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Sample records for organic azeotropic mixtures

  1. Separation of organic azeotropic mixtures by pervaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.W.

    1991-12-01

    Distillation is a commonly used separation technique in the petroleum refining and chemical processing industries. However, there are a number of potential separations involving azetropic and close-boiling organic mixtures that cannot be separated efficiently by distillation. Pervaporation is a membrane-based process that uses selective permeation through membranes to separate liquid mixtures. Because the separation process is not affected by the relative volatility of the mixture components being separated, pervaporation can be used to separate azetropes and close-boiling mixtures. Our results showed that pervaporation membranes can be used to separate azeotropic mixtures efficiently, a result that is not achievable with simple distillation. The membranes were 5--10 times more permeable to one of the components of the mixture, concentrating it in the permeate stream. For example, the membrane was 10 times more permeable to ethanol than methyl ethyl ketone, producing 60% ethanol permeate from an azeotropic mixture of ethanol and methyl ethyl ketone containing 18% ethanol. For the ethyl acetate/water mixture, the membranes showed a very high selectivity to water (> 300) and the permeate was 50--100 times enriched in water relative to the feed. The membranes had permeate fluxes on the order of 0.1--1 kg/m{sup 2}{center dot}h in the operating range of 55--70{degrees}C. Higher fluxes were obtained by increasing the operating temperature.

  2. Separation of organic azeotropic mixtures by pervaporation. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.W.

    1991-12-01

    Distillation is a commonly used separation technique in the petroleum refining and chemical processing industries. However, there are a number of potential separations involving azetropic and close-boiling organic mixtures that cannot be separated efficiently by distillation. Pervaporation is a membrane-based process that uses selective permeation through membranes to separate liquid mixtures. Because the separation process is not affected by the relative volatility of the mixture components being separated, pervaporation can be used to separate azetropes and close-boiling mixtures. Our results showed that pervaporation membranes can be used to separate azeotropic mixtures efficiently, a result that is not achievable with simple distillation. The membranes were 5--10 times more permeable to one of the components of the mixture, concentrating it in the permeate stream. For example, the membrane was 10 times more permeable to ethanol than methyl ethyl ketone, producing 60% ethanol permeate from an azeotropic mixture of ethanol and methyl ethyl ketone containing 18% ethanol. For the ethyl acetate/water mixture, the membranes showed a very high selectivity to water (> 300) and the permeate was 50--100 times enriched in water relative to the feed. The membranes had permeate fluxes on the order of 0.1--1 kg/m{sup 2}{center_dot}h in the operating range of 55--70{degrees}C. Higher fluxes were obtained by increasing the operating temperature.

  3. Near azeotropic mixture substitute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention comprises a refrigerant mixture consisting of a first mole fraction of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) and a second mole fraction of a component selected from the group consisting of a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124) and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b); a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a) and CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124); a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a) and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b); and a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124), CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b) and CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a).

  4. Nearly Azeotropic Mixtures To Replace Refrigerant 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Number of nearly azeotropic fluid mixtures have saturation pressures similar to Refrigerant 12 while being about 2 percent as damaging to ozone layer. Five mixtures of R134a, R152a, R124, and R142b have low boiling-point spreads, low toxicity, and low ozone-damaging capability, are nonflammable, and more compatible with conventional oils than R134a. Pressure of combinations nearly equal to R12, and mixtures may be good "drop-in substitutes". Overall composition not altered by leakage. Usable in commercial, automotive, and household refrigerators and air conditioners.

  5. Near azeotropic mixture substitute for dichlorodifluoromethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A refrigerant and a process of formulating thereof that consists of a mixture of a first mole fraction of CH.sub.2 FCF.sub.3 and a second mole fraction of a component selected from the group consisting of a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 ; a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 ; and a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3, CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 and CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3.

  6. Near azeotropic mixture substitute for dichlorodifluoromethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention comprises a refrigerant mixture having two halocarbon components. The first component is present in a mole fraction of about 0.7 to less than 1.0 while the second component is present in a mole fraction of more than 0.0 to about 0.3. The first component is CH.sub.2 FCF.sub.3. The second component can be CHClFCF.sub.3, CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2, a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2, a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 and CHClFCF.sub.3, a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2, or a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3, CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 and CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3. The preferred embodiment of this invention comprises about 0.7 to less than 1.0 mole fraction CH.sub.2 FCF.sub.3, and more than 0.0 to about 0.3 mole fraction of a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2. The most preferred embodiment of this invention comprises about 0.7 to less than 1.0 mole fraction CH.sub.2 FCF.sub.3 and more than 0.0 to about 0.3 mole fraction CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2. The resulting refrigerant has a vapor pressure close to-that of CF.sub.2 Cl.sub.2, a nearly constant vapor pressure with evaporation, and is substantially less damaging to the Earth's ozone layer than CF.sub.2 Cl.sub.2.

  7. A PROCESS FOR SEPARATING AZEOTROPIC MIXTURES BY EXTRACTIVE AND CONVECTIVE DISTILLATION

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, J.W.

    1961-12-19

    A method is described for separating an azeotrope of carbon tetrachloride and 1,1,2,2-tetrafluorodinitroethane boiling at 60 deg C. The ndethod comnprises, specifically, feeding azeotrope vapors admixed with a non- reactive gas into an extractive distillation column heated to a temperature preferably somewhat above the boiling point of the constant boiling mixture. A solvent, di-n-butylphthalate, is metered into the column above the gas inlet and permitted to flow downward, earrying with it the higher bomling fraction, while the constituent having the lower boiling point passes out of the top of the column with the non-reactive gas and is collected in a nitrogen cold trap. Other solvents which alter the vapor pressure relationship may be substituted. The method is generally applicable to azeotropic mixtures. A number of specific mixtures whicb may be separated are disclosed. (AEC)

  8. Adsorption of binary gas mixtures in heterogeneous carbon predicted by density functional theory: on the formation of adsorption azeotropes.

    PubMed

    Ritter, James A; Pan, Huanhua; Balbuena, Perla B

    2010-09-07

    Classical density functional theory (DFT) was used to predict the adsorption of nine different binary gas mixtures in a heterogeneous BPL activated carbon with a known pore size distribution (PSD) and in single, homogeneous, slit-shaped carbon pores of different sizes. By comparing the heterogeneous results with those obtained from the ideal adsorbed solution theory and with those obtained in the homogeneous carbon, it was determined that adsorption nonideality and adsorption azeotropes are caused by the coupled effects of differences in the molecular size of the components in a gas mixture and only slight differences in the pore sizes of a heterogeneous adsorbent. For many binary gas mixtures, selectivity was found to be a strong function of pore size. As the width of a homogeneous pore increases slightly, the selectivity for two different sized adsorbates may change from being greater than unity to less than unity. This change in selectivity can be accompanied by the formation of an adsorption azeotrope when this same binary mixture is adsorbed in a heterogeneous adsorbent with a PSD, like in BPL activated carbon. These results also showed that the selectivity exhibited by a heterogeneous adsorbent can be dominated by a small number of pores that are very selective toward one of the components in the gas mixture, leading to adsorption azeotrope formation in extreme cases.

  9. Decay rate of critical fluctuations in ethane+carbon dioxide mixtures near the critical line including the critical azeotrope

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R.F.; Doiron, T.; Pegg, I.L.; Hanley, H.J.M.; Cezairliyan, A.

    1986-03-01

    Using the technique of photon correlation spectroscopy we have measured the decay rate of critical fluctuations in mixtures of ethane and carbon dioxide of various compositions including a near-azeotropic mixture. Our experimental data indicate that there is only one dominant mode of fluctuations and the decay rate is well described by the predictions of the mode-coupling theory with the exponent v=0.63 for all compositions. The decay rate, its background contributions, the shear viscosity, and the correlation length for the mixtures appear to interpolate simply between those of ethane and carbon dioxide.

  10. Performance of Pentaborane, Pentaborane - JP-4 Fuel Mixtures, and Trimethylborate Azeotrope Fuel in a Full-scale Turbojet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breitwiesser, Roland; Useller, James W.

    1956-01-01

    This report summarizes the full-scale engine tests of pentaborane, pentaborane - JP-4 fuel mixtures, and trimethylborate azeotrope fuel. The tests were conducted in a full-scale turbojet engine at a simulated altitude of 50,000 feet and Mach number of 0.08. Engine speeds were 90 to 100 percent of rated speed. Pentaborane reduced the the specific fuel consumption to two-thirds that of JP-4 fuel. However, because boron oxide collected in the engine, the performance deteriorated with continued operation of pentaborane in each of the short-duration tests reported.

  11. Theoretical Consideration on the Characteristics and the Performance Evaluation for a Heat Pump Cycle of Non-azeotropic Refrigerant Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Tetsu; Koyama, Shigeru; Miyara, Akio

    The present paper treats a possibility of performance improvement and its evaluation method for a heat pump cycle of non-azeotropic refrigerant mixtures. Calculation is made for R22 + R114 and R22 + R11 mixtures under the conditions that the inlet temperature and flow rates of heat source fluids through a condenser and an evaporator of counter flow type, heat pump thermal output and FK-value (heat transfer area times average overall heat transfer coefficient) are given. It is graphically shown that the coefficient of performance (COP)h, pressures and volumetric flow rates at suction and discharge ports of a compressor depend on the FK-value and on the flow rate of heat source fluid as well as mixture composition. The characteristics of the heat pump cycle thus obtained are markedly different from those, in which the state points of the refrigerant mixture are fixed.

  12. SIMULATION OF NON-AZEOTROPIC REFRIGERANT MIXTURES FOR USE IN A DUAL-CIRCUIT REFRIGERATOR/FREEZER WITH COUNTERCURRENT HEAT EXCHANGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses a refrigerator/freezer (RF) system that has two complete and independent refrigeration cycles for the two compartments. It uses a non-azeotropic refrigerant mixture (NARM) in each cycle and countercurrent heat exchangers throughout. This RF is housed in a stan...

  13. Recovery of organic carbon from atmospheric particulate matter using soxhlet extraction with the benzene/methanol azeotrope

    SciTech Connect

    Barkenbus, B.D.; Griest, W.H.; Huntzicker, J.J.; Heyerdahl, E.K.; MacDougall, C.S.

    1983-01-01

    The extraction efficiency of the benzene/methanol azeotrope for organic carbon in atmospheric particulate matter was determined using a carbon types analyzer and also radio-labeled tracers and liquid scintillation spectroscopy. A twenty-four hour Soxhlet extraction with the azeotrope extracts 76 percent of the organic carbon, 15 percent of the elemental carbon, and 61 percent of the total carbon. Nonpolar and moderately polar organic compounds such as dotriacontane, benzo(a)pyrene, and stearic acid are extracted with 95 percent recovery. Highly polar oxygenated species such as succinic acid are extracted with an efficiency of 82 percent. The Soxhlet extractor was more efficient than ultrasonication for the extraction of highly polar species.

  14. Thermodynamic performance limit and evaporator design considerations for NARM-based domestic refrigerator-freeze systems. Rept. for Aug 89-May 90. [Non-Azeotropic Refrigerant Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.K.; Heun, M.C.; Crawford, R.R.; Newell, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    The paper gives results of an investigation of non-azeotropic refrigerant mixtures (NARMs) for a two-temperature-level heat exchange process found in a domestic refrigerator-freezer. Ideal (constant air temperature) heat exchange processes are assumed. The results allow the effects of intercooling between the evaporator refrigerant stream and the condenser outlet stream to be examined systematically. Three refrigerant pairs, R22/R142b, R22/R123, and R32/R142b, were studied, but the results for only R22/R123 are presented because of its unique temperature glide curvature. Practical implementation of a Lorenz cycle constrains evaporator design. An evaporator module design is presented which meets the NARM system constraints.

  15. Adsorption isotherm of non-azeotropic solution onto porous adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, A.; Ramlan, N. A.; Anisuzzaman, S. M.; Chu, C. M.; Farm, Y. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Adsorption isotherm is essential component in the understanding of the adsorption process. Several methods of the measurements, analysis and interpretation of adsorption from solution have been reported in the literature. Most of the measurements of adsorption isotherm from solution were involved the measurement of excess isotherm conducted at low region of sorbates concentration. Direct interpretation of excess adsorption isotherm as adsorption isotherm is always been practice. Therefore, in this work a study on the measurement of the adsorption isotherm from solution of non-azeotropic organic solvent mixture onto porous adsorbents for whole range of liquid concentration was conducted. The study included the measurement of excess adsorption isotherm using conventional technique. Theoretical analysis and interpretation of adsorption isotherm from the excess isotherm were conducted using Pseudo Ideal Adsorption, Gibbs Dividing Plane Model and Langmuir-Fruendlich binary isotherm model. For organic solvents, acetone and propanol were chosen as the adsorbates due to the non-azeotropic properties in the mixture. Activated carbon and silicalite were chosen as adsorbents due to the different in their porosity such as macro porous and micro porous structure. The result of the study has revealed that the adsorption isotherm of non-azeotropic mixture onto activated carbon and silicalite can be interpreted as monolayer type of adsorption.

  16. Variation of Azeotropic Composition and Temperature with Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbard, H. Frank; Emptage, Michael R.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate physical chemistry experiment in which an azeotropic mixture is studied using the vapor pressures of the components as functions of temperature and the azeotropic composition and temperature at one pressure. Discusses in detail the mathematical treatment of obtained thermodynamic data. (MLH)

  17. Azeotropic dehydration process for treating bituminous froth

    SciTech Connect

    Filby, J. E.

    1985-04-30

    Bituminous froths, typically obtained from the known Hot Water Method of extraction treatment of oil sands, are processed to remove water and part of the coarse mineral solids contained in the froth. In the process, the froth feed stock from the Hot Water Method treatment is mixed with a naphtha diluent, preferably naphtha which is derived from upgrading or refining of separated bitumen, in preferably the minimum amount sufficient to effectively remove all water by azeotropic distillation, while providing a workable feed viscosity. The mixture of naphtha and froth is treated to remove coarse solids and part of the water in a settling device, heated to a temperature sufficient to cause vaporization of the naphtha and remaining water as an azeotrope and flashed to substantially separate all water and naphtha from the bitumen. The dry bitumen with remaining solids, is normally not suitable for passing to a refinery but rather is sent to upgrading at a typical oil sands mining upgrading complex. Naphtha is recovered and recycled. The naphtha, in addition to its azeotrope forming feature, makes the froth more homogenous, less viscous, easier to handle and less fouling in heat exchangers, facilitates separation of coarse solids, and eliminates severe foaming when the froth is heated.

  18. Study to determine the existence of an azeotropic R-22 `drop-in` substitute

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.S.; Morrison, G.; Mulroy, W.J.; Didion, D.A.

    1996-03-01

    The reduction in chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) production and the scheduled phase-out of these ozone depleting refrigerants requires the development and determination of environmentally safe refrigerants for use in heat pumps, water chillers, air conditioners, and refrigerators. Azeotropic mixtures are attractive as alternative refrigerants because they behave very nearly as pure materials. A simple correlative scheme that allows one to judge whether or not an azeotrope is likely in a binary refrigerant mixture is discussed. This paper presents laboratory and computer simulation model evaluation of two of the azeotropic refrigerant mixtures which are identified, HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) with R-C290 (Propane) and HFC-134a with R-600a (Isobutane), in a generic heat pump apparatus. A third azeotropes mixture, HFC-134a with R-C290 (Cyclopropane) is examined by computer simulation only.

  19. Azeotropic Preparation of a "C"-Phenyl "N"-Aryl Imine: An Introductory Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverberg, Lee J.; Coyle, David J.; Cannon, Kevin C.; Mathers, Robert T.; Richards, Jeffrey A.; Tierney, John

    2016-01-01

    Imines are important in biological chemistry and as intermediates in organic synthesis. An experiment for introductory undergraduate organic chemistry is presented in which benzaldehyde was condensed with "p"-methoxyaniline in toluene to give 4-methoxy-"N"-(phenylmethylene)benzenamine. Water was removed by azeotropic…

  20. Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Chum, H.L.; Filardo, G.

    1990-10-23

    A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70 C and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution. 1 fig.

  1. Supercritical separation process for complex organic mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Chum, Helena L.; Filardo, Giuseppe

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for separating low molecular weight components from complex aqueous organic mixtures. The process includes preparing a separation solution of supercritical carbon dioxide with an effective amount of an entrainer to modify the solvation power of the supercritical carbon dioxide and extract preselected low molecular weight components. The separation solution is maintained at a temperature of at least about 70.degree. C. and a pressure of at least about 1,500 psi. The separation solution is then contacted with the organic mixtures while maintaining the temperature and pressure as above until the mixtures and solution reach equilibrium to extract the preselected low molecular weight components from the organic mixtures. Finally, the entrainer/extracted components portion of the equilibrium mixture is isolated from the separation solution.

  2. Nonlinear ultrasonic nature of organic liquid and organic liquid mixture.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-gang; Zhang, Yang; Dong, Yan-wu

    2006-12-22

    Based on Jacobson's molecular free length theory in liquids and the relationship between ultrasonic velocity and the molecular free length in organic liquids, this paper deduces the equations for pressure coefficient and temperature coefficient of ultrasonic velocity and nonlinear acoustic parameter B/A in both of organic liquid and organic liquid binary mixtures. These nonlinear acoustic parameters are evaluated against the measured results and data from other sources. The equations reveal the connections between the nonlinear acoustic parameters and some internal structural of the medium or mixtures e.g. the sizes of molecule, several thermodynamic physical parameters and outside status e.g. condition of pressure and temperature of the liquid or liquid mixture. With the equations the nonlinear acoustic parameter B/A of organic liquid binary mixtures, which is impossible to know without the nonlinear acoustic parameter B/A of the tow components before, can be calculated based on the structural and physical parameters of organic liquid and organic liquid binary mixtures.

  3. RELIABLE COMPUTATION OF HOMOGENEOUS AZEOTROPES. (R824731)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    It is important to determine the existence and composition of homogeneous azeotropes in the analysis of phase behavior and in the synthesis and design of separation systems, from both theoretical and practical standpoints. A new method for reliably locating an...

  4. Activation of aqueous hydrogen peroxide for non-catalyzed dihydroperoxidation of ketones by azeotropic removal of water.

    PubMed

    Starkl Renar, K; Pečar, S; Iskra, J

    2015-09-28

    Cyclic and acyclic ketones were selectively converted to gem-dihydroperoxides in 72-99% yield with 30% aq. hydrogen peroxide by azeotropic distillation of water from the reaction mixture without any catalyst. The reactions were more selective than with 100% H2O2 and due to neutral conditions also less stable products could be obtained.

  5. SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL FORMATION FROM MIXTURES OF BIOGENIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this work the influence of hydrocarbon mixtures on the overall Secondary Organic Aerosol yield is investigated. Photochemical reaction experiments were conducted using mixtures of a-pinene, isoprene and propene in the presence of NOx. Results of the experiments show...

  6. Dehydration of an ethanol/water azeotrope through alginate-DNA membranes cross-linked with metal ions by pervaporation.

    PubMed

    Uragami, Tadashi; Banno, Masashi; Miyata, Takashi

    2015-12-10

    To obtain high dehydration membranes for an ethanol/water azeotrope, dried blend membranes prepared from mixtures of sodium alginate (Alg-Na) and sodium deoxyribonucleate (DNA-Na) were cross-linked by immersing in a methanol solution of CaCl2 or MaCl2. In the dehydration of an ethanol/water azeotropic mixture by pervaporation, the effects of immersion time in methanol solution of CaCl2 or MaCl2 on the permeation rate and water/ethanol selectivity through Alg-DNA/Ca(2+) and Alg-DNA/Mg(2+) cross-linked membranes were investigated. Alg-DNA/Mg(2+) cross-linked membrane immersed for 12h in methanol solution of MaCl2 exhibited the highest water/ethanol selectivity. This results from depressed swelling of the membranes by formation of a cross-linked structure. However, excess immersion in solution containing cross-linker led to an increase in the hydrophobicity of cross-linked membrane. Therefore, the water/ethanol selectivity of Alg-DNA/Mg(2+) cross-linked membranes with an excess immersion in cross-linking solution was lowered. The relationship between the structure of Alg-DNA/Ca(2+) and Alg-DNA/Mg(2+) cross-linked membranes and their permeation and separation characteristics during pervaporation of an ethanol/water azeotropic mixture is discussed in detail.

  7. Lateral organization of complex lipid mixtures from multiscale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumaneng, Paul W.; Pandit, Sagar A.; Zhao, Guijun; Scott, H. L.

    2010-02-01

    The organizational properties of complex lipid mixtures can give rise to functionally important structures in cell membranes. In model membranes, ternary lipid-cholesterol (CHOL) mixtures are often used as representative systems to investigate the formation and stabilization of localized structural domains ("rafts"). In this work, we describe a self-consistent mean-field model that builds on molecular dynamics simulations to incorporate multiple lipid components and to investigate the lateral organization of such mixtures. The model predictions reveal regions of bimodal order on ternary plots that are in good agreement with experiment. Specifically, we have applied the model to ternary mixtures composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine:18:0 sphingomyelin:CHOL. This work provides insight into the specific intermolecular interactions that drive the formation of localized domains in these mixtures. The model makes use of molecular dynamics simulations to extract interaction parameters and to provide chain configuration order parameter libraries.

  8. Separation of polar compounds using a flexible metal-organic framework

    SciTech Connect

    Motkuri, Radha K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Annapureddy, Harsha V.; Dang, Liem X.; Krishna, Rajamani; Nune, Satish K.; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Liu, Jian; McGrail, B. Peter

    2015-01-01

    A flexible metal-organic framework constructed from a flexible linker is shown to possess the capability of separating mixtures of polar compounds by exploiting the differences in the saturation capacities of the constituents. The separation possibilities with the flexible MOF include mixtures of propanol isomers, and various azeotropes. Transient breakthrough simulations show that these sorption-based separations are in favor of the component with higher saturation capacity.

  9. Efficient water removal in lipase-catalyzed esterifications using a low-boiling-point azeotrope.

    PubMed

    Yan, Youchun; Bornscheuer, Uwe T; Schmid, Rolf D

    2002-04-05

    High conversions in lipase-catalyzed syntheses of esters from free acyl donors and an alcohol requires efficient removal of water preferentially at temperatures compatible to enzyme activity. Using a lipase B from Candida antarctica (CAL-B)-mediated synthesis of sugar fatty-acid esters, we show that a mixture of ethyl methylketone (EMK) and hexane (best ratio: 4:1, vo/vo) allows efficient removal of water generated during esterification. Azeotropic distillation of the solvent mixture (composition: 26% EMK, 55% hexane, 19% water) takes place at 59 degrees C, which closely matches the optimum temperature reported for CAL-B. Water is then removed from the azeotrope by membrane vapor permeation. In case of glucose stearate, 93% yield was achieved after 48 h using an equimolar ratio of glucose and stearic acid. CAL-B could be reused for seven reaction cycles, with 86% residual activity after 14 d total reaction time at 59 degrees C. A decrease in fatty-acid chain length as well as increasing temperatures (75 degrees C) resulted in lower conversions. In addition, immobilization of CAL-B on a magnetic polypropylene carrier (EP 100) facilitated separation of the biocatalyst.

  10. Method for removing organic liquids from aqueous solutions and mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Coronado, Paul R.; Dow, Jerome P.

    2004-03-23

    A method for removing organic liquids from aqueous solutions and mixtures. The method employs any porous material preferably in granular form and having small pores and a large specific surface area, that is hydrophobic so that liquid water does not readily wet its surface. In this method, organics, especially organic solvents that mix with and are more volatile than water, are separated from aqueous solution by preferentially evaporating across the liquid/solid boundary formed at the surfaces of the hydrophobic porous materials. Also, organic solvents that are immiscible with water, preferentially wet the surfaces of the hydrophobic material and are drawn within the porous materials by capillary action.

  11. Toxicity of thiocyanate, phenol, and their mixtures to freshwater aquatic organisms: A mixture modeling approach

    SciTech Connect

    Soboslay, E.G.

    1987-01-01

    Thiocyanate and phenol are two environmentally significant constituents of wastewater streams from coke production plants and coal conversion facilities. Acute and chronic toxicity experiments were conducted for thiocyanate and phenol with Daphnia magna at 20 C and Ceriodaphnia affinis/dubia at 25C in hard water to study their individual toxic effects on survival and reproduction. Statistical analysis of the dose response relationships for the individual chemicals indicated the type of combined effects that occur when thiocyanate and phenol are present simultaneously. Mixture models for toxicant interaction were used to predict joint toxic effects on survival and reproduction. The applicability of the mixture model was tested by performing joint toxicity experiments for specific thiocyanate and phenol mixtures to verify the model for toxic effects on specific whole organism performances. Neonate production and hatchability, two indices of reproduction, were selected to evaluate the chronic toxic effects of thiocyanate and phenol. The resulting dose response curves for mixtures were compared to curves predicted on the basis of the mathematical model for concentration addition. Low concentrations of thiocyanate, phenol and their mixtures generally caused a stimulation effect on D. magna and C. affinis/dubia reproduction.

  12. ATR spectra on boundary with mixture containing organic substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelokov, R. V.; Yatsishen, V. V.

    2005-02-01

    The problem of not destroying diagnostics and dosing of radiation at laser therapy is one of important in medicine. Therefore the purpose of our work is development of method ATR for diagnostics and researches in biomedicine. In this work as objects of consideration were: a mixture of nicotine with water, a mixture of an ascorbic acid with water and surface lesions of an eye cornea by a herpes virus. Results of our consideration are the ATR spectra defined at different concentration of organic substances and virions.

  13. Adsorbate shape selectivity: Separation of the HF/134a azeotrope over carbogenic molecular sieve

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, A.; Mariwala, R.K.; Kane, M.S.; Foley, H.C.

    1995-03-01

    Experimental evidence is provided for adsorptive shape selectivity in the separation of the azeotrope between HF and 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (134a) over pyrolyzed poly(furfuryl alcohol)-derived carbogenic molecular sieve (PPFA-CMS). The separation can be accomplished over coconut charcoal or Carbosieve G on the basis of the differences in the extent of equilibrium adsorption of HF and 134a. On these adsorbents 134a is more strongly bound than HF, thus it elutes much more slowly from the bed. The heat of adsorption for 134a in the vicinity of 200 C on Carbosieve G is {approximately}8.8 kcal/mol. In contrast, when the same azeotropic mixture is separated over PPFA-CMS prepared at 500 C, 134a is not adsorbed. As a result 134a elutes from the bed first, followed by HF. The reversal is brought about by the narrower pore size and pore size distribution of the PPFA-CMS versus that for Carbosieve G. Thus the separation over PPFA-CMS is an example of adsorbate shape selectivity and represents a limiting case of kinetic separation.

  14. How will Primary and Secondary Organic Mixtures Impact CCN?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asa-Awuku, A. A.; Donahue, N. M.; Robinson, A. L.

    2009-12-01

    As organic particles age, they may enhance their ability to uptake water, activate and form cloud droplets. These particles that activate are called cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Understanding the chemical and thermodynamic properties that control CCN activity and droplet growth is necessary for constraining impacts on the hydrological cycle and uncertainties from the aerosol indirect effect. In particular, quantifying the effects of changes in partitioning and aging are important for predicting CCN concentrations. In our study we investigate changes in the CCN activity of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) modified by the presence of two anthropogenic two types of primary organic aerosol (POA) that are emitted by anthropogenic sources; POA from a flash vaporized mixture of motor-oil and fuel and POA emitted by a diesel engine. The aerosol are sampled from a 12 meter-cubed chamber and an Aerodyne quadrapole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) measures changes in aerosol chemical composition and a continuous flow thermal gradient CCN counter measures CCN activity at different instrument supersaturations. We present the CCN activity of alpha-pinene SOA, motor-oil fuel and diesel exhaust POA and their subsequent mixtures. Alpha-pinene SOA is moderately CCN active and the POA that contain lubricating oil components are significantly less active. CCN measurements are compared with mass spectra to identify correlations in the data sets. CCN concentrations are predicted using Q-AMS chemical composition data; particle time of flight data is used to infer the aerosol mixing state and size-resolved CCN predictions are compared to measurements. The assumption that CCN properties are additive is tested by applying CCN properties of individual species to data from mixing experiments.

  15. Flammability limits of fuel/fluorocarbon azeotropes

    SciTech Connect

    Alvares, N.J.; Hammond, P.R.; Foote, K.; Ford, H.W. Jr.

    1981-02-10

    Both Dehn and Thorne have intimated that flash point (FP) measurements could be used to define the gas-phase flammability limits of fire and retardant vapor mixtures above the surface of heated retardant containing flammable liquids. However, it was found that ignitable mixtures exist above the liquid surface, where the concentration of the agent in the fluid is well beyond the limiting concentrating for inerting of alcohol fires. Clearly this anomaly results from diffusion competition of air and liquid vapor mixture at the position of the ignitor, as influenced by the design of the experimental apparatus. The authors are skeptical about the need or worth of attempting to define flammability limits using FP data, especially since unknown variables control the response. More important is to define the concentration of liquid phase retardant that will affect gas phase inerting. Thus, it is necessary to continue practical testing of retardant-containing liquids for their effectiveness in mitigating possible accidents, e.g., the next phase of this work will assess the effectiveness of halocarbons to inert high-pressure alcohol/agent leaks impinging on both electrical and flame ignition sources.

  16. Self-organized pattern formation in motor-microtubule mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankararaman, Sumithra; Menon, Gautam I.; Sunil Kumar, P. B.

    2004-09-01

    We model the stable self-organized patterns obtained in the nonequilibrium steady states of mixtures of molecular motors and microtubules. In experiments [Nédélec , Nature (London) 389, 305 (1997); Surrey , Science 292, 1167 (2001)] performed in a quasi-two-dimensional geometry, microtubules are oriented by complexes of motor proteins. This interaction yields a variety of patterns, including arrangements of asters, vortices, and disordered configurations. We model this system via a two-dimensional vector field describing the local coarse-grained microtubule orientation and two scalar density fields associated to molecular motors. These scalar fields describe motors which either attach to and move along microtubules or diffuse freely within the solvent. Transitions between single aster, spiral, and vortex states are obtained as a consequence of confinement, as parameters in our model are varied. For systems in which the effects of confinement can be neglected, we present a map of nonequilibrium steady states, which includes arrangements of asters and vortices separately as well as aster-vortex mixtures and fully disordered states. We calculate the steady state distribution of bound and free motors in aster and vortex configurations of microtubules and compare these to our simulation results, providing qualitative arguments for the stability of different patterns in various regimes of parameter space. We study the role of crowding or “saturation” effects on the density profiles of motors in asters, discussing the role of such effects in stabilizing single asters. We also comment on the implications of our results for experiments.

  17. Control of Meloidogyne incognita Using Mixtures of Organic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Yunhee; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to control the root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne incognita using benign organo-chemicals. Second-stage juveniles (J2) of RKN were exposed to dilutions (1.0%, 0.5%, 0.2%, and 0.1%) of acetic acid (AA), lactic acid (LA), and their mixtures (MX). The nematode bodies were disrupted severely and moderately by vacuolations in 0.5% of MX and single organic acids, respectively, suggesting toxicity of MX may be higher than AA and LA. The mortality of J2 was 100% at all concentrations of AA and MX and only at 1.0% and 0.5% of LA, which lowered slightly at 0.2% and greatly at 0.1% of LA. This suggests the nematicidal activity of MX may be mostly derived from AA together with supplementary LA toxicity. MX was applied to chili pepper plants inoculated with about 1,000 J2, for which root-knot gall formations and plant growths were examined 4 weeks after inoculation. The root gall formation was completely inhibited by 0.5% MX and standard and double concentrations of fosthiazate; and inhibited 92.9% and 57.1% by 0.2% and 0.1% MX, respectively. Shoot height, shoot weight, and root weight were not significantly (P ≤ 0.05) different among all treatments and the untreated and non-inoculated controls. All of these results suggest that the mixture of the organic acids may have a potential to be developed as an eco-friendly nematode control agent that needs to be supported by the more nematode control experiments in fields. PMID:25506312

  18. The effect of azeotropism on combustion characteristics of blended fuel pool fire.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yanming; Wang, Changjian; Lu, Shouxiang

    2014-04-30

    The effect of azeotropism on combustion characteristics of blended fuel pool fire was experimentally studied in an open fire test space of State Key Laboratory of Fire Science. A 30 cm × 30 cm square pool filled with n-heptane and ethanol blended fuel was employed. Flame images, burning rate and temperature distribution were collected and recorded in the whole combustion process. Results show that azeotropism obviously dominates the combustion behavior of n-heptane/ethanol blended fuel pool fire. The combustion process after ignition exhibits four typical stages: initial development, azeotropic burning, single-component burning and decay stage. Azeotropism appears when temperature of fuel surface reaches azeotropic point and blended fuel burns at azeotropic ratio. Compared with individual pure fuel, the effect of azeotropism on main fire parameters, such as flame height, burning rate, flame puffing frequency and centerline temperature were analyzed. Burning rate and centerline temperature of blended fuel are higher than that of individual pure fuel respectively at azeotropic burning stage, and flame puffing frequency follows the empirical formula between Strouhal and Froude number for pure fuel.

  19. Rotary drum composting of different organic waste mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kalamdhad, Ajay S; Kazmi, Absar A

    2009-03-01

    The effects of three different mixtures of organic waste on composting in a rotary drum were examined by measuring changes in physico-chemical and biological parameters. It was observed that the time courses of the three mixtures: run A (grass cuttings, vegetable waste and food waste), run B (cattle manure, vegetable waste and sawdust) and run C (cattle manure, food waste, vegetable waste, paper waste and sawdust) were quite diverse. Run B, with initial C/N ratio 22 and containing a large proportion of cattle manure produced high quality and mature compost within 20 days. It showed a final total nitrogen (2.1%), final total phosphorus 3.52 g kg(-1), final total organic carbon (TOC) (24.8%) and final moisture content (44%). At the end of 20 days, higher degradation led to final chemical oxygen demand (COD) (454 mg L(- 1)), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) (107 mg L(- 1)), fecal coliform (1.2 x 10(2) bacteria g(- 1)), fecal streptococci (85 bacteria g(-1)) and low electrical conductivity (1.658 dS m(-1)), respectively. Furthermore, run C with initial C/N ratio of 30 and containing a larger amount of food and vegetable waste produced good quality compost and resulted in 4.34% total nitrogen and 2.42% total phosphorus after 20 days, but, it had higher final fecal coliform 2.5 x 10(4) bacteria g( -1), fecal streptococci 2.1 x 10(4) bacteria g(-1), high TOC and NH(4)-N and a BOD/COD ratio of 0.63, which rendered it hygienically unsafe and immature. Finally, run A with initial C/N ratio of 15 showed a higher amount of EC (4.84 dS m(-1)), NH(4)-N, BOD/COD ratio of 0.4 with 15% nitrogen loss, which indicated an unstable product even after 20 days of composting. Therefore, it was found that rotary drum composting of a combination of cattle manure, vegetable waste and sawdust resulted in a primary stabilized compost within 20 days of composting.

  20. Behavioural evaluation of workers exposed to mixtures of organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Maizlish, N A; Langolf, G D; Whitehead, L W; Fine, L J; Albers, J W; Goldberg, J; Smith, P

    1985-09-01

    Reports from Scandinavia have suggested behavioural impairment among long term workers exposed to solvents below regulatory standards. A cross sectional study of behavioural performance was conducted among printers and spray painters exposed to mixtures of organic solvents to replicate the Scandinavian studies and to examine dose-response relationships. Eligible subjects consisted of 640 hourly workers from four midwestern United States companies. Of these, 269 responded to requests to participate and 240 were selected for study based on restrictions for age, sex, education, and other potentially confounding variables. The subjects tested had been employed on average for six years. Each subject completed an occupational history, underwent a medical examination, and completed a battery of behavioural tests. These included the Fitts law psychomotor task, the Stroop colour-word test, the Sternberg short term memory scanning test, the short term memory span test, and the continuous recognition memory test. Solvent exposure for each subject was defined as an exposed or non-exposed category based on a plant industrial hygiene walk-through and the concentration of solvents based on an analysis of full shift personal air samples by gas chromatography. The first definition was used to maintain consistency with Scandinavian studies, but the second was considered to be more accurate. The average full shift solvent concentration was 302 ppm for the printing plant workers and 6-13 ppm for the workers at other plants. Isopropanol and hexane were the major components, compared with toluene in Scandinavian studies. Performance on behavioural tests was analysed using multiple linear regression with solvent concentration as an independent variable. Other relevant demographic variables were also considered for inclusion. No significant (p greater than 0.05) relation between solvent concentration and impairment on any of the 10 behavioural variables was observed after controlling for

  1. Behavioural evaluation of workers exposed to mixtures of organic solvents.

    PubMed Central

    Maizlish, N A; Langolf, G D; Whitehead, L W; Fine, L J; Albers, J W; Goldberg, J; Smith, P

    1985-01-01

    Reports from Scandinavia have suggested behavioural impairment among long term workers exposed to solvents below regulatory standards. A cross sectional study of behavioural performance was conducted among printers and spray painters exposed to mixtures of organic solvents to replicate the Scandinavian studies and to examine dose-response relationships. Eligible subjects consisted of 640 hourly workers from four midwestern United States companies. Of these, 269 responded to requests to participate and 240 were selected for study based on restrictions for age, sex, education, and other potentially confounding variables. The subjects tested had been employed on average for six years. Each subject completed an occupational history, underwent a medical examination, and completed a battery of behavioural tests. These included the Fitts law psychomotor task, the Stroop colour-word test, the Sternberg short term memory scanning test, the short term memory span test, and the continuous recognition memory test. Solvent exposure for each subject was defined as an exposed or non-exposed category based on a plant industrial hygiene walk-through and the concentration of solvents based on an analysis of full shift personal air samples by gas chromatography. The first definition was used to maintain consistency with Scandinavian studies, but the second was considered to be more accurate. The average full shift solvent concentration was 302 ppm for the printing plant workers and 6-13 ppm for the workers at other plants. Isopropanol and hexane were the major components, compared with toluene in Scandinavian studies. Performance on behavioural tests was analysed using multiple linear regression with solvent concentration as an independent variable. Other relevant demographic variables were also considered for inclusion. No significant (p greater than 0.05) relation between solvent concentration and impairment on any of the 10 behavioural variables was observed after controlling for

  2. Application of the Firefly and Luus-Jaakola algorithms in the calculation of a double reactive azeotrope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes Platt, Gustavo; Pinheiro Domingos, Roberto; Oliveira de Andrade, Matheus

    2014-01-01

    The calculation of reactive azeotropes is an important task in the preliminary design and simulation of reactive distillation columns. Classically, homogeneous nonreactive azeotropes are vapor-liquid coexistence conditions where phase compositions are equal. For homogeneous reactive azeotropes, simultaneous phase and chemical equilibria occur concomitantly with equality of compositions (in the Ung-Doherty transformed space). The modeling of reactive azeotrope calculation is represented by a nonlinear algebraic system with phase equilibrium, chemical equilibrium and azeotropy equations. This nonlinear system can exhibit more than one solution, corresponding to a double reactive azeotrope. In a previous paper (Platt et al 2013 J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 410 012020), we investigated some numerical aspects of the calculation of reactive azeotropes in the isobutene + methanol + methyl-tert-butyl-ether (with two reactive azeotropes) system using two metaheuristics: the Luus-Jaakola adaptive random search and the Firefly algorithm. Here, we use a hybrid structure (stochastic + deterministic) in order to produce accurate results for both azeotropes. After identifying the neighborhood of the reactive azeotrope, the nonlinear algebraic system is solved using Newton's method. The results indicate that using metaheuristics and some techniques devoted to the calculation of multiple minima allows both azeotropic coordinates in this reactive system to be obtains. In this sense, we provide a comprehensive analysis of a useful framework devoted to solving nonlinear systems, particularly in phase equilibrium problems.

  3. Membrane permeation process for dehydration of organic liquid mixtures using sulfonated ion-exchange polyalkene membranes

    DOEpatents

    Cabasso, Israel; Korngold, Emmanuel

    1988-01-01

    A membrane permeation process for dehydrating a mixture of organic liquids, such as alcohols or close boiling, heat sensitive mixtures. The process comprises causing a component of the mixture to selectively sorb into one side of sulfonated ion-exchange polyalkene (e.g., polyethylene) membranes and selectively diffuse or flow therethrough, and then desorbing the component into a gas or liquid phase on the other side of the membranes.

  4. Processes of Heat Transfer in Rheologically Unstable Mixtures of Organic Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, S. I.; Pishenina, N. V.; Rumyantseva, T. Yu.

    2014-05-01

    The dependence of the coefficient of heat transfer from the heat-exchange surface to a rheologically unstable organic mixture on the thermohydrodynamic state of the mixture and its prehistory has been established. A method for multivariant investigation of the process of heat transfer in compound organic mixtures has been proposed; this method makes it possible to evaluate the character and peculiarities of change in the rheological structure of the mixture as functions of the thermohydrodynamic conditions of its treatment. The possibility of evaluating the intensity of heat transfer in a biotechnological system for production of energy carriers at the step of its designing by multivariant investigation of the heat-transfer intensity in rheologically unstable organic mixtures with account of their prehistory has been shown.

  5. SOIL SORPTION OF VOLATILE AND SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN A MIXTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies were conducted to evaluate lipophilicity as a predictor sorption for a mixture of organic compounds with high vapor pressures commonly present at hazardous waste sites. Sorption partition coefficients (Kp) for the mixture of 16 volatile and semivolatile ...

  6. Toxicity of natural mixtures of organic pollutants in temperate and polar marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Echeveste, Pedro; Galbán-Malagón, Cristóbal; Dachs, Jordi; Berrojalbiz, Naiara; Agustí, Susana

    2016-11-15

    Semivolatile and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) undergo atmospheric transport before being deposited to the oceans, where they partition to phytoplankton organic matter. The goal of this study was to determine the toxicity of naturally occurring complex mixtures of organic pollutants to temperate and polar phytoplankton communities from the Mediterranean Sea, the North East (NE) Atlantic, and Southern Oceans. The cell abundance of the different phytoplankton groups, chlorophyll a concentrations, viability of the cells, and growth and decay constants were monitored in response to addition of a range of concentrations of mixtures of organic pollutants obtained from seawater extracts. Almost all of the phytoplankton groups were significantly affected by the complex mixtures of non-polar and polar organic pollutants, with toxicity being greater for these mixtures than for single POPs or simple POP mixtures. Cocktails' toxicity arose at concentrations as low as tenfold the field oceanic levels, probably due to a higher chemical activity of the mixture than of simple POPs mixtures. Overall, smaller cells were the most affected, although Mediterranean picophytoplankton was significantly more tolerant to non-polar POPs than picophytoplankton from the Atlantic Ocean or the Bellingshausen Sea microphytoplankton.

  7. PROCEDURES FOR DERIVING EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING BENCHMARKS (ESBS) FOR THE PROTECTION OF BENTHIC ORGANISM: PAH MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This equilibrium partitioning sediment benchmark (ESB) document describes procedures to derive concentrations of PAH mixtures in sediment which are protective of the presence of benthic organisms. The equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach was chosen because it accounts for t...

  8. Parameters for the Pyrolysis of Organic Material - Perchlorate Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steininger, Harald; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter

    2013-04-01

    The ESA-lead Mars rover ExoMars (launch in 2018) will carry a suit of instruments, one of the in-struments is the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer MOMA. Organic material in the Martian soil will be either pyrolyzed at temperatures of up to 1000°C and separated by gas chromatography or volatilized with the help of an UV-laser. A mass spectrometer will be the detector for both methods. Chlorinated organics have been detected in pyroly-sis GC-MS experiments on Mars two times. The first time during the Viking mission in 1976 and a second time with the Sample Analysis on Mars (SAM) in-strument onboard the Curiosity rover in 2012. [1] [2] The presence of perchlorates found by the Phoenix mission in 2008 [3] lead to the discovery that organic molecules not only get oxidized during pyrolysis, but also chlorinated organic compounds can be pro-duced. [4] The parameters used for pyrolysis and the sample composition especially the distribution of organics and perchlorates within the sample and the concentrations of organics and perchlorate have a huge influence on the products created. It is possible to change the condi-tions of the pyrolysis by spatially separating the organ-ics from the perchlorates that the chloromethanes get the major product of the pyrolysis. This might help to understand the results of the (SAM) instrument yield-ing mono-, di- and trichloromethane and a chlorinated 4-hydrocarbon molecule. References: [1] Biemann K et al. (1977) JGR, 82, 4641-4658. [2] Grotzinger J. P et al. (2011) AGU Fall Meeting U13A-01 [3] Hecht M. H., et al. (2009) Science, 325 64-67. [4] Steininger H., Goesmann F., Goetz W. (2011) Planet. & Space Sci., 71, 9-17. Acknowledgments: This work was funded by DLR (FKZ 50QX1001)

  9. Nanofiltration properties of PTMSP in binary organic solvents mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yushkin, A. A.; Kossov, A. A.; Volkov, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the stability and nanofiltration performance of poly[1-(trimethylsilyl)- 1-propyne] (PTMSP) in ethanol solutions of butylaldehyde, 1-decanal, 1-hexene, 1-decene was evaluated. It was found that PTMSP was insoluble in all aldehyde solutions, but it was soluble at olefin concentration of 80% or higher. Nanofiltration experiments demonstrate that binary mixtures of 1-decanal and ethanol viscosity are not the parameter affecting on membrane permeability and rejection of solute as well as swelling degree. In the case of decanol/ethanol solutions both solution viscosity and molar volume demonstrate the best fit of experimental data. It was shown that with the decrease of ethanol content in the feed, the rejection of anionic solute Remazol Brilliant Blue R (MW 626) increases from 94 up to 97%.

  10. Nanostructural organization and anion effects in the optical Kerr effect spectra of binary ionic liquid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dong; Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Hines, Larry G; Li, Shengfu; Bartsch, Richard A; Quitevis, Edward L

    2008-10-23

    This article reports a study of the effect of anions on the optical Kerr effect (OKE) spectra of binary ionic liquid mixtures with one mixture comprising the 3-methyl-1-pentylimidazolium ([C 5mim] (+)) cation and the anions PF 6 (-) and CF 3CO 2 (-) (TFA (-)), and another mixture comprising the [C 5mim] (+) cation and the anions Br (-) and bis(trifluomethanesulfonyl)imide (NTf 2 (-)). The spectra were obtained by the use of optical heterodyne-detected Raman-induced Kerr Effect Spectroscopy at 295 K. The OKE spectra of the mixtures are compared with the calculated mole-fraction weighted sum of the normalized OKE spectra of the neat liquids. The OKE spectra are nearly additive for [C 5mim]Br/[C 5mim][NTf 2] mixtures, but nonadditive for [C 5mim][PF 6]/[C 5mim][TFA] mixtures. In the case of the equimolar [C 5mim][PF 6]/[C 5mim][TFA] mixture, the nonadditivity is such that the experimental OKE spectrum is narrower than the calculated OKE spectrum. The additivity or nonadditivity of OKE spectra for IL mixtures can be explained by assuming ionic liquids are nanostructurally organized into nonpolar regions and ionic networks. The ionic networks in mixtures will be characterized by "random co-networks" for anions that are nearly the same in size (PF 6 (-) and TFA (-)) and by "block co-networks" for anions that differ greatly in size (Br (-) and NTf 2 (-)).

  11. Complex mixtures of air pollutants: characterizing the cancer risk of polycyclic organic matter.

    PubMed Central

    Lewtas, J

    1993-01-01

    Complex mixtures of polycyclic organic matter (POM) are used to illustrate the scientific problems and issues associated with characterizing the comparative risk of related complex mixtures. The complexity of mixtures in which the active components are not well characterized present special challenges, which include identifying the critical components of mixtures, their sources, and the appropriate biomarker(s) of exposure and dose; developing the appropriate experimental models for dose-response assessment; species extrapolation; and developing a scientific basis for predicting from one mixture to another. Strategies for addressing these issues include bioassay-directed chemical characterization of bioactive components of complex mixtures, apportionment methods to determine the source of biological activity and risk, DNA adduct methods to determine tissue exposure and target dose of mixtures, and comparative approaches to determining the relative similarity, potency, and risk of complex mixtures. Epidemiological data are available for humans exposed to POM from coke ovens, coal roofing tar, coal smoke, aluminum smelters, and cigarette smoke. These emissions are characterized and compared to POM from automotive emissions (diesel and gasoline), woodstove emissions, residential oil furnace emissions, and ambient air particles. The tumor potency and estimated cancer risks for these POM mixtures ranges over nearly three orders of magnitude. PMID:8354169

  12. SOLUBILITY, SORPTION AND TRANSPORT OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN COMPLEX MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research summarized in this report focuses on the effects which organic cosolvents have on the sorption and mobility of organic contaminants. This work was initiated In an effort to improve our understanding of the environmental consequences associated with complex mixtur...

  13. Passivity and breakdown of carbon steel in organic solvent mixtures of propylene carbonate and dimethoxyethane

    SciTech Connect

    Shifler, D.A.; Kruger, J.; Moran, P.J.

    1998-07-01

    The passivity and breakdown of passivity of 1018 carbon steel in propylene carbonate (PC) and 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) mixtures with 0.5 molar lithium hexafluoroarsenate supporting electrolyte were examined via several electrochemical and surface analytical methods. The PC-DME/0.5 M LiAsF{sub 6} mixtures ranged from 10 to 90 mol % PC. The results from the PC/DME mixtures were compared to passivating mechanisms found in pure PC and DME solutions. In PC-rich mixtures, the breakdown of passivity occurred near the oxidation potentials of either organic solvent. Premature breakdown of the carbon steel in PC-DME mixtures occurred at sulfide inclusions as was observed earlier in PC/0.5 M LiAsF{sub 6} solutions although passive films attempted to form at these inclusion sites in mixtures containing at least 10 mol % DME. As the DME content increased in the PC-DME mixtures, the passive films formed on bare steel surfaces possessed an increasing polymer film character. In 50 and 70 mol % DME solutions nonprotective polymer films were formed. The nonprotective nature of these films indicated that PC passivation mechanisms competed and interfered with the DME mechanism of electropolymerized film formation. Only in 10 mol % PC-90 mol % DME mixtures were protective electropolymerized films formed on 1018 carbon steel.

  14. ACTION CONCENTRATION FOR MIXTURES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOC) & METHANE & HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    MARUSICH, R.M.

    2006-07-10

    Waste containers may contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs), methane, hydrogen and possibly propane. These constituents may occur individually or in mixtures. Determining if a waste container contains a flammable concentration of flammable gases and vapors (from VOCs) is important to the safety of the handling, repackaging and shipping activities. This report provides the basis for determining the flammability of mixtures of flammable gases and vapors. The concentration of a mixture that is at the lowest flammability limit for that mixture is called the action concentration. The action concentration can be determined using total VOC concentrations or actual concentration of each individual VOC. The concentrations of hydrogen and methane are included with the total VOC or individual VOC concentration to determine the action concentration. Concentrations below this point are not flammable. Waste containers with gas/vapor concentrations at or above the action concentration are considered flammable.

  15. Strategies for Transferring Mixtures of Organic Contaminants from Aquatic Environments into Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Annika; Mayer, Philipp; Schäfer, Sabine; Witt, Gesine; Haase, Nora; Escher, Beate I

    2016-06-07

    Mixtures of organic contaminants are ubiquitous in the environment. Depending on their persistence and physicochemical properties, individual chemicals that make up the mixture partition and distribute within the environment and might then jointly elicit toxicological effects. For the assessment and monitoring of such mixtures, a variety of cell-based in vitro and low-complexity in vivo bioassays based on algae, daphnids or fish embryos are available. A very important and sometimes unrecognized challenge is how to combine sampling, extraction and dosing to transfer the mixtures from the environment into bioassays, while conserving (or re-establishing) their chemical composition at adjustable levels for concentration-effect assessment. This article outlines various strategies for quantifiable transfer from environmental samples including water, sediment, and biota into bioassays using total extraction or polymer-based passive sampling combined with either solvent spiking or passive dosing.

  16. Liquid-liquid phase separation in atmospheric aerosol particles: dependence on organic functionalities and mixture complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, M.; Marcolli, C.; Krieger, U. K.; Zuend, A.; Peter, T.

    2012-04-01

    In the troposphere, aerosol particles undergo phase transitions such as deliquescence and efflorescence during humidity cycles (Marcolli and Krieger, 2006). In addition, interactions between organic and inorganic compounds lead to liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) (Ciobanu et al., 2009). Recent studies on a limited number of model systems have shown that oxygen-to-carbon ratios (O:C) of the organic aerosol fraction might be a good predictor for LLPS in mixed organic/ammonium sulfate (AS) particles (Bertram et al., 2011; Song et al., 2011). However, in order to corroborate this hypothesis experiments with an organic fraction that consists of a higher number of components with different O:C ratios and functional groups are needed. In order to determine the influence of O:C ratio, the specific organic functionalities and the mixture complexity on LLPS, we subjected organic/AS particles deposited on a hydrophobically coated substrate to relative humidity (RH) cycles and observed phase changes using optical microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. To determine the influence of mixture complexity, we mixed together up to 10 organic compounds. We also prepared mixtures that were rich in different types of functional groups like polyols, aromatics and dicarboxylic acids which were identified from field measurements. We screened for a miscibility gap by varying the organic-to-inorganic ratio from 2:1 to 1:6. AS in the investigated single particles effloresced at 27 - 50 %RH and deliquesced at 72 - 79 %RH during humidity cycles. The occurrence of LLPS is determined to a high degree by the O:C of the organics: there was no LLPS for mixtures with O:C > 0.8 and there was always LLPS for mixtures with O:C < 0.57. In the range in between, we observed a dependence on the specific functional groups: a high share of aromatic functionalities shifts the range of O:C for which LLPS occurs to lower values. A correlation was also found for the onset RH of LLPS as a function of O

  17. Molecular identification of organic compounds in atmospheric complex mixtures and relationship to atmospheric chemistry and sources.

    PubMed Central

    Mazurek, Monica A

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a chemical characterization approach for complex organic compound mixtures associated with fine atmospheric particles of diameters less than 2.5 m (PM2.5). It relates molecular- and bulk-level chemical characteristics of the complex mixture to atmospheric chemistry and to emission sources. Overall, the analytical approach describes the organic complex mixtures in terms of a chemical mass balance (CMB). Here, the complex mixture is related to a bulk elemental measurement (total carbon) and is broken down systematically into functional groups and molecular compositions. The CMB and molecular-level information can be used to understand the sources of the atmospheric fine particles through conversion of chromatographic data and by incorporation into receptor-based CMB models. Once described and quantified within a mass balance framework, the chemical profiles for aerosol organic matter can be applied to existing air quality issues. Examples include understanding health effects of PM2.5 and defining and controlling key sources of anthropogenic fine particles. Overall, the organic aerosol compositional data provide chemical information needed for effective PM2.5 management. PMID:12634131

  18. Optical Properties of Fluorescent Mixtures: Comparing Quantum Dots to Organic Dyes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Benjamin M.; Morgan, Thomas T.; Ucak-Astarlioglu, Mine G.; Wlilliams, Mary Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The study describes and compares the size-dependent optical properties of organic dyes with those of semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs). The analysis shows that mixtures of QDs contain emission colors that are sum of the individual QD components.

  19. Effects of organic acid-surfactant mixtures on levels of bacteria and beef quality traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Organic acid efficacy as an antimicrobial treatment of beef carcass surfaces may be increased through the addition of surfactants. However, the effects of antimicrobial-surfactant mixtures on beef quality traits such as flavor and color stability may make their use unacceptable. Purp...

  20. Fact or artifact: the representativeness of ESI-MS for complex natural organic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Nicole R; Capley, Erin N; Stenson, Alexandra C

    2014-04-01

    Because mass spectrometers provide their own dispersion and resolution of analytes, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has become a workhorse for the characterization of complex mixtures from aerosols to crude oil. Unfortunately, ESI mass spectra commonly contain multimers, adducts and fragments. For the characterization of complex mixtures of unknown initial composition, this presents a significant concern. Mixed-multimer formation could potentially lead to results that bare no resemblance to the original mixture. Conversely, ESI-MS has continually reflected subtle differences between natural organic matter mixtures that are in agreement with prediction or theory. Knowing the real limitations of the technique is therefore critical to avoiding both over-interpretation and unwarranted skepticism. Here, data were collected on four mass spectrometers under a battery of conditions. Results indicate that formation of unrepresentative ions cannot entirely be ruled out, but non-covalent multimers do not appear to make a major contribution to typical natural organic matter spectra based on collision-induced dissociation results. Multimers also appear notably reduced when a cooling gas is present in the accumulation region of the mass spectrometer. For less complex mixtures, the choice of spray solvent can make a difference, but generally spectrum cleanliness (i.e. representativeness) comes at the price of increased selectivity.

  1. Adsorption and desorption of mixtures of organic vapors on beaded activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyan; Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Fayaz, Mohammadreza; Hashisho, Zaher; Philips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2012-08-07

    In this study, adsorption and desorption of mixtures of organic compounds commonly emitted from automotive painting operations were experimentally studied. A mixture of two alkanes and a mixture of eight organic compounds were adsorbed onto beaded activated carbon (BAC) and then thermally desorbed under nitrogen. Following both adsorption and regeneration, samples of the BAC were chemically extracted. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to quantify the compounds in the adsorption and desorption gas streams and in the BAC extracts. In general, for both adsorbate mixtures, competitive adsorption resulted in displacing low boiling point compounds by high boiling point compounds during adsorption. In addition to boiling point, adsorbate structure and functionality affected adsorption dynamics. High boiling point compounds such as n-decane and 2,2-dimethylpropylbenzene were not completely desorbed after three hours regeneration at 288 °C indicating that these two compounds contributed to heel accumulation on the BAC. Additional compounds not present in the mixtures were detected in the extract of regenerated BAC possibly due to decomposition or other reactions during regeneration. Closure analysis based on breakthrough curves, solvent extraction of BAC and mass balance on the reactor provided consistent results of the amount of adsorbates on the BAC after adsorption and/or regeneration.

  2. Water uptake of multicomponent organic mixtures and their influence on hygroscopicity of inorganic salts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Jing, Bo; Guo, Yucong; Li, Junling; Tong, Shengrui; Zhang, Yunhong; Ge, Maofa

    2016-07-01

    The hygroscopic behaviors of atmospherically relevant multicomponent water soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) and their effects on ammonium sulfate (AS) and sodium chloride were investigated using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) in the relative humidity (RH) range of 5%-90%. The measured hygroscopic growth was compared with predictions from the Extended-Aerosol Inorganics Model (E-AIM) and Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) method. The equal mass multicomponent WSOCs mixture containing levoglucosan, succinic acid, phthalic acid and humic acid showed gradual water uptake without obvious phase change over the whole RH range. It was found that the organic content played an important role in the water uptake of mixed particles. When organic content was dominant in the mixture (75%), the measured hygroscopic growth was higher than predictions from the E-AIM or ZSR relation, especially under high RH conditions. For mass fractions of organics not larger than 50%, the hygroscopic growth of mixtures was in good agreement with model predictions. The influence of interactions between inorganic and organic components on the hygroscopicity of mixed particles was related to the salt type and organic content. These results could contribute to understanding of the hygroscopic behaviors of multicomponent aerosol particles.

  3. Azeotropic distillation assisted fabrication of silver nanocages and their catalytic property for reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Min, Jianzhong; Wang, Fei; Cai, Yunliang; Liang, Shuai; Zhang, Zhenwei; Jiang, Xingmao

    2015-01-14

    Monodisperse silver nanocages (AgNCs) with specific interiors were successfully synthesized by an azeotropic distillation (AD) assisted method and exhibited excellent catalytic activities for reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) into 4-aminophenol (4-AP) due to the unique hollow morphology and small thickness of the silver shell.

  4. Improved AIOMFAC model parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients for aqueous organic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbavale, G.; Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2014-06-01

    This study presents a new, improved parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients in the AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) model applicable for aqueous as well as water-free organic solutions. For electrolyte-free organic and organic-water mixtures the AIOMFAC model uses a group-contribution approach based on UNIFAC (UNIversal quasi-chemical Functional-group Activity Coefficients). This group-contribution approach explicitly accounts for interactions among organic functional groups and between organic functional groups and water. The previous AIOMFAC version uses a simple parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients, aimed to be applicable in the temperature range from ~275 to ~400 K. With the goal to improve the description of a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend the AIOMFAC parameterisation for the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon to atmospherically relevant low temperatures with the introduction of a new temperature dependence parameterisation. The improved temperature dependence parameterisation is derived from classical thermodynamic theory by describing effects from changes in molar enthalpy and heat capacity of a multicomponent system. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of aqueous organic and water-free organic mixtures from the literature are carefully assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database, covering a wide temperature range (~190 to ~440 K) for many of the functional group combinations considered. Different experimental data types and their processing for the estimation of AIOMFAC model parameters are discussed. The new AIOMFAC parameterisation for the temperature dependence of activity coefficients from low to high temperatures shows an overall improvement of 25% in comparison to

  5. Thermodynamic aspects of phase equilibrium in binary water-organic solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizerovskii, L. N.

    2017-02-01

    It is shown that the boundary curves of liquid equilibria in binary systems characterize the temperature-concentration boundary of the existence of homogeneous mixtures whose formation is not accompanied by changes in the Gibbs energy of the system and are a combination of two branches that do not convert into each other but intersect at the temperature of homogenization of a mixture of critical composition. The phase diagrams of a number of water-organic solvent systems are analyzed to determine the thermodynamic particularities of the latter.

  6. Toxicity of five antibiotics and their mixtures towards photosynthetic aquatic organisms: implications for environmental risk assessment.

    PubMed

    González-Pleiter, Miguel; Gonzalo, Soledad; Rodea-Palomares, Ismael; Leganés, Francisco; Rosal, Roberto; Boltes, Karina; Marco, Eduardo; Fernández-Piñas, Francisca

    2013-04-15

    The individual and combined toxicities of amoxicillin, erythromycin, levofloxacin, norfloxacin and tetracycline have been examined in two organisms representative of the aquatic environment, the cyanobacterium Anabaena CPB4337 as a target organism and the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata as a non-target organism. The cyanobacterium was more sensitive than the green alga to the toxic effect of antibiotics. Erythromycin was highly toxic for both organisms; tetracycline was more toxic to the green algae whereas the quinolones levofloxacin and norfloxacin were more toxic to the cyanobacterium than to the green alga. Amoxicillin also displayed toxicity to the cyanobacterium but showed no toxicity to the green alga. The toxicological interactions of antibiotics in the whole range of effect levels either in binary or multicomponent mixtures were analyzed using the Combination Index (CI) method. In most cases, synergism clearly predominated both for the green alga and the cyanobacterium. The CI method was compared with the classical models of additivity Concentration Addition (CA) and Independent Action (IA) finding that CI could accurately predict deviations from additivity. Risk assessment was performed by calculating the ratio between Measured Environmental Concentration (MEC) and the Predicted No Effect Concentration (PNEC). A MEC/PNEC ratio higher than 1 was found for the binary erythromycin and tetracycline mixture in wastewater effluents, a combination which showed a strong synergism at low effect levels in both organisms. From the tested antibiotic mixtures, it can be concluded that certain specific combinations may pose a potential ecological risk for aquatic ecosystems with the present environmentally measured concentrations.

  7. Comparison of activity coefficient models for atmospheric aerosols containing mixtures of electrolytes, organics, and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Chinghang; Clegg, Simon L.; Seinfeld, John H.

    Atmospheric aerosols generally comprise a mixture of electrolytes, organic compounds, and water. Determining the gas-particle distribution of volatile compounds, including water, requires equilibrium or mass transfer calculations, at the heart of which are models for the activity coefficients of the particle-phase components. We evaluate here the performance of four recent activity coefficient models developed for electrolyte/organic/water mixtures typical of atmospheric aerosols. Two of the models, the CSB model [Clegg, S.L., Seinfeld, J.H., Brimblecombe, P., 2001. Thermodynamic modelling of aqueous aerosols containing electrolytes and dissolved organic compounds. Journal of Aerosol Science 32, 713-738] and the aerosol diameter dependent equilibrium model (ADDEM) [Topping, D.O., McFiggans, G.B., Coe, H., 2005. A curved multi-component aerosol hygroscopicity model framework: part 2—including organic compounds. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 5, 1223-1242] treat ion-water and organic-water interactions but do not include ion-organic interactions; these can be referred to as "decoupled" models. The other two models, reparameterized Ming and Russell model 2005 [Raatikainen, T., Laaksonen, A., 2005. Application of several activity coefficient models to water-organic-electrolyte aerosols of atmospheric interest. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 5, 2475-2495] and X-UNIFAC.3 [Erdakos, G.B., Change, E.I., Pandow, J.F., Seinfeld, J.H., 2006. Prediction of activity coefficients in liquid aerosol particles containing organic compounds, dissolved inorganic salts, and water—Part 3: Organic compounds, water, and ionic constituents by consideration of short-, mid-, and long-range effects using X-UNIFAC.3. Atmospheric Environment 40, 6437-6452], include ion-organic interactions; these are referred to as "coupled" models. We address the question—Does the inclusion of a treatment of ion-organic interactions substantially improve the performance of the coupled models over

  8. Methods of analysis for complex organic aerosol mixtures from urban emission sources of particulate carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurek, M.A. ); Hildemann, L.M. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Cass, G.R.; Rogge, W.F. . Dept. of Environmental Engineering Science); Simoneit, B.R.T. . Coll. of Oceanography)

    1990-04-01

    Extractable organic compounds having between 6 to 40 carbon atoms comprise an important mass fraction of the fine particulate matter samples from major urban emission sources. Depending on the emission source type, this solvent-soluble fraction accounts for <20% to 100% of the total organic aerosol mass, as measured by quantitative high-resolution has chromatography (HRGC) with flame ionization detection. In addition to total extract quantitation, HRGC can be applied to further analyses of the mass distributions of elutable organics present in the complex aerosol extract mixtures, thus generating profiles that serve as fingerprints'' for the sources of interest. This HRGC analytical method is applied to emission source samples that contain between 7 to 12,000 {mu}g/filter organic carbon. It is shown to be a sensitive technique for analysis of carbonaceous aerosol extract mixtures having diverse mass loadings and species distributions. This study describes the analytical chemical methods that have been applied to: the construction of chemical mass balances based on the mass of fine organic aerosol emitted for major urban sources of particulate carbon; and the generation of discrete emission source chemical profiles derived from chromatographic characteristics of the organic aerosol components. 21 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. Modeling the surface tension of complex, reactive organic-inorganic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwier, A. N.; Viglione, G. A.; Li, Z.; McNeill, V. Faye

    2013-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosols can contain thousands of organic compounds which impact aerosol surface tension, affecting aerosol properties such as heterogeneous reactivity, ice nucleation, and cloud droplet formation. We present new experimental data for the surface tension of complex, reactive organic-inorganic aqueous mixtures mimicking tropospheric aerosols. Each solution contained 2-6 organic compounds, including methylglyoxal, glyoxal, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, oxalic acid, succinic acid, leucine, alanine, glycine, and serine, with and without ammonium sulfate. We test two semi-empirical surface tension models and find that most reactive, complex, aqueous organic mixtures which do not contain salt are well described by a weighted Szyszkowski-Langmuir (S-L) model which was first presented by Henning et al. (2005). Two approaches for modeling the effects of salt were tested: (1) the Tuckermann approach (an extension of the Henning model with an additional explicit salt term), and (2) a new implicit method proposed here which employs experimental surface tension data obtained for each organic species in the presence of salt used with the Henning model. We recommend the use of method (2) for surface tension modeling of aerosol systems because the Henning model (using data obtained from organic-inorganic systems) and Tuckermann approach provide similar modeling results and goodness-of-fit (χ2) values, yet the Henning model is a simpler and more physical approach to modeling the effects of salt, requiring less empirically determined parameters.

  10. Predicting the lifetime of organic vapor cartridges exposed to volatile organic compound mixtures using a partial differential equations model.

    PubMed

    Vuong, François; Chauveau, Romain; Grevillot, Georges; Marsteau, Stéphanie; Silvente, Eric; Vallieres, Cécile

    2016-09-01

    In this study, equilibria, breakthrough curves, and breakthrough times were predicted for three binary mixtures of four volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using a model based on partial differential equations of dynamic adsorption coupling a mass balance, a simple Linear Driving Force (LDF) hypothesis to describe the kinetics, and the well-known Extended-Langmuir (EL) equilibrium model. The model aims to predict with a limited complexity, the BTCs of respirator cartridges exposed to binary vapor mixtures from equilibria and kinetics data obtained from single component. In the model, multicomponent mass transfer was simplified to use only single dynamic adsorption data. The EL expression used in this study predicted equilibria with relatively good accuracy for acetone/ethanol and ethanol/cyclohexane mixtures, but the prediction of cyclohexane uptake when mixed with heptane is less satisfactory. The BTCs given by the model were compared to experimental BTCs to determine the accuracy of the model and the impact of the approximation on mass transfer coefficients. From BTCs, breakthrough times at 10% of the exposure concentration t10% were determined. All t10% were predicted within 20% of the experimental values, and 63% of the breakthrough times were predicted within a 10% error. This study demonstrated that a simple mass balance combined with kinetic approximations is sufficient to predict lifetime for respirator cartridges exposed to VOC mixtures. It also showed that a commonly adopted approach to describe multicomponent adsorption based on volatility of VOC rather than adsorption equilibrium greatly overestimated the breakthrough times.

  11. Dual-channel microcantilever heaters for volatile organic compound detection and mixture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahangir, Ifat; Koley, Goutam

    2016-07-01

    We report on novel microcantilever heater sensors with separate AlGaN/GaN heterostructure based heater and sensor channels to perform advanced volatile organic compound (VOC) detection and mixture analysis. Operating without any surface functionalization or treatment, these microcantilevers utilize the strong surface polarization of AlGaN, as well as the unique heater and sensor channel geometries, to perform selective detection of analytes based on their latent heat of evaporation and molecular dipole moment over a wide concentration range with sub-ppm detection limit. The dual-channel microcantilevers have demonstrated much superior sensing behavior compared to the single-channel ones, with the capability to not only identify individual VOCs with much higher specificity, but also uniquely detect them in a generic multi-component mixture of VOCs. In addition, utilizing two different dual channel configurations and sensing modalities, we have been able to quantitatively determine individual analyte concentration in a VOC mixture. An algorithm for complete mixture analysis, with unique identification of components and accurate determination of their concentration, has been presented based on simultaneous operation of an array of these microcantilever heaters in multiple sensing modalities.

  12. Dual-channel microcantilever heaters for volatile organic compound detection and mixture analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jahangir, Ifat; Koley, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    We report on novel microcantilever heater sensors with separate AlGaN/GaN heterostructure based heater and sensor channels to perform advanced volatile organic compound (VOC) detection and mixture analysis. Operating without any surface functionalization or treatment, these microcantilevers utilize the strong surface polarization of AlGaN, as well as the unique heater and sensor channel geometries, to perform selective detection of analytes based on their latent heat of evaporation and molecular dipole moment over a wide concentration range with sub-ppm detection limit. The dual-channel microcantilevers have demonstrated much superior sensing behavior compared to the single-channel ones, with the capability to not only identify individual VOCs with much higher specificity, but also uniquely detect them in a generic multi-component mixture of VOCs. In addition, utilizing two different dual channel configurations and sensing modalities, we have been able to quantitatively determine individual analyte concentration in a VOC mixture. An algorithm for complete mixture analysis, with unique identification of components and accurate determination of their concentration, has been presented based on simultaneous operation of an array of these microcantilever heaters in multiple sensing modalities. PMID:27381318

  13. Pervaporative removal of organics from water using hydrophobic membranes. Binary mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawski, W.

    2000-01-01

    Results of pervaporation experiments are presented for the separation of several polar and nonpolar organic solvents from their aqueous solutions. Three membranes were evaluated: a polydimethylsiloxane (PERVAP-1060) membrane, a PDMS ZSM-5 zeolite filled (PERVAP-1070) membrane, and a poly(ether-block-amide) (PEBAX-4033) membrane. The effect of feed composition on flux and selectivity was also investigated. Performance parameters of a given membrane depended both on the kind of the organic solvent and the feed composition. The PERVAP-1070 membrane exhibited the highest selectivity with a separation factor over 900 in contact with a water-butyl acetate mixture. Polar solvents like methanol were also preferentially separated from aqueous solutions, but the separation factors were close to those obtained from liquid-vapor equilibria data. Permeate fluxes of organics increased with increasing feed concentration. Synergetic effects between water and organics fluxes were also observed.

  14. Secondary organic aerosol formation from ozone reactions with single terpenoids and terpenoid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waring, Michael S.; Wells, J. Raymond; Siegel, Jeffrey A.

    2011-08-01

    Ozone reacts with indoor-emitted terpenoids to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Most SOA research has focused on ozone reactions with single terpenoids or with consumer products, and this paper reports the results from an investigation of SOA formation from ozone reactions with both single terpenoids and mixtures of D-limonene, α-pinene, and α-terpineol. Transient experiments were conducted at low (25 ppb) and high (100 ppb) initial concentrations of ozone. The three terpenoids were tested singly and in combinations in a manner that controlled for their different reaction rates with ozone. The SOA formation was assessed by examining the evolution in time of the resulting number size-distributions and estimates of the mass concentrations. The results suggest that at higher ozone and terpenoid concentrations, SOA number formation follows a linear trend as a function of the initial rate of reaction. This finding was valid for both single terpenoids and mixtures. Generally speaking, higher ozone and terpenoid concentrations also led to larger geometric mean diameters and smaller geometric standard deviations of fitted lognormal distributions of the formed SOA. By assuming a density, mass concentrations were also assessed and did not follow as consistent of a trend. At low ozone concentration conditions, reactions with only D-limonene yielded the largest number concentrations of any experiment, even more than experiments with mixtures containing D-limonene and much higher overall terpenoid concentrations. This finding was not seen for high ozone concentrations. These experiments demonstrate quantifiable trends for SOA forming reactions of ozone and mixtures, and this work provides a framework for expanding these results to more complex mixtures and consumer products.

  15. Desolventizing of Jatropha curcas oil from azeotropes of solvents using ceramic membranes.

    PubMed

    Carniel, Naira; Zabot, Giovani L; Paliga, Marshall; Mignoni, Marcelo L; Mazutti, Marcio A; Priamo, Wagner L; Oliveira, J V; Di Luccio, Marco; Tres, Marcus V

    2017-02-03

    The separation of Jatropha curcas oil from azeotropes of ethyl alcohol-n-hexane and isopropyl alcohol-n-hexane using ceramic membranes with different cutoffs (5, 10 and 20 kDa) is presented. The mass ratios of oil:azeotropes (O:S) studied were 1:3 for feeding pressures of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 MPa, and 1:1 for the feeding pressure of 0.1 MPa. Isopropyl alcohol was the best solvent for the membranes conditioning to permeate n-hexane (240 kg/m(2 )h). In the separation of J. curcas oil and azeotropes of solvents, both membranes showed oil retention and total flux decreases with time. Overall, the lowest decrease in the retentions was reached in the 5 kDa membrane, while the lowest decrease in the total flux was reached in the 20 kDa. In the separation of oil and ethyl alcohol-n-hexane azeotrope, the best retention at 60 min of the process was equal to 17.3 wt% in the 20 kDa membrane at 0.3 MPa and O:S ratio equalled to 1:3. In this condition, the total permeate flux was 17.5 kg/m(2) h. Different retentions and permeabilities are provided when changing the O:S ratio, the feeding pressure and the molecular weight cutoff of membranes.

  16. Energy transfer studies in binary laser dye mixtures in organically modified silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Maliki, Firas J.

    2014-08-01

    Energy transfer of binary dye mixture (Rhodamine110, as donor, and Oxizine1and/or Nile blue as acceptors) doped in organically modified silicates (ORMOSILs) matrix has been studied. The energy transfer process from donor molecules to acceptor molecules in the final bulk samples has been observed spectrally. Some of energy transfer parameters have been determined as a function of acceptor concentration. Stern-Volmer relation of energy transfer has been proved and the dominant mechanism of the energy transfer of dye mixture doped in such matrices has been determined. The results show that the emission properties of acceptor molecules (Ox1 and Nb) can be enhanced using the dye mixing recipe in sol-gel matrices.

  17. Organic biowastes blend selection for composting industrial eggshell by-product: experimental and statistical mixture design.

    PubMed

    Soares, Micaela A R; Andrade, Sandra R; Martins, Rui C; Quina, Margarida J; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M

    2012-01-01

    Composting is one of the technologies recommended for pre-treating industrial eggshells (ES) before its application in soils, for calcium recycling. However, due to the high inorganic content of ES, a mixture of biodegradable materials is required to assure a successful procedure. In this study, an adequate organic blend composition containing potato peel (PP), grass clippings (GC) and wheat straw (WS) was determined by applying the simplex-centroid mixture design method to achieve a desired moisture content, carbon: nitrogen ratio and free air space for effective composting of ES. A blend of 56% PP, 37% GC and 7% WS was selected and tested in a self heating reactor, where 10% (w/w) of ES was incorporated. After 29 days of reactor operation, a dry matter reduction of 46% was achieved and thermophilic temperatures were maintained during 15 days, indicating that the blend selected by statistical approach was adequate for composting of ES.

  18. Improved AIOMFAC model parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients for aqueous organic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbavale, G.; Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a new, improved parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients in the AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) model applicable for aqueous as well as water-free organic solutions. For electrolyte-free organic and organic-water mixtures the AIOMFAC model uses a group-contribution approach based on UNIFAC (UNIversal quasi-chemical Functional-group Activity Coefficients). This group-contribution approach explicitly accounts for interactions among organic functional groups and between organic functional groups and water. The previous AIOMFAC version uses a simple parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients, aimed to be applicable in the temperature range from ~ 275 to ~ 400 K. With the goal to improve the description of a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend the AIOMFAC parameterisation for the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon to atmospherically relevant low temperatures. To this end we introduce a new parameterisation for the temperature dependence. The improved temperature dependence parameterisation is derived from classical thermodynamic theory by describing effects from changes in molar enthalpy and heat capacity of a multi-component system. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of aqueous organic and water-free organic mixtures from the literature are carefully assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database, covering a wide temperature range (~ 190 to ~ 440 K) for many of the functional group combinations considered. Different experimental data types and their processing for the estimation of AIOMFAC model parameters are discussed. The new AIOMFAC parameterisation for the temperature dependence of activity coefficients from low to high temperatures shows an overall improvement of 28% in

  19. Effect of some organic solvent-water mixtures composition on precipitated calcium carbonate in carbonation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopacka-Łyskawa, Donata; Kościelska, Barbara; Karczewski, Jakub

    2015-05-01

    Precipitated calcium carbonate particles were obtained during carbonation of calcium hydroxide slurry with carbon dioxide. Aqueous solutions of isopropyl alcohol, n-butanol and glycerol were used as solvents. Concentration of organic additives in the reactive mixture was from 0% to 20% (vol). Precipitation process were performed in a stirred tank reactor equipped with gas distributor. Multimodal courses of particles size distribution were determined for produced CaCO3 particles. Calcium carbonate as calcite was precipitated in all experiments. The mean Sauter diameter of CaCO3 particles decreased when the concentration of all used organic additives increased. The amount of small particle fraction in the product increased with the increasing concentration of organic solvents. Similar physical properties of used liquid phase resulted in the similar characteristics of obtained particles.

  20. Hygroscopic behavior of multicomponent organic aerosols and their internal mixtures with ammonium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, B.; Tong, S. R.; Liu, Q. F.; Li, K.; Wang, W. G.; Zhang, Y. H.; Ge, M. F.

    2015-08-01

    Water soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) are important components of organics in the atmospheric fine particulate matter. Although WSOCs play an important role in the hygroscopicity of aerosols, water uptake behavior of internally mixed WSOC aerosols remains limited characterization. Here, the hygroscopic properties of single component such as levoglucosan, oxalic acid, malonic acid, succinic acid and phthalic acid and multicomponent WSOC aerosols mainly involving oxalic acid are investigated with the hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). The coexisting hygroscopic species including levoglucosan, malonic acid and phthalic acid have strong influence on the hygroscopic growth and phase behavior of oxalic acid, even suppress its crystallization completely. The interactions between oxalic acid and levoglucosan are confirmed by infrared spectra. The discrepancies between measured growth factors and predictions from Extended Aerosol Inorganics Model (E-AIM) with UNIFAC method and Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) approach increase at medium and high relative humidity (RH) assuming oxalic acid in a solid state. For the internal mixture of oxalic acid with levoglucosan or succinic acid, there is enhanced water uptake at high RH due to positive chemical interactions between solutes. Organic mixture has more complex effect on the hygroscopicity of ammonium sulfate than single species. Although hygroscopic species such as levoglucosan accounts for a small fraction in the multicomponent aerosols, they may still strongly influence the hygroscopic behavior of ammonium sulfate by changing phase state of oxalic acid which plays the role of "intermediate" species. Considering the abundance of oxalic acid in the atmospheric aerosols, its mixtures with hygroscopic species may significantly promote water uptake under high RH conditions and thus affect the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, optical properties and chemical reactivity of atmospheric particles.

  1. Hygroscopic behavior of multicomponent organic aerosols and their internal mixtures with ammonium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Bo; Tong, Shengrui; Liu, Qifan; Li, Kun; Wang, Weigang; Zhang, Yunhong; Ge, Maofa

    2016-03-01

    Water-soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) are important components of organics in the atmospheric fine particulate matter. Although WSOCs play an important role in the hygroscopicity of aerosols, knowledge on the water uptake behavior of internally mixed WSOC aerosols remains limited. Here, the hygroscopic properties of single components such as levoglucosan, oxalic acid, malonic acid, succinic acid, phthalic acid, and multicomponent WSOC aerosols mainly involving oxalic acid are investigated with the hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). The coexisting hygroscopic species including levoglucosan, malonic acid, and phthalic acid have a strong influence on the hygroscopic growth and phase behavior of oxalic acid, even suppressing its crystallization completely during the drying process. The phase behaviors of oxalic acid/levoglucosan mixed particles are confirmed by infrared spectra. The discrepancies between measured growth factors and predictions from Extended Aerosol Inorganics Model (E-AIM) with the Universal Quasi-Chemical Functional Group Activity Coefficient (UNIFAC) method and Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) approach increase at medium and high relative humidity (RH) assuming oxalic acid in a crystalline solid state. For the internal mixture of oxalic acid with levoglucosan or succinic acid, there is enhanced water uptake at high RH compared to the model predictions based on reasonable oxalic acid phase assumption. Organic mixture has more complex effects on the hygroscopicity of ammonium sulfate than single species. Although hygroscopic species such as levoglucosan account for a small fraction in the multicomponent aerosols, they may still strongly influence the hygroscopic behavior of ammonium sulfate by changing the phase state of oxalic acid which plays the role of "intermediate" species. Considering the abundance of oxalic acid in the atmospheric aerosols, its mixtures with hygroscopic species may significantly promote water uptake

  2. Enabling the identification, quantification, and characterization of organics in complex mixtures to understand atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacman, Gabriel Avram

    Particles in the atmosphere are known to have negative health effects and important but highly uncertain impacts on global and regional climate. A majority of this particulate matter is formed through atmospheric oxidation of naturally and anthropogenically emitted gases to yield highly oxygenated secondary organic aerosol (SOA), an amalgamation of thousands of individual chemical compounds. However, comprehensive analysis of SOA composition has been stymied by its complexity and lack of available measurement techniques. In this work, novel instrumentation, analysis methods, and conceptual frameworks are introduced for chemically characterizing atmospherically relevant mixtures and ambient aerosols, providing a fundamentally new level of detailed knowledge on their structures, chemical properties, and identification of their components. This chemical information is used to gain insights into the formation, transformation and oxidation of organic aerosols. Biogenic and anthropogenic mixtures are observed in this work to yield incredible complexity upon oxidation, producing over 100 separable compounds from a single precursor. As a first step toward unraveling this complexity, a method was developed for measuring the polarity and volatility of individual compounds in a complex mixture using two-dimensional gas chromatography, which is demonstrated in Chapter 2 for describing the oxidation of SOA formed from a biogenic compound (longifolene: C15H24). Several major products and tens of substantial minor products were produced, but none could be identified by traditional methods or have ever been isolated and studied in the laboratory. A major realization of this work was that soft ionization mass spectrometry could be used to identify the molecular mass and formula of these unidentified compounds, a major step toward a comprehensive description of complex mixtures. This was achieved by coupling gas chromatography to high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry with

  3. Simultaneous Detection of Genetically Modified Organisms in a Mixture by Multiplex PCR-Chip Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Supriya; Dasari, Srikanth; Bhagavatula, Krishna; Mueller, Steffen; Deepak, Saligrama Adavigowda; Ghosh, Sudip; Basak, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    An efficient PCR-based method to trace genetically modified food and feed products is in demand due to regulatory requirements and contaminant issues in India. However, post-PCR detection with conventional methods has limited sensitivity in amplicon separation that is crucial in multiplexing. The study aimed to develop a sensitive post-PCR detection method by using PCR-chip capillary electrophoresis (PCR-CCE) to detect and identify specific genetically modified organisms in their genomic DNA mixture by targeting event-specific nucleotide sequences. Using the PCR-CCE approach, novel multiplex methods were developed to detect MON531 cotton, EH 92-527-1 potato, Bt176 maize, GT73 canola, or GA21 maize simultaneously when their genomic DNAs in mixtures were amplified using their primer mixture. The repeatability RSD (RSDr) of the peak migration time was 0.06 and 3.88% for the MON531 and Bt176, respectively. The RSD (RSDR) of the Cry1Ac peak ranged from 0.12 to 0.40% in multiplex methods. The method was sensitive in resolving amplicon of size difference up to 4 bp. The PCR-CCE method is suitable to detect multiple genetically modified events in a composite DNA sample by tagging their event specific sequences.

  4. A non-ideal model for predicting the effect of dissolved salt on the flash point of solvent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Horng-Jang; Wang, Tzu-Ai

    2007-03-06

    Flash point is one of the major quantities used to characterize the fire and explosion hazard of liquids. Herein, a liquid with dissolved salt is presented in a salt-distillation process for separating close-boiling or azeotropic systems. The addition of salts to a liquid may reduce fire and explosion hazard. In this study, we have modified a previously proposed model for predicting the flash point of miscible mixtures to extend its application to solvent/salt mixtures. This modified model was verified by comparison with the experimental data for organic solvent/salt and aqueous-organic solvent/salt mixtures to confirm its efficacy in terms of prediction of the flash points of these mixtures. The experimental results confirm marked increases in liquid flash point increment with addition of inorganic salts relative to supplementation with equivalent quantities of water. Based on this evidence, it appears reasonable to suggest potential application for the model in assessment of the fire and explosion hazard for solvent/salt mixtures and, further, that addition of inorganic salts may prove useful for hazard reduction in flammable liquids.

  5. Personal Exposure to Mixtures of Volatile Organic Compounds: Modeling and Further Analysis of the RIOPA Data

    PubMed Central

    Batterman, Stuart; Su, Feng-Chiao; Li, Shi; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Jia, Chunrong

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Emission sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are numerous and widespread in both indoor and outdoor environments. Concentrations of VOCs indoors typically exceed outdoor levels, and most people spend nearly 90% of their time indoors. Thus, indoor sources generally contribute the majority of VOC exposures for most people. VOC exposure has been associated with a wide range of acute and chronic health effects; for example, asthma, respiratory diseases, liver and kidney dysfunction, neurologic impairment, and cancer. Although exposures to most VOCs for most persons fall below health-based guidelines, and long-term trends show decreases in ambient emissions and concentrations, a subset of individuals experience much higher exposures that exceed guidelines. Thus, exposure to VOCs remains an important environmental health concern. The present understanding of VOC exposures is incomplete. With the exception of a few compounds, concentration and especially exposure data are limited; and like other environmental data, VOC exposure data can show multiple modes, low and high extreme values, and sometimes a large portion of data below method detection limits (MDLs). Field data also show considerable spatial or interpersonal variability, and although evidence is limited, temporal variability seems high. These characteristics can complicate modeling and other analyses aimed at risk assessment, policy actions, and exposure management. In addition to these analytic and statistical issues, exposure typically occurs as a mixture, and mixture components may interact or jointly contribute to adverse effects. However most pollutant regulations, guidelines, and studies remain focused on single compounds, and thus may underestimate cumulative exposures and risks arising from coexposures. In addition, the composition of VOC mixtures has not been thoroughly investigated, and mixture components show varying and complex dependencies. Finally, although many factors are

  6. Characterization of secondary organic aerosol generated from ozonolysis of α-pinene mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Hardik S.; Hatfield, Meagan L.; Huff Hartz, Kara E.

    2013-03-01

    In the atmosphere, multiple volatile organic compounds (VOCs) co-exist, and they can be oxidized concurrently and generate secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this work, SOA is formed by the oxidation (in presence of excess ozone) of mixtures containing α-pinene and other VOCs. The VOC mixtures were made so their composition approached a commercially-available α-pinene-based essential oil, Siberian fir needle oil. The SOA products were sampled using filters, solvent extracted and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with trimethylsilyl derivatization. The individual product yields for SOA generated from α-pinene changed upon the addition of other VOCs. An increase in concentration of non-reactive VOCs (bornyl acetate, camphene, and borneol) lead to a decrease in individual product yields of characteristic α-pinene SOA products. Although these experiments were carried out under higher VOC and ozone concentrations in comparison to the atmosphere, this work suggests that the role of non-reactive VOCs should be explored in SOA products formation.

  7. Modeling sorption of neutral organic compound mixtures to simulated aquifer sorbents with pseudocompounds.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jin Chul; Shackelford, Charles D; Reardon, Kenneth F

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of the ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) in reducing the complexity associated with predicting the sorption behaviors of 12 neutral organic compounds (NOCs) contained in complex mixtures as a fewer number (four to six) of pseudocompounds (groups of compounds) to simulated aquifer sorbents was investigated. All sorption isotherms from individual- and multiple-pseudocompound systems were fit reasonably well ( ≥ 0.953) by the Freundlich sorption model over the range of aqueous concentrations evaluated (i.e., ≤200 μmol L). The presence and magnitude of mutual competition among pseudocompounds varied depending on the composition of the mixtures (i.e., concentrations and polarities of pseudocompounds) and the properties of sorbents (i.e., the fraction of organic carbon and the availability of hydrophilic specific sorption sites). Finally, comparisons between the IAST-based predictions with individual-pseudocompound sorption parameters and experimentally measured data revealed that the accuracy in predicting the sorption behaviors of several NOCs in terms of a fewer number of pseudocompounds decreased with increasing deviations from the assumption of equal and ideal competition in the IAST (i.e., differential availability of sorption sites and nonideal competitions among pseudocompounds).

  8. Phase behavior of skin lipid mixtures: the effect of cholesterol on lipid organization.

    PubMed

    Mojumdar, E H; Gooris, G S; Bouwstra, J A

    2015-06-07

    The lipid matrix in the stratum corneum (SC), the upper layer of the skin, plays a critical role in the skin barrier. The matrix consists of ceramides (CERs), cholesterol (CHOL) and free fatty acids (FFAs). In human SC, these lipids form two coexisting crystalline lamellar phases with periodicities of approximately 6 and 13 nm. In the studies reported here, we investigated the effect of CHOL on lipid organization in each of these lamellar phases separately. For this purpose, we used lipid model mixtures. Our studies revealed that CHOL is imperative for the formation of each of the lamellar phases. At low CHOL levels, the formation of the lamellar phases was dramatically changed: a minimum 0.2 CHOL level in the CER/CHOL/FFA (1 : 0.2 : 1) mixture is required for the formation of each of the lamellar phases. Furthermore, CHOL enhances the formation of the highly dense orthorhombic lateral packing. The gradual increment of CHOL increases the fraction of lipids forming the very dense orthorhombic lateral packing. Therefore, these studies demonstrate that CHOL is an indispensable component of the SC lipid matrix and is of fundamental importance for appropriate dense lipid organization and thus important for the skin barrier function.

  9. Organic tank safety project: Preliminary results of energetics and thermal behavior studies of model organic nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures and a simulated organic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Sell, R.L.; Sobolik, J.L.; Burger, L.L.

    1995-08-01

    As a result of years of production and recovery of nuclear defense materials and subsequent waste management at the Hanford Site, organic-bearing radioactive high-level wastes (HLW) are currently stored in large (up to 3. ML) single-shell storage tanks (SSTs). Because these wastes contain both fuels (organics) and the oxidants nitrate and nitrite, rapid energetic reactions at certain conditions could occur. In support of Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) efforts to ensure continued safe storage of these organic- and oxidant-bearing wastes and to define the conditions necessary for reactions to occur, we measured the thermal sensitivities and thermochemical and thermokinetic properties of mixtures of selected organics and sodium nitrate and/or nitrite and a simulated Hanford organic-bearing waste using thermoanalytical technologies. These thermoanalytical technologies are used by chemical reactivity hazards evaluation organizations within the chemical industry to assess chemical reaction hazards.

  10. Spectroscopic characterization of organic matter of a soil and vinasse mixture during aerobic or anaerobic incubation

    SciTech Connect

    Doelsch, Emmanuel Masion, Armand; Cazevieille, Patrick

    2009-06-15

    Mineralization potentials are often used to classify organic wastes. These methods involve measuring CO{sub 2} production during batch experiments, so variations in chemical compounds are not addressed. Moreover, the physicochemical conditions are not monitored during the reactions. The present study was designed to address these deficiencies. Incubations of a mixture of soil and waste (vinasse at 20% dry matter from a fermentation industry) were conducted in aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and liquid samples obtained by centrifugation were collected at 2 h, 1 d and 28 d. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) patterns highlighted that: there was a 'soil effect' which increased organic matter (OM) degradation in all conditions compared to vinasse incubated alone; and OM degradation was faster under aerobic conditions since 500 mg kg{sup -1} of C remained after aerobic incubation, as compared to 4000 mg kg{sup -1} at the end of the anaerobic incubation period. No changes were detected by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) between 2 h and 1 d incubation. At 28 days incubation, the FTIR signal of the aerobic samples was deeply modified, thus confirming the high OM degradation. Under anaerobic conditions, the main polysaccharide contributions ({nu}(C-O)) disappeared at 1000 and 1200 cm{sup -1}, as also confirmed by the {sup 13}C NMR findings. Under aerobic incubation, a 50% decrease in the polysaccharide proportion was observed. Under anaerobic conditions, significant chemical modifications of the organic fraction were detected, namely formation of low molecular weight organic acids.

  11. Single- and mixture toxicity of three organic UV-filters, ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate, octocrylene, and avobenzone on Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang-Beom; Jang, Jiyi; Kim, Sanghun; Kim, Young Jun

    2017-03-01

    In freshwater environments, aquatic organisms are generally exposed to mixtures of various chemical substances. In this study, we tested the toxicity of three organic UV-filters (ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate, octocrylene, and avobenzone) to Daphnia magna in order to evaluate the combined toxicity of these substances when in they occur in a mixture. The values of effective concentrations (ECx) for each UV-filter were calculated by concentration-response curves; concentration-combinations of three different UV-filters in a mixture were determined by the fraction of components based on EC25 values predicted by concentration addition (CA) model. The interaction between the UV-filters were also assessed by model deviation ratio (MDR) using observed and predicted toxicity values obtained from mixture-exposure tests and CA model. The results from this study indicated that observed ECxmix (e.g., EC10mix, EC25mix, or EC50mix) values obtained from mixture-exposure tests were higher than predicted ECxmix (e.g., EC10mix, EC25mix, or EC50mix) values calculated by CA model. MDR values were also less than a factor of 1.0 in a mixtures of three different UV-filters. Based on these results, we suggest for the first time a reduction of toxic effects in the mixtures of three UV-filters, caused by antagonistic action of the components. Our findings from this study will provide important information for hazard or risk assessment of organic UV-filters, when they existed together in the aquatic environment. To better understand the mixture toxicity and the interaction of components in a mixture, further studies for various combinations of mixture components are also required.

  12. Importance of Aqueous-phase Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Aromatics in an Atmospheric Hydrocarbon Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, H. M.; Carlton, A. G.; Vizuete, W.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, Y.; Chen, E.; Kamens, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    Two new secondary organic aerosol (SOA) modeling frameworks are developed, one based on an aromatic gas and particle-phase kinetic mechanism and another based on a parameterized SOA model used in conjunction with an underlying gas-phase mechanism, both of which simulate SOA formation through partitioning to two stable liquid phases: one hydrophilic containing particle aqueous-phase and the other hydrophobic comprising mainly organic components. The models were evaluated against outdoor smog chamber experiments with different combinations of initial toluene, o-xylene, p-xylene, toluene and xylene mixtures, NOx, non-SOA-forming hydrocarbon mixture, initial seed type, and humidity. Aerosol data for experiments with either ammonium sulfate or initial background seed particles, in the presence of an atmospheric hydrocarbon mixture, NOx and in sunlight under a dry atmosphere (RH = 6 to 10%) show reduced SOA formation when compared to experiments with similar initial gas and particle concentrations at higher relative humidities (RH = 40 to 90%). Both frameworks simulated reasonable fits to the total observed SOA concentrations under all conditions. For both dry and wet experiments with low initial seed, semi-volatile product partitioning in particle organic-phase is mass-transfer limited and is modeled using a dynamic gas-particle partitioning algorithm with accommodation coefficient as the primary pseudo-transport parameter. Further, the modeled SOA product distributions for both frameworks clearly show the importance of the contribution of aqueous-phase SOA particularly under conditions of low initial seed concentrations and high-humidity. For both models, under these conditions, aqueous-phase SOA from uptake of glyoxal, methylglyoxal and related polar products to particle water phase dominates as compared to the partitioning of semi-volatiles to particle organic phase. Interestingly, both the kinetic and parameterized SOA frameworks simulate similar amounts of aqueous

  13. Multi-atlas segmentation for abdominal organs with Gaussian mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Ryan P.; Xu, Zhoubing; Lee, Christopher P.; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Abramson, Richard G.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal organ segmentation with clinically acquired computed tomography (CT) is drawing increasing interest in the medical imaging community. Gaussian mixture models (GMM) have been extensively used through medical segmentation, most notably in the brain for cerebrospinal fluid / gray matter / white matter differentiation. Because abdominal CT exhibit strong localized intensity characteristics, GMM have recently been incorporated in multi-stage abdominal segmentation algorithms. In the context of variable abdominal anatomy and rich algorithms, it is difficult to assess the marginal contribution of GMM. Herein, we characterize the efficacy of an a posteriori framework that integrates GMM of organ-wise intensity likelihood with spatial priors from multiple target-specific registered labels. In our study, we first manually labeled 100 CT images. Then, we assigned 40 images to use as training data for constructing target-specific spatial priors and intensity likelihoods. The remaining 60 images were evaluated as test targets for segmenting 12 abdominal organs. The overlap between the true and the automatic segmentations was measured by Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). A median improvement of 145% was achieved by integrating the GMM intensity likelihood against the specific spatial prior. The proposed framework opens the opportunities for abdominal organ segmentation by efficiently using both the spatial and appearance information from the atlases, and creates a benchmark for large-scale automatic abdominal segmentation.

  14. Multi-Atlas Segmentation for Abdominal Organs with Gaussian Mixture Models.

    PubMed

    Burke, Ryan P; Xu, Zhoubing; Lee, Christopher P; Baucom, Rebeccah B; Poulose, Benjamin K; Abramson, Richard G; Landman, Bennett A

    2015-03-17

    Abdominal organ segmentation with clinically acquired computed tomography (CT) is drawing increasing interest in the medical imaging community. Gaussian mixture models (GMM) have been extensively used through medical segmentation, most notably in the brain for cerebrospinal fluid/gray matter/white matter differentiation. Because abdominal CT exhibit strong localized intensity characteristics, GMM have recently been incorporated in multi-stage abdominal segmentation algorithms. In the context of variable abdominal anatomy and rich algorithms, it is difficult to assess the marginal contribution of GMM. Herein, we characterize the efficacy of an a posteriori framework that integrates GMM of organ-wise intensity likelihood with spatial priors from multiple target-specific registered labels. In our study, we first manually labeled 100 CT images. Then, we assigned 40 images to use as training data for constructing target-specific spatial priors and intensity likelihoods. The remaining 60 images were evaluated as test targets for segmenting 12 abdominal organs. The overlap between the true and the automatic segmentations was measured by Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). A median improvement of 145% was achieved by integrating the GMM intensity likelihood against the specific spatial prior. The proposed framework opens the opportunities for abdominal organ segmentation by efficiently using both the spatial and appearance information from the atlases, and creates a benchmark for large-scale automatic abdominal segmentation.

  15. Residue organic mixtures from drinking water show in vitro mutagenic and transforming activity.

    PubMed

    Loper, J C; Lang, D R; Schoeny, R S; Richmond, B B; Gallagher, P M; Smith, C C

    1978-01-01

    Indications of possible health effects of residue organics in drinking water have been sought using short-term tests of mutagenic and transforming activity. Ten percent or less of the total organic material in drinking water has been identified; the remainder is believed to include thousands of unknown nonvolatile compounds. Residual organics were concentrated from drinking water from representative U.S. cities by reverse osmosis followed by liquid-liquid extraction [yielding the reverse osmosis concentrate-organic extract (ROC-OE) fraction] and sorption-desorption on XAD-2 resin. Samples of these residue organics were provided by the Environmental Protection Agency for bioassay. They were examined for mutagenic activity by using Salmonella tester strains (primarily TA98 and TA100) and for transforming activity by using mouse fibroblasts (BALB/3T3 clone 1-13). City-specific patterns of dose-dependent bacterial mutagenesis and of bacterial toxicity were observed for these samples and for subfractions generated by sequential extractions with hexane, ethyl ether, and acetone. Mutagenic effects were essentially independent of a microsome activation system prepared from liver of Aroclor 1254-induced rats. On the basis of strain-specific effects in mutagenesis and differential distributions of mutagenic activity during liquid-liquid extraction, at least some of the active compounds are thought to be acidic, frameshift mutagens. The ROC-OE fraction of a New Orleans sample transformed BALB/3T3 cells in replicate experiments. By comparison with the bacterial mutagenesis data, cell transformation is a relatively sensitive method for detecting possible mutagenic and carcinogenic activity in this sample. The appropriateness of these systems for the assay of complex mixtures and the degree to which reverse osmosis concentrates contain the unaltered organic compounds in the original samples are discussed.

  16. Decrease in the abundance and viability of oceanic phytoplankton due to trace levels of complex mixtures of organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Echeveste, Pedro; Dachs, Jordi; Berrojalbiz, Naiara; Agustí, Susana

    2010-09-01

    Long range atmospheric transport and deposition is a significant introduction pathway of organic pollutants to remote oceanic regions, leading to their subsequent accumulation in marine organisms. Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) bioconcentrate in planktonic food webs and these exert a biogeochemical control on the regional and global cycling of POPs. Therefore, an important issue is to determine whether the anthropogenic chemical perturbation of the biosphere introduced by the myriad of organic pollutants present in seawater influences phytoplankton abundance and productivity. The results reported here from five sets of experiments performed in the NE Atlantic Ocean show that there is a toxic effect induced by trace levels of complex mixtures of organic pollutants on phytoplankton oceanic communities. The levels of single pollutant, such as phenanthrene and pyrene, at which lethality of phytoplankton is observed are high in comparison to field levels. Complex mixtures of organic pollutants, however, have an important toxic effect on phytoplankton abundances, viability and concentrations of Chlorophyll a at pollutant concentrations 20-40 folds those found in the open ocean. The toxicity of these complex mixtures of organic pollutants exceeds by 10(3) times the toxicity expected for a single pollutant. Therefore, our results point out the need for a systematic investigation of the influence of complex mixtures of organic hydrophobic pollutants to oceanic phytoplankton communities, a perturbation not accounted for on previous assessments of anthropogenic pressures in the marine environment.

  17. Linking in Vitro Effects and Detected Organic Micropollutants in Surface Water Using Mixture-Toxicity Modeling.

    PubMed

    Neale, Peta A; Ait-Aissa, Selim; Brack, Werner; Creusot, Nicolas; Denison, Michael S; Deutschmann, Björn; Hilscherová, Klára; Hollert, Henner; Krauss, Martin; Novák, Jiří; Schulze, Tobias; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Serra, Helene; Shao, Ying; Escher, Beate I

    2015-12-15

    Surface water can contain countless organic micropollutants, and targeted chemical analysis alone may only detect a small fraction of the chemicals present. Consequently, bioanalytical tools can be applied complementary to chemical analysis to detect the effects of complex chemical mixtures. In this study, bioassays indicative of activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR), activation of the estrogen receptor (ER), adaptive stress responses to oxidative stress (Nrf2), genotoxicity (p53) and inflammation (NF-κB) and the fish embryo toxicity test were applied along with chemical analysis to water extracts from the Danube River. Mixture-toxicity modeling was applied to determine the contribution of detected chemicals to the biological effect. Effect concentrations for between 0 to 13 detected chemicals could be found in the literature for the different bioassays. Detected chemicals explained less than 0.2% of the biological effect in the PXR activation, adaptive stress response, and fish embryo toxicity assays, while five chemicals explained up to 80% of ER activation, and three chemicals explained up to 71% of AhR activation. This study highlights the importance of fingerprinting the effects of detected chemicals.

  18. Use of partition models to evaluate guidelines for mixtures of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Hau, K M; Connell, D W; Richardson, B J

    2000-08-01

    Partition models based on the octanol-air parition coefficients and associated quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) have been developed to describe the triggering of odor response and nasal irritation by common volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This study made use of the QSARs developed by Hau and Connell (1998, Indoor Air 8, 23-33) and Hau et al. (1999, Toxicol. Sci. 47, 93-98) to evaluate risk-based guidelines on the airborne concentrations of common VOCs in the nonindustrial environment. A new concept referred to as the "apparent internal threshold concentration" was developed for evaluating the odor and nasal pungency responses to a typical low-concentration VOC mixture described by Otto et al. (1990, Neurotoxicol. Teratol. 12, 649-652). The assessment indicated that odor can be detected at a total VOC concentration of about 3 mg/m(3), consistent with the findings of Molhave et al. (1991, Atmos. Environ. 25, 1283-1293). Nasal pungency, according to our assessment, should not ocur at a total concentration of 25 mg/m(3), which is apparently in conflict with the findings of Molhave (1986, ASHRAE Trans. 92(1A), 306-316). It can be inferred from this investigation that pure nasal pungency without the influence of odor is unlikely to result from exposure to low-concentration VOC mixtures typically found in the nonindustrial environment.

  19. Dew point fast measurement in organic vapor mixtures using quartz resonant sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Jing; Liu, Jia; Meng, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-01

    A fast dew point sensor has been developed for organic vapor mixtures by using the quartz crystal with sensitive circuits. The sensor consists of the quartz crystal and a cooler device. Proactive approach is taken to produce condensation on the surface of the quartz crystal, and it will lead to a change in electrical features of the quartz crystal. The cessation of oscillation was measured because this phenomenon is caused by dew condensation. Such a phenomenon can be used to detect the dew point. This method exploits the high sensitivity of the quartz crystal but without frequency measurement and also retains the stability of the resonant circuit. It is strongly anti-interfered. Its performance was evaluated with acetone-methanol mixtures under different pressures. The results were compared with the dew points predicted from the universal quasi-chemical equation to evaluate the performance of the proposed sensor. Though the maximum deviations of the sensor are less than 1.1 °C, it still has a fast response time with a recovery time of less than 10 s, providing an excellent dehumidifying performance.

  20. Fundamental measure density functional theory studies on the freezing of binary hard-sphere and Lennard-Jones mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Warshavsky, Vadim B.; Song, Xueyu

    2008-07-18

    Free energies and correlation functions of liquid and solid hard-sphere (HS) mixtures are calculated using the fundamental measure density functional theory. Using the thermodynamic perturbation theory the free energies of solid and liquid Lennard-Jones (LJ) mixtures are obtained from correlation functions of HS systems within a single theoretical approach. The resulting azeotrope- and spindle-type solid-liquid phase diagrams of HS and LJ binary mixtures are in good agreement with the corresponding ones from computer simulations.

  1. Binary Solvent Organization at Silica/Liquid Interfaces: Preferential Ordering in Acetonitrile-Methanol Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gobrogge, Eric A; Walker, Robert A

    2014-08-07

    Nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy experiments examined solvent organization at the silica/binary solvent interface where the binary solvent consisted of methanol and acetonitrile in varying mole fractions. Data were compared with surface vibrational spectra acquired from silica surfaces exposed to a vapor phase saturated with the same binary solvent mixtures. Changes in vibrational band intensities suggest that methanol ideally adsorbs to the silica/vapor interface but acetonitrile accumulates in excess relative to vapor-phase composition. At the silica/liquid interface, acetonitrile's signal increases until a solution phase mole fraction of ∼0.85. At higher acetonitrile concentrations, acetonitrile's signal decreases dramatically until only a weak signature persists with the neat solvent. This behavior is ascribed to dipole-paired acetonitrile forming a bilayer with the first sublayer associating with surface silanol groups and a second sublayer consisting of weakly associating, antiparallel partners. On the basis of recent simulations, we propose that the second sublayer accumulates in excess.

  2. Polymer coated quartz crystal microbalance sensors for detection of volatile organic compounds in gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Si, Pengchao; Mortensen, John; Komolov, Alexei; Denborg, Jens; Møller, Preben Juul

    2007-08-06

    By coating different conducting polymers of thiophene and its derivatives on quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor surfaces, new novel QCM gas sensors have been produced in two simple ways, which could classify testing gas samples of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) gases. Principle components analysis (PCA) has been performed based on the QCM measurement results, which shows that our QCM sensors array has very good utilizing potential on sensing both polar and low-polar/nonpolar VOC gases. The sensitivity, selectivity, reproducibility and detection limit of QCM sensors have also been discussed. Quantitative variation of sensitivity response with the increasing concentration has been studied. (PLS) analysis and prediction of concentrations of single gas in mixtures have been carried out.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanostructural organization in ionic liquid/water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Yanting; Voth, Gregory A

    2007-05-10

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to investigate nanostructural organization in mixtures of 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate ionic liquid and water at multiple water concentrations. Evolution of the polar network, water network, and micelle structures is visualized and analyzed via partial radial distribution functions. The calculated static partial structure factors show that within the range of water contents examined, polar networks, water networks, and micelles possess an approximately invariant characteristic length at around 20 A. Furthermore, the above calculations point out that, as the amount of water increases, the polar network is continuously broken up (screened) by the intruding water, while the structural organization of the water network and the micelle exhibits a turnover. At the turnover point, the most ordered micelle (cation-cation) structure and water (water-anion-water) network are formed. Thereafter, the structural organization abates drastically, and only loose micelle structure exists due to the dominant water-water interactions. The simulated turnover of structural organization agrees with the sharpest peak in the experimentally obtained structure factor in aqueous solutions of similar ionic liquids; the simulated water structure reveals that water can form liquidlike associated aggregates due to the planar symmetry and strong basicity of NO(3)-, in agreement with experiment. The turnover of structural organization of micelles results from the persistent competition between the hydrophobic interactions of the nonpolar groups and the breakup of the charged polar network with increasing water content, whereas the turnover of the water network results from the competition between the water-water and water-anion interactions.

  4. The shock synthesis of complex organics from impacts into cometary analogue mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, M.; Wozniakiewicz, P.; Cole, M.; Martins, Z.; Burchell, M.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: If amino acids are required for the evolution of life, what was their source? Many different theories abound as to the source of amino acids on the early Earth including exogenous delivery from comets/asteroids (for example, glycine was found recently on comet Wild-2 [1]), formation in the protoplanetary nebula [2], or UV catalysed reactions of gases [3]. An alternative explanation is that amino acids can be shock-synthesised during the impact on an icy body onto a rocky body (or, equivalently, the impact of rocky body onto an icy surface). This theory is supported by computer simulations [4] and by very recent experimental data, which demonstrated the formation of simple (including abiotic) amino acids from shocks into ice mixtures mimicking the composition of comets and the surfaces of the icy Jovian and Saturnian satellites. Although the results from these experiments are fundamentally important, the yield of synthesised amino acids was low (nano-grams of material), complicating their detection and identification. In order to increase the collected yield of complex organics, and aid in their detection and identification, we have implemented a new collection technique within our hypervelocity impact facility. Experimental Methodology: Figure 1A) shows a low-resolution high-speed photograph of an impact plasma generated from an impact of a stainless-steel sphere into a mixture of water, CO_{2}, ammonia, and methanol ices. The plasma has an intense blue colour, and lasted for < 1 msec (the frame-rate of the camera). It is during and within this flash that complex organics are most likely synthesised, and thus to maximise the collection of these materials, we have implemented a new collection mechanism. Figure 1B) shows the prototype collection mechanism. Here an aluminium cold-plate (˜150 K) is placed in front of the target holder containing the ice mixtures. The plate has a central hole which allows the projectile to pass through to impact the ice

  5. Gas-particle partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) on mixtures of aerosols in a smog chamber.

    PubMed

    Chandramouli, Bharadwaj; Jang, Myoseon; Kamens, Richard M

    2003-09-15

    The partitioning behavior of a set of diverse SOCs on two and three component mixtures of aerosols from different sources was studied using smog chamber experimental data. A set of SOCs of different compound types was introduced into a system containing a mixture of aerosols from two or more sources. Gas and particle samples were taken using a filter-filter-denuder sampling system, and a partitioning coefficient Kp was estimated using Kp = Cp/(CgTSP). Particle size distributions were measured using a differential mobility analyzer and a light scattering detector. Gas and particle samples were analyzed using GCMS. The aerosol composition in the chamber was tracked chemically using a combination of signature compounds and the organic matter mass fraction (f(om)) of the individual aerosol sources. The physical nature of the aerosol mixture in the chamber was determined using particle size distributions, and an aggregate Kp was estimated from theoretically calculated Kp on the individual sources. Model fits for Kp showed that when the mixture involved primary sources of aerosol, the aggregate Kp of the mixture could be successfully modeled as an external mixture of the Kp on the individual aerosols. There were significant differences observed for some SOCs between modeling the system as an external and as an internal mixture. However, when one of the aerosol sources was secondary, the aggregate model Kp required incorporation of the secondary aerosol products on the preexisting aerosol for adequate model fits. Modeling such a system as an external mixture grossly overpredicted the Kp of alkanes in the mixture. Indirect evidence of heterogeneous, acid-catalyzed reactions in the particle phase was also seen, leading to a significant increase in the polarity of the resulting aerosol mix and a resulting decrease in the observed Kp of alkanes in the chamber. The model was partly consistent with this decrease but could not completely explain the reduction in Kp because of

  6. Improved electrolytes for Li-ion batteries: Mixtures of ionic liquid and organic electrolyte with enhanced safety and electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerfi, A.; Dontigny, M.; Charest, P.; Petitclerc, M.; Lagacé, M.; Vijh, A.; Zaghib, K.

    Physical and electrochemical characteristics of Li-ion battery systems based on LiFePO 4 cathodes and graphite anodes with mixture electrolytes were investigated. The mixed electrolytes are based on an ionic liquid (IL), and organic solvents used in commercial batteries. We investigated a range of compositions to determine an optimum conductivity and non-flammability of the mixed electrolyte. This led us to examine mixtures of ILs with the organic electrolyte usually employed in commercial Li-ion batteries, i.e., ethylene carbonate (EC) and diethylene carbonate (DEC). The IL electrolyte consisted of (trifluoromethyl sulfonylimide) (TFSI) as anion and 1-ethyl-3-methyleimidazolium (EMI) as the cation. The physical and electrochemical properties of some of these mixtures showed an improvement characteristics compared to the constituents alone. The safety was improved with electrolyte mixtures; when IL content in the mixture is ≥40%, no flammability is observed. A stable SEI layer was obtained on the MCMB graphite anode in these mixed electrolytes, which is not obtained with IL containing the TFSI-anion. The high-rate capability of LiFePO 4 is similar in the organic electrolyte and the mixture with a composition of 1:1. The interface resistance of the LiFePO 4 cathode is stabilized when the IL is added to the electrolyte. A reversible capacity of 155 mAh g -1 at C/12 is obtained with cells having at least some organic electrolyte compared to only 124 mAh g -1 with pure IL. With increasing discharge rate, the capacity is maintained close to that in the organic solvent up to 2 C rate. At higher rates, the results with mixture electrolytes start to deviate from the pure organic electrolyte cell. The evaluation of the Li-ion cells; LiFePO 4//Li 4Ti 5O 12 with organic and, 40% mixture electrolytes showed good 1st CE at 98.7 and 93.0%, respectively. The power performance of both cell configurations is comparable up to 2 C rate. This study indicates that safety and

  7. An Analytical Method to Measure Free-Water Tritium in Foods using Azeotropic Distillation.

    PubMed

    Soga, Keisuke; Kamei, Toshiyuki; Hachisuka, Akiko; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    A series of accidents at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant has raised concerns about the discharge of contaminated water containing tritium ((3)H) from the nuclear power plant into the environment and into foods. In this study, we explored convenient analytical methods to measure free-water (3)H in foods using a liquid scintillation counting and azeotropic distillation method. The detection limit was 10 Bq/L, corresponding to about 0.01% of 1 mSv/year. The (3)H recoveries were 85-90% in fruits, vegetables, meats and fishes, 75-85% in rice and cereal crops, and less than 50% in sweets containing little water. We found that, in the case of sweets, adding water to the sample before the azeotropic distillation increased the recovery and precision. Then, the recoveries reached more than 75% and RSD was less than 10% in all food categories (13 kinds). Considering its sensitivity, precision and simplicity, this method is practical and useful for (3)H analysis in various foods, and should be suitable for the safety assessment of foods. In addition, we examined the level of (3)H in foods on the Japanese market. No (3)H radioactivity was detected in any of 42 analyzed foods.

  8. An assessment of air quality reflecting the chemosensory irritation impact of mixtures of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Michael H; Gola, Joelle M R; Cometto-Muñiz, J Enrique

    2016-01-01

    We present a method to assess the air quality of an environment based on the chemosensory irritation impact of mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in such environment. We begin by approximating the sigmoid function that characterizes psychometric plots of probability of irritation detection (Q) versus VOC vapor concentration to a linear function. First, we apply an established equation that correlates and predicts human sensory irritation thresholds (SIT) (i.e., nasal and eye irritation) based on the transfer of the VOC from the gas phase to biophases, e.g., nasal mucus and tear film. Second, we expand the equation to include other biological data (e.g., odor detection thresholds) and to include further VOCs that act mainly by "specific" effects rather than by transfer (i.e., "physical") effects as defined in the article. Then we show that, for 72 VOCs in common, Q values based on our calculated SITs are consistent with the Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) listed for those same VOCs on the basis of sensory irritation by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). Third, we set two equations to calculate the probability (Qmix) that a given air sample containing a number of VOCs could elicit chemosensory irritation: one equation based on response addition (Qmix scale: 0.00 to 1.00) and the other based on dose addition (1000*Qmix scale: 0 to 2000). We further validate the applicability of our air quality assessment method by showing that both Qmix scales provide values consistent with the expected sensory irritation burden from VOC mixtures present in a wide variety of indoor and outdoor environments as reported on field studies in the literature. These scales take into account both the concentration of VOCs at a particular site and the propensity of the VOCs to evoke sensory irritation.

  9. Health Effects of a Mixture of Indoor Air Volatile Organics, Their Ozone Oxidation Products, and Stress

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Nancy; Laumbach, Robert; Kelly-McNeil, Kathie; Lioy, Paul; Fan, Zhi-Hua; Zhang, Junfeng; Ottenweller, John; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Kipen, Howard

    2005-01-01

    In our present study we tested the health effects among women of controlled exposures to volatile organic compounds (VOCs), with and without ozone (O3), and psychological stress. Each subject was exposed to the following three conditions at 1-week intervals (within-subject factor): VOCs (26 mg/m3), VOCs + O3 (26 mg/m3 + 40 ppb), and ambient air with a 1-min spike of VOCs (2.5 mg/m3). As a between-subjects factor, half the subjects were randomly assigned to perform a stressor. Subjects were 130 healthy women (mean age, 27.2 years; mean education, 15.2 years). Health effects measured before, during, and after each 140-min exposure included symptoms, neurobehavioral performance, salivary cortisol, and lung function. Mixing VOCs with O3 was shown to produce irritating compounds including aldehydes, hydrogen peroxide, organic acids, secondary organic aerosols, and ultrafine particles (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < 0.1 μm). Exposure to VOCs with and without O3 did not result in significant subjective or objective health effects. Psychological stress significantly increased salivary cortisol and symptoms of anxiety regardless of exposure condition. Neither lung function nor neurobehavioral performance was compromised by exposure to VOCs or VOCs + O3. Although numerous epidemiologic studies suggest that symptoms are significantly increased among workers in buildings with poor ventilation and mixtures of VOCs, our acute exposure study was not consistent with these epidemiologic findings. Stress appears to be a more significant factor than chemical exposures in affecting some of the health end points measured in our present study. PMID:16263509

  10. Energy efficient membrane processes for the separation of organic liquids: Part 1: Final report, September 28, 1982--December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Cabasso, I.; Acharya, H.R.; Korngold, E.; Liu, Z.; Stern, S.A.; Li, W.; Makenzie, T.; Poda, E.

    1987-10-01

    The potential usefulness of two membrane processes, namely, pervaporation and perstraction, for separating azeotropic mixtures of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons was studied theoretically and experimentally. A third membrane process, osmotic phase-separation, was investigated experimentally. The separation of an azeotropic mixture of benzene and cyclohexane was used as an example. Part II of this report will discuss membrane processes for the separation of alcohol/water mixtures. Mathematical models of pervaporation and perstraction were developed for computer simulations of the processes. The perstraction model presented herein is the first of its kind. Additionally, the energy requirements and capital investments costs for the separation of an azeotropic benzene/cyclohexane mixture were determined and compared with those for extractive distillation. 31 refs., 64 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. Removal of Selenium and Nitrate in Groundwater Using Organic Carbon-Based Reactive Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Hyeonsil; Jeen, Sung-Wook

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of selenium and nitrate in groundwater was evaluated through column experiments. Four columns consisting of reactive mixtures, either organic carbon-limestone (OC-LS) or organic carbon-zero valent iron (OC-ZVI), were used to determine the removal efficiency of selenium with different concentrations of nitrate. The source waters were collected from a mine site in Korea or were prepared artificially based on the mine drainage water or deionized water, followed by spiking of elevated concentrations of Se (40 mg/L) and nitrate (100 or 10 mg/L as NO3-N). The results for the aqueous chemistry showed that selenium and nitrate were effectively removed both in the mine drainage water and deionized water-based artificial input solution. However, the removal of selenium was delayed when selenium and nitrate coexisted in the OC-LS columns. The removal of selenium was not significant when the influent nitrate concentration was 100 mg/L as NO3-N, while most of nitrate was gradually removed within the columns. In contrast, 94% of selenium was removed when the influent nitrate concentration was reduced to 10 mg/L as NO3-N. In the OC-ZVI column, selenium and nitrate was removed almost simultaneously and completely even with the high nitrate concentration; however, a high concentration of ammonia was produced as a by-product of abiotic reaction between ZVI and nitrate. The elemental analysis for the solid samples after the termination of the experiments showed that selenium was accumulated in the reactive materials where removal of aqueous-phase selenium mostly occurred. The X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) study indicated that selenium existed in the forms of SeS2 and Se(0) in the OC-LS column, while selenium was present in the forms of FeSe, SeS2 and absorbed Se(IV) in the OC-ZVI column. This study shows that OC-based reactive mixtures have an ability to remove selenium and nitrate in groundwater. However, the removal of selenium was influenced by the high

  12. A COMPARISON OF THE LETHAL AND SUBLETHAL TOXICITY OF ORGANIC CHEMICAL MIXTURES TO THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The joint toxic effects of known binary and multiple organic chemical mixtures to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) were defined at both the 96-h 50% lethal effect concentration (LC50) and sublethal (32-d growth) response levels for toxicants with a narcosis I, narcosis II...

  13. COMPARISON OF SORPTION ENERGTICS FOR HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC CHEMICALS BY SYNTHETIC AND NATURAL SORBENTS FROM METHANOL/WATER SOLVENT MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) was used to investigate the thermodynamics and mechanisms of hydrophobic organic chemical (HOC) retention from methanol/water solvent mixtures. The enthalpy-entropy compensation model was used to infer that the hydro- phobic sorptive me...

  14. Human reactions to a mixture of indoor air volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjærgaard, Søren K.; Mølhave, Lars; Pedersen, Ole F.

    A controlled experimental study of human reactions to a mixture of 22 volatile organic compounds often found in indoor air was performed in a climate chamber. Twenty-one healthy subjects were compared with a group of 14 subjects suffering from the 'sick building syndrome' (SBS subjects), i.e. having symptoms related to the indoor environment (irritated mucous membranes, headache, etc.) as defined by WHO in 1982. In groups of 4 these subjects were exposed during two successive periods to either 0 and 0 mg m -3, 25 and 0 mg m -3, or 0 and 25 mg m -3; 25 mg m -3 is equivalent to the highest concentrations expected in a new building. The study was double blinded, and a latin square design was used to balance out effects of day in the week and season. Both groups reacted subjectively to the air reporting worse odor, worse indoor air quality as defined by the subject, and more irritated mucous membranes in eye, throat and nose than in the clean environment. A tendency to a stronger response was seen among the SBS subjects. Objective measures indicated among others an exposure related reduction in lung function among SBS subjects. Both groups had an increased number of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in tear fluid as a result of exposure. This was not seen for nasal secretions. Psychological performance tests indicated an exposure related diminished ability to learn. In conclusion, the experiment indicates that exposure to volatile organic compounds in low concentrations as seen in new houses causes both subjective complaints and objective signs in normal healty subjects; but more so in subjects from the sick building syndrome.

  15. Modeling competitive adsorption of mixtures of volatile organic compounds in a fixed-bed of beaded activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Tefera, Dereje Tamiru; Hashisho, Zaher; Philips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2014-05-06

    A two-dimensional mathematical model was developed to study competitive adsorption of n-component mixtures in a fixed-bed adsorber. The model consists of an isotherm equation to predict adsorption equilibria of n-component volatile organic compounds (VOCs) mixture from single component isotherm data, and a dynamic adsorption model, the macroscopic mass, energy and momentum conservation equations, to simulate the competitive adsorption of the n-components onto a fixed-bed of adsorbent. The model was validated with experimentally measured data of competitive adsorption of binary and eight-component VOCs mixtures onto beaded activated carbon (BAC). The mean relative absolute error (MRAE) was used to compare the modeled and measured breakthrough profiles as well as the amounts of adsorbates adsorbed. For the binary and eight-component mixtures, the MRAE of the breakthrough profiles was 13 and 12%, respectively, whereas, the MRAE of the adsorbed amounts was 1 and 2%, respectively. These data show that the model provides accurate prediction of competitive adsorption of multicomponent VOCs mixtures and the competitive adsorption isotherm equation is able to accurately predict equilibrium adsorption of VOCs mixtures.

  16. Toxicity to Eisenia andrei and Folsomia candida of a metal mixture applied to soil directly or via an organic matrix.

    PubMed

    Natal-da-Luz, T; Ojeda, G; Pratas, J; Van Gestel, C A M; Sousa, J P

    2011-09-01

    Regulatory limits for chemicals and ecological risk assessment are usually based on the effects of single compounds, not taking into account mixture effects. The ecotoxicity of metal-contaminated sludge may, however, not only be due to its metal content. Both the sludge matrix and the presence of other toxicants may mitigate or promote metal toxicity. To test this assumption, the toxicity of soils recently amended with an industrial sludge predominantly contaminated with chromium, copper, nickel, and zinc and soils freshly spiked with the same mixture of metals was evaluated through earthworm (Eisenia andrei) and collembolan (Folsomia candida) reproduction tests. The sludge was less toxic than the spiked metal mixture for E. andrei but more toxic for F. candida. Results obtained for the earthworms suggest a decrease in metal bioavailability promoted by the high organic matter content of the sludge. The higher toxicity of the sludge for F. candida was probably due to the additive toxic effect of other pollutants.

  17. Unprecedentedly high selective adsorption of gas mixtures in rho zeolite-like metal-organic framework: a molecular simulation study.

    PubMed

    Babarao, Ravichandar; Jiang, Jianwen

    2009-08-19

    We report a molecular simulation study for the separation of industrially important gas mixtures (CO(2)/H(2), CO(2)/CH(4), and CO(2)/N(2)) in rho zeolite-like metal-organic framework (rho-ZMOF). Rho-ZMOF contains a wide-open anionic framework and charge-balancing extraframework Na(+) ions. Two types of binding sites for Na(+) ions are identified in the framework. Site I is in the single eight-membered ring, whereas site II is in the alpha-cage. Na(+) ions at site I have a stronger affinity for the framework and thus a smaller mobility. The binding sites in rho-ZMOF resemble those in its inorganic counterpart rho-zeolite. CO(2) is adsorbed predominantly over other gases because of its strong electrostatic interactions with the charged framework and the presence of Na(+) ions acting as additional adsorption sites. At ambient temperature and pressure, the CO(2) selectivities are 1800 for the CO(2)/H(2) mixture, 80 for the CO(2)/CH(4) mixture, and 500 for the CO(2)/N(2) mixture. Compared with other MOFs and nanoporous materials reported to date, rho-ZMOF exhibits unprecedentedly high selective adsorption for these gas mixtures. This work represents the first simulation study to characterize extraframework ions and examine gas separation in a charged ZMOF. The simulation results reveal that rho-ZMOF is a promising candidate for the separation of syngas, natural gas, and flue gas.

  18. Soil surface colonization by phototrophic indigenous organisms, in two contrasted soils treated by formulated maize herbicide mixtures.

    PubMed

    Joly, Pierre; Misson, Benjamin; Perrière, Fanny; Bonnemoy, Frédérique; Joly, Muriel; Donnadieu-Bernard, Florence; Aguer, Jean-Pierre; Bohatier, Jacques; Mallet, Clarisse

    2014-11-01

    Soil phototrophic microorganisms, contributors to soil health and food webs, share their particular metabolism with plants. Current agricultural practices employ mixtures of pesticides to ensure the crops yields and can potentially impair these non-target organisms. However despite this environmental reality, studies dealing the susceptibility of phototrophic microorganisms to pesticide mixtures are scarce. We designed a 3 months microcosm study to assess the ecotoxicity of realistic herbicide mixtures of formulated S-metolachlor (Dual Gold Safeneur(®)), mesotrione (Callisto(®)) and nicosulfuron (Milagro(®)) on phototrophic communities of two soils (Limagne vertisol and Versailles luvisol). The soils presented different colonizing communities, with diatoms and chlorophyceae dominating communities in Limagne soil and cyanobacteria and bryophyta communities in Versailles soil. The results highlighted the strong impairment of Dual Gold Safeneur(®) treated microcosms on the biomass and the composition of both soil phototrophic communities, with no resilience after a delay of 3 months. This study also excluded any significant mixture effect on these organisms for Callisto(®) and Milagro(®) herbicides. We strongly recommend carrying on extensive soil studies on S-metolachlor and its commercial formulations, in order to reconsider its use from an ecotoxicological point of view.

  19. Identification and quantification of individual volatile organic compounds in a binary mixture by SAW multisensor array and pattern recognition analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penza, M.; Cassano, G.; Tortorella, F.

    2002-06-01

    We have developed a surface acoustic wave (SAW) multisensor array with five acoustic sensing elements configured as two-port resonator 433.92 MHz oscillators and a reference SAW element to recognize different individual components and determine their concentrations in a binary mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as methanol and acetone, in the ranges 15-130 and 50-250 ppm, respectively. The SAW sensors have been specifically coated by various sensing thin films such as arachidic acid, carbowax, behenic acid, triethanolamine or acrylated polysiloxane, operating at room temperature. By using the relative frequency change as the output signal of the SAW multisensor array with an artificial neural network (ANN), a recognition system has been realized for the identification and quantification of tested VOCs. The features of the SAW multisensor array exposed to a binary component organic mixture of methanol and acetone have been extracted from the output signals of five SAW sensors by pattern recognition (PARC) techniques, such as principal component analysis (PCA). An organic vapour pattern classifier has been implemented by using a multilayer neural network with a backpropagation learning algorithm. The normalized responses of a reduced set of SAW sensors or selected principal components scores have been used as inputs for a feed-forward multilayer perceptron (MLP), resulting in a 70% correct recognition rate with the normalized responses of the four SAW sensors and in an enhanced 80% correct recognition rate with the first two principal components of the original data consisting of the normalized responses of the four SAW sensors. The prediction of the individual vapour concentrations has been tackled with PCA for features extraction and by using the first two principal components scores as inputs to a feed-forward MLP consisting of a gating network, which decides which of three specific subnets should be used to determine the output concentration: the

  20. Combining polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) with toxicity testing to evaluate pesticide mixture effects on natural phototrophic biofilms.

    PubMed

    Pesce, Stéphane; Morin, Soizic; Lissalde, Sophie; Montuelle, Bernard; Mazzella, Nicolas

    2011-03-01

    Polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) are valuable tools in passive sampling methods for monitoring polar organic pesticides in freshwaters. Pesticides extracted from the environment using such methods can be used to toxicity tests. This study evaluated the acute effects of POCIS extracts on natural phototrophic biofilm communities. Our results demonstrate an effect of POCIS pesticide mixtures on chlorophyll a fluorescence, photosynthetic efficiency and community structure. Nevertheless, the range of biofilm responses differs according to origin of the biofilms tested, revealing spatial variations in the sensitivity of natural communities in the studied stream. Combining passive sampler extracts with community-level toxicity tests offers promising perspectives for ecological risk assessment.

  1. Screening Metal-Organic Frameworks by Analysis of Transient Breakthrough of Gas Mixtures in a Fixed Bed Adsorber

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, Rajamani; Long, Jeffrey R.

    2011-07-07

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) offer considerable potential for separating a variety of mixtures that are important in applications such as CO₂ capture and H₂ purification. In view of the vast number of MOFs that have been synthesized, there is a need for a reliable procedure for comparing screening and ranking MOFs with regard to their anticipated performance in pressure swing adsorption (PSA) units. For this purpose, the most commonly used metrics are the adsorption selectivity and the working capacity. Here, we suggest an additional metric for comparing MOFs that is based on the analysis of the transient response of an adsorber to a step input of a gaseous mixture. For a chosen purity of the gaseous mixture exiting from the adsorber, a dimensionless breakthrough time τ{sub break} can be defined and determined; this metric determines the frequency of required regeneration and influences the productivity of a PSA unit. The values of τ{sub break} are dictated both by selectivity and by capacity metrics .By performing transient adsorber calculations for separation of CO₂/H₂, CO₂/CH₄, CH₄/H₂, and CO₂/CH₄/H₂ mixtures, we compare the values of τbreak to highlight some important advantages of MOFs over conventionally used adsorbents such as zeolite NaX. For a given separation duty, such comparisons provide a more realistic ranking of MOFs than afforded by either selectivity or capacity metrics alone. We conclude that breakthrough calculations can provide an essential tool for screening MOFs.

  2. Pervaporation Separation of Water-Ethanol Mixtures Using Organic-Inorganic Nanocomposite Membranes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Preyssler type heteropolyacid viz., H14[NaP5W30O110] incorporated chitosan nanocomposite membranes (NCMs) were prepared by solution casting, characterized using a variety of techniques and employed in the pervaporation separation of water-ethanol mixtures as a function of feed wa...

  3. Binary Mixtures of Permanganate and Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds in Groundwater Samples: Sample Preservation and Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground water samples collected at sites where in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) has been deployed may contain binary mixtures of ground water contaminants and permanganate (MnO4-), an oxidant injected into the subsurface to destroy the contaminant. Commingling of the oxidant and ...

  4. Sputtering Yields for Mixtures of Organic Materials Using Argon Gas Cluster Ions.

    PubMed

    Seah, M P; Havelund, R; Shard, A G; Gilmore, I S

    2015-10-22

    The sputtering yield volumes of binary mixtures of Irganox 1010 with either Irganox 1098 or Fmoc-pentafluoro-L-phenylalanine (FMOC) have been measured for 5 keV Ar2000(+) ions incident at 45° to the surface normal. The sputtering yields are determined from the doses to sputter through various compositions of 100 nm thick, intimately mixed, layers. Because of matrix effects, the profiles for secondary ions are distorted, and profile shifts in depth of 15 nm are observed leading to errors above 20% in the deduced sputtering yield. Secondary ions are selected to avoid this. The sputtering yield volumes for the mixtures are shown to be lower than those deduced from a linear interpolation from the pure materials. This is shown to be consistent with a simple model involving the changing energy absorbed for the sputtering of intimate mixtures. Evidence to support this comes from the secondary ion data for pairs of the different molecules. Both binary mixtures behave similarly, but matrix effects are stronger for the Irganox 1010/FMOC system.

  5. Effects of a combination of hinokitiol (β-thujaplicin) and an organic acid mixture on ruminal fermentation in heifers fed a high-grain diet.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Junichiro; Omura, Hiroshi; Mitsui, Tadao; Eguchi, Norichika; Ueno, Takashi; Goto, Hisaya; Ito, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of hinokitiol (a natural antibacterial compound extracted from Thujopsis dolabrata var. hondai) and an organic acid mixture (citrate content 50%) on ruminal fermentation. Antibacterial properties were examined by measuring minimal inhibitory concentration. Hinokitiol at 1.56µg/mL or an organic acid mixture at 1600µg/mL inhibited Streptococcus bovis growth. The combination of 0.78µg/mL hinokitiol and 200µg/mL of an organic acid mixture also inhibited S. bovis growth. Both hinokitiol and the hinokitiol and an organic acid mixture combination showed strong antibacterial properties on Gram-positive bacteria such as S. bovis, but relatively weak antibacterial activities on Gram-negative bacteria such as Megasphaera elsdenii. Three ruminally cannulated heifers were fed a bloat-producing diet containing barley, pelleted alfalfa meal, soybean meal and salt without long-cut roughage to investigate the ruminal characteristics in vivo. Feeding to heifers a bloat-producing diet containing 7.8mg/kg hinokitiol and 0.2% of an organic acid mixture significantly decreased the increase in stable ingesta volume. Hinokitiol or an organic acid mixture did not affect ruminal volatile fatty acids, protozoa and bacteria. These results suggest that a combination of hinokitiol and an organic acid mixture might reduce frothy bloat in cattle fed high-grain diets.

  6. Surface excess isotherms of organic solvent mixtures in a system made of liquid carbon dioxide and a silicagel surface.

    PubMed

    Vajda, Péter; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-09-20

    The surface excess isotherms of methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol and acetonitrile from liquid carbon dioxide on a silica adsorbent were measured, using the minor disturbance method. The minor disturbance peaks - or system peaks - of each organic modifier were recorded using UV-detection in the whole composition range of the organic/liquid carbon dioxide mixtures, the whole composition range was completed by injecting the modifiers into pure liquid carbon dioxide as well. The excess isotherms were calculated based on the retention of the organic solvent signals. Our results show an enrichment of the organic modifier at the adsorbent surface. The alcohols show multilayer adsorption with an extremely high retention on the silica surface while acetonitrile shows weaker interactions and only a slight trend toward the formation of a multilayer above the surface.

  7. Influence of Wetting and Mass Transfer Properties of Organic Chemical Mixtures in Vadose Zone Materials on Groundwater Contamination by Nonaqueous Phase Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Charles J Werth; Albert J Valocchi, Hongkyu Yoon

    2011-05-21

    Previous studies have found that organic acids, organic bases, and detergent-like chemicals change surface wettability. The wastewater and NAPL mixtures discharged at the Hanford site contain such chemicals, and their proportions likely change over time due to reaction-facilitated aging. The specific objectives of this work were to (1) determine the effect of organic chemical mixtures on surface wettability, (2) determine the effect of organic chemical mixtures on CCl4 volatilization rates from NAPL, and (3) accurately determine the migration, entrapment, and volatilization of organic chemical mixtures. Five tasks were proposed to achieve the project objectives. These are to (1) prepare representative batches of fresh and aged NAPL-wastewater mixtures, (2) to measure interfacial tension, contact angle, and capillary pressure-saturation profiles for the same mixtures, (3) to measure interphase mass transfer rates for the same mixtures using micromodels, (4) to measure multiphase flow and interphase mass transfer in large flow cell experiments, all using the same mixtures, and (5) to modify the multiphase flow simulator STOMP in order to account for updated P-S and interphase mass transfer relationships, and to simulate the impact of CCl4 in the vadose zone on groundwater contamination. Results and findings from these tasks and summarized in the attached final report.

  8. Complex mixture analysis of organic compounds in green coffee bean extract by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feifei; Furihata, Kazuo; Hu, Fangyu; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2010-11-01

    A complex mixture analysis by one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was carried out for the first time for the identification and quantification of organic compounds in green coffee bean extract (GCBE). A combination of (1)H-(1)H DQF-COSY, (1)H-(13)C HSQC, and (1)H-(13)C CT-HMBC two-dimensional sequences was used, and 16 compounds were identified. In particular, three isomers of caffeoylquinic acid were identified in the complex mixture without any separation. In addition, GCBE components were quantified by the integration of carbon signals by use of a relaxation reagent and an inverse-gated decoupling method without a nuclear Overhauser effect. This NMR methodology provides detailed information about the kinds and amounts of GCBE components, and in our study, the chemical makeup of GCBE was clarified by the NMR results.

  9. Microporous metal-organic framework with dual functionalities for highly efficient removal of acetylene from ethylene/acetylene mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tong-Liang; Wang, Hailong; Li, Bin; Krishna, Rajamani; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Wei; Zhao, Yunfeng; Han, Yu; Wang, Xue; Zhu, Weidong; Yao, Zizhu; Xiang, Shengchang; Chen, Banglin

    2015-06-01

    The removal of acetylene from ethylene/acetylene mixtures containing 1% acetylene is a technologically very important, but highly challenging task. Current removal approaches include the partial hydrogenation over a noble metal catalyst and the solvent extraction of cracked olefins, both of which are cost and energy consumptive. Here we report a microporous metal-organic framework in which the suitable pore/cage spaces preferentially take up much more acetylene than ethylene while the functional amine groups on the pore/cage surfaces further enforce their interactions with acetylene molecules, leading to its superior performance for this separation. The single X-ray diffraction studies, temperature dependent gas sorption isotherms, simulated and experimental column breakthrough curves and molecular simulation studies collaboratively support the claim, underlying the potential of this material for the industrial usage of the removal of acetylene from ethylene/acetylene mixtures containing 1% acetylene at room temperature through the cost- and energy-efficient adsorption separation process.

  10. Microporous metal–organic framework with dual functionalities for highly efficient removal of acetylene from ethylene/acetylene mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tong-Liang; Wang, Hailong; Li, Bin; Krishna, Rajamani; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Wei; Zhao, Yunfeng; Han, Yu; Wang, Xue; Zhu, Weidong; Yao, Zizhu; Xiang, Shengchang; Chen, Banglin

    2015-01-01

    The removal of acetylene from ethylene/acetylene mixtures containing 1% acetylene is a technologically very important, but highly challenging task. Current removal approaches include the partial hydrogenation over a noble metal catalyst and the solvent extraction of cracked olefins, both of which are cost and energy consumptive. Here we report a microporous metal–organic framework in which the suitable pore/cage spaces preferentially take up much more acetylene than ethylene while the functional amine groups on the pore/cage surfaces further enforce their interactions with acetylene molecules, leading to its superior performance for this separation. The single X-ray diffraction studies, temperature dependent gas sorption isotherms, simulated and experimental column breakthrough curves and molecular simulation studies collaboratively support the claim, underlying the potential of this material for the industrial usage of the removal of acetylene from ethylene/acetylene mixtures containing 1% acetylene at room temperature through the cost- and energy-efficient adsorption separation process. PMID:26041691

  11. Composition dependent structural organization in trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium chloride ionic liquid-methanol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Aditya; Sharma, Shobha; Kashyap, Hemant K.

    2015-04-07

    This article reports results from the molecular dynamics simulations on the structural arrangement of the ions and molecules in the mixtures of trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium chloride ([P{sub 666,14}{sup +}][Cl{sup −}]) ionic liquid (IL) and methanol (MeOH) over the entire composition range. Effects of composition on the charge and polarity orderings have been investigated via computation of X-ray scattering structure function, S(q), and by using a partitioning scheme proposed for such multi-component mixtures. Except for the neat methanol liquid, the total S(q) shows two peaks in its intermolecular region for all the mole-fractions. The lowest q peak is dominated primarily by anion-anion, cation-anion, and methanol-anion correlations. Our results signify that the methanol bulk structure, which predominantly has short-distance characteristic correlations and is governed by polar group of methanol, is retained for x{sub IL} ≤ 0.1. Then, the mixture goes through gradual structural changes from methanol-like to the IL-like for 0.1 < x{sub IL} ≤ 0.7. The dipolar interaction between methanol molecules weakens in this range, and the structural landscape of the mixture is steered by strong ion-ion, anion-methanol, and nonpolar interactions. The IL-like structural arrangement is virtually recovered for x{sub IL} > 0.7. At all the compositions studied, while the cation head groups are predominantly solvated by anions and subsequently by methanol molecules, the polar hydroxyl group of methanol is preferentially solvated by the anions. The radial distribution functions of selected pair of atomic species have also confirmed these observations.

  12. Hygroscopic properties of potassium chloride and its internal mixtures with organic compounds relevant to biomass burning aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Bo; Peng, Chao; Wang, Yidan; Liu, Qifan; Tong, Shengrui; Zhang, Yunhong; Ge, Maofa

    2017-02-01

    While water uptake of aerosols exerts considerable impacts on climate, the effects of aerosol composition and potential interactions between species on hygroscopicity of atmospheric particles have not been fully characterized. The water uptake behaviors of potassium chloride and its internal mixtures with water soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) related to biomass burning aerosols including oxalic acid, levoglucosan and humic acid at different mass ratios were investigated using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). Deliquescence points of KCl/organic mixtures were observed to occur at lower RH values and over a broader RH range eventually disappearing at high organic mass fractions. This leads to substantial under-prediction of water uptake at intermediate RH. Large discrepancies for water content between model predictions and measurements were observed for KCl aerosols with 75 wt% oxalic acid content, which is likely due to the formation of less hygroscopic potassium oxalate from interactions between KCl and oxalic acid without taken into account in the model methods. Our results also indicate strong influence of levoglucosan on hygroscopic behaviors of multicomponent mixed particles. These findings are important in further understanding the role of interactions between WSOCs and inorganic salt on hygroscopic behaviors and environmental effects of atmospheric particles.

  13. Effect of Sodium Sulfate, Ammonium Chloride, Ammonium Nitrate, and Salt Mixtures on Aqueous Phase Partitioning of Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Lei, Ying Duan; Wania, Frank

    2016-12-06

    Dissolved inorganic salts influence the partitioning of organic compounds into the aqueous phase. This influence is especially significant in atmospheric aerosol, which usually contains large amounts of ions, including sodium, ammonium, chloride, sulfate, and nitrate. However, empirical data on this salt effect are very sparse. Here, the partitioning of numerous organic compounds into solutions of Na2SO4, NH4Cl, and NH4NO3 was measured and compared with existing data for NaCl and (NH4)2SO4. Salt mixtures were also tested to establish whether the salt effect is additive. In general, the salt effect showed a decreasing trend of Na2SO4 > (NH)2SO4 > NaCl > NH4Cl > NH4NO3 for the studied organic compounds, implying the following relative strength of the salt effect of individual anions: SO4(2-) > Cl(-) > NO3(-) and of cations: Na(+) > NH4(+). The salt effect of different salts is moderately correlated. Predictive models for the salt effect were developed based on the experimental data. The experimental data indicate that the salt effect of mixtures may not be entirely additive. However, the deviation from additivity, if it exists, is small. Data of very high quality are required to establish whether the effect of constituent ions or salts is additive or not.

  14. Hygroscopic properties of potassium chloride and its internal mixtures with organic compounds relevant to biomass burning aerosol particles

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Bo; Peng, Chao; Wang, Yidan; Liu, Qifan; Tong, Shengrui; Zhang, Yunhong; Ge, Maofa

    2017-01-01

    While water uptake of aerosols exerts considerable impacts on climate, the effects of aerosol composition and potential interactions between species on hygroscopicity of atmospheric particles have not been fully characterized. The water uptake behaviors of potassium chloride and its internal mixtures with water soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) related to biomass burning aerosols including oxalic acid, levoglucosan and humic acid at different mass ratios were investigated using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). Deliquescence points of KCl/organic mixtures were observed to occur at lower RH values and over a broader RH range eventually disappearing at high organic mass fractions. This leads to substantial under-prediction of water uptake at intermediate RH. Large discrepancies for water content between model predictions and measurements were observed for KCl aerosols with 75 wt% oxalic acid content, which is likely due to the formation of less hygroscopic potassium oxalate from interactions between KCl and oxalic acid without taken into account in the model methods. Our results also indicate strong influence of levoglucosan on hygroscopic behaviors of multicomponent mixed particles. These findings are important in further understanding the role of interactions between WSOCs and inorganic salt on hygroscopic behaviors and environmental effects of atmospheric particles. PMID:28240258

  15. Hygroscopic properties of potassium chloride and its internal mixtures with organic compounds relevant to biomass burning aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Jing, Bo; Peng, Chao; Wang, Yidan; Liu, Qifan; Tong, Shengrui; Zhang, Yunhong; Ge, Maofa

    2017-02-27

    While water uptake of aerosols exerts considerable impacts on climate, the effects of aerosol composition and potential interactions between species on hygroscopicity of atmospheric particles have not been fully characterized. The water uptake behaviors of potassium chloride and its internal mixtures with water soluble organic compounds (WSOCs) related to biomass burning aerosols including oxalic acid, levoglucosan and humic acid at different mass ratios were investigated using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). Deliquescence points of KCl/organic mixtures were observed to occur at lower RH values and over a broader RH range eventually disappearing at high organic mass fractions. This leads to substantial under-prediction of water uptake at intermediate RH. Large discrepancies for water content between model predictions and measurements were observed for KCl aerosols with 75 wt% oxalic acid content, which is likely due to the formation of less hygroscopic potassium oxalate from interactions between KCl and oxalic acid without taken into account in the model methods. Our results also indicate strong influence of levoglucosan on hygroscopic behaviors of multicomponent mixed particles. These findings are important in further understanding the role of interactions between WSOCs and inorganic salt on hygroscopic behaviors and environmental effects of atmospheric particles.

  16. Menstrual disturbances and hormonal changes in women workers exposed to a mixture of organic solvents in a pharmaceutical company

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, Somayeh; Namvar, Mohamad; Ghoreishvandi, Maryam; Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Golabadi, Majid; Seyedmehdi, Seyed Mohammad; Khodarahmian, Mahshad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chemicals are among risk factors that can affect women's reproductive system. This study is aimed to investigate the association of occupational exposure to a mixture of organic solvents with menstruation disturbances and hormonal changes among female workers. Methods: Female workers of a pharmaceutical company were divided into three groups of non-exposed, lowexposed and highly-exposed to a mixture of organic solvents (formaldehyde, phenol, N-hexane, and chloroform) based on workplace measurements. Menstrual disturbances (in terms of short cycles, long cycles, irregular cycles, and bleeding or spotting between periods) and mean of hormone levels (including follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, prolactin, estrogen and progesterone levels) were compared between these three groups. For investigating associations, logistic regression was performed. Results: Our study showed that mean length of cycles, duration of bleeding, and amount of flow and also prevalence of long cycles, irregular cycles, and bleeding or spotting between periods were higher in exposed groups (p≤0.05). Odds ratio for prevalence of menstrual disturbances in the low exposure group and high exposure group were 9.69 (p=0.001) and 3.40 (p=0.002) respectively compared to the reference group. Estrogen and progesterone levels were not affected (p> 0.05), but other hormones levels were significantly disturbed in the exposed groups compared with the non-exposed group (p=0.001). Conclusion: Occupational exposure to the mixture of organic solvents may be associated with the increase of menstrual disorders and hormonal changes in female workers. Based on our findings, periodic evaluation of reproductive system of female workers in pharmaceutical companies is recommended. PMID:25695014

  17. PROCEDURES FOR DERIVING EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING SEDIMENT BENCHMARKS (ESBS) FOR THE PROTECTION OF BENTHIC ORGANISMS: METALS MIXTURES (CADMIUM, COPPER, LEAD, NICKEL, SILVER, AND ZINC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This equilibrium partitioning sediment benchmark (ESB) document describes procedures to derive concentrations of metal mixtures in sediment which are protective of the presence of benthic organisms. The equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach was chosen because it accounts for t...

  18. Effects of defined mixtures of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) on multiple cellular responses in the human hepatocarcinoma cell line, HepG2, using high content analysis screening.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jodie; Berntsen, Hanne Friis; Zimmer, Karin Elisabeth; Frizzell, Caroline; Verhaegen, Steven; Ropstad, Erik; Connolly, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are toxic substances, highly resistant to environmental degradation, which can bio-accumulate and have long-range atmospheric transport potential. Most studies focus on single compound effects, however as humans are exposed to several POPs simultaneously, investigating exposure effects of real life POP mixtures on human health is necessary. A defined mixture of POPs was used, where the compound concentration reflected its contribution to the levels seen in Scandinavian human serum (total mix). Several sub mixtures representing different classes of POPs were also constructed. The perfluorinated (PFC) mixture contained six perfluorinated compounds, brominated (Br) mixture contained seven brominated compounds, chlorinated (Cl) mixture contained polychlorinated biphenyls and also p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene, hexachlorobenzene, three chlordanes, three hexachlorocyclohexanes and dieldrin. Human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cells were used for 2h and 48h exposures to the seven mixtures and analysis on a CellInsight™ NXT High Content Screening platform. Multiple cytotoxic endpoints were investigated: cell number, nuclear intensity and area, mitochondrial mass and membrane potential (MMP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Both the Br and Cl mixtures induced ROS production but did not lead to apoptosis. The PFC mixture induced ROS production and likely induced cell apoptosis accompanied by the dissipation of MMP. Synergistic effects were evident for ROS induction when cells were exposed to the PFC+Br mixture in comparison to the effects of the individual mixtures. No significant effects were detected in the Br+Cl, PFC+Cl or total mixtures, which contain the same concentrations of chlorinated compounds as the Cl mixture plus additional compounds; highlighting the need for further exploration of POP mixtures in risk assessment.

  19. Hazardous and Corrosive Gas Production in the Radiolysis of Water/Organic Mixtures in Model TRU Waste

    SciTech Connect

    LaVerne, Jay A.

    2005-06-01

    Experiments in combination with diffusion-kinetic modeling incorporating track structure simulations are used to examine the radiation chemistry of aqueous systems containing chlorinated hydrocarbons. Irradiations with both Co-60 gamma rays and alpha particles are employed in order to simulate typical mixed radiation environments encountered in waste management. The goal is to determine fundamental mechanisms, kinetics, and yields for the formation of potentially explosive gases and corrosive agents, such as H2 and HCl, respectively, in the radiolysis of water-organic mixtures. The radiation chemical systems studied are found throughout the DOE portfolio and are important in radioactive waste remediation and management.

  20. 'Quasi-Mixture' Descriptors for QSPR Analysis of Molecular Macroscopic Properties. The Critical Properties of Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Mokshyna, E; Nedostup, V I; Polishchuk, P G; Kuzmin, V E

    2014-10-01

    Rational approach towards the QSAR/QSPR modeling requires the descriptors to be computationally efficient, yet physically and chemically meaningful. On the basis of existing simplex representation of molecular structure (SiRMS) the novel 'quasi-mixture' descriptors were developed in order to accomplish the goal of characterization molecules on 2D level (i.e. without explicit generation of 3D structure and exhaustive conformational search) with account for potential intermolecular interactions. The critical properties of organic compounds were chosen as target properties for the estimation of descriptors' efficacy because of their well-known physical nature, rigorously estimated experimental errors and large quantity of experimental data. Among described properties are critical temperature, pressure and volume. Obtained models have high statistical characteristics, therefore showing the efficacy of suggested 'quasi-mixture' approach. Moreover, 'quasi-mixture' approach, as a branch of the SiRMS, allows to interpret results in terms of simple basic molecular properties. The obtained picture of influences corresponds to the accepted theoretical views.

  1. Transport properties of the binary mixtures of the three organic liquids toluene, methanol, and cyclohexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapeira, E.; Gebhardt, M.; Triller, T.; Mialdun, A.; Köhler, W.; Shevtsova, V.; Bou-Ali, M. M.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the measurements of diffusion (D), thermodiffusion (DT), and Soret (ST) coefficients in binary pairs of the ternary system toluene-methanol-cyclohexane using different instrumental techniques: microgravity measurements (SODI/DCMIX2) on the International Space Station, thermogravitational column in combination with sliding symmetric tubes, optical beam deflection, optical digital interferometry, and counter flow cell. The binary systems have large regions where the mixtures are either not miscible or the Soret coefficient is negative. All the coefficients have been measured over a wide composition range with the exception of a miscibility gap. Results from different instruments and literature data are in favorable agreement over a broad composition range. Additionally, we have carefully measured the physical properties and the optical contrast factors (∂n/∂c ) p ,T and (∂n/∂T ) p ,c. The latter ones were also calculated using the Looyenga equation. The measurements in methanol-cyclohexane mixture revealed a decay of the diffusion coefficient when approaching the miscibility gap. We have interpreted this in the spirit of the pseudospinodal concept.

  2. Pesticide Toxicity Index: a tool for assessing potential toxicity of pesticide mixtures to freshwater aquatic organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowell, Lisa H.; Norman, Julia E.; Moran, Patrick W.; Martin, Jeffrey D.; Stone, Wesley W.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide mixtures are common in streams with agricultural or urban influence in the watershed. The Pesticide Toxicity Index (PTI) is a screening tool to assess potential aquatic toxicity of complex pesticide mixtures by combining measures of pesticide exposure and acute toxicity in an additive toxic-unit model. The PTI is determined separately for fish, cladocerans, and benthic invertebrates. This study expands the number of pesticides and degradates included in previous editions of the PTI from 124 to 492 pesticides and degradates, and includes two types of PTI for use in different applications, depending on study objectives. The Median-PTI was calculated from median toxicity values for individual pesticides, so is robust to outliers and is appropriate for comparing relative potential toxicity among samples, sites, or pesticides. The Sensitive-PTI uses the 5th percentile of available toxicity values, so is a more sensitive screening-level indicator of potential toxicity. PTI predictions of toxicity in environmental samples were tested using data aggregated from published field studies that measured pesticide concentrations and toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia in ambient stream water. C. dubia survival was reduced to ≤ 50% of controls in 44% of samples with Median-PTI values of 0.1–1, and to 0% in 96% of samples with Median-PTI values > 1. The PTI is a relative, but quantitative, indicator of potential toxicity that can be used to evaluate relationships between pesticide exposure and biological condition.

  3. Dehydration of water-pyridine mixtures by pervaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawski, W. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-UA 494, Nancy ); Nguyen, T.Q.; Neel, J. )

    1991-08-01

    The pervaporation technique, in which the liquid feed mixture is maintained in contact with one side of a nonporous membrane and the permeate is continuously removed from the other side as a vapor, is one of the new methods to attain separation of azeotropic mixtures, structural isomers, or even to displace the equilibrium of chemical reactions. Several ion-exchange and neutral membranes were examined in the pervaporation of water-pyridine mixtures. Carboxylic and sulfonic ion-exchange membranes were used with hydrogen counterion and additionally with trimethylammonium, triethylammonium, and tributylammonium counterions. All membranes were selective to water, but the transport mode and selectivity properties of membranes were dependent on both the character of the ion-exchange group and the ionic form of the membrane. The results obtained suggest that pervaporation of water-pyridine mixtures could be used with standard distillation in the large-scale dehydration process of pyridine.

  4. Thermodynamic functions, freezing transition, and phase diagram of dense carbon-oxygen mixtures in white dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Iyetomi, H.; Ogata, S.; Ichimaru, S.

    1989-07-01

    Equations of state for dense carbon-oxygen (C-O) binary-ionic mixtures (BIM's) appropriate to the interiors of white dwarfs are investigated through Monte Carlo simulations, by solution of relevant integral equations andvariational calculations in the density-functional formalism. It is thereby shown that the internal energies of the C-O BIM solids and fluids both obey precisely the linear mixing formulas. We then present an accurate calculation of the phase diagram associated with freezing transitions in such BIM materials, resulting in a novel prediction of an azeotropic diagram. Discontinuities of the mass density across the azeotropic phase boundaries areevaluated numerically for application to a study of white-dwarf evolution.

  5. Single Molecule Lateral Mobility and Membrane Organization in DMPC/Cholesterol Mixtures at the Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Saame; Stillwell, William; Naumann, Christoph

    2002-03-01

    To better understand the lipid heterogeneity of biological membranes, we have studied the lateral mobility and membrane organization of DMPC and cholesterol (Chol) mixtures at the air-water interface using single molecule fluorescence imaging and epifluorescence microscopy. The single molecule imaging technique was used to track the lateral diffusion of single molecules of TRITC-DPPE or cholesteryl Bodipy. In the absence of Chol, mean square displacement histograms obtained from single molecule tracking of TRITC-DPPE show unobstructed diffusion. Including Chol at low levels of Chol (<10 moldiffusion at intermediate levels ( 30 molof Chol (>40 molmacroscopic phase separations. Data obtained from tracking experiments of cholesteryl-Bodipy also show complementary changes in diffusion. Our results indicate that our techniques provide insight into the micro and macro organization of lipid domains at the air-water interface.

  6. Organic carbon aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1998-04-28

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes .ltoreq.1000 .ANG., and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1050.degree. C. to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors.

  7. Organic aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.

    1995-12-19

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes{<=}1000{angstrom}, and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1050 C to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors. 8 figs.

  8. Organic aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.

    1996-09-17

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes {<=}1,000{angstrom}, and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1,050 C to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors. 8 figs.

  9. Organic carbon aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.

    1998-04-28

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes {<=}1000 {angstrom}, and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1050 C to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors. 8 figs.

  10. Organic aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1995-01-01

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes.ltoreq.1000.ANG., and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1050.degree. C. to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors.

  11. Organic aerogels from the sol-gel polymerization of phenolic-furfural mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1996-01-01

    The sol-gel polymerization of a phenolic-furfural mixture in dilute solution leads to a highly cross-linked network that can be supercritically dried to form a high surface area foam. These porous materials have cell/pore sizes .ltoreq.1000.ANG., and although they are dark brown in color, they can be classified as a new type of aerogel. The phenolic-furfural aerogel can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere at 1050.degree. C. to produce carbon aerogels. This new aerogel may be used for thermal insulation, chromatographic packing, water filtration, ion-exchange, and carbon electrodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and double-layer capacitors.

  12. Self-organized Gels in DNA/F-Actin mixtures without Crosslinkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, John; Hwee Lai, Ghee; Zribi, Olena; Smalyukh, Ivan; Angelini, Thomas; Purdy, Kirstin; Golestanian, Ramin; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2009-03-01

    Interactions between flexible chains and rigid rods govern a broad range of soft matter systems. As a model system of like-charged rigid rods and flexible chains, we examine mixtures of DNA and filamentous actin (F-actin). Confocal microscopy reveals the formation of elongated nematic F-actin domains reticulated via defect-free vertices into a network embedded in a mesh of random DNA. Synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) indicates that the DNA mesh squeezes the F-actin domains into a nematic state with an inter-actin spacing that decreases with increasing DNA concentration. Salt strongly influences the domain sizes and transitions the system from a counterion-controlled regime to a depletion-controlled regime, both mechanisms of which are entropic in origin.

  13. Enthalpy characteristics of L-proline dissolution in certain water-organic mixtures at 298.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badelin, V. G.; Smirnov, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    A thermochemical study of the processes of L-proline dissolution in aqueous solutions of acetonitrile, 1,4-dioxane, acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide, nitromethane and tetrahydrofuran at T = 298.15 K in the range of organic solvent concentrations x2 = 0-0.25 mole fractions is performed. Standard values of the enthalpies of solution and transfer of L-proline from water to mixed solvent, and the enthalpy coefficients of pairwise interactions between L-proline and molecules of organic solvents, are calculated. The effect the composition of a water-organic mixture and the structure of organic solvents have on the enthalpy characteristics of L-proline dissolution and transfer is examined. The effect the energy properties of intermolecular interactions between components of a mixed solvent has on the intermolecular interactions between L-proline and molecules of cosolvent is estimated. The correlation between the enthalpy characteristics of L-proline dissolution and electron-donor properties of organic cosolvent in aqueous solutions is determined.

  14. Thermodynamics of Multicomponent PAH Mixtures and Development of Tar-Like Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Rice, James W.; Fu, Jinxia; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the solid/liquid phase behavior of mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), exploring the transition from non-ideal solid mixtures to a relatively ideal liquid behavior characteristic of “tars”. PAH mixtures have been studied using differential scanning calorimetry, melting point analysis and Knudsen effusion. Mixtures of anthracene, pyrene and fluoranthene show behavior that is consistent with other binary PAH mixtures; that is, the initially solid mixture exhibits a significant melting point depression, relative to the pure components, and in a certain range of composition, solid azeotrope behavior on vaporization. As the number of distinct PAH species is increased (by adding in benzo[a]pyrene, phenanthrene, fluorene and chrysene) this behavior gradually gives way to liquid phase character at even room temperature, and the vaporization behavior approaches that crudely predictable from ideal mixture theory. PMID:21442010

  15. Complex Mixture Analysis of Organic Compounds in Yogurt by NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Hu, Fangyu; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2016-06-16

    NMR measurements do not require separation and chemical modification of samples and therefore rapidly and directly provide non-targeted information on chemical components in complex mixtures. In this study, one-dimensional (¹H, (13)C, and (31)P) and two-dimensional (¹H-(13)C and ¹H-(31)P) NMR spectroscopy were conducted to analyze yogurt without any pretreatment. ¹H, (13)C, and (31)P NMR signals were assigned to 10 types of compounds. The signals of α/β-lactose and α/β-galactose were separately observed in the ¹H NMR spectra. In addition, the signals from the acyl chains of milk fats were also successfully identified but overlapped with many other signals. Quantitative difference spectra were obtained by subtracting the diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra from the quantitative ¹H NMR spectra. This method allowed us to eliminate interference on the overlaps; therefore, the correct intensities of signals overlapped with those from the acyl chains of milk fat could be determined directly without separation. Moreover, the ¹H-(31)P HMBC spectra revealed for the first time that N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-1-phosphate is contained in yogurt.

  16. Measuring the dielectric properties of soil-organic mixtures using coaxial impedance dielectric reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisca, Franco M.; Montoro, Marcos A.

    2012-05-01

    Contamination of soils with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) is frequently produced by accidental spills and storage tanks or pipes leakage. The main goals dealing with soil and groundwater contamination include determining the extension of the affected zone, monitoring the contaminant plume and quantifying the pollution degree. The objective of this work is to evaluate the potential of dielectric permittivity measurements to detect the presence of NAPLs in sands. Tested samples were fine, medium, coarse and silty sand with different volumetric contents of water and paraffin oil. The dielectric permittivity was measured by means of a Coaxial Impedance Dielectric Reflectometry method in specimens with either known fluid content or at different stages during immiscible displacement tests. A simplified method was developed to quantify the amount of oil from dielectric permittivity measurements and effective mixture media models. Obtained results showed that groundwater contamination with NAPL and the monitoring of immiscible fluid displacement in saturated porous media can be clearly identified from dielectric measurements. Finally, very accurate results can be obtained when computing the contamination degree with the proposed method in comparison with the real volumetric content of NAPL (r2 > 90%).

  17. Complex Mixture Analysis of Organic Compounds in Yogurt by NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Hu, Fangyu; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    NMR measurements do not require separation and chemical modification of samples and therefore rapidly and directly provide non-targeted information on chemical components in complex mixtures. In this study, one-dimensional (1H, 13C, and 31P) and two-dimensional (1H-13C and 1H-31P) NMR spectroscopy were conducted to analyze yogurt without any pretreatment. 1H, 13C, and 31P NMR signals were assigned to 10 types of compounds. The signals of α/β-lactose and α/β-galactose were separately observed in the 1H NMR spectra. In addition, the signals from the acyl chains of milk fats were also successfully identified but overlapped with many other signals. Quantitative difference spectra were obtained by subtracting the diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra from the quantitative 1H NMR spectra. This method allowed us to eliminate interference on the overlaps; therefore, the correct intensities of signals overlapped with those from the acyl chains of milk fat could be determined directly without separation. Moreover, the 1H-31P HMBC spectra revealed for the first time that N-acetyl-d-glucosamine-1-phosphate is contained in yogurt. PMID:27322339

  18. Enhancing rock phosphate integration rate for fast bio-transformation of cow-dung waste-paper mixtures to organic fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Unuofin, F O; Siswana, M; Cishe, E N

    2016-01-01

    Rock phosphate (RP) addition in cow-dung waste-paper mixtures at rates above 2% P has been reported to increase the rate of bio-transformation and humification of organic waste mixtures during vermicomposting to produce organic fertilizer for organic farming. However, the optimization of RP for vermicomposting was not established. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal amount of RP integration rates for effective bio-transformation of cow-dung waste-paper mixtures. Arrays of RP integration degrees (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, and 4% P as RP) were thoroughly mixed with cow- dung waste-paper mixtures to achieve an optimized C:N ratio of 30 and allowed to vermidegrade following the introduction of earthworms at a stocking mass of 12.5 g-worms kg(-1). The bio-transformation of the waste mixtures was examined by measuring C:N ratios and humification index (HI) and per cent ash and volatile solids. Application of 1% P as RP resulted in fast bio-transformation and maturation of cow-dung waste-paper mixtures. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the morphological properties of the different vermicomposts affected by rates of RP showing the degree of degradation of initial compacted aggregates of cellulose and protein fibres in the mixtures at maturity. A germination test was used to further determine phytotoxicity of the final composts and microbial biomass assessment. The final vermicompost (organic fertilizer) had a C:N ratio of 7, MBC of 900 mg kg(-1) and HI of 27.1%. The RP incorporation rate of 1% P of RP investigated is therefore, recommended for efficient vermidegradation and humification of cow-dung waste-paper mixtures. However, higher rates of RP incorporation should be considered where greater P enrichment of the final vermicompost (organic fertilizer) is desired.

  19. A NEW MASS SPECTROMETRIC TECHNIQUE FOR IDENTIFYING TRACE-LEVEL ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN COMPLEX MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory



    Most organic compounds are not found in mass spectral libraries and cannot be easily identified from low resolution mass spectra. Ion Composition Elucidation (ICE) utilizes selected ion recording with a double focusing mass spectrometer in a new way to determine exact mas...

  20. Nitric acid-organic mixtures surveyed for use in separation by anion exchange methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, C. A. A.; Faris, J. P.; Stewart, D. C.

    1968-01-01

    Column elution-spectrographic analysis technique compares certain solvents directly to the methanol system, using inert rare earths instead of actinides. Distribution ratios for americium between 90 percent solvent, 10 percent 5 M nitric acid and Dowex 1 nitrate form resin for a large group of organics miscible in water was determined.

  1. SOLUBILITY OF ORGANIC BIOCIDES IN SUPERCRITICAL CO2 AND CO2+ COSOLVENT MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solubilities of four organic biocides in supercritical carbon dioxide (Sc-CO2) were measured using a dynamic flowr apparatus over a pressure range of 10 to 30 MPa and temperature of 35-80 degrees C. The biocides studied were: Amical-48 (diiodomethyl p-tolyl sulfone), chlorothalo...

  2. Uphill diffusion in multicomponent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2015-05-21

    Molecular diffusion is an omnipresent phenomena that is important in a wide variety of contexts in chemical, physical, and biological processes. In the majority of cases, the diffusion process can be adequately described by Fick's law that postulates a linear relationship between the flux of any species and its own concentration gradient. Most commonly, a component diffuses down the concentration gradient. The major objective of this review is to highlight a very wide variety of situations that cause the uphill transport of one constituent in the mixture. Uphill diffusion may occur in multicomponent mixtures in which the diffusion flux of any species is strongly coupled to that of its partner species. Such coupling effects often arise from strong thermodynamic non-idealities. For a quantitative description we need to use chemical potential gradients as driving forces. The transport of ionic species in aqueous solutions is coupled with its partner ions because of the electro-neutrality constraints; such constraints may accelerate or decelerate a specific ion. When uphill diffusion occurs, we observe transient overshoots during equilibration; the equilibration process follows serpentine trajectories in composition space. For mixtures of liquids, alloys, ceramics and glasses the serpentine trajectories could cause entry into meta-stable composition zones; such entry could result in phenomena such as spinodal decomposition, spontaneous emulsification, and the Ouzo effect. For distillation of multicomponent mixtures that form azeotropes, uphill diffusion may allow crossing of distillation boundaries that are normally forbidden. For mixture separations with microporous adsorbents, uphill diffusion can cause supra-equilibrium loadings to be achieved during transient uptake within crystals; this allows the possibility of over-riding adsorption equilibrium for achieving difficult separations.

  3. Nanostructural organization in carbon disulfide/ionic liquid mixtures: Molecular dynamics simulations and optical Kerr effect spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peng; Voth, Gregory A.; Xiao, Dong; Hines, Larry G.; Bartsch, Richard A.; Quitevis, Edward L.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, the nanostructural organization and subpicosecond intermolecular dynamics in the mixtures of CS2 and the room temperature ionic liquid (IL) 1-pentyl-3-methylimidazolium bis{(trifluoromethane)sulfonyl}amide ([C5mim][NTf2]) were studied as a function of concentration using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and optical heterodyne-detected Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy. At low CS2 concentrations (<10 mol.% CS2/IL), the MD simulations indicate that the CS2 molecules are localized in the nonpolar domains. In contrast, at higher concentrations (≥10 mol.% CS2/IL), the MD simulations show aggregation of the CS2 molecules. The optical Kerr effect (OKE) spectra of the mixtures are interpreted in terms of an additivity model with the components arising from the subpicosecond dynamics of CS2 and the IL. Comparison of the CS2-component with the OKE spectra of CS2 in alkane solvents is consistent with CS2 mainly being localized in the nonpolar domains, even at high CS2 concentrations, and the local CS2 concentration being higher than the bulk CS2 concentration.

  4. Growth of columnar hydrogel colloidal crystals in water-organic solvent mixture.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Cai, Tong; Tang, Shijun; Marquez, Manuel; Hu, Zhibing

    2006-01-31

    A novel emulsion method has been demonstrated to grow columnar hydrogel colloidal crystals by mixing an aqueous suspension of poly-N-isopropylacrylamide-co-allylamine microgels with organic solvent, driven by the coalescence of micelles consisting of organic oil droplets coated by many microgels. This method leads to microgel colloidal crystals of several centimeters growing from the top to the bottom along the gravity direction. Both temperature and polymer concentration play critical roles for the formation of columnar crystals. A phase diagram has been determined, and it can be used as a guide to selectively grow different crystals, including columnar crystals and randomly oriented crystals, and enable the coexistence of columnar crystals and randomly oriented crystals.

  5. Evaluations of an Enhanced Total Hydrocarbon Analyzer With Complex Mixtures of Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, John H.; Limero, Thomas F.; James, John T.; Breach, James; Hinton, Mark

    1995-01-01

    From the earliest manned missions, the volatile organic compound (VOC) content of spacecraft air has been a concern because of a much greater potential for contamination than air in most terrestrial settings. First, the volume of air is small compared to the mass of man- made materials comprising the interior furnishings of the spacecraft. These man-made materials offgas VOCs trapped during manufacture. Second, the nitrogen fraction of the air is recycled. Any VOCs not scrubbed out with charcoal filters or aqueous condensate (mainly water expired by the crew) will accumulate in the air. Third, the crew emits metabolic VOCs. Fourth, experimental payloads can also offgas or accidentally release a VOC; in fact a major organic constituent of the atmosphere is the disinfectant isopropanol released from swabs used in medical experiments.

  6. High performance liquid chromatography study of complex oxygenated alkane mixtures from organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalafut-Pettibone, Alicia J.; Klems, Joseph P.; McGivern, W. Sean

    2013-05-01

    The composition of secondary organic aerosol particles is of primary importance both in identifying particle sources and in determining physical parameters, such as cloud condensation nucleus propensity. Further, measurements of composition are valuable in determining the chemistry of formation and aging. In this work, we describe the application of a recently-developed derivatization technique to a complex synthetic organic aerosol derived from the photolysis of 1-iodooctane. The technique utilizes high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to both ultravioletvisible (UV/VIS) spectroscopy and tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) to determine the overall distribution of hydroxyl (OH), non-acid carbonyl (C=O), and carboxylic acid (COOH) moieties as well as the specific identities of chromatographically separated products. This composition data will then be used to constrain models of the particle formation mechanisms.

  7. Evaluation of the COSHH Essentials model with a mixture of organic chemicals at a medium-sized paint producer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Slaven, James; Bowen, Russell B; Harper, Martin

    2011-01-01

    the threshold limit value of the mixture (P > 1 = 0.2375), the expected personal exposure after adjusting for the assigned protection factor for the respirators in use would be considerably lower (P > 1 = 0.0161). Thus, our findings suggested that the COSHH essentials model worked reasonably well for the volatile organic chemicals at the plant. However, it was difficult to override the reproductive hazard even though it was meant to be possible in principle. Further, it became apparent that an input of existing controls, which is not possible in the web-based model, may have allowed the model be more widely applicable. The experience of using the web-based COSHH Essentials model generated some suggestions to provide a more user-friendly tool to the model users who do not have expertise in occupational hygiene.

  8. Study on Exploration of Azeotropic Point of Pb-Sb Alloys by Vacuum Distillation and Ab Initio Molecular Dynamic Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bingyi; Jiang, Wenlong; Yang, Bin; Chen, Xiumin; Xu, Baoqiang; Kong, Lingxin; Liu, Dachun; Dai, Yongnian

    2016-10-01

    The possibility of the separation of Pb-Sb alloys by vacuum distillation was investigated theoretically. The results show that Pb and Sb can be separated by vacuum distillation. However, the experimental results show that vacuum distillation technique does not provide clear separation. According to the literature, Pb-Sb alloys belong to azeotropic compounds under some certain temperature; the experiment and computer simulation were carried out based on the exceptional condition so as to analyze the reason from the experiment and microstructure of Pb-Sb alloys perspective. The separation of Pb-Sb alloys by vacuum distillation was experimentally carried out to probe the azeotropic point. Also, the functions, such as partial radial distributions functions, the structure factor, mean square displacement, and the density of state, were calculated by ab-initio molecular dynamics for the representation of the structure and properties of Pb-Sb alloys with different composition of Sb. The experimental results indicate that there exists common volatilization for Pb-Sb alloys when Sb content is 16.5 wt pct. On the other hand, the calculation results show that there is an intense interaction between Pb and Sb when Sb content is 22 wt pct, which supports the experimental results although Sb content is slightly deviation.

  9. Sorption of acidic organic solute onto kaolinitic soils from methanol-water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juhee; Kim, Minhee; Hyun, Seunghun; Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Ok, Yong Sik

    2012-01-01

    The fate of the acidic organic solute from the soil-water-solvent system is not well-understood. In this study, the effect of the acidic functional group of organic solute in the sorption from cosolvent system was evaluated. The sorption of naphthalene (NAP) and 1-naphthoic acid (1-NAPA) by three kaolinitic soils and two model sorbents (kaolinite and humic acid) were measured as functions of the methanol volume fractions (f (c) ≤ 0.4) and ionic compositions (CaCl(2) and KCl). The solubility of 1-NAPA was also measured in various ionic compositions. The sorption data were interpreted using the cosolvency-induced sorption model. The K (m) values (= the linear sorption coefficient) of NAP with kaolinitic soil for both ionic compositions was log linearly decreased with f (c). However, the K (m) values of 1-NAPA with both ionic compositions remained relatively constant over the f (c) range. For the model sorbent, the K (m) values of 1-NAPA with kaolinite for the KCl system and with humic acid for both ionic compositions decreased with f (c), while the sorption of 1-NAPA with kaolinite for the CaCl(2) system was increased with f (c). From the solubility data of 1-NAPA with f (c), no significant difference was observed with the different ionic compositions, indicating an insignificant change in the aqueous activity of the liquid phase. In conclusion, the enhanced 1-NAPA sorption, greater than that predicted from the cosolvency-induced model, was due to an untraceable interaction between the carboxylate and hydrophilic soil domain in the methanol-water system. Therefore, in order to accurately predict the environmental fate of acidic pesticides and organic solutes, an effort to quantitatively incorporate the enhanced hydrophilic sorption into the current cosolvency-induced sorption model is required.

  10. Methods of analysis for complex organic aerosol mixtures from urban emission sources of particulate carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurek, M.A. ); Hildemann, L.M. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Cass, G.R.; Rogge, W.F. ); Simoneit, B.R.T. . Coll. of Oceanography)

    1990-10-01

    Organic aerosols comprise approximately 30% by mass of the total fine particulate matter present in urban atmospheres. The chemical composition of such aerosols is complex and reflects input from multiple sources of primary emissions to the atmosphere, as well as from secondary production of carbonaceous aerosol species via photochemical reactions. To identify discrete sources of fine carbonaceous particles in urban atmospheres, analytical methods must reconcile both bulk chemical and molecular properties of the total carbonaceous aerosol fraction. This paper presents an overview of the analytical protocol developed and used in a study of the major sources of fine carbon particles emitted to an urban atmosphere. 23 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms : implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures.

    SciTech Connect

    Banaszak, J.E.; Reed, D.T.; Rittmann, B.E.

    1999-02-12

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, we assess how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. We describe how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility. We explain why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. We describe the development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions. Throughout, we identify the key research needs.

  12. A traceable reference for direct comparative assessment of total naphthenic acid concentrations in commercial and acid extractable organic mixtures derived from oil sands process water.

    PubMed

    Brunswick, Pamela; Hewitt, L Mark; Frank, Richard A; Kim, Marcus; van Aggelen, Graham; Shang, Dayue

    2017-02-23

    The advantage of using naphthenic acid (NA) mixtures for the determination of total NA lies in their chemical characteristics and identification of retention times distinct from isobaric interferences. However, the differing homolog profiles and unknown chemical structures of NA mixtures do not allow them to be considered a traceable reference material. The current study provides a new tool for the comparative assessment of different NA mixtures by direct reference to a single, well-defined and traceable compound, decanoic-d19 acid. The method employed an established liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/QToF) procedure that was applicable both to the classic O2 NA species dominating commercial mixtures and additionally to the O4 species known to be present in acid extractable organics (AEOs) derived from oil sands process water (OSPW). Four different commercial NA mixtures and one OSPW-derived AEOs mixture were comparatively assessed. Results showed significant difference among Merichem Technical, Aldrich, Acros, and Kodak commercial NA mixtures with respect to "equivalent to decanoic-d19 acid" concentration ratios to nominal. Furthermore, different lot numbers of single commercial NA mixtures were found to be inconsistent with respect to their homolog content by percent response. Differences in the observed homolog content varied significantly, particularly at the lower (n = 9-14) and higher (n = 20-23) carbon number ranges. Results highlighted the problem between using NA mixtures from different sources and different lot numbers but offered a solution to the problem from a concentration perspective. It is anticipated that this tool may be utilized in review of historical data in addition to future studies, such as the study of OSPW derived acid extractable organics (AEOs) and fractions employed during toxicological studies.

  13. Measurements of thermodynamic and optical properties of selected aqueous organic and organic-inorganic mixtures of atmospheric relevance.

    PubMed

    Lienhard, Daniel M; Bones, David L; Zuend, Andreas; Krieger, Ulrich K; Reid, Jonathan P; Peter, Thomas

    2012-10-11

    Atmospheric aerosol particles can exhibit liquid solution concentrations supersaturated with respect to the dissolved organic and inorganic species and supercooled with respect to ice. In this study, thermodynamic and optical properties of sub- and supersaturated aqueous solutions of atmospheric interest are presented. The density, refractive index, water activity, ice melting temperatures, and homogeneous ice freezing temperatures of binary aqueous solutions containing L(+)-tartaric acid, tannic acid, and levoglucosan and ternary aqueous solutions containing levoglucosan and one of the salts NH(4)HSO(4), (NH(4))(2)SO(4), and NH(4)NO(3) have been measured in the supersaturated concentration range for the first time. In addition, the density and refractive index of binary aqueous citric acid and raffinose solutions and the glass transition temperatures of binary aqueous L(+)-tartaric acid and levoglucosan solutions have been measured. The data presented here are derived from experiments on single levitated microdroplets and bulk solutions and should find application in thermodynamic and atmospheric aerosol models as well as in food science applications.

  14. Factors influencing inapplicability of cosolvency-induced model on organic acid sorption onto humic substance from methanol mixture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minhee; Kim, Juhee; Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Hyun, Seunghun

    2015-10-01

    Applicability of cosolvency model for describing the sorption of organic acids to humic substance was investigated by analyzing dataset of sorption (K m) and solubility (S m) of selected solutes (benzoic acid, 1-naphthoic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP)) as a function of pH(appCME) (apparent pH of liquid phase) and f c (methanol volume fractions). For all solutes, the K m decreased with f c with the K m reduction being less than the S m-based prediction. The slope of log K m-f c plot in the three organic carboxylic acids was well correlated with their cosolvency power, whereas the data of organic phenolic acid (2,4,6-TCP) was placed above the trend, indicating the different actions of functional groups. The occurrence of Ca(2+) bridge between carboxylate and negatively charged humic surface may explain this phenomenon. Normalizing the K m to the corresponding S m (α' = K m/S m) was not in unity over the pH(app)-f c range but decreased with f c, indicating a possible structural modification of sorption domain favoring extra sorption. For a given solute, the α' of neutral species was always greater than that of anionic species, showing that extra interaction will be likely at pH(app) organic acids by humic substance in methanol/water mixtures. Modification of humic structure and hydrophilic interaction (such as Ca(2+) bridge and same-charge repulsion) is considered a relevant process that possibly restricts the applicability of the cosolvency model.

  15. Picosecond dynamics of proton transfer of a 7-hydroxyflavylium salt in aqueous-organic solvent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Adilson A; Quina, Frank H; Maçanita, António A L

    2011-10-13

    The intermediacy of the geminate base-proton pair (A*···H(+)) in excited-state proton-transfer (ESPT) reactions (two-step mechanism) has been investigated employing the synthetic flavylium salt 7-hydroxy-4-methyl-flavylium chloride (HMF). In aqueous solution, the ESPT mechanism involves solely the excited acid AH(+)* and base A* forms of HMF as indicated by the fluorescence spectra and double-exponential fluorescence decays (two species, two decay times). However, upon addition of either 1,4-dioxane or 1,2-propylene glycol, the decays become triple-exponential with a term consistent with the presence of the geminate base-proton pair A*···H(+). The geminate pair becomes detectable because of the increase in the recombination rate constant, k(rec), of (A*···H(+)) with increasing the mole fraction of added organic cosolvent. Because the two-step ESPT mechanism splits the intrinsic prototropic reaction rates (deprotonation of AH(+)*, k(d), and recombination, k(rec), of A*···H(+)) from the diffusion controlled rates (dissociation, k(diss), and formation, k(diff)[H(+)], of A*···H(+)), the experimental detection of the geminate pair provides a wealth of information on the proton-transfer reaction (k(d) and k(rec)) as well as on proton diffusion/migration (k(diss) and k(diff)).

  16. In vitro steroidogenic effects of mixtures of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) extracted from burbot (Lota lota) caught in two Norwegian lakes.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Karin E; Montaño, Mauricio; Olsaker, Ingrid; Dahl, Ellen; Berg, Vidar; Karlsson, Camilla; Murk, Albertinka J; Skaare, Janneche U; Ropstad, Erik; Verhaegen, Steven

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of two mixtures of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) on steroidogenesis in the H295R cell line. The two mixtures were obtained from the livers of burbot (Lota lota) caught in two Norwegian lakes (Mjøsa and Losna) with different contaminant profiles. Steroid hormone levels in the cell culture medium and mRNA levels of 16 genes involved in steroidogenesis were investigated. The crude Lake Mjøsa extract had to be diluted ten times more than the Lake Losna extract in order to prevent cytotoxicity. The ten times diluted Lake Mjøsa mixture had higher levels of DDT and derivates (∑DDTs, 1.7 times) and brominated flame retardants (∑BDEs and HBCD, 15-25 times) than the Lake Losna mixture, which, on the other hand, had higher concentrations of ∑PCBs (1.5 times higher) and also of HCB, ∑HCH isomers and ∑chlordane isomers (5-20 times higher). In the cell culture media, only cortisol levels were increased at the highest exposure concentration to the Lake Mjøsa mixture, while both cortisol and estradiol levels were increased following exposure to the two highest Lake Losna mixture exposure concentrations. Testosterone levels decreased only at the highest exposure concentration of the Lake Losna mixture. Multivariate models suggested that ∑PCBs, and to a lesser extent ∑DDTs, were responsible for the cortisol responses, while estradiol and testosterone alterations were best explained by HCB and ∑PCBs, respectively. Exposure to the mixtures generally increased mRNA levels, with smaller effects exerted by the Lake Mjøsa mixture than the Lake Losna mixture. It was concluded that both mixtures affected steroidogenesis in the H295R cells. Small differences in mixture composition, rather than the high content of brominated flame retardants in the Lake Mjøsa mixture, were suggested to be the most probable reason for the apparent differences in potencies of the two mixtures.

  17. A Bayesian mixture model relating dose to critical organs and functional complication in 3D conformal radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy D; Taylor, Jeremy M G; Ten Haken, Randall K; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2005-10-01

    A goal of cancer radiation therapy is to deliver maximum dose to the target tumor while minimizing complications due to irradiation of critical organs. Technological advances in 3D conformal radiation therapy has allowed great strides in realizing this goal; however, complications may still arise. Critical organs may be adjacent to tumors or in the path of the radiation beam. Several mathematical models have been proposed that describe the relationship between dose and observed functional complication; however, only a few published studies have successfully fit these models to data using modern statistical methods which make efficient use of the data. One complication following radiation therapy of head and neck cancers is the patient's inability to produce saliva. Xerostomia (dry mouth) leads to high susceptibility to oral infection and dental caries and is, in general, unpleasant and an annoyance. We present a dose-damage-injury model that subsumes any of the various mathematical models relating dose to damage. The model is a nonlinear, longitudinal mixed effects model where the outcome (saliva flow rate) is modeled as a mixture of a Dirac measure at zero and a gamma distribution whose mean is a function of time and dose. Bayesian methods are used to estimate the relationship between dose delivered to the parotid glands and the observational outcome-saliva flow rate. A summary measure of the dose-damage relationship is modeled and assessed by a Bayesian chi(2) test for goodness-of-fit.

  18. Modeling and interpreting bioavailability of organic contaminant mixtures in subsurface environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haws, Nathan W.; Ball, William P.; Bouwer, Edward J.

    2006-01-01

    Bioavailability often controls the fate of organic contaminants in surface and subsurface aquatic environments. Bioavailability can be limited by sorption, mass transfer, and intrinsic biodegradation potential and can be further altered by the presence of other compounds. This paper reviews current perspectives on the processes influencing subsurface contaminant bioavailability, how these processes are modeled, and how the relative role of the various processes can be assessed through bioavailability indices. Although these processes are increasingly well understood, the use of sophisticated models and indices often are precluded by an inability to estimate the many parameters that are associated with complex models. Nonetheless, the proper representation of sorption, mass transfer, biodegradation, and co-solute effects can be critical in predicting bio-attenuation. The influence of these processes on contaminant fate is illustrated with numerical simulations for the simultaneous degradation of toluene (growth substrate) and trichloroethylene (nongrowth cometabolite) in hypothetical, aerobic, solid-water systems. The results show how the relative impacts on contaminant fate of the model's various component processes depends upon system conditions, including co-solute concentrations. Slow biodegradation rates increase the inhibition effects of a cometabolite and suppress the rate enhancement effects of a growth substrate. Irrespective of co-solute effects, contaminant fate is less sensitive to biodegradation processes in systems with strong sorption and slow desorption rates. Bioavailability indices can be used to relate these findings and to help identify appropriate modeling simplifications. In general, however, there remains a need to redefine such indices in order that bioavailability concepts can be better incorporated into site characterization, remediation design, and regulatory oversight.

  19. Nonequimolar Mixture of Organic Acids and Bases: An Exception to the Rule of Thumb for Salt or Cocrystal.

    PubMed

    Pratik, Saied Md; Datta, Ayan

    2016-08-04

    Formation of salt and/or cocrystal from organic acid-base mixtures has significant consequences in the pharmaceutical industry and its related intellectual property rights (IPR). On the basis of calculations using periodic dispersion corrected DFT (DFT-D2) on formic acid-pyridine adduct, we have demonstrated that an equimolar stoichiometric ratio (1:1) exists as a neutral cocrystal. On the other hand, the nonequimolar stoichiometry (4:1) readily forms an ionic salt. While the former result is in agreement with the ΔpKa rule between the base and the acid, the latter is not. Calculations reveal that, within the equimolar manifold (n:n; n = 1-4), the mixture exists as a hydrogen bonded complex in a cocrystal-like environment. However, the nonequimolar mixture in a ratio of 5:1 and above readily forms salt-like structures. Because of the cooperative nature of hydrogen bonding, the strength of the O-H···N hydrogen bond increases and eventually transforms into O(-)···H-N(+) (complete proton transfer) as the ratio of formic acid increases and forms salt as experimentally observed. Clearly, an enhanced polarization of formic acid on aggregation increases its acidity and, hence, facilitates its transfer to pyridine. Motion of the proton from formic acid to pyridine is shown to follow a relay mechanism wherein the proton that is far away from pyridine is ionized and is subsequently transferred to pyridine via hopping across the neutral formic acid molecules (Grotthuss type pathway). The dynamic nature of protons in the condensed phase is also evident for cocrystals as the barrier of intramolecular proton migration in formic acid (leading to tautomerism), ΔH(⧧)tautomer = 17.1 kcal/mol in the presence of pyridine is half of that in free formic acid (cf. ΔH(⧧)tautomer = 34.2 kcal/mol). We show that an acid-base reaction can be altered in the solid state to selectively form a cocrystal or salt depending on the strength and nature of aggregation.

  20. The Challenge of Peat Substitution in Organic Seedling Production: Optimization of Growing Media Formulation through Mixture Design and Response Surface Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ceglie, Francesco Giovanni; Bustamante, Maria Angeles; Ben Amara, Mouna; Tittarelli, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Peat replacement is an increasing demand in containerized and transplant production, due to the environmental constraints associated to peat use. However, despite the wide information concerning the use of alternative materials as substrates, it is very complex to establish the best materials and mixtures. This work evaluates the use of mixture design and surface response methodology in a peat substitution experiment using two alternative materials (green compost and palm fibre trunk waste) for transplant production of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.); melon, (Cucumis melo L.); and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) in organic farming conditions. In general, the substrates showed suitable properties for their use in seedling production, showing the best plant response the mixture of 20% green compost, 39% palm fibre and 31% peat. The mixture design and applied response surface methodology has shown to be an useful approach to optimize substrate formulations in peat substitution experiments to standardize plant responses.

  1. The Challenge of Peat Substitution in Organic Seedling Production: Optimization of Growing Media Formulation through Mixture Design and Response Surface Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ceglie, Francesco Giovanni; Bustamante, Maria Angeles; Ben Amara, Mouna; Tittarelli, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Peat replacement is an increasing demand in containerized and transplant production, due to the environmental constraints associated to peat use. However, despite the wide information concerning the use of alternative materials as substrates, it is very complex to establish the best materials and mixtures. This work evaluates the use of mixture design and surface response methodology in a peat substitution experiment using two alternative materials (green compost and palm fibre trunk waste) for transplant production of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.); melon, (Cucumis melo L.); and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) in organic farming conditions. In general, the substrates showed suitable properties for their use in seedling production, showing the best plant response the mixture of 20% green compost, 39% palm fibre and 31% peat. The mixture design and applied response surface methodology has shown to be an useful approach to optimize substrate formulations in peat substitution experiments to standardize plant responses. PMID:26070163

  2. A chromatographic method to analyze products from photo-oxidation of anthropogenic and biogenic mixtures of volatile organic compounds in smog chambers.

    PubMed

    Pindado Jiménez, Oscar; Pérez Pastor, Rosa M; Vivanco, Marta G; Santiago Aladro, Manuel

    2013-03-15

    A method for quantifying secondary organic aerosol compounds (SOA) and water soluble secondary organic aerosol compounds (WSOA) produced from photo-oxidation of complex mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in smog chambers by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been developed. This method employs a double extraction with water and methanol jointly to a double derivatization with N,O-bis (trimethylsilil) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) and O-(2,3,4,5,6)-pentafluorobenzyl-hydroxylamine hydrochloride (PFBHA) followed by an analysis performed by GC/MS. The analytical procedure complements other methodologies because it can analyze SOA and WSOA compounds simultaneously at trace levels. As application, the methodology was employed to quantify the organic composition of aerosols formed in a smog chamber as a result of photo-oxidation of two different mixtures of volatile organic compounds: an anthropogenic mixture and a biogenic mixture. The analytical method allowed us to quantify up to 17 SOA compounds at levels higher than 20 ng m(-3) with reasonable recovery and a precision below 11%. Values found for applicability, selectivity, linearity, precision, recovery, detection limit, quantification limit and sensitivity demonstrated that the methodology can be satisfactorily applied to quantify SOA and WSOA.

  3. A Comparison of delO18 Composition of Water Extracted from Suction Lysimeters, Centrifugation, and Azeotropic Distillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, A.; Tindall, J. A.; Friedel, M. J.

    2005-12-01

    Concentration of delO18 in water samples extracted by suction lysimeters is compared to samples obtained by methods of centrifugation and azeotropic distillation. Intact soil cores (30 cm diameter by 40 cm height) were extracted from two different sites. Site 1 was rapid infiltration basin number 50, near Altamonte Springs in Seminole County, Florida on properties belonging to the Walt Disney World Resort Complex. Site 2 was the Missouri Management System Evaluation Area (MSEA) near Centralia in Boone County, Missouri. The delO18 water was analyzed on a mass spectrophotometer. Potassium Bromide (KBr) was also used as a tracer and analyzed by ion chromatography. A portion of the data obtained was modeled using CXTFIT. Water collected by centrifugation and azeotropic distillation data were about 2-5% more negative than that collected by suction lysimeter values from the Florida (sandy) soil and about 5-7 % more negative from the Missouri (well structured clay) soil. Results indicate that the majority of soil water in well structured soil is strongly bound to soil grain surfaces and is not easily sampled by suction lysimeters. Also, it is plausible that evaporation caused some delO18 enrichment in the suction lysimeters. Suction lysimeters preferentially sampled water held at lower matric potentials, which may not represent total soil water. In cases where a sufficient volume of water has passed through the soil profile and displaced all previous pore water, suction lysimeters will however collect a representative sample of all the water at that depth interval. It is suggested that for stable isotope studies monitoring precipitation and soil water, suction lysimeters be installed at shallow depths (10 cm). Samples should also be coordinated with precipitation events. The CXTFIT program worked well for Florida soils (a more homogeneous sand), but gave poor performance for Missouri soils (well structured clays) except for deeper depths where clay structure was less

  4. A COSMO-RS based guide to analyze/quantify the polarity of ionic liquids and their mixtures with organic cosolvents.

    PubMed

    Palomar, José; Torrecilla, José S; Lemus, Jesús; Ferro, Víctor R; Rodríguez, Francisco

    2010-02-28

    A COSMO-RS descriptor (S(sigma-profile)) has been used in quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies by a neural network (NN) for the prediction of empirical solvent polarity E(T)(N) scale of neat ionic liquids (ILs) and their mixtures with organic solvents. S(sigma-profile) is a two-dimensional quantum chemical parameter which quantifies the polar electronic charge of chemical structures on the polarity (sigma) scale. Firstly, a radial basis neural network exact fit (RBNN) is successfully optimized for the prediction of E(T)(N), the solvatochromic parameter of a wide variety of neat organic solvents and ILs, including imidazolium, pyridinium, ammonium, phosphonium and pyrrolidinium families, solely using the S(sigma-profile) of individual molecules and ions. Subsequently, a quantitative structure-activity map (QSAM), a new concept recently developed, is proposed as a valuable tool for the molecular understanding of IL polarity, by relating the E(T)(N) polarity parameter to the electronic structure of cations and anions given by quantum-chemical COSMO-RS calculations. Finally, based on the additive character of the S(sigma-profile) descriptor, we propose to simulate the mixture of IL-organic solvents by the estimation of the S(sigma-profile)(Mixture) descriptor, defined as the weighted mean of the S(sigma-profile) values of the components. Then, the E(T)(N) parameters for binary solvent mixtures, including ILs, are accurately predicted using the S(sigma-profile)(Mixture) values from the RBNN model previously developed for pure solvents. As result, we obtain a unique neural network tool to simulate, with similar reliability, the E(T)(N) polarity of a wide variety of pure ILs as well as their mixtures with organic solvents, which exhibit significant positive and negative deviations from ideality.

  5. Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosol from Irradiated a-Pinene/Tolueme/NOx Mixtures and the Effect of Isoprene and Sulfur Dioxide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was generated by irradiating a series of a-pinene/toluene/NOx mixtures in the absence and presence of isoprene or sulfur dioxide. The purpose of the experiment was to evaluate the extent to which chemical perturbations to this base-case (a-pinene/...

  6. Quantitative structure-activity relationships and mixture toxicity of organic chemicals in Photobacterium phosphoreum: the Microtox test

    SciTech Connect

    Hermens, J.; Busser, F.; Leeuwangh, P.; Musch, A.

    1985-02-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships were calculated for the inhibition of bioluminescence of Photobacterium phosphoreum by 22 nonreactive organic chemicals. The inhibition was measured using the Microtox test and correlated with the partition coefficient between n-octanol and water (Poct), molar refractivity (MR), and molar volume (MW/d). At log Poct less than 1 and greater than 3, deviations from linearity were observed. Introduction of MR and MW/d improved the quality of the relationships. The influences of MR or MW/d may be related with an interaction of the tested chemicals to the enzyme system which produces the light emission. The sensitivity of the Microtox test to the 22 tested compounds is comparable to a 14-day acute mortality test with guppies for chemicals with log Poct less than 4. The inhibition of bioluminescence by a mixture of the tested compounds was slightly less than was expected in case of concentration addition. The Microtox test can give a good estimate of the total aspecific minimum toxicity of polluted waters. When rather lipophilic compounds or pollutants with more specific modes of action are present, this test will underestimate the toxicity to other aquatic life.

  7. A Mixture of Persistent Organic Pollutants and Perfluorooctanesulfonic Acid Induces Similar Behavioural Responses, but Different Gene Expression Profiles in Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Khezri, Abdolrahman; Fraser, Thomas W. K.; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Kamstra, Jorke H.; Berg, Vidar; Zimmer, Karin E.; Ropstad, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are widespread in the environment and some may be neurotoxic. As we are exposed to complex mixtures of POPs, we aimed to investigate how a POP mixture based on Scandinavian human blood data affects behaviour and neurodevelopment during early life in zebrafish. Embryos/larvae were exposed to a series of sub-lethal doses and behaviour was examined at 96 h post fertilization (hpf). In order to determine the sensitivity window to the POP mixture, exposure models of 6 to 48 and 48 to 96 hpf were used. The expression of genes related to neurological development was also assessed. Results indicate that the POP mixture increases the swimming speed of larval zebrafish following exposure between 48 to 96 hpf. This behavioural effect was associated with the perfluorinated compounds, and more specifically with perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS). The expression of genes related to the stress response, GABAergic, dopaminergic, histaminergic, serotoninergic, cholinergic systems and neuronal maintenance, were altered. However, there was little overlap in those genes that were significantly altered by the POP mixture and PFOS. Our findings show that the POP mixture and PFOS can have a similar effect on behaviour, yet alter the expression of genes relevant to neurological development differently. PMID:28146072

  8. Validating the Equilibrium Stage Model for an Azeotropic System in a Laboratorial Distillation Column

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duarte, B. P. M.; Coelho Pinheiro, M. N.; Silva, D. C. M.; Moura, M. J.

    2006-01-01

    The experiment described is an excellent opportunity to apply theoretical concepts of distillation, thermodynamics of mixtures and process simulation at laboratory scale, and simultaneously enhance the ability of students to operate, control and monitor complex units.

  9. Thermodynamic study of (anthracene + phenanthrene) solid state mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rice, James W; Fu, Jinxia; Sandström, Emma; Ditto, Jenna C; Suuberg, Eric M

    2015-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are common components of many materials, such as petroleum and various types of tars. They are generally present in mixtures, occurring both naturally and as byproducts of fuel processing operations. It is important to understand the thermodynamic properties of such mixtures in order to understand better and predict their behavior (i.e., fate and transport) in the environment and in industrial operations. To characterize better the thermodynamic behavior of PAH mixtures, the phase behavior of a binary (anthracene + phenanthrene) system was studied by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and the Knudsen effusion technique. Mixtures of (anthracene + phenanthrene) exhibit non-ideal mixture behavior. They form a lower-melting, phenanthrene-rich phase with an initial melting temperature of 372 K (identical to the melting temperature of pure phenanthrene) and a vapor pressure of roughly lnP/Pa = -2.38. The phenanthrene-rich phase coexists with an anthracene-rich phase when the mole fraction of phenanthrene (xP) in the mixture is less than or equal to 0.80. Mixtures initially at xP = 0.90 consist entirely of the phenanthrene-rich phase and sublime at nearly constant vapor pressure and composition, consistent with azeotrope-like behavior. Quasi-azeotropy was also observed for very high-content anthracene mixtures (2.5 < xP < 5) indicating that anthracene may accommodate very low levels of phenanthrene in its crystal structure.

  10. Thermodynamic study of (anthracene + phenanthrene) solid state mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Rice, James W.; Fu, Jinxia; Sandström, Emma; Ditto, Jenna C.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are common components of many materials, such as petroleum and various types of tars. They are generally present in mixtures, occurring both naturally and as byproducts of fuel processing operations. It is important to understand the thermodynamic properties of such mixtures in order to understand better and predict their behavior (i.e., fate and transport) in the environment and in industrial operations. To characterize better the thermodynamic behavior of PAH mixtures, the phase behavior of a binary (anthracene + phenanthrene) system was studied by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and the Knudsen effusion technique. Mixtures of (anthracene + phenanthrene) exhibit non-ideal mixture behavior. They form a lower-melting, phenanthrene-rich phase with an initial melting temperature of 372 K (identical to the melting temperature of pure phenanthrene) and a vapor pressure of roughly lnP/Pa = −2.38. The phenanthrene-rich phase coexists with an anthracene-rich phase when the mole fraction of phenanthrene (xP) in the mixture is less than or equal to 0.80. Mixtures initially at xP = 0.90 consist entirely of the phenanthrene-rich phase and sublime at nearly constant vapor pressure and composition, consistent with azeotrope-like behavior. Quasi-azeotropy was also observed for very high-content anthracene mixtures (2.5 < xP < 5) indicating that anthracene may accommodate very low levels of phenanthrene in its crystal structure. PMID:26973354

  11. Densities and vapor-liquid equilibria in binary mixtures formed by propyl methanoate + ethanol, + propan-1-ol, and + butan-1-ol at 160.0 kPa

    SciTech Connect

    Falcon, J.; Ortega, J.; Gonzalez, E.

    1996-07-01

    Densities and excess volumes were determined at 298.15 K for propyl methanoate + ethanol, + propan-1-ol, and + butan-1-ol. The results of those quantities were then correlated to get the concentrations of vapor-liquid equilibrium obtained isobarically at 160 kPa for the same mixtures. Two mixtures show azeotropes: for propyl methanoate (1) + ethanol (2), x{sub 1} = 0.443 at T = 358.7 K; and for propyl methanoate (1) + propan-1-ol (2), x{sub 1} = 0.762 at T = 368.2 K. The mixtures are thermodynamically consistent, and the predictions made using several group-contribution models are satisfactory.

  12. The structural organization of N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone + water mixtures: A densitometry, x-ray diffraction, and molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Usula, M.; Marincola, F. Cesare; Porcedda, S.; Mocci, F.; Gontrani, L.; Caminiti, R.

    2014-03-28

    A combined approach of molecular dynamics simulations, wide angle X-ray scattering experiments, and density measurements was employed to study the structural properties of N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) + water mixtures over the whole concentration range. Remarkably, a very good agreement between computed and experimental densities and diffraction patterns was achieved, especially if the effect of the mixture composition on NMP charges is taken into account. Analysis of the intermolecular organization, as revealed by the radial and spatial distribution functions of relevant solvent atoms, nicely explained the density maximum observed experimentally.

  13. Energy efficient membrane processes for the separation of organic liquids: Part 3 (Supplement report): Final report, September 28, 1982--December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Cabasso, I.; Acharya, H.R.; Korngold, E.; Liu, Z.; Stern, S.A.; Li, W.; Makenzie, T.; Poda, E.

    1987-10-01

    In this supplemental report, two pilot plants are described. The first is air purge pervaporation (or air sweep pervaporation hollow fiber system) for the separation of azeotropic aqueous liquids. The second describes pilot plant construction and operation for the perstraction process. Several configurations for the air purge pervaporation process were studied and were shown to yield high purity products e.g., isopropanol from the azeotropic mixture with water was enriched to 99.9%. Parallel and U-module configuration were used and durability experiments up to 120 days were carried out successfully. The report describes the first successful low scale pilot plant unit and elements for perstraction process. The conclusion and outcome of this study are two fold. First, membrane systems in a pilot plant unit proved to be very efficient in upgrading nonpermeable components in a membrane system and especially when dealing with azeotropic mixtures. For example, more than 99% isopropanol can be produced from a feed liquid which is 88% i-PrOH (azeotropic mixture with water). The membrane system proved to be durable within the time limit of the experiments (120 days). Second, all parameters including the various configurations of the pilot plants (which are still being studied) are available for chemical, petroleum, and other US industries. 3 refs., 22 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Tube radial distribution phenomenon with a two-phase separation solution of a fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon organic solvent mixture in a capillary tube and metal compounds separation.

    PubMed

    Kitaguchi, Koichi; Hanamura, Naoya; Murata, Masaharu; Hashimoto, Masahiko; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    A fluorocarbon and hydrocarbon organic solvent mixture is known as a temperature-induced phase-separation solution. When a mixed solution of tetradecafluorohexane as a fluorocarbon organic solvent and hexane as a hydrocarbon organic solvent (e.g., 71:29 volume ratio) was delivered in a capillary tube that was controlled at 10°C, the tube radial distribution phenomenon (TRDP) of the solvents was clearly observed through fluorescence images of the dye, perylene, dissolved in the mixed solution. The homogeneous mixed solution (single phase) changed to a heterogeneous solution (two phases) with inner tetradecafluorohexane and outer hexane phases in the tube under laminar flow conditions, generating the dynamic liquid-liquid interface. We also tried to apply TRDP to a separation technique for metal compounds. A model analyte mixture, copper(II) and hematin, was separated through the capillary tube, and detected with a chemiluminescence detector in this order within 4 min.

  15. Rotational Diffusion of Charged and Nondipolar Solutes in Ionic Liquid-Organic Solvent Mixtures: Evidence for Stronger Specific Solute-Solvent Interactions in Presence of Organic Solvent.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Sugosh R; Dutt, G B

    2015-08-20

    Rotational diffusion of a charged solute, rhodamine 110 (R110), and a nondipolar solute, 2,5-dimethyl-1,4-dioxo-3,6-diphenylpyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole (DMDPP), has been investigated in ionic liquids, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([BMIM][Tf2N]) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate ([BMIM][FAP]), with 0.8 mole fraction of dibenzyl ether (DBE). This study has been undertaken to find out how specific interactions between the solute and the ionic liquid are affected upon dilution with a nondipolar solvent. It has been observed that at a given viscosity (η) and temperature (T), the reorientation times of R110 increase by 40-60% in the ionic liquid-organic solvent mixtures compared to ones in the corresponding neat ionic liquids. In the case of DMDPP, the influence of DBE is less pronounced, and its reorientation times increase by 25-50% at a given η/T. The addition of DBE weakens the numerous interactions prevailing between the cations and the anions of the ionic liquids, which results in stronger specific interactions between the solutes and the constituent ions, consequently leading to slower rotation of the solutes.

  16. Influence of Seeding Ratio, Planting Date, and Termination Date on Rye-Hairy Vetch Cover Crop Mixture Performance under Organic Management

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Andrew; Cogger, Craig; Bary, Andy; Fortuna, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Cover crop benefits include nitrogen accumulation and retention, weed suppression, organic matter maintenance, and reduced erosion. Organic farmers need region-specific information on winter cover crop performance to effectively integrate cover crops into their crop rotations. Our research objective was to compare cover crop seeding mixtures, planting dates, and termination dates on performance of rye (Secale cereale L.) and hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) monocultures and mixtures in the maritime Pacific Northwest USA. The study included four seed mixtures (100% hairy vetch, 25% rye-75% hairy vetch, 50% rye-50% hairy vetch, and 100% rye by seed weight), two planting dates, and two termination dates, using a split-split plot design with four replications over six years. Measurements included winter ground cover; stand composition; cover crop biomass, N concentration, and N uptake; and June soil NO3--N. Rye planted in mid-September and terminated in late April averaged 5.1 Mg ha-1 biomass, whereas mixtures averaged 4.1 Mg ha-1 and hairy vetch 2.3 Mg ha-1. Delaying planting by 2.5 weeks reduced average winter ground cover by 65%, biomass by 50%, and cover crop N accumulation by 40%. Similar reductions in biomass and N accumulation occurred for late March termination, compared with late April termination. Mixtures had less annual biomass variability than rye. Mixtures accumulated 103 kg ha-1 N and had mean C:N ratio <17:1 when planted in mid-September and terminated in late April. June soil NO3--N (0 to 30 cm depth) averaged 62 kg ha-1 for rye, 97 kg ha-1 for the mixtures, and 119 kg ha-1 for hairy vetch. Weeds comprised less of the mixtures biomass (20% weeds by weight at termination) compared with the monocultures (29%). Cover crop mixtures provided a balance between biomass accumulation and N concentration, more consistent biomass over the six-year study, and were more effective at reducing winter weeds compared with monocultures. PMID:26080008

  17. Influence of Seeding Ratio, Planting Date, and Termination Date on Rye-Hairy Vetch Cover Crop Mixture Performance under Organic Management.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Andrew; Cogger, Craig; Bary, Andy; Fortuna, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Cover crop benefits include nitrogen accumulation and retention, weed suppression, organic matter maintenance, and reduced erosion. Organic farmers need region-specific information on winter cover crop performance to effectively integrate cover crops into their crop rotations. Our research objective was to compare cover crop seeding mixtures, planting dates, and termination dates on performance of rye (Secale cereale L.) and hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) monocultures and mixtures in the maritime Pacific Northwest USA. The study included four seed mixtures (100% hairy vetch, 25% rye-75% hairy vetch, 50% rye-50% hairy vetch, and 100% rye by seed weight), two planting dates, and two termination dates, using a split-split plot design with four replications over six years. Measurements included winter ground cover; stand composition; cover crop biomass, N concentration, and N uptake; and June soil NO3(-)-N. Rye planted in mid-September and terminated in late April averaged 5.1 Mg ha(-1) biomass, whereas mixtures averaged 4.1 Mg ha(-1) and hairy vetch 2.3 Mg ha(-1). Delaying planting by 2.5 weeks reduced average winter ground cover by 65%, biomass by 50%, and cover crop N accumulation by 40%. Similar reductions in biomass and N accumulation occurred for late March termination, compared with late April termination. Mixtures had less annual biomass variability than rye. Mixtures accumulated 103 kg ha(-1) N and had mean C:N ratio <17:1 when planted in mid-September and terminated in late April. June soil NO3(-)-N (0 to 30 cm depth) averaged 62 kg ha(-1) for rye, 97 kg ha(-1) for the mixtures, and 119 kg ha(-1) for hairy vetch. Weeds comprised less of the mixtures biomass (20% weeds by weight at termination) compared with the monocultures (29%). Cover crop mixtures provided a balance between biomass accumulation and N concentration, more consistent biomass over the six-year study, and were more effective at reducing winter weeds compared with monocultures.

  18. Nitrogen transformation during organic waste composting by the Rutgers system and its effects on pH, EC and maturity of the composting mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Monedero, M A; Roig, A; Paredes, C; Bernal, M P

    2001-07-01

    The evolution of the different forms of nitrogen during the composting of several wastes was studied, as well as its relation to the pH, electrical conductivity and parameters of maturity of the composts obtained. Four mixtures were prepared from different organic materials: sewage sludge, municipal solid waste, brewery sludge, sorghum bagasse, cotton waste and pine bark. The evolution of the different forms of nitrogen during composting depended on the material which supplied the nitrogen to the mixtures and the organic matter (OM) degradation rate during composting. The greatest concentration of ammonium was observed during the first weeks of composting, coinciding with the most intense period of OM degradation, and ammonium then decreased gradually to reach final values of below 0.04%. The use of urea as a nitrogen source in the mixtures led to high ammonium levels during the first weeks as a result of its rapid hydrolysis. The nitrification process began only when the temperature of the mixtures had dropped below 40 degrees C and its intensity depended on the quantity of ammonium present when the process began. The highest concentrations of NO3-N were always produced at the end of maturation, reaching values of 0.52%, 0.53%, 0.12% and 0.20% in the four mixtures studied. Nitrogen losses during composting depended on the materials used and on the pH values of the mixtures. Mixtures with the highest lignocellulose content showed the lowest losses (below 25%), while those containing municipal solid waste lost more than 40% of the initial content. Statistically significant correlations at a high probability level were found between the NO3-N concentration and pH and electrical conductivity. confirming that nitrification was responsible for the falling pH values and increasing electrical conductivity. The ratio of NH4-N and NO3-N concentrations was shown to be a clear indicator of the maturity of the mixtures during composting, the final values of 0.08, 0.04, 0

  19. Factors associated with sources, transport, and fate of volatile organic compounds and their mixtures in aquifers of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Squillace, P.J.; Moran, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Factors associated with sources, transport, and fate of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in groundwater from aquifers throughout the United States were evaluated using statistical methods. Samples were collected from 1631 wells throughout the conterminous United States between 1996 and 2002 as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. Water samples from wells completed in aquifers used to supply drinking water were analyzed for more than 50 VOCs. Wells were primarily rural domestic water supplies (1184), followed by public water supplies (216); the remaining wells (231) supplied a variety of uses. The median well depth was 50 meters. Age-date information shows that about 60% of the samples had a fraction of water recharged after 1953. Chloroform, toluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and perchloroethene were some of the frequently detected VOCs. Concentrations generally were less than 1 ??g/L. Source factors include, in order of importance, general land-use activity, septic/sewer density, and sites where large concentrations of VOCs are potentially released, such as leaking underground storage tanks. About 10% of all samples had VOC mixtures that were associated with concentrated sources; 20% were associated with dispersed sources. Important transport factors included well/screen depth, precipitation/groundwater recharge, air temperature, and various soil characteristics. Dissolved oxygen was strongly associated with VOCs and represents the fate of many VOCs in groundwater. Well type (domestic or public water supply) was also an important explanatory factor. Results of multiple analyses show the importance of (1) accounting for both dispersed and concentrated sources of VOCs, (2) measuring dissolved oxygen when sampling wells to help explain the fate of VOCs, and (3) limiting the type of wells sampled in monitoring networks to avoid unnecessary variance in the data, or controlling for this variance during data analysis.

  20. Factors associated with sources, transport, and fate of volatile organic compounds and their mixtures in aquifers of the United States.

    PubMed

    Squillace, Paul J; Moran, Michael J

    2007-04-01

    Factors associated with sources, transport, and fate of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in groundwater from aquifers throughout the United States were evaluated using statistical methods. Samples were collected from 1631 wells throughout the conterminous United States between 1996 and 2002 as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. Water samples from wells completed in aquifers used to supply drinking water were analyzed for more than 50 VOCs. Wells were primarily rural domestic water supplies (1184), followed by public water supplies (216); the remaining wells (231) supplied a variety of uses. The median well depth was 50 meters. Age-date information shows that about 60% of the samples had a fraction of water recharged after 1953. Chloroform, toluene, 1,2,4-trimethyl-benzene, and perchloroethene were some of the frequently detected VOCs. Concentrations generally were less than 1 microg/L. Source factors include, in order of importance, general land-use activity, septic/sewer density, and sites where large concentrations of VOCs are potentially released, such as leaking underground storage tanks. About 10% of all samples had VOC mixtures that were associated with concentrated sources; 20% were associated with dispersed sources. Important transport factors included well/screen depth, precipitation/groundwater recharge, air temperature, and various soil characteristics. Dissolved oxygen was strongly associated with VOCs and represents the fate of many VOCs in groundwater. Well type (domestic or public water supply) was also an important explanatory factor. Results of multiple analyses show the importance of (1) accounting for both dispersed and concentrated sources of VOCs, (2) measuring dissolved oxygen when sampling wells to help explain the fate of VOCs, and (3) limiting the type of wells sampled in monitoring networks to avoid unnecessary variance in the data, or controlling for this variance during data

  1. Endocrine effects of real-life mixtures of persistent organic pollutants (POP) in experimental models and wild fish.

    PubMed

    Berg, Vidar; Kraugerud, Marianne; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Olsvik, Pål A; Skåre, Janneche U; Alestrøm, Peter; Ropstad, Erik; Zimmer, Karin Elisabeth; Lyche, Jan L

    2016-01-01

    A series of studies have assessed the occurrence, levels, and potential adverse effects of persistent organic pollutants (POP) in fish from Lake Mjøsa. In this lake, high levels of various POP were detected in biota. Fish from the nearby Lake Losna contain background levels of POP and served as reference (controls) in these studies. Significantly higher prevalence of mycobacteriosis and pathological changes were documented in burbot (Lota lota) from Mjøsa compared to burbot from Losna. Further, transcriptional profiling identified changes in gene expression in burbot from Mjøsa compared to burbot from Losna associated with drug metabolism enzymes and oxidative stress. POP extracted from burbot liver oil from the two lakes was used to expose zebrafish (Danio rerio) during two consecutive generations. During both generations, POP mixtures from both lakes increased the rate of mortality, induced earlier onset of puberty, and skewed sex ratio toward males. However, opposite effects on weight gain were found in exposure groups compared to controls during the two generations. Exposure to POP from both lakes was associated with suppression of ovarian follicle development. Analyses of genome-wide transcription profiling identified functional networks of genes associated with weight homeostasis, steroid hormone functions, and insulin signaling. In human cell studies using adrenocortical H295R and primary porcine theca and granulosa cells, exposure to lake extracts from both populations modulated steroid hormone production with significant difference from controls. The results suggest that POP from both lakes may possess the potential to induce endocrine disruption and may adversely affect health in wild fish.

  2. CONTRIBUTIONS OF TOLUENE AND Α -PINENE TO SOA FORMED IN AN IRRADIATED TOLUENE/Α-PINENE/NOX/AIR MIXTURE: COMPARISON OF RESULTS USING 14C CONTENT AND SOA ORGANIC TRACER METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An organic tracer method, recently proposed for estimating individual contributions of toluene and α-pinene to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, was evaluated by conducting a laboratory study where a binary hydrocarbon mixture, containing the anthropogenic aromatic hydro...

  3. Understanding the Effect of Solvent Structure on Organic Reaction Outcomes When Using Ionic Liquid/Acetonitrile Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Keaveney, Sinead T; Greaves, Tamar L; Kennedy, Danielle F; Harper, Jason B

    2016-12-15

    The rate constant for the reaction between hexan-1-amine and 4-methoxybenzaldehyde was determined in ionic liquids containing an imidazolium cation. The effect on the rate constant of increasing the length of the alkyl substituent on the cation was examined in a number of ionic liquid/acetonitrile mixtures. In general it was found that there was no significant effect of changing the alkyl substituent on the rate constant of this process, suggesting that any nanodomains in these mixtures do not have a significant effect on the outcome of this process. A series of small-angle X-ray scattering and wide-angle X-ray scattering experiments were performed on mixtures of the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([Bmim][N(CF3SO2)2]) and acetonitrile; this work indicated that the main structural changes in the mixtures occur by about a 0.2 mole fraction of ionic liquid in the mixture (χIL). This region at which the main changes in the solvent structuring occurs corresponds to the region at which the main changes in the rate constant and activation parameters occur for SN2 and condensation reactions examined previously; this is the first time that such a correlation has been observed. To examine the ordering of the solvent about the nucleophile hexan-1-amine, WAXS experiments were performed on a number of [Bmim][N(CF3SO2)2]/acetonitrile/hexan-1-amine mixtures, where it was found that some of the patterns featured asymmetric peaks as well as additional peaks not observed in the [Bmim][N(CF3SO2)2]/acetonitrile mixtures; this suggests that the addition of hexan-1-amine to the mixture affects the bulk structure of the liquid. The SAXS/WAXS patterns of mixtures of 1-butyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([Bm2im][N(CF3SO2)2]) and acetonitrile were also determined, with the results suggesting that [Bm2im][N(CF3SO2)2] is more ordered than [Bmim][N(CF3SO2)2] due to an enhancement in the short-range interactions.

  4. Neurobehavioral deficits and brain oxidative stress induced by chronic low dose exposure of persistent organic pollutants mixture in adult female rat.

    PubMed

    Lahouel, Asma; Kebieche, Mohamed; Lakroun, Zohra; Rouabhi, Rachid; Fetoui, Hamadi; Chtourou, Yassine; Djamila, Zama; Soulimani, Rachid

    2016-10-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are long-lived organic compounds that are considered one of the major risks to ecosystem and human health. Recently, great concerns are raised about POPs mixtures and its potential toxicity even in low doses of daily human exposure. The brain is mostly targeted by these lipophilic compounds because of its important contain in lipids. So, it would be quite interesting to study the effects of exposure to these mixtures and evaluate their combined toxicity on brain cells. The present study was designed to characterize the cognitive and locomotors deficits and brain areas redox status in rat model. An orally chronic exposure to a representative mixture of POPs composed of endosulfan (2.6 μg/kg), chlorpyrifos (5.2 μg/kg), naphthalene (0.023 μg/kg) and benzopyrane (0.002 μg/kg); the same mixture with concentration multiplied by 10 and 100 was also tested. Exposed rats have shown a disturbance of memory and a decrease in learning ability concluded by Morris water maze and the open field tests results and anxiolytic behaviour in the test of light/dark box compared to control. Concerning brain redox homeostasis, exposed rats have shown an increased malondialdehyde (MDA) amount and an alteration in glutathione (GSH) levels in both the brain mitochondria and cytosolic fractions of the cerebellum, striatum and hippocampus. These effects were accompanied by a decrease in levels of cytosolic glutathione S-transferase (GST) and a highly significant increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities in both cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions. The current study suggests that environmental exposure to daily even low doses of POPs mixtures through diet induces oxidative stress status in the brain and especially in the mitochondria with important cognitive and locomotor behaviour variations in the rats.

  5. Using molecular docking between organic chemicals and lipid membrane to revise the well known octanol-water partition coefficient of the mixture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Zhou, Xianghong; Wang, Dali; Yin, Daqiang; Lin, Zhifen

    2012-07-01

    The octanol-water partition coefficient of a mixture has been widely used to predict the baseline toxicity of non-polar narcotic chemical mixtures, since toxic effects are usually generated by multiple mixtures. However, it remains unclear whether the validity of log Kowmix can be demonstrated, because experimental methods cannot be used to determine this parameter. The invalidity and the further revision of log Kowmix were therefore studied by using molecular docking between non-polar narcotic chemicals and lipid membrane (E(binding)). The results show E(binding) is a feasible substitute parameter for log Kow because their relationship is linear. Based on a molecular docking and QSAR model, a new calculated method of log Kowmix was proposed as follows: log(Kowmix)=∑x(i)log Kowi. Comparison of this new method with the established methods demonstrates the invalidity of the latter, and therefore the former is suggested to be used to calculate the log Kowmix of organic chemical mixtures.

  6. Evaluation of the risk of mixtures of paddy insecticides and their transformation products to aquatic organisms in the Sakura River, Japan.

    PubMed

    Iwafune, Takashi; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Nagai, Takashi; Horio, Takeshi

    2011-08-01

    To assess the risk of mixtures of six paddy insecticides and their transformation products (TPs) to aquatic organisms in the Sakura River, Japan, their concentrations in the river water were monitored during the rice cultivation season in 2008 and 2009, and acute toxicity tests for Cheumatopsyche brevilineata (caddisflies) and Daphnia magna (daphnids), surrogate test species for caddisflies and cladocerans, respectively, were conducted. The mixture of fipronil, applied in the rice nursery box, and its desulfinyl, sulfide, and sulfone TPs were detected in the river for several months after transplanting, and they were more toxic to C. brevilineata than the other tested compounds. The toxicities of the parent compound and its TPs, such as fipronil and its TPs, may be related to their hydrophobicities. Risk quotients for mixtures (RQ(mix)) of only parent compounds did not exceed 1, but, in mid-June 2009, the RQ(mix) of parent compounds and TPs for caddisflies exceeded 1. Diazinon, fenitrothion, and fenthion sprayed on the rice crop and their TPs posed a sporadic risk for cladocerans, depending on the application timing, whereas fipronil TPs contributed to the RQ(mix) for caddisflies for several months after transplanting. The risk of mixtures of insecticides and their TPs differed seasonally between caddisflies and cladocerans, depending on insecticide application timing and the persistence and toxicity of TPs.

  7. Natural mixtures of persistent organic pollutants (POP) increase weight gain, advance puberty, and induce changes in gene expression associated with steroid hormones and obesity in female zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Lyche, Jan L; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Almaas, Camilla; Stavik, Benedicte; Berg, Vidar; Skåre, Janneche Utne; Alestrøm, Peter; Ropstad, Erik

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, developmental and reproductive effects of lifelong exposure to environmental relevant concentrations of two natural mixtures of persistent organic pollutants (POP) were investigated using classical and molecular methods in a controlled zebrafish model. The mixtures used were extracted from burbot (Lota lota) liver originating from freshwater systems in Norway: one mixture with high levels and one mixture with background levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane metabolites (DDT). The concentration of POP measured in the zebrafish ranged from levels detected in wild fish from Lake Mjøsa to concentrations reported in human and wildlife populations, indicating that the experimental fish were exposed to concentrations comparable with wild fish. Phenotypic effects observed in both exposure groups included earlier onset of puberty, increased male/female sex ratio, and differences in body weight at 5 mo of age. Interestingly, genome-wide transcription profiling showed changes in regulation of genes involved in endocrine signaling and growth. The transcriptomics changes include key regulator genes for steroid hormone functions (ncoa3), and growth (c/ebp, ncoa3). The effects observed in the experimental zebrafish model raise the question whether chemical pollution represents a risk to reproductive health of wild fish inhabitating the freshwater system.

  8. Correlating solubility parameters and solvatochromic parameters with the self-assembly of poly(3-hexylthiophene) in mixtures of organic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Madeleine; Boucher, David

    2015-03-01

    We have studied the assembly and crystallinity of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) (Mn ~ 28.2 kDa, regioregularity > 96 %, PDI ~ 1.3) in >100 binary solvent mixtures using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, and it is clear that the identity of the poor solvent used to drive aggregation has a significant impact on the structural order and crystallinity of the P3HT aggregates in solution. Here we report our findings using Hansen solubility parameters (HSPs), specifically the solubility distance vector, Ra, and the Kamlet-Taft solvatochromic parameters of the solvent mixtures to better understand the dominant solvent forces driving the self assembly of P3HT. We find that the directionality of the Ra vector provides a better measure of the crystallinity of the P3HT assemblies formed in the solvent mixtures than does the magnitude of the Ra vector. Our analysis of the Kamlet-Taft (α, β, π*) and ET(30) solvatochromic parameters reveals that the β parameter correlates best with the crystallinity of P3HT and that, in general, assemblies having higher structural order are formed in solvent mixtures with lower values of β.

  9. Mixture Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.

    2007-12-01

    A mixture experiment involves combining two or more components in various proportions or amounts and then measuring one or more responses for the resulting end products. Other factors that affect the response(s), such as process variables and/or the total amount of the mixture, may also be studied in the experiment. A mixture experiment design specifies the combinations of mixture components and other experimental factors (if any) to be studied and the response variable(s) to be measured. Mixture experiment data analyses are then used to achieve the desired goals, which may include (i) understanding the effects of components and other factors on the response(s), (ii) identifying components and other factors with significant and nonsignificant effects on the response(s), (iii) developing models for predicting the response(s) as functions of the mixture components and any other factors, and (iv) developing end-products with desired values and uncertainties of the response(s). Given a mixture experiment problem, a practitioner must consider the possible approaches for designing the experiment and analyzing the data, and then select the approach best suited to the problem. Eight possible approaches include 1) component proportions, 2) mathematically independent variables, 3) slack variable, 4) mixture amount, 5) component amounts, 6) mixture process variable, 7) mixture of mixtures, and 8) multi-factor mixture. The article provides an overview of the mixture experiment designs, models, and data analyses for these approaches.

  10. Molecular dynamics study of nanoscale organization and hydrogen bonding in binary mixtures of butylammonium nitrate ionic liquid and primary alcohols.

    PubMed

    Shrivastav, Gourav; Gupta, Aditya; Rastogi, Aman; Dhabal, Debdas; Kashyap, Hemant K

    2017-02-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations are utilized here to explore the nanoscale morphology and the nature of hydrogen bonding in the equimolar mixtures of butylammonium nitrate protic ionic liquid with ethanol, propanol, and butanol. The X-ray scattering experimental study of Greaves et al. [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 13 501 (2011)] has evidenced that alkylammonium nitrate plus alcohol mixtures possess nanoscale structural order which becomes more pronounced as the chain length of the alcohol increases. Our analysis carried out using simulated total and partial X-ray scattering structure functions quantifies the basis of these observations. The partial structure functions highlight the off-phase density correlations of alcohol with both cation and anion in the low-q region. We demonstrate that the chain lengthening of alcohols offers significant variation in the structuring of the polar and apolar moieties in the mixtures. The inspection based on radial distribution functions manifests the non-linear hydrogen bonds of cations with nitrate anions as well as alcohol molecules. The alcohol's hydroxyl group prefers to form linear hydrogen bonds with anions and with other alcohol molecules. Incremented chain length of alcohol improves the extent of hydrogen bonding but does not alter their geometry. Spatial distribution functions delineate similar preferences. It shows stronger directional preferences of the hydroxyl group of alcohols than cation in the vicinity of an anion. Enhanced pair correlations associated with the terminal methyl carbons suggest aggregation of butanol chains in apolar domains. Triplet correlation functions (TCFs) are also used to evaluate the orientational preferences of the present polar moieties in the mixtures. Information based on TCFs for distribution of polar head group of cations and anions unveils the dominance of equilateral configurations over the less frequent isosceles configurations in all the three mixtures.

  11. Molecular dynamics study of nanoscale organization and hydrogen bonding in binary mixtures of butylammonium nitrate ionic liquid and primary alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastav, Gourav; Gupta, Aditya; Rastogi, Aman; Dhabal, Debdas; Kashyap, Hemant K.

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are utilized here to explore the nanoscale morphology and the nature of hydrogen bonding in the equimolar mixtures of butylammonium nitrate protic ionic liquid with ethanol, propanol, and butanol. The X-ray scattering experimental study of Greaves et al. [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 13 501 (2011)] has evidenced that alkylammonium nitrate plus alcohol mixtures possess nanoscale structural order which becomes more pronounced as the chain length of the alcohol increases. Our analysis carried out using simulated total and partial X-ray scattering structure functions quantifies the basis of these observations. The partial structure functions highlight the off-phase density correlations of alcohol with both cation and anion in the low-q region. We demonstrate that the chain lengthening of alcohols offers significant variation in the structuring of the polar and apolar moieties in the mixtures. The inspection based on radial distribution functions manifests the non-linear hydrogen bonds of cations with nitrate anions as well as alcohol molecules. The alcohol's hydroxyl group prefers to form linear hydrogen bonds with anions and with other alcohol molecules. Incremented chain length of alcohol improves the extent of hydrogen bonding but does not alter their geometry. Spatial distribution functions delineate similar preferences. It shows stronger directional preferences of the hydroxyl group of alcohols than cation in the vicinity of an anion. Enhanced pair correlations associated with the terminal methyl carbons suggest aggregation of butanol chains in apolar domains. Triplet correlation functions (TCFs) are also used to evaluate the orientational preferences of the present polar moieties in the mixtures. Information based on TCFs for distribution of polar head group of cations and anions unveils the dominance of equilateral configurations over the less frequent isosceles configurations in all the three mixtures.

  12. Efficiency of methods for Karl Fischer determination of water in oils based on oven evaporation and azeotropic distillation.

    PubMed

    Larsson, William; Jalbert, Jocelyn; Gilbert, Roland; Cedergren, Anders

    2003-03-15

    The efficiency of azeotropic distillation and oven evaporation techniques for trace determination of water in oils has recently been questioned by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), on the basis of measurements of the residual water found after the extraction step. The results were obtained by volumetric Karl Fischer (KF) titration in a medium containing a large excess of chloroform (> or = 65%), a proposed prerequisite to ensure complete release of water from the oil matrix. In this work, the extent of this residual water was studied by means of a direct zero-current potentiometric technique using a KF medium containing more than 80% chloroform, which is well above the concentration recommended by NIST. A procedure is described that makes it possible to correct the results for dilution errors as well as for chemical interference effects caused by the oil matrix. The corrected values were found to be in the range of 0.6-1.5 ppm, which should be compared with the 12-34 ppm (uncorrected values) reported by NIST for the same oils. From this, it is concluded that the volumetric KF method used by NIST gives results that are much too high.

  13. Development of cellulose acetate propionate membrane for separation of ethanol and ethyl tert-butyl ether mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, G.S.; Niang, M.; Schaetzel, P.

    1997-04-01

    For pervaporation separation of ethanol and ethyl tert-butyl ether mixtures, a cellulose acetate propionate membrane was chosen as the experimental membrane because of its high selectivity and good mass fluxes. The properties of the membranes were evaluated by the pervaporation separation of mixtures of ethyl tert-butyl ether/ethanol and the sorption experiments. The experimental results showed that the selectivity and the permeates depend on the ethanol concentration in the feed and the experimental temperature. With increases of the ethanol weight fraction in the feed and the temperature, the total and partial mass fluxes increased. With respect to the temperature, ethanol mass flux obeys the Arrhenius equation. The selectivity of this membrane decreases as the temperature and the ethanol concentration in the feed increase. This membrane shows special characteristics at the azeotropic composition. In the vicinity of the azeotropic point, minimum values of ethanol concentration in the permeate and in sorption solution are obtained. The swelling ratios increase when temperature and the ethanol concentration in the feed are increasing. The ethanol concentration in the sorption solution is also influenced by the temperature and the mixture`s composition. When the temperature increases, the sorption selectivity of the membrane decreases.

  14. Effect of incorporation of walnut cake (Juglans regia) in concentrate mixture on degradation of dry matter, organic matter and production of microbial biomass in vitro in goat

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Mohsin Ahmad; Sharma, R. K.; Rastogi, Ankur; Barman, Keshab

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was carried out to investigate the effect of incorporation of different level of walnut cake in concentrate mixture on in vitro dry matter degradation in order to determine its level of supplementation in ruminant ration. Materials and Methods: Walnut cake was used @ 0, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30% level to formulate an iso-nitrogenous concentrate mixtures and designated as T1, T2, T3, T4, T5 and T6 respectively. The different formulae of concentrate mixtures were used for in vitro gas production studies using goat rumen liquor with wheat straw in 40:60 ratio. Proximate composition, fiber fractionation and calcium and phosphrous content of walnut cake were estimated. Result: The per cent IVDMD value of T1 and T2 diets was 68.42 ± 1.20 and 67.25 ± 1.37 respectively which was found highest (P<0.05) T3, T4, T5 and T6. Similar trend was also found for TDOM and MBP. Inclusion of walnut cake at 10% level in the concentrate mixture does not affect in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD), truly degradable organic matter (TDOM, mg/200 mg DM), total gas production, microbial biomass production (MBP) and efficiency of microbial biomass production (EMP). Conclusion: It is concluded that walnut cake incorporation up to 10% level in the iso -nitrogenous concentrate mixture has no any negative effect on in vitro digestibility of dry matter (DM), TDOM, MBP, EMP and total gas production in goat. PMID:27047013

  15. A Combined Kinetic and Volatility Basis Set Approach to Model Secondary Organic Aerosol from Toluene and Diesel Exhaust/Meat Cooking Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, H. M.; Carlton, A. G.; Zhang, H.; Kamens, R.; Vizuete, W.

    2011-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is simulated for 6 outdoor smog chamber experiments using a SOA model based on a kinetic chemical mechanism in conjunction with a volatility basis set (VBS) approach. The experiments include toluene, a non-SOA-forming hydrocarbon mixture, diesel exhaust or meat cooking emissions and NOx, and are performed under varying conditions of relative humidity. SOA formation from toluene is modeled using a condensed kinetic aromatic mechanism that includes partitioning of lumped semi-volatile products in particle organic-phase and incorporates particle aqueous-phase chemistry to describe uptake of glyoxal and methylglyoxal. Modeling using the kinetic mechanism alone, along with primary organic aerosol (POA) from diesel exhaust (DE) /meat cooking (MC) fails to simulate the rapid SOA formation at the beginning hours of the experiments. Inclusion of a VBS approach with the kinetic mechanism to characterize the emissions and chemistry of complex mixture of intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOCs) from DE/MC, substantially improves SOA predictions when compared with observed data. The VBS model includes photochemical aging of IVOCs and evaporation of POA after dilution. The relative contribution of SOA mass from DE/MC is as high as 95% in the morning, but substantially decreases after mid-afternoon. For high humidity experiments, aqueous-phase SOA fraction dominates the total SOA mass at the end of the day (approximately 50%). In summary, the combined kinetic and VBS approach provides a new and improved framework to semi-explicitly model SOA from VOC precursors in conjunction with a VBS approach that can be used on complex emission mixtures comprised with hundreds of individual chemical species.

  16. Organic matter characteristics in boreal forest soils under stands of silver birch, Norway spruce, and Norway spruce with a mixture of silver birch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolander, A.; Kitunen, V.

    2012-04-01

    The aim was to study how tree species and a tree species mixture affect microbial C and N transformations and two major plant secondary compound groups, terpenes and phenolic compounds in soil. The study site was a tree-species experiment in middle-eastern part of Finland containing plots of 43-year-old silver birch, Norway spruce and Norway spruce with a mixture of silver birch (22 and 37 % birch of the total stem number). Soil was podzol and humus type mor. Samples were taken from the organic layer. C and N in the microbial biomass, rates of C mineralization (CO2 evolution), net N mineralization and nitrification, and concentrations of total water-soluble phenolic compounds, condensed tannins and different kind of terpenes were measured. Amounts of C and N in the microbial biomass and the rates of C mineralization and net N mineralization were all lower under spruce than birch, and particularly net N mineralization was stimulated by birch mixture. Concentrations of total water-soluble phenolic compounds were on a similar level, irrespective of tree species. However, there were less low-molecular-weight phenolics and more high-molecular-weight phenolics under spruce than birch. Concentrations of condensed tannins and both sesqui- and diterpenes were all higher under spruce than birch but the concentrations of triterpenes were similar in all soils. The difference between tree species was greatest with monoterpenes which were measured from both organic layer and soil atmosphere: high concentrations under spruce and negligible under birch. Birch mixture tended to decrease the concentrations of condensed tannins and mono-, sesqui- and diterpenes.

  17. Mixture effects of organic micropollutants present in water: towards the development of effect-based water quality trigger values for baseline toxicity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Janet Y M; McCarty, Shane; Glenn, Eva; Neale, Peta A; Warne, Michel St J; Escher, Beate I

    2013-06-15

    In this study we propose for the first time an approach for the tentative derivation of effect-based water quality trigger values for an apical endpoint, the cytotoxicity measured by the bioluminescence inhibition in Vibrio fischeri. The trigger values were derived for the Australian Drinking Water Guideline and the Australian Guideline for Water Recycling as examples, but the algorithm can be adapted to any other set of guideline values. In the first step, a Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) describing the 50% effect concentrations, EC50, was established using chemicals known to act according to the nonspecific mode of action of baseline toxicity. This QSAR described the effect of most of the chemicals in these guidelines satisfactorily, with the exception of antibiotics, which were more potent than predicted by the baseline toxicity QSAR. The mixture effect of 10-56 guideline chemicals mixed at various fixed concentration ratios (equipotent mixture ratios and ratios of the guideline values) was adequately described by concentration addition model of mixture toxicity. Ten water samples were then analysed and 5-64 regulated chemicals were detected (from a target list of over 200 chemicals). These detected chemicals were mixed in the ratios of concentrations detected and their mixture effect was predicted by concentration addition. Comparing the effect of these designed mixtures with the effect of the water samples, it became evident that less than 1% of effect could be explained by known chemicals, making it imperative to derive effect-based trigger values. The effect-based water quality trigger value, EBT-EC50, was calculated from the mixture effect concentration predicted for concentration-additive mixture effects of all chemicals in a given guideline divided by the sum of the guideline concentrations for individual components, and dividing by an extrapolation factor that accounts for the number of chemicals contained in the guidelines and for

  18. Features of non-congruent phase transition in modified Coulomb model of the binary ionic mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroev, N. E.; Iosilevskiy, I. L.

    2016-11-01

    Non-congruent gas-liquid phase transition (NCPT) have been studied previously in modified Coulomb model of a binary ionic mixture C(+6) + O(+8) on a uniformly compressible ideal electronic background /BIM(∼)/. The features of NCPT in improved version of the BIM(∼) model for the same mixture on background of non-ideal electronic Fermi-gas and comparison it with the previous calculations are the subject of present study. Analytical fits for Coulomb corrections to equation of state of electronic and ionic subsystems were used in present calculations within the Gibbs-Guggenheim conditions of non-congruent phase equilibrium. Parameters of critical point-line were calculated on the entire range of proportions of mixed ions 0 < X < 1. Strong “distillation” effect was found for NCPT in the present BIM(∼) model. Just similar distillation was obtained in the variant of NCPT in dense nuslear matter. The absence of azeotropic compositions was revealed in studied variants of BIM(∼) in contrast to an explicit existence of the azeotropic compositions for the NCPT in chemically reacting plasmas and in astrophysical applications.

  19. Improved anaerobic digestion of a thermally pretreated mixture of physicochemical sludge; broiler excreta and sugar cane wastes (SCW): Effect on organic matter solubilization, biodegradability and bioenergy production.

    PubMed

    Nava-Valente, Noemí; Alvarado-Lassman, Alejandro; Nativitas-Sandoval, Liliana S; Mendez-Contreras, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    Thermal pretreatment effect of a mixture of organic wastes (physicochemical sludge, excreta of broiler chickens and sugarcane wastes (SCW)) in the solubilization and biodegradability organic matter as well as bioenergy production by anaerobic digestion was evaluated. Two different mixtures of physicochemical sludge, excreta of broiler chickens and SCW (70%, 15%, 15% and 60%, 20%, 20% of VS, respectively) were treated at different temperatures (80 °C, 85 °C and 90 °C) and contact time (30, 60 and 90 min). Results indicate that, organic matter solubilization degree increased from 1.14 to 6.56%; subsequently, in the anaerobic digestion process, an increase of 50% in the volatile solids removal and 10% in biogas production was observed, while, retention time decreased from 23 up to 9 days. The results obtained were similar to pilot-scale. In both experimental scales it showed that the synergy produced by the simultaneous anaerobic digestion of different substrates could increase bioenergy production up to 1.3 L bio g(-1) VS removed and 0.82 L CH4 g(-1) VS removed. The treatment conditions presented in this study allow for large residue quantities to be treated and large bioenergy quantities to be produced (10% higher than during conventional treatment) without increasing the anaerobic digester volume.

  20. The combined effect of persistent organic pollutants in the serum POP mixture in Greenlandic Inuit: xenoestrogenic, xenoandrogenic and dioxin-like transactivities.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Tanja; Long, Manhai; Ghisari, Mandana; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva C

    2012-12-01

    Greenlandic Inuit have high body burden of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). We analyzed the combined effect of the actual lipophilic serum POP mixture on estrogen-, androgen- and aryl hydrocarbon-receptor functions as effect biomarkers, and the associations between the effect biomarkers and serum POPs, and lifestyle characteristics. The serum POPs were extracted from 232 Inuit from Ittoqqortoormiit, Narsaq and Qeqertarsuaq. The POP-related receptor transactivities correlated negatively to the POP levels and were associated to the lifestyle characteristics. The POP-related receptor transactivities can be used as effect biomarkers. The serum POPs have hormone disruptive potentials.

  1. Aspects of High-Resolution Gas Chromatography as Applied to the Analysis of Hydrocarbon Fuels and Other Complex Organic Mixtures. Volume 2. Survey of Sample Insertion Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    AD-A158 772 ASPECTS OF HIGH-RESOL.UTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY S 1ll APPLIED0 TO THE ANALYSIS 0..(U)1 DAYTON UNIV ON RESEARCH INST W A RUSEY ET AL. JUN...RESOLUTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY AS APPLIED TO THE ANALYSIS OF HYDROCARBON FUELS AND OTHER COMPLEX ORGANIC MIXTURES Volume II - Survey of Sample Insertion...NO. NO. 45433-6563 62203F 3048 05 91 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) (cont’ d on reverse) ASPECTS OF HIGH-RESOLUTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY T

  2. Hazardous and Corrosive Gas Production in the Radiolysis of Water/Organic Mixtures in Model TRU Waste

    SciTech Connect

    LaVerne, Jay A.

    2004-12-01

    Scope. The radiation chemistry of aqueous systems containing chlorinated hydrocarbons is investigated using a multi-pronged approach employing 60Co gamma ray and alpha particle irradiation experiments in conjunction with diffusion-kinetic modeling incorporating track structure simulations. The goal is to determine mechanisms, kinetics, and yields for the formation of potentially explosive gases and corrosive agents, such as H2 and HCl, respectively, in the radiolysis of water-organic mixtures. The information obtained is of a fundamental nature, but the radiation chemical systems studied are found throughout the DOE portfolio and are important in radioactive waste remediation and management. Program Highlights. Radiation-induced production of H2 and HCl from chlorinated hydrocarbons. 60Co gamma-radiolysis experiments and stochastic kinetic modeling have been used to investigated the radiation-induced yield of H2 and Cl- from aqueous solutions of 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCE) and 1,1-dichloroethane (1,1-DCE) over the concentration range 1-80 mM. In deoxygenated solution, the yield of H2 from both 1,2-DCE and 1,1-DCE solutions decreases as the concentration of DCE is increased. The decrease in the H2 yield shows that the reaction of H atom with DCE does not lead to the production of H2. This observation is unexpected and reflects the reverse of the effect seen in the gas phase, where the reaction of H atom with 1,2-DCE and 1,1-DCE leads to the production of H2. The yield of Cl- from 1,2-DCE and 1,1-DCE solutions increases slightly from 2.8 ions/100eV to 3.6 over the concentration range 10-50 mM, demonstrating the increased competition of the DCE with intra-track processes. Comparison of the measured yields of Cl- with the predictions of stochastic kinetic modeling shows that the reactions of eaq- with 1,2-DCE and with 1,1-DCE are quantitative, and that the reaction of H atom with both DCEs leads to the production of Cl- (and Haq+). In aerated solution, the yield of Cl

  3. Pesticide Toxicity Index--a tool for assessing potential toxicity of pesticide mixtures to freshwater aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Lisa H; Norman, Julia E; Moran, Patrick W; Martin, Jeffrey D; Stone, Wesley W

    2014-04-01

    Pesticide mixtures are common in streams with agricultural or urban influence in the watershed. The Pesticide Toxicity Index (PTI) is a screening tool to assess potential aquatic toxicity of complex pesticide mixtures by combining measures of pesticide exposure and acute toxicity in an additive toxic-unit model. The PTI is determined separately for fish, cladocerans, and benthic invertebrates. This study expands the number of pesticides and degradates included in previous editions of the PTI from 124 to 492 pesticides and degradates, and includes two types of PTI for use in different applications, depending on study objectives. The Median-PTI was calculated from median toxicity values for individual pesticides, so is robust to outliers and is appropriate for comparing relative potential toxicity among samples, sites, or pesticides. The Sensitive-PTI uses the 5th percentile of available toxicity values, so is a more sensitive screening-level indicator of potential toxicity. PTI predictions of toxicity in environmental samples were tested using data aggregated from published field studies that measured pesticide concentrations and toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia in ambient stream water. C. dubia survival was reduced to ≤50% of controls in 44% of samples with Median-PTI values of 0.1-1, and to 0% in 96% of samples with Median-PTI values >1. The PTI is a relative, but quantitative, indicator of potential toxicity that can be used to evaluate relationships between pesticide exposure and biological condition.

  4. Detailed Chemical Characterization of Unresolved Complex Mixtures (UCM) inAtmospheric Organics: Insights into Emission Sources, Atmospheric Processing andSecondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies suggest that semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are important precursors to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in urban atmospheres. However, knowledge of the chemical composition of SVOCs is limited by current analytical techniques, which are typically unable to...

  5. Self-Organized Gels in DNA/F-Actin Mixtures without Crosslinkers: Networks of Induced Nematic Domains with Tunable Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Ghee Hwee; Butler, John C.; Zribi, Olena V.; Smalyukh, Ivan I.; Angelini, Thomas E.; Purdy, Kirstin R.; Golestanian, Ramin; Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2008-11-01

    We examine mixtures of DNA and filamentous actin (F-actin) as a model system of like-charged rigid rods and flexible chains. Confocal microscopy reveals the formation of elongated nematic F-actin domains reticulated via defect-free vertices into a network embedded in a mesh of random DNA. Synchrotron x-ray scattering results indicate that the DNA mesh squeezes the F-actin domains into a nematic state with an interactin spacing that decreases with increasing DNA concentration as dactin∝ρDNA-1/2. Interestingly, the system changes from a counterion-controlled regime to a depletion-controlled regime with added salt, with drastic consequences for the osmotic pressure induced phase behavior.

  6. Self-organized gels in DNA/F-actin mixtures without crosslinkers: networks of induced nematic domains with tunable density.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ghee Hwee; Butler, John C; Zribi, Olena V; Smalyukh, Ivan I; Angelini, Thomas E; Purdy, Kirstin R; Golestanian, Ramin; Wong, Gerard C L

    2008-11-21

    We examine mixtures of DNA and filamentous actin (F-actin) as a model system of like-charged rigid rods and flexible chains. Confocal microscopy reveals the formation of elongated nematic F-actin domains reticulated via defect-free vertices into a network embedded in a mesh of random DNA. Synchrotron x-ray scattering results indicate that the DNA mesh squeezes the F-actin domains into a nematic state with an interactin spacing that decreases with increasing DNA concentration as d(actin) proportional, variantrho(DNA)(-1/2). Interestingly, the system changes from a counterion-controlled regime to a depletion-controlled regime with added salt, with drastic consequences for the osmotic pressure induced phase behavior.

  7. Influence of organic solvent on the separation of an ionic liquid from a lignin-ionic liquid mixture.

    PubMed

    Weerachanchai, Piyarat; Lim, Kok Hwa; Lee, Jong-Min

    2014-03-01

    Sixteen solvents added in lignin-ionic liquid mixture provide four types of solubility characteristics. The distinct characteristics can be classified by considering solubility parameters including ET Scale, Kamlet-Taft parameters and solubility parameters. Group 1 solvent shows promising solvents for lignin-ionic liquid separation, contributing full dissolution of ionic liquid with lignin precipitation. Isopropanol, the most potential solvent has solubility properties as following normalized molar electronic transition energies (ET(N))=0.57, hydrogen-bond acidity (α)=0.76 and Hildebrand solubility parameter (δT)=23.58. This study examines potential solvents for ionic recovery, provides simple method of separation and leads to the feasibility of using ionic liquids in industrial applications.

  8. Interactive effects of MnO2, organic matter and pH on abiotic formation of N2O from hydroxylamine in artificial soil mixtures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shurong; Berns, Anne E; Vereecken, Harry; Wu, Di; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Abiotic conversion of the reactive nitrification intermediate hydroxylamine (NH2OH) to nitrous oxide (N2O) is a possible mechanism of N2O formation during nitrification. Previous research has demonstrated that manganese dioxide (MnO2) and organic matter (OM) content of soil as well as soil pH are important control variables of N2O formation in the soil. But until now, their combined effect on abiotic N2O formation from NH2OH has not been quantified. Here, we present results from a full-factorial experiment with artificial soil mixtures at five different levels of pH, MnO2 and OM, respectively, and quantified the interactive effects of the three variables on the NH2OH-to-N2O conversion ratio (RNH2OH-to-N2O). Furthermore, the effect of OM quality on RNH2OH-to-N2O was determined by the addition of four different organic materials with different C/N ratios to the artificial soil mixtures. The experiments revealed a strong interactive effect of soil pH, MnO2 and OM on RNH2OH-to-N2O. In general, increasing MnO2 and decreasing pH increased RNH2OH-to-N2O, while increasing OM content was associated with a decrease in RNH2OH-to-N2O. Organic matter quality also affected RNH2OH-to-N2O. However, this effect was not a function of C/N ratio, but was rather related to differences in the dominating functional groups between the different organic materials.

  9. Molecular composition of fresh and aged secondary organic aerosol from a mixture of biogenic volatile compounds: a high-resolution mass spectrometry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtchev, I.; Doussin, J.-F.; Giorio, C.; Mahon, B.; Wilson, E. M.; Maurin, N.; Pangui, E.; Venables, D. S.; Wenger, J. C.; Kalberer, M.

    2015-05-01

    Field observations over the past decade indicate that a significant fraction of organic aerosol in remote areas may contain highly oxidized molecules. Aerosol processing or further oxidation (aging) of organic aerosol has been suggested to be responsible for their formation through heterogeneous reaction with oxidants and multigenerational oxidation of vapours by OH radicals. In this study we investigated the influence of several aging processes on the molecular composition of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) using direct infusion and liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry. SOA was formed in simulation chamber experiments from ozonolysis of a mixture of four biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC): α-pinene, β-pinene, Δ3-carene and isoprene. The SOA was subsequently aged under three different sets of conditions: in the dark in the presence of residual ozone, with UV irradiation and OH radicals, and using UV light only. Among all studied conditions, only OH radical-initiated aging was found to influence the molecular composition of the aerosol and showed an increase in carbon oxidation state (OSC) and elemental O / C ratios of the SOA components. None of the aging processes produced an observable effect on the oligomers formed from ozonolysis of the BVOC mixture, which were found to be equally abundant in both "fresh" and "aged" SOA. Additional experiments using α-pinene as the sole precursor demonstrated that oligomers are an important group of compounds in SOA produced from both ozonolysis and OH radical-initiated oxidation processes; however, a completely different set of oligomers is formed under these two oxidation regimes. SOA from the OH-initiated oxidation of α-pinene had a significantly higher overall OSC and O / C compared to that from pure ozonolysis experiments confirming that the OH radical reaction is more likely to be responsible for the occurrence of highly oxidized species in ambient biogenic SOA.

  10. Interactive effects of MnO2, organic matter and pH on abiotic formation of N2O from hydroxylamine in artificial soil mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shurong; Berns, Anne E.; Vereecken, Harry; Wu, Di; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Abiotic conversion of the reactive nitrification intermediate hydroxylamine (NH2OH) to nitrous oxide (N2O) is a possible mechanism of N2O formation during nitrification. Previous research has demonstrated that manganese dioxide (MnO2) and organic matter (OM) content of soil as well as soil pH are important control variables of N2O formation in the soil. But until now, their combined effect on abiotic N2O formation from NH2OH has not been quantified. Here, we present results from a full-factorial experiment with artificial soil mixtures at five different levels of pH, MnO2 and OM, respectively, and quantified the interactive effects of the three variables on the NH2OH-to-N2O conversion ratio (RNH2OH-to-N2O). Furthermore, the effect of OM quality on RNH2OH-to-N2O was determined by the addition of four different organic materials with different C/N ratios to the artificial soil mixtures. The experiments revealed a strong interactive effect of soil pH, MnO2 and OM on RNH2OH-to-N2O. In general, increasing MnO2 and decreasing pH increased RNH2OH-to-N2O, while increasing OM content was associated with a decrease in RNH2OH-to-N2O. Organic matter quality also affected RNH2OH-to-N2O. However, this effect was not a function of C/N ratio, but was rather related to differences in the dominating functional groups between the different organic materials.

  11. Interactive effects of MnO2, organic matter and pH on abiotic formation of N2O from hydroxylamine in artificial soil mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shurong; Berns, Anne E.; Vereecken, Harry; Wu, Di; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Abiotic conversion of the reactive nitrification intermediate hydroxylamine (NH2OH) to nitrous oxide (N2O) is a possible mechanism of N2O formation during nitrification. Previous research has demonstrated that manganese dioxide (MnO2) and organic matter (OM) content of soil as well as soil pH are important control variables of N2O formation in the soil. But until now, their combined effect on abiotic N2O formation from NH2OH has not been quantified. Here, we present results from a full-factorial experiment with artificial soil mixtures at five different levels of pH, MnO2 and OM, respectively, and quantified the interactive effects of the three variables on the NH2OH-to-N2O conversion ratio (RNH2OH-to-N2O). Furthermore, the effect of OM quality on RNH2OH-to-N2O was determined by the addition of four different organic materials with different C/N ratios to the artificial soil mixtures. The experiments revealed a strong interactive effect of soil pH, MnO2 and OM on RNH2OH-to-N2O. In general, increasing MnO2 and decreasing pH increased RNH2OH-to-N2O, while increasing OM content was associated with a decrease in RNH2OH-to-N2O. Organic matter quality also affected RNH2OH-to-N2O. However, this effect was not a function of C/N ratio, but was rather related to differences in the dominating functional groups between the different organic materials. PMID:28145407

  12. Distillation of binary mixtures with capillary porous plates

    SciTech Connect

    Abu Al-Rub, F.A.; Akili, J.; Datta, R.

    1998-07-01

    Distillation of liquid mixtures using capillary porous plates is a new process which depends upon the use of the intermolecular interactions between solids and liquids to alter the normal vapor-liquid equilibrium of a given mixture. Distillation of different binary mixtures, namely ethanol-water, ethanol-benzene, and acetone-ethanol systems, of different compositions was experimentally studied in a continuous distillation column equipped with four, five, or six porous sintered stainless steel fractionating plates of 13.5 {micro}m pore diameter as well as six normal sieve plates. The results showed that the main factors affecting the separation efficiency in a given porous plate are the polarization of the pure liquids and the polarization difference between the mixture components. For the ethanol-water system, the results showed that while no separation was achieved in a distillation column with conventional stages, the zeotropic point of this system was broken in the distillation column with porous plates. A distillate of about 94 mol% ethanol was obtained for a feed of the zeotropic composition, i.e., 89.7 mol% ethanol. For the ethanol-benzene system, the azeotropic point was shifted from 40 mol% ethanol to about 30 mol% ethanol. For the acetone-ethanol system, there was no significant difference between the results obtained with normal stages and those with the porous plates. These results are in agreement with the developed theory.

  13. Study of the feasibility of controlling the length scale of the phase separation of organic molecular mixtures on Si(111) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cezza, Miriam

    We present investigations on the arrangements of phase separating small organic molecules in mixtures subsequent to deposition from liquid solution. This phenomenon may have technological applications in efficient organic solar cells. The spontaneous formation of a morphology during phase separation from a solvent-based, bimolecular solution onto a substrate depends on several parameters, including relative molecular concentrations, individual molecules/solvent/substrate interactions, solvent evaporation rate, and annealing conditions. Our molecular mixtures consist of tetranitro zinc-phthalocyanine (tn-ZnPc) and [6,6]-phenyl-C 61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) in chloroform, deposited on native oxide-covered Si(111) substrates. We investigate the role that solvent evaporation rate during deposition, solvent vapor annealing (SVA) and thermal annealing play on the morphology formation of molecular domains. We find that slow enough rates of solvent evaporation, along with SVA action, lead to ordered PCBM structures. Most of tn-ZnPc molecules aggregate in rod-shaped clusters of size ~ 100 nm while in liquid solution, even at diluted concentrations, but some remain solvated, and form a wetting layer on the Si(111) surfaces, affecting the morphology of PCBM deposited through mixture solutions. We find that PCBM aggregates vertically diffuse upon heating in spin-coated samples, while tn-ZnPc clusters and wetting layer are not affected. Investigations of different relative concentrations of individual molecules in mixtures show that the concentration of tn-ZnPc strongly affects the crystallization process of PCBM: for a 1:1 ratio PCBM crystallization is suppressed, while changing the amount of tn-ZnPc, PCBM crystals form. While PCBM domains display several different morphologies, tn-ZnPc cluster morphology is not affected by changes in the deposition conditions or by post-deposition treatments. Overall we find that, under the conditions studied here, PCBM molecules

  14. The Effect of Circuiting Arrangement on the Thermal Performance of Refrigeration Mixtures in Tube-and-Fin Condensing Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.T.; Conklin, J.C.

    1999-03-15

    For the pure or azeotropic refrigerants typically used in present air conditioning and refrigeration applications, the refrigerant changes phase at a constant temperature. Thus, the refrigerant circuiting arrangement such as crossfiow, counterfiow, or cross-counterflow, has no effect on the thermal performance. For zeotropic refrigerant mixtures, however, the phase-change occurs over a temperature range, or "glide", and the refrigerant circuiting arrangement, or flow path through the heat exchanger, can affect the thermal performance of both the heat exchangers as well as the overall efficiency of the vapor compression cooling cycle. The effects of tsvo diflerent circuiting arrangements on the thermal performance of a zeotropic retligerant mixture and an almost azeotropic refrigerant mixture in a four-row cross-countertlow heat exchanger arrangement are reported here. The two condensers differ only in the manner of circuiting the refrigerant tubes, where one has refrigerant always flowing downward in the active heat transfer region ("identical order") and the other has refrigerant alternating flow direction in the active heat transfer region ("inverted order"). All other geometric parameters, such as bce are% fin louver geometry, refrigerant tube size and enhancement etc., are the same for both heat exchangers. One refrigerant mixture (R-41OA) un&rgoes a small temperature change ("low glide") during phase change, and the other retligerant mixture (a multi- component proprietary mixture) has a substantial temperature change ("high glide") of approximately 10"C during the phase change process. The overall thermal conductance, two-phase conductance, and pressure drop are presented. For the flow conditions of these tests, which are representative of resi&ntial cooling conditions, inverted order circuiting is more desirable than identical order. The potential thermal advantages of the i&ntical order arrangement for high-glide zeotropic refrigerant mixtures are negated

  15. New insights into self-organization of a model lipid mixture and quantification of its adsorption on spherical polymer particles.

    PubMed

    Troutier, Anne-Lise; Véron, Laurent; Delair, Thierry; Pichot, Christian; Ladavière, Catherine

    2005-10-25

    The adsorption of lipids onto spherical polymer colloids led to original assemblies presenting structural characteristics adjustable with the lipid formulation. The model system selected for this work involved sulfate-charged poly(styrene) submicrometer particles and zwitterionic/cationic lipid mixtures composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DPTAP). According to the theoretical packing parameter calculations and whatever the DPPC/DPTAP ratio, the two lipids self-assembled in aqueous media to spontaneously form vesicles. A phase transition investigation of these DPPC/DPTAP vesicles using differential scanning calorimetry revealed particular thermotropic behaviors, especially for the equimolar formulation where very strong interactions occurred between DPPC and DPTAP. Furthermore, the coating of the lipids around particles was monitored versus DPPC/DPTAP ratio by means of numerous appropriate techniques. First, a thermogravimetric analysis, providing decomposition profiles of lipid/polymer particle assemblies with temperature, was atypically carried out for such nanostructures. Then, 1H NMR spectroscopy enabled the exact DPPC/DPTAP molar ratios adsorbed on particles to be determined by differentiating both lipids. Subsequently, it also pointed out the major role of electrostatic interactions as driving forces in the assembly elaboration process. In addition to these findings, quantitative information has been collected and correlated with chemical lipid assays and permitted the statement of a lipid bilayer coverage for the assemblies prepared in water, in agreement with quasi-elastic light scattering data.

  16. Anion exchange of organic carboxylate by soils responsible for positive Km-fc relationship from methanol mixture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minhee; Han, Junho; Hyun, Seunghun

    2013-09-01

    The cosolvency model was not applicable for predicting the sorption of organic carboxylic acids. The reason of inapplicability was investigated by analyzing the solubility (Sm) and sorption (Km) of benzoic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP). The Sm and Km by two iron-rich soils was measured as a function of methanol volume fraction (fc), electrolyte compositions, and pH(app). For 2,4,6-TCP, the Km of both neutral and anion species was well-explainable by the cosolvency model, exemplifying the knowledge of cosolvency power (σ) being sufficient to describe its sorption. However, for benzoic acid and 2,4-D, the Km of organic anions increased with fc, illustrating the organic carboxylate to be responsible for the deviation. The Sm of organic anions was not affected by the ionic valence (Ca(2+) vs. K(+)) of liquid phase. Among hydrophilic quantities of the 2,4-D sorption, the fraction of anion exchange increased with fc while the fraction of Ca-bridge decreased in the same range. Adding solvent in soil-water system is likely to render soil surface charge more positive, fortifying the anion exchange, but opposing the formation of Ca-bridging. Therefore, it can be concluded that the positive Km-fc relationship is due to the anion exchange of organic carboxylate with positively charged soil surface, whose contribution is >50% of overall sorption at solvent-free system and becomes greater with fc up to 82%.

  17. Photosynthetic based algal-bacterial combined treatment of mixtures of organic pollutants and CO2 mitigation in a continuous photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Essam, Tamer; ElRakaiby, Marwa; Hashem, Abdelgawad

    2013-06-01

    An algal-bacterial microcosm was synthetically constructed of Chlorella vulgaris MMl and Pseudomonas MTl. This microcosm was able to treat simulated wastewater supplemented with mixtures of phenol and pyridine up to 4.6 and 4.4 mM, respectively, in a continuous stirred tank bioreactor (CSTR) using photosynthetic oxygenation. Complete pollutant removal and detoxification and 82 % removal of introduced chemical oxygen demand (COD) were achieved at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2.7 days. Increasing the influent load to 5.3 and 6.3 mM reduced the removal of phenol, pyridine and COD to 78, 21 and 59 %, respectively. Fertilization of the photobioreactor with 24 mM NaHCO3 restored the treatment and detoxification efficiencies. The system was able to additionally mitigate up to 72 mM NaHCO3 at the same HRT. Although the fertilization increased the system treatment efficiency, the settleability of the algal-bacterial microcosm was significantly reduced. When the photobioreactor was operated at HRT of 2.7 days in a 12/12 h of dark/light cycle, complete removal of 4.7 mM phenol was recorded but only 11 % of 5.7 mM pyridine was removed. The COD removal efficiency and CO2 mitigation were also reduced to 65 and 86 %, respectively, and the effluent retained significant toxicity where 73 % inhibition was recorded. Elongation of the illumination time to 48 h (HRT of 4 days at 12/12 h dark/light cycle) restored the treatment and detoxification efficiencies.

  18. Performance of innovative PU-foam and natural fiber-based composites for the biofiltration of a mixture of volatile organic compounds by a fungal biofilm.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Acosta, O B; Arriaga, S; Escobar-Barrios, V A; Casas-Flores, S; Almendarez-Camarillo, A

    2012-01-30

    The performance of perlite and two innovative carriers that consist of polyurethane (PU) chemically modified with starch; and polypropylene reinforced with agave fibers was evaluated in the biofiltration of a mixture of VOCs composed of hexane, toluene and methyl-ethyl-ketone. At a total organic loading rate of 145 gCm(-3)h(-1) the elimination capacities (ECs) obtained were 145, 24 and 96 gCm(-3)h(-1) for the biofilters packed with the PU, the reinforced polypropylene, and perlite, respectively. Specific maximum biodegradation rates of the mixture, in the biofilters, were 416 mgCg(protein)(-1)  h(-1) for the PU and 63 mgCg(protein)(-1) h(-1) for perlite, which confirms the highest performance of the PU-composite. 18S rDNA analysis from the PU-biofilter revealed the presence of Fusarium solani in its sexual and asexual states, respectively. The modified PU carrier significantly reduced the start-up period of the biofilter and enhanced the EC of the VOCs. Thus, this study gives new alternatives in the field of packing materials synthesis, promoting the addition of easily biodegradable sources to enhance the performance of biofilters.

  19. A high performance membrane for sorption and pervaporation separation of ethyl tert-butyl ether and ethanol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, G.S.; Niang, M.; Schaetzel, P.

    1999-02-01

    A new kind of membrane was prepared by blending 5 wt% poly(1-vinylpyrrolidone-co-acrylic acid) with cellulose acetate propionate for the separation of ethyl tert-butyl ether and ethanol mixtures. The membrane properties were evaluated by pervaporation and sorption of mixtures of ethyl tert-butyl ether/ethanol. The experimental results show that the selectivity and the fluxes of this membrane depend upon the feed composition and upon the temperature. The minimum values of ethanol concentration in the permeate and in the sorption solution were obtained in the vicinity of the azeotropic point. Compared with the pure CAP membrane, the new membrane shows high performance for the separation of ETBE and EtOH mixtures, especially under high temperature conditions.

  20. Hydrophobic treatment of organics against glass employing nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure pulsed plasmas with a mixture of CF{sub 4} and N{sub 2} gases

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, Hirotoshi; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Yara, Takuya; Uehara, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    A hydrophobic organics surface selectively against glass was realized by employing nonequilibrium atmospheric-pressure pulsed plasmas with a mixture of CF{sub 4} and N{sub 2} gases. The organic surface was drastically altered to have a high hydrophobicity, while the glass surface itself remained hydrophilic after the plasma treatment with the addition of a small amount of CF{sub 4} to the N{sub 2} gas. After 100 CF{sub 4}/N{sub 2} plasma treatments, no thin film deposition was observed on the organic material. To investigate the characteristics of the CF{sub 4}/N{sub 2} plasma, the exhaust gas from the plasma was measured by using ion attachment mass spectroscopy (IAMS). The IAMS spectrum indicated that the amounts of CF{sub 3} and F radicals were increased drastically with increasing addition of CF{sub 4}. A mechanism of the selective surface modification was clarified on a result of surface chemical bonding with the gas phase.

  1. A case study on co-exposure to a mixture of organic solvents in a Tunisian adhesive-producing company

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives to assess environmental and biological monitoring of exposure to organic solvents in a glue-manufacturing company in Sfax, Tunisia. Methods Exposure of volunteer workers, in the solvented glue-work-stations, in the control laboratory and in the storage rooms of the finished products, was assessed through indoor-air and urine measurements. Informed consent of the workers was obtained. Results and discussion The exposure indexes were found with high values in the solvented workshop as well as in the control laboratory and were respectively, 8.40 and 3.12. These indexes were also correlated with hexane and toluene indoor air concentrations. As to urine, the obtained results for the 2,5-hexandione and hippuric acid, metabolites of hexane and toluene, respectively, were in accord with the indoor-air measurements, with an average of 0.46 mg/l and 1240 mg/g of creatinine. Conclusion This study assessed for the first time biological exposure to organic solvents used in Tunisian adhesive industries. Although values are likely to underestimate true exposure levels, some figures exceed European and American occupational exposure guidelines. PMID:22082240

  2. Thermodynamic parameters monitoring the equilibrium shift of enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis/synthesis reactions in favor of synthesis in mixtures of water and organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Deschrevel, Brigitte; Vincent, Jean-Claude; Ripoll, Camille; Thellier, Michel

    2003-01-20

    The main strategy developed to shift the equilibrium state of a hydrolase-catalyzed hydrolysis/synthesis reaction consists in reducing water activity by addition of organic solvents in the reaction medium. We have used several mixtures of water and 1,4-butanediol, ranging from pure water to pure 1,4-butanediol, to study the hydrolysis/synthesis reaction of the N-Cbz-L-tryptophanyl-glycineamide dipeptide, catalyzed by alpha-chymotrypsin. In the presence of 1,4-butanediol, alpha-chymotrypsin also catalyzed the esterification reaction between this diol and N-Cbz-L-tryptophan; this ester hydrolysis/synthesis reaction has thus also been examined. The dipeptide and ester equilibrium concentrations increase when the water content of the reaction medium is decreased. Using our experimental data, we have determined the equilibrium constants of the hydrolysis/synthesis equilibria involving the nonionized forms of the protected amino acids, the estimated values of which are Ksp = 8 10(5) for the dipeptide and Kse = 78 for the ester respectively. They are true thermodynamic equilibrium constants, each related to a single, well-defined reaction equilibrium and with water activity being taken into account. If an organic solvent is added to the reaction medium these equilibria can be shifted towards synthesis by decreasing the water activity but also by modifying the ionization/neutralization equilibrium constant of the ionizable groups. These two effects depend both on the water content and on the nature of the organic solvent used, and, in particular, on its dielectric constant. Because of the importance of this parameter in our study, we discuss using it as an indicator to select an appropriate organic solvent to perform an enzyme-catalyzed synthesis.

  3. Assessing the bioremediation potential of algal species indigenous to oil sands process-affected waters on mixtures of oil sands acid extractable organics.

    PubMed

    Ruffell, Sarah E; Frank, Richard A; Woodworth, Adam P; Bragg, Leslie M; Bauer, Anthony E; Deeth, Lorna E; Müller, Kirsten M; Farwell, Andrea J; Dixon, D George; Servos, Mark R; McConkey, Brendan J

    2016-11-01

    Surface mining extraction of bitumen from oil sand in Alberta, Canada results in the accumulation of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW). In attempts to maximize water recycling, and because its constituents are recognized as being toxic, OSPW is retained in settling basins. Consequently, research efforts are currently focused on developing remediation strategies capable of detoxifying OSPW to allow for eventual release. One potential bioremediation strategy proposes to utilize phytoplankton native to the Alberta oil sand region to sequester, break down, or modify the complex oil sands acid extractable organic (AEO) mixtures in OSPW. Preliminary attempts to quantify changes in total oil sands AEO concentration in test solutions by ESI-MS following a 14-day algal remediation period revealed the presence of unknown organic acids in control samples, likely released by the phytoplankton strains and often of the same atomic mass range as the oil sands AEO under investigation. To address the presence of these "biogenic" organic acids in test samples, ESI-MS in MRM mode was utilized to identify oil sands AEO "marker ions" that were a) present within the tested oil sands AEO extract and b) unique to the oil sands AEO extract only (e.g. atomic masses different from biogenic organic acids). Using this approach, one of the 21 tested algal strains, Stichococcus sp. 1, proved capable of significantly reducing the AEO marker ion concentration at test concentrations of 10, 30, and 100mgL(-1). This result, along with the accelerated growth rate and recalcitrance of this algal strain with exposure to oil sands AEO, suggests the strong potential for the use of the isolated Stichococcus sp. 1 as a candidate for bioremediation strategies.

  4. Reflectance spectroscopy of natural organic solids, iron sulfides and their mixtures as refractory analogues for Rosetta/VIRTIS' surface composition analysis of 67P/CG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Lyuba V.; Markus, Kathrin; Arnold, Gabriele; Henckel, Daniela; Kappel, David; Schade, Ulrich; Rousseau, Batiste; Quirico, Eric; Schmitt, Bernard; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Filacchione, Gianrico; Érard, Stéphane; Leyrat, Cedric; VIRTIS Team

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of 0.25-5 µm reflectance spectra provided by the Visible and InfraRed Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS) onboard Rosetta orbiter revealed that the surface of 67P/CG is dark from the near-UV to the IR and is enriched in refractory phases such as organic and opaque components. The broadness and complexity of the ubiquitous absorption feature around 3.2 µm suggest a variety of cometary organic constituents. For example, complex hydrocarbons (aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic) can contribute to the feature between 3.3 and 3.5 µm and to the low reflectance of the surface in the visible. Here we present the 0.25-5 µm reflectance spectra of well-characterized terrestrial hydrocarbon materials (solid oil bitumens, coals) and discuss their relevance as spectral analogues for a hydrocarbon part of 67P/CG's complex organics. However, the expected low degree of thermal processing of cometary hydrocarbons (high (H+O+N+S)/C ratios and low carbon aromaticities) suggests high IR reflectance, intense 3.3-3.5 µm absorption bands and steep red IR slopes that are not observed in the VIRTIS spectra. Fine-grained opaque refractory phases (e.g., iron sulfides, Fe-Ni alloys) intimately mixed with other surface components are likely responsible for the low IR reflectance and low intensities of absorption bands in the VIRTIS spectra of the 67P/CG surface. In particular, iron sulfides are common constituents of cometary dust, "cometary" chondritic IDPs, and efficient darkening agents in primitive carbonaceous chondrites. Their effect on reflectance spectra of an intimate mixture is strongly affected by grain size. We report and discuss the 0.25-5 µm reflectance spectra of iron sulfides (meteoritic troilite and several terrestrial pyrrhotites) ground and sieved to various particle sizes. In addition, we present reflectance spectra of several intimate mixtures of powdered iron sulfides and solid oil bitumens. Based on the reported laboratory data, we discuss the ability of

  5. Surface Partitioning in Organic-Inorganic Mixtures Contributes to the Size-Dependence of the Phase-State of Atmospheric Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Werner, Josephina; Dalirian, Maryam; Walz, Marie-Madeleine; Ekholm, Victor; Wideqvist, Ulla; Lowe, Samuel J; Öhrwall, Gunnar; Persson, Ingmar; Riipinen, Ilona; Björneholm, Olle

    2016-07-19

    Atmospheric particulate matter is one of the main factors governing the Earth's radiative budget, but its exact effects on the global climate are still uncertain. Knowledge on the molecular-scale surface phenomena as well as interactions between atmospheric organic and inorganic compounds is necessary for understanding the role of airborne nanoparticles in the Earth system. In this work, surface composition of aqueous model systems containing succinic acid and sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate is determined using a novel approach combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, surface tension measurements and thermodynamic modeling. It is shown that succinic acid molecules are accumulated in the surface, yielding a 10-fold surface concentration as compared with the bulk for saturated succinic acid solutions. Inorganic salts further enhance this enrichment due to competition for hydration in the bulk. The surface compositions for various mixtures are parametrized to yield generalizable results and used to explain changes in surface tension. The enhanced surface partitioning implies an increased maximum solubility of organic compounds in atmospheric nanoparticles. The results can explain observations of size-dependent phase-state of atmospheric nanoparticles, suggesting that these particles can display drastically different behavior than predicted by bulk properties only.

  6. Greening pharmaceutical applications of liquid chromatography through using propylene carbonate-ethanol mixtures instead of acetonitrile as organic modifier in the mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Tache, Florentin; Udrescu, Stefan; Albu, Florin; Micăle, Florina; Medvedovici, Andrei

    2013-03-05

    Substitution of acetonitrile (ACN) as organic modifier in mobile phases for liquid chromatography by mixtures of propylene carbonate (PC) and ethanol (EtOH) may be considered a greener approach for pharmaceutical applications. Such a replacement is achievable without any major compromise in terms of elution order, chromatographic retention, efficiency and peak symmetry. This has been equally demonstrated for reverse phase (RP), ion pair formation (IP) and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) separation modes. The impact on the sensitivity induced by the replacement between these organic solvents is discussed for UV-vis and mass spectrometric detection. A comparison between Van Deemter plots obtained under elution conditions based on ACN and PC/EtOH is presented. The alternative elution modes were also compared in terms of thermodynamic parameters, such as standard enthalpy (ΔH⁰) and entropic contributions to the partition between the mobile and the stationary phases, for some model compounds. Van't Hoff plots demonstrated that differences between the thermodynamic parameters are minor when shifting from ACN/water to PC/EtOH/water elution on an octadecyl chemically modified silicagel stationary phase. As long as large volume injection (LVI) of diluents non-miscible with the mobile phase is a recently developed topic having a high potential of greening the sample preparation procedures through elimination of the solvent evaporation stage, this feature was also assessed in the case of ACN replacement by PC/EtOH.

  7. Monte Carlo simulations of mixtures involving ketones and aldehydes by a direct bubble pressure calculation.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, Nicolas; Lachet, Véronique; Boutin, Anne

    2010-07-08

    Ketone and aldehyde molecules are involved in a large variety of industrial applications. Because they are mainly present mixed with other compounds, the prediction of phase equilibrium of mixtures involving these classes of molecules is of first interest particularly to design and optimize separation processes. The main goal of this work is to propose a transferable force field for ketones and aldehydes that allows accurate molecular simulations of not only pure compounds but also complex mixtures. The proposed force field is based on the anisotropic united-atoms AUA4 potential developed for hydrocarbons, and it introduces only one new atom, the carbonyl oxygen. The Lennard-Jones parameters of this oxygen atom have been adjusted on saturated thermodynamic properties of both acetone and acetaldehyde. To simulate mixtures, Monte Carlo simulations are carried out in a specific pseudoensemble which allows a direct calculation of the bubble pressure. For polar mixtures involved in this study, we show that this approach is an interesting alternative to classical calculations in the isothermal-isobaric Gibbs ensemble. The pressure-composition diagrams of polar + polar and polar + nonpolar binary mixtures are well reproduced. Mutual solubilities as well as azeotrope location, if present, are accurately predicted without any empirical binary interaction parameters or readjustment. Such result highlights the transferability of the proposed force field, which is an essential feature toward the simulation of complex oxygenated mixtures of industrial interest.

  8. The use of cyprinodont fish, Aphanius fasciatus, as a sentinel organism to detect complex genotoxic mixtures in the coastal lagoon ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Mosesso, Pasquale; Angeletti, Dario; Pepe, Gaetano; Pretti, Carlo; Nascetti, Giuseppe; Bellacima, Raffaela; Cimmaruta, Roberta; Jha, Awadhesh N

    2012-02-18

    In the present work we aimed to standardise the alkaline comet assay with erythrocytes of the cyprinodont, Mediterranean Killifish, Aphanius fasciatus. The aims of the study were to explore the suitability of this fish to assess biomarkers of genotoxic effects and as a sentinel organism to detect complex genotoxic mixtures in coastal lagoon ecosystems. Following proper optimisation, the application and effectiveness of the comet assay in erythrocytes of A. fasciatus were tested by measuring the tail DNA (%) induced by (a) in vivo exposure of individual fish to X-rays (dose, 3Gy) and (b) following in vitro challenge of erythrocytes with restriction endonucleases Fok-I and Eco-RI, which selectively induce double-strand breaks with cohesive and blunt termini, respectively. Furthermore, in order to evaluate whether circulating fish blood contained actively proliferating cells that could influence the extent of DNA damage in control (untreated) fish, we measured the number of "comets" positive for 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) by the use of anti-BrdU antibody and immuno-histochemical methods. Both treatments (i.e. with X-rays and restriction endonucleases) induced statistically significant increases in tail DNA (%) values compared with the relevant untreated controls, indicating the effectiveness of the comet assay in the erythrocytes of A. fasciatus to detect different types of DNA lesions. Results from anti-BrdU antibody labelling of erythrocytes indicated a very low percentage (5%) of "comets" positive for BrdU. Following optimisation and validation of the assay under laboratory conditions, fish were collected in the Orbetello lagoon (Tuscany, Italy), considered to be a significantly polluted site. The results showed statistically significant increases for tail DNA (%) compared with corresponding values observed in erythrocytes of fish caught in the unpolluted reference site "Saline di Tarquinia". The effects of physico-chemical parameters of the water (i

  9. Dissipation of a commercial mixture of polyoxyethylene amine surfactants in aquatic outdoor microcosms: Effect of water depth and sediment organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Gil, Jose Luis; Lissemore, Linda; Solomon, Keith; Hanson, Mark

    2016-04-15

    This study optimized existing analytical approaches and characterized the effect of sediment total organic carbon (0.05-2.05% TOC), and water depth (15, 30, and 90cm) on the fate of MON 0818, a commercial mixture of polyoxyethylene amine surfactants (POEAs), in outdoor microcosms. Mixtures of POEAs are commonly used as adjuvants in commercial herbicide formulations containing glyphosate. Until recently, analytical methods sensitive enough to monitor environmental concentrations of POEAs in aquatic systems were not available. After optimizing recently developed analytical methods, we found that the combined use of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry provided a reliable approach for determining the concentration of sediment-adsorbed POEAs. The surfactant showed strong affinity for sediment materials, with low maximum recoveries by ASE of 52%. Under microcosm conditions, water depth or sediment characteristics did not significantly affect the water-column half-life of POEA, which ranged from 3.2 to 5.3h. Binding of POEAs to suspended solids was observed, which dissipated via one- or two-phase exponential decay; when two-phase decay occurred, fast phase half-life values ranged from 0.71 to 1.3h and slow-phase values ranged from 18 to 44h. Concentrations of POEA increased in sediment shortly after application and decreased over the study period with a half-life of 5.8 to 71d. The concentrations of POEAs in the sediment of the shallow (15cm) ponds dissipated following a two-phase exponential decay model with an initial fast-phase half-life of 1.1 to 8.9d and a slower second-phase half-life of 21d. Our results suggest that aquatic organisms are unlikely to be exposed to POEAs in aqueous phase for periods of more than a few hours following an over-water application, and that sediment is a significant sink for POEAs in aquatic systems.

  10. Reduction of lead oxide (PbO2) and release of Pb(II) in mixtures of natural organic matter, free chlorine and monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Valentine, Richard L

    2009-05-15

    The primary focus of this paper is to elucidate the influence of mixtures of natural organic matter (NOM) and free chlorine and NOM and monochloramine on the reduction of PbO2 in drinking water. Parallel experiments using PbO2 particles of two different sizes (approximately 20 and approximately 200 nm) were conducted to explore the effects of particle size on this process. In the absence of NOM, reduction of PbO2 was observed in monochloramine solutions but not in free chlorine solutions. In the presence of NOM, significant Pb(II) formation was observed in disinfectant-free solutions. The release of Pb(II) was suppressed by the additional presence of free chlorine until the point in time when free chlorine was exhausted. Monochloramine also repressed Pb(II) formation in the presence of NOM but not as significantly as free chlorine. The presence of NOM and monochloramine does not necessarily act additively or synergistically due to complex interactions including reduction of PbO2 by NOM, monochloramine mediated reduction of PbO2, and oxidation of NOM by monochloramine. Higher surface area-normalized Pb(ll) formation was found in experiments using larger PbO2 particles. The high reactivity generally associated with nanoparticles was not observed in our study.

  11. Potential of Effective micro-organisms and Eisenia fetida in enhancing vermi-degradation and nutrient release of fly ash incorporated into cow dung-paper waste mixture.

    PubMed

    Mupambwa, Hupenyu Allan; Ravindran, Balasubramani; Mnkeni, Pearson Nyari Stephano

    2016-02-01

    The interactions between earthworms and microorganisms activity has prompted several researchers to evaluate the potential of artificially inoculating vermicomposts with additional specific microbes, with the intention of enhancing the vermicomposting process. This study evaluated the potential of inoculating fly ash (F)-cow dung-paper waste (CP) mixture (F-CP) with a specialized microbial cocktail called Effective micro-organisms (EM) during vermicomposting using Eisenia fetida earthworms. Inoculation with EM alone did not result in significantly (P>0.05) different changes in C/N ratio and dissolved organic matter (DOC) compared to the control with no EM and E. fetida. A significant interaction between EM and E. fetida presence resulted in greater changes in C/N ratio and DOC, which were not statistically different from the E. fetida alone treatment. It was also noteworthy that the activity of ß-Glucosidase was not influenced by the presence of EM, but was significantly influenced (P=0.0014) by the presence of E. fetida. However, the EM+E. fetida treatment resulted in a rate of weekly Olsen P release of 54.32mgkg(-1) which was 12.3%, 89.2% and 228.0% more that the E. fetida alone, EM alone and control treatments, respectively. Similarly, though higher in the E. fetida plus EM treatment, the phosphate solubilizing bacteria counts were not significantly different (P>0.05) from the E. fetida alone treatment. It is concluded that inoculation of F-CP composts with EM alone may not be beneficial, while combining EM with E. fetida results in faster compost maturity and significantly greater Olsen P release. It would be interesting to evaluate higher optimized rates of EM inoculation and fortifying EM cocktails with phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB) on F-CP vermicompost degradation and phosphorus mineralization.

  12. Vapor-liquid equilibria of binary and ternary mixtures of cyclohexane, 3-methyl-2-butanone, and octane at 101.3 kPa

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.C.; Tang, M.; Chen, Y.P.

    1996-05-01

    Vapor-liquid equilibria were measured at 101.3 kPa for the three binary and one ternary mixtures of cyclohexane, 3-methyl-2-butanone, and octane. The isobaric T-x-y data were reported, including an azeotropic point for the binary mixture cyclohexane + 3-methyl-2-butanone. The virial equation of state truncated after the second coefficient was used to calculate the vapor-phase fugacity coefficients. The Tsonopoulos correlation equation was applied to determine the second virial coefficients. Various activity coefficient models of the Wilson, the NRTL, and the UNIQUAC equations were used to correlate the binary experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium results. Optimally-fitted binary parameters of the activity coefficient models were obtained and those parameters of the NRTL model were employed to predict the ternary vapor-liquid equilibria. Satisfactory results were presented for the correlation and prediction of the vapor-liquid equilibrium data on binary and ternary mixtures.

  13. Pulse-echo overlap technique of signal processing and ultrasonic velocity measurements of Cu(I) and some tetra-alkylammonium salts in binary organic mixtures to study various structural effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Parvinder; Kansal, Deepika; Singh, Gurdev

    2001-08-01

    AIM OF THE PRESENT WORK Copper (I) salts are unstable in many orgnic solvents. Previous investigations of copper(I) salts are limited only to acetonitrile and its binary mixtures with some organic solvents. Benzonitrile like acetonitrile has also -C -N group attached to the benzene ring system. This solvent like acetonitrile also stabilize copper (I) salts strongly. Moreover, the solubility of copper(I) salts in benzonitrile and its binary mixtures with other organic solvents is much higher as compared to that in acetonitrile. In spite of very favourable properties of benzonitrile, studies of copper salts have never been made in benzonitrile and its binaru mixtures with other organic solvents. The binary mixtures of benzonitrile with acetonitrile and pyridine has a wide range of dielectric constant and viscosity. these solvent systems are very interesting solvent systems for the study of copper(I) salts. Cu+ and Na+ ions have almost some ionic radii (Cu+ = 0.90 A and Na+ = 0.95 A). These ions are expected to have some type of solvation behaviour in many solvents. It has been found that in nitrile solvents and pyridine Cu+ is solvated by a special type of interaction while Na+ is solvated by the normal electrostatic ion-dipole interaction.

  14. Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor is the major toxic mode of action of an organic extract of a reference urban dust particulate matter mixture: the role of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Andrysík, Zdeněk; Vondráček, Jan; Marvanová, Soňa; Ciganek, Miroslav; Neča, Jiří; Pěnčíková, Kateřina; Mahadevan, Brinda; Topinka, Jan; Baird, William M; Kozubík, Alois; Machala, Miroslav

    2011-09-01

    Many of the toxic and carcinogenic effects of urban air pollution have been linked to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) adsorbed to airborne particulate matter (PM). The carcinogenic properties of PAHs in complex organic mixtures derived from PM have been chiefly attributed to their mutagenicity. Nevertheless, PAHs are also potent activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), which may contribute to their nongenotoxic effects, including tumor promotion. As the genotoxicity of carcinogenic PAHs in complex mixtures derived from urban PM is often inhibited by other mixture constituents, the AhR-mediated activity of urban PM extracts might significantly contribute to the carcinogenic activity of such mixtures. In the present study, we used an organic extract of the urban dust standard reference material, SRM1649a, as a model mixture to study a range of toxic effects related to DNA damage and AhR activation. Both the organic extract and its neutral aromatic fraction formed a low number of DNA adducts per nucleotide in the liver epithelial WB-F344 cells model, without inducing DNA damage response, such as tumor suppressor p53 activation and apoptosis. In contrast, we found that this extract, as well as its neutral and polar fractions, were potent inducers of a range of AhR-mediated responses, including induction of the AhR-mediated transcription, such as cytochrome P450 1A1/1B1 expression, and the AhR-dependent cell proliferation. Importantly, these toxic events occurred at doses one order of magnitude lower than DNA damage. The AhR-mediated activity of the neutral fraction was linked to PAHs and their derivatives, as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans and biphenyls were only minor contributors to the overall AhR-mediated activity. Taken together, our data suggest that more attention should be paid to the AhR-dependent nongenotoxic events elicited by urban PM constituents, especially PAHs and their derivatives.

  15. Application of solubility parameters in 1,3:2,4-bis(3,4-dimethylbenzylidene)sorbitol organogel in binary organic mixtures.

    PubMed

    Shen, Huahua; Niu, Libo; Fan, Kaiqi; Li, Jingjing; Guan, Xidong; Song, Jian

    2014-08-05

    The gelation behavior of 1,3:2,4-bis(3,4-dimethylbenzylidene)sorbitol (DMDBS) in binary solvents has been systematically investigated. DMDBS is soluble in DMSO and insoluble in toluene (apolar) or 1-propanol (polar). When DMSO is added to a poor solvent at a certain volume fraction, DMDBS forms an organogel in the mixed solvent. With increasing DMSO content, the minimum gelation concentration increases and the gel-to-sol transition temperature decreases in both systems. However, compared with those in toluene-DMSO mixtures, the gelation ability and thermal stability are better in 1-propanol-DMSO mixtures. Scanning electron microscopy images reveal that the gelators aggregate to form three-dimensional networks. X-ray diffraction shows that the gel has a lamellar structure, which is different from the structure of the precipitate. Fourier transform infrared results reveal H-bonding is the main driving force for self-aggregation and indicate that stronger H-bonding interactions exist between gelators in 1-propanol-DMSO mixtures in contrast with toluene-DMSO mixtures. Attempts have been taken to correlate solvent parameters to gelation behavior in binary solvents. A Teas plot exhibits distinctly different solvent zones in the studied mixed solvents. The polar parameter (δp) indicates a narrow favorable domain for gel formation in the range of 1.64-7.99 MPa(1/2) for some apolar solvent-DMSO mixtures. The hydrogen-bonding parameter (δh) predicts that gelation occurs for values of 14.00-16.50 MPa(1/2) for some polar solvent-DMSO mixtures. The result may have potential applications in predicting the gelation behavior of 1,3:2,4-di-O-benzylidene-d-sorbitol derivatives in mixed solvents.

  16. Pervaporation study for the dehydration of tetrahydrofuran-water mixtures by polymeric and ceramic membranes.

    PubMed

    McGinness, Colleen A; Slater, C Stewart; Savelski, Mariano J

    2008-12-01

    Pervaporation technology can effectively separate a tetrahydrofuran (THF) solvent-water waste stream at an azeotropic concentration. The performance of a Sulzer 2210 polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) membrane and a Pervatech BV silica membrane were studied, as the operating variables feed temperature and permeate pressure, were varied. The silica membrane was found to exhibit a flux of almost double that of the PVA membrane, but both membranes had comparable separation ability in purifying the solvent-water mixture. At benchmark feed conditions of 96 wt% THF and 4 wt% water, 50 degrees C and 10 torr permeate pressure, the silica membrane flux was 0.276 kg/m(2)hr and selectivity was 365. For both membranes, flux was found to increase at an exponential rate as the feed temperature increased from 20 to 60 degrees C. The flux through the silica membrane increases at a 6% faster rate than the PVA membrane. Flux decreased as permeate pressure was increased from 5 to 25 torr for both membranes. The amount of water in the permeate decreased exponentially as the permeate pressure was increased, but increased linearly with increasing temperature. Optimum conditions for flux and selectivity are at low permeate pressure and high feed temperature. When a small amount of salt is added to the feed solution, an increase in flux is observed. Overall models for flux and permeate concentration were created from the experimental data. The models were used to predict scale-up performance in separating an azeotropic feed waste to produce dehydrated THF solvent for reuse and a permeate stream with a dilute THF concentration.

  17. Adsorptive separation of xenon/krypton mixtures using a zirconium-based metal-organic framework with high hydrothermal and radioactive stabilities.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Joon; Yoon, Tae-Ung; Kim, Ah-Reum; Kim, Seo-Yul; Cho, Kyung-Ho; Hwang, Young Kyu; Yeon, Jei-Won; Bae, Youn-Sang

    2016-12-15

    The separation of xenon/krypton mixtures is important for both environmental and industrial purposes. The potential of three hydrothermally stable MOFs (MIL-100(Fe), MIL-101(Cr), and UiO-66(Zr)) for use in Xe/Kr separation has been experimentally investigated. From the observed single-component Xe and Kr isotherms, isosteric heat of adsorption (Qst(o)), and IAST-predicted Xe/Kr selectivities, we observed that UiO-66(Zr) has the most potential as an adsorbent among the three candidate MOFs. We performed dynamic breakthrough experiments with an adsorption bed filled with UiO-66(Zr) to evaluate further the potential of UiO-66(Zr) for Xe/Kr separation under mixture flow conditions. Remarkably, the experimental breakthrough curves show that UiO-66(Zr) can efficiently separate the Xe/Kr mixture. Furthermore, UiO-66(Zr) maintains most of its Xe and Kr uptake capacity, as well as its crystallinity and internal surface area, even after exposure to gamma radiation (2kGy) for 7h and aging for 16 months under ambient conditions. This result indicates that UiO-66(Zr) can be considered to be a potential adsorbent for Xe/Kr mixtures under both ambient and radioactive conditions.

  18. Interactions in Ternary Mixtures of MnO2, Al2O3, and Natural Organic Matter (NOM) and the Impact on MnO2 Oxidative Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Taujale, Saru; Baratta, Laura R; Huang, Jianzhi; Zhang, Huichun

    2016-03-01

    Our previous work reported that Al2O3 inhibited the oxidative reactivity of MnO2 through heteroaggregation between oxide particles and surface complexation of the dissolved Al ions with MnO2 (S. Taujale and H. Zhang, "Impact of interactions between metal oxides to oxidative reactivity of manganese dioxide" Environ. Sci. Technol. 2012, 46, 2764-2771). The aim of the current work was to investigate interactions in ternary mixtures of MnO2, Al2O3, and NOM and how the interactions affect MnO2 oxidative reactivity. For the effect of Al ions, we examined ternary mixtures of MnO2, Al ions, and NOM. Our results indicated that an increase in the amount of humic acids (HAs) increasingly inhibited Al adsorption by forming soluble Al-HA complexes. As a consequence, there was less inhibition on MnO2 reactivity than by the sum of two binary mixtures (MnO2+Al ions and MnO2+HA). Alginate or pyromellitic acid (PA)-two model NOM compounds-did not affect Al adsorption, but Al ions increased alginate/PA adsorption by MnO2. The latter effect led to more inhibition on MnO2 reactivity than the sum of the two binary mixtures. In ternary mixtures of MnO2, Al2O3, and NOM, NOM inhibited dissolution of Al2O3. Zeta potential measurements, sedimentation experiments, TEM images, and modified DLVO calculations all indicated that HAs of up to 4 mg-C/L increased heteroaggregation between Al2O3 and MnO2, whereas higher amounts of HAs completely inhibited heteroaggregation. The effect of alginate is similar to that of HAs, although not as significant, while PA had negligible effects on heteroaggregation. Different from the effects of Al ions and NOMs on MnO2 reactivity, the MnO2 reactivity in ternary mixtures of Al2O3, MnO2, and NOM was mostly enhanced. This suggests MnO2 reactivity was mainly affected through heteroaggregation in the ternary mixtures because of the limited availability of Al ions.

  19. IDENTIFICATION AND EXPERIMENTAL DATABASE FOR BINARY AND MULTICOMPONENT MIXTURES WITH POTENTIAL FOR INCREASING OVERALL CYCLE EFFICIENCY

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen M Bajorek; J. Schnelle

    2002-05-01

    This report describes an experimental investigation designed to identify binary and multicomponent mixture systems that may be for increasing the overall efficiency of a coal fired unit by extracting heat from flue gases. While ammonia-water mixtures have shown promise for increasing cycle efficiencies in a Kalina cycle, the costs and associated range of thermal conditions involved in a heat recovery system may prohibit its use in a relatively low temperature heat recovery system. This investigation considered commercially available non-azeotropic binary mixtures with a boiling range applicable to a flue gas initially at 477.6 K (400 F) and developed an experimental database of boiling heat transfer coefficients for those mixtures. In addition to their potential as working fluids for increasing cycle efficiency, cost, ease of handling, toxicity, and environmental concerns were considered in selection of the mixture systems to be examined experimentally. Based on this review, water-glycol systems were identified as good candidates. However, previous investigations of mixture boiling have focused on aqueous hydrocarbon mixtures, where water is the heaviest component. There have been few studies of water-glycol systems, and those that do exist have investigated boiling on plain surfaces only. In water-glycol systems, water is the light component, which makes these systems unique compared to those that have been previously examined. This report examines several water-glycol systems, and documents a database of experimental heat transfer coefficients for these systems. In addition, this investigation also examines the effect of an enhanced surface on pool boiling in water-glycol mixtures, by comparing boiling on a smooth surface to boiling on a Turbo IIIB. The experimental apparatus, test sections, and the experimental procedures are described. The mixture systems tested included water-propylene glycol, water-ethylene glycol, and water-diethylene glycol. All

  20. Two- and three-dimensional van krevelen diagrams: a graphical analysis complementary to the kendrick mass plot for sorting elemental compositions of complex organic mixtures based on ultrahigh-resolution broadband fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass measurements.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhigang; Rodgers, Ryan P; Marshall, Alan G

    2004-05-01

    Ultrahigh-resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry has resolved and identified the elemental compositions of over 10000 organic constituents of coal and petroleum crude oil. A plot of Kendrick mass defect versus Kendrick nominal mass sorts compounds into homologous series according to compound class (i.e., numbers of N, O, and S heteroatoms), type (number of rings plus double bonds), and degree of alkylation (number of CH(2) groups), to yield unique elemental assignments from ultrahigh-resolution mass measurements in the 200-900 Da range. Interpretation of such a vast compilation requires a simple (preferably graphical) means to differentiate between complex organic mixtures of different origin or processing. In an extension of the recently revived van Krevelen plot, each elemental composition is projected onto two or three axes according to its H/C, O/C, and/or N/C atomic ratios. The H/C ratio separates compounds according to degree of saturation, whereas O/C or N/C ratios separate according to O and N classes. We show that the three-dimensional van Krevelen diagram can completely separate different classes in pyridine-extracted coal or petroleum samples and can also graphically distinguish fossil fuels according to their nature (coal vs petroleum), maturation (coals of different rank), and processing (the same coal at two stages of liquefaction). The van Krevelen diagram thus appears well suited to amplifying and exposing compositional differences within and between complex organic mixtures.

  1. Emergence of Photoautotrophic Minimal Protocell-Like Supramolecular Assemblies, "Jeewanu" Synthesied Photo Chemically in an Irradiated Sterilised Aqueous Mixture of Some Inorganic and Organic Substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vinod Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Sunlight exposed sterilised aqueous mixture of ammonium molybdate, diammonium hydrogen phosphate, biological minerals and formaldehyde showed photochemical formation of self-sustaining biomimetic protocell-like supramolecular assemblies "Jeewanu" (Bahadur and Ranganayaki J Brit Interplanet Soc 23:813-829 1970). The structural and functional characteristics of Jeewanu suggests that in possible prebiotic atmosphere photosy nergistic collaboration of non-linear processes at mesoscopic level established autocatalytic pathways on mineral surfaces by selforganisation and self recognition and led to emergence of similar earliest energy transducing supramolecular assemblies which might have given rise to common universal ancestor on the earth or elsewhere.

  2. Contributions of toluene and alpha-pinene to SOA formed in an irradiated toluene/alpha-pinene/NO(x)/ air mixture: comparison of results using 14C content and SOA organic tracer methods.

    PubMed

    Offenberg, John H; Lewis, Charles W; Lewandowski, Michael; Jaoui, Mohammed; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E; Edney, Edward O

    2007-06-01

    An organic tracer method, recently proposed for estimating individual contributions of toluene and alpha-pinene to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, was evaluated by conducting a laboratory study where a binary hydrocarbon mixture, containing the anthropogenic aromatic hydrocarbon, toluene, and the biogenic monoterpene, alpha-pinene, was irradiated in air in the presence of NO(x) to form SOA. The contributions of toluene and alpha-pinene to the total SOA concentration, calculated using the organic tracer method, were compared with those obtained with a more direct 14C content method. In the study, SOA to SOC ratios of 2.07 +/- 0.08 and 1.41 +/- 0.04 were measured for toluene and (alpha-pinene SOA, respectively. The individual tracer-based SOA contributions of 156 microg m(-3) for toluene and 198 microg m(-)3 for alpha-pinene, which together accounted for 82% of the gravimetrically determined total SOA concentration, compared well with the 14C values of 182 and 230 microg m(-3) measured for the respective SOA precursors. While there are uncertainties associated with the organic tracer method, largely due to the chemical complexity of SOA forming chemical mechanisms, the results of this study suggest the organic tracer method may serve as a useful tool for determining whether a precursor hydrocarbon is a major SOA contributor.

  3. DETERMINATION OF 2-METHYL TETROLS AND 2-METHYLGLYCERIC ACID IN SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL FROM LABORATORY IRRADIATED ISOPRENE/NO X/SO 2/AIR MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation addresses recent work performed at EPA to evaluate the potential for the photooxidation of isoprene to produce secondary organic aerosol. Analysis of the samples for methyl tetrols and 2-methylglyceric acid were performed at EPA and the University of Antwerp. T...

  4. Mixtures Research at NIEHS: An Evolving Program

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Cynthia V; Carlin, Danielle J; DeVito, Micheal J; Thompson, Claudia L; Walker, Nigel J

    2014-01-01

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) has a rich history in evaluating the toxicity of mixtures. The types of mixtures assessed by the Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP) and the extramural community (through the Division of Extramural Research and Training (DERT)) have included a broad range of chemicals and toxicants, with each study having a unique set of questions and design considerations. Some examples of the types of mixtures studied include: groundwater contaminants, pesticides/fertilizers, dioxin-like chemicals (assessing the toxic equivalency approach), drug combinations, air pollution, metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, technical mixtures (e.g. pentachlorophenol, flame retardants), and mixed entities (e.g. herbals, asbestos). These endeavors have provided excellent data on the toxicity of specific mixtures and have been informative to the human health risk assessment process in general (e.g. providing data on low dose exposures to environmental chemicals). However, the mixtures research effort at NIEHS, to date, has been driven by test article nominations to the DNTP or by investigator-initiated research through DERT. Recently, the NIEHS has embarked upon an effort to coordinate mixtures research across both intramural and extramural divisions in order to maximize mixtures research results. A path forward for NIEHS mixtures research will be based on feedback from a Request for Information (RFI) designed to gather up-to-date views on the knowledge gaps and roadblocks to evaluating mixtures and performing cumulative risk assessment, and a workshop organized to bring together mixtures experts from risk assessment, exposure science, biology, epidemiology, and statistics. The future of mixtures research at NIEHS will include projects from nominations to DNTP, studies by extramural investigators, and collaborations across government agencies that address high-priority questions in the field of mixtures research

  5. Mixtures research at NIEHS: an evolving program.

    PubMed

    Rider, Cynthia V; Carlin, Danielle J; Devito, Micheal J; Thompson, Claudia L; Walker, Nigel J

    2013-11-16

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) has a rich history in evaluating the toxicity of mixtures. The types of mixtures assessed by the Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP) and the extramural community (through the Division of Extramural Research and Training, DERT) have included a broad range of chemicals and toxicants, with each study having a unique set of questions and design considerations. Some examples of the types of mixtures studied include: groundwater contaminants, pesticides/fertilizers, dioxin-like chemicals (assessing the toxic equivalency approach), drug combinations, air pollution, metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, technical mixtures (e.g., pentachlorophenol, flame retardants), and mixed entities (e.g., herbals, asbestos). These endeavors have provided excellent data on the toxicity of specific mixtures and have been informative to the human health risk assessment process in general (e.g., providing data on low dose exposures to environmental chemicals). However, the mixtures research effort at NIEHS, to date, has been driven by test article nominations to the DNTP or by investigator-initiated research through DERT. Recently, the NIEHS has embarked upon an effort to coordinate mixtures research across both intramural and extramural divisions in order to maximize mixtures research results. A path forward for NIEHS mixtures research will be based on feedback from a Request for Information (RFI) designed to gather up-to-date views on the knowledge gaps and roadblocks to evaluating mixtures and performing cumulative risk assessment, and a workshop organized to bring together mixtures experts from risk assessment, exposure science, biology, epidemiology, and statistics. The future of mixtures research at NIEHS will include projects from nominations to DNTP, studies by extramural investigators, and collaborations across government agencies that address high-priority questions in the field of mixtures research.

  6. Mixtures of quaternary ammonium compounds and anionic organic compounds in the aquatic environment: Elimination and biodegradability in the closed bottle test monitored by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Sütterlin, H; Alexy, R; Coker, A; Kümmerer, K

    2008-06-01

    Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are widely used as disinfectants, detergents and fabric softeners. Anionic detergents are one of the most widely used chemical substances. QACs and anionic surfactants can form ionic pairs. In the present study we investigated the biodegradability of QACs in the presence of different anionic surfactants. The biodegradability of three QACs, namely benzalkonium chloride (BAC), didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDMAC) and ethacridine lactate (EL), when applied as single substances and in combination with anionic surfactants such as benzene sulfonic acid (BSA), LAS, naphthalene sulfonic acid (NSA) and sodium dodecylsulfonate (SDS) was studied applying the closed bottle test (CBT) [OECD 301D, 1992. Guidelines for Testing of Chemicals. Closed bottle test. Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris] at a ratio of 1:1 (mol:mol). Biodegradation was monitored by measuring oxygen concentration in the test vessels with an oxygen electrode in accordance with international standard methods [ISO 5414, 1990. Water quality - determination of dissolved oxygen. In: German Standard Methods for the Examination of Water, Wastewater and Sludge. VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, Weinheim, New York, Basel Cambridge]. Primary elimination of the QACs and of LAS was monitored by LC-MS/MS. There was little biodegradability of the QACs as either single compounds or in the presence of organic counter ions. The biodegradability of the organic counter ions was lower in the presence of QACs as compared to the single substances. Primary elimination of the QACs by sorption took place.

  7. Organics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chian, Edward S. K.; DeWalle, Foppe B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents water analysis literature for 1978. This review is concerned with organics, and it covers: (1) detergents and surfactants; (2) aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; (3) pesticides and chlorinated hydrocarbons; and (4) naturally occurring organics. A list of 208 references is also presented. (HM)

  8. Organizers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a…

  9. Toxicity of individual pharmaceuticals and their mixtures to Aliivibrio fischeri: Experimental results for single compounds and considerations of their mechanisms of action and potential acute effects on aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Di Nica, Valeria; Villa, Sara; Finizio, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    In the first part of a broader study on the effects of individual and multicomponent mixtures of pharmaceutical active compounds, the authors used the Microtox(®) test system to analyze in detail the effects of 10 widely used human and veterinary pharmaceutical active compounds toward the bioluminescent bacterium Aliivibrio fischeri. The experimental results indicated moderate toxicity for the majority of the tested compounds. Comparison between experimental 50% inhibitory concentrations and those predicted from the quantitative structure-activity relationship models indicated that most of the tested pharmaceutical active compounds behave as polar narcotic compounds toward A. fischeri (only the antibiotic chlortetracycline seemed to have a specific mechanism of action). A comparison between the experimental results and a collection of acute toxicity data on other nontarget organisms indicated that in general A. fischeri has a comparable sensitivity to other aquatic species. However, according to the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, the majority of the investigated chemicals can be classified as harmful or nontoxic for aquatic ecosystems. Finally, based on comparisons among the 95th percentile of measured environmental concentrations found in European Union water bodies and acute toxicity data on various aquatic organisms, no risk to aquatic life exists when the tested pharmaceutical active compounds are assessed as individual chemicals. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:807-814. © 2016 SETAC.

  10. First direct observation of secondary organic aerosol formation during cloud condensation-evaporation cycles in isoprene photo-oxidation reacting mixtures (CUMULUS project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brégonzio-Rozier, Lola; Siekmann, Frank; Giorio, Chiara; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Pangui, Edouard; Morales, Sébastien; Ravier, Sylvain; Monod, Anne; Doussin, Jean-François

    2014-05-01

    Several field observations, laboratory and model studies suggest a potentially important role of cloud droplets in forming additional secondary organic aerosol (SOA) (Sorooshian et al., 2007; Altieri et al., 2008; Couvidat et al., 2013). While this SOAaq hypothesis seems to be robust and is considered quite established, so far, no direct observations of such a process have been provided. Recently a consortium of five laboratories has joined theirs efforts in a series of experimental simulation experiments to try to bring a direct confirmation of this hypothesis: the CUMULUS project (CloUd MULtiphase chemistry of organic compoUndS in the troposphere). The aim of the present work is to study SOA formation from isoprene photo-oxidation during cloud condensation-evaporation cycles. The chemistry occurring in the gaseous, particulate and aqueous phases, and the exchange between these phases were investigated through an original multiphase approach in a simulation chamber. Experiments were performed in the CESAM chamber (Wang et al., 2011) which was designed to investigate multiphase processes under realistic actinic flux, and accurate control of both temperature and relative humidity. A protocol was designed to generate cloud events in the simulation chamber, it has allowed us to generate clouds lasting for ca. 10 minutes in the presence of light and many clouds could be generated in a single experiment. Connected to the chamber, a large panel of instruments was used to monitor the gas-phase and the particulate phase during experiments. Gas-phase composition was analyzed in-situ via a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) and a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) as well as NOx and O3 analyzers. A Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) measured dried SOA size distributions and total concentrations inside the chamber. An Aerodyne High Resolution Time-Of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS) was also used to investigate aerosol

  11. Symmetric normal mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turmon, Michael

    2004-01-01

    We consider mixture density estimation under the symmetry constraint x = Az for an orthogonal matrix A. This distributional constraint implies a corresponding constraint on the mixture parameters. Focusing on the gaussian case, we derive an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to enforce the constraint and show results for modeling of image feature vectors.

  12. Method of extracting iodine from liquid mixtures of iodine, water and hydrogen iodide

    DOEpatents

    Mysels, Karol J.

    1979-01-01

    The components of a liquid mixture consisting essentially of HI, water and at least about 50 w/o iodine are separated in a countercurrent extraction zone by treating with phosphoric acid containing at least about 90 w/o H.sub.3 PO.sub.4. The bottom stream from the extraction zone is substantially completely molten iodine, and the overhead stream contains water, HI, H.sub.3 PO.sub.4 and a small fraction of the amount of original iodine. When the water and HI are present in near-azeotropic proportions, there is particular advantage in feeding the overhead stream to an extractive distillation zone wherein it is treated with additional concentrated phosphoric acid to create an anhydrous HI vapor stream and bottoms which contain at least about 85 w/o H.sub.3 PO.sub.4. Concentration of these bottoms provides phosphoric acid infeed for both the countercurrent extraction zone and for the extractive distillation zone.

  13. Perception of trigeminal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Filiou, Renée-Pier; Lepore, Franco; Bryant, Bruce; Lundström, Johan N; Frasnelli, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminal system is a chemical sense allowing for the perception of chemosensory information in our environment. However, contrary to smell and taste, we lack a thorough understanding of the trigeminal processing of mixtures. We, therefore, investigated trigeminal perception using mixtures of 3 relatively receptor-specific agonists together with one control odor in different proportions to determine basic perceptual dimensions of trigeminal perception. We found that 4 main dimensions were linked to trigeminal perception: sensations of intensity, warmth, coldness, and pain. We subsequently investigated perception of binary mixtures of trigeminal stimuli by means of these 4 perceptual dimensions using different concentrations of a cooling stimulus (eucalyptol) mixed with a stimulus that evokes warmth perception (cinnamaldehyde). To determine if sensory interactions are mainly of central or peripheral origin, we presented stimuli in a physical "mixture" or as a "combination" presented separately to individual nostrils. Results showed that mixtures generally yielded higher ratings than combinations on the trigeminal dimensions "intensity," "warm," and "painful," whereas combinations yielded higher ratings than mixtures on the trigeminal dimension "cold." These results suggest dimension-specific interactions in the perception of trigeminal mixtures, which may be explained by particular interactions that may take place on peripheral or central levels.

  14. SEPARATION OF FLUID MIXTURES

    DOEpatents

    Lipscomb, R.; Craig, A.; Labrow, S.; Dunn, J.F.

    1958-10-28

    An apparatus is presented for separating gaseous mixtures by selectively freezing a constituent of the mixture and subsequently separating the frozen gas. The gas mixture is passed through a cylinder fltted with a cooling jacket, causing one gas to freeze on the walls of the cylinder. A set of scraper blades are provided in the interior of the cyllnder, and as the blades oscillate, the frozen gas is scraped to the bottom of the cylinder. Means are provided for the frozen material to pass into a heating chamber where it is vaporized and the product gas collected.

  15. Carbonaceous materials water mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Papalos, J.G.; Sinka, J.V.

    1985-04-30

    Particulate carbonaceous materials water mixtures are prepared by adding a condensate which is a condensation product of an aldehyde having from about 1 to about 7 carbon atoms, a benzene derivative such as benzene sulfonic acid, an alkyl benzene sulfonic acid having at least one alkyl group of from about 1 to about 20 carbon atoms and mixtures thereof, and optionally, and a naphthalene derivative such as naphthalene sulfonic acid, an alkyl naphthalene sulfonic acid having at least one alkyl group of from about 1 to about 12 carbon atoms and mixtures thereof. The condensate is added in an amount sufficient to reduce viscosity of the water mixture of carbonaceous materials, to stabilize carbonaceous materials in the water network and to improve pumpability. An acid form of the condensate or a salt may be added.

  16. Condensate Mixtures and Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermans, E.

    1998-09-14

    The experimental study of condensate mixtures is a particularly exciting application of the recently developed atomic-trap Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) technology: such multiple condensates represent the first laboratory systems of distinguishable boson superfluid mixtures. In addition, as the authors point out in this paper, the possibility of inter-condensate tunneling greatly enhances the richness of the condensate mixture physics. Not only does tunneling give rise to the oscillating particle currents between condensates of different chemical potentials, such as those studied extensively in the condensed matter Josephson junction experiments, it also affects the near-equilibrium dynamics and stability of the condensate mixtures. In particular, the stabilizing influence of tunneling with respect to spatial separation (phase separation) could be of considerable practical importance to the atomic trap systems. Furthermore, the creation of mixtures of atomic and molecular condensates could introduce a novel type of tunneling process, involving the conversion of a pair of atomic condensate bosons into a single molecular condensate boson. The static description of condensate mixtures with such type of pair tunneling suggests the possibility of observing dilute condensates with the liquid-like property of a self-determined density.

  17. Physical properties of fluorinated propane and butane derivatives and the vapor pressure of R-245ca/338mccq mixtures as R-11 alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Beyerlein, A.L.; DesMarteau, D.D.; Xie, Y.; Naik, K.N.

    1996-11-01

    Two new fluorinated propane derivatives, six new fluorinated butane derivatives,and the R-245ca(HCF{sub 2}CF{sub 2}CH{sub 2}F)/338mccq(CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}F) mixtures are investigated as R-11 alternatives. The investigations on the pure chemicals included measurements of the melting point, boiling point, vapor pressure below the boiling point, heat of vaporization at the boiling point, saturated liquid density, and critical properties (temperature and density). Four of the butane derivatives--R-338mcfm, R-356mffm, R-356mecs, and R-356mms--have boiling points comparable to that of R-11 and have potential as far-term R-11 alternatives. The vapor pressures of the R-245ca/338mccq mixtures were measured over the entire concentration range for temperatures ranging from 25 C (77 F) to 135 C (275 F). The mixtures form an azeotrope at 0.64 R-245ca mole fraction with a normal boiling point of 22.6 C (72.7 F).

  18. Characterization of the thermotropic behavior and lateral organization of lipid-peptide mixtures by a combined experimental and theoretical approach: effects of hydrophobic mismatch and role of flanking residues.

    PubMed Central

    Morein, Sven; Killian, J Antoinette; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena

    2002-01-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study was performed on a series of mixtures of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and synthetic peptides to investigate their thermotropic behavior and lateral organization. The experimental study was based on differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and phosphorous nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P-NMR) techniques; the theoretical study was based on calculations on a microscopic molecular interaction model, where the lipid-peptide interaction is built on the hydrophobic matching principle. The chosen peptides, WALP and KALP, consist of a hydrophobic stretch, of variable length, of alternating leucine and alanine residues, flanked on both ends with tryptophan and lysine residues, respectively. By systematically varying the peptide hydrophobic length it was thus possible to explore different matching conditions between the peptide's hydrophobic length and the lipid bilayer hydrophobic thickness, and to investigate the potential role of flanking residues. The results show that both the WALP and the KALP peptides tend to favor the liquid-crystalline (or fluid) phase of the system; i.e., they tend to depress the main-transition temperature, T(m), of pure DPPC. However, the detailed effects of both peptides on the lateral phase behavior of the lipid-peptide system are dependent on the peptide length and the type of flanking residues. The results suggest that below T(m), the shortest among the WALP and KALP peptides induce gel-fluid phase separation in the system within an extensive temperature-composition region. The longer the hydrophobic length of the peptides is, the more narrow this region appears to become. PMID:11867456

  19. An interpretation of the CONSERT and SESAME-PP results based on new permittivity measurements of porous water ice and ice-basaltic/organic dust mixtures suggests an increase of porosity with depth in 67P.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouet, Yann; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Sabouroux, Pierre; Neves, Luisa; Encrenaz, Pierre; Poch, Olivier; Pommerol, Antoine; Thomas, Nicolas; Kofman, Wlodek; Le Gall, Alice; Ciarletti, Valérie; Hérique, Alain; Lethuillier, Anthony

    2016-10-01

    The CONSERT bistatic radar on Rosetta and Philae sounded the interior of the small lobe of 67P/C-G at 90 MHz and determined the average of the real part of the complex permittivity (hereafter ɛ') to be equal to 1.27±0.05 [1,2]. The permittivity probe (PP) of the SESAME package sounded the near-surface in the 400-800 Hz range and derived a lower limit of ɛ' equal to 2.45±0.20 [3,4]. At the time of the measurements, the temperature was found to be below 150 K at Philae's location and expected to be close or below 100 K inside the nucleus [4-6].The complex permittivity depends of the frequency, the composition, the porosity and the temperature of the material [7,8,9]. These parameters have to be taken into account to interpret the permittivity values. The non-dispersive behavior of ɛ' below 150 K [9], allows us to compare the CONSERT and SESAME-PP results and to interpret their difference in terms of porosity and/or composition. For this purpose we use a semi-empirical formula obtained from reproducible permittivity measurements performed in the laboratory at 243 K on water ice particles and ice-basaltic dust mixtures [10], with a controlled porosity in the 26-91% range and dust-to-ice volumetric ratios in the 0.1-2.8 range. The influence of the presence of organic materials on ɛ' is also discussed based on new measurements of analogues of complex extraterrestrial organic matter [11]. Our results suggest an increase of the porosity of the small lobe of 67P with depth [11], in agreement Lethuillier et al. [4]'s conclusion using a different method.[1]Kofman et al., 1998. Adv. Space Res., 21, 1589.[2]Ciarletti et al., 2015. A&A, 583, A40.[3]Seidensticker et al., 2007. Space Sci. Rev., 128, 301.[4]Lethuillier et al., 2016. A&A, 591, A32.[5]Spohn et al., 2015. Science, 349, aab0464.[6]Festou et al. (Eds.), Comets II. Univ. of Arizona Press.[7]Campbell and Ulrichs, 1969. J. Geophys. Res., 74, 5867.[8]Brouet et al., 2015. A&A, 583, A39.[9]Mattei et al., 2014. Icarus

  20. Photoisomerization- and photopolymerization-induced phase transitions in mixtures of photoresponsive chromophores and reactive mesogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Namil

    mixtures underwent phase separation. As the crystalline and nematic ordering of monomeric unit was frozen, LMWLC was dispersed in the continuum of isotropic or anisotropic networks. Phase diagram exhibited the broad immiscible regions. The phase diagram of annealed hyperbranched polymer/LMWLC mixtures was an upper azeotrope, exhibiting the coexistence of nematic + isotropic phase above the clearing temperature of neat LMWLC. With decreasing temperature a focal-conic fan shaped texture developed in the composition range of 63~93 wt %, suggestive of induced smectic phase in the mixture.

  1. Methods of increasing net work output of organic Rankine cycles for low-grade waste heat recovery with a detailed analysis using a zeotropic working fluid mixture and scroll expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodland, Brandon Jay

    An organic Rankine cycle (ORC) is a thermodynamic cycle that is well-suited for waste heat recovery. It is generally employed for waste heat with temperatures in the range of 80 °C -- 300 °C. When the application is strictly to convert waste heat into work, thermal efficiency is not recommended as a key performance metric. In such an application, maximization of the net power output should be the objective rather than maximization of the thermal efficiency. Two alternative cycle configurations that can increase the net power produced from a heat source with a given temperature and flow rate are proposed and analyzed. These cycle configurations are 1) an ORC with two-phase flash expansion and 2) an ORC with a zeotropic working fluid mixture (ZRC). A design-stage ORC model is presented for consistent comparison of multiple ORC configurations. The finite capacity of the heat source and heat sink fluids is a key consideration in this model. Of all working fluids studied for the baseline ORC, R134a and R245fa yield the highest net power output from a given heat source. Results of the design-stage model indicate that the ORC with two-phase flash expansion offers the most improvement over the baseline ORC. However, the level of improvement that could be achieved in practice is highly uncertain due to the requirement of highly efficient two-phase expansion. The ZRC shows improvement over the baseline as long as the condenser fan power requirement is not negligible. At the highest estimated condenser fan power, the ZRC shows the most improvement, while the ORC with flash expansion is no longer beneficial. The ZRC was selected for detailed study because it does not require two-phase expansion. An experimental test rig was used to evaluate baseline ORC performance with R134a and with R245fa. The ZRC was tested on the same rig with a mixture of 62.5% R134a and 37.5% R245fa. The tested expander is a minimally-modified, of-the-shelf automotive scroll compressor. The high

  2. Prevalence Incidence Mixture Models

    Cancer.gov

    The R package and webtool fits Prevalence Incidence Mixture models to left-censored and irregularly interval-censored time to event data that is commonly found in screening cohorts assembled from electronic health records. Absolute and relative risk can be estimated for simple random sampling, stratified sampling, and two-phase stratified sampling. Non-parametric (absolute risks only), semi-parametric, weakly-parametric (using B-splines), and some fully parametric (such as the logistic-Weibull) models are supported.

  3. Energy efficient membrane processes for the separation of organic liquids: Part 2: Final report, September 28, 1982--December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Cabasso, I.; Acharya, H.R.; Korngold, E.; Liu, Z.; Stern, S.A.; Li, W.; Makenzie, T.; Poda, E.

    1987-10-01

    The present report demonstrates the use of membrane technology for dehydration processes concentrating on two examples: azeotropic separation of isopropanol-water, and separation of ethanol-water mixtures (starting at 84.5 wt. % ethanol where separation by distillation begins to be progressively more energy intensive). The principles of the membrane separation processes employed in such separations were discussed in Part I of the report. The advantage of the membrane processes is that they do not require the addition of a third component and separation is a continuous process. Pervaporation, perstraction, and air-sweep pervaporation were thoroughly studied for these separations. An urgent need for the identification of the appropriate membrane was realized. This study has revealed that ion-exchange membranes are suited for these separations. Results are discussed. 9 refs., 68 figs., 33 tabs.

  4. Binomial Gaussian mixture filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitoharju, Matti; Ali-Löytty, Simo; Piché, Robert

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present a novel method for approximating a normal distribution with a weighted sum of normal distributions. The approximation is used for splitting normally distributed components in a Gaussian mixture filter, such that components have smaller covariances and cause smaller linearization errors when nonlinear measurements are used for the state update. Our splitting method uses weights from the binomial distribution as component weights. The method preserves the mean and covariance of the original normal distribution, and in addition, the resulting probability density and cumulative distribution functions converge to the original normal distribution when the number of components is increased. Furthermore, an algorithm is presented to do the splitting such as to keep the linearization error below a given threshold with a minimum number of components. The accuracy of the estimate provided by the proposed method is evaluated in four simulated single-update cases and one time series tracking case. In these tests, it is found that the proposed method is more accurate than other Gaussian mixture filters found in the literature when the same number of components is used and that the proposed method is faster and more accurate than particle filters.

  5. Mutation spectra of complex environmental mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    DeMarini, D.M.

    1997-10-01

    Bioassay-directed chemical analysis of complex environmental mixtures has indicated that much of the genotoxic activity of mixtures is due to the presence of one or a few classes or chemicals within the mixture. We have extended this observation to the molecular level by using colony probe hybridization and PCR/DNA sequence analysis to determine the mutation spectra of {approximately}8,000 revertants induced by a variety of complex mixtures and their chemical fractions in TA100 and TA98 of Salmonella. For urban air, >80% of mutagenic activity was due to a base/neutral fraction that contained primarily PAHs. The mutation spectrum induced by unfractionated urban air was not significantly different from that produced by a model PAH, B(a)P. The mutation spectrum induced by organic extracts of chlorinated drinking water were similar to those produced by the chlorinated furanone MX, which accounted for {approximately}20% of the mutagenic activity of the samples. The base/neutral fraction of municipal waste incinerator emissions accounted for the primary class of mutations induced by the emissions, and a polar neutral fraction accounted for the secondary class of mutations induced by the emissions. The primary class of mutations induced by cigarette smoke condensate in TA100 (GC {yields} TA) is also the primary class of mutations in the p53 gene of lung tumors of cigarette smokers. These results confirm at the molecular level that the mutations induced by a complex mixture reflect the dominance of one or a few classes of chemicals within the mixture.

  6. Toxicological approaches to complex mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Mauderly, J L

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of toxicological studies in understanding the health effects of environmental exposures to mixtures. The approach taken is to review mixtures that have received the greatest emphasis from toxicology; major mixtures research programs; the toxicologist's view of mixtures and approaches to their study; and the complementary roles of toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological studies. Studies of tobacco smoke, engine exhaust, combustion products, and air pollutants comprise most of the past research on mixtures. Because of their great experimental control over subjects, exposures, and endpoints, toxicologists tend to consider a wider range of toxic interactions among mixture components and sequential exposures than is practical for human studies. The three fundamental experimental approaches used by toxicologists are integrative (studying the mixture as a whole), dissective (dissecting a mixture to determine causative constituents), and synthetic (studying interactions between agents in simple combinations). Toxicology provides information on potential hazards, mechanisms by which mixture constituents interact to cause effects, and exposure dose-effect relationships; but extrapolation from laboratory data to quantitative human health risks is problematic. Toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological approaches are complementary but are seldom coordinated. Fostering synergistic interactions among the disciplines in studying the risks from mixtures could be advantageous. PMID:7515806

  7. Mixtures and Mineral Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumble, D.

    The monograph Mixtures and Mineral Reactions contains a large amount of information of value to mineralogists, petrologists, and geochemists. The first four chapters are a succinct account of the thermodynamic description of crystalline solutions. In these early chapters a comparison is made between different mathematical treatments of activitycomposition models, there is a discussion of the unmixing by exsolution of a single solution into two phases, and methods of computing phase equilibria in assemblages of different minerals are given. If the reader is perplexed by the discussion of standard states (cf. Figure 1.3), not to worry. That is a normal condition for anyone forced to choose between equivalent reference frames yet knowing, somewhere down the line, that the choice will ultimately make one's computational life more or less difficult.

  8. Oxidative particle mixtures for groundwater treatment

    DOEpatents

    Siegrist, Robert L.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.

    2000-01-01

    The invention is a method and a composition of a mixture for degradation and immobilization of contaminants in soil and groundwater. The oxidative particle mixture and method includes providing a material having a minimal volume of free water, mixing at least one inorganic oxidative chemical in a granular form with a carrier fluid containing a fine grained inorganic hydrophilic compound and injecting the resulting mixture into the subsurface. The granular form of the inorganic oxidative chemical dissolves within the areas of injection, and the oxidative ions move by diffusion and/or advection, therefore extending the treatment zone over a wider area than the injection area. The organic contaminants in the soil and groundwater are degraded by the oxidative ions, which form solid byproducts that can sorb significant amounts of inorganic contaminants, metals, and radionuclides for in situ treatment and immobilization of contaminants. The method and composition of the oxidative particle mixture for long-term treatment and immobilization of contaminants in soil and groundwater provides for a reduction in toxicity of contaminants in a subsurface area of contamination without the need for continued injection of treatment material, or for movement of the contaminants, or without the need for continuous pumping of groundwater through the treatment zone, or removal of groundwater from the subsurface area of contamination.

  9. Zwanzig model of multi-component mixtures of biaxial particles: y3 theory re-visited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, E. P.; Tumanyan, N. P.; Vlasov, A. Yu.; Masters, A. J.

    nematic. For similar molecular volumes of the two components strong fractionation is observed: shorter rods and thicker platelets congregate in the isotropic phase. In general, the stabilization of the ordered phase and the fractionation between the phases are both weaker in the platelet mixtures. The calculated spinodal curves for isotropic-isotropic demixing are noticeably different between the R1 - R2 and the P1 - P2 systems. The platelet mixtures turn out to be stable with respect to de-mixing up to extremely high densities. The values of the consolute points for the R1 - R2 blends are remarkably similar to those obtained using the Parsons-Lee approximation for bi-disperse mixtures of freely rotating cylinders with similar aspect ratios [S. Varga. A. Galindo, G. Jackson, Mol. Phys., 101, 817 (2003)]. In a number of R1 - R2 mixtures, phase diagrams exhibiting both N - I equilibrium and I - I de-mixing were calculated. The latter is pre-empted by nematic ordering in all the cases studied. Calculations show the possible appearance of azeotropes in the N - I coexistence domain.

  10. Complex mixtures, complex responses: Assessing pharmaceutical mixtures using field and laboratory approaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoenfuss, Heiko L.; Furlong, Edward T.; Phillips, Patrick J.; Scott, Tia-Marie; Kolpin, Dana W.; Cetkovic-Cvrlje, Marina; Lesteberg, Kelsey E.; Rearick, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals are present in low concentrations (<100 ng/L) in most municipal wastewater effluents but may be elevated locally because of factors such as input from pharmaceutical formulation facilities. Using existing concentration data, the authors assessed pharmaceuticals in laboratory exposures of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and added environmental complexity through effluent exposures. In the laboratory, larval and mature minnows were exposed to a simple opioid mixture (hydrocodone, methadone, and oxycodone), an opioid agonist (tramadol), a muscle relaxant (methocarbamol), a simple antidepressant mixture (fluoxetine, paroxetine, venlafaxine), a sleep aid (temazepam), or a complex mixture of all compounds. Larval minnow response to effluent exposure was not consistent. The 2010 exposures resulted in shorter exposed minnow larvae, whereas the larvae exposed in 2012 exhibited altered escape behavior. Mature minnows exhibited altered hepatosomatic indices, with the strongest effects in females and in mixture exposures. In addition, laboratory-exposed, mature male minnows exposed to all pharmaceuticals (except the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor mixture) defended nest sites less rigorously than fish in the control group. Tramadol or antidepressant mixture exposure resulted in increased splenic T lymphocytes. Only male minnows exposed to whole effluent responded with increased plasma vitellogenin concentrations. Female minnows exposed to pharmaceuticals (except the opioid mixture) had larger livers, likely as a compensatory result of greater prominence of vacuoles in liver hepatocytes. The observed alteration of apical endpoints central to sustaining fish populations confirms that effluents containing waste streams from pharmaceutical formulation facilities can adversely impact fish populations but that the effects may not be temporally consistent. The present study highlights the importance of including diverse biological endpoints spanning

  11. Complex mixtures, complex responses: Assessing pharmaceutical mixtures using field and laboratory approaches.

    PubMed

    Schoenfuss, Heiko L; Furlong, Edward T; Phillips, Pat J; Scott, Tia-Marie; Kolpin, Dana W; Cetkovic-Cvrlje, Marina; Lesteberg, Kelsey E; Rearick, Daniel C

    2016-04-01

    Pharmaceuticals are present in low concentrations (<100 ng/L) in most municipal wastewater effluents but may be elevated locally because of factors such as input from pharmaceutical formulation facilities. Using existing concentration data, the authors assessed pharmaceuticals in laboratory exposures of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and added environmental complexity through effluent exposures. In the laboratory, larval and mature minnows were exposed to a simple opioid mixture (hydrocodone, methadone, and oxycodone), an opioid agonist (tramadol), a muscle relaxant (methocarbamol), a simple antidepressant mixture (fluoxetine, paroxetine, venlafaxine), a sleep aid (temazepam), or a complex mixture of all compounds. Larval minnow response to effluent exposure was not consistent. The 2010 exposures resulted in shorter exposed minnow larvae, whereas the larvae exposed in 2012 exhibited altered escape behavior. Mature minnows exhibited altered hepatosomatic indices, with the strongest effects in females and in mixture exposures. In addition, laboratory-exposed, mature male minnows exposed to all pharmaceuticals (except the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor mixture) defended nest sites less rigorously than fish in the control group. Tramadol or antidepressant mixture exposure resulted in increased splenic T lymphocytes. Only male minnows exposed to whole effluent responded with increased plasma vitellogenin concentrations. Female minnows exposed to pharmaceuticals (except the opioid mixture) had larger livers, likely as a compensatory result of greater prominence of vacuoles in liver hepatocytes. The observed alteration of apical endpoints central to sustaining fish populations confirms that effluents containing waste streams from pharmaceutical formulation facilities can adversely impact fish populations but that the effects may not be temporally consistent. The present study highlights the importance of including diverse biological endpoints spanning

  12. EVALUATION OF THE JOINT TOXIC ACTION OF MIXTURES OF HALOACETIC ACIDS CONSTRUCTED USING ENVIRONMENTAL CONCENTRATION/EXPOSURE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are formed by reactions between chemicals used to disinfect water and organic compounds present in source water. The composition of DBP mixtures varies based on a number of factors, including treatment scenario, with different DBP mixtures contain...

  13. Bioassay of complex mixtures of indoor air pollutants. Chapter 7

    SciTech Connect

    Lewtas, J.; Claxton, L.; Mumford, J.; Lofroth, G.

    1990-01-01

    There are several strategies for conducting bioassay studies of indoor air pollutant mixtures. One approach is to generate indoor pollutants from sources under laboratory conditions suitable for human, animal, or in vitro bioassay studies. This approach was used extensively to evaluate tobacco smoke and to a lesser extent for other indoor combustion sources such as kerosene heaters. A second approach is to simulate these complex mixtures by simpler mixtures of pure chemicals which can be used in biological studies. The third approach, which is described in more detail here, is to use bioassays in the direct evaluation of complex mixtures of indoor air pollutants. The mixtures of organics found indoors from combustion sources, building materials, household products and human activities are extremely complex. They consist of thousands of components which are not well characterized or quantified. Many of these mixtures and certain components are potential human carcinogens. The development of short-term bioassays to detect mutagens and potential carcinogens has facilitated studies of complex mixtures including air pollutants and combustion emissions. Chapter 7 will focus on the development and application of bacterial mutagenicity assays to complex mixtures of indoor air pollutants.

  14. Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 4 NIST Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   Interactive computer program for predicting thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures containing up to 20 components. The components are selected from a database of 196 components, mostly hydrocarbons.

  15. TEST REPORT #33: Compressor Calorimeter Test of R-410A Alternative: R-32/R-134a Mixture Using a Scroll Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Som; Sharma, Vishaldeep; Abdelaziz, Omar

    2014-02-18

    This report investigates the tested performance of lower - GWP candidate refrigerant, 94.07 wt% R - 32 + 5.93 wt % R - 134 a mixture (hereafter referred to as R - 32/134a), as an alternative to baseline refrigerant R - 410 A using a 36,000 Btu/hr compressor calorimeter located at the Heat Exchanger Advanced Testing Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory . These tests were conducted during May and August 2013. R - 410A is a near - azeotropic blend of R - 32 and R - 125 with 0.5/0.5 mass fraction and has a GWP 100 of 2100. R - 32 and R - 134a are pure refrigerants and have GWP 100 of 716 and 1370 1, respectively. Based on the GWP 100 values of pure refrigerants and their mass fraction in the blend, GWP 100 of R - 32/134a, which is under development by National Refrigerant, is 755. This report compares various performance parameters, such as cooling capacity, compressor power, refrigerant mass flow rate, EER, isentropic efficiency and discharge temperature of the alternative refrigerant to that of R - 410 A.

  16. Some results on Gaussian mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felgueiras, Miguel; Santos, Rui; Martins, João Paulo

    2014-10-01

    We investigate Gaussian mixtures with independent components, whose parameters are numerically estimated. A decomposition of a Gaussian mixture is presented when the components have a common variance. We introduce a shifted and scaled t-Student distribution as an approximation for the distribution of Gaussian mixtures when their components have a common mean and develop a hypothesis test for testing the equality of the components means. Finally, we analyse the fitness of the approximate model to the logarithmic daily returns of the Portuguese stock index PSI-20.

  17. Water-enhanced solvation of organic solutes in ketone and ester solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Brunt, V. van; King, C.J. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1994-05-01

    Previous research has shown that the solubilities of dicarboxylic acids in certain electron-donor solvents are substantially increased in the presence of water. Information on solubilities, liquid-liquid equilibria and maximum-boiling ternary azeotropes was screened so as to identify other systems where codissolved water appears to enhance solvation of organic solutes in solvents. Several carboxylic acids, an alcohol, diols, and phenols were selected for examination as solutes in ketone and ester solvents. Effects of water upon solute solubilities and volatilities were measured. Results showed that water-enhanced solvation is greatest for carboxylic acids. Solute activity coefficients decreased by factors of 2--3, 6--8, and 7--10 due to the presence of water for mono-, di and tricarboxylic acids, respectively. Activity coefficients decreased by a factor of about 1.5 for ethanol and 1,2-propanediol as solutes. Water-enhanced solvation of phenols is small, when existent.

  18. Bridging environmental mixtures and toxic effects

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Sarah E.; Smith, Brian W.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2012-01-01

    BRIDGES is a bioanalytical tool that combines passive sampling with the embryonic zebrafish developmental toxicity bioassay to provide a quantitative measure of the toxicity of bioavailable complex mixtures. Passive sampling devices (PSDs), which sequester and concentrate bioavailable organic contaminants from the environment, were deployed in the Willamette and Columbia Rivers within and outside of the Portland Harbor Superfund site in Portland, Oregon. Six sampling events were conducted in the summer and fall of 2009 and 2010. PSD extracts were analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds and screened for 1201 chemicals of concern using deconvolution reporting software. The developmental toxicity of the extracts was analyzed using the embryonic zebrafish bioassay. BRIDGES provided site-specific, temporally resolved information about environmental contaminant mixtures and their toxicity. Multivariate modeling approaches were applied to paired chemical and toxic effects data sets to help unravel chemistry-toxicity associations. Modeling demonstrated a significant correlation between PAH concentrations and the toxicity of the samples and identified a subset of PAH analytes that were the most highly correlated with observed toxicity. Although this research highlights the complexity of discerning specific bioactive compounds in complex mixtures, it demonstrates methods for associating toxic effects with chemical characteristics of environmental samples. PMID:23001962

  19. Experimental study on the adsorptive-distillation for dehydration of ethanol-water mixture using natural and synthetic zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megawati, Wicaksono, D.; Abdullah, M. S.

    2017-03-01

    This research studied adsorptive-distillation (AD) for dehydration of ethanol-water mixture using natural and synthetic zeolites as adsorbent for ethanol purification. Especially, the effect of purification time is recorded and studied to evaluate performance of designed AD equipment. This AD was performed in a batch condition using boiling flask covered with heating mantle and it was maintained at 78°C temperature and 1 atm pressure. The initial ethanol volume was 300 mL with 93.8% v/v concentration. The synthetic zeolite type used was zeolite 3A. The flowed vapour was condensed using water as a cooling medium. Every 5 minutes of time duration the samples were collected until the vapour could not be condensed in that condition and then be analyzed its concentration using Gas-Chromatography. Experiment shows that the designed AD equipment could increase ethanol concentration at first 5 minutes with highest ethanol concentration achieved using synthetic zeolite (97.47% v/v). However, ethanol concentration from AD process using natural zeolite only reached 96.5% v/v. Thus, synthetic zeolite as adsorbent could pass azeotropic point, but natural zeolite fail. The ratio of adsorbed water per adsorbent for natural and synthetic zeolites are about 0.023 and 0.056 gwater/gads, respectively, at 50 minutes of time. Finally, synthetic zeolite (at 55 minutes the value of C/C0 is about 0.85 and the average outlet water concentration is 4.70 mole/L) as adsorbent for AD of ethanol water is better than natural zeolite (at 55 minutes the value of C/C0 is about 0.63 and the average outlet water concentration is 6.43 mole/L).

  20. Modeling and interpreting biological effects of mixtures in the environment: introduction to the metal mixture modeling evaluation project.

    PubMed

    Van Genderen, Eric; Adams, William; Dwyer, Robert; Garman, Emily; Gorsuch, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    The fate and biological effects of chemical mixtures in the environment are receiving increased attention from the scientific and regulatory communities. Understanding the behavior and toxicity of metal mixtures poses unique challenges for incorporating metal-specific concepts and approaches, such as bioavailability and metal speciation, in multiple-metal exposures. To avoid the use of oversimplified approaches to assess the toxicity of metal mixtures, a collaborative 2-yr research project and multistakeholder group workshop were conducted to examine and evaluate available higher-tiered chemical speciation-based metal mixtures modeling approaches. The Metal Mixture Modeling Evaluation project and workshop achieved 3 important objectives related to modeling and interpretation of biological effects of metal mixtures: 1) bioavailability models calibrated for single-metal exposures can be integrated to assess mixture scenarios; 2) the available modeling approaches perform consistently well for various metal combinations, organisms, and endpoints; and 3) several technical advancements have been identified that should be incorporated into speciation models and environmental risk assessments for metals.

  1. Predicting the toxicity of metal mixtures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Mebane, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    The toxicity of single and multiple metal (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) solutions to trout is predicted using an approach that combines calculations of: (1) solution speciation; (2) competition and accumulation of cations (H, Ca, Mg, Na, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) on low abundance, high affinity and high abundance, low affinity biotic ligand sites; (3) a toxicity function that accounts for accumulation and potency of individual toxicants; and (4) biological response. The approach is evaluated by examining water composition from single metal toxicity tests of trout at 50% mortality, results of theoretical calculations of metal accumulation on fish gills and associated mortality for single, binary, ternary, and quaternary metal solutions, and predictions for a field site impacted by acid rock drainage. These evaluations indicate that toxicity of metal mixtures depends on the relative affinity and potency of toxicants for a given aquatic organism, suites of metals in the mixture, dissolved metal concentrations and ratios, and background solution composition (temperature, pH, and concentrations of major ions and dissolved organic carbon). A composite function that incorporates solution composition, affinity and competition of cations for two types of biotic ligand sites, and potencies of hydrogen and individual metals is proposed as a tool to evaluate potential toxicity of environmental solutions to trout.

  2. Modeling and analysis of personal exposures to VOC mixtures using copulas

    PubMed Central

    Su, Feng-Chiao; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Batterman, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Environmental exposures typically involve mixtures of pollutants, which must be understood to evaluate cumulative risks, that is, the likelihood of adverse health effects arising from two or more chemicals. This study uses several powerful techniques to characterize dependency structures of mixture components in personal exposure measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with aims of advancing the understanding of environmental mixtures, improving the ability to model mixture components in a statistically valid manner, and demonstrating broadly applicable techniques. We first describe characteristics of mixtures and introduce several terms, including the mixture fraction which represents a mixture component's share of the total concentration of the mixture. Next, using VOC exposure data collected in the Relationship of Indoor Outdoor and Personal Air (RIOPA) study, mixtures are identified using positive matrix factorization (PMF) and by toxicological mode of action. Dependency structures of mixture components are examined using mixture fractions and modeled using copulas, which address dependencies of multiple variables across the entire distribution. Five candidate copulas (Gaussian, t, Gumbel, Clayton, and Frank) are evaluated, and the performance of fitted models was evaluated using simulation and mixture fractions. Cumulative cancer risks are calculated for mixtures, and results from copulas and multivariate lognormal models are compared to risks calculated using the observed data. Results obtained using the RIOPA dataset showed four VOC mixtures, representing gasoline vapor, vehicle exhaust, chlorinated solvents and disinfection by-products, and cleaning products and odorants. Often, a single compound dominated the mixture, however, mixture fractions were generally heterogeneous in that the VOC composition of the mixture changed with concentration. Three mixtures were identified by mode of action, representing VOCs associated with hematopoietic, liver

  3. Modeling and analysis of personal exposures to VOC mixtures using copulas.

    PubMed

    Su, Feng-Chiao; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Batterman, Stuart

    2014-02-01

    Environmental exposures typically involve mixtures of pollutants, which must be understood to evaluate cumulative risks, that is, the likelihood of adverse health effects arising from two or more chemicals. This study uses several powerful techniques to characterize dependency structures of mixture components in personal exposure measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with aims of advancing the understanding of environmental mixtures, improving the ability to model mixture components in a statistically valid manner, and demonstrating broadly applicable techniques. We first describe characteristics of mixtures and introduce several terms, including the mixture fraction which represents a mixture component's share of the total concentration of the mixture. Next, using VOC exposure data collected in the Relationship of Indoor Outdoor and Personal Air (RIOPA) study, mixtures are identified using positive matrix factorization (PMF) and by toxicological mode of action. Dependency structures of mixture components are examined using mixture fractions and modeled using copulas, which address dependencies of multiple variables across the entire distribution. Five candidate copulas (Gaussian, t, Gumbel, Clayton, and Frank) are evaluated, and the performance of fitted models was evaluated using simulation and mixture fractions. Cumulative cancer risks are calculated for mixtures, and results from copulas and multivariate lognormal models are compared to risks calculated using the observed data. Results obtained using the RIOPA dataset showed four VOC mixtures, representing gasoline vapor, vehicle exhaust, chlorinated solvents and disinfection by-products, and cleaning products and odorants. Often, a single compound dominated the mixture, however, mixture fractions were generally heterogeneous in that the VOC composition of the mixture changed with concentration. Three mixtures were identified by mode of action, representing VOCs associated with hematopoietic, liver

  4. Separation of a Five-Component Mixture in the Microscale Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara-Mays, Ellen P.; Yuen, George U.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a microscale organic chemistry laboratory which involves the separation and purification of a mixture consisting of a strong organic acid, a weak organic acid, an organic base, and two neutral compounds. Reinforced are the basic principles of acid/base chemistry and the physical properties of the associated functional groups. (CW)

  5. Separation of copper from aqueous sulfate solutions by mixtures of Cyanex 301 and LIX 984N.

    PubMed

    Fouad, E A

    2009-07-30

    The extraction equilibria of copper(II) with Cyanex 301, LIX 984N, and their mixtures have been investigated. Extraction was studied as a function of organic phase composition, sulfuric acid concentration, pH, temperature, initial copper concentration, mixing speed, and aqueous/organic volume ratio. Considerable synergistic enhancement has been observed in the extraction of Cu(2+) with mixtures of Cyanex 301 and LIX 984N. The results demonstrate that copper ion is extracted as CuRL(2)H with synergistic mixture. The thermodynamic parameter, enthalpy change (Delta H) of Cyanex 301, LIX 984N, and their mixtures have been determined and the endothermic process has been found. The synergistic enhancement factor of copper(II) with mixtures is higher at more acidic solutions, which suggests that it is a promising synergistic extraction system for the separation of copper(II) from more acidic medium. HCl was found to be more efficient for copper stripping from loaded synergistic mixtures.

  6. Bayesian Kernel Mixtures for Counts.

    PubMed

    Canale, Antonio; Dunson, David B

    2011-12-01

    Although Bayesian nonparametric mixture models for continuous data are well developed, there is a limited literature on related approaches for count data. A common strategy is to use a mixture of Poissons, which unfortunately is quite restrictive in not accounting for distributions having variance less than the mean. Other approaches include mixing multinomials, which requires finite support, and using a Dirichlet process prior with a Poisson base measure, which does not allow smooth deviations from the Poisson. As a broad class of alternative models, we propose to use nonparametric mixtures of rounded continuous kernels. An efficient Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, and a simulation study is performed to assess performance. Focusing on the rounded Gaussian case, we generalize the modeling framework to account for multivariate count data, joint modeling with continuous and categorical variables, and other complications. The methods are illustrated through applications to a developmental toxicity study and marketing data. This article has supplementary material online.

  7. Unrestricted Mixture Models for Class Identification in Growth Mixture Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Min; Hancock, Gregory R.

    2014-01-01

    Growth mixture modeling has gained much attention in applied and methodological social science research recently, but the selection of the number of latent classes for such models remains a challenging issue, especially when the assumption of proper model specification is violated. The current simulation study compared the performance of a linear…

  8. A regression model for calculating the boiling point isobars of tetrachloromethane-based binary solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preobrazhenskii, M. P.; Rudakov, O. B.

    2016-01-01

    A regression model for calculating the boiling point isobars of tetrachloromethane-organic solvent binary homogeneous systems is proposed. The parameters of the model proposed were calculated for a series of solutions. The correlation between the nonadditivity parameter of the regression model and the hydrophobicity criterion of the organic solvent is established. The parameter value of the proposed model is shown to allow prediction of the potential formation of azeotropic mixtures of solvents with tetrachloromethane.

  9. Dipole oscillations in fermionic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Chiacchiera, S.; Macri, T.; Trombettoni, A.

    2010-03-15

    We study dipole oscillations in a general fermionic mixture. Starting from the Boltzmann equation, we classify the different solutions in the parameter space through the number of real eigenvalues of the small oscillations matrix. We discuss how this number can be computed using the Sturm algorithm and its relation with the properties of the Laplace transform of the experimental quantities. After considering two components in harmonic potentials having different trapping frequencies, we study dipole oscillations in three-component mixtures. Explicit computations are done for realistic experimental setups using the classical Boltzmann equation without intraspecies interactions. A brief discussion of the application of this classification to general collective oscillations is also presented.

  10. Gaussian-mixture umbrella sampling

    PubMed Central

    van der Vaart, Arjan; Karplus, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the Gaussian-mixture umbrella sampling method (GAMUS), a biased molecular dynamics technique based on adaptive umbrella sampling that efficiently escapes free energy minima in multi-dimensional problems. The prior simulation data are reweighted with a maximum likelihood formulation, and the new approximate probability density is fit to a Gaussian-mixture model, augmented by information about the unsampled areas. The method can be used to identify free energy minima in multi-dimensional reaction coordinates. To illustrate GAMUS, we apply it to the alanine dipeptide (2D reaction coordinate) and tripeptide (4D reaction coordinate). PMID:19284746

  11. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and each mixture control must have guards or must be shaped or arranged to prevent confusion...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and each mixture control must have guards or must be shaped or arranged to prevent confusion...

  13. 16 CFR 1500.5 - Hazardous mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous mixtures. 1500.5 Section 1500.5... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.5 Hazardous mixtures. For a mixture of substances, the determination of whether the mixture is a “hazardous substance”...

  14. 16 CFR 1500.5 - Hazardous mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous mixtures. 1500.5 Section 1500.5... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.5 Hazardous mixtures. For a mixture of substances, the determination of whether the mixture is a “hazardous substance”...

  15. 16 CFR 1500.5 - Hazardous mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous mixtures. 1500.5 Section 1500.5... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.5 Hazardous mixtures. For a mixture of substances, the determination of whether the mixture is a “hazardous substance”...

  16. 16 CFR 1500.5 - Hazardous mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hazardous mixtures. 1500.5 Section 1500.5... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.5 Hazardous mixtures. For a mixture of substances, the determination of whether the mixture is a “hazardous substance”...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and each mixture control must have guards or must be shaped or arranged to prevent confusion...

  18. 16 CFR 1500.5 - Hazardous mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hazardous mixtures. 1500.5 Section 1500.5... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.5 Hazardous mixtures. For a mixture of substances, the determination of whether the mixture is a “hazardous substance”...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and each mixture control must have guards or must be shaped or arranged to prevent confusion...

  20. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and each mixture control must have guards or must be shaped or arranged to prevent confusion...

  1. Separating mixtures by exploiting molecular packing effects in microporous materials.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2015-01-07

    We examine mixture separations with microporous adsorbents such as zeolites, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs), operating under conditions close to pore saturation. Pore saturation is realized, for example, when separating bulk liquid phase mixtures of polar compounds such as water, alcohols and ketones. For the operating conditions used in industrial practice, pore saturation is also attained in separations of hydrocarbon mixtures such as xylene isomers and hexane isomers. Separations under pore saturation conditions are strongly influenced by differences in the saturation capacities of the constituent species; the adsorption is often in favor of the component with the higher saturation capacity. Effective separations are achieved by exploiting differences in the efficiency with which molecules pack within the ordered crystalline porous materials. For mixtures of chain alcohols, the shorter alcohol can be preferentially adsorbed because of its higher saturation capacity. With hydrophilic adsorbents, water can be selectively adsorbed from water-alcohol mixtures. For separations of o-xylene-m-xylene-p-xylene mixtures, the pore dimensions of MOFs can be tailored in such a manner as to allow optimal packing of the isomer that needs to be adsorbed preferentially. Subtle configurational differences between linear and branched alkane isomers result in significantly different packing efficiencies within the pore topology of MFI, AFI, ATS, and CFI zeolites. A common characteristic feature of most separations that are reliant on molecular packing effects is that adsorption and intra-crystalline diffusion are synergistic; this enhances the separation efficiencies in fixed bed adsorbers.

  2. Mixture toxicity of flubendazole and fenbendazole to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Puckowski, Alan; Stolte, Stefan; Wagil, Marta; Markiewicz, Marta; Łukaszewicz, Paulina; Stepnowski, Piotr; Białk-Bielińska, Anna

    2017-02-03

    Nowadays, residual amounts of many pharmaceuticals can be found in various environmental compartments including surface and ground waters, soils and sediments as well as biota. Even though they undergo degradability, their environmental discharge is relatively continuous, thus they may be regarded as quasi-persistent contaminants, and are also frequently regarded as emerging organic pollutants. Benzimidazoles, especially flubendazole (FLU) and fenbendazole (FEN), represent two anthelmintic drugs belonging to this group. Although their presence in environmental matrices has been reported, there is relatively little data concerning their (eco)toxicological impact. Furthermore, no data is available on their mixture toxicity. FLU and FEN have been found to have a strong impact on an environmentally important non-target organism - Daphnia magna. Moreover, these compounds are usually present in the environment as a part of pharmaceutical mixtures. Therefore, there is a need to evaluate their mixture toxicity, which was the main aim of this study. Single substance toxicity tests were carried out in parallel with mixture studies of FLU and FEN, with the application of two well established concepts of Concentration Addition (CA) and Independent Action (IA). As a result, both models (CA and IA) were found to underestimate the toxicity of mixtures, however CA yielded more accurate predictions.

  3. Influence factors of multicomponent mixtures containing reactive chemicals and their joint effects.

    PubMed

    Tian, Dayong; Lin, Zhifen; Yu, Jianqiao; Yin, Daqiang

    2012-08-01

    Organic chemicals usually coexist as a mixture in the environment, and the mixture toxicity of organic chemicals has received increased attention. However, research regarding the joint effects of reactive chemicals is lacking. In this study, we examined two kinds of reactive chemicals, cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes and determined their joint effects on Photobacterium phosphoreum. Three factors were found to influence the joint effects of multicomponent mixtures containing reactive chemicals, including the number of components, the dominating components and the toxic ratios. With an increased number of components, the synergistic or antagonistic effects (interactions) will weaken to the additive effects (non-interactions) if the added component cannot yield a much stronger joint effect with an existing component. Contrarily, the joint effect of the mixture may become stronger instead of weaker if the added components can yield a much stronger joint effect than the existing joint effect of the multicomponent mixture. The components that yield the strongest interactions in their binary mixture can be considered the dominating components. These components contribute more to the interactions of multicomponent mixtures than other components. Moreover, the toxic ratios also influence the joint effects of the mixtures. This study provides an insight into what are the main factors and how they influence the joint effects of multicomponent mixtures containing reactive chemicals, and thus, the findings are beneficial to the study of mixture toxicology.

  4. Method and compositions for the degradation of tributyl phosphate in chemical waste mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Stoner, D.L.; Tien, A.J.

    1995-09-26

    A method and process are disclosed for the degradation of tributyl phosphate in an organic waste mixture and a biologically pure, novel bacteria culture for accomplishing the same. A newly-discovered bacteria (a strain of Acinetobacter sp. ATCC 55587) is provided which is combined in a reactor vessel with a liquid waste mixture containing tributyl phosphate and one or more organic waste compounds capable of functioning as growth substrates for the bacteria. The bacteria is thereafter allowed to incubate within the waste mixture. As a result, the tributyl phosphate and organic compounds within the waste mixture are metabolized (degraded) by the bacteria, thereby eliminating such materials which are environmentally hazardous. In addition, the bacteria is capable of degrading waste mixtures containing high quantities of tributyl phosphate (e.g. up to about 1.0% by weight tributyl phosphate). 6 figs.

  5. Method and compositions for the degradation of tributyl phosphate in chemical waste mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Stoner, Daphne L.; Tien, Albert J.

    1995-01-01

    A method and process for the degradation of tributyl phosphate in an organic waste mixture and a biologically pure, novel bacteria culture for accomplishing the same. A newly-discovered bacteria (a strain of Acinetobacter sp. ATCC 55587) is provided which is combined in a reactor vessel with a liquid waste mixture containing tributyl phosphate and one or more organic waste compounds capable of functioning as growth substrates for the bacteria. The bacteria is thereafter allowed to incubate within the waste mixture. As a result, the tributyl phosphate and organic compounds within the waste mixture are metabolized (degraded) by the bacteria, thereby eliminating such materials which are environmentally hazardous. In addition, the bacteria is capable of degrading waste mixtures containing high quantities of tributyl phosphate (e.g. up to about 1.0% by weight tributyl phosphate).

  6. Taylor dispersion analysis of mixtures.

    PubMed

    Cottet, Hervé; Biron, Jean-Philippe; Martin, Michel

    2007-12-01

    Taylor dispersion analysis (TDA) is a fast and simple method for determining hydrodynamic radii. In the case of sample mixtures, TDA, as the other nonseparative methods, leads to an average diffusion coefficient on the different molecules constituting the mixture. We set in this work the equations giving, on a consistent basis, the average values obtained by TDA with detectors with linear response functions. These equations confronted TDA experiments of sample mixtures containing different proportions of a small molecule and a polymer standard. Very good agreement between theory and experiment was obtained. In a second part of this work, on the basis of monomodal or bimodal molar mass distributions of polymers, the different average diffusion coefficients corresponding to TDA were compared to the z-average diffusion coefficient (D(z)) obtained from dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments and to the weight average diffusion coefficient (D(w)). This latter value is sometimes considered as the most representative of the sample mixture. From these results, it appears that, for monomodal distribution and relatively low polydispersity (I = 1.15), the average diffusion coefficient generally derived from TDA is very close to Dw. However, for highly polydisperse samples (e.g., bimodal polydisperse distributions), important differences could be obtained (up to 35% between TDA and D(w)). In all the cases, the average diffusion coefficient obtained by TDA for a mass concentration detector was closer to the Dw value than the z-average obtained by DLS.

  7. Electrochemical signatures of multivitamin mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mohan, A M Vinu; Brunetti, Barbara; Bulbarello, Andrea; Wang, Joseph

    2015-11-21

    The ability of cyclic square wave voltammetry to identify distinct fingerprints of multiple vitamins, in a single voltammetric run, is demonstrated. This method represents an efficient alternative to more common techniques for fast screening of complex vitamin mixtures or commercial tablets due to its low cost, high speed and sensitivity.

  8. Genetic Analysis of Plant Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Griffing, B.

    1989-01-01

    Plant mixtures are difficult to analyze genetically because of possible interactions between neighboring plants (i.e., between plants in the same biological group). However, a genetic modeling scheme has been devised which, theoretically, can accommodate such interactions. This study was an attempt to put the theoretical modeling procedure to an experimental test. To this end an experimental procedure was devised that generated biological groups from a well defined base population. A cultural system was used which permitted growing plant mixtures in controlled environmental facilities. This allowed the experiment to be conducted over a wide range of temperature and nutrient conditions. Application of the theoretical gene model to the experimental data permitted identification of those classes of gene effects that were responsible for genetic variation exhibited by the mixtures. Adequacy of the genetic modeling description was corroborated by precise prediction of an independent genetic response. The genetic analyses also identified statistically significant temperature-and nutrient-dependent forms of heterosis. It was concluded that the study demonstrated the suitability of the theoretical group gene model for describing complexities inherent in plant mixtures. PMID:17246509

  9. Bioavailability of genotoxic mixtures in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Bordelon, N.; Washburn, K.; He, L.Y.; Donnelly, K.C.

    1996-12-31

    Contaminated media at Superfund sites typically consist of complex mixtures of organic and inorganic chemicals which are difficult to characterize, both analytically and toxicologically. The current EPA approach to risk assessment uses solvent extraction to remove chemicals from the soil as a basis for estimating risk to the human population. However, contaminants that can be recovered with a solvent extract may not represent the mixture of chemicals that are available for human exposure. A procedure using an aqueous extraction was investigated to provide a more realistic estimate of what chemicals are bioavailable. A study was conducted with two soil types: creosote-contaminated sandy soil and coal tar-contaminated clay soil spiked with benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P], and trinitrotoluene (TNT). Samples were extracted with hexane:acetone and water titrated to pH2 and pH7. HPLC analysis demonstrated up to 35% and 29% recovery of contaminants using the aqueous extracts. The estimated cancer risk for the aqueous extract was one order of magnitude less than that for solvent extracts. Analysis using the Salmonella/microsome assay demonstrated that solvent extracts were genotoxic (133 revertants/mg) with metabolic activation while aqueous extracts of clay soil were not genotoxic. Sandy soil showed genotoxicity both with and without metabolic activation. These results suggest that solvent extraction techniques may overestimate the concentration of contaminants that are available for human exposure and, hence, the risk associated with the presence of the contaminants in soil.

  10. The long-term effect of initial pH control on the enrichment culture of phosphorus- and glycogen-accumulating organisms with a mixture of propionic and acetic acids as carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Yinguang; Liu, Yan

    2007-11-01

    In most studies on phosphorus- and glycogen-accumulating organisms (PAO and GAO), pH was controlled constantly throughout the entire anaerobic and aerobic periods, and acetic acid was used as the carbon source. In this paper, the effect of long-term initial pH values on PAO and GAO was investigated with mixed propionic and acetic acids as carbon sources. It was observed that with pH increasing from 6.4 to 8.0, the anaerobic propionic acid uptake rate by PAO linearly increased but that by GAO proportionally decreased. At pH 6.70 and pH 7.51, PAO and GAO exhibited the same acetic and propionic acid uptake rates, respectively. The acetic acid uptake rate by PAO was greater than that by GAO at pH>6.70, and the propionic acid uptake rate by PAO was higher than that by GAO at pH>7.51, which indicated that PAO would take predominance over GAO at pH>7.51. Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate, poly-3-hydroxyvalerate and poly-3-hydroxy-2-methylvalerate shared 7%, 62% and 31%, respectively in the PAO system, and 11%, 44% and 45% respectively in the GAO system, and these fractions were observed independent of pH either in the PAO or in the GAO system. In the PAO system, with the increase of pH, the phosphorus removal efficiency was improved greatly, and a phosphorus removal efficiency of 100% was achieved at 8.0. Further investigation showed that the higher phosphorus removal efficiency at higher pH was mainly caused by a biological effect instead of chemical one.

  11. Free Volume Theory of Hydrocarbon Mixture Transport in Nanoporous Materials.

    PubMed

    Obliger, Amaël; Pellenq, Roland; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-10-06

    Despite recent focus on shale gas, hydrocarbon recovery from the ultraconfining and disordered porosity of organic matter in shales (kerogen) remains poorly understood. Key aspects such as the breakdown of hydrodynamics at the nanoscale and strong adsorption effects lead to unexplained non-Darcy behaviors. Here, molecular dynamics and statistical mechanics are used to elucidate hydrocarbon mixture transport through a realistic molecular model of kerogen [ Bousige, C.; et al. Nat. Mater. 2016 , 15 , 576 ]. Owing to strong adsorption effects, velocity cross-correlations between the mixture components and between molecules of the same species are shown to be negligible. This allows estimation of each component permeance from its self-diffusivity, which can be obtained from single-component data. These permeances are found to scale with the reciprocal of the alkane length and decrease with the number of adsorbed molecules following a simple free volume theory, therefore allowing mixture transport prediction as a function of the amount of trapped fluid.

  12. Generalized Beta Mixtures of Gaussians.

    PubMed

    Armagan, Artin; Dunson, David B; Clyde, Merlise

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, a rich variety of shrinkage priors have been proposed that have great promise in addressing massive regression problems. In general, these new priors can be expressed as scale mixtures of normals, but have more complex forms and better properties than traditional Cauchy and double exponential priors. We first propose a new class of normal scale mixtures through a novel generalized beta distribution that encompasses many interesting priors as special cases. This encompassing framework should prove useful in comparing competing priors, considering properties and revealing close connections. We then develop a class of variational Bayes approximations through the new hierarchy presented that will scale more efficiently to the types of truly massive data sets that are now encountered routinely.

  13. MULTIVARIATE KERNEL PARTITION PROCESS MIXTURES

    PubMed Central

    Dunson, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Mixtures provide a useful approach for relaxing parametric assumptions. Discrete mixture models induce clusters, typically with the same cluster allocation for each parameter in multivariate cases. As a more flexible approach that facilitates sparse nonparametric modeling of multivariate random effects distributions, this article proposes a kernel partition process (KPP) in which the cluster allocation varies for different parameters. The KPP is shown to be the driving measure for a multivariate ordered Chinese restaurant process that induces a highly-flexible dependence structure in local clustering. This structure allows the relative locations of the random effects to inform the clustering process, with spatially-proximal random effects likely to be assigned the same cluster index. An exact block Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, avoiding truncation of the infinite measure. The methods are applied to hormone curve data, and a dependent KPP is proposed for classification from functional predictors. PMID:24478563

  14. Gas adsorption and gas mixture separations using mixed-ligand MOF material

    DOEpatents

    Hupp, Joseph T.; Mulfort, Karen L.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Bae, Youn-Sang

    2011-01-04

    A method of separating a mixture of carbon dioxiode and hydrocarbon gas using a mixed-ligand, metal-organic framework (MOF) material having metal ions coordinated to carboxylate ligands and pyridyl ligands.

  15. Gene Expression Responses in Male Fathead Minnows Exposed to Binary Mixtures of an Estrogen and Antiestrogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic organisms are continuously exposed to complex mixtures of chemicals, many of which can interfere with their endocrine system, resulting in impaired reproduction, development or survival, among others. In order to analyze the effects and mechanisms of action of estrogen...

  16. International issues on human health effects of exposure to chemical mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Feron, Victor J; Cassee, Flemming R; Groten, John P; van Vliet, Petronella W; van Zorge, Job A

    2002-01-01

    In this article, we highlight new developments and recent studies concerning adverse human health effects related to chemical mixtures. One group of activities comprises the development of a new computer program for analyzing mixture studies and a mathematical model as a basis for combination rules that predict the toxicity of mixtures. Other new activities in the area of experimental studies are the application of gene expression technologies in mixture research, and pattern recognition as a tool in safety evaluation of complex mixtures. A "bottom-up" approach for chemosensory detection of mixtures has recently been presented. Other topics include a method for the safety evaluation of natural flavoring complexes, and an evaluation of the possible health effects of the simultaneous intake of food additives. Examples of issues related to mixtures of airborne chemicals are potential interaction of fine particles and gaseous pollutants in ambient air, nasal cancer associated with inhaled chemical mixtures, and the recommendation of a limit value for volatile organic compounds. Topics of a more strategic nature include studies concerning the public health effects of large airports, and the development of criteria for a harmonized classification of chemical mixtures. This overview illustrates that strategies to tackle the safety evaluation of combined exposures and complex mixtures as well as models facilitating the interpretation of findings in the context of risk assessment of mixtures have become increasingly important. It is true that exposure of humans to chemical mixtures is the rule rather than the exception, and therefore health risk assessments should focus on mixtures and not on single chemicals. It is also true, however, that humans have learned to cope with exposure to huge numbers of chemicals simultaneously (food, water, air, soil, and consumer products). Therefore, in view of limited resources for toxicological research, the focus in toxicology should be

  17. International issues on human health effects of exposure to chemical mixtures.

    PubMed

    Feron, Victor J; Cassee, Flemming R; Groten, John P; van Vliet, Petronella W; van Zorge, Job A

    2002-12-01

    In this article, we highlight new developments and recent studies concerning adverse human health effects related to chemical mixtures. One group of activities comprises the development of a new computer program for analyzing mixture studies and a mathematical model as a basis for combination rules that predict the toxicity of mixtures. Other new activities in the area of experimental studies are the application of gene expression technologies in mixture research, and pattern recognition as a tool in safety evaluation of complex mixtures. A "bottom-up" approach for chemosensory detection of mixtures has recently been presented. Other topics include a method for the safety evaluation of natural flavoring complexes, and an evaluation of the possible health effects of the simultaneous intake of food additives. Examples of issues related to mixtures of airborne chemicals are potential interaction of fine particles and gaseous pollutants in ambient air, nasal cancer associated with inhaled chemical mixtures, and the recommendation of a limit value for volatile organic compounds. Topics of a more strategic nature include studies concerning the public health effects of large airports, and the development of criteria for a harmonized classification of chemical mixtures. This overview illustrates that strategies to tackle the safety evaluation of combined exposures and complex mixtures as well as models facilitating the interpretation of findings in the context of risk assessment of mixtures have become increasingly important. It is true that exposure of humans to chemical mixtures is the rule rather than the exception, and therefore health risk assessments should focus on mixtures and not on single chemicals. It is also true, however, that humans have learned to cope with exposure to huge numbers of chemicals simultaneously (food, water, air, soil, and consumer products). Therefore, in view of limited resources for toxicological research, the focus in toxicology should be

  18. Characterization and Coding of Behaviorally Significant Odor Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Riffell, Jeffrey A.; Lei, Hong; Christensen, Thomas A.; Hildebrand, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary For animals to execute odor-driven behaviors, the olfactory system must process complex odor signals and maintain stimulus identity in the face of constantly changing odor intensities [1–5]. Surprisingly, how the olfactory system maintains identity of complex odors is unclear [6–10]. We took advantage of the plant-pollinator relationship between the Sacred Datura (Datura wrightii) and the moth Manduca sexta [11, 12] to determine how olfactory networks in this insect’s brain represent odor mixtures. We combined gas chromatography and neural-ensemble recording in the moth’s antennal lobe to examine population codes for the floral mixture and its fractionated components. Although the floral scent of D. wrightii comprises at least 60 compounds, only nine of those elicited robust neural responses. Behavioral experiments confirmed that these nine odorants mediate flower-foraging behaviors, but only as a mixture. Moreover, the mixture evoked equivalent foraging behaviors over a 1000-fold range in dilution, suggesting a singular percept across this concentration range. Furthermore, neural-ensemble recordings in the moth’s antennal lobe revealed that reliable encoding of the floral mixture is organized through synchronized activity distributed across a population of glomerular coding units, and this timing mechanism may bind the features of a complex stimulus into a coherent odor percept. PMID:19230669

  19. Consensus sediment quality guidelines for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, R.C.

    1999-04-01

    Sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been derived from a variety of laboratory, field, and theoretical foundations. They include the screening level concentration, effects ranges-low and -median, equilibrium partitioning concentrations, apparent effects threshold, {Sigma}PAH model, and threshold and probable effects levels. The resolution of controversial differences among the PAH SQGs lies in an understanding of the effects of mixtures. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons virtually always occur in field-collected sediment as a complex mixture of covarying compounds. When expressed as a mixture concentration, that is, total PAH (TPAH), the guidelines form three clusters that were intended in their original derivations to represent threshold (TEC = 290 {micro}g/g organic carbon [OC]), median (MEC = 1,800 {micro}g/g OC), and extreme (EEC = 10,000 {micro}g/g OC) effects concentrations. The TEC/MEC/EEC consensus guidelines provide a unifying synthesis of other SQGs, reflect causal rather than correlative effects, account for mixtures, and predict sediment toxicity and benthic community perturbations at sites of PAH contamination. The TEC offers the most useful SQG because PAH mixtures are unlikely to cause adverse effects on benthic ecosystems below the TEC.

  20. Model Misspecification: Finite Mixture or Homogeneous?

    PubMed Central

    Tarpey, Thaddeus; Yun, Dong; Petkova, Eva

    2007-01-01

    A common problem in statistical modelling is to distinguish between finite mixture distribution and a homogeneous non-mixture distribution. Finite mixture models are widely used in practice and often mixtures of normal densities are indistinguishable from homogenous non-normal densities. This paper illustrates what happens when the EM algorithm for normal mixtures is applied to a distribution that is a homogeneous non-mixture distribution. In particular, a population-based EM algorithm for finite mixtures is introduced and applied directly to density functions instead of sample data. The population-based EM algorithm is used to find finite mixture approximations to common homogeneous distributions. An example regarding the nature of a placebo response in drug treated depressed subjects is used to illustrate ideas. PMID:18974843

  1. Variable mixture ratio performance through nitrogen augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichel, R.; Obrien, C. J.; Bair, E. K.

    1988-01-01

    High/variable mixture ratio O2/H2 candidate engine cycles are examined for earth-to-orbit vehicle application. Engine performance and power balance information are presented for the candidate cycles relative to chamber pressure, bulk density, and mixture ratio. Included in the cycle screening are concepts where a third fluid (liquid nitrogen) is used to achieve a variable mixture ratio over the trajectory from liftoff to earth orbit. The third fluid cycles offer a very low risk, fully reusable, low operation cost alternative to high/variable mixture ratio bipropellant cycles. Variable mixture ratio engines with extendible nozzle are slightly lower performing than a single mixture ratio engine (MR = 7:1) with extendible nozzle. Dual expander engines (MR = 7:1) have slightly better performance than the single mixture ratio engine. Dual fuel dual expander engines offer a 16 percent improvement over the single mixture ratio engine.

  2. Medicines, shaken and stirred: a critical review on the ecotoxicology of pharmaceutical mixtures.

    PubMed

    Backhaus, Thomas

    2014-11-19

    Analytical monitoring surveys routinely confirm that organisms in the environment are exposed to complex multi-component pharmaceutical mixtures. We are hence tasked with the challenge to take this into consideration when investigating the ecotoxicology of pharmaceuticals. This review first provides a brief overview of the fundamental approaches for mixture toxicity assessment, which is then followed by a critical review on the empirical evidence that is currently at hand on the ecotoxicology of pharmaceutical mixtures. It is concluded that, while the classical concepts of concentration addition and independent action (response addition) provide a robust scientific footing, several knowledge gaps remain. This includes, in particular, the need for more and better empirical data on the effects of pharmaceutical mixtures on soil organisms as well as marine flora and fauna, and exploring the quantitative consequences of toxicokinetic, toxicodynamic and ecological interactions. Increased focus should be put on investigating the ecotoxicology of pharmaceutical mixtures in environmentally realistic settings.

  3. Medicines, shaken and stirred: a critical review on the ecotoxicology of pharmaceutical mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Backhaus, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Analytical monitoring surveys routinely confirm that organisms in the environment are exposed to complex multi-component pharmaceutical mixtures. We are hence tasked with the challenge to take this into consideration when investigating the ecotoxicology of pharmaceuticals. This review first provides a brief overview of the fundamental approaches for mixture toxicity assessment, which is then followed by a critical review on the empirical evidence that is currently at hand on the ecotoxicology of pharmaceutical mixtures. It is concluded that, while the classical concepts of concentration addition and independent action (response addition) provide a robust scientific footing, several knowledge gaps remain. This includes, in particular, the need for more and better empirical data on the effects of pharmaceutical mixtures on soil organisms as well as marine flora and fauna, and exploring the quantitative consequences of toxicokinetic, toxicodynamic and ecological interactions. Increased focus should be put on investigating the ecotoxicology of pharmaceutical mixtures in environmentally realistic settings. PMID:25405972

  4. Experimental evaluation of drying characteristics of sewage sludge and hazelnut shell mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pehlivan, Hüseyin; Ateş, Asude; Özdemir, Mustafa

    2016-11-01

    In this study the drying behavior of organic and agricultural waste mixtures has been experimentally investigated. The usability of sewage sludge as an organic waste and hazelnut shell as an agricultural waste was assessed in different mixture range. The paper discusses the applicability of these mixtures as a recovery energy source. Moisture content of mixtures has been calculated in laboratory and plant conditions. Indoor and outdoor solar sludge drying plants were constructed in pilot scale for experimental purposes. Dry solids and climatic conditions were constantly measured. A total more than 140 samples including for drying has been carried out to build up results. Indoor and outdoor weather conditions are taken into consideration in winter and summer. The most effective drying capacity is obtained in mixture of 20 % hazelnut shell and 80 % sewage sludge.

  5. 21 CFR 82.6 - Certifiable mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and, in the case of mixtures which are aqueous solutions or aqueous pastes, sodium benzoate in a... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Certifiable mixtures. 82.6 Section 82.6 Food and... PROVISIONALLY LISTED COLORS AND SPECIFICATIONS General Provisions § 82.6 Certifiable mixtures. (a) A batch of...

  6. 21 CFR 82.6 - Certifiable mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and, in the case of mixtures which are aqueous solutions or aqueous pastes, sodium benzoate in a... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certifiable mixtures. 82.6 Section 82.6 Food and... PROVISIONALLY LISTED COLORS AND SPECIFICATIONS General Provisions § 82.6 Certifiable mixtures. (a) A batch of...

  7. 14 CFR 25.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mixture controls. 25.1147 Section 25.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control. The controls must...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 25.1147 Section 25.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control. The controls must...

  9. 14 CFR 27.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mixture controls. 27.1147 Section 27.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1147 Mixture controls. If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control and the controls must...

  10. 40 CFR 721.9540 - Polysulfide mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polysulfide mixture. 721.9540 Section... Substances § 721.9540 Polysulfide mixture. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polysulfide mixture (PMN P-93-1043)...

  11. 40 CFR 721.9540 - Polysulfide mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Polysulfide mixture. 721.9540 Section... Substances § 721.9540 Polysulfide mixture. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polysulfide mixture (PMN P-93-1043)...

  12. 14 CFR 29.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 29.1147 Section 29.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and the...

  13. 14 CFR 29.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mixture controls. 29.1147 Section 29.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and the...

  14. 14 CFR 27.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 27.1147 Section 27.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1147 Mixture controls. If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control and the controls must...

  15. 40 CFR 721.9540 - Polysulfide mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Polysulfide mixture. 721.9540 Section... Substances § 721.9540 Polysulfide mixture. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polysulfide mixture (PMN P-93-1043)...

  16. 14 CFR 25.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mixture controls. 25.1147 Section 25.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control. The controls must...

  17. 40 CFR 721.9540 - Polysulfide mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polysulfide mixture. 721.9540 Section... Substances § 721.9540 Polysulfide mixture. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polysulfide mixture (PMN P-93-1043)...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mixture controls. 25.1147 Section 25.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control. The controls must...

  19. 14 CFR 27.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mixture controls. 27.1147 Section 27.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1147 Mixture controls. If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control and the controls must...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9540 - Polysulfide mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Polysulfide mixture. 721.9540 Section... Substances § 721.9540 Polysulfide mixture. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polysulfide mixture (PMN P-93-1043)...

  1. 14 CFR 29.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mixture controls. 29.1147 Section 29.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and the...

  2. 21 CFR 82.6 - Certifiable mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Certifiable mixtures. 82.6 Section 82.6 Food and... PROVISIONALLY LISTED COLORS AND SPECIFICATIONS General Provisions § 82.6 Certifiable mixtures. (a) A batch of a mixture which contains no straight color listed in subpart C or D may be certified for use in food,...

  3. 21 CFR 82.6 - Certifiable mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Certifiable mixtures. 82.6 Section 82.6 Food and... PROVISIONALLY LISTED COLORS AND SPECIFICATIONS General Provisions § 82.6 Certifiable mixtures. (a) A batch of a mixture which contains no straight color listed in subpart C or D may be certified for use in food,...

  4. 14 CFR 27.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mixture controls. 27.1147 Section 27.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1147 Mixture controls. If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control and the controls must...

  5. 14 CFR 29.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mixture controls. 29.1147 Section 29.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and the...

  6. 14 CFR 25.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mixture controls. 25.1147 Section 25.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control. The controls must...

  7. 14 CFR 29.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mixture controls. 29.1147 Section 29.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and the...

  8. 14 CFR 27.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mixture controls. 27.1147 Section 27.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1147 Mixture controls. If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control and the controls must...

  9. 21 CFR 82.6 - Certifiable mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Certifiable mixtures. 82.6 Section 82.6 Food and... PROVISIONALLY LISTED COLORS AND SPECIFICATIONS General Provisions § 82.6 Certifiable mixtures. (a) A batch of a mixture which contains no straight color listed in subpart C or D may be certified for use in food,...

  10. Sample preparation for semivolatile organics analysis of Hanford single-shell tank waste with high nitrate/nitrite and water content

    SciTech Connect

    Stromatt, R.W.; Hoppe, E.W.; Steele, M.J.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes research work carried out to solve sample preparation problems associated with applying gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (GC/MS) to the analysis of single shell tank (SST) samples from Hanford for semivolatile organic compounds. Poor performance was found when applying the procedures based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Contract Laboratory Program, Statement of Work (CLP SOW). Analysis work was carried out on simulated drainable liquid modeled after the SST core samples which had evidenced analysis problems. Some work was also conducted on true SST samples. It was found that the pH range was too broad in the original procedure. It was also found that by decreasing the amount of methanol used in the extraction process, problems associated with the formation of an azeotrope phase could be avoided. The authors suggest a new procedure, whose eventual application to a wide array of SST samples will lend itself to better quality control limits.

  11. Generating mixtures of spatial qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, G.; Torres-Ruiz, F. A.; Neves, Leonardo; Delgado, A.; Saavedra, C.; Pádua, S.

    2008-10-01

    In a recent letter [L. Neves, G. Lima, J.G. Aguirre Gómez, C.H. Monken, C. Saavedra, S. Pádua, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 100501], we presented a scheme for generating pure entangled states of spatial qudits ( D-dimensional quantum systems) by using the momentum transverse correlation of the parametric down-converted photons. In this work, we discuss a generalization of this process to enable the creation of mixed states. With the technique proposed we experimentally generated a mixture of two spatial qubits.

  12. Plasma polymerization of an ethylene-nitrogen gas mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudis, M.; Wydeven, T.

    1975-01-01

    A procedure has been developed whereby nitrogen can be incorporated into an organic film from an ethylene-nitrogen gas mixture using an internal electrode capacitively coupled radio frequency reactor. The presence of nitrogen has been shown directly by infrared transmittance spectra and electron spectroscopic chemical analysis data, and further indirect evidence was provided by dielectric measurements and by the reverse osmosis properties of the film. Preparation of a nitrogen containing film did not require vapor from an organic nitrogen containing liquid monomer. Some control over the bonding and stoichiometry of the polymer film was provided by the added degree of freedom of the nitrogen partial pressure in the gas mixture. This new parameter strongly affected the dielectric properties of the plasma polymerized film and could affect the reverse osmosis behavior.

  13. Comparison of chronic mixture toxicity of nickel-zinc-copper and nickel-zinc-copper-cadmium mixtures between Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata.

    PubMed

    Nys, Charlotte; Van Regenmortel, Tina; Janssen, Colin R; Blust, Ronny; Smolders, Erik; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2017-04-01

    Although aquatic organisms in the environment are exposed to mixtures of metals, risk assessment for metals is most commonly performed on a metal-by-metal basis. To increase the knowledge about chronic mixture effects, the authors investigated whether metal mixture effects are dependent on the biological species, mixture composition, and metal concentration ratio. The authors evaluated the effects of quaternary Ni-Zn-Cu-Cd and ternary Ni-Zn-Cu mixtures on 48-h algal growth rate (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) and 7-d daphnid reproduction (Ceriodaphnia dubia) using a ray design. Single metals were 3-fold to 42-fold more toxic for C. dubia than for P. subcapitata, based on the 50% effective concentration expressed as free metal activity, the range representing different metals. Statistical analysis of mixture effects showed that the ternary and quaternary mixture effects were antagonistic on algal growth relative to the concentration addition (CA) model, when the analysis was based on dissolved concentrations and on free metal ion activities. Using the independent action (IA) model, mixture effects in both rays were statistically noninteractive for algal growth when the analysis was based on dissolved concentrations; however, the interactions shifted toward antagonism when based on free ion activities. The ternary Ni-Zn-Cu mixture acted antagonistically on daphnid reproduction relative to both reference models, either expressed as free ion activities or dissolved concentrations. When Cd was added to the mixture, however, the mixture effects shifted toward noninteractivity for daphnids. The metal concentration ratio did not significantly influence the magnitude of observed antagonistic effects. Regardless of statistical interactions observed, based on the present study, CA and in most instances also IA can serve as a protective model for ternary Ni-Zn-Cu and quaternary Ni-Zn-Cu-Cd toxicity to both species. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1056-1066. © 2016 SETAC.

  14. Separation and IR Analysis of a Mixture of Organic Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Evan M.; Almy, John

    1982-01-01

    Presents an experiment which includes fractional distillation with gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) and infrared analysis. Objectives are to introduce students to fractional distillation and analysis of each fraction by GLC, to induce them to decide if each fraction is sufficient for infrared analysis, and to identify unknowns. (Author/JN)

  15. Analysis of Analgesic Mixtures: An Organic Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ned H.

    1981-01-01

    Describes an experiment to analyze commercial analgesic preparations (pain relievers) by silica gel thin layer chromatography, followed by preparative (thick) layer chromatographic separation and spectroscopic analysis. Key difference from similar experiments is that students are responsible for devising suitable solvent systems for the thin layer…

  16. Effect of Cement on Emulsified Asphalt Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruc, Seref; Celik, Fazil; Akpinar, M. Vefa

    2007-10-01

    Emulsified asphalt mixtures have environmental, economical, and logistical advantages over hot mixtures. However, they have attracted little attention as structural layers due to their inadequate performance and susceptibility to early life damage by rainfall. The objective of this article is to provide an improved insight into how the mechanical properties of emulsion mixtures may be improved and to determine the influence of cement on emulsified asphalt mixtures. Laboratory tests on strength, temperature susceptibility, water damage, creep and permanent deformation were implemented to evaluate the mechanical properties of emulsified asphalt mixtures. The test results showed that mechanical properties of emulsified asphalt mixtures have significantly improved with Portland cement addition. This experimental study suggested that cement modified asphalt emulsion mixtures might be an alternate way of a structural layer material in pavement.

  17. Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Hegde, Uday G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject presentation, entitled, Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment, was presented at the International Space Station (ISS) Increment 33/34 Science Symposium. This presentation provides an overview of an international collaboration between NASA and CNES to study the behavior of a dilute aqueous solution of Na2SO4 (5% w) at near-critical conditions. The Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) investigation, serves as important precursor work for subsequent Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) experiments. The SCWM investigation will be performed in DECLICs High Temperature Insert (HTI) for the purpose of studying critical fluid phenomena at high temperatures and pressures. The HTI includes a completely sealed and integrated test cell (i.e., Sample Cell Unit SCU) that will contain approximately 0.3 ml of the aqueous test solution. During the sequence of tests, scheduled to be performed in FY13, temperatures and pressures will be elevated to critical conditions (i.e., Tc = 374C and Pc = 22 MPa) in order to observe salt precipitation, precipitate agglomeration and precipitate transport in the presence of a temperature gradient without the influences of gravitational forces. This presentation provides an overview of the motivation for this work, a description of the DECLIC HTI hardware, the proposed test sequences, and a brief discussion of the scientific research objectives.

  18. Effects of active pharmaceutical ingredients mixtures in mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rey, M; Mattos, J J; Piazza, C E; Bainy, A C D; Bebianno, M J

    2014-08-01

    Active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) are emergent environmental contaminants widely detected in surface waters as result of incomplete waste water treatment plant (WWTP) removal processes and improper disposal. The assessment of potential effects of APIs on non-target organisms is still scarce since besides presenting multiple chemical structures, properties and modes of action, these compounds occur as complex mixtures. This study comprises a 15-day exposure of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis to mixtures (at environmentally relevant nominal concentrations) of non-steroidal inflammatory drugs ibuprofen (IBU) and diclofenac (DCF) (250 ng L(-1) each) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine (FLX) (75 ng L(-1)) (MIX 1) along with the addition of classical pro-oxidant copper (Cu) (5 μg L(-1)) (MIX 2). The goals included the assessment of oxidative stress, neurotoxic and endocrine effects on this sentinel species applying both a multibiomarker and gene expression (here and later gene expression is taken as synonym to gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that it is also affected by, e.g. translation, and mRNA and protein stability) analysis approaches. The results revealed a swifter antioxidant response in digestive glands than in gills induced by MIX 1, nevertheless the presence of Cu in MIX 2 promoted a higher lipid peroxidation (LPO) induction. Neither mixture altered acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, while both triggered the formation of vitellogenin-like proteins in females confirming the xenoestrogenic effect of mixtures. All these results varied with respect to those obtained in previous single exposure essays. Moreover, RT-PCR analysis revealed a catalase (CAT) and CYP4Y1 gene expression down- and upregulation, respectively, with no significant changes in mRNA levels of genes encoding superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Finally, this study highlights variable tissue and time-specific biomarker

  19. Mixture theory-based poroelasticity as a model of interstitial tissue growth.

    PubMed

    Cowin, Stephen C; Cardoso, Luis

    2012-01-01

    This contribution presents an alternative approach to mixture theory-based poroelasticity by transferring some poroelastic concepts developed by Maurice Biot to mixture theory. These concepts are a larger RVE and the subRVE-RVE velocity average tensor, which Biot called the micro-macro velocity average tensor. This velocity average tensor is assumed here to depend upon the pore structure fabric. The formulation of mixture theory presented is directed toward the modeling of interstitial growth, that is to say changing mass and changing density of an organism. Traditional mixture theory considers constituents to be open systems, but the entire mixture is a closed system. In this development the mixture is also considered to be an open system as an alternative method of modeling growth. Growth is slow and accelerations are neglected in the applications. The velocity of a solid constituent is employed as the main reference velocity in preference to the mean velocity concept from the original formulation of mixture theory. The standard development of statements of the conservation principles and entropy inequality employed in mixture theory are modified to account for these kinematic changes and to allow for supplies of mass, momentum and energy to each constituent and to the mixture as a whole. The objective is to establish a basis for the development of constitutive equations for growth of tissues.

  20. Chronic toxicity of a mixture of chlorinated alkanes and alkenes in ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fun-In; Kuo, Min-Liang; Shun, Chia-Tung; Ma, Yee-Chung; Wang, Jung-Der; Ueng, Tzuu-Huei

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the chronic toxicity of a mixture of chlorinated alkanes and alkenes (CA) consisting of chloroform, 1,1-dichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene. These chlorinated organic solvents were present in the underground water near an electronic appliances manufactory in Taoyuan, Taiwan. Male and female weanling ICR mice were treated with low-, medium-, and high-dose CA mixtures in drinking water for 16 and 18 mo, respectively. A significant number of male mice treated with the high-dose CA mixture developed tail alopecia and deformation, which was not prominent in CA-treated female mice. Medium- and high-dose CA mixtures induced marginal increases of liver and lung weights, blood urea nitrogen, and serum creatinine levels in male mice. In female mice, the high-dose CA mixture increased liver, kidney, and uterus and ovary total weights, without affecting serum biochemistry parameters. CA mixtures had no effects on the total glutathione content or the level of glutathione S-transferase activity in the livers and kid- neys of male and female mice. Treatments with CA mixtures produced a trend of increasing frequency of hepatocelluar neoplasms in male mice, compared to male and female controls and CA-treated female mice. The high-dose CA mixture induced a significantly higher incidence of mammary adenocarcinoma in female mice. The calculated odds ratios of mammary adenocarcinoma in female mice induced by low-, medium-, and high-dose CA mixtures were 1.14, 1.37, and 3.53 times that of the controls, respectively. The low-dose CA mixture induced a higher incidence of cysts and inflammation in and around the ovaries. This study has demonstrated that the CA mixture is a potential carcinogen to male and female mice. These animal toxicology data may be important in assessing the health effects of individuals exposed to the CA mixture.

  1. Interdiffusion in binary ionic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.; Pollock, E.L.

    1987-08-15

    In this paper we present molecular-dynamics and kinetic-theory calculations of the interdiffusion coefficients in dense binary ionic mixtures for conditions appropriate to both astrophysical and inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas. The diffusion coefficient is the product of a Green-Kubo integral and a thermodynamic prefactor. The molecular-dynamics and kinetic-theory estimates of the Green-Kubo portion agree very well, and it is found that this integral may also be well represented by the usual concentration-weighted sum of self-diffusion coefficients. In addition, the low-density limit of the thermodynamic prefactor is shown to represent an enhancement of the diffusion by the ''ambipolar'' electric field.

  2. What contributes to the combined effect of a complex mixture?

    PubMed

    Altenburger, Rolf; Walter, Helge; Grote, Matthias

    2004-12-01

    The effect of a mixture of 10 compounds, which have previously been identified in an effect-directed analysis as potentially relevant for a specific contaminated riverine sediment (Brack et al. Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 1999, 37, 164), were investigated for the underlying joint effect. Components identified in an organic sediment extract included several PAHs (benzo[ghi]fluoranthene, benz[a]anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, 2-phenylnaphthalene, anthracene, and phenanthrene) plus prometryn, N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine, and parathion-methyl. Experiments were performed using a one-generation algal bioassay with the unicellular green algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus as well as chlorophyll fluorescence quenching analysis to describe the effects of the components and mixtures thereof. Analysis of the mixture effects based on concentration-response modeling of the effect data reveals that indeed effect contributions of several components can be expected although the mixture ratio is not equitoxic and the individual components vary greatly with respect to biological effect. Comparing predicted and observed mixture effects, the combined effect may not be attributed to a joint narcotic effect of the mixture components. Evidently, some of the components act specifically and dissimilar and may therefore be best described in their combined effect by response addition while for others a similar mode of action seems plausible. Chlorophyll fluorescence quenching analysis supports to discriminate between prometryn, N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine, and PAHs. A joint model for calculating the combined effect using concentration addition for the suspected unspecifically acting components in algae (PAHs and parathion-methyl) and subsequently response addition for this group and the other components clearly improves the description of the observed combined effect. Allocation of effect contributions to specific components using toxic units or effect contributions lead to different judgments. The

  3. Thermodiffusion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashmi, Sara M.; Senthilnathan, Sid; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2016-11-01

    Thermodiffusion in liquid mixtures may explain some counter-intuitive but naturally occurring phenomena such as hydrocarbon reservoirs with heavier component(s) stratified on top of lighter ones. However, beyond benchmark systems, systematic measurements of thermodiffusion in binary organic mixtures are lacking. We use an optical beam deflection apparatus to simultaneously probe Fickian and thermal diffusion in binary solution mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons dissolved in alkanes, and measure both Fickian diffusion D and the Soret coefficient ST, and then obtain the thermodiffusion coefficient DT. In a series of nine binary mixtures, we vary both the size of the aromatic compound from two to four rings, as well as the length of the alkane chain from 6 to 16 carbons. To probe the effect of increasing ring size, we include a 6-ringed aromatic compound, coronene, and toluene as a solvent, due to the insolubility of coronene in alkanes. Our results suggest that Fickian diffusion increases with the inverse of solvent viscosity and also with decreasing molecular weight of the solute. While both of these trends match our intuition, the behavior of ST and DT is more complicated. We find that ST and DT increase with the solute molecular weight when the solvent is held fixed and that the impact of solute ring size is higher in shorter chain alkane solvents.

  4. Perceptual and imaginary mixtures in chemosensation.

    PubMed

    Schifferstein, H N

    1997-02-01

    D. Algom and W.S. Cain (1991) reported similar interaction patterns for perceived and imaginary mixtures of odorants. However, their experimental design did not allow sensitive statistical testing to demonstrate differences between conditions. Three experiments on 16 mixtures of sucrose-citric acid mixtures yielded significantly different interaction pattern for perceived and imaginary mixtures. Inconsistencies in the degrees of suppression in the imaginary condition suggested that participants did not base their responses on the inspection of a mental image but on incomplete implicit or explicit knowledge of sensory interactions. Participants knew the phenomenon of mixture suppression and knew that its effects were level dependent, but they were unable to predict the exact intensity of a mixture on the basis of the intensities of its unmixed components.

  5. Thermal Analysis of Various Epoxy Mixtures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    Dicyandiamide Thermal analysis Accelerator r20 ABSTRAC r (Continue on revre side If necesary and identif by. block riimeyp.) 4 4 (SEE REVERSE SIDE...mixed with Monuron. Also, three-component mixtures, epoxide + Dicy/Monuron, were prepared with dicyandiamide . The mixtures were cured by differential... dicyandiamide and Monuron, on the curing process, was simulated by the isothermal reaction of two mixtures. A type of reaction kinetics having the

  6. Performance Test for Open Grade Bitumen and Cement Mixture OGBC-20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. Y.; Wu, Z. L.; Li, C. M.; Gan, X. Z.; Xiong, X. J.

    For effective prevention of urban road intersection special sections for nit diseases and improving the pavement durability, an open grade bitumen and cement (OGBC-20) mixture is proposed. In organic hydraulic cement mixture design, mix proportion designs of cement mortar and matrix open-graded bitumen were done. The matrix mixture gradation was adjusted .It has greater void of air volume than that of ATPB-25. A variety of tests in laboratory for OGBC-20 were performed. The experimental results show that: The void of air volume of adjusted gradation matrix asphalt mixture is up to 23%. and binder drainage loss is ≤ 0.3%. Cement mortar filling is fuller and better water stability and low temperature crack resistance compared to ordinary bitumen mixture. It has the absolute advantage on high temperature stability and shows the superiority of the new pavement materials.

  7. Cluster kinetics model for mixtures of glassformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenskelle, Lisa A.; McCoy, Benjamin J.

    2007-10-01

    For glassformers we propose a binary mixture relation for parameters in a cluster kinetics model previously shown to represent pure compound data for viscosity and dielectric relaxation as functions of either temperature or pressure. The model parameters are based on activation energies and activation volumes for cluster association-dissociation processes. With the mixture parameters, we calculated dielectric relaxation times and compared the results to experimental values for binary mixtures. Mixtures of sorbitol and glycerol (seven compositions), sorbitol and xylitol (three compositions), and polychloroepihydrin and polyvinylmethylether (three compositions) were studied.

  8. Dielectric gas mixtures containing sulfur hexafluoride

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Chathan M.

    1979-01-01

    Electrically insulating gaseous media of unexpectedly high dielectric strength comprised of mixtures of two or more dielectric gases are disclosed wherein the dielectric strength of at least one gas in each mixture increases at less than a linear rate with increasing pressure and the mixture gases are present in such proportions that the sum of their electrical discharge voltages at their respective partial pressures exceeds the electrical discharge voltage of each individual gas at the same temperature and pressure as that of the mixture.

  9. Alcohol production from sugar mixtures by Pachysolen tannophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Neirinck, L.; Maleszka, R.; Schneider, H.

    1982-01-01

    The ability of P. tannophilus to produce ethanol from sugar mixtures was investigated. With mixtures simulating spent sulfite liquor and a hardboard mill effluent, yields of 76 to 84% of theoretical were obtained with a wild-type strain, which increased to 83 to 90% with a mutant selected for more rapid growth on D-galactose. A small but significant loss in yield was caused by the formation by both strains of acetate, xylitol and L-arabinitol. The loss was estimated to be in the range of 5 to 8.3% for the mutant and 7.1 to 12% for the wild-type. One conclusion drawn from these results was that the organism has the potential for use with a wide variety of hydrolysates, since the four sugars which could be efficiently fermented in the mixtures - D-mannose, D-xylose, D-glucose, and D-galactose - generally comprise more than 90% of those in polysaccharides from many biomass sources. The organism was also found to be capable of producing ethanol from, and surviving in, spent sulfite liquor. However, productivity decreased on recycling the cells, suggesting that strain improvement will be a necessary step in process development. 1 figure, 3 tables.

  10. Acute toxicity of binary and ternary mixtures of Cd, Cu, and Zn to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Joseph S; Ranville, James F; Pontasch, Mandee; Gorsuch, Joseph W; Adams, William J

    2015-04-01

    Standard static-exposure acute lethality tests were conducted with Daphnia magna neonates exposed to binary or ternary mixtures of Cd, Cu, and Zn in moderately hard reconstituted water that contained 3 mg dissolved organic carbon/L added as Suwannee River fulvic acid. These experiments were conducted to test for additive toxicity (i.e., the response to the mixture can be predicted by combining the responses obtained in single-metal toxicity tests) or nonadditive toxicity (i.e., the response is less than or greater than additive). Based on total metal concentrations (>90% dissolved) the toxicity of the tested metal mixtures could be categorized into all 3 possible additivity categories: less-than-additive toxicity (e.g., Cd-Zn and Cd-Cu-Zn mixtures and Cd-Cu mixtures when Cu was titrated into Cd-containing waters), additive toxicity (e.g., some Cu-Zn mixtures), or more-than-additive toxicity (some Cu-Zn mixtures and Cd-Cu mixtures when Cd was titrated into Cu-containing waters). Exposing the organisms to a range of sublethal to supralethal concentrations of the titrated metal was especially helpful in identifying nonadditive interactions. Geochemical processes (e.g., metal-metal competition for binding to dissolved organic matter and/or the biotic ligand, and possibly supersaturation of exposure waters with the metals in some high-concentration exposures) can explain much of the observed metal-metal interactions. Therefore, bioavailability models that incorporate those geochemical (and possibly some physiological) processes might be able to predict metal mixture toxicity accurately.

  11. Overview of human health and chemical mixtures: problems facing developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Yáñ ez, Leticia; Ortiz, Deogracias; Calderón, Jaqueline; Batres, Lilia; Carrizales, Leticia; Mejía, Jesús; Martínez, Lourdes; García-Nieto, Edelmira; Díaz-Barriga, Fernando

    2002-01-01

    In developing countries, chemical mixtures within the vicinity of small-scale enterprises, smelters, mines, agricultural areas, toxic waste disposal sites, etc., often present a health hazard to the populations within those vicinities. Therefore, in these countries, there is a need to study the toxicological effects of mixtures of metals, pesticides, and organic compounds. However, the study of mixtures containing substances such as DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, an insecticide banned in developed nations), and mixtures containing contaminants such as fluoride (of concern only in developing countries) merit special attention. Although the studies may have to take into account simultaneous exposures to metals and organic compounds, there is also a need to consider the interaction between chemicals and other specific factors such as nutritional conditions, alcoholism, smoking, infectious diseases, and ethnicity. PMID:12634117

  12. Ultracentrifuge for separating fluid mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Lowry, Ralph A.

    1976-01-01

    1. A centrifuge for the separation of fluid mixtures having light and heavy fractions comprising a cylindrical rotor, disc type end-plugs closing the ends of the rotor, means for mounting said rotor for rotation about its cylindrical axis, a housing member enclosing the rotor, a vacuum chamber in said housing about the central portion of the rotor, a collection chamber at each end of the housing, the innermost side of which is substantially formed by the outer face of the end-plug, means for preventing flow of the fluid from the collection chambers to said vacuum chamber, at least one of said end-plugs having a plurality of holes therethrough communicating between the collection chamber adjacent thereto and the inside of the rotor to induce countercurrent flow of the fluid in the centrifuge, means for feeding fluid to be processed into the centrifuge, means communicating with the collection chambers to extract the light and heavy separated fractions of the fluid, and means for rotating the rotor.

  13. Aquatic toxicity of PAHs and PAH mixtures at saturation to benthic amphipods: linking toxic effects to chemical activity.

    PubMed

    Engraff, Maria; Solere, Clémentine; Smith, Kilian E C; Mayer, Philipp; Dahllöf, Ingela

    2011-04-01

    Organisms in marine sediments are usually exposed to mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), whereas risk assessment and management typically focus on the effects of single PAHs. This can lead to an underestimation of risk if the effects of single compounds are additive or synergistic. Because of the virtually infinite number of mixture-combinations, and the many different targeted organisms, it would be advantageous to have a model for the assessment of mixture effects. In this study we tested whether chemical activity, which drives the partitioning of PAHs into organisms, can be used to model the baseline toxicity of mixtures. Experiments were performed with two benthic amphipod species (Orchomonella pinguis and Corophium volutator), using passive dosing to control the external exposure of single PAHs and mixtures of three and four PAHs. The baseline toxicity of individual PAHs at water saturation generally increased with increasing chemical activity of the PAHs. For O. pinguis, the baseline toxicity of PAH mixtures was successfully described by the sum of chemical activities. Some compounds and mixtures showed a delayed expression of toxicity, highlighting the need to adjust the length of the experiment depending on the organism. On the other hand, some of the single compounds had a higher toxicity than expected, possibly due to the toxicity of PAH metabolites. We suggest that chemical activity of mixtures can, and should, be used in addition to toxicity data for single compounds in environmental risk assessment.

  14. Automatic NMR-based identification of chemical reaction types in mixtures of co-occurring reactions.

    PubMed

    Latino, Diogo A R S; Aires-de-Sousa, João

    2014-01-01

    The combination of chemoinformatics approaches with NMR techniques and the increasing availability of data allow the resolution of problems far beyond the original application of NMR in structure elucidation/verification. The diversity of applications can range from process monitoring, metabolic profiling, authentication of products, to quality control. An application related to the automatic analysis of complex mixtures concerns mixtures of chemical reactions. We encoded mixtures of chemical reactions with the difference between the (1)H NMR spectra of the products and the reactants. All the signals arising from all the reactants of the co-occurring reactions were taken together (a simulated spectrum of the mixture of reactants) and the same was done for products. The difference spectrum is taken as the representation of the mixture of chemical reactions. A data set of 181 chemical reactions was used, each reaction manually assigned to one of 6 types. From this dataset, we simulated mixtures where two reactions of different types would occur simultaneously. Automatic learning methods were trained to classify the reactions occurring in a mixture from the (1)H NMR-based descriptor of the mixture. Unsupervised learning methods (self-organizing maps) produced a reasonable clustering of the mixtures by reaction type, and allowed the correct classification of 80% and 63% of the mixtures in two independent test sets of different similarity to the training set. With random forests (RF), the percentage of correct classifications was increased to 99% and 80% for the same test sets. The RF probability associated to the predictions yielded a robust indication of their reliability. This study demonstrates the possibility of applying machine learning methods to automatically identify types of co-occurring chemical reactions from NMR data. Using no explicit structural information about the reactions participants, reaction elucidation is performed without structure elucidation of

  15. Nanoscale Density Fluctuations in Ionic Liquid Binary Mixtures with Nonamphiphilic Compounds: First Experimental Evidence.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Alessandro; Dattani, Rajeev; Caminiti, Ruggero; Gontrani, Lorenzo

    2016-10-04

    A complex mesoscopic organization is observed in systems containing ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) and two nonamphiphilic compounds, using wide and small angle X-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. The macroscopically homogeneous mixtures exhibit a separation where an ionic liquid-rich region is percolating a molecular liquid-rich one, but no unmixing is observed. This effect was already reported in EAN-alcohol mixtures, but the models proposed so far cannot explain this behavior for a nonamphiphilic compound.

  16. Epoxidation of propylene dimers and isomerization of mixtures obtained

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrev, D.M.; Kurtev, K.S.

    1988-05-10

    Mixtures of hexenes are obtained in the dimerization of propylene on a Ziegler catalyst. By the epoxidation of this mixture by organic peroxides, followed by isomerization of the oxides, C/sub 6/ ketones, which are used as solvents, can be obtained. The hexenes were obtained by dimerization of propylene in the presence of a Ni(C/sub 5/H/sub 7/O/sub 2/)/sub 2/-P(C/sub 6/H/sub 5/)/sub 3/-(C/sub 3/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/AlCl catalytic system. The epoxidation was carried with technical grade isopropylbenzyl hydroperoxide (IPBHP). MoO/sub 2/(C/sub 5/H/sub 7/O/sub 2/)/sub 2/ was used as the catalyst. The relative rates of epoxidation of different isomers contained in the dimeric fraction, with respect to 2-methyl-1-pentene, was determined by means of competing reactions.

  17. THE VISCOSITY OF HELIUM-CESIUM MIXTURES,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The viscosities of helium-cesium mixtures having mole fractions of cesium from zero to unity were evaluated using a Lennard - Jones 6-12 interaction potential for all encounters in the Enskog Chapman expressions for the viscosity of a binary mixture. (Author)

  18. THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM GAS MIXTURE

    DOEpatents

    Jury, S.H.

    1964-03-17

    A method of separating uranium from a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and other gases is described that comprises bringing the mixture into contact with anhydrous calcium sulfate to preferentially absorb the uranium hexafluoride on the sulfate. The calcium sulfate is then leached with a selective solvent for the adsorbed uranium. (AEC)

  19. Mixture Modeling: Applications in Educational Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harring, Jeffrey R.; Hodis, Flaviu A.

    2016-01-01

    Model-based clustering methods, commonly referred to as finite mixture modeling, have been applied to a wide variety of cross-sectional and longitudinal data to account for heterogeneity in population characteristics. In this article, we elucidate 2 such approaches: growth mixture modeling and latent profile analysis. Both techniques are…

  20. Mixture Modeling of Individual Learning Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streeter, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We show that student learning can be accurately modeled using a mixture of learning curves, each of which specifies error probability as a function of time. This approach generalizes Knowledge Tracing [7], which can be viewed as a mixture model in which the learning curves are step functions. We show that this generality yields order-of-magnitude…

  1. Gas mixtures for spark gap closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Hunter, S.R.

    1987-02-20

    Gas mixtures for use in spark gap closing switches comprised of fluorocarbons and low molecular weight, inert buffer gases. To this can be added a third gas having a low ionization potential relative to the buffer gas. The gas mixtures presented possess properties that optimized the efficiency spark gap closing switches. 6 figs.

  2. Process Dissociation and Mixture Signal Detection Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCarlo, Lawrence T.

    2008-01-01

    The process dissociation procedure was developed in an attempt to separate different processes involved in memory tasks. The procedure naturally lends itself to a formulation within a class of mixture signal detection models. The dual process model is shown to be a special case. The mixture signal detection model is applied to data from a widely…

  3. Gas mixtures for spark gap closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; McCorkle, Dennis L.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1988-01-01

    Gas mixtures for use in spark gap closing switches comprised of fluorocarbons and low molecular weight, inert buffer gases. To this can be added a third gas having a low ionization potential relative to the buffer gas. The gas mixtures presented possess properties that optimized the efficiency spark gap closing switches.

  4. Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. )

    1992-04-01

    This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE's Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

  5. Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M.

    1992-04-01

    This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE`s Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

  6. Mixture of Skewed α-Stable Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaei, S. R. Hosseini; Nassiri, V.; Mohammadian, Gh. R.; Mohammadpour, A.

    2011-03-01

    Expectation maximization (EM) algorithm and the Bayesian techniques are two approaches for statistical inference of mixture models [3, 4]. By noting the advantages of the Bayesian methods, practitioners prefer them. However, implementing Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms can be very complicated for stable distributions, due to the non-analytic density or distribution function formulas. In this paper, we introduce a new class of mixture of heavy-tailed distributions, called mixture of skewed stable distributions. Skewed stable distributions belongs to the exponential family and they have analytic density representation. It is shown that skewed stable distributions dominate skew stable distribution functions and they can be used to model heavy-tailed data. The class of skewed stable distributions has an analytic representation for its density function and the Bayesian inference can be done similar to the exponential family of distributions. Finally, mixture of skewed stable distributions are compared to the mixture of stable distributions through a simulations study.

  7. Prediction of viscosity of dense fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royal, Damian D.; Vesovic, Velisa; Trusler, J. P. Martin; Wakeham, William. A.

    The Vesovic-Wakeham (VW) method of predicting the viscosity of dense fluid mixtures has been improved by implementing new mixing rules based on the rigid sphere formalism. The proposed mixing rules are based on both Lebowitz's solution of the Percus-Yevick equation and on the Carnahan-Starling equation. The predictions of the modified VW method have been compared with experimental viscosity data for a number of diverse fluid mixtures: natural gas, hexane + hheptane, hexane + octane, cyclopentane + toluene, and a ternary mixture of hydrofluorocarbons (R32 + R125 + R134a). The results indicate that the proposed improvements make possible the extension of the original VW method to liquid mixtures and to mixtures containing polar species, while retaining its original accuracy.

  8. Environmental complex mixture toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Gardner, H S; Brennan, L M; Toussaint, M W; Rosencrance, A B; Boncavage-Hennessey, E M; Wolfe, M J

    1998-12-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was found as a contaminant in the well supplying water to an aquatic testing laboratory. The groundwater was routinely screened by a commercial laboratory for volatile and semivolatile compounds, metals, herbicides, pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency methods. Although TCE was the only reportable peak on the gas chromatograph, with average concentrations of 0.200 mg/l, other small peaks were also present, indicating the possibility that the contamination was not limited to TCE alone. A chronic 6-month carcinogenicity assay was conducted on-site in a biomonitoring trailer, using the Japanese medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) in an initiation-promotion protocol, with diethylnitrosamine (DEN) as the initiator and the TCE-contaminated groundwater as a promoter. Study results indicated no evidence of carcinogenic potential of the groundwater without initiation. There was, however, a tumor-promotional effect of the groundwater after DEN initiation. A follow-up laboratory study was conducted using reagent grade TCE added to carbon-filtered groundwater to simulate TCE concentrations comparable to those found in the contaminated groundwater. Study results indicated no promotional effects of TCE. These studies emphasize the necessity for on-site bioassays to assess potential environmental hazards. In this instance, chemical analysis of the groundwater identified TCE as the only reportable contaminant, but other compounds present below reportable limits were noted and may have had a synergistic effect on tumor promotion observed with the groundwater exposure. Laboratory toxicity testing of single compounds can produce toxicity data specific to that compound for that species but cannot take into account the possible toxic effects of mixtures of compounds.

  9. Environmental complex mixture toxicity assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, H S; Brennan, L M; Toussaint, M W; Rosencrance, A B; Boncavage-Hennessey, E M; Wolfe, M J

    1998-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was found as a contaminant in the well supplying water to an aquatic testing laboratory. The groundwater was routinely screened by a commercial laboratory for volatile and semivolatile compounds, metals, herbicides, pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency methods. Although TCE was the only reportable peak on the gas chromatograph, with average concentrations of 0.200 mg/l, other small peaks were also present, indicating the possibility that the contamination was not limited to TCE alone. A chronic 6-month carcinogenicity assay was conducted on-site in a biomonitoring trailer, using the Japanese medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) in an initiation-promotion protocol, with diethylnitrosamine (DEN) as the initiator and the TCE-contaminated groundwater as a promoter. Study results indicated no evidence of carcinogenic potential of the groundwater without initiation. There was, however, a tumor-promotional effect of the groundwater after DEN initiation. A follow-up laboratory study was conducted using reagent grade TCE added to carbon-filtered groundwater to simulate TCE concentrations comparable to those found in the contaminated groundwater. Study results indicated no promotional effects of TCE. These studies emphasize the necessity for on-site bioassays to assess potential environmental hazards. In this instance, chemical analysis of the groundwater identified TCE as the only reportable contaminant, but other compounds present below reportable limits were noted and may have had a synergistic effect on tumor promotion observed with the groundwater exposure. Laboratory toxicity testing of single compounds can produce toxicity data specific to that compound for that species but cannot take into account the possible toxic effects of mixtures of compounds. Images Figure 2 PMID:9860885

  10. Heterogeneous equilibrium between the condensed phase and vapor of aprotonic solvents and electrolytes based on them II. Solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidym, I. L.; Gurevich, I. G.; Shchitnikov, V. K.; Dubasova, V. S.; Tumanov, B. I.

    1982-06-01

    Experimental results for the saturated vapor pressure of mixtures of organic solvents with electrolytes based on them are given, together with thermodynamic characteristics of the vaporization process calculated on this basis.

  11. Purification of metal-organic framework materials

    SciTech Connect

    Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2012-12-04

    A method of purification of a solid mixture of a metal-organic framework (MOF) material and an unwanted second material by disposing the solid mixture in a liquid separation medium having a density that lies between those of the wanted MOF material and the unwanted material, whereby the solid mixture separates by density differences into a fraction of wanted MOF material and another fraction of unwanted material.

  12. Purification of metal-organic framework materials

    DOEpatents

    Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2015-06-30

    A method of purification of a solid mixture of a metal-organic framework (MOF) material and an unwanted second material by disposing the solid mixture in a liquid separation medium having a density that lies between those of the wanted MOF material and the unwanted material, whereby the solid mixture separates by density differences into a fraction of wanted MOF material and another fraction of unwanted material.

  13. DETERMINATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF NON-AQUEOUS PHASE LIQUID MIXTURES IN ENVIRONMENTAL MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker, G

    2006-09-22

    It is important to recognize the presence of Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLs) in soils at a waste site in order to design and construct a successful remediation system. NAPLs often manifest as a complex, multi-component mixture of organic compounds that can occur in environmental media, such as vadose zone soil, where the mixture will partition and equilibrate with soil particles, pore vapor, and pore water. Complex organic mixtures can greatly complicate the determination and quantification of NAPL in soil due to inter-media transfer. NAPL thresholds can also change because of mixture physical properties and can disguise the presence of NAPL. A unique analytical method and copyrighted software have been developed at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site that facilitates solution of this problem. The analytical method uses a classic chemistry approach and applies the principals of solubility limit theory, Raoult's Law, and equilibrium chemistry to derive an accurate estimation of NAPL presence and quantity. The method is unique because it calculates an exact result that is mass balanced for each physical state, chemical mixture component, and mixture characteristics. The method is also unique because the solution can be calculated on both a wet weight and dry weight basis--a factor which is often overlooked. The software includes physical parameters for 300 chemicals in a database that self-loads into the model to save time. The method accommodates up to 20 different chemicals in a multi-component mixture analysis. A robust data display is generated including important parameters of the components and mixture including: NAPL thresholds for individual chemical components within the mixture, mass distribution in soil for each physical state, molar fractions, density, vapor pressure, solubility, mass balance, media concentrations, residual saturation, and modest graphing capabilities. This method and software are power tools to simplify otherwise tedious

  14. Single and mixture toxicity of pharmaceuticals and chlorophenols to freshwater algae Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Elisabeth; Hornek-Gausterer, Romana; Saçan, Melek Türker

    2016-07-01

    Organisms in the aquatic environment are exposed to a variety of substances of numerous chemical classes. The unintentional co-occurrence of pharmaceuticals and other contaminants of emerging concern may pose risk to non-target organisms. In this study, individual and binary mixture toxicity experiments of selected pharmaceuticals (ibuprofen and ciprofloxacin) and chlorophenols (2.4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) and 3-chlorophenol (3-CP)) have been performed with freshwater algae Chlorella vulgaris. All experiments have been carried out according to the 96-h algal growth inhibition test OECD No. 201. Binary mixture tests were conducted using proportions of the respective IC50s in terms of toxic unit (TU). The mixture concentration-response curve was compared to predicted effects based on both the concentration addition (CA) and the independent action (IA) model. Additionally, the Combination Index (CI)-isobologram equation method was used to assess toxicological interactions of the binary mixtures. All substances individually tested had a significant effect on C. vulgaris population density and revealed IC50 values <100mgL(-1) after exposure period of 96-h. The toxic ranking of these four compounds to C. vulgaris was 2,4-DCP>ciprofloxacin>3-CP>ibuprofen. Generally, it can be concluded from this study that toxic mixture effects of all tested chemicals to C. vulgaris are higher than the individual effect of each mixture component. It could be demonstrated that IC50 values of the tested mixtures predominately lead to additive effects. The CA model is appropriate to estimate mixture toxicity, while the IA model tends to underestimate the joint effect. The CI-isobologram equation method predicted the mixtures accurately and elicited synergism at low effect levels for the majority of tested combinations.

  15. Evaluating the similarity of complex drinking-water disinfection by-product mixtures: overview of the issues.

    PubMed

    Rice, Glenn E; Teuschler, Linda K; Bull, Richard J; Simmons, Jane E; Feder, Paul I

    2009-01-01

    Humans are exposed daily to complex mixtures of environmental chemical contaminants, which arise as releases from sources such as engineering procedures, degradation processes, and emissions from mobile or stationary sources. When dose-response data are available for the actual environmental mixture to which individuals are exposed (i.e., the mixture of concern), these data provide the best information for dose-response assessment of the mixture. When suitable data on the mixture itself are not available, surrogate data might be used from a sufficiently similar mixture or a group of similar mixtures. Consequently, the determination of whether the mixture of concern is "sufficiently similar" to a tested mixture or a group of tested mixtures is central to the use of whole mixture methods. This article provides an overview for a series of companion articles whose purpose is to develop a set of biostatistical, chemical, and toxicological criteria and approaches for evaluating the similarity of drinking-water disinfection by-product (DBPs) complex mixtures. Together, the five articles in this series serve as a case study whose techniques will be relevant to assessing similarity for other classes of complex mixtures of environmental chemicals. Schenck et al. (2009) describe the chemistry and mutagenicity of a set of DBP mixtures concentrated from five different drinking-water treatment plants. Bull et al. (2009a, 2009b) describe how the variables that impact the formation of DBP affect the chemical composition and, subsequently, the expected toxicity of the mixture. Feder et al. (2009a, 2009b) evaluate the similarity of DBP mixture concentrates by applying two biostatistical approaches, principal components analysis, and a nonparametric "bootstrap" analysis. Important factors for determining sufficient similarity of DBP mixtures found in this research include disinfectant used; source water characteristics, including the concentrations of bromide and total organic carbon

  16. Foaming of mixtures of pure hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. V.; Woods, W. W.

    1950-01-01

    Mixtures of pure liquid hydrocarbons are capable of foaming. Nine hydrocarbons were mixed in pairs, in all possible combinations, and four proportions of each combination. These mixtures were sealed in glass tubes, and the foaming was tested by shaking. Mixtures of aliphatic with other aliphatic hydrocarbons, or of alkyl benzenes with other alkyl benzenes, did not foam. Mixtures of aliphatic hydrocarbons with alkyl benzenes did foam. The proportions of the mixtures greatly affected the foaming, the maximum foaming of 12 of 20 pairs being at the composition 20 percent aliphatic hydrocarbon, 80 percent alkyl benzene. Six seconds was the maximum foam lifetime of any of these mixtures. Aeroshell 120 lubricating oil was fractionated into 52 fractions and a residue by extraction with acetone in a fractionating extractor. The index of refraction, foam lifetime, color, and viscosity of these fractions were measured. Low viscosity and high index fractions were extracted first. The viscosity of the fractions extracted rose and the index decreased as fractionation proceeded. Foam lifetimes and color were lowest in the middle fractions. Significance is attached to the observation that none of the foam lifetimes of the fractions or residue is as high as the foam lifetime of the original Aeroshell, indicating that the foaming is not due to a particular foaming constituent, but rather to the entire mixture.

  17. A framework for evaluating mixture analysis algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasaratha, Sridhar; Vignesh, T. S.; Shanmukh, Sarat; Yarra, Malathi; Botonjic-Sehic, Edita; Grassi, James; Boudries, Hacene; Freeman, Ivan; Lee, Young K.; Sutherland, Scott

    2010-04-01

    In recent years, several sensing devices capable of identifying unknown chemical and biological substances have been commercialized. The success of these devices in analyzing real world samples is dependent on the ability of the on-board identification algorithm to de-convolve spectra of substances that are mixtures. To develop effective de-convolution algorithms, it is critical to characterize the relationship between the spectral features of a substance and its probability of detection within a mixture, as these features may be similar to or overlap with other substances in the mixture and in the library. While it has been recognized that these aspects pose challenges to mixture analysis, a systematic effort to quantify spectral characteristics and their impact, is generally lacking. In this paper, we propose metrics that can be used to quantify these spectral features. Some of these metrics, such as a modification of variance inflation factor, are derived from classical statistical measures used in regression diagnostics. We demonstrate that these metrics can be correlated to the accuracy of the substance's identification in a mixture. We also develop a framework for characterizing mixture analysis algorithms, using these metrics. Experimental results are then provided to show the application of this framework to the evaluation of various algorithms, including one that has been developed for a commercial device. The illustration is based on synthetic mixtures that are created from pure component Raman spectra measured on a portable device.

  18. Health Risk Assessment of Chemical Mixtures | Science ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The implementation of Superfund requires a methodology for estimating health risk from multi-chemical contamination at ambient levels. Most often, the chemical composition of these mixtures is poorly characterized, exposure data are uncertain and toxicologic data on the known components of the mixture are limited. However, a potential human health hazard may exist and the U.S.EPA, state and local governments need to be able to assess the total hazard in order to make decisions on appropriate action. This report describes a procedure for assessing the risks from chemical mixtures that includes options when different kinds of data are available. Good-quality information on the mixture of concern or a similar mixture should always be used. Less desirable, but still useful approach, is to utilize data on components and their interactions. The quality of exposure and toxicity data must be determined and the uncertainties involved in each risk assessment must be thoroughly discussed. ater contamination is briefly discussed since it is of vital concern as the primary exposure medium for chemical mixtures. The methodology for estimating the human health risk from single chemicals, both carcinogens and systemic toxicants, is reviewed as it forms the basis for the assessment of mixtures. The Implementation of Superfund requires a methodology for estimating health risk from multi-chemical contamination at ambient levels. Most often, the chemical composition of these mix

  19. SEPARATION OF POLONIUM, PROTACTINIUM OR MIXTURES THEREOF IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION FROM BISMUTH, LEAD, ZIRCONIUM AND/OR COLUMBIUM VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Van Winkle, Q.; Kraus, K.A.

    1959-10-27

    A process is presented for separating polonium, protactinium, or mixtures thereof in aqueous solution from bismuth, zirconium, lead, and niobium values contained in the solution. The method comprises providing hydrochloric acid in the solution in a concentration of at least 5N. contacting the aqueous solution with a substantially waterimmiscible organic solvent such as diisopropyl ketone, and separating the aqueous phase containing the bismuth, zirconium, lead, and niobium from the organic extract phase containing the polonium, protactinium, or mixture thereof.

  20. Estrogenic activity of UV filter mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Petra Y; Fent, Karl

    2006-11-15

    UV-absorbing chemicals (UV filters) are widely used for protection against UV radiation in sunscreens and in a variety of cosmetic products and materials. Depending on the breadth and factor of UV protection, they are added as single compounds or as a combination thereof. Some UV filters have estrogenic activity, but their activity and interactions in mixtures are largely unknown. In this work, we analyzed 8 commonly used UV filters, which are pure or partial hERalpha agonists, for their estrogenic activity in equieffective mixtures in a recombinant yeast assay carrying the human estrogen receptor alpha (hERalpha). Mixtures of two, four and eight UV filters alone, or in combination with 17 beta estradiol (E2), were assessed at different effect levels and no-observed-effect-concentrations (NOEC). Predictions of the joint effects of these mixtures were calculated by employing the concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) model. Most binary mixtures comprising of pure hERalpha agonists showed a synergistic activity at all mixture combinations. Only in combination with benzophenone-1, antagonistic activity was observed at some effect levels. All mixtures of four or eight, pure or pure and partial hERalpha agonists, alone or including E2, showed synergistic activity at concentrations giving an increase of 10% of basal activity (BC10). This occurred even at concentrations that were at the NOEC level of each single compound. Hence, there were substantial mixture effects even though each UV filter was present at its NOEC level. These results show that significant interactions occur in UV filter mixtures, which is important for the hazard and risk assessments of these personal care products.

  1. Estrogenic activity of UV filter mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Petra Y. . E-mail: petra.kunz@fhnw.ch; Fent, Karl . E-mail: karl.fent@bluewin.ch

    2006-11-15

    UV-absorbing chemicals (UV filters) are widely used for protection against UV radiation in sunscreens and in a variety of cosmetic products and materials. Depending on the breadth and factor of UV protection, they are added as single compounds or as a combination thereof. Some UV filters have estrogenic activity, but their activity and interactions in mixtures are largely unknown. In this work, we analyzed 8 commonly used UV filters, which are pure or partial hER{alpha} agonists, for their estrogenic activity in equieffective mixtures in a recombinant yeast assay carrying the human estrogen receptor alpha (hER{alpha}). Mixtures of two, four and eight UV filters alone, or in combination with 17 {beta} estradiol (E2), were assessed at different effect levels and no-observed-effect-concentrations (NOEC). Predictions of the joint effects of these mixtures were calculated by employing the concentration addition (Canada) and independent action (IA) model. Most binary mixtures comprising of pure hER{alpha} agonists showed a synergistic activity at all mixture combinations. Only in combination with benzophenone-1, antagonistic activity was observed at some effect levels. All mixtures of four or eight, pure or pure and partial hER{alpha} agonists, alone or including E2, showed synergistic activity at concentrations giving an increase of 10% of basal activity (BC10). This occurred even at concentrations that were at the NOEC level of each single compound. Hence, there were substantial mixture effects even though each UV filter was present at its NOEC level. These results show that significant interactions occur in UV filter mixtures, which is important for the hazard and risk assessments of these personal care products.

  2. Quantitative NIR Raman analysis in liquid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sato-Berrú, R Ysacc; Medina-Valtierra, Jorge; Medina-Gutiérrez, Cirilo; Frausto-Reyes, Claudio

    2004-08-01

    The capability to obtain quantitative information of a simple way from Raman spectra is a subject of considerable interest. In this work, this is demonstrated for mixtures of ethanol with water and rhodamine-6G (R-6G) with methanol, which were analyzed directly in glass vessel. The Raman intensities and a simple mathematical model have been used and applied for the analysis of liquid samples. It is starting point to generate a general expression, from the experimental spectra, as the sum of the particular expression for each pure compound allow us to obtain an expression for the mixtures which can be used for determining concentrations, from the Raman spectrum, of the mixture.

  3. APPARATUS FOR HANDLING MIXTURES OF SOLID MATERIALS

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, J.P.

    1959-08-25

    An apparatus is described for handling either a mixture of finely subdivided materials or a single material requiring a compacting action thereon preparatory to a chemical reducing process carried out in a crucible container. The apparatus is designed to deposit a mixture of dust-forming solid materials in a container while confining the materials against escape into the surrounding atmosphere. A movable filling tube, having a compacting member, is connected to the container and to a covered hopper receiving the mixture of materials. The filling tube is capable of reciprocating in the container and their relative positions are dependent upon the pressure established upon the material by the compacting member.

  4. Nucleate pool boiling of hydrocarbon mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sardesai, R.G.; Palen, J.W.; Thome, J.

    1986-01-01

    The Schlunder method can be correctly used to predict boiling heat transfer coefficient of multicomponent hydrocarbon mixtures. The method was tested against experimental mixtures containing up to five components. The Stephan-Abdelsalam correlation can be used to calculate a ''pseudo-single component'' boiling heat transfer coefficient for a mixture using weighted properties. The effective temperature driving force term and the high mass flux correction term in the Schlunder formulation are empirically adjusted to improve the accuracy of prediction. Predictions of the Schlunder method are sensitive to the VLE calculations. The UNIFAC method is used in this study for reasons discussed in the paper.

  5. Flashpoint prediction for ternary mixtures of alcohols with water for CFD simulation of unsteady flame propagation during explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skřínský, Jan; Vereš, Ján; Ševčíková, Silvie Petránková

    2016-06-01

    Aqueous solutions of binary and ternary mixtures of alcohols are of considerable interest for a wide range of scientists and technologists. Simple dimensionless experimental formulae based on rational reciprocal and polynomial functions are proposed for correlation of the flashpoint data of binary mixtures of two components. The formulae are based on data obtained from flashpoint experiments and predictions. The main results are the derived experimental flashpoint values for ternary mixtures of two aqueous-organic solutions and the model prediction of maximum explosion pressure values for the studied mixtures. Potential application for the results concerns the assessment of fire and explosion hazards, and the development of inherently safer designs for chemical processes containing binary and ternary partially miscible mixtures of an aqueous-organic system. The goal of this article is to present the results of modelling using these standard models and to demonstrate its importance in the area of CFD simulation.

  6. Genotoxicity of complex mixtures: CHO cell mutagenicity assay

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, M.E.; Samuel, J.E.

    1985-02-01

    A Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mammalian cell assay was used to evaluate the genotoxicity of complex mixtures (synthetic fuels). The genotoxicity (mutagenic potency) of the mixtures increased as the temperature of their boiling range increased. Most of the genotoxicity in the 750/sup 0/F+ boiling-range materials was associated with the neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fractions. Chemical analysis data indicate that the PAH fractions of high-boiling coal liquids contain a number of known chemical carcinogens, including five- and six-ring polyaromatics (e.g., benzo(a)pyrene) as well as four- and five-ring alkyl-substituted PAH (e.g., methylchrysene and dimethylbenzanthracenes); concentrations are a function of boiling point (bp). In vitro genotoxicity was also detected in fractions of nitrogen-containing polyaromatic compounds, as well as in those with aliphatics of hydroxy-containing PAH. Mutagenic activity of some fractions was detectable in the CHO assay in the absence of an exogenous metabolic activation system; in some instances, addition of exogenous enzymes and cofactors inhibited expression of the direct-acting mutagenic potential of the fraction. These data indicate that the organic matrix of the chemical fraction determines whether, and to what degree, various mutagens are expressed in the CHO assay. Therefore, the results of biological assays of these mixtures must be correlated with chemical analyses for proper interpretation of these data. 29 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  7. Transfers of Colloidal Silica from Water into Organic Solvents of Intermediate Polarities

    PubMed

    Kasseh; Keh

    1998-01-15

    Dispersions of discrete metal-oxide submicroparticles in organic solvents of medium polarities are uneasy to generate and weakly documented. We address this topic along two general methods focusing on silica. Successive transfers of colloidal particles from water into n-propanol and then into 1,2-dichloroethane by azeotropic distillation yield a stable organosol. The particles are found to be propanol-coated by surface esterification to the extent of 0.40 nm2 per molecule. Alternatively, centrifugation-redispersion cycles make it possible to obtain stable suspensions of unaltered silica in methanol and acetonitrile starting from an aqueous silicasol. Particles are characterized by various methods including nitrogen adsorption, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and electrophoresis. The stabilities of these suspensions in various organic solvents are investigated with special concern for the role of residual water. Stabilization of silica in methanol is inconspicuously related to solvent permittivity and prominently dependent on the presence of adsorbed water. In contrast, the acetonitrile silicasol, which is unaffected by residual water, displays electrophoretic behavior compatible with electrostatic stabilization. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. Copyright 1998Academic Press

  8. Transcriptional responses to complex mixtures - A review

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of people to hazardous compounds is primarily through complex environmental mixtures, those that occur through media such as air, soil, water, food, cigarette smoke, and combustion emissions. Microarray technology offers the ability to query the entire genome after expos...

  9. Brain processing of a configural vs elemental odor mixture in the newborn rabbit.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nanette Y; Datiche, Frédérique; Wilson, Donald A; Gigot, Vincent; Thomas-Danguin, Thierry; Ferreira, Guillaume; Coureaud, Gérard

    2016-06-01

    Organisms are surrounded throughout life by chemically complex odors. How individuals process an odorant within a mixture or a mixture as a whole is a key question in neuroethology and chemical senses. This question is addressed here by using newborn rabbits, which can be rapidly conditioned to a new stimulus by single association with the mammary pheromone. After conditioning to ethyl maltol (odorant B), pups behaviorally respond to B and an A'B' mixture (68/32 ratio) but not to ethyl isobutyrate (odorant A) or an AB mixture (30/70 ratio). This suggests elemental and configural perception of A'B' and AB, respectively. We then explored the neural substrates underlying the processing of these mixtures with the hypothesis that processing varies according to perception. Pups were pseudoconditioned or conditioned to B on postnatal day 3 before exposure to B, A'B' or AB on day 4. Fos expression was not similar between groups (mainly in the olfactory bulb and posterior piriform cortex) suggesting a differential processing of the stimuli that might reflect either stimulus complexity or conditioning effect. Thus, the ratio of components in A'B' vs AB leads to differential activation of the olfactory system which may contribute to elemental and configural percepts of these mixtures. In addition, together with recent behavioral data, this highlights that configural perception occurs even in relatively immature animals, emphasizing the value of the newborn rabbit for exploration of odor mixture processing from molecules to brain and behavior.

  10. Identification of the main pesticide residue mixtures to which the French population is exposed.

    PubMed

    Crépet, A; Tressou, J; Graillot, V; Béchaux, C; Pierlot, S; Héraud, F; Leblanc, J Ch

    2013-10-01

    Owing to the intensive use of pesticides and their potential persistence in the environment, various pesticide residues can be found in the diet. Consumers are therefore exposed to complex pesticide mixtures which may have combined adverse effects on human health. By modelling food exposure to multiple pesticides, this paper aims to determine the main mixtures to which the general population is exposed in France. Dietary exposure of 3337 individuals from the INCA2 French national consumption survey was assessed for 79 pesticide residues, based on results of the 2006 French food monitoring programmes. Individuals were divided into groups with similar patterns of co-exposure using the clustering ability of a Bayesian nonparametric model. In the 5 groups of individuals with the highest exposure, mixtures are formed by pairs of pesticides with correlations above 0.7. Seven mixtures of 2-6 pesticides each were characterised. We identified the commodities that contributed the most to exposure. Pesticide mixtures can either be components of a single plant protection product applied together on the same crop or be from separate products that are consumed together during a meal. Of the 25 pesticides forming the mixtures, two--DDT and Dieldrin--are known persistent organic pollutants. The approach developed is generic and can be applied to all types of substances found in the diet in order to characterise the mixtures that should be studied first because of their adverse effects on health.

  11. Toxicity of Pesticide Tank Mixtures from Rice Crops Against Telenomus podisi Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae).

    PubMed

    de B Pazini, J; Pasini, R A; Rakes, M; de Armas, F S; Seidel, E J; da S Martins, J F; Grützmacher, A D

    2017-02-14

    The use of insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides commonly occurs in mixtures in tanks in order to control phytosanitary problems in crops. However, there is no information regarding the effects of these mixtures on non-target organisms associated to the rice agroecosystem. The aim of this study was to know the toxicity of pesticide tank mixtures from rice crops against Telenomus podisi Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae). Based on the methods adapted from the International Organisation for Biological and Integrated Control of Noxious Animals and Plants (IOBC), adults of T. podisi were exposed to residues of insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides, individually or in mixture commonly used by growers, in laboratory and on rice plants in a greenhouse. The mixture between fungicides tebuconazole, triclyclazole, and azoxystrobin and the mixture between herbicides cyhalofop-butyl, imazethapyr, imazapyr/imazapic, and penoxsulam are harmless to T. podisi and can be used in irrigated rice crops without harming the natural biological control. The insecticides cypermethin, thiamethoxam, and bifenthrin/carbosulfan increase the toxicity of the mixtures in tank with herbicides and fungicides, being more toxic to T. podisi and less preferred for use in phytosanitary treatments in the rice crop protection.

  12. Predicting skin permeability from complex chemical mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Riviere, Jim E. . E-mail: Jim_Riviere@ncsu.edu; Brooks, James D.

    2005-10-15

    Occupational and environmental exposure to topical chemicals is usually in the form of complex chemical mixtures, yet risk assessment is based on experimentally derived data from individual chemical exposures from a single, usually aqueous vehicle, or from computed physiochemical properties. We present an approach using hybrid quantitative structure permeation relationships (QSPeR) models where absorption through porcine skin flow-through diffusion cells is well predicted using a QSPeR model describing the individual penetrants, coupled with a mixture factor (MF) that accounts for physicochemical properties of the vehicle/mixture components. The baseline equation is log k {sub p} = c + mMF + a{sigma}{alpha} {sub 2} {sup H} + b{sigma}{beta} {sub 2} {sup H} + s{pi} {sub 2} {sup H} + rR {sub 2} + vV {sub x} where {sigma}{alpha} {sub 2} {sup H} is the hydrogen-bond donor acidity, {sigma}{beta} {sub 2} {sup H} is the hydrogen-bond acceptor basicity, {pi} {sub 2} {sup H} is the dipolarity/polarizability, R {sub 2} represents the excess molar refractivity, and V {sub x} is the McGowan volume of the penetrants of interest; c, m, a, b, s, r, and v are strength coefficients coupling these descriptors to skin permeability (k {sub p}) of 12 penetrants (atrazine, chlorpyrifos, ethylparathion, fenthion, methylparathion, nonylphenol, {rho}-nitrophenol, pentachlorophenol, phenol, propazine, simazine, and triazine) in 24 mixtures. Mixtures consisted of full factorial combinations of vehicles (water, ethanol, propylene glycol) and additives (sodium lauryl sulfate, methyl nicotinate). An additional set of 4 penetrants (DEET, SDS, permethrin, ricinoleic acid) in different mixtures were included to assess applicability of this approach. This resulted in a dataset of 16 compounds administered in 344 treatment combinations. Across all exposures with no MF, R{sup 2} for absorption was 0.62. With the MF, correlations increased up to 0.78. Parameters correlated to the MF include refractive

  13. Flash evaporation of liquid monomer particle mixture

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.; Darab, J.G.; Gross, M.E.

    1999-05-11

    The present invention is a method of making a first solid composite polymer layer. The method has the steps of (a) mixing a liquid monomer with particles substantially insoluble in the liquid monomer forming a monomer particle mixture; (b) flash evaporating the particle mixture and forming a composite vapor; and (c) continuously cryocondensing said composite vapor on a cool substrate and cross-linking the cryocondensed film thereby forming the polymer layer. 3 figs.

  14. Flash evaporation of liquid monomer particle mixture

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.; Darab, John G.; Gross, Mark E.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a method of making a first solid composite polymer layer. The method has the steps of (a) mixing a liquid monomer with particles substantially insoluble in the liquid monomer forming a monomer particle mixture; (b) flash evaporating the particle mixture and forming a composite vapor; and (c) continuously cryocondensing said composite vapor on a cool substrate and cross-linking the cryocondensed film thereby forming the polymer layer.

  15. Diffusion method of seperating gaseous mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pontius, Rex B.

    1976-01-01

    A method of effecting a relatively large change in the relative concentrations of the components of a gaseous mixture by diffusion which comprises separating the mixture into heavier and lighter portions according to major fraction mass recycle procedure, further separating the heavier portions into still heavier subportions according to a major fraction mass recycle procedure, and further separating the lighter portions into still lighter subportions according to a major fraction equilibrium recycle procedure.

  16. Picosecond reorientational dynamics of polar dye probes in binary aqueous mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, G. B.; Doraiswamy, S.

    1992-02-01

    Picosecond time dependent fluorescence method has been used to measure the rotational reorientation times (τr) of three kinds of dye probes—oxazine 720 (a monocation), nile red (neutral but polar), and resorufin (a monoanion)—in a series of binary mixtures of water-amides, water-dipolar aprotics, and water-alcohols at 298 K. Most of the binary mixtures are characterized by the fact that at a particular composition (between 25% to 40% of the organic solvent in water), the viscosity (η) of the solution reaches a maximum value that is higher than the viscosities of the two solvents. As a consequence, the viscosity profile of the solution as a function of the organic solvent exhibits a bivaluedness, the extent of which is more, if the liquids are nearly isoviscous. The dielectric properties of the solution also change across the composition range. All the dyes show a near linear behavior of τr vs η in formamide-water, N-methylformamide-water, and methanol-water mixtures. A dual-valued profile for τr vs η is obtained for the cation oxazine 720 in the three dipolar aprotic mixtures (N, N-dimethylformamide-water, N, N-dimethylacetamide-water, and dimethylsulphoxide-water), with the rotational reorientation times being higher in the organic solvent-rich zone, compared to the corresponding isoviscous point in the water-rich zone. However, the anion resorufin shows a bivalued profile of τr vs η only in dimethylsulphoxide-water mixtures, while the neutral nile red shows a linear behavior in all the dipolar-aprotic water mixtures. A hook-type profile of τr vs η is seen for the anion resorufin in ethanol-, 1-propanol-, and 2-propanol-water mixtures and for the cation oxazine 720 in 1-propanol- and 2-propanol-water mixtures; but nile red shows no departure from linear behavior even in alcohol-water mixtures. The rotational dynamics of the cation oxazine 720 in dipolar aprotic-water mixtures is explained in terms of solvation since the dielectric friction is minimal

  17. Phase equilibria for complex fluid mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Prausnitz, J.M.

    1983-04-01

    After defining complex mixtures, attention is given to the canonical procedure used for the thermodynamics of fluid mixtures: first, we establish a suitable, idealized reference system and then we establish a perturbation (or excess function) which corrects the idealized system for real behavior. For complex mixtures containing identified components (e.g. alcohols, ketones, water) discussion is directed at possible techniques for extending to complex mixtures our conventional experience with reference systems and perturbations for simple mixtures. Possible extensions include generalization of the quasi-chemical approximation (local compositions) and superposition of chemical equilibria (association and solvation) on a physical equation of state. For complex mixtures containing unidentified components (e.g. coal-derived fluids), a possible experimental method is suggested for characterization; conventional procedures can then be used to calculate phase equilibria using the concept of pseudocomponents whose properties are given by the characterization data. Finally, as an alternative to the pseudocomponent method, a brief introduction is given to phase-equilibrium calculations using continuous thermodynamics.

  18. Toxicity evaluation of PAH mixtures using Microtox

    SciTech Connect

    Thompkins, J.; Guthrie, E.; Pfaender, F.

    1995-12-31

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are produced from both natural and anthropogenic combustion processes. PAHs are known to be toxic and carcinogenic, are prevalent at many hazardous waste sites, and pose a potential risk to both ecological and human health. To date, few researchers have assessed the toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) mixtures. The toxicity of chrysene, anthracene, pyrene, phenanthrene, fluoranthrene, acenaphthene, fluorene, and naphthalene were evaluated using Microtox, and acute toxicity assay that uses bioluminescent bacteria, Photobacterium phosphoreum, to measure toxicity. In this study, the toxicities of 2, 3, and 4 ring PAHs were determined for individual compounds. Synergistic or additive effects of PAH mixtures was assessed by comparing the toxicity of mixtures with that of pure compounds. Each PAH or mixture was evaluated at their respective water solubility concentrations, For individual PAHs tested, the toxicity of PAHs is inversely related to water solubility. Mixtures of two and three PAHs with disparate water solubilities resulted in synergistic interactions. Antagonistic interactions, a decrease in toxicity, were observed for mixtures of similar water solubilities.

  19. Novel anisole mixture and gasoline containing the same

    DOEpatents

    Singerman, Gary M.

    1982-01-26

    A novel anisole mixture containing anisole and a mixture of alkyl anisoles and liquid hydrocarbon fuels containing said novel anisole mixture in an amount sufficient to increase the octane number of said liquid fuel composition.

  20. Primordial soup was edible: abiotically produced Miller-Urey mixture supports bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xueshu; Backman, Daniel; Lebedev, Albert T; Artaev, Viatcheslav B; Jiang, Liying; Ilag, Leopold L; Zubarev, Roman A

    2015-09-28

    Sixty years after the seminal Miller-Urey experiment that abiotically produced a mixture of racemized amino acids, we provide a definite proof that this primordial soup, when properly cooked, was edible for primitive organisms. Direct admixture of even small amounts of Miller-Urey mixture strongly inhibits E. coli bacteria growth due to the toxicity of abundant components, such as cyanides. However, these toxic compounds are both volatile and extremely reactive, while bacteria are highly capable of adaptation. Consequently, after bacterial adaptation to a mixture of the two most abundant abiotic amino acids, glycine and racemized alanine, dried and reconstituted MU soup was found to support bacterial growth and even accelerate it compared to a simple mixture of the two amino acids. Therefore, primordial Miller-Urey soup was perfectly suitable as a growth media for early life forms.

  1. Primordial soup was edible: abiotically produced Miller-Urey mixture supports bacterial growth

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xueshu; Backman, Daniel; Lebedev, Albert T.; Artaev, Viatcheslav B.; Jiang, Liying; Ilag, Leopold L.; Zubarev, Roman A.

    2015-01-01

    Sixty years after the seminal Miller-Urey experiment that abiotically produced a mixture of racemized amino acids, we provide a definite proof that this primordial soup, when properly cooked, was edible for primitive organisms. Direct admixture of even small amounts of Miller-Urey mixture strongly inhibits E. coli bacteria growth due to the toxicity of abundant components, such as cyanides. However, these toxic compounds are both volatile and extremely reactive, while bacteria are highly capable of adaptation. Consequently, after bacterial adaptation to a mixture of the two most abundant abiotic amino acids, glycine and racemized alanine, dried and reconstituted MU soup was found to support bacterial growth and even accelerate it compared to a simple mixture of the two amino acids. Therefore, primordial Miller-Urey soup was perfectly suitable as a growth media for early life forms. PMID:26412575

  2. Amphiphile Meets Amphiphile: Beyond the Polar-Apolar Dualism in Ionic Liquid/Alcohol Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Russina, Olga; Sferrazza, Alessio; Caminiti, Ruggero; Triolo, Alessandro

    2014-05-15

    The mesoscopic morphology of binary mixtures of ethylammonium nitrate (EAN), the protic ionic liquid par excellence, and methanol is explored using neutron/X-ray diffraction and computational techniques. Both compounds are amphiphilic and characterized by an extended hydrogen bonding network: surprisingly, though macroscopically homogeneous, these mixtures turn out to be mesoscopically highly heterogeneous. Our study reveals that even in methanol-rich mixtures, a wide distribution of clusters exists where EAN preserves its bulk, sponge-like morphology. Accordingly methanol does not succeed in fully dissociating the ionic liquid that keeps on organizing in a bulk-like fashion. This behavior represents the premises to the more dramatic phenomenology observed with longer alcohols that eventually phase separate from EAN. These results challenge the commonly accepted polar and apolar moieties segregation in ionic liquids/molecular liquids mixtures and the current understanding of technologically relevant solvation processes.

  3. Measuring Vapor Pressure with an Isoteniscope: A Hands-on Introduction to Thermodynamic Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Wenqian; Haslam, Andrew J.; Macey, Andrew; Shah, Umang V.; Brechtelsbauer, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of the vapor pressure of a volatile liquid or azeotropic mixture, and its fluid phase diagram, can be achieved with an isoteniscope and an industrial grade digital pressure sensor using the experimental method reported in this study. We describe vapor-pressure measurements of acetone and n-hexane and their azeotrope, and how the…

  4. Impact of Organic Contamination on Some Aquatic Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Yasser, El-Nahhal; Shawkat, El-Najjar; Samir, Afifi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Contamination of water systems with organic compounds of agricultural uses pose threats to aquatic organisms. Carbaryl, chlorpyrifos, and diuron were considered as model aquatic pollutants in this study. The main objective of this study was to characterize the toxicity of organic contamination to two different aquatic organisms. Materials and Methods: Low concentrations (0.0–60 µmol/L) of carbaryl, diuron and very low concentration (0.0–0.14 µmol/L) of chlorpyrifos and their mixtures were tested against fish and Daphnia magna. Percentage of death and immobilization were taken as indicators of toxicity. Results: Toxicity results to fish and D. magna showed that chlorpyrifos was the most toxic compound (LC50 to fish and D. magna are 0.08, and 0.001 µmol/L respectively), followed by carbaryl (LC50 to fish and D. magna are 43.19 and 0.031 µmol/L), while diuron was the least toxic one (LC50 values for fish and D. magna are 43.48 and 32.11 µmol/L respectively). Mixture toxicity (binary and tertiary mixtures) showed antagonistic effects. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference among mixture toxicities to fish and D. magma. Conclusion: Fish and D. magam were sensitive to low concentrations. These data suggest potent threats to aquatic organisms from organic contamination. PMID:26862260

  5. Bayesian source separation with mixture of Gaussians prior for sources and Gaussian prior for mixture coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoussi, Hichem; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2001-05-01

    In this contribution, we present new algorithms to source separation for the case of noisy instantaneous linear mixture, within the Bayesian statistical framework. The source distribution prior is modeled by a mixture of Gaussians [1] and the mixing matrix elements distributions by a Gaussian [2]. We model the mixture of Gaussians hierarchically by mean of hidden variables representing the labels of the mixture. Then, we consider the joint a posteriori distribution of sources, mixing matrix elements, labels of the mixture and other parameters of the mixture with appropriate prior probability laws to eliminate degeneracy of the likelihood function of variance parameters and we propose two iterative algorithms to estimate jointly sources, mixing matrix and hyperparameters: Joint MAP (Maximum a posteriori) algorithm and penalized EM algorithm. The illustrative example is taken in [3] to compare with other algorithms proposed in literature. .

  6. Separation of gaseous mixtures using inorganic nanofiltration membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Niezyniecki, G.M.; Anderson, M.A.; Hill, C.G. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    The use of membranes for gas phase separations dates back to the separation of isotopes of uranium hexafluoride in the 1940`s. Presently, both organic and inorganic membranes are used in a variety of industrial separation processes. Potential advantages of ceramic membranes over polymeric membranes include the ability to perform separations at elevated temperatures and in the presence of organic vapors. Various ceramic membranes have been fabricated via sol-gel techniques. These membranes are characterized by mean pore diameters of less than 15 angstroms. The permeabilities of these membranes have been measured for a variety of gases. In addition, permselectivities have been determined for mixtures of these gases. Increases in permeability are observed with increases in applied pressure. The permeability of these membranes to propylene is as much as thirty times greater than to nitrogen. Experimental results indicate that the transport of gases through these membranes involves a surface transport mechanism in addition to Knudsen diffusion.

  7. Prebiotic hydrocarbon synthesis in impacting reduced astrophysical icy mixtures

    DOE PAGES

    Koziol, Lucas; Goldman, Nir

    2015-04-21

    We present results of prebiotic organic synthesis in shock-compressed reducing mixtures of simple ices from quantum molecular dynamics simulations extended to close to chemical equilibrium timescales. Given the relative abundance of carbon in reduced forms in astrophysical ices as well as the tendency of these mixtures to form complex hydrocarbons under the presence of external stimuli, it is possible that cometary impacts on a planetary surface could have yielded a larger array of prebiotic organic compounds than previously investigated. We find that the high pressures and temperatures due to shock compression yield a large assortment of carbon- and nitrogen-bonded extendedmore » structures that are highly reactive with short molecular lifetimes. Expansion and cooling causes these materials to break apart and form a wide variety of stable, potentially life-building compounds, including long-chain linear and branched hydrocarbons, large heterocyclic compounds, and a variety of different amines and exotic amino acids. Lastly, our results help provide a bottom-up understanding of hydrocarbon impact synthesis on the early Earth and its role in producing life-building molecules from simple starting materials.« less

  8. Prebiotic hydrocarbon synthesis in impacting reduced astrophysical icy mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Koziol, Lucas; Goldman, Nir

    2015-04-21

    We present results of prebiotic organic synthesis in shock-compressed reducing mixtures of simple ices from quantum molecular dynamics simulations extended to close to chemical equilibrium timescales. Given the relative abundance of carbon in reduced forms in astrophysical ices as well as the tendency of these mixtures to form complex hydrocarbons under the presence of external stimuli, it is possible that cometary impacts on a planetary surface could have yielded a larger array of prebiotic organic compounds than previously investigated. We find that the high pressures and temperatures due to shock compression yield a large assortment of carbon- and nitrogen-bonded extended structures that are highly reactive with short molecular lifetimes. Expansion and cooling causes these materials to break apart and form a wide variety of stable, potentially life-building compounds, including long-chain linear and branched hydrocarbons, large heterocyclic compounds, and a variety of different amines and exotic amino acids. Lastly, our results help provide a bottom-up understanding of hydrocarbon impact synthesis on the early Earth and its role in producing life-building molecules from simple starting materials.

  9. PREBIOTIC HYDROCARBON SYNTHESIS IN IMPACTING REDUCED ASTROPHYSICAL ICY MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Koziol, Lucas; Goldman, Nir E-mail: ngoldman@llnl.gov

    2015-04-20

    We present results of prebiotic organic synthesis in shock-compressed reducing mixtures of simple ices from quantum molecular dynamics simulations extended to close to chemical equilibrium timescales. Given the relative abundance of carbon in reduced forms in astrophysical ices as well as the tendency of these mixtures to form complex hydrocarbons under the presence of external stimuli, it is possible that cometary impacts on a planetary surface could have yielded a larger array of prebiotic organic compounds than previously investigated. We find that the high pressures and temperatures due to shock compression yield a large assortment of carbon- and nitrogen-bonded extended structures that are highly reactive with short molecular lifetimes. Expansion and cooling causes these materials to break apart and form a wide variety of stable, potentially life-building compounds, including long-chain linear and branched hydrocarbons, large heterocyclic compounds, and a variety of different amines and exotic amino acids. Our results help provide a bottom-up understanding of hydrocarbon impact synthesis on the early Earth and its role in producing life-building molecules from simple starting materials.

  10. Prebiotic Hydrocarbon Synthesis in Impacting Reduced Astrophysical Icy Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziol, Lucas; Goldman, Nir

    2015-04-01

    We present results of prebiotic organic synthesis in shock-compressed reducing mixtures of simple ices from quantum molecular dynamics simulations extended to close to chemical equilibrium timescales. Given the relative abundance of carbon in reduced forms in astrophysical ices as well as the tendency of these mixtures to form complex hydrocarbons under the presence of external stimuli, it is possible that cometary impacts on a planetary surface could have yielded a larger array of prebiotic organic compounds than previously investigated. We find that the high pressures and temperatures due to shock compression yield a large assortment of carbon- and nitrogen-bonded extended structures that are highly reactive with short molecular lifetimes. Expansion and cooling causes these materials to break apart and form a wide variety of stable, potentially life-building compounds, including long-chain linear and branched hydrocarbons, large heterocyclic compounds, and a variety of different amines and exotic amino acids. Our results help provide a bottom-up understanding of hydrocarbon impact synthesis on the early Earth and its role in producing life-building molecules from simple starting materials.

  11. Prebiotic hydrocarbon synthesis in impacting reduced astrophysical icy mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Nir; Koziol, Lucas

    2015-06-01

    We present results of prebiotic organic synthesis in shock compressed reducing mixtures of simple ices from quantum molecular dynamics simulations extended to close to chemical equilibrium time-scales. Given the relative abundance of carbon in reduced forms in astrophysical ices as well as the tendency of these mixtures to form complex hydrocarbons under the presence of external stimuli, it is possible that cometary impact on a planetary surface could have yielded a larger array of prebiotic organic compounds than previously investigated. We find that the high pressures and temperatures due to shock compression yield a large assortment of carbon and nitrogen bonded extended structures that are highly reactive with short molecular lifetimes. Expansion and cooling causes these materials to break apart and form a wide variety of stable, potentially life-building compounds, including long-chain linear and branched hydrocarbons, large heterocyclic compounds, and a variety of different amines and exotic amino acids. Our results help provide a bottom-up understanding for hydrocarbon impact synthesis on early Earth and its role in producing life building molecules from simple starting materials. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Method of photocatalytic conversion of C-H organics

    DOEpatents

    Camaioni, D.M.; Lilga, M.A.

    1998-01-13

    The present invention is the addition of a semiconductor material and energy to the reaction mixture of organic, acid (for example, trifluoroacetate), and oxygen. A transition metal ion may be added to the reaction mixture. The semiconductor material converts energy to oxidants thereby promoting oxidation of the organic. Alternatively, using metal in combination with exposure to light may be used.

  13. Method of photocatalytic conversion of C-H organics

    DOEpatents

    Camaioni, Donald M.; Lilga, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is the addition of a semiconductor material and energy to the reaction mixture of organic, acid (for example, trifluoroacetate), and oxygen. A transition metal ion may be added to the reaction mixture. The semiconductor material converts energy to oxidants thereby promoting oxidation of the organic. Alternatively, using metal in combination with exposure to light may be used.

  14. Gravimetric dilution of calibration gas mixtures (CO2, CO, and CH4 in He balance): Toward their uncertainty estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiman, Harry; Mulyana, Muhammad Rizky; Zuas, Oman

    2017-01-01

    Uncertainty estimation for the gravimetric dilution of four calibration gas mixtures [carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and methane (CH4) in helium (He) Balance] have been carried out according to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) of "Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement". The uncertainty of the composition of gas mixtures was evaluated to measure the quality, reliability, and comparability of the prepared calibration gas mixtures. The analytical process for the uncertainty estimation is comprised of four main stages such as specification of measurand, identification, quantification of the relevant uncertainty sources, and combination of the individual uncertainty sources. In this study, important uncertainty sources including weighing, gas cylinder, component gas, certified calibration gas mixture (CCGM) added, and purity of the He balance were examined to estimate the final uncertainty of composition of diluted calibration gas mixtures. The results shows that the uncertainties of gravimetric dilution of the four calibration gas mixtures (CO2, CO, and CH4 in He Balance) were found in the range of 5.974% - 7.256% that were expressed as %relative of expanded uncertainty at 95% of confidence level (k=2). The major contribution of sources uncertainty to the final uncertainty arose from the uncertainty related to the certified calibration gas mixture (CCGM) which was the uncertainty value stated in the CCGM certificate. The verification of calibration gas mixtures composition shows that the gravimetric values of calibration gas mixtures were consistent with the results of measurement using gas chromatography flame ionization detector equipped by methanizer.

  15. Relativistic mixtures of charged and uncharged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, Gilberto M.

    2014-01-14

    Mixtures of relativistic gases within the framework of Boltzmann equation are analyzed. Three systems are considered. The first one refers to a mixture of uncharged particles by using Grad’s moment method, where the relativistic mixture is characterized by the moments of the distribution functions: particle four-flows, energy-momentum tensors, and third-order moment tensors. In the second Fick’s law for a mixture of relativistic gases of non-disparate rest masses in a Schwarzschild metric are derived from an extension of Marle and McCormack model equations applied to a relativistic truncated Grad’s distribution function, where it is shown the dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the gravitational potential. The third one consists in the derivation of the relativistic laws of Ohm and Fourier for a binary mixtures of electrons with protons and electrons with photons subjected to external electromagnetic fields and in presence of gravitational fields by using the Anderson and Witting model of the Boltzmann equation.

  16. Mixture models for distance sampling detection functions.

    PubMed

    Miller, David L; Thomas, Len

    2015-01-01

    We present a new class of models for the detection function in distance sampling surveys of wildlife populations, based on finite mixtures of simple parametric key functions such as the half-normal. The models share many of the features of the widely-used "key function plus series adjustment" (K+A) formulation: they are flexible, produce plausible shapes with a small number of parameters, allow incorporation of covariates in addition to distance and can be fitted using maximum likelihood. One important advantage over the K+A approach is that the mixtures are automatically monotonic non-increasing and non-negative, so constrained optimization is not required to ensure distance sampling assumptions are honoured. We compare the mixture formulation to the K+A approach using simulations to evaluate its applicability in a wide set of challenging situations. We also re-analyze four previously problematic real-world case studies. We find mixtures outperform K+A methods in many cases, particularly spiked line transect data (i.e., where detectability drops rapidly at small distances) and larger sample sizes. We recommend that current standard model selection methods for distance sampling detection functions are extended to include mixture models in the candidate set.

  17. A constitutive theory of reacting electrolyte mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Reis, Martina; Wang, Yongqi; Bono Maurizio Sacchi Bassi, Adalberto

    2013-11-01

    A constitutive theory of reacting electrolyte mixtures is formulated. The intermolecular interactions among the constituents of the mixture are accounted for through additional freedom degrees to each constituent of the mixture. Balance equations for polar reacting continuum mixtures are accordingly formulated and a proper set of constitutive equations is derived with basis in the Müller-Liu formulation of the second law of thermodynamics. Moreover, the non-equilibrium and equilibrium responses of the reacting mixture are investigated in detail by emphasizing the inner and reactive structures of the medium. From the balance laws and constitutive relations, the effects of molecular structure of constituents upon the fluid flow are studied. It is also demonstrated that the local thermodynamic equilibrium state can be reached without imposing that the set of independent constitutive variables is time independent, neither spatially homogeneous nor null. The resulting constitutive relations presented throughout this work are of relevance to many practical applications, such as swelling of clays, developing of bio and polymeric membranes, and use of electrorheological fluids in industrial processes. The first author acknowledges financial support from National Counsel of Technological and Scientific Development (CNPq) and German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD).

  18. Coal-water mixture fuel burner

    DOEpatents

    Brown, T.D.; Reehl, D.P.; Walbert, G.F.

    1985-04-29

    The present invention represents an improvement over the prior art by providing a rotating cup burner arrangement for use with a coal-water mixture fuel which applies a thin, uniform sheet of fuel onto the inner surface of the rotating cup, inhibits the collection of unburned fuel on the inner surface of the cup, reduces the slurry to a collection of fine particles upon discharge from the rotating cup, and further atomizes the fuel as it enters the combustion chamber by subjecting it to the high shear force of a high velocity air flow. Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide for improved combustion of a coal-water mixture fuel. It is another object of the present invention to provide an arrangement for introducing a coal-water mixture fuel into a combustion chamber in a manner which provides improved flame control and stability, more efficient combustion of the hydrocarbon fuel, and continuous, reliable burner operation. Yet another object of the present invention is to provide for the continuous, sustained combustion of a coal-water mixture fuel without the need for a secondary combustion source such as natural gas or a liquid hydrocarbon fuel. Still another object of the present invention is to provide a burner arrangement capable of accommodating a coal-water mixture fuel having a wide range of rheological and combustion characteristics in providing for its efficient combustion. 7 figs.

  19. Transcriptional responses indicate attenuated oxidative stress in the springtail Folsomia candida exposed to mixtures of cadmium and phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Muriel E; Ellers, Jacintha; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; den Dunnen, Johan T; van Straalen, Nico M; Roelofs, Dick

    2013-05-01

    Since the 'omics revolution', the assessment of toxic chemical mixtures has incorporated approaches where phenotypic endpoints are connected to a mechanistic understanding of toxicity. In this study we determined the effect of binary mixtures of cadmium and phenanthrene on the reproduction of Folsomia candida and investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying this response. Mixture toxicity modeling showed an antagonistic deviation from concentration addition for reproduction effects of the mixtures. Subsequent transcriptional response analysis was done using five mixtures at the modeled 50 % effect level for reproduction. The transcription profiles of 86 high throughput RT-qPCR assays were studied by means of partial least squares regression analysis. The first and second principal components (PCs) were correlated with global responses to cadmium and phenanthrene, while correlations with the mixture treatments were found in the higher PCs. Specifically associated with the mixture treatments were a biotransformation phase II gene, four mitochondrial related genes and a gene involved in the biosynthesis of antioxidant selenoproteins. Membrane integrity related gene inductions were correlated with the single phenanthrene treatment but not with the mixtures. Immune and inflammatory response assays did not correlate with any of the mixtures. These results suggest moderated oxidative stress, a higher mitochondrial maintenance and less compromised membrane function in the mixture exposed samples compared to the separate cadmium or phenanthrene exposures. The antagonism found for inhibition of reproduction may partially originate from these differences. Mechanistic studies on mixture toxicity can ultimately aid risk assessment by defining relevant toxicity pathways in organisms exposed to real-world mixture exposures present in the field.

  20. Combining Toxicological and Chemical Characterization of Complex Mixtures to Understand the Impact of the Unknown Fraction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicological assessment of adverse health outcomes associated with exposure to complex mixtures provides an integrated response of the organism (or in vitro test system) that accounts for additivity among the components (both dose and response) as well as any greater than or les...

  1. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of mixtures of compounds containing both hydrogen and deuterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespi, H. L.; Harkness, L.; Katz, J. J.; Norman, G.; Saur, W.

    1969-01-01

    Method allows qualitative and quantitative analysis of mixtures of partially deuterated compounds. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy determines location and amount of deuterium in organic compounds but not fully deuterated compounds. Mass spectroscopy can detect fully deuterated species but not the location.

  2. Micromorphic Theory of Bubbly Fluid Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiming; Paolucci, Samuel

    2008-11-01

    We use a continuum theory for multiphase immiscible mixtures with inner structure. Based on micromorphic theory, the average balance equations for the different phases, as well as for the mixture, result from a systematic averaging procedure. In addition to equations for mass, momentum, energy and entropy, the balance equations also include equations for microinertia and microspin tensors. These equations, together with appropriate constitutive equations consistent with the entropy inequality, enable the modeling of immiscible multiphase materials where internal parameters are important. Here, we apply the results to a two-phase simple microstretch (expansion or contraction) bubbly fluid mixture. We show that the equations for microspin and microinertia, under a number of simplifying assumptions, combine to yield a general form of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation.

  3. Capillary condensation and adsorption of binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, B; Darkrim-Lamari, F; Levesque, D

    2006-06-21

    The adsorption of equimolar binary mixtures of hydrogen-carbon dioxide, hydrogen-methane, and methane-carbon dioxide in porous material models is determined by grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. The material models have an adsorbent surface similar to that of nanofibers with a herringbone structure. Our main result, which is relevant for hydrogen purification and carbon dioxide capture, is that the adsorption selectivities calculated for the mixtures can differ significantly from those deduced from simulations of the adsorption of pure gases, in particular, when one of the adsorbed gases presents a capillary condensation induced by confinement within the pore network. A comparison of our data is also made with theoretical models used in the literature for predicting the properties of the mixture adsorption.

  4. Mixtures of planetary ices at extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mal-Soon; Scandolo, Sandro

    2011-02-08

    The interiors of Neptune and Uranus are believed to be primarily composed of a fluid mixture of methane and water. The mixture is subjected to pressures up to several hundred gigapascal, causing the ionization of water. Laboratory and simulation studies so far have focused on the properties of the individual components. Here we show, using first-principle molecular dynamic simulations, that the properties of the mixed fluid are qualitatively different with respect to those of its components at the same conditions. We observe a pressure-induced softening of the methane-water intermolecular repulsion that points to an enhancement of mixing under extreme conditions. Ionized water causes the progressive ionization of methane and the mixture becomes electronically conductive at milder conditions than pure water, indicating that the planetary magnetic field of Uranus and Neptune may originate at shallower depths than currently assumed.

  5. Detailed Kinetic Modeling of Gasoline Surrogate Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-03-09

    Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, a recently revised version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multi-component gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines. Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

  6. Development and validation of a metal mixture bioavailability model (MMBM) to predict chronic toxicity of Ni-Zn-Pb mixtures to Ceriodaphnia dubia.

    PubMed

    Nys, Charlotte; Janssen, Colin R; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2017-01-01

    Recently, several bioavailability-based models have been shown to predict acute metal mixture toxicity with reasonable accuracy. However, the application of such models to chronic mixture toxicity is less well established. Therefore, we developed in the present study a chronic metal mixture bioavailability model (MMBM) by combining the existing chronic daphnid bioavailability models for Ni, Zn, and Pb with the independent action (IA) model, assuming strict non-interaction between the metals for binding at the metal-specific biotic ligand sites. To evaluate the predictive capacity of the MMBM, chronic (7d) reproductive toxicity of Ni-Zn-Pb mixtures to Ceriodaphnia dubia was investigated in four different natural waters (pH range: 7-8; Ca range: 1-2 mM; Dissolved Organic Carbon range: 5-12 mg/L). In each water, mixture toxicity was investigated at equitoxic metal concentration ratios as well as at environmental (i.e. realistic) metal concentration ratios. Statistical analysis of mixture effects revealed that observed interactive effects depended on the metal concentration ratio investigated when evaluated relative to the concentration addition (CA) model, but not when evaluated relative to the IA model. This indicates that interactive effects observed in an equitoxic experimental design cannot always be simply extrapolated to environmentally realistic exposure situations. Generally, the IA model predicted Ni-Zn-Pb mixture toxicity more accurately than the CA model. Overall, the MMBM predicted Ni-Zn-Pb mixture toxicity (expressed as % reproductive inhibition relative to a control) in 85% of the treatments with less than 20% error. Moreover, the MMBM predicted chronic toxicity of the ternary Ni-Zn-Pb mixture at least equally accurately as the toxicity of the individual metal treatments (RMSEMix = 16; RMSEZn only = 18; RMSENi only = 17; RMSEPb only = 23). Based on the present study, we believe MMBMs can be a promising tool to account for the effects of water

  7. Establishment of three permanent cover crop seed mixtures in Hungarian vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miglécz, Tamas; Valkó, Orsolya; Donkó, Ádám; Deák, Balázs; Török, Péter; Kelemen, András; Drexler, Dóra; Tóthmérész, Béla

    2015-04-01

    In organic vineyard farming sowing high diversity cover crop seed mixtures offers a great opportunity to overcome high-priority problems mitigating vineyard cultivation, such as gain erosion control, save soil fertility, improve soil microbial activity and control weeds. Furthermore, we can also improve the biodiversity and ecosystem services of vineyards. Mainly non-native or low diversity seed mixtures are used for cover cropping containing some grass, grain or Fabaceae species. We studied vegetation development after sowing native high-diversity seed mixtures in four vineyards in an on farm field trial. We compared the effects of 4 treatments: (i) Biocont-Ecowin mixture (12 species), (ii) Fabaceae mixture (9 species), (iii) Grass-forb mixture (16 species) and control (no seed sowing). Study sites were located in Tokaj wine region, East Hungary. Seed mixtures were sown in March, 2012. After sowing, we recorded the percentage cover of vascular plant species in the end of June 2012, 2013 and 2014 in altogether 80 permanent plots. In the first year the establishment and weed control of Biocont-Ecowin and Legume seed mixture was the best. For the second year in inter-rows sown with Grass-herb and Legume seed mixtures we detected decreasing weed cover scores, while in inter-rows sown with Biocont-Ecowin seed mixture and in control inter-rows we detected higher weed cover scores. In the third year we still detected lower weed cover scores in inter-rows sown with Grass-forb and Legume seed mixtures, however on several sites we also detected decreasing cover of sown species. All sown species were detected in our plots during the time of the study, however some species were present only with low cover scores or only in a few plots. Out of the sown species Lotus corniculatus, Medicago lupulina, Plantago lanceolata, Trifolium repens, T. pratense and Coronilla varia established the most successfully, and had high cover scores on most sites even in the second and third year

  8. Thermophysical Properties of Fluids and Fluid Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sengers, Jan V.; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2004-05-03

    The major goal of the project was to study the effect of critical fluctuations on the thermophysical properties and phase behavior of fluids and fluid mixtures. Long-range fluctuations appear because of the presence of critical phase transitions. A global theory of critical fluctuations was developed and applied to represent thermodynamic properties and transport properties of molecular fluids and fluid mixtures. In the second phase of the project, the theory was extended to deal with critical fluctuations in complex fluids such as polymer solutions and electrolyte solutions. The theoretical predictions have been confirmed by computer simulations and by light-scattering experiments. Fluctuations in fluids in nonequilibrium states have also been investigated.

  9. 21 CFR 1310.12 - Exempt chemical mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... aqueous or alcoholic solutions, is not considered a mixture. Weight is based on sulfuric acid in the... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exempt chemical mixtures. 1310.12 Section 1310.12... CHEMICALS AND CERTAIN MACHINES § 1310.12 Exempt chemical mixtures. (a) The chemical mixtures meeting...

  10. Productivity, botanical composition, and nutritive value of commercial pasture mixtures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pastures in the northeastern USA often are planted to mixtures of grasses and legumes. There is limited public sector information on the performance of commercial forage mixtures. We evaluated a range of commercial pasture mixtures to determine if the number of species in a mixture affected yield an...

  11. Metal mixture modeling evaluation project: 3. Lessons learned and steps forward.

    PubMed

    Farley, Kevin J; Meyer, Joseph S

    2015-04-01

    A comparison of 4 metal mixture toxicity models (that were based on the biotic ligand model [BLM] and the Windermere humic aqueous model using the toxicity function [WHAM-FTOX ]) was presented in a previous paper. In the present study, a streamlined version of the 4 models was developed and applied to multiple data sets and test conditions to examine key assumptions and calibration strategies that are crucial in modeling metal mixture toxicity. Results show that 1) a single binding site on or in the organism was a useful and oftentimes sufficient framework for predicting metal toxicity; 2) a linear free energy relationship (LFER) for bidentate binding of metals and cations to the biotic ligand provided a good first estimate of binding coefficients; 3) although adjustments in metal binding coefficients or adjustments in chemical potency factors can both be used in model calibration for single-metal exposures, changing metal binding coefficients or chemical potency factors had different effects on model predictions for metal mixtures; and 4) selection of a mixture toxicity model (based on concentration addition or independent action) was important in predicting metal mixture toxicity. Moving forward, efforts should focus on reducing uncertainties in model calibration, including development of better methods to characterize metal binding to toxicologically active binding sites, conducting targeted exposure studies to advance the understanding of metal mixture toxicity, and further developing LFERs and other tools to help constrain the model calibration.

  12. Investigation on minimum ignition energy of mixtures of α-pinene-benzene/air.

    PubMed

    Coudour, B; Chetehouna, K; Rudz, S; Gillard, P; Garo, J P

    2015-01-01

    Minimum ignition energies (MIE) of α-pinene-benzene/air mixtures at a given temperature for different equivalence ratios and fuel proportions are experimented in this paper. We used a cylindrical chamber of combustion using a nanosecond pulse at 1,064 nm from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Laser-induced spark ignitions were studied for two molar proportions of α-pinene/benzene mixtures, respectively 20-80% and 50-50%. The effect of the equivalence ratio (Φ) has been investigated for 0.7, 0.9, 1.1 and 1.5 and ignition of fuel/air mixtures has been experimented for two different incident laser energies: 25 and 33 mJ. This study aims at observing the influence of different α-pinene/benzene proportions on the flammability of the mixture to have further knowledge of the potential of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and smoke mixtures to influence forest fires, especially in the case of the accelerating forest fire phenomenon (AFF). Results of ignition probability and energy absorption are based on 400 laser shots for each studied fuel proportions. MIE results as functions of equivalence ratio compared to data of pure α-pinene and pure benzene demonstrate that the presence of benzene in α-pinene-air mixture tends to increase ignition probability and reduce MIE without depending strongly on the α-pinene/benzene proportion.

  13. Toxicity of a complex mixture of atmospherically transported pesticides to Ceriodaphnia dubia.

    PubMed

    George, Tara K; Waite, Don; Liber, Karsten; Sproull, Jim

    2003-07-01

    The presence of several anthropogenic chemicals has been documented in the atmosphere of the Canadian prairies. The deposition of these chemicals as a mixture is of importance since little is known of the combined effects of these chemicals on aquatic organisms. This study was designed to evaluate the acute and chronic toxicity of a complex mixture of nine atmospherically transported pesticides to Ceriodaphnia dubia. The nine selected pesticides (bromoxynil, dicamba, 2,4-D, MCPA, triallate, trifluralin, pentachlorophenol, lindane, and 4,4'-DDT) were detected in appreciable quantities in dry atmospheric deposits. The concentration of each pesticide in the mixture was based on maximum measured daily dry deposition rates for central Canada, except for pentachlorophenol, which was estimated based on atmospheric concentrations. The 48-h LC50 estimate for C. dubia exposed to the pesticide mixture was 174.60 microg L(-1) (340 times the measured total dry deposition concentration). The estimated NOEC and LOEC for both survival and reproduction, as determined in the 7-d chronic toxicity test, were 51.3 (100 times) and 154 microg/L(-1) (300 times), respectively. A basic risk assessment, using the toxic unit approach, suggested that the toxicity of the pesticide mixture was mainly due to 4,4'-DDT. Overall, this atmospherically transported complex mixture of pesticides appears to pose a negligible toxicological risk to non-target aquatic invertebrates such as zooplankton.

  14. Self-assembly of 6-O- and 6'-O-hexadecylsucroses mixture under aqueous conditions.

    PubMed

    Kanemaru, Manami; Kuwahara, Shin-ya; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Kaneko, Yoshiro; Kadokawa, Jun-ichi

    2010-12-10

    In this paper, we report the self-assembly of 6-O- and 6'-O-hexadecylsucroses mixture under aqueous conditions. The mixture was synthesized by a five-step sequence from sucrose. The SEM image of a sample prepared by drying a dispersion of the mixture in water showed nanoparticles with the diameter of ∼50nm and aggregates that were formed by further assembly of them. The XRD measurement of the sample exhibited the diffraction pattern assignable to face-centered cubic (FCC) structure and the diameter of a sphere, which took part in the FCC structure, was calculated to be 5.1nm. This value was relatively close to that observed in the DLS measurement of a dispersion of the mixture in water and estimated for a spherical micelle based on the molecular sizes of the two sucrose ethers. On the basis of the above findings, the following self-assembly process of the mixture under aqueous conditions was proposed. The mixture formed the spherical micelles with the diameter of ∼5-7nm in water. The micelles regularly organized according to the FCC structure during the drying process from the aqueous dispersion to construct the nanoparticles with the diameter of ∼50nm. Several numbers of the nanoparticles further assembled to form the aggregates.

  15. Occupational exposure limits in the context of solvent mixtures, consumption of ethanol, and target tissue dose.

    PubMed

    Dennison, James E; Bigelow, Philip L; Andersen, Melvin E

    2004-09-01

    Individuals are exposed to mixtures, and never to single chemicals. Depending on the composition of the elements of mixtures, significant toxicological interactions between the components may occur. These interactions are complex and often difficult to predict, ranging from synergistic to additive and subadditive interactions. The nature of the interactions needs to be evaluated as the target tissue dose of the active form of each chemical. PBPK modeling is an effective tool for determining the target tissue dose and evaluating these interactions when data are available for model development. Some of the interactions are pharmacokinetic in nature, affecting the disposition of other chemicals in the body. Other interactions can be pharmacodynamic in nature, altering the effects that other chemicals have on the organism. For many organic solvents, these interactions occur principally at the level of the metabolizing enzyme, cytochrome P-450 2E1 (CYP2E1). Many solvents are known to induce or inhibit CYP2E1, or both. Mixtures may be comprised of concomitant exposures to chemicals or from components encountered separately on-the-job, off-the-job, through the diet, and otherwise. Examples of mixtures where the exposure to separate components occurs off the job will be discussed, with special emphasis on ethanol consumption as a modifier of solvent pharmacokinetics. The present practice of the linear extrapolation of the toxicity of individual mixture components in the interpretation of occupational exposure limits will also be critiqued.

  16. Toxicological evaluation of complex mixtures by pattern recognition: correlating chemical fingerprints to mutagenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Eide, Ingvar; Neverdal, Gunhild; Thorvaldsen, Bodil; Grung, Bjørn; Kvalheim, Olav M

    2002-01-01

    We describe the use of pattern recognition and multivariate regression in the assessment of complex mixtures by correlating chemical fingerprints to the mutagenicity of the mixtures. Mixtures were 20 organic extracts of exhaust particles, each containing 102-170 individual compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro-PAHs, oxy-PAHs, and saturated hydrocarbons. Mixtures were characterized by full-scan GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry). Data were resolved into peaks and spectra for individual compounds by an automated curve resolution procedure. Resolved chromatograms were integrated, resulting in a predictor matrix that was used as input to a principal component analysis to evaluate similarities between mixtures (i.e., classification). Furthermore, partial least-squares projections to latent structures were used to correlate the GC-MS data to mutagenicity, as measured in the Ames Salmonella assay (i.e., calibration). The best model (high r2 and Q2) identifies the variables that co-vary with the observed mutagenicity. These variables may subsequently be identified in more detail. Furthermore, the regression model can be used to predict mutagenicity from GC-MS chromatograms of other organic extracts. We emphasize that both chemical fingerprints as well as detailed data on composition can be used in pattern recognition. PMID:12634129

  17. Toxicity of a hazardous chemical mixture in the planarian, Dugesia dorotocephala

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, H.S.; Matthews, C.M.

    1995-12-31

    The responses of the planarian, Dugesia dorotocephala to toxic chemical mixtures representative of water contaminants associated with hazardous waste sites have been studied in laboratory experiments. These free-living flatworms are readily maintained under laboratory conditions and are a useful invertebrate model for toxicology studies. Their widespread occurrence also makes them potentially useful for environmental studies. Mature asexual Dugesia dorotocephala were exposed for 14 days to mixtures of seven contaminants frequently detected in water at hazardous waste sites. The complete 1X mixture contained both metals (As, 3.1 ppm; Cr, 0.7 ppm; Pb, 3.7 ppm) and organics (chloroform, 1.5 ppm; benzene, 5.0 ppm; phenol, 3.4 ppm; trichloroethylene, 3.8 ppm). Groups of planaria were treated with the complete mixture at 0.1X, 1X and 10X concentrations. Additional groups were exposed to the metals-only or organics-only submixtures, also at 0.1X, 1X and 10X concentrations. Treatment solutions were renewed daily. Suppression of fissioning was observed in all of the 1X and 10X treatment groups. Significant mortality occurred only in the 10X complete and 1 0X metals-only treatments. It appears that the toxic effects of the complete mixture are primarily associated with the metal components.

  18. Development and application of a multimetal multibiotic ligand model for assessing aquatic toxicity of metal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Santore, Robert C; Ryan, Adam C

    2015-04-01

    A multimetal, multiple binding site version of the biotic ligand model (mBLM) has been developed for predicting and explaining the bioavailability and toxicity of mixtures of metals to aquatic organisms. The mBLM was constructed by combining information from single-metal BLMs to preserve compatibility between the single-metal and multiple-metal approaches. The toxicities from individual metals were predicted by assuming additivity of the individual responses. Mixture toxicity was predicted based on both dissolved metal and mBLM-normalized bioavailable metal. Comparison of the 2 prediction methods indicates that metal mixtures frequently appear to have greater toxicity than an additive estimation of individual effects on a dissolved metal basis. However, on an mBLM-normalized basis, mixtures of metals appear to be additive or less than additive. This difference results from interactions between metals and ligands in solutions including natural organic matter, processes that are accounted for in the mBLM. As part of the mBLM approach, a technique for considering variability was developed to calculate confidence bounds (called response envelopes) around the central concentration-response relationship. Predictions using the mBLM and response envelope were compared with observed toxicity for a number of invertebrate and fish species. The results show that the mBLM is a useful tool for considering bioavailability when assessing the toxicity of metal mixtures.

  19. Low concentrations of metal mixture exposures have adverse effects on selected biomarkers of Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Yologlu, Ertan; Ozmen, Murat

    2015-11-01

    Polluted ecosystems may contain mixtures of metals, such that the combinations of metals, even in low concentrations, may cause adverse effects. In the present study, we focused on toxic effects of mixtures of selected metals, the LC50 values, and also their safety limit in aquatic systems imposed by the European legislation using a model organism. Xenopus laevis tadpoles were used as test organisms. They were exposed to metals or their combinations due to 96-h LC50 values. Glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), carboxylesterase (CaE), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) levels were evaluated. Metallothionein concentrations were also determined. The LC50s for Cd, Pb, and Cu were calculated as 5.81mg AI/L, 123.05mg AI/L, and 0.85mg AI/L, respectively. Low lethality ratios were observed with unary exposure of each metal in lower concentrations. Double or triple combinations of LC50 and LC50/2 concentrations caused 100% lethality with Cd+Cu and Pb+Cd+Cu mixtures, while the Pb+Cu mixture also caused high lethal ratios. The selected enzyme activities were significantly affected by metals or mixtures, and dose-related effects were determined. The metallothionein levels generally increased as related to concentration in unary metals and mixtures. Acceptable limit values of unary metals and mixtures did not significantly change metallothionein levels. The results suggest that oxidative stress-related mechanisms are involved in the toxicity induced by selected metals with combinations of very low concentrations.

  20. Impairment of humoral immune responses in mice exposed to nitrogen dioxide and ozone mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimaki, H.

    1989-04-01

    The relationship between immune defense mechanisms and environmental pollutants remains unknown because of uncertainty about the effects of combined or mixed pollutants. To investigate whether exposure to toxic gas mixtures change the effect of a single gas exposure on immune function, BALB/c mice were continuously exposed to 4.0 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/), 0.8 ppm ozone (O/sub 3/), or the mixture of NO/sub 2/ plus O/sub 3/ for 3, 7, 14, and 56 days. Organ weights (lung, thymus, and spleen) and antibody responses to sheep red blood cells (SRBC), and to DNP-Ficoll were measured immediately after the exposure. Lung weights in mice exposed to O/sub 3/ or the mixture were increased significantly in all exposure periods. The weights of thymus and spleen in mice exposed for 3, 7, and 14 days to the mixture were decreased. O/sub 3/ exposure for 56 days showed significant decreases of the weights of both organs. Antibody response to SRBC in mice exposed for 3, 7, and 14 days to O/sub 3/ or the mixture was markedly suppressed, but exposure to the mixture for 56 days did not show the suppression of anti-SRBC antibody response. No differences in anti-DNP antibody response between exposed and control mice were observed, except those exposed to O/sub 3/ or the mixture for 14 days. These results suggest that mixed gas exposures variously modify the effects of a single gas exposure on antibody production in mice.

  1. Enthalpy characteristics of the dissolution of L-valine in water/formamide mixtures at 298.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, V. I.; Badelin, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    The thermochemical dissolution of L-valine in solvent mixtures H2O + (formamide, N-methylformamide, and N, N-dimethylformamide) is studied at an organic component concentration of x 2 = 0-0.35 molar fractions and a temperature of 298.15 K. The experimental data are used to calculate standard enthalpies of dissolution, the transferring of L-valine from water to a mixed solvent, and the enthalpy coefficients of pairwise interactions ( h xy ) with organic solvent molecules. The correlation between the enthalpy characteristics of the dissolution of L-valine with the composition of aqueous organic mixtures and the nature of the organic solvent (its physicochemical properties) is determined. A comparative analysis of the values of h xy of a number of aliphatic L-amino acids in similar solvent mixtures with the hydrophobicity parameters of their side chains is performed.

  2. Organic synthesis in experimental impact shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, C. P.; Borucki, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    Laboratory simulations of shocks created with a high-energy laser demonstrate that the efficacy of organic production depends on the molecular, not just the elemental composition of the shocked gas. In a methane-rich mixture that simulates a low-temperature equilibrium mixture of cometary material, hydrogen cyanide and acetylene were produced with yields of 5 x 10(17) molecules per joule. Repeated shocking of the methane-rich mixture produced amine groups, suggesting the possible synthesis of amino acids. No organic molecules were produced in a carbon dioxide-rich mixture, which is at odds with thermodynamic equilibrium approaches to shock chemistry and has implications for the modeling of shock-produced organic molecules on early Earth.

  3. Cadmium, lead and their mixtures with copper: Paracentrotus lividus embryotoxicity assessment, prediction, and offspring quality evaluation.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Sonia; Buono, Silvia; Cremisini, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this research was to assess the combined effects of three heavy metals (copper, lead, cadmium) on the fertilization and offspring quality of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus at EC50, NOEL, and EC1 concentrations. The observed data were compared with the predictions derived from approaches of Concentration Addition (CA) and Independent Action (IA) in order to evaluate the proper prediction of the observed mixture toxic effect. The P. lividus embryotoxicity of trace metals decreases as follows: Cu > Pb > Cd at all toxicity concentration tested. EC50 mixture revealed less toxic only than Cu; EC50 was 0.80 (± 0.07) mg/l, the offspring malformations were mainly P1 type (skeletal alterations) up to 20% mixture concentration, and P2 type from 70% concentration. The NOEL and EC1 mixtures evidenced that all compounds contribute to the overall toxicity, even if present at low concentrations: the former EC50 was 0.532 (± 0.058) mg/l and the latter was 1.081 (± 0.240) mg/l. The developmental defects observed were mainly P1 type in both mixtures. Both CA and IA models did not accurately predict mixture toxicity for EC50 and NOEL mixtures. Instead, EC1 mixture effects seemed well represented by the IA model. The protective action of the CA model, although quite accurate when applied to simple biological systems like algae and bacteria, but failed to represent the worst-case in this study with more complex organisms. It would be useful to introduce in the models one or more factors that take into account the complexity of these biological systems.

  4. Methods and systems for deacidizing gaseous mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Liang

    2010-05-18

    An improved process for deacidizing a gaseous mixture using phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption is described. The process utilizes a multiphasic absorbent that absorbs an acid gas at increased rate and leads to reduced overall energy costs for the deacidizing operation.

  5. Modeling the chemistry of complex petroleum mixtures.

    PubMed

    Quann, R J

    1998-12-01

    Determining the complete molecular composition of petroleum and its refined products is not feasible with current analytical techniques because of the astronomical number of molecular components. Modeling the composition and behavior of such complex mixtures in refinery processes has accordingly evolved along a simplifying concept called lumping. Lumping reduces the complexity of the problem to a manageable form by grouping the entire set of molecular components into a handful of lumps. This traditional approach does not have a molecular basis and therefore excludes important aspects of process chemistry and molecular property fundamentals from the model's formulation. A new approach called structure-oriented lumping has been developed to model the composition and chemistry of complex mixtures at a molecular level. The central concept is to represent an individual molecular or a set of closely related isomers as a mathematical construct of certain specific and repeating structural groups. A complex mixture such as petroleum can then be represented as thousands of distinct molecular components, each having a mathematical identity. This enables the automated construction of large complex reaction networks with tens of thousands of specific reactions for simulating the chemistry of complex mixtures. Further, the method provides a convenient framework for incorporating molecular physical property correlations, existing group contribution methods, molecular thermodynamic properties, and the structure--activity relationships of chemical kinetics in the development of models.

  6. The Coffee-Milk Mixture Problem Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    This analysis of a problem that is frequently posed at professional development workshops, in print, and on the Web--the coffee-milk mixture riddle--illustrates the timeless advice of George Pólya's masterpiece on problem solving in mathematics, "How to Solve It." In his book, Pólya recommends that problems previously solved and put…

  7. A Skew-Normal Mixture Regression Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Min; Lin, Tsung-I

    2014-01-01

    A challenge associated with traditional mixture regression models (MRMs), which rest on the assumption of normally distributed errors, is determining the number of unobserved groups. Specifically, even slight deviations from normality can lead to the detection of spurious classes. The current work aims to (a) examine how sensitive the commonly…

  8. Ternary gas mixture for diffuse discharge switch

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1988-01-01

    A new diffuse discharge gas switch wherein a mixture of gases is used to take advantage of desirable properties of the respective gases. There is a conducting gas, an insulating gas, and a third gas that has low ionization energy resulting in a net increase in the number of electrons available to produce a current.

  9. Modeling the chemistry of complex petroleum mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Quann, R J

    1998-01-01

    Determining the complete molecular composition of petroleum and its refined products is not feasible with current analytical techniques because of the astronomical number of molecular components. Modeling the composition and behavior of such complex mixtures in refinery processes has accordingly evolved along a simplifying concept called lumping. Lumping reduces the complexity of the problem to a manageable form by grouping the entire set of molecular components into a handful of lumps. This traditional approach does not have a molecular basis and therefore excludes important aspects of process chemistry and molecular property fundamentals from the model's formulation. A new approach called structure-oriented lumping has been developed to model the composition and chemistry of complex mixtures at a molecular level. The central concept is to represent an individual molecular or a set of closely related isomers as a mathematical construct of certain specific and repeating structural groups. A complex mixture such as petroleum can then be represented as thousands of distinct molecular components, each having a mathematical identity. This enables the automated construction of large complex reaction networks with tens of thousands of specific reactions for simulating the chemistry of complex mixtures. Further, the method provides a convenient framework for incorporating molecular physical property correlations, existing group contribution methods, molecular thermodynamic properties, and the structure--activity relationships of chemical kinetics in the development of models. PMID:9860903

  10. Phase separations in a copolymer copolymer mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin-Jun; Jin, Guojun; Ma, Yuqiang

    2006-01-01

    We propose a three-order-parameter model to study the phase separations in a diblock copolymer-diblock copolymer mixture. The cell dynamical simulations provide rich information about the phase evolution and structural formation, especially the appearance of onion-rings. The parametric dependence and physical reason for the domain growth of onion-rings are discussed.

  11. Theoretical Thermodynamics of Mixtures at High Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    The development of an understanding of the chemistry of mixtures of metallic hydrogen and abundant, higher-z material such as oxygen, carbon, etc., is important for understanding of fundamental processes of energy release, differentiation, and development of atmospheric abundances in the Jovian planets. It provides a significant theoretical base for the interpretation of atmospheric elemental abundances to be provided by atmospheric entry probes in coming years. Significant differences are found when non-perturbative approaches such as Thomas-Fermi-Dirac (TFD) theory are used. Mapping of the phase diagrams of such binary mixtures in the pressure range from approx. 10 Mbar to approx. 1000 Mbar, using results from three-dimensional TFD calculations is undertaken. Derivation of a general and flexible thermodynamic model for such binary mixtures in the relevant pressure range was facilitated by the following breakthrough: there exists an accurate nd fairly simple thermodynamic representation of a liquid two-component plasma (TCP) in which the Helmholtz free energy is represented as a suitable linear combination of terms dependent only on density and terms which depend only on the ion coupling parameter. It is found that the crystal energies of mixtures of H-He, H-C, and H-O can be satisfactorily reproduced by the same type of model, except that an effective, density-dependent ionic charge must be used in place of the actual total ionic charge.

  12. Topic Analysis Using a Finite Mixture Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hang; Yamanishi, Kenji

    2003-01-01

    Presents a single framework for conducting topic analysis that performs both topic identification and text segmentation. Key characteristics of the framework are: representing a topic by means of a cluster of words closely related to the topic; and employing a stochastic model, called a finite mixture model, to represent a word distribution within…

  13. Evaporation of Liquid Hydrocarbon Mixtures on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luspay-Kuti, Adrienn; Chevrier, V. F.; Rivera-Valentin, E. G.; Singh, S.; Roe, L. A.; Wagner, A.

    2013-10-01

    Besides Earth, Titan is the only other known planetary body with proven stable liquids on its surface. The hydrological cycle of these liquid hydrocarbon mixtures is critical in understanding Titan’s atmosphere and surface features. Evaporation of liquid surface bodies has been indirectly observed as shoreline changes from measurements by Cassini ISS and RADAR (Hayes et al. 2011, Icarus 211, 655-671; Turtle et al. 2011, Science 18, 1414-1417.), but the long seasons of Saturn strongly limit the time span of these observations and their validity over the course of an entire Titan year. Using a novel Titan simulation chamber, the evaporation rate of liquid methane and dissolved nitrogen mixture under Titan surface conditions was derived (Luspay-Kuti et al. 2012, GRL 39, L23203), which is especially applicable to low latitude transient liquids. Polar lakes, though, are expected to be composed of a variety of hydrocarbons, primarily a mixture of ethane and methane (e.g. Cordier et al. 2009, ApJL 707, L128-L131). Here we performed laboratory simulations of ethane-methane mixtures with varying mole fraction under conditions suitable for the polar regions of Titan. We will discuss results specifically addressing the evaporation behavior as the solution becomes increasingly ethane dominated, providing quantitative values for the evaporation rate at every step. These laboratory results are relevant to polar lakes, such as Ontario Lacus, and can shed light on their stability.

  14. Superconductor precursor mixtures made by precipitation method

    DOEpatents

    Bunker, Bruce C.; Lamppa, Diana L.; Voigt, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus for preparing highly pure homogeneous precursor powder mixtures for metal oxide superconductive ceramics. The mixes are prepared by instantaneous precipitation from stoichiometric solutions of metal salts such as nitrates at controlled pH's within the 9 to 12 range, by addition of solutions of non-complexing pyrolyzable cations, such as alkyammonium and carbonate ions.

  15. Concrete mixture characterization. Cementitious barriers partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.; Protiere, Yannick

    2014-12-01

    This report summarizes the characterization study performed on two concrete mixtures used for radioactive waste storage. Both mixtures were prepared with approximately 425 kg of binder. The testing protocol mostly focused on determining the transport properties of the mixtures; volume of permeable voids (porosity), diffusion coefficients, and water permeability were evaluated. Tests were performed after different curing durations. In order to obtain data on the statistical distribution of transport properties, the measurements after 2 years of curing were performed on 10+ samples. Overall, both mixtures exhibited very low tortuosities and permeabilities, a direct consequence of their low water-to-binder ratio and the use of supplementary cementitious materials. The data generated on 2-year old samples showed that porosity, tortuosity and permeability follow a normal distribution. Chloride ponding tests were also performed on test samples. They showed limited chloride ingress, in line with measured transport properties. These test results also showed that both materials react differently with chloride, a consequence of the differences in the binder chemical compositions.

  16. Spinodal decomposition of chemically reactive binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamorgese, A.; Mauri, R.

    2016-08-01

    We simulate the influence of a reversible isomerization reaction on the phase segregation process occurring after spinodal decomposition of a deeply quenched regular binary mixture, restricting attention to systems wherein material transport occurs solely by diffusion. Our theoretical approach follows a diffuse-interface model of partially miscible binary mixtures wherein the coupling between reaction and diffusion is addressed within the frame of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, leading to a linear dependence of the reaction rate on the chemical affinity. Ultimately, the rate for an elementary reaction depends on the local part of the chemical potential difference since reaction is an inherently local phenomenon. Based on two-dimensional simulation results, we express the competition between segregation and reaction as a function of the Damköhler number. For a phase-separating mixture with components having different physical properties, a skewed phase diagram leads, at large times, to a system converging to a single-phase equilibrium state, corresponding to the absolute minimum of the Gibbs free energy. This conclusion continues to hold for the critical phase separation of an ideally perfectly symmetric binary mixture, where the choice of final equilibrium state at large times depends on the initial mean concentration being slightly larger or less than the critical concentration.

  17. Theory of dynamic arrest in colloidal mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juárez-Maldonado, R.; Medina-Noyola, M.

    2008-05-01

    We present a first-principles theory of dynamic arrest in colloidal mixtures based on the multicomponent self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of colloid dynamics [M. A. Chávez-Rojo and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 72, 031107 (2005); M. A. Chávez-Rojo and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E76, 039902 (2007)]. We illustrate its application with a description of dynamic arrest in two simple model colloidal mixtures: namely, hard-sphere and repulsive Yukawa binary mixtures. Our results include observation of the two patterns of dynamic arrest, one in which both species become simultaneously arrested and the other involving the sequential arrest of the two species. The latter case gives rise to mixed states in which one species is arrested while the other species remains mobile. We also derive the (”bifurcation” or fixed-point”) equations for the nonergodic parameters of the system, which takes the surprisingly simple form of a system of coupled equations for the localization length of the particles of each species. The solution of this system of equations indicates unambiguously which species is arrested (finite localization length) and which species remains ergodic (infinite localization length). As a result, we are able to draw the entire ergodic-nonergodic phase diagram of the binary hard-sphere mixture.

  18. 2,4-/2,6-Dinitrotoluene mixture

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    2,4 - / 2,6 - Dinitrotoluene mixture ; no CASRN Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncar

  19. SIPCAn (Separation, Isolation, Purification, Characterization, and Analysis): A One-Term, Integrated Project for the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dintzner, Matthew R.; Kinzie, Charles R.; Pulkrabek, Kimberly A.; Arena, Anthony F.

    2011-01-01

    SIPCAn, an acronym for separation, isolation, purification, characterization, and analysis, is presented as a one-term, integrated project for the first-term undergraduate organic laboratory course. Students are assigned two mixtures of unknown organic compounds--a mixture of two liquid compounds and a mixture of two solid compounds--at the…

  20. MixtureTree annotator: a program for automatic colorization and visual annotation of MixtureTree.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Chuan; Ogata, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    The MixtureTree Annotator, written in JAVA, allows the user to automatically color any phylogenetic tree in Newick format generated from any phylogeny reconstruction program and output the Nexus file. By providing the ability to automatically color the tree by sequence name, the MixtureTree Annotator provides a unique advantage over any other programs which perform a similar function. In addition, the MixtureTree Annotator is the only package that can efficiently annotate the output produced by MixtureTree with mutation information and coalescent time information. In order to visualize the resulting output file, a modified version of FigTree is used. Certain popular methods, which lack good built-in visualization tools, for example, MEGA, Mesquite, PHY-FI, TreeView, treeGraph and Geneious, may give results with human errors due to either manually adding colors to each node or with other limitations, for example only using color based on a number, such as branch length, or by taxonomy. In addition to allowing the user to automatically color any given Newick tree by sequence name, the MixtureTree Annotator is the only method that allows the user to automatically annotate the resulting tree created by the MixtureTree program. The MixtureTree Annotator is fast and easy-to-use, while still allowing the user full control over the coloring and annotating process.