Science.gov

Sample records for organic medium passivation

  1. Determining Passive Sampler Partition Coefficients for Dissolved-phase Organic Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passive samplers are used for environmental and analytical purposes to measure dissolved nonionic organic contaminants (NOCs) by absorption from a contaminated medium into a clean phase, usually in the form of a synthetic organic film. Recently developed passive sampler techniqu...

  2. Phase Segregation of Passive Advective Particles in an Active Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Amit; Polley, Anirban; Rao, Madan

    2016-02-01

    Localized contractile configurations or asters spontaneously appear and disappear as emergent structures in the collective stochastic dynamics of active polar actomyosin filaments. Passive particles which (un)bind to the active filaments get advected into the asters, forming transient clusters. We study the phase segregation of such passive advective scalars in a medium of dynamic asters, as a function of the aster density and the ratio of the rates of aster remodeling to particle diffusion. The dynamics of coarsening shows a violation of Porod behavior; the growing domains have diffuse interfaces and low interfacial tension. The phase-segregated steady state shows strong macroscopic fluctuations characterized by multiscaling and intermittency, signifying rapid reorganization of macroscopic structures. We expect these unique nonequilibrium features to manifest in the actin-dependent molecular clustering at the cell surface.

  3. Passive microwave remote sensing of an anisotropic random-medium layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. K.; Kong, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The principle of reciprocity is invoked to calculate the brightness temperatures for passive microwave remote sensing of a two-layer anisotropic random medium. The bistatic scattering coefficients are first computed with the Born approximation and then integrated over the upper hemisphere to be subtracted from unity, in order to obtain the emissivity for the random-medium layer. The theoretical results are illustrated by plotting the emissivities as functions of viewing angles and polarizations. They are used to interpret remote sgnsing data obtained from vegetation canopy where the anisotropic random-medium model applies. Field measurements with corn stalks arranged in various configurations with preferred azimuthal directions are successfully interpreted with this model.

  4. Evaluating the Relationship between Equilibrium Passive Sampler Uptake and Aquatic Organism Bioaccumulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Critcal Review evaluates passive sampler uptake of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in water column and interstitial water exposures as a surrogate for organism bioaccumulation. Fifty-seven studies were found where both passive sampler uptake and organism bioaccumulat...

  5. a Thermally Desorbable Miniature Passive Dosimeter for Organic Vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Jesus Antonio

    A thermally desorbable miniature passive dosimeter (MPD) for organic vapors has been developed in conformity with theoretical and practical aspects of passive dosimeter design. The device was optimized for low sample loadings resulting from short-term and/or low concentration level exposure. This was accomplished by the use of thermal desorption rather than solvent elution, which provided the GC method with significantly higher sensitivity. Laboratory evaluation of this device for factors critical to the performance of passive dosimeters using benzene as the test vapor included: desorption efficiency (97.2%), capacity (1400 ppm-min), sensitivity (7ng/sample or 0.06 ppmv for 15 minutes sampling) accuracy and precision, concentration level, environmental conditions (i.e., air face velocity, relative humidity) and sample stability during short (15 minutes) and long periods of time (15 days). This device has demonstrated that its overall accuracy meets NIOSH and OSHA requirements for a sampling and analytical method for the exposure concentration range of 0.1 to 50 ppm (v/v) and 15 minutes exposures. It was demonstrated that the MPD operates in accordance with theoretically predicted performance and should be adequate for short-term and/or low concentration exposure monitoring of organic vapors in the workplace. In addition a dynamic vapor exposure evaluation system for passive dosimeters have been validated using benzene as the test vapor. The system is capable of generating well defined short-square wave concentration profiles suitable for the evaluation of passive dosimeters for ceiling exposure monitoring.

  6. Organic chemistry and biology of the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.

    1973-01-01

    Interstellar organic chemistry is discussed as the field of study emerging from the discovery of microwave lines of formaldehyde and of hydrogen cyanide in the interstellar medium. The reliability of molecular identifications and comparisons of interstellar and cometary compounds are considered, along with the degradational origin of simple organics. It is pointed out that the contribution of interstellar organic chemistry to problems in biology is not substantive but analogical. The interstellar medium reveals the operation of chemical processes which, on earth and perhaps on vast numbers of planets throughout the universe, led to the origin of life, but the actual molecules of the interstellar medium are unlikely to play any significant biological role.

  7. Passive dosimetry as an alternative technique to dynamic enrichment of organic pollutants of indoor air.

    PubMed

    Zabiegała, B; Przyjazny, A; Namieśnik, J

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of the quality of indoor air was carried out in 20 apartments, 3 offices, and 3 laboratories in the Tricity area in Poland with reference to concentrations of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as benzene, toluene, butyl acetate, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, styrene, and m-dichlorobenzene. The time dependence of concentrations of selected VOCs in a newly erected building was studied. Two different techniques were used for the isolation and preconcentration of analytes from air samples: a passive method employing a home-made permeation-type passive sampler and a dynamic method based on a sorption tube. In both cases, activated charcoal was used as a sorption medium (trap packing). The sorption tube was used to validate the results obtained by the passive method, as well. In the majority of dwellings examined, the concentrations of air pollutants were relatively low and did not exceed the MAC values. No significant differences were observed between MAC concentrations determined by using the passive or the dynamic method of air sampling. The results obtained by both sampling methods were characterized by similar precision.

  8. Performance bounds for passive sensor arrays operating in a turbulent medium: plane-wave analysis.

    PubMed

    Collier, S L; Wilson, D K

    2003-05-01

    The performance bounds of a passive acoustic array operating in a turbulent medium with fluctuations described by a von Kármán spectrum are investigated. This treatment considers a single, monochromatic, plane-wave source at near-normal incidence. A line-of-sight propagation path is assumed. The primary interests are in calculating the Cramer-Rao lower bounds of the azimuthal and elevational angles of arrival and in observing how these bounds change with the introduction of additional unknowns, such as the propagation distance, turbulence parameters, and signal-to-noise ratio. In both two and three dimensions, it is found that for large values of the index-of-refraction variance, the Cramer-Rao lower bounds of the angles of arrival increase significantly at large values of the normalized propagation distance. For small values of the index-of-refraction variance and normalized propagation distance, the signal-to-noise ratio is found to be the limiting factor. In the two-dimensional treatment, it is found that the estimate of the angle of arrival will decouple from the estimates of the other parameters with the appropriate choice of array geometry. In three dimensions, again with an appropriate choice of array geometry, the estimates of the azimuth and elevation will decouple from the estimates of the other parameters, but due to the constraints of the model, will remain coupled to one another.

  9. Performance bounds for passive sensor arrays operating in a turbulent medium: Plane-wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, S. L.; Wilson, D. K.

    2003-05-01

    The performance bounds of a passive acoustic array operating in a turbulent medium with fluctuations described by a von Kármán spectrum are investigated. This treatment considers a single, monochromatic, plane-wave source at near-normal incidence. A line-of-sight propagation path is assumed. The primary interests are in calculating the Cramer-Rao lower bounds of the azimuthal and elevational angles of arrival and in observing how these bounds change with the introduction of additional unknowns, such as the propagation distance, turbulence parameters, and signal-to-noise ratio. In both two and three dimensions, it is found that for large values of the index-of-refraction variance, the Cramer-Rao lower bounds of the angles of arrival increase significantly at large values of the normalized propagation distance. For small values of the index-of-refraction variance and normalized propagation distance, the signal-to-noise ratio is found to be the limiting factor. In the two-dimensional treatment, it is found that the estimate of the angle of arrival will decouple from the estimates of the other parameters with the appropriate choice of array geometry. In three dimensions, again with an appropriate choice of array geometry, the estimates of the azimuth and elevation will decouple from the estimates of the other parameters, but due to the constraints of the model, will remain coupled to one another.

  10. Modeling uptake of hydrophobic organic contaminants into polyethylene passive samplers.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jay M; Hsieh, Ching-Hong; Luthy, Richard G

    2015-02-17

    Single-phase passive samplers are gaining acceptance as a method to measure hydrophobic organic contaminant (HOC) concentration in water. Although the relationship between the HOC concentration in water and passive sampler is linear at equilibrium, mass transfer models are needed for nonequilibrium conditions. We report measurements of organochlorine pesticide diffusion and partition coefficients with respect to polyethylene (PE), and present a Fickian approach to modeling HOC uptake by PE in aqueous systems. The model is an analytic solution to Fick's second law applied through an aqueous diffusive boundary layer and a polyethylene layer. Comparisons of the model with existing methods indicate agreement at appropriate boundary conditions. Laboratory release experiments on the organochlorine pesticides DDT, DDE, DDD, and chlordane in well-mixed slurries support the model's applicability to aqueous systems. In general, the advantage of the model is its application in the cases of well-agitated systems, low values of polyethylene-water partioning coefficients, thick polyethylene relative to the boundary layer thickness, and/or short exposure times. Another significant advantage is the ability to estimate, or at least bound, the needed exposure time to reach a desired CPE without empirical model inputs. A further finding of this work is that polyethylene diffusivity does not vary by transport direction through the sampler thickness. PMID:25607420

  11. Passive dosing versus solvent spiking for controlling and maintaining hydrophobic organic compound exposure in the Microtox® assay.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kilian E C; Jeong, Yoonah; Kim, Jongwoon

    2015-11-01

    Microbial toxicity bioassays such as the Microtox® test are ubiquitously applied to measure the toxicity of chemicals and environmental samples. In many ways their operation is conducive to the testing of organic chemicals. They are of short duration, use glass cuvettes and take place at reduced temperatures in medium lacking sorbing components. All of these are expected to reduce sorptive and volatile losses, but particularly for hydrophobic organics the role of such losses in determining the bioassay response remains unclear. This study determined the response of the Microtox® test when using solvent spiking compared to passive dosing for introducing the model hydrophobic compounds acenaphthene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene and benzo(a)pyrene. Compared to solvent spiking, the apparent sensitivity of the Microtox® test with passive dosing was 3.4 and 12.4 times higher for acenaphthene and phenanthrene, respectively. Furthermore, fluoranthene only gave a consistent response with passive dosing. Benzo(a)pyrene did not result in a response with either spiking or passive dosing even at aqueous solubility. Such differences in the apparent sensitivity of the Microtox® test can be traced back to the precise definition of the dissolved exposure concentrations and the buffering of losses with passive dosing. This highlights the importance of exposure control even in simple and short-term microbial bioassays such as the Microtox® test. PMID:26117202

  12. Quantum-Noise-Limited Sensitivity-Enhancement of a Passive Optical Cavity by a Fast-Light Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Luckay, H. A.; Chang, Hongrok; Myneni, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate for a passive optical cavity containing an intracavity dispersive atomic medium, the increase in scale factor near the critical anomalous dispersion is not cancelled by mode broadening or attenuation, resulting in an overall increase in the predicted quantum-noiselimited sensitivity. Enhancements of over two orders of magnitude are measured in the scale factor, which translates to greater than an order-of-magnitude enhancement in the predicted quantumnoise- limited measurement precision, by temperature tuning a low-pressure vapor of noninteracting atoms in a low-finesse cavity close to the critical anomalous dispersion condition. The predicted enhancement in sensitivity is confirmed through Monte-Carlo numerical simulations.

  13. Coal liquefaction in an inorganic-organic medium

    DOEpatents

    Vermeulen, Theodore; Grens, II, Edward A.; Holten, Ronald R.

    1982-01-01

    Improved process for liquefaction of coal by contacting pulverized coal in an inorganic-organic medium solvent system containing a ZnCl.sub.2 catalyst, a polar solvent with the structure RX where X is one of the elements O, N, S or P, and R is hydrogen or a lower hydrocarbon radical; the solvent system can contain a hydrogen donor solvent (and must when RX is water) which is immiscible in the ZnCl.sub.2 and is a hydroaromatic hydrocarbon, selected from tetralin, dihydrophenanthrene, dihydroanthracene or a hydrogenated coal derived hydroaromatic hydrocarbon distillate fraction.

  14. Organic Chemistry: From the Interstellar Medium to the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This talk will review the various types of organic materials observed in different environments in the interstellar medium, discuss the processes by which these materials may have formed and been modified, and present the evidence supporting the contention that at least a fraction of this material survived incorporation, substantially unaltered, into our Solar System during its formation. The nature of this organic material is of direct interest to issues associated with the origin of life, both because this material represents a large fraction of the Solar System inventory of the biogenically-important elements, and because many of the compounds in this inventory have biogenic implications. Several specific examples of such molecules will be briefly discussed.

  15. Quantum-noise-limited sensitivity enhancement of a passive optical cavity by a fast-light medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David D.; Luckay, H. A.; Chang, Hongrok; Myneni, Krishna

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate that for a passive optical cavity containing a dispersive atomic medium, the increase in scale factor near the critical anomalous dispersion is not canceled by mode broadening or attenuation, resulting in an overall increase in the predicted quantum-noise-limited sensitivity. Enhancements of over two orders of magnitude are measured in the scale factor, which translates to greater than an order-of-magnitude enhancement in the predicted quantum-noise-limited measurement precision, by temperature-tuning a low-pressure vapor of noninteracting atoms in a low-finesse cavity close to the critical anomalous dispersion condition. The predicted enhancement in sensitivity is confirmed through Monte Carlo numerical simulations.

  16. Passive Sampling in Regulatory Chemical Monitoring of Nonpolar Organic Compounds in the Aquatic Environment.

    PubMed

    Booij, Kees; Robinson, Craig D; Burgess, Robert M; Mayer, Philipp; Roberts, Cindy A; Ahrens, Lutz; Allan, Ian J; Brant, Jan; Jones, Lisa; Kraus, Uta R; Larsen, Martin M; Lepom, Peter; Petersen, Jördis; Pröfrock, Daniel; Roose, Patrick; Schäfer, Sabine; Smedes, Foppe; Tixier, Céline; Vorkamp, Katrin; Whitehouse, Paul

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed compliance monitoring requirements in the European Union, the United States, and the Oslo-Paris Convention for the protection of the marine environment of the North-East Atlantic, and evaluated if these are met by passive sampling methods for nonpolar compounds. The strengths and shortcomings of passive sampling are assessed for water, sediments, and biota. Passive water sampling is a suitable technique for measuring concentrations of freely dissolved compounds. This method yields results that are incompatible with the EU's quality standard definition in terms of total concentrations in water, but this definition has little scientific basis. Insufficient quality control is a present weakness of passive sampling in water. Laboratory performance studies and the development of standardized methods are needed to improve data quality and to encourage the use of passive sampling by commercial laboratories and monitoring agencies. Successful prediction of bioaccumulation based on passive sampling is well documented for organisms at the lower trophic levels, but requires more research for higher levels. Despite the existence of several knowledge gaps, passive sampling presently is the best available technology for chemical monitoring of nonpolar organic compounds. Key issues to be addressed by scientists and environmental managers are outlined. PMID:26619247

  17. Local oscillator induced degradation of medium-term stability in passive atomic frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. John; Prestage, John D.; Greenhall, Charles A.; Maleki, Lute

    1990-01-01

    As the performance of passive atomic frequency standards improves, a new limitation is encountered due to frequency fluctuations in an ancillary local oscillator (L.O.). The effect is due to time variation in the gain of the feedback which compensates L.O. frequency fluctuations. The high performance promised by new microwave and optical trapped ion standards may be severely compromised by this effect. Researchers present an analysis of this performance limitation for the case of sequentially interrogated standards. The time dependence of the sensitivity of the interrogation process to L.O. frequency fluctuations is evaluated for single-pulse and double-pulse Ramsey RF interrogation and for amplitude modulated pulses. The effect of these various time dependencies on performance of the standard is calculated for an L.O. with frequency fluctuations showing a typical 1/f spectral density. A limiting 1/sq. root gamma dependent deviation of frequency fluctuations is calculated as a function of pulse lengths, dead time, and pulse overlap. Researchers also present conceptual and hardware-oriented solutions to this problem which achieve a much more nearly constant sensitivity to L.O. fluctuations. Solutions involve use of double-pulse interrogation; alternate interrogation of multiple traps so that the dead time of one trap can be covered by operation of the other; and the use of double-pulse interrogation for two traps, so that during the time of the RF pulses, the increasing sensitivity of one trap tends to compensate for the decreasing sensitivity of the other. A solution making use of amplified-modulated pulses is also presented which shows nominally zero time variation.

  18. A passive DOAS instrument for trace gas measurements on medium sized UAS: Instrumental design and first measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horbanski, Martin; Pöhler, Denis; Mahr, Tobias; Wagner, Thomas; Keleshis, Christos; Ioannou, Stelios; Lange, Manfred A.; Lelieveld, Jos; Platt, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) are a new powerful tool for observations in the atmospheric boundary layer. Recent developments in measuring technology allow the construction of compact and sensitive active and passive DOAS instruments which can fit the space and weight constraints on UAS. This opens new possibilities for trace gas measurements in the lower troposphere, especially in areas which are not accessible to manned aviation e.g. volcanic plumes or which should be monitored regularly (e.g. industrial emissions of a stack). We present a new developed passive DOAS instrument for the APAESO Platform of the Cyprus Institute, a medium size UAS. It is equipped with two telescopes for observations in downward (nadir) and horizontal (limb) viewing direction, respectively. Thus it allows determining height profiles and the horizontal distribution of trace gases. This is accomplished by analyzing the radiation collected by the telescopes with compact spectrometers, which cover the UV-blue spectral range allowing to measure a broad variety of atmospheric trace gases (e.g. NO2, SO2, BrO, IO, H2O ...) as well as aerosol properties via O4 absorption. Additionally, the nadir direction is equipped with a VIS-NIR spectrometer. It is used to measure reflection spectra of different types of vegetation. These will serve as references for satellite measurements to create global maps. First measurements on the APAESO platform were performed in October 2012 on Cyprus in a rural area south of Nicosia. The instrument is shown to work reliably and was able to detect NO2, H2O and O4 at atmospheric column densities. The instrumental design and first measurements will be presented and discussed.

  19. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS MEASURED IN DEARS PASSIVE SAMPLERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A suite of 27 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were monitored in personal exposures, indoors and outdoors of participant's residences, and at a central community site during the DEARS summer 2004 monitoring season. The list of VOCs focused on compounds typically associated with ...

  20. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AS BREATH BIOMARKERS FOR ACTIVE AND PASSIVE SMOKING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time breath measurement technology was used to investigate the suitability of some volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to serve as breath biomarkers for active and passive smoking and to measure actual exposures and resulting breath concentrations for persons exposed to toba...

  1. Preparation of carbon quantum dots with tunable photoluminescence by rapid laser passivation in ordinary organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangyou; Wang, Hongqiang; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Pyatenko, Alexander; Kawaguchi, Kenji; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2011-01-21

    A simple approach to prepare carbon quantum dots is presented in this communication by laser rapid passivation of nano carbon particles in ordinary organic solvent. The as-prepared carbon dots exhibited visible, tunable and stable photoluminescence (PL). XPS analysis showed that the increased oxygen concentration might be concerned with the origin of PL.

  2. Spatial analysis of volatile organic compounds in South Philadelphia using passive samplers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Select volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured in the vicinity of a petroleum refinery and related operations in South Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, using passive air sampling and laboratory analysis methods. Two-week, time-integrated samplers were deployed at 17 sites...

  3. Passive micromixers and organic electrochemical transistors for biosensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanakamedala, Senaka Krishna

    Fluid handling at the microscale has greatly affected different fields such as biomedical, pharmaceutical, biochemical engineering and environmental monitoring due to its reduced reagent consumption, portability, high throughput, lower hardware cost and shorter analysis time compared to large devices. The challenges associated with mixing of fluids in microscale enabled us in designing, simulating, fabricating and characterizing various micromixers on silicon and flexible polyester substrates. The mixing efficiency was evaluated by injecting the fluids through the two inlets and collecting the sample at outlet. The images collected from the microscope were analyzed, and the absorbance of the color product at the outlet was measured to quantify the mixing efficacy. A mixing efficiency of 96% was achieved using a flexible disposable micromixer. The potential for low-cost processing and the device response tuning using chemical doping or synthesis opened doorways to use organic semiconductor devices as transducers in chemical and biological sensor applications. A simple, inexpensive organic electrochemical transistor (OECT) based on conducting polymer poly(3,4- ethyelenedioxythiphene) poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) was fabricated using a novel one step fabrication method. The developed transistor was used as a biosensor to detect glucose and glutamate. The developed glucose sensor showed a linear response for the glucose levels ranging from 1 muM-10 mM and showed a decent response for the glucose levels similar to those found in human saliva and to detect glutamate released from brain tumor cells. The developed glutamate sensor was used to detect the glutamate released from astrocytes and glioma cells after stimulation, and the results are compared with fluorescent spectrophotometer. The developed sensors employ simple fabrication, operate at low potentials, utilize lower enzyme concentrations, do not employ enzyme immobilization techniques, require only 5 muL of

  4. Chemical and toxicologic assessment of organic contaminants in surface water using passive samplers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alvarez, D.A.; Cranor, W.L.; Perkins, S.D.; Clark, R.C.; Smith, S.B.

    2008-01-01

    Passive sampling methodologies were used to conduct a chemical and toxicologic assessment of organic contaminants in the surface waters of three geographically distinct agricultural watersheds. A selection of current-use agrochemicals and persistent organic pollutants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and organochlorine pesticides, were targeted using the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) and the semipermeable membrane device passive samplers. In addition to the chemical analysis, the Microtox assay for acute toxicity and the yeast estrogen screen (YES) were conducted as potential assessment tools in combination with the passive samplers. During the spring of 2004, the passive samplers were deployed for 29 to 65 d at Leary Weber Ditch, IN; Morgan Creek, MD; and DR2 Drain, WA. Chemical analysis of the sampler extracts identified the agrochemicals predominantly used in those areas, including atrazine, simazine, acetochlor, and metolachlor. Other chemicals identified included deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine, trifluralin, fluoranthene, pyrene, cis- and trans-nonachlor, and pentachloroanisole. Screening using Microtox resulted in no acutely toxic samples. POCIS samples screened by the YES assay failed to elicit a positive estrogenic response. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  5. Passive samplers of hydrophobic organic chemicals reach equilibrium faster in the laboratory than in the field.

    PubMed

    Booij, Kees; Tucca, Felipe

    2015-09-15

    The use of passive sampling methods for monitoring hydrophobic organic chemicals frequently requires the determination of equilibration times and partition coefficients in the laboratory. These experiments are often carried out by exposing passive samplers in a finite water volume, and errors are easily made when the obtained results are applied to the field, where water volumes are essentially infinite. The effect of water volume on the equilibration rate constant is discussed, using a mechanistic model. Application of this model to two literature reports illustrates that aqueous concentrations in the field may be underestimated by a factor of 10 or more, when the water volume effect is neglected. Finally, it is shown that the concept of "sorption capacity" (sampler mass times partition coefficient) allows for a more intuitive understanding of the passive sampling process in small and large water volumes, which may reduce the risk of laboratory-field extrapolation errors.

  6. Passive remediation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds using barometric pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.; Looney, B.B.; Dilek, C.A.E.; Riha, B.; Rohay, V.J.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Program, sponsored by the Department of Energy, is to demonstrate new subsurface characterization, monitoring, and remediation technologies. The interbedded clay and sand layers at the Integrated Demonstration Site (IDS) are contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs). Characterization studies show that the bulk of the contamination is located in the approximately 40 m thick vadose zone. The most successful strategy for removing contaminants of this type from this environment is vapor extraction alone or in combination with other methods such as air sparging or enhanced bioremediation. Preliminary work at the IDS has indicated that natural pressure differences between surface and subsurface air caused by surface barometric fluctuations can produce enough gas flow to make barometric pumping a viable method for subsurface remediation. Air flow and pressure were measured in wells that are across three stratigraphic intervals in the vadose zone` The subsurface pressures were correlated to surface pressure fluctuations but were damped and lagging in phase corresponding to depth and stratum permeability. Piezometer wells screened at lower elevations exhibited a greater phase lag and damping than wells screened at higher elevations where the pressure wave from barometric fluctuations passes through a smaller number of low permeable layers. The phase lag between surface and subsurface pressures results in significant fluxes through these wells. The resultant air flows through the subsurface impacts CVOC fate and transport. With the appropriate controls (e.g. solenoid valves) a naturally driven vapor extraction system can be implemented requiring negligible operating costs yet capable of a large CVOC removal rate (as much as 1--2 kg/day in each well at the IDS).

  7. THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM AND FEEDBACK IN THE PROGENITORS OF THE COMPACT PASSIVE GALAXIES AT z ∼ 2

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Christina C.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Lee, Bomee; Tundo, Elena; Mobasher, Bahram; Nayyeri, Hooshang; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton; Grogin, Norman; Trump, Jonathan R.; Cassata, Paolo; Dekel, Avishai; Guo, Yicheng; Pentericci, Laura; Castellano, Marco; Fontana, Adriano; Grazian, Andrea; Bell, Eric F.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; and others

    2015-02-10

    Quenched galaxies at z > 2 are nearly all very compact relative to z ∼ 0, suggesting a physical connection between high stellar density and efficient, rapid cessation of star-formation. We present rest-frame UV spectra of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) at z ∼ 3 selected to be candidate progenitors of the quenched galaxies at z ∼ 2 based on their compact rest-frame-optical sizes and high Σ{sub SFR}. We compare their UV properties to those of more extended LBGs of similar mass and star-formation rate (non-candidates). We find that candidate progenitors have faster bulk interstellar medium (ISM) gas velocities and higher equivalent widths of interstellar absorption lines, implying larger velocity spread among absorbing clouds. Candidates deviate from the relationship between equivalent widths of Lyα and interstellar absorption lines in that their Lyα emission remains strong despite high interstellar absorption, possibly indicating that the neutral H I fraction is patchy, such that Lyα photons can escape. We detect stronger C IV P-Cygni features (emission and absorption) and He II emission in candidates, indicative of larger populations of metal-rich Wolf-Rayet stars compared to non-candidates. The faster bulk motions, broader spread of gas velocity, and Lyα properties of candidates are consistent with their ISM being subject to more energetic feedback than non-candidates. Together with their larger metallicity (implying more evolved star-formation activity) this leads us to propose, if speculatively, that they are likely to quench sooner than non-candidates, supporting the validity of selection criteria used to identify them as progenitors of z ∼ 2 passive galaxies. We propose that massive, compact galaxies undergo more rapid growth of their stellar mass content, perhaps because the gas accretion mechanisms are different, and quench sooner than normally sized LBGs at these (early) epochs.

  8. Passive dosing for producing defined and constant exposure of hydrophobic organic compounds during in vitro toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kilian E C; Oostingh, Gertie J; Mayer, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    Toxicity testing of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in plastic cell culture plates is problematic due to compound losses through volatilization and sorption to the wells and culture medium constituents. This leads to poorly defined exposure and reduced test sensitivity. Passive dosing can overcome these problems by the continual partitioning of HOCs from a dominating reservoir loaded in a biologically inert polymer such as silicone, providing defined and constant freely dissolved concentrations and also eliminating spiking with cosolvents. This study aimed to select a suitable passive dosing format for in vitro tests in multiwell plates and characterize its performance at 37 degrees C. Silicone O-rings were the most suitable format; they were both practical and demonstrated excellent passive dosing performance. (1) The rings were loaded by partitioning from a methanol solution containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (log K(OW), 3.33-6.43) that served as model compounds, followed by removal of the methanol with water. This resulted in highly reproducible HOC concentrations in the silicone O-rings. (2) The release of PAHs into aqueous solutions was rapid and reproducible, with equilibrium partitioning being reached within hours. (3) The buffering capacity of the O-rings was sufficient to maintain stable concentrations over more than 72 h. The O-rings were then applied to test a range of PAHs at their aqueous solubility in an array of established in vitro cell culture assays with human cells and cell lines. These included the formation of reactive oxygen species, induction of the IL-8 cytokine promoter, and secretion of MCP-1 by the cells. The biological responses depended on the melting point of the individual PAHs and their maximum chemical activities (a(max)). Only those PAHs with the highest a(max) stimulated the formation of reactive oxygen species and MCP-1 secretion, while they inhibited the induction of the IL-8 cytokine promoter. PMID:19928796

  9. Self-organized, effective medium Black Silicon for infrared antireflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steglich, Martin; Käsebier, Thomas; Schrempel, Frank; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    Statistical Black Silicon antireflection structures for the mid-infrared spectral region, fabricated by Inductively Coupled Plasma Reactive Ion Etching, are investigated. Upon variation of etch duration scaling of the structure morphologies is observed and related to the optical losses in specular transmittance. By means of statistical morphology analysis, an effective medium criterion for the examined structures is derived that can be used as a design rule for maximizing sample transmittance at a given wavelength. To obtain Black Silicon antireflection structures with elevated bandwidth, an additional deep-etch step is proposed and demonstrated.

  10. MICROWAVE EFFECTS IN ORGANIC SYNTHESIS: MECHANISTIC AND REACTION MEDIUM CONSIDERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The scope of applications of microwave irradiation relates to a wide spectrum of organic syntheses with numerous benefits (reduction in reaction times, improved purity of products and better yields) encompassing advantages of both thermal and (or) specific non-purely thermal effe...

  11. Rheology of zirconia suspensions in a nonpolar organic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Moloney, V.M.B.; Parris, D.; Edirisinghe, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    Three dispersants (stearic acid, oleic acid, and poly-(12-hydroxystearic acid)) are compared for their ability to produce low-viscosity suspensions of zirconia in kerosene. Rheological measurements and sediment packing density measurements show that poly(12-hydroxystearic acid) is a better dispersant than stearic acid or oleic acid; this is explained in terms of the longer tail of the poly-(12-hydroxystearic acid) surfactant molecule. The amount of dispersant can be optimized to reduce viscosity and yield point of the suspension, and to eliminate thixotropic hysteresis. The use of a dispersion medium of lower viscosity than the dispersant makes it easy to detect when complete monolayer coverage has been achieved. The loss of pseudoplasticity, brought about by a higher degree of deflocculation, can be recovered by increasing the volume fraction of solids of a suspension and this is beneficial in the plastic forming of ceramics. Rheological measurements showed that these suspensions reach a critical state above a critical shear stress ({tau}{sub c}). This critical state is described by several parameters, i.e., the Bingham yield stress ({tau}{sub B}), the plastic viscosity ({eta}{sub PL}), and the critical shear rate ({dot {gamma}}{sub c}), which are dependent on the volume fraction of solids.

  12. Oxidative stress gradient in a medium during human corneal organ culture

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen-Soriano, Siv; Haug, Kristiane; Arnal, Emma; Peris-Martinez, Cristina; Moe, Morten C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Lipid peroxidation content was measured in an organ culture medium after one-week storage of human donor corneas. Moreover, the effects of the medium on oxidative stress, antioxidant capacity, and the proliferation of cultured human corneal cells were studied. Methods The medium was sampled from the upper and lower halves of storage vials and from controls (n=42). Malondialdehyde (MDA) was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Cultured human corneal epithelium (CRL-11515) was exposed to different medium samples and monitored for changes in MDA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]), total antioxidant capacity (antioxidant assay kit), and proliferation (Ki-67). Results A significant increase in MDA was observed in the organ culture medium in the lower level of storage vials. The addition of this fraction to cultured cells increased MDA significantly after 3 days, and the medium from both levels significantly increased MDA after 7 days. The medium from both levels significantly decreased the total antioxidant capacity of the cells but did not affect proliferative activity. Conclusions An oxidative gradient with an evident biologic effect is established in the medium in vials during organ culture of human donor corneas. Donor tissue stored at the bottom or in lower levels of such vials is exposed to a significant amount of oxidative stress. PMID:22736949

  13. Effect of the length of ligands passivating quantum dots on the electrooptical characteristics of organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kurochkin, N. S.; Vashchenko, A. A. Vitukhnovsky, A. G.; Tananaev, P. N.

    2015-07-15

    The electrooptical characteristics of organic light-emitting diodes with quantum dots passivated with organic ligands of different lengths as emitting centers are investigated. It is established that the thickness of the ligand coating covering the quantum dots has little effect on the Förster energy transfer in the diodes, but significantly affects the direct injection of charge carriers into the quantum-dot layer. It is shown that the thickness of the passivation coating covering the quantum dots in a close-packed nanoparticle layer is deter- mined both by the length of passivating ligands and the degree of quantum-dot coverage with ligands.

  14. The Role of Organ of Corti Mass in Passive Cochlear Tuning

    PubMed Central

    de La Rochefoucauld, Ombeline; Olson, Elizabeth S.

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism for passive cochlear tuning remains unsettled. Early models considered the organ of Corti complex (OCC) as a succession of spring-mass resonators. Later, traveling wave models showed that passive tuning could arise through the interaction of cochlear fluid mass and OCC stiffness without local resonators. However, including enough OCC mass to produce local resonance enhanced the tuning by slowing and thereby growing the traveling wave as it approached its resonant segment. To decide whether the OCC mass plays a role in tuning, the frequency variation of the wavenumber of the cochlear traveling wave was measured (in vivo, passive cochleae) and compared to theoretical predictions. The experimental wavenumber was found by taking the phase difference of basilar membrane motion between two longitudinally spaced locations and dividing by the distance between them. The theoretical wavenumber was a solution of the dispersion relation of a three-dimensional cochlear model with OCC mass and stiffness as the free parameters. The experimental data were only well fit by a model that included OCC mass. However, as the measurement position moved from a best-frequency place of 40 to 12 kHz, the role of mass was diminished. The notion of local resonance seems to only apply in the very high-frequency region of the cochlea. PMID:17905841

  15. Comparison of lichen, conifer needles, passive air sampling devices, and snowpack as passive sampling media to measure semi-volatile organic compounds in remote atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Schrlau, Jill E; Geiser, Linda; Hageman, Kimberly J; Landers, Dixon H; Simonich, Staci Massey

    2011-12-15

    A wide range of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs), including pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were measured in lichen, conifer needles, snowpack and XAD-based passive air sampling devices (PASDs) collected from 19 different U.S. national parks in order to compare the magnitude and mechanism of SOC accumulation in the different passive sampling media. Lichen accumulated the highest SOC concentrations, in part because of its long (and unknown) exposure period, whereas PASDs accumulated the lowest concentrations. However, only the PASD SOC concentrations can be used to calculate an average atmospheric gas-phase SOC concentration because the sampling rates are known and the media is uniform. Only the lichen and snowpack SOC accumulation profiles were statistically significantly correlated (r = 0.552, p-value <0.0001) because they both accumulate SOCs present in the atmospheric particle-phase. This suggests that needles and PASDs represent a different composition of the atmosphere than lichen and snowpack and that the interpretation of atmospheric SOC composition is dependent on the type of passive sampling media used. All four passive sampling media preferentially accumulated SOCs with relatively low air-water partition coefficients, while snowpack accumulated SOCs with higher log K(OA) values compared to the other media. Lichen accumulated more SOCs with log K(OA) > 10 relative to needles and showed a greater accumulation of particle-phase PAHs.

  16. Modulation of stratum corneum lipid composition and organization of human skin equivalents by specific medium supplements.

    PubMed

    Thakoersing, Varsha S; van Smeden, Jeroen; Boiten, Walter A; Gooris, Gert S; Mulder, Aat A; Vreeken, Rob J; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2015-09-01

    Our in-house human skin equivalents contain all stratum corneum (SC) barrier lipid classes, but have a reduced level of free fatty acids (FAs), of which a part is mono-unsaturated. These differences lead to an altered SC lipid organization and thereby a reduced barrier function compared to human skin. In this study, we aimed to improve the SC FA composition and, consequently, the SC lipid organization of the Leiden epidermal model (LEM) by specific medium supplements. The standard FA mixture (consisting of palmitic, linoleic and arachidonic acids) supplemented to the medium was modified, by replacing protonated palmitic acid with deuterated palmitic acid or by the addition of deuterated arachidic acid to the mixture, to determine whether FAs are taken up from the medium and are incorporated into SC of LEM. Furthermore, supplementation of the total FA mixture or that of palmitic acid alone was increased four times to examine whether this improves the SC FA composition and lipid organization of LEM. The results demonstrate that the deuterated FAs are taken up into LEMs and are subsequently elongated and incorporated in their SC. However, a fourfold increase in palmitic acid supplementation does not change the SC FA composition or lipid organization of LEM. Increasing the concentration of the total FA mixture in the medium resulted in a decreased level of very long chain FAs and an increased level of mono-unsaturated FAs, which lead to deteriorated SC lipid properties. These results indicate that SC lipid properties can be modulated by specific medium supplements.

  17. Initial pH of medium affects organic acids production but do not affect phosphate solubilization.

    PubMed

    Marra, Leandro M; de Oliveira-Longatti, Silvia M; Soares, Cláudio R F S; de Lima, José M; Olivares, Fabio L; Moreira, Fatima M S

    2015-06-01

    The pH of the culture medium directly influences the growth of microorganisms and the chemical processes that they perform. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of the initial pH of the culture medium on the production of 11 low-molecular-weight organic acids and on the solubilization of calcium phosphate by bacteria in growth medium (NBRIP). The following strains isolated from cowpea nodules were studied: UFLA03-08 (Rhizobium tropici), UFLA03-09 (Acinetobacter sp.), UFLA03-10 (Paenibacillus kribbensis), UFLA03-106 (Paenibacillus kribbensis) and UFLA03-116 (Paenibacillus sp.). The strains UFLA03-08, UFLA03-09, UFLA03-10 and UFLA03-106 solubilized Ca3(PO4)2 in liquid medium regardless of the initial pH, although without a significant difference between the treatments. The production of organic acids by these strains was assessed for all of the initial pH values investigated, and differences between the treatments were observed. Strains UFLA03-09 and UFLA03-10 produced the same acids at different initial pH values in the culture medium. There was no correlation between phosphorus solubilized from Ca3(PO4)2 in NBRIP liquid medium and the concentration of total organic acids at the different initial pH values. Therefore, the initial pH of the culture medium influences the production of organic acids by the strains UFLA03-08, UFLA03-09, UFLA03-10 and UFLA03-106 but it does not affect calcium phosphate solubilization.

  18. Initial pH of medium affects organic acids production but do not affect phosphate solubilization

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Leandro M.; de Oliveira-Longatti, Silvia M.; Soares, Cláudio R.F.S.; de Lima, José M.; Olivares, Fabio L.; Moreira, Fatima M.S.

    2015-01-01

    The pH of the culture medium directly influences the growth of microorganisms and the chemical processes that they perform. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of the initial pH of the culture medium on the production of 11 low-molecular-weight organic acids and on the solubilization of calcium phosphate by bacteria in growth medium (NBRIP). The following strains isolated from cowpea nodules were studied: UFLA03-08 (Rhizobium tropici), UFLA03-09 (Acinetobacter sp.), UFLA03-10 (Paenibacillus kribbensis), UFLA03-106 (Paenibacillus kribbensis) and UFLA03-116 (Paenibacillus sp.). The strains UFLA03-08, UFLA03-09, UFLA03-10 and UFLA03-106 solubilized Ca3(PO4)2 in liquid medium regardless of the initial pH, although without a significant difference between the treatments. The production of organic acids by these strains was assessed for all of the initial pH values investigated, and differences between the treatments were observed. Strains UFLA03-09 and UFLA03-10 produced the same acids at different initial pH values in the culture medium. There was no correlation between phosphorus solubilized from Ca3(PO4)2 in NBRIP liquid medium and the concentration of total organic acids at the different initial pH values. Therefore, the initial pH of the culture medium influences the production of organic acids by the strains UFLA03-08, UFLA03-09, UFLA03-10 and UFLA03-106 but it does not affect calcium phosphate solubilization. PMID:26273251

  19. Passivation of organic light emitting diode anode grid lines by pulsed Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janka, M.; Gierth, R.; Rubingh, J.-E.; Abendroth, M.; Eggert, M.; Moet, D. J. D.; Lupo, D.

    2015-09-01

    We report the self-aligned passivation of a current distribution grid for an organic light emitting diode (OLED) anode using a pulsed Joule heating method to align the passivation layer accurately on the metal grid. This method involves passing an electric current through the grid to cure a polymer dielectric. Uncured polymer is then rinsed away, leaving a patterned dielectric layer that conforms to the shape of the grid lines. To enhance the accuracy of the alignment, heat conduction into the substrate and the transparent electrode is limited by using short current pulses instead of a constant current. Excellent alignment accuracy of the dielectric layer on printed metal grid lines has been achieved, with a typical 4-μm dielectric overhang. In addition to good accuracy, pulsed Joule heating significantly cuts down process time and energy consumption compared to heating with a constant current. The feasibility of using a printed current distribution grid and Joule heating was demonstrated in an OLED device.

  20. Calibration and field application of passive sampling for episodic exposure to polar organic pesticides in streams.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Diego; Vermeirssen, Etiënne L M; Bandow, Nicole; Muñoz, Katherine; Schäfer, Ralf B

    2014-11-01

    Rainfall-triggered runoff is a major driver of pesticide input in streams. Only few studies have examined the suitability of passive sampling to quantify such episodic exposures. In this study, we used Empore™ styrene-divinylbenzene reverse phase sulfonated disks (SDB disks) and event-driven water samples (EDS) to assess exposure to 15 fungicides and 4 insecticides in 17 streams in a German vineyard area during 4 rainfall events. We also conducted a microcosm experiment to determine the SDB-disk sampling rates and provide a free-software solution to derive sampling rates under time-variable exposure. Sampling rates ranged from 0.26 to 0.77 L d(-1) and time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations from 0.05 to 2.11 μg/L. The 2 sampling systems were in good agreement and EDS exceeded TWA concentrations on average by a factor of 3. Our study demonstrates that passive sampling is suitable to quantify episodic exposures from polar organic pesticides.

  1. Development of a passive, in situ, integrative sampler for hydrophilic organic contaminants in aquatic environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alvarez, D.A.; Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.; Jones-Lepp, T. L.; Getting, D.T.; Goddard, J.P.; Manahan, S.E.

    2004-01-01

    Increasingly it is being realized that a holistic hazard assessment of complex environmental contaminant mixtures requires data on the concentrations of hydrophilic organic contaminants including new generation pesticides, pharmaceuticals, personal care products, and many chemicals associated with household, industrial, and agricultural wastes. To address this issue, we developed a passive in situ sampling device (the polar organic chemical integrative sampler [POCIS]) that integratively concentrates trace levels of complex mixtures of hydrophilic environmental contaminants, enables the determination of their time-weighted average water concentrations, and provides a method of estimating the potential exposure of aquatic organisms to the complex mixture of waterborne contaminants. Using a prototype sampler, linear uptake of selected herbicides and pharmaceuticals with log Kows < 4.0 was observed for up to 56 d. Estimation of the ambient water concentrations of chemicals of interest is achieved by using appropriate uptake models and determination of POCIS sampling rates for appropriate exposure conditions. Use of POCIS in field validation studies targeting the herbicide diuron in the United Kingdom resulted in the detection of the chemical at estimated concentrations of 190 to 600 ng/L. These values are in agreement with reported levels found in traditional grab samples taken concurrently.

  2. Assessment of PDMS-water partition coefficients: implications for passive environmental sampling of hydrophobic organic compounds.

    PubMed

    DiFilippo, Erica L; Eganhouse, Robert P

    2010-09-15

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has shown potential as an in situ passive-sampling technique in aquatic environments. The reliability of this method depends upon accurate determination of the partition coefficient between the fiber coating and water (K(f)). For some hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), K(f) values spanning 4 orders of magnitude have been reported for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and water. However, 24% of the published data examined in this review did not pass the criterion for negligible depletion, resulting in questionable K(f) values. The range in reported K(f) is reduced to just over 2 orders of magnitude for some polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) when these questionable values are removed. Other factors that could account for the range in reported K(f), such as fiber-coating thickness and fiber manufacturer, were evaluated and found to be insignificant. In addition to accurate measurement of K(f), an understanding of the impact of environmental variables, such as temperature and ionic strength, on partitioning is essential for application of laboratory-measured K(f) values to field samples. To date, few studies have measured K(f) for HOCs at conditions other than at 20° or 25 °C in distilled water. The available data indicate measurable variations in K(f) at different temperatures and different ionic strengths. Therefore, if the appropriate environmental variables are not taken into account, significant error will be introduced into calculated aqueous concentrations using this passive sampling technique. A multiparameter linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) was developed to estimate log K(f) in distilled water at 25 °C based on published physicochemical parameters. This method provided a good correlation (R(2) = 0.94) between measured and predicted log K(f) values for several compound classes. Thus, an LSER approach may offer a reliable means of predicting log K(f) for HOCs whose experimental log K(f) values are presently

  3. Assessment of PDMS-water partition coefficients: implications for passive environmental sampling of hydrophobic organic compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DiFilippo, Erica L.; Eganhouse, Robert P.

    2010-01-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has shown potential as an in situ passive-sampling technique in aquatic environments. The reliability of this method depends upon accurate determination of the partition coefficient between the fiber coating and water (Kf). For some hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), Kf values spanning 4 orders of magnitude have been reported for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and water. However, 24% of the published data examined in this review did not pass the criterion for negligible depletion, resulting in questionable Kf values. The range in reported Kf is reduced to just over 2 orders of magnitude for some polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) when these questionable values are removed. Other factors that could account for the range in reported Kf, such as fiber-coating thickness and fiber manufacturer, were evaluated and found to be insignificant. In addition to accurate measurement of Kf, an understanding of the impact of environmental variables, such as temperature and ionic strength, on partitioning is essential for application of laboratory-measured Kf values to field samples. To date, few studies have measured Kf for HOCs at conditions other than at 20 degrees or 25 degrees C in distilled water. The available data indicate measurable variations in Kf at different temperatures and different ionic strengths. Therefore, if the appropriate environmental variables are not taken into account, significant error will be introduced into calculated aqueous concentrations using this passive sampling technique. A multiparameter linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) was developed to estimate log Kf in distilled water at 25 degrees C based on published physicochemical parameters. This method provided a good correlation (R2 = 0.94) between measured and predicted log Kf values for several compound classes. Thus, an LSER approach may offer a reliable means of predicting log Kf for HOCs whose experimental log Kf values are presently unavailable. Future

  4. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: State of the science for organic contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Lydy, Michael J; Landrum, Peter F; Oen, Amy MP; Allinson, Mayumi; Smedes, Foppe; Harwood, Amanda D; Li, Huizhen; Maruya, Keith A; Liu, Jingfu

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript surveys the literature on passive sampler methods (PSMs) used in contaminated sediments to assess the chemical activity of organic contaminants. The chemical activity in turn dictates the reactivity and bioavailability of contaminants in sediment. Approaches to measure specific binding of compounds to sediment components, for example, amorphous carbon or specific types of reduced carbon, and the associated partition coefficients are difficult to determine, particularly for native sediment. Thus, the development of PSMs that represent the chemical activity of complex compound–sediment interactions, expressed as the freely dissolved contaminant concentration in porewater (Cfree), offer a better proxy for endpoints of concern, such as reactivity, bioaccumulation, and toxicity. Passive sampling methods have estimated Cfree using both kinetic and equilibrium operating modes and used various polymers as the sorbing phase, for example, polydimethylsiloxane, polyethylene, and polyoxymethylene in various configurations, such as sheets, coated fibers, or vials containing thin films. These PSMs have been applied in laboratory exposures and field deployments covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales. A wide range of calibration conditions exist in the literature to estimate Cfree, but consensus values have not been established. The most critical criteria are the partition coefficient between water and the polymer phase and the equilibrium status of the sampler. In addition, the PSM must not appreciably deplete Cfree in the porewater. Some of the future challenges include establishing a standard approach for PSM measurements, correcting for nonequilibrium conditions, establishing guidance for selection and implementation of PSMs, and translating and applying data collected by PSMs. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2014;10:167–178. © 2014 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of

  5. Passive Strain-Induced Matrix Synthesis and Organization in Shape-Specific, Cartilaginous Neotissues

    PubMed Central

    MacBarb, Regina F.; Paschos, Nikolaos K.; Abeug, Reedge; Makris, Eleftherios A.; Hu, Jerry C.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-engineered musculoskeletal soft tissues typically lack the appropriate mechanical robustness of their native counterparts, hindering their clinical applicability. With structure and function being intimately linked, efforts to capture the anatomical shape and matrix organization of native tissues are imperative to engineer functionally robust and anisotropic tissues capable of withstanding the biomechanically complex in vivo joint environment. The present study sought to tailor the use of passive axial compressive loading to drive matrix synthesis and reorganization within self-assembled, shape-specific fibrocartilaginous constructs, with the goal of developing functionally anisotropic neotissues. Specifically, shape-specific fibrocartilaginous neotissues were subjected to 0, 0.01, 0.05, or 0.1 N axial loads early during tissue culture. Results found the 0.1-N load to significantly increase both collagen and glycosaminoglycan synthesis by 27% and 67%, respectively, and to concurrently reorganize the matrix by promoting greater matrix alignment, compaction, and collagen crosslinking compared with all other loading levels. These structural enhancements translated into improved functional properties, with the 0.1-N load significantly increasing both the relaxation modulus and Young's modulus by 96% and 255%, respectively, over controls. Finite element analysis further revealed the 0.1-N uniaxial load to induce multiaxial tensile and compressive strain gradients within the shape-specific neotissues, with maxima of 10.1%, 18.3%, and −21.8% in the XX-, YY-, and ZZ-directions, respectively. This indicates that strains created in different directions in response to a single axis load drove the observed anisotropic functional properties. Together, results of this study suggest that strain thresholds exist within each axis to promote matrix synthesis, alignment, and compaction within the shape-specific neotissues. Tailoring of passive axial loading, thus, presents

  6. Effect of Organic and Inorganic Passivation in Quantum-Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Mauricio Solis; Sánchez, Rafael S; González-Pedro, Victoria; Boix, Pablo P; Mhaisalkar, S G; Rincón, Marina E; Bisquert, Juan; Mora-Seró, Iván

    2013-05-01

    The effect of semiconductor passivation on quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) has been systematically characterized for CdS and CdS/ZnS. We have found that passivation strongly depends on the passivation agent, obtaining an enhancement of the solar cell efficiency for compounds containing amine and thiol groups and, in contrast, a decrease in performance for passivating agents with acid groups. Passivation can induce a change in the position of TiO2 conduction band and also in the recombination rate and nature, reflected in a change in the β parameter. Especially interesting is the finding that β, and consequently the fill factor can be increased with the passivation treatment. Applying this strategy, record cells of 4.65% efficiency for PbS-based QDSCs have been produced.

  7. Continuous enzymatic production of peptide precursor in aqueous/organic biphasic medium.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Y; Yoshida, T; Hayashi, S; Hirata, A

    2000-07-01

    N-(benzyloxycarbonyl)-L-aspartic acid (Z-L-Asp) has generally been used as a carboxyl substrate for the enzymatic synthesis of a precursor of aspartame (synthetic sweetener); however, alternative inexpensive protection groups have been in demand for lowering the total cost of its industrial-scale production. A formyl group (F-) was found to be a more desirable protecting group for the N-terminus of amino acid derivatives due to its low cost of preparation, introduction, and removal. The yield of F-AspPheOMe (N-formyl-L-aspartyl-L-phe- nylalanine methylester), however, was found to be <10% in a conventional aqueous medium. We found that F-L-Asp and L-PheOMe were partitioned mainly to the aqueous phase in an aqueous/organic biphasic medium, whereas F-AspPheOMe partitioned to the organic phase, especially when some extracting agents were added. In this study, simultaneous operation of an enzymatic reaction and a product separation by liquid-liquid extraction was thus applied to the F-AspPheOMe synthesis. We succeeded in synthesizing F-AspPheOMe continuously in an aqueous/tributylphosphate (TBP) biphasic medium with >95% yield, which was about tenfold higher than that in an aqueous monophasic medium.

  8. Oxygen demand for the stabilization of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste in passively aerated bioreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kasinski, Slawomir Wojnowska-Baryla, Irena

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • The use of an passively aerated reactor enables effective stabilization of OFMSW. • Convective air flow does not inhibit the aerobic stabilization of waste. • The use of an passively aerated reactor reduces the heat loss due to convection. • The volume of supplied air exceeds 1.7–2.88 times the microorganisms demand. - Abstract: Conventional aerobic waste treatment technologies require the use of aeration devices that actively transport air through the stabilized waste mass, which greatly increases operating costs. In addition, improperly operated active aeration systems, may have the adverse effect of cooling the stabilized biomass. Because active aeration can be a limiting factor for the stabilization process, passive aeration can be equally effective and less expensive. Unfortunately, there are few reports documenting the use of passive aeration systems in municipal waste stabilization. There have been doubts raised as to whether a passive aeration system provides enough oxygen to the organic matter mineralization processes. In this paper, the effectiveness of aeration during aerobic stabilization of four different organic fractions of municipal waste in a reactor with an integrated passive ventilation system and leachate recirculation was analyzed. For the study, four fractions separated by a rotary screen were chosen. Despite the high temperatures in the reactor, the air flow rate was below 0.016 m{sup 3}/h. Using Darcy’s equation, theoretical values of the air flow rate were estimated, depending on the intensity of microbial metabolism and the amount of oxygen required for the oxidation of organic compounds. Calculations showed that the volume of supplied air exceeded the microorganisms demand for oxidation and endogenous activity by 1.7–2.88-fold.

  9. Oxygen demand for the stabilization of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste in passively aerated bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Kasinski, Slawomir; Wojnowska-Baryla, Irena

    2014-02-01

    Conventional aerobic waste treatment technologies require the use of aeration devices that actively transport air through the stabilized waste mass, which greatly increases operating costs. In addition, improperly operated active aeration systems, may have the adverse effect of cooling the stabilized biomass. Because active aeration can be a limiting factor for the stabilization process, passive aeration can be equally effective and less expensive. Unfortunately, there are few reports documenting the use of passive aeration systems in municipal waste stabilization. There have been doubts raised as to whether a passive aeration system provides enough oxygen to the organic matter mineralization processes. In this paper, the effectiveness of aeration during aerobic stabilization of four different organic fractions of municipal waste in a reactor with an integrated passive ventilation system and leachate recirculation was analyzed. For the study, four fractions separated by a rotary screen were chosen. Despite the high temperatures in the reactor, the air flow rate was below 0.016 m(3)/h. Using Darcy's equation, theoretical values of the air flow rate were estimated, depending on the intensity of microbial metabolism and the amount of oxygen required for the oxidation of organic compounds. Calculations showed that the volume of supplied air exceeded the microorganisms demand for oxidation and endogenous activity by 1.7-2.88-fold. PMID:24268917

  10. Guidelines for Using Passive Samplers to Monitor Organic Contaminants at Superfund Sediment Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passive samplers are monitoring tools that can provide faster, cheaper, and scientifically-sound information about the water column and interstitial water concentrations of contaminants of concern (COC) at Superfund sites. Often, the use of passive samplers is more effective tha...

  11. Environmental monitoring of selected pesticides and organic chemicals in urban stormwater recycling systems using passive sampling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Declan; Miotliński, Konrad; Gonzalez, Dennis; Barry, Karen; Dillon, Peter; Gallen, Christie

    2014-03-01

    Water recycling via aquifers has become a valuable tool to augment urban water supplies in many countries. This study reports the first use of passive samplers for monitoring of organic micropollutants in Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR). Five different configurations of passive samplers were deployed in a stormwater treatment wetland, groundwater monitoring wells and a recovery tank to capture a range of polar and non-polar micropollutants present in the system. The passive samplers were analysed for a suite of pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other chemicals. As a result, 17 pesticides and pesticide degradation products, 5 PAHs and 8 other organic chemicals including flame retardants and fragrances were detected in urban stormwater recharging Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) and an Aquifer Storage Transfer and Recovery (ASTR) system. Of the pesticides detected, diuron, metolachlor and chlorpyrifos were generally detected at the highest concentrations in one or more passive samplers, whereas chlorpyrifos, diuron, metolachlor, simazine, galaxolide and triallate were detected in multiple samplers. Fluorene was the PAH detected at the highest concentration and the flame retardant Tris(1-chloro-2-propyl)phosphate was the chemical detected in the greatest abundance at all sites. The passive samplers showed different efficiencies for capture of micropollutants with the Empore disc samplers giving the most reliable results. The results indicate generally low levels of organic micropollutants in the stormwater, as the contaminants detected were present at very low ng/L levels, generally two to four orders of magnitude below the drinking water guidelines (NHMRC, 2011). The efficiency of attenuation of these organic micropollutants during MAR was difficult to determine due to variations in the source water concentrations. Comparisons were made between different samplers, to give a field-based calibration where existing lab-based calibrations were

  12. Environmental monitoring of selected pesticides and organic chemicals in urban stormwater recycling systems using passive sampling techniques.

    PubMed

    Page, Declan; Miotliński, Konrad; Gonzalez, Dennis; Barry, Karen; Dillon, Peter; Gallen, Christie

    2014-03-01

    Water recycling via aquifers has become a valuable tool to augment urban water supplies in many countries. This study reports the first use of passive samplers for monitoring of organic micropollutants in Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR). Five different configurations of passive samplers were deployed in a stormwater treatment wetland, groundwater monitoring wells and a recovery tank to capture a range of polar and non-polar micropollutants present in the system. The passive samplers were analysed for a suite of pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other chemicals. As a result, 17 pesticides and pesticide degradation products, 5 PAHs and 8 other organic chemicals including flame retardants and fragrances were detected in urban stormwater recharging Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) and an Aquifer Storage Transfer and Recovery (ASTR) system. Of the pesticides detected, diuron, metolachlor and chlorpyrifos were generally detected at the highest concentrations in one or more passive samplers, whereas chlorpyrifos, diuron, metolachlor, simazine, galaxolide and triallate were detected in multiple samplers. Fluorene was the PAH detected at the highest concentration and the flame retardant Tris(1-chloro-2-propyl)phosphate was the chemical detected in the greatest abundance at all sites. The passive samplers showed different efficiencies for capture of micropollutants with the Empore disc samplers giving the most reliable results. The results indicate generally low levels of organic micropollutants in the stormwater, as the contaminants detected were present at very low ng/L levels, generally two to four orders of magnitude below the drinking water guidelines (NHMRC, 2011). The efficiency of attenuation of these organic micropollutants during MAR was difficult to determine due to variations in the source water concentrations. Comparisons were made between different samplers, to give a field-based calibration where existing lab-based calibrations were

  13. Use of Passive Diffusion Samplers for Monitoring Volatile Organic Compounds in Ground Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.; Brayton, Michael J.; Ives, Wayne

    2000-01-01

    Passive diffusion samplers have been tested at a number of sites where volatile organic compounds (VOC's) are the principal contaminants in ground water. Test results generally show good agreement between concentrations of VOC's in samples collected with diffusion samplers and concentrations in samples collected by purging the water from a well. Diffusion samplers offer several advantages over conventional and low-flow ground-water sampling procedures: * Elimination of the need to purge a well before collecting a sample and to dispose of contaminated water. * Elimination of cross-contamination of samples associated with sampling with non-dedicated pumps or sample delivery tubes. * Reduction in sampling time by as much as 80 percent of that required for 'purge type' sampling methods. * An increase in the frequency and spatial coverage of monitoring at a site because of the associated savings in time and money. The successful use of diffusion samplers depends on the following three primary factors: (1) understanding site conditions and contaminants of interest (defining sample objectives), (2) validating of results of diffusion samplers against more widely acknowledged sampling methods, and (3) applying diffusion samplers in the field.

  14. Blue/white organic light-emitting diodes and passive matrix display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Lin; Jiang, Xue-Yin; Zhu, Wen-Qing; Xu, Shao-Hong

    2005-01-01

    The blue organic light emitting diodes (OLED) based on anthracene derivatives (ADN) doped with distryrylarylene derivatives (BCzVB and DSA-ph) were presented. The device of ADN doped with BCzVb shows high color purity (x=0.146, y=0.162) with maximum luminance 11600 cd/m2 (15V), current efficiency 2.8 cd/A, while the device of ADN doped with DSA-ph exhibits a sky blue with as high as efficiency 8.29 cd/A, both have a flat efficiency vs current density responses. A typical blue device of ADN doped with TBPe is used for comparison, which gives greenish blue and a stronger current-induced flyorescence quenching. Three kinds of White organic light emitting devices (WOLED) with different dopants and doping sites were constructed. The cell with a single-doped red dye in the light emitting layer (EML)(single-doped) and the cell with both red and blue dyes doped in a single EML (double-doped as well as the cell with red and blue dyes doped in EML and a green dye in another layer (triple-doped). The triple-doped cell shows much higher performance than other two cells: maximum luminance 21200cd/m2, 1026 cd/m2 at driving current 20mA/cm2, efficiency 6cd/A and a half lifetime over 22245h were reached. A passive display features 102x64 pixels with pixel size of 0.25x0.25mm2 pixel pitch 0.08mm, luminance 100 cd/m2 at driving duty 1/64, and power consumption of 0.6W was constructed.

  15. Post-Hurricane Katrina passive sampling of ambient volatile organic compounds in the greater New Orleans area.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kuenja C; Stock, Thomas H; Smith, Luther A; Afshar, Masoud; Liao, Xiaojuan L; Stallings, Casson

    2009-11-01

    On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall near New Orleans, Louisiana, a major metroplex with petroleum industries. In response to the potential impact of the storm on air quality and to assess the exposures to toxic air pollutants of public health concern, the United States Environmental Protection Agency conducted passive monitoring of air toxics for three months, starting in late October 2005 through early February 2006, at up to 18 sites in the New Orleans area affected by Hurricane Katrina. The overall results of the passive ambient monitoring are summarized with the concentrations for the twenty-nine observed volatile organic chemicals, which include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes, and the measured concentrations are compared with available health-based screening levels. The results of passive monitoring are also compared with those of the collocated canister sampling at one of the sites. The overall results showed that the outdoor levels of atmospheric volatile organic chemcals in the post-Katrina New Orleans area were very low and far below the available screening levels. The results also confirm the effectiveness of passive monitoring in a large geographical area where conventional methods are not feasible, electrical power is not available, and the need for sampling is urgent, as in the aftermath of natural disasters and other catastrophes.

  16. Screening of atmospheric short- and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins in India and Pakistan using polyurethane foam based passive air sampler.

    PubMed

    Chaemfa, Chakra; Xu, Yue; Li, Jun; Chakraborty, Paromita; Hussain Syed, Jabir; Naseem Malik, Riffat; Wang, Yan; Tian, Chongguo; Zhang, Gan; Jones, Kevin C

    2014-05-01

    Production and use of chlorinated paraffins (CPs) have been increasing in India. Distribution of CPs in the area and vicinity have become a great concern due to their persistency and toxicity. Polyurethane foam based passive air samplers (PUF-PAS) was deployed in order to screen the presence of short- and medium- chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs and MCCPs) in the outdoor atmosphere at many sites in India (in winter 2006) and Pakistan (in winter 2011). Concentrations of SCCPs and MCCPs ranged from not detected (ND) to 47.4 and 0 to 38.2 ng m(-3) with means of 8.11 and 4.83 ng m(-3), respectively. Indian concentrations showed higher average levels of both SCCPs and MCCPs India (10.2 ng m(-3) and 3.62 ng m(-3)than the samples from Pakistan (5.13 ng m(-3) and 4.21 ng m(-3)). Relative abundance patterns of carbon number are C10 > C11 > C12 ∼ C13 for SCCPs and C14 > C15 > C16 C17 for MCCP with similarity to the profiles of samples from China, the biggest CPs producer in the world. Principal Component Analysis suggested that detected SCCPs and MCCPs in this study originated from the same emission source.

  17. Characterization of polymer coated glass as a passive air sampler for persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Harner, Tom; Farrar, Nick J; Shoeib, Mahiba; Jones, Kevin C; Gobas, Frank A P C

    2003-06-01

    The use of thin-film polymer-coated glass surfaces or POGs as passive air samplers was investigated during an uptake experiment in an indoor environment with high levels of gas-phase polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). POGs consisted of a micron thick layer of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) coated onto glass cylinders. The uptake was initially linear with time and governed by the air-side mass transfer coefficient and surface area of the sampler. This was followed by a curvilinear region and finally a constant phase when equilibrium was established between air and EVA. The high surface area-to-volume ratio of the POGs allowed rapid equilibrium with gas-phase PCBs; equilibration times were on the order of hours for the low molecular weight congeners. The equilibrium concentration was dependent on the EVA-air partition coefficient, K(EVA-A), which was shown to be very well correlated to the octanol-air partition coefficient, K(OA). When POGs of varying thickness were equilibrated with air, the amount of PCB accumulated increased with increasing thickness of the EVA, indicating that uptake was by absorption into the entire polymer matrix. A wind field of 4 m s(-1) resulted in an increased uptake rate by a factor of approximately six compared to uptake in relatively still air. This wind speed effect was diminished, however, when POGs were housed in deployment chambers consisting of inverted stainless steel bowls. Relationships based on the air-side mass transfer coefficient and K(EVA-A) were developed for PCBs that describe the entire uptake profile and allow air concentrations to be determined from the amount of chemical accumulated in the POG. It is believed that these relationships are also valid when POGs are used to detect other classes of persistent organic pollutants. PMID:12831034

  18. Characterization of polymer coated glass as a passive air sampler for persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Harner, Tom; Farrar, Nick J; Shoeib, Mahiba; Jones, Kevin C; Gobas, Frank A P C

    2003-06-01

    The use of thin-film polymer-coated glass surfaces or POGs as passive air samplers was investigated during an uptake experiment in an indoor environment with high levels of gas-phase polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). POGs consisted of a micron thick layer of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) coated onto glass cylinders. The uptake was initially linear with time and governed by the air-side mass transfer coefficient and surface area of the sampler. This was followed by a curvilinear region and finally a constant phase when equilibrium was established between air and EVA. The high surface area-to-volume ratio of the POGs allowed rapid equilibrium with gas-phase PCBs; equilibration times were on the order of hours for the low molecular weight congeners. The equilibrium concentration was dependent on the EVA-air partition coefficient, K(EVA-A), which was shown to be very well correlated to the octanol-air partition coefficient, K(OA). When POGs of varying thickness were equilibrated with air, the amount of PCB accumulated increased with increasing thickness of the EVA, indicating that uptake was by absorption into the entire polymer matrix. A wind field of 4 m s(-1) resulted in an increased uptake rate by a factor of approximately six compared to uptake in relatively still air. This wind speed effect was diminished, however, when POGs were housed in deployment chambers consisting of inverted stainless steel bowls. Relationships based on the air-side mass transfer coefficient and K(EVA-A) were developed for PCBs that describe the entire uptake profile and allow air concentrations to be determined from the amount of chemical accumulated in the POG. It is believed that these relationships are also valid when POGs are used to detect other classes of persistent organic pollutants.

  19. Coal liquefaction in an inorganic-organic medium. [DOE patent application

    DOEpatents

    Vermeulen, T.; Grens, E.A. II; Holten, R.R.

    Improved process for liquefaction of coal by contacting pulverized coal in an inorganic-organic medium solvent system containing a ZnCl/sub 2/ catalyst, a polar solvent with the structure RX where X is one of the elements O, N, S, or P, and R is hydrogen or a lower hydrocarbon radical; the solvent system can contain a hydrogen donor solvent (and must when RX is water) which is immiscible in the ZnCl/sub 2/ and is a hydroaromatic hydrocarbon selected from tetralin, dihydrophenanthrene, dihydroanthracene or a hydrogenated coal derived hydroaromatic hydrocarbon distillate fraction.

  20. Modeling the transport of organic chemicals between polyethylene passive samplers and water in finite and infinite bath conditions.

    PubMed

    Tcaciuc, A Patricia; Apell, Jennifer N; Gschwend, Philip M

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the transfer of chemicals between passive samplers and water is essential for their use as monitoring devices of organic contaminants in surface waters. By applying Fick's second law to diffusion through the polymer and an aqueous boundary layer, the authors derived a mathematical model for the uptake of chemicals into a passive sampler from water, in finite and infinite bath conditions. The finite bath model performed well when applied to laboratory observations of sorption into polyethylene (PE) sheets for various chemicals (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane [DDT]) and at varying turbulence levels. The authors used the infinite bath model to infer fractional equilibration of PCB and DDT analytes in field-deployed PE, and the results were nearly identical to those obtained using the sampling rate model. However, further comparison of the model and the sampling rate model revealed that the exchange of chemicals was inconsistent with the sampling rate model for partially or fully membrane-controlled transfer, which would be expected in turbulent conditions or when targeting compounds with small polymer diffusivities and small partition coefficients (e.g., phenols, some pesticides, and others). The model can be applied to other polymers besides PE as well as other chemicals and in any transfer regime (membrane, mixed, or water boundary layer-controlled). Lastly, the authors illustrate practical applications of this model such as improving passive sampler design and understanding the kinetics of passive dosing experiments. PMID:26109238

  1. Effective medium analysis of thermally evaporated Ag nanoparticle films for plasmonic enhancement in organic solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidari, Gholamhosain; Hajimahmoodzadeh, Morteza; Fallah, Hamid Reza; Varnamkhasti, Mohsen Ghasemi

    2015-09-01

    Films of silver nanoparticles have optical properties that are useful for applications such as plasmonic light trapping in solar cells. We report on the simple fabrication of Ag nanoparticle films via thermal evaporation, with and without subsequent annealing. These films result in a random array of particles of various shapes and sizes. The modeling of such a vast collection of particles is still beyond reach of the modern computers. We show that it is possible to represent the silver island films by the Bergman effective mediums with the same optical properties. The effective medium method provides us with deep insight about the shape, the size and the distribution of nanoparticles. The far field simulations of solar cells, in which the silver island film is replaced with an effective medium layer, show a reduction in the absorption of active layer. Besides, the near field simulations based on finite-difference time-domain technique demonstrate that the near field effects on active layer absorption are negligible and this method highlights the importance of nanoparticles shapes. The PCPDTBT:PCBM solar cells with embedded silver island films are fabricated, and it is found that their performances show the similar trend. This insight can be used for the optical analysis of thermally evaporated Ag nanoparticle films for the improvement of organic solar cells.

  2. Peculiarities of the submicroscopic organization of chlorella cells cultivated on a solid medium in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sytnik, K. M.; Popova, A. F.; Nechitailo, G. S.; Mashinsky, A. L.

    The submicroscopic organization of Chlorella vulgaris cells (strain LARG-1) growing over 30 days on a solid agarized medium aboard the orbital station ``Mir'' was studied. A number of differences in the ultrastructure of cells of the experimental population compared to the control has been revealed. Thus, changes in the membrane system of plastids, in particular, appearance of numerous vesicles of different diameter and outgrowths of the plastids and their contact with the plasmalemma as well as a considerable decrease of reserve polysaccharide number in the plastids. Moreover, an increase in the size of mitochondria, their cristae and lipid drops in cytoplasm, the formation of more complicated configuration folding of plasmalemma and appearance of small-granular material of mean electron density in the periplasmic space of Chlorella cells grown during space flight, are demonstrated. Comparative cytological analysis has revealed general regularities of rearrangements of the submicroscopic organization in Chlorella cells cultivated on both solid and semiliquid agarized nutrient media.

  3. High-capacitance organic nanodielectrics: effective medium models of their response.

    PubMed

    DiBenedetto, Sara A; Paci, Irina; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J; Ratner, Mark A

    2006-11-16

    Molecular and macromolecular high-permittivity organic gate dielectric materials have been the focus of recent experimental research as a consequence of their promising properties for organic and inorganic field effect transistor (FET) applications. Two types of molecular thin films, self-assembled nanodielectrics (SANDs) and cross-linked polymer blends (CPBs), have been shown experimentally to afford high capacitances and low FET operating voltages. In an effort to design optimized nanostructures having even larger capacitances, lower leakage current densities, and further reduced FET operating voltages, we discuss approaches for computing the effective permittivities of each nanodielectric motif and investigate how molecular arrangements impact overall device capacitance. The calculated frequency-dependent capacitances, derived from Maxwell-Wagner theory applied to the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium approximation, agree fairly well with the experimental values for the two types of nanodielectrics. Predictions of larger capacitance SANDs are made with the two-capacitors-in-series equivalent circuit, where the layered, self-assembled structure is viewed as two different capacitors. The Maxwell-Garnett and Polder-Van Santen effective medium approximations are used to predict the dielectric response of higher permittivity polymer cross-linked blends. In calculations showing good agreement between theory and experiment, and with all parameters being equal, it is found that greater capacitances should be achievable with cross-linked composites than with layered composites.

  4. Limulus ventral eye. Physiological properties of photoreceptor cells in an organ culture medium

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Ventral photoreceptor cells bathed in an organ culture medium typically have resting potentials of -85 mV and membrane resistances of 35 Momega and, when dark-adapted, exhibit large potential fluctuations (LPFs) of 60 mV and small potential fluctuations (SPFs) of less than 30 mV. LPFs appear to be regenerative events triggered by SPFs, the well-known quantum bumps. In the dark, SPFs and LPFs occur spontaneously. At intensities near threshold, the rate of occurrence is directly proportional to light intensity, indicating that SPFs and LPFs are elicited by single photon events. At higher intensities, SPFs and LPFs sum to produce a receptor potential that is graded over approximately a 9-log-unit range of light intensity. Amplitude histograms of the discrete potential waves are bimodal, reflecting the SPF and LPF populations. Histograms of current waves are unimodal. SPFs and LPFs are insensitive to 1 microgram tetrodotoxin. I-V characteristics show initial inward currents of approximately 15 nA for voltage clamps to - 40 mV and steady-state outward currents for all clamp potentials. Photoreceptor cells bathed in organ culture medium retain these properties for periods of at least 75 days. PMID:722278

  5. Assessment of SPME Partitioning Coefficients: Implications for Passive Environmental Sampling of Hydrophobic Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Difilippo, E. L.; Eganhouse, R. P.

    2009-12-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has shown potential as an in situ passive sampling technique in aqueous environments. The reliability of this method depends upon accurate determination of the partitioning coefficient between the fiber coating and water (Kf) for the compounds of interest. Kf values for poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and water spanning 4 orders of magnitude have been reported for hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs). However, most of the published data (86%) do not pass the criterion for negligible depletion (Vw > 100KfVf , where Vw is the sample volume [μl] and Vf is the fiber coating volume [μl]), resulting in erroneous Kf values. The range in reported Kf values is reduced to just over 2 orders of magnitude for some polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) when these erroneous values are removed. We conducted a two-tailed t-test comparing Kf values for the same compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and PCBs) measured with different fiber coating thicknesses and fiber manufacturers; the majority (85%) of these Kf values are not statistically different (p = 0.10). In addition to an accurate measurement of Kf, the impact of environmental factors on partitioning, such as temperature and ionic strength, are essential in applying laboratory-measured Kf values to field samples. To date, few studies have measured Kf at conditions other than at 25° C in distilled water. While the available data indicate slight differences in Kf at different temperatures and ionic strength, the data are too limited to make an accurate assessment of the impact of these factors on the accuracy of in situ concentration measurements. Because of the challenges in measuring Kf for HOCs, it may be useful to develop predictive models for calculating Kf using known or measured physico-chemical properties. A multi-parameter linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) was developed to estimate Kf in distilled water at 25° C for HOCs based on published physico

  6. Passive Sampling in Regulatory Chemical Monitoring of Nonpolar Organic Compounds in the Aquatic Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    We reviewed compliance monitoring requirements in the European Union (EU), the United States(USA), and the Oslo-Paris Convention for the protection of the marine environment of the North-East Atlantic (OSPAR), and evaluated if these are met by passive sampling methods for nonpola...

  7. Ambient organic molecular passivation of Si yields near-ideal, Schottky-Mott limited, junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Har-Lavan, Rotem; Yaffe, Omer; Joshi, Pranav; Kazaz, Roy; Cohen, Hagai; Cahen, David

    2012-03-01

    We report near-perfect transfer of the electrical properties of oxide-free Si surface, modified by a molecular monolayer, to the interface of a junction made with that modified Si surface. Such behavior is highly unusual for a covalent, narrow bandgap semiconductor, such as Si. Short, ambient atmosphere, room temperature treatment of oxide-free Si(100) in hydroquinone (HQ)/alkyl alcohol solutions, fully passivates the Si surface, while allowing controlled change of the resulting surface potential. The junctions formed, upon contacting such surfaces with Hg, a metal that does not chemically interact with Si, follow the Schottky-Mott model for metal-semiconductor junctions closer than ever for Si-based junctions. Two examples of such ideal behavior are demonstrated: a) Tuning the molecular surface dipole over 400 mV, with only negligible band bending, by changing the alkyl chain length. Because of the excellent passivation this yields junctions with Hg with barrier heights that follow the change in the Si effective electron affinity nearly ideally. b) HQ/ methanol passivation of Si is accompanied by a large surface dipole, which suffices, as interface dipole, to drive the Si into strong inversion as shown experimentally via its photovoltaic effect. With only ˜0.3 nm molecular interlayer between the metal and the Si, our results proves that it is passivation and prevention of metal-semiconductor interactions that allow ideal metal-semiconductor junction behavior, rather than an insulating transport barrier.

  8. Passive and Active Vibrations Allow Self-Organization in Large-Scale Electromechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscarino, Arturo; Fortuna, Carlo Famoso Luigi; Frasca, Mattia

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the role of passive and active vibrations for the control of nonlinear large-scale electromechanical systems is investigated. The mathematical model of the system is discussed and detailed experimental results are shown in order to prove that coupling the effects of feedback and vibrations elicited by proper control signals makes possible to regularize imperfect uncertain large-scale systems.

  9. Benchmarking Density Functionals on Structural Parameters of Small-/Medium-Sized Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Brémond, Éric; Savarese, Marika; Su, Neil Qiang; Pérez-Jiménez, Ángel José; Xu, Xin; Sancho-García, Juan Carlos; Adamo, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    In this Letter we report the error analysis of 59 exchange-correlation functionals in evaluating the structural parameters of small- and medium-sized organic molecules. From this analysis, recently developed double hybrids, such as xDH-PBE0, emerge as the most reliable methods, while global hybrids confirm their robustness in reproducing molecular structures. Notably the M06-L density functional is the only semilocal method reaching an accuracy comparable to hybrids'. A comparison with errors obtained on energetic databases (including thermochemistry, reaction barriers, and interaction energies) indicate that most of the functionals have a coherent behavior, showing low (or high) deviations on both energy and structure data sets. Only a few of them are more prone toward one of these two properties. PMID:26730741

  10. Medium Vacuum Electron Emitter as Soft Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Source for Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Liedtke, Sascha; Ahlmann, Norman; Marggraf, Ulrich; Schütz, Alexander; Vautz, Wolfgang; Franzke, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    An electron emitter as a soft atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source is presented, which operates at inner pressures of the device in the medium vacuum range (>10(-3) hPa). Conventional nonradioactive electron emitters require high vacuum (<10(-6) hPa) to prevent electrical sparkovers. The emitter presented here contains structural modifications of an existing setup, which inhibits electrical breakdowns up to 10(-2) hPa at 8 kV acceleration voltage. The increased inner pressure reduces the ionization efficiency until 10(-3) hPa-achievable without a turbomolecular pump-by 2% compared to high-vacuum conditions. This can be compensated with an increase of the electron source output. The functionality of this ion source is demonstrated with mass spectrometric and ion mobility measurements of acetone, eucalyptol, and diisopropyl methanephosphonate. Additional mass spectrometric measurements of 20 different organic compounds demonstrate the soft characteristics of this ionization source. PMID:27046293

  11. Non-equilibrium passive sampling of hydrophobic organic contaminants in sediment pore-water: PCB exchange kinetics.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yongju; Wu, Yanwen; Luthy, Richard G; Kang, Seju

    2016-11-15

    This study investigates the isotropic exchange kinetics of PCBs for polyethylene (PE) passive samplers in quiescent sediment and develops a novel non-equilibrium passive sampling method using PE with multiple thicknesses. The release and uptake kinetics of PCBs in quiescent sediment are reproduced by a 1-D diffusion model using sediment diffusion parameters fitted with the data from actual measurements. From the sediment diffusion parameters observed for uptake and release kinetics, it is seen that the uptake kinetics are distinctly slower than the release kinetics, most likely because of the sorption-desorption hysteresis of PCBs in the study sediment. Despite the presence of the anisotropic PCB exchange kinetics, a performance reference compound (PRC)-based method, which is grounded on the assumption of isotropic exchange kinetics, estimated the freely dissolved aqueous concentrations (Cfree) of PCBs in sediment pore-water with less than a factor of two error for the study sediment. The novel method developed in this study using PE with multiple thicknesses also gives reasonable estimates of Cfree, demonstrating its potential as another option for non-equilibrium passive sampling for hydrophobic organic contaminants in sediment pore-water.

  12. Passive sampling for volatile organic compounds in indoor air-controlled laboratory comparison of four sampler types.

    PubMed

    McAlary, Todd; Groenevelt, Hester; Disher, Stephen; Arnold, Jason; Seethapathy, Suresh; Sacco, Paolo; Crump, Derrick; Schumacher, Brian; Hayes, Heidi; Johnson, Paul; Górecki, Tadeusz

    2015-05-01

    This article describes laboratory testing of four passive diffusive samplers for assessing indoor air concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including SKC Ultra II, Radiello®, Waterloo Membrane Sampler (WMS) and Automated Thermal Desorption (ATD) tubes with two different sorbents (Tenax TA and Carbopack B). The testing included 10 VOCs (including chlorinated ethenes, ethanes, and methanes, aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons), spanning a range of properties and including some compounds expected to pose challenges (naphthalene, methyl ethyl ketone). Tests were conducted at different temperatures (17 to 30 °C), relative humidities (30 to 90% RH), face velocities (0.014 to 0.41 m s(-1)), concentrations (1 to 100 parts per billion by volume [ppbv]) and sampling durations (1 to 7 days). The results show that all of the passive samplers provided data that met the success criteria (relative percent difference [RPD] ≤ 45% of active sample concentrations and coefficient of variation [COV] ≤ 30%) in the majority of cases, but some compounds were problematic for some samplers. The passive sampler uptake rates depend to varying degrees on the sampler, sorbent, target compounds and environmental conditions, so field calibration is advantageous for the highest levels of data quality.

  13. Soil organic carbon as a factor in passive microwave retrievals of soil water content over agricultural croplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manns, Hida R.; Berg, Aaron A.; Colliander, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    Remote sensing has the potential to deliver global soil water content (SWC) on vast scales with frequent revisit times for progress in the fields of climate, weather forecasting, agriculture and hydrology. Although surface roughness, vegetation and soil texture have been established as sources of variability in passive microwave interpretation, soil organic carbon (SOC) has not typically been considered as a factor that affects SWC estimation during field sampling campaigns. SOC was observed along with soil texture and bulk density during the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment in 2012 (SMAPVEX12), the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite algorithm development field sampling campaign held June 6 to July 19 in Southern Manitoba, Canada. Aerial measurements from the PALS (Passive Active L-band System) instrument were recorded over agricultural fields and forest areas from aircraft while SWC was measured simultaneously on the ground with resistance probes on 17 sampling dates. Additionally, fields were sampled for surface roughness, vegetation growth and water content, soil and vegetation temperature and soil physical characteristics. A soil core was collected on each field each sampling time to assess bulk density, soil particle size and SOC. SOC accounted for more variability in the anomalies between PALS and ground sampled SWC than sand, clay or bulk density, although all soil variables explained significant variability. With analysis by partial least squares multiple regression over 11 sampling dates and 39 fields where both ground and PALS data were well represented, only SOC contributed significantly to the regression of SWC beyond the variance all soil variables had in common. The significance of SOC in the relative SWC anomalies was highest in very wet and very dry conditions and in loam soil over all sampling dates, while bulk density was more significant in sand soils. This analysis suggests SOC is a simple variable that incorporates

  14. Quantifying the effects of temperature and salinity on partitioning of hydrophobic organic chemicals to silicone rubber passive samplers.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Michiel T O; van der Heijden, Stephan A; Kotte, Marcel; Smedes, Foppe

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays, passive sampling is a widely applied technique to determine freely dissolved aqueous concentrations of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs), such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Crucial to the measurements are sampler-water partition coefficients, which are generally determined in the laboratory under "standard conditions" (in freshwater at 20 °C). Theoretically, however, the coefficients are dependent on environmental conditions, such as temperature and salinity. Yet, there are insufficient experimental data in the scientific literature to prove this for different polymers. Several polymers are already being applied during field monitoring, however, and neglecting any effects may lead to imprecise results. In the present study, we therefore quantified the effects of temperature and salinity on the sampler-water partition coefficients of PAHs and PCBs for silicone rubber, a material used in Dutch passive sampling monitoring campaigns. The results demonstrated a chemical-specific and hydrophobicity-dependent temperature effect, being independent of salinity, and a chemical- and temperature-independent salinity effect. Based on the obtained data, location-specific silicone rubber-water partition coefficients (Ksr-w; adjusted for temperature and salinity) can be calculated. The impact of applying such location-specific values was demonstrated using the Dutch passive sampling field monitoring database, covering ten years of PAH and PCB data for several locations. Adjusting the Ksr-w values resulted in aqueous concentrations that were lowered by a factor of 1.6 on average. The reduction was rather constant because of the manner of sampling (under nonequilibrium conditions and using performance reference compounds) and calculating. When sampling under equilibrium conditions in seawater at temperatures at about freezing, and/or applying different calculation approaches, the adjustment effect can potentially

  15. Quantifying the effects of temperature and salinity on partitioning of hydrophobic organic chemicals to silicone rubber passive samplers.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Michiel T O; van der Heijden, Stephan A; Kotte, Marcel; Smedes, Foppe

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays, passive sampling is a widely applied technique to determine freely dissolved aqueous concentrations of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs), such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Crucial to the measurements are sampler-water partition coefficients, which are generally determined in the laboratory under "standard conditions" (in freshwater at 20 °C). Theoretically, however, the coefficients are dependent on environmental conditions, such as temperature and salinity. Yet, there are insufficient experimental data in the scientific literature to prove this for different polymers. Several polymers are already being applied during field monitoring, however, and neglecting any effects may lead to imprecise results. In the present study, we therefore quantified the effects of temperature and salinity on the sampler-water partition coefficients of PAHs and PCBs for silicone rubber, a material used in Dutch passive sampling monitoring campaigns. The results demonstrated a chemical-specific and hydrophobicity-dependent temperature effect, being independent of salinity, and a chemical- and temperature-independent salinity effect. Based on the obtained data, location-specific silicone rubber-water partition coefficients (Ksr-w; adjusted for temperature and salinity) can be calculated. The impact of applying such location-specific values was demonstrated using the Dutch passive sampling field monitoring database, covering ten years of PAH and PCB data for several locations. Adjusting the Ksr-w values resulted in aqueous concentrations that were lowered by a factor of 1.6 on average. The reduction was rather constant because of the manner of sampling (under nonequilibrium conditions and using performance reference compounds) and calculating. When sampling under equilibrium conditions in seawater at temperatures at about freezing, and/or applying different calculation approaches, the adjustment effect can potentially

  16. Nature of the Organic Signature in Dust from the Interstellar Medium: Laboratory Analog Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, M. M.; Freund, F. T.; Staple, A.; Scoville, J.

    2002-01-01

    We measured the infrared (IR) nu(sub CH) absorption bands around 3.4 microns (2800 - 3000 cm(sup -1) in large laboratory-grown magnesium oxide (MgO) and natural olivine single crystals that crystallized from CO/CO2/H2O saturated melts. These bands are very similar to those from many astronomical sources, such as from dust in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), from the outflow of evolved stars, etc., and they are characteristic of aliphatic -CH2- and -CH3 entities. In our laboratory single crystals the VCH bands arise from C-H entities that were introduced by a solid solution process, and that are imbedded in the mineral matrix in form of polyatomic C(sub n) entities with C atoms bonded to O and to H. Heating breaks the C-H bonds, causing hydrogen to disperse in the mineral matrix. C-H bonds are re-established rapidly during annealing. We propose that dust grains probably contain the same type of internal C(sub n)-H entities in solid matrix rather than an external organic layer covering the grain surfaces. Thermodynamical arguments show that the concentration of organics in solid solution in small grains can be comparable to that found in astronomical environments.

  17. Mass spectra deconvolution of low, medium, and high volatility biogenic secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Kostenidou, Evangelia; Lee, Byong-Hyoek; Engelhart, Gabriella J; Pierce, Jeffrey R; Pandis, Spyros N

    2009-07-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) consists of compounds with a wide range of volatilities and its ambient concentration is sensitive to this volatility distribution. Recent field studies have shown that the typical mass spectrum of ambient oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) as measured by the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) is quite different from the SOA mass spectra reported in smog chamber experiments. Part of this discrepancy is due to the dependence of SOA composition on the organic aerosol concentration. High precursor concentrations lead to higher concentrations of the more volatile species in the produced SOA while at lower concentrations the less volatile compounds dominate the SOA composition. alpha-Pinene, beta-pinene, d-limonene, and beta-caryophyllene ozonolysis experiments were performed at moderate concentration levels. Using a thermodenuder the more volatile SOA species were removed achieving even lower SOA concentration. The less volatile fraction was then chemically characterized by an AMS. The signal fraction of m/z44, and thus the concentration of C02+, is significantly higher for the less volatile SOA. High NO(x) conditions result in less oxidized SOA than low NO(x) conditions, while increasing relative humidity levels results in more oxidized products for limonene but has little effect on alpha-and beta-pinene SOA. Combining a smog chamber with a thermodenuder model employing the volatility basis-set framework, the AMS SOA mass spectrum for each experiment and for each precursor is deconvoluted into low, medium, and high volatility component mass spectra. The spectrum of the surrogate component with the lower volatility is quite similar to that of ambient OOA.

  18. Non-equilibrium sediment-water partitioning and its effect on passive and active bioaccumulation of organic contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, D.

    1995-12-31

    The authors measured the bioaccumulation of non-polar organic contaminants (PAHs, PCBs, OCPs) in the deposit feeding soft-shell clam, M. arenaria, and in the passive accumulator, the semi-permeable membrane device (SPMD) in sediments of Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay. They also modeled the partitioning of these contaminants by measuring both the total and AEP (available for equilibrium partitioning) fraction of contaminants in the sediment and the sediment porewater, along with measurements of sediment and colloidal organic carbon. They found the sediment AEP fraction of pyrogenic PAH ranged from 15% to 85% depending on location and time of the sediment collection and the porewater AEP fraction ranged from < 1% to 50% depending on the octanol-water partition coefficient. Using lipid normalized concentrations, they found that the deposit feeding clams were in equilibrium with the sediment AEP fraction, the passive SPMDs were in equilibrium with the porewater AEP fraction, but the sediment and porewater were in non-equilibrium, steady state. Implications of these results to benthic bioaccumulation processes and to sediment quality management will be discussed.

  19. The risk of radiation-induced second cancers in the high to medium dose region: a comparison between passive and scanned proton therapy, IMRT and VMAT for pediatric patients with brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moteabbed, Maryam; Yock, Torunn I.; Paganetti, Harald

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of second malignant tumors is a clinically observed adverse late effect of radiation therapy, especially in organs close to the treatment site, receiving medium to high doses (>2.5 Gy). For pediatric patients, choosing the least toxic radiation modality is of utmost importance, due to their high radiosensitivity and small size. This study aims to evaluate the risk of second cancer incidence in the vicinity of the primary radiation field, for pediatric patients with brain/head and neck tumors and compare four treatment modalities: passive scattering and pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PPT and PBS), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). For a cohort of six pediatric patients originally treated with PPT, additional PBS, IMRT and VMAT plans were created. Dose distributions from these plans were used to calculate the excess absolute risk (EAR) and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for developing a second tumor in soft tissue and skull. A widely used risk assessment formalism was employed and compared with a linear model based on recent clinical findings. In general, LAR was found to range between 0.01%-2.8% for PPT/PBS and 0.04%-4.9% for IMRT/VMAT. PBS was associated with the lowest risk for most patients using carcinoma and sarcoma models, whereas IMRT and VMAT risks were comparable and the highest among all modalities. The LAR for IMRT/VMAT relative to PPT ranged from 1.3-4.6 for soft tissue and from 3.5-9.5 for skull. Larger absolute LAR was observed for younger patients and using linear risk models. The number of fields used in proton therapy and IMRT had minimal effect on the risk. When planning treatments and deciding on the treatment modality, the probability of second cancer incidence should be carefully examined and weighed against the possibility of developing acute side effects for each patient individually.

  20. The risk of radiation-induced second cancers in the high to medium dose region: a comparison between passive and scanned proton therapy, IMRT and VMAT for pediatric patients with brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Moteabbed, Maryam; Yock, Torunn I; Paganetti, Harald

    2014-06-21

    The incidence of second malignant tumors is a clinically observed adverse late effect of radiation therapy, especially in organs close to the treatment site, receiving medium to high doses (>2.5 Gy). For pediatric patients, choosing the least toxic radiation modality is of utmost importance, due to their high radiosensitivity and small size. This study aims to evaluate the risk of second cancer incidence in the vicinity of the primary radiation field, for pediatric patients with brain/head and neck tumors and compare four treatment modalities: passive scattering and pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PPT and PBS), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). For a cohort of six pediatric patients originally treated with PPT, additional PBS, IMRT and VMAT plans were created. Dose distributions from these plans were used to calculate the excess absolute risk (EAR) and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for developing a second tumor in soft tissue and skull. A widely used risk assessment formalism was employed and compared with a linear model based on recent clinical findings. In general, LAR was found to range between 0.01%-2.8% for PPT/PBS and 0.04%-4.9% for IMRT/VMAT. PBS was associated with the lowest risk for most patients using carcinoma and sarcoma models, whereas IMRT and VMAT risks were comparable and the highest among all modalities. The LAR for IMRT/VMAT relative to PPT ranged from 1.3-4.6 for soft tissue and from 3.5-9.5 for skull. Larger absolute LAR was observed for younger patients and using linear risk models. The number of fields used in proton therapy and IMRT had minimal effect on the risk. When planning treatments and deciding on the treatment modality, the probability of second cancer incidence should be carefully examined and weighed against the possibility of developing acute side effects for each patient individually. PMID:24828559

  1. Enhanced Organic Solar Cell Stability through the Effective Blocking of Oxygen Diffusion using a Self-Passivating Metal Electrode.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hansol; Jo, Sae Byeok; Lee, Hyo Chan; Kim, Min; Sin, Dong Hun; Ko, Hyomin; Cho, Kilwon

    2016-03-01

    A new and simple strategy for enhancing the stability of organic solar cells (OSCs) was developed by using self-passivating metal top electrodes. Systematic investigations on O2 permeability of Al top electrodes revealed that the main pathways for oxidation-induced degradation could be greatly suppressed by simply controlling the nanoscale morphology of the Al electrode. The population of nanoscale pinholes among Al grains, which critically decided the diffusion of O2 molecules toward the Al-organic interfaces that are vulnerable to oxidation, was successfully regulated by rapidly depositing Al or promoting lateral growth among the Al grains, accompanied by increasing the deposition thickness. Our observations suggested that the stability of OSCs with conventional architectures might be greatly enhanced simply by controlling the fabrication conditions of the Al top electrode, without the aid of additional secondary treatments.

  2. Organic Fluids and Passive Cooling in a Supercritical Rankine Cycle for Power Generation from Low Grade Heat Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidhi, Rachana

    Low grade heat sources have a large amount of thermal energy content. Due to low temperature, the conventional power generation technologies result in lower efficiency and hence cannot be used. In order to efficiently generate power, alternate methods need to be used. In this study, a supercritical organic Rankine cycle was used for heat source temperatures varying from 125°C to 200°C. Organic refrigerants with zero ozone depletion potential and their mixtures were selected as working fluid for this study while the cooling water temperature was changed from 10-25°C. Operating pressure of the cycle has been optimized for each fluid at every heat source temperature to obtain the highest thermal efficiency. Energy and exergy efficiencies of the thermodynamic cycle have been obtained as a function of heat source temperature. Efficiency of a thermodynamic cycle depends significantly on the sink temperature. At areas where water cooling is not available and ambient air temperature is high, efficient power generation from low grade heat sources may be a challenge. Use of passive cooling systems coupled with the condenser was studied, so that lower sink temperatures could be obtained. Underground tunnels, buried at a depth of few meters, were used as earth-air-heat-exchanger (EAHE) through which hot ambient air was passed. It was observed that the air temperature could be lowered by 5-10°C in the EAHE. Vertical pipes were used to lower the temperature of water by 5°C by passing it underground. Nocturnal cooling of stored water has been studied that can be used to cool the working fluid in the thermodynamic cycle. It was observed that the water temperature can be lowered by 10-20°C during the night when it is allowed to cool. The amount of water lost was calculated and was found to be approximately 0.1% over 10 days. The different passive cooling systems were studied separately and their effects on the efficiency of the thermodynamic cycle were investigated. They were

  3. Novel passive sampling device for measuring sediment-water diffusion fluxes of hydrophobic organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Hui; Bao, Lian-Jun; Zhang, Kai; Xu, Shi-Ping; Wu, Feng-Chang; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2013-09-01

    Molecular diffusion across the sediment-water interface, as one of the key geochemical processes, dictates whether a sediment is a source or sink of chemicals, providing useful data in designing remedial actions. Despite ample previous efforts in quantifying sediment-water diffusion fluxes, the resulting methods are largely unsatisfactory. Herein, we introduce a novel passive sampling device capable of measuring vertical profiles of chemical concentrations near the sediment-water interface, from which diffusion fluxes can be calculated based on a model that we developed. In laboratory testing, diffusion fluxes (0.032-310 ng m(-2) d(-1)) of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites obtained from the present sampling device were consistent with those (0.38-610 ng m(-2) d(-1)) determined by using a conventional active sampling method, solid-phase extraction/liquid-liquid extraction. Field deployment of the sampling device yielded individual diffusion fluxes of p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDMU, o,p'-DDMU, p,p'-DDNU, and p,p'-DBP in the range of 5.9-150 ng m(-2) d(-1), which were comparable to those (5.5-85 ng m(-2) d(-1)) obtained with a benthic chamber. Moreover, diffusion fluxes of p,p'-DDT and o,p'-DDT obtained with the sampling device were negative; i.e., the sediment is acting as a sink for these chemicals, while that could not be found using the benthic chamber. Thus, the passive sampling device can provide better information about the movement of chemicals through the sediment and overlying water for the choice of remedial strategies.

  4. [Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from wood furniture--estimation of emission rate by passive flux sampler].

    PubMed

    Jinno, Hideto; Tanaka-Kagawa, Toshiko; Furuta, Mitsuko; Shibatsuji, Masayoshi; Nishimura, Tetsuji

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate aldehydes and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emission from furniture, which may cause hazardous influence on human being such as sick building/sick house syndrome. In this study, VOCs emitted from six kinds of wood furniture, including three set of dining tables and three beds, were analyzed by large chamber test method (JIS A 1911). Based on the emission rates of total VOCs (TVOC), the impacts on the indoor TVOC was estimated by the simulation model with volume of 20 m3 and ventilation frequency of 0.5 times/h. The estimated increment of formaldehyde were exceeded the guideline value (100 microg/m3) in one set of dining table and one bed. The estimated TVOC increment values were exceeded the provisional target value for indoor air (400 microg/m3) in two sets of dining tables and two beds. These results revealed that VOC emissions from wood furniture may influence significantly indoor air quality. Also, in this study, to establish the alternative method for large chamber test methods, emission rates from representative five areas of furniture unit were evaluated by passive sampling method using flux sampler and emission rate from full-sized furniture was predicted. Emission rates predicted by flux passive sampler were 10-106% (formaldehyde) and 8-141% (TVOC) of the data measured using large chamber test, respectively.

  5. Enhanced photoluminescence and solar cell performance via Lewis base passivation of organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Noel, Nakita K; Abate, Antonio; Stranks, Samuel D; Parrott, Elizabeth S; Burlakov, Victor M; Goriely, Alain; Snaith, Henry J

    2014-10-28

    Organic-inorganic metal halide perovskites have recently emerged as a top contender to be used as an absorber material in highly efficient, low-cost photovoltaic devices. Solution-processed semiconductors tend to have a high density of defect states and exhibit a large degree of electronic disorder. Perovskites appear to go against this trend, and despite relatively little knowledge of the impact of electronic defects, certified solar-to-electrical power conversion efficiencies of up to 17.9% have been achieved. Here, through treatment of the crystal surfaces with the Lewis bases thiophene and pyridine, we demonstrate significantly reduced nonradiative electron-hole recombination within the CH(3)NH(3)PbI(3-x)Cl(x) perovskite, achieving photoluminescence lifetimes which are enhanced by nearly an order of magnitude, up to 2 μs. We propose that this is due to the electronic passivation of under-coordinated Pb atoms within the crystal. Through this method of Lewis base passivation, we achieve power conversion efficiencies for solution-processed planar heterojunction solar cells enhanced from 13% for the untreated solar cells to 15.3% and 16.5% for the thiophene and pyridine-treated solar cells, respectively.

  6. Active and passive sampling for the assessment of hydrophilic organic contaminants in a river basin-ecotoxicological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Terzopoulou, Evangelia; Voutsa, Dimitra

    2016-03-01

    This study presents a complementary approach for the evaluation of water quality in a river basin by employing active and passive sampling. Thirty-eight hydrophilic organic compounds (HpOCs) (organohalogen herbicides, organophosphorous pesticides, carbamate, triazine, urea, pharmaceuticals, phenols, and industrial chemicals) were studied in grab water samples and in passive samplers POCIS collected along Strymonas River, Northern Greece, at three sampling campaigns during the year 2013. Almost all the target compounds were detected at the periods of high rainfall intensity and/or low flow rate. The most frequently detected compounds were aminocarb, carbaryl, chlorfenviphos, chloropropham, 2,4-D, diflubenzuron, diuron, isoproturon, metolachlor, and salicylic acid. Bisphenol A and nonylphenol were also occasionally detected. The use of POCIS allowed the detection of more micropollutants than active sampling. Low discrepancy between the concentrations obtained from both samplings was observed, at least for compounds with >50 % detection frequency; thus, POCIS could be a valuable tool for the selection and monitoring of the most relevant HpOCs in the river basin. Results showed relatively low risk from the presence of HpOCs; however, the potential risk associated with micropollutants such as carbaryl, dinoseb, diuron, fenthion, isoproturon, metolachlor, nonylphenol, and salicylic acid should not be neglected. PMID:26573318

  7. Evaluation of a passive optical based end of service life indicator (ESLI) for organic vapor respirator cartridges.

    PubMed

    Checky, Melissa; Frankel, Kevin; Goddard, Denise; Johnson, Erik; Thomas, J Christopher; Zelinsky, Maria; Javner, Cassidy

    2016-01-01

    A passive visual end of service life indicator (ESLI) for certain organic vapors has been attached to the inside wall of an organic vapor respirator cartridge. The opposite side of the ESLI touches activated carbon inside the cartridge. During use, organic vapors moving through the cartridge adsorb into both the carbon and the ESLI. The cartridge body is clear so that when vapor concentrations meet a certain threshold, the user may observe the progressive development of an indicator bar down the side of the ESLI. The cartridge is deemed ready to change when any part of the indicator bar touches a marked end line. The performance of the ESLI was observed when the cartridge was tested against a variety of organic vapors, exposure concentrations above the minimum indication level, humidities, temperatures, flow rates, and mixtures. In all cases, the ESLI indicated end of service life with more than 10% cartridge service life remaining (which is a NIOSH test criteria). The results were also compared to mathematical predictions of cartridge service life. PMID:26418577

  8. Evaluation of a passive optical based end of service life indicator (ESLI) for organic vapor respirator cartridges

    PubMed Central

    Checky, Melissa; Frankel, Kevin; Goddard, Denise; Johnson, Erik; Thomas, J. Christopher; Zelinsky, Maria; Javner, Cassidy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A passive visual end of service life indicator (ESLI) for certain organic vapors has been attached to the inside wall of an organic vapor respirator cartridge. The opposite side of the ESLI touches activated carbon inside the cartridge. During use, organic vapors moving through the cartridge adsorb into both the carbon and the ESLI. The cartridge body is clear so that when vapor concentrations meet a certain threshold, the user may observe the progressive development of an indicator bar down the side of the ESLI. The cartridge is deemed ready to change when any part of the indicator bar touches a marked end line. The performance of the ESLI was observed when the cartridge was tested against a variety of organic vapors, exposure concentrations above the minimum indication level, humidities, temperatures, flow rates, and mixtures. In all cases, the ESLI indicated end of service life with more than 10% cartridge service life remaining (which is a NIOSH test criteria). The results were also compared to mathematical predictions of cartridge service life. PMID:26418577

  9. Low-Temperature Process for Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Al2O3 Passivation Layer for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoonbae; Lee, Jihye; Sohn, Sunyoung; Jung, Donggeun

    2016-05-01

    Flexible organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells have drawn extensive attention due to their light weight, cost efficiency, portability, and so on. However, OPV cells degrade quickly due to organic damage by water vapor or oxygen penetration when the devices are driven in the atmosphere without a passivation layer. In order to prevent damage due to water vapor or oxygen permeation into the devices, passivation layers have been introduced through methods such as sputtering, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD). In this work, the structural and chemical properties of Al2O3 films, deposited via ALCVD at relatively low temperatures of 109 degrees C, 200 degrees C, and 300 degrees C, are analyzed. In our experiment, trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O were used as precursors for Al2O3 film deposition via ALCVD. All of the Al2O3 films showed very smooth, featureless surfaces without notable defects. However, we found that the plastic flexible substrate of an OPV device passivated with 300 degrees C deposition temperature was partially bended and melted, indicating that passivation layers for OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates need to be formed at temperatures lower than 300 degrees C. The OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates were passivated by the Al2O3 film deposited at the temperature of 109 degrees C. Thereafter, the photovoltaic properties of passivated OPV cells were investigated as a function of exposure time under the atmosphere. PMID:27483916

  10. Low-Temperature Process for Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Al2O3 Passivation Layer for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoonbae; Lee, Jihye; Sohn, Sunyoung; Jung, Donggeun

    2016-05-01

    Flexible organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells have drawn extensive attention due to their light weight, cost efficiency, portability, and so on. However, OPV cells degrade quickly due to organic damage by water vapor or oxygen penetration when the devices are driven in the atmosphere without a passivation layer. In order to prevent damage due to water vapor or oxygen permeation into the devices, passivation layers have been introduced through methods such as sputtering, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD). In this work, the structural and chemical properties of Al2O3 films, deposited via ALCVD at relatively low temperatures of 109 degrees C, 200 degrees C, and 300 degrees C, are analyzed. In our experiment, trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O were used as precursors for Al2O3 film deposition via ALCVD. All of the Al2O3 films showed very smooth, featureless surfaces without notable defects. However, we found that the plastic flexible substrate of an OPV device passivated with 300 degrees C deposition temperature was partially bended and melted, indicating that passivation layers for OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates need to be formed at temperatures lower than 300 degrees C. The OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates were passivated by the Al2O3 film deposited at the temperature of 109 degrees C. Thereafter, the photovoltaic properties of passivated OPV cells were investigated as a function of exposure time under the atmosphere.

  11. [Effect of phosphate and organic acid addition on passivation of simulated Pb contaminated soil and the stability of the product].

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ji-Chao; Gao, Ting-Ting; Su, Xiao-Juan; Wan, Tian-Ying; Hu, Hong-Qing

    2014-10-01

    Organic acids can improve the phosphorus availability, influence the immobilization of heavy metals in soil, and has very complicated function in phosphorus activation and heavy metal passivation. This research took simulated Pb contaminated soil as material, phosphate and citric acid as remediation matter, adopted BCR continuous extraction, 0.01 mol · L(-1) CaCl2 and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) to evaluate the remediation effect. Besides, malic acid and NaNO3 were taken as desorption reagents to discuss the stability of the phosphorus-citric acid-Pb system. The results showed that: in the absence of citric acid, the amount of acid extracted Pb decreased along with the increase of P concentration; when the P concentration was 100 and 400 mg · kg(-1), acid extractable Pb increased with the increasing of citric acid concentration. However, residual Pb changed in the opposite direction from acid extractable Pb. The phenomenon showed that P improved the bioavailability of Pb, while citric acid had the opposite effect. With a certain organic acid concentration, extractable Pb contents extracted by 0.01 mol · L(-1) CaCl2 and TCLP both decreased with the increasing P concentration, therefore, P had immobilization effect on Pb in contaminated soil. But at a fixed P concentration, extractable Pb contents by 0.01 mol · L(-1) CaCl2 and TCLP changed in the opposite trend with the increasing citric acid concentration. The desorption rate of Pb in soil increased with the increasing malic acid concentration, the decreasing pH and the increasing ionic strength. The desorption extent of Pb in soil with P only was lower than that with both P and citric acid. But the stability of Pb passivated by the former was higher. PMID:25693396

  12. [Effect of phosphate and organic acid addition on passivation of simulated Pb contaminated soil and the stability of the product].

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ji-Chao; Gao, Ting-Ting; Su, Xiao-Juan; Wan, Tian-Ying; Hu, Hong-Qing

    2014-10-01

    Organic acids can improve the phosphorus availability, influence the immobilization of heavy metals in soil, and has very complicated function in phosphorus activation and heavy metal passivation. This research took simulated Pb contaminated soil as material, phosphate and citric acid as remediation matter, adopted BCR continuous extraction, 0.01 mol · L(-1) CaCl2 and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) to evaluate the remediation effect. Besides, malic acid and NaNO3 were taken as desorption reagents to discuss the stability of the phosphorus-citric acid-Pb system. The results showed that: in the absence of citric acid, the amount of acid extracted Pb decreased along with the increase of P concentration; when the P concentration was 100 and 400 mg · kg(-1), acid extractable Pb increased with the increasing of citric acid concentration. However, residual Pb changed in the opposite direction from acid extractable Pb. The phenomenon showed that P improved the bioavailability of Pb, while citric acid had the opposite effect. With a certain organic acid concentration, extractable Pb contents extracted by 0.01 mol · L(-1) CaCl2 and TCLP both decreased with the increasing P concentration, therefore, P had immobilization effect on Pb in contaminated soil. But at a fixed P concentration, extractable Pb contents by 0.01 mol · L(-1) CaCl2 and TCLP changed in the opposite trend with the increasing citric acid concentration. The desorption rate of Pb in soil increased with the increasing malic acid concentration, the decreasing pH and the increasing ionic strength. The desorption extent of Pb in soil with P only was lower than that with both P and citric acid. But the stability of Pb passivated by the former was higher.

  13. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Passive Sampling as a Surrogate for Organism Bioaccumulation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurement of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) and the subsequent evaluation of their ecological and human health risks are common endpoints in aquatic environmental monitoring. Due to their hydrophobicity, many anthropogenic HOCs will partition from the water into organi...

  14. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Passive Sampling as a Surrogate for Organism Bioaccumulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurement of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) and the subsequent evaluation of their ecological and human health risks are common endpoints in aquatic environmental monitoring. Due to their hydrophobicity, many anthropogenic HOCs will partition from the water into organi...

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A PASSIVE, IN SITU, INTEGRATIVE SAMPLER FOR HYDROPHILLIC ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Until recently, hydrophobic, bioconcentratable compounds have been the primary focus of most environmental organic contaminant investigations, There is an increasing realization that a holistic hazard assessment of complex environmental contaminant mixtures requires data on the c...

  16. Use of Passive Samplers to Measure Dissolved Organic Contaminants in a Temperate Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measuring dissolved concentrations of organic contaminants can be challenging given their low solubilities and high particle association. However, to perform accurate risk assessments of these chemicals, knowing the dissolved concentration is critical since it is considered to b...

  17. Comparison of Passive Samplers for Monitoring Dissolved Organic Contaminants in Water Column Deployments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonionic organic contaminants (NOCs) are difficult to measure in the water column due to their inherent chemical properties resulting in low water solubility and high particle activity. Traditional sampling methods require large quantities of water to be extracted and interferen...

  18. Oxidation of organic contaminants by manganese oxide geomedia for passive urban stormwater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Grebel, Janel E; Charbonnet, Joseph A; Sedlak, David L

    2016-01-01

    To advance cost-effective strategies for removing trace organic contaminants from urban runoff, the feasibility of using manganese oxides as a geomedia amendment in engineered stormwater infiltration systems to oxidize organic contaminants was evaluated. Ten representative organic chemicals that have previously been detected in urban stormwater were evaluated for reactivity in batch experiments with birnessite. With respect to reactivity, contaminants could be classified as: highly reactive (e.g., bisphenol A), moderately reactive (e.g., diuron) and unreactive (e.g., tris(2-chloro-1-propyl)phosphate). Bisphenol A and diuron reacted with birnessite to produce a suite of products, including ring-cleavage products for bisphenol A and partially dechlorinated products for diuron. Columns packed with manganese oxide-coated sand were used evaluate design parameters for an engineered infiltration system, including necessary contact times for effective treatment, as well as the impacts of stormwater matrix variables, such as solution pH, concentration of natural organic matter and major anions and cations. The manganese oxide geomedia exhibited decreased reactivity when organic contaminants were oxidized, especially in the presence of divalent cations, bicarbonate, and natural organic matter. Under typical conditions, the manganese oxides are expected to retain their reactivity for 25 years.

  19. Dopant passivation and work function tuning through attachment of heterogeneous organic monolayers on silicon in ultrahigh vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Ashley J.; Keyvanfar, Kian; Deberardinis, Albert; Pu, Lin; Bean, John C.

    2011-05-01

    Electronic structures of silicon-organic interfaces were studied by the scanning Kelvin probe technique. These surfaces were fabricated by covalent bonding of a range of phenylacetylene-based molecules ( p-X-C 6H 4C tbnd CH, where X = CF 3, OCH 3, and H) onto a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface. Organic molecules were bound to the surface under high vacuum conditions by ultraviolet light-induced hydrosilylation. Changes in the electronic structure due to electron-donating ability and dipole moment were analyzed under dark and illuminated conditions. The origin of the silicon band bending was tested to separate the effects of molecular monolayers and unintended dopant passivation. In addition, heterogeneous monolayers were grown by controllably diluting the incoming vapor stream with acetylene during growth. The measured work functions follow a trend linked to dipole moment that can be further tuned by molecular dilution. These results suggest a way to use heterogeneous organic monolayers to tune the electron affinity of silicon and directly alter channel modulation in small semiconductor devices.

  20. Monitoring Organic Contaminant Fluxes Following Dam Removal Utilizing Passive Sampler Technology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Restoration of riverine habitats and their associated ecosystems is a growing priority for government agencies (e.g., USEPA, NOAA, USDA), as well as non-profit conservation organizations (e.g., American Rivers). Dam removal is a major component of many restoration projects credi...

  1. [Passive smoking].

    PubMed

    Grandjean, E; Weber, A; Fischer, T

    1979-03-01

    Passive smoking is the involuntary inspiration of smoky indoor air. Based on the information available today, it may be assumed that passive smoking normally is no health hazard as far as the classical smoker's diseases (lung cancer, myocardial infarct, etc.) are concerned. Nevertheless, it is probable that irritations caused by tobacco smoke have an unfavorable influence on the health of small children and that of already sick persons. The main problem of passive smoking is annoyance due to odor and irritations of eyes and respiratory organs. Our investigations in a climatic chamber with healthy subjects show that air pollution caused by tobacco smoke as indicated by 5 ppm CO leads to marked eye irritations--objectively as well as subjectively--in 15 to 20% of the subjects. This corresponds to smoking 10 cigarettes per hour in a small room with an air ventilation rate of four times per hour. If air pollution caused by tobacco smoke lies below the level of 2 ppm CO, irritations and annoyance for healthy persons are regarded as low and tolerable. This corresponds to about four cigarettes per hour under the same circumstances.

  2. Ambient air levels of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in a medium size city in Northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Parra, M A; Elustondo, D; Bermejo, R; Santamaría, J M

    2009-01-15

    Ambient concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were measured by means of passive sampling at 40 sampling points in a medium-size city in Northern Spain, from June 2006 to June 2007. VOC and NO2 samplers were analysed by thermal desorption followed by gas chromatography/mass-selective detector and by visible spectrophotometry, respectively. Mean concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, propylbenzene, trimethylbenzenes, and NO(2) were 2.84, 13.26, 2.15, 6.01, 0.59, 1.32 and 23.17 microg m(-3) respectively, and found to be highly correlated. Their spatial distribution showed high differences in small distances and pointed to traffic as the main emission source of these compounds. The lowest levels of VOC and NO2 occurred during summer, owing to the increase in solar radiation and to lower traffic densities. Mean concentrations of benzene and NO2 exceeded the European limits at some of the monitored points.

  3. Substrate patterning for passive matrix organic light-emitting devices by photolithography processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Yu, Jun-sheng; Lin, Hui; Lou, Shuang-ling; Jiang, Ya-dong

    2007-12-01

    The fabrication technology of high resolution substrate pattern for organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) was discussed in the paper. Surface morphology and crystallization properties of ITO films and the shape of photolithography pattern were investigated. Experimental results show that three factors including deposition pressure, flow ratio of argon to oxygen and annealing temperature greatly influence the conductance of ITO film.. Some attempts about designing photomask were enumerated and the reverse taper angle separator was successfully fabricated with image reversal process.

  4. Calculating the Diffusive Flux of Persistent Organic Pollutants between Sediments and the Water Column on the Palos Verdes Shelf Superfund Site using Polymeric Passive Samplers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passive samplers were used to determine water concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the surface sediments and near-bottom water of a marine Superfund site on the Palos Verdes Shelf, California, USA. Measured concentrations in the porewater and water column at...

  5. Passive Sampling to Measure Baseline Dissolved Persistent Organic Pollutant Concentrations in the Water Column of the Palos Verdes Shelf Superfund Site

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passive sampling was used to deduce water concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the vicinity of a marine Superfund site on the Palos Verdes Shelf, California, USA. Pre-calibrated solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers and polyethylene (PE) strips that were...

  6. Passive Measurement of Organic-Scintillator Neutron Signatures for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jennfier L. Dolan; Eric C. Miller; Alexis C. Kaplan; Andreas Enqvist; Marek Flaska; Alice Tomanin; Paolo Peerani; David L. Chichester; Sara A. Pozzi

    2012-10-01

    At nuclear facilities, domestically and internationally, most measurement systems used for nuclear materials’ control and accountability rely on He-3 detectors. Due to resource shortages, alternatives to He-3 systems are needed. This paper presents preliminary simulation and experimental efforts to develop a fast-neutron-multiplicity counter based on liquid organic scintillators. This mission also provides the opportunity to broaden the capabilities of such safeguards measurement systems to improve current neutron-multiplicity techniques and expand the scope to encompass advanced nuclear fuels.

  7. An Agile Methodology for Implementing Service-Oriented Architecture in Small and Medium Sized Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laidlaw, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of Lean/Agile principles, using action research to develop and deploy new technology for Small and Medium sized enterprises. The research case was conducted at the Lapeer County Sheriff's Department and involves the initial deployment of a Service Oriented Architecture to alleviate the data…

  8. Field testing of passive diffusion bag samplers for volatile organic compound concentrations in ground water, Naval Industrial Reserve Ordnance Plant, Fridley, Minnesota, November 1999 and May 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Petkewich, Matthew D.

    2000-01-01

    Volatile organic compound concentrations from passive diffusion bag samplers were compared with concentrations from conventional purge (three or more casing volumes) sampling and low-flow purge sampling in side-by-side tests in 17 wells at the Naval Industrial Reserve Ordnance Plant, in Fridley, Minnesota. An initial comparison of 1,2-dichloroethene and trichloroethene concentrations obtained by using passive diffusion bag samplers and the conventional purge method in wells where one passive diffusion bag sampler was deployed showed good agreement at several wells but poor agreement at others. Collection of data from multiple diffusion samplers during the conventional purge sampling and during the low-flow sampling, however, suggests that the volatile organic compound concentrations from the passive diffusion bag samplers accurately reflect the volatile organic compound distribution in the screened interval, whereas the conventional purge and low-flow purge samples reflect mixing during pumping. The data also show that contaminant stratification was present in some wells. In one well, trichloroethene concentrations ranged from 470 to 1,600 micrograms per liter over a vertical distance of approximately 6 feet.

  9. Plant leaves as indoor air passive samplers for volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Todd A; Doucette, William J

    2015-03-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) enter indoor environments through internal and external sources. Indoor air concentrations of VOCs vary greatly but are generally higher than outdoors. Plants have been promoted as indoor air purifiers for decades, but reports of their effectiveness differ. However, while air-purifying applications may be questionable, the waxy cuticle coating on leaves may provide a simple, cost-effective approach to sampling indoor air for VOCs. To investigate the potential use of plants as indoor air VOC samplers, a static headspace approach was used to examine the relationship between leaf and air concentrations, leaf lipid contents and octanol-air partition coefficients (Koa) for six VOCs and four plant species. The relationship between leaf and air concentrations was further examined in an actual residence after the introduction of several chlorinated VOC emission sources. Leaf-air concentration factors (LACFs), calculated from linear regressions of the laboratory headspace data, were found to increase as the solvent extractable leaf lipid content and Koa value of the VOC increased. In the studies conducted in the residence, leaf concentrations paralleled the changing air concentrations, indicating a relatively rapid air to leaf VOC exchange. Overall, the data from the laboratory and residential studies illustrate the potential for plant leaves to be used as cost effective, real-time indoor air VOC samplers.

  10. Predicting Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Concentrations in Resident Aquatic Organisms Using Passive Samplers and Partial Least-Squares Calibration

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The current work sought to develop predictive models between time-weighted average polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in the freely dissolved phase and those present in resident aquatic organisms. We deployed semipermeable membrane passive sampling devices (SPMDs) and collected resident crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) at nine locations within and outside of the Portland Harbor Superfund Mega-site in Portland, OR. Study results show that crayfish and aqueous phase samples collected within the Mega-site had PAH profiles enriched in high molecular weight PAHs and that freely dissolved PAH profiles tended to be more populated by low molecular weight PAHs compared to crayfish tissues. Results also show that of several modeling approaches, a two-factor partial least-squares (PLS) calibration model using detection limit substitution provided the best predictive power for estimating PAH concentrations in crayfish, where the model explained ≥72% of the variation in the data set and provided predictions within ∼3× of measured values. Importantly, PLS calibration provided a means to estimate PAH concentrations in tissues when concentrations were below detection in the freely dissolved phase. The impact of measurements below detection limits is discussed. PMID:24800862

  11. Denitrification of high concentrations of nitrites and nitrates in synthetic medium with different sources of organic carbon. III. Methanol.

    PubMed

    Błaszczyk, M; Gałka, E; Sakowicz, E; Mycielski, R

    1985-01-01

    The denitrification of nitrites and nitrates (1000 mg N/l) in medium containing methanol as a source of organic carbon was studied. Continuous cultures of mixed population of autochtonic microflora from bottom sludge of nitrogenous wastewater reservoir were set up in a chemostat-type column and packed bed reactor. The efficiency of denitrification of nitrates in packed bed reactor was 506.7 mg N/l/h whereas denitrification of nitrites was from 8.7 to 16.0 mg N/l/h depending on the granulation of the filing material. In the latter case 83% nitrogen was removed from the medium. One of the factors causing low efficiency of denitrification of nitrites is excessive alkalization of the medium in the bed. The use of a three-step bed with adjusted pH resulted in complete denitrification of nitrites with efficiency 60 mg N/l/h. The bacteria inside the bed were dominated by Paracoccus denitrificans and by Pseudomonas aeruginosa when nitrates were present. The sensitivity of P. denitrificans to high concentrations of nitrites seems to be the second factor contributing to low efficiency of denitrification with methanol as organic substrate. PMID:2412408

  12. Sampling trace organic compounds in water: a comparison of a continuous active sampler to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Coes, Alissa L; Paretti, Nicholas V; Foreman, William T; Iverson, Jana L; Alvarez, David A

    2014-03-01

    A continuous active sampling method was compared to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods for the sampling of trace organic compounds (TOCs) in water. Results from each method are compared and contrasted in order to provide information for future investigators to use while selecting appropriate sampling methods for their research. The continuous low-level aquatic monitoring (CLAM) sampler (C.I.Agent® Storm-Water Solutions) is a submersible, low flow-rate sampler, that continuously draws water through solid-phase extraction media. CLAM samplers were deployed at two wastewater-dominated stream field sites in conjunction with the deployment of polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and the collection of discrete (grab) water samples. All samples were analyzed for a suite of 69 TOCs. The CLAM and POCIS samples represent time-integrated samples that accumulate the TOCs present in the water over the deployment period (19-23 h for CLAM and 29 days for POCIS); the discrete samples represent only the TOCs present in the water at the time and place of sampling. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling and cluster analysis were used to examine patterns in both TOC detections and relative concentrations between the three sampling methods. A greater number of TOCs were detected in the CLAM samples than in corresponding discrete and POCIS samples, but TOC concentrations in the CLAM samples were significantly lower than in the discrete and (or) POCIS samples. Thirteen TOCs of varying polarity were detected by all of the three methods. TOC detections and concentrations obtained by the three sampling methods, however, are dependent on multiple factors. This study found that stream discharge, constituent loading, and compound type all affected TOC concentrations detected by each method. In addition, TOC detections and concentrations were affected by the reporting limits, bias, recovery, and performance of each method.

  13. Sampling trace organic compounds in water: a comparison of a continuous active sampler to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coes, Alissa L.; Paretti, Nicholas V.; Foreman, William T.; Iverson, Jana L.; Alvarez, David A.

    2014-01-01

    A continuous active sampling method was compared to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods for the sampling of trace organic compounds (TOCs) in water. Results from each method are compared and contrasted in order to provide information for future investigators to use while selecting appropriate sampling methods for their research. The continuous low-level aquatic monitoring (CLAM) sampler (C.I.Agent® Storm-Water Solutions) is a submersible, low flow-rate sampler, that continuously draws water through solid-phase extraction media. CLAM samplers were deployed at two wastewater-dominated stream field sites in conjunction with the deployment of polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and the collection of discrete (grab) water samples. All samples were analyzed for a suite of 69 TOCs. The CLAM and POCIS samples represent time-integrated samples that accumulate the TOCs present in the water over the deployment period (19–23 h for CLAM and 29 days for POCIS); the discrete samples represent only the TOCs present in the water at the time and place of sampling. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling and cluster analysis were used to examine patterns in both TOC detections and relative concentrations between the three sampling methods. A greater number of TOCs were detected in the CLAM samples than in corresponding discrete and POCIS samples, but TOC concentrations in the CLAM samples were significantly lower than in the discrete and (or) POCIS samples. Thirteen TOCs of varying polarity were detected by all of the three methods. TOC detections and concentrations obtained by the three sampling methods, however, are dependent on multiple factors. This study found that stream discharge, constituent loading, and compound type all affected TOC concentrations detected by each method. In addition, TOC detections and concentrations were affected by the reporting limits, bias, recovery, and performance of each method.

  14. Sampling trace organic compounds in water: a comparison of a continuous active sampler to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Coes, Alissa L; Paretti, Nicholas V; Foreman, William T; Iverson, Jana L; Alvarez, David A

    2014-03-01

    A continuous active sampling method was compared to continuous passive and discrete sampling methods for the sampling of trace organic compounds (TOCs) in water. Results from each method are compared and contrasted in order to provide information for future investigators to use while selecting appropriate sampling methods for their research. The continuous low-level aquatic monitoring (CLAM) sampler (C.I.Agent® Storm-Water Solutions) is a submersible, low flow-rate sampler, that continuously draws water through solid-phase extraction media. CLAM samplers were deployed at two wastewater-dominated stream field sites in conjunction with the deployment of polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and the collection of discrete (grab) water samples. All samples were analyzed for a suite of 69 TOCs. The CLAM and POCIS samples represent time-integrated samples that accumulate the TOCs present in the water over the deployment period (19-23 h for CLAM and 29 days for POCIS); the discrete samples represent only the TOCs present in the water at the time and place of sampling. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling and cluster analysis were used to examine patterns in both TOC detections and relative concentrations between the three sampling methods. A greater number of TOCs were detected in the CLAM samples than in corresponding discrete and POCIS samples, but TOC concentrations in the CLAM samples were significantly lower than in the discrete and (or) POCIS samples. Thirteen TOCs of varying polarity were detected by all of the three methods. TOC detections and concentrations obtained by the three sampling methods, however, are dependent on multiple factors. This study found that stream discharge, constituent loading, and compound type all affected TOC concentrations detected by each method. In addition, TOC detections and concentrations were affected by the reporting limits, bias, recovery, and performance of each method. PMID:24419241

  15. Open Source Software in Medium Size Organizations: Key Factors for Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Jerry T.

    2010-01-01

    For-profit organizations are constantly evaluating new technologies to gain competitive advantage. One such technology, application software, has changed significantly over the past 25 years with the introduction of Open Source Software (OSS). In contrast to commercial software that is developed by private companies and sold to organizations, OSS…

  16. Facebook as a medium for promoting statement of intent for organ donation: 5-years of experience.

    PubMed

    Brzeziński, Michał; Klikowicz, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    The number of potential registered organ donors does not cover the actual demand in most developed countries. Therefore, methods increasing awareness and interest in organ donation, including modern tools of social marketing, are being researched worldwide. The aim of this paper is to present our 5-year experiences with a Facebook networking campaign - the Dawca.pl Club. The mission of the campaign is to raise awareness and educate Polish society on tissue, cell, and organ transplants, to increase public acceptance for transplants as a treatment method, and to increase the number of voluntary donors signing consents for organ donation. The project is based on the idea of creating a community promoting transplantation, focused around the Dawca.pl Club. At present the club has over 48,000 registered members - people who declared willingness to donate their organs after death. We present a description of members of this social networking service, the possibilities of using it to promote transplants and organ donation, and the efficacy of selected schemes for creating and publishing content on Facebook. The example of Dawca.pl shows that 2-way relations, spread over time, are required for social media to effectively engage and exert influence in a chosen sphere of public health and medicine. Unfortunately, at this time it is difficult to assess how such campaigns, apart from raising social awareness and acceptance, will affect the number of transplantations of organs from living and deceased donors.

  17. Facebook as a medium for promoting statement of intent for organ donation: 5-years of experience.

    PubMed

    Brzeziński, Michał; Klikowicz, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    The number of potential registered organ donors does not cover the actual demand in most developed countries. Therefore, methods increasing awareness and interest in organ donation, including modern tools of social marketing, are being researched worldwide. The aim of this paper is to present our 5-year experiences with a Facebook networking campaign - the Dawca.pl Club. The mission of the campaign is to raise awareness and educate Polish society on tissue, cell, and organ transplants, to increase public acceptance for transplants as a treatment method, and to increase the number of voluntary donors signing consents for organ donation. The project is based on the idea of creating a community promoting transplantation, focused around the Dawca.pl Club. At present the club has over 48,000 registered members - people who declared willingness to donate their organs after death. We present a description of members of this social networking service, the possibilities of using it to promote transplants and organ donation, and the efficacy of selected schemes for creating and publishing content on Facebook. The example of Dawca.pl shows that 2-way relations, spread over time, are required for social media to effectively engage and exert influence in a chosen sphere of public health and medicine. Unfortunately, at this time it is difficult to assess how such campaigns, apart from raising social awareness and acceptance, will affect the number of transplantations of organs from living and deceased donors. PMID:25761524

  18. Production of Normal Mammalian Organ Culture Using a Medium Containing Mem-Alpha, Leibovitz L 15, Glucose Galactose Fructose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under micro- gravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel. The medium used for culturing the cells, especially a mixture of epithelial and mesenchymal cells contains a mixture of Mem-alpha and Leibovits L15 supplemented with glucose, galactose and fructose.

  19. On the construction, comparison, and variability of airsheds for interpreting semivolatile organic compounds in passively sampled air.

    PubMed

    Westgate, John N; Wania, Frank

    2011-10-15

    Air mass origin as determined by back trajectories often aids in explaining some of the short-term variability in the atmospheric concentrations of semivolatile organic contaminants. Airsheds, constructed by amalgamating large numbers of back trajectories, capture average air mass origins over longer time periods and thus have found use in interpreting air concentrations obtained by passive air samplers. To explore some of their key characteristics, airsheds for 54 locations on Earth were constructed and compared for roundness, seasonality, and interannual variability. To avoid the so-called "pole problem" and to simplify the calculation of roundness, a "geodesic grid" was used to bin the back-trajectory end points. Departures from roundness were seen to occur at all latitudes and to correlate significantly with local slope but no strong relationship between latitude and roundness was revealed. Seasonality and interannual variability vary widely enough to imply that static models of transport are not sufficient to describe the proximity of an area to potential sources of contaminants. For interpreting an air measurement an airshed should be generated specifically for the deployment time of the sampler, especially when investigating long-term trends. Samples taken in a single season may not represent the average annual atmosphere, and samples taken in linear, as opposed to round, airsheds may not represent the average atmosphere in the area. Simple methods are proposed to ascertain the significance of an airshed or individual cell. It is recommended that when establishing potential contaminant source regions only end points with departure heights of less than ∼700 m be considered.

  20. Extraterrestrial Organic Chemistry: From the Interstellar Medium to the Origins of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Extraterrestrially delivered organics in the origin of cellular life. Various processes leading to the emergence of cellular life from organics delivered from space to earth or other planetary bodies in the solar system will be reviewed. The focus will be on: (1) self-assembly of amphiphilic material to vesicles and other structures, such as micelles and multilayers, and its role in creating environments suitable for chemical catalysis, (2) a possible role of extraterrestrial delivery of organics in the formation of the simplest bioenergetics (3) mechanisms leading from amino acids or their precursors to simple peptides and, subsequently, to the evolution of metabolism. These issues will be discussed from two opposite points of view: (1) Which molecules could have been particularly useful in the protobiological evolution; this may provide focus for searching for these molecules in interstellar media. (2) Assuming that a considerable part of the inventory of organic matter on the early earth was delivered extraterrestrially, what does relative abundance of different organics in space tell us about the scenario leading to the origin of life.

  1. Chemically-defined medium for growth and differentiation of mixed epithelial and connective tissues in organ culture.

    PubMed

    Hodges, G M; Melcher, A H

    1976-06-01

    The effect on tissue differentiation and growth in vitro of certain of the factors implicated in collagen synthesis (ascorbic acid, alpha-ketoglutarate and oxygen) and the influence of hydrocortisone was studied using organ cultures of fetal mouse mandible as a mixed epithelial and connective tissue system. Using serum-free Waymouth's MB 752/1 chemically-defined medium, addition of high levels of ascorbic acid (300mug per ml), hydrocortisone (1mug per ml) and oxygen (95%) enhanced differentiation in a number of tissues, in particular skin and appendages, tooth germs and bone, while osteoid and dentine production were noticeable promoted. It is suggested that an essential aspect of media design for organ culture involves the incorporaation of collagen-promoting factors to the in vitro enviornment particularly with regard to the controlling role implicated for collagen in a variety of biological processess.

  2. In-situ Characterization of Gas Phase Organic Emissions from a Medium Duty Diesel Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, E. S.; Sappok, A.; Hunter, J. F.; Jayne, J.; Wong, V. W.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kroll, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    With volatilities slightly lower than VOCs, intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOCs; e.g. C13-C20 n-alkanes) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs; e.g. C21-C32 n-alkanes) comprise an important, largely unmeasured part of the organic carbon emission profile of a diesel engine. Similar to VOCs, I/SVOCs have important impacts on air quality and climate, serving as precursor species to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, but a detailed understanding of SOA formation from I/SVOCs remains incomplete due to a lack of fast, reliable measurement techniques that target I/SVOCs. This paper presents experimental results obtained with a recently developed technique that combines cryogenic collection and electron-impact, high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry to enable fast, quantitative, volatility-resolved, bulk characterization of I/SVOCs. In this experiment, I/SVOC tailpipe emissions from a Cummins (5.9 L) 2002 ISB 300 engine were measured as a function of engine speed and load during steady-state and transient conditions, including numerous cold starts. Analysis of the high resolution mass spectra reveal evolving hydrocarbon and oxygenated hydrocarbon signatures as a function of engine block temperature and engine load. The exhaust sampling apparatus included the ability to test different emission control technologies. For a subset of tests, a diesel particulate filter (DPF) was integrated into the exhaust system to characterize post-DPF I/SVOC emissions during soot loading and DPF-regeneration cycles.

  3. Medium-based optimization of an organic solvent-tolerant extracellular lipase from the isolated halophilic Alkalibacillus salilacus.

    PubMed

    Samaei-Nouroozi, Amene; Rezaei, Shahla; Khoshnevis, Nika; Doosti, Mahmoud; Hajihoseini, Reza; Khoshayand, Mohammad Reza; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali

    2015-09-01

    A haloalkaliphilic solvent-tolerant lipase was produced from Alkalibacillus salilacus within 48 h of growth in liquid medium. An overall 4.9-fold enhanced production was achieved over unoptimized media after medium optimization by statistical approaches. Plackett-Burman screening suggested lipase production maximally influenced by olive oil, KH2PO4, NaCl, and glucose; and response surface methodology predicted the appropriate levels of each parameter. Produced lipase was highly active and stable over broad ranges of temperature (15-65 °C), pH (4.0-11.0), and NaCl concentration (0-30 %) showing excellent thermostable, pH-stable, and halophilic properties. The enzyme was optimally active at pH 8.0 and 40 °C. Majority of cations, except some like Co(2+) and Al(3+) were positive signals for lipase activity. In addition, the presence of chemical agents and organic solvents with different log P ow was well tolerated by the enzyme. Finally, efficacy of lipase-mediated esterification of various alcohols with oleic acid in organic solvents was studied. PMID:26198037

  4. Synthesis of Formamide and Related Organic Species in the Interstellar Medium via Chemical Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spezia, Riccardo; Jeanvoine, Yannick; Hase, William L.; Song, Kihyung; Largo, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    We show, by means of direct dynamics simulations, how it is possible to define possible reactants and mechanisms leading to the formation of formamide in the interstellar medium. In particular, different ion-molecule reactions in the gas phase were considered: NH3OH+, NH2OH{}2+, H2COH+, and NH4 + for the ions and NH2OH, H2CO, and NH3 for the partner neutrals. These calculations were combined with high level ab initio calculations to investigate possible further evolution of the products observed. In particular, for formamide, we propose that the NH2OH{}2+ + H2CO reaction can produce an isomer, NH2OCH{}2+, that, after dissociative recombination, can produce neutral formamide, which was observed in space. The direct dynamics do not pre-impose any reaction pathways and in other reactions, we did not observe the formation of formamide or any possible precursor. On the other hand, we obtained other interesting reactions, like the formation of NH2CH{}2+. Finally, some radiative association processes are proposed. All of the results obtained are discussed in light of the species observed in radioastronomy.

  5. Synthesis of Formamide and Related Organic Species in the Interstellar Medium via Chemical Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spezia, Riccardo; Jeanvoine, Yannick; Hase, William L.; Song, Kihyung; Largo, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    We show, by means of direct dynamics simulations, how it is possible to define possible reactants and mechanisms leading to the formation of formamide in the interstellar medium. In particular, different ion–molecule reactions in the gas phase were considered: NH3OH+, NH2OH{}2+, H2COH+, and NH4 + for the ions and NH2OH, H2CO, and NH3 for the partner neutrals. These calculations were combined with high level ab initio calculations to investigate possible further evolution of the products observed. In particular, for formamide, we propose that the NH2OH{}2+ + H2CO reaction can produce an isomer, NH2OCH{}2+, that, after dissociative recombination, can produce neutral formamide, which was observed in space. The direct dynamics do not pre-impose any reaction pathways and in other reactions, we did not observe the formation of formamide or any possible precursor. On the other hand, we obtained other interesting reactions, like the formation of NH2CH{}2+. Finally, some radiative association processes are proposed. All of the results obtained are discussed in light of the species observed in radioastronomy.

  6. Microbial toxicity of mixtures of organic chemicals in soil medium-experimental protocol and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Arulgnanendran, V.R.J.; Khandan, N.N.

    1995-12-31

    A laboratory procedure was developed to measure the microbial toxicity in soils using respirometric technique. The procedure was tested on 35 organic chemicals and several 8- and 10- component equitoxic mixtures. The chemicals assayed in this study were found to act jointly by simple addition. A modeling approach incorporating partitioning, sorption and Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) techniques was developed to estimate single chemical and mixture toxicity. This modeling approach was validated using an external testing set of data.

  7. Message framing and medium considerations for recruiting newly eligible teen organ donor registrants.

    PubMed

    Quick, B L; Bosch, D; Morgan, S E

    2012-06-01

    In response to the current organ shortage-and in an effort to increase the number of registered donors-the present campaign employed a direct-mail marketing strategy that registered 6908 individuals in the state's First-Person Consent Registry (FPCR). In evaluating the most effective of three mailers, 18-year-old individuals (N = 139,356) were randomly assigned to receive: (a) a letter from the Secretary of State (SoS); (b) a brochure from the SoS or (c) both. As hypothesized, the results revealed that exposure to the SoS letter only resulted in a greater registration rate than exposure to the SoS brochure only. Results also revealed that exposure to both the SoS letter and SoS brochure resulted in a greater registration rate than exposure to the SoS brochure only. No difference in registration rate emerged between exposure to the SoS letter and SoS brochure compared to exposure to the SoS letter only. Our results speak to the effectiveness of utilizing personalized direct-mail marketing strategies to promote organ donation with an emphasis on the practical implications of our findings for organ donation practitioners. PMID:22420417

  8. Message framing and medium considerations for recruiting newly eligible teen organ donor registrants.

    PubMed

    Quick, B L; Bosch, D; Morgan, S E

    2012-06-01

    In response to the current organ shortage-and in an effort to increase the number of registered donors-the present campaign employed a direct-mail marketing strategy that registered 6908 individuals in the state's First-Person Consent Registry (FPCR). In evaluating the most effective of three mailers, 18-year-old individuals (N = 139,356) were randomly assigned to receive: (a) a letter from the Secretary of State (SoS); (b) a brochure from the SoS or (c) both. As hypothesized, the results revealed that exposure to the SoS letter only resulted in a greater registration rate than exposure to the SoS brochure only. Results also revealed that exposure to both the SoS letter and SoS brochure resulted in a greater registration rate than exposure to the SoS brochure only. No difference in registration rate emerged between exposure to the SoS letter and SoS brochure compared to exposure to the SoS letter only. Our results speak to the effectiveness of utilizing personalized direct-mail marketing strategies to promote organ donation with an emphasis on the practical implications of our findings for organ donation practitioners.

  9. Formation of halogenated organic byproducts during medium-pressure UV and chlorine coexposure of model compounds, NOM and bromide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Quan; Shang, Chii; Zhang, Xiangru; Ding, Guoyu; Yang, Xin

    2011-12-01

    When chlorine is applied before or during UV disinfection of bromide-containing water, interactions between chlorine, bromide and UV light are inevitable. Formation of halogenated organic byproducts was studied during medium-pressure UV (MPUV) and chlorine coexposure of phenol, nitrobenzene and benzoic acid and maleic acid, chosen to represent electron-donating aromatics, electron-withdrawing aromatics, and aliphatic structures in natural organic matter (NOM), respectively. All were evaluated in the presence and absence of bromide. MPUV and chlorine coexposure of phenol produced less total organic halogen (TOX, a collective parameter for halogenated organic byproducts) than chlorination in the dark, and more haloacetic acids instead of halophenols. Increases in TOX were found in the coexposure of nitrobenzene and benzoic acid, but maleic acid was rather inert during coexposure. The presence of bromide increased the formation of brominated TOX but did not significantly affect total TOX formation, in spite of the fact that it reduced hydroxyl radical levels. MPUV and chlorine coexposure of NOM gave a higher differential UV absorbance of NOM and a larger shift to lower molecular weight compounds than chlorination in the dark. However, TOX formation with NOM remained similar to that observed from dark chlorination.

  10. High-Resolution Spectroscopic Studies of Complexes Formed by Medium-Size Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Becucci, Maurizio; Melandri, Sonia

    2016-05-11

    A wealth of structural and dynamical information has been obtained in the last 30 years from the study of high-resolution spectra of molecular clusters generated in a cold supersonic expansion by means of highly resolved spectroscopic methods. The data obtained, generally lead to determination of the structures of stable conformations. In addition, in the case of weakly bound molecular complexes, it is usual to observe the effects of internal motions due to the shallowness of the potential energy surfaces involved and the flexibility of the systems. In the case of electronic excitation experiments, also the effect of electronic distribution changes on both equilibrium structures and internal motions becomes accessible. The structural and dynamical information that can be obtained by applying suitable theoretical models to the analysis of these unusually complex spectra allows the determination and understanding of the driving forces involved in formation of the molecular complex. In this way, many types of non-covalent interactions have been characterized, from pure van der Waals interactions in complexes of rare gases to moderate-strength and weak hydrogen bonds and to the most recent halogen bonds and n-π interactions. The aim of this review is to underline how the different experimental and theoretical methods converge in giving a detailed picture of weak interactions in small molecular adducts involving medium-size molecules. The conclusions regarding geometries and energies can contribute to understanding of the different driving forces involved in the dynamics of the processes and can be exploited in all fields of chemistry and biochemistry, from design of new materials with novel properties to rational design of drugs. PMID:26986455

  11. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown. Final report, [September 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.

    1994-02-21

    Purpose is to understand the mechanisms for growth and breakdown of passive films on metal and alloy surfaces in aqueous medium; a secondary goal is to devise methods for predicting localized corrosion damage in industrial systems. Tasks currently being studied are: formation of bilayer structures in passive films on metals and alloys; passivity breakdown on solid vs. liquid gallium; roles of alloying elements in passivity breakdown; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of passive films; electronic structure of passive oxide films; photoelectrochemical impedance spectroscopy of passive films; and kinetics of localized attack.

  12. Development of a flow-injection analysis system with fluorescence detection for gatifloxacin determination in organized medium.

    PubMed

    Lima Vaz, Monica F; de Oliveira, João Vitor F; Cassella, Ricardo J; Pacheco, Wagner F

    2015-05-01

    This work reports the development and optimization of a flow injection analysis system with fluorescence detection (FIA-FLUO) for gatifloxacin (GFX) determination in organized medium. The analytical system was based on the enhanced fluorescence of gatifloxacin in micellar medium containing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at pH 6.0. The influence of physical (carrier flow rate, sample volume and volume of reaction coil) and chemical (pH, concentration of buffer and concentration of SDS) parameters that could affect the performance of the FIA system was evaluated in order to reach optimum conditions in terms of sensitivity and analytical throughput. Under optimized conditions, the FIA-FLUO system allowed the injection of 40 samples per hour with a limit of quantification of 72 µg/L and a RSD of 3.5% at 0.20 mg/L. Real samples of commercial pharmaceutical formulations containing GFX were analyzed, and no statistical difference was observed between the results obtained using the developed system and those obtained using the reference method based on high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection.

  13. Anomalously slow relaxation of the system of strongly interacting liquid clusters in a disordered nanoporous medium: Self-organized criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borman, V. D.; Tronin, V. N.

    2016-09-01

    It has been shown that changes in the energy of a system of nonwetting liquid clusters confined in a random nanoporous medium in the process of relaxation can be written in the quasiparticle approximation in the form of the sum of the energies of local (metastable) configurations of liquid clusters interacting with clusters in the connected nearest pores. The energy spectrum and density of states of the local configuration have been calculated. It has been shown that the relaxation of the state of the system occurs through the scenario of self-organized criticality (SOC). The process is characterized by the expectation of a fluctuation necessary for overcoming a local energy barrier of the metastable state with the subsequent rapid hydrodynamic extrusion of the liquid under the action of the surface buoyancy forces of the nonwetting framework. In this case, the dependence of the interaction between local configurations on the number of filled pores belonging to the infinite percolation cluster of filled pores serves as an internal feedback initiating the SOC process. The calculations give a power-law time dependence of the relative volume of the confined liquid θ ∼t-α(α ∼ 0.1) . The developed model of the relaxation of the porous medium with the nonwetting liquid demonstrates possible mechanisms and scenarios of SOC for disordered atomic systems.

  14. Graphene quantum dots as a highly efficient solution-processed charge trapping medium for organic nano-floating gate memory.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yongsung; Kim, Juhan; Cha, An-Na; Lee, Sang-A; Lee, Myung Woo; Suh, Jung Sang; Bae, Sukang; Moon, Byung Joon; Lee, Sang Hyun; Lee, Dong Su; Wang, Gunuk; Kim, Tae-Wook

    2016-04-01

    A highly efficient solution-processible charge trapping medium is a prerequisite to developing high-performance organic nano-floating gate memory (NFGM) devices. Although several candidates for the charge trapping layer have been proposed for organic memory, a method for significantly increasing the density of stored charges in nanoscale layers remains a considerable challenge. Here, solution-processible graphene quantum dots (GQDs) were prepared by a modified thermal plasma jet method; the GQDs were mostly composed of carbon without any serious oxidation, which was confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These GQDs have multiple energy levels because of their size distribution, and they can be effectively utilized as charge trapping media for organic NFGM applications. The NFGM device exhibited excellent reversible switching characteristics, with an on/off current ratio greater than 10(6), a stable retention time of 10(4) s and reliable cycling endurance over 100 cycles. In particular, we estimated that the GQDs layer trapped ∼7.2 × 10(12) cm(-2) charges per unit area, which is a much higher density than those of other solution-processible nanomaterials, suggesting that the GQDs layer holds promise as a highly efficient nanoscale charge trapping material. PMID:26905768

  15. Enzymatic Synthesis of Isopropyl Acetate by Immobilized Bacillus cereus Lipase in Organic Medium

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Madan Lal; Azmi, Wamik; Kanwar, Shamsher Singh

    2011-01-01

    Selective production of fragrance fatty acid ester from isopropanol and acetic acid has been achieved using silica-immobilized lipase of Bacillus cereus MTCC 8372. A purified thermoalkalophilic extracellular lipase was immobilized by adsorption onto the silica. The effects of various parameters like molar ratio of substrates (isopropanol and acetic acid; 25 to 100 mM), concentration of biocatalyst (25–125 mg/mL), reaction time, reaction temperature, organic solvents, molecular sieves, and initial water activity were studied for optimal ester synthesis. Under optimized conditions, 66.0 mM of isopropyl acetate was produced when isopropanol and acetic acid were used at 100 mM: 75 mM in 9 h at 55°C in n-heptane under continuous shaking (160 rpm) using bound lipase (25 mg). Addition of molecular sieves (3 Å × 1.5 mm) resulted in a marked increase in ester synthesis (73.0 mM). Ester synthesis was enhanced by water activity associated with pre-equilibrated saturated salt solution of LiCl. The immobilized lipase retained more than 50% of its activity after the 6th cycle of reuse. PMID:21603222

  16. Synthesis of Isopropyl Ferulate Using Silica-Immobilized Lipase in an Organic Medium

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashok; Kanwar, Shamsher Singh

    2011-01-01

    Immobilization of lipases has proved to be a useful technique for improving an enzyme's activity in organic solvents. In the present study, the performance of a silica-immobilized lipase was evaluated for the synthesis of isopropyl ferulate in DMSO. The biocatalyst was cross-linked onto the matrix with 1% glutaraldehyde. The effects of various parameters, molar ratio of ferulic acid to isopropyl alcohol (25 mM : 100 mM), concentration of biocatalyst (2.5–20 mg/mL), molecular sieves (25–250 mg/mL), and various salt ions, were studied consecutively as a function of percent esterification. Immobilized lipase at 25 mg/mL showed maximum esterification (~84%) of ferulic acid and isopropanol at a molar ratio of 25 mM : 100 mM, respectively, in DMSO at 45°C in 3 h under shaking (150 rpm). To overcome the inhibitory effect of water (a byproduct) if any, in the reaction mixture, molecular sieves (3 Å × 1.5 mm; 100 mg/mL) were added to the reaction mixture to promote the forward reaction. Salt ions like Ca2+, Cd2+, and Fe2+ enhanced the activity of immobilized biocatalyst while a few ions like Co2+, Zn2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, Al3+, and Na+ had mild inhibitory effect. Approximately, one third of total decrease in the esterification efficacy was observed after the 5th repetitive cycle of esterification. PMID:21603272

  17. Guidance on the use of passive-vapor-diffusion samplers to detect volatile organic compounds in ground-water-discharge areas, and example applications in New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, Peter E.; Vroblesky, Don A.; Lyford, Forest P.

    2002-01-01

    Polyethylene-membrane passive-vapor-diffusion samplers, or PVD samplers, have been shown to be an effective and economical reconnaissance tool for detecting and identifying volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in bottom sediments of surface-water bodies in areas of ground-water discharge. The PVD samplers consist of an empty glass vial enclosed in two layers of polyethylene membrane tubing. When samplers are placed in contaminated sediments, the air in the vial equilibrates with VOCs in pore water. Analysis of the vapor indicates the presence or absence of VOCs and the likely magnitude of concentrations in pore water.

  18. Comparison of a novel passive sampler to standard water-column sampling for organic contaminants associated with wastewater effluents entering a New Jersey stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alvarez, D.A.; Stackelberg, P.E.; Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.; Furlong, E.T.; Zaugg, S.D.; Meyer, M.T.

    2005-01-01

    Four water samples collected using standard depth and width water-column sampling methodology were compared to an innovative passive, in situ, sampler (the polar organic chemical integrative sampler or POCIS) for the detection of 96 organic wastewater-related contaminants (OWCs) in a stream that receives agricultural, municipal, and industrial wastewaters. Thirty-two OWCs were identified in POCIS extracts whereas 9-24 were identified in individual water-column samples demonstrating the utility of POCIS for identifying contaminants whose occurrence are transient or whose concentrations are below routine analytical detection limits. Overall, 10 OWCs were identified exclusively in the POCIS extracts and only six solely identified in the water-column samples, however, repetitive water samples taken using the standard method during the POCIS deployment period required multiple trips to the sampling site and an increased number of samples to store, process, and analyze. Due to the greater number of OWCs detected in the POCIS extracts as compared to individual water-column samples, the ease of performing a single deployment as compared to collecting and processing multiple water samples, the greater mass of chemical residues sequestered, and the ability to detect chemicals which dissipate quickly, the passive sampling technique offers an efficient and effective alternative for detecting OWCs in our waterways for wastewater contaminants.

  19. Combined effect of starch/montmorillonite coating and passive MAP in antioxidant activity, total phenolics, organic acids and volatile of fresh-cut carrots.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Isabela Costa; dos Reis, Kelen Cristina; Menezes, Evandro Galvão Tavares; Borges, Paulo Rogério Siriano; Rodrigues, Ariel Costa; Leal, Renato; Hernandes, Thais; de Carvalho, Elisângela Helena Nunes; Vilas Boas, Eduardo Valério de Barros

    2016-01-01

    This work evaluates fresh-cut carrots (FCC) coated with montmorillonite (MMT) subjected to passive modified atmosphere packaging. Carrots were sanitized, cooled, peeled and sliced. Half of the FCC were coated with MMT nanoparticle film and the other half were not. All FCCs were packed in a polypropylene rigid tray, covered with a polypropylene rigid lid or sealed with polyethylene + propylene film, in four treatments (RL, rigid lid; RLC, rigid lid + coating; ST, sealed tray; STC, sealed tray + coating). FCCs were stored at 4 °C and were analyzed weekly for 4 weeks (total antioxidant activity by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl method and the β-carotene/linoleic acid, phenolic compounds, organic acids and volatile compounds). The use of coating film with starch nanoparticles and a modified atmosphere leads to the preservation of the total antioxidant activity, the volatile and organic acids of FCC. PMID:26857136

  20. Combined effect of starch/montmorillonite coating and passive MAP in antioxidant activity, total phenolics, organic acids and volatile of fresh-cut carrots.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Isabela Costa; dos Reis, Kelen Cristina; Menezes, Evandro Galvão Tavares; Borges, Paulo Rogério Siriano; Rodrigues, Ariel Costa; Leal, Renato; Hernandes, Thais; de Carvalho, Elisângela Helena Nunes; Vilas Boas, Eduardo Valério de Barros

    2016-01-01

    This work evaluates fresh-cut carrots (FCC) coated with montmorillonite (MMT) subjected to passive modified atmosphere packaging. Carrots were sanitized, cooled, peeled and sliced. Half of the FCC were coated with MMT nanoparticle film and the other half were not. All FCCs were packed in a polypropylene rigid tray, covered with a polypropylene rigid lid or sealed with polyethylene + propylene film, in four treatments (RL, rigid lid; RLC, rigid lid + coating; ST, sealed tray; STC, sealed tray + coating). FCCs were stored at 4 °C and were analyzed weekly for 4 weeks (total antioxidant activity by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl method and the β-carotene/linoleic acid, phenolic compounds, organic acids and volatile compounds). The use of coating film with starch nanoparticles and a modified atmosphere leads to the preservation of the total antioxidant activity, the volatile and organic acids of FCC.

  1. Surface correlation behaviors of metal-organic Langmuir-Blodgett films on differently passivated Si(001) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, J. K.; Kundu, Sarathi

    2013-03-01

    Langmuir-Blodgett films of standard amphiphilic molecules like nickel arachidate and cadmium arachidate are grown on wet chemically passivated hydrophilic (OH-Si), hydrophobic (H-Si), and hydrophilic plus hydrophobic (Br-Si) Si(001) surfaces. Top surface morphologies and height-difference correlation functions g(r) with in-plane separation (r) are obtained from the atomic force microscopy studies. Our studies show that deposited bilayer and trilayer films have self-affine correlation behavior irrespective of different passivations and different types of amphiphilic molecules, however, liquid like correlation coexists only for a small part of r, which is located near the cutoff length (1/κ) or little below the correlation length ξ obtained from the liquid like and self-affine fitting, respectively. Thus, length scale dependent surface correlation behavior is observed for both types of Langmuir-Blodgett films. Metal ion specific interactions (ionic, covalent, etc.,) in the headgroup and the nature of the terminated bond (polar, nonpolar, etc.,) of Si surface are mainly responsible for having different correlation parameters.

  2. Calibration of a passive sampler based on stir bar sorptive extraction for the monitoring of hydrophobic organic pollutants in water.

    PubMed

    Vrana, Branislav; Komancová, Lucie; Sobotka, Jaromír

    2016-05-15

    A passive sampler based on stir bars coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was calibrated for the measurement of time-weighted average concentrations of hydrophobic micropollutants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides, in water. Stir bar/water partition coefficients were measured by equilibrating bars with sheets made of silicone rubber material for which partition coefficients had been reported previously. Kinetic parameters characterising the exchange of analytes between stir bars and water were determined under controlled exposure conditions using a passive dosing system. The dosing system consisted of silicone rubber sheets with a large surface area, spiked with analytes. During stir bar sampler exposure, analytes partitioned from dosing sheets to water in the exposure tank and maintained constant exposure concentrations. Reversible and isotropic exchange kinetics of analytes between sampler and water was confirmed by measuring the release of a range of performance reference compounds (PRCs) from stir bars. Application of a two-resistance model confirmed that, except for hexachlorocyclohexane isomers, uptake of the test compounds under the experimental conditions was controlled by diffusion in the water boundary layer. This permits the application of PRCs for in situ calibration of uptake kinetics of test compounds to stir bars. PMID:26992498

  3. Classification and source determination of medium petroleum distillates by chemometric and artificial neural networks: a self organizing feature approach.

    PubMed

    Mat-Desa, Wan N S; Ismail, Dzulkiflee; NicDaeid, Niamh

    2011-10-15

    Three different medium petroleum distillate (MPD) products (white spirit, paint brush cleaner, and lamp oil) were purchased from commercial stores in Glasgow, Scotland. Samples of 10, 25, 50, 75, 90, and 95% evaporated product were prepared, resulting in 56 samples in total which were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Data sets from the chromatographic patterns were examined and preprocessed for unsupervised multivariate analyses using principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), and a self organizing feature map (SOFM) artificial neural network. It was revealed that data sets comprised of higher boiling point hydrocarbon compounds provided a good means for the classification of the samples and successfully linked highly weathered samples back to their unevaporated counterpart in every case. The classification abilities of SOFM were further tested and validated for their predictive abilities where one set of weather data in each case was withdrawn from the sample set and used as a test set of the retrained network. This revealed SOFM to be an outstanding mechanism for sample discrimination and linkage over the more conventional PCA and HCA methods often suggested for such data analysis. SOFM also has the advantage of providing additional information through the evaluation of component planes facilitating the investigation of underlying variables that account for the classification. PMID:21919512

  4. Application of passive sampling for measuring dissolved concentrations of organic contaminants in the water column at three marine superfund sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    At contaminated sediment sites, including U.S. EPA Superfund sites, it is critical to measure water column concentrations of freely dissolved contaminants to understand the complete exposure of aquatic organisms to hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). However, historically a...

  5. Effect of fast-, medium- and slow-growing strains on meat quality of chickens reared under the organic farming method.

    PubMed

    Sirri, F; Castellini, C; Bianchi, M; Petracci, M; Meluzzi, A; Franchini, A

    2011-02-01

    The characteristics of meat quality, chemical and fatty acid composition, from fast-growing (FG) and medium-growing (MG) meat-type and slow-growing (SG) egg-type chickens reared under organic conditions were compared. Three-hundred and sixty 1-day-old male chicks, equally divided into three experimental groups represented by strains (FG: Cobb 700, MG: Naked neck Kabir and SG: Brown Classic Lohman) were housed into three poultry houses with outdoor pasture availability of 10 m(2)/bird located in the same Research Centre of the University of Perugia. All the birds were fed ad libitum the same diets formulated according to the European Union (EU) Regulations by using organic raw materials. Birds from the FG and MG groups were raised until 81 days, whereas birds from the SG group were raised until 96 days in order to achieve an acceptable market live weight. SG birds showed significantly (P < 0.01) higher breast meat drip and cook losses, Allo-Kramer shear values and collagen content. In comparison with FG and SG, MG exhibited a higher breast meat pH (5.86% v. 5.79% and 5.78%, respectively; P < 0.01) and a lower lightness (54.88% v. 57.81% and 56.98%, respectively; P < 0.05). Genotype dramatically affected the lipid content as well as the fatty acid composition of both breast and thigh meat. SG exhibited the lowest content of lipid, both in breast and in thigh meat, the lowest proportions of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and the highest proportions of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The total n-3 PUFA of SG breast meat was double that of FG meat and intermediate with respect to MG birds (8.07% v. 4.07% v. 5.14% total fatty acids; P < 0.01). The fatty acid composition of thigh meat is similar to that of breast meat, but the differences among genotypes are less pronounced. Total saturated fatty acids were not affected by the genotype. In conclusion, meat functional properties of FG and MG strains appeared much more attractive both for industry and consumer

  6. Application of XAD-resin based passive air samplers to assess local (roadside) and regional patterns of persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Paul; Thuens, Sabine; Shunthirasingham, Chubashini; Westgate, John N; Wania, Frank; Radke, Michael

    2012-07-01

    We used XAD-resin based passive air samplers (PAS) to measure atmospheric levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at five ombrotrophic bogs in Eastern Canada. The aims of our study were to investigate the influence of local roads on contaminant levels in the bogs, to derive the regional pattern of atmospheric concentrations, and to assess the uncertainties of the method. Expanded uncertainties based on the duplicate PAS deployed at 24 sites were good for the PAHs, while the deployment period of approx. 100 days was too short to yield acceptable uncertainties for PCBs. The regional PAH distribution was in good agreement with the calculated source proximity of the sampled bogs. We conclude that XAD-resin based PAS deployed for comparatively short periods are well suited for measuring atmospheric concentrations of volatile PAHs, while in remote regions longer deployment is necessary for less volatile PAHs and for PCBs. PMID:22516712

  7. The potential of passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect organic emissions under the Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.C.; Hammer, C.L. ); Kroutil, R.T. )

    1992-01-01

    The Clean Air Act of 1990 regulates the emission of 198 air toxics. Currently, there is no existing technology by which a regulatory agency can independently determine if a facility is in compliance. We have successfully tested the ability of passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect chemical plumes released in the field. Additional laboratory releases demonstrated that FTIR spectroscopy can detect target analytes in mixtures containing components which have overlapping absorbances. The FTIR spectrometer was able to identify and quantify each component released with an average quantitative error of less than 20% using partial least squares (PLS) analysis and 40% using classical least squares analysis (CLS) when calibration files containing pure components and mixtures were used. Calibration files containing only pure analytes resulted in CLS outperforming PLS analyses.

  8. The potential of passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect organic emissions under the Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.C.; Hammer, C.L.; Kroutil, R.T.

    1992-07-01

    The Clean Air Act of 1990 regulates the emission of 198 air toxics. Currently, there is no existing technology by which a regulatory agency can independently determine if a facility is in compliance. We have successfully tested the ability of passive-remote Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to detect chemical plumes released in the field. Additional laboratory releases demonstrated that FTIR spectroscopy can detect target analytes in mixtures containing components which have overlapping absorbances. The FTIR spectrometer was able to identify and quantify each component released with an average quantitative error of less than 20% using partial least squares (PLS) analysis and 40% using classical least squares analysis (CLS) when calibration files containing pure components and mixtures were used. Calibration files containing only pure analytes resulted in CLS outperforming PLS analyses.

  9. REAL-TIME EMISSION CHARACTERIZATION OF ORGANIC AIR TOXIC POLLUTANTS DURING STEADY STATE AND TRANSIENT OPERATION OF A MEDIUM DUTY DIESEL ENGINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An on-line monitoring method, jet resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) was used to measure emissions of organic air toxics from a medium-duty (60 kW)diesel generator during transient and steady state operations. Emission...

  10. Self-assembly of folic acid: a chiral-aligning medium for enantiodiscrimination of organic molecules in an aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Lokesh; Suryaprakash, N

    2012-09-10

    Weak orienting medium: Self-assembly of alkaline salt of folic acid yielded a weak liquid-crystalline phase in an aqueous environment. This medium has the ability to discriminate enantiomers. The mesophase exists over a broad range and has the physical parameter dependent tunability of degree of alignment (see scheme).

  11. [The becoming of biological function of endoecology in phylogenesis. The support of "purity" of inter-cellular medium in paracrin cenosises of cells, organs and organism (a lecture)].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2014-10-01

    The decentralized system of resident macrophages phylogenetically is earlier and complement-depending one in every paracrin regulated cenosis of cells, intima of elastic type arteries. This system primarily utilizes protein macromolecules implementing biological reaction of transcytosis. The anatomically and functionally more perfect system of insulin-depended Kupffer macrophages in liver is centralized at the level of organism and is also intended to collect and utilize minor and protein biological "garbage". The various peptides, humoral active mediators, fragments of plasmatic membranes, integral proteins of micro RNA in hydrophilic medium of blood plasma are forming under their physical chemical interaction micro-particles, micro-vesicles and exosomes. All of them, under effect of IgG, absorb phylogenetically late Kupffer macrophages. The consequent system of implementation of biologic function of endoecology includes biologic reaction of exocytosis at autocrin level; complement-depended macrophages in paracrin cenosises of cells; resident macrophages in intima of elastic type arteries with reaction of transcytosis; centralized Kupffer macrophages in liver in sinusoidal capillaries and Disse spaces without reaction of transcytosis. The difference of function of systems makes it possible to make a conception of the role of biologic function of endoecology in pathological processes. Therefore, an opportunity appears to evaluate diagnostic value of methods based on detection of amount and quality composition of micro particles of blood plasma. This can be useful in differential diagnostic of metabolic pandemics.

  12. Complex organic molecules in the interstellar medium: IRAM 30 m line survey of Sagittarius B2(N) and (M)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloche, A.; Müller, H. S. P.; Menten, K. M.; Schilke, P.; Comito, C.

    2013-11-01

    Context. The discovery of amino acids in meteorites fallen to Earth and the detection of glycine, the simplest of them, in samples returned from a comet to Earth strongly suggest that the chemistry of the interstellar medium is capable of producing such complex organic molecules and that they may be widespread in our Galaxy. Aims: Our goal is to investigate the degree of chemical complexity that can be reached in the interstellar medium, in particular in dense star-forming regions. Methods: We performed an unbiased, spectral line survey toward Sgr B2(N) and (M), two regions where high-mass stars are formed, with the IRAM 30 m telescope in the 3 mm atmospheric transmission window. Partial surveys at 2 and 1.3 mm were performed in parallel. The spectra were analyzed with a simple radiative transfer model that assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium but takes optical depth effects into account. Results: About 3675 and 945 spectral lines with a peak signal-to-noise ratio higher than 4 are detected at 3 mm toward Sgr B2(N) and (M), i.e. about 102 and 26 lines per GHz, respectively. This represents an increase by about a factor of two over previous surveys of Sgr B2. About 70% and 47% of the lines detected toward Sgr B2(N) and (M) are identified and assigned to 56 and 46 distinct molecules as well as to 66 and 54 less abundant isotopologues of these molecules, respectively. In addition, we report the detection of transitions from 59 and 24 catalog entries corresponding to vibrationally or torsionally excited states of some of these molecules, respectively, up to a vibration energy of 1400 cm-1 (2000 K). Excitation temperatures and column densities were derived for each species but should be used with caution. The rotation temperatures of the detected complex molecules typically range from ~50 to 200 K. Among the detected molecules, aminoacetonitrile, n-propyl cyanide, and ethyl formate were reported for the first time in space based on this survey, as were five rare

  13. Cellulose binding domain assisted immobilization of lipase (GSlip-CBD) onto cellulosic nanogel: characterization and application in organic medium.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Zhang, Shaowei; Wu, Gaobing; Wu, Cheng Chao; Chen, JunPeng; Baskaran, R; Liu, Ziduo

    2015-12-01

    A cbd gene was cloned into the C-terminal region of a lip gene from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. The native lipase (43.5 kDa) and CBD-Lip fusion protein (60.2 kDa) were purified to homogeneity by SDS-PAGE. A highly stable cellulosic nanogel was prepared by controlled hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose onto which the CBD-lip fusion protein was immobilized through bio-affinity based binding. The nanogel-bound lipase showed optimum activity at 55 °C, and it remains stable and active at pH 10-10.5. Furthermore, the immobilized lipase showed an over two-fold increase of relative activity in the presence of DMSO, isopropanol, isoamyl alcohol and n-butanol, but a mild activity decrease at a low concentration of methanol and ethanol. The immobilized biocatalyst retained ~50% activity after eight repetitive hydrolytic cycles. Enzyme kinetic studies of the immobilized lipase showed a 1.24 fold increase in Vmax and 5.25 fold increase in kcat towards p-NPP hydrolysis. Additionally, the nanogel bound lipase was tested to synthesize a biodiesel ester, ethyl oleate in DMSO. Kinetic analysis showed the km 100.5 ± 4.3 mmol and Vmax 0.19 ± 0.015 mmolmin(-1) at varied oleic acid concentration. Also, the values of km and Vmax at varying concentration of ethanol were observed to be 95.9 ± 13.9 mmol and 0.22 ± 0.013 mmolmin(-1) respectively. The maximum yield of ethyl oleate 111.2 ± 1.24 mM was obtained under optimized reaction conditions in organic medium. These results suggest that this immobilized biocatalyst can be used as an efficient tool for the biotransformation reactions on an industrial scale. PMID:26590897

  14. Morphology and electronic properties of metal organic molecular beam epitaxy grown ZnO on hydrogen passivated 6H-SiC(0001)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, Stefan; Pettenkofer, Christian; Speck, Florian; Seyller, Thomas

    2008-05-01

    Thin ZnO films were grown on hydrogen passivated 6H-SiC(0001) substrates by metal organic molecular beam epitaxy. The initial growth as well as the electronic properties of the growing interface were monitored by low electron diffraction and photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). From the PES intensities of the substrate and ZnO film a layered Frank-van-der-Merwe-like growth mode could be observed within the first 10nm. The ZnO films grow preferentially in (0001) direction and show a pronounced facetting in the {101¯2} direction. The experimentally determined band alignment reveals band offsets of ΔEVBM≈1.6eV and ΔECBM≈1.2eV between the valence and conduction bands, respectively. With growing ZnO thickness a band bending of about -0.51eV is observed in the SiC substrate.

  15. Comparison of Passive Samplers for Monitoring Dissolved Organic Contaminants in Water Column Deployments (SETAC Europe 22nd Annual Meeting)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonionic organic contaminants (NOCs) are difficult to measure in the water column due to their inherent chemical properties resulting in low water solubility and high particle activity. Traditional sampling methods require large quantities of water to be extracted and interferen...

  16. Comparison of Passive Samplers for Monitoring Dissolved Organic Contaminants in Water Column Deployments NAC/SETAC 2012

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nonionic organic contaminants (NOCs) are difficult to measure in the water column due to their inherent chemical properties resulting in low water solubility and high particle activity. Traditional sampling methods require large quantities of water to be extracted and interferen...

  17. Passive Accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J.; Baugher, Charles; Alexander, Iwan

    1992-01-01

    Motion of ball in liquid indicates acceleration. Passive accelerometer measures small accelerations along cylindrical axis. Principle of operation based on Stokes' law. Provides accurate measurements of small quasi-steady accelerations. Additional advantage, automatically integrates out unwanted higher-frequency components of acceleration.

  18. Evaluation of the COSHH Essentials model with a mixture of organic chemicals at a medium-sized paint producer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Slaven, James; Bowen, Russell B; Harper, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Essentials model was evaluated using full-shift exposure measurements of five chemical components in a mixture [acetone, ethylbenzene, methyl ethyl ketone, toluene, and xylenes] at a medium-sized plant producing paint materials. Two tasks, batch-making and bucket-washing, were examined. Varying levels of control were already established in both tasks and the average exposures of individual chemicals were considerably lower than the regulatory and advisory 8-h standards. The average exposure fractions using the additive mixture formula were also less than unity (batch-making: 0.25, bucket-washing: 0.56) indicating the mixture of chemicals did not exceed the combined occupational exposure limit (OEL). The paper version of the COSHH Essentials model was used to calculate a predicted exposure range (PER) for each chemical according to different levels of control. The estimated PERs of the tested chemicals for both tasks did not show consistent agreement with exposure measurements when the comparison was made for each control method and this is believed to be because of the considerably different volatilities of the chemicals. Given the combination of health hazard and exposure potential components, the COSHH Essentials model recommended a control approach 'special advice' for both tasks, based on the potential reproductive hazard ascribed to toluene. This would not have been the same conclusion if some other chemical had been substituted (for example styrene, which has the same threshold limit value as toluene). Nevertheless, it was special advice, which had led to the combination of hygienic procedures in place at this plant. The probability of the combined exposure fractions exceeding unity was 0.0002 for the batch-making task indicating that the employees performing this task were most likely well protected below the OELs. Although the employees involved in the bucket-washing task had greater potential to exceed

  19. Characterization of medium-range order in organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials by fluctuation x-ray microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, L.; Paterson, D.; McNulty, I.; Treacy, M. M. J.; Kumar, D.; Du, P.; Wiesner, U.; Gibson, J. M.; Experimental Facilities Division; Arizona State Univ.; Cornell Univ.

    2006-01-01

    Medium-range order (MRO) is crucial for understanding the nature of defects, mechanical behaviors, rheology in polymers, order-disorder processes and nucleation, etc. Measuring MRO is a challenging problem. Recently, we have developed fluctuation x-ray microscopy (FXM), which offers quantitative insight into MRO in materials at the micrometer scale. In this paper, we have applied our further-developed technique for characterization of MRO in nanomaterials. The study of mesostructured polymer-inorganic hybrid materials is an exciting, emerging research area offering enormous scientific and technological promise. The ability to control the shape, size and order of hybrid materials is a key requirement for their future development. By choice of the appropriate block copolymer system and inorganic precursors, the shape and size of the hybrid materials can be controlled at the nanometer scale. However, the control of formation and ordering of the nanostructures with medium to long range order remains a challenge that limits advances in many fields of nanotechnology. By using FXM here we examine the influence of sol-gel process variables on medium range order. The FXM method is described elsewhere. Two hybrids of PI-b-PEO/aluminosilicates with {approx}20nm phase separation length scale were prepared using known procedures. The PI-b-PEO amphiphilic block copolymer was synthesized via anionic polymerization techniques. Hybrids were fabricated by dissolving 0.05 g of PI-b-PEO in tetrahydrofuran (THF) (sample A) or a THF/chloroform mixture (28/72 v/v) (sample B) and adding 0.3 g of pre-hydrolyzed sol-gel inorganic precursors (3-glycidyloxypropyl-trimethoxysilane and aluminum-tri-secbutoxide). Samples were spin coated onto Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} windows on Si substrate. Both samples were UV/ozone treated for degrading the isoprene components in order to increase contrast for x-ray scattering experiments. The sample A was further cacinated at 350 C to remove all organic components

  20. Volatile organic compounds at oil and natural gas production well pads in Colorado and Texas using passive samplers

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot study was conducted in application of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Methods 325A/B variant for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) near two oil and natural gas (ONG) production well pads in the Texas Barnett Shale formation and Colorado Denver&nd...

  1. Extraction of medium chain fatty acids from organic municipal waste and subsequent production of bio-based fuels.

    PubMed

    Kannengiesser, Jan; Sakaguchi-Söder, Kaori; Mrukwia, Timo; Jager, Johannes; Schebek, Liselotte

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview on investigations for a new technology to generate bio-based fuel additives from bio-waste. The investigations are taking place at the composting plant in Darmstadt-Kranichstein (Germany). The aim is to explore the potential of bio-waste as feedstock in producing different bio-based products (or bio-based fuels). For this investigation, a facultative anaerobic process is to be integrated into the normal aerobic waste treatment process for composting. The bio-waste is to be treated in four steps to produce biofuels. The first step is the facultative anaerobic treatment of the waste in a rotting box namely percolate to generate a fatty-acid rich liquid fraction. The Hydrolysis takes place in the rotting box during the waste treatment. The organic compounds are then dissolved and transferred into the waste liquid phase. Browne et al. (2013) describes the hydrolysis as an enzymatically degradation of high solid substrates to soluble products which are further degraded to volatile fatty acids (VFA). This is confirmed by analytical tests done on the liquid fraction. After the percolation, volatile and medium chain fatty acids are found in the liquid phase. Concentrations of fatty acids between 8.0 and 31.5 were detected depending on the nature of the input material. In the second step, a fermentation process will be initiated to produce additional fatty acids. Existing microorganism mass is activated to degrade the organic components that are still remaining in the percolate. After fermentation the quantity of fatty acids in four investigated reactors increased 3-5 times. While fermentation mainly non-polar fatty acids (pentanoic to octanoic acid) are build. Next to the fermentation process, a chain-elongation step is arranged by adding ethanol to the fatty acid rich percolate. While these investigations a chain-elongation of mainly fatty acids with pair numbers of carbon atoms (acetate, butanoic and hexanoic acid) are demonstrated. After

  2. Extraction of medium chain fatty acids from organic municipal waste and subsequent production of bio-based fuels.

    PubMed

    Kannengiesser, Jan; Sakaguchi-Söder, Kaori; Mrukwia, Timo; Jager, Johannes; Schebek, Liselotte

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview on investigations for a new technology to generate bio-based fuel additives from bio-waste. The investigations are taking place at the composting plant in Darmstadt-Kranichstein (Germany). The aim is to explore the potential of bio-waste as feedstock in producing different bio-based products (or bio-based fuels). For this investigation, a facultative anaerobic process is to be integrated into the normal aerobic waste treatment process for composting. The bio-waste is to be treated in four steps to produce biofuels. The first step is the facultative anaerobic treatment of the waste in a rotting box namely percolate to generate a fatty-acid rich liquid fraction. The Hydrolysis takes place in the rotting box during the waste treatment. The organic compounds are then dissolved and transferred into the waste liquid phase. Browne et al. (2013) describes the hydrolysis as an enzymatically degradation of high solid substrates to soluble products which are further degraded to volatile fatty acids (VFA). This is confirmed by analytical tests done on the liquid fraction. After the percolation, volatile and medium chain fatty acids are found in the liquid phase. Concentrations of fatty acids between 8.0 and 31.5 were detected depending on the nature of the input material. In the second step, a fermentation process will be initiated to produce additional fatty acids. Existing microorganism mass is activated to degrade the organic components that are still remaining in the percolate. After fermentation the quantity of fatty acids in four investigated reactors increased 3-5 times. While fermentation mainly non-polar fatty acids (pentanoic to octanoic acid) are build. Next to the fermentation process, a chain-elongation step is arranged by adding ethanol to the fatty acid rich percolate. While these investigations a chain-elongation of mainly fatty acids with pair numbers of carbon atoms (acetate, butanoic and hexanoic acid) are demonstrated. After

  3. Linking lithology and land use to sources of dissolved and particulate organic matter in headwaters of a temperate, passive-margin river system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longworth, B. E.; Petsch, S. T.; Raymond, P. A.; Bauer, J. E.

    2007-09-01

    A number of rivers have been found to transport highly aged organic matter [OM]; however, the sources of this aged material remain a matter of debate. One potential source may be erosion and weathering of headwater lithologies rich in ancient sedimentary OM. In this study, waters, suspended particulates, streambed sediments, rocks and soils from fourteen small headwater watersheds of a mid-size, temperate, passive margin river were sampled and characterized by Δ 14C, δ 13C, and POC/TPN ratios to identify sources of particulate and dissolved OM delivered to the river mainstem. These headwater sites encompass a range in lithology (OM-rich shales, OM-lean carbonate/mudstone facies, and OM-free crystalline rocks) and land use types (forested and agricultural), and allow investigation of the influence of agriculture and bedrock types on stream OM characteristics. Streams draining large areas of both agricultural land use and OM-rich lithology contain particulate OM [POM] that is more 14C-depleted than streams draining forested, shale-free watersheds. However, this is not sufficient to account for the significantly lower Δ 14C-POC measured in the river mainstem. Dissolved OM [DOM] Δ 14C are in all cases enriched compared to POM from the same stream, but are otherwise highly variable and unrelated to either land use or lithology. POC/TPN ratios were likewise highly variable. POC and DOC δ 13C signatures were similar across all watersheds. Based on isotope mass balance, 14C-free fossil OM sources contribute 0-12% of total stream POM. Although these results do not unequivocally separate the influences of land use and lithology, watershed coverage by shale and agriculture are both important controls on stream Δ 14C-POC. Thus export of aged, particle-associated OM may be a feature of river systems along both passive and active continental margins.

  4. Elasticity-induced force reversal between active spinning particles in dense passive media

    PubMed Central

    Aragones, J. L.; Steimel, J. P.; Alexander-Katz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The self-organization of active particles is governed by their dynamic effective interactions. Such interactions are controlled by the medium in which such active agents reside. Here we study the interactions between active agents in a dense non-active medium. Our system consists of actuated, spinning, active particles embedded in a dense monolayer of passive, or non-active, particles. We demonstrate that the presence of the passive monolayer alters markedly the properties of the system and results in a reversal of the forces between active spinning particles from repulsive to attractive. The origin of such reversal is due to the coupling between the active stresses and elasticity of the system. This discovery provides a mechanism for the interaction between active agents in complex and structured media, opening up opportunities to tune the interaction range and directionality via the mechanical properties of the medium. PMID:27112961

  5. Elasticity-induced force reversal between active spinning particles in dense passive media.

    PubMed

    Aragones, J L; Steimel, J P; Alexander-Katz, A

    2016-04-26

    The self-organization of active particles is governed by their dynamic effective interactions. Such interactions are controlled by the medium in which such active agents reside. Here we study the interactions between active agents in a dense non-active medium. Our system consists of actuated, spinning, active particles embedded in a dense monolayer of passive, or non-active, particles. We demonstrate that the presence of the passive monolayer alters markedly the properties of the system and results in a reversal of the forces between active spinning particles from repulsive to attractive. The origin of such reversal is due to the coupling between the active stresses and elasticity of the system. This discovery provides a mechanism for the interaction between active agents in complex and structured media, opening up opportunities to tune the interaction range and directionality via the mechanical properties of the medium.

  6. Elasticity-induced force reversal between active spinning particles in dense passive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragones, J. L.; Steimel, J. P.; Alexander-Katz, A.

    2016-04-01

    The self-organization of active particles is governed by their dynamic effective interactions. Such interactions are controlled by the medium in which such active agents reside. Here we study the interactions between active agents in a dense non-active medium. Our system consists of actuated, spinning, active particles embedded in a dense monolayer of passive, or non-active, particles. We demonstrate that the presence of the passive monolayer alters markedly the properties of the system and results in a reversal of the forces between active spinning particles from repulsive to attractive. The origin of such reversal is due to the coupling between the active stresses and elasticity of the system. This discovery provides a mechanism for the interaction between active agents in complex and structured media, opening up opportunities to tune the interaction range and directionality via the mechanical properties of the medium.

  7. Evaluation of Passive Samplers for Long-Term Monitoring of Organic Compounds in the Untreated Drinking Water Supply for the City of Eugene, Oregon, September-October 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Kathleen A.; Alvarez, David A.; Anderson, Chauncey W.; Cranor, Walter L.; Perkins, Stephanie D.; Schroeder, Vickie

    2009-01-01

    Two types of passive samplers, polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs), were deployed at three sites in the McKenzie River basin during September-October 2007. The McKenzie River is the source of drinking water for the city of Eugene, Oregon, and the work presented here was designed to evaluate the use of POCIS and SMPDs as part of a long-term monitoring plan for the river. Various compounds were detected in extracts from the POCIS and SPMDs, indicating that some compounds of concern are present in the McKenzie River basin, including the intake for the drinking water plant. However, most concentrations were near the quantitation limits of the analytical methods used - generally at subnanogram per liter concentrations - and would not have been detectable with conventional water sampling and analysis methods. These results indicate that both POCIS and SPMDs are well suited to monitor organic compounds in the McKenzie River basin.

  8. Formulation of multifunctional oil-in-water nanosized emulsions for active and passive targeting of drugs to otherwise inaccessible internal organs of the human body.

    PubMed

    Tamilvanan, Shunmugaperumal

    2009-10-20

    Oil-in-water (o/w) type nanosized emulsions (NE) have been widely investigated as vehicles/carrier for the formulation and delivery of drugs with a broad range of applications. A comprehensive summary is presented on how to formulate the multifunctional o/w NE for active and passive targeting of drugs to otherwise inaccessible internal organs of the human body. The NE is classified into three generations based on its development over the last couple of decades to make ultimately a better colloidal carrier for a target site within the internal and external organs/parts of the body, thus allowing site-specific drug delivery and/or enhanced drug absorption. The third generation NE has tremendous application for drug absorption enhancement and for 'ferrying' compounds across cell membranes in comparison to its first and second generation counterparts. Furthermore, the third generation NE provides an interesting opportunity for use as drug delivery vehicles for numerous therapeutics that can range in size from small molecules to macromolecules.

  9. Evaluation of the COSHH Essentials Model with a Mixture of Organic Chemicals at a Medium-Sized Paint Producer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Slaven, James; Bowen, Russell B.; Harper, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Essentials model was evaluated using full-shift exposure measurements of five chemical components in a mixture [acetone, ethylbenzene, methyl ethyl ketone, toluene, and xylenes] at a medium-sized plant producing paint materials. Two tasks, batch-making and bucket-washing, were examined. Varying levels of control were already established in both tasks and the average exposures of individual chemicals were considerably lower than the regulatory and advisory 8-h standards. The average exposure fractions using the additive mixture formula were also less than unity (batch-making: 0.25, bucket-washing: 0.56) indicating the mixture of chemicals did not exceed the combined occupational exposure limit (OEL). The paper version of the COSHH Essentials model was used to calculate a predicted exposure range (PER) for each chemical according to different levels of control. The estimated PERs of the tested chemicals for both tasks did not show consistent agreement with exposure measurements when the comparison was made for each control method and this is believed to be because of the considerably different volatilities of the chemicals. Given the combination of health hazard and exposure potential components, the COSHH Essentials model recommended a control approach ‘special advice’ for both tasks, based on the potential reproductive hazard ascribed to toluene. This would not have been the same conclusion if some other chemical had been substituted (for example styrene, which has the same threshold limit value as toluene). Nevertheless, it was special advice, which had led to the combination of hygienic procedures in place at this plant. The probability of the combined exposure fractions exceeding unity was 0.0002 for the batch-making task indicating that the employees performing this task were most likely well protected below the OELs. Although the employees involved in the bucket-washing task had greater potential to

  10. Evaluation of the COSHH Essentials model with a mixture of organic chemicals at a medium-sized paint producer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Gyung; Slaven, James; Bowen, Russell B; Harper, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Essentials model was evaluated using full-shift exposure measurements of five chemical components in a mixture [acetone, ethylbenzene, methyl ethyl ketone, toluene, and xylenes] at a medium-sized plant producing paint materials. Two tasks, batch-making and bucket-washing, were examined. Varying levels of control were already established in both tasks and the average exposures of individual chemicals were considerably lower than the regulatory and advisory 8-h standards. The average exposure fractions using the additive mixture formula were also less than unity (batch-making: 0.25, bucket-washing: 0.56) indicating the mixture of chemicals did not exceed the combined occupational exposure limit (OEL). The paper version of the COSHH Essentials model was used to calculate a predicted exposure range (PER) for each chemical according to different levels of control. The estimated PERs of the tested chemicals for both tasks did not show consistent agreement with exposure measurements when the comparison was made for each control method and this is believed to be because of the considerably different volatilities of the chemicals. Given the combination of health hazard and exposure potential components, the COSHH Essentials model recommended a control approach 'special advice' for both tasks, based on the potential reproductive hazard ascribed to toluene. This would not have been the same conclusion if some other chemical had been substituted (for example styrene, which has the same threshold limit value as toluene). Nevertheless, it was special advice, which had led to the combination of hygienic procedures in place at this plant. The probability of the combined exposure fractions exceeding unity was 0.0002 for the batch-making task indicating that the employees performing this task were most likely well protected below the OELs. Although the employees involved in the bucket-washing task had greater potential to exceed

  11. Observations on persistent organic pollutants in plants: Implications for their use as passive air samplers and for POP cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Ockenden, W.A.; Parker, C.; Jones, K.C.; Steinnes, E.

    1998-09-15

    Pine Needle (Pinus sylvestris) and lichen (Hypogymnia physodes) samples from various remote sites across Norway have been analyzed for a range of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Results have shown differences in accumulation between species, with higher concentrations being noted in the H. physodes than the P. sylvestris. This indicates that to use vegetation as a biomonitor, intraspecies and not interspecies comparisons in vegetation pollutant loading between sites are necessary. {alpha}/{gamma}-HCH ratios were highest at colder northern sites, indicating increased distance from source areas and long-range atmospheric transport. Concentrations of PCBs 101, 118, 138, and 153 in H. physodes were found to be higher at lower temperatures. Trends between burdens of the other POPs in H. physodes or P. sylvestris and site temperature or latitude were not apparent. Plant/air partition coefficients indicate favored accumulation of PCBs in vegetation at lower temperatures and for higher chlorinated congeners.

  12. Influence of organic matter on the transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in a ferric oxyhydroxide-coated quartz sand saturated porous medium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abudalo, R.A.; Ryan, J.N.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Landkamer, L.

    2010-01-01

    To assess the effect of organic matter on the transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in a geochemically heterogeneous saturated porous medium, we measured the breakthrough and collision efficiencies of oocysts as a function of dissolved organic matter concentration in a flow-through column containing ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand. We characterized the surface properties of the oocysts and ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand using microelectrophoresis and streaming potential, respectively, and the amount of organic matter adsorbed on the ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand as a function of the concentration of dissolved organic matter (a fulvic acid isolated from Florida Everglades water). The dissolved organic matter had no significant effect on the zeta potential of the oocysts. Low concentrations of dissolved organic matter were responsible for reversing the charge of the ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand surface from positive to negative. The charge reversal and accumulation of negative charge on the ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand led to increases in oocyst breakthrough and decreases in oocyst collision efficiency with increasing dissolved organic matter concentration. The increase in dissolved organic matter concentration from 0 to 20 mg L-1 resulted in a two-fold decrease in the collision efficiency. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Changing the Density of the External Medium can Modulate and Reverse the Gravity Response of Plant Cells and Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staves, Mark P.; Kovacevic, Naila

    2013-02-01

    As an alternative to the statolith model, we have presented a model for plant gravity sensing in which the entire protoplast functions as the gravity sensor. This gravitational pressure model was developed as a result of experiments with the large, statolith-free, intermodal cells of Chara. The question remains whether the gravitational pressure model can explain the gravity responses of higher plants containing statocytes. We tested the gravitational pressure model by monitoring gravitropic curvature of statolith-containing roots in media of differing densities. The statolith model predicts that density of the external medium will have no effect on gravity sensing whereas the gravitational pressure model predicts that changing the density of the external medium will affect gravity sensing, and consequently the gravity response. We find that increasing the density of the external medium inhibits, and in some cases reverses the direction of gravitropic curvature of these roots. These data are consistent with the gravitational pressure model for plant gravity sensing and inconsistent with the statolith model.

  14. Single-particle to single-particle transformation of an active type organic μ-tubular homo-structure photonic resonator into a passive type hetero-structure resonator.

    PubMed

    Venkataramudu, Uppari; Venkatakrishnarao, Dasari; Chandrasekhar, Naisa; Mohiddon, Mahamad Ahamad; Chandrasekar, Rajadurai

    2016-06-21

    Self-assembled hexagonal organic submicrotubes, upon electronic excitation with an UV laser, display an active type polarized whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonance in the visible (Vis) range (400-600 nm). Due to the photonic cavity effect the tubes show fluorescence (FL) signal intensity 5× greater than the corresponding powder state. Furthermore, the same tubes, which are passive to a visible laser, produce yellow-orange emitting carbonaceous lumps when burnt with an intense laser beam (42 mW) forming a chemically binary heterogeneous structure. The hetero-structure upon excitation with a visible laser at the passive tubular part showed emission in the Vis-Near infrared (NIR) range (500-800 nm) with WGMs thus producing a passive/active type hetero-structure photonic resonator.

  15. FIELD METHOD COMPARISON BETWEEN PASSIVE AIR SAMPLERS AND CONTINUOUS MONITORS FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AND NO2 IN EL PASO, TEXAS, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passive sampling of gas-phase air toxics and criteria pollutants has become an attractive monitoring method in human exposure studies due to the relatively low sampling cost and ease of use. This study evaluates the performance of Model 3300 Ogawa(TM) Passive NO2 Samplers and 3...

  16. Anomalously slow relaxation of the system of liquid clusters in a disordered nanoporous medium according to the self-organized criticality scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borman, V. D.; Tronin, V. N.; Byrkin, V. A.

    2016-04-01

    We propose a physical model of a relaxation of states of clusters of nonwetting liquid confined in a random nanoporous medium. The relaxation is occurred by the self-organized criticality (SOC) scenario. Process is characterized by waiting for fluctuation necessary for overcoming of a local energy barrier with the subsequent avalanche hydrodynamic extrusion of the liquid by surface forces of the nonwetting frame. The dependence of the interaction between local configurations on the number of filled pores belonging to the infinite percolation cluster of filled pores serves as an internal feedback initiating the SOC process. The calculations give a power-law time dependence of the relative volume θ of the confined liquid θ ∼t-ν (ν ∼ 0.2) as in the picture of relaxation in the mean field approximation. The model of the relaxation of the porous medium with the nonwetting liquid demonstrates possible mechanisms and scenarios of SOC for relaxation of other disordered systems.

  17. Comparison of passive diffusion bag samplers and submersible pump sampling methods for monitoring volatile organic compounds in ground water at Area 6, Naval Air Station, Whidbey Island, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huffman, Raegan L.

    2002-01-01

    Ground-water samples were collected in April 1999 at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Washington, with passive diffusion samplers and a submersible pump to compare concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water samples collected using the two sampling methods. Single diffusion samplers were installed in wells with 10-foot screened intervals, and multiple diffusion samplers were installed in wells with 20- to 40-foot screened intervals. The diffusion samplers were recovered after 20 days and the wells were then sampled using a submersible pump. VOC concentrations in the 10-foot screened wells in water samples collected with diffusion samplers closely matched concentrations in samples collected with the submersible pump. Analysis of VOC concentrations in samples collected from the 20- to 40-foot screened wells with multiple diffusion samplers indicated vertical concentration variation within the screened interval, whereas the analysis of VOC concentrations in samples collected with the submersible pump indicated mixing during pumping. The results obtained using the two sampling methods indicate that the samples collected with the diffusion samplers were comparable with and can be considerably less expensive than samples collected using a submersible pump.

  18. Evaluation of passive air sampler calibrations: Selection of sampling rates and implications for the measurement of persistent organic pollutants in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melymuk, Lisa; Robson, Matthew; Helm, Paul A.; Diamond, Miriam L.

    2011-04-01

    Polyurethane foam (PUF) passive air samplers (PAS) are a common and highly useful method of sampling persistent organic pollutants (POP) concentrations in air. PAS calibration is necessary to obtain reasonable and comparable semi-quantitative measures of air concentrations. Various methods are found in the literature concerning PAS calibration. 35 studies on PAS use and calibration are examined here, in conjunction with a study involving 10 PAS deployed concurrently in outdoor air with a low-volume air sampler in order to measure the sampling rates of PUF-PAS for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polycyclic musks (PCMs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Based on this analysis it is recommended that (1) PAS should be assumed to represent bulk rather than gas-phase compound concentrations due to the sampling of particle-bound compounds, (2) calibration of PAS sampling rates is more accurately achieved using an active low-volume air sampler rather than depuration compounds since the former measures gas- and particle-phase compounds and does so continuously over the deployment period of the PAS, and (3) homolog-specific sampling rates based on KOA groupings be used in preference to compound/congener-specific or single sampling rates.

  19. Differences in Early Stages of Tactile ERP Temporal Sequence (P100) in Cortical Organization during Passive Tactile Stimulation in Children with Blindness and Controls.

    PubMed

    Ortiz Alonso, Tomás; Santos, Juan Matías; Ortiz Terán, Laura; Borrego Hernández, Mayelin; Poch Broto, Joaquín; de Erausquin, Gabriel Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Compared to their seeing counterparts, people with blindness have a greater tactile capacity. Differences in the physiology of object recognition between people with blindness and seeing people have been well documented, but not when tactile stimuli require semantic processing. We used a passive vibrotactile device to focus on the differences in spatial brain processing evaluated with event related potentials (ERP) in children with blindness (n = 12) vs. normally seeing children (n = 12), when learning a simple spatial task (lines with different orientations) or a task involving recognition of letters, to describe the early stages of its temporal sequence (from 80 to 220 msec) and to search for evidence of multi-modal cortical organization. We analysed the P100 of the ERP. Children with blindness showed earlier latencies for cognitive (perceptual) event related potentials, shorter reaction times, and (paradoxically) worse ability to identify the spatial direction of the stimulus. On the other hand, they are equally proficient in recognizing stimuli with semantic content (letters). The last observation is consistent with the role of P100 on somatosensory-based recognition of complex forms. The cortical differences between seeing control and blind groups, during spatial tactile discrimination, are associated with activation in visual pathway (occipital) and task-related association (temporal and frontal) areas. The present results show that early processing of tactile stimulation conveying cross modal information differs in children with blindness or with normal vision. PMID:26225827

  20. Differences in Early Stages of Tactile ERP Temporal Sequence (P100) in Cortical Organization during Passive Tactile Stimulation in Children with Blindness and Controls.

    PubMed

    Ortiz Alonso, Tomás; Santos, Juan Matías; Ortiz Terán, Laura; Borrego Hernández, Mayelin; Poch Broto, Joaquín; de Erausquin, Gabriel Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Compared to their seeing counterparts, people with blindness have a greater tactile capacity. Differences in the physiology of object recognition between people with blindness and seeing people have been well documented, but not when tactile stimuli require semantic processing. We used a passive vibrotactile device to focus on the differences in spatial brain processing evaluated with event related potentials (ERP) in children with blindness (n = 12) vs. normally seeing children (n = 12), when learning a simple spatial task (lines with different orientations) or a task involving recognition of letters, to describe the early stages of its temporal sequence (from 80 to 220 msec) and to search for evidence of multi-modal cortical organization. We analysed the P100 of the ERP. Children with blindness showed earlier latencies for cognitive (perceptual) event related potentials, shorter reaction times, and (paradoxically) worse ability to identify the spatial direction of the stimulus. On the other hand, they are equally proficient in recognizing stimuli with semantic content (letters). The last observation is consistent with the role of P100 on somatosensory-based recognition of complex forms. The cortical differences between seeing control and blind groups, during spatial tactile discrimination, are associated with activation in visual pathway (occipital) and task-related association (temporal and frontal) areas. The present results show that early processing of tactile stimulation conveying cross modal information differs in children with blindness or with normal vision.

  1. Collaborative Preference: The Role of Homophily, Multiplexity, and Advantageous Network Position across Small and Medium-Sized Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voelker, Troy A.; McDowell, William C.; Harris, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine collaboration between individuals across organizations. While both for profit and not-for-profit organizations utilize collaborative efforts, the factors that are important for bringing individuals and businesses together for collaboration still remain somewhat unresolved. In this paper, colleague…

  2. Passive broadband acoustic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Klin'shov, V. V.; Mansfel'd, A. D.; Subochev, P. V.

    2016-04-01

    The 1D internal (core) temperature profiles for the model object (plasticine) and the human hand are reconstructed using the passive acoustothermometric broadband probing data. Thermal acoustic radiation is detected by a broadband (0.8-3.5 MHz) acoustic radiometer. The temperature distribution is reconstructed using a priori information corresponding to the experimental conditions. The temperature distribution for the heated model object is assumed to be monotonic. For the hand, we assume that the temperature distribution satisfies the heat-conduction equation taking into account the blood flow. The average error of reconstruction determined for plasticine from the results of independent temperature measurements is 0.6 K for a measuring time of 25 s. The reconstructed value of the core temperature of the hand (36°C) generally corresponds to physiological data. The obtained results make it possible to use passive broadband acoustic probing for measuring the core temperatures in medical procedures associated with heating of human organism tissues.

  3. Graphene oxide liquid crystals as a versatile and tunable alignment medium for the measurement of residual dipolar couplings in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xinxiang; Xu, Zhen; Sun, Han; Wang, Shun; Griesinger, Christian; Peng, Li; Gao, Chao; Tan, Ren X

    2014-08-13

    Residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) have proven to be an invaluable anisotropic NMR parameter for the structural elucidation of complex biopolymers and organic molecules. However, a remaining bottleneck limiting its wider use by organic and natural product chemists is the lack of a range of easily applicable aligning media for diverse organic solvents. In this study, graphene oxide (GO) liquid crystals (LCs) were developed to induce partial orientation of organic molecules to allow RDC measurements. These LCs were determined to be maintainable at very low concentrations (as low as 1 mg/mL, corresponding to quadrupolar (2)H splittings ranging from 2.8 to 30 Hz and maximum (13)C-(1)H dipolar couplings of 20 Hz for camphor in a CH3COCH3/water system) and to be remarkably stable and broadly compatible with aqueous and organic solvents such as dimethyl sulfoxide, CH3COCH3, and CH3CN. Moreover, compared with those for other alignment media, very clean and high-quality NMR spectra were acquired with the GO molecules in solution because of their rigidity and high molecular weight. The developed medium offers a versatile and robust method for RDC measurements that may routinize the RDC-based structure determination of organic molecules.

  4. Development of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene-co-indole-5-carboxylic acid) co-polymer coatings on passivated low-nickel stainless steel for enhanced corrosion resistance in the sulphuric acid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopi, D.; Karthikeyan, P.; Kavitha, L.; Surendiran, M.

    2015-12-01

    The present study deals with the successful development of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene-co-indole-5-carboxylic acid) co-polymer coatings on passivated low-nickel stainless steel (LN SS) by electropolymerization. The structural and morphological evaluation of the co-polymer coatings were performed using various analytical techniques. Also, the effect of monomer feed ratio on the morphological behaviour of the co-polymer coatings was studied towards the protection efficiency of LN SS in 0.5 M H2SO4. The results demonstrated that the co-polymer coating on passivated LN SS improved the corrosion protection efficiency at the feed ratio 50:50 and hence the as-coated LN SS can serve as a prospective material for industrial applications.

  5. Evaluation of the HB&L System for the Microbiological Screening of Storage Medium for Organ-Cultured Corneas.

    PubMed

    Camposampiero, D; Grandesso, S; Zanetti, E; Mazzucato, S; Solinas, M; Parekh, M; Frigo, A C; Gion, M; Ponzin, D

    2013-01-01

    Aims. To compare HB&L and BACTEC systems for detecting the microorganisms contaminating the corneal storage liquid preserved at 31°C. Methods. Human donor corneas were stored at 4°C followed by preservation at 31°C. Samples of the storage medium were inoculated in BACTEC Peds Plus/F (aerobic microorganisms), BACTEC Plus Anaerobic/F (anaerobic microorganisms), and HB&L bottles. The tests were performed (a) after six days of storage, (b) end of storage, and (c) after 24 hours of preservation in deturgescent liquid sequentially. 10,655 storage and deturgescent media samples were subjected to microbiological control using BACTEC (6-day incubation) and HB&L (24-hour incubation) systems simultaneously. BACTEC positive/negative refers to both/either aerobic and anaerobic positives/negatives, whereas HB&L can only detect the aerobic microbes, and therefore the positives/negatives depend on the presence/absence of aerobic microorganisms. Results. 147 (1.38%) samples were identified positive with at least one of the two methods. 127 samples (134 identified microorganisms) were positive with both HB&L and BACTEC. 14 HB&L+/BACTEC- and 6 BACTEC+/HB&L- were identified. Sensitivity (95.5%), specificity (99.8%), and positive (90.1%) and negative predictive values (99.9%) were high with HB&L considering a 3.5% annual contamination rate. Conclusion. HB&L is a rapid system for detecting microorganisms in corneal storage medium in addition to the existing methods.

  6. Comparison of two different passive air samplers (PUF-PAS versus SIP-PAS) to determine time-integrated average air concentration of volatile hydrophobic organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-Kyu; Park, Jong-Eun

    2014-06-01

    Despite remarkable achievements with r some chemicals, a field-measurement technique has not been advanced for volatile hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) that are the subjects of international concern. This study assesses the applicability of passive air sampling (PAS) by comparing PUF-PAS and its modified SIP-PAS which was made by impregnating XAD-4 powder into PUF, overviewing the principles of PAS, screening sensitive parameters, and determining the uncertainty range of PAS-derived concentration. The PAS air sampling rate determined in this study, corrected by a co-deployed low-volume active air sampler (LAS) for neutral PFCs as model chemicals, was ˜1.2 m3 day-1. Our assessment shows that the improved sorption capacity in a SIP lengthens PAS deployment duration by expanding the linear uptake range and then enlarges the effective air sampling volume and detection frequency of chemicals at trace level. Consequently, volatile chemicals can be collected during sufficiently long times without reaching equilibrium when using SIP, while this is not possible for PUF. The most sensitive parameter to influence PAS-derived CA was an air-side mass transfer coefficient (kA), implying the necessity of spiking depuration chemicals (DCs) because this parameter is strongly related with meteorological conditions. Uncertainty in partition coefficients (KPSM-A or KOA) influences PAS-derived CA to a greater extent with regard to lower KPSM-A chemicals. Also, the PAS-derived CA has an uncertainty range of a half level to a 3-fold higher level of the calculated one. This work is expected to establish solid grounds for the improvement of field measurement technique of HOCs.

  7. Physiological properties of a Pseudomonas strain which grows with p-xylene in a two-phase (organic-aqueous) medium.

    PubMed Central

    Cruden, D L; Wolfram, J H; Rogers, R D; Gibson, D T

    1992-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida Idaho utilizes toluene, m-xylene, p-xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and 3-ethyltoluene as growth substrates when these hydrocarbons are provided in a two-phase system at 5 to 50% (vol/vol). Growth also occurs on Luria-Bertani medium in the presence of a wide range of organic solvents. The ability of the organism to grow in the presence of organic solvents is correlated with the logarithm of the octanol-water partition coefficient, with dimethyl-phthalate (log P(OCT) = 2.3) being the most polar solvent tolerated. During growth with p-xylene (20% [vol/vol]), there was an initial lag period accompanied by cell death, which was followed by a period of exponential growth. The stationary phase of growth was characterized by a dramatic decrease in cell viability, although cell dry weight and turbidity measurements slowly increased. Electron micrographs revealed that during growth in the presence of p-xylene, the outer cell membrane becomes convoluted and membrane fragments are shed into the culture medium. At the same time, the cytoplasmic membrane invaginates, forming vesicles, and becomes disorganized. Electron-dense intracellular inclusions were observed in cells grown with p-xylene (20% [vol/vol]) and p-xylene vapors, which are not present in cells grown with succinate. Attempts to demonstrate the presence of plasmid DNA in P. putida Idaho were negative. However, polarographic studies indicated that the organism utilizes the same pathway for the degradation of toluene, m-xylene, and p-xylene as that used by P. putida mt-2 which contains the TOL plasmid pWWO.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:1444381

  8. The Identification of Complex Organic Molecules in the Interstellar Medium: Using Lasers and Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy to Simulate the Interstellar Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Bradley M.

    1998-01-01

    The Astrochemistry Group at NASA Ames Research Center is interested in the identification of large organic molecules in the interstellar medium Many smaller organic species (e.g. hydrocarbons, alcohols, etc.) have been previously identified by their radiofrequency signature due to molecular rotations. However, this becomes increasingly difficult to observe as the size of the molecule increases. Our group in interested in the identification of the carriers of the Diffuse Interstellar Bands (absorption features observed throughout the visible and near-infrared in the spectra of stars, due to species in the interstellar medium). Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and related molecules are thought to be good candidates for these carriers. Laboratory experiments am performed at Ames to simulate the interstellar environment, and to compare spectra obtained from molecules in the laboratory to those derived astronomically. We are also interested in PAHs with respect to their possible connection to the UIR (Unidentified infrared) and ERE (Extended Red Emission) bands - emission features found to emanate from particular regions of our galaxy (e.g. Orion nebula, Red Rectangle, etc.). An old, "tried and proven spectroscopic technique, matrix isolation spectroscopy creates molecular conditions ideal for performing laboratory astrophysics.

  9. Bio-oil production and removal of organic load by microalga Scenedesmus sp. using culture medium contaminated with different sugars, cheese whey and whey permeate.

    PubMed

    Borges, Wesley da Silva; Araújo, Breno Severiano Alves; Moura, Lucas Gomes; Coutinho Filho, Ubirajara; de Resende, Miriam Maria; Cardoso, Vicelma Luiz

    2016-05-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the bio-oil production and the organic load removal using the microalga Scenedesmus sp. The cultivation was carried out in reactors with a total volume of 3 L and 0.7 vvm aeration, with illumination in photoperiods of 12 h light/12 h dark for 12 days. The following sugar concentrations were tested: 2.5, 5.0 and 10 g/L of glucose, lactose, fructose and galactose with 10% inoculum volume. After experiments were performed with cheese whey in natura and cheese whey permeate with different lactose concentrations (1.5, 2.5, 3.5 and 5.0 g/L). In these experiments the inoculum concentrations were 10, 15, 20 and 30% (v/v). The results showed that this microalga was effective for the production of lipids when it was cultivated in medium with cheese whey in natura with 2.5 g/L of lactose and 20% inoculum (v/v). Using cheese whey in natura at the concentration of 3.5 g/L of lactose and 30% (v/v) of inoculum obtained 77.9% of TOC removal and 38.447 mg of TOC removed/mg oil produced. It was also observed that when there is increased production of bio-oil, there is less removal of organic matter. The addition of glucose, fructose or galactose in the medium did not enhance the production of bio-oil by Scenedesmus sp. when compared to lactose, but increased the organic matter removal.

  10. Electrochemical Reduction of CO2 to Organic Acids by a Pd-MWNTs Gas-Diffusion Electrode in Aqueous Medium

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guang; Bian, Zhaoyong; Liu, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Pd-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (Pd-MWNTs) catalysts for the conversion of CO2 to organic acids were prepared by the ethylene glycol reduction and fully characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and cyclic voltammetry (CV) technologies. The amorphous Pd particles with an average size of 5.7 nm were highly dispersed on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Functional groups of the MWNTs played a key role in the palladium deposition. The results indicated that Pd-MWNTs could transform CO2 into organic acid with high catalytic activity and CO2 could take part in the reduction reaction directly. Additionally, the electrochemical reduction of CO2 was investigated by a diaphragm electrolysis device, using a Pd-MWNTs gas-diffusion electrode as a cathode and a Ti/RuO2 net as an anode. The main products in present system were formic acid and acetic acid identified by ion chromatograph. The selectivity of the products could be achieved by reaction conditions changing. The optimum faraday efficiencies of formic and acetic acids formed on the Pd-MWNTs gas-diffusion electrode at 4 V electrode voltages under 1 atm CO2 were 34.5% and 52.3%, respectively. PMID:24453849

  11. Design and synthesis of a new organic receptor and evaluation of colorimetric anion sensing ability in organo-aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Srikala, P; Tarafder, Kartick; Trivedi, Darshak R

    2017-01-01

    A new organic receptor has been designed and synthesized by the combination of aromatic dialdehyde with nitro-substituted aminophenol resulting in a Schiff base compound. The receptor exhibited a colorimetric response for F(-) and AcO(-) ion with a distinct color change from pale yellow to red and pink respectively in dry DMSO solvent and yellow to pale greenish yellow in DMSO:H2O (9:1, v/v). UV-Vis titration studies displayed a significant shift in absorption maxima in comparison with the free receptor. The shift could be attributed to the hydrogen bonding interactions between the active anions and the hydroxyl functionality aided by the electron withdrawing nitro substituent on the receptor. (1)H NMR titration and density functionality studies have been performed to understand the nature of interaction of receptor and anions. The lower detection limit of 1.12ppm was obtained in organic media for F(-) ion confirming the real time application of the receptor.

  12. Design and synthesis of a new organic receptor and evaluation of colorimetric anion sensing ability in organo-aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Srikala, P; Tarafder, Kartick; Trivedi, Darshak R

    2017-01-01

    A new organic receptor has been designed and synthesized by the combination of aromatic dialdehyde with nitro-substituted aminophenol resulting in a Schiff base compound. The receptor exhibited a colorimetric response for F(-) and AcO(-) ion with a distinct color change from pale yellow to red and pink respectively in dry DMSO solvent and yellow to pale greenish yellow in DMSO:H2O (9:1, v/v). UV-Vis titration studies displayed a significant shift in absorption maxima in comparison with the free receptor. The shift could be attributed to the hydrogen bonding interactions between the active anions and the hydroxyl functionality aided by the electron withdrawing nitro substituent on the receptor. (1)H NMR titration and density functionality studies have been performed to understand the nature of interaction of receptor and anions. The lower detection limit of 1.12ppm was obtained in organic media for F(-) ion confirming the real time application of the receptor. PMID:27398634

  13. Electrical properties of GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor structure comprising Al2O3 gate oxide and AlN passivation layer fabricated in situ using a metal-organic vapor deposition/atomic layer deposition hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Takeshi; Fukuhara, Noboru; Osada, Takenori; Sazawa, Hiroyuki; Hata, Masahiko; Inoue, Takayuki

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a compressive study on the fabrication and optimization of GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures comprising a Al2O3 gate oxide, deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD), with an AlN interfacial passivation layer prepared in situ via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The established protocol afforded self-limiting growth of Al2O3 in the atmospheric MOCVD reactor. Consequently, this enabled successive growth of MOCVD-formed AlN and ALD-formed Al2O3 layers on the GaAs substrate. The effects of AlN thickness, post-deposition anneal (PDA) conditions, and crystal orientation of the GaAs substrate on the electrical properties of the resulting MOS capacitors were investigated. Thin AlN passivation layers afforded incorporation of optimum amounts of nitrogen, leading to good capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics with reduced frequency dispersion. In contrast, excessively thick AlN passivation layers degraded the interface, thereby increasing the interfacial density of states (Dit) near the midgap and reducing the conduction band offset. To further improve the interface with the thin AlN passivation layers, the PDA conditions were optimized. Using wet nitrogen at 600 °C was effective to reduce Dit to below 2 × 1012 cm-2 eV-1. Using a (111)A substrate was also effective in reducing the frequency dispersion of accumulation capacitance, thus suggesting the suppression of traps in GaAs located near the dielectric/GaAs interface. The current findings suggest that using an atmosphere ALD process with in situ AlN passivation using the current MOCVD system could be an efficient solution to improving GaAs MOS interfaces.

  14. Tin-graphite materials prepared by reduction of SnCl 4 in organic medium: Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical lithiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, L.; Schneider, R.; Willmann, P.; Billaud, D.

    Tin-graphite materials were prepared by chemical reduction of SnCl 4 by t-BuONa-activated NaH. TEM imaging showed that the crude material is composed of an amorphous organic matrix containing tin present either as nanosized particles deposited on the graphite surface or as free aggregates. Subsequent washings with ethanol and water allow removal of side products as well as most part of the organic matrix. Electrochemical insertion of lithium occurred in graphite and in tin. The initial reversible massic capacity of 630 mAh g -1 decayed to a stable value of 415 mAh g -1 after 12 cycles. This capacity value was lower than the expected maximum one of 650 mAh g -1 corresponding to a Sn/12C molar composition and assuming the formation of LiC 6 and Li 22Sn 5. Even if this massic capacity is not much improved by comparison with that of graphite, it must be pointed out that the volume capacity of this graphite/Sn material is much larger (2137 mAh cm -3) than that corresponding to graphite (837 mAh cm -3). It was hypothesized that the part of tin bound to graphite could be responsible for the stable reversible capacity. To the contrary, graphite unsupported tin aggregates would contribute to the observed gradual decline in the storage capacity. Therefore, the improvement in cycleability, compared to that of massive metals, could be attributed both to the nanoscale dimension of the metal particles and to interactions between graphite and metal the nature of which remaining to be precised.

  15. Evaluation of Volatile Organic Compounds and Carbonyl Compounds Present in the Cabins of Newly Produced, Medium- and Large-Size Coaches in China

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan-Yang; Lin, Yi; Zhang, Han; Ding, Dongxiao; Sun, Xia; Huang, Qiansheng; Lin, Lifeng; Chen, Ya-Jie; Chi, Yu-Lang; Dong, Sijun

    2016-01-01

    An air-conditioned coach is an important form of transportation in modern motorized society; as a result, there is an increasing concern of in-vehicle air pollution. In this study, we aimed to identify and quantify the levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbonyl compounds (CCs) in air samples collected from the cabins of newly produced, medium- and large-size coaches. Among the identified VOCs and CCs, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein/acetone, and isovaleraldehyde were relatively abundant in the cabins. Time was found to affect the emissions of the contaminants in the coaches. Except for benzaldehyde, valeraldehyde and benzene, the highest in-vehicle concentrations of VOCs and CCs were observed on the 15th day after coming off the assembly line, and the concentrations exhibited an approximately inverted U-shaped pattern as a function of time. Interestingly, this study also showed that the interior temperature of the coaches significantly affected the VOCs emissions from the interior materials, whereas the levels of CCs were mainly influenced by the relative humidity within the coaches. In China, guidelines and regulations for the in-vehicle air quality assessment of the coaches have not yet been issued. The results of this study provide further understanding of the in-vehicle air quality of air-conditioned coaches and can be used in the development of both specific and general rules regarding medium- and large-size coaches. PMID:27314375

  16. Evaluation of Volatile Organic Compounds and Carbonyl Compounds Present in the Cabins of Newly Produced, Medium- and Large-Size Coaches in China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan-Yang; Lin, Yi; Zhang, Han; Ding, Dongxiao; Sun, Xia; Huang, Qiansheng; Lin, Lifeng; Chen, Ya-Jie; Chi, Yu-Lang; Dong, Sijun

    2016-01-01

    An air-conditioned coach is an important form of transportation in modern motorized society; as a result, there is an increasing concern of in-vehicle air pollution. In this study, we aimed to identify and quantify the levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbonyl compounds (CCs) in air samples collected from the cabins of newly produced, medium- and large-size coaches. Among the identified VOCs and CCs, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein/acetone, and isovaleraldehyde were relatively abundant in the cabins. Time was found to affect the emissions of the contaminants in the coaches. Except for benzaldehyde, valeraldehyde and benzene, the highest in-vehicle concentrations of VOCs and CCs were observed on the 15th day after coming off the assembly line, and the concentrations exhibited an approximately inverted U-shaped pattern as a function of time. Interestingly, this study also showed that the interior temperature of the coaches significantly affected the VOCs emissions from the interior materials, whereas the levels of CCs were mainly influenced by the relative humidity within the coaches. In China, guidelines and regulations for the in-vehicle air quality assessment of the coaches have not yet been issued. The results of this study provide further understanding of the in-vehicle air quality of air-conditioned coaches and can be used in the development of both specific and general rules regarding medium- and large-size coaches. PMID:27314375

  17. Block-copolymer of polyethylene glycol and polylysine as a carrier of organic iodine: design of long-circulating particulate contrast medium for X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, V S; Gazelle, G S; Wolf, G L; Torchilin, V P

    1997-01-01

    In order to obtain small, polymer-stabilized particulate carriers for organic iodine to serve as a contrast agent for X-ray computed tomography (CT) an attempt was made to design a carrier based on polymeric micelles. Here we describe the synthesis of an iodine-containing amphiphilic block-copolymer which can micellize in aqueous solutions. The two blocks of the copolymer consisted of methoxypoly(ethyleneglycol) and poly[epsilon,N-(triiodobenzoyl)-L-lysine]. Upon dispersion in water, the block copolymer formed particles with average diameter 80 nm and iodine content up to 44.7%. The particles start to dissociate to the individual polymeric chains in the concentration range of 0.05-0.5 microM in water at 23 degrees C. Upon intravenous injection at 250 mg of iodine/kg (570 mg of the agent/kg) in rabbits the medium demonstrated exceptional 24 hr half-life in the blood substantiating corona/core structure of the particles with PEG chains protecting the iodine-containing core. The possible use of these particulates as contrast medium for X-ray computed tomography is discussed.

  18. Evaluation of Volatile Organic Compounds and Carbonyl Compounds Present in the Cabins of Newly Produced, Medium- and Large-Size Coaches in China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan-Yang; Lin, Yi; Zhang, Han; Ding, Dongxiao; Sun, Xia; Huang, Qiansheng; Lin, Lifeng; Chen, Ya-Jie; Chi, Yu-Lang; Dong, Sijun

    2016-06-15

    An air-conditioned coach is an important form of transportation in modern motorized society; as a result, there is an increasing concern of in-vehicle air pollution. In this study, we aimed to identify and quantify the levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and carbonyl compounds (CCs) in air samples collected from the cabins of newly produced, medium- and large-size coaches. Among the identified VOCs and CCs, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein/acetone, and isovaleraldehyde were relatively abundant in the cabins. Time was found to affect the emissions of the contaminants in the coaches. Except for benzaldehyde, valeraldehyde and benzene, the highest in-vehicle concentrations of VOCs and CCs were observed on the 15th day after coming off the assembly line, and the concentrations exhibited an approximately inverted U-shaped pattern as a function of time. Interestingly, this study also showed that the interior temperature of the coaches significantly affected the VOCs emissions from the interior materials, whereas the levels of CCs were mainly influenced by the relative humidity within the coaches. In China, guidelines and regulations for the in-vehicle air quality assessment of the coaches have not yet been issued. The results of this study provide further understanding of the in-vehicle air quality of air-conditioned coaches and can be used in the development of both specific and general rules regarding medium- and large-size coaches.

  19. Aqueous-Medium Carbon-Carbon Bond-Forming Radical Reactions Catalyzed by Excited Rhodamine B as a Metal-Free Organic Dye under Visible Light Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Eito; Kohtani, Shigeru; Jichu, Takahisa; Fukazawa, Takuya; Nagai, Toyokazu; Kawashima, Akira; Takemoto, Yoshiji; Miyabe, Hideto

    2016-08-19

    The utility of rhodamine B as a water-soluble organic photocatalyst was studied in the cascade radical addition-cyclization-trapping reactions under visible light irradiation. In the presence of (i-Pr)2NEt, the electron transfer from the excited rhodamine B to perfluoroalkyl iodides proceeded smoothly to promote the carbon-carbon bond-forming radical reactions in aqueous media. When i-C3F7I was employed as a radical precursor, the aqueous-medium radical reactions proceeded even in the absence of (i-Pr)2NEt. In these reactions, the direct electron transfer from the excited singlet state of rhodamine B would take place. Furthermore, the cleavage of the C-I bond in less reactive i-PrI could be achieved by the reductive electron transfer from the excited rhodamine B, which was confirmed by the fluorescence quenching of rhodamine B with the addition of i-PrI.

  20. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed point defects models'' (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies.

  1. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Fanning, Alan W.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

  2. Nitride passivation reduces interfacial traps in atomic-layer-deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaAs (001) metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors using atmospheric metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, T. Fukuhara, N.; Osada, T.; Sazawa, H.; Hata, M.; Inoue, T.

    2014-07-21

    Using an atmospheric metal-organic chemical vapor deposition system, we passivated GaAs with AlN prior to atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This AlN passivation incorporated nitrogen at the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaAs interface, improving the capacitance-voltage (C–V) characteristics of the resultant metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPs). The C–V curves of these devices showed a remarkable reduction in the frequency dispersion of the accumulation capacitance. Using the conductance method at various temperatures, we extracted the interfacial density of states (D{sub it}). The D{sub it} was reduced over the entire GaAs band gap. In particular, these devices exhibited D{sub it} around the midgap of less than 4 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}eV{sup −1}, showing that AlN passivation effectively reduced interfacial traps in the MOS structure.

  3. Fundamental studies on passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.

    1993-06-01

    Using photoelectrochemical impedance and admittance spectroscopies, a fundamental and quantitative understanding of the mechanisms for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal and alloy surfaces in contact with aqueous environments is being developed. A point defect model has been extended to explain the breakdown of passive films, leading to pitting and crack growth and thus development of damage due to localized corrosion.

  4. Tropospheric Passive Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The long term role of airborne/spaceborne passive remote sensing systems for tropospheric air quality research and the identification of technology advances required to improve the performance of passive remote sensing systems were discussed.

  5. Interlanguage Passive Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simargool, Nirada

    2008-01-01

    Because the appearance of the passive construction varies cross linguistically, differences exist in the interlanguage (IL) passives attempted by learners of English. One such difference is the widely studied IL pseudo passive, as in "*new cars must keep inside" produced by Chinese speakers. The belief that this is a reflection of L1 language…

  6. Passive blast pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

    2013-03-19

    A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

  7. [Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.

    1993-07-01

    We developed and experimentally tested physical models for growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models are ``point defect models,`` in which the growth and breakdown are described in terms of movement of anion and cation vacancies. The work during the past 5 years resulted in: theory of growth and breakdown of passive films, theory of corrosion-resistant alloys, electronic structure of passive films, and estimation of damage functions for energy systems. Proposals are give for the five ongoing tasks. 10 figs.

  8. Passive sampling reversed: coupling passive field sampling with passive lab dosing to assess the ecotoxicity of mixtures present in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Claessens, Michiel; Monteyne, Els; Wille, Klaas; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Roose, Patrick; Janssen, Colin R

    2015-04-15

    This study presents a new approach in aquatic toxicity testing combining passive sampling and passive dosing. Polydimethylsiloxane sheets were used to sample contaminant mixtures in the marine environment. These sheets were subsequently transferred to ecotoxicological test medium in which the sampled contaminant mixtures were released through passive dosing. 4 out of 17 of these mixtures caused severe effects in a growth inhibition assay with a marine diatom. These effects could not be explained by the presence of compounds detected in the sampling area and were most likely attributable to unmeasured compounds absorbed to the passive samplers during field deployment. The findings of this study indicate that linking passive sampling in the field to passive dosing in laboratory ecotoxicity tests provides a practical and complimentary approach for assessing the toxicity of hydrophobic contaminant mixtures that mimics realistic environmental exposures. Limitations and opportunities for future improvements are presented.

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) mitigation in the pyrolysis process of waste tires using CO₂ as a reaction medium.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eilhann E; Oh, Jeong-Ik; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Our work reported the CO2-assisted mitigation of PAHs and VOCs in the thermo-chemical process (i.e., pyrolysis). To investigate the pyrolysis of used tires to recover energy and chemical products, the experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale batch-type reactor. In particular, to examine the influence of the CO2 in pyrolysis of a tire, the pyrolytic products including C1-5-hydrocarbons (HCs), volatile organic carbons (VOCs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were evaluated qualitatively by gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectroscopy (MS) as well as with a thermal conductivity detector (TCD). The mass balance of the pyrolytic products under various pyrolytic conditions was established on the basis of their weight fractions of the pyrolytic products. Our experimental work experimentally validated that the amount of gaseous pyrolytic products increased when using CO2 as a pyrolysis medium, while substantially altering the production of pyrolytic oil in absolute content (7.3-17.2%) and in relative composition (including PAHs and VOCs). Thus, the co-feeding of CO2 in the pyrolysis process can be considered an environmentally benign and energy efficient process.

  10. Application of Passive Sampling for Measuring Dissolved Concentrations of Organic Contaminants in the Water Column at Three U.S. EPA Marine Superfund Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    At contaminated sediment sites, including U.S. EPA Superfund sites, it is critical to measure water column concentrations of freely dissolved contaminants to understand the complete exposure of aquatic organisms to hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). Historically acquiring ...

  11. Application of Passive Sampling for Measuring Dissolved Concentrations of Organic Contaminants in the Water Column at Three U.S. EPA Marine Superfund Sites.

    EPA Science Inventory

    At contaminated sediment sites, including U.S. EPA Superfund sites, it is critical to measure water column concentrations of freely dissolved contaminants to understand the complete exposure of aquatic organisms to hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). Historically, acquiring...

  12. [Passive smoking--active killer].

    PubMed

    Palavra, Irena Rojnić; Franelić, Iva Pejnović; Milanović, Sanja Musić; Puljić, Kresimir

    2013-01-01

    Although still not perceived in this way, passive smoking is a public health issue of great importance. World Health Organization estimates that as a result of passive exposure to tobacco smoke each year 600,000 people die, of which 165,000 children. There are 33% of men, 35% of women and 40% of children who do not smoke, but are exposed to second hand smoke, and still only 11% of the world population is protected by adequate smoke-free legislation. Scientific literature provides evidence that passive exposure to tobacco smoke can result in numerous adverse health effects: asthma and allergies, respiratory infections and (middle) ear infections, cancers of various localization, accelerated atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases, retardation of growth and development in children, and in pregnancy it can lead to congenital anomalies and premature birth as well as lower body weight and length of the child. Certainly, the scariest consequence of all is sudden infant death syndrome, also called "death in the crib". Smoke-free policies have proven their effectiveness, but while implementing the laws, it is necessary to raise public awareness of the hazards of, both active and passive, exposure to tobacco smoke. PMID:24490334

  13. The interstellar C-H stretching band near 3.4 microns: constraints on the composition of organic material in the diffuse interstellar medium.

    PubMed

    Sandford, S A; Allamandola, L J; Tielens, A G; Sellgren, K; Tapia, M; Pendleton, Y

    1991-04-20

    N. The relative strengths and profiles of the 2955 and 2925 cm-1 features towards five objects suggests an average diffuse ISM line-of-sight -CH2-/-CH3 ratio of about 2.5, indicating the presence of relatively complex organic materials. The strengths of the subpeaks at 2925 and 2955 cm-1, due to -CH2- and -CH3 groups, respectively, correlate with visual extinction, strongly suggesting that the C-H stretching band is a general feature of the material along different lines of sight in the diffuse ISM. We find average ratios of A nu/tau(2925 cm-1) = 240 +/- 40 and A nu/tau(2955 cm-1) = 310 +/- 90 for the objects we have observed. We deduce that 2.6%-35% of the cosmic carbon in the ISM is tied up in the carrier of this band with the most likely value falling near 10%. The interstellar C-H band is remarkably similar to the feature in lab residues produced by irradiating analogs of dense molecular cloud ices. This is consistent with a model in which the hydrocarbon component in the diffuse interstellar medium consists of complex hydrocarbons containing aliphatic side chains and bridges which are produced in dense molecular clouds and subsequently modified in the diffuse medium.

  14. Illegal Passive Smoking at Work

    PubMed Central

    Lesage, François-Xavier; Deschamps, Frédéric; Jurca, Denisa

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Exposure to passive smoking at work has been forbidden for few years in France. This study's aim is to estimate the prevalence of passive smoking at work (PSW), the characteristics of illegal passive smoking and to identify eventual respiratory effects. Methods. Occupational practitioners (OPs) of a French county of 320,000 wage earners were contacted by mail. Then OP answered questions from a standardized questionnaire. These questions concerned the practised job, exposure features linked to PSW and health effects in relationship with second-hand smoke in workplace, and the focus on nonsmoker encountered by OP during the most recent occupational medical examination. Results. Ninety-five percent of a total group of 172 OP of Champagne county filled the postal questionnaire. More than 80% of OP's replies identified illegal PSW. The average prevalence of PSW exposure was 0.7% of the total working population. Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) levels were considered between low and medium for most passive smokers (71%). Main features exposure to ETS at work for non-smokers was associated with female gender (69.5%), age between 40 and 49 years (41.2%) and belonging to tertiary sector (75.6%). Environmental tobacco smoke exposures at work was firstly in the office for 49.7% of the subjects and secondly in the restroom for 18% of them. Main medical symptoms encountered by non-smokers were respiratory tractus irritation (81.7%). Eighty-three percent of OPs indicated solution to eradicate PSW. Illegal PSW is really weaker than fifteen years ago. However, the findings support a real ban on smoking in the workplace in order to protect all workers. PMID:21991448

  15. Marked synergistic bactericidal effects and mode of action of medium-chain fatty acids in combination with organic acids against Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Kim, S A; Rhee, M S

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the synergistic bactericidal effects of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs; caprylic, capric, and lauric acid) and organic acids (OAs; acetic, lactic, malic, and citric acid) against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and to identify their underlying mechanism(s) of action. E. coli O157:H7 was treated with MCFAs, OAs, or different combinations of MCFAs and OAs. Membrane damage and cell morphology were examined by flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Combined treatment resulted in an additional log-unit reduction compared with the sum of the reductions obtained after individual treatment. For example, caprylic acid (1.0 mM, or 0.016%) and citric acid (1.0 mM, or 0.012%) alone showed negligible bactericidal effects (0.30- and 0.06-log-unit reductions, respectively); however, a marked synergistic effect (>7.15-log-unit reduction) was observed when the two were combined. Although flow cytometry and microscopic analyses of bacteria treated with individual MCFAs and OAs showed evidence of membrane disruption, the bacteria were still able to form colonies; thus, the cell damage was recoverable. In contrast, cells exposed to combined treatments showed clear membrane disintegration and/or cell death (irreversible damage). The mechanism underlying the antimicrobial effects of combined treatment with MCFAs or OAs may involve disruption of the bacterial membrane, which then facilitates the entry of other antimicrobial compounds into the cytoplasm. The main advantage of combined treatment with very low concentrations of natural antimicrobial compounds is that it is very cost-effective. Thus, this approach may be an alternative to more conventional antimicrobial treatments, such as those currently used in public health, medical centers, and the food industry.

  16. User's guide for polyethylene-based passive diffusion bag samplers to obtain volatile organic compound concentrations in wells. Part 2, Field tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.

    2001-01-01

    Diffusion samplers installed in observation wells were found to be capable of yielding representative water samples for chlorinated volatile organic compounds. The samplers consisted of polyethylene bags containing deionized water and relied on diffusion of chlorinated volatile organic compounds through the polyethylene membrane. The known ability of polyethylene to transmit other volatile compounds, such as benzene and toluene, indicates that the samplers can be used for a variety of volatile organic compounds. In wells at the study area, the volatile organic compound concentrations in water samples obtained using the samplers without prior purging were similar to concentrations in water samples obtained from the respective wells using traditional purging and sampling approaches. The low cost associated with this approach makes it a viable option for monitoring large observation-well networks for volatile organic compounds.

  17. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F.

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  18. Overcoming Passive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Marilyn

    1986-01-01

    Passivity in learning disabled children is identified as either inborn or as "learned helplessness," and the role of the teacher in overcoming passivity is noted. Teachers can help students understand themselves, become active agents in learning, and use self monitoring devices. (CL)

  19. Modeling of active and passive nonlinear metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colestock, Patrick L.; Reiten, Matthew T.; O'Hara, John F.

    2012-11-01

    We develop general results for nonlinear metamaterials based on simple circuit models that reflect the elementary nonlinear behavior of the medium. In particular, we consider both active and passive nonlinearities which can lead to gain, harmonic generation and a variety of nonlinear waves depending on circuit parameters and signal amplitude. We show that the medium can exhibit a phase transition to a synchronized state and derive conditions for the transformation based on a widely used multiple time scale approach that leads to the well-known Complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. Further, we examine the variety of nonlinear waves that can exist in such systems, and we present numerical results for both active and passive metamaterial cases.

  20. Passive solar heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claridge, David E.; Mowris, Robert J.

    1985-11-01

    Buildings have been designed to use solar gains for winter heating for several millenia, but the quantitative basis for passive solar design has only been developed in the last decade. A simplified lumped capacitance model is used to provide insight into the physics of passive building behavior. Three passive design methods are described: the Solar Load Ratio (SLR) method based on correlations to simulation results; the Gordon/Zarmi closed form analytical mode;; and the ``unutilizability'' model of Monsen and Klein. Model predictions are compared with measured results; agreement is good if measured building characteristics are used. Numerous passive houses use less than 2 Btu/ft2-DD for auxiliary heating and consensus is developing that modest levels of passive glazing combined with superinsulation techniques can provide the best feature of both approaches.

  1. Passive solar construction handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

    1981-08-01

    Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. The unique design constraints presented in passive homes are introduced and many of the salient issues influencing design decisions are described briefly. Passive solar construction is described for each passive system type: direct gain, thermal storage wall, attached sunspace, thermal storage roof, and convective loop. For each system type, important design and construction issues are discussed and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type are presented. Construction details are given and construction and thermal performance information is given for the materials used in collector components, storage components, and control components. Included are glazing materials, framing systems, caulking and sealants, concrete masonry, concrete, brick, shading, reflectors, and insulators. The Load Collector Ratio method for estimating passive system performance is appended, and other analysis methods are briefly summarized. (LEW)

  2. H ATOM IRRADIATION OF CARBON GRAINS UNDER SIMULATED DENSE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM CONDITIONS: THE EVOLUTION OF ORGANICS FROM DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS TO THE SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Mennella, Vito

    2010-08-01

    We present the results of experiments aimed at studying the interaction of hydrogen atoms at 80 K with carbon grains covered with a water ice layer at 12 K. The effects of H processing have been analyzed, using IR spectroscopy, as a function of the water ice layer. The results confirm that exposure of the samples to H atoms induces the activation of the band at 3.47 {mu}m with no evidence for the formation of aromatic and aliphatic C-H bonds in the CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} functional groups. The formation cross section of the 3.47 {mu}m band has been estimated from the increase of its integrated optical depth as a function of the H atom fluence. The cross section decreases with increasing thickness of the water ice layer, indicating an increase of adsorption of H atoms in the water ice layer. A penetration depth of 100 nm has been estimated for H atoms in the porous water ice covering carbon grains. Sample warm-up at room temperature causes the activation of the IR features due to the vibrations of the CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} aliphatic functional groups. The evolution of the 3.47 {mu}m band carrier has been evaluated for dense and diffuse interstellar clouds, using the estimated formation cross section and assuming that the destruction cross section by energetic processing is the same as that derived for the 3.4 {mu}m band. In both environments, the presence of the 3.47 {mu}m band carrier is compatible with the evolutionary timescale limit imposed by fast cycling of materials between dense and diffuse regions of the interstellar medium. In diffuse regions the formation of the CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} aliphatic bands, inhibited in dense regions, takes place, masking the 3.47 {mu}m band. The activation of the CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} aliphatic vibrational modes at the end of H processing after sample warm-up represents the first experimental evidence supporting an evolutionary connection between the interstellar carbon grain population, which is responsible for the 3

  3. Selective 4e-/4H+ O2 reduction by an iron(tetraferrocenyl)porphyrin complex: from proton transfer followed by electron transfer in organic solvent to proton coupled electron transfer in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Mittra, Kaustuv; Chatterjee, Sudipta; Samanta, Subhra; Dey, Abhishek

    2013-12-16

    An iron porphyrin catalyst bearing four ferrocenes and a hydrogen bonding distal pocket is found to catalyze 4e(-)/4H(+) oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in organic solvent under homogeneous conditions in the presence of 2-3 equiv of Trifluoromethanesulphonic acid. Absorption spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and resonance Raman data along with H2O2 assay indicate that one out of the four electrons necessary to reduce O2 to H2O is donated by the ferrous porphyrin while three are donated by the distal ferrocene residues. The same catalyst shows 4e(-)/4H(+) reduction of O2 in an aqueous medium, under heterogeneous conditions, over a wide range of pH. Both the selectivity and the rate of ORR are found to be pH independent in an aqueous medium. The ORR proceeds via a proton transfer followed by electron transfer (PET) step in an organic medium and while a 2e(-)/1H(+) proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) step determines the electrochemical potential of ORR in an aqueous medium.

  4. Dieldrin uptake and translocation in plants growing in hydroponic medium.

    PubMed

    Murano, Hirotatsu; Otani, Takashi; Seike, Nobuyasu; Sakai, Mizuki

    2010-01-01

    It has been known that the Cucurbitaceae family takes up a large amount of persistent organic pollutants from soils and that the translocation of those compounds in cucurbits is higher than those in non-cucurbits. To understand the persistent organic pollutant uptake mechanisms of plant species, we compared the dieldrin absorption and transportation potentials of several plants in hydroponic medium. Sorghum (Sorghum vulgare Moench), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), soybean (Glycine max), komatsuna (Brassica rapa var. peruviridis), white-flowered gourd (Lagenaria siceraria var. hispida), cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), and zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) were grown in a dieldrin-added hydroponic medium for 10 d, and then the amount of dieldrin in their shoots and roots was measured. All of the roots contained dieldrin, whereas only the cucurbits (white-flowered gourd, cucumber, and zucchini) contained considerable amounts of dieldrin in their shoots. The dieldrin uptake to the roots depended on the concentration of the n-hexane soluble components in the roots, regardless of whether the dieldrin in the roots was translocated to shoots or not. The dieldrin uptake from the solution to the roots was thought to be due to a passive response, such as adsorption on the roots. The translocation of dieldrin from the roots to the shoots was probably through the xylems. The amounts of dieldrin in the shoots per transpiration rates were higher for cucurbits than for non-cucurbits. It seems likely that cucurbits have uptake mechanisms for hydrophobic organic chemicals.

  5. Passive CO2 concentration in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F; Khoshravesh, Roxana

    2016-06-01

    Photorespiratory limitations on C3 photosynthesis are substantial in warm, low CO2 conditions. To compensate, certain plants evolved mechanisms to actively concentrate CO2 around Rubisco using ATP-supported CO2 pumps such as C4 photosynthesis. Plants can also passively accumulate CO2 without additional ATP expenditure by localizing the release of photorespired and respired CO2 around Rubisco that is diffusively isolated from peripheral air spaces. Passive accumulation of photorespired CO2 occurs when glycine decarboxylase is localized to vascular sheath cells in what is termed C2 photosynthesis, and through forming sheaths of chloroplasts around the periphery of mesophyll cells. The peripheral sheaths require photorespired CO2 to re-enter chloroplasts where it can be refixed. Passive accumulation of respiratory CO2 is common in organs such as stems, fruits and flowers, due to abundant heterotrophic tissues and high diffusive resistance along the organ periphery. Chloroplasts within these organs are able to exploit this high CO2 to reduce photorespiration. CO2 concentration can also be enhanced passively by channeling respired CO2 from roots and rhizomes into photosynthetic cells of stems and leaves via lacunae, aerenchyma and the xylem stream. Through passive CO2 concentration, C3 species likely improved their carbon economy and maintained fitness during episodes of low atmospheric CO2.

  6. A Correlational Study between IT Governance and the Effect on Strategic Management Functioning among Senior & Middle Management in Medium Scale Software Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurien, Sam

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore whether there are relationships between elements of information technology (IT) governance, strategic planning, and strategic functions among senior and mid-level management at medium-scaled software development firms. Several topics and models of IT governance literature were discussed and the gap in…

  7. Passive immunotherapies protect WRvFire and IHD-J-Luc vaccinia virus-infected mice from lethality by reducing viral loads in the upper respiratory tract and internal organs.

    PubMed

    Zaitseva, Marina; Kapnick, Senta M; Meseda, Clement A; Shotwell, Elisabeth; King, Lisa R; Manischewitz, Jody; Scott, John; Kodihalli, Shantha; Merchlinsky, Michael; Nielsen, Henriette; Lantto, Johan; Weir, Jerry P; Golding, Hana

    2011-09-01

    Whole-body bioimaging was employed to study the effects of passive immunotherapies on lethality and viral dissemination in BALB/c mice challenged with recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing luciferase. WRvFire and IHD-J-Luc vaccinia viruses induced lethality with similar times to death following intranasal infection, but WRvFire replicated at higher levels than IHD-J-Luc in the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Three types of therapies were tested: licensed human anti-vaccinia virus immunoglobulin intravenous (VIGIV); recombinant anti-vaccinia virus immunoglobulin (rVIG; Symphogen, Denmark), an investigational product containing a mixture of 26 human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) against mature virion (MV) and enveloped virion (EV); and HuMAb compositions targeting subsets of MV or EV proteins. Bioluminescence recorded daily showed that pretreatment with VIGIV (30 mg) or with rVIG (100 μg) on day -2 protected mice from death but did not prevent viral replication at the site of inoculation and dissemination to internal organs. Compositions containing HuMAbs against MV or EV proteins were protective in both infection models at 100 μg per animal, but at 30 μg, only anti-EV antibodies conferred protection. Importantly, the t statistic of the mean total fluxes revealed that viral loads in surviving mice were significantly reduced in at least 3 sites for 3 consecutive days (days 3 to 5) postchallenge, while significant reduction for 1 or 2 days in any individual site did not confer protection. Our data suggest that reduction of viral replication at multiple sites, including respiratory tract, spleen, and liver, as monitored by whole-body bioluminescence can be used to predict the effectiveness of passive immunotherapies in mouse models.

  8. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  9. Investigation of polyethylene passive diffusion samplers for sampling volatile organic compounds in ground water at Davis Global Communications, Sacramento, California, August 1998 to February 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Borchers, J.W.; Campbell, T.R.; Kinsey, Willey

    2000-01-01

    Fourteen wells were instrumented with diffusion samplers as a test to determine whether the samplers could be used to obtain representative volatile organic compound concentrations at a study site in Sacramento, California. Single diffusion samplers were placed in 10-foot-long well screens, and multiple diffusion samplers were positioned in 20-foot-long well screens. Borehole geophysical logs and electromagnetic flowmeter tests were run in selected wells with 20-foot-long well screens prior to deploying the samplers. The diffusion samplers were recovered after 25 to 30 days, and the wells were then sampled by using the purge-and-sample method. In most wells, the concentrations obtained by using the downhole diffusion samplers closely matched those obtained by using the purge-and-sample method. In seven wells, the concentrations differed between the two methods by only 2 micrograms per liter (g/L) or less. In three wells, volatile organic compounds were not detected in water obtained by using either method. In the four remaining wells, differences between the methods were less than 2g/L in the 0.2- to 8.5-g/L concentration range and from 1.2 to 8.7g/L in the 10- to 26-g/L concentration range. Greater differences (23 percent or 14.5g/L, 31 percent or 66g/L, and 46 percent or 30g/L) between the two methods were observed for tetrachloroethene concentrations, which ranged between 30 and 211g/L in three wells. The most probable explanation for the differences is that in some wells, the purging induced drawdowns and introduced water that differed in volatile organic compound concentrations from the in situ water in contact with the screened interval of the well. Alternate explanations include the possibility of unrecorded changes in nearby contaminant-extraction-well operation during the equilibration period. The data suggest that the combined use of borehole flowmeter tests and diffusion samplers may be useful in optimizing the radius of capture of contaminated ground

  10. USE OF PASSIVE SAMPLERS IN THE DEARS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) employs a number of passive diffusion-based samplers for the collection of select gaseous air pollutants. These pollutants include criteria gases such as ozone, carbonyls such as acrolein, and volatile organics such as 1-3, ...

  11. Polyethylene passive samplers to determine sediment-pore water distribution coefficients of persistent organic pollutants in five heavily contaminated dredged sediments.

    PubMed

    Charrasse, Benoit; Tixier, Céline; Hennebert, Pierre; Doumenq, Pierre

    2014-02-15

    Pore concentration and partition coefficients of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were determined in sediments from five distinct contaminated sites in France (marine harbour, rivers canals and highway sedimentation tank). The assessment of the risk caused by such micropollutants requires, in most cases, the measurement of their availability. To assess this availability, low density polyethylene (LDPE) membrane samplers were exposed to these sediments under constant and low-level agitation over a period of 46 days. Freely dissolved pore water contaminant concentrations were estimated from the concentration at equilibrium in the LDPE membrane. The depletion of contaminants in the sediments was monitored by the use of performance reference compounds (PRCs). Marked differences in freely dissolved PAH and PCB concentrations and resulting sediment-pore water partition coefficients between these five sediments were observed. Data set was tested onto different empirical and mechanistic models. As final findings, triple domain sorption (a total organic carbon, black carbon and oil phase model) could model PCB data successfully whereas the best fitting for PAH partitioning was obtained by Raoult's Law model. PMID:24360917

  12. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  13. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1990-01-01

    A method of passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  14. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A method is described for passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  15. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, David

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  16. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  17. Passive electroreception in aquatic mammals.

    PubMed

    Czech-Damal, Nicole U; Dehnhardt, Guido; Manger, Paul; Hanke, Wolf

    2013-06-01

    Passive electroreception is a sensory modality in many aquatic vertebrates, predominantly fishes. Using passive electroreception, the animal can detect and analyze electric fields in its environment. Most electric fields in the environment are of biogenic origin, often produced by prey items. These electric fields can be relatively strong and can be a highly valuable source of information for a predator, as underlined by the fact that electroreception has evolved multiple times independently. The only mammals that possess electroreception are the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and the echidnas (Tachyglossidae) from the monotreme order, and, recently discovered, the Guiana dolphin (Sotalia guianensis) from the cetacean order. Here we review the morphology, function and origin of the electroreceptors in the two aquatic species, the platypus and the Guiana dolphin. The morphology shows certain similarities, also similar to ampullary electroreceptors in fishes, that provide cues for the search for electroreceptors in more vertebrate and invertebrate species. The function of these organs appears to be very similar. Both species search for prey animals in low-visibility conditions or while digging in the substrate, and sensory thresholds are within one order of magnitude. The electroreceptors in both species are innervated by the trigeminal nerve. The origin of the accessory structures, however, is completely different; electroreceptors in the platypus have developed from skin glands, in the Guiana dolphin, from the vibrissal system. PMID:23187861

  18. Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1980

    1980-01-01

    This is a list of aerospace organizations and other groups that provides educators with assistance and information in specific areas. Both government and nongovernment organizations are included. (Author/SA)

  19. Hybrid passivated colloidal quantum dot solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Alexander H.; Thon, Susanna M.; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Zhitomirsky, David; Debnath, Ratan; Levina, Larissa; Rollny, Lisa R.; Carey, Graham H.; Fischer, Armin; Kemp, Kyle W.; Kramer, Illan J.; Ning, Zhijun; Labelle, André J.; Chou, Kang Wei; Amassian, Aram; Sargent, Edward H.

    2012-09-01

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films allow large-area solution processing and bandgap tuning through the quantum size effect. However, the high ratio of surface area to volume makes CQD films prone to high trap state densities if surfaces are imperfectly passivated, promoting recombination of charge carriers that is detrimental to device performance. Recent advances have replaced the long insulating ligands that enable colloidal stability following synthesis with shorter organic linkers or halide anions, leading to improved passivation and higher packing densities. Although this substitution has been performed using solid-state ligand exchange, a solution-based approach is preferable because it enables increased control over the balance of charges on the surface of the quantum dot, which is essential for eliminating midgap trap states. Furthermore, the solution-based approach leverages recent progress in metal:chalcogen chemistry in the liquid phase. Here, we quantify the density of midgap trap states in CQD solids and show that the performance of CQD-based photovoltaics is now limited by electron-hole recombination due to these states. Next, using density functional theory and optoelectronic device modelling, we show that to improve this performance it is essential to bind a suitable ligand to each potential trap site on the surface of the quantum dot. We then develop a robust hybrid passivation scheme that involves introducing halide anions during the end stages of the synthesis process, which can passivate trap sites that are inaccessible to much larger organic ligands. An organic crosslinking strategy is then used to form the film. Finally, we use our hybrid passivated CQD solid to fabricate a solar cell with a certified efficiency of 7.0%, which is a record for a CQD photovoltaic device.

  20. Hybrid passivated colloidal quantum dot solids.

    PubMed

    Ip, Alexander H; Thon, Susanna M; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Zhitomirsky, David; Debnath, Ratan; Levina, Larissa; Rollny, Lisa R; Carey, Graham H; Fischer, Armin; Kemp, Kyle W; Kramer, Illan J; Ning, Zhijun; Labelle, André J; Chou, Kang Wei; Amassian, Aram; Sargent, Edward H

    2012-09-01

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films allow large-area solution processing and bandgap tuning through the quantum size effect. However, the high ratio of surface area to volume makes CQD films prone to high trap state densities if surfaces are imperfectly passivated, promoting recombination of charge carriers that is detrimental to device performance. Recent advances have replaced the long insulating ligands that enable colloidal stability following synthesis with shorter organic linkers or halide anions, leading to improved passivation and higher packing densities. Although this substitution has been performed using solid-state ligand exchange, a solution-based approach is preferable because it enables increased control over the balance of charges on the surface of the quantum dot, which is essential for eliminating midgap trap states. Furthermore, the solution-based approach leverages recent progress in metal:chalcogen chemistry in the liquid phase. Here, we quantify the density of midgap trap states in CQD solids and show that the performance of CQD-based photovoltaics is now limited by electron-hole recombination due to these states. Next, using density functional theory and optoelectronic device modelling, we show that to improve this performance it is essential to bind a suitable ligand to each potential trap site on the surface of the quantum dot. We then develop a robust hybrid passivation scheme that involves introducing halide anions during the end stages of the synthesis process, which can passivate trap sites that are inaccessible to much larger organic ligands. An organic crosslinking strategy is then used to form the film. Finally, we use our hybrid passivated CQD solid to fabricate a solar cell with a certified efficiency of 7.0%, which is a record for a CQD photovoltaic device.

  1. Direct, simple derivatization of disulfide bonds in proteins with organic mercury in alkaline medium without any chemical pre-reducing agents.

    PubMed

    Campanella, Beatrice; Onor, Massimo; Ferrari, Carlo; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Bramanti, Emilia

    2014-09-16

    In this work we have studied the derivatization of protein disulfide bonds with p-Hydroxymercurybenzoate (pHMB) in strong alkaline medium without any preliminary reduction. The reaction has been followed by the determination of the protein-pHMB complex using size exclusion chromatography coupled to a microwave/UV mercury oxidation system for the on-line oxidation of free and protein-complexed pHMB and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (SEC-CVG-AFS) detection. The reaction has been optimized by an experimental design using lysozyme as a model protein and applied to several thiolic proteins. The proposed method reports, for the first time, that it is possible to label 75-100% cysteines of proteins and, thus, to determine thiolic proteins without the need of any reducing step to obtain reduced SH groups before mercury labelling. We obtained a detection limit of 100 nmol L(-1) based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 for unbound and complexed pHMB, corresponding to a detection limit of proteins ranged between 3 and 360 nmol L(-1), depending on the number of cysteines in the protein sequence.

  2. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350... Microbiological assay culture medium. (a) Identification. A microbiological assay culture medium is a device that... organism in the innoculated medium. Test results aid in the diagnosis of disease resulting from...

  3. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350... Microbiological assay culture medium. (a) Identification. A microbiological assay culture medium is a device that... organism in the innoculated medium. Test results aid in the diagnosis of disease resulting from...

  4. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350... Microbiological assay culture medium. (a) Identification. A microbiological assay culture medium is a device that... organism in the innoculated medium. Test results aid in the diagnosis of disease resulting from...

  5. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350... Microbiological assay culture medium. (a) Identification. A microbiological assay culture medium is a device that... organism in the innoculated medium. Test results aid in the diagnosis of disease resulting from...

  6. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350... Microbiological assay culture medium. (a) Identification. A microbiological assay culture medium is a device that... organism in the innoculated medium. Test results aid in the diagnosis of disease resulting from...

  7. Passive detection of vehicle loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Troy R.; Salvaggio, Carl; Faulring, Jason W.; Salvaggio, Philip S.; McKeown, Donald M.; Garrett, Alfred J.; Coleman, David H.; Koffman, Larry D.

    2012-01-01

    The Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Laboratory (DIRS) at the Rochester Institute of Technology, along with the Savannah River National Laboratory is investigating passive methods to quantify vehicle loading. The research described in this paper investigates multiple vehicle indicators including brake temperature, tire temperature, engine temperature, acceleration and deceleration rates, engine acoustics, suspension response, tire deformation and vibrational response. Our investigation into these variables includes building and implementing a sensing system for data collection as well as multiple full-scale vehicle tests. The sensing system includes; infrared video cameras, triaxial accelerometers, microphones, video cameras and thermocouples. The full scale testing includes both a medium size dump truck and a tractor-trailer truck on closed courses with loads spanning the full range of the vehicle's capacity. Statistical analysis of the collected data is used to determine the effectiveness of each of the indicators for characterizing the weight of a vehicle. The final sensing system will monitor multiple load indicators and combine the results to achieve a more accurate measurement than any of the indicators could provide alone.

  8. PASSIVE DETECTION OF VEHICLE LOADING

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, A.

    2012-01-03

    The Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Laboratory (DIRS) at the Rochester Institute of Technology, along with the Savannah River National Laboratory is investigating passive methods to quantify vehicle loading. The research described in this paper investigates multiple vehicle indicators including brake temperature, tire temperature, engine temperature, acceleration and deceleration rates, engine acoustics, suspension response, tire deformation and vibrational response. Our investigation into these variables includes building and implementing a sensing system for data collection as well as multiple full-scale vehicle tests. The sensing system includes; infrared video cameras, triaxial accelerometers, microphones, video cameras and thermocouples. The full scale testing includes both a medium size dump truck and a tractor-trailer truck on closed courses with loads spanning the full range of the vehicle's capacity. Statistical analysis of the collected data is used to determine the effectiveness of each of the indicators for characterizing the weight of a vehicle. The final sensing system will monitor multiple load indicators and combine the results to achieve a more accurate measurement than any of the indicators could provide alone.

  9. Evaluation and guidelines for using polyurethane foam (PUF) passive air samplers in double-dome chambers to assess semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in non-industrial indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Bohlin, Pernilla; Audy, Ondřej; Škrdlíková, Lenka; Kukučka, Petr; Vojta, Šimon; Přibylová, Petra; Prokeš, Roman; Čupr, Pavel; Klánová, Jana

    2014-11-01

    Indoor air pollution has been recognized as an important risk factor for human health, especially in areas where people tend to spend most of their time indoors. Many semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) have primarily indoor sources and are present in orders of magnitude higher concentrations indoors than outdoors. Despite this, awareness of SVOCs in indoor air and assessment of the link between indoor concentrations and human health have lagged behind those of outdoor air. This is partially related to challenges associated with indoor sampling of SVOCs. Passive air samplers (PASs), which are widely accepted in established outdoor air monitoring networks, have been used to fill the knowledge gaps on indoor SVOCs distribution. However, their applicability for indoor environments and the assessment of human health risks lack sufficient experimental data. To address this issue, we performed an indoor calibration study of polyurethane foam (PUF) PAS deployed in a double-dome chamber, covering both legacy and new SVOC classes. PUF-PAS and a continuous low-volume active air sampler (AAS) were co-deployed for a calibration period of twelve weeks. Based on the results from this evaluation, PUF-PAS in a double-bowl chamber is recommended for indoor sampling and health risk assessment of gas phase SVOCs, including novel brominated flame retardants (nBFR) providing sufficient exposure time is applied. Data for particle associated SVOCs suffered from significant uncertainties caused by low level of detection and low precision in this study. A more open chamber design for indoor studies may allow for higher sampling rates (RS) and better performance for the particle associated SVOCs. PMID:25274245

  10. Passivated niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  11. Maximization of organic acids production by Aspergillus niger in a bubble column bioreactor for V and Ni recovery enhancement from power plant residual ash in spent-medium bioleaching experiments.

    PubMed

    Rasoulnia, P; Mousavi, S M

    2016-09-01

    Spent-medium bioleaching of V and Ni from a power plant residual ash (PPR ash) was conducted using organic acids produced by Aspergillus niger. The production of organic acids in a bubble column bioreactor was optimized through selecting three most influencing factors. Under optimum condition of aeration rate of 762.5(ml/min), sucrose concentration of 101.9(g/l) and inoculum size of 40(ml/l), respectively 17,185, 4539, 1042 and 502(ppm) of oxalic, gluconic, citric and malic acids were produced. Leaching experiments were carried out using biogenic produced organic acids under leaching environment temperature of 60°C and rotary shaking speed of 135rpm, with various pulp densities of 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 9(%w/v). The results showed that biogenic produced organic acids leached V much more efficiently than Ni so that even at high pulp density of 9(%w/v), 83% of V was recovered while Ni recovery yield was 30%. PMID:27295250

  12. Maximization of organic acids production by Aspergillus niger in a bubble column bioreactor for V and Ni recovery enhancement from power plant residual ash in spent-medium bioleaching experiments.

    PubMed

    Rasoulnia, P; Mousavi, S M

    2016-09-01

    Spent-medium bioleaching of V and Ni from a power plant residual ash (PPR ash) was conducted using organic acids produced by Aspergillus niger. The production of organic acids in a bubble column bioreactor was optimized through selecting three most influencing factors. Under optimum condition of aeration rate of 762.5(ml/min), sucrose concentration of 101.9(g/l) and inoculum size of 40(ml/l), respectively 17,185, 4539, 1042 and 502(ppm) of oxalic, gluconic, citric and malic acids were produced. Leaching experiments were carried out using biogenic produced organic acids under leaching environment temperature of 60°C and rotary shaking speed of 135rpm, with various pulp densities of 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 9(%w/v). The results showed that biogenic produced organic acids leached V much more efficiently than Ni so that even at high pulp density of 9(%w/v), 83% of V was recovered while Ni recovery yield was 30%.

  13. Electronic Spectroscopy of Organic Cations in Gas-Phase at 6 K:IDENTIFICATION of C60/^+ in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, John P.

    2016-06-01

    After the discovery of C60, the question of its relevance to the diffuse interstellar bands was raised. In 1987 H. W. Kroto wrote: ``The present observations indicate that C60 might survive in the general interstellar medium (probably as the ion C60/^+)''. In 1994 two diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) at 9632 and 9577 Å/ were detected and proposed to be the absorption features of C60/^+. This was based on the proximity of these wavelengths to the two prominent absorption bands of C60/^+ measured by us in a neon matrix in 1993. Confirmation of the assignment required the gas phase spectrum of C60/^+ and has taken 20 years. The approach which succeeded confines C60/^+ ions in a radiofrequency trap, cools them by collisions with high density helium allowing formation of the weakly bound C60/^+--He complexes below 10 K. The photofragmentation spectrum of this mass-selected complex is then recorded using a cw laser. In order to infer the position of the absorption features of the bare C60/^+ ion, measurements on C60/^+--He_2 were also made. The spectra show that the presence of a helium atom shifts the absorptions by less than 0.2 Å, much less than the accuracy of the astronomical measurements. The two absorption features in the laboratory have band maxima at 9632.7(1) and 9577.5(1) Å, exactly the DIB wavelengths, and the widths and relative intensities agree. This leads to the first definite identification of now five bands among the five hundred or so DIBs known and proves the presence of gaseous C60/^+ in the interstellar medium. The absorption of cold C70/^+ has also been obtained by this approach. In addition the electronic spectra of a number of cations of astrophysical interest ranging from those of carbon chains including oxygen to larger polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon could be measured in the gas phase at around 10 K in the ion trap but using an excitation-dissociation approach. The implications of these laboratory spectra in relation to the diffuse

  14. Passive fetal monitoring sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Hall, Earl T. (Inventor); Baker, Donald A. (Inventor); Bryant, Timothy D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ambulatory, passive sensor for use in a fetal monitoring system is discussed. The invention is comprised of a piezoelectric polymer film, combined with a metallic mounting plate fastened to a belt, and electrically connected to a signal processing unit by means of a shielded cable. The purpose of the sensor is to receive pressure pulses emitted by a fetus inside an expectant mother. Additionally, the monitor will filter out pressure pulses arising from other sources, such as the maternal heart.

  15. Passively actuated valve

    DOEpatents

    Modro, S. Michael; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.

    2005-09-20

    A passively actuated valve for isolating a high pressure zone from a low pressure zone and discontinuing the isolation when the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below a preset threshold. If the pressure in the high pressure zone drops below the preset threshold, the valve opens and allows flow from the high pressure zone to the low pressure zone. The valve remains open allowing pressure equalization and back-flow should a pressure inversion between the two pressure zone occur.

  16. Organics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chian, Edward S. K.; DeWalle, Foppe B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents water analysis literature for 1978. This review is concerned with organics, and it covers: (1) detergents and surfactants; (2) aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; (3) pesticides and chlorinated hydrocarbons; and (4) naturally occurring organics. A list of 208 references is also presented. (HM)

  17. Organizers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a specific…

  18. Stimulated resonance Raman scattering from organic dyes in a multiple-scattering medium as a potential method for determining their vibrational spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, V P; Tikhonov, E A; Bukatar', A O; Prigodiuk, O A; Smalyuk, A P

    2011-10-31

    A method is described for deriving Raman spectra of organic dyes from their random lasing spectra. The method was tested using Rhodamine 6G. The Raman spectrum obtained for this dye agrees well with the spectra measured by standard techniques but is more structured, which allows unresolved features to be detected. The spectrum provides more detailed information owing to the interference between the Raman scattered light and amplified spontaneous emission of the dye molecules within a photon mean free path. One advantage of the method is that the luminescence of the dye helps to observe Raman lines, which allows one to work in the Stokes region and facilitates the measurement procedure. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  19. Molten salt medium synthesis of wormlike platinum silver nanotubes without any organic surfactant or solvent for methanol and formic acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haidong; Liu, Rui; Guo, Yong; Yang, Shengchun

    2015-12-14

    In the current research, the PtxAgy (x/y = 86/14, 79/21, 52/48, 21/79, 11/89) nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized in the KNO3-LiNO3 molten salts without using any organic surfactant or solvent. The SEM results suggest that when the content of Ag is higher than 48%, the wormlike PtxAgy nanotubes (NTs) can be synthesized. The diameter of the PtxAgyNTs shows a slow decrease with the increase of Ag content. The TEM and HRTEM results indicate that the growth of hollow PtxAgy NTs undergoes an oriented attachment process and a Kirkendall effect approach. The results of cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurement indicate that the Pt52Ag48 catalyst presents a remarkable enhancement for methanol electrooxidation, while the Pt86Ag14 catalyst prefers electrochemically oxidizing formic acid compared with that of the commercially available Pt black.

  20. Comet Halley as an aggregate of interstellar dust and further evidence for the photochemical formation of organics in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, R.; Ertem, G.; Ferris, J. P.; Greenberg, J. M.; Mccain, P. J.; Mendoza-Gomez, C. X.; Schutte, W.

    1992-01-01

    Photolysis of mixtures of CO:NH3:H2O at 12 K results in the formation of an organic residue which is not volatile in high vacuum at room temperature. Analysis of this fraction by GC-MS resulted in the detection of C2-C3 hydroxy acids and hydroxy amides, glycerol, urea, glycine, hexamethylene tetramine, formamidine and ethanolamine. Use of isotopically labeled gases made it possible to establish that the observed products were not contaminants. The reaction pathways for the formation of these products were determined from the position of the isotopic labels in the mass spectral fragments. The significance of these findings to the composition of comets and the origins of life is discussed.

  1. Electrocatalytic oxidation of small organic molecules in acid medium: enhancement of activity of noble metal nanoparticles and their alloys by supporting or modifying them with metal oxides

    PubMed Central

    Kulesza, Pawel J.; Pieta, Izabela S.; Rutkowska, Iwona A.; Wadas, Anna; Marks, Diana; Klak, Karolina; Stobinski, Leszek; Cox, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Different approaches to enhancement of electrocatalytic activity of noble metal nanoparticles during oxidation of small organic molecules (namely potential fuels for low-temperature fuel cells such as methanol, ethanol and formic acid) are described. A physical approach to the increase of activity of catalytic nanoparticles (e.g. platinum or palladium) involves nanostructuring to obtain highly dispersed systems of high surface area. Recently, the feasibility of enhancing activity of noble metal systems through the formation of bimetallic (e.g. PtRu, PtSn, and PdAu) or even more complex (e.g. PtRuW, PtRuSn) alloys has been demonstrated. In addition to possible changes in the electronic properties of alloys, specific interactions between metals as well as chemical reactivity of the added components have been postulated. We address and emphasize here the possibility of utilization of noble metal and alloyed nanoparticles supported on robust but reactive high surface area metal oxides (e.g. WO3, MoO3, TiO2, ZrO2, V2O5, and CeO2) in oxidative electrocatalysis. This paper concerns the way in which certain inorganic oxides and oxo species can act effectively as supports for noble metal nanoparticles or their alloys during electrocatalytic oxidation of hydrogen and representative organic fuels. Among important issues are possible changes in the morphology and dispersion, as well as specific interactions leading to the improved chemisorptive and catalytic properties in addition to the feasibility of long time operation of the discussed systems. PMID:24443590

  2. Electrocatalytic oxidation of small organic molecules in acid medium: enhancement of activity of noble metal nanoparticles and their alloys by supporting or modifying them with metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Kulesza, Pawel J; Pieta, Izabela S; Rutkowska, Iwona A; Wadas, Anna; Marks, Diana; Klak, Karolina; Stobinski, Leszek; Cox, James A

    2013-11-01

    Different approaches to enhancement of electrocatalytic activity of noble metal nanoparticles during oxidation of small organic molecules (namely potential fuels for low-temperature fuel cells such as methanol, ethanol and formic acid) are described. A physical approach to the increase of activity of catalytic nanoparticles (e.g. platinum or palladium) involves nanostructuring to obtain highly dispersed systems of high surface area. Recently, the feasibility of enhancing activity of noble metal systems through the formation of bimetallic (e.g. PtRu, PtSn, and PdAu) or even more complex (e.g. PtRuW, PtRuSn) alloys has been demonstrated. In addition to possible changes in the electronic properties of alloys, specific interactions between metals as well as chemical reactivity of the added components have been postulated. We address and emphasize here the possibility of utilization of noble metal and alloyed nanoparticles supported on robust but reactive high surface area metal oxides (e.g. WO3, MoO3, TiO2, ZrO2, V2O5, and CeO2) in oxidative electrocatalysis. This paper concerns the way in which certain inorganic oxides and oxo species can act effectively as supports for noble metal nanoparticles or their alloys during electrocatalytic oxidation of hydrogen and representative organic fuels. Among important issues are possible changes in the morphology and dispersion, as well as specific interactions leading to the improved chemisorptive and catalytic properties in addition to the feasibility of long time operation of the discussed systems.

  3. Polyaniline layer for iron protection in sulfate medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, M.C.; Goff, A.H.L.; Joiret, S.; Dinh, N.N.; Toan, N.N.

    1999-03-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) has been electrodeposited on iron in oxalic medium in order to evaluate the protective character of this polymer. PANI has been found to be efficient for corrosion protection during at least 10 h in a pH 4.5 sulfate medium. Interaction between the passive layer and polymer has been studied using spectroelectrochemical techniques such as Raman spectroscopy and reflectance measurements.

  4. Addition of an organic amendment and/or residue mud to bauxite residue sand in order to improve its properties as a growth medium.

    PubMed

    Jones, B E H; Haynes, R J; Phillips, I R

    2012-03-01

    The effects of addition of carbonated residue mud (RMC) or seawater neutralized residue mud (RMS), at two rates, in the presence or absence of added green waste compost, on the chemical, physical and microbial properties of gypsum-treated bauxite residue sand were studied in a laboratory incubation study. The growth of two species commonly used in revegetation of residue sand (Lolium rigidum and Acacia saligna) in the treatments was then studied in a 18-week greenhouse study. Addition of green waste-based compost increased ammonium acetate-extractable (exchangeable) Mg, K and Na. Addition of residue mud at 5 and 10% w/w reduced exchangeable Ca but increased that of Mg and Na (and K for RMS). Concentrations of K, Na, Mg and level of EC in saturation paste extracts were increased by residue mud additions. Concentrations of cations in water extracts were considerably higher than those in saturation paste extracts but trends with treatment were broadly similar. Addition of both compost and residue mud caused a significant decrease in macroporosity with a concomitant increase in mesoporosity and microporosity, available water holding capacity and the quantity of water held at field capacity. Increasing rates of added residue mud reduced the percentage of sample present as discrete sand particles and increased that in aggregated form (particularly in the 1-2 and >10mm diameter ranges). Organic C content, C/N ratio, soluble organic C, microbial biomass C and basal respiration were increased by compost additions. Where compost was added, residue mud additions caused a substantial increase in microbial biomass and basal respiration. L. rigidum grew satisfactorily in all treatments although yields tended to be reduced by additions of mud (especially RMC) particularly in the absence of added compost. Growth of A. saligna was poor in sand alone and mud-amended sand and was greatly promoted by additions of compost. However, in the presence of compost, addition of carbonated

  5. A comparison of the performance of cystine lactose electrolyte deficient (CLED) agar with Oxoid chromogenic urinary tract infection (CUTI) medium for the isolation and presumptive identification of organisms from urine

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, D; Andrews, N; Frodsham, D; Gee, B; Howe, S; Iliffe, A; Nye, K J; Warren, R E

    2002-01-01

    Aims: As part of the UK antimicrobial resistance strategy and action plan, the Public Health Laboratory Service (PHLS) is required to collect antibiotic susceptibility data so that resistance trends and patterns can be monitored. Most laboratories report urine Gram negative isolates, as “coliforms” according to morphological appearance, but without an acceptable identification system the antimicrobial surveillance data will be meaningless. Commercially available identification systems tend to be expensive and time consuming. Chromogenic agars, which claim to improve the detection of mixed cultures and identification of organisms from urine, have now become available and may provide a cost effective alternative. The primary aim of this study was to compare the performance of cystine lactose electrolyte deficient (CLED) agar with a chromogenic agar (Oxoid urinary tract infection medium; CUTI) in terms of isolation rates and ability to detect mixed cultures. Secondary aims were to evaluate the correlation of “presumptive” identification of isolates from chromogenic media with that of two commercial identification systems and to appraise the sensitivity of the semiquantitative loop and filter paper strip culture techniques. Method: One thousand, four hundred and sixty six urine samples were examined in four laboratories using the semiquantitative culture methods of 1 μl loop and filter paper strip. The degree of accuracy of organism identification was measured by comparing the presumptive identification using colony colour supplemented with simple bench tests, with identification obtained from two more complex commercial systems. Results: There was no significant difference between the performance of the loop and filter paper strip methods on the CLED agar, but the CUTI agar performed significantly better than the CLED agar for the detection of significant isolates and mixed cultures. This difference was greater using the loop method. Identification of the

  6. Methyl oleate-capped upconverting nanocrystals: a simple and general ligand exchange strategy to render nanocrystals dispersible in aqueous and organic medium.

    PubMed

    Meesaragandla, Brahmaiah; Adusumalli, Venkata N K B; Mahalingam, Venkataramanan

    2015-05-19

    We report a simple and general ligand exchange strategy to functionalize the nanocrystals with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic ligands. This is achieved by first capping the Er/Yb-doped NaYF4 nanocrystals with a weak ligand such as methyl oleate and subsequently ligand exchanged with various organic ligands which can strongly coordinate to the surface of the nanocrystals. The method involves only a simple stirring or sonication of the nanocrystals dispersion with the ligands of interest. Dicarboxylic acids such as sebacic acid, adipic acid, succinic acid, and malonic acid-functionalized nanocrystals which are difficult to achieve via thermal decomposition method were easily prepared by this ligand exchange strategy. In addition, low boiling point ligands like hexanoic acid can easily be coated over the surface of the Er/Yb-doped NaYF4 nanocrystals. Both size and shape of the nanocrystals were preserved after the ligand exchange process. The methyl oleate-capped Er/Yb-doped NaYF4 nanocrystals display strong upconversion emission after ligand exchanged with hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules. The high stability of the nanocrystals after ligand exchange process is verified by performing time-dependent luminescent measurements at different pH, buffers, etc.

  7. Electrical properties of GaAs metal–oxide–semiconductor structure comprising Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate oxide and AlN passivation layer fabricated in situ using a metal–organic vapor deposition/atomic layer deposition hybrid system

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Takeshi Fukuhara, Noboru; Osada, Takenori; Sazawa, Hiroyuki; Hata, Masahiko; Inoue, Takayuki

    2015-08-15

    This paper presents a compressive study on the fabrication and optimization of GaAs metal–oxide–semiconductor (MOS) structures comprising a Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate oxide, deposited via atomic layer deposition (ALD), with an AlN interfacial passivation layer prepared in situ via metal–organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The established protocol afforded self-limiting growth of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the atmospheric MOCVD reactor. Consequently, this enabled successive growth of MOCVD-formed AlN and ALD-formed Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers on the GaAs substrate. The effects of AlN thickness, post-deposition anneal (PDA) conditions, and crystal orientation of the GaAs substrate on the electrical properties of the resulting MOS capacitors were investigated. Thin AlN passivation layers afforded incorporation of optimum amounts of nitrogen, leading to good capacitance–voltage (C–V) characteristics with reduced frequency dispersion. In contrast, excessively thick AlN passivation layers degraded the interface, thereby increasing the interfacial density of states (D{sub it}) near the midgap and reducing the conduction band offset. To further improve the interface with the thin AlN passivation layers, the PDA conditions were optimized. Using wet nitrogen at 600 °C was effective to reduce D{sub it} to below 2 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1}. Using a (111)A substrate was also effective in reducing the frequency dispersion of accumulation capacitance, thus suggesting the suppression of traps in GaAs located near the dielectric/GaAs interface. The current findings suggest that using an atmosphere ALD process with in situ AlN passivation using the current MOCVD system could be an efficient solution to improving GaAs MOS interfaces.

  8. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed ``point defects models`` (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies.

  9. Passive bistatic radar analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hagan, Daniel W.; Kuschel, H.; Schiller, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    Passive Bistatic Radar (PBR) research is at its zenith with several notable PBR systems currently operational, or available for deployment. Such PBRs include the Manastash Ridge Radar (MRR) developed for and by academia; Silent Sentry developed as a commercial concern by Lockheed Martin; and Homeland Alerter (HA100) also a commercial system developed by Thales. However at present, despite the existence of numerous PBR prototypes, take up of commercial passive radar technology remains slow. This is due in part to technology immaturity, in part to politics, and particularly due to the fact that monostatic radars perform so well. If PBRs are to enjoy longevity as a viable technology then it is imperative that they address certain niche application areas, with the aforementioned MRR being one prime example of this. The focus of this paper will be an analysis of a PBR system that utilised FM radio signals of opportunity to detect aircraft targets with an RCS generally not lower than 20 m2. The paper will demonstrate the theoretical detection coverage of an FM based PBR operating in a severe interference environment.

  10. Fly ash carbon passivation

    DOEpatents

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  11. Passive damping technology demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Robert E.; Spencer, Susan M.; Austin, Eric M.; Johnson, Conor D.

    1995-05-01

    A Hughes Space Company study was undertaken to (1) acquire the analytical capability to design effective passive damping treatments and to predict the damped dynamic performance with reasonable accuracy; (2) demonstrate reasonable test and analysis agreement for both baseline and damped baseline hardware; and (3) achieve a 75% reduction in peak transmissibility and 50% reduction in rms random vibration response. Hughes Space Company teamed with CSA Engineering to learn how to apply passive damping technology to their products successfully in a cost-effective manner. Existing hardware was selected for the demonstration because (1) previous designs were lightly damped and had difficulty in vibration test; (2) multiple damping concepts could be investigated; (3) the finite element model, hardware, and test fixture would be available; and (4) damping devices could be easily implemented. Bracket, strut, and sandwich panel damping treatments that met the performance goals were developed by analysis. The baseline, baseline with damped bracket, and baseline with damped strut designs were built and tested. The test results were in reasonable agreement with the analytical predictions and demonstrated that the desired reduction in dynamic response could be achieved. Having successfully demonstrated this approach, it can now be used with confidence for future designs as a means for reducing weight and enhancing reliability.

  12. Volcanic passive margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geoffroy, Laurent

    2005-12-01

    Compared to non-volcanic ones, volcanic passive margins mark continental break-up over a hotter mantle, probably subject to small-scale convection. They present distinctive genetic and structural features. High-rate extension of the lithosphere is associated with catastrophic mantle melting responsible for the accretion of a thick igneous crust. Distinctive structural features of volcanic margins are syn-magmatic and continentward-dipping crustal faults accommodating the seaward flexure of the igneous crust. Volcanic margins present along-axis a magmatic and tectonic segmentation with wavelength similar to adjacent slow-spreading ridges. Their 3D organisation suggests a connection between loci of mantle melting at depths and zones of strain concentration within the lithosphere. Break-up would start and propagate from localized thermally-softened lithospheric zones. These 'soft points' could be localized over small-scale convection cells found at the bottom of the lithosphere, where adiabatic mantle melting would specifically occur. The particular structure of the brittle crust at volcanic passive margins could be interpreted by active and sudden oceanward flow of both the unstable hot mantle and the ductile part of the lithosphere during the break-up stage. To cite this article: L. Geoffroy, C. R. Geoscience 337 (2005).

  13. Passive-solar construction handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.; Evans, D.; Gardstein, C.

    1981-02-01

    Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. Passive solar construction is covered according to system type, each system type discussion including a general discussion of the important design and construction issues which apply to the particular system and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type. The three basic types of passive solar systems discussed are direct gain, thermal storage wall, and attached sunspace. Thermal performance and construction information is presented for typical materials used in passive solar collector components, storage components, and control components. Appended are an overview of analysis methods and a technique for estimating performance. (LEW)

  14. Passive appendages generate drift through symmetry breaking

    PubMed Central

    Lācis, U.; Brosse, N.; Ingremeau, F.; Mazzino, A.; Lundell, F.; Kellay, H.; Bagheri, S.

    2014-01-01

    Plants and animals use plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs and fins to aid locomotion. Many of these appendages are not actively controlled, instead they have to interact passively with the surrounding fluid to generate motion. Here, we use theory, experiments and numerical simulations to show that an object with a protrusion in a separated flow drifts sideways by exploiting a symmetry-breaking instability similar to the instability of an inverted pendulum. Our model explains why the straight position of an appendage in a fluid flow is unstable and how it stabilizes either to the left or right of the incoming flow direction. It is plausible that organisms with appendages in a separated flow use this newly discovered mechanism for locomotion; examples include the drift of plumed seeds without wind and the passive reorientation of motile animals. PMID:25354545

  15. Passive appendages generate drift through symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lācis, U.; Brosse, N.; Ingremeau, F.; Mazzino, A.; Lundell, F.; Kellay, H.; Bagheri, S.

    2014-10-01

    Plants and animals use plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs and fins to aid locomotion. Many of these appendages are not actively controlled, instead they have to interact passively with the surrounding fluid to generate motion. Here, we use theory, experiments and numerical simulations to show that an object with a protrusion in a separated flow drifts sideways by exploiting a symmetry-breaking instability similar to the instability of an inverted pendulum. Our model explains why the straight position of an appendage in a fluid flow is unstable and how it stabilizes either to the left or right of the incoming flow direction. It is plausible that organisms with appendages in a separated flow use this newly discovered mechanism for locomotion; examples include the drift of plumed seeds without wind and the passive reorientation of motile animals.

  16. Passive appendages aid locomotion through symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Shervin; Lacis, Ugis; Mazzino, Andrea; Kellay, Hamid; Brosse, Nicolas; Lundell, Fredrik; Ingremeau, Francois

    2014-11-01

    Plants and animals use plumes, barbs, tails, feathers, hairs, fins, and other types of appendages to aid locomotion. Despite their enormous variation, passive appendages may contribute to locomotion by exploiting the same physical mechanism. We present a new mechanism that applies to body appendages surrounded by a separated flow, which often develops behind moving bodies larger than a few millimeters. We use theory, experiments, and numerical simulations to show that bodies with protrusions turn and drift by exploiting a symmetry-breaking instability similar to the instability of an inverted pendulum. Our model explains why the straight position of an appendage in flowing fluid is unstable and how it stabilizes either to the left or right of the incoming fluid flow direction. The discovery suggests a new mechanism of locomotion that may be relevant for certain organisms; for example, how plumed seeds may drift without wind and how motile animals may passively reorient themselves.

  17. Adaptive passive fathometer processing.

    PubMed

    Siderius, Martin; Song, Heechun; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S; Hursky, Paul; Harrison, Chris

    2010-04-01

    Recently, a technique has been developed to image seabed layers using the ocean ambient noise field as the sound source. This so called passive fathometer technique exploits the naturally occurring acoustic sounds generated on the sea-surface, primarily from breaking waves. The method is based on the cross-correlation of noise from the ocean surface with its echo from the seabed, which recovers travel times to significant seabed reflectors. To limit averaging time and make this practical, beamforming is used with a vertical array of hydrophones to reduce interference from horizontally propagating noise. The initial development used conventional beamforming, but significant improvements have been realized using adaptive techniques. In this paper, adaptive methods for this process are described and applied to several data sets to demonstrate improvements possible as compared to conventional processing.

  18. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, Paul F.; Cooke, Franklin E.; Fitch, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

  19. Passive Ball Capture Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloyd, Richard A. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A passive ball capture joint has a sleeve with a plurality of bores distributed about a circumference thereof and formed therethrough at an acute angle relative to the sleeve's longitudinal axis. A spring-loaded retainer is slidingly fitted in each bore and is biased such that, if allowed, will extend at least partially into the sleeve to retain a ball therein. A ring, rotatably mounted about the bores, has an interior wall defining a plurality of shaped races that bear against the spring-loaded retainers. A mechanized rotational force producer is coupled to the ring. The ring can be rotated from a first position (that presses the retainers into the sleeve to lock the ball in place) to a second position (that allows the retainers to springback out of the sleeve to release the ball).

  20. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

    1994-01-25

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

  1. Passive focus sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Kai; Knop, Karl

    1995-05-01

    A focus-sensor module that could take the place of the visual-image control for professional large-format cameras was fabricated. In addition, a passive focus-sensing method was shown to work at arbitrary locations and orientations in the recording plane of large-format professional cameras. A focus resolution of better than 0.1 mm and a range of measurement of +/- 5 mm at the image side were obtained at a minimum level of illuminance and with an aperture f/5.6 of the imaging lens. In the current method, three out of four images that arose from various sections of the camera's objective lens were applied for triangulation. The demonstrated approach was based on a linear photodiode array and employed one-dimensional image information for focus sensing.

  2. Passive magnetic bearing system

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Richard F.

    2014-09-02

    An axial stabilizer for the rotor of a magnetic bearing provides external control of stiffness through switching in external inductances. External control also allows the stabilizer to become a part of a passive/active magnetic bearing system that requires no external source of power and no position sensor. Stabilizers for displacements transverse to the axis of rotation are provided that require only a single cylindrical Halbach array in its operation, and thus are especially suited for use in high rotation speed applications, such as flywheel energy storage systems. The elimination of the need of an inner cylindrical array solves the difficult mechanical problem of supplying support against centrifugal forces for the magnets of that array. Compensation is provided for the temperature variation of the strength of the magnetic fields of the permanent magnets in the levitating magnet arrays.

  3. Commentary on "Capturing the Evasive Passive"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillo-Martin, Diane; Snyder, William

    2009-01-01

    Passives has been the focus of much research in language acquisition since the 1970s. It has been clear from this research that young children seldom produce passives spontaneously, particularly "long" or "full" passives with a by-phrase; and they usually perform poorly on experimental tests of the comprehension of passives, especially passives of…

  4. End-of-Mission Passivation: Successes and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas; Matney, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The passivation of spacecraft and launch vehicle orbital stages at end-of-mission has been a principal space debris mitigation measure world-wide since the 1980 s. Space vehicle passivation includes the removal of stored energies, especially those associated with propulsion and electrical power systems. Prior to 2007 the breakup of non-functioning, non-passivated space vehicles was the major source of hazardous debris in Earth orbit. The United Nations and the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee have both included passivation in their formal space debris mitigation guidelines. This often simple countermeasure has been adopted by many spacefaring countries and organizations and has undoubtedly prevented numerous major satellite breakups. For some existing space vehicle designs, passivation requires changes in hardware, software, and/or operational procedures. Questions about the permissible degree of passivation for both current and future space vehicles have arisen and are addressed herein. An important element to be considered is the potentially long period in which the space vehicle will remain in orbit, i.e., up to 25 years after mission termination in LEO and for centuries in orbits above LEO. Finally, the issue of passivation of space vehicles which have failed prematurely is addressed.

  5. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

  6. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1994-01-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

  7. Lifetime increase using passive harmonic cavities insynchrotronlight sources

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.M.; Georgsson, M.

    2000-09-22

    Harmonic cavities have been used in storage rings to increase beam lifetime and Landau damping by lengthening the bunch.The need for lifetime increase is particularly great in the present generation of low to medium energy synchrotron light sources where the small transverse beam sizes lead to relatively short lifetimes from large-angle intrabeam (Touschek) scattering. We review the beam dynamics of harmonic radiofrequency (RF) systems and discuss optimization of the beam lifetime using passive harmonic cavities.

  8. Synthetic laser medium

    DOEpatents

    Stokowski, Stanley E.

    1989-01-01

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chormium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  9. Synthetic laser medium

    DOEpatents

    Stokowski, S.E.

    1987-10-20

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chromium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  10. New analysis method for passive microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Kengo; Schmidt, Christoph; Mackintosh, Fred

    Passive microrheology is an experimental technique used to measure the mechanical response of materials from the fluctuations of micron-sized beads embedded in the medium. Microrheology is well suited to study rheological properties of materials that are difficult to obtain in larger amounts and also of materials inside of single cells. In one common approach, one uses the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to obtain the imaginary part of the material response function from the power spectral density of bead displacement fluctuations, while the real part of the response function is calculated using a Kramers-Kronig integral. The high-frequency cut-off of this integral strongly affects the real part of the response function in the high frequency region. Here, we discuss how to obtain more accurate values of the real part of the response function by an alternative method using autocorrelation functions.

  11. New passive helicopter detector

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sandia has developed a new helicopter detector. The device relies on the correlation between the acoustic wave from the helicopter and the resulting coupled seismic wave. A significant feature of this approach is that the detector is completely passive; there is no radio frequency radiation. Intended for deployment as a perimeter sensor around a site, the unit offers a low nuisance/false alarm rate and a high probability of detection for a wide range of helicopters. Reliable detection occurs when the target is at high altitude and also very near the earth's surface. Detection ranges start at one kilometer for the small, four-place, civilian helicopter and approach five kilometers for heavier, military types. The system has two parts: a transducer package containing a microphone and a geophone and a digital processor. Development is underway for a model which will be AC powered and well suited to permanent facilities. A prototype unit using a lightweight, battery powered processor is being constructed for rapid-deployment applications. 6 figs.

  12. Passive-solar greenhouse

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Our project objective was to design, construct, and operate a commercialized (16' x 50') passive, solar greenhouse. The structure was originally intended as a vegetable forcing facility to produce vegetable crops in the off-season. Building and size constraints and economic considerations convinced us to use the greenhouse for producing bedding plants and vegetable starts in the spring, high value vegetables (tomatoes, cucumbers) in the fall and forced bulbs in the winter. This crop sequence allows us to use the greenhouse all year without additional heat as the crops are adopted to the temperature regime of the greenhouse during each particular season. In our first season, the greenhouse performed beautifully. The lowest temperature recorded was 38/sup 0/F after 4 cold, cloudy days in February. The production of bedding plants has allowed us to diversify our products and the early transplants we produced were a great asset to our vegetable farming operation. Although construction cost (4.57 sq. ft.) is higher than that of a conventional polyethylene-covered, quonset-type greenhouse (approx. $1.92 sq. ft.), our annual operating cost is cheaper than that of a conventional greenhouse (0.49 cents sq. ft. versus 0.67 cents sq. ft.) due to a longer usable lifetime of the structure and the elimination of heating costs. Our structure has been toured by interested individuals, school and farm groups. We plan to publicize the structure and its advantages by promoting more visits to the site.

  13. Passive Acoustic Vessel Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwal, Pasang Sherpa

    This thesis investigates the development of a low-cost passive acoustic system for localizing moving vessels to monitor areas where human activities such as fishing, snorkeling and poaching are restricted. The system uses several off-the-shelf sensors with unsynchronized clocks where the Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA) or time delay is extracted by cross-correlation of the signal between paired sensors. The cross-correlation function uses phase correlation or Phase Transform (PHAT) which whitens the cross-spectrum in order to de-emphasize dominant frequency components. Using the locations of pairs of sensors as foci, hyperbolic equations can be defined using the time delay between them. With three or more sensors, multiple hyperbolic functions can be calculated which intersect at a unique point: the boat's location. It is also found that increasing separation distances between sensors decreased the correlation between the signals. However larger separation distances have better localization capability than with small distances. Experimental results from the Columbia and Willamette Rivers are presented to demonstrate performance.

  14. Passive Vaporizing Heat Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, TImothy R.; Ashford, Victor A.; Carpenter, Michael G.; Bier, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    A passive vaporizing heat sink has been developed as a relatively lightweight, compact alternative to related prior heat sinks based, variously, on evaporation of sprayed liquids or on sublimation of solids. This heat sink is designed for short-term dissipation of a large amount of heat and was originally intended for use in regulating the temperature of spacecraft equipment during launch or re-entry. It could also be useful in a terrestrial setting in which there is a requirement for a lightweight, compact means of short-term cooling. This heat sink includes a hermetic package closed with a pressure-relief valve and containing an expendable and rechargeable coolant liquid (e.g., water) and a conductive carbon-fiber wick. The vapor of the liquid escapes when the temperature exceeds the boiling point corresponding to the vapor pressure determined by the setting of the pressure-relief valve. The great advantage of this heat sink over a melting-paraffin or similar phase-change heat sink of equal capacity is that by virtue of the =10x greater latent heat of vaporization, a coolant-liquid volume equal to =1/10 of the paraffin volume can suffice.

  15. Comparison of Ashdown's medium, Burkholderia cepacia medium, and Burkholderia pseudomallei selective agar for clinical isolation of Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Sharon J; Chieng, Grace; Cheng, Allen C; Dance, David A B; Amornchai, Premjit; Wongsuvan, Gumphol; Teerawattanasook, Nittaya; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Day, Nicholas P J; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn

    2005-10-01

    Ashdown's medium, Burkholderia pseudomallei selective agar (BPSA), and a commercial Burkholderia cepacia medium were compared for their abilities to grow B. pseudomallei from 155 clinical specimens that proved positive for this organism. The sensitivity of each was equivalent; the selectivity of BPSA was lower than that of Ashdown's or B. cepacia medium.

  16. Passive Endwall Treatments for Enhancing Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    These lecture notes were presented at the von Karman Institutes lecture series on Advances in Axial Compressor Aerodynamics, May 2006. They provide a fairly extensive overview of what's been learned from numerous investigations of various passive casing endwall technologies that have been proposed for alleviating the stall limiting physics associated with the compressor endwall flow field. The lecture notes are organized to give an appreciation for the inventiveness and understanding of the earliest compressor technologists and to provide a coherent thread of understanding that has arisen out of the early investigations. As such the lecture notes begin with a historical overview of casing treatments from their infancy through the earliest proposed concepts involving blowing, suction and flow recirculation. A summary of lessons learned from these early investigations is provided at the end of this section. The lecture notes then provide a somewhat more in-depth overview of recent advancements in the development of passive casing treatments from the late 1990's through 2006, including advancements in understanding the flow mechanism of circumferential groove casing treatments, and the development of discrete tip injection and self-recirculating casing treatments. At the conclusion of the lecture notes a final summary of lessons learned throughout the history of the development of passive casing treatments is provided. Finally, a list of future needs is given. It is hoped that these lecture notes will be a useful reference for future research endeavors to improve our understanding of the fluid physics of passive casing treatments and how they act to enhance compressor stability, and that they will perhaps provide a springboard for future research activities in this area of interest

  17. Passivation-free solid state battery

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M.; Peramunage, Dharmasena

    1998-01-01

    This invention pertains to passivation-free solid-state rechargeable batteries composed of Li.sub.4 Ti.sub.5 O.sub.12 anode, a solid polymer electrolyte and a high voltage cathode. The solid polymer electrolyte comprises a polymer host, such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(vinyl chloride), poly(vinyl sulfone), and poly(vinylidene fluoride), plasticized by a solution of a Li salt in an organic solvent. The high voltage cathode includes LiMn.sub.2 O.sub.4, LiCoO.sub.2, LiNiO.sub.2 and LiV.sub.2 O.sub.5 and their derivatives.

  18. Passivation-free solid state battery

    DOEpatents

    Abraham, K.M.; Peramunage, D.

    1998-06-16

    This invention pertains to passivation-free solid-state rechargeable batteries composed of Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} anode, a solid polymer electrolyte and a high voltage cathode. The solid polymer electrolyte comprises a polymer host, such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(vinyl chloride), poly(vinyl sulfone), and poly(vinylidene fluoride), plasticized by a solution of a Li salt in an organic solvent. The high voltage cathode includes LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, LiCoO{sub 2}, LiNiO{sub 2} and LiV{sub 2}O{sub 5} and their derivatives. 5 figs.

  19. Orion Passive Thermal: Control Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez-Hermandez, Angel; Miller, Stephen W.

    2009-01-01

    A general overview of the NASA Orion Passive Thermal Control System (PTCS) is presented. The topics include: 1) Orion in CxP Hierarchy; 2) General Orion Description/Orientation; and 3) Orion PTCS Overview.

  20. [Passive smoking. Effects on health].

    PubMed

    Trédaniel, J; Zalcman, G; Boffetta, P; Hirsch, A

    1993-05-15

    Passive smoking--also called involuntary or environmental smoking--is the exposure of non-smokers to the tobacco smoke released by smokers. The physico-chemical composition of tobacco smoke, and notably its contents in toxic and carcinogenic substances, is the same in the secondary stream between puffs as in the primary stream released by the smoker. The pathogenic effects of passive smoking are increasingly well known and accepted. A high incidence of respiratory tract infections and of chronic respiratory and asthmatic symptoms is observed in children. In adults, passive smoking seems to be one of the main risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Its repercussions on the respiratory tracts is difficult to evaluate, but there are marked by an increase of respiratory symptoms and perhaps of chronic obstructive lung diseases. Finally, it is now recognized that passive smoking is a major risk factor for primary lung cancer in non-smokers exposed to tobacco smoke. PMID:8235360

  1. Passivating metals on cracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mckay, D.L.

    1980-01-15

    Metals such as nickel, vanadium and iron contaminating a cracking catalyst are passivated by contacting the cracking catalyst under elevated temperature conditions with antimony selenide, antimony sulfide, antimony sulfate, bismuth selenide, bismuth sulfide, or bismuth phosphate.

  2. Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1987-07-14

    A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique. 7 figs.

  3. Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1987-01-01

    A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique.

  4. Passive Wake Vortex Control

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J M

    2001-10-18

    works by placing shape memory alloy (SMA) control surfaces on the submarine's diving planes and periodically oscillating them. The modulated control vortices generated by these surfaces interact with the tip vortices on the diving planes, causing an instability to rapidly occur. Though several numerical simulations have been presented, experimental verification does not appear to be available in the open literature. The authors address this problem through a concept called passive wake vortex control (PWVC), which has been demonstrated to rapidly break apart a trailing vortex wake and render it incoherent. PWVC functions by introducing unequal strength, counter-rotating control vortices next to the tip vortices. The presence of these control vortices destabilizes the vortex wake and produces a rapidly growing wake instability.

  5. Treating inertia in passive microbead rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indei, Tsutomu; Schieber, Jay D.; Córdoba, Andrés; Pilyugina, Ekaterina

    2012-02-01

    The dynamic modulus G* of a viscoelastic medium is often measured by following the trajectory of a small bead subject to Brownian motion in a method called “passive microbead rheology.” This equivalence between the positional autocorrelation function of the tracer bead and G* is assumed via the generalized Stokes-Einstein relation (GSER). However, inertia of both bead and medium are neglected in the GSER so that the analysis based on the GSER is not valid at high frequency where inertia is important. In this paper we show how to treat both contributions to inertia properly in one-bead passive microrheological analysis. A Maxwell fluid is studied as the simplest example of a viscoelastic fluid to resolve some apparent paradoxes of eliminating inertia. In the original GSER, the mean-square displacement (MSD) of the tracer bead does not satisfy the correct initial condition. If bead inertia is considered, the proper initial condition is realized, thereby indicating an importance of including inertia, but the MSD oscillates at a time regime smaller than the relaxation time of the fluid. This behavior is rather different from the original result of the GSER and what is observed. What is more, the discrepancy from the GSER result becomes worse with decreasing bead mass, and there is an anomalous gap between the MSD derived by naïvely taking the zero-mass limit in the equation of motion and the MSD for finite bead mass as indicated by McKinley [J. Rheol.JORHD20148-605510.1122/1.3238546 53, 1487 (2009)]. In this paper we show what is necessary to take the zero-mass limit of the bead safely and correctly without causing either the inertial oscillation or the anomalous gap, while obtaining the proper initial condition. The presence of a very small purely viscous element can be used to eliminate bead inertia safely once included in the GSER. We also show that if the medium contains relaxation times outside the window where the single-mode Maxwell behavior is observed

  6. Passivated ambipolar black phosphorus transistors.

    PubMed

    Yue, Dewu; Lee, Daeyeong; Jang, Young Dae; Choi, Min Sup; Nam, Hye Jin; Jung, Duk-Young; Yoo, Won Jong

    2016-07-01

    We report the first air-passivated ambipolar BP transistor formed by applying benzyl viologen, which serves as a surface charge transfer donor for BP flakes. The passivated BP devices exhibit excellent stability under both an ambient atmosphere and vacuum; their transistor performance is maintained semi-permanently. Unlike their intrinsic p-type properties, passivated BP devices present advantageous ambipolar properties with much higher electron mobility up to ∼83 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) from 2-terminal measurement at 300 K, compared to other reported studies on n-type BP transistors. On the basis of the n-type doping effect that originated from benzyl viologen, we also systematically investigated the BP thickness dependence of our devices on electrical properties, in which we found the best electron transport performance to be attained when an ∼10 nm thick BP flake was used. PMID:27283027

  7. Passivation of high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The surface of high temperature superconductors such as YBa2Cu3O(7-x) are passivated by reacting the native Y, Ba and Cu metal ions with an anion such as sulfate or oxalate to form a surface film that is impervious to water and has a solubility in water of no more than 10(exp -3) M. The passivating treatment is preferably conducted by immersing the surface in dilute aqueous acid solution since more soluble species dissolve into the solution. The treatment does not degrade the superconducting properties of the bulk material.

  8. The anodic passivation of lithium

    SciTech Connect

    James, S.D.

    1983-10-01

    The anodic passivation of Li has been characterized at room temperature in a variety of electrolytes (propylene carbonate, thionyl chloride, sulfur dioxide), as a function of convection and current density and in the presence of water and other impurities. In thionyl chloride the effect of salt concentration (0.5-4.5M, LiA1C1/sub 4/) and acidity (0.5-3M, A1C1/sub 3/) has been studied. The evidence accumulated suggests that anodic passivation is caused by anodic enrichment and eventual precipitation of electrolyte salt in superficial anolyte.

  9. Hypermedia as medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dede, Christopher J.

    1990-01-01

    Claims and rebuttals that hypermedia (the associative, nonlinear interconnection of multimedia materials) is a fundamentally innovative means of thinking and communicating are described. This representational architecture has many advantages that make it a major advance over other media; however, it also has several intrinsic problems that severly limits its effectiveness as a medium. These advantages and limits in applications are discussed.

  10. Holographic recording medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gange, Robert Allen (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A holographic recording medium comprising a conductive substrate, a photoconductive layer and an electrically alterable layer of a linear, low molecular weight hydrocarbon polymer has improved fatigue resistance. An acrylic barrier layer can be interposed between the photoconductive and electrically alterable layers.

  11. Measuring freely dissolved water concentrations of PCBs using LDPE passive samplers and performance reference compounds (PRCs)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low-Density polyethylene (LDPE) sheets are often used as passive samplers for aquatic environmental monitoring to measure the dissolved concentrations of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). These concentrations are then used to evaluate the potential for ecological and human...

  12. User's guide for polyethylene-based passive diffusion bag samplers to obtain volatile organic compound concentrations in wells. Part I, Deployment, recovery, data interpretation, and quality control and assurance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.

    2001-01-01

    Diffusion samplers installed in observation wells were found to be capable of yielding representative water samples for chlorinated volatile organic compounds. The samplers consisted of polyethylene bags containing deionized water and relied on diffusion of chlorinated volatile organic compounds through the polyethylene membrane. The known ability of polyethylene to transmit other volatile compounds, such as benzene and toluene, indicates that the samplers can be used for a variety of volatile organic compounds. In wells at the study area, the volatile organic compound concentrations in water samples obtained using the samplers without prior purging were similar to concentrations in water samples obtained from the respective wells using traditional purging and sampling approaches. The low cost associated with this approach makes it a viable option for monitoring large observation-well networks for volatile organic compounds.

  13. The Passive Aggressive Conflict Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitson, Signe

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the Passive Aggressive Conflict Cycle (PACC) helps observers to be able to look beyond behavior and better understand what is occurring beneath the surface. This article presents a real-life example of a seemingly minor conflict between a teacher and child that elicited an apparent major overreaction by the adult. Also provided is a…

  14. Orion Passive Thermal Control Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    An viewgraph presentation of Orion's passive thermal control system is shown. The topics include: 1) Orion in CxP Hierarchy; 2) General Orion Description/Orientation; 3) Module Descriptions and Images; 4) Orion PTCS Overview; 5) Requirements/Interfaces; 6) Design Reference Missions; 7) Natural Environments; 8) Thermal Models; 9) Challenges/Issues; and 10) Testing

  15. Monitored passive-solar buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. W.

    1982-06-01

    Selected performance results from six monitored passive and hybrid solar heated buildings are presented. These employ: a two story trombe wall; a thermosyphoning solar air heater with rock bin storage; a greenhouse; a composite concrete and water trombe wall; two story sunspace; and, for a mobile/modular home, direct gain and roof pond.

  16. Thoracoscopic surgery support system using passive RFID marker.

    PubMed

    Takahata, Hiromi; Kojima, Fumitsugu; Okada, Minoru; Sugiura, Tadao; Sato, Toshihiko; Oshiro, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a RFID based thoracoscopic surgery support system, which is capable of marking a tumor inside organ tissue. The marker composed of small RFID-tags is implanted in the vicinity of tumor found in the endoscopy test. In the thoracoscopic surgery operation for removing the tumor, an RFID detector determines the accurate position of the implanted RFID-tag markers by measuring the strength of the signal emitted from the target tag. Due to limitation in the size of RFID-tag, the proposed system employs a passive RFID. To activate the passive tag implanted in the organ tissue, this paper designs a saddle-shape efficient power supply antenna. A sensitive and frequency-selective receiver is then designed for detecting the weak signal from the tag. The feasibility test confirms that the proposed method is capable of determining the accurate location of RFID tags implanted in the patient's organ tissue.

  17. Evaluation of passive samplers with neutral or ion-exchange polymer coatings to determine freely dissolved concentrations of the basic surfactant lauryl diethanolamine: Measurements of acid dissociation constant and organic carbon-water sorption coefficient.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Chen, Yi; Hermens, Joop L M; Droge, Steven T J

    2013-11-01

    A passive sampler tool (solid-phase microextraction, SPME) was optimized to measure freely dissolved concentrations (Cw,free) of lauryl diethanolamine (C12-DEA). C12-DEA can be protonated and act as a cationic surfactant. From the pH-dependent sorption to neutral SPME coatings (polyacrylate and PDMS), a pKa of 8.7 was calculated, which differs more than two units from the value of 6.4 reported elsewhere. Polyacrylate coated SPME could not adequately sample largely protonated C12-DEA in humic acid solutions of pH 6. A new hydrophobic SPME coating with cation-exchange properties (C18/SCX) sorbed C12-DEA 100 fold stronger than polyacrylate, because it specifically sorbs protonated C12-DEA species. The C18/SCX-SPME fiber showed linear calibration isotherms in a concentration range of <1 nM-1 μM (well below the CMC). Using the C18/SCX-SPME fibers, linear sorption isotherms to Aldrich humic acid at pH 6 (ionic strength 0.015 M) were measured over a broad concentration range with a sorption coefficient of 10(5.3).

  18. Passivated ambipolar black phosphorus transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Dewu; Lee, Daeyeong; Jang, Young Dae; Choi, Min Sup; Nam, Hye Jin; Jung, Duk-Young; Yoo, Won Jong

    2016-06-01

    We report the first air-passivated ambipolar BP transistor formed by applying benzyl viologen, which serves as a surface charge transfer donor for BP flakes. The passivated BP devices exhibit excellent stability under both an ambient atmosphere and vacuum; their transistor performance is maintained semi-permanently. Unlike their intrinsic p-type properties, passivated BP devices present advantageous ambipolar properties with much higher electron mobility up to ~83 cm2 V-1 s-1 from 2-terminal measurement at 300 K, compared to other reported studies on n-type BP transistors. On the basis of the n-type doping effect that originated from benzyl viologen, we also systematically investigated the BP thickness dependence of our devices on electrical properties, in which we found the best electron transport performance to be attained when an ~10 nm thick BP flake was used.We report the first air-passivated ambipolar BP transistor formed by applying benzyl viologen, which serves as a surface charge transfer donor for BP flakes. The passivated BP devices exhibit excellent stability under both an ambient atmosphere and vacuum; their transistor performance is maintained semi-permanently. Unlike their intrinsic p-type properties, passivated BP devices present advantageous ambipolar properties with much higher electron mobility up to ~83 cm2 V-1 s-1 from 2-terminal measurement at 300 K, compared to other reported studies on n-type BP transistors. On the basis of the n-type doping effect that originated from benzyl viologen, we also systematically investigated the BP thickness dependence of our devices on electrical properties, in which we found the best electron transport performance to be attained when an ~10 nm thick BP flake was used. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Transfer characteristics of BP field effect transistors (BV1-BV4) (Fig. S1 and S2 and Table S1); output characteristics of BP field effect transistors in different directions (Fig. S3

  19. Antenna for passive RFID tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Cristea, Ionica; Grosu, Neculai; Vladescu, Marian; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    Minuscule devices, called RFID tags are attached to objects and persons and emit information which positioned readers may capture wirelessly. Many methods of identification have been used, but that of most common is to use a unique serial number for identification of person or object. RFID tags can be characterized as either active or passive [1,2]. Traditional passive tags are typically in "sleep" state until awakened by the reader's emitted field. In passive tags, the reader's field acts to charge the capacitor that powers the badge and this can be a combination of antenna and barcodes obtained with SAW( Surface Acoustic Wave) devices [1,2,3] . The antenna in an RFID tag is a conductive element that permits the tag to exchange data with the reader. The paper contribution are targeted to antenna for passive RFID tags. The electromagnetic field generated by the reader is somehow oriented by the reader antenna and power is induced in the tag only if the orientation of the tag antenna is appropriate. A tag placed orthogonal to the reader yield field will not be read. This is the reason that guided manufacturers to build circular polarized antenna capable of propagating a field that is alternatively polarized on all planes passing on the diffusion axis. Passive RFID tags are operated at the UHF frequencies of 868MHz (Europe) and 915MHz (USA) and at the microwave frequencies of 2,45 GHz and 5,8 GHz . Because the tags are small dimensions, in paper, we present the possibility to use circular polarization microstrip antenna with fractal edge [2].

  20. Genotoxic risk of passive smoking.

    PubMed

    Bos, R P; Henderson, P T

    1984-01-01

    More than 60 chemical components are identified in cigarette smoke which have shown to be carcinogenic. The presence of these chemicals is established in mainstream smoke. However, many of them also appear in sidestream smoke resulting in pollution of indoor air, as is shown by the presence of mutagenic substances. Some rather potent carcinogens like N-nitroso-dimethylamine and benzo(a)pyrene have been established in the air of smoke filled rooms. Only a few studies describe internal exposure of passive smokers. Deposition of sidestream smoke in the human respiratory tract has been established for passive smokers. On the other hand, it was shown that inhalation of air contaminated with sidestream smoke results in an increase in the urinary excretion of products mutagenic in the Salmonella/microsome assay. Three epidemiological studies showed an increased risk of lung cancer for non-smoking wives having smoking husbands. Since it is generally acknowledged that most of the genotoxic carcinogens can be detected by in vitro mutagenicity tests, mutagenicity in urine of passive smokers can be considered as an indication of exposure to carcinogens. This observation suggests that there is a causality in the association between increased cancer risk and passive smoking as was found in three epidemiological studies. It is generally accepted that genotoxic chemicals exert their effects in direct proportion to the level of exposure, which means that for these agents no safe thresholds can be established. Several studies clearly show the presence of genotoxic substances in indoor air as a consequence of smoking. Therefore, the outcome of the epidemiological studies is not surprising. As long as half of the human population persists in smoking, the problems of involuntary inhalation of genotoxic substances will continue for the other half. Strategies to control the environmental cancer problem can only be successful if the health hazards of passive smoking are taken seriously.

  1. Passive Detection of Narrowband Sources Using a Sensor Array

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D H; Candy, J V; Guidry, B L

    2007-10-24

    In this report we derive a model for a highly scattering medium, implemented as a set of MATLAB functions. This model is used to analyze an approach for using time-reversal to enhance the detection of a single frequency source in a highly scattering medium. The basic approach is to apply the singular value decomposition to the multistatic response matrix for a time-reversal array system. We then use the array in a purely passive mode, measuring the response to the presence of a source. The measured response is projected onto the singular vectors, creating a time-reversal pseudo-spectrum. We can then apply standard detection techniques to the pseudo-spectrum to determine the presence of a source. If the source is close to a particular scatterer in the medium, then we would expect an enhancement of the inner product between the array response to the source with the singular vector associated with that scatterer. In this note we begin by deriving the Foldy-Lax model of a highly scattering medium, calculate both the field emitted by the source and the multistatic response matrix of a time-reversal array system in the medium, then describe the initial analysis approach.

  2. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  3. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-13

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

  4. Passive fathometer reflector identification with phase shift modeling.

    PubMed

    Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni; Gerstoft, Peter

    2016-07-01

    In passive fathometer processing, the presence of wavelets in the estimate of the medium's Green's function corresponds to the location of reflectors in the seabed; amplitudes are related to seabed properties. Bayesian methods have been successful in identifying reflectors that define layer interfaces. Further work, however, revealed that phase shifts are occasionally present in the wavelets and hinder accurate layer identification for some reflectors. With a Gibbs sampler that computes probability densities of reflector depths, strengths of the reflections, and wavelet phase shifts, the significance of phase shift modeling in successful estimation of reflectors and their strengths is demonstrated. PMID:27475201

  5. Passivation Of High-Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    Surfaces of high-temperature superconductors passivated with native iodides, sulfides, or sulfates formed by chemical treatments after superconductors grown. Passivating compounds nearly insoluble in and unreactive with water and protect underlying superconductors from effects of moisture. Layers of cuprous iodide and of barium sulfate grown. Other candidate passivating surface films: iodides and sulfides of bismuth, strontium, and thallium. Other proposed techniques for formation of passivating layers include deposition and gas-phase reaction.

  6. Passive immunization of pigeons against trichomoniasis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.M.

    1970-01-01

    Nonimmune homing pigeons Columba livia were infected with the Jones' Barn strain of Trichomonas gallinae and subsequently transfused with plasma from acute or chronically infected pigeons harboring one of 3 different strains of T. gallinae. The transfusions were either a single 2 mi dose given one day after inoculation or three 1 ml doses given 0, 5, and 10 days after inoculation. Plasma from pigeons harboring any of the 3 strains was capable of passively immunizing nonimmune birds. All birds which were immunized with plasma from infected pigeons survived until killed at the end of the test period and no visceral lesions were found on necropsy but trichomonads were present in the oropharynx. All controls (untreated or transfused with normal plasma) died of visceral trichomoniasis. Immune plasma produced some lysis of trichomonads in vitro, and inhibition of motility and vacuolization occurred in some of the non-lysed organisms. The overall lytic activity in vitro affected less than 10% of the suspended trichomonads.

  7. [General environmental pollutants and passive smoking].

    PubMed

    Meister, R

    1990-02-01

    Epidemiological studies-especially data from smog episodes-indicate that antropogenous outdoor air pollution exercises a deleterious effect on health and particularly on the respiratory organs. Controlled exposure test in animals and man confirm this. The main pollutants are SO2, suspended dust particles (dust aerosols or solid atmospheric condensation nuclei) as well as NO2 (NOx) and O3. The adverse influence of quite a number of meteorological factors such as low temperature and inversion cannot be denied. During smog conditions in January 1985 in the Federal Republic of Germany there was a highly significant negative correlation between atmospheric temperature and the rate of exacerbations of bronchitis. Indoor air pollution is gaining in importance. Airtight sealing of buildings associated with reduced indoor ventilation results in novel health upsets ("sick building syndrome"). Interiors are characterised by an accumulation of CO2, CO, NO2, dust aerosols and various organic substances such as benzene, benzypyrene, formaldehyde, nitrosamines etc. Cigarette smoke is a frequent cause of indoor air pollution. The possible unhealthy effects of passive smoking (mainly the inhalation of sidestream smoke) have been frequently studied. Infants of smoking parents are more often affected by respiratory diseases than non-exposed children. The same applies to schoolchildren: the incidence of bronchial signs and symptoms increases with increasing smoke consumptions of the parents. However, no definitely established effect on lung function has been seen in children, adults and asthmatics. The important question as to whether passive smoking increases lung cancer risk is still a subject of controversial discussion among experts. PMID:2195521

  8. New England style passive solar

    SciTech Connect

    Kriescher, P.

    2000-06-01

    There are homeowners throughout New England who planned for and built homes that allow them to avoid the sting of winter's high heating bills. These climate-responsive homes rely on passive solar heating, cooling and lighting. An example of such a climate-responsive/passive solar house is the home that Arthur and Terry Becker build on 6 beautiful acres (2.4 hectares) of rolling farm and woodland southeast of Andover, Connecticut, in 1981. They worked very closely with their designer, Al Eggan of K.T. Lear and Associates, to ensure that they would never have to pay for home heating oil, and that they would enjoy a level of year-round comfort that they had not experienced in conventionally built homes.

  9. All-passive nonreciprocal metastructure

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Davoyan, Arthur R.; Engheta, Nader

    2015-01-01

    One-way propagation of light, analogous to the directional flow of electrons in the presence of electric potential difference, has been an important goal in the wave–matter interaction. Breaking time-reversal symmetry in photonic flows is faced with challenges different from those for electron flows. In recent years several approaches and methods have been offered towards achieving this goal. Here we investigate another systematic approach to design all-passive relatively high-throughput metastructures that exhibit nonreciprocal properties and achieve wave-flow isolation. Moreover, we build on those findings and propose a paradigm for a quasi-two-dimensional metastructure that mimics the nonreciprocal property of Faraday rotation without using any magnetic or electric biasing. We envision that the proposed approaches may serve as a building block for all-passive time-reversal symmetry breaking with potential applications for future nonreciprocal systems and devices PMID:26414528

  10. The Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferlet, Roger

    Substantial progress in the field of the Local Interstellar Medium has been largely due to recent launches of space missions, mostly in the UV and X-ray domains, but also to ground-based observations, mainly in high resolution spectroscopy. However, a clear gap seems to remain between the wealth of new data and the theoretical understanding. This paper gives an overview of some observational aspects, with no attempt of completeness or doing justice to all the people involved in the field. As progress rarely evolves in straight paths, we can expect that our present picture of the solar system surroundings is not definitive.

  11. Passive immunization in murine mucormycosis.

    PubMed

    Waldorf, A R; Halde, C; Vedros, N A

    1983-11-25

    Antibody raised in mice against mycelial homogenates of Rhizomucor pusillus was effective in passive immunization against pulmonary and disseminated mucormycosis (phycomycosis) in immunocompromised mice. Mice intranasally inoculated and infected with Rh. pusillus and treated with antisera had a statistically significant increased resistance to infection and a diminished secondary dissemination of viable fungal fragments. Histological examination of infected lung tissues showed that antibody treated animals were apparently able to degrade hyphal fragments.

  12. Passive Neutron Detection at Borders

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Ely, James H.; Keller, Paul E.; McConn, Ronald J.

    2008-03-01

    Radiation portal monitor systems have been deployed to screen for illicit trafficking of radioactive materials at international border crossings. This report reviews some of the neutron detection requirements and capabilities of passive detection systems used for such applications. Simulations show the effects of cargo materials on neutron spectra, different detector geometries, using a large-array of neutron detectors, and the effects of backgrounds including “ship effect” neutrons.

  13. Active and Passive Hybrid Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carswell, James R.

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid ocean wind sensor (HOWS) can map ocean vector wind in low to hurricane-level winds, and non-precipitating and precipitating conditions. It can acquire active and passive measurements through a single aperture at two wavelengths, two polarizations, and multiple incidence angles. Its low profile, compact geometry, and low power consumption permits installation on air craft platforms, including high-altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

  14. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and European Space Agency (ESA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. It is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The primary objective of this effort is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys.

  15. A holidic medium for Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Piper, Matthew D W; Blanc, Eric; Leitão-Gonçalves, Ricardo; Yang, Mingyao; He, Xiaoli; Linford, Nancy J; Hoddinott, Matthew P; Hopfen, Corinna; Soultoukis, George A; Niemeyer, Christine; Kerr, Fiona; Pletcher, Scott D; Ribeiro, Carlos; Partridge, Linda

    2014-01-01

    A critical requirement for research using model organisms is a well-defined and consistent diet. There is currently no complete chemically defined (holidic) diet available for Drosophila melanogaster. We describe a holidic medium that is equal in performance to an oligidic diet optimized for adult fecundity and lifespan. This holidic diet supports development over multiple generations but at a reduced rate. Over 7 years of experiments, the holidic diet yielded more consistent experimental outcomes than did oligidic food for egg laying by females. Nutrients and drugs were more available to flies in holidic medium and, similar to dietary restriction on oligidic food, amino acid dilution increased fly lifespan. We used this holidic medium to investigate amino acid-specific effects on food-choice behavior and report that folic acid from the microbiota is sufficient for Drosophila development.

  16. Interior design for passive solar homes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, J. C.

    1981-07-01

    The increasing emphasis on refinement of passive solar systems brought recognition to interior design as an integral part of passive solar architecture. Interior design can be used as a finetuning tool minimizing many of the problems associated with passive solar energy use in residential buildings. In addition, treatment of interior space in solar model homes may be a prime factor in determining sales success. A new style of interior design is evolving in response to changes in building from incorporating passive solar design features. The psychology behind passive solar architecture is reflected in interiors, and selection of interior components increasingly depends on the functional suitably of various interior elements.

  17. Interior design for passive solar homes

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, J. C.

    1981-07-01

    The increasing emphasis on refinement of passive solar systems has brought recognition to interior design as an integral part of passive solar architecture. Interior design can be used as a finetuning tool minimizing many of the problems associated with passive solar energy use in residential buildings. In addition, treatment of interior space in solar model homes may be a prime factor in determining sales success. A new style of interior design is evolving in response to changes in building form incorporating passive solar design features. The psychology behind passive solar architecture is reflected in interiors, and selection of interior components increasingly depends on the functional suitability of various interior elements.

  18. Passivation effects on quantum dots prepared by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qilin; Maloney, Scott; Chen, Weimin; Poudyal, Uma; Wang, Wenyong

    2016-06-01

    ZnS is typically used to passivate semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) prepared by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method for solar cell applications, while for colloidal QDs, organic ligands are usually used for this passivation purpose. In this study we utilized oleylamine and oleic acid ligands, besides ZnS, to passivate QDs prepared by the SILAR approach, and investigated their effects on the incident photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE) performance of the solar cells. It was observed that oleylamine passivation decreased device performance, while oleic acid passivation improved the IPCE of the cells. Redshift of the IPCE onset wavelength was also observed after oleic acid coating, which was attributed to the delocalization of excitons in the CdS QDs. PMID:27103144

  19. Evaluation of Alternate Surface Passivation Methods (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E

    2005-05-31

    Stainless steel containers were assembled from parts passivated by four commercial vendors using three passivation methods. The performance of these containers in storing hydrogen isotope mixtures was evaluated by monitoring the composition of initially 50% H{sub 2} 50% D{sub 2} gas with time using mass spectroscopy. Commercial passivation by electropolishing appears to result in surfaces that do not catalyze hydrogen isotope exchange. This method of surface passivation shows promise for tritium service, and should be studied further and considered for use. On the other hand, nitric acid passivation and citric acid passivation may not result in surfaces that do not catalyze the isotope exchange reaction H{sub 2} + D{sub 2} {yields} 2HD. These methods should not be considered to replace the proprietary passivation processes of the two current vendors used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility.

  20. DENSE MEDIUM CYCLONE OPTIMIZATON

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald H. Luttrell; Chris J. Barbee; Peter J. Bethell; Chris J. Wood

    2005-06-30

    Dense medium cyclones (DMCs) are known to be efficient, high-tonnage devices suitable for upgrading particles in the 50 to 0.5 mm size range. This versatile separator, which uses centrifugal forces to enhance the separation of fine particles that cannot be upgraded in static dense medium separators, can be found in most modern coal plants and in a variety of mineral plants treating iron ore, dolomite, diamonds, potash and lead-zinc ores. Due to the high tonnage, a small increase in DMC efficiency can have a large impact on plant profitability. Unfortunately, the knowledge base required to properly design and operate DMCs has been seriously eroded during the past several decades. In an attempt to correct this problem, a set of engineering tools have been developed to allow producers to improve the efficiency of their DMC circuits. These tools include (1) low-cost density tracers that can be used by plant operators to rapidly assess DMC performance, (2) mathematical process models that can be used to predict the influence of changes in operating and design variables on DMC performance, and (3) an expert advisor system that provides plant operators with a user-friendly interface for evaluating, optimizing and trouble-shooting DMC circuits. The field data required to develop these tools was collected by conducting detailed sampling and evaluation programs at several industrial plant sites. These data were used to demonstrate the technical, economic and environmental benefits that can be realized through the application of these engineering tools.

  1. Effect of passivator on Cu form transformation in pig manure aerobic composting and application in soil.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Peng-Zhen; Chen, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Hui; Fu, Jie

    2015-10-01

    A sequential extraction approach was used to evaluate the effects of various combinations of passivators (sepiolite, phosphate rock, and coal fly ash) on the concentration and speciation of Cu in swine manure aerobic compost along with soil to which the compost had been applied. The results indicate that the various passivators altered the bound forms of Cu in pig manure and soil; the concentrations of exchangeable and Fe-Mn-bound Cu decreased, whereas the residual Cu concentration increased, indicating that Cu transformed to low-availability forms after the passivator treatments. The concentrations of the carbonate-bound and organic-bound Cu varied widely. Among all treatments, the treatment of the control + straw + sepiolite + coal fly ash (2.5 %) + phosphate rock (5.0 %) resulted in the most efficient passivation of Cu; the percentage of residual Cu reached 3.91-21.14 %, obviously surpassing the percentage for the control without passivation. The treatment of the control + straw + sepiolite + phosphate rock (2.5 %) resulted in the lowest residual Cu fraction (0.85 %) among passivator treatments. These results show that the addition of suitable combinations of passivators to the composting process reduced the availability of Cu and the risk of Cu pollution during the application of composted pig manure to soil. Passivation also decreased the Cu content of Apium graveolens.

  2. Effect of passivator on Cu form transformation in pig manure aerobic composting and application in soil.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Peng-Zhen; Chen, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Hui; Fu, Jie

    2015-10-01

    A sequential extraction approach was used to evaluate the effects of various combinations of passivators (sepiolite, phosphate rock, and coal fly ash) on the concentration and speciation of Cu in swine manure aerobic compost along with soil to which the compost had been applied. The results indicate that the various passivators altered the bound forms of Cu in pig manure and soil; the concentrations of exchangeable and Fe-Mn-bound Cu decreased, whereas the residual Cu concentration increased, indicating that Cu transformed to low-availability forms after the passivator treatments. The concentrations of the carbonate-bound and organic-bound Cu varied widely. Among all treatments, the treatment of the control + straw + sepiolite + coal fly ash (2.5 %) + phosphate rock (5.0 %) resulted in the most efficient passivation of Cu; the percentage of residual Cu reached 3.91-21.14 %, obviously surpassing the percentage for the control without passivation. The treatment of the control + straw + sepiolite + phosphate rock (2.5 %) resulted in the lowest residual Cu fraction (0.85 %) among passivator treatments. These results show that the addition of suitable combinations of passivators to the composting process reduced the availability of Cu and the risk of Cu pollution during the application of composted pig manure to soil. Passivation also decreased the Cu content of Apium graveolens. PMID:25982987

  3. H2O2: a Ca(2+) or Mg(2+)-sensing function in statin passive diffusion.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Yves Claude; Lethier, Lydie; André, Claire

    2015-09-01

    In a previous paper Guillaume's group demonstrated that magnesium (Mg(2+) concentration range 0.00-2.60 mm) increased the passive diffusion of statins and thus played a role in their potential toxicity. In order to confirm an increase in this passive diffusion by divalent salt cations, the role of calcium chloride (CaCl2) on the statin-immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) association was studied. It was demonstrated that calcium supplementation (Ca(2+) concentration range 0.00-3.25 mm) increases the statin passive diffusion. In addition, it was shown that the Ca(2+) effect on the statin-IAM association is higher than that of Mg(2+). These results show that Ca(2+) enhances the passive diffusion of drugs into biological membranes and thus their potential toxicity. Also, addition of H2O2 to the medium showed a hyperbolic response for the statin passive diffusion and this effect was enhanced for the highest Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) concentrations in the medium. H2O2 is likely to interact with the polar head groups of the IAM through dipole-dipole interactions. The conformational changes in H2O2-IAM result in a higher degree of exposure of hydrophobic areas, thus explaining why the binding of pravastatin, which showed the lowest logP value, was less affected by H2O2. This result shows the significant contribution of H2O2 and thus the oxidative stress on the statin passive diffusion. Much of the sensitivity derives from the action of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+), in turn supported the idea that H2O2 may serve a Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) sensing function in statin passive diffusion.

  4. Gibbs free energy assisted passivation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salihoglu, Omer; Tansel, T.; Hostut, M.; Ergun, Y.; Aydinli, A.

    2016-05-01

    Reduction of surface leakage is a major challenge in most photodetectors that requires the elimination of surface oxides on etched mesas during passivation. Engineering the passivation requires close attention to chemical reactions that take place at the interface during the process. In particular, removal of surface oxides may be controlled via Gibbs reactivity. We have compared electrical performance of type-II superlattice photodetectors, designed for MWIR operation, passivated by different passivation techniques. We have used ALD deposited Al2O3, HfO2, TiO2, ZnO, PECVD deposited SiO2, Si3N4 and sulphur containing octadecanethiol (ODT) selfassembled monolayers (SAM) passivation layers on InAs/GaSb p-i-n superlattice photodetectors with cutoff wavelength at 5.1 μm. In this work, we have compared the result of different passivation techniques which are done under same conditions, same epitaxial structure and same fabrication processes. We have found that ALD deposited passivation is directly related to the Gibbs free energy of the passivation material. Gibbs free energies of the passivation layer can directly be compared with native surface oxides to check the effectiveness of the passivation layer before the experimental study.

  5. Germanium oxide removal by citric acid and thiol passivation from citric acid-terminated Ge(100).

    PubMed

    Collins, Gillian; Aureau, Damien; Holmes, Justin D; Etcheberry, Arnaud; O'Dwyer, Colm

    2014-12-01

    Many applications of germanium (Ge) are underpinned by effective oxide removal and surface passivation. This important surface treatment step often requires H-X (X = Cl, Br, I) or HF etchants. Here, we show that aqueous citric acid solutions are effective in the removal of GeOx. The stability of citric acid-treated Ge(100) is compared to HF and HCl treated surfaces and analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Further Ge surface passivation was investigated by thiolation using alkane monothiols and dithiols. The organic passivation layers show good stability with no oxide regrowth observed after 3 days of ambient exposure.

  6. Passive microwave soil moisture research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Oneill, P. E.; Wang, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The AgRISTARS Soil Moisture Project has made significant progress in the quantification of microwave sensor capabilities for soil moisture remote sensing. The 21-cm wavelength has been verified to be the best single channel for radiometric observations of soil moisture. It has also been found that other remote sensing approaches used in conjunction with L-band passive data are more successful than multiple wavelength microwave radiometry in this application. AgRISTARS studies have also improved current understanding of noise factors affecting the interpretability of microwave emission data. The absorption of soil emission by vegetation has been quantified, although this effect is less important than absorption effects for microwave radiometry.

  7. Passive motion reduces vestibular balance and perceptual responses

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Richard C; Watson, Shaun R D

    2015-01-01

    With the hypothesis that vestibular sensitivity is regulated to deal with a range of environmental motion conditions, we explored the effects of passive whole-body motion on vestibular perceptual and balance responses. In 10 subjects, vestibular responses were measured before and after a period of imposed passive motion. Vestibulospinal balance reflexes during standing evoked by galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) were measured as shear reaction forces. Perceptual tests measured thresholds for detecting angular motion, perceptions of suprathreshold rotation and perceptions of GVS-evoked illusory rotation. The imposed conditioning motion was 10 min of stochastic yaw rotation (0.5–2.5 Hz ≤ 300 deg s−2) with subjects seated. This conditioning markedly reduced reflexive and perceptual responses. The medium latency galvanic reflex (300–350 ms) was halved in amplitude (48%; P = 0.011) but the short latency response was unaffected. Thresholds for detecting imposed rotation more than doubled (248%; P < 0.001) and remained elevated after 30 min. Over-estimation of whole-body rotation (30–180 deg every 5 s) before conditioning was significantly reduced (41.1 to 21.5%; P = 0.033). Conditioning reduced illusory vestibular sensations of rotation evoked by GVS (mean 113 deg for 10 s at 1 mA) by 44% (P < 0.01) and the effect persisted for at least 1 h (24% reduction; P < 0.05). We conclude that a system of vestibular sensory autoregulation exists and that this probably involves central and peripheral mechanisms, possibly through vestibular efferent regulation. We propose that failure of these regulatory mechanisms at different levels could lead to disorders of movement perception and balance control during standing. Key points Human activity exposes the vestibular organs to a wide dynamic range of motion. We aimed to discover whether the CNS regulates sensitivity to vestibular afference during exposure to ambient motion. Balance and perceptual

  8. Gap between active and passive solar heating

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The gap between active and passive solar could hardly be wider. The reasons for this are discussed and advantages to narrowing the gap are analyzed. Ten years of experience in both active and passive systems are reviewed, including costs, frequent problems, performance prediction, performance modeling, monitoring, and cooling concerns. Trends are analyzed, both for solar space heating and for service water heating. A tendency for the active and passive technologies to be converging is observed. Several recommendations for narrowing the gap are presented.

  9. Passive solar in China: traditional and new

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J D; Balcomb, S A

    1986-04-01

    The authors' observations of a tradition of passive solar architecture in northern China are described. Tendencies for modern buildings to depart from this tradition are noted. Major passive solar research programs are discussed and experimental buildings are illustrated. It is concluded that the Chinese could realize a major advantage by combining their strong tradition of passive solar architecture with modern insulation methods and improved glazing systems.

  10. Passive component manufacturing in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The serious downturn of optical fiber communication industry in the past three years speeds up the consolidation of passive component manufacturing. Automation activity and investment stopped due to no driving force from the volume demand. A lot of skillful but low cost labors must be needed in the future for manufacturing when the demand comes back. Except MEMS based VOA, most of components based on advanced technology seem to get delayed in most applications. Furthermore, the highly integrated products are also delayed and become uncertain, especially AWG technology. Most of the manufacturing of passive components already moved or are moving to Asia especially China. Browave already built its manufacturing factory and is almost doing all the manufacturing in Zhong Shan. Browave tries to optimize the value of Taiwan plus China, i.e., Tawan provides superior management system, quality systems and manufacturing engineering support where China provides a lot of skillful but low cost labors. Browave is now not only providing the basic elements like Couplers, Isolators, TFF add/drop filter, Thin Film based GFF (Gain Flattened Filters), but also providing "Dedicated Lines" for the components/modules/subsystems for the players who need the value as mentioned above.

  11. Applications of passivated silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung, Richard; Park, Chan Ho

    2012-03-01

    We can postulate that dark matter are WIMPS, more specifically, Majorana particles called neutralinos floating through space. Upon neutralino-neutralino annihilation, they create a greater burst of other particles into space: these being all kinds of particles including anti-deuterons which are the indications of the existence of dark matter. For the study of the applications of passivated silicon detectors, this paper shows following procedures in two categories. Painting on little pieces of silicon (Polyimid and Boxcar Red) :Took clean paint brush and painted on Polyimid and Boxcar red samples onto little pieces of sample silicon and dried for a certain number of hours in different conditions. Cooling test : usually done in 7 cycles, cool until usually -35 degrees or -40 degrees Celsius with thermoelectric cooler, dry out, evapate the moisture in the fume hood, take pictures with the microscope and check for irregularities every 1, 4 and 7 times. The results show us how the passivated silicon will act in the real experiment--the vacuum chamber and x-rays (from the radioactive source), and different atmospheric pressures simulate what it will be like in space.

  12. Recovering the Green's function from field-field correlations in an open scattering medium (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derode, Arnaud; Larose, Eric; Tanter, Mickael; de Rosny, Julien; Tourin, Arnaud; Campillo, Michel; Fink, Mathias

    2003-06-01

    The possibility of recovering the Green's function from the field-field correlations of coda waves in an open multiple scattering medium is investigated. The argument is based on fundamental symmetries of reciprocity, time-reversal invariance, and the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff theorem. A criterion is defined, indicating how sources should be placed inside an open medium in order to recover the Green's function between two passive receivers. The case of noise sources is also discussed. Numerical experiments of ultrasonic wave propagation in a multiple scattering medium are presented to support the argument.

  13. Passive tamper-indicating secure container

    SciTech Connect

    Bartberger, J.C.

    1993-07-01

    This paper describes a passive tamper-indicating secure container that has been designed to demonstrate concepts, features, and materials that can be used in passive container applications. (In a passive security system, physical phenomena provide visual indication of tampering.) The basic container {open_quotes}volume within a volume{close_quotes} assembly consists of a transparent plastic outer container and an aluminum inner container. Both containers incorporate passive, fingerprinted layers as part of the tamper-indicating container system. Many of the tamper-indicating features can be visually inspected without disassembling the container. The status of container development and potential applications for the container are addressed.

  14. Organic contaminant separator

    DOEpatents

    Del Mar, Peter; Hemberger, Barbara J.

    1991-01-01

    A process of sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium by (a) passing an initial aqueous medium including a minor amount of the organic contaminant through a polyolefin tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.01 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit the organic contaminant to adhere to the tube, (b) passing a solvent through the tube, said solvent capable of separating the adhered organic contaminant from the tube. Further, a chromatographic apparatus for sample preparation prior to analysis for the concentration of an organic contaminant in an aqueous medium, said apparatus including a polyolefin tube having an internal diameter of from about 0.01 to about 2.0 millimeters and being of sufficient length to permit an organic contaminant contained within an aqueous medium passed therethrough to adhere to the tube is disclosed.

  15. Mesoscopics of ultrasound and seismic waves: application to passive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larose, É.

    2006-05-01

    This manuscript deals with different aspects of the propagation of acoustic and seismic waves in heterogeneous media, both simply and multiply scattering ones. After a short introduction on conventional imaging techniques, we describe two observations that demonstrate the presence of multiple scattering in seismic records: the equipartition principle, and the coherent backscattering effect (Chap. 2). Multiple scattering is related to the mesoscopic nature of seismic and acoustic waves, and is a strong limitation for conventional techniques like medical or seismic imaging. In the following part of the manuscript (Chaps. 3 5), we present an application of mesoscopic physics to acoustic and seismic waves: the principle of passive imaging. By correlating records of ambient noise or diffuse waves obtained at two passive sensors, it is possible to reconstruct the impulse response of the medium as if a source was placed at one sensor. This provides the opportunity of doing acoustics and seismology without a source. Several aspects of this technique are presented here, starting with theoretical considerations and numerical simulations (Chaps. 3, 4). Then we present experimental applications (Chap. 5) to ultrasound (passive tomography of a layered medium) and to seismic waves (passive imaging of California, and the Moon, with micro-seismic noise). Physique mésoscopique des ultrasons et des ondes sismiques : application à l'imagerie passive. Cet article de revue rassemble plusieurs aspects fondamentaux et appliqués de la propagation des ondes acoustiques et élastiques dans les milieux hétérogènes, en régime de diffusion simple ou multiple. Après une introduction sur les techniques conventionelles d'imagerie sismique et ultrasonore, nous présentons deux expériences qui mettent en évidence la présence de diffusion multiple dans les enregistrements sismologiques : l'équipartition des ondes, et la rétrodiffusion cohérente (Chap. 2). La diffusion multiple des

  16. Hybrid passivated colloidal quantum dot solids for photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thon, Susanna M.; Ip, Alexander H.; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Zhitomirsky, David; Debnath, Ratan; Levina, Larissa; Rollny, Lisa R.; Carey, Graham H.; Fischer, Armin; Kemp, Kyle W.; Kramer, Illan J.; Ning, Zhijun; Labelle, André J.; Chou, Kang Wei; Amassian, Aram; Sargent, Edward H.

    2013-03-01

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films are an attractive photovoltaic material due to their large-area-compatible solution processing and bandgap tuning through the quantum size effect. However, the large internal surface areas make CQD films prone to high trap state densities, leading to recombination of charge carriers. We quantify the density of midgap trap states in PbS CQD solids and show that the current photovoltaic performance is limited by these states. We develop a robust hybrid passivation scheme that involves introducing halide anions during the end stages of the synthesis process, which can passivate trap sites that are inaccessible to much larger standard organic ligands, and combine this with an organic crosslinking strategy to form the film. We use our hybrid passivated CQD solid to fabricate a solar cell with a certified efficiency of 7.0%, which is a record for a CQD photovoltaic device. This work is supported by an award (KUS-11-009-21) from KAUST, by the Ontario Research Fund Research Excellence Program and by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  17. Enhanced Attenuation Technologies: Passive Soil Vapor Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Vangelas, K.; Looney, B.; Kamath, R.; Adamson, D.; Newell, C.

    2010-03-15

    Passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) is an enhanced attenuation (EA) approach that removes volatile contaminants from soil. The extraction is driven by natural pressure gradients between the subsurface and atmosphere (Barometric Pumping), or by renewable sources of energy such as wind or solar power (Assisted PSVE). The technology is applicable for remediating sites with low levels of contamination and for transitioning sites from active source technologies such as active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) to natural attenuation. PSVE systems are simple to design and operate and are more cost effective than active systems in many scenarios. Thus, PSVE is often appropriate as an interim-remedial or polishing strategy. Over the past decade, PSVE has been demonstrated in the U.S. and in Europe. These demonstrations provide practical information to assist in selecting, designing and implementing the technology. These demonstrations indicate that the technology can be effective in achieving remedial objectives in a timely fashion. The keys to success include: (1) Application at sites where the residual source quantities, and associated fluxes to groundwater, are relatively low; (2) Selection of the appropriate passive energy source - barometric pumping in cases with a deep vadose zone and barrier (e.g., clay) layers that separate the subsurface from the atmosphere and renewable energy assisted PSVE in other settings and where higher flow rates are required. (3) Provision of sufficient access to the contaminated vadose zones through the spacing and number of extraction wells. This PSVE technology report provides a summary of the relevant technical background, real-world case study performance, key design and cost considerations, and a scenario-based cost evaluation. The key design and cost considerations are organized into a flowchart that dovetails with the Enhanced Attenuation: Chlorinated Organics Guidance of the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC). The PSVE

  18. Interstellar medium simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitschwerdt, D.; de Avillez, M. A.; Feige, J.; Dettbarn, C.

    2012-06-01

    In this review we critically assess numerical simulations of the interstellar medium (ISM), and argue that 3D high resolution calculations are the most promising method to determine the structure of the interstellar gas and follow its evolution well into the nonlinear regime. Based on a Riemann solver adaptive mesh refinement code, we present a model, which fulfills the basic requirements of running it sufficiently long in order to erase memory effects of the initial conditions, set up a disk-halo fountain flow cycle, for converging solutions with increasing mesh refinement. We obtain the following results: (i) in a supernova driven ISM, high Reynolds number turbulence generates structures on all scales, (ii) the volume filling factor of the hot gas is substantially reduced due to the fountain flow, (iii) gas clouds are transient shock compressed layers, (iv) more than half of the gas mass resides in thermally unstable regimes, (v) O VI is distributed in patchy mixing layers, with the derived column densities being in agreement with FUSE and Copernicus observations, (vi) the electron density distribution up to distances of 8 kpc in the disk is consistent with pulsar dispersion measure observations, provided that the electron and ionization structure are not in equilibrium, (vii) the interstellar cooling function depends both on space and time (and not only on temperature and metallicity), (viii) the Local Bubble has been produced by 14-20 supernovae about 14 Myr ago, exploding in a moving group on its path through the local ISM, (ix) the nearest supernova explosion to Earth occurred 2.2 {×} 106 yr ago at a distance of {˜} 85 pc, in agreement with measurements of the radionuclide 60Fe found in the ferromanganese crust on the ocean floor.

  19. Green synthesis of the Cu/Fe3O4 nanoparticles using Morinda morindoides leaf aqueous extract: A highly efficient magnetically separable catalyst for the reduction of organic dyes in aqueous medium at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrollahzadeh, Mahmoud; Atarod, Monireh; Sajadi, S. Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the green and in-situ preparation of the Cu/Fe3O4 magnetic nanocatalyst synthesized using Morinda morindoides leaf extract without stabilizers or surfactants. The catalyst was characterized by XRD, SEM, EDS, UV-visible, TEM, VSM and TGA-DTA. The catalytic performance of the resulting nanocatalyst was examined for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP), Congo red (CR) and Rhodamine B (RhB) in an environmental friendly medium at room temperature. The catalyst was recovered using an external magnet and reused several times without appreciable loss of its catalytic activity. In addition, the stability of the recycled catalyst has been proved by SEM and EDS techniques.

  20. Comparing the Accumulation of PCBs by Passive Samplers and Mussels from the Water Column at a Contaminated Sediment Site

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passive samplers, including semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs), solid phase microextraction (SPME) and polyethylene devices (PEDs), provide innovative tools for measuring hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) originating from contaminated waters and sediments. Because the...

  1. Organic spintronics.

    PubMed

    Bergenti, I; Dediu, V; Prezioso, M; Riminucci, A

    2011-08-13

    Organic semiconductors are emerging materials in the field of spintronics. Successful achievements include their use as a tunnel barrier in magnetoresistive tunnelling devices and as a medium for spin-polarized current in transport devices. In this paper, we give an overview of the basic concepts of spin transport in organic semiconductors and present the results obtained in the field, highlighting the open questions that have to be addressed in order to improve devices performance and reproducibility. The most challenging perspectives will be discussed and a possible evolution of organic spin devices featuring multi-functional operation is presented.

  2. Characterization and Monitoring Strategy for MNA and Enhanced Passive Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Tyler J.; Looney, Brian B.; Riha, Brian D.; Waugh, Jody; Sink, Claire H.

    2004-06-01

    A framework for characterizing and monitoring the Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) and Enhanced Passive Remediation (EPR) options was developed to facilitate the use of these naturally passive remedial options. The framework provides the technical basis for evaluating, applying and monitoring MNA/EPR over the lifetime of application. The mass balance concept is used as the scientific and technical framework for this characterization and monitoring approach. The approach is organized into four transitional phases: screening characterization, decision characterization, process monitoring and system verification. The framework overlays the CERCLA process with the intent to expand the description of characterizations and monitoring and not to replace nor increase the requirements of the Remediation Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS). The use of natural processes to promote cleanup is, in many ways, unique from engineered solutions. And, this framework allows MNA to be evaluated holistically taking into consideration the requirements over the lifetime of the remedy.

  3. A Passive Magnetic Bearing Flywheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siebert, Mark; Ebihara, Ben; Jansen, Ralph; Fusaro, Robert L.; Morales, Wilfredo; Kascak, Albert; Kenny, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    A 100 percent passive magnetic bearing flywheel rig employing no active control components was designed, constructed, and tested. The suspension clothe rotor was provided by two sets of radial permanent magnetic bearings operating in the repulsive mode. The axial support was provided by jewel bearings on both ends of the rotor. The rig was successfully operated to speeds of 5500 rpm, which is 65 percent above the first critical speed of 3336 rpm. Operation was not continued beyond this point because of the excessive noise generated by the air impeller and because of inadequate containment in case of failure. Radial and axial stiffnesses of the permanent magnetic bearings were experimentally measured and then compared to finite element results. The natural damping of the rotor was measured and a damping coefficient was calculated.

  4. Passive Phase Noise Cancellation Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Kenig, Eyal; Cross, M. C.; Lifshitz, Ron; Karabalin, R. B.; Villanueva, L. G.; Matheny, M. H.; Roukes, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new method for reducing phase noise in oscillators, thereby improving their frequency precision. The noise reduction is realized by a passive device consisting of a pair of coupled nonlinear resonating elements that are driven parametrically by the output of a conventional oscillator at a frequency close to the sum of the linear mode frequencies. Above the threshold for parametric instability, the coupled resonators exhibit self-oscillations which arise as a response to the parametric driving, rather than by application of active feedback. We find operating points of the device for which this periodic signal is immune to frequency noise in the driving oscillator, providing a way to clean its phase noise. We present results for the effect of thermal noise to advance a broader understanding of the overall noise sensitivity and the fundamental operating limits. PMID:23004985

  5. Passive Tracking System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor); Chen, Henry A. (Inventor); Phan, Chau T. (Inventor); Bourgeois, Brian A. (Inventor); Dusl, Jon (Inventor); Hill, Brent W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Systems and methods are disclosed for passively determining the location of a moveable transmitter utilizing a pair of phase shifts at a receiver for extracting a direction vector from a receiver to the transmitter. In a preferred embodiment, a phase difference between the transmitter and receiver is extracted utilizing a noncoherent demodulator in the receiver. The receiver includes an antenna array with three antenna elements, which preferably are patch antenna elements spaced apart by one-half wavelength. Three receiver channels are preferably utilized for simultaneously processing the received signal from each of the three antenna elements. Multipath transmission paths for each of the three receiver channels are indexed so that comparisons of the same multipath component are made for each of the three receiver channels. The phase difference for each received signal is determined by comparing only the magnitudes of received and stored modulation signals to determine a winning modulation symbol.

  6. Passive adaptive imaging through turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofsted, David

    2016-05-01

    Standard methods for improved imaging system performance under degrading optical turbulence conditions typically involve active adaptive techniques or post-capture image processing. Here, passive adaptive methods are considered where active sources are disallowed, a priori. Theoretical analyses of short-exposure turbulence impacts indicate that varying aperture sizes experience different degrees of turbulence impacts. Smaller apertures often outperform larger aperture systems as turbulence strength increases. This suggests a controllable aperture system is advantageous. In addition, sub-aperture sampling of a set of training images permits the system to sense tilts in different sub-aperture regions through image acquisition and image cross-correlation calculations. A four sub-aperture pattern supports corrections involving five realizable operating modes (beyond tip and tilt) for removing aberrations over an annular pattern. Progress to date will be discussed regarding development and field trials of a prototype system.

  7. Addressing Passive Smoking in Children

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Sasha G.; Kuijlaars, Jennifer S.; Mesters, Ilse; Muris, Jean W. M.; van Schayck, Constant P.; Dompeling, Edward; Feron, Frans J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background A significant number of parents are unaware or unconvinced of the health consequences of passive smoking (PS) in children. Physicians could increase parental awareness by giving personal advice. Aim To evaluate the current practices of three Dutch health professions (paediatricians, youth health care physicians, and family physicians) regarding parental counselling for passive smoking (PS) in children. Methods All physicians (n = 720) representing the three health professions in Limburg, the Netherlands, received an invitation to complete a self-administered electronic questionnaire including questions on their: sex, work experience, personal smoking habits, counselling practices and education regarding PS in children. Results The response rate was 34%. One tenth (11%) of the responding physicians always addressed PS in children, 32% often, 54% occasionally and 4% reported to never attend to it. The three health professions appeared comparable regarding their frequency of parental counselling for PS in children. Addressing PS was more likely when children had respiratory problems. Lack of time was the most frequently mentioned barrier, being very and somewhat applicable for respectively 14% and 43% of the physicians. One fourth of the responders had received postgraduate education about PS. Additionally, 49% of the responders who did not have any education about PS were interested in receiving it. Conclusions Physicians working in the paediatric field in Limburg, the Netherlands, could more frequently address PS in children with parents. Lack of time appeared to be the most mentioned barrier and physicians were more likely to counsel parents for PS in children with respiratory complaints/diseases. Finally, a need for more education on parental counselling for PS was expressed. PMID:24809443

  8. Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe

    DOEpatents

    Gorski, Anthony J.; Schertz, William W.

    1982-01-01

    A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

  9. The So-Called Japanese Passive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Irwin

    The principal claim of this paper is that the Japanese passive consists of two different constructions, each derived from a distinct deep structure and each having associated with it a distinct set of syntactic and semantic properties. One of these constructions, the "adversative passive," implies that the grammatical subject of the sentence is…

  10. Passive Thermal Management of Foil Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for passive thermal management of foil bearing systems are disclosed herein. The flow of the hydrodynamic film across the surface of bearing compliant foils may be disrupted to provide passive cooling and to improve the performance and reliability of the foil bearing system.

  11. Strong local passivity in finite quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Frey, Michael; Funo, Ken; Hotta, Masahiro

    2014-07-01

    Passive states of quantum systems are states from which no system energy can be extracted by any cyclic (unitary) process. Gibbs states of all temperatures are passive. Strong local (SL) passive states are defined to allow any general quantum operation, but the operation is required to be local, being applied only to a specific subsystem. Any mixture of eigenstates in a system-dependent neighborhood of a nondegenerate entangled ground state is found to be SL passive. In particular, Gibbs states are SL passive with respect to a subsystem only at or below a critical system-dependent temperature. SL passivity is associated in many-body systems with the presence of ground state entanglement in a way suggestive of collective quantum phenomena such as quantum phase transitions, superconductivity, and the quantum Hall effect. The presence of SL passivity is detailed for some simple spin systems where it is found that SL passivity is neither confined to systems of only a few particles nor limited to the near vicinity of the ground state.

  12. New medium licensed for campylobacter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A medium, “Campy-Cefex”, has been licensed by the ARS Office of Technology Transfer with Becton Dickinson (No. 1412-002) and Neogen (No. 1412-001) based on patent No. 5,891,709, “Campy-Cefex Selective and Differential Medium for Campylobacter” by Dr. Norman Stern of the Poultry Microbiological Safet...

  13. Visuomotor learning by passive motor experience.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Takashi; Kondo, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Humans can adapt to unfamiliar dynamic and/or kinematic transformations through the active motor experience. Recent studies of neurorehabilitation using robots or brain-computer interface (BCI) technology suggest that passive motor experience would play a measurable role in motor recovery, however our knowledge of passive motor learning is limited. To clarify the effects of passive motor experience on human motor learning, we performed arm reaching experiments guided by a robotic manipulandum. The results showed that the passive motor experience had an anterograde transfer effect on the subsequent motor execution, whereas no retrograde interference was confirmed in the ABA paradigm experiment. This suggests that the passive experience of the error between visual and proprioceptive sensations leads to the limited but actual compensation of behavior, although it is fragile and cannot be consolidated as a persistent motor memory.

  14. Bismuth nickel passivation effective in FCCU

    SciTech Connect

    Heite, R.S. ); English, A.R. ); Smith, G.A. )

    1990-06-04

    Bismuth-based nickel passivation has been effective in Mapco Petroleum Inc.'s fluid catalytic cracking unit (FCCU) at its Memphis, Tenn., refinery for the past 2 years. Mapco switched to the bismuth passivator in 1988 after using antimony as a passivator since the early 1980s. Metals (nickel and vanadium) passivators help reduce the catalyst activity suppression that occurs from contamination of the catalyst with feed-born metals. With the switch to bismuth, a hazardous material has been eliminated. Antimony is on the U.S. Environmental protection Agency's lit of hazardous chemicals. The bismuth also reduced the deleterious effects of high nickel content in the feed to the FCCU, at a bismuth quantity equal to, or slightly greater than, the amount of antimony previously used. Trouble-free operation of the unit was maintained at a reduced passivation cost.

  15. Aerodynamic control with passively pitching wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravish, Nick; Wood, Robert

    Flapping wings may pitch passively under aerodynamic and inertial loads. Such passive pitching is observed in flapping wing insect and robot flight. The effect of passive wing pitch on the control dynamics of flapping wing flight are unexplored. Here we demonstrate in simulation and experiment the critical role wing pitching plays in yaw control of a flapping wing robot. We study yaw torque generation by a flapping wing allowed to passively rotate in the pitch axis through a rotational spring. Yaw torque is generated through alternating fast and slow upstroke and and downstroke. Yaw torque sensitively depends on both the rotational spring force law and spring stiffness, and at a critical spring stiffness a bifurcation in the yaw torque control relationship occurs. Simulation and experiment reveal the dynamics of this bifurcation and demonstrate that anomalous yaw torque from passively pitching wings is the result of aerodynamic and inertial coupling between the pitching and stroke-plane dynamics.

  16. Visuomotor learning by passive motor experience

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Takashi; Kondo, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Humans can adapt to unfamiliar dynamic and/or kinematic transformations through the active motor experience. Recent studies of neurorehabilitation using robots or brain-computer interface (BCI) technology suggest that passive motor experience would play a measurable role in motor recovery, however our knowledge of passive motor learning is limited. To clarify the effects of passive motor experience on human motor learning, we performed arm reaching experiments guided by a robotic manipulandum. The results showed that the passive motor experience had an anterograde transfer effect on the subsequent motor execution, whereas no retrograde interference was confirmed in the ABA paradigm experiment. This suggests that the passive experience of the error between visual and proprioceptive sensations leads to the limited but actual compensation of behavior, although it is fragile and cannot be consolidated as a persistent motor memory. PMID:26029091

  17. Passive pavement-mounted acoustical linguistic drive alert system and method

    DOEpatents

    Kisner, Roger A.; Anderson, Richard L.; Carnal, Charles L.; Hylton, James O.; Stevens, Samuel S.

    2001-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for passive pavement-mounted acoustical alert of the occupants of a vehicle. A method of notifying a vehicle occupant includes providing a driving medium upon which a vehicle is to be driven; and texturing a portion of the driving medium such that the textured portion interacts with the vehicle to produce audible signals, the textured portion pattern such that a linguistic message is encoded into the audible signals. The systems and methods provide advantages because information can be conveyed to the occupants of the vehicle based on the location of the vehicle relative to the textured surface.

  18. Characterization of tetraethylene glycol passivated iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Eloiza da Silva; Viali, Wesley Renato; da Silva, Sebastião William; Coaquira, José Antonio Huamaní; Garg, Vijayendra Kumar; de Oliveira, Aderbal Carlos; Morais, Paulo César; Jafelicci Júnior, Miguel

    2014-10-01

    The present study describes the synthesis and characterization of iron@iron oxide nanoparticles produced by passivation of metallic iron in tetraethylene glycol media. Structural and chemical characterizations were performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Pomegranate-like core@shell nanoparticulate material in the size range of 90-120 nm was obtained. According to quantitative phase analysis using Rietveld structure refinement the synthesized iron oxide was identified as magnetite (Fe3O4) whereas the iron to magnetite mass fractions was found to be 47:53. These findings are in good agreement with the data obtained from Mössbauer and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The XPS data revealed the presence of a surface organic layer with higher hydrocarbon content, possibly due to the tetraethylene glycol thermal degradation correlated with iron oxidation. The room-temperature (300 K) saturation magnetization measured for the as-synthesized iron and for the iron-iron oxide were 145 emu g-1 and 131 emu g-1, respectively. The measured saturation magnetizations are in good agreement with data obtained from TEM, XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  19. Encapsulation as a passive soil remediation alternative

    SciTech Connect

    Mario, B.R. De

    1996-12-31

    By implementing institutional and engineering controls, a passive, cost-effective, remedial alternative has allowed redevelopment of an abandoned, industrial, site located in Newark, New Jersey. Soil and groundwater contaminants at the site include volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds and metals. The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) recognized the impracticality of requiring an aggressive, localized, remedial action to clean up contaminated soil and groundwater in a region that has historically used fill to create land along the state`s waterways. By placing an institutional control, known as a Declaration of Environmental Restriction (DER), on the property, the NJDEP allowed contaminated fill to remain on site and approved encapsulation as the remedial action for the soil. The approved engineering control, encapsulation, consisted of the design and placement of an asphalt pavement cap that covered the affected areas of concern. The asphalt pavement cap prevents direct human contact to contaminated soil and leaching of contaminants in the soil into the groundwater by surface water infiltration. This paper focuses on the subsurface soil investigation and establishment of the DER. The benefits of this remedial alternative are: (1) the urban redevelopment of contaminated land while simultaneously ensuring protection to human health and the environment; (2) costs savings of not having to clean up a regional problem as if it were local; and (3) the facilitation of a property transfer transaction without the risk of future liability for an historical problem.

  20. Passively Mode-Locked Femtosecond Laser with Disordered Crystal Nd:CGA as Gain Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Kun-Na; Liu, Jia-Xing; Tian, Wen-Long; Shen, Zhong-Wei; Xu, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Zhao-Hua; Li, De-Hua; Xu, Jun; Di, Ju-Qing; Xia, Chang-Tai; Wei, Zhi-Yi

    2016-09-01

    Not Available Supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China under Grant No 2013CB922402, the International Joint Research Program, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos 61210017 and 11434016.

  1. Improvement of erythromycin production by Saccharopolyspora erythraea in molasses based medium through cultivation medium optimization.

    PubMed

    El-Enshasy, H A; Mohamed, N A; Farid, M A; El-Diwany, A I

    2008-07-01

    In the present work, erythromycin production was carried out in submerged culture using Saccharopolyspora erythraea. Different experiments were conducted to optimize the cultivation medium through the change of carbon and nitrogen sources to cheaper one in order to reduce the cost of medium and to utilize sugar cane molasses as one of major sugar industry by-products in Egypt. It was found that the addition of sugar cane molasses a sole carbon source at a concentration of 60 g/l accompanied by corn steep liquor (as organic N-source) in combination with ammonium sulphate (as inorganic N-source) gave the maximal erythromycin production. The antibiotic production in this medium reached about 600 mg/l which is about 33% higher than the value obtained in glucose based medium. On the other hand, the addition of n-propanol in concentration of 1% (v/v) increased the antibiotic production reaching about 720 mg/l after 144 h. Concluding, the new medium formulation based on cheap carbon source, sugar cane molasses, was a good alternative solution for the production of erythromycin economically.

  2. A medium-chain fatty acid, capric acid, inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation via the suppression of NF-κB signaling and blocks cytoskeletal organization and survival in mature osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ju; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Yoon, Young-Ran

    2014-08-01

    Fatty acids, important components of a normal diet, have been reported to play a role in bone metabolism. Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells that are responsible for many bone-destructive diseases such as osteoporosis. In this study, we investigated the impact of a medium-chain fatty acid, capric acid, on the osteoclast differentiation, function, and survival induced by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (MCSF). Capric acid inhibited RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow-derived macrophages and suppressed RANKL-induced IκBα phosphorylation, p65 nuclear translocation, and NF-κB transcriptional activity. Capric acid further blocked the RANKL-stimulated activation of ERK without affecting JNK or p38. The induction of NFATc1 in response to RANKL was also attenuated by capric acid. In addition, capric acid abrogated M-CSF and RANKL-mediated cytoskeleton reorganization, which is crucial for the efficient bone resorption of osteoclasts. Capric acid also increased apoptosis in mature osteoclasts through the induction of Bim expression and the suppression of ERK activation by M-CSF. Together, our results reveal that capric acid has inhibitory effects on osteoclast development. We therefore suggest that capric acid may have potential therapeutic implications for the treatment of bone resorption-associated disorders.

  3. A selective-differential medium for detection of Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, R K; Brunson, K W; Stiles, J C

    1968-01-01

    A practical culture medium which allows direct plating of milk samples for detection and differentiation of Streptococcus agalactiae within 48 hours is described. Most other micro-organisms likely to be present in these samples are inhibited. Although some strains of Staphylococcus species and ofStreptococcus faecalis are able to grow, they may be differentiated on the basis of reaction in the medium surrounding the colonies.

  4. Passive-sensor data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolitz, Stephan E.

    1991-08-01

    Problems in multi-sensor data fusion are addressed for passive (angle-only) sensors; the example used is a constellation of IR sensors on satellites in low-earth orbit, viewing up to several hundred ballistic missile targets. The sensor data used in the methodology of the report is 'post-detection,' with targets resolved on single pixels (it is possible for several targets to be resolved on the same pixel). A 'scan' by a sensor is modeled by the formation of a rectangular focal plane image of lit pixels (bits with value 1), representing the presence of at least one target, and unlit pixels (bits with value 0), representing the absence of a target, at a particular time. Approaches and algorithmic solutions are developed which address the following passive sensor data fusion problems: scan-to-scan target association, and association classification. The ultimate objective is to estimate target states, for use in a larger battle management system. Results indicate that successful scan-to-scan target association is feasible at scan rates >=2 Hz, independent of resolution. Sensor-to-sensor target association is difficult at low resolution; even with high-resolution sensors the performance of a standard two-sensor single scan approach is variable and unpredictable, since it is a function of the relative geometry of sensors and targets. A single-scan approach using the Varad algorithm and three sensors is not as sensitive to this relative geometry, but is usable only for high-resolution sensors. Innovative multi-scan and multi-sensor modifications of the three- sensor Varad algorithm are developed which provide excellent performance for a wide range of sensor resolutions. The multi-sensor multi-scan methodology also provides accurate information on the classification of target associations as correct or incorrect. For the scenarios examined with resolution cell sizes ranging from 300 m to 2 km, association errors are less than 5% and essentially no classification errors

  5. Satellite Remote Sensing: Passive-Microwave Measurements of Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Satellite passive-microwave measurements of sea ice have provided global or near-global sea ice data for most of the period since the launch of the Nimbus 5 satellite in December 1972, and have done so with horizontal resolutions on the order of 25-50 km and a frequency of every few days. These data have been used to calculate sea ice concentrations (percent areal coverages), sea ice extents, the length of the sea ice season, sea ice temperatures, and sea ice velocities, and to determine the timing of the seasonal onset of melt as well as aspects of the ice-type composition of the sea ice cover. In each case, the calculations are based on the microwave emission characteristics of sea ice and the important contrasts between the microwave emissions of sea ice and those of the surrounding liquid-water medium.

  6. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  7. Coronary Heart Disease Attributable to Passive Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Lightwood, James M.; Coxson, Pamela G.; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Williams, Lawrence W.; Goldman, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Background Passive smoking is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), and existing estimates are out of date due to recent and substantial changes in the level of exposure. Objective To estimate the annual clinical burden and cost of CHD treatment attributable to passive smoking. Outcome measures Annual attributable CHD deaths, myocardial infarctions (MI), total CHD events, and the direct cost of CHD treatment. Methods A Monte Carlo simulation estimated the CHD events and costs as a function of the prevalence of CHD risk factors, including passive-smoking prevalence and a low (1.26) and high (1.65) relative risk of CHD due to passive smoking. Estimates were calculated using the CHD Policy Model, calibrated to reproduce key CHD outcomes in the baseline Year 2000 in the U.S. Results At 1999–2004 levels, passive smoking caused 21,800 (SE=2400) to 75,100 (SE=8000) CHD deaths and 38,100 (SE=4300) to 128,900 (SE=14,000) MIs annually, with a yearly CHD treatment cost of $1.8 (SE=$0.2) to $6.0 (SE=$0.7) billion. If recent trends in the reduction in the prevalence of passive smoking continue from 2000 to 2008, the burden would be reduced by approximately 25%–30%. Conclusions Passive smoking remains a substantial clinical and economic burden in the U.S. PMID:19095162

  8. Passive Auditory Stimulation Improves Vision in Hemianopia

    PubMed Central

    Lewald, Jörg; Tegenthoff, Martin; Peters, Sören; Hausmann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Techniques employed in rehabilitation of visual field disorders such as hemianopia are usually based on either visual or audio-visual stimulation and patients have to perform a training task. Here we present results from a completely different, novel approach that was based on passive unimodal auditory stimulation. Ten patients with either left or right-sided pure hemianopia (without neglect) received one hour of unilateral passive auditory stimulation on either their anopic or their intact side by application of repetitive trains of sound pulses emitted simultaneously via two loudspeakers. Immediately before and after passive auditory stimulation as well as after a period of recovery, patients completed a simple visual task requiring detection of light flashes presented along the horizontal plane in total darkness. The results showed that one-time passive auditory stimulation on the side of the blind, but not of the intact, hemifield of patients with hemianopia induced an improvement in visual detections by almost 100% within 30 min after passive auditory stimulation. This enhancement in performance was reversible and was reduced to baseline 1.5 h later. A non-significant trend of a shift of the visual field border toward the blind hemifield was obtained after passive auditory stimulation. These results are compatible with the view that passive auditory stimulation elicited some activation of the residual visual pathways, which are known to be multisensory and may also be sensitive to unimodal auditory stimuli as were used here. Trial Registration DRKS00003577 PMID:22666311

  9. Effects of ecotoxicological chemicals on passive plasmalemma permeability in plants.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, G; Sellner, M; Golle, B; Lüttge, U

    1983-08-01

    The measurement of changes of electrical conductivity in the external medium of isolated mesophyll protoplasts of Vicia faba, tissue disks of red beetroot (Beta vulgaris), and intact duckweed plants (Lemna gibba) was used to determine nonspecific electrolyte efflux. This provided rapid screening tests to assess the impact of environmental chemicals on passive membrane permeabilities. The conditions of the tests and their applicability to environmental studies are described in detail. Twenty-five reference chemicals selected by the Bundesminister für Forschung und Technologie (BMFT, FRG) were tested. The sequence of effectiveness of the various substances was similar in the different test systems and appeared to be independent of the organizational level of the plant material. Passive electrolyte efflux was most effectively stimulated by HgCl2, pentachlorophenol (PCP), and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (LAS). The threshold concentrations showing clear stimulation of electrolyte efflux after 3 hr of application with protoplasts and 24 hr with tissue disks were in the vicinity of relevant environmental levels. The tests described allow the detection of effects at least down to concentrations of 0.004 mol m-3 HgCl2, 0.001 mol m-3 PCP, and 0.04 mol m-3 LAS. Other putatively very toxic chemicals were ineffective in these short-term permeability tests.

  10. Adaptive spatial combining for passive time-reversed communications.

    PubMed

    Gomes, João; Silva, António; Jesus, Sérgio

    2008-08-01

    Passive time reversal has aroused considerable interest in underwater communications as a computationally inexpensive means of mitigating the intersymbol interference introduced by the channel using a receiver array. In this paper the basic technique is extended by adaptively weighting sensor contributions to partially compensate for degraded focusing due to mismatch between the assumed and actual medium impulse responses. Two algorithms are proposed, one of which restores constructive interference between sensors, and the other one minimizes the output residual as in widely used equalization schemes. These are compared with plain time reversal and variants that employ postequalization and channel tracking. They are shown to improve the residual error and temporal stability of basic time reversal with very little added complexity. Results are presented for data collected in a passive time-reversal experiment that was conducted during the MREA'04 sea trial. In that experiment a single acoustic projector generated a 24-PSK (phase-shift keyed) stream at 200400 baud, modulated at 3.6 kHz, and received at a range of about 2 km on a sparse vertical array with eight hydrophones. The data were found to exhibit significant Doppler scaling, and a resampling-based preprocessing method is also proposed here to compensate for that scaling.

  11. Report from the Passive Microwave Data Set Management Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Ed; Conover, Helen; Goodman, Michael; Krupp, Brian; Liu, Zhong; Moses, John; Ramapriyan, H. K.; Scott, Donna; Smith, Deborah; Weaver, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Passive microwave data sets are some of the most important data sets in the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), providing data as far back as the early 1970s. The widespread use of passive microwave (PM) radiometer data has led to their collection and distribution over the years at several different Earth science data centers. The user community is often confused by this proliferation and the uneven spread of information about the data sets. In response to this situation, a Passive Microwave Data Set Management Workshop was held 17 ]19 May 2011 at the Global Hydrology Resource Center, sponsored by the NASA Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project. The workshop attendees reviewed all primary (Level 1 ]3) PM data sets from NASA and non ]NASA sensors held by NASA Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs), as well as high ]value data sets from other NASA ]funded organizations. This report provides the key findings and recommendations from the workshop as well as detailed tabluations of the datasets considered.

  12. Passive Cooling of Body Armor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtz, Ronald; Matic, Peter; Mott, David

    2013-03-01

    Warfighter performance can be adversely affected by heat load and weight of equipment. Current tactical vest designs are good insulators and lack ventilation, thus do not provide effective management of metabolic heat generated. NRL has undertaken a systematic study of tactical vest thermal management, leading to physics-based strategies that provide improved cooling without undesirable consequences such as added weight, added electrical power requirements, or compromised protection. The approach is based on evaporative cooling of sweat produced by the wearer of the vest, in an air flow provided by ambient wind or ambulatory motion of the wearer. Using an approach including thermodynamic analysis, computational fluid dynamics modeling, air flow measurements of model ventilated vest architectures, and studies of the influence of fabric aerodynamic drag characteristics, materials and geometry were identified that optimize passive cooling of tactical vests. Specific architectural features of the vest design allow for optimal ventilation patterns, and selection of fabrics for vest construction optimize evaporation rates while reducing air flow resistance. Cooling rates consistent with the theoretical and modeling predictions were verified experimentally for 3D mockups.

  13. A new passive helicopter detector

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sandia has developed a new helicopter detector. The device relies on the correlation between the acoustic wave from the helicopter and the resulting coupled seismic wave. A significant feature of this approach is that the detector is completely passive; there is no radio frequency radiation. Intended for deployment as a perimeter sensor around a site, the unit offers a low nuisance/false alarm rate and a high probability of detection for a wide range of helicopters. Reliable detection occurs when the target is at high altitude and also very near the earth's surface. Detection ranges start at one kilometre for the small, four-place, civilian helicopter and approach five kilometres for heavier, military types. The system has two parts: a transducer package containing a microphone and a geophone and a digital processor. Development is underway for a model which will be AC powered and well suited to permanent facilities. A prototype unit using a lightweight, battery powered processor is being constructed for rapid-deployment applications.

  14. [Passive euthanasia and living will].

    PubMed

    Julesz, Máté

    2014-07-01

    This article deals with the intentional distinction between murder of first degree and passive euthanasia. In Hungary, active euthanasia is considered to be a murder of first degree, whilst the Netherlands, Belgium, Luxemburg and Switzerland have legalized the active form of mercy killing in Europe. The palliative terminal care, when e.g. giving pain-killer morphine to the patient, might result in decreasing the patient's life-span, and thus causing indirect euthanasia. However, the legal institution of living will exists in several counter-euthanasia countries. The living will allows future patients to express their decision in advance to refuse a life-sustaining treatment, e.g. in case of irreversible coma. The institution of living will exists in Germany and in Hungary too. Nevertheless, the formal criteria of living will make it hardly applicable. The patient ought to express his/her will before a notary public in advance, and he/she should hand it over when being hospitalized. If the patient is not able to present his/her living will to his/her doctor in the hospital, then his/her only hope remains that he/she has given a copy of the living will to the family doctor previously, and the family doctor will notify the hospital.

  15. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOEpatents

    Evans, D.J.; Cha, Y.S.

    1999-04-06

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment. 6 figs.

  16. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Daniel J.; Cha, Yung S.

    1999-01-01

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment.

  17. Passive states for essential observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strich, Robert

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this note is to present a unified approach to the results given by Borchers and Buchholz ["Global properties of vacuum states in de Sitter space," Ann. Inst. Henri Poincare, Sect. A. 70, 23-40 (1999)] and by Buchholz and Summers ["Stable quantum systems in anti-de Sitter space: Causality, independence and spectral properties," J. Math. Phys. 45, 4810-4831 (2004)] which also covers examples of models not presented in these two papers (e.g., d-dimensional Minkowski space-time for d ⩾3). Assuming that a state is passive for an observer traveling along certain (essential) worldlines, we show that this state is invariant under the isometry group, is a temperature equilibrium state for the observer at a temperature uniquely determined by the structure constants of the Lie algebra involved, and fulfills (a variant of) the Reeh-Schlieder property. Also, the modular objects associated with such a state and the observable algebra of an observer are computed and a version of weak locality is examined.

  18. Passive states for essential observers

    SciTech Connect

    Strich, Robert

    2008-02-15

    The aim of this note is to present a unified approach to the results given by Borchers and Buchholz ['Global properties of vacuum states in de Sitter space', Ann. Inst. Henri Poincare, Sect. A. 70, 23-40 (1999)] and by Buchholz and Summers ['Stable quantum systems in anti-de Sitter space: Causality, independence and spectral properties', J. Math. Phys. 45, 4810-4831 (2004)] which also covers examples of models not presented in these two papers (e.g., d-dimensional Minkowski space-time for d{>=}3). Assuming that a state is passive for an observer traveling along certain (essential) worldlines, we show that this state is invariant under the isometry group, is a temperature equilibrium state for the observer at a temperature uniquely determined by the structure constants of the Lie algebra involved, and fulfills (a variant of) the Reeh-Schlieder property. Also, the modular objects associated with such a state and the observable algebra of an observer are computed and a version of weak locality is examined.

  19. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of NASA and the GSDO Program, the objective of this project is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys. This project is a direct follow-on to United Space Alliance (USA) work at KSC to optimize the parameters for the use of citric acid and verify effectiveness. This project will build off of the USA study to further evaluate citric acids effectiveness and suitability for corrosion protection of a number of stainless steels alloys used by NASA, the Department of Defense (DoD), and the European Space Agency (ESA).

  20. Passive environmental temperature control system

    DOEpatents

    Corliss, John M.; Stickford, George H.

    1981-01-01

    Passive environmental heating and cooling systems are described, which utilize heat pipes to transmit heat to or from a thermal reservoir. In a solar heating system, a heat pipe is utilized to carry heat from a solar heat absorber plate that receives sunlight, through a thermal insulation barrier, to a heat storage wall, with the outer end of the pipe which is in contact with the solar absorber being lower than the inner end. The inclining of the heat pipe assures that the portion of working fluid, such as Freon, which is in a liquid phase will fall by gravity to the outer end of the pipe, thereby assuring diode action that prevents the reverse transfer of heat from the reservoir to the outside on cool nights. In a cooling system, the outer end of the pipe which connects to a heat dissipator, is higher than the inner end that is coupled to a cold reservoir, to allow heat transfer only out of the reservoir to the heat dissipator, and not in the reverse direction.

  1. [Passive smoking and respiratory health of children].

    PubMed

    Strumylaite, Loreta; Kregzdyte, Rima; Vaitkaitiene, Egle

    2005-01-01

    Passive smoking has been shown to be a risk factor for respiratory diseases in children. Some authors reported reduced lung function of children exposed to passive smoking. The purpose of the study was to assess the prevalence of exposure to passive smoking and its relation to respiratory health of Kaunas children. In 1998-2000 a cross-sectional survey was conducted in 20 kindergartens of Kaunas. Survey participants were 594 children (356 boys and 238 girls) aged 6-7 years. Children's parents filled out a questionnaire of the Swiss Study on Childhood Allergy and Respiratory Symptoms with Respect to Air Pollution designed on the basis of International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood. Exposure to passive smoking was determined by an answer "everyday" or "sometimes" to the question "How often is your child in surrounding where someone smokes?". The parameters of respiratory function (FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC, FEF25, FEF50, FEF75, PEF) were measured with Pony Graphics 3.5. Response rate was 58.6% to 69.2% depending on a kindergarten. More than two fifth of children were exposed to passive smoking at home. Cough that lasted for at least four weeks during the past year was experienced by 24.5% and 16.9% of children with and without exposure to passive smoking (p<0.05). Wheezing in the past was found in 43% and 27% of children in groups compared (p<0.05). There was a significant difference in prevalence of sneezing or a runny/blocked nose when a child did not have a cold among children with and without exposure to passive smoking (46.6% and 36.6%, respectively, p<0.05). FEF25, FEF50, FEF75 and PEF of exposed girls were significantly lower than that of girls not exposed to passive smoking. Multiple regression analysis that included variables such as passive smoking, family history of allergy, smoked mother during pregnancy, gas stove and pets in child's room showed that FEF25 and FEF50 in girls were related to passive smoking. Our data show that more than two fifth of

  2. Passive samplers accurately predict PAH levels in resident crayfish.

    PubMed

    Paulik, L Blair; Smith, Brian W; Bergmann, Alan J; Sower, Greg J; Forsberg, Norman D; Teeguarden, Justin G; Anderson, Kim A

    2016-02-15

    Contamination of resident aquatic organisms is a major concern for environmental risk assessors. However, collecting organisms to estimate risk is often prohibitively time and resource-intensive. Passive sampling accurately estimates resident organism contamination, and it saves time and resources. This study used low density polyethylene (LDPE) passive water samplers to predict polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels in signal crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus. Resident crayfish were collected at 5 sites within and outside of the Portland Harbor Superfund Megasite (PHSM) in the Willamette River in Portland, Oregon. LDPE deployment was spatially and temporally paired with crayfish collection. Crayfish visceral and tail tissue, as well as water-deployed LDPE, were extracted and analyzed for 62 PAHs using GC-MS/MS. Freely-dissolved concentrations (Cfree) of PAHs in water were calculated from concentrations in LDPE. Carcinogenic risks were estimated for all crayfish tissues, using benzo[a]pyrene equivalent concentrations (BaPeq). ∑PAH were 5-20 times higher in viscera than in tails, and ∑BaPeq were 6-70 times higher in viscera than in tails. Eating only tail tissue of crayfish would therefore significantly reduce carcinogenic risk compared to also eating viscera. Additionally, PAH levels in crayfish were compared to levels in crayfish collected 10 years earlier. PAH levels in crayfish were higher upriver of the PHSM and unchanged within the PHSM after the 10-year period. Finally, a linear regression model predicted levels of 34 PAHs in crayfish viscera with an associated R-squared value of 0.52 (and a correlation coefficient of 0.72), using only the Cfree PAHs in water. On average, the model predicted PAH concentrations in crayfish tissue within a factor of 2.4 ± 1.8 of measured concentrations. This affirms that passive water sampling accurately estimates PAH contamination in crayfish. Furthermore, the strong predictive ability of this simple model suggests

  3. Medium-depth chemical peels.

    PubMed

    Monheit, G D

    2001-07-01

    The combination medium-depth chemical peel (Jessner's solution +35% TCA) has been accepted as a safe, reliable, and effective method for the treatment of moderate photoaging skin. This article discusses the procedure in detail, including postoperative considerations. PMID:11599398

  4. An improved holographic recording medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gange, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Solid, linear chain hydrocarbons with molecular weight ranging from about 300 to 2000 can serve as long-lived recording medium in optical memory system. Suitable recording hydrocarbons include microcrystalline waxes and low molecular weight polymers or ethylene.

  5. Application of semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) as passive air samplers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petty, Jimmie D.; Huckins, James N.; Zajicek, James L.

    1993-01-01

    The semipermeable membrane device (SPMD), consisting of a neutral lipid (triolein) enclosed in polyethylene layflat tubing, is demonstrated to be a highly efficient passive air sampler. These devices readily sequester lipophilic organic contaminants from the vapor phase. Specifically, the SPMDs are shown to concentrate polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) residues from a laboratory atmosphere in a linear manner through 28 days. Under the conditions of this study, a three device composite (1.4 g triolein) extracted PCB residues from ≈ 7 m3 of air per day.

  6. Climate-Specific Passive Building Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Graham S.; Klingenberg, Katrin

    2015-07-29

    In 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognized the value of performance-based passive building standards when it joined with Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) to promote DOE’s Challenge Home program in tandem with the PHIUS+ Certification program. Since then, the number of passive building projects that have been certified under the partnership has grown exponentially because of some synergy. Passive building represents a well-developed approach to arrive at the envelope basis for zero energy and energy-positive projects by employing performance-based criteria and maximizing cost-effective savings from conservation before implementing renewable energy technologies. The Challenge Home program evolved into the Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program in a move toward 1) attaining zero energy and 2) including active renewable energy generation such as photovoltaics (PV)—toward the zero energy goal.

  7. Method and structure for passivating semiconductor material

    DOEpatents

    Pankove, Jacques I.

    1981-01-01

    A structure for passivating semiconductor material comprises a substrate of crystalline semiconductor material, a relatively thin film of carbon disposed on a surface of the crystalline material, and a layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited on the carbon film.

  8. Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, Eni G.; Entekhabi, Dara

    1994-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing provides a unique capability for direct observation of soil moisture... This Paper outlines the basic principles of the passive microwave technique for soil moisture sensing, and reviews briefly the status of current retrieval methods.

  9. Passive imaging with pulsed ultrasound insonations.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Kevin J; Mast, T Douglas; Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Burgess, Mark T; Kopechek, Jonathan A; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2012-07-01

    Previously, passive cavitation imaging has been described in the context of continuous-wave high-intensity focused ultrasound thermal ablation. However, the technique has potential use as a feedback mechanism for pulsed-wave therapies, such as ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. In this paper, results of experiments and simulations are reported to demonstrate the feasibility of passive cavitation imaging using pulsed ultrasound insonations and how the images depend on pulsed ultrasound parameters. The passive cavitation images were formed from channel data that was beamformed in the frequency domain. Experiments were performed in an invitro flow phantom with an experimental echo contrast agent, echogenic liposomes, as cavitation nuclei. It was found that the pulse duration and envelope have minimal impact on the image resolution achieved. The passive cavitation image amplitude scales linearly with the cavitation emission energy. Cavitation images for both stable and inertial cavitation can be obtained from the same received data set.

  10. Passive and iontophoretic permeation of glipizide.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ashish; Ghosh, Bijaya; Rajgor, Naresh; Desai, B G

    2008-08-01

    In vitro iontophoretic delivery of glipizide across the pigskin was investigated. The experiment was carried out at three different donor drug concentrations using cathodal iontophoresis (current density 0.5 mA cm(-2)) with corresponding passive controls. At all concentration levels, iontophoresis showed enhanced permeation rate compared to passive controls (P<0.01). For passive permeation, the steady-state flux significantly increased with the increase in donor drug concentration (P<0.01). Passive process followed zero-order profile while the profile was nonlinear in iontophoresis. Competition by chloride ions released in the cathode compartment could be the reason. Flux enhancement was highest at the lowest drug load and lowest at the highest drug load. The target flux of glipizide was calculated to be 0. 4147 micromol h(-1). As the highest flux obtained was 0.2727 micromol cm(-2) h(-1), it can be said that glipizide is a promising candidate for iontophoretic delivery.

  11. Market ecology of active and passive investors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capocci, Andrea; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2001-09-01

    We study the role of active and passive investors in an investment market with uncertainties. Active investors concentrate on a single or a few stocks with a given probability of determining the quality of them. Passive investors spread their investment uniformly, resembling buying the market index. In this toy market stocks are introduced as good and bad. If a stock receives sufficient investment it will survive, otherwise die. Active players exert a selective pressure since they can determine to an extent the investment quality. We show that the active players provide the driving force, whereas the passive ones act as free riders. While their gains do not differ too much, we show that the active players enjoy an edge. Their presence also provides better gains to the passive players and stocks themselves.

  12. Studies on thio-substituted polyurethane foam (T-PUF) as a new efficient separation medium for the removal of inorganic/organic mercury from industrial effluents and solid wastes.

    PubMed

    Anjaneyulu, Y; Marayya, R; Rao, T H

    1993-01-01

    Novel thio-substituted flexible polyurethane foam (T-PUF) was synthesised by addition polymerisation of mercaptan with the precursors of an open-cell polyurethane foam, which can be used as a highly selective sorbent for inorganic and organic mercury from complex matrices. The percentage extraction of inorganic mercury was studied at different flow-rates, over a wide pH range at different concentrations ranging from 1 ppm, to 100 ppm. The break-through capacity and total capacity of unmodified and thio-foams were determined for inorganic and organic mercurials. The absorption efficiency of thio-foam was far superior to other sorbent media, such as activated carbon, polymeric ion-exchange resins and reagent-loaded polyurethane foams. It was observed that even at the 1000 ppm level, divalent ions like Cu, Mg, Ca, Zn do not appreciably influence the per cent extraction of inorganic mercury at the 10 ppm level. These matrix levels are the most concentrated ones which are likely to occur, both in local sewage and effluent waters. Further, the efficiency of this foam was sufficiently high at 10-100 ppm levels of Hg, even from 5-10 litres of effluent volumes using 50 g of thio-foam packed into different columns in series. Thio-foams were found to possess excellent abilities to remove and recover mercury even at low levels from industrial effluents and brine mud of chlor-alkali industry after pre-acid extraction. This makes it a highly efficient sorbent for possible application in effluent treatment. Model schemes for the removal and recovery of mercury from industrial effluents and municipal sewage (100-1000 litre) by a dynamic method are proposed and the costs incurred in a full-scale application method are indicated to show that the use of thio-foam could be commercially attractive.

  13. Passive Energy Building Design Tool

    1994-11-01

    SOLAR5 is a computer aided design tool to help architects design better, more energy efficient buildings. It is intended for use at the beginning of the design process. To get started, only four pieces of information are necessary to compute the energy needed: the square footage, the number of stories, the kind of building (such as school, home, hotel, or any one of 20 types), and its location (the program stores the temperature ranges formore » fourty major cities). Additional information may be given later to fine tune the design. An expert system using heuristics from a wide range of sources, automatically creates a passive solar baseline building from the four facts specified for that project. By modifying and adapting prior designs the user can create and work upon as many as nine schemes simultaneously. SOLAR5 can analyze the buildings thermal performance for each hour of each month and plot its total heat gain or loss as a three-dimensional surface. After reading the plot, the user can immediately redesign the building and rerun the analysis. Separate heat gain/loss surfaces can be plotted for each of the different parts of the building or schemes that add together to make up the total, including walls, roof, windows, skylights, floor, slab on grade, people, lights, equipment, and infiltration. Two different schemes can be instantly compared by asking for a three-dimensional plot showing only the difference in their performances. The objective of SOLAR5 is to allow the designer to make changes easily and quickly with detailed instantaneous pictorial feedback of the implications of the change.« less

  14. Expansion-based passive ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique of passive ranging which is based on utilizing the image-plane expansion experienced by every object as its distance from the sensor decreases. This technique belongs in the feature/object-based family. The motion and shape of a small window, assumed to be fully contained inside the boundaries of some object, is approximated by an affine transformation. The parameters of the transformation matrix are derived by initially comparing successive images, and progressively increasing the image time separation so as to achieve much larger triangulation baseline than currently possible. Depth is directly derived from the expansion part of the transformation. To a first approximation, image-plane expansion is independent of image-plane location with respect to the focus of expansion (FOE) and of platform maneuvers. Thus, an expansion-based method has the potential of providing a reliable range in the difficult image area around the FOE. In areas far from the FOE the shift parameters of the affine transformation can provide more accurate depth information than the expansion alone, and can thus be used similarly to the way they have been used in conjunction with the Inertial Navigation Unit (INU) and Kalman filtering. However, the performance of a shift-based algorithm, when the shifts are derived from the affine transformation, would be much improved compared to current algorithms because the shifts--as well as the other parameters--can be obtained between widely separated images. Thus, the main advantage of this new approach is that, allowing the tracked window to expand and rotate, in addition to moving laterally, enables one to correlate images over a very long time span which, in turn, translates into a large spatial baseline resulting in a proportionately higher depth accuracy.

  15. Expansion-based passive ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1993-01-01

    A new technique of passive ranging which is based on utilizing the image-plane expansion experienced by every object as its distance from the sensor decreases is described. This technique belongs in the feature/object-based family. The motion and shape of a small window, assumed to be fully contained inside the boundaries of some object, is approximated by an affine transformation. The parameters of the transformation matrix are derived by initially comparing successive images, and progressively increasing the image time separation so as to achieve much larger triangulation baseline than currently possible. Depth is directly derived from the expansion part of the transformation. To a first approximation, image-plane expansion is independent of image-plane location with respect to the focus of expansion (FOE) and of platform maneuvers. Thus, an expansion-based method has the potential of providing a reliable range in the difficult image area around the FOE. In areas far from the FOE the shift parameters of the affine transformation can provide more accurate depth information than the expansion alone, and can thus be used similarly to the way they were used in conjunction with the Inertial Navigation Unit (INU) and Kalman filtering. However, the performance of a shift-based algorithm, when the shifts are derived from the affine transformation, would be much improved compared to current algorithms because the shifts - as well as the other parameters - can be obtained between widely separated images. Thus, the main advantage of this new approach is that, allowing the tracked window to expand and rotate, in addition to moving laterally, enables one to correlate images over a very long time span which, in turn, translates into a large spatial baseline - resulting in a proportionately higher depth accuracy.

  16. Vertical Diffusivities of Active and Passive Tracers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Cheng, Y.; Howard, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    The climate models that include a carbon-cycle need the vertical diffusivity of a passive tracer. Since an expression for the latter is not available, it has been common practice to identify it with that of salt. The identification is questionable since T, S are active, not passive tracers. We present the first derivation of the diffusivity of a passive tracer in terms of Ri (Richardson number) and Rq (density ratio, ratio of salinity over temperature z-gradients). The following results have emerged: (a) The passive tracer diffusivity is an algebraic function of Ri, Rq. (b) In doubly stable regimes (DS, partial derivative of T with respect to z > 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z < 0), the passive scalar diffusivity is nearly the same as that of salt/heat for any values of Rq < 0 and Ri > 0. (c) In DC regimes (diffusive convection, partial derivative of T with respect to z < 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z < 0, Rq > 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is larger than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be more than twice as large. (d) In SF regimes (salt fingers, partial derivative of T with respect to z > 0, partial derivative of S with respect to z > 0, Rq < 1), the passive scalar diffusivity is smaller than that of salt. At Ri = O(1), it can be less than half of it. (e) The passive tracer diffusivity predicted at the location of NATRE (North Atlantic Tracer Release Experiment) is discussed. (f) Perhaps the most relevant conclusion is that the common identification of the tracer diffusivity with that of salt is valid only in DS regimes. In the Southern Ocean, where there is the largest CO2 absorption, the dominant regime is diffusive convection discussed in (c) above.

  17. Energy savings obtainable through passive solar techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    A passive solar energy system is one in which the thermal energy flow is by natural means, that is by radiation, conduction, or natural convection. The purpose of the paper is to provide a survey of passive solar heating experience, especially in the US. Design approaches are reviewed and examples shown. Misconceptions are discussed. Advantages are listed. The Los Alamos program of performance simulation and evaluation is described and a simplified method of performance estimation is outlined.

  18. Tracking Passive Sentence Comprehension in Agrammatic Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Aaron M.; Mack, Jennifer E.; Thompson, Cynthia K.

    2011-01-01

    People with agrammatic aphasia often experience greater difficulty comprehending passive compared to active sentences. The Trace Deletion Hypothesis (TDH; Grodzinsky, 2000) proposes that aphasic individuals cannot generate accurate syntactic representations of passive sentences and, hence, use an agent-first processing strategy which leads to at-chance performance. We tested this claim using the eyetracking-while-listening paradigm in order to reveal online processing routines. Ten agrammatic aphasic participants and 10 age-matched controls listened to passive and active sentences and performed a sentence-picture matching task (i.e., selecting between two pictures with reversed thematic roles), while their eye movements were monitored. Control participants’ performance was at ceiling, whereas accuracy for the aphasic participants was above chance for active sentences and at chance for passive sentences. Further, for the control participants, the eye movement data showed an initial agent-first processing bias, followed by fixation on the correct picture in the vicinity of the verb in both active and passive sentences. However, the aphasic participants showed no evidence of agent-first processing, counter the predictions of the TDH. In addition, in active sentences, they reliably fixated the correct picture only at sentence offset, reflecting slowed processing. During passive sentence processing, fixations were at chance throughout the sentence, but different patterns were noted for correct and incorrect trials. These results are consistent with the proposal that agrammatic sentence comprehension failure involves lexical processing and/or lexical integration deficits. PMID:22043134

  19. Passive Dosing in Chronic Toxicity Tests with the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Fabian; Böhm, Leonard; Höss, Sebastian; Möhlenkamp, Christel; Claus, Evelyn; Düring, Rolf-Alexander; Schäfer, Sabine

    2016-09-01

    In chronic toxicity tests with Caenorhabditis elegans, it is necessary to feed the nematode with bacteria, which reduces the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree) of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs), leading to poorly defined exposure with conventional dosing procedures. We examined the efficacy of passive dosing of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using silicone O-rings to control exposure during C. elegans toxicity testing and compared the results to those obtained with solvent spiking. Solid-phase microextraction and liquid-liquid extraction were used to measure Cfree and the chemicals taken up via ingestion. During toxicity testing, Cfree decreased by up to 89% after solvent spiking but remained constant with passive dosing. This led to a higher apparent toxicity on C. elegans exposed by passive dosing than by solvent spiking. With increasing bacterial cell densities, Cfree of solvent-spiked PAHs decreased while being maintained constant with passive dosing. This resulted in lower apparent toxicity under solvent spiking but an increased apparent toxicity with passive dosing, probably as a result of the higher chemical uptake rate via food (CUfood). Our results demonstrate the utility of passive dosing to control Cfree in routine chronic toxicity testing of HOCs. Moreover, both chemical uptake from water or via food ingestion can be controlled, thus enabling the discrimination of different uptake routes in chronic toxicity studies.

  20. Passive Dosing in Chronic Toxicity Tests with the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Fabian; Böhm, Leonard; Höss, Sebastian; Möhlenkamp, Christel; Claus, Evelyn; Düring, Rolf-Alexander; Schäfer, Sabine

    2016-09-01

    In chronic toxicity tests with Caenorhabditis elegans, it is necessary to feed the nematode with bacteria, which reduces the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree) of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs), leading to poorly defined exposure with conventional dosing procedures. We examined the efficacy of passive dosing of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using silicone O-rings to control exposure during C. elegans toxicity testing and compared the results to those obtained with solvent spiking. Solid-phase microextraction and liquid-liquid extraction were used to measure Cfree and the chemicals taken up via ingestion. During toxicity testing, Cfree decreased by up to 89% after solvent spiking but remained constant with passive dosing. This led to a higher apparent toxicity on C. elegans exposed by passive dosing than by solvent spiking. With increasing bacterial cell densities, Cfree of solvent-spiked PAHs decreased while being maintained constant with passive dosing. This resulted in lower apparent toxicity under solvent spiking but an increased apparent toxicity with passive dosing, probably as a result of the higher chemical uptake rate via food (CUfood). Our results demonstrate the utility of passive dosing to control Cfree in routine chronic toxicity testing of HOCs. Moreover, both chemical uptake from water or via food ingestion can be controlled, thus enabling the discrimination of different uptake routes in chronic toxicity studies. PMID:27494096

  1. Passive monitors to measure hydrogen sulfide near concentrated animal feeding operations

    PubMed Central

    Pavilonis, Brian T.; O'Shaughnessy, Patrick T.; Altmaier, Ralph; Metwali, Nervana; Thorne, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is one of many airborne pollutants emitted by concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). However, few studies have characterized ambient H2S levels near these facilities, largely due to the lack of low-cost, reliable, and easily transportable instrumentation available to researchers. We determined intermediate environmental H2S exposure near CAFOs using Radiello passive monitors. First, a laboratory study was performed to determine the accuracy of the device. Next, a total of eight passive H2S monitors were deployed bi-weekly in close proximity (<40 m) to a medium-sized swine confinement for seven months in order to determine the temporal and spatial variability of H2S. Finally, we measured H2S concentrations across two rural Iowa counties to characterize ambient exposure near thirteen CAFOs and two schools. The value of the temperature-adjusted H2S passive diffusion rate provided by the supplier was 29% larger than the 24-hr rate determined experimentally. Concentrations of H2S measured near the medium-sized confinement were varied and ranged from 0.2 to 48.6 ppb depending on the sampling period and proximity to a lagoon on the property. Two-week concentrations near the schools were low (<1 ppb), while concentrations near the thirteen CAFOs ranged from 0.1 to 42.9 ppb. The passive monitors were effective in measuring H2S concentrations near a swine CAFO as long as they were exposed for a sufficient period of time (two weeks). Radiello passive monitors are a promising new device in measuring intermediate H2S exposure in rural populations. Measured values in excess of an Iowa state limit of 30 ppb (24-hr average) suggest that enforcement actions are needed to mitigate H2S migration from swine CAFOs. PMID:23681048

  2. Passive monitors to measure hydrogen sulfide near concentrated animal feeding operations.

    PubMed

    Pavilonis, Brian T; O'Shaughnessy, Patrick T; Altmaier, Ralph; Metwali, Nervana; Thorne, Peter S

    2013-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is one of many airborne pollutants emitted by concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). However, few studies have characterized ambient H2S levels near these facilities, largely due to the lack of low-cost, reliable, and easily transportable instrumentation available to researchers. We determined intermediate environmental H2S exposure near CAFOs using Radiello passive monitors. First, a laboratory study was performed to determine the accuracy of the device. Next, a total of eight passive H2S monitors were deployed bi-weekly in close proximity (<40 m) to a medium-sized swine confinement for seven months in order to determine the temporal and spatial variability of H2S. Finally, we measured H2S concentrations across two rural Iowa counties to characterize ambient exposure near thirteen CAFOs and two schools. The value of the temperature-adjusted H2S passive diffusion rate provided by the supplier was 29% larger than the 24 h rate determined experimentally. Concentrations of H2S measured near the medium-sized confinement were varied and ranged from 0.2 to 48.6 ppb depending on the sampling period and proximity to a lagoon on the property. Two-week concentrations near the schools were low (<1 ppb), while concentrations near the thirteen CAFOs ranged from 0.1 to 42.9 ppb. The passive monitors were effective in measuring H2S concentrations near a swine CAFO as long as they were exposed for a sufficient period of time (two weeks). Radiello passive monitors are a promising new device in measuring intermediate H2S exposure in rural populations. Measured values in excess of an Iowa state limit of 30 ppb (24 h average) suggest that enforcement actions are needed to mitigate H2S migration from swine CAFOs. PMID:23681048

  3. Offshore Benin, a classic passive margin

    SciTech Connect

    Mathalone, J.M.P. )

    1991-03-01

    Offshore Benin comprises a narrow east-west continental shelf, some 30 km wide. A sharp shelf break running parallel to the coast borders the shelf, whereupon water depths rapidly increase to over 7000 ft. The area lies within the Dahomey Embayment, one of a series of Cretaceous and younger basins lining the coast of Africa that owe their inception to the Late Mesozoic break-up of the Gondwanaland Continent. The basin extends some 100 km inland, but sedimentary section is thin onshore compared to a maximum of 20,000 ft of sediment offshore. Initial sedimentation in this basin was of Neocomian alluvial and lacustrine clastics. These were deposited in east-west-trending narrow half-grabens associated with the initial break up of the South American and African continents. They are covered unconformably by more extensive Albian and Cenomanian transgressive clastics and shallow marine Turonian sandstones which are the main reservoir at Seme, Benin's only oilfield. The Senonian section offshore comprises passive margin deep sea clastic sediments prograding southwards. Very large proximal deep sea channels up to 2500 ft thick are developed in this interval. These channels are associated with excellent petroleum source rocks, averaging 4-5% oil-prone organic carbon, and form the main exploration target in the area when configured in a trap morphology. Seismic data quality is excellent in the region allowing detailed examination of the relationships between the rifted section and later units. In addition, these data illustrate clearly both internal and external morphology of the Senonian proximal deep sea channels.

  4. NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Barron; Moran, M. Susan; Escobar, Vanessa; Brown, Molly E.

    2014-05-01

    The launch of the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission in 2014 will provide global soil moisture and freeze-thaw measurements at moderate resolution (9 km) with latency as short as 24 hours. The resolution, latency and global coverage of SMAP products will enable new applications in the fields of weather, climate, drought, flood, agricultural production, human health and national security. To prepare for launch, the SMAP mission has engaged more than 25 Early Adopters. Early Adopters are users who have a need for SMAP-like soil moisture or freeze-thaw data, and who agreed to apply their own resources to demonstrate the utility of SMAP data for their particular system or model. In turn, the SMAP mission agreed to provide Early Adopters with simulated SMAP data products and pre-launch calibration and validation data from SMAP field campaigns, modeling, and synergistic studies. The applied research underway by Early Adopters has provided fundamental knowledge of how SMAP data products can be scaled and integrated into users' policy, business and management activities to improve decision-making efforts. This presentation will cover SMAP applications including weather and climate forecasting, vehicle mobility estimation, quantification of greenhouse gas emissions, management of urban potable water supply, and prediction of crop yield. The presentation will end with a discussion of potential international applications with focus on the ESA/CEOS TIGER Initiative entitled "looking for water in Africa", the United Nations (UN) Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) which carries a specific mandate focused on Africa, the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) which lists soil moisture as an Essential Climate Variable (ECV), and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which reported a food and nutrition crisis in the Sahel.

  5. Quantitative passive soil vapor sampling for VOCs--Part 4: Flow-through cell.

    PubMed

    McAlary, Todd; Groenevelt, Hester; Seethapathy, Suresh; Sacco, Paolo; Crump, Derrick; Tuday, Michael; Schumacher, Brian; Hayes, Heidi; Johnson, Paul; Parker, Louise; Górecki, Tadeusz

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a controlled experiment comparing several quantitative passive samplers for monitoring concentrations of volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors in soil gas using a flow-through cell. This application is simpler than conventional active sampling using adsorptive tubes because the flow rate does not need to be precisely measured and controlled, which is advantageous because the permeability of subsurface materials affects the flow rate and the permeability of geologic materials is highly variable. Using passive samplers in a flow-through cell, the flow rate may not need to be known exactly, as long as it is sufficient to purge the cell in a reasonable time and minimize any negative bias attributable to the starvation effect. An experiment was performed in a 500 mL flow-through cell using a two-factor, one-half fraction fractional factorial test design with flow rates of 80, 670 and 930 mL min(-1) and sample durations of 10, 15 and 20 minutes for each of five different passive samplers (passive Automatic Thermal Desorption Tube, Radiello®, SKC Ultra, Waterloo Membrane Sampler™ and 3M™ OVM 3500). A Summa canister was collected coincident with each passive sampler and analyzed by EPA Method TO-15 to provide a baseline for comparison of the passive sampler concentrations. The passive sampler concentrations were within a factor of 2 of the Summa canister concentrations in 32 of 35 cases. Passive samples collected at the low flow rate and short duration showed low concentrations, which is likely attributable to insufficient purging of the cell after sampler placement.

  6. What exactly is measured by passive microbead rheology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieber, Jay; Pilyugina, Ekaterina

    2010-03-01

    The dynamic modulus G^* of a viscoelastic medium is often measured by following the trajectory of a small bead subject to Brownian motion in a method called ``passive microbead rheology". In the pioneering manuscript that introduced the idea [T. G. Mason and D. A. Weitz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 1250 (1995)], this equivalence between the autocorrelation function and G^* was assumed via the generalized Stokes-Einstein relation (GSER). We show here that this expression does not satisfy the correct initial condition. Also, earlier derivations of the GSER use an initial condition that freezes the bead in space until measurements begin, which is not typical for experiments. We use here an analytic solution of the forces on a sphere undergoing arbitrary displacement in an arbitrary viscoelastic medium combined with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to derive what is actually measured in the microbead rheology experiment. We find that a convolution of G^* is indeed measured in bead-displacement statistics, which is similar to GSER but obeys the correct initial conditions. The result includes inertial effects, and allows for the presence of an optical trap, allowing a more general technique to extract the dynamic modulus from microrheology.

  7. Passivation of fluorinated activated charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Del Cul, G.D.; Trowbridge, L.D.; Simmons, D.W.; Williams, D.F.; Toth, L.M.

    1997-10-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE), at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since 1969 when the fuel salt was drained from the core into two Hastelloy N tanks at the reactor site. In 1995, a multiyear project was launched to remediate the potentially hazardous conditions generated by the movement of fissile material and reactive gases from the storage tanks into the piping system and an auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB). The top 12 in. of the ACB is known by gamma scan and thermal analysis to contain about 2.6 kg U-233. According to the laboratory tests, a few feet of fluorinated charcoal are believed to extend beyond the uranium front. The remainder of the ACB should consist of unreacted charcoal. Fluorinated charcoal, when subjected to rapid heating, can decompose generating gaseous products. Under confined conditions, the sudden exothermic decomposition can produce high temperatures and pressures of near-explosive characteristics. Since it will be necessary to drill and tap the ACB to allow installation of piping and instrumentation for remediation and recovery activities, it is necessary to chemically convert the reactive fluorinated charcoal into a more stable material. Ammonia can be administered to the ACB as a volatile denaturing agent that results in the conversion of the C{sub x}F to carbon and ammonium fluoride, NH{sub 4}F. The charcoal laden with NH{sub 4}F can then be heated without risking any sudden decomposition. The only consequence of heating the treated material will be the volatilization of NH{sub 4}F as a mixture of NH{sub 3} and HF, which would primarily recombine as NH{sub 4}F on surfaces below 200 C. The planned scheme for the ACB denaturing is to flow diluted ammonia gas in steps of increasing NH{sub 3} concentration, 2% to 50%, followed by the injection of pure ammonia. This report summarizes the planned passivation treatment scheme to stabilize the ACB and remove the potential hazards. It also includes basic information

  8. Feasibility study of a passive aeration reactor equipped with vertical pipes for compost stabilization of cow manure.

    PubMed

    Sylla, Youssouf Boundou; Kuroda, Masao; Yamada, Masayuki; Matsumoto, Naoko

    2006-10-01

    Pilot-scale composting was carried out with cow manure to evaluate the performances of two passive aeration systems: a conventional passive aeration system equipped with horizontal pipes and an unusual passive aeration method based on air delivery by means of vertical pipes. The effects of both types of passive aeration apparatus were investigated in order to determine the degree of composting rate by continuously monitoring temperature, moisture content, organic matter, electrical conductivity, pH and C/N ratio in the piles. Temperatures in the range of thermophily (55-65 degrees C) were reached in all runs within 1-2 days then lasting for about 1 week, a span long enough for pathogen abatement. Results suggest that passive aeration carried out by vertical pipes is more effective for air delivery into compost piles than conventional passive aeration of air adduction with horizontal pipes. The variation in the number of vertical pipes was revealed to be an important parameter for the control of composting rate and temperature. Composting rates estimated from the heat balance equation were substantially in agreement with those computed through the conversion ratio of total organic matter decrement. The conversion ratios and composting rates obtained in this study using passive aeration with vertical pipes were well aligned with those found using forced air delivery systems.

  9. Feasibility study of a passive aeration reactor equipped with vertical pipes for compost stabilization of cow manure.

    PubMed

    Sylla, Youssouf Boundou; Kuroda, Masao; Yamada, Masayuki; Matsumoto, Naoko

    2006-10-01

    Pilot-scale composting was carried out with cow manure to evaluate the performances of two passive aeration systems: a conventional passive aeration system equipped with horizontal pipes and an unusual passive aeration method based on air delivery by means of vertical pipes. The effects of both types of passive aeration apparatus were investigated in order to determine the degree of composting rate by continuously monitoring temperature, moisture content, organic matter, electrical conductivity, pH and C/N ratio in the piles. Temperatures in the range of thermophily (55-65 degrees C) were reached in all runs within 1-2 days then lasting for about 1 week, a span long enough for pathogen abatement. Results suggest that passive aeration carried out by vertical pipes is more effective for air delivery into compost piles than conventional passive aeration of air adduction with horizontal pipes. The variation in the number of vertical pipes was revealed to be an important parameter for the control of composting rate and temperature. Composting rates estimated from the heat balance equation were substantially in agreement with those computed through the conversion ratio of total organic matter decrement. The conversion ratios and composting rates obtained in this study using passive aeration with vertical pipes were well aligned with those found using forced air delivery systems. PMID:17121117

  10. Passive Sampling Methods for Contaminated Sediments: Practical Guidance for Selection, Calibration, and Implementation

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article provides practical guidance on the use of passive sampling methods(PSMs) that target the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree) for improved exposure assessment of hydrophobic organic chemicals in sediments. Primary considerations for selecting a PSM for a specific a...

  11. Intrahippocampal Insulin Improves Memory in a Passive-Avoidance Task in Male Wistar Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babri, Shirin; Badie, Hamid Gholamipour; Khamenei, Saeed; Seyedlar, Mehdi Ordikhani

    2007-01-01

    The main impacts of insulin favor the peripheral organs. Although it functions as a neuropeptide, insulin possesses also some central effects. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of intrahippocampal infusion of insulin on passive avoidance learning in healthy male rats. Thirty male wistar rats were divided into three groups (n = 10…

  12. Effects of passive smoking on theophylline clearance.

    PubMed

    Matsunga, S K; Plezia, P M; Karol, M D; Katz, M D; Camilli, A E; Benowitz, N L

    1989-10-01

    Theophylline disposition was examined in seven passive smokers, defined as nonsmokers with long-term exposure to cigarette smoke, and seven age-matched nonsmokers with minimal smoke exposure. Subjects were given an intravenous infusion of aminophylline (6 mg/kg) and blood samples were drawn before and during the 48-hour postinfusion period. Clearance for passive smokers was 6.01 x 10(-2) L/hr.kg and for nonsmokers, clearance was 4.09 x 10(-2) L/hr.kg (p less than 0.025). Terminal elimination half-life for passive smokers was 6.93 hours versus 8.69 hours for nonsmokers (p less than 0.05). The mean residence time for passive smokers was 9.89 hours. For nonsmokers, the mean residence time was 13.11 hours (p less than 0.05). These measurements were statistically different, whereas there was no difference in volume of distribution between the groups, suggesting that passive smokers metabolize theophylline more rapidly than nonsmokers. Plasma and urine cotinine and nicotine concentrations were measured in all subjects. There was a significant difference between the subject groups in plasma (p less than 0.004) and urine (p less than 0.002) cotinine concentrations. Theophylline clearance correlated with both plasma (r = 0.73, p less than 0.01) and urine (r = 0.79, p less than 0.01) cotinine concentrations. Additional studies should be conducted to further define the pharmacokinetic characteristics of passive smokers and to assess the effects of passive smoking on drugs metabolized by the mixed function oxidase system. PMID:2791443

  13. Properties of the nuclear medium.

    PubMed

    Baldo, M; Burgio, G F

    2012-02-01

    We review our knowledge on the properties of the nuclear medium that have been studied, over many years, on the basis of many-body theory, laboratory experiments and astrophysical observations. Throughout the presentation particular emphasis is placed on the possible relationship and links between the nuclear medium and the structure of nuclei, including the limitations of such an approach. First we consider the realm of phenomenological laboratory data and astrophysical observations and the hints they can give on the characteristics that the nuclear medium should possess. The analysis is based on phenomenological models, that however have a strong basis on physical intuition and an impressive success. More microscopic models are also considered, and it is shown that they are able to give invaluable information on the nuclear medium, in particular on its equation of state. The interplay between laboratory experiments and astrophysical observations is particularly stressed, and it is shown how their complementarity enormously enriches our insights into the structure of the nuclear medium. We then introduce the nucleon-nucleon interaction and the microscopic many-body theory of nuclear matter, with a critical discussion about the different approaches and their results. The Landau-Fermi liquid theory is introduced and briefly discussed, and it is shown how fruitful it can be in discussing the macroscopic and low-energy properties of the nuclear medium. As an illustrative example, we discuss neutron matter at very low density, and it is shown how it can be treated within the many-body theory. The general bulk properties of the nuclear medium are reviewed to indicate at which stage of our knowledge we stand, taking into account the most recent developments both in theory and experiments. A section is dedicated to the pairing problem. The connection with nuclear structure is then discussed, on the basis of the energy density functional method. The possibility of linking

  14. Properties of the nuclear medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldo, M.; Burgio, G. F.

    2012-02-01

    We review our knowledge on the properties of the nuclear medium that have been studied, over many years, on the basis of many-body theory, laboratory experiments and astrophysical observations. Throughout the presentation particular emphasis is placed on the possible relationship and links between the nuclear medium and the structure of nuclei, including the limitations of such an approach. First we consider the realm of phenomenological laboratory data and astrophysical observations and the hints they can give on the characteristics that the nuclear medium should possess. The analysis is based on phenomenological models, that however have a strong basis on physical intuition and an impressive success. More microscopic models are also considered, and it is shown that they are able to give invaluable information on the nuclear medium, in particular on its equation of state. The interplay between laboratory experiments and astrophysical observations is particularly stressed, and it is shown how their complementarity enormously enriches our insights into the structure of the nuclear medium. We then introduce the nucleon-nucleon interaction and the microscopic many-body theory of nuclear matter, with a critical discussion about the different approaches and their results. The Landau-Fermi liquid theory is introduced and briefly discussed, and it is shown how fruitful it can be in discussing the macroscopic and low-energy properties of the nuclear medium. As an illustrative example, we discuss neutron matter at very low density, and it is shown how it can be treated within the many-body theory. The general bulk properties of the nuclear medium are reviewed to indicate at which stage of our knowledge we stand, taking into account the most recent developments both in theory and experiments. A section is dedicated to the pairing problem. The connection with nuclear structure is then discussed, on the basis of the energy density functional method. The possibility of linking

  15. Silicone rubber selection for passive sampling of pesticides in water.

    PubMed

    Martin, A; Margoum, C; Randon, J; Coquery, M

    2016-11-01

    Silicone rubber can extract organic compounds with a broad range of polarities (logKow>2-3) from aqueous samples. Such compounds include substances of major concern in the protection of aquatic ecosystems and human health, e.g. pesticides. Silicone rubbers (SRs) with various characteristics have been successfully used in sorptive methods for water sample extraction in the laboratory (SPME, SBSE), and for passive sampling in aquatic environments. However, only few studies have evaluated variability in organic compound sorption due to the origin of SRs, particularly for pesticides. The aim of this study was to select an SR for the extraction of pesticides from water samples by passive sampling. To this end we measured the impact of seven SR formulations on sorption capacity, defined by the partition coefficient (Ksw). Kinetic experiments and sorption isotherms were performed to determine extraction recovery as a selection criterion for SRs, and pesticide partition coefficients. Very large differences in affinity for pesticides were found between two kinds of SRs: "Polymerized SR kits" and "Manufactured SRs". One SR was chosen among the "Manufactured SRs", and the Ksw values of 21 pesticides were determined, filling a gap in the literature (1.50

  16. Propulsion by passive filaments and active flagella near boundaries.

    PubMed

    Evans, Arthur A; Lauga, Eric

    2010-10-01

    Confinement and wall effects are known to affect the kinematics and propulsive characteristics of swimming microorganisms. When a solid body is dragged through a viscous fluid at constant velocity, the presence of a wall increases fluid drag, and thus the net force required to maintain speed has to increase. In contrast, recent optical trapping experiments have revealed that the propulsive force generated by human spermatozoa is decreased by the presence of boundaries. Here, we use a series of simple models to analytically elucidate the propulsive effects of a solid boundary on passively actuated filaments and model flagella. For passive flexible filaments actuated periodically at one end, the presence of the wall is shown to increase the propulsive forces generated by the filaments in the case of displacement-driven actuation, while it decreases the force in the case of force-driven actuation. In the case of active filaments as models for eukaryotic flagella, we demonstrate that the manner in which a solid wall affects propulsion cannot be known a priori, but is instead a nontrivial function of the flagellum frequency, wavelength, its material characteristics, the manner in which the molecular motors self-organize to produce oscillations (prescribed activity model or self-organized axonemal beating model), and the boundary conditions applied experimentally to the tethered flagellum. In particular, we show that in some cases, the increase in fluid friction induced by the wall can lead to a change in the waveform expressed by the flagella, which results in a decrease in their propulsive force.

  17. Propulsion by passive filaments and active flagella near boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur A.; Lauga, Eric

    2010-10-01

    Confinement and wall effects are known to affect the kinematics and propulsive characteristics of swimming microorganisms. When a solid body is dragged through a viscous fluid at constant velocity, the presence of a wall increases fluid drag, and thus the net force required to maintain speed has to increase. In contrast, recent optical trapping experiments have revealed that the propulsive force generated by human spermatozoa is decreased by the presence of boundaries. Here, we use a series of simple models to analytically elucidate the propulsive effects of a solid boundary on passively actuated filaments and model flagella. For passive flexible filaments actuated periodically at one end, the presence of the wall is shown to increase the propulsive forces generated by the filaments in the case of displacement-driven actuation, while it decreases the force in the case of force-driven actuation. In the case of active filaments as models for eukaryotic flagella, we demonstrate that the manner in which a solid wall affects propulsion cannot be known a priori, but is instead a nontrivial function of the flagellum frequency, wavelength, its material characteristics, the manner in which the molecular motors self-organize to produce oscillations (prescribed activity model or self-organized axonemal beating model), and the boundary conditions applied experimentally to the tethered flagellum. In particular, we show that in some cases, the increase in fluid friction induced by the wall can lead to a change in the waveform expressed by the flagella, which results in a decrease in their propulsive force.

  18. Redox-active porous coordination polymers prepared by trinuclear heterometallic pivalate linking with the redox-active nickel(II) complex: synthesis, structure, magnetic and redox properties, and electrocatalytic activity in organic compound dehalogenation in heterogeneous medium.

    PubMed

    Lytvynenko, A S; Kolotilov, S V; Kiskin, M A; Cador, O; Golhen, S; Aleksandrov, G G; Mishura, A M; Titov, V E; Ouahab, L; Eremenko, I L; Novotortsev, V M

    2014-05-19

    Linking of the trinuclear pivalate fragment Fe2CoO(Piv)6 by the redox-active bridge Ni(L)2 (compound 1; LH is Schiff base from hydrazide of 4-pyridinecarboxylic acid and 2-pyridinecarbaldehyde, Piv(-) = pivalate) led to formation of a new porous coordination polymer (PCP) {Fe2CoO(Piv)6}{Ni(L)2}1.5 (2). X-ray structures of 1 and 2 were determined. A crystal lattice of compound 2 is built from stacked 2D layers; the Ni(L)2 units can be considered as bridges, which bind two Fe2CoO(Piv)6 units. In desolvated form, 2 possesses a porous crystal lattice (SBET = 50 m(2) g(-1), VDR = 0.017 cm(3) g(-1) estimated from N2 sorption at 78 K). At 298 K, 2 absorbed a significant quantity of methanol (up to 0.3 cm(3) g(-1)) and chloroform. Temperature dependence of molar magnetic susceptibility of 2 could be fitted as superposition of χMT of Fe2CoO(Piv)6 and Ni(L)2 units, possible interactions between them were taken into account using molecular field model. In turn, magnetic properties of the Fe2CoO(Piv)6 unit were fitted using two models, one of which directly took into account a spin-orbit coupling of Co(II), and in the second model the spin-orbit coupling of Co(II) was approximated as zero-field splitting. Electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties of 2 were studied by cyclic voltammetry in suspension and compared with electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties of a soluble analogue 1. A catalytic effect was determined by analysis of the catalytic current dependency on concentrations of the substrate. Compound 1 possessed electrocatalytic activity in organic halide dehalogenation, and such activity was preserved for the Ni(L)2 units, incorporated into the framework of 2. In addition, a new property occurred in the case of 2: the catalytic activity of PCP depended on its sorption capacity with respect to the substrate. In contrast to homogeneous catalysts, usage of solid PCPs may allow selectivity due to porous structure and simplify separation of product. PMID

  19. A concept of JAERI passive safety light water reactor system (JPSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Murao, Y.; Araya, F.; Iwamura, T.

    1995-09-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) proposed a passive safety reactor system concept, JPSR, which was developed for reducing manpower in operation and maintenance and influence of human errors on reactor safety. In the concept the system was extremely simplified. The inherent matching nature of core generation and heat removal rate within a small volume change of the primary coolant is introduced by eliminating chemical shim and adopting in-vessel control rod drive mechanism units, a low power density core and once-through steam generators. In order to simplify the system, a large pressurizer, canned pumps, passive engineered-safety-features-system (residual heat removal system and coolant injection system) are adopted and the total system can be significantly simplified. The residual heat removal system is completely passively actuated in non-LOCAs and is also used for depressurization of the primary coolant system to actuate accumulators in small break LOCAs and reactor shutdown cooling system in normal operation. All of systems for nuclear steam supply system are built in the containment except for the air coolers as a the final heat sink of the passive residual heat removal system. Accordingly the reliability of the safety system and the normal operation system is improved, since most of residual heat removal system is always working and a heat sink for normal operation system is {open_quotes}safety class{close_quotes}. In the passive coolant injection system, depressurization of the primary cooling system by residual heat removal system initiates injection from accumulators designed for the MS-600 in medium pressure and initiates injection from the gravity driven coolant injection pool at low pressure. Analysis with RETRAN-02/MOD3 code demonstrated the capability of passive load-following, self-power-controllability, cooling and depressurization.

  20. Discreet passive explosive detection through 2-sided waveguided fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Harper, Ross James; la Grone, Marcus; Fisher, Mark

    2011-10-18

    The current invention provides a passive sampling device suitable for collecting and detecting the presence of target analytes. In particular, the passive sampling device is suitable for detecting nitro-aromatic compounds. The current invention further provides a passive sampling device reader suitable for determining the collection of target analytes. Additionally, the current invention provides methods for detecting target analytes using the passive sampling device and the passive sampling device reader.

  1. Discreet passive explosive detection through 2-sided wave guided fluorescence

    DOEpatents

    Harper, Ross James; la Grone, Marcus; Fisher, Mark

    2012-10-16

    The current invention provides a passive sampling device suitable for collecting and detecting the presence of target analytes. In particular, the passive sampling device is suitable for detecting nitro-aromatic compounds. The current invention further provides a passive sampling device reader suitable for determining the collection of target analytes. Additionally, the current invention provides methods for detecting target analytes using the passive sampling device and the passive sampling device reader.

  2. Nitric acid passivation of Ti6Al4V reduces thickness of surface oxide layer and increases trace element release.

    PubMed

    Callen, B W; Lowenberg, B F; Lugowski, S; Sodhi, R N; Davies, J E

    1995-03-01

    Passivation of Ti6Al4V and cpTi implants using methods based on the ASTM-F86 nitric acid protocol are used with the intention of reducing their surface reactivity, and consequently the corrosion potential, in the highly corrosive biologic milieu. The ASTM-F86 passivation protocol was originally developed for surgical implants made of stainless steel and chrome cobalt alloy. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to examine the effect of nitric acid passivation on the surface oxide layer of mill-annealed Ti6Al4V and cpTi, we have found that such treatment actually reduced the oxide thickness on the alloy while having no significant effect on the pure metal. These results correlated with observations obtained using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (GFAAS) to detect trace element release from solid, mill-annealed, Ti6Al4V and cpTi into serum-containing culture medium. We detected significantly greater levels of Ti, Al, and V in the presence of passivated compared to nonpassivated Ti6Al4V. In contrast, nitric acid passivation did not influence Ti release from mill-annealed cpTi. These results, derived from two mill-annealed Ti-based metals, would indicate that re-examination of ASTM-F86-based passivation protocols with respect to Ti6Al4V should be considered in view of the widespread use of this alloy for biomedical devices. PMID:7615579

  3. Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layers for the in-situ passivation of GaN-based HEMT structures

    SciTech Connect

    Yunin, P. A. Drozdov, Yu. N.; Drozdov, M. N.; Korolev, S. A.; Okhapkin, A. I.; Khrykin, O. I.; Shashkin, V. I.

    2015-11-15

    A method for the in situ passivation of GaN-based structures with silicon nitride in the growth chamber of a metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) reactor is described. The structural and electrical properties of the obtained layers are investigated. The in situ and ex situ passivation of transistor structures with silicon nitride in an electron-beam-evaporation device are compared. It is shown that ex situ passivation changes neither the initial carrier concentration nor the mobility. In situ passivation makes it possible to protect the structure surface against uncontrollable degradation upon the finishing of growth and extraction to atmosphere. In the in situ passivated structure, the carrier concentration increases and the mobility decreases. This effect should be taken into account when manufacturing passivated GaN-based transistor structures.

  4. Charge carrier trapping at passivated silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiffe, Johannes; Hofmann, Marc; Rentsch, Jochen; Preu, Ralf

    2011-03-01

    Surface passivation has become an essential factor for translating high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cell concepts into industrial production schemes. In photovoltaics, a widespread method to determine the surface recombination is to measure the effective charge carrier lifetime from the photoconductance of symmetrically passivated silicon wafers in transient or quasi-static mode. In this work, it is shown how the injection history at the surface influences the transient effective lifetime measurement for several passivation layers. This dependence leads to systematic differences between quasi-static and transient measurements. The influence can be explained by charge trapping in slow surface states at the surface passivation layer. A model including slow surface states is used in a fit procedure to evaluate the capture cross sections of these traps. The observed effect is well-pronounced for silicon-rich passivation layers like a-Si:H, a-SiCx:H or silicon-rich a-SiOxNy:H. For PECVD-AlOx layers and for thermally grown SiO2 layers as well, however, the effective lifetime measurement could be influenced.

  5. Passive terahertz imaging for security application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lan-tao; Deng, Chao; Zhao, Yuan-meng; Zhang, Cun-lin

    2013-08-01

    The passive detection is safe for passengers and operators as no radiation. Therefore, passive terahertz (THz) imaging can be applied to human body security check. Imaging in the THz band offers the unique property of being able to identify object through a range of materials. Therefore passive THz imaging is meaningful for security applications. This attribute has always been of interest to both the civil and military marks with applications. We took advantage of a single THz detector and a trihedral scanning mirror to propose another passive THz beam scanning imaging method. This method overcame the deficiencies of the serious decline in image quality due to the movement of the focused mirror. We exploited a THz scanning mirror with a trihedral scanning mirror and an ellipsoidal mirror to streamline the structure of the system and increase the scanning speed. Then the passive THz beam scanning imaging system was developed based on this method. The parameters were set as follows: the best imaging distance was 1.7m, the image height was 2m, the image width was 1m, the minimum imaging time of per frame was 8s, and the minimum resolution was 4cm. We imaged humans with different objects hidden under their clothes, such as fruit knife, belt buckle, mobile phone, screwdriver, bus cards, keys and other items. All the tested stuffs could be detected and recognized from the image.

  6. Passive cooling systems in residential buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingersoll, John G.; Givoni, Baruch

    1985-11-01

    The performance of four passive cooling systems, nocturnal convective cooling, nocturnal radiative cooling, direct evaporative cooling and conductive earth-coupled cooling, is evaluated for representative environmental conditions in the temperate, hot-humid and hot-arid climatic zones of the United States. The analysis indicates that substantial portion of the cooling load of a typical energy-efficient single family residential building can be eliminated with any of these passive systems. Depending on system type and climatic zone, the building cooling load can be reduced by 1/3 to over 4/5 of its original value. The corresponding energy savings would amount to a minimum of 25 TWh/yr and could potentially exceed 50 TWh/yr, if proper passive cooling systems were to be employed throughout the country. Incorporation of passive cooling models in building energy analysis codes will be necessary to determine more precisely the potential of each system. Field testing will also be required to further evaluate this potential. Moreover, the extension of analytical modeling to include additional passive cooling systems and the research of advanced building—natural environment coupling systems and materials constitute tasks requiring further effort.

  7. Passive-solar homes for Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, M. L.

    1982-06-01

    Acceptance of passive solar technologies has been slow within the conventional building trades in Texas because it is a common misconception that solar is expensive, and data on local applications is severely limited or nonexistent. It is the purpose of this solar development to move passive solar design into the mainstream of public acceptance by helping to overcome and eliminate these barriers. Specifically, the goal is to develop a set of regional climatic building standards to help guide the conventional building trade toward the utilization of soft energy systems which will reduce overall consumption at a price and convenience most Texans can afford. To meet this objective, eight sample passive design structures are presented. These designs represent state of the art regional applications of passive solar space conditioning. The methodology used in the passive solar design process included: analysis of regional climatic data; analysis of historical regional building prototypes; determination of regional climatic design priorities and assets; prototypical design models for the discretionary housing market; quantitative thermal analysis of prototypical designs; and construction drawings of building prototypes.

  8. Passive ventilation for residential air quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Axley, J.

    1999-07-01

    Infiltration has long served the residential ventilation needs in North America. In Northern Europe it has been augmented by purpose-provided natural ventilation systems--so-called passive ventilation systems--to better control moisture problems in dwellings smaller than their North American counterparts and in a generally wetter climate. The growing concern for energy consumption, and the environmental impacts associated with it, has however led to tighter residential construction standards on both continents and as a result problems associated with insufficient background ventilation have surfaced. Can European passive ventilation systems be adapted for use in North American dwellings to provide general background ventilation for air quality control? This paper attempts to answer this question. The configuration, specifications and performance of the preferred European passive ventilation system--the passive stack ventilation (PSV) system--will be reviewed; innovative components and system design strategies recently developed to improve the traditional PSV system performance will be outlined; and alternative system configurations will be presented that may better serve the climatic extremes and more urban contexts of North America. While these innovative and alternative passive ventilation systems hold great promise for the future, a rational method to size the components of these systems to achieve the control and precision needed to meet the conflicting constraints of new ventilation and air tightness standards has not been forthcoming. Such a method will be introduced in this paper and an application of this method will be presented.

  9. Re-active Passive (RAP) Devices for Control of Noise Transmission through a Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carneal, James P.; Giovanardi, Marco; Fuller, Chris R.; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    Re-Active Passive (RAP) devices have been developed to control low frequency (<1000 Hz) noise transmission through a panel. These devices use a combination of active, re-active, and passive technologies packaged into a single unit to control a broad frequency range utilizing the strength of each technology over its best suited frequency range. The RAP device uses passive constrained layer damping to cover the relatively high frequency range (>200 Hz), reactive distributed vibration absorber) to cover the medium frequency range (75 to 250 Hz), and active control for controlling low frequencies (<200 Hz). The device was applied to control noise transmission through a panel mounted in a transmission loss test facility. Experimental results are presented for the bare panel, and combinations of passive treatment, reactive treatment, and active control. Results indicate that three RAP devices were able to increase the overall broadband (15-1000 Hz) transmission loss by 9.4 dB. These three devices added a total of 285 grams to the panel mass of 6.0 kg, or approximately 5%, not including control electronics.

  10. Air-drying kinetics affect yeast membrane organization and survival.

    PubMed

    Lemetais, Guillaume; Dupont, Sébastien; Beney, Laurent; Gervais, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    The plasma membrane (PM) is a key structure for the survival of cells during dehydration. In this study, we focused on the concomitant changes in survival and in the lateral organization of the PM in yeast strains during desiccation, a natural or technological environmental perturbation that involves transition from a liquid to a solid medium. To evaluate the role of the PM in survival during air-drying, a wild-type yeast strain and an osmotically fragile mutant (erg6Δ) were used. The lateral organization of the PM (microdomain distribution) was observed using a fluorescent marker related to a specific green fluorescent protein-labeled membrane protein (Sur7-GFP) after progressive or rapid desiccation. We also evaluated yeast behavior during a model dehydration experiment performed in liquid medium (osmotic stress). For both strains, we observed similar behavior after osmotic and desiccation stresses. In particular, the same lethal magnitude of dehydration and the same lethal kinetic effect were found for both dehydration methods. Thus, yeast survival after progressive air-drying was related to PM reorganization, suggesting the positive contribution of passive lateral rearrangements of the membrane components. This study also showed that the use of glycerol solutions is an efficient means to simulate air-drying desiccation.

  11. Passive Entrapment of Tumor Cells Determines Metastatic Dissemination to Spinal Bone and Other Osseous Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Piffko, Andras; Hoffmann, Christian J.; Harms, Christoph; Vajkoczy, Peter; Czabanka, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    During the metastatic process tumor cells circulate in the blood stream and are carried to various organs. In order to spread to different organs tumor cell—endothelial cell interactions are crucial for extravasation mechanisms. It remains unclear if tumor cell dissemination to the spinal bone occurs by passive entrapment of circulating tumor cells or by active cellular mechanisms mediated by cell surface molecules or secreted factors. We investigated the seeding of three different tumor cell lines (melanoma, lung and prostate carcinoma) to the microvasculature of different organs. Their dissemination was compared to biologically passive microbeads. The spine and other organs were resected three hours after intraarterial injection of tumor cells or microbeads. Ex vivo homogenization and fluorescence analysis allowed quantification of tumor cells or microbeads in different organs. Interestingly, tumor cell distribution to the spinal bone was comparable to dissemination of microbeads independent of the tumor cell type (melanoma: 5.646% ± 7.614%, lung: 6.007% ± 1.785%, prostate: 3.469% ± 0.602%, 7 μm beads: 9.884% ± 7.379%, 16 μm beads: 7.23% ± 1.488%). Tumor cell seeding differed significantly between tumor cells and microbeads in all soft tissue organs. Moreover, there were significant differences between the different tumor cell lines in their dissemination behaviour to soft tissue organs only. These findings demonstrate that metastatic dissemination of tumor cells to spinal bone and other osseous organs is mediated by passive entrapment of tumor cells similar to passive plugging of microvasculature observed after intraarterial microbeads injection. PMID:27603673

  12. Passive Entrapment of Tumor Cells Determines Metastatic Dissemination to Spinal Bone and Other Osseous Tissues.

    PubMed

    Broggini, Thomas; Piffko, Andras; Hoffmann, Christian J; Harms, Christoph; Vajkoczy, Peter; Czabanka, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    During the metastatic process tumor cells circulate in the blood stream and are carried to various organs. In order to spread to different organs tumor cell-endothelial cell interactions are crucial for extravasation mechanisms. It remains unclear if tumor cell dissemination to the spinal bone occurs by passive entrapment of circulating tumor cells or by active cellular mechanisms mediated by cell surface molecules or secreted factors. We investigated the seeding of three different tumor cell lines (melanoma, lung and prostate carcinoma) to the microvasculature of different organs. Their dissemination was compared to biologically passive microbeads. The spine and other organs were resected three hours after intraarterial injection of tumor cells or microbeads. Ex vivo homogenization and fluorescence analysis allowed quantification of tumor cells or microbeads in different organs. Interestingly, tumor cell distribution to the spinal bone was comparable to dissemination of microbeads independent of the tumor cell type (melanoma: 5.646% ± 7.614%, lung: 6.007% ± 1.785%, prostate: 3.469% ± 0.602%, 7 μm beads: 9.884% ± 7.379%, 16 μm beads: 7.23% ± 1.488%). Tumor cell seeding differed significantly between tumor cells and microbeads in all soft tissue organs. Moreover, there were significant differences between the different tumor cell lines in their dissemination behaviour to soft tissue organs only. These findings demonstrate that metastatic dissemination of tumor cells to spinal bone and other osseous organs is mediated by passive entrapment of tumor cells similar to passive plugging of microvasculature observed after intraarterial microbeads injection. PMID:27603673

  13. Passive infrared bullet detection and tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, T.J.

    1994-12-31

    An apparatus and method for passively detecting a projectile such as, for example, a bullet using a passive infrared detector. A passive infrared detector is focused onto a region in which a projectile is expected to be located. Successive images of infrared radiation in the region are recorded. Background infrared radiation present in the region is suppressed such that second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile as the projectile passes through the region are produced. A projectile path calculator determines the path and other aspects of the projectile by using the second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile. The present invention, in certain embodiments, also determines the origin of the path of the projectile and takes a photograph of the area surrounding the origin and/or fires at least one projectile at the area surrounding the origin of the path of the projectile.

  14. Passive infrared bullet detection and tracking

    DOEpatents

    Karr, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for passively detecting a projectile such as, for example, a bullet using a passive infrared detector. A passive infrared detector is focused onto a region in which a projectile is expected to be located. Successive images of infrared radiation in the region are recorded. Background infrared radiation present in the region is suppressed such that second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile as the projectile passes through the region are produced. A projectile path calculator determines the path and other aspects of the projectile by using the second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile. The present invention, in certain embodiments, also determines the origin of the path of the projectile and takes a photograph of the area surrounding the origin and/or fires at least one projectile at the area surrounding the origin of the path of the projectile.

  15. Passive infrared bullet detection and tracking

    DOEpatents

    Karr, T.J.

    1997-01-21

    An apparatus and method for passively detecting a projectile such as, for example, a bullet using a passive infrared detector. A passive infrared detector is focused onto a region in which a projectile is expected to be located. Successive images of infrared radiation in the region are recorded. Background infrared radiation present in the region is suppressed such that second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile as the projectile passes through the region are produced. A projectile path calculator determines the path and other aspects of the projectile by using the second successive images of infrared radiation generated by the projectile. The present invention, in certain embodiments, also determines the origin of the path of the projectile and takes a photograph of the area surrounding the origin and/or fires at least one projectile at the area surrounding the origin of the path of the projectile. 9 figs.

  16. Climate-Specific Passive Building Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Graham S.; Klingenberg, Katrin

    2015-07-01

    Passive design principles (super insulation, airtight envelopes, elimination of thermal bridges, etc.) - pioneered in North America in the 70s and 80s and refined in Europe in the 90s have proven to be universally effective to significantly reduce heating and cooling loads. However, a single, rigid performance metric developed in Germany has led to limited uptake of passive building principles in many regions of the United States. It has also, in many cases, promoted some design decisions that had negative effects on economic feasibility and thermal comfort. This study's main objective is to validate (in a theoretical sense) verifiable, climate-specific passive standards and space conditioning criteria that retain ambitious, environmentally-necessary energy reduction targets and are economically feasible, such standards provide designers an ambitious but achievable performance target on the path to zero.

  17. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Payer, J H

    2006-01-10

    Alloy 22 (N06022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nanometers per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids.

  18. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. Rebak; J.H. Payer

    2006-01-20

    Alloy 22 (NO6022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nano-meters per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids.

  19. Passive cooling system for a vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Thoensen, Thomas

    2005-11-15

    A passive cooling system for a vehicle (114) transfers heat from an overheated internal component, for example, an instrument panel (100), to an external portion (116) of the vehicle (114), for example, a side body panel (126). The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section (118) embedded in the overheated internal component and a condenser section (120) at the external portion (116) of the vehicle (114). The evaporator (118) and condenser (120) sections are in fluid communication. The passive cooling system may also include a thermally conductive film (140) for thermally connecting the evaporator sections (118) of the heat pipes (112) to each other and to the instrument panel (100).

  20. Passive Cooling System for a Vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, T. J.; Thoensen, T.

    2005-11-15

    A passive cooling system for a vehicle (114) transfers heat from an overheated internal component, for example, an instrument panel (100), to an external portion (116) of the vehicle (114), for example, a side body panel (126). The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section (118) embedded in the overheated internal component and a condenser section (120) at the external portion (116) of the vehicle (114). The evaporator (118) and condenser (120) sections are in fluid communication. The passive cooling system may also include a thermally conductive film (140) for thermally connecting the evaporator sections (118) of the heat pipes (112) to each other and to the instrument panel (100).

  1. Load attenuating passively adaptive wind turbine blade

    DOEpatents

    Veers, Paul S.; Lobitz, Donald W.

    2003-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving wind turbine performance by alleviating loads and controlling the rotor. The invention employs the use of a passively adaptive blade that senses the wind velocity or rotational speed, and accordingly modifies its aerodynamic configuration. The invention exploits the load mitigation prospects of a blade that twists toward feather as it bends. The invention includes passively adaptive wind turbine rotors or blades with currently preferred power control features. The apparatus is a composite fiber horizontal axis wind-turbine blade, in which a substantial majority of fibers in the blade skin are inclined at angles of between 15 and 30 degrees to the axis of the blade, to produces passive adaptive aeroelastic tailoring (bend-twist coupling) to alleviate loading without unduly jeopardizing performance.

  2. Load attenuating passively adaptive wind turbine blade

    DOEpatents

    Veers, Paul S.; Lobitz, Donald W.

    2003-01-07

    A method and apparatus for improving wind turbine performance by alleviating loads and controlling the rotor. The invention employs the use of a passively adaptive blade that senses the wind velocity or rotational speed, and accordingly modifies its aerodynamic configuration. The invention exploits the load mitigation prospects of a blade that twists toward feather as it bends. The invention includes passively adaptive wind turbine rotors or blades with currently preferred power control features. The apparatus is a composite fiber horizontal axis wind-turbine blade, in which a substantial majority of fibers in the blade skin are inclined at angles of between 15 and 30 degrees to the axis of the blade, to produces passive adaptive aeroelastic tailoring (bend-twist coupling) to alleviate loading without unduly jeopardizing performance.

  3. Passive absolute age and temperature history sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Alex; Vianco, Paul T.

    2015-11-10

    A passive sensor for historic age and temperature sensing, including a first member formed of a first material, the first material being either a metal or a semiconductor material and a second member formed of a second material, the second material being either a metal or a semiconductor material. A surface of the second member is in contact with a surface of the first member such that, over time, the second material of the second member diffuses into the first material of the first member. The rate of diffusion for the second material to diffuse into the first material depends on a temperature of the passive sensor. One of the electrical conductance, the electrical capacitance, the electrical inductance, the optical transmission, the optical reflectance, or the crystalline structure of the passive sensor depends on the amount of the second material that has diffused into the first member.

  4. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L.

    2013-01-01

    The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. This procedure results in the formation of a metal oxide layer to prevent corrosion. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid which exhibits excellent corrosion performance; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. The longtime military specification for the passivation of stainless steel was cancelled in favor of newer specifications which allow for the use of citric acid in place of nitric acid. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits that include increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational costs. There have been few studies, however, to determine whether citric acid is an acceptable alternative for NASA and DoD. This paper details activities to date including development of the joint test plan, on-going and planned testing, and preliminary results.

  5. Active colloids that slosh through passive matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Granick, Steve

    Studies of natural and artificial active matter have focused on systems with a large mismatch of the time and length scales for active and passive elements, but in a variety of non-equilibrium condensed matter systems, including numerous biological processes, actively driven elements have a crowded environment of surrounding passive ``solvent'' elements of comparable size. Here we study self-propelled colloidal particles in a passive matrix of comparable size. Particles with high activity take straight lines and sharp turns through the soft 2-D crystal matrix to ensure rapid healing of the crystal structure. Effective attraction between active particles arises when the concentration of active particles or the hardness of the matrix increases; active particles tend to segregate in the grain boundaries of the crystal matrix.

  6. Generating passive NIR images from active LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagstrom, Shea; Broadwater, Joshua

    2016-05-01

    Many modern LIDAR platforms contain an integrated RGB camera for capturing contextual imagery. However, these RGB cameras do not collect a near-infrared (NIR) color channel, omitting information useful for many analytical purposes. This raises the question of whether LIDAR data, collected in the NIR, can be used as a substitute for an actual NIR image in this situation. Generating a LIDAR-based NIR image is potentially useful in situations where another source of NIR, such as satellite imagery, is not available. LIDAR is an active sensing system that operates very differently from a passive system, and thus requires additional processing and calibration to approximate the output of a passive instrument. We examine methods of approximating passive NIR images from LIDAR for real-world datasets, and assess differences with true NIR images.

  7. Passive Grubenwasserreinigung als Alternative zu aktiven Systemen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolkersdorfer, Christian; Younger, Paul L.

    2002-06-01

    For the treatment of contaminated mine waters reliable treatment methods with low investment and operational costs are essential. Therefore, passive treatment systems recently have been installed in Great Britain and in Germany (e. g. anoxic limestone drains, constructed wetlands, reactive barriers, roughing filters) and during the last eight years such systems successfully treated mine waters, using up to 6 ha of space. In some cases with highly contaminated mine water, a combination of active and passive systems should be applied, as in any case the water quality has to reach the limits. Because not all the processes of passive treatment systems are understood in detail, current research projects (e. g. EU-project PIRAMID) were established to clarify open questions.

  8. Antimony Passivation of InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobusawa, Hajime; Ikoma, Hideaki

    1993-09-01

    Antimony passivation of InP was investigated. Sb was evaporated on a HCl-etched InP substrate and annealed at 300°C for 10 min. I--V characteristics of the Au/Sb/InP diode are substantially improved and the Schottky barrier height becomes higher as compared with the conventional Au/InP diode. The reverse current decreases by about two orders of magnitude upon Sb passivation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) measurements show that the Sb oxide, Sb2O3, is formed near both the surface and the interface, i.e., the Sb2O3/Sb/Sb2O3 layered structure exists on the InP substrate. On the other hand, In2O3, the dominant component species of the native oxide of InP, is not observed in the Sb-passivated sample, which indicates that Sb passivation effectively removes that native oxide (In2O3) and suppresses reoxidation of the InP surface. Sb is considered to reduce In2O3 and is oxidized itself to become Sb2O3. This is a probable mechanism of Sb passivation. After the Sb-passivated substrate is washed in deionized water, the amount of Sb decreases and In2O3 is again observed. This is explained by the balance in the chemical reaction between In2O3 and Sb2O3 (the mass-action law). The low Schottky barrier height and the poor electrical characteristics are thus well correlated with the existence of the native oxide of InP, dominantly, In2O3.

  9. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1994-05-31

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer. 1 fig.

  10. An all-silicon passive optical diode.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Wang, Jian; Varghese, Leo T; Shen, Hao; Niu, Ben; Xuan, Yi; Weiner, Andrew M; Qi, Minghao

    2012-01-27

    A passive optical diode effect would be useful for on-chip optical information processing but has been difficult to achieve. Using a method based on optical nonlinearity, we demonstrate a forward-backward transmission ratio of up to 28 decibels within telecommunication wavelengths. Our device, which uses two silicon rings 5 micrometers in radius, is passive yet maintains optical nonreciprocity for a broad range of input power levels, and it performs equally well even if the backward input power is higher than the forward input. The silicon optical diode is ultracompact and is compatible with current complementary metal-oxide semiconductor processing.

  11. Passive Cooling For Large Infrared Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Edward I.

    1993-01-01

    Conceptual passive-cooling technique enables very large infrared telescope in vacuum of outer space cooled to below 20 K without using cryogen. Telescope orbiting Earth at high altitude of around 100,000 km. Scheme also offers very small gradient of temperature across primary telescope reflector, so thermal distortions smaller; accuracy of surface figure of reflector significantly enhanced. Passive-cooling technique also applied to building of very large cryostats and to development of very large sun shields in traditional manner, and some elements of technique adapted for current small observatories.

  12. Technical Assessment: WRAP 1 HVAC Passive Shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, D.E.; Nash, C.R.; Stroup, J.L.

    1993-08-12

    As the result of careful interpretation of DOE Order 6430.lA and other DOE Orders, the HVAC system for WRAP 1 has been greatly simplified. The HVAC system is now designed to safely shut down to Passive State if power fails for any reason. The fans cease functioning, allowing the Zone 1 and Zone 2 HVAC Confinement Systems to breathe with respect to atmospheric pressure changes. Simplifying the HVAC system avoided overdesign. Construction costs were reduced by eliminating unnecessary equipment. This report summarizes work that was done to define the criteria, physical concepts, and operational experiences that lead to the passive shutdown design for WRAP 1 confinement HVAC systems.

  13. Inherently safe passive gas monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph V.; Bellamy, John Stephen; Shuler, James M.; Shull, Davis J.; Leduc, Daniel R.

    2016-09-06

    Generally, the present disclosure is directed to gas monitoring systems that use inductive power transfer to safely power an electrically passive device included within a nuclear material storage container. In particular, the electrically passive device can include an inductive power receiver for receiving inductive power transfer through a wall of the nuclear material storage container. The power received by the inductive power receiver can be used to power one or more sensors included in the device. Thus, the device is not required to include active power generation components such as, for example, a battery, that increase the risk of a spark igniting flammable gases within the container.

  14. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer.

  15. Passive Proton Conductance Is the Major Reason for Membrane Depolarization and Conductance Increase in Chara buckellii in High-Salt Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yao, X.; Bisson, M. A.

    1993-09-01

    Chara buckellii G.O.A., a salt-tolerant alga, has a less negative membrane potential (Em) when cultured in saline medium (artificial Waldsea water) than when cultured in freshwater. The cell hyperpolarizes and membrane conductance (Gm) decreases when the external medium is changed from Waldsea control solution (WCS), a high-salt medium, to low-salt medium containing sufficient sorbitol to generate the same osmotic potential as WCS. Banding pattern and proton flux experiments show that C. buckellii has higher passive proton influx in the alkaline band in high-salt medium than in low-salt medium. Decrease of the passive proton influx by darkness or low external pH dramatically hyperpolarizes the membrane and decreases the conductance. The pH dependence curves of Em and Gm also indicate the existence of high passive proton conductance (GH) in C. buckellii. Ion substitution experiments show that Em and Gm of saltwater cells are not dependent on K+, Na+, Cl-, or SO42+. Mg2+ also affects Em and Gm, but its effect is probably on GH. We conclude that GH is the most important cause of the membrane depolarization and conductance increase in the saltwater alga C. buckellii.

  16. Passive motion reduces vestibular balance and perceptual responses.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Richard C; Watson, Shaun R D

    2015-05-15

    With the hypothesis that vestibular sensitivity is regulated to deal with a range of environmental motion conditions, we explored the effects of passive whole-body motion on vestibular perceptual and balance responses. In 10 subjects, vestibular responses were measured before and after a period of imposed passive motion. Vestibulospinal balance reflexes during standing evoked by galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) were measured as shear reaction forces. Perceptual tests measured thresholds for detecting angular motion, perceptions of suprathreshold rotation and perceptions of GVS-evoked illusory rotation. The imposed conditioning motion was 10 min of stochastic yaw rotation (0.5-2.5 Hz ≤ 300 deg s(-2) ) with subjects seated. This conditioning markedly reduced reflexive and perceptual responses. The medium latency galvanic reflex (300-350 ms) was halved in amplitude (48%; P = 0.011) but the short latency response was unaffected. Thresholds for detecting imposed rotation more than doubled (248%; P < 0.001) and remained elevated after 30 min. Over-estimation of whole-body rotation (30-180 deg every 5 s) before conditioning was significantly reduced (41.1 to 21.5%; P = 0.033). Conditioning reduced illusory vestibular sensations of rotation evoked by GVS (mean 113 deg for 10 s at 1 mA) by 44% (P < 0.01) and the effect persisted for at least 1 h (24% reduction; P < 0.05). We conclude that a system of vestibular sensory autoregulation exists and that this probably involves central and peripheral mechanisms, possibly through vestibular efferent regulation. We propose that failure of these regulatory mechanisms at different levels could lead to disorders of movement perception and balance control during standing.

  17. Passive Wireless Hermetic Environment Monitoring System for Spray Painting Workshop.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Ma, Jingjing; Huang, Yan; Tang, Dan; Huang, Qing-An

    2016-08-01

    Passive wireless sensors have the advantages of operating without a power supply and remote sensing capability. Hence, they are very suitable for some harsh environments, such as hermetic environments, rotating parts, or very high temperature environments. The spray painting workshop is such a harsh environment, containing a large amount of flammable paint mist and organic gas. Aiming at this special environment of spray painting workshop, a passive wireless hermetic environment monitoring system was designed, fabricated, and demonstrated. The proposed system is composed of a transponder and a reader, and the circuit design of each part is given in detail in this paper. The power and the data transmission between the transponder and the reader are realized by the inductive coupling mechanism. Utilizing the back scatter modulation and channel multiplexing, the frequency signals generated by three different environmental sensors-together with their interfaces in the transponder-are wirelessly read out by the reader. Because of the harsh environment of the spray painting room, the package of the monitoring system is quite important. Three different kinds of filter films for the system package were compared. The experimental results show that the composite filter film aluminum anodic oxide/polytetrafluoroethylene (AAO/PTFE) has the best performance. After fabrication, the measured temperature, humidity, and pressure sensitivities were measured and found to be 180 Hz/°C in the range of 0~60 °C, 100 Hz/%RH in the range of 15~95 %RH, and 42 Hz/hPa in the range of 600~1100 hPa, respectively. Additionally, the remote sensing distance of the monitoring system reaches 4 cm. Finally, the passive wireless hermetic environment monitoring system was installed on the glass wall of the spray painting workshop and was successfully demonstrated.

  18. Passive Wireless Hermetic Environment Monitoring System for Spray Painting Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lifeng; Ma, Jingjing; Huang, Yan; Tang, Dan; Huang, Qing-An

    2016-01-01

    Passive wireless sensors have the advantages of operating without a power supply and remote sensing capability. Hence, they are very suitable for some harsh environments, such as hermetic environments, rotating parts, or very high temperature environments. The spray painting workshop is such a harsh environment, containing a large amount of flammable paint mist and organic gas. Aiming at this special environment of spray painting workshop, a passive wireless hermetic environment monitoring system was designed, fabricated, and demonstrated. The proposed system is composed of a transponder and a reader, and the circuit design of each part is given in detail in this paper. The power and the data transmission between the transponder and the reader are realized by the inductive coupling mechanism. Utilizing the back scatter modulation and channel multiplexing, the frequency signals generated by three different environmental sensors—together with their interfaces in the transponder—are wirelessly read out by the reader. Because of the harsh environment of the spray painting room, the package of the monitoring system is quite important. Three different kinds of filter films for the system package were compared. The experimental results show that the composite filter film aluminum anodic oxide/polytetrafluoroethylene (AAO/PTFE) has the best performance. After fabrication, the measured temperature, humidity, and pressure sensitivities were measured and found to be 180 Hz/°C in the range of 0~60 °C, 100 Hz/%RH in the range of 15~95 %RH, and 42 Hz/hPa in the range of 600~1100 hPa, respectively. Additionally, the remote sensing distance of the monitoring system reaches 4 cm. Finally, the passive wireless hermetic environment monitoring system was installed on the glass wall of the spray painting workshop and was successfully demonstrated. PMID:27490546

  19. Passive Wireless Hermetic Environment Monitoring System for Spray Painting Workshop.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Ma, Jingjing; Huang, Yan; Tang, Dan; Huang, Qing-An

    2016-01-01

    Passive wireless sensors have the advantages of operating without a power supply and remote sensing capability. Hence, they are very suitable for some harsh environments, such as hermetic environments, rotating parts, or very high temperature environments. The spray painting workshop is such a harsh environment, containing a large amount of flammable paint mist and organic gas. Aiming at this special environment of spray painting workshop, a passive wireless hermetic environment monitoring system was designed, fabricated, and demonstrated. The proposed system is composed of a transponder and a reader, and the circuit design of each part is given in detail in this paper. The power and the data transmission between the transponder and the reader are realized by the inductive coupling mechanism. Utilizing the back scatter modulation and channel multiplexing, the frequency signals generated by three different environmental sensors-together with their interfaces in the transponder-are wirelessly read out by the reader. Because of the harsh environment of the spray painting room, the package of the monitoring system is quite important. Three different kinds of filter films for the system package were compared. The experimental results show that the composite filter film aluminum anodic oxide/polytetrafluoroethylene (AAO/PTFE) has the best performance. After fabrication, the measured temperature, humidity, and pressure sensitivities were measured and found to be 180 Hz/°C in the range of 0~60 °C, 100 Hz/%RH in the range of 15~95 %RH, and 42 Hz/hPa in the range of 600~1100 hPa, respectively. Additionally, the remote sensing distance of the monitoring system reaches 4 cm. Finally, the passive wireless hermetic environment monitoring system was installed on the glass wall of the spray painting workshop and was successfully demonstrated. PMID:27490546

  20. Microwave remote sensing of a two-layer random medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, L.; Kong, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    A two-variable expansion technique is used to solve for the mean Green's. function from the Dyson equation under the nonlinear approximation. The Bethe-Salpeter equation then gives rise to a set of modified radiative transfer (MRT) equations which accommodate coherent effects essential to bounded media. It is found that the nonlinear approximation, instead of the more popular bilocal approximation, should be used for the case of bounded media. The two approximations yield identical results for unbounded media. The MRT equations are then solved for a two-layer random medium. The MRT equations give rise to simple and useful solutions which are applicable to both active and passive microwave remote sensing.

  1. A program for passively tracking a target using an array of sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Buhl, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of passively tracking a moving signal source has importance in a variety of applications such as radar, sonar, seismology, and radio astronomy. In many applications, only limited information is available about the signal source. It will be assumed here that only the signals which are detected by the sensors and the velocity of the source signal are known. The objective of this document is to present a program which passively tracks a target using an array of sensors. This program is available in MATLAB, version 3.5. The algorithm which is implemented consists of three main parts: time delay estimation, passive localization, and data post processing. Each of these parts are discussed, and the mathematical foundation for their solution given. Following, this the organization of the program is presented, and an example of its usage is given.

  2. A program for passively tracking a target using an array of sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhl, M. R.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of passively tracking a moving signal source has importance in a variety of applications such as radar, sonar, seismology, and radio astronomy. In many applications, only limited information is available about the signal source. It will be assumed here that only the signals which are detected by the sensors and the velocity of the source signal are known. The objective of this document is to present a program which passively tracks a target using an array of sensors. This program is available in MATLAB, version 3.5. The algorithm which is implemented consists of three main parts: time delay estimation, passive localization, and data post processing. Each of these parts are discussed, and the mathematical foundation for their solution given. Following this, the organization of the program is presented, and an example of its usage is given.

  3. Characterization and Application of Passive Samplers for Monitoring of Pesticides in Water.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Lutz; Daneshvar, Atlasi; Lau, Anna E; Kreuger, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Five different water passive samplers were calibrated under laboratory conditions for measurement of 124 legacy and current used pesticides. This study provides a protocol for the passive sampler preparation, calibration, extraction method and instrumental analysis. Sampling rates (RS) and passive sampler-water partition coefficients (KPW) were calculated for silicone rubber, polar organic chemical integrative sampler POCIS-A, POCIS-B, SDB-RPS and C18 disk. The uptake of the selected compounds depended on their physicochemical properties, i.e., silicone rubber showed a better uptake for more hydrophobic compounds (log octanol-water partition coefficient (KOW) > 5.3), whereas POCIS-A, POCIS-B and SDB-RPS disk were more suitable for hydrophilic compounds (log KOW < 0.70). PMID:27584699

  4. Robust Control of Non-Passive Systems via Passification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, A. G.; Joshi, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents methods which enable the use of passivity-based control design techniques to control non-passive systems. For inherently non-passive finite- dimensional linear time-invaraint systems, passification methods are presented to render such systems passive by suitable compensation. The passified system can then be controlled by a class of passive linear controllers. The idea is to exploit the robust stability properties of passivity-based control laws for uncertain systems. The proposed passification methods are demonstrated by application to the ACC benchmark problem and to pitch-axis control of an F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) model.

  5. Medium Modification of Vector Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Chaden Djalali, Michael Paolone, Dennis Weygand, Michael H. Wood, Rakhsha Nasseripour

    2011-03-01

    The theory of the strong interaction, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), has been remarkably successful in describing high-energy and short-distance-scale experiments involving quarks and gluons. However, applying QCD to low energy and large-distance scale experiments has been a major challenge. Various QCD-inspired models predict a partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclear matter with modifications of the properties of hadrons from their free-space values. Measurable changes such as a shift in mass and/or a change of width are predicted at normal nuclear density. Photoproduction of vector mesons off nuclei have been performed at different laboratories. The properties of the ρ, ω and φ mesons are investigated either directly by measuring their mass spectra or indirectly through transparency ratios. The latest results regarding medium modifications of the vector mesons in the nuclear medium will be discussed.

  6. Medium modifications with recoil polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, J.F.J. van den; Ent, R.

    1994-04-01

    The authors show that the virtual Compton scattering process allows for a precise study of the off-shell electron-nucleon vertex. In a separable model, they show the sensitivity to new unconstrained structure functions of the nucleon, beyond the usual Dirac and Pauli form factors. In addition, they show the sensitivity to bound nucleon form factors using the reaction 4He({rvec e},e{prime},{rvec p}){sup 3}H. A nucleon embedded in a nucleus represents a complex system. Firstly, the bound nucleon is necessarily off-shell and in principle a complete understanding of the dynamical structure of the nucleon is required in order to calculate its off-shell electromagnetic interaction. Secondly, one faces the possibility of genuine medium effects, such as for example quark-exchange contributions. Furthermore, the electromagnetic coupling to the bound nucleon is dependent on the nuclear dynamics through the self-energy of the nucleon in the nuclear medium.

  7. Passive solar energy in Washington: Results of the Washington passive solar design/build/competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-03-01

    The Washington Passive Solar Design and Build Competition was held in an effort to encourage the design, construction, and marketing of moderately priced passive solar homes in Washington state. Four categories were established, including single and multi-family, new design and remodel. A number of commonly made thermal mistakes are discussed. Eight winning entries are presented along with four notable entries, for each of which is given as an overview of the design, energy conservation measures, passive heating and cooling features, system operation, and thermal performance.

  8. Mg Isotope Fractionation Between E. coli and Growth Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basset, R.; Lemelle, L.; Albalat, E.; Telouk, P.; Albarède, F.

    2008-12-01

    Magnesium is a major element in both microbial cells and minerals, immune to redox conditions and atmospheric interactions. In organic cells, Mg can be associated with membranes, with cytoplasm (either as an isolated ion or bound to proteins). Its isotope composition can be used to constrain the contribution of organic material to carbonate fluxes and the overall cycle of this element in the exogenous environment [1, 2]. Cells of DH5α E. coli strain were grown in Luria Broth medium and the Mg isotope fractionation between the cells and their growth medium determined after calcination in Pt crucibles, chemical purification by cation exchange chemistry in HCl medium [3] and isotopic analysis on a Nu HR MC-ICPMS. The yield is better than 96%. The Mg contents of 2.19 ± 0.08 mg per g DW in cells and 0.117 ± 0.001 mg per g DW in Luria Broth medium are consistent with literature data [4]. About half of the Mg initially present in the LB medium is taken up by the growing cells. At high cellular concentrations (OD600 = 3.5), cells are enriched in 26Mg by 0.97 ± 0.14 ‰ with respect to the culture medium. Although E. coli may not be a good proxy for oceanic plankton, such a substantial fractionation of Mg isotopes suggests that incorporation of even a few percent organic matter into oceanic oozes depletes oceanic Mg in its heavy isotopes and therefore accounts for the isotopic difference between riverine and marine Mg. [1] Drever, The Sea 5 (1974) 337-357 [2] Tipper et al., EPSL 250 (2006) 241-253 [3] Chang et al., JAAS 18 (2003) 296-301 [4] Outten et al., Science 292 (2001), 2488-2492

  9. Development of a Dehumidification System for a Passive Sampler for Determining 1,3-Butadiene.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Kenji; Miyake, Yuichi; Amagai, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    The passive sampler is a simple device for collecting gaseous compounds. It is affected by environmental conditions such as relative humidity, but a dehumidification system (DHS) has not been developed for it. We have developed a dehumidification device for the passive sampler for determining 1,3-butadiene. It consists of a passive sampler surrounded by a DHS consisting of a basket filled with granular magnesium perchlorate as the dehumidification agent. The passive sampler consists of a porous polytetrafluoroethylene tube packed with Carboxen 1000 adsorbent. We compared the amounts of water adsorbed on the Carboxen 1000 adsorbent in the presence and in the absence of the DHS; the results showed that the DHS prevented water from entering the sampler. Volatile organic compounds that entered the sampler were collected by the Carboxen 1000 adsorbent. In the case of 1,3-butadiene, much higher amounts were collected by the passive sampler with the DHS than without it. This may be due to interference of adsorption or acceleration of 1,3-butadiene degradation by the water-soluble oxidant on the surface of the Carboxen 1000 adsorbent. PMID:27627969

  10. Structure, Dynamics, and Thermodynamics of Passivated Gold Nanocrystallites and Their Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luedtke, W. D.; Landman, Uzi

    1997-03-01

    The structure, dynamics, and thermodynamics of gold nanocrystallites passivated by alkylthiolate monolayers were investigated, using molecular dynamics simulations, in different environments-as isolated gas-phase clusters, when adsorbed on a graphite surface, and when assembled into three-dimensional superlattices. (W.D.Luedtke and U.Landman, J.Phys.Chem. 100), 13323(1996). The passivating monolayers organize into molecular bundles which undergo a reversible melting transition to a uniform orientational distribution. The passivating molecules confer high surface mobility to the crystallites, involving a collective slip-diffusion mechanism. The room-temperature structure of the superlattice made of Au_140(C_12H_25S)_62 nanocrystallites is predicted to be tetragonally distorted fcc with enhanced orientational bundling of the passivating molecules along the direction of the tetragonal distortion. On the other hand, passivation by shorter chain molecules, Au_140(C_4H_9S)_62, results in a room-temperature bcc superlattice, transforming to a fcc lattice at higher temperatures.

  11. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J.S.

    1991-12-31

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process.

  12. Passive Baited Sequential Filth Fly Trap

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Filth fly control measures may be optimized with a better understanding of fly population dynamics measured throughout the day. We describe the modification of a commercial motorized sequential mosquito trap to accept liquid odorous bait and leverage a classic inverted cone design to passively confi...

  13. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    DOEpatents

    Herring, J.S.

    1993-09-21

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process. 8 figures.

  14. Submerged passively-safe power plant

    DOEpatents

    Herring, J. Stephen

    1993-01-01

    The invention as presented consists of a submerged passively-safe power station including a pressurized water reactor capable of generating at least 600 MW of electricity, encased in a double hull vessel, and provides fresh water by using the spent thermal energy in a multistage flash desalination process.

  15. Passive damping in EDS maglev systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Rote, D. M.

    2002-05-03

    There continues to be strong interest in the subjects of damping and drag forces associated with electrodynamic suspension (EDS) systems. While electromagnetic drag forces resist the forward motion of a vehicle and therefore consume energy, damping forces control, at least in part, the response of the vehicle to disturbances. Ideally, one would like to reduce the drag forces as much as possible while retaining adequate damping forces to insure dynamic stability and satisfactory ride quality. These two goals turn out to be difficult to achieve in practice. It is well known that maglev systems tend to be intrinsically under damped. Consequently it is often necessary in a practical system design to enhance the damping passively or actively. For reasons of cost and simplicity, it is desirable to rely as much as possible on passive damping mechanisms. In this paper, rough estimates are made of the passive damping and drag forces caused by various mechanisms in EDS systems. No attention will be given to active control systems or secondary suspension systems which are obvious ways to augment passive damping mechanisms if the latter prove to be inadequate.

  16. Passive Polarimetric Microwave Signatures Observed Over Antarctica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    WindSat satellite-based fully polarimetric passive microwave observations, expressed in the form of the Stokes vector, were analyzed over the Antarctic ice sheet. The vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures (first two Stokes components) from WindSat are shown to be consistent w...

  17. Comprehension of Passives in Broca's Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastiaanse, Roelien; van Zonneveld, Ron

    2006-01-01

    Drai and Grodzinsky have statistically analyzed a large corpus of data on the comprehension of passives by patients with Broca's aphasia. The data come, according to Drai and Grodzinsky, from binary choice tasks. Among the languages that are analyzed are Dutch and German. Drai and Grodzinsky argue that Dutch and German speaking Broca patients…

  18. Passive ranging using a single IR sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, W.; Gobel, R.W.; Draper, J.S.

    1994-12-31

    As current defense system architectures change and downsize there is a need to accomplish more with each sensors capability. Desert Storm`s missile to aircraft and missile to missile engagements elevated the need to better cope with early and stealthy assessment of the adversaries location while providing minimal compromise to the operator. The use of stealth vehicles introduces a requirement to deploy sensors that silently assess tactical and theater issues [battle damage assessment (BDA) and theater missile defense (TMD)] without preengagement detection. IR sensor system development and high speed, parallel, distributed processing make practical the implementation of compact passive ranging packages aboard satellites and aircraft. Here, single IR Sensor Passive Ranging from an observer to a target embedded in the atmosphere exploits the effect of atmospheric attenuation of the signal. By judicious choice of wavebands the range and altitude to a target can be determined passively with a single observer. This result will be shown to be relatively insensitive to assumed atmospheric models or precise source spectral content. A detailed closed-form solution relating range (and altitude) to observed target intensities will be presented. Previous studies of this type have required either detailed knowledge of the source spectra or spectral resolution of individual rotational lines. The single sensor passive ranging methodology requires no such detailed information.

  19. Camp Sacajawea Passive Solar Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-31

    The intent of the Passive Solar Demonstration Project was to have: an actual demonstration of the effectiveness of a passive solar design and working automatic shading devices; accurate data of energy saved by the passive design and shading devices; a brochure distributed to architects, builders, and consumers, with the monitoring data and information about the project; and the continued monitoring of the building to help explain to those who are using the building the value of the system; this would not only include the 7000 members, bu visitors and other users of the facility. To accomplish these goals, a monitoring system was installed in the recently build Passive Solar Lodge at Camp Sacajawea on Casper Mountain south of Casper, Wyoming. The building was monitored continously for the remainder of the project. The installation of the automatic shading device, a curtain wall was accomplished but had some difficulty. The results indicate there is some effectiveness of the Curtain Wall, but a quantitative value would be impossible at this time.

  20. Propulsion by active and passive airfoil oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackowski, A. W.; Williamson, C. H. K.

    2013-11-01

    Oscillating airfoils have been the subject of much research both as a mechanism of propulsion in engineering devices as well as a model of understanding how fish, birds, and insects produce thrust and maneuvering forces. Additionally, the jet or wake generated by an oscillating airfoil exhibits a multitude of vortex patterns, which are an interesting study in their own right. We present PIV measurements of the vortex flow behind an airfoil undergoing controlled pitching oscillations at moderate Reynolds number. As a method of propulsion, oscillating foils have been found to be capable performers when undergoing both pitching and heaving motions [Anderson et al. 1998]. While an airfoil undergoing only pitching motion is a relatively inefficient propulsor, we examine the effect of adding passive dynamics to the system: for example, actuated pitching with a passive spring in the heave direction. Practically speaking, a mechanical system with such an arrangement has the potential to reduce the cost and complexity of an oscillating airfoil propulsor. To study an airfoil undergoing both active and passive motion, we employ our ``cyber-physical fluid dynamics'' technique [Mackowski & Williamson, 2011] to simulate the effects of passive dynamics in a physical experiment.