaohua; Bao, Chuang; Tang, Chao; Ma, Jianxiong

    2017-03-01

    Analyses of sphalerite minerals from the characteristic brecciated Zn-Pb ores of the main ore body in the giant Dongshengmiao deposit have revealed variations in δ66Zn from 0.17 to 0.40‰ and in δ56Fe from -1.78 to -0.35‰. Further, the investigated pyrrhotite samples have iron that is isotopically similar to that of associated sphalerite minerals. The most distinctive pattern revealed by the zinc and iron isotope data is the lateral trend of increasing δ66Zn and δ56Fe values from southwest to northeast within the main ore body. The lead isotopic homogeneity of ore sulfides from the main ore body suggests that there is only one significant source for metal, thus precluding the mixing of multiple metal sources as the key factor controlling spatial variations of zinc and iron isotopes. The most likely control on spatial variations is Rayleigh fractionation during hydrothermal fluid flow, with lighter Zn and Fe isotopes preferentially incorporated into the earliest sulfides to precipitate from fluids. Precipitations of sphalerite and pyrrhotite have played vital roles in the Zn and Fe isotopic variations, respectively, of the ore-forming system. Accordingly, the larger isotopic variability for Fe than Zn within the same hydrothermal system perhaps resulted from a larger proportion of precipitation for pyrrhotite than for sphalerite. The lateral trend pattern revealed by the zinc and iron isotope data is consistent with the occurrence of a cystic-shaped breccia zone, which is characterized by marked elevation in Cu. The results further confirm that Zn and Fe isotopes can be used as a vectoring tool for mineral prospecting.

  19. Magma evolution and the formation of porphyry Cu Au ore fluids: evidence from silicate and sulfide melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halter, Werner E.; Heinrich, Christoph A.; Pettke, Thomas

    2005-03-01

    for S. The extra sulfur could be added in the form of anhydrite phenocrysts present in the rhyodacitic magma. It appears, thus, that unusually sulfur-rich, not Cu-rich magmas are the key to the formation of porphyry-type ore deposits. Our observations imply that dacitic intrusions hosting the porphyry Cu Au mineralization are not representative of the magma from which the ore-fluid exsolved. The source of the ore fluid is the underlying more mafic magma, and unaltered andesitic dikes emplaced immediately after ore formation are more likely to represent the magma from which the fluids were generated. At Alumbrera, these andesitic dikes carry relicts of the sulfide melt as inclusions in amphibole. Sulfide inclusions in similar dykes of other, less explored magmatic complexes may be used to predict the Au/Cu ratio of potential ore-forming fluids and the expected metal ratio in any undiscovered porphyry deposit.

  20. Understanding Cu release into environment from Kure massive sulfide ore deposits, Kastamonu, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, Cansu; Sonmez, Seref; Balci, Nurgul

    2014-05-01

    Covering a wide range on the earth's crust, oxidation of metal sulfide minerals have vital environmental impacts on the aquatic environment, causing one of the major environmental problems known as acid mine drainage (AMD). Located in the Kastamonu province of the Western Black Sea region, Kure district is one of the major copper mining sites in Turkey. Mining activities in the area heads back to ancient times, such that operation is thought to be started with the Roman Empire. Currently, only the underground mining tunnels of Bakibaba and Asikoy are being operated. Thus, mining heaps and ores of those pyritic deposits have been exposed to the oxidative conditions for so long. As a result of weathering processes of past and recent heaps of the Kure volcanic massive sulfide deposits in addition to the main ore mineral (chalcopyrite), significant amount of metals, especially Cu, are being released into the environment creating undesirable environmental conditions. In order to elucidate Cu release mechanisms from Kure pyritic ore deposits and mining wastes, field and laboratory approaches were used. Surface water and sediment samples from the streams around the mining and waste sites were collected. Groundwater samples from the active underground mining site were also collected. Physical parameters (pH, Eh, T°C, and EC) of water samples were determined in situ and in the laboratory using probes (WTW pH 3110, WTW Multi 9310 and CRISON CM 35). Metal and ion concentrations of the water samples were analysed using ICP-MS and DR 2800 spectrophotometer, respectively. High Cu, Co, Zn and Fe concentrations were determined in the water samples with pH values ranging from 2.9- 4. Cu concentrions ranges from 345 ppm to 36 ppm in the water samples. Consistent with the water samples, high Cu, Fe, Zn and Co were also determined in the sediment samples. Laboratory chalcopyrite oxidation experiments under the conditions representing the field site were set up as biological and

  1. 3D Geological Model of Nihe ore deposit Constrained by Gravity and Magnetic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Guang; Yan, Jiayong; Lv, Qingtan; Zhao, Jinhua

    2016-04-01

    We present a case study on using integrated geologic model in mineral exploration at depth. Nihe ore deposit in Anhui Province, is deep hidden ore deposit which was discovered in recent years, this finding is the major driving force of deep mineral exploration work in Luzong. Building 3D elaborate geological model has the important significance for prospecting to deep or surround in this area, and can help us better understand the metallogenic law and ore-controlling regularity. A 3D geological model, extending a depth from +200m to -1500m in Nihe ore deposit, has been compiled from surface geological map, cross-section, borehole logs and amounts of geological inference. And then the 3D geological models have been given physical property parameter for calculating the potential field. Modelling the potential response is proposed as means of evaluating the viability of the 3D geological models, and the evidence of making small changes to the uncertain parts of the original 3D geological models. It is expected that the final models not only reproduce supplied prior geological knowledge, but also explain the observed geophysical data. The workflow used to develop the 3D geologic model in this study includes the three major steps, as follows: (1) Determine the basic information of Model: Defining the 3D limits of the model area, the basic geological and structural unit, and the tectonic contact relations and the sedimentary sequences between these units. (2) 3D model construction: Firstly, a series of 2D geological cross sections over the model area are built by using all kinds of prior information, including surface geology, borehole data, seismic sections, and local geologists' knowledge and intuition. Lastly, we put these sections into a 3D environment according to their profile locations to build a 3D model by using geostatistics method. (3) 3D gravity and magnetic modeling: we calculate the potential field responses of the 3D model, and compare the predicted and

  2. Processes of ore genesis at the world-class Yuchiling molybdenum deposit, Henan province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Juan; Ye, Hui-shou; Zhou, Ke; Meng, Fang

    2014-01-01

    The Yuchiling molybdenum deposit is one of the most significant porphyry molybdenum systems in the eastern Qinling of central China. The mineralization is mainly hosted by a porphyritic granite and associated cryptoexplosive breccia. Hydrothermal alteration minerals include K-feldspar, sericite, pyrite, chlorite, epidote, carbonate, kaolinite, fluorite, and gypsum. Ore minerals are dominated by molybdenite and pyrite, with lesser amounts of chalcopyrite, galena, scheelite, wolframite, ilmenite, leucoxene, native gold, sphalerite, and hematite. The δ34S compositions of sulfide minerals range from -6.0‰ to +4.0‰. The deposit is characterized by four hydrothermal stages: quartz-K-feldspar (stage I), molybdenite-quartz (stage II), pyrite-sericite-quartz (stage III), and quartz-carbonate (stage IV). Microthermometric studies of fluid inclusions show that the fluids evolved gradually during the ore-forming process. Homogenization temperatures, salinities, and minimum pressure estimates for the inclusions from each mineralization stage evolved as follows: (1) stage I: homogenization temperatures = 203.7-525.8 °C, salinities = 2.96-10.49 and 29.66 wt.% NaCl equiv., and minimum pressures = 101.9-196.2 MPa; (2) stage II: homogenization temperatures = 173.6-448.6 °C, salinities = 1.81-9.74 wt.% NaCl equiv., and minimum pressures = 93.1-172.0 MPa; (3) stage III: homogenization temperatures = 130.1-386.0 °C, salinities = 1.40-9.73 and 34.07 wt.% NaCl equiv., and minimum pressures = 95.5-142.5 MPa; (4) stage IV: homogenization temperatures = 170-230 °C and salinities = 0.18-5.71 wt.% NaCl equiv. Various fluid inclusions were observed to contain H2O, CO2, CH4, SO2, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, and (or) H2S, as well as solids that include halite, sylvite, anhydrite, chalcopyrite, hematite, molybdenite, and jamesonite. The δ18O and δD of the hydrothermal fluids vary from -4.4‰ to +8.5‰ and -81‰ to -61‰, respectively. Microthermometric and stable isotope data indicate that

  3. Fluid mixing and ore deposition during the geodynamic evolution of the Sierra Almagrera (Betics, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyja, Vanessa; Tarantola, Alexandre; Hibsch, Christian; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Cathelineau, Michel

    2013-04-01

    Marine and continental intramountaineous basins developed during the Neogene orographic evolution of the Betico-rifan orogenic wedge, as well as the related uplifted ranges within the Sierra Almagrera Metamorphic Core Complexes (MCC). The NNE-SSW striking trans-Alboran transcurrent fault system crosscuts the MCC post-dating the extensional exhumation stages recorded in the metamorphic fabric. Iron ores (± Pb, Cu, Zn) are encountered either as stratabound ore deposits in the Neogene basins or as vein networks crosscutting the metamorphic fabric of graphitic phyllites from the Sierra Almagrera. These Late Miocene ore deposits are related to the activity of the N-S striking Palomares fault segment of the Trans-Alboran fault system. Three sets of quartz veins (Vα, Vαβ and Vβ) and one set of mineralized vein (Vγ, siderite, barite) are distinguished. The Vα and Vαβ respectively are totally or partially transposed into the foliation. The Vβ and Vγ veins are discordant to the foliation. The problem addressed in this study concerns the nature of the fluids involved in the metal deposits and their relationships with the main reservoir fluids, e.g. the deep metamorphic fluids, the basinal fluids, and eventually the recharge meteoric fluids. This study focuses thus on the evolution of the fluids at different stages of ductile-brittle exhumation of the metamorphic ranges (Sierras) and their role during the exhumation and later on in relation with the hydrothermalism and metal deposition at a regional scale. Paleofluids were studied as inclusions in quartz, siderite and barite from veins by microthermometry and Raman spectroscopy, and a stable isotope study is in progress. Earliest fluids recorded in (Vαβ) quartz veins are H2O- NaCl + CaCl2 (17 wt. %) - (traces of CO2, CH4, N2) metamorphic brines trapped at the ductile brittle transition at a minimum trapping temperatures (Th) of 340 °C. Older metamorphic fluids in (Vα) veins were lost during the complete

  4. Jasperoid float and stream cobbles as tools in geochemical exploration for hydrothermal ore deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    Fragments of silicified rocks that are associated with deposits of base and precious metals may be transported as cobbles and pebbles in alluvium far downstream from the source outcrop. These rocks commonly exhibit certain characteristics which distinguish them from other detrital siliceous material, and may thus serve as a useful tool in reconnaissance geochemical exploration. The predominant characteristics of jasperoid samples, classified according to genesis, type of host rock, and proximity to base and precious metal deposits have been tabulated from a large master file containing descriptive and analytical information on jasperoid samples representing more than a hundred areas in the United States. Jasperoid that is genetically and spatially associated with ore deposits is generally dark gray or brown in color, brecciated, phaneritic, and vuggy. Jasperoids associated with lead and zinc deposits exhibit extensive halos of lead and silver anomalies, and more restricted zinc and gold anomalies. Those related to copper deposits show extensive copper, silver, and gold anomalies, and more restricted bismuth and molybdenum anomalies. Jasperoid related to gold deposits tends to exhibit extensive gold and silver anomalies and more restricted titanium, barium, vanadium, molybdenum, and rare-earth element anomalies. ?? 1981.

  5. Hydrothermal alteration, ore fluid characteristics, and gold depositional processes along a trondhjemite-komatiite contact at Tarmoola, Western Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duuring, P.; Hagemann, S.G.; Cassidy, K.F.; Johnson, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    studies and stage II mineral equilibria, gold deposited from a homogeneous, neutral to slightly alkaline (pH 5.1-5.5), reduced, low-salinity (<5.5 wt % NaCl equiv) fluid that had a bulk composition of 78 mole percent H2O and 21 mole percent CO2, and trace amounts of CH4, C2H6, H2, Ar, H2S, and He. Gold deposition occurred at 300?? ?? 50??C and 0.5 to 3.0 kbars. Assuming lithostatic fluid pressures, gold precipitated at a 2- to 10-km depth. Stage II gray quartz ??18Ofluid values range from 5.9 to 7.5 per mil, whereas ??Dfluid values calculated from the dehydration of muscovite grains and measured directly from bulk fluid inclusion analyses of stage II gray quartz have ranges of -9 to -35 and -27 to -28 per mil, respectively. Hydrothermal ore fluids were transported from greater crustal depths to the site of gold deposition during the district-scale D3 event by shallowly W dipping, reverse brittle-ductile shear zones in supracrustal rock and along the steeply east dipping trondhjemite contact. Associated subhorizontal east-west shortening caused the reactivation of the eastern trondhjemite margin and subparallel foliation, which facilitated the transport of hydrothermal fluids and the generation of gold-bearing veins and hydrothermal alteration zones in komatiite. East-west-striking fractures in trondhjemite aided the lateral migration of ore fluids away from trondhjemite margins and the formation of east-west-striking gold-bearing veins and broad alteration zones. Gold was most likely transported in the stage II fluid as bisulfide complexes. The sulfidation of trondhjemite and komatiite wall rock by the stage II fluid caused the destabilization of An bisulfide complexes and gold deposition. Potassium, Ca, and CO2 metasomatism of komatiite wall rock may have enhanced gold deposition via the acidification of the stage II fluid. The physicochemical characteristics of the Tarmoola ore fluid and relative timing of gold mineralization are consistent with the Yilgarn-wide,

  6. Mineralogy and trace-element geochemistry of the high-grade iron ores of the Águas Claras Mine and comparison with the Capão Xavier and Tamanduá iron ore deposits, Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spier, Carlos Alberto; de Oliveira, Sonia Maria Barros; Rosière, Carlos Alberto; Ardisson, José Domingos

    2008-02-01

    Several major iron deposits occur in the Quadrilátero Ferrífero (QF), southeastern region of Brazil, where metamorphosed and heterogeneously deformed banded iron formation (BIF) of the Cauê Formation, regionally called itabirite, was transformed into high- (Fe >64%) and low-grade (30% < Fe < 64%) hematite ores. Based on their mineralogical composition, three major types of itabirites occur in the QF: siliceous, dolomitic, and amphibolitic itabirite. Unlike other mines in the QF, the Águas Claras Mine contained mainly high-grade ores hosted within dolomitic itabirite. Two distinct types of high-grade ore occurred at the mine: soft and hard. The soft ore was the most abundant and represented more than 85% of the total ore mined until it was mined out in 2002. Soft and hard ores consist essentially of hematite, occurring as martite, anhedral to granular/tabular hematite and, locally, specularite. Gangue minerals are rare, consisting of dolomite, sericite, chlorite, and apatite in the hard and soft ores, and Mn-oxides and ferrihydrite in the soft ore where they are concentrated within porous bands. Chemical analyses show that hard and soft ores consist almost entirely of Fe2O3, with a higher amount of detrimental impurities, especially MnO, in the soft ore. Both hard and soft ores are depleted in trace elements. The high-grade ores at the Águas Claras Mine have at least a dual origin, involving hypogene and supergene processes. The occurrence of the hard, massive high-grade ore within “fresh” dolomitic itabirite is evidence of its hypogene origin. Despite the contention about the origin of the dolomitic itabirite (if this rock is a carbonate-rich facies of the Cauê Formation or a hematite-carbonate precursor of the soft high-grade ore), mineralogical and geochemical features of the soft high-grade ore indicate that it was formed by leaching of dolomite from the dolomitic itabirite by meteoric water. The comparison of the Águas Claras, Capão Xavier and

  7. Rock Magnetic and Oxide Microscopy Studies of two South American Iron-Ore Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Valdivia, L. M.

    2005-05-01

    Microscopy and rock-magnetic studies of the iron oxide-ore and host rocks in the Cristales-Pleito Melon (Chile) and Jacupiranga (Brazil) deposits were carried out to characterize and compare the magnetic mineralogy and the processes that affected the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) during emplacement and evolution of the iron-ore deposits. The microscopy study under reflected light shows that magnetic carriers are mainly magnetites, with minor amounts of ilmenite-hematite minerals. Titanomagnetite, shows trellis texture, which is compatible with high temperature oxy-exsolution processes. Grain sizes range from a few microns to >100 µm, and dominant magnetic state pseudo-single-domain, in agreement with hysteresis measurements. Thermal spectra, continuous susceptibility measurements, and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition suggest a predominance of some spinels (titanomagnetite or titanomaghemite) with low-Ti content as magnetic carriers. These data help to investigate the magnetic domain states and the remanence acquisition processes, and to assess their significance as a source of magnetic anomalies.

  8. Mineral paragenesis, geochemistry and geochronology investigations of the Carlin-type gold deposits at the Goldstrike property, northern Nevada: Implications for ore genesis, igneous petrogenesis and mineral exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Carolina Michelin De

    The Goldstrike property is located in northern Nevada and contains one of the largest and highest-grade Carlin-type gold deposits. The majority of the Eocene Au mineralization (e.g., Ore I) is hosted in intensely altered Paleozoic lower plate impure carbonate rocks, and is characterized by strong to moderate silicification, higher calculated pyrite and ore-related element concentrations (e.g., As, Cu, Hg, Ni, Tl, Sb, W, and Zn) than Ore II, which is weakly altered. However, both ore types contain similar Au concentration in whole rock and pyrite chemistry analyses. Lithogeochemical and microprobe data suggest that the Paleozoic sedimentary rocks may have been a major source of Cd, Mo, Ni, U, V, and Zn and minor As, Cu, Hg, and Se. The Jurassic lamprophyre dikes might have been a significant source of Ba, Co, and Se, and minor Au, and some of the Jurassic and Eocene intrusive rocks may have provided some Fe. Moreover, the Eocene magmas are interpreted to be the main source of auriferous mineralizing fluids. Trace element abundances and ratios of the Jurassic intrusive rocks suggest that they are shoshonitic and formed from a metasomatized mantle-derived magma, crystal fractionation, and crustal contamination. The Eocene dikes, also shoshonitic, are considerably more evolved and contaminated than the studied Jurassic rocks. Furthermore, Ar-Ar results show that the Jurassic rocks were negligibly affected by the Eocene thermal event, and that temperature of mineralizing fluids were below the closure temperature of biotite (< 350°C). A magmatic-related model is proposed to explain the formation of the Carlin-type gold deposits at the studied area. In this model, Au and the ore-related elements were exsolved along with volatiles by degassing of a deep and large plutonic complex during its early stage of crystallization. As these magmatic-hydrothermal fluids moved upward along major conduits (e.g., NNW-striking faults), they may have interacted with a Fe-rich fluid

  9. Origin and evolution of ore-forming fluids in the Hemushan magnetite-apatite deposit, Anhui Province, Eastern China, and their metallogenic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Gan; Zhang, Zhiyu; Du, Yangsong; Pang, Zhenshan; Zhang, Yanwen; Jiang, Yongwei

    2015-12-01

    The Middle-Lower Yangtze River Metallogenic Belt in the northern Yangtze Block is one of the most important economic mineral districts in China. The Hemushan deposit is a medium-class Fe deposit located in the southern part of the Ningwu iron ore district of the Middle-Lower Yangtze River Metallogenic Belt. The Fe-orebodies are mainly hosted in the contact zone between diorite and Triassic marble. The actinolite-phlogopite-apatite-magnetite ore shows metasomatic/filling textures and disseminated/mesh-vein structures. Based on evidences and petrographic observations, the ore-forming process can be divided into three distinct periods-the early metallogenic period (albite-diopside stage), the middle metallogenic period (magnetite stage and hematite stage), and the late metallogenic period (quartz-pyrite stage and carbonate stage). Fluid inclusion studies show four types of inclusions: type I daughter mineral-bearing three-phase inclusions (L + V + S), type II vapor-rich two-phase inclusions (L + V), type III liquid-rich two phase inclusions (L + V), and minor type IV liquid-phase inclusions (L). Apatites from the magnetite stage contain type I, type II and type III inclusions; anhydrites from the hematite stage mainly contain abundant type II inclusions and relatively less type I inclusions; quartz and calcite from the late metallogenic stage are mainly characterized by type III inclusions. Laser Raman spectroscopy and microthermometry of fluid inclusions show that the ore-forming fluids broadly correspond to unsaturated NaCl-H2O system. From the magnetite stage to the carbonate stage, the ore-forming fluids evolved from moderate-high temperature (average 414 °C), moderate salinity (average 25.01 wt.% NaCl equiv.) conditions to low temperature (average 168 °C), low salinity (average 6.18 wt.% NaCl equiv.) conditions. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopic studies indicate that the ore-forming fluid during the early stage of middle metallogenic period was mainly of magmatic

  10. The distribution of trace elements in a range of deep-sea sulphide ore deposits and their impact on seafloor mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, E. K.; Scott, T. B.; Brooker, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Acid rock drainage is a natural weathering process that is often exacerbated by mining activities, common in onshore sulphide ore deposits, that can lead to considerable environmental impact. A similar 'weathering process' occurs at seafloor massive sulphide (SMS) ore deposits. In contrast to the onshore situation, the expected consequence in the marine environment is often considered to be oxide formation, negligible metal release and minimal net acid generation due to the high buffering capacity of seawater and low solubility of iron at near neutral pH. However, no dissolution studies exist that emulate the true composition of sulphide ore deposits that either sit passively on the seafloor or are actively mined in this colder, more saline, and alkaline environment. In particular, these deposits will include a variety of minerals, and it is the interaction of these minerals and inclusions in regards to galvanic cells that can subsequently increase the dissolution of metals into the water column. Any heavy metal release that is not balanced by subsequent oxidation and precipitation, has the potential to produce toxicity for benthic ecosystems, bioaccumulation and dispersal through currents. The present work has sought to provide a pilot investigation on the deep sea weathering of sulphide minerals, by identifying the mineral phases, trace elements and potential galvanic couples that may arise in sulphide mineral samples collected from various tectonic settings. Samples have been analysed using EMPA and LA-ICPMS in order to identify the range of trace elements and toxins that may be contributed to the water column, especially heavy metals and environmental toxins (e.g. Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, Co, Ni, Cd, As, Sb, Sn, Hg). Our observations raise important questions about which ore deposits could have more or less environmental impact during any mining activity. These observations will be used to design oxidative dissolution experiments at deep-sea conditions utilising the

  11. Lead Isotope Constraints on the Sources of Ore Metals in SW Mexican Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potra, A.; Macfarlane, A. W.

    2007-12-01

    Lead isotope ratios from mineral deposits in southern Mexico increase with distance from the trench from 206Pb/204Pb values between 18.597 and 18.650 in the coastal area to values between 18.712 and 19.069 approximately 800 km east from the trench. This variation has been attributed to increasing assimilation of radiogenic lead from the crust with increasing distance from the trench. New sampling was undertaken in this area to provide a clearer picture of the potential sources of ore metals in this arc system, and also, if possible, to examine whether ore metal sources differ among the proposed tectonostratigraphic exotic terranes of southern Mexico. New TIMS lead isotope analyses are presented for samples from the metamorphic basement rocks of the Guerrero Terrane, the Late Cretaceous clastic sedimentary rocks from the Upper Mesozoic Assemblage, and for mid-Cretaceous igneous rocks, as well as for samples from the Oligocene La Verde, Esmeralda, and El Malacate copper prospects. Whole rock samples of schist from the Jurassic-Cretaceous Arteaga Complex and phyllite and slate from the Tierra Caliente Complex contain radiogenic lead relative to bulk earth models, with 206Pb/204Pb ranging from 18.981-19.256. These values are substantially more radiogenic than published values of analyses of metagabbro and charnockite from the Grenvillian-age Oaxaca Terrane. Sedimentary rocks (sandstones, siltstones, and marls) belonging to the Huetamo Sequence have 206Pb/204Pb values ranging between 18.630 to 18.998, close to the published data for the sediments from IPOD-DSDP Sites 487 and 488, Cocos Plate. Whole rock analyses of igneous rocks (granodiorite) collected from La Verde and El Malacate have 206Pb/204Pb ranging from 18.764 to 18.989, clustering between the fields represented by the sedimentary and the metamorphic rocks, suggesting assimilation of lead from these components. Ore samples from La Verde and Esmeralda have 206Pb/204Pb between 18.685 and 18.731 and plot within

  12. Robotic complex for the development of thick steeply-inclined coal seams and ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitenko, M. S.; Malakhov, Yu V.; Neogi, Biswarup; Chakraborty, Pritam; Banerjee, Dipesu

    2017-09-01

    Proposal for the formulation of robotic complexes for steeply inclined coal seams as a basis of the supportive-enclosing walking module and power support with a controlled outlet for mining industry has been represented in this literature. In mining industry, the available resource base reserves and mineral deposits are concentrated deep down the earth crust leading towards a complicated geological condition i.e. abrupt ore bedding and steeply inclined strata with the high gas content and fire hazard of thick coal stratum, heading against an unfavorable and sometimes human labor life risk during subversive mining. Prevailing towards the development of effective robotic complexes based on the means of “unmanned technologies” for extraction of minerals from hard-to-reach deposits and make sure the safety of underground staff during sublevel mining technology.

  13. Environment of ore deposition in the Creede mining district, San Juan Mountains, Colorado: Part VI. Maximum duration for mineralization of the OH vein

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.R.; Barton, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    The rate at which ore deposits form is one of the least well established parameters in all of economic geology. However, increased detail in sampling, improved technology of dating, and sophistication in modeling are reducing the uncertainties and establishing that ore formation, at least for the porphyry copper-skarn-epithermal base and precious metals deposit package, may take place in surprisingly brief intervals. This contribution applies another approach to examine the duration of mineralization. The degree to which compositional gradients within single crystals has flattened through solid-state diffusion offers a measure of the thermal dose (that is temperature combined with time) that the crystals have been subjected to since deposition. Here we examine the steepness of gradients in iron content within individual single sphalerite crystals from the epithermal silver-lead-zinc deposit in the OH vein at Creede, Colorado. Two initial textures are considered: growth-banded crystals and compositionally contrasting overgrowths that succeed crosscutting dissolution or fractured surfaces. The model used estimates the maximum possible time by assuming a perfectly sharp original compositional step, and it asks how long it would take at a known temperature for the gradient measured today to have formed. Applying the experimentally determined diffusion rates of Mizuta (1988a) to compositional gradients (ranging from 0.4-2.2 mol % FeS/??m) measured by the electron microprobe in 2-??m steps on banded sphalerite formed early in the paragenetic history yields a maximum duration of less than ???10,000 yr. Sphalerite from a solution unconformity in a position midway through the paragenetic sequence is indistinguishable from instantaneous deposition, supporting the conclusion of rapid ore formation. While this formation interval seems very brief, it is consistent with less well constrained estimates using entirely different criteria. ?? 2005 Society of Economic Geologists, Inc.

  14. Swelling related to ettringite crystal formation in chromite ore processing residue.

    PubMed

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Dermatas, Dimitris; Wazne, Mahmoud; Sanchez, Adriana M; Chrysochoou, Maria; Grubb, Dennis G

    2007-08-01

    Several million tons of Chromite Ore Processing Residue (COPR) were deposited at two sites in New Jersey and Maryland, USA, and over time they exhibited extensive heaving phenomena. Ettringite, a needle-shaped mineral and an expansive mineral commonly recognized in the literature concerning cement- and soil, has been identified extensively in numerous COPR samples collected from these sites. It was therefore believed that ettringite formation and its crystal growth are strongly associated with COPR heaving. We investigated the correlation between ettringite and the heaving phenomena in COPR materials that contained no initial ettringite. Two identical COPR samples were exposed to a 4% w/w sulfate solution (25 degrees C, 50 degrees C) in a confined swell test apparatus. Both swell test samples were analyzed by means of X-ray powder diffraction. The peak intensities of newly formed ettringite were more pronounced in the sample tested at 50 degrees C, and swell development was only observed in this sample. Scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed well-crystallized ettringite needles exceeding 40 microm in length for this sample, while ettringite crystals less than 15 microm in length formed in the sample tested at 25 degrees C. Therefore, the results suggest that the quantity of ettringite and the extent of crystallization play a key role in the heave of COPR.

  15. Micro-scale characterization of iron ores from a banded iron formation in Yishui county, western Shandong province of North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, I.; Lee, I.; Yang, X.

    2016-12-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) are widely distributed in North China Craton (NCC). Yishui BIF is located in Yishui county, western Shandong Province of NCC and is categorized as Algoma-type. The origin of iron and silica of BIFs in this region have been studied extensively for decades. The trace elemental concentrations of magnetite and hematite in iron ores from Yishui BIF are focused in this study to better understand the origins of BIF. To discuss micro-structural signatures of iron ores, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectrometer, electron microprobe (EPMA) and laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometer (LA-ICP-MS) were utilized. Overall geochemical data represents abundance of trace elements, oxygen fugacity (fO2) condition during the formation of iron oxides, depositional environment of Yishui BIF, implying the involvement of volcanic eruption and hydrothermal exhalation during the chemical deposition.

  16. Precipitation of lead-zinc ores in the Mississippi Valley-type deposit at Treves, Cevennes region of southern France

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leach, D.; Macquar, J.-C.; Lagneau, V.; Leventhal, J.; Emsbo, P.; Premo, W.

    2006-01-01

    The Trèves zinc–lead deposit is one of several Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) deposits in the Cévennes region of southern France. Fluid inclusion studies show that the ore was deposited at temperatures between approximately 80 and 150°C from a brine that derived its salinity mainly from the evaporation of seawater past halite saturation. Lead isotope studies suggest that the metals were extracted from local basement rocks. Sulfur isotope data and studies of organic matter indicate that the reduced sulfur in the ores was derived from the reduction of Mesozoic marine sulfate by thermochemical sulfate reduction or bacterially mediated processes at a different time or place from ore deposition. The large range of δ34S values determined for the minerals in the deposit (12.2–19.2‰ for barite, 3.8–13.8‰ for sphalerite and galena, and 8.7 to −21.2‰ for pyrite), are best explained by the mixing of fluids containing different sources of sulfur. Geochemical reaction path calculations, based on quantitative fluid inclusion data and constrained by field observations, were used to evaluate possible precipitation mechanisms. The most important precipitation mechanism was probably the mixing of fluids containing different metal and reduced sulfur contents. Cooling, dilution, and changes in pH of the ore fluid probably played a minor role in the precipitation of ores. The optimum results that produced the most metal sulfide deposition with the least amount of fluid was the mixing of a fluid containing low amounts of reduced sulfur with a sulfur-rich, metal poor fluid. In this scenario, large amounts of sphalerite and galena are precipitated, together with smaller quantities of pyrite precipitated and dolomite dissolved. The relative amounts of metal precipitated and dolomite dissolved in this scenario agree with field observations that show only minor dolomite dissolution during ore deposition. The modeling results demonstrate the important control of the reduced

  17. A deposit model for Mississippi Valley-Type lead-zinc ores: Chapter A in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leach, David L.; Taylor, Ryan D.; Fey, David L.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Saltus, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    This report also describes the geoenvironmental characteristic of MVT deposits. The response of MVT ores in the supergene environment is buffered by their placement in carbonate host rocks which commonly results in near-neutral associated drainage water. The geoenvironmental features and anthropogenic mining effects presented in this report illustrates this important environmental aspect of MVT deposits which separates them from other deposit types (especially coal, VHMS, Cu-porphyry, SEDEX, acid-sulfate polymetallic vein).

  18. Compositional variation of glauconites in Upper Cretaceous-Paleogene sedimentary iron-ore deposits in South-eastern Western Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudmin, Maxim; Banerjee, Santanu; Mazurov, Aleksey

    2017-06-01

    Glauconite occurs either as unaltered greenish or as altered brownish variety in Upper Cretaceous-Palaeocene sediments in the southeastern corner of Western Siberia. Studied section within the Bakchar iron-ore deposit includes Ipatovo, Slavgorod, Gan'kino and Lyulinvor formations, which are represented by sandstones, siltstones, claystones and oolitic ironstones of coastal-marine facies. The origin of unaltered glauconite is explained by the ;verdissement theory;. Transgressions during Lower Coniacian, Santonian and Campanian favored the formation of unaltered glauconites in dysoxic to anoxic conditions. Subaerial exposure of glauconite resulted in leaching of potassium, oxidation of iron and formation of iron hydroxides in Upper Coniacian, Maastrichtian and Palaeocene. Glauconite ultimately converts to leptochlorite and hydrogoethite by this alteration. Abundant microscopic gold inclusions, besides sulphides, sulphates, oxides and silicates characterize this glauconite. Mineral inclusions include precious, rare metals and non-ferrous metals. The concentration of gold in glauconite may be as high as 42.9 ppb. Abundant inclusions of various compositions in glauconites indicate enrichment of marine sediments in precious and non-precious metals. While major element composition of glauconites is affected by subaerial exposure, the broadly similar micro-inclusions in both altered and unaltered varieties are possibly related to the comparatively immobile nature of REE and trace elements.

  19. Significance of oil-like hydrocarbons in metamorphic and ore-deposit rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Price, L.C.

    1996-10-01

    Carbonaceous rocks (0.7-45.0% carbon content) from both greenschist metamorphism and hydrothermal-ore deposition were solvent-extracted and the resulting extracts characterized by standard analyses. Blank runs showed no contamination from laboratory procedures. The recovered HCS are in low, but significant, concentrations (0.5-50 ppm, rock weight). Moreover, the composition of these HCS (including biomarkers) resemble that of mature crude oils and do not have the ultra-mature characteristics expected from their high temperature environs. This strongly suggests that HCS will survive in even higher-rank rocks. These data contradict petroleum-geochemical paradigm regarding an inferred thermal instability of HCS and also bear on natural gas origins (e.g. - the hypothesized cracking of oil to gas), rock-water-HC interactions, petroleum-geochemical models, and other related topics.

  20. [Polish asbestos and its fibrogenic effect. I. Fibrous minerals in nickel ore deposits].

    PubMed

    Woźniak, H

    1984-01-01

    In experiments on white rats (Wistar) fibrogenic effects of 6 samples of fibrous minerals collected at different levels of nickel ore deposits were investigated. Sample 1 contained exclusively anthophyllite, samples 2 and 3--anthophyllite and quartz (approx. 30%), sample 4 exclusively antigorite, sample 5-- antigorite and quartz (approx. 10%) and chamoisite. The test samples contained admixtures of ferrum (0.9-2%), nickel (0,07-0,2%), and copper (0,-0,05%). The average length of fibres was 6.2-12.5 micron. The fibrogenic effects of the test fibrous minerals did not differ from fibrogenic effects of crocidolite, chrystolite and quartz. The strongest fibrogenic effects were exhibited by the sample containing exclusively antigorite. Hydroxyproline content in lungs after 6 months' experiment amounted to over 8 mg on intratracheal administration of 25 mg of dust, whereas average lung weight--3650 mg. No clear dependence was found between free crystalline content in dust and dust fibrogenic effects.

  1. A Long-Lived Porphyry Ore Deposit and Associated Upper Crustal Silicic Magma Body, Bajo de la Alumbrera, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. C.; Allen, C. M.; Reiners, P. W.; Dunlap, W. J.; Cooke, D. R.; Campbell, I. H.; White, N. C.

    2004-05-01

    Porphyry Cu deposits form within and adjacent to small porphyritic intrusions that are apophyses to larger silicic magma bodies that reside in the upper parts of the Earth's crusts. Centred on these intrusions are hydrothermal systems of exsolved magmatic fluid with a carapace of convectively circulating meteoric water. We have applied several different dating techniques to assess the longevity of the magmatic-hydrothermal system and to define the cooling history of porphyry intrusions at the Bajo de la Alumbrera porphyry Cu-Au deposit, Argentina. The closure temperatures of these techniques range from 800oC (zircon U-Pb) to ~70oC (apatite (U-Th)/He; Fig. 1). The resulting cooling history indicates that the magmatic-hydrothermal system cooled to ca. 200oC by ~1.5 m.y. after the last porphyry intrusion (i.e., 6.96±0.09 Ma; U-Pb zircon age). Based on (U-Th)/He apatite data (closure temperature ~60-70oC), exposure and cessation of the system occurred before 4 Ma. The longevity of the magmatic-hydrothermal system indicated by these results is inconsistent with accepted mechanisms for porphyry Cu deposit formation. Depending on wallrock permeability, depth and cooling method, a 2 km wide by 3 km high intrusion has been predicted to cool between 0.01 to 0.1 m.y. (marked as the grey interval; Cathles et al., 1997 Economic Geology). We have obtained numerous age determinations younger than the U-Pb zircon age of the last known intrusion at Bajo de la Alumbrera. These imply that simple cooling of the small, mineralized porphyries did not happen. For the magmatic-hydrothermal system to have been sustained for longer than 0.1 m.y., either 1) younger small intrusions have been episodically emplaced below the youngest known intrusions, thus prolonging heat flow, or 2) fluids derived from a deeper and larger parental intrusion have been episodically discharged through the ore deposit long after the porphyry intrusion had lost its available heat. In either case, the longevity of

  2. Paragenesis and conditions of formation of ore minerals from metalliferous breccia pipes, N. Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Wenrich, K.J.; Pratt, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    Ore deposits within N. Arizona breccia pipes are currently being exploited for U, but at various times during the past century Cu, Pb, Zn, and Ag were mined. These pipes formed as solution-collapses within the Mississippian Redwall Ls and stopped upward through overlying strata. The principal ore minerals are: uraninite, chalcopyrite, chalcocite, tennantite-tetrahedrite, galena, sphalerite, millerite, gersdorffite, siegenite, and molybdenite. Common gangue minerals are marcasite, pyrite, barite, dolomite, calcite and quartz. Marcasite and pyrite appear to have formed prior to the ore minerals, followed closely by chalcopyrite. The Ni and Co phases also appear to be early: gersdorffite crystals are rimmed by later galena. Tennantite-tetrahedrite formed later than both galena and sphalerite; uraninite, the latest ore mineral, consisting fills interstices. Primary fluid inclusions in dolomite, quartz, and sphalerite show filling temperatures from 80 to 145/degree/C and high salinities, averaging 15 wt% NaCl (eq). Secondary inclusions in sphalerite have consistently higher filling temperatures from 105 to 173/degree/C, but similar salinities. Rock-Eval pyrolysis of pyrobitumen yields little or no volatile hydrocarbons (S/sub 1/=0-0.2 mg/gm), but large amounts of pyrolytic hydrocarbons (S/sub 2/=105-216 mg/gm). Temperatures of maximum pyrolytic yield are relatively low (424-430/degree/C), suggesting temperatures did not exceed 150/degree/C following pyrobitumen emplacement. Except for uraninite, the breccia pipes are similar to Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) deposits in mineralogy, fluid-inclusion filling temperatures and salinities, and associated organic material. Because MVT deposits do not host U minerals, a possible two-stage mineralization history of the pipes is suggested, the first by a MVT brine and perhaps a second forming the uraninite.

  3. Volatile element isotopes of submarine hydrothermal ore deposits in the Western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Y.; Ooki, M.; Kagoshima, T.; Lan, T. F.; Takahata, N.; Ishibashi, J. I.

    2015-12-01

    This report describes abundances and isotopic compositions of volatile element trapped in fluid inclusions of submarine hydrothermal ore deposits collected in Western Pacific subduction zones (Okinawa Trough, Izu-Bonin arc, Mariana Trough, and Lau Basin) together with those in Kuroko ore deposits in northeastern Japan. The helium isotopic composition of Okinawa Trough, 6.6±1.0 Ra is much smaller than that of Izu-Bonin samples, 8.4±0.5 Ra. Those of Mariana Trough samples are similar to those of the Okinawa Trough, whereas Lau Basin data are consistent with those of Izu-Bonin. These characteristics might reflect the tectonic setting of regions: the former is related to back-arc spreading or rifting with a sediment signature in a graben, although the latter is attributable to island-arc type magmatism and/or its influence to back-arc volcanism. Argon and nitrogen isotopes are also explainable according to a similar hypothesis, although carbon isotopes are not the discriminator of tectonics. Origins of carbon and nitrogen are estimated respectively by the δ13C-CO2/3He and δ15N-N2/36Ar diagrams. The sedimentary contributions of both carbon and nitrogen are larger in Okinawa and Mariana Troughs than in Izu-Bonin and Lau Basin, whereas Kuroko samples agree well with the latter. Carbon and nitrogen fluxes are again larger in the former than in the latter. The CO2/N2 flux ratio at Okinawa and Mariana Troughs is larger than that at Izu-Bonin and Lau Basin, although both are considerably larger than that at MOR, suggesting that the additional sedimentary component has a higher C/N ratio than the upper mantle value.

  4. Contamination of soils near a tailing pond at the Zlate Hory polymetallic ore deposit

    SciTech Connect

    Raclavska, H.; Raclavska, K.

    1994-12-31

    The relationship between concentrations of trace elements in soils and their content in plants has became a frequently discussed issue. Attention also focuses on the effects of trace element concentrations on the healthy development of vegetation. The Zlate Hory Mining District (in the northern part of the Jeseniky Mountains, 14 km east of Jesenik) with its polymetallic mineral deposits represents an important geochemical source area. It provides opportunities for the study of trace element distributions in the soil horizons and vegetation of a forest comprising mainly Norway spruce, Picea abies (L.) Karsten. Conditions of geochemical migration vary widely from geochemical background to the anomalous areas affected by a high level of mining activity. Trace element distribution in soil horizons was studied in the flood plain of Prudnik Creek. The study area was delineated using basic square units, 10 x 10 m, alternated regularly with free squares. Soil sampling was performed inside the basic square units simultaneously with geobotanical mapping. The study area was located where soils of the flood plain are influenced by waters discharged from a tailing pond and by the highly contaminated waters of Prudnik Creek. The tailing pond is situated above the study area, on the western slope of the Prudnik valley. The mine and mineral dressing plant is located two kilometers upstream to the south. Flotation technology is used to produce chalcopyrite concentrate from ore of the disseminated type. Stratiform ore bodies formed by chalcopyrite and pyrite, with some admixtures of galena and sphalerite, are deposited in metamorphosed Devonian series with quartzite and phyllites predominant.

  5. Ore metals through geologic history.

    PubMed

    Meyer, C

    1985-03-22

    The ores of chromite, nickel, copper, and zinc show a wide distribution over geologic time, but those of iron, titanium, lead, uranium, gold, silver, molybdenum, tungsten, and tin are more restricted. Many of the limitations to specific time intervals are probably imposed by the evolving tectonic history of Earth interacting with the effects of the biomass on the evolution of the earth's s surface chemistry. Photosynthetic generation of free oxygen and "carbon" contributes significantlly to the diversity of redox potentials in both sedimentary and igneous-related processes of ore formation, influencing the selection of metals at the source, during transport, and at the site of ore deposition.

  6. Oxidation potential and state of some vanadium ores and the relation of woody material to their deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pommer, Alfred Michael

    1956-01-01

    Oxidation potential studies with a multiple pH-potential recorder designed and constructed for this purpose demonstrated that some uranium-vanadium ores in the Colorado Plateau were in a reduced state when deposited. Any oxidation which took place occurred after deposition. Experimental and theoretical reducing studies on fresh wood, wood degraded by burial for 450 years, and lignite, indicate that such ores may have been deposited by reduction of oxidized vanadium solutions by woody material. A vanadium (III) mineral, V2O(OH)4, was prepared synthetically by reduction of a vanadium (V) solution with wood. This is the only reported synthesis of any reduced vanadium mineral by any method. It was shown that the origin of almost all vanadium deposits currently of commercial importance involves life processes and products.

  7. Paragenesis and geochemistry of ore minerals in the epizonal gold deposits of the Yangshan gold belt, West Qinling, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Deng, Jun; Yang, Li-Qiang; Goldfarb, Richard J.; Zhang, Chuang; Marsh, Erin; Lei, Shi-Bin; Koenig, Alan; Lowers, Heather

    2014-04-01

    Six epizonal gold deposits in the 30-km-long Yangshan gold belt, Gansu Province are estimated to contain more than 300 t of gold at an average grade of 4.76 g/t and thus define one of China's largest gold resources. Detailed paragenetic studies have recognized five stages of sulfide mineral precipitation in the deposits of the belt. Syngenetic/diagenetic pyrite (Py0) has a framboidal or colloform texture and is disseminated in the metasedimentary host rocks. Early hydrothermal pyrite (Py1) in quartz veins is disseminated in metasedimentary rocks and dikes and also occurs as semi-massive pyrite aggregates or bedding-parallel pyrite bands in phyllite. The main ore stage pyrite (Py2) commonly overgrows Py1 and is typically associated with main ore stage arsenopyrite (Apy2). Late ore stage pyrite (Py3), arsenopyrite (Apy3), and stibnite occur in quartz ± calcite veins or are disseminated in country rocks. Post-ore stage pyrite (Py4) occurs in quartz ± calcite veins that cut all earlier formed mineralization. Electron probe microanalyses and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analyses reveal that different generations of sulfides have characteristic of major and trace element patterns, which can be used as a proxy for the distinct hydrothermal events. Syngenetic/diagenetic pyrite has high concentrations of As, Au, Bi, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, and Zn. The Py0 also retains a sedimentary Co/Ni ratio, which is distinct from hydrothermal ore-related pyrite. Early hydrothermal Py1 has high contents of Ag, As, Au, Bi, Cu, Fe, Sb, and V, and it reflects elevated levels of these elements in the earliest mineralizing metamorphic fluids. The main ore stage Py2 has a very high content of As (median value of 2.96 wt%) and Au (median value of 47.5 ppm) and slightly elevated Cu, but relatively low values for other trace elements. Arsenic in the main ore stage Py2 occurs in solid solution. Late ore stage Py3, formed coevally with stibnite, contains relatively

  8. A petrological investigation of the bi-modal gabbro-syenite Baima igneous complex, Sichuan, China: implications for the genesis of Fe-Ti-V-oxide ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsia, T. W.; Shellnutt, J. G.; Liu, T.; Iizuka, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of orthomagmatic Fe-Ti oxide deposits from the Late Permian Emeishan large igneous province (ELIP) of SW China is debated and has important petrologic and economic implications. The Baima igneous complex (BIC) is one of the largest Fe-Ti oxide deposits of the ELIP and is composed of a cumulate layered gabbroic portion, a thick Fe-Ti oxide ore zone and an isotropic peralkaline quartz syenite. The gabbro is composed of various proportions of olivine, plagioclase, clinopyroxene and interstitial titanomagnetite with minor apatite and sulphide minerals. Unlike many other ore-bearing layered intrusions (e.g. Bushveld, Stillwater), the oxide deposit is located in the lower third rather than the upper portions. This study attempts to experimentally constrain the origin and formation of the BIC by using a starting material (i.e. high-Ti Emeishan basalt) similar to the estimated parental magma composition of the gabbro-syenite complex. An anhydrous basaltic rock powder equal to high-Ti Emeishan rocks in the area was loaded into platinum envelopes and suspended in a 1-atm vertical-quenching furnace. The experiments proceeded at temperatures between 1310°C to 1100°C. They were quenched in water after each run. The run products were crafted into polished sections and individual phases were analyzed by EPMA. The experimental results show that the liquidus temperature is ~1310°C whereas the solidus temperature is estimated to be ~1100°C and the melting interval is ~210°C. The crystallization sequence is: titanomagnetite, plagioclase (An65), and pyroxene (Wo43-47En32-45Fs11-23). The residual liquid composition, represented by the quenched glass, evolves from lower SiO2 (SiO2 = ~45 wt%) values to higher SiO2 values (SiO2 = ~60 wt%) with corresponding decrease in Ti, Fe, Mg, Ca and increase of Na and K. The most evolved glass composition is strikingly similar to the enclaves within the Baima syenitic unit. Thus, the liquidus mineral is iron-titanium oxide which is

  9. Stable Te isotope fractionation in tellurium-bearing minerals from precious metal hydrothermal ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornadel, Andrew P.; Spry, Paul G.; Haghnegahdar, Mojhgan A.; Schauble, Edwin A.; Jackson, Simon E.; Mills, Stuart J.

    2017-04-01

    reduced vapor to a solid is necessary to form the common tellurides and native tellurium in ore-forming systems. Our data suggest that these sorts of reactions during mineralization may account for a ∼3‰ range of δ130/125Te values. Based on the data ranges for Te minerals from various ore deposits, the underpinning geologic processes responsible for mineralization seem to have primary control on the magnitude of fractionation, with tellurides in epithermal gold deposits showing a narrower range of isotope values than those in orogenic gold and volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits.

  10. Coupled Heat and Fluid Flow Modeling of the Earth's Largest Zinc Ore Deposit at Red Dog, Alaska: Implications for Structurally-Focused, Free Convection in Submarine Sedimentary Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garven, G.; Dumoulin, J. A.; Bradley, D. A.; Young, L. E.; Kelley, K. D.; Leach, D. L.

    2002-12-01

    Crustal heat flow can provide a strong mechanism for driving groundwater flow, particularly in submarine basins where other mechanisms for driving pore fluid flow such as topography, compaction and crustal deformation are too weak or too slow to have a significant effect on disturbing conductive heat flow. Fault zones appear to play a crucial role in focusing fluid migration in basins, as inferred in ancient rocks by many examples of hydrothermal deposits of sediment-hosted ores worldwide. Many rift-hosted deposits of lead, zinc, and barite ore appear to have formed at or near the seafloor by focused venting of hot basinal fluids and modified seawater, although the geophysical nature of these systems is not so well known. For example, the upper Kuna Formation, a finely laminated, black, organic-rich siliceous mudstone and shale in the Western Brooks Range of northwest Alaska, is host to the largest resources of zinc yet discovered in the Earth's crust, containing ore reserves in excess of 175 Mt averaging about 16% Zn and 5% Pb. Although situated today in a highly-deformed series of structural allocthonous plates thrusted during the Jurassic to Cretaceous Brookian Orogeny, the stratiform ores are thought to have formed much earlier in the anoxic, mud-rich Carboniferous-age Kuna Basin when adjacent carbonate platforms were drowned by rifting and tectonic subsidence. Fluid inclusion studies of ore-stage sphalerite and gangue minerals indicate sub-seafloor mineralization temperatures less than 200oC and most likely between 120 to 150 oC, during a period of sediment diagenesis and extensional faulting. We have constructed fully-coupled numerical models of heat and fluid flow to test hydrologic theories for free convection, submarine venting and subsequent ore formation, as constrained by paleoheat flow and petrologic observations. A finite element grid was designed and adapted for a cross section of the Kuna Basin, geologically restored to latest Mississippian time

  11. PGE geochemistry and Re Os dating of massive sulfide ores from the Baimazhai Cu Ni deposit, Yunnan province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoming; Wang, Shengwei; Sun, Weidong; Shi, Guiyong; Sun, Yali; Xiong, Dexin; Qu, Wenjun; Du, Andao

    2008-09-01

    The Baimazhai deposit in Yunnan Province is one of the largest Cu-Ni sulfide deposits hosted in mafic-ultramafic intrusions in China. Concentrations of platinum-group elements (PGE) in massive sulfide ores and host rocks from Baimazhai were determined by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) following nickel sulfide fire assay pre-concentration. The results show that the total PGE (ΣPGE) are quite low, decreasing gradually from central massive ores (78.2-556 ppb) to olivine pyroxenite (0.472-67.0 ppb), gabbro (0.847 ppb) and, websterite (0.76-0.809). The intruded lamprophyre dykes also show low ΣPGE (2.98-4.07 ppb). The ΣPGE exhibit obvious positive correlations with Au, Ni and Cu contents. Primitive mantle normalized PGE patterns of the massive Cu-Ni ores are of the Pt-Pd type with relatively steep and trough-like patterns, which are similar to those of the host rocks. In addition, the Pt/Pd and Cu/Pd ratios of the massive sulfide ores are similar to those of olivine pyroxenite, gabbro and websterite. These characteristics suggest that sulfides in the massive ores are of magmatic origin, co-genetic with their host rocks. The relatively high Pt/Pd ratios of the Baimazhai massive sulfide ores (averaging 0.83) and their host rocks imply that the Baimazhai sulfides formed in a single sulfide saturation event, but not through multiple sulfide injections. High Ir contents (0.77-5.52 ppb, averaging 2.35 ppb) and dramatically variable Pd/Ir ratios (4.76-296, averaging 138) of the massive sulfide ores suggest that the Baimazhai sulfide ores might have suffered significant late stage hydrothermal alteration. The Baimazhai massive sulfide ores yield a Re-Os isochron age of 259 ± 20 Ma (MSWD = 0.025), which is the same as the major eruption stage of the Emeishan large igneous province and the Baimazhai intrusion, further supporting their magmatic origin. The initial 187Os/ 188Os value of 0.456 ± 0.026 indicates that crustal contamination has played

  12. Metallogenic problems of hydrothermal gold deposit formation: facts and arguments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherenko, I. V.; Yuxuan, Zhang

    2015-02-01

    The research problem of substituting existing hypotheses by a well-defined re modeling of the geological processes, which, in its turn, initiate and govern the formation of hydrothermal gold-ore deposits, is becoming more and more relevant. The four existing hypotheses - granitogene, basaltogene (magmagene), metamorphogene, and polygene have been considered and discussed. The interpretation of different hypotheses and analysis of substantiating facts showed the inconsistency of above-mentioned hypothesis-approaches. Up-dated petrological, petrochemical, geochemical data proved the following: generation of metal-bearing fluids in sources of moderate alkali-basalt melts during the late basalt formation stages show recycling Late Riphean to Late Paleozoic convergent antidromic granite diorite dolerite magmatic complexes.

  13. Ore mineralogy and sulfur isotope study of the massive sulfide deposit of Filon Norte, Tharsis Mine, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kase, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Nakamura, T.; Mitsuno, C.

    1990-10-01

    The volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit of Filon Norte at Tharsis is hosted by carbonaceous black slate and connected only partly with stockwork veins. The massive ores are usually composed of fine-grained pyrite with subordinate amounts of sphalerite, chalcopyrite, galena and arsenopyrite. Monoclinic pyrrhotite sometimes occurs in massive pyritic ores in the apparently middle and upper horizons of the orebody, and siderite-rich ores are interstratified with compact pyritic ores in the apparently lower horizons. From the occurrence of monoclinic pyrrhotite, together with the FeS contents of sphalerite mostly ranging from 11 to 16 mol %, it is inferred that the sulfide minerals of the massive orebody were precipitated in euxinic muds on the sea-floor at temperatures below 250°C. The negatively shifted, highly variable δ 34S values of the massive ores and their close similarity to those of the underlying black slates strongly suggest that the sulfide sulfur of the massive orebody and the slates is cognate and biogenic.

  14. Geological and geochemical studies of the Shujiadian porphyry Cu deposit, Anhui Province, Eastern China: Implications for ore genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiwei; Zhou, Taofa; Yuan, Feng; Fan, Yu; White, Noel C.; Lin, Fengjie

    2015-05-01

    Most porphyry deposits in the world occur in magmatic arc settings and are related to subduction of oceanic plates. A small proportion of porphyry deposits occur in intracontinental settings, however they are still poorly understood. Shujiadian, a newly-discovered porphyry Cu deposit, is located in the Middle-Lower Yangtze River Valley metallogenic belt and belongs to the intracontinental class. The deposit has classic alteration zones defined by a core of potassic alteration and local Ca-silicate alteration, which is overprinted by a feldspar-destructive alteration zone and cut by veins containing epidote and chlorite. Wallrocks of the deposit are unreactive quartz-rich sedimentary rocks. Three main paragenetic stages have been recognized based on petrographic observations; silicate stage, quartz-sulfide stage, and sulfide-carbonate stage. Quartz + pyrite + chalcopyrite ± molybdenite veins, and quartz + chalcopyrite + pyrite veins of the quartz-sulfide stage contribute most of the copper, and chalcopyrite + chlorite ± pyrite ± pyrrhotite ± quartz ± illite veins of the sulfide-carbonate stage also contribute part of the copper; all the mineralized veins are associated with feldspar-destructive alteration. Investigations on the fluid inclusions in Shujiadian indicate that the ore-forming fluids had four evolutionary episodes: immiscibility and overpressure in the silicate stage, boiling in the quartz-sulfide stage and mixing with meteoric water in the sulfide-carbonate stage. Sulfur and strontium isotope studies suggest that ore metals were mainly derived from magmatic-hydrothermal fluids, and combined with our study of fluid inclusions, we infer that decompression, changes in oxygen fugacity and sulfur content were the main factors that caused Cu precipitation. Compared with porphyry deposits in magmatic arc settings, there are some differences in the ore-bearing rock, alteration, and the composition of ore-forming fluids.

  15. Source of ore-forming fluids of the Tianbaoshan Pb-Zn deposit, Southwest China: constrains from C-O, S, and He-Ar isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Wenbin

    2016-04-01

    The Sichuan-Yunnan-Guizhou (SYG) metallogenic province is one of the most important areas for Pb-Zn resources in China. The metallogenic sources of these Pb-Zn deposits have long been debated. In this study, we provide integrated C-O-S-He-Ar isotopic data of the typical Tianbaoshan Pb-Zn deposit, with an aim to constrain the sources of ore-forming fluids. The Tianbaoshan deposit a large-sized Pb-Zn deposit in SYG metallogenic province, Southwest China. The proven resources include 2.6 Mt metals of Zn+Pb with average grades of 10.09% Zn and 1.50% Pb. The orebodies are hosted within the carbonates of the Ediacaran Dengying Formation. Ore minerals consist mainly of sphalerite, galena, chalcopyrite, and pyrite. Gangue minerals are dominated by calcite and dolomite. The calcite samples from the Tianbaoshan deposit yield homogeneous δ13CV -PDBvalues of -1.70‰ to -1.60‰ (average -1.63), with δ18OV -SMOW values ranging from 12.9‰ to 15.2‰ (average 14.4). The C-O isotopic data suggest the hydrothermal fluids may be originated from a mixed source involving both mantle and carbonate wall rocks. The δ34S values of the sphalerite, galena and chalcopyrite samples vary from 3.32‰ to 5.71‰ -0.36‰ to 1.31‰ and 4.5‰ to 4.7‰ respectively, indicating a magmatic source for sulfur. The 3He/4He ratios of chalcopyrite samples range from 0.01 to 0.32 Ra which is slightly higher than the crustal ratios (0.05 Ra), but obviously lower than that of mantle fluids (6 to 9 Ra). The 40Ar/36Ar ratios range from 345.0 to 669.1, which are slightly higher than that of air (298.5). The He-Ar isotopic compositions suggest that the ore-forming fluids are dominantly derived from the crust, with litter contamination from mantle-derived fluids. In combination with the C-O, S, and He-Ar isotopic data, we propose the ore-forming fluids of the Tianbaoshan deposit were derived by mixing of crustal and mantle fluids. And the metallogenic process may be genetically related to the magmatism

  16. High-resolution acoustic mapping to understand the ore deposit in the Bayonnaise knoll caldera, Izu-Ogasawara arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honsho, Chie; Ura, Tamaki; Asada, Akira; Kim, Kangsoo; Nagahashi, Kenji

    2015-04-01

    We collected deep-sea multibeam, side scan, and subbottom profiler data using an autonomous underwater vehicle at the Bayonnaise knoll, a submarine caldera located in the rift zone of the Izu-Ogasawara arc. We aimed to reveal topographic and geological features and the origin of a hydrothermal field called the Hakurei site in the caldera. We performed seafloor classification by textural analysis using calibrated side-scan sonar data, which provided an effective means to understand the geology and to highlight potential areas of hydrothermal constructions. The high-resolution bathymetric map illustrates that the Hakurei hydrothermal field is distributed over a landslide landform in the caldera wall. The distribution of hydrothermal vents indicates that the slip surface has served as a major route of hydrothermal fluids. The radial alignment of chimneys and mounds indicates radial routes of hydrothermal fluid and/or belching along fragile lines in the landslide landform. Various postcaldera activities are inferred including the formation of a lava dome, a pyroclastic cone, and subsequent phreatic explosions. A general volcano-tectonic structure extending across the caldera in a NW-SE direction is interpreted as an inferred boundary fault of the North Myojin Rift. Analogous to the Hokuroku basin and land kuroko deposits, it is suggested that the main contributing factor in the formation of kuroko deposits was volcano-tectonic activity that dominated the margin of the back-arc rift basin. The intersections between the margin of a rift basin and the surrounding knolls have a high potential for ore-forming areas.

  17. Model of formation of the Khibiny-Lovozero ore-bearing volcanic-plutonic complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzamastsev, A. A.; Arzamastseva, L. V.; Zhirova, A. M.; Glaznev, V. N.

    2013-09-01

    The paper presents the results of a study of the large Paleozoic ore-magmatic system in the northeastern Fennoscandian Shield comprising the Khibiny and Lovozero plutons, the Kurga intrusion, volcanic rocks, and numerous alkaline dike swarms. As follows from the results of deep drilling and 3D geophysical simulation, large bodies of rocks pertaining to the ultramafic alkaline complex occur at the lower level of the ore-magmatic system. Peridotite, pyroxenite, melilitolite, melteigite, and ijolite occupy more than 50 vol % of the volcanic-plutonic complex within the upper 15 km accessible to gravity exploration. The proposed model represents the ore-magmatic system as a conjugate network of mantle magmatic sources localized at different depth levels and periodically supplying the melts belonging to the two autonomous groups: (1) ultramafic alkaline rocks with carbonatites and (2) alkali syenites-peralkaline syenites, which were formed synchronously having a common system of outlet conduits. With allowance for the available isotopic datings and new geochronological evidence, the duration of complex formation beginning from supply of the first batches of melt into calderas and up to postmagmatic events, expressed in formation of late pegmatoids, was no less than 25 Ma.

  18. Lead isotope signatures of epithermal and porphyry-type ore deposits from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcoux, Eric; Grancea, Luminita; Lupulescu, Marian; Milési, Jean

    2002-03-01

    Lead isotope analyses have been performed on the two major Miocene mining districts of Romania, Baia Mare and Apuseni Mountains. These two districts have different non-overlapping 206Pb/204Pb isotopic signatures ranging from 18.752 to 18.876 and 18.497 to 18.740. In the Baia Mare district, epithermal deposits are overall homogeneous in their lead isotopic compositions and have values similar to the average of the calc-alkaline volcanic rocks. These results suggest a magmatic signature for the Pb (and possibly other metals) in the hydrothermal fluids. However, magmas in this district show isotopic evidence of crustal assimilation. In the southern Apuseni Mountains, the lead isotope compositions of sulfide minerals in porphyry copper deposits are clustered, confirming that Pb, and probably other metals, were derived principally from associated porphyry stocks. On the other hand, lead isotope data on sulfides in epithermal ore deposits are much more scattered, indicating a notable contribution of Pb from local country rocks. In the Apuseni Mountains, 'fertile' volcanics are few and appear to come from a more primitive mantle-derived source. Most of the analysed volcanic rocks seem 'barren'. Differences in lead isotopic compositions between the Baia Mare district and the Apuseni Mountains are due to a different basement, and probably to variations in crustal assimilation superimposed on variations in the mantle source composition. In the Apuseni Mountains, Pb may be partly inherited from the previous Mesozoic magmatic-hydrothermal stage. From a geodynamic point of view, it seems that the nature and the source of volcanic rocks and their position related to the collision area of the Carpathian arc are not the only factors controlling the 'fertility' of a volcanic district.

  19. SHRIMP U-Pb ages of xenotime and monazite from the Spar Lake red bed-associated Cu-Ag deposit, western Montana: Implications for ore genesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, John N.; Hayes, Timothy S.; Evans, Karl V.; Mazdab, Frank K.; Pillers, Renee M.; Fanning, C. Mark

    2012-01-01

    Xenotime occurs as epitaxial overgrowths on detrital zircons in the Mesoproterozoic Revett Formation (Belt Supergroup) at the Spar Lake red bed-associated Cu-Ag deposit, western Montana. The deposit formed during diagenesis of Revett strata, where oxidizing metal-bearing hydrothermal fluids encountered a reducing zone. Samples for geochronology were collected from several mineral zones. Xenotime overgrowths (1–30 μm wide) were found in polished thin sections from five ore and near-ore zones (chalcocite-chlorite, bornite-calcite, galena-calcite, chalcopyrite-ankerite, and pyrite-calcite), but not in more distant zones across the region. Thirty-two in situ SHRIMP U-Pb analyses on xenotime overgrowths yield a weighted average of 207Pb/206Pb ages of 1409 ± 8 Ma, interpreted as the time of mineralization. This age is about 40 to 60 m.y. after deposition of the Revett Formation. Six other xenotime overgrowths formed during a younger event at 1304 ± 19 Ma. Several isolated grains of xenotime have 207Pb/206Pb ages in the range of 1.67 to 1.51 Ga, and thus are considered detrital in origin. Trace element data can distinguish Spar Lake xenotimes of different origins. Based on in situ SHRIMP analysis, detrital xenotime has heavy rare earth elements-enriched patterns similar to those of igneous xenotime, whereas xenotime overgrowths of inferred hydrothermal origin have hump-shaped (i.e., middle rare earth elements-enriched) patterns. The two ages of hydrothermal xenotime can be distinguished by slightly different rare earth elements patterns. In addition, 1409 Ma xenotime overgrowths have higher Eu and Gd contents than the 1304 Ma overgrowths. Most xenotime overgrowths from the Spar Lake deposit have elevated As concentrations, further suggesting a genetic relationship between the xenotime formation and Cu-Ag mineralization.

  20. The composition of fluid inclusions in ore and gangue minerals from the Silesian-Cracow Mississippi Valley-type Zn-Pb deposits Poland: Genetic and environmental implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viets, J.G.; Hofstra, A.H.; Emsbo, P.; Kozlowski, A.

    1996-01-01

    The composition of fluids extracted from ore and gangue sulfide minerals that span most of the paragenesis of the Silesian-Cracow district was determined using a newly developed ion chromatographic (IC) technique. Ionic species determined were Na+, NH+4, Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Rb+, Sr2+, Ba2+, Cl-, Br-, F-, I-, PO3-4, CO2-3, HS-, S2O2-3, SO2-4, NO-3, and acetate. Mineral samples included six from the Pomorzany mine and one from the Trzebionka mine which are hosted in the Triassic Muschelkalk Formation, and two samples of drill core from mineralized Upper Devonian strata. Nine paragenetically identifiable sulfide minerals occur throughout the Silesian-Cracow district. These include from earliest to latest: early iron sulfides, granular sphalerite, early galena, light-banded sphalerite, galena, dark-banded sphalerite, iron sulfides, late dark-banded sphalerite with late galena, and late iron sulfides. Seven of the minerals were sampled for fluid inclusion analysis in this study. Only the early iron sulfides and the last galena stage were not sampled. Although the number of analyses are limited to nine samples and two replicates and there is uncertainty about the characteristics of the fluid inclusions analyzed, the data show clear temporal trends in the composition of the fluids that deposited these minerals. Fluid inclusions in minerals deposited later in the paragenesis have significantly more K+, Br-, NH+4, and acetate but less Sr2+ than those deposited earlier in the paragenesis. The later minerals are also characterized by isotopically lighter sulfur and significantly more Tl and As in the solid minerals. The change in ore-fluid chemistry is interpreted to reflect a major change in the hydrologic regime of the district. Apparently, the migrational paths of ore fluids from the Upper Silesian basin changed during ore deposition and the fluids which deposited early minerals reacted with aquifers with very different geochemical characteristics than those that deposited

  1. Chapter C: Hydrothermal Enrichment of Gallium in Zones of Advanced Argillic Alteration-Examples from the Paradise Peak and McDermitt Ore Deposits, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, James J.; John, David A.; Foster, Andrea; Ludington, Steven D.; Kotlyar, Boris

    2003-01-01

    Gallium is produced as a byproduct from bauxite and zinc sulfide ores and rarely from primary Ga ores. High Ga contents (>60 ppm) can occur in zones of advanced argillic alteration consisting of alunite+kaolinite+quartz associated with quartz-alunite (high sulfidation Au-Ag) deposits. In a magmatic-hydrothermal environment, the zones of advanced argillic alteration associated with quartz-alunite (high sulfidation) Au-Ag deposits have the highest Ga contents (max 120 ppm). In these Au deposits, Ga is enriched in the zone of alunite+kaolinite alteration and depleted in the zone of quartz-rich alteration within acid-leached rocks. Peripheral zones of argillic alteration have Ga contents and Al/Ga ratios similar to those in unaltered volcanic rocks. The zones of advanced argillic alteration that formed in a steam-heated environment in association with hot-spring-type Hg-Au deposits are not Ga enriched, and residual silicified zones have very low Ga contents. The McDermitt Hg and Paradise Peak Au-Hg deposits, Nev., have zones of advanced argillic alteration that are Ga enriched. At the Paradise Peak Au-Hg deposits, Ga is enriched in the zone of alunite+jarosite alteration that formed in a magmatic-hydrothermal environment. Ga is depleted in the zone of opal+alunite alteration formed in a steam-heated environment, in residual silicified zones formed in a magmatic-hydrothermal environment, and in zones of supergene jarosite alteration. At the McDermitt Hg deposit, Ga is enriched in the zone of alunite+kaolinite alteration below the zone of adularia-quartz alteration that coincides with the Hg ore body. The spatial relation of Ga enrichment to alunite-kaolinite alteration suggests that formation in a magmatic-hydrothermal environment. X-ray-absorption spectra of Ga-enriched samples from the McDermitt Hg deposit are similar to that of gallium sulfate and support the association of Ga enrichment with alunite alteration.

  2. Physicochemical parameters of the melts participating in the formation of chromite ore hosted in the Klyuchevsky ultramafic massif, the Central Urals, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonov, V. A.; Ivanov, K. S.; Smirnov, V. N.; Kovyazin, S. V.

    2009-04-01

    The results of melt inclusion study are reported for chromites of the Klyuchevsky ultramafic massif, which is the most representative of all Ural ultramafic massifs localized beyond the Main Ural Fault Zone. The massif is composed of a dunite-harzburgite complex (tectonized mantle peridotite) and a dunite-wehrlite-clinopyroxenite-gabbro complex (layered portion of the ophiolitic section). The studied Kozlovsky chromite deposit is located in the southeastern part of the Klyuchevsky massif and hosted in serpentinized dunite as a series of lenticular bodies and layers up to 7-8 m thick largely composed of disseminated and locally developed massive ore. Melt inclusions have been detected in chromites of both ore types. The heated and then quenched into glass melt inclusions and host minerals were analyzed on a Camebax-Micro microprobe. The glasses of melt inclusions contain up to 1.06 wt % Na2O + K2O and correspond to melts of normal alkalinity. In SiO2 content (49-56 wt %), they fit basalt and basaltic andesite. The melt inclusions are compared with those from chromites of the Nurali massif in the southern Urals and the Karashat massif in southern Tuva. The physicochemical parameters of magmatic systems related to the formation of disseminated and massive chromite ores of the Klyuchevsky massif are different. The former are characterized by a wider temperature interval (1185-1120°C) in comparison with massive chromite ore (1160-1140°C).

  3. Hydrothermal zebra dolomite in the Great Basin, Nevada--attributes and relation to Paleozoic stratigraphy, tectonics, and ore deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diehl, S.F.; Hofstra, A.H.; Koenig, A.E.; Emsbo, P.; Christiansen, W.; Johnson, Chad

    2010-01-01

    In other parts of the world, previous workers have shown that sparry dolomite in carbonate rocks may be produced by the generation and movement of hot basinal brines in response to arid paleoclimates and tectonism, and that some of these brines served as the transport medium for metals fixed in Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) and sedimentary exhalative (Sedex) deposits of Zn, Pb, Ag, Au, or barite. Numerous occurrences of hydrothermal zebra dolomite (HZD), comprised of alternating layers of dark replacement and light void-filling sparry or saddle dolomite, are present in Paleozoic platform and slope carbonate rocks on the eastern side of the Great Basin physiographic province. Locally, it is associated with mineral deposits of barite, Ag-Pb-Zn, and Au. In this paper the spatial distribution of HZD occurrences, their stratigraphic position, morphological characteristics, textures and zoning, and chemical and stable isotopic compositions were determined to improve understanding of their age, origin, and relation to dolostone, ore deposits, and the tectonic evolution of the Great Basin. In northern and central Nevada, HZD is coeval and cogenetic with Late Devonian and Early Mississippian Sedex Au, Zn, and barite deposits and may be related to Late Ordovician Sedex barite deposits. In southern Nevada and southwest California, it is cogenetic with small MVT Ag-Pb-Zn deposits in rocks as young as Early Mississippian. Over Paleozoic time, the Great Basin was at equatorial paleolatitudes with episodes of arid paleoclimates. Several occurrences of HZD are crosscut by Mesozoic or Cenozoic intrusions, and some host younger pluton-related polymetallic replacement and Carlin-type gold deposits. The distribution of HZD in space (carbonate platform, margin, and slope) and stratigraphy (Late Neoproterozoic Ediacaran-Mississippian) roughly parallels that of dolostone and both are prevalent in Devonian strata. Stratabound HZD is best developed in Ediacaran and Cambrian units, whereas

  4. Cesium and strontium tolerant Arthrobacter sp. strain KMSZP6 isolated from a pristine uranium ore deposit.

    PubMed

    Swer, Pynskhem Bok; Joshi, Santa Ram; Acharya, Celin

    2016-12-01

    Arthrobacter sp. KMSZP6 isolated from a pristine uranium ore deposit at Domiasiat located in North-East India exhibited noteworthy tolerance for cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr). The strain displayed a high minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 400 mM for CsCl and for SrCl2. Flow cytometric analysis employing membrane integrity indicators like propidium iodide (PI) and thiazole orange (TO) indicated a greater sensitivity of Arthrobacter cells to cesium than to strontium. On being challenged with 75 mM of Cs, the cells sequestered 9612 mg Cs g(-1) dry weight of cells in 12 h. On being challenged with 75 mM of Sr, the cells sequestered 9989 mg Sr g(-1) dry weight of cells in 18 h. Heat killed cells exhibited limited Cs and Sr binding as compared to live cells highlighting the importance of cell viability for optimal binding. The association of the metals with Arthrobacter sp. KMSZP6 was further substantiated by Field Emission-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) coupled with Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. This organism tolerated up to 1 kGy (60)Co-gamma rays without loss of survival. The present report highlights the superior tolerance and binding capacity of the KMSZP6 strain for cesium and strontium over other earlier reported strains and reveals its potential for bioremediation of nuclear waste.

  5. Ore transport and deposition in the Red Sea geothermal system: a geochemical model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanks, Wayne C.; Bischoff, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculation of distribution of dissolved aqueous species in the Red Sea geothermal brine provides a model of ore transport and deposition in good agreement with observed accumulations of base metal sulfides, anhydrite, and barite. The Red Sea brine is recirculated seawater that acquires high salinity by low-temperature interaction with Miocene evaporites and is subsequently heated to temperatures in excess of 200??C by interaction with recent rift zone intrusive rocks. At temperatures up to 250??C, NaSO-4 and MgSO04 are the dominant sulfur-bearing species. H2S forms by inorganic sulfate reduction at the higher temperatures but is maintained at a uniform concentration of about 2 ppm by the strength of the sulfate complexes. Chloride complexes solubilize metals at the higher temperatures, and thus sulfide and metals are carried together into the Atlantis II Deep. Below 150??C, the brine becomes supersaturated with respect to chalcopyrite, sphalerite, galena, and iron monosulfide due to chloride-complex dissociation. Sulfide precipitation rates, based on the rate of brine influx, are in good agreement with measured sedimentation rates. Anhydrite precipitates as crystalline fissure infillings from high-temperature inflowing brine. Barite forms from partial oxidation of sulfides at the interface between the lower hot brine and the transitional brine layer. ?? 1977.

  6. Boiling, colloid nucleation and aggregation, and the genesis of bonanza Au-Ag ores of the sleeper deposit, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, J. A.; Schoenly, P. A.

    1995-06-01

    A deep “parent” composition for bonanza oreforming fluids at the Sleeper deposit was calculated by the computer program SOLVEQ using fluid-inclusion microthermometric and gas data, and by assuming equilibrium with the following minerals present in vein samples below the bonanza zones: gold, chalcedony, adularia, pyrite, chalcopyrite, and acanthite. The calculated dissolved gold content of 295 ppb is approximately 2 orders of magnitude higher than that assumed for typical geothermal systems. Thus, a gold-enriched fluid appears to have been a principal factor in the genesis of bonanza Au-Ag ores at the Sleeper deposit. Geochemical modelling of possible ore-forming processes using the computer program CHILLER, with the reconstructed ore-forming solution as a starting composition, indicates that boiling most closely reproduces observed minerals and their relative abundances in bonanza ores. The constraint imposed by the association of amorphous silica with gold precludes all of the mixing scenarios modelled, such as mixing with cold and steam-heated groundwaters (acid-sulfate, CO2-rich). Modelling indicates that boiling of a gold-rich deep solution leads to rapid gold precipitation, and that the amount of gold precipitated initially is large relative to other minerals. These factors apparently led to nucleation of colloidal gold particles instead of in-situ gold deposition or coprecipitation with other phases. Gold colloids apparently were entrained in the upward-flowing hydrothermal solutions and grew as they travelled. Upon reaching a critical size (10 100 nm?), they were deposited due to orthokinetic aggregation at an elevation and temperature at which amorphous silica was nucleating and aggregating.

  7. Occurrences and distributions of branched alkylbenzenes in the Dongsheng sedimentary uranium ore deposits, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuo, Jincai; Chen, Ru; Zhang, Mingfeng; Wang, Xianbin

    2010-11-01

    A series of branched alkylbenzene ranging from C 15 to C 19 with several isomers (2-5) at each carbon number were identified in sediments from the Dongsheng sedimentary uranium ore deposits, Ordos Basin, China. The distribution patterns of the branched alkylbenzenes show significant differences in the sample extracts. The branched alkylbenzenes from organic-rich argillites and coals range from C 15 to C 19 homologues, in which the C 17 or C 18 dominated. On the other hand, the C 19 branched alkylbenzenes dominated in the sandstone/siltstone extracts. The obvious differences of the branched alkylbenzene distributions between the uranium-host sandstones/siltstones and the interbedded barren organic-rich mudstones/coals probably indicate their potential use as biological markers associated with particular depositional environments and/or maturity diagenetic processes. Possible origins for these branched alkylbenzenes include interaction of simple aromatic compounds with, or cyclization and aromatization reactions of, these linear lipid precursors such as fatty acids, methyl alkanoates, wax esters or alkanes/alkenes that occur naturally in carbonaceous sediments. The possible simple aromatic compounds may include substituted benzenes, functionalized compounds such as phenols that are bound to kerogen at the benzyl position, and phenols that are decomposition products derived from aquatic and terrestrial sources. The distributions of methyl alkanoates and n-alkanes were found to be different between organic-rich mudstone/coal and sandstone/siltstone. From this result, it can be concluded that such differences of the alkylbenzene distributions were mainly resulting from the differences of organic precursors, although maturity effect and radiolytic alteration cannot be completely excluded.

  8. Formation of NO sub x by digestion of phosphate ores with concentrated nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tinge, J.T. )

    1992-05-01

    The digestion of twelve phosphate ores with concentrated nitric acid has been studied in order to quantify the formation of nitrogen oxides, NO{sub x}. The experiments were performed in a batch laboratory-scale reactor under reaction conditions which are representative of the acidulation of phosphate rock with nitric acid in the nitrophosphate process, an important process for the production of compound fertilizers. The results obtained from these experiments show that the amount of NO{sub x} formed during digestion is directly proportional to the organic carbon content and is only marginally related to the carbonate and fluoride contents of these phosphate ores. It is assumed that organic material in the ores is partly oxidized by nitric acid, which in its turn is reduced to NO and NO{sub 2}. On the basis of the authors results the following correlation between the organic carbon content and the quantity of nitrogen produced in the form of nitrogen oxides is proposed: (NO{sub x}-N) = A.(C{sub org}) in which A = 0.65 if (NO{sub x}-N) and (C{sub org}) are both expressed on a weight basis and A = 46 if (NO{sub x}-N) and (C{sub org}) are expressed in mol/tonne of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and kg/tonne of P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, respectively. The result is important in specifying the value of phosphate ores for the nitrophosphate process because it quantifies the possible emissions of NO{sub x}into the atmosphere as well as the amount of wasted nitric acid.

  9. Using oxygen isotope chemistry to track hydrothermal processes and fluid sources in itabirite-hosted iron ore deposits in the Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensler, Ana-Sophie; Hagemann, Steffen G.; Brown, Philip E.; Rosière, Carlos A.

    2014-03-01

    The Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil, is presently the largest accumulation of single itabirite-hosted iron ore bodies worldwide. Detailed petrography of selected hypogene high-grade iron ore bodies at, e.g. the Águas Claras, Conceição, Pau Branco and Pico deposits revealed different iron oxide generations, from oldest to youngest: magnetite → martite (hematite pseudomorph after magnetite) → granoblastic (recrystallised) → microplaty (fine-grained, <100 μm) → specular (coarse-grained, >100 μm) hematite. Laser-fluorination oxygen isotope analyses of selected iron ore species showed that the δ18O composition of ore-hosted martite ranges between -4.4 and 0.9 ‰ and is up to 11 ‰ depleted in 18O relative to hematite of the host itabirite. During the modification of iron ore and the formation of new iron oxide generations (e.g. microplaty and specular hematite), an increase of up to 8 ‰ in δ18O values is recorded. Calculated δ18O values of hydrothermal fluids in equilibrium with the iron oxide species indicate: (1) the involvement of isotopically light fluids (e.g. meteoric water or brines) during the upgrade from itabirite-hosted hematite to high-grade iron ore-hosted martite and (2) a minor positive shift in δ18Ofluid values from martite to specular hematite as result of modified meteoric water or brines with slightly elevated δ18O values and/or the infiltration of small volumes of isotopically heavy (metamorphic and/or magmatic) fluids into the iron ore system. The circulation of large fluid volumes that cause the systematic decrease of 18O/16O ratios from itabirite to high-grade iron ore requires the presence of, e.g. extensive faults and/or large-scale folds.

  10. Geodynamic and climate controls in the formation of Mio-Pliocene world-class oxidized cobalt and manganese ores in the Katanga province, DR Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decrée, Sophie; Deloule, Étienne; Ruffet, Gilles; Dewaele, Stijn; Mees, Florias; Marignac, Christian; Yans, Johan; de Putter, Thierry

    2010-10-01

    The Katanga province, Democratic Republic of Congo, hosts world-class cobalt deposits accounting for ~50% of the world reserves. They originated from sediment-hosted stratiform copper and cobalt sulfide deposits within Neoproterozoic metasedimentary rocks. Heterogenite, the main oxidized cobalt mineral, is concentrated as “cobalt caps” along the top of silicified dolomite inselbergs. The supergene cobalt enrichment process is part of a regional process of residual ore formation that also forms world-class “manganese cap” deposits in western Katanga, i.e., the “black earths” that are exploited by both industrial and artisanal mining. Here, we provide constraints on the genesis and the timing of these deposits. Ar-Ar analyses of oxidized Mn ore and in situ U-Pb SIMS measurements of heterogenite yield Mio-Pliocene ages. The Ar-Ar ages suggest a multi-phase process, starting in the Late Miocene (10-5 Ma), when the metal-rich substratum was exposed to the action of meteoric fluids, due to major regional uplift. Further oxidation took place in the Pliocene (3.7-2.3 Ma) and formed most of the observed deposits under humid conditions: Co- and Mn-caps on metal-rich substrata, and coeval Fe laterites on barren areas. These deposits formed prior to the regional shift toward more arid conditions in Central Africa. Arid conditions still prevailed during the Quaternary and resulted in erosion and valley incision, which dismantled the metal-bearing caps and led to ore accumulation in valleys and along foot slopes.

  11. Structural controls and evolution of gold-, silver-, and REE-bearing copper-cobalt ore deposits, Blackbird district, east-central Idaho: Epigenetic origins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lund, K.; Tysdal, R.G.; Evans, K.V.; Kunk, M.J.; Pillers, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    Textural data at all scales indicate that the host sites for veins and the tectonic evolution of both host rocks and mineral deposits were kinematically linked to Late Cretaceous regional thrust faulting. Heat, fluids, and conduits for generation and circulation of fluids were part of the regional crustal thickening. The faulting also juxtaposed metaevaporite layers in the Mesoproterozoic Yellowjacket Formation over Blackbird district host rocks. We conclude that this facilitated chemical exchange between juxtaposed units resulting in leaching of critical elements (Cl, K, B, Na) from metaevaporites to produce brines, scavenging of metals (Co, Cu, etc) from rocks in the region, and, finally, concentrating metals in the lower-plate ramp structures. Although the ultimate source of the metals remains undetermined, the present Cu-Co ± Au (± Ag ± Ni ± REE) Blackbird ore deposits formed during Late Cretaceous compressional deformation.

  12. Leaching of silica bands and concentration of magnetite in Archean BIF by hypogene fluids: Beebyn Fe ore deposit, Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duuring, Paul; Hagemann, Steffen

    2013-03-01

    The ~2,752-Ma Weld Range greenstone belt in the Yilgarn Craton of Western Australia hosts several Fe ore deposits that provide insights into the role of early hypogene fluids in the formation of high-grade (>55 wt% Fe) magnetite-rich ore in banded iron formation (BIF). The 1.5-km-long Beebyn orebody comprises a series of steeply dipping, discontinuous, <50-m-thick lenses of magnetite-(martite)-rich ore zones in BIF that extend from surface to vertical depths of at least 250 m. The ore zones are enveloped by a 3-km-long, 150-m-wide outer halo of hypogene siderite and ferroan dolomite in BIF and mafic igneous country rocks. Ferroan chlorite characterises 20-m-wide proximal alteration zones in mafic country rocks. The magnetite-rich Beebyn orebody is primarily the product of hypogene fluids that circulated through reverse shear zones during the formation of an Archean isoclinal fold-and-thrust belt. Two discrete stages of hypogene fluid flow caused the pseudomorphic replacement of silica-rich bands in BIF by Stage 1 siderite and magnetite and later by Stage 2 ferroan dolomite. The resulting carbonate-altered BIF is markedly depleted in SiO2 and enriched in CaO, MgO, LOI, P2O5 and Fe2O3(total) compared with the least-altered BIF. Subsequent reactivation of these shear zones and circulation of hypogene fluids resulted in the leaching of existing hypogene carbonate minerals and the concentration of residual magnetite-rich bands. These Stage 3 magnetite-rich ore zones are depleted in SiO2 and enriched in K2O, CaO, MgO, P2O5 and Fe2O3(total) relative to the least-altered BIF. Proximal wall rock hypogene alteration zones in mafic igneous country rocks (up to 20 m from the BIF contact) are depleted in SiO2, CaO, Na2O, and K2O and are enriched in Fe2O3(total), MgO and P2O5 compared with distal zones. Recent supergene alteration affects all rocks within about 100 m below the present surface, disturbing hypogene mineral and the geochemical zonation patterns associated with

  13. The Sarylakh and Sentachan gold-antimony deposits, Sakha-Yakutia: A case of combined mesothermal gold-quartz and epithermal stibnite ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortnikov, N. S.; Gamynin, G. N.; Vikent'eva, O. V.; Prokof'ev, V. Yu.; Prokop'ev, A. V.

    2010-10-01

    New mineralogical, thermobarometric, isotopic, and geochemical data provide evidence for long and complex formation history of the Sarylakh and Sentachan Au-Sb deposits conditioned by regional geodynamics and various types of ore mineralization, differing in age and source of ore matter combined in the same ore-localizing structural units. The deposits are situated in the Taryn metallogenic zone of the East Yakutian metallogenic belt in the central Verkhoyansk-Kolyma Fold Region. They are controlled by the regional Adycha-Taryn Fault Zone that separates the Kular-Nera Terrane and the western part of the Verkhoyansk Fold-Thrust Belt. The fault extends along the strike of the northwest-trending linear folds and is deep-rooted and repeatedly reactivated. The orebodies are mineralized crush zones accompanied by sulfidated (up to 100 m wide) quartz-sericite metasomatic rocks and replacing dickite-pyrophyllite alteration near stibnite veinlets. Two stages of low-sulfide gold-quartz and stibnite mineralization are distinguished. The formation conditions of the early milk white quartz in orebodies with stibnite mineralization at the Sarylakh and Sentachan deposits are similar: temperature interval 340-280°C, salt concentration in fluids 6.8-1.6 wt % NaCl equiv, fluid pressure 3430-1050 bar, and sodic bicarbonate fluid composition. The ranges of fluid salinity overlapped at both deposits. In the late regenerated quartz that attends stibnite mineralization, fluid inclusions contain an aqueous solution with salinity of 3.2 wt % NaCl equiv and are homogenized into liquid at 304-189°C. Syngenetic gas inclusions contain nitrogen 0.19 g/cm3 in density. The pressure of 300 bar is estimated at 189°C. The composition of the captured fluid is characterized as K-Ca bicarbonatesulfate. The sulfur isotopic composition has been analyzed in pyrite and arsenopyrite from ore and metasomatic zones, as well as in coarse-, medium-, and fine-grained stibnite varieties subjected to

  14. Dal'negosrk skarn deposit, Sikhote-Alin: Stages and sources of matter for borosilicate ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas', O. A.; Ratkin, V. V.

    2014-04-01

    The danburite orebody at the northeastern wall of the open pit of the Dal'negorsk borosilicate deposit is studied. The comparative mineralogical-, isotopic-, and thermobarogeochemical analyses of danburite from the Levoberezhnyi area and datolite of the late skarn stage from the Tsentral'nyi open pit confirms that danburite is a result of the early borosilicate stage of formation of the deposit. Combined with previously published data, it is concluded that marine sedimentary rocks or Early Cretaceous arkose sandstones from the matrix of the Taukhin accretionary prism could be the source of boron.

  15. Effect of Experimental Conditions on Cementite Formation During Reduction of Iron Ore Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Mania; Sichen, Du

    2016-12-01

    Experiments have been carried out to study the effect of temperature, gas composition, residence time, and type of iron ore pellets on formation of cementite during gaseous reduction of hematite. Industrial iron ore pellets have been reduced isothermally in a gas mixture with H2 and CO as main components. The presence of Fe3C in the partially reduced pellets shows that reduction and cementite formation take place at the same time. The maximum content of cementite is identified in the samples reduced by H2-CO at 1123 K (850 °C). The decrease in the carbide content due to addition of 1 pct CO2 to the initial gas mixture reveals the major influence of carbon potential in the gas atmosphere. Further increase of CO2 content increases the Fe3C. The variations of the amount of cementite with the CO2 content suggest that both the thermodynamics and kinetics of cementite formation are affected by the gas composition. Cementite decomposes to graphite and iron particles in reducing and inert atmospheres as the residence time of pellets at high temperature is increased above 60 minutes.

  16. Genesis of massive sulfide deposits in the Verkhneural'sk ore district, the South Urals, Russia: Evidence for magmatic contribution of metals and fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpukhina, V. S.; Naumov, V. B.; Vikent'ev, I. V.

    2013-03-01

    Melt inclusions and aqueous fluid inclusions in quartz phenocrysts from host felsic volcanics, as well as fluid inclusions in minerals of ores and wall rocks were studied at the Cu-Zn massive sulfide deposits in the Verkhneural'sk ore district, the South Urals. The high-temperature (850-1210°C) magmatic melts of volcanic rocks are normal in alkalinity and correspond to rhyolites of the tholeiitic series. The groups of predominant K-Na-type (K2O/Na2O = 0.3-1.0), less abundant Na-type (K2O/Na2O = 0.15-0.3), and K-type (K2O/Na2O = 1.9-9.3) rhyolites are distinguished. The average concentrations (wt %) of volatile components in the melts are as follows: 2.9 H2O (up to 6.5), 0.13 Cl (up to 0.28), and 0.09 F (up to 0.42). When quartz was crystallizing, the melt was heterogeneous, contained magnetite crystals and sulfide globules (pyrrhotite, pentlandite, chalcopyrite, bornite). High-density aqueous fluid inclusions, which were identified for the first time in quartz phenocrysts from felsic volcanics of the South Urals, provide evidence for real participation of magmatic water in hydrothermal ore formation. The fluids were homogenized at 124-245°C in the liquid phase; the salinity of the aqueous solution is 1.2-6.2 wt % NaCl equiv. The calculated fluid pressure is very high: 7.0-8.7 kbar at 850°C and 5.1-6.8 kbar at 700°C. The LA-ICP-MS analysis of melt and aqueous fluid inclusions in quartz phenocrysts shows a high saturation of primary magmatic fluid and melt with metals. This indicates ore potential of island-arc volcanic complexes spatially associated with massive sulfide deposits. The systematic study of fluid inclusions in minerals of ores and wall rocks at five massive sulfide deposits of the Verkhneural'sk district furnished evidence that ore-forming fluids had temperature of 375-115°C, pressure up to 1.0-0.5 kbar, chloride composition, and salinity of 0.8-11.2 (occasionally up to 22.8) wt % NaCl equiv. The H and O isotopic compositions of sericite from host

  17. Mineral-organic formations in Berezitovy deposit (the Amur region, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakh, E. A.; Vakh, A. S.; Petukhov, V. I.; Nikulina, T. V.; Tarasenko, I. A.

    2016-03-01

    The article examines the structure and composition of mineral-organic formations within the hypergenesis zone of Berezitovy deposit (the Amur region). The detailed study has shown that these recent formations are represented by algae identified as Trentepohlia jolithus (Linnaeus) Wallroth. The process of macro and micro element accumulation in these formations is likely to have a complex sediment-chemogenic-organogenic nature and results from the flow of the suspended and dissolved substances formed within the hypergenesis zone of sulphide ores. It is also assumed that some elements accumulated in the formations were previously absorbed by algae from the mineralized water environment.

  18. [Physiological Properties of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Strains Isolated from Sulfide Ore Deposits in Kazakhstan].

    PubMed

    Kanaeva, Z K; Bulaev, A G; Kanaev, A T; Kondrat'eva, T F

    2015-01-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferroxidans strains were isolated from acidophilic microbial communities of Kazakhstan sulfide ore deposits. Their biotechnologically important properties (optimal and maximal growth temperatures and resistance to NaCl) were determined. While temperature optima of the strains were the same (30-32 degrees C), temperature ranges were different. Thus, strain TFBK oxidized iron very poorly at 37 degrees C, while for strain TFV, the iron oxidation rate at this temperature was insignificantly lower than at lesser temperatures. NaCl inhibited the oxidative activity of both strains. Iron oxidation by strain TFV was inhibited at 5 g/L NaCl and was suppressed almost completely at 20 g/L. Iron oxidation by strain TFBK was inhibited by NaCl to a lesser degree, so that iron oxidation rate was relatively high at 10 g/L, while at 20 g/L NaCl the process was not suppressed completely, although the oxidation rate was low. Sulfur oxidation by these strains was less affected by NaCl than oxidation of ferrous iron. Sulfur oxidation by strain TFV was considerably inhibited only at 20 g/L NaCl, but was not suppressed completely. Sulfur oxidation by strain TFBK was more affected by NaCl. At 10 g/L NaCl the oxidation rate was much lower than at lower NaCl concentrations (sulfate concentrations after 6 days of oxidation at 5 and 10 g/L NaCl were -130 and -100 mM, respectively). While sulfur oxidation by strain TFBK was considerably inhibited at 10 and 20 g/L NaCl, similar to strain TFV it was not suppressed completely. Our results indicate the adaptation of the species A. ferrooxidans to a broad range of growth conditions.

  19. Kizilcaören ore-bearing complex with carbonatites (northwestern Anatolia, Turkey): Formation time and mineralogy of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, A. V.; Öztürk, H.; Altuncu, S.; Lebedev, V. A.

    2014-02-01

    The results of isotope-geochronological and mineralogical studies of the rocks making up the Kizilcaören fluorite-barite-REE deposit, northwestern Anatolia, Turkey are discussed in the paper. The ore is a constituent of the subvolcanic complex localized in a large fault zone. The complex combines (from earlier to later rocks): (1) phonolite and trachyte stocks, (2) carbonatite and carbonate-silicate dikelike bodies; and (3) fluorite-barite-bastnaesite ore in the form of thick homogeneous veins and cement in breccia. The K-Ar dating of silicate igneous rocks and carbonatites shows that they were formed in the Chattian Age of the Oligocene 25-24 Ma ago. Mineralogical observations show that the ore is the youngest constituent in the rock complex. Supergene alteration deeply transformed ore-bearing rocks, in particular, resulting in leaching of primary minerals, presumably Ca-Mn-Fe carbonates, and in cementation of the residual bastnaesitefluorite framework by Fe and Mn hydroxides. Most of the studied rocks contain pyrochlore, LREE fluorocarbonates, Nb-bearing rutile, Fe-Mg micas, and K-feldspar. The genetic features of the deposit have been considered. In general, the ore-bearing rock complex is compared in the set of rocks and their mineralogy and geochemistry with deposits of the Gallinas Mountains in the United States, the Arshan and Khalyuta deposits in the western Transbaikalia region, and Mushugai-Khuduk deposit in Mongolia. The Kizilcaören deposit represents a variant of postmagmatic mineralization closely related to carbonatite magmatism associated with alkaline and subalkaline intermediate rocks.

  20. Gold in the volcanogenic mercury-rich sulfide deposit Långsele, Skellefte ore district, northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nysten, Per

    1986-04-01

    The mineralogy of gold from a volcanogenic sulfide deposit in northern Sweden (Långsele) was studied. The enrichment of gold and silver in massive ore occurs associated with an intrusive metadolerite vein which can be traced across the ore. The emplacement of this vein mobilized the precious metals together with galena and Pb-Sb sulfosalts into fractures and low pressure zones. A high mercury content at L»ngsele (average 250 ppm) has influenced the gold mineralogy. Thus, gold occurs as Au-Ag amalgam, native gold and rarely as aurostibite (AuSb2). The results of microprobe analyses of amalgam cluster around Au0.45Ag0.45Hg0.10. The composition of ternary amalgam is discussed in connection with the synthetic Au-Ag-Hg system. Furthermore, native gold was found myrmekitically integrown with stibnite which has been interpreted as a breakdown product of aurostibite at low temperature.

  1. Enumeration and characterization of microorganisms associated with the uranium ore deposit at Cigar Lake, Canada; Informal report

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.; Joshi-Tope, G.; Gillow, J.B.; Dodge, C.J.

    1994-03-01

    The high-grade uranium deposit at Cigar Lake, Canada, is being investigated as a natural analog for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste. Geochemical aspects of the site have been studied in detail, but the microbial ecology has not been fully investigated. Microbial populations in an ore sample and in groundwater samples from the vicinity of the ore zone were examined to determine their effect on uranium mobility. Counts of the total number of bacteria and of respiring bacteria were obtained by direct microscopy, and the viable aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were assessed as colony forming units (CFUs) by the dilution plating technique. In addition, the population distribution of denitrifiers, fermenters, iron- and sulfur-oxidizers, iron- and sulfate-reducers, and methanogens was determined by the most probable number (MPN) technique.

  2. [Mechanisms of immune deposit formation in glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Bussolati, B; Camussi, G

    1996-03-01

    Recent experimental studies allowed the identification of several mechanisms of immune deposit formation, which are able to reproduce the morphological and clinical pattern of human glomerulonephritis. Moreover, it was shown that most of the lesions considered, in the past, as due to circulating immune complexes (IC), are instead caused by the "in situ" formation of IC. As a result of these studies, the following schematic classification was proposed: 1) immune deposits formed by glomerular localization of IC primarily formed in the circulation; 2) immune deposits formed "in situ" by reaction of circulating antibodies with fixed structural antigens; 3) immune deposits formed "in situ" by antibodies reactive with movable structural antigens; 4) immune deposits formed "in situ" by antibodies reactive with sequestered antigens leaking out of tissues; 5) IC formed "in situ" by antibodies reactive with exogenous or non-glomerular endogenous antigens planted in the glomeruli; 6) ANCA-associated glomerular disease.

  3. Ore mineralogy of the Serra Pelada Au-Pd-Pt deposit, Carajás, Brazil and implications for ore-forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berni, Gabriel V.; Heinrich, Christoph A.; Lobato, Lydia M.; Wall, Vic

    2016-08-01

    Serra Pelada is a world-class hydrothermal Au-Pd-Pt deposit located at the eastern border of the Amazon craton, northern Brazil. The rocks at Serra Pelada have experienced intense tropical weathering for about 70 Ma, but drill core samples preserve the primary mineralogy and hydrothermal alteration features, with extreme grades of Au, Pd and Pt individually reaching hundreds of parts per million (ppm) by weight. Mineralization at Serra Pelada occurs in hydrothermally altered metasiltstones and dolomitic metasandstones at the hinge zone of a recumbent syncline, comprising zones of hematite, chlorite-carbon, argillic, and siliceous alteration. The main hydrothermal gangue minerals are quartz, kaolinite, sericite, amesite, hematite, monazite, florencite and variable amounts of highly reflective carbonaceous matter. Hydrothermal carbon input is evident from precipitated carbon occurring along crenulation planes and veinlets associated with the precious metals. Ore and accessory minerals include a variety of sulphide, selenide, arsenide, sulphate and oxide minerals, including gold with variable metal contents, palladian gold, fischesserite, sudovikovite, sperrylite, selenian braggite, isomertieite, mertieite-II and secondary Au-Pt-Pd alloys. The composition of fischesserite varies from the ideal formula (Ag3AuSe2) towards a more Ag-rich composition, indicating a disordered solid solution form that is stable only above 260 °C, consistent with the high thermal maturity of associated carbonaceous matter approaching graphite. Primary ore and gangue minerals at Serra Pelada comprise a suite of elements that are best transported in oxidising conditions and precipitated upon reduction. This suggests that fluid mixing between a highly oxidised (metal carrier) and a reduced fluid was a key process for high-grade noble metal precipitation at Serra Pelada.

  4. The importance of dissolved free oxygen during formation of sandstone-type uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granger, Harry Clifford; Warren, C.G.

    1979-01-01

    One factor which distinguishes t, he genesis of roll-type uranium deposits from the Uravan Mineral Belt and other sandstone-type uranium deposits may be the presence and concentration of dissolved free oxygen in the ore-forming. solutions. Although dissolved oxygen is a necessary prerequisite for the formation of roll-type deposits, it is proposed that a lack of dissolved oxygen is a prerequisite for the Uravan deposits. Solutions that formed both types of deposits probably had a supergene origin and originated as meteoric water in approximate equilibrium with atmospheric oxygen. Roll-type deposits were formed where the Eh dropped abruptly following consumption of the oxygen by iron sulfide minerals and creation of kinetically active sulfur species that could reduce uranium. The solutions that formed the Uravan deposits, on the other hand, probably first equilibrated with sulfide-free ferrous-ferric detrital minerals and fossil organic matter in the host rock. That is, the uraniferous solutions lost their oxygen without lowering their Eh enough to precipitate uranium. Without oxygen, they then. became incapable of oxidizing iron sulfide minerals. Subsequent localization and formation of ore bodies from these oxygen-depleted solutions, therefore, was not necessarily dependent on large reducing capacities.

  5. Metallogeny of the northeastern Pacific Rim: an example of the distribution of ore deposits along a growing continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldfarb, R.J.; Hart, C.J.; Mortensen, J.K.; Weber, Graeme

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of mineral deposits within northwestern North America (Alaska, Yukon, and northern British Columbia) allows for an in-depth examination of the metallogenic patterns of a growing continental margin. A more complete understanding of the tectonic evolution of this part of the Pacific Rim, achieved over the last 15 to 20 years, now allows for the placement of ore systems into a well-defined plate tectonic framework. Ore deposits older than about 185 Ma represent hydrothermal systems that were active in the platform/shelf environment of ancestral North America's miogeocline or hydrothermal systems developed in oceanic arcs and continental fragments more distal to the craton. These include important SEDEX, VMS, and pre-accretionary porphyry deposits. In contrast, most mineral deposits younger than about 185 Ma were formed within the growing Cordilleran orogen, as terranes were accreted to the continental margin during interactions between the North America and Pacific/Farallon/Kula plates. Such syn- to post-accretionary mineralised systems include many large lode gold and porphyry/skarn systems.

  6. Formation and resulfidization of a South Texas roll-type uranium deposit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldhaber, Martin B.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Rye, Robert O.

    1979-01-01

    Core samples from a roll type uranium deposit in Live Oak County, south Texas have been studied and results are reported for Se, Mo, FeS2 and organic-carbon distribution, sulfide mineral petrology, and sulfur isotopic composition of iron-disulfide phases. In addition, sulfur isotopic compositions of dissolved sulfate and sulfide from the modern ground water within the ore bearing sand have been studied. The suite of elements in the ore sand and their geometric relationships throughout the deposit are those expected for typical roll-type deposits with well-developed oxidation-reduction interfaces. However, iron-disulfide minerals are abundant in the altered tongue, demonstrating that this interval has been sulfidized after mineralization (resulfidized or rereduced). Iron disulfide minerals in the rereduced interval differ mineralogically and isotopically from those throughout the remainder of the deposit. The resulfidized sand contains dominantly pyrite that is enriched in 34S, whereas the sand beyond the altered tongue contains abundant marcasite that is enriched in the light isotope, 32S. Textural relationships between pyrite and marcasite help to establish relative timing of iron disulfide formation. In reduced rock outside the altered tongue, three distinct generations of iron disulfide are present. The oldest of these generations consists largely of pyrite with lesser amounts of marcasite. A major episode of marcasite formation contemporaneous with ore genesis postdates the oldest pyrite generation but predates a younger pyrite generation. Resulfidization probably led to the final pyrite stage recognized beyond the altered tongue. Stable isotope data establish that the source of sulfur for the resulfidization was fault-leaked H2S probably derived from the Edwards Limestone of Cretaceous age which underlies the deposit. The deposit formed in at least two stages: (1) a pre-ore process of host rock sulfidization which produced disseminated pyrite as the dominant

  7. Influence of Mineralogical Characteristics of Iron Ore on Formation and Flow of Liquid Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Bo; Wu, Sheng-li; Zhang, Guo-liang

    The mineralogical characteristics of iron ores can influence their high temperature sintering performance. In this study, eight iron ore samples from Brazil, Australia, and South Africa were characterized by their chemical composition, mineral types, particle morphology, and gangue dispersity. Meanwhile the influence rules between the mineralogical characteristics and the high temperature characteristics were evaluated and analyzed. The results showed that the effect of SiO2 on assimilation characteristic of iron ores was relatively complex, Al2O3 and LOI of iron ores had negative correlation with assimilation temperature of iron ores, the dense slab-flaky mineral granule restrained to the assimilation characteristics of iron ores; liquid phase of iron ores with high SiO2 content and low Al2O3 content had high fluidity, and the higher dispersity of gangue minerals in iron ores was good to the fluidity of liquid phase.

  8. Mineralogy and chemical composition of VMS deposits of northern Apennine ophiolites, Italy: evidence for the influence of country rock type on ore composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccarini, F.; Garuti, G.

    2008-09-01

    In the ophiolites of the Italian northern Apennines, mantle rocks were exposed on the seafloor and eroded prior to the extrusion of pillow basalt and the deposition of pelagic sediments. Various types of VMS deposits occur at different stratigraphic positions in the ophiolite sequence. Stockwork-vein and seafloor-stratiform ore bodies are associated with serpentinized mantle peridotite and serpentinite breccia. A second group of sulfide deposits consist of crosscutting stockwork or conformable stratabound ore bodies emplaced into the pillow basalt, and seafloor-stratiform deposits located at the top of the volcanic pile, in contact with the sedimentary cover. Geochemical and mineralogical differences are observed in the ore and gangue assemblages of the deposits that were formed before the outflow of pillow basalt, and those precipitated during and after basalt extrusion. Compared with basalt-hosted sulfide deposits, the ores associated with serpentinite have a higher Cu/Zn ratio due to a low modal proportion of sphalerite and are enriched in the compatible elements Ni, Cr, and Mg. The Co and Ni of the ores reflect those of pyrite. The Co/Ni ratios of pyrite range from 0.29 to 1.79 (av. = 0.74) in serpentinite-hosted deposits and from 1.09 to 8.0 (av. = 2.59) in basalt-hosted deposits. The composition of chlorite varies from Cr-rich, Mg-clinochlore, in serpentinite-hosted deposits, to Fe-clinochlore with relatively high Mn contents, in basalt-hosted deposits. The sulfides in serpentinite contain accessory chromite that is compositionally similar to chromian spinels from abyssal peridotites. The observed geochemical variations among the various ore types are due to the interaction of the ore-forming fluids with different types of country rock (ultramafic vs. mafic), which involves hydrothermal leaching of metals from the substrate, rock-fluid reactions at the site of ore deposition and the mechanical transfer of detrital material from the country rock to the ore

  9. Learning characteristic natural gamma shale marker signatures in iron ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, D.; Duuring, P.; Holden, E. J.; Wedge, D.; Horrocks, T.

    2017-09-01

    Uncertainty in the location of stratigraphic boundaries in stratiform deposits has a direct impact on the uncertainty of resource estimates. The interpretation of stratigraphic boundaries in banded iron formation (BIF)-hosted deposits in the Hamersley province of Western Australia is made by recognizing shale markers which have characteristic signatures from natural gamma wireline logs. This paper presents a novel application of a probabilistic sequential model, named a continuous profile model, which is capable of jointly modelling the uncertainty in the amplitude and alignment of characteristic signatures. We demonstrate the accuracy of this approach by comparing three models that incorporate varying intensities of distortion and alignment in their ability to correctly identify a shale band of the West Angelas member of the Wittenoom Formation which overlies the Marra Mamba Iron Formation in the Hamersley Basin. Our experiments show that the proposed approach recovers 98.72% of interpreted shale band intervals and importantly quantifies the uncertainty in scale and alignment that contribute to probabilistic interpretations of stratigraphic boundaries.

  10. Formation and characterization of metallic iron grains in coal-based reduction of oolitic iron ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yong-sheng; Han, Yue-xin; Li, Yan-feng; Li, Yan-jun

    2017-02-01

    To reveal the formation and characteristics of metallic iron grains in coal-based reduction, oolitic iron ore was isothermally reduced in various reduction times at various reduction temperatures. The microstructure and size of the metallic iron phase were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and a Bgrimm process mineralogy analyzer. In the results, the reduced Fe separates from the ore and forms metallic iron protuberances, and then the subsequent reduced Fe diffuses to the protuberances and grows into metallic iron grains. Most of the metallic iron grains exist in the quasi-spherical shape and inlaid in the slag matrix. The cumulative frequency of metallic iron grain size is markedly influenced by both reduction time and temperature. With increasing reduction temperature and time, the grain size of metallic iron obviously increases. According to the classical grain growth equation, the growth kinetic parameters, i.e., time exponent, growth activation energy, and pre-exponential constant, are estimated to be 1.3759 ± 0.0374, 103.18 kJ·mol-1, and 922.05, respectively. Using these calculated parameters, a growth model is established to describe the growth behavior of metallic iron grains.

  11. Lead-isotopic, sulphur-isotopic, and trace-element studies of galena from the Silesian-Cracow Zn-Pb ores, polymetallic veins from the Gory Swietokrzyskie MTS, and the Myszkow porphyry copper deposit, Poland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, S.E.; Vaughn, R.B.; Gent, C.A.; Hopkins, R.T.

    1996-01-01

    Lead-isotopic data on galena samples collected from a paragenetically constrained suite of samples from the Silesian-Cracow ore district show no regional or paragenetically controlled lead-isotopic trends within the analytical reproducibility of the measurements. Furthermore, the new lead-isotopic data agree with previously reported lead-isotopic results (R. E. Zartman et al., 1979). Sulfur-isotopic analyses of ores from the Silesian-Cracow district as well as from vein ore from the Gory Swietokrzyskie Mts. and the Myszkow porphyry copper deposit, when coupled with trace-element data from the galena samples, clearly discriminate different hydrothermal ore-forming events. Lead-isotopic data from the Permian and Miocene evaporite deposits in Poland indicate that neither of these evaporite deposits were a source of metals for the Silesian-Cracow district ores. Furthermore, lead-isotopic data from these evaporite deposits and the shale residues from the Miocene halite samples indicate that the crustal evolution of lead in the central and western European platform in southern Poland followed normal crustal lead-isotopic growth, and that the isotopic composition of crustal lead had progressed beyond the lead-isotopic composition of lead in the Silesian-Cracow ores by Permian time. Thus, Mesozoic and Tertiary sedimentary flysch rocks can be eliminated as viable source rocks for the metals in the Silesian-Cracow Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) deposits. The uniformity of the isotopic composition of lead in the Silesian-Cracow ores, when coupled with the geologic evidence that mineralization must post-date Late Jurassic faulting (E. Gorecka, 1991), constrains the geochemical nature of the source region. The source of the metals is probably a well-mixed, multi-cycle molasse sequence of sedimentary rocks that contains little if any Precambrian metamorphic or granitic clasts (S. E. Church, R. B. Vaughn, 1992). If ore deposition was post Late Jurassic (about 150 m. y.) or later

  12. Spatial and temporal distribution of Cu-Au-Mo ore deposits along the western Tethyan convergent margin: a link with the 3D subduction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menant, A.; Bertrand, G.; Loiselet, C.; Guillou-Frottier, L.; Jolivet, L.

    2012-12-01

    Emplacement conditions of mineralized systems in subduction and post-subduction environments and the sources of metals such as Cu, Mo and Au have been considered in the past. However, despite their importance in exploration strategies at the continental scale, interrelationships between distribution of ore systems and subduction dynamics are still partly unclear. Along the western Tethyan convergent margin, where Tertiary subduction history is well constrained, porphyry, epithermal and skarn ore deposits show a variable evolution of their spatial distribution. Using different and complementary database on European and Middle East ore deposits, three metallogenic episodes have been highlighted: (1) a late Cretaceous - Paleocene phase characterized by a copper mineralization within the Balkan chain and in the Kaçkar mountains (eastern Turkey), (2) an Eocene phase with a few copper ore deposits in eastern Turkey and small Caucasia and (3) an Oligocene - Neogene phase with a more southern distribution along the margin and mainly constituted by epithermal Au systems in the west (Carpathians, Rhodope, Aegean and western Turkey) and by porphyry copper deposits in the east (Zagros). These changes are suspected to be controlled by complex and evolving subduction dynamics. Using paleogeographic tools, it turned out that, in the eastern Mediterranean area, the late Cretaceous - Paleocene and Oligocene - Neogene metallogenic episodes are coeval with a significant decrease of the Africa - Eurasia convergence rate, from about 1.5 to 0.4 cm/yr. Indeed, compressional tectonics in the volcanic arc domain, associated with a high convergent rate, promote the storage of large volumes of metal-rich magma and the development of an extensive MASH (melting, assimilation, storage and homogenization) zone. When this convergence rate decreases, a stress relaxation occurs in the overriding crust, inducing the ascent of a sufficient flux of this fertile magma and allowing the formation of

  13. Boron isotope evidence for the involvement of non-marine evaporites in the origin of the Broken Hill ore deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, J.F.; Palmer, M.R.; Stevens, B.P.J.

    1989-01-01

    IDENTIFYING the palaeogeographic setting and mode of origin of stratabound ore deposits can be difficult in high-grade metamorphic terranes, where the effects of metamorphism may obscure the nature of the protoliths. Here we report boron isotope data for tourmalines from the early Proterozoic Broken Hill block, in Australia, which hosts giant lead-zinc-silver sulphide deposits. With one exception the 11B/10B ratios are lower than those for all other tourmalines from massive sulphide deposits and tour-malinites elsewhere in the world. We propose that these low ratios reflect leaching of boron from non-marine evaporitic borates by convecting hydrothermal fluids associated with early Proterozoic continental rifting. A possible modern analogue is the Salton Sea geothermal field in California. ?? 1989 Nature Publishing Group.

  14. Tension vein arrays in progressive strain: complex but predictable architecture, and major hosts of ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laing, W. P.

    2004-06-01

    Most en échelon vein arrays are extensional and can be termed tension vein arrays (TVAs). TVAs in major fault and shear zones (FSZs) are subject to progressive deformation. This deforms the initial TVA (whose geometry is well documented in the literature), via discrete stages; first into progressively more complex architecture, involving folding of the tension veins, then into progressively more simple architecture, ultimately forming pipes. During this progression the TVA axis (new definition) rotates within the shear plane from normal, to parallel, to the displacement vector. The deforming TVA axis has simpler geometry than the complex tension veins, and it can be employed to precisely track the deformation state of the FSZ, its displacement vector, and shear sense, through all the strain stages. Five structural-metasomatic stages are defined by discrete steps in the strain evolution. TVAs are difficult to recognise, and are under-recognised, in ore systems for a number of inherent geological reasons. Orebodies founded on dilation form parallel to the TVA axis, which is also parallel to dilational jogs in the parent FSZ. Orebodies formed early in the FSZ history are normal to the displacement vector, and in progressive shear rotate with the TVA axis toward the displacement vector; orebodies formed late in the FSZ history overprint apparently complex to 'chaotic' vein stockwork, which nevertheless has analysable geometry. TVA-hosted orebodies are not necessarily parallel to the displacement vector of the host FSZ, but occupy elongate orientations over a 90° range within the FSZ. Large orebodies are favourably developed in TVAs in unfoliated FSZs (type 1 shear zones), which may form fluid 'superhighways'. Type 1 shear zones form in predictable circumstances involving particularly host rocktype and crustal position. Strike-slip FSZs possess a downdip TVA axis and are especially able to tap deep crustal fluid. TVA-hosted orebodies form a major deposit style

  15. Deposit formation in hydrocarbon rocket fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roback, R.; Szetela, E. J.; Spadaccini, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study deposit formation in hydrocarbon fuels under flow conditions that exist in high-pressure, rocket engine cooling systems. A high pressure fuel coking test apparatus was designed and developed and was used to evaluate thermal decomposition (coking) limits and carbon deposition rates in heated copper tubes for two hydrocarbon rocket fuels, RP-1 and commercial-grade propane. Tests were also conducted using JP-7 and chemically-pure propane as being representative of more refined cuts of the baseline fuels. A parametric evaluation of fuel thermal stability was performed at pressures of 136 atm to 340 atm, bulk fuel velocities in the range 6 to 30 m/sec, and tube wall temperatures in the range 422 to 811 K. Results indicated that substantial deposit formation occurs with RP-1 fuel at wall temperatures between 600 and 800 K, with peak deposit formation occurring near 700 K. No improvements were obtained when deoxygenated JP-7 fuel was substituted for RP-1. The carbon deposition rates for the propane fuels were generally higher than those obtained for either of the kerosene fuels at any given wall temperature. There appeared to be little difference between commercial-grade and chemically-pure propane with regard to type and quantity of deposit. Results of tests conducted with RP-1 indicated that the rate of deposit formation increased slightly with pressure over the range 136 atm to 340 atm. Finally, lating the inside wall of the tubes with nickel was found to significantly reduce carbon deposition rates for RP-1 fuel.

  16. The Balmat-Edwards zinc-lead deposits-synsedimentary ore from Mississippi valley-type fluids.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whelan, J.F.; Rye, R.O.; Delorraine, W.

    1984-01-01

    The Balmat-Edwards Zn-Pb district in New York is in Mid-Proterozoic Grenville marbles. Tabular to podiform, generally conformable massive sphalerite-galena orebodies occur at various horizons in the approx 1 km-thick marbles. Metamorphism obscured or obliterated most primary characteristics, whose reconstruction is attempted through detailed S, C, and O isotope studies of the Fowler orebody, and trace element and S isotope studies of sphalerite concentrates and composite ore samples from 22 orebodies. Sulphur isotope data reflect equilibration at near peak metamorphism with some indication of re-equilibration during retrograde metamorphism. The carbon and oxygen isotope composition of gangue carbonates suggests derivation from the host marbles. The oxygen isotope composition of gangue quartz is compatible with a chert origin or metamorphism-equilibration with other minerals. Sulphur and lead isotopes and sulphide mineralogy suggests that the ore fluids were evolved basin brines, chemically like those responsible for Mississippi Valley-type deposits. The large stratigraphic span (> 600 m) of the Balmat orebodies may be due to basin dewatering of million-year intervals. Stratigraphically increasing 34S values of evaporite-anhydrite are postulated to record hydrothermal events and to imply bacterial sulphate reduction on an unusually large scale. Such a stratigraphic increase may be a general exploration guide where sediment-hosted exhalative deposits or Mississippi Valley-type deposits occur.-G.J.N.

  17. Ores and Climate Change - Primary Shareholders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Holly J.; Hannah, Judith L.

    2015-04-01

    Many in the economic geology community concern themselves with details of ore formation at the deposit scale, whether tallying fluid inclusion data to get at changes in ore-forming fluids or defining structures that aid and abet mineralization. These compilations are generally aimed at interpretation of events at the site of ore formation, with the goal being assignment of the deposit to a sanctioned ore deposit model. While providing useful data, this approach is incomplete and does not, by itself, serve present-day requirements for true interdisciplinary science. The ore-forming environment is one of chaos and disequilibrium at nearly all scales (Stein, 2014). Chaos and complexity are documented by variably altered rocks, veins or disseminated mineralization with multi-generational fluid histories, erratic and unusual textures in host rocks, and the bitumen or other hydrocarbon products entwined within many ore deposits. This should give pause to our drive for more data as a means to find "the answer". The answer lies in the kind of data collected and more importantly, in the way we interpret those data. Rather than constructing an ever-increasing catalog of descriptive mutations on sanctioned ore deposit models (e.g., IOGC or Iron-Oxide Copper Gold deposits), the way forward is to link source and transport of metals, sulfur, and organic material with regional and ultimately whole Earth chemical evolution. Important experimental work provides chemical constraints in controlled and behaved environments. To these data, we add imagination and interpretation, always tying back to field observations. In this paper, several key points are made by way of ore deposit examples: (1) many IOCG deposits are outcomes of profound changes in the chemistry of the Earth's surface, in the interplay of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere; (2) the redox history of Fe in deep earth may be ultimately expressed in the ore-forming sequence; and (3) the formation of

  18. Studies into the formation of PBDEs and PBDD/Fs in the iron ore sintering process.

    PubMed

    Drage, D S; Aries, E; Harrad, S

    2014-07-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PBDD/Fs) were detected in stack emissions from UK sinter plants. The sum of 36 PBDE congeners was measured at a mean concentration of 295 ng/N m(3) with a standard deviation of 96 ng/N m(3). The mean PBDD/F concentrations were 0.14 ng WHO-TEQ/m(3) (range=0.03-0.39). PBDD/F emission concentrations were approximately ten times lower than their PCDD/F homologues. To understand the possible formation mechanisms of brominated organic species in iron ore sintering, both full-scale and laboratory experiments using an experimental sintering process were carried out. A complete PBDE mass balance was undertaken for a full scale sinter plant showing that PBDEs were already present in the raw materials such as iron ores and coke breeze and that a significant proportion of the PBDE inputs were actually destroyed during the process. A number of controlled experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale sintering apparatus (sinter pot). These were designed to investigate: (a) mass balance of PBDEs during sintering, (b) the relationship between the availability of bromide (as KBr) and PBDE emissions, and (c) the influence of the availability of both bromide and PBDEs on PBDD/F formation. As observed in the full scale plant, the PBDEs already present in the raw materials were mostly destroyed during the process (79-96%) for all sinter pot experiments. Increasing amounts of KBr in the raw sinter mix did not result in a significant increase in PBDE formation suggesting that there was no PBDE formation in sintering via de novo synthesis. No relationship was observed between PBDE inputs and PBDD/F emissions indicating that PBDEs did not act as precursors for PBDD/Fs formation. Finally, PBDD/F formation was enhanced substantially with increasing amounts of KBr suggesting that their formation mechanism was similar to that of PCDD/Fs via de novo synthesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  19. Mineralogy, geochemistry and stratigraphy of the Maslovsky Pt-Cu-Ni sulfide deposit, Noril'sk Region, Russia. Implications for relationship of ore-bearing intrusions and lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivolutskaya, Nadezhda Alexandrovna; Sobolev, Alexandr Vladimirovich; Snisar, Sergey Grigor'evich; Gongalskiy, Bronislav Iosiphovich; Kuzmin, Dmitry Vladimirovich; Hauff, Folkmar; Tushentsova, Irina Nikolaevna; Svirskaya, Natalya Mikhailovna; Kononkova, Natalya Nikolaevna; Schlychkova, Tatyana B.

    2012-01-01

    We report new data on the stratigraphy, mineralogy and geochemistry of the rocks and ores of the Maslovsky Pt-Cu-Ni sulfide deposit which is thought to be the southwestern extension of the Noril'sk 1 intrusion. Variations in the Ta/Nb ratio of the gabbro-dolerites hosting the sulfide mineralization and the compositions of their pyroxene and olivine indicate that these rocks were produced by two discrete magmatic pulses, which gave rise to the Northern and Southern Maslovsky intrusions that together host the Maslovsky deposit. The Northern intrusion is located inside the Tungusska sandstones and basalt of the Ivakinsky Formation. The Southern intrusion cuts through all of the lower units of the Siberian Trap tuff-lavas, including the Lower Nadezhdinsky Formation; demonstrating that the ore-bearing intrusions of the Noril'sk Complex post-date that unit. Rocks in both intrusions have low TiO2 and elevated MgO contents (average mean TiO2 <1 and MgO = 12 wt.%) that are more primitive than the lavas of the Upper Formations of the Siberian Traps which suggests that the ore-bearing intrusions result from a separate magmatic event. Unusually high concentrations of both HREE (Dy+Yb+Er+Lu) and Y (up to 1.2 and 2.1 ppm, respectively) occur in olivines (Fo79.5 and 0.25% NiO) from picritic and taxitic gabbro-dolerites with disseminated sulfide mineralization. Thus accumulation of HREE, Y and Ni in the melts is correlated with the mineral potential of the intrusions. The TiO2 concentration in pyroxene has a strong negative correlation with the Mg# of both host mineral and Mg# of host rock. Sulfides from the Northern Maslovsky intrusion are predominantly chalcopyrite-pyrrhotite-pentlandite with subordinate and minor amounts of cubanite, bornite and millerite and a diverse assemblage of rare precious metal minerals including native metals (Au, Ag and Pd), Sn-Pd-Pt-Bi-Pb compounds and Fe-Pt alloys. Sulfides from the Southern Maslovsky intrusion have δ 34S = 5-6‰ up to 10.8‰ in

  20. Hydrodynamic modeling of magmatic-hydrothermal activity at submarine arc volcanoes, with implications for ore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruen, Gillian; Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Heinrich, Christoph A.; de Ronde, Cornel E. J.

    2014-10-01

    Subduction-related magmas have higher volatile contents than mid-ocean ridge basalts, which affects the dynamics of associated submarine hydrothermal systems. Interaction of saline magmatic fluids with convecting seawater may enhance ore metal deposition near the seafloor, making active submarine arcs a preferred modern analogue for understanding ancient massive sulfide deposits. We have constructed a quantitative hydrological model for sub-seafloor fluid flow based on observations at Brothers volcano, southern Kermadec arc, New Zealand. Numerical simulations of multi-phase hydrosaline fluid flow were performed on a two-dimensional cross-section cutting through the NW Caldera and the Upper Cone sites, two regions of active venting at the Brothers volcanic edifice, with the former hosting sulfide mineralization. Our aim is to explore the flow paths of saline magmatic fluids released from a crystallizing magma body at depth and their interaction with seawater circulating through the crust. The model includes a 3 × 2km2 sized magma chamber emplaced at ∼ 2.5 km beneath the seafloor connected to the permeable cone via a ∼ 200 m wide feeder dike. During the simulation, a magmatic fluid was temporarily injected from the top of the cooling magma chamber into the overlying convection system, assuming hydrostatic conditions and a static permeability distribution. The simulations predict a succession of hydrologic regimes in the subsurface of Brothers volcano, which can explain some of the present-day hydrothermal observations. We find that sub-seafloor phase separation, inferred from observed vent fluid salinities, and the temperatures of venting at Brothers volcano can only be achieved by input of a saline magmatic fluid at depth, consistent with chemical and isotopic data. In general, our simulations show that the transport of heat, water, and salt from magmatic and seawater sources is partly decoupled. Expulsion of magmatic heat and volatiles occurs within the first

  1. Physicochemical conditions of deposition and origin of carbonate-hosted base metal sulfide mineralization, Thermes ore-field, Rhodope Massif, northeastern Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogeropoulos, S. I.; Kilias, S. P.; Arvanitidis, N. D.

    1996-07-01

    Vein and stratabound base metal sulfide mineralization of the Thermes ore-field, Rhodope Massif, NE Greece, is hosted in marbles. The Thermes area is a structurally complex, E W-trending zone consisting of felsic gneisses alternating with amphibolites, amphibole-biotite, and biotite gneisses, and marbles. These rocks have undergone amphibolite facies metamorphism (5 7 kbar, 580 ° 620 °C), in Upper Cretaceous to Eocene times, and were subsequently retrograded to greenschist facies metamorphism of Miocene age. Granitoids of Oligocene age, and volcanic rocks of Eocene-Oligocene age, crosscut the metamorphic rocks. Two major base metal sulfide ore varieties occur in the Thermes ore-field. The first comprises brecciated vein Pb-Zn mineralization, related to NNW- and NNE-trending faults. The second comprises stratabound (manto) polymetallic, and Pb-Zn replacement ores with associated veins. On the basis of ore geochemistry, as well as field and textural evidence, these two ore varieties form part of a vein associated skarn-replacement base metal sulfide ore system. Based on fluid inclusion data in quartz, together with the iron content of sphalerites and existing lead and sulfur isotope data, it is suggested that after the cessation of the regional amphibolite facies metamorphism circulating evolved meteoric waters, probably with magmatic fluid contributions, deposited sulfide ores at temperatures of 200 ° 400 °C, and pressures of less than 300 bar. Ore was deposited as a result of increase in pH of the mineralizing fluids due to fluid-rock interaction, and adiabatic cooling and/or simple cooling accompanying fluid boiling. Thermochemical considerations indicate a pH increase from about 4 to 7 and a decrease in f S2 and f O2.

  2. Chalcophile element (Ni, Cu, PGE, and Au) variations in the Tamarack magmatic sulfide deposit in the Midcontinent Rift System: implications for dynamic ore-forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranovic, Valentina; Ripley, Edward M.; Li, Chusi; Rossell, Dean

    2016-10-01

    correlation between Pt and Pd, and between individual IPGE. At a given Pt or Pd content, however, the semi-massive sulfide ores have higher IPGE contents than the disseminated sulfide samples. Modeling results show that the variations in PGE tenors (metals in recalculated 100 % sulfide) in the Tamarack magmatic sulfide deposit are mainly controlled by variable R factors (magma/sulfide-liquid mass ratios) during sulfide-liquid segregation and subsequent monosulfide solid solution (MSS) fractionation during cooling. The initial contents of Ir, Pt, and Pd in the parental magma, estimated from the metal tenors of the disseminated sulfides, are 0.2, 2, and 1.8 ppb, respectively, which are ˜1/5 of the values for the PGE-undepleted primitive basalts of the Midcontinent Rift System. The variations of PGE tenors in the semi-massive and massive sulfide ores can be explained by MSS fractional crystallization from sulfide liquids. Extreme variations in the PGE contents of the massive sulfides may also in part reflect metal mobility during post-crystallization hydrothermal processes. The higher PGE tenors for the disseminated sulfides in the CGO dike relative to those in the FGO Intrusion are consistent with formation in a dynamic conduit where the early sulfide liquids left in the conduit by the FGO magma were subsequently upgraded by the subsequent surge of the CGO magma. The relatively low PGE tenors for the semi-massive and massive sulfides can be explained by lack of such an upgrading process for the sulfide due to their distal locations in a migrating conduit.

  3. Paleontology and deposition of the Phosphoria Formation.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wardlaw, B.R.; Collinson, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Phosphoria Formation and related rocks were deposited in an interior sag basin developed in the Cordilleran miogeocline of western North America. Deposition can be characterized as a fringing bank complex on a carbonate ramp. Conodont-brachiopod biostratigraphy provides a sufficient relative time framework for correlation of the many units. These age correlations and the distribution of fossils, plus the biofacies of conodonts and brachiopods in particular, indicate that phosphate deposition was a cool-water, deeper ramp facies that transgressed over the carbonate bank twice, representing the Meade Peak and Retort Phosphatic Shale Members of the Phosphoria Formation. Conodont data that substantiate the above are presented, and a new genus and species, Sweetina triticum, is described. -Authors

  4. Geophysical model of the Cu-Mo porphyry ore deposit at Copper Flat Mine, Hillsboro, Sierra County, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Adrian Emmanuel Gutierrez

    A 3D gravity model of the Copper Flat Mine was performed as part of the exploration of new resources in at the mine. The project is located in the Las Animas Mining District in Sierra County, New Mexico. The mine has been producing ore since 1877 and is currently owned by the New Mexico Copper Corporation, which plans o bringing the closed copper mine back into production with innovation and a sustainable approach to mining development. The Project is located on the Eastern side of the Arizona-Sonora-New Mexico porphyry copper Belt of Cretaceous age. Copper Flat is predominantly a Cretaceous age stratovolcano composed mostly of quartz monzonite. The quartz monzonite was intruded by a block of andesite alter which a series of latite dikes creating veining along the topography where the majority of the deposit. The Copper Flat deposit is mineralized along a breccia pipe where the breccia is the result of auto-brecciation due to the pore pressure. There have been a number of geophysical studies conducted at the site. The most recent survey was a gravity profile on the area. The purpose of the new study is the reinterpretation of the IP Survey and emphasizes the practical use of the gravity geophysical method in evaluating the validity of the previous survey results. The primary method used to identify the deposit is gravity in which four Talwani models were created in order to created a 3D model of the ore body. The Talwani models have numerical integration approaches that were used to divide every model into polygons. The profiles were sectioned into polygons; each polygon was assigning a specific density depending on the body being drawn. Three different gridding techniques with three different filtering methods were used producing ten maps prior to the modeling, these maps were created to establish the best map to fit the models. The calculation of the polygons used an exact formula instead of the numerical integration of the profile made with a Talwani approach. A

  5. Evolution of volcanic rocks and associated ore deposits in the Marysvale volcanic field, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Charles G.; Steven, Thomas A.; Rowley, Peter D.; Naeser, Charles W.; Mehnert, Harald H.; Hedge, Carl E.; Ludwig, Kenneth R.

    1994-01-01

    A geological account on the igneous activity and associated mineral deposition in the volcanic field of Marysvale in Utah is presented. Three episodes (34-22 Ma, 22-14 Ma and 9-5 Ma) involved in the volcanic rock eruption and associated mineralization are described. The first episode is believed to have occurred during the time of tectonic convergence when two contrasting suites of rocks, Mount Dutton Formation and Bullion Canyon Volcanics, erupted concurrently. Mineralization during this period was sparse. In the second episode, change from intermediate to bimodal volcanism occurred. During the third episode, basaltic compositions did not change. Although major element constituent had rhyolites similar to that of the second episode, rhyolites had a marked radiogenic isotope characteristic difference.

  6. Physicochemical formation conditions of silver sulfoselenides at the Rogovik deposit, Northeastern Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravkova, T. V.; Palyanova, G. A.; Kravtsova, R. G.

    2015-07-01

    The chemical compositions of acanthite, naumannite, and associated ore minerals have been studied from the samples of polychronous Au-Ag ores at the Rogovik deposit. The following admixtures have been detected: S in naumannite (0-2.9 wt %), Se in acanthite (0-7.45 wt %), argyrodite (~4.8 wt %), and galena (~3.1 wt %), and Fe in sphalerite (~1.2 wt %). The physicochemical parameters of ore formation have been reconstructed on the basis of mineralogical and geochemical data and thermodynamic calculations. Eh-pH (25°C, 1 bar), log fO2-pH, log fS2- T, log fSe2- T, and log fS2-log fSe2 (100-300°C, 1-300 bars) diagrams for the Ag-S-Se-H2O system with the stability fields of Ag sulfoselenides Ag2S1- x Se x of various composition (step x = 0.25, where 0 ≤ x ≤ 1) have been calculated for the first time. It has been established that Ag sulfoselenides of the naumannite series from polychronous ores of the Rogovik deposit precipitated below 70-133°C under reductive conditions (log fO2 =-65…-50) from near-neutral solutions containing elevated Se and relatively lowered S. It has been established that Ag sulfoselenides of acanthite series were formed later then naumannite but in the same range of log fO2 values at temperatures below 110-177°C from solutions with high S concentration and relatively lowered concentration of Se. The complex composition of the studied Au-Ag ores, whose characteristic feature is extremely variable mineralogy, is confirmed.

  7. Formation and mitigation of PCDD/Fs in iron ore sintering.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Tze Chean; Lu, Liming

    2011-10-01

    The sintering of iron ore is presently a significant industrial source of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) worldwide owing to the fundamental requirement of the operation of a high temperature process to pre-treat fines and to recycle plant by-products arising from the integrated iron and steelworks. The process is a noteworthy contributor of PCDD/F indirectly due to decreasing PCDD/F releases from municipal solid waste incineration. Commonly PCDD/F formation from the process is associated with the addition of oily mill scales although raw material containing a combination of C, Cl and specific metal catalyst has been shown to drastically increase PCDD/F formation in the process. The degenerate graphitic structure of carbon present in coke fuel and soot formed and the chemistry of catalytic metals and Cl are important factors. A review on PCDD/F emission in this process has been carried out, including examination of its formation mechanism, congener distribution, contributing factors and mitigation strategies, with emphasis on the use of inhibiting compound to achieve suppression. A detailed analysis of the de novo and precursor theories of formation and the contributing factor is given since the subject of PCDD/F formation is still controversial. The de novo formation pathway identified in sinter plants and controlled studies performed in the laboratory as well as at pilot-scale are discussed; where appropriate, a comparison is drawn between sintering and other thermal processes emitting PCDD/Fs. Summary of the latest developments in PCDD/F downstream abatement strategies presently employed in full scale industrial plants is provided. Potential inhibiting compounds are discussed in terms of their mode of action and merits under sintering conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The timing of ore formation in southeast Missouri: Rb-Sr glauconite dating at the Magmont mine, Viburnum trend.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stein, H.J.; Kish, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Seven glauconite samples from the Magmont area yield a 359 + or - 22 m.y. Rb-Sr isochron. The Rb/Sr ratios for these seven samples are significantly lower than the ratios for glauconite samples from distant, unmineralized sites. The glauconites from Magmont are postulated to have been affected by the same thermochemical event(s) that produced the SE Missouri ore deposits, and therefore to date that mineralization.-G.J.N.

  9. Lebediny gold deposit, Central Aldan: Mineral parageneses, stages, and formation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovol'skaya, M. G.; Razin, M. V.; Prokof'ev, V. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    The mineral parageneses and succession of their formation are considered for the first time for the Zverevsky, Orekhovy, and Vodonosny ore lodes of the Lebediny gold deposit and the Radostny prospect in the Central Aldan ore district, which are genetically related to the epoch of Mesozoic tectonomagmatic reactivation. The orebodies, represented by two morphological varieties—ribbonlike lodes and steeply dipping veins—are hosted in lower part of the Vendian-Cambrian dolomitic sequence, which is cut through by Mesozoic subalkaline intrusive bodies. The chemistry of fahlore and rare minerals, including native gold and bismuth, altaite, aikinite, tetradymite, and sulfosalts of lillianite series, has been studied. Native gold is related to the late hydrothermal process and occurs in skarn and in quartz-tremolite-sulfide and quartz-carbonate-sulfide veins. The data on stable sulfur (δ34S) isotopes of sulfides, oxygen (δ18O) and carbon (δ13C) isotopes of carbonates, as well as on fluid inclusions in various generations of tremolite and quartz, provide evidence for the heterogeneity of ore-bearing solutions, their relationships to magmatism, the depth of the source feeding each specific lode, and different sources of ore-forming hydrothermal solutions.

  10. Hydrothermal alteration of organic matter in uranium ores, Elliot Lake, Canada: Implications for selected organic-rich deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, D.J.; Nagy, B.; Davis, D.W.

    1993-07-01

    Organic matter in the uraniferous Matinenda Formation, Elliot Lake, is preserved in the forms of syngenetic kerogen and solid bitumen as it is in many of the Oklo uranium deposits and in the Witwatersrand gold-uranium ores. The Elliot Lake kerogen is a vitrinite-like material considered to be remnants of the Precambrian cyanobacterial mats. The kerogen at Elliot Lake has reflectances (in oil) ranging from 2.63-7.31% RO{sub max}, high aromaticity, relatively low (0.41-0.60) atomic H/C ratios, and it contains cryptocrystalline graphite. Bitumen, present primarily as dispersed globules (up to 0.5 mm dia.), has reflectances from 0.72-1.32% RO{sub max}, atomic H/C ratios of 0.71-0.81, and is somewhat less aromatic than the kerogen. Overall similarity in molecular compositions indicates that liquid bitumen was derived from kerogen by processes similar to hydrous pyrolysis. The carbon isotopic composition of kerogen ({minus}15.62 to {minus}24.72%), and the now solid bitumen ({minus}25.91 to {minus}33.00%) are compatible with these processes. Despite having been subjected to several thermal episodes, ca. 2.45 Ga old kerogen of microbiological origin here survived as testimony of the antiquity of life on Earth. U-Pb isotopic data from discrete kerogen grains at Elliot Lake form a scattered array intersecting concordia at 2130 {+-} 100 Ma, correspond to the Nipissing event. U-Pb systems were totally reset by this event. Uranium and lead show subsequently partial mobility, the average of which is indicated by the lower concordia intersect of 550 {+-} 260 Ma. The migrated bitumen contains virtually no uranium and thorium but has a large excess of {sup 206}Pb, which indicates that the once liquid bitumen must have acted as a sink for mobile intermediate decay products of {sup 238}U. Emplacement of the Nipissing diabase may have been responsible for producing the bitumen and, indirectly, for its enrichment in {sup 206}Pb as a result of outgassing of {sup 222}Rn.

  11. The role of impurity ions in the formation of phase composition of Norilsk ore types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashukov, Anatoly; Mashukova, Alla

    2013-04-01

    Using the methods of X-ray and Mössbauer spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, there were studied the samples of Norilsk ore types in order to identify compounds containing Cu and Ni. Depending on elemental composition there were singled out two sample series. Maximum concentration in percentage of selected elements for this series is presented below. 1: Ni (0), Cu (0,42), S (11,2), O (20,2), H (0.02), Fe(46,8), Ca (5,85), Mg (1,75), K (0,47), Na (0). 2: Ni (4,93), Cu (0), S (14,9), O (27,1), H (0,11), Fe (28,1), Ca (14,9), Mg (0), K (0), Na (1,61). The research conducted by using the method of scanning electron microscopy and the X-ray microanalysis showed that iron and sulfur are spread uniformly over the scanned area. Sulfur is absent in the inclusions containing Fe and Ni. There are areas, sizes 8 - 120 microns, strongly enriched by Fe. The inclusions of rectangular and rhomboid shapes sizes 8 - 15 microns contain Ni as the content of Fe increases. There were identified the inclusions having a high content of Cu, with a maximum concentration of Ni. The presence of native elements testifies to the reducing mode of ore formation processes. The phases, containing Cu ? Ni, have a complex composition: pentlandite (FeNiS2), chalcopyrite (CuFeS2), bornite (CuFeS4), nickelhexahydrite (NiSO4 [6H2O]), wroewolfeite (Cu4 (OH) 6 (SO4) • 2H2O), pyrrhotine (Fe7S8), pyrite (FeS2). The position of the absorption lines in the magnetically ordered areas indicates the presence of stoichiometric FeS and CuFeS2. Some of the samples of this group have broadened lines, indicating the existence of various positions of the Fe ions in the sublattices. The ingrowths of CuFeS2 are characterized by the degree of the structure defectiveness, by various impurities, which is reflected in the studied parameters. As regards the other sample series, containing FeS and CuFeS2 in pyrrhotine matrix of Fe 1-xSx, the spectra are the superposition of the unsolved doublet, which shows the

  12. The source of phosphate in the oxidation zone of ore deposits: Evidence from oxygen isotope compositions of pyromorphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmann, Fabian; Keim, Maximilian F.; Oelmann, Yvonne; Teiber, Holger; Marks, Michael A. W.; Markl, Gregor

    2013-12-01

    Pyromorphite (Pb5[PO4]3Cl) is an abundant mineral in oxidized zones of lead-bearing ore deposits and due to its very low solubility product effectively binds Pb during supergene alteration of galena (PbS). The capacity of a soil or near-surface fluid to immobilize dissolved Pb depends critically on the availability of phosphate in this soil or fluid. Potential phosphorus sources in soil include (i) release during biological processes, i.e. leaching from litter/lysis of microbial cells (after intracellular enzyme activity) in soil and hydrolysis from soil organic matter by extracellular enzymes and (ii) inorganic phosphate from the dissolution of apatite in the adjacent basement rocks. Intracellular enzyme activity in plants/microorganisms associated with kinetic fractionation produces an oxygen isotope composition distinctly different from inorganic processes in soil. This study presents the first oxygen isotope data for phosphate (δ18OP) in pyromorphite and a comprehensive data set for apatite from crystalline rocks. We investigated 38 pyromorphites from 26 localities in the Schwarzwald (Southwest Germany) and five samples from localities outside the Schwarzwald in addition to 12 apatite separates from gneissic and granitic host rocks. Pyromorphites had δ18OP values between +10‰ and +19‰, comparable to literature data on δ18OP in the readily available P fraction in soil (resin-extractable P) from which minerals potentially precipitate in soils. δ18OP values below the range of equilibrium isotope fractionation can be attributed either to apatites that formed geochemically (δ18OP of apatites:+6‰ to +9‰) or less likely to biological processes (extracellular enzyme activity). However, for most of our samples isotopic equilibrium with ambient water was indicated, which suggests biological activity. Therefore, we conclude that the majority of pyromorphites in oxidized zones of ore bodies formed from biologically cycled phosphate. This study highlights that

  13. Geology, ore facies and sulfur isotopes geochemistry of the Nudeh Besshi-type volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit, southwest Sabzevar basin, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghfouri, Sajjad; Rastad, Ebrahim; Mousivand, Fardin; Lin, Ye; Zaw, Khin

    2016-08-01

    The southwest Sabzevar basin is placed in the southwestern part of a crustal domain known as the Sabzevar zone, at the north of Central Iranian microcontinent. This basin hosts abundant mineral deposits; particularly of the Mn exhalative and Cu-Zn volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) types. The evolution of this basin is governed by the Neo-tethys oceanic crust subduction beneath the Central Iranian microcontinent and by the resulting continental arc (Sanandaj-Sirjan) and back-arc (Sabzevar-Naien). This evolution followed two major sequences: (I) Lower Late Cretaceous Volcano-Sedimentary Sequence (LLCVSS), which is indicated by fine-grained siliciclastic sediments, gray basic coarse-grained different pyroclastic rocks and bimodal volcanism. During this stage, tuff-hosted stratiform, exhalative Mn deposits (Nudeh, Benesbourd, Ferizy and Goft), oxide Cu deposits (Garab and Ferizy) and Cu-Zn VMS (Nudeh, Chun and Lala) deposits formed. (II) Upper Late Cretaceous Sedimentary Dominated Sequence (ULCSS), including pelagic limestone, marly tuff, silty limestone and marl with minor andesitic tuff rocks. The economically most important Mn (Zakeri and Cheshmeh-sefid) deposits of Sabzevar zone occur within the marly tuff of this sequence. The Nudeh Cu-Zn volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposit is situated in the LLCVSS. The host-rock of deposits consists of alkali olivine basalt flow and tuffaceous silty sandstone. Mineralization occurs as stratiform blanket-like and tabular orebodies. Based on ore body structure, mineralogy, and ore fabric, we recognize three different ore facies in the Nudeh deposit: (1) a stringer zone, consisting of a discordant mineralization of sulfides forming a stockwork of sulfide-bearing quartz veins cutting the footwall volcano-sedimentary rocks; (2) a massive ore, consisting of massive replacement pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite and Friedrichite with magnetite; (3) bedded ore, with laminated to disseminated pyrite, and chalcopyrite

  14. A quantitative model of ground-water flow during formation of tabular sandstone uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, R.F.

    1994-01-01

    Presents a quantitative simulation of regional groundwater flow during uranium deposition in the Westwater Canyon Member and Jackpile Sandstone Member of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in the San Juan basin. Topographic slope, shoreline position, and density contrasts in the lake and pore fluids controlled the directions of flow and recharge-discharge areas. The most important results for uranium ore deposit formation are that regional groundwater discharged throughout the basin, regional discharge was concentrated along the shore line or playa margin, flow was dominantly gravity driven, and compaction dewatering was negligible. A strong association is found between the tabular sandstone uranium deposits and major inferred zones of mixed local and regional groundwater discharge. -from Author

  15. In situ iron isotope ratio determination using UV-femtosecond laser ablation with application to hydrothermal ore formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Ingo; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Schoenberg, Ronny; Steinhoefel, Grit; Markl, Gregor

    2006-07-01

    immediate close range re-precipitation of the oxidized Fe. Abrupt changes are documented for secondary goethite showing a distinct overgrowth that is 0.4‰ lighter than the core of the grain. If indeed Fe isotopes in secondary minerals from hydrothermal ore deposits record the initial isotopic signatures of their precursor minerals, and these in turn record hydrothermal fluid histories, then the tools are in place for a detailed reconstruction of the deposit's genesis. We expect similar observations from other Fe-rich deposits formed at intermediate and low-temperatures (e.g. banded iron formations). Laser ablation now provides us with the spatial resolution that adds a further dimension to our interpretation of stable Fe-isotope fractionation.

  16. The speciation of mercury in hydrothermal systems, with applications to ore deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varekamp, Johan C.; Buseck, Peter R.

    1984-01-01

    Hg in hydrothermal systems is generally thought to be transported as Hg-S complexes. However, the abundance of Hg 0vap, in geothermal emissions suggests that Hg 0eq, is present in the liquid phase of geothermal systems. Calculations for reducing fluids (HS - dominant over SO =4) in equilibrium with cinnabar indicate that Hg 0eq, can be quite abundant relative to other species at temperatures above 200°C. Increasing pH and temperature, and decreasing total S, ionic strength, and pO 2 all promote the abundance of Hg 0eq. When a vapor phase develops from a geothermal liquid, Hg partitions strongly into the vapor as Hg 0vap. Vapor transport at shallow level then results in the formation of Hg halos around shallow aquifers as well as in a flux of Hg to the atmosphere. Hg deposition may occur in response to mixing with oxidizing or acidic water, turning Hg 0eq, into Hg ++, with subsequent cinnabar precipitation. When pyrite is the stable Fe-sulfide, cinnabar solubility is at its lowest, so cinnabar + pyrite assemblages are common. Cinnabar + hematite ± pyrite can precipitate from more oxidized or S-poor water. Hg 0liq, can occur as a primary mineral, in coexistence with all common Fe-sulfides and oxides. Cinnabar ± Hg 0liq cannot coexist with pyrrhotite or magnetite at temperatures between 100° and 250°C. Evidence from Hg deposits indicates that many formed from dilute hydrothermal fluids in which Hg probably occurred as Hg 0eq. In S-rich systems, Hg may occur as Hg-S complexes, and in saline waters it can occur as Hg-Cl complexes.

  17. Significance of the precambrian basement and late Cretaceous thrust nappes on the location of tertiary ore deposits in the Oquirrh Mountains, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tooker, Edwin W.

    2005-01-01

    The Oquirrh Mountains are located in north central Utah, in the easternmost part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, immediately south of the Great Salt Lake. The range consists of a northerly trending alignment of peaks 56 km long. Tooele and Rush Valleys flank the Oquirrh Mountains on the western side and Salt Lake and Cedar Valleys lie on the eastern side. The world class Bingham mine in the central part of the range hosts disseminated copper-bearing porphyry, skarn, base-and precious-metal vein and replacement ore deposits. The district includes the outlying Barneys Canyon disseminated-gold deposits. Disseminated gold in the Mercur mining district in the southern part of the range has become exhausted. The Ophir and Stockton base- and precious-metal mining districts in the range north of Mercur also are inactive. A geologic map of the range (Tooker and Roberts, 1998), available at a scale of 1:50,000, is a summation of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) studies. Information about the range and its mining areas is scattered. This report summarizes map locations, new stratigraphic and structural data, and reexamined data from an extensive published record. Unresolved controversial geological interpretations are considered, and, for the first time, the complete geological evidence provides a consistent regional basis for the location of the ore deposits in the range. The geological setting and the siting of mineral deposits in the Oquirrh Mountains began with the formation of a Precambrian craton. Exposures of folded Proterozoic basement rocks of the craton, in the Wasatch Mountains east of Salt Lake City, were accreted and folded onto an Archean crystalline rock terrane. The accretion suture lies along the north flank of the Uinta Mountains. The western part of the accreted block was offset to northern Utah along a north-trending fault lying approximately along the Wasatch Front (Nelson and others, 2002), thereby creating a prominant basement barrier or

  18. The roles of organic matter in the formation of uranium deposits in sedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spirakis, C.S.

    1996-01-01

    Because reduced uranium species have a much smaller solubility than oxidized uranium species and because of the strong association of organic matter (a powerful reductant) with many uranium ores, reduction has long been considered to be the precipitation mechanism for many types of uranium deposits. Organic matter may also be involved in the alterations in and around tabular uranium deposits, including dolomite precipitation, formation of silicified layers, iron-titanium oxide destruction, dissolution of quartz grains, and precipitation of clay minerals. The diagenetic processes that produced these alterations also consumed organic matter. Consequently, those tabular deposits that underwent the more advanced stages of diagenesis, including methanogenesis and organic acid generation, display the greatest range of alterations and contain the smallest amount of organic matter. Because of certain similarities between tabular uranium deposits and Precambrian unconformity-related deposits, some of the same processes might have been involved in the genesis of Precambrian unconformity-related deposits. Hydrologic studies place important constraints on genetic models of various types of uranium deposits. In roll-front deposits, oxidized waters carried uranium to reductants (organic matter and pyrite derived from sulfate reduction by organic matter). After these reductants were oxidized at any point in the host sandstone, uranium minerals were reoxidized and transported further down the flow path to react with additional reductants. In this manner, the uranium ore migrated through the sandstone at a rate slower than the mineralizing ground water. In the case of tabular uranium deposits, the recharge of surface water into the ground water during flooding of lakes carried soluble humic material to the water table or to an interface where humate precipitated in tabular layers. These humate layers then established the chemical conditions for mineralization and related

  19. Remote-sensing ore prediction in and around the Linghou copper-polymetal deposit, southeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, F.; Zhao, B.; Wu, J. J.; Liao, Y. Z.; Zhang, T.

    2017-06-01

    Taking advantage of the band-ratioing operation, principal component analysis (PCA), and multifractal model, the OLI image was employed to extract iron - stained and hydroxyl alteration in and around the Linghou copper-polymetal mine. Findings showed that the extraction results successfully bypassed the interferences caused by the quite thick vegetational and sedimentary covers, and can accurately locate the Linghou diggings, as well as several suspected ore spots. This study may have contributed a useful case study for in-depth geological remote-sensing analysis.

  20. Extraction and separation of nickel and cobalt from saprolite laterite ore by microwave-assisted hydrothermal leaching and chemical deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan; Gao, Jian-ming; Yue, Yi; Peng, Ben; Que, Zai-qing; Guo, Min; Zhang, Mei

    2013-07-01

    Extraction and separation of nickel and cobalt from saprolite laterite ore were studied by using a method of microwave-assisted hydrothermal leaching and chemical deposition. The effects of leaching temperature and time on the extraction efficiencies of Ni2+ and Co2+ were investigated in detail under microwave conditions. It is shown that the extraction efficiencies of Ni2+ and Co2+ from the ore pre-roasted at 300°C for 5 h were 89.19% and 61.89% when the leaching temperature and time were about 70°C and 60 min, respectively. For the separation process of Ni and Co, the separation of main chemical components was performed by adjusting the pH values of sulfuric leaching solutions using a NaOH solution based on the different pH values of precipitation for metal hydroxides. The final separation efficiencies of Ni and Co were 77.29% and 65.87%, respectively. Furthermore, the separation efficiencies of Fe of 95.36% and Mg of 92.2% were also achieved at the same time.

  1. Diversity, metal resistance and uranium sequestration abilities of bacteria from uranium ore deposit in deep earth stratum.

    PubMed

    Islam, Ekramul; Sar, Pinaki

    2016-05-01

    Metal resistance and uranium (U) sequestration abilities of bacteria residing in subsurface U ore was investigated using 122 pure culture strains isolated through enrichment. The cumulative frequencies of isolates resistant to each metal tested were as follows: As(V), 74%; Zn, 58%; Ni, 53%; Cd, 47%; Cr(VI), 41%; Co, 40%; Cu, 20%; and Hg, 4%. 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that isolated bacteria belonged to 14 genera with abundance of Arthrobacter, Microbacterium, Acinetobacter and Stenotrophomonas. Cobalt did not interfere with the growth of most of the bacterial isolates belonging to different groups while U allowed growth of four different genera of which Stenotrophomonas and Microbacterium showed high U tolerance. Interestingly, tolerance to Ni, Zn, Cu, and Hg was observed only in Microbacterium, Arthrobacter, Paenibacillus¸ and Acinetobacter, respectively. However, Microbacterium was found to be dominant when isolated from other five different metal enrichments including U. Uranium removal study showed that 84% of the test bacteria could remove more than 50mgUg(-1) dry weight from 80 or 160mgL(-1) U within 48h. In general, Microbacterium, Arthrobacter and Acinetobacter could remove a higher amount of U. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) study of U exposed cells revealed that accumulated U sequestered mostly around the cell periphery. The study highlights that indigenous U ore deposit bacteria have the potential to interact with U, and thus could be applied for bioremediation of U contaminated sites or wastes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genesis of the gossan at the Las Cruces Ore Deposit (SW Spain). Groundwater-Rock Interaction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheiber, L.; Ayora, C.; Vázquez-Suñé, E.; Soler, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Las Cruces deposit has sparked an interest in the scientific community due to the exceptional genesis and mineralogical composition. The original gossan formed by goethite and hematite has been replaced by siderite and galena rock. The current gossan composition is as the result of the interaction of groundwater that circulates through the Niebla-Posadas aquifer and a gossan formed by Fe-oxyhydroxides. The groundwater conditions promoted the reductive dissolution of Pb-bearing goethite by the organic matter degradation and the formation of siderite and galena. Hydrochemical and isotopic characteristics of groundwater endorses this hypothesis. Thus, negative Eh values, the existence of H2S and the tendency to light sulfate isotope values show the reducing conditions of groundwater. The key role of the organic matter degradation is marked by the high ammonium, boron and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations together the light δ13C values, both in groundwater and siderite. The siderite precipitation is confirmed by the high pH values (up to 10), the low amount of Fe (<10ppb) and the thermodynamic calculations. The Fe-oxyhydroxides are a high adsorption capacity which is capable of absorbing metals as arsenic, lead and antimony. The reductive dissolution of these minerals involves the release of these metal to groundwater. Then, the groundwater rich in sulfur and an excess of lead produce the galena precipitation. The likeness between the δ34S values, both the gossan and groundwater, reveals that the sulfur of the galena come from the currently groundwater. A reactive transport model confirm that the present day groundwater flux and composition is able to form the siderite rock in less than 1Ma, with no external supply of reactants. The limiting factor of the process is the Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) concentration in groundwater, i.e., higher concentrations would decrease the formation time, whereas the result is not sensitive to flow conditions.

  3. Stratification Studies with Sub Grade Iron Ore from Deposit No. 10 and 11A, Bacheli Complex, Bailadila, Chhattisgarh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswara Rao, Gottumukkala; Markandeya, Ravvala; Sharma, Satish Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Experiments were carried out with two different sizes of (-30 + 6 and -6 + 1 mm) sub grade iron ore sample from Deposit No. 10 and 11A, Bacheli Complex, Bailadila, India to study the stratification behaviour at optimised parameters in a under bed air pulsed jig at 1, 2, 5, 10, 15 and 20 minutes residence time. This paper deals with the rate at which stratification takes place and determines the optimum stratification time (residence time) for above two size fractions. Average apparent density along with Jig Stratification Index (JSI) of both the size fractions was calculated. It was observed that the stratification rate is high for fines (-6 + 1 mm) and stratification index was higher for lump (-30 + 6 mm) when compared with the other size fraction. The maximum JSI observed was 0.35 for lump (-30 + 6 mm) and 0.30 for fines (-6 + 1 mm).

  4. Te-Rich argyrodite occurrence in Roşia Montană ore deposit, Apuseni Mountains, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailly, Laurent; Tămaş, Călin-Gabriel; Minuţ, Adrian

    2005-06-01

    A new argyrodite occurrence has been discovered in the Roşia Montană ore deposit located in the South Apuseni Mountains, Romania. Argyrodite is associated with common base metal sulfides and sulfosalts (galena, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, tetrahedrite ± alabandite, pyrite, and marcasite), tellurides (hessite, altaite, sylvanite) and rare electrum grains in the Ag-rich Cârnicel vein hosted by an extracraterial phreatomagmatic breccia within the Cârnic massif. SEM and EPMA analyses revealed that this argyrodite is Te-rich and a mean Ag 8.04Ge 0.9Te 2.07S 3.77 formula was calculated. This phase could be the germaniferous equivalent of the previously-described Te-rich canfieldite. To cite this article: L. Bailly et al., C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  5. Combining in situ isotopic, trace element and textural analyses of quartz from four magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Dominique; Henley, Richard W.; Mavrogenes, John A.; Holden, Peter

    2013-10-01

    This study couples in situ 16O, 17O and 18O isotope and in situ trace element analyses to investigate and characterize the geochemical and textural complexity of magmatic-hydrothermal quartz crystals. Euhedral quartz crystals contemporaneous with mineralization were obtained from four magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits: El Indio Au-Ag-Cu deposit; Summitville Au-Ag-Cu deposit; North Parkes Cu-Au deposit and Kingsgate quartz-Mo-Bi-W deposit. The internal features of the crystals were imaged using cathodoluminescence and qualitative electron microprobe maps. Quantitative isotopic data were collected in situ using 157 nm laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (for 40 trace elements in quartz) and sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (for 3 isotopes in quartz). Imaging revealed fine oscillatory zoning, sector zoning, complex "macromosaic" textures and hidden xenocrystic cores. In situ oxygen isotope analyses revealed a δ18O range of up to 12.4 ± 0.3 ‰ in a single crystal—the largest isotopic range ever ascribed to oscillatory zonation in quartz. Some of these crystals contain a heavier δ18O signature than expected by existing models. While sector-zoned crystals exhibited strong trace element variations between faces, no evidence for anisotropic isotope fractionation was found. We found: (1) isotopic heterogeneity in hydrothermal quartz crystals is common and precludes provenance analysis (e.g., δD-δ18O) using bulk analytical techniques, (2) the trace element signature of quartz is not an effective pathfinder toward noble metal mineralization and (3) in three of the four samples, both textural and isotopic data indicate non-equilibrium deposition of quartz.

  6. The formation and evolution of the Bitincke nickel laterite deposit, Albania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, Robert; Roberts, Stephen; Herrington, Richard

    2012-12-01

    The Bitincke nickel laterite deposit, located in the south east of Albania, contains an estimated ore resource of 35.6 Mt of nickel ore with a grade of 1.2 % Ni. The deposit developed on peridotites within Late Jurassic ophiolites which were obducted in the Early Cretaceous and which form part of the Albanian Mirdita ophiolite zone. Limestones and conglomerates overlying the deposit delimit the minimum age of lateritization to the mid-Eocene. The laterite is composed of two distinct ore zones characterized by silicate nickel and iron oxide phases. Within the silicate zone, Ni concentrations reach a maximum of 1.5 wt% and although laterally and vertically variable this zone is typically characterized by olivine and serpentine at the base of the horizon which are gradually replaced by secondary silicates and iron oxides up section. The boundary between the silicate and the oxide zone above is normally sharp and characterized by an increase in Fe2O3 (from ~10 to 80 wt%), decreases in SiO2 (from ~30 to 5 wt%) and a dramatic reduction in MgO content (from ~10 to 0.1 wt%). The oxide horizon is dominated by goethite and displays relatively little variation in textural morphology or geochemistry. Nickel concentrations are greatest near the base of this zone, reaching a maximum of 2.3 wt%. Weathering profile formation and variation in the thickness of the deposit was controlled by the interaction between topography, faulting and protolith fracture density. The oxide zone formed on topographic highs was subject to increased rates of erosion, whereas the laterite profile within topographic lows, and in areas of relatively high fracture density, tends to be thicker due to increased permeability. The most substantive sections of the Ni laterite weathering profile developed in small fault controlled basins and were preserved by the deposition of a sequence of limestones and mudstones.

  7. Influence of gangue existing states in iron ores on the formation and flow of liquid phase during sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-liang; Wu, Sheng-li; Chen, Shao-guo; Su, Bo; Que, Zhi-gang; Hou, Chao-gang

    2014-10-01

    Gangue existing states largely affect the high-temperature characteristics of iron ores. Using a micro-sintering method and scanning electron microscopy, the effects of gangue content, gangue type, and gangue size on the assimilation characteristics and fluidity of liquid phase of five different iron ores were analyzed in this study. Next, the mechanism based on the reaction between gangues and sintering materials was unraveled. The results show that, as the SiO2 levels increase in the iron ores, the lowest assimilation temperature (LAT) decreases, whereas the index of fluidity of liquid phase (IFL) increases. Below 1.5wt%, Al2O3 benefits the assimilation reaction, but higher concentrations proved detrimental. Larger quartz particles increase the SiO2 levels at the local reaction interface between the iron ore and CaO, thereby reducing the LAT. Quartz-gibbsite is more conductive to assimilation than kaolin. Quartz-gibbsite and kaolin gangues encourage the formation of liquid-phase low-Al2O3-SFCA with high IFL and high-Al2O3-SFCA with low IFL, respectively.

  8. A precise 232Th-208Pb chronology of fine-grained monazite: Age of the Bayan Obo REE-Fe-Nb ore deposit, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Jingyuan; Tatsumoto, M.; Li, X.; Premo, W.R.; Chao, E.C.T.

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained precise Th-Pb internal isochron ages on monazite and bastnaesite for the world's largest known rare earth elements (REE)-Fe-Nb ore deposit, the Bayan Obo of Inner Mongolia, China. The monazite samples, collected from the carbonate-hosted ore zone, contain extremely small amounts of uranium (less than 10 ppm) but up to 0.7% ThO2. Previous estimates of the age of mineralization ranged from 1.8 to 0.255 Ga. Magnetic fractions of monazite and bastnaesite samples (<60-??m size) showed large ranges in 232Th 204Pb values (900-400,000) and provided precise Th-Pb internal isochron ages for paragenetic monazite mineralization ranging from 555 to 398 Ma within a few percent error (0.8% for two samples). These results are the first indication that REE mineralization within the giant Bayan Obo ore deposit occurred over a long period of time. The initial lead isotopic compositions (low 206Pb 204Pb and high 208Pb 204Pb) and large negative ??{lunate}Nd values for Bayan Obo ore minerals indicate that the main source(s) for the ores was the lower crust which was depleted in uranium, but enriched in thorium and light rare earth elements for a long period of time. Zircon from a quartz monzonite, located 50 km south of the ore complex and thought to be related to Caledonian subduction, gave an age of 451 Ma, within the range of monazite ages. Textural relations together with the mineral ages favor an epigenetic rather than a syngenetic origin for the orebodies. REE mineralization started around 555 Ma (disseminated monazite in the West, the Main, and south of the East Orebody), but the main mineralization (banded ores) was related to the Caledonian subduction event ca. 474-400 Ma. ?? 1994.

  9. New Csbnd O isotopic data on supergene minerals from the Skorpion and Rosh Pinah ore deposits (Namibia): Genetic and paleoclimatic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfè, G.; Boni, M.; Balassone, G.; Mondillo, N.; Hinder, G.; Joachimski, M.

    2017-02-01

    involvement of both re-oxidized organic carbon and host dolomite inorganic carbon during smithsonite formation, whereas at Skorpion a larger contribution of isotopically light organic carbon is considered more probable. The comparable δ18O compositions of smithsonite from the two deposits imply similar ore-forming fluids and/or similar temperatures conditions during formation. In agreement with former studies, we suggest that Skorpion smithsonite precipitated at an average temperature near 17 °C from fluids depleted in 13C due to a high contribution of soil organic carbon, either during the first (Late Cretaceous-Paleocene) or the last humid climatic stage (early-middle Miocene). Even if the similarity between the δ18O composition of Rosh Pinah and Skorpion smithsonites points to similar ore-forming fluids and/or similar conditions during formation, the relatively high δ13C values of the Rosh Pinah smithsonites suggest a minor influence of isotopically light organic carbon and the absence of soils over this deposit. Combining these data with the limited thickness of the supergene zone over the latter orebody, it is likely that the Rosh Pinah smithsonites, together with the gossan in which they occur, formed at the end of the early-middle Miocene semi-humid period. The δ18O and δ13C compositions of Skorpion calcite indicate that the precipitating supergene fluids remained roughly unchanged, but that the bicarbonate from the host rock became prevailing. This suggests that calcite formation occurred at the beginning of the last late Miocene-Pliocene semi-arid period, when the host marbles were uplifted and karstified, thus promoting a higher bicarbonate contribution from dissolving host rock.

  10. Plavica epithermal Au-Ag-Cu deposit in eastern Macedonia: Geology and 3D model of valuable component distribution in ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafimovski, T.; Volkov, A. V.; Serafimovski, D.; Tasev, G.; Ivanovski, I.; Murashov, K. Yu.

    2017-07-01

    The Plavica Au-Ag-Cu deposit is related to the large Neogene volcanic center, which complicates the paleocaldera in the central Kratovo-Zletovo ore district of eastern Macedonia. Based on the geology, ore mineralogy, wall-rock alteration, and fluid inclusions, the Plavica deposit has been referred to the epithermal high-sulfidation type. The general 3D model of orebody at this deposit is based on its general geological structure and complex distribution of metal contents. The framework of the 3D model, which has been constructed in the ArcGIS System, comprises 195 exploration boreholes 47295.8 m in total length. The 3D model allows to a better understanding of distribution of mineralization and supplements the geological data on the deposit.

  11. Mechanism of unintentionally produced persistent organic pollutant formation in iron ore sintering.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yifei; Liu, Lina; Fu, Xin; Zhu, Tianle; Buekens, Alfons; Yang, Xiaoyi; Wang, Qiang

    2016-04-05

    Effects of temperature, carbon content and copper additive on formation of chlorobenzenes (CBzs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in iron ore sintering were investigated. By heating simulated fly ash (SFA) at a temperature range of 250-500°C, the yield of both CBzs and PCBs presented two peaks of 637ng/g-fly ash at 350°C and 1.5×10(5)ng/g-fly ash at 450°C for CBzs, and 74ng/g-fly ash at 300°C and 53ng/g-fly ash at 500°C. Additionally, in the thermal treatment of real fly ash (RFA), yield of PCBs displayed two peak values at 350°C and 500°C, however, yield of CBzs showed only one peak at 400°C. In the thermal treatment of SFA with a carbon content range of 0-20wt% at 300°C, both CBzs and PCBs obtained the maximum productions of 883ng/g-fly ash for CBzs and 127ng/g-fly ash for PCBs at a 5wt% carbon content. Copper additives also affected chlorinated aromatic formation. The catalytic activity of different copper additives followed the orders: CuCl2∙2H2O>Cu2O>Cu>CuSO4>CuO for CBzs, and CuCl2∙2H2O>Cu2O>CuO>Cu>CuSO4 for PCBs.

  12. Tertiary meteoric hydrothermal systems and their relation to ore deposition, northwestern United States and southern British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criss, Robert E.; Fleck, Robert J.; Taylor, Hugh P., Jr.

    1991-07-01

    U-bearing Eocene "porphyry" plutons; and (6) Miocene epithermal deposits, most prominently the Au and Ag bearing veins at Silver City and DeLamar, Idaho, the Hg deposits at the McDermitt caldera, Nevada and Oregon, and at Weiser, Idaho, and Au deposits in the Western Cascade Range and Lake County, Oregon. A close spatial association has been demonstrated between ore deposits and rocks having anomalous δ18O values and low δD values. The most important deposits are associated with relatively small (generally 5-300 km2) zones of low δ18O values, and they are particularly closely linked with zones of very steep 18O/16O gradients in the altered rocks. These associations hold much promise for the use of δ18O and δD contour maps in future exploration efforts.

  13. Sedimentary exhalative nickel-molybdenum ores in south China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lott, D.A.; Coveney, R.M.; Murowchick, J.B.; Grauch, R.I.

    1999-01-01

    Unique bedded Ni-Mo ores hosted by black shales were discovered in localized paleobasins along the Yangzte platform of southern China in 1971. Textural evidence and radiometric dates imply ore formation during sedimentation of black shales that grade into readily combustible beds, termed stone coals, which contain 10 to 15 percent organic carbon. Studies of 427 fluid inclusions indicate extreme variation in hydrothermal brine salinities that were contained by Proterozoic dolostones underlying the ore zone in Hunan and Guizhou. Variations of fluid inclusion salinities, which range from 0.1 to 21.6 wt percent NaCl equiv, are attributed to differences in the compositions of brines in strata underlying the ore bed, complicated by the presence of seawater and dilute fluids that represent condensates of vapors generated by boiling of mineralizing fluids or Cambrian meteoric water. The complex processes of ore deposition led to scattered homogenization temperatures ranging from 100??to 187??C within the Hunan ore zone and from 65??to 183??C within the Guizhou ore zone. While living organisms probably did not directly accumulate metals in situ in sufficient amounts to explain the unusually high grades of the deposits, sulfur isotope ratios indicate that bacteria, now preserved as abundant microfossils, provided sufficient sulfide for the ores by reduction of seawater sulfate. Such microbiota may have depended on vent fluids and transported organic matter for key nutrients and are consistent with a sedex origin for the ores. Vent fluids interacted with organic remains, including rounded fragments of microbial mats that were likely transported to the site of ore deposition by the action of waves and bottom currents prior to replacement by ore minerals.

  14. Ore deposits and epithermal evidences associated with intra-magmatic faults at Aïn El Araâr-Oued Belif ring structure (NW of Tunisia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aissa, Wiem Ben; Aissa, Lassaâd Ben; Amara, Abdesslem Ben Haj; Tlig, Said; Alouani, Rabah

    2017-03-01

    Hydrothermal ore deposits at Aïn El Araâr-Oued Belif location are classified as epithermal deposits type. The ore bodies are hosted by upper Turonian (8-9 M.y) volcanic rhyodacitic complex. Polymetallic sulfide orebodies are mainly concentrated within intra-magmatic faults. Petrographic, XRD, and TEM-STEM investigations revealed that ore minerals are essentially, arsenopyrite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, hematite, goethite and magnetite with Au, Ag and Pt trace metals. Gangue minerals are mainly adularia, quartz, sericite, alunite, tridymite, chlorite, phlogopite and smectite. Epithermal alteration is well zoned with four successive characteristic zones: (1) zone of quartz-adularia-sericite and rare alunite; (2) zone of kaolinite and plagioclase albitization; (3) intermediate zone of illite-sericite; (4) sapropelic alteration type zone of chlorite-smectite and rare illite. This can be interpreted as a telescoping of two different acidity epithermal phases; low sulfidation (adularia-sericite) and high sulfidation (quartz-alunite), separated in time or due to a gradual increase of fluids acidity and oxicity within the same mineralization phase. Brecciated macroscopic facies with fragments hosting quartz-adularia-sericite minerals (low-sulfidation phase) without alunite, support the last hypothesis. Geodynamic context and mineral alteration patterns are closely similar to those of Maria Josefa gold mine at SE of Spain which exhibit a volcanic-hosted epithermal ore deposit in a similar vein system, within rhyolitic ignimbrites, altered to an argillic assemblage (illite-sericite abundant and subordinate kaolinite) that grades outwards into propylitic alteration (Sanger-von Oepen et al. (1990)). Mineralogical and lithologic study undertaken in the volcanic host rock at Aïn El Araâr-Oued Belif reveals a typical epithermal low-sulfidation and high-sulfidation ore deposits with dominance of low-sulfidation. Host rocks in these systems range from silicic to

  15. Silicophosphate Sorbents, Based on Ore-Processing Plants' Waste in Kazakhstan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubekova, Sholpan N.; Kapralova, Viktoria I.; Telkov, Shamil A.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of ore-processing plants' waste and man-made mineral formations (MMF) disposal is very important for the Republic of Kazakhstan. The research of various ore types (gold, polymetallic, iron-bearing) MMF from a number of Kazakhstan's deposits using a complex physical and chemical methods showed, that the waste's main components are…

  16. Rare earth and other rare elements in uranium ores of paleovalley deposits in the Vitim district: Distribution, occurrence, and applied implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokurov, S. F.; Magazina, L. O.; Strelkova, E. A.

    2017-03-01

    The degree of concentration and REE and Zr distribution and occurrence in uranium ore samples from paleovalley deposits are considered. Various types of REE distribution in ores with variable uranium content has been revealed: the negative type with predominance of LREE in ordinary ore and the V-shaped type with significant growth of Y, MREE, and HREE contents in high-grade ore. In addition, the relationship between U, on the one hand, and MREE, HREE, Y, and Zr, on the other hand, has been established. Predominant isomorphic incorporation of these elements into various uranium constituents is suggested. The conclusion was arrived at about the most probable gain of REE and Zr along with U on various geochemical barriers from postvolcanic thermal carbonated and sulfuric-acid aqueous solutions enriched in these chemical elements. The significant enrichment of uranium ore in REE confirms the real possibility of recovery of them as a by-product from working solutions in the process of in situ uranium leaching.

  17. The formation of technic soil in a revegetated uranium ore waste rock pile (Limousin, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boekhout, Flora; Gérard, Martine; Kanzari, Aisha; Calas, Georges; Descostes, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Mining took place in France between 1945 and 2001 during which time ~210 different sites were exploited and/or explored. A total of 76 Kt of uranium was produced, 52 Mt of ore was extracted, but also 200 Mt of waste rocks was produced, the majority of which, with uranium levels corresponding to the natural environment. So far, the processes of arenisation and technic soil formation in waste rock piles are not well understood but have important implications for understanding the environmental impact and long-term speciation of uranium. Understanding weathering processes in waste rock piles is essential to determine their environmental impact. The main objectives of this work are to assess 1) the micromorphological features and neo-formed U-bearing phases related to weathering and 2) the processes behind arenisation of the rock pile. The site that was chosen is the Vieilles Sagnes waste rock pile in Fanay (Massif Central France) that represents more or less hydrothermally altered granitic rocks that have been exposed to weathering since the construction of the waste rock pile approximately 50 years ago. Two trenches were excavated to investigate the vertical differentiation of the rock pile. This site serves as a key location for studying weathering processes of waste rock piles, as it has not been reworked after initial construction and has therefore preserved information on the original mineralogy of the waste rock pile enabling us to access post emplacement weathering processes. The site is currently overgrown by moss, meter high ferns and small trees. At present day the rock pile material can be described as hydrothermally altered rocks and rock fragments within a fine-grained silty clay matrix exposed to surface conditions and weathering. A sandy "paleo" technic soil underlies the waste rock pile and functions as a natural liner by adsorption of uranium on clay minerals. Post-mining weathering of rock-pile material is superimposed on pre-mining hydrothermal and

  18. The formation of Luoboling porphyry Cu-Mo deposit: Constraints from zircon and apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cong-ying; Hao, Xi-luo; Liu, Ji-qiang; Ling, Ming-xing; Ding, Xing; Zhang, Hong; Sun, Wei-dong

    2017-02-01

    The Luobuling porphyry Cu-Mo deposit belongs to the Late Cretaceous Zijinshan Cu-Au-Mo mineralization field in southeastern China. Due to intensive hydrothermal alteration and weathering, it is very difficult to collect fresh whole rock samples for geochemical and isotopic studies in Luobuling. Zircon and apatite are accessory minerals that are resistant to hydrothermal alterations. In this study, we compared the trace element and isotope compositions of zircon and apatite from ore-bearing and barren samples to understand the formation of the Luoboling Cu-Mo deposit. Zircon U-Pb LA-ICP-MS dating shows that the Luoboling porphyries formed at 100 Ma (100.3 ± 1.2 Ma, 100.6 ± 1.5 Ma and 98.6 ± 1.2 Ma), which belongs to the late stage mineralization of the Zijinshan mineralization field. Zhongliao porphyritic granodiorite has the same age as the deposit (99.5 ± 1.6 Ma). The age of barren Sifang granodiorite is slightly older (109.7 ± 0.8 Ma). All these zircon grains have high Ce4+/Ce3+ ratios, indicating high oxygen fugacities. The ore-bearing samples show variable εHf(t) of - 7.3 to 0.2, suggesting either heterogeneous sources or mixing of two different magmas. Interestingly, the Hf isotope composition of barren samples is systematically higher (εHf(t) of - 3.6 to 5.5), implying a lower contribution of crustal materials. The OH mole percent of apatite grains from barren samples (LBL22-03 and SF09-05) is 0.5, which is higher than that of apatite from the ore-bearing samples (LBL20-01 LBL20-02 and LBL22-02), indicating lower F, Cl contents or higher water contents in the magma. In apatite from the ore-bearing samples, Sr is high, indicating the absence of plagioclase crystallization. In contrast, barren samples have varied and lower Sr, indicating that apatite crystallization was accompanied by plagioclase. These patterns were controlled by water contents because the crystallization of plagioclase is suppressed by high water contents in magmas. It also suggests

  19. Mineralogical variation of skarn ore from the Tellerhäuser deposit, Pöhla, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Bethany; Andersen, Jens Christian; Rollinson, Gavyn; Armstrong, Robin; Dolgopolova, Alla; Seltmann, Reimar; Stanley, Chris; Roscher, Marco

    2017-04-01

    The polymetallic Zn-Fe-Sn-Cu-In skarns at Pöhla Tellerhäuser in the western Erzgebirge represent some of the largest unexploited occurrences of Sn and In in Europe. The skarns developed in schists and gneisses at the margin of the Schwarzenberg Gneiss cupola and the Eibenstock granites. The flat-lying skarn layers display extreme mineralogical variability with alternating units of pyroxene, sphalerite, magnetite, amphibole and calc-silicate skarns with hanging wall schist and feeder stockwork. The polymetallic skarn ores represent a complex challenge for mineral processing, with fine-grained, locked target minerals and partitioning of target metals into silicates (e.g. Sn in malayaite). Optical microscopy, QEMSCAN® and electron-probe microanalysis have been used to determine the mineralogical variability of the skarn types with the aim to determine the deportment of the target metals to guide mineral processing test work. The composition of the skarns is extremely variable reflecting the complex mineralogy and indicating substantial variability associated with replacement reactions through the protolith(s). Cassiterite (SnO2) is the dominant Sn-bearing mineral in all the skarn types. However, the skarns also carry malayaite (CaSnO[SiO4], up to 0.03 vol%), which locally dominates over cassiterite. Cassiterite is intergrown with Fe-amphibole, grossular garnet, fluorite and magnetite. The cassiterite is unaltered, but some grains have rare iron oxide rims and inclusions. Malayaite shows a similar association to cassiterite and is intergrown as clusters of grains with silicate gangue, particularly Fe amphibole and grossular garnet and remains unaltered with no inclusions. Zinc is exclusively hosted in sphalerite and varies from 0.02 wt.% in the hanging wall schist to 36.5 wt.% in the sphalerite skarn. The high Zn values are accompanied by high values of Cd (locally in excess of 1000 ppm) and In (up to 180 ppm). Sphalerite grains are locally up to 4 mm, subhedral

  20. Pattern Formation in Mississippi Valley-Type Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelka, Ulrich; Koehn, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Alternating, monomineralic dark and white bands are common features of ore hosting dolostones which are generally termed Zebra textures. These structures consist of coarse grained light and fine grained dark layers and accompany ore bodies of the Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT) worldwide. These deposits frequently develop in large hydrothermal systems, located in the flanks of foreland basins or in fold and thrust belts. The microstructural- and microchemical analysis in this study were performed on samples which were collected in the San Vicente mine. This large MVT deposit is hosted in Triassic/Jurassic Platform Carbonates located in an east-vergent fold and thrust belt of the Peruvian Andes. The thin sections were analyzed with petrographic- and scanning electron microscope. It is observed that one common striking feature is the high density of second-phase particles in the dark bands, whereas the coarser grained layers are virtually particle free. Furthermore, the particle distribution is found to be non-random. The highest particle densities in the samples occur on grain boundaries in the dark bands implying that grain boundaries can capture particles. Based on recent theories and the additional analytical findings, we developed a numerical simulation to study the pattern formation. The modelling is performed in 2D at the scale of a thin section, using a boundary-model coupled with a lattice-particle-code. During the simulation two processes are active, first a reaction takes place that replaces calcite with dolomite driven by a fluid that infiltrates the model, followed by a grain growth processes with an average grain size increase as a function of surface energy reduction. Fluid infiltration in the rock is modelled assuming Darcy Flow and an advection-diffusion equation coupled with a reaction which is a function of concentration. The reaction increases permeability of the solid and thus enhances infiltration. The reaction front in the model shifts particles

  1. Systematics of hydrothermal alteration at the volcanic-hosted Falun Zn-Pb-Cu-(Au-Ag) deposit - implications for ore genesis, structure and exploration in a 1.9 Ga ore district, Fennoscandian Shield, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampmann, Tobias C.; Jansson, Nils J.; Stephens, Michael B.; Majka, Jarosław

    2016-04-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic, volcanic-hosted Falun Zn-Pb-Cu-(Au-Ag) sulphide deposit was mined for base and precious metals during several centuries, until its closure in 1992. The deposit is located in a 1.9 Ga ore district in the Bergslagen lithotectonic unit, Fennoscandian Shield, south-central Sweden. Both the ores and their host rock underwent polyphase ductile deformation, and metamorphism under amphibolite facies and later retrograde conditions at 1.9-1.8 Ga (Svecokarelian orogenic system). This study has the following aims: (i) Classify styles and intensities of alteration in the hydrothermally altered zone at Falun; (ii) identify precursor rocks to hydrothermally altered rocks and their spatial distribution at the deposit; (iii) evaluate the chemical changes resulting from hydrothermal alteration using mass change calculations; and (iv) assess the pre-metamorphic alteration assemblages accounting for the observed metamorphic mineral associations in the altered rocks at Falun. Results will have implications for both the ore-genetic and structural understanding of the deposit, as well as for local and regional exploration. Metamorphic mineral associations in the altered rocks include biotite-quartz-cordierite-(anthophyllite) and, more proximally, quartz-anthophyllite-(biotite-cordierite/almandine), biotite-cordierite-(anthophyllite) and biotite-almandine-(anthophyllite). The proximal hydrothermally altered zone corresponds to intense chlorite-style alteration. Subordinate dolomite or calcite marble, as well as calc-silicate (tremolite, diopside) rocks are also present at the deposit. Metavolcanic rocks around the deposit are unaltered, weakly sericitized or sodic-altered. Immobile-element (e.g. Zr, TiO2, Al2O3, REE) systematics of the silicate-rich samples at and around the deposit suggest that the precursors to the hydrothermally altered rocks at Falun were predominantly rhyolitic in composition, dacitic rocks being subordinate and mafic-intermediate rocks

  2. Geology and ore deposits of the McDermitt Caldera, Nevada-Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, James J.

    1976-01-01

    The McDermitt caldera is a Miocene collapse structure along the Nevada-Oregon border. The oval-shaped caldera is bounded by arcuate normal faults on the north and south and by rhyolite ring domes on the west. Precollapse ash-flow tuffs exposed within the south caldera rim consist of three cooling units and are peralkaline in composition. Refractive indexes of nonhydrated glasses from basal vitrophyres of the. units range from 1.493 to 1.503 and are typical of comendites. Post-collapse intracaldera rocks consist of tuffaceous lake sediments, rhyolite flows and domes, and ash-flow tuffs. Within the caldera are the mercury mines of Bretz, Cordero, McDermitt, Opalite, and Ruja and the Moonlight uranium mine. The mercury mines are adjacent to ring fracture faults, and the uranium mine and other uranium occurrences are located within rhyolite ring domes. Fluid inclusions in quartz indicate a deposition temperature of 340?C for the uranium deposit and 200?C for the mercury deposits. The mercury deposits formed at shallow depth by replacement of lakebed sediments and volcanic rocks.

  3. Mining Hazards Analysis with Simultaneous Mining Copper Ores and Salt Deposits in LGOM (Legnica-Głogów Copper Belt) Mines with Regard to Dynamic Influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłeczek, Zdzisław; Niedojadło, Zygmunt; Popiołek, Edward; Skobliński, Wojciech; Sopata, Paweł; Stoch, Tomasz; Wójcik, Artur; Zeljaś, Dagmara

    2016-09-01

    In the case of locating two bedded deposits of different mineral resources in a small vertical distance, additional or increased mining hazards can occur (deformations of the rock mass, crumps and mining shocks, hazards to the land surface). This paper has thoroughly examined the impact of exploitation of the lower-located deposit of copper ore on the higher-located deposit of salt as well as the reverse situation as regards the dynamic phenomena, being the greatest lithospheric hazard in LGOM. At the same time theoretical models of processes were applied, verified by previous observations in situ in mines of Legnica-Głogów Copper Belt.

  4. Beyond the obvious limits of ore deposits: The use of mineralogical, geochemical, and biological features for the remote detection of mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, D.L.; Kelley, K.D.; Coker, W.B.; Caughlin, B.; Doherty, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    Far field features of ore deposits include mineralogical, geochemical, or biological attributes that can be recognized beyond the obvious limits of the deposits. They can be primary, if formed in association with mineralization or alteration processes, or secondary, if formed from the interaction of ore deposits with the hydrosphere and biosphere. This paper examines a variety of far field features of different ore deposit types and considers novel applications to exploration and discovery. Primary far field features include mineral and rock chemistry, isotopic or element halos, fluid pathways and thermal anomalies in host-rock sequences. Examples include the use of apatite chemistry to distinguish intrusive rocks permissive for iron oxide copper gold (IOCG) and porphyry deposits; resistate mineral (e.g., rutile, tourmaline) chemistry in exploration for volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS), orogenic gold, and porphyry deposits; and pyrite chemistry to vector toward sedimentary exhalative (sedex) deposits. Distinctive whole-rock geochemical signatures also can be recognized as a far field feature of porphyry deposits. For example, unique Sr/Y ratios in whole-rock samples, used to distinguish barren versus fertile magmas for Cu mineralization, result from the differentiation of oxidized hydrous melts. Anomalous concentrations of halogen elements (Cl, Br, and I) have been found for distances of up to 200 m away from some mineralized centers. Variations in isotopic composition between ore-bearing and barren intrusions and/or systematic vertical and lateral zonation in sulfur, carbon, or oxygen isotope values have been documented for some deposit types. Owing to the thermal aureole that extends beyond the area of mineralization for some deposits, detection of paleothermal effects through methods such as conodont alteration indices, vitrinite or bitumen reflectance, illite crystallinity, and apatite or zircon thermochronology studies also can be valuable, particularly for

  5. The role of the thermal convection of fluids in the formation of unconformity-type uranium deposits: the Athabasca Basin, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pek, A. A.; Malkovsky, V. I.

    2017-05-01

    In the global production of uranium, 18% belong to the unconformity-type Canadian deposits localized in the Athabasca Basin. These deposits, which are unique in terms of their ore quality, were primarily studied by Canadian and French scientists. They have elaborated the diagenetic-hydrothermal hypothesis of ore formation, which suggests that (1) the deposits were formed within a sedimentary basin near an unconformity surface dividing the folded Archean-Proterozoic metamorphic basement and a gently dipping sedimentary cover, which is not affected by metamorphism; (2) the spatial accommodation of the deposits is controlled by the rejuvenated faults in the basement at their exit into the overlying sedimentary sequence; the ore bodies are localized above and below the unconformity surface; (3) the occurrence of graphite-bearing rocks is an important factor in controlling the local structural mineralization; (4) the ore bodies are the products of uranium precipitation on a reducing barrier. The mechanism that drives the circulation of ore-forming hydrothermal solutions has remained one of the main unclear questions in the general genetic concept. The ore was deposited above the surface of the unconformity due to the upflow discharge of the solution from the fault zones into the overlying conglomerate and sandstone. The ore formation below this surface is a result of the downflow migration of the solutions along the fault zones from sandstone into the basement rocks. A thermal convective system with the conjugated convection cells in the basement and sedimentary fill of the basin may be a possible explanation of why the hydrotherms circulate in the opposite directions. The results of our computations in the model setting of the free thermal convection of fluids are consistent with the conceptual reasoning about the conditions of the formation of unique uranium deposits in the Athabasca Basin. The calculated rates of the focused solution circulation through the fault

  6. Stratabound copper-silver deposits of the Mesoproterozoic Revett formation, Montana and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boleneus, David E.; Appelgate, Larry M.; Stewart, John H.; Zientek, Michael L.

    2005-01-01

    The western Montana copper belt in western Montana and northern Idaho contains several large stratabound copper-silver deposits in fine- to medium-grained quartzite beds of the Revett Formation of the Mesoproterozoic (1,470-1,401 Ma) Belt Supergroup. Production from the deposits at the Troy Mine and lesser production from the Snowstorm Mine has yielded 222,237 tons Cu and 1,657.4 tons Ag. Estimates of undeveloped resources, mostly from the world-class Rock Creek-Montanore deposits, as well as lesser amounts at the Troy Mine, total more than 2.9 million tons Cu and 2,600 tons Ag in 406 million tons of ore.The Rock Creek-Montanore and Troy deposits, which are currently the most significant undeveloped resources identified in the copper belt, are also among the largest stratabound copper-silver deposits in North America and contain about 15 percent of the copper in such deposits in North America. Worldwide, stratabound copper-silver deposits contain 23 percent of all copper resources and are the second-most important global source of the metal after porphyry copper deposits.The Revett Formation, which consists of subequal amounts of argillite, siltite, and quartzite, is informally divided into lower, middle, and upper members on the basis of the proportions of the dominant rock types. The unit thickness increases from north to south, from 1,700 ft near the Troy Mine, 55 mi north of Wallace, Idaho, to more than 5,300 ft at Wallace, Idaho, in the Coeur d'Alene Trough south of the Osburn Fault, a major right-lateral strike-slip fault.Mineral deposits in the Revett Formation occur mostly in the A-D beds of the lower member and in the middle quartzite of the upper member. The deposits are concentrated along a preore pyrite/hematite interface in relatively coarse grained, thick quartzite beds that acted as paleoaquifers for ore fluids. The deposits are characterized by mineral zones (alteration-mineral assemblages) that are a useful guide to the locations of mineral

  7. Paragenetic and minor- and trace-element studies of Mississippi Valley-type ore deposits of the Silesian-Cracow district, Poland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viets, J.G.; Leach, D.L.; Lichte, F.E.; Hopkins, R.T.; Gent, C.A.; Powell, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    Paragenetic and minor- and trace-element studies were conducted on samples of epigenetic ore and gangue minerals collected from mines and drill core in the Silesian-Cracow (S-C) district of southern Poland. Four discrete mineral suites representing four mineralizing stages can be identified throughout the district. The earliest epigenetic minerals deposited during stage 1 consist of a late dolomite cement together with minor pyrite and marcasite. Stage 2 was the first ore-forming stage and included repetitive deposition of sphalerite and galena in a variety of morphologies. Stage 3 abruptly followed the first ore stage and deposited marcasite and pyrite with variable amounts of late sphalerite and galena. In the samples studied, minerals deposited during stage 3 are predominately marcasite-pyrite with minor sphalerite and galena in the Pomorzany and Olkusz mines, whereas, at the Trzebionka mine, stage 3 mineralization deposited mostly galena and sphalerite with little marcasite or pyrite. Stage 4 minerals include contains barite, followed by calcite, with very minor pyrite and a rare, late granular sphalerite. Compared to other major Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) districts of the world, the Silesian-Cracow district contains sphalerite with the second largest range in Ag concentrations and the largest range in Fe and Cd concentrations of any district. Unlike in other districts, very wide ranges in minor- and trace-element concentrations are also observed in paragenetically equivalent samples collected throughout the district. This wide range indicates that the minor- and trace-element content of the ore-forming environment was highly variable, both spatially and temporally, and suggests that the hydrologic system that the ore fluids traversed from their basinal source was very complex. Throughout the district, a significant increase in Tl, Ge, and As concentrations is accompanied by a lightening of sulfur isotopes between stage 2 and stage 3 minerals. This change

  8. Understanding the residence of Co in ore minerals - towards the development of novel Co extraction strategies for laterite deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybowska, Agnieszka; Norman, Rachel; Schofield, Paul; Herrington, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Cobalt has unique properties highly valued for many applications essential to the green economy. It has been classified as a critical raw material due to the particularly high risk of supply shortage and its importance for the value chain. Despite low crustal abundance (25ppm), Co is concentrated by various geological processes to concentrations suitable for mining, however the majority of Co is recovered as a by-product of Cu and Ni processing in three principal geological settings: hydrothermal, magmatic and lateritic. Cobalt-rich laterites, which provide 20% of the world's Co, are mainly processed using energy-inefficient pyrometallurgical techniques or high-pressure acid leaching technologies often optimised for extraction of other elements, which can leave between 50 and 80% of the Co unrecovered. In order to develop more efficient Co extraction strategies, understanding the residence of Co in ore minerals is essential. To this end, we are undertaking a detailed mineralogical, chemical and atomistic-scale characterization of Co in samples from a range of laterite deposits. Bulk samples representative of the average ore material were sourced from a variety of undeveloped laterite deposits: Shevchenko (Kazakhstan), Acoje (Philippines), Nkamouna (Cameroon) and Piauí (Brazil). Bulk chemical and mineralogical characterisation was undertaken with ICP-OES/MS and XRD, followed by spatially resolved chemical and mineralogical imaging at the micron scale using µXRD, EPMA, SEM and synchrotron-based µXRF. The chemical state and local environment of Co were determined using X ray spectroscopy (μXANES and μEXAFS). The total concentrations of Co ranged from 630 to 2780 mg/kg. The ore mineral assemblage in the various samples includes goethite, maghemite, hematite, quartz, talc, serpentines, chlorites, smectites, kaolinite and chromites. Manganese oxide minerals are present but, due to their poor crystallinity and low concentration, are not routinely detectable with bulk

  9. Sulfuric acid karst and its relationship to hydrocarbon reservoir porosity, native sulfur deposits, and the origin of Mississippi Valley-type ore deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, C.A. , Albuquerque, NM )

    1993-03-01

    The Delaware Basin of southeastern New Mexico and West Texas contains hydrocarbons and native sulfur in the basin and sulfuric acid-formed caves and Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) ore deposits around the margins of the basin. Hydrocarbons reacting with sulfate evaporite rock produced hydrogen sulfide gas, which gas oxidized to native sulfur in the basin and which gas also migrated from basin to reef and accumulated there in structural and stratigraphic traps. In the reduced zone of the carbonate reef margin the H[sub 2]S combined with metal-chloride complexes to form MVTs, and in the oxidized zone later in time the H[sub 2]S formed sulfuric acid which dissolved out the famous caves of the region (e.g., Carlsbad Cavern, Lechuguilla Cave). Sulfuric acid karst can be recognized by the discontinuity, large size, and spongework nature of its cave passages, and by the presence of native sulfur, endellite, and large gypsum deposits within these caves. Sulfuric acid oilfield karst refers to cavernous porosity filled with hydrocarbons and can be produced by the mixing of waters of different H[sub 2]S content or by the oxidation of H[sub 2]S to sulfuric acid. Sulfur and carbon-oxygen isotopes have been used to establish and trace the sequence of related hydrocarbon, sulfur, MVT, and karst events in the Delaware Basin.

  10. Magmatic ore deposits in layered intrusions - Descriptive model for reef-type PGE and contact-type Cu-Ni-PGE deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zientek, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Layered, ultramafic to mafic intrusions are uncommon in the geologic record, but host magmatic ore deposits containing most of the world's economic concentrations of platinum-group elements (PGE) (figs. 1 and 2). These deposits are mined primarily for their platinum, palladium, and rhodium contents (table 1). Magmatic ore deposits are derived from accumulations of crystals of metallic oxides, or immiscible sulfide, or oxide liquids that formed during the cooling and crystallization of magma, typically with mafic to ultramafic compositions. "PGE reefs" are stratabound PGE-enriched lode mineralization in mafic to ultramafic layered intrusions. The term "reef" is derived from Australian and South African literature for this style of mineralization and used to refer to (1) the rock layer that is mineralized and has distinctive texture or mineralogy (Naldrett, 2004), or (2) the PGE-enriched sulfide mineralization that occurs within the rock layer. For example, Viljoen (1999) broadly defined the Merensky Reef as "a mineralized zone within or closely associated with an unconformity surface in the ultramafic cumulate at the base of the Merensky Cyclic Unit." In this report, we will use the term PGE reef to refer to the PGE-enriched mineralization, not the host rock layer. Within a layered igneous intrusion, reef-type mineralization is laterally persistent along strike, extending for the length of the intrusion, typically tens to hundreds of kilometers. However, the mineralized interval is thin, generally centimeters to meters thick, relative to the stratigraphic thickness of layers in an intrusion that vary from hundreds to thousands of meters. PGE-enriched sulfide mineralization is also found near the contacts or margins of layered mafic to ultramafic intrusions (Iljina and Lee, 2005). This contact-type mineralization consists of disseminated to massive concentrations of iron-copper-nickel-PGE-enriched sulfide mineral concentrations in zones that can be tens to hundreds

  11. Genesis of sediment-hosted disseminated-gold deposits by fluid mixing and sulfidization: chemical-reaction-path modeling of ore- depositional processes documented in the Jerritt Canyon district, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hofstra, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    Integrated geologic, geochemical, fluid-inclusion, and stable-isotope studies of the gold deposits in the Jerritt Canyon district, Nevada, provide evidence that gold deposition was a consequence of both fluid mixing and sulfidization of host-rock iron. Chemical-reaction-path models of these ore-depositional processes confirm that the combination of fluid mixing, including simultaneous cooling, dilution, and oxidation of the ore fluid, and wall-rock reaction, with sulfidization of reactive iron in the host rock, explains the disseminated nature and small size of the gold and the alteration zonation, mineralogy, and geochemistry observed at Jerritt Canyon and at many other sediment-hosted disseminated gold deposits. -Authors

  12. How metallic is the binding state of indium hosted by excess-metal chalcogenides in ore deposits?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondina Figueiredo, Maria; Pena Silva, Teresa; Oliveira, Daniel; Rosa, Diogo

    2010-05-01

    Discovered in 1863, indium is nowadays a strategic scarce metal used both in classical technologic fields (like low melting-temperature alloys and solders) and in innovative nano-technologies to produce "high-tech devices" by means of new materials, namely liquid crystal displays (LCDs), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and the recently introduced transparent flexible thin-films manufactured with ionic amorphous oxide semiconductors (IAOS). Indium is a typical chalcophile element, seldom forming specific minerals and occurring mainly dispersed within polymetallic sulphides, particularly with excess metal ions [1]. The average content of indium in the Earth's crust is very low but a further increase in its demand is still expected in the next years, thus focusing a special interest in uncovering new exploitation sites through promising polymetallic sulphide ores - e.g., the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) [2] - and in improving recycling technologies. Indium recovery stands mostly on zinc extraction from sphalerite, the natural cubic sulphide which is the prototype of so-called "tetrahedral sulphides" where metal ions fill half of the available tetrahedral sites within the cubic closest packing of sulphur anions where the double of unfilled interstices are available for further in-filling. It is worth remarking that such packing array is particularly suitable for accommodating polymetallic cations by filling closely located interstitial sites [3] as happens in excess-metal tetrahedral sulphides - e.g. bornite, ideally Cu5FeS4, recognized as an In-carrying mineral [4]. Studying the tendency towards In-In interactions able of leading to the formation of polycations would efficiently contribute to understand indium crystal chemistry and the metal binding state in natural chalcogenides. Accordingly, an X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) study at In L3-edge was undertaken using the instrumental set-up of ID21 beamline at the ESRF (European Synchrotron

  13. Magmatogenic manganese ores of the South Minusa Intermontane Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassandrov, E. G.; Mazurov, M. P.

    2009-10-01

    The first data on the mineral composition and formation conditions of manganese ore at the Chapsordag and Malosyrsky deposits in the Askiz ore district of Khakassia are integrated and systematized. The detailed mineralogical mapping of the deposits has been carried out. The identification of minerals and examination of the ore microstructure were performed with optical microscopy in transmitted and reflected light and using SEM/EDS, EMPA, XRD, IRS, and other methods. It was established that the ore mineralization is spatially and genetically related to the Early Devonian magmatism and accompanying hydrothermal activity and metasomatism. Syngenetic braunite was detected for the first time in elevated amounts reaching an economic level in the devitrified groundmass of volcanic rocks, in cement of lava breccia, and in fragments in pyroclastic rocks. By analogy with iron deposits, this magmatogenic type of manganese mineralization is regarded as ore lavas and tuffs combined with metasomatic and hydrothermal mineral assemblages into a strata-bound orebearing complex and as a source of hydrothermal metasomatic ore. The elevated Mn content in magmatic melts of the Early Devonian trachybasalt-trachyandesite-trachydacite association is caused by assimilation of Riphean and Lower Cambrian high-Mn carbonate sequences in crustal magma chambers. In contours of economic orebodies, the hydrothermal economic ore is recognized as sites of massive, patchy and impregnated, brecciated, stringer-disseminated, and disseminated varieties. High-grade massive ore occurs as stratiform and branching bodies up to 1.5 m thick and a few tens of meters long and as smaller pocketlike bodies. Braunite and pyrolusite (polianite) are major ore minerals varying in size, degree of crystallinity, and character of intergrowths with associating minerals. Gangue minerals include carbonates, sulfates, albite, quartz, chlorite, actinolite, piemontite, and okhotskite, a Mn-pumpellyite identified in Russia

  14. Alfred E. Bergeat (1866-1924): a distinguished volcanologist and ore deposit researching scientist at the mining academies of Freiberg (Saxony) and Clausthal (Harz mountains) in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaffl, Fritz A.

    2010-06-01

    Alfred E. Bergeat, originated from a family, who produced gold-glance in a factory (porcelain painting), studied mineralogy and geology at the University of Munich from 1886 to 1892. Due to the results of his habilitation work on the volcanism of island arcs, especially of the Stromboli volcanic island in the Tyrrhenian Sea, he became a recognized volcanologist and specialist in volcanic petrography. He further became an explorer of syngenetic, epigenetic and deuterogenic ore deposits at the mining academies (Bergakademien) of Freiberg (Saxony) and Clausthal (Harz mountains). He described these ore deposits in a two-volume manual (1904-1906) which was summarized again in 1913. After his early death in 1924, the two manuals “Die Vulkane” (1925) and “Vulkankunde” (1927) were posthumously published by his colleague and friend Karl Sapper (1866-1945).

  15. The Reocín zinc-lead deposit, Spain: paleomagnetic dating of a late Tertiary ore body

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symons, David T. A.; Lewchuk, Michael T.; Kawasaki, Kazuo; Velasco, Francisco; Leach, David L.

    2009-01-01

    The Reocín mine in northern Spain’s Basque–Cantabrian basin exploited a world-class Mississippi Valley-type Zn–Pb deposit. Its epigenetic mineralization is in Urgonian 116 ± 1 Ma dolomitized limestones of the Santillana syncline, which was formed by Oligocene and mid Miocene pulses of the Pyrenean orogeny. Paleomagnetic results (22 sites, 274 specimens) in mineralization isolated a stable remanence (ChRM) in pyrrhotite and minor magnetite inclusions in ore specimens, Zn concentrate, and tailings. A fold test shows that the ChRM is substantially post-folding. The mineralization’s paleopole lies on the European apparent polar wander path and indicates that the mineralization was formed at 15 ± 10 Ma. We postulate that brines originated in underlying Triassic and Lower Cretaceous sedimentary rocks and were driven upward into the host rocks by the hydraulic gradient created by the nearby Asturian massif.

  16. Rock chemistry and fluid inclusion studies as exploration tools for ore deposits in the Sila batholith, southern Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    de Vivo, B.; Ayuso, R.A.; Belkin, H.E.; Lima, A.; Messina, A.; Viscardi, A.

    1991-01-01

    The Sila batholith is the focus of an extensive petrogenetic research program, which includes an assessment of its potential to host granite-related ore deposits. Univariate and multivariate statistical techniques were applied to major- and minor-element rock geochemical data. The analysis indicates that the highest potential for mineralization occurs in corundum-normative, peraluminous, unfoliated, relatively late-stage plutons. The plutons are enriched in Rb, Nb, Ta and U, but depleted in Fe, Mg and Sr. The K/Rb, Ba/Rb, Rb/Sr and Rb3/Ba??Sr??K indices and high R-factor scores of Si-K-Rb are typical of mineralized granitic rocks. A reconnaissance fluid inclusion study indicates that the sub-solidus rock was infiltrated by solutions of widely different temperatures (50-416??C) and variable salinities (0 to ???26 wt.% NaCl equivalent). The higher-temperature solutions probably represent granite or magmatic-related Hercynian fluids, whereas the lower-temperature fluids may be either Hercynian or Alpine in age. Fluids with characteristics typical of mineralized "porphyry" systems have not been recognized. ?? 1991.

  17. Measurement of uranium series radionuclides in rock and groundwater at the Koongarra ore deposit, Australia, by gamma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yanase, Nobuyuki; Sekine, Keiichi

    1995-12-31

    Gamma spectrometry without any self-absorption correction was developed to measure low energy gamma rays emitted by uranium and actinium series radionuclides in rock samples and groundwater residues collected at the Koongarra ore deposit, Australia. Thin samples were prepared to minimize the self-absorption by uranium in the samples. The present method gave standard deviations of 0.9 to 18% for the measurements of concentrations of uranium and actinium series radionuclides. The concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 230}Th and {sup 235}U measured by gamma spectrometry were compared with those by alpha spectrometry that requires a complicated chemical separation procedure. The results obtained by both methods were in fairly good agreement, and it was found that the gamma spectrometry is applicable to rock and groundwater samples having uranium content sup to 8.1% (10{sup 3} B1/g) and 3 Bq/l of {sup 238}U, respectively. The detection limits were calculated to be of the order of 10{sup {minus}2} Bq/g for rock samples and 10{sup {minus}1} Bq/l for groundwater samples. The concentrations of uranium and actinium series radionuclides can be determined precisely in these samples using gamma spectrometry without any self-absorption correction.

  18. Host-rock controlled epigenetic, hydrothermal metasomatic origin of the Bayan Obo REEFe-Nb ore deposit, Inner Mongolia, P.R.C.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, E.C.T.; Back, J.M.; Minkin, J.A.; Yinchen, R.

    1992-01-01

    Bayan Obo, a complex rare earth element (REE)FeNb ore deposit, located in Inner Mongolia, P.R.C. is the world's largest known REE deposit. The deposit is chiefly in a marble unit (H8), but extends into an overlying unit of black shale, slate and schist unit (H9), both of which are in the upper part of the Middle Proterozoic Bayan Obo Group. Based on sedimentary structures, the presence of detrital quartz and algal fossil remains, and the 16-km long geographic extent, the H8 marble is a sedimentary deposit, and not a carbonatite of magmatic origin, as proposed by some previous investigators. The unit was weakly regionally metamorphosed (most probably the lower part of the green schist facies) into marble and quartzite prior to mineralization. Tectonically, the deposit is located on the northern flank of the Sino-Korean craton. Many hypotheses have been proposed for the origin of the Bayan Obo deposit; the studies reported here support an epigenetic, hydrothermal, metasomatic origin. Such an origin is supported by field and laboratory textural evidence; 232Th/208Pb internal isochron mineral ages of selected monazite and bastnaesite samples; 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating minimum mineral ages of selected alkali amphiboles; chemical compositions of different generations of both REE ore minerals and alkali amphiboles; and evidence of host-rock influence on the various types of Bayan Obo ores. The internal isochron ages of the REE minerals indicate Caledonian ages for various episodes of REE and Fe mineralization. No evidence was found to indicate a genetic relation between the extensive biotite granitic rocks of Hercynian age in the mine region and the Bayan Obo are deposit, as suggested by previous workers. ?? 1992.

  19. Relation of ERTS-1 detected geologic structure to known economic ore deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, E. I.

    1973-01-01

    A preliminary analysis of ERTS-1 imagery of the Northern Coast Ranges and Sacramento Valley, California, has disclosed a potentially important fracture system which may be one of the controlling factors in the location of known mercury deposits in the Coast Ranges and which appears to be associated with some of the oil and gas fields within the Sacramento Valley. Recognition of this fracture system may prove to be an extremely useful exploration tool, hence careful analysis of subsequent ERTS imagery might delineate areas for field evaluation.

  20. Effects of simulated deposition of acid mist and iron ore particulate matter on photosynthesis and the generation of oxidative stress in Schinus terebinthifolius Radii and Sophora tomentosa L.

    PubMed

    Kuki, Kacilda Naomi; Oliva, Marco Antônio; Pereira, Eduardo Gusmão; Costa, Alan Carlos; Cambraia, José

    2008-09-15

    Particulate matter is a natural occurrence in the environment, but some industries, such as the iron ore sector, can raise the total amount of particles in the atmosphere. This industry is primarily a source of iron and sulfur dioxide particulates. The effects of the pollutants from the iron ore industries on representatives of restinga vegetation in a Brazilian coastal ecosystem were investigated using physiological and biochemical measures. Two species, Schinus terebinthifolius and Sophora tomentosa, were exposed to simulated deposition of acid mist and iron ore particulate matter in acrylic chambers in a greenhouse. Parameters such as gas exchange, fluorescence emission, chlorophyll content, total iron content, antioxidant enzyme activity and malondialdehyde content were assessed in order to evaluate the responses of the two species. Neither treatment was capable of inducing oxidative stress in S. terebinthifolius. Nevertheless, the deposition of iron ore particulates on this species increased chlorophyll content, the maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II and the electron transport rate, while iron content was unaltered. On the other hand, S. tomentosa showed a greater sensitivity to the treatments. Plants of S. tomentosa that were exposed to acid mist had a decrease in photosynthesis, while the deposition of iron particulate matter led to an increase in iron content and membrane permeability of the leaves. The activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as catalases and superoxide dismutase, were enhanced by both treatments. The results suggested that the two restinga species use different strategies to overcome the stressful conditions created by the deposition of particulate matter, either solid or wet. It seems that while S. terebinthifolius avoided stress, S. tomentosa used antioxidant enzyme systems to partially neutralize oxidative stress. The findings also point to the potential use of S. tomentosa as a biomarker species under field conditions.

  1. The conjunction of factors that lead to formation of giant gold provinces and deposits in non-arc settings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groves, David I.; Goldfarb, Richard J.; Santosh, M.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to their province scale similarities, the different giant gold deposit styles show contrasting critical controls at the district to deposit scale. For orogenic gold deposits, the giants appear to have formed by conjunction of a greater number of parameters to those that control smaller deposits, with resultant geometrical and lithostratigraphic complexity as a guide to their location. There are few giant IRGS due to their inferior fluid-flux systems relative to orogenic gold deposits, and those few giants are essentially preservational exceptions. Many Carlin-type deposits are giants due to the exceptional conjunction of both structural and lithological parameters that caused reactive and permeable rocks, enriched in syngenetic gold, to be located below an impermeable cap along antiformal “trends”. Hydrocarbons probably played an important role in concentrating metal. The supergiant Post-Betze deposit has additional ore zones in strain heterogeneities surrounding the pre-gold Goldstrike stock. All unequivocal IOCG deposits are giant or near-giant deposits in terms of gold-equivalent resources, partly due to economic factors for this relatively poorly understood, low Cu-Au grade deposit type. The supergiant Olympic Dam deposit, the most shallowly formed deposit among the larger IOCGs, probably owes its origin to eruption of volatile-rich hybrid magma at surface, with formation of a large maar and intense and widespread brecciation, alteration and Cu-Au-U deposition in a huge rock volume.

  2. Positive feedback between strain localization and fluid flow at the ductile-brittle transition leading to Pb-Zn-Fe-Cu-Ag ore deposits in Lavrion (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffer, Christophe; Tarantola, Alexandre; Vanderhaeghe, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    At the crustal scale, the ductile-brittle transition (DBT) might correspond to a physical barrier that separates a deep reservoir of metamorphic and magmatic fluids from a shallow reservoir of surficial fluids. Rock rheology, and thus the location of the DBT, is mainly governed by lithology, temperature and the presence/absence of fluids. Accordingly, the position of the DBT potentially evolves during orogenic evolution owing to thermal evolution and fluid circulation. In turn rocks are transferred across it during burial and exhumation. These processes induce connections between fluid reservoirs which might play a role on ore deposition. In this contribution, we discuss the impact of lithological heterogeneities on deformation, fluid flow and ore deposition based on the example of the Lavrion low-angle top-to-the-SSW detachment accommodating gravitational collapse of the Hellenides orogenic belt in Greece. The Lavrion peninsula, localized along the western boundary of the Attic-Cycladic Metamorphic Core Complex, is characterized by Pb-Zn-Fe-Cu-Ag ore mineralization mainly concentrated along a lithological contact (marble/schists) below and within a detachment shear zone. The mylonitic marble below the detachment shear zone is composed of white layers of pure marble alternating with blue layers containing impurities (SiO2, Al2O3, organic matter…). Development of the mylonitic fabric in competent impure blue marble is associated with its preferred dolomitization related to focused fluid infiltration. This mylonitic marble is cross-cut by several cataclastic horizons preferentially developed within the more competent impure blue marble and newly-crystallized dolomitic horizon. These cataclasites are invaded by fluorite and calcite gangue minerals showing locally Mn, Pb, Zn, Fe oxides and/or hydroxides, sphalerite, Ag-galena, Ag-sulfur and native Ag. Oxygen and carbon stable isotopes performed on marble sections point out decarbonation with magmatic contribution and

  3. A unique ore-placer cluster with high-Hg gold mineralization in the Amur region (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, V. A.; Moyseenko, V. G.; Melnikov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    This work presents the geological structure and a description of gold-ore manifestations and gold placers in the Un'ya-Bom ore-placer cluster of the Amur gold-bearing province. The host rocks are Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic black-shale formations. Intrusive formations are rare. The sublatitudinal Un'ya thrust fault, along which Paleozoic sandstones overlap Mesozoic flyschoid deposits, is regarded as an orecontrolling structure. Gold-quartz and low-sulfide ores are confined to quartz-vein zones. Ore minerals are arsenopyrite, scheelite, ferberite, galena, and native gold. Gold-ore manifestations and placers contain high-Hg native gold. The high Hg content in native gold is explained by the occurrence of the eroded frontal part of the gold-ore pipe in the ore cluster, a source of native gold.

  4. Formation of the enigmatic Matoush uranium deposit in the Paleoprotozoic Otish Basin, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, Paul; Kyser, Kurt; Layton-Matthews, Daniel; Beyer, Steve R.; Hiatt, Eric E.; Lafontaine, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    The Matoush uranium deposit is situated in the Paleoproterozoic Otish Basin, northern Quebec, Canada, and is hosted by the Indicator Formation sandstones. Its sheet-like ore bodies are closely associated with the steeply dipping Matoush Fracture, which hosts mafic dykes and minor quartz-feldspar-tourmaline pegmatites. Regional diagenesis, involving oxidizing basinal fluids (δ2H ˜-15‰, δ18O ˜8‰), produced mostly illite and possibly leached U from accessory phases in the Indicator Formation sandstones. The bimodal Matoush dyke intruded the Indicator Formation along the Matoush Fracture, and the related metasomatism produced Cr-rich dravite and muscovite in both the dyke and the proximal sandstones. Uraninite formed when U6+ in the basinal brine was reduced to U4+ in contact with the mafic dyke and by Fe2+ in Cr-dravite and Cr-muscovite, and precipitated together with eskolaite and hematite. Because of its unique characteristics, the Matoush deposit cannot be easily classified within the generally accepted classification of uranium deposits. Two of its main characteristics (unusual reduction mechanism, structural control) do not correspond to the sandstone-hosted group of deposits (unconformity type, tabular, roll front), in spite of uranium being derived from the Otish Group sandstones.

  5. Sulfur-containing particles emitted by concealed sulfide ore deposits: an unknown source of sulfur-containing particles in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J. J.; Li, Y. K.; Jiang, T.; Hu, G.

    2015-06-01

    Sources of sulfur dioxide, sulfates, and organic sulfur compounds, such as fossil fuels, volcanic eruptions, and animal feeding operations, have attracted considerable attention. In this study, we collected particles carried by geogas flows ascending through soil, geogas flows above the soil that had passed through the soil, and geogas flows ascending through deep faults of concealed sulfide ore deposits, and analysed them using transmission electron microscopy. Numerous crystalline and amorphous sulfur-containing particles or particle aggregations were found in the ascending geogas flows. In addition to S, the particles contained O, Ca, K, Mg, Fe, Na, Pb, Hg, Cu, Zn, As, Ti, Sr, Ba, Si, etc. Such particles are usually a few to several hundred nanometres in diameter with either regular or irregular morphology. The sulfur-containing particles originated from deep-seated weathering or faulting products of concealed sulfide ore deposits. The particles suspended in the ascending geogas flow migrated through faults from deep-seated sources to the atmosphere. This is a previously unknown source of the atmospheric particles. This paper reports, for the first time, the emission of sulfur-containing particles into the atmosphere from concealed sulfide ore deposits. The climatic and ecological influences of these sulfur-containing particles and particle aggregations should be assessed.

  6. Sulfur-containing particles emitted by concealed sulfide ore deposits: an unknown source of sulfur-containing particles in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J.; Li, Y.; Jiang, T.; Hu, G.

    2014-11-01

    Sources of sulfur dioxide, sulfates, and organic sulfur compounds, such as fossil fuels, volcanic eruptions, and animal feeding operations, have attracted considerable attention. In this study, we collected particles carried by geogas flows ascending through soil, geogas flows above the soil that had passed through the soil, and geogas flows ascending through deep faults of concealed sulfide ore deposits and analyzed them using transmission electron microscopy. Numerous crystalline and amorphous sulfur-containing particles or particle aggregations were found in the ascending geogas flows. In addition to S, the particles contained O, Ca, K, Mg, Fe, Na, Pb, Hg, Cu, Zn, As, Ti, Sr, Ba, Si, etc. Such particles are usually a few to several hundred nanometers in diameter with either regular or irregular morphology. The sulfur-containing particles originated from deep-seated weathering or faulting products of concealed sulfide ore deposits. The particles suspended in the ascending geogas flow migrated through faults from deep-seated sources to the atmosphere. This is a previously unknown source of the atmospheric particles. This paper reports, for the first time, the emission of sulfur-containing particles into the atmosphere from concealed sulfide ore deposits. The climatic and ecological influences of these sulfur-containing particles and particle aggregations should to be assessed.

  7. Paleomagnetic Constraints on the age of the Lisheen Zn-Pb Deposit, Ireland: A Pre- Variscan Metamorphosed "MVT" Versus an Epigenetic Variscan Model for Ore Genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannalal, S. J.; Symons, D. T.; Sangster, D. F.

    2009-05-01

    Lower Carboniferous carbonate units in the Irish Midlands host major Zn-Pb ore deposits in two units, the Navan Group and the Waulsortian Limestone. The age and, therefore, the genesis of these ore deposits remains controversial because of the lack of absolute geochronological constraints. In addition, the effect of the Early Permian Variscan thermal episode, observed by elevated conodont color alteration indices in all Carboniferous strata in Ireland, on the Zn-Pb ore deposits is not clearly understood. This paleomagnetic study was undertaken to date and, thereby, constrain the genesis of the Waulsortian Limestone-hosted Lisheen Zn- Pb ore deposit. Specimens (432) from 12 sites in ore mineralization and 10 sites in host rocks at Lisheen were subjected to alternating-field and thermal step demagnetization protocols. Analysis of these specimens isolated a well-defined stable shallow and southerly-up paleomagnetic characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) direction. Saturation remanence tests, thermal decay data, and a paleomagnetic tilt test indicate a post-folding ChRM that is carried dominantly by single-domain magnetite. The ChRM directions from 8 host rock and 11 Zn-Pb mineralized sites are indistinguishable at 95% confidence, and give a mean paleopole at 41.6° S, 18.8° W (dp = 1.7°, dm = 3.3° ) with a paleomagnetic age of 277 ± 7 (2 σ) Ma on the apparent polar wander path for Laurentia in European coordinates. This Early Permian magnetization postdates peak-Variscan orogenic heating to ˜ 350° C in the surrounding region, suggesting two basic genetic models for Lisheen's Zn-Pb mineralization i.e. Variscan and metamorphosed pre-Variscan. The Variscan model, our preferred interpretation, suggests that the Zn-Pb mineralizing event occurred at 277 Ma during cooling from the regional Variscan thermal episode. This model, in conjunction with other thermal data, supports an entirely epigenetic origin that invokes a topographically-driven fluid flow, either

  8. Geochronology, petrogenesis and tectonic settings of pre- and syn-ore granites from the W-Mo deposits (East Kounrad, Zhanet and Akshatau), Central Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, GuangMing; Cao, MingJian; Qin, KeZhang; Evans, Noreen J.; Hollings, Pete; Seitmuratova, Eleonora Yusupovha

    2016-05-01

    There is significant debate regarding the mineralization ages of the East Kounrad, Zhanet and Akshatau W-Mo deposits of Central Kazakhstan, and the petrogenesis and tectono-magmatic evolution of the granites associated with these deposits. To address these issues, we present molybdenite Re-Os dating, zircon U-Pb dating, whole rock geochemistry as well as Sr-Nd-Pb and zircon O-Hf isotopic analyses on the pre-mineralization and ore-forming granites. U-Pb dating of zircons from pre-mineralization granitic rocks yield Late Carboniferous ages of 320-309 Ma, whereas ore-forming granites have Early Permian ages of 298-285 Ma. Molybdenite Re-Os isotopic data indicate a mineralization age of ~ 296 Ma at East Kounrad, ~ 294 Ma at Akshatau and ~ 285 Ma at Zhanet. The pre-ore and ore-forming granites are high-K calc-alkaline, metaluminous to slightly peraluminous I-type granites. The pre-mineralization granites are relatively unfractionated, whereas the ore-forming granites are highly fractionated. The fractionating mineral phases are probably K-feldspar, apatite, Ti-bearing phases and minor plagioclase. The pre-mineralization and ore-forming rocks are characterized by similar Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf-O isotopic compositions ((87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.70308-0.70501, εNd (t) = - 0.5 to + 2.8, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.60-15.82, zircon εHf (t) = + 1.2 to + 15.6 and δ18O = + 4.6 to + 10.3‰), whole rock TDMC (Nd) (840-1120 Ma) and zircon TDMC (Hf) (320-1240 Ma). The isotopic characteristics are consistent with a hybrid magma source caused by 10-30% assimilation of ancient crust by juvenile lower crust. The geochronology and geochemistry of these granites show that the Late Carboniferous pre-mineralization granitic rocks formed during subduction, whereas the Early Permian ore-forming, highly fractionated granite probably underwent significant fractionation with a restite assemblage of K-feldspar, apatite, Ti-bearing phases and minor plagioclase and developed during collision between the Yili and Kazakhstan

  9. The geology and ore deposits of Upper Mayflower Gulch, Summit County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Randall, John Alexander

    1958-01-01

    Upper Mayflower Gulch is on the highly glaciated western side of the Tenmile Range near Kokomo in central Colorado. Somewhat less than $500,000 in silver and gold has been produced from the area since the first mining in the 1880' s. In the mapped area high grade regional metamorphism has produced two varieties of gneiss and a granulite. Total thickness of the rocks is about 5,000 feet. Relict bedding is preserved in compositional banding which strikes north to N. 20 ? E. and dips 70 ? to 80 ? southeast. No significant folding was observed. Normal faulting has occurred since the Precambrian; two major sets of faults are recognizable: (1) a set striking N. 70 ? to 85 ? E. and dipping 75?-85 ? NW; and (2) a set striking N. 70?-50 ? W. and dipping 50?-60 ? SW. Tabular bodies of pegmatite and retrogressively metamorphosed schist along many faults indicate Precambrian movement. The Mayflower fault, a 90 to 300 foot wide zone of siltification and shattered rock, strikes about N. 40 ? W. It extends the entire length of the gulch and appears to form the northern terminus for the northeast trending Mosquito Fault. The Mayflower fault shows repeated movement since the Precambrian, totaling about 3,000 feet of apparent dip slip and 640 feet of apparent strike slip. Faulting during the Tertiary includes both additional movement along Precambrian faults and development of shears trending N. to N. 20 ? E. The shears served as channels for the intrusion of two varieties of quartz latite porphyry dikes. Specular hematite and base-metal sulfide mineralization followed intrusion of the porphyry dikes; the minerals were deposited in open fault zones by high temperature solutions in a low pressure environment. The principal metallic minerals in order of deposition are: hematite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, galena, and rarer argentite. The major mines are the Gold Crest, Payrock, Nova Scotia Boy, and Bird's Nest.

  10. Preliminary mineralogical data on epithermal ore veins associated with Rosia Poieni porphyry copper deposit, Apuseni Mountains, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iatan, E. L.; Popescu, Gh. C.

    2012-04-01

    Rosia Poieni is the largest porphyry copper (±Au±Mo) deposits associated with Neogene magmatic rocks from the South Apuseni Mountains, being located approximately 8 km northeast of the town of Abrud. During a recent examination of some epithermal mineralized veins, crosscutting the porphyry mineralization from the Roşia Poieni deposit, two species of tellurides and one tellurosulfide minerals were identified. The studied samples were collected from the + 1045 m level, SW side of the open pit and are represented by epithermal veins, crosscutting the porphyry copper mineralized body. The thickness of the veins is almost 4 cm. Following reflected-polarized light microscopy to identify the ore-mineral assemblages, the polished sections were studied with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) equipped with a back-scattered electron (BSE) detector to study fine-sized minerals. Quantitative compositional data were determined using a Cameca SX 50 electron microprobe (EMP). Based on optical microscopy, SEM and EMPA three mineral associations have been separated inside the epithermal vein, from the margins to the centre: 1. quartz+tennantite-tetrahedrite+goldfieldite+pyrite+sphalerite; 2. quartz+pyrite+tellurobismutite; 3. chalcopyrite+hessite+vivianite. Goldfieldite occurs in anhedral grains and it is associated with tennantite-tetrahedrite and quartz. The electron microprobe analysis gave a variable content in Te between 13.28-13.39 wt.%, 43.34 wt.% Cu, 0.1 wt. % Fe, 0.2 wt.% Zn, 14.68 wt.% As, 4.35 wt.% Sb and 24.84 wt.% S. The calculated formula for the goldfieldite is Cu11.8Te1.8(Sb,As)4S13.4. The EPM analyses on tetrahedrite-tennantite revealed a low content in Te (0.02-0.03 wt.%) and 42.23 wt.% Cu, 2.67 wt.% Fe, 7.34 wt.% Zn, 0.04 wt.% Sb, 19.28 wt.% As and 28.4 wt.% S. The calculated formula is Cu9.8(Fe,Zn)2.4(Sb,As,Te)3.8S13. The variable ratio of the Te content may reflect a variable content of Te in the hydrothermal fluids from which the tellurian tetrahedrite

  11. Lead isotope studies of the Guerrero composite terrane, west-central Mexico: implications for ore genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potra, Adriana; Macfarlane, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    New thermal ionization mass spectrometry and multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry Pb isotope analyses of three Cenozoic ores from the La Verde porphyry copper deposit located in the Zihuatanejo-Huetamo subterrane of the Guerrero composite terrane are presented and the metal sources are evaluated. Lead isotope ratios of 3 Cenozoic ores from the El Malacate and La Esmeralda porphyry copper deposits located in the Zihuatanejo-Huetamo subterrane and of 14 ores from the Zimapan and La Negra skarn deposits from the adjoining Sierra Madre terrane are also presented to look for systematic differences in the lead isotope trends and ore metal sources among the proposed exotic tectonostratigraphic terranes of southern Mexico. Comparison among the isotopic signatures of ores from the Sierra Madre terrane and distinct subterranes of the Guerrero terrane supports the idea that there is no direct correlation between the distinct suspect terranes of Mexico and the isotopic signatures of the associated Cenozoic ores. Rather, these Pb isotope patterns are interpreted to reflect increasing crustal contribution to mantle-derived magmas as the arc advanced eastward onto a progressively thicker continental crust. The lead isotope trend observed in Cenozoic ores is not recognized in the ores from Mesozoic volcanogenic massive sulfide and sedimentary exhalative deposits. The Mesozoic ores formed prior to the amalgamation of the Guerrero composite terrane to the continental margin, which took place during the Late Cretaceous, in intraoceanic island arc and intracontinental marginal basin settings, while the Tertiary deposits formed after this event in a continental arc setting. Lead isotope ratios of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic ores appear to reflect these differences in tectonic setting of ore formation. Most Pb isotope values of ores from the La Verde deposit (206Pb/204Pb = 18.674-18.719) are less radiogenic than those of the host igneous rocks, but plot within the

  12. Geology and ore deposits of the Globe-Miami district, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, N.P.

    1962-01-01

    The rocks of the Globe-Miami district range from lower Precambrian to Recent. The oldest formation, the Pinal schist, comprises several varieties of schist formed by dynamic and thermal metamorphism of shale and feldspathic sandstone during the early Precambrian Mazatzal revolution. During the later stages of this revolution, the schist was intruded by a complex of dioritic rocks and by plutons of granite and quartz monzonite. There were extensive intrusions of a biotite-quartz diorite, known as the Madera diorite, mainly south of the district. In the northern part of the mapped area, the schist was invaded by an extensive mass, the Ruin granite, which is a coarse-grained rock most commonly of quartz monzonitic composition. There are also smaller sill-like masses of slightly gneissic muscovite granite.

  13. Sulphur isotope geochemistry of the ores and country rocks at the Almadén mercury deposit, Ciudad Real, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saupé, Francis; Arnold, Michel

    1992-10-01

    Seventy-four new S isotope analyses of ore minerals and country rocks are given for the Hg deposit of Almadén. The spread of the cinnabar δ34S is narrow within each of the three orebodies, but the δ34S average values differ sufficiently between them (mean δ34S: San Nicolas = 0.2 ± 1.1 %., San Francisco = 8.1 ± 0.7%., San Pedro = 5.9 ± 1.0%.) to indicate three different mineralization episodes and possibly processes. The unweighted mean for all cinnabar samples is 5.6%. and the S source is considered to be the host-rocks, either the Footwall Shales ( δ34S = 5.5%.) or the spilites ( δ34 S = 5.1 ± 1.3%.). For geometric and chronologic reasons, the former seem the best potential source. However, the high δ34 S values of the San Francisco cinnabar cannot be explained without addition of heavy S from reduction of seawater sulphate. Orderly distributions of the δ34S values are observed in all three orebodies: (1) their increase from the stratigraphic bottom to the top in the San Pedro orebody is explained by a Rayleigh process, and (2) the maxima in the centres of the San Francisco and San Nicolas orebodies are explained by mixing of the S transporting hydrothermal fluids with seawater within the sediments. Associated pyrite and cinnabar were deposited under isotopic disequilibrium, probably because the low solubility of cinnabar caused rapid precipitation of cinnabar. The different morphological pyrite types have their own isotopic δ34S signatures. The spilites are notably enriched in S ( n = 3; average S content = 0.56%) compared to normal basalts (1000 ppm) and have an average δ34S = 5.1 ± 1.3%.. The linear relationship between the δ34S and the S content of the spilites is interpreted as a mixing line between mantle S and a constant S source, probably an infinite open reservoir. An incomplete basalt-seawater reaction at nearly constant temperature is the best explanation for this relation. The S (predominantly pyrite) of the black shales ( n = 3; δ34S

  14. Introduction to ore geology

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    This textbook on ore geology is for second and third year undergraduates and closely parallels the undergraduate course given in this subject at England's University of Leicester. The volume covers three major areas: (1) principles of ore geology, (2) examples of the most important types of ore deposits, and (3) mineralization in space and time. Many chapters have been thoroughly revised for this edition and a chapter on diamonds has been added. Chapters on greisen and pegmatite have also been added, the former in response to the changing situation in tin mining following the recent tin crisis, and the latter in response to suggestions from geologists in a number of overseas countries. Some chapters have been considerably expanded and new sections added, including disseminated gold deposits and unconformity-associated uranium deposits. The author also expands on the importance of viewing mineral deposits from an economic standpoint.

  15. Complex, multiple ore fluids in the world class southeast Missouri Pb-Zn-Cu MVT deposits: Sulfur isotope evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Burstein, I.B.; Shelton, K.L. ); Gregg, J.M.; Hagni, R.D. . Dept. of Geology Geophysics)

    1993-03-01

    More than 625 sulfur isotope data from all of the mines in the Viburnum Trend Pb-Zn-Cu MVT district of southeast Missouri have identified large temporal variations of sulfur isotope composition within the complex mineral paragenesis of each mine as well as large spatial variations in sulfur isotope composition within and among mines. The general trend of [delta][sup 34]S values with increasing paragenetic time is: Early pyrite, [minus]9 to [minus]1[per thousand]; Early bornite-chalcopyrite, [minus]9 to +16[per thousand]; Massive chalcopyrite, [minus]14 to +9[per thousand]; Main sphalerite, +12 to +26[per thousand]; Cuboctahedral galena, +5 to +22[per thousand]; Main marcasite, [minus]19 to +9[per thousand]; Cubic galena, [minus]2 to +13[per thousand] Late sphalerite, +6 to +13[per thousand]; Late marcasite, +10 to +19[per thousand]; Late chalcopyrite, +2 to +33[per thousand]. Spatial correlation of [delta][sup 34]S values of the Main stages of sulfide mineralization in the West Fork mine may indicate that the cuboctahedral galena in this mine was precipitated from a Pb-rich, S-poor fluid that incorporated sulfur from reaction with earlier marcasite. In the rest of the district, ore precipitation may have occurred by mixing of Pb-rich, S-poor fluids with Pb-poor, S-rich fluids. Complex mineral parageneses and sulfur isotope systematics within the southeast Missouri Pb-Zn-Cu MVT deposits are compatible with multiple, metal-specific fluids and multiple precipitation mechanisms, as well as multiple sulfur sources.

  16. Structural evolution of the Mount Wall region in the Hamersley province, Western Australia and its control on hydrothermal alteration and formation of high-grade iron deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalstra, Hilke J.

    2014-10-01

    The discovery of two relatively small but high-grade iron ore deposits near Mt Wall, an intensely faulted part of the southwestern Hamersley province provides unique insights into the structural control on ore formation in this region. The deposits have many geological features typical of the high grade microplaty hematite group which also contains the much larger Mt Tom Price, Paraburdoo and Mt Whaleback deposits. The deposits are structurally controlled along early normal faults and contain abundant microplaty hematite and martite, and are largely confined to the Dales Gorge member of the Brockman Iron Formation. In addition to the microplaty hematite-martite ore, there are martite-goethite ores and rare magnetite-goethite or magnetite-hematite ores. Below the modern weathering surface, hydrothermally altered zones in wallrock BIF from the Lower Dales Gorge member contain magnetite, hematite and carbonate/talc bearing mineral assemblages. A staged ore genesis model involving early extension and fluid circulation along normal faults, hypogene silica leaching and carbonate alteration, followed by deep meteoric oxidation with microplaty hematite formation and finally weathering can explain most features of the Mt Wall deposits. The role of deformation was to provide pathways for mineralising fluids and initiate the seed points for the mineralised systems. High grade iron in the Wellthandalthaluna deposit is situated between the NW to NNW trending Boolgeeda Creek fault and a synthetic joining splay, the Northern fault. Both are high angle normal faults and formed during early extension in this part of the province. Faults are characterised by localised small scale deformation and brecciation, deep carbonate alteration and oxidation. Recent weathering has penetrated deeply into the fault zones, converting the carbonate-rich assemblages into goethite. Mineralisation in the Arochar deposit is situated in the overlap or relay zone between two segments of the Mt Wall

  17. Photosynthesis and oxidative stress in the restinga plant species Eugenia uniflora L. exposed to simulated acid rain and iron ore dust deposition: potential use in environmental risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Neves, Natália Rust; Oliva, Marco Antonio; da Cruz Centeno, Danilo; Costa, Alan Carlos; Ribas, Rogério Ferreira; Pereira, Eduardo Gusmão

    2009-06-01

    The Brazilian sandy coastal plain named restinga is frequently subjected to particulate and gaseous emissions from iron ore factories. These gases may come into contact with atmospheric moisture and produce acid rain. The effects of the acid rain on vegetation, combined with iron excess in the soil, can lead to the disappearance of sensitive species and decrease restinga biodiversity. The effects of iron ore dust deposition and simulated acid rain on photosynthesis and on antioxidant enzymes were investigated in Eugenia uniflora, a representative shrub species of the restinga. This study aimed to determine the possible utility of this species in environmental risk assessment. After the application of iron ore dust as iron solid particulate matter (SPM(Fe)) and simulated acid rain (pH 3.1), the 18-month old plants displayed brown spots and necrosis, typical symptoms of iron toxicity and injuries caused by acid rain, respectively. The acidity of the rain intensified leaf iron accumulation, which reached phytotoxic levels, mainly in plants exposed to iron ore dust. These plants showed the lowest values for net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration, chlorophyll a content and electron transport rate through photosystem II (PSII). Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were decreased by simulated acid rain. Peroxidase activity and membrane injury increased following exposure to acid rain and simultaneous SPM(Fe) application. Eugenia uniflora exhibited impaired photosynthetic and antioxidative metabolism in response to combined iron and acid rain stresses. This species could become a valuable tool in environmental risk assessment in restinga areas near iron ore pelletizing factories. Non-invasive evaluations of visual injuries, photosynthesis and chlorophyll a fluorescence, as well as invasive biochemical analysis could be used as markers.

  18. Formation conditions of paleovalley uranium deposits hosted in upper Eocene-lower Oligocene rocks of Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokurov, S. F.; Strelkova, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The uranium deposits of Bulgaria related to the Late Alpine tectonomagmatic reactivation are subdivided into two groups: exogenic-epigenetic paleovalley deposits related to the basins filled with upper Eocene-lower Oligocene volcanic-sedimentary rocks and the hydrothermal deposits hosted in the coeval depressions. The geological and lithofacies conditions of their localization, the epigenetic alteration of rocks, mineralogy and geochemistry of uranium ore are exemplified in thoroughly studied paleovalley deposits of the Maritsa ore district. Argumentation of the genetic concepts providing insights into both sedimentation-diagenetic and exogenic-epigenetic mineralization with development of stratal oxidation zones is discussed. A new exfiltration model has been proposed to explain the origin of the aforementioned deposits on the basis of additional analysis with consideration of archival factual data and possible causes of specific ningyoite uranium ore composition.

  19. Evidence for microbial activity in the formation of carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucha, H.; Raith, J.

    2009-04-01

    *Kucha H **Raith J *University of Mining and Metallurgy, Faculty of Geology, Geophysics and Environmental Protection, Mickiewicza 30, PL-30-059 Krakow, Poland. ** University of Leoben, Department of Applied Geosciences and Geophysics, A-8700 Leoben, Peter Tunner Str. 5, Austria Evidence for microbial activity in the formation of carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb deposits To date evaluation of bacterial processes in the formation of carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb deposits is largely based on sulphur isotope evidence. However, during a past few years, textural criteria, have been established, which support the bacterial origin of many of these deposits. This has received a strong support from micro-, and nano-textures of naturally growing bacterial films in a flooded tunnel within carbonates that host the Piquette Zn-Pb deposit (Druschel et al., 2002). Bacterial textures, micro- and nano textures found in carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb deposits are: i)wavy bacterial films up to a few mm thick to up to a few cm long composed of peloids, ii)semimassive agglomeration of peloids in the carbonate matrix, and iii)solitary peloids dispersed in the carbonate matrix. Peloids are usually composed of a distinct 50-90um core most often made up of Zn-bearing calcite surrounded by 30-60um thick dentate rim composed of ZnS. Etching of Zn-carbonate cores reveals 1 - 2um ZnS filaments, and numerous 15 to 90nm large ZnS nano-spheres (Kucha et al., 2005). In massive ore composite Zn-calcite - sphalerite peloids are entirely replaced by zinc sulphide, and form peloids ghosts within banded sulphide layers. Bacterially derived micro- and nano-textures have been observed in the following carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb deposits: 1)Irish-type Zn-Pb deposits. In the Navan deposit the basic sulphur is isotopically light bacteriogenic S (Fallick at al., 2001). This is corroborated by semimassive agglomerations of composite peloids (Zn-calcite-ZnS corona or ZnS core-melnikovite corona). Etching of Zn-calcite core reveals globular

  20. Hydrothermal alteration, fluid inclusions and stable isotope systematics of the Alvo 118 iron oxide-copper-gold deposit, Carajás Mineral Province (Brazil): Implications for ore genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torresi, Ignacio; Xavier, Roberto Perez; Bortholoto, Diego F. A.; Monteiro, Lena V. S.

    2012-03-01

    The Alvo 118 iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) deposit (170 Mt at 1.0 wt.% Cu, 0.3 g/t Au) lies in the southern sector of the Itacaúnas Shear Belt, Carajás Mineral Province, along a WNW-ESE-striking, 60-km-long shear zone, close to the contact of the ~2.76-Ga metavolcano-sedimentary Itacaiúnas Supergroup and the basement (~3.0 Ga Xingu Complex). The Alvo 118 deposit is hosted by mafic and felsic metavolcanic rocks and crosscutting granitoid and gabbro intrusions that have been subjected to the following hydrothermal alteration sequence towards the ore zones: (1) poorly developed sodic alteration (albite and scapolite); (2) potassic alteration (biotite or K-feldspar) accompanied by magnetite formation and silicification; (3) widespread, pervasive chlorite alteration spatially associated with quartz-carbonate-sulphide infill ore breccia and vein stockworks; and (4) local post-ore quartz-sericite alteration. The ore assemblage is dominated by chalcopyrite (~60%), bornite (~10%), hematite (~20%), magnetite (10%) and subordinate chalcocite, native gold, Au-Ag tellurides, galena, cassiterite, F-rich apatite, xenotime, monazite, britholite-(Y) and a gadolinite-group mineral. Fluid inclusion studies in quartz point to a fluid regime composed of two distinct fluid types that may have probably coexisted within the timeframe of the Cu-Au mineralizing episode: a hot (>200°C) saline (32.8‰ to 40.6 wt.% NaCl eq.) solution, represented by salt-bearing aqueous inclusions, and a lower temperature (<200°C), low to intermediate salinity (<15 wt.% NaCl eq.) aqueous fluid defined by two-phase (LH2O + VH2O) fluid inclusions. This trend is very similar to those defined for other IOCG systems of the Carajás Mineral Province. δ 18OH2O values in equilibrium with calcite (-1.0‰ to 7.5‰ at 277°C to 344°C) overlap the lower range for primary magmatic waters, but the more 18O-depleted values also point to the involvement of externally derived fluids, possibly of meteoric origin

  1. Genesis and prospecting perspective of Xianglushan iron deposit, Sichuan Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianguo; Liu, Jishun; Huang, Chaowen

    2017-03-01

    More than 30 ore bodies have currently been discovered in the Xianglushan iron deposit in the central part of the Huili-Dongchuan Aulacogen. The main orebody is stratiform or stratoid within the volcanic sedimentary metamorphic rock of the Paleo-Mesoproterozoic Yinmin formation. Minor ores intrude as veins in the country rock and the mineral components of the iron ore are mainly magnetite and hematite. The ore evolved through the Paleo- Mesoproterozoic submarine volcanic eruption deposition period and the Neoproterozoic iron slurry superimposed transformation, and is identified as a sedimentation-transformation-type deposit. A study is conducted on the regional metallogenic background and geological characteristics of the ore deposit; results show that the ore-forming setting of the Xianglushan iron ore is excellent and that the potential of finding large-scale rich iron deposit is considerable.

  2. Time relationships between volcanism-plutonism-alteration-mineralization in Cu-stratabound ore deposits from the Michilla mining district, northern Chile: a 40Ar/39Ar geochronological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveros, Verónica; Tristá-Aguilera, Dania; Féraud, Gilbert; Morata, Diego; Aguirre, Luis; Kojima, Shoji; Ferraris, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    The Michilla mining district comprises one of the most important stratabound and breccia-style copper deposits of the Coastal Cordillera of northern Chile, hosted by the Middle Jurassic volcanic rocks of the La Negra Formation. 40Ar/39Ar analyses carried out on igneous and alteration minerals from volcanic and plutonic rocks in the district allow a chronological sequence of several magmatic and alteration events of the district to be established. The first event was the extrusion of a thick lava series of the La Negra Formation, dated at 159.9 ± 1.0 Ma (2 σ) from the upper part of the series. A contemporaneous intrusion is dated at 159.6 ± 1.1 Ma, and later intrusive events are dated at 145.5 ± 2.8 and 137.4 ± 1.1 Ma, respectively. Analyzed alteration minerals such as adularia, sericite, and actinolite apparently give valid 40Ar/39Ar plateau and miniplateau ages. They indicate the occurrence of several alteration events at ca. 160-163, 154-157, 143-148, and 135-137 Ma. The first alteration event, being partly contemporaneous with volcanic and plutonic rocks, was probably produced in a high thermal gradient environment. The later events may be related either to a regional low-grade hydrothermal alteration/metamorphism process or to plutonic intrusions. The Cu mineralization of the Michilla district is robustly bracketed between 163.6 ± 1.9 and 137.4 ± 1.1 Ma, corresponding to dating of actinolite coexisting with early-stage chalcocite and a postmineralization barren dyke, respectively. More precisely, the association of small intrusives (a dated stock from the Michilla district) with Cu mineralization in the region strongly suggests that the main Michilla ore deposit is related to a magmatic/hydrothermal event that occurred between 157.4 ± 3.6 and 163.5 ± 1.9 Ma, contemporaneous or shortly after the extrusion of the volcanic sequence. This age is in agreement with the Re-Os age of 159 ± 16 Ma obtained from the mineralization itself (Tristá-Aguilera et al

  3. Regional Crustal Structures and Their Relationship to the Distribution of Ore Deposits in the Western United States, Based on Magnetic and Gravity Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildenbrand, T.G.; Berger, B.; Jachens, R.C.; Ludington, S.

    2000-01-01

    Upgraded gravity and magnetic databases and associated filtered-anomaly maps of western United States define regional crustal fractures or faults that may have guided the emplacement of plutonic rocks and large metallic ore deposits. Fractures, igneous intrusions, and hydrothermal circulation tend to be localized along boundaries of crustal blocks, with geophysical expressions that are enhanced here by wavelength filtering. In particular, we explore the utility of regional gravity and magnetic data to aid in understanding the distribution of large Mesozoic and Cenozoic ore deposits, primarily epithermal and porphyry precious and base metal deposits and sediment-hosted gold deposits in the western United States cordillera. On the broadest scale, most ore deposits lie within areas characterized by low magnetic properties. The Mesozoic Mother Lodge gold belt displays characteristic geophysical signatures (regional gravity high, regional low-to-moderate background magnetic field anomaly, and long curvilinear magnetic highs) that might serve as an exploration guide. Geophysical lineaments characterize the Idaho-Montana porphyry belt and the La Caridad-Mineral Park belt (from northern Mexico to western Arizona) and thus indicate a deep-seated control for these mineral belts. Large metal accumulations represented by the giant Bingham porphyry copper and the Butte polymetallic vein and porphyry copper systems lie at intersections of several geophysical lineaments. At a more local scale, geophysical data define deep-rooted faults and magmatic zones that correspond to patterns of epithermal precious metal deposits in western and northern Nevada. Of particular interest is an interpreted dense crustal block with a shape that resembles the elliptical deposit pattern partly formed by the Carlin trend and the Battle Mountain-Eureka mineral belt. We support previous studies, which on a local scale, conclude that structural elements work together to localize mineral deposits within

  4. An investigation into heterogeneity in a single vein-type uranium ore deposit: Implications for nuclear forensics.

    PubMed

    Keatley, A C; Scott, T B; Davis, S; Jones, C P; Turner, P

    2015-12-01

    Minor element composition and rare earth element (REE) concentrations in nuclear materials are important as they are used within the field of nuclear forensics as an indicator of sample origin. However recent studies into uranium ores and uranium ore concentrates (UOCs) have shown significant elemental and isotopic heterogeneity from a single mine site such that some sites have shown higher variation within the mine site than that seen between multiple sites. The elemental composition of both uranium and gangue minerals within ore samples taken along a single mineral vein in South West England have been measured and reported here. The analysis of the samples was undertaken to determine the extent of the localised variation in key elements. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to analyse the gangue mineralogy and measure major element composition. Minor element composition and rare earth element (REE) concentrations were measured by Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA). The results confirm that a number of key elements, REE concentrations and patterns used for origin location do show significant variation within mine. Furthermore significant variation is also visible on a meter scale. In addition three separate uranium phases were identified within the vein which indicates multiple uranium mineralisation events. In light of these localised elemental variations it is recommended that representative sampling for an area is undertaken prior to establishing the REE pattern that may be used to identify the originating mine for an unknown ore sample and prior to investigating impact of ore processing on any arising REE patterns.

  5. Evolution of Ore Deposits and Technology Transfer Project: Isotope and Chemical Methods in Support of the U.S. Geological Survey Science Strategy, 2003-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rye, Robert O.; Johnson, Craig A.; Landis, Gary P.; Hofstra, Albert H.; Emsbo, Poul; Stricker, Craig A.; Hunt, Andrew G.; Rusk, Brian G.

    2010-01-01

    Principal functions of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Resources Program are providing assessments of the location, quantity, and quality of undiscovered mineral deposits, and predicting the environmental impacts of exploration and mine development. The mineral and environmental assessments of domestic deposits are used by planners and decisionmakers to improve the stewardship of public lands and public resources. Assessments of undiscovered mineral deposits on a global scale reveal the potential availability of minerals to the United States and other countries that manufacture goods imported to the United States. These resources are of fundamental relevance to national and international economic and security policy in our globalized world economy. Performing mineral and environmental assessments requires that predictions be made of the likelihood of undiscovered deposits. The predictions are based on geologic and geoenvironmental models that are constructed for the diverse types of mineral deposits from detailed descriptions of actual deposits and detailed understanding of the processes that formed them. Over the past three decades the understanding of ore-forming processes has benefited greatly from the integration of laboratory-based geochemical tools with field observations and other data sources. Under the aegis of the Evolution of Ore Deposits and Technology Transfer Project (referred to hereinafter as the Project), a 5-year effort that terminated in 2008, the Mineral Resources Program provided state-of-the-art analytical capabilities to support applications of several related geochemical tools to ore-deposit-related studies. The analytical capabilities and scientific approaches developed within the Project have wide applicability within Earth-system science. For this reason the Project Laboratories represent a valuable catalyst for interdisciplinary collaborations of the type that should be formed in the coming years for the United States to meet

  6. Sulfur isotope geochemistry of ore and gangue minerals from the Silesian-Cracow Mississippi Valley-type ore district, Poland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leach, D.L.; Vets, J.G.; Gent, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    Studies of the sulfur isotopic composition of ore and gangue minerals from the Silesian-Cracow Zn-Pb district were conducted to gain insights into processes that controlled the location and distribution of the ore deposits. Results of this study show that minerals from the Silesian-Cracow ore district have the largest range of sulfur isotope compositions in sulfides observed from any Mississippi Valley-type ore district in the world. The ??34S values for sulfide minerals range from +38 to -32 per mil for the entire paragenetic sequence but individual stages exhibit smaller ranges. There is a well developed correlation between the sulfur isotope composition and paragenetic stage of ore deposition. The first important ore stage contains mostly positive ??34S values, around 5 per mil. The second stage of ore formation are lower, with a median value of around -5 to -15 per mil, and with some values as low as -32 per mil. Late stage barite contains isotopically heavy sulfur around +32 per mil. The range in sulfur isotope compositions can be explained by contributions of sulfur from a variety of source rocks together with sulfur isotope fractionations produced by the reaction paths for sulfate reduction. Much of the variation in sulfur isotope compositions can be explained by bacterial reduction of sedimentary sulfate and disequilibrium reactions by intermediate-valency sulfur species, especially in the late-stage pyrite and sphalerite. Organic reduction of sulfate and thermal release of sulfur from coals in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin may have been important contributors to sulfur in the ore minerals. The sulfur isotopic data, ore mineral textures, and fluid inclusion data, are consistent with the hypothesis that fluid mixing was the dominant ore forming mechanism. The rather distinct lowering of ?? 34S values in sulfides from stage 2 to stage 3 is believed to reflect some fundamental change in the source of reduced sulfur and/or hydrology of the ore

  7. Petrogenesis of Paleocene-Eocene porphyry deposit-related granitic rocks in the Yaguila-Sharang ore district, central Lhasa terrane, Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junxing; Li, Guangming; Evans, Noreen J.; Qin, Kezhang; Li, Jinxiang; Zhang, Xia'nan

    2016-11-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene ore deposits in the Gangdese Metallogenic Belt, Tibet, are thought to have been formed during the main period of India-Asia continental collision. This paper reports the whole-rock major element, trace element, and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions and zircon trace element contents of volcanic and intrusive rocks from the Paleocene Yaguila skarn Pb-Zn-Ag deposit and adjacent Eocene Sharang porphyry Mo deposit in the central Lhasa terrane, Tibet. Geochemical signatures and Nd-Hf isotopic compositions indicate that the Yaguila Cretaceous rhyolitic rocks were formed by the melting of ancient continental crust, whereas the Paleocene causative granite porphyry may have resulted from the interaction between mantle-derived and crustal-derived materials when continental collision was initiated. The dramatic increase of εNd(t) values between emplacement of the granite porphyry and later porphyritic biotite granite suggests a greater involvement of mantle materials during the crystallization of the barren biotite granite stock. The post-ore Miocene granodiorite porphyry has a similar geochemical signature to the Sharang Miocene dykes, suggesting they were both generated from melting of enriched lithospheric mantle. Nd-Hf mixing calculations indicate an increasing contribution of mantle materials in Paleocene to Eocene intrusions, consistent with the regional tectonic model of Neo-Tethyan oceanic slab roll-back and break-off. Zircons from both the Yaguila and Sharang ore-related porphyries have higher Ce anomalies than those from the barren granitoids, suggesting that Mo mineralization was closely related to highly oxidized and differentiated magma. The fertile intrusions in the Yaguila-Sharang district contain EuN/EuN∗ values from 0.3 to 0.6, higher than the non-mineralized intrusions. The processes of early crystallization of plagioclase and/or SO2-degassing from underlying magma can explain the observed negative Eu anomalies in zircon.

  8. Mineralogical and geochemical constraints on environmental impacts from waste rock at Taojiang Mn-ore deposit, central Hunan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Bo; Piestrzynski, Adam; Pieczonka, Jadwiga; Xiao, Meilian; Wang, Yaozhu; Xie, Shurong; Tang, Xiaoyan; Yu, Changxun; Song, Zhi

    2007-07-01

    The mineralogy and geochemistry of the waste rocks distributed at Taojiang Mn-ore deposit, central Hunan province, China, were studied using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) fitted with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrum (atomic emission spectra) ICP-MS (AES), with the aim of predicting the environmental impacts of weathering of the waste rocks. The mineralogical results from microscope observation and XRD and EMPA studies show that the waste rock is composed of black shale and minor Mn carbonates. The oxidation of sulfide minerals such as galena, pyrite and chalcopyrite is accompanied by decomposition of Mn carbonates and K-feldspar during exposure to atmospheric O2. The geochemical characteristics of major, rare earth elements (REE) and trace elements of the waste rocks also show that the waste rock can be divided into black shale and Mn carbonate, and both of them are currently under chemical weathering. The major alkalies and alkaline elements (Ca, Mg, Na, K, Rb, Sr and Cs) and major elements (Fe, S and P) and heavy metals (Sc, V, Cr, Th, U, Sn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, Mo, Cd, Sb, an Tl) are being released during weathering. The mobility of alkalis and alkaline elements Ca, Mg, Na, K, Rb, Sr and Cs is controlled by decomposition of Mn carbonates. The dispersion of Cr, Sc and Th (U) might be related to weathering of K-feldspar, and the release of the heavy metals Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, Mo, Cd Sb and Tl is dominated by the breaking of sulfide minerals. The REE of the waste rocks and surrounding soils and the spidery distribution patterns of heavy metals in the waste rocks, the surrounding soils and the surface waters show that weathering of the waste rocks and bedrock might be the sources of heavy metal contamination for the surrounding soils and surface water system for the mining area. This is predicted by the mass-balance calculation by using Zr as an immobile element. Therefore, it is

  9. Evaluation and development of integrated technology of rare metal concentrate production in high-level ore processing at Zashikhinsk deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhulya, MS; Mukhina, TN; Ivanova, V. A.; Mitrofanova, G. V.; Fomin, A. V.; Sokolov, VD

    2017-02-01

    The authors discuss material constitution of columbite ore sample and recommend optimized pretreatment modes to obtain ball milling products at the maximum dissociation of ore minerals in aggregates. A concentration technology is proposed, with division of material into two flows -0.315 mm and -0.2 mm in sizes, generated in the milling and screening cycles and subjected to gravity-magnetic and magnetic-gravity treatment, respectively. It is shown that the technology ensures production of both tantalum-niobium and zircon concentrates. It has become possible to additionally recover rare metal components Nb2O5 and ZrO2 from tailings through flotation.

  10. Occurrence of copper, gold, silver,uranium, tungsten, tin ore deposits in the Late Proterozoic aulacogen mobile melt of southeast China

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, X.H.

    1985-01-01

    In the early period of the late Proterozoic Era (1100 m.y. +/-) an aulacogen mobile belt was formed in the southeast of China. It extends about 1000 km crossing the Yantze Platform and Jiangnan Foldbelt in NNE-NE direction and adjoins the south China geosyncline basement. This belt shows some features of geology and mineralization similar to the Adelaide geosyncline and the Zambia-Zaire Copper-uranium belt. Within the belt, there are about 9000 to 12,000 m polystratotype strata and continuous sediments of the Late Proterozoic Erathem, including alkaline and meta-alkaline volcanic products of 4 epochs of mainly marine facies. A great number of ore-forming elements, such as Cu, U, Pb, Zn, Au, Ag, Fe, Co, Ni, Mn, P, and W, Sn, TR etc., were deposited and enriched in the whole volcano-sedimentary sequency at various times and in various places. A few of them have become syngenetic deposits, but most of them have been transformed into large-scale ore deposits or mineralization fields or areas of copper and gold, lead-zinc and silver, uranium, tungsten, tin, and other metals.

  11. New isotopic evidence bearing on bonanza (Au-Ag) epithermal ore-forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, James A.; Mathur, Ryan; Kamenov, George D.; Shimizu, Toru; Brueseke, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    New Cu, S, and Pb isotope data provide evidence for a magmatic source of metal(loid)s and sulfur in epithermal Au-Ag deposits even though their ore-forming solutions are composed primarily of heated meteoric (ground) waters. The apparent isotopic discrepancy between ore metals and ore-forming solutions, and even between the ore and associated gangue minerals, indicates two different sources of epithermal ore-forming constituents: (1) a shallow geothermal system that not only provides the bulk of water for the ore-forming solutions but also major chemical constituents leached from host rocks (silica, aluminum, potassium, sodium, calcium) to make gangue minerals and (2) metals and metalloids (As, Te, Sb, etc.) and sulfur (±Se) derived from deeper magma bodies. Isotopic data are consistent with either vapor-phase transport of metal(loids) and sulfur and their subsequent absorption by shallow geothermal waters or formation of metallic (Au, Ag, Cu phases) nanoparticles at depth from magmatic fluids prior to encountering the geothermal system. The latter is most consistent with ore textures that indicate physical transport and aggregation of nanoparticles were significant ore-forming processes. The recognition that epithermal Au-Ag ores form in tectonic settings that produce magmas capable of releasing metal-rich fluids necessary to form these deposits can refine exploration strategies that previously often have focused on locating fossil geothermal systems.

  12. Gum and deposit formation from jet turbine and diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, F.R.; Lan, B.Y.

    1983-09-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the chemistry of deposit formation in hot parts of jet turbine and diesel engines and, thus, to predict and prevent deposit formation. Previous work in the field has been extensive, but a real understanding of deposit formation has been elusive. Work at SRI started on the basis that deposit formation from fuels must take place stepwise and is associated with autoxidation and the hydroperoxide produced. More recent work showed that in the absence of dissolved oxygen, higher temperatures are required for deposit formation. A recent report indicated that gum and deposit formation proceed mainly through oxidation products of the parent hydrocarbon, coupling of these products to dimeric, trimeric and higher condensation products (partly or wholly by radicals from hydroperoxides) and precipitation of insoluble products. The authors know of no information on how these first precipitates are converted to the ultimate, very insoluble, carbonaceous materials that cause engine problems. The present paper describes measurements of rates of oxidation and soluble gum formation in both pure hydrocarbons and mixed hydrocarbon fuels. Some patterns appear that can be largely explained on the basis of what is known about co-oxidations of hydrocarbon mixtures.

  13. Formation of the layered deposits in the Valles Marineris, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nedell, Susan S.; Squyres, Steven W.

    1987-01-01

    Thick sequences of layered deposits are found in the Valles Marineris, which exhibit fine, nearly horizontal layering, and are present as isolated plateaus of what were once more extensive deposits. It was argued that the morphology of the deposits is most consistent with origin in standing bodies of water. The conditions necessary for the existence of ice-covered Martian paleolakes are examined in detail and mechanisms for sediment deposition in them are considered. It was concluded that there are several geologically feasible mechanisms that could have led to the formation of thick deposits in ice-covered paleolakes in the Valles Marineris. Present data are insufficient to choose conclusively among the various possibilities. Several types of data from the Mars Observer mission will be useful in further characterizing the deposits and clarifying the process of their origin. The deposits should be considered important targets for a future Mars sample return mission.

  14. Tube entrance heat transfer with deposit formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szetela, E. J.; Sobel, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    A two-peak wall temperature profile was observed while flowing a kerosene-type gas turbine fuel through a direct-resistance heated tube at an entrance Reynolds number of about 1500. The downstream peak gradually diminished as deposits formed inside the tube, and only one peak remained after seven hours. The observation is explained qualitatively on the basis of analytical and experimental results reported in the literature. It is shown that the temperature profile can be divided into five regions: development of the thermal boundary layer, appearance of the secondary flows, fully developed thermal boundary layer, transition to turbulent flow, and turbulent flow. Deposits increase the tube roughness and reduce the length required for laminar-turbulent transition.

  15. Tube entrance heat transfer with deposit formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szetela, E. J.; Sobel, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    A two-peak wall temperature profile was observed while flowing a kerosene-type gas turbine fuel through a direct-resistance heated tube at an entrance Reynolds number of about 1500. The downstream peak gradually diminished as deposits formed inside the tube, and only one peak remained after seven hours. The observation is explained qualitatively on the basis of analytical and experimental results reported in the literature. It is shown that the temperature profile can be divided into five regions: development of the thermal boundary layer, appearance of the secondary flows, fully developed thermal boundary layer, transition to turbulent flow, and turbulent flow. Deposits increase the tube roughness and reduce the length required for laminar-turbulent transition.

  16. Concentrations of Fluorine in Magmatic and Mississippi Valley-type Ore Fluids in the Illinois-Kentucky Fluorite-Zn-Pb-Ba District: Implications for Ore Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appold, M. S.; Kenderes, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Illinois-Kentucky (IL-KY) district is an anomalous occurrence of fluorite-dominant Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) mineralization. The close temporal and spatial association of the mineralization with ultramafic-carbonatitic igneous intrusive rocks has led to the long-standing hypothesis that the mineralization formed from sedimentary brines that had become enriched in F through mixing with local magmatic fluids. The purpose of the present study was to test this hypothesis by measuring the concentration of F in fluid inclusions hosted by sphalerite and by calculating the concentration of F in the magmatic fluid based on the concentration of F in apatite in the igneous rocks. Fluid inclusion F concentrations were determined by thermally decrepitating the fluid inclusions, measuring the F concentration of the resultant evaporative solute mounds using SEM-EDS, and calibrating to several standard solutions containing variable concentrations of F. The results showed the fluid inclusions to contain F concentrations on the order of 103 to 104 ppm, which are 2 to 3 orders of magnitude greater than the typical F concentrations of sedimentary brines. At fluorite saturation, these F concentrations correspond to pH values of about 1 to 2, which are much lower than the pH values of about 4 to 5.5 typical of MVT ore fluids. Thus, the high F concentrations of the IL-KY ore fluids would not only have promoted the precipitation of fluorite but would have suppressed the precipitation of metal sulfide minerals by increasing their solubility by lowering the ore fluids' pH. Apatite crystals in igneous intrusive rocks in the IL-KY district contain between about 2 to 3 weight percent F. Based on experimental partitioning relationships, the HF to water fugacity ratio of the exsolved magmatic fluid was calculated to be on the order of 10-3 at temperatures between 1200 and 1500° C. If this fugacity ratio was maintained as the magmatic fluid cooled to MVT ore-forming temperatures of about

  17. Fluid migration at the basement/sediment interface along the margin of the Southeast basin (France): implications for Pb-Zn ore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquilina, Luc; Boulvais, Philippe; Mossmann, Jean-Rémi

    2011-12-01

    This study investigates the isotopic composition (C, O, S and Sr) of carbonates, sulphates and sulphide cements in the rock matrix and fracture fillings in geological formations of the Southeast basin of France, using core samples collected during the Deep Geology of France programme (GPF Ardèche theme). The Southeast basin belongs to the Alpine Tethyan margin. It is one of the thickest sedimentary basins in Europe, reaching upwards of 9 km in certain locations. The main fluid transfer from the basin is related to the large Pb-Zn Mississippi Valley-type district along the southern margin of the Massif Central block. A synthesis of the tectonic, mineralogical and petrographic investigations on the GPF boreholes shows that a major fluid circulation event occurred across the Alpine margin of Tethys during the Early Jurassic (Hettangian-Bathonian). It produced a general cementation of the rock porosity through precipitation of dolomite, sulphate and barite. Fracture fillings yield isotopic signatures distinct from the matrix cements. Matrix cements have particular characteristics, i.e. δ34S and δ13C that agree with a marine origin. The δ34S values of Permo-Carboniferous to Triassic sulphides from fracture cements are interpreted as resulting from the thermo-chemical reduction of sulphates. Fracture sulphates in the same geological formations yield δ34S values that define a relatively homogeneous end-member, whose composition is similar to sulphates in the Largentière Pb-Zn ore deposit. The source of S is attributed to the Permo-Carboniferous succession. The borehole fracture fillings are attributed to a major fluid circulation stage compatible with the Early Jurassic stage identified from the geological investigation of the boreholes. The formation of the Largentière deposit is considered as resulting from the mixing of this Early Jurassic fluid with continental hydrothermal fluids circulating in a basement horst, along its margin with the sedimentary basin

  18. Formation and deposition of volcanic sulfate aerosols on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Settle, M.

    1979-01-01

    The paper considers the formation and deposition of volcanic sulfate aerosols on Mars. The rate limiting step in sulfate aerosol formation on Mars is the gas phase oxidation of SO2 by chemical reactions with O, OH, and HO2; submicron aerosol particles would circuit Mars and then be removed from the atmosphere by gravitational forces, globally dispersed, and deposited over a range of equatorial and mid-latitudes. Volcanic sulfate aerosols on Mars consist of liquid droplets and slurries containing sulfuric acid; aerosol deposition on a global or hemispheric scale could account for the similar concentrations of sulfur within surficial soils at the two Viking lander sites.

  19. P-T evolution of the Precambrian mafic rocks hosting the Varena iron ore deposit in SE Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šiliauskas, Laurynas; Skridlaitė, Gražina; Prusinskiene, Sabina

    2017-04-01

    The Precambrian Varena iron ore deposit in the western East European Craton, near the Latvian-East Lithuanian and Middle Lithuanian domain boundary, is buried beneath 210-500 m thick sediments. It consists of variable metasomatic rocks, mostly Mg-Fe skarns, associated with dolomitic marbles, magnetite and other ores. Metasomatites are hosted by metamorphosed igneous (mostly mafic) and sedimentary rocks and crosscut by later granites and diabase dikes. Three samples of altered mafic rocks (D8-3, D8-4 and D8-6) were chosen for PT estimations. D8-3 sample (582.5 m) is a coarse-grained metagabbro near a metasomatic K-Mg hastingsite rock. It consists of diopsidic pyroxene, edenitic and actinolitic hornblende, plagioclase (An22-15) and scapolite with minor titanite, chlorite, apatite and talc. Diopside compositions range from iron richer (Mg# 0.64, jadeite component of 0.027) to magnesium richer (Mg# 0.89, jadeite less than 0.01). Amphiboles vary from primary Mg-hastingsitic (AlVI 0.38 apfu, Mg# 0.70) to secondary edenitic (AlVI 0.25, Mg# 0.72) hornblende. Plagioclase is slightly zoned, cores more calcium-rich (An22-20) than rims (An18-15). Sample D8-4 (588 m) has similar mineral and chemical compositions, but is somewhat more altered than the D8-3 sample. Plagioclase in diopside is more anorthitic (An32-30), while matrix plagioclase is more albitic (An27-20). Sample D8-6 (710 m) is composed of diopside, plagioclase, scapolite, Mg-hornblende and actinolite. Diopside has Mg# of 0.77-0.84 and jadeite component of 0.01-0.02. Amphibole compositions range from Mg-hornblende (Mg# 0.64-0.7, Al VI 0.2-0.17 apfu) to actinolite (Mg# 0.76-0.83, Al VI 0.12-0.10 apfu). Plagioclases are An18 in cores and An10 at rims. Diopsides with the lowest Mg# and highest jadeite components, together with plagioclase cores were used for PT calculations by the winTWQ software (Berman, 1991). Temperatures of 530° C and 550° C and pressures of 6.3 and 6.1 kbar were estimated for the D8-3 and D8

  20. Timing and setting of skarn and iron oxide formation at the Smältarmossen calcic iron skarn deposit, Bergslagen, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansson, Nils F.; Allen, Rodney L.

    2013-03-01

    Abundant iron oxide deposits including banded iron formations, apatite iron oxide ores, and enigmatic marble/skarn-hosted magnetite deposits occur in the Palaeoproterozoic Bergslagen region, southern Sweden. During the last 100 years, the latter deposit class has been interpreted as contact metasomatic skarn deposits, metamorphosed iron formations, or metamorphosed carbonate replacement deposits. Their origin is still incompletely understood. At the Smältarmossen mine, magnetite was mined from a ca. 50-m-thick calcic skarn zone at the contact between rhyolite and stratigraphically overlying limestone. A syn-volcanic dacite porphyry which intruded the footwall has numerous apophyses that extend into the mineralized zone. Whole-rock lithogeochemical and mineral chemical analyses combined with textural analysis suggests that the skarns formed by veining and replacement of the dacite porphyry and rhyolite. These rocks were added substantial Ca and Fe, minor Mg, Mn, and LREE, as well as trace Co, Sn, U, As, and Sr. In contrast, massive magnetite formed by pervasive replacement of limestone. Tectonic fabrics in magnetite and skarn are consistent with ore formation before or early during Svecokarelian ductile deformation. Whereas a syngenetic-exhalative model has previously been suggested, our results are more compatible with magnetite formation at ca. 1.89 Ga in a contact metasomatic skarn setting associated with the dacite porphyry.

  1. In-situ Pb isotope analysis of Fe-Ni-Cu sulphides by laser ablation multi-collector ICPMS: New insights into ore formation in the Sudbury impact melt sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, J. R.; Storey, C. D.; Hawkesworth, C. J.; Lightfoot, P. C.

    2012-12-01

    Laser-ablation (LA) multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) is ideally suited to in situ determination of isotope ratios in sulphide minerals. Using samples of magmatic sulphide ore from the Sudbury impact structure, we test LA-MC-ICPMS analytical protocols that aim to meet a range of analytical challenges in the analysis of Pb isotopes. These include: potential matrix sensitive isotopic fractionation; interferences on Pb isotopes; low melting points of many sulphide minerals; the availability of standards. Magmatic sulphides of wide ranging mineralogy (pyrrhotite, pentlandite, chalcopyrite, pyrite and sphalerite) were analysed for Pb isotopic composition, using the silicate glass NIST SRM 610 as an external standard to correct for instrumental mass-fractionation. Despite matrix sensitive melting and re-deposition around ablation pits, several lines of evidence indicate that all analyses are accurate, within typical analytical uncertainties of 0.003-2% (2σ), and that the defined approach is insensitive to compositional diversity in sample matrix: (a) laser ablation and dissolution based measurements of sulphide powders are in agreement; (b) analyses from each sample define isochron ages within uncertainty of the known crystallization age (1850 Ma); (c) the results of sulphide measurements by laser ablation are consistent with age-corrected feldspar analyses from the same samples. The results have important implications for ore formation in Sudbury. The Pb isotope data regressions are consistent with age corrected feldspar analyses from each respective sample, which together with time integrated Th/U ratios that match whole rock values (3.1, 4.0 and 6.1 for the Worthington, Copper Cliff and Parkin Offset Dykes, respectively) indicate chemical equilibrium between the silicate and sulphide systems during ore formation. The sulphides within each respective sample have indistinguishable model initial Pb isotope ratios (207Pb/204Pbm

  2. Iron isotope and REE+Y composition of the Cauê banded iron formation and related iron ores of the Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Mônica; Lobato, Lydia M.; Kunzmann, Marcus; Halverson, Galen P.; Rosière, Carlos A.

    2017-02-01

    The Minas Supergroup banded iron formations (BIFs) of the Brazilian Quadrilátero Ferrífero (QF) mineral province experienced multiple deformational events synchronous with hypogene mineralization, which resulted in the metamorphism of BIFs to itabirites and their upgrade to high-grade iron ore. Here, we present rare earth element and yttrium (REE+Y) compositions together with iron isotope ratios of itabirites and their host iron orebodies from 10 iron deposits to constrain environmental conditions during BIF deposition and the effects of hypogene iron enrichment. The REE+Y characteristics of itabirites (positive Eu anomaly and LREE depletion) indicate hydrothermal iron contribution to the Minas basin. Iron isotope data and Ce anomalies suggest BIFs were precipitated by a combination of anoxic biological-mediated ferrous iron oxidation and abiotic oxidation in an environment with free oxygen (such as an oxygen oasis), perhaps related to increase in oxygen concentrations before the Great Oxidation Event (GOE). The similarity of the REE+Y composition of the itabirites from the different QF deformational domains, as well as to other Superior-type BIFs, indicates that the metamorphism and synchronous hydrothermal mineralization did not significantly affect the geochemical signature of the original BIFs. However, iron isotope compositions of iron ore vary systematically between deformational domains of the QF, likely reflecting the specific mineralization features in each domain.

  3. Iron isotope and REE+Y composition of the Cauê banded iron formation and related iron ores of the Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Mônica; Lobato, Lydia M.; Kunzmann, Marcus; Halverson, Galen P.; Rosière, Carlos A.

    2016-04-01

    The Minas Supergroup banded iron formations (BIFs) of the Brazilian Quadrilátero Ferrífero (QF) mineral province experienced multiple deformational events synchronous with hypogene mineralization, which resulted in the metamorphism of BIFs to itabirites and their upgrade to high-grade iron ore. Here, we present rare earth element and yttrium (REE+Y) compositions together with iron isotope ratios of itabirites and their host iron orebodies from 10 iron deposits to constrain environmental conditions during BIF deposition and the effects of hypogene iron enrichment. The REE+Y characteristics of itabirites (positive Eu anomaly and LREE depletion) indicate hydrothermal iron contribution to the Minas basin. Iron isotope data and Ce anomalies suggest BIFs were precipitated by a combination of anoxic biological-mediated ferrous iron oxidation and abiotic oxidation in an environment with free oxygen (such as an oxygen oasis), perhaps related to increase in oxygen concentrations before the Great Oxidation Event (GOE). The similarity of the REE+Y composition of the itabirites from the different QF deformational domains, as well as to other Superior-type BIFs, indicates that the metamorphism and synchronous hydrothermal mineralization did not significantly affect the geochemical signature of the original BIFs. However, iron isotope compositions of iron ore vary systematically between deformational domains of the QF, likely reflecting the specific mineralization features in each domain.

  4. How two gravity-gradient inversion methods can be used to reveal different geologic features of ore deposit - A case study from the Quadrilátero Ferrífero (Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos, Dionísio U.; Uieda, Leonardo; Barbosa, Valeria C. F.

    2016-07-01

    Airborne gravity gradiometry data have been recently used in mining surveys to map the 3D geometry of ore deposits. This task can be achieved by different gravity-gradient inversion methods, many of which use a voxel-based discretization of the Earth's subsurface. To produce a unique and stable solution, an inversion method introduces particular constraints. One constraining inversion introduces a depth-weighting function in the first-order Tikhonov regularization imposing a smoothing on the density-contrast distributions that are not restricted to near-surface regions. Another gravity-gradient inversion, the method of planting anomalous densities, imposes compactness and sharp boundaries on the density-contrast distributions. We used these two inversion methods to invert the airborne gravity-gradient data over the iron-ore deposit at the southern flank of the Gandarela syncline in Quadrilátero Ferrífero (Brazil). Because these methods differ from each other in the particular constraint used, the estimated 3D density-contrast distributions reveal different geologic features of ore deposit. The depth-weighting smoothing inversion reveals variable dip directions along the strike of the retrieved iron-ore body. The planting anomalous density inversion estimates a compact iron-ore mass with a single density contrast, which reveals a variable volume of the iron ore along its strike increasing towards the hinge zone of the Gandarela syncline which is the zone of maximum compression. The combination of the geologic features inferred from each estimate leads to a synergistic effect, revealing that the iron-ore deposit is strongly controlled by the Gandarela syncline.

  5. The gold-vanadium-tellurium association at the Tuvatu gold-silver prospect, Fiji: conditions of ore deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spry, P. G.; Scherbarth, N. L.

    2006-07-01

    The Tuvatu gold-telluride prospect is one of several epithermal gold systems along the >250 km northeast trending Viti Levu lineament, Fiji, which are genetically associated with alkalic magmatism. Vein structures contain a variety of sulfides, native elements, sulfosalts, and tellurides. Calaverite is intimately associated with various vanadium-bearing minerals: roscoelite, karelianite, vanadian muscovite, Ti-free nolanite, vanadian rutile, schreyerite, and an unnamed vanadium silicate. Thermodynamic calculations for the systems V-Al-K-Si-O-H ( Cameron, 1998) and Au-Te-Cl-S-O-H at estimated conditions of formation of the telluride-native gold stage at Tuvatu (˜250 °C, ΣAu = 1 ppb, ΣTe = 1 ppb, ΣS = 0.001 m, ΣV = 0.0001 m, and aK = 0.01), show that the stability fields of calaverite, roscoelite, and karelianite converge in pH- fO2 space near the hematite-magnetite buffer and at neutral to slightly acid conditions. Thermodynamic and textural data suggest that these minerals were deposited together at Tuvatu and likely explain the common coexistence of roscoelite and calaverite in epithermal gold systems elsewhere. The presence of magnetite with up to 0.7 wt.% V2O3 in the Navilawa Monzonite is consistent with the derivation of V from the alkalic intrusive rocks, which are also considered to be the source of Au and Te in the Tuvatu deposit.

  6. Gum and Deposit Formation in Diesel Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-15

    this C-C coupling is superseded by the oxidative coupling mechanism above. Still another mechanism is aldol -type condensations and esterifica- tions of...that much more naphthaldehyde than naphthoic acid is formed. Gum formation by aldol condensations and esterifcation of oxida- tion products (Mayo, 1975...propagation and termination during oxidation, (2) a coupling of fuel molecules by decomposing peroxides in the absence of oxygen, and (3) a condensation

  7. Chemical changes during alteration of volcanic rocks and gold ore formation, La Libertad, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darce, M.; Levi, B.; Nyström, J. O.

    A chemical comparison between altered and unaltered basic lavas from a Tertiary epithermal gold deposit at La Libertad and its surroundings in central Nicaragua shows that chemical changes associated with the geothermal field type of alteration centered at the mining district reach more than 5 km away from it. Titanium seems to have been immobile, H 2O, CO 2, K, and S have been added, and Ni, Mg, and Cl partly lost from the fossil geothermal system. Gold, originally concentrated in the glass of basic lavas, was leached during zeolite facies conditions and precipitated with silica in fractures, forming veins in the center of the geothermal field. An estimate shows that the amount of Au released during the alteration was sufficient to form the La Libertad deposit.

  8. Lead isotope study of Zn-Pb ore deposits associated with the Basque-Cantabrian basin and Paleozoic basement, Northern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, F.; Pesquera, A.; Herrero, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    A total of forty-three galena samples from syngenetic and epigenetic Pb-Zn mineralizations emplaced in the Lower Cretaceous Basque-Cantabrian basin and Paleozoic basement of the Cinco Villas massif in the western Pyrenees, have been analyzed for Pb-isotopic composition. Galena from sedex mineralizations hosted in Carboniferous clastic rocks in the Cinco Villas massif display an homogeneous lead isotopic signature (206Pb/2044Pb ≈ 18.43, 207Pb/204Pb ≈ 15.66, 208Pb/ 204Pb ≈ 38.69) suggesting a single lead reservoir. These values are slightly more radiogenic than lead from other European Hercynian deposits, possibly reflecting the influence of a more evolved upper crustal source. Underlying Paleozoic sediments are proposed as lead source for the Cinco Villas massif ores. Analyses from twenty-six galena samples from the four strata-bound ore districts hosted in Mesozoic rocks reveal the existence of two populations regarding their lead isotopic composition. Galena from the western Santander districts (e.g., Reocin) is characterized by more radiogenic isotope values (206Pb/204Pb ≈ 18.74, 207Pb/204Pb ≈ 15.67, 208Pb/ 204Pb ≈ 38.73) than those from the central and eastern districts (Troya-Legorreta, Central and Western Vizcaya, 206Pb/204Pb ≈ 18.59, 207Pb/204Pb ≈ 15.66, 208Pb/ 204Pb ≈ 38.73). In all districts, the most likely source for these mineralizations was the thick sequence of Lower Cretaceous clastic sediments. The existence of two separate lead isotopic populations could be the result of regional difference in the composition of the basement rocks and the clastic sediments derived of it or different evolution histories. In both sub-basins, isotopic ratios indicate an increase in crustal influence as the age of the ores decreases.

  9. Sintering Characteristics of Iron Ores with Addition of Laterite Nickel Ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinyu; Zhang, Jianliang; Yao, Chaoquan; Zhang, Yapeng; Shi, Zhiwen; Wang, Fei

    A great deal of iron ores which have special elements have been applied in the sintering process with the decreasing of high-grade quality iron ores resources. In this paper, the laterite nickel ores were added into three different kinds of iron ores respectively to make liquid phase formation research by software of Factsage and high temperature characteristic sintering experiments. The results showed that the adding proportion of laterite nickel ores should be less than 15% when the high temperature properties of the mixing ores were well. Increasing the mixing ration of laterite nickel ores in the sintering blending would play an important role in the reduction of the sintering cost.

  10. Genesis of iron-apatite ores in Posht-e-Badam Block (Central Iran) using REE geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari, Mir Ali Asghar; Zadeh, Ghader Hossein; Emami, Mohamad Hashem

    2013-06-01

    Rare earth elements in apatites of different ore types show characteristic patterns which are related to different modes of formation of the ores. Most of the apatite-bearing iron ores are associated with alkaline magmas with LREE/HREE fractionation varying from moderate to steep. Iron-apatite deposits in Posht-e-Badam Block (Central Iran) have a high concentration of REE (more than 1000 ppm up to 2.5%), and show a strong LREE/HREE ratio with a pronounced negative Eu anomaly. This REE pattern is typical of magmatic apatite and quiet distinct from sedimentary apatites (phosphorites) which have a low REE contents and Ce negative anomalies. On the other hand, they are comparable to the REE patterns of apatites in Kiruna-type iron ores in different parts of the world. The REE patterns of apatites, iron-apatite ores and iron ores are similar and only have different REE contents. This similarity indicates a genetic relation for these rocks. Most of the iron-apatite deposits in Central Iran have similar REE patterns too, which in turn show a genetic relation for all of these deposits. This similarity indicates a similar origin and processes in their genesis. There are some small intrusions around some of the iron-apatite deposits that are petrographically identified as syenite and gabbro. These intrusions also have REE patterns similar to that of iron-apatite ores. This demonstrates a genetic relation between these intrusions and iron-apatite ores. The REE patterns of apatites in different deposits of Posht-e-Badam Block iron-apatite ores show an affinity to alkaline to sub-alkaline magmas and rifting environment. The alkaline host rocks of Central Iran iron-apatite ores are clearly related to an extensional setting where rifting was important (SSE-NNW fault lines). A probable source for this large scale ore forming processes is relatively low partial melting of mantle rocks. The ores have originated by magmatic differentiation as a late phase in the volcanic cycle

  11. Occurrence of Sn-Bearing colusite in the ore-body "T" of the Bor copper deposit, Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetković, Ljubomir; Pačevski, Aleksandar; Tončić, Trajče

    2013-07-01

    The ore body "T" is the newly discovered massive-pyrite type one which is located in the central part of the Bor copper mine. The main copper minerals are chalcocite-digenite, covellite and enargite. Small amounts of colusite are frequently present in the ore-body. It mostly occurs as the distinct exsolutions in digenite and, associating with enargite and covellite. Composition of the studied colusite shows enriched Sn content, giving an empirical formula from Cu24.7V1.8Fe0.2As5.1Sb0.2Sn0.8S32 to Cu26.7V2.0Fe0.3As3.0Sb0.3Sn3.5S32. This colusite represents a solid solution between colusite and nekrasovite within a range of 14-54 mol % nekrasovite. Most of the analyses show content of <50 mol % nekrasovite corresponding to the Sn-bearing colusite variety, while one analysis shows content of 54 mol % nekrasovite corresponding to the As-bearing nekrasovite.

  12. Elemental imaging of organic matter and associated metals in ore deposits using micro PIXE and micro-EBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, S.; Przybylowicz, W. J.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2014-01-01

    Micro-PIXE and micro-EBS analyses were carried out on samples from the Au-U-bearing Carbon Leader Reef of the Witwatersrand in South Africa to investigate the role of organic matter in the formation of this deposit. Micro-PIXE and Micro-EBS shows a very complex metal distribution within the bitumen nodules and their interstitial spaces. The style of the gold distribution and its association with epigenetic minerals (REE phosphates, phyllosilicates) indicates that all observed gold migrated in aqueous solution and precipitated by reduction on the surfaces of the bitumen nodules. Uraninite occurrences are confined to the bitumen nodules, which supports the argument of a uraninite paleo-placer; however the pervasive distribution of uranium also supports the argument that uraninite is derived from organo-metallic complexes. This study shows that micro-PIXE is a powerful tool to characterize metals associated with hydrocarbons. However, the organic matrix, the complexity of the obtained spectra and the small size of the minerals have significant influence on the reliability of the quantitative data. Due to highly variable amounts of heavy metals (U, Au, Pb) the obtained micro-EBS results are of questionable quality.

  13. Magneto-Mineralogical and Physico-Chemical Characterization of the Peña Colorada Iron-Ore, México: Genetic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, M. L.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Urrutia, J.; Gogitchaichvili, A.

    2004-05-01

    Peña Colorada iron-ores represented by massive-disseminated ore and intergranular magnetite ore. Mössbauer spectroscopy shows differences in both magnetite-ores. Magnetite of massive-disseminated ore has a stable structure, with Fe in oxidation state III (Fe2O3) and Fe in oxidation state II (FeO). Magnetite of intergranular ore has a micro-margin of replacement with particular properties, because have radicals (OH-) in positions corresponding to oxygen, shifting alternatively Fe II by Fe III. Chlorite associated to intergranular magnetite is classified as chamosite (berthierine variety). Berthierine presents structural differences by X-ray diffraction at 550 oC temperature loosing its cristallinity becoming amorphous. Differential and gravimetric thermal analyses of berthierine show typical endo-thermal reactions at 430 oC and 510 oC by dehydratation, and endo-thermal reaction at 980 oC by structural change. We propose contact metamorphism and a hydrothermal phase, pursued by disseminated-massive magnetite deposition as the main processes acting in the formation of the Peña Colorada iron-ore deposit. Intergranular ore is sedimentary exhalative origin deposited together with berthierine. Massive-disseminated and intergranular ore have similar geochemical evolution and different conditions of deposit. Curie temperatures are mostly 580 ± 5oC typical of magnetite. Hysteresis parameters indicate that most samples present PSD to MD behavior. AF demagnetization and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition curves show that NRM and laboratory remanence are carried by MD magnetite in iron ores and PSD-SD magnetite in host rocks. Magnetic Force Microscope images for both ore minerals show good and diffuse magnetic domain definition, respectively. Lack of clarity of the intergranular ore image is due to environment, temperature and formation conditions related to magnetostatic changes and magnetocrystalline anisotropy of grains.

  14. Krasnotur'insk Skarn copper ore field, Northern Urals: The U-Pb age of ore-controlling diorites and their place in the regional metallogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabezhev, A. I.; Ronkin, Yu. L.; Puchkov, V. N.; Gerdes, A.; Rovnushkin, M. Yu.

    2014-06-01

    The Krasnotur'insk skarn copper ore field known from the theoretical works of Academician K.S. Korzhinskii is located in the western part of the Tagil volcanic zone (in the area of the town of Krasnotur'insk). The ore field is composed of layered Devonian (Emsian) volcanosedimentary rocks intruded by small plutons of quartz diorites, diorites, and gabbrodiorites. Widespread pre-ore and intra-ore dikes of similar composition control the abundance of the andradite skarns formed after limestones and the magnetitesulfide and sulfide ore bodies formed after skarns. The LA-ICP-MS U-Pb concordant age of zircon from the quartz diorite of the Vasil'evsko-Moskalevskii pluton calculated by 16 analyses (16 crystals) is 407.7 ± 1.6 Ma (MSWD = 1.5). Taking into account the geological and petrogeochemical similarity of diorites of small plutons and intra-ore dikes, it is assumed that this age corresponds to the period of formation of the ore-magmatic system of the Krasnotur'insk skarn copper ore field. It was probably formed somewhat earlier than the Auerbakh montzonitic pluton and the accompanying skarn magnetite deposits in the south.

  15. Organic matter diagenesis as the key to a unifying theory for the genesis of tabular uranium-vanadium deposits in the Morrison Formation, Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansley, P.L.; Spirakis, C.S.

    1992-01-01

    Interstitial, epigenetic amorphous organic matter is intimately associated with uranium in the Grants uranium region and is considered essential to genetic models for these deposits. In contrast, uranium minerals are intimately associated with authigenic vanadium chlorite and vanadium oxides in amorphous organic matter-poor ores of the Slick Rock and Henry Mountains mining districts and therefore, in some genetic models amorphous organic matter is not considered crucial to the formation of these deposits. Differences in organic matter content can be explained by recognizing that amorphous organic matter-poor deposits have been subjected to more advanced stages of diagenesis than amorphous organic matter-rich deposits. Evidence that amorphous organic matter was involved in the genesis of organic matter-poor, as well as organic matter-rich, deposits is described. -from Authors

  16. Influence of SO2-related interactions on PM2.5 formation in iron ore sintering.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhiyun; Fan, Xiaohui; Gan, Min; Chen, Xuling; Lv, Wei; Li, Qiang; Zhou, Yang; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Tao

    2016-11-21

    The formation of PM2.5 (aerosol particulate matters less than 2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter) in association with SO2 emission during sintering process has been studied by dividing the whole sintering process into 6 typical sampling stages. A low-pressure cascade impactor was used to collect PM2.5 by automatically segregating particulates into 6 sizes. It was found that strong correlation was existed between the emission properties of PM2.5 and SO2. Wet mixture layer (over-wetted layer and raw mixture layer) had the function to simultaneously capture SO2 and PM2.5 during the early sintering stages, and released them back into flue gas mainly in the flue gas temperature-rising period. CaSO4 crystals comprised the main SO2-related PM2.5 during the disappearing process of over-wetted layer, which was able to form perfect individual crystals or to form particles with complex chemical compositions. Besides the existence of individual CaSO4 crystals, mixed crystals of K2SO4-CaSO4 in PM2.5 were also found during the first half of the temperature-rising period of flue gas. The interaction between fine-grained Ca-based fluxes, potassium vapors and SO2 was the potential source of SO2-related PM2.5. IMPLICATION STATEMENTS The emission property of PM2.5 and SO2 throughout the sintering process exhibited well similarity. This phenomenon tightened the relationship between the formation of PM2.5 and the emission of SO2. Through revealing the properties of SO2-related PM2.5 during sintering process, the potential interaction between fine-grained Ca-based fluxes, potassium vapors and SO2 was found to be the source of SO2-related PM2.5. This information can serve as the guidance to develop efficient techniques to control the formation and emission of PM2.5 in practical sintering plants.

  17. A depositional model for organic-rich Duvernay Formation mudstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Levi J.; McMillan, Julia M.; Harris, Nicholas B.

    2017-01-01

    The Upper Devonian Duvernay Formation of western Canada is an organic-rich shale formation now targeted as a hydrocarbon reservoir. We present a detailed sedimentological analysis of the Duvernay Formation in order to better understand organic-rich mudstone depositional processes and conditions and to characterize the vertical and lateral heterogeneity of mudstone lithofacies that affect petrophysical and geomechanical rock properties. Organic-rich mudstone facies of the Duvernay Formation were deposited in a dynamic depositional environment by a variety of sediment transport mechanisms, including suspension settling, turbidity currents, and bottom water currents in variably oxygenated bottom waters. Suspension settling dominated in distal relatively deep areas of the basin, but evidence for weak turbidity currents and bottom water currents was observed in the form of graded beds and thin grain-supported siltstone laminae. Organic enrichment primarily occurred in distal areas as a result of bottom water anoxia and low depositional rates of inorganic sediment. In deep water locations near platform margins, alternating silty-sandy contourite beds and organic-rich mudstone beds are present, the former interpreted to have been deposited and reworked by bottom water currents flowing parallel to slope. In shallower, more oxygenated settings, mudstone lithologies vary from calcareous to argillaceous. These sediments were deposited from suspension settling, turbidity currents, and bottom water currents, although primary sedimentary structures are often obscured by extensive bioturbation. Locally, organic enrichment in dysoxic rather than anoxic bottom waters was driven by a slightly increased sedimentation rate and possibly also by aggregation of sedimentary particles in the water column due to interaction between organic matter and clay minerals. Large variations observed in sediment composition, from siliceous to calcareous to argillaceous, reflect multiple biogenic

  18. Formation of the giant Chalukou porphyry Mo deposit in northern Great Xing'an Range, NE China: Partial melting of the juvenile lower crust in intra-plate extensional environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen-Zhen; Qin, Ke-Zhang; Li, Guang-Ming; Ishihara, Shunso; Jin, Lu-Ying; Song, Guo-Xue; Meng, Zhao-Jun

    2014-08-01

    monzogranite formed by partial melting of thickened lower crust in a collisional setting caused by closure of Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean. The post-ore feldspar porphyry shares a similar magma source with ore-forming porphyry, but the quartz monzonite porphyry has a relatively deeper magma source region and has not experienced as much fractional crystallization. The transformation from middle Jurassic compression to late Jurassic extension created favorable conditions for the generation and emplacement of the ore-forming magma. The juvenile lower crust provided the main source of molybdenum for Chalukou deposit. Enrichment of Mo by fractional crystallization played an important role in concentrating Mo during formation of the Chalukou Mo deposit. The age (~ 147 Ma), high fluorine, and associated Pb-Zn deposits are all different from other major porphyry Mo deposits in NE China; Chalukou is a new mineral deposit type in the Great Xing'an Range.

  19. Coke Deposition and Smoke Formation in Turbojet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, R. R.; Wear, J. D.

    1956-01-01

    In the early development of jet engines, it was occasionally found that excessive amounts of coke or other carbonaceous deposits were formed in the combustion chamber. Sometimes a considerable amount of smoke was noted in the-exhaust gases. Excessive coke deposits may adversely affect jet-engine performance in several ways. The formation of excessive amounts of coke on or just downstream of a fuel nozzle (figs. 116(a) and (b)) changes the fuel-spray pattern and possibly affects combustor life and performance. Similar effects on performance can result from the deposition of coke on primary-air entry ports (fig. 116(c)). Sea-level or altitude starting may be impaired by the deposition of coke on spark-plug electrodes (fig. 116(b)), deposits either grounding the electrodes completely or causing the spark to occur at positions other than the intended gap. For some time it was thought that large deposits of coke in turbojet combustion chambers (fig. 116(a)) might break away and damage turbine blades; however, experience has indicated that for metal blades this problem is insignificant. (Cermet turbine blades may be damaged by loose coke deposits.) Finally, the deposition of coke may cause high-temperature areas, which promote liner warping and cracking (fig. 116(d)) from excessive temperature gradients and variations in thermal-expansion rates. Smoke in the exhaust gases does not generally impair engine performance but may be undesirable from a tactical or a nuisance standpoint. Appendix B of reference 1 and references 2 to 4 present data obtained from full-scale engines operated on test stands and from flight tests that indicate some effects on performance caused by coke deposits and smoke. Some information about the mechanism of coke formation is given in reference 5 and chapter IX. The data indicate that (1) high-boiling fuel residuals and partly polymerized products may be mixed with a large amount of smoke formed in the gas phase to account for the consistency

  20. Reduction kinetics of aqueous U(VI) in acidic chloride brines to uraninite by methane, hydrogen or C-graphite under hydrothermal conditions: Implications for the genesis of unconformity-related uranium ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dargent, Maxime; Truche, Laurent; Dubessy, Jean; Bessaque, Gilles; Marmier, Hervé

    2015-10-01

    The formation of hydrothermal uranium ore deposits involves the reduction of dissolved U(VI)(aq) to uraninite. However, the nature of the reducing agent and the kinetics of such a process are currently unknown. These questions are addressed through dedicated experiments performed under conditions relevant for the genesis of unconformity-related uranium (URU) deposits. We tested the efficiency of the following potential reductants supposed to be involved in the reaction: H2, CH4, C-graphite and dissolved Fe(II). Results demonstrate the great efficiency of H2, CH4 and C-graphite to reduce U(VI)(aq) into uraninite in acidic chloride brines, unlike dissolved Fe(II). Times needed for H2 (1.4 bar), CH4 (2.4 bar) and C-graphite (water/carbon mass ratio = 10) to reduce 1 mM of U(VI)(aq) in an acidic brine (1 m LiCl, pH ≈ 1 fixed by HCl) to uraninite at 200 °C are 12 h, 3 days and 4 months, respectively. The effects of temperature (T) between 100 °C and 200 °C, H2 partial pressure (0.14, 1.4, and 5.4 bar), salinity (0.1, 1 and 3.2 m LiCl) and pH at 25 °C (0.8 and 3.3) on the reduction rate were also investigated. Results show that increasing temperature and H2 partial pressure increase the reaction rate, whereas increasing salinity or pH have the reverse effect. The reduction of uranyl to uraninite follows an apparent zero-order with respect to time, whatever the considered electron donor. From the measured rate constants, the following values of activation energy (Ea), depending on the nature of the electron donor, have been derived: EaC-graphite = 155 ± 3 kJ mol-1, EaCH4 = 143 ± 6 kJ mol-1, and EaH2 = 124 ± 15 kJ mol-1 at T < 150 °C and 32 ± 6 kJ mol-1 at T > 150 °C. An empirical relationship between the reaction rate, the hydrogen partial pressure, the uranyl speciation, and the temperature is also proposed. This allows an estimation of the time of formation of a giant U ore deposit such as McArthur River (Canada). The duration of the mineralizing event is

  1. Research on Ore-controlling factors and Metallogenic Prognosis of Dongchuan Copper Mining Area, Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianguo; Liu, Jishun; Huang, Chaowen

    2017-03-01

    Dongchuan is a famous copper producing area in China, where has good geological condition to form many copper deposits with local characteristics. This article summarizes the metallogenic regularities of Dongchuan copper deposits based on the previous works, research findings and the latest research advances. The study suggests that the Dongchuan copper-ore area has a good metallogenic background and immense prospecting potential. Copper ore is mainly found in Yinmin Formation, Luoxue Formation, Heishan Formation, Daqiaodi Formation, and in the Sinian-aged basement, and its occurrence is closely related to volcanic magmatism. The discussions regarding prospecting directions of Dongchuan copper ore were conducted based on the metallogenic regularity research, the results shows that further expanding of the exploration activities from the existing ore-bodies would be carried out; the breakthrough points focus on the Pingdingshan Formation, Qinglongshan Formation, and Daqiaodi Formation strata; at the same tine, more attention should be paid to the new types of deposits, such as Yanziya-type or hydrothermal deposits.

  2. Effect of Temperature on Morphology of Metallic Iron and Formation of Clusters of Iron Ore Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Alencar, Jean Philippe Santos Gherardi; de Resende, Valdirene Gonzaga; de Castro, Luiz Fernando Andrade

    2016-02-01

    The increase of the reduction temperature in direct reduction furnaces has been a recurring tool due to the benefits that it provides to the process. However, its increase cannot be performed without taking into account some considerations, since the sticking phenomenon is directly correlated with it and could lead to permeability problems and reactor performance. An analysis of the formation of pellets clusters at different temperatures was carried out with focus on morphological characterization of reduced materials to better understand the causes and effects of these actions. The results showed a correlation between the morphology of the metallic iron present in the samples and the clustering index. At low reduction temperatures, 1123 K (850 °C), the iron formed is eroded and deformed and the cluster hardly remains after tumbling. When forming iron with fibrous structure, 1223 K (950 °C), the clustering index increases because of anchor points which make the material to stick together. Finally, under the effect of high temperature and long time, it generates fresh precipitated iron, enhancing the resistance of the clusters so that they cannot be separated.

  3. Computer finds ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Artificial intelligence techniques are being used for the first time to evaluate geophysical, geochemical, and geologic data and theory in order to locate ore deposits. After several years of development, an intelligent computer code has been formulated and applied to the Mount Tolman area in Washington state. In a project funded by the United States Geological Survey and the National Science Foundation a set of computer programs, under the general title Prospector, was used successfully to locate a previously unknown ore-grade porphyry molybdenum deposit in the vicinity of Mount Tolman (Science, Sept. 3, 1982).The general area of the deposit had been known to contain exposures of porphyry mineralization. Between 1964 and 1978, exploration surveys had been run by the Bear Creek Mining Company, and later exploration was done in the area by the Amax Corporation. Some of the geophysical data and geochemical and other prospecting surveys were incorporated into the programs, and mine exploration specialists contributed to a set of rules for Prospector. The rules were encoded as ‘inference networks’ to form the ‘expert system’ on which the artificial intelligence codes were based. The molybdenum ore deposit discovered by the test is large, located subsurface, and has an areal extent of more than 18 km2.

  4. Origin of ore-forming fluids of the Haigou gold deposit in the eastern Central Asian Orogenic belt, NE China: Constraints from H-O-He-Ar isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Qingdong; He, Huaiyu; Zhu, Rixiang; Zhang, Song; Wang, Yongbin; Su, Fei

    2017-08-01

    The Haigou lode deposit contains 40 t of gold at an average grade of 3.5 g/t, and is one of the largest deposits in the Jiapigou gold belt located along the eastern segment of the northern margin of the North China Craton. The deposit comprises 15 gold-bearing quartz veins hosted in a Carboniferous monzonite-monzogranite stock. Cretaceous dikes consisting of diorite, diabase, and granodiorite porphyries are well developed in the deposit. The diorite porphyry dikes (130.4 ± 6.3 Ma) occur together with gold-bearing quartz veins in NNE- and NE-striking faults. Gold-bearing quartz veins crosscut the diorite porphyry dikes, and the veins are in turn crosscut by E-W-striking 124.6 ± 2.2 Ma granodiorite porphyry dikes. The mineralization mainly occurs as auriferous quartz veins with minor amounts of sulfide minerals, including pyrite, galena, chalcopyrite, and molybdenite. Gold occurs as either native gold or calaverite. Common gangue minerals in the deposit include quartz, sericite, and calcite. The deposit is characterized by various types of hydrothermal alteration, including silicification, sericitization, chloritization, potassic alteration, and carbonatization. Three stages of hydrothermal activity have been recognized in the deposit: (1) a barren quartz stage; (2) a polymetallic sulfide (gold) stage; (3) a calcite stage. Fluid inclusions in hydrothermal pyrites have 3He/4He ratios of 0.3 to 3.3 Ra and 40Ar/36Ar ratios of 351 to 1353, indicating mixing of fluids of mantle and crustal origin. Hydrothermal quartz yielded δ18O values of -1.3‰ to +7.2‰ and δD values of fluid inclusions in the quartz vary between -80‰ and -104‰. These stable isotope data also suggest mixing of magmatic and meteoric fluids. Noble gas and stable isotopic data suggest that the ore fluids have a predominant mantle source with a significant crustal component. Based on the spatial association of gold-bearing quartz veins with early Cretaceous intrusions, and the H-O-He-Ar isotopic

  5. DEPOSITIONAL RELATIONS OF UMPQUA AND TYEE FORMATIONS (EOCENE), SOUTHWESTERN OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molenaar, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    The Umpqua Formation (as herein restricted) consists of as much as 10,000 ft of mudstone, sandstone, and conglomerate of nonmarine to deep marine origin. A basaltic basement that underlies the sedimentary rocks in most of the area and was formerly included in the Umpqua is herein considered a separate unit and assigned to the Siletz River Volcanics. A proposal to subdivide the Umpqua into three unconformity-bounded formations in the area west of Roseburg, Oregon, is not recognized in this report because of questionable correlations and limited extent of some units. The Tyee Formation, which conformably overlies the Umpqua, is a predominantly sandstone unit about 6,000 ft thick, deposited in environments ranging from shallow marine and nonmarine deltaic on the south, to slope and deep marine basinal to the north. Deposition across the Umpqua-Tyee boundary contact represents a change in tectonic setting. Refs.

  6. Field Vectors to Metamorphosed Ores: A Prelude to Finding Currently Concealed Volcano-Plutonic Arc Settings and Their Mineral Deposits in The Grenville Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corriveau, L.; Bonnet, A.; van Breemen, O.

    2004-05-01

    Recent mineral deposits synthesis highlights the largely barren nature of the high-grade metamorphic terrains of the Canadian Shield in terms of large mining camps. No where is the gap most startling than in the Grenville Province even though a lot of its Paleo- to Mesoproterozoic crust consists of magmatic arcs renown worldwide to host IOCG, VHMS and Porphyry Cu deposits. All these deposit types have significant alteration halos that can serve as vectors to ore. The use of such vectors forced a complete reinterpretation of the nature of the La Romaine domain in the eastern Grenville Province. Mapped in the 70's as being a metasedimentary basin with >500 km2 of meta-arkose and minor pelite, quartzite, conglomerate and marble, the domain is herein reassessed as a major 1.5 Ga Pinwarian continental magmatic arc fertile in Cu-sulphides and Fe-oxides mineralizing systems. The original markers used to prognosticate a sedimentary origin can now be demonstrated to be a series of rhyolitic to dacitic lapillistone, sericitized tuff with Al nodules and veins, Al gneiss locally with lapilli textures, garnetite, ironstones and calc-silicate rocks. The distribution, paragenesis and mode of the Al-, Fe- and Ca-rich units significantly depart from those of normal metasediments but are very diagnostic of metamorphosed hydrothermal alteration zones and meta-exhalites. Mapping alteration vectors provided clues to search for and find the volcanic rocks concealed among the composite granitic gneiss, the zones of hydrothermal leaching (e.g., sericitic, argillic and advanced argillic alterations) and discharge, the cap rocks, and the Cu mineralization. Spatial and stratigraphic relationships provided a means to compare their settings with ore deposit models. Roof pendants of Ba-rich meta-exhalite in surrounding 1.5 Ga granitic plutons and intrusion of 1495 Ma Qtz-Kfs porphyry across hydrothermally altered 1500 Ma tuffs attest to coeval hydrothermal activity and sub-volcanic plutons. The

  7. Origin of marcasite and its implications regarding the genesis of roll-front uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldhaber, Martin B.; Reynolds, Richard L.

    1979-01-01

    Study of five roll-type uranium deposits (three in Texas and two in Wyoming) has resulted in the recognition of ore-stage marcasite in each deposit. Ore-stage marcasite is identified by its close association with uranium- and vanadium-bearing phases in the ore zones; by its close association with ferroselite at and near the redox boundary in some deposits; by its abundance and distribution across deposits; and by its textural relationships with identifiable pre-ore iron disulfide minerals (primarily pyrite). In deposits that are essentially devoid of fossil vegetal debris, marcasite is the dominant ore-stage sulfide and occurs in a large volume of rock beyond the ore zones. In deposits that contain organic matter, ore-stage pyrite is at least as abundant as ore-stage marcasite. Many factors and processes may lead to the formation of either marcasite or pyrite as an ore-stage mineral in roll-type deposits. One of the dominant factors is the complex interrelationship of pH and sulfur species that are precursors of iron-disulfide minerals. Experimental work and study of geochemical environments analogous to those governing the formation of roll-type deposits indicate that relatively low pH (less than about six) and the presence of elemental sulfur favor marcasite, whereas higher pH and the presence of polysulfide ions favor pyrite. Conditions that favor marcasite as the dominant ore-stage iron disulfide are likely to arise during uranium deposition in host rock without fossil vegetal matter. In host rock containing carbonaceous debris, the presence of polysulfide ions and pH buffering any anaerobic bacterial metabolic processes apparently lead to the formation of ore-stage pyrite.

  8. Depositional history of Smackover Formation in southwestern Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.J.

    1988-09-01

    The Smackover Formation in southwestern Alabama is the product of an overall Middle Jurassic transgression. However, significant lateral variation in lithologic sequence reflects the effects of Smackover paleotopography. Paleozoic ridges and Mesozoic horst blocks defined a number of paleohighs, which separated southwestern Alabama into a series of subbasins or embayments. The Smackover lithologic sequence differs significantly from basin to paleohigh. Initial transgression of Smackover seas reworked the upper surface of the underlying Norphlet clastics and resulted in deposition of intertidal to shallow subtidal algally laminated mudstones and peloidal and oncoidal wackestones and packstones. These lower Smackover rocks are common dolomitized and locally anhydritic. Initial lower Smackover deposition was restricted to paleolows, and subaerial clastic deposition continued over the still emergent paleohighs. As sea level continued to rise, these lower Smackover deposits graded upward into skeletal and peloidal wackestones that contain a sparse, somewhat restricted, faunal assemblage. These wackestones are interbedded with argillaceous organic-rich mudstones that reflect deeper, more restricted depositional conditions. By the early Oxfordian, the sea level rise had inundated most of the paleohighs. Ooid and oncoidal grainstone shoals developed across paleohighs and along the updip margin. In the basin centers, skeletal and peloidal wackestone/packstones were being deposited. As the rate of sea level rise decreased, the shoals began to prograde basinward and lagoonal environments developed behind the shoals in some areas. Sea level fluctuations led to the formation of stacked shallowing-upward sequences. Evaporitic sabkhas developed along the updip margin and prograded basinward behind the shoals, eventually terminating carbonate deposition.

  9. Zircon U-Pb ages and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes of the highly fractionated granite with tetrad REE patterns in the Shamai tungsten deposit in eastern Inner Mongolia, China: Implications for the timing of mineralization and ore genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Si-Hong; Bagas, Leon; Hu, Peng; Han, Ning; Chen, Chun-Liang; Liu, Yuan; Kang, Huan

    2016-09-01

    The Shamai tungsten deposit is located in the eastern part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). Tungsten mineralization is closely related to the emplacement of fine- to medium-grained biotite monzogranite (G1) and porphyritic biotite monzogranite (G2) in the Shamai Granite. NW-trending joints and faults host orebodies in the Shamai Granite and Devonian hornfels. The mineralization is characterized by a basal veinlet zone progressing upwards to a thick vein zone followed by a mixed zone, a veinlet zone, and a thread vein zone at the top. The ore-related alteration typically consists of muscovite, greisen, and hornfels. In order to constrain the timing of the Shamai mineralization and discuss the ore genesis, muscovite Ar-Ar, molybdenite Re-Os, and zircon U-Pb geochronological, geochemical, and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic studies were completed on the deposit. The U-Pb zircon dating yielded weighted mean ages of 153 ± 1 Ma for G1 and 146 ± 1 Ma for G2. Muscovite from a wolframite-bearing quartz vein yielded an Ar-Ar plateau age of 140 ± 1 Ma, whereas two molybdenite samples yielded identical Re-Os model ages of 137 ± 2 Ma. These two ages are younger than the two monzogranites, suggesting a prolonged magmatic-hydrothermal interaction during tungsten mineralization. Major and trace element geochemistry shows that both G1 and G2 are characterized by high SiO2 and K2O contents, high A/CNK values (1.08-1.40), a spectacular tetrad effect in their REE distribution patterns, and non-CHARAC (charge-and-radius-controlled) trace element behavior. This suggests that both G1 and G2 are highly differentiated peraluminous rocks with strong hydrothermal interaction. The Nd-Hf isotope data for the Shamai Granite (εNd(t) between - 1.9 and + 7.4, ɛHf(t) from 5.2 to 12.8) are largely compatible with the general scenario for much of the Phanerozoic granite emplaced in the CAOB. It is here suggested that the Shamai Granite originated from partial melting of a juvenile lower crust with

  10. Depositional setting and paleogeography of Ordovician Vinini Formation, central Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, S.C.; Perry, B.D. )

    1991-02-01

    The eugeoclinal strata of the Ordovician Vinini Formation composes most of the Roberts Mountains allochthon (RMA). Its stratigraphy, reconstructed in the Roberts Mountains, can be precisely correlated throughout much of the RMA and into coeval strata of the autochthonous miogeocline by means of graptolite and conodont biostratigraphy. The Vinini is a mixture of clastic lithologies with some limestone and greenstone. Coarse clastics, characterized by well-rounded and well-sorted sands derived from cratonic sources, occur in two separate intervals and provide critical data on depositional and paleogeographic setting. The lower interval, hundreds of meters thick, was deposited in the latest Ibexian-earliest Whiterockian and can be closely correlated throughout central Nevada. It is a mixture of quartz sandstone, siltstone, limestone, and calcareous sandstone, deposited by turbidity flows during a lowstand of sea level. Both eastern and western sources have been interpreted for these sands. The upper interval is a prominent, pure quartzite up to 20 m thick deposited as a prograding blanket of sand in the latest Whiterockian-earliest Mohawkian. It occurs in the Vinini in the northern Toquima Range and in a parautochthonous sequence of transitional strata in the southern Toiyabe Range. This interval represents the most basinward edge of the Eureka Quartzite, which was also deposited across the miogeocline. The presence of sand of the Eureka Quartzite in the RMA indicates that the basin in which the RMA strata were deposited was immediately adjacent to the margin of North America in the Ordovician.

  11. Appropriate deposition parameters for formation of fcc Co-Ni alloy nanowires during electrochemical deposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhtar, Aiman; Shahzad Khan, Babar; Mehmood, Tahir

    2016-12-01

    The effect of deposition potential on the crystal structure and composition of Co-Ni alloy nanowires is studied by XRD, FE-SEM and EDX. The alloy nanowires deposited at -3.2 V are metastable fcc phase Co-Ni. The alloy nanowires deposited at -1.8 V are hcp phase Co-Ni. The formation of the metastable fcc alloy nanowires can be attributed to smaller critical clusters formed at the high potential as the smaller critical clusters favor fcc structure because of the significant surface energy effect. The content of Co inside nanowires increases with increasing potential. This can be understood by the polarization curves of depositing Co and Ni nanowires, which show that the current density ratio of Ni to Co at low potential has larger value than that at high potential.

  12. Deposits of the Peruvian Pisco Formation compared to layered deposits on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowe, M.; Bishop, J. L.; Gross, C.; Walter, S.

    2013-09-01

    Deposits of the Peruvian Pisco Formation are morphologically similar to the mounds of Juventae Chasma at the equatorial region on Mars (Fig. 1). By analyzing these deposits, we hope to gain information about the environmental conditions that prevailed during sediment deposition and erosion, hence conditions that might be applicable to the Martian layered and hydrated deposits. Mariner 9 data of the Martian mid-latitudes have already shown evidence of the wind-sculptured landforms that display the powerful prevailing eolian regime [1]. In addition, [2] reported on similarities between Martian erosional landforms and those of the rainless coastal desert of central Peru from the Paracas peninsula to the Rio Ica. As indicated by similar erosional patterns, hyper-arid conditions and unidirectional winds must have dominated at least after deposition of the sediments, which are intermixed volcaniclastic materials and evaporate minerals at both locations. Likewise, variations in composition are displayed by alternating layers of different competence. The Pisco formation bears yardangs on siltstones, sandstones and clays with volcaniclastic admixtures [3] whereas the presence of sulphate minerals and the omnipresent mafic mineralogy has been reported for the layered mounds of Juventae Chasma equally [4]. Likewise, a volcanic airfall deposition and lacustrine formation have been proposed for the sulphate-rich deposits of Juventae Chasma [5,6]. In order to find out about potential spectral similarities, we performed a detailed spectral analysis of the surface by using LANDSAT and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) VNIR/ SWIR data (visible to near-infrared and shortwave infrared region).

  13. Comparison of the chemical characteristics of the uranium deposits of the Morrison Formation in the Grants uranium region, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spirakis, C.S.; Pierson, C.T.

    1983-01-01

    Statistical treatment of the chemical data of samples from the northeast Church Rock area, Ruby deposit, Mariano Lake deposit, and the Ambrosia Lake district indicates that primary ore-forming processes concentrated copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, selenium, vanadium, yttrium, arsenic, organic carbon, and sulfur, along with uranium. A barium halo that is associated with all of these deposits formed from secondary processes. Calcium and strontium were also enriched in the ores by secondary processes. Comparison of the chemical characteristics of the redistributed deposits in the Church Rock district to the primary deposits in the Grants uranium region indicates that calcium, manganese, strontium, yttrium, copper, iron, magnesium, molybdenum, lead, selenium, and vanadium are separated from uranium during redistribution of the deposits in the Church Rock area. Comparisons of the chemical characteristics of the Church Rock deposits and the secondary deposits at Ambrosia Lake suggest some differences in the processes that were involved in the genesis of the redistributed deposits in these two areas.

  14. The Cretaceous sediment-hosted copper deposits of San Marcos (Coahuila, Northeastern Mexico): An approach to ore-forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Alonso, Donají; Canet, Carles; González-Partida, Eduardo; Villanueva-Estrada, Ruth Esther; Prol-Ledesma, Rosa María; Alfonso, Pura; Caballero-Martínez, Juan Antonio; Lozano-Santa Cruz, Rufino

    2011-04-01

    In the San Marcos ranges of Cuatrociénegas, NE Mexico, several sediment-hosted copper deposits occur within the boundary between the Coahuila Block, a basement high mostly granitic in composition and Late Paleozoic to Triassic in age, and the Mesozoic Sabinas rift basin. This boundary is outlined by the regional-scale synsedimentary San Marcos Fault. At the basin scale, the copper mineralization occurs at the top of a ˜1000 m thick red-bed succession (San Marcos Formation, Berrisian), a few meters below a conformable, transitional contact with micritic limestones (Cupido Formation, Hauterivian to Aptian). It consists of successive decimeter-thick roughly stratiform copper-rich horizons placed just above the red-beds, in a transitional unit of carbonaceous grey-beds grading to micritic limestones. The host rocks are fine- to medium-grained arkoses, with poorly sorted and subangular to subrounded grains. The detrital grains are cemented by quartz and minor calcite; besides, late iron oxide grain-coating cement occurs at the footwall unmineralized red-beds. The source area of the sediments, indicated by their modal composition, is an uplifted basement. The contents of SiO 2 (40.70-87.50 wt.%), Al 2O 3 (5.91-22.00 wt.%), K 2O (3.68-12.50 wt.%), Na 2O (0.03-2.03 wt.%) and CaO (0.09-3.78 wt.%) are within the ranges expected for arkoses. Major oxide ratios indicate that the sedimentary-tectonic setting was a passive margin. The outcropping copper mineralization essentially consists in a supergene assemblage of chrysocolla, malachite and azurite. All that remains of the primary mineralization are micron-sized chalcocite grains shielded by quartz cement. In addition, pyrite subhedral grains occur scattered throughout the copper-mineralized horizons. In these weathered orebodies copper contents range between 4.24 and 7.72 wt.%, silver between 5 and 92 ppm, and cobalt from 8 to 91 ppm. Microthermometric measurements of fluid inclusions in quartz and calcite crystals from

  15. Distinguishing nanowire and nanotube formation by the deposition current transients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    High aspect ratio Ni nanowires (NWs) and nanotubes (NTs) were electrodeposited inside ordered arrays of self-assembled pores (approximately 50 nm in diameter and approximately 50 μm in length) in anodic alumina templates by a potentiostatic method. The current transients monitored during each process allowed us to distinguish between NW and NT formation. The depositions were long enough for the deposited metal to reach the top of the template and form a continuous Ni film. The overfilling process was found to occur in two steps when depositing NWs and in a single step in the case of NTs. A comparative study of the morphological, structural, and magnetic properties of the Ni NWs and NTs was performed using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometry, respectively. PMID:22650765

  16. Deposit formation and heat transfer in hydrocarbon rocket fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovanetti, A. J.; Spadaccini, L. J.; Szetela, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental research program was undertaken to investigate the thermal stability and heat transfer characteristics of several hydrocarbon fuels under conditions that simulate high-pressure, rocket engine cooling systems. The rates of carbon deposition in heated copper and nickel-plated copper tubes were determined for RP-1, propane, and natural gas using a continuous flow test apparatus which permitted independent variation and evaluation of the effect on deposit formation of wall temperature, fuel pressure, and fuel velocity. In addition, the effects of fuel additives and contaminants, cryogenic fuel temperatures, and extended duration testing with intermittent operation were examined. Corrosion of the copper tube surface was detected for all fuels tested; however, plating the insides of the tubes with nickel reduced deposit formation and eliminated corrosion in most cases. The lowest rates of carbon deposition were obtained for natural gas, and the highest rates were obtained for propane. Forced-convection heat transfer film coefficients were satisfactorily correlated using a Nusselt-Reynolds-Prandtl number equation for all the fuels tested.

  17. Deposit formation and heat transfer in hydrocarbon rocket fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovanetti, A. J.; Spadaccini, L. J.; Szetela, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental research program was undertaken to investigate the thermal stability and heat transfer characteristics of several hydrocarbon fuels under conditions that simulate high-pressure, rocket engine cooling systems. The rates of carbon deposition in heated copper and nickel-plated copper tubes were determined for RP-1, propane, and natural gas using a continuous flow test apparatus which permitted independent variation and evaluation of the effect on deposit formation of wall temperature, fuel pressure, and fuel velocity. In addition, the effects of fuel additives and contaminants, cryogenic fuel temperatures, and extended duration testing with intermittent operation were examined. Parametric tests to map the thermal stability characteristics of RP-1, commercial-grade propane, and natural gas were conducted at pressures of 6.9 to 13.8 MPa, bulk fuel velocities of 30 to 90 m/s, and tube wall temperatures in the range of 230 to 810 K. Also, tests were run in which propane and natural gas fuels were chilled to 230 and 160 K, respectively. Corrosion of the copper tube surface was detected for all fuels tested. Plating the inside of the copper tubes with nickel reduced deposit formation and eliminated tube corrosion in most cases. The lowest rates of carbon deposition were obtained for natural gas, and the highest rates were obtained for propane. For all fuels tested, the forced-convection heat transfer film coefficients were satisfactorily correlated using a Nusselt-Reynolds-Prandtl number equation.

  18. The role of bitumen in strata-bound copper deposit formation in the Copiapo area, Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisternas, M. Eugenia; Hermosilla, Juan

    2006-07-01

    In northern Chile, between 27 and 33°S, there are numerous deposits where residual petroleum is associated with Cu-(Ag) mineralisation (the most famous being El Soldado). All of these deposits are hosted by Lower Cretaceous volcanic or volcanoclastic facies along the axis of a former backarc basin. This close relationship suggests that the generation, migration and emplacement of hydrocarbons in the Cretaceous volcanic units is a regional process, associated with the evolution of the Cretaceous backarc basin and points to the importance of pyrobitumen as an exploration tool for similar Cu-(Ag) deposits. The present work analyses four small strata-bound copper deposits located along a north-south belt approximately 10 km east of Copiapó in northern Chile. These deposits are typically hosted by pyrobitumen-rich andesitic volcanic to volcanoclastic rocks intercalated with the marine carbonate Pabellón Formation, the youngest formation within the Chañarcillo Group. The strong genetic and spatial relationships between the pyrobitumen-rich lavas and the mineral deposits allow us to define this volcanic belt as the Ocoita-Pabellón Metallotect. Two hydrothermal events can be distinguished based on the mineralogical, textural, fluid inclusion and isotope data of ore and gangue and on the optical properties of residual petroleum. During the early event, petroleum was mobilised from the source rocks into the primary and secondary porosity of the lavas by Fe-rich hydrothermal fluids, which precipitated pyrite as an early sulphide phase. The second event is characterised by Cu-rich hydrothermal fluids, which induced three successive sub-stages of Cu-sulphide precipitation. The hydrothermal fluids chemically and thermally altered the first-stage bitumen, transforming it into pyrobitumen. The present work documents similarities between the Ocoita-Pabellón Metallotect and the El Soldado ore deposit and emphasises important differences. In the El Soldado host rocks, a

  19. Quantifying fat, oil, and grease deposit formation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Iasmin, Mahbuba; Dean, Lisa O; Ducoste, Joel J

    2016-01-01

    Fat, oil, and grease (FOG) deposits formed in sanitary sewers are calcium-based saponified solids that are responsible for a significant number of nationwide sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) across United States. In the current study, the kinetics of lab-based saponified solids were determined to understand the kinetics of FOG deposit formation in sewers for two types of fat (Canola and Beef Tallow) and two types of calcium sources (calcium chloride and calcium sulfate) under three pH (7 ± 0.5, 10 ± 0.5, and ≈14) and two temperature conditions (22 ± 0.5 and 45 ± 0.5 °C). The results of this study displayed quick reactions of a fraction of fats with calcium ions to form calcium based saponified solids. Results further showed that increased palmitic fatty acid content in source fats, the magnitude of the pH, and temperature significantly affect the FOG deposit formation and saponification rates. The experimental data of the kinetics were compared with two empirical models: a) Cotte saponification model and b) Foubert crystallization model and a mass-action based mechanistic model that included alkali driven hydrolysis of triglycerides. Results showed that the mass action based mechanistic model was able to predict changes in the rate of formation of saponified solids under the different experimental conditions compared to both empirical models. The mass-action based saponification model also revealed that the hydrolysis of Beef Tallow was slower compared to liquid Canola fat resulting in smaller quantities of saponified solids. This mechanistic saponification model, with its ability to track the saponified solids chemical precursors, may provide an initial framework to predict the spatial formation of FOG deposits in municipal sewers using system wide sewer collection modeling software. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Gondolellid conodonts and depositional setting of the Phosphoria Formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wardlaw, Bruce R.

    2015-01-01

    The Phosphoria Formation and related rocks were deposited over an 8.9 m.y. interval beginning approximately 274.0Ma and ending approximately 265.1Ma. The Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale Member was deposited in southeastern Idaho and adjacent Wyoming over 5.4 m.y. from approximately 273.2 to 268.6 Ma. The Retort Phosphatic Shale Member was deposited in southwestern Montana and west-central Wyoming over 1.3 m.y. from approximately 267.4 to 266.1Ma. The base of the Roadian Stage of the Middle Permian occurs within the lower phosphate zone of the Meade Peak. The base of the Wordian Stage occurs within the upper phosphate zone of the Meade Peak. The presence of a cool-water brachiopod fauna, cool-water conodont faunas, and the absence of fusulinids throughout the Phosphoria basin indicate the presence of pervasive cool, upwelling waters. Acritarchs are intimately associated with phosphorites and phosphatic shales and may have been the primary organic producer to help drive phosphate production. The gondolellid conodont fauna of the Phosphoria Formation links a geographic cline of Jinogondolella nankingensis from the Delaware basin, West Texas, to the Sverdrup basin, Canadian Arctic, and shows distinct differentiation in species distribution, as do other conodont groups, within the Phosphoria basin. Ten species and two subspecies of gondolellid conodonts are recognized from the Phosphoria Formation and related rocks that belong to Mesogondolella and Jinogondolella.

  1. The role of the Kupferschiefer in the formation of hydrothermal base metal mineralization in the Spessart ore district, Germany: insight from detailed sulfur isotope studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Thomas; Okrusch, Martin; Weyer, Stefan; Lorenz, Joachim; Lahaye, Yann; Taubald, Heiner; Schmitt, Ralf T.

    2010-03-01

    The Spessart district (SW Germany), located at the southwestern margin of the Permian Kupferschiefer basin in Central Europe, hosts abundant stratabound and structurally controlled base metal mineralization. The mineralization styles identified are (1) stratabound Cu-Pb-Zn-(Ag) ores in Zechstein sedimentary rocks, (2) structurally controlled Cu-As-(Ag) ores in Zechstein sedimentary rocks, (3) crosscutting Co-Ni-(Bi)-As and Cu-Fe-As veins, (4) stratabound metasomatic Fe-Mn carbonate ores in Zechstein dolomite, (5) barren barite veins, and (6) Fe-Mn-As veins in Permian rhyolites. Building on previous work that involved mineralogical, textural, and chemical characterization of the major mineralization types, we have performed a comprehensive sulfur isotope study that applied both conventional and novel laser-ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry techniques. The δ34S values of sulfide minerals from the different ore types are consistently negative and highly variable, in the range between -44.5‰ and -3.9‰, whereas the δ34S values of barite are all positive in the range between 4.7‰ and 18.9‰. Remarkably, stratabound and structurally controlled mineralization in Zechstein sedimentary rocks has the least negative δ34S values, whereas vein-type deposits have consistently more negative δ34S values. The observed pattern of sulfide δ34S values can be best interpreted in terms of fluid mixing at the basement-cover interface. Hydrothermal fluids originating from the crystalline basement migrated upward along subvertical fault zones and were periodically injected into groundwaters that were flowing in the post-Variscan sedimentary cover. These groundwaters had interacted with the Zechstein sedimentary rocks, resulting in fluids characterized by elevated concentrations of reduced sulfur (with negative δ34S values) and alkaline pH. Repeated mixing between both chemically contrasting fluids caused rapid and efficient precipitation of

  2. Geographical coincidence of high heat flow, high seismicity, and upwelling, with hydrocarbon deposits, phosphorites, evaporites, and uranium ores.

    PubMed

    Libby, L M; Libby, W F

    1974-10-01

    Oil deposits occur in deep sediments, and appear to be organic matter that has been transformed through the action of geothermal heat and pressure. Deep sediments, rich in biological remains, are created by ocean upwelling, caused in part by high geothermal heat flow through the sea bottom. Such regions correlate with enhanced seismic activity. We look for correlations of seismicity, high heat flux, petroleum, uranium, phosphates, and salts, deposited from abundant plant life. These may be useful in discovering more petroleum and coal. We estimate that the known world reserves of petroleum and coal are about 10(-4) of the total of buried biogenic carbon.

  3. Geographical Coincidence of High Heat Flow, High Seismicity, and Upwelling, with Hydrocarbon Deposits, Phosphorites, Evaporites, and Uranium Ores

    PubMed Central

    Libby, L. M.; Libby, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    Oil deposits occur in deep sediments, and appear to be organic matter that has been transformed through the action of geothermal heat and pressure. Deep sediments, rich in biological remains, are created by ocean upwelling, caused in part by high geothermal heat flow through the sea bottom. Such regions correlate with enhanced seismic activity. We look for correlations of seismicity, high heat flux, petroleum, uranium, phosphates, and salts, deposited from abundant plant life. These may be useful in discovering more petroleum and coal. We estimate that the known world reserves of petroleum and coal are about 10-4 of the total of buried biogenic carbon. Images PMID:16592185

  4. Sag River Formation, Prudhoe Bay, Alaska: depositional environment and diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.A.

    1985-04-01

    The Sag River Formation is a minor hydrocarbon reservoir in the Prudhoe Bay field, Alaska. It comprises bioturbated, glauconitic, argillaceous, quartzose fine to very fine-grained sandstone and siltstone and varies from 55 ft (17 m) to 20 ft (6 m) in thickness in the field. The formation is the upper part of very fine-grained, upward coarsening, terrigenous, clastic-dominated sequence deposited in late triassic time. This sequence includes the upper part of the subjacent Shublik Formation. Lithofacies variation within the Sag River is minimal with stratigraphic thinning from the north-northeast to a south-southwest shaleout. The formation was deposited in a low-energy, offshore, marine-shelf environment basinward of a low-relief source area. Upward coarsening, as well as slightly older Sag River facies in more proximal areas, suggests regionally significant marine regression during deposition. In the Prudhoe Bay field, diagenesis along with abundant primary detrital matrix significantly diminishes reservoir quality. Ductile grain deformation, authigenic clay-grain coatings, quartz overgrowths, and carbonate cementation have resulted in microporosity and associate low permeability, which is the primary shortcoming of the Sag River reservoir. Larger, interconnected secondary pores (and associated improved reservoir quality) were produced by the dissolution of carbonate cement and possibly other mineral phases. Reservoir quality in the Sag River Formation is strongly influenced by proximity to its subcrop with the overlying Lower Cretaceous Highly Radioactive Zone. Mineral leaching probably resulted from aggressive fluid incursion at that truncation surface. The source of those fluids is not presently known.

  5. Inkjet printing of aqueous rivulets: Formation, deposition, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberg, Vadim

    early-time dynamics during rivulet formation in determining the nature of subsequent particle convection and deposition. New flow and deposition phenomena have also been identified and leveraged to develop novel processes for deposition of micron-scale electrically conducting lines of silver nanoparticles. Low-temperature processing of printed silver nitrate lines with environmentally benign Ar plasma to improve electrical properties has also been investigated and will be discussed.

  6. The formation of basal-type uranium deposits in south central British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, D.R.

    1982-08-01

    The basal-type uranium deposits in south central British Columbia occur within unconsolidated, late Miocene fluvial paleochannel sediments that overlie major fault zones within the Okanagan Highlands Intrusive Complex. Five uranium deposits have been outlined to date, of which the Blizzard (4,020 metric tons U) and Tyee (650 metric tons U) are the largest. The basement intrusive complex underlying the deposits varies in age from early Cretaceous to Eocene and is comprised of quartz monzonite, granodiorite, Coryell monzonite, porphyritic granite, and pegmatite. Uranium mineralization is present in the form of uranous (ningyoite) or uranyl (saleeite, autunite) phosphates coating clastic grains and filling voids. Because of very strong reducing conditions related to large concentrations of marcasite and organic material, ningyoite is the only uranium mineral in the Tyee deposit, whereas the Blizzard deposit contains a more complex assemblage of minerals (saleeite, autunite, ningyoite). The observed paragenetic sequence of mineral precipitation in the Blizzard deposit (autunite-saleeite-ningyoite) indicates that the uranyl minerals, saleeite and autunite, are primary. Investigations of the source of the ore-forming elements (U, Ca, Mg, PO/sub 4/) showed the deposits to be formed by the infiltration into fluvial sediments of deep-seated, structurally controlled, ground waters that migrated in a well-developed regional hydrologic system within the Complex. Research indicates that the ore-forming ground waters were cold, slightly bicarbonated (150-400 ppm), highly uraniferous (10-50 ppb), and slightly oxidizing (dissolved oxygen = 2-4 ppm).

  7. Fat, oil and grease deposits in sewers: characterisation of deposits and formation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Williams, J B; Clarkson, C; Mant, C; Drinkwater, A; May, E

    2012-12-01

    Fat, oil and grease deposits (FOG) in sewers are a major problem and can cause sewer overflows, resulting in environmental damage and health risks. Often simplistically portrayed as cooling of fats, recent research has suggested that saponification may be involved in FOG formation. However there are still questions about the mechanisms effecting transformations in sewers and the role and source of metal cations involved in saponification. This study characterises FOG deposits from pumping stations, sewers and sewage works from different water hardness zones across the UK. The sites all had previous problems with FOG and most catchments contained catering and food preparation establishments. The FOG deposits were highly variable with moisture content ranging from 15 to 95% and oil content from 0 to 548 mg/g. Generally the pumping stations had lower moisture content and higher fat content, followed by the sewers then the sewage works. The water in contact with the FOG had high levels of oil (mean of about 800 mg/L) and this may indicate poor kitchen FOG management practices. FOG fatty acid profiles showed a transformation from unsaturated to saturated forms compared to typical cooking oils. This seems to relate to ageing in the sewer network or the mechanism of formation, as samples from pumping stations had higher proportions of C18:1 compared to C16. This may be due to microbial transformations by bacteria such as Clostridium sp. in a similar process to adipocere formation. There was an association between water hardness and increased Ca levels in FOG along with harder deposits and higher melting points. A link between FOG properties and water hardness has not been previously reported for field samples. This may also be due to microbial processes, such as biocalcification. By developing the understanding of these mechanisms it may be possible to more effectively control FOG deposits, especially when combined with promotion of behavioural change.

  8. Helium isotope data from the Goldfield epithermal system, Nevada: Evidence for volatile input from a primitive mantle source during ore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstra, A. H.; Manning, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    crust. This exceptional volatile plumbing system may be an important ingredient in the formation of large, high sulfidation gold deposits. The ascent of mantle-sourced volatiles may be related to the coeval transition from transpression to transtension within the western North American plate caused by microplate capture along the San Andreas transform.

  9. Three mechanisms of ore re-mobilisation during amphibolite facies metamorphism at the Montauban Zn-Pb-Au-Ag deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomkins, Andrew G.

    2007-08-01

    The relative importance of mechanical re-mobilisation, hydrothermal dissolution and re-precipitation, and sulphide melting in controlling redistribution of metals during concurrent metamorphism and deformation is evaluated at the middle amphibolite facies Montauban deposit in Canada. As at many other deposits, ductile deformation was important in driving mechanical re-mobilisation of massive sulphides from limb regions into hinge regions of large-scale folds and is thus the most important for controlling the economics of Pb and Zn distribution. Two possible stages of hydrothermally driven re-mobilisation are discussed, each of which produces characteristically different alteration assemblages. Prograde hydrothermal re-mobilisation is driven by pyrite de-sulphidation and concurrent chlorite dehydration and is thus an internally driven process. At Montauban, the H2S-rich fluid generated through this process allowed re-mobilisation of gold into the wall rock, where it was deposited in response to sulphidation of Fe Mg silicates. Retrograde hydrothermal re-mobilisation is an externally driven process, whereby large volumes of fluids from outside the deposit may dissolve and re-precipitate metals, and cause hydration of silicate minerals. This second hydrothermally driven process is not recognised at Montauban. Sulphide melting occurred as temperatures neared the peak metamorphic conditions. Melting initiated in the massive sulphides through arsenopyrite breakdown, and a small volume of melt was subsequently re-mobilised into the wall rock. Trace element partitioning and fractional crystallisation of this melt generated a precious metal-rich fractionate, which remained mobile until well after peak metamorphism. Thus, prograde hydrothermal re-mobilisation and sulphide melting were the most important mechanisms for controlling the distribution of Au and Ag.

  10. Thallium-rich pyrite ores from the Apuan Alps, Tuscany, Italy:constraints for their origin and environmental concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orazio, Massimo; Biagioni, Cristian; Dini, Andrea; Vezzoni, Simone

    2017-06-01

    The southern sector of the Apuan Alps (AA) massif, Tuscany, Italy, is characterized by the occurrence of a series of baryte-pyrite-iron oxide orebodies whose Tl-rich nature was recognized only recently. The geochemistry of the pyrite ore was investigated through inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In addition, lead isotope data for selected pyrite ores from AA were collected. Pyrite ores are characterized by a complex geochemistry, with high concentrations of Tl (up to 1100 μg/g) coupled with high As and Sb contents; the Co/Ni ratio is always <1. Geochemical data of pyrite and marcasite ore samples from other mining districts of Tuscany have been collected in order to compare them with those from the AA. These samples usually have very low Tl content (less than 2 μg/g) and high to very high Co/Ni and As/Sb ratios. Only some samples from the Sb-Hg ore deposits showed very high Tl concentrations (up to 3900 μg/g). Another difference is related to the lead isotope composition, with pyrite ores from AA markedly less radiogenic than those from the other deposits from Tuscany. Geochemical data of pyrite ores from AA give new insights on the genesis of the baryte-pyrite-iron oxide orebodies, relating their formation to low-temperature hydrothermal systems active during early Paleozoic; in addition, these data play a fundamental role in assessing the environmental impact of these deposits.

  11. Influence of deposit architecture on intrastratal deformation, slope deposits of the Tres Pasos Formation, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchter, Neal C.; Romans, Brian W.; Hubbard, Stephen M.

    2016-07-01

    Slope sediments on passive and active margins deform and fail across a broad range of scales ranging from loading and sediment remobilization near the sediment-water interface to submarine landslides and mass movements that incorporate significant volumes of slope deposits. Deformational styles are characterized by updip extension and downdip compressional features that occur above a detachment surface. Conditions for failure and deformation include the presence of weak layer(s) that serve as a detachment surface, competency contrasts that allow for detachment and downslope movement, deformation above a detachment surface, and a triggering mechanism(s) that initiates failure. Slope failure processes and products are well documented at scales resolvable by seismic-reflection surveys and in instances of extensive downslope failure, but the processes and products associated with intermediate-scale slope deformation are poorly understood. Intrastratal deformation is defined as stratigraphically isolated zones of deformation bounded above and below by concordant and undeformed strata. In this study, outcrop examples of intrastratal deformation from the Upper Cretaceous Tres Pasos Formation are used to elucidate the influence of depositional architecture on slope deformation. The facies distribution associated with compensational stacking of lobe deposits is shown to have a first-order control on the location and style of deformation. Detachment planes that form in mudstone deposits associated with lobe fringe and interlobe deposits are spatially limited and deformation is restricted to interbedded sandstone and mudstone associated with off-axial lobe positions. Downslope translation was arrested by stratigraphic buttresses associated with more sandstone-prone axial deposits. Emplacement of a regionally extensive mass transport deposit is interpreted as the triggering mechanism for contemporaneous intrastratal deformation of > 60 m of underlying stratigraphy. A vertical

  12. Depositional environment and origin of the Lilaozhuang Neoarchean BIF-hosted iron-magnesite deposit on the southern margin of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hua; Zhang, LianChang; Fabre, Sébastien; Wang, ChangLe; Zhai, MingGuo

    2016-08-01

    The Neoarchean Lilaozhuang iron-magnesite deposit is located in the middle of the Huoqiu banded iron formation (BIF) ore belt in Anhui Province on the southern margin of the North China Craton. The Huoqiu BIF is the unique one that simultaneously develops quartz-type, silicate-type, and carbonate-type magnetite in the region. The Lilaozhuang deposit is characterized by magnesium-rich carbonate (magnesite) in magnetite ores. The BIF-hosted iron ores include mainly of silicate type and carbonate type, with a small amount of quartz type, which chiefly exhibit banded and massive structure, with minor disseminated structure. The magnesite ores occur as crystal-like bright white and exhibits massive structure. The Y/Ho ratio and REY pattern of both iron and magnesite ores are similar to that of seawater, while Eu shows positive anomaly, which is the sign of seafloor hydrothermal mixture. These features suggest that ore-forming materials of iron and magnesium in the Lilaozhuang deposit are mainly from the mixture of seafloor hydrothermal and seawater. Both ores do not exhibit negative Ce anomaly, which indicates that the deposit was formed in an environment showing a lack of oxygen. C-O isotopic compositions indicate that magnesite ore has been reformed by metamorphism of low amphibolite facies and later hydrothermal alteration. Based on the comprehensive analysis, authors suggest that iron and magnesite ores in the Lilaozhuang deposits formed in a confined sea basin on continental margin and was influenced by later complex geological processes.

  13. Depositional environment and origin of the Lilaozhuang Neoarchean BIF-hosted iron-magnesite deposit on the southern margin of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hua; Zhang, LianChang; Fabre, Sébastien; Wang, ChangLe; Zhai, MingGuo

    2017-07-01

    The Neoarchean Lilaozhuang iron-magnesite deposit is located in the middle of the Huoqiu banded iron formation (BIF) ore belt in Anhui Province on the southern margin of the North China Craton. The Huoqiu BIF is the unique one that simultaneously develops quartz-type, silicate-type, and carbonate-type magnetite in the region. The Lilaozhuang deposit is characterized by magnesium-rich carbonate (magnesite) in magnetite ores. The BIF-hosted iron ores include mainly of silicate type and carbonate type, with a small amount of quartz type, which chiefly exhibit banded and massive structure, with minor disseminated structure. The magnesite ores occur as crystal-like bright white and exhibits massive structure. The Y/Ho ratio and REY pattern of both iron and magnesite ores are similar to that of seawater, while Eu shows positive anomaly, which is the sign of seafloor hydrothermal mixture. These features suggest that ore-forming materials of iron and magnesium in the Lilaozhuang deposit are mainly from the mixture of seafloor hydrothermal and seawater. Both ores do not exhibit negative Ce anomaly, which indicates that the deposit was formed in an environment showing a lack of oxygen. C-O isotopic compositions indicate that magnesite ore has been reformed by metamorphism of low amphibolite facies and later hydrothermal alteration. Based on the comprehensive analysis, authors suggest that iron and magnesite ores in the Lilaozhuang deposits formed in a confined sea basin on continental margin and was influenced by later complex geological processes.

  14. The possible bearing of the granite of the UPH Deep Drill Holes, northern Illinois, on the origin of Mississippi Valley ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doe, B. R.; Stuckless, J. S.; Delevaux, M. H.

    1983-09-01

    The Pb-Pb, Th-Pb, and U-Pb systems of whole-rock drill-core samples of the granite of UPH record at least one postcrystallization event. Treatment of the data on a concordia plot indicate the timing of this disturbance was probably 260 ±35 m.y. ago and probably no older than 400 m.y. ago. The upper intercept age on concordia is 1416±20 m.y and the Pb-Pb isochron age for the four least disturbed rocks plus the four potassium feldspars is 1451±19 m.y. These ages are in close agreement with Rb-Sr whole rock and U-Pb zircon ages determined by others and should be the age of granite formation. Considerable Pb loss is indicated for many of the shallower samples that have a more red rather than pink color, probably to a factor of two to three or more as a result of the disturbance, although the granite remains Pb-rich today (40-80 ppm). In some other studies of disturbed U-Th-Pb systems, the radiogenic lead has been taken up by potassium feldspars; however, the Pb for most samples seems to have been lost from the system for the granite of UPH. One sample with an unusually high Pb content of about 195 ppm has the most radiogenic Pb of any sample but `normal' values of Th-U. This sample has obviously gained radiogenic Pb (by more than a factor of four) and confirms that Pb was indeed mobilized in parts of the system. Within the limits of the uncertainties, equal amounts of Pb were lost or gained in both the U-Pb and Th-Pb systems, which is compatible with mobilization being restricted to lead. There is some tendency, however, for the more affected samples to have lower Th-U values and higher U contents. A complex model in which U is gained, Pb lost, and 208Pb lost preferentially to 207Pb and 206Pb cannot be ruled out. U and Th have somewhat different crystallographic locations and decay energies so that 208Pb might be in more accessible sites than the other Pb isotopes. Fission track mapping of the samples indicates most of the U today is located in submicroscopic sites

  15. Nanoparticle formation and thin film deposition in aniline containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattyn, Cedric; Dias, Ana; Hussain, Shahzad; Strunskus, Thomas; Stefanovic, Ilija; Boulmer-Leborgne, Chantal; Lecas, Thomas; Kovacevic, Eva; Berndt, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    This contribution deals with plasma based polymerization processes in mixtures of argon and aniline. The investigations are performed in a capacitively coupled RF discharge (in pulsed and continuous mode) and concern both the observed formation of nanoparticles in the plasma volume and the deposition of films. The latter process was used for the deposition of ultra-thin layers on different kind of nanocarbon materials (nanotubes and free standing graphene). The analysis of the plasma and the plasma chemistry (by means of mass spectroscopy and in-situ FTIR spectroscopy) is accompanied by several ex-situ diagnostics of the obtained materials which include NEXAFS and XPS measurements as well as Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy. The decisive point of the investigations concern the preservation of the original monomer structure during the plasma polymerization processes and the stability of the thin films on the different substrates.

  16. Suture zones of the Urals as integral prospective ore-bearing tectonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koroteev, V. A.; Sazonov, V. N.; Ogorodnikov, V. N.; Polenov, Yu. A.

    2009-04-01

    Rift-related (1.2 Ga) and collision (380-240 Ma) suture zones of the Urals are described. The riftrelated suture zones comprise an ultramafic-gabbro complex with titanomagnetite mineralization, an ultramafic complex with chromite mineralization, and a complex of alkali granitoids with rare-metal (including REE) mineralization accompanied by K-feldspathites, albitites, and calcite metasomatic rocks. The collision suture zones are distinguished by early collision granitoids specialized for tungsten (scheelite) and gold, as well as by raremetal granites and such derivatives of them as pegmatite and greisen with rare-metal and colored-stone mineralization. The suture zones are characterized by long-term (up to 80 Ma or more) continuous-discontinuous periods of ore deposition; heterogeneous sources of ore matter and ore-bearing fluids; a polyelemental composition of lithogeochemical halos and an integral mineral composition of altered wall rocks; and the occurrence of mafic, intermediate, and felsic dikes at large gold deposits, as well as wide variations in PT parameters of the ore-forming process: T = 620-150°C and P = 3.2-0.6 kbar. Collision played a dual role in ore formation. On the one hand, collision led to deformation and metamorphism of precollision massive sulfide deposits and, to a lesser degree, Au-bearing Fe and Cu skarn and porphyry copper deposits, and, on the other hand, to the formation of new gold, rare-metal, quartz, colored-stone, talc, muscovite, and noble serpentine deposits. As a rule, this polygenetic mineralization differs in age and is related to collision volcanic and plutonic complexes. This diversity can be a good basis for metallogenic analysis, forecasting, and prospecting of various metallic deposits and industrial minerals. Polygenetic mineralization of various age known in suture zones is accompanied by integral lithogeochemical and metasomatic halos characterized by a continuous-discontinuous history. The complexity of ore

  17. Calcium chloride brines: The vital component in the hydrothermal brine-hydrothermal ore deposit-evaporite-basinal brine cycle in continental rift basins

    SciTech Connect

    Hardie, L. . Dept. of Earth and Planetary Science)

    1992-01-01

    Nonmarine evaporites are forming today in chloride-rich saline lakes in a number of arid continental rift and strike-slip basins that are characterized by upwelling of subsurface CaCl[sub 2]-bearing brines driven by forced convection of cool basinal brines or by free convection of hydrothermal brines which reach the surface as brine springs. The compositions of these upwelling brines are distinctively different from that of seawater or typical continental waters due primarily to their high proportion of Ca and low proportion of SO[sub 4]. The most viable explanation for the CaCl[sub 2] composition of these upwelling brines is the interaction between hot convecting groundwaters and bedrock at or above zeolite facies temperatures, as for example occurs in the modern Salton Sea basin. Such upwelling CaCl[sub 2] brines in extensional fault basins can explain the puzzling chemical composition of MgSO[sub 4]-poor potash evaporites, the least understood of all ancient salt deposits. In this regard it is suggested that the following cyclic succession of processes occurs in active continental rift basins during a magmatically-driven thermal event: (1) hydrothermal convection of the ambient porewaters in the rift sediments, (2) dissolution of buried evaporites and hydrothermal metamorphism of the rift sediments, (3) hydrothermal ore deposition in fault-related fractures and within the rift sediments, (4) upwelling brine springs add CaCl[sub 2] and KCl components to the surface lake waters, which on evaporation produce MgSO[sub 4]-poor potash evaporites, (5) decay of the thermal event leads to cool down of the hot brines, which now migrate gravitationally to the deeper parts of the basin to become static Na-Ca-Cl basinal brines.

  18. Oxidation and formation of deposit precursors in hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, F. R.; Lan, B.; Cotts, D. B.; Buttrill, S. E., Jr.; St.john, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    The oxidation of two jet turbine fuels and some pure hydrocarbons was studied at 130 C with and without the presence of small amounts of N-methyl pyrrole (NMP) or indene. Tendency to form solid-deposit precursors was studied by measuring soluble gum formation as well as dimer and trimer formation using field ionization mass spectrometry. Pure n-dodecane oxidized fastest and gave the smallest amount of procursors. An unstable fuel oil oxidized much slower but formed large amounts of precursors. Stable Jet A fuel oxidized slowest and gave little precursors. Indene either retarded or accelerated the oxidation of n-dodecane, depending on its concentration, but always caused more gum formation. The NMP greatly retarded n-dodecane oxidation but accelerated Jet A oxidation and greatly increased the latter's gum formation. In general, the additive reacted faster and formed most of the gum. Results are interpreted in terms of classical cooxidation theory. The effect of oxygen pressure on gum formation is also reported.

  19. Igneous activity and related ore deposits in the western and southern Tushar Mountains, Marysvale volcanic field, west-central Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steven, Thomas A.

    1984-01-01

    PART A: Igneous activity in the Marysvale volcanic field of western Utah can be separated into many episodes of extrusion, intrusion, and hydrothermal activity. The rocks of the western Tushar Mountains, near the western part of the volcanic field, include intermediate-composition, calc-alkalic volcanic rocks erupted from scattered volcanoes in Oligocene through earliest Miocene time and related monzonitic intrusions emplaced 24-23 m.y. ago. Beginning 22-21 m.y. ago and extending through much of the later Cenozoic, a bimodal basalt-rhyolite assemblage was erupted widely throughout the volcanic field. Only volcanic and intrusive rocks belonging to the rhyolitic end member of this bimodal assemblage are present in the western Tushar Mountains; most of these rocks either fill the Mount Belknap caldera (19 m.y. old) or are part of the rhyolite of Gillies Hill (9---8 m.y. old). Episodic hydrothermal activity altered and mineralized rocks at many places in the western Tushar Mountains during Miocene time. The earliest activity took place in and adjacent to monzonitic calcalkalic intrusions emplaced in the vicinity of Indian Creek and Cork Ridge. These rocks were widely propylitized, and gold-bearing quartz-pyrite-carbonate veins formed in local fractures. Hydrothermal activity associated with the Mount Belknap caldera mobilized and redeposited uranium contained in the caldera-fill rocks and formed primary concentrations of lithophile elements (including molybdenum and uranium) in the vicinity of intrusive bodies. Hydrothermal activity associated with the rhyolite of Gillies Hill altered and mineralized rocks at several places along the fault zone that marks the western margin of the Tushar Mountains; the zoned alunite and gold deposits at Sheep Rock, the gold deposit at the Sunday Mine, and an alunite deposit near Indian Creek were thus produced. Resetting of isotopic ages suggests that another center of hydrothermally altered rocks associated with a buried pluton about

  20. Pattern, age, and origin of structural features within the Ozark plateau and the relationship to ore deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Topography and gravity anomaly images for the continental United States were constructed. Evidence was found based on gravity, remote sensing data, the presence, trend, and character of fractures, and on rock type data, for a Precambrian rift through Missouri. The feature is probably the failed arm of a triple junction that existed prior to formation of the granite-rhyolite terrain of southern Missouri.

  1. Terrestrial ferromanganese ore concentrations from mid-european basement blocks and their implication concerning the environment of formation during the late cenozoic (northern Bavaria, F.R.G.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, Harald

    1985-10-01

    Terrestrial Fe-Mn concentrations from the Hercynian Basement in Central Europe may be categorized into five principal types: ferricretes sensu stricto, pebble iron ores, ferruginous conglomerates and breccias (Fe-Mn cement), Fe replacement ores and limonitic gossans of vein-type deposits. The four types first mentioned are true supergene, whereas the last-mentioned type of Fe-Mn mineralization is suggested to have been generated by ascending hydrothermal fluids which reacted with ground waters. A sequence of minerals common to all the different host-rock lithologies may be established: Fe silcretes, goethite, poorly hydrated Mn oxides and intensively hydrated modifications of manganomelane. The Fe-Mn enrichments, irrespective of their host rocks, were taken as remnants of hydromorphic paleosoils of nonlateritic origin (Plio-Pleistocene). The more silicified equivalents are assumed to be precursor of these concretions. The most significant controls on Fe-Mn enrichments are considered to be the host-rock lithology, the local and regional geomorphology and the Cenozoic climatic conditions.

  2. Silico-ferrite of Calcium and Aluminum (SFCA) Iron Ore Sinter Bonding Phases: New Insights into Their Formation During Heating and Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2012-12-01

    The formation of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter phases during heating and cooling of synthetic iron ore sinter mixtures in the range 298 K to 1623 K (25 °C to 1350 °C) and at oxygen partial pressure of 5 × 10-3 atm has been characterized using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. SFCA and SFCA-I are the key bonding phases in iron ore sinter, and an improved understanding of their formation mechanisms may lead to improved efficiency of industrial sintering processes. During heating, SFCA-I formation at 1327 K to 1392 K (1054 °C to 1119 °C) (depending on composition) was associated with the reaction of Fe2O3, 2CaO·Fe2O3, and SiO2. SFCA formation (1380 K to 1437 K [1107 °C to 1164 °C]) was associated with the reaction of CaO·Fe2O3, SiO2, and a phase with average composition 49.60, 9.09, 0.14, 7.93, and 32.15 wt pct Fe, Ca, Si, Al, and O, respectively. Increasing Al2O3 concentration in the starting sinter mixture increased the temperature range over which SFCA-I was stable before the formation of SFCA, and it stabilized SFCA to a higher temperature before it melted to form a Fe3O4 + melt phase assemblage (1486 K to 1581 K [1213 °C to 1308 °C]). During cooling, the first phase to crystallize from the melt (1452 K to 1561 K [1179 °C to 1288 °C]) was an Fe-rich phase, similar in composition to SFCA-I, and it had an average composition 58.88, 6.89, 0.82, 3.00, and 31.68 wt pct Fe, Ca, Si, Al, and O, respectively. At lower temperatures (1418 K to 1543 K [1145 °C to 1270 °C]), this phase reacted with melt to form SFCA. Increasing Al2O3 increased the temperature at which crystallization of the Fe-rich phase occurred, increased the temperature at which crystallization of SFCA occurred, and suppressed the formation of Fe2O3 (1358 K to 1418 K [1085 °C to 1145 °C]) to lower temperatures.

  3. Local natural electric fields - the electrochemical factor of formation of placers and the criterion of prospectings of oil and gas deposits on the Arctic shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmiansky, Mikhail; Anokhin, Vladimir; Kholmianskaia, Galina

    2014-05-01

    On the basis litologo-facial, geo- and hydrochemical characteristics of a cross-section lito - and shelf hydrospheres, the estimation of structural features modern and paleostatic local electric fields and their influence on transportation of the suspended mineral material is made. The formula of dynamic carrying over of the ore material which is in a subcolloidal condition under the influence of natural electric field of a shelf is deduced. On a structure of a friable cover and its features on G.I. Teodorovicha's method position of oxidation-reduction border, sign Eh was reconstructed. On the basis of the established dependence between Eh and local substatic electric field of a shelf it was reconstructed paleostatic a field and its influence on the weighed mineral particles was estimated. Influence of local electric field on lithodynamic moving of ore minerals is estimated for a shelf of the Arctic seas of Russia. On the basis of this estimation and data on structure of a friable cover the map of influence of local electric field on sedimentation and transportation of ore minerals for water area of the East Arctic seas of Russia is constructed. For Laptev seas and East-Siberian the areas in which limits local electric field promoted are revealed and promotes formation Holocene placers of an ilmenite, a cassiterite and gold. For Chukchi and the Bering Seas such estimation is made for all friable cover. hydrocarbonic deposits located on water area of the Arctic shelf of the Russian Federation, initiate occurrence of jet auras of dispersion of heavy metals in ground deposits and in a layer of the sea water, blocking these deposits. Intensity of auras and their spatial position is caused by a geological structure of deposits of breeds containing them, lithodynamic and oceanologic factors. On the basis of the theoretical representations developed by M.A.Holmjansky and O.F.Putikova (Holmjansky, Putikov, 2000, 2006, 2008) application of electrochemical updating of

  4. Ion-Selective Deposition of Manganese Sulphate Solution from Trenggalek Manganese Ore by Active Carbon and Sodium Hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriyah, L.; Sulistiyono, E.

    2017-02-01

    One of the step in manganese dioxide manufacturing process for battery industry is a purification process of lithium manganese sulphate solution. The elimination of impurities such as iron removal is important in hydrometallurgical processes. Therefore, this paper present the purification results of manganese sulphate solution by removing impurities using a selective deposition method, namely activated carbon adsorption and NaOH. The experimental results showed that the optimum condition of adsorption process occurs on the addition of 5 g adsorbent and the addition of 10 ml NaOH 1 N, processing time of 30 minutes and the best is the activated carbon adsorption of Japan. Because the absolute requirement of the cathode material of lithium ion manganese are free of titanium then of local wood charcoal is good enough in terms of eliminating ions Ti is equal to 70.88%.

  5. Sedimentology of a muddy alluvial deposit: Triassic Denwa Formation, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Parthasarathi; Sarkar, Soumen; Maulik, Pradip

    2006-09-01

    Triassic Upper Denwa Formation (˜ 380 m) in the Satpura Gondwana basin, central India is a mudstone-dominated fluvial succession that comprises isolated ribbon-shaped (2-5-m-thick) channel-fill bodies encased within fine-grained extra-channel deposits. Eight architectural elements are recognized, of which five belong to channel-fill deposits and the remaining three to extra-channel deposits. Majority of channel-fill deposits are characterized by sandy or muddy inclined heterolithic strata (IHS) that record limited lateral accretion of point bars or benches (constrained by cohesive banks) in mixed- to suspended-load sinuous channels. A few ribbon bodies are mud rich and attest to nearly stagnant conditions in partly abandoned channels. A few single- or multistorey ribbon bodies that are dominantly sandy and lack inclined strata represent deposits of straight, laterally stable channel. The smallest ribbon bodies (˜ 1 m thick) of calcirudite/calcarenite possibly represent deposits of secondary channels in the interfluves. Coexistence of channel-fill bodies of different dimension, lithology and internal organization in restricted stratigraphic intervals suggests an anabranching system having channels with different fill histories. The extra-channel deposits mainly comprise red mudstone (1-5 m thick) that indicates pervasive oxidation of overbank sediments in well-aerated and well-drained setting. Sporadically developed calcic vertisols suggest a hot, semi-arid climate during the Upper Denwa period. Sandy to heterolithic sheets (70 cm to 2 m thick) with sharp, planar basal surfaces are replete with features suggestive of unconfined sheet flow. Also at places there are indications of subaqueous emplacement of sands. These bodies with paleocurrent oblique to that of the channel-fills are interpreted as crevasse splay deposits. Tabular heterolithic bodies (3-5 m thick) are characterized by undulating basal surface, complex organization of sandstone lenses interwoven with

  6. Depositional Environment of Permian Tak Fa Formation, Nakhonsawan, Northern Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketwetsuriya, Chatchalerm; Nützel, Alexander; Kanjanapayont, Pitsanupong

    2016-04-01

    The carbonate rocks of the study area at Amphoe Tak Fa and Amphoe Takhli, Changwat Nakhon Sawan belong to the Tak Fa Formation, Saraburi Group. This formation crops out in the Khao Khwang Platform and consists of late Palaeozoic carbonate platform deposits. It reaches a thickness of 900 meters and crops out in a vast area. The exposures have been measured and samples were collected for petrographic study. The rock consists of limestones, argillaceous limestones, mudstones and dolomites with nodular and banded cherts, which comprise many invertebrate fossils such as fusulinids, ammonoid, pelecypod, gastropod, coral and bryozoa. Many of the fossils are silicified. The gastropod assemblage is currently under study and represents one of the most diverse faunas reported from SE Asia. The age of the rock is Yakhtashian or Artinskian (late Early Permian) to Midian or Capitanian (late Middle Permian). The study of carbonate facies and fauna indicates that the depositional environment was on shelf lagoon within the carbonate platform varying from shallow marine to barrier bar.

  7. Composition and origin of Early Cambrian Tiantaishan phosphorite-Mn carbonate ores, Shaanxi Province, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, J.R.; Fan, D.; Ye, J.; Liu, T.; Yeh, H.-W.

    1999-01-01

    The Tiantaishan phosphorite-Mn carbonate ores occur in the Early Cambrian Tananpo Formation in complexly folded and faulted rocks located in southern Shaanxi Province. About 65 x 106 tonnes of 17% P2O5 ore reserves exist and Mn-ore reserves are about 8.3 x 106 tonnes of +18% Mn. The stratigraphic sequence in ascending order consists of black phyllite, black to gray phosphorite ore, black phyllite, rhodochrostone ore, Mn mixed-carbonates, and dolostone. Data are presented from microprobe mineral chemistry, whole-rock chemistry, stable isotopes of carbonates, X-ray mineralogy, petrographic and SEM observations, and statistical analysis of chemical data. The dominant ore-forming minerals are hydroxy- and carbonate fluorapatite and Ca rhodochrosite, with Mg kutnahorite and dolomite comprising the Mn mixed-carbonate section. Pyrite occurs in all rock types and alabandite (MnS) occurs throughout the rhodochrostone section. The mean P2O5 content of phosphorite is 31% and argillaceous phosphorite is 16%, while the mean MnO content of rhodochrostone ore is 37%. Phosphorite ores are massive, spheroidal, laminated, and banded, while rhodochrostone ores have oolitic, spheroidal, and granular fabrics. The most distinguishing characteristics of the ores are high total organic carbon (TOC) contents (mean 8.4%) in the phosphorite and high P2O5 contents (mean 2.7%) in the rhodochrostone ore. The atypically high TOC contents in the Tiantaishan phosphorite probably result from very strong productivity leading to high sedimentation rates accompanied by weak reworking of sediments; poor utilization of the organic matter by bacteria; and/or partial replacement of bacterial or algal mats by the apatite. The depositional setting of the ores was the margin of an epicontinental seaway created as a direct consequence of global processes that included break-up of a supercontinent, formation of narrow seaways, creation of extensive continental shelves, overturn of stagnant, metal-rich deep

  8. Ash formation, deposition, corrosion, and erosion in conventional boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.A.; Jones, M.L.

    1995-12-01

    The inorganic components (ash-forming species) associated with coals significantly affect boiler design, efficiency of operation, and lifetimes of boiler parts. During combustion in conventional pulverized fuel boilers, the inorganic components are transformed into inorganic gases, liquids, and solids. This partitioning depends upon the association of the inorganic components in the coal and combustion conditions. The inorganic components are associated as mineral grains and as organically associated elements, and these associations of inorganic components in the fuel directly influence their fate upon combustion. Combustion conditions, such as temperature and atmosphere, influence the volatility and the interaction of inorganic components during combustion and gas cooling, which influences the state and size composition distribution of the particulate and condensed ash species. The intermediate species are transported with the bulk gas flow through the combustion systems, during which time the gases and entrained ash are cooled. Deposition, corrosion, and erosion occur when the ash intermediate species are transported to the heat-transfer surface, react with the surface, accumulate, sinter, and develop strength. Research over the past decade has significantly advanced understanding of ash formation, deposition, corrosion, and erosion mechanisms. Many of the advances in understanding and predicting ash-related issues can be attributed to advanced analytical methods to determine the inorganic composition of fuels and the resulting ash materials. These new analytical techniques have been the key to elucidation of the mechanisms of ash formation and deposition. This information has been used to develop algorithms and computer models to predict the effects of ash on combustion system performance.

  9. Sulfate formation on synthetic deposits under haze conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turšič, Janja; Berner, Axel; Veber, Marjan; Bizjak, Mirko; Podkrajšek, Boštjan; Grgić, Irena

    Particles and droplets containing liquid water represent very important media for chemical reactions. The presented investigation was focused on the formation of acidic product (sulfate) during SO 2 oxidation in the presence of manganese under haze conditions, i.e. at relative humidity below 100%. Since the reaction kinetics of the transformation of atmospheric trace gases depend on the concentration and composition of the aqueous phase, the influence of these parameters was studied. Synthetic deposits of varying composition containing mainly NaCl and NaNO 3 were exposed to SO 2/air gas mixture at concentrations typical for heavily polluted atmosphere. Experiments were carried out in a specially designed reaction chamber under controlled conditions. Formation of sulfate was negligible below the deliquescent point on both matrices in the presence and absence of Mn(II). However, above this threshold relative humidity, the production of SO 42- was observed only in the presence of Mn(II). The reaction rate increases exponentially with relative humidity. A considerable increase was noticed at relative humidity above 85%, where the amount of condensed water becomes substantial. For example, the reaction rate at SO 2 concentration of 3 ppmv on MnCl 2/NaCl deposits at T=10°C increased from 3.2 to 16.6 mg SO 42-/(g salt h), if the RH is increased from 80% to 90%. Our results also showed that the process of SO 2 conversion on deposits is self-limited due to a decrease of pH of condensed water.

  10. Selective copper diffusion into quartz-hosted vapor inclusions: Evidence from other host minerals, driving forces, and consequences for Cu-Au ore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung Hun; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2013-07-01

    Recent experimental studies have raised concerns that Cu concentrations in quartz-hosted fluid inclusions from magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits do not represent pristine concentrations in the trapped fluids, but are modified by post-entrapment diffusional exchange through the host quartz. New microanalyses of fluid inclusions hosted in topaz show significantly lower Cu concentrations in vapor inclusions, compared to otherwise identical inclusions hosted by coexisting quartz, whereas coeval brine (hypersaline liquid) inclusions are very similar independent of host mineral in one sample. Sulfur is present as a major component in all vapor inclusions, as in most porphyry-related vapor inclusions, and Cu never exceeds S, but commonly matches the S content at a molar ratio of Cu:S ⩽ 2 in vapor inclusions hosted by quartz. Univalent ions with a radius smaller than ˜1 Å are known to diffuse rapidly through the channels of the quartz structure, parallel to its crystallographic c axis. Since only Cu concentrations differ between topaz- and quartz-hosted inclusions, we hypothesize that Cu+ and H+ re-equilibrate by diffusional ion exchange through these channels, while all other element concentrations remain essentially unchanged. A thermodynamic model considering charge-balanced Cu+H+ exchange and diffusive H2 re-equilibration of an initially Cu-poor but S-rich vapor inclusion with a typical rock-buffered fluid environment outside the host crystal demonstrates a strong chemical driving force for Cu+ to migrate from the surrounding rock into the fluid inclusion during cooling of the system. The driving force for Cu diffusion, against the gradient in total Cu concentration, is the abundant H+ liberated inside the inclusion by dissociation of HCl and particularly by the precipitation of CuFeS2 by reaction with the initially trapped H2S and/or SO2. Gold is not only a much larger ion, but is subject to an opposing driving force, suggesting that high concentrations of this

  11. Possible lunar ores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillett, Stephen L.

    1991-01-01

    Despite the conventional wisdom that there are no lunar ores, geochemical considerations suggest that local concentrations of useful rare elements exist on the Moon in spite of its extreme dryness. The Moon underwent protracted igneous activity in its history, and certain magmatic processes can concentrate incompatible elements even if anhydrous. Such processes include: (1) separation of a magma into immiscible liquid phases (depending on composition, these could be silicate-silicate, silicate-oxide, silicate-sulfide, or silicate-salt); (2) cumulate deposits in layered igneous intrusions; and (3) concentrations of rare, refractory, lithophile elements (e.g., Be, Li, Zr) in highly differentiated, silica-rich magmas, as in the lunar granites. Terrestrial mining experience indicates that the single most important characteristic of a potential ore is its concentration of the desire element. The utility of a planet as a resource base is that the welter of interacting processes over geologic time can concentrate rare element automatically. This advantage is squandered if adequate exploration for ores is not first carried out.

  12. Melting of oxidized nickel ores in a barbotage unit: II. Experimental investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starykh, R. V.; Pakhomov, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    The possibility of efficient processing of oxidized nickel ores (ONOs) to form ferronickel in a barbotage unit (liquid bath melting (LBM), Vanyukov furnace) is corroborated theoretically and experimentally. The processing of the ONOs of the Buruktal deposit with the formation of ferronickel under the conditions that model melting in a barbotage unit is subjected to laboratory investigations. Wet or dried ore and its reduced cinder are melted. It is shown that melting of the reduced cinder of ONO can result in the formation of nickel-rich (up to 40% Ni) ferronickel upon the extraction of more than 91% nickel from the raw materials at a residual nickel content of <0.1% in a slag. Direct melting of the ore results in the formation of ferronickel with at most 18% Ni and a low degree of nickel extraction into ferronickel, which has high sulfur, phosphorus, and carbon contents in this case.

  13. The sources of our iron ores. II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burchard, E.F.

    1933-01-01

    In this instalment** the iron ore deposits of the Lake Superior States, which normally furnish about 80 per cent, of the annual output of the United States, are described together with historical notes on discovery and transportation of ore. Deposits in the Mississippi Valley and Western States are likewise outlined and the sources of imported ore are given. Reviewing the whole field, it is indicated that the great producing deposits of the Lake Superior and southern Appalachian regions are of hematite in basin areas of sedimentary rocks, that hydrated iron oxides and iron carbonates are generally found in undisturbed comparatively recent sediments, and that magnetite occurs in metamorphic and igneous rocks; also that numerical abundance of deposits is not a criterion as to their real importance as a source of supply. Statistics of production of iron ore and estimates of reserves of present grade conclude the paper.

  14. 3D electrical structure of porphyry copper deposit: A case study of Shaxi copper deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiang-Bin; Lü, Qing-Tian; Yan, Jia-Yong

    2012-06-01

    Located in Lu-Zong ore concentration area, middle-lower Yangtze metallogenic belt, ShaXi porphyry copper deposit is a typical hydrothermal deposit. To investigate the distribution of deep ore bodies and spatial characteristics of host structures, an AMT survey was conducted in mining area. Eighteen pseudo-2D resistivity sections were constructed through careful processing and inversion. These sections clearly show resistivity difference between the Silurian sandstones formation and quartz diorite porphyry and this porphyry copper formation was controlled by the highly resistive anticlines. Using 3D block Kriging interpolation method and 3D visualization techniques, we constructed a detailed 3D resistivity model of quartz diorite porphyry which shows the shape and spatial distribution of deep ore bodies. This case study can serve as a good example for future ore prospecting in and around this mining area.

  15. Molybdenite Re/Os dating, zircon U-Pb age and geochemistry of granitoids in the Yangchuling porphyry W-Mo deposit (Jiangnan tungsten ore belt), China: Implications for petrogenesis, mineralization and geodynamic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jingwen; Xiong, Bikang; Liu, Jun; Pirajno, Franco; Cheng, Yanbo; Ye, Huishou; Song, Shiwei; Dai, Pan

    2017-08-01

    The Yangchuling W-Mo deposit, located in the Jiangnan porphyry-skarn (JNB) tungsten ore belt, is the first recognized typical porphyry W-Mo deposit in China in the 1980's. Stockworks and disseminated W-Mo mineralization occur in the roof pendant of a 0.3 km2 monzogranitic porphyry stock that intruded into a granodiorite stock, hosted by Neoproterozoic phyllite and slate. LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb analyses suggest that of the monzogranitic porphyry and granodiorite were formed at 143.8 ± 0.5 Ma and 149.8 ± 0.6 Ma, respectively. Six molybdenite samples yielded a Re-Os weighted mean age of 146.4 ± 1.0 Ma. Geochemical data show that both granodiorite and monzogranitic porphyry are characterized by enrichment of large ion lithophile elements (LILE) relative to high field strength elements (HFSE), indicating a peraluminous nature (A/CNK = 1.01-1.08). Two granitoids are characterized by a negative slope with significant light REE/heavy REE fractionation [(La/Yb)N = 8.38-23.20] and negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 0.69-0.76). The P2O5 contents of the Yangchuling granitoids range from 0.12% to 0.17% and exhibit a negative correlation with SiO2, reflecting that they are highly fractionated I-type. They have high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7104-0.7116), low negative εNd(t) (- 5.05 to - 5.67), and homogeneous εHf(t) between - 1.39 and - 2.17, indicating similar sources. Additionally, two-stage Nd model ages (TDM2) of 1.3-1.4 Ga and two-stage Hf model ages (TDM2) of 1.2-1.3 Ga are consistent, indicating that Neoproterozoic crustal rocks of the Shuangqiaoshan Group could have contributed to form the Yangchuling magmas. Considering the two groups of parallel Late Mesozoic ore belts, namely the Jiangnan porphyry-skarn tungsten belt (JNB) in the south and the Middle-Lower Yangtze River porphyry-skarn Cu-Au-Mo-Fe ore belt (YRB) in the north, the Nanling granite-related W-Sn ore belt (NLB) in the south, the neighboring Qin-Hang porphyry-skarn Cu-Mo-hydrothermal Pb-Zn-Ag ore belt (QHB

  16. Geodynamic conditions of formation of massive sulfide deposits in the Magnitogorsk Megazone, Southern Urals, and prospection criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seravkin, I. B.; Kosarev, A. M.; Puchkov, V. N.

    2017-05-01

    The zoned composition changes of the massive sulfide deposits in the major massive sulfide zone of the Southern Urals such as the Magnitogorsk Megasynclinorium are considered. The zoning is expressed as the trend of Ni-Co-Cu → Zn-Cu → Cu-Zn → Au-Ba-Pb-Cu-Zn. This trend is related to two basic factors: (1) the subduction process with the slab's eastward subsidence preconditioned the formation (from the west to the east) of the following massive sulfide zones: accretionary prism, frontal island arc, developed island arc, inter-arc spreading zone, split back arc, and back-arc spreading; (2) the longitudinal zoning of the massive sulfide paleovolcanic belts related to changes in the thickness of the crust's basaltic layer and an inclination of the subducting plate in transverse blocks of the belt. The first factor affects the general paleovolcanic and metallogenic latitudinal zoning of the studied region, while the second factor defines the local meridional zoning. The composition of ore-bearing solutions is dependent on the formation depth of the subduction fluids, magma differentiation type, and the ratio of deep fluids to solutions of near-surface convective cells. The combination of the geodynamic factors expressed in the composition of ore-bearing volcanic complexes and the specific geological settings defines the massive sulfide mineralization composition and productivity criteria. The most productive structures include the frontal island-arc and inter-arc spreading zones and within them, the central-type volcanic edifices whose basalts are referred to as the island-arc tholeiite series and are characterized by the minimum TiO2 and Zr content and low La/Yb ratios.

  17. El Paso Formation - a Lower Ordovician platform carbonate deposit

    SciTech Connect

    Clemons, R.E.

    1987-05-01

    The eastward-transgressive Lower Ordovician El Paso Formation conformably overlies Bliss Sandstone in southern New Mexico. Locally, lower El Paso was deposited on low hills of plutonic and volcanic rocks. The region subsided gradually throughout Canadian time, receiving the El Paso carbonate rock blanket up to 460 m thick. Lithologic and chronologic correlative rocks were deposited over most of the southwestern US as the first Paleozoic carbonate platform sequence. The El Paso Formation contains four members, listed here in ascending order: Hitt Canyon, Jose, McKelligon, and Padre. Gradually decreasing sand content upward through the Hitt Canyon indicates deepening water and/or greater distance to shore. Girvanella(.) oncolites are locally abundant. Stromatolite mounds near the top of the Hitt Canyon, combined with an influx of sand, ooids, and rounded bioclasts in the Jose Member, recorded a shoaling phase. The overlying McKelligon Member contains little or no sand, and sponge-Calathium mounds are prominent at some locales. Stromatolite mounds are interbedded with sponge-Calathium mounds in a few sections. Lower Padre Member beds are typically silty to sandy and locally contain thinly-laminated zones. The Padre contains more restricted fauna that includes traces of ostracods. Pervasive bioturbation of El Paso beds and fauna consisting of echinoderms, sponges, gastropods, trilobites, Nuia, Calathium, cephalopods, and algae plus minor brachiopods and Pulchrilamina indicate predominating shallow-subtidal environments. Low-energy platform environments, in which a large volume of micritic muds accumulated, were disturbed thousands of times by storms producing abundant thin, poorly washed biosparite, intrasparite, and intrasparrudite lenses.

  18. Constraints of mineralogical characterization of gold ore: Implication for genesis, controls and evolution of gold from Kundarkocha gold deposit, eastern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, P. R.; Venkatesh, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Gold mineralization in Kundarkocha gold deposit occurs in the eastern Indian Craton that is hosted by sheared quartz-carbonate-sulfide veins emplaced within the graphitic schist, carbonaceous phyllite and talc-chlorite-serpentine schist belongs to Gorumahisani-Badampahar schist belt of Iron Ore Group. Gold mineralization exhibits both lithological and structural controls in the study area, albeit the stratigraphic control is more ubiquitously observed. Detailed mineralogical characterization coupled with electron probe microanalysis of the sulfide phases reveal the occurrences of gold in three distinct forms (i) as lattice-bound form within sulfides especially enriched in arsenopyrite, loellingite, pyrite, pyrrhotite and chalcopyrite in decreasing order of abundance; (ii) as micro inclusions or nano-scale gold inclusions within pyrite and arsenopyrite especially along the growth zones and micro-fractures as substrates and (iii) as free milling nugget gold grains either along the grain boundaries of sulfides or within the host rocks. Three generations of pyrite (Py-I, Py-II and Py-III) and arsenopyrite (Asp-I, Asp-II, Asp-III) have been identified based on textural, morphological characteristics and mineral chemistry. The lattice-bound gold content in pyrite and arsenopyrite varies from 600 to 2700 ppm and 900 to 3600 ppm respectively and increase in concentration of such refractory gold is seen in the order of chalcopyrite > pyrrhotite > pyrite > loellingite/arsenopyrite. The evolutionary stages of different forms of gold include remobilization of the lattice-bound grains in pyrite and arsenopyrite (Py-I and Asp-I) and re-concentration along the zoned-pyrite and arsenopyrite (Py-II and Asp-II) and ultimately as native gold/nuggets surrounding the sulfides as well as within the main mineralized zone. Lattice-bound gold distribution could have resulted due to metamorphic devolatilization reactions which are further aided by the influx of hydrothermal fluids. These

  19. Source and evolution of ore-forming hydrothermal fluids in the northern Iberian Pyrite Belt massive sulphide deposits (SW Spain): evidence from fluid inclusions and stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-España, Javier; Velasco, Francisco; Boyce, Adrian J.; Fallick, Anthony E.

    2003-08-01

    A fluid inclusion and stable isotopic study has been undertaken on some massive sulphide deposits (Aguas Teñidas Este, Concepción, San Miguel, San Telmo and Cueva de la Mora) located in the northern Iberian Pyrite Belt. The isotopic analyses were mainly performed on quartz, chlorite, carbonate and whole rock samples from the stockworks and altered footwall zones of the deposits, and also on some fluid inclusion waters. Homogenization temperatures of fluid inclusions in quartz mostly range from 120 to 280 °C. Salinity of most fluid inclusions ranges from 2 to 14 wt% NaCl equiv. A few cases with Th=80-110 °C and salinity of 16-24 wt% NaCl equiv., have been also recognized. In addition, fluid inclusions from the Soloviejo Mn-Fe-jaspers (160-190 °C and ≈6 wt% NaCl equiv.) and some Late to Post-Hercynian quartz veins (130-270 °C and ≈4 wt% NaCl equiv.) were also studied. Isotopic results indicate that fluids in equilibrium with measured quartz (δ18Ofluid ≈-2 to 4‰), chlorites (δ18Ofluid ≈8-14‰, δDfluid ≈-45 to -27‰), whole rocks (δ18Ofluid ≈4-7‰, δDfluid ≈-15 to -10‰), and carbonates (δ18Oankerite ≈14.5-16‰, δ13Cfluid =-11 to -5‰) evolved isotopically during the lifetime of the hydrothermal systems, following a waxing/waning cycle at different temperatures and water/rock ratios. The results (fluid inclusions, δ18O, δD and δ13C values) point to a highly evolved seawater, along with a variable (but significant) contribution of other fluid reservoirs such as magmatic and/or deep metamorphic waters, as the most probable sources for the ore-forming fluids. These fluids interacted with the underlying volcanic and sedimentary rocks during convective circulation through the upper crust.

  20. Environment of ore deposition in the creede mining district, San Juan Mountains, Colorado: Part V. Epithermal mineralization from fluid mixing in the OH vein

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayba, D.O.

    1997-01-01

    Detailed fluid inclusion studies on coarse-grained sphalerite from the OH vein, Creede, Colorado, have shown that the abrupt color changes between growth zones correspond to abrupt changes in the nature of the ore fluids. Within each growth zone, however, the composition of the fluids remained constant. The base of a distinctive orange-brown growth zone marks a sharp increase in both temperature and salinity relative to the preceding yellow-white zone. The orange-brown growth zone can be correlated along much of the vein and is believed to represent a time-stratigraphic interval. Along the vein, temperatures and salinities of fluid inclusions within this interval show a systematic decrease from about 285??C and 11.5 wt percent NaCl equiv near the base of the vein to about 250??C and 8 wt percent NaCl equiv, respectively, near the top of the vein. The iron concentration of this sphalerite growth zone shows a similar pattern, decreasing from about 2.8 to 1.2 mole percent FeS. When plotted on an enthalpy-salinity diagram, the fluid inclusion data define a spatial trend indicating the progressive mixing of deeply circulating hydrothermal brines with overlying, dilute ground waters. The hydrothermal brines entered the OH vein from below at a temperature, salinity, and density of approximately 285??C, 11.5 wt percent NaCl equiv, and 860 kg/m3, respectively, whereas the overlying ground waters appear to have been preheated to roughly 150??C and had an assumed salinity of 0 wt percent and a density of 920 kg/m3. The greater density of the heated ground water promoted mixing with the hydrothermal brine within the open fractures, causing sphalerite deposition. Although there were also episodes of boiling during vein mineralization, boiling appears unimportant for this sphalerite. Isotopic evidence and geochemical modeling studies also indicate that mixing was the depositional mechanism for sphalerite. An important aspect of the mixing hydrology of the Creede system involves

  1. Late-Variscan rare metal ore deposition and plume-related magmatism in the eastern European Variscides (D, CZ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Located at the northwestern border of the Bohemian Massif in the eastern part of the European Variscides, the Erzgebirge-Krušné hory is one of the most important metallogenic provinces in Europe with a 800-year history of mining. The following rare metal resources are associated with late-Variscan (315 - 280 Ma), postmagmatic mineralization pulses in the Erzgebirge-Krušné hory and surrounded areas: 900 kt Sn, 230 kt W, 10 kt Mo, 1 kt Ta, 300 kt Li, 200 kt Rb, 2 kt Cs, 1.5 kt In, 230 t Ge, 320 t Sc, 14 kt Sb, 10 kt Bi, and 3 kt Ag. At the end of the Variscan Orogeny the regional tectonic regime in Central Europe changed, indicating the beginning of the break-up of the supercontinent. The Late Carboniferous-Early Permian in Europe was a period of widespread basin formation that was associated in many areas with mantle-derived magmatic activity. 300 Ma-old dike swarms in NE England and the Scottish Midland Valley, the Oslo Graben and Scania, radiate from a triple junction in the northernmost part of Jutland. This triple junction marked the axis of a deep-mantle plume centered in this area. In this context it is important to note that the mantle plume center is surrounded by significant lamprophyre intrusions which show in some districts spatial-time relationships to Sn-W-polymetallic, Ag-base metal, and U mineralization. During the Late Carboniferous and Early Permian an extensive magmatic province developed within the present northern and central Europe, intimately with extensional tectonics, in an area stretching from southern Scandinavia, through the North Sea, into Northern Germany. Peak magmatic activity was concentrated in a narrow time-span from 300 to 280 Ma. Simultaneously in Stephanian-Early Permian an intensive bimodal magmatism associated with intra-continental extensional setting occurs in the European Variscides. Permo-Carboniferous volcanism in the Spanish Central System, Iberian Ranges, Cantabrian Chain, Pyrenees and the French Massif Central

  2. Stable isotope study of water-rock interaction and ore formation, Bayhorse base and precious metal district, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seal, R.R.; Rye, R.O.

    1992-01-01

    Whole-rock ??18O and ??D values from the Garden Creek Phyllite define an isotopically depleted zone (60 km2) around the Nevada Mountain stock and are the result of high-temperature interactions with ancient meteoric waters at water/rock ratios ranging from 0.002 to 0.09. Comparison of the ore fluid ??18OH2O and ??DH2O values with hypothetical waters equilibrated with the Garden Creek Phyllite indicates that the hydrothermal fluids must have also interacted with the basal dolomite of Bayhorse Creek, which underlies the phyllite. The ?? 13CCO2 values for the hydrothermal fluids also record a transition from early water/rock interactions that were dominated by the Garden Creek Phyllite to later interactions that were influenced significantly by the basal dolomite of Bayhorse Creek. The range of ??34S values may be interpreted as either a heterogeneous sedimentary source or mixed sedimentary-magmatic sources. -from Authors

  3. Metallization of siderite ore in reducing roasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vusikhis, A. S.; Leont'ev, L. I.; Kudinov, D. Z.; Gulyakov, V. S.

    2016-05-01

    The behavior of the initial ore and the concentrate of magnetoroasting beneficiation during metallization under the conditions that are close to those for reducing roasting of iron ores in a rotary furnace is studied in terms of works on extending the field of application of Bakal siderites. A difference in the mechanisms of the metallization of crude ore and the roasted concentrate is observed. The metallization of roasted concentrate lumps is more efficient than that of crude siderite ore. In this case, the process ends earlier and can be carried out at higher temperatures (1250-1300°C) without danger of skull formation.

  4. Exploration for uranium deposits, Grants mineral belt

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    Uranium ore deposits in the Grants mineral belt, New Mexico, occur in fluvial sandstones in the Morrison Formation (Jurassic). Uranium mineralization is concentrated by a dark-gray to black substance that has been identified as humate, which is derived from decaying vegetation. Black ore is truncated by overlying sandstone in at least three ore deposits, documenting an early age for mineralization. Ore deposits in the Grants mineral belt vary greatly in size and shape, tend to occur in clusters, and often present difficult drill targets. Current exploration is largely a matter of drilling in stages to distinguish favorable from unfavorable ground on a wide spacing, to seek mineralization in favorable ground, and to conduct close-spaced drilling in mineralized areas. Criteria for favorability differ among exploration groups but generally include 1) presence of a host sandstone, 2) anomalous mineralization, 3) color of the host rock, 4) presence of carbonaceous matter, and 5) position of the area relative to mineralized trends. A description of the drilling sequence, from ore discovery to the development of a mine at the Johnny M deposit (in the east part of the Ambrosia Lake district), exemplifies the problem of predicting where orebodies may occur. A study of the drill data at the Johnny M indicates the uranium ore is not related to specific geologic features other than humate, which is commonly associated with coalified plant fragments in mudstone-rich parts of the host sandstone.

  5. Role of hydrodynamic factors in controlling the formation and location of unconformity-related uranium deposits: insights from reactive-flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghbelagh, Yousef Beiraghdar; Yang, Jianwen

    2017-03-01

    The role of hydrodynamic factors in controlling the formation and location of unconformity-related uranium (URU) deposits in sedimentary basins during tectonically quiet periods is investigated. A number of reactive-flow modeling experiments at the deposit scale were carried out by assigning different dip angles and directions to a fault and various permeabilities to hydrostratigraphic units). The results show that the fault dip angle and direction, and permeability of the hydrostratigraphic units govern the convection pattern, temperature distribution, and uranium mineralization. A vertical fault results in uranium mineralization at the bottom of the fault within the basement, while a dipping fault leads to precipitation of uraninite below the unconformity either away from or along the plane of the fault, depending on the fault permeability. A more permeable fault causes uraninite precipitates along the fault plane, whereas a less permeable one gives rise to the precipitation of uraninite away from it. No economic ore mineralization can form when either very low or very high permeabilities are assigned to the sandstone or basement suggesting that these units seem to have an optimal window of permeability for the formation of uranium deposits. Physicochemical parameters also exert an additional control in both the location and grade of URU deposits. These results indicate that the difference in size and grade of different URU deposits may result from variation in fluid flow pattern and physicochemical conditions, caused by the change in structural features and hydraulic properties of the stratigraphic units involved.

  6. Role of hydrodynamic factors in controlling the formation and location of unconformity-related uranium deposits: insights from reactive-flow modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghbelagh, Yousef Beiraghdar; Yang, Jianwen

    2016-11-01

    The role of hydrodynamic factors in controlling the formation and location of unconformity-related uranium (URU) deposits in sedimentary basins during tectonically quiet periods is investigated. A number of reactive-flow modeling experiments at the deposit scale were carried out by assigning different dip angles and directions to a fault and various permeabilities to hydrostratigraphic units). The results show that the fault dip angle and direction, and permeability of the hydrostratigraphic units govern the convection pattern, temperature distribution, and uranium mineralization. A vertical fault results in uranium mineralization at the bottom of the fault within the basement, while a dipping fault leads to precipitation of uraninite below the unconformity either away from or along the plane of the fault, depending on the fault permeability. A more permeable fault causes uraninite precipitates along the fault plane, whereas a less permeable one gives rise to the precipitation of uraninite away from it. No economic ore mineralization can form when either very low or very high permeabilities are assigned to the sandstone or basement suggesting that these units seem to have an optimal window of permeability for the formation of uranium deposits. Physicochemical parameters also exert an additional control in both the location and grade of URU deposits. These results indicate that the difference in size and grade of different URU deposits may result from variation in fluid flow pattern and physicochemical conditions, caused by the change in structural features and hydraulic properties of the stratigraphic units involved.

  7. Translocation of the retinal pigment epithelium and formation of sub-retinal pigment epithelium deposit induced by subretinal deposit

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lian; Wang, Zhenfang; Liu, Yun; Song, Ying; Li, Yiwen; Laties, Alan M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose A cardinal pathological feature of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the deposition of extracellular material between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and Bruch's membrane, pathologically described as sub-RPE deposits. Both the presence and local organization of these deposits contribute to the clinical manifestations of AMD, including localized deposits clinically recognized as drusen. The biogenesis of sub-RPE deposits remains elusive. This work explores the pathological processes of sub-RPE deposit formation. Methods Matrigel was injected to the subretinal space of rats to create an amorphous deposit. Tissue sections were examined by light or confocal microscopy. Results In the presence of the subretinal deposit of Matrigel, RPE cells leave Bruch's membrane to migrate toward photoreceptors and then form a new layer between the deposit and photoreceptors, resulting in RPE translocation. The new RPE layer displaces the deposit to the sub-RPE location and therefore it becomes a sub-RPE deposit. The RPE mobilization requires the presence of photoreceptors. Bruch's membrane devoid of RPE attachment becomes vulnerable to invasion by new blood vessels from the choroid. Conclusions Our work supports a novel model of sub-RPE deposit formation in which excessive material first accumulates in the subretinal space, disrupting the physical contact between RPE cells and photoreceptors. To restore the contact, RPE cells migrate toward photoreceptors and form a new layer. The subretinal material is consequently displaced to the sub-RPE location and becomes sub-RPE deposit. Our data also provide evidence that the presence of sub-RPE deposit is sufficient to induce choroidal neovascularization to penetrate Bruch's membrane. PMID:17615538

  8. Time-stratigraphic aspects of a formation: Interpretation of surficial Pleistocene deposits by analogy with Holocene paralic deposits, southeastern Delaware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demarest, J. M.; Biggs, R. B.; Kraft, J. C.

    1981-08-01

    Pleistocene shoreline deposits in close spatial and temporal proximity to Holocene deposits permit detailed interpretation of the development of Pleistocene coastal deposits when a modern-ancient analog approach is used. Peak sea levels during the past 1 m.y. or more have allowed the preservation of transgressive shoreline systems, here referred to as paralic units, along the inner continental margin. These Pleistocene paralic units are similar to Holocene coastal deposits now forming on Delmarva Peninsula. The Omar Formation (early to late Pleistocene age) incorporates at least four juxtaposed, transgressive, paralic units of different ages, each containing deposits of lagoonal sands and muds, tidal marsh, barrier sands and gravels, tidal delta sands and silty sands, and tidal channel sands and gravels. The successive paralic units become younger in the seaward direction. Thus, although the Omar Formation in the study area is almost entirely made up of transgressive deposits produced during rising sea levels, in a longer time frame it forms a progradational sequence. Only about 2% to 5% of the elapsed time during the deposition of the studied part of the Omar Formation is represented by sedimentary units. The internal time-stratigraphy of the Omar Formation is extremely complex. This makes the time-stratigraphic interpretation of any one outcrop or drill hole difficult. Any lithologic change may represent a wide variety of time gaps, from minutes to tens of thousands of years. The analog approach, in which sedimentary lithosome mapping is used, allows one to infer a time-stratigraphic framework of the deposits. These concepts can aid in the interpretation of depositional history of older paralic deposits and the nature of the development of certain types of clastic formations.

  9. Metasomatism and ore formation at contacts of dolerite with saliferous rocks in the sedimentary cover of the southern Siberian platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurov, M. P.; Grishina, S. N.; Istomin, V. E.; Titov, A. T.

    2007-08-01

    The data on the mineral composition and crystallization conditions of magnesian skarn and magnetite ore at contacts of dolerite with rock salt and dolomite in ore-bearing volcanic—tectonic structures of the Angara—Ilim type have been integrated and systematized. Optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, electron paramagnetic resonance, Raman and IR spectroscopy, and methods of mineralogical thermometry were used for studying minerals and inclusions contained therein. The most diverse products of metasomatic reactions are found in the vicinity of a shallow-seated magma chamber that was formed in Lower Cambrian carbonate and saliferous rocks under a screen of terrigenous sequences. Conformable lodes of spinel-forsterite skarn and calciphyre impregnated with magnesian magnetite replaced dolomite near the central magma conduit and apical portions of igneous bodies. At the postmagmatic stage, the following mineral assemblages were formed at contacts of dolerite with dolomite: (1) spinel + fassaite + forsterite + magnetite (T = 820-740°C), (2) phlogopite + titanite + pargasite + magnetite (T = 600 500°C), And (3) clinochlore + serpentine + pyrrhotite (T = 450°C and lower). Rock salt is transformed at the contact into halitite as an analogue of calciphyre. The specific features of sedimentary, contact-metasomatic, and hydrothermal generations of halite have been established. The primary sedimentary halite contains solid inclusions of sylvite, carnallite, anhydrite, polyhalite, quartz, astrakhanite, and antarcticite; nitrogen, methane, and complex hydrocarbons have been detected in gas inclusions; and the liquid inclusions are largely aqueous, with local hydrocarbon films. The contact-metasomatic halite is distinguished by a fine-grained structure and the occurrence of anhydrous salt phases (CaCl2 · KCl, CaCl2, nMgCl2 · mCaCl2) and high-density gases (CO2, H2S, N2, CH4, etc.) as inclusions. The low

  10. Fluid inclusion and stable isotope studies of the Mesloula Pb-Zn-Ba ore deposit, NE Algeria: Characteristics and origin of the mineralizing fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laouar, Rabah; Salmi-Laouar, Sihem; Sami, Lounis; Boyce, Adrian J.; Kolli, Omar; Boutaleb, Abdelhak; Fallick, Anthony E.

    2016-09-01

    In the Saharan Atlas (NE Algeria), the Triassic evaporitic formation was brought to the surface through the thick Cretaceous and Tertiary sedimentary cover as diapirs due to the effect of Atlasic tectonic events. The diapir piercing began in the Jurassic and has continued through present day. Many outcrops of several square kilometres are distributed in a large area (approximately 80 km wide) that extends northeasterly over 300 km towards Tunisia. The diapiric evaporitic formation is often accompanied by the emplacement of Pb-Zn-Ba-F mineralization. The Mesloula massif is an example of these deposits. Fluid inclusion and sulphur, carbon and oxygen isotope studies were carried out on Pb-Zn-Ba mineralization and associated gangue carbonates. Gypsum of the Triassic formation was also analysed for its sulphur isotope composition to show the role of evaporates in the generation of this typical peridiapiric deposit. Gypsum from the Triassic formation showed a narrow range of δ34SVCDT values, ranging from +14.6 to +15.5‰ (n = 8). This range is comparable to that of Triassic seawater sulphates. Sulphide minerals yielded δ34SVCDT values between 0 and + 11.7‰ (n = 15), indicating that sulphide sulphur was likely derived from Triassic sulphates through thermochemical sulphate reduction (TSR) because fluid inclusion microthermometric measurements yielded a mean temperature of 150 °C. Residual sulphate in such a system would have been enriched in 34S; this is reflected in the barite δ34SVCDT values, which range from +21.1 to +33.5‰ (n = 5). The δ13CVPDB values of calcite minerals, ranging from +2.1 to +6.3‰ (n = 4), indicate an inorganic carbon origin, likely from the host carbonate rocks. δ18OVSMOW values were between +21.9 and + 24.9‰, indicating that the most likely source of mineralizing fluids was formation water.

  11. Uranium mill ore dust characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Knuth, R.H.; George, A.C.

    1980-11-01

    Cascade impactor and general air ore dust measurements were taken in a uranium processing mill in order to characterize the airborne activity, the degree of equilibrium, the particle size distribution and the respirable fraction for the /sup 238/U chain nuclides. The sampling locations were selected to limit the possibility of cross contamination by airborne dusts originating in different process areas of the mill. The reliability of the modified impactor and measurement techniques was ascertained by duplicate sampling. The results reveal no significant deviation from secular equilibrium in both airborne and bulk ore samples for the /sup 234/U and /sup 230/Th nuclides. In total airborne dust measurements, the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides were found to be depleted by 20 and 25%, respectively. Bulk ore samples showed depletions of 10% for the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides. Impactor samples show disequilibrium of /sup 226/Ra as high as +-50% for different size fractions. In these samples the /sup 226/Ra ratio was generally found to increase as particle size decreased. Activity median aerodynamic diameters of the airborne dusts ranged from 5 to 30 ..mu..m with a median diameter of 11 ..mu..m. The maximum respirable fraction for the ore dusts, based on the proposed International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) definition of pulmonary deposition, was < 15% of the total airborne concentration. Ore dust parameters calculated for impactor duplicate samples were found to be in excellent agreement.

  12. A Paleozoic anorthosite massif related to rutile-bearing ilmenite ore deposits, south of the Polochic fault, Chiapas Massif Complex, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros, A.; Ortega-Gutiérrez, F.; Weber, B.; Solari, L.; Schaaf, P. E.; Maldonado, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Chiapas Massif Complex in the southern Maya terrane is mostly composed of late Permian igneous and meta-igneous rocks. Within this complex in southern Mexico and in the adjacent San Marcos Department of Guatemala, south of the Polochic fault, several small outcrops (~10 km2) of a Phanerozoic andesine anorthosite massif were found following an E-W trend similar to the Polochic-Motagua Fault System. Such anorthosites are related to rutile-bearing ilmenite ore deposits and hornblendite-amphibolite bands (0.1-3 meters thick). The anorthosites show recrystallization and metamorphic retrogression (rutile with titanite rims), but no relicts of high-grade metamorphic minerals such as pyroxene or garnet have been found. In Acacoyagua, Chiapas, anorthosites are spatially related to oxide-apatite rich mafic rocks; in contrast, further to the west in Motozintla, they are related to monzonites. Zircons from these monzonites yield a Permian U-Pb age (271.2×1.4 Ma) by LA-MC-ICPMS. Primary mineral assemblage of the anorthosites include mostly medium to fine-grained plagioclase (>90%) with rutile and apatite as accessory minerals, occasionally with very low amounts of quartz. Massive Fe-Ti oxide lenses up to tens of meters in length and few meters thick are an ubiquitous constituent of these anorthosites and their mineralogy include ilmenite (with exsolution lamellae of Ti-magnetite), rutile, magnetite, clinochlore, ×spinel, ×apatite, ×zircon and srilankite (Ti2ZrO6, first finding of this phase in Mexico). Rutile occurs within the massive ilmenite in two