Science.gov

Sample records for organization surgical safety

  1. Surgical Safety Training of World Health Organization Initiatives.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christopher R; Bates, Anthony S; Toll, Edward C; Cole, Matthew; Smith, Frank C T; Stark, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate training in surgical safety is essential to maximize patient safety. This national review quantified undergraduate surgical safety training. Training of 2 international safety initiatives was quantified: (1) World Health Organization (WHO) "Guidelines for Safe Surgery" and (2) Department of Health (DoH) "Principles of the Productive Operating Theatre." Also, 13 additional safety skills were quantified. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U tests. In all, 23 universities entered the study (71.9% response). Safety skills from WHO and DoH documents were formally taught in 4 UK medical schools (17.4%). Individual components of the documents were taught more frequently (47.6%). Half (50.9%) of the additional safety skills identified were taught. Surgical societies supplemented safety training, although the total amount of training provided was less than that in university curricula (P < .0001). Surgical safety training is inadequate in UK medical schools. To protect patients and maximize safety, a national undergraduate safety curriculum is recommended.

  2. 77 FR 25179 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Surgical Safety Institute

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Surgical Safety Institute AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS... and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient Safety Act) authorizes the listing of PSOs, which are...

  3. Impact of the World Health Organization's Surgical Safety Checklist on safety culture in the operating theatre: a controlled intervention study.

    PubMed

    Haugen, A S; Søfteland, E; Eide, G E; Sevdalis, N; Vincent, C A; Nortvedt, M W; Harthug, S

    2013-05-01

    Positive changes in safety culture have been hypothesized to be one of the mechanisms behind the reduction in mortality and morbidity after the introduction of the World Health Organization's Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC). We aimed to study the checklist effects on safety culture perceptions in operating theatre personnel using a prospective controlled intervention design at a single Norwegian university hospital. We conducted a study with pre- and post-intervention surveys using the intervention and control groups. The primary outcome was the effects of the Norwegian version of the SSC on safety culture perceptions. Safety culture was measured using the validated Norwegian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Descriptive characteristics of operating theatre personnel and checklist compliance data were also recorded. A mixed linear regression model was used to assess changes in safety culture. The response rate was 61% (349/575) at baseline and 51% (292/569) post-intervention. Checklist compliance ranged from 77% to 85%. We found significant positive changes in the checklist intervention group for the culture factors 'frequency of events reported' and 'adequate staffing' with regression coefficients at -0.25 [95% confidence interval (CI), -0.47 to -0.07] and 0.21 (95% CI, 0.07-0.35), respectively. Overall, the intervention group reported significantly more positive culture scores-including at baseline. Implementation of the SSC had rather limited impact on the safety culture within this hospital.

  4. Impact of the World Health Organization's Surgical Safety Checklist on safety culture in the operating theatre: a controlled intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Haugen, A. S.; Søfteland, E.; Eide, G. E.; Sevdalis, N.; Vincent, C. A.; Nortvedt, M. W.; Harthug, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Positive changes in safety culture have been hypothesized to be one of the mechanisms behind the reduction in mortality and morbidity after the introduction of the World Health Organization's Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC). We aimed to study the checklist effects on safety culture perceptions in operating theatre personnel using a prospective controlled intervention design at a single Norwegian university hospital. Methods We conducted a study with pre- and post-intervention surveys using the intervention and control groups. The primary outcome was the effects of the Norwegian version of the SSC on safety culture perceptions. Safety culture was measured using the validated Norwegian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Descriptive characteristics of operating theatre personnel and checklist compliance data were also recorded. A mixed linear regression model was used to assess changes in safety culture. Results The response rate was 61% (349/575) at baseline and 51% (292/569) post-intervention. Checklist compliance ranged from 77% to 85%. We found significant positive changes in the checklist intervention group for the culture factors ‘frequency of events reported’ and ‘adequate staffing’ with regression coefficients at −0.25 [95% confidence interval (CI), −0.47 to −0.07] and 0.21 (95% CI, 0.07–0.35), respectively. Overall, the intervention group reported significantly more positive culture scores—including at baseline. Conclusions Implementation of the SSC had rather limited impact on the safety culture within this hospital. PMID:23404986

  5. Improved compliance with the World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist is associated with reduced surgical specimen labelling errors.

    PubMed

    Martis, Walston R; Hannam, Jacqueline A; Lee, Tracey; Merry, Alan F; Mitchell, Simon J

    2016-09-09

    A new approach to administering the surgical safety checklist (SSC) at our institution using wall-mounted charts for each SSC domain coupled with migrated leadership among operating room (OR) sub-teams, led to improved compliance with the Sign Out domain. Since surgical specimens are reviewed at Sign Out, we aimed to quantify any related change in surgical specimen labelling errors. Prospectively maintained error logs for surgical specimens sent to pathology were examined for the six months before and after introduction of the new SSC administration paradigm. We recorded errors made in the labelling or completion of the specimen pot and on the specimen laboratory request form. Total error rates were calculated from the number of errors divided by total number of specimens. Rates from the two periods were compared using a chi square test. There were 19 errors in 4,760 specimens (rate 3.99/1,000) and eight errors in 5,065 specimens (rate 1.58/1,000) before and after the change in SSC administration paradigm (P=0.0225). Improved compliance with administering the Sign Out domain of the SSC can reduce surgical specimen errors. This finding provides further evidence that OR teams should optimise compliance with the SSC.

  6. Surgical Outcomes and Safety of Robotic Sacrocolpopexy in Women With Apical Pelvic Organ Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Sung, Hyun Hwan; Ko, Kwang Jin; Suh, Yoon Seok; Ryu, Gyu Ha; Lee, Kyu-Sung

    2017-03-24

    This study aimed to investigate the surgical outcomes and safety of robotic sacrocolpopexy (RSC) in patients with uterine/vaginal vault prolapse. Between January 2009 and June 2015, 16 women with apical prolapse underwent RSC. Pelvic organ prolapse quantification (POP-Q) examination was performed, and treatment success was defined as the presence of grade 0 or I apical prolapse upon POP-Q examination at the final follow-up. Pelvic floor distress inventory-short form 20 (PFDI-SF 20) was administered at every follow-up. A treatment satisfaction questionnaire was administered by telephone to evaluate patient satisfaction with the operation. Median age was 65 years (interquartile range [IQR], 56-68 years), and follow-up duration was 25.3 months (IQR, 5.4-34.0 months). Thirteen women (81.3%) had ≥grade III apical prolapse. Operation time was 251 minutes (IQR, 236-288 minutes), and blood loss was 75 mL (IQR, 50-150 mL). Median hospital stay was 4 days (IQR, 3-5 days). At the final follow-up, treatment success was reported in all patients, who presented grade 0 (n=8, 57.1%) and grade I (n=6, 42.9%) apical prolapse. Dramatic improvements in PFDI-SF 20 scores were noted after RSC (from 39 to 4; P=0.001). Most patients (12 of 13) were satisfied with RSC. An intraoperative complication (sacral venous plexus injury) was reported in 1 patient, and there was no conversion to open surgery. Mesh erosion was not reported. RSC is an efficient and safe surgical option for apical prolapse repair. Most patients were satisfied with RSC. Thus, RSC might be one of the best treatment options for apical prolapse in women.

  7. Surgical Outcomes and Safety of Robotic Sacrocolpopexy in Women With Apical Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to investigate the surgical outcomes and safety of robotic sacrocolpopexy (RSC) in patients with uterine/vaginal vault prolapse. Methods Between January 2009 and June 2015, 16 women with apical prolapse underwent RSC. Pelvic organ prolapse quantification (POP-Q) examination was performed, and treatment success was defined as the presence of grade 0 or I apical prolapse upon POP-Q examination at the final follow-up. Pelvic floor distress inventory-short form 20 (PFDI-SF 20) was administered at every follow-up. A treatment satisfaction questionnaire was administered by telephone to evaluate patient satisfaction with the operation. Results Median age was 65 years (interquartile range [IQR], 56–68 years), and follow-up duration was 25.3 months (IQR, 5.4–34.0 months). Thirteen women (81.3%) had ≥grade III apical prolapse. Operation time was 251 minutes (IQR, 236–288 minutes), and blood loss was 75 mL (IQR, 50–150 mL). Median hospital stay was 4 days (IQR, 3–5 days). At the final follow-up, treatment success was reported in all patients, who presented grade 0 (n=8, 57.1%) and grade I (n=6, 42.9%) apical prolapse. Dramatic improvements in PFDI-SF 20 scores were noted after RSC (from 39 to 4; P=0.001). Most patients (12 of 13) were satisfied with RSC. An intraoperative complication (sacral venous plexus injury) was reported in 1 patient, and there was no conversion to open surgery. Mesh erosion was not reported. Conclusions RSC is an efficient and safe surgical option for apical prolapse repair. Most patients were satisfied with RSC. Thus, RSC might be one of the best treatment options for apical prolapse in women. PMID:28361513

  8. Surgical safety checklists in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Vivekanantham, Sayinthen; Ravindran, Rahul Prashanth; Shanmugarajah, Kumaran; Maruthappu, Mahiben; Shalhoub, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist (WHO SSC) has demonstrated efficacy in developed and developing countries alike. Recent increases in awareness of surgical morbidity in developing countries has placed greater emphasis on strategies to improve surgical safety in resource-limited settings. The implementation of surgical safety checklists in low-income countries has specific barriers related to resources and culture. Adapting and amending existing surgical safety checklists, as well as considering factors unique to developing countries, may allow the potential of this simple intervention to be fully harnessed in a wider setting. This review will address the benefits and challenges of implementation of surgical safety checklists in developing countries. Moreover, inspiration for the original checklist is revisited to identify areas that will be of particular benefit in a resource-poor setting. Potential future strategies to encourage the implementation of checklists in these countries are also discussed.

  9. [Medical safety and the Japan Surgical Society].

    PubMed

    Kokudo, Norihiro

    2013-03-01

    Medical safety has been one of the most important issues addressed by the Japan Surgical Society (JSS), and the topic has been discussed at every annual meeting of the JSS since 2004. In 2008, the Medical Safety Committee was established under the JSS. The JSS is one of the principal founding members of the Japan Council for Quality Health Care (JCQHR) and has placed many members on evaluation committees for a majority of malpractice cases. In cooperation with the Japanese Society of Internal Medicine and JCQHR, the JSS is trying to lead the Japanese medical community to create an official third-party organization for medical safety.

  10. Use of a Surgical Safety Checklist to Improve Team Communication.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Richard A; Eggenberger, Terry; Keller, Kathryn; Gallison, Barry S; Newman, David

    2016-09-01

    To improve surgical team communication, a team at Broward Health Imperial Point Hospital, Ft Lauderdale, Florida, implemented a program for process improvement using a locally adapted World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist. This program included a standardized, comprehensive time out and a briefing/debriefing process. Postimplementation responses to the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire revealed a significant increase in the surgical team's perception of communication compared with that reported on the pretest (6% improvement resulting in t79 = -1.72, P < .05, d = 0.39). Perceptions of communication increased significantly for nurses (12% increase, P = .002), although the increase for surgeons and surgical technologists was lower (4% for surgeons, P = .15 and 2.3% for surgical technologists, P = .06). As a result of this program, we have observed improved surgical teamwork behaviors and an enhanced culture of safety in the OR.

  11. World Health Organization (WHO) surgical safety checklist implementation and its impact on perioperative morbidity and mortality in an academic medical center in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Lacassie, Hector J.; Ferdinand, Constanza; Guzmán, Sergio; Camus, Lorena; Echevarria, Ghislaine C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Health care organizations are unsafe. Numerous centers have incorporated the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist in their processes with good results; however, only limited information is available about its effectiveness in Latin America. We aimed to evaluate the impact of the checklist implementation on the in-hospital morbidity and mortality rate in a tertiary health care center. After Institutional review board approval, and using data from our hospital administrative records, we conducted a retrospective analysis of all surgical encounters (n = 70,639) over the period from January 2005 to December 2012. Propensity scoring (PS) methods (matching and inverse weighting) were used to compare the pre and postintervention period, after controlling for selection bias. After PS matching (n = 29,250 matched pairs), the in-hospital mortality rate was 0.82% [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.73–0.92] before and 0.65% (95% CI, 0.57–0.74) after checklist implementation [odds ratio (OR) 0.73; 95% CI, 0.61–0.89]. The median length of stay was 3 days [interquartile range (IQR), 1–5] and 2 days (IQR, 1–4) for the pre and postchecklist period, respectively (P < 0.01). This is the first Latin American study reporting a decrease in mortality after the implementation of the WHO Surgical Checklist in adult surgical patients. This is a strong and simple tool to make health care safer, especially in developing countries. PMID:27281092

  12. Safety organizations and experts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, G.; Rubinstein, R. I.; Pinto, J. J.; Meschkow, S. Z.

    1977-01-01

    Handbook lists organizations and experts in specific, well defined areas of safety technology. Special emphasis is given to relevant safety information sources on aircraft fire hazards and aircraft interior flammability.

  13. Trends in internet search activity, media coverage, and patient-centered health information after the FDA safety communications on surgical mesh for pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Stone, Benjamin V; Forde, James C; Levit, Valerie B; Lee, Richard K; Te, Alexis E; Chughtai, Bilal

    2016-11-01

    In July 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a safety communication regarding serious complications associated with surgical mesh for pelvic organ prolapse, prompting increased media and public attention. This study sought to analyze internet search activity and news article volume after this FDA warning and to evaluate the quality of websites providing patient-centered information. Google Trends™ was utilized to evaluate search engine trends for the term "pelvic organ prolapse" and associated terms between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2014. Google News™ was utilized to quantify the number of news articles annually under the term "pelvic organ prolapse." The search results for the term "pelvic organ prolapse" were assessed for quality using the Health On the Net Foundation (HON) certification. There was a significant increase in search activity from 37.42 in 2010 to 57.75 in 2011, at the time of the FDA communication (p = 0.021). No other annual interval had a statistically significant increase in search activity. The single highest monthly search activity, given the value of 100, was August 2011, immediately following the July 2011 notification, with the next highest value being 98 in July 2011. Linear regression analysis of news articles per year since the FDA communication revealed r(2) = 0.88, with a coefficient of 186. Quality assessment demonstrated that 42 % of websites were HON-certified, with .gov sites providing the highest quality information. Although the 2011 FDA safety communication on surgical mesh was associated with increased public and media attention, the quality of relevant health information on the internet remains of poor quality. Future quality assurance measures may be critical in enabling patients to play active roles in their own healthcare.

  14. [Surgical infections as patient safety problems].

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Kulin, László; Jósa, Valéria; Mayer, Akos

    2011-06-01

    Surgical infections are severe complications of surgical interventions and one of the most important patient safety issues. These are associated with increased morbidity, mortality, costs and decreased quality of life. Prevention of infections is essential, while one has to consider pre-, intra- and postoperative factors and procedures in the clinical practice. In this article we summarize the latest recommendations for clinicians based on the relevant published literature.

  15. The Surgical Safety Checklist: Results of Implementation in Otorhinolaryngology

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact of implementing the surgical safety checklist (SSCL) on the outcome of patient safety in otorhinolaryngology (ENT) surgical procedures in two hospitals in Saudi Arabia: Aseer Central and Abha Private Hospitals. Methods This retrospective study conducted over seven years (1 July 2008 to 30 June 2015) followed a staff educational and training program for the implementation of the World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist (WHO SSCL). The program included the use of audiovisual aids and practical demonstrations. Incidents of non-compliance were treated as sentinel events and were audited by the process of root cause analysis. Results There were 5 144 elective ENT surgical cases in both hospitals in which the SSCL was utilized over the seven-year study period. The average compliance rate was 96.5%. Reasons for non-compliance included staff shortage, fast staff turnover, excessive workload, communication problems, and presence of existing processes. Conclusions The implementation of the SSCL was a substantial leap in efforts towards ensuring surgical patients’ safety. It is compulsory in the healthcare system in many countries. Such progress in healthcare improvement can be accomplished with the commitment of the operating suite staff by spending few moments checking facts and establishing an environment of teamwork for the benefit of the surgical patient. PMID:28042399

  16. SAGES TAVAC safety and effectiveness analysis: da Vinci ® Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA).

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Shawn; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Gould, Jon; Azagury, Dan; Sandler, Bryan; Hutter, Matthew; Ross, Sharona; Haas, Eric; Brody, Fred; Satava, Richard

    2015-10-01

    The da Vinci(®) Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) is a computer-assisted (robotic) surgical system designed to enable and enhance minimally invasive surgery. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared computer-assisted surgical systems for use by trained physicians in an operating room environment for laparoscopic surgical procedures in general, cardiac, colorectal, gynecologic, head and neck, thoracic and urologic surgical procedures. There are substantial numbers of peer-reviewed papers regarding the da Vinci(®) Surgical System, and a thoughtful assessment of evidence framed by clinical opinion is warranted. The SAGES da Vinci(®) TAVAC sub-committee performed a literature review of the da Vinci(®) Surgical System regarding gastrointestinal surgery. Conclusions by the sub-committee were vetted by the SAGES TAVAC Committee and SAGES Executive Board. Following revisions, the document was evaluated by the TAVAC Committee and Executive Board again for final approval. Several conclusions were drawn based on expert opinion organized by safety, efficacy, and cost for robotic foregut, bariatric, hepatobiliary/pancreatic, colorectal surgery, and single-incision cholecystectomy. Gastrointestinal surgery with the da Vinci(®) Surgical System is safe and comparable, but not superior to standard laparoscopic approaches. Although clinically acceptable, its use may be costly for select gastrointestinal procedures. Current data are limited to the da Vinci(®) Surgical System; further analyses are needed.

  17. [Surgical techniques of organ transplants].

    PubMed

    Froněk, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    The list of surgical procedures of solid organ transplantations appears very interesting and colorful, even with overlap among techniques. Liver transplantation is a life-saving procedure in a majority of cases, the liver can be transplanted as a full or partial graft. The liver graft can be split for two recipients; it can also be reduced for a small recipient if splitting is not indicated. Kidney transplantation is the most common solid organ transplant procedure, the majority of kidney grafts come from brain-dead donors whereas the number of live donor transplants is increasing, also thanks to paired donation and blood group incompatible transplantation methods. The small bowel and multivisceral transplantation are rare procedures; they serve selected patients with short bowel syndrome, some patients with retroperitoneal tumors or with extensive visceral thrombosis. Solid organ transplants are well established treatment methods with good and proven outcomes. A majority of patients can return to a normal life after their transplants.

  18. Systems Approaches to Surgical Quality and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Charles; Moorthy, Krishna; Sarker, Sudip K.; Chang, Avril; Darzi, Ara W.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This approach provides the basis of our research program, which aims to expand operative assessment beyond patient factors and the technical skills of the surgeon; to extend assessment of surgical skills beyond bench models to the operating theater; to provide a basis for assessing interventions; and to provide a deeper understanding of surgical outcomes. Summary Background Data: Research into surgical outcomes has primarily focused on the role of patient pathophysiological risk factors and on the skills of the individual surgeon. However, this approach neglects a wide range of factors that have been found to be of important in achieving safe, high-quality performance in other high-risk environments. The outcome of surgery is also dependent on the quality of care received throughout the patient's stay in hospital and the performance of a considerable number of health professionals, all of whom are influenced by the environment in which they work. Methods: Drawing on the wider literature on safety and quality in healthcare, and recent papers on surgery, this article argues for a much wider assessment of factors that may be relevant to surgical outcome. In particular, we suggest the development of an “operation profile” to capture all the salient features of a surgical operation, including such factors as equipment design and use, communication, team coordination, factors affecting individual performance, and the working environment. Methods of assessing such factors are outlined, and ethical issues and other potential concerns are discussed. PMID:15024308

  19. Enhancing surgical safety using digital multimedia technology.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Jennifer L; Mukhopadhyay, Dhriti; Hunt, Justin; Jupiter, Daniel; Smythe, William R; Papaconstantinou, Harry T

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether incorporating digital and video multimedia components improved surgical time-out performance of a surgical safety checklist. A prospective pilot study was designed for implementation of a multimedia time-out, including a patient video. Perceptions of the staff participants were surveyed before and after intervention (Likert scale: 1, strongly disagree to 5, strongly agree). Employee satisfaction was high for both time-out procedures. However, employees appreciated improved clarity of patient identification (P < .05) and operative laterality (P < .05) with the digital method. About 87% of the respondents preferred the digital version to the standard time-out (75% anesthesia, 89% surgeons, 93% nursing). Although the duration of time-outs increased (49 and 79 seconds for standard and digital time-outs, respectively, P > .001), there was significant improvement in performance of key safety elements. The multimedia time-out allows improved participation by the surgical team and is preferred to a standard time-out process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Food safety and organic meats.

    PubMed

    Van Loo, Ellen J; Alali, Walid; Ricke, Steven C

    2012-01-01

    The organic meat industry in the United States has grown substantially in the past decade in response to consumer demand for nonconventionally produced products. Consumers are often not aware that the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) organic standards are based only on the methods used for production and processing of the product and not on the product's safety. Food safety hazards associated with organic meats remain unclear because of the limited research conducted to determine the safety of organic meat from farm-to-fork. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the published results on the microbiological safety of organic meats. In addition, antimicrobial resistance of microbes in organic food animal production is addressed. Determining the food safety risks associated with organic meat production requires systematic longitudinal studies that quantify the risks of microbial and nonmicrobial hazards from farm-to-fork.

  1. Swedish Nurse Anesthetists' Experiences of the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist.

    PubMed

    Rönnberg, Linda; Nilsson, Ulrica

    2015-12-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) surgical safety checklist aims to increase communication, build teamwork, and standardize routines in clinical practice in an effort to reduce complications and improve patient safety. The checklist has been implemented in surgical departments both nationally and internationally. The purpose of this study was to describe the registered nurse anesthetists' (RNA) experience with the use of the WHO surgical safety checklist. This was a cross-sectional study with a descriptive mixed methods design, involving nurse anesthetists from two different hospitals in Sweden. Data were collected using a study-specific questionnaire. Forty-seven RNAs answered the questionnaire. There was a statistically significant lower compliance to "Sign-in" compared with the other two parts, "Timeout" and "Sign-out." The RNAs expressed that the checklist was very important for anesthetic and perioperative care. They also expressed that by confirming their own area of expertise, they achieved an increased sense of being a team member. Thirty-four percent believed that the surgeon was responsible for the checklist, yet this was not the reality in clinical practice. Although 23% reported that they initiated use of the checklist, only one RNA believed that it was the responsibility of the RNA. Forty-three percent had received training about the checklist and its use. The WHO surgical checklist facilitates the nurse anesthetist's anesthetic and perioperative care. It allows the nurse anesthetist to better identify each patient's specific concerns and have an increased sense of being a team member. Copyright © 2015 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Surgical safety checklists briefings: Perceived efficacy and team member involvement.

    PubMed

    McDowell, D S; McComb, S

    2016-06-01

    Researchers have shown inconsistencies in compliance, outcomes and attitudes of surgical team members related to surgical safety checklist briefings. The purpose of this study was to examine surgical circulator and scrub practitioners' perceptions of safety checklist briefings and team member involvement, and to identify potential improvements in the process based on those perceptions. An anonymous survey was conducted with members of the Association of periOperative Registered Nurses (AORN) and the Association of Surgical Technologists (AST). Questions focused on perceptions of checklist briefing efficacy and team member involvement in safety practices. From the 346 usable responses, a third respondent group of self-identified perioperative leaders emerged. Significant results were obtained related to leaders' perceptions, post-procedure briefings and various perceptions of team member involvement. Study results indicate that variances in safety practices continue as perceived by surgical team members thus presenting opportunities for further examination and improvement of processes in reducing surgical errors.

  3. Time to rethink: an evidence-based response from pelvic surgeons to the FDA Safety Communication: "UPDATE on Serious Complications Associated with Transvaginal Placement of Surgical Mesh for Pelvic Organ Prolapse".

    PubMed

    Murphy, Miles; Holzberg, Adam; van Raalte, Heather; Kohli, Neeraj; Goldman, Howard B; Lucente, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    In July of 2011 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a safety communication entitled "UPDATE on Serious Complications Associated with Transvaginal Placement of Surgical Mesh for Pelvic Organ Prolapse." The stated purpose of this communication is to inform health care providers and patients that serious complications with placement of this mesh are not rare and that it is not clear that these repairs are more effective than nonmesh repair. The comments regarding efficacy are based on a systematic review of the scientific literature from 1996-2011 conducted by the FDA. Our review of the literature during this time yields some different conclusions regarding the safety and efficacy of mesh use in prolapse repair. It may be useful to consider this information prior to making recommendations regarding mesh use in prolapse surgery according to the recent UPDATE.

  4. Implementation Science: A Neglected Opportunity to Accelerate Improvements in the Safety and Quality of Surgical Care.

    PubMed

    Hull, Louise; Athanasiou, Thanos; Russ, Stephanie

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this review was to emphasize the importance of implementation science in understanding why efforts to integrate evidence-based interventions into surgical practice frequently fail to replicate the improvements reported in early research studies. Over the past 2 decades, numerous patient safety initiatives have been developed to improve the quality and safety of surgical care. The surgical community is now faced with translating "promising" initiatives from the research environment into clinical practice-the World Health Organization (WHO) has described this task as one of the greatest challenges facing the global health community and has identified the importance of implementation science in scaling up evidence-based interventions. Using the WHO surgical safety checklist, a prominent example of a rapidly and widely implemented surgical safety intervention of the past decade, a review of literature, spanning surgery, and implementation science, was conducted to identify and describe a broad range of factors affecting implementation success, including contextual factors, implementation strategies, and implementation outcomes. Our current approach to conceptualizing and measuring the "effectiveness" of interventions has resulted in factors critical to implementing surgical safety interventions successfully being neglected. Improvements in the safety and quality of surgical care can be accelerated by drawing more heavily upon implementation science and that until this rapidly evolving field becomes more firmly embedded into surgical research and implementation efforts, our understanding of why interventions such as the checklist "work" in some settings and appear "not to work" in other settings will be limited.

  5. Patient Safety Center Organization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    commercial partner Red Llama , we have embarked on developing a series of cognitive skills platforms specifically aimed at the cognitive component of...specific surgical procedures. Red Llama has contributed a development platform, SimPraxisTM, and programming expertise. ISIS has developed a

  6. Surgical Safety in Pediatrics: practical application of the Pediatric Surgical Safety Checklist1

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Maria Paula de Oliveira; Pedreira, Mavilde L. G.; Peterlini, Maria Angélica Sorgini

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: to assess the practical application of the Pediatric Surgical Safety Checklist on the preoperative period and to verify family satisfaction regarding the use of the material. Method: exploratory study that aimed to analyze the use of the checklist by children who underwent surgical interventions. The sample was constituted by 60 children (from preschoolers to teens) and 60 family members. The variables related to demographic characterization, filling out the checklist, and family satisfaction, being evaluated through inferential and descriptive statistical analysis. Results: most children (71.7%) were male, with a median age of 7.5 years. We identified the achievement of 65.3% of the checklist items, 30.0% were not filled due to non-performance of the team and 4.7% for children and family reasons. In the association analysis, we found that the removal of accessories item (p = 0.008) was the most checked by older children. Regarding satisfaction, the family members evaluated the material as great (63.3%) and good (36.7%) and believed that there was a reduction of the child's anxiety (83.3%). Conclusion: the use of the checklist in clinical practice can change health services regarding safety culture and promote customer satisfaction. PMID:26626002

  7. The WHO surgical safety checklist: survey of patients’ views

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Stephanie Jane; Rout, Shantanu; Caris, Jochem; Moorthy, Krishna; Mayer, Erik; Darzi, Ara; Sevdalis, Nick; Vincent, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that full implementation of the WHO surgical safety checklist across NHS operating theatres is still proving a challenge for many surgical teams. The aim of the current study was to assess patients’ views of the checklist, which have yet to be considered and could inform its appropriate use, and influence clinical buy-in. Method Postoperative patients were sampled from surgical wards at two large London teaching hospitals. Patients were shown two professionally produced videos, one demonstrating use of the WHO surgical safety checklist, and one demonstrating the equivalent periods of their operation before its introduction. Patients’ views of the checklist, its use in practice, and their involvement in safety improvement more generally were captured using a bespoke 19-item questionnaire. Results 141 patients participated. Patients were positive towards the checklist, strongly agreeing that it would impact positively on their safety and on surgical team performance. Those worried about coming to harm in hospital were particularly supportive. Views were divided regarding hearing discussions around blood loss/airway before their procedure, supporting appropriate modifications to the tool. Patients did not feel they had a strong role to play in safety improvement more broadly. Conclusions It is feasible and instructive to capture patients’ views of the delivery of safety improvements like the checklist. We have demonstrated strong support for the checklist in a sample of surgical patients, presenting a challenge to those resistant to its use. PMID:25038036

  8. Improvement of teamwork and safety climate following implementation of the WHO surgical safety checklist at a university hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Takashi; Taniwaki, Miki; Ogata, Kimiyo; Sakamoto, Miwa; Yokoyama, Masataka

    2014-06-01

    With the aim to optimize surgical safety, the World Health Organization (WHO) introduced the Surgical Safety Checklist (SSCL) in 2008. The SSCL has been piloted in many countries worldwide and shown to improve both safety attitudes within surgical teams and patient outcomes. In the study reported here we investigated whether implementation of the SSCL improved the teamwork and safety climate at a single university hospital in Japan. All surgical teams at the hospital implemented the SSCL in all surgical procedures with strict adherence to the SSCL implementation manual developed by WHO. Changes in safety attitudes were evaluated using the modified operating-room version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). A before and after design was used, with the questionnaire administered before and 3 months after SSCL implementation. Our analysis revealed that the mean scores on the SAQ had significantly improved 3 months after implementation of the SSCL compared to those before implementation. This finding implies that effective implementation of the SSCL could improve patient outcomes in Japan, similar to the findings of the WHO pilot study.

  9. Safety culture and care: a program to prevent surgical errors.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Maureen White; O'Malley, Catherine; Silvestri, Sandra

    2015-04-01

    Surgical errors are under scrutiny in health care as part of ensuring a culture of safety in which patients receive quality care. Hospitals use safety measures to compare their performance against industry benchmarks. To understand patient safety issues, health care providers must have processes in place to analyze and evaluate the quality of the care they provide. At one facility, efforts made to improve its quality and safety led to the development of a robust safety program with resources devoted to enhancing the culture of safety in the Perioperative Services department. Improvement initiatives included changing processes for safety reporting and performance improvement plans, adding resources and nurse roles, and creating communication strategies around adverse safety events and how to improve care. One key outcome included a 54% increase in the percentage of personnel who indicated in a survey that they would speak up if they saw something negatively affecting patient care. Copyright © 2015 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Errors in surgery. Strategies to improve surgical safety].

    PubMed

    Arenas-Márquez, Humberto; Anaya-Prado, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Surgery is an extreme experience for both patient and surgeon. The patient has to be rescued from something so serious that it may justify the surgeon to violate his/her integrity in order to resolve the problem. Nevertheless, both physician and patient recognize that the procedure has some risks. Medical errors are the 8th cause of death in the U.S., and malpractice can be documented in >50% of the legal prosecutions in Mexico. Of special interest is the specialty of general surgery where legal responsibility can be confirmed in >80% of the cases. Interest in mortality attributed to medical errors has existed since the 19th century; clearly identifying the lack of knowledge, abilities, and poor surgical and diagnostic judgment as the cause of errors. Currently, poor organization, lack of team work, and physician/ patient-related factors are recognized as the cause of medical errors. Human error is unavoidable and health care systems and surgeons should adopt the culture of error analysis openly, inquisitively and permanently. Errors should be regarded as an opportunity to learn that health care should to be patient centered and not surgeon centered. In this review, we analyze the causes of complications and errors that can develop during routine surgery. Additionally, we propose measures that will allow improvements in the safety of surgical patients.

  11. Applying the WHO conceptual framework for the International Classification for Patient Safety to a surgical population

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, L. M.; Woods, D. M.; Yanes, A. F.; Skaro, A. I.; Daud, A.; Curtis, T.; Wymore, E.; Holl, J. L.; Abecassis, M. M.; Ladner, D. P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Efforts to improve patient safety are challenged by the lack of universally agreed upon terms. The International Classification for Patient Safety (ICPS) was developed by the World Health Organization for this purpose. This study aimed to test the applicability of the ICPS to a surgical population. Design A web-based safety debriefing was sent to clinicians involved in surgical care of abdominal organ transplant patients. A multidisciplinary team of patient safety experts, surgeons and researchers used the data to develop a system of classification based on the ICPS. Disagreements were reconciled via consensus, and a codebook was developed for future use by researchers. Results A total of 320 debriefing responses were used for the initial review and codebook development. In total, the 320 debriefing responses contained 227 patient safety incidents (range: 0–7 per debriefing) and 156 contributing factors/hazards (0–5 per response). The most common severity classification was ‘reportable circumstance,’ followed by ‘near miss.’ The most common incident types were ‘resources/organizational management,’ followed by ‘medical device/equipment.’ Several aspects of surgical care were encompassed by more than one classification, including operating room scheduling, delays in care, trainee-related incidents, interruptions and handoffs. Conclusions This study demonstrates that a framework for patient safety can be applied to facilitate the organization and analysis of surgical safety data. Several unique aspects of surgical care require consideration, and by using a standardized framework for describing concepts, research findings can be compared and disseminated across surgical specialties. The codebook is intended for use as a framework for other specialties and institutions. PMID:26803539

  12. Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckenbaugh, Raymond W.

    1996-11-01

    Each organic chemistry student should become familiar with the educational and governmental laboratory safety requirements. One method for teaching laboratory safety is to assign each student to locate safety resources for a specific class laboratory experiment. The student should obtain toxicity and hazardous information for all chemicals used or produced during the assigned experiment. For example, what is the LD50 or LC50 for each chemical? Are there any specific hazards for these chemicals, carcinogen, mutagen, teratogen, neurotixin, chronic toxin, corrosive, flammable, or explosive agent? The school's "Chemical Hygiene Plan", "Prudent Practices for Handling Hazardous Chemicals in the Laboratory" (National Academy Press), and "Laboratory Standards, Part 1910 - Occupational Safety and Health Standards" (Fed. Register 1/31/90, 55, 3227-3335) should be reviewed for laboratory safety requirements for the assigned experiment. For example, what are the procedures for safe handling of vacuum systems, if a vacuum distillation is used in the assigned experiment? The literature survey must be submitted to the laboratory instructor one week prior to the laboratory session for review and approval. The student should then give a short presentation to the class on the chemicals' toxicity and hazards and describe the safety precautions that must be followed. This procedure gives the student first-hand knowledge on how to find and evaluate information to meet laboartory safety requirements.

  13. 14 CFR 415.33 - Safety organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety organization. 415.33 Section 415.33....33 Safety organization. (a) An applicant shall maintain a safety organization and document it by... communication, both within the applicant's organization and between the applicant and any federal launch...

  14. 14 CFR 415.33 - Safety organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety organization. 415.33 Section 415.33....33 Safety organization. (a) An applicant shall maintain a safety organization and document it by... communication, both within the applicant's organization and between the applicant and any federal launch...

  15. 14 CFR 415.33 - Safety organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety organization. 415.33 Section 415.33....33 Safety organization. (a) An applicant shall maintain a safety organization and document it by... communication, both within the applicant's organization and between the applicant and any federal launch...

  16. 14 CFR 415.33 - Safety organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety organization. 415.33 Section 415.33....33 Safety organization. (a) An applicant shall maintain a safety organization and document it by... communication, both within the applicant's organization and between the applicant and any federal launch...

  17. 14 CFR 415.33 - Safety organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety organization. 415.33 Section 415.33....33 Safety organization. (a) An applicant shall maintain a safety organization and document it by... communication, both within the applicant's organization and between the applicant and any federal launch...

  18. Patient safety in dermatologic surgery: Part I. Safety related to surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Timothy J; Lolis, Margarita; Goldberg, David J; MacFarlane, Deborah F

    2015-07-01

    Surgical procedures involve unique elements related to patient safety. One must be aware of potential complications and safety issues within the practice of dermatologic surgery. Developing a high level of competence in skin surgery will address some safety issues, while implementing protocols and redundancies provides systems-based correction for other safety issues. We provide an in-depth review of patient safety in dermatologic surgery. In particular, we highlight the most common safety issues and methods for reducing error. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Navigating towards improved surgical safety using aviation-based strategies.

    PubMed

    Kao, Lillian S; Thomas, Eric J

    2008-04-01

    Safety practices in the aviation industry are being increasingly adapted to healthcare in an effort to reduce medical errors and patient harm. However, caution should be applied in embracing these practices because of limited experience in surgical disciplines, lack of rigorous research linking these practices to outcome, and fundamental differences between the two industries. Surgeons should have an in-depth understanding of the principles and data supporting aviation-based safety strategies before routinely adopting them. This paper serves as a review of strategies adapted to improve surgical safety, including the following: implementation of crew resource management in training operative teams; incorporation of simulation in training of technical and nontechnical skills; and analysis of contributory factors to errors using surveys, behavioral marker systems, human factors analysis, and incident reporting. Avenues and challenges for future research are also discussed.

  20. [Safety and accuracy of surgical procedures: case law evolution].

    PubMed

    Rougé-Maillart, C; Gaudin, A; Lermite, E; Arnaud, J-P; Penneau, M

    2008-01-01

    Surgeons, like other doctors, practice their profession within a framework of contractual liability defined by statute in 1936. This established that the doctor was subject to a contractual obligation to provide appropriate and diligent care. Care and technical acts should conform to those which would have been provided by a prudent doctor within the standards of knowledge and practice of his field; care which deviates from this standard would be considered medical error or fault. This standard of care is referred to as "sound professional conduct". However, while not calling this basic principle into question, civil jurisdictions have progressively held surgeons liable whenever injury has occurred following surgical acts, without considering whether care deviates from sound professional conduct. Since 2000, judges have begun to attribute a requirement for absolute safety of results in cases where the surgeon had injured an organ unrelated to the planned operation. However it seems that the rare judgments given on this topic in the last 2-3 years have become less frequent. The creation of a compensation regime for medical accidents, via the law dated March 4, 2002, has contributed to this evolution. It is to be hoped that the flaws described in this system do not encourage jurisdictions to reconsider previous case law decisions.

  1. 14 CFR 431.33 - Safety organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety organization. 431.33 Section 431.33... Launch and Reentry of a Reusable Launch Vehicle § 431.33 Safety organization. (a) An applicant shall maintain a safety organization and document it by identifying lines of communication and approval...

  2. 14 CFR 431.33 - Safety organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety organization. 431.33 Section 431.33... Launch and Reentry of a Reusable Launch Vehicle § 431.33 Safety organization. (a) An applicant shall maintain a safety organization and document it by identifying lines of communication and approval...

  3. 14 CFR 431.33 - Safety organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety organization. 431.33 Section 431.33... Launch and Reentry of a Reusable Launch Vehicle § 431.33 Safety organization. (a) An applicant shall maintain a safety organization and document it by identifying lines of communication and approval...

  4. 14 CFR 431.33 - Safety organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety organization. 431.33 Section 431.33... Launch and Reentry of a Reusable Launch Vehicle § 431.33 Safety organization. (a) An applicant shall maintain a safety organization and document it by identifying lines of communication and approval...

  5. 14 CFR 431.33 - Safety organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety organization. 431.33 Section 431.33... Launch and Reentry of a Reusable Launch Vehicle § 431.33 Safety organization. (a) An applicant shall maintain a safety organization and document it by identifying lines of communication and approval...

  6. 76 FR 79192 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From HSMS Patient Safety Organization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From HSMS Patient Safety Organization AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ... relinquishment from the HSMS Patient Safety Organization of its status as a Patient Safety Organization...

  7. 14 CFR 417.103 - Safety organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety organization. 417.103 Section 417... organization. (a) A launch operator must maintain and document a safety organization. A launch operator must... within the launch operator's organization and between the launch operator and any federal launch range...

  8. 14 CFR 417.103 - Safety organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety organization. 417.103 Section 417... organization. (a) A launch operator must maintain and document a safety organization. A launch operator must... within the launch operator's organization and between the launch operator and any federal launch range...

  9. 14 CFR 417.103 - Safety organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety organization. 417.103 Section 417... organization. (a) A launch operator must maintain and document a safety organization. A launch operator must... within the launch operator's organization and between the launch operator and any federal launch range...

  10. 14 CFR 417.103 - Safety organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety organization. 417.103 Section 417... organization. (a) A launch operator must maintain and document a safety organization. A launch operator must... within the launch operator's organization and between the launch operator and any federal launch range...

  11. 14 CFR 417.103 - Safety organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety organization. 417.103 Section 417... organization. (a) A launch operator must maintain and document a safety organization. A launch operator must... within the launch operator's organization and between the launch operator and any federal launch range...

  12. A Patient Safety Dilemma: Obesity in the Surgical Patient.

    PubMed

    Goode, Victoria; Phillips, Elayne; DeGuzman, Pamela; Hinton, Ivora; Rovnyak, Virginia; Scully, Kenneth; Merwin, Elizabeth

    2016-12-01

    Patient safety and the delivery of quality care are major concerns for healthcare in the United States. Special populations (eg, obese patients) need study in order to support patient safety, quantify risks, advance education for healthcare-workers, and establish healthcare policy. Obesity is a complex chronic disease and is considered the second leading cause of preventable death in the United States with approximately 300,000 deaths per year. Obesity is recognized by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) as a comorbid condition. These concerns emphasize the need to focus further research on the obese patient. Through the use of clinical and administrative data, this study examines the incidence of adverse outcomes in the obese surgical population through AHRQ Patient Safety Indicators (PSI) and allows for the engagement PSIs as measures to guide and improve performance. In this study, the surgical population was overwhelmingly positive for obesity. Body mass index (BMI) was also a significant positive predictor for 2 of 3 postoperative outcomes. This finding suggests that as BMI reaches the classification of obesity, the risk of these adverse outcomes increases. It further suggests there exists a threshold BMI that requires anticipation of alterations to systems and processes to revise outcomes. Copyright© by the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists.

  13. Developing and Implementing a Culture of Safety in the Dentoalveolar Surgical Practice.

    PubMed

    Hupp, James R

    2015-08-01

    The health care industry and delivery systems are placing greater emphasis on making their organizations safe. They do this by cultivating a culture of safety to help anticipate and prevent injuries and documenting and investigating injuries to develop prevention protocols. Many of the strategies used in the hospital industry can be applied to the dentoalveolar surgery practice of oral-maxillofacial surgeons and other dentists. This article discusses the development of a culture of safety in the dentoalveolar practice and gives ideas of how threats of injuries to patients, guests, and the surgical care team can be reduced or eliminated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Surgical safety cheklist at the management of the hybrid operating room].

    PubMed

    Cherkashin, M A; Berezina, N A; Kuplevatsky, V I; Serov, A V; Mefodovsky, A A

    2016-01-01

    An essential aspect of the work of the operating room is the provision of safety of both the patient and staff. The organization of the activity of the surgical service requires serious elaboration of each of its stage, as well as standardization in using various validated instruments. When speaking of a hybrid operating room with the use of intraoperative magnetic resonance tomography, such an approach becomes not merely a recommendation but rather forced and justified necessity. Simultaneous use of various technologies of imaging and treatment with the engagement of physicians of various specialties requires especially thorough control. A generally accepted international standard of the work of the operating block is the use of checklists, and since 2008 the initiative of the World Health Organization "Safe Surgery Saves Lives" has globally been working to promote implementation of the WHO Surgical Safety Checklists (SSCL) to the real clinical practice. The intraoperative MR-diagnostic stage dictates rigid requirements for proper inventory of ferromagnetic and nonmagnetic surgical tools, verified logistics, and routing of the patient in the conditions of high and extremely high (1.5-3.0 T) magnetic field. A separate and not less important problem is anaesthesiological support during MRT. In order to optimise the patient's movements and adequate monitoring of his/her safety inside the operating department, the authors have modified the standard WHO Surgical Safety Checklist. Implementation of the modified checklist for the MRT-equipped hybrid operating room should improve the control over the processes, as well as increase safety of both the patient and personnel.

  15. Perioperative patient safety indicators and hospital surgical volumes.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Takefumi; Matsumoto, Kunichika; Fujita, Shigeru; Yoshida, Ai; Iida, Shuhei; Nishizawa, Hirotoshi; Hasegawa, Tomonori

    2014-02-28

    Since the late 1990s, patient safety has been an important policy issue in developed countries. To evaluate the effectiveness of the activities of patient safety, it is necessary to quantitatively assess the incidence of adverse events by types of failure mode using tangible data. The purpose of this study is to calculate patient safety indicators (PSIs) using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination/per-diem payment system (DPC/PDPS) reimbursement data and to elucidate the relationship between perioperative PSIs and hospital surgical volume. DPC/PDPS data of the Medi-Target project managed by the All Japan Hospital Association were used. An observational study was conducted where PSIs were calculated using an algorithm proposed by the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. We analyzed data of 1,383,872 patients from 188 hospitals who were discharged from January 2008 to December 2010. Among 20 provider level PSIs, four PSIs (three perioperative PSIs and decubitus ulcer) and mortality rates of postoperative patients were related to surgical volume. Low-volume hospitals (less than 33rd percentiles surgical volume per month) had higher mortality rates (5.7%, 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.9% to 7.4%) than mid- (2.9%, 95% CI, 2.6% to 3.3%) or high-volume hospitals (2.7%, 95% CI, 2.5% to 2.9%). Low-volume hospitals had more deaths among surgical inpatients with serious treatable complications (38.5%, 95% CI, 33.7% to 43.2%) than high-volume hospitals (21.4%, 95% CI, 19.0% to 23.9%). Also Low-volume hospitals had lower proportion of difficult surgeries (54.9%, 95% CI, 50.1% to 59.8%) compared with high-volume hospitals (63.4%, 95% CI, 62.3% to 64.6%). In low-volume hospitals, limited experience may have led to insufficient care for postoperative complications. We demonstrated that PSIs can be calculated using DPC/PDPS data and perioperative PSIs were related to hospital surgical volume. Further investigations focusing on identifying risk factors for poor

  16. 75 FR 57477 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary... Services Research and Patient Safety (CHRP) Patient Safety Organization (PSO). The Patient Safety and... PSOs, which are entities or component organizations whose mission and primary activity is to...

  17. 76 FR 58812 - Patient Safety Organizations: Delisting for Cause of Patient Safety Organization One, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Delisting for Cause of Patient Safety Organization One, Inc. AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Delisting. SUMMARY: Patient Safety Organization One, Inc.: AHRQ has...

  18. 76 FR 9350 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Rocky Mountain Patient Safety Organization

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... Delisting From Rocky Mountain Patient Safety Organization AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Delisting. SUMMARY: Rocky Mountain Patient Safety Organization: AHRQ has accepted a notification of voluntary relinquishment from Rocky Mountain Patient Safety Organization, a...

  19. Teamwork and communication in surgical teams: implications for patient safety.

    PubMed

    Mills, Peter; Neily, Julia; Dunn, Ed

    2008-01-01

    As part of a national program in the Department of Veterans Affairs to improve communication within the health-care environment, the Medical Team Training questionnaire was developed to assess organizational culture, communication, teamwork, and awareness of human factors engineering principles. The Medical Team Training questionnaire was pilot tested with 300 health-care clinicians. The final version of the Medical Team Training questionnaire was administered to an interdisciplinary group of 384 surgical staff members in 6 facilities as part of the Medical Team Training pilot project in the Department of Veterans Affairs. The results revealed a pattern of discrepancies among physicians and nurses in which surgeons perceive a stronger organizational culture of safety, better communication, and better teamwork than either nurses or anesthesiologists do. The Medical Team Training questionnaire was helpful in identifying hidden problems with communication before formal team training learning sessions, and it will be useful in focusing efforts to improve communication and teamwork in the operating room.

  20. 78 FR 59036 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Cogent Patient Safety Organization, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Cogent Patient Safety Organization, Inc. AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Delisting. SUMMARY: The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of...

  1. Relationship between Patient Safety and Hospital Surgical Volume

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Downey, John R; McDonald, Kathryn; Morton, John M

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between hospital volume and in-hospital adverse events. Data Sources Patient safety indicator (PSI) was used to identify hospital-acquired adverse events in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database in abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery bypass graft, and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass from 2005 to 2008. Study Design In this observational study, volume thresholds were defined by mean year-specific terciles. PSI risk-adjusted rates were analyzed by volume tercile for each procedure. Principal Findings Overall, hospital volume was inversely related to preventable adverse events. High-volume hospitals had significantly lower risk-adjusted PSI rates compared to lower volume hospitals (p < .05). Conclusion These data support the relationship between hospital volume and quality health care delivery in select surgical cases. This study highlights differences between hospital volume and risk-adjusted PSI rates for three common surgical procedures and highlights areas of focus for future studies to identify pathways to reduce hospital-acquired events. PMID:22091561

  2. Surgical team member assessment of the safety of surgery practice in 38 South Carolina hospitals.

    PubMed

    Singer, Sara J; Jiang, Wei; Huang, Lyen C; Gibbons, Lorri; Kiang, Mathew V; Edmondson, Lizabeth; Gawande, Atul A; Berry, William R

    2015-06-01

    We assessed surgical team member perceptions of multiple dimensions of safe surgical practice in 38 South Carolina hospitals participating in a statewide initiative to implement surgical safety checklists. Primary data were collected using a novel 35-item survey. We calculated the percentage of 1,852 respondents with strongly positive, positive, and neutral/negative responses about the safety of surgical practice, compared results by hospital and professional discipline, and examined how readiness, teamwork, and adherence related to staff perception of care quality. Overall, 78% of responses were positive about surgical safety at respondent's hospitals, but in each survey dimension, from 16% to 40% of responses were neutral/negative, suggesting significant opportunity to improve surgical safety. Respondents not reporting they would feel safe being treated in their operating rooms varied from 0% to 57% among hospitals. Surgeons responded more positively than nonsurgeons. Readiness, teamwork, and practice adherence related directly to staff perceptions of patient safety (p < .001).

  3. Effectiveness of the surgical safety checklist in correcting errors: a literature review applying Reason's Swiss cheese model.

    PubMed

    Collins, Susan J; Newhouse, Robin; Porter, Jody; Talsma, AkkeNeel

    2014-07-01

    Approximately 2,700 patients are harmed by wrong-site surgery each year. The World Health Organization created the surgical safety checklist to reduce the incidence of wrong-site surgery. A project team conducted a narrative review of the literature to determine the effectiveness of the surgical safety checklist in correcting and preventing errors in the OR. Team members used Swiss cheese model of error by Reason to analyze the findings. Analysis of results indicated the effectiveness of the surgical checklist in reducing the incidence of wrong-site surgeries and other medical errors; however, checklists alone will not prevent all errors. Successful implementation requires perioperative stakeholders to understand the nature of errors, recognize the complex dynamic between systems and individuals, and create a just culture that encourages a shared vision of patient safety. Copyright © 2014 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Compliance and Effectiveness of WHO Surgical Safety Check list: A JPMC Audit

    PubMed Central

    Anwer, Mariyah; Manzoor, Shahneela; Muneer, Nadeem; Qureshi, Shamim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess World Health Organization (WHO) Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC), compliance and its effectiveness in reducing complications and final outcome of patients. Methods: This was a prospective study done in Department of General Surgery (Ward 02), Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre (JPMC), Karachi. The study included Total 3638 patients who underwent surgical procedure in elective theatre in four years from November 2011 to October 2015 since the SSC was included as part of history sheets in ward. Files were checked to confirm the compliance with regards to filling the three stage checklist properly and complications were noted. Results: In 1st year, out of 840 surgical procedures, SSC was properly marked in 172 (20.4%) cases. In 2nd year, out of 857 surgical procedures 303 (35.3%) cases were marked which increased in 3rd year out of 935 surgical procedures 757 (80.9%) cases and in 4th year out of 932 surgical procedures 838 (89.9%) cases were marked. No significant change in site and side (left or right) complications were noted in all four years. Surgical Site Infection (SSI) was noted in 59 (7.50%), 52 (6.47%), 44 (4.70%) and 20 (2.12%) cases in 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th year respectively. SSI in laparoscopic cholecystectomies was 41 (20.8 %), 45 (13%), 20 (5.68%) and 4 (1.12%) in 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th year respectively. No significant change in chest complications were noted in all four years. Mortality rate also remained same in all four years. Conclusion: WHO SSC is an effective tool in reducing in-hospital complications thus producing a favorable outcome. Realization its efficacy would improve compliance. PMID:27648023

  5. [Compliance with the surgical safety checklist and surgical events detected by the Global Trigger Tool].

    PubMed

    Menéndez Fraga, M D; Cueva Álvarez, M A; Franco Castellanos, M R; Fernández Moral, V; Castro Del Río, M P; Arias Pérez, J I; Fernández León, A; Vázquez Valdés, F

    2016-06-01

    The implementing of the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC) has helped to improve patient safety. The aim of this study was to assess the level of compliance of the SSC, and incorporating the non-compliances as «triggers» in the Global Trigger Tool (GTT). Acute Geriatric Hospital (200 beds). Retrospective study, study period: 2011-2014. The SSC formulary and the methodology of the GTT were used for the analysis of electronic medical records and the compliance with the SSC. The NCCP MERP categories were used to assess the severity of the harm. Out of all the electronic medical records (EMR), a total of 227 (23.6%) discharged patients (1.7% of interventions in the four year study period) were analysed. All (100%) of the EMR included the SSC, with 94.4% of the items being completed, and 28.2% of SSC had all items completed in the 3 phases of the process. Surgical adverse events decreased from 16.3% in 2011 to 9.4% in 2014 (P=.2838, not significant), and compliance with all items of SSC was increased from 18.6% to 39.1% (P=.0246, significant). The GTT systematises and evaluates, at low cost, the triggers and incidents/ AEs found in the EMR in order to assess the compliance with the SSC and consider non-compliance of SSC as «triggers» for further analysis. This strategy has never been referred to in the GTT or in the SCC formulary. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. 75 FR 75471 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary... Safety Organization (PSO). The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient Safety Act... organizations whose mission and primary activity is to conduct activities to improve patient safety and...

  7. Surgical checklist application and its impact on patient safety in pediatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Oak, S N; Dave, N M; Garasia, M B; Parelkar, S V

    2015-01-01

    Surgical care is an essential component of health care of children worldwide. Incidences of congenital anomalies, trauma, cancers and acquired diseases continue to rise and along with that the impact of surgical intervention on public health system also increases. It then becomes essential that the surgical teams make the procedures safe and error proof. The World Health Organization (WHO) has instituted the surgical checklist as a global initiative to improve surgical safety. To assess the acceptance, application and adherence to the WHO Safe Surgery Checklist in Pediatric Surgery Practice at a university teaching hospital. In a prospective study, spanning 2 years, the checklist was implemented for all patients who underwent operative procedures under general anesthesia. The checklist identified three phases of an operation, each corresponding to a specific period in the normal flow of work: Before the induction of anesthesia ("sign in"), before the skin incision ("time out") and before the patient leaves the operating room ("sign out"). In each phase, an anesthesiologist,-"checklist coordinator," confirmed that the anesthesia, surgery and nursing teams have completed the listed tasks before proceeding with the operation and exit. The checklist was used for 3000 consecutive patients. No major perioperative errors were noted. In 54 (1.8%) patients, children had the same names and identical surgical procedure posted on the same operation list. The patient identification tag was missing in four (0.1%) patients. Mention of the side of procedures was missing in 108 (3.6%) cases. In 0.1% (3) of patients there was mix up of the mention of side of operation in the case papers and consent forms. In 78 (2.6%) patients, the consent form was not signed by parents/guardians or the side of the procedure was not quoted. Antibiotic orders were missing in five (0.2%) patients. In 12 (0.4%) cases, immobilization of the patients was suboptimal, which led to displacement of diathermy

  8. Surgical council on resident education: a new organization devoted to graduate surgical education.

    PubMed

    Bell, Richard H

    2007-03-01

    The Surgical Council on Resident Education (SCORE) is a voluntary consortium of six organizations with responsibility for resident education in surgery and an interest in improving the training of surgeons. The founding organizations are the American Board of Surgery (ABS), the American College of Surgeons (ACS), the American Surgical Association (ASA), the Association of Program Directors in Surgery (APDS), the Association for Surgical Education (ASE), and the Residency Review Committee for Surgery of the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (RRC-S). SCORE emerged from a concerted desire to strengthen the graduate education of surgeons and to assure the competence of surgical trainees in the US. SCORE has a unique ability to foster change in resident education because it brings together the major regulatory organizations (ABS and RRC-S), the major professional organization in surgery (ACS), the senior academic organization in surgery (ASA), and the major surgical education organizations (APDS and ASE). SCORE envisions an ambitious agenda. At its meeting in Philadelphia on November 20, 2006, it began developing a standardized curriculum in general surgery to span the period from medical school to practice, and it defined the scope of the curriculum. It approved continued work of building a national Web site to deliver educational content to general surgery residents and to assist program directors. It endorsed continued development of a basic surgery curriculum for all first-year surgery residents and development of a comprehensive technical skills curriculum for all levels of general surgery training, both of which have been initiated by the ACS. In the future, SCORE plans to examine issues such as the assessment of technical competency, the role of simulation in surgical education, the teaching and assessment of professional behaviors, the practicing surgeon's view of the adequacy of residency training, faculty development, and the attrition of

  9. Surgical Updates in the Treatment of Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Geynisman-Tan, Julia; Kenton, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse affects approximately 8% of women, and the demand for pelvic organ prolapse surgery is expected to increase by nearly 50% over the next 40 years. The surgical techniques used to correct pelvic organ prolapse have evolved over the last 10 years, with multiple well-designed studies addressing the risks, outcomes, reoperation rates, and optimal surgical approaches. Here we review the most recent evidence on the route of access, concomitant procedures, and synthetic materials for augmenting the repair. Ultimately, this review highlights that there is no optimal method for correcting pelvic organ prolapse and that the risks, benefits, and approaches should be discussed in a patient-centered, goal-oriented approach to decision-making. PMID:28467763

  10. Surgical safety checklist is associated with improved operating room safety culture, reduced wound complications, and unplanned readmissions in a pilot study in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Lepänluoma, M; Takala, R; Kotkansalo, A; Rahi, M; Ikonen, T S

    2014-03-01

    The World Health Organization's surgical safety checklist is designed to improve adherence to operating room safety standards, and its use has been shown to reduce complications among surgical patients. The objective of our study was to assess the impact of the implementation of the checklist on safety-related issues in the operating room and on postoperative adverse events in neurosurgery. From structured questionnaires delivered to operating room personnel, answers were analyzed to evaluate communication and safety-related issues during 89 and 73 neurosurgical operations before and after the checklist implementation, respectively. From the analyzed operations, 83 and 67 patients, respectively, were included in a retrospective analysis of electronic patient records to compare the length of hospital stay, reported adverse events, and readmissions. In addition, the consistency of operating room documentation and patient records was assessed. Communication between the surgeon and the anesthesiologist was enhanced, and safety-related issues were better covered when the checklist was used. Unplanned readmissions fell from 25% to 10% after the checklist implementation (p = 0.02). Wound complications decreased from 19% to 8% (p = 0.04). The consistency of documentation of the diagnosis and the procedure improved. The use of the checklist improved safety-related performance and, contemporarily, reduced numbers of wound complications, and readmissions were observed.

  11. Ensuring the safety of surgical teams when managing casualties of a radiological dirty bomb.

    PubMed

    Williams, Geraint; O'Malley, Michael; Nocera, Antony

    2010-09-01

    The capacity for surgical teams to ensure their own safety when dealing with the consequences caused by the detonation of a radiological dirty bomb is primarily determined by prior knowledge, familiarity and training for this type of event. This review article defines the associated radiological terminology with an emphasis on the personal safety of surgical team members in respect to the principles of radiological protection. The article also describes a technique for use of hand held radiation monitors and will discuss the identification and management of radiologically contaminated patients who may pose a significant danger to the surgical team.

  12. Quality and strength of patient safety climate on medical-surgical units.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Linda C; Chang, Yunkyung; Mark, Barbara A

    2009-01-01

    Describing the safety climate in hospitals is an important first step in creating work environments where safety is a priority. Yet, little is known about the patient safety climate on medical-surgical units. Study purposes were to describe quality and strength of the patient safety climate on medical-surgical units and explore hospital and unit characteristics associated with this climate. Data came from a larger organizational study to investigate hospital and unit characteristics associated with organizational, nurse, and patient outcomes. The sample for this study was 3,689 RNs on 286 medical-surgical units in 146 hospitals. Nursing workgroup and managerial commitment to safety were the two most strongly positive attributes of the patient safety climate. However, issues surrounding the balance between job duties and safety compliance and nurses' reluctance to reveal errors continue to be problematic. Nurses in Magnet hospitals were more likely to communicate about errors and participate in error-related problem solving. Nurses on smaller units and units with lower work complexity reported greater safety compliance and were more likely to communicate about and reveal errors. Nurses on smaller units also reported greater commitment to patient safety and participation in error-related problem solving. Nursing workgroup commitment to safety is a valuable resource that can be leveraged to promote a sense of personal responsibility for and shared ownership of patient safety. Managers can capitalize on this commitment by promoting a work environment in which control over nursing practice and active participation in unit decisions are encouraged and by developing channels of communication that increase staff nurse involvement in identifying patient safety issues, prioritizing unit-level safety goals, and resolving day-to-day operational problems the have the potential to jeopardize patient safety.

  13. Surgical innovation-enhanced quality and the processes that assure patient/provider safety: A surgical conundrum.

    PubMed

    Bruny, Jennifer; Ziegler, Moritz

    2015-12-01

    Innovation is a crucial part of surgical history that has led to enhancements in the quality of surgical care. This comprises both changes which are incremental and those which are frankly disruptive in nature. There are situations where innovation is absolutely required in order to achieve quality improvement or process improvement. Alternatively, there are innovations that do not necessarily arise from some need, but simply are a new idea that might be better. All change must assure a significant commitment to patient safety and beneficence. Innovation would ideally enhance patient care quality and disease outcomes, as well stimulate and facilitate further innovation. The tensions between innovative advancement and patient safety, risk and reward, and demonstrated effectiveness versus speculative added value have created a contemporary "surgical conundrum" that must be resolved by a delicate balance assuring optimal patient/provider outcomes. This article will explore this delicate balance and the rules that govern it. Recommendations are made to facilitate surgical innovation through clinical research. In addition, we propose options that investigators and institutions may use to address competing priorities.

  14. 75 FR 57048 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary... Patient Safety of Chicagoland (CQPS) of its status as a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). The Patient... the listing of PSOs, which are entities or component organizations whose mission and primary...

  15. 75 FR 75473 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary... Medical, Inc., of its status as a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). The Patient Safety and Quality... or component organizations whose mission and primary activity is to conduct activities to...

  16. 75 FR 57281 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary delisting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary... Corporation of its status as a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement... or component organizations whose mission and primary activity is to conduct activities to...

  17. 75 FR 63498 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary... Foundation of its status as a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement... or component organizations whose mission and primary activity is to conduct activities to...

  18. Surgical Non-governmental Organizations: Global Surgery's Unknown Nonprofit Sector.

    PubMed

    Ng-Kamstra, Joshua S; Riesel, Johanna N; Arya, Sumedha; Weston, Brad; Kreutzer, Tino; Meara, John G; Shrime, Mark G

    2016-08-01

    Charitable organizations may play a significant role in the delivery of surgical care in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). However, in order to quantify their collective contribution, to account for the care they provide in national surgical plans, and to maximize coordination between organizations, a comprehensive database of these groups is required. We aimed to create such a database using web-available data. We searched for organizations that meet the United Nations Rule of Law definition of non-governmental organizations and provide surgery in LMICs. We termed these surgical non-governmental organizations (s-NGOs). We screened multiple sources including a listing of disaster relief organizations, medical volunteerism databases, charity commissions, and the results of a literature search. We performed a secondary review of each eligible organization's website to verify inclusion criteria and extracted data. We found 403 s-NGOs providing surgery in all 139 LMICs, with most (61 %) incorporating surgery into a broader spectrum of health services. Over 80 % of s-NGOs had an office in the USA, the UK, Canada, India, or Australia, and they most commonly provided surgery in India (87 s-NGOs), Haiti (71), Kenya (60), and Ethiopia (55). The most common specialties provided were general surgery (184), obstetrics and gynecology (140), and plastic surgery (116). This new catalog includes the largest number of s-NGOs to date, but this is likely to be incomplete. This list will be made publicly available to promote collaboration between s-NGOs, national health systems, and global health policymakers.

  19. 76 FR 60495 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From the Patient Safety Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From the Patient Safety Group AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS... relinquishment from The Patient Safety Group of its status as a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). The...

  20. 77 FR 11120 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From UAB Health System Patient Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary... Organization (PSO). The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient Safety Act), Public Law 109... analyze confidential information regarding the quality and safety of health care delivery. The Patient...

  1. 76 FR 71345 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Child Health Patient Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary... (PSO). The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient Safety Act), Public Law 109-41... confidential information regarding the quality and safety of health care delivery. The Patient Safety and...

  2. 76 FR 71345 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Emergency Medicine Patient Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary... (PSO). The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient Safety Act), Public Law 109-41... confidential information regarding the quality and safety of health care delivery. The Patient Safety and...

  3. Surgical robotics for patient safety in the perioperative environment: realizing the promise.

    PubMed

    Fuji Lai; Louw, Deon

    2007-06-01

    Surgery is at a crossroads of complexity. However, there is a potential path toward patient safety. One such course is to leverage computer and robotic assist techniques in the reduction and interception of error in the perioperative environment. This white paper attempts to facilitate the road toward realizing that promise by outlining a research agenda. The paper will briefly review the current status of surgical robotics and summarize any conclusions that can be reached to date based on existing research. It will then lay out a roadmap for future research to determine how surgical robots should be optimally designed and integrated into the perioperative workflow and process. Successful movement down this path would involve focused efforts and multiagency collaboration to address the research priorities outlined, thereby realizing the full potential of surgical robotics to augment human capabilities, enhance task performance, extend the reach of surgical care, improve health care quality, and ultimately enhance patient safety.

  4. Surgical Safety Checklists Are Underutilized in Ambulatory Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Archana; Balint, Andras; Johnson, Robert E; Rosenberg, Morton B; Oreadi, Daniel

    2017-07-21

    The objective of this study was to determine attitudes toward and the prevalence of using a surgical safety checklist in ambulatory oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) practice. The authors designed and implemented a cross-sectional study and enrolled a random sample of oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The predictor variable was years removed from residency. The primary outcome was the prevalence of surgical safety checklist usage in ambulatory OMS practice. The secondary outcome was to determine whether surgeons who do not currently use a checklist would be willing to do so if provided with one. Other demographic variables included age, gender, location of practice, type of practice, and number of ambulatory procedures performed per week. Appropriate uni- and bivariate statistics were computed and the level of significance set at .05; 95% confidence intervals also were calculated. The study sample was composed of 120 clinicians. Forty-two percent of respondents reported that they were not using a surgical safety checklist for ambulatory surgery. Ninety-three percent of those respondents not currently using a checklist reported they would consider implementing a surgical safety checklist in their practice if provided with one. In addition, 45.3% of surgeons performing more than 30 procedures a week reported not using a surgical safety checklist. Most respondents (67.9%) who had completed OMS training more than 20 years previously reported not using a checklist in their practice. According to this survey, most practicing oral and maxillofacial surgeons do not currently use surgical safety checklists. Although the response rate was only 12%, the survey does reflect a clear lack of use of checklists among practicing oral and maxillofacial surgeons despite its widespread acceptance in the medical community. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Organic Tanks Safety Program: Waste aging studies

    SciTech Connect

    Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Lenihan, B.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

    1994-11-01

    The underground storage tanks at the Hanford Complex contain wastes generated from many years of plutonium production and recovery processes, and mixed wastes from radiological degradation processes. The chemical changes of the organic materials used in the extraction processes have a direct on several specific safety issues, including potential energy releases from these tanks. This report details the first year`s findings of a study charged with determining how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds disposed to the tank. Their approach relies on literature precedent, experiments with simulated waste, and studies of model reactions. During the past year, efforts have focused on the global reaction kinetics of a simulated waste exposed to {gamma} radiation, the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion, and the decomposition reactions of nitro compounds. In experiments with an organic tank non-radioactive simulant, the authors found that gas production is predominantly radiolytically induced. Concurrent with gas generation they observe the disappearance of EDTA, TBP, DBP and hexone. In the absence of radiolysis, the TBP readily saponifies in the basic medium, but decomposition of the other compounds required radiolysis. Key organic intermediates in the model are C-N bonded compounds such as oximes. As discussed in the report, oximes and nitro compounds decompose in strong base to yield aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids (from nitriles). Certain aldehydes can react in the absence of radiolysis to form H{sub 2}. Thus, if the pathways are correct, then organic compounds reacting via these pathways are oxidizing to lower energy content. 75 refs.

  6. Parental involvement in the preoperative surgical safety checklist is welcomed by both parents and staff.

    PubMed

    Corbally, Martin T; Tierney, Eamon

    2014-01-01

    We involved the parents of paediatric patients in the first part of the three-stage WHO Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC) process. Forty-two parents took part in the study. They came to the theatre suite with their child and into the induction room. Immediately before induction of anaesthesia they were present at, and took part in, the first stage of the three-stage SSC process, confirming with staff the identity of their child, the procedure to be performed, the operating site, and the consent being adequately obtained and recorded. We asked parents and theatre staff later whether they thought that parental involvement in the SSC was beneficial to patient safety. Both parents and staff welcomed parental involvement in the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist and felt that it improved patient safety.

  7. 75 FR 75472 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary.... SUMMARY: AHRQ has accepted a notification of voluntary relinquishment from Human Performance Technology Group, Inc. of its status as a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). The Patient Safety and Quality...

  8. Assessing the impact of teaching patient safety principles to medical students during surgical clerkships.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Kenneth; Augenstein, Jeffrey; Schulman, Carl I; Wilson, Katherine; McKenney, Mark; Livingstone, Alan

    2011-09-01

    A critical aspect of enhancing patient safety is modifying the healthcare safety culture. We hypothesize that students who participate in safety curricula are knowledgeable regarding patient safety and likely to intervene to avoid patient errors. A two-part patient safety curriculum was taught: introductory theories (first year) and a clinically oriented course during surgery rotations (third year). All students participated in the first year introduction and a random cohort of students (62.6%, N = 67) participated in the third year program. Multiple choice tests and web-based surveys were administered. Statistical analysis was carried out using Student's t-test for comparisons of test mean scores and z-test for comparison of the survey data. Students who participated in both years' curricula scored higher on didactic test than those who participated in only the first year course (82.9% versus 75.5%, P < 0.001). More students participating in both portions of the curricula intervened during at least one clinical encounter to avoid a patient error (77% versus 61%, P < 0.05). Students rated junior house-staff more receptive to patient safety suggestions than surgical fellows and faculty (84% versus 66%, P < 0.05); 75% of students rated their surgical clerkship exposure to patient safety somewhat/extremely valuable compared with 54% students who rated the first year exposure as somewhat/extremely valuable (P < 0.05). Medical students who have practical applications of patient safety education reinforced during surgery rotations are knowledgeable and willing to intervene in patient safety concerns. Teaching clinically relevant patient safety skills influences positive behavioral changes in medical students' performance on surgical teams. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Operating Room Clinicians' Attitudes and Perceptions of a Pediatric Surgical Safety Checklist at 1 Institution.

    PubMed

    Norton, Elizabeth K; Singer, Sara J; Sparks, William; Ozonoff, Al; Baxter, Jessica; Rangel, Shawn

    2016-03-01

    Despite mounting evidence that use of surgical checklists improves patient morbidity and mortality, compliance among surgical teams in executing required elements of checklists has been low. Recognizing that clinicians' receptivity is a major determinant of checklist use, we conducted a survey to investigate how mandated use of a surgical checklist impacts its operating room clinicians' attitudes about and perceptions of operating room safety, efficiency, teamwork, and prevention of medical errors. Operating room clinicians at 1 pediatric hospital were surveyed on their attitudes and perception of the novel Pediatric Surgical Safety Checklist and the impact the checklist had on efficiency, teamwork, and prevention of medical errors 1 year after its implementation. The survey responses were compared and classified by multidisciplinary perioperative clinical staff. Most responses reflected positive attitudes toward checklist use. The respondents felt that the checklist reduced complications and errors and improved patient safety, communication among team members, teamwork in complex procedures, and efficiency in the operating room. Many operating room staff also reported that checklist use had prevented or averted an error or a complication. Perceptions varied according to perioperative clinical discipline, reflecting differences in perspectives. For example, the nurses perceived a higher rate of consent-related errors and site marking errors than did the physicians; the surgeons reported more antibiotic timing and equipment errors than did others. The surgical staff at 1 pediatric hospital who responded viewed the novel Pediatric Surgical Safety Checklist as potentially beneficial to operative patient safety by improving teamwork and communication, reducing errors, and improving efficiency. Responses varied by discipline, indicating that team members view the checklist from different perspectives.

  10. What Does a Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Reveal About Patient Safety Culture of Surgical Units Compared With That of Other Units?

    PubMed

    Shu, Qin; Cai, Miao; Tao, Hong-Bing; Cheng, Zhao-Hui; Chen, Jing; Hu, Yin-Huan; Li, Gang

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the strengths and weaknesses of surgical units as compared with other units, and to provide an opportunity to improve patient safety culture in surgical settings by suggesting targeted actions using Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) investigation.A Hospital Survey on Patient Safety questionnaire was conducted to physicians and nurses in a tertiary hospital in Shandong China. 12 patient safety culture dimensions and 2 outcome variables were measured.A total of 23.5% of respondents came from surgical units, and 76.5% worked in other units. The "overall perceptions of safety" (48.1% vs 40.4%, P < 0.001) and "frequency of events reported" (63.7% vs 60.7%, P = 0.001) of surgical units were higher than those of other units. However, the communication openness (38.7% vs 42.5%, P < 0.001) of surgical units was lower than in other units. Medical workers in surgical units reported more events than those in other units, and more respondents in the surgical units assess "patient safety grade" to be good/excellent. Three dimensions were considered as strengths, whereas 5 other dimensions were considered to be weaknesses in surgical units. Six dimensions have potential to aid in improving events reporting and patient safety grade. Appropriate working times will also contribute to ensuring patient safety. Medical staff with longer years of experience reported more events.Surgical units outperform the nonsurgical ones in overall perception of safety and the number of events reported but underperform in the openness of communication. Four strategies, namely deepening the understanding about patient safety of supervisors, narrowing the communication gap within and across clinical units, recruiting more workers, and employing the event reporting system and building a nonpunitive culture, are recommended to improve patient safety in surgical units in the context of 1 hospital.

  11. 78 FR 40146 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Northern Metropolitan Patient Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary... Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Delisting. SUMMARY: The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act... information regarding the quality and safety of health care delivery. The Patient Safety and Quality...

  12. High Reliability Organizations--Medication Safety.

    PubMed

    Yip, Luke; Farmer, Brenna

    2015-06-01

    High reliability organizations (HROs), such as the aviation industry, successfully engage in high-risk endeavors and have low incidence of adverse events. HROs have a preoccupation with failure and errors. They analyze each event to effect system wide change in an attempt to mitigate the occurrence of similar errors. The healthcare industry can adapt HRO practices, specifically with regard to teamwork and communication. Crew resource management concepts can be adapted to healthcare with the use of certain tools such as checklists and the sterile cockpit to reduce medication errors. HROs also use The Swiss Cheese Model to evaluate risk and look for vulnerabilities in multiple protective barriers, instead of focusing on one failure. This model can be used in medication safety to evaluate medication management in addition to using the teamwork and communication tools of HROs.

  13. Development of a surgical safety checklist for the performance of radical nephrectomy and tumor thrombectomy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The surgical management of renal cell carcinoma with invasion of the renal vein or inferior vena cava is associated with significant rates of perioperative morbidity and mortality. In this report we propose a surgical checklist aimed at reducing adverse events associated with the resection of these tumors. Methods This review describes the development of an evidence- and experience-based surgical checklist aimed at improving the perioperative safety of patients undergoing radical nephrectomy and tumor thrombectomy. Results Reducing the risk of complications during the surgical management of renal tumors with venous invasion begins with appropriate pre-operative imaging aimed at defining the cranial extent of the tumor thrombus, thus facilitating accurate preoperative planning. Other key elements of the checklist are aimed at ensuring clear and precise pre-, intra- and postoperative communication between members of the multidisciplinary-care team. Conclusion A standardized surgical checklist may help to increase the perioperative safety of patients undergoing radical nephrectomy and tumor thrombectomy. Future validation studies are required to determine the clinical feasibility and post-implementation safety profile of this new checklist. PMID:23241448

  14. Recommendations for surgical safety checklist use in Canadian children’s hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Skarsgard, Erik D.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is ample evidence that avoidable harm occurs in patients, including children, who undergo surgical procedures. Among a number of harm mitigation strategies, the use of surgical safety checklists (SSC) is now a required organizational practice for accreditation in all North American hospitals. Although much has been written about the effects of SSC on outcomes of adult surgical patients, there is a paucity of literature on the use and role of the SSC as an enabler of safe surgery for children. Methods The Pediatric Surgical Chiefs of Canada (PSCC) advocates on behalf of all Canadian children undergoing surgical procedures. We undertook a survey of the use of SSC in Canadian children’s hospitals to understand the variability of implementation of the SSC and understand its role as both a measure and driver of patient safety and to make specific recommendations (based on survey results and evidence) for standardized use of the SSC in Canadian children’s hospitals. Results Survey responses were received from all 15 children’s hospitals and demonstrated significant variability in how the checklist is executed, how compliance is measured and reported, and whether or not use of the checklist resulted in specific instances of error prevention over a 12-month observation period. There was near unanimous agreement that use of the SSC contributed positively to the safety culture of the operating room. Conclusion Based on the survey results, the PSCC have made 5 recommendations regarding the use of the SSC in Canadian children’s hospitals. PMID:27240284

  15. Thirty-day outcomes support implementation of a surgical safety checklist.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Lindsay A; Ross-Richardson, Cynthia B; Sanzari, Laura J; Shapiro, David S; Lukianoff, Alexandra E; Bernstein, Bruce A; Ellner, Scott J

    2012-12-01

    Thirty-day postoperative complications from unintended harm adversely affect patients and their families and increase institutional health care costs. A surgical checklist is an inexpensive tool that will facilitate effective communication and teamwork. Surgical team training has demonstrated the opportunity for stakeholders to professionally engage one another through leveling of the authority gradient to prevent patient harm. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database is an outcomes reporting tool capable of validating the use of surgical checklists. Three 60-minute team training sessions were conducted and participants were oriented to the use of a comprehensive surgical checklist. The surgical team used the checklist for high-risk procedures selected from those analyzed for the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Trained observers assessed the checklist completion and collected data about perioperative communication and safety-compromising events. Data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program were compared for 2,079 historical control cases, 246 cases without checklist use, and 73 cases with checklist use. Overall completion of the checklist sections was 97.26%. Comparison of 30-day morbidity demonstrated a statistically significant (p = 0.000) reduction in overall adverse event rates from 23.60% for historical control cases and 15.90% in cases with only team training, to 8.20% in cases with checklist use. Use of a comprehensive surgical safety checklist and implementation of a structured team training curriculum produced a statistically significant decrease in 30-day morbidity. Adoption of a comprehensive checklist is feasible with team training intervention and can produce measurable improvements in patient outcomes. Copyright © 2012 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Safety organizing, emotional exhaustion, and turnover in hospital nursing units.

    PubMed

    Vogus, Timothy J; Cooil, Bruce; Sitterding, Mary; Everett, Linda Q

    2014-10-01

    Prior research has found that safety organizing behaviors of registered nurses (RNs) positively impact patient safety. However, little research exists on how engaging in safety organizing affects caregivers. While we know that organizational processes can have divergent effects on organizational and employee outcomes, little research exists on the effects of pursuing highly reliable performance through safety organizing on caregivers. Specifically, we examined whether, and the conditions under which, safety organizing affects RN emotional exhaustion and nursing unit turnover rates. Subjects included 1352 RNs in 50 intensive care, internal medicine, labor, and surgery nursing units in 3 Midwestern acute-care hospitals who completed questionnaires between August and December 2011 and 50 Nurse Managers from the units who completed questionnaires in December 2012. Cross-sectional analyses of RN emotional exhaustion linked to survey data on safety organizing and hospital incident reporting system data on adverse event rates for the year before survey administration. Cross-sectional analysis of unit-level RN turnover rates for the year following the administration of the survey linked to survey data on safety organizing. Multilevel regression analysis indicated that safety organizing was negatively associated with RN emotional exhaustion on units with higher rates of adverse events and positively associated with RN emotional exhaustion with lower rates of adverse events. Tobit regression analyses indicated that safety organizing was associated with lower unit level of turnover rates over time. Safety organizing is beneficial to caregivers in multiple ways, especially on nursing units with high levels of adverse events and over time.

  17. Adopting a surgical safety checklist could save money and improve the quality of care in U.S. hospitals.

    PubMed

    Semel, Marcus E; Resch, Stephen; Haynes, Alex B; Funk, Luke M; Bader, Angela; Berry, William R; Weiser, Thomas G; Gawande, Atul A

    2010-09-01

    Use of the World Health Organization's Surgical Safety Checklist has been associated with a significant reduction in major postoperative complications after inpatient surgery. We hypothesized that implementing the checklist in the United States would generate cost savings for hospitals. We performed a decision analysis comparing implementation of the checklist to existing practice in U.S. hospitals. In a hospital with a baseline major complication rate after surgery of at least 3 percent, the checklist generates cost savings once it prevents at least five major complications. Using the checklist would both save money and improve the quality of care in hospitals throughout the United States.

  18. 75 FR 75472 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary... Group (A Component of Helmet Fire, Inc. of its status as a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). The... the listing of PSOs, which are entities or component organizations whose mission and primary...

  19. Thinking in three's: changing surgical patient safety practices in the complex modern operating room.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Verna C

    2012-12-14

    The three surgical patient safety events, wrong site surgery, retained surgical items (RSI) and surgical fires are rare occurrences and thus their effects on the complex modern operating room (OR) are difficult to study. The likelihood of occurrence and the magnitude of risk for each of these surgical safety events are undefined. Many providers may never have a personal experience with one of these events and training and education on these topics are sparse. These circumstances lead to faulty thinking that a provider won't ever have an event or if one does occur the provider will intuitively know what to do. Surgeons are not preoccupied with failure and tend to usually consider good outcomes, which leads them to ignore or diminish the importance of implementing and following simple safety practices. These circumstances contribute to the persistent low level occurrence of these three events and to the difficulty in generating sufficient interest to resource solutions. Individual facilities rarely have the time or talent to understand these events and develop lasting solutions. More often than not, even the most well meaning internal review results in a new line to a policy and some rigorous enforcement mandate. This approach routinely fails and is another reason why these problems are so persistent. Vigilance actions alone have been unsuccessful so hospitals now have to take a systematic approach to implementing safer processes and providing the resources for surgeons and other stakeholders to optimize the OR environment. This article discusses standardized processes of care for mitigation of injury or outright prevention of wrong site surgery, RSI and surgical fires in an action-oriented framework illustrating the strategic elements important in each event and focusing on the responsibilities for each of the three major OR agents-anesthesiologists, surgeons and nurses. A Surgical Patient Safety Checklist is discussed that incorporates the necessary elements to

  20. Patient safety culture in a Dutch pediatric surgical intensive care unit: an evaluation using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Poley, Marten J; van der Starre, Cynthia; van den Bos, Ada; van Dijk, Monique; Tibboel, Dick

    2011-11-01

    Nowadays, the belief is widespread that a safety culture is crucial to achieving patient safety, yet there has been virtually no analysis of the safety culture in pediatric hospital settings so far. Our aim was to measure the safety climate in our unit, compare it with benchmarking data, and identify potential deficiencies. Prospective longitudinal survey study at two points in time. Pediatric surgical intensive care unit at a Dutch university hospital. All unit personnel. To measure the safety climate, the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire was administered to physicians, nurses, nursing assistants, pharmacists, technicians, and ward clerks in both May 2006 and May 2007. This questionnaire assesses caregiver attitudes through use of the six following scales: teamwork climate, job satisfaction, perceptions of management, safety climate, working conditions, and stress recognition. Earlier research showed that the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire has good psychometric properties and produced benchmarking data that can be used to evaluate strengths and weaknesses in a given clinical unit against peers. The response rates for the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire were 85% (May 2006) and 74% (May 2007). There were mixed findings regarding the difference between physicians and nurses: on three scales (i.e., teamwork climate, safety climate, and stress recognition), physicians scored better than nurses at both points in time. On another two scales (i.e., perceptions of management and working conditions), nurses consistently had higher mean scale scores. Probably due to the small number of physicians, only some of these differences between physicians and nurses reached the level of statistical significance. Compared to benchmarking data, scores on perceptions of management were higher than expected (p < .01), whereas scores on stress recognition were low (p < .001). The scores on the other scales were somewhat above (job satisfaction), close to (teamwork climate, safety climate

  1. Nonbibliographic Databases in a Corporate Health, Safety, and Environment Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cubillas, Mary M.

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes the characteristics of TOXIN, CHEMFILE, and the Product Profile Information System (PPIS), nonbibliographic databases used by Shell Oil Company's Health, Safety, and Environment Organization. (FM)

  2. The effect of the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist on complication rate and communication.

    PubMed

    Fudickar, Axel; Hörle, Kim; Wiltfang, Jörg; Bein, Berthold

    2012-10-01

    In 2009, the World Health Organisation issued a worldwide recommendation for the use of its Surgical Safety Checklist in all operative procedures. In this review, we present the available data on the implementation of this checklist and its effect on perioperative morbidity and mortality and on operating-room safety culture. We also survey the experience with the checklist to date and give some recommendations for its practical implementation. We reviewed pertinent original publications retrieved by a selective search in the PubMed and Medline databases on the search term "Surgical Safety Checklist". All papers published before February 2012 were analyzed. The 20 studies that we analyzed included a single prospective randomized trial concerning the effect of the WHO checklist on safety-related behavior in the operating room. The two surgical outcome studies documented a relative improvement of perioperative mortality by 47% in one study (from 56 in 3733 cases [1.5%] to 32 in 3955 cases [0.8%]) and by 62% in the other (from 31 in 842 cases [3.7%] to 13 in 908 cases [1.4%]), as well as a relative improvement of perioperative morbidity by 36% in one study (from 411 in 3733 cases [11.0%] to 288 in 3,955 cases [7.3%]) and by 37% in the other (from 151 in 842 cases [17.9%] to 102 in 908 cases [11.2%]). Improved interdisciplinary communication was also found. Factors that aided effective use of the checklist included exemplary implementation by team leaders and structured training. These results support the WHO's recommendation to use the Surgical Safety Checklist in all operative procedures. The checklist should be understood not merely as a list of items to be checked off, but as an instrument for the improvement of communication, teamwork, and safety culture in the operating room, and it should be implemented accordingly.

  3. Factors that drive team participation in surgical safety checks: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Brigid M; Withers, Teresa K; Lavin, Joanne; Gardiner, Therese; Marshall, Andrea P

    2016-01-01

    Team-based group communications using checklists are widely advocated to achieve shared understandings and improve patient safety. Despite the positive effect checklists have on collaborations and reduced postoperative complications, their use has not been straightforward. Previous research has described contextual factors that impact on the implementation of checklists, however there is limited understanding of the issues that impede team participation in checklist use in surgery. The aim of this prospective study was to identify and describe factors that drive team participation in safety checks in surgery. We observed ten surgical teams and conducted 33 semi-structured interviews with 70 participants from nursing, surgery and anaesthetics, and the community. Constant comparative methods were used to analyse textual data derived from field notes and interviews. Observational and interview data were collected during 2014-15. Analysis of the textual data generated from the field notes and interviews revealed the extent to which members of the surgical team participated in using the surgical safety checklist during each phase of patient care. These three categories included: 'using the checklist'; 'working independently'; and, 'communicating checks with others'. The phases in the checking process most vulnerable to information loss or omission were sign in and sign out. Team participation in safety checks depends on a convergence of intertwined factors; namely, team attributes, communication strategies and checking processes. A whole-of-team approach to participation in surgical safety checks is far more complex when considering the factors that drive participation. Strategies to increase participation in safety checks need to target professional communication practices and work processes such as workflow which curtail team members' ability to participate.

  4. Attitudes and beliefs about the surgical safety checklist: Just another tick box?

    PubMed Central

    Dharampal, Navjit; Cameron, Christopher; Dixon, Elijah; Ghali, William; Quan, May Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Background Following a landmark study showing decreased morbidity and mortality after implementation of the surgical safety checklist (SSC), it has been widely adopted into perioperative policy. We explored the impact of attitudes and beliefs surrounding the SSC on its uptake in Calgary. Methods We used qualitative methodology to examine factors influencing SSC use. We performed semistructured interviews based on Rogers’ theory of diffusion of innovation. Purposive and snowball sampling were used to identify surgeons, anesthesiologists and operating room nurses from hospitals in Calgary. Data collection and analysis were based on grounded theory. Two individuals jointly analyzed data and achieved consensus on emerging themes. Results Generated themes included 1) the SSC has brought organization to previous informal perioperative checks, 2) the SSC is most helpful when it is simple, and 3) the 3 current components of the checklist are redundant. The briefing was considered the most important aspect and the debriefing the least important. Initially the SSC was difficult to implement owing to a shift in time management and perioperative culture; however, it has now assimilated into perioperative routine. Finally, though most participants agreed that the SSC might avoid some delays and complications, only a few believe there have been observable improvements to morbidity and mortality. Conclusion Although the SSC has been integrated into perioperative practice in Calgary, participants believe that previous informal checkpoints were able to circumvent most perioperative issues. Although the SSC may help with flow and equipment, participants believe it fails to show a subjective, clinically important improvement. PMID:27454839

  5. Patient Safety Events and Harms During Medical and Surgical Hospitalizations for Persons With Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Daumit, Gail L.; McGinty, Emma E.; Pronovost, Peter; Dixon, Lisa B.; Guallar, Eliseo; Ford, Daniel E.; Cahoon, Elizabeth K.; Boonyasai, Romsai T.; Thompson, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study explored the risk of patient safety events and associated nonfatal physical harms and mortality in a cohort of persons with serious mental illness. This group experiences high rates of medical comorbidity and premature mortality and may be at high risk of adverse patient safety events. Methods Medical record review was conducted for medical-surgical hospitalizations occurring during 1994–2004 in a community-based cohort of Maryland adults with serious mental illness. Individuals were eligible if they died within 30 days of a medical-surgical hospitalization and if they also had at least one prior medical-surgical hospitalization within five years of death. All admissions took place at Maryland general hospitals. A case-crossover analysis examined the relationships among patient safety events, physical harms, and elevated likelihood of death within 30 days of hospitalization. Results A total of 790 hospitalizations among 253 adults were reviewed. The mean number of patient safety events per hospitalization was 5.8, and the rate of physical harms was 142 per 100 hospitalizations. The odds of physical harm were elevated in hospitalizations in which 22 of the 34 patient safety events occurred (p<.05), including medical events (odds ratio [OR]=1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.3–1.7) and procedure-related events (OR=1.6, CI=1.2–2.0). Adjusted odds of death within 30 days of hospitalization were elevated for individuals with any patient safety event, compared with those with no event (OR=3.7, CI=1.4–10.3). Conclusions Patient safety events were positively associated with physical harm and 30-day mortality in nonpsychiatric hospitalizations for persons with serious mental illness. PMID:27181736

  6. Using Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment to Develop a Patient Safety Curriculum for Surgical Residents.

    PubMed

    McKee, Rohini; Sussman, Andrew L; Nelson, M Timothy; Russell, John C

    2016-01-01

    The objective is to use qualitative and quantitative analysis to develop a patient safety curriculum for surgical residents. A prospective study of surgical residents using both quantitative and qualitative methods to craft a patient safety curriculum. Both a survey and focus groups were held before and 4 months after delivery of the patient safety curriculum. The University of New Mexico Hospital, a tertiary academic medical center. General surgery residents, postgraduate years 1 to 5 RESULTS: Qualitative and quantitative analysis revealed areas that required attention and thus helped to mold the curriculum. Qualitative analysis after delivery of the curriculum showed positive changes in attitudes and normative beliefs toward patient safety. Specifically, attitudes and approach to quality improvement and teamwork showed improvement. Survey analysis did not show any significant change in resident perception of the environment during the time frame of this study. Using qualitative analysis to uncover attitudinal barriers to a safe patient environment can help to enhance the relevance and content of a patient safety curriculum for general surgery residents. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Fundamental Use of Surgical Energy (FUSE): An Essential Educational Program for Operating Room Safety.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stephanie B; Munro, Malcolm G; Feldman, Liane S; Robinson, Thomas N; Brunt, L Michael; Schwaitzberg, Steven D; Jones, Daniel B; Fuchshuber, Pascal R

    2017-01-01

    Operating room (OR) safety has become a major concern in patient safety since the 1990s. Improvement of team communication and behavior is a popular target for safety programming at the institutional level. Despite these efforts, essential safety gaps remain in the OR and procedure rooms. A prime example is the use of energy-based devices in ORs and procedural areas. The lack of fundamental understanding of energy device function, design, and application contributes to avoidable injury and harm at a rate of approximately 1 to 2 per 1000 patients in the US. Hundreds of OR fires occur each year in the US, some causing severe injury and even death. Most of these fires are associated with the use of energy-based surgical devices.In response to this safety issue, the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) developed the Fundamental Use of Surgical Energy (FUSE) program. This program includes a standardized curriculum targeted to surgeons, other physicians, and allied health care professionals and a psychometrically designed and validated certification test. A successful FUSE certification documents acquisition of the basic knowledge needed to safely use energy-based devices in the OR. By design FUSE fills a void in the curriculum and competency assessment for surgeons and other procedural specialists in the use of energy-based devices in patients.

  8. Fundamental Use of Surgical Energy (FUSE): An Essential Educational Program for Operating Room Safety

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephanie B; Munro, Malcolm G; Feldman, Liane S; Robinson, Thomas N; Brunt, L Michael; Schwaitzberg, Steven D; Jones, Daniel B; Fuchshuber, Pascal R

    2017-01-01

    Operating room (OR) safety has become a major concern in patient safety since the 1990s. Improvement of team communication and behavior is a popular target for safety programming at the institutional level. Despite these efforts, essential safety gaps remain in the OR and procedure rooms. A prime example is the use of energy-based devices in ORs and procedural areas. The lack of fundamental understanding of energy device function, design, and application contributes to avoidable injury and harm at a rate of approximately 1 to 2 per 1000 patients in the US. Hundreds of OR fires occur each year in the US, some causing severe injury and even death. Most of these fires are associated with the use of energy-based surgical devices. In response to this safety issue, the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) developed the Fundamental Use of Surgical Energy (FUSE) program. This program includes a standardized curriculum targeted to surgeons, other physicians, and allied health care professionals and a psychometrically designed and validated certification test. A successful FUSE certification documents acquisition of the basic knowledge needed to safely use energy-based devices in the OR. By design FUSE fills a void in the curriculum and competency assessment for surgeons and other procedural specialists in the use of energy-based devices in patients. PMID:28241913

  9. Interview with a quality leader: Dr. Verna Gibbs on surgical safety. Interview by Susan V. White.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Verna

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Verna Gibbs describes the "NoThing Left Behind" Program designed to eliminate retained devices from surgical procedures. She explains the genesis of the program along with adjuncts to counting including computer-assisted sponge count, radiofrequency detection system, radiofrequency identification system, and the Sponge ACCOUNTing system. She provides comments on the use of these adjuncts with responses on their effectiveness on improving safety.

  10. [Surgical research in Germany. Organization, quality and international competitiveness].

    PubMed

    Menger, M D; Laschke, M W

    2012-04-01

    Surgical research in Germany is performed within surgical clinics by individual working groups or in surgical research divisions. Additionally, a few independent institutes and departments of surgical research have been established at medical faculties. The number of these institutions, however, is too small. To increase productivity in surgical research, structural changes are necessary, including additional establishment of further institutes and professorships. The quality of clinical research in surgery in Germany is critically discussed. International comparison shows that Germany has a low ranking with respect to the number of clinical studies published in leading surgical journals. However, there has been some improvement in the quality of clinical studies performed in surgical departments during the last 15 years. The establishment of the study center of the German Society of Surgery shows that excellent clinical studies with adequate numbers of patients can also be performed in Germany and can be published in leading journals. Accordingly, there is need to distribute the structures and the competence necessary to perform clinical studies in a standardized manner to all surgical departments involved in clinical research. The experimental surgical research in Germany is not adequately visible, although over the last 10 years the most relevant publications from institutions for surgical research have been placed in journals with a mean impact factor of 8. This may be due to the fact that 85% of these top publications are published in non-surgical journals. The aim for the future must therefore be to increase the impact factor and, thus, the attractiveness of surgical journals. This may be achieved by publishing the highest quality results from experimental surgical research not in non-surgical but in surgical journals.

  11. Uterine sparing surgical methods in pelvic organ prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Tola, Esra Nur; Erdemoğlu, Evrim; Erdemoğlu, Ebru

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is defined as the protrusion of pelvic organs to the vagen and is an important health problem in patients of older age. Today, most women with POP prefer uterine sparing surgery due to the changes in lifestyle, beliefs, pregnancy desire, and understanding the role of the uterus and cervix in sexual function. Therefore, the need for newer surgical procedures that involve less invasive surgery, reduced intraoperative and postoperative risks, and a faster healing time in POP surgery have gained importance. Vaginal, abdominal, laparoscopic, and robotic methods are defined in uterine preserving surgery but there is not yet a consensus on which of them should be chosen. In choosing the proper technique, the patient’s general status, accompanying disease, correct indication, and the surgeon’s experience are all important. In our practice we prefer laparoscopic mesh sacrohysteropexy in patients who prefer to preserve their uterus because of the lower costs and high success rates compared with abdominal and robotic techniques. PMID:28913063

  12. System Safety in an IT Service Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Mike; Scutt, Simon

    Within Logica UK, over 30 IT service projects are considered safetyrelated. These include operational IT services for airports, railway infrastructure asset management, nationwide radiation monitoring and hospital medical records services. A recent internal audit examined the processes and documents used to manage system safety on these services and made a series of recommendations for improvement. This paper looks at the changes and the challenges to introducing them, especially where the service is provided by multiple units supporting both safety and non-safety related services from multiple locations around the world. The recommendations include improvements to service agreements, improved process definitions, routine safety assessment of changes, enhanced call logging, improved staff competency and training, and increased safety awareness. Progress is reported as of today, together with a road map for implementation of the improvements to the service safety management system. A proposal for service assurance levels (SALs) is discussed as a way forward to cover the wide variety of services and associated safety risks.

  13. GSFC Safety and Mission Assurance Organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's approach to safety and mission assurance. The contents include: 1) NASA GSFC Background; 2) Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate; 3) The Role of SMA-D and the Technical Authority; 4) GSFC Mission assurance Requirements; 5) GSFC Systems Review Office (SRO); 6) GSFC Supply Chain Management Program; and 7) GSFC ISO9001/AS9100 Status Brief.

  14. Elective surgical patients' narratives of hospitalization: the co-construction of safety.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Carole; Saunders, Mark N K

    2013-12-01

    This research explores how elective surgical patients make sense of their hospitalization experiences. We explore sensemaking using longitudinal narrative interviews (n=72) with 38 patients undergoing elective surgical procedures between June 2010 and February 2011. We consider patients' narratives, the stories they tell of their prior expectations, and subsequent post-surgery experiences of their care in a United Kingdom (UK) hospital. An emergent pre-surgery theme is that of a paradoxical position in which they choose to make themselves vulnerable by agreeing to surgery to enhance their health, this necessitating trust of clinicians (doctors and nurses). To make sense of their situation, patients draw on technical (doctors' expert knowledge and skills), bureaucratic (National Health Service as a revered institution) and ideological (hospitals as places of safety), discourses. Post-operatively, themes of 'chaos' and 'suffering' emerge from the narratives of patients whose pre-surgery expectations (and trust) have been violated. Their stories tell of unmet expectations and of inability to make shared sense of experiences with clinicians who are responsible for their care. We add to knowledge of how patients play a critical part in the co-construction of safety by demonstrating how patient-clinician intersubjectivity contributes to the type of harm that patients describe. Our results suggest that approaches to enhancing patients' safety will be limited if they fail to reflect patients' involvement in the negotiated process of healthcare. We also provide further evidence of the contribution narrative inquiry can make to patient safety.

  15. The quality of surgical care in safety net hospitals: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mouch, Charles A; Regenbogen, Scott E; Revels, Sha'Shonda L; Wong, Sandra L; Lemak, Christy H; Morris, Arden M

    2014-05-01

    The quality of surgical care in safety net hospitals (SNHs) is not well understood owing to sparse data that have not yet been analyzed systematically. We hypothesized that on average, SNHs provide a lesser quality of care for surgery patients than non-SNHs. We performed a systematic review of published literature on quality of surgical care in SNHs in accordance with guidelines from the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. We searched within the PubMed, CINAHL, and Scopus online databases, and included peer-reviewed, English-language, scientific papers published between 1995 and 2013 that analyzed primary or secondary data on ≥1 of the domains of quality (safety, effectiveness, efficiency, timeliness, patient centeredness, and equity) of surgical care in a US hospital or system that met the Institute of Medicine definition of a SNH. Each article was reviewed independently by ≥2 co-investigators. A data abstraction tool was used to record the eligibility, purpose, design, results, conclusion, and overall quality of each article reviewed. Disagreements over eligibility and data were resolved by group discussion. The main results and conclusions abstracted from the included articles were then analyzed and presented according to the quality domains addressed most clearly by each article. Our initial search identified 1,556 citations, of which 86 were potentially eligible for inclusion. After complete review and abstraction, only 19 of these studies met all inclusion criteria. SNHs performed significantly worse than non-SNHs in measures of timeliness and patient centeredness. Surgical care in SNHs tended to be less equitable than in non-SNHs. Data on the safety of surgical care in SNHs were inconsistent. Although data are limited, there seems to be need for improvement in particular aspects of the quality of surgical care provided in SNHs. Thus, SNHs should be priority settings for future quality improvement interventions in surgery

  16. Using administrative data to identify surgical adverse events: an introduction to the Patient Safety Indicators.

    PubMed

    Kaafarani, Haytham M A; Rosen, Amy K

    2009-11-01

    The Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) are algorithms based on the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, aimed at identifying potential safety-related adverse events through the automated screening of readily available administrative databases. Many of these indicators focus on surgical care, and a few have been endorsed by the National Quality Forum as performance measures. The aim of this report is to give a brief overview of the development and definitions of the PSIs as well as the current evidence for their validity, compared with the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program and chart abstraction designed for the purpose of PSI validation. Several articles published in the past few years, in addition to primary data collected from an ongoing study of PSI validation in the Veterans Health Administration, were examined. Selected surgical PSIs have positive predictive values ranging from 22% to 89%, depending on the nature of the PSI and the method of validation used. With adequate coding revisions, PSI performance can be substantially improved.

  17. Automating Safety for a More Efficient Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folkman, John; Strasburger, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Despite the challenges of understaffing, unfunded legislative mandates, and tight budgets, district support services departments are still expected to meet school systems' myriad noncurriculum-related needs. But the very nature of these services, even when they are focused on school safety and security, is so diverse and labor-intensive that…

  18. Operating room data management: improving efficiency and safety in a surgical block.

    PubMed

    Agnoletti, Vanni; Buccioli, Matteo; Padovani, Emanuele; Corso, Ruggero M; Perger, Peter; Piraccini, Emanuele; Orelli, Rebecca Levy; Maitan, Stefano; Dell'amore, Davide; Garcea, Domenico; Vicini, Claudio; Montella, Teresa Maria; Gambale, Giorgio

    2013-03-11

    European Healthcare Systems are facing a difficult period characterized by increasing costs and spending cuts due to economic problems. There is the urgent need for new tools which sustain Hospitals decision makers work. This project aimed to develop a data recording system of the surgical process of every patient within the operating theatre. The primary goal was to create a practical and easy data processing tool to give hospital managers, anesthesiologists and surgeons the information basis to increase operating theaters efficiency and patient safety. The developed data analysis tool is embedded in an Oracle Business Intelligence Environment, which processes data to simple and understandable performance tachometers and tables. The underlying data analysis is based on scientific literature and the projects teams experience with tracked data. The system login is layered and different users have access to different data outputs depending on their professional needs. The system is divided in the tree profile types Manager, Anesthesiologist and Surgeon. Every profile includes subcategories where operators can access more detailed data analyses. The first data output screen shows general information and guides the user towards more detailed data analysis. The data recording system enabled the registration of 14.675 surgical operations performed from 2009 to 2011. Raw utilization increased from 44% in 2009 to 52% in 2011. The number of high complexity surgical procedures (≥120 minutes) has increased in certain units while decreased in others. The number of unscheduled procedures performed has been reduced (from 25% in 2009 to 14% in 2011) while maintaining the same percentage of surgical procedures. The number of overtime events decreased in 2010 (23%) and in 2011 (21%) compared to 2009 (28%) and the delays expressed in minutes are almost the same (mean 78 min). The direct link found between the complexity of surgical procedures, the number of unscheduled procedures

  19. Operating room data management: improving efficiency and safety in a surgical block

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background European Healthcare Systems are facing a difficult period characterized by increasing costs and spending cuts due to economic problems. There is the urgent need for new tools which sustain Hospitals decision makers work. This project aimed to develop a data recording system of the surgical process of every patient within the operating theatre. The primary goal was to create a practical and easy data processing tool to give hospital managers, anesthesiologists and surgeons the information basis to increase operating theaters efficiency and patient safety. Methods The developed data analysis tool is embedded in an Oracle Business Intelligence Environment, which processes data to simple and understandable performance tachometers and tables. The underlying data analysis is based on scientific literature and the projects teams experience with tracked data. The system login is layered and different users have access to different data outputs depending on their professional needs. The system is divided in the tree profile types Manager, Anesthesiologist and Surgeon. Every profile includes subcategories where operators can access more detailed data analyses. The first data output screen shows general information and guides the user towards more detailed data analysis. The data recording system enabled the registration of 14.675 surgical operations performed from 2009 to 2011. Results Raw utilization increased from 44% in 2009 to 52% in 2011. The number of high complexity surgical procedures (≥120 minutes) has increased in certain units while decreased in others. The number of unscheduled procedures performed has been reduced (from 25% in 2009 to 14% in 2011) while maintaining the same percentage of surgical procedures. The number of overtime events decreased in 2010 (23%) and in 2011 (21%) compared to 2009 (28%) and the delays expressed in minutes are almost the same (mean 78 min). The direct link found between the complexity of surgical procedures, the number

  20. Safety culture in the nuclear versus non-nuclear organization

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, S.B.; Shurberg, D.A.

    1996-10-01

    The importance of safety culture in the safe and reliable operation of nuclear organizations is not a new concept. The greatest barriers to this area of research are twofold: (1) the definition and criteria of safety culture for a nuclear organization and (2) the measurement of those attributes in an objective and systematic fashion. This paper will discuss a proposed resolution of those barriers as demonstrated by the collection of data across nuclear and non-nuclear facilities over a two year period.

  1. Efficacy and safety of a new surgical method to treat malignant glaucoma in pseudophakia

    PubMed Central

    Żarnowski, T; Wilkos-Kuc, A; Tulidowicz-Bielak, M; Kalinowska, A; Zadrożniak, A; Pyszniak, E; Rękas, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the efficacy and safety of a relatively new surgical method in pseudophakic malignant glaucoma patients. Methods This study is a retrospective, non-comparative, interventional case series. Ten eyes of nine pseudophakic malignant glaucoma patients with mean age of 63.3 years were analysed. All 10 eyes underwent a novel surgical technique, an anterior chamber capsulo-hyaloidectomy and anterior vitrectomy through the peripheral iridectomy. Main outcome measures were: reformation of the anterior chamber, intraocular pressure (IOP), best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and complications. Results All 10 eyes with pseudophakic malignant glaucoma were treated successfully by using a new surgical technique. All cases had a relief of aqueous misdirection with anterior chamber deepening during and after the surgery and post-operative intraocular pressure (IOP) normalization. No relapses have been observed so far. There were no complications during surgery and in the post-operative period. Conclusion The presented surgical technique seems to be safe and effective in all cases of malignant glaucoma in pseudophakia. PMID:24625375

  2. 78 FR 6819 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From The Connecticut Hospital Association...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From The Connecticut Hospital Association Federal Patient Safety Organization AGENCY: Agency for... for the formation of Patient Safety Organizations (PSOs), which collect, aggregate, and...

  3. Safety assessment and detection methods of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Zheng, Zhe; Jiao, Guanglian

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs), are gaining importance in agriculture as well as the production of food and feed. Along with the development of GMOs, health and food safety concerns have been raised. These concerns for these new GMOs make it necessary to set up strict system on food safety assessment of GMOs. The food safety assessment of GMOs, current development status of safety and precise transgenic technologies and GMOs detection have been discussed in this review. The recent patents about GMOs and their detection methods are also reviewed. This review can provide elementary introduction on how to assess and detect GMOs.

  4. Improving safety culture through the health and safety organization: a case study.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Kent J

    2014-02-01

    International research indicates that internal health and safety organizations (HSO) and health and safety committees (HSC) do not have the intended impact on companies' safety performance. The aim of this case study at an industrial plant was to test whether the HSO can improve company safety culture by creating more and better safety-related interactions both within the HSO and between HSO members and the shop-floor. A quasi-experimental single case study design based on action research with both quantitative and qualitative measures was used. Based on baseline mapping of safety culture and the efficiency of the HSO three developmental processes were started aimed at the HSC, the whole HSO, and the safety representatives, respectively. Results at follow-up indicated a marked improvement in HSO performance, interaction patterns concerning safety, safety culture indicators, and a changed trend in injury rates. These improvements are interpreted as cultural change because an organizational double-loop learning process leading to modification of the basic assumptions could be identified. The study provides evidence that the HSO can improve company safety culture by focusing on safety-related interactions. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd and National Safety Council.

  5. Simulation Training Improves Surgical Proficiency and Safety During Diagnostic Shoulder Arthroscopy Performed by Residents.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Brian R; Martin, Kevin D; Cameron, Kenneth L; Owens, Brett D; Belmont, Philip J

    2016-05-01

    Although virtual reality simulators have established construct validity, no studies have proven transfer of skills from a simulator to improved in vivo surgical skill. The current authors hypothesized that simulation training would improve residents' basic arthroscopic performance and safety. Twenty-two orthopedic surgery trainees were randomized into simulation or standard practice groups. At baseline testing, all of the participants performed simulator-based testing and a supervised, in vivo diagnostic shoulder arthroscopy with video recording. The simulation group subsequently received 1 hour of total instruction during a 3-month period, and the standard practice group received no simulator training. After intervention, both groups were reevaluated with simulator testing and a second recorded diagnostic shoulder arthroscopy. Two blinded, independent experts evaluated arthroscopic performance using the anatomic checklist, Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET) score, and total elapsed time. All outcome measures were compared within and between groups. After intervention, mean time required by the simulation group to complete the simulator task (30.64 seconds) was 8±1.2 seconds faster than the time required by the control group (38.64 seconds; P=.001). Probe distance (51.65 mm) was improved by 41.2±6.08 mm compared with the control (92.83 mm; P=.001). When comparing ASSET safety scores, the simulation group was competent (3.29) and significantly better than the control group (3.00; P=.005) during final arthroscopic testing. This study establishes transfer validity for an arthroscopic shoulder simulator model. Simulator training for residents in training can decrease surgical times, improve basic surgical skills, and confer greater patient safety during shoulder arthroscopy. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e479-e485.].

  6. 78 FR 12065 - Patient Safety Organizations: Delisting for Cause for Independent Data Safety Monitoring, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Delisting for Cause for Independent Data Safety Monitoring, Inc. AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...

  7. Surgical Outreach for Children by International Humanitarian Organizations: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zeigler, Laura; McQueen, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    Low- and middle-income countries carry a disproportionate share of the global burden of pediatric surgical disease and have limited local healthcare infrastructure and human resources to address this burden. Humanitarian efforts that have improved or provided access to necessary basic or emergency surgery for children in these settings have included humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, short-term surgical missions, and long-term projects such as building pediatric specialty hospitals and provider networks. Each of these efforts may also include educational initiatives designed to increase local capacity. This article will provide an overview of pediatric humanitarian surgical outreach including reference to available evidence-based analyses of these platforms and make recommendations for surgical outreach initiatives for children. PMID:28657589

  8. The Surgical Safety Checklist and Teamwork Coaching Tools: a study of inter-rater reliability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lyen C; Conley, Dante; Lipsitz, Stu; Wright, Christopher C; Diller, Thomas W; Edmondson, Lizabeth; Berry, William R; Singer, Sara J

    2014-08-01

    To assess the inter-rater reliability (IRR) of two novel observation tools for measuring surgical safety checklist performance and teamwork. Data surgical safety checklists can promote adherence to standards of care and improve teamwork in the operating room. Their use has been associated with reductions in mortality and other postoperative complications. However, checklist effectiveness depends on how well they are performed. Authors from the Safe Surgery 2015 initiative developed a pair of novel observation tools through literature review, expert consultation and end-user testing. In one South Carolina hospital participating in the initiative, two observers jointly attended 50 surgical cases and independently rated surgical teams using both tools. We used descriptive statistics to measure checklist performance and teamwork at the hospital. We assessed IRR by measuring percent agreement, Cohen's κ, and weighted κ scores. The overall percent agreement and κ between the two observers was 93% and 0.74 (95% CI 0.66 to 0.79), respectively, for the Checklist Coaching Tool and 86% and 0.84 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.90) for the Surgical Teamwork Tool. Percent agreement for individual sections of both tools was 79% or higher. Additionally, κ scores for six of eight sections on the Checklist Coaching Tool and for two of five domains on the Surgical Teamwork Tool achieved the desired 0.7 threshold. However, teamwork scores were high and variation was limited. There were no significant changes in the percent agreement or κ scores between the first 10 and last 10 cases observed. Both tools demonstrated substantial IRR and required limited training to use. These instruments may be used to observe checklist performance and teamwork in the operating room. However, further refinement and calibration of observer expectations, particularly in rating teamwork, could improve the utility of the tools. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  9. Efficacy, safety, and cost of surgical versus nonsurgical treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yi-Ming; Wang, Xi-Shan; Wei, Zhi-Jian; Fan, Bao-You; Lin, Wei; Zhou, Xian-Hu; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common peripheral nerve entrapment disease. Either surgical or conservative intervention for CTS patients is needed to choose. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the clinical efficacy, safety, and cost of surgical versus nonsurgical intervention. Methods: The eligible studies were acquired from PubMed, Medline, Embase, Web of Science, Google, and Cochrane Library. The data were extracted by 2 of the coauthors independently and were analyzed by RevMan5.3. Standardized mean differences (SMDs), odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Tool and Newcastle–Ottawa Scale were used to assess risk of bias. Results: Thirteen studies including 9 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 4 observational studies were assessed. The methodological quality of the trials ranged from moderate to high. The difference of clinical efficacy was statistically significant between surgical and nonsurgical intervention, and nonsurgical treatment was more effective (OR = 2.35, 95%CI = 1.18–4.67, P = 0.01). Meanwhile, different results were discovered by subgroup analysis. The pooled results of function improvement, symptom improvement, neurophysiological parameters improvement, and cost of care at different follow-up times showed that the differences were not statistically significant between the 2 interventions. The difference of complications and side-effects was statistically significant and conservative treatment achieved better result than surgery (OR = 2.03, 95%CI = 1.28–3.22, P = 0.003). Sensitivity analysis proved the stability of the pooled results. Conclusion: Both surgical and conservative interventions had benefits in CTS. Nonsurgical treatment was more effective and safety than surgical treatment, but there were no significant differences in function improvement, symptom improvement, neurophysiological

  10. An investigation into the impact of safety features on the ergonomics of surgical scalpels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xuefang; Thomson, Gareth; Tang, Benjie

    2009-05-01

    In the case of surgical scalpels, blade retraction and disposability have been incorporated into a number of commercial designs to address sharps injury and infection transmission issues. Despite these new designs, the traditional metal reusable scalpel is still extensively used and this paper attempts to determine whether the introduction of safety features has compromised the ergonomics and so potentially the take-up of the newer designs. Examples of scalpels have been analysed to determine the ergonomic impact of these design changes. Trials and questionnaires were carried out using both clinical and non-clinical user groups, with the trials making use of assessment of incision quality, cutting force, electromyography and video monitoring. The results showed that ergonomic performance was altered by the design changes and that while these could be for the worse, the introduction of safety features could act as a catalyst to encourage re-evaluation of the ergonomic demands of a highly traditional product.

  11. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory. Organic Peroxides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanley, Edward S.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the thermodynamic instability of organic peroxides. The process of autoxidation which results in peroxide formation is described. Precautions necessary to prevent autoxidation hazards associated with these reagents are suggested. (CW)

  12. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory. Organic Peroxides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanley, Edward S.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the thermodynamic instability of organic peroxides. The process of autoxidation which results in peroxide formation is described. Precautions necessary to prevent autoxidation hazards associated with these reagents are suggested. (CW)

  13. Evaluating the Impact of Radio Frequency Identification Retained Surgical Instruments Tracking on Patient Safety: Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Schnock, Kumiko O; Biggs, Bonnie; Fladger, Anne; Bates, David W; Rozenblum, Ronen

    2017-02-22

    Retained surgical instruments (RSI) are one of the most serious preventable complications in operating room settings, potentially leading to profound adverse effects for patients, as well as costly legal and financial consequences for hospitals. Safety measures to eliminate RSIs have been widely adopted in the United States and abroad, but despite widespread efforts, medical errors with RSI have not been eliminated. Through a systematic review of recent studies, we aimed to identify the impact of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology on reducing RSI errors and improving patient safety. A literature search on the effects of RFID technology on RSI error reduction was conducted in PubMed and CINAHL (2000-2016). Relevant articles were selected and reviewed by 4 researchers. After the literature search, 385 articles were identified and the full texts of the 88 articles were assessed for eligibility. Of these, 5 articles were included to evaluate the benefits and drawbacks of using RFID for preventing RSI-related errors. The use of RFID resulted in rapid detection of RSI through body tissue with high accuracy rates, reducing risk of counting errors and improving workflow. Based on the existing literature, RFID technology seems to have the potential to substantially improve patient safety by reducing RSI errors, although the body of evidence is currently limited. Better designed research studies are needed to get a clear understanding of this domain and to find new opportunities to use this technology and improve patient safety.

  14. Effectiveness in professional organizations: the impact of surgeons and surgical staff organizations on the quality of care in hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Flood, A B; Scott, W R; Ewy, W; Forrest, W H

    1982-01-01

    In this research, we examine the relative importance of different structural units in a professional organization, the hospital, as they affect organizational effectiveness. The difficulties of measuring effectiveness in a complex professional organization are discussed, and an adjusted measure of surgical outcome is developed. Data are drawn from a prospective study of over 8,000 surgical patients treated by more than 500 surgeons in 15 hospitals throughout the nation. Two different types of analyses are presented, both indicating that hospital features have more impact on surgical outcomes than do surgeon characteristics. The second analysis assesses the relative importance of specific attributes of the hospital, surgical staff organization, and surgeon characteristics on surgical outcomes. PMID:7152960

  15. A qualitative evaluation of the barriers and facilitators toward implementation of the WHO surgical safety checklist across hospitals in England: lessons from the "Surgical Checklist Implementation Project".

    PubMed

    Russ, Stephanie J; Sevdalis, Nick; Moorthy, Krishna; Mayer, Erik K; Rout, Shantanu; Caris, Jochem; Mansell, Jenny; Davies, Rachel; Vincent, Charles; Darzi, Ara

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate how the World Health Organization (WHO) surgical safety checklist was implemented across hospitals in England; to identify barriers and facilitators toward implementation; and to draw out lessons for implementing improvement initiatives in surgery/health care more generally. The WHO checklist has been linked to improved surgical outcomes and teamwork, yet we know little about the factors affecting its successful uptake. A longitudinal interview study with operating room personnel was conducted across a representative sample of 10 hospitals in England between March 2010 and March 2011. Interviews were audio recorded over the phone. Interviewees were asked about their experience of how the checklist was introduced and the factors that hindered or aided this process. Transcripts were submitted to thematic analysis. A total of 119 interviews were completed. Checklist implementation varied greatly between and within hospitals, ranging from preplanned/phased approaches to the checklist simply "appearing" in operating rooms, or staff feeling it had been imposed. Most barriers to implementation were specific to the checklist itself (eg, perceived design issues) but also included problematic integration into preexisting processes. The most common barrier was resistance from senior clinicians. The facilitators revealed some positive steps that can been taken to prevent/address these barriers, for example, modifying the checklist, providing education/training, feeding-back local data, fostering strong leadership (particularly at attending level), and instilling accountability. We identified common themes that have aided or hindered the introduction of the WHO checklist in England and have translated these into recommendations to guide the implementation of improvement initiatives in surgery and wider health care systems.

  16. Development and content validation of a surgical safety checklist for operating theatres that use robotic technology.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Kamran; Khan, Nuzhath; Khan, Mohammed Shamim; Dasgupta, Prokar

    2013-06-01

    To identify and assess potential hazards in robot-assisted urological surgery. To develop a comprehensive checklist to be used in operating theatres with robotic technology. Healthcare Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (HFMEA), a risk assessment tool, was used in a urology operating theatre with innovative robotic technology in a UK teaching hospital between June and December 2011. A 15-member multidisciplinary team identified 'failure modes' through process mapping and flow diagrams. Potential hazards were rated according to severity and frequency and scored using a 'hazard score matrix'. All hazards scoring ≥8 were considered for 'decision tree' analysis, which produced a list of hazards to be included in a surgical safety checklist. Process mapping highlighted three main phases: the anaesthesia phase, the operating phase and the postoperative handover to recovery phase. A total of 51 failure modes were identified, 61% of which had a hazard score ≥8. A total of 22 hazards were finalised via decision tree analysis and were included in the checklist. The focus was on hazards specific to robotic urological procedures such as patient positioning (hazard score 12), port placement (hazard score 9) and robot docking/de-docking (hazard score 12). HFMEA identified hazards in an operating theatre with innovative robotic technologies which has led to the development of a surgical safety checklist. Further work will involve validation and implementation of the checklist. © 2013 BJU International.

  17. Validity of selected AHRQ patient safety indicators based on VA National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data.

    PubMed

    Romano, Patrick S; Mull, Hillary J; Rivard, Peter E; Zhao, Shibei; Henderson, William G; Loveland, Susan; Tsilimingras, Dennis; Christiansen, Cindy L; Rosen, Amy K

    2009-02-01

    To examine the criterion validity of the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality (AHRQ) Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) using clinical data from the Veterans Health Administration (VA) National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP). Fifty five thousand seven hundred and fifty two matched hospitalizations from 2001 VA inpatient surgical discharge data and NSQIP chart-abstracted data. We examined the sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values (PPVs), and positive likelihood ratios of five surgical PSIs that corresponded to NSQIP adverse events. We created and tested alternative definitions of each PSI. FY01 inpatient discharge data were merged with 2001 NSQIP data abstracted from medical records for major noncardiac surgeries. Sensitivities were 19-56 percent for original PSI definitions; and 37-63 percent using alternative PSI definitions. PPVs were 22-74 percent and did not improve with modifications. Positive likelihood ratios were 65-524 using original definitions, and 64-744 using alternative definitions. "Postoperative respiratory failure" and "postoperative wound dehiscence" exhibited significant increases in sensitivity after modifications. PSI sensitivities and PPVs were moderate. For three of the five PSIs, AHRQ has incorporated our alternative, higher sensitivity definitions into current PSI algorithms. Further validation should be considered before most of the PSIs evaluated herein are used to publicly compare or reward hospital performance.

  18. Validity of Selected AHRQ Patient Safety Indicators Based on VA National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Data

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Patrick S; Mull, Hillary J; Rivard, Peter E; Zhao, Shibei; Henderson, William G; Loveland, Susan; Tsilimingras, Dennis; Christiansen, Cindy L; Rosen, Amy K

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To examine the criterion validity of the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality (AHRQ) Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) using clinical data from the Veterans Health Administration (VA) National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP). Data Sources Fifty five thousand seven hundred and fifty two matched hospitalizations from 2001 VA inpatient surgical discharge data and NSQIP chart-abstracted data. Study Design We examined the sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values (PPVs), and positive likelihood ratios of five surgical PSIs that corresponded to NSQIP adverse events. We created and tested alternative definitions of each PSI. Data Collection FY01 inpatient discharge data were merged with 2001 NSQIP data abstracted from medical records for major noncardiac surgeries. Principal Findings Sensitivities were 19–56 percent for original PSI definitions; and 37–63 percent using alternative PSI definitions. PPVs were 22–74 percent and did not improve with modifications. Positive likelihood ratios were 65–524 using original definitions, and 64–744 using alternative definitions. “Postoperative respiratory failure” and “postoperative wound dehiscence” exhibited significant increases in sensitivity after modifications. Conclusions PSI sensitivities and PPVs were moderate. For three of the five PSIs, AHRQ has incorporated our alternative, higher sensitivity definitions into current PSI algorithms. Further validation should be considered before most of the PSIs evaluated herein are used to publicly compare or reward hospital performance. PMID:18823449

  19. Safety and Efficacy of Single-Stage Surgical Treatment for Congenital Scoliosis Associated with Intraspinal Mass

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo-bo; Tao, Hui-ren; Wu, Tai-lin; Wang, Lin; Duan, Chun-guang; Zhang, Tao; Li, Tao; Yang, Wei-zhou; Liu, Ming; Ma, Jun

    2017-01-01

    For congenital scoliosis associated with intraspinal anomaly, surgical treatment is often advocated. However, the safety and efficacy of single-stage intraspinal mass resection and scoliosis correction remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the feasibility and risk factors of single-stage surgical treatment for congenital scoliosis associated with intraspinal mass. Patients’ clinical records were reviewed for demographic and radiographic data, operating time, intraoperative blood loss, perioperative complications, and postoperative pathologic results. Two female and 5 male patients with an average age of 19.14 ± 7.52 years (range, 11–31 years) were evaluated. Patients were followed for a minimum of 24 months after initial surgical treatment, with an average of 49.71 ± 32.90 months (range, 27–99 months). Spinal curvature was corrected from an average of 69.57 ± 20.44° to 29.14 ± 9.87°, demonstrating a mean correction rate of 55.05% ± 18.75%. No obvious loss of correction was observed at the final follow-up. Complications included transient neurologic deficit, cerebrospinal fluid leakage, and intraspinal mass recurrence in 1 patient each. There was no paralysis or permanent nerve damage. In conclusion, simultaneous intraspinal mass resection and scoliosis correction appears to be safe and effective. PMID:28117436

  20. Surgical Patient Safety Outcomes in Critical Access Hospitals: How Do They Compare?

    PubMed

    Natafgi, Nabil; Baloh, Jure; Weigel, Paula; Ullrich, Fred; Ward, Marcia M

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study was to examine whether Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs), the predominant type of hospital in small and isolated rural areas, perform better than, the same as, or worse than Prospective Payment System (PPS) hospitals on measures of quality. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases and American Hospital Association annual survey data were used for analyses. A total of 35,674 discharges from 136 nonfederal general hospitals with fewer than 50 beds were included in the analyses: 14,296 from 100 CAHs and 21,378 from 36 PPS hospitals. Outcome measures included 6 bivariate indicators of adverse events (including complications) of surgical care developed from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's Patient Safety Indicators. Multiple logistic regression models were developed to examine the relationship between hospital adverse events and CAH status. Compared with PPS hospitals, CAHs are significantly less likely to have any observed (unadjusted) adverse event on 4 of the 6 indicators. After adjusting for patient mix and hospital characteristics, CAHs perform better on 3 of the 6 indicators. Accounting for the number of discharges eliminated the differences between CAHs and PPS hospitals in the likelihood of adverse events across all indicators except one. The study suggests there are no differences in surgical patient safety outcomes between CAHs and PPS hospitals of comparable size. This reinforces the central role of CAHs in providing quality surgical care to populations in rural and isolated areas, and underscores the importance of strategies to sustain rural surgery infrastructure. © 2016 National Rural Health Association.

  1. Diffusion of Surgical Innovations, Patient Safety, and Minimally Invasive Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, J. Kellogg; Messer, Karen; Palazzi, Kerrin; Stroup, Sean; Chang, David

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Surgical innovations disseminate in the absence of coordinated systems to ensure their safe integration into clinical practice, potentially exposing patients to increased risk for medical error. OBJECTIVE To investigate associations of patient safety with the diffusion of minimally invasive radical prostatectomy (MIRP) resulting from the development of the da Vinci robot. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A cohort study of 401 325 patients in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample who underwent radical prostatectomy during MIRP diffusion between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2009. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We used Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs), which measure processes of care and surgical provider performance. We estimated the prevalence of MIRP among all prostatectomies and compared PSI incidence between MIRP and open radical prostatectomy in each year during the study. We also collected estimates of MIRP incidence attributed to the manufacturer of the da Vinci robot. RESULTS Patients who underwent MIRP were more likely to be white (P = .004), have fewer comorbidities (P = .02), and have undergone surgery in higher-income areas (P = .005). The incidence of MIRP was substantially lower than da Vinci manufacturer estimates. Rapid diffusion onset occurred in 2006, when MIRP accounted for 10.4% (95% CI, 10.2-10.7) of all radical prostatectomies in the United States. In 2005, MIRP was associated with an increased adjusted risk for any PSI (adjusted odds ratio, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.7; P = .02) vs open radical prostatectomy. Stratification by hospital status demonstrated similar patterns: rapid diffusion onset among teaching hospitals occurred in 2006 (11.7%; 95% CI, 11.3-12.0), with an increased risk for PSI for MIRP in 2005 (adjusted odds ratio, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4-5.3; P = .004), and onset among nonteaching hospitals occurred in 2008 (27.1%; 95% CI, 26.6-27.7), with an increased but nonsignificant risk for PSI in 2007

  2. 76 FR 7854 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Quality Excellence, Inc./PSO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary... Medical Care, of its status as a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). The Patient Safety and Quality... safety of health care delivery. The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Final Rule (Patient Safety...

  3. Product Safety, It's No Accident. A Consumer Product Safety Monthly Planning Guide for Community Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer Product Safety Commission, Washington, DC.

    A consumer product safety monthly planning guide for community organizations is provided. The material is organized into suggested monthly topics with seasonal emphasis. Each section highlights selected information about how to identify potential hazards associated with categories of products. Each section also includes recommendaitons of ways to…

  4. Teamwork, communication and safety climate: a systematic review of interventions to improve surgical culture.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Greg D; Shannon, Evan M; Dawes, Aaron J; Rollo, Johnathon C; Nguyen, David K; Russell, Marcia M; Ko, Clifford Y; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda A

    2015-07-01

    To define the target domains of culture-improvement interventions, to assess the impact of these interventions on surgical culture and to determine whether culture improvements lead to better patient outcomes and improved healthcare efficiency. Healthcare systems are investing considerable resources in improving workplace culture. It remains unclear whether these interventions, when aimed at surgical care, are successful and whether they are associated with changes in patient outcomes. PubMed, Cochrane, Web of Science and Scopus databases were searched from January 1980 to January 2015. We included studies on interventions that aimed to improve surgical culture, defined as the interpersonal, social and organisational factors that affect the healthcare environment and patient care. The quality of studies was assessed using an adapted tool to focus the review on higher-quality studies. Due to study heterogeneity, findings were narratively reviewed. The 47 studies meeting inclusion criteria (4 randomised trials and 10 moderate-quality observational studies) reported on interventions that targeted three domains of culture: teamwork (n=28), communication (n=26) and safety climate (n=19); several targeted more than one domain. All moderate-quality studies showed improvements in at least one of these domains. Two studies also demonstrated improvements in patient outcomes, such as reduced postoperative complications and even reduced postoperative mortality (absolute risk reduction 1.7%). Two studies reported improvements in healthcare efficiency, including fewer operating room delays. These findings were supported by similar results from low-quality studies. The literature provides promising evidence for various strategies to improve surgical culture, although these approaches differ in terms of the interventions employed as well as the techniques used to measure culture. Nevertheless, culture improvement appears to be associated with other positive effects, including

  5. [The healthcare professional's perceptions on the implementation and usefulness of the surgical safety checklist].

    PubMed

    Rodrigo-Rincón, M I; Tirapu-León, B; Zabalza-López, P; Martín-Vizcaino, M P; de La Fuente-Calixto, A; Villalgordo-Ortín, P; Domench-Mañero, L; Gost-Garde, J

    2011-01-01

    To find out the perception of the health care professionals on the level of implementation and the usefulness of the surgical safety checklist (LVQ) after its introduction in a tertiary care hospital. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using a specially designed self-completion questionnaire. This consisted of 5 questions on the usefulness, 5 questions on the use of the LVQ, one open question and 4 control questions. The target population was hospital surgeons, anaesthetists, ward nurses, and surgical nurses. The response rate was 73%, ranking from 51% to 88% depending on the respondent profile. Almost all (95.7%) of the respondents declared they always or almost always used the LVQ when performing a surgical operation. The health care professionals rated the usefulness of the LVQ with a mean of 6.6 (scale, 1-10); 11.6% mentioned that actual errors had been avoided through the use of the LVQ; 32.5% considered the LVQ as a tool that improves communication between professionals; and 68% of the respondents declared they would like the LVQ to be used if they were surgical patients. Those respondents who answered that the LVQ had prevented errors gave higher usefulness scores, 1.4 above the mean. In this same group, 100% of the respondents would like the LVQ to be used on themselves and 63.2% considered that communication had improved. There were no differences in usefulness scores as regards professional experience or gender. The health care professionals use the LVQ very frequently, and consider that it has a moderate usefulness. Those professionals with experience of the LVQ preventing errors considered it to be more useful than those who did not experience an error being prevented. Copyright © 2011 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of a "Lean" intervention to improve safety processes and outcomes on a surgical emergency unit.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Peter; Kreckler, Simon; New, Steve; Sheena, Yezen; Handa, Ashok; Catchpole, Ken

    2010-11-02

    Emergency surgical patients are at high risk for harm because of errors in care. Quality improvement methods that involve process redesign, such as “Lean,” appear to improve service reliability and efficiency in healthcare. Interrupted time series. The emergency general surgery ward of a university hospital in the United Kingdom. Seven safety relevant care processes. A Lean intervention targeting five of the seven care processes relevant to patient safety. 969 patients were admitted during the four month study period before the introduction of the Lean intervention (May to August 2007), and 1114 were admitted during the four month period after completion of the intervention (May to August 2008). Compliance with the five process measures targeted for Lean intervention (but not the two that were not) improved significantly (relative improvement 28% to 149%; P<0.007). Excellent compliance continued at least 10 months after active intervention ceased. The proportion of patients requiring transfer to other wards fell from 27% to 20% (P<0.000025). Rates of adverse events and potential adverse events were unchanged, except for a significant reduction in new safety events after transfer to other wards (P<0.028). Most adverse events and potential adverse events were owing to delays in investigation and treatment caused by factors outside the ward being evaluated. Lean can substantially and simultaneously improve compliance with a bundle of safety related processes. Given the interconnected nature of hospital care, this strategy might not translate into improvements in safety outcomes unless a system-wide approach is adopted to remove barriers to change.

  7. Characterization strategy report for the organic safety issues

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, S.C.; Campbell, J.A.; Fryxell, G.E.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes a logical approach to resolving potential safety issues resulting from the presence of organic components in hanford tank wastes. The approach uses a structured logic diagram (SLD) to provide a pathway for quantifying organic safety issue risk. The scope of the report is limited to selected organics (i.e., solvents and complexants) that were added to the tanks and their degradation products. The greatest concern is the potential exothermic reactions that can occur between these components and oxidants, such as sodium nitrate, that are present in the waste tanks. The organic safety issue is described in a conceptual model that depicts key modes of failure-event reaction processes in tank systems and phase domains (domains are regions of the tank that have similar contents) that are depicted with the SLD. Applying this approach to quantify risk requires knowing the composition and distribution of the organic and inorganic components to determine (1) how much energy the waste would release in the various domains, (2) the toxicity of the region associated with a disruptive event, and (3) the probability of an initiating reaction. Five different characterization options are described, each providing a different level of quality in calculating the risks involved with organic safety issues. Recommendations include processing existing data through the SLD to estimate risk, developing models needed to link more complex characterization information for the purpose of estimating risk, and examining correlations between the characterization approaches for optimizing information quality while minimizing cost in estimating risk.

  8. Health and safety in organic farming: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Soto Mas, Francisco; Handal, Alexis J; Rohrer, Rose E; Tomalá Viteri, Eric

    2017-09-22

    To explore health and safety issues in organic farming, specifically among small farmers in central New Mexico. Participants included 10 certified organic producers and 20 workers. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and observations. The sample consisted of a young, educated, low experienced population which may differ from conventional farmers. Both producers and workers seemed to be aware of the health risks involved with small-scale farming. Producers presented mixed attitudes towards health and safety, while workers' attitudes were more systematically negative. Perception of risk was generally lower among workers compared to producers. Although health and safety training was not specifically mentioned, most participants seemed to understand the relevance of the work environment for health and safety. Regarding ergonomics, the physical demands of working long hours and having to perform a multitude of tasks that contribute to physical stress were issues of concern. This is one of few studies in the United States exploring health and safety among organic farmers. Although participants reported very few actual incidents, the study identified relevant intrapersonal and behavioral factors that may increase or reduce the risk for disease and injury. Results also point to the need for research that focuses on the psychosocial and contextual factors that may contribute to injury and disease among organic farmers.

  9. A Targeted E-Learning Program for Surgical Trainees to Enhance Patient Safety in Preventing Surgical Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHugh, Seamus Mark; Corrigan, Mark; Dimitrov, Borislav; Cowman, Seamus; Tierney, Sean; Humphreys, Hilary; Hill, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infection accounts for 20% of all health care-associated infections (HCAIs); however, a program incorporating the education of surgeons has yet to be established across the specialty. Methods: An audit of surgical practice in infection prevention was carried out in Beaumont Hospital from July to November 2009. An…

  10. A Targeted E-Learning Program for Surgical Trainees to Enhance Patient Safety in Preventing Surgical Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHugh, Seamus Mark; Corrigan, Mark; Dimitrov, Borislav; Cowman, Seamus; Tierney, Sean; Humphreys, Hilary; Hill, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infection accounts for 20% of all health care-associated infections (HCAIs); however, a program incorporating the education of surgeons has yet to be established across the specialty. Methods: An audit of surgical practice in infection prevention was carried out in Beaumont Hospital from July to November 2009. An…

  11. [The organization of surgical care in Russian army during 1812 Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Gliantsev, S P

    2012-01-01

    The article considers the characteristics of surgical care to warriors of Russian army during 1812 Great Patriotic War. Such conditions are analyzed as damaging action of French weapons, types of combat wounds, organization and forces of military sanitary service of Russian troops, surgeons' support with means of supplying surgical care to the wounded and arsenal of surgical aids. On the basis of given materials analysis a preliminary conclusion is made that surgical care in Russian army in 1812 not only was on the sufficiently high level but it played a specified role in the victory of Russian weapon.

  12. A preliminary study of patients' perceptions on the implementation of the WHO surgical safety checklist in women who had Cesarean sections.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Takashi; Tani, Megumi; Taniwaki, Miki; Ogata, Kimiyo; Yokoyama, Masataka

    2015-06-01

    The surgical safety checklist (SSCL), developed by the World Health Organization, is widely implemented by surgical staff for the improvement of their communication, teamwork, and safety culture in the operating room. However, there is no research available addressing the question of how surgical patients perceive the implementation of the SSCL. In order to address this issue, a questionnaire-based preliminary study was conducted for patients who had undergone elective Cesarean section under awake regional anesthesia. Although most participants had not been informed about the implementation of the SSCL before surgery, all of the patients were aware that the SSCL had been performed in the operating room. Over 80% of patients answered that the implementation of the SSCL could help to reduce their feelings of anxiety, tension, and fear, as well as enhance their feeling of security. Furthermore, most patients answered that they were able to understand the components as well as the purpose of the SSCL, and considered that the SSCL should be implemented. These results suggest that awake patients undergoing Cesarean section perceive the implementation of the SSCL to be a highly positive aspect of their surgical care.

  13. Allergic reaction to a red plastic allergy alert patient identification bracelet: implications for surgical patient safety.

    PubMed

    Colbert, Serryth; Williams, John V; Mackenzie, Neil; Brennan, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of allergy to a hospital thermally-printed red plastic allergy alert bracelet in a 48 year old lady admitted to the day surgery unit. Two hours postoperatively, an intensely itchy area of erythema and oedema was seen extending from her left wrist distally to the fingers. The bracelet was removed and the rash resolved overnight without further complication. A diagnosis of contact dermatitis was made, secondary to exposure to an agent within the bracelet. We discuss the safety implications for surgical patients unable to wear an identification bracelet and the steps that may be taken to minimise the risk of harm from misidentification. We believe this to be the first documented case of an allergy to a patient identification bracelet in the medical literature.

  14. Safety in Numbers: Progressive Implementation of a Robotics Program in an Academic Surgical Oncology Practice.

    PubMed

    King, Jonathan C; Zeh, Herbert J; Zureikat, Amer H; Celebrezze, James; Holtzman, Matthew P; Stang, Michael L; Tsung, Allan; Bartlett, David L; Hogg, Melissa E

    2016-08-01

    Background Robotic-assisted surgery has potential benefits over laparoscopy yet little has been published on the integration of this platform into complex surgical oncology. We describe the outcomes associated with integration of robotics into a large surgical oncology program, focusing on metrics of safety and efficiency. Methods A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database of robotic procedures from July 2009 to October 2014 identifying trends in volume, operative time, complications, conversion to open, and 90-day mortality. Results Fourteen surgeons performed 1236 cases during the study period: thyroid (246), pancreas/duodenum (458), liver (157), stomach (56), colorectal (129), adrenal (38), cholecystectomy (102), and other (48). There were 38 conversions to open (3.1%), 230 complications (18.6%), and 13 mortalities (1.1%). From 2009 to 2014, operative volume increased (7 cases/month vs 24 cases/month; P < .001) and procedure time decreased (471 ± 166 vs 211 ± 140 minutes; P < .001) with statistically significant decreases for all years except 2014 when volume and time plateaued. Conversion to open decreased (12.1% vs 1.7%; P = .009) and complications decreased (48.5% vs 12.3%; P < .001) despite increasing complexity of cases performed. There were 13 deaths within 90 days (5/13 30-day mortality) and 2 (15.4%) were from palliative surgeries. Conclusions Implementation of a diverse robotic surgical oncology program utilizing multiple surgeons is safe and feasible. As operative volume increased, operative time, complications, and conversions to open decreased and plateaued at approximately 3 years. No unanticipated adverse events attributable to the introduction of this platform were observed.

  15. Surgically implanted and non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation: a review of efficacy, safety and tolerability.

    PubMed

    Ben-Menachem, E; Revesz, D; Simon, B J; Silberstein, S

    2015-09-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is effective in refractory epilepsy and depression and is being investigated in heart failure, headache, gastric motility disorders and asthma. The first VNS device required surgical implantation of electrodes and a stimulator. Adverse events (AEs) are generally associated with implantation or continuous on-off stimulation. Infection is the most serious implantation-associated AE. Bradycardia and asystole have also been described during implantation, as has vocal cord paresis, which can last up to 6 months and depends on surgical skill and experience. The most frequent stimulation-associated AEs include voice alteration, paresthesia, cough, headache, dyspnea, pharyngitis and pain, which may require a decrease in stimulation strength or intermittent or permanent device deactivation. Newer non-invasive VNS delivery systems do not require surgery and permit patient-administered stimulation on demand. These non-invasive VNS systems improve the safety and tolerability of VNS, making it more accessible and facilitating further investigations across a wider range of uses. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Neurology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Academy of Neurology.

  16. The future of patient safety: Surgical trainees accept virtual reality as a new training tool

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Rachel; Gantert, Walter A; Hamel, Christian; Metzger, Jürg; Kocher, Thomas; Vogelbach, Peter; Demartines, Nicolas; Hahnloser, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Background The use of virtual reality (VR) has gained increasing interest to acquire laparoscopic skills outside the operating theatre and thus increasing patients' safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate trainees' acceptance of VR for assessment and training during a skills course and at their institution. Methods All 735 surgical trainees of the International Gastrointestinal Surgery Workshop 2006–2008, held in Davos, Switzerland, were given a minimum of 45 minutes for VR training during the course. Participants' opinion on VR was analyzed with a standardized questionnaire. Results Fivehundred-twenty-seven participants (72%) from 28 countries attended the VR sessions and answered the questionnaires. The possibility of using VR at the course was estimated as excellent or good in 68%, useful in 21%, reasonable in 9% and unsuitable or useless in 2%. If such VR simulators were available at their institution, most course participants would train at least one hour per week (46%), two or more hours (42%) and only 12% wouldn't use VR. Similarly, 63% of the participants would accept to operate on patients only after VR training and 55% to have VR as part of their assessment. Conclusion Residents accept and appreciate VR simulation for surgical assessment and training. The majority of the trainees are motivated to regularly spend time for VR training if accessible. PMID:18544173

  17. The future of patient safety: Surgical trainees accept virtual reality as a new training tool.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Rachel; Gantert, Walter A; Hamel, Christian; Metzger, Jürg; Kocher, Thomas; Vogelbach, Peter; Demartines, Nicolas; Hahnloser, Dieter

    2008-06-11

    The use of virtual reality (VR) has gained increasing interest to acquire laparoscopic skills outside the operating theatre and thus increasing patients' safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate trainees' acceptance of VR for assessment and training during a skills course and at their institution. All 735 surgical trainees of the International Gastrointestinal Surgery Workshop 2006-2008, held in Davos, Switzerland, were given a minimum of 45 minutes for VR training during the course. Participants' opinion on VR was analyzed with a standardized questionnaire. Fivehundred-twenty-seven participants (72%) from 28 countries attended the VR sessions and answered the questionnaires. The possibility of using VR at the course was estimated as excellent or good in 68%, useful in 21%, reasonable in 9% and unsuitable or useless in 2%. If such VR simulators were available at their institution, most course participants would train at least one hour per week (46%), two or more hours (42%) and only 12% wouldn't use VR. Similarly, 63% of the participants would accept to operate on patients only after VR training and 55% to have VR as part of their assessment. Residents accept and appreciate VR simulation for surgical assessment and training. The majority of the trainees are motivated to regularly spend time for VR training if accessible.

  18. Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization qualification program. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

    1997-05-19

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Organization (NCSO) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of highly qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This document defines the Qualification Program to address the NCSO technical and managerial qualification as required by the Y-12 Training Implementation Matrix (TIM). It is implemented through a combination of LMES plant-wide training courses and professional nuclear criticality safety training provided within the organization. This Qualification Program is applicable to technical and managerial NCSO personnel, including temporary personnel, sub-contractors and/or LMES employees on loan to the NCSO, who perform the NCS tasks or serve NCS-related positions as defined in sections 5 and 6 of this program.

  19. Cost-Effectiveness of a Locally Organized Surgical Outreach Mission: Making a Case for Strengthening Local Non-Governmental Organizations.

    PubMed

    Gyedu, Adam; Gaskill, Cameron; Boakye, Godfred; Abantanga, Francis

    2017-07-24

    Many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have a high prevalence of unmet surgical need. Provision of operations through surgical outreach missions, mostly led by foreign organizations, offers a way to address the problem. We sought to assess the cost-effectiveness of surgical outreach missions provided by a wholly local organization in Ghana to highlight the role local groups might play in reducing the unmet surgical need of their communities. We calculated the disability-adjusted life years (DALY) averted by surgical outreach mission activities of ApriDec Medical Outreach Group (AMOG), a Ghanaian non-governmental organization. The total cost of their activities was also calculated. Conclusions about cost-effectiveness were made according to World Health Organization (WHO)-suggested parameters. We analyzed 2008 patients who had been operated upon by AMOG since December 2011. Operations performed included hernia repairs (824 patients, 41%) and excision biopsy of soft tissue masses (364 patients, 18%). More specialized operations included thyroidectomy (103 patients, 5.1%), urological procedures (including prostatectomy) (71 patients, 3.5%), and plastic surgery (26 patients, 1.3%). Total cost of the outreach trips was $283,762, and 2079 DALY were averted; cost per DALY averted was 136.49 USD. The mission trips were "very cost-effective" per WHO parameters. There was a trend toward a lower cost per DALY averted with subsequent outreach trips organized by AMOG. Our findings suggest that providing surgical services through wholly local surgical mission trips to underserved LMIC communities might represent a cost-effective and viable option for countries seeking to reduce the growing unmet surgical needs of their populations.

  20. Clinical and surgical factors associated with organ/space surgical site infection after laparoscopic gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Komatsu, Shuhei; Kubota, Takeshi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Konishi, Hirotaka; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Otsuji, Eigo

    2017-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI), particularly organ/space SSI, remains a clinically important issue even after laparoscopic gastrectomy (LG) for gastric cancer (GC). This study aimed to identify specific clinical and surgical factors associated with organ/space SSI after LG. This was a retrospective study of 407 patients who underwent LG for clinical stage I GC. SSI was defined according to the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System. The incidence and treatment outcomes of either incisional or organ/space SSI after LG were examined, and the risk factors for each type of SSI were identified using univariate and multivariate analyses. Organ/space SSI was observed in 21 patients (5.2 %), while incisional SSI was detected in 18 patients (4.4 %). Although no mortality was observed, the occurrence of either incisional or organ/space SSI significantly prolonged postoperative hospital stays (p = 0.000 and 0.000, respectively); however, organ/space SSI required more re-operations and re-admissions, and eventually longer total hospital stays than incisional SSI (p = 0.036). Intra-abdominal abscess around the pancreas was the main cause of organ/space SSI, while no anastomotic leakage was observed. Multivariate analyses identified male gender (odds ratio (OR) 3.385; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.073-15.07, p = 0.037), chronic liver disease (OR 8.897; 95 % CI 2.502-28.99, p = 0.001), and total gastrectomy (TG) (OR 3.817; 95 % CI 1.380-10.24, p = 0.011) as independent risk factors for organ/space SSI, while TG (OR 3.130; 95 % CI 1.102-8.768, p = 0.033) and operation time ≥320 min (OR 3.732; 95 % CI 1.109-16.98, p = 0.033) were independently associated with incisional SSI. Male gender, chronic liver disease, and TG are independent risk factors for organ/space SSI after LG for GC; thus, meticulous surgical procedures need to be performed among patients with these specific risk factors.

  1. 76 FR 7855 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Community Medical Foundation for Patient...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary... Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Delisting. SUMMARY: Community Medical Foundation for Patient Safety... Patient Safety, of its status as a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). The Patient Safety and Quality...

  2. Improving patient safety in cardiothoracic surgery: an audit of surgical handover in a tertiary center.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Natasha Johan

    2016-01-01

    Novel research has revealed that the relative risk of death increased by 10% and 15% for admissions on a Saturday and Sunday, respectively. With an imminent threat of 7-day services in the National Health Service, including weekend operating lists, handover plays a pivotal role in ensuring patient safety is paramount. This audit evaluated the quality, efficiency, and safety of surgical handover of pre- and postoperative cardiothoracic patients in a tertiary center against guidance on Safe Handover published by the Royal College of Surgeons of England and the British Medical Association. A 16-item questionnaire prospectively audited the nature, time and duration of handover, patient details, operative history and current clinical status, interruptions during handover, and difficulties cross-covering specialties over a month. Just over half (52%) of the time, no handover took place. The majority of handovers (64%) occurred over the phone; two-thirds of these were uninterrupted. All handovers were less than 10 minutes in duration. About half of the time, the senior house officer had previously met the registrar involved in the handover, but the overwhelming majority felt it would facilitate the handover process if they had prior contact. Patient details handed over 100% of the time included name, ward, and current clinical diagnosis. A third of the time, the patient's age, responsible consultant, and recent operations or procedures were not handed over, potentially compromising future management due to delays and lack of relevant information. Perhaps the most revealing result was that the overall safety of handover was perceived to be five out of ten, with ten being very safe with no aspects felt to impact negatively on optimal patient care. These findings were presented to the department, and a handover proforma was implemented. Recommendations included the need for a new face-to-face handover. A reaudit will evaluate the effects of these changes.

  3. Organizing patient safety research to identify risks and hazards

    PubMed Central

    Battles, J; Lilford, R

    2003-01-01

    Patient safety has become an international priority with major research programmes being carried out in the USA, UK, and elsewhere. The challenge is how to organize research efforts that will produce the greatest yield in making health care safer for patients. Patient safety research initiatives can be considered in three different stages: (1) identification of the risks and hazards; (2) design, implementation, and evaluation of patient safety practices; and (3) maintaining vigilance to ensure that a safe environment continues and patient safety cultures remain in place. Clearly, different research methods and approaches are needed at each of the different stages of the continuum. A number of research approaches can be used at stage 1 to identify risks and hazards including the use of medical records and administrative record review, event reporting, direct observation, process mapping, focus groups, probabilistic risk assessment, and safety culture assessment. No single method can be universally applied to identify risks and hazards in patient safety. Rather, multiple approaches using combinations of these methods should be used to increase identification of risks and hazards of health care associated injury or harm to patients. PMID:14645888

  4. Project plan for resolution of the organic waste tank safety issues at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Meacham, J.E.

    1996-10-03

    A multi-year project plan for the Organic Safety Project has been developed with the objective of resolving the organic safety issues associated with the High Level Waste (HLW) in Hanford`s single-shell tanks (SSTS) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). The objective of the Organic Safety Project is to ensure safe interim storage until retrieval for pretreatment and disposal operations begins, and to resolve the organic safety issues by September 2001. Since the initial identification of organics as a tank waste safety issue, progress has been made in understanding the specific aspects of organic waste combustibility, and in developing and implementing activities to resolve the organic safety issues.

  5. Preventable Errors in Organ Transplantation: An Emerging Patient Safety Issue?

    PubMed Central

    Ison, Michael G.; Holl, Jane L.; Ladner, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Several widely publicized errors in transplantation including a death due ABO incompatibility, two HIV transmissions and two HCV transmissions have raised concerns about medical errors in organ transplantation. The root cause analysis of each of these events revealed preventable failures in the systems and processes of care as the underlying causes. In each event, no standardized system or redundant process was in place to mitigate the failures that led to the error. Additional system and process vulnerabilities such as poor clinician communication, erroneous data transcription and transmission were also identified. Organ transplantation, because it is highly complex, often stresses the systems and processes of care and, therefore, offers a unique opportunity to proactively identify vulnerabilities and potential failures. Initial steps have been taken to understand such issues through the OPTN/UNOS Operations and Safety Committee, the Disease Transmission Advisory Committee (DTAC), and the current A2ALL ancillary Safety Study. However, to effectively improve patient safety in organ transplantation, the development of a process for reporting of preventable errors that affords protection and the support of empiric research are critical. Further, the transplant community needs to embrace the implementation of evidence-based system and process improvements that will mitigate existing safety vulnerabilities. PMID:22703471

  6. Transportation of Organs by Air: Safety, Quality, and Sustainability Criteria.

    PubMed

    Mantecchini, L; Paganelli, F; Morabito, V; Ricci, A; Peritore, D; Trapani, S; Montemurro, A; Rizzo, A; Del Sordo, E; Gaeta, A; Rizzato, L; Nanni Costa, A

    2016-03-01

    The outcomes of organ transplantation activities are greatly affected by the ability to haul organs and medical teams quickly and safely. Organ allocation and usage criteria have greatly improved over time, whereas the same result has not been achieved so far from the transport point of view. Safety and the highest level of service and efficiency must be reached to grant transplant recipients the healthiest outcome. The Italian National Transplant Centre (CNT), in partnership with the regions and the University of Bologna, has promoted a thorough analysis of all stages of organ transportation logistics chains to produce homogeneous and shared guidelines throughout the national territory, capable of ensuring safety, reliability, and sustainability at the highest levels. The mapping of all 44 transplant centers and the pertaining airport network has been implemented. An analysis of technical requirements among organ shipping agents at both national and international level has been promoted. A national campaign of real-time monitoring of organ transport activities at all stages of the supply chain has been implemented. Parameters investigated have been hospital and region of both origin and destination, number and type of organs involved, transport type (with or without medical team), stations of arrival and departure, and shipping agents, as well as actual times of activities involved. National guidelines have been issued to select organ storage units and shipping agents on the basis of evaluation of efficiency, reliability, and equipment with reference to organ type and ischemia time. Guidelines provide EU-level standards on technical equipment of aircrafts, professional requirements of shipping agencies and cabin crew, and requirements on service provision, including pricing criteria. The introduction in the Italian legislation of guidelines issuing minimum requirements on topics such as the medical team, packaging, labeling, safety and integrity, identification

  7. [Genetically modified organisms: a new threat to food safety].

    PubMed

    Spendeler, Liliane

    2005-01-01

    This article analyzes all of the food safety-related aspects related to the use of genetically modified organisms into agriculture and food. A discussion is provided as to the uncertainties related to the insertion of foreign genes into organisms, providing examples of unforeseen, undesirable effects and of instabilities of the organisms thus artificially fabricated. Data is then provided from both official agencies as well as existing literature questioning the accuracy and reliability of the risk analyses as to these organisms being harmless to health and discusses the almost total lack of scientific studies analyzing the health safety/dangerousness of transgenic foods. Given all these unknowns, other factors must be taken into account, particularly genetic contamination of the non-genetically modified crops, which is now starting to become widespread in some parts of the world. Not being able of reversing the situation in the even of problems is irresponsible. Other major aspects are the impacts on the environment (such as insects building up resistances, the loss of biodiversity, the increase in chemical products employed) with indirect repercussions on health and/or future food production. Lastly, thoughts for discussion are added concerning food safety in terms of food availability and food sovereignty, given that the transgenic seed and related agrochemicals market is currently cornered by five large-scale transnational companies. The conclusion entails an analysis of biotechnological agriculture's contribution to sustainability.

  8. Surgical management of pelvic organ prolapse in a woman with achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Frankman, Elizabeth A; Guido, Richard; Zyczynski, Halina M

    2010-08-01

    Achondroplasia is an autosomal-dominant disorder resulting in short-limbed dwarfism. Limited data exist regarding the management of pelvic organ prolapse in women with achondroplasia. A young nulligravid woman with stage IV uterovaginal prolapse desired surgical correction of her prolapse with uterine preservation. The severity of her prolapse, profound cervical elongation, and distortion of the bony pelvis presented surgical challenges. She underwent abdominal lumbohysteropexy with polypropylene mesh. At 1 year postoperative, she has marked improvement in symptoms and objective findings. Abdominal lumbohysteropexy appears to be an effective surgical approach in women with achondroplasia desiring uterine preservation.

  9. Patient safety in surgical environments: Cross-countries comparison of psychometric properties and results of the Norwegian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background How hospital health care personnel perceive safety climate has been assessed in several countries by using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety (HSOPS). Few studies have examined safety climate factors in surgical departments per se. This study examined the psychometric properties of a Norwegian translation of the HSOPS and also compared safety climate factors from a surgical setting to hospitals in the United States, the Netherlands and Norway. Methods This survey included 575 surgical personnel in Haukeland University Hospital in Bergen, an 1100-bed tertiary hospital in western Norway: surgeons, operating theatre nurses, anaesthesiologists, nurse anaesthetists and ancillary personnel. Of these, 358 returned the HSOPS, resulting in a 62% response rate. We used factor analysis to examine the applicability of the HSOPS factor structure in operating theatre settings. We also performed psychometric analysis for internal consistency and construct validity. In addition, we compared the percent of average positive responds of the patient safety climate factors with results of the US HSOPS 2010 comparative data base report. Results The professions differed in their perception of patient safety climate, with anaesthesia personnel having the highest mean scores. Factor analysis using the original 12-factor model of the HSOPS resulted in low reliability scores (r = 0.6) for two factors: "adequate staffing" and "organizational learning and continuous improvement". For the remaining factors, reliability was ≥ 0.7. Reliability scores improved to r = 0.8 by combining the factors "organizational learning and continuous improvement" and "feedback and communication about error" into one six-item factor, supporting an 11-factor model. The inter-item correlations were found satisfactory. Conclusions The psychometric properties of the questionnaire need further investigations to be regarded as reliable in surgical environments. The operating theatre personnel perceived

  10. Surgical considerations and safety of cochlear implantation in otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Cevizci, Rasit; Dilci, Alper; Celenk, Fatih; Karamert, Recep; Bayazit, Yildirim

    2017-07-26

    To evaluate the effects of otitis media with effusion on surgical parameters, patient safety, perioperative and postoperative complications. Total 890 children who underwent cochlear implantation between 2006 and 2015 were included. The ages ranged from 12 months to 63 months (mean: 32 months). The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of otitis media with effusion; otitis media with effusion group and non-otitis media group. Of 890 children, 105 had otitis media with effusion prior to surgery. In non-otitis media with group, there were 785 children. The average duration of surgery was 60min (ranged from 28 to 75min) in non-otitis media group, and 90min (ranged from 50 to 135min) in otitis media with effusion group (p<0.05). Granulation tissue and edematous middle ear and mastoid mucosa were observed in all cases of otitis media with effusion during the surgery. There was no significant difference between the complications of groups with or without otitis media with effusion (p>0.05). In 5 of 105 patients, there was a ventilation tube inserted before cochlear implantation, which did not change the outcome of implantation. There is no need for surgical treatment for otitis media with effusion before implantation since otitis media with effusion does not increase the risks associated with cochlear implantation. Operation duration is longer in the presence of otitis media with effusion. However, otitis media with effusion leads to intraoperative difficulties like longer operation duration, bleeding, visualization of the round window membrane, cleansing the middle ear granulations as well as mastoid and petrous air cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Surgical management of pelvic organ prolapse and uterine descent in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Detollenaere, R J; den Boon, J; Kluivers, K B; Vierhout, M E; van Eijndhoven, H W F

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate current practice in the surgical treatment of uterine descent among members of the Dutch Urogynecological Society and to analyze possible trends in the surgical treatment of pelvic organ prolapse in the Netherlands during the last decade. A questionnaire, including case scenarios, was sent to the members of the Dutch Urogynecological Society. Using a nationwide registry from the Netherlands, we assessed the number and type of surgical procedures performed for pelvic organ prolapse between 1997 and 2009. The response rate was 73%, with 161 questionnaires completed. Vaginal hysterectomy, sacrospinous hysteropexy, and the Manchester Fothergill procedure were the most frequently performed surgical interventions for uterine descent. In the case of lower stage uterine descent, uterus preservation was preferred, but in the case of higher stage there was wide variation. Two thirds of the respondents stated that in recent years they tended to save the uterus more often. The registered number of hospital admissions for uterine descent increased by 30% between 1997 and 2009 and the number of surgical procedures almost doubled. The number of vaginal hysterectomies performed because of uterine descent increased by only 15% in this period. In the Netherlands, surgical policy in the case of uterine descent is very variable, with no clear preference for either hysterectomy or uterus preservation. There was a high increase in hospital admissions and pelvic organ prolapse procedures in the last decade. The number of vaginal hysterectomies performed because of uterine descent did not follow this change, which reflects a trend toward preserving the uterus.

  12. Can patient safety indicators monitor medical and surgical care at New Zealand public hospitals?

    PubMed

    Hider, Phil; Parker, Karl; von Randow, Martin; Milne, Barry; Lay-Yee, Roy; Davis, Peter

    2014-11-07

    Increasing interest has focused on the safety of hospital care. The AusPSIs are a set of indicators developed from Australian administrative data to reliably identify inpatient adverse events in hospitals. The main aim of this study was to explore the application of the AHRQ/AusPSIs to New Zealand administrative hospital data related to medical and surgical care. Variation over time and across hospitals were also considered for a subset of the more common indicators. AHRQ/AusPSIs were adapted for use with New Zealand National Minimum Dataset administrative data for the period 2001-9. Crude positive event rates for each of the 16 indicators were assessed across New Zealand public hospitals. Variation over time for six more common indicators is presented using statistical control charts. Variation between hospitals was explored using rates adjusted for differences in patient variables including age, sex, ethnicity, rurality of residence, NZDep score and comorbidities. The AHRQ/AusPSIs were applied to New Zealand administrative hospital data and some 99,366 admissions were associated with a positive indicator event. However rates for some indicators were low (<1% of denominator admissions). Over the study period considerable variation in the rate of positive events was evident for the six most common indicators. Likewise there was substantial variation between hospitals in relation to risk adjusted positive event rates Patient safety indicators can be applied to New Zealand administrative hospital data. While infrequent rates hinder the use of some of the indicators, several could now be readily employed as warning flags to help monitor rates of adverse events at particular hospitals. In conjunction with other established or emerging tools, such as audit and trigger tools, the PSIs are now available to promote ongoing quality improvement activities in New Zealand hospitals.

  13. The mission of safety net organizations following national insurance reform.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mark A

    2011-07-01

    National health insurance reform will pose considerable challenges to the core missions of safety net organizations that serve the uninsured. Those who currently donate money or time will, rightly or wrongly, view uninsured recipients as less deserving on the whole. Nevertheless, safety net organizations can serve several critical functions that continue to justify their existence and support.One important mission is to maintain access for low-income uninsured until all elements of insurance reform are fully in place. Second, once the reform is implemented, people will need a great deal of assistance and encouragement to determine what they are supposed to do and where they are supposed to sign up. Third, substantial portions of the remaining uninsured will continue to lack affordable insurance options, and large numbers of people eligible for coverage will unavoidably undergo temporary gaps in coverage as their family and financial circumstances change. Finally, not all people with insurance will have affordable access to all needed care. Market conditions will continue pushing higher levels of patient cost-sharing through deductibles and co-payments.To serve these multiple needs, safety net organizations should consider adapting their missions and business models so that they accept both insured and uninsured patients under a sliding fee scale that varies charges according to ability to pay.

  14. Comparative study of the clinical effect and safety of anterior surgical approach and posterior surgical approach in the treatment of thoracolumbar spinal fracture

    PubMed Central

    Dengfeng, Zhang; Haojie, Wu; Xiao, Wang

    2015-01-01

    The clinical effect and safety of the anterior surgical approach and posterior surgical approach in the treatment of thoracolumbar spinal fracture was compared. Retrospective analyses of clinical data for 91 patients observed from March 2010 to September 2014 were made. The pre-operation and post-operation comparisons between two sets of Cobb’s angle, affected vertebra height, Frankel’s classification of spinal nerves, motion functions, and tactile functions showed statistically significant differences (P<0.05). After having the operation, the Cobb’s angle and affected vertebra height of the patient in the anterior approach group were both significantly higher than that of patients in the posterior approach group (P<0.05). The bone graft fusion rate of the patients in the anterior approach group 3 months after operation was higher than that of patients in the control group while the status of complications was worse than that of patients in the posterior approach group, both with a remarkable difference (P<0.05). Both the anterior surgical approach and posterior surgical approach have good clinical outcome for spinal fractures but they all have their respective adaption diseases. The key in the treatment of thoracolumbar spinal fractures lies in choosing proper operative approach. PMID:28352728

  15. Safety of Edhazardia aedis (Microspora: Amblyosporidae) for nontarget aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Becnel, J J

    1992-09-01

    The susceptibility of common nontarget aquatic organisms to the microsporidium Edhazardia aedis was investigated in the laboratory. Eight predacious species along with 9 scavengers and filter feeders were tested. The nontarget organisms were not susceptible to infection by E. aedis and there was no appreciable mortality. To measure the relative safety of E. aedis to nontarget organisms, a simple mathematical expression was employed where risk is defined as the product of the probability of exposure and the result of exposure (infection) expressed as P(e)P(i). In these laboratory tests, the probability of exposure was fixed at 1 (maximum challenge) and the probability of infection was determined to be 0. Therefore, the risk associated with release of E. aedis into the environment is considered to be negligible under these conditions. The true risk for nontarget organisms to E. aedis can only be determined by careful evaluation of controlled field studies in the natural habitat of the target host.

  16. Safety and efficacy of continuous morphine infusions following pediatric cranial surgery in a surgical ward setting.

    PubMed

    Warren, Daniel T; Bowen-Roberts, Tim; Ou, Christine; Purdy, Robert; Steinbok, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Morphine is avoided by many neurosurgeons following cranial surgery. There exists a concern regarding the potential complications and a perception that cranial surgery is less painful than other surgical procedures. At British Columbia Children's Hospital continuous morphine infusions (CMI) have been used to control pain in pediatric neurosurgical patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of continuous intravenous morphine infusion to standard oral analgesics in a neurosurgical ward setting. A retrospective review of medical records for 71 children was completed. The patients underwent either cranial reconstruction (2002-2007) or craniotomies for intradural pathology (2005-2007) at British Columbia Children's Hospital. Outcome measures included pain control and adverse events. Comparison was made between patients receiving a CMI and patients receiving acetaminophen and codeine. Thirty-seven children received CMI on the ward (30 cranial reconstruction and 7 craniotomy), while 34 (10 cranial reconstruction and 24 craniotomy) received acetaminophen and codeine. There was no statistical difference in pain control. There was significantly more nausea on post-operative day one in the CMI group (p = 0.002). There were no other significant adverse events. These findings suggest that CMI is comparable to acetaminophen and codeine with respect to analgesia and serious side effects. We recommend the use of CMIs as an alternative when pain is poorly controlled in post-operative pediatric neurosurgical patients to prevent the potential adverse consequences of inadequate analgesia.

  17. Safety and utility of a PMMA-based tissue adhesive for closure of surgical incision wounds.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryusuke; Kuroyanagi, Yoshimitsu

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the safety and utility of the polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based tissue adhesive (PMMA-ta) for wound closure. This product is composed of 4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride and methylmethacrylate as monomers, tri-n-butylborane as initiator, and PMMA powder as filler. These components are mixed at the time of use. This resulting paste hardens within several minutes. The safety of PMMA-ta was evaluated in an internal wound model using a cultured dermal substitute (CDS), i.e. a fibroblast-embedded collagen gel sheet. PMMA-ta was applied to one CDS, covered with a second CDS, and then cultured for 1 week (group II). A commercially available 2-octyl cyanoacrylate-based tissue adhesive (OCA) was used for comparative purposes (group I). No tissue adhesive was applied to the CDSs in the control group. Fibroblast viability was measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Cell viability in the group I was 36%, and cell viability in the group II was 84%, of that in the control group. These results indicate that PMMA-ta has lower cytotoxicity than OCA. Next, the usefulness of PMMA-ta as a tissue adhesive was evaluated in three different wound models using Sprague-Dawley rats: (1) a thin skin incision wound, (2) a thick skin incision wound, and (3) a full-thickness incision wound through the abdominal wall. The third experiment is the surgical incision model with the most severe condition. The comparative study using OCA was conducted only in the third experiment. Each wound healing process was evaluated macroscopically and histologically after 1 week, 2 weeks, and 3 months. An excellent macroscopic wound appearance was observed with both PMMA-ta and OCA, with only a slightly visible fine-line scar. Histologically, a typical primary healing was observed for both adhesives. Considering its safety and utility, PMMA-ta is therefore promising for use as a tissue adhesive in wound closure.

  18. 76 FR 7854 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Lumetra PSO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary... Organization (PSO). The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient Safety Act), Public Law 109... analyze confidential information regarding the quality and safety of health care delivery. The Patient...

  19. 77 FR 25179 - Patient Safety Organizations: Expired Listing for Medkinetics, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Expired Listing... as a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005... mission and primary activity is to conduct activities to improve patient safety and the quality of health...

  20. 76 FR 60494 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From HPI-PSO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary... Organization (PSO). The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient Safety Act), Public Law 109... analyze confidential information regarding the quality and safety of health care delivery. The Patient...

  1. 76 FR 7853 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From HealthDataPSO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary... status as a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005... collect, aggregate, and analyze confidential information regarding the quality and safety of health care...

  2. 78 FR 70560 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Morgridge Institute for Research PSO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Morgridge Institute for.... SUMMARY: The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient Safety Act), Public Law 109-41, 42 U.S.C. 299b-21-b-26, provides for the formation of Patient Safety Organizations (PSOs),...

  3. Changes in surgical team performance and safety climate attitudes following expansion of perioperative services: a repeated-measures study.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Brigid M; Harbeck, Emma; Kang, Evelyn; Steel, Catherine; Fairweather, Nicole; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2017-08-10

    Objective The aim of the present study was to describe process changes in surgical team performance and team members' attitudes to safety culture following hospital relocation and expansion of perioperative services.Methods The study was a naturalistic study using structured observations and surveys to assess non-technical skills (NTS; i.e. communication, teamwork, situational awareness, decision making and leadership) in surgery. This interrupted time series design used mixed-linear regression models to examine the effect of phase (before and after hospital relocation) on surgical teams' NTS and their processes that may affect performance. Differences in self-reported teamwork and safety climate attitudes were also examined.Results In all, 186 procedures (100 before and 81 after hospital relocation) were observed across teams working in general, paediatric, orthopaedic and thoracic surgeries. Interobserver agreement ranged from 86% to 95%. An effect of phase was found, indicating that there were significant improvements after relocation in the use of NTS by the teams observed (P=0.020; 95% confidence interval 1.9-4.7).Conclusions The improvements seen in surgical teams' NTS performance and safety culture attitudes may be related to the move to a new state-of-the-art perioperative department.What is known about the topic? Patient safety in surgery relies on optimal team performance, underpinned by effective NTS.What does this paper add? The NTS of surgical teams may be improved through ergonomic innovations that promote teams' shared mental models.What are the implications for practitioners? Effective multidisciplinary teamwork relies on a combination of NTS and ergonomic factors, which inherently contribute to team performance and safety climate attitudes.

  4. Organizing safety: conditions for successful information assurance programs.

    PubMed

    Collmann, Jeff; Coleman, Johnathan; Sostrom, Kristen; Wright, Willie

    2004-01-01

    Organizations must continuously seek safety. When considering computerized health information systems, "safety" includes protecting the integrity, confidentiality, and availability of information assets such as patient information, key components of the technical information system, and critical personnel. "High Reliability Theory" (HRT) argues that organizations with strong leadership support, continuous training, redundant safety mechanisms, and "cultures of high reliability" can deploy and safely manage complex, risky technologies such as nuclear weapons systems or computerized health information systems. In preparation for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996, the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs), the Offices of the Surgeons General of the United States Army, Navy and Air Force, and the Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC), US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command sponsored organizational, doctrinal, and technical projects that individually and collectively promote conditions for a "culture of information assurance." These efforts include sponsoring the "P3 Working Group" (P3WG), an interdisciplinary, tri-service taskforce that reviewed all relevant Department of Defense (DoD), Miliary Health System (MHS), Army, Navy and Air Force policies for compliance with the HIPAA medical privacy and data security regulations; supporting development, training, and deployment of OCTAVE(sm), a self-directed information security risk assessment process; and sponsoring development of the Risk Information Management Resource (RIMR), a Web-enabled enterprise portal about health information assurance.

  5. Hospital collaboration with public safety organizations on bioterrorism response.

    PubMed

    Niska, Richard W

    2008-01-01

    To identify hospital characteristics that predict collaboration with public safety organizations on bioterrorism response plans and mass casualty drills. The 2003 and 2004 Bioterrorism and Mass Casualty Supplements to the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey examined collaboration with emergency medical services (EMS), hazardous materials teams (HAZMAT), fire departments, and law enforcement. The sample included 112 geographic primary sampling units and 1,110 hospitals. Data were weighted by inverse selection probability, to yield nationally representative estimates. Characteristics included residency and medical school affiliation, bed capacity, ownership, urbanicity and Joint Commission accreditation. The response rate was 84.6%. Chi-square analysis was performed with alpha set at p < 0.05. Logistic regression modeling yielded odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals. During a bioterrorism incident, 68.9% of hospitals would contact EMS, 68.7% percent law enforcement, 61.6% fire departments, 58.1% HAZMAT, and 42.8% all four. About 74.2% had staged mass casualty drills with EMS, 70.4% with fire departments, 67.4% with law enforcement, 43.3% with HAZMAT, and 37.0% with all four. Predictors of drilling with some or all of these public safety organizations included larger bed capacity, nonprofit and proprietary ownership, and JCAHO accreditation. Medical school affiliation was a negative predictor of drilling with EMS. The majority of hospitals involve public safety organizations in their emergency plans or drills. Bed capacity was most predictive of drilling with these organizations. Medical school affiliation was the only characteristic negatively associated with drilling.

  6. A Comparative Effectiveness Analysis of the Implementation of Surgical Safety Checklists in a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Bock, Matthias; Fanolla, Antonio; Segur-Cabanac, Isabelle; Auricchio, Franco; Melani, Carla; Girardi, Flavio; Meier, Horand; Pycha, Armin

    2016-07-01

    The appropriately coached implementation of surgical safety checklists (SSCs) reduces the incidence of perioperative complications and 30-day mortality of patients undergoing surgery. The association of the introduction of SSCs with 90-day mortality remains unclear. To assess the association between the implementation of SSCs and all-cause 90- and 30-day mortality rates. Evaluation of the outcomes of surgical procedures performed during the 6 months before (January 1 to June 30, 2010) and after (January 1 to June 30, 2013) the introduction of SSCs by retrospective analysis of administrative databases. The study was conducted in a public, regional, university-affiliated hospital in Italy. Data were collected from October 23, 2013, to November 12, 2014, including 90-day all-cause mortality, 30-day all-cause mortality, length of hospital stay, and 30-day readmission rate among patients undergoing noncardiac surgery. Patients undergoing surgery during the 6-month periods before and after the implementation of SSCs were compared. Data were analyzed from September 17, 2014, to July 31, 2015. Risk-adjusted rates of 90- and 30-day mortality, readmission rate, and length of stay. The total study sample of 10 741 patients included 5444 preintervention and 5297 postintervention patients (5093 [47.4%] male and 5648 [52.6%] female patients; mean [SD] age, 53.0 [23.0] years). Ninety-day all-cause mortality was 2.4% (129 patients) before compared with 2.2% (118 patients) after the SSC implementation, for an adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of 0.73 (95% CI, 0.56-0.96; P = .02). Thirty-day all-cause mortality was 1.36% (74 patients) before compared with 1.32% (70 patients) after the SSC implementation, for an AOR of 0.79 (95% CI, 0.56-1.11; P = .17). Thirty-day readmission occurred in 797 patients (14.6%) in the preimplementation group vs 766 patients (14.5%) in the postimplementation group, for an AOR of 0.90 (95% CI, 0.81-1.01; P = .79). The adjusted length of stay was 10

  7. Trends in use of surgical mesh for pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Jonsson Funk, Michele; Edenfield, Autumn L; Pate, Virginia; Visco, Anthony G; Weidner, Alison C; Wu, Jennifer M

    2013-01-01

    Limited data exist on the rates of pelvic organ prolapse procedures utilizing mesh. The objective of this study was to examine trends in vaginal mesh prolapse procedures (VMs), abdominal sacrocolpopexy (ASC), and minimally invasive sacrocolpopexy (MISC) from 2005 to 2010. We utilized deidentified, adjudicated health care claims data from across the United States from 2005 to 2010. Among women 18 years old or older, we identified all mesh prolapse procedures based on current procedural terminology codes (57267 for VM, 57280 for ASC, and 57425 for MISC). VM procedures included all vaginal prolapse surgeries in which mesh was placed, whether in the anterior, apical, or posterior compartment. We estimated rates per 100,000 person-years (100,000 py) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). During 78.5 million person-years of observation, we identified 60,152 mesh prolapse procedures, for a rate of 76.0 per 100,000 py (95% CI, 73.6-78.5). Overall, VMs comprised 74.9% of these surgeries for an overall rate of 56.9 per 100,000 py (95% CI, 55.0-58.9). Rates of ASC and MISC were considerably lower at 12.0 per 100,000 py (95% CI, 11.6-12.5) and 9.5 per 100,000 py (95% CI, 9.2-9.9), respectively. Among sacrocolpopexies, ASC was more common than MISC in 2005-2007; however, since 2007, the rate of MISC has increased, whereas the rate of ASC has decreased. Regarding trends by age, VM was considerably more common than sacrocolpopexies at all ages, and ASC was more common than MISC in women older than 50 years. From 2005 to 2010, the rate of mesh prolapse procedures has increased, with vaginal mesh surgeries constituting the vast majority. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 77 FR 38294 - Patient Safety Organizations: Delisting for Cause for Medical Informatics

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Delisting for...: Notice of Delisting. SUMMARY: AHRQ has delisted Medical Informatics as a Patient Safety Organization (PSO... (Patient Safety Act) authorizes the listing of PSOs, which are entities or component organizations...

  9. Organizing uninsured safety-net access to specialist physician services.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mark A

    2013-05-01

    Arranging referrals for specialist services is often the greatest difficulty that safety-net access programs face in attempting to provide fairly comprehensive services for the uninsured. When office-based community specialists are asked to care for uninsured patients, they cite the following barriers: difficulty determining which patients merit charity care, having to arrange for services patients need from other providers, and concerns about liability for providing inadequate care. Solutions to these barriers to specialist access can be found in the same institutional arrangements that support primary care and hospital services for the uninsured. These safety-net organization structures can be extended to include specialist physician care by funding community health centers to contract for specialist referrals, using free-standing referral programs to subsidize community specialists who accept uninsured patients at discounted rates, and encouraging hospitals through tax exemption or disproportionate share funding to require specialists on their medical staffs to accept an allocation of uninsured office-based referrals.

  10. Attention to surgeons and surgical care is largely missing from early medicare accountable care organizations.

    PubMed

    Dupree, James M; Patel, Kavita; Singer, Sara J; West, Mallory; Wang, Rui; Zinner, Michael J; Weissman, Joel S

    2014-06-01

    The Affordable Care Act supports the growth of accountable care organizations (ACOs) as a potentially powerful model for health care delivery and payment. The model focuses on primary care. However, surgeons and other specialists have a large role to play in caring for ACOs' patients. No studies have yet investigated the role of surgical care in the ACO model. Using case studies and a survey, we examined the early experience of fifty-nine Medicare-approved ACOs in providing surgical care. We found that ACOs have so far devoted little attention to surgical care. Instead, they have emphasized coordinating care for patients with chronic conditions and reducing unnecessary hospital readmissions and ED visits. In the years to come, ACOs will likely focus more on surgical care. Some ACOs have the ability to affect surgical practice patterns through referral pressures, but local market conditions may limit ACOs' abilities to alter surgeons' behavior. Policy makers, ACO administrators, and surgeons need to be aware of these trends because they have the potential to affect the surgical care provided to ACO patients as well as the success of ACOs themselves. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  11. Improving risk-adjusted measures of surgical site infection for the national healthcare safety network.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yi; Edwards, Jonathan R; Horan, Teresa C; Berrios-Torres, Sandra I; Fridkin, Scott K

    2011-10-01

    The National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) has provided simple risk adjustment of surgical site infection (SSI) rates to participating hospitals to facilitate quality improvement activities; improved risk models were developed and evaluated. Data reported to the NHSN for all operative procedures performed from January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2008, were analyzed. Only SSIs related to the primary incision site were included. A common set of patient- and hospital-specific variables were evaluated as potential SSI risk factors by univariate analysis. Some ific variables were available for inclusion. Stepwise logistic regression was used to develop the specific risk models by procedure category. Bootstrap resampling was used to validate the models, and the c-index was used to compare the predictive power of new procedure-specific risk models with that of the models with the NHSN risk index as the only variable (NHSN risk index model). From January 1, 2006, through December 31, 2008, 847 hospitals in 43 states reported a total of 849,659 procedures and 16,147 primary incisional SSIs (risk, 1.90%) among 39 operative procedure categories. Overall, the median c-index of the new procedure-specific risk was greater (0.67 [range, 0.59-0.85]) than the median c-index of the NHSN risk index models (0.60 [range, 0.51-0.77]); for 33 of 39 procedures, the new procedure-specific models yielded a higher c-index than did the NHSN risk index models. A set of new risk models developed using existing data elements collected through the NHSN improves predictive performance, compared with the traditional NHSN risk index stratification.

  12. Nursing assessment of continuous vital sign surveillance to improve patient safety on the medical/surgical unit.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Terri; Whisman, Lynn; Booker, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Evaluate continuous vital sign surveillance as a tool to improve patient safety in the medical/surgical unit. Failure-to-rescue is an important measure of hospital quality. Patient deterioration is often preceded by changes in vital signs. However, continuous multi-parameter vital sign monitoring may decrease patient safety with an abundance of unnecessary alarms. Prospective observational study at two geographically disperse hospitals in a single hospital system. A multi-parameter vital sign monitoring system was installed in a medical/surgical unit in Utah and one in Alabama providing continuous display of SpO2, heart rate, blood pressure and respiration rate on a central station. Alarm thresholds and time to alert annunciations were set based on prior analysis of the distribution of each vital sign. At the end of 4 weeks, nurses completed a survey on their experience. An average alert per patient, per day was determined retrospectively from the saved vital signs data and knowledge of the alarm settings. Ninety-two per cent of the nurses agreed that the number of alarms and alerts were appropriate; 54% strongly agreed. On average, both units experienced 10·8 alarms per patient, per day. One hundred per cent agreed the monitor provided valuable patient data that increased patient safety; 79% strongly agreed. Continuous, multi-parameter patient monitoring could be performed on medical/surgical units with a small and appropriate level of alarms. Continuous vital sign assessment may have initiated nursing interventions that prevented failure-to-rescue events. Nurses surveyed unanimously agreed that continuous vital sign surveillance will help enhance patient safety. Nursing response to abnormal vital signs is one of the most important levers in patient safety, by providing timely recognition of early clinical deterioration. This occurs through diligent nursing surveillance, involving assessment, interpretation of data, recognition of a problem and meaningful

  13. Validity and reliability on three European language versions of the Safety Organizing Scale.

    PubMed

    Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Schubert, Maria; Blegen, Mary; De Geest, Sabina; Schwendimann, René

    2013-04-01

    The Safety Organizing Scale (SOS) offers a reliable snapshot of nurses' engagement in unit-level safety behaviors in hospitals. As no comparable questionnaire exists in German, French and Italian, we explored the psychometric properties of SOS translations into each of those languages. The psychometric properties of the nine-item SOS were tested according to American Educational Research Association guidelines. Between October 2009 and June 2010, 1633 registered medical and/or surgical nurses in 35 Swiss hospitals completed translated SOS questionnaires. For each translation, psychometric evaluation revealed evidence based on content (scale-content validity index >0.89), response patterns (e.g. average of missing values across all items = 0.80%), internal structure (e.g. comparative fit indices >0.90, root mean square error of approximation <0.08) and reliability (Cronbach's alpha >0.79). We differentiated the scale regarding one related concept (implicit rationing of nursing care). Higher SOS scores correlated with supportive leadership and lower nurse-reported medication errors, but not with nurse-reported patient falls. The SOS offers a valuable measurement of engagement in safety practices that might influence patient outcomes. Initial evidence regarding the validity and reliability of the translated versions supports their use in German, French and Italian. Concurrent validity will require confirmation via further analysis using more reliable outcome measures (e.g. mortality rates). The translated versions' predictive validity needs to be established in prospective studies.

  14. Efficacy and safety of surgical lung biopsy for interstitial disease. Experience of 161 consecutive patients from a single institution in Italy.

    PubMed

    Rotolo, Nicola; Imperatori, Andrea; Dominioni, Lorenzo; Facchini, Annalaura; Conti, Valentina; Castiglioni, Massimo; Spanevello, Antonio

    2015-09-14

    The role of surgical biopsy for interstitial lung disease (ILD) is controversial, because of possible postoperative morbidity and mortality. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of surgical biopsy for ILD. We retrospectively analysed the diagnostic performance and the postoperative complications of 161 consecutive surgical lung biopsy procedures carried out in suspected ILD cases that were undefined after multidisciplinary clinico-radiological evaluation. In 151 cases (93.8%) the biopsy was performed by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), in 6.2% by limited thoracotomy. A specific histological diagnosis was obtained in 154 (95.7%) of the surgically biopsied patients, while 4.3% remained histologically unclassified. The predominant histological patterns were sarcoidosis (29.8 %), usual interstitial pneumonia/idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (UIP/IPF) (24.2%), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (18.6%) and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (8.1%). The postoperative course was uneventful in 142 cases. In 19 patients (11.8%) we observed postoperative complications, predominantly prolonged air leakage (5.0% of all cases). Thirty-day postoperative mortality was 3.1%, mostly due to acute exacerbation of respiratory insufficiency. Postoperative mortality independently correlated with preoperative need of oxygen therapy (OR, 5.21; 95% CI, 1.19-22.95) and with UIP/IPF histology (OR, 5.67; 95% CI, 1.27-25.25). Lung biopsy was performed mostly by VATS, with limited morbidity, and was effective in yielding a specific histologic diagnosis in the vast majority of undefined ILD cases. To optimize the outcome of surgical biopsy for specific diagnosis of ILD, this procedure should be performed only exceptionally in patients with critical respiratory illness as postoperative mortality risk in these subjects is exceedingly high.

  15. Organic bench model to complement the teaching and learning on basic surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Denadai, Rafael; Souto, Luís Ricardo Martinhão

    2012-01-01

    To propose an organic bench model made with fruits/vegetables as an alternative to complement the arsenal of simulators used in the teaching and learning of basic surgical skills during medical graduation and education. They were described the training strategies, through the use of fruits (or vegetables) to the learning of different techniques of incision, sutures, biopsies and basic principles of reconstruction. The preparation of bench model, the processes of skill acquisition, feedback and evaluation were also delineated. A proposal for teaching based on an organic model with training delivered in multiple sessions, with increasing levels of difficulty, and with feedback and evaluation during all the process was structured. The organic model, being simple, versatile, portable, reproducible, readily available, and having low cost, is another option to complement the existing simulators for teaching and learning of basic surgical skills.

  16. Development of a surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance system, calculation of SSI rates and specification of important factors affecting SSI in a digestive organ surgical department.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Koji; Sawa, Akihiro; Akagi, Shinji; Kihira, Kenji

    2007-06-01

    We have developed an original system to conduct surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance. This system accumulates SSI surveillance information based on the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) System and the Japanese Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (JNIS) System. The features of this system are as follows: easy input of data, high generality, data accuracy, SSI rate by operative procedure and risk index category (RIC) can be promptly calculated and compared with the current NNIS SSI rate, and the SSI rates and accumulated data can be exported electronically. Using this system, we monitored 798 patients in 24 operative procedure categories in the Digestive Organs Surgery Department of Mazda Hospital, Mazda Motor Corporation, from January 2004 through December 2005. The total number and rate of SSI were 47 and 5.89%, respectively. The SSI rates of 777 patients were calculated based on 15 operative procedure categories and Risk Index Categories (RIC). The highest SSI rate was observed in the rectum surgery of RIC 1 (30%), followed by the colon surgery of RIC3 (28.57%). About 30% of the isolated infecting bacteria were Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli. Using quantification theory type 2, the American Society of Anesthesiology score (4.531), volume of hemorrhage under operation (3.075), wound classification (1.76), operation time (1.352), and history of diabetes (0.989) increased to higher ranks as factors for SSI. Therefore, we evaluated this system as a useful tool in safety control for operative procedures.

  17. Organic Tanks Safety Program: Advanced organic analysis FY 1996 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    Major focus during the first part of FY96 was to evaluate using organic functional group concentrations to screen for energetics. Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy would be useful screening tools for determining C-H and COO- organic content in tank wastes analyzed in a hot cell. These techniques would be used for identifying tanks of potential safety concern that may require further analysis. Samples from Tanks 241-C-106 and -C-204 were analyzed; the major organic in C-106 was B2EHPA and in C-204 was TBP. Analyses of simulated wastes were also performed for the Waste Aging Studies Task; organics formed as a result of degradation were identified, and the original starting components were monitored quantitatively. Sample analysis is not routine and required considerable methods adaptation and optimization. Several techniques have been evaluated for directly analyzing chelator and chelator fragments in tank wastes: matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection using Cu complexation. Although not directly funded by the Tanks Safety Program, the success of these techniques have implications for both the Flammable Gas and Organic Tanks Safety Programs.

  18. An investigation of safety climate in OHSAS 18001-certified and non-certified organizations.

    PubMed

    Ghahramani, Abolfazl

    2016-09-01

    Many organizations worldwide have implemented Occupational Health and Safety Assessment Series (OHSAS) 18001 in their premises because of the assumed positive effects of this standard on safety. Few studies have analyzed the effect of the safety climate in OHSAS 18001-certified organizations. This case-control study used a new safety climate questionnaire to evaluate three OHSAS 18001-certified and three non-certified manufacturing companies in Iran. Hierarchical regression indicated that the safety climate was influenced by OHSAS implementation and by safety training. Employees who received safety training had better perceptions of the safety climate and its dimensions than other respondents within the certified companies. This study found that the implementation of OHSAS 18001 does not guarantee improvement of the safety climate. This study also emphasizes the need for high-quality safety training for employees of the certified companies to improve the safety climate.

  19. When Operating on Dead People Saves Lives: Benefits of Surgical Organ Donor Intensivists.

    PubMed

    Long, Kristin; Talley, Cynthia; Yarrison, Rebecca B; Bernard, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation has emerged as a life-saving treatment for many patients suffering from end-stage organ failure. Organs have been successfully recovered after a variety of aggressive interventions. We propose that decompressive laparotomy, when clinically indicated, should be considered in the aggressive resuscitation of potential organ donors. A thorough literature review examining aggressive interventions on potential organ donors was conducted after experience with a unique case at this institution. Articles were reviewed for the types of interventions performed as well as the time frame in relation to organ donation. In our case, several ethical issues were raised when considering decompressive laparotomy in a patient pronounced dead by neurologic criteria. We propose that having a surgical intensivist involved in the management of potential donors will further increase the salvage rate, as more invasive resuscitation options are possible.

  20. 77 FR 65892 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From PDR Secure, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary...: Notice of Delisting. SUMMARY: The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient Safety Act... (PSOs), which collect, aggregate, and analyze confidential information regarding the quality and safety...

  1. 76 FR 60495 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Illinois PSO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary... Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient Safety Act), Public Law 109-41, 42 U.S.C. 299b-21--b-26, provides... the quality and safety of health care delivery. The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Final Rule...

  2. 78 FR 17212 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From QAISys, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary... of delisting. SUMMARY: The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient Safety Act), Public Law 109-41, 42 U.S.C. 299b-21-- b-26, provides for the formation of Patient Safety...

  3. Optimizing Safety, Predictability, and Aesthetics in Direct to Implant Immediate Breast Reconstruction: Evolution of Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Kalus, Ram; Dixon Swartz, Jennifer; Metzger, Sarah Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Although immediate breast reconstruction with the insertion of a permanent prosthesis rather than a tissue expander (direct to implant [DTI]) has become gradually more preferred and requested by patients, the technique has yet to be fully embraced by most plastic surgeons, presumably due to concerns of patient safety and perceived higher complication and revision rates, despite not being supported by the literature. The authors review the senior author's protocol for patient selection and surgical technique in DTI reconstructions. A simple device is introduced which adds predictability and control in determining the inset suture line for the acellular dermal matrix and thus the position of the inframammary fold and lateral mammary fold, resulting in improved aesthetic outcomes, reduced complications, and reduced reoperation rates. A retrospective review of our one surgeon experience with 134 DTI breast reconstructions in 77 patients between 2006 and 2015 is presented. The series is further subdivided into 74 reconstructions in 43 patients in whom their reconstruction was performed before the use of a patented 2-dimensional (2-D) template, and 60 reconstructions in 34 patients in whom the template was used. The overall complication rate requiring reoperation in the first 54 reconstructions was 50% versus 15% in the last 84. Failure of the reconstruction, defined by explantation, occurred in 11 of 74 reconstructions (14.9%) before the use of 2-D templates, and in 5 of 60 reconstructions (8.3%) in which templates were used, representing a 44% reduction. The revision rate specifically for implant malposition dropped from 18.6% before the use of templates to 2.9% after the incorporation of templates. Fifty-three reconstructions in 33 patients (40%) had no complications and no reoperations, correctly described as "one and done." Direct to implant reconstruction can be technically more demanding and exacting than 2-stage expander/implant reconstructions. A review of this

  4. 76 FR 74788 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From HealthWatch, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From HealthWatch, Inc. AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION...Watch, Inc. of its status as a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). The Patient Safety and Quality...

  5. How Does Patient Safety Culture in the Surgical Departments Compare to the Rest of the County Hospitals in Xiaogan City of China?

    PubMed

    Wang, Manli; Tao, Hongbing

    2017-09-26

    Objectives: Patient safety culture affects patient safety and the performance of hospitals. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) is generally used to assess the safety culture in hospitals and unit levels. However, only a few studies in China have measured surgical settings compared with other units in county hospitals using the HSOPSC. This study aims to assess the strengths and weaknesses of surgical departments compared with all other departments in county hospitals in China with HSOPSC. Design: This research is a cross-sectional study. Methods: In 2015, a Chinese translation of HSOPSC was administered to 1379 staff from sampled departments from 19 county hospitals in Xiaogan City (Hubei Province, China) using a simple random and cluster sampling method. Outcome Measures: The HSOPSC was completed by 1379 participants. The percent positive ratings (PPRs) of 12 dimensions (i.e., teamwork within units, organizational learning and continuous improvement, staffing, non-punitive response to errors, supervisor/ manager expectations and actions promoting patient safety, feedback and communication about errors, communication openness, hospital handoffs and transitions, teamwork across hospital units, hospital management support for patient safety, overall perception of safety, as well as frequency of events reported) and the positive proportion of outcome variables (patient safety grade and number of events reported) between surgical departments and other departments were compared with t-tests and X² tests, respectively. A multiple regression analysis was conducted, with the outcome dimensions serving as dependent variables and basic characteristics and other dimensions serving as independent variables. Similarly, ordinal logistic regression was used to explore the influencing factors of two categorical outcomes. Results: A total of 56.49% of respondents were from surgical departments. The PPRs for "teamwork within units" and "organizational learning

  6. Keeping patients safe in healthcare organizations: a structuration theory of safety culture.

    PubMed

    Groves, Patricia S; Meisenbach, Rebecca J; Scott-Cawiezell, Jill

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the use of structuration theory to facilitate understanding and improvement of safety culture in healthcare organizations. Patient safety in healthcare organizations is an important problem worldwide. Safety culture has been proposed as a means to keep patients safe. However, lack of appropriate theory limits understanding and improvement of safety culture. The proposed structuration theory of safety culture was based on a critique of available English-language literature, resulting in literature published from 1983 to mid-2009. CINAHL, Communication and Mass Media Complete, ABI/Inform and Google Scholar databases were searched using the following terms: nursing, safety, organizational culture and safety culture. When viewed through the lens of structuration theory, safety culture is a system involving both individual actions and organizational structures. Healthcare organization members, particularly nurses, share these values through communication and enact them in practice, (re)producing an organizational safety culture system that reciprocally constrains and enables the actions of the members in terms of patient safety. This structurational viewpoint illuminates multiple opportunities for safety culture improvement. Nurse leaders should be cognizant of competing value-based culture systems in the organization and attend to nursing agency and all forms of communication when attempting to create or strengthen a safety culture. Applying structuration theory to the concept of safety culture reveals a dynamic system of individual action and organizational structure constraining and enabling safety practice. Nurses are central to the (re)production of this safety culture system. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Multivariable predictors of postoperative surgical site infection after general and vascular surgery: results from the patient safety in surgery study.

    PubMed

    Neumayer, Leigh; Hosokawa, Patrick; Itani, Kamal; El-Tamer, Mahmoud; Henderson, William G; Khuri, Shukri F

    2007-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a potentially preventable complication. We developed and tested a model to predict patients at high risk for surgical site infection. Data from the Patient Safety in Surgery Study/National Surgical Quality Improvement Program from a 3-year period were used to develop and test a predictive model of SSI using logistic regression analyses. From October 2001 through September 2004, 7,035 of 163,624 (4.30%) patients undergoing vascular and general surgical procedures at 14 academic and 128 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical centers experienced SSI. Fourteen variables independently associated with increased risk of SSI included patient factors (age greater than 40 years, diabetes, dyspnea, use of steroids, alcoholism, smoking, recent radiotherapy, and American Society of Anesthesiologists class 2 or higher), preoperative laboratory values (albumin<3.5 mg/dL, total bilirubin>1.0 mg/dL), and operative characteristics (emergency, complexity [work relative value units>/=10], type of procedure, and wound classification). The SSI risk score is more accurate than the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance score in predicting SSI (c-indices 0.70, 0.62, respectively). We developed and tested an accurate prediction score for SSI. Clinicians can use this score to predict their patient's risk of an SSI and implement appropriate prevention strategies.

  8. Safety and Tumor-specificity of Cetuximab-IRDye800 for Surgical Navigation in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Eben L; Warram, Jason M; de Boer, Esther; Chung, Thomas K; Korb, Melissa L; Brandwein-Gensler, Margie; Strong, Theresa V; Schmalbach, Cecelia E; Morlandt, Anthony B; Agarwal, Garima; Hartman, Yolanda E; Carroll, William R; Richman, Joshua S; Clemons, Lisa K; Nabell, Lisle M; Zinn, Kurt R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Positive margins dominate clinical outcomes after surgical resections in most solid cancer types including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Unfortunately, surgeons remove cancer in the same manner they have for a century with complete dependence on subjective tissue changes to identify cancer in the operating room. To effect change, we hypothesize that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) can be targeted for safe and specific real-time localization of cancer. Experimental design A dose escalation study of cetuximab conjugated to IRDye800 was performed in patients (n=12) undergoing surgical resection of squamous cell carcinoma arising in the head and neck. Safety and pharmacokinetic data were obtained out to 30 days post-infusion. Multi-instrument fluorescence imaging was performed in the operating room and in surgical pathology. Results There were no grade 2 or higher adverse events attributable to cetuximab-IRDye800. Fluorescence imaging with an intraoperative, wide-field device successfully differentiated tumor from normal tissue during resection with an average tumor-to-background ratio of 5.2 in the highest dose range. Optical imaging identified opportunity for more precise identification of tumor during the surgical procedure and during the pathological analysis of tissues ex-vivo. Fluorescence levels positively correlated with EGFR levels. Conclusion We demonstrate for the first time that commercially available antibodies can be fluorescently labeled and safely administered to humans to identify cancer with sub-millimeter resolution, which has the potential to improve outcomes in clinical oncology. PMID:25904751

  9. Surgical preparation of rats and mice for intravital microscopic imaging of abdominal organs.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, George J

    2017-09-01

    Intravital microscopy is a powerful research tool that can provide insight into cellular and subcellular events that take place in organs in the body. However, meaningful results can only be obtained from animals whose physiology is preserved during the process of microscopy. Here I discuss the importance of preserving the overall state of health of the animal, methods of anesthesia, surgical techniques for intravital microscopy of various abdominal organs, methods to maintain and monitor the physiology of the animal during microscopy and associated peri- and post-operative recovery considerations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Governing the surgical count through communication interactions: implications for patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Riley, R; Manias, E; Polglase, A

    2006-01-01

    Background Intermittently, the incidence of retained surgical items after surgery is reported in the healthcare literature, usually in the form of case studies. It is commonly recognised that poor communication practices influence surgical outcomes. Aim To explore the power relationships in the communication between nurses and surgeons that affect the conduct of the surgical count. Methods A qualitative, ethnographic study was undertaken. Data were collected in three operating room departments in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. 11 operating room nurses who worked as anaesthetic, instrument and circulating nurses were individually observed during their interactions with surgeons, anaesthetists, other nurses and patients. Data were generated through 230 h of participant observation, 11 individual and 4 group interviews, and the keeping of a diary by the first author. A deconstructive analysis was undertaken. Results Results are discussed in terms of the discursive practices in which clinicians engaged to govern and control the surgical count. The three major issues presented in this paper are judging, coping with normalisation and establishing priorities. Conclusions The findings highlight the power relationships between members of the surgical team and the complexity of striking a balance between organisational policy and professional judgement. Increasing professional accountability may help to deal with the issues of normalisation, whereas greater attention needs to be paid to issues of time management. More sophisticated technological solutions need to be considered to support manual counting techniques. PMID:17074876

  11. Implementation of the Surgical Safety Checklist in Switzerland and Perceptions of Its Benefits: Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Patricia; Degiorgi, Adriana; Bezzola, Paula; Courvoisier, Delphine S.; Chopard, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the implementation of the Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC) among surgeons and anaesthetists working in Swiss hospitals and clinics and their perceptions of the SSC. Methods Cross-sectional survey at the 97th Annual Meeting of the Swiss Society of Surgery, Switzerland, 2010. Opinions of the SSC were assessed with a 6-item questionnaire. Results 152 respondents answered the questionnaire (participation rate 35.1%). 64.7% respondents acknowledged having a checklist in their hospital or their clinic. Median implementation year was 2009. More than 8 out of 10 respondents reported their team applied the Sign In and the Time Out very often or quasi systematically, whereas almost half of respondents acknowledged the Sign Out was applied never or rarely. The majority of respondents agreed that the checklist improves safety and team communication, and helps to develop a safety culture. However, they were less supportive about the opinion that the checklist facilitates teamwork and eliminates social hierarchy between caregivers. Conclusions This survey indicates that the SSC has been largely implemented in many Swiss hospitals and clinics. Both surgeons and anaesthetists perceived the SSC as a valuable tool in improving intraoperative patient safety and communication among health care professionals, with lesser importance in facilitating teamwork (and eliminating hierarchical categories). PMID:25036453

  12. Meta-analysis comparing the safety of laparoscopic and open surgical approaches for suspected adnexal mass during the second trimester.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Xuan; Zhang, Yang; Huang, Jin-Feng; Wang, Li

    2017-03-01

    The safety of laparoscopic surgery during the second trimester of pregnancy remains a controversial subject. To compare the safety of laparoscopic surgery and laparotomy for suspected adnexal mass during the second trimester. Articles published in any language prior to April 31, 2016, were retrieved from PubMed, Scopus, EMBSCO, and the Cochrane Library using keywords including pregnant, adnexal mass, laparoscopy, laparotomy, pregnancy outcomes, and surgical outcomes. Randomized and non-randomized controlled trials reporting at least one obstetric or surgical outcome were included if they compared laparoscopic surgery and laparotomy for adnexal masses during the second trimester. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers. Homogeneous data were pooled using a fixed effects model and heterogeneous data were qualitatively analyzed. Four comparative effectiveness studies including a total of 240 patients were identified. Laparoscopic surgery was associated with a reduced risk of post-operative adverse events (relative risk 0.20, 95% confidence interval 0.06-0.72); no difference was recorded in the risk of post-operative spontaneous abortion (P=0.26) or threatened spontaneous abortion (P=0.13). Laparoscopic surgery could be preferable to laparotomy for suspected adnexal mass during the second trimester of pregnancy. © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  13. [Preliminary safety and stability assessment of orthodontic miniscrew implantation guided by surgical template based on cone-beam CT images].

    PubMed

    Qiu, L L; Li, S; Bai, Y X

    2016-06-01

    To develop surgical templates for orthodontic miniscrew implantation based on cone-beam CT(CBCT)three-dimensional(3D)images and to evaluate the safety and stability of implantation guided by the templates. DICOM data obtained in patients who had CBCT scans taken were processed using Mimics software, and 3D images of teeth and maxillary bone were acquired. Meanwhile, 3D images of miniscrews were acquired using Solidworks software and processed with Mimics software. Virtual position of miniscrews was determined based on 3D images of teeth, bone, and miniscrews. 3D virtual templates were designed according to the virtual implantation plans. STL files were output and the real templates were fabricated with stereolithographic appliance(SLA). Postoperative CBCT scans were used to evaluate the implantation safety and the stability of miniscrews were investigated. All the templates were positioned accurately and kept stable throughout the implantation process. No root damage was found. The deviations were(1.73±0.65)mm at the corona, and(1.28±0.82)mm at the apex, respectively. The stability of miniscrews was fairly well. Surgical templates for miniscrew implantation could be acquired based on 3D CBCT images and fabricated with SLA. Implantation guided by these templates was safe and stable.

  14. [Effectiveness of an intervention to improve the implementation of a surgical safety check-list in a tertiary hospital].

    PubMed

    Vázquez-González, A; Luque-Ramírez, J M; Del Nozal-Nalda, M; Barroso-Gutierrez, C; Román-Fuentes, M; Vilaplana-Garcia, A

    2016-06-01

    To determine the percentage of verification of a Surgical Safety Checklist and improvements made. Quasi-experimental study in 28 Clinical Management Units with surgical activity in the University Hospital Virgen del Rocio (HUVR) and University Hospital Virgen Macarena (HUVM). A situation analysis was made to estimate the completing of a Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC), after which a new system of completing the SSC was introduced as an element of improvement, which included a reusable vinyl board. Subsequently, the prevalence over two periods was calculated, to assess the effectiveness of the intervention. A total 1,964 SSC were reviewed in the HUVR-HUVM in June (baseline), and in December 2013 and June 2014. A percentage completion of 65.8%, 86.2%, and 88% was obtained in the HUVR, and 70.9%, 77.2%, and 75% in the HUVM, respectively. Of these SSC, 15.1% (baseline) were completed entirely in the HUVR, increasing to 36.6% (P<.001), and 89.8% (P<.001) in the last measurement. In the HUVM, 15.6% (baseline) were fully completed, increasing to 18.3% (P=.323), and 29.4% (P=.001) in the last measurement. The percentage of completion of SSC obtained is around 80%, and is similar to that reported in the literature. The re-design of the SSC procedure, including the use of a vinyl board, the designation of SSC coordinator role, and professional staff training, is effective for improve outcomes in terms of completing the SSC, and quality of the completion. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. 77 FR 42738 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From the Coalition for Quality and Patient...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From the Coalition for Quality and Patient Safety of Chicagoland (CQPS PSO) AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Delisting. SUMMARY: The Patient Safety and...

  16. 78 FR 6819 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From the BREF PSO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From the BREF PSO AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of delisting. SUMMARY: The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient Safety Act...

  17. Community Organizations' Involvement in School Safety Planning: Does It Make a Difference in School Violence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Joy D.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between school violence and involvement of community organizations in school safety planning. The study is a secondary analysis of data from the School Survey on Crime and Safety 2003-2004 (U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, 2006). This survey collects data on crime and safety from…

  18. Community Organizations' Involvement in School Safety Planning: Does It Make a Difference in School Violence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Joy D.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between school violence and involvement of community organizations in school safety planning. The study is a secondary analysis of data from the School Survey on Crime and Safety 2003-2004 (U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, 2006). This survey collects data on crime and safety from…

  19. 78 FR 70560 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From GE-PSO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From GE- PSO AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of delisting. SUMMARY: The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient Safety Act), Public Law 109-41, 42 U.S.C. 299b-21-b-26, provides for...

  20. Using the Job Demands-Resources model to investigate risk perception, safety climate and job satisfaction in safety critical organizations.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten Birkeland; Mearns, Kathryn; Matthiesen, Stig Berge; Eid, Jarle

    2011-10-01

    Using the Job Demands-Resources model (JD-R) as a theoretical framework, this study investigated the relationship between risk perception as a job demand and psychological safety climate as a job resource with regard to job satisfaction in safety critical organizations. In line with the JD-R model, it was hypothesized that high levels of risk perception is related to low job satisfaction and that a positive perception of safety climate is related to high job satisfaction. In addition, it was hypothesized that safety climate moderates the relationship between risk perception and job satisfaction. Using a sample of Norwegian offshore workers (N = 986), all three hypotheses were supported. In summary, workers who perceived high levels of risk reported lower levels of job satisfaction, whereas this effect diminished when workers perceived their safety climate as positive. Follow-up analyses revealed that this interaction was dependent on the type of risks in question. The results of this study supports the JD-R model, and provides further evidence for relationships between safety-related concepts and work-related outcomes indicating that organizations should not only develop and implement sound safety procedures to reduce the effects of risks and hazards on workers, but can also enhance other areas of organizational life through a focus on safety.

  1. Combining Systems and Teamwork Approaches to Enhance the Effectiveness of Safety Improvement Interventions in Surgery: The Safer Delivery of Surgical Services (S3) Program.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Peter; Morgan, Lauren; New, Steve; Catchpole, Ken; Roberston, Eleanor; Hadi, Mohammed; Pickering, Sharon; Collins, Gary; Griffin, Damian

    2017-01-01

    Patient safety improvement interventions usually address either work systems or team culture. We do not know which is more effective, or whether combining approaches is beneficial. To compare improvement in surgical team performance after interventions addressing teamwork culture, work systems, or both. Suite of 5 identical controlled before-after intervention studies, with preplanned analysis of pooled data for indirect comparisons of strategies. Operating theatres in 5 UK hospitals performing elective orthopedic, plastic, or vascular surgery PARTICIPANTS:: All operating theatres staff, including surgeons, nurses, anaesthetists, and others INTERVENTIONS:: 4-month safety improvement interventions, using teamwork training (TT), systems redesign and standardization (SOP), Lean quality improvement, SOP + TT combination, or Lean + TT combination. Team technical and nontechnical performance and World Health Organization (WHO) checklist compliance, measured for 3 months before and after intervention using validated scales. Pooled data analysis of before-after change in active and control groups, comparing combined versus single and systems versus teamwork interventions, using 2-way ANOVA. We studied 453 operations, (255 intervention, 198 control). TT improved nontechnical skills and WHO compliance (P < 0.001), but not technical performance; systems interventions (Lean & SOP, 2 & 3) improved nontechnical skills and technical performance (P < 0.001) but improved WHO compliance less. Combined interventions (4 & 5) improved all performance measures except WHO time-out attempts, whereas single approaches (1 & 2 & 3) improved WHO compliance less (P < 0.001) and failed to improve technical performance. Safety interventions combining teamwork training and systems rationalization are more effective than those adopting either approach alone. This has important implications for safety improvement strategies in hospitals.

  2. Advanced organic analysis and analytical methods development: FY 1995 progress report. Waste Tank Organic Safety Program

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.; Clauss, S.A.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes the work performed during FY 1995 by Pacific Northwest Laboratory in developing and optimizing analysis techniques for identifying organics present in Hanford waste tanks. The main focus was to provide a means for rapidly obtaining the most useful information concerning the organics present in tank waste, with minimal sample handling and with minimal waste generation. One major focus has been to optimize analytical methods for organic speciation. Select methods, such as atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, were developed to increase the speciation capabilities, while minimizing sample handling. A capillary electrophoresis method was developed to improve separation capabilities while minimizing additional waste generation. In addition, considerable emphasis has been placed on developing a rapid screening tool, based on Raman and infrared spectroscopy, for determining organic functional group content when complete organic speciation is not required. This capability would allow for a cost-effective means to screen the waste tanks to identify tanks that require more specialized and complete organic speciation to determine tank safety.

  3. A three-dimensional model of error and safety in surgical health care microsystems. Rationale, development and initial testing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Research estimates of inadvertent harm to patients undergoing modern healthcare demonstrate a serious problem. Much attention has been paid to analysis of the causes of error and harm, but researchers have typically focussed either on human interaction and communication or on systems design, without fully considering the other components. Existing models for analysing harm are principally derived from theory and the analysis of individual incidents, and their practical value is often limited by the assumption that identifying causal factors automatically suggests solutions. We suggest that new models based on observation are required to help analyse healthcare safety problems and evaluate proposed solutions. We propose such a model which is directed at "microsystem" level (Ward and operating theatre), and which frames problems and solutions within three dimensions. Methods We have developed a new, simple, model of safety in healthcare systems, based on analysis of real problems seen in surgical systems, in which influences on risk at the "microsystem" level are described in terms of only 3 dimensions - technology, system and culture. We used definitions of these terms which are similar or identical to those used elsewhere in the safety literature, and utilised a set of formal empirical and deductive processes to derive the model. The "3D" model assumes that new risks arise in an unpredictable stochastic manner, and that the three defined dimensions are interactive, in an unconstrained fashion. We illustrated testing of the model, using analysis of a small number of incidents in a surgical environment for which we had detailed prospective observational data. Results The model appeared to provide useful explanation and categorisation of real events. We made predictions based on the model, which are experimentally verifiable, and propose further work to test and refine it. Conclusion We suggest that, if calibrated by application to a large incident dataset

  4. Qualitative study exploring surgical team members' perception of patient safety in conflict-ridden Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Labat, Francoise; Sharma, Anjali

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify potential barriers to patient safety (PS) interventions from the perspective of surgical team members working in an operating theatre in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Design In-depth interviews were conducted and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Setting Governmental referral teaching hospital in Eastern DRC. Participants We purposively selected 2–4 national and expatriate surgical team members from each specialisation. Of the 31 eligible surgical health workers (HWs), 17 volunteered to be interviewed. Results Economics issues affected PS throughout the entire health system, from human resources and hospital management, to access to healthcare for patients. Surgical team members seemed embedded in a paternalistic organisational structure and blame culture accompanied by perceived inefficient support services and low salaries. The armed conflict did not only worsen these system failures, it also carried direct threats to patients and HWs, and resulted in complex indirect consequences compromising PS. The increased corruption within health organisations, and population impoverishment and substance abuse among health staff adversely altered safe care. Simultaneously, HWs’ reported resilience and resourcefulness to address barrier to PS. Participants had varying views on external aid depending on its relevance. Conclusions The complex links between war and PS emphasise the importance of a comprehensive approach including occupational health to strengthen HWs' resilience, external clinical audits to limit corruption, and educational programmes in PS to support patient-centred care and address blame culture. Finally, improvement of equity in the health financing system seems essential to ensure access to healthcare and safe perioperative outcomes for all. PMID:27113232

  5. Qualitative study exploring surgical team members' perception of patient safety in conflict-ridden Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Labat, Francoise; Sharma, Anjali

    2016-04-25

    To identify potential barriers to patient safety (PS) interventions from the perspective of surgical team members working in an operating theatre in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In-depth interviews were conducted and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Governmental referral teaching hospital in Eastern DRC. We purposively selected 2-4 national and expatriate surgical team members from each specialisation. Of the 31 eligible surgical health workers (HWs), 17 volunteered to be interviewed. Economics issues affected PS throughout the entire health system, from human resources and hospital management, to access to healthcare for patients. Surgical team members seemed embedded in a paternalistic organisational structure and blame culture accompanied by perceived inefficient support services and low salaries. The armed conflict did not only worsen these system failures, it also carried direct threats to patients and HWs, and resulted in complex indirect consequences compromising PS. The increased corruption within health organisations, and population impoverishment and substance abuse among health staff adversely altered safe care. Simultaneously, HWs' reported resilience and resourcefulness to address barrier to PS. Participants had varying views on external aid depending on its relevance. The complex links between war and PS emphasise the importance of a comprehensive approach including occupational health to strengthen HWs' resilience, external clinical audits to limit corruption, and educational programmes in PS to support patient-centred care and address blame culture. Finally, improvement of equity in the health financing system seems essential to ensure access to healthcare and safe perioperative outcomes for all. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Surgical innovation and safety: femoroacetabular impingement and the IDEAL collaborative framework

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cara Beth

    2016-01-01

    Operative treatment of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a relatively new, yet rapidly expanding surgical innovation. Although the practice of surgery is inherently innovative, there is no clear distinction between minor technical variation and true modification that warrants testing. This raises important questions about how new procedures should be evaluated before being broadly disseminated. The IDEAL Collaborative is a consortium that promotes safe and responsible translation of research into clinical practice. The collaborative has delineated the typical stages of evolution of new interventional technologies, and the type of study designs appropriate for each stage. This report examines the surgical treatment of FAI as a case study of the IDEAL framework and discusses both missed and future opportunities for critical assessment. PMID:27583143

  7. Surgical Critical Care for the Patient with Sepsis and Multiple Organ Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kaml, Gary J; Davis, Kimberly A

    2016-12-01

    Sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is common in the surgical intensive care unit. Sepsis involves infection and the patient's immune response. Timely recognition of sepsis and swift application of evidence-based interventions is critical to the success of therapy. This article reviews the nature of the septic process, existing definitions of sepsis, and current evidence-based treatment strategies for sepsis and MODS. An improved understanding of the process of sepsis and its relation to MODS has resulted in clinical definitions and scoring systems that allow for the quantification of disease severity and guidelines for treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 76 FR 7853 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Oregon Patient Safety Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... Delisting From Oregon Patient Safety Commission AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of delisting. SUMMARY: Oregon Patient Safety Commission: AHRQ has accepted a notification of voluntary relinquishment from Oregon Patient Safety Commission of its status as a...

  9. 78 FR 17212 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Universal Safety Solution PSO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... Relinquishment From Universal Safety Solution PSO AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS.... AHRQ has accepted a notification of voluntary relinquishment from Universal Safety Solution PSO of its... the list of federally approved PSOs. AHRQ has accepted a notification from Universal Safety...

  10. 76 FR 9351 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From West Virginia Center for Patient Safety

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... Improvement and Patient Safety, AHRQ, 540 Gaither Road, Rockville, MD 20850; Telephone (toll free): (866) 403-3697; Telephone (local): (301) 427-1111; TTY (toll free): (866) 438-7231; TTY (local): (301) 427-1130... the Patient Safety Act and Patient Safety Rule (PDF file, 450 KB. PDF Help) relating to the listing...

  11. Surgical pearl: the safety pin as a better alternative to the versatile paper clip comedo extractor.

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, Muhammed; Sharma, Rajeev

    2004-12-01

    Acne vulgaris is a very common, chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous apparatus. The comedo extractor is the instrument primarily used for comedo extraction. There are many types of more costly instruments available, but extraction can be achieved with the help of a modified versatile paper clip and disposable syringes. The disposable syringe is a good option for acne surgery, but a safety pin has been found to be more effective than the clip comedo extractor for extracting the comedo. The safety pin can be regarded as a "two-in-one" instrument for piercing the lesion and for extracting the keratinous material from the pilosebaceous canals.

  12. The Safety Organizing Scale: development and validation of a behavioral measure of safety culture in hospital nursing units.

    PubMed

    Vogus, Timothy J; Sutcliffe, Kathleen M

    2007-01-01

    Evidence that medical error is a systemic problem requiring systemic solutions continues to expand. Developing a "safety culture" is one potential strategy toward improving patient safety. A reliable and valid self-report measure of safety culture is needed that is both grounded in concrete behaviors and is positively related to patient safety. We sought to develop and test a self-report measure of safety organizing that captures the behaviors theorized to underlie a safety culture and demonstrates use for potentially improving patient safety as evidenced by fewer reported medication errors and patient falls. A total of 1685 registered nurses from 125 nursing units in 13 hospitals in California, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Michigan, and Ohio completed questionnaires between December 2003 and June 2004. The authors conducted a cross-sectional assessment of factor structure, dimensionality, and construct validity. The Safety Organizing Scale (SOS), a 9-item unidimensional measure of self-reported behaviors enabling a safety culture, was found to have high internal reliability and reflect theoretically derived and empirically observed content domains. The measure was shown to discriminate between related concepts like organizational commitment and trust, vary significantly within hospitals, and was negatively associated with reported medication errors and patient falls in the subsequent 6-month period. The SOS not only provides meaningful, behavioral insight into the enactment of a safety culture, but because of the association between SOS scores and reported medication errors and patient falls, it also provides information that may be useful to registered nurses, nurse managers, hospital administrators, and governmental agencies.

  13. Uterine sparing robotic-assisted laparoscopic sacrohysteropexy for pelvic organ prolapse: safety and feasibility.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ted; Rosenblum, Nirit; Nitti, Victor; Brucker, Benjamin M

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the surgical technique and report the safety and feasibility of robotic-assisted laparoscopic sacrohysteropexy, a uterine sparing procedure to correct pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Hysterectomy at the time of POP surgery has yet to be proven to improve the durability of repair. Nevertheless, the leading indication for hysterectomy in postmenopausal women is POP. We reviewed the medical records of a consecutive case series of uterine sparing prolapse repair procedures from 2005 to 2011. Fifteen women were identified. Procedures utilized a type I polypropylene mesh securing the posterior uterocervical junction to the sacral promontory. This was later modified to utilize a Y-shaped strip that was inserted through the broad ligaments to include the anterior uterocervical junction. Objective success was defined as Baden Walker grade 0 uterine prolapse and subjective success was defined as no complaint of vaginal bulge or pressure. The mean age of women was 51.8 years (28-64 years). No intraoperative complications were noted. The mean operating time was 159.4 minutes (130-201 minutes) and mean estimated blood loss was 35 mL (0-100 mL). The mean length of stay was 1.6 days (1-4 days) and mean length of follow-up was 10.8 months. Uterine prolapse improved in all 15 patients. Objective success was 93% (14/15) and subjective success was 80% (12/15). Robotic-assisted laparoscopic sacrohysteropexy was found to be a safe and feasible surgical treatment option for POP patients who desire uterine preservation.

  14. Duke Surgery Patient Safety: an open-source application for anonymous reporting of adverse and near-miss surgical events

    PubMed Central

    Pietrobon, Ricardo; Lima, Raquel; Shah, Anand; Jacobs, Danny O; Harker, Matthew; McCready, Mariana; Martins, Henrique; Richardson, William

    2007-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that 4% of hospitalized patients suffer from an adverse event caused by the medical treatment administered. Some institutions have created systems to encourage medical workers to report these adverse events. However, these systems often prove to be inadequate and/or ineffective for reviewing the data collected and improving the outcomes in patient safety. Objective To describe the Web-application Duke Surgery Patient Safety, designed for the anonymous reporting of adverse and near-miss events as well as scheduled reporting to surgeons and hospital administration. Software architecture DSPS was developed primarily using Java language running on a Tomcat server and with MySQL database as its backend. Results Formal and field usability tests were used to aid in development of DSPS. Extensive experience with DSPS at our institution indicate that DSPS is easy to learn and use, has good speed, provides needed functionality, and is well received by both adverse-event reporters and administrators. Discussion This is the first description of an open-source application for reporting patient safety, which allows the distribution of the application to other institutions in addition for its ability to adapt to the needs of different departments. DSPS provides a mechanism for anonymous reporting of adverse events and helps to administer Patient Safety initiatives. Conclusion The modifiable framework of DSPS allows adherence to evolving national data standards. The open-source design of DSPS permits surgical departments with existing reporting mechanisms to integrate them with DSPS. The DSPS application is distributed under the GNU General Public License. PMID:17472749

  15. [Role of patient safety in the official approval of new surgical techniques and devices].

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Jósa, Valéria; Kulin, László

    2011-12-25

    Health technological industry brings every year thousands of new devices to the market worldwide. However, there is a large gap between the process of device approval and the control after release. Although, drugs can be used in health care only if they underwent randomized placebo controlled trials there are only a few devices that had similar studies. Surgery is a dangerous part of medicine and new technologies can represent hazard for patient safety.

  16. Forum for debate: Safety of allogeneic blood transfusion alternatives in the surgical/critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Muñoz Gómez, M; Bisbe Vives, E; Basora Macaya, M; García Erce, J A; Gómez Luque, A; Leal-Noval, S R; Colomina, M J; Comin Colet, J; Contreras Barbeta, E; Cuenca Espiérrez, J; Garcia de Lorenzo Y Mateos, A; Gomollón García, F; Izuel Ramí, M; Moral García, M V; Montoro Ronsano, J B; Páramo Fernández, J A; Pereira Saavedra, A; Quintana Diaz, M; Remacha Sevilla, Á; Salinas Argente, R; Sánchez Pérez, C; Tirado Anglés, G; Torrabadella de Reinoso, P

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, several safety alerts have questioned or restricted the use of some pharmacological alternatives to allogeneic blood transfusion in established indications. In contrast, there seems to be a promotion of other alternatives, based on blood products and/or antifibrinolytic drugs, which lack a solid scientific basis. The Multidisciplinary Autotransfusion Study Group and the Anemia Working Group España convened a multidisciplinary panel of 23 experts belonging to different healthcare areas in a forum for debate to: 1) analyze the different safety alerts referred to certain transfusion alternatives; 2) study the background leading to such alternatives, the evidence supporting them, and their consequences for everyday clinical practice, and 3) issue a weighted statement on the safety of each questioned transfusion alternative, according to its clinical use. The members of the forum maintained telematics contact for the exchange of information and the distribution of tasks, and a joint meeting was held where the conclusions on each of the items examined were presented and discussed. A first version of the document was drafted, and subjected to 4 rounds of review and updating until consensus was reached (unanimously in most cases). We present the final version of the document, approved by all panel members, and hope it will be useful for our colleagues.

  17. Safety by design: effects of operating room floor marking on the position of surgical devices to promote clean air flow compliance and minimise infection risks.

    PubMed

    de Korne, Dirk F; van Wijngaarden, Jeroen D H; van Rooij, Jeroen; Wauben, Linda S G L; Hiddema, U Frans; Klazinga, Niek S

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the use of floor marking on the positioning of surgical devices within the clean air flow in an operating room (OR) to minimise infection risk. Laminar flow clean air systems are important in preventing infection in ORs but, for optimal results, surgical devices must be correctly positioned. The authors evaluated floor marking in four ORs at an eye hospital using time series analysis. Through observations during 829 surgeries over a 20-month period, the positions of surgical devices were determined. Eight semistructured interviews with surgical staff were conducted to assess user experiences and team dynamics. Before marking, the instrument table was positioned completely within the laminar flow in only 6.1% of the cases. This increased to 36.1% and finally 53.8%. Mayo stands were increasingly positioned within the laminar flow: from 74.2% to 84.7%. The surgical lamp decreasingly obstructed flow: from 41.8% to 28.7%. At T3 (20 months), however, in 48.6% of the applicable cases the lamp was positioned in the flow again. Discussions and site visits between airside operators and surgical staff resulted in increasing awareness of specific risk areas in the OR. OR floor markings facilitated and stimulated safety awareness and resulted in significantly increased compliance with the positioning of surgical devices in the clean air flow. Safety and quality approaches in hospital care, therefore, should include a human factors approach that focuses on system design in addition to teaching clinical and non-technical skills.

  18. Surgical technology and operating-room safety failures: a systematic review of quantitative studies.

    PubMed

    Weerakkody, Ruwan A; Cheshire, Nicholas J; Riga, Celia; Lear, Rachael; Hamady, Mohammed S; Moorthy, Krishna; Darzi, Ara W; Vincent, Charles; Bicknell, Colin D

    2013-09-01

    Surgical technology has led to significant improvements in patient outcomes. However, failures in equipment and technology are implicated in surgical errors and adverse events. We aim to determine the proportion and characteristics of equipment-related error in the operating room (OR) to further improve quality of care. A systematic review of the published literature yielded 19 362 search results relating to errors and adverse events occurring in the OR, from which 124 quantitative error studies were selected for full-text review and 28 were finally selected. Median total errors per procedure in independently-observed prospective studies were 15.5, interquartile range (IQR) 2.0-17.8. Failures of equipment/technology accounted for a median 23.5% (IQR 15.0%-34.1%) of total error. The median number of equipment problems per procedure was 0.9 (IQR 0.3-3.6). From eight studies, subdivision of equipment failures was possible into: equipment availability (37.3%), configuration and settings (43.4%) and direct malfunctioning (33.5%). Observed error rates varied widely with study design and with type of operation: those with a greater burden of technology/equipment tended to show higher equipment-related error rates. Checklists (or similar interventions) reduced equipment error by mean 48.6% (and 60.7% in three studies using specific equipment checklists). Equipment-related failures form a substantial proportion of all error occurring in the OR. Those procedures that rely more heavily on technology may bear a higher proportion of equipment-related error. There is clear benefit in the use of preoperative checklist-based systems. We propose the adoption of an equipment check, which may be incorporated into the current WHO checklist.

  19. Gene therapy during cardiac surgery: role of surgical technique to minimize collateral organ gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Michael G.; Swain, JaBaris D.; Fargnoli, Anthony S.; Bridges, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Effective gene therapy for heart failure has not yet been achieved clinically. The aim of this study is to quantitatively assess the cardiac isolation efficiency of the molecular cardiac surgery with recirculating delivery (MCARD™) and to evaluate its efficacy as a means to limit collateral organ gene expression. 1014 genome copies (GC) of recombinant adeno-associated viral vector 6 encoding green fluorescent protein under control of the cytomegalovirus promoter was delivered to the nine arrested sheep hearts. Blood samples were assessed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT QPCR). Collateral organ gene expression was assessed at four-weeks using immunohistochemical staining. The blood vector GC concentration in the cardiac circuit during complete isolation trended from 9.59±0.73 to 9.05±0.65 (log GC/cm3), and no GC were detectable in the systemic circuit (P<0.001). The washing procedure performed prior to relinquishing the cardiac circuit decreased the systemic blood vector GC concentration >800-fold (P<0.001), consistent with >99% isolation efficiency. Conversely, incomplete isolation resulted in equalization of vector GC concentration in the circuits, leading to robust collateral organ gene expression. MCARD™ is an efficient, clinically translatable myocardial delivery platform for cardiac specific gene therapy. The cardiac surgical techniques utilized are critically important to limit collateral organ gene expression. PMID:20861057

  20. The shortened infusion time of intravenous ibuprofen, part 2: a multicenter, open-label, surgical surveillance trial to evaluate safety.

    PubMed

    Gan, Tong J; Candiotti, Keith; Turan, Alparslan; Buvanendran, Asokumar; Philip, Beverly K; Viscusi, Eugene R; Soghomonyan, Suren; Bergese, Sergio D

    2015-02-01

    The literature and clinical data support the use of intravenous (IV) infusions of ibuprofen to control pain and reduce the opioid requirements associated with surgical pain. According to current guidelines, IV ibuprofen can be administered via a slow IV infusion performed during a 30-minute period. Although recent studies indicate that more rapid infusions may yield additional benefits for patients, the safety of such an approach needs further evaluation. The main purpose of this study was to determine the safety of single and multiple doses of IV ibuprofen (800 mg) administered over 5 to 10 minutes at the induction of anesthesia and after the surgical procedure for the treatment of postoperative pain. This was a Phase IV, multicenter, open-label, clinical surveillance study. It was conducted at 21 hospitals in the United States, and 300 adult hospitalized patients undergoing surgery were enrolled. The exclusion criteria for the study were: inadequate IV access; hypersensitivity to any component of IV ibuprofen, aspirin, or related products; and any active, clinically significant bleeding. Also excluded were patients who had taken NSAIDs <6 hours before administration of IV ibuprofen; pregnant or breastfeeding female patients; and patients in the perioperative period of coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Patients received 800 mg of IV ibuprofen administered over 5 to 10 minutes preoperatively. Vital signs, adverse events, and pain scores were assessed. Approximately 22% (65 of 300) of patients reported adverse events (serious and nonserious). The most common adverse event was infusion site pain (34 of 300 [11%]). No deaths were reported. Nine subjects reported serious adverse events, 8 of which occurred during the first 6 hours. All serious events reported were judged unrelated to ibuprofen. Of the 300 total patients, 2 (0.67%) discontinued the study drug due to an adverse event (1 patient discontinued the study because of infusion site pain, and 1 patient

  1. The patient safety climate in healthcare organizations (PSCHO) survey: Short-form development.

    PubMed

    Benzer, Justin K; Meterko, Mark; Singer, Sara J

    2017-08-01

    Measures of safety climate are increasingly used to guide safety improvement initiatives. However, cost and respondent burden may limit the use of safety climate surveys. The purpose of this study was to develop a 15- to 20-item safety climate survey based on the Patient Safety Climate in Healthcare Organizations survey, a well-validated 38-item measure of safety climate. The Patient Safety Climate in Healthcare Organizations was administered to all senior managers, all physicians, and a 10% random sample of all other hospital personnel in 69 private sector hospitals and 30 Veterans Health Administration hospitals. Both samples were randomly divided into a derivation sample to identify a short-form subset and a confirmation sample to assess the psychometric properties of the proposed short form. The short form consists of 15 items represented 3 overarching domains in the long-form scale-organization, work unit, and interpersonal. The proposed short form efficiently captures 3 important sources of variance in safety climate: organizational, work-unit, and interpersonal. The short-form development process was a practical method that can be applied to other safety climate surveys. This safety climate short form may increase response rates in studies that involve busy clinicians or repeated measures. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. A Prognostic Scoring Tool for Cesarean Organ/Space Surgical Site Infections: Derivation and Internal Validation.

    PubMed

    Assawapalanggool, Srisuda; Kasatpibal, Nongyao; Sirichotiyakul, Supatra; Arora, Rajin; Suntornlimsiri, Watcharin

    Organ/space surgical site infections (SSIs) are serious complications after cesarean delivery. However, no scoring tool to predict these complications has yet been developed. This study sought to develop and validate a prognostic scoring tool for cesarean organ/space SSIs. Data for case and non-case of cesarean organ/space SSI between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 from a tertiary care hospital in Thailand were analyzed. Stepwise multivariable logistic regression was used to select the best predictor combination and their coefficients were transformed to a risk scoring tool. The likelihood ratio of positive for each risk category and the area under receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curves were analyzed on total scores. Internal validation using bootstrap re-sampling was tested for reproducibility. The predictors of 243 organ/space SSIs from 4,988 eligible cesarean delivery cases comprised the presence of foul-smelling amniotic fluid (four points), vaginal examination five or more times before incision (two points), wound class III or greater (two points), being referred from local setting (two points), hemoglobin less than 11 g/dL (one point), and ethnic minorities (one point). The likelihood ratio of cesarean organ/space SSIs with 95% confidence interval among low (total score of 0-1 point), medium (total score of 2-5 points), and high risk (total score of ≥6 points) categories were 0.11 (0.07-0.19), 1.03 (0.89-1.18), and 13.25 (10.87-16.14), respectively. Both AUROCs of the derivation and validation data were comparable (87.57% versus 86.08%; p = 0.418). This scoring tool showed a high predictive ability regarding cesarean organ/space SSIs on the derivation data and reproducibility was demonstrated on internal validation. It could assist practitioners prioritize patient care and management depending on risk category and decrease SSI rates in cesarean deliveries.

  3. 76 FR 71346 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From Peminic Inc. dba The Peminic-Greeley PSO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary...). The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient Safety Act), Public Law 109-41, 42 U.S... confidential information regarding the quality and safety of health care delivery. The Patient Safety and...

  4. 77 FR 32975 - Patient Safety Organizations: Expired Listing for The American Cancer Biorepository, Inc. d/b/a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Expired Listing... Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient Safety Act) authorizes the listing of PSOs... activities to improve patient safety and the quality of health care delivery. HHS issued the Patient Safety...

  5. Multispectral visualization of surgical safety-margins using fluorescent marker seeds

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Patrick TK; Beekman, Chantal AC; Buckle, Tessa; Josephson, Lee; van Leeuwen, Fijs WB

    2012-01-01

    Optical guidance provided by luminescent marker seeds may be suitable for intraoperative determination of appropriate resection margins. In phantom studies we compared the tissue penetration of several organic dyes and inorganic particles (quantum dots; QDs) after incorporation in experimental marker seeds. The tissue penetration of (near infra-) red organic dyes was much better than the penetration of dyes and QDs with an emission in the visible range. By combining 3 dyes in a single marker seed we were able to distinguish four depth ranges. The difference in tissue penetration between the dyes and QDS enabled depth estimation via a ‘traffic light’ approach. PMID:23133810

  6. [The particularities of acute surgical diseases treatment of abdominal cavity organs in patients with haemophilia].

    PubMed

    Shutov, S A; Karagiulia, S R; Danishian, K I; Zorenko, V Iu; Grzhimolovskiĭ, A V; Polianskaia, T Iu; Shulutko, E M; Galstian, G M

    2014-01-01

    The experience of treatment of 366 patients with haemophilia who were urgently hospitalized in hеmatological Scientific Center over the last 10 years is presented in the article. There were 114 (31.1%) patients with acute diseases of abdominal cavity organs, 150 (41%) patients with bleeding from upper gastrointestinal tract, 102 (27.9%) patients with acute hematomas of retroperitoneal space. Urgent operations were performed in 48 (22.2%) patients who were hospitalized with clinical symptoms of acute abdomen syndrome. It was developed the criteria of diagnosis and choice of treatment tactic on the basis of the received results. Application of presented algorithms led to improve the quality of urgent surgical care to patients with haemophilia.

  7. [Surgical therapeutic strategy in vital risk polytrauma with multiple organ injuries, case report].

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Iulia; Stefan, S; Isloi, Anca; Coca, I C; Baroi, Genoveva; Radu, L; Lăpuşneanu, A; Tamaş, Camelia

    2008-01-01

    The medical interest for trauma pathology is incresing, due to the gravity of the given injuries. The surgical therapeutic strategy used is directly related to the localization and to the type of the trauma. The supplementary lesions and their vital risk also matter. The multidisciplinary team approach is the key to resolve this type of lesions with a good outcome. We recently observed an increasing tendency toward the rise of number and variety of patients with trauma, due to the great diversity of the etiopathogenic agents. The most important factor, during the assessment of a politraumatised patient is to diagnose correctly the functional deficits of vital organs and establish the vital prognosis. It is necessary to adopt the best and fast therapeutic strategy in order to obtain rapid life-saving decisions.

  8. Corneal and conjunctival toxicity of disinfectants--assessing safety for use with ophthalmic surgical instruments.

    PubMed

    Ayaki, Masahiko; Shimada, Kazuo; Yaguchi, Shigeo; Koide, Ryohei; Iwasawa, Atsuo

    2007-08-01

    We investigated the corneal toxicity of ortho-phthalaldehyde (Cidex OPA, Johnson and Johnson K.K.) and its predecessor glutaraldehyde (Cidex, Johnson and Johnson K.K.). We made primary cultures of porcine and human corneal endothelial cells. Commercially available cell lines were also used including human, bovine, and rabbit corneal epithelium and human conjunctival cells. Following incubation for two days, cell survival was measured using a WST-1 assay for endothelia and a MTT assay for the other cells. Test solutions included 2.25% and 3.5% glutaraldehyde and 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde. Cell survival was presented as a percentage of the control value. ortho-phthalaldehyde displayed less toxicity than glutaraldehyde for all cell types tested. As expected 3.5% glutaraldehyde was slightly more toxic than 2.25% glutaraldehyde. When primary human corneal endothelial cultures were exposed to ortho-phthalaldehyde, the survival rates were 88% for 100-fold dilutions and 95% for 500-fold dilutions. The survival rates for all cells tested were greater than 90% when dilutions of 1000-fold or more were used. In conclusion, the corneal toxicity of glutaraldehyde and ortho-phthalaldehyde appears to be within safe levels following washing procedures and therefore the use of these disinfectants may be suitable for selected ophthalmic surgical instruments in urgent or under-equipped circumstances.

  9. Risk, ritual and health responsibilisation: Japan's 'safety blanket' of surgical face mask-wearing.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Adam; Horii, Mitsutoshi

    2012-11-01

    This article begins to develop an understanding of surgical mask-wearing in Japan, now a routine practice against a range of health threats. Their usage and associated meanings are explored through surveys conducted in Tokyo with both mask wearers and non-mask wearers. It contests commonly held cultural views of the practice as a fixed and distinctively Japanese collective courtesy to others. A historical analysis suggests that an originally collective, targeted and science-based response to public health threats has dispersed into a generalised practice lacking a clear end or purpose. Developed as part of the biomedical response to the Spanish flu of 1919, the practice resonated with folk assumptions as making a barrier between purity and pollution. But mask-wearing became socially embedded as a general protective practice only from the 1990s through a combination of commercial, corporate and political pressures that responsibilised individual health protection. These developments are usefully understood amidst the uncertainty created by Japan's 'second modernity' and the fracturing of her post-war order. Mask-wearing is only one form of a wider culture of risk; a self-protective risk ritual rather than a selfless collective practice. © 2012 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2012 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Cost analysis of surgical treatment for pelvic organ prolapse by laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy or transvaginal mesh.

    PubMed

    Carracedo, D; López-Fando, L; Sánchez, M D; Jiménez, M Á; Gómez, J M; Laso, I; Rodríguez, M Á; Burgos, F J

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study is to compare direct costs of repairing pelvic organ prolapse by laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy (LS) against vaginal mesh (VM). Our hypothesis is the correction of pelvic organ prolapse by LS has a similar cost per procedure compared to VM. We made a retrospective comparative analysis of medium cost per procedure of first 69 consecutive LS versus first 69 consecutive VM surgeries. We calculate direct cost for each procedure: structural outlays, personal, operating room occupation, hospital stay, perishable or inventory material and prosthetic material. Medium cost per procedure were calculated for each group, with a 95% confidence interval. LS group has a higher cost related to a longer length of surgery, higher operating room occupation and anesthesia; VM group has a higher cost due to longer hospital stay and more expensive prosthetic material. Globally, LS has a lower medium cost per procedure in comparison to VM (5,985.7 €±1,550.8 € vs. 6,534.3 €±1,015.5 €), although it did not achieve statistical signification. In our midst, pelvic organ prolapse surgical correction by LS has at least similar cost per procedure compared to VM. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Surgical treatment of pelvic organ prolapse: a historical review with emphasis on the anterior compartment.

    PubMed

    Lensen, E J M; Withagen, M I J; Kluivers, K B; Milani, A L; Vierhout, M E

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this work was to collect and summarize a detailed historical review of the surgical treatment of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) in which we specifically focused on the anterior compartment. A literature search in English, Dutch, and German was carried out using the keywords pelvic organ prolapse, anterior colporrhaphy, cystocele, and interposition operations in several databases (e.g., PubMed and HathiTrust Digital Library). Other relevant journal and textbook articles were found by retrieving references cited in previous articles and textbooks. Probably the first explanation of the treatment of POP dates from 1500 B.C. The Egyptians gave a description to "falling of the womb" in the Kahun Papyrus. More than a millennium later, Euryphon, a contemporary of Hippocrates (400 B.C.) described some interesting therapeutic options, from succussion (turning a women upside down for several minutes) to irrigating the displaced uterus with wine. A wide range of techniques has been attempted to repair the prolapsing anterior vaginal wall. By 1866, Sim had already performed a series of operations very similar to a modern anterior repair. The first reviews about the abdominal approach to correcting a cystocele were in 1890. The first description of using mesh to cystoceles was the use of tantalum mesh in 1955. In 1970, the first report of collagen mesh in urogynecology was described. Nowadays, robot-assisted surgery and cell-based tissue engineering are the latest interventions. Many surgeons have tried to find the ideal surgical therapy for anterior compartment prolapse, but to date, this has not been achieved.

  12. Distinction of Risk Factors for Superficial vs Organ-Space Surgical Site Infections After Pancreatic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Irmina A; Chan, Carmen; Russell, Tara A; Dann, Amanda M; Williams, Jennifer L; Damato, Lauren; Chung, Hallie; Girgis, Mark D; Hines, O Joe; Reber, Howard A; Donahue, Timothy R

    2017-07-12

    Surgical site infection (SSI) rates are increasingly used as a quality metric. However, risk factors for SSI in pancreatic surgery remain undefined. To stratify superficial and organ-space SSIs after pancreatectomy and investigate their modifiable risk factors. This retrospective analysis included 201 patients undergoing pancreatic surgery at a university-based tertiary referral center from July 1, 2013, through June 30, 2015, and 10 371 patients from National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Hepatopancreaticobiliary (NSQIP-HPB) Collaborative sites from January 1, 2014, through December 31, 2015. Superficial, deep-incisional, and organ-space SSIs, as defined by NSQIP. Among the 201 patients treated at the single center (108 men [53.7%] and 93 women [46.3%]; median age, 48.6 years [IQR, 41.4-57.3 years]), 58 had any SSI (28.9%); 28 (13.9%), superficial SSI; 8 (4%), deep-incisional SSI; and 24 (11.9%), organ-space SSI. Independent risk factors for superficial SSI were preoperative biliary stenting (odds ratio [OR], 4.81; 95% CI, 1.25-18.56; P = .02) and use of immunosuppressive corticosteroids (OR, 13.42; 95% CI, 1.64-109.72; P = .02), whereas soft gland texture was the only risk factor for organ-space SSI (OR, 4.45; 95% CI, 1.35-14.66; P = .01). Most patients with organ-space infections also had grades B/C fistulae (15 of 24 [62.5%] vs 4 of 143 [2.8%] in patients with no SSI; P < .001). Organ/space but not superficial SSI was associated with an increased rate of sepsis (7 of 24 [29.2%] vs 4 of 143 [2.8%]; P < .001) and prolonged length of hospital stay (12 vs 8 days; P = .04). Among patients in the NSQIP-HPB Collaborative, 2057 (19.8%) had any SSI; 719 (6.9%), superficial SSI; 207 (2%), deep-incisional SSI; and 1287 (12.4%), organ-space SSI. Preoperative biliary stenting was confirmed as an independent risk factor for superficial SSI (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.58-2.71; P < .001). In this larger data set, soft gland texture was an

  13. Enhancing patient safety in the trauma/surgical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Kenneth; Palileo, Albert; Schulman, Carl I; Wilson, Katherine; Augenstein, Jeffrey; Kiffin, Chauniqua; McKenney, Mark

    2009-09-01

    Preventable deaths due to errors in trauma patients with otherwise survivable injuries account for up to 10% of fatalities in Level I trauma centers, 50% of these errors occur in the intensive care unit (ICU). The root cause of 67% of the Joint Commission sentinel events is communication errors. The objective is (1) to study how critical information degrades and how it is lost over 24 hours and (2) to determine whether a structured checklist for ICU handoffs prevents information loss. Prospective cohort study of trauma and surgical ICU teams observed with and without use of the checklist. An observational period (control group) was followed by a didactic session on the science and use of a checklist (study group), which was used for patient management and handoffs. Information was tracked for a 24-hour period and all handoffs. Comparisons use chi or Fisher's exact test and a p value <0.05 was defined as significant. Three hundred and thirty-two patient ICU days were observed (119 control, 213 study) and 689 patient care items (303 control, 386 study) were followed. Seventy-five (10.9%) items were lost over 24 hours; 61 of 303 (20.1%) without checklist and 14 of 386 (3.6%) with checklist (p < 0.0001). Critical laboratory values and test results were the most frequent lost items (36.1% control vs. 4.5% study p < 0.0001). Six of 75 (8.1%) items were correctly ordered but not carried out by ICU nursing staff--all caught and corrected with checklist use. Critical information is degraded over 24 hours in the ICU. A structured checklist significantly reduces patient errors due to lost information and communication lapses between trauma ICU team members at handoffs of care.

  14. 76 FR 79192 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From the Georgia Hospital Association...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... Relinquishment From the Georgia Hospital Association Research and Education Foundation Patient Safety... Association Research and Education Foundation Patient Safety Organization (GHA-PSO) of its status as a Patient... PSOs. AHRQ has accepted a notification from The Georgia Hospital Association Research and Education...

  15. Waste Tank Organic Safety Project: Analysis of liquid samples from Hanford waste tank 241-C-103

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.; Bean, R.M.

    1994-03-01

    A suite of physical and chemical analyses has been performed in support of activities directed toward the resolution of an Unreviewed Safety Question concerning the potential for a floating organic layer in Hanford waste tank 241-C-103 to sustain a pool fire. The analysis program was the result of a Data Quality Objectives exercise conducted jointly with staff from Westinghouse Hanford Company and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The organic layer has been analyzed for flash point, organic composition including volatile organics, inorganic anions and cations, radionuclides, and other physical and chemical parameters needed for a safety assessment leading to the resolution of the Unreviewed Safety Question. The aqueous layer underlying the floating organic material was also analyzed for inorganic, organic, and radionuclide composition, as well as other physical and chemical properties. This work was conducted to PNL Quality Assurance impact level III standards (Good Laboratory Practices).

  16. Individual employee's perceptions of " Group-level Safety Climate" (supervisor referenced) versus " Organization-level Safety Climate" (top management referenced): Associations with safety outcomes for lone workers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Lee, Jin; McFadden, Anna C; Rineer, Jennifer; Robertson, Michelle M

    2017-01-01

    Research has shown that safety climate is among the strongest predictors of safety behavior and safety outcomes in a variety of settings. Previous studies have established that safety climate is a multi-faceted construct referencing multiple levels of management within a company, most generally: the organization level (employee perceptions of top management's commitment to and prioritization of safety) and group level (employee perceptions of direct supervisor's commitment to and prioritization of safety). Yet, no research to date has examined the potential interaction between employees' organization-level safety climate (OSC) and group-level safety climate (GSC) perceptions. Furthermore, prior research has mainly focused on traditional work environments in which supervisors and workers interact in the same location throughout the day. Little research has been done to examine safety climate with regard to lone workers. The present study aims to address these gaps by examining the relationships between truck drivers' (as an example of lone workers) perceptions of OSC and GSC, both potential linear and non-linear relationships, and how these predict important safety outcomes. Participants were 8095 truck drivers from eight trucking companies in the United States with an average response rate of 44.8%. Results showed that employees' OSC and GSC perceptions are highly correlated (r= 0.78), but notable gaps between the two were observed for some truck drivers. Uniquely, both OSC and GSC scores were found to have curvilinear relationships with safe driving behavior, and both scores were equally predictive of safe driving behavior. Results also showed the two levels of climate significantly interacted with one another to predict safety behavior such that if either the OSC or GSC scores were low, the other's contribution to safety behavior became stronger. These findings suggest that OSC and GSC may function in a compensatory manner and promote safe driving behavior even

  17. Environment Health & Safety Research Program. Organization and 1979-1980 Publications

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    This document was prepared to assist readers in understanding the organization of Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and the organization and functions of the Environment, Health and Safety Research Program Office. Telephone numbers of the principal management staff are provided. Also included is a list of 1979 and 1980 publications reporting on work performed in the Environment, Health and Safety Research Program, as well as a list of papers submitted for publication.

  18. Feasibility and safety of surgical wound remote follow-up by smart phone in appendectomy: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Segura-Sampedro, Juan José; Rivero-Belenchón, Inés; Pino-Díaz, Verónica; Rodríguez Sánchez, María Cristina; Pareja-Ciuró, Felipe; Padillo-Ruiz, Javier; Jimenez-Rodriguez, Rosa María

    2017-09-01

    The objective of the present study is to assess the safety and feasibility of the use of telemedicine-based services for surgical wound care and to measure patient satisfaction with telemedicine-based follow-up. 24 patients were included, they were provided with a corporate mail address. On day 7 after surgery patients sent, via email, an image of their surgical wound together with a completed questionnaire in order to obtain an early diagnosis. Two independent physicians studied this information and the histologic analysis of the specimen. On day 8, all patients underwent face-to-face office examination by a third physician and all of them completed a satisfaction questionnaire at the end of the study. The use of telemedicine-based services showed a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 91.6%, a positive predictive value of 75% and a negative predictive value of 100%. Degree of concordance between the two physicians, as regards the necessity of face-to-face follow-up yielded a kappa coefficient of 0.42 (standard error 0.25 and confidence interval 95% (0.92-0.08), which means a moderate agreement between the two evaluations. 94% of patients were satisfied with telemedicine-based follow-up and 93% showed their preference for this procedure over conventional methods. The telemedicine-based follow-up, has proven to be feasible and safe for the evaluation of early postoperative complications. Patients reported high levels of satisfaction with the procedure. Telemedicine-based follow-up could become standard practice with the development of a specific mobile application.

  19. A prospective, observational study of the effects of implementation strategy on compliance with a surgical safety checklist.

    PubMed

    Hannam, J A; Glass, L; Kwon, J; Windsor, J; Stapelberg, F; Callaghan, K; Merry, A F; Mitchell, S J

    2013-11-01

    The reported benefits of using the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC) are likely to depend on compliance with its correct use. Compliance with SSC administration in centres that have introduced the checklist under a research protocol may differ from centres where the SSC is introduced independently. To compare compliance with SSC administration at an original WHO pilot study centre (Hospital 1) with that at a similar neighbouring hospital (Hospital 2) that independently integrated the SSC with pre-existing practice. This was a prospective, observational study. One hundred operations were observed at each hospital. We recorded: compliance with administration of SSC domains (Sign In, Time Out and Sign Out) and individual domain items; timing of domain administration; and operating room team engagement during administration. Domain compliance at Hospital 1 and Hospital 2, respectively, was: 96% and 31% (p<0.0005) for Sign In; 99% and 48% (p<0.0005) for Time Out and 22% and 9% (p=0.008) for Sign Out. Engagement of two or more teams during Sign In and Time Out occurred more frequently at Hospital 2 than at Hospital 1. Compliance with administration of SSC domains was lower at Hospital 2 which introduced the SSC outside the context of a strict study protocol. This finding mandates caution in extrapolation of benefits identified in SSC studies to non-study hospitals. Staff engagement was better at Hospital 2 where checklist administration leadership is strategically shared among anaesthetic, surgical and nursing team members as compared with exclusive nursing leadership at Hospital 1. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: Ref: ACTRN12612000135819, http://www.anzctr.org.au/trial_view.aspx?ID=362007.

  20. Trade associations and labor organizations as intermediaries for disseminating workplace safety and health information.

    PubMed

    Okun, Andrea H; Watkins, Janice P; Schulte, Paul A

    2017-09-01

    There has not been a systematic study of the nature and extent to which business and professional trade associations and labor organizations obtain and communicate workplace safety and health information to their members. These organizations can serve as important intermediaries and play a central role in transferring this information to their members. A sample of 2294 business and professional trade associations and labor organizations in eight industrial sectors identified by the National Occupational Research Agenda was surveyed via telephone. A small percent of these organizations (40.9% of labor organizations, 15.6% of business associations, and 9.6% of professional associations) were shown to distribute workplace safety and health information to their members. Large differences were also observed between industrial sectors with construction having the highest total percent of organizations disseminating workplace safety and health information. There appears to be significant potential to utilize trade and labor organizations as intermediaries for transferring workplace safety and health information to their members. Government agencies have a unique opportunity to partner with these organizations and to utilize their existing communication channels to address high risk workplace safety and health concerns. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Corporate Functional Management Evaluation of the LLNL Radiation Safety Organization

    SciTech Connect

    Sygitowicz, L S

    2008-03-20

    A Corporate Assess, Improve, and Modernize review was conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to evaluate the LLNL Radiation Safety Program and recommend actions to address the conditions identified in the Internal Assessment conducted July 23-25, 2007. This review confirms the findings of the Internal Assessment of the Institutional Radiation Safety Program (RSP) including the noted deficiencies and vulnerabilities to be valid. The actions recommended are a result of interviews with about 35 individuals representing senior management through the technician level. The deficiencies identified in the LLNL Internal Assessment of the Institutional Radiation Safety Program were discussed with Radiation Safety personnel team leads, customers of Radiation Safety Program, DOE Livermore site office, and senior ES&H management. There are significant issues with the RSP. LLNL RSP is not an integrated, cohesive, consistently implemented program with a single authority that has the clear roll and responsibility and authority to assure radiological operations at LLNL are conducted in a safe and compliant manner. There is no institutional commitment to address the deficiencies that are identified in the internal assessment. Some of these deficiencies have been previously identified and corrective actions have not been taken or are ineffective in addressing the issues. Serious funding and staffing issues have prevented addressing previously identified issues in the Radiation Calibration Laboratory, Internal Dosimetry, Bioassay Laboratory, and the Whole Body Counter. There is a lack of technical basis documentation for the Radiation Calibration Laboratory and an inadequate QA plan that does not specify standards of work. The Radiation Safety Program lack rigor and consistency across all supported programs. The implementation of DOE Standard 1098-99 Radiological Control can be used as a tool to establish this consistency across LLNL. The establishment of a site

  2. Safety and Efficacy of Expanded Polytetrafluoroethylene Implants in the Surgical Management of Traumatic Nasal Deformity.

    PubMed

    Shadfar, Scott; Farag, Alexandar; Jarchow, Andrea M; Shockley, William W

    2015-08-01

    The ideal alloplastic implant for correction of traumatic nasal deformity has not been adequately examined. To evaluate the safety profile and postoperative results of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) implants used in functional nasal surgery (FNS) in the setting of traumatic nasal deformity. We conducted a 13-year retrospective medical chart review for patients treated at a tertiary academic facial plastic and reconstructive surgery practice between July 1999 and July 2012. A total of 404 FNS procedures were performed by a single surgeon during this period, 255 to repair traumatic deformities, 35 of these involving ePTFE implants. Patient demographics, medical comorbidities, operative and technical considerations, functional and aesthetic results, complications, and postoperative course findings were collected from patient records. In addition, preoperative and postoperative photographic documents were examined. Functional nasal surgery. Postoperative complications or presentations necessitating revision. A total of 404 patients (197 male, 207 female) underwent FNS. Of those, 255 procedures were to treat traumatic deformities. Forty patients altogether required the use of an ePTFE implant, 35 of those 40 deformities being associated with a traumatic injury. One of the 35 patients in the ePTFE-repaired traumatic deformities group experienced postoperative infection. This patient ultimately developed exposure after the infection failed to resolve with oral antibiotics, and the implant was removed. An additional patient in the ePTFE group required revision of the implant owing to contour irregularity and aesthetic concerns. No infections or other complications occurred among the 220 patients with traumatic deformity treated with autologous grafts. Analysis of other variables including sex, tobacco use, diabetes, immunosuppression, implant thickness, suture material, and prior septorhinoplasty were not associated with increased rate of infection (P > .05

  3. Surgical safety of cervical pedicle screw placement with computer navigation system.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Nobuyuki; Takami, Toshihiro

    2017-04-01

    Cervical pedicle screw (CPS) may be the biomechanically best system for posterior cervical segmental fixation, but may carry a surgery-related risk. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of CPS placement using computer navigation system for posterior cervical instrumented fixation and discuss its complication avoidance and management. Posterior cervical instrumented fixation using CPS was performed in a total of 128 patients during the period between 2007 and 2015. Intraoperative image guidance was achieved using a preoperative 3D CT-based or an intraoperative 3D CT-based navigation system. A total of 762 CPSs were placed in the spine level of C2 to Th3. The radiological accuracy of CPS placement was evaluated using postoperative CT. Accuracy of CPS placement using a preoperative 3D CT-based navigation system was 93.6 % (423 of 452 screws) in grade 0; the screw was completely contained in the pedicle, and accuracy of CPS placement using an intraoperative 3D CT-based navigation system was a little bit improved to 97.1 % (301 of 310 screws) in grade 0. CPS misplacement (more than half of screw) was 3.3 % (15 of 452 screws) using a preoperative 3D CT-based navigation system, and CPS misplacement (more than half of screw) was 0.6 % (2 of 310 screws) using an intraoperative 3D CT-based navigation system. In total, 38 screws (5.0 %) were found to perforate the cortex of pedicle, although any neural or vascular complications closely associated with CPS placement were not encountered. Twenty nine of 38 screws (76.3 %) were found to perforate laterally, and seven screws (18.4 %) were found to perforate medially. Image-guided CPS placement has been an important advancement to secure the safe surgery, although the use of CPS placement needs to be carefully determined based on the individual pathology.

  4. Health and safety organizing: OCAW'S worker-to-worker health and safety training program.

    PubMed

    Slatin, C

    2001-01-01

    In 1987, the Oil, Chemical, and Atomic Workers International Union (OCAW) was funded as one of the original eleven awardees of the Superfund Worker Training Program of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The OCAW, with the Labor Institute, developed a hazardous waste worker and hazardous materials emergency responder health and safety training program that was specific to its members in the represented industries. A social history is developed to explore a union-led, worker health education intervention. The program sought to develop worker-trainers who would conduct the training, using the Small-Group Activity Method, participate in curriculum development, and ultimately use health and safety training as a vehicle for identifying, developing, and mobilizing health and safety activists among the membership. Although the direction for this effort came from progressive leadership, it arose from the political economy of labor/management relations within specific industrial sectors.

  5. Attitudes towards the surgical safety checklist and factors associated with its use: A global survey of frontline medical professionals☆

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Ravinder S.; Cowley, Jonathan B.; Bhasin, Neeraj; Barakat, Hashem M.; Gough, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC) has been shown to reduce perioperative errors and complications and its implementation is recommended by the World Health Organisation (WHO). However, it is unknown how widely this intervention is used. We investigated attitudes and factors associated with use of WHO SSC in frontline medical professionals across the globe using a survey distributed through social networks. Methods A survey of usage and opinions regarding the SSC was posted on the Facebook and Twitter pages of a not-for-profit surgical news website for one month (March 2013). Respondents were grouped into four groups based on their country's Gross National Income: high, upper middle, lower middle and low income. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to investigate how different factors were associated with the use of the SSC. Results 6269 medical professionals from 69 countries responded to the survey: most respondents were from lower middle (47.4%) countries, followed by: high (35.0%), upper middle (14.6%), and low (3.0%) income countries. In total, 57.5% reported that they used the WHO SSC perioperatively. Fewer respondents used the WHO SSC in upper middle, lower middle and low income countries (LMICs) compared to high income countries (43.5% vs. 83.5%, p < 0.001). Female (61.3% vs. 56.4% males, p = 0.001), consultant surgeons (59.6% vs. 53.2% interns, p < 0.001) and working in university hospitals (61.4% vs. 53.7% non-university hospitals, p < 0.001) were more likely to use the SSC. Believing the SSC was useful, did not work or caused delays was independently associated with the respondents reported use of the SSC (OR 1.22 95% CI 1.07–1.39; OR 0.47 95% CI 0.36–0.60; OR 0.64 95% CI 0.53–0.77, respectively). Conclusion This study suggests the use of the WHO SSC is variable across countries, especially in LMICs where it has the most potential to improve patient safety. Critical appraisal of the documented benefits of the WHO

  6. Early rehabilitation treatment combined with equinovarus foot deformity surgical correction in stroke patients: safety and changes in gait parameters.

    PubMed

    Giannotti, Erika; Merlo, Andrea; Zerbinati, Paolo; Longhi, Maria; Prati, Paolo; Masiero, Stefano; Mazzoli, Davide

    2016-06-01

    Equinovarus foot deformity (EVFD) compromises several prerequisites of walking and increases the risk of falling. Guidelines on rehabilitation following EVFD surgery are missing in current literature. The aim of this study was to analyze safety and adherence to an early rehabilitation treatment characterized by immediate weight bearing with an ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) in hemiplegic patients after EVFD surgery and to describe gait changes after EVFD surgical correction combined with early rehabilitation treatment. Retrospective observational cohort study. Inpatient rehabilitation clinic. Forty-seven adult patients with hemiplegia consequent to ischemic or haemorrhagic stroke (L/R 20/27, age 56±15 years, time from lesion 6±5 years). A specific rehabilitation protocol with a non-articulated AFO, used to allow for immediate gait training, started one day after EVFD surgery. Gait analysis (GA) data before and one month after surgery were analyzed. The presence of differences in GA space-time parameters, in ankle dorsiflexion (DF) values and peaks at initial contact (DF at IC), during stance (DF at St) and swing (DF at Sw) were assessed by the Wilcoxon Test while the presence of correlations between pre- and post-operative values by Spearman's correlation coefficient. All patients completed the rehabilitation protocol and no clinical complications occurred in the sample. Ankle DF increased one month after surgery at all investigated gait phases (Wilcoxon Test, P<0.0001), becoming neutral at IC. Significant (P<0.05) variations were found for stride length, stride width, anterior step length of the affected side and for the duration of the double support phase of the contralateral side. The postsurgery ankle DF at St was found to be correlated (R=0.81, P<0.0001) with its pre-surgery value, thus being predictable. Weaker significant correlations were found for DF at Sw and DF at IC, where contribution from the dorsiflexor muscles is required in addition to calf muscle

  7. Food safety for the solid organ transplant patient: preventing foodborne illness while on chronic immunosuppressive drugs.

    PubMed

    Obayashi, Patricia A C

    2012-12-01

    Issues regarding food safety are seen increasingly in the news; outbreaks of foodborne illness have been associated with public health concerns ranging from mild illness to death. For the solid organ transplant patient, immunosuppressive and antibacterial drugs, which maintain transplant organ function, can expose the transplant patient to increased risk of foodborne illness from bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. This review article describes the clinical consequences, sources of foodborne illness, and food safety practices needed to minimize risks to the solid organ transplant patient who must take lifelong immunosuppressive drugs. All members of the transplant team share responsibility for education of the solid organ transplant patient in preventing infections. The registered dietitian, as part of the transplant team, is the recognized expert in providing food safety education in the context of medical nutrition therapy to solid organ transplant patients, the patients' caregivers, and other healthcare providers.

  8. Thermal effects of white light illumination during microsurgery: clinical pilot study on the application safety of surgical microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibst, Raimund; Saal, David; Russ, Detlef; Kunzi-Rapp, Karin; Kienle, Alwin; Stock, Karl

    2010-07-01

    Modern operating microscopes offer high power illumination to ensure optimal visualization, but can also cause thermal damage. The aim of our study is to quantify the thermal effects in vivo and discuss conditions for safe use. In a pilot study on volunteers, we measured the temperature at the skin surface during microscope illumination, including the influence of anaesthesia and the effects of staining, draping, or moistening of the skin. Irradiation within the limit given by safety regulations (200 mW/cm2) results in skin surface temperature of 43 °C. Higher intensities (forearm 335 mW/cm2, back 250 mW/cm2) are tolerated, resulting in reversible hyperaemia. At a very high illumination intensity (750 mW/cm2), pain occurs within 30 s at temperatures of 46 °C+/-1 °C (hand and forearm), and 43 °C+/-2 °C (back), respectively. Anaesthesia has no distinct effect on the temperature, whereas staining and drapes result in much higher temperatures (>100 °C). Moistening at practicable flow rates can reduce temperature efficiently when combined with a light absorbing and water absorbent drape. In conclusion, surgeons must be aware that surgical microscope illumination without protective means can cause skin temperatures to rise much above pain threshold, which in our study serves as a (conservative) benchmark for potential damage.

  9. Thermal effects of white light illumination during microsurgery: clinical pilot study on the application safety of surgical microscopes.

    PubMed

    Hibst, Raimund; Saal, David; Russ, Detlef; Kunzi-Rapp, Karin; Kienle, Alwin; Stock, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Modern operating microscopes offer high power illumination to ensure optimal visualization, but can also cause thermal damage. The aim of our study is to quantify the thermal effects in vivo and discuss conditions for safe use. In a pilot study on volunteers, we measured the temperature at the skin surface during microscope illumination, including the influence of anaesthesia and the effects of staining, draping, or moistening of the skin. Irradiation within the limit given by safety regulations (200 mW/cm(2)) results in skin surface temperature of 43 degrees C. Higher intensities (forearm 335 mW/cm(2), back 250 mW/cm(2)) are tolerated, resulting in reversible hyperaemia. At a very high illumination intensity (750 mW/cm(2)), pain occurs within 30 s at temperatures of 46 degrees C+/-1 degrees C (hand and forearm), and 43 degrees C+/-2 degrees C (back), respectively. Anaesthesia has no distinct effect on the temperature, whereas staining and drapes result in much higher temperatures (>100 degrees C). Moistening at practicable flow rates can reduce temperature efficiently when combined with a light absorbing and water absorbent drape. In conclusion, surgeons must be aware that surgical microscope illumination without protective means can cause skin temperatures to rise much above pain threshold, which in our study serves as a (conservative) benchmark for potential damage.

  10. Efficiency and safety of surgical intervention to patients with Non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li-Chao; Liang, Shuo; Lu, Hai-Wen; Fei, Ke; Xu, Jin-Fu

    2015-12-02

    No quantitative systematic review was found to report the efficiency and safety of surgical resection in the management of non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF) bronchiectasis. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis to assess the effects of operative intervention to patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. PubMed, the Cochrane library and Web of Science databases were searched up to July 8th, 2015. The pooled mortality from 34 studies recruiting 4788 patients was 1.5% (95% CI, 0.9-2.5%). The pooled morbidity from 33 studies consisting of 4583 patients was 16.7% (95% CI, 14.8-18.6%). The pooled proportion of patients from 35 studies, consisting of 4614 patients who were free of symptoms was 66.5% (95% CI, 61.3-71.7%) after surgery. The summary proportion of patients from 35 articles including 4279 participants who were improved was 27.5% (95% CI, 22.5-32.5%), and 9.1% (95% CI, 7.3-11.5%) showed no clinical improvement. In conclusion, our analysis indicated that lung resection in the management of non-CF bronchiectasis is associated with significant improvements in symptoms, low risk of mortality and acceptable morbidity.

  11. Parenteral safflower oil emulsion (Liposyn 10%): safety and effectiveness in treating or preventing essential fatty acid deficiency in surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bivins, B A; Rapp, R P; Record, K; Meng, H C; Griffen, W O

    1980-01-01

    The safety and effectiveness of a 10% safflower oil emulsion in treating or preventing essential fatty acid deficiency was tested in a prospective study of 15 surgical patients requiring total parenteral nutrition for two to four weeks. Three dosage regimens were evaluated including: Group I: 4% of calories as linoleate daily (five patients), Group II: 4% of calories as linoleate every other day (two patients), and Group III: 8% of calories every other day (eight patients). Patients were monitored for laboratory changes from baseline specifically in those areas where previous fat emulsions have caused serious deviations. No significant changes were noted in hematologic parameters, coagulation studies, cholesterol and triglyceride serum levels. Although there were sporadic mild deviations in liver function changes in several patients, no clinically significant adverse effects could be directly attributed to infusion of the fat emulsion. Three patients had baseline triene/tetraene ratios of 0.4 or greater, indicative of essential fatty/acid deficiency, and these ratios dropped to less than 0.4 within eight days of beginning therapy with the parenteral fat emulsion. The remaining 12 patients maintained a normal triene/tetraene ratio of less than 0.4 throughout the 28 day study period. All three dosage regimens were considered effective for treatment and prevention of essential fatty acid deficiency. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6767452

  12. Efficiency and safety of surgical intervention to patients with Non-Cystic Fibrosis bronchiectasis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-Chao; Liang, Shuo; Lu, Hai-Wen; Fei, Ke; Xu, Jin-Fu

    2015-01-01

    No quantitative systematic review was found to report the efficiency and safety of surgical resection in the management of non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF) bronchiectasis. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis to assess the effects of operative intervention to patients with non-CF bronchiectasis. PubMed, the Cochrane library and Web of Science databases were searched up to July 8th, 2015. The pooled mortality from 34 studies recruiting 4788 patients was 1.5% (95% CI, 0.9–2.5%). The pooled morbidity from 33 studies consisting of 4583 patients was 16.7% (95% CI, 14.8–18.6%). The pooled proportion of patients from 35 studies, consisting of 4614 patients who were free of symptoms was 66.5% (95% CI, 61.3–71.7%) after surgery. The summary proportion of patients from 35 articles including 4279 participants who were improved was 27.5% (95% CI, 22.5–32.5%), and 9.1% (95% CI, 7.3–11.5%) showed no clinical improvement. In conclusion, our analysis indicated that lung resection in the management of non-CF bronchiectasis is associated with significant improvements in symptoms, low risk of mortality and acceptable morbidity. PMID:26627202

  13. Organic tanks safety program FY95 waste aging studies

    SciTech Connect

    Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Lenihan, B.D.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.

    1995-09-01

    This report gives the second year`s findings of a study of how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds in the underground tanks at Hanford. Efforts were focused on the global reaction kinetics in a simulated waste exposed to {gamma} rays and the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion. The gas production is predominantly radiolytic. Decarboxylation of carboxylates is probably an aging pathway. TBP was totaly consumed in almost every run. Radiation clearly accelerated consumption of the other compounds. EDTA is more reactive than citrate. Oximes and possibly organic nitro compounds are key intermediates in the radiolytic redox reactions of organic compounds with nitrate/nitrite. Observations are consistent with organic compounds being progressively degraded to compounds with greater numbers of C-O bonds and fewer C-H and C-C bonds, resulting in an overall lower energy content. If the radwaste tanks are adequately ventilated and continually dosed by radioactivity, their total energy content should have declined. Level of risk depends on how rapidly carboxylate salts of moderate energy content (including EDTA fragments) degrade to low energy oxalate and formate.

  14. Organization and Representation of Patient Safety Data: Current Status and Issues around Generalizability and Scalability

    PubMed Central

    Boxwala, Aziz A.; Dierks, Meghan; Keenan, Maura; Jackson, Susan; Hanscom, Robert; Bates, David W.; Sato, Luke

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports have identified medical errors as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among patients. A variety of approaches have been implemented to identify errors and their causes. These approaches include retrospective reporting and investigation of errors and adverse events and prospective analyses for identifying hazardous situations. The above approaches, along with other sources, contribute to data that are used to analyze patient safety risks. A variety of data structures and terminologies have been created to represent the information contained in these sources of patient safety data. Whereas many representations may be well suited to the particular safety application for which they were developed, such application-specific and often organization-specific representations limit the sharability of patient safety data. The result is that aggregation and comparison of safety data across organizations, practice domains, and applications is difficult at best. A common reference data model and a broadly applicable terminology for patient safety data are needed to aggregate safety data at the regional and national level and conduct large-scale studies of patient safety risks and interventions. PMID:15298992

  15. Establishment and use of surgical rat models for assessment of organ specific in vivo clearance.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Bill

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of clearance plays a key role in the development of new drug entities, especially in the development of improved analogues for treatment of chronic conditions. Improved pharmacokinetic properties can be used to increase dosing interval and thereby improve patient compliance. This will lead to improved treatment outcome or decreased risk of treatment failure when treating chronic conditions. Therefore, animal models for assessment of organ-specific clearance are of great value in preclinical drug development. These models can be used to obtain insights into the relative importance of a clearance organ and thereby guide drug design of new analogues in early drug discovery. The current PhD project was undertaken to explore surgical in vivo models, which could be used in the assessment of the relative importance of major clearance organs. It was the aim of the PhD project to establish and validate both a nephrectomy model and a hepatectomy model as tools to investigate relative importance of renal and hepatic clearance. Furthermore, the project aim was to investigate renal clearance of rFVIIa and rhGH using a nephrectomy model in rats. The thesis is composed of a short theoretical background, a literature review, two papers based on experimental work as well as experimental work not included in the papers. Chapter one is an introduction with the specific aims and hypotheses. The chapters from two to five contain theoretical background of the clearance concept, anatomical and physiological description of clearance organs and a brief overview of potential clearance models including in vivo models. Chapters six through nine highlight the experimental work with the results obtained during the PhD project. Lastly, the chapters from ten to twelve contain a general discussion, conclusion and perspectives of the current thesis. Paper I "Nephrectomized and hepatectomized animal models as tools in preclinical pharmacokinetics" provides a literature review of animal

  16. Alcohol skin preparation causes surgical fires.

    PubMed

    Rocos, B; Donaldson, L J

    2012-03-01

    Surgical fires are a rare but serious preventable safety risk in modern hospitals. Data from the US show that up to 650 surgical fires occur each year, with up to 5% causing death or serious harm. This study used the National Reporting and Learning Service (NRLS) database at the National Patient Safety Agency to explore whether spirit-based surgical skin preparation fluid contributes to the cause of surgical fires. The NRLS database was interrogated for all incidents of surgical fires reported between 1 March 2004 and 1 March 2011. Each report was scrutinised manually to discover the cause of the fire. Thirteen surgical fires were reported during the study period. Of these, 11 were found to be directly related to spirit-based surgical skin preparation or preparation soaked swabs and drapes. Despite manufacturer's instructions and warnings, surgical fires continue to occur. Guidance published in the UK and US states that spirit-based skin preparation solutions should continue to be used but sets out some precautions. It may be that fire risk should be included in pre-surgical World Health Organization checklists or in the surgical training curriculum. Surgical staff should be aware of the risk that spirit-based skin preparation fluids pose and should take action to minimise the chance of fire occurring.

  17. Alcohol skin preparation causes surgical fires

    PubMed Central

    Rocos, B; Donaldson, LJ

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Surgical fires are a rare but serious preventable safety risk in modern hospitals. Data from the US show that up to 650 surgical fires occur each year, with up to 5% causing death or serious harm. This study used the National Reporting and Learning Service (NRLS) database at the National Patient Safety Agency to explore whether spirit-based surgical skin preparation fluid contributes to the cause of surgical fires. METHODS The NRLS database was interrogated for all incidents of surgical fires reported between 1 March 2004 and 1 March 2011. Each report was scrutinised manually to discover the cause of the fire. RESULTS Thirteen surgical fires were reported during the study period. Of these, 11 were found to be directly related to spirit-based surgical skin preparation or preparation soaked swabs and drapes. CONCLUSIONS Despite manufacturer's instructions and warnings, surgical fires continue to occur. Guidance published in the UK and US states that spirit-based skin preparation solutions should continue to be used but sets out some precautions. It may be that fire risk should be included in pre-surgical World Health Organization checklists or in the surgical training curriculum. Surgical staff should be aware of the risk that spirit-based skin preparation fluids pose and should take action to minimise the chance of fire occurring. PMID:22391366

  18. Workforce Perceptions of Hospital Safety Culture: Development and Validation of the Patient Safety Climate in Healthcare Organizations Survey

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Sara; Meterko, Mark; Baker, Laurence; Gaba, David; Falwell, Alyson; Rosen, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Objective To describe the development of an instrument for assessing workforce perceptions of hospital safety culture and to assess its reliability and validity. Data Sources/Study Setting Primary data collected between March 2004 and May 2005. Personnel from 105 U.S. hospitals completed a 38-item paper and pencil survey. We received 21,496 completed questionnaires, representing a 51 percent response rate. Study Design Based on review of existing safety climate surveys, we developed a list of key topics pertinent to maintaining a culture of safety in high-reliability organizations. We developed a draft questionnaire to address these topics and pilot tested it in four preliminary studies of hospital personnel. We modified the questionnaire based on experience and respondent feedback, and distributed the revised version to 42,249 hospital workers. Data Collection We randomly divided respondents into derivation and validation samples. We applied exploratory factor analysis to responses in the derivation sample. We used those results to create scales in the validation sample, which we subjected to multitrait analysis (MTA). Principal Findings We identified nine constructs, three organizational factors, two unit factors, three individual factors, and one additional factor. Constructs demonstrated substantial convergent and discriminant validity in the MTA. Cronbach's α coefficients ranged from 0.50 to 0.89. Conclusions It is possible to measure key salient features of hospital safety climate using a valid and reliable 38-item survey and appropriate hospital sample sizes. This instrument may be used in further studies to better understand the impact of safety climate on patient safety outcomes. PMID:17850530

  19. A policy-based intervention for the reduction of communication breakdowns in inpatient surgical care: results from a Harvard surgical safety collaborative.

    PubMed

    Arriaga, Alexander F; Elbardissi, Andrew W; Regenbogen, Scott E; Greenberg, Caprice C; Berry, William R; Lipsitz, Stuart; Moorman, Donald; Kasser, James; Warshaw, Andrew L; Zinner, Michael J; Gawande, Atul A

    2011-05-01

    To develop and evaluate an intervention to reduce breakdowns in communication during inpatient surgical care. Communication breakdowns are the second most common cause of avoidable surgical adverse events after technical errors. In a pre- and postintervention study, a random selection of patients on the surgical services of 4 teaching hospitals were observed according to 3 measures: (1) resident-attending communication of critical patient events (eg, transfer into the intensive care unit, unplanned intubation, cardiac arrest); (2) resident-attending notification regarding routine weekend patient status; and (3) frequency of weekend patient visits by an attending. All departments then developed and adopted a set of policy and education initiatives designed to increase prompt and consistent resident-attending communication (especially in critical events) and to improve regular attending visits with surgical patients. Specific reinforcement of the policies included a pocket information card for residents, as well as periodic reminders. Repeat audits of the surgical services were then conducted. We reviewed information for 211 critical events and 1360 patients for the nature of resident and attending communication practices. After the intervention, the proportion of critical events not conveyed to an attending decreased from 33% (26/80) to 2% (1/47), and gaps in the frequency of attending notification of patient status on weekends were virtually eliminated (P < 0.0001); the proportion of weekend patients not visited by an attending for greater than 24 hours decreased by half (from 61% to 33%; P = 0.0002). Contact resulted in attending-led changes in patient management in one-third of cases. An intervention to improve surgical communication practices at 4 teaching hospitals led to significant reductions in potentially harmful communication breakdowns during inpatient care; significant alterations in patient management were noted in one-third of cases in which there was

  20. Alternative and Organic Beef Production: Food-Safety Issues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The sales of organic beef is increasing yearly due to the perception of it being more nutritious, better for the environment, contains minimal levels of pesticides, is produced without growth hormones, is not genetically engineered, and is produced using improved animal welfare practices. Artisan, ...

  1. The impact of safety organizing, trusted leadership, and care pathways on reported medication errors in hospital nursing units.

    PubMed

    Vogus, Timothy J; Sutcliffe, Kathleen M

    2011-01-01

    Prior research has found that safety organizing behaviors of registered nurses (RNs) positively impact patient safety. However, little research exists on the joint benefits of safety organizing and other contextual factors that help foster safety. Although we know that organizational practices often have more powerful effects when combined with other mutually reinforcing practices, little research exists on the joint benefits of safety organizing and other contextual factors believed to foster safety. Specifically, we examined the benefits of bundling safety organizing with leadership (trust in manager) and design (use of care pathways) factors on reported medication errors. A total of 1033 RNs and 78 nurse managers in 78 emergency, internal medicine, intensive care, and surgery nursing units in 10 acute-care hospitals in Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Michigan, and Ohio who completed questionnaires between December 2003 and June 2004. Cross-sectional analysis of medication errors reported to the hospital incident reporting system for the 6 months after the administration of the survey linked to survey data on safety organizing, trust in manager, use of care pathways, and RN characteristics and staffing. Multilevel Poisson regression analyses indicated that the benefits of safety organizing on reported medication errors were amplified when paired with high levels of trust in manager or the use of care pathways. Safety organizing plays a key role in improving patient safety on hospital nursing units especially when bundled with other organizational components of a safety supportive system.

  2. Organic tanks safety program FY96 waste aging studies

    SciTech Connect

    Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Linehan, J.C.; Clauss, S.A.; Sharma, A.K.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    Uranium and plutonium production at the Hanford Site produced large quantities of radioactive by-products and contaminated process chemicals, which are stored in underground tanks awaiting treatment and disposal. Having been made strongly alkaline and then subjected to successive water evaporation campaigns to increase storage capacity, the wastes now exist in the physical forms of salt cakes, metal oxide sludges, and partially saturated aqueous brine solutions. The tanks that contain organic process chemicals mixed with nitrate/nitrite salt wastes may be at risk for fuel- nitrate combustion accidents. The purpose of the Waste Aging Task is to elucidate how chemical and radiological processes will have aged or degraded the organic compounds stored in the tanks. Ultimately, the task seeks to develop quantitative measures of how aging changes the energetic properties of the wastes. This information will directly support efforts to evaluate the hazard as well as to develop potential control and mitigation strategies.

  3. Gender-Based Differences in Surgical Residents' Perceptions of Patient Safety, Continuity of Care, and Well-Being: An Analysis from the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial.

    PubMed

    Ban, Kristen A; Chung, Jeanette W; Matulewicz, Richard S; Kelz, Rachel R; Shea, Judy A; Dahlke, Allison R; Quinn, Christopher M; Yang, Anthony D; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about gender differences in residency training experiences and whether duty hour policies affect these differences. Using data from the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) trial, we examined gender differences in surgical resident perceptions of patient safety, education, health and well-being, and job satisfaction, and assessed whether duty hour policies affected gender differences. We compared proportions of male and female residents expressing dissatisfaction or perceiving a negative effect of duty hours on aspects of residency training (ie patient safety, resident education, well-being, job satisfaction) overall and by PGY. Logistic regression models with robust clustered SEs were used to test for significant gender differences and interaction effects of duty hour policies on gender differences. Female PGY2 to 3 residents were more likely than males to be dissatisfied with patient safety (odds ratio [OR] = 2.50; 95% CI, 1.29-4.84) and to perceive a negative effect of duty hours on most health and well-being outcomes (OR = 1.51-2.10; all p < 0.05). Female PGY4 to 5 residents were more likely to be dissatisfied with resident education (OR = 1.56; 95% CI, 1.03-2.35) and time for rest (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.05-2.28) than males. Flexible duty hours reduced gender differences in career dissatisfaction among interns (p = 0.028), but widened gender differences in negative perceptions of duty hours on patient safety (p < 0.001), most health and well-being outcomes (p < 0.05), and outcomes related to job satisfaction (p < 0.05) among PGY2 to 3 residents. Gender differences exist in perceptions of surgical residency. These differences vary across cohorts and can be influenced by duty hour policies. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Perception of Safety of Surgical Practice Among Operating Room Personnel From Survey Data Is Associated With All-cause 30-day Postoperative Death Rate in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Molina, George; Berry, William R; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Edmondson, Lizabeth; Li, Zhonghe; Neville, Bridget A; Moonan, Aunyika T; Gibbons, Lorri R; Gawande, Atul A; Singer, Sara J; Haynes, Alex B

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate whether the perception of safety of surgical practice among operating room (OR) personnel is associated with hospital-level 30-day postoperative death. The relationship between improvements in the safety of surgical practice and benefits to postoperative outcomes has not been demonstrated empirically. As part of the Safe Surgery 2015: South Carolina initiative, a baseline survey measuring the perception of safety of surgical practice among OR personnel was completed. We evaluated the relationship between hospital-level mean item survey scores and rates of all-cause 30-day postoperative death using binomial regression. Models were controlled for multiple patient, hospital, and procedure covariates using supervised principal components regression. The overall survey response rate was 38.1% (1793/4707) among 31 hospitals. For every 1 point increase in the hospital-level mean score for respect [adjusted relative risk (aRR) 0.78, 95% CI 0.65-0.93, P = 0.0059], clinical leadership (aRR 0.86, 95% CI 0.74-0.9932, P = 0.0401), and assertiveness (aRR 0.71, 95% CI 0.54-0.93, P = 0.01) among all survey respondents, there were associated decreases in the hospital-level 30-day postoperative death rate after inpatient surgery ranging from 14% to 29%. Higher hospital-level mean scores for the statement, "I would feel safe being treated here as a patient," were associated with significantly lower hospital-level 30-day postoperative death rates (aRR 0.83, 95% CI 0.70-0.97, P = 0.02). Although most findings seen among all OR personnel were seen among nurses, they were often absent among surgeons. Perception of OR safety of surgical practice was associated with hospital-level 30-day postoperative death rates.

  5. Lethal and sublethal effects of cadmium on marine organisms--a critical discussion about "safety levels".

    PubMed

    Sperling, K R

    1983-12-01

    The applicability of terms such as "safety level" and "safety factor" for the purpose of risk assessment in the frame of the marine dumping conventions is discussed. In view of a series of experiments on sublethal effects of cadmium on marine organisms it is stated that the dose-response relationships cover a range of 10(4), and that there is no indication that the lowest level found so far is actually just above a no-effect threshold.

  6. Lethal and sublethal effects of cadmium on marine organisms: a critical discussion about ''safety levels''

    SciTech Connect

    Sperling, K.R.

    1983-12-01

    The applicability of terms such as ''safety level'' and ''safety factor'' for the purpose of risk assessment in the frame of the marine dumping conventions is discussed. In view of a series of experiments on sublethal effects of cadmium on marine organisms it is stated that the dose-response relationships cover a range of 10(4), and that there is no indication that the lowest level found so far is actually just above a no-effect threshold.

  7. The Gap between Individual Perception and Compliance: A Qualitative Follow-Up Study of the Surgical Safety Checklist Application

    PubMed Central

    Sendlhofer, Gerald; Lumenta, David Benjamin; Leitgeb, Karina; Kober, Brigitte; Jantscher, Lydia; Schanbacher, Monika; Berghold, Andrea; Pregartner, Gudrun; Brunner, Gernot; Tax, Christa; Kamolz, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background “The Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC) is important, but we don’t use it adequately” is a well-suited statement that reflects the SSC's application in hospitals. Our aim was to follow up on our initial study on compliance (2014) by analysing differences between individual perception and compliance with the SSC. Methods We conducted a follow-up online survey to assess healthcare professionals’ individual perception of, as well as satisfaction and compliance with the SSC three years following its thorough implementation. Results 171 (19.5%) of 875 operating team members completed the online survey. 99.4% confirmed using the SSC. Self-estimated subjective knowledge about the intention of the checklist was high, whereas objective knowledge was moderate, but improved as compared to 2014. According to an independent audit the SSC was used in 93.1% of all operations and among the SSCs used the completion rate was 57.2%. The use of the SSC was rated as rather easy [median (IQR): 7 (6–7)], familiar [7 (6–7)], generally important [7 (7–7)], and good for patients [7 (6–7)] as well as for employees [7 (7–7)]. Only comfort of use was rated lower [6 (5–7)]. Conclusion There is a gap between individual perception and actual application of the SSC. Despite healthcare professionals confirming the importance of the SSC, compliance was moderate. The introduction of SSCs in the health care sector remains a constant challenge and requires continuous re-evaluation as well as a sensible integration into existing workflows in hospitals. PMID:26925579

  8. Patient safety in anesthesia: learning from the culture of high-reliability organizations.

    PubMed

    Wright, Suzanne M

    2015-03-01

    There has been an increased awareness of and interest in patient safety and improved outcomes, as well as a growing body of evidence substantiating medical error as a leading cause of death and injury in the United States. According to The Joint Commission, US hospitals demonstrate improvements in health care quality and patient safety. Although this progress is encouraging, much room for improvement remains. High-reliability organizations, industries that deliver reliable performances in the face of complex working environments, can serve as models of safety for our health care system until plausible explanations for patient harm are better understood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Designing safety into the minimally invasive surgical revolution: a commentary based on the Jacques Perissat Lecture of the International Congress of the European Association for Endoscopic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Clarke, John R

    2009-01-01

    Surgical errors with minimally invasive surgery differ from those in open surgery. Perforations are typically the result of trocar introduction or electrosurgery. Infections include bioburdens, notably enteric viruses, on complex instruments. Retained foreign objects are primarily unretrieved device fragments and lost gallstones or other specimens. Fires and burns come from illuminated ends of fiber-optic cables and from electrosurgery. Pressure ischemia is more likely with longer endoscopic surgical procedures. Gas emboli can occur. Minimally invasive surgery is more dependent on complex equipment, with high likelihood of failures. Standardization, checklists, and problem reporting are solutions for minimizing failures. The necessity of electrosurgery makes education about best electrosurgical practices important. The recording of minimally invasive surgical procedures is an opportunity to debrief in a way that improves the reliability of future procedures. Safety depends on reliability, designing systems to withstand inevitable human errors. Safe systems are characterized by a commitment to safety, formal protocols for communications, teamwork, standardization around best practice, and reporting of problems for improvement of the system. Teamwork requires shared goals, mental models, and situational awareness in order to facilitate mutual monitoring and backup. An effective team has a flat hierarchy; team members are empowered to speak up if they are concerned about problems. Effective teams plan, rehearse, distribute the workload, and debrief. Surgeons doing minimally invasive surgery have a unique opportunity to incorporate the principles of safety into the development of their discipline.

  10. Multi-organ resection for locally advanced adrenocortical cancer: surgical strategy and literature review

    PubMed Central

    GUIDA, F.; CLEMENTE, M.; VALVANO, L.; NAPOLITANO, C.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare and aggressive endocrine malignancy with an estimated worldwide incidence of 0.5–2 per million/year. Complete surgical removal of ACC represents the current treatment of choice for this tumor. A disease-free resection margin (R0) is an important predictor of long-term survival: surgery is demanding and must be performed by a highly experienced surgical team. We report the surgical strategy adopted in a patient with locally advanced ACC and virilization to obtain a R0 resection. PMID:26712261

  11. [Managment system in safety and health at work organization. An Italian example in public sector: Inps].

    PubMed

    Di Loreto, G; Felicioli, G

    2010-01-01

    The Istituto Nazionale della Previdenza Sociale (Inps) is one of the biggest Public Sector organizations in Italy; about 30.000 people work in his structures. Fifteen years ago, Inps launched a long term project with the objective to create a complex and efficient safety and health at work organization. Italian law contemplates a specific kind of physician working on safety and health at work, called "Medico competente", and 85 Inps's physicians work also as "Medico competente". This work describes how IT improved coordination and efficiency in this occupational health's management system.

  12. Resistance to synthetic blood penetration of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-approved N95 filtering facepiece respirators and surgical N95 respirators

    PubMed Central

    Rengasamy, Samy; Sbarra, Deborah; Nwoko, Julian; Shaffer, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs), certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) as a respirator and cleared by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a surgical mask, are often used to protect from the inhalation of infectious aerosols and from splashes/sprays of body fluids in health care facilities. A shortage of respirators can be expected during a pandemic. The availability of surgical N95 FFRs can potentially be increased by incorporating FDA clearance requirements in the NIOSH respirator approval process. Methods Fluid resistance of NIOSH-approved N95 FFRs, and FDA-cleared surgical N95 FFRs and surgical masks was tested using the ASTM F1862 method at 450 and 635 cm/sec velocities and compared with the results from a third-party independent laboratory. Blood penetration through different layers of filter media of masks were also analyzed visually. Results Four N95 FFR models showed no test failures at both velocities. The penetration results obtained in the NIOSH laboratory were comparable to those from the third-party independent laboratory. The number of respirator samples failing the test increased with increasing test velocity. Conclusions The results indicate that several NIOSH-approved N95 FFR models would likely pass FD clearance requirements for resistance to synthetic blood penetration. PMID:26231551

  13. Resistance to synthetic blood penetration of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-approved N95 filtering facepiece respirators and surgical N95 respirators.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Samy; Sbarra, Deborah; Nwoko, Julian; Shaffer, Ronald

    2015-11-01

    Surgical N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs), certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) as a respirator and cleared by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a surgical mask, are often used to protect from the inhalation of infectious aerosols and from splashes/sprays of body fluids in health care facilities. A shortage of respirators can be expected during a pandemic. The availability of surgical N95 FFRs can potentially be increased by incorporating FDA clearance requirements in the NIOSH respirator approval process. Fluid resistance of NIOSH-approved N95 FFRs, and FDA-cleared surgical N95 FFRs and surgical masks was tested using the ASTM F1862 method at 450 and 635 cm/sec velocities and compared with the results from a third-party independent laboratory. Blood penetration through different layers of filter media of masks were also analyzed visually. Four N95 FFR models showed no test failures at both velocities. The penetration results obtained in the NIOSH laboratory were comparable to those from the third-party independent laboratory. The number of respirator samples failing the test increased with increasing test velocity. The results indicate that several NIOSH-approved N95 FFR models would likely pass FDA clearance requirements for resistance to synthetic blood penetration. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Management of health and safety in the organization of worktime at the local level.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, H J; Bøggild, H

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the consideration of health and safety issues in the local process of organizing worktime within the framework of regulations. The study encompassed all 7 hospitals in one region of Denmark. Twenty-three semi-structured interviews were carried out with 2 representatives from the different parties involved (management, cooperation committees, health and safety committees from each hospital, and 2 local unions). Furthermore, a questionnaire was sent to all 114 wards with day and night duty. The response rate was 84%. Data were collected on alterations in worktime schedules, responsibilities, reasons for the present design of schedules, and use of inspection reports. The organization of worktime takes place in single wards without external interference and without guidelines other than the minimum standards set in regulations. At the ward level, management and employees were united in a mutual desire for flexibility, despite the fact that regulations were not always followed. No interaction was found in the management of health and safety factors between the parties concerned at different levels. The demands for flexibility in combination with the absence of guidelines and the missing dynamics between the parties involved imply that the handling of health and safety issues in the organization of worktime may be accidental and unsystematic. In order to consider the health and safety of night and shift workers within the framework of regulations, a clarification of responsibilities, operational levels, and cooperation is required between the parties concerned.

  15. The Vaccine Safety Datalink: immunization research in health maintenance organizations in the USA.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, R. T.; DeStefano, F.; Davis, R. L.; Jackson, L. A.; Thompson, R. S.; Mullooly, J. P.; Black, S. B.; Shinefield, H. R.; Vadheim, C. M.; Ward, J. I.; Marcy, S. M.

    2000-01-01

    The Vaccine Safety Datalink is a collaborative project involving the National Immunization Program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and several large health maintenance organizations in the USA. The project began in 1990 with the primary purpose of rigorously evaluating concerns about the safety of vaccines. Computerized data on vaccination, medical outcome (e.g. outpatient visits, emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and deaths) and covariates (e.g. birth certificates, census data) are prospectively collected and linked under joint protocol at multiple health maintenance organizations for analysis. Approximately 6 million persons (2% of the population of the USA) are now members of health maintenance organizations participating in the Vaccine Safety Datalink, which has proved to be a valuable resource providing important information on a number of vaccine safety issues. The databases and infrastructure created for the Vaccine Safety Datalink have also provided opportunities to address vaccination coverage, cost-effectiveness and other matters connected with immunization as well as matters outside this field. PMID:10743283

  16. [A surgical safety checklist implementation: experience of a start-up phase of a collaborative project in hospitals of Catalonia, Spain].

    PubMed

    Secanell, Mariona; Orrego, Carola; Vila, Miquel; Vallverdú, Helena; Mora, Núria; Oller, Anna; Bañeres, Joaquim

    2014-07-01

    Surgical patient safety is a priority in the national and international quality healthcare improvement strategies. The objective of the study was to implement a collaborative intervention with multiple components and to evaluate the impact of the patient surgical safety checklist (SSC) application. This is a prospective, longitudinal multicenter study with a 7-month follow-up period in 2009 based on a collaborative intervention for the implementation of a 24 item-SSC distributed in 3 different stages (sign in, time out, sign out) for its application to the surgical patient. A total number of 27 hospitals participated in the strategy. The global implementation rate was 48% (95%CI, 47.6%-48.4%) during the evaluation period. The overall compliance with all the items of the SSC included in each stage (sign in, time out, sign out) was 75,1% (95%CI, 73.5%-76.7%) for the sign in, 77.1% (95%CI, 75.5%-78.6%) for the time out and 88.3% (95%CI, 87.2%-89.5%) for the sign out respectively. The individual compliance with each item of the SSC has remained above 85%, except for the surgical site marking with an adherence of 67.4% (95%CI, 65.7%-69.1%)] and 71.2% (95%CI, 69.6%-72.9%)] in the sign in and time out respectively. The SSC was successfully implemented to 48% of the surgeries performed to the participating hospitals. The global compliance with the SSC was elevated and the intervention trend was stable during the evaluation period. Strategies were identified to allow of a higher number of surgeries with application of the SSC and more professional involvement in measures compliance such as surgical site marking. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  17. The SAFER guides: empowering organizations to improve the safety and effectiveness of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Sittig, Dean F; Ash, Joan S; Singh, Hardeep

    2014-05-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have potential to improve quality and safety of healthcare. However, EHR users have experienced safety concerns from EHR design and usability features that are not optimally adapted for the complex work flow of real-world practice. Few strategies exist to address unintended consequences from implementation of EHRs and other health information technologies. We propose that organizations equipped with EHRs should consider the strategy of "proactive risk assessment" of their EHR-enabled healthcare system to identify and address EHR-related safety concerns. In this paper, we describe the conceptual underpinning of an EHR-related self-assessment strategy to provide institutions a foundation upon which they could build their safety efforts. With support from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), we used a rigorous, iterative process to develop a set of 9 self-assessment tools to optimize the safety and safe use of EHRs. These tools, referred to as the Safety Assurance Factors for EHR Resilience (SAFER) guides, could be used to self-assess safety and effectiveness of EHR implementations, identify specific areas of vulnerability, and create solutions and culture change to mitigate risks. A variety of audiences could conduct these assessments, including frontline clinicians or care teams in different practices, or clinical, quality, or administrative leaders within larger institutions. The guides use a multifaceted systems-based approach to assess risk and empower organizations to work with internal or external stakeholders (eg, EHR developers) on optimizing EHR functionality and using EHRs to drive improvements in the quality and safety of healthcare.

  18. 76 FR 7853 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Apollo Publishing, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... Delisting From Apollo Publishing, Inc. AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Delisting. SUMMARY: Apollo Publishing, Inc.: AHRQ has accepted a notification of voluntary relinquishment from Apollo Publishing, Inc., of its status as a Patient Safety Organization (PSO...

  19. 77 FR 42737 - Patient Safety Organizations: Delisting for Cause for The Steward Group PSO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... Cause for The Steward Group PSO AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of delisting. SUMMARY: AHRQ has delisted The Steward Group PSO as a Patient Safety Organization... Steward Group PSO failed to respond to a Notice of Preliminary Finding of Deficiency sent by AHRQ...

  20. Continuing Education Meets the Learning Organization: The Challenge of a Systems Approach to Patient Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, John M.

    2000-01-01

    Increased attention to medical errors and patient safety highlights the importance of quality improvement in continuing medical education. Ways to enhance quality include informatics, clinical practice guidelines, learning from opinion leaders and patients, learning organizations, and just-in-time and point-of-care delivery of continuing…

  1. 78 FR 70561 - Patient Safety Organizations: Delisting for Cause for Leadership Triad

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... Patient Safety Organizations: Delisting for Cause for Leadership Triad AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of delisting. SUMMARY: AHRQ has delisted Leadership Triad....108(a)(3)(iii)(C), Leadership Triad stated that it did not meet the requirement that, within 24...

  2. Safety and Efficacy Evaluation of Pulsed Dye Laser Treatment, CO2 Ablative Fractional Resurfacing, and Combined Treatment for Surgical Scar Clearance.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel L; Geronemus, Roy

    2016-11-01

    Surgical scars are an unwanted sequela following surgical procedures. Several different treatment modalities and approaches are currently being employed to improve the cosmesis of surgical scars with each having varying degrees of success. The objective of this study was to assess the ef cacy and safety pulsed dye laser treatment, CO2 ablative fractional resurfacing, and a combined treatment with these two modalities for the cosmetic improvement of surgical scarring that occurred following the surgical removal of skin cancer from different anatomic areas. Twenty-five patients with surgical scarring most frequently on the face following recent surgical excision of skin cancer with Mohs surgery were included in this multicenter, prospective clinical study. Patients were randomized into 4 treatment arms, namely, pulsed dye laser alone, CO2 laser alone, a combined treatment with these two modalities, and CO2 ablative fractional resurfacing on the same day of surgery to half of the scar, followed by a combined treatment with the two modalities to that half of the scar. Patients in each study arm received a total of 3-4 treatments, while those patients in Arm 4 underwent an additional treatment with CO2 laser immediately after surgery. Patients were followed up at 1 and 3 months after the final treatment session. No adverse events were seen. Significant improvements in the appearance of scars were achieved in all study arms, as as- sessed by the Vancouver Scar Scale and Global Evaluation Response scales, with the best clinical outcomes seen in those scars that underwent a combination treatment. All patients reported very high satisfaction from treatment. Both pulsed dye laser treatment and CO2 ablative fractional resurfacing, when used as a monotherapy, are safe and effective in the treatment and improvement of recent surgical scarring. When both of these modalities are used in combination, however, they appear to potentially have a synergistic effect and an accelerated

  3. Utilization of surgical procedures for pelvic organ prolapse: a population-based study in Olmsted County, Minnesota, 1965-2002.

    PubMed

    Babalola, Ebenezer O; Bharucha, Adil E; Melton, L Joseph; Schleck, Cathy D; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Klingele, Christopher J; Gebhart, John B

    2008-09-01

    To describe trends in the utilization of surgical procedures for pelvic organ prolapse among women in Olmsted County, MN, we retrospectively identified all county residents undergoing pelvic organ prolapse repair from January 1, 1965 through December 31, 2002. From 1965 to 2002, 3,813 women had pelvic organ prolapse surgeries: 3,126 had hysterectomy combined with pelvic floor repair (PFR) procedures and 687 had PFR alone. The age-adjusted utilization of hysterectomy plus PFR and of PFR alone decreased by 62% (P < 0.001) and 32% (P = 0.02), respectively. In both groups, utilization decreased in all age groups over time except in women aged 80 years and older undergoing hysterectomy plus PFR and women aged 70 years and older undergoing PFR only. The most common indication for PFR was uterovaginal prolapse. Among women in the community, the rate of utilization and age distribution of pelvic organ prolapse surgery changed substantially between 1965 and 2002.

  4. [EXPERIENCE OF RELAPAROTOMY APPLICATION IN SURGICAL TREATMENT OF THE ABDOMINAL CAVITY ORGANS DISEASES].

    PubMed

    Malyk, S V; Podlesnyi, V I; Lavrenko, D O; Ksyonz, I V

    2015-10-01

    During 2011 - 2014 yrs in Surgical Clinic of The First City Clinic (Poltava) a relaparotomy was performed in 127 patients. There was established, that relaparotomy constitutes the only one procedure for such life threatening states, as intraabdominal bleeding, ileus in a decompensation stage, eventration, progressing peritonitis, abdominal compartment syndrome stages III - IV. The rate of relaparotomy application after performance of urgent operative interventions is bigger than after planned operations (ratio 4:1). Individual estimation of a state and choice of optimal surgical tactics during primary and secondary operative interventions are needed to improve the results of treatment.

  5. Pediatric emergency and essential surgical care in Zambian hospitals: a nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Kendra G; Jovic, Goran; Rangel, Shawn; Berry, William R; Gawande, Atul A

    2013-06-01

    Pediatric surgical care in developing countries is not well studied. We sought to identify the range of pediatric surgery available, the barriers to provision, and level of safety of surgery performed for the entire pediatric population in Zambia. In cooperation with the Ministry of Health, we validated and adapted a World Health Organization instrument. During onsite visits, the availability of 32 emergency and essential surgical procedures relevant to children was surveyed. The availability of basic World Health Organization surgical safety criteria was determined. A single interviewer visited 103 (95%) of 108 surgical hospitals in Zambia and carried out 495 interviews. An average of 68% of the 32 emergency and essential surgical procedures was available (range 32%-100%). Lack of surgical skill was the primary reason for referral in 72% of procedure types, compared with 24%, 2% and 3% due to lack of equipment, supplies and anesthesia skills, respectively (p<0.001). Minimum pediatric surgical safety criteria were met by 14% of hospitals. The primary limitation to providing pediatric surgical care in Zambia is lack of surgical skills. Minimum safety standards were met by 14% of hospitals. Efforts to improve pediatric surgery should prioritize teaching surgical skills to expand access and providing safety training, equipment and supplies to increase safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Survey and analysis of radiation safety management systems at medical institutions--initial report: radiation protection supervisor, radiation safety organization, and education and training].

    PubMed

    Ohba, Hisateru; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Aburano, Tamio

    2005-11-20

    In this study, a questionnaire survey was carried out to determine the actual situation of radiation safety management systems in Japanese medical institutions with nuclear medicine facilities. The questionnaire consisted of questions concerning the Radiation Protection Supervisor license, safety management organizations, and problems related to education and training in safety management. Analysis was conducted according to region, type of establishment, and number of beds. The overall response rate was 60%, and no significant difference in response rate was found among regions. Medical institutions that performed nuclear medicine practices without a radiologist participating accounted for 10% of the total. Medical institutions where nurses gave patients intravenous injections of radiopharmaceuticals as part of the nuclear medicine practices accounted for 28% of the total. Of these medical institutions, 59% provided education and training in safety management for nurses. The rate of acquisition of Radiation Protection Supervisor licenses was approximately 70% for radiological technologists and approximately 20% for physicians (regional difference, p=0.02). The rate of medical institutions with safety management organizations was 71% of the total. Among the medical institutions (n=208) without safety management organizations, approximately 56% had 300 beds or fewer. In addition, it became clear that 35% of quasi-public organizations and 44% of private organizations did not provide education and training in safety management (p<0.001, according to establishment).

  7. Safety and efficacy of immediate postoperative feeding and bowel stimulation to prevent ileus after major gynecologic surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Fanning, James; Hojat, Rod

    2011-08-01

    Postoperative ileus is a major complication of abdominal surgical procedures To evaluate the incidence of ileus and gastrointestinal morbidity in patients who received immediate postoperative feeding and bowel stimulation after undergoing major gynecologic surgical procedures. During a 5-year period, the authors tracked demographic, surgical outcome, and follow-up information for 707 patients who underwent major gynecologic operations. All patients received the same postoperative orders, including immediate feeding of a diet of choice and bowel stimulation with 30 mL of magnesium hydroxide (milk of magnesia) twice daily until bowel movements occurred. Of 707 patients, 6 (<1%) had postoperative ileus. No patients experienced postoperative bowel obstruction and 2 patients (0.3%) had postoperative intestinal leak. No serious adverse effects associated with bowel stimulation were reported. Immediate postoperative feeding and bowel stimulation is a safe and effective approach to preventing ileus in patients who undergo major gynecologic surgical procedures.

  8. Detecting adverse events in surgery: comparing events detected by the Veterans Health Administration Surgical Quality Improvement Program and the Patient Safety Indicators.

    PubMed

    Mull, Hillary J; Borzecki, Ann M; Loveland, Susan; Hickson, Kathleen; Chen, Qi; MacDonald, Sally; Shin, Marlena H; Cevasco, Marisa; Itani, Kamal M F; Rosen, Amy K

    2014-04-01

    The Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) use administrative data to screen for select adverse events (AEs). In this study, VA Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP) chart review data were used as the gold standard to measure the criterion validity of 5 surgical PSIs. Independent chart review was also used to determine reasons for PSI errors. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of PSI software version 4.1a were calculated among Veterans Health Administration hospitalizations (2003-2007) reviewed by VASQIP (n = 268,771). Nurses re-reviewed a sample of hospitalizations for which PSI and VASQIP AE detection disagreed. Sensitivities ranged from 31% to 68%, specificities from 99.1% to 99.8%, and positive predictive values from 31% to 72%. Reviewers found that coding errors accounted for some PSI-VASQIP disagreement; some disagreement was also the result of differences in AE definitions. These results suggest that the PSIs have moderate criterion validity; however, some surgical PSIs detect different AEs than VASQIP. Future research should explore using both methods to evaluate surgical quality. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Scalable, sustainable cost-effective surgical care: a model for safety and quality in the developing world, part III: impact and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Alex; Restrepo, Carolina; Mackay, Don; Sherman, Randy; Varma, Ajit; Ayala, Ruben; Sarma, Hiteswar; Deshpande, Gaurav; Magee, William

    2014-09-01

    The Guwahati Comprehensive Cleft Care Center (GCCCC) utilizes a high-volume, subspecialized institution to provide safe, quality, and comprehensive and cost-effective surgical care to a highly vulnerable patient population. The GCCCC utilized a diagonal model of surgical care delivery, with vertical inputs of mission-based care transitioning to investments in infrastructure and human capital to create a sustainable, local care delivery system. Over the first 2.5 years of service (May 2011-November 2013), the GCCCC made significant advances in numerous areas. Progress was meticulously documented to evaluate performance and provide transparency to stakeholders including donors, government officials, medical oversight bodies, employees, and patients. During this time period, the GCCCC provided free operations to 7,034 patients, with improved safety, outcomes, and multidisciplinary services while dramatically decreasing costs and increasing investments in the local community. The center has become a regional referral cleft center, and governments of surrounding states have contracted the GCCCC to provide care for their citizens with cleft lip and cleft palate. Additional regional and global impact is anticipated through continued investments into education and training, comprehensive services, and research and outcomes. The success of this public private partnership demonstrates the value of this model of surgical care in the developing world, and offers a blueprint for reproduction. The GCCCC experience has been consistent with previous studies demonstrating a positive volume-outcomes relationship, and provides evidence for the value of the specialty hospital model for surgical delivery in the developing world.

  10. Clinical Improvement and Safety of Ablative Fractional Laser Therapy for Post-Surgical Scars: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Custis, Trenton; Eisen, Daniel B

    2015-11-01

    Ablative fractional laser (AFL) therapy for scars is an area of increasing interest. While the enthusiasm for these treatments is high, a systematic review of their use on surgical scars has not been done. To identify randomized trials that study the efficacy of ablative fractionated laser therapy for treatment of surgical scars. EMBASE, Web of Science, and Pubmed databases were searched for randomized trials with 10 or more surgical wounds. No restrictions were placed on the language of the publications. Three randomized trials were identified that met the criteria for the review. One study found superior efficacy of ablative fractionated laser treatment of surgical scars compared to pulsed dye laser while the others found equivalent efficacy when compared to dermabrasion or pulsed dye laser. One study found a superior safety profile for ablative fractionated laser treatment over dermabrasion. No studies compared fractionated laser therapy to sham therapy or observation. AFL compares well with the scar amelioration techniques of dermabrasion and pulsed dye laser. Additional studies are needed to further contrast AFL to these and other modalities as well as to observation alone.

  11. [Achievements and challenges in implementing the surgical checklist in a pediatric hospital].

    PubMed

    Dackiewicz, Nora; Viteritti, Laura; Marciano, Beatriz; Bailez, Marcela; Merino, Patricia; Bortolato, Diana; Jaichenko, André; Seminara, Rodolfo; Amarilla, Analía

    2012-12-01

    Patient safety in the operating room is a topic of universal concern. Several studies support the existence of a high percentage of complications and a high mortality rate in surgical procedures (0.5 to 5%). The World Health Organization (WHO) has proposed the implementation of surgical check list in order to improve patient safety in the operating room. In Hospital Garrahan, 9600 surgeries and surgical anesthesia for more than 8000 studies and other invasive procedures are performed per year. WHO checklist adaptation and implementation was considered an institutional priority. We describe difficulties and solutions in implementing the surgical checklist. Surgical team involvement in project planning and development was essential.

  12. Edible safety requirements and assessment standards for agricultural genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Deng, Pingjian; Zhou, Xiangyang; Zhou, Peng; Du, Zhong; Hou, Hongli; Yang, Dongyan; Tan, Jianjun; Wu, Xiaojin; Zhang, Jinzhou; Yang, Yongcun; Liu, Jin; Liu, Guihua; Li, Yonghong; Liu, Jianjun; Yu, Lei; Fang, Shisong; Yang, Xiaoke

    2008-05-01

    This paper describes the background, principles, concepts and methods of framing the technical regulation for edible safety requirement and assessment of agricultural genetically modified organisms (agri-GMOs) for Shenzhen Special Economic Zone in the People's Republic of China. It provides a set of systematic criteria for edible safety requirements and the assessment process for agri-GMOs. First, focusing on the degree of risk and impact of different agri-GMOs, we developed hazard grades for toxicity, allergenicity, anti-nutrition effects, and unintended effects and standards for the impact type of genetic manipulation. Second, for assessing edible safety, we developed indexes and standards for different hazard grades of recipient organisms, for the influence of types of genetic manipulation and hazard grades of agri-GMOs. To evaluate the applicability of these criteria and their congruency with other safety assessment systems for GMOs applied by related organizations all over the world, we selected some agri-GMOs (soybean, maize, potato, capsicum and yeast) as cases to put through our new assessment system, and compared our results with the previous assessments. It turned out that the result of each of the cases was congruent with the original assessment.

  13. Safety analysis of exothermic reaction hazards associated with the organic liquid layer in tank 241-C-103

    SciTech Connect

    Postma, A.K.; Bechtold, D.B.; Borsheim, G.L.; Grisby, J.M.; Guthrie, R.L.; Kummerer, M.; Turner, D.A.; Plys, M.G.

    1994-03-01

    Safety hazards associated with the interim storage of a potentially flammable organic liquid in waste Tank C-103 are identified and evaluated. The technical basis for closing the unreviewed safety question (USQ) associated with the floating liquid organic layer in this tank is presented.

  14. Surgical and clinical safety and effectiveness of robot-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy compared to conventional laparoscopy and laparotomy for cervical cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, D A; Yun, J E; Kim, S W; Lee, S H

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the surgical safety and clinical effectiveness of RH versus LH and laparotomy for cervical cancer. We searched Ovid-Medline, Ovid-EMBASE, and the Cochrane library through May 2015, and checked references of relevant studies. We selected the comparative studies reported the surgical safety (overall; peri-operative; and post-operative complications; death within 30 days; and specific morbidities), and clinical effectiveness (survival; recurrence; length of stay [LOS]; estimated blood loss [EBL]; operative time [OT]) and patient-reported outcomes. Fifteen studies comparing RH with OH and 11 comparing RH with LH were identified. No significant differences were found in survival outcomes. The LOS was shorter and transfusion rate was lower with RH compared to OH or LH. EBL was significantly reduced with RH compared to OH. Compared to OH, overall complications, urinary infection, wound infection, and fever were significantly less frequent with RH. The overall, peri-operative, and post-operative complications were similar in other comparisons. Several patient-reported outcomes were improved with RH, though each outcome was reported in only one study. RH appears to have a positive effect in reducing overall complications, individual adverse events including wound infection, fever, urinary tract infection, transfusion, LOS, EBL, and time to diet than OH for cervical cancer patients. Compared to LH, the current evidence is not enough to clearly determine its clinical safety and effectiveness. Further rigorous prospective studies with long-term follow-up that overcome the many limitations of the current evidence are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  15. Remote video auditing with real-time feedback in an academic surgical suite improves safety and efficiency metrics: a cluster randomised study.

    PubMed

    Overdyk, Frank J; Dowling, Oonagh; Newman, Sheldon; Glatt, David; Chester, Michelle; Armellino, Donna; Cole, Brandon; Landis, Gregg S; Schoenfeld, David; DiCapua, John F

    2016-12-01

    Compliance with the surgical safety checklist during operative procedures has been shown to reduce inhospital mortality and complications but proper execution by the surgical team remains elusive. We evaluated the impact of remote video auditing with real-time provider feedback on checklist compliance during sign-in, time-out and sign-out and case turnover times. Prospective, cluster randomised study in a 23-operating room (OR) suite. Surgeons, anaesthesia providers, nurses and support staff. ORs were randomised to receive, or not receive, real-time feedback on safety checklist compliance and efficiency metrics via display boards and text messages, followed by a period during which all ORs received feedback. Checklist compliance (Pass/Fail) during sign-in, time-out and sign-out demonstrated by (1) use of checklist, (2) team attentiveness, (3) required duration, (4) proper sequence and duration of case turnover times. Sign-in, time-out and sign-out PASS rates increased from 25%, 16% and 32% during baseline phase (n=1886) to 64%, 84% and 68% for feedback ORs versus 40%, 77% and 51% for no-feedback ORs (p<0.004) during the intervention phase (n=2693). Pass rates were 91%, 95% and 84% during the all-feedback phase (n=2001). For scheduled cases (n=1406, 71%), feedback reduced mean turnover times by 14% (41.4 min vs 48.1 min, p<0.004), and the improvement was sustained during the all-feedback period. Feedback had no effect on turnover time for unscheduled cases (n=587, 29%). Our data indicate that remote video auditing with feedback improves surgical safety checklist compliance for all cases, and turnover time for scheduled cases, but not for unscheduled cases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Remote video auditing with real-time feedback in an academic surgical suite improves safety and efficiency metrics: a cluster randomised study

    PubMed Central

    Overdyk, Frank J; Dowling, Oonagh; Newman, Sheldon; Glatt, David; Chester, Michelle; Armellino, Donna; Cole, Brandon; Landis, Gregg S; Schoenfeld, David; DiCapua, John F

    2016-01-01

    Importance Compliance with the surgical safety checklist during operative procedures has been shown to reduce inhospital mortality and complications but proper execution by the surgical team remains elusive. Objective We evaluated the impact of remote video auditing with real-time provider feedback on checklist compliance during sign-in, time-out and sign-out and case turnover times. Design, setting Prospective, cluster randomised study in a 23-operating room (OR) suite. Participants Surgeons, anaesthesia providers, nurses and support staff. Exposure ORs were randomised to receive, or not receive, real-time feedback on safety checklist compliance and efficiency metrics via display boards and text messages, followed by a period during which all ORs received feedback. Main outcome(s) and measure(s) Checklist compliance (Pass/Fail) during sign-in, time-out and sign-out demonstrated by (1) use of checklist, (2) team attentiveness, (3) required duration, (4) proper sequence and duration of case turnover times. Results Sign-in, time-out and sign-out PASS rates increased from 25%, 16% and 32% during baseline phase (n=1886) to 64%, 84% and 68% for feedback ORs versus 40%, 77% and 51% for no-feedback ORs (p<0.004) during the intervention phase (n=2693). Pass rates were 91%, 95% and 84% during the all-feedback phase (n=2001). For scheduled cases (n=1406, 71%), feedback reduced mean turnover times by 14% (41.4 min vs 48.1 min, p<0.004), and the improvement was sustained during the all-feedback period. Feedback had no effect on turnover time for unscheduled cases (n=587, 29%). Conclusions and relevance Our data indicate that remote video auditing with feedback improves surgical safety checklist compliance for all cases, and turnover time for scheduled cases, but not for unscheduled cases. PMID:26658775

  17. Nurse Level of Education, Quality of Care and Patient Safety in the Medical and Surgical Wards in Malaysian Private Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Hamzah Abdul; Jarrar, Mu’taman; Don, Mohammad Sobri

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Nursing knowledge and skills are required to sustain quality of care and patient safety. The number of nurses with Bachelor degrees in Malaysia is very limited. This study aims to predict the impact of nurse level of education on quality of care and patient safety in the medical and surgical wards in Malaysian private hospitals. Methodology: A cross-sectional survey by questionnaire was conducted. A total of 652 nurses working in the medical and surgical wards in 12 private hospitals participated in the study. Multistage stratified simple random sampling performed to invite nurses working in small size (less than 100 beds), medium size (100-199 beds) and large size (over than 200) hospitals to participate in the study. This allowed nurses from all shifts to participate in this study. Results: Nurses with higher education were not significantly associated with both quality of care and patient safety. However, a total 355 (60.9%) of respondents who participated in this study were working in teaching hospitals. Teaching hospitals offer training for all newly appointed staff. They also provide general orientation programs and training to outline the policies, procedures of the nurses’ roles and responsibilities. This made the variances between the Bachelor and Diploma nurses not significantly associated with the outcomes of care. Conclusions: Nursing educational level was not associated with the outcomes of care in Malaysian private hospitals. However, training programs and the general nursing orientation programs for nurses in Malaysia can help to upgrade the Diploma-level nurses. Training programs can increase their self confidence, knowledge, critical thinking ability and improve their interpersonal skills. So, it can be concluded that better education and training for a medical and surgical wards’ nurses is required for satisfying client expectations and sustaining the outcomes of patient care. PMID:26153190

  18. Nurse Level of Education, Quality of Care and Patient Safety in the Medical and Surgical Wards in Malaysian Private Hospitals: A Cross-sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Abdul Rahman, Hamzah; Jarrar, Mu'taman; Don, Mohammad Sobri

    2015-04-23

    Nursing knowledge and skills are required to sustain quality of care and patient safety. The numbers of nurses with Bachelor degrees in Malaysia are very limited. This study aims to predict the impact of nurse level of education on quality of care and patient safety in the medical and surgical wards in Malaysian private hospitals. A cross-sectional survey by questionnaire was conducted. A total 652 nurses working in the medical and surgical wards in 12 private hospitals were participated in the study. Multistage stratified simple random sampling performed to invite nurses working in small size (less than 100 beds), medium size (100-199 beds) and large size (over than 200) hospitals to participate in the study. This allowed nurses from all shifts to participate in this study. Nurses with higher education were not significantly associated with both quality of care and patient safety. However, a total 355 (60.9%) of respondents participated in this study were working in teaching hospitals. Teaching hospitals offer training for all newly appointed staff. They also provide general orientation programs and training to outline the policies, procedures of the nurses' roles and responsibilities. This made the variances between the Bachelor and Diploma nurses not significantly associated with the outcomes of care. Nursing educational level was not associated with the outcomes of care in Malaysian private hospitals. However, training programs and the general nursing orientation programs for nurses in Malaysia can help to upgrade the Diploma-level nurses. Training programs can increase their self confidence, knowledge, critical thinking ability and improve their interpersonal skills. So, it can be concluded that better education and training for a medical and surgical wards' nurses is required for satisfying client expectations and sustaining the outcomes of patient care.

  19. Effectiveness and safety of elective surgical procedures to improve wound healing and reduce re-ulceration in diabetic patients with foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Lawrence A

    2012-02-01

    The objective is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of surgical off-loading to heal diabetic foot ulcers and prevent ulcer recurrence. Usually, structural foot deformities such as hallux rigidus, hammertoe deformities and equinus of the ankle contribute to abnormal pressure and shear forces and non-healing foot ulcers. Elective surgery to remove the deformity and restore joint mobility has been shown to be safe and effective to improve wound healing of recalcitrant ulcer and to reduce the risk of re-ulceration. Unfortunately, there is very little high-level evidence to help guide patient selection or to compare clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Discusses safety issues in science, including: allergic reactions to peanuts used in experiments; explosions in lead/acid batteries; and inspection of pressure vessels, such as pressure cookers or model steam engines. (MKR)

  1. Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Discusses safety issues in science, including: allergic reactions to peanuts used in experiments; explosions in lead/acid batteries; and inspection of pressure vessels, such as pressure cookers or model steam engines. (MKR)

  2. [Mathematical analysis of complicated course of acute surgical diseases of abdominal cavity organs].

    PubMed

    Vozniuk, S M; Pol'ovyĭ, V P; Sydorchuk, R I; Palianytsia, A S

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we analyze the results of diagnosis and treatment of 130 patients with acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity, complicated by peritonitis. We proposed the method of estimating the severity of the patients using a coefficient of status severity (C(SS)), developed a scale for prediction of complicated outcomes of acute surgical pathology of the abdominal cavity and abdominal sepsis, which is adapted to the working conditions of local clinics. Using the C(SS) and the scale prediction, allowed timely identification of patients' risk group with possible complicated course, assign adequate treatment, reduce postoperative complications by 5%, relaparotomies by 4.4%, decrease postoperative mortality by 3.9%.

  3. Sustainability and long-term effectiveness of the WHO surgical safety checklist combined with pulse oximetry in a resource-limited setting: two-year update from Moldova.

    PubMed

    Kim, Rebecca Y; Kwakye, Gifty; Kwok, Alvin C; Baltaga, Ruslan; Ciobanu, Gheorghe; Merry, Alan F; Funk, Luke M; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Gawande, Atul A; Berry, William R; Haynes, Alex B

    2015-05-01

    Little is known about the sustainability and long-term effect of surgical safety checklists when implemented in resource-limited settings. A previous study demonstrated the marked, short-term effect of a structured hospital-wide implementation of a surgical safety checklist in Moldova, a lower-middle-income country, as have studies in other low-resource settings. To assess the long-term reduction in perioperative harm following the introduction of a checklist-based surgical quality improvement program in a resource-limited setting and to understand the long-term effects of such programs. Twenty months after the initial implementation of a surgical safety checklist and the provision of pulse oximetry at a referral hospital in Moldova, a lower-middle-income, resource-limited country in Eastern Europe, we conducted a prospective study of perioperative care and outcomes of 637 consecutive patients undergoing noncardiac surgery (the long-term follow-up group), and we compared the findings with those from 2106 patients who underwent surgery shortly after implementation (the short-term follow-up group). Preintervention data were collected from March to July 2010. Data collection during the short-term follow-up period was performed from October 2010 to January 2011, beginning 1 month after the implementation of the launch period. Data collection during the long-term follow-up period took place from May 25 to July 6, 2012, beginning 20 months after the initial intervention. The primary end points of interest were surgical morbidity (ie, the complication rate), adherence to safety process measures, and frequency of hypoxemia. Between the short- and long-term follow-up groups, the complication rate decreased 30.7% (P = .03). Surgical site infections decreased 40.4% (P = .05). The mean (SD) rate of completion of the checklist items increased from 88% (14%) in the short-term follow-up group to 92% (11%) in the long-term follow-up group (P < .001). The rate of

  4. Risk factors for superficial vs deep/organ-space surgical site infections: implications for quality improvement initiatives.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Elise H; Hall, Bruce Lee; Ko, Clifford Y

    2013-09-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the focus of numerous quality improvement initiatives because they are a common and costly cause of potentially preventable patient morbidity. Superficial and deep/organ-space SSIs differ in terms of anatomical location and clinical severity. To identify risk factors that are uniquely predictive of superficial vs deep/organ-space SSIs occurring after colectomy procedures. Retrospective cohort study. American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Patients undergoing colectomy procedures in 2011 were identified by Current Procedural Terminology codes. Colectomy procedures. We compared rates of superficial SSI and deep/organ-space SSI associated with perioperative variables of interest: demographics; preoperative clinical severity, risk factors, and comorbidities and variables related to the hospitalization or procedure. Hierarchical multivariable logistic regression models were developed to identify risk-adjusted predictors of each SSI type. Among 27 011 patients identified from 305 hospitals, 6.2% developed a superficial SSI and 4.7% developed a deep/organ-space SSI. Risk factors common to the occurrence of both SSI types were identified: open surgery (vs laparoscopic) and current smoker. Risk factors with differential effects on each SSI type included specific postoperative diagnoses, disseminated cancer, and irradiation therapy, which were all associated with increased odds of deep/organ-space SSI only. The graded relationship between increasing body mass index and SSI occurrence appeared to be stronger for superficial SSI. Risk factors for superficial SSI and deep/organ-space SSI vary in terms of magnitude and significance, suggesting that these SSI types are somewhat different disease processes. Groups interested in preventing SSIs might improve success by considering these SSI types independently for root-cause analyses and development of best practices and interventions.

  5. Regeneration of Surgically Excised Segments of Dog Esophagus using Biodegradable PLA Hollow Organ Grafts,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    received no further dilations (over seven months). Endoscopic examination showed that no esophageal constric- tions were present and that the epithelium of...7 AG 396 ARMY INST OF DENTAL RESEARCH WASHINGTON DC FIG 6/5 REGENERATION OF SURGICALLY EXCISED SEGMENTS OF DOG ESOPHAGUS US-ETC(W) U15 G’OE UN8 N F...which will yield effective long-term functional results. The current therapy for repair and replacement of the diseased or avulsed esophagus is by the

  6. [Experience in organizing the surgical work of a garrison hospital in an armed conflict].

    PubMed

    Ulunov, A D; Tatarin, S N; Ivantsov, V A; Teslenko, Iu A; Ismailov, R M; Fokin, Iu N; Lukashov, O V

    2000-02-01

    The authors have summarized organizational experience of surgical work of garrison military hospital strengthened with specialized brigades during the period of armed conflict in Republic of Dagestan (August-September, 1999). From the start of active actions in order to render assistance specialized surgical teams from district military hospital equipped with special kits (at the rate of 7 operations/day during a week) were sent to garrison hospital. In this armed conflict there are features characterising both mine-and-explosive war in Afghanistan and sniper war in Chechen Republic resulting in increase in the number of seriously wounded (up to 46.7%) casualties during Botlikhskiĭ operation constituted 1:4, Novolakskiĭ (Kadarskiĭ)--1:5. Bullet injuries were fatal in 49.4% of the cases, fragmentation (including MET)--50.6%. During 1.5 month of hospital work there were performed 303 surgical interventions. 22.7% of slightly wounded from local garrisons were treated in garrison hospitals. Treatment results--postoperative lethality in gunshot trauma at the given stage constituted 1.1%.

  7. A multicenter study on attitude toward organ donation in Spain and Latin America between the surgical units of 12 hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ríos, A; Martínez-Alarcón, L; López-Navas, A I; Ayala-García, M A; Sebastián, M J; Abdo-Cuza, A; González, B; Ramírez, P; Ramis, G; Parrilla, P

    2015-01-01

    Medical advances and improvements in surgical techniques have transformed transplantation into an ever safer therapeutic option. However, its main limitation is the shortage of available organs. Therefore, it is necessary to join forces to achieve optimal deceased donation and prevent the loss of potential donors. We sought to analyze the acceptance of deceased organ donation (OD) among hospital personnel in surgical units in hospitals in Spain and Latin America. A random sample (n = 554) was taken was stratified according to surgical services and job category in 12 hospitals-4 in Spain (n = 294 participants), 5 in Mexico (n = 202), 2 in Cuba (n = 41), and 1 in Costa Rica (n = 17). Attitude was assessed using a questionnaire validated, which was completed anonymously and self-administered. The χ(2) test, Student t test, and a logistic regression analysis were used. Overall, 75% of respondents (n = 417) were in favor of deceased OD and 25% were against it (n = 137). Regarding the respondent's country, there was a favorable attitude among 88% of Cubans, 85% of Mexicans, 82% of Costa Ricans, and 67% of Spaniards (P < .001). The physicians were most in favor of OD with 87% supporting it (n = 149), followed by nurses (n = 182) and ancillary personnel (n = 28) both at 74%, and the health care assistants at 59% (n = 58; P < .001). The following factors affect attitude toward OD: young age (37 ± 10 years; P = .001), being a male (P = .018), having an unstable job situation (P = .009), a belief that one might need a future transplant (P = .036), having a favorable attitude toward living donation (P < .001), being in favor of donating a family member's organs (P < .001), having had a family discussion about OD (P < .001), and a partner's favorable attitude (P < .001). Attitude toward OD among surgeons in hospitals in Spain and Latin America was not as favorable as we might have expected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Organized labor and the origins of the Occupational Safety and Health Act.

    PubMed

    Asher, Robert

    2014-11-01

    New Solutions is republishing this 1991 article by Robert Asher, which reviews the history of organized labor's efforts in the United States to secure health and safety protections for workers. The 1877 passage of the Massachusetts factory inspection law and the implementation of primitive industrial safety inspection systems in many states paralleled labor action for improved measures to protect workers' health and safety. In the early 1900s labor was focusing on workers' compensation laws. The New Deal expanded the federal government's role in worker protection, supported at least by the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO), but challenged by industry and many members of the U.S. Congress. The American Federation of Labor (AFL) and the CIO backed opposing legal and inspection strategies in the late 1940s and through the 1950s. Still, by the late 1960s, several unions were able to help craft the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and secure new federal protections for U.S. workers.

  9. Safety and efficacy of propofol with EDTA when used for sedation of surgical intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Herr, D L; Kelly, K; Hall, J B; Ulatowski, J; Fulda, G J; Cason, B; Hickey, R; Nejman, A M; Zaloga, G P; Teres, D

    2000-01-01

    To compare propofol with disodium edetate (EDTA) and propofol without EDTAwhen used for the sedation of critically ill surgical intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Prospective, randomised, multicentre trial. A total of 122 surgical ICU patients who required intubation and mechanical ventilation. Patients were randomised to receive either propofol or propofol plus EDTA (propofol EDTA) by continuous infusion for sedation. The addition of EDTA to propofol had no effect on calcium or magnesium homeostasis, renal function, haemodynamic function, or efficacy when used for the sedation of surgical patients in the ICU. The most common adverse events were hypotension, atrial fibrillation, and hypocalcaemia. In this trial, a greater number of serious adverse events and adverse events leading to withdrawal occurred in the propofol group relative to the propofol EDTA group. There was a significantly lower crude mortality rate at 7 and 28 days for the propofol EDTA group compared with the propofol group. There were no statistically significant differences between groups with respect to depth of sedation. The propofol EDTA formulation had no effect on calcium or magnesium homeostasis, renal function, or sedation efficacy compared with propofol alone when used for sedation in critically ill surgical ICU patients. There was a significant decrease in mortality in the propofol EDTA group compared with the propofol group. Further investigations are needed to validate this survival benefit and elucidate a possible mechanism.

  10. Non-surgical interventions for pelvic organ prolapse in rural Nepal: a prospective monitoring and evaluation study

    PubMed Central

    Fitchett, Joseph R; Bhatta, Surya; Sherpa, Tenzing Y; Malla, Bishwo S; A Fitchett, Elizabeth J; Samen, Arlene

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a major cause of morbidity in Nepal, particularly affecting women in the rural communities. Women with POP in Nepal may suffer from symptoms for decades. At present, the Government of Nepal advocates surgical intervention but access to surgical care is inadequate. This report evaluated the feasibility of a non-surgical public health programme in rural Nepal, and describes risk factors associated with POP in this setting. Design Prospective monitoring and evaluation study of a new public health programme. Setting Baglung district, rural Nepal. Participants Women with gynaecological symptoms of POP. Main outcome measures Risk factors for disease progression were assessed using Fisher’s exact test, Pearson’s χ2-test and logistic regression analysis. Results Of the 74 women included in this analysis, 70.8% were diagnosed with stage 2 POP or greater. The majority of women did not have any further children following the onset of POP symptoms (63.5%). Duration of symptoms ranged from 2 months to 60 years, with 73.4% of women suffering for over 5 years and 28.4% suffering for over 20 years. Univariate analyses identified age at screening, age at onset of symptoms, the duration of symptoms and an associated rectocele as factors associated with increasing POP severity (p < 0.05). Kegel exercises were taught to 25 (33.8%) women with POP and ring pessaries were offered to 47 (63.5%) women with POP. Conclusions Non-surgical interventions may provide an opportunity to address the significant burden of POP in rural Nepal. PMID:26664731

  11. Application of an engineering problem-solving methodology to address persistent problems in patient safety: a case study on retained surgical sponges after surgery.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Devon E; Watts, Bradley V

    2013-09-01

    Despite innumerable attempts to eliminate the postoperative retention of surgical sponges, the medical error persists in operating rooms worldwide and places significant burden on patient safety, quality of care, financial resources, and hospital/physician reputation. The failure of countless solutions, from new sponge counting methods to radio labeled sponges, to truly eliminate the event in the operating room requires that the emerging field of health-care delivery science find innovative ways to approach the problem. Accordingly, the VA National Center for Patient Safety formed a unique collaboration with a team at the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College to evaluate the retention of surgical sponges after surgery and find a solution. The team used an engineering problem solving methodology to develop the best solution. To make the operating room a safe environment for patients, the team identified a need to make the sponge itself safe for use as opposed to resolving the relatively innocuous counting methods. In evaluation of this case study, the need for systematic engineering evaluation to resolve problems in health-care delivery becomes clear.

  12. [Check-list "Patient Safety" in the operating room: one year experience of 40,000 surgical procedures at the university hospital of Nice].

    PubMed

    Rateau, F; Levraut, L; Colombel, A-L; Bernard, J-L; Quaranta, J-F; Cabarrot, P; Raucoules-Aimé, M

    2011-06-01

    The implementation of the check-list "Safe surgery saves live" (CL) has proven effective to reduce morbidity and perioperative mortality. Since 1st January 2010 it is a requirement of the HAS as part of the process of certification of hospitals. The CL has been established on all the operating rooms of our hospital after the onset of a near accident. The CL has been computerized to facilitate its adoption by professionals. An internal benchmarking was immediately implemented to allow each surgical specialty to benchmark themselves with other teams. We conducted an audit concerning the CL and periodic assessments in order to learn more precisely concerning the expectations and feelings of medical and nursing teams. Nearly 40 000 CL were collected in the patient record. The completeness of information of some items seems to reflect the difficulty for professionals to realize the difference between traceability and information sharing within the team on the implementation of a protocol. This audit has confirmed the difficulty in sharing information orally. The CL is involved in developing a safety culture in the operating room and led to the establishment of a risk mapping in the operating room and the recovery room and participation in the program error prevention procedure and surgical site through international program "High 5s" whose purpose is to improve the safety of care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Waste Tank Organic Safety Program: Analytical methods development. Progress report, FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.A.; Clauss, S.A.; Grant, K.E.

    1994-09-01

    The objectives of this task are to develop and document extraction and analysis methods for organics in waste tanks, and to extend these methods to the analysis of actual core samples to support the Waste Tank organic Safety Program. This report documents progress at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (a) during FY 1994 on methods development, the analysis of waste from Tank 241-C-103 (Tank C-103) and T-111, and the transfer of documented, developed analytical methods to personnel in the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) and 222-S laboratory. This report is intended as an annual report, not a completed work.

  14. Factors in the Growth and Decline of System Safety within Organizations

    SciTech Connect

    GANTER, JOHN H.; STORAGE, WILLIAM K.

    1999-08-16

    System safety as a technical field faces numerous opportunities, and some challenges, in the high technology, low cost future. As a relatively small field best known in high consequence domains (defense, aviation, space) it may have to tailor its messages and approaches to influence organizations (both private and public) pressured by incessant competition and ''Internet time.'' We present a model of organizations as cultures that carefully ration attention and reward personnel who successfully pursue goals. These evolving goals result from a fusing of both external influences (market share: regulation) and internal influences (dominant group identities such as marketers or engineers). In the context of organizational goals, these same influences cause people to search narrowly and quickly for technologies and ideas that can fit through ''influence gates'' in the organization and that will likely grow there. System safety must thus compete with all manner of cost-cutting and quality management approaches, in an environment currently obsessed with short-term value and return on investment. From this model we develop some ideas for the communication and promotion of system safety that could increase the net impact and effectiveness of the field.

  15. Application of the risk-based strategy to the Hanford tank waste organic-nitrate safety issue

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, V.L.; Colson, S.D.; Ferryman, T.; Gephart, R.E.; Heasler, P.; Scheele, R.D.

    1997-12-01

    This report describes the results from application of the Risk-Based Decision Management Approach for Justifying Characterization of Hanford Tank Waste to the organic-nitrate safety issue in Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs). Existing chemical and physical models were used, taking advantage of the most current (mid-1997) sampling and analysis data. The purpose of this study is to make specific recommendations for planning characterization to help ensure the safety of each SST as it relates to the organic-nitrate safety issue. An additional objective is to demonstrate the viability of the Risk-Based Strategy for addressing Hanford tank waste safety issues.

  16. Hanford Site organic waste tanks: History, waste properties, and scientific issues. Hanford Tank Safety Project

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.; Schulz, W.W.; Reynolds, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Eight Hanford single-shell waste tanks are included on a safety watch list because they are thought to contain significant concentrations of various organic chemical. Potential dangers associated with the waste in these tanks include exothermic reaction, combustion, and release of hazardous vapors. In all eight tanks the measured waste temperatures are in the range 16 to 46{degree}C, far below the 250 to 380{degree}C temperatures necessary for onset of rapid exothermic reactions and initiation of deflagration. Investigation of the possibility of vapor release from Tank C-103 has been elevated to a top safety priority. There is a need to obtain an adequate number of truly representative vapor samples and for highly sensitive and capable methods and instruments to analyze these samples. Remaining scientific issues include: an understanding of the behavior and reaction of organic compounds in existing underground tank environments knowledge of the types and amounts of organic compounds in the tanks knowledge of selected physical and chemical properties of organic compounds source, composition, quality, and properties of the presently unidentified volatile organic compound(s) apparently evolving from Tank C-103.

  17. Scalable, sustainable cost-effective surgical care: a model for safety and quality in the developing world, part I: challenge and commitment.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Alex; Restrepo, Carolina; Mackay, Don; Sherman, Randy; Varma, Ajit; Ayala, Ruben; Sarma, Hiteswar; Deshpande, Gaurav; Magee, William

    2014-09-01

    With an estimated backlog of 4,000,000 patients worldwide, cleft lip and cleft palate remain a stark example of the global burden of surgical disease. The need for a new paradigm in global surgery has been increasingly recognized by governments, funding agencies, and professionals to exponentially expand care while emphasizing safety and quality. This three-part article examines the evolution of the Operation Smile Guwahati Comprehensive Cleft Care Center (GCCCC) as an innovative model for sustainable cleft care in the developing world. The GCCCC is the result of a unique public-private partnership between government, charity, and private enterprise. In 2009, Operation Smile, the Government of Assam, the National Rural Health Mission, and the Tata Group joined together to work towards the common goal of creating a center of excellence in cleft care for the region. This partnership combined expertise in medical care and training, organizational structure and management, local health care infrastructure, and finance. A state-of-the-art surgical facility was constructed in Guwahati, Assam which includes a modern integrated operating suite with an open layout, advanced surgical equipment, sophisticated anesthesia and monitoring capabilities, central medical gases, and sterilization facilities. The combination of established leaders and dreamers from different arenas combined to create a synergy of ambitions, resources, and compassion that became the backbone of success in Guwahati.

  18. Multifactorial influences on and deviations from medication administration safety and quality in the acute medical/surgical context.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Andrea; Currey, Judy; Botti, Mari

    2011-03-01

    Although numerous factors influence medication administration, our understanding of the interplay of these factors on medication quality and safety is limited. The aim of this study was to explore the multifactorial influences on medication quality and safety in the context of a single checking policy for medication administration in acute care. An exploratory/descriptive study using non-participant observation and follow-up interview was used to identify factors influencing medication quality and safety in medication administration episodes (n=30). Observations focused on nurses' interactions with patients during medication administration, and the characteristics of the environment in which these took place. Confirmation of observed data occurred on completion of the observation period during short semi-structured interviews with participant nurses. Findings showed nurses developed therapeutic relationships with patients in terms of assessing patients before administering medications and educating patients about drugs during medication administration. Nurses experienced more frequent distractions when medications were stored and prepared in a communal drug room according to ward design. Nurses deviated from best-practice guidelines during medication administration. Nurses' abilities and readiness to develop therapeutic relationships with patients increased medication quality and safety, thereby protecting patients from potential adverse events. Deviations from best-practice medication administration had the potential to decrease medication safety. System factors such as ward design determining medication storage areas can be readily addressed to minimise potential error. Nurses displayed behaviours that increased medication administration quality and safety; however, violations of practice standards were observed. These findings will inform future intervention studies to improve medication quality and safety. Copyright ©2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  19. Spectrophotometer properties of vein blood plasma in UF-region patients with sharp surgical pathology of abdominal region organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guminestskij, S. G.; Polianski, I. J.; Motrich, A. V.; Grunchuk, F. W.

    2006-05-01

    It is set that there are two maximums in UF- region absorption of vein blood plasma of a man: at λ = 235 nm and at λ = 280 nm. It is shown that there are the substantial changes of values of the optical density D comparative with controls (for donors) exactly in a maximum at development of sharp surgical diseases of organs of abdominal region λ = 280 nm, in that time as maximum at λ = 235 nm in this plan is not informing. Resulted results of researches of dynamics of changes of optical properties of vein blood plasma in UF- region of patients with pathology of abdominal region organs in after operating period (sharp appendicitis, sharp pancreatitis, intestinal impassability and others like that), which can have the diagnostic value.

  20. [Social network analysis: a method to improve safety in healthcare organizations].

    PubMed

    Marqués Sánchez, Pilar; González Pérez, Marta Eva; Agra Varela, Yolanda; Vega Núñez, Jorge; Pinto Carral, Arrate; Quiroga Sánchez, Enedina

    2013-01-01

    Patient safety depends on the culture of the healthcare organization involving relationships between professionals. This article proposes that the study of these relations should be conducted from a network perspective and using a methodology called Social Network Analysis (SNA). This methodology includes a set of mathematical constructs grounded in Graph Theory. With the SNA we can know aspects of the individual's position in the network (centrality) or cohesion among team members. Thus, the SNA allows to know aspects related to security such as the kind of links that can increase commitment among professionals, how to build those links, which nodes have more prestige in the team in generating confidence or collaborative network, which professionals serve as intermediaries between the subgroups of a team to transmit information or smooth conflicts, etc. Useful aspects in stablishing a safety culture. The SNA would analyze the relations among professionals, their level of communication to communicate errors and spontaneously seek help and coordination between departments to participate in projects that enhance safety. Thus, they related through a network, using the same language, a fact that helps to build a culture. In summary, we propose an approach to safety culture from a SNA perspective that would complement other commonly used methods.

  1. Transforming communication and safety culture in intrapartum care: a multi-organization blueprint.

    PubMed

    Lyndon, Audrey; Johnson, M Christina; Bingham, Debra; Napolitano, Peter G; Joseph, Gerald; Maxfield, David G; O'Keeffe, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Effective, patient-centered communication facilitates interception and correction of potentially harmful conditions and errors. All team members, including women, their families, physicians, midwives, nurses, and support staff, have roles in identifying the potential for harm during labor and birth. However, the results of collaborative research studies conducted by organizations that represent professionals who care for women during labor and birth indicate that health care providers may frequently witness, but may not always report, problems with safety or clinical performance. Some of these health care providers felt resigned to the continuation of such problems and fearful of retribution if they tried to address them. Speaking up to address safety and quality concerns is a dynamic social process. Every team member must feel empowered to speak up about concerns without fear of put-downs, retribution, or receiving poor-quality care. Patient safety requires mutual accountability: individuals, teams, health care facilities, and professional associations have a shared responsibility for creating and sustaining environments of mutual respect and engaging in highly reliable perinatal care. Defects in human factors, communication, and leadership have been the leading contributors to sentinel events in perinatal care for more than a decade. Organizational commitment and executive leadership are essential to creating an environment that proactively supports safety and quality. The problem is well-known; the time for action is now.

  2. Transforming communication and safety culture in intrapartum care: a multi-organization blueprint.

    PubMed

    Lyndon, Audrey; Johnson, M Christina; Bingham, Debra; Napolitano, Peter G; Joseph, Gerald; Maxfield, David G; OʼKeeffe, Daniel F

    2015-05-01

    Effective, patient-centered communication facilitates interception and correction of potentially harmful conditions and errors. All team members, including women, their families, physicians, midwives, nurses, and support staff, have a role in identifying the potential for harm during labor and birth. However, the results of collaborative research studies conducted by organizations that represent professionals who care for women during labor and birth indicate that health care providers may frequently witness, but may not always report, problems with safety or clinical performance. Some of these health care providers felt resigned to the continuation of such problems and fearful of retribution if they tried to address them. Speaking up to address safety and quality concerns is a dynamic social process. Every team member must feel empowered to speak up about concerns without fear of put-downs, retribution, or receiving poor-quality care. Patient safety requires mutual accountability: individuals, teams, health care facilities, and professional associations have a shared responsibility for creating and sustaining environments of mutual respect and engaging in highly reliable perinatal care. Defects in human factors, communication, and leadership have been the leading contributors to sentinel events in perinatal care for more than a decade. Organizational commitment and executive leadership are essential to creating an environment that proactively supports safety and quality. The problem is well-known; the time for action is now.

  3. Transforming communication and safety culture in intrapartum care: a multi-organization blueprint.

    PubMed

    Lyndon, Audrey; Johnson, M Christina; Bingham, Debra; Napolitano, Peter G; Joseph, Gerald; Maxfield, David G; O'Keeffe, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Effective, patient-centered communication facilitates interception and correction of potentially harmful conditions and errors. All team members, including women, their families, physicians, midwives, nurses, and support staff, have a role in identifying the potential for harm during labor and birth. However, the results of collaborative research studies conducted by organizations that represent professionals who care for women during labor and birth indicate that health care providers may frequently witness, but may not always report, problems with safety or clinical performance. Some of these health care providers felt resigned to the continuation of such problems and fearful of retribution if they tried to address them. Speaking up to address safety and quality concerns is a dynamic social process. Every team member must feel empowered to speak up about concerns without fear of put-downs, retribution, or receiving poor-quality care. Patient safety requires mutual accountability: individuals, teams, health care facilities, and professional associations have a shared responsibility for creating and sustaining environments of mutual respect and engaging in highly reliable perinatal care. Defects in human factors, communication, and leadership have been the leading contributors to sentinel events in perinatal care for more than a decade. Organizational commitment and executive leadership are essential to creating an environment that proactively supports safety and quality. The problem is well-known; the time for action is now.

  4. Food safety training needs at evacuation shelters operated by faith-based organizations.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Junehee; Zottarelli, Lisa; Kwon, Sockju; Lee, Yee Ming; Ryu, Dojin

    2013-09-01

    The authors conducted a survey to identify food safety training needs at evacuation shelters operated by faith-based organizations (FBOs) in four hurricane-prone states. Five thousand randomly selected FBO leaders were asked questions about their food safety attitudes and food handling practices at evacuation shelters. Descriptive statistics and multivariate analysis of variance were calculated to summarize and prioritize the responses. Results from 138 leaders revealed that on average, 590 +/- 4,787 evacuees were served for 36 +/- 72 days at FBO-operated shelters. Only 19.6% felt they were well prepared for the shelter. Only 5.8% had professional food preparation staff and many accepted hot (47.8%) and cold (37%) prepared food donations. Some lacked adequate refrigerator (18.8%) or freezer (16.7%) spaces, but 40% kept hot food leftovers for later use. The majority did not provide food safety training before opening the shelters (73.2%), yet 76.9% said they will provide food to evacuation shelters again. The results show a need for food safety training and specific strategies for training at FBOs.

  5. Risk factors and outcomes of organ-space surgical site infections after elective colon and rectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Gomila, Aina; Carratalà, Jordi; Camprubí, Daniel; Shaw, Evelyn; Badia, Josep Mª; Cruz, Antoni; Aguilar, Francesc; Nicolás, Carmen; Marrón, Anna; Mora, Laura; Perez, Rafel; Martin, Lydia; Vázquez, Rosa; Lopez, Ana Felisa; Limón, Enric; Gudiol, Francesc; Pujol, Miquel

    2017-01-01

    Organ-space surgical site infections (SSI) are the most serious and costly infections after colorectal surgery. Most previous studies of risk factors for SSI have analysed colon and rectal procedures together. The aim of the study was to determine whether colon and rectal procedures have different risk factors and outcomes for organ-space SSI. A multicentre observational prospective cohort study of adults undergoing elective colon and rectal procedures at 10 Spanish hospitals from 2011 to 2014. Patients were followed up until 30 days post-surgery. Surgical site infection was defined according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. Oral antibiotic prophylaxis (OAP) was considered as the administration of oral antibiotics the day before surgery combined with systemic intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis. Of 3,701 patients, 2,518 (68%) underwent colon surgery and 1,183 (32%) rectal surgery. In colon surgery, the overall SSI rate was 16.4% and the organ-space SSI rate was 7.9%, while in rectal surgery the rates were 21.6% and 11.5% respectively (p < 0.001). Independent risk factors for organ-space SSI in colon surgery were male sex (Odds ratio -OR-: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.14-2.15) and ostomy creation (OR: 2.65, 95% CI: 1.8-3.92) while laparoscopy (OR: 0.5, 95% CI: 0.38-0.69) and OAP combined with intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis (OR: 0.7, 95% CI: 0.51-0.97) were protective factors. In rectal surgery, independent risk factors for organ-space SSI were male sex (OR: 2.11, 95% CI: 1.34-3.31) and longer surgery (OR: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.03-2.15), whereas OAP with intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis (OR: 0.49, 95% CI: 0.32-0.73) was a protective factor. Among patients with organ-space SSI, we found a significant difference in the overall 30-day mortality, being higher in colon surgery than in rectal surgery (11.5% vs 5.1%, p = 0.04). Organ-space SSI in colon and rectal surgery has some differences in terms of incidence, risk factors and outcomes. These

  6. Exploring the state of health and safety management system performance measurement in mining organizations.

    PubMed

    Haas, Emily Joy; Yorio, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Complex arguments continue to be articulated regarding the theoretical foundation of health and safety management system (HSMS) performance measurement. The culmination of these efforts has begun to enhance a collective understanding. Despite this enhanced theoretical understanding, however, there are still continuing debates and little consensus. The goal of the current research effort was to empirically explore common methods to HSMS performance measurement in mining organizations. The purpose was to determine if value and insight could be added into the ongoing approaches of the best ways to engage in health and safety performance measurement. Nine site-level health and safety management professionals were provided with 133 practices corresponding to 20 HSMS elements, each fitting into the plan, do, check, act phases common to most HSMS. Participants were asked to supply detailed information as to how they (1) assess the performance of each practice in their organization, or (2) would assess each practice if it were an identified strategic imperative. Qualitative content analysis indicated that the approximately 1200 responses provided could be described and categorized into interventions, organizational performance, and worker performance. A discussion of how these categories relate to existing indicator frameworks is provided. The analysis also revealed divergence in two important measurement issues; (1) quantitative vs qualitative measurement and reporting; and (2) the primary use of objective or subjective metrics. In lieu of these findings we ultimately recommend a balanced measurement and reporting approach within the three metric categories and conclude with suggestions for future research.

  7. Exploring the state of health and safety management system performance measurement in mining organizations

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Emily Joy; Yorio, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Complex arguments continue to be articulated regarding the theoretical foundation of health and safety management system (HSMS) performance measurement. The culmination of these efforts has begun to enhance a collective understanding. Despite this enhanced theoretical understanding, however, there are still continuing debates and little consensus. The goal of the current research effort was to empirically explore common methods to HSMS performance measurement in mining organizations. The purpose was to determine if value and insight could be added into the ongoing approaches of the best ways to engage in health and safety performance measurement. Nine site-level health and safety management professionals were provided with 133 practices corresponding to 20 HSMS elements, each fitting into the plan, do, check, act phases common to most HSMS. Participants were asked to supply detailed information as to how they (1) assess the performance of each practice in their organization, or (2) would assess each practice if it were an identified strategic imperative. Qualitative content analysis indicated that the approximately 1200 responses provided could be described and categorized into interventions, organizational performance, and worker performance. A discussion of how these categories relate to existing indicator frameworks is provided. The analysis also revealed divergence in two important measurement issues; (1) quantitative vs qualitative measurement and reporting; and (2) the primary use of objective or subjective metrics. In lieu of these findings we ultimately recommend a balanced measurement and reporting approach within the three metric categories and conclude with suggestions for future research. PMID:26823642

  8. The safety assessment of food ingredients derived from plant cell, tissue and organ cultures: a review.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Hosakatte Niranjana; Georgiev, Milen I; Park, So-Young; Dandin, Vijayalaxmi S; Paek, Kee-Yoeup

    2015-06-01

    Plant cell, tissue and organ cultures (PCTOC) have become an increasingly attractive alternative for the production of various high molecular weight molecules which are used as flavourings, fragrances, colouring agents and food additives. Although PCTOC products are cultivated in vitro in a contamination free environment, the raw material produced from PCTOC may contain many components apart from the target compound. In some cases, PCTOC raw materials may also carry toxins, which may be naturally occurring or accumulated during the culture process. Assessment of the safety of PCTOC products is, therefore, a priority of the biotech industries involved in their production. The safety assessment involves the evaluation of starting material, production process and the end product. Before commercialisation, PCTOC products should be evaluated for their chemical and biological properties, as well as for their toxicity. In this review, measures and general criteria for biosafety evaluation of PCTOC products are addressed and thoroughly discussed.

  9. Evolution of surgical skills training.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kurt-E; Bell, Robert-L; Duffy, Andrew-J

    2006-05-28

    Surgical training is changing: one hundred years of tradition is being challenged by legal and ethical concerns for patient safety, work hours restrictions, the cost of operating room time, and complications. Surgical simulation and skills training offers an opportunity to teach and practice advanced skills outside of the operating room environment before attempting them on living patients. Simulation training can be as straight forward as using real instruments and video equipment to manipulate simulated "tissue" in a box trainer. More advanced, virtual reality simulators are now available and ready for widespread use. Early systems have demonstrated their effectiveness and discriminative ability. Newer systems enable the development of comprehensive curricula and full procedural simulations. The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education's (ACGME) has mandated the development of novel methods of training and evaluation. Surgical organizations are calling for methods to ensure the maintenance of skills, advance surgical training, and to credential surgeons as technically competent. Simulators in their current form have been demonstrated to improve the operating room performance of surgical residents. Development of standardized training curricula remains an urgent and important agenda, particularly for minimal invasive surgery. An innovative and progressive approach, borrowing experiences from the field of aviation, can provide the foundation for the next century of surgical training, ensuring the quality of the product. As the technology develops, the way we practice will continue to evolve, to the benefit of physicians and patients.

  10. Evolution of surgical skills training

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kurt E; Bell, Robert L; Duffy, Andrew J

    2006-01-01

    Surgical training is changing: one hundred years of tradition is being challenged by legal and ethical concerns for patient safety, work hours restrictions, the cost of operating room time, and complications. Surgical simulation and skills training offers an opportunity to teach and practice advanced skills outside of the operating room environment before attempting them on living patients. Simulation training can be as straight forward as using real instruments and video equipment to manipulate simulated “tissue” in a box trainer. More advanced, virtual reality simulators are now available and ready for widespread use. Early systems have demonstrated their effectiveness and discriminative ability. Newer systems enable the development of comprehensive curricula and full procedural simulations. The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education’s (ACGME) has mandated the development of novel methods of training and evaluation. Surgical organizations are calling for methods to ensure the maintenance of skills, advance surgical training, and to credential surgeons as technically competent. Simulators in their current form have been demonstrated to improve the operating room performance of surgical residents. Development of standardized training curricula remains an urgent and important agenda, particularly for minimal invasive surgery. An innovative and progressive approach, borrowing experiences from the field of aviation, can provide the foundation for the next century of surgical training, ensuring the quality of the product. As the technology develops, the way we practice will continue to evolve, to the benefit of physicians and patients. PMID:16718842

  11. Risk and safety requirements for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in allergology: World Allergy Organization Statement.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Marek L; Ansotegui, Ignacio; Aberer, Werner; Al-Ahmad, Mona; Akdis, Mubeccel; Ballmer-Weber, Barbara K; Beyer, Kirsten; Blanca, Miguel; Brown, Simon; Bunnag, Chaweewan; Hulett, Arnaldo Capriles; Castells, Mariana; Chng, Hiok Hee; De Blay, Frederic; Ebisawa, Motohiro; Fineman, Stanley; Golden, David B K; Haahtela, Tari; Kaliner, Michael; Katelaris, Connie; Lee, Bee Wah; Makowska, Joanna; Muller, Ulrich; Mullol, Joaquim; Oppenheimer, John; Park, Hae-Sim; Parkerson, James; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Pawankar, Ruby; Renz, Harald; Rueff, Franziska; Sanchez-Borges, Mario; Sastre, Joaquin; Scadding, Glenis; Sicherer, Scott; Tantilipikorn, Pongsakorn; Tracy, James; van Kempen, Vera; Bohle, Barbara; Canonica, G Walter; Caraballo, Luis; Gomez, Maximiliano; Ito, Komei; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Larche, Mark; Melioli, Giovanni; Poulsen, Lars K; Valenta, Rudolf; Zuberbier, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    One of the major concerns in the practice of allergy is related to the safety of procedures for the diagnosis and treatment of allergic disease. Management (diagnosis and treatment) of hypersensitivity disorders involves often intentional exposure to potentially allergenic substances (during skin testing), deliberate induction in the office of allergic symptoms to offending compounds (provocation tests) or intentional application of potentially dangerous substances (allergy vaccine) to sensitized patients. These situations may be associated with a significant risk of unwanted, excessive or even dangerous reactions, which in many instances cannot be completely avoided. However, adverse reactions can be minimized or even avoided if a physician is fully aware of potential risk and is prepared to appropriately handle the situation. Information on the risk of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in allergic diseases has been accumulated in the medical literature for decades; however, except for allergen specific immunotherapy, it has never been presented in a systematic fashion. Up to now no single document addressed the risk of the most commonly used medical procedures in the allergy office nor attempted to present general requirements necessary to assure the safety of these procedures. Following review of available literature a group of allergy experts within the World Allergy Organization (WAO), representing various continents and areas of allergy expertise, presents this report on risk associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in allergology and proposes a consensus on safety requirements for performing procedures in allergy offices. Optimal safety measures including appropriate location, type and required time of supervision, availability of safety equipment, access to specialized emergency services, etc. for various procedures have been recommended. This document should be useful for allergists with already established practices and experience as well

  12. Impact of surgical training on the performance of proposed quality measures for hysterectomy for pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Adams-Piper, Emily R; Guaderrama, Noelani M; Chen, Qiaoling; Whitcomb, Emily L

    2017-06-01

    Recent healthcare reform has led to increased emphasis on standardized provision of quality care. Use of government- and organization-approved quality measures is 1 way to document quality care. Quality measures, to improve care and aid in reimbursement, are being proposed and vetted in many areas of medicine. We aimed to assess performance of proposed quality measures that pertain to hysterectomy for pelvic organ prolapse stratified by surgical training. The 4 quality measures that we assessed were (1) the documentation of offering conservative treatment of pelvic organ prolapse, (2) the quantitative assessment of pelvic organ prolapse (Pelvic Organ Prolapse-Quantification or Baden-Walker), (3) the performance of an apical support procedure, and (4) the performance of cystoscopy at time of hysterectomy. Patients who underwent hysterectomy for pelvic organ prolapse from January 1 to December 31, 2008, within a large healthcare maintenance organization were identified by diagnostic and procedural codes within the electronic medical record. Medical records were reviewed extensively for demographic and clinical data that included the performance of the 4 proposed quality measures and the training background of the primary surgeon (gynecologic generalist, fellowship-trained surgeon in Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, and "grandfathered" Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery). Data were analyzed with the use of descriptive statistics. Inferential statistics with chi-squared tests were used to compare performance rates of quality measures that were stratified by surgical training. Probability values <.05 were considered statistically significant. Six hundred thirty patients who underwent hysterectomy for pelvic organ prolapse in 2008 had complete records available for analysis. Fellowship-trained surgeons performed 302 hysterectomies for pelvic organ prolapse; grandfathered Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery surgeons performed

  13. Comparison of the Microbiological Quality and Safety between Conventional and Organic Vegetables Sold in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Chee-Hao; Rukayadi, Yaya; Ahmad, Siti H.; Wan Mohamed Radzi, Che W. J.; Thung, Tze-Young; Premarathne, Jayasekara M. K. J. K.; Chang, Wei-San; Loo, Yuet-Ying; Tan, Chia-Wanq; Ramzi, Othman B.; Mohd Fadzil, Siti N.; Kuan, Chee-Sian; Yeo, Siok-Koon; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki; Radu, Son

    2017-01-01

    Given the remarkable increase of public interest in organic food products, it is indeed critical to evaluate the microbiological risk associated with consumption of fresh organic produce. Organic farming practices including the use of animal manures may increase the risk of microbiological contamination as manure can act as a vehicle for transmission of foodborne pathogens. This study aimed to determine and compare the microbiological status between organic and conventional fresh produce at the retail level in Malaysia. A total of 152 organic and conventional vegetables were purchased at retail markets in Malaysia. Samples were analyzed for mesophilic aerobic bacteria, yeasts and molds, and total coliforms using conventional microbiological methods. Combination methods of most probable number-multiplex polymerase chain reaction (MPN-mPCR) were used to detect and quantify foodborne pathogens, including Escherichia coli O157:H7, Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Salmonella Enteritidis. Results indicated that most types of organic and conventional vegetables possessed similar microbial count (P > 0.05) of mesophilic aerobic bacteria, yeasts and molds, and total coliforms. E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium were not detected in any sample analyzed in this study. Among the 152 samples tested, only the conventional lettuce and organic carrot were tested positive for STEC and S. Enteritidis, respectively. L. monocytogenes were more frequently detected in both organic (9.1%) and conventional vegetables (2.7%) as compared to E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and S. Enteritidis. Overall, no trend was shown that either organically or conventionally grown vegetables have posed greater microbiological risks. These findings indicated that one particular type of farming practices would not affect the microbiological profiles of fresh produce. Therefore, regardless of farming methods, all vegetables should be subjected to

  14. Comparison of the Microbiological Quality and Safety between Conventional and Organic Vegetables Sold in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Chee-Hao; Rukayadi, Yaya; Ahmad, Siti H; Wan Mohamed Radzi, Che W J; Thung, Tze-Young; Premarathne, Jayasekara M K J K; Chang, Wei-San; Loo, Yuet-Ying; Tan, Chia-Wanq; Ramzi, Othman B; Mohd Fadzil, Siti N; Kuan, Chee-Sian; Yeo, Siok-Koon; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki; Radu, Son

    2017-01-01

    Given the remarkable increase of public interest in organic food products, it is indeed critical to evaluate the microbiological risk associated with consumption of fresh organic produce. Organic farming practices including the use of animal manures may increase the risk of microbiological contamination as manure can act as a vehicle for transmission of foodborne pathogens. This study aimed to determine and compare the microbiological status between organic and conventional fresh produce at the retail level in Malaysia. A total of 152 organic and conventional vegetables were purchased at retail markets in Malaysia. Samples were analyzed for mesophilic aerobic bacteria, yeasts and molds, and total coliforms using conventional microbiological methods. Combination methods of most probable number-multiplex polymerase chain reaction (MPN-mPCR) were used to detect and quantify foodborne pathogens, including Escherichia coli O157:H7, Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Salmonella Enteritidis. Results indicated that most types of organic and conventional vegetables possessed similar microbial count (P > 0.05) of mesophilic aerobic bacteria, yeasts and molds, and total coliforms. E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium were not detected in any sample analyzed in this study. Among the 152 samples tested, only the conventional lettuce and organic carrot were tested positive for STEC and S. Enteritidis, respectively. L. monocytogenes were more frequently detected in both organic (9.1%) and conventional vegetables (2.7%) as compared to E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and S. Enteritidis. Overall, no trend was shown that either organically or conventionally grown vegetables have posed greater microbiological risks. These findings indicated that one particular type of farming practices would not affect the microbiological profiles of fresh produce. Therefore, regardless of farming methods, all vegetables should be subjected to

  15. Surgical hand antisepsis: the evidence.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Judith

    2008-08-01

    For 150 years members of the surgical team have been washing their hands with solutions designed to remove micro-organisms and therefore reduce surgical site infections in patients. This article discusses the evidence surrounding aspects of surgical hand antisepsis.

  16. Animal-assisted interventions: A national survey of health and safety policies in hospitals, eldercare facilities, and therapy animal organizations.

    PubMed

    Linder, Deborah E; Siebens, Hannah C; Mueller, Megan K; Gibbs, Debra M; Freeman, Lisa M

    2017-08-01

    Animal-assisted intervention (AAI) programs are increasing in popularity, but it is unknown to what extent therapy animal organizations that provide AAI and the hospitals and eldercare facilities they work with implement effective animal health and safety policies to ensure safety of both animals and humans. Our study objective was to survey hospitals, eldercare facilities, and therapy animal organizations on their AAI policies and procedures. A survey of United States hospitals, eldercare facilities, and therapy animal organizations was administered to assess existing health and safety policies related to AAI programs. Forty-five eldercare facilities, 45 hospitals, and 27 therapy animal organizations were surveyed. Health and safety policies varied widely and potentially compromised human and animal safety. For example, 70% of therapy animal organizations potentially put patients at risk by allowing therapy animals eating raw meat diets to visit facilities. In general, hospitals had stricter requirements than eldercare facilities. This information suggests that there are gaps between the policies of facilities and therapy animal organizations compared with recent guidelines for animal visitation in hospitals. Facilities with AAI programs need to review their policies to address recent AAI guidelines to ensure the safety of animals and humans involved. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Preliminary safety criteria for organic watch list tanks at the Hanford site

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, A.B.; Stewart, J.L.; Turner, O.A.; Plys, M.G.; Malinovic, B.; Grigsby, J.M.; Camaioni, D.M.; Heasler, P.G.; Samuels, W.O.; Toth, J.J.

    1995-11-01

    Condensed-phase, rapid reactions of organic salts with nitrates/nitrites in Hanford High Level Radioactive Waste single-shell tanks could lead to structural failure of the tanks resulting in significant releases of radionuclides and toxic materials. This report establishes appropriate preliminary safety criteria to ensure that tank wastes will be maintained safe. These criteria show that if actual dry wastes contain less than 1.2 MJ/kg of reactants reaction energy or less 4.5 wt % of total organic carbon, then the waste will be safe and will not propagate if ignited. Waste moisture helps to retard reactions; when waste moisture exceeds 20 wt %, rapid reactions are prevented, regardless of organic carbon concentrations. Aging and degradation of waste materials has been considered to predict the types and amounts to organic compounds present in the waste. Using measurements of 3 waste phases (liquid, salt cake, and sludge) obtained from tank waste samples analyzed in the laboratory, analysis of variance (ANOVA) models were used to estimate waste states for unmeasured tanks. The preliminary safety criteria are based upon calorimetry and propagation testing of likely organic compounds which represent actual tank wastes. These included sodium salts of citrate, formate, acetate and hydroxyethylethylenediaminetricetate (HEDTA). Hot cell tests of actual tank wastes are planned for the future to confirm propagation tests performed in the laboratory. The effects of draining liquids from the tanks which would remove liquids and moisture were considered because reactive waste which is too dry may propagate. Evaporation effects which could remove moisture from the tanks were also calculated. The various ways that the waste could be heated or ignited by equipment failures or tank operations activities were considered and appropriate monitoring and controls were recommended.

  18. Organic food: buying more safety or just peace of mind? A critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Magkos, Faidon; Arvaniti, Fotini; Zampelas, Antonis

    2006-01-01

    Consumer concern over the quality and safety of conventional food has intensified in recent years, and primarily drives the increasing demand for organically grown food, which is perceived as healthier and safer. Relevant scientific evidence, however, is scarce, while anecdotal reports abound. Although there is an urgent need for information related to health benefits and/or hazards of food products of both origins, generalized conclusions remain tentative in the absence of adequate comparative data. Organic fruits and vegetables can be expected to contain fewer agrochemical residues than conventionally grown alternatives; yet, the significance of this difference is questionable, inasmuch as actual levels of contamination in both types of food are generally well below acceptable limits. Also, some leafy, root, and tuber organic vegetables appear to have lower nitrate content compared with conventional ones, but whether or not dietary nitrate indeed constitutes a threat to human health is a matter of debate. On the other hand, no differences can be identified for environmental contaminants (e.g. cadmium and other heavy metals), which are likely to be present in food from both origins. With respect to other food hazards, such as endogenous plant toxins, biological pesticides and pathogenic microorganisms, available evidence is extremely limited preventing generalized statements. Also, results for mycotoxin contamination in cereal crops are variable and inconclusive; hence, no clear picture emerges. It is difficult, therefore, to weigh the risks, but what should be made clear is that 'organic' does not automatically equal 'safe.' Additional studies in this area of research are warranted. At our present state of knowledge, other factors rather than safety aspects seem to speak in favor of organic food.

  19. [Clinical diagnosis of HIV infection in patients with acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs and pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Nguen, V Kh; Stroganov, P V; Geshelin, S A

    2011-09-01

    The results of treatment of 81 patients, suffering tuberculosis and operated in emergency for an acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs, are adduced, in 29 of them--nonspecific diseases of nontuberculosis genesis were diagnosed. In 52 patients the indication for emergency operation performance were complications of abdominal tuberculosis (perforation of the tuberculosis ulcers of small intestine--in 37, the tuberculosis mesadenitis--in 15), of them in 34--pulmonary tuberculosis was in inactive phase, that's why the HIV presence was supposed. In 26 patients the diagnosis was confirmed, basing on serologic analysis data. The presence of intraabdominal catastrophe, caused by abdominal tuberculosis complications on inactive pulmonary tuberculosis background witnesses with 85.3% probability the HIV-infectioning of the patient.

  20. GiPSi:a framework for open source/open architecture software development for organ-level surgical simulation.

    PubMed

    Cavuşoğlu, M Cenk; Göktekin, Tolga G; Tendick, Frank

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents the architectural details of an evolving open source/open architecture software framework for developing organ-level surgical simulations. Our goal is to facilitate shared development of reusable models, to accommodate heterogeneous models of computation, and to provide a framework for interfacing multiple heterogeneous models. The framework provides an application programming interface for interfacing dynamic models defined over spatial domains. It is specifically designed to be independent of the specifics of the modeling methods used, and therefore facilitates seamless integration of heterogeneous models and processes. Furthermore, each model has separate geometries for visualization, simulation, and interfacing, allowing the model developer to choose the most natural geometric representation for each case. Input/output interfaces for visualization and haptics for real-time interactive applications have also been provided.

  1. Determining the Oncologic Safety of Autologous Fat Grafting as a Reconstructive Modality: An Institutional Review of Breast Cancer Recurrence Rates and Surgical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Oriana; Lam, Gretl; Karp, Nolan; Choi, Mihye

    2017-09-01

    The increasing use of autologous fat grafting in breast cancer patients has raised concerns regarding its oncologic safety. This study evaluated patient outcomes and tumor recurrence following mastectomy reconstruction and autologous fat grafting. Retrospective chart review identified patients who underwent mastectomy followed by breast reconstruction from 2010 to 2015. Eight hundred twenty-nine breasts met inclusion criteria: 248 (30.0 percent) underwent autologous fat grafting, whereas 581 (70.0 percent) breasts did not. Patient demographics, cancer characteristics, oncologic treatment, surgical treatment, surgical complications, local recurrence, and distant metastases were analyzed. Autologous fat grafting patients and control patients were of similar body mass index, smoking status, and BRCA status. Patients who underwent fat grafting were significantly younger than control patients and were less likely to have diabetes, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia. The two groups represented similar distributions of BRCA status, Oncotype scores, and hormone receptor status. Patients underwent one to four grafting procedures: one procedure in 83.1 percent, two procedures in 13.7 percent, three in 2.8 percent, and four in 0.4 percent. Mean follow-up time from initial surgery was 45.6 months in the fat grafting group and 38.8 months in controls. The overall complication rate following fat grafting was 9.4 percent. Among breasts undergoing surgery for therapeutic indications, there were similar rates of local recurrence (fat grafting group, 2.5 percent; controls, 1.9 percent; p = 0.747). Interestingly, mean time to recurrence was significantly longer in the fat grafting group (52.3 months versus 22.8 months from initial surgery; p = 0.016). Autologous fat grafting is a powerful tool in breast reconstruction. This large, single-institution study provides valuable evidence-based support for its oncologic safety. Therapeutic, III.

  2. Surgical extraction of human dorsal root ganglia from organ donors and preparation of primary sensory neuron cultures

    PubMed Central

    Valtcheva, Manouela V.; Copits, Bryan A.; Davidson, Steve; Sheahan, Tayler D.; Pullen, Melanie Y.; McCall, Jordan G.; Dikranian, Krikor; Gereau, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Primary cultures of rodent sensory neurons are widely used to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in pain, itch, nerve injury, and regeneration. However, translation of these preclinical findings may be greatly improved by direct validation in human tissues. We have developed an approach to extract and culture human sensory neurons in collaboration with a local organ procurement organization. Here we describe the surgical procedure for extraction of human dorsal root ganglia (hDRG) and the necessary modifications to existing culture techniques to prepare viable adult human sensory neurons for functional studies. Dissociated sensory neurons can be maintained in culture for >10 days, and are amenable to electrophysiological recording, calcium imaging, and viral gene transfer. The entire process of extraction and culturing can be completed in less than 7 hours, and can be performed by trained graduate students. This approach can be applied at any institution with access to organ donors consenting to tissue donation for research and provides an invaluable resource for improving translational research. PMID:27606776

  3. Focal positive surgical margins decrease disease-free survival after radical prostatectomy even in organ-confined disease.

    PubMed

    Lake, Alison M; He, Chang; Wood, David P

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the significance of focal positive margins (FPM) in prostatectomy patients. The significance of FPM after radical prostatectomy is unclear. The implication is that FPM are surgically induced, may not represent true tumor extension beyond the prostate, and thus would not affect disease-free survival (DFS). Data were retrospectively reviewed from 2468 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy between January 1996 and October 2008. The DFS probabilities were compared among different margin statuses (negative [NM], FPM, and extensively positive [EPM]) with the log-rank test. FPM was defined as less than/equal to 3 mm. EPM was greater than 3 mm. A multivariate Cox analysis was performed to evaluate the significance of FPM in patients with prostate cancer. Of all patients, 2022 (82%) had NM, 344 (14%) had FPM, and 99 (4%) had EPM. Of the 1997 patients with pT2 disease, 1716 (86%) had NM, 229 (11.5%) had FPM, and 52 (2.6%) had EPM. The 10-year DFS for all patients was 84%, 64%, 38% for NM, FPM, and EPM, respectively (P < .0001). The 10-year DFS for organ-confined disease was 90%, 76%, and 53% for NM, FPM, and EPM, respectively (P < .0001). The risk of biochemical recurrence for all patients increases with worsening margin status. Margin status affects biochemical recurrence and depends on the Gleason grade on surgical pathology for all patients (P = .0005) and patients with pT2 disease (P = .0233). FPM and EPM after radical prostatectomy confer a decreased DFS even in patients with otherwise organ-confined disease. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Early experience of a safety net provider reorganizing into an accountable care organization.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Karen; Santos, Palmira; Thompson, Douglas; Stout, Somava S; Bearse, Adriana; Mechanic, Robert E

    2014-08-01

    Although safety net providers will benefit from health insurance expansions under the Affordable Care Act, they also face significant challenges in the postreform environment. Some have embraced the concept of the accountable care organization to help improve quality and efficiency while addressing financial shortfalls. The experience of Cambridge Health Alliance (CHA) in Massachusetts, where health care reform began six years ago, provides insight into the opportunities and challenges of this approach in the safety net. CHA's strategies include care redesign, financial realignment, workforce transformation, and development of external partnerships. Early results show some improvement in access, patient experience, quality, and utilization; however, the potential efficiencies will not eliminate CHA's current operating deficit. The patient population, payer mix, service mix, cost structure, and political requirements reduce the likelihood of financial sustainability without significant changes in these factors, increased public funding, or both. Thus the future of safety net institutions, regardless of payment and care redesign success, remains at risk. Copyright © 2014 by Duke University Press.

  5. Aggressive surgical resection for hilar cholangiocarcinoma of the left-side predominance: radicality and safety of left-sided hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroaki; Kimura, Fumio; Yoshidome, Hiroyuki; Ohtsuka, Masayuki; Kato, Atsushi; Yoshitomi, Hideyuki; Furukawa, Katsunori; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the clinicopathologic outcomes in patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HC) after left-sided hepatectomy (L-H). L-H is indicated as radical surgery for HC, predominantly involving left hepatic duct. However, several reports have demonstrated that L-H often results in tumor-positive margin and unfavorable prognosis compared with right-sided hepatectomy (R-H). A total of 224 patients with HC underwent surgical resection with curative intent at our institution: L-H for Bismuth-Corlette (B-C) type IIIb tumors in 88 patients (39.3%) including 75 left hemihepatectomies and 13 left trisectionectomies, and R-H mainly for B-C type IIIa and IV tumors in 84 patients (37.5%). In this study, clinicopathologic outcomes and perioperative morbidity and mortality rates after L-H were investigated and compared with those after R-H. Histologically negative margin (R0) resection was achieved in 56 cases (63.6%) with L-H, similar to the results for R-H (58/84, 69.1%). However, the R0 resection rate in L-H cases with portal vein (PV) resection was lower (11/25, 44.0%), and various types of PV reconstruction were required. Proximal ductal stumps and excisional surface at periductal structures were the most common sites of positive margins. However, when curative resection was achieved, 5-year survival was comparable to that in R-H cases. Furthermore, lower mortality was noted in L-H cases, even with left trisectionectomy. Multivariate analysis indicated curability and hepatic artery resection as independent prognostic factors. Since L-H is a safe procedure and represents the only curative resectional option for type IIIb tumor, aggressive surgical resection should be performed even in cases with PV involvement, if R0 resection is possible.

  6. Review of Occupational Health and Safety Organization in Expanding Economies: The Case of Southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Moyo, Dingani; Zungu, Muzimkhulu; Kgalamono, Spoponki; Mwila, Chimba D

    2015-01-01

    Globally, access to occupational health and safety (OHS) by workers has remained at very low levels. The organization and implementation of OHS in South Africa, Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Botswana has remained at suboptimal levels. Inadequacy of human resource capital, training, and education in the field of OHS has had a major negative impact on the improvement of worker access to such services in expanding economies. South Africa, Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Botswana have expanding economies with active mining and agricultural activities that pose health and safety risks to the working population. A literature review and country systems inquiry on the organization of OHS services in the 4 countries was carried out. Because of the infancy and underdevelopment of OHS in southern Africa, literature on the status of this topic is limited. In the 4 countries under review, OHS services are a function shared either wholly or partially by 3 ministries, namely Health, Labor, and Mining. Other ministries, such as Environment and Agriculture, carry small fragments of OHS function. The 4 countries are at different stages of OHS legislative frameworks that guide the practice of health and safety in the workplace. Inadequacies in human resource capital and expertise in occupational health and safety are noted major constraints in the implementation and compliance to health and safety initiatives in the work place. South Africa has a more mature system than Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Botswana. Lack of specialized training in occupational health services, such as occupational medicine specialization for physicians, has been a major drawback in Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Botswana. The full adoption and success of OHS systems in Southern Africa remains constrained. Training and education in OHS, especially in occupational medicine, will enhance the development and maturation of occupational health in southern Africa. Capacitating primary health services with basic occupational health knowledge would

  7. Occupational safety and health as an element of a complex compensation system evaluation within an organization.

    PubMed

    Beck-Krala, Ewa; Klimkiewicz, Katarzyna

    2016-12-01

    Occupational safety and health (OSH) plays a significant role in today's organizations, because it helps in attracting and retaining employees as well as molding their attitudes and behaviors at work. This is why the issue of OSH is stressed in a comprehensive approach to employee rewards: the total reward concept. This article explains how OSH may be included in a complex evaluation process of the compensation system. Although the literature on the effectiveness of employee compensation refers mainly to financial and non-financial components, there is a need for inclusion of working conditions in such analyses. An evaluation of the compensation system that incorporates OSH can drive many benefits for both the organization and employees. Obtaining such benefits, however, requires systematic evaluation of the reward system, including OSH. Incorporation of OSH issue within the comprehensive analysis of compensation systems promotes responsible behavior of all stakeholders.

  8. Effects of Resident Duty Hour Reform on Surgical and Procedural Patient Safety Indicators Among Hospitalized VA and Medicare Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Amy K.; Loveland, Susan A.; Romano, Patrick S.; Itani, Kamal MF; Silber, Jeffrey H.; Even-Shoshan, Orit O.; Halenar, Michael J.; Teng, Yun; Zhu, Jingsan; Volpp, Kevin G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Improving patient safety was a strong motivation behind duty hour regulations implemented by ACGME on July 1, 2003. We investigated whether rates of Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) changed following these reforms. Research Design Observational study of patients admitted to VA (N=826,047) and Medicare (N=13,367,273) acute-care hospitals from 7/1/2000–6/30/2005. We examined changes in patient safety events in more vs. less teaching-intensive hospitals before (2000–2003) and after (2003–2005) duty hour reform, using conditional logistic regression, adjusting for patient age, gender, comorbidities, secular trends, baseline severity, and hospital site. Measures Ten PSIs were aggregated into 3 composite measures based on factor analyses: “Continuity of Care,” “Technical Care,” and “Other” composites. Results “Continuity of Care” composite rates showed no significant changes post-reform in hospitals of different teaching intensity in either VA or Medicare. In the VA, there were no significant changes post-reform for the “Technical Care” composite. In Medicare, the odds of a Technical Care PSI event in more vs. less teaching-intensive hospitals in post-reform year 1 were 1.12 (95% CI; 1.01–1.25); there were no significant relative changes in post-reform year 2. “Other” composite rates increased in VA in post-reform year 2 in more vs. less teaching-intensive hospitals (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.10–2.41), but not in Medicare in either post-reform year. Conclusions Duty hour reform had no systematic impact on PSI rates. In the few cases where there were statistically significant increases in the relative odds of developing a PSI, the magnitude of the absolute increases were too small to be clinically meaningful. PMID:19536029

  9. Risk-adjusted morbidity in teaching hospitals correlates with reported levels of communication and collaboration on surgical teams but not with scale measures of teamwork climate, safety climate, or working conditions.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Daniel L; Henderson, William G; Mosca, Cecilia L; Khuri, Shukri F; Mentzer, Robert M

    2007-12-01

    Since the Institute of Medicine patient safety reports, a number of survey-based measures of organizational climate safety factors (OCSFs) have been developed. The goal of this study was to measure the impact of OCSFs on risk-adjusted surgical morbidity and mortality. Surveys were administered to staff on general/vascular surgery services during a year. Surveys included multiitem scales measuring OCSFs. Additionally, perceived levels of communication and collaboration with coworkers were assessed. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program was used to assess risk-adjusted morbidity and mortality. Correlations between outcomes and OCSFs were calculated and between outcomes and communication/collaboration with attending and resident doctors, nurses, and other providers. Fifty-two sites participated in the survey: 44 Veterans Affairs and 8 academic medical centers. A total of 6,083 surveys were returned, for a response rate of 52%. The OCSF measures of teamwork climate, safety climate, working conditions, recognition of stress effects, job satisfaction, and burnout demonstrated internal validity but did not correlate with risk-adjusted outcomes. Reported levels of communication/collaboration with attending and resident doctors correlated with risk-adjusted morbidity. Survey-based teamwork, safety climate, and working conditions scales are not confirmed to measure organizational factors that influence risk-adjusted surgical outcomes. Reported communication/collaboration with attending and resident doctors on surgical services influenced patient morbidity. This suggests the importance of doctors' coordination and decision-making roles on surgical teams in providing high-quality and safe care. We propose risk-adjusted morbidity as an effective measure of surgical patient safety.

  10. The Patient's Voice in Pharmacovigilance: Pragmatic Approaches to Building a Patient-Centric Drug Safety Organization.

    PubMed

    Smith, Meredith Y; Benattia, Isma

    2016-09-01

    Patient-centeredness has become an acknowledged hallmark of not only high-quality health care but also high-quality drug development. Biopharmaceutical companies are actively seeking to be more patient-centric in drug research and development by involving patients in identifying target disease conditions, participating in the design of, and recruitment for, clinical trials, and disseminating study results. Drug safety departments within the biopharmaceutical industry are at a similar inflection point. Rising rates of per capita prescription drug use underscore the importance of having robust pharmacovigilance systems in place to detect and assess adverse drug reactions (ADRs). At the same time, the practice of pharmacovigilance is being transformed by a host of recent regulatory guidances and related initiatives which emphasize the importance of the patient's perspective in drug safety. Collectively, these initiatives impact the full range of activities that fall within the remit of pharmacovigilance, including ADR reporting, signal detection and evaluation, risk management, medication error assessment, benefit-risk assessment and risk communication. Examples include the fact that manufacturing authorization holders are now expected to monitor all digital sources under their control for potential reports of ADRs, and the emergence of new methods for collecting, analysing and reporting patient-generated ADR reports for signal detection and evaluation purposes. A drug safety department's ability to transition successfully into a more patient-centric organization will depend on three defining attributes: (1) a patient-centered culture; (2) deployment of a framework to guide patient engagement activities; and (3) demonstrated proficiency in patient-centered competencies, including patient engagement, risk communication and patient preference assessment. Whether, and to what extent, drug safety departments embrace the new patient-centric imperative, and the methods and

  11. Development of a transplantation transmission sentinel network to improve safety and traceability of organ and tissues.

    PubMed

    Strong, D Michael; Seem, Debbie; Taylor, Gloria; Parker, Jory; Stewart, Darren; Kuehnert, Matthew J

    2010-11-01

    The US lags behind other developed countries in creating a system to monitor disease transmission and other complications from human allograft use, despite a pressing need. The risks of transmission are amplified in transplantation, since at least 8 organs and more than 100 tissues can be recovered from a single common organ and tissue donor. Moreover, since many allografts collected in the US are distributed internationally, tissue safety is a global concern. In June 2005, participants of a US government-sponsored workshop concluded that a communication network for the tracking and reporting of disease transmissions for tissues and organs was critically needed. The United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) entered into a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 2006 to develop a system prototype. Over the following 3 years, the Transplantation Transmission Sentinel Network (TTSN) was developed and piloted with the participation of organ procurement organizations, tissue banks and transplant centers. The prototype centered around three elements of data entry: (1) donation, (2) tissue implantation, and (3) adverse event. The pilot proved that a system can be built and operated successfully, but also suggested that users may be hesitant to report adverse events. CDC has requested further input on scope and cost to build a transplant surveillance infrastructure for a fully functional national system. For tissues however, in contrast to organs, tracking from recovery to implantation will be necessary before a system is operable, requiring common identifiers and nomenclature. Until a US sentinel network is operational, future transmission events that are preventable may result nationally and globally due to its absence.

  12. Organic Tank Safety Project: Equilibrium moisture determination task fiscal year 1997. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

    1997-09-01

    Twenty waste storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site are included in the Organic Tank Watch List. The water content in the wastes plays a significant role in preventing propagating or sustainable chemical reactions, and the fuel and energetics independent safety criterion has been determined to be 20 wt % water. To ensure that the organic-bearing wastes continue to be stored safely, Duke Engineering and Services Hanford commissioned the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to investigate the effect of water partial pressure (P{sub H2O}) on the water content of organic-bearing or representative wastes. If necessary, the P{sub H2O} could be managed to maintain the water content at an acceptable level or adjust the water content back to an acceptable level. During fiscal year 1997, the effect of P{sub H2O} was tested to determine how organic-bearing wastes will respond if exposed to environmental Hanford water partial pressures or other potential water partial pressures. The samples tested were obtained from Organic Watch List Tanks, tanks that D.A. Reynolds of Lockheed Martin Hanford suspects may contain wastes having significant organic content, or wastes characteristic of organic-bearing wastes. Temperatures at or near maximum tank waste surface temperatures were used in the tests. At 26{degrees}C, the lowest temperature used, the water partial pressures used in the tests ranged from 2 to 22 torr. At 41{degrees}C, the highest temperature used, the water partial pressures used ran ed from 3.5 to 48 torr.

  13. Surgical specimen handover from the operating theatre to laboratory-Can we improve patient safety by learning from aviation and other high-risk organisations?

    PubMed

    Brennan, Peter A; Brands, Marieke T; Caldwell, Lucy; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Turley, Nic; Foley, Susie; Rahimi, Siavash

    2017-07-10

    Essential communication between healthcare staff is considered one of the key requirements for both safety and quality care when patients are handed over from one clinical area to other. This is particularly important in environments such as the operating theatre and intensive care where mistakes can be devastating. Health care has learned from other high-risk organisations (HRO) such as aviation where the use of checklists and human factors awareness has virtually eliminated human error and mistakes. To our knowledge, little has been published around ways to improve pathology specimen handover following surgery, with pathology request forms often conveying the bare minimum of information to assist the laboratory staff. Furthermore, the request form might not warn staff about potential hazards. In this article, we provide a brief summary of the factors involved in human error and introduce a novel checklist that can be readily completed at the same time as the routine pathology request form. This additional measure enhances safety, can help to reduce processing and mislabelling errors and provides essential information in a structured way assisting both laboratory staff and pathologists when handling head and neck surgical specimens. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The Rotator Cuff Organ: Integrating Developmental Biology, Tissue Engineering, and Surgical Considerations to Treat Chronic Massive Rotator Cuff Tears.

    PubMed

    Rothrauff, Benjamin B; Pauyo, Thierry; Debski, Richard E; Rodosky, Mark W; Tuan, Rocky S; Musahl, Volker

    2017-08-01

    The torn rotator cuff remains a persistent orthopedic challenge, with poor outcomes disproportionately associated with chronic, massive tears. Degenerative changes in the tissues that comprise the rotator cuff organ, including muscle, tendon, and bone, contribute to the poor healing capacity of chronic tears, resulting in poor function and an increased risk for repair failure. Tissue engineering strategies to augment rotator cuff repair have been developed in an effort to improve rotator cuff healing and have focused on three principal aims: (1) immediate mechanical augmentation of the surgical repair, (2) restoration of muscle quality and contractility, and (3) regeneration of native enthesis structure. Work in these areas will be reviewed in sequence, highlighting the relevant pathophysiology, developmental biology, and biomechanics, which must be considered when designing therapeutic applications. While the independent use of these strategies has shown promise, synergistic benefits may emerge from their combined application given the interdependence of the tissues that constitute the rotator cuff organ. Furthermore, controlled mobilization of augmented rotator cuff repairs during postoperative rehabilitation may provide mechanotransductive cues capable of guiding tissue regeneration and restoration of rotator cuff function. Present challenges and future possibilities will be identified, which if realized, may provide solutions to the vexing condition of chronic massive rotator cuff tears.

  15. Guidance for implementing an environmental, safety, and health-assurance program. Volume 15. A model plan for line organization environmental, safety, and health-assurance programs

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, A.C.; Trauth, C.A. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This is 1 of 15 documents designed to illustrate how an Environmental, Safety and Health (ES and H) Assurance Program may be implemented. The generic definition of ES and H Assurance Programs is given in a companion document entitled An Environmental, Safety and Health Assurance Program Standard. This particular document presents a model operational-level ES and H Assurance Program that may be used as a guide by an operational-level organization in developing its own plan. The model presented here reflects the guidance given in the total series of 15 documents.

  16. [Successful surgical treatment of a massive pulmonary embolism in the organized thromboembolic phase].

    PubMed

    Mandarić, V; Todorić, M; Ilić, R; Tisma, S; Trifunović, Z; Nikolić, G; Stojnić, B

    2000-01-01

    A patient, male, aged 36, clinically presented as an unstable angina pectoris following myocardial infarction, who came from general hospital of Banja Luka for further examination is presented. According to the medical report, he was treated for acute myocardial infarction in 1994 at Banja Luka's general hospital, when he was resusciated due to of cardiac arrest. The anginous pain was still present regardless of prescribed therapy. Following the clinical examination at the Military Medical Academy we have established a diagnosis of thromboembolism of the main pulmonary artery with a high pressure in the right ventricle. He underwent surgery under the extracorporeal circulation, when an organized old thrombus the main pulmonary artery and partially in arterial branches. The main pulmonary artery was almost completely obliterated. Thrombectomy was done. Following the operation, the patient was in a good condition and the repeated echocardiographic examinations showed no signs of recurrent thrombosis while the pressure in the right ventricle was significantly decreased. Afterwards, he was treated by heparine and oral anticoagulants and then by antiagregants. This case is very instructive because the massive pulmonary thromboembolism which was wrongly recognized and treated as an acute myocardial infarction.

  17. Efficacy of antimicrobial coating suture coated polyglactin 910 with tricosan (Vicryl plus) compared with polyglactin 910 (Vicryl) in reduced surgical site infection of appendicitis, double blind randomized control trial, preliminary safety report.

    PubMed

    Mingmalairak, Chatchai; Ungbhakorn, Pookate; Paocharoen, Veeraya

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of new antibacterial suture (Vicryl Plus) compared with a traditional braided suture (Vicryl) in a clinical study. The primary goal was to study effectiveness on reduced surgical site infection in an appendectomy operation. The authors' secondary goal was to analyze the safety and physical properties of Vicryl plus. This was a prospective, randomized, controlled, double blind, comparative, single-center study. After appendectomy was done, the patients were randomized in two groups: Vicryl Plus and Vicryl to selected suture for suturing the abdominal sheath. The surgical site infection was evaluated for 30 days, 6 months, and 1 year. The surgeons and attending doctor were blind to the type of suture. This is the primary report of the first 100 patients. There was no difference in demographic and preoperative clinical in both groups. Although there was no statistical difference in the surgical site infection of Vicryl and Vicryl Plus (8 and 10%, p = 0.05), one case of deep surgical site infection was detected in the Vicryl group. No complications and no difference in related suture materials were detected. Coated polyglactin 910 with tricosan (Vicryl Plus) is safe and satisfactory in surgical practice. Surgical site infection of appendectomy seemed too to be comparable between coated polyglactin 910 with tricosan (Vicryl Plus) and traditional polyglactin 910 (Vicryl) group.

  18. Clearing the Air About Surgical Smoke: An Education Program.

    PubMed

    Chavis, Sherry; Wagner, Vicki; Becker, Melanie; Bowerman, Mercelita I; Jamias, Mary Shirley

    2016-03-01

    Evidence of the harmful effects of surgical smoke has been recognized in the literature and by professional organizations for many years, yet surgical smoke continues to pose a safety hazard for patients and perioperative personnel. A team of perioperative nurses and educators sought to improve compliance with policies and procedures for surgical smoke management in the OR. The team quantified smoke-evacuator use, assessed staff members' knowledge using a pre-education survey, and presented a three-part multimodal education program. The team conducted a posteducation survey that showed significant improvement in staff members' knowledge. Ninety-day postimplementation quantitative data showed a 14.6% increase in surgical smoke-evacuation use. This educational initiative increased staff members' awareness about reducing the presence of surgical smoke in the OR and helped ensure a safer environment for patients, staff members, and the surgical team.

  19. A traffic-light coding system to organize emergency surgery across surgical disciplines.

    PubMed

    Leppäniemi, A; Jousela, I

    2014-01-01

    Emergency surgery is associated with night-time procedures and disruption of elective surgery. An analysis was undertaken of the effect of classifying emergency operations uniformly with a three-tier urgency colour code and the use of dedicated daytime operating rooms. Observed changes from 2001 to 2012 in the number, timing and ability to meet the urgency-designated colour code deadline were retrieved from the computer-based operating theatre organization system for all emergency operations. The number of emergency operations performed annually ranged from 3330 to 4341, with an increasing trend. The proportion of night-time emergency operations decreased from 27.4 per cent (2563 of 9347) before to 23.5 per cent (7731 of 32,959) after introduction of the colour coding system in 2004 (χ2  = 61.94, 1 d.f., P < 0.001). In 2007, owing to long preoperative delays in patients with acute appendicitis and acute cholecystitis, colour codes for these patients were upgraded from 'orange' to 'red' and from 'yellow' to 'orange' respectively. The proportion of patients operated on with a red code before and after this change increased from 45.2 per cent (5831 of 12,907 operations) to 62.7 per cent (13,020 of 20,778 operations; χ2  = 986.99, 1 d.f., P < 0.001). In 2012, the office-hours raw utilization time for the principal emergency operation theatre was 85.4 per cent. The structural separation of elective and emergency surgery, the use of dedicated daytime operating theatres and the implementation of a universal classification of emergency operations reduced night-time surgery, improved the efficiency of operating theatre utilization during daytime, shortened preoperative delay in patients requiring urgent surgery, and enabled monitoring and corrective actions for providing emergency surgery services. © 2013 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Safety Evaluation of Osun River Water Containing Heavy Metals and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Rats.

    PubMed

    Azeez, L; Salau, A K; Adewuyi, S O; Osineye, S O; Tijani, K O; Balogun, R O

    2015-12-20

    This study evaluated the pH, heavy metals and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Osun river water. It also evaluated its safety in rats. Heavy metals were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) while VOCs were determined by gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Male and female rats were exposed to Osun river water for three weeks and then sacrificed. The abundance of heavy metals in Osun river followed the trend Pb > Cd > Zn > Fe > Cr > Cu while VOCs followed the trend benzene < ethylbenzene < toluene < xylene. The concentrations of Pb, Cd and benzene were higher than the permissible limits of Standards Organization of Nigeria (SON) and World Health Organization (WHO) respectively. Rats exposed to Osun river water for three weeks had increased WBC, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), serum proteins and serum aminotransferases. There were also significant decreases in HCT, PLT, liver aminotransferases and liver glutathione compared to the control. These results show that the pollutants in Osun river water are capable of inducing hematological imbalance and liver cell injury. The toxicity induced in blood was sex-dependent affecting female rats more than male rats.

  1. Waste Tank Safety Program. Annual status report for FY 1993, Task 3: Organic chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Lucke, R.B.; Clauss, T.T.W.; Hoheimer, R.; Goheen, S.C.

    1994-02-01

    This task supports the tank-vapor project, mainly by providing organic analytical support and by analyzing Tank 241-C-103 (Tank C-103) vapor-space samples, collected via SUMMA{trademark} canisters, by gas chromatography (GC) and GC/mass spectrometry (MS). In the absence of receiving tank-vapor samples, we have focused our efforts toward validating the normal paraffin hydrocarbon (NPH) sampling and analysis methods and preparing the SUMMA{trademark} laboratory. All required milestones were met, including a report on the update of phase I sampling and analysis on August 15, 1993. This update described the work involved in preparing to analyze phase I samples (Appendix A). This report describes the analytical support provided by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL){sup (a)} to the Hanford Tank Safety Vapor Program.

  2. Randomized controlled trial of the shang ring versus conventional surgical techniques for adult male circumcision: safety and acceptability.

    PubMed

    Sokal, David C; Li, Philip S; Zulu, Robert; Awori, Quentin D; Combes, Stephanie L; Simba, Raymond O; Lee, Richard; Hart, Catherine; Perchal, Paul; Hawry, Hayden J; Bowa, Kasonde; Goldstein, Marc; Barone, Mark A

    2014-04-01

    To compare clinical profiles of Shang Ring versus conventional circumcisions. Parallel group open-label randomized controlled trial with one-to-one allocations in 2 sites. We enrolled HIV-negative men aged 18-54 years in Homa Bay, Kenya, and Lusaka, Zambia and followed them at 2, 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, and 60 days after Shang Ring versus conventional circumcision. We compared the duration of surgery, postoperative pain using a visual analog scale, adverse events rates, time to complete wound healing by clinical assessment, participant acceptability, and provider preferences between circumcision groups. We randomized 200 men to each group; 197 and 201 contributed to the Shang Ring and conventional surgery analyses, respectively. Adverse event rates were similar between groups. Pain scores at most time points were similar, however, the Shang Ring group reported higher scores for worst pain during erections (3.5 ± 1.9 vs. 2.3 ± 1.7; P < 0.001). Significantly more men were satisfied with the cosmetic appearance following Shang Ring male circumcision (MC), 95.7% versus 85.9% (P = 0.02) in Kenya, and 96.8% versus 71.3% (P < 0.01) in Zambia. Although median time to complete wound healing was 43 days in both groups, conventional circumcisions healed on average 5.2 days sooner (P < 0.001). Shang Ring procedures took one-third the time of conventional MC, 7 versus 20 minutes. All circumcision providers preferred the Shang Ring. Safety profiles of the 2 techniques were similar, all MC providers preferred the Shang Ring technique, and study participants preferred the Shang Ring's cosmetic results. The Shang Ring should be considered for adult MC as programs scale-up.

  3. Safety and Efficacy of Surgical and Endovascular Treatment for Distal Anterior Cerebral Artery Aneurysms: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Petr, Ondra; Coufalová, Lucie; Bradáč, Ondřej; Rehwald, Rafael; Glodny, Berharnd; Beneš, Vladimír

    2017-04-01

    Aneurysms of the distal anterior cerebral artery (DACA) are rare, representing between 1% and 9% of all intracranial aneurysms. The best treatment strategy for these aneurysms continues to be debated. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the safety and efficacy of treatment strategies of DACA aneurysms. A systematic search of Medline, Embase, Scopus, and Web of Science was performed for studies published from January 2000 to August 2015. We included studies describing treatment of DACA aneurysms with ≥10 patients. Random effects meta-analysis was used to pool the following outcomes: complete occlusion, technical success, periprocedural morbidity/mortality and stroke rates, aneurysm recurrence/rebleed, and long-term neurologic morbidity/mortality. Thirty studies with 1329 DACA aneurysms were included. Complete occlusion was 95% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91.0%-97.0%) in the surgical group and 68% (95% CI, 56.0%-78.0%) in the endovascular group (P < 0.0001). Aneurysm recurrence occurred in 3% (95% CI, 2.0%-4.0%) after surgery and in 19.1% (95% CI, 12.0%-27.0%) after endovascular treatment (P < 0.0001). Overall neurologic morbidity and mortality were 15% (95% CI, 11.0%-21.0%) and 9% (95% CI, 7.0%-11.0%) after surgery and 14% (95% CI, 10.0%-19.0%) (P = 0.725) and 7% (95% CI, 5.0%-10.0%) (P = 0.422) after endovascular treatment, respectively. Overall long-term favorable neurologic outcome was 80% and it was equal in both groups (80%; 95% CI, 73.0%-85.0% in the surgical group and 80%; 95% CI, 72.0%-87.0% in the endovascular group) (P = 0.892). Our meta-analysis showed that both treatment modalities are technically feasible and effective with sufficient long-term aneurysm occlusion and acceptable recurrence/rebleed rates. Surgical treatment is associated with superior angiographic outcomes. There were no substantial differences in procedure-related morbidity and mortality. These findings are important because they suggest that therapy of

  4. The safety of early fresh, whole blood transfusion among severely battle injured at US Marine Corps forward surgical care facilities in Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Auten, Jonathan D; Lunceford, Nicole L; Horton, Jaime L; Galarneau, Mike R; Galindo, Roger M; Shepps, Craig D; Zieber, Tara J; Dewing, Chris B

    2015-11-01

    In Afghanistan, care of the acutely injured trauma patient commonly occurred in facilities with limited blood banking capabilities. Apheresis platelets were often not available. Component therapy consisted of 1:1 packed red blood cells and fresh frozen plasma. Fresh, whole blood transfusion often augmented therapy in the severely injured patient. This study analyzed the safety of fresh, whole blood use in a resource-limited setting. A retrospective analysis was performed on a prospectively collected data set of US battle injuries presenting to three US Marine Corps (USMC) expeditionary surgical care facilities in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, between January 2010 and July 2012. Included in the review were patients with Injury Severity Scores (ISSs) of 15 or higher receiving blood transfusions. Univariate analyses were performed, followed by multivariable logistic regression to describe the relationship between the treatment group and posttreatment complications such as trauma-induced coagulopathy, infection, mortality, venous thromboembolism, and transfusion reaction. Propensity scores were calculated and included in multivariable models to adjust for potential bias in treatment selection. A total of 61 patients were identified; all were male marines with a mean (SD) age of 23.5 (3.6) years. The group receiving fresh, whole blood was noted to have higher ISSs and lower blood pressure, pH, and base deficits on arrival. Traumatic coagulopathy was significantly less common in the group receiving fresh, whole blood (odds ratio, 0.01; 95% confidence interval, 0.00-0.18). Multivariable models found no other significant differences between the treatment groups. The early use of fresh, whole blood in a resource-limited setting seems to confer a benefit in reducing traumatic coagulopathy. This study's small sample size precludes further statement on the overall safety of fresh, whole blood use. Therapy study, level IV.

  5. Classification of Meningiomas Based on Their Surgical Removal, World Health Organization Grade, and Cytogenetic Profile: A Treatment Algorithm.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Carlos Eduardo; de Freitas, Paulo Eduardo Peixoto

    2017-09-01

    Meningiomas are the most common primary intracranial tumor, but the lack of prospective randomized trials has led to different guidelines for their treatment. We proposed a classification of meningiomas that considers surgical removal, histology, and cytogenetic profile, based on a literature review of these 3 criteria. The classification can be used to guide adjuvant treatment and follow-up. A retrospective literature review was performed of PubMed from 2007 to 2016. Search terms were "meningioma," "surgery," "WHO classification," "cytogenetic," and "algorithm." Meningiomas were classified into 5 groups (A-E) according to the Simpson resection grade, World Health Organization grade, and cytogenetic profile. Adjuvant therapy, follow-up magnetic resonance imaging, and management of recurrence and/or regrowth were proposed according to the classification. The proposed meningioma classification was based on our experience and retrospective evidence collated from the literature and supported by recommendations. The application of the classification criteria yielded an algorithm for treatment and follow-up of patients with meningioma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Professionalization of surgical abdominal organ recovery leading to an increase in pancreatic allografts accepted for transplantation in the Netherlands: a serial analysis.

    PubMed

    Lam, Hwai-Ding; Schaapherder, Alexander F; Kopp, Wouter H; Putter, Hein; Braat, Andries E; Baranski, Andrzej G

    2017-02-01

    Professional abdominal organ recovery with certification has been mandatory in the Netherlands since 2010. This study analyses the effects of certification (January 2010-September 2015) on pancreas transplantation and compares it to an era before certification (February 2002-May 2008) for surgical injuries and the number of pancreases transplanted. A total of 264 cases were analysed. Eighty-four recovered pancreases (31.8%) with surgically injuries were encountered. Forty-six of those were surgically salvaged for transplantation, resulting in a total of 226 (85.6%) being transplanted. It was found that certified surgeons recovered grafts from older donors (36.8 vs. 33.3; P = 0.021), more often from donation after circulatory death (DCD) donors (18% vs. 0%; P < 0.001) and had less surgical injuries (21.6% vs. 41.0%; P < 0.001). Certification (OR: 0.285; P < 0.001) and surgeons from a pancreas transplant centre (OR: 0.420; P = 0.002) were independent risk factors for surgical organ injury. Predictors for proceeding to the actual pancreas transplantation were a recovering surgeon from a pancreas transplantation centre (OR: 3.230; P = 0.003), certification (OR: 3.750; P = 0.004), donation after brain death (DBD) (OR: 8.313; P = 0.002) and donor body mass index (BMI) (OR: 0.851; P = 0.023). It is concluded that certification in abdominal organ recovery will limit the number of surgical injuries in pancreas grafts which will translate in more pancreases available for transplantation.

  7. Development of AR Surgical Navigation Systems for Multiple Surgical Regions.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Naoki; Hattori, Asaki; Iimura, Jiro; Otori, Nobuyoshi; Onda, Shinji; Okamoto, Tomoyoshi; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of our research is to develop surgical navigation systems to enhance surgical safety. Our systems make use of augmented reality technology to superimpose, on the surgery screen on a real time basis, patients' organ models reconstructed in 3D from their X-ray CT data taken before surgery. By doing so, the systems display anatomical risk materials, tumors and blood vessels which surgeons cannot see with their naked eyes. This will in turn lead to surgeons intuitively grasping the inner structures of the operational fields. We so far have been developing navigation systems that can conduct surgeries in various fields. The basic structure of the navigation systems are the same. The navigation systems uses different peripheral equipment and different methods to display navigation images which best meet the demands of each type of surgery. In this thesis, we report on our navigation systems for 2 types of surgery - endoscopic sinus surgery and hepatobilialy-pancreatic surgery.

  8. Abortion - surgical

    MedlinePlus

    Suction curettage; Surgical abortion; Elective abortion - surgical; Therapeutic abortion - surgical ... Surgical abortion involves dilating the opening to the uterus (cervix) and placing a small suction tube into the uterus. ...

  9. An overview of dissolved organic carbon in groundwater and implications for drinking water safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S.; Hynds, P.; Flynn, R.

    2017-06-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is composed of a diverse array of compounds, predominantly humic substances, and is a near ubiquitous component of natural groundwater, notwithstanding climatic extremes such as arid and hyper-arid settings. Despite being a frequently measured parameter of groundwater quality, the complexity of DOC composition and reaction behaviour means that links between concentration and human health risk are difficult to quantify and few examples are reported in the literature. Measured concentrations from natural/unpolluted groundwater are typically below 4 mg C/l, whilst concentrations above these levels generally indicate anthropogenic influences and/or contamination issues and can potentially compromise water safety. Treatment processes are effective at reducing DOC concentrations, but refractory humic substance reaction with chlorine during the disinfection process produces suspected carcinogenic disinfectant by-products (DBPs). However, despite engineered artificial recharge systems being commonly used to remove DOC from recycled treated wastewaters, little research has been conducted on the presence of DBPs in potable groundwater systems. In recent years, the capacity to measure the influence of organic matter on colloidal contaminants and its influence on the mobility of pathogenic microorganisms has aided understanding of transport processes in aquifers. Additionally, advances in polymerase chain reaction techniques used for the detection, identification, and quantification of waterborne pathogens, provide a method to confidently investigate the behaviour of DOC and its effect on contaminant transfer in aquifers. This paper provides a summary of DOC occurrence in groundwater bodies and associated issues capable of indirectly affecting human health.

  10. Scalable, sustainable cost-effective surgical care: a model for safety and quality in the developing world, part II: program development and quality care.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Alex; Restrepo, Carolina; Mackay, Don; Sherman, Randy; Varma, Ajit; Ayala, Ruben; Sarma, Hiteswar; Deshpande, Gaurav; Magee, William

    2014-09-01

    The Guwahati Comprehensive Cleft Care Center (GCCCC) is committed to free medical and surgical care to patients afflicted with facial deformities in Assam, India. A needs-based approach was utilized to assemble numerous teams, processes of care, and systems aimed at providing world-class care to the most needy of patients, and to assist them with breaking through the barriers that prohibit them from obtaining services. A team of international professionals from various disciplines served in Guwahati full time to implement and oversee patient care and training of local counterparts. Recruitment of local professionals in all disciplines began early in the scheme of the program and led to gradual expansion of all medical teams. Emphasis was placed on achieving optimal outcome for each patient treated, as opposed to treating the maximum number of patients. The center is open year round to offer full-time services and follow-up care. Along with surgery, GCCCC provides speech therapy, child life counseling, dental care, otolaryngology, orthodontics, and nutrition services for the cleft patients under one roof. Local medical providers participated in a model of graded responsibility commiserate with individualized skill and progress, and gradually assumed all leadership positions and now account for 92% of the workforce. Institutional infrastructure improvements positioned and empowered teams of skilled local providers while implementing systemized perioperative processes. This needs-based approach to program development in Guwahati was successful in optimization of quality and safety in all clinical divisions.

  11. Organization and management of the plant safety evaluation of the VVER-440/230 units at Novovoronezh.

    SciTech Connect

    Afshar, C. M.; Pizzica, P.; Puglia, W. J.; Rozin, V.

    1999-05-13

    As part of the Soviet-Designed Reactor Safety (SDRS) element of the International Nuclear Safety Program (INSP), the US Department of Energy (US DOE) is funding a plant safety evaluation (PSE) project for the Novovoronezh Nuclear Power Plant (NvNPP). The Novovoronezh PSE Project is a multi-faceted project with participants from sixteen different international organizations from five different countries scattered across eleven time zones. The purpose of this project is to provide a thorough Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) and Deterministic Safety Analysis (DSA) for Units 3 and 4 of the NvNPP. In addition, this project provides assistance to the operation organizations in meeting their international commitments in support of safety upgrades, and their regulatory requirements for the conduct of safety analyses. Managing this project is a complex process requiring numerous management tools, constant monitoring, and effective communication skills. Employing management tools to resolve unanticipated problems one of the keys to project success. The overall scope, programmatic context, objectives, project interactions, communications, practical hindrances, and lessons learned from the challenging performance of the PSE project are summarized in this paper.

  12. Hazardous organic compounds in biogas plant end products--soil burden and risk to food safety.

    PubMed

    Suominen, K; Verta, M; Marttinen, S

    2014-09-01

    The end products (digestate, solid fraction of the digestate, liquid fraction of the digestate) of ten biogas production lines in Finland were analyzed for ten hazardous organic compounds or compound groups: polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB(7)), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH(16)), bis-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), perfluorinated alkyl compounds (PFCs), linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LASs), nonylphenols and nonylphenol ethoxylates (NP+NPEOs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA). Biogas plant feedstocks were divided into six groups: municipal sewage sludge, municipal biowaste, fat, food industry by-products, animal manure and others (consisting of milling by-products (husk) and raw former foodstuffs of animal origin from the retail trade). There was no clear connection between the origin of the feedstocks of a plant and the concentrations of hazardous organic compounds in the digestate. For PCDD/Fs and for DEHP, the median soil burden of the compound after a single addition of digestate was similar to the annual atmospheric deposition of the compound or compound group in Finland or other Nordic countries. For PFCs, the median soil burden was somewhat lower than the atmospheric deposition in Finland or Sweden. For NP+NPEOs, the soil burden was somewhat higher than the atmospheric deposition in Denmark. The median soil burden of PBDEs was 400 to 1000 times higher than the PBDE air deposition in Finland or in Sweden. With PBDEs, PFCs and HBCD, the impact of the use of end products should be a focus of further research. Highly persistent compounds, such as PBDE- and PFC-compounds may accumulate in agricultural soil after repeated use of organic fertilizers containing these compounds. For other compounds included in this study, agricultural use of biogas plant end products is unlikely to cause risk to food safety in Finland. Copyright © 2014

  13. Abdominoperineal Resection, Pelvic Exenteration, and Additional Organ Resection Increase the Risk of Surgical Site Infection after Elective Colorectal Surgery: An American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kwaan, Mary R; Melton, Genevieve B; Madoff, Robert D; Chipman, Jeffrey G

    2015-12-01

    Determining predictors of surgical site infection (SSI) in a large cohort is important for the design of accurate SSI surveillance programs. We hypothesized that additional organ resection and pelvic exenterative procedures are associated independently with a higher risk of SSI. Patients in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program® (ACS NSQIP®; American College of Surgeons, Chicago, IL) database (2005-2012) were identified (n=112,282). Surgical site infection (superficial or deep SSI) at 30 d was the primary outcome. Using primary and secondary CPT® codes (American Medical Association, Chicago, IL) pelvic exenteration was defined and additional organ resection was defined as: bladder resection/repair, hysterectomy, partial vaginectomy, additional segmental colectomy, small bowel, gastric, or diaphragm resection. Univariable analysis of patient and procedure factors identified significant (p<0.05) predictors, which were modeled using stepwise logistic regression. The rate of SSI was 9.2%. After adjusting for operative duration, predictors of SSI were body mass index (BMI) 25-29.9 (odds ratio [OR]: 1.3), BMI 30-34.9 (OR: 1.59), BMI 35-39.9 (OR: 2.11), BMI>40 (OR: 2.51), pulmonary comorbidities (OR: 1.22), smoking (OR: 1.24), bowel obstruction (OR: 1.40), wound classification 3 or 4 (OR: 1.18), and abdominoperineal resection (OR: 1.58). Laparoscopic or laparoscopically assisted procedures offered a protective effect against incision infection (OR: 0.55). Additional organ resection (OR: 1.08) was also associated independently with SSI, but the magnitude of the effect was decreased after accounting for operative duration. In the analysis that excludes operative duration, pelvic exenteration is associated with SSI (OR: 1.38), but incorporating operative duration into the model results in this variable becoming non-significant. In addition to other factors, obesity, surgery for bowel obstruction, abdominoperineal resection, and

  14. Effect of organic acid treatments on microbial safety and overall acceptability of fresh-cut melon cubes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is much interest in developing effective minimal processing methodologies for fruits and vegetables that would enhance the microbial safety and not change overall acceptability. In this study, several organic acids (EDTA, nisin, sorbic acid and sodium lactate) generally regarded as safe (GRAS)...

  15. Testing of the World Health Organization-recommended formulations for surgical hand preparation and proposals for increased efficacy.

    PubMed

    Suchomel, M; Kundi, M; Allegranzi, B; Pittet, D; Rotter, M L

    2011-10-01

    The 2009 World Health Organization (WHO) Guidelines on hand hygiene in health care recommend alcohol-based hand rubs for both hygienic and pre-surgical hand treatment. Two formulations based on ethanol 80% v/v and 2-propanol 75% v/v are proposed for local preparation in healthcare settings where commercial products are not available or too expensive. Both formulations and our suggested modifications (using mass rather than volume percent concentrations) were evaluated for their conformity with the efficacy requirements of the forthcoming amendment of the European Norm (EN) 12791, i.e. non-inferiority of a product when compared with a reference procedure (1-propanol 60% v/v for 3 min) immediately and 3 h after antisepsis. In this study, the WHO-recommended formulations were tested for 3 min and 5 min. Neither formulation met the efficacy requirements of EN 12791 with 3 min application. Increasing the respective concentrations to 80 w/w (85% v/v) and 75 w/w (80% v/v), together with a prolonged application of 5 min, rendered the immediate effect of both formulations non-inferior to the reference antisepsis procedure. This was not the case with the 3h effect, which remained significantly inferior to the reference. Although the original formulations do not meet the efficacy requirements of EN 12791, the clinical significance of this finding deserves further clinical trials. To comply with the requirement of EN 12791, an amendment to the formulations is possible by increasing the alcohol concentrations through changing volume into mass percent and prolonging the duration of application from 3 min to 5 min.

  16. [Problems of organization of surgical care to the wounded in a modern armed conflict: surgical care to the walking wounded in armed conflicts (Report 2)].

    PubMed

    Samokhvalov, I M; Kotenko, P K; Severin, V V

    2013-01-01

    There are two triage groups of the walking wounded in a medical company of a brigade/special-purpose medical team: those returning to fighting role and those who have to be evacuated to level 3 echelon of care. The main purposes of surgical care of the walking wounded in the 3rd echelon of care are the following: diagnosis of injury pattern ruling out severe damages and separation of the independent category of the walking wounded. There is medical evacuation of the walking wounded from the 3rd echelon to the 4th echelon deployed in a combat zone. The walking wounded who needs less than 30 days of staying in hospital are evacuated to the garrison military hospitals and medical treatment facilities subordinated to a district military hospital. The wounded with the prolonged period of hospitalization (more than 30 days) are evacuated toward the district military hospital. Treatment of the walking wounded should be accomplished in the military district where the armed conflict goes on.

  17. [Emission characteristics and safety evaluation of volatile organic compounds in manufacturing processes of automotive coatings].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Pei-Yuan; Li, Jian-Jun; Liao, Dong-Qi; Tu, Xiang; Xu, Mei-Ying; Sun, Guo-Ping

    2013-12-01

    Emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were investigated in an automotive coating manufacturing enterprise. Air samples were taken from eight different manufacturing areas in three workshops, and the species of VOCs and their concentrations were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Safety evaluation was also conducted by comparing the concentration of VOCs with the permissible concentration-short term exposure limit (PC-STEL) regulated by the Ministry of Health. The results showed that fifteen VOCs were detected in the indoor air of the automotive coatings workshop, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, ethyl acetate, butyl acetate, methyl isobutyl ketone, propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate, trimethylbenzene and ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, Their concentrations widely ranged from 0.51 to 593.14 mg x m(-3). The concentrations of TVOCs were significantly different among different manufacturing processes. Even in the same manufacturing process, the concentrations of each component measured at different times were also greatly different. The predominant VOCs of indoor air in the workshop were identified to be ethylbenzene and butyl acetate. The concentrations of most VOCs exceeded the occupational exposure limits, so the corresponding control measures should be taken to protect the health of the workers.

  18. Hennepin Health: a safety-net accountable care organization for the expanded Medicaid population.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Shana F; Erikson, Clese; Owen, Ross; Vickery, Katherine D; Shimotsu, Scott T; Linzer, Mark; Garrett, Nancy A; Johnsrud, Kimry A; Soderlund, Dana M; DeCubellis, Jennifer

    2014-11-01

    Health care payment and delivery models that challenge providers to be accountable for outcomes have fueled interest in community-level partnerships that address the behavioral, social, and economic determinants of health. We describe how Hennepin Health--a county-based safety-net accountable care organization in Minnesota--has forged such a partnership to redesign the health care workforce and improve the coordination of the physical, behavioral, social, and economic dimensions of care for an expanded community of Medicaid beneficiaries. Early outcomes suggest that the program has had an impact in shifting care from hospitals to outpatient settings. For example, emergency department visits decreased 9.1 percent between 2012 and 2013, while outpatient visits increased 3.3 percent. An increasing percentage of patients have received diabetes, vascular, and asthma care at optimal levels. At the same time, Hennepin Health has realized savings and reinvested them in future improvements. Hennepin Health offers lessons for counties, states, and public hospitals grappling with the problem of how to make the best use of public funds in serving expanded Medicaid populations and other communities with high needs.

  19. History of safe use as applied to the safety assessment of novel foods and foods derived from genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Constable, A; Jonas, D; Cockburn, A; Davi, A; Edwards, G; Hepburn, P; Herouet-Guicheney, C; Knowles, M; Moseley, B; Oberdörfer, R; Samuels, F

    2007-12-01

    Very few traditional foods that are consumed have been subjected to systematic toxicological and nutritional assessment, yet because of their long history and customary preparation and use and absence of evidence of harm, they are generally regarded as safe to eat. This 'history of safe use' of traditional foods forms the benchmark for the comparative safety assessment of novel foods, and of foods derived from genetically modified organisms. However, the concept is hard to define, since it relates to an existing body of information which describes the safety profile of a food, rather than a precise checklist of criteria. The term should be regarded as a working concept used to assist the safety assessment of a food product. Important factors in establishing a history of safe use include: the period over which the traditional food has been consumed; the way in which it has been prepared and used and at what intake levels; its composition and the results of animal studies and observations from human exposure. This paper is aimed to assist food safety professionals in the safety evaluation and regulation of novel foods and foods derived from genetically modified organisms, by describing the practical application and use of the concept of 'history of safe use'.

  20. Pilot study evaluating the efficacy, tolerance and safety of a peptide-based enteral formula versus a high protein enteral formula in multiple ICU settings (medical, surgical, cardiothoracic).

    PubMed

    Seres, David S; Ippolito, Paul R

    2017-06-01

    Predigested, peptide-based enteral formulas are commonly used to promote GI tolerance in critically ill patients, but studies comparing these against polymeric enteral formulas are lacking. We performed a prospective, randomized clinical comparison pilot study to assess safety, tolerance and effectiveness of a peptide-based enteral product. Critically ill patients from ICUs, including medical, surgical, and cardiothoracic, were randomized to either of two enteral feeding products: Group A: Peptide-based, high Protein, high omega-3 fat (Vital AF(®), Abbott Nutrition); Group B: high protein standard enteral formula (Osmolite(®), Abbott Nutrition). Tolerance and comorbidities as well as enteral feeding volume were collected at baseline and then daily for up to 21 days, or until the patient was discharged from the ICU. A total of 49 patients were included, 25 (51%) on group A, 24 (49%) on group B. Adverse events and undesired gastrointestinal events at baseline and mean intake (ml/d and percent of goal) post baseline were not different between the groups. There were significantly fewer days with adverse events (p = 0.0336, odds ratio = 3.02, standard error = 1.60, n = 24 per group) and undesired gastrointestinal events (p = 0.0489, odds ratio = 2.79, standard error = 1.48, n = 24 per group) in group A. There was no difference in other clinical outcomes. This pilot study suggests that feeding a peptide-based formula to ICU patients may be associated with a statistically significant reduction in the number of days during which adverse events occurred as compared to a standard formula. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  1. Environment, safety and health, management and organization compliance assessment, West Valley Demonstration Program, West Valley, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    An Environment, Safety and Health Tiger Team'' Assessment was conducted at the West Valley Demonstration Project. The Tiger Team was chartered to conduct an onsite, independent assessment of WVDP's environment, safety and health (ES H) programs to assure compliance with applicable Federal and State laws, regulations, and standards, and Department of Energy Orders. The objective is to provide to the Secretary of Energy the following information: current ES H compliance status of each facility; specific noncompliance items; root causes'' for noncompliance items; evaluation of the adequacy of ES H organization and resources (DOE and contractor) and needed modifications; and where warranted, recommendations for addressing identified problem areas.

  2. How will we know patients are safer? An organization-wide approach to measuring and improving safety.

    PubMed

    Pronovost, Peter; Holzmueller, Christine G; Needham, Dale M; Sexton, J Bryan; Miller, Marlene; Berenholtz, Sean; Wu, Albert W; Perl, Trish M; Davis, Richard; Baker, David; Winner, Laura; Morlock, Laura

    2006-07-01

    Our institution, like many, is struggling to develop measures that answer the question, How do we know we are safer? Our objectives are to present a framework to evaluate performance in patient safety and describe how we applied this model in intensive care units. We focus on measures of safety rather than broader measures of quality. The measures will allow health care organizations to evaluate whether they are safer now than in the past by answering the following questions: How often do we harm patients? How often do patients receive the appropriate interventions? How do we know we learned from defects? How well have we created a culture of safety? The first two measures are rate based, whereas the latter two are qualitative. To improve care within institutions, caregivers must be engaged, must participate in the selection and development of measures, and must receive feedback regarding their performance. The following attributes should be considered when evaluating potential safety measures: Measures must be important to the organization, must be valid (represent what they intend to measure), must be reliable (produce similar results when used repeatedly), must be feasible (affordable to collect data), must be usable for the people expected to employ the data to improve safety, and must have universal applicability within the entire institution. Health care institutions. Health care currently lacks a robust safety score card. We developed four aggregate measures of patient safety and present how we applied them to intensive care units in an academic medical center. The same measures are being applied to nearly 200 intensive care units as part of ongoing collaborative projects. The measures include how often do we harm patients, how often do we do what we should (i.e., use evidence-based medicine), how do we know we learned from mistakes, and how well do we improve culture. Measures collected by different departments can then be aggregated to provide a hospital

  3. Attitude toward deceased organ donation and transplantation among the workers in the surgical services in a hospital with a transplant program.

    PubMed

    Ríos, A; Conesa, C; Ramírez, P; Galindo, P J; Martínez, L; Montoya, M J; Pons, J A; Rodríguez, M M; Parrilla, P

    2005-11-01

    There are data that suggest that the percentage of hospital workers not in favor of donation is relatively high, even in services that are directly related to transplantation. The objective was to analyze attitudes toward decreased organ donation in the surgical services. A random sample was stratified by the surgical service and the job category (n = 263) in a third-level hospital with a transplant program assessed attitudes toward the donation of ones own organs after death using a questionnaire including psychosocial factors as validated in our geographic surroundings. Student t test and the chi-square test were used for data analysis. Favorable attitudes toward donation were observed in 68% (n = 178) as opposed to 32% with an attitude that was undecided or against the act (n = 85). The psychosocial variables that showed significant relationships with this attitude were age (most in favor are younger; P = .021); nonmedical surgical staff (50% against donation; P = .0001); resident physicians (94% in favor; P = .001); discussion and prior consideration of donation (P = .016); knowledge of the concept of brain death (an important factor in nonhealth staff; P = .010); attitude toward manipulation of the deceased (P = .011) and concerns about mutilation (P = .026); partner's opinion toward organ donation (P = .0001); and existence of frequent medical errors (P = .003). No significant differences were found, depending on whether the services were involved in a specific transplant program (P = .853). Favorable attitudes toward donation among the hospital staff on surgical services, including those who perform transplants, did not reach more than 70% and was determined by multiple psychosocial factors. Donation promotion activities are necessary for these services, given the importance that this group's negative attitude could have on the attitude of the general population.

  4. Evidence-based organization and patient safety strategies in European hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Sunol, Rosa; Wagner, Cordula; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Shaw, Charles D.; Kristensen, Solvejg; Thompson, Caroline A.; Dersarkissian, Maral; Bartels, Paul D.; Pfaff, Holger; Secanell, Mariona; Mora, Nuria; Vlcek, Frantisek; Kutaj-Wasikowska, Halina; Kutryba, Basia; Michel, Philippe; Groene, Oliver; Klazinga, N.; Kringos, D.S.; Lombarts, M.J.M.H.; Plochg, T.; Lopez, M.A.; Vallejo, P.; Saillour-Glenisson, F.; Car, M.; Jones, S.; Klaus, E.; Bottaro, S.; Garel, P.; Saluvan, M.; Bruneau, C.; Depaigne-Loth, A.; Hammer, A.; Ommen, O.; Pfaff, H.; Botje, D.; Escoval, A.; Lívio, A.; Eiras, M.; Franca, M.; Leite, I.; Almeman, F.; Kus, H.; Ozturk, K.; Mannion, R.; Wang, A.; Thompson, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore how European hospitals have implemented patient safety strategies (PSS) and evidence-based organization of care pathway (EBOP) recommendations and examine the extent to which implementation varies between countries and hospitals. Design Mixed-method multilevel cross-sectional design in seven countries as part of the European Union-funded project ‘Deepening our Understanding of Quality improvement in Europe’ (DUQuE). Setting and participants Seventy-four acute care hospitals with 292 departments managing acute myocardial infarction (AMI), hip fracture, stroke, and obstetric deliveries. Main outcome measure Five multi-item composite measures—one generic measure for PSS and four pathway-specific measures for EBOP. Results Potassium chloride had only been removed from general medication stocks in 9.4–30.5% of different pathways wards and patients were adequately identified with wristband in 43.0–59.7%. Although 86.3% of areas treating AMI patients had immediate access to a specialist physician, only 56.0% had arrangements for patients to receive thrombolysis within 30 min of arrival at the hospital. A substantial amount of the total variance observed was due to between-hospital differences in the same country for PSS (65.9%). In EBOP, between-country differences play also an important role (10.1% in AMI to 57.1% in hip fracture). Conclusions There were substantial gaps between evidence and practice of PSS and EBOP in a sample of European hospitals and variations due to country differences are more important in EBOP than in PSS, but less important than within-country variations. Agencies supporting the implementation of PSS and EBOP should closely re-examine the effectiveness of their current strategies. PMID:24578501

  5. Flammable Gas Safety Program: actual waste organic analysis FY 1996 progress report; Flammable Gas Safety Program: actual waste organic analysis FY 1996 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, S.A.; Grant, K.E.; Hoopes, V.; Mong, G.M.; Rau, J.; Steele, R.; Wahl, K.H.

    1996-09-01

    This report describes the status of optimizing analytical methods to account for the organic components in Hanford waste tanks, with emphasis on tanks assigned to the Flammable Gas Watch List. The methods developed are illustrated by their application to samples from Tanks 241-SY-103 and 241-S-102. Capability to account for organic carbon in Tank SY-101 was improved significantly by improving techniques for isolating organic constituents relatively free from radioactive contamination and by improving derivatization methodology. The methodology was extended to samples from Tank SY-103 and results documented in this report. Results from analyzing heated and irradiated SY-103 samples (Gas Generation Task) and evaluating methods for analyzing tank waste directly for chelators and chelator fragments are also discussed.

  6. Organic Tank Safety Project: development of a method to measure the equilibrium water content of Hanford organic tank wastes and demonstration of method on actual waste

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

    1996-09-01

    Some of Hanford`s underground waste storage tanks contain Organic- bearing high level wastes that are high priority safety issues because of potentially hazardous chemical reactions of organics with inorganic oxidants in these wastes such as nitrates and nitrites. To ensure continued safe storage of these wastes, Westinghouse Hanford Company has placed affected tanks on the Organic Watch List and manages them under special rules. Because water content has been identified as the most efficient agent for preventing a propagating reaction and is an integral part of the criteria developed to ensure continued safe storage of Hanford`s organic-bearing radioactive tank wastes, as part of the Organic Tank Safety Program the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed and demonstrated a simple and easily implemented procedure to determine the equilibrium water content of these potentially reactive wastes exposed to the range of water vapor pressures that might be experienced during the wastes` future storage. This work focused on the equilibrium water content and did not investigate the various factors such as @ ventilation, tank surface area, and waste porosity that control the rate that the waste would come into equilibrium, with either the average Hanford water partial pressure 5.5 torr or other possible water partial pressures.

  7. Field Test of the World Health Organization Multi-Professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide

    PubMed Central

    Farley, Donna; Zheng, Hao; Rousi, Eirini; Leotsakos, Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although the importance of training in patient safety has been acknowledged for over a decade, it remains under-utilized and under-valued in most countries. WHO developed the Multi-professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide to provide schools with the requirements and tools for incorporating patient safety in education. It was field tested with 12 participating schools across the six WHO regions, to assess its effectiveness for teaching patient safety to undergraduate and graduate students in a global variety of settings. Methods The evaluation used a combined prospective/retrospective design to generate formative information on the experiences of working with the Guide and summative information on the impacts of the Guide. Using stakeholder interviews and student surveys, data were gathered from each participating school at three times: the start of the field test (baseline), soon after each school started teaching, and soon after each school finished teaching. Results Stakeholders interviewed were strongly positive about the Guide, noting that it emphasized universally important patient safety topics, was culturally appropriate for their countries, and gave credibility and created a focus on patient safety at their schools. Student perceptions and attitudes regarding patient safety improved substantially during the field test, and their knowledge of the topics they were taught doubled, from 10.7% to 20.8% of correct answers on the student survey. Discussion This evaluation documented the effectiveness of the Curriculum Guide, for both ease of use by schools and its impacts on improving the patient safety knowledge of healthcare students. WHO should be well positioned to refine the contents of the Guide and move forward in encouraging broader use of the Guide globally for teaching patient safety. PMID:26406893

  8. Evaluation of the Quality of Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems Based on Key Performance Indicators in Certified Organizations.

    PubMed

    Mohammadfam, Iraj; Kamalinia, Mojtaba; Momeni, Mansour; Golmohammadi, Rostam; Hamidi, Yadollah; Soltanian, Alireza

    2017-06-01

    Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems are becoming more widespread in organizations. Consequently, their effectiveness has become a core topic for researchers. This paper evaluates the performance of the Occupational Health and Safety Assessment Series 18001 specification in certified companies in Iran. The evaluation is based on a comparison of specific criteria and indictors related to occupational health and safety management practices in three certified and three noncertified companies. Findings indicate that the performance of certified companies with respect to occupational health and safety management practices is significantly better than that of noncertified companies. Occupational Health and Safety Assessment Series 18001-certified companies have a better level of occupational health and safety; this supports the argument that Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems play an important strategic role in health and safety in the workplace.

  9. [Organize quality assurance as in aviation; improve patient safety in Dutch hospitals].

    PubMed

    Haerkens, Marck H T M; Beekmann, Roland T A; van den Elzen, Guus J P; Lansbergen, Michael D I; Berlijn, Dick L

    2009-01-01

    Failing teamwork is a major cause of adverse events in hospitals in the Netherlands. Training team-skills can improve the safety standards in clinical heath care. An adapted version of Crew Resource Management (CRM) training is proving to be a usable format in the hospital environment. We emphasize that paying attention to the subject of safety has to start early in medical education in order to incorporate non-technical skills into the hospital culture.

  10. Prevention of retained surgical items.

    PubMed

    Feldman, David L

    2011-01-01

    Reduction in retained surgical items is an important part of any operating room patient-safety effort. Any item used in an operation can result in a retained surgical item, but sponges are the most frequent and the abdomen is the most common location. Retained sponges can cause significant morbidity, and the costs associated with both prevention and treatment of retained surgical items, including legal costs, can be considerable. This review will examine counting, teamwork, radiography, and new technology as methods used to prevent retained surgical items. Even though none of these techniques individually is likely to completely prevent retained surgical items, when used together the numbers can be reduced.

  11. Developing Natural Solutions to Reducing Food Safety Pathogens in Organically Raised Poultry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Organic poultry production is one of the fastest growing segments of organic agriculture with a 20% increase/yr since the establishment of the National Organic Program (NOP). Restrictions on prophylactic antibiotics used for conventional poultry production raise unique challenges for organic produce...

  12. First evidence on the validity and reliability of the Safety Organizing Scale-Nursing home version (SOS-NH)

    PubMed Central

    Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Anderson, Ruth A.; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen; Schwendimann, René

    2013-01-01

    Background The Safety Organizing Scale is a valid and reliable measure on safety behaviors and practices in hospitals. Purpose of the study This study aimed to explore the psychometric properties of the Safety Organizing Scale-Nursing Home version (SOS-NH). Design and Methods In a cross-sectional analysis of staff survey data, we examined validity and reliability of the 9-item Safety SOS-NH using American Educational Research Association guidelines. Subjects and Setting This sub-study of a larger trial used baseline survey data collected from staff members (n=627) in a variety of work roles in 13 NHs in North Carolina and Virginia, USA. Results Psychometric evaluation of the SOS-NH revealed good response patterns with low average of missing values across all items (3.05%). Analyses of the SOS-NH’s internal structure (e.g., comparative fit indices = 0.929, standardized root mean square error of approximation = 0.045) and consistency (composite reliability = 0.94) suggested its one-dimensionality. Significant between-facility variability, intraclass correlations, within-group agreement and design effect confirmed appropriateness of the SOS-NH for measurement at the NH level, justifying data aggregation. The SOS-NH showed discriminate validity from one related concept, communication openness. Implications Initial evidence regarding validity and reliability of the SOS-NH supports its’ utility in measuring safety behaviors and practices among a wide range of NH staff members, including those with low literacy. Further psychometric evaluation should focus on testing concurrent and criterion validity, using resident outcome measures (e.g., patient fall rates). PMID:23684122

  13. Normal people working in normal organizations with normal equipment: system safety and cognition in a mid-air collision.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Paulo Victor Rodrigues; Gomes, José Orlando; Huber, Gilbert Jacob; Vidal, Mario Cesar

    2009-05-01

    A fundamental challenge in improving the safety of complex systems is to understand how accidents emerge in normal working situations, with equipment functioning normally in normally structured organizations. We present a field study of the en route mid-air collision between a commercial carrier and an executive jet, in the clear afternoon Amazon sky in which 154 people lost their lives, that illustrates one response to this challenge. Our focus was on how and why the several safety barriers of a well structured air traffic system melted down enabling the occurrence of this tragedy, without any catastrophic component failure, and in a situation where everything was functioning normally. We identify strong consistencies and feedbacks regarding factors of system day-to-day functioning that made monitoring and awareness difficult, and the cognitive strategies that operators have developed to deal with overall system behavior. These findings emphasize the active problem-solving behavior needed in air traffic control work, and highlight how the day-to-day functioning of the system can jeopardize such behavior. An immediate consequence is that safety managers and engineers should review their traditional safety approach and accident models based on equipment failure probability, linear combinations of failures, rules and procedures, and human errors, to deal with complex patterns of coincidence possibilities, unexpected links, resonance among system functions and activities, and system cognition.

  14. Near-misses are an opportunity to improve patient safety: adapting strategies of high reliability organizations to healthcare.

    PubMed

    Van Spall, Harriette; Kassam, Alisha; Tollefson, Travis T

    2015-08-01

    Near-miss investigations in high reliability organizations (HROs) aim to mitigate risk and improve system safety. Healthcare settings have a higher rate of near-misses and subsequent adverse events than most high-risk industries, but near-misses are not systematically reported or analyzed. In this review, we will describe the strategies for near-miss analysis that have facilitated a culture of safety and continuous quality improvement in HROs. Near-miss analysis is routine and systematic in HROs such as aviation. Strategies implemented in aviation include the Commercial Aviation Safety Team, which undertakes systematic analyses of near-misses, so that findings can be incorporated into Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). Other strategies resulting from incident analyses include Crew Resource Management (CRM) for enhanced communication, situational awareness training, adoption of checklists during operations, and built-in redundancy within systems. Health care organizations should consider near-misses as opportunities for quality improvement. The systematic reporting and analysis of near-misses, commonplace in HROs, can be adapted to health care settings to prevent adverse events and improve clinical outcomes.

  15. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of 2% lidocaine HCl with different epinephrine concentration for local anesthesia in participants undergoing surgical extraction of impacted mandibular third molars: A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, crossover, phase IV trial.

    PubMed

    Karm, Myong-Hwan; Park, Fiona Daye; Kang, Moonkyu; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Kang, Jeong Wan; Kim, Seungoh; Kim, Yong-Deok; Kim, Cheul-Hong; Seo, Kwang-Suk; Kwon, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Chul-Hwan; Lee, Jung-Woo; Hong, Sung-Woon; Lim, Mi Hyoung; Nam, Seung Kwan; Cho, Jae Min

    2017-05-01

    The most commonly impacted tooth is the third molar. An impacted third molar can ultimately cause acute pain, infection, tumors, cysts, caries, periodontal disease, and loss of adjacent teeth. Local anesthesia is employed for removing the third molar. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 or 1:200,000 epinephrine for surgical extraction of bilateral impacted mandibular third molars. Sixty-five healthy participants underwent surgical extraction of bilateral impacted mandibular third molars in 2 separate visits while under local anesthesia with 2% lidocaine with different epinephrine concentration (1:80,000 or 1:200,000) in a double-blind, randomized, crossover trial. Visual analog scale pain scores obtained immediately after surgical extraction were primarily evaluated for the 2 groups receiving different epinephrine concentrations. Visual analog scale pain scores were obtained 2, 4, and 6 hours after administering an anesthetic. Onset and duration of analgesia, onset of pain, intraoperative bleeding, operator's and participant's overall satisfaction, drug dosage, and hemodynamic parameters were evaluated for the 2 groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups in any measurements except hemodynamic factors (P >.05). Changes in systolic blood pressure and heart rate following anesthetic administration were significantly greater in the group receiving 1:80,000 epinephrine than in that receiving 1:200,000 epinephrine (P ≤.01). The difference in epinephrine concentration between 1:80,000 and 1:200,000 in 2% lidocaine liquid does not affect the medical efficacy of the anesthetic. Furthermore, 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine has better safety with regard to hemodynamic parameters than 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine. Therefore, we suggest using 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine rather than 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine for surgical extraction of impacted

  16. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory. Stable Organic Oxidants: Paradox or Possibility?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretherick, Leslie

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the relative instability of organic oxidants, citing early attempts at overcoming the solubility limitations in organic reaction systems. Describes the more recent introduction of new types of organic oxidant salts that have demonstrated more promising levels of stability, though unexpected explosions have still occurred. (TW)

  17. [Experience of organization of the skilled and emergency specialized surgical care rendered during the armed conflicts in the North Caucasus].

    PubMed

    Deviatkin, A E; Zuev, V K; Ivantsov, V A; Tatarin, S N; Fokin, Iu N

    2003-07-01

    At present the hepatosurgery in the Vishnevsky Central Military Clinical Hospital has become one of the most perspective and rapidly developing directions of the surgery. The authors present the review of hepatosurgery development in the hospital with the detailed analysis of treatment results at each stage of development, the description of technical support of the new methods for conducting the complex operations on liver. For the short time (since 1991) we have passed the way from atypical hepatic resections up to the liver autotransplantation. The importance of additional surgical manipulations and procedures facilitating the surgery, the postoperative period and improving the operation results are underlined.

  18. 77 FR 26280 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From CareRise LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    ... Relinquishment From CareRise LLC AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Delisting. SUMMARY: AHRQ has accepted a notification of voluntary relinquishment from CareRise LLC... quality of health care delivery. HHS issued the Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Final Rule...

  19. 76 FR 37817 - Cooperative Agreement With the World Health Organization Department of Food Safety and Zoonoses...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... Nutrition, and the Center for Veterinary Medicine is to contribute to the knowledge base of the current... technical support complements a paradigm shift that is emerging around the globe; a shift from a focus on... Food Safety and Nutrition, and the Center for Veterinary Medicine is to contribute to the knowledge...

  20. Surgical Technologists

    MedlinePlus

    ... A small number of states regulate surgical technologists. Education Surgical technologists typically need postsecondary education. Many community ... the skills needed in this occupation. Entry-level Education Typical level of education that most workers need ...

  1. Disruptive visions: surgical education.

    PubMed

    Satava, R M

    2004-05-01

    Technological change, decreased financial support for medical education, and social oversight (in the form of the "To Err Is Human" report, HIPPA, and reduced work hours) are forcing a rethinking of the traditional model of surgical education to improve patient safety. New approaches to evaluating surgical competence, such as objective assessment, in combination with new technologies, such as the Internet and surgical simulators, provide the tools to effect a revolution in surgical education and training. Competency based upon quantifiable criteria measures must replace the traditional subjective assessment. The implementation requires accurately defining the elements of training, establishing new quantifiable metrics, stringently measuring performance against criterion, and reporting outcomes throughout the career of a surgeon.

  2. Organization and education in occupational safety and health in Maghreb countries.

    PubMed

    Laraqui, C H; Rahhali, A; Laraqui, O; Mounassif, M; Gharbi, R

    2001-01-01

    The Maghreb consists of five countries of North Africa (Mauritania, Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya) which are members of a socio-economical community called the Union of Arab Maghreb. This paper discusses the organisation of occupational health, medical protection of workers and training in occupational safety and health in these countries. After a review of socio-economic and demographic data and legislative aspects, we report epidemiological and analytic data specific to each country concerning organisation and training in occupational health. Occupational medicine in Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia has progressed but some deficiencies are still observed at several levels. Like countries of the European Union, cooperation between the Maghreb countries in occupational health and safety seems indispensable.

  3. Biodegradable scaffold with built-in vasculature for organ-on-a-chip engineering and direct surgical anastomosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Boyang; Montgomery, Miles; Chamberlain, M. Dean; Ogawa, Shinichiro; Korolj, Anastasia; Pahnke, Aric; Wells, Laura A.; Massé, Stéphane; Kim, Jihye; Reis, Lewis; Momen, Abdul; Nunes, Sara S.; Wheeler, Aaron R.; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Keller, Gordon; Sefton, Michael V.; Radisic, Milica

    2016-06-01

    We report the fabrication of a scaffold (hereafter referred to as AngioChip) that supports the assembly of parenchymal cells on a mechanically tunable matrix surrounding a perfusable, branched, three-dimensional microchannel network coated with endothelial cells. The design of AngioChip decouples the material choices for the engineered vessel network and for cell seeding in the parenchyma, enabling extensive remodelling while maintaining an open-vessel lumen. The incorporation of nanopores and micro-holes in the vessel walls enhances permeability, and permits intercellular crosstalk and extravasation of monocytes and endothelial cells on biomolecular stimulation. We also show that vascularized hepatic tissues and cardiac tissues engineered by using AngioChips process clinically relevant drugs delivered through the vasculature, and that millimetre-thick cardiac tissues can be engineered in a scalable manner. Moreover, we demonstrate that AngioChip cardiac tissues implanted with direct surgical anastomosis to the femoral vessels of rat hindlimbs establish immediate blood perfusion.

  4. Improved electrolytes for Li-ion batteries: Mixtures of ionic liquid and organic electrolyte with enhanced safety and electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerfi, A.; Dontigny, M.; Charest, P.; Petitclerc, M.; Lagacé, M.; Vijh, A.; Zaghib, K.

    Physical and electrochemical characteristics of Li-ion battery systems based on LiFePO 4 cathodes and graphite anodes with mixture electrolytes were investigated. The mixed electrolytes are based on an ionic liquid (IL), and organic solvents used in commercial batteries. We investigated a range of compositions to determine an optimum conductivity and non-flammability of the mixed electrolyte. This led us to examine mixtures of ILs with the organic electrolyte usually employed in commercial Li-ion batteries, i.e., ethylene carbonate (EC) and diethylene carbonate (DEC). The IL electrolyte consisted of (trifluoromethyl sulfonylimide) (TFSI) as anion and 1-ethyl-3-methyleimidazolium (EMI) as the cation. The physical and electrochemical properties of some of these mixtures showed an improvement characteristics compared to the constituents alone. The safety was improved with electrolyte mixtures; when IL content in the mixture is ≥40%, no flammability is observed. A stable SEI layer was obtained on the MCMB graphite anode in these mixed electrolytes, which is not obtained with IL containing the TFSI-anion. The high-rate capability of LiFePO 4 is similar in the organic electrolyte and the mixture with a composition of 1:1. The interface resistance of the LiFePO 4 cathode is stabilized when the IL is added to the electrolyte. A reversible capacity of 155 mAh g -1 at C/12 is obtained with cells having at least some organic electrolyte compared to only 124 mAh g -1 with pure IL. With increasing discharge rate, the capacity is maintained close to that in the organic solvent up to 2 C rate. At higher rates, the results with mixture electrolytes start to deviate from the pure organic electrolyte cell. The evaluation of the Li-ion cells; LiFePO 4//Li 4Ti 5O 12 with organic and, 40% mixture electrolytes showed good 1st CE at 98.7 and 93.0%, respectively. The power performance of both cell configurations is comparable up to 2 C rate. This study indicates that safety and

  5. How trust in institutions and organizations builds general consumer confidence in the safety of food: a decomposition of effects.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, J; van Trijp, J C M; van der Lans, I A; Renes, R J; Frewer, L J

    2008-09-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between general consumer confidence in the safety of food and consumer trust in institutions and organizations. More specifically, using a decompositional regression analysis approach, the extent to which the strength of the relationship between trust and general confidence is dependent upon a particular food chain actor (for example, food manufacturers) is assessed. In addition, the impact of specific subdimensions of trust, such as openness, on consumer confidence are analyzed, as well as interaction effects of actors and subdimensions of trust. The results confirm previous findings, which indicate that a higher level of trust is associated with a higher level of confidence. However, the results from the current study extend on previous findings by disentangling the effects that determine the strength of this relationship into specific components associated with the different actors, the different trust dimensions, and specific combinations of actors and trust dimensions. The results show that trust in food manufacturers influences general confidence more than trust in other food chain actors, and that care is the most important trust dimension. However, the contribution of a particular trust dimension in enhancing general confidence is actor-specific, suggesting that different actors should focus on different trust dimensions when the purpose is to enhance consumer confidence in food safety. Implications for the development of communication strategies that are designed to regain or maintain consumer confidence in the safety of food are discussed.

  6. Ergonomics support for local initiative in improving safety and health at work: International Labour Organization experiences in industrially developing countries.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, T; Kogi, K

    2005-04-15

    Ergonomics has played essential roles in the technical cooperation activities of the International Labour Organization (ILO) in occupational safety and health in industrially developing countries. Ergonomics support focusing on practical day-to-day needs at the grass-root workplace has strengthened the local initiative in improving safety and health. Practical action-tools such as ergonomics checklists, local good example photos and group discussions have assisted workers and employers in identifying feasible solutions using locally available resources. Direct participation of workers and employers has been promoted in ergonomics training aimed at immediate solutions. ILO Guidelines on Occupational Safety and Health Management Systems have played increasingly important roles in the systematic planning of local improvement actions. Policy-level programmes to develop network support mechanisms to the grass-root workplace were essential for following up and sustaining local achievements. Practical ergonomics support tools, such as action checklists and low-cost improvement guides, should be developed and widely applied so as to reach grass-root levels and help local people create safer and healthier workplaces.

  7. Minimally invasive left ventricular assist device explantation after cardiac recovery: surgical technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Schmitto, Jan D; Rojas, Sebastian V; Hanke, Jasmin S; Avsar, Murat; Haverich, Axel

    2014-06-01

    The new generation of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) has enabled minimally invasive surgical procedures for implantation. Herein we present two alternative approaches for minimally invasive LVAD explantation following cardiac recovery, avoiding a sternotomy and improving patient safety. Copyright © 2013 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Surgical Instrument Restraint in Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Mark R.; Dawson, David L.; Melton, Shannon; Hooker, Dona; Cantu, Hilda

    2000-01-01

    Performing a surgical procedure during spaceflight will become more likely with longer duration missions in the near future. Minimal surgical capability has been present on previous missions as the definitive medical care time was short and the likelihood of surgical events too low to justify surgical hardware availability. Early demonstrations of surgical procedures in the weightlessness of parabolic flight indicated the need for careful logistical planning and restraint of surgical hardware. The consideration of human ergonomics also has more impact in weightlessness than in the conventionall-g environment. Three methods of surgical instrument restraint - a Minor Surgical Kit (MSK), a Surgical Restraint Scrub Suit (SRSS), and a Surgical Tray (ST) were evaluated in parabolic flight surgical procedures. The Minor Surgical Kit was easily stored, easily deployed, and demonstrated the best ability to facilitate a surgical procedure in weightlessness. Important factors in this surgical restraint system include excellent organization of supplies, ability to maintain sterility, accessibility while providing secure restraint, ability to dispose of sharp items and biological trash, and ergonomical efficiency.

  9. Determination of Appropriate Weight-Based Cutoffs for Empiric Cefazolin Dosing Using Data from a Phase 1 Pharmacokinetics and Safety Study of Cefazolin Administered for Surgical Prophylaxis in Pediatric Patients Aged 10 to 12 Years

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Michael L.; Blumer, Jeffrey L.; Cetnarowski, Wes

    2015-01-01

    Despite over 40 years of worldwide usage, relatively few data have been published on the pharmacokinetics of cefazolin in pediatric surgical patients. The primary objectives of this study were to examine the pharmacokinetics and safety of cefazolin in children 10 to 12 years of age (inclusive) receiving 1 or 2 g of cefazolin, based on body weight. This multiple-center, open-label study enrolled pediatric patients electively scheduled for surgical procedures who required cefazolin as part of their routine clinical management. Patients weighing ≥25 to <50 kg received a 1-g dose, and patients weighing ≥50 to ≤85 kg received a 2-g dose. Postdose pharmacokinetic and safety assessments were conducted following drug administration. Cefazolin concentration-time data were analyzed by using both noncompartmental and population pharmacokinetics methods. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to identify appropriate weight-based cutoffs for the dosing of children aged 10 to 17 years of age. Twelve patients were enrolled in this study and provided the requisite pharmacokinetic data. In general, cefazolin was well tolerated. The mean cefazolin terminal elimination half-life, clearance, and area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity in this population were 1.95 h, 0.804 ml/min/kg, and 607 mg · h/liter, respectively. Patients weighing 50 to 60 kg exhibited elevated cefazolin exposures. Observed pharmacokinetic parameters and simulation results indicated that a weight-based cutoff of 60 kg is predicted to provide cefazolin exposure consistent with that observed in normal, healthy adults at recommended doses for surgical prophylaxis. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01904357.) PMID:25941220

  10. Determination of appropriate weight-based cutoffs for empiric cefazolin dosing using data from a phase 1 pharmacokinetics and safety study of cefazolin administered for surgical prophylaxis in pediatric patients aged 10 to 12 years.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Michael L; Blumer, Jeffrey L; Cetnarowski, Wes; Rubino, Christopher M

    2015-07-01

    Despite over 40 years of worldwide usage, relatively few data have been published on the pharmacokinetics of cefazolin in pediatric surgical patients. The primary objectives of this study were to examine the pharmacokinetics and safety of cefazolin in children 10 to 12 years of age (inclusive) receiving 1 or 2 g of cefazolin, based on body weight. This multiple-center, open-label study enrolled pediatric patients electively scheduled for surgical procedures who required cefazolin as part of their routine clinical management. Patients weighing ≥25 to <50 kg received a 1-g dose, and patients weighing ≥50 to ≤85 kg received a 2-g dose. Postdose pharmacokinetic and safety assessments were conducted following drug administration. Cefazolin concentration-time data were analyzed by using both noncompartmental and population pharmacokinetics methods. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to identify appropriate weight-based cutoffs for the dosing of children aged 10 to 17 years of age. Twelve patients were enrolled in this study and provided the requisite pharmacokinetic data. In general, cefazolin was well tolerated. The mean cefazolin terminal elimination half-life, clearance, and area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity in this population were 1.95 h, 0.804 ml/min/kg, and 607 mg · h/liter, respectively. Patients weighing 50 to 60 kg exhibited elevated cefazolin exposures. Observed pharmacokinetic parameters and simulation results indicated that a weight-based cutoff of 60 kg is predicted to provide cefazolin exposure consistent with that observed in normal, healthy adults at recommended doses for surgical prophylaxis. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01904357.). Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Cognitive decision errors and organization vulnerabilities in nuclear power plant safety management: Modeling using the TOGA meta-theory framework

    SciTech Connect

    Cappelli, M.; Gadomski, A. M.; Sepiellis, M.; Wronikowska, M. W.

    2012-07-01

    In the field of nuclear power plant (NPP) safety modeling, the perception of the role of socio-cognitive engineering (SCE) is continuously increasing. Today, the focus is especially on the identification of human and organization decisional errors caused by operators and managers under high-risk conditions, as evident by analyzing reports on nuclear incidents occurred in the past. At present, the engineering and social safety requirements need to enlarge their domain of interest in such a way to include all possible losses generating events that could be the consequences of an abnormal state of a NPP. Socio-cognitive modeling of Integrated Nuclear Safety Management (INSM) using the TOGA meta-theory has been discussed during the ICCAP 2011 Conference. In this paper, more detailed aspects of the cognitive decision-making and its possible human errors and organizational vulnerability are presented. The formal TOGA-based network model for cognitive decision-making enables to indicate and analyze nodes and arcs in which plant operators and managers errors may appear. The TOGA's multi-level IPK (Information, Preferences, Knowledge) model of abstract intelligent agents (AIAs) is applied. In the NPP context, super-safety approach is also discussed, by taking under consideration unexpected events and managing them from a systemic perspective. As the nature of human errors depends on the specific properties of the decision-maker and the decisional context of operation, a classification of decision-making using IPK is suggested. Several types of initial situations of decision-making useful for the diagnosis of NPP operators and managers errors are considered. The developed models can be used as a basis for applications to NPP educational or engineering simulators to be used for training the NPP executive staff. (authors)

  12. The Economics of Surgical Simulation.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Noel; Snyderman, Carl H

    2017-10-01

    There are massive hidden costs in the current paradigm of surgical training related to increased operative times for procedures with resident involvement and costs of medical errors. Shifting procedural training outside of the operating room through use of simulation has the potential to improve patient safety, minimize learning time to achieve competency, and increase operative efficiency. Investment in surgical simulation has the potential to reduce costs to health care systems through improved operating room efficiency and reduction of medical errors. This article explores the economic costs related to surgical training in otolaryngology and the value of investment in surgical simulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mapping Disparities in Access to Safe, Timely, and Essential Surgical Care in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, Micaela M; Uribe-Leitz, Tarsicio; Makasa, Emmanuel; Lishimpi, Kennedy; Mwaba, Peter; Bowman, Kendra; Weiser, Thomas G

    2016-11-01

    Surgical care is widely unavailable in developing countries; advocates recommend that countries evaluate and report on access to surgical care to improve availability and aid health planners in decision making. To analyze the infrastructure, capacity, and availability of surgical care in Zambia to inform health policy priorities. In this observational study, all hospitals providing surgical care were identified in cooperation with the Zambian Ministry of Health. On-site data collection was conducted from February 1 through August 30, 2011, with an adapted World Health Organization Global Initiative for Emergency and Essential Surgical Care survey. Data collection at each facility included interviews with hospital personnel and assessment of material resources. Data were geocoded and analyzed in a data visualization platform from March 1 to December 1, 2015. We analyzed time and distance to surgical services, as well as the proportion of the population living within 2 hours from a facility providing surgical care. Surgical capacity, supplies, human resources, and infrastructure at each surgical facility, as well as the population living within 2 hours from a hospital providing surgical care. Data were collected from all 103 surgical facilities identified as providing surgical care. When including all surgical facilities (regardless of human resources and supplies), 14.9% of the population (2 166 460 of 14 500 000 people) lived more than 2 hours from surgical care. However, only 17 hospitals (16.5%) met the World Health Organization minimum standards of surgical safety; when limiting the analysis to these hospitals, 65.9% of the population (9 552 780 people) lived in an area that was more than 2 hours from a surgical facility. Geographic analysis of emergency and essential surgical care, defined as access to trauma care, obstetric care, and care of common abdominal emergencies, found that 80.7% of the population (11 704 700 people) lived in an area

  14. Associations of patient safety outcomes with models of nursing care organization at unit level in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Carl-Ardy; D'amour, Danielle; Tchouaket, Eric; Clarke, Sean; Rivard, Michèle; Blais, Régis

    2013-04-01

    To examine the associations of four distinct nursing care organizational models with patient safety outcomes. Cross-sectional correlational study. Using a standardized protocol, patients' records were screened retrospectively to detect occurrences of patient safety-related events. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the associations of those events with four nursing care organizational models. Twenty-two medical units in 11 hospitals in Quebec, Canada, were clustered into 4 nursing care organizational models: 2 professional models and 2 functional models. Two thousand six hundred and ninety-nine were patients hospitalized for at least 48 h on the selected units. Composite of six safety-related events widely-considered sensitive to nursing care: medication administration errors, falls, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, unjustified restraints and pressure ulcers. Events were ultimately sorted into two categories: events 'without major' consequences for patients and events 'with' consequences. After controlling for patient characteristics, patient risk of experiencing one or more events (of any severity) and of experiencing an event with consequences was significantly lower, by factors of 25-52%, in both professional models than in the functional models. Event rates for both functional models were statistically indistinguishable from each other. Data suggest that nursing care organizational models characterized by contrasting staffing, work environment and innovation characteristics may be associated with differential risk for hospitalized patients. The two professional models, which draw mainly on registered nurses (RNs) to deliver nursing services and reflect stronger support for nurses' professional practice, were associated with lower risks than are the two functional models.

  15. Assessment of safety and efficiency of nitrogen organic fertilizers from animal-based protein hydrolysates--a laboratory multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Corte, Laura; Dell'abate, Maria Teresa; Magini, Alessandro; Migliore, Melania; Felici, Barbara; Roscini, Luca; Sardella, Roccaldo; Tancini, Brunella; Emiliani, Carla; Cardinali, Gianluigi; Benedetti, Anna

    2014-01-30

    Protein hydrolysates or hydrolysed proteins (HPs) are high-N organic fertilizers allowing the recovery of by-products (leather meal and fluid hydrolysed proteins) otherwise disposed of as polluting wastes, thus enhancing matter and energy conservation in agricultural systems while decreasing potential pollution. Chemical and biological characteristics of HPs of animal origin were analysed in this work to assess their safety, environmental sustainability and agricultural efficacy as fertilizers. Different HPs obtained by thermal, chemical and enzymatic hydrolytic processes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and their safety and efficacy were assessed through bioassays, ecotoxicological tests and soil biochemistry analyses. HPs can be discriminated according to their origin and hydrolysis system by proteomic and metabolomic methods. Three experimental systems, soil microbiota, yeast and plants, were employed to detect possible negative effects exerted by HPs. The results showed that these compounds do not significantly interfere with metabolomic activity or the reproductive system. The absence of toxic and genotoxic effects of the hydrolysates prepared by the three hydrolytic processes suggests that they do not negatively affect eukaryotic cells and soil ecosystems and that they can be used in conventional and organic farming as an important nitrogen source derived from otherwise highly polluting by-products. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Dancing the two-step: Collaborating with intermediary organizations as research partners to help implement workplace health and safety interventions.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Desre M; Wells, Richard P; Bigelow, Phillip L; Carlan, Niki A; Cole, Donald C; Hepburn, C Gail

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of the involvement of intermediaries who were research partners on three intervention studies. The projects crossed four sectors: manufacturing, transportation, service sector, and electrical-utilities sectors. The interventions were participative ergonomic programs. The study attempts to further our understanding of collaborative workplace-based research between researchers and intermediary organizations; to analyze this collaboration in terms of knowledge transfer; and to further our understanding of the successes and challenges with such a process. The intermediary organizations were provincial health and safety associations (HSAs). They have workplaces as their clients and acted as direct links between the researchers and workplaces. Data was collected from observations, emails, research-meeting minutes, and 36 qualitative interviews. Interviewees were managers, and consultants from the collaborating associations, 17 company representatives and seven researchers. The article describes how the collaborations were created, the structure of the partnerships, the difficulties, the benefits, and challenges to both the researchers and intermediaries. The evidence of knowledge utilization between the researchers and HSAs was tracked as a proxy-measure of impact of this collaborative method, also called Mode 2 research. Despite the difficulties, both the researchers and the health and safety specialists agreed that the results of the research made the process worthwhile.

  17. Organic tank safety project: Preliminary results of energetics and thermal behavior studies of model organic nitrate and/or nitrite mixtures and a simulated organic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Sell, R.L.; Sobolik, J.L.; Burger, L.L.

    1995-08-01

    As a result of years of production and recovery of nuclear defense materials and subsequent waste management at the Hanford Site, organic-bearing radioactive high-level wastes (HLW) are currently stored in large (up to 3. ML) single-shell storage tanks (SSTs). Because these wastes contain both fuels (organics) and the oxidants nitrate and nitrite, rapid energetic reactions at certain conditions could occur. In support of Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) efforts to ensure continued safe storage of these organic- and oxidant-bearing wastes and to define the conditions necessary for reactions to occur, we measured the thermal sensitivities and thermochemical and thermokinetic properties of mixtures of selected organics and sodium nitrate and/or nitrite and a simulated Hanford organic-bearing waste using thermoanalytical technologies. These thermoanalytical technologies are used by chemical reactivity hazards evaluation organizations within the chemical industry to assess chemical reaction hazards.

  18. Evaluation of surgical care in El Salvador using the WHO surgical vital statistics.

    PubMed

    Molina, George; Funk, Luke M; Rodriguez, Virginia; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Gawande, Atul

    2013-06-01

    Vital statistics to assess surgical care worldwide have been published by the World Health Organization. These data have not been reported for any Latin American country. We sought to measure these metrics as a starting point for understanding how to improve the safety of surgery in El Salvador. We designed an institutional survey that was sent to 21 hospitals and used national administrative data sources to estimate the number of surgeons, anesthesia professionals, operating rooms, and annual surgical volume for El Salvador. We reviewed surgical and death logs for 12 Ministry of Health hospitals to calculate day-of-surgery and postoperative in-hospital mortality ratios for a 6-month period (October 2009-March 2010). We estimate there to be 1,222 surgeons [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1,137-1,307], 539 anesthesia providers, 168 operating rooms (95 % CI 136-199), and 172,972 operations (95 % CI 171,961-173,983) annually in El Salvador. There were on average 1,197 annual cases per operating room and 436 annual cases per surgeon in the 21 hospitals we studied. The day-of-surgery mortality ratio was 0.42 % (95 % CI 0.35-0.5), whereas the postoperative in-hospital mortality ratio was 1.58 % (95 % CI 1.44-1.72). The postoperative in-hospital mortality ratio was higher for hospitals with a greater number of hospital beds (p = 0.01) and operating rooms (p = 0.02). Despite the challenges that El Salvador faces to provide surgical care, national collection of surgical vital statistics is feasible. Collection of additional process and outcome measures may be insightful for improving the surgical safety in El Salvador and elsewhere.

  19. Biodegradable scaffold with built-in vasculature for organ-on-a-chip engineering and direct surgical anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Boyang; Montgomery, Miles; Chamberlain, M. Dean; Ogawa, Shinichiro; Korolj, Anastasia; Pahnke, Aric; Wells, Laura A.; Massé, Stéphane; Kim, Jihye; Reis, Lewis; Momen, Abdulah; Nunes, Sara S.; Wheeler, Aaron; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Keller, Gordon; Sefton, Michael V.; Radisic, Milica

    2016-01-01

    We report the fabrication of a scaffold (hereafter referred to as AngioChip) that supports the assembly of parenchymal cells on a mechanically tunable matrix surrounding a perfusable, branched, three-dimensional microchannel network coated with endothelial cells. The design of AngioChip decouples the material choices for the engineered vessel network and for cell seeding in the parenchyma, enabling extensive remodelling while maintaining an open-vessel lumen. The incorporation of nanopores and micro-holes in the vessel walls enhances permeability, and permits intercellular crosstalk and extravasation of monocytes and endothelial cells on biomolecular stimulation. We also show that vascularized hepatic tissues and cardiac tissues engineered by using AngioChips process clinically relevant drugs delivered through the vasculature, and that millimeter-thick cardiac tissues can be engineered in a scalable manner. Moreover, we demonstrate that AngioChip cardiac tissues implanted via direct surgical anastomosis to the femoral vessels of rat hindlimbs establish immediate blood perfusion. PMID:26950595

  20. A systematic review of minimally invasive surgical treatment for atrial fibrillation: a comparison of the Cox-Maze procedure, beating-heart epicardial ablation, and the hybrid procedure on safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Je, Hyung Gon; Shuman, Deborah J; Ad, Niv

    2015-10-01

    There is a growing trend to perform off-bypass surgical ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) because it is perceived to be safer and more effective than the Cox-Maze procedure with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) support. In this systematic review, we compared three minimally invasive stand-alone surgical ablation procedures for AF: the endocardial Cox-Maze procedure, epicardial surgical ablation and a hybrid epicardial surgical and catheter-based endocardial ablation procedure (hybrid procedure). Relevant studies were identified in MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. From 565 initial studies, 37 were included in this review. The total number of patients across all studies was 1877 (range 10-139). Two studies reported on endocardial Cox-Maze procedures (n = 145), 26 reported on epicardial surgical ablation (n = 1382) and 9 reported on hybrid surgical ablation (n = 350). For minimally invasive Cox-Maze, epicardial and hybrid groups, operative mortality rates were 0, 0.5 and 0.9%, perioperative permanent pacemaker insertion rates were 3.5, 2.7 and 1.5%, incidence of conversion to median sternotomy was 0, 2.4 and 2.5%, and reoperation for bleeding was 1.0, 1.5 and 2.2%, with mean length of stay (days) of 5.4, 6.0 and 4.6, respectively. At 12 months, rates of sinus rhythm restoration were 93, 80 and 70%, and sinus restoration without anti-arrhythmic medications was 87, 72 and 71%, for Cox-Maze, epicardial and hybrid procedures, respectively. Of the three procedures, the minimally invasive Cox-Maze procedure with CPB support was most effective for the treatment of stand-alone AF and had important safety advantages in conversion to sternotomy and major bleeding. The minimally invasive Cox-Maze procedure with CPB support also demonstrated the potential for a higher success rate 12 months following the procedure.

  1. Surgical Airway

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapna A; Meyer, Tanya K

    2014-01-01

    Close to 3% of all intubation attempts are considered difficult airways, for which a plan for a surgical airway should be considered. Our article provides an overview of the different types of surgical airways. This article provides a comprehensive review of the main types of surgical airways, relevant anatomy, necessary equipment, indications and contraindications, preparation and positioning, technique, complications, and tips for management. It is important to remember that the placement of a surgical airway is a lifesaving procedure and should be considered in any setting when one “cannot intubate, cannot ventilate”. PMID:24741501

  2. The Safety Limits Of An Extended Fast: Lessons from a Non-Model Organism

    PubMed Central

    Bertile, Fabrice; Fouillen, Laetitia; Wasselin, Thierry; Maes, Pauline; Le Maho, Yvon; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Raclot, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    While safety of fasting therapy is debated in humans, extended fasting occurs routinely and safely in wild animals. To do so, food deprived animals like breeding penguins anticipate the critical limit of fasting by resuming feeding. To date, however, no molecular indices of the physiological state that links spontaneous refeeding behaviour with fasting limits had been identified. Blood proteomics and physiological data reveal here that fasting-induced body protein depletion is not unsafe “per se”. Indeed, incubating penguins only abandon their chick/egg to refeed when this state is associated with metabolic defects in glucose homeostasis/fatty acid utilization, insulin production and action, and possible renal dysfunctions. Our data illustrate how the field investigation of “exotic” models can be a unique source of information, with possible biomedical interest. PMID:27991520

  3. An Analysis of Whitewater Rafting Safety Data: Risk Management for Programme Organizers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, I. Roy

    2007-01-01

    Many outdoor organizations integrate whitewater rafting into their programmes. Often this is accomplished by contracting with a whitewater outfitter. This paper analyses rafting accident data collected by the American Canoe Association in an effort to suggest ways in which programmes can better manage risk while contracting with outfitters for…

  4. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Flameless Organic Teaching Laboratories are Safer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Frederick J.

    1985-01-01

    The goal of many colleges is to make the organic chemistry laboratory completely flameless by using electric heating equipment. Benefits of eliminating the Bunsen burner, electrical heating equipment and accessories, hazards remaining in flameless laboratories, and design standards related to laboratory liability are the major topic areas…

  5. Organic horticulture, compost, and season-extending tunnels: Food Safety and crop quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Consumer demand for fresh, local, organic produce continues to increase in the U.S. and internationally. Consumers and growers often form direct market links that reinforce consumer confidence that produce contains no pesticide or agrichemical residues and is at its peak quality, flavor, and freshn...

  6. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Flameless Organic Teaching Laboratories are Safer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Frederick J.

    1985-01-01

    The goal of many colleges is to make the organic chemistry laboratory completely flameless by using electric heating equipment. Benefits of eliminating the Bunsen burner, electrical heating equipment and accessories, hazards remaining in flameless laboratories, and design standards related to laboratory liability are the major topic areas…

  7. An Analysis of Whitewater Rafting Safety Data: Risk Management for Programme Organizers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, I. Roy

    2007-01-01

    Many outdoor organizations integrate whitewater rafting into their programmes. Often this is accomplished by contracting with a whitewater outfitter. This paper analyses rafting accident data collected by the American Canoe Association in an effort to suggest ways in which programmes can better manage risk while contracting with outfitters for…

  8. Surgical management of stress urinary incontinence in women: safety, effectiveness and cost-utility of trans-obturator tape (TOT) versus tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) five years after a randomized surgical trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We recently completed a randomized clinical trial of two minimally invasive surgical procedures for stress urinary incontinence, the retropubic tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) versus the trans-obturator tape (TOT) procedure. At one year postoperatively, we were concerned to find that a significant number of women had tape that was palpable when a vaginal examination was undertaken. Because the risk factors for adverse outcomes of tape surgery are not clearly understood, we are unable to say whether palpable tapes will lead to vaginal erosions or whether they merge into vaginal tissue. We do not know whether patients go on to have further adverse consequences of surgery, leading to additional cost to patients and healthcare system. Our current study is a 5 year follow-up of the women who took part in our original trial. Methods/Design All 199 women who participated in our original trial will be contacted and invited to take part in the follow-up study. Consenting women will attend a clinic visit where they will have a physical examination to identify vaginal erosion or other serious adverse outcomes of surgery, undertake a standardized pad test for urinary incontinence, and complete several health-related quality of life questionnaires (15D, UDI-6, IIQ-7). Analyses will compare the outcomes for women in the TOT versus TVT groups. The cost-effectiveness of TOT versus TVT over the 5 years after surgery, will be assessed with the use of disease-specific health service administrative data and an objective health outcome measure. A cost-utility analysis may also be undertaken, based on economic modeling, data from the clinical trial and inputs obtained from published literature. Discussion This study is needed now, because TOT and TVT are among the most frequently conducted surgical procedures for stress urinary incontinence in Canada. Because stress urinary incontinence is so common, the impact of selecting an approach that causes more adverse events, or is

  9. Solidifying Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covault, Craig

    2003-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. Solidifying Safety: NASA s new safety organization spools up, as the 1SS program grapples with long-term risk. 2. Earth to Orbit O'Keefe telling skeptical lawmakers Orbital Space Plan (OSP) will cover exploration vision. China's rapid pace.

  10. Evaluation of medication safety in the discharge medication of 509 surgical inpatients using electronic prescription support software and an extended operational interaction classification.

    PubMed

    Frölich, Thomas; Zorina, Olesya; Fontana, Andrea O; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Vollenweider, Andreas; Russmann, Stefan

    2011-12-01

    Our aim was to study drug interactions and dose adjustments in patients with renal impairment in the discharge medication of surgical inpatients and to evaluate the strengths and limitations of clinical decision support software (CDSS) for this task. This was a cross-sectional study involving 509 surgical patients of a primary care hospital. We developed a customized interface for the CDSS MediQ, which we used for automated retrospective identification of drug interactions in the patients' discharge medication. The clinical relevance of the interactions was evaluated based on the Zurich Interaction System (ZHIAS) that incorporates the operational classification of drug interactions (ORCA). Prescriptions were further analyzed for recommended dose adjustments in patients with a glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min. For the total of 2,729 prescriptions written for the 509 patients enrolled in the study, MediQ generated 2,558 interaction alerts and 1,849 comments. Among these were ten "high danger" and 551 "average danger" alerts that we reclassified according to ORCA criteria. This reclassification resulted in ten contraindicated combinations, 77 provisionally contraindicated combinations, and 310 with a conditional and 164 with a minimal risk of adverse outcomes. The ZHIAS classification also provides categorical information on expected adverse outcomes and management recommendations, which are presented in detail. We identified 56 prescriptions without a recommended dose adjustment for impaired renal function. CDSS identified a large number of drug interactions in surgical discharge medication, but according to ZHIAS criteria only a minor fraction of these appeared to involve a substantial risk to the patient. CDSS should therefore aim at reducing over-alerting and improve usability in order to become more efficacious in terms of the prevention of adverse drug events in clinical practice.

  11. Anti-metastasis efficacy and safety of non-anticoagulant heparin derivative versus low molecular weight heparin in surgical pancreatic cancer models.

    PubMed

    Alyahya, Reem; Sudha, Thangirala; Racz, Michael; Stain, Steven C; Mousa, Shaker A

    2015-03-01

    Heparin and its derivatives are known to attenuate cancer metastasis in preclinical models, but have not been used clinically due to adverse bleeding effects. This study compared the efficacy of S-NACH (a sulfated non-anticoagulant heparin) versus tinzaparin (a low molecular weight heparin) in inhibiting metastasis of a growing primary tumor and following surgical excision of primary tumor in a pancreatic cancer mouse model. The efficacy of S-NACH versus tinzaparin on metastasis of the primary tumor was evaluated in each experiment using IVIS imaging. Athymic female mice were treated with S-NACH or tinzaparin, and 30 min later luciferase-transfected pancreatic cancer cells (Mpanc96) were implanted into the spleen; treatment was continued daily until termination. Next we studied the effect of S-NACH versus tinzaparin on metastasis after surgical excision of the primary tumor after 3 weeks of daily treatment with S-NACH or tinzaparin. S-NACH reduced surgically induced metastasis (p<0.01) and tumor recurrence (p<0.05) relative to control. Histopathological studies demonstrated significant increase in tumor necrosis mediated by S-NACH and to lesser extent by tinzaparin as compared to control group. Furthermore, either S-NACH or tinzaparin upregulated the expression of the junctional adhesion molecule E-cadherin in pancreatic cancer cells where its low expression enhances cancer cell migration and invasion. In terms of bleeding time (BT), S-NACH did not affect BT as compared to tinzaparin, which doubled BT. These data suggest that S-NACH is an effective and safe anti-metastatic agent and warrants further clinical evaluation.

  12. [Role of heat flow generated by an abdominal cavity in monitoring of acute surgical pathology of abdominal organs].

    PubMed

    Bodiaka, V Iu

    2013-01-01

    Despite of significant development of modern surgery results of treatment of acute diffused peritonitis and acute intestinal obstruction are still unsatisfactory. Successful treatment of these conditions depends considerably on timely and adequate diagnosing as it gives a choice of optimal treatment tactics. Measuring of a human body heat flow in areas of organs affected by pathology in cases of acute diffused peritonitis and acute intestinal obstruction provides a possibility to improve the principles of early differential diagnosing, to form new approaches to treatment tactics and monitoring of general health status of a patient during early postoperative treatment. 47 patient suffering from acute diffused peritonitis and 42 patients suffering from acute intestinal obstruction have been examined; the patients were divided into groups based on abdominal cavity exudates character, intestinal obstruction type and intra-abdominal hypertension grade. Measurement of abdominal cavity heat flow was performed by a contact method with use of thermoelectric medical thermometer. Intra-abdominal hypertension was measured by generally used transvesical method. It has been established that abdominal cavity heat flow correlates with character of abdominal cavity exudates; this is also confirmed by reliable difference between serous peritonitis and fibrinopurulent peritonitis indices. Indices in case of acute intestinal obstruction are lower than ones in case of acute diffused peritonitis as there are no inflammatory changes of peritoneum. Development of intra-abdominal hypertension of grades 3-4 directly influences the heat flow extent; this is explained by accelerated and aggravated pathological changes of inner organs cased by the main disease. Thus, abdominal cavity heat flow fully reflects degree of purulent and inflammatory processes of abdominal cavity organs and can be used for additional diagnosing and clinical course monitoring.

  13. Organic chemical aging mechanisms: An annotated bibliography. Waste Tank Safety Program

    SciTech Connect

    Samuels, W.D.; Camaioni, D.M.; Nelson, D.A.

    1993-09-01

    An annotated bibliography has been compiled of the potential chemical and radiological aging mechanisms of the organic constituents (non-ferrocyanide) that would likely be found in the UST at Hanford. The majority of the work that has been conducted on the aging of organic chemicals used for extraction and processing of nuclear materials has been in conjunction with the acid or PUREX type processes. At Hanford the waste being stored in the UST has been stabilized with caustic. The aging factors that were used in this work were radiolysis, hydrolysis and nitrite/nitrate oxidation. The purpose of this work was two-fold: to determine whether or not research had been or is currently being conducted on the species associated with the Hanford UST waste, either as a mixture or as individual chemicals or chemical functionalities, and to determine what areas of chemical aging need to be addressed by further research.

  14. Organic tanks safety program, FY97 waste aging studies. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Linehan, J.C.; Sharma, A.K.; Hogan, M.O.; Lilga, M.A.; Clauss, S.A.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

    1998-02-01

    To model tank waste aging and interpret tank waste speciation results, the authors began measuring the reactivity of organic complexants and related compounds towards radiation-induced oxidation reactions. Because of the high efficiency of scavenging of the primary radicals of water radiolysis by nitrate and nitrite ion, the major radiolytically-generated radicals in these solutions, and in Hanford tank wastes, are NO{sub 2}, NO and O{sup {minus}}. Prior to this effort, little quantitative information existed for the reactions of these radicals with organic compounds such as those that were used in Hanford processes. Therefore, modeling of actual waste aging, or even simulated waste aging, was not feasible without measuring reactivities and determining reaction paths. The authors have made the first rate measurements of complexant aging and determined some of their degradation products.

  15. 101-SY Hydrogen Safety Project chemical analysis support: Window ``C`` total organic carbon analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, B.M.; Stromatt, R.W.; Baldwin, D.L.; Hoopes, F.V.

    1992-01-01

    Core samples taken from Hanford double-shell waste tank 101-SY during Window ``C`` (after the May 1991 gas release event) were analyzed for total organic carbon by the staff of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The procedure uses the oxidation/extraction method of hot acid persulfate oxidation. Evolved CO{sub 2} is measured by a UIC Coulometric Carbon Analyzer coulometry detector. Samples are acidified with heated sulfuric acid to drive off all inorganic carbonate carbon as CO{sub 2}. Excess potassium persulfate oxidant, along with a silver catalyst, is then added to the heated sulfuric acid solution. All organic carbon is oxidized to CO{sub 2}, swept away by the carrier gas to the Coulometrics Analyzer, and the results calculated and displayed directly as {mu}g carbon titrated.

  16. 101-SY Hydrogen Safety Project chemical analysis support: Window C'' total organic carbon analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, B.M.; Stromatt, R.W.; Baldwin, D.L.; Hoopes, F.V.

    1992-01-01

    Core samples taken from Hanford double-shell waste tank 101-SY during Window C'' (after the May 1991 gas release event) were analyzed for total organic carbon by the staff of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The procedure uses the oxidation/extraction method of hot acid persulfate oxidation. Evolved CO{sub 2} is measured by a UIC Coulometric Carbon Analyzer coulometry detector. Samples are acidified with heated sulfuric acid to drive off all inorganic carbonate carbon as CO{sub 2}. Excess potassium persulfate oxidant, along with a silver catalyst, is then added to the heated sulfuric acid solution. All organic carbon is oxidized to CO{sub 2}, swept away by the carrier gas to the Coulometrics Analyzer, and the results calculated and displayed directly as {mu}g carbon titrated.

  17. 76 FR 44592 - Cooperative Agreement With the World Health Organization Department of Food Safety and Zoonoses...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is correcting a notice that appeared in the Federal Register of June 28, 2011 (76 FR 37817). The document announced the availability of funds for the support of a sole source cooperative agreement with the World Health Organization. The document published stating that the total funding available was up to $260,000 (total costs including indirect costs) in fiscal year 2011 in support of this project. This document corrects that error.

  18. Organic tanks safety program waste aging studies. Final report, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Linehan, J.C.

    1998-09-01

    Uranium and plutonium production at the Hanford Site produced large quantities of radioactive byproducts and contaminated process chemicals that are stored in underground tanks awaiting treatment and disposal. Having been made strongly alkaline and then subjected to successive water evaporation campaigns to increase storage capacity, the wastes now exist in the physical forms of saltcakes, metal oxide sludges, and aqueous brine solutions. Tanks that contain organic process chemicals mixed with nitrate/nitrite salt wastes might be at risk for fuel-nitrate combustion accidents. This project started in fiscal year 1993 to provide information on the chemical fate of stored organic wastes. While historical records had identified the organic compounds originally purchased and potentially present in wastes, aging experiments were needed to identify the probable degradation products and evaluate the current hazard. The determination of the rates and pathways of degradation have facilitated prediction of how the hazard changes with time and altered storage conditions. Also, the work with aged simulated waste contributed to the development of analytical methods for characterizing actual wastes. Finally, the results for simulants provide a baseline for comparing and interpreting tank characterization data.

  19. Safety evaluation of phytosterols in laying hens: effects on laying performance, clinical blood parameters, and organ development.

    PubMed

    Shi, S R; Shen, Y R; Chang, L L; Zhou, C J; Bo, Z; Wang, Z Y; Tong, H B; Zou, J M

    2014-03-01

    Phytosterols are intended for use as a novel food ingredient with plasma cholesterol-lowering activity. Although phytosterols are naturally present in the normal diet, daily consumption is insufficient to ensure plasma cholesterol-lowering levels. Therefore, phytosterols may be added to the diets to achieve the desired cholesterol-lowering activity. A subchronic laying hen safety study was conducted to examine if high-dose phytosterols could affect the safety of hens. Three hundred sixty 21-wk-old Hy-Line Brown laying hens were randomly assigned to 5 groups with 6 replicates of 12 birds each; after 3 wk, birds were fed diets supplemented with 0, 20, 80, 400, and 800 mg/kg of phytosterols for 12 wk. Throughout the study, clinical observations and laying performance were measured. At the end of the study, birds were subjected to a full postmortem examination: blood samples were taken for clinical pathology, selected organs were weighed, and specified tissues were taken for subsequent histological examination. No treatment-related changes that were considered to be of toxicological significance were observed. Therefore, a nominal phytosterol concentration of 800 mg/kg was considered to be the no-observed-adverse-effect level.

  20. The World Health Organization's water safety plan is much more than just an integrated drinking water quality management plan.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, F C

    2010-01-01

    South Africa is a country of contrasts with far ranging variations in climate, precipitation rates, cultures, demographics, housing levels, education, wealth and skills levels. These differences have an impact on water services delivery as do expectations, affordability and available resources. Although South Africa has made much progress in supplying drinking water, the same cannot be said regarding water quality throughout the country. A concerted effort is currently underway to correct this situation and as part of this drive, water safety plans (WSP) are promoted. Rand Water, the largest water services provider in South Africa, used the World Health Organization (WHO) WSP framework as a guide for the development of its own WSP which was implemented in 2003. Through the process of implementation, Rand Water found the WHO WSP to be much more than just another integrated quality system.

  1. Highly stable aluminum-based metal-organic frameworks as biosensing platforms for assessment of food safety.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Sen; Sun, Chun-Xiao; Tian, Jia-Yue; Wang, Zhuo-Wei; Ji, Hong-Fei; Song, Ying-Pan; Zhang, Shuai; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; He, Ling-Hao; Du, Miao

    2017-05-15

    Two unique immunosensors made of aluminum-based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), namely, 515- and 516-MOFs, with 4,4',4''-nitrilotribenzoic acid (H3NTB) were successfully obtained to efficiently assess food safety. The as-prepared 515- and 516-MOFs exhibited superior thermal and physicochemical stability, high electrochemical activity, and good biocompatibility. Among these immunosensors, 516-MOF showed a preferable biosensing ability toward analytes determined by electrochemical techniques. The developed 516-MOF-based electrochemical biosensor not only demonstrated high sensitivity with low detection limits of 0.70 and 0.40pgmL(-1) toward vomitoxin and salbutamol, respectively, but also showed good selectivity in the presence of other interferences. Therefore, with the advantages of high sensitivity, good selectivity, and simple operation, this new strategy is believed to exhibit great potential for simple and convenient detection of poisonous and harmful residues in food. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Potential impact on food safety and food security from persistent organic pollutants in top soil improvers on Mediterranean pasture.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, G; Abate, V; Battacone, G; De Filippis, S P; Esposito, M; Esposito, V; Miniero, R

    2016-02-01

    The organic carbon of biosolids from civil wastewater treatment plants binds persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as polychlorodibenzo -dioxins and -furans (PCDD/Fs), dioxin and non-dioxin -like polychlorobiphenyls (DL and NDL-PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS). The use of such biosolids, derived digestates and composts as top soil improvers (TSIs) may transfer POPs into the food chain. We evaluated the potential carry-over of main bioavailable congeners from amended soil-to-milk of extensive farmed sheep. Such estimates were compared with regulatory limits (food security) and human intakes (food safety). The prediction model was based on farming practices, flocks soil intake, POPs toxicokinetics, and dairy products intake in children, of the Mediterranean area. TSI contamination ranged between 0.20-113 ng WHO-TEQ/kg dry matter for PCDD/Fs and DL-PCBs (N = 56), 3.40-616 μg/kg for ∑6 NDL-PCBs (N = 38), 0.06-17.2 and 0.12-22.3 μg/kg for BDE no. 47 and no. 99, 0.872-89.50 μg/kg for PFOS (N = 27). For a 360 g/head/day soil intake of a sheep with an average milk yield of 2.0 kg at 6.5% of fat percentage, estimated soil quality standards supporting milk safety and security were 0.75 and 4.0 ng WHO-TEQ/kg for PCDD/Fs and DL-PCBs, and 3.75 and 29.2 μg/kg for ∑6 NDL-PCBs, respectively. The possibility to use low-contaminated TSIs to maximize agriculture benefits and if the case, to progressively mitigate highly contaminated soils is discussed.

  3. Evaluation of World Health Organization Multi-Professional Patient Safety Curriculum Topics in Nursing Education: Pre-test, post-test, none-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Mansour; Skull, Alice; Parker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Multi-professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide was launched by the World Health Organization to develop a patient safety-friendly curriculum in health education. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of teaching related to two topics from the Patient Safety Curriculum Guide on student nurses' knowledge and attitudes toward patient safety. A pretest, posttest, nonexperimental design was used. Patient safety education questionnaires were distributed to a convenience sample of 181 nursing students before the intervention, and 141 questionnaires after the intervention in one university in the East of England. The intervention consisted of two face-to-face lectures and one facilitated group work discussion. Seventy-one responses from pre- and posttest stages were matched. Paired t test, McNemar's test, and frequency measures were used for data analysis. The findings suggest that there are statistically significant differences in the subscales of the error and patient safety and personal influence over safety. The differences in the students' answers on patient safety knowledge before and after the interventions were not statistically significant. Although the student nurses highly commended the teaching delivered in this study, the use of experimental design in future curriculum evaluation may provide a more complementary insight to the findings of this study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tension-free Polypropylene Mesh-related Surgical Repair for Pelvic Organ Prolapse has a Good Anatomic Success Rate but a High Risk of Complications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Lan; Chen, Juan; Xu, Tao; Lang, Jing-He

    2015-01-01

    Background: Food and Drug Administration announcements have highlighted the standard rate of mesh-related complications. We aimed to report the short-term results and complications of tension-free polypropylene mesh (PROSIMA™) surgical repair of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) using the standard category (C), timing (T), and site (S) classification system. Methods: A prospective cohort study of 48 patients who underwent PROSIMA™ mesh kit-related surgical repairs were followed for two years at Peking Union Medical College Hospital. Recurrence was defined as symptomatic POP quantification (POP-Q) Stage II or higher (leading edge ≥ −1 cm). The Patient Global Impression of Change Questionnaire, the Chinese version of the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire short-form-7 and POP/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire short-form-12 were used to evaluate the self-perception and sexual function of each patient. Mesh-related complications conformed to the International Urogynecological Association/International Continence Society joint terminology. The paired-sample t-test, one-way analysis of variance, Fisher's exact test, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and log-rank test were used to analyze data. Results: All patients were followed up for ≥12 months; 30 (62.5%) patients completed the 24 months study. We observed a 93.8% (45/48) positive anatomical outcome rate at 12 months and 90.0% (27/30) at 24 months. Recurrence most frequently involved the anterior compartment (P < 0.05). Pelvic symptoms improved significantly from baseline (P < 0.05), although the patients’ impressions of change and sexual function were not satisfying. Vaginal complication was the main complication observed (35.4%, 17/48). The survival analysis did not identify any relationship between vaginal complication and anatomical recurrent prolapse (POP-Q ≥ Stage II) (P = 0.653). Conclusions: Tension-free polypropylene mesh (PROSIMA™)-related surgical repair of POP has better short-term anatomical

  5. Survival Analyses for Patients With Surgically Resected Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors by World Health Organization 2010 Grading Classifications and American Joint Committee on Cancer 2010 Staging Systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Ke, Neng-wen; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Tan, Chun-lu; Zhang, Hao; Mai, Gang; Tian, Bo-le; Liu, Xu-bao

    2015-12-01

    In 2010, World Health Organization (WHO) reclassified pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) into 4 main groups: neuroendocrine tumor G1 (NET G1), neuroendocrine tumor G2 (NET G2), neuroendocrine carcinoma G3 (NEC G3), mixed adeno and neuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Clinical value of these newly updated WHO grading criteria has not been rigorously validated. The authors aimed to evaluate the clinical consistency of the new 2010 grading classifications by WHO and the 2010 tumor-node metastasis staging systems by American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) on survivals for patients with surgically resected p-NETs. Moreover, the authors would validate the prognostic value of both criteria for p-NETs.The authors retrospectively collected the clinicopathologic data of 120 eligible patients who were all surgically treated and histopathologically diagnosed as p-NETs from January 2004 to February 2014 in our single institution. The new WHO criteria were assigned to 4 stratified groups with a respective distribution of 62, 35, 17, and 6 patients. Patients with NET G1 or NET G2 obtained a statistically better survival compared with those with NEC G3 or MANEC (P < 0.001). Survivals of NET G1 was also better than those of NET G2 (P = 0.023), whereas difference of survivals between NEC G3 and MANEC present no obvious significance (P = 0.071). The AJCC 2010 staging systems were respectively defined in 61, 36, 12, and 11 patients for each stage. Differences of survivals of stage I with stage III and IV were significant (P < 0.001), as well as those of stage II with III and IV (P < 0.001); whereas comparisons of stage I with stage II and stage III with IV were not statistically significant (P = 0.129, P = 0.286; respectively). Together with radical resection, these 2 systems were both significant in univariate and multivariate analysis (P < 0.05).The newly updated WHO 2010 grading classifications and the AJCC 2010 staging systems could consistently reflect the clinical outcome

  6. The management of health and safety hazards in tourist resorts. World Tourism Organization.

    PubMed

    Phillip, R; Hodgkinson, G

    1994-01-01

    The enjoyment of a holiday has to do with landscape, buildings, people, and their activities. For truly sustainable development, these components need to become better integrated. Ways of achieving this were discussed at the IVth World Health Organization International Conference on Tourist Health, Rimini, Italy, in May 1994. It was agreed that attention to the health enhancing aspects of each component in the built environment is essential. Risks to health from man-made hazards in tourist resorts therefore need to be eliminated where possible, or otherwise minimised, contained or controlled. A systematic approach is outlined here in which owners, managers, operators, workers and users all have responsibilities and in which occupational physicians can contribute.

  7. A Registry for Evaluation of Efficiency and Safety of Surgical Treatment of Cartilage Defects: The German Cartilage Registry (KnorpelRegister DGOU)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The need for documentation in cartilage defects is as obvious as in other medical specialties. Cartilage defects can cause significant pain, and lead to reduced quality of life and loss of function of the affected joint. The risk of developing osteoarthritis is high. Therefore, the socioeconomic burden of cartilage defects should not be underestimated. Objective The objective of our study was to implement and maintain a registry of all patients undergoing surgical treatment of cartilage defects. Methods We designed this multicenter registry for adults whose cartilage defects of a knee, ankle, or hip joint are treated surgically. The registry consists of two parts: one for the physician and one for the patient. Data for both parts will be gathered at baseline and at 6-, 12-, 24-, 36-, 60-, and 120-month follow-ups. Results To date, a wide range of German, Swiss, and Austrian trial sites are taking part in the German Cartilage Registry, soon to be followed by further sites. More than 2124 (as of January 31, 2016) cases are already documented and the first publications have been released. Conclusions The German Cartilage Registry addresses fundamental issues regarding the current medical care situation of patients with cartilage defects of knee, ankle, and hip joints. In addition, the registry will help to identify various procedure-specific complications, along with putative advantages and disadvantages of different chondrocyte products. It provides an expanding large-scale, unselected, standardized database for cost and care research for further retrospective studies. Trial Registration German Clinical Trials Register: DRKS00005617; https://drks-neu.uniklinik-freiburg.de/ drks_web/navigate.do?navigationId=trial.HTML&TRIAL_ID=DRKS00005617 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6hbFqSws0) PMID:27357998

  8. Surgical exposures of the hand.

    PubMed

    Watt, Andrew J; Chung, Kevin C

    2014-11-01

    Surgical approaches to the hand are commonly executed in the treatment of fractures, ligament injuries, and less commonly in the resection of bony tumors. Careful design and execution of these surgical approaches translates into superior functional and aesthetic outcomes. We have provided a thorough review of commonly used approaches to the hand by evaluating each of these approaches in the context of core principles including safety, versatility, preservation of stability, and aesthetic outcomes.

  9. Effects of resident duty hour reform on surgical and procedural patient safety indicators among hospitalized Veterans Health Administration and Medicare patients.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Amy K; Loveland, Susan A; Romano, Patrick S; Itani, Kamal M F; Silber, Jeffrey H; Even-Shoshan, Orit O; Halenar, Michael J; Teng, Yun; Zhu, Jingsan; Volpp, Kevin G

    2009-07-01

    Improving patient safety was a strong motivation behind duty hour regulations implemented by Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education on July 1, 2003. We investigated whether rates of patient safety indicators (PSIs) changed after these reforms. Observational study of patients admitted to Veterans Health Administration (VA) (N = 826,047) and Medicare (N = 13,367,273) acute-care hospitals from July 1, 2000 to June 30, 2005. We examined changes in patient safety events in more versus less teaching-intensive hospitals before (2000-2003) and after (2003-2005) duty hour reform, using conditional logistic regression, adjusting for patient age, gender, comorbidities, secular trends, baseline severity, and hospital site. Ten PSIs were aggregated into 3 composite measures based on factor analyses: "Continuity of Care," "Technical Care," and "Other" composites. Continuity of Care composite rates showed no significant changes postreform in hospitals of different teaching intensity in either VA or Medicare. In the VA, there were no significant changes postreform for the technical care composite. In Medicare, the odds of a Technical Care PSI event in more versus less teaching-intensive hospitals in postreform year 1 were 1.12 (95% CI; 1.01-1.25); there were no significant relative changes in postreform year 2. Other composite rates increased in VA in postreform year 2 in more versus less teaching-intensive hospitals (odds ratio, 1.63; 95% CI; 1.10-2.41), but not in Medicare in either postreform year. Duty hour reform had no systematic impact on PSI rates. In the few cases where there were statistically significant increases in the relative odds of developing a PSI, the magnitude of the absolute increases were too small to be clinically meaningful.

  10. Exposing exposure: enhancing patient safety through automated data mining of nuclear medicine reports for quality assurance and organ dose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Ichiro; Sodickson, Aaron; Wasser, Elliot J; Warden, Graham I; Gerbaudo, Victor H; Khorasani, Ramin

    2012-08-01

    To develop and validate an open-source informatics toolkit capable of creating a radiation exposure data repository from existing nuclear medicine report archives and to demonstrate potential applications of such data for quality assurance and longitudinal patient-specific radiation dose monitoring. This study was institutional review board approved and HIPAA compliant. Informed consent was waived. An open-source toolkit designed to automate the extraction of data on radiopharmaceuticals and administered activities from nuclear medicine reports was developed. After iterative code training, manual validation was performed on 2359 nuclear medicine reports randomly selected from September 17, 1985, to February 28, 2011. Recall (sensitivity) and precision (positive predictive value) were calculated with 95% binomial confidence intervals. From the resultant institutional data repository, examples of usage in quality assurance efforts and patient-specific longitudinal radiation dose monitoring obtained by calculating organ doses from the administered activity and radiopharmaceutical of each examination were provided. Validation statistics yielded a combined recall of 97.6% ± 0.7 (95% confidence interval) and precision of 98.7% ± 0.5. Histograms of administered activity for fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose and iodine 131 sodium iodide were generated. An organ dose heatmap which displays a sample patient's dose accumulation from multiple nuclear medicine examinations was created. Large-scale repositories of radiation exposure data can be extracted from institutional nuclear medicine report archives with high recall and precision. Such repositories enable new approaches in radiation exposure patient safety initiatives and patient-specific radiation dose monitoring.

  11. The European Organization for Research and Treatment for Cancer (EORTC) strategy for quality assurance in surgical clinical research: Assessment of the past and moving towards the future.

    PubMed

    Tanis, E; Caballero, C; Collette, L; Verleye, L; den Dulk, M; Lacombe, D; Schuhmacher, C; Werutsky, G

    2016-08-01

    Quality assurance (QA) in a surgical trial must be planned and implemented from study development to completion. Elements of quality must be consistently described in a protocols, case report forms (CRFs) and reported in publications. The purpose of this review was to evaluate the most common surgical parameters and how consistently they were described in EORTC study documents where surgery was included. This was the preliminary step in mapping out the challenges of developing a surgical QA strategy in EORTC. A systematic review of EORTC surgical protocols from 1980 to 2013 was performed. Two independent reviewers selected and reviewed the protocols. Data extraction was done using a questionnaire developed by EORTC QA committee. The results were compared across the time period. The most common quality parameters described in protocols were surgical technique, definition of resectability, surgical margins and methods of assessing adverse events using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event (CTCAE). However, these were not consistently reported in publications. A general improvement in the method of protocol development was observed since year 2000 after standardization measures by EORTC. A new surgical chapter template has been proposed. There is a need to consistently define and report surgical parameters from protocol development to publication as a first step to QA. A standard surgical chapter in the EORTC protocol template can help address this need. A framework to consistently implement QA for future surgical trials is needed and the rationale for this is described in this review. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Safety and acceptability of an organic light-emitting diode sleep mask as a potential therapy for retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Sahni, J N; Czanner, G; Gutu, T; Taylor, S A; Bennett, K M; Wuerger, S M; Grierson, I; Murray-Dunning, C; Holland, M N; Harding, S P

    2017-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of the study was to study the effect of an organic light-emitting diode sleep mask on daytime alertness, wellbeing, and retinal structure/function in healthy volunteers and in diabetic macular oedema (DMO).Patients and methodsHealthy volunteers in two groups, 18-30 yrs (A), 50-70 yrs (B) and people with DMO (C) wore masks (504 nm wavelength; 80 cd/m(2) luminance; ≤8 h) nightly for 3 months followed by a 1-month recovery period. Changes from baseline were measured for (means): psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) (number of lapses (NL), response time (RT)), sleep, depression, psychological wellbeing (PW), visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, colour, electrophysiology, microperimetry, and retinal thickness on OCT.ResultsOf 60 participants, 16 (27%) withdrew, 8 (13%) before month 1, due to sleep disturbances and mask intolerance. About 36/55 (65%) who continued beyond month 1 reported ≥1 adverse event. At month 3 mean PVT worsened in Group A (RT (7.65%, P<0.001), NL (43.3%, P=0.005)) and mean PW worsened in all groups (A 28.0%, P=0.01, B 21.2%, P=0.03, C 12.8%, P<0.05). No other clinically significant safety signal was detected. Cysts reduced/resolved in the OCT subfield of maximal pathology in 67% Group C eyes. Thinning was greater at 3 and 4 months for greater baseline thickness (central subfield P<0.001, maximal P<0.05).ConclusionSleep masks showed no major safety signal apart from a small impairment of daytime alertness and a moderate effect on wellbeing. Masks were acceptable apart from in some healthy participants. Preliminary data suggest a beneficial effect on retinal thickness in DMO. This novel therapeutic approach is ready for large clinical trials.

  13. Animal study assessing safety of an acoustic coupling fluid that holds the potential to avoid surgically induced artifacts in 3D ultrasound guided operations.

    PubMed

    Jakola, Asgeir S; Jørgensen, Arve; Selbekk, Tormod; Michler, Ralf-Peter; Solheim, Ole; Torp, Sverre H; Sagberg, Lisa M; Aadahl, Petter; Unsgård, Geirmund

    2014-03-25

    Use of ultrasound in brain tumor surgery is common. The difference in attenuation between brain and isotonic saline may cause artifacts that degrade the ultrasound images, potentially affecting resection grades and safety. Our research group has developed an acoustic coupling fluid that attenuates ultrasound energy like the normal brain. We aimed to test in animals if the newly developed acoustic coupling fluid may have harmful effects. Eight rats were included for intraparenchymal injection into the brain, and if no adverse reactions were detected, 6 pigs were to be included with injection of the coupling fluid into the subarachnoid space. Animal behavior, EEG registrations, histopathology and immunohistochemistry were used in assessment. In total, 14 animals were included, 8 rats and 6 pigs. We did not detect any clinical adverse effects, seizure activity on EEG or histopathological signs of tissue damage. The novel acoustic coupling fluid intended for brain tumor surgery appears safe in rats and pigs under the tested circumstances.

  14. ”Evaluation of safety margin” in ameloblastoma of the mandible by surgical, radiological, and histopathological methods: An evidence-based study

    PubMed Central

    Kalaiselvan, S.; Dharmesh Kumar Raja, A. V.; Saravanan, B.; Vigneswari, A. Srivel; Srinivasan, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to elicit the amount of safety margin necessary around the ameloblastic lesion in view of preventing further recurrence. Materials and Methods: The study consisted of 25 cases of mandibular ameloblastoma. Diagnosis was based on clinical and radiological analysis and confirmed by histopathological report. An incisional biopsy was done preoperatively to confirm the diagnosis. Segmental resection was planned for all the cases. After the resection, postoperative panoramic radiograph of the specimen was taken followed by histopathological examination of its margin to detect tumor cell infiltration. Results and Conclusion: In all our cases, the ameloblastoma was infiltrating in nature. A follow-up period of 10 years showed neither recurrence nor implant failure. In our study, we conclude our safe margin for infiltrating variant of ameloblastoma based on histopathological report of the resected specimen. PMID:27829762

  15. [Evaluation of safety and effectiveness of pelvic organ prolapse treatment with the use of polypropylene mesh depending on mesh and application technique].

    PubMed

    Banach, Renata; Antosiak, Beata; Blewniewska, Grazyna; Malinowski, Andrzej

    2013-07-01

    Evaluation of safety and effectiveness of POP (pelvic organ prolapse) treatment with the use of polypropylene mesh depending on type of mesh and application technique. We carried out a retrospective study and compared the frequency of perioperative complications and treatment results three months after the surgical procedure in two groups of patients, divided according to POP type. The first group comprise of patients with anterior compartment disorders who had Prolift Anterior (n = 100) or Pelvimesh Anterior (n = 98) placed. The second group included patients with posterior and central compartment who had Prolifit Posterior (n = 72) and Pelvimesh Posterior (n = 89) fitted. Early peri- and postoperative complications criteria were: profuse intraoperative bleeding (hemoglobin decrease of 3g%), intraoperative damage of urinary bladder and bowel, presence of hematoma in paravesical and perirectal space, urine retention after miction on the second day after the operation (> 100 ml), uroschesis after catheter removal, early operative failure (during 3 months after the operation), mesh erosion. No statistically significant differences in peri- and postoperative complications were reported between the studied groups (Pelvimesh vs. Prolift). No damage of urinary bladder or bowel was found in any of the studied groups. Other complications in Prolift Ant. Vs. Pelvimesh Ant groups were: postoperative anemia (4.00% vs. 4.09%); presence of hematoma (1.00% vs. 1.03%); postoperative urine retention (7.00% vs. 5.11%); uroschesis (1.00% vs. 1.03%); mesh erosion (2.00% vs. 1.03%); early operative failure (1.00% vs. 3.07%). Early postoperative results did not statistically differ between the Pelvimesh and the Prolift group. Results in the Prolift Post. vs. Pelvimesh Post. Groups were: postoperative anemia (2.78% vs. 5.62%); mesh erosion (1.38% vs. 0%), early operative failure (1.38% vs. 5.62%). Damage to bowel and hematoma was not observed in these groups. Our research failed to

  16. Improving patient safety in the intra-operative MRI suite using an on-duty safety nurse, safety manual and checklist.

    PubMed

    Matsumae, Mitsunori; Nakajima, Yasuhiro; Morikawa, Eiji; Nishiyama, Jun; Atsumi, Hideki; Tominaga, Jiro; Tsugu, Atsushi; Kenmochi, Isao

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the use of an on-duty safety nurse, a surgical safety manual and a checklist as an essential precursor to evaluating how these approaches affect surgical quality, communication in surgery crews and contribute to the safety of surgical care in the intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suite.

  17. AORN guidance statement: creating a patient safety culture.

    PubMed

    2006-04-01

    AORN believes all health care organizations must strive to create a culture of safety. Such a culture will provide an atmosphere where all members of the perioperative team can openly discuss errors, process improvements, or system issues without fear of reprisal. A culture of safety places an emphasis on flexibility and learning as a means of improving safety and reducing errors. Characteristics of a culture of safety include the following: communication is open and honest; the emphasis is on the team rather than the individual; standards and practices are developed in a multidisciplinary framework; staff members are helpful and supportive of each other; staff members trust each other; surgical team members have a friendly, open relationship emphasizing credibility and attentiveness; the environment is resilient, encourages creativity, and is patient outcomes-driven; the focus is on work flow and process; and these attributes are supported by an informed culture that learns from incidents and near misses. A commitment to safety must be articulated at all levels of the organization. Safety must be valued as the top priority, even at the expense of efficiency. Health care organizations must allocate an appropriate amount of resources and provide the necessary incentives or rewards to promote a robust patient safety culture. AORN recognizes that most patient safety initiatives will fail in the absence of a viable safety culture.

  18. Exposing Exposure: Enhancing Patient Safety through Automated Data Mining of Nuclear Medicine Reports for Quality Assurance and Organ Dose Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Ikuta, Ichiro; Wasser, Elliot J.; Warden, Graham I.; Gerbaudo, Victor H.; Khorasani, Ramin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and validate an open-source informatics toolkit capable of creating a radiation exposure data repository from existing nuclear medicine report archives and to demonstrate potential applications of such data for quality assurance and longitudinal patient-specific radiation dose monitoring. Materials and Methods: This study was institutional review board approved and HIPAA compliant. Informed consent was waived. An open-source toolkit designed to automate the extraction of data on radiopharmaceuticals and administered activities from nuclear medicine reports was developed. After iterative code training, manual validation was performed on 2359 nuclear medicine reports randomly selected from September 17, 1985, to February 28, 2011. Recall (sensitivity) and precision (positive predictive value) were calculated with 95% binomial confidence intervals. From the resultant institutional data repository, examples of usage in quality assurance efforts and patient-specific longitudinal radiation dose monitoring obtained by calculating organ doses from the administered activity and radiopharmaceutical of each examination were provided. Results: Validation statistics yielded a combined recall of 97.6% ± 0.7 (95% confidence interval) and precision of 98.7% ± 0.5. Histograms of administered activity for fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose and iodine 131 sodium iodide were generated. An organ dose heatmap which displays a sample patient’s dose accumulation from multiple nuclear medicine examinations was created. Conclusion: Large-scale repositories of radiation exposure data can be extracted from institutional nuclear medicine report archives with high recall and precision. Such repositories enable new approaches in radiation exposure patient safety initiatives and patient-specific radiation dose monitoring. © RSNA, 2012 PMID:22627599

  19. [Measures to enhance patient safety. Importance of efficiency evaluation].

    PubMed

    Conen, D

    2011-02-01

    Over the last 10 years, there has been increasing awareness of medical errors and harm to patients in healthcare. There is now widespread acceptance of the problem of medical harm and a determination to tackle major patient safety problems. Safety is defined as freedom from accidental injury. Thus, clinical risk management has been increasingly requested by professionals and their professional or