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Sample records for organic scintillation detector

  1. Investigating the Anisotropic Scintillation Response in Organic Crystal Scintillator Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Patricia Frances

    This dissertation presents several studies that experimentally characterize the scintillation anisotropy in organic crystal scintillators. These include measurements of neutron, gamma-ray and cosmic muon interactions in anthracene, a historical benchmark among organic scintillator materials, to confirm and extend measurements previously available in the literature. The gamma-ray and muon measurements provide new experimental confirmation that no scintillation anisotropy is present in their interactions. Observations from these measurements have updated the hypothesis for the physical mechanism that is responsible for the scintillation anisotropy concluding that a relatively high dE/dx is required in order to produce a scintillation anisotropy. The directional dependence of the scintillation output in liquid and plastic materials was measured to experimentally confirm that no scintillation anisotropy correlated to detector orientation exists in amorphous materials. These observations confirm that the scintillation anisotropy is not due to an external effect on the measurement system, and that a fixed, repeating structure is required for a scintillation anisotropy. The directional dependence of the scintillation output in response to neutron interactions was measured in four stilbene crystals of various sizes and growth-methods. The scintillation anisotropy in these materials was approximately uniform, indicating that the crystal size, geometry, and growth method do not significantly impact the effect. Measurements of three additional pure crystals and two mixed crystals were made. These measurements showed that 1) the magnitude of the effect varies with energy and material, 2) the relationship between the light output and pulse shape anisotropy varies across materials, and 3) the effect in mixed materials is very complex. These measurements have informed the hypothesis of the mechanism that produces the directional dependence. By comparing the various relationships

  2. Organic Scintillator Detector Response Simulations with DRiFT

    DOE PAGES

    Andrews, Madison Theresa; Bates, Cameron Russell; Mckigney, Edward Allen; ...

    2016-06-11

    Here, this work presents the organic scintillation simulation capabilities of DRiFT, a post-processing Detector Response Function Toolkit for MCNPR output. DRiFT is used to create realistic scintillation detector response functions to incident neutron and gamma mixed- field radiation. As a post-processing tool, DRiFT leverages the extensively validated radiation transport capabilities of MCNPR®6, which also provides the ability to simulate complex sources and geometries. DRiFT is designed to be flexible, it allows the user to specify scintillator material, PMT type, applied PMT voltage, and quenching data used in simulations. The toolkit's capabilities, which include the generation of pulse shape discrimination plotsmore » and full-energy detector spectra, are demonstrated in a comparison of measured and simulated neutron contributions from 252Cf and PuBe, and photon spectra from 22Na and 228Th sources. DRiFT reproduced energy resolution effects observed in EJ-301 measurements through the inclusion of scintillation yield variances, photon transport noise, and PMT photocathode and multiplication noise.« less

  3. Organic Scintillator Detector Response Simulations with DRiFT

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Madison Theresa; Bates, Cameron Russell; Mckigney, Edward Allen; Solomon, Clell Jeffrey Jr.; Sood, Avneet

    2016-06-11

    Here, this work presents the organic scintillation simulation capabilities of DRiFT, a post-processing Detector Response Function Toolkit for MCNPR output. DRiFT is used to create realistic scintillation detector response functions to incident neutron and gamma mixed- field radiation. As a post-processing tool, DRiFT leverages the extensively validated radiation transport capabilities of MCNPR®6, which also provides the ability to simulate complex sources and geometries. DRiFT is designed to be flexible, it allows the user to specify scintillator material, PMT type, applied PMT voltage, and quenching data used in simulations. The toolkit's capabilities, which include the generation of pulse shape discrimination plots and full-energy detector spectra, are demonstrated in a comparison of measured and simulated neutron contributions from 252Cf and PuBe, and photon spectra from 22Na and 228Th sources. DRiFT reproduced energy resolution effects observed in EJ-301 measurements through the inclusion of scintillation yield variances, photon transport noise, and PMT photocathode and multiplication noise.

  4. Organic scintillator detector response simulations with DRiFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, M. T.; Bates, C. R.; McKigney, E. A.; Solomon, C. J.; Sood, A.

    2016-09-01

    This work presents the organic scintillation simulation capabilities of DRiFT, a post-processing Detector Response Function Toolkit for MCNP® output. DRiFT is used to create realistic scintillation detector response functions to incident neutron and gamma mixed-field radiation. As a post-processing tool, DRiFT leverages the extensively validated radiation transport capabilities of MCNP® 6 , which also provides the ability to simulate complex sources and geometries. DRiFT is designed to be flexible, it allows the user to specify scintillator material, PMT type, applied PMT voltage, and quenching data used in simulations. The toolkit's capabilities, which include the generation of pulse shape discrimination plots and full-energy detector spectra, are demonstrated in a comparison of measured and simulated neutron contributions from 252Cf and PuBe, and photon spectra from 22Na and 228Th sources. DRiFT reproduced energy resolution effects observed in EJ-301 measurements through the inclusion of scintillation yield variances, photon transport noise, and PMT photocathode and multiplication noise.

  5. Organic liquid scintillation detector shape and volume impact on radiation portal monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paff, Marc G.; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed and tested a radiation portal monitor using organic liquid scintillation detectors. In order to optimize our system designs, neutron measurements were carried out with three organic liquid scintillation detectors of different shapes and sizes, along with a 3He radiation portal monitor (RPM) as a reference. The three liquids tested were a 7.62 cm diameter by 7.62 cm length cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector, a 12.7 cm diameter by 12.7 cm length cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector, and a 25 cm by 25 cm by 10 cm "paddle" shaped organic liquid scintillation detector. Background and Cf-252 neutron measurements were recorded to allow for a comparison of neutron intrinsic efficiencies as well as receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves between detectors. The 12.7 cm diameter cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector exhibited the highest intrinsic neutron efficiency (54%) of all three liquid scintillators. An ROC curve analysis for a heavily moderated Cf-252 measurement showed that using the 12.7 cm diameter by 12.7 cm length cylindrical active volume Eljen EJ309 organic liquid scintillation detector would result in the fewest needed detector units in order to achieve a near 100% positive neutron alarm rate while maintaining a better than 1 in 10,000 false alarm rate on natural neutron background. A small number of organic liquid scintillation detectors could therefore be a valid alternative to 3He in some RPM applications.

  6. Evaluation of a reflective coating for an organic scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarancón, A.; Marin, E.; Tent, J.; Rauret, G.; Garcia, J. F.

    2012-05-01

    A reflective coating based on white paint, black paint and varnish has been evaluated to determine its reflective capabilities and its potential use in radioactivity detectors based on organic scintillators. Three different white paints, all of which were based on TiO2, were also tested to determine the one with the best performance and lowest radioactivity content. In a first experiment, we evaluated the capability of the reflective coating by measuring 90Sr/90Y with PSm in a polyethylene vial partially painted with EJ510 (Eljen Technology) reflective paint, black paint and varnish. In a second experiment, we compared the performance of the EJ510 to that of other white paints used for artistic purposes (Vallejo and Rembrandt). The results showed that, when a vial was only partially painted with the white paints (keeping a window free of paint to allow photons to exit), the efficiency and spectral distribution of the painted vial was similar to that of a non-painted vial. This behavior showed the efficiency of the reflective coatings. In terms of reflection capabilities, all of the tested paints were equivalent; however, the background was higher for the EJ510 paint. Analyses using high-resolution gamma spectroscopy indicated the presence of natural radionuclides (40K, 226Ra and 228Ra) in the EJ510. On the basis of the results (high reflection capabilities and the absence of radioactive impurities) and its lower cost, the Vallejo paint was selected as the white reflective paint. The final structure of the reflective coating was composed of five white paint layers, a black paint (to avoid external light entrance) and a layer of varnish (to protect the paints).

  7. Hybrid metal organic scintillator materials system and particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Christina A.; Allendorf, Mark D.; Doty, F. Patrick; Simmons, Blake A.

    2011-07-26

    We describe the preparation and characterization of two zinc hybrid luminescent structures based on the flexible and emissive linker molecule, trans-(4-R,4'-R') stilbene, where R and R' are mono- or poly-coordinating groups, which retain their luminescence within these solid materials. For example, reaction of trans-4,4'-stilbenedicarboxylic acid and zinc nitrate in the solvent dimethylformamide (DMF) yielded a dense 2-D network featuring zinc in both octahedral and tetrahedral coordination environments connected by trans-stilbene links. Similar reaction in diethylformamide (DEF) at higher temperatures resulted in a porous, 3-D framework structure consisting of two interpenetrating cubic lattices, each featuring basic to zinc carboxylate vertices joined by trans-stilbene, analogous to the isoreticular MOF (IRMOF) series. We demonstrate that the optical properties of both embodiments correlate directly with the local ligand environments observed in the crystal structures. We further demonstrate that these materials produce high luminescent response to proton radiation and high radiation tolerance relative to prior scintillators. These features can be used to create sophisticated scintillating detection sensors.

  8. SCINTILLATION EXPOSURE RATE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Spears, W.G.

    1960-11-01

    A radiation detector for gamma and x rays is described. The detector comprises a scintillation crystal disposed between a tantalum shield and the input of a photomultiplier tube, the crystal and the shield cooperating so that their combined response to a given quantity of radiation at various energy levels is substantially constant.

  9. Scintillating pad detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; Baumbaugh, B.; Borcherding, F.

    1996-12-31

    We have been investigating the performance of scintillating pad detectors, individual small tiles of scintillator that are read out with wavelength-shifting fibers and visible light photon counters, for application in high luminosity colliding beam experiments such as the D0 Upgrade. Such structures could provide {open_quotes}pixel{close_quotes} type readout over large fiducial volumes for tracking, preshower detection and triggering.

  10. Organic scintillation detector response simulation using non-analog MCNPX-PoliMi

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, S.; Clarke, S. D.; Pozzi, S. A.; Larsen, E. W.

    2012-07-01

    Organic liquid scintillation detectors are valuable for the detection of special nuclear material since they are capable of detecting both neutrons and gamma rays. Scintillators can also provide energy information which is helpful in identification and characterization of the source. In order to design scintillation based measurement systems appropriate simulation tools are needed. MCNPX-PoliMi is capable of simulating scintillation detector response; however, simulations have traditionally been run in analog mode which leads to long computation times. In this paper, non-analog MCNPX-PoliMi mode which uses variance reduction techniques is applied and tested. The non-analog MCNPX-PoliMi simulation test cases use source biasing, geometry splitting and a combination of both variance reduction techniques to efficiently simulate pulse height distribution and then time-of-flight for a heavily shielded case with a {sup 252}Cf source. An improvement factor (I), is calculated for distributions in each of the three cases above to analyze the effectiveness of the non-analog MCNPX-PoliMi simulations in reducing computation time. It is found that of the three cases, the last case which uses a combination of source biasing and geometry splitting shows the most improvement in simulation run time for the same desired variance. For pulse height distributions speedup ranging from a factor 5 to 25 is observed, while for time-of-flights the speedup factors range from 3 to 10. (authors)

  11. Digital discrimination of neutrons and gamma-rays in organic scintillation detectors using moment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xufei; Zhang, Xing; Yuan, Xi; Chen, Jinxiang; Li, Xiangqing; Zhang, Guohui; Fan, Tieshuan; Yuan, Guoliang; Yang, Jinwei; Yang, Qingwei

    2012-09-01

    Digital discrimination of neutron and gamma-ray events in an organic scintillator has been investigated by moment analysis. Signals induced by an americium-beryllium (Am/Be) isotropic neutron source in a stilbene crystal detector have been sampled with a flash analogue-to-digital converter (ADC) of 1 GSamples/s sampling rate and 10-bit vertical resolution. Neutrons and gamma-rays have been successfully discriminated with a threshold corresponding to gamma-ray energy about 217 keV. Moment analysis has also been verified against the results assessed by a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. It is shown that the classification of neutrons and gamma-rays afforded by moment analysis is consistent with that achieved by digital TOF measurement. This method has been applied to analyze the data acquired from the stilbene crystal detector in mixed radiation field of the HL-2A tokamak deuterium plasma discharges and the results are described.

  12. Digital discrimination of neutrons and gamma-rays in organic scintillation detectors using moment analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Xufei; Zhang Xing; Yuan Xi; Chen Jinxiang; Li Xiangqing; Zhang Guohui; Fan Tieshuan; Yuan Guoliang; Yang Jinwei; Yang Qingwei

    2012-09-15

    Digital discrimination of neutron and gamma-ray events in an organic scintillator has been investigated by moment analysis. Signals induced by an americium-beryllium (Am/Be) isotropic neutron source in a stilbene crystal detector have been sampled with a flash analogue-to-digital converter (ADC) of 1 GSamples/s sampling rate and 10-bit vertical resolution. Neutrons and gamma-rays have been successfully discriminated with a threshold corresponding to gamma-ray energy about 217 keV. Moment analysis has also been verified against the results assessed by a time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. It is shown that the classification of neutrons and gamma-rays afforded by moment analysis is consistent with that achieved by digital TOF measurement. This method has been applied to analyze the data acquired from the stilbene crystal detector in mixed radiation field of the HL-2A tokamak deuterium plasma discharges and the results are described.

  13. Neutron detector based on Particles of 6Li glass scintillator dispersed in organic lightguide matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianakiev, K. D.; Hehlen, M. P.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Favalli, A.; Iliev, M. L.; Lin, T. C.; Bennett, B. L.; Barker, M. T.

    2015-06-01

    Most 3He replacement neutron detector technologies today have overlapping neutron-gamma pulse-height distributions, which limits their usefulness and performance. Different techniques are used to mitigate this shortcoming, including Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) or threshold settings that suppress all gammas as well as much of the neutrons. As a result, count rates are limited and dead times are high when PSD is used, and the detection efficiency for neutron events is reduced due to the high threshold. This is a problem in most applications where the neutron-gamma separation of 3He detectors had been essential. This challenge is especially severe for neutron coincidence and multiplicity measurements that have numerous conflicting requirements such as high detection efficiency, short die-away time, short dead time, and high stability. 6Li-glass scintillators have excellent light output and a single peak distribution, but they are difficult to implement because of their gamma sensitivity. The idea of reducing the gamma sensitivity of 6Li-glass scintillators by embedding small glass particles in an organic light-guide medium was first presented by L.M. Bollinger in the early 60s but, to the best of our knowledge, has never been reduced to practice. We present a proof of principle detector design and experimental data that develop this concept to a large-area neutron detector. This is achieved by using a multi-component optical medium (6Li glass particles attached to a glass supporting structure and a mineral oil light guide) which matches the indices of refraction and minimizes the absorption of the 395 nm scintillator light. The detector design comprises a 10 in. long tube with dual end readout with about 3% volume density of 6Li glass particles installed. The presented experimental data with various neutron and gamma sources show the desired wide gap between the neutron and gamma pulse height distributions, resulting in a true plateau in the counting

  14. Scintillation detector for carbon-14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, G. F.; Rogers, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    Detector consists of plastic, cylindrical double-wall scintillation cell, which is filled with gas to be analyzed. Thin, inner cell wall is isolated optically from outer (guard) scintillator wall by evaporated-aluminum coating. Bonding technique provides mechanical support to cell wall when device is exposed to high temperatures.

  15. Shifting scintillator neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Jr., Morris Lowell; Hannah, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A

    2014-03-04

    Provided are sensors and methods for detecting thermal neutrons. Provided is an apparatus having a scintillator for absorbing a neutron, the scintillator having a back side for discharging a scintillation light of a first wavelength in response to the absorbed neutron, an array of wavelength-shifting fibers proximate to the back side of the scintillator for shifting the scintillation light of the first wavelength to light of a second wavelength, the wavelength-shifting fibers being disposed in a two-dimensional pattern and defining a plurality of scattering plane pixels where the wavelength-shifting fibers overlap, a plurality of photomultiplier tubes, in coded optical communication with the wavelength-shifting fibers, for converting the light of the second wavelength to an electronic signal, and a processor for processing the electronic signal to identify one of the plurality of scattering plane pixels as indicative of a position within the scintillator where the neutron was absorbed.

  16. Fast neutron tomography with real-time pulse-shape discrimination in organic scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Malcolm J.; Agar, Stewart; Aspinall, Michael D.; Beaumont, Jonathan S.; Colley, Edmund; Colling, Miriam; Dykes, Joseph; Kardasopoulos, Phoevos; Mitton, Katie

    2016-10-01

    A fast neutron tomography system based on the use of real-time pulse-shape discrimination in 7 organic liquid scintillation detectors is described. The system has been tested with a californium-252 source of dose rate 163 μSv/h at 1 m and neutron emission rate of 1.5×107 per second into 4π and a maximum acquisition time of 2 h, to characterize two 100×100×100 mm3 concrete samples. The first of these was a solid sample and the second has a vertical, cylindrical void. The experimental data, supported by simulations with both Monte Carlo methods and MATLAB®, indicate that the presence of the internal cylindrical void, corners and inhomogeneities in the samples can be discerned. The potential for fast neutron assay of this type with the capability to probe hydrogenous features in large low-Z samples is discussed. Neutron tomography of bulk porous samples is achieved that combines effective penetration not possible with thermal neutrons in the absence of beam hardening.

  17. Unitary scintillation detector and system

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, Stephanie A.; Chiles, Marion M.

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations.

  18. Unitary scintillation detector and system

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, S.A.; Chiles, M.M.

    1994-05-31

    The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations. 10 figs.

  19. Characterization of the scintillation anisotropy in crystalline stilbene scintillator detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, P.; Brubaker, E.

    2016-11-23

    This study reports a series of measurements that characterize the directional dependence of the scintillation response of crystalline melt-grown and solution-grown trans-stilbene to incident DT and DD neutrons. These measurements give the amplitude and pulse shape dependence on the proton recoil direction over one hemisphere of the crystal, confirming and extending previous results in the literature for melt-grown stilbene and providing the first measurements for solution-grown stilbene. In similar measurements of liquid and plastic detectors, no directional dependence was observed, confirming the hypothesis that the anisotropy in stilbene and other organic crystal scintillators is a result of internal effects due to the molecular or crystal structure and not an external effect on the measurement system.

  20. Characterization of the scintillation anisotropy in crystalline stilbene scintillator detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Schuster, P.; Brubaker, E.

    2016-11-23

    This study reports a series of measurements that characterize the directional dependence of the scintillation response of crystalline melt-grown and solution-grown trans-stilbene to incident DT and DD neutrons. These measurements give the amplitude and pulse shape dependence on the proton recoil direction over one hemisphere of the crystal, confirming and extending previous results in the literature for melt-grown stilbene and providing the first measurements for solution-grown stilbene. In similar measurements of liquid and plastic detectors, no directional dependence was observed, confirming the hypothesis that the anisotropy in stilbene and other organic crystal scintillators is a result of internal effects duemore » to the molecular or crystal structure and not an external effect on the measurement system.« less

  1. An investigation of the digital discrimination of neutrons and γ rays with organic scintillation detectors using an artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G.; Aspinall, M. D.; Ma, X.; Joyce, M. J.

    2009-08-01

    The discrimination of neutron and γ-ray events in an organic scintillator has been investigated by using a method based on an artificial neural network (ANN). Voltage pulses arising from an EJ-301 organic liquid scintillation detector in a mixed radiation field have been recorded with a fast digital sampling oscilloscope. Piled-up events have been disentangled using a pile-up management unit based on a fitting method. Each individual pulse has subsequently been sent to a discrimination unit which discriminates neutron and γ-ray events with a method based on an artificial neural network. This discrimination technique has been verified by the corresponding mixed-field data assessed by time of flight (TOF). It is shown that the characterization of the neutrons and photons achieved by the discrimination method based on the ANN is consistent with that afforded by TOF. This approach enables events that are often as a result of scattering or pile-up to be identified and returned to the data set and affords digital discrimination of mixed radiation fields in a broad range of environments on the basis of training obtained with a single TOF dataset.

  2. Rayleigh scattering of linear alkylbenzene in large liquid scintillator detectors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Qian; Wurm, Michael; Zhang, Qingmin; Ding, Yayun; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhou, Li; Cao, Jun; Wang, Yifang

    2015-07-01

    Rayleigh scattering poses an intrinsic limit for the transparency of organic liquid scintillators. This work focuses on the Rayleigh scattering length of linear alkylbenzene (LAB), which will be used as the solvent of the liquid scintillator in the central detector of the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory. We investigate the anisotropy of the Rayleigh scattering in LAB, showing that the resulting Rayleigh scattering length will be significantly shorter than reported before. Given the same overall light attenuation, this will result in a more efficient transmission of photons through the scintillator, increasing the amount of light collected by the photosensors and thereby the energy resolution of the detector.

  3. Rayleigh scattering of linear alkylbenzene in large liquid scintillator detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiang Zhang, Zhenyu; Liu, Qian; Zheng, Yangheng; Wurm, Michael; Zhang, Qingmin; Ding, Yayun; Zhou, Li; Cao, Jun; Wang, Yifang

    2015-07-15

    Rayleigh scattering poses an intrinsic limit for the transparency of organic liquid scintillators. This work focuses on the Rayleigh scattering length of linear alkylbenzene (LAB), which will be used as the solvent of the liquid scintillator in the central detector of the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory. We investigate the anisotropy of the Rayleigh scattering in LAB, showing that the resulting Rayleigh scattering length will be significantly shorter than reported before. Given the same overall light attenuation, this will result in a more efficient transmission of photons through the scintillator, increasing the amount of light collected by the photosensors and thereby the energy resolution of the detector.

  4. Large volume flow-through scintillating detector

    DOEpatents

    Gritzo, Russ E.; Fowler, Malcolm M.

    1995-01-01

    A large volume flow through radiation detector for use in large air flow situations such as incinerator stacks or building air systems comprises a plurality of flat plates made of a scintillating material arranged parallel to the air flow. Each scintillating plate has a light guide attached which transfers light generated inside the scintillating plate to an associated photomultiplier tube. The output of the photomultiplier tubes are connected to electronics which can record any radiation and provide an alarm if appropriate for the application.

  5. Plastic scintillator detector for pulsed flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplun, A. A.; Taraskin, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    A neutron detector, providing charged particle detection capability, has been designed. The main purpose of the detector is to measure pulsed fluxes of both charged particles and neutrons during scientific experiments. The detector consists of commonly used neutron-sensitive ZnS(Ag) / 6LiF scintillator screens wrapping a layer of polystyrene based scintillator (BC-454, EJ-254 or equivalent boron loaded plastic). This type of detector design is able to log a spatial distribution of events and may be scaled to any size. Different variations of the design were considered and modelled in specialized toolkits. The article presents a review of the detector design features as well as simulation results.

  6. a Subminiature Scintillation Detector for Catheter Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafè, R.; Montani, L.; Burgio, N.; Iurlaro, G.; Santagata, A.; Ciavola, C.; Alonge, G.

    2006-04-01

    The feasibility of a subminiature scintillation detector to be inserted in a catheter for lesion localization in nuclear medicine SPECT has been studied. Measurements on a simple laboratory setup have been performed and compared with Monte Carlo results. Further simulations, at 30keV and 140keV, concerning a configuration reproducing severe clinical conditions have shown poor lesion detectability. Several factors affecting the response have to be investigated to improve the capability of lesion localization characterizing such detector.

  7. High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Craig S.; Hoffman, Edward J.

    2000-01-01

    A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

  8. Plastic scintillator centrality detector for BRAHMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y. K.; Debbe, R.; Lee, J. H.; Ito, Hironori; Sanders, S. J.

    2004-01-01

    An array of 40 tiles of thin plastic scintillators is used to construct the outer layer of the charged particle multiplicity detector for the BRAHMS experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Each tile is a square with 12 cm long sides and 5 mm thickness. The light from each of the scintillators is collected by wavelength shifting fibers embedded on the periphery. The light collection is uniform within 5% over the tile with the edge effect limited to 4 mm along the edge. The response is found to be linear in the high-multiplicity environment at RHIC with Au+Au beams at s NN of 200 GeV.

  9. The design of the TASD (totally active scintillator detector) prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Mefodiev, A. V. Kudenko, Yu. G.

    2015-12-15

    Totally active and magnetic segmented scintillation neutrino detectors are developed for the nextgeneration accelerator neutrino experiments. Such detectors will incorporate scintillation modules with scintillation counters that form X and Y planes. A single counter is a 7 × 10 × 90 mm{sup 3} scintillation bar with gluedin wavelength-shifting fibers and micropixel avalanche photodiodes. The results of measurements of the parameters of these detectors are presented.

  10. Current trends in scintillator detectors and materials

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    2001-10-23

    The last decade has seen a renaissance in inorganic scintillator development for gamma ray detection. Lead tungstate (PbWO4) has been developed for high energy physics experiments, and possesses exceptionally high density and radiation hardness, albeit with low luminous efficiency. Lutetium orthosilicate or LSO (Lu2SiO5:Ce) possesses a unique combination of high luminous efficiency, high density, and reasonably short decay time, and is now incorporated in commercial positron emission tomography (PET) cameras. There have been advances in understanding the fundamental mechanisms that limit energy resolution, and several recently discovered materials (such as LaBr3:Ce) possess energy resolution that approaches that of direct solid state detectors. Finally, there are indications that a neglected class of scintillator materials that exhibit near band-edge fluorescence could provide scintillators with sub-nanosecond decay times and high luminescent efficiency.

  11. Measurements of high energy neutrons penetrated through iron shields using the Self-TOF detector and an NE213 organic liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, M.; Nakao, N.; Nunomiya, T.; Nakamura, T.; Fukumura, A.; Takada, M.

    2002-11-01

    Neutron energy spectra penetrated through iron shields were measured using the Self-TOF detector and an NE213 organic liquid scintillator which have been newly developed by our group at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan. Neutrons were generated by bombarding 400 MeV/nucleon C ion on a thick (stopping-length) copper target. The neutron spectra in the energy range from 20 to 800 MeV were obtained through the FORIST unfolding code with their response functions and compared with the MCNPX calculations combined with the LA150 cross section library. The neutron fluence measured by the NE213 detector was simulated by the track length estimator in the MCNPX, and evaluated the contribution of the room-scattered neutrons. The calculations are in fairly good agreement with the measurements. Neutron fluence attenuation lengths were obtained from the experimental results and the calculation.

  12. Scintillating fiber detector performance, detector geometries, trigger, and electronics issues for scintillating fiber tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, A.E.

    1994-06-01

    Scintillating Fiber tracking technology has made great advances and has demonstrated great potential for high speed charged particle tracking and triggering. The small detector sizes and fast scintillation fluors available make them very promising for use at high luminosity experiments at today`s and tomorrow`s colliding and fixed target experiments where high rate capability is essential. This talk will discuss the current state of Scintillating fiber performance and current Visual Light Photon Counter (VLPC) characteristics. The primary topic will be some of the system design and integration issues which should be considered by anyone attempting to design a scintillating fiber tracking system which includes a high speed tracking trigger. Design. constraints placed upon the detector system by the electronics and mechanical sub-systems will be discussed. Seemingly simple and unrelated decisions can have far reaching effects on overall system performance. SDC and DO example system designs will be discussed.

  13. Pulse height model for deuterated scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitang; Enqvist, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model of light pulse height distribution for finite deuterated scintillation detectors is created using the impulse approximation. Particularly, the energy distribution of a scattered neutron is calculated based on an existing collision probability scheme for general cylindrical shaped detectors considering double differential cross-sections. The light pulse height distribution is analytically and numerically calculated by convoluting collision sequences with the light output function for an EJ-315 detector from our measurements completed at Ohio University. The model provides a good description of collision histories capturing transferred neutron energy in deuterium-based scintillation materials. The resulting light pulse height distribution details pulse compositions and their corresponding contributions. It shows that probabilities of neutron collision with carbon and deuterium nuclei are comparable, however the light pulse amplitude due to collisions with carbon nuclei is small and mainly located at the lower region of the light pulse distribution axis. The model can explore those neutron interaction events that generate pulses near or below a threshold that would be imposed in measurements. A comparison is made between the light pulse height distributions given by the analytical model and measurements. It reveals a significant probability of a neutron generating a small light pulse due to collisions with carbon nuclei when compared to larger light pulse generated by collisions involving deuterium nuclei. This model is beneficial to understand responses of scintillation materials and pulse compositions, as well as nuclei information extraction from recorded pulses.

  14. Liquid Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Stefanie N.; Learned, John G.

    2010-03-30

    Large open volume (not segmented) liquid scintillation detectors have been generally dedicated to low energy neutrino measurements, in the MeV energy region. We describe the potential employment of large detectors (>1 kiloton) for studies of higher energy neutrino interactions, such as cosmic rays and long-baseline experiments. When considering the physics potential of new large instruments the possibility of doing useful measurements with higher energy neutrino interactions has been overlooked. Here we take into account Fermat's principle, which states that the first light to reach each PMT will follow the shortest path between that PMT and the point of origin. We describe the geometry of this process, and the resulting wavefront, which we are calling the 'Fermat surface', and discuss methods of using this surface to extract directional track information and particle identification. This capability may be demonstrated in the new long-baseline neutrino beam from Jaeri accelerator to the KamLAND detector in Japan. Other exciting applications include the use of Hanohano as a movable long-baseline detector in this same beam, and LENA in Europe for future long-baseline neutrino beams from CERN. Also, this methodology opens up the question as to whether a large liquid scintillator detector should be given consideration for use in a future long-baseline experiment from Fermilab to the DUSEL underground laboratory at Homestake.

  15. Nanocomposite scintillator, detector, and method

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D. Wayne; McKigney, Edward A.; Muenchausen, Ross E.; Bennett, Bryan L.

    2009-04-28

    A compact includes a mixture of a solid binder and at least one nanopowder phosphor chosen from yttrium oxide, yttrium tantalate, barium fluoride, cesium fluoride, bismuth germanate, zinc gallate, calcium magnesium pyrosilicate, calcium molybdate, calcium chlorovanadate, barium titanium pyrophosphate, a metal tungstate, a cerium doped nanophosphor, a bismuth doped nanophosphor, a lead doped nanophosphor, a thallium doped sodium iodide, a doped cesium iodide, a rare earth doped pyrosilicate, or a lanthanide halide. The compact can be used in a radiation detector for detecting ionizing radiation.

  16. Neutron spectroscopy with scintillation detectors using wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Jessica

    The purpose of this research was to study neutron spectroscopy using the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator. This scintillator material provided a novel means of detection for fast neutrons, without the disadvantages of traditional liquid scintillation materials. EJ-299-33A provided a more durable option to these materials, making it less likely to be damaged during handling. Unlike liquid scintillators, this plastic scintillator was manufactured from a non-toxic material, making it safer to use, as well as easier to design detectors. The material was also manufactured with inherent pulse shape discrimination abilities, making it suitable for use in neutron detection. The neutron spectral unfolding technique was developed in two stages. Initial detector response function modeling was carried out through the use of the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The response functions were developed for a monoenergetic neutron flux. Wavelets were then applied to smooth the response function. The spectral unfolding technique was applied through polynomial fitting and optimization techniques in MATLAB. Verification of the unfolding technique was carried out through the use of experimentally determined response functions. These were measured on the neutron source based on the Van de Graff accelerator at the University of Kentucky. This machine provided a range of monoenergetic neutron beams between 0.1 MeV and 24 MeV, making it possible to measure the set of response functions of the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator detector to neutrons of specific energies. The response of a plutonium-beryllium (PuBe) source was measured using the source available at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The neutron spectrum reconstruction was carried out using the experimentally measured response functions. Experimental data was collected in the list mode of the waveform digitizer. Post processing of this data focused on the pulse shape discrimination analysis of the recorded response functions to remove the

  17. Optical scattering lengths in large liquid-scintillator neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wurm, M.; Feilitzsch, F. von; Goeger-Neff, M.; Hofmann, M.; Lewke, T.; Meindl, Q.; Moellenberg, R.; Oberauer, L.; Potzel, W.; Tippmann, M.; Todor, S.; Winter, J.; Lachenmaier, T.; Traunsteiner, C.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodan

    2010-05-15

    For liquid-scintillator neutrino detectors of kiloton scale, the transparency of the organic solvent is of central importance. The present paper reports on laboratory measurements of the optical scattering lengths of the organic solvents phenylxylylethane, linear alkylbenzene (LAB), and dodecane, which are under discussion for next-generation experiments such as SNO+ (Sudbury Neutrino Observatory), HanoHano, or LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy). Results comprise the wavelength range of 415-440 nm. The contributions from Rayleigh and Mie scattering as well as from absorption/re-emission processes are discussed. Based on the present results, LAB seems to be the preferred solvent for a large-volume detector.

  18. Optical scattering lengths in large liquid-scintillator neutrino detectors.

    PubMed

    Wurm, M; von Feilitzsch, F; Göger-Neff, M; Hofmann, M; Lachenmaier, T; Lewke, T; Marrodán Undagoitia, T; Meindl, Q; Möllenberg, R; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Tippmann, M; Todor, S; Traunsteiner, C; Winter, J

    2010-05-01

    For liquid-scintillator neutrino detectors of kiloton scale, the transparency of the organic solvent is of central importance. The present paper reports on laboratory measurements of the optical scattering lengths of the organic solvents phenylxylylethane, linear alkylbenzene (LAB), and dodecane, which are under discussion for next-generation experiments such as SNO+ (Sudbury Neutrino Observatory), HanoHano, or LENA (Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy). Results comprise the wavelength range of 415-440 nm. The contributions from Rayleigh and Mie scattering as well as from absorption/re-emission processes are discussed. Based on the present results, LAB seems to be the preferred solvent for a large-volume detector.

  19. Metal-loaded organic scintillators for neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Christian; Yeh, Minfang

    2016-09-01

    Organic liquid scintillators are used in many neutrino physics experiments of the past and present. In particular for low energy neutrinos when realtime and energy information are required, liquid scintillators have several advantages compared to other technologies. In many cases the organic liquid needs to be loaded with metal to enhance the neutrino signal over background events. Several metal loaded scintillators of the past suffered from chemical and optical instabilities, limiting the performance of these neutrino detectors. Different ways of metal loading are described in the article with a focus on recent techniques providing metal loaded scintillators that can be used under stable conditions for many years even in ton scale experiments. Applications of metal loaded scintillators in neutrino experiments are reviewed and the performance as well as the prospects of different scintillator types are compared.

  20. Metal-loaded organic scintillators for neutrino physics

    DOE PAGES

    Buck, Christian; Yeh, Minfang

    2016-08-03

    Organic liquid scintillators are used in many neutrino physics experiments of the past and present. In particular for low energy neutrinos when realtime and energy information are required, liquid scintillators have several advantages compared to other technologies. In many cases the organic liquid needs to be loaded with metal to enhance the neutrino signal over background events. Several metal loaded scintillators of the past suffered from chemical and optical instabilities, limiting the performance of these neutrino detectors. Different ways of metal loading are described in the article with a focus on recent techniques providing metal loaded scintillators that can bemore » used under stable conditions for many years even in ton scale experiments. Lastly, we review applications of metal loaded scintillators in neutrino experiments and compare the performance as well as the prospects of different scintillator types.« less

  1. Metal-loaded organic scintillators for neutrino physics

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, Christian; Yeh, Minfang

    2016-08-03

    Organic liquid scintillators are used in many neutrino physics experiments of the past and present. In particular for low energy neutrinos when realtime and energy information are required, liquid scintillators have several advantages compared to other technologies. In many cases the organic liquid needs to be loaded with metal to enhance the neutrino signal over background events. Several metal loaded scintillators of the past suffered from chemical and optical instabilities, limiting the performance of these neutrino detectors. Different ways of metal loading are described in the article with a focus on recent techniques providing metal loaded scintillators that can be used under stable conditions for many years even in ton scale experiments. Lastly, we review applications of metal loaded scintillators in neutrino experiments and compare the performance as well as the prospects of different scintillator types.

  2. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  3. Organic liquid scintillation detectors for on-the-fly neutron/gamma alarming and radionuclide identification in a pedestrian radiation portal monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paff, Marc Gerrit; Ruch, Marc L.; Poitrasson-Riviere, Alexis; Sagadevan, Athena; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara

    2015-07-01

    We present new experimental results from a radiation portal monitor based on the use of organic liquid scintillators. The system was tested as part of a 3He-free radiation portal monitor testing campaign at the European Commission's Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy, in February 2014. The radiation portal monitor was subjected to a wide range of test conditions described in ANSI N42.35, including a variety of gamma-ray sources and a 20,000 n/s 252Cf source. A false alarm test tested whether radiation portal monitors ever alarmed in the presence of only natural background. The University of Michigan Detection for Nuclear Nonproliferation Group's system triggered zero false alarms in 2739 trials. It consistently alarmed on a variety of gamma-ray sources travelling at 1.2 m/s at a 70 cm source to detector distance. The neutron source was detected at speeds up to 3 m/s and in configurations with up to 8 cm of high density polyethylene shielding. The success of on-the-fly radionuclide identification varied with the gamma-ray source measured as well as with which of two radionuclide identification methods was used. Both methods used a least squares comparison between the measured pulse height distributions to library spectra to pick the best match. The methods varied in how the pulse height distributions were modified prior to the least squares comparison. Correct identification rates were as high as 100% for highly enriched uranium, but as low as 50% for 241Am. Both radionuclide identification algorithms produced mixed results, but the concept of using liquid scintillation detectors for gamma-ray and neutron alarming in radiation portal monitor was validated.

  4. Nonproportionality of Scintillator Detectors: Theory and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Stephen; Cherepy, Nerine; Hull, Giulia; Valentine, John; Moses, William; Choong, Woon-Seng

    2009-08-17

    On the basis of nonproportionality data obtained for several scintillators, we have developed a theory to describe the carrier dynamics to fit the light yield versus electron energy. The theory of Onsager was adapted to explain how the carriers form excitons or sequentially arrive at the activators to promote the ion to an excited state, and the theory of Birks was employed to allow for exciton-exciton annihilation. We then developed a second theory to deduce the degradation in resolution that results from nonproportionality by evoking Landau fluctuations, which are essentially variations in the deposited energy density that occur as the high energy electron travels along its trajectory. In general there is good agreement with the data, in terms of fitting the nonproportionality curves and reproducing the literature values of nonproportionality's contribution to the scintillator resolution. With the resurgence of interest in developing scintillator detectors that have good energy resolution, an improved understanding of nonproportionality has become a crucial matter since it presents the fundamental limit to the achievable resolution. In order to hasten an improved understanding of scintillator nonproportionality, we have constructed an instrument referred to as SLYNCI (Scintillator Light Yield Nonproportionality Compton Instrument). This is a second-generation instrument to the original device developed by Valentine and coworkers, wherein several new principles of operation have served to increase the data rate by an order of magnitude as discussed in detail in References. In the present article, the focus is on a theory to describe the measured electron response, which is the light yield as a function of the electron energy. To do this, we account for transport of carriers and excitons, in terms of how they transfer their energy to the activators with competition from nonradiative decay pathways. This work builds on the original work of Murray and coworkers, and

  5. A large area liquid scintillation multiphoton detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharadwaj, V. K.; Cain, M. P.; Caldwell, D. O.; Denby, B. H.; Eisner, A. M.; Joshi, U. P.; Kennett, R. G.; Lu, A.; Morrison, R. J.; Pfost, D. R.; Stuber, H. R.; Summers, D. J.; Yellin, S. J.; Appel, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A 60 layer lead-liquid scintillator shower detector, which we call the SLIC, has been used for multiphoton detection in the Fermilab tagged photon spectrometer. The detector has an unimpeded active area which is 2.44 m by 4.88 m and is segmented, by means of teflon coated channels, into 3.17 cm wide strips. The 60 layers in depth are broken into three directions of alternating readouts so that three position coordinates are determined for each shower. At present the readouts are made by 334 photomultiplier tubes coupled to BBQ doped wavelength shifter bars which integrate the entire depth of the detector. It is relatively straightforward to increase the number of readouts to include longitudinal segmentation and to increase the segmentation of the outer region which are at present read out two strips to a readout. The energy and position resolutions of isolated showers are about {12%}/{√E} and 3 mm., respectively. The SLIC has been used to study the K-π+π0 decay of the D 0 [1], as well as for electron and muon identification in ψ → e +e - and ψ → μ+μ- plus π0 identification in γp → ψχ [8].

  6. Barium iodide single-crystal scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Hull, Giulia; Niedermayr, Thomas R.; Drobshoff, Alexander; Payne, Stephen A.; Roy, Utpal N.; Cui, Yunlong; Bhattacharaya, Ajanta; Harrison, Melissa; Guo, Mingsheng; Groza, Michael; Burger, Arnold

    2007-09-01

    We find that the high-Z crystal Barium Iodide is readily growable by the Bridgman growth technique and is less prone to crack compared to Lanthanum Halides. We have grown Barium Iodide crystals: undoped, doped with Ce 3+, and doped with Eu 2+. Radioluminescence spectra and time-resolved decay were measured. BaI II(Eu) exhibits luminescence from both Eu 2+ at 420 nm (~450 ns decay), and a broad band at 550 nm (~3 μs decay) that we assign to a trapped exciton. The 550 nm luminescence decreases relative to the Eu 2+ luminescence when the Barium Iodide is zone refined prior to crystal growth. We also describe the performance of BaI II(Eu) crystals in experimental scintillator detectors.

  7. Fundamental Limits of Scintillation Detector Timing Precision

    PubMed Central

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we review the primary factors that affect the timing precision of a scintillation detector. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to explore the dependence of the timing precision on the number of photoelectrons, the scintillator decay and rise times, the depth of interaction uncertainty, the time dispersion of the optical photons (modeled as an exponential decay), the photodetector rise time and transit time jitter, the leading-edge trigger level, and electronic noise. The Monte Carlo code was used to estimate the practical limits on the timing precision for an energy deposition of 511 keV in 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm Lu2SiO5:Ce and LaBr3:Ce crystals. The calculated timing precisions are consistent with the best experimental literature values. We then calculated the timing precision for 820 cases that sampled scintillator rise times from 0 to 1.0 ns, photon dispersion times from 0 to 0.2 ns, photodetector time jitters from 0 to 0.5 ns fwhm, and A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons per ns decay time. Since the timing precision R was found to depend on A−1/2 more than any other factor, we tabulated the parameter B, where R = BA−1/2. An empirical analytical formula was found that fit the tabulated values of B with an rms deviation of 2.2% of the value of B. The theoretical lower bound of the timing precision was calculated for the example of 0.5 ns rise time, 0.1 ns photon dispersion, and 0.2 ns fwhm photodetector time jitter. The lower bound was at most 15% lower than leading-edge timing discrimination for A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. A timing precision of 8 ps fwhm should be possible for an energy deposition of 511 keV using currently available photodetectors if a theoretically possible scintillator were developed that could produce 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. PMID:24874216

  8. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics: Future role of scintillation detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurfess, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The future role of conventional scintillation detector telescopes for line gamma-ray astronomy is discussed. Although the energy resolution of the germanium detectors now being used by several groups is clearly desirable, the larger effective areas and higher efficiencies available with scintillation detectors is advantageous for many observations. This is particularly true for those observations of astrophysical phenomena where significant line broadening is expected.

  9. Neutron detector using lithiated glass-scintillating particle composite

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Steven; Stephan, Andrew C.; Dai, Sheng; Im, Hee-Jung

    2009-09-01

    A neutron detector composed of a matrix of scintillating particles imbedded in a lithiated glass is disclosed. The neutron detector detects the neutrons by absorbing the neutron in the lithium-6 isotope which has been enriched from the natural isotopic ratio to a commercial ninety five percent. The utility of the detector is optimized by suitably selecting scintillating particle sizes in the range of the alpha and the triton. Nominal particle sizes are in the range of five to twenty five microns depending upon the specific scintillating particle selected.

  10. New Scintillators for Photosensitive Gaseous Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpak, G.; Peskov, V.; Scigocki, D.; Valbis, J.

    A new family of scintillators are presented. Their properties are similar to those of barium fluoride, and the spectrum of the scintillation emission is between 140 and 300 nm. Our latest efficiency measurements of ethyl ferrocene and triethylamine liquid or caesium iodide solid photocathodes, in parallel-plate avalanche chambers (PPACs) at high electric field, are also presented. We discuss the revolutionary consequences of the combination of the new scintillators with PPACs with semitransparent photocathodes deposited on the crystals, such as high speed, high resistance to radiation damage, compacity, high gamma efficiency, and applications to tracking devices with scintillation optical fibres.

  11. Molecular origins of scintillation in organic scintillators (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Patrick; Mengesha, Wondwosen; Myllenbeck, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    Organic-based scintillators are indispensable materials for radiation detection owing to their high sensitivity to fast neutrons, low cost, and tailorable properties. There has been a recent resurgence of interest in organic scintillators due to exciting discoveries related to neutron discrimination and gamma-ray spectroscopy, which represent capabilities previously thought not possible in these materials. I will discuss our development of crystalline and polymer-based scintillators for these applications. Structure-property relationships related to intermolecular interactions and host-guest electronic exchange will be discussed in the context of energy-transfer pathways relevant to scintillation. An emphasis will be placed on the rational design of these materials, as guided by first principles and DFT calculations. Two related topics will be discussed: 1) Incorporation of organometallic triplet-harvesting additives to plastic scintillator matrices to confer a 'two-state' (singlet and triplet) luminescence signature to different types of ionizing radiation. This approach relies upon energetic and spatial overlap between the donor and acceptor excited states for efficient electronic exchange. Key considerations also include synthetic modification of the luminescence spectra and kinetics, as well as the addition of secondary additives to increase the recombination efficiency. 2) Design of organotin-containing plastic scintillators as a route towards gamma-ray spectroscopy. Organometallic compounds were selected on the basis of distance-dependent quenching relationships, phase compatibility with the polymer matrix, and the gamma-ray cross sections. This approach is guided by molecular modeling and radiation transport modeling to achieve the highest possible detection sensitivity luminescence intensity.

  12. Large-Area Liquid Scintillation Detector Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, M. F.; Gurr, H. S.; Hruschka, A. A.; Jenkins, T. L.; Kropp, W. P.; Reines, P.; Sobel, H.

    The following sections are included: * SUMMARY * INTRODUCTION * DETECTOR RESPONSE FUNCTION F(z) AND EVENT POSITION DETERMINATION * REFINEMENTS IN THE DETECTOR CONFIGURATION DESIGN * DETECTOR PERFORMANCE * APPENDIX * REFERENCES

  13. Ruby-based inorganic scintillation detectors for 192Ir brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Beddar, Sam

    2016-11-01

    We tested the potential of ruby inorganic scintillation detectors (ISDs) for use in brachytherapy and investigated various unwanted luminescence properties that may compromise their accuracy. The ISDs were composed of a ruby crystal coupled to a poly(methyl methacrylate) fiber-optic cable and a charge-coupled device camera. The ISD also included a long-pass filter that was sandwiched between the ruby crystal and the fiber-optic cable. The long-pass filter prevented the Cerenkov and fluorescence background light (stem signal) induced in the fiber-optic cable from striking the ruby crystal, which generates unwanted photoluminescence rather than the desired radioluminescence. The relative contributions of the radioluminescence signal and the stem signal were quantified by exposing the ruby detectors to a high-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The photoluminescence signal was quantified by irradiating the fiber-optic cable with the detector volume shielded. Other experiments addressed time-dependent luminescence properties and compared the ISDs to commonly used organic scintillator detectors (BCF-12, BCF-60). When the brachytherapy source dwelled 0.5 cm away from the fiber-optic cable, the unwanted photoluminescence was reduced from  >5% to  <1% of the total signal as long as the ISD incorporated the long-pass filter. The stem signal was suppressed with a band-pass filter and was  <3% as long as the source distance from the scintillator was  <7 cm. Some ruby crystals exhibited time-dependent luminescence properties that altered the ruby signal by  >5% within 10 s from the onset of irradiation and after the source had retracted. The ruby-based ISDs generated signals of up to 20 times that of BCF-12-based detectors. The study presents solutions to unwanted luminescence properties of ruby-based ISDs for high-dose-rate brachytherapy. An optic filter should be sandwiched between the ruby crystal and the fiber-optic cable to suppress the

  14. Development of the dual scintillator sheet and Phoswich detector for simultaneous Alpha- and Beta-rays measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, B.K.; Kim, G.H.; Park, C.H.; Jung, Y.H.; Jung, C.H.; Lee, K.W.; Han, M.J.

    2007-07-01

    Thin sheet type of ZnS(Ag)/plastic dual scintillator for simultaneous counting of alpha- and beta-particles using a organic and inorganic scintillator widely used in the radiation measurement was manufactured, which could be applicable in the contamination monitoring systems. Counting materials were manufactured by solidification of the scintillator solution which mixed scintillator, solvent, and polymer. Prepared dual scintillator is a counting material which can simultaneously measure the alpha- and beta-particles. It was divided into two parts : an inorganic scintillator layer for alpha-particle detection and an organic one for beta-particle detection. The organic layer was composed of 2,5-diphenyloxazole [PPO] and 1,4,-bis[5-phenyl(oxazolyl)benzene] [POPOP] acting as the scintillator and polysulfone acting as the polymer. The inorganic layer was composed of ZnS(Ag) as scintillator and polysulfone as paste. The ZnS(Ag) scintillator layer was printed onto the organic layer using screen printing method. To estimate the detection ability of the prepared counting materials, alpha-particle emitting nuclide, Am-241, and beta emitting nuclide, Sr/Y-90, were used. The scintillations produced by interaction between radiation and scintillator were measured by photomultiplier tube. The overall counting results reveal that the developed detector is efficient for simultaneous counting of alpha- and beta-particles. For application test, the dual scintillator was fabricated with a Phoswich detector for monitoring the in-pipe alpha and beta contamination. To deploy inside a pipe, two types of Phoswich detectors, sheets and cylinders, were prepared. For in-pipe monitoring, it was found that the cylindrical type was excellent. In the study, polymer composite counting material and Phoswich detectors were prepared using organic and inorganic scintillator for detecting different radiations. In the future, it will be applied to the contamination monitoring system for nuclear

  15. Scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector has been developed using a bundle of square cross-section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified Charge Injection Device (CID) camera. Detector to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei have been exposed and images of their tracks are obtained. This paper presents details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle.

  16. Characterization and testing of EJ-309 and Stilbene scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baramsai, B.; Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Rusev, G.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-09-01

    A new neutron detector array (NEUANCE) is under development at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). After completion, NEUANCE will be installed in the central cavity of the 3.6π Υ-ray detector array DANCE located at the Lujan Center of LANSCE. The detector system, with simultaneous neutron and -ray detection capability, will be used to study neutron-induced capture and session reactions. The response of a EJ-309 scintillation detector to Υ-ray and neutron radiation was measured using the standard Υ-ray and 252Cf sources. The light from the detector was collected using a Hamamatsu photomultiplier tube or a Silicon photomultiplier GEANT4 was used to understand the light output and the optical photon transport in the scintillation. The detector geometry and optimum parameters for the data acquisition system were determined based on the test results and the simulations.

  17. Performance of photomultiplier tubes and sodium iodide scintillation detector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of photomultiplier tubes (PMT's) and scintillation detector systems incorporating 50.8 by 1.27 cm NaI (T l) crystals was investigated to determine the characteristics of the photomultiplier tubes and optimize the detector geometry for the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory. Background information on performance characteristics of PMT's and NaI (T l) detectors is provided, procedures for measurement of relevant parameters are specified, and results of these measurements are presented.

  18. Scintillator-fiber charged particle track-imaging detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1983-01-01

    A scintillator-fiber charged-particle track-imaging detector was developed using a bundle of square cross section plastic scintillator fiber optics, proximity focused onto an image intensified charge injection device (CID) camera. The tracks of charged particle penetrating into the scintillator fiber bundle are projected onto the CID camera and the imaging information is read out in video format. The detector was exposed to beams of 15 MeV protons and relativistic Neon, Manganese, and Gold nuclei and images of their tracks were obtained. Details of the detector technique, properties of the tracks obtained, and preliminary range measurements of 15 MeV protons stopping in the fiber bundle are presented.

  19. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Measurement of the response function and the detection efficiency of an organic liquid scintillator for neutrons between 1 and 30 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Han-Xiong; Ruan, Xi-Chao; Chen, Guo-Chang; Zhou, Zu-Ying; Li, Xia; Bao, Jie; Nie, Yang-Bo; Zhong, Qi-Ping

    2009-08-01

    The light output function of a varphi50.8 mm × 50.8 mm BC501A scintillation detector was measured in the neutron energy region of 1 to 30 MeV by fitting the pulse height (PH) spectra for neutrons with the simulations from the NRESP code at the edge range. Using the new light output function, the neutron detection efficiency was determined with two Monte-Carlo codes, NEFF and SCINFUL. The calculated efficiency was corrected by comparing the simulated PH spectra with the measured ones. The determined efficiency was verified at the near threshold region and normalized with a Proton-Recoil-Telescope (PRT) at the 8-14 MeV energy region.

  20. Maximum likelihood positioning and energy correction for scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Lerche, Christoph W; Salomon, André; Goldschmidt, Benjamin; Lodomez, Sarah; Weissler, Björn; Solf, Torsten

    2016-02-21

    An algorithm for determining the crystal pixel and the gamma ray energy with scintillation detectors for PET is presented. The algorithm uses Likelihood Maximisation (ML) and therefore is inherently robust to missing data caused by defect or paralysed photo detector pixels. We tested the algorithm on a highly integrated MRI compatible small animal PET insert. The scintillation detector blocks of the PET gantry were built with the newly developed digital Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) technology from Philips Digital Photon Counting and LYSO pixel arrays with a pitch of 1 mm and length of 12 mm. Light sharing was used to readout the scintillation light from the 30 × 30 scintillator pixel array with an 8 × 8 SiPM array. For the performance evaluation of the proposed algorithm, we measured the scanner's spatial resolution, energy resolution, singles and prompt count rate performance, and image noise. These values were compared to corresponding values obtained with Center of Gravity (CoG) based positioning methods for different scintillation light trigger thresholds and also for different energy windows. While all positioning algorithms showed similar spatial resolution, a clear advantage for the ML method was observed when comparing the PET scanner's overall single and prompt detection efficiency, image noise, and energy resolution to the CoG based methods. Further, ML positioning reduces the dependence of image quality on scanner configuration parameters and was the only method that allowed achieving highest energy resolution, count rate performance and spatial resolution at the same time.

  1. Neutron response characterization for an EJ299-33 plastic scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Chris C.; Febbraro, Michael; Massey, Thomas N.; Flaska, Marek; Becchetti, F. D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2014-05-10

    Organic scintillation detectors have shown promise as neutron detectors for characterizing special nuclear materials in various arms-control and homeland security applications. Recent advances have yielded a new plastic scintillator - EJ299-33 - with pulse-shape-discrimination (PSD) capability. Plastic scintillators would have a much expanded range of deployment relative to liquids and crystals. Here, we present a full characterization of pulse height response to fission-energy neutrons for an EJ299-33 detector with 7.62-by-7.62-cm cylindrical active volume, and compare with an EJ309 liquid scintillator in the same assembly. Scintillation light output relations, energy resolutions, and response matrices are presented for both detectors. A Continuous spectrum neutron source, obtained via the bombardment of Al-27 with 7.44-MeV deuterons at the Edwards Accelerator Facility at Ohio University, was used for the measurement. A new procedure for evaluating and comparing PSD performance is presented which accounts for the effect of the light output relation on the ability to detect low energy neutrons. The EJ299-33 is shown to have considerable deficit in matrix condition, and in PSD figure of merit when compared to EJ309, especially when neutron energy is taken into account. Furthermore the EJ299 is likely to bring a modest PSD capability into a array of held applications that are not accessible to liquids or crystals. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords

  2. Neutron response characterization for an EJ299-33 plastic scintillation detector

    DOE PAGES

    Lawrence, Chris C.; Febbraro, Michael; Massey, Thomas N.; ...

    2014-05-10

    Organic scintillation detectors have shown promise as neutron detectors for characterizing special nuclear materials in various arms-control and homeland security applications. Recent advances have yielded a new plastic scintillator - EJ299-33 - with pulse-shape-discrimination (PSD) capability. Plastic scintillators would have a much expanded range of deployment relative to liquids and crystals. Here, we present a full characterization of pulse height response to fission-energy neutrons for an EJ299-33 detector with 7.62-by-7.62-cm cylindrical active volume, and compare with an EJ309 liquid scintillator in the same assembly. Scintillation light output relations, energy resolutions, and response matrices are presented for both detectors. A Continuousmore » spectrum neutron source, obtained via the bombardment of Al-27 with 7.44-MeV deuterons at the Edwards Accelerator Facility at Ohio University, was used for the measurement. A new procedure for evaluating and comparing PSD performance is presented which accounts for the effect of the light output relation on the ability to detect low energy neutrons. The EJ299-33 is shown to have considerable deficit in matrix condition, and in PSD figure of merit when compared to EJ309, especially when neutron energy is taken into account. Furthermore the EJ299 is likely to bring a modest PSD capability into a array of held applications that are not accessible to liquids or crystals. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords« less

  3. A scintillator purification system for the Borexino solar neutrino detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benziger, J.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Chen, M.; Corsi, A.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Fernholz, R.; Ford, R.; Galbiati, C.; Goretti, A.; Harding, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Kidner, S.; Leung, M.; Loeser, F.; McCarty, K.; McKinsey, D.; Nelson, A.; Pocar, A.; Salvo, C.; Schimizzi, D.; Shutt, T.; Sonnenschein, A.

    2008-03-01

    Purification of the 278 tons of liquid scintillator and 889 tons of buffer shielding for the Borexino solar neutrino detector is performed with a system that combines distillation, water extraction, gas stripping, and filtration. This paper describes the principles of operation, design, and construction of that purification system, and reviews the requirements and methods to achieve system cleanliness and leak-tightness.

  4. A scintillating fission detector for neutron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy; Esch, Ernst I; Burgett, Eric A; May, Iain; Muenchausen, Ross E; Taw, Felicia; Tovesson, Fredrik K

    2010-01-01

    Neutron flux monitors are commonly used for a variety of nuclear physics applications. A scintillating neutron detector, consisting of a liquid scintillator loaded with fissionable material, has been developed, characterized, and tested in the beam line at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and shows a significant improvement in neutron sensitivity compared with a conventional fission chamber. Recent research on nanocomposite-based scintillators for gamma-ray detection indicates that this approach can be extended to load nanoparticles of fissionable material into a scintillating matrix, with up to three orders of magnitude higher loading than typical fission chambers. This will result in a rugged, cost-efficient detector with high efficiency, a short signal rise time, and the ability to be used in low neutron-flux environments. Initial efforts to utilize the luminescence of uranyl oxide to eliminate the need for wavelength-shifting dyes were unsuccessful. Excitation of uranyl compounds has been reported at wavelengths ranging from 266 nm to 532 nm. However, neither the 300 nm emission of toluene, nor the 350 nm emission of PPO, nor the 410 nm emission of POPOP resulted in significant excitation of and emission by uranyl oxide. As indicated by UV/visible spectroscopy, light emitted at these wavelengths was absorbed by the colored solution. {sup 235}U remains the most attractive candidate for a fissionable scintillator, due to its high fission cross-section and lack of a threshold fission energy, but all solutions containing molecular uranium compounds will be colored, most more highly than the U{sup 6+} compounds used here. Research is therefore continuing toward the fabrication of uranium nanoparticles, in which, due to Rayleigh scattering, the coloration should be less pronounced. The characterization of the thorium-loaded liquid scintillator and the fabrication of the 100 mL detectors for use at LANSCE demonstrated the feasibility of loading fissionable

  5. Temperature dependence of the plastic scintillator detector for DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhao-Min; Yu, Yu-Hong; Sun, Zhi-Yu; Yue, Ke; Yan, Duo; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Zhou, Yong; Fang, Fang; Huang, Wen-Xue; Chen, Jun-Ling

    2017-01-01

    The Plastic Scintillator Detector (PSD) is one of the main sub-detectors in the DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) project. It will be operated over a large temperature range from -10 to 30 °C, so the temperature effect of the whole detection system should be studied in detail. The temperature dependence of the PSD system is mainly contributed by the three parts: the plastic scintillator bar, the photomultiplier tube (PMT), and the Front End Electronics (FEE). These three parts have been studied in detail and the contribution of each part has been obtained and discussed. The temperature coefficient of the PMT is -0.320(±0.033)%/°C, and the coefficient of the plastic scintillator bar is -0.036(±0.038)%/°C. This result means that after subtracting the FEE pedestal, the variation of the signal amplitude of the PMT-scintillator system due to temperature mainly comes from the PMT, and the plastic scintillator bar is not sensitive to temperature over the operating range. Since the temperature effect cannot be ignored, the temperature dependence of the whole PSD has been also studied and a correction has been made to minimize this effect. The correction result shows that the effect of temperature on the signal amplitude of the PSD system can be suppressed. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program on Space Science of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA04040202-3) and Youth Innovation Promotion Association, CAS

  6. Fiber optic thermal/fast neutron and gamma ray scintillation detector

    DOEpatents

    Neal, John S.; Mihalczo, John T.

    2006-11-28

    A detector system that combines a .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber scintillation thermal neutron detector with a fast scintillation detector in a single layered structure. Detection of thermal and fast neutrons and ionizing electromagnetic radiation is achieved in the unified detector structure. The fast scintillator replaces the polyethelene moderator layer adjacent the .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber panel of the neutron detector and acts as the moderator for the glass fibers. Fast neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays are detected in the fast scintillator. Thermal neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays are detected in the glass fiber scintillator.

  7. Boronated Scintillator Detector for Use in Space with Ionization Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britvich, G. I.; Chernichenko, S. K.; Demichev, M. A.; Gnezdilov, I. I.; Mukhin, V. I.; Soukhih, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    Boronated Scintillator Detector (BSD) for use in space with ionization calorimeters was suggested. BSD improved e/h showers separation, which are initiated in the ionization calorimeter in interaction it with high energy particles. Improve the rejection is based on the hadron-induced showers tend to be accompanied by significantly more neutron activity than electromagnetic showers. The detector is composed of natural boron-loaded (5%) castable plastic scintillation plates. To collect light using wavelength-shifting (WLS) fibers. The experiment showed that the photoelectron yield is ∼ 40 ph.el./MeV with using PMT EMI 9954KB. Simulation on GEANT4 was obtained neutron detection efficiency. The simulation was conducted in the assumption that neutrons have the spectrum 252Cf and fall plane-parallel on the entry surface of the detector.

  8. Bismuth germanate as a potential scintillation detector in positron cameras.

    PubMed

    Cho, Z H; Farukhi, M R

    1977-08-01

    Timing and energy resolutions of the bismuth germanate (Bi4Ge3O12) scintillation crystals were studied, with particular respect to a positron-camera application. In comparison with the NaI(Tl) system, the detection efficiency for annihilation radiation is more than triple, and coincidence detection efficiency is more than ten times as good. This paper explores the properties of the new scintillator material and their bearing on the spatial resolution and the efficiency of coincidence detection in positron cameras with stationary ring detectors.

  9. Study of silicon photosensor applicability for scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khilya, V. M.; Voronov, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present work is the creation a prototype of anticoincidence system AC for gamma-telescope GAMMA-400. The detectors of AC are developed on the basis of plastic scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. This work is focuses on research of applicability of silicon photomultipliers SiPM by company SensL, type 60000 with BC-408 plastics for the prototype of anticoincidence system detector ACtop. In frame of project the assembly for measuring of the SiPM characteristics such as the linearity, boundary of saturation, the time resolution was developed. The final stage of work was the integration of the prototype of anticoincidence detector.

  10. Maximum likelihood positioning and energy correction for scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerche, Christoph W.; Salomon, André; Goldschmidt, Benjamin; Lodomez, Sarah; Weissler, Björn; Solf, Torsten

    2016-02-01

    An algorithm for determining the crystal pixel and the gamma ray energy with scintillation detectors for PET is presented. The algorithm uses Likelihood Maximisation (ML) and therefore is inherently robust to missing data caused by defect or paralysed photo detector pixels. We tested the algorithm on a highly integrated MRI compatible small animal PET insert. The scintillation detector blocks of the PET gantry were built with the newly developed digital Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) technology from Philips Digital Photon Counting and LYSO pixel arrays with a pitch of 1 mm and length of 12 mm. Light sharing was used to readout the scintillation light from the 30× 30 scintillator pixel array with an 8× 8 SiPM array. For the performance evaluation of the proposed algorithm, we measured the scanner’s spatial resolution, energy resolution, singles and prompt count rate performance, and image noise. These values were compared to corresponding values obtained with Center of Gravity (CoG) based positioning methods for different scintillation light trigger thresholds and also for different energy windows. While all positioning algorithms showed similar spatial resolution, a clear advantage for the ML method was observed when comparing the PET scanner’s overall single and prompt detection efficiency, image noise, and energy resolution to the CoG based methods. Further, ML positioning reduces the dependence of image quality on scanner configuration parameters and was the only method that allowed achieving highest energy resolution, count rate performance and spatial resolution at the same time.

  11. The readout electronics for Plastic Scintillator Detector of DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jie; Yang, Haibo; Zhao, Hongyun; Su, Hong; Sun, Zhiyu; Yu, Yuhong; JingZhe, Zhang; Wang, XiaoHui; Liu, Jie; Xiao, Guoqing; Ma, Xinwen

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) satellite, which launched in December 2015, is designed to find the evidence of the existence of dark matter particles in the universe via the detection of the high-energy electrons and gamma-ray particles produced possibly by the annihilation of dark matter particles. Plastic Scintillator Detector (PSD) is one of major part of the satellite payload, which is comprised of a crossed pair of layers with 41 plastic scintillator-strips, each read out from both ends by the same Hamamatsu R4443MOD2 photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs). In order to extend linear dynamic range of detector, PMTs read out each plastic scintillator-strip separately with two dynode pickoffs. Therefore, the readout electronics system comprises of four Front-end boards to receive the pulses from 328 PMTs and implement charge measurement, which is based on the Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) chip VA160, 16 bits ADC and FPGA. The electronics of the detector has been designed following stringent requirements on mechanical and thermal stability, power consumption, radiation hardness and double redundancy. Various experiments are designed and implemented to check the performance of the electronics, some excellent results has been achieved.According to experimental results analysis, it is proved that the readout electronics works well.

  12. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hamel, S; Carman, L; Faust, M; Lordi, V; Cherepy, N; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2009-07-15

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10-diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  13. Large surface scintillators as base of impact point detectors and their application in Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayuso, Sindulfo; Medina, José; Gómez-Herrero, Raul; José Blanco, Juan; García-Tejedor, Ignacio; García-Población, Oscar; Díaz-Romeral, Gonzalo

    2016-04-01

    The use of a pile of two 100 cm x 100 cm x 5 cm BC-400 organic scintillators is proposed as ground-based cosmic ray detector able to provide directional information on the incident muons. The challenge is to get in real time the muon impact point on the scintillator and its arrival direction using as few Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) as possible. The instrument is based on the dependence of attenuation of light with the traversed distance in each scintillator. For the time being, four photomultiplier tubes gather the light through the lateral faces (100 cm x 5 cm) of the scintillator. Several experiments have already been carried out. The results show how data contain information about the muon trajectory through the scintillator. This information can be extracted using the pulse heights collected by the PMTs working in coincidence mode. Reliability and accuracy of results strongly depend on the number of PMTs used and mainly on their appropriate geometrical arrangement with regard to the scintillator. In order to determine the optimal position and the minimum number of PMTs required, a Montecarlo simulation code has been developed. Preliminary experimental and simulation results are presented and the potential of the system for space weather monitoring is discussed.

  14. Fast calibration of SPECT monolithic scintillation detectors using un-collimated sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    España, Samuel; Deprez, Karel; Van Holen, Roel; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2013-07-01

    Monolithic scintillation detectors for positron emission tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging have many advantages over pixelated detectors. The use of monolithic crystals allows for reducing the scintillator cost per unit volume and increasing the sensitivity along with the energy and timing resolution of the detector. In addition, on thick detectors the depth-of-interaction can be determined without additional hardware. However, costly and complex calibration procedures have been proposed to achieve optimal detector performance for monolithic detectors. This hampers their use in commercial systems. There is thus, a need for simple calibration routines that can be performed on assembled systems. The main goal of this work is to develop a simplified calibration procedure based on acquired training data. In comparison with other methods that use training data acquired with beam sources attached to robotic stages, the proposed method uses a static un-collimated activity source with simple geometry acquiring in a reasonable time. Once the data are acquired, the calibration of the detector is accomplished in three steps: energy calibration based on the k-means clustering method, self-organization based on the self-organizing maps algorithm, and distortion correction based on the Monge-Kantorovich grid adaptation. The proposed calibration method was validated for 2D positioning using a SPECT detector. Similar results were obtained by comparison with an existing calibration method (maximum likelihood estimation). In conclusion, we proposed a novel calibration method for monolithic scintillation detectors that greatly simplifies their use with optimal performance in SPECT systems.

  15. Comparison of gamma-ray detectors: Scintillators, scintillating fibers, and semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C.E.

    1994-12-31

    New scintillators that have advantages relative to NaI(Tl) and BGO include GSO, LSO, YAP, and BaF{sub 2}. GSO, for example, is very radiation hard, and BaF{sub 2} is very fast. Scintillating fibers, which allow good spatial resolution and complex geometries, have been used extensively in high energy physics, but they can also be used at lower energies. Semiconductors such as germanium, silicon, CdTe, CdZnTe, and HgI{sub 2} can provide good resolution. The proliferation of types has made selection of a gamma-ray detector for a particular application difficult. The authors compare the different types and give examples of choices that have been made for laboratory experiments, portable instruments, and space applications.

  16. Emulation workbench for position sensitive gaseous scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, L.; Margato, L. M. S.; Morozov, A.; Solovov, V.; Fraga, F. A. F.

    2015-12-01

    Position sensitive detectors based on gaseous scintillation proportional counters with Anger-type readout are being used in several research areas such as neutron detection, search for dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay. Design and optimization of such detectors are complex and time consuming tasks. Simulations, while being a powerful tool, strongly depend on the light transfer models and demand accurate knowledge of many parameters, which are often not available. Here we describe an alternative approach based on the experimental evaluation of a detector using an isotropic point-like light source with precisely controllable light emission properties, installed on a 3D positioning system. The results obtained with the developed setup at validation conditions, when the scattered light is strongly suppressed show good agreement with simulations.

  17. Neutron response function characterization of 4He scintillation detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Kelley, Ryan P.; Rolison, Lucas M.; Lewis, Jason M.; ...

    2015-04-15

    Time-of-flight measurements were conducted to characterize the neutron energy response of pressurized 4He fast neutron scintillation detectors for the first time, using the Van de Graaff generator at Ohio University. The time-of-flight spectra and pulse height distributions were measured. This data was used to determine the light output response function, which was found to be linear at energies below 3.5 MeV. The intrinsic efficiency of the detector as a function of incident energy was also calculated: the average efficiency up to 10 MeV was 3.1%, with a maximum efficiency of 6.6% at 1.05 MeV. Furthermore, these results will enable developmentmore » of neutron spectrum unfolding algorithms for neutron spectroscopy applications with these detectors.« less

  18. Apparatus and method for temperature correction and expanded count rate of inorganic scintillation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Hsue, Sin Tao; Browne, Michael C.; Audia, Jeffrey M.

    2006-07-25

    The present invention includes an apparatus and corresponding method for temperature correction and count rate expansion of inorganic scintillation detectors. A temperature sensor is attached to an inorganic scintillation detector. The inorganic scintillation detector, due to interaction with incident radiation, creates light pulse signals. A photoreceiver processes the light pulse signals to current signals. Temperature correction circuitry that uses a fast light component signal, a slow light component signal, and the temperature signal from the temperature sensor to corrected an inorganic scintillation detector signal output and expanded the count rate.

  19. A Minor Modification of Leading Edge Discriminator Circuitry with a Delay Line for Baseline Restoration of Scintillation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N

    2003-05-27

    Multi-channel neutron time-of-flight detector arrays LaNSA, T-ion, Medusa, and Mandala, have been used for neutron spectroscopy in inertial confinement fusion experiments. These multi-channel neutron detector arrays consist of many identical scintillation detectors (842 {approx} 1024 channel), data acquisition electronics (discriminators, time-to digital converters, and controller). Each detector element is operated in neutron counting mode. Time-of-flight of individual detected neutrons are recorded by time to digital converters. The energy of each detected neutrons is determined from its time-of-flight. The accurate time measurement ({Delta}t {approx} 0.5 ns) and straightforward statistical features of the data obtained with these systems provides good integrity and reliability. The elements detector used in these systems are organic scintillators coupled with photo multiplier tubes. A scintillation detector operated in particle-counting mode requires finite recovery time after each detection event. The recovery time is determined by the time responses of scintillators, photo multiplier tubes, and the dead times of following discriminators and time-to digital converters. The harsh gamma ray background environment of fast ignitor experiments requires detectors that have fast recovery times. In high intensity laser experiments (I > 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}), strong gamma ray bursts are produced by relativistic laser plasma interactions. Prior to the neutron signal, these strong gamma ray bursts hit the detectors and interfere with the detection of following neutron signals. In these situations, the recovery time of the system after preceding gamma ray bursts is determined mainly by the base line shift of the PMT signal (due to slower decay components of scintillators ''after glow''). Discriminators cannot detect following signal pulses until the proceeding burst decays below its threshold voltage. The base line shift caused by the after glow prolongs the recovery

  20. Optimizing ZnS/6LiF scintillators for wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Crow, Lowell; Funk, Loren L; Hannan, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Riedel, Richard A; Wang, Cai-Lin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we compare the performance of grooved and flat ZnS/6LiF scintillators in a wavelength shifting-fiber (WLSF) detector. Flat ZnS/6LiF scintillators with the thickness L=0.2-0.8 mm were characterized using photon counting and pulse-height analysis and compared to a grooved scintillator of approximately 0.8 mm thick. While a grooved scintillator considerably increases the apparent thickness of the scintillator to neutrons for a given coating thickness, we find that the flat scintillators perform better than the grooved scintillators in terms of both light yield and neutron detection efficiency. The flat 0.8-mm-thick scintillator has the highest light output, and it is 52% higher compared with a grooved scintillator of same thickness. The lower light output of the grooved scintillator as compared to the flat scintillator is consistent with the greater scintillator-WLSF separation and the much larger average emission angle of the grooved scintillator. We also find that the average light cone width, or photon travel-length as measured using time-of-flight powder diffraction of diamond and vanadium, decreases with increasing L in the range of L=0.6-0.8 mm. This result contrasts with the traditional Swank diffusion model for micro-composite scintillators, and could be explained by a decrease in photon diffusion-coefficient or an increase in micro-particle content in the flat scintillator matrix for the thicker scintillators.

  1. Simulation results of liquid and plastic scintillator detectors for reactor antineutrino detection - A comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, V. K. S.; Pant, L. M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Datar, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    A simulation study of two kinds of scintillation detectors has been done using GEANT4. We compare plastic scintillator and liquid scintillator based designs for detecting electron antineutrinos emitted from the core of reactors. The motivation for this study is to set up an experiment at the research reactor facility at BARC for very short baseline neutrino oscillation study and remote reactor monitoring.

  2. Atmospheric Neutron Measurements using a Small Scintillator Based Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kole, Merlin; Pearce, Mark; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kentaro; Ishizu, Sumito; Jackson, Miranda; Kamae, Tune; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Kawano, Takafumi; Kiss, Mozsi; Moretti, Elena; Yanagida, Takayuki; Chauvin, Maxime; Mikhalev, Victor; Rydstrom, Stefan; Takahashi, Hiromitsu

    PoGOLino is a standalone scintillator-based neutron detector designed for balloon-borne missions. Its main purpose is to provide data of the neutron flux in 2 different energy ranges in the high altitude / high latitude region where the highest neutron flux in the atmosphere is found. Furthermore the influence of the Solar activity upon the neutron environment in this region is relatively strong. As a result both short and long term time fluctuations are strongest in this region. At high altitudes neutrons can form a source of background for balloon-borne scientific measurements. They can furthermore form a major source for single event upsets in electronics. A good understanding of the high altitude / high latitude neutron environment is therefore important. Measurements of the neutron environment in this region are however lacking. PoGOLino contains two 5 mm thick Lithium Calcium Aluminium Fluoride (LiCAF) scintillators used for neutron detection. The LiCAF crystals are sandwiched between 2 Bismuth Germanium Oxide (BGO) scintillating crystals, which serve to veto signals produced by gamma-rays and charged particles. The veto system makes measurements of the neutron flux possible even in high radiation environments. One LiCAF detector is shielded with polyethylene while the second remains unshielded, making the detectors sensitive in different energy ranges. The choice of a scintillator crystals as the detection material ensures a high detection efficiency while keeping the instrument small, robust and light weight. The full standalone cylindrical instrument has a radius of 120 mm, a height of 670 mm and a total mass of 13 kg, making it suitable as a piggy back mission. PoGOLino was successfully launched on March 20th 2013 from the Esrange Space Center in Northern Sweden to an altitude of 30.9 km. A detailed description of the detector design is presented, along with results of of the flight. The neutron flux measured during flight is compared to predictions based

  3. A new compact neutron/gamma ray scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffler, A.; Comrie, A. C.; Smit, F. D.; Wörtche, H. J.

    2016-09-01

    Progress towards the realization of a new compact neutron spectrometer is described. The detector is based on EJ299-33 plastic scintillator coupled to silicon photomultipliers, and a digital implementation of pulse shape discrimination is used to separate events associated with neutrons from those associated with gamma rays. The spectrometer will be suitable over the neutron energy range 1-100 MeV, illustrated in this work with measurements made using an AmBe radioisotopic source and quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams produced using a cyclotron.

  4. Modular design of long narrow scintillating cells for ILC detector

    SciTech Connect

    Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Dyshkant, A.; Maloney, J.; Rykalin, V.; Schellpfeffer, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    The experimental results for the narrow scintillating elements with effective area about 20 cm{sup 2} are reported. The elements were formed from the single piece of scintillator and were read out via wavelength shifting fibers with the MRS (Metal/Resistor/Semiconductor) photodiodes on both ends of each fiber. The formation of the cells from the piece of scintillator by using grooves is discussed. The cell performance was tested using the radioactive source by measuring the PMT current and a single rate after amplifier and discrimination with threshold at about three photo electrons in each channel and quad coincidences (double coincidences between sensors on each fiber and double coincidences between two neighboring fibers). This result is of high importance for large multi-channel systems, i.e. module may be used as an active element for calorimeter or muon system for the design of the future electron-positron linear collider detector because cell effective area can be smoothly enlarged or reduced (to 4 cm{sup 2} definitely).

  5. Fission-fragment detector for DANCE based on thin scintillating films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Roman, A. R.; Daum, J. K.; Springs, R. K.; Bond, E. M.; Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Favalli, A.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, M. L.; Mosby, S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films has been built to serve as a trigger/veto detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing 4 π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillation photons were registered with silicon photomultipliers. A measurement of the 235U (n , f) reaction with this detector at DANCE revealed a correct time-of-flight spectrum and provided an estimate for the efficiency of the prototype detector of 11.6(7)%. Design and test measurements with the detector are described.

  6. Fast-Neutron Survey With Compact Plastic Scintillation Detectors.

    PubMed

    Preston, Rhys M; Tickner, James R

    2017-01-17

    With the rise of the Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM), it is now practical to build compact scintillation detectors well suited to portable use. A prototype survey meter for fast-neutrons and gamma-rays, based around an EJ-299-34 plastic scintillator with SiPM readout, has been developed and tested. A custom digital pulse processor was used to perform pulse shape discrimination on-the-fly. Ambient dose equivalent H*(10) was calculated by means of two energy-dependent 'G-functions'. The sensitivity was calculated to be between 0.10 and 0.22 cps/(µSv/hr) for fast-neutrons with energies above 2.5 MeV. The prototype was used to survey various laboratory radiation fields, with the readings compared with commercial survey meters. The high sensitivity and lightweight nature of this detector makes it promising for rapid survey of the mixed neutron/gamma-ray fields encountered in industry and homeland security.

  7. Performance characterization of a new high resolution PET scintillation detector

    PubMed Central

    Foudray, A M K; Olcott, P D

    2013-01-01

    Performance of a new high resolution PET detection concept is presented. In this new concept, annihilation radiation enters the scintillator detectors edge-on. Each detector module comprises two 8 × 8 LYSO scintillator arrays of 0.91 × 0.91 × 1 mm3 crystals coupled to two position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) mounted on a flex circuit. Appropriate crystal segmentation allows the recording of all three spatial coordinates of the interaction(s) simultaneously with submillimeter resolution. We report an average energy resolution of 14.6 ± 1.7% for 511 keV photons at FWHM. Coincident time resolution was determined to be 2.98 ± 0.13 ns FWHM on average. The coincidence point spread function (PSF) has an average FWHM of 0.837 ± 0.049 mm (using a 500 μm spherical source) and is uniform across the arrays. Both PSF and coincident time resolution degrade when Compton interactions are included in the data. Different blurring factors were evaluated theoretically, resulting in a calculated PSF of 0.793 mm, in good agreement with the measured value. PMID:20844332

  8. Preliminary study of the inclusion of Water-based Liquid Scintillator in the WATCHMAN Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sweany, Melinda; Feng, Patrick L.; Marleau, Peter

    2015-02-01

    This note summarizes an effort to characterize the effects of adding water-based liquid scintillator to the WATCHMAN detector. A detector model was built in the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit, and the position reconstruction of positrons within the detector was compared with and without scintillator. This study highlights the need for further modeling studies and small-scale experimental studies before inclusion into a large-scale detector, as the benefits compared to the associated costs are unclear.

  9. MCNPX--PoliMi Variance Reduction Techniques for Simulating Neutron Scintillation Detector Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Shikha

    Scintillation detectors have emerged as a viable He-3 replacement technology in the field of nuclear nonproliferation and safeguards. The scintillation light produced in the detectors is dependent on the energy deposited and the nucleus with which the interaction occurs. For neutrons interacting with hydrogen in organic liquid scintillation detectors, the energy-to-light conversion process is nonlinear. MCNPX-PoliMi is a Monte Carlo Code that has been used for simulating this detailed scintillation physics; however, until now, simulations have only been done in analog mode. Analog Monte Carlo simulations can take long times to run, especially in the presence of shielding and large source-detector distances, as in the case of typical nonproliferation problems. In this thesis, two nonanalog approaches to speed up MCNPX-PoliMi simulations of neutron scintillation detector response have been studied. In the first approach, a response matrix method (RMM) is used to efficiently calculate neutron pulse height distributions (PHDs). This method combines the neutron current incident on the detector face with an MCNPX-PoliMi-calculated response matrix to generate PHDs. The PHD calculations and their associated uncertainty are compared for a polyethylene-shielded and lead-shielded Cf-252 source for three different techniques: fully analog MCNPX-PoliMi, the RMM, and the RMM with source biasing. The RMM with source biasing reduces computation time or increases the figure-of-merit on an average by a factor of 600 for polyethylene and 300 for lead shielding (when compared to the fully analog calculation). The simulated neutron PHDs show good agreement with the laboratory measurements, thereby validating the RMM. In the second approach, MCNPX-PoliMi simulations are performed with the aid of variance reduction techniques. This is done by separating the analog and nonanalog components of the simulations. Inside the detector region, where scintillation light is produced, no variance

  10. A model of scintillation detector performance for positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surti, Suleman

    2000-10-01

    This work investigates two new Anger-logic detector models to improve the performance of PET scanners. The first model investigates using a slotted front surface in a position-sensitive NaI(Tl) detector. The sensitivity of an unslotted detector increases with crystal thickness, but the spatial resolution worsens due to increased spreading of light. A slotted detector reduces the light spreading which leads to a reduction of pulse-pileup, thereby extending the count-rate capability of the PET scanner. Experimental measurements were performed with a 1″ thick, slotted Nal(TI) detector to validate the model developed through simulations, and optimize the tradeoff of the slot depth and spatial resolution. The count-rate performance of NaI(TI) detectors is also limited by the long decay time of NaI(T1) signal. A pulse shaping circuit was developed which narrows the NaI(T1) signal and improves the energy resolution at short integration times and high count-rate. A high count-rate simulation program predicts a doubling of the peak performance rate of the current whole-body scanner (CPET), using the slotted detector together with the pulse shaping circuit. For the second detector model, a new scintillator (GSO) with a high attenuation coefficient, good energy resolution, and short signal decay time was chosen. Detector simulations and measurements helped in designing a lightguide which optimizes the discrimination of 4 x 4 x 10 mm3 crystals. The pulse shaping circuit was modified for the GSO signal to achieve good signal sampling with the digitizers used in the electronics. High count-rate simulations show that a GSO- based brain scanner using this detector will result in a five fold increase in the peak performance rate over the current Nal(Tl)-based brain scanner (HPET). A brain scanner based upon the GSO Anger-logic detector has been almost completed. Initial results show that the image resolution is 3.5 mm with very little pulse pileup in the energy spectrum at high

  11. Systematic study of particle quenching in organic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, L. M.; Bagán, H.; Tarancón, A.; Rauret, G.; Garcia, J. F.

    2013-01-01

    Among the different factors that affect measurements by organic scintillators, the majority of attention has been focused on those related to the scintillator (i.e., ionization, chemical, color and optical quenching), and less attention has been paid to the loss of energy before the particle (i.e., alpha or beta) arrives at the scintillator (i.e., particle quenching). This study evaluates the effect of particle quenching in different scintillation methods (i.e., using two plastic scintillation microspheres (PSm1 and PSm2), liquid scintillator and gel scintillator) by measuring solutions that contain increasing concentrations of NaCl, BaCl2 and glycerin. The results show the importance of particle quenching in PSm measurements because detection efficiency decreases with increasing concentrations of the quenching component, although the spectrum position and external standard parameter remain constant. The results have shown evidence of particle quenching, although at a lower magnitude, in the liquid scintillation or gel scintillation measurements. Moreover, the use of two PSm with different diameters and salty compound that alters the equilibrium of the liquid and gel emulsions also exemplified the importance of the transmission of optical photons through different scintillation media (i.e., optical quenching). Improvement and deterioration of the optical conditions on the scintillation media is manifested as a movement of the spectrum to higher and lower energies, respectively. The results obtained with PSm were confirmed by Monte Carlo simulation.

  12. Determination of Total Body Radioactivity Using Liquid Scintillation Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reines, F.; Schuch, R. L.; Cowan, C. L.; Harrison, F. B.; Anderson, E. C.; Hayes, F. N.

    IN the course of developing equipment for other problems1, we have made some measurements of the total radioactivity content of several humans and a dog, using a technique which may have other applications in biophysics. The equipment used consists of a liquid scintillation detector in the shape of a cylinder 30 in. in diameter and 30 in. high, surrounded by RCA type 5819 photomultipliers, fortyfive of which were used in these measurements. Cylindrical steel inserts, 14 in. in diameter in one case and 20 in. in diameter in another, 32 in. high and 0.015 in. thick, were placed in the tank, leaving an annular region filled with liquid scintillator (toluene-terphenyl-α-naphthyl phenyl oxazole). A lead shield 5 in. thick was placed around the assembly, leaving only the top of the insert open. The fortyfive photomultipliers were connected in parallel and their output fed through a linear amplifier to a tenchannel pulse-height analyser (see Fig. 1)…

  13. Advanced Scintillator Detectors for Neutron Imaging in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geppert-Kleinrath, Verena; Danly, Christopher; Merrill, Frank; Simpson, Raspberry; Volegov, Petr; Wilde, Carl

    2016-10-01

    The neutron imaging team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been providing two-dimensional neutron imaging of the inertial confinement fusion process at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for over five years. Neutron imaging is a powerful tool in which position-sensitive detectors register neutrons emitted in the fusion reactions, producing a picture of the burning fuel. Recent images have revealed possible multi-dimensional asymmetries, calling for additional views to facilitate three-dimensional imaging. These will be along shorter lines of sight to stay within the existing facility at NIF. In order to field imaging capabilities equivalent to the existing system several technological challenges have to be met: high spatial resolution, high light output, and fast scintillator response to capture lower-energy neutrons, which have scattered from non-burning regions of fuel. Deuterated scintillators are a promising candidate to achieve the timing and resolution required; a systematic study of deuterated and non-deuterated polystyrene and liquid samples is currently ongoing. A test stand has been implemented to measure the response function, and preliminary data on resolution and light output have been obtained at the LANL Weapons Neutrons Research facility.

  14. Structural design of a high energy particle detector using liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Timothy John; /Minnesota U.

    1997-02-01

    This thesis presents a design for a 10,000 ton liquid scintillator neutrino detector being considered for the MINOS project at Fermilab. Details of designing, manufacturing, and assembling the active detector components are presented. The detector consists of 1080 magnetized steel absorber planes alternating with 1080 active detector planes. Each active plane is made up of plastic extrusions divided into nearly 400 cells for positional resolution. Life tests on the plastic extrusions determine their feasibility for containing the scintillator. The extrusions are sealed at the bottom, filled with liquid scintillator, and have an optical fiber running the entire length of each cell. The fibers terminate at the top of each extrusion in a manifold. An optical-fiber-light-guide connects the fibers in each manifold to a photo-detector. The photo-detector converts the light signals from the scintillator and optical fibers into electrical impulses for computer analysis.

  15. Radiation Hard Plastic Scintillators for a New Generation of Particle Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dettmann, M.; Herrig, V.; Maldonis, J.; Neuhaus, J.; Shrestha, D.; Rajbhandari, P.; Thune, Z.; Been, M.; Martinez-Szewczyk, M.; Khristenko, V.; Onel, Y.; Akgun, U.

    2017-03-01

    The radiation hardness of specific scintillating materials used in particle physics experiments is one of the main focuses of research in detector development. This report summarizes the preparation methods, light yield characterization and radiation damage tests of a plastic scintillator with a polysiloxane base and pTP and bis-MSB dopants. The scintillator is shown to be a promising candidate for particle detectors with its intense light output around 400 nm and very little scintillation or transmission loss after proton irradiation of 4 × 105 Gy.

  16. Influence of Depth of Interaction upon the Performance of Scintillator Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Mark S.; Gundacker, Stefan; Taylor, Alaric; Tummeltshammer, Clemens; Auffray, Etiennette; Lecoq, Paul; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    The uncertainty in time of particle detection within a scintillator detector, characterised by the coinci- dence time resolution (CTR), is explored with respect to the interaction position within the scintillator crystal itself. Electronic collimation between two scintillator detectors is utilised to determine the CTR with depth of interaction (DOI) for different materials, geometries and wrappings. Significantly, no rela- tionship between the CTR and DOI is observed within experimental error. Confinement of the interaction position is seen to degrade the CTR in long scintillator crystals by 10%. PMID:24875832

  17. A mathematical formalism for hyperspectral, multipoint plastic scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Archambault, Louis; Therriault-Proulx, François; Beddar, Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-11-07

    The aim of this paper is to generalize and extend the mathematical formalism used with plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs). By doing so, we show the feasibility of multi-point PSD. The new formalism is based on the sole hypothesis that a PSD optical signal is a linear superposition of spectra. Two calibration scenarios were developed. Both involve solving a linear equation of the form Y = XB, but the process and input data depend on the information available on the detector system. Simulations were carried out to validate both scenarios and demonstrate the advantages of the new formalism. In this paper, we prove the following results. (1) Multi-point PSDs are feasible. Simulations have shown that six different spectra could be resolved accurately even in the presence of up to 10% Gaussian noise. (2) The new formalism leads to more precise PSD measurements. (3) By using the condition number of the measurement matrix, the ideal sets of calibration measurements can be identified. (4) By using principal component analysis it was possible to identify the best set of wavelength filters. We have shown through numerical simulations that multi-point detectors are feasible. This has potential for applications such as in vivo dose verification. Furthermore, our new formalism can be used to improve the robustness and ease of use of PSDs.

  18. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Studies of a scintillator-bar detector for a neutron wall at an external target facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yu-Hong; Xu, Hua-Gen; Xu, Hu-Shan; Zhan, Wen-Long; Sun, Zhi-Yu; Guo, Zhong-Yan; Hu, Zheng-Guo; Wang, Jian-Song; Chen, Jun-Ling; Zheng, Chuan

    2009-07-01

    To achieve a better time resolution of a scintillator-bar detector for a neutron wall at the external target facility of HIRFL-CSR, we have carried out a detailed study of the photomultiplier, the wrapping material and the coupling media. The timing properties of a scintillator-bar detector have been studied in detail with cosmic rays using a high and low level signal coincidence. A time resolution of 80 ps has been achieved in the center of the scintillator-bar detector.

  19. Developing Detectors for Scintillation Light in Liquid Argon for DUNE

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, Bruce

    2016-12-22

    The Deep Underground Neutrino experiment will conduct a broad program of physics research by studying a beam of neutrinos from Fermilab, atmospheric neutrinos, neutrinos from potential supernovae, and potential nucleon decay events. In pursuit of these studies, the experiment will deploy four 10kt fiducial mass liquid argon time projection chambers underground in Lead, South Dakota. Liquid argon time projection chambers allow high-resolution tracking and energy measurements. A precise timing signal is needed to provide the necessary time stamp to localize events in the drift direction. As liquid argon is a natural scintillator, a photon detection system will be deployed to provide such a signal, especially for non-beam events. In the baseline design for the single-phase time projection chamber, the detectors are contained within the anode plane assemblies. The design of two prototypes utilizing wavelength shifters and light guides are presented, and aspects of the research and development program are discussed.

  20. Use of internal scintillator radioactivity to calibrate DOI function of a PET detector with a dual-ended-scintillator readout

    SciTech Connect

    Bircher, Chad; Shao Yiping

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) detectors that use a dual-ended-scintillator readout to measure depth-of-interaction (DOI) must have an accurate DOI function to provide the relationship between DOI and signal ratios to be used for detector calibration and recalibration. In a previous study, the authors used a novel and simple method to accurately and quickly measure DOI function by irradiating the detector with an external uniform flood source; however, as a practical concern, implementing external uniform flood sources in an assembled PET system is technically challenging and expensive. In the current study, therefore, the authors investigated whether the same method could be used to acquire DOI function from scintillator-generated (i.e., internal) radiation. The authors also developed a method for calibrating the energy scale necessary to select the events within the desired energy window. Methods: The authors measured the DOI function of a PET detector with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) scintillators. Radiation events originating from the scintillators' internal Lu-176 beta decay were used to measure DOI functions which were then compared with those measured from both an external uniform flood source and an electronically collimated external point source. The authors conducted these studies with several scintillators of differing geometries (1.5 x 1.5 and 2.0 x 2.0 mm{sup 2} cross-section area and 20, 30, and 40 mm length) and various surface finishes (mirror-finishing, saw-cut rough, and other finishes in between), and in a prototype array. Results: All measured results using internal and external radiation sources showed excellent agreement in DOI function measurement. The mean difference among DOI values for all scintillators measured from internal and external radiation sources was less than 1.0 mm for different scintillator geometries and various surface finishes. Conclusions: The internal radioactivity of LYSO scintillators can be used

  1. The plastic scintillator detector calibration circuit for DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haibo; Kong, Jie; Zhao, Hongyun; Su, Hong

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is being constructed as a scientific satellite to observe high energy cosmic rays in space. Plastic scintillator detector array (PSD), developed by Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMPCAS), is one of the most important parts in the payload of DAMPE which is mainly used for the study of dark matter. As an anti-coincidence detector, and a charged-particle identification detector, the PSD has a total of 360 electronic readout channels, which are distributed at four sides of PSD using four identical front end electronics (FEE). Each FEE reads out 90 charge signals output by the detector. A special calibration circuit is designed in FEE. FPGA is used for on-line control, enabling the calibration circuit to generate the pulse signal with known charge. The generated signal is then sent to the FEE for calibration and self-test. This circuit mainly consists of DAC, operation amplifier, analog switch, capacitance and resistance. By using controllable step pulse, the charge can be coupled to the charge measuring chip using the small capacitance. In order to fulfill the system's objective of large dynamic range, the FEE is required to have good linearity. Thus, the charge-controllable signal is needed to do sweep test on all channels in order to obtain the non-linear parameters for off-line correction. On the other hand, the FEE will run on the satellite for three years. The changes of the operational environment and the aging of devices will lead to parameter variation of the FEE, highlighting the need for regular calibration. The calibration signal generation circuit also has a compact structure and the ability to work normally, with the PSD system's voltage resolution being higher than 0.6%.

  2. Fluorescence decay-time constants in organic liquid scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Marrodan Undagoitia, T.; Feilitzsch, F. von; Oberauer, L.; Potzel, W.; Ulrich, A.; Winter, J.; Wurm, M.

    2009-04-15

    The fluorescence decay-time constants have been measured for several scintillator mixtures based on phenyl-o-xylylethane (PXE) and linear alkylbenzene (LAB) solvents. The resulting values are of relevance for the physics performance of the proposed large-volume liquid scintillator detector Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy (LENA). In particular, the impact of the measured values to the search for proton decay via p{yields}K{sup +}{nu} is evaluated in this work.

  3. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined detection of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, M.M.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.

    1987-02-27

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation event count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  4. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, Marion M.; Mihalczo, John T.; Blakeman, Edward D.

    1989-01-01

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation even count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  5. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, Marion M.; Mihalczo, John T.; Blakeman, Edward D.

    1989-02-07

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation even count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  6. Testing a new NIF neutron time-of-flight detector with a bibenzyl scintillator on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Glebov, V Yu; Forrest, C; Knauer, J P; Pruyne, A; Romanofsky, M; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M J; Stoeckl, C; Caggiano, J A; Carman, M L; Clancy, T J; Hatarik, R; McNaney, J; Zaitseva, N P

    2012-10-01

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector with a bibenzyl crystal as a scintillator has been designed and manufactured for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This detector will replace a nTOF20-Spec detector with an oxygenated xylene scintillator currently operational on the NIF to improve the areal-density measurements. In addition to areal density, the bibenzyl detector will measure the D-D and D-T neutron yield and the ion temperature of indirect- and direct-drive-implosion experiments. The design of the bibenzyl detector and results of tests on the OMEGA Laser System are presented.

  7. Design optimization of liquid scintillator cosmic-ray veto detector with BBQ shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, H.W.; Egdorf, S.S.; Simmons, D.F.

    1981-10-01

    Certain design characteristics of a liquid scintillator detector for charged cosmic particles, have been studied. These include evaluation of scintillator emission spectra, absorption in various thicknesses of BBQ shifter bars and effective transmission in long lengths of BBQ acrylic. For our BBQ sample, 12.5 mm thick with semicircular shape, the shifted light was transmitted with 2.0 m absorption length.

  8. Optimizing timing performance of silicon photomultiplier-based scintillation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Jung Yeol; Vinke, Ruud

    2013-01-01

    Precise timing resolution is crucial for applications requiring photon time-of-flight (ToF) information such as ToF positron emission tomography (PET). Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) for PET, with their high output capacitance, are known to require custom preamplifiers to optimize timing performance. In this paper, we describe simple alternative front-end electronics based on a commercial low-noise RF preamplifier and methods that have been implemented to achieve excellent timing resolution. Two radiation detectors with L(Y)SO scintillators coupled to Hamamatsu SiPMs (MPPC S10362–33-050C) and front-end electronics based on an RF amplifier (MAR-3SM+), typically used for wireless applications that require minimal additional circuitry, have been fabricated. These detectors were used to detect annihilation photons from a Ge-68 source and the output signals were subsequently digitized by a high speed oscilloscope for offline processing. A coincident resolving time (CRT) of 147 ± 3 ps FWHM and 186 ± 3 ps FWHM with 3 × 3 × 5 mm3 and with 3 × 3 × 20 mm3 LYSO crystal elements were measured, respectively. With smaller 2 × 2 × 3 mm3 LSO crystals, a CRT of 125 ± 2 ps FWHM was achieved with slight improvement to 121 ± 3 ps at a lower temperature (15°C). Finally, with the 20 mm length crystals, a degradation of timing resolution was observed for annihilation photon interactions that occur close to the photosensor compared to shallow depth-of-interaction (DOI). We conclude that commercial RF amplifiers optimized for noise, besides their ease of use, can produce excellent timing resolution comparable to best reported values acquired with custom readout electronics. On the other hand, as timing performance degrades with increasing photon DOI, a head-on detector configuration will produce better CRT than a side-irradiated setup for longer crystals. PMID:23369872

  9. Tomographic analysis of neutron and gamma pulse shape distributions from liquid scintillation detectors at Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, D. B.

    2014-02-15

    The Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D)/Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. Neutrons produced in these plasmas are measured using various types of neutron detectors and spectrometers. Two of these instruments on JET make use of organic liquid scintillator detectors. The neutron emission profile monitor implements 19 liquid scintillation counters to detect the 2.45 MeV neutron emission from D plasmas. A new compact neutron spectrometer is operational at JET since 2010 to measure the neutron energy spectra from both D and DT plasmas. Liquid scintillation detectors are sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation but give light responses of different decay time such that pulse shape discrimination techniques can be applied to identify the neutron contribution of interest from the data. The most common technique consists of integrating the radiation pulse shapes within different ranges of their rising and/or trailing edges. In this article, a step forward in this type of analysis is presented. The method applies a tomographic analysis of the 3-dimensional neutron and gamma pulse shape and pulse height distribution data obtained from liquid scintillation detectors such that n/γ discrimination can be improved to lower energies and additional information can be gained on neutron contributions to the gamma events and vice versa.

  10. Dealing with Cerenkov radiation generated in organic scintillator dosimeters by bremsstrahlung beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clift, M. A.; Sutton, R. A.; Webb, D. V.

    2000-05-01

    An organic scintillator detector system has been developed for radiotherapy bremsstrahlung dosimetry. The scintillators are connected to photodiodes by light pipes as the photodiodes must be removed and shielded from the incident radiation. The photodiodes see visible and near-visible light emissions from the scintillator as well as Cerenkov and fluorescence radiation that has been generated and trapped in the scintillator and light pipe. The Cerenkov and fluorescence radiation limits the accuracy of the dosimeter. This work examines a range of methods for diminishing the signal contribution of Cerenkov and fluorescence radiation while optimizing the scintillator signal. Three methods of achieving these goals have been used. They are: reflective coatings on the scintillator, long-wavelength-emitting scintillators used in conjunction with the photodiode, and absorptive filters placed between the light guide and photodiode. The contribution of the Cerenkov radiation to the light seen by the photodiode has been modelled and the model predictions have been tested using bremsstrahlung beams of peak energy between 13 and 20 MV, showing agreement with measurement.

  11. Detection of Extensive Cosmic Air Showers by Small Scintillation Detectors with Wavelength-Shifting Fibres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiola, Salvatore; La Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco; Riggi, Simone

    2012-01-01

    A set of three small scintillation detectors was employed to measure correlated events due to the passage of cosmic muons originating from extensive air showers. The coincidence rate between (any) two detectors was extracted as a function of their relative distance. The difference between the arrival times in three non-aligned detectors was used…

  12. Advances in Neutron Spectroscopy with Deuterated Organic Scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Febbraro, Michael; Pain, Steve; Becchetti, Frederick

    2015-10-01

    Deuterated organic scintillators have shown promise as neutron detectors for nuclear science as well as applications in nuclear non-proliferation and safeguards. In particular, they can extract neutron spectra without the use of neutron time-of-flight measurement (n-ToF) utilizing spectrum unfolding techniques. This permits the measure of cross sections of bound and unbound states with high efficiency and angular coverage. In the case of measurements with radioactive ion beams where low beam intensities limit long path n-ToF, short path n-ToF can be used to discriminate neutrons of interest from room return and background neutrons. This presentation will provide recent advances with these types of detectors. Digital pulse-shape discrimination using fast waveform digitizers, spectrum unfolding methods for extraction of neutron spectra, and a new safer deuterated-xylene formulation EJ-301D will be discussed. In addition, experimental results from measurements of discrete and continuous neutron spectra which illustrate the advantage of these detectors for certain applications in nuclear physics research and nuclear security will be shown. This work is supported by NSF and DOE.

  13. Scintillation Detector for the Measurement of Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Rays on the Super-TIGER Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Link, Jason

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the design and construction of the scintillation detectors for the Super-TIGER experiment. Super-TIGER is a large-area (5.4sq m) balloon-borne experiment designed to measure the abundances of cosmic-ray nuclei between Z= 10 and Z=56. It is based on the successful TIGER experiment that flew in Antarctica in 2001 and 2003. Super-TIGER has three layers of scintillation detectors, two Cherenkov detectors and a scintillating fiber hodoscope. The scintillation detector employs four wavelength shifter bars surrounding the edges of the scintillator to collect the light from particles traversing the detector. PMTs are optically coupled at both ends of the bars for light collection. We report on laboratory performance of the scintillation counters using muons. In addition we discuss the design challenges and detector response over this broad charge range including the effect of scintilator saturation.

  14. Proton-induced radioactivity in NaI (Tl) scintillation detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    Radioactivity induced by protons in sodium iodide scintillation crystals were calculated and directly measured. These data are useful in determining trapped radiation and cosmic-ray induced, background-counting rates in spaceborne detectors.

  15. Optimum design calculations for detectors based on ZnSe(Те,О) scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katrunov, K.; Ryzhikov, V.; Gavrilyuk, V.; Naydenov, S.; Lysetska, O.; Litichevskyi, V.

    2013-06-01

    Light collection in scintillators ZnSe(X), where X is an isovalent dopant, was studied using Monte Carlo calculations. Optimum design was determined for detectors of "scintillator—Si-photodiode" type, which can involve either one scintillation element or scintillation layers of large area made of small-crystalline grains. The calculations were carried out both for determination of the optimum scintillator shape and for design optimization of light guides, on the surface of which the layer of small-crystalline grains is formed.

  16. An analytical light distribution model in the optical system of a scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Sergey; Skachkov, E. V.; Belyaev, V. N.

    2017-01-01

    The article describes an analytical light distribution model in the optical system of a scintillation detector. The model can be useful for scintillation detector development since it allows to make quick calculations with different parameters. Comparison of the analytical model and Geant4 calculation results has been done. The comparison of the analytical model calculation results and experimental measurements have been done. Both comparisons show model validity and a capability to be used in the research.

  17. Double phase (liquid/gas) xenon scintillation detector for WIMPs direct search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, M.; Doke, T.; Kikuchi, J.; Suzuki, S.

    2003-10-01

    A double phase (liquid/gas) xenon prototype detector of a 0.3 l active volume for WIMPs direct search has been constructed and tested. Proportional scintillation signals are observed by a multi-wire anode mounted in gas phase after ionization electrons drifted successfully long distance in liquid xenon. Both direct and proportional scintillation were used to discriminate electron recoil from nuclear recoil. Basic performances of the detector and the rejection efficiency of background gamma rays were demonstrated.

  18. Lithium glass scintillator neutron detector as an improved alternative to the standard 3 he proportional counter

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Popov, Pavel Degtiarenko

    2011-06-01

    Lithium glass scintillator made from 6Li-enriched substrate is a well known for its neutron detection capability. In spite of neutron interaction, cross section of 6Li happens to be lower than that of 3He. However, the neutron detection efficiency could be higher due to higher volume content of 6Li nuclear in the solid scintillator vs. gas filled proportional counter. At the same time, as lithium glass is sensitive to gamma and charge particle radiation, non-neutron radiation discrimination is required. Our detector is composed of two equal-size cylindrical Li(Ce) glass scintillators. The first one is high-sensitive to thermal neutrons GS-20 (6Li doped), the second one is GS-30 (7Li doped) type Scint-Gobain made lithium glass scintillator. Each of scintillators is coupled with R7400U Hamamatsu subminiature photomultiplier tube, and all assembly is fitted into NP100H 3He tube size. 6Li absorbs thermal neutrons releasing alpha particles and triton with 4.8 MeV total energy deposit inside the scintillator (equivalent to about ~1.3 MeV gamma energy depositions). Because 7Li isotope does not absorb thermal neutrons, and the physical properties of the two scintillators are virtually identical, the difference between these two scintillators could be used to provide neutron dose rate information. Results of study of neutron detector assembled of two Li(Ce) scintillators and NP100H moderator are presented

  19. Characterization of a cubic EJ-309 liquid scintillator detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomanin, A.; Paepen, J.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Wynants, R.; Nolte, R.; Lavietes, A.

    2014-08-01

    A cubic EJ-309 liquid scintillator of 10 cm width has been characterized for its response to γ-rays and neutrons. Response functions to γ-rays were measured with calibrated radionuclide γ-ray sources in the energy range from 400 keV to 6 MeV. Response functions for neutrons were obtained from measurements at the PTB Van de Graaff accelerator with quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range from 500 keV to 2.7 MeV, and at the PTB cyclotron with time-of-flight (TOF) measurements in the energy range from 2.5 to 14 MeV. The light output and resolution functions for electrons and protons were derived by a least squares adjustment to experimental data using theoretical response functions determined with Monte Carlo simulations. The simulated response function for neutron was validated by results of measurements with an AmBe neutron source which was characterized for its total neutron intensity. The results indicate that the cubic EJ-309 detector is suitable for use in mixed γ-ray and neutron fields.

  20. Fast range measurement of spot scanning proton beams using a volumetric liquid scintillator detector

    PubMed Central

    Hui, CheukKai; Robertson, Daniel; Alsanea, Fahed; Beddar, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Accurate confirmation and verification of the range of spot scanning proton beams is crucial for correct dose delivery. Current methods to measure proton beam range using ionization chambers are either time-consuming or result in measurements with poor spatial resolution. The large-volume liquid scintillator detector allows real-time measurements of the entire dose profile of a spot scanning proton beam. Thus, liquid scintillator detectors are an ideal tool for measuring the proton beam range for commissioning and quality assurance. However, optical artefacts may decrease the accuracy of measuring the proton beam range within the scintillator tank. The purpose of the current study was to 1) develop a geometric calibration system to accurately calculate physical distances within the liquid scintillator detector, taking into account optical artefacts; and 2) assess the accuracy, consistency, and robustness of proton beam range measurement using the liquid scintillator detector with our geometric calibration system. The range of the proton beam was measured with the calibrated liquid scintillator system and was compared to the nominal range. Measurements were made on three different days to evaluate the setup robustness from day to day, and three sets of measurements were made for each day to evaluate the consistency from delivery to delivery. All proton beam ranges measured using the liquid scintillator system were within half a millimeter of the nominal range. The delivery-to-delivery standard deviation of the range measurement was 0.04 mm, and the day-to-day standard deviation was 0.10 mm. In addition to the accuracy and robustness demonstrated by these results when our geometric calibration system was used, the liquid scintillator system allowed the range of all 94 proton beams to be measured in just two deliveries, making the liquid scintillator detector a perfect tool for range measurement of spot scanning proton beams. PMID:27274863

  1. Rejection of Alpha Surface Background in Non-scintillating Bolometric Detectors: The ABSuRD Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; di Vacri, M. L.; Gorla, P.; Pavan, M.; Yeh, M.

    2016-08-01

    Due to their excellent energy resolution values and the vast choice of possible materials, bolometric detectors are currently widely used in the physics of rare events. A limiting aspect for bolometers rises from their inability to discriminate among radiation types or surface from bulk events. It has been demonstrated that the main limitation to sensitivity for purely bolometric detectors is represented by surface alpha contaminations, causing a continuous background that cannot be discriminated. A new scintillation-based technique for the rejection of surface alpha background in non-scintillating bolometric experiments is proposed in this work. The idea is to combine a scintillating and a high sensitivity photon detector with a non-scintillating absorber. We present results showing the possibility to reject events due to alpha decay at or nearby the surface of the crystal.

  2. Rejection of Alpha Surface Background in Non-scintillating Bolometric Detectors: The ABSuRD Project

    SciTech Connect

    Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; di Vacri, M. L.; Gorla, P.; Pavan, M.; Yeh, M.

    2016-01-14

    Due to their excellent energy resolution values and the vast choice of possible materials, bolometric detectors are currently widely used in the physics of rare events. A limiting aspect for bolometers rises from their inability to discriminate among radiation types or surface from bulk events. It has been demonstrated that the main limitation to sensitivity for purely bolometric detectors is represented by surface alpha contaminations, causing a continuous background that cannot be discriminated. A new scintillation based technique for the rejection of surface alpha background in non- scintillating bolometric experiments is proposed in this work. The idea is to combine a scintillating and a high sensitivity photon detector with a non- scintillating absorber. Finally, we present results showing the possibility to reject events due to alpha decay at or nearby the surface of the crystal.

  3. Rejection of Alpha Surface Background in Non-scintillating Bolometric Detectors: The ABSuRD Project

    DOE PAGES

    Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; ...

    2016-01-14

    Due to their excellent energy resolution values and the vast choice of possible materials, bolometric detectors are currently widely used in the physics of rare events. A limiting aspect for bolometers rises from their inability to discriminate among radiation types or surface from bulk events. It has been demonstrated that the main limitation to sensitivity for purely bolometric detectors is represented by surface alpha contaminations, causing a continuous background that cannot be discriminated. A new scintillation based technique for the rejection of surface alpha background in non- scintillating bolometric experiments is proposed in this work. The idea is to combinemore » a scintillating and a high sensitivity photon detector with a non- scintillating absorber. Finally, we present results showing the possibility to reject events due to alpha decay at or nearby the surface of the crystal.« less

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of the nonlinear full peak energy responses for gamma-ray scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Peeples, Johanna L; Gardner, Robin P

    2012-07-01

    A Monte Carlo code has been developed, which predicts the nonlinear full peak energy responses of scintillation detectors to incident gamma-rays. It is illustrated here for the popular scintillation detectors, NaI and BGO. The full energy response can be determined by treating the detector as effectively infinite and assuming that all photons and electrons are fully absorbed within the detector. This assumption means that no geometrical direction or position tracking is required, only the selection of sequential photon interactions based on the appropriate energy-dependent interaction cross-sections. The full energy pulse-height response is determined by the sum of the pulse-height responses from all secondary electrons. Results from infinite NaI and BGO detectors indicate that even though the maximum difference in electron scintillation efficiency is about the same for the two scintillation detectors, the overall effect on the extent of the difference in pulse height is much less for BGO than NaI. This result is due to the larger density and effective atomic number of BGO, which causes significantly fewer Compton scattering events. Compton scattering interactions reduce the incident photon energy without absorption and therefore give more responses at reduced energy where the electron scintillation efficiency is most different.

  5. Optical simulation of monolithic scintillator detectors using GATE/GEANT4.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, D J Jan; Schaart, Dennis R; Maas, Marnix C; Beekman, Freek J; Bruyndonckx, Peter; van Eijk, Carel W E

    2010-03-21

    Much research is being conducted on position-sensitive scintillation detectors for medical imaging, particularly for emission tomography. Monte Carlo simulations play an essential role in many of these research activities. As the scintillation process, the transport of scintillation photons through the crystal(s), and the conversion of these photons into electronic signals each have a major influence on the detector performance; all of these processes may need to be incorporated in the model to obtain accurate results. In this work the optical and scintillation models of the GEANT4 simulation toolkit are validated by comparing simulations and measurements on monolithic scintillator detectors for high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET). We have furthermore made the GEANT4 optical models available within the user-friendly GATE simulation platform (as of version 3.0). It is shown how the necessary optical input parameters can be determined with sufficient accuracy. The results show that the optical physics models of GATE/GEANT4 enable accurate prediction of the spatial and energy resolution of monolithic scintillator PET detectors.

  6. Development of a thin scintillation films fission-fragment detector and a novel neutron source

    DOE PAGES

    Rusev, Gencho Yordanov; Jandel, Marian; Baramsai, Bayarbadrakh; ...

    2015-08-26

    Here, investigation of prompt fission and neutron-capture Υ rays from fissile actinide samples at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) requires use of a fission-fragment detector to provide a trigger or a veto signal. A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers has been built to serve as a trigger/veto detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing a 4π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillations were registered with silicon photomultipliers. A measurement of the 235U(n,f) reaction with this detector at DANCE revealed a correct time-of-flightmore » spectrum and provided an estimate for the efficiency of the prototype detector of 11.6(7)%. Design and test measurements with the detector are described. A neutron source with fast timing has been built to help with detector-response measurements. The source is based on the neutron emission from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and the same type of scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers. Overall time resolution of the source is 0.3 ns. Design of the source and test measurements with it are described. An example application of the source for determining the neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination by a stilbene crystal is given.« less

  7. Development of a thin scintillation films fission-fragment detector and a novel neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Rusev, Gencho Yordanov; Jandel, Marian; Baramsai, Bayarbadrakh; Bond, Evelyn M.; Bredeweg, Todd Allen; Couture, Aaron Joseph; Daum, Jaimie Kay; Favalli, Andrea; Ianakiev, Kiril Dimitrov; Iliev, Metodi L.; Mosby, Shea Morgan; Roman, Audrey Rae; Springs, Rebecca Kristien; Ullmann, John Leonard; Walker, Carrie Lynn

    2015-08-26

    Here, investigation of prompt fission and neutron-capture Υ rays from fissile actinide samples at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) requires use of a fission-fragment detector to provide a trigger or a veto signal. A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers has been built to serve as a trigger/veto detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing a 4π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillations were registered with silicon photomultipliers. A measurement of the 235U(n,f) reaction with this detector at DANCE revealed a correct time-of-flight spectrum and provided an estimate for the efficiency of the prototype detector of 11.6(7)%. Design and test measurements with the detector are described. A neutron source with fast timing has been built to help with detector-response measurements. The source is based on the neutron emission from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and the same type of scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers. Overall time resolution of the source is 0.3 ns. Design of the source and test measurements with it are described. An example application of the source for determining the neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination by a stilbene crystal is given.

  8. Development of a thin scintillation films fission-fragment detector and a novel neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Jandel, M.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Daum, J. K.; Favalli, A.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, M. L.; Mosby, S.; Roman, A. R.; Springs, R. K.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-08-01

    Investigation of prompt fission and neutron-capture Υ rays from fissile actinide samples at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) requires use of a fission-fragment detector to provide a trigger or a veto signal. A fission-fragment detector based on thin scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers has been built to serve as a trigger/veto detector in neutron-induced fission measurements at DANCE. The fissile material is surrounded by scintillating films providing a 4π detection of the fission fragments. The scintillations were registered with silicon photomultipliers. A measurement of the 235U(n,f) reaction with this detector at DANCE revealed a correct time-of-flight spectrum and provided an estimate for the efficiency of the prototype detector of 11.6(7)%. Design and test measurements with the detector are described. A neutron source with fast timing has been built to help with detector-response measurements. The source is based on the neutron emission from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf and the same type of scintillating films and silicon photomultipliers. Overall time resolution of the source is 0.3 ns. Design of the source and test measurements with it are described. An example application of the source for determining the neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination by a stilbene crystal is given.

  9. Prospects of the search for neutrino bursts from supernovae with Baksan large volume scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, V. B.

    2016-11-01

    Observing a high-statistics neutrino signal from the supernova explosions in the Galaxy is a major goal of low-energy neutrino astronomy. The prospects for detecting all flavors of neutrinos and antineutrinos from the core-collapse supernova (ccSN) in operating and forthcoming large liquid scintillation detectors (LLSD) are widely discussed now. One of proposed LLSD is Baksan Large Volume Scintillation Detector (BLVSD). This detector will be installed at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory (BNO) of the Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, at a depth of 4800 m.w.e. Low-energy neutrino astronomy is one of the main lines of research of the BLVSD.

  10. Development of a Compton camera for medical applications based on silicon strip and scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimmer, J.; Ley, J.-L.; Abellan, C.; Cachemiche, J.-P.; Caponetto, L.; Chen, X.; Dahoumane, M.; Dauvergne, D.; Freud, N.; Joly, B.; Lambert, D.; Lestand, L.; Létang, J. M.; Magne, M.; Mathez, H.; Maxim, V.; Montarou, G.; Morel, C.; Pinto, M.; Ray, C.; Reithinger, V.; Testa, E.; Zoccarato, Y.

    2015-07-01

    A Compton camera is being developed for the purpose of ion-range monitoring during hadrontherapy via the detection of prompt-gamma rays. The system consists of a scintillating fiber beam tagging hodoscope, a stack of double sided silicon strip detectors (90×90×2 mm3, 2×64 strips) as scatter detectors, as well as bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors (38×35×30 mm3, 100 blocks) as absorbers. The individual components will be described, together with the status of their characterization.

  11. Detection of gamma-neutron radiation by solid-state scintillation detectors. Detection of gamma-neutron radiation by novel solid-state scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhikov, V.; Grinyov, B.; Piven, L.; Onyshchenko, G.; Sidletskiy, O.; Naydenov, S.; Pochet, T.; Smith, C.

    2015-07-01

    It is known that solid-state scintillators can be used for detection of both gamma radiation and neutron flux. In the past, neutron detection efficiencies of such solid-state scintillators did not exceed 5-7%. At the same time it is known that the detection efficiency of the gamma-neutron radiation characteristic of nuclear fissionable materials is by an order of magnitude higher than the efficiency of detection of neutron fluxes alone. Thus, an important objective is the creation of detection systems that are both highly efficient in gamma-neutron detection and also capable of exhibiting high gamma suppression for use in the role of detection of neutron radiation. In this work, we present the results of our experimental and theoretical studies on the detection efficiency of fast neutrons from a {sup 239}Pu-Be source by the heavy oxide scintillators BGO, GSO, CWO and ZWO, as well as ZnSe(Te, O). The most probable mechanism of fast neutron interaction with nuclei of heavy oxide scintillators is the inelastic scattering (n, n'γ) reaction. In our work, fast neutron detection efficiencies were determined by the method of internal counting of gamma-quanta that emerge in the scintillator from (n, n''γ) reactions on scintillator nuclei with the resulting gamma energies of ∼20-300 keV. The measured efficiency of neutron detection for the scintillation crystals we considered was ∼40-50 %. The present work included a detailed analysis of detection efficiency as a function of detector and area of the working surface, as well as a search for new ways to create larger-sized detectors of lower cost. As a result of our studies, we have found an unusual dependence of fast neutron detection efficiency upon thickness of the oxide scintillators. An explanation for this anomaly may involve the competition of two factors that accompany inelastic scattering on the heavy atomic nuclei. The transformation of the energy spectrum of neutrons involved in the (n, n'γ) reactions towards

  12. Continuous Scintillator Detector Blocks for Simultaneous Pet-Mr Imaging of the Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rato Mendes, Pedro

    2010-04-01

    Continuous scintillator detector blocks have several advantages over pixelated designs, presenting a larger active volume and a lower cost with comparable or better energy and spatial resolutions. In this paper we describe the operation of continuous detector blocks for positron emission tomography (PET) and their suitability for multimodality imaging operating inside a magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. This detector technology is being used on a full-scale clinical scanner for human brain PET studies presently under development at Ciemat. Results will be presented on the laboratory characterization of monolithic scintillators coupled to APD matrices with ASIC readout, including images of point sources from a prototype dual-head demonstrator illustrating the potential of continuous scintillator detector blocks for high-resolution PET-MR imaging.

  13. A crystal identification method for monolithic phoswich detectors based on scintillation light distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preziosi, E.; Pani, R.; Trigila, C.; Polito, C.; Bettiol, M.; Borrazzo, C.; Cinti, M. N.; Fabbri, A.; Pellegrini, R.; Pani, R.

    2016-12-01

    Phoswich detectors based on scintillation crystals are widely diffused for both PET and SPECT applications. In order to separate the signals arising from different layers many methods have been proposed in literature. Separation of the layers commonly relies on time discrimination or pulse height discrimination. In this work, by means of experimental measurement on a phoswich detector based on Lanthanum Bromide and Lutetium Fine Silicate monolithic crystals, a novel method allowing to separate signals coming from different layers has been evaluated. The main feature of this method, specifically developed for phoswich based on monolithic scintillation crystals, is the discrimination capability based on the scintillation light distribution shape. For this reason, the findings that will be shown could be easily extended to whatever combination of scintillator, independently from their decay time or light yield.

  14. Research on radiation detectors, boiling transients, and organic lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The accomplishments of a space projects research facility are presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) a study of radiation resistant semiconductor devices, (2) synthesis of high temperature organic lubricants, (3) departure from phase equilibrium during boiling transients, (4) effects of neutron irradiation on defect state in tungsten, and (5) determination of photon response function of NE-213 liquid scintillation detectors.

  15. Cryogenic phonon-scintillation detectors with PMT readout for rare event search experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Lin, J.; Mikhailik, V. B.; Kraus, H.

    2016-06-01

    Cryogenic phonon-scintillation detectors (CPSD) for rare event search experiments require reliable, efficient and robust photon detectors that can resolve individual photons in a scintillation event. We report on a cryogenic detector containing a scintillating crystal, equipped with an NTD-Ge phonon sensor and a photon detector based on a low-temperature photomultiplier tube (PMT) that is powered by a Cockcroft-Walton generator. Here we present results from the characterisation of two detector modules, one with CaWO4, the other with CaMoO4 as scintillator. The energy resolutions (FWHM) at 122.1 keV for the scintillation/PMT channel are 19.9% and 29.7% respectively for CaWO4 and CaMoO4 while the energy resolutions (FWHM) for the phonon channels are 2.17 keV (1.8%) and 0.97 keV (0.79%). These characteristics compare favourably with other CPSDs currently used in cryogenic rare-event search experiments. The detection module with PMT readout benefits from the implementation of a well-understood, reliable, and commercially available component and improved time resolution, while retaining the major advantages of conventional CPSD, such as high sensitivity, resolving power and discrimination ability.

  16. Improving detector spatial resolution using pixelated scintillators with a barrier rib structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Langechuan; Lu, Minghui; Cao, Wanqing; Peng, Luke; Chen, Arthur

    2016-03-01

    Indirect conversion flat panel detectors (FPDs) based on amorphous silicon (a-Si) technology are widely used in digital X-ray imaging. In such FPDs a scintillator layer is used for converting X-rays into visible light photons. However, the lateral spread of these photons inside the scintillator layer reduces spatial resolution of the FPD. In this study, FPDs incorporating pixelated scintillators with a barrier rib structure were developed to limit lateral spread of light photons thereby improving spatial resolution. For the pixelated scintillator, a two-dimensional barrier rib structure was first manufactured on a substrate layer, coated with reflective materials, and filled to the rim with the scintillating material of gadolinium oxysulfide (GOS). Several scintillator samples were fabricated, with pitch size varying from 160 to 280 μm and rib height from 200 to 280 μm. The samples were directly coupled to an a-Si flat panel photodiode array with a pitch of 200 μm to convert optical photons to electronic signals. With the pixelated scintillator, the detector modulation transfer function was shown to improve significantly (by 94% at 2 cycle/mm) compared to a detector using an unstructured GOS layer. However, the prototype does show lower sensitivity due to the decrease in scintillator fill factor. The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility of using the barrier-rib structure to improve the spatial resolution of FPDs. Such an improvement would greatly benefit nondestructive testing applications where the spatial resolution is the most important parameter. Further investigation will focus on improving the detector sensitivity and exploring its medical applications.

  17. Development of a small scintillation detector with an optical fiber for fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Yagi, T; Unesaki, H; Misawa, T; Pyeon, C H; Shiroya, S; Matsumoto, T; Harano, H

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the characteristics of a reactor and a neutron generator, a small scintillation detector with an optical fiber with ThO(2) has been developed to measure fast neutrons. However, experimental facilities where (232)Th can be used are limited by regulations, and S/N ratio is low because the background counts of this detector are increase by alpha decay of (232)Th. The purpose of this study is to develop a new optical fiber detector for measuring fast neutrons that does not use nuclear material such as (232)Th. From the measured and calculated results, the new optical fiber detector which uses ZnS(Ag) as a converter material together with a scintillator have the highest detection efficiency among several developed detectors. It is applied for the measurement of reaction rates generated from fast neutrons; furthermore, the absolute detection efficiency of this detector was obtained experimentally.

  18. Combinatorial Screening of Advanced Scintillators for High Resolution X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Shifan; Tao, Dejie; Lynch, Michael; Yuan, Xianglong; Li, Yiqun

    2008-05-12

    The lack of efficient scintillators is a major problem for developing powerful x-ray detectors that are widely used in homeland security, industrial and scientific research. Intematix has developed and applied a high throughput screening process and corresponding crystal growth technology to significantly speed up the discovery process for new efficient scintillators. As a result, Intematix has invented and fabricated three new scintillators both in powder and bulk forms, which possess promising properties such as better radiation hardness and better matching for silicon diode.

  19. Development and characterization of a 2D scintillation detector for quality assurance in scanned carbon ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamborini, A.; Raffaele, L.; Mirandola, A.; Molinelli, S.; Viviani, C.; Spampinato, S.; Ciocca, M.

    2016-04-01

    At the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO Foundation), a two-dimensional high resolution scintillating dosimetry system has been developed and tested for daily Quality Assurance measurements (QA) in carbon ion radiotherapy with active scanning technique, for both single pencil beams and scanned fields produced by a synchrotron accelerator. The detector consists of a thin plane organic scintillator (25×25 cm2, 2 mm thick) coupled with a high spatial resolution CCD camera (0.25 mm) in a light-tight box. A dedicated Labview software was developed for image acquisition triggered with the beam extraction, data post-processing and analysis. The scintillator system was preliminary characterized in terms of short-term reproducibility (found to be within±0.5%), linearity with the number of particles (linear fit χ2 = 0.996) and dependence on particle flux (measured to be < 1.5 %). The detector was then tested for single beam spot measurements (Full Width at Half Maximum and position) and for 6×6 cm2 reference scanned field (determination of homogeneity) for carbon ions with energy from 115 MeV/u up to 400 MeV/u. No major differences in the investigated beam parameters measured with scintillator system and the radiochromic EBT3 reference films were observed. The system allows therefore real-time monitoring of the carbon ion beam relevant parameters, with a significant daily time saving with respect to films currently used. The results of this study show the suitability of the scintillation detector for daily QA in a carbon ion facility with an active beam delivery system.

  20. Ultra-violet light-emitting diode calibration system for timing large area scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, P. Yu; Runtso, M. F.; Naumov, P. P.; Maklyaev, E. F.; Kaplin, V. A.; Fomin, V. S.; Razzhivin, I. S.; Melikyan, Yu A.

    2017-01-01

    Timing large area plastic scintillation detectors are developing for the space gamma-ray telescopes now. For the in-flight calibration of these detectors the use of ultra-violet light-emitting diode, irradiating the 1 m long detector module at the center of its lateral side is suggested. The results of the measurements show the possibility of this calibration system implementation as for amplitude as for timing properties monitoring.

  1. Comparative testing of various flow-cell detectors fabricated using CaF{sub 2} solid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, T.; Ohashi, H.; Hamada, Y.; Jamsranjav, E.

    2015-03-15

    A monitoring system based on a flow-cell detector was developed for measuring the tritium concentration in water. The flow-cell detector was fabricated using a granular CaF{sub 2} solid scintillator. This system does not use a liquid scintillation counting system and does not generate radioactive organic liquid waste. Moreover, continuous real-time measurements are possible, in contrast to a liquid scintillation counting system, which requires batch measurements. For further development of the system, four flow-cell detectors were fabricated. They included a single 3-mm-diameter cell, three 3-mm-diameter cells in series, a single 5-mm-diameter cell, and three 5-mm-diameter cells in series. Continuously flowing water containing tritium at various concentrations was passed through the flow cells, and tritium count were measured for 600 and 10000 s. Investigating the relation between the count rate and concentration, the three 5-mm-diameter cells were most sensitive, with a linear relation maintained down to approximately 2 Bq/ml and 10 Bq/ml for 10000- and 600-s measurements, respectively. (authors)

  2. Observation of EAS Core with the Small Scintillation Detector at Taro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuyama, H.; Kuramochi, Hiroshi; Obara, Hitoshi; Ono, Shunichi; Origasa, Satoru; Mochida, Akinori; Sakayama, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Noboru

    2003-07-01

    We have observed the core structure of extensive air showers(EAS) that primary energy above 1016 eV. To measure the more detail and the correct density of the incident particles near EAS core, we installed 100 small scintillation detectors (using plastic scintillator : 15cm × 15cm × 2.5cm) that are placed on a lattice 10 × 10, and 40cm separation, at Taro Cosmic Ray Lab oratory, at autumn 2002. We report the detail of the small detector, and preliminary results.

  3. Search for fractionally charged particles in the Mont Blanc LSD scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglietta, M.; Antonioli, P.; Badino, G.; Castagnoli, C.; Castellina, A.; Dadykin, V. L.; Fulgione, W.; Galeotti, P.; Khalchukov, F. F.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kortchaguin, P. V.; Kortchaguin, V. B.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Malguin, A. S.; Marchetti, G.; Periale, L.; Ryassny, V. G.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Saavedra, O.; Trinchero, G. C.; Vernetto, S.; Yakushev, V. F.; Zatsepin, G. T.

    1994-02-01

    An analysis of the events recorded by the Mont Blanc Neutrino Scintillation Detector was performed in order to search for fractionally charged particles with |Q| = 1/3and |Q| = 2/3. In a live time of 2378 days, the obtained 90% C. L. upper limits on the fluxes of fractionally charged particles in the core of our detector are Φ(|Q| = 1/3) < 2. 3 10 -13cm-2s-1sr-1and Φ(|Q| = 2/3) < 2. 7 10 -13cm-2s-1sr-1, the best available limits obtained by scintillation counters technique.

  4. First-principles Electronic Structure Calculations for Scintillation Phosphor Nuclear Detector Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canning, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Inorganic scintillation phosphors (scintillators) are extensively employed as radiation detector materials in many fields of applied and fundamental research such as medical imaging, high energy physics, astrophysics, oil exploration and nuclear materials detection for homeland security and other applications. The ideal scintillator for gamma ray detection must have exceptional performance in terms of stopping power, luminosity, proportionality, speed, and cost. Recently, trivalent lanthanide dopants such as Ce and Eu have received greater attention for fast and bright scintillators as the optical 5d to 4f transition is relatively fast. However, crystal growth and production costs remain challenging for these new materials so there is still a need for new higher performing scintillators that meet the needs of the different application areas. First principles calculations can provide a useful insight into the chemical and electronic properties of such materials and hence can aid in the search for better new scintillators. In the past there has been little first-principles work done on scintillator materials in part because it means modeling f electrons in lanthanides as well as complex excited state and scattering processes. In this talk I will give an overview of the scintillation process and show how first-principles calculations can be applied to such systems to gain a better understanding of the physics involved. I will also present work on a high-throughput first principles approach to select new scintillator materials for fabrication as well as present more detailed calculations to study trapping process etc. that can limit their brightness. This work in collaboration with experimental groups has lead to the discovery of some new bright scintillators. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and carried out under U.S. Department of Energy Contract no. DE-AC02-05CH11231 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  5. Performance of Large Neutron Detectors Containing Lithium-Gadolinium-Borate Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, David M.; Stuart, Cory R.; Klaass, R. Fred; Merrill, David B.

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of a neutron counter, spectrometer, and dosimeter that is compact, efficient, and accurate. A self-contained neutron detection instrument has wide applications in health physics, scientific research, and programs to detect, monitor, and control strategic nuclear materials (SNM). The 1.3 liter detector head for this instrument is a composite detector with an organic scintillator containing uniformly distributed {sup 6}Li{sub 6}{sup nat}Gd{sup 10}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}:Ce (LGB:Ce) microcrystals. The plastic scintillator acts to slow impinging neutrons and emits light proportional to the energy lost by the neutrons as they moderate in the detector body. Moderating neutrons that have slowed sufficiently capture in one of the Lithium-6, Boron-10, or Gadolinium-157 atoms in the LGB:Ce scintillator, which then releases the capture energy in a characteristic cerium emission pulse. The measured captured pulses indicate the presence of neutrons. When a scintillating fluor is present in the plastic, the light pulse resulting from the neutron moderating in the plastic is paired with the LGB:Ce capture pulse to identify the energy of the neutron. About 2% of the impinging neutrons lose all of their energy in a single collision with the detector. There is a linear relationship between the pulse areas of this group of neutrons and energy. The other 98% of neutrons have a wide range of collision histories within the detector body. When these neutrons are 'binned' into energy groups, each group contains a distribution of pulse areas. This data was used to assist in the unfolding of the neutron spectra. The unfolded spectra were then validated with known spectra, at both neutron emitting isotopes and fission/accelerator facilities. Having validated spectra, the dose equivalent and dose rate are determined by applying standard, regulatory damage coefficients to the measured neutron counts for each energy bin of the spectra. Testing at the

  6. Capture-gated Spectroscopic Measurements of Monoenergetic Neutrons with a Composite Scintillation Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Nattress, Jason; Mayer, M.; Foster, A.; Barhoumi Meddeb, A.; Trivelpiece, C.; Ounaies, Z.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-04-01

    Abstract—We report on the measurements of Monoenergetic neutrons from DD and DT fusion reactions by use of the capture gating method in a heterogeneous plastic-glass composite scintillation detector. The cylindrical detector is 5.08 cm in diameter and 5.05 cm in height and was fabricated using 1-mm diameter Li-doped glass rods(GS20) and scintillating polyvinyl toluene (EJ-290). Different scintillation decay constants are used to identify energy depositions in two materials constituting the composite scintillator. Geant4 simulations of the neutron thermalization and capture process were conducted, finding a mean capture time of approximately 2.6 ms for both DD and DT neutrons. A capture gating time acceptance window based on simulation results was used to identify the neutron thermalization pulses. The total scintillation light yield produced in neutron thermalization was measured and found to show consistency on event-by-event basis despite the variety of neutron thermalization histories prior to capture. The ratio of light yields from thermalization of 14.1 MeV and 2.45 MeV neutrons in the EJ-290 scintillator was determined to be 14.6, and the light output from 2.45 MeV neutrons was also correlated to its electron equivalent, obtaining a value of 0.58*0.05 MeVee.

  7. Development of a Position Sensitive Liquid Scintillator Bar-type Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atencio, Ariella; Cizewski, Jolie; Walter, David; Chipps, Kelly; Febbraro, Michael; Pain, Steven; Smith, Karl; Thornsberry, Cory

    2016-09-01

    The ability to detect neutrons is important for both nuclear reactions and beta decay. Liquid scintillators have the useful property of Pulse Shape Discrimination(PSD), which can be used to separate gamma-ray-induced events when the scintillators are used as neutron detectors. Because of their ability to apply PSD, these liquid scintillators will have many applications in neutron detection, such as a recent experiment conducted at the University of Notre Dame. The liquid scintillators use a xylene based liquid made in-house at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Naphthalene in the liquid scintillator improves the light output properties of the scintillator. An optimized method for the purification of naphthalene will be discussed as well as the first implementation of an array of these detectors. This work is supported in part by the NSF and the U.S. DOE. Research sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  8. Quantum noise in digital x-ray image detectors with optically coupled scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, M.J.; Hames, S.M. |; Wilderman, S.J.; Ciarelli, J.J.

    1996-08-01

    Digital x-ray imaging detectors designed to soft x-ray (1 to 50 keV) are significant for medical mammography, dental radiography, microradiography, and microtomography. Detector designs involve either direct absorption of x-rays in solid state devices or thin scintillator screens optically coupled to solid state sensors. Well designed scintillator systems produce 10 or more electrons per detected x-ray and, used with charge coupled devices (CCD), detect 100,000 x-rays per pixel before saturation. However, if the scintillator is directly coupled to the detector, radiation can penetrate to the semiconductor detector with a small number of events producing large charge and noise. The authors have investigated the degradation of image noise by these direct absorption events using numerical models for a laboratory detector system consisting of a 60 {micro}m CsI scintillator optically coupled to a scientific CCD. Monte Carlo methods were used to estimate the charge deposition signal and noise for both the CsI and the semiconductor. Without a fiber optic coupler, direct absorptions dominate the signal and increase the signal variance by a factor of about 30 at energies above 10 keV. With a 3 mm fiber optic coupler, no significant degradation is observed for input energies below 45 keV.

  9. A fast microchannel plate-scintillator detector for velocity map imaging and imaging mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, B.; King, S. J.; Vallance, C.; Brouard, M.

    2014-02-15

    The time resolution achievable using standard position-sensitive ion detectors, consisting of a chevron pair of microchannel plates coupled to a phosphor screen, is primarily limited by the emission lifetime of the phosphor, around 70 ns for the most commonly used P47 phosphor. We demonstrate that poly-para-phenylene laser dyes may be employed extremely effectively as scintillators, exhibiting higher brightness and much shorter decay lifetimes than P47. We provide an extensive characterisation of the properties of such scintillators, with a particular emphasis on applications in velocity-map imaging and microscope-mode imaging mass spectrometry. The most promising of the new scintillators exhibits an electron-to-photon conversion efficiency double that of P47, with an emission lifetime an order of magnitude shorter. The new scintillator screens are vacuum stable and show no signs of signal degradation even over longer periods of operation.

  10. Improved scintillation detector performance via a method of enhanced layered coatings

    DOE PAGES

    Wakeford, Daniel Tyler; Tornga, Shawn Robert; Adams, Jillian Cathleen; ...

    2016-11-16

    Increasing demand for better detection performance with a simultaneous reduction in size, weight and power consumption has motivated the use of compact semiconductors as photo-converters for many gamma-ray and neutron scintillators. The spectral response of devices such as silicon avalanche photodiodes (APDs) is poorly matched to many common high-performance scintillators. We have developed a generalized analytical method that utilizes an optical reference database to match scintillator luminescence to the excitation spectrum of high quantum efficiency semiconductor detectors. This is accomplished by the fabrication and application of a series of high quantum yield, short fluorescence lifetime, wavelengthshifting coatings. Furthermore, we showmore » here a 22% increase in photoelectron collection and a 10% improvement in energy resolution when applying a layered coating to an APD-coupled, cerium-doped, yttrium oxyorthosilicate (YSO:Ce) scintillator. Wavelength-shifted radioluminescence emission and rise time analysis are also discussed.« less

  11. Improved scintillation detector performance via a method of enhanced layered coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeford, Daniel Tyler; Tornga, Shawn Robert; Adams, Jillian Cathleen; Trautschold, Olivia Carol; Hehlen, Markus Peter

    2016-11-16

    Increasing demand for better detection performance with a simultaneous reduction in size, weight and power consumption has motivated the use of compact semiconductors as photo-converters for many gamma-ray and neutron scintillators. The spectral response of devices such as silicon avalanche photodiodes (APDs) is poorly matched to many common high-performance scintillators. We have developed a generalized analytical method that utilizes an optical reference database to match scintillator luminescence to the excitation spectrum of high quantum efficiency semiconductor detectors. This is accomplished by the fabrication and application of a series of high quantum yield, short fluorescence lifetime, wavelengthshifting coatings. Furthermore, we show here a 22% increase in photoelectron collection and a 10% improvement in energy resolution when applying a layered coating to an APD-coupled, cerium-doped, yttrium oxyorthosilicate (YSO:Ce) scintillator. Wavelength-shifted radioluminescence emission and rise time analysis are also discussed.

  12. SENTIRAD—An innovative personal radiation detector based on a scintillation detector and a silicon photomultiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osovizky, A.; Ginzburg, D.; Manor, A.; Seif, R.; Ghelman, M.; Cohen-Zada, I.; Ellenbogen, M.; Bronfenmakher, V.; Pushkarsky, V.; Gonen, E.; Mazor, T.; Cohen, Y.

    2011-10-01

    The alarming personal radiation detector (PRD) is a device intended for Homeland Security (HLS) applications. This portable device is designed to be worn or carried by security personnel to detect photon-emitting radioactive materials for the purpose of crime prevention. PRD is required to meet the scope of specifications defined by various HLS standards for radiation detection. It is mandatory that the device be sensitive and simultaneously small, pocket-sized, of robust mechanical design and carriable on the user's body. To serve these specialized purposes and requirements, we developed the SENTIRAD, a new radiation detector designed to meet the performance criteria established for counterterrorist applications. SENTIRAD is the first commercially available PRD based on a CsI(Tl) scintillation crystal that is optically coupled with a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) serving as a light sensor. The rapidly developing technology of SiPM, a multipixel semiconductor photodiode that operates in Geiger mode, has been thoroughly investigated in previous studies. This paper presents the design considerations, constraints and radiological performance relating to the SENTIRAD radiation sensor.

  13. A comparison of CsI:Tl and GOS in a scintillator-CCD detector for nuclear medicine imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugby, S. L.; Jambi, L. K.; Lees, J. E.

    2016-09-01

    A number of portable gamma cameras for medical imaging use scintillator-CCD based detectors. This paper compares the performance of a scintillator-CCD based portable gamma camera with either a columnar CsI:Tl or a pixelated GOS scintillator installed. The CsI:Tl scintillator has a sensitivity of 40% at 140.5 keV compared to 54% with the GOS scintillator. The intrinsic spatial resolution of the pixelated GOS detector was 1.09 mm, over 4 times poorer than for CsI:Tl. Count rate capability was also found to be significantly lower when the GOS scintillator was used. The uniformity was comparable for both scintillators.

  14. Exploring detection of nuclearites in a large liquid scintillator neutrino detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wan-Lei; Xia, Cheng-Jun; Lin, Tao; Wang, Zhi-Min

    2017-01-01

    We take the JUNO experiment as an example to explore nuclearites in the future large liquid scintillator detector. Comparing to the previous calculations, the visible energy of nuclearites across the liquid scintillator will be reestimated for the liquid scintillator based detector. Then the JUNO sensitivities to the nuclearite flux are presented. It is found that the JUNO projected sensitivities can be better than 7.7 ×10-17 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 for the nuclearite mass 1 015 GeV ≤M ≤1 024 GeV and initial velocity 10-4≤β0≤10-1 with a 20 year running. Note that the JUNO will give the most stringent limits for downgoing nuclearites with 1.6 ×1 013 GeV ≤M ≤4.0 ×1 015 GeV and a typical galactic velocity β0=10-3.

  15. Gamma-ray detector employing scintillators coupled to semiconductor drift photodetectors

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation detectors according to one embodiment of the invention are implemented using scintillators combined with a semiconductor drift photodetectors wherein the components are specifically constructed in terms of their geometry, dimensions, and arrangement so that the scintillator decay time and drift time in the photodetector pairs are matched in order to achieve a greater signal-to-noise ratio. The detectors may include electronics for amplification of electrical signals produced by the silicon drift photodetector, the amplification having a shaping time optimized with respect to the decay time of the scintillator and time spread of the signal in the silicon drift photodetector to substantially maximize the ratio of the signal to the electronic noise.

  16. Measurement of Total Scatter Factor for Stereotactic Cones with Plastic Scintillation Detector

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Suresh H; Dobhal, Rishabh; Kinhikar, Rajesh A.; Kadam, Sudarshan S.; Deshpande, Deepak D.

    2017-01-01

    Advanced radiotherapy modalities such as stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and image-guided radiotherapy may employ very small beam apertures for accurate localized high dose to target. Accurate measurement of small radiation fields is a well-known challenge for many dosimeters. The purpose of this study was to measure total scatter factors for stereotactic cones with plastic scintillation detector and its comparison against diode detector and theoretical estimates. Measurements were performed on Novalis Tx™ linear accelerator for 6MV SRS beam with stereotactic cones of diameter 6 mm, 7.5 mm, 10 mm, 12.5 mm, and 15 mm. The advantage of plastic scintillator detector is in its energy dependence. The total scatter factor was measured in water at the depth of dose maximum. Total scatter factor with plastic scintillation detector was determined by normalizing the readings to field size of 10 cm × 10 cm. To overcome energy dependence of diode detector for the determination of scatter factor with diode detector, daisy chaining method was used. The plastic scintillator detector was calibrated against the ionization chamber, and the reproducibility in the measured doses was found to be within ± 1%. Total scatter factor measured with plastic scintillation detector was 0.728 ± 0.3, 0.783 ± 0.05, 0.866 ± 0.55, 0.885 ± 0.5, and 0.910 ± 0.06 for cone sizes of 6 mm, 7.5 mm, 10 mm, 12.5 mm, and 15 mm, respectively. Total scatter factor measured with diode detector was 0.733 ± 0.03, 0.782 ± 0.02, 0.834 ± 0.07, 0.854 ± 0.02, and 0.872 ± 0.02 for cone sizes of 6 mm, 7.5 mm, 10 mm, 12.5 mm, and 15 mm, respectively. The variation in the measurement of total scatter factor with published Monte Carlo data was found to be −1.3%, 1.9%, −0.4%, and 0.4% for cone sizes of 7.5 mm, 10 mm, 12.5 mm, and 15 mm, respectively. We conclude that total scatter factor measurements for stereotactic cones can be adequately carried out with a plastic scintillation detector. Our results show

  17. A large area plastic scintillation detector with 4-corner-readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shu-Wen; Yu, Yu-Hong; Zhou, Yong; Sun, Zhi-Yu; Zhang, Xue-Heng; Wang, Shi-Tao; Yue, Ke; Liu, Long-Xiang; Fang, Fang; Yan, Duo; Sun, Yu; Wang, Zhao-Min

    2016-05-01

    A 760 mm × 760 mm × 30 mm plastic scintillation detector viewed by photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) from four corners has been developed, and the detector has been tested with cosmic rays and γ rays. A position-independent effective time T eff has been found, indicating this detector can be used as a TOF detector. The hit position can also be reconstructed by the time from the four corners. A TOF resolution of 236 ps and a position resolution of 48 mm have been achieved, and the detection efficiency has also been investigated. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1332207, 11405242)

  18. The research program of the Liquid Scintillation Detector (LSD) in the Mont Blanc Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadykin, V. L.; Yakushev, V. F.; Korchagin, P. V.; Korchagin, V. B.; Malgin, A. S.; Ryassny, F. G.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Talochkin, V. P.; Zatsepin, G. T.; Badino, G.

    1985-01-01

    A massive (90 tons) liquid scintillation detector (LSD) has been running since October 1984 in the Mont Blanc Laboratory at a depth of 5,200 hg/sq cm of standard rock. The research program of the experiment covers a variety of topics in particle physics and astrophysics. The performance of the detector, the main fields of research are presented and the preliminary results are discussed.

  19. The Effect of Neutron and Gamma Ray Cross Talk Between Plastic Scintillating Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, S.A.

    2000-11-06

    In this paper a method is developed, using higher order statistics, to identify the type and degree of neutron and gamma ray cross talk between detectors that are placed in proximity to one another. A set of measurements was performed using the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) to acquire the time-dependent bicovariance of the pulses in fast plastic scintillating detectors. These signatures were analyzed to infer the degree and type of false coincidences (cross talk) in relation to true coincidences.

  20. A study of the characteristics of scintillation detectors with a diffuse reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, V. A.; Filchenkov, V. V.; Konin, A. D.; Zhuk, V. V.

    1996-02-01

    The process of light collection in a scintillation counter with a diffuse reflector is studied using the Monte-Carlo codes "PHOTON" and "LIGHT". The results obtained are compared with the simple model estimations and employed to describe the time shape of the signal for several different detectors including the full absorption neutron spectrometer, and reanalyze the previous NE-213 transparency measurements.

  1. A Scintillator tile-fiber preshower detector for the CDF Central Calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    S. Lami

    2004-08-12

    The front face of the CDF central calorimeter is being equipped with a new Preshower detector, based on scintillator tiles read out by WLS fibers. A light yield of about 40 pe/MIP at the tile exit was obtained, exceeding the design requirements.

  2. Wavelength-Shifting-Fiber Scintillation Detectors for Thermal Neutron Imaging at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Lowell; Diawara, Yacouba; Ellis, E Darren; Funk, Loren L; Hannan, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A; Wang, Cai-Lin

    2012-01-01

    We have developed wavelength-Shifting-fiber Scintillator Detector (SSD) with 0.3 m2 area per module. Each module has 154 x 7 pixels and a 5 mm x 50 mm pixel size. Our goal is to design a large area neutron detector offering higher detection efficiency and higher count-rate capability for Time-Of-Flight (TOF) neutron diffraction in Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). A ZnS/6LiF scintillator combined with a novel fiber encoding scheme was used to record the neutron events. A channel read-out-card (CROC) based digital-signal processing electronics and position-determination algorithm was applied for neutron imaging. Neutron-gamma discrimination was carried out using pulse-shape discrimination (PSD). A sandwich flat-scintillator detector can have detection efficiency close to He-3 tubes (about 10 atm). A single layer flat-scintillator detector has count rate capability of 6,500 cps/cm2, which is acceptable for powder diffractometers at SNS.

  3. A gas scintillation proportional detector to search for 17 keV neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Okx, W.J.C.; Bom, V.R.; Eijk, C.W.E. van; Hollander, R.W. )

    1993-08-01

    Evidence for the existence of a 17 keV neutrino was first reported in 1985. Since then many experiments have been performed with contradicting results. In this paper the authors describe an experiment with a new approach to the problem by the introduction of a Gas Scintillation Proportional Detector.

  4. Multilayer Scintillator Responses for Mo Observatory of Neutrino Experiment Studied Using a Prototype Detector MOON-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hidehito; Doe, Peter J.; Ejiri, Hiroyasu; Elliott, Steven R.; Engel, Jonathan; Finger, Miroslav; Finger,, Michael; Fushimi, Kenichi; Gehman, Victor M.; Greenfield, Mark B.; Hai, Vo H.; Hazama, Ryuta; Imaseki, Hitoshi; Kavitov, Petr; Kekelidze, Vladimir D.; Kitamura, Hisashi; Matsuoka, Kenji; Nomachi, Masaharu; Ogama, Takeo; Para, Adam; Robertson, R. G. Hamish; Sakiuchi, Takuya; Shima, Tatsushi; Slunecka, Milos; Shirkov, Grigori D.; Sissakian, Alexei N.; Titov, Alexander I.; Uchihori, Yukio; Umehara, Saori; Urano, Atsushi; Vaturin, Vladimir; Voronov, Victor V.; Wilkerson, John F.; Will, Douglas I.; Yasuda, Kensuke; Yoshida, Sei

    2007-11-01

    An ensemble of multilayer scintillators is discussed as an option of the high-sensitivity detector MOON (Mo Observatory of Neutrinos) for spectroscopic measurements of neutrinoless double beta decays. A prototype detector MOON-1, which consists of 6-layer plastic scintillator plates, was built to study the photon responses of the MOON-type detector. The photon responses, i.e., the number of scintillation photons collected and the energy resolution, which are key elements for high-sensitivity experiments, are found to be 1835± 30 photoelectrons for 976 keV electrons and σ=2.9± 0.1% (Δ E/E=6.8± 0.3% in FWHM) at the Qββ˜ 3 MeV region, respectively. The multilayer plastic scintillator structure with high energy resolution as well as a good signal for the background suppression of β-γ rays is crucial for the MOON-type detector to achieve inverted-hierarchy neutrino-mass sensitivity. It will also be useful for medical and other rare-decay experiments as well.

  5. Development of a thermal neutron detector based on scintillating fibers and silicon photomultipliers

    SciTech Connect

    Barbagallo, Massimo; Greco, Giuseppe; Scire, Carlotta; Scire, Sergio; Cosentino, Luigi; Pappalardo, Alfio; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Montereali, Rosa Maria; Vincenti, Maria Aurora

    2010-09-15

    We propose a technique for thermal neutron detection, based on a {sup 6}Li converter placed in front of scintillating fibers readout by means of silicon photomultipliers. Such a technique allows building cheap and compact detectors and dosimeters, thus possibly opening new perspectives in terms of granular monitoring of neutron fluxes as well as space-resolved neutron detection.

  6. Neutron emission measurement at the HL-2A tokamak device with a liquid scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xufei; Chen, Zhongjing; Peng, Xingyu; Yuan, Xi; Zhang, Xing; Cui, Zhiqiang; Du, Tengfei; Hu, Zhimeng; Li, Tao; Fan, Tieshuan Chen, Jinxiang; Li, Xiangqing; Zhang, Guohui; Gorini, Giuseppe; Yuan, Guoliang; Yang, Jinwei; Yang, Qingwei

    2014-10-15

    Neutron emission measurement at the HL-2A tokamak device with a liquid scintillation detector is described. The detector was placed at a location with little structure material in the field of view, and equipped with a gain monitoring system which could provide the possibility to evaluate the gain variation as well as to correct for the detector response. Time trace of the neutron emissivity was obtained and it was consistent with the result of a standard {sup 235}U fission chamber. During the plasma discharge the neutron yield could vary by about four orders of magnitude and the fluctuation of the detector gain was up to about 6%. Pulse height spectrum of the liquid scintillation detector was constructed and corrected with the aid of the gain monitoring system, and the correction was found to be essential for the assessment of the neutron energy spectrum. This successful measurement offered experience and confidence for the application of liquid scintillation detectors in the upcoming neutron camera system.

  7. Characterization of a scintillating lithium glass ultra-cold neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebenitsch, Lori; Canada-Japan UCN Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    A new 6Li-glass ultra cold neutron detector was developed for the neutron Electric Dipole Moment (nEDM) experiment being prepared for the TRIUMF Ultra-Cold Neutron (UCN) source. The detector was characterized using the UCN source at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). This talk will review detection of UCN with 6Li detectors, the detector and data acquisition design, and results of measurements of UCN data taken at PSI. Results presented will include a comparison of the relative rates of the detector channels, and a comparisons with a commercial Cascade detector. A detailed simulation of scintillation pulses and the data acquisition electronics was developed to estimate the efficiency and background contamination remaining when applying a pulse shape discrimination cut. One of the highlights will be on the processing and analysis of the data, including estimates of the background rejection, the effects of pileup, and the detector stability. On behalf of the Canada-Japan UCN Collaboration.

  8. Integrated semiconductor quantum dot scintillation detector: Ultimate limit for speed and light yield

    SciTech Connect

    Oktyabrsky, Serge; Yakimov, Michael; Tokranov, Vadim; Murat, Pavel

    2016-03-30

    Here, a picosecond-range timing of charged particles and photons is a long-standing challenge for many high-energy physics, biophysics, medical and security applications. We present a design, technological pathway and challenges, and some properties important for realization of an ultrafast high-efficient room-temperature semiconductor scintillator based on self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QD) embedded in a GaAs matrix. Low QD density (<; 1015 cm-3), fast (~5 ps) electron capture, luminescence peak redshifted by 0.2-0.3 eV from GaAs absorption edge with fast decay time (0.5-1 ns) along with the efficient energy transfer in the GaAs matrix (4.2 eV/pair) allows for fabrication of a semiconductor scintillator with the unsurpassed performance parameters. The major technological challenge is fabrication of a large volume (> 1 cm3 ) of epitaxial QD medium. This requires multiple film separation and bonding, likely using separate epitaxial films as waveguides for improved light coupling. Compared to traditional inorganic scintillators, the semiconductor-QD based scintillators could have about 5x higher light yield and 20x faster decay time, opening a way to gamma detectors with the energy resolution better than 1% and sustaining counting rates MHz. Picosecond-scale timing requires segmented low-capacitance photodiodes integrated with the scintillator. For photons, the proposed detector inherently provides the depth-of-interaction information.

  9. Integrated semiconductor quantum dot scintillation detector: Ultimate limit for speed and light yield

    DOE PAGES

    Oktyabrsky, Serge; Yakimov, Michael; Tokranov, Vadim; ...

    2016-03-30

    Here, a picosecond-range timing of charged particles and photons is a long-standing challenge for many high-energy physics, biophysics, medical and security applications. We present a design, technological pathway and challenges, and some properties important for realization of an ultrafast high-efficient room-temperature semiconductor scintillator based on self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QD) embedded in a GaAs matrix. Low QD density (<; 1015 cm-3), fast (~5 ps) electron capture, luminescence peak redshifted by 0.2-0.3 eV from GaAs absorption edge with fast decay time (0.5-1 ns) along with the efficient energy transfer in the GaAs matrix (4.2 eV/pair) allows for fabrication of a semiconductormore » scintillator with the unsurpassed performance parameters. The major technological challenge is fabrication of a large volume (> 1 cm3 ) of epitaxial QD medium. This requires multiple film separation and bonding, likely using separate epitaxial films as waveguides for improved light coupling. Compared to traditional inorganic scintillators, the semiconductor-QD based scintillators could have about 5x higher light yield and 20x faster decay time, opening a way to gamma detectors with the energy resolution better than 1% and sustaining counting rates MHz. Picosecond-scale timing requires segmented low-capacitance photodiodes integrated with the scintillator. For photons, the proposed detector inherently provides the depth-of-interaction information.« less

  10. Segmented scintillation detectors with silicon photomultiplier readout for measuring antiproton annihilations

    SciTech Connect

    Sótér, A.; Todoroki, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Barna, D.; Horváth, D.; Hori, M.

    2014-02-15

    The Atomic Spectroscopy and Collisions Using Slow Antiprotons experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility of CERN constructed segmented scintillators to detect and track the charged pions which emerge from antiproton annihilations in a future superconducting radiofrequency Paul trap for antiprotons. A system of 541 cast and extruded scintillator bars were arranged in 11 detector modules which provided a spatial resolution of 17 mm. Green wavelength-shifting fibers were embedded in the scintillators, and read out by silicon photomultipliers which had a sensitive area of 1 × 1 mm{sup 2}. The photoelectron yields of various scintillator configurations were measured using a negative pion beam of momentum p ≈ 1 GeV/c. Various fibers and silicon photomultipliers, fiber end terminations, and couplings between the fibers and scintillators were compared. The detectors were also tested using the antiproton beam of the AD. Nonlinear effects due to the saturation of the silicon photomultiplier were seen at high annihilation rates of the antiprotons.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of a very high resolution thermal neutron detector composed of glass scintillator microfibers.

    PubMed

    Song, Yushou; Conner, Joseph; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P

    2016-02-01

    In order to develop a high spatial resolution (micron level) thermal neutron detector, a detector assembly composed of cerium doped lithium glass microfibers, each with a diameter of 1 μm, is proposed, where the neutron absorption location is reconstructed from the observed charged particle products that result from neutron absorption. To suppress the cross talk of the scintillation light, each scintillating fiber is surrounded by air-filled glass capillaries with the same diameter as the fiber. This pattern is repeated to form a bulk microfiber detector. On one end, the surface of the detector is painted with a thin optical reflector to increase the light collection efficiency at the other end. Then the scintillation light emitted by any neutron interaction is transmitted to one end, magnified, and recorded by an intensified CCD camera. A simulation based on the Geant4 toolkit was developed to model this detector. All the relevant physics processes including neutron interaction, scintillation, and optical boundary behaviors are simulated. This simulation was first validated through measurements of neutron response from lithium glass cylinders. With good expected light collection, an algorithm based upon the features inherent to alpha and triton particle tracks is proposed to reconstruct the neutron reaction position in the glass fiber array. Given a 1 μm fiber diameter and 0.1mm detector thickness, the neutron spatial resolution is expected to reach σ∼1 μm with a Gaussian fit in each lateral dimension. The detection efficiency was estimated to be 3.7% for a glass fiber assembly with thickness of 0.1mm. When the detector thickness increases from 0.1mm to 1mm, the position resolution is not expected to vary much, while the detection efficiency is expected to increase by about a factor of ten.

  12. A New Columnar CsI(Tl) Scintillator for iQID detectors

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ling; Miller, Brian W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    A 1650 μm thick columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator for upgrading iQID detectors, which is a high-resolution photon-counting gamma-ray and x-ray detector recently developed at the Center for Gamma-Ray Imaging (CGRI), has been studied in terms of sensitivity, spatial resolution and depth-of-interaction effects. To facilitate these studies, a new frame-parsing algorithm for processing raw event data is also proposed that has more degrees of freedom in data processing and can discriminate against a special kind of noise present in some low-cost intensifiers. The results show that in comparison with a 450 μm-thickness columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator, the 1650 μm thick CsI(Tl) scintillator provides more than twice the sensitivity at the expense of some spatial resolution degradation. The depth-of-interaction study also shows that event size and amplitude vary with scintillator thickness, which can assist in future detector simulations and 3D-interaction-position estimation. PMID:26146444

  13. Searching for dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic neutrinos with liquid scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, J.; Sandick, P.

    2015-06-22

    We consider searches for dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic neutrinos in the core of the Sun. We find that liquid scintillation neutrino detectors have enhanced sensitivity to this class of dark matter models, due to the energy and angular resolution possible for electron neutrinos and antineutrinos that scatter via charged-current interactions. In particular we find that KamLAND, utilizing existing data, could provide better sensitivity to such models than any current direct detection experiment for m{sub X}≲15 Gev. KamLAND’s sensitivity is signal-limited, and future liquid scintillation or liquid argon detectors with similar energy and angular resolution, but with larger exposure, will provide significantly better sensitivity. These detectors may be particularly powerful probes of dark matter with mass O(10) GeV.

  14. Searching for dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic neutrinos with liquid scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, J.; Sandick, P. E-mail: sandick@physics.utah.edu

    2015-06-01

    We consider searches for dark matter annihilation to monoenergetic neutrinos in the core of the Sun. We find that liquid scintillation neutrino detectors have enhanced sensitivity to this class of dark matter models, due to the energy and angular resolution possible for electron neutrinos and antineutrinos that scatter via charged-current interactions. In particular we find that KamLAND, utilizing existing data, could provide better sensitivity to such models than any current direct detection experiment for m{sub X} ∼< 15 Gev. KamLAND's sensitivity is signal-limited, and future liquid scintillation or liquid argon detectors with similar energy and angular resolution, but with larger exposure, will provide significantly better sensitivity. These detectors may be particularly powerful probes of dark matter with mass O(10) GeV.

  15. Developing LAr Scintillation Light Collection Ideas in the Short Baseline Neutrino Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Szelc, A. M.

    2016-02-08

    Scintillation light is becoming the most rapidly developing feature of Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) neutrino detectors due to its capability to enhance and expand their physics reach traditionally based on charge readout. The SBND detector, set to be built on the Booster Neutrino Beam Line at Fermilab, is in a unique position to test novel liquid argon scintillation light readout systems in a detector with physics neutrino events. The different ideas under consideration by the collaboration are described, including an array of PMTs detecting direct light, SiPM coupled lightguide bars and a setup which uses PMTs/SiPMS and wavelength shifter covered reflector foils, as well as their respective strengths and physics foci and the benchmarks used to compare them.

  16. Improved Growth Methods for LaBr3 Scintillation Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, Douglas S

    2011-05-01

    The objective is to develop advanced materials for deployment as high-resolution gamma ray detectors. Both LaBr3 and CeBr3 are advanced scintillation materials, and will be studied in this research. Prototype devices, in collaboration Sandia National Laboratories, will be demonstrated along with recommendations for mass production and deployment. It is anticipated that improved methods of crystal growth will yield larger single crystals of LaBr3 for deployable room-temperature operated gamma radiation spectrometers. The growth methods will be characterized. The LaBr3 and CeBr3 scintillation crystals will be characterized for light yield, spectral resolution, and for hardness.

  17. SU-E-T-641: Proton Range Measurements Using a Geometrically Calibrated Liquid Scintillator Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, C; Robertson, D; Alsanea, F; Beddar, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop a geometric calibration method to accurately calculate physical distances within a liquid scintillator detector and to assess the accuracy, consistency, and robustness of proton beam range measurements when using a liquid scintillator detector system with the proposed geometric calibration process. Methods: We developed a geometric calibration procedure to accurately convert pixel locations in the camera frame into physical locations in the scintillator frame. To ensure accuracy, the geometric calibration was performed before each experiment. The liquid scintillator was irradiated with spot scanning proton beams of 94 energies in two deliveries. A CCD camera was used to capture the two-dimensional scintillation light profile of each of the proton energies. An algorithm was developed to automatically calculate the proton range from the acquired images. The measured range was compared to the nominal range to assess the accuracy of the detector. To evaluate the robustness of the detector between each setup, the experiments were repeated on three different days. To evaluate the consistency of the measurements between deliveries, three sets of measurements were acquired for each experiment. Results: Using this geometric calibration procedure, the proton beam ranges measured using the liquid scintillator system were all within 0.3mm of the nominal range. The average difference between the measured and nominal ranges was −0.20mm. The delivery-to-delivery standard deviation of the proton range measurement was 0.04mm, and the setup-to-setup standard deviation of the measurement was 0.10mm. Conclusion: The liquid scintillator system can measure the range of all 94 beams in just two deliveries. With the proposed geometric calibration, it can measure proton range with sub-millimeter accuracy, and the measurements were shown to be consistent between deliveries and setups. Therefore, we conclude that the liquid scintillator

  18. Scintillation efficiency for low energy nuclear recoils in liquid xenon dark matter detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Wei; Xiong, Xiaonu; Ji, Xiangdong

    2015-02-01

    We perform a theoretical study of the scintillation efficiency of the low energy region crucial for liquid xenon dark matter detectors. We develop a computer program to simulate the cascading process of the recoiling xenon nucleus in liquid xenon and calculate the nuclear quenching effect due to atomic collisions. We use the electronic stopping power extrapolated from experimental data to the low energy region, and take into account the effects of electron escape from electron-ion pair recombination using the generalized Thomas-Imel model fitted to scintillation data. Our result agrees well with the experiments from neutron scattering and vanishes rapidly as the recoil energy drops below 3 keV.

  19. Evaluation of Large Volume SrI2(Eu) Scintillator Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, B W; Cherepy, N J; Drury, O B; Thelin, P A; Fisher, S E; Magyar, A F; Payne, S A; Burger, A; Boatner, L A; Ramey, J O; Shah, K S; Hawrami, R

    2010-11-18

    There is an ever increasing demand for gamma-ray detectors which can achieve good energy resolution, high detection efficiency, and room-temperature operation. We are working to address each of these requirements through the development of large volume SrI{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator detectors. In this work, we have evaluated a variety of SrI{sub 2} crystals with volumes >10 cm{sup 3}. The goal of this research was to examine the causes of energy resolution degradation for larger detectors and to determine what can be done to mitigate these effects. Testing both packaged and unpackaged detectors, we have consistently achieved better resolution with the packaged detectors. Using a collimated gamma-ray source, it was determined that better energy resolution for the packaged detectors is correlated with better light collection uniformity. A number of packaged detectors were fabricated and tested and the best spectroscopic performance was achieved for a 3% Eu doped crystal with an energy resolution of 2.93% FWHM at 662keV. Simulations of SrI{sub 2}(Eu) crystals were also performed to better understand the light transport physics in scintillators and are reported. This study has important implications for the development of SrI{sub 2}(Eu) detectors for national security purposes.

  20. Positronium signature in organic liquid scintillators for neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, D.; Consolati, G.; Trezzi, D.

    2011-01-15

    Electron antineutrinos are commonly detected in liquid scintillator experiments via inverse {beta} decay by looking at the coincidence between the reaction products: neutrons and positrons. Prior to positron annihilation, an electron-positron pair may form an orthopositronium (o-Ps) state, with a mean lifetime of a few nanoseconds. Even if the o-Ps decay is speeded up by spin-flip or pick-off effects, it may introduce distortions in the photon emission time distribution, crucial for position reconstruction and pulse shape discrimination algorithms in antineutrino experiments. Reversing the problem, the o-Ps-induced time distortion represents a new signature for tagging antineutrinos in liquid scintillator. In this article, we report the results of measurements of the o-Ps formation probability and lifetime for the most used solvents for organic liquid scintillators in neutrino physics (pseudocumene, linear alkyl benzene, phenylxylylethane, and dodecane). We characterize also a mixture of pseudocumene +1.5 g/l of 2,5-diphenyloxazole, a fluor acting as wavelength shifter. In the second part of the article, we demonstrate that the o-Ps-induced distortion of the scintillation photon emission time distributions represent an optimal signature for tagging positrons on an event by event basis, potentially enhancing the antineutrino detection.

  1. Radiation Hardness Tests of a Scintillation Detector with Wavelength Shifting Fiber Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Alfaro, R.; Sandoval, A.; Cruz, E.; Martinez, M. I.; Paic, G.; Montano, L. M.

    2006-09-25

    We have performed radiation tolerance tests on the BCF-99-29MC wavelength shifting fibers and the BC404 plastic scintillator from Bicron as well as on silicon rubber optical couplers. We used the 60Co gamma source at the Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares facility to irradiate 30-cm fiber samples with doses from 50 Krad to 1 Mrad. We also irradiated a 10x10 cm2 scintillator detector with the WLS fibers embedded on it with a 200 krad dose and the optical conectors between the scintillator and the PMT with doses from 100 to 300 krad. We measured the radiation damage on the materials by comparing the pre- and post-irradiation optical transparency as a function of time.

  2. Signal pulse emulation for scintillation detectors using Geant4 Monte Carlo with light tracking simulation.

    PubMed

    Ogawara, R; Ishikawa, M

    2016-07-01

    The anode pulse of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled with a scintillator is used for pulse shape discrimination (PSD) analysis. We have developed a novel emulation technique for the PMT anode pulse based on optical photon transport and a PMT response function. The photon transport was calculated using Geant4 Monte Carlo code and the response function with a BC408 organic scintillator. The obtained percentage RMS value of the difference between the measured and simulated pulse with suitable scintillation properties using GSO:Ce (0.4, 1.0, 1.5 mol%), LaBr3:Ce and BGO scintillators were 2.41%, 2.58%, 2.16%, 2.01%, and 3.32%, respectively. The proposed technique demonstrates high reproducibility of the measured pulse and can be applied to simulation studies of various radiation measurements.

  3. Prompt directional detection of galactic supernova by combining large liquid scintillator neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, V.; Chirac, T.; Lasserre, T. E-mail: tchirac@gmail.fr; and others

    2015-08-01

    Core-collapse supernovae produce an intense burst of electron antineutrinos in the few-tens-of-MeV range. Several Large Liquid Scintillator-based Detectors (LLSD) are currently operated worldwide, being very effective for low energy antineutrino detection through the Inverse Beta Decay (IBD) process. In this article, we develop a procedure for the prompt extraction of the supernova location by revisiting the details of IBD kinematics over the broad energy range of supernova neutrinos. Combining all current scintillator-based detector, we show that one can locate a canonical supernova at 10 kpc with an accuracy of 45 degrees (68% C.L.). After the addition of the next generation of scintillator-based detectors, the accuracy could reach 12 degrees (68% C.L.), therefore reaching the performances of the large water Čerenkov neutrino detectors. We also discuss a possible improvement of the SuperNova Early Warning System (SNEWS) inter-experiment network with the implementation of a directionality information in each experiment. Finally, we discuss the possibility to constrain the neutrino energy spectrum as well as the mass of the newly born neutron star with the LLSD data.

  4. Neutron detection in nuclear astrophysics experiments: study of organic liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciani, Giovanni Francesco

    2016-02-01

    In order to study the nuclear reaction 13 C(α,n)16 O, crucial for the nucleosynthesis of heavy nuclei (A>58), the LUNA collaboration at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, is looking for the best neutron detector to use in the set up. One of the possibilities is to use detectors based on cell filled with Organic Liquid Scintillator BC501A. These detectors are sensible to fast neutron, but also to gamma rays. A Pulse Shape Discrimination process using the Zero Crossing method has been performed to select only signals from neutrons. Comparing the neutron spectra after the Pulse Shape Discrimination and the spectrum from a GEANT4 simulations, the efficiency of the BC501A, in function of the neutron energy and varying the light threshold, has been evaluated.

  5. Characteristics of Un doped and Europium-dopedSrI2 Scintillator Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, Benjamin; Cherepy, Nerine; Drury, Owen; Thelin, P; Fisher, S E; O’Neal, S P; Payne, Stephen A.; Burger, Arnold; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Shah, Kanai; Hawrami, Rastgo

    2012-01-01

    High energy resolution gamma-ray detectors that can be formed into relatively large sizes while operating at room temperature offer many advantages for national security applications. We are working toward that goal through the development of SrI{sub 2}(Eu) scintillator detectors, which routinely provide <;3.0% energy resolution at 662 keV with volumes >;10 cm{sup 3}. In this study, we have tested pure, undoped SrI{sub 2} to gain a better understanding of the scintillation properties and spectroscopic performance achievable without activation. An undoped crystal grown from 99.999% pure SrI{sub 2} pellets was tested for its spectroscopic performance, its light yield, and uniformity of scintillation light collection as a function of gamma-ray interaction position relative to the crystal growth direction. Undoped SrI{sub 2} was found to provide energy resolution of 5.3% at 662 keV, and the light collection nonuniformity varied by only 0.72% over the length of the crystal. Measurements of both a 3% Eu-doped and the undoped SrI{sub 2} crystal were carried out in the SLYNCI facility and indicate differences in their light yield non-proportionality. The surprisingly good scintillation properties of the pure SrI{sub 2} crystal suggests that with high-purity feedstock, further reduction of the Eu concentration can be made to grow larger crystals while not adversely impacting the spectroscopic performance.

  6. Physics studies with ICARUS and a hybrid ionization and scintillation fiber detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, D.B.

    1992-12-31

    We discuss the physics possibilities for the ICARUS detector currently being tested at CERN. The physics potential goes from a massive proton decay detector to the study of solar neutrinos. In addition, the detection of {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}} and {nu}{sub e} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}} will be possible with such a detector. One major topic involves the possibility of a complete determination of the MSW solar neutrino parameters with the ICARUS. The possibility of detecting WIMPS with a scintillating fiber liquid Argon (Ar) detector or fiber Xenon (Xe) detector doped with Ar is also described. Some comments on the measurement of the {sup 42}Ar level from an experiment at the Gran Sasso will be made.

  7. Discriminating cosmic muons and radioactivity using a liquid scintillation fiber detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. P.; Xu, J. L.; Lu, H. Q.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, C. C.; Yang, C. G.

    2017-03-01

    In the case of underground experiments for neutrino physics or rare event searches, the background caused by cosmic muons contributes significantly and therefore must be identified and rejected. We proposed and optimized a new detector using liquid scintillator with wavelenghth-shifting fibers which can be employed as a veto detector for cosmic muons background rejection. From the prototype study, it has been found that the detector has good performances and is capable of discriminating between muons induced signals and environmental radiation background. Its muons detection efficiency is greater than 98%, and on average, 58 photo-electrons (p.e.) are collected when a muon passes through the detector. To optimize the design and enhance the collection of light, the reflectivity of the coating materials has been studied in detail. A Monte Carlo simulation of the detector has been developed and compared to the performed measurements showing a good agreement between data and simulation results.

  8. Development and Characterization of 6Li-doped Liquid Scintillator Detectors for PROSPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaison, Jeremy; Prospect Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    PROSPECT, the Precision Reactor Oscillation and Spectrum experiment, is a phased reactor antineutrino experiment designed to search for eV-scale sterile neutrinos via short-baseline neutrino oscillations and to make a precision measurement of the 235U reactor antineutrino spectrum. A multi-ton, optically segmented detector will be deployed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to measure the reactor spectrum at baselines ranging from 7-12m. A two-segment detector prototype with 50 liters of active liquid scintillator target has been built to verify the detector design and to benchmark its performance. In this presentation, we will summarize the performance of this detector prototype and describe the optical and energy calibration of the segmented PROSPECT detectors.

  9. Characterization of liquid scintillation detector (BC-501A) and digital pulse shape discrimination (DPSD) system

    SciTech Connect

    Lombigit, L. Yussup, N. Ibrahim, Maslina Mohd; Rahman, Nur Aira Abd; Rawi, M. Z. M.

    2015-04-29

    A digital n/γ pulse shape discrimination (PSD) system is currently under development at Instrumentation and Automation Centre, Malaysian Nuclear Agency. This system aims at simultaneous detection of fast neutron and gamma ray in mixed radiations environment. This work reports the system characterization performed on the liquid scintillation detector (BC-501A) and digital pulse shape discrimination (DPSD) system. The characterization involves measurement of electron light output from the BC-501A detector and energy channels calibration of the pulse height spectra acquired with DPSD system using set of photon reference sources. The main goal of this experiment is to calibrate the ADC channel of our DPSD system, characterized the BC-501 detector and find the position of Compton edge which later could be used as threshold for the n/γ PSD experiment. The detector resolution however is worse as compared to other published data but it is expected as our detector has a smaller active volume.

  10. Design and development of hard x-ray imaging detector using scintillator and Si photomultiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, S. K.; Naik, Amisha P.; Mithun, N. P. S.; Vadawale, S. V.; Acharya, Y. B.; Patel, A. R.; Ladiya, T.; Devashrayee, Niranjan M.

    2016-07-01

    There are various astrophysical phenomena which are of great importance and interest such as stellar explosions, Gamma ray bursts etc. There is also a growing interest in exploring the celestial sources in hard X-rays. High sensitive instruments are essential to perform the detailed studies of these cosmic accelerators and explosions. Hard X-ray imaging detectors having high absorption efficiency and mm spatial resolution are the key requirements to locate the generation of these astrophysical phenomenon. We hereby present a detector module which consists of a single CsI scintillation detector of size 15 x 15 x 3 mm3. The photon readout is done using an array of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). SiPM is a new development in the field of photon detection and can be described as 2D array of small (hundreds of μm2) avalanche photodiodes. We have achieved a spatial resolution of 0.5 mm with our initial setup. By using the array of these detector modules, we can build the detector with a large sensitive area with a very high spatial resolution. This paper presents the experimental details for single detector module using CsI (Tl) scintillator and SiPM and also presents the preliminary results of energy and position measurement. The GEANT4 simulation has also been carried out for the same geometry.

  11. Passive Measurement of Organic-Scintillator Neutron Signatures for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jennfier L. Dolan; Eric C. Miller; Alexis C. Kaplan; Andreas Enqvist; Marek Flaska; Alice Tomanin; Paolo Peerani; David L. Chichester; Sara A. Pozzi

    2012-10-01

    At nuclear facilities, domestically and internationally, most measurement systems used for nuclear materials’ control and accountability rely on He-3 detectors. Due to resource shortages, alternatives to He-3 systems are needed. This paper presents preliminary simulation and experimental efforts to develop a fast-neutron-multiplicity counter based on liquid organic scintillators. This mission also provides the opportunity to broaden the capabilities of such safeguards measurement systems to improve current neutron-multiplicity techniques and expand the scope to encompass advanced nuclear fuels.

  12. Feasibility of a boron loaded scintillation detector for dose measurements related to boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Don-Soo; Egan, James J.; Kegel, Gunter H. R.; Desimone, David

    2002-04-01

    The feasibility of the use of a boron loaded scintillation detector in a head phantom for boron neutron capture therapy dose estimates was evaluated. Several monoenergetic neutron groups were produced via the ^7Li(p,n)^7Be reaction in a metallic lithium target using the Van de Graaff accelerator at University of Massachusetts Lowell. The pulse-height spectra were taken from a natural boron loaded (10205-, 304-, 407-, 507-, 570-, 702-, and 780-keV incident neutrons. The results shows that a boron loaded scintillator could be used to distinguish the doses from different radiation sources in boron neutron capture therapy. This detector may be used in the estimation of doses due to fast neutrons, alpha particles and recoil lithium from ^10B(n,α)^7Li, and photons at the same time during neutron irradiation procedures.

  13. Development of the Fast Scintillation Detector with Programmable High Voltage Adjustment Suitable for Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Prochazka, R.; Frydrych, J.; Pechousek, J.

    2010-07-13

    This work is focused on a development of a compact fast scintillation detector suitable for Moessbauer spectroscopy (low energy X-ray/{gamma}-ray detection) where high counting rates are inevitable. Optimization of this part was necessary for a reliable function, better time resolution and to avoid a detector pulses pile-up effect. The pile-up effect decreases the measurement performance, significantly depends on the source activity and also on the pulse duration. Our new detection unit includes a fast scintillation crystal YAP:Ce, an R6095 photomultiplier tube, a high voltage power supply socket C9028-01 assembly, an AD5252 digital potentiometer with an I2C interface and an AD8000 ultra fast operation preamplifier. The main advantages of this solution lie in a short pulse duration (less than 200 ns), stable operation for high activities, programmable gain of the high voltage supply and compact design in the aluminum housing.

  14. Gas scintillation glass GEM detector for high-resolution X-ray imaging and CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, T.; Mitsuya, Y.; Fushie, T.; Murata, K.; Kawamura, A.; Koishikawa, A.; Toyokawa, H.; Takahashi, H.

    2017-04-01

    A high-spatial-resolution X-ray-imaging gaseous detector has been developed with a single high-gas-gain glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM), scintillation gas, and optical camera. High-resolution X-ray imaging of soft elements is performed with a spatial resolution of 281 μm rms and an effective area of 100×100 mm. In addition, high-resolution X-ray 3D computed tomography (CT) is successfully demonstrated with the gaseous detector. It shows high sensitivity to low-energy X-rays, which results in high-contrast radiographs of objects containing elements with low atomic numbers. In addition, the high yield of scintillation light enables fast X-ray imaging, which is an advantage for constructing CT images with low-energy X-rays.

  15. Scintillator Based Tracking Detectors for a Muon System at Future Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, Dmitri; Evdokimov, Valery; Lukic, Strahinja; Ujic, Predrag

    2017-01-01

    Extruded scintilator +WLS strips with SiPM readout for large muon detection systems were tested in the muon beam of the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. Light yield of up to 140 photoelectrons per muon per strip has been observed, as well as time resolution of 330 ps and position resolution along the strip of 5.4 cm. With such excellent performance parameters this detector is natural option for large scale future colliders muon systems.

  16. Characterization of a scintillating GEM detector with low energy x-rays.

    PubMed

    Seravalli, E; de Boer, M R; Geurink, F; Huizenga, J; Kreuger, R; Schippers, J M; van Eijk, C W E

    2008-11-07

    A two-dimensional position-sensitive dosimetry system based on a scintillating gas detector is being developed with the aim of using it for pre-treatment verification of dose distributions in charged particle therapy. The dosimetry system consists of a chamber filled with an Ar/CF(4) scintillating gas mixture, inside which two cascaded gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are mounted. A GEM is a thin kapton foil with copper cladding structured with a regular pattern of sub-mm holes. In such a system, light quanta are emitted by the scintillating gas mixture during the electron avalanches in the GEM holes when radiation traverses the detector. The light intensity distribution is proportional to the energy deposited in the detector's sensitive volume by the beam. In the present work, we investigated the optimization of the scintillating GEM detector light yield. The light quanta are detected by means of a CCD camera or a photomultiplier tube coupled to a monochromator. The GEM charge signal is measured simultaneously. We have found that with 60 microm diameter double conical GEM holes, a brighter light signal and a higher electric signal are obtained than with 80 microm diameter holes. With an Ar + 8% CF(4) volume concentration, the highest voltage across the GEMs and the largest light and electric signals were reached. Moreover, we have found that the emission spectrum of Ar/CF(4) is independent of (1) the voltages applied across the GEMs, (2) the x-ray beam intensity and (3) the GEM hole diameter. On the other hand, the ratio of Ar to CF(4) peaks in the spectrum changes when the concentration of the latter gas is varied.

  17. Investigation of the dynamic range of calorimeter scintillation detector for space gamma-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runtso, M. F.; Naumov, P. Yu; Naumov, P. P.; Solodovnikov, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    An arrangement of the GAMMA-400 space gamma-ray telescope that currently is under the ground testing, suggests implementation of fast two-layer calorimeter scintillation detector system S3 with large dynamic range for electromagnetic showers detection in the main operation mode of the device. The S3 constructive features are demonstrated. The experimental method and basic diagram of the ground prototype dynamic range investigation are described.

  18. Scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in the ASDEX upgrade tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Zohm, H.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2009-05-15

    A scintillator based detector for fast-ion losses has been designed and installed on the ASDEX upgrade (AUG) tokamak [A. Herrmann and O. Gruber, Fusion Sci. Technol. 44, 569 (2003)]. The detector resolves in time the energy and pitch angle of fast-ion losses induced by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) fluctuations. The use of a novel scintillator material with a very short decay time and high quantum efficiency allows to identify the MHD fluctuations responsible for the ion losses through Fourier analysis. A Faraday cup (secondary scintillator plate) has been embedded behind the scintillator plate for an absolute calibration of the detector. The detector is mounted on a manipulator to vary its radial position with respect to the plasma. A thermocouple on the inner side of the graphite protection enables the safety search for the most adequate radial position. To align the scintillator light pattern with the light detectors a system composed by a lens and a vacuum-compatible halogen lamp has been allocated within the detector head. In this paper, the design of the scintillator probe, as well as the new technique used to analyze the data through spectrograms will be described. A last section is devoted to discuss the diagnosis prospects of this method for ITER [M. Shimada et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, S1 (2007)].

  19. Using handheld plastic scintillator detectors to triage individuals exposed to a radiological dispersal device

    SciTech Connect

    Manger, Ryan P; Hertel, Nolan; Burgett, E.; Ansari, A.

    2011-01-01

    After a radiological dispersal device (RDD) event, people could become internally contaminated by inhaling dispersed radioactive particles. A rapid method to screen individuals who are internally contaminated is desirable. Such initial screening can help in prompt identification of those who are highly contaminated and in prioritizing individuals for further and more definitive evaluation such as laboratory testing. The use of handheld plastic scintillators to rapidly screen those exposed to an RDD with gamma-emitting radionuclides was investigated in this study. The Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code was used to model two commercially available plastic scintillation detectors in conjunction with anthropomorphic phantom models to determine the detector response to inhaled radionuclides. Biokinetic models were used to simulate an inhaled radionuclide and its progression through the anthropomorphic phantoms up to 30 d after intake. The objective of the study was to see if internal contamination levels equivalent to 250 mSv committed effective dose equivalent could be detected using these instruments. Five radionuclides were examined: {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 131}I and {sup 241}Am. The results demonstrate that all of the radionuclides except {sup 241}Am could be detected when placing either one of the two plastic scintillator detector systems on the posterior right torso of the contaminated individuals.

  20. Advances in CMOS Solid-state Photomultipliers for Scintillation Detector Applications

    PubMed Central

    Christian, James F.; Stapels, Christopher J.; Johnson, Erik B.; McClish, Mickel; Dokhale, Purushotthom; Shah, Kanai S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmistha; Chapman, Eric; Augustine, Frank L.

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state photomultipliers (SSPMs) are a compact, lightweight, potentially low-cost alternative to a photomultiplier tube for a variety of scintillation detector applications, including digital-dosimeter and medical-imaging applications. Manufacturing SSPMs with a commercial CMOS process provides the ability for rapid prototyping, and facilitates production to reduce the cost. RMD designs CMOS SSPM devices that are fabricated by commercial foundries. This work describes the characterization and performance of these devices for scintillation detector applications. This work also describes the terms contributing to device noise in terms of the excess noise of the SSPM, the binomial statistics governing the number of pixels triggered by a scintillation event, and the background, or thermal, count rate. The fluctuations associated with these terms limit the resolution of the signal pulse amplitude. We explore the use of pixel-level signal conditioning, and characterize the performance of a prototype SSPM device that preserves the digital nature of the signal. In addition, we explore designs of position-sensitive SSPM detectors for medical imaging applications, and characterize their performance. PMID:25540471

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of the data acquisition chain of scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Binda, F.; Ericsson, G.; Hellesen, C.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Eriksson, J.; Skiba, M.; Conroy, S.; Weiszflog, M.

    2014-08-21

    The good performance of a detector can be strongly affected by the instrumentation used to acquire the data. The possibility of anticipating how the acquisition chain will affect the signal can help in finding the best solution among different set-ups. In this work we developed a Monte Carlo code that aims to simulate the effect of the various components of a digital Data Acquisition system (DAQ) applied to scintillation detectors. The components included in the model are: the scintillator, the photomultiplier tube (PMT), the signal cable and the digitizer. We benchmarked the code against real data acquired with a NE213 scintillator, comparing simulated and real signal pulses induced by gamma-ray interaction. Then we studied the dependence of the energy resolution of a pulse height spectrum (PHS) on the sampling frequency and the bit resolution of the digitizer. We found that exceeding some values of the sampling frequency and the bit resolution improves only marginally the performance of the system. The method can be applied for the study of various detector systems relevant for nuclear techniques, such as in fusion diagnostics.

  2. A large dynamic range readout design for the plastic scintillator detector of DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Sun, Zhiyu; Yu, Yuhong; Zhang, Yongjie; Fang, Fang; Chen, Junling; Hu, Bitao

    2016-08-01

    A large dynamic range is required by the Plastic Scintillator Detector (PSD) of DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) to detect particles from electron to heavy ions with Z ≤ 20. To expand the dynamic range, the readout design based on the double-dynodes signal extraction from the photomultiplier tube has been proposed and adopted by PSD. To verify this design, a prototype detector module has been constructed and tested with cosmic ray and relativistic ion beam. The results match with the estimation and the readout unit could easily cover the required dynamic range of about 4 orders of magnitude.

  3. Performance of an X-ray imaging detector based on a structured scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenonius, Olof; Sahlholm, Anna; Wiklund, Per; Linnros, Jan

    2009-08-01

    Structured scintillator plates have been fabricated by filling thallium-doped caesium iodide (CsI) into a silicon pore array. Their X-ray imaging properties have been characterized using a standard dental X-ray source and a charge coupled device (CCD) detector. Results indicate that finer structured pore arrays provide superior imaging resolution while their light output is lower. Direct absorption of X-ray quanta in the CCD is a significant contributor of detector noise. This can be avoided by using a thick fibre optic plate or, in certain cases, by using a hot-pixel software algorithm.

  4. LHCb Scintillating Fiber detector front end electronics design and quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vink, W. E. W.; Pellegrino, A.; Ietswaard, G. C. M.; Verkooijen, J. C.; Carneiro, U.; Massefferi, A.

    2017-03-01

    The on-detector electronics of the LHCb Scintillating Fiber Detector consists of multiple PCBs assembled in a unit called Read Out Box, capable of reading out 2048 channels with an output rate of 70 Gbps. There are three types of boards: PACIFIC, Clusterization and Master Board. The Pacific Boards host PACIFIC ASICs, with pre-amplifier and comparator stages producing two bits of data per channel. A cluster-finding algorithm is then run in an FPGA on the Clusterization Board. The Master Board distributes fast and slow control, and power. We describe the design, production and test of prototype PCBs.

  5. A New scintillator tile / fiber preshower detector for the CDF central calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Gallinaro, Michele; Artikov, A.; Bromberg, C.; Budagov, J.; Byrum, K.; Chang, S.; Chlachidze, G.; Goulianos, K.; Huston, J.; Iori, M.; Kim, M.; Kuhlmann, S.; Lami, S.; Lindgren, M.; Lytken, E.; Miller, R.; Nodulman, L.; Pauletta, G.; Penzo, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Roser, R.; /Argonne /Dubna, JINR /Fermilab /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Michigan State U. /INFN, Siena /Rockefeller U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Trieste /INFN, Udine /Tsukuba U.

    2004-11-01

    A detector designed to measure early particle showers has been installed in front of the central CDF calorimeter at the Tevatron. This new preshower detector is based on scintillator tiles coupled to wavelength-shifting fibers read out by multianode photomultipliers and has a total of 3,072 readout channels. The replacement of the old gas detector was required due to an expected increase in instantaneous luminosity of the Tevatron collider in the next few years. Calorimeter coverage, jet energy resolution, and electron and photon identification are among the expected improvements. The final detector design, together with the R&D studies that led to the choice of scintillator and fiber, mechanical assembly, and quality control are presented. The detector was installed in the fall 2004 Tevatron shutdown and is expected to start collecting colliding beam data by the end of 2004. First measurements indicate a light yield of 12 photoelectrons/MIP, a more than two-fold increase over the design goals.

  6. Characterization of a scintillating lithium glass ultra-cold neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, B.; Rebenitsch, L. A.; Hansen-Romu, S.; Lauss, B.; Lindner, T.; Mammei, R.; Martin, J. W.; Pierre, E.

    2017-01-01

    A 6 Li-glass-based scintillation detector developed for the TRIUMF neutron electric dipole moment experiment was characterized using the ultra-cold neutron source at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). The data acquisition system for this detector was demonstrated to perform well at rejecting backgrounds. An estimate of the absolute efficiency of background rejection of 99.7 ± 0.1% is made. For variable ultra-cold neutron rate (varying from < 1 kHz to approx. 100 kHz per channel) and background rate seen at the Paul Scherrer Institute, we estimate that the absolute detector efficiency is 89.7^{+1.3}_{-1.9}%. Finally a comparison with a commercial Cascade detector was performed for a specific setup at the West-2 beamline of the ultra-cold neutron source at PSI.

  7. High spatial resolution radiation detectors based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon and scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, Tao

    1995-05-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) as a large-area thin film semiconductor with ease of doping and low-cost fabrication capability has given a new impetus to the field of imaging sensors; its high radiation resistance also makes it a good material for radiation detectors. In addition, large-area microelectronics based on a-Si:H or polysilicon can be made with full integration of peripheral circuits, including readout switches and shift registers on the same substrate. Thin a-Si:H p-i-n photodiodes coupled to suitable scintillators are shown to be suitable for detecting charged particles, electrons, and X-rays. The response speed of CsI/a-Si:H diode combinations to individual particulate radiation is limited by the scintillation light decay since the charge collection time of the diode is very short (< 10ns). The reverse current of the detector is analyzed in term of contact injection, thermal generation, field enhanced emission (Poole-Frenkel effect), and edge leakage. A good collection efficiency for a diode is obtained by optimizing the p layer of the diode thickness and composition. The CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to an a-Si:H photodiode detector shows a capability for detecting minimum ionizing particles with S/N ~20. In such an arrangement a p-i-n diode is operated in a photovoltaic mode (reverse bias). In addition, a p-i-n diode can also work as a photoconductor under forward bias and produces a gain yield of 3--8 for shaping times of 1 {micro}s. The mechanism of the formation of structured CsI scintillator layers is analyzed. Initial nucleation in the deposited layer is sensitive to the type of substrate medium, with imperfections generally catalyzing nucleation. Therefore, the microgeometry of a patterned substrate has a significant effect on the structure of the CsI growth.

  8. Nanophosphor composite scintillator with a liquid matrix

    DOEpatents

    McKigney, Edward Allen; Burrell, Anthony Keiran; Bennett, Bryan L.; Cooke, David Wayne; Ott, Kevin Curtis; Bacrania, Minesh Kantilal; Del Sesto, Rico Emilio; Gilbertson, Robert David; Muenchausen, Ross Edward; McCleskey, Thomas Mark

    2010-03-16

    An improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid comprises nanophosphor particles in a liquid matrix. The nanophosphor particles are optionally surface modified with an organic ligand. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially surface charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during dispersion in a liquid scintillator matrix. The improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid may be used in any conventional liquid scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  9. Organic metal neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Ginley, D.S.

    1984-11-21

    A device for detection of neutrons comprises: as an active neutron sensing element, a conductive organic polymer having an electrical conductivity and a cross-section for said neutrons whereby a detectable change in said conductivity is caused by impingement of said neutrons on the conductive organic polymer which is responsive to a property of said polymer which is altered by impingement of said neutrons on the polymer; and means for associating a change in said alterable property with the presence of neutrons at the location of said device.

  10. A Geant Study of the Scintillating Optical Fiber (SOFCAL) Cosmic Ray Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munroe, Ray B., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Recent energy measurements by balloon-borne passive emulsion chambers indicate that the flux ratios of protons to helium nuclei and of protons to all heavy nuclei decrease as the primary cosmic ray energy per nucleon increases above approx. 200 GeV/n, and suggest a "break" in the proton spectrum between 200 GeV and 5 TeV. However, these passive emulsion chambers are limited to a lower energy threshold of approx. 5 TeV/n, and cannot fully explore this energy regime. Because cosmic ray flux and composition details may be significant to acceleration models, a hybrid detector system called the Scintillating Optical Fiber Calorimeter (SOFCAL) has been designed and flown. SOFCAL incorporates both conventional passive emulsion chambers and an active calorimeter utilizing scintillating plastic fibers as detectors. These complementary types of detectors allow the balloon-borne SOFCAL experiment to measure the proton and helium spectra from approx. 400 GeV/n to approx. 20 TeV. The fundamental purpose of this study is to use the GEANT simulation package to model the hadronic and electromagnetic shower evolution of cosmic rays incident on the SOFCAL detector. This allows the interpretation of SOFCAL data in terms of charges and primary energies of cosmic rays, thus allowing the determinations of cosmic ray flux and composition as functions of primary energy.

  11. Limits on low-energy neutrino fluxes with the Mont Blanc liquid scintillator detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglietta, M.; Antonioli, P.; Badino, G.; Bologna, G.; Castagnoli, C.; Castellina, A.; Dadykin, V. L.; Fulgione, W.; Galeotti, P.; Khalchukov, F. F.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kortchaguin, P. V.; Kortchaguin, V. B.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Malguin, A. S.; Periale, L.; Ryassny, V. G.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Saavedra, O.; Trinchero, G.; Vernetto, S.; Yakushev, V. F.; Zatsepin, G. T.

    1992-11-01

    The LSD liquid scintillation detector has been operating since 1985 as an underground neutrino observatory in the Mont Blanc Laboratory with the main objective of detecting antineutrino bursts from collapsing stars. In August 1988 the construction of an additional lead and borex paraffin shield considerably reduced the radioactive background and increased the sensitivity of the apparatus. In this way the search for steady fluxes of low-energy neutrinos of different flavours through their interactions with free protons and carbon nuclei of the scintillator was made possible. No evidence for a galactic collapse was observed during the whole period of measurement. The corresponding 90% c.l. upper limit on the galactic collapses rate is 0.45 y -1 for a burst duration of ΔT ⩽ 10 s. After analysing the last 3 years data, the following 90% c.l. upper limits on the steady neutrino and antineutrino fluxes were obtained:

  12. Scalability, Scintillation Readout and Charge Drift in a Kilogram Scale Solid Xenon Particle Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, J.; Cease, H.; Jaskierny, W. F.; Markley, D.; Pahlka, R. B.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Saab, T.; Filipenko, M.

    2014-10-23

    We report a demonstration of the scalability of optically transparent xenon in the solid phase for use as a particle detector above a kilogram scale. We employ a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat combined with a xenon purification and chiller system to measure the scintillation light output and electron drift speed from both the solid and liquid phases of xenon. Scintillation light output from sealed radioactive sources is measured by a set of high quantum efficiency photomultiplier tubes suitable for cryogenic applications. We observed a reduced amount of photons in solid phase compared to that in liquid phase. We used a conventional time projection chamber system to measure the electron drift time in a kilogram of solid xenon and observed faster electron drift speed in the solid phase xenon compared to that in the liquid phase.

  13. Scintillator Pad Detector: Very Front End Electronics. Design and Pre-Series

    SciTech Connect

    Luengo, S.; Riera, J.; Tortella, S.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Gascon, D.; Comerma, A.; Garrido, L.

    2006-10-27

    The SPD (Scintillator Pad Detector) is a part of LHCb calorimeter which is designed to distinguish electrons and photons for this first level trigger. This detector is a plastic scintillator layer, divided in about 6000 cells of different size to obtain better granularity near the beam. Charged particles will produce, and photons will not, ionisation on the scintillator. This ionisation generates a light pulse that is collected by a Wavelength Shifting (WLS) fibre that is twisted inside the scintillator cell. The light is transmitted through a clear fibre to the readout system. For cost reduction, these 6000 cells are divided in groups using a MAPMT of 64 channels for receiving information in the readout system. The signal outing the SPD PMTs is rather unpredictable as a result of the low photostatistics, 20-30 photoelectrons per MIP, and the response of the WLS fibre, which has low decay time. Then, the signal processing must be performed by first integrating the total charge and later subtracting to avoid pile-up. The SPD Readout system is performed by an ASIC which integrates the signal, makes the pile-up compensation, and compares the level obtained to a programmable threshold (distinguishing electrons and photons), an FPGA which programmes the ASIC thresholds and pile-up subtraction and finally LVDS serializers, in order to send information to the first level trigger system. The design of the VFE unit takes into account not only mechanical constraints, as a result of the little space for the readout electronics but also the radiation quote expected in the environment and the distance between the VFE electronics and the racks were information is sent.

  14. Advances in the growth of alkaline-Earth halide single crystals for scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; Kolopus, J. A.; Neal, J. S.; Cherepy, N. J.; Beck, P. R.; Payne, S. A.; Burger, A.; Rowe, E.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2014-09-01

    Alkaline-earth scintillators such as strontium iodide and other alkaline-earth halides activated with divalent europium represent some of the most efficient and highest energy resolution scintillators for use as gamma-ray detectors in a wide range of applications. These applications include the areas of nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, the detection of undeclared nuclear material, nuclear physics and materials science, medical diagnostics, space physics, high energy physics, and radiation monitoring systems for first responders, police, and fire/rescue personnel. Recent advances in the growth of large single crystals of these scintillator materials hold the promise of higher crystal yields and significantly lower detector production costs. In the present work, we describe new processing protocols that, when combined with our molten salt filtration methods, have led to advances in achieving a significant reduction of cracking effects during the growth of single crystals of SrI2:Eu2+. In particular, we have found that extended pumping on the molten crystalgrowth charge under vacuum for time periods extending up to 48 hours is generally beneficial in compensating for variations in the alkaline-earth halide purity and stoichiometry of the materials as initially supplied by commercial sources. These melt-pumping and processing techniques are now being applied to the purification of CaI2:Eu2+ and some mixed-anion europium-doped alkaline-earth halides prior to single-crystal growth by means of the vertical Bridgman technique. The results of initial studies of the effects of aliovalent doping of SrI2:Eu2+ on the scintillation characteristics of this material are also described.

  15. Advances in the growth of alkaline-earth halide single crystals for scintillator detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Kolopus, James A; Neal, John S; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.; Beck, P; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline-earth scintillators such as strontium iodide and other alkaline-earth halides activated with divalent europium represent some of the most efficient and highest energy resolution scintillators for use as gamma-ray detectors in a wide range of applications. These applications include the areas of nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, the detection of undeclared nuclear material, nuclear physics and materials science, medical diagnostics, space physics, high energy physics, and radiation monitoring systems for first responders, police, and fire/rescue personnel. Recent advances in the growth of large single crystals of these scintillator materials hold the promise of higher crystal yields and significantly lower detector production costs. In the present work, we describe new processing protocols that, when combined with our molten salt filtration methods, have led to advances in achieving a significant reduction of cracking effects during the growth of single crystals of SrI2:Eu2+. In particular, we have found that extended pumping on the molten crystal-growth charge under vacuum for time periods extending up to 48 hours is generally beneficial in compensating for variations in the alkaline-earth halide purity and stoichiometry of the materials as initially supplied by commercial sources. These melt-pumping and processing techniques are now being applied to the purification of CaI2:Eu2+ and some mixed-anion europium-doped alkaline-earth halides prior to single-crystal growth by means of the vertical Bridgman technique. The results of initial studies of the effects of aliovalent doping of SrI2:Eu2+ on the scintillation characteristics of this material are also described.

  16. Reaching time resolution of less than 10 ps with plastic scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. W.; Sun, B. H.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Zhu, L. H.; Enomoto, A.; Nagae, D.; Nishimura, T.; Omika, S.; Ozawa, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2016-07-01

    Timing-pick up detectors with excellent timing resolutions are essential in many modern nuclear physics experiments. Aiming to develop a Time-Of-Flight system with precision down to about 10 ps, we have made a systematic study of the timing characteristic of TOF detectors, which consist of several combinations of plastic scintillators and photomultiplier tubes. With the conventional electronics, the best timing resolution of about 5.1 ps (σ) has been achieved for detectors with an area size of 3 × 1cm2 . It is found that for data digitalization a combination of TAC and ADC can achieve a better time resolution than the currently available TDC. Simultaneous measurements of both time and pulse height are very valuable for the correction of time-walk effect.

  17. Neutron response function characterization of 4He scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, Ryan P.; Rolison, Lucas M.; Lewis, Jason M.; Murer, David; Massey, Thomas N.; Enqvist, Andreas; Jordan, Kelly A.

    2015-04-15

    Time-of-flight measurements were conducted to characterize the neutron energy response of pressurized 4He fast neutron scintillation detectors for the first time, using the Van de Graaff generator at Ohio University. The time-of-flight spectra and pulse height distributions were measured. This data was used to determine the light output response function, which was found to be linear at energies below 3.5 MeV. The intrinsic efficiency of the detector as a function of incident energy was also calculated: the average efficiency up to 10 MeV was 3.1%, with a maximum efficiency of 6.6% at 1.05 MeV. Furthermore, these results will enable development of neutron spectrum unfolding algorithms for neutron spectroscopy applications with these detectors.

  18. Towards monolithic scintillator based TOF-PET systems: practical methods for detector calibration and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, Giacomo; Tabacchini, Valerio; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2016-07-01

    Gamma-ray detectors based on thick monolithic scintillator crystals can achieve spatial resolutions  <2 mm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) and coincidence resolving times (CRTs) better than 200 ps FWHM. Moreover, they provide high sensitivity and depth-of-interaction (DOI) information. While these are excellent characteristics for clinical time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET), the application of monolithic scintillators has so far been hampered by the lengthy and complex procedures needed for position- and time-of-interaction estimation. Here, the algorithms previously developed in our group are revised to make the calibration and operation of a large number of monolithic scintillator detectors in a TOF-PET system practical. In particular, the k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classification method for x,y-position estimation is accelerated with an algorithm that quickly preselects only the most useful reference events, reducing the computation time for position estimation by a factor of ~200 compared to the previously published k-NN 1D method. Also, the procedures for estimating the DOI and time of interaction are revised to enable full detector calibration by means of fan-beam or flood irradiations only. Moreover, a new technique is presented to allow the use of events in which some of the photosensor pixel values and/or timestamps are missing (e.g. due to dead time), so as to further increase system sensitivity. The accelerated methods were tested on a monolithic scintillator detector specifically developed for clinical PET applications, consisting of a 32 mm  ×  32 mm  ×  22 mm LYSO : Ce crystal coupled to a digital photon counter (DPC) array. This resulted in a spatial resolution of 1.7 mm FWHM, an average DOI resolution of 3.7 mm FWHM, and a CRT of 214 ps. Moreover, the possibility of using events missing the information of up to 16 out of 64 photosensor pixels is shown. This results in only a small

  19. Characterizing energy dependence and count rate performance of a dual scintillator fiber-optic detector for computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hoerner, Matthew R. Stepusin, Elliott J.; Hyer, Daniel E.; Hintenlang, David E.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Kilovoltage (kV) x-rays pose a significant challenge for radiation dosimetry. In the kV energy range, even small differences in material composition can result in significant variations in the absorbed energy between soft tissue and the detector. In addition, the use of electronic systems in light detection has demonstrated measurement losses at high photon fluence rates incident to the detector. This study investigated the feasibility of using a novel dual scintillator detector and whether its response to changes in beam energy from scatter and hardening is readily quantified. The detector incorporates a tissue-equivalent plastic scintillator and a gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator, which has a higher sensitivity to scatter x-rays. Methods: The detector was constructed by coupling two scintillators: (1) small cylindrical plastic scintillator, 500 μm in diameter and 2 mm in length, and (2) 100 micron sheet of gadolinium oxysulfide 500 μm in diameter, each to a 2 m long optical fiber, which acts as a light guide to transmit scintillation photons from the sensitive element to a photomultiplier tube. Count rate linearity data were obtained from a wide range of exposure rates delivered from a radiological x-ray tube by adjusting the tube current. The data were fitted to a nonparalyzable dead time model to characterize the time response. The true counting rate was related to the reference free air dose air rate measured with a 0.6 cm{sup 3} Radcal{sup ®} thimble chamber as described in AAPM Report No. 111. Secondary electron and photon spectra were evaluated using Monte Carlo techniques to analyze ionization quenching and photon energy-absorption characteristics from free-in-air and in phantom measurements. The depth/energy dependence of the detector was characterized using a computed tomography dose index QA phantom consisting of nested adult head and body segments. The phantom provided up to 32 cm of acrylic with a compatible 0.6 cm{sup 3} calibrated

  20. Response function measurements of an NE102A organic scintillator using an 241Am-Be source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naqvi, A. A.; Aksoy, A.; Khiari, F. Z.; Coban, A.; Nagadi, M. M.; Al-Ohali, M. A.; Al-Jalal, M. A.

    1994-07-01

    The response function of a 125 mm diameter NE102A organic scintillation detector has been measured over the 2.7-14.8 MeV neutron energy range. The detector response function was derived from the light output for monoenergetic neutrons and gamma rays. The light output of the detector for monoenergetic neutrons was measured by selecting narrowgates in the time-of-flight (TOF) spectrum for a 241Am-Be neutron source. In order to provide check points on the data, the detector light output was also measured for monoenergetic neutrons from the D(d, n) and T(d, n) reactions. The response function of the NE102A detector is in good agreement (within 1-5%) with the published data of Cecil et al. [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 161 (1979) 439].

  1. A scintillating plastic fiber tracking detector for neutron and proton imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Castaneda, C. M.; Holslin, D.; Macri, J. R.; McConnell, M. L.; Romero, J. L.; Wunderer, C. B.

    1999-02-01

    We report on a prototype detector system designed to perform imaging and spectroscopy on 20-250MeV neutrons. The detection techniques employed can be applied to measurements in a variety of disciplines including solar and atmospheric physics, radiation therapy and nuclear materials monitoring. The detector measures the energy and direction of neutrons by detecting double neutron-proton scatters and recording images of the ionization tracks of the recoil protons in a densely packed bundle of scintillating plastic fibers stacked in orthogonal layers. The scintillation tracks are detected and imaged by photomultipliers and image intensifier/CCD camera optics. By tracking the recoil protons from individual neutrons, the kinematics of the scatter are determined. This directional information results in a high signal-to-noise measurement. The self-triggering and track imaging features of a prototype for tracking in two dimensions are demonstrated in calibrations with 14-65MeV neutrons, 20-67.5MeV protons, and with cosmic-ray muons. Preliminary results of phantom imaging measurements using a proton beam are also presented. We discuss several applications for this detector technique and outline future development work.

  2. Fission signal detection using helium-4 gas fast neutron scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J. M. Kelley, R. P.; Jordan, K. A.; Murer, D.

    2014-07-07

    We demonstrate the unambiguous detection of the fission neutron signal produced in natural uranium during active neutron interrogation using a deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron generator and a high pressure {sup 4}He gas fast neutron scintillation detector. The energy deposition by individual neutrons is quantified, and energy discrimination is used to differentiate the induced fission neutrons from the mono-energetic interrogation neutrons. The detector can discriminate between different incident neutron energies using pulse height discrimination of the slow scintillation component of the elastic scattering interaction between a neutron and the {sup 4}He atom. Energy histograms resulting from this data show the buildup of a detected fission neutron signal at higher energies. The detector is shown here to detect a unique fission neutron signal from a natural uranium sample during active interrogation with a (d, d) neutron generator. This signal path has a direct application to the detection of shielded nuclear material in cargo and air containers. It allows for continuous interrogation and detection while greatly minimizing the potential for false alarms.

  3. Monte Carlo code G3sim for simulation of plastic scintillator detectors with wavelength shifter fiber readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, P. K.; Dugad, S. R.; Gupta, S. K.

    2012-04-01

    A detailed description of a compact Monte Carlo simulation code "G3sim" for studying the performance of a plastic scintillator detector with wavelength shifter (WLS) fiber readout is presented. G3sim was developed for optimizing the design of new scintillator detectors used in the GRAPES-3 extensive air shower experiment. Propagation of the blue photons produced by the passage of relativistic charged particles in the scintillator is treated by incorporating the absorption, total internal, and diffuse reflections. Capture of blue photons by the WLS fibers and subsequent re-emission of longer wavelength green photons is appropriately treated. The trapping and propagation of green photons inside the WLS fiber is treated using the laws of optics for meridional and skew rays. Propagation time of each photon is taken into account for the generation of the electrical signal at the photomultiplier. A comparison of the results from G3sim with the performance of a prototype scintillator detector showed an excellent agreement between the simulated and measured properties. The simulation results can be parametrized in terms of exponential functions providing a deeper insight into the functioning of these versatile detectors. G3sim can be used to aid the design and optimize the performance of scintillator detectors prior to actual fabrication that may result in a considerable saving of time, labor, and money spent.

  4. The customized groud test platforms for the plastic scintillator detector of DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Sun, Zhiyu; Yu, Yuhong; Fang, Fang; Chen, Junling; Zhang, Yongjie

    2016-07-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a high-precision satellite-borne spectrometer aiming for dark matter search, understanding of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays and gamma-ray astronomy. The Plastic Scintillator Detector (PSD) is a key sub-detector of DAMPE, which provides the function of e/γ discrimination and charge measurement from proton to calcium. It consists of 82 plastic scintillator bars with the dimension of 884mm×28mm×10mm, each readout by two photomultiplier tubes (PMT) at both ends. To ensure the quality and achieve the best performance, various ground tests have been carried out during the construction phase of PSD both on the module and system scale. Customized test platforms are designed and constructed to facilitate these works which includes a test bench for batch PMT characterization and qualification with the capacity of 25 tubes, a test bench for batch scintillator bar characterization with the capacity of 24 bars, and an integrated platform which emulates the vacuum condition in space and provides accurate tracking of the incident cosmic ray particle for precise calibration of the PSD detector as a whole. A dedicated analysis software based on ROOT library has also been developed for PSD ground test, which can process both the engineering and science data, and combines decoding, analysis and data visualization into a single framework. These facilities constitute a complete test suite for PSD development and are applied successfully in the construction of both the Engineering Qualified Model and the Flight Model of PSD.

  5. Neutron light output response and resolution functions in EJ-309 liquid scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Andreas; Lawrence, Christopher C.; Wieger, Brian M.; Pozzi, Sara A.; Massey, Thomas N.

    2013-03-26

    Here, the neutron light output response functions and detector resolution functions were measured at Ohio University's tandem Van de Graaff generator for three cylindrical EJ-309 liquid scintillator cells, having dimensions 12.7(circle divide)-by-12.7, 7.6-by-7.6, and 7.6-by-5.1 cm. A 7.44 MeV deuteron beam was used on an Al-27 target generating a continuous spectrum over the energy range from a few hundred keV to over 10 MeV. The light output response functions are determined using an exponential fit. Detector resolution functions are obtained for the 12.7-by-12.7 and 7.6-by-7.6 cm detectors. It is demonstrated that the dependence on detector size is important for the light output response functions, but not to the same extent for the resolution function, even when photomultiplier tubes, detector material, and other detector characteristics are carefully matched.

  6. Discrimination of charged particles in a neutral beam line by using a solid scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Jong-Kwan; Ko, Jewou; Liu, Dong

    2017-01-01

    In the past several decades, many studies have been conducted to search for non-baryonic dark matter, such as weakly interactive massive particles (WIMPs). In the search for WIMPs, charged particles incident on the detector are background particles because WIMPs are neutral. Charged particles originate from various sources, such as cosmic rays and laboratory materials surrounding the main detector. Therefore, a veto that discriminates charged particles can improve the particle-detection efficiency of the entire experiment for detecting WIMPs. Here, we investigate in the thickness range of 1 mm to 5 mm, the optimal thickness of a polystyrene scintillator as a chargedparticle veto detector. We found that 3-mm-thick polystyrene provides the best performance to veto charged particles and the charged-particle background in the search for the WIMP signal. Furthermore, we fabricated 3-mm-thick and 5-mm-thick polystyrene charged particle veto detectors that will be used in an underground laboratory in the search for WIMP dark matter. After exposing those detectors are the actual beam line, we compared the rate of charged particles measured using those detectors and the rate simulated through a Monte Carlo simulation.

  7. Neutron light output response and resolution functions in EJ-309 liquid scintillation detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Enqvist, Andreas; Lawrence, Christopher C.; Wieger, Brian M.; ...

    2013-03-26

    Here, the neutron light output response functions and detector resolution functions were measured at Ohio University's tandem Van de Graaff generator for three cylindrical EJ-309 liquid scintillator cells, having dimensions 12.7(circle divide)-by-12.7, 7.6-by-7.6, and 7.6-by-5.1 cm. A 7.44 MeV deuteron beam was used on an Al-27 target generating a continuous spectrum over the energy range from a few hundred keV to over 10 MeV. The light output response functions are determined using an exponential fit. Detector resolution functions are obtained for the 12.7-by-12.7 and 7.6-by-7.6 cm detectors. It is demonstrated that the dependence on detector size is important for themore » light output response functions, but not to the same extent for the resolution function, even when photomultiplier tubes, detector material, and other detector characteristics are carefully matched.« less

  8. Data acquisition system for the Large Scintillating Neutrino Detector at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.; Cohen, I. ); Homann, B.; Smith, D. ); Strossman, W.; VanDalen, G.J. ); Weaver, L.S.; Evans, D.; Vernon, W. ); Band, A.; Burman, R.; Chang, T.; Federspiel, F.; Foreman, W.; Gomulka, S.; H

    1992-01-01

    The data acquisition system for the Large Scintillating Neutrino Detector (LSND) is described. The system collects time and charge information in real time from 1600 photomultiplier tubes and passes the data in intelligent-trigger selected time windows to analysis computers, where events are reconstructed and analyzed as candidates for a variety of neutrino-related physics processes. The system is composed of fourteen VME crates linked to a Silicon Graphics, Inc. 4D/480'' multiprocessor computer through multiple, parallel Ethernets, and a collection of contemporary high-performance workstations.

  9. Data acquisition system for the Large Scintillating Neutrino Detector at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.; Cohen, I.; Homann, B.; Smith, D.; Strossman, W.; VanDalen, G.J.; Weaver, L.S.; Evans, D.; Vernon, W.; Band, A.; Burman, R.; Chang, T.; Federspiel, F.; Foreman, W.; Gomulka, S.; Hart, G.; Kozlowski, T.; Louis, W.C.; Margulies, J.; Nuanes, A.; Sandberg, V.; Thompson, T.N.; White, D.H.; Whitehouse, D.

    1992-10-01

    The data acquisition system for the Large Scintillating Neutrino Detector (LSND) is described. The system collects time and charge information in real time from 1600 photomultiplier tubes and passes the data in intelligent-trigger selected time windows to analysis computers, where events are reconstructed and analyzed as candidates for a variety of neutrino-related physics processes. The system is composed of fourteen VME crates linked to a Silicon Graphics, Inc. ``4D/480`` multiprocessor computer through multiple, parallel Ethernets, and a collection of contemporary high-performance workstations.

  10. Imaging the LHC beams with silicon and scintillating fibre vertex detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihl, M.

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) is used to reconstruct beam-gas interaction vertices which allows one to obtain precise profiles of the LHC beams. In LHCb, this information is combined with the profile of the reconstructed beam-beam collisions and with the LHC beam currents to perform precise measurements of the luminosity. This beam-gas imaging (BGI) method also allows one to study the transverse beam shapes, beam positions and angles in real time. Therefore, a demonstrator beam-gas vertex detector (BGV) based on scintillating fibre modules has been built and installed in LHC Ring 2 at point 4.

  11. Alignment of the Near Detector scintillator modules using cosmic ray muons

    SciTech Connect

    Ospanov, Rustem; Lang, Karol; /Texas U.

    2008-05-01

    The authors describe the procedures and the results of the first alignment of the Near Detector. Using 15.5 million cosmic ray muon tracks, collected from October, 2004 through early january, 2005, they derive the effective transverse positions of the calorimeter scintillator modules. The residuals from straight line fits indicate that the current alignment has achieved better than 1 mm precision. They estimate the size of the remaining misalignment and using tracks recorded with a magnetic field test the effect of the magnetic field on the alignment.

  12. Predicting the sensitivity of the beryllium/scintillator layer neutron detector using Monte Carlo and experimental response functions

    SciTech Connect

    Styron, J. D. Cooper, G. W.; Carpenter, Ken; Bonura, M. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Nelson, A. J.; Torres, J. A.; McWatters, B. R.

    2014-11-15

    A methodology for obtaining empirical curves relating absolute measured scintillation light output to beta energy deposited is presented. Output signals were measured from thin plastic scintillator using NIST traceable beta and gamma sources and MCNP5 was used to model the energy deposition from each source. Combining the experimental and calculated results gives the desired empirical relationships. To validate, the sensitivity of a beryllium/scintillator-layer neutron activation detector was predicted and then exposed to a known neutron fluence from a Deuterium-Deuterium fusion plasma (DD). The predicted and the measured sensitivity were in statistical agreement.

  13. WE-AB-BRB-09: Real Time In Vivo Scintillating Fiber Array Detector for Medical LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Knewtson, T; Pokhrel, S; Hernandez-Morales, D; Loyalka, S; Rangaraj, D; Izaguirre, E; Price, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: An in vivo transmission scintillation fiber detector was developed to monitor patient treatment in real time for the enhancement of patient safety and treatment accuracy. The detector system is capable of monitoring each pulse from a medical LINAC during treatment to determine the dose delivered as treatment progresses. Methods: The detector system consists of 60 parallel scintillating fibers coupled to fast data processing optoelectronics that can monitor the beam fluence in real time. Each 2.5mm{sup 2} square fiber is aligned with an MLC leaf pair and is long enough to capture a 40cm field. The fibers are embedded within a water equivalent polymer substrate that is secured in the LINAC accessory tray. The fibers are coupled to high speed photosensors and front end amplifiers that filter noise and pass each pulse to a high speed analog-to-digital converter. The system components are capable of detecting pulse repetition times shorter than what is delivered by a medical LINAC to ensure true real time data acquisition. Results: The system was able to capture and record the signal from each linac pulse and display the information in real time with no pulse pile up. It was found that the fiber array attenuates 2.65% of the beam which can easily be compensated for in treatment planning. The fibers responded linearly with dose, are independent of clinical beam energies, and are independent of dose rate. Calibration of the system was performed as a function of beam energy, beam size, dose rate, and monitor units to optimize beam fluence error detection. Conclusion: The detector system presented provides true real time in vivo beam monitoring to enhance patient safety and treatment delivery accuracy. Furthermore, the detector can be used for current patient specific QA.

  14. Development of Scintillator Detectors for Fast-Ignition Experiments and Down-Scattered Neutron Measurements on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Sangster, T. C.; Marshall, K. L.; Shoup, M. J., III; Buczek, T.; Pruyne, A.; Fox, M.; Duffy, T.; Moran, M. J.; Lauck, R.

    2009-11-01

    A small signal must be recorded after very large DT or hard x-ray signals in a neutron time-of-flight detector to measure down-scattered neutrons in cryogenic DT implosions or to measure neutron yield in the presence of hard x-ray background from an ultrahigh-intensity laser. Several detectors with plastic and liquid scintillators were developed and tested at the Omega/Omega EP Laser Facility in cryogenic DT implosions and integrated fast-ignition experiments. A gated photomultiplier tube was used to eliminate large DT or hard x-ray signals. The liquid scintillator consists of 0.4% PPO, 0.04% MSB dissolved in xylene and saturated with oxygen. The afterglow (long decay constant) with this scintillator is ˜100x less than conventional scintillators. This is an essential property to mitigate the residual scintillator signal in down-scattered neutron measurements and fast-ignition experiments. Detector designs and responses with the different scintillators will be presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement Nos. DE-FC52-08NA28302, DE-FC02-04ER54789, and DE-FG02-05ER54839.

  15. Study of a detector system for high-energy astrophysical objects using a combination of plastic scintillator and MPPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaoka, Tatsuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Fukazawa, Yasushi

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated a hard X-ray detector system using a combination of a plastic scintillator and multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC). Photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) have typically been adopted to read scintillators because of their high gain and large photoelectric surface, and studies on PMT and scintillator systems are well advanced. However, PMTs have limitations; for example, they are relatively large in size, require high voltage to operate, and cannot be used in strong magnetic fields. On the other hand, MPPCs do not have such limitations and instead possess high quantum efficiency and a large compact size. Therefore, we have studied a detector system that combines an MPPC with a plastic scintillator. The system is primarily intended to be used for polarization measurements of high-energy astrophysical objects. We achieved an energy threshold of as low as ~5 keV while operating the detector at low temperature (-10 °C), reading the signal with short integration time (50 ns), and using a low-noise MPPC. We also confirmed that the light yield of our MPPC+plastic scintillator system is comparable to that obtained using a conventional PMT to read the scintillator signal. Herein, we report test results and future prospects.

  16. Development and Testing of Scintillating Detectors for the Muon g-2 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Benjamin; Diamond, Edward; Sblendorio, Alec; Gray, Frederick

    2016-09-01

    The precise value of the muon's anomalous magnetic moment that was measured at Brookhaven National Laboratory E821 differed by more than three standard deviations from predictions of the Standard Model. The Muon g-2 Experiment at Fermilab will attain a more precise measurement by a factor of three by observing the muon spin precession frequency in a magnetic field. This improved measurement could lead to evidence of physics beyond the Standard Model. A thin-scintillator entrance (T0) counter prototype is being tested for possible use in the experiment to determine the intensity and temporal profile of the beam as it is injected into the muon storage ring. The counter is also being evaluated to determine whether it can monitor undesired particles that arrive after the main beam pulse. The unique design of the entrance counter uses a silicon photomultiplier to read the light output from a scintillator. The progress of the design of the T0 entrance counter along with the results of light output tests from a beta source and the SLAC high-energy electron beam are the primary foci of this presentation. The status of scintillating fiber harp beam monitor detectors that will also be used in the g-2 Experiment to detect the position and width of the muon beam will also be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1505887.

  17. Double {beta} experiments with the help of scintillation and HPGe detectors at Gran Sasso

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, A.; Konovalov, S. I.; Umatov, V. I.; Belli, P.; D'Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A.; Bernabei, R.; Boiko, R. S.; Chernyak, D. M.; Danevich, F. A.; Kobychev, V. V.; Kropivyansky, B. N.; Kudovbenko, V. M.; Nagorny, S. S.; Podviyanuk, R. B.; Polischuk, O. G.; Tretyak, V. I.; Vyshnevskyi, I. M.; Yurchenko, S. S.; Brudanin, V. B.; and others

    2011-12-16

    A search for double beta decay of {sup 64,70}Zn, {sup 180,186}W was carried out by using low background ZnWO{sub 4} crystal scintillators, while a CeCl{sub 3} scintillation detector was applied to investigate 2{beta} processes in {sup 136,138,142}Ce. A search for 2{beta} decay of {sup 96,104}Ru, {sup 156,158}Dy, {sup 190,198}Pt and study of 2{nu}2{beta} decay of {sup 100}Mo to the first excited 0{sup +} level of {sup 100}Ru were realized by ultra-low background HPGe {gamma} spectrometry. Moreover, CdWO{sub 4} crystal scintillators from enriched {sup 106}Cd and {sup 116}Cd isotopes were developed to search for 2{beta} decay of {sup 106}Cd and {sup 116}Cd. Finally, experiments aimed to investigate {sup 96,104}Ru and {sup 116}Cd are in progress and a new phase of the experiment to search for 2{beta} processes in {sup 106}Cd is in preparation.

  18. Data-driven exploration of the ionization-phonon partitioning in scintillating radiation detector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, Kim F.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Jordan, David V.; Jones, Dumont M.

    2008-06-01

    An information-based approach to scintillating materials development has been applied to ranking the alkali halide and alkali earth halide series in terms of their energy conversion efficiency. The efficiency of scintillating radiation detection materials can be viewed as the product of a consecutive series of electronic processes (energy conversion, transfer, and luminescence) as outlined by Lempicki and others. Relevant data are relatively sparse, but sufficient for the development of forward mapping of materials properties through materials signatures. These mappings have been used to explore the limits of the K ratio in the Lempicki model with chemical composition, and examine its relationship with another common design objective, density. The alkali halides and alkali earth halide compounds separate themselves into distinct behavior classes favoring heavier cations and anions for improved K ratio. While the coupling of ionization is strongly related to the optical phonon modes, both dielectric and band gap contributions cannot be ignored. When applied within a candidate screen, the resulting model for K imposes design rules—simple structural restrictions—on scintillating radiation detector materials.

  19. A systematic characterization of the low-energy photon response of plastic scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Jonathan; Beddar, Sam; Bonde, Chris; Schmidt, Daniel; Culberson, Wesley; Guillemette, Maxime; Beaulieu, Luc

    2016-08-01

    To characterize the low energy behavior of scintillating materials used in plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs), 3 PSDs were developed using polystyrene-based scintillating materials emitting in different wavelengths. These detectors were exposed to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)-matched low-energy beams ranging from 20 kVp to 250 kVp, and to 137Cs and 60Co beams. The dose in polystyrene was compared to the dose in air measured by NIST-calibrated ionization chambers at the same location. Analysis of every beam quality spectrum was used to extract the beam parameters and the effective mass energy-absorption coefficient. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed to calculate the energy absorbed in the scintillators’ volume. The scintillators’ expected response was then compared to the experimental measurements and an energy-dependent correction factor was identified to account for low-energy quenching in the scintillators. The empirical Birks model was then compared to these values to verify its validity for low-energy electrons. The clear optical fiber response was below 0.2% of the scintillator’s light for x-ray beams, indicating that a negligible amount of fluorescence contamination was produced. However, for higher-energy beams (137Cs and 60Co), the scintillators’ response was corrected for the Cerenkov stem effect. The scintillators’ response increased by a factor of approximately 4 from a 20 kVp to a 60Co beam. The decrease in sensitivity from ionization quenching reached a local minimum of about 11%+/- 1% between 40 keV and 60 keV x-ray beam mean energy, but dropped by 20% for very low-energy (13 keV) beams. The Birks model may be used to fit the experimental data, but it must take into account the energy dependence of the kB quenching parameter. A detailed comprehension of intrinsic scintillator response is essential for proper calibration of PSD dosimeters for radiology.

  20. Luminescent and scintillation properties of composites based on sol-gel SiO2 matrices and organic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyagin, O. G.; Bespalova, I. I.; Masalov, A. A.; Zelenskaya, O. V.; Tarasov, V. A.; Malyukin, Yu. V.

    2014-11-01

    Luminescent composites based on SiO2 matrices synthesized using the sol-gel method and organic scintillators PPO and o-POPOP are produced, and their optical, luminescent, and scintillation characteristics are studied. It is shown that these composites generate an intense photoluminescence signal, possess a nanosecond decay time, and have a transparency in the range of 400-700 nm of no less than 70%. The absolute light output during excitation by α radiation with an energy of 5.46 MeV is 4400-5100 photon/MeV, and the amplitude resolution is 27-32%.

  1. Organic Scintillators in Nonproliferation Applications With a Hybridized Double-Pulse Rejection Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, Mark Mitchell

    Alternative detection technologies are crucial to meeting demand for neutron detectors, for the current production of He-3, which has been the classical neutron choice, is insufficient. Organic scintillators are a strong candidate as a He-3 alternative due to their high efficiency, fast timing properties, and capabilities for separately identifying gamma-rays and neutrons through pulse shape discrimination (PSD). However, the use of organic scintillators in environments with numerous gamma rays can be limited because overlapping gamma-ray events can be misclassified as neutron events during PSD. To solve this problem, a new, hybridized double-pulse cleaning technique, consisting of three separate cleaning algorithms, was developed. The technique removes gamma-ray double pulses while preserving as many neutron pulses as possible. This technique was applied to separate experiments of Cf-252 and a gamma-ray source when measuring at a 100-kHz count rate and a field of 1000 incident gamma rays per incident neutron. It was found that stilbene scintillators were capable of intrinsic neutron efficiencies between 15-19% when measuring bare Cf-252 and 13-17% when exposed to the gamma-ray field. Misclassification rates ranged from 10-6-10-5, a factor-of-5 better than both the EJ-309 liquid and BB3-5 plastic. Next, plutonium experiments were performed with stilbene to determine which cleaning algorithm was best for each sample. A clear correlation was found that related the correct method of cleaning to the measured gamma ray-to-neutron ratio. When the measured gamma ray-to-neutron ratio is 10 or below, the template cleaning algorithm is preferred, while the fractional and hybrid cleaning algorithms are preferred when the gamma ray-to-neutron ratio is 100 or greater. Discriminating neutron sources such as Cf-252 or AmLi from SNM samples such as plutonium is a top priority in nonproliferation. We demonstrate that time-correlated experiments, utilizing both PSD-capable plastic

  2. Simulations of neutron and proton detection for a 4π plastic scintillator detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkovic, Tomislav; Simicevic, N.; Trezeciak, R.; Ullrich, H.

    1997-02-01

    Neutron detection efficiencies for a 4 (pi) plastic scintillator detector were calculated with the Monte Carlo code of Cecil et al for various threshold of 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10 and 20 MeVee, assuming an isotropic distribution of neutrons emerging form the center of the target. A good agreement between the data obtained from the reaction (pi) +4He yields pppn with 120 MeV pions and efficiency calculations has been found. Proton reaction losses for 15, 20 and 35 cm thick plastic detectors were calculated using the GEANT code for proton energies up to 150 MeV. Reaction losses were extracted from the simulated spectra. Our correction curve for proton reaction losses gives slightly higher values than the data of Measday and Serre and the calculation of Janni.

  3. Unfolding the fast neutron spectra of a BC501A liquid scintillation detector using GRAVEL method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, YongHao; Chen, XiMeng; Lei, JiaRong; An, Li; Zhang, XiaoDong; Shao, JianXiong; Zheng, Pu; Wang, XinHua

    2014-10-01

    Accurate knowledge of the neutron energy spectra is useful in basic research and applications. The overall procedure of measuring and unfolding the fast neutron energy spectra with BC501A liquid scintillation detector is described. The recoil proton spectrum of 241Am-Be neutrons was obtained experimentally. With the NRESP7 code, the response matrix of detector was simulated. Combining the recoil proton spectrum and response matrix, the unfolding of neutron spectra was performed by GRAVEL iterative algorithm. A MatLab program based on the GRAVEL method was developed. The continuous neutron spectrum of 241Am-Be source and monoenergetic neutron spectrum of D-T source have been unfolded successfully and are in good agreement with their standard reference spectra. The unfolded 241Am-Be spectrum are more accurate than the spectra unfolded by artificial neural networks in recent years.

  4. Solar flare and pulsar detection with small balloon borne scintillator detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Ritabrata; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Bhowmick, Debashis; Bhattacharya, Arnab

    2016-07-01

    We present radiation measurement data from the Sun and the Crab Pulsar using a very light weight payload comprising a scintillator detector from one of the ongoing missions carried out by Indian Centre for Space Physics, India. This is a unique observation in the sense that the payload containing the detector unit was carried off above the Earth atmosphere using small weather balloons in a very cost effective way and with severe weight constraints. In this Mission we have been able to observe two consecutive solar flares and radiation from the Crab pulsar when the payload was under 30 km altitude. We present a brief description of the mission strategy and the temporal and spectral analysis of the data from those sources.

  5. A novel, SiPM-array-based, monolithic scintillator detector for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaart, Dennis R.; van Dam, Herman T.; Seifert, Stefan; Vinke, Ruud; Dendooven, Peter; Löhner, Herbert; Beekman, Freek J.

    2009-06-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are of great interest to positron emission tomography (PET), as they enable new detector geometries, for e.g., depth-of-interaction (DOI) determination, are MR compatible, and offer faster response and higher gain than other solid-state photosensors such as avalanche photodiodes. Here we present a novel detector design with DOI correction, in which a position-sensitive SiPM array is used to read out a monolithic scintillator. Initial characterization of a prototype detector consisting of a 4 × 4 SiPM array coupled to either the front or back surface of a 13.2 mm × 13.2 mm × 10 mm LYSO:Ce3+ crystal shows that front-side readout results in significantly better performance than conventional back-side readout. Spatial resolutions <1.6 mm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) were measured at the detector centre in response to an ~0.54 mm FWHM diameter test beam. Hardly any resolution losses were observed at angles of incidence up to 45°, demonstrating excellent DOI correction. About 14% FWHM energy resolution was obtained. The timing resolution, measured in coincidence with a BaF2 detector, equals 960 ps FWHM.

  6. A novel, SiPM-array-based, monolithic scintillator detector for PET.

    PubMed

    Schaart, Dennis R; van Dam, Herman T; Seifert, Stefan; Vinke, Ruud; Dendooven, Peter; Löhner, Herbert; Beekman, Freek J

    2009-06-07

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are of great interest to positron emission tomography (PET), as they enable new detector geometries, for e.g., depth-of-interaction (DOI) determination, are MR compatible, and offer faster response and higher gain than other solid-state photosensors such as avalanche photodiodes. Here we present a novel detector design with DOI correction, in which a position-sensitive SiPM array is used to read out a monolithic scintillator. Initial characterization of a prototype detector consisting of a 4 x 4 SiPM array coupled to either the front or back surface of a 13.2 mm x 13.2 mm x 10 mm LYSO:Ce(3+) crystal shows that front-side readout results in significantly better performance than conventional back-side readout. Spatial resolutions <1.6 mm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) were measured at the detector centre in response to an approximately 0.54 mm FWHM diameter test beam. Hardly any resolution losses were observed at angles of incidence up to 45 degrees , demonstrating excellent DOI correction. About 14% FWHM energy resolution was obtained. The timing resolution, measured in coincidence with a BaF(2) detector, equals 960 ps FWHM.

  7. Scintillating fiber detectors for precise time and position measurements read out with Si-PMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damyanova, A.; Bravar, A.

    2017-02-01

    We present the development and performance of compact scintillating fiber detectors read out with silicon photo-multipliers (Si-PMs). The compact size, fast response, and insensitivity to magnetic fields make these detectors suitable for a variety of applications where precise tracking and timing information is required. These detectors will be used with different particle beams (electrons, protons, heavy ions) at very high rates. In particular, we present the SciFi tracker/time of flight detector that is being developed for the Mu3e experiment at PSI (search for the lepton flavor violating decay μ → eee at very high rates). We also present the SciFi beam position detectors that will be employed in NA61 at CERN to track the incoming proton and heavy ion beam particles. We are considering different readout scenarios in which (a) each fiber is individually coupled to a single Si-PM photo-sensor and (b) fibers are arranged in columns and coupled to a Si-PM arrays.

  8. Comparative Investigation of the Performance of ZnO-Based Scintillators for Use as α-Particle Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, John S; Boatner, Lynn A; Giles, N. C.; Halliburton, L. E.; Derenzo, S. E.; Bourret-Courchesne, E. D.

    2006-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive investigation of the scintillation properties of zinc-oxide-based scintillators, four samples of gallium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) powders have been characterized by means of X-ray excitation, {alpha}-particle excitation, and temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL). The ultimate goals of these studies are, first, to understand the scintillation mechanisms that are operative in various members of the ZnO family of scintillators, and, subsequently, to use this knowledge in order to improve the radiation-detection performance of ZnO. These samples have been considered for use in an {alpha}-detector for installation in a deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron generator. All of the samples demonstrated principal decay time components on the order of 1 ns. PL measurements of the four powder samples did not unequivocally support any of the discussed models. Excitonic and shallow acceptor models, however, share a common starting point for future investigations. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3518 sample was found to be the most promising candidate, in terms of fast light output, for replacing the Nuclear Enterprises Technology sample for use in a ZnO:Ga-based {alpha}-particle detector. While the nature of the luminescence center(s) or the energy transfer mechanisms actually responsible for scintillation are not yet clearly understood, ZnO:Ga remains a highly desirable candidate scintillator for use in an {alpha}-detector for installation in a D-T neutron generator and extended investigations of the fundamental mechanisms and scintillation parameters that are operative in ZnO:Ga scintillators are continuing.

  9. Performance assessment of a 2D array of plastic scintillation detectors for IMRT quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Mathieu; Gingras, Luc; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2013-07-01

    The purposes of this work are to assess the performance of a 2D plastic scintillation detectors array prototype for quality assurance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to determine its sensitivity and specificity to positioning errors of one multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf and one MLC leaf bank by applying the principles of signal detection theory. Ten treatment plans (step-and-shoot delivery) and one volumetric modulated arc therapy plan were measured and compared to calculations from two treatment-planning systems (TPSs) and to radiochromic films. The averages gamma passing rates per beam found for the step-and-shoot plans were 95.8% for the criteria (3%, 2 mm), 97.8% for the criteria (4%, 2 mm), and 98.1% for the criteria (3%, 3 mm) when measurements were compared to TPS calculations. The receiver operating characteristic curves for the one leaf errors and one leaf bank errors were determined from simulations (theoretical upper limits) and measurements. This work concludes that arrays of plastic scintillation detectors could be used for IMRT quality assurance in clinics. The use of signal detection theory could improve the quality of dosimetric verifications in radiation therapy by providing optimal discrimination criteria for the detection of different classes of errors.

  10. Application of scintillating fiber gamma-ray detectors for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaney, Roy C.; Fenyves, Ervin J.; Nelson, Gregory S.; Anderson, Jon A.; Antich, Peter P.; Atac, Muzaffer

    1993-02-01

    The recently developed plastic scintillating fiber technology started the development of a new generation of high spatial and time resolution gamma ray detectors for medical imaging, such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A scintillating fiber PET module consisting of two 5 X 5 X 2.5 cm(superscript 3) detector stacks made of parallel 1.0 mm diameter fiber, separated by 20 cm, each viewed by a Hamamatsu R2486 position sensitive photomultiplier was developed and tested. The time resolution of the coincidence system is 10 nsec. The spatial resolution and efficiency of this module turned out to be 2.3 mm (FWHM) and 2.0%, respectively, and independent of the location of the (superscript 22)Na testing source inside a sphere of 2 cm radius around the center of the two fiber stacks. The effect of gammas scattered in a 15 cm diameter water filled glass cylinder into which the (superscript 22)Na was immersed did not change the spatial resolution of the system.

  11. Radionuclide identification algorithm for organic scintillator-based radiation portal monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paff, Marc Gerrit; Di Fulvio, Angela; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2017-03-01

    We have developed an algorithm for on-the-fly radionuclide identification for radiation portal monitors using organic scintillation detectors. The algorithm was demonstrated on experimental data acquired with our pedestrian portal monitor on moving special nuclear material and industrial sources at a purpose-built radiation portal monitor testing facility. The experimental data also included common medical isotopes. The algorithm takes the power spectral density of the cumulative distribution function of the measured pulse height distributions and matches these to reference spectra using a spectral angle mapper. F-score analysis showed that the new algorithm exhibited significant performance improvements over previously implemented radionuclide identification algorithms for organic scintillators. Reliable on-the-fly radionuclide identification would help portal monitor operators more effectively screen out the hundreds of thousands of nuisance alarms they encounter annually due to recent nuclear-medicine patients and cargo containing naturally occurring radioactive material. Portal monitor operators could instead focus on the rare but potentially high impact incidents of nuclear and radiological material smuggling detection for which portal monitors are intended.

  12. Development of a real-time digital radiography system using a scintillator-type flat-panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Shigeyuki; Suzuki, Katsumi; Ishikawa, Ken; Okajima, Kenichi

    2001-06-01

    In order to study the advantage and remaining problems of FPD (flat panel detector) for clinical use by the real-time DR (digital radiography) system, we developed a prototype system using a scintillator type FPD and which was compared with previous I.I.-CCD type real-time DR. We replaced the X- ray detector of DR-2000X from I.I.-4M (4 million pixels)-CCD camera to the scintillator type dynamic FPD(7' X 9', 127 micrometers ), which can take both radiographic and fluoroscopic images. We obtained the images of head and stomach phantoms, and discussed about the image quality with medical doctors.

  13. Thin-film-based scintillators for hard x-ray microimaging detectors: the ScinTAX Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, A.; Cecilia, A.; Douissard, P.-A.; Dupré, K.; Wesemann, V.; Baumbach, T.; Couchaud, M.; Rochet, X.; Riesemeier, H.; Radtke, M.; Martin, T.

    2014-09-01

    The project ScinTAX developed novel thin scintillating films for the application in high performance X-ray imaging and subsequent introduced new X-ray detectors to the market. To achieve this aim lutetium orthosilicate (LSO) scintillators doped with different activators were grown successfully by liquid phase epitaxy. The high density of LSO (7.4 g/cm3), the effective atomic number (65.2) and the high light yield make this scintillator highly applicable for indirect X-ray detection in which the ionizing radiation is converted into visible light and then registered by a digital detector. A modular indirect detection system has been developed to fully exploit the potential of this thin film scintillator for radiographic and tomographic imaging. The system is compatible for high-resolution imaging with moderate dose as well as adaptable to intense high-dose applications where radiation hard microimaging detectors are required. This proceedings article shall review the achieved performances and technical details on this high-resolution detector system which is now available. A selected example application demonstrates the great potential of the optimized detector system for hard X-ray microimaging, i.e. either to improve image contrast due to the availability of efficient thin crystal films or to reduce the dose to the sample.

  14. Comparison of neutron spectra measured with three sizes of organic liquid scintillators using differentiation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shook, D. F.; Pierce, C. R.

    1972-01-01

    Proton recoil distributions were obtained by using organic liquid scintillators of different size. The measured distributions are converted to neutron spectra by differentiation analysis for comparison to the unfolded spectra of the largest scintillator. The approximations involved in the differentiation analysis are indicated to have small effects on the precision of neutron spectra measured with the smaller scintillators but introduce significant error for the largest scintillator. In the case of the smallest cylindrical scintillator, nominally 1.2 by 1.3 cm, the efficiency is shown to be insensitive to multiple scattering and to the angular distribution to the incident flux. These characteristics of the smaller scintillator make possible its use to measure scalar flux spectra within media high efficiency is not required.

  15. Proton transfer bis-benzazole fluors and their use in scintillator detectors

    DOEpatents

    Kauffman, Joel M.

    1994-01-01

    A novel class of proton transfer, bis-benzazole, fluorescent compounds, i.e., fluors, is disclosed. The novel fluors include substituted or unsubstituted 1,4-bis(2-benzazolyl)-2-hydroxybenzenes and 1,4-bis(2-benzazolyl)-2-amidobenzenes wherein the benzazolyl group may be benzoxazolyl, benzimidazolyl, benzothiazolyl, and the like. The benzazolyl groups may be substituted with one or more alkyl groups to improve solubility in organic matrix materials such as solvents, monomers, resins, polymers, and the like. The novel fluors may be used in the manufacture of fluorescent coatings, objects, scintillators, light sources and the like. The novel fluors are particularly useful for radiation-hard, solid scintillators for the detection and measurement of high energy particles and radiation.

  16. Proton transfer bis-benzazole fluors and their use in scintillator detectors

    DOEpatents

    Kauffman, J.M.

    1994-03-29

    A novel class of proton transfer, bis-benzazole, fluorescent compounds, i.e., fluors, is disclosed. The novel fluors include substituted or unsubstituted 1,4-bis(2-benzazolyl)-2-hydroxybenzenes and 1,4-bis(2-benzazolyl)-2-amidobenzenes wherein the benzazolyl group may be benzoxazolyl, benzimidazolyl, benzothiazolyl, and the like. The benzazolyl groups may be substituted with one or more alkyl groups to improve solubility in organic matrix materials such as solvents, monomers, resins, polymers, and the like. The novel fluors may be used in the manufacture of fluorescent coatings, objects, scintillators, light sources and the like. The novel fluors are particularly useful for radiation-hard, solid scintillators for the detection and measurement of high energy particles and radiation.

  17. Non-Carbon Dyes For Platic Scintillators- Report

    SciTech Connect

    Teprovich, J.; Colon-Mercado, H.; Gaillard, J.; Sexton, L.; Washington, A.; Ward, P.; Velten, J.

    2015-10-19

    Scintillation based detectors are desirable for many radiation detection applications (portal and border monitoring, safeguards verification, contamination detection and monitoring). The development of next generation scintillators will require improved detection sensitivity for weak gamma ray sources, and fast and thermal neutron quantification. Radiation detection of gamma and neutron sources can be accomplished with organic scintillators, however, the single crystals are difficult to grow for large area detectors and subject to cracking. Alternatives to single crystal organic scintillators are plastic scintillators (PS) which offer the ability to be shaped and scaled up to produce large sized detectors. PS is also more robust than the typical organic scintillator and are ideally suited for deployment in harsh real-world environments. PS contain a mixture of dyes to down-convert incident radiation into visible light that can be detected by a PMT. This project will evaluate the potential use of nano-carbon dyes in plastic scintillators.

  18. Reflectance measurements of PTFE, Kapton, and PEEK for xenon scintillation light for the LZ detector.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthurs, M.; Batista, E.; Haefner, J.; Lorenzon, W.; Morton, D.; Neff, A.; Okunawo, M.; Pushkin, K.; Sander, A.; Stephenson, S.; Wang, Y.; LZ Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    LZ (LUX-Zeplin) is an international collaboration that will look for dark matter candidates, WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles), through direct detection by dual-phase time projection chamber (TPC) using liquid xenon. The LZ detector will be located nearly a mile underground at SURF, South Dakota, shielded from cosmic background radiation. Seven tons active mass of liquid xenon will be used for detecting the weak interaction of WIMPs with ordinary matter. Over three years of operation it is expected to reach the ultimate sensitivity of 2x10-48 cm2 for a WIMP mass of 50 GeV. As for many other rare event searches, high light collection efficiency is essential for LZ detector. Moreover, in order to achieve greater active volume for detection as well as reduce potential backgrounds, thinner detector walls without significant loss in reflectance are desired. Reflectance measurements of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), Kapton, and PEEK for xenon scintillation light (178 nm), conducted at the University of Michigan using the Michigan Xenon Detector (MiX) will be presented. The University of Michigan, LZ Collaboration, The US Department of Energy.

  19. Detector optimization for hand-held CsI(Tl)/HgI{sub 2} gamma-ray scintillation spectrometer applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.J.; Patt, B.E.; Iwanczyk, J.S.; Cherry, S.R.; Shao, Y.

    1996-06-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometers using mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) photodetectors (PDs) coupled with CsI(Tl) scintillators have shown excellent energy resolutions and high detection efficiency at room temperature. Additionally HgI{sub 2} semiconductor PDs allow for extreme miniaturization of the detector packaging compared with photomultiplier tube (PMT) based detectors. These advantages make possible the construction of a new generation of hand-held gamma-ray spectrometers. Studies of detector optimization for this application have been undertaken. Several contact materials including hydrogen and semi-transparent metal films have been evaluated and compared for their performances and long term stability. In order to provide higher gamma-ray detection efficiency (i.e., larger scintillator volume), but without causing significant degradation of the excellent response achieved with the matched scintillator/PD interface, the scintillator/PD configuration has been studied. A Monte Carlo simulation model has been developed so that the spectral shape can be predicted for various scintillator shapes and surface treatments.

  20. A PET detector prototype based on digital SiPMs and GAGG scintillators.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Florian R; Shimazoe, Kenji; Somlai-Schweiger, Ian; Ziegler, Sibylle I

    2015-02-21

    Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) are interesting light sensors for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The detector signal of analog SiPMs is the total charge of all fired cells. Energy and time information have to be determined with dedicated readout electronics. Philips Digital Photon Counting has developed a SiPM with added electronics on cell level delivering a digital value of the time stamp and number of fired cells. These so called Digital Photon Counters (DPC) are fully digital devices. In this study, the feasibility of using DPCs in combination with LYSO (Lutetium Yttrium Oxyorthosilicate) and GAGG (Gadolinium Aluminum Gallium Garnet) scintillators for PET is tested. Each DPC module has 64 channels with 3.2 × 3.8775 mm(2), comprising 3200 cells each. GAGG is a recently developed scintillator (Zeff = 54, 6.63 g cm(-3), 520 nm peak emission, 46 000 photons MeV(-1), 88 ns (92%) and 230 ns (8%) decay times, non-hygroscopic, chemically and mechanically stable). Individual crystals of 2 × 2 × 6 mm(3) were coupled onto each DPC pixel. LYSO coupled to the DPC results in a coincidence time resolution (CTR) of 171 ps FWHM and an energy resolution of 12.6% FWHM at 511 keV. Using GAGG, coincidence timing is 310 ps FWHM and energy resolution is 8.5% FWHM. A PET detector prototype with 2 DPCs equipped with a GAGG array matching the pixel size (3.2 × 3.8775 × 8 mm(3)) was assembled. To emulate a ring of 10 modules, objects are rotated in the field of view. CTR of the PET is 619 ps and energy resolution is 9.2% FWHM. The iterative MLEM reconstruction is based on system matrices calculated with an analytical detector response function model. A phantom with rods of different diameters filled with (18)F was used for tomographic tests.

  1. Spatial and spectral gamma-ray response of plastic scintillators used in portal radiation detectors; comparison of measurements and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takoudis, G.; Xanthos, S.; Clouvas, A.; Antonopoulos-Domis, M.; Potiriadis, C.; Silva, J.

    2009-02-01

    Portal radiation detectors are commonly used by steel industries in the probing and detection of radioactivity contamination in scrap metal. Furthermore, a large number of portal monitors are installed at the border crossings to prevent illegal radioactive material trafficking. These portal detectors typically consist of either PS (polystyrene) or PVT (polyvinyltoluene) plastic scintillating detectors. Through the electronic circuit of the detector, an energy region-of-interest window can be determined in order to focus on the detection of certain radionuclides. In this study, the spatial response of a portal's PS scintillator to a Cs-137 and a Co-60 source for various energy region-of-interest windows is presented. Furthermore, a number of measured spectra for different source positions on the surface of the scintillating detector are shown. The measured spatial response showed a quantitative and qualitative dependence on the energy window used each time. In addition, measured spectra showed energy shifts for different positions of the two sources on the detector surface. The aforementioned phenomena could not be adequately explained and modelled using gamma-particle transport Monte Carlo simulation tools, such as the MCNP4C2 code. In order to fully explain these phenomena, we performed optical simulations, modelling the transport of the light yield within the detector, using Gate v3.0.0 with Geant 4.8.0p01 of CERN. The results of those simulations are presented and compared to the measured ones.

  2. Integrated Operation of the GАММА-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope Scintillation Detector Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runtso, Mikhail

    In this paper the question of integrated operation of scintillation detector systems AC (anticoincidence system) and SDC (scintillation detector system of calorimeter) in the GАММА-400 gamma-ray telescope is discussed. The main problem is the presence of so-called «backsplash current» (BSC) of particles from massive telescope calorimeter when detecting of very high-energy gamma-rays is provided. BSC is a low energy particle flux, moving up from the calorimeter and producing triggering of the AC detector, imitating detection of a charged particle. It is offered to record all events accompanied by BSC that should not result in to overload of the gamma-ray telescope in frequency of triggering. As an indicator to the number of BSC particles in the AC detector we offer the value of energy release in the C3 scintillation detector placing between two parts of the calorimeter (KK1 and KK2). Using mathematical simulation, the threshold on energy release in the C3 detector equal to 280 GeV was determined, at which the losses of gamma-quanta number in events with BSC do not exceed 10%. When detecting protons there are also events with BSC, which will be accompanied by exceeding of the indicated threshold of energy release in the С3 detector for proton energies above 30 GeV. However, counting rate for such protons will not exceed 200 Hz, that is reasonable for the GAMMA-400 data acquisition system.

  3. Metal-organic scintillator crystals for X-ray, gamma ray, and neutron detection

    DOEpatents

    Boatner, Lynn A [Oak Ridge, TN; Kolopus, James A [Clinton, TN; Neal, John S [Knoxville, TN; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine [Knoxville, TN; Wisniewski, Dariusz J [Torun, PL

    2012-01-03

    New metal-organic materials are useful as scintillators and have the chemical formula LX.sub.3(CH.sub.3OH).sub.4 where L is Y, Sc, or a lanthanide element, and X is a halogen element. An example of the scintillator materials is CeCl.sub.3(CH.sub.3OH).sub.4.

  4. Present status of sensitive detector of reactor’s antineutrinos using scintillating detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fajt, L.; Mamedov, F.; Přidal, P.; Špavorová, M.; Štekl, I.; Belov, V.; Egorov, V. G.; Fomina, M.; Kuznetsov, A.; Ponomarev, D.; Rozova, I.; Zhitnikov, I.; Burešová, H.

    2015-08-17

    In 2011, the reanalysis of the reactor antineutrinos spectra led to the formulation of the Reactor Antineutrino Anomaly (RAA) [1], which indicates the discrepancy between measured and expected antineutrino fluxes on short baselines. This discrepancy appears to favor the existence of the fourth “sterile” neutrino with |Δm{sup 2}|>1 eV{sup 2}. To confirm or reject this hypothesis a high sensitive antineutrino detector located close to the reactor is required. In addition to that such a detector could be used to online monitor the isotopic composition of the reactor core and to prevent illegal production and removal of{sup 239}Pu, which is the essential part of nuclear weapons. Detector DANSSino [2] already proved that even a compact antineutrino detector (∼ 1 m{sup 3}) based on polystyrene is capable of antineutrino detection in the close vicinity of a reactor core (∼ 10 m) with signal to background ratio about one. As a common activity between JINR Dubna and IEAP CTU a new prototype of detector (called S{sup 3}) has been proposed and is under construction. The construction design, selected results of Monte Carlo simulations and results of benchmark tests are presented.

  5. Present status of sensitive detector of reactor's antineutrinos using scintillating detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajt, L.; Belov, V.; Burešová, H.; Egorov, V. G.; Fomina, M.; Kuznetsov, A.; Mamedov, F.; Ponomarev, D.; Přidal, P.; Rozova, I.; Špavorová, M.; Štekl, I.; Zhitnikov, I.

    2015-08-01

    In 2011, the reanalysis of the reactor antineutrinos spectra led to the formulation of the Reactor Antineutrino Anomaly (RAA) [1], which indicates the discrepancy between measured and expected antineutrino fluxes on short baselines. This discrepancy appears to favor the existence of the fourth "sterile" neutrino with |Δm2|>1 eV2. To confirm or reject this hypothesis a high sensitive antineutrino detector located close to the reactor is required. In addition to that such a detector could be used to online monitor the isotopic composition of the reactor core and to prevent illegal production and removal of239Pu, which is the essential part of nuclear weapons. Detector DANSSino [2] already proved that even a compact antineutrino detector (˜ 1 m3) based on polystyrene is capable of antineutrino detection in the close vicinity of a reactor core (˜ 10 m) with signal to background ratio about one. As a common activity between JINR Dubna and IEAP CTU a new prototype of detector (called S3) has been proposed and is under construction. The construction design, selected results of Monte Carlo simulations and results of benchmark tests are presented.

  6. On method of muon spectrum measurements by the scintillation detectors of a large thickness T4t sub o

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryazhskaya, O. G.

    1985-01-01

    Various methods for the study of muon spectrum are presented. The direct ones include the muon energy measurements by magnetic spectrometers. The indirect ones deal with the reconstruction of the muon spectrum from the spectrum of secondary particles obtained by burst or calorimeter technique. The burst technique is based on the measurement of the number of cascade particles, mainly in the cascade maximum, by the detectors of small thickness T sub 0. The calorimeter method consist in determination of the cascade energy with help of the cascade curve shape. The multilayer detectors are used for this purpose. They are usually comprised of proportional counters, X-ray emulsion chambers or scintillation counters with the target material placed between them. The scintillation detectors of a large thickness measures the total cascade energy directly and the detector works as a true calorimeter. When the total energy is detected, the cascade spectrum differs from the muon one.

  7. Fiber optic thermal/fast neutron and gamma ray scintillation detector

    DOEpatents

    Neal, John S.; Mihalczo, John T

    2007-10-30

    A system for detecting fissile and fissionable material originating external to the system includes: a .sup.6Li loaded glass fiber scintillator for detecting thermal neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays; a fast scintillator for detecting fast neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays, the fast scintillator conjoined with the glass fiber scintillator such that the fast scintillator moderates fast neutrons prior to their detection as thermal neutrons by the glass fiber scintillator; and a coincidence detection system for processing the time distributions of arriving signals from the scintillators.

  8. Real-time scintillation array dosimetry for radiotherapy: The advantages of photomultiplier detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Paul Z. Y.; Suchowerska, Natalka; Abolfathi, Peter; McKenzie, David R.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: In this paper, a photomultiplier tube (PMT) array dosimetry system has been developed and tested for the real-time readout of multiple scintillation signals from fiber optic dosimeters. It provides array dosimetry with the advantages in sensitivity provided by a PMT, but without the need for a separate PMT for each detector element. Methods: The PMT array system consisted of a multianode PMT, a multichannel data acquisition system, housing and optic fiber connections suitable for clinical use. The reproducibility, channel uniformity, channel crosstalk, acquisition speed, and sensitivity of the PMT array were quantified using a constant light source. Its performance was compared to other readout systems used in scintillation dosimetry. An in vivo HDR brachytherapy treatment was used as an example of a clinical application of the dosimetry system to the measurement of dose at multiple sites in the rectum. The PMT array system was also tested in the pulsed beam of a linear accelerator to test its response speed and its application with two separate methods of Cerenkov background removal. Results: The PMT array dosimetry system was highly reproducible with a measurement uncertainty of 0.13% for a 10 s acquisition period. Optical crosstalk between neighboring channels was accounted for by omitting every second channel. A mathematical procedure was used to account for the crosstalk in next-neighbor channels. The speed and sensitivity of the PMT array system were found be superior to CCD cameras, allowing for measurement of more rapid changes in dose rate. This was further demonstrated by measuring the dose delivered by individual photon pulses of a linear accelerator beam. Conclusions: The PMT array system has advantages over CCD camera-based systems for the readout of scintillation light. It provided a more sensitive, more accurate, and faster response to meet the demands of future developments in treatment delivery.

  9. Microstructured boron foil scintillating G-GEM detector for neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Takeshi; Bautista, Unico; Mitsuya, Yuki; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Norifumi L.; Otake, Yoshie; Taketani, Atsushi; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Toyokawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a new simple neutron imaging gaseous detector was successfully developed by combining a micro-structured 10B foil, a glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM), and a mirror-lens-charge-coupled device (CCD)-camera system. The neutron imaging system consists of a chamber filled with Ar/CF4 scintillating gas mixture. Inside this system, the G-GEM is mounted for gas multiplication. The neutron detection in this system is based on the reaction between 10B and neutrons. A micro-structured 10B is developed to overcome the issue of low detection efficiency. Secondary electrons excite Ar/CF4 gas molecules, and high-yield visible photons are emitted from those excited gas molecules during the gas electron multiplication process in the G-GEM holes. These photons are easily detected by a mirror-lens-CCD-camera system. A neutron radiograph is then simply formed. We obtain the neutron images of different materials with a compact accelerator-driven neutron source. We confirm that the new scintillating G-GEM-based neutron imager works properly with low gamma ray sensitivity and exhibits a good performance as a new simple digital neutron imaging device.

  10. Radiation hardness of plastic scintillators for the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jivan, H.; Mellado, B.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Erasmus, R.; Liao, S.; Madhuku, M.; Peters, G.; Solvyanov, O.

    2015-06-01

    The radiation damage in polyvinyl toluene based plastic scintillator EJ200 obtained from ELJEN technology was investigated. This forms part of a comparative study conducted to aid in the upgrade of the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector during which the Gap scintillators will be replaced. Samples subjected to 6 MeV proton irradiation using the tandem accelerator of iThemba LABS, were irradiated with doses of approximately 0.8 MGy, 8 MGy, 25 MGy and 80 MGy. The optical properties were investigated using transmission spectroscopy whilst structural damage was assessed using Raman spectroscopy. Findings indicate that for the dose of 0.8 MGy, no structural damage occurs but a breakdown in the light transfer between base and fluor dopants is observed. For doses of 8 MGy to 80 MGy, structural damage leads to hydrogen loss in the benzene ring of the PVT base which forms free radicals. This results in an additional absorptive component causing increased transmission loss as dose is increased.

  11. Radiation hardness of plastic scintillators for the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jivan, H.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Erasmus, R.; Liao, S.; Madhuku, M.; Peters, G.; Sekonya, K.; Solvyanov, O.

    2015-10-01

    The radiation damage in polyvinyl toluene based plastic scintillator EJ200 obtained from ELJEN technology was investigated. This forms part of a comparative study conducted to aid in the upgrade of the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector during which the Gap scintillators will be replaced. Samples subjected to 6 MeV proton irradiation using the tandem accelerator of iThemba LABS, were irradiated with doses of approximately 0.8 MGy, 8 MGy, 25 MGy and 80 MGy. The optical properties were investigated using transmission spectroscopy and light yield analysis whilst structural damage was assessed using Raman spectroscopy. Findings indicate that for the dose of 0.8 MGy, no structural damage occurs and light loss can be attributed to a breakdown in the light transfer between base and fluor dopants. For doses of 8 MGy to 80 MGy, structural damage leads to possible hydrogen loss in the benzene ring of the PVT base which forms free radicals. This results in an additional absorptive component causing increased transmission loss and light yield loss with increasing dose.

  12. Relative light yield and temporal response of a stilbene-doped bibenzyl organic scintillator for neutron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. A.; Goldblum, B. L. Brickner, N. M.; Daub, B. H.; Kaufman, G. S.; Bibber, K. van; Vujic, J.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Caggiano, J. A.; Hatarik, R.; Phillips, T. W.; Zaitseva, N. P.; Wender, S. A.

    2014-05-21

    The neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) diagnostics used to characterize implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has necessitated the development of novel scintillators that exhibit a rapid temporal response and high light yield. One such material, a bibenzyl-stilbene mixed single-crystal organic scintillator grown in a 99.5:0.5 ratio in solution, has become the standard scintillator used for nTOF diagnostics at NIF. The prompt fluorescence lifetime and relative light yield as a function of proton energy were determined to calibrate this material as a neutron detector. The temporal evolution of the intensity of the prompt fluorescent response was modeled using first-order reaction kinetics and the prompt fluorescence decay constant was determined to be 2.46 ± 0.01 (fit) ± 0.13 (systematic) ns. The relative response of the bibenzyl-stilbene mixed crystal generated by recoiling protons was measured, and results were analyzed using Birks' relation to quantify the non-radiative quenching of excitation energy in the scintillator.

  13. Used fuel storage monitoring using novel 4He scintillation fast neutron detectors and neutron energy discrimination analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Ryan P.

    With an increasing quantity of spent nuclear fuel being stored at power plants across the United States, the demand exists for a new method of cask monitoring. Certifying these casks for transportation and long-term storage is a unique dilemma: their sealed nature lends added security, but at the cost of requiring non-invasive measurement techniques to verify their contents. This research will design and develop a new method of passively scanning spent fuel casks using 4He scintillation detectors to make this process more accurate. 4He detectors are a relatively new technological development whose full capabilities have not yet been exploited. These detectors take advantage of the high 4He cross section for elastic scattering at fast neutron energies, particularly the resonance around 1 MeV. If one of these elastic scattering interactions occurs within the detector, the 4He nucleus takes energy from the incident neutron, then de-excites by scintillation. Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) at either end of the detector tube convert this emitted light into an electrical signal. The goal of this research is to use the neutron spectroscopy features of 4He scintillation detectors to maintain accountability of spent fuel in storage. This project will support spent fuel safeguards and the detection of fissile material, in order to minimize the risk of nuclear proliferation and terrorism.

  14. A practical method for depth of interaction determination in monolithic scintillator PET detectors.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Herman T; Seifert, Stefan; Vinke, Ruud; Dendooven, Peter; Löhner, Herbert; Beekman, Freek J; Schaart, Dennis R

    2011-07-07

    Several new methods for determining the depth of interaction (DOI) of annihilation photons in monolithic scintillator detectors with single-sided, multi-pixel readout are investigated. The aim is to develop a DOI decoding method that allows for practical implementation in a positron emission tomography system. Specifically, calibration data, obtained with perpendicularly incident gamma photons only, are being used. Furthermore, neither detector modifications nor a priori knowledge of the light transport and/or signal variances is required. For this purpose, a clustering approach is utilized in combination with different parameters correlated with the DOI, such as the degree of similarity to a set of reference light distributions, the measured intensity on the sensor pixel(s) closest to the interaction position and the peak intensity of the measured light distribution. The proposed methods were tested experimentally on a detector comprised of a 20 mm × 20 mm × 12 mm polished LYSO:Ce crystal coupled to a 4 × 4 multi-anode photomultiplier. The method based on the linearly interpolated measured intensities on the sensor pixels closest to the estimated (x, y)-coordinate outperformed the other methods, yielding DOI resolutions between ∼1 and ∼4.5 mm FWHM depending on the DOI, the (x, y) resolution and the amount of reference data used.

  15. A practical method for depth of interaction determination in monolithic scintillator PET detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dam, Herman T.; Seifert, Stefan; Vinke, Ruud; Dendooven, Peter; Löhner, Herbert; Beekman, Freek J.; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2011-07-01

    Several new methods for determining the depth of interaction (DOI) of annihilation photons in monolithic scintillator detectors with single-sided, multi-pixel readout are investigated. The aim is to develop a DOI decoding method that allows for practical implementation in a positron emission tomography system. Specifically, calibration data, obtained with perpendicularly incident gamma photons only, are being used. Furthermore, neither detector modifications nor a priori knowledge of the light transport and/or signal variances is required. For this purpose, a clustering approach is utilized in combination with different parameters correlated with the DOI, such as the degree of similarity to a set of reference light distributions, the measured intensity on the sensor pixel(s) closest to the interaction position and the peak intensity of the measured light distribution. The proposed methods were tested experimentally on a detector comprised of a 20 mm × 20 mm × 12 mm polished LYSO:Ce crystal coupled to a 4 × 4 multi-anode photomultiplier. The method based on the linearly interpolated measured intensities on the sensor pixels closest to the estimated (x, y)-coordinate outperformed the other methods, yielding DOI resolutions between ~1 and ~4.5 mm FWHM depending on the DOI, the (x, y) resolution and the amount of reference data used.

  16. Measurement of loss of DT fusion products using scintillator detectors in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.; Johnson, D.W.; Marsala, R.J.; Palladino, R.W.; Zweben, S.J.; Tuszewski, M.

    1995-03-01

    A poloidal array of MeV ion loss probes previously used to measure DD fusion product loss has been upgraded to measure the loss of alpha particles from DT plasmas in TFTR. The following improvements to the system have been made in preparation for the use of tritium in TFTR: (1) relocation of detectors to a neutronshielded enclosure in the basement to reduce neutron-induced background signals; (2) replacement of ZnS:Cu (P31) scintillators in the probes with the Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}0{sub 12}:Ce(P46) variety to minimize damage and assure linearity at the fluxes anticipated from DT plasmas; and (3) shielding of the fiber optic bundles which carry the fight from the probes to the detectors to reduce neutron- and gamma-induced light within them. In addition to the above preparations, the probes have been absolutely calibrated for alpha particles by using the Van de Graaf accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Alpha particle losses from DT plasmas have been observed, and losses at the detector 901 below the midplane are consistent with first orbit loss.

  17. R&D Studies of a Lead-Scintillating Fiber Calorimeter as a STAR Forward Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmuganathan, Prashanth; STAR Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    A forward upgrade of the STAR detector will achieve several physics goals. Examples are studying the internal structure of nucleons and nuclei through measurement of di-jets and Drell-Yan and improvements in the resolution of energy weighted event plane determination for study of more central and more peripheral events in heavy-ion collisions. The AGS E864 lead-scintillating fiber calorimeter cells ((10 cm) 2 × 117 cm) were repurposed by pixelizing their readout into a three by three array of (3 . 3 cm) 2 pixels. A prototype six by six array of these cells (324 pixels) was mounted on the west side of the STAR detector during Run14 and events from 3He+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV were recorded. The detector response was simulated by a GEANT model using HIJING particle production. Further tests of the pixelized cells were conducted at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. In this talk, we will present the calorimeter response in 3He+Au collisions using reconstructed π0 from clusters formed from energy deposition by π0 decay gammas. Energy resolution and shower shapes from pixelization are also discussed using test beam data and simulations.

  18. Development of a gadolinium-loaded liquid scintillator for the Hanaro short baseline prototype detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, In Sung; Joo, Kyung Kwang; So, Sun Heang; Song, Sook Hyung; Kim, Hong Joo; So, Jung Ho; Park, Kang Soon; Ma, Kyung Ju; Jeon, Eun Ju; Kim, Jin Yu; Kim, Young Duk; Lee, Jason; Lee, Jeong-Yeon; Sun, Gwang-Min

    2014-02-01

    We propose a new experiment on the site of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) located at Daejeon, Korea. The Hanaro short baseline (SBL) nuclear reactor with a thermal power output 30 MW is used to investigate a reactor neutrino anomaly. A Hanaro SBL prototype detector having a 60- l volume has been constructed ˜6 m away from the reactor core. A gadolinium (Gd)-loaded liquid scintillator (LS) is used as an active material to trigger events. The selection of the LS is guided by physical and technical requirements, as well as safety considerations. A linear alkyl benzene (LAB) is used as a base solvent of the Hanaro SBL prototype detector. Three g/ l of PPO and 30 mg/ l of bis-MSB are dissolved to formulate the LAB-based LS. Then, a 0.5% gadolinium (Gd) complex with carboxylic acid is loaded into the LAB-based LS by using the liquidliquid extraction method. In this paper, we will summarize all the characteristics of the Gd-loaded LAB-based LS for the Hanaro prototype detector.

  19. A scintillating-fiber 14-MeV neutron detector on TFTR during DT operation

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G.A.; Chrien, R.E.; Barnes, C.W.; Sailor, W.C.; Roquemore, A.L.; Lavelle, M.J.; O`Gara, P.M.; Jordan, R.J.

    1994-07-01

    A compact 14-MeV neutron detector using an array of scintillating fibers has been tested on the TFTR tokamak under conditions of a high gamma background. This detector uses a fiber-matrix geometry, a magnetic field-insensitive phototube with an active HV base and pulse-height discrimination to reject low-level pulses from 2.5 MeV neutron and intense gammas. Laboratory calibrations have been performed at EG&G Las Vegas using a pulsed DT neutron generator and a 30 kCi {sup 60}Co source as background, at PPPL using DT neutron sources, and at LANL using an energetic deuterium beam and target at a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator. During the first high power DT shots on TFTR in December 1993, the detector was 15.5 meters from the torus in a large collimator. For a rate of 1 {times} 10{sup 18} n/sec from the tokamak, it operated in an equivalent background of 1 {times} 10{sup 10} gammas/cm{sup 2}/sec ({approximately}4 mA current drain) at a DT count rate of 200 kHz.

  20. Toward a Real-Time In Vivo Dosimetry System Using Plastic Scintillation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, Louis; Briere, Tina M.; Poenisch, Falk; Beaulieu, Luc; Kuban, Deborah A.; Lee, Andrew; Beddar, Sam

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we have presented and validated a plastic scintillation detector (PSD) system designed for real-time multiprobe in vivo measurements. Methods and Materials: The PSDs were built with a dose-sensitive volume of 0.4 mm{sup 3}. The PSDs were assembled into modular detector patches, each containing five closely packed PSDs. Continuous dose readings were performed every 150 ms, with a gap between consecutive readings of <0.3 ms. We first studied the effect of electron multiplication. We then assessed system performance in acrylic and anthropomorphic pelvic phantoms. Results: The PSDs were compatible with clinical rectal balloons and were easily inserted into the anthropomorphic phantom. With an electron multiplication average gain factor of 40, a twofold increase in the signal/noise ratio was observed, making near real-time dosimetry feasible. Under calibration conditions, the PSDs agreed with the ion chamber measurements to 0.08%. Precision, evaluated as a function of the total dose delivered, ranged from 2.3% at 2 cGy to 0.4% at 200 cGy. Conclusion: Real-time PSD measurements are highly accurate and precise. These PSDs can be mounted onto rectal balloons, transforming these clinical devices into in vivo dose detectors without modifying current clinical practice. Real-time monitoring of the dose delivered near the rectum during prostate radiotherapy should help radiation oncologists protect this sensitive normal structure.

  1. Measurements on semiconductor and scintillator detectors at the Advanced Light Source (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarda, Giuseppe S.; Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Cui, Yonggang; Gul, Rubi; Hossain, Anwar; Roy, Utpal N.; Yang, Ge; James, Ralph B.; Vanier, Peter E.

    2016-09-01

    During the transition period between closure of Beamline X27B at BNL's NSLS and the opening of Beamline MID at NSLS-II, we began operation of LBNL's ALS Beamline 3.3.2 to carry out our radiation detection materials RD. Measurements performed at this Beamline include, X-ray Detector Response Mapping and White Beam X-ray Diffraction Topography (WBXDT), among others. We will introduce the capabilities of the Beamline and present the most recent results obtained on CdZnTe and scintillators. The goal of the studies on CdZnTe is to understand the origin and effects of subgrain boundaries and help to visualize the presence of a higher concentration of impurities, which might be responsible for the deterioration of the energy resolution and response uniformity in the vicinity of the sub-grain boundaries. The results obtained in the second year of measurements will be presented.

  2. Results of the liquid scintillation detector of the Mont Blanc Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglietta, M.; Badino, G.; Bologna, G. F.; Castagnoli, C.; Fulgione, W.

    1986-04-01

    Preliminary results research on collapsing-star neutrino bursts and cosmic-ray muons, obtained using the 90-ton 72 element liquid-scintillation detector (LSD) at Mt. Blanc Laboratory since October 1984, are presented in tables and graphs and characterized. The theoretically expected energy and time values for neutrinos from collapsing stars of 2 solar mass are calculated, and it is shown that no burst with multiplicity 6 or greater and Delta t 30 s or less was detected in 4 mo of LSD live time, corresponding to a preliminary upper limit of 3/yr for Galactic stellar collapses. About 3 muons/h crossing at least two counters were observed, and detection of aobut 700 muon bundles per year of multiplicity 2 or greater or 90 bundles per year of multiplicity 3 or greater is predicted. The possible use of the LSD to search for nucleon instability (proton decay into muons) is considered.

  3. Characterization of plastic scintillators using magnetic resonance techniques for the upgrade of the Tile Calorimeter in the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelwan, C.; Jivan, H.; Joubert, D.; Keartland, J.; Liao, S.; Peters, G.; Sideras-Haddad, E.

    2015-10-01

    In this study we look at radiation damage and its adverse effects on plastic scintillators housed within the Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS detector. The study focuses on determining how the interaction of ionizing radiation with plastic scintillators effects their efficacy and desired properties such as high light output and fast decay time. Plastic scintillators form an integral part of the ATLAS trigger system and their optimal functionality is paramount to the success of ATLAS. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) provides insight into the electronic structure of the plastics and can characterize the damage caused by ionizing radiation. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations will be performed in order to simulate the EPR signal. Preliminary EPR results investigate four different types of plastic scintillators. These include three polyvinyl-toluene based Eljen technologies: EJ200, EJ208 and EJ260, and one polystyrene based Dubna sample. It has been observed that the Dubna sample, identical on the current scintillator used in the ATLAS detector, undergoes more structural damage when compared to the Eljen samples.

  4. Development of SiPM-based scintillator tile detectors for a multi-layer fast neutron tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, R.; Jakubek, J.; Prokopovich, D.; Uher, J.

    2012-10-01

    We are developing thin tile scintillator detectors with silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readout for use in a multi-layer fast-neutron tracker. The tracker is based on interleaved Timepix and plastic scintillator layers. The thin 15 × 15 × 2 mm plastic scintillators require suitable optical readout in order to detect and measure the energy lost by energetic protons that have been recoiled by fast neutrons. Our first prototype used dual SiPMs, coupled to opposite edges of the scintillator tile using light-guides. An alternative readout geometry was designed in an effort to increase the fraction of scintillation light detected by the SiPMs. The new prototype uses a larger SiPM array to cover the entire top face of the tile. This paper details the comparative performance of the two prototype designs. A deuterium-tritium (DT) fast-neutron source was used to compare the relative light collection efficiency of the two designs. A collimated UV light source was scanned across the detector face to map the uniformity. The new prototype was found to have 9.5 times better light collection efficiency over the original design. Both prototypes exhibit spatial non-uniformity in their response. Methods of correcting this non-uniformity are discussed.

  5. {sup 6}LiF:ZnS(Ag) Neutrons Scintillator Detector Configuration for Optimal Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Osovizky, A.; Yehuda-Zada, Y.; Ghelman, M.; Tsai, P.; Thompson, A.K.; Pritchard, K.; Ziegler, J.B.; Ibberson, R.M.; Majkrzak, C.F.; Maliszewskyj, N.C.

    2015-07-01

    A Chromatic Analysis Neutron Diffractometer Or Reflectometer (CANDOR) is under development at the NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). The CANDOR neutron sensor will rely on scintillator material for detecting the neutrons scattered by the sample under test. It consists of {sup 6}LiF:ZnS(Ag) scintillator material into which wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers have been embedded. Solid state photo-sensors (silicon photomultipliers) coupled to the WLS fibers are used to detect the light produced by the neutron capture event ({sup 6}Li (n,α) {sup 3}H reaction) and ionization of the ZnS(Ag). This detector configuration has the potential to accomplish the CANDOR performance requirements for efficiency of 90% for 5 A (3.35 meV) neutrons with high gamma rejection (10{sup 7}) along with compact design, affordable cost and materials availability. However this novel design includes challenges for precise neutron detection. The recognizing of the neutron signature versus the noise event produce by gamma event cannot be easy overcome by pulse height discrimination obstacle as can be achieved with {sup 3}He gas tube. Furthermore the selection of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) as the light sensor maintains the obstacle of dark noise that does not exist when a photomultiplier tube is coupled to the scintillator. A proper selection of SiPM should focus on increasing the output signal and reducing the dark noise in order to optimize the detection sensitivity and to provide a clean signal pulse shape discrimination. The main parameters for evaluation are: - Quantum Efficiency (QE) - matching the SiPM peak QE with the peak transmission wavelength emission of the WLS. - Recovery time - a short recovery time is preferred to minimize the pulse width beyond the intrinsic decay time of the scintillator crystal (improves the gamma rejection based output pulse shape (time)). - Diode dimensions -The dark noise is proportional to the diode active area while the signal is provided by the

  6. Characterization of scintillator materials for fast-ion loss detectors in nuclear fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Ramos, M. C.; García López, J.; García-Muñoz, M.; Rodríguez-Ramos, M.; Carmona Gázquez, M.; Zurro, B.

    2014-08-01

    In fusion plasma reactors, fast ion generated by heating systems and fusion born particles must be well confined. The presence of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities can lead to a significant loss of these ions, which may reduce drastically the heating efficiency and may cause damage to plasma facing components in the vacuum vessel. In order to understand the physics underlying the fast ion loss mechanism, scintillator based detectors have been installed in several fusion devices. In this work we present the absolute photon yield and its degradation with ion fluence in terms of the number of photons emitted per incident ion of several scintillators thin coatings: SrGa2S4:Eu2+ (TG-Green), Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ (P46) and Y2O3:Eu3+ (P56) when irradiated with light ions of different masses (deuterium ions, protons and α-particles) at energies between approximately 575 keV and 3 MeV. The photon yield will be discussed in terms of the energy deposited by the particles into the scintillator. For that, the actual composition and thickness of the thin layers were determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). A collimator with 1 mm of diameter, which defines the beam size for the experiments, placed at the entrance of the chamber. An electrically isolated sample holder biased to +300 V to collect the secondary electrons, connected to a digital current integrator (model 439 by Ortec) to measure the incident beam current. A home made device has been used to store the real-time evolution of the beam current in a computer file allowing the correction of the IL yields due to the current fluctuations. The target holder is a rectangle of 150 × 112 mm2 and can be tilted. The X and Y movements are controlled through stepping motors, which permits a fine control of the beam spot positioning as well as the study of several samples without venting the chamber. A silica optical fiber of 1 mm diameter fixed to the vacuum chamber, which collects the light from the scintillators

  7. Melt-cast organic glasses as high-efficiency fast neutron scintillators

    DOE PAGES

    Carlson, Joseph S.; Feng, Patrick L.

    2016-06-24

    In this work we report a new class of organic-based scintillators that combines several of the desirable attributes of existing crystalline, liquid, and plastic organic scintillators. The prepared materials may be isolated in single crystalline form or melt-cast to produce highly transparent glasses that have been shown to provide high light yields of up to 16,000 photons/MeVee, as evaluated against EJ-200 plastic scintillators and solution-grown trans-stilbene crystals. The prepared organic glasses exhibit neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and are compatible with wavelength shifters to reduce optical self-absorption effects that are intrinsic to pure materials such as crystalline organics. In conclusion, themore » combination of high scintillation efficiency, PSD capabilities, and facile scale-up via melt-casting distinguishes this new class of amorphous materials from existing alternatives.« less

  8. Melt-cast organic glasses as high-efficiency fast neutron scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Joseph S.; Feng, Patrick L.

    2016-06-24

    In this work we report a new class of organic-based scintillators that combines several of the desirable attributes of existing crystalline, liquid, and plastic organic scintillators. The prepared materials may be isolated in single crystalline form or melt-cast to produce highly transparent glasses that have been shown to provide high light yields of up to 16,000 photons/MeVee, as evaluated against EJ-200 plastic scintillators and solution-grown trans-stilbene crystals. The prepared organic glasses exhibit neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and are compatible with wavelength shifters to reduce optical self-absorption effects that are intrinsic to pure materials such as crystalline organics. In conclusion, the combination of high scintillation efficiency, PSD capabilities, and facile scale-up via melt-casting distinguishes this new class of amorphous materials from existing alternatives.

  9. Imaging characterization of a new gamma ray detector based on CRY019 scintillation crystal for PET and SPECT applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polito, C.; Pani, R.; Trigila, C.; Cinti, M. N.; Fabbri, A.; Frantellizzi, V.; De Vincentis, G.; Pellegrini, R.; Pani, R.

    2017-02-01

    In the last 40 years, in the field of Molecular Medicine imaging there has been a huge growth in the employment and in the improvement of detectors for PET and SPECT applications in order to reach accurate diagnosis of the diseases. The most important feature required to these detectors is an high quality of images that is usually obtained benefitting from the development of a wide number of new scintillation crystals with high imaging performances. In this contest, features like high detection efficiency, short decay time, great spectral match with photodetectors, absence of afterglow and low costs are surely attractive. However, there are other factors playing an important role in the realization of high quality images such as energy and spatial resolutions, position linearity and contrast resolution. With the aim to realize an high performace gamma ray detector for PET and SPECT applications, this work is focused on the evaluation of the imaging characteristics of a recently developed scintillation crystal, CRY019.

  10. Development of a novel scintillation-trigger detector for the MTV experiment using aluminum-metallized film tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, S.; Ozaki, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Tanuma, R.; Yoshida, T.; Murata, J.

    2014-07-01

    A new type of a trigger-scintillation counter array designed for the MTV experiment at TRIUMF-ISAC has been developed, which uses aluminum-metallized film tape for wrapping to achieve the required assembling precision of ±0.5 mm. The MTV experiment uses a cylindrical drift chamber (CDC) as the main electron-tracking detector. The barrel-type trigger counter is placed inside the CDC to generate a trigger signal using 1 mm thick, 300 mm long thin plastic scintillation counters. Detection efficiency and light attenuation compared with conventional wrapping materials are studied.

  11. On the use of a single-fiber multipoint plastic scintillation detector for 192Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Therriault-Proulx, François; Beddar, Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to prove the feasibility of using a single-fiber multipoint plastic scintillation detector (mPSD) as an in vivo verification tool during 192Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. Methods: A three-point detector was built and inserted inside a catheter-positioning template placed in a water phantom. A hyperspectral approach was implemented to discriminate the different optical signals composing the light output at the exit of the single collection optical fiber. The mPSD was tested with different source-to-detector positions, ranging from 1 to 5 cm radially and over 10.5 cm along the longitudinal axis of the detector, and with various integration times. Several strategies for improving the accuracy of the detector were investigated. The device's accuracy in detecting source position was also tested. Results: Good agreement with the expected doses was obtained for all of the scintillating elements, with average relative differences from the expected values of 3.4 ± 2.1%, 3.0 ± 0.7%, and 4.5 ± 1.0% for scintillating elements from the distal to the proximal. A dose threshold of 3 cGy improved the general accuracy of the detector. An integration time of 3 s offered a good trade-off between precision and temporal resolution. Finally, the mPSD measured the radioactive source positioning uncertainty to be no more than 0.32 ± 0.06 mm. The accuracy and precision of the detector were improved by a dose-weighted function combining the three measurement points and known details about the geometry of the detector construction. Conclusions: The use of a mPSD for high-dose-rate brachytherapy dosimetry is feasible. This detector shows great promise for development of in vivo applications for real-time verification of treatment delivery. PMID:23718599

  12. The First Tests of a Large-Area Light Detector Equipped with Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Scintillating Bolometers for the LUMINEU Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, D.; Enss, C.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Hassel, C.; Hengstler, D.; Kempf, S.; Loidl, M.; Navick, X. F.; Rodrigues, M.

    2016-08-01

    Future rare-event searches using scintillating crystals need very low background levels for high sensitivity; however, unresolved pile-up can limit this. We present the design and fabrication of large-area photon detectors based on metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs), optimized for fast rise times to resolve close pile-up. The first prototypes have been characterized using Fe-55 X-rays and ZnMoO4 crystal scintillation light. A fast intrinsic rise time of 25-30 \\upmu s has been measured and has been compared to the 250 \\upmu s scintillation light pulse rise time constant. The difference indicates that the scintillation process limits the light pulse rise time. The fast rise time allows for a reduction of background due to close pile-up events as well as the study of the inherent crystal scintillation process. MMC-based photon detectors are shown to be a promising tool for scintillating crystal based rare event searches.

  13. Analytical calculation of the lower bound on timing resolution for PET scintillation detectors comprising high-aspect-ratio crystal elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, Joshua W.; Vinke, Ruud; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-07-01

    Excellent timing resolution is required to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain available from the incorporation of time-of-flight (ToF) information in image reconstruction for positron emission tomography (PET). As the detector’s timing resolution improves, so does SNR, reconstructed image quality, and accuracy. This directly impacts the challenging detection and quantification tasks in the clinic. The recognition of these benefits has spurred efforts within the molecular imaging community to determine to what extent the timing resolution of scintillation detectors can be improved and develop near-term solutions for advancing ToF-PET. Presented in this work, is a method for calculating the Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRLB) on timing resolution for scintillation detectors with long crystal elements, where the influence of the variation in optical path length of scintillation light on achievable timing resolution is non-negligible. The presented formalism incorporates an accurate, analytical probability density function (PDF) of optical transit time within the crystal to obtain a purely mathematical expression of the CRLB with high-aspect-ratio (HAR) scintillation detectors. This approach enables the statistical limit on timing resolution performance to be analytically expressed for clinically-relevant PET scintillation detectors without requiring Monte Carlo simulation-generated photon transport time distributions. The analytically calculated optical transport PDF was compared with detailed light transport simulations, and excellent agreement was found between the two. The coincidence timing resolution (CTR) between two 3× 3× 20 mm3 LYSO:Ce crystals coupled to analogue SiPMs was experimentally measured to be 162+/- 1 ps FWHM, approaching the analytically calculated lower bound within 6.5%.

  14. Analytical Calculation of the Lower Bound on Timing Resolution for PET Scintillation Detectors Comprising High-Aspect-Ratio Crystal Elements

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Joshua W.; Vinke, Ruud; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Excellent timing resolution is required to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain available from the incorporation of time-of-flight (ToF) information in image reconstruction for positron emission tomography (PET). As the detector’s timing resolution improves, so does SNR, reconstructed image quality, and accuracy. This directly impacts the challenging detection and quantification tasks in the clinic. The recognition of these benefits has spurred efforts within the molecular imaging community to determine to what extent the timing resolution of scintillation detectors can be improved and develop near-term solutions for advancing ToF-PET. Presented in this work, is a method for calculating the Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRLB) on timing resolution for scintillation detectors with long crystal elements, where the influence of the variation in optical path length of scintillation light on achievable timing resolution is non-negligible. The presented formalism incorporates an accurate, analytical probability density function (PDF) of optical transit time within the crystal to obtain a purely mathematical expression of the CRLB with high-aspect-ratio (HAR) scintillation detectors. This approach enables the statistical limit on timing resolution performance to be analytically expressed for clinically-relevant PET scintillation detectors without requiring Monte Carlo simulation-generated photon transport time distributions. The analytically calculated optical transport PDF was compared with detailed light transport simulations, and excellent agreement was found between the two. The coincidence timing resolution (CTR) between two 3×3×20 mm3 LYSO:Ce crystals coupled to analogue SiPMs was experimentally measured to be 162±1 ps FWHM, approaching the analytically calculated lower bound within 6.5%. PMID:26083559

  15. Silicon multistrip detectors and caesium iodide scintillator for identification of heavy and ultra heavy nuclides in space experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miozza, Maurizio

    1997-03-01

    An instrument made of silicon multistrip detectors, time-of-flight and caesium iodide scintillators for ion identification in cosmic ray experiments has been constructed and tested. The charge dynamic of the preamplifier reading the silicon multistrip detectors allows to identify all the nuclides of the periodic table. A redundant method for measuring the ion energy, autotrigger capability and low power consumption of the silicon detector readout are the major characteristic features of the apparatus. Performance results of the instrument, tested with a calcium beam of 0.5 GeV/u at the GSI accelerator, are presented.

  16. Organic scintillators with pulse shape discrimination for detection of radiation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabe, Andrew; Carman, M. Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M.; Zaitseva, Natalia P.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2016-09-01

    The detection of neutrons in the presence of gamma-ray fields has important applications in the fields of nuclear physics, homeland security, and medical imaging. Organic scintillators provide several attractive qualities as neutron detection materials including low cost, fast response times, ease of scaling, and the ability to implement pulse shape discrimination (PSD) to discriminate between neutrons and gamma-rays. This talk will focus on amorphous organic scintillators both in plastic form and small-molecule organic glass form. The first section of this talk will describe recent advances and improvements in the performance of PSD-capable plastic scintillators. The primary advances described in regard to modification of the polymer matrix, evaluation of new scintillating dyes, improved fabrication conditions, and implementation of additives which impart superior performance and mechanical properties to PSD-capable plastics as compared to commercially-available plastics and performance comparable to PSD-capable liquids. The second section of this talk will focus on a class of small-molecule organic scintillators based on modified indoles and oligophenylenes which form amorphous glasses as PSD-capable neutron scintillation materials. Though indoles and oligophenylenes have been known for many decades, their PSD properties have not been investigated and their scintillation properties only scantily investigated. Well-developed synthetic methodologies have permitted the synthesis of a library of structural analogs of these compounds as well as the investigation of their scintillation properties. The emission wavelengths of many indoles are in the sensitive region of common photomultiplier tubes, making them appropriate to be used as scintillators in either pure or doped form. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work has been supported by the U

  17. New Cerium-Based Metal-Organic Scintillators for Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A; Neal, John S; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Custelcean, Radu; Van Loef, Edgar; Markosyan, G

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that a new class of scintillating materials can be developed based on the synthesis and crystal growth of rare-earth metal-organic compounds. The first scintillator of this type consisted of single crystals of CeCl3(CH3OH)4 that were grown from a methanol solution. These crystals were shown to be applicable to both gamma-ray and fast neutron detection. Subsequently, metal-organic scintillators consisting of the compound LaBr3(CH3OH)4 activated with varying levels of Ce3+ and of CeBr3(CH3OH)4 were grown in single crystal form. We have now extended the development of this new class of scintillators to more complex organic components by reacting rare-earth halides such as CeCl3 or CeBr3 with different isomers of propanol and butanol including 1-propanol, isobutanol, n-butanol, and tert-butanol. The reaction of CeCl3 or CeBr3 with these organics results in the formation of new and relatively complex molecular crystals whose structures were determined using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. These new metal-organic scintillating materials were grown in single crystal form from solution, and their scintillation characteristics have been investigated using X-ray-excited luminescence plus energy spectra obtained with gamma-ray and alpha-particle sources. If the reactions between the inorganic and organic components are not carried out under very dry and highly controlled conditions, molecular structures can be formed that incorporate waters of hydration. The present observation of scintillation in these hydrated rare-earth metal-organic compounds is apparently an original finding, since we are not aware of any previous reports of scintillation being observed in a material that incorporates waters of hydration

  18. DANSS: Detector of the reactor AntiNeutrino based on Solid Scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, I.; Belov, V.; Brudanin, V.; Danilov, M.; Egorov, V.; Filosofov, D.; Fomina, M.; Hons, Z.; Kazartsev, S.; Kobyakin, A.; Kuznetsov, A.; Machikhiliyan, I.; Medvedev, D.; Nesterov, V.; Olshevsky, A.; Ponomarev, D.; Rozova, I.; Rumyantseva, N.; Rusinov, V.; Salamatin, A.; Shevchik, Ye.; Shirchenko, M.; Shitov, Yu.; Skrobova, N.; Starostin, A.; Svirida, D.; Tarkovsky, E.; Tikhomirov, I.; Vlášek, J.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zinatulina, D.

    2016-11-01

    The DANSS project is aimed at creating a relatively compact neutrino spectrometer which does not contain any flammable or other dangerous liquids and may therefore be located very close to the core of an industrial power reactor. As a result, it is expected that high neutrino flux would provide about 15,000 IBD interactions per day in the detector with a sensitive volume of 1 m3. High segmentation of the plastic scintillator will allow to suppress a background down to a ~1% level. Numerous tests performed with a simplified pilot prototype DANSSino under a 3 GWth reactor of the Kalinin NPP have demonstrated operability of the chosen design. The DANSS detector surrounded with a composite shield is movable by means of a special lifting gear, varying the distance to the reactor core in a range from 10 m to 12 m. Due to this feature, it could be used not only for the reactor monitoring, but also for fundamental research including short-range neutrino oscillations to the sterile state. Supposing one-year measurement, the sensitivity to the oscillation parameters is expected to reach a level of sin2(2θnew) ~ 5 × 10-3 with Δ m2 ⊂ (0.02-5.0) eV2.

  19. Local coordination state of rare earth in eutectic scintillators for neutron detector applications

    PubMed Central

    Masai, Hirokazu; Yanagida, Takayuki; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Ina, Toshiaki; Miyazaki, Takamichi; Kawaguti, Noriaki; Fukuda, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    Atomic distribution in phosphors for neutron detection has not been fully elucidated, although their ionization efficiency is strongly dependent on the state of the rare earth in the matrix. In this work, we examine optical properties of Eu-doped 80LiF-20CaF2 eutectics for neutron detector applications based on the Eu distribution. At low concentrations, aggregation of Eu cations is observed, whereas homogeneous atomic dispersion in the CaF2 layer, to substitute Ca2+ ions, is observed in the eutectics at high concentrations. Eu LIII edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis suggests that neutron responses do not depend on the amount of Eu2+ ions. However, transparency, which depends on an ordered lamellar structure, is found to be important for a high light yield in neutron detection. The results confirm the effectiveness of the basic idea concerning the separation of radiation absorbers and activators in particle radiation scintillation and present potential for further improvement of novel bulk detectors. PMID:26292726

  20. Comparison of photon counting and conventional scintillation detectors in a pinhole SPECT system for small animal imaging: Monte carlo simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Jin; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Seung-Wan; Kim, Dae-Hong; Kim, Ye-Seul; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2013-05-01

    The photon counting detector based on cadmium telluride (CdTe) or cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is a promising imaging modality that provides many benefits compared to conventional scintillation detectors. By using a pinhole collimator with the photon counting detector, we were able to improve both the spatial resolution and the sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the photon counting and conventional scintillation detectors in a pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system. We designed five pinhole SPECT systems of two types: one type with a CdTe photon counting detector and the other with a conventional NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. We conducted simulation studies and evaluated imaging performance. The results demonstrated that the spatial resolution of the CdTe photon counting detector was 0.38 mm, with a sensitivity 1.40 times greater than that of a conventional NaI(Tl) scintillation detector for the same detector thickness. Also, the average scatter fractions of the CdTe photon counting and the conventional NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors were 1.93% and 2.44%, respectively. In conclusion, we successfully evaluated various pinhole SPECT systems for small animal imaging.

  1. Warhead verification as inverse problem: Applications of neutron spectrum unfolding from organic-scintillator measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Chris C.; Febbraro, Michael; Flaska, Marek; Pozzi, Sara A.; Becchetti, F. D.

    2016-08-01

    Verification of future warhead-dismantlement treaties will require detection of certain warhead attributes without the disclosure of sensitive design information, and this presents an unusual measurement challenge. Neutron spectroscopy—commonly eschewed as an ill-posed inverse problem—may hold special advantages for warhead verification by virtue of its insensitivity to certain neutron-source parameters like plutonium isotopics. In this article, we investigate the usefulness of unfolded neutron spectra obtained from organic-scintillator data for verifying a particular treaty-relevant warhead attribute: the presence of high-explosive and neutron-reflecting materials. Toward this end, several improvements on current unfolding capabilities are demonstrated: deuterated detectors are shown to have superior response-matrix condition to that of standard hydrogen-base scintintillators; a novel data-discretization scheme is proposed which removes important detector nonlinearities; and a technique is described for re-parameterizing the unfolding problem in order to constrain the parameter space of solutions sought, sidestepping the inverse problem altogether. These improvements are demonstrated with trial measurements and verified using accelerator-based time-of-flight calculation of reference spectra. Then, a demonstration is presented in which the elemental compositions of low-Z neutron-attenuating materials are estimated to within 10%. These techniques could have direct application in verifying the presence of high-explosive materials in a neutron-emitting test item, as well as other for treaty verification challenges.

  2. Use of a large time-compensated scintillation detector in neutron time-of-flight measurements

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Charles D.

    1979-01-01

    A scintillator for neutron time-of-flight measurements is positioned at a desired angle with respect to the neutron beam, and as a function of the energy thereof, such that the sum of the transit times of the neutrons and photons in the scintillator are substantially independent of the points of scintillations within the scintillator. Extrapolated zero timing is employed rather than the usual constant fraction timing. As a result, a substantially larger scintillator can be employed that substantially increases the data rate and shortens the experiment time.

  3. Measurement of the Fast Neutron Response for {sup 4}He Scintillation Detectors Using a Coincidence Scattering Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, R.P.; Lewis, J.M.; Murer, D.; Enqvist, A.; Jordan, K.A.

    2015-07-01

    Previous work has measured the neutron response of pressurized {sup 4}He scintillation detectors, however these studies only examine the response as a function of incident neutron energy. Since the detection mechanism in {sup 4}He detectors is elastic scattering, and the interacting neutron will only deposit a fraction of its incident kinetic energy in the detector gas, an examination of the response of the detector output to deposited energy is necessary to transform these detectors into instruments for neutron spectrometry. Using a combined time-of-flight (TOF) and coincidence scattering method, this paper further characterizes the {sup 4}He light response to fast neutrons by examining the scintillation light yield as a function of deposited energy, measuring the light response up to 5 MeV. These {sup 4}He detectors are simple in design, and are manufactured by Arktis Radiation Detectors in several sizes. The specific model used in this experiment had an active volume 20 cm long with an inner diameter of 4.4 cm, giving a total active volume of 304 cm{sup 3}. The key components include the active volume, filled with 150 bar of helium-4 gas, and photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) mounted at either end of the active volume. The detector body is made of stainless steel. The detector response was experimentally measured using a two-detector coincidence arrangement with a {sup 252}Cf source. Two {sup 4}He detectors were vertically mounted, and the source was placed at a horizontal distance from the center of the bottom detector, forming a right angle. By requiring coincidence between the two detectors, it was confirmed that each neutron interacting in the second (top) detector must first have undergone a scattering interaction in the first (bottom) detector, and the time-of-flight (TOF) technique could then be used to determine the energy of the neutron as it traveled between the two detectors by the difference in time between the two detector events. More importantly, with

  4. Doping of polysiloxane rubbers for the production of organic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaranta, A.; Carturan, S.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Scian, C.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Degerlier, M.; Gramegna, F.; Poggi, M.; Maggioni, G.

    2010-08-01

    Polysiloxane rubbers have been produced with different concentrations of phenyl groups and of dye molecules in order to find the best synthesis conditions for reaching a high light yield. In particular, two different polymer compositions were examined, namely with 15% and 22% of phenyl units in the starting resin. 2,5-Diphenyl oxazole (PPO) as a primary dopant and Lumogen F Violet 570 as secondary dopant were dispersed in the polysiloxane. Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) technique was employed for studying radioluminescence and radiation hardness properties. The α and γ scintillation yields were analyzed by measuring the pulse height spectra from 241Am and 60Co radioactive sources. First tests on the suitability of these materials to the detection of fast neutrons were also performed with a TOF procedure. Preliminary results indicate that these materials exhibit a scintillation yield comparable with NE102 plastic scintillator.

  5. Determination of the energy dependence of the BC-408 plastic scintillation detector in medium energy x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yücel, H.; Çubukçu, Ş.; Uyar, E.; Engin, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The energy dependence of the response of BC-408 plastic scintillator (PS), an approximately water-equivalent material, has been investigated by employing standardized x-ray beams. IEC RQA and ISO N series x-ray beam qualities, in the range of 40-100 kVp, were calibrated using a PTW-type ionization chamber. The energy response of a thick BC-408 PS detector was measured using the multichannel pulse height analysis method. The response of BC-408 PS increased gradually with increasing energy in the energy range of 40-80 kVp and then showed a flat behavior at about 80 to 120 kVp. This might be due to the self-attenuation of scintillation light by the scintillator itself and may also be partly due to the ionization quenching, leading to a reduction in the intensity of the light output from the scintillator. The results indicated that the sensitivity drop in BC-408 PS material at lower photon energies may be overcome by adding some high-Z elements to its polyvinyltoluene (PVT) base. The material modification may compensate for the drop in the response at lower photon energies. Thus plastic scintillation dosimetry is potentially suitable for applications in diagnostic radiology.

  6. Dosimetric performance and array assessment of plastic scintillation detectors for stereotactic radiosurgery quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, Jean-Christophe; Theriault, Dany; Guillot, Mathieu; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: To compare the performance of plastic scintillation detectors (PSD) for quality assurance (QA) in stereotactic radiosurgery conditions to a microion-chamber (IC), Gafchromic EBT2 films, 60 008 shielded photon diode (SD) and unshielded diodes (UD), and assess a new 2D crosshair array prototype adapted to small field dosimetry. Methods: The PSD consists of a 1 mm diameter by 1 mm long scintillating fiber (BCF-60, Saint-Gobain, Inc.) coupled to a polymethyl-methacrylate optical fiber (Eska premier, Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Output factors (S{sub c,p}) for apertures used in radiosurgery ranging from 4 to 40 mm in diameter have been measured. The PSD crosshair array (PSDCA) is a water equivalent device made up of 49 PSDs contained in a 1.63 cm radius area. Dose profiles measurements were taken for radiosurgery fields using the PSDCA and were compared to other dosimeters. Moreover, a typical stereotactic radiosurgery treatment using four noncoplanar arcs was delivered on a spherical phantom in which UD, IC, or PSD was placed. Using the Xknife planning system (Integra Radionics Burlington, MA), 15 Gy was prescribed at the isocenter, where each detector was positioned. Results: Output Factors measured by the PSD have a mean difference of 1.3% with Gafchromic EBT2 when normalized to a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field, and 1.0% when compared with UD measurements normalized to the 35 mm diameter cone. Dose profiles taken with the PSD crosshair array agreed with other single detectors dose profiles in spite of the presence of the 49 PSDs. Gamma values comparing 1D dose profiles obtained with PSD crosshair array with Gafchromic EBT2 and UD measured profiles shows 98.3% and 100.0%, respectively, of detector passing the gamma acceptance criteria of 0.3 mm and 2%. The dose measured by the PSD for a complete stereotactic radiosurgery treatment is comparable to the planned dose corrected for its SD-based S{sub c,p} within 1.4% and 0.7% for 5 and 35 mm diameter cone

  7. Development of the Fast Scintillation Detector with Programmable High Voltage Adjustment Suitable for Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, R.; Pechousek, J.; Frydrych, J.

    2010-07-01

    This work is focused on a development of a compact fast scintillation detector suitable for Mössbauer spectroscopy (low energy X-ray/γ-ray detection) where high counting rates are inevitable. Optimization of this part was necessary for a reliable function, better time resolution and to avoid a detector pulses pile-up effect. The pile-up effect decreases the measurement performance, significantly depends on the source activity and also on the pulse duration. Our new detection unit includes a fast scintillation crystal YAP:Ce, an R6095 photomultiplier tube, a high voltage power supply socket C9028-01 assembly, an AD5252 digital potentiometer with an I2C interface and an AD8000 ultra fast operation preamplifier. The main advantages of this solution lie in a short pulse duration (less than 200 ns), stable operation for high activities, programmable gain of the high voltage supply and compact design in the aluminum housing.

  8. Proton beam characterisation of a prototype thin-tile plastic scintillator detector with SiPM readout for use in fast-neutron tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, R.; Jakubek, J.; Prokopovich, D.; Uher, J.

    2012-02-01

    We present details of the construction and characterisation of a prototype thin-tile plastic scintillation detector for use in a multi-layer Fast Neutron Tracker. Scintillation light is read out using solid-state silicon photomultiplier detectors (SiPMs). The Tracker consists of alternating scintillator and Timepix detector layers. The scintillator tile provides a hydrogen-rich target, in which impinging fast neutrons produce recoil protons. The energies lost by protons in the plastic scintillator are measured and recoil protons exiting the scintillator are tracked in the Timepix detector. The combination of signals from the scintillator and Timepix provides information to reconstruct the energy or direction of the impinging neutron, using calculations based on the kinematics of the elastic neutron scattering. Three prototype scintillation detectors were constructed, using either a pair of 3 × 3 mm sensitive area SPMMicro3035 SiPMs from SensL or a pair of MAPD-3n SiPMs from Zecotek. The detector performances were characterised using a mono-energetic proton beam. An absolute energy calibration was measured at 3, 4 and 5 MeV proton energies with good linearity. The best measured energy resolution was 29.8% at 5 MeV. Spatial uniformity was assessed by measuring the response across the detector face. Finally, the tile detector's ability to provide a trigger for Timepix acquisition in the stack configuration was demonstrated for single and double neutron recoil events using a DT neutron source. The SiPM-based design was found to be well-suited for the application of the multi-layer fast neutron tracker.

  9. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

  10. Real-time, digital pulse-shape discrimination in non-hazardous fast liquid scintillation detectors: Prospects for safety and security

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, M. J.; Aspinall, M. D.; Cave, F. D.; Lavietes, A. D.

    2011-07-01

    Pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) in fast, organic scintillation detectors is a long-established technique used to separate neutrons and {gamma} rays in mixed radiation fields. In the analogue domain the method can achieve separation in real time, but all knowledge of the pulses themselves is lost thereby preventing the possibility of any post- or repeated analysis. Also, it is typically reliant on electronic systems that are largely obsolete and which require significant experience to set up. In the digital domain, PSD is often more flexible but significant post-processing has usually been necessary to obtain neutron/{gamma}-ray separation. Moreover, the scintillation media on which the technique relies usually have a low flash point and are thus deemed hazardous. This complicates the ease with which they are used in industrial applications. In this paper, results obtained with a new portable digital pulse-shape discrimination instrument are described. This instrument provides real-time, digital neutron/{gamma} separation whilst preserving the synchronization with the time-of-arrival for each event, and realizing throughputs of 3 x 10{sup 6} events per second. Furthermore, this system has been tested with a scintillation medium that is non-flammable and not hazardous. (authors)

  11. High efficiency plastic scintillator detector with wavelength-shifting fiber readout for the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseev, A. A.; Deering, P. L.; Hartman, R. C.; Johnson, T. E.; Nebel, T. R.; Ormes, J. F.; Thompson, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes the design and performance studies of the scintillator tile detectors for the anti-coincidence detector (ACD) of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Gamma ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled for launch in early 2008. The scintillator tile detectors utilize wavelength-shifting fibers and have dual-photomultiplier-tube readout. The design requires highly efficient and uniform detection of singly charged relativistic particles over the tile area and must meet all requirements for a launch, as well as operation in a space environment. We present here the design of three basic types of tiles used in the ACD, ranging in size from ˜450 to ˜2500 cm2, all ˜1 cm thick, with different shapes, and with photoelectron yield of ˜20 photoelectrons per minimum ionizing particle at normal tile incidence, uniform over the tile area. Some tiles require flexible clear fiber cables up to 1.5 m long to deliver scintillator light to remotely located photomultiplier tubes.

  12. High-energy X-ray detection by hafnium-doped organic-inorganic hybrid scintillators prepared by sol-gel method

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yan; Koshimizu, Masanori Yahaba, Natsuna; Asai, Keisuke; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Kishimoto, Shunji; Haruki, Rie

    2014-04-28

    With the aim of enhancing the efficiency with which plastic scintillators detect high-energy X-rays, hafnium-doped organic-inorganic hybrid scintillators were fabricated via a sol-gel method. Transmission electron microscopy of sampled material reveals the presence of Hf{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}O{sub 2} nanoparticles, dispersed in a polymer matrix that constitutes the active material of the X-ray detector. With Hf{sub x}Si{sub 1−x}O{sub 2} nanoparticles incorporated in the polymer matrix, the absorption edge and the luminescence wavelength is shifted, which we attribute to Mie scattering. The detection efficiency for 67.4-keV X-rays in a 0.6-mm-thick piece of this material is two times better than the same thickness of a commercial plastic scintillator-NE142.

  13. Extraction of depth-dependent perturbation factors for silicon diodes using a plastic scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lacroix, Frederic; Guillot, Mathieu; McEwen, Malcolm; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: This work presents the experimental extraction of the perturbation factor in megavoltage electron beams for three models of silicon diodes (IBA Dosimetry, EFD and SFD, and the PTW 60012 unshielded) using a plastic scintillation detector (PSD). Methods: The authors used a single scanning PSD mounted on a high-precision scanning tank to measure depth-dose curves in 6-, 12-, and 18-MeV clinical electron beams. They also measured depth-dose curves using the IBA Dosimetry, EFD and SFD, and the PTW 60012 unshielded diodes. The authors used the depth-dose curves measured with the PSD as a perturbation-free reference to extract the perturbation factors of the diodes. Results: The authors found that the perturbation factors for the diodes increased substantially with depth, especially for low-energy electron beams. The experimental results show the same trend as published Monte Carlo simulation results for the EFD diode; however, the perturbations measured experimentally were greater. They found that using an effective point of measurement (EPOM) placed slightly away from the source reduced the variation of perturbation factors with depth and that the optimal EPOM appears to be energy dependent. Conclusions: The manufacturer recommended EPOM appears to be incorrect at low electron energy (6 MeV). In addition, the perturbation factors for diodes may be greater than predicted by Monte Carlo simulations.

  14. Clinical Trials of a Urethral Dose Measurement System in Brachytherapy Using Scintillation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Suchowerska, Natalka; Jackson, Michael; Lambert, Jamil; Yin, Yong Bai; Hruby, George; McKenzie, David R.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To report on the clinical feasibility of a novel scintillation detector system with fiberoptic readout that measures the urethral dose during high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of the prostate. Methods and Materials: The clinical trial enrolled 24 patients receiving high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment to the prostate. After the first 14 patients, three improvements were made to the dosimeter system design to improve clinical reliability: a dosimeter self-checking facility; a radiopaque marker to determine the position of the dosimeter, and a more robust optical extension fiber. Results: Improvements to the system design allowed for accurate dose measurements to be made in vivo. A maximum measured dose departure of 9% from the calculated dose was observed after dosimeter design improvements. Conclusions: Departures of the measured from the calculated dose, after improvements to the dosimetry system, arise primarily from small changes in patient anatomy. Therefore, we recommend that patient response be correlated with the measured in vivo dose rather than with the calculated dose.

  15. Results from a prototype Lead-Scintillating Fiber Calorimeter for use as a STAR Forward Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmuganathan, Prashanth; STAR Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Forward instrumentation consisting of hadronic as well as electromagnetic calorimeters will achieve several physics goals at RHIC. Examples include studying the internal structure of nucleons and properties of nuclear matter through measurement of forward jets and long-range correlations. Earlier studies that pixelized AGS E864 lead-scintillating fiber calorimeter cells (10 cm2x117 cm) into a three by three array of 3.3 cm2 pixels showed that neutral pions can be reconstructed to E >15 GeV and hadronic shower shapes can be distinguished from EM shower shapes with 90% confidence. In this contribution, we compare the light collection efficiency from total internal reflective light guides with that of a Fresnel lens system; light signals for both guide types are recorded using photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and silicon photomultipliers (SiPM). The Fresnel lens system allows better magnetic shielding of PMTs from the STAR magnet fringe field and focuses light into the small sensitive area of the SiPM. A prototype of these designs consisting of a two by three array of cells (54 pixels) was mounted on the east side of the STAR detector during Run16 and 80 million events from Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} =200 GeV were recorded. In this talk, we will present comparisons

  16. SuperTIGER scintillator detector calibration with 30 GeV/nucleon Pb and its fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    The SuperTIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) long-duration balloon instrument has measured the abundances of galactic cosmic-ray elements to provide sensitive tests and clarification of the OB-association model of Galactic cosmic-ray origins. More than 600 nuclei with atomic number Z > 30 were observed on its first flight and the abundances of nuclei have been determined with clear individual element resolution and high statistical precision for 30 <= Z <= 40. From November 25 to December 01, 2015, a beamtest was carried out at CERN with fixed energy 30 GeV/nucleon Pb and its fragments to measure the saturation response of the scintillator detectors, which are essential to determine the abundances of nuclei with atomic number Z > 40. The beamtest results have been used to optimize the Geant4 simulation to represent the flight data, and will be used to interpret the flight data to extend the abundance determination to about _{60}Nd. SuperTIGER was developed by Washington University in St. Louis, NASA Goddard Flight Center, the California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the University of Minnesota.

  17. Response of organic liquid scintillators to fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoertz, Paul G.; Mills, Karmann; Davis, Lynn; Baldasaro, Nicholas; Gupta, Vijay

    2013-03-01

    Liquid organic scintillators are cocktails of aromatic fluorophores in an aromatic solvent. They find widespread use in Liquid Scintillation Counters with applications in medical diagnostics as well as fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Ultima Gold™ XR, a commercially available organic liquid scintillator from Perkin Elmer, can be used in both aqueous and non-aqueous systems and is typically used for beta detection in medical diagnostics. Its performance under gamma radiation and neutron radiation is less well-characterized. Special and normal Ultima Gold™ XR liquid scintillators were exposed in separate experiments to fast neutrons and high energy photons from a nuclear reactor and to gamma rays from a Co-60 source. To perform the measurements in the radiation chamber, a custom light collection system consisting of a fiber optic cable, spectrometer and a diffuse reflecting optical cavity was fabricated. Advanced calibration procedures, traceable to NIST standards, were developed to determine photon fluxes and flux densities of the scintillators under ionizing radiation conditions. The scintillator emission spectra under gamma radiation from a Co-60 source and neutron radiation from a pool-type nuclear reactor were recorded and compared. Results on the spectrometer design and comparison of the spectra under different exposure are presented.

  18. Absolute measurement of anti. nu. /sub p/ for /sup 252/Cf using the ORNL large liquid scintillator neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, R.R.; Gwin, R.; Ingle, R.

    1981-08-01

    The ORNL large liquid scintillator detector was used in a precise determination of anti ..nu../sub p/, the number of neutrons emitted promptly, for spontaneous fission of /sup 252/Cf. Measurements of the detector efficiency over a broad energy region were made by means of a proton-recoil technique employing the ORELA white neutron source. Monte Carlo calculation of the detector efficiency for a spectrum representative of /sup 252/Cf fission neutrons was calibrated with these elaborate measurements. The unusually flat response of the neutron detector resulted in elimination of several known sources of error. Experimental measurement was coupled with calculational methods to correct for other known errors. These measurements lead to an unusually small estimated uncertainty of 0.2% in the value obtained, anti ..nu../sub p/ = 3.773 +- 0.007.

  19. Gamma-gamma coincidence performance of LaBr3:Ce scintillation detectors vs HPGe detectors in high count-rate scenarios

    DOE PAGES

    Drescher, A.; Yoho, M.; Landsberger, S.; ...

    2017-01-15

    In this study, a radiation detection system consisting of two cerium doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) scintillation detectors in a gamma-gamma coincidence configuration has been used to demonstrate the advantages that coincident detection provides relative to a single detector, and the advantages that LaBr3:Ce detectors provide relative to high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. Signal to noise ratios of select photopeak pairs for these detectors have been compared to high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors in both single and coincident detector configurations in order to quantify the performance of each detector configuration. The efficiency and energy resolution of LaBr3:Ce detectors have been determined andmore » compared to HPGe detectors. Coincident gamma-ray pairs from the radionuclides 152Eu and 133Ba have been identified in a sample that is dominated by 137Cs. Gamma-gamma coincidence successfully reduced the Compton continuum from the large 137Cs peak, revealed several coincident gamma energies characteristic of these nuclides, and improved the signal-to-noise ratio relative to single detector measurements. LaBr3:Ce detectors performed at count rates multiple times higher than can be achieved with HPGe detectors. The standard background spectrum consisting of peaks associated with transitions within the LaBr3:Ce crystal has also been significantly reduced. Finally, it is shown that LaBr3:Ce detectors have the unique capability to perform gamma-gamma coincidence measurements in very high count rate scenarios, which can potentially benefit nuclear safeguards in situ measurements of spent nuclear fuel.« less

  20. Gamma-gamma coincidence performance of LaBr3:Ce scintillation detectors vs HPGe detectors in high count-rate scenarios.

    PubMed

    Drescher, A; Yoho, M; Landsberger, S; Durbin, M; Biegalski, S; Meier, D; Schwantes, J

    2017-04-01

    A radiation detection system consisting of two cerium doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) scintillation detectors in a gamma-gamma coincidence configuration has been used to demonstrate the advantages that coincident detection provides relative to a single detector, and the advantages that LaBr3:Ce detectors provide relative to high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors. Signal to noise ratios of select photopeak pairs for these detectors have been compared to high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors in both single and coincident detector configurations in order to quantify the performance of each detector configuration. The efficiency and energy resolution of LaBr3:Ce detectors have been determined and compared to HPGe detectors. Coincident gamma-ray pairs from the radionuclides (152)Eu and (133)Ba have been identified in a sample that is dominated by (137)Cs. Gamma-gamma coincidence successfully reduced the Compton continuum from the large (137)Cs peak, revealed several coincident gamma energies characteristic of these nuclides, and improved the signal-to-noise ratio relative to single detector measurements. LaBr3:Ce detectors performed at count rates multiple times higher than can be achieved with HPGe detectors. The standard background spectrum consisting of peaks associated with transitions within the LaBr3:Ce crystal has also been significantly reduced. It is shown that LaBr3:Ce detectors have the unique capability to perform gamma-gamma coincidence measurements in very high count rate scenarios, which can potentially benefit nuclear safeguards in situ measurements of spent nuclear fuel.

  1. Sub-200 ps CRT in monolithic scintillator PET detectors using digital SiPM arrays and maximum likelihood interaction time estimation.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Herman T; Borghi, Giacomo; Seifert, Stefan; Schaart, Dennis R

    2013-05-21

    Digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM) arrays have favorable characteristics for application in monolithic scintillator detectors for time-of-flight positron emission tomography (PET). To fully exploit these benefits, a maximum likelihood interaction time estimation (MLITE) method was developed to derive the time of interaction from the multiple time stamps obtained per scintillation event. MLITE was compared to several deterministic methods. Timing measurements were performed with monolithic scintillator detectors based on novel dSiPM arrays and LSO:Ce,0.2%Ca crystals of 16 × 16 × 10 mm(3), 16 × 16 × 20 mm(3), 24 × 24 × 10 mm(3), and 24 × 24 × 20 mm(3). The best coincidence resolving times (CRTs) for pairs of identical detectors were obtained with MLITE and measured 157 ps, 185 ps, 161 ps, and 184 ps full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM), respectively. For comparison, a small reference detector, consisting of a 3 × 3 × 5 mm(3) LSO:Ce,0.2%Ca crystal coupled to a single pixel of a dSiPM array, was measured to have a CRT as low as 120 ps FWHM. The results of this work indicate that the influence of the optical transport of the scintillation photons on the timing performance of monolithic scintillator detectors can at least partially be corrected for by utilizing the information contained in the spatio-temporal distribution of the collection of time stamps registered per scintillation event.

  2. Development of a new scintillation-trigger detector for the MTV experiment using aluminum-metallized film tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yuko; Ozaki, Sachi; Tanaka, Saki; Tanuma, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Tatsuru; Murata, Jiro

    2014-09-01

    A new type of trigger-scintillation counter array designed for the MTV experiment at TRIUMF-ISAC has been developed, using aluminum-metallized film tape for wrapping. The MTV experiment aims to perform the finest precision test of time reversal symmetry in nuclear beta decay. In that purpose, we search non-zero T-Violating transverse polarization of electrons emitted from polarized Li-8 nuclei. It uses a cylindrical drift chamber (CDC) as the main electron-tracking detector. The trigger-scintillation counter consists of 12-segmented 1 mm thick 300 mm long thin plastic scintillation counters. This counter is placed inside the CDC to generate a trigger signal. The required assembling precision of +-0.5 mm was a tricky point when we tried to use conventional total reflection mode. Indeed, produce an air-layer surrounding the scintillating bar to keep good light transmission was the main issue. For this reason, we tried to use a new wrapping material made of metallized-aluminum tape, which has a good mirror-like reflecting surface on both sides of the tape. Through this report, we will compare detection efficiency and light attenuation between conventional and new wrapping materials.

  3. LC scintillator-based muon detector tail-catcher R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, R.; Blazey, G.; Driutti, A.; Dychkant, A.; Fisk, H.E.; Gutierrez, A.; Karchin, P.; McKenna, M.; Milstene, C.; Para, A.; Pauletta, G.; /Indiana U. /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab /Wayne State U. /Notre Dame U. /Udine U.

    2007-11-01

    Preliminary analysis of test beam data from strip scintillator planes read-out with multi-anode PMTs (MAPMTs) is presented along with a description of the independent systematic measurements of relative response for all channels of several MAPMTs used in the tests. Test beam measurements for the response of a scintillator strip, read out with Si photo-sensors, is also described.

  4. Digital pulse shape discrimination methods for n-γ separation in an EJ-301 liquid scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Bo; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Chen, Liang; Ge, Hong-Lin; Ma, Fei; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Ju, Yong-Qin; Zhang, Yan-Bin; Li, Yan-Yan; Xu, Xiao-Wei

    2015-11-01

    A digital pulse shape discrimination system based on a programmable module NI-5772 has been established and tested with an EJ-301 liquid scintillation detector. The module was operated by running programs developed in LabVIEW, with a sampling frequency up to 1.6 GS/s. Standard gamma sources 22Na, 137Cs and 60Co were used to calibrate the EJ-301 liquid scintillation detector, and the gamma response function was obtained. Digital algorithms for the charge comparison method and zero-crossing method have been developed. The experimental results show that both digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms can discriminate neutrons from γ-rays. Moreover, the zero-crossing method shows better n-γ discrimination at 80 keVee and lower, whereas the charge comparison method gives better results at higher thresholds. In addition, the figure-of-merit (FOM) for detectors of two different dimensions were extracted at 9 energy thresholds, and it was found that the smaller detector presented better n-γ separation for fission neutrons. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (91226107, 11305229) and the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA03030300)

  5. Validating plastic scintillation detectors for photon dosimetry in the radiologic energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Lessard, Francois; Archambault, Louis; Plamondon, Mathieu; and others

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Photon dosimetry in the kilovolt (kV) energy range represents a major challenge for diagnostic and interventional radiology and superficial therapy. Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) are potentially good candidates for this task. This study proposes a simple way to obtain accurate correction factors to compensate for the response of PSDs to photon energies between 80 and 150 kVp. The performance of PSDs is also investigated to determine their potential usefulness in the diagnostic energy range. Methods: A 1-mm-diameter, 10-mm-long PSD was irradiated by a Therapax SXT 150 unit using five different beam qualities made of tube potentials ranging from 80 to 150 kVp and filtration thickness ranging from 0.8 to 0.2 mmAl + 1.0 mmCu. The light emitted by the detector was collected using an 8-m-long optical fiber and a polychromatic photodiode, which converted the scintillation photons to an electrical current. The PSD response was compared with the reference free air dose rate measured with a calibrated Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber. PSD measurements were corrected using spectra-weighted corrections, accounting for mass energy-absorption coefficient differences between the sensitive volumes of the ionization chamber and the PSD, as suggested by large cavity theory (LCT). Beam spectra were obtained from x-ray simulation software and validated experimentally using a CdTe spectrometer. Correction factors were also obtained using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Percent depth dose (PDD) measurements were compensated for beam hardening using the LCT correction method. These PDD measurements were compared with uncorrected PSD data, PDD measurements obtained using Gafchromic films, Monte Carlo simulations, and previous data. Results: For each beam quality used, the authors observed an increase of the energy response with effective energy when no correction was applied to the PSD response. Using the LCT correction, the PSD response was almost energy independent, with

  6. A Dose Distribution Study of Uranyl Nitrate in Zebrafish using Liquid Scintillation and Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshammari, Ohud Fhaid

    Standard curves for a Perkin Elmer TriCarb 2800 liquid scintillation detector (LSC) and a Ludlum 3030p Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon detector have been developed and utilized for studying the dose distribution of depleted uranium (DU) within zebrafish. The DU source was crystallized uranyl nitrate (N2O8U•6H2O) solution, normally used for staining in electron microscopy with a manufactured average specific activity of 0.3 uCi/g. Zebrafish, both larvae and adults, were exposed to three different mass concentrations, dissected, dissolved and counted using an LSC. The counts were compared to the standard curve correlating the measured activity to that of the mass absorbed. It was found that the larvae were more tolerant to the toxicity of the DU by almost a factor of 10 showing survival up to 200 ppm where the adults had zero survival when exposed to concentrations above 20 ppm. The absorbed DU was observed to concentrate more heavily in the skeletal structure and the blood containing organs (liver and heart) when comparing the relative mass concentrations observed in each organ compared to that of the whole fish exposed to the same concentration. The highest absorbed dose rate was found in the skeletal system at 3.5 mGy/d followed by the blood containing organs at 2.2 mGy/d when exposed to 20 ppm DU. It was also noted that the bioconcentration factors (BCF) of the adult zebrafish followed the same trend observed in similar studies. As the mass concentration of DU was lowered, the BCF calculated for fish exposed increased with a BCF of 130.6 found for those exposed to 20 ppm U and a BCF of 774.2 for fish exposed to 2 ppm. This method shows to present a suitable way of developing a dose distribution for DU along with similar isotopes which will be instrumental in studying the long term effects of more specific exposures to natural radioactive metals combined with other common environmental exposures.

  7. Study of scintillation, fluorescence and scattering in mineral oil for the MiniBooNE neutrino detector

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Bruce C.; Brice, Stephen; Hawker, Eric; Maza, Shannon; Meyer, Hans-Otto; Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Tayloe, Rex; Tanaka, Hirohisa A.; Toptygin, Dmitri; /Fermilab /Western Illinois U. /Indiana U. /Princeton U. /Johns Hopkins U.

    2004-11-01

    The MiniBooNE neutrino detector at Fermilab (FNAL) is filled with 250,000 gallons of pure mineral oil. The principal signal for MiniBooNE is light observed in a prompt Cherenkov cone. Scattering and fluorescence modify our detection of this light. Scintillation is also created by ionization in the oil. Studies of fluorescence of this oil have been carried out over a wide spectrum of exciting light and time resolved fluorescence with a narrower range of excitation. Polarized scattering measurements have been carried out at longer wavelengths. Time resolved and spectrally resolved scintillation has been studied with a 200 MeV Proton beam at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Results of these studies will be reported.

  8. Application of a BC501A Liquid Scintillation Detector with a Gain Stabilization System on the EAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xingyu; Chen, Zhongjing; Du, Tengfei; Hu, Zhimeng; Ge, Lijian; Chen, Jinxiang; Li, Xiangqing; Fan, Tieshuan

    2016-01-01

    A 2” × 2” BC501A liquid scintillation detector with a gain stabilization system is developed and applied to neutron and γ-ray measurement on the EAST tokamak. Energy calibration of a liquid scintillator using a fast coincidence method is presented and compared with the Monte Carlo simulation. Determination of the proton light output function of the BC501A is presented. Results from dedicated experiments with an Am-Be neutron source, γ source and quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams, and from measurements on EAST tokamak are presented and discussed. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB106004 and 2012GB101003) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 91226102)

  9. Some features and results of thermal neutron background measurements with the [ZnS(Ag)+6LiF] scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzminov, V. V.; Alekseenko, V. V.; Barabanov, I. R.; Etezov, R. A.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gavrilyuk, Yu. M.; Gezhaev, A. M.; Kazalov, V. V.; Khokonov, A. Kh.; Panasenko, S. I.; Ratkevich, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    Features of a thermal neutron test detector with thin scintillator [ZnS(Ag)+6LiF] are described. Background of the detector and its registration efficiency were defined as a result of measurements. The thermal neutron flux at different locations, and for different conditions around the Baksan Neutrino Observatory are reported.

  10. SHIELDING AND DETECTOR RESPONSE CALCULATIONS PERTAINING TO CATEGORY 1 QUANTITIES OF PLUTONIUM AND HAND-HELD PLASTIC SCINTILLATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, A.

    2013-06-07

    Nuclear facilities sometimes use hand-held plastic scintillator detectors to detect attempts to divert special nuclear material in situations where portal monitors are impractical. MCNP calculations have been performed to determine the neutron and gamma radiation field arising from a Category I quantity of weapons-grade plutonium in various shielding configurations. The shields considered were composed of combinations of lead and high-density polyethylene such that the mass of the plutonium plus shield was 22.7 kilograms. Monte-Carlo techniques were also used to determine the detector response to each of the shielding configurations. The detector response calculations were verified using field measurements of high-, medium-, and low- energy gamma-ray sources as well as a Cf-252 neutron source.

  11. Software for Control and Measuring Instrumentation of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-telescope Fast Scintillator Detector System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, P. P.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Runtso, M. F.; Solodovnikov, A. A.

    Currently, the final stage of the ground tests for the technological detector of the high-energy gamma-ray telescope (GRT) GAMMA-400 are finished. The new space GRT will accept the gamma-rays with energy more than 400 MeV and is aimed to open our eyes for so-called "dark matter" problem in the Universe. The high-speed scintillation detectors system (SDS) is used one of the main GRT particle detectors and the good ground test measurements will let the future space mission to get the reliable data. This paper describes the software and hardware of the laboratory control and calibration systems for physical measurements of GRT STDS properties.

  12. Measurements of the scintillation time constants of inorganic crystals for the development of a triple-Phoswich detector for high-energy X-ray quanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelis, Thilo

    1987-04-01

    A setup for the measurement of the rise time distribution of pulses measured by a triple-Phoswich detector that is planned as component of an imaging system of a rotation-modulation telescope (RMT) was built. The principles and characteristics of scintillation crystals, scintillation detectors, and RMT's are outlined. Measurements on CsT(Tl) test crystals show a strong dependence of rise time distribution on Tl-concentration, and a clear dependence on temperature. A system for optimum light collection was developed for a Phoswich detector. The scintillation crystals NaJ(Tl) and CsJ(Na) are very suitable for a strip Phoswich. Proposals for a triple-Phoswich as detector for an RMT are given.

  13. Recent progress of MPPC-based scintillation detectors in high precision X-ray and gamma-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, J.; Kishimoto, A.; Fujita, T.; Nishiyama, T.; Kurei, Y.; Tsujikawa, T.; Oshima, T.; Taya, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Ogata, H.; Okochi, H.; Ohsuka, S.; Ikeda, H.; Yamamoto, S.

    2015-06-01

    The multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) is a promising light sensor for various applications, not only in physics experiments but also in nuclear medicine, industry, and even high-energy astrophysics. In this paper, we present the current status and most recent progress of the MPPC-based scintillation detectors, such as (1) a high-precision X-ray and gamma-ray spectral image sensor, (2) next-generation PET detectors with MRI, TOF, and DOI measurement capabilities, and (3) a compact gamma camera for environmental radiation surveys. We first present a new method of fabricating a Ce:GAGG scintillator plate (1 or 2 mm thick) with ultra-fine resolution (0.2 mm/pixel), cut using a dicing saw to create 50 μm wide micro-grooves. When the plate is optically coupled with a large-area MPPC array, excellent spatial resolution of 0.48 mm (FWHM) and energy resolution of 14% (FWHM) are obtained for 122 keV gamma rays. Hence, the detector can act as a convenient "multi-color" imaging device that can potentially be used for future SPECT and photon-counting CT. We then show a prototype system for a high-resolution MPPC-based PET scanner that can realize ≃1 mm (FWHM) spatial resolution, even under a strong magnetic field of 4.7 T. We develop a front-end ASIC intended for future TOF-PET scanner with a 16-channel readout that achieves a coincidence time resolution of 489 ps (FWHM). A novel design for a module with DOI-measurement capability for gamma rays is also presented by measuring the pulse height ratio of double-sided MPPCs coupled at both ends of scintillation crystal block. Finally, we present the concept of a two-plane Compton camera consisting of Ce:GAGG scintillator arrays coupled with thin MPPC arrays. As a result of the thin and compact features of the MPPC device, the camera not only achieves a small size (14×14×15 cm3) and light weight (1.9 kg) but also excellent sensitivity, compared to the conventional PMT-based pinhole camera used in Fukushima. Finally, we briefly

  14. The light-yield response of a NE-213 liquid-scintillator detector measured using 2-6 MeV tagged neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherzinger, J.; Al Jebali, R.; Annand, J. R. M.; Fissum, K. G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Kanaki, K.; Lundin, M.; Nilsson, B.; Perrey, H.; Rosborg, A.; Svensson, H.

    2016-12-01

    The response of a NE-213 liquid-scintillator detector has been measured using tagged neutrons from 2 to 6 MeV originating from an Am/Be neutron source. The neutron energies were determined using the time-of-flight technique. Pulse-shape discrimination was employed to discern between gamma-rays and neutrons. The behavior of both the fast (35 ns) and the combined fast and slow (475 ns) components of the neutron scintillation-light pulses were studied. Three different prescriptions were used to relate the neutron maximum energy-transfer edges to the corresponding recoil-proton scintillation-light yields, and the results were compared to simulations. The overall normalizations of parametrizations which predict the fast or total light yield of the scintillation pulses were also tested. Our results agree with both existing data and existing parametrizations. We observe a clear sensitivity to the portion and length of the neutron scintillation-light pulse considered.

  15. Devices based on InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well for scintillator and detector applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hospodková, Alice; Pangrác, Jiří; Kuldová, Karla; Nikl, Martin; Pacherová, Oliva; Oswald, Jiří; Hubáček, Tomáš; Zíková, Markéta; Brůža, Petr; Pánek, Dalibor; Blažek, Karel; Ledoux, Gilles; Dujardin, Christophe; Heuken, Michael; Hulicius, Eduard

    2016-02-01

    Fast scintillators are necessary for electron microscopes, as well as in many other application fields like medical diagnostics and therapy and fundamental science. InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structures (QW) are perspective candidates due to strong exciton binding energy, high quantum efficiency, short decay time in order of ns and good radiation resistance. The aim of our work is to prepare scintillator structure with fast luminescence response and high intensity of light. InGaN/GaN multiple QW structures described here were prepared by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy and characterized by high resolution X-ray diffraction measurements. We demonstrate structure suitability for scintillator application including a unique measurement of wavelength-resolved scintillation response under nanosecond pulse soft X-ray source in extended dynamical and time scales. The photo-, radio- and cathodo-luminescence (PL, RL, CL) were measured. We observed double peak luminescence governed by different recombination mechanisms: i) exciton in QW and ii) related to defects. We have shown that for obtaining fast and intensive luminescence response proper structure design is required. The radioluminescence decay time of QW exciton maximum decreased 4 times from 16 ns to 4 ns when the QW thickness was decreased from 2.4 nm to 2 nm. We have proved suitability of InGaN/GaN structures for fast scintillator application for electron or other particle radiation detection. For x-ray detection the fast scintillation response would be hard to achieve due to the dominant slow defect luminescence maximum.

  16. ANTS — a simulation package for secondary scintillation Anger-camera type detector in thermal neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.; Defendi, I.; Engels, R.; Fraga, F. A. F.; Fraga, M. M. F. R.; Guerard, B.; Jurkovic, M.; Kemmerling, G.; Manzin, G.; Margato, L. M. S.; Niko, H.; Pereira, L.; Petrillo, C.; Peyaud, A.; Piscitelli, F.; Raspino, D.; Rhodes, N. J.; Sacchetti, F.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Van Esch, P.; Zeitelhack, K.

    2012-08-01

    A custom and fully interactive simulation package ANTS (Anger-camera type Neutron detector: Toolkit for Simulations) has been developed to optimize the design and operation conditions of secondary scintillation Anger-camera type gaseous detectors for thermal neutron imaging. The simulation code accounts for all physical processes related to the neutron capture, energy deposition pattern, drift of electrons of the primary ionization and secondary scintillation. The photons are traced considering the wavelength-resolved refraction and transmission of the output window. Photo-detection accounts for the wavelength-resolved quantum efficiency, angular response, area sensitivity, gain and single-photoelectron spectra of the photomultipliers (PMTs). The package allows for several geometrical shapes of the PMT photocathode (round, hexagonal and square) and offers a flexible PMT array configuration: up to 100 PMTs in a custom arrangement with the square or hexagonal packing. Several read-out patterns of the PMT array are implemented. Reconstruction of the neutron capture position (projection on the plane of the light emission) is performed using the center of gravity, maximum likelihood or weighted least squares algorithm. Simulation results reproduce well the preliminary results obtained with a small-scale detector prototype. ANTS executables can be downloaded from http://coimbra.lip.pt/~andrei/.

  17. The SNO+ Scintillator Purification Plant and Projected Sensitivity to Solar Neutrinos in the Pure Scintillator Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pershing, Teal; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The SNO+ detector is a neutrino and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment utilizing the renovated SNO detector. In the second phase of operation, the SNO+ detector will contain 780 tons of organic liquid scintillator composed of 2 g/L 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). In this phase, SNO+ will strive to detect solar neutrinos in the sub-MeV range, including CNO production neutrinos and pp production neutrinos. To achieve the necessary detector sensitivity, a four-part scintillator purification plant has been constructed in SNOLAB for the removal of ionic and radioactive impurities. We present an overview of the SNO+ scintillator purification plant stages, including distillation, water extraction, gas stripping, and metal scavenger columns. We also give the projected SNO+ sensitivities to various solar-produced neutrinos based on the scintillator plant's projected purification efficiency.

  18. Analysis of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized 4He fast neutron detector using pulse shape fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, R. P.; Murer, D.; Ray, H.; Jordan, K. A.

    2015-03-01

    An empirical investigation of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized 4He gas fast neutron detector was conducted using pulse shape fitting. Scintillation signals from neutron interactions were measured and averaged to produce a single generic neutron pulse shape from both a 252Cf spontaneous fission source and a (d,d) neutron generator. An expression for light output over time was then developed by treating the decay of helium excited states in the same manner as the decay of radioactive isotopes. This pulse shape expression was fitted to the measured neutron pulse shape using a least-squares optimization algorithm, allowing an empirical analysis of the mechanism of scintillation inside the 4He detector. A further understanding of this mechanism in the 4He detector will advance the use of this system as a neutron spectrometer. For 252Cf neutrons, the triplet and singlet time constants were found to be 970 ns and 686 ns, respectively. For neutrons from the (d,d) generator, the time constants were found to be 884 ns and 636 ns. Differences were noted in the magnitude of these parameters compared to previously published data, however the general relationships were noted to be the same and checked with expected trends from theory. Of the excited helium states produced from a 252Cf neutron interaction, 76% were found to be born as triplet states, similar to the result from the neutron generator of 71%. The two sources yielded similar pulse shapes despite having very different neutron energy spectra, validating the robustness of the fits across various neutron energies.

  19. Analysis of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized {sup 4}He fast neutron detector using pulse shape fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, R.P. Ray, H.; Jordan, K.A.; Murer, D.

    2015-03-15

    An empirical investigation of the scintillation mechanism in a pressurized {sup 4}He gas fast neutron detector was conducted using pulse shape fitting. Scintillation signals from neutron interactions were measured and averaged to produce a single generic neutron pulse shape from both a {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission source and a (d,d) neutron generator. An expression for light output over time was then developed by treating the decay of helium excited states in the same manner as the decay of radioactive isotopes. This pulse shape expression was fitted to the measured neutron pulse shape using a least-squares optimization algorithm, allowing an empirical analysis of the mechanism of scintillation inside the {sup 4}He detector. A further understanding of this mechanism in the {sup 4}He detector will advance the use of this system as a neutron spectrometer. For {sup 252}Cf neutrons, the triplet and singlet time constants were found to be 970 ns and 686 ns, respectively. For neutrons from the (d,d) generator, the time constants were found to be 884 ns and 636 ns. Differences were noted in the magnitude of these parameters compared to previously published data, however the general relationships were noted to be the same and checked with expected trends from theory. Of the excited helium states produced from a {sup 252}Cf neutron interaction, 76% were found to be born as triplet states, similar to the result from the neutron generator of 71%. The two sources yielded similar pulse shapes despite having very different neutron energy spectra, validating the robustness of the fits across various neutron energies.

  20. A comparative study of the radiation hardness of plastic scintillators for the upgrade of the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, S.; Erasmus, R.; Jivan, H.; Pelwan, C.; Peters, G.; Sideras-Haddad, E.

    2015-10-01

    The influence of radiation on the light transmittance of plastic scintillators was studied experimentally. The high optical transmittance property of plastic scintillators makes them essential in the effective functioning of the Tile calorimeter of the ATLAS detector at CERN. This significant role played by the scintillators makes this research imperative in the movement towards the upgrade of the tile calorimeter. The radiation damage of polyvinyl toluene (PVT) based plastic scintillators was studied, namely, EJ-200, EJ-208 and EJ-260, all manufactured and provided to us by ELJEN technology. In addition, in order to compare to scintillator brands actually in use at the ATLAS detector currently, two polystyrene (PS) based scintillators and an additional PVT based scintillator were also scrutinized in this study, namely, Dubna, Protvino and Bicron, respectively. All the samples were irradiated using a 6 MeV proton beam at different doses at iThemba LABS Gauteng. The radiation process was planned and mimicked by doing simulations using a SRIM program. In addition, transmission spectra for the irradiated and unirradiated samples of each grade were obtained, observed and analyzed.

  1. Determination of neutrino incoming direction in the CHOOZ experiment and its application to supernova explosion location by scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonio, M.; Baldini, A.; Bemporad, C.; Caffau, E.; Cei, F.; Déclais, Y.; de Kerret, H.; Dieterle, B.; Etenko, A.; Foresti, L.; George, J.; Giannini, G.; Grassi, M.; Kozlov, Y.; Kropp, W.; Kryn, D.; Laiman, M.; Lane, C. E.; Lefièvre, B.; Machulin, I.; Martemyanov, A.; Martemyanov, V.; Mikaelyan, L.; Nicolò, D.; Obolensky, M.; Pazzi, R.; Pieri, G.; Price, L.; Riley, S.; Reeder, R.; Sabelnikov, A.; Santin, G.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Sobel, H.; Steele, J.; Steinberg, R.; Sukhotin, S.; Tomshaw, S.; Veron, D.; Vyrodov, V.

    2000-01-01

    The CHOOZ experiment has measured the antineutrino flux at about 1 km from two nuclear reactors to search for possible ν¯e-->ν¯x oscillations with mass-squared differences as low as 10-3 eV2 for full mixing. We show that the analysis of the ~2700 ν¯e events, collected by our liquid scintillation detector, locates the antineutrino source within a cone of half-aperture ~18° at the 68 % C.L. We discuss the implications of this result for locating a supernova explosion.

  2. Results of low energy background measurements with the Liquid Scintillation Detector (LSD) of the Mont Blanc Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aglietta, M.; Badino, G.; Bologna, G. F.; Castagnoli, C.; Fulgione, W.; Galeotti, P.; Saavedra, O.; Trinchero, G. C.; Vernetto, S.; Dadykin, V. L.

    1985-01-01

    The 90 tons liquid scintillation detector (LSD) is fully running since October 1984, at a depth of 5,200 hg/sq cm of standard rock underground. The main goal is to search for neutrino bursts from collapsing stars. The experiment is very sensitive to detect low energy particles and has a very good signature to gamma-rays from (n,p) reaction which follows the upsilon e + p yields n + e sup + neutrino capture. The analysis of data is presented and the preliminary results on low energy measurements are discussed.

  3. A high-granularity plastic scintillator tile hadronic calorimeter with APD readout for a linear collider detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V.; Cvach, J.; Danilov, M.; Devitsin, E.; Dodonov, V.; Eigen, G.; Garutti, E.; Gilitzky, Yu.; Groll, M.; Heuer, R.-D.; Janata, M.; Kacl, I.; Korbel, V.; Kozlov, V.; Meyer, H.; Morgunov, V.; Němeček, S.; Pöschl, R.; Polák, I.; Raspereza, A.; Reiche, S.; Rusinov, V.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Terkulov, A.; Valkár, Š.; Weichert, J.; Zálešák, J.

    2006-08-01

    We report upon the performance of an analog hadron calorimeter prototype, where plastic scintillator tiles are read out with wavelength-shifting fibers coupled to avalanche photodiodes. This prototype configuration has been tested using a positron beam at DESY with energies between 1 and 6 GeV. We present different detector calibration methods, show measurements for noise, linearity, and energy resolution and discuss gain monitoring with an LED system. The results are in good agreement with our simulation studies and previous measurements using silicon photomultiplier readout.

  4. Resarch investigation on dense scintillation glass for use in total absorption nuclear cascade detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensler, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Three approaches to the development of a high density scintillation glass were investigated: They include the increase of density of glass systems containing cerium - the only systems which were known to show scintillation, the testing of a novel silicate glass system containing significant concentrations of silver produced by ion exchange and never tested previously, and the hot pressing of a diphasic compact of low density scintillation glass with high density passive glass. In first two cases, while ultraviolet excited fluorescence was maintained in the glasses showing high density, scintillation response to high energy particles was not retained in the case of the cerium containing glasses or developed in the case of the silver containing glasses. In the case of the compacts, the extremely long path length caused by the multiple internal reflections which occur in such a body resulted in attenuation even with glasses of high specific transmission. It is not clear why the scintillation efficiency is not maintained in the higher density cerium containing glasses.

  5. Monte Carlo study of the energy and angular dependence of the response of plastic scintillation detectors in photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lilie L. W.; Klein, David; Beddar, A. Sam

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: By using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors investigated the energy and angular dependence of the response of plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) in photon beams. Methods: Three PSDs were modeled in this study: A plastic scintillator (BC-400) and a scintillating fiber (BCF-12), both attached by a plastic-core optical fiber stem, and a plastic scintillator (BC-400) attached by an air-core optical fiber stem with a silica tube coated with silver. The authors then calculated, with low statistical uncertainty, the energy and angular dependences of the PSDs' responses in a water phantom. For energy dependence, the response of the detectors is calculated as the detector dose per unit water dose. The perturbation caused by the optical fiber stem connected to the PSD to guide the optical light to a photodetector was studied in simulations using different optical fiber materials. Results: For the energy dependence of the PSDs in photon beams, the PSDs with plastic-core fiber have excellent energy independence within about 0.5% at photon energies ranging from 300 keV (monoenergetic) to 18 MV (linac beam). The PSD with an air-core optical fiber with a silica tube also has good energy independence within 1% in the same photon energy range. For the angular dependence, the relative response of all the three modeled PSDs is within 2% for all the angles in a 6 MV photon beam. This is also true in a 300 keV monoenergetic photon beam for PSDs with plastic-core fiber. For the PSD with an air-core fiber with a silica tube in the 300 keV beam, the relative response varies within 1% for most of the angles, except in the case when the fiber stem is pointing right to the radiation source in which case the PSD may over-response by more than 10%. Conclusions: At {+-}1% level, no beam energy correction is necessary for the response of all three PSDs modeled in this study in the photon energy ranges from 200 keV (monoenergetic) to 18 MV (linac beam). The PSD would be even closer

  6. SU-C-201-01: Investigation of the Effects of Scintillator Surface Treatment On Light Output Measurements with SiPM Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Valenciaga, Y; Prout, D; Chatziioannou, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the effect of different scintillator surface treatments (BGO crystals) on the fraction of scintillation photons that exit the crystal and reach the photodetector (SiPM). Methods: Positron Emission Tomography is based on the detection of light that exits scintillator crystals, after annihilation photons deposit energy inside these crystals. A considerable fraction of the scintillation light gets trapped or absorbed after going through multiple internal reflections on the interfaces surrounding the crystals. BGO scintillator crystals generate considerably less scintillation light than crystals made of LSO and its variants. Therefore, it is crucial that the small amount of light produced by BGO exits towards the light detector. The surface treatment of scintillator crystals is among the factors affecting the ability of scintillation light to reach the detectors. In this study, we analyze the effect of different crystal surface treatments on the fraction of scintillation light that is detected by the solid state photodetector (SiPM), once energy is deposited inside a BGO crystal. Simulations were performed by a Monte Carlo based software named GATE, and validated by measurements from individual BGO crystals coupled to Philips digital-SiPM sensor (DPC-3200). Results: The results showed an increment in light collection of about 4 percent when only the exit face of the BGO crystal, is unpolished; compared to when all the faces are polished. However, leaving several faces unpolished caused a reduction of at least 10 percent of light output when the interaction occurs as far from the exit face of the crystal as possible compared to when it occurs very close to the exit face. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the advantages on light collection from leaving unpolished the exit face of BGO crystals. The configuration with best light output will be used to obtain flood images from BGO crystal arrays coupled to SiPM sensors.

  7. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Study of the characteristics of a scintillation array and single pixels for nuclear medicine imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jie; Ma, Hong-Guang; Ma, Wen-Yan; Zeng, Hui; Wang, Zhao-Min; Xu, Zi-Zong

    2009-04-01

    By using a pixelized Nal(Tl) crystal array coupled to a R2486 PSPMT, the characteristics of the array and of a single pixel, such as the light output, energy resolution, peak-to-valley ratio (P/V) and imaging performance of the detector were studied. The pixel size of the NaI(TI) scintillation pixel array is 2 mm×2 mm×5 mm. There are in total 484 pixels in a 22 × 22 matrix. In the pixel spectrum an average peak-to-valley ratio (P/V) of 16 was obtained. In the image of all the pixels, good values for the Peak-to-Valley ratios could be achieved, namely a mean of 17, a maximum of 45 and the average peak FWHM (the average value of intrinsic spatial resolution) of 2.3 mm. However, the PSPMT non-uniform response and the scintillation pixels array inhomogeneities degrade the imaging performance of the detector.

  8. Comparison of calculation results of neutron detection efficiency for models with silicon semiconductor detector and plastic scintillator for GAMMA-400 telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedenko, G.; Zin, Thant; Kadilin, V.; Gavrikov, I.; Tyurin, E.; Isakov, S.

    2013-02-01

    Monte Carlo calculations were performed for two models of neutron detector. The first model of the neutron detector includes the layer of polyethylene as a moderator, boron as a target for (n, α) reaction and silicon as a detector of α-particles. The second model consists of polyethylene layers alternating with layers of plastic-boron scintillators. Calculations were performed for parallel neutron flux with evaporation spectrum. The calculation results of neutron detection efficiency for two proposed models were analyzed and compared. The high neutron detection efficiency is attained by using a plastic-boron scintillator. Using natural boron the 10% of detection efficiency is attained and in the case of enriched boron more than 15% of detection efficiency is attained when the detector thickness is 4 cm. The model using silicon detectors provides the detection efficiency about 4%.

  9. Plastic scintillation dosimetry: Optimal selection of scintillating fibers and scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, Louis; Arsenault, Jean; Gingras, Luc; Sam Beddar, A.; Roy, Rene; Beaulieu, Luc

    2005-07-15

    Scintillation dosimetry is a promising avenue for evaluating dose patterns delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans or for the small fields involved in stereotactic radiosurgery. However, the increase in signal has been the goal for many authors. In this paper, a comparison is made between plastic scintillating fibers and plastic scintillator. The collection of scintillation light was measured experimentally for four commercial models of scintillating fibers (BCF-12, BCF-60, SCSF-78, SCSF-3HF) and two models of plastic scintillators (BC-400, BC-408). The emission spectra of all six scintillators were obtained by using an optical spectrum analyzer and they were compared with theoretical behavior. For scintillation in the blue region, the signal intensity of a singly clad scintillating fiber (BCF-12) was 120% of that of the plastic scintillator (BC-400). For the multiclad fiber (SCSF-78), the signal reached 144% of that of the plastic scintillator. The intensity of the green scintillating fibers was lower than that of the plastic scintillator: 47% for the singly clad fiber (BCF-60) and 77% for the multiclad fiber (SCSF-3HF). The collected light was studied as a function of the scintillator length and radius for a cylindrical probe. We found that symmetric detectors with nearly the same spatial resolution in each direction (2 mm in diameter by 3 mm in length) could be made with a signal equivalent to those of the more commonly used asymmetric scintillators. With augmentation of the signal-to-noise ratio in consideration, this paper presents a series of comparisons that should provide insight into selection of a scintillator type and volume for development of a medical dosimeter.

  10. A novel radiation detector consisting of an H /SUB g/ I/sub 2/ photo detector coupled to a scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Barton, J.B.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Kusmiss, J.H.; Szymczyk, W.M.

    1983-02-01

    HgI/sub 2/ photodetectors have been used in conjunction with CsI(T1) and BGO to detect the light pulses from gamma rays and alpha particles. The photocurrent response to light of a typical H /SUB g/ I/sub 2/ photodetector is presented and discussed. The spectral response is appropriate for most important scintillators, which have their maximum emission between 400 and 560 nm. Energy spectra obtained with an HgI/sub 2/ photodetector coupled to a CsI(T1) scintillator crystal are presented for gamma rays from /sup 137/Cs, a /sup 68/Ga positron source, /sup 241/Am, and /SUP 99m/ Tc, as well as for the K x-rays from Pb. The photopeak energy resolution value for 511 keV annihilation gamma rays with the CsI(T1)-HgI/sub 2/ combination was about 10%. Spectra obtained with an HgI/sub 2/ photodetector coupled to a BGO scintillator crystal are presented for the annihilation gamma rays from a /sup 68/Ga positron source (19% photopeak resolution) and the alpha particles from a /sup 244/Cm source. Estimates of the quantum efficiencies for an HgI/sub 2/ photodetector coupled to CsI(T1) and BGO scintillator crystals give values in excess of 70%. A brief discussion is given of the limits on energy resolution set by the electronic noise. Potential applications of this novel radiation detection device and the advantages over photomultiplier-based devices are discussed.

  11. Ultracold neutron detection with 6Li-doped glass scintillators. NANOSC: A fast ultracold neutron detector for the nEDM experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, G.; Bison, G.; Bodek, K.; Chowdhuri, Z.; Geltenbort, P.; Griffith, W. C.; Hélaine, V.; Henneck, R.; Kasprzak, M.; Kermaidic, Y.; Kirch, K.; Komposch, S.; Koss, P. A.; Kozela, A.; Krempel, J.; Lauss, B.; Lefort, T.; Lemière, Y.; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Musgrave, M.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Piegsa, F. M.; Pierre, E.; Pignol, G.; Quéméner, G.; Rawlik, M.; Ries, D.; Rebreyend, D.; Roccia, S.; Rogel, G.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Severijns, N.; Wursten, E.; Zejma, J.; Zsigmond, G.

    2016-10-01

    This paper summarizes the results from measurements aiming to characterize ultracold neutron detection with 6Li-doped glass scintillators. Single GS10 or GS20 scintillators, with a thickness of 100-200μm, fulfill the ultracold neutron detection requirements with an acceptable neutron-gamma discrimination. This discrimination is clearly improved with a stack of two scintillators: a 6Li-depleted glass bonded to a 6Li-enriched glass. The technique of optical contact bonding is used between the two glasses in order to eliminate the need for optical glue or grease between them. Relative to a 3He Strelkov gas detector, the scintillator's detection efficiency is lower for UCN energies close to the scintillator's Fermi potential (85-100 neV), but becomes larger at higher UCN energies. Coupled to a digital data acquisition system, counting rates up to a few 105 counts/s can be handled. A detector based on such a scintillator stack arrangement was built and has been used in the neutron electric dipole moment experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute since 2010. Its response for routine runs of the neutron electric dipole moment experiment is presented.

  12. Low-energy neutron detector based upon lithium lanthanide borate scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Czirr, John B.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting neutrons includes a cerium activated scintillation crystal containing .sup.10 B, with the scintillation crystal emitting light in response to .alpha. particles emitted from the .sup.10 B(n,.alpha.)Li* reaction. The apparatus also includes a gamma scintillator positioned adjacent the crystal and which generates light in response to gamma rays emitted from the decay of Li*. The apparatus further includes a first and a second light-to-electronic signal converter each positioned to respectively receive light from the crystal and the gamma scintillator, and each respectively outputting first and second electronic signals representative of .alpha. particles from the .sup.10 B(n,.alpha.)Li* reaction and gamma rays from the .sup.10 B(n,.alpha.)Li* reaction. The apparatus includes a coincidence circuit connected to receive the first and second signals and which generates a coincidence signal when the first and second signals coincide. The apparatus also includes a data analyzer for receiving an additional signal from at least one of the first and second converters, and for operating in response to the coincidence signal.

  13. Thin-film scintillators for extended ultraviolet /UV/ response silicon detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W.

    1979-01-01

    The preparation and radiometric properties of silicon detectors coated with fluorescent thin films are described. The films are deposited from solutions of clear plastics, such as acrylic resins, polyvinyl toluene or polystyrene, and of organic laser dyes in a common solvent. They are optically clear, mechanically and chemically stable, yet easily applied and removed. Multiple doped films of a few microns thickness exhibit broad-band absorption from less than 250 nm to about 450 nm and narrow band emissions with peaks ranging from 380 nm to 600 nm. Internal quantum efficiencies are close to 100 percent and fluorescence decay times are in the nanosecond range. When deposited on optically denser media, a large fraction of the fluorescent emission is trapped in the substrate. Silicon photodiodes coated with multiple doped films exhibit high external quantum efficiencies and virtually flat photon response in the near UV.

  14. WE-AB-BRB-06: A Temperature Independent Plastic Scintillation Detector Capable of Simultaneous Dose and Temperature Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Therriault-Proulx, F; Wootton, L; Beddar, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a measurement method that renders plastic scintillation detectors temperature independent and capable of recovering dose and temperature information simultaneously. Methods: A novel approach was developed to account for the temperature dependence of plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) without prior knowledge of the temperature. To enable this, the optical response of the scintillating element is separated into two sub-components, one being the response at a given temperature and the other accounting for the change in the optical emission spectrum with temperature. Using a previously demonstrated hyperspectral approach and following the proper calibration protocol, the contribution to scintillator emission and physical value of both dose and temperature can be obtained in real-time. To validate the method, dose and temperature were measured under cobalt irradiation in a temperature controlled water tank developed for this study. The temperature was varied from 22°C to 42°C. Depth-dose curves were also obtained during irradiations from a linear accelerator, first maintaining the water at room temperature and then warming it to 40°C and letting it cool down naturally over the course of the second measurement. Results: Dose measurements delivered with the Co-60 unit showed an average relative difference to the expected value of (1.0±0.8)%, with a maximum difference of 2.3% over the entire range of temperatures. The measured temperatures using the PSD were all within 1°C of the expected values. The difference between room temperature and warmer depth dose measurements differed by only (1.2±0.4)%. The dosimeter showed to be accurate for temporal resolution down to 0.1s. Conclusion: The proposed method was shown to reliably correct for the temperature dependence of a PSD. Additionally, it makes it possible to assess the temperature at the point of measurement. These are significant advances in PSD technology, particularly in relation to real

  15. Optimization of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory Digital Data Acquisition System for use with fast scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokop, C. J.; Liddick, S. N.; Larson, N. R.; Suchyta, S.; Tompkins, J. R.

    2015-08-01

    The Digital Data Acquisition System (DDAS) at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) has expanded to instrument arrays composed of fast-scintillator detectors. The expansion has motivated the development of software designed to optimize the time- and energy-resolving capabilities of the system, which is a collection of 16-channel FPGA-programmable modules running 12- and 14-bit ADCs with sampling frequencies of 100 and 250 MSPS, respectively. Using the techniques described herein, the time resolution of the DDAS electronics has been substantially improved. For signal amplitudes occupying < 10 % the full range of the ADC, the time resolution of the DDAS electronics, measured online, has been reduced to < 100 ps and < 40 ps for 100 MSPS and 250 MSPS modules, respectively. A time resolution of ≈ 350 ps, at 511 keV, between two 38 mm×38 mm lanthanum bromide (LaBr3) detectors, equipped with Hamamatsu R6231 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), has also been realized. Similar optimization techniques applied to the DDAS energy-extraction algorithms have yielded energy resolutions below 2% at 1.33 MeV for both the 100 and 250 MSPS digitizers using the same LaBr3 detectors. The techniques described in this work are broadly applicable to other digital acquisition systems that are capable of recording the digitized raw detector signals.

  16. Characterization of a GEM-based scintillation detector with He-CF4 gas mixture in clinical proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichiporov, D.; Coutinho, L.; Klyachko, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    Accurate, high-spatial resolution dosimetry in proton therapy is a time consuming task, and may be challenging in the case of small fields, due to the lack of adequate instrumentation. The purpose of this work is to develop a novel dose imaging detector with high spatial resolution and tissue equivalent response to dose in the Bragg peak, suitable for beam commissioning and quality assurance measurements. A scintillation gas electron multiplier (GEM) detector based on a double GEM amplification structure with optical readout was filled with a He/CF4 gas mixture and evaluated in pristine and modulated proton beams of several penetration ranges. The detector’s performance was characterized in terms of linearity in dose rate, spatial resolution, short- and long-term stability and tissue-equivalence of response at different energies. Depth-dose profiles measured with the GEM detector in the 115-205 MeV energy range were compared with the profiles measured under similar conditions using the PinPoint 3D small-volume ion chamber. The GEM detector filled with a He-based mixture has a nearly tissue equivalent response in the proton beam and may become an attractive and efficient tool for high-resolution 2D and 3D dose imaging in proton dosimetry, and especially in small-field applications.

  17. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

  18. SU-E-T-167: Characterization of In-House Plastic Scintillator Detectors Array for Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, T; Liu, H; Dimofte, A; Darafsheh, A; Lin, H; Kassaee, A; Finlay, J; Both, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize basic performance of plastic scintillator detectors (PSD) array designed for dosimetry of radiation therapy. Methods: An in-house PSD array has been developed by placing single point PSD into customized 2D holder. Each point PSD is a plastic scintillating fiber-based detector designed for highly accurate measurement of small radiotherapy fields used in patient plan verification and machine commissioning and QA procedures. A parallel fiber without PSD is used for Cerenkov separation by subtracting from PSD readings. Cerenkov separation was confirmed by optical spectroscopy. Alternative Cerenkov separation approaches are also investigated. The optical signal was converted to electronic signal with a photodiode and then subsequently amplified. We measured its dosimetry performance, including percentage depth dose and output factor, and compared with reference ion chamber measurements. The PSD array is then placed along the radiation beam for multiple point dose measurement, representing subsets of PDD measurements, or perpendicular to the beam for profile measurements. Results: The dosimetry results of PSD point measurements agree well with reference ion chamber measurements. For percentage depth dose, the maximal differences between PSD and ion chamber results are 3.5% and 2.7% for 6MV and 15MV beams, respectively. For the output factors, PSD measurements are within 3% from ion chamber results. PDD and profile measurement with PSD array are also performed. Conclusions: The current design of multichannel PSD array is feasible for the dosimetry measurement in radiation therapy. Dose distribution along or perpendicular to the beam path could be measured. It might as well be used as range verification in proton therapy.A PS hollow fiber detector will be investigated to eliminate the Cerenkov radiation effect so that all 32 channels can be used.

  19. Physics studies with ICARUS and a hybrid ionization and scintillation fiber detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the physics possibilities for the ICARUS detector currently being tested at CERN. The physics potential goes from a massive proton decay detector to the study of solar neutrinos. In addition, the detection of [nu][sub [mu

  20. SU-E-T-423: TrueBeam Small Field Dosimetry Using Commercial Plastic Scintillation and Other Stereotactic Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Pino, R; Therriault-Proulx, F; Wang, X; Yang, J; Beddar, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To perform dose profile and output factor (OF) measurements with the Exradin W1 plastic scintillation detector (PSD) for small fields made by the high-definition multi-leaf collimator (MLC) on the TrueBeam STx system and to compare them to values measured with an IBA CC01 ionization chamber and a Sun Nuclear Edge detector diode for 6 MV photon beams. Methods: The Exradin W1 is a new small volume near-water equivalent and energy independent PSD manufactured by Standard Imaging, Inc. All measurements were performed in an IBA Blue Phantom water tank. Square MLC-shaped fields with sides ranging from 0.5 cm to 2 cm and jawshaped fields with sides ranging from 1 cm to 40 cm were measured using an SAD setup at 10 cm depth. Dose profile and percent depth dose (PDD) measurements were also taken under the same conditions for MLC fields 0.5×0.5 and 1×1 cm2 in size with jaws at 2×2cm2. The CC01 and W1 were vertically mounted. Results: OFs measured with the W1 for jaw only square fields were consistent with the ones measured with a Farmers PTW TN33013 ion chamber (1.8% maximum deviation). OF and penumbra measurement results are presented below. PDDs measured for all detectors are within 1.5% for the 0.5×0.5 cm2 and within 1% for the 1×1 cm2 MLC fields.Output factors:MLC size W1 CC01 EDGE0.5cm 0.555 0.541 0.5851.0cm 0.716 0.702 0.7331.5cm 0.779 0.761 0.7772.0cm 0.804 0.785 0.796Penumbras (mm):MLC size W1 CC01 EDGE0.5cm 2.7 2.9 2.51.0cm 3.0 3.4 2. Conclusion: OFs measured for small MLC fields were consistent with the ones measured with the other stereotactic detectors. Measured penumbras are consistent with detector size. The Exradin W1 PSD is an excellent choice for characterizing MLC-shaped small beam dosimetry used for stereotactic radiosurgery and body radiation therapy. Sam Beddar would like to disclose a NIH/NCI SBIR Phase II grant (2R44CA153824-02A1) with Standard Imaging, Title: “Water-Equivalent Plastic Scintillation Detectors for Small Field

  1. Development of a scintillation-fiber detector for real-time particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presti, D.; Bonanno, D. L.; Longhitano, F.; Pugliatti, C.; Russo, G. V.; Aiello, S.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Giordano, V.; Leonora, E.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Russo, M.; Sipala, V.; Stancampiano, C.; Reito, S.

    2013-04-01

    The prototype of the OFFSET (Optical Fiber Folded Scintillating Extended Tracker) tracker is presented. It exploits a novel system for particle tracking, designed to achieve real-time imaging, large detection areas, and a high spatial resolution especially suitable for use in medical diagnostics. The main results regarding the system architecture have been used as a demonstration of the technique which has been patented by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). The prototype of this tracker, presented in this paper, has a 20 × 20 cm2 sensitive area, consisting of two crossed ribbons of 500 micron square scintillating fibers. The track position information is extracted in real time in an innovative way, using a reduced number of read-out channels to obtain very large detection area with moderate enough costs and complexity. The performance of the tracker was investigated using beta sources, cosmic rays, and a 62 MeV proton beam.

  2. Evaluating the Response of Polyvinyl Toluene Scintillators used in Portal Detectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    34 6. Panel mounted in light box with grid. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 7. Pulse-height spectrum from a test sample of BC-408. . . . . . . 37...61 24. Modeled effects of the self attenuation and loss of scintillated light . 63 25. The residuals from a multiple linear regression of model of total...24 9. Determination of the effects of ambient light on pulse-height spec- trum

  3. The angular dependence of pulse shape discrimination and detection sensitivity in cylindrical and cubic EJ-309 organic liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. R.; Joyce, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Liquid scintillators are used widely for neutron detection and for the assay of nuclear materials. However, due to the constituents of the detector and the nitrogen void within the detector cell, usually incorporated to accommodate any expansion that might occur to avoid leakage, fluctuations in detector response have been observed associated with the orientation of the detector when in use. In this work the angular dependence of the pulse-shape discrimination performance in an EJ309 liquid scintillator has been investigated with 252Cf in terms of the separation of γ -ray and neutron events, described quantitatively by the figure-of-merit. A subtle dependence in terms of pulse-shape discrimination is observed. In contrast, a more significant dependence of detection sensitivity with the angle of orientation is evident.

  4. Impact of the Fano Factor on Position and Energy Estimation in Scintillation Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Bora, Vaibhav; Barrett, Harrison H.; Jha, Abhinav K.; Clarkson, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The Fano factor for an integer-valued random variable is defined as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Light from various scintillation crystals have been reported to have Fano factors from sub-Poisson (Fano factor < 1) to super-Poisson (Fano factor > 1). For a given mean, a smaller Fano factor implies a smaller variance and thus less noise. We investigated if lower noise in the scintillation light will result in better spatial and energy resolutions. The impact of Fano factor on the estimation of position of interaction and energy deposited in simple gamma-camera geometries is estimated by two methods - calculating the Cramér-Rao bound and estimating the variance of a maximum likelihood estimator. The methods are consistent with each other and indicate that when estimating the position of interaction and energy deposited by a gamma-ray photon, the Fano factor of a scintillator does not affect the spatial resolution. A smaller Fano factor results in a better energy resolution. PMID:26523069

  5. Impact of the Fano Factor on Position and Energy Estimation in Scintillation Detectors.

    PubMed

    Bora, Vaibhav; Barrett, Harrison H; Jha, Abhinav K; Clarkson, Eric

    2015-02-01

    The Fano factor for an integer-valued random variable is defined as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Light from various scintillation crystals have been reported to have Fano factors from sub-Poisson (Fano factor < 1) to super-Poisson (Fano factor > 1). For a given mean, a smaller Fano factor implies a smaller variance and thus less noise. We investigated if lower noise in the scintillation light will result in better spatial and energy resolutions. The impact of Fano factor on the estimation of position of interaction and energy deposited in simple gamma-camera geometries is estimated by two methods - calculating the Cramér-Rao bound and estimating the variance of a maximum likelihood estimator. The methods are consistent with each other and indicate that when estimating the position of interaction and energy deposited by a gamma-ray photon, the Fano factor of a scintillator does not affect the spatial resolution. A smaller Fano factor results in a better energy resolution.

  6. Cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS flat panel detector: Visibility of simulated microcalcifications

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To measure and investigate the improvement of microcalcification (MC) visibility in cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (Dexela 2923, Perkin Elmer).Methods: Aluminum wires and calcium carbonate grains of various sizes were embedded in a paraffin cylinder to simulate imaging of calcifications in a breast. Phantoms were imaged with a benchtop experimental cone beam CT system at various exposure levels. In addition to the Dexela detector, a high pitch (50 μm), thin (150 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (C7921CA-09, Hamamatsu Corporation, Hamamatsu City, Japan) and a widely used low pitch (194 μm), thick (600 μm) scintillator aSi/CsI flat panel detector (PaxScan 4030CB, Varian Medical Systems) were also used in scanning for comparison. The images were independently reviewed by six readers (imaging physicists). The MC visibility was quantified as the fraction of visible MCs and measured as a function of the estimated mean glandular dose (MGD) level for various MC sizes and detectors. The modulation transfer functions (MTFs) and detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) were also measured and compared for the three detectors used.Results: The authors have demonstrated that the use of a high pitch (75 μm) CMOS detector coupled with a thick (500 μm) CsI scintillator helped make the smaller 150–160, 160–180, and 180–200 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 10.8, 9, and 10.8 mGy, respectively. It also made the larger 200–212 and 212–224 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 7.2 mGy. No performance improvement was observed for 224–250 μm or larger size groups. With the higher spatial resolution of the Dexela detector based system, the apparent dimensions and shapes of MCs were more accurately rendered. The results show that with the aforementioned detector, a 73% visibility could be achieved in imaging 160–180 μm MCs as compared to 28% visibility achieved by

  7. SU-E-T-476: Quality Assurance for Gamma Knife Perfexion Using the Exradin W1 Plastic Scintillation Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Pino, R; Therriault-Proulx, F; Yang, J; Beddar, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To perform dose profile and output factor measurements for the Exradin W1 plastic scintillation detector (PSD) for the Gamma Knife Perfexion (GKP) collimators in a Lucy phantom and to compare these values to an Exradin A16 ion chamber, EBT3 radiochromic film and treatment planning system (TPS) data. Methods: We used the Exradin W1 PSD which has a small volume, near-water equivalent sensitive element. It has also been shown to be energy independent. This new detector is manufactured and distributed by Standard Imaging, Inc. Measurements were performed for all three collimators (4 mm, 8 mm and 16 mm) for the GKP. The Lucy phantom with the PSD inserted was moved in small steps to acquire profiles in all three directions. EBT3 film was inserted in the Lucy phantom and exposed to a single shot for each collimator. Relative output factors were measured using the three detectors while profiles acquired with the PSD were compared to the ones measured with EBT3 radiochromic film. Results: Measured output factors relative to the largest collimator are as followsCollimator PS EBT3 A1616mm 1.000 1.000 1.0008mm 0.892 0.881 0.8834mm 0.795 0.793 0.727 The nominal (vendor) OFs for GKP are 1.000, 0.900, and 0.814, for collimators 16 mm, 8 mm and 4 mm, respectively. There is excellent agreement between all profiles measured with the PSD and EBT3 as well as with the TPS data provided by the vendor. Conclusion: Output factors measured with the W1 were consistent with the ones measured with EBT3 and A16 ion chamber. Measured profiles are in excellent agreement. The W1 detector seems well suited for beam QA for Gamma Knife due to its dosimetric characteristics. Sam Beddar would like to disclose a NIH/NCI SBIR Phase II grant (2R44CA153824-02A1) with Standard Imaging, Title: “Water-Equivalent Plastic Scintillation Detectors for Small Field Radiotherapy”.

  8. Homestake tracking spectrometer: a one-mile deep 1400-ton liquid-scintillation nucleon-decay detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, M.L.; Davidson, I.; Lande, K.; Lee, C.K.; Marshall, E.; Steinberg, R.I.; Cleveland, B.; Davis, R. Jr.; Lowenstein, D.

    1982-01-01

    We describe a proposed nucleon decay detector able to demonstrate the existence of nucleon decay for lifetimes up to 5 x 10/sup 32/ yr. The proposed instrument is a self-vetoed completely-active 1400-ton liquid scintillation Tracking Spectrometer to be located in the Homestake Mine at a depth of 4200 mwe, where the cosmic ray muon flux is only 1100/m/sup 2//yr, more than 10/sup 7/ times lower than the flux at the earth's surface. Based on computer simulations and laboratory measurements, the Tracking Spectrometer will have a spatial resolution of +- 15 cm (0.32 radiation lengths); energy resolution of +- 4.2%; and time resolution of +-1.3 ns. Because liquid scintillator responds to total ionization energy, all neutrinoless nucleon decay modes will produce a sharp (+- 4.2%) total energy peak at approximately 938 MeV, thereby allowing clear separation of nucleon decay events from atmospheric neutrino and other backgrounds. The instrument will be about equally sensitive to most nucleon decay modes. It will be able to identify most of the likely decay modes (including n ..-->.. ..nu.. + K/sub s//sup 0/ as suggested by supersymmetric grand unified theories), as well as determine the charge of lepton secondaries and the polarization of secondary muons.

  9. Preliminary evaluation of the dosimetric accuracy of the in vivo plastic scintillation detector OARtrac system for prostate cancer treatments

    PubMed Central

    Klawikowski, Slade J.; Zeringue, Clint; Wootton, Landon S.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Beddar, Sam

    2014-01-01

    A promising, new, in vivo prostate dosimetry system has been developed for clinical radiation therapy. This work outlines the preliminary end-to-end testing of the accuracy and precision of the new OARtrac scintillation dosimetry system. We tested 94 calibrated plastic scintillation detector (PSD) probes before their final integration into endorectal balloon assemblies. These probes had been calibrated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Dosimetry Laboratory (MDADL). We used a complete clinical OARtrac system including the PSD probes, charge coupled device (CCD camera) monitoring system, and the manufacturer’s integrated software package. The PSD probes were irradiated at 6 MV in a Solid Water® phantom. Irradiations were performed with a 6 MV linear accelerator using anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior (AP/PA) matched fields to a maximum dose of 200 cGy in a 100 cm source-axis distance (SAD geometry. As a whole, the OARtrac system has good accuracy with a mean error of 0.01% and an error spread of ± 5.4% at the 95% confidence interval. These results reflect the PSD probes’ accuracy before their final insertion into endorectal balloons. Future work will test the dosimetric effects of mounting the PSD probes within the endorectal balloon assemblies. PMID:24732073

  10. Urey: Mars Organic and Oxidant Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version

    Some key components of a NASA-funded instrument being developed for the payload of the European Space Agency's ExoMars mission stand out in this illustration of the instrument.

    The instrument is the Urey: Mars Organic and Oxidant Detector. It can check for the faintest traces of life's molecular building blocks. If those are present, it can assess whether they were produced by anything alive. It can also evaluate harsh environmental conditions that could be erasing those molecular clues.

    ExoMars is planned as a rover to be launched in 2013 and search on Mars for signs of life.

    Samples of Martian soil collected by a drill on the rover will be delivered to the Urey instrument. The instrument component called the sub-critical water extractor adds water and heats the sample, getting different types of organic compounds to dissolve into the water at different temperatures. The Mars organic detector uses a fluorescent reagent and laser to detect organic chemicals. The micro-capillary electrophoresis component separates different types of organic chemicals from each others for identifying which ones are present in the sample. The Mars oxidant instrument, part of which is on a separately mounted deck unit not pictured, assesses how readily organic material would be broken down by the radiation, atmosphere and soil chemistry of the site.

  11. A detector insert based on continuous scintillators for hybrid MR-PET imaging of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rato Mendes, P.; Cuerdo, R.; Sarasola, I.; García de Acilu, P.; Navarrete, J.; Vela, O.; Oller, J. C.; Cela, J. M.; Núñez, L.; Pastrana, M.; Romero, L.; Willmott, C.

    2013-02-01

    We are developing a positron emission tomography (PET) insert for existing magnetic resonance (MR) equipment, aiming at hybrid MR-PET imaging. Our detector block design is based on trapezoid-shaped LYSO:Ce monolithic scintillators coupled to magnetically compatible Hamamatsu S8550-02 silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) matrices with a dedicated ASIC front-end readout from GammaMedica-Ideas (Fornebu, Norway). The detectors are position sensitive, capable of determining the incidence point of 511 keV gammas with an intrinsic spatial resolution on the order of 2 mm by means of supervised learning neural-network (NN) algorithms. These algorithms, apart from providing continuous coordinates, are also intrinsically corrected for depth of interaction effects and thus parallax-free. Recently we have implemented an advanced prototype featuring two heads with four detector blocks each and final front-end and readout electronics, improving the spatial resolution of reconstructed point source images down to 1.7 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM). Presently we are carrying out operational tests of components and systems under magnetic fields using a 3 T MR scanner. In this paper we present a description of our project, a summary of the results obtained with laboratory prototypes, and the strategy to build and install the complete system at the nuclear medicine department of a collaborating hospital.

  12. Real-time in vivo rectal wall dosimetry using plastic scintillation detectors for patients with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wootton, Landon; Kudchadker, Rajat; Lee, Andrew; Beddar, Sam

    2014-01-01

    We designed and constructed an in vivo dosimetry system using plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) to monitor dose to the rectal wall in patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Five patients were enrolled in an Institutional Review Board–approved protocol for twice weekly in vivo dose monitoring with our system, resulting in a total of 142 in vivo dose measurements. PSDs were attached to the surface of endorectal balloons used for prostate immobilization to place the PSDs in contact with the rectal wall. Absorbed dose was measured in real time and the total measured dose was compared with the dose calculated by the treatment planning system on the daily CT image dataset. The mean difference between measured and calculated doses for the entire patient population was −0.4% (standard deviation 2.8%). The mean difference between daily measured and calculated doses for each patient ranged from −3.3% to 3.3% (standard deviation ranged from 5.6% to 7.1% for 4 patients and was 14.0% for the last, for whom optimal positioning of the detector was difficult owing to the patient’s large size). Patients tolerated the detectors well and the treatment workflow was not compromised. Overall, PSDs performed well as in vivo dosimeters, providing excellent accuracy, real-time measurement, and reusability. PMID:24434775

  13. Counting neutrons from the spontaneous fission of {sup 238}U using scintillation detectors and mixed field analysers

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Helen M. O'D.; Joyce, Malcolm J.; Jones, Ashley

    2015-07-01

    It is well documented that {sup 238}U decays by spontaneous fission, and that it is the main component of most nuclear fuels. As nuclear fuels are largely classed as Special Nuclear Material (SNM), they have to be fully accounted for by owners and processing facilities. One possible method for verifying declared amounts of SNM is to count the spontaneous neutrons produced from {sup 238}U. Using four EJ-309 liquid scintillation detectors and a mixed field analyser, spontaneous neutrons from 16.4 g of depleted uranium (0.3% enrichment) have been assayed. The assay method shows promising results and this proof of principle will be researched further in order for it to be applied in an industrial setting. (authors)

  14. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Measurement of the neutron spectrum of a Pu-C source with a liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Song-Lin; Huang, Han-Xiong; Ruan, Xi-Chao; Li, Xia; Bao, Jie; Nie, Yang-Bo; Zhong, Qi-Ping; Zhou, Zu-Ying; Kong, Xiang-Zhong

    2009-05-01

    The neutron response function for a BC501A liquid scintillator (LS) has been measured using a series of monoenergetic neutrons produced by the p-T reaction. The proton energies were chosen such as to produce neutrons in the energy range of 1 to 20 MeV. The principles of the technique of unfolding a neutron energy spectrum by using the measured neutron response function and the measured Pulse Height (PH) spectrum is briefly described. The PH spectrum of neutrons from the Pu-C source, which will be used for the calibration of the reactor antineutrino detectors for the Daya Bay neutrino experiment, was measured and analyzed to get the neutron energy spectrum. Simultaneously the neutron energy spectrum of an Am-Be source was measured and compared with other measurements as a check of the result for the Pu-C source. Finally, an error analysis and a discussion of the results are given.

  15. Hybrid gas scintillation proportional counter/phoswich detector for hard X-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Manandhar, Raj P.

    1989-01-01

    A concept is presented for a balloon-borne imaging hybrid proportional counter/phoswich detector of medium to hard X-rays. The phoswich would be optically coupled to the exit window of the proportional counter, and both detectors would use a common position-sensitive readout. It is anticipated that such a detector could combine the good energy and position resolution and excellent background rejection ability of the proportional counter for incident photon energies less than 100 keV with the extended response of the phoswich for higher energies. The phoswich could also be used to reject Compton scattering events in the proportional counter. This detector concept is studied using numerical simulations of a 400 sq cm square prototype detector. Results from this simulation indicate that current levels of proportional counter and phoswich performance are attainable at small cost in quantum efficiency, compared to a bare phoswich detector.

  16. Shaped scintillation detector systems for measurements of gamma ray flux anisotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trombka, J. I.; Vette, J. I.; Stecker, F. W.; Eller, E. L.; Wildes, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    The detection efficiencies of cylindrical detectors for various gamma ray photon angular distributions were studied in the energy range from .10 Mev to 15 Mev. These studies indicate that simple detector systems on small satellites can be used to measure flux anisotropy of cosmic gamma rays and the angular distribution of albedo gamma rays produced in planetary atmospheres. The results indicate that flat cylindrical detectors are most suitable for measuring flux anisotropy because of their angular response function. A general method for calculating detection efficiencies for such detectors is presented.

  17. Separating double-beta decay events from solar neutrino interactions in a kiloton-scale liquid scintillator detector by fast timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elagin, Andrey; Frisch, Henry J.; Naranjo, Brian; Ouellet, Jonathan; Winslow, Lindley; Wongjirad, Taritree

    2017-03-01

    We present a technique for separating nuclear double beta decay (ββ -decay) events from background neutrino interactions due to 8B decays in the sun. This background becomes dominant in a kiloton-scale liquid-scintillator detector deep underground and is usually considered as irreducible due to an overlap in deposited energy with the signal. However, electrons from 0 νββ -decay often exceed the Cherenkov threshold in liquid scintillator, producing photons that are prompt and correlated in direction with the initial electron direction. The use of large-area fast photodetectors allows some separation of these prompt photons from delayed isotropic scintillation light and, thus, the possibility of reconstructing the event topology. Using a simulation of a 6.5 m radius liquid scintillator detector with 100 ps resolution photodetectors, we show that a spherical harmonics analysis of early-arrival light can discriminate between 0 νββ -decay signal and 8B solar neutrino background events on a statistical basis. Good separation will require the development of a slow scintillator with a 5 ns risetime.

  18. An algorithm for automatic crystal identification in pixelated scintillation detectors using thin plate splines and Gaussian mixture models.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, Graham; Stortz, Greg; Goertzen, Andrew L

    2016-02-07

    A typical positron emission tomography detector is comprised of a scintillator crystal array coupled to a photodetector array or other position sensitive detector. Such detectors using light sharing to read out crystal elements require the creation of a crystal lookup table (CLUT) that maps the detector response to the crystal of interaction based on the x-y position of the event calculated through Anger-type logic. It is vital for system performance that these CLUTs be accurate so that the location of events can be accurately identified and so that crystal-specific corrections, such as energy windowing or time alignment, can be applied. While using manual segmentation of the flood image to create the CLUT is a simple and reliable approach, it is both tedious and time consuming for systems with large numbers of crystal elements. In this work we describe the development of an automated algorithm for CLUT generation that uses a Gaussian mixture model paired with thin plate splines (TPS) to iteratively fit a crystal layout template that includes the crystal numbering pattern. Starting from a region of stability, Gaussians are individually fit to data corresponding to crystal locations while simultaneously updating a TPS for predicting future Gaussian locations at the edge of a region of interest that grows as individual Gaussians converge to crystal locations. The algorithm was tested with flood image data collected from 16 detector modules, each consisting of a 409 crystal dual-layer offset LYSO crystal array readout by a 32 pixel SiPM array. For these detector flood images, depending on user defined input parameters, the algorithm runtime ranged between 17.5-82.5 s per detector on a single core of an Intel i7 processor. The method maintained an accuracy above 99.8% across all tests, with the majority of errors being localized to error prone corner regions. This method can be easily extended for use with other detector types through adjustment of the initial

  19. An algorithm for automatic crystal identification in pixelated scintillation detectors using thin plate splines and Gaussian mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellenberg, Graham; Stortz, Greg; Goertzen, Andrew L.

    2016-02-01

    A typical positron emission tomography detector is comprised of a scintillator crystal array coupled to a photodetector array or other position sensitive detector. Such detectors using light sharing to read out crystal elements require the creation of a crystal lookup table (CLUT) that maps the detector response to the crystal of interaction based on the x-y position of the event calculated through Anger-type logic. It is vital for system performance that these CLUTs be accurate so that the location of events can be accurately identified and so that crystal-specific corrections, such as energy windowing or time alignment, can be applied. While using manual segmentation of the flood image to create the CLUT is a simple and reliable approach, it is both tedious and time consuming for systems with large numbers of crystal elements. In this work we describe the development of an automated algorithm for CLUT generation that uses a Gaussian mixture model paired with thin plate splines (TPS) to iteratively fit a crystal layout template that includes the crystal numbering pattern. Starting from a region of stability, Gaussians are individually fit to data corresponding to crystal locations while simultaneously updating a TPS for predicting future Gaussian locations at the edge of a region of interest that grows as individual Gaussians converge to crystal locations. The algorithm was tested with flood image data collected from 16 detector modules, each consisting of a 409 crystal dual-layer offset LYSO crystal array readout by a 32 pixel SiPM array. For these detector flood images, depending on user defined input parameters, the algorithm runtime ranged between 17.5-82.5 s per detector on a single core of an Intel i7 processor. The method maintained an accuracy above 99.8% across all tests, with the majority of errors being localized to error prone corner regions. This method can be easily extended for use with other detector types through adjustment of the initial

  20. Light yield measurements of "finger" structured and unstructured scintillators after gamma and neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, S. V.; Boyarintsev, A. Yu.; Danilov, M. V.; Emeliantchik, I. F.; Ershov, Yu. V.; Golutvin, I. A.; Grinyov, B. V.; Ibragimova, E.; Levchuk, L. G.; Litomin, A. V.; Makankin, A. M.; Malakhov, A. I.; Moisenz, P. V.; Nuritdinov, I.; Popov, V. F.; Rusinov, V. Yu.; Shumeiko, N. M.; Smirnov, V. A.; Sorokin, P. V.; Tarkovskii, E. I.; Tashmetov, A.; Vasiliev, S. E.; Yuldashev, B.; Zamiatin, N. I.; Zhmurin, P. N.

    2016-05-01

    Plastic scintillators are often used as detectors in High Energy Physics (HEP), but have insufficient radiation hardness. Organization of better light collection inside a single detector may prolong operation life of scintillators. A finger-strip plastic scintillator option has many advantages to keep the excellent detector performance at high luminosity. Measurements assigned to show an advantage of a stripped detector vs. the un-stripped one in the range of increased absorbed doses and the smallest dose rates have been performed. This method has proved to be a good upgrade strategy.

  1. On the use of a single-fiber multipoint plastic scintillation detector for {sup 192}Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Therriault-Proulx, Francois; Beddar, Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to prove the feasibility of using a single-fiber multipoint plastic scintillation detector (mPSD) as an in vivo verification tool during {sup 192}Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments.Methods: A three-point detector was built and inserted inside a catheter-positioning template placed in a water phantom. A hyperspectral approach was implemented to discriminate the different optical signals composing the light output at the exit of the single collection optical fiber. The mPSD was tested with different source-to-detector positions, ranging from 1 to 5 cm radially and over 10.5 cm along the longitudinal axis of the detector, and with various integration times. Several strategies for improving the accuracy of the detector were investigated. The device's accuracy in detecting source position was also tested.Results: Good agreement with the expected doses was obtained for all of the scintillating elements, with average relative differences from the expected values of 3.4 {+-} 2.1%, 3.0 {+-} 0.7%, and 4.5 {+-} 1.0% for scintillating elements from the distal to the proximal. A dose threshold of 3 cGy improved the general accuracy of the detector. An integration time of 3 s offered a good trade-off between precision and temporal resolution. Finally, the mPSD measured the radioactive source positioning uncertainty to be no more than 0.32 {+-} 0.06 mm. The accuracy and precision of the detector were improved by a dose-weighted function combining the three measurement points and known details about the geometry of the detector construction.Conclusions: The use of a mPSD for high-dose-rate brachytherapy dosimetry is feasible. This detector shows great promise for development of in vivo applications for real-time verification of treatment delivery.

  2. Digital signal processing for a thermal neutron detector using ZnS(Ag):6LiF scintillating layers read out with WLS fibers and SiPMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosset, J.-B.; Stoykov, A.; Greuter, U.; Hildebrandt, M.; Schlumpf, N.

    2016-07-01

    We present a digital signal processing system based on a photon counting approach which we developed for a thermal neutron detector consisting of ZnS(Ag):6LiF scintillating layers read out with WLS fibers and SiPMs. Three digital filters have been evaluated: a moving sum, a moving sum after differentiation and a digital CR-RC4 filter. The performances of the detector with these filters are presented. A full analog signal processing using a CR-RC4 filter has been emulated digitally. The detector performance obtained with this analog approach is compared with the one obtained with the best performing digital approach.

  3. Novel scintillation detector design and performance for proton radiography and computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, R. W.; Hurley, R. F.; Johnson, R. P.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Plautz, T.; Giacometti, V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (pCT) will enable accurate prediction of proton and ion range in a patient while providing the benefit of lower radiation exposure than in x-ray CT. The accuracy of the range prediction is essential for treatment planning in proton or ion therapy and depends upon the detector used to evaluate the water-equivalent path length (WEPL) of a proton passing through the object. A novel approach is presented for an inexpensive WEPL detector for pCT and proton radiography. Methods: A novel multistage detector with an aperture of 10 × 37.5 cm was designed to optimize the accuracy of the WEPL measurements while simplifying detector construction and the performance requirements of its components. The design of the five-stage detector was optimized through simulations based on the geant4 detector simulation toolkit, and the fabricated prototype was calibrated in water-equivalent millimeters with 200 MeV protons in the research beam line of the clinical proton synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center. A special polystyrene step phantom was designed and built to speed up and simplify the calibration procedure. The calibrated five-stage detector was tested in the 200 MeV proton beam as part of the pCT head scanner, using a water phantom and polystyrene slabs to verify the WEPL reconstruction accuracy. Results: The beam-test results demonstrated excellent performance of the new detector, in good agreement with the simulation results. The WEPL measurement accuracy is about 3.0 mm per proton in the 0–260 mm WEPL range required for a pCT head scan with a 200 MeV proton beam. Conclusions: The new multistage design approach to WEPL measurements for proton CT and radiography has been prototyped and tested. The test results show that the design is competitive with much more expensive calorimeter and range-counter designs. PMID:26843230

  4. A method to correct for temperature dependence and measure simultaneously dose and temperature using a plastic scintillation detector

    PubMed Central

    Therriault-Proulx, Francois; Wootton, Landon; Beddar, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) work well for radiation dosimetry. However, they show some temperature dependence, and a priori knowledge of the temperature surrounding the PSD is required to correct for this dependence. We present a novel approach to correct PSD response values for temperature changes instantaneously and without the need for prior knowledge of the temperature value. In addition to rendering the detector temperature-independent, this approach allows for actual temperature measurement using solely the PSD apparatus. With a temperature-controlled water tank, the temperature was varied from room temperature to more than 40°C and the PSD was used to measure the dose delivered from a cobalt-60 photon beam unit to within an average of 0.72% from the expected value. The temperature was measured during each acquisition with the PSD and a thermocouple and values were within 1°C of each other. The depth-dose curve of a 6-MV photon beam was also measured under warm non-stable conditions and this curve agreed to within an average of −0.98% from the curve obtained at room temperature. The feasibility of rendering PSDs temperature-independent was demonstrated with our approach, which also enabled simultaneous measurement of both dose and temperature. This novel approach improves both the robustness and versatility of PSDs. PMID:26407188

  5. The sensitivity of LaBr3:Ce scintillation detectors to low energy neutrons: Measurement and Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tain, J. L.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Aprahamian, A.; Cano-Ott, D.; Fraile, L. M.; Guerrero, C.; Jordan, M. D.; Mach, H.; Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E.; Mosconi, M.; Nolte, R.

    2015-02-01

    The neutron sensitivity of a cylindrical ⊘1.5 in.×1.5 in. LaBr3:Ce scintillation detector was measured using quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams in the energy range from 40 keV to 2.5 MeV. In this energy range the detector is sensitive to γ-rays generated in neutron inelastic and capture processes. The experimental energy response was compared with Monte Carlo simulations performed with the Geant4 simulation toolkit using the so-called High Precision Neutron Models. These models rely on relevant information stored in evaluated nuclear data libraries. The performance of the Geant4 Neutron Data Library as well as several standard nuclear data libraries was investigated. In the latter case this was made possible by the use of a conversion tool that allowed the direct use of the data from other libraries in Geant4. Overall it was found that there was good agreement with experiment for some of the neutron data bases like ENDF/B-VII.0 or JENDL-3.3 but not with the others such as ENDF/B-VI.8 or JEFF-3.1.

  6. Scintillation properties of polycrystalline LaxY1-xO3 ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahi, Sunil; Chen, Wei; Kenarangui, Rasool

    2015-03-01

    Scintillators are the material that absorbs the high-energy photons and emits visible photons. Scintillators are commonly used in radiation detector for security, medical imaging, industrial applications and high energy physics research. Two main types of scintillators are inorganic single crystals and organic (plastic or liquid) scintillators. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, some efficient inorganic scintillator such as NaI and CsI are not environmental friendly. But on the other hand, organic scintillators have low density and hence poor energy resolution which limits their use in gamma spectroscopy. Polycrystalline ceramic can be a cost effective alternative to expensive inorganic single crystal scintillators. Here we have fabricated La0.2Y1.8O3 ceramic scintillator and studied their luminescence and scintillation properties. Ceramic scintillators were fabricated by vacuum sintering of La0.2Y1.8O3 nanoparticles at temperature below the melting point. La0.2Y1.8O3 ceramic were characterized structurally using XRD and TEM. Photoluminescence and radioluminescence studies were done using UV and X-ray as an excitation source. We have used gamma isotopes with different energy to studies the scintillation properties of La0.2Y1.8O3 scintillator. Preliminary studies of La0.2Y1.8O3 scintillator shows promising result with energy resolution comparable to that of NaI and CsI.

  7. A Depth-of-Interaction encoding method for SPECT monolithic scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettiol, M.; Preziosi, E.; Cinti, M. N.; Borrazzo, C.; Fabbri, A.; Cassano, B.; Polito, C.; Pellegrini, R.; Pani, R.

    2016-12-01

    The Depth of Interaction (DoI) discrimination of gamma-photons within scintillation crystals allows to improve imaging performance in PET scanners as well as in SPECT devices equipped with non-parallel collimators (e. g. pinhole ones). In previous works, the authors experimentally proved the efficiency of a DoI-encoding technique in case of a 20 mm-thick monolithic crystal PET module. For the thinner crystals commonly used in SPECT, DoI determination still remains a challenging goal. To this aim, in this work the authors have experimentally evaluated the DoI-encoding method on a 6 mm-thick monolithic LaBr3:Ce crystal. The results prove the efficiency and reliability of the proposed method. It indeed allows to discriminate the gamma photons interacting at the the top and the bottom of the crystal.

  8. Development of a scintillating-fiber beam detector for the MUSE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Erez O.; Piasetzky, Eli; Shamai, Yair; Pilip, Nikolay

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the design, simulation, and prototyping of a scintillating-fiber (SciFi) beam hodoscope that enables real-time particle identification, momentum and position determination, and flux counting in a low-momentum mixed beam of pions, electrons and muons for the MUon-proton Scattering Experiment (MUSE) at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland. The experimental demands and conceptual design are discussed, including the mixing scheme used to suppress cross-talk between adjacent fibers. A comparison between different types of fibers is given. The timing resolution for 1 plane of SciFis is 0.40 ± 0.05 ns, and for 2 fiber planes in coincidence, it is 0.27 ± 0.03 ns. The detection efficiency when at least two planes are required to fire is 98%.

  9. Urey: Mars Organic and Oxidant Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bada, J. L.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Grunthaner, F.; Blaney, D.; Coleman, M.; Farrington, A.; Yen, A.; Mathies, R.; Amudson, R.; Quinn, R.; Zent, A.; Ride, S.; Barron, L.; Botta, O.; Clark, B.; Glavin, D.; Hofmann, B.; Josset, J. L.; Rettberg, P.; Robert, F.; Sephton, M.

    2008-03-01

    One of the fundamental challenges facing the scientific community as we enter this new century of Mars research is to understand, in a rigorous manner, the biotic potential both past and present of this outermost terrestrial-like planet in our solar system. Urey: Mars Organic and Oxidant Detector has been selected for the Pasteur payload of the European Space Agency’s (ESA’s) ExoMars rover mission and is considered a fundamental instrument to achieve the mission’s scientific objectives. The instrument is named Urey in recognition of Harold Clayton Urey’s seminal contributions to cosmochemistry, geochemistry, and the study of the origin of life. The overall goal of Urey is to search for organic compounds directly in the regolith of Mars and to assess their origin. Urey will perform a groundbreaking investigation of the Martian environment that will involve searching for organic compounds indicative of life and prebiotic chemistry at a sensitivity many orders of magnitude greater than Viking or other in situ organic detection systems. Urey will perform the first in situ search for key classes of organic molecules using state-of-the-art analytical methods that provide part-per-trillion sensitivity. It will ascertain whether any of these molecules are abiotic or biotic in origin and will evaluate the survival potential of organic compounds in the environment using state-of-the-art chemoresistor oxidant sensors.

  10. Urey: Mars Organic and Oxidant Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bada, J.

    2006-12-01

    Mars lies at the frontier of planetary exploration science and the question of whether life arose on Mars has been widely debated. One of the fundamental challenges facing the scientific community as we enter this new century of Mars research is to understand in a rigorous manner the biotic potential both past and present of this outermost terrestrial-like planet in our solar system. Urey: Mars Organic and Oxidant Detector has been selected for the Pasteur payload in the European Space Agency's (ESA's) ExoMars rover mission and is considered a fundamental instrument to achieve the mission's scientific objectives. The instrument is named Urey in recognition of Harold Clayton Urey's seminal contributions to cosmochemistry, geochemistry and the study of the origin of life. The overall goal of Urey is to search for organic compounds directly in the regolith of Mars and to assess their origin. Urey will perform a groundbreaking investigation of the Martian environment that will involve searching for organic compounds indicative of life and prebiotic chemistry at a sensitivity many orders of magnitude greater than Viking or other in situ organic detection systems. Urey will perform the first in situ search for key classes of organic molecules using state-of-the-art analytical methods that provide part- per-trillion sensitivity. It will ascertain whether any of these molecules are abiotic or biotic in origin and will evaluate the survival potential of organic compounds in the environment using state-of-the-art chemoresistor oxidant sensors.

  11. Urey: Mars Organic and Oxidant Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bada, J. L.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Grunthaner, F.; Blaney, D.; Coleman, M.; Farrington, A.; Yen, A.; Mathies, R.; Amudson, R.; Quinn, R.; Zent, A.; Ride, S.; Barron, L.; Botta, O.; Clark, B.; Glavin, D.; Hofmann, B.; Josset, J. L.; Rettberg, P.; Robert, F.; Sephton, M.

    One of the fundamental challenges facing the scientific community as we enter this new century of Mars research is to understand, in a rigorous manner, the biotic potential both past and present of this outermost terrestrial-like planet in our solar system. Urey: Mars Organic and Oxidant Detector has been selected for the Pasteur payload of the European Space Agency's (ESA's) ExoMars rover mission and is considered a fundamental instrument to achieve the mission's scientific objectives. The instrument is named Urey in recognition of Harold Clayton Urey's seminal contributions to cosmochemistry, geochemistry, and the study of the origin of life. The overall goal of Urey is to search for organic compounds directly in the regolith of Mars and to assess their origin. Urey will perform a groundbreaking investigation of the Martian environment that will involve searching for organic compounds indicative of life and prebiotic chemistry at a sensitivity many orders of magnitude greater than Viking or other in situ organic detection systems. Urey will perform the first in situ search for key classes of organic molecules using state-of-the-art analytical methods that provide part-per-trillion sensitivity. It will ascertain whether any of these molecules are abiotic or biotic in origin and will evaluate the survival potential of organic compounds in the environment using state-of-the-art chemoresistor oxidant sensors.

  12. Technical Note: Removing the stem effect when performing Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy in vivo dosimetry using plastic scintillation detectors: A relevant and necessary step

    SciTech Connect

    Therriault-Proulx, Francois; Beddar, Sam; Briere, Tina M.; Archambault, Louis; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not a stem effect removal technique is necessary when performing Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy in vivo dosimetry using a scintillation detector. Methods: A red-green-blue photodiode connected to a multichannel electrometer was used to detect the light emitted from a plastic scintillation detector (PSD) during irradiation with an Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy source. Accuracy in dose measurement was compared with and without the use of stem effect removal techniques. Monochromatic and polychromatic filtration techniques were studied. An in-house template was built for accurate positioning of catheters in which the source and the PSD were inserted. Dose distribution was measured up to 5 cm from source to detector in the radial and longitudinal directions. Results: The authors found the stem effect to be particularly important when the source was close to the optical fiber guide and far from the scintillation component of the detector. It can account for up to (72{+-}3)% of the signal under clinically relevant conditions. The polychromatic filtration outperformed the monochromatic filtration as well as the absence of filtration in regard to dose measurement accuracy. Conclusions: It is necessary to implement a stem effect removal technique when building a PSD for in vivo dosimetry during Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy. The PSD that the authors have developed for this study would be suitable for such an application.

  13. Time walk correction for TOF-PET detectors based on a monolithic scintillation crystal coupled to a photosensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinke, R.; Löhner, H.; Schaart, D. R.; van Dam, H. T.; Seifert, S.; Beekman, F. J.; Dendooven, P.

    2010-09-01

    When optimizing the timing performance of a time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET) detector based on a monolithic scintillation crystal coupled to a photosensor array, time walk as a function of annihilation photon interaction location inside the crystal needs to be considered. In order to determine the 3D spatial coordinates of the annihilation photon interaction location, a maximum likelihood estimation algorithm was developed, based on a detector characterization by a scan of a 511 keV photon beam across the front and one of the side surfaces of the crystal. The time walk effect was investigated using a 20 mm×20 mm×12 mm LYSO crystal coupled to a fast 4×4 multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT). In the plane parallel to the photosensor array, a spatial resolution of 2.4 mm FWHM is obtained. In the direction perpendicular to the MAPMT (depth-of-interaction, DOI), the resolution ranges from 2.3 mm FWHM near the MAPMT to 4 mm FWHM at a distance of 10 mm. These resolutions are uncorrected for the ˜1 mm beam diameter. A coincidence timing resolution of 358 ps FWHM is obtained in coincidence with a BaF 2 detector. A time walk depending on the 3D annihilation photon interaction location is observed. Throughout the crystal, the time walk spans a range of 100 ps. Calibration of the time walk vs. interaction location allows an event-by-event correction of the time walk.

  14. SU-C-BRD-06: Results From a 5 Patient in Vivo Rectal Wall Dosimetry Study Using Plastic Scintillation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, L; Kudchadker, R; Lee, A; Beddar, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance characteristics of plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) in an in vivo environment for external beam radiation, and to establish the usefulness and ease of implementation of a PSD based in vivo dosimetry system for routine clinical use. Methods: A five patient IRB approved in vivo dosimetry study was performed. Five patients with prostate cancer were enrolled and PSDs were used to monitor rectal wall dose and verify the delivered dose for approximately two fractions each week over the course of their treatment (approximately fourteen fractions), resulting in a total of 142 in vivo measurements. A set of two PSDs was fabricated for each patient. At each monitored fraction the PSDs were attached to the anterior surface of an endorectal balloon used to immobilize the patient's prostate during treatment. A CT scan was acquired with a CTon- rails linear accelerator to localize the detectors and to calculate the dose expected to be delivered to the detectors. Each PSD acquired data in 10 second intervals for the duration of the treatment. The deviation between expected and measured cumulative dose was calculated for each detector for each fraction, and averaged over each patient and the patient population as a whole. Results: The average difference between expected dose and measured dose ranged from -3.3% to 3.3% for individual patients, with standard deviations between 5.6% and 7.1% for four of the patients. The average difference for the entire population was -0.4% with a standard deviation of 2.8%. The detectors were well tolerated by the patients and the system did not interrupt the clinical workflow. Conclusion: PSDs perform well as in vivo dosimeters, exhibiting good accuracy and precision. This, combined with the practicability of using such a system, positions the PSD as a strong candidate for clinical in vivo dosimetry in the future. This work supported in part by the National Cancer Institute through an R01 grant (CA120198

  15. Study of the response of plastic scintillation detectors in small-field 6 MV photon beams by Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lilie L. W.; Beddar, Sam

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the response of plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) in a 6 MV photon beam of various field sizes using Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Three PSDs were simulated: A BC-400 and a BCF-12, each attached to a plastic-core optical fiber, and a BC-400 attached to an air-core optical fiber. PSD response was calculated as the detector dose per unit water dose for field sizes ranging from 10x10 down to 0.5x0.5 cm{sup 2} for both perpendicular and parallel orientations of the detectors to an incident beam. Similar calculations were performed for a CC01 compact chamber. The off-axis dose profiles were calculated in the 0.5x0.5 cm{sup 2} photon beam and were compared to the dose profile calculated for the CC01 chamber and that calculated in water without any detector. The angular dependence of the PSDs' responses in a small photon beam was studied. Results: In the perpendicular orientation, the response of the BCF-12 PSD varied by only 0.5% as the field size decreased from 10x10 to 0.5x0.5 cm{sup 2}, while the response of BC-400 PSD attached to a plastic-core fiber varied by more than 3% at the smallest field size because of its longer sensitive region. In the parallel orientation, the response of both PSDs attached to a plastic-core fiber varied by less than 0.4% for the same range of field sizes. For the PSD attached to an air-core fiber, the response varied, at most, by 2% for both orientations. Conclusions: The responses of all the PSDs investigated in this work can have a variation of only 1%-2% irrespective of field size and orientation of the detector if the length of the sensitive region is not more than 2 mm long and the optical fiber stems are prevented from pointing directly to the incident source.

  16. Study of a Li doped CsI scintillator crystal as a neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madi Filho, T.; Pereira, M. C. C.; Berretta, J. R.; Cárdenas, J. P. N.

    2015-07-01

    The radiation monitoring system is an important requirement in the premises of a nuclear reactor. A variety of types of radiation (neutrons. gamma. beta and fission products) exist in a reactor. associated to the broad energy spectrum of these radiations. implying the need of detectors to be used in the reactor system and security. as well as radiation monitoring. As the neutron sources are associated to gamma radiation. it is necessary that the neutron detecting system may be capable to discriminate the gamma interference. In our work environment. there are two Nuclear Research Reactors and a neutron irradiator with two AmBe sources (592GBq of Am. each). These conditions warrant the development of new types of detectors. Due to the absence of charge in the neutron. it is necessary to use a converter material that generates radiations capable to produce signals in the detector. Materials with high cross section. like Li or B. are used for this purpose. The CsIcrystal doped with 6Li has been studied. The concentration of the lithium doping element (Li) studied was 10-3M. The detector test was done using an AmBe source (37GBq) and gamma sources. The crystal was coupled to a photomultiplier.

  17. Measuring output factors of small fields formed by collimator jaws and multileaf collimator using plastic scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, David M.; Tailor, Ramesh C.; Archambault, Louis; Wang, Lilie; Therriault-Proulx, Francois; Beddar, A. Sam

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: As the practice of using high-energy photon beams to create therapeutic radiation fields of subcentimeter dimensions (as in intensity-modulated radiotherapy or stereotactic radiosurgery) grows, so too does the need for accurate verification of beam output at these small fields in which standard practices of dose verification break down. This study investigates small-field output factors measured using a small plastic scintillation detector (PSD), as well as a 0.01 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber. Specifically, output factors were measured with both detectors using small fields that were defined by either the X-Y collimator jaws or the multileaf collimator (MLC). Methods: A PSD of 0.5 mm diameter and 2 mm length was irradiated with 6 and 18 MV linac beams. The PSD was positioned vertically at a source-to-axis distance of 100 cm, at 10 cm depth in a water phantom, and irradiated with fields ranging in size from 0.5x0.5 to 10x10 cm{sup 2}. The field sizes were defined either by the collimator jaws alone or by a MLC alone. The MLC fields were constructed in two ways: with the closed leaves (i.e., those leaves that were not opened to define the square field) meeting at either the field center line or at a 4 cm offset from the center line. Scintillation light was recorded using a CCD camera and an estimation of error in the median-filtered signals was made using the bootstrapping technique. Measurements were made using a CC01 ionization chamber under conditions identical to those used for the PSD. Results: Output factors measured by the PSD showed close agreement with those measured using the ionization chamber for field sizes of 2.0x2.0 cm{sup 2} and above. At smaller field sizes, the PSD obtained output factors as much as 15% higher than those found using the ionization chamber by 0.6x0.6 cm{sup 2} jaw-defined fields. Output factors measured with no offset of the closed MLC leaves were as much as 20% higher than those measured using a 4 cm leaf offset

  18. Verification of proton range, position, and intensity in IMPT with a 3D liquid scintillator detector system

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, L.; Poenisch, F.; Sahoo, N.; Robertson, D.; Lee, A.; Gillin, M. T.; Mohan, R.; Beddar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) using spot scanned proton beams relies on the delivery of a large number of beamlets to shape the dose distribution in a highly conformal manner. The authors have developed a 3D system based on liquid scintillator to measure the spatial location, intensity, and depth of penetration (energy) of the proton beamlets in near real-time. Methods: The detector system consists of a 20 × 20 × 20 cc liquid scintillator (LS) material in a light tight enclosure connected to a CCD camera. This camera has a field of view of 25.7 by 19.3 cm and a pixel size of 0.4 mm. While the LS is irradiated, the camera continuously acquires images of the light distribution produced inside the LS. Irradiations were made with proton pencil beams produced with a spot-scanning nozzle. Pencil beams with nominal ranges in water between 9.5 and 17.6 cm were scanned to irradiate an area of 10 × 10 cm square on the surface of the LS phantom. Image frames were acquired at 50 ms per frame. Results: The signal to noise ratio of a typical Bragg peak was about 170. Proton range measured from the light distribution produced in the LS was accurate to within 0.3 mm on average. The largest deviation seen between the nominal and measured range was 0.6 mm. Lateral position of the measured pencil beam was accurate to within 0.4 mm on average. The largest deviation seen between the nominal and measured lateral position was 0.8 mm; however, the accuracy of this measurement could be improved by correcting light scattering artifacts. Intensity of single proton spots were measured with precision ranging from 3 % for the smallest spot intensity (0.005 MU) to 0.5 % for the largest spot (0.04 MU). Conclusions: Our LS detector system has been shown to be capable of fast, submillimeter spatial localization of proton spots delivered in a 3D volume. This system could be used for beam range, intensity and position verification in IMPT. PMID:22380355

  19. Monitoring gross alpha and beta activity in liquids by using ZnS(Ag) scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Stevanato, L.; Cester, D.; Filippi, D.; Lunardon, M.; Mistura, G.; Moretto, S.; Viesti, G.; Badocco, D.; Pastore, P.; Romanini, F.

    2015-07-01

    In this work the possibility of monitoring gross alpha and beta activity in liquids using EJ-444 was investigated. Specific tests were carried out to determine the change of the detector properties in water tests. Possible protecting coating is also proposed and tested. Alpha/beta real-time monitoring in liquids is a goal of the EU project TAWARA{sub R}TM. (authors)

  20. High count rate γ-ray spectroscopy with LaBr3:Ce scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löher, B.; Savran, D.; Fiori, E.; Miklavec, M.; Pietralla, N.; Vencelj, M.

    2012-09-01

    The applicability of LaBr3:Ce detectors for high count rate γ-ray spectroscopy is investigated. A 3 in.×3 in. LaBr3:Ce detector is used in a test setup with radioactive sources to study the dependence of energy resolution and photo peak efficiency on the overall count rate in the detector. Digitized traces were recorded using a 500 MHz FADC and analysed with digital signal processing methods. Good performance is obtained using standard techniques up to about 500 kHz counting rate. A pile-up correction method is applied to the data in order to further improve the capabilities at even higher rates with a focus on recovering the losses in efficiency due to signal pile-up. It is shown that γ-ray spectroscopy can be performed with only moderate lossen in efficiency and high resolution at count rates even above 1 MHz and that the performance can be enhanced in the region between 500 kHz and 10 MHz by using the applied pile-up correction techniques.

  1. Extraction of depth-dependent perturbation factors for parallel-plate chambers in electron beams using a plastic scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lacroix, Frederic; Guillot, Mathieu; McEwen, Malcolm; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Gingras, Luc; Beddar, A. Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: This work presents the experimental extraction of the overall perturbation factor P{sub Q} in megavoltage electron beams for NACP-02 and Roos parallel-plate ionization chambers using a plastic scintillation detector (PSD). Methods: The authors used a single scanning PSD mounted on a high-precision scanning tank to measure depth-dose curves in 6, 12, and 18 MeV clinical electron beams. The authors also measured depth-dose curves using the NACP-02 and PTW Roos chambers. Results: The authors found that the perturbation factors for the NACP-02 and Roos chambers increased substantially with depth, especially for low-energy electron beams. The experimental results were in good agreement with the results of Monte Carlo simulations reported by other investigators. The authors also found that using an effective point of measurement (EPOM) placed inside the air cavity reduced the variation of perturbation factors with depth and that the optimal EPOM appears to be energy dependent. Conclusions: A PSD can be used to experimentally extract perturbation factors for ionization chambers. The dosimetry protocol recommendations indicating that the point of measurement be placed on the inside face of the front window appear to be incorrect for parallel-plate chambers and result in errors in the R{sub 50} of approximately 0.4 mm at 6 MeV, 1.0 mm at 12 MeV, and 1.2 mm at 18 MeV.

  2. Time resolution of time-of-flight detector based on multiple scintillation counters readout by SiPMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattaneo, P. W.; De Gerone, M.; Gatti, F.; Nishimura, M.; Ootani, W.; Rossella, M.; Shirabe, S.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2016-08-01

    A new timing detector measuring ∼ 50 MeV / c positrons is under development for the MEG II experiment, aiming at a time resolution σt ∼ 30 ps. The resolution is expected to be achieved by measuring each positron time with multiple counters made of plastic scintillator readout by silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the time resolution for ∼ 50 MeV / c positrons using prototype counters. Counters with dimensions of 90 × 40 × 5mm3 readout by six SiPMs (three on each 40 × 5mm2 plane) were built with SiPMs from Hamamatsu Photonics and AdvanSiD and tested in a positron beam at the DAΦNE Beam Test Facility. The time resolution was found to improve nearly as the square root of the number of counter hits. A time resolution σt = 26.2 ± 1.3 ps was obtained with eight counters with Hamamatsu SiPMs. These results suggest that the design resolution is achievable in the MEG II experiment.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation studies on scintillation detectors and image reconstruction of brain-phantom tumors in TOFPET

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Nagendra Nath

    2009-01-01

    This study presents Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) results of detection efficiencies, spatial resolutions and resolving powers of a time-of-flight (TOF) PET detector systems. Cerium activated Lutetium Oxyorthosilicate (Lu2SiO5: Ce in short LSO), Barium Fluoride (BaF2) and BriLanCe 380 (Cerium doped Lanthanum tri-Bromide, in short LaBr3) scintillation crystals are studied in view of their good time and energy resolutions and shorter decay times. The results of MCS based on GEANT show that spatial resolution, detection efficiency and resolving power of LSO are better than those of BaF2 and LaBr3, although it possesses inferior time and energy resolutions. Instead of the conventional position reconstruction method, newly established image reconstruction (talked about in the previous work) method is applied to produce high-tech images. Validation is a momentous step to ensure that this imaging method fulfills all purposes of motivation discussed by reconstructing images of two tumors in a brain phantom. PMID:20098551

  4. Direct Observation of Neutron Scattering in MoNA Scintillator Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, W. F.; Mosby, S.; Frank, N.; Kuchera, A. N.; Thoennessen, M.; MoNA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations provide an important tool for the interpretation of neutron scattering data in the MoNA and LISA arrays at NSCL. Neutron energy and trajectory are determined by time of flight and position of first light produced in the array. Neutrons elastically scattered from H and inelastically from C typically produce light above detector threshold, while those elastically scattered from C produce light below threshold (``dark scattering'') and are redirected in flight, thus lowering energy and trajectory resolution. In order to test the effectiveness of our Geant4/MENATE_R simulations, we conducted an experiment at the LANSCE facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory to observe scattering of individual neutrons with well defined energy and trajectory in 16 MoNA detector bars arranged in two different stack geometries. Neutrons with energies ranging from 0.5 to 800 MeV emerged from a 3 mm collimator in the 90m shed on the WNR 4FP15L flight path to enter the array at a well defined point. Several features of neutron scattering are compared with simulation predictions, including hit multiplicity, scattering angle, mean distance between scatters, and the effect of dark scatter redirection. Results to date will be presented. Work supported by NSF Grant PHY-1506402.

  5. Improved image quality using monolithic scintillator detectors with dual-sided readout in a whole-body TOF-PET ring: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabacchini, Valerio; Surti, Suleman; Borghi, Giacomo; Karp, Joel S.; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2017-03-01

    We have recently built and characterized the performance of a monolithic scintillator detector based on a 32 mm  ×  32 mm  ×  22 mm LYSO:Ce crystal read out by digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM) arrays coupled to the crystal front and back surfaces in a dual-sided readout (DSR) configuration. The detector spatial resolution appeared to be markedly better than that of a detector consisting of the same crystal with conventional back-sided readout (BSR). Here, we aim to evaluate the influence of this difference in the detector spatial response on the quality of reconstructed images, so as to quantify the potential benefit of the DSR approach for high-resolution, whole-body time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) applications. We perform Monte Carlo simulations of clinical PET systems based on BSR and DSR detectors, using the results of our detector characterization experiments to model the detector spatial responses. We subsequently quantify the improvement in image quality obtained with DSR compared to BSR, using clinically relevant metrics such as the contrast recovery coefficient (CRC) and the area under the localized receiver operating characteristic curve (ALROC). Finally, we compare the results with simulated rings of pixelated detectors with DOI capability. Our results show that the DSR detector produces significantly higher CRC and increased ALROC values than the BSR detector. The comparison with pixelated systems indicates that one would need to choose a crystal size of 3.2 mm with three DOI layers to match the performance of the BSR detector, while a pixel size of 1.3 mm with three DOI layers would be required to get on par with the DSR detector.

  6. Improved image quality using monolithic scintillator detectors with dual-sided readout in a whole-body TOF-PET ring: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Tabacchini, Valerio; Surti, Suleman; Borghi, Giacomo; Karp, Joel S; Schaart, Dennis R

    2017-02-13

    We have recently built and characterized the performance of a monolithic scintillator detector based on a 32 mm  ×  32 mm  ×  22 mm LYSO:Ce crystal read out by digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM) arrays coupled to the crystal front and back surfaces in a dual-sided readout (DSR) configuration. The detector spatial resolution appeared to be markedly better than that of a detector consisting of the same crystal with conventional back-sided readout (BSR). Here, we aim to evaluate the influence of this difference in the detector spatial response on the quality of reconstructed images, so as to quantify the potential benefit of the DSR approach for high-resolution, whole-body time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) applications. We perform Monte Carlo simulations of clinical PET systems based on BSR and DSR detectors, using the results of our detector characterization experiments to model the detector spatial responses. We subsequently quantify the improvement in image quality obtained with DSR compared to BSR, using clinically relevant metrics such as the contrast recovery coefficient (CRC) and the area under the localized receiver operating characteristic curve (ALROC). Finally, we compare the results with simulated rings of pixelated detectors with DOI capability. Our results show that the DSR detector produces significantly higher CRC and increased ALROC values than the BSR detector. The comparison with pixelated systems indicates that one would need to choose a crystal size of 3.2 mm with three DOI layers to match the performance of the BSR detector, while a pixel size of 1.3 mm with three DOI layers would be required to get on par with the DSR detector.

  7. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-03: Verification of Range, SOBP Width, and Output for Passive-Scattering Proton Beams Using a Liquid Scintillator Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, T; Robertson, D; Therriault-Proulx, F; Beddar, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Liquid scintillators have been shown to provide fast and high-resolution measurements of radiation beams. However, their linear energy transfer-dependent response (quenching) limits their use in proton beams. The purpose of this study was to develop a simple and fast method to verify the range, spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) width, and output of a passive-scattering proton beam with a liquid scintillator detector, without the need for quenching correction. Methods: The light signal from a 20×20×20 cm3 liquid scintillator tank was collected with a CCD camera. Reproducible landmarks on the SOBP depth-light curve were identified which possessed a linear relationship with the beam range and SOBP width. The depth-light profiles for three beam energies (140, 160 and 180 MeV) with six SOBP widths at each energy were measured with the detector. Beam range and SOBP width calibration factors were obtained by comparing the depth-light curve landmarks with the nominal range and SOBP width for each beam setting. The daily output stability of the liquid scintillator detector was also studied by making eight repeated output measurements in a cobalt-60 beam over the course of two weeks. Results: The mean difference between the measured and nominal beam ranges was 0.6 mm (σ=0.2 mm), with a maximum difference of 0.9 mm. The mean difference between the measured and nominal SOBP widths was 0.1 mm (σ=1.8 mm), with a maximum difference of 4.0 mm. Finally an output variation of 0.14% was observed for 8 measurements performed over 2 weeks. Conclusion: A method has been developed to determine the range and SOBP width of a passive-scattering proton beam in a liquid scintillator without the need for quenching correction. In addition to providing rapid and accurate beam range and SOBP measurements, the detector is capable of measuring the output consistency with a high degree of precision. This project was supported in part by award number CA182450 from the National Cancer

  8. Study on Response Function of Organic Liquid Scintillator for High-Energy Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Daiki; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Endo, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Takada, Masashi; Ishibashi, Kenji

    2005-05-01

    Response functions of liquid organic scintillator for neutrons up to 800 MeV have been measured at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). 800-MeV/u Si ions and 400-MeV/u C ions bombarded a thick carbon target to produce neutrons. The kinetic energies of emitted neutrons were determined by the time-of-flight (TOF) method. Light output for neutrons was evaluated by eliminating events due to gamma-rays and charged particles. The measured response functions were compared with calculations using SCINFUL-QMD and CECIL codes. It was found that SCINFUL-QMD reproduced our experimental data adequately.

  9. Mapping large areas of radioactively contaminated land with a self adapted, handheld, GPS coupled, scintillation detector.

    PubMed

    Paridaens, Johan

    2008-03-01

    In Belgium, during several decennia, a phosphate plant discharged radium chloride containing waste water into two small rivers. One of those is part of a hydrographically very complex ecosystem with lots of small tributaries and hundreds of hectares of flooding zones. Hence, the river banks and large parts of these flooding zones have become contaminated with radium, heavy metals and chlorides. During a foot campaign, using a home made portable data logging system, consisting of a commercial 2.5 kg NaI detector, a computer mouse sized GPS, and a small pocket PC, the radioactive contamination of about 600 ha of sometimes very rough terrain was measured and mapped. The resulting very detailed radium contamination maps shed a whole new light on the water flow patterns of the ecosystem. The apparatus can also be used for efficiently guiding sampling campaigns for investigating other types of contamination. The ground maps are also compared to existing maps from helicopter measurements, evaluating strengths and weaknesses from both methods.

  10. Investigation of crystal surface finish and geometry on single LYSO scintillator detector performance for depth-of-interaction measurement with silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bircher, Chad; Shao, Yiping

    2012-11-01

    Depth of Interaction (DOI) information can improve quality of reconstructed images acquired from Positron Emission Tomography (PET), especially in high resolution and compact scanners dedicated for breast, brain, or small animal imaging applications. Additionally, clinical scanners with time of flight capability can also benefit from DOI information. One of the most promising methods of determining DOI in a crystal involves reading the signal from two ends of a scintillation crystal, and calculating the signal ratio between the two detectors. This method is known to deliver a better DOI resolution with rough crystals compared to highly polished crystals. However, what is still not well studied is how much of a tradeoff is involved between spatial, energy, temporal, and DOI resolutions as a function of the crystal surface treatment and geometry with the use of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) as the photo detectors. This study investigates the effects of different crystal surface finishes and geometries on energy, timing and DOI resolutions at different crystal depths. The results show that for LYSO scintillators of 1.5×1.5×20 mm3 and 2×2×20 mm3 with their surfaces finished from 0.5 to 30 μm roughness, almost the same energy and coincidence timing resolutions were maintained, around 15% and 2.4 ns, respectively across different crystal depths, while the DOI resolutions were steadily improved from worse than 5 mm to better than 2 mm. They demonstrate that crystal roughness, with proper surface preparing, does not have a significant effect on the energy and coincidence timing resolutions in the crystals examined, and there does not appear to be a tradeoff between improving DOI resolution and degrading other detector performances. These results will be valuable to guide the selection of crystal surface conditions for developing a DOI measurable PET detector with a full array of LYSO scintillators coupled to SiPM arrays.

  11. SU-E-T-486: In Vivo Skin Dosimetry Using the Exradin W1 Plastic Scintillation Detector for Passively Scattered Proton Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Alsanea, F; Kudchadker, R; Usama, M; Beddar, S; Wootton, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy and usefulness of plastic scintillation detectors used for skin dosimetry of patients undergoing passive scatter proton therapy. Methods: Following an IRB approved protocol, six patients undergoing passively scattered proton beam therapy for prostate cancer were selected for in vivo skin dosimetry using the Exradin W1 plastic scintillator. The detector was calibrated on a Cobalt-60 unit, and phantom measurements in the proton beam with the W1 and a calibrated parallel plate ion chamber were used to account for the under-response due to high LET at energies used for treatment. Measurements made in a heated water tank were used to account for temperature dependence. For in vivo measurements, the W1 is fixed to the patient’s skin with medical tape in the center of each of two laterally opposed treatment fields. Measurements will be performed once per week for each patient for the duration of treatment, for a total of thirty six measurements. The measured dose will be compared to the expected dose, extracted from the Eclipse treatment planning system. The average difference over all measurements and per-patient will be computed, as well as standard deviations. Results: The calibrated detector exhibited a 7% under-response in 225 and 250 MeV beams, and a 4% under-response when used at 37 °C (relative to the response at the calibration temperature of 20 °C). Patient measurements are ongoing. Conclusion: The Exradin W1 plastic scintillator detector is a strong candidate for in vivo skin dosimetry in passively scattered proton beams as PSDs are water equivalent and very small (2mm in diameter), permitting accurate measurements that do not perturb the delivered dose. This project was supported in part by award number CA182450 from the National Cancer Institute.

  12. Investigation of Crystal Surface Finish and Geometry on Single LYSO Scintillator Detector Performance for Depth-of-Interaction Measurement with Silicon Photomultipliers.

    PubMed

    Bircher, Chad; Shao, Yiping

    2012-11-21

    Depth of Interaction (DOI) information can improve quality of reconstructed images acquired from Positron Emission Tomography (PET), especially in high resolution and compact scanners dedicated for breast, brain, or small animal imaging applications. Additionally, clinical scanners with time of flight capability can also benefit from DOI information. One of the most promising methods of determining DOI in a crystal involves reading the signal from two ends of a scintillation crystal, and calculating the signal ratio between the two detectors. This method is known to deliver a better DOI resolution with rough crystals compared to highly polished crystals. However, what is still not well studied is how much of a tradeoff is involved between spatial, energy, temporal, and DOI resolutions as a function of the crystal surface treatment and geometry with the use of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) as the photo detectors. This study investigates the effects of different crystal surface finishes and geometries on energy, timing and DOI resolutions at different crystal depths. The results show that for LYSO scintillators of 1.5×1.5×20 mm(3) and 2×2×20 mm(3) with their surfaces finished from 0.5 to 30 micron roughness, almost the same energy and coincidence timing resolutions were maintained, around 15% and 2.4 ns respectively across different crystal depths, while the DOI resolutions were steadily improved from worse than 5 mm to better than 2 mm. They demonstrate that crystal roughness, with proper surface preparing, does not have a significant effect on the energy and coincidence timing resolutions in the crystals examined, and there does not appear to be a tradeoff between improving DOI resolution and degrading other detector performances. These results will be valuable to guide the selection of crystal surface conditions for developing a DOI measurable PET detector with a full array of LYSO scintillators coupled to SiPM arrays.

  13. A depth-of-interaction PET detector using a stair-shaped reflector arrangement and a single-ended scintillation light readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Jeong-Whan; Lee, Min Sun; Lee, Jae Sung

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) detectors with the ability to encode depth-of-interaction (DOI) information allow us to simultaneously improve the spatial resolution and sensitivity of PET scanners. In this study, we propose a DOI PET detector based on a stair-pattern reflector arrangement inserted between pixelated crystals and a single-ended scintillation light readout. The main advantage of the proposed method is its simplicity; DOI information is decoded from a flood map and the data can be simply acquired by using a single-ended readout system. Another potential advantage is that the two-step DOI detectors can provide the largest peak position distance in a flood map because two-dimensional peak positions can be evenly distributed. We conducted a Monte Carlo simulation and obtained flood maps. Then, we conducted experimental studies using two-step DOI arrays of 5  ×  5 Lu1.9Y0.1SiO5:Ce crystals with a cross-section of 1.7  ×  1.7 mm2 and different detector configurations: an unpolished single-layer (US) array, a polished single-layer (PS) array and a polished stacked two-layer (PT) array. For each detector configuration, both air gaps and room-temperature vulcanization (RTV) silicone gaps were tested. Detectors US and PT showed good peak separation in each scintillator with an average peak-to-valley ratio (PVR) and distance-to-width ratio (DWR) of 2.09 and 1.53, respectively. Detector PSRTV showed lower PVR and DWR (1.65 and 1.34, respectively). The configuration of detector PTAir is preferable for the construction of time-of-flight-DOI detectors because timing resolution was degraded by only about 40 ps compared with that of a non-DOI detector. The performance of detectors USAir and PSRTV was lower than that of a non-DOI detector, and thus these designs are favorable when the manufacturing cost is more important than timing performance. The results demonstrate that the proposed DOI-encoding method is a promising candidate for PET

  14. A depth-of-interaction PET detector using a stair-shaped reflector arrangement and a single-ended scintillation light readout.

    PubMed

    Son, Jeong-Whan; Lee, Min Sun; Lee, Jae Sung

    2017-01-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) detectors with the ability to encode depth-of-interaction (DOI) information allow us to simultaneously improve the spatial resolution and sensitivity of PET scanners. In this study, we propose a DOI PET detector based on a stair-pattern reflector arrangement inserted between pixelated crystals and a single-ended scintillation light readout. The main advantage of the proposed method is its simplicity; DOI information is decoded from a flood map and the data can be simply acquired by using a single-ended readout system. Another potential advantage is that the two-step DOI detectors can provide the largest peak position distance in a flood map because two-dimensional peak positions can be evenly distributed. We conducted a Monte Carlo simulation and obtained flood maps. Then, we conducted experimental studies using two-step DOI arrays of 5  ×  5 Lu1.9Y0.1SiO5:Ce crystals with a cross-section of 1.7  ×  1.7 mm(2) and different detector configurations: an unpolished single-layer (US) array, a polished single-layer (PS) array and a polished stacked two-layer (PT) array. For each detector configuration, both air gaps and room-temperature vulcanization (RTV) silicone gaps were tested. Detectors US and PT showed good peak separation in each scintillator with an average peak-to-valley ratio (PVR) and distance-to-width ratio (DWR) of 2.09 and 1.53, respectively. Detector PSRTV showed lower PVR and DWR (1.65 and 1.34, respectively). The configuration of detector PTAir is preferable for the construction of time-of-flight-DOI detectors because timing resolution was degraded by only about 40 ps compared with that of a non-DOI detector. The performance of detectors USAir and PSRTV was lower than that of a non-DOI detector, and thus these designs are favorable when the manufacturing cost is more important than timing performance. The results demonstrate that the proposed DOI-encoding method is a promising candidate for PET

  15. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Monte Carlo simulation of the property of a scintillation bar in the multi-neutron correlation spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yu-Shou; Ye, Yan-Lin; Ge, Yu-Cheng; Lü, Lin-Hui; Faisal, Q.; Jiang, Dong-Xing; Hua, Hui; Zheng, Tao; Li, Zhi-Huan; Li, Xiang-Qing; Lou, Jian-Ling; Lu, Fei; Fan, Feng-Ying; Cao, Zhong-Xin; Li, Qi-Te; Xiao, Jun

    2009-10-01

    To perform a kinematically complete measurement of the dissociation reaction for neutron-rich nuclei, a multi-neutron correlation spectrometer is proposed at Peking University. A Monte Carlo simulation code based on GEANT4 is developed for a single scintillation bar which processes not only the energy deposition but also the light propagation in the scintillator and the light collection and conversion to signal at the end of the bar in a realistic way. The simulating method is described in detail in this paper, and the timing and position resolutions and detector efficiency are studied based on the simulation and compared with the experimental results. A new method of crosstalk rejection has been demonstrated to be important for the design of the whole spectrometer.

  16. Spectrum-dose conversion operator of NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl) scintillation detectors for air dose rate measurement in contaminated environments.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Shuichi; Saito, Kimiaki

    2017-01-01

    Spectrum-dose conversion operators, the G(E) functions, for common NaI(Tl) scintillation survey meters and CsI(Tl) detectors are obtained for measurements in a semi-infinite plane of contaminated ground field by photon-emitting radionuclides (ground source). The calculated doses at a height of 100 cm from the ground in (137)Cs-contaminated environments by the Monte Carlo simulation technique are compared with those obtained using the G(E) functions by assuming idealized irradiation geometries such as anterior-posterior or isotropic. The simulation reveals that one could overestimate air dose rates in the environment by a maximum of 20-30% for NaI(Tl) detectors and 40-50% for CsI(Tl) detectors depending on photon energy when using the G(E) functions assuming idealized irradiation geometries for ground source measurements. Measurements obtained after the nuclear accident in Fukushima reveal that the doses calculated using a G(E) function for a unidirectional irradiation geometry are 1.17 times higher than those calculated using a G(E) function for the ground source in the case of a CsI(Tl) scintillation detector, which has a rectangular parallelepiped crystal (13 × 13 × 20 mm(3)). However, if a G(E) function is used assuming irradiation to a surface of the detector, the doses agree with those of the ground source within 2%. These results indicate that in contaminated environments, the commonly used scintillation-based detectors overestimate doses within the acceptable limit. In addition, the degree of overestimation depends on the irradiation direction of each detector assumed for developing the G(E) function. With regard to directional dependence of the detectors, reliable air dose rates in the environment can be obtained using the G(E) function determined in unidirectional irradiation geometry, provided that the irradiation surface of the crystal is determined properly.

  17. Effect of organic moieties on the scintillation properties of organic-inorganic layered perovskite-type compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Naoki; Koshimizu, Masanori; Horiai, Akiyoshi; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Haruki, Rie; Kishimoto, Shunji; Shibuya, Kengo; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Yanagida, Takayuki; Asai, Keisuke

    2016-11-01

    The effects of organic moieties on the scintillation properties of organic-inorganic layered perovskite-type compounds have been investigated. Three kinds of single crystals were fabricated, namely, (C4H9NH3)2PbBr4 (C4), (C6H5CH2NH3)2PbBr4 (Ben), and (C6H5C2H4NH3)2PbBr4 (Phe). Among the single crystals, the light output of Phe was found to have the greatest value when exposed to X-ray radiation (67.4 keV). The light output of Phe was 0.62 times that of YAP:Ce. The relative values of the light outputs among the fabricated single crystals under X-ray radiation correlated well with those of the quantum efficiencies and the luminescence intensity under ultraviolet radiation.

  18. Development and calibration of a real-time airborne radioactivity monitor using direct gamma-ray spectrometry with two scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Casanovas, R; Morant, J J; Salvadó, M

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry in an automatic real-time environmental radiation surveillance network can help to identify and characterize abnormal radioactivity increases quickly. For this reason, a Real-time Airborne Radioactivity Monitor using direct gamma-ray spectrometry with two scintillation detectors (RARM-D2) was developed. The two scintillation detectors in the RARM-D2 are strategically shielded with Pb to permit the separate measurement of the airborne isotopes with respect to the deposited isotopes.In this paper, we describe the main aspects of the development and calibration of the RARM-D2 when using NaI(Tl) or LaBr3(Ce) detectors. The calibration of the monitor was performed experimentally with the exception of the efficiency curve, which was set using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with the EGS5 code system. Prior to setting the efficiency curve, the effect of the radioactive source term size on the efficiency calculations was studied for the gamma-rays from (137)Cs. Finally, to study the measurement capabilities of the RARM-D2, the minimum detectable activity concentrations for (131)I and (137)Cs were calculated for typical spectra at different integration times.

  19. Rejection of randomly coinciding events in Li_2^{100}MoO_4 scintillating bolometers using light detectors based on the Neganov-Luke effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyak, D. M.; Danevich, F. A.; Dumoulin, L.; Giuliani, A.; Mancuso, M.; Marcillac, P. de; Marnieros, S.; Nones, C.; Olivieri, E.; Poda, D. V.; Tretyak, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    Random coincidences of nuclear events can be one of the main background sources in low-temperature calorimetric experiments looking for neutrinoless double-beta decay, especially in those searches based on scintillating bolometers embedding the promising double-beta candidate ^{100} Mo, because of the relatively short half-life of the two-neutrino double-beta decay of this nucleus. We show in this work that randomly coinciding events of the two-neutrino double-beta decay of ^{100} Mo in enriched Li_2^{100} MoO_4 detectors can be effectively discriminated by pulse-shape analysis in the light channel if the scintillating bolometer is provided with a Neganov-Luke light detector, which can improve the signal-to-noise ratio by a large factor, assumed here at the level of {˜ }750 on the basis of preliminary experimental results obtained with these devices. The achieved pile-up rejection efficiency results in a very low contribution, of the order of {˜ }6× 10^{-5} counts/(keV\\cdot kg\\cdot y), to the background counting rate in the region of interest for a large volume ({˜ }90 cm^3) Li_2^{100} MoO_4 detector. This background level is very encouraging in view of a possible use of the Li_2^{100} MoO_4 solution for a bolometric tonne-scale next-generation experiment as that proposed in the CUPID project.

  20. Advances in scintillators for medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loef, Edgar V.; Shah, Kanai S.

    2014-09-01

    A review is presented of some recent work in the field of inorganic scintillator research for medical imaging applications, in particular scintillation detectors for Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET).

  1. Response of silicon multistrip detectors and a cesium iodide scintillator to a calcium ion beam of 0.5 GeV/u

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codino, A.; Miozza, M.; Brunetti, M. T.; Checcucci, B.; Federico, C.; Grimani, C.; Lanfranchi, M.; Macchiaiolo, T.; Menichelli, M.; Maffei, P.; Plouin, F.; Vocca, H.

    1997-02-01

    We have constructed and operated charge preamplifiers for silicon strip detectors with a dynamic range extending from fractions of minimum ionising particle (MIP) up to 16 124 MIPs. These silicon detectors combined with time-of-flight counters and cesium iodide scintillator form a segment of the VENUS detector that has been exposed to a calcium beam of 0.5 GeV/u at the GSI accelerator. The aim of the instrument is the identification of all nuclides of the periodic table of the elements. Measurements of electronic noise, cross-talk among channels and energy deposit resolutions in various experimental conditions for silicon detectors are given. The measured light output of the CsI(Tl) crystal induced by calcium is compared with that extrapolated from lower-energy data of various nuclide species determined in other experiments. The charge resolution for calcium ions, determined by the {dE }/{dχ } detectors and TOF counters of time resolution of 55 ± 7 ps, amounts to 0.42 charge units (rms). Improvements in ion discrimination with respect to the present detector configuration are considered.

  2. The Application of the BrilLanCe Series Scintillation Detector in the Spectrometer of Neutral Particles for the Satellite Experiment Zina-Nt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhangelskaja, Irene V.; Arkhangelsky, Andrey I.; Batischev, Alexey. G.; Galper, Arkady M.; Kondratyeva, Natalya V.; Naumov, Petr Yu.

    Spectrometric detector complex ZINA-NT is intended to study a radiation conditions onboard satellite and characteristics of hard X-ray and gamma-ray fluxes from GRB, solar flares and to detect other non-stationary fluxes of cosmic gamma-rays. The advantages for using of this new detector for modification of present neutral particles detector on the base of CsI(Tl) are discussed. Scintillation detectors based on BrilLanCe series crystal have got very small lighting time, an excellent energy resolution and light output, more intensive than devices based on CsI(Tl). Using of BrilLanCe series crystal instead of CsI(Tl) ones allows to detect terrestrial gamma flashes (TGF), gamma ray bursts (GRB) and solar flares with smaller time durations and intensities. Moreover, the counts rate linearity region of BrilLanCe detectors is extended up to 106 s-1 and it allows to observe a very intensive events. So, the using of such type of detector permits us the possibility to separate gamma-quanta and neutrons on the timescales less than 50 microseconds.

  3. Taheri-Saramad x-ray detector (TSXD): A novel high spatial resolution x-ray imager based on ZnO nano scintillator wires in polycarbonate membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Taheri, A. Saramad, S.; Ghalenoei, S.; Setayeshi, S.

    2014-01-15

    A novel x-ray imager based on ZnO nanowires is designed and fabricated. The proposed architecture is based on scintillation properties of ZnO nanostructures in a polycarbonate track-etched membrane. Because of higher refractive index of ZnO nanowire compared to the membrane, the nanowire acts as an optical fiber that prevents the generated optical photons to spread inside the detector. This effect improves the spatial resolution of the imager. The detection quantum efficiency and spatial resolution of the fabricated imager are 11% and <6.8 μm, respectively.

  4. Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary; Craig, Richard A.; Reeder; Paul L.

    2003-04-22

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  5. A measurement of the time profile of scintillation induced by low energy gamma-rays in liquid xenon with the XMASS-I detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiya, H.; Abe, K.; Hiraide, K.; Ichimura, K.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Kobayashi, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Norita, T.; Ogawa, H.; Sekiya, H.; Takachio, O.; Takeda, A.; Tasaka, S.; Yamashita, M.; Yang, B. S.; Kim, N. Y.; Kim, Y. D.; Itow, Y.; Kegasa, R.; Kobayashi, K.; Masuda, K.; Fushimi, K.; Martens, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Fujita, R.; Hosokawa, K.; Miuchi, K.; Oka, N.; Onishi, Y.; Takeuchi, Y.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, M. K.; Fukuda, Y.; Nishijima, K.; Nakamura, S.

    2016-10-01

    We report the measurement of the emission time profile of scintillation from gamma-ray induced events in the XMASS-I 832 kg liquid xenon scintillation detector. Decay time constant was derived from a comparison of scintillation photon timing distributions between the observed data and simulated samples in order to take into account optical processes such as absorption and scattering in liquid xenon. Calibration data of radioactive sources, 55Fe, 241Am, and 57Co were used to obtain the decay time constant. Assuming two decay components, τ1 and τ2, the decay time constant τ2 increased from 27.9 ns to 37.0 ns as the gamma-ray energy increased from 5.9 keV to 122 keV. The accuracy of the measurement was better than 1.5 ns at all energy levels. A fast decay component with τ1 ∼ 2 ns was necessary to reproduce data. Energy dependencies of τ2 and the fraction of the fast decay component were studied as a function of the kinetic energy of electrons induced by gamma-rays. The obtained data almost reproduced previously reported results and extended them to the lower energy region relevant to direct dark matter searches.

  6. A Study of the quality of CsI detectors and pulse-shape discrimination of scintillators for ?[U+0251]-particles, ?[U+0263]-particles, and neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salyer, Kaitlin; Rogachev, Grigory; Hooker, Joshua

    2016-09-01

    This project studied the capabilities of two different scintillators, Cesium Iodide (CsI) and p-Terphenyl. First, the resolution of a CsI detector was investigated by exposing only very small areas of its surface at a time to an alpha source. Second, the abilities of p-Terphenyl to detect alpha particles, gamma particles, and neutrons were analyzed through pulse shape discrimination. p-Terphenyl is of particular interest because it will be used in the Mitchell Institute Neutrino Experiment at Reactor (MINER) at Texas A&M University for measuring background data. The information learned from conducting these tests will be useful in understanding and expanding the limits of the experiments in which these detectors will ultimately be used.

  7. A comparison of digital zero-crossing and charge-comparison methods for neutron/γ-ray discrimination with liquid scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhostin, M.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we have compared the performances of the digital zero-crossing and charge-comparison methods for n/γ discrimination with liquid scintillation detectors at low light outputs. The measurements were performed with a 2″×2″ cylindrical liquid scintillation detector of type BC501A whose outputs were sampled by means of a fast waveform digitizer with 10-bit resolution, 4 GS/s sampling rate and one volt input range. Different light output ranges were measured by operating the photomultiplier tube at different voltages and a new recursive algorithm was developed to implement the digital zero-crossing method. The results of our study demonstrate the superior performance of the digital zero-crossing method at low light outputs when a large dynamic range is measured. However, when the input range of the digitizer is used to measure a narrow range of light outputs, the charge-comparison method slightly outperforms the zero-crossing method. The results are discussed in regard to the effects of the quantization noise and the noise filtration performance of the zero-crossing filter.

  8. An indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain for low dose x-ray imaging: SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Dan; Rowlands, J. A.; Egami, N.; Takiguchi, Y.; Nanba, M.; Honda, Y.; Ohkawa, Y.; Kubota, M.; Tanioka, K.; Suzuki, K.; Kawai, T.

    2008-03-01

    An indirect flat-imager with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose x-ray imaging with high resolution. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator CsI (Tl) to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called HARP (high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor). The charge image created by HARP is read out by electron beams generated by the FEA. The proposed detector is called SAPHIRE (Scintillator Avalanche Photoconductor with HIgh Resolution Emitter readout). The avalanche gain of HARP depends on both a-Se thickness and applied electric field E Se. At E Se of > 80 V/μm, the avalanche gain can enhance the signal at low dose (e.g. fluoroscopy) and make the detector x-ray quantum noise limited down to a single x-ray photon. At high exposure (e.g. radiography), the avalanche gain can be turned off by decreasing E Se to < 70 V/μm. In this paper the imaging characteristics of the FEA readout method, including the spatial resolution and noise, were investigated experimentally using a prototype optical HARP-FEA image sensor. The potential x-ray imaging performance of SAPHIRE, especially the aspect of programmable gain to ensure wide dynamic range and x-ray quantum noise limited performance at the lowest exposure in fluoroscopy, was investigated.

  9. Modeling of low-energy charged particles passage through GAMMA-400 gamma-telescope thermal insulation and two- layer plastic scintillation detectors used as anticoincidence shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasovikov, E. N.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Kheymits, M. D.; Yurkin, Yu T.

    2016-02-01

    The results of low-energy charged particles passage through GAMMA-400 gamma- telescope thermal insulation and two-layer plastic scintillation detectors used as anticoincidence shield are presented. An existing GEANT4 GAMMA-400 model is used. Effects of thermal insulation on charged particle passage are investigated. These results will be used to testing the effect of low-energy charged particles flux on GAMMA-400 gamma-quanta registration capabilities. Sufficiently large energy deposition in two-layer plastic anticoincidence scintillation detectors might interfere with high-energy particle registration and identification. However, GAMMA-400 detection capabilities are not affected by this, as the energy deposition in the lower layer of S3 is less than 1.5 MeV in all simulated cases. This value is less than threshold for high energy particles identification start (2.5 MeV). It makes impossible to incorrectly identify a low-energy charged particle energy deposition as backsplash from a high-energy gamma-quantum.

  10. Photofraction of a 5 cm x 2 cm BGO scintillator. [bismuth germanate crystal for use in cosmic gamma ray detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunphy, P. P.; Forrest, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The photofraction of a 5.1 cm x 2.0 cm bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillator was measured over a gamma-ray energy range of 0.2 to 6.1 MeV. Several methods, used to minimize the effect of room scattering on the measurement, are discussed. These include a gamma-gamma coincidence technique, a beta-gamma coincidence technique, and the use of sources calibrated with a standard 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm sodium iodide scintillator.

  11. Nanophosphor composite scintillators comprising a polymer matrix

    DOEpatents

    Muenchausen, Ross Edward; Mckigney, Edward Allen; Gilbertson, Robert David

    2010-11-16

    An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ligand, or by covalently bonding a polymeric or polymeric precursor material. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during formation of the composite material. The improved nanophosphor composite may be used in any conventional scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  12. Searching for Galactic hidden gas through interstellar scintillation: results from a test with the NTT-SOFI detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, F.; Moniez, M.; Ansari, R.; Rahvar, S.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: Stars twinkle because their light propagates through the atmosphere. The same phenomenon is expected at a longer time scale when the light of remote stars crosses an interstellar molecular cloud, but it has never been observed at optical wavelength. In a favorable case, the light of a background star can be subject to stochastic fluctuations on the order of a few percent at a characteristic time scale of a few minutes. Our ultimate aim is to discover or exclude these scintillation effects to estimate the contribution of molecular hydrogen to the Galactic baryonic hidden mass. This feasibility study is a pathfinder toward an observational strategy to search for scintillation, probing the sensitivity of future surveys and estimating the background level. Methods: We searched for scintillation induced by molecular gas in visible dark nebulae as well as by hypothetical halo clumpuscules of cool molecular hydrogen (H2-He) during two nights. We took long series of 10 s infrared exposures with the ESO-NTT telescope toward stellar populations located behind visible nebulae and toward the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We therefore searched for stars exhibiting stochastic flux variations similar to what is expected from the scintillation effect. According to our simulations of the scintillation process, this search should allow one to detect (stochastic) transverse gradients of column density in cool Galactic molecular clouds of order of ~ 3 × 10-5 g/cm2/10 000 km. Results: We found one light-curve that is compatible with a strong scintillation effect through a turbulent structure characterized by a diffusion radius Rdiff < 100 km in the B68 nebula. Complementary observations are needed to clarify the status of this candidate, and no firm conclusion can be established from this single observation. We can also infer limits on the existence of turbulent dense cores (of number density n > 109 cm-3) within the dark nebulae. Because no candidate is found toward the SMC, we

  13. Photonic crystal scintillators and methods of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Ricardo D.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Cortes-Concepcion, Jose

    2015-08-11

    Photonic crystal scintillators and their methods of manufacture are provided. Exemplary methods of manufacture include using a highly-ordered porous anodic alumina membrane as a pattern transfer mask for either the etching of underlying material or for the deposition of additional material onto the surface of a scintillator. Exemplary detectors utilizing such photonic crystal scintillators are also provided.

  14. Possible application of scintillation detectors with semiconductor PMT for cosmic-neutron and gamma-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrousov, M. I.; Vostrukhin, A. A.; Karpushkina, N. E.; Malakhov, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    Solar system planets exploration and cosmic neutrons and gamma-ray flux research have been dynamically evolving for several decades. Different scintillation crystals are used for this purpose along with photo signal receivers, such as vacuum photomultiplier tubes (PMT). Many studies are being performed in order to provide alternative devices for photon signal capture: PIN-diodes,avalanche photodiodes, semiconductor silicon photomultipliers. We study the applicability of a silicon PMT in employing highresolution crystals in space applications.

  15. Scintillator Measurements for SNO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaptanoglu, Tanner; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    SNO+ is a neutrino detector located 2km underground in the SNOLAB facility with the primary goal of searching for neutrinoless double beta decay. The detector will be filled with a liquid scintillator target primarily composed of linear alkyl benzene (LAB). As charged particles travel through the detector the LAB produces scintillation light which is detected by almost ten thousand PMTs. The LAB is loaded with Te130, an isotope known to undergo double beta decay. Additionally, the LAB is mixed with an additional fluor and wavelength shifter to improve the light output and shift the light to a wavelength regime in which the PMTs are maximally efficient. The precise scintillator optics drastically affect the ultimate sensitivity of SNO+. I will present work being done to measure the optical properties of the SNO+ scintillator cocktail. The measured properties are used as input to a scintillation model that allows us to extrapolate to the SNO+ scale and ultimately predict the sensitivity of the experiment. Additionally, I will present measurements done to characterize the R5912 PMT, a candidate PMT for the second phase of SNO+ that provides better light collection, improved charge resolution, and a narrower spread in timing.

  16. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, T.; Spector, G.B.

    1994-03-29

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected is described. 11 figures.

  17. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, Tom; Spector, Garry B.

    1994-01-01

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected.

  18. Extruded plastic scintillator for MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Bross, Alan D.; Rykalin, Victor V.; Wood, Brian M.; /NICADD, DeKalb

    2005-11-01

    An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. A new experiment at Fermilab is pursuing the use of extruded plastic scintillator. A new plastic scintillator strip is being tested and its properties characterized. The initial results are presented here.

  19. The use of 99Tcm-DTPA aerosol and caesium iodide mini-scintillation detectors in the assessment of lung injury during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Keavey, P M; Hasan, A; Au, J; Dark, J H

    1997-01-01

    Lung injury is a well-documented adverse effect of cardiopulmonary bypass. The mechanism of injury is not fully understood, but pulmonary hypoxia may be a factor. Post-operative pulmonary epithelial permeability (PEP) in ventilated versus non-ventilated lungs was measured within 2 h of return to the intensive care unit using a 99Tcm-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate aerosol technique. A portable scintillation detector system was required. Sodium iodide detectors have been used previously with this technique but are cumbersome. This study used mini caesium iodide detectors (Oakfield Instruments, Oxon, UK), which can be attached directly to the patient and are more suited to the intensive care setting. The clearance half-time from lung to blood (T1/2LB) was measured in 31 patients (62 lungs). The mean (+/- S.E.M.) clearance half-times were 42.3 +/- 2.7 and 45.7 +/- 3.8 min for non-ventilated and ventilated lungs respectively, with a mean difference of 3.4 +/- 3.1 min (P > 0.05). We conclude that, using this technique, no significant difference in PEP is observed between ventilated and non-ventilated lungs in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass.

  20. Joint measurement of the atmospheric muon flux through the Puy de Dome volcano with plastic scintillators and Resistive Plate Chambers detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosino, F.; Anastasio, A.; Bross, A.; Bene, S.; Bonechi, L.; Carloganu, C.; Cimmino, L.; Combaret, Ch.; Durand, S.; Fehr, F.; Gailler, L.; Labazuy, Ph.; Laktineh, I.; Masone, V.; Miallier, D.; Mori, N.; Niess, V.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Portal, A.; Rubinov, P.; Saracino, G.; Scarlini, E.; Strolin, P.; Vulpescu, B.

    2015-11-14

    The muographic imaging of volcanoes relies on the measured transmittance of the atmospheric muon flux through the target. An important bias affecting the result comes from background contamination mimicking a higher transmittance. The MU-RAY and TOMUVOL collaborations measured independently in 2013 the atmospheric muon flux transmitted through the Puy de Dôme volcano using their early prototype detectors, based on plastic scintillators and on Glass Resistive Plate Chambers, respectively. These detectors had three (MU-RAY) or four (TOMUVOL) detection layers of 1 m2 each, tens (MU-RAY) or hundreds (TOMUVOL) of nanosecond time resolution, a few millimeter position resolution, an energy threshold of few hundreds MeV, and no particle identification capabilities. The prototypes were deployed about 1.3 km away from the summit, where they measured, behind rock depths larger than 1000 m, remnant fluxes of 1.83±0.50(syst)±0.07(stat) m–2 d–1 deg–2 (MU-RAY) and 1.95±0.16(syst)±0.05(stat) m–2 d–1 deg–2 (TOMUVOL), that roughly correspond to the expected flux of high-energy atmospheric muons crossing 600 meters water equivalent (mwe) at 18° elevation. This implies that imaging depths larger than 500 mwe from 1 km away using such prototype detectors suffer from an overwhelming background. These measurements confirm that a new generation of detectors with higher momentum threshold, time-of-flight measurement, and/or particle identification is needed. As a result, the MU-RAY and TOMUVOL collaborations expect shortly to operate improved detectors, suitable for a robust muographic imaging of kilometer-scale volcanoes.

  1. Joint measurement of the atmospheric muon flux through the Puy de Dome volcano with plastic scintillators and Resistive Plate Chambers detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Ambrosino, F.; Anastasio, A.; Bross, A.; ...

    2015-11-14

    The muographic imaging of volcanoes relies on the measured transmittance of the atmospheric muon flux through the target. An important bias affecting the result comes from background contamination mimicking a higher transmittance. The MU-RAY and TOMUVOL collaborations measured independently in 2013 the atmospheric muon flux transmitted through the Puy de Dôme volcano using their early prototype detectors, based on plastic scintillators and on Glass Resistive Plate Chambers, respectively. These detectors had three (MU-RAY) or four (TOMUVOL) detection layers of 1 m2 each, tens (MU-RAY) or hundreds (TOMUVOL) of nanosecond time resolution, a few millimeter position resolution, an energy threshold ofmore » few hundreds MeV, and no particle identification capabilities. The prototypes were deployed about 1.3 km away from the summit, where they measured, behind rock depths larger than 1000 m, remnant fluxes of 1.83±0.50(syst)±0.07(stat) m–2 d–1 deg–2 (MU-RAY) and 1.95±0.16(syst)±0.05(stat) m–2 d–1 deg–2 (TOMUVOL), that roughly correspond to the expected flux of high-energy atmospheric muons crossing 600 meters water equivalent (mwe) at 18° elevation. This implies that imaging depths larger than 500 mwe from 1 km away using such prototype detectors suffer from an overwhelming background. These measurements confirm that a new generation of detectors with higher momentum threshold, time-of-flight measurement, and/or particle identification is needed. As a result, the MU-RAY and TOMUVOL collaborations expect shortly to operate improved detectors, suitable for a robust muographic imaging of kilometer-scale volcanoes.« less

  2. Cosmic-muon intensity measurement and overburden estimation in a building at surface level and in an underground facility using two BC408 scintillation detectors coincidence counting system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weihua; Ungar, Kurt; Liu, Chuanlei; Mailhot, Maverick

    2016-10-01

    A series of measurements have been recently conducted to determine the cosmic-muon intensities and attenuation factors at various indoor and underground locations for a gamma spectrometer. For this purpose, a digital coincidence spectrometer was developed by using two BC408 plastic scintillation detectors and an XIA LLC Digital Gamma Finder (DGF)/Pixie-4 software and card package. The results indicate that the overburden in the building at surface level absorbs a large part of cosmic ray protons while attenuating the cosmic-muon intensity by 20-50%. The underground facility has the largest overburden of 39 m water equivalent, where the cosmic-muon intensity is reduced by a factor of 6. The study provides a cosmic-muon intensity measurement and overburden assessment, which are important parameters for analysing the background of an HPGe counting system, or for comparing the background of similar systems.

  3. Search for double beta processes in {sup 106}Cd with enriched {sup 106}CdWO{sub 4} crystal scintillator in coincidence with four crystals HPGe detector

    SciTech Connect

    Danevich, F. A. Chernyak, D. M.; Mokina, V. M.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; D’Angelo, S.; Brudanin, V. B.; Cappella, F.; Caracciolo, V.; Cerulli, R.; Laubenstein, M.; Incicchitti, A.; Poda, D. V.; Polischuk, O. G.; Tretyak, V. I.; Tupitsyna, I. A.

    2015-10-28

    A radiopure cadmium tungstate crystal scintillator, enriched in {sup 106}Cd ({sup 106}CdWO{sub 4}), was used to search for double beta decay processes in {sup 106}Cd in coincidence with an ultra-low background set-up containing four high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors in a single cryostat. The experiment has been completed after 13085 h of data taking. New improved limits on most of the double beta processes in {sup 106}Cd have been set on the level of 10{sup 20}−10{sup 21} yr. Tn particular, the half-life limit on the two neutrino electron capture with positron emission, T{sub 1/2} ≥ 1.8 × 10{sup 21} yr, reached the region of theoretical predictions.

  4. Measurement of parameters of scintillating bars with wavelength-shifting fibres and silicon photomultiplier readout for the SHiP Muon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, W.; Blondel, A.; Calcaterra, A.; Jacobsson, R.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurochka, V.; Lanfranchi, G.; Mefodiev, A.; Mineev, O.; Montanari, A.; Noah Messomo, E.; Saputi, A.; Tosi, N.

    2017-03-01

    The light yield and the time resolution of different types of 3 m long scintillating bars instrumented with wavelength shifting fibres and read out by different models of silicon photomultipliers have been measured at a test beam at the T9 area at the CERN Proton Synchrotron. The results obtained with different configurations are presented. A time resolution better than 800 ps, constant along the bar length within 20%, and a light yield of 0~ 14 (70) photoelectrons are obtained for bars 3 m long, ~ 4.5 (5) cm wide and 2 (0.7) cm thick. These results nicely match the requirements for the Muon Detector of the SHiP experiment.

  5. Organic light detectors: photodiodes and phototransistors.

    PubMed

    Baeg, Kang-Jun; Binda, Maddalena; Natali, Dario; Caironi, Mario; Noh, Yong-Young

    2013-08-21

    While organic electronics is mostly dominated by light-emitting diodes, photovoltaic cells and transistors, optoelectronics properties peculiar to organic semiconductors make them interesting candidates for the development of innovative and disruptive applications also in the field of light signal detection. In fact, organic-based photoactive media combine effective light absorption in the region of the spectrum from ultraviolet to near-infrared with good photogeneration yield and low-temperature processability over large areas and on virtually every substrate, which might enable innovative optoelectronic systems to be targeted for instance in the field of imaging, optical communications or biomedical sensing. In this review, after a brief resume of photogeneration basics and of devices operation mechanisms, we offer a broad overview of recent progress in the field, focusing on photodiodes and phototransistors. As to the former device category, very interesting values for figures of merit such as photoconversion efficiency, speed and minimum detectable signal level have been attained, and even though the simultaneous optimization of all these relevant parameters is demonstrated in a limited number of papers, real applications are within reach for this technology, as it is testified by the increasing number of realizations going beyond the single-device level and tackling more complex optoelectronic systems. As to phototransistors, a more recent subject of study in the framework of organic electronics, despite a broad distribution in the reported performances, best photoresponsivities outperform amorphous silicon-based devices. This suggests that organic phototransistors have a large potential to be used in a variety of optoelectronic peculiar applications, such as a photo-sensor, opto-isolator, image sensor, optically controlled phase shifter, and opto-electronic switch and memory.

  6. Scintillator plate calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Price, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Calorimetry using scintillator plates or tiles alternated with sheets of (usually heavy) passive absorber has been proven over multiple generations of collider detectors. Recent detectors including UA1, CDF, and ZEUS have shown good results from such calorimeters. The advantages offered by scintillator calorimetry for the SSC environment, in particular, are speed (<10 nsec), excellent energy resolution, low noise, and ease of achieving compensation and hence linearity. On the negative side of the ledger can be placed the historical sensitivity of plastic scintillators to radiation damage, the possibility of nonuniform response because of light attenuation, and the presence of cracks for light collection via wavelength shifting plastic (traditionally in sheet form). This approach to calorimetry is being investigated for SSC use by a collaboration of Ames Laboratory/Iowa State University, Argonne National Laboratory, Bicron Corporation, Florida State University, Louisiana State University, University of Mississippi, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, and University of Wisconsin.

  7. Spectral method for the correction of the Cerenkov light effect in plastic scintillation detectors: A comparison study of calibration procedures and validation in Cerenkov light-dominated situations

    SciTech Connect

    Guillot, Mathieu; Gingras, Luc; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The purposes of this work were: (1) To determine if a spectral method can accurately correct the Cerenkov light effect in plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) for situations where the Cerenkov light is dominant over the scintillation light and (2) to develop a procedural guideline for accurately determining the calibration factors of PSDs. Methods: The authors demonstrate, by using the equations of the spectral method, that the condition for accurately correcting the effect of Cerenkov light is that the ratio of the two calibration factors must be equal to the ratio of the Cerenkov light measured within the two different spectral regions used for analysis. Based on this proof, the authors propose two new procedures to determine the calibration factors of PSDs, which were designed to respect this condition. A PSD that consists of a cylindrical polystyrene scintillating fiber (1.6 mm{sup 3}) coupled to a plastic optical fiber was calibrated by using these new procedures and the two reference procedures described in the literature. To validate the extracted calibration factors, relative dose profiles and output factors for a 6 MV photon beam from a medical linac were measured with the PSD and an ionization chamber. Emphasis was placed on situations where the Cerenkov light is dominant over the scintillation light and on situations dissimilar to the calibration conditions. Results: The authors found that the accuracy of the spectral method depends on the procedure used to determine the calibration factors of the PSD and on the attenuation properties of the optical fiber used. The results from the relative dose profile measurements showed that the spectral method can correct the Cerenkov light effect with an accuracy level of 1%. The results obtained also indicate that PSDs measure output factors that are lower than those measured with ionization chambers for square field sizes larger than 25x25 cm{sup 2}, in general agreement with previously published Monte

  8. Extruding plastic scintillator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Pla-Dalmau; Alan D. Bross; Victor V. Rykalin

    2003-10-31

    An understanding of the costs involved in the production of plastic scintillators and the development of a less expensive material have become necessary with the prospects of building very large plastic scintillation detectors. Several factors contribute to the high cost of plastic scintillating sheets, but the principal reason is the labor-intensive nature of the manufacturing process. In order to significantly lower the costs, the current casting procedures had to be abandoned. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. This concept was tested and high quality extruded plastic scintillator was produced. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. This paper will discuss the characteristics of extruded plastic scintillator and its raw materials, the different manufacturing techniques and the current R&D program at Fermilab.

  9. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF.sub.3 and CeF.sub.3 as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF.sub.3 and the remainder CeF.sub.3 have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography.

  10. The performance for the TeV photon measurement of the LHCf upgraded detector using Gd2SiO5 (GSO) scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Y.; Adriani, O.; Berti, E.; Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M.; Castellini, G.; D'Alessandro, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Itow, Y.; Iwata, T.; Kasahara, K.; Masuda, K.; Matsubayashi, E.; Menjo, H.; Muraki, Y.; Papini, P.; Ricciarini, S.; Sako, T.; Suzuki, T.; Tamura, T.; Tiberio, A.; Torii, S.; Tricomi, A.; Turner, W. C.; Ueno, M.; Zhou, Q. D.

    2017-02-01

    The Large Hadron Collider forward (LHCf) experiment measures the forward particle production at the LHC to verify hadronic interaction models used in air shower experiments. We have upgraded very small sampling and imaging calorimeters using GSO scintillators to measure the most energetic particles generated in √{ s }=13 TeV p-p collisions at the zero-degree region of the LHC. Upgraded detectors were calibrated at the SPS North area facility in CERN and it was confirmed that the detector can measure electro-magnetic showers with energy resolution of 3% and position resolution of better than 123 μm for 100 GeV electrons. The operation of LHCf in 13 TeV p-p collisions has been successfully completed with integrated luminosity of 5 nb-1. Reconstructed π0 peak with the mass resolution of 3.7% and stability less than 1% during the operation implies that our measurement was stable enough in the high irradiation condition.

  11. Optimization of the Neutron Detector Design Based on the 6LiF/ZnS(Ag) Scintillation Screens for the GAMMA-400 Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnezdilov, I. I.; Dedenko, G. L.; Ibragimov, R. F.; Idalov, V. A.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplun, A. A.; Klemetiev, A. V.; Mukhin, V. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Turin, E. M.; Zaripov, R. N.

    The Neutron Detector (ND) is a new detector sub-system for the future GAMMA-400 space observatory. It aims to complement the instrument's GAMMA-400 electromagnetic calorimeter (CsI(Tl), total depth is 25.0 X0) in identifying cosmic-ray electrons from ∼ 100 MeV up to 3 TeV. Such electrons are of significant scientific interest, but their identification is complicated by the overwhelmingly more abundant hadronic cosmic rays, hence making significant hadronic rejection power of paramount importance. Particle showers initiated by nuclei in the GAMMA-400 calorimeter have a profile different from an electron-induced electromagnetic cascade, and the hadron rejection power deriving from this difference can be significantly enhanced by making use of the thermal neutron activity at late (>100 ns) times relative to the start of the shower. Indeed hadron-induced showers tend to be accompanied by significantly more neutron activity than electromagnetic showers. In the described ND for capturing thermalized neutrons applied isotope 6Li, which is part of the scintillation screen 6LiF/ZnS(Ag). ND placed are under the electromagnetic calorimeter. The results GEANT4 simulation of the ND shows that ND has high neutron detection efficiency.

  12. A new water-equivalent 2D plastic scintillation detectors array for the dosimetry of megavoltage energy photon beams in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Guillot, Mathieu; Beaulieu, Luc; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Gingras, Luc

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to present a new 2D plastic scintillation detectors array (2D-PSDA) designed for the dosimetry of megavoltage (MV) energy photon beams in radiation therapy and to characterize its basic performance. Methods: We developed a 2D detector array consisting of 781 plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) inserted into a plane of a water-equivalent phantom. The PSDs were distributed on a 26 x 26 cm{sup 2} grid, with an interdetector spacing of 10 mm, except for two perpendicular lines centered on the detection plane, where the spacing was 5 mm. Each PSD was made of a 1 mm diameter by 3 mm long cylindrical polystyrene scintillating fiber coupled to a clear nonscintillating plastic optical fiber. All of the light signals emitted by the PSDs were read simultaneously with an optical system at a rate of one measurement per second. We characterized the performance of the optical system, the angular dependency of the device, and the perturbation of dose distributions caused by the hundreds of PSDs inserted into the phantom. We also evaluated the capacity of the system to monitor complex multileaf collimator (MLC) sequences such as those encountered in step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. We compared our results with calculations performed by a treatment planning system and with measurements taken with a 2D ionization chamber array and with a radiochromic film. Results: The detector array that we developed allowed us to measure doses with an average precision of better than 1% for cumulated doses equal to or greater than 6.3 cGy. Our results showed that the dose distributions produced by the 6-MV photon beam are not perturbed (within {+-}1.1%) by the presence of the hundreds of PSDs located into the phantom. The results also showed that the variations in the beam incidences have little effect on the dose response of the device. For all incidences tested, the passing rates of the gamma tests between the 2D-PSDA and

  13. Construction and testing of a neutron and gamma spectrometry system using pulse shape discrimination with an organic scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Robert S.

    1993-03-01

    The goal of this thesis was to construct and test a neutron detector to measure the energy spectrum of 1 to 14-MeV neutrons in the presence of gammas. A spectrometer based on the process of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) was constructed, in which the scintillator NE-213 was used. The primary neutron/gamma sources used were 78-mCi and 4.7-Ci Pu-239Be sources, while 4.7-micro-Ci and 97.6-micro-Ci Na-22 gamma sources were used for energy calibration and additional testing of the detector. Proton recoil spectra and Compton electron spectra were unfolded with the neutron and gamma unfolding code FORIST to generate the incident neutron and gamma spectra, respectively. FORIST, which was written for a CDC computer, was modified to run on a VAX 6420. The experimental spectra were compared to those in the literature. The locations of the peaks in the Pu-239Be spectrum agreed with the literature to within 8.3%, the Pu-239Be gamma spectrum agreed to within 0.7%, while the Na-22 gamma spectrum agreed exactly. Uncertainties in the detection system and unfolding procedure are on the order of 5-10%. This thesis is intended to be a summary of the relevant literature and a user's guide to the PSD spectrometer.

  14. Indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain: Fundamental feasibility investigation for SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Wei; Li Dan; Reznik, Alla; Lui, B.J.M.; Hunt, D.C.; Rowlands, J.A.; Ohkawa, Yuji; Tanioka, Kenkichi

    2005-09-15

    An indirect flat-panel imager (FPI) with avalanche gain is being investigated for low-dose x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator CsI(Tl) to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called HARP (high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor). The final electronic image is read out using an active matrix array of thin film transistors (TFT). We call the proposed detector SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager). The advantage of the SHARP-AMFPI is its programmable gain, which can be turned on during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise, and turned off during high dose radiography to avoid pixel saturation. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the important design considerations for SHARP-AMFPI such as avalanche gain, which depends on both the thickness d{sub Se} and the applied electric field E{sub Se} of the HARP layer. To determine the optimal design parameter and operational conditions for HARP, we measured the E{sub Se} dependence of both avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency of an 8 {mu}m HARP layer. The results were used in a physical model of HARP as well as a linear cascaded model of the FPI to determine the following x-ray imaging properties in both the avalanche and nonavalanche modes as a function of E{sub Se}: (1) total gain (which is the product of avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency); (2) linearity; (3) dynamic range; (4) gain nonuniformity resulting from thickness nonuniformity; and (5) effects of direct x-ray interaction in HARP. Our results showed that a HARP layer thickness of 8 {mu}m can provide adequate avalanche gain and sufficient dynamic range for x-ray imaging applications to permit quantum limited operation over the range of exposures needed for radiography and fluoroscopy.

  15. Indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain: fundamental feasibility investigation for SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Dan; Reznik, Alla; Lui, B J M; Hunt, D C; Rowlands, J A; Ohkawa, Yuji; Tanioka, Kenkichi

    2005-09-01

    An indirect flat-panel imager (FPI) with avalanche gain is being investigated for low-dose x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator CsI(Tl) to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called HARP (high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor). The final electronic image is read out using an active matrix array of thin film transistors (TFT). We call the proposed detector SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager). The advantage of the SHARP-AMFPI is its programmable gain, which can be turned on during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise, and turned off during high dose radiography to avoid pixel saturation. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the important design considerations for SHARP-AMFPI such as avalanche gain, which depends on both the thickness d(Se) and the applied electric field E(Se) of the HARP layer. To determine the optimal design parameter and operational conditions for HARP, we measured the E(Se) dependence of both avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency of an 8 microm HARP layer. The results were used in a physical model of HARP as well as a linear cascaded model of the FPI to determine the following x-ray imaging properties in both the avalanche and nonavalanche modes as a function of E(Se): (1) total gain (which is the product of avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency); (2) linearity; (3) dynamic range; (4) gain nonuniformity resulting from thickness nonuniformity; and (5) effects of direct x-ray interaction in HARP. Our results showed that a HARP layer thickness of 8 microm can provide adequate avalanche gain and sufficient dynamic range for x-ray imaging applications to permit quantum limited operation over the range of exposures needed for radiography and fluoroscopy.

  16. A technique for verifying the input response function of neutron time-of-flight scintillation detectors using cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bonura, M. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Nelson, A. J.; Styron, J. D.; Ruiz, C. L. Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G.; Hahn, K. D.; Torres, J. A.

    2014-11-15

    An accurate interpretation of DD or DT fusion neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) signals from current mode detectors employed at the Z-facility at Sandia National Laboratories requires that the instrument response functions (IRF’s) be deconvolved from the measured nTOF signals. A calibration facility that produces detectable sub-ns radiation pulses is typically used to measure the IRF of such detectors. This work, however, reports on a simple method that utilizes cosmic radiation to measure the IRF of nTOF detectors, operated in pulse-counting mode. The characterizing metrics reported here are the throughput delay and full-width-at-half-maximum. This simple approach yields consistent IRF results with the same detectors calibrated in 2007 at a LINAC bremsstrahlung accelerator (Idaho State University). In particular, the IRF metrics from these two approaches and their dependence on the photomultipliers bias agree to within a few per cent. This information may thus be used to verify if the IRF for a given nTOF detector employed at Z has changed since its original current-mode calibration and warrants re-measurement.

  17. A technique for verifying the input response function of neutron time-of-flight scintillation detectors using cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Bonura, M A; Ruiz, C L; Fehl, D L; Cooper, G W; Chandler, G; Hahn, K D; Nelson, A J; Styron, J D; Torres, J A

    2014-11-01

    An accurate interpretation of DD or DT fusion neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) signals from current mode detectors employed at the Z-facility at Sandia National Laboratories requires that the instrument response functions (IRF's) be deconvolved from the measured nTOF signals. A calibration facility that produces detectable sub-ns radiation pulses is typically used to measure the IRF of such detectors. This work, however, reports on a simple method that utilizes cosmic radiation to measure the IRF of nTOF detectors, operated in pulse-counting mode. The characterizing metrics reported here are the throughput delay and full-width-at-half-maximum. This simple approach yields consistent IRF results with the same detectors calibrated in 2007 at a LINAC bremsstrahlung accelerator (Idaho State University). In particular, the IRF metrics from these two approaches and their dependence on the photomultipliers bias agree to within a few per cent. This information may thus be used to verify if the IRF for a given nTOF detector employed at Z has changed since its original current-mode calibration and warrants re-measurement.

  18. A technique for verifying the input response function of neutron time-of-flight scintillation detectors using cosmic raysa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonura, M. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Fehl, D. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Chandler, G.; Hahn, K. D.; Nelson, A. J.; Styron, J. D.; Torres, J. A.

    2014-11-01

    An accurate interpretation of DD or DT fusion neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) signals from current mode detectors employed at the Z-facility at Sandia National Laboratories requires that the instrument response functions (IRF's) be deconvolved from the measured nTOF signals. A calibration facility that produces detectable sub-ns radiation pulses is typically used to measure the IRF of such detectors. This work, however, reports on a simple method that utilizes cosmic radiation to measure the IRF of nTOF detectors, operated in pulse-counting mode. The characterizing metrics reported here are the throughput delay and full-width-at-half-maximum. This simple approach yields consistent IRF results with the same detectors calibrated in 2007 at a LINAC bremsstrahlung accelerator (Idaho State University). In particular, the IRF metrics from these two approaches and their dependence on the photomultipliers bias agree to within a few per cent. This information may thus be used to verify if the IRF for a given nTOF detector employed at Z has changed since its original current-mode calibration and warrants re-measurement.

  19. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  20. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1994-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  1. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1992-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  2. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  3. MOD: An Organic Detector for the Future Exploration of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kminek, G.; Bada, J. L.; Botta, O.; Grunthaner, F.; Glavin, D. P.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Organic Detector (MOD) is designed to assess whether organic compounds, possibly associated with life, are present in Martian rock and soil samples. MOD has a detection limit that is at least two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the Viking GCMS. MOD is focused on detecting amino acids, amines and PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons). Amino acids play an essential role in biochemistry on Earth and PAH are widespread throughout the universe and can provide an indication of the delivery of meteoritic organic material to Mars. The advantage of MOD is the absence of wet chemistry and its simple and robust design. The sample will be extracted from the mineral matrix (0.1 - 1 g of rock-powder) using sublimation and analyzed with a fluorescence detector. The isolation method is based on the fact that amino acids and PAH are volatile at temperatures greater than 150C. The fluorescence detection scheme is based on UV excitation with LED's, optical filters, PrN diode photon detector and a sample calibration reservoir. Fluorescamine is used as a fluorescing reagent for amino acids and amines, while PAH are naturally fluorescent. There is no sample preparation required and the turnaround time for a single analysis is on the order of minutes.

  4. A compact and high sensitivity positron detector using dual-layer thin GSO scintillators for a small animal PET blood sampling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Imaizumi, Masao; Shimosegawa, Eku; Kanai, Yasukazu; Sakamoto, Yusuke; Minato, Kotaro; Shimizu, Keiji; Senda, Michio; Hatazawa, Jun

    2010-07-01

    For quantitative measurements of small animals such as mice or rats, a compact and high sensitivity continuous blood sampling detector is required because their blood sampling volume is limited. For this purpose we have developed and tested a new positron detector. The positron detector uses a pair of dual-layer thin gadolinium orthosilicate (GSO) scintillators with different decay times. The front layer detects the positron and the background gamma photons, and the back layer detects the background gamma photons. By subtracting the count rate of the latter from that of the former, the count rate of the positrons can be estimated. The GSO for the front layer has a Ce concentration of 1.5 mol% (decay time of 35 ns), and that for the back layer has a Ce concentration of 0.5 mol% (decay time of 60 ns). By using the pulse shape analysis, the count rate of these two GSOs can be discriminated. The thickness is 0.5 mm, which is thick enough to detect positrons while minimizing the detection of the background gamma photons. These two types of thin GSOs were optically coupled to each other and connected to a metal photomultiplier tube (PMT) through triangular light guides. The signal from the PMT was digitized by 100 MHz free-running A-D converters in the data acquisition system and digitally integrated at two different integration times for the pulse shape analysis. We obtained good separation of the pulse shape distributions of these two GSOs. The energy threshold level was decreased to 80 keV, increasing the sensitivity of the detector. The sensitivity of a small diameter plastic tube was 8.6% and 24% for the F-18 and C-11 positrons, respectively. The count rate performance was linear up to ~50 kcps. The background counts from the gamma photons could be precisely corrected. The time-activity curve (TAC) of the rat artery blood was successfully obtained and showed a good correlation with that measured using a well counter. With these results, we confirmed that the

  5. Material identification in x-ray microscopy and micro CT using multi-layer, multi-color scintillation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Modgil, Dimple; Rigie, David S.; Wang, Yuxin; Xiao, Xianghui; Vargas, Phillip A.; La Rivière, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that a dual-layer, dual-color scintillator construct for microscopic CT, originally proposed to increase sensitivity in synchrotron imaging, can also be used to perform material quantification and classification when coupled with polychromatic illumination. We consider two different approaches to data handling: (1) a data-domain material decomposition whose estimation performance can be characterized by the Cramer-Rao Lower Bound formalism but which requires careful calibration and (2) an image-domain material classification approach that is more robust to calibration errors. The data-domain analysis indicates that useful levels of SNR (>5) could be achieved in one second or less at typical bending magnet fluxes for relatively large amounts of contrast (several mm path length, such as in a fluid flow experiment) and at typical undulator fluxes for small amount of contrast (tens of microns path length, such as an angiography experiment). The tools introduced could of course be used to study and optimize parameters for a wider range of potential applications. The image domain approach was analyzed in terms of its ability to distinguish different elemental stains by characterizing the angle between the lines traced out in a two-dimensional space of effective attenuation coefficient in the front and back layer images. This approach was implemented at a synchrotron and the results were consistent with simulation predictions. PMID:26422059

  6. Material identification in x-ray microscopy and micro CT using multi-layer, multi-color scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modgil, Dimple; Rigie, David S.; Wang, Yuxin; Xiao, Xianghui; Vargas, Phillip A.; La Rivière, Patrick J.

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that a dual-layer, dual-color scintillator construct for microscopic CT, originally proposed to increase sensitivity in synchrotron imaging, can also be used to perform material quantification and classification when coupled with polychromatic illumination. We consider two different approaches to data handling: (1) a data-domain material decomposition whose estimation performance can be characterized by the Cramer-Rao lower bound formalism but which requires careful calibration and (2) an image-domain material classification approach that is more robust to calibration errors. The data-domain analysis indicates that useful levels of SNR (>5) could be achieved in one second or less at typical bending magnet fluxes for relatively large amounts of contrast (several mm path length, such as in a fluid flow experiment) and at typical undulator fluxes for small amount of contrast (tens of microns path length, such as an angiography experiment). The tools introduced could of course be used to study and optimize parameters for a wider range of potential applications. The image domain approach was analyzed in terms of its ability to distinguish different elemental stains by characterizing the angle between the lines traced out in a two-dimensional space of effective attenuation coefficient in the front and back layer images. This approach was implemented at a synchrotron and the results were consistent with simulation predictions.

  7. Material identification in x-ray microscopy and micro CT using multi-layer, multi-color scintillation detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Modgil, Dimple; Rigie, David S.; Wang, Yuxin; ...

    2015-09-30

    We demonstrate that a dual-layer, dual-color scintillator construct for microscopic CT, originally proposed to increase sensitivity in synchrotron imaging, can also be used to perform material quantification and classification when coupled with polychromatic illumination. We consider two different approaches to data handling: (1) a data-domain material decomposition whose estimation performance can be characterized by the Cramer-Rao lower bound formalism but which requires careful calibration and (2) an image-domain material classification approach that is more robust to calibration errors. The data-domain analysis indicates that useful levels of SNR (>5) could be achieved in one second or less at typical bending magnetmore » fluxes for relatively large amounts of contrast (several mm path length, such as in a fluid flow experiment) and at typical undulator fluxes for small amount of contrast (tens of microns path length, such as an angiography experiment). The tools introduced could of course be used to study and optimize parameters for a wider range of potential applications. The image domain approach was analyzed in terms of its ability to distinguish different elemental stains by characterizing the angle between the lines traced out in a two-dimensional space of effective attenuation coefficient in the front and back layer images. As a result, this approach was implemented at a synchrotron and the results were consistent with simulation predictions.« less

  8. Material identification in x-ray microscopy and micro CT using multi-layer, multi-color scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Modgil, Dimple; Rigie, David S.; Wang, Yuxin; Xiao, Xianghui; Vargas, Phillip A.; La Riviere, Patrick J.

    2015-09-30

    We demonstrate that a dual-layer, dual-color scintillator construct for microscopic CT, originally proposed to increase sensitivity in synchrotron imaging, can also be used to perform material quantification and classification when coupled with polychromatic illumination. We consider two different approaches to data handling: (1) a data-domain material decomposition whose estimation performance can be characterized by the Cramer-Rao lower bound formalism but which requires careful calibration and (2) an image-domain material classification approach that is more robust to calibration errors. The data-domain analysis indicates that useful levels of SNR (>5) could be achieved in one second or less at typical bending magnet fluxes for relatively large amounts of contrast (several mm path length, such as in a fluid flow experiment) and at typical undulator fluxes for small amount of contrast (tens of microns path length, such as an angiography experiment). The tools introduced could of course be used to study and optimize parameters for a wider range of potential applications. The image domain approach was analyzed in terms of its ability to distinguish different elemental stains by characterizing the angle between the lines traced out in a two-dimensional space of effective attenuation coefficient in the front and back layer images. As a result, this approach was implemented at a synchrotron and the results were consistent with simulation predictions.

  9. Scintillation Counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Zane W.

    Scintillators find wide use in radiation detection as the detecting medium for gamma/X-rays, and charged and neutral particles. Since the first notice in 1895 by Roentgen of the production of light by X-rays on a barium platinocyanide screen, and Thomas Edison's work over the following 2 years resulting in the discovery of calcium tungstate as a superior fluoroscopy screen, much research and experimentation have been undertaken to discover and elucidate the properties of new scintillators. Scintillators with high density and high atomic number are prized for the detection of gamma rays above 1 MeV; lower atomic number, lower-density materials find use for detecting beta particles and heavy charged particles; hydrogenous scintillators find use in fast-neutron detection; and boron-, lithium-, and gadolinium-containing scintillators are used for slow-neutron detection. This chapter provides the practitioner with an overview of the general characteristics of scintillators, including the variation of probability of interaction with density and atomic number, the characteristics of the light pulse, a list and characteristics of commonly available scintillators and their approximate cost, and recommendations regarding the choice of material for a few specific applications. This chapter does not pretend to present an exhaustive list of scintillators and applications.

  10. About NICADD extruded scintillating strips

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Chakraborty, D.; Francis, K.; Kubik, D.; Lima, J.G.; Rykalin, V.; Zutshi, v.; Baldina, E.; Bross, A.; Deering, P.; Nebel, T.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Schellpfeffer, J.; Serritella, C.; Zimmerman, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    The results of control measurements of extruded scintillating strip responses to a radioactive source Sr-90 are provided, and details of strip choice, preparation, and method of measurement are included. About four hundred one meter long extruded scintillating strips were measured at four different points. These results were essential for prototyping a tail catcher and muon tracker for a future international electron positron linear collider detector.

  11. Multilayer passive shielding of scintillation detectors based on BGO, NaI(Tl), and stilbene crystals operating in intense neutron fields with an energy of 14.1 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystritsky, V. M.; Valkovic, V.; Grozdanov, D. N.; Zontikov, A. O.; Ivanov, I. Zh.; Kopatch, Yu. N.; Krylov, A. R.; Rogov, Yu. N.; Ruskov, I. N.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Skoy, V. R.; Shvetsov, V. N.

    2015-03-01

    We discuss the issues related to choosing the optimum type of passive shielding of scintillation detectors based on BGO, NaI(Tl), and stilbene crystals from the direct penetration of neutron radiation with an energy of 14.1 MeV that was emitted isotropically into a solid angle of 4π. A series of experimental measurements of the count-rate suppression factor that may be obtained for the indicated detectors through the use of various shielding filters comprising iron, lead, and borated polyethylene layers with a total thickness not exceeding 50 cm are conducted.

  12. Liquid Scintillator Production for the NOvA Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Mufson, S.; Baugh, B.; Bower, C.; ...

    2015-04-15

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator as the active detector medium to its near and far detectors. The composition of this scintillator was specifically developed to satisfy NOvA's performance requirements. A rigorous set of quality control procedures was put in place to verify that the incoming components and the blended scintillator met these requirements. The scintillator was blended commercially in Hammond, IN. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers cleaned to food grade.

  13. Liquid scintillator production for the NOvA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mufson, S.; Baugh, B.; Bower, C.; Coan, T. E.; Cooper, J.; Corwin, L.; Karty, J. A.; Mason, P.; Messier, M. D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Proudfoot, M.

    2015-11-01

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator as the active detector medium to its near and far detectors. The composition of this scintillator was specifically developed to satisfy NOvA's performance requirements. A rigorous set of quality control procedures was put in place to verify that the incoming components and the blended scintillator met these requirements. The scintillator was blended commercially in Hammond, IN. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers cleaned to food grade.

  14. Laboratory studies on the removal of radon-born lead from KamLAND׳s organic liquid scintillator

    DOE PAGES

    Keefer, G.; Grant, C.; Piepke, A.; ...

    2014-09-28

    We studied the removal of radioactivity from liquid scintillator in preparation of a low background phase of KamLAND. We describe the methods and techniques developed to measure and efficiently extract radon decay products from liquid scintillator. Lastly, we report the radio-isotope reduction factors obtained when applying various extraction methods. During this study, distillation was identified as the most efficient method for removing radon daughters from liquid scintillator.

  15. Laboratory studies on the removal of radon-born lead from KamLAND's organic liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keefer, G.; Grant, C.; Piepke, A.; Ebihara, T.; Ikeda, H.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kibe, Y.; Koseki, Y.; Ogawa, M.; Shirai, J.; Takeuchi, S.; Mauger, C.; Zhang, C.; Schweitzer, G.; Berger, B. E.; Dazeley, S.; Decowski, M. P.; Detwiler, J. A.; Djurcic, Z.; Dwyer, D. A.; Efremenko, Y.; Enomoto, S.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Furuno, K.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Gratta, G.; Hatakeyama, S.; Heeger, K. M.; Hsu, L.; Ichimura, K.; Inoue, K.; Iwamoto, T.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Karwowski, H. J.; Koga, M.; Kozlov, A.; Lane, C. E.; Learned, J. G.; Maricic, J.; Markoff, D. M.; Matsuno, S.; McKee, D.; McKeown, R. D.; Miletic, T.; Mitsui, T.; Motoki, M.; Nakajima, Kyo; Nakajima, Kyohei; Nakamura, K.; O`Donnell, T.; Ogawa, H.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J.-S.; Shimizu, I.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Svoboda, R.; Tajima, O.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Tolich, K.; Tornow, W.; Watanabe, Hideki; Watanabe, Hiroko; Winslow, L. A.; Yoshida, S.

    2015-01-01

    The removal of radioactivity from liquid scintillator has been studied in preparation of a low background phase of KamLAND. This paper describes the methods and techniques developed to measure and efficiently extract radon decay products from liquid scintillator. We report the radio-isotope reduction factors obtained when applying various extraction methods. During this study, distillation was identified as the most efficient method for removing radon-born lead from liquid scintillator.

  16. Scintillating glass fiber neutron senors

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, K.H.; Arthur, R.J.; Bliss, M.

    1994-04-01

    Cerium-doped lithium-silicate glass fibers have been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for use as thermal neutron detectors. By using highly-enriched {sup 6} Li , these fibers efficiently capture thermal neutrons and produce scintillation light that can be detected at the ends of the fibers. Advantages of scintillating fibers over {sup 3}He or BF{sub 3} proportional tubes include flexibility in geometric configuration, ruggedness in high-vibration environments, and less detector weight for the same neutron sensitivity. This paper describes the performance of these scintillating fibers with regard to count rates, pulse height spectra, absolute efficiencies, and neutron/gamma discrimination. Fibers with light transmission lengths (1/e) of greater than 2 m have been produced at PNL. Neutron sensors in fiber form allow development of a variety of neutron detectors packaged in previously unavailable configurations. Brief descriptions of some of the devices already produced are included to illustrate these possibilities.

  17. A comparative study of small field total scatter factors and dose profiles using plastic scintillation detectors and other stereotactic dosimeters: The case of the CyberKnife

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, J.; Beliveau-Nadeau, D.; Chung, E.; Seuntjens, J.; Theriault, D.; Archambault, L.; Beddar, S.; Beaulieu, L.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Small-field dosimetry is challenging, and the main limitations of most dosimeters are insufficient spatial resolution, water nonequivalence, and energy dependence. The purpose of this study was to compare plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) to several commercial stereotactic dosimeters by measuring total scatter factors and dose profiles on a CyberKnife system. Methods: Two PSDs were developed, having sensitive volumes of 0.196 and 0.785 mm{sup 3}, and compared with other detectors. The spectral discrimination method was applied to subtract Cerenkov light from the signal. Both PSDs were compared to four commercial stereotactic dosimeters by measuring total scatter factors, namely, an IBA dosimetry stereotactic field diode (SFD), a PTW 60008 silicon diode, a PTW 60012 silicon diode, and a microLion. The measured total scatter factors were further compared with those of two independent Monte Carlo studies. For the dose profiles, two commercial detectors were used for the comparison, i.e., a PTW 60012 silicon diode and Gafchromics EBT2. Total scatter factors for a CyberKnife system were measured in circular fields with diameters from 5 to 60 mm. Dose profiles were measured for the 5- and 60-mm cones. The measurements were performed in a water tank at a 1.5-cm depth and an 80-cm source-axis distance. Results: The total scatter factors measured using all the detectors agreed within 1% with the Monte Carlo values for cones of 20 mm or greater in diameter. For cones of 10-20 mm in diameter, the PTW 60008 silicon diode was the only dosimeter whose measurements did not agree within 1% with the Monte Carlo values. For smaller fields (<10 mm), each dosimeter type showed different behaviors. The silicon diodes over-responded because of their water nonequivalence; the microLion and 1.0-mm PSD under-responded because of a volume-averaging effect; and the 0.5-mm PSD was the only detector within the uncertainties of the Monte Carlo simulations for all the cones. The

  18. Scintillating Track Image Camera-SCITIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Akira; Asai, Jyunkichi; Ieiri, Masaharu; Iwata, Soma; Kadowaki, Tetsuhito; Kurosawa, Maki; Nagae, Tomohumi; Nakai, Kozi

    2004-04-01

    A new type of track detector, scintillating track image camera (SCITIC) has been developed. Scintillating track images of particles in a scintillator are focused by an optical lens system on a photocathode on image intesifier tube (IIT). The image signals are amplified by an IIT-cascade and stored by a CCD camera. The performance of the detector has been tested with cosmic-ray muons and with pion- and proton-beams from the KEK 12-GeV proton synchrotron. Data of the test experiments have shown promising features of SCITIC as a triggerable track detector with a variety of possibilities.

  19. Background identification system in MEG II experiment based on high-rate scintillation detector with SiPM readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, R.

    2017-02-01

    The MEG experiment has been searching for the lepton flavor violating process, μ+ arrow e+γ, which is a clear evidence of new physics models beyond the Standard Model. The upgrade experiment (MEG II) is currently being prepared to obtain one order higher branching ratio sensitivity Script B < 5.0 × 10‑14 by using the world's most intense muon beam up to ~108 μ+/s and upgraded detectors with considerably improved performance. One of the keys for the upgrade is to suppress the background rate which is significantly increased with the higher muon decay rate. In the MEG II experiment, the Radiative Decay Counter (RDC) will be newly introduced for active background identification. The RDC is able to identify the most dominant background due to photons from Radiative Muon Decay and improve the sensitivity by 22%. In this paper, the concept of the RDC and its development are described.

  20. Scintillator tiles read out with silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooth, O.; Radermacher, T.; Weingarten, S.; Weinstock, L.

    2015-10-01

    A detector prototype based on a fast plastic scintillator read out with silicon photomultipliers is presented. All studies have been done with cosmic muons and focus on parameter optimization such as coupling the SiPM to the scintillator or wrapping the scintillator with reflective material. The prototype shows excellent results regarding the light-yield and offers a detection efficiency of 99.5% with a signal purity of 99.9% for cosmic muons.

  1. Improvements in apparatus and procedures for using an organic liquid scintillator as a fast-neutron spectrometer for radiation protection applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thorngate, J.H.

    1987-05-15

    For use in radiation protection measurements, a neutron spectrometer must have a wide energy range, good sensitivity, medium resolution, and ease of taking and reducing data. No single spectrometer meets all of these requirements. Several experiments aimed at improving and characterizing the detector response to gamma rays and neutrons were conducted. A light pipe (25 mm) was needed between the scintillator cell and the photomultiplier tube to achieve the best resolution. The light output of the scintillator as a function of gamma-ray energy was measured. Three experiments were conducted to determine the light output as a function of neutron energy. Monte Carlo calculations were made to evaluate the effects of multiple neutron scattering and edge effects in the detector. The electronic systems associated with the detector were improved with a transistorized circuit providing the bias voltage for the photomultiplier tube dynodes. This circuit was needed to obtain pulse-height linearity over the wide range of signal sizes. A special live-time clock was built to compensate for the large amount of dead time generated by the pulse-shape discrimination circuit we chose to use. 64 refs., 58 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Measurements of the response functions of a large size NE213 organic liquid scintillator for neutrons up to 800 MeV.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, S; Moriya, T; Takada, M; Hatanaka, K; Wakasa, T; Saito, T

    2005-01-01

    The response functions of 25.4 cm (length) x 25.4 cm (diameter) NE213 organic liquid scintillator have been measured for neutrons in the energy range from 20 to 800 MeV at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) and at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP) of Osaka University. At HIMAC, white (continuous) energy spectrum neutrons were produced by the 400 MeV per nucleon carbon ion bombardment on a thick graphite target, whose energy spectrum has already been measured by Kurosawa et al., [Nucl. Sci. Eng. 132, 30 (1999)] and the response functions of the time-of-flight-gated monoenergetic neutrons in a wide energy range from 20 to 800 MeV were simultaneously measured. At RCNP, the quasi-monoenergetic neutrons were produced via 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction by 250 MeV proton beam bombardment on a thin 7Li target, and the TOF-gated 245 MeV peak neutrons were measured. The absolute peak neutron yield was obtained by the measurement of 478 keV gamma rays from the 7Be nuclei produced in a Li target. The measured results show that the response functions for monoenergetic neutrons < 250 MeV have a recoil proton plateau and an edge around the maximum light output, which increases with increasing incident neutron energy, on the other hand > 250 MeV, the plateau and the edge become unclear because the proton range becomes longer than the detector size and the escaping protons increase. It can be found that the efficiency of the 24.5 cm (diameter) x 25.4 cm (length) NE213 for the 250 MeV neutrons is -10 times larger than the 12.7 cm (length) x 12.7 cm (diameter) NE213, which is widely used as a neutron spectrometer.

  3. Digital processing of signals arising from organic liquid scintillators for applications in the mixed-field assessment of nuclear threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspinall, M. D.; Joyce, M. J.; Mackin, R. O.; Jarrah, Z.; Peyton, A. J.

    2008-10-01

    The nuclear aspect of the CBRN* threat is often divided amongst radiological substances posing no criticality risk, often referred to as 'dirty bomb' scenarios, and fissile threats. The latter have the theoretical potential for criticality excursion, resulting in elevated neutron fluxes in addition to the γ-ray component that is common to dirty bombs. Even in isolation of the highly-unlikely criticality scenario, fissile substances often exhibit radiation fields comprising a significant neutron component which can require considerably different counterterrorism measures and clean-up methodologies. The contrast between these threats can indicate important differences in the relative sophistication of the perpetrators and their organizations. Consequently, the detection and discrimination of nuclear perils in terms of mixed-field content is an important assay in combating terrorist threats. In this paper we report on the design and implementation of a fast digitizer and embedded-processor for onthe- fly signal processing of events from organic liquid scintillators. A digital technique, known as Pulse Gradient Analysis (PGA), has been developed at Lancaster University for the digital discrimination of neutrons and γ rays. PGA has been deployed on bespoke hardware and demonstrates remarkable improvement over analogue methods for the assay of mixed fields and the real-time discrimination of neutrons and γ rays. In this regard the technology constitutes an attractive and affordable means for the discrimination of the radiation fields arising from fissile threats and those from dirty bombs. Data are presented demonstrating this capability with sealed radioactive sources.

  4. MOD: An In-Situ Organic Detector for the MSR 2003 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kminek, G.; Bada, J. L.; Botta, O.; Glavin, D. P.; Grunthaner, F. J.; LaBaw, C. C.; Serviss, O. E.

    2000-01-01

    Looking for organic compounds that are essential for biochemistry or indicative of extraterrestrial organic influx is the primary goal of MOD (Mars Organic Detector). MOD can also quantify adsorbed and chemisorbed water and evolved carbon dioxide.

  5. Research and Development of Scintillation fiber Trackers

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, A.; ITO, H.; Kawai, H.; Kodama, S.; Kaneko, N.; Han, S.

    2015-07-01

    We are developing the scintillation fiber trackers. This detector is consist of 0.5 mm diameter scintillation fibers and PPDs. This detector has the doughnut shape with outer diameter of 50 cm and inner diameter of 10 cm and thickness of 2 mm. The position resolution is 70 μm. There are no ineffective area. And the cost is several million yen. (authors)

  6. Neutron detector and fabrication method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Bhandari, Harish B.; Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Ovechkina, Olena E.

    2016-08-16

    A neutron detector and a method for fabricating a neutron detector. The neutron detector includes a photodetector, and a solid-state scintillator operatively coupled to the photodetector. In one aspect, the method for fabricating a neutron detector includes providing a photodetector, and depositing a solid-state scintillator on the photodetector to form a detector structure.

  7. Neutron detector characterization for SCINTIA array

    SciTech Connect

    Matei, C.; Hambsch, F. J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2011-07-01

    SCINTIA is a new detector array of organic scintillators under development at the Inst. for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM). The present design of SCINTIA includes NE213, p-terphenyl and Li glass neutron detectors positioned in a spherical configuration around the target. The properties of a novel p-terphenyl neutron detector to be used with SCINTIA have been investigated using photon sources and neutrons from a time tagged {sup 252}Cf(sf) source. The results show that the p-terphenyl crystal has better energy resolution, increased proton light output and neutron efficiency when compared to a similar size NE213 equivalent neutron detector. (authors)

  8. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  9. The HALO / HALO-2 Supernova Neutrino Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Stanley; HALO Collaboration; HALO-2 Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Helium and Lead Observatory (HALO) is a dedicated supernova neutrino detector in SNOLAB, which is built from 79 tons of surplus lead and the helium-3 neutron detectors from the SNO experiment. It is sensitive primarily to electron neutrinos, and is thus complementary to water Cerenkov and organic scintillation detectors which are primarily sensitive to electron anti-neutrinos. A comparison of the rates in these complementary detectors will enable a flavor decomposition of the neutrino flux from the next galactic core-collapse supernova. We have tentative ideas to build a 1000-ton HALO-2 detector in the Gran Sasso laboratory by using the lead from the decommissioned OPERA detector. We are exploring several neutron detector technologies to supplement the existing helium-3 detectors. We welcome new collaborators to join us. This research is supported by the NRC and NSERC (Canada), the US DOE and NSF, and the German RISE program.

  10. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.

  11. SCINTILLATION SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Francis, J.E.

    1960-06-21

    A portable scintillation spectrometer is described which is especially useful in radio-biological studies for determining the uptake and distribution of gamma -emitting substances in tissue. The spectrometer includes a collimator having a plurality of apertures that are hexagonal in cross section. Two crystals are provided: one is activated to respond to incident rays from the collimator; the other is not activated and shields the first from external radiation.

  12. Estimation of Fano factor in inorganic scintillators

    PubMed Central

    Bora, Vaibhav; Barrett, Harrison H.; Fastje, David; Clarkson, Eric; Furenlid, Lars; Bousselham, Abdelkader; Shah, Kanai S.; Glodo, Jarek

    2015-01-01

    The Fano factor of an integer-valued random variable is defined as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Correlation between the outputs of two photomultiplier tubes on opposite faces of a scintillation crystal was used to estimate the Fano factor of photoelectrons and scintillation photons. Correlations between the integrals of the detector outputs were used to estimate the photoelectron and photon Fano factor for YAP:Ce, SrI2:Eu and CsI:Na scintillator crystals. At 662 keV, SrI2:Eu was found to be sub-Poisson, while CsI:Na and YAP:Ce were found to be super-Poisson. An experiment setup inspired from the Hanbury Brown and Twiss experiment was used to measure the correlations as a function of time between the outputs of two photomultiplier tubes looking at the same scintillation event. A model of the scintillation and the detection processes was used to generate simulated detector outputs as a function of time for different values of Fano factor. The simulated outputs from the model for different Fano factors was compared to the experimentally measured detector outputs to estimate the Fano factor of the scintillation photons for YAP:Ce, LaBr3:Ce scintillator crystals. At 662 keV, LaBr3:Ce was found to be sub-Poisson, while YAP:Ce was found to be close to Poisson. PMID:26644631

  13. Deuterated-xylene (EJ301D): A new, improved deuterated scintillator for neutron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becchetti, Fred; Torres-Isea, Ramon; Febbraro, Michael; Clarke, Shaun; di Fulvio, Angela; Pozzi, Sara

    2015-10-01

    In conjunction with Eljen Technologies (Sweetwater,TX), we have developed and evaluated a deuterated-xylene based liquid organic scintillator detector (3 in. × 3 in.) and PMT assembly. Like deuterated-benzene based scintillators such as EJ315 and NE230 the n +d recoil spectrum producing the light spectrum has distinct peaks corresponding to specific neutron energy groups. The light spectrum can then be unfolded to produce neutron energy spectra including fission spectra without the need for time-of-flight. This results in a large over-all detection efficiency for such detectors as they can be used in arrays covering a large angular range, close to the neutron source and do not require a pulsed or gated source. In addition, the new EJ301D scintillator has a lower neutron energy threshold for improved PSD, which is important in many low-energy measurements. More importantly this scintillator has a much safer flash point than benzene-based scintillators making it better suited for many applications including field applications in nuclear security and non-proliferation. Work supported in part by US NSF and by the Consortium for Verification Technology under Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Award Number DE-NA0002534.

  14. The homestake surface-underground scintillations: Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, M. L.; Corbato, S.; Daily, T.; Fenyves, E. J.; Kieda, D.; Lande, K.; Lee, C. K.

    1985-01-01

    Two new detectors are currently under construction at the Homestake Gold Mine a 140-ton Large Area Scintillation Detector (LASD) with an upper surface area of 130 square meters, a geometry factor (for an isotropic flux) of 1200 square meters, sr, and a depth of 4200 m.w.e.; and a surface air shower array consisting of 100 scintillator elements, each 3 square meters, spanning an area of approximately square kilometers. Underground, half of the LASD is currently running and collecting muon data; on the surface, the first section of the air shower array will begin operation in the spring of 1985. The detectors and their capabilities are described.

  15. Monte Carlo simulated corrections for beam commissioning measurements with circular and MLC shaped fields on the CyberKnife M6 System: a study including diode, microchamber, point scintillator, and synthetic microdiamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francescon, P.; Kilby, W.; Noll, J. M.; Masi, L.; Satariano, N.; Russo, S.

    2017-02-01

    Monte Carlo simulation was used to calculate correction factors for output factor (OF), percentage depth-dose (PDD), and off-axis ratio (OAR) measurements with the CyberKnife M6 System. These include the first such data for the InCise MLC. Simulated detectors include diodes, air-filled microchambers, a synthetic microdiamond detector, and point scintillator. Individual perturbation factors were also evaluated. OF corrections show similar trends to previous studies. With a 5 mm fixed collimator the diode correction to convert a measured OF to the corresponding point dose ratio varies between  ‑6.1% and  ‑3.5% for the diode models evaluated, while in a 7.6 mm  ×  7.7 mm MLC field these are  ‑4.5% to  ‑1.8%. The corresponding microchamber corrections are  +9.9% to  +10.7% and  +3.5% to  +4.0%. The microdiamond corrections have a maximum of  ‑1.4% for the 7.5 mm and 10 mm collimators. The scintillator corrections are  <1% in all beams. Measured OF showed uncorrected inter-detector differences  >15%, reducing to  <3% after correction. PDD corrections at d  >  d max were  <2% for all detectors except IBA Razor where a maximum 4% correction was observed at 300 mm depth. OAR corrections were smaller inside the field than outside. At the beam edge microchamber OAR corrections were up to 15%, mainly caused by density perturbations, which blurs the measured penumbra. With larger beams and depths, PTW and IBA diode corrections outside the beam were up to 20% while the Edge detector needed smaller corrections although these did vary with orientation. These effects are most noticeable for large field size and depth, where they are dominated by fluence and stopping power perturbations. The microdiamond OAR corrections were  <3% outside the beam. This paper provides OF corrections that can be used for commissioning new CyberKnife M6 Systems and retrospectively checking estimated

  16. Light propagation and fluorescence quantum yields in liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, C.; Gramlich, B.; Wagner, S.

    2015-09-01

    For the simulation of the scintillation and Cherenkov light propagation in large liquid scintillator detectors a detailed knowledge about the absorption and emission spectra of the scintillator molecules is mandatory. Furthermore reemission probabilities and quantum yields of the scintillator components influence the light propagation inside the liquid. Absorption and emission properties are presented for liquid scintillators using 2,5-Diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 4-bis-(2-Methylstyryl)benzene (bis-MSB) as primary and secondary wavelength shifter. New measurements of the quantum yields for various aromatic molecules are shown.

  17. Extruded scintillator for the calorimetry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Rykalin, V.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Beznosko, D.; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2006-08-01

    An extrusion line has been installed and successfully operated at FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new Facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Recently progress has been made in producing co-extruded plastic scintillator, thus increasing the potential HEP applications of this Facility. The current R&D work with extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator for a potential ALICE upgrade, the ILC calorimetry program and the MINERvA experiment show the attractiveness of the chosen strategy for future experiments and calorimetry. We extensively discuss extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator in calorimetry in synergy with new Solid State Photomultipliers. The characteristics of extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator will be presented here as well as results with non-traditional photo read-out.

  18. Extruded scintillator for the Calorimetry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyshkant, A.; Rykalin, V.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Beznosko, D.

    2006-10-01

    An extrusion line has been installed and successfully operated at FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new Facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Recently progress has been made in producing co-extruded plastic scintillator, thus increasing the potential HEP applications of this Facility. The current R&D work with extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator for a potential ALICE upgrade, the ILC calorimetry program and the MINERvA experiment show the attractiveness of the chosen strategy for future experiments and calorimetry. We extensively discuss extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator in calorimetry in synergy with new Solid State Photomultipliers. The characteristics of extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator will be presented here as well as results with non-traditional photo read-out.

  19. FNAL-NICADD extruded scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Beznosko, D.; Bross, A.; Dyshkant, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Rykalin, V.; /Northern Illinois U.

    2005-09-01

    The possibility to produce a scintillator that satisfies the demands of physicists from different science areas has emerged with the installation of an extrusion line at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The extruder is the product of the fruitful collaboration between FNAL and Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development (NICADD) at Northern Illinois University (NIU). The results from the light output, light attenuation length and mechanical tolerance indicate that FNAL-NICADD scintillator is of high quality. Improvements in the extrusion die will yield better scintillator profiles and decrease the time needed for initial tuning. This paper will present the characteristics of the FNAL-NICADD scintillator based on the measurements performed. They include the response to MIPs from cosmic rays for individual extruded strips and irradiation studies where extruded samples were irradiated up to 1 Mrad. We will also discuss the results achieved with a new die design. The attractive perspective of using the extruded scintillator with MRS (Metal Resistive Semiconductor) photodetector readout will also be shown.

  20. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, R.; Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.

    2011-04-27

    We describe the R and D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O{sub 2}, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed ''natural'' radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.